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Sample records for approx constant applicable

  1. High dielectric constant polymer nanocomposites for embedded capacitor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jiongxin

    Driven by ever growing demands of miniaturization, increased functionality, high performance and low cost for microelectronic products and packaging, embedded passives will be one of the key emerging techniques for realizing the system integration which offer various advantages over traditional discrete components. Novel materials for embedded capacitor applications are in great demand, for which a high dielectric constant ( k), low dielectric loss and process compatibility with printed circuit boards are the most important prerequisites. To date, no available material satisfies all these prerequisites and research is needed to develop materials for embedded capacitor applications. Conductive filler/polymer composites are likely candidate material because they show a dramatic increase in their dielectric constant close to the percolation threshold. One of the major hurdles for this type of high-k composites is the high dielectric loss inherent in these systems. In this research, material and process innovations were explored to design and develop conductive filler/polymer nanocomposites based on nanoparticles with controlled parameters to fulfill the balance between sufficiently high-k and low dielectric loss, which satisfied the requirements for embedded capacitor applications. This work involved the synthesis of the metal nanoparticles with different parameters including size, size distribution, aggregation and surface properties, and an investigation on how these varied parameters impact the dielectric properties of the high-k nanocomposites incorporated with these metal nanoparticles. The dielectric behaviors of the nanocomposites were studied systematically over a range of frequencies to determine the dependence of dielectric constant, dielectric loss tangent and dielectric strength on these parameters.

  2. A New Application for Radioimmunoassay: Measurement of Thermodynamic Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angstadt, Carol N.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment in which an equilibrium radioimmunoassay (RIA) is used to estimate thermodynamic parameters such as equilibrium constants. The experiment is simple and inexpensive, and it introduces a technique that is important in the clinical chemistry and research laboratory. Background information, procedures, and results are…

  3. High Dielectric Constant Oxides for Advanced Micro-Electronic Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-29

    having an appropriately larger dielectric constant, other physical considerations come into play: a) the material must be thermodynamically stable...substrate bias. 7 The primary activity outside the domain of deposition involved extensive characterization of the physical and electrical properties of...from Si. Interacts with Si when recrystallizing to form silicide and SiO2. LaAlO3 expected ε ~ 29 in crystalline phase but much lower in amorphous

  4. BROADBAND IMAGING SEGREGATION OF z approx 3 Lyalpha EMITTING AND Lyalpha ABSORBING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Jeff

    2009-10-10

    The spectral properties of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) offer a means to isolate pure samples displaying either dominant Lyalpha in absorption or Lyalpha in emission using broadband information alone. We present criteria developed using a large z approx 3 LBG spectroscopic sample from the literature that enables large numbers of each spectral type to be gathered in photometric data, providing good statistics for multiple applications. In addition, we find that the truncated faint, blue-end tail of z approx 3 LBG population overlaps and leads directly into an expected Lyalpha emitter (LAE) population. As a result, we present simple criteria to cleanly select large numbers of z approx 3 LAEs in deep broadband surveys. We present the spectroscopic results of 32r' approx< 25.5 LBGs and r' approx< 27.0 LAEs at z approx 3 preselected in the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey that confirm these criteria.

  5. Quantum theory of the dielectric constant of a magnetized plasma and astrophysical applications. I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Ventura, J.

    1972-01-01

    A quantum mechanical treatment of an electron plasma in a constant and homogeneous magnetic field is considered, with the aim of (1) defining the range of validity of the magnetoionic theory (2) studying the deviations from this theory, in applications involving high densities, and intense magnetic field. While treating the magnetic field exactly, a perturbation approach in the photon field is used to derive general expressions for the dielectric tensor. Numerical estimates on the range of applicability of the magnetoionic theory are given for the case of the 'one-dimensional' electron gas, where only the lowest Landau level is occupied.

  6. Constant modulus factorization technique for smart antenna applications in mobile communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Veen, Alle-Jan; Paulraj, Arogyaswami

    1994-10-01

    A fundamental problem in sensor array signal processing is to separate and retrieve all independent co-channel signals that arrive at the antenna array. Such problems arise in smart antenna applications for mobile wireless communication, such as interference reduction and in- cell frequency reuse. In a mobile environment, the presence of large delay multipath makes the array manifold poorly defined, and spatial model methods are not applicable. However in case the signals have a constant modulus property (as in FDMA/FM systems like AMPS or TACS), iterative algorithms such as Godard and CMA have been used to retrieve the signals. Because of a non-convex optimization criterion, these algorithms suffer from local minima and random convergence behavior, with no satisfactory remedy known as yet. In this paper, we present an algorithm to compute the exact solution to the underlying constant modulus (CM) factorization problem. With this new approach, it is possible to detect the number of CM signals present at the array, and to retrieve all of them exactly, rejecting other, non-CM signals. Only a modest amount of samples are required. The algorithm is robust in the presence of noise, and is tested on real data, collected from an experimental set-up.

  7. Recent development and application of constant pH molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Morrow, Brian H; Shi, Chuanyin; Shen, Jana K

    2014-01-01

    Solution pH is a critical environmental factor for chemical and biological processes. Over the last decade, significant efforts have been made in the development of constant pH molecular dynamics (pHMD) techniques for gaining detailed insights into pH-coupled dynamical phenomena. In this article we review the advancement of this field in the past five years, placing a special emphasis on the development of the all-atom continuous pHMD technique. We discuss various applications, including the prediction of pKa shifts for proteins, nucleic acids and surfactant assemblies, elucidation of pH-dependent population shifts, protein-protein and protein-RNA binding, as well as the mechanisms of pH-dependent self-assembly and phase transitions of surfactants and peptides. We also discuss future directions for the further improvement of the pHMD techniques.

  8. Second order rate constants for intramolecular conversions: Application to gas-phase NMR relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. H.; Lazaar, K. I.

    1983-09-01

    The usually quoted expression for the second order rate constant, for a unimolecular reaction at the low pressure limit, is valid only for strictly irreversible processes. Its application to isomerization reactions (which are to some extent reversible) is demonstrably in error; corrected expressions have been published. Attention is directed to intramolecular conversions over low barriers, for which the inappropriateness of the unidirectional expression becomes obvious. For such isomerizations we propose a model which incorporates only operationally observable states, so that an essential conceptual ambiguity is avoided. Use of this model is illustrated for the syn⇄anti conversions of methyl nitrite, derived from a gas phase NMR coalescence curve (Mc:Tc). The present data suggest that during isomerization the alkyl nitrites may not be completely ergodic on a time scale of 10-9 s. A regional phase-space model is proposed which has the appropriate formalism to account for this behavior.

  9. A QSAR for the hydroxyl radical reaction rate constant: validation, domain of application, and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öberg, Tomas

    A large number of anthropogenic organic chemicals are emitted into the troposphere. Reactions with the hydroxyl radical are a dominant removal pathway for most organic compounds, but experimentally determined gas-phase reaction rate constants are only available for about 750 compounds. The lack of experimental data increases the importance of applying quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) to evaluate and predict reactivities. It is generally acknowledged that these empirical relationships are valid only within the same domain for which they were developed. However, model validation is sometimes neglected and the application domain is not always well defined. The purpose of this paper is to outline how validation and domain definition can facilitate the modeling and prediction of the hydroxyl radical reaction rates for a large database. A substantial number of theoretical descriptors (867) were generated from 2D molecular structures for compounds present in the Syracuse Research Corporation's PhysProp Database. A QSAR model was developed for the hydroxyl radical reaction rate constant using a projection-based regression technique, partial least squares regression (PLSR). The PLSR model was subsequently validated with an external test set. The main factors of variation could be attributed to two reaction pathways, hydrogen atom abstraction and addition to double bonds or aromatic systems. A set of 17 293 compounds, drawn from the PhysProp Database, was projected onto the PLSR model and 74% were inside the applicability domain. The predicted hydroxyl reaction rates for 25% of these compounds were slow or negligible, with atmospheric half-lives in the range from days to years. Finally, the list of persistent organic compounds was matched against the OECD list of high production volume chemicals (HPVC). Together with the experimental data, nearly three hundred compounds were identified as both persistent and in high volume production.

  10. ULTRAVIOLET LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS FROM 132 z {approx} 7 AND z {approx} 8 LYMAN-BREAK GALAXIES IN THE ULTRA-DEEP HUDF09 AND WIDE-AREA EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE WFC3/IR OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bouwens, R. J.; Illingworth, G. D.; Magee, D.; Gonzalez, V.; Labbe, I.; Trenti, M.; Van Dokkum, P.; Franx, M.; Stiavelli, M.

    2011-08-20

    We identify 73 z {approx} 7 and 59 z {approx} 8 candidate galaxies in the reionization epoch, and use this large 26-29.4 AB mag sample of galaxies to derive very deep luminosity functions to < - 18 AB mag and the star formation rate (SFR) density at z {approx} 7 and z {approx} 8 (just 800 Myr and 650 Myr after recombination, respectively). The galaxy sample is derived using a sophisticated Lyman-break technique on the full two-year Wide Field Camera 3/infrared (WFC3/IR) and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) data available over the HUDF09 ({approx}29.4 AB mag, 5{sigma}), two nearby HUDF09 fields ({approx}29 AB mag, 5{sigma}, 14 arcmin{sup 2}), and the wider area Early Release Science ({approx}27.5 AB mag, 5{sigma}, {approx}40 arcmin{sup 2}). The application of strict optical non-detection criteria ensures the contamination fraction is kept low (just {approx}7% in the HUDF). This very low value includes a full assessment of the contamination from lower redshift sources, photometric scatter, active galactic nuclei, spurious sources, low-mass stars, and transients (e.g., supernovae). From careful modeling of the selection volumes for each of our search fields, we derive luminosity functions for galaxies at z {approx} 7 and z {approx} 8 to < - 18 AB mag. The faint-end slopes {alpha} at z {approx} 7 and z {approx} 8 are uncertain but very steep at {alpha} = -2.01 {+-} 0.21 and {alpha} = -1.91 {+-} 0.32, respectively. Such steep slopes contrast to the local {alpha} {approx}> -1.4 and may even be steeper than that at z {approx} 4 where {alpha} = -1.73 {+-} 0.05. With such steep slopes ({alpha} {approx}< -1.7) lower luminosity galaxies dominate the galaxy luminosity density during the epoch of reionization. The SFR densities derived from these new z {approx} 7 and z {approx} 8 luminosity functions are consistent with the trends found at later times (lower redshifts). We find reasonable consistency with the SFR densities implied from reported stellar mass densities being

  11. DUST OBSCURATION IN LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES AT z {approx} 4

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, I-Ting; Wang, Wei-Hao; Morrison, Glenn E.; Miller, Neal A. E-mail: itho@asiaa.sinica.edu.t

    2010-10-20

    Measuring star formation rates (SFRs) in high-z galaxies with their rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) continuum can be uncertain because of dust obscuration. Prior studies had used the submillimeter emission at 850 {mu}m to determine the intrinsic SFRs of rest-frame UV-selected galaxies, but the results suffered from the low sensitivity and poor resolution ({approx}15''). Here, we use ultradeep Very Large Array 1.4 GHz images with {approx}1''-2'' resolutions to measure the intrinsic SFRs. We perform stacking analyses in the radio images centered on {approx}3500 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z {approx} 4 in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-North and South fields selected with Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys data. The stacked radio flux is very low, 0.08 {+-} 0.15 {mu}Jy, implying a mean SFR of 6 {+-} 11 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. This is comparable to the uncorrected mean UV SFRs of {approx}5 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, implying that the z {approx} 4 LBGs have little dust extinction. The low SFR and dust extinction support the previous results that z {approx} 4 LBGs are in general not submillimeter galaxies. We further show that there is no statistically significant excess of dust-hidden star-forming components within {approx}22 kpc from the LBGs.

  12. DASCH ON KU Cyg: A {approx} 5 YEAR DUST ACCRETION EVENT IN {approx} 1900

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Sumin; Grindlay, Jonathan; Los, Edward; Servillat, Mathieu

    2011-09-01

    KU Cyg is an eclipsing binary consisting of an F-type star accreting through a large accretion disk from a K5III red giant. Here we present the discovery of a 5 year dip around 1900 found from its 100 year DASCH light curve. It showed a {approx}0.5 mag slow fading from 1899 to 1903 and brightened back around 1904 on a relatively shorter timescale. The light curve shape of the 1899-1904 fading-brightening event differs from the dust production and dispersion process observed in R Coronae Borealis stars, which usually has a faster fading and slower recovery, and for KU Cyg is probably related to the accretion disk surrounding the F star. The slow fading in KU Cyg is probably caused by increases in dust extinction in the disk, and the subsequent quick brightening may be due to the evaporation of dust transported inward through the disk. The extinction excess which caused the fading may arise from increased mass transfer rate in the system or from dust clump ejections from the K giant.

  13. X-filtering for a range of coupling constants: application to the detection of intermolecular NOEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangger, Klaus; Oberer, Monika; Keller, Walter; Sterk, Heinz

    2003-02-01

    A new method for heteronuclear X-filtering is presented, which relies on repetitive applications of 90°( 1H)-τ(1/4 1J HC)-180°( 1H, 13C)-τ(1/4 1J HC)-90°( 1H, 13C)- PFG building blocks employing gradient-mediated suppression of magnetization built up for directly heteronuclear coupled protons. Thereby, a range of heteronuclear coupling constants can be suppressed by varying the delays of scalar coupling evolution both within and between individual transients. To achieve efficient destruction of 13C-coupled protons in macromolecular systems, the scalar coupling evolution delays were optimized using simulated annealing by including transverse relaxation effects. With a combination of regular hard pulses, delays and pulsed field gradients only, this method yields sufficient X-filtering to allow the observation of intermolecular nuclear overhauser effects in a molecular complex consisting of a 13C, 15N double-labeled, and an unlabeled protein. This is achieved by exciting magnetization of 12C- and 14N-bound protons and detecting 13C-bound 1H magnetization in a 3D 13C-filtered, 13C-edited NOESY-HSQC experiment. The method is tested on the 18 kDa homodimeric bacterial antidote ParD.

  14. Backbending phenomena in light nuclei at A{approx}60

    SciTech Connect

    El-Kameesy, S. U.; Alharbi, H. H.; Alhendi, H. A.

    2006-04-26

    Recent studies of the backbending phenomenon in medium light weight nuclei near A{approx} 60 expanded greatly our interest about how the single particle orbits are nonlinearly affected by the collective motion. As a consequence we have applied a modified version of the exponential model in mass region at A {approx} 60. A firm conclusion is obtained concerning the successful validity of the proposed modified model in describing the backbending phenomenon in this region. Comparison with different theoretical descriptions is discussed.

  15. Characterization of Iodine Quenching and Energy Transfer Rate Constants for Supersonic Flow Visualization Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-28

    SUBTITLE Sm. CONTRACTNUBER Characterization of iodine quenching and energy transfer rate FA9550-41-- o3G Sb. GRANT NUMBER constants for supersonic flow...in the nozzle from a chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL). PLIF images are recorded using laser excitation of the I= B-X transition. Data for the...Preacolbed byANSI Sad Z30.16 20071015188 Final report for the project, "Characterization of iodine quenching and energy transfer rate constants for

  16. Application of an Artificial Neural Network to the Prediction of OH Radical Reaction Rate Constants for Evaluating Global Warming Potential.

    PubMed

    Allison, Thomas C

    2016-03-03

    Rate constants for reactions of chemical compounds with hydroxyl radical are a key quantity used in evaluating the global warming potential of a substance. Experimental determination of these rate constants is essential, but it can also be difficult and time-consuming to produce. High-level quantum chemistry predictions of the rate constant can suffer from the same issues. Therefore, it is valuable to devise estimation schemes that can give reasonable results on a variety of chemical compounds. In this article, the construction and training of an artificial neural network (ANN) for the prediction of rate constants at 298 K for reactions of hydroxyl radical with a diverse set of molecules is described. Input to the ANN consists of counts of the chemical bonds and bends present in the target molecule. The ANN is trained using 792 (•)OH reaction rate constants taken from the NIST Chemical Kinetics Database. The mean unsigned percent error (MUPE) for the training set is 12%, and the MUPE of the testing set is 51%. It is shown that the present methodology yields rate constants of reasonable accuracy for a diverse set of inputs. The results are compared to high-quality literature values and to another estimation scheme. This ANN methodology is expected to be of use in a wide range of applications for which (•)OH reaction rate constants are required. The model uses only information that can be gathered from a 2D representation of the molecule, making the present approach particularly appealing, especially for screening applications.

  17. Anharmonic force constants extracted from first-principles molecular dynamics: applications to heat transfer simulations.

    PubMed

    Tadano, T; Gohda, Y; Tsuneyuki, S

    2014-06-04

    A systematic method to calculate anharmonic force constants of crystals is presented. The method employs the direct-method approach, where anharmonic force constants are extracted from the trajectory of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations at high temperature. The method is applied to Si where accurate cubic and quartic force constants are obtained. We observe that higher-order correction is crucial to obtain accurate force constants from the trajectory with large atomic displacements. The calculated harmonic and anharmonic force constants are, then, combined with the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) methods in calculating the thermal conductivity. The BTE approach successfully predicts the lattice thermal conductivity of bulk Si, whereas NEMD shows considerable underestimates. To evaluate the linear extrapolation method employed in NEMD to estimate bulk values, we analyze the size dependence in NEMD based on BTE calculations. We observe strong nonlinearity in the size dependence of NEMD in Si, which can be ascribed to acoustic phonons having long mean-free-paths and carrying considerable heat. Subsequently, we also apply the whole method to a thermoelectric material Mg2Si and demonstrate the reliability of the NEMD method for systems with low thermal conductivities.

  18. Application of fiber laser in time constant measurement of thin wire thermal resistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Junwei; Feng, Shuanglian; Zhang, Zhigang; Qiang, Xiwen; Zong, Fei; Feng, Gang; Hu, Yuehong

    2016-01-01

    Measuring principle of time constant for thin wire thermal resistor was put forward. An 1.07μm fiber laser was used to output a rectangle laser pulse with edges of several tens microns and width of 100ms, and the thermal resistor under test was shined by the laser. As a result, the temperature of the thermal resistor rose and gradually went up to a fixed level with the irradiation. And then the thermal resistor's temperature dropped and gradually went down to the room temperature with the laser powered off. Time constant of the thermal resistor could be obtained by means of measuring the temperature variation of the thermal resistor due to the laser pulse. A device was designed and experiments were carried out, the time constants of three commonly used thin wire thermal resistors were measured.

  19. Low dielectric constant Parylene-F-like films for intermetal dielectric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanyaloglu, Bengi; Aydinli, Atilla; Oye, Michael; Aydi, Eray S.

    1999-01-01

    We report on the dielectric properties and thermal stability of thin polymer films that are suitable candidates for replacing silicon dioxide as the intermetal dielectric material in integrated circuits. Parylene-F-like films, (-CF2-C6H4-CF2-)n, were produced by plasma deposition from a mixture of Ar and 1,4-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzene (CF3-C6H4-CF3) discharges and characterized using infrared absorption spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and capacitance measurements. The dielectric constant and the magnitude of the electronic and ionic contributions to the dielectric constant were determined through capacitance measurements and Kramers-Kronig analysis of the infrared absorption data. The film's dielectric constant ranges between 2 and 2.6 depending on the deposition conditions and the largest contribution to the dielectric constant is electronic. The films deposited at 300 °C are stable above 400 °C and further optimization could push this limit to as high as 500 °C.

  20. The 'Densitometric Image Analysis Software' and its application to determine stepwise equilibrium constants from electrophoretic mobility shift assays.

    PubMed

    van Oeffelen, Liesbeth; Peeters, Eveline; Nguyen Le Minh, Phu; Charlier, Daniël

    2014-01-01

    Current software applications for densitometric analysis, such as ImageJ, QuantityOne (BioRad) and the Intelligent or Advanced Quantifier (Bio Image) do not allow to take the non-linearity of autoradiographic films into account during calibration. As a consequence, quantification of autoradiographs is often regarded as problematic, and phosphorimaging is the preferred alternative. However, the non-linear behaviour of autoradiographs can be described mathematically, so it can be accounted for. Therefore, the 'Densitometric Image Analysis Software' has been developed, which allows to quantify electrophoretic bands in autoradiographs, as well as in gels and phosphorimages, while providing optimized band selection support to the user. Moreover, the program can determine protein-DNA binding constants from Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays (EMSAs). For this purpose, the software calculates a chosen stepwise equilibrium constant for each migration lane within the EMSA, and estimates the errors due to non-uniformity of the background noise, smear caused by complex dissociation or denaturation of double-stranded DNA, and technical errors such as pipetting inaccuracies. Thereby, the program helps the user to optimize experimental parameters and to choose the best lanes for estimating an average equilibrium constant. This process can reduce the inaccuracy of equilibrium constants from the usual factor of 2 to about 20%, which is particularly useful when determining position weight matrices and cooperative binding constants to predict genomic binding sites. The MATLAB source code, platform-dependent software and installation instructions are available via the website http://micr.vub.ac.be.

  1. Efficient quantum-classical method for computing thermal rate constant of recombination: application to ozone formation.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Mikhail V; Babikov, Dmitri

    2012-05-14

    Efficient method is proposed for computing thermal rate constant of recombination reaction that proceeds according to the energy transfer mechanism, when an energized molecule is formed from reactants first, and is stabilized later by collision with quencher. The mixed quantum-classical theory for the collisional energy transfer and the ro-vibrational energy flow [M. Ivanov and D. Babikov, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144107 (2011)] is employed to treat the dynamics of molecule + quencher collision. Efficiency is achieved by sampling simultaneously (i) the thermal collision energy, (ii) the impact parameter, and (iii) the incident direction of quencher, as well as (iv) the rotational state of energized molecule. This approach is applied to calculate third-order rate constant of the recombination reaction that forms the (16)O(18)O(16)O isotopomer of ozone. Comparison of the predicted rate vs. experimental result is presented.

  2. Optical constants of sulfuric acid - Application to the clouds of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, K. F.; Williams, D.

    1975-01-01

    Young (1973) and Sill (1972) have independently suggested that the clouds of Venus may well consist of particles composed of sulfuric acid molecules with attached water molecules. For a further study of this hypothesis an investigation has been conducted with the objective to supply the needed laboratory data for a wide range of sulfuric acid concentrations. Optical constants have been determined for the visible, near infrared, and intermediate infrared wavelength regions.

  3. DISCOVERY OF A RADIO-SELECTED z {approx} 6 QUASAR

    SciTech Connect

    Zeimann, Gregory R.; Becker, Robert H.; Hodge, Jacqueline A.; Stanford, Spencer A.; White, Richard L.; Richards, Gordon T.

    2011-07-20

    We present the discovery of only the second radio-selected z {approx} 6 quasar. We identified SDSS J222843.54+011032.2 (z = 5.95) by matching the optical detections of the deep Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 with their radio counterparts in the Stripe 82 Very Large Array Survey. We also matched the Canadian-France-Hawaiian Telescope Legacy Survey Wide with the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm survey but have yet to find any z {approx} 6 quasars in this survey area. The discovered quasar is optically faint, z = 22.3 and M{sub 1450} {approx} -24.5, but radio bright, with a flux density of f{sub 1.4GHz,peak} = 0.31 mJy and a radio loudness of R {approx} 1100 (where R {identical_to} f{sub 5GHz}/f{sub 2500}). The i - z color of the discovered quasar places it outside the color selection criteria for existing optical surveys. We conclude by discussing the need for deeper wide-area radio surveys in the context of high-redshift quasars.

  4. Developmental Times of Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) at Constant Temperatures and Applications in Forensic Entomology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong-Qiang; Li, Xue-Bo; Shao, Ru-Yue; Lyu, Zhou; Li, Hong-Wei; Li, Gen-Ping; Xu, Lyu-Zi; Wan, Li-Hua

    2016-09-01

    The characteristic life stages of infesting blowflies (Calliphoridae) such as Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius) are powerful evidence for estimating the death time of a corpse, but an established reference of developmental times for local blowfly species is required. We determined the developmental rates of C. megacephala from southwest China at seven constant temperatures (16-34°C). Isomegalen and isomorphen diagrams were constructed based on the larval length and time for each developmental event (first ecdysis, second ecdysis, wandering, pupariation, and eclosion), at each temperature. A thermal summation model was constructed by estimating the developmental threshold temperature D0 and the thermal summation constant K. The thermal summation model indicated that, for complete development from egg hatching to eclosion, D0 = 9.07 ± 0.54°C and K = 3991.07 ± 187.26 h °C. This reference can increase the accuracy of estimations of postmortem intervals in China by predicting the growth of C. megacephala.

  5. Binding constants determined from Ca2+ current responses to rapid applications and washouts of nifedipine in frog cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Méry, P F; Hove-Madsen, L; Mazet, J L; Hanf, R; Fischmeister, R

    1996-07-01

    1. A fast perfusion system was used to analyse the kinetics of the response of L-type calcium current (ICa) to rapid applications and washouts of the dihydropyridine antagonist nifedipine in whole-cell patch-clamped frog ventricular myocytes. 2. Both the inhibition of ICa induced by nifedipine and the recovery from inhibition upon washout of the drug behaved as mono-exponential functions of time. 3. During application or washout of 100 nM nifedipine, only the peak amplitude of ICa varied but not its time course of activation or inactivation. 4. The rate constant of the onset of ICa inhibition increased with the concentration of nifedipine. However, the time course of the recovery from inhibition was independent of drug concentration. 5. Both rate constants were strongly sensitive to the holding potential but insensitive to the test potential. 6. Using simple rate equations and a one-binding-site analysis it was possible to determine the rate constants for association (k1) and dissociation (k-1) and the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of the reaction between nifedipine and Ca2+ channels. KD values for nifedipine were identical to IC50 values obtained from classical steady-state experiments. 7. With depolarized holding potentials, KD decreased strongly due to a large reduction in k-1 and a modest increase in k1. Assuming that these changes result from the distribution of Ca2+ channels between resting and inactivated states, a low-affinity binding to the resting state (R) and a high-affinity binding to the inactivated state (I) were obtained with the binding constants: k1R = 1.0 x 10(6) M-1 S-1, k-1R = 0.077 S-1, and KDR = 77 nM for the resting state; k1I = 4.47 x 10(6) M-1 S-1, k-1I = 7.7 x 10(-4) S-1, and KDI = 0.17 nM for the inactivated state. 8. Rapid application/washout experiments provide a unique way to determine, in an intact cell and in a relatively short period (2-4 min), the binding rate constants and the KD value of the reaction between a

  6. Organic/Inorganic Nano-hybrids with High Dielectric Constant for Organic Thin Film Transistor Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang-Yen; Jiang, Ai-Hua; Lee, Wen-Ya

    2016-11-01

    The organic material soluble polyimide (PI) and organic-inorganic hybrid PI-barium titanate (BaTiO3) nanoparticle dielectric materials (IBX, where X is the concentration of BaTiO3 nanoparticles in a PI matrix) were successfully synthesized through a sol-gel process. The effects of various BaTiO3 contents on the hybrid film performance and performance optimization were investigated. Furthermore, pentacene-based organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) with PI-BaTiO3/polymethylmethacrylate or cyclic olefin copolymer (COC)-modified gate dielectrics were fabricated and examined. The hybrid materials showed effective dispersion of BaTiO3 nanoparticles in the PI matrix and favorable thermal properties. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that the BaTiO3 nanoparticles had a perovskite structure. The hybrid films exhibited high formability and planarity. The IBX hybrid dielectric films exhibited tunable insulating properties such as the dielectric constant value and capacitance in ranges of 4.0-8.6 and 9.2-17.5 nF cm-2, respectively. Adding the modified layer caused the decrease of dielectric constant values and capacitances. The modified dielectric layer without cross-linking displayed a hydrophobic surface. The electrical characteristics of the pentacene-based OTFTs were enhanced after the surface modification. The optimal condition for the dielectric layer was 10 wt% hybrid film with the COC-modified layer; moreover, the device exhibited a threshold voltage of 0.12 V, field-effect mobility of 4.32 × 10-1 cm2 V-1 s-1, and on/off current of 8.4 × 107.

  7. Organic/Inorganic Nano-hybrids with High Dielectric Constant for Organic Thin Film Transistor Applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang-Yen; Jiang, Ai-Hua; Lee, Wen-Ya

    2016-12-01

    The organic material soluble polyimide (PI) and organic-inorganic hybrid PI-barium titanate (BaTiO3) nanoparticle dielectric materials (IBX, where X is the concentration of BaTiO3 nanoparticles in a PI matrix) were successfully synthesized through a sol-gel process. The effects of various BaTiO3 contents on the hybrid film performance and performance optimization were investigated. Furthermore, pentacene-based organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) with PI-BaTiO3/polymethylmethacrylate or cyclic olefin copolymer (COC)-modified gate dielectrics were fabricated and examined. The hybrid materials showed effective dispersion of BaTiO3 nanoparticles in the PI matrix and favorable thermal properties. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed that the BaTiO3 nanoparticles had a perovskite structure. The hybrid films exhibited high formability and planarity. The IBX hybrid dielectric films exhibited tunable insulating properties such as the dielectric constant value and capacitance in ranges of 4.0-8.6 and 9.2-17.5 nF cm(-2), respectively. Adding the modified layer caused the decrease of dielectric constant values and capacitances. The modified dielectric layer without cross-linking displayed a hydrophobic surface. The electrical characteristics of the pentacene-based OTFTs were enhanced after the surface modification. The optimal condition for the dielectric layer was 10 wt% hybrid film with the COC-modified layer; moreover, the device exhibited a threshold voltage of 0.12 V, field-effect mobility of 4.32 × 10(-1) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), and on/off current of 8.4 × 10(7).

  8. Interacting boson models for N{approx}Z nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Van Isacker, P.

    2011-05-06

    This contribution discusses the use of boson models in the description of N{approx}Z nuclei. A brief review is given of earlier attempts, initiated by Elliott and co-workers, to extend the interacting boson model of Arima and Iachello by the inclusion of neutron-proton s and d bosons with T = 1 (IBM-3) as well as T = 0 (IBM-4). It is argued that for the N{approx}Z nuclei that are currently studied experimentally, a different approach is needed which invokes aligned neutron-proton pairs with angular momentum J = 2j and isospin T = 0. This claim is supported by an analysis of shell-model wave functions in terms of pair states. Results of this alternative version of the interacting boson model are compared with shell-model calculations in the 1g{sub 9/2} shell.

  9. Neutron Orbital Occupancies in the A{approx}100 Region

    SciTech Connect

    Borello-Lewin, T.; Duarte, J. L. M.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L. B.; Rodrigues, C. L.; Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Ukita, G. M.

    2009-06-03

    The evolutive behavior of the experimental neutron orbital occupancies, along isotopic chains in the A{approx}100, is taken as a microscopic indicator of the transition. No increase of the vlg{sub 7/2} orbital occupancy was revealed for N>55, contrary previous expectations that interpreted the increase of deformation as due mainly to the n-p interaction in the SOP orbitals.

  10. Astrophysics to z approx. 10 with Gravitational Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, Robin; Hughes, Scott; Lang, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    The most useful characterization of a gravitational wave detector's performance is the accuracy with which astrophysical parameters of potential gravitational wave sources can be estimated. One of the most important source types for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is inspiraling binaries of black holes. LISA can measure mass and spin to better than 1% for a wide range of masses, even out to high redshifts. The most difficult parameter to estimate accurately is almost always luminosity distance. Nonetheless, LISA can measure luminosity distance of intermediate-mass black hole binary systems (total mass approx.10(exp 4) solar mass) out to z approx.10 with distance accuracies approaching 25% in many cases. With this performance, LISA will be able to follow the merger history of black holes from the earliest mergers of proto-galaxies to the present. LISA's performance as a function of mass from 1 to 10(exp 7) solar mass and of redshift out to z approx. 30 will be described. The re-formulation of LISA's science requirements based on an instrument sensitivity model and parameter estimation will be described.

  11. Application of the median method to estimate the kinetic constants of the substrate uncompetitive inhibition equation.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Pedro L; Astudillo-Castro, Carolina; Gajardo, Diego; Flores, Sebastián

    2017-04-07

    In 1974, Eisenthal and Cornish-Bowden published the direct linear plot method, which used the median to estimate the Vmax and Km from a set of initial rates as a function of substrate concentrations. The robustness of this non-parametric method was clearly demonstrated by comparing it with the least-squares method. The authors commented that the method cannot readily be generalized to equations of more than two parameters. Unfortunately, this comment has been misread by other authors. Comments such as "this method cannot be extended directly to equations with more than two parameters" were found in some publications. In addition, recently, the most drastic comment was published: "this method cannot be applied for the analysis of substrate inhibition." Given all of these presumptions, we have been motivated to publish a demonstration of the contrary: the median method can be applied to more than two-parameter equations, using as an example, the substrate uncompetitive inhibition equation. A computer algorithm was written to evaluate the effect of simulated experimental error of the initial rates on the estimation of Vmax, Km and KS. The error was assigned to different points of the experimental design. Four different KS/Km ratios were analyzed with the values 10, 100, 1000 and 10,000. The results indicated that the least-squares method was slightly better than the median method in terms of accuracy and variance. However, the presence of outliers affected the estimation of kinetic constants using the least-squares method more severely than the median method. The estimation of KS using the median method to estimate 1/KS was much better than the direct estimation of KS, causing a negative effect of non-linearity of KS in the kinetic equation. Considering that the median method is free from the assumptions of the least-squares method and the arbitrary assumptions implicit in the linearization methods to estimate the kinetic constants Vmax, Km and KS from the substrate

  12. THE CURIOUS CASE OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS: GROWING YOUNGER FROM z {approx} 3 to z {approx} 2?

    SciTech Connect

    Acquaviva, Viviana; Vargas, Carlos; Gawiser, Eric; Guaita, Lucia

    2012-06-01

    Ly{alpha} emitting (LAE) galaxies are thought to be progenitors of present-day L* galaxies. Clustering analyses have suggested that LAEs at z {approx} 3 might evolve into LAEs at z {approx} 2, but it is unclear whether the physical nature of these galaxies is compatible with this hypothesis. Several groups have investigated the properties of LAEs using spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting, but direct comparison of their results is complicated by inconsistencies in the treatment of the data and in the assumptions made in modeling the stellar populations, which are degenerate with the effects of galaxy evolution. By using the same data analysis pipeline and SED fitting software on two stacked samples of LAEs at z = 3.1 and z = 2.1, and by eliminating several systematic uncertainties that might cause a discrepancy, we determine that the physical properties of these two samples of galaxies are dramatically different. LAEs at z = 3.1 are found to be old (age {approx}1 Gyr) and metal-poor (Z < 0.2 Z{sub Sun }), while LAEs at z = 2.1 appear to be young (age {approx}50 Myr) and metal-rich (Z > Z{sub Sun }). The difference in the observed stellar ages makes it very unlikely that z 3.1 LAEs evolve directly into z = 2.1 LAEs. Larger samples of galaxies, studies of individual objects, and spectroscopic measurements of metallicity at these redshifts are needed to confirm this picture, which is difficult to reconcile with the effects of 1 Gyr of cosmological evolution.

  13. Dispersion-model-free determination of optical constants: application to materials for organic thin film devices.

    PubMed

    Flämmich, Michael; Danz, Norbert; Michaelis, Dirk; Bräuer, Andreas; Gather, Malte C; Kremer, Jonas H-W M; Meerholz, Klaus

    2009-03-10

    We describe a method to determine the refractive index and extinction coefficient of thin film materials without prior knowledge of the film thickness and without the assumption of a dispersion model. A straightforward back calculation to the optical parameters can be performed starting from simple measurements of reflection and transmission spectra of a 100-250 nm thick supported film. The exact film thickness is found simultaneously by fulfilling the intrinsic demand of continuity of the refractive index as a function of wavelength. If both the layer and the substrate are homogeneous and isotropic media with plane and parallel interfaces, effects like surface roughness, scattering, or thickness inhomogeneities can be neglected. Then, the accuracy of the measurement is approximately 10(-2) and 10(-3) for the refractive index and the extinction coefficient, respectively. The error of the thin film thickness determination is well below 1 nm. Thus this technique is well suited to determine the input parameters for optical simulations of organic thin film devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) or organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. We apply the method to the electroluminescent polymer poly(2,5-dioctyl-p-phenylene vinylene) (PDO-PPV) and show its applicability by comparing the measured and calculated reflection and transmission spectra of OLED stacks with up to five layers.

  14. Are Fundamental Constants Really Constant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swetman, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    Dirac's classical conclusions, that the values of e2, M and m are constants and the quantity of G decreases with time. Evoked considerable interest among researchers and traces historical development by which further experimental evidence points out that both e and G are constant values. (PS)

  15. Solubility constants of hydroxyl sodalite at elevated temperatures evaluated from hydrothermal experiments: Applications to nuclear waste isolation

    DOE PAGES

    Xiong, Yongliang

    2016-09-17

    In this study, solubility constants of hydroxyl sodalite (ideal formula, Na8[Al6Si6O24][OH]2·3H2O) from 25°C to 100°C are obtained by applying a high temperature Al—Si Pitzer model to evaluate solubility data on hydroxyl sodalite in high ionic strength solutions at elevated temperatures. A validation test comparing model-independent experimental data to model predictions demonstrates that the solubility values produced by the model are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. In addition, the equilibrium constants obtained in this study have a wide range of applications, including synthesis of hydroxyl sodalite, de-silication in the Bayer process for extraction of alumina, and the performance ofmore » proposed sodalite waste forms in geological repositories in various lithologies including salt formations. The thermodynamic calculations based on the equilibrium constants obtained in this work indicate that the solubility products in terms of mΣAl×mΣSi for hydroxyl sodalite are very low (e.g., ~10-13 [mol·kg-1]2 at 100°C) in brines characteristic of salt formations, implying that sodalite waste forms would perform very well in repositories located in salt formations. Finally, the information regarding the solubility behavior of hydroxyl sodalite obtained in this study provides guidance to investigate the performance of other pure end-members of sodalite such as chloride- and iodide-sodalite, which may be of interest for geological repositories in various media.« less

  16. Solubility constants of hydroxyl sodalite at elevated temperatures evaluated from hydrothermal experiments: Applications to nuclear waste isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Yongliang

    2016-09-17

    In this study, solubility constants of hydroxyl sodalite (ideal formula, Na8[Al6Si6O24][OH]2·3H2O) from 25°C to 100°C are obtained by applying a high temperature Al—Si Pitzer model to evaluate solubility data on hydroxyl sodalite in high ionic strength solutions at elevated temperatures. A validation test comparing model-independent experimental data to model predictions demonstrates that the solubility values produced by the model are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. In addition, the equilibrium constants obtained in this study have a wide range of applications, including synthesis of hydroxyl sodalite, de-silication in the Bayer process for extraction of alumina, and the performance of proposed sodalite waste forms in geological repositories in various lithologies including salt formations. The thermodynamic calculations based on the equilibrium constants obtained in this work indicate that the solubility products in terms of mΣAl×mΣSi for hydroxyl sodalite are very low (e.g., ~10-13 [mol·kg-1]2 at 100°C) in brines characteristic of salt formations, implying that sodalite waste forms would perform very well in repositories located in salt formations. Finally, the information regarding the solubility behavior of hydroxyl sodalite obtained in this study provides guidance to investigate the performance of other pure end-members of sodalite such as chloride- and iodide-sodalite, which may be of interest for geological repositories in various media.

  17. Spectral editing of weakly coupled spins using variable flip angles in PRESS constant echo time difference spectroscopy: Application to GABA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Jeff; Hanstock, Chris C.; Wilman, Alan H.

    2009-10-01

    A general in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy editing technique is presented to detect weakly coupled spin systems through subtraction, while preserving singlets through addition, and is applied to the specific brain metabolite γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) at 4.7 T. The new method uses double spin echo localization (PRESS) and is based on a constant echo time difference spectroscopy approach employing subtraction of two asymmetric echo timings, which is normally only applicable to strongly coupled spin systems. By utilizing flip angle reduction of one of the two refocusing pulses in the PRESS sequence, we demonstrate that this difference method may be extended to weakly coupled systems, thereby providing a very simple yet effective editing process. The difference method is first illustrated analytically using a simple two spin weakly coupled spin system. The technique was then demonstrated for the 3.01 ppm resonance of GABA, which is obscured by the strong singlet peak of creatine in vivo. Full numerical simulations, as well as phantom and in vivo experiments were performed. The difference method used two asymmetric PRESS timings with a constant total echo time of 131 ms and a reduced 120° final pulse, providing 25% GABA yield upon subtraction compared to two short echo standard PRESS experiments. Phantom and in vivo results from human brain demonstrate efficacy of this method in agreement with numerical simulations.

  18. STRONG POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON EMISSION FROM z {approx} 2 ULIRGs

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Vandana; Soifer, B. T.; Melbourne, Jason; Dey, Arjun; Brand, Kate; Brodwin, Mark; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Armus, Lee; Teplitz, Harry; Brown, Michael J. I.; Houck, James R.; Weedman, Daniel W.; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Huang Jiasheng; Smith, Howard A.; Willner, Steve P.; Gonzalez, Anthony

    2009-08-01

    Using the Infrared Spectrograph on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, we present low-resolution (64 < {lambda}/{delta}{lambda} < 124), mid-infrared (20-38 {mu}m) spectra of 23 high-redshift ULIRGs detected in the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. All of the sources were selected to have (1) f {sub {nu}}(24 {mu}m)>0.5 mJy; (2) R - [24]>14 Vega mag; and (3) a prominent rest frame 1.6 {mu}m stellar photospheric feature redshifted into Spitzer's 3-8 {mu}m IRAC bands. Of these, 20 show emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), usually interpreted as signatures of star formation. The PAH features indicate redshifts in the range 1.5 < z < 3.0, with a mean of (z) = 1.96 and a dispersion of 0.30. Based on local templates, these sources have extremely large infrared luminosities, comparable to that of submillimeter galaxies. Our results confirm previous indications that the rest-frame 1.6 {mu}m stellar bump can be efficiently used to select highly obscured star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 2, and that the fraction of starburst-dominated ULIRGs increases to faint 24 {mu}m flux densities. Using local templates, we find that the observed narrow redshift distribution is due to the fact that the 24 {mu}m detectability of PAH-rich sources peaks sharply at z = 1.9. We can analogously use observed spectral energy distributions to explain the broader redshift distribution of Spitzer-detected ULIRGs that are dominated by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Finally, we conclude that z {approx} 2 sources with a detectable 1.6 {mu}m stellar opacity feature lack sufficient AGN emission to veil the 7.7 {mu}m PAH band.

  19. DNA genetic artificial fish swarm constant modulus blind equalization algorithm and its application in medical image processing.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y C; Wang, H; Zhang, B L

    2015-10-02

    This study proposes use of the DNA genetic artificial fish swarm constant modulus blind equalization algorithm (DNA-G-AFS-CMBEA) to overcome the local convergence of the CMBEA. In this proposed algorithm, after the fusion of the fast convergence of the AFS algorithm and the global search capability of the DNA-G algorithm to drastically optimize the position vector of the artificial fish, the global optimal position vector is obtained and used as the initial optimal weight vector of the CMBEA. The result of application of this improved method in medical image processing demonstrates that the proposed algorithm outperforms the CMBEA and the AFS-CMBEA in removing the noise in a medical image and improving the peak signal to noise ratio.

  20. Optical constants of materials in the EUV/soft x-ray region for multilayer mirror applications

    SciTech Connect

    Soufli, Regina

    1997-12-01

    The response of a given material to an incident electromagnetic wave is described by the energy dependent complex index of refraction n = 1 - δ + iβ. In the extreme ultraviolet (EUV)/soft x-ray spectral region, the need for accurate determination of n is driven by activity in areas such as synchrotron based research, EUV/x-ray lithography, x-ray astronomy and plasma applications. Knowledge of the refractive index is essential for the design of the optical components of instruments used in experiments and applications. Moreover, measured values of n may be used to evaluate solid state models for the optical behavior of materials. The refractive index n of Si, Mo and Be is investigated in the EUV/soft x-ray region. In the case of Si, angle dependent reflectance measurements are performed in the energy range 50-180 eV. The optical constants δ, β are both determined by fitting to the Fresnel equations. The results of this method are compared to the values in the 1993 atomic tables. Photoabsorption measurements for the optical constants of Mo are performed on C/Mo/C foils, in the energy range 60-930 eV. Photoabsorption measurements on Be thin films supported on silicon nitride membranes are performed, and the results are applied in the determination of the absorption coefficient of Be in the energy region 111.5-250 eV. The new results for Si and Mo are applied to the calculation of normal incidence reflectivities of Mo/Si and Mo/Be multilayer mirrors. These calculations show the importance of accurate knowledge of δ and β in the prediction and modeling of the performance of multilayer optics.

  1. A Virtual Mixture Approach to the Study of Multistate Equilibrium: Application to Constant pH Simulation in Explicit Water.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiongwu; Brooks, Bernard R

    2015-10-01

    Chemical and thermodynamic equilibrium of multiple states is a fundamental phenomenon in biology systems and has been the focus of many experimental and computational studies. This work presents a simulation method to directly study the equilibrium of multiple states. This method constructs a virtual mixture of multiple states (VMMS) to sample the conformational space of all chemical states simultaneously. The VMMS system consists of multiple subsystems, one for each state. The subsystem contains a solute and a solvent environment. The solute molecules in all subsystems share the same conformation but have their own solvent environments. Transition between states is implicated by the change of their molar fractions. Simulation of a VMMS system allows efficient calculation of relative free energies of all states, which in turn determine their equilibrium molar fractions. For systems with a large number of state transition sites, an implicit site approximation is introduced to minimize the cost of simulation. A direct application of the VMMS method is for constant pH simulation to study protonation equilibrium. Applying the VMMS method to a heptapeptide of 3 ionizable residues, we calculated the pKas of those residues both with all explicit states and with implicit sites and obtained consistent results. For mouse epidermal growth factor of 9 ionizable groups, our VMMS simulations with implicit sites produced pKas of all 9 ionizable groups and the results agree qualitatively with NMR measurement. This example demonstrates the VMMS method can be applied to systems of a large number of ionizable groups and the computational cost scales linearly with the number of ionizable groups. For one of the most challenging systems in constant pH calculation, SNase Δ+PHS/V66K, our VMMS simulation shows that it is the state-dependent water penetration that causes the large deviation in lysine66's pKa.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS ON THE STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN GALAXIES AT z {approx_equal} 1.2 IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Ideue, Y.; Nagao, T.; Sasaki, S.; Taniguchi, Y.; Shioya, Y.; Saito, T.; Murayama, T.; Trump, J. R.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Aussel, H.; Ilbert, O.; Sanders, D. B.; McCracken, H.; Mobasher, B.

    2009-08-01

    We investigate the relation between the star formation activity in galaxies and environment at z {approx_equal} 1.2 in the Cosmic Evolution Survey field, using the fraction of [O II] emitters and the local galaxy density. The fraction of [O II] emitters appears to be almost constant over the surface density of galaxies between 0.2 and 10 Mpc{sup -2}. This trend is different from that seen in the local universe where the star formation activity is weaker in higher density regions. To understand this difference between z {approx} 1 and z {approx} 0, we study the fraction of non-isolated galaxies as a function of local galaxy density. We find that the fraction of non-isolated galaxies increases with increasing density. Our results suggest that the star formation in galaxies at z {approx} 1 is triggered by galaxy interaction and/or mergers.

  3. "Recognizing Numerical Constants"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Craw, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The advent of inexpensive, high performance computer and new efficient algorithms have made possible the automatic recognition of numerically computed constants. In other words, techniques now exist for determining, within certain limits, whether a computed real or complex number can be written as a simple expression involving the classical constants of mathematics. In this presentation, some of the recently discovered techniques for constant recognition, notably integer relation detection algorithms, will be presented. As an application of these methods, the author's recent work in recognizing "Euler sums" will be described in some detail.

  4. THE UDF05 FOLLOW-UP OF THE HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP FIELD. III. THE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z {approx} 6

    SciTech Connect

    Su Jian; Stiavelli, Massimo; Bergeron, Eddie; Bradley, Larry; Dahlen, Tomas; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton; Lucas, Ray A.; Panagia, Nino; Pavlovsky, Cheryl; Oesch, Pascal; Carollo, Marcella; Lilly, Simon; Trenti, Michele; Giavalisco, Mauro; Mobasher, Bahram

    2011-09-10

    In this paper, we present a derivation of the rest-frame 1400 A luminosity function (LF) at redshift six from a new application of the maximum likelihood method by exploring the five deepest Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) fields, i.e., the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, two UDF05 fields, and two Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey fields. We work on the latest improved data products, which makes our results more robust than those of previous studies. We use unbinned data and thereby make optimal use of the information contained in the data set. We focus on the analysis to a magnitude limit where the completeness is larger than 50% to avoid possibly large errors in the faint end slope that are difficult to quantify. We also take into account scattering in and out of the dropout sample due to photometric errors by defining for each object a probability that it belongs to the dropout sample. We find the best-fit Schechter parameters to the z {approx} 6 LF are {alpha} = 1.87 {+-} 0.14, M{sub *} = -20.25 {+-} 0.23, and {phi}{sub *} = 1.77{sup +0.62}{sub -0.49} x 10{sup -3} Mpc{sup -3}. Such a steep slope suggests that galaxies, especially the faint ones, are possibly the main sources of ionizing photons in the universe at redshift six. We also combine results from all studies at z {approx} 6 to reach an agreement in the 95% confidence level that -20.45 < M{sub *} < -20.05 and -1.90 < {alpha} < -1.55. The luminosity density has been found not to evolve significantly between z {approx} 6 and z {approx} 5, but considerable evolution is detected from z {approx} 6 to z {approx} 3.

  5. Tailoring the optical constants in single-crystal silicon with embedded silver nanostructures for advanced silicon photonics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Akhter, Perveen; Huang, Mengbing Spratt, William; Kadakia, Nirag; Amir, Faisal

    2015-03-28

    Plasmonic effects associated with metal nanostructures are expected to hold the key to tailoring light emission/propagation and harvesting solar energy in materials including single crystal silicon which remains the backbone in the microelectronics and photovoltaics industries but unfortunately, lacks many functionalities needed for construction of advanced photonic and optoelectronics devices. Currently, silicon plasmonic structures are practically possible only in the configuration with metal nanoparticles or thin film arrays on a silicon surface. This does not enable one to exploit the full potential of plasmonics for optical engineering in silicon, because the plasmonic effects are dominant over a length of ∼50 nm, and the active device region typically lies below the surface much beyond this range. Here, we report on a novel method for the formation of silver nanoparticles embedded within a silicon crystal through metal gettering from a silver thin film deposited at the surface to nanocavities within the Si created by hydrogen ion implantation. The refractive index of the Ag-nanostructured layer is found to be 3–10% lower or higher than that of silicon for wavelengths below or beyond ∼815–900 nm, respectively. Around this wavelength range, the optical extinction values increase by a factor of 10–100 as opposed to the pure silicon case. Increasing the amount of gettered silver leads to an increased extinction as well as a redshift in wavelength position for the resonance. This resonance is attributed to the surface plasmon excitation of the resultant silver nanoparticles in silicon. Additionally, we show that the profiles for optical constants in silicon can be tailored by varying the position and number of nanocavity layers. Such silicon crystals with embedded metal nanostructures would offer novel functional base structures for applications in silicon photonics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and plasmonics.

  6. Tailoring the optical constants in single-crystal silicon with embedded silver nanostructures for advanced silicon photonics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Perveen; Huang, Mengbing; Spratt, William; Kadakia, Nirag; Amir, Faisal

    2015-03-01

    Plasmonic effects associated with metal nanostructures are expected to hold the key to tailoring light emission/propagation and harvesting solar energy in materials including single crystal silicon which remains the backbone in the microelectronics and photovoltaics industries but unfortunately, lacks many functionalities needed for construction of advanced photonic and optoelectronics devices. Currently, silicon plasmonic structures are practically possible only in the configuration with metal nanoparticles or thin film arrays on a silicon surface. This does not enable one to exploit the full potential of plasmonics for optical engineering in silicon, because the plasmonic effects are dominant over a length of ˜50 nm, and the active device region typically lies below the surface much beyond this range. Here, we report on a novel method for the formation of silver nanoparticles embedded within a silicon crystal through metal gettering from a silver thin film deposited at the surface to nanocavities within the Si created by hydrogen ion implantation. The refractive index of the Ag-nanostructured layer is found to be 3-10% lower or higher than that of silicon for wavelengths below or beyond ˜815-900 nm, respectively. Around this wavelength range, the optical extinction values increase by a factor of 10-100 as opposed to the pure silicon case. Increasing the amount of gettered silver leads to an increased extinction as well as a redshift in wavelength position for the resonance. This resonance is attributed to the surface plasmon excitation of the resultant silver nanoparticles in silicon. Additionally, we show that the profiles for optical constants in silicon can be tailored by varying the position and number of nanocavity layers. Such silicon crystals with embedded metal nanostructures would offer novel functional base structures for applications in silicon photonics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics, and plasmonics.

  7. S(3) HMBC: Spin-State-Selective HMBC for accurate measurement of homonuclear coupling constants. Application to strychnine yielding thirteen hitherto unreported J(HH).

    PubMed

    Kjaerulff, Louise; Benie, Andrew J; Hoeck, Casper; Gotfredsen, Charlotte H; Sørensen, Ole W

    2016-02-01

    A novel method, Spin-State-Selective (S(3)) HMBC, for accurate measurement of homonuclear coupling constants is introduced. As characteristic for S(3) techniques, S(3) HMBC yields independent subspectra corresponding to particular passive spin states and thus allows determination of coupling constants between detected spins and homonuclear coupling partners along with relative signs. In the presented S(3) HMBC experiment, spin-state selection occurs via large one-bond coupling constants ensuring high editing accuracy and unequivocal sign determination of the homonuclear long-range relative to the associated one-bond coupling constant. The sensitivity of the new experiment is comparable to that of regular edited HMBC and the accuracy of the J/RDC measurement is as usual for E.COSY and S(3)-type experiments independent of the size of the homonuclear coupling constant of interest. The merits of the method are demonstrated by an application to strychnine where thirteen J(HH) coupling constants not previously reported could be measured.

  8. REST-FRAME UV-OPTICALLY SELECTED GALAXIES AT 2.3 {approx}< z {approx}< 3.5: SEARCHING FOR DUSTY STAR-FORMING AND PASSIVELY EVOLVING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Yicheng; Giavalisco, Mauro; Cassata, Paolo; Williams, Christina C.; Salimbeni, Sara; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton; Grogin, Norman A.; Dickinson, Mark; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Messias, Hugo; Tundo, Elena; Lin Lihwai; Lee, Seong-Kook; Fontana, Adriano; Grazian, Andrea; Kocevski, Dale; Villanueva, Edward; Van der Wel, Arjen

    2012-04-20

    A new set of color selection criteria (VJL) analogous with the BzK method is designed to select both star-forming galaxies (SFGs) and passively evolving galaxies (PEGs) at 2.3 {approx}< z {approx}< 3.5 by using rest-frame UV-optical (V - J versus J - L) colors. The criteria are thoroughly tested with theoretical stellar population synthesis models and real galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts to evaluate their efficiency and contamination. We apply the well-tested VJL criteria to the HST/WFC3 Early Release Science field and study the physical properties of selected galaxies. The redshift distribution of selected SFGs peaks at z {approx} 2.7, slightly lower than that of Lyman break galaxies at z {approx} 3. Comparing the observed mid-infrared fluxes of selected galaxies with the prediction of pure stellar emission, we find that our VJL method is effective at selecting massive dusty SFGs that are missed by the Lyman break technique. About half of the star formation in massive (M{sub star} > 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }) galaxies at 2.3 {approx}< z {approx}< 3.5 is contributed by dusty (extinction E(B - V) > 0.4) SFGs, which, however, only account for {approx}20% of the number density of massive SFGs. We also use the mid-infrared fluxes to clean our PEG sample and find that galaxy size can be used as a secondary criterion to effectively eliminate the contamination of dusty SFGs. The redshift distribution of the cleaned PEG sample peaks at z {approx} 2.5. We find six PEG candidates at z > 3 and discuss possible methods to distinguish them from dusty contamination. We conclude that at least part of our candidates are real PEGs at z {approx} 3, implying that these types of galaxies began to form their stars at z {approx}> 5. We measure the integrated stellar mass density (ISMD) of PEGs at z {approx} 2.5 and set constraints on it at z > 3. We find that the ISMD grows by at least about a factor of 10 in 1 Gyr at 3 < z <5 and by another factor of 10 in the next 3.5 Gyr (1 < z

  9. An initial-abstraction, constant-loss model for unit hydrograph modeling for applicable watersheds in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, William H.; Roussel, Meghan C.

    2007-01-01

    Estimation of representative hydrographs from design storms, which are known as design hydrographs, provides for cost-effective, riskmitigated design of drainage structures such as bridges, culverts, roadways, and other infrastructure. During 2001?07, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Texas Department of Transportation, investigated runoff hydrographs, design storms, unit hydrographs,and watershed-loss models to enhance design hydrograph estimation in Texas. Design hydrographs ideally should mimic the general volume, peak, and shape of observed runoff hydrographs. Design hydrographs commonly are estimated in part by unit hydrographs. A unit hydrograph is defined as the runoff hydrograph that results from a unit pulse of excess rainfall uniformly distributed over the watershed at a constant rate for a specific duration. A time-distributed, watershed-loss model is required for modeling by unit hydrographs. This report develops a specific time-distributed, watershed-loss model known as an initial-abstraction, constant-loss model. For this watershed-loss model, a watershed is conceptualized to have the capacity to store or abstract an absolute depth of rainfall at and near the beginning of a storm. Depths of total rainfall less than this initial abstraction do not produce runoff. The watershed also is conceptualized to have the capacity to remove rainfall at a constant rate (loss) after the initial abstraction is satisfied. Additional rainfall inputs after the initial abstraction is satisfied contribute to runoff if the rainfall rate (intensity) is larger than the constant loss. The initial abstraction, constant-loss model thus is a two-parameter model. The initial-abstraction, constant-loss model is investigated through detailed computational and statistical analysis of observed rainfall and runoff data for 92 USGS streamflow-gaging stations (watersheds) in Texas with contributing drainage areas from 0.26 to 166 square miles. The analysis is

  10. 'DARK' GRB 080325 IN A DUSTY MASSIVE GALAXY AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, T.; Ohta, K.; Yabe, K.; Niino, Y.; Aoki, K.; Tanaka, I.; Hattori, T.; Minowa, Y.; Noumaru, J.; Kawai, N.; Aoki, W.; Furusawa, H.; Iye, M.; Komiyama, Y.; Kosugi, G.; Mizumoto, Y.; Ogasawara, R.; Kawabata, K. S.; Kobayashi, N.; Nomoto, K.

    2010-08-10

    We present optical and near-infrared observations of Swift GRB 080325 classified as a 'dark gamma-ray burst (GRB)'. Near-infrared observations with Subaru/MOIRCS provided a clear detection of afterglow in the K{sub s} band, although no optical counterpart was reported. The flux ratio of rest-wavelength optical to X-ray bands of the afterglow indicates that the dust extinction along the line of sight to the afterglow is A{sub V} = 2.7-10 mag. This large extinction is probably the major reason for the optical faintness of GRB 080325. The J - K{sub s} color of the host galaxy, (J - K{sub s} = 1.3 in AB magnitude), is significantly redder than those for typical GRB hosts previously identified. In addition to J and K{sub s} bands, optical images in B, R{sub c} , i', and z' bands with Subaru/Suprime-Cam were obtained at about 1 year after the burst, and a photometric redshift of the host is estimated to be z {sub photo} = 1.9. The host luminosity is comparable to L* at z {approx} 2 in contrast to the sub-L* property of typical GRB hosts at lower redshifts. The best-fit stellar population synthesis model for the host shows that the red nature of the host is attributed to a large dust extinction (A{sub V} = 0.8 mag), and that the host galaxy is massive (M* = 7.0 x 10{sup 10} M {sub sun}), which makes it one of the most massive GRB hosts yet identified. By assuming that the mass-metallicity relation for star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 2 is applicable for the GRB host, this large stellar mass suggests the high-metallicity environment around GRB 080325, consistent with inferred large extinction.

  11. A CENSUS OF MID-INFRARED-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN MASSIVE GALAXY CLUSTERS AT 0 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.3

    SciTech Connect

    Tomczak, Adam R.; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Saintonge, Amelie

    2011-09-01

    We conduct a deep mid-infrared (mid-IR) census of nine massive galaxy clusters at (0 < z < 1.3) with a total of {approx}1500 spectroscopically confirmed member galaxies using Spitzer/IRAC photometry and established mid-IR color selection techniques. Of the 949 cluster galaxies that are detected in at least three of the four IRAC channels at the {>=}3{sigma} level, we identify 12 that host mid-IR-selected active galactic nuclei (IR-AGNs). To compare the IR-AGNs across our redshift range, we define two complete samples of cluster galaxies: (1) optically selected members with rest-frame V{sub AB} magnitude < - 21.5 and (2) mid-IR-selected members brighter than (M*{sub 3.6} + 0.5), i.e., essentially a stellar mass cut. In both samples, we measure f{sub IR-AGN} {approx} 1% with a strong upper limit of {approx}3% at z < 1. This uniformly low IR-AGN fraction at z < 1 is surprising given that the fraction of 24 {mu}m sources in the same galaxy clusters is observed to increase by about a factor of four from z {approx} 0 to z {approx} 1; this indicates that most of the detected 24 {mu}m flux is due to star formation. Only in our single galaxy cluster at z = 1.24 is the IR-AGN fraction measurably higher at {approx}15% (all members; {approx}70% for late-types only). In agreement with recent studies, we find that the cluster IR-AGNs are predominantly hosted by late-type galaxies with blue optical colors, i.e., members with recent/ongoing star formation. The four brightest IR-AGNs are also X-ray sources; these IR+X-ray AGNs all lie outside the cluster core (R{sub proj} {approx}> 0.5 Mpc) and are hosted by highly morphologically disturbed members. Although our sample is limited, our results suggest that f{sub IR-AGN} in massive galaxy clusters is not strongly correlated with star formation at z < 1 and that IR-AGNs have a more prominent role at z {approx}> 1.

  12. Dual constant composition method and its application to studies of phase transformation and crystallization of mixed phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimpour, A.; Zhang, Jingwu; Nancollas, G. H.

    1991-08-01

    In a novel approach, a dual constant composition (DCC) technique has been developed for the investigation of concurrent dissolution and growth processes such as crystalline phase transformation, as well as growth of mixed crystalline phases. DCC utilizes two potentiostats and electrode sets to control simultaneous reactions in the same medium. The kinetics of concurrent dissolution or growth of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) and the growth of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) were studied.

  13. The Star Formation Rate Efficiency of Neutral Atomic-Dominated Hydrogen Gas in the Ooutskirts of Star-Forming Galaxies From z approx. 1 to z approx. 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rafelski, Marc; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Fumagalli, Michele; Neeleman, Marcel; Teplitz, Harry I.; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Scarlata, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Current observational evidence suggests that the star formation rate (SFR)efficiency of neutral atomic hydrogen gas measured in damped Ly(alpha) systems (DLAs) at z approx. 3 is more than 10 times lower than predicted by the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS)relation. To understand the origin of this deficit, and to investigate possible evolution with redshift and galaxy properties, we measure the SFR efficiency of atomic gas at z approx. 1, z approx. 2, and z approx. 3 around star-forming galaxies. We use new robust photometric redshifts in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field to create galaxy stacks in these three redshift bins, and measure the SFR efficiency by combining DLA absorber statistics with the observed rest-frame UV emission in the galaxies' outskirts. We find that the SFR efficiency of H I gas at z > 1 is approx. 1%-3% of that predicted by the KS relation. Contrary to simulations and models that predict a reduced SFR efficiency with decreasing metallicity and thus with increasing redshift, we find no significant evolution in the SFR efficiency with redshift. Our analysis instead suggests that the reduced SFR efficiency is driven by the low molecular content of this atomic-dominated phase, with metallicity playing a secondary effect in regulating the conversion between atomic and molecular gas. This interpretation is supported by the similarity between the observed SFR efficiency and that observed in local atomic-dominated gas, such as in the outskirts of local spiral galaxies and local dwarf galaxies.

  14. Potential atmospheric impact of the Toba mega-eruption {approx}71,000 years ago

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinski, G.A.; Mayewski, P.A.; Meeker, L.D.; Whitlow, S.; Twickler, M.S.; Taylor, K.

    1996-04-15

    An {approx}6 year-long period of volcanic sulfate recorded in the GISP2 ice core about 71,000 {+-} 5000 years ago may provide detailed information on the atmospheric and climate impact in the Toba mega-eruption. Deposition of these aerosols occur beginning of an {approx}1000-year long stadial event, but not immediately before the longer glacial period beginning {approx}67,500 years ago. Total stratospheric loading estimates over this {approx}6 year period range from 2200 to 4400 Mt of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aerosols. The range in values is given to compensate for uncertainties in aerosol transport. Magnitude and longevity of the atmospheric loading may have led directly to enhanced cooling during the initial two centuries of this {approx}1000-year cooling event. 25 refs., 2 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Metabolic Rate Constants for Hydroquinone in F344 Rat and Human Liver Isolated Hepatocytes: Application to a PBPK model.

    SciTech Connect

    Poet, Torka S.; Wu, Hong; English, J C.; Corley, Rick A.

    2004-11-15

    Hydroquinone (HQ) is an important industrial chemical that also occurs naturally in foods and in the leaves and bark of a number of plant species. Exposure of laboratory animals to HQ may result in a species-, sex-, and strain-specific nephrotoxicity. The sensitivity of male F344 vs. female F344 and Sprague-Dawley rats or B6C3F1 mice appears to be related to differences in the rates of formation and further metabolism of key nephrotoxic metabolites. Metabolic rate constants for the conversion of HQ through several metabolic steps to the mono-glutathione conjugate and subsequent detoxification via mercapturic acid were measured in suspension cultures of hepatocytes isolated from male F344 rats and humans. An in vitro mathematic kinetic model was used to analyze each metabolic step by simultaneously fitting the disappearance of each substrate and the appearance of subsequent metabolites. An iterative, nested approach was used whereby downstream metabolites were considered first and the model was constrained by the requirement that rate constants determined during analysis of individual metabolic steps must also satisfy the complete, integrated metabolism scheme, including competitive pathways. The results from this study indicated that the overall capacity for metabolism of HQ and its mono-glutathione conjugate is greater in hepatocytes from humans than those isolated from rats, suggesting a greater capacity for detoxification of the glutathione conjugates. Metabolic rate constants were applied to an existing physiologically based pharmacokinetic model and the model was used to predict total glutathione metabolites produced in the liver. The results showed that body burdens of these metabolites will be much higher in rats than humans.

  16. Enhanced effects of variation of the fundamental constants in laser interferometers and application to dark-matter detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadnik, Y. V.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    We outline laser interferometer measurements to search for variation of the electromagnetic fine-structure constant α and particle masses (including a nonzero photon mass). We propose a strontium optical lattice clock—silicon single-crystal cavity interferometer as a small-scale platform for these measurements. Our proposed laser interferometer measurements, which may also be performed with large-scale gravitational-wave detectors, such as LIGO, Virgo, GEO600, or TAMA300, may be implemented as an extremely precise tool in the direct detection of scalar dark matter that forms an oscillating classical field or topological defects.

  17. DYNAMICAL MASSES OF EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES AT z approx 2: ARE THEY TRULY SUPERDENSE?

    SciTech Connect

    Cappellari, Michele; Di Serego Alighieri, S.; Cimatti, A.; Daddi, E.; Kurk, J. D.; Cassata, P.; Dickinson, M.; Franceschini, A.; Rodighiero, G.; Mignoli, M.; Pozzetti, L.; Zamorani, G.; Rosati, P.

    2009-10-10

    We measured stellar velocity dispersions sigma and derived dynamical masses of nine massive (M approx 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}) early-type galaxies (ETGs) from the Galaxy Mass Assembly ultra-deep Spectroscopic Survey (GMASS) sample at redshift 1.4 approx< z approx< 2.0. The sigma are based on individual spectra for two galaxies at z approx 1.4 and on a stacked spectrum for seven galaxies with 1.6 < z < 2.0, with 202 hr of exposure at the ESO Very Large Telescope. We constructed detailed axisymmetric dynamical models for the objects, based on the Jeans equations, taking the observed surface brightness (from deep HST/ACS observations), point-spread function, and slit effects into account. Our dynamical masses M{sub Jeans} agree within approx<30% with virial estimates M{sub vir} = 5 x R{sub e}sigma{sup 2}/G, although the latter tend to be smaller. Our M{sub Jeans} also agrees within a factor approx<2 with the M{sub pop} previously derived using stellar population models and 11 bands photometry. This confirms that the galaxies are intrinsically massive. The inferred mass-to-light ratios (M/L) {sub U} in the very age-sensitive rest-frame U band are consistent with passive evolution in the past approx1 Gyr (formation redshift z{sub f} approx 3). A 'bottom-light' stellar initial mass function appears to be required to ensure close agreement between M{sub Jeans} and M {sub pop} at z approx 2, as it does at z approx 0. The GMASS ETGs are on average more dense than their local counterpart. However, a few percent of local ETGs of similar dynamical masses also have comparable sigma and mass surface density SIGMA{sub 50} inside R{sub e}.

  18. THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS: BRIGHT, HIGHLY MAGNIFIED GALAXY CANDIDATES AT z {approx} 7 BEHIND A1703

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, L. D.; Coe, D.; Bouwens, R. J.; Smit, R.; Zitrin, A.; Ford, H. C.; Zheng, W.; Illingworth, G. D.

    2012-03-01

    We report the discovery of seven strongly lensed Lyman-break galaxy (LBG) candidates at z {approx} 7 detected in Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging of A1703. The brightest candidate, called A1703-zD1, has an observed (lensed) magnitude of 24.0 AB (26{sigma}) in the WFC3/IR F160W band, making it 0.2 mag brighter than the z{sub 850}-dropout candidate recently reported behind the Bullet Cluster and 0.7 mag brighter than the previously brightest known z {approx} 7.6 galaxy, A1689-zD1. With a cluster magnification of {approx}9, this source has an intrinsic magnitude of H{sub 160} = 26.4 AB, a strong z{sub 850} - J{sub 125} break of 1.7 mag, and a photometric redshift of z {approx} 6.7. Additionally, we find six other bright LBG candidates with H{sub 160}-band magnitudes of 24.9-26.4, photometric redshifts z {approx} 6.4 - 8.8, and magnifications {mu} {approx} 3-40. Stellar population fits to the Advanced Camera for Surveys, WFC3/IR, and Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera data for A1703-zD1 and A1703-zD4 yield stellar masses (0.7 - 3.0) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }, stellar ages 5-180 Myr, and star formation rates {approx}7.8 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, and low reddening with A{sub V} {<=} 0.7. The source-plane reconstruction of the exceptionally bright candidate A1703-zD1 exhibits an extended structure, spanning {approx}4 kpc in the z {approx} 6.7 source plane, and shows three resolved star-forming knots of radius r {approx} 0.4 kpc.

  19. ON THE STAR FORMATION-AGN CONNECTION AT z {approx}< 0.3

    SciTech Connect

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Urry, C. Megan; Heckman, T. M.; Ptak, A.

    2013-03-10

    Using the spectra of a sample of {approx}28,000 nearby obscured active galaxies from Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we probe the connection between active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity and star formation over a range of radial scales in the host galaxy. We use the extinction-corrected luminosity of the [O III] 5007 A line as a proxy of intrinsic AGN power and supermassive black hole (SMBH) accretion rate. The star formation rates (SFRs) are taken from the MPA-JHU value-added catalog and are measured through the 3'' SDSS aperture. We construct matched samples of galaxies covering a range in redshifts. With increasing redshift, the projected aperture size encompasses increasing amounts of the host galaxy. This allows us to trace the radial distribution of star formation as a function of AGN luminosity. We find that the star formation becomes more centrally concentrated with increasing AGN luminosity and Eddington ratio. This implies that such circumnuclear star formation is associated with AGN activity, and that it increasingly dominates over omnipresent disk star formation at higher AGN luminosities, placing critical constraints on theoretical models that link host galaxy star formation and SMBH fueling. We parameterize this relationship and find that the star formation on radial scales <1.7 kpc, when including a constant disk component, has a sub-linear dependence on SMBH accretion rate: SFR{proportional_to} M-dot {sup 0.36}, suggesting that angular momentum transfer through the disk limits accretion efficiency rather than the supply from stellar mass loss.

  20. MOIRCS DEEP SURVEY. VIII. EVOLUTION OF STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY AS A FUNCTION OF STELLAR MASS IN GALAXIES SINCE z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kajisawa, M.; Ichikawa, T.; Yamada, T.; Akiyama, M.; Uchimoto, Y. K.; Yoshikawa, T.; Onodera, M.

    2010-11-01

    We study the evolution of star formation activity of galaxies at 0.5 < z < 3.5 as a function of stellar mass, using very deep NIR data taken with the Multi-Object Infrared Camera and Spectrograph on the Subaru telescope in the GOODS-North region. The NIR imaging data reach K{approx} 23-24 Vega magnitude and they allow us to construct a nearly stellar-mass-limited sample down to {approx}10{sup 9.5-10} M{sub sun} even at z {approx} 3. We estimated star formation rates (SFRs) of the sample with two indicators, namely, the Spitzer/MIPS 24 {mu}m flux and the rest-frame 2800 A luminosity. The SFR distribution at a fixed M{sub star} shifts to higher values with increasing redshift at 0.5 < z < 3.5. More massive galaxies show stronger evolution of SFR at z {approx}> 1. We found galaxies at 2.5 < z < 3.5 show a bimodality in their SSFR distribution, which can be divided into two populations by a constant SSFR of {approx}2 Gyr{sup -1}. Galaxies in the low-SSFR group have SSFRs of {approx}0.5-1.0 Gyr{sup -1}, while the high-SSFR population shows {approx}10 Gyr{sup -1}. The cosmic SFR density (SFRD) is dominated by galaxies with M{sub star} = 10{sup 10-11} M{sub sun} at 0.5 < z < 3.5, while the contribution of massive galaxies with M{sub star} = 10{sup 11-11.5} M{sub sun} shows a strong evolution at z>1 and becomes significant at z {approx} 3, especially in the case with the SFR based on MIPS 24 {mu}m. In galaxies with M{sub star} = 10{sup 10-11.5} M{sub sun}, those with a relatively narrow range of SSFR ({approx}<1 dex) dominates the cosmic SFRD at 0.5 < z < 3.5. The SSFR of galaxies that dominate the SFRD systematically increases with redshift. At 2.5 < z < 3.5, the high-SSFR population, which is relatively small in number, dominates the SFRD. Major star formation in the universe at higher redshift seems to be associated with a more rapid growth of stellar mass of galaxies.

  1. CO-EVOLUTION OF SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE AND HOST GALAXY FROM z {approx} 1 TO z = 0

    SciTech Connect

    Kiuchi, Gaku; Ohta, Kouji; Akiyama, Masayuki

    2009-05-01

    Stellar masses of bulges in hosts of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and black hole masses in the AGNs are derived at z = 0.5-1.15 to study evolution of the black hole-to-bulge mass relation. In order to derive bulge stellar masses, we use a sample of type-2 AGNs to avoid the bright nuclear light. 34 type-2 AGNs are selected from the spectroscopically identified X-ray sources in the Chandra Deep Field South. We use optical images from the Hubble Space Telescope, and near- and mid-infrared photometry from the Very Large Telescope and the Spitzer Space Telescope. The bulge components are derived by fitting the two-dimensional surface brightness model consisting of a bulge and a disk component to the optical images. We derive stellar masses (M {sub bulge}) and star formation rates (SFRs) of the bulge components by spectral energy distribution fitting. The derived M {sub bulge} ranges over 10{sup 9}-10{sup 11} M {sub sun}, and the estimated SFR is 0.01-100 M {sub sun} yr{sup -1}. Masses of supermassive black holes (SMBHs; M {sub .}) and black hole accretion rates (BHARs) are estimated with the absorption-corrected X-ray luminosities in the 2-10 keV band under an assumption of the constant Eddington ratio of 0.1 and the constant energy conversion factor of 0.1. Resulting black hole masses and BHARs range over 10{sup 5.5}-10{sup 8} M {sub sun} and 0.001-1 M {sub sun} yr{sup -1}, respectively. For luminous AGNs, the estimated M {sub .}/M {sub bulge} ratio is {approx}4 x 10{sup -4} in the median, which is lower than that for local galaxies and for type-2 AGNs at z {approx} 0.2. However, these differences are within uncertainty and are not significant. This can imply that SMBHs and their host galaxies are evolving almost holding the constant M {sub .}/M {sub bulge} ratio from z {approx} 1.0 to 0 in a cosmological timescale. Meanwhile, the estimated BHAR/SFR ratio is about 60 times larger than the M {sub .}/M {sub bulge} ratio in the median value. This indicates that growths

  2. Damn You, Little h! (Or, Real-World Applications of the Hubble Constant Using Observed and Simulated Data)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croton, Darren J.

    2013-10-01

    The Hubble constant, H 0, or its dimensionless equivalent, "little h", is a fundamental cosmological property that is now known to an accuracy better than a few per cent. Despite its cosmological nature, little h commonly appears in the measured properties of individual galaxies. This can pose unique challenges for users of such data, particularly with survey data. In this paper we show how little h arises in the measurement of galaxies, how to compare like-properties from different datasets that have assumed different little h cosmologies, and how to fairly compare theoretical data with observed data, where little h can manifest in vastly different ways. This last point is particularly important when observations are used to calibrate galaxy formation models, as calibrating with the wrong (or no) little h can lead to disastrous results when the model is later converted to the correct h cosmology. We argue that in this modern age little h is an anachronism, being one of least uncertain parameters in astrophysics, and we propose that observers and theorists instead treat this uncertainty like any other. We conclude with a `cheat sheet' of nine points that should be followed when dealing with little h in data analysis.

  3. Application of a Constant Gain Extended Kalman Filter for In-Flight Estimation of Aircraft Engine Performance Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Takahisa; Simon, Donald L.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2005-01-01

    An approach based on the Constant Gain Extended Kalman Filter (CGEKF) technique is investigated for the in-flight estimation of non-measurable performance parameters of aircraft engines. Performance parameters, such as thrust and stall margins, provide crucial information for operating an aircraft engine in a safe and efficient manner, but they cannot be directly measured during flight. A technique to accurately estimate these parameters is, therefore, essential for further enhancement of engine operation. In this paper, a CGEKF is developed by combining an on-board engine model and a single Kalman gain matrix. In order to make the on-board engine model adaptive to the real engine s performance variations due to degradation or anomalies, the CGEKF is designed with the ability to adjust its performance through the adjustment of artificial parameters called tuning parameters. With this design approach, the CGEKF can maintain accurate estimation performance when it is applied to aircraft engines at offnominal conditions. The performance of the CGEKF is evaluated in a simulation environment using numerous component degradation and fault scenarios at multiple operating conditions.

  4. Estimation of stability constants for metal-ligand complexes containing neutral nitrogen donor atoms with applications to natural organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atalay, Yasemin B.; Di Toro, Dominic M.; Carbonaro, Richard F.

    2013-12-01

    Linear free energy relationships (LFERs) were developed for estimating 1:1 metal-ligand stability constants (log KML) for small organic molecules containing neutral nitrogen donor atoms. A data set of 44 monodentate and 112 bidentate ligands for six metal ions: Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+ and Cd2+ was employed to parameterize the LFER equations. Monodentate and bidentate log KML values were adequately described using Irving-Rossotti LFERs previously developed for ligands containing negatively-charged oxygen functional groups. Modifications to the LFER equations were necessary to account for steric hindrances to metal complexation by primary, secondary, and tertiary amines. The resulting LFER equations can be used to estimate log KML values for monodentate and bidentate ligands with neutral nitrogen donor groups where such values do not currently exist in the literature. Comparison of these results to our previous work with negatively-charged oxygen donor atoms reveals that neutral nitrogen functional groups are weaker than their oxygen counterparts for metal ions classified as “hard” on the basis of Hard-Soft Acid-Base (HSAB) theory. For “soft” metals, the opposite is true. These LFERs can be used to incorporate nitrogen functional groups in models for metal ion binding to natural organic matter (NOM).

  5. Determination of temperature dependent Henry's law constants of polychlorinated naphthalenes: Application to air-sea exchange in Izmir Bay, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odabasi, Mustafa; Adali, Mutlu

    2016-12-01

    The Henry's law constant (H) is a crucial variable to investigate the air-water exchange of persistent organic pollutants. H values for 32 polychlorinated naphthalene (PCN) congeners were measured using an inert gas-stripping technique at five temperatures ranging between 5 and 35 °C. H values in deionized water (at 25 °C) varied between 0.28 ± 0.08 Pa m3 mol-1 (PCN-73) and 18.01 ± 0.69 Pa m3 mol-1 (PCN-42). The agreement between the measured and estimated H values from the octanol-water and octanol-air partition coefficients was good (measured/estimated ratio = 1.00 ± 0.41, average ± SD). The calculated phase change enthalpies (ΔHH) were within the interval previously determined for other several semivolatile organic compounds (42.0-106.4 kJ mol-1). Measured H values, paired atmospheric and aqueous concentrations and meteorological variables were also used to reveal the level and direction of air-sea exchange fluxes of PCNs at the coast of Izmir Bay, Turkey. The net PCN air-sea exchange flux varied from -0.55 (volatilization, PCN-24/14) to 2.05 (deposition, PCN-23) ng m-2 day-1. PCN-19, PCN-24/14, PCN-42, and PCN-33/34/37 were mainly volatilized from seawater while the remaining congeners were mainly deposited. The overall number of the cases showing deposition was higher (67.9%) compared to volatilization (21.4%) and near equilibrium (10.7%).

  6. The Hubble Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Wendy; Madore, Barry; Mager, Violet; Persson, Eric; Rigby, Jane; Sturch, Laura

    2008-12-01

    We present a plan to measure a value of the Hubble constant having a final systematic uncertainty of only 3% by taking advantage of Spitzer's unique mid-infrared capabilities. This involves using IRAC to undertake a fundamental recalibration of the Cepheid distance scale and progressively moving it out to pure Hubble flow by an application of a revised mid-IR Tully-Fisher relation. The calibration and application, in one coherent and self-consistent program, will go continuously from distances of parsecs to several hundred megaparsecs. It will provide a first-ever mid-IR calibration of Cepheids in the Milky Way, LMC and Key Project spiral galaxies and a first-ever measurement and calibration of the TF relation at mid-infrared wavelengths, and finally a calibration of Type Ia SNe. Most importantly this program will be undertaken with a single instrument, on a single telescope, working exclusively at mid-infrared wavelengths that are far removed from the obscuring effects of dust extinction. Using Spitzer in this focused way will effectively eliminate all of the major systematics in the Cepheid and TF distance scales that have been the limiting factors in all previous applications, including the HST Key Project. By executing this program, based exclusively on Spitzer data, we will deliver a value of the Hubble constant, having a statistical precision better than 11%, with all currently known systematics quantified and constrained to a level of less than 3%. A value of Ho determined to this level of systematic accuracy is required for up-coming cosmology experiments, including Planck. A more accurate value of the Hubble constant will directly result in other contingently measured cosmological parameters (e.g., Omega_m, Omega_L, & w) having their covariant uncertainties reduced significantly now. Any further improvements using this route will have to await JWST, for which this study is designed to provide a lasting and solid foundation, and ultimately a value of Ho

  7. Universe of constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongquan, Han

    2016-10-01

    The ideal gas state equation is not applicable to ordinary gas, it should be applied to the Electromagnetic ``gas'' that is applied to the radiation, the radiation should be the ultimate state of matter changes or initial state, the universe is filled with radiation. That is, the ideal gas equation of state is suitable for the Singular point and the universe. Maybe someone consider that, there is no vessel can accommodate radiation, it is because the Ordinary container is too small to accommodate, if the radius of your container is the distance that Light through an hour, would you still think it can't accommodates radiation? Modern scientific determinate that the radius of the universe now is about 1027 m, assuming that the universe is a sphere whose volume is approximately: V = 4.19 × 1081 cubic meters, the temperature radiation of the universe (cosmic microwave background radiation temperature of the universe, should be the closest the average temperature of the universe) T = 3.15k, radiation pressure P = 5 × 10-6 N / m 2, according to the law of ideal gas state equation, PV / T = constant = 6 × 1075, the value of this constant is the universe, The singular point should also equal to the constant Author: hanyongquan

  8. Capacitive Cells for Dielectric Constant Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguía; Maldonado, Rigoberto Franco

    2015-01-01

    A simple capacitive cell for dielectric constant measurement in liquids is presented. As an illustrative application, the cell is used for measuring the degradation of overheated edible oil through the evaluation of their dielectric constant.

  9. USING THE BULLET CLUSTER AS A GRAVITATIONAL TELESCOPE TO STUDY z {approx}> 7 LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Nicholas; Bradac, Marusa; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Treu, Tommaso; Clowe, Douglas; Jones, Christine; Stiavelli, Massimo; Zaritsky, Dennis; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel; Clement, Benjamin

    2012-02-01

    We use imaging obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 to search for z{sub 850} dropouts at z {approx} 7 and J{sub 110} dropouts at z {approx} 9 lensed by the Bullet Cluster. In total we find 10 z{sub 850} dropouts in our 8.27 arcmin{sup 2} field. Using magnification maps from a combined weak- and strong-lensing mass reconstruction of the Bullet Cluster and correcting for estimated completeness levels, we calculate the surface density and luminosity function of our z{sub 850} dropouts as a function of intrinsic (accounting for magnification) magnitude. We find results consistent with published blank field surveys, despite using much shallower data, and demonstrate the effectiveness of cluster surveys in the search for z {approx} 7 galaxies.

  10. THE BIMODAL METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION OF THE COOL CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM AT z {approx}< 1

    SciTech Connect

    Lehner, N.; Howk, J. C.; Tripp, T. M.; Tumlinson, J.; Thom, C.; Fox, A. J.; Prochaska, J. X.; Werk, J. K.; Ribaudo, J.

    2013-06-20

    We assess the metal content of the cool ({approx}10{sup 4} K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) about galaxies at z {approx}< 1 using an H I-selected sample of 28 Lyman limit systems (LLS; defined here as absorbers with 16.2 {approx}< log N{sub H{sub I}} {approx}< 18.5) observed in absorption against background QSOs by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. The N{sub H{sub I}} selection avoids metallicity biases inherent in many previous studies of the low-redshift CGM. We compare the column densities of weakly ionized metal species (e.g., O II, Si II, Mg II) to N{sub H{sub I}} in the strongest H I component of each absorber. We find that the metallicity distribution of the LLS (and hence the cool CGM) is bimodal with metal-poor and metal-rich branches peaking at [X/H] {approx_equal} -1.6 and -0.3 (or about 2.5% and 50% solar metallicities). The cool CGM probed by these LLS is predominantly ionized. The metal-rich branch of the population likely traces winds, recycled outflows, and tidally stripped gas; the metal-poor branch has properties consistent with cold accretion streams thought to be a major source of fresh gas for star forming galaxies. Both branches have a nearly equal number of absorbers. Our results thus demonstrate there is a significant mass of previously undiscovered cold metal-poor gas and confirm the presence of metal enriched gas in the CGM of z {approx}< 1 galaxies.

  11. EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES AT z {approx} 1.3. IV. SCALING RELATIONS IN DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Raichoor, A.; Mei, S.; Huertas-Company, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Rettura, A.; Jee, M. J.; Holden, B. P.; Illingworth, G.; Rosati, P.; Shankar, F.; Tanaka, M.; Ford, H.; Postman, M.; White, R. L.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Demarco, R.

    2012-02-01

    We present the Kormendy and mass-size relations (MSR) for early-type galaxies (ETGs) as a function of environment at z {approx} 1.3. Our sample includes 76 visually classified ETGs with masses 10{sup 10} < M/M{sub Sun} < 10{sup 11.5}, selected in the Lynx supercluster and in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey/Chandra Deep Field South field; 31 ETGs in clusters, 18 in groups, and 27 in the field, all with multi-wavelength photometry and Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys observations. The Kormendy relation, in place at z {approx} 1.3, does not depend on the environment. The MSR reveals that ETGs overall appear to be more compact in denser environments: cluster ETGs have sizes on average around 30%-50% smaller than those of the local universe and a distribution with a smaller scatter, whereas field ETGs show an MSR with a similar distribution to the local one. Our results imply that (1) the MSR in the field did not evolve overall from z {approx} 1.3 to present; this is interesting and in contrast to the trend found at higher masses from previous works; (2) in denser environments, either ETGs have increased in size by 30%-50% on average and spread their distributions, or more ETGs have been formed within the dense environment from non-ETG progenitors, or larger galaxies have been accreted to a pristine compact population to reproduce the MSR observed in the local universe. Our results are driven by galaxies with masses M {approx}< 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} and those with masses M {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} follow the same trends as that of the entire sample. Following the Valentinuzzi et al. definition of superdense ETGs, {approx}35%-45% of our cluster sample is made up of superdense ETGs.

  12. A NEARBY ANALOG OF z {approx} 2 COMPACT QUIESCENT GALAXIES WITH A ROTATING DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Fangzhou; Van Dokkum, Pieter; Bezanson, Rachel; Franx, Marijn

    2012-04-10

    Recent studies have identified a population of compact quiescent galaxies at z {approx} 2. These galaxies are very rare today and establishing the existence of a nearby analog could allow us to study its structure in greater detail than is possible at high redshift. Here we present such a local analog, NGC 5845, which has a dynamical mass of M{sub dyn} = 4.3 {+-} 0.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} and an effective radius of only r{sub e} 0.45 {+-} 0.05 kpc. We study the structure and kinematics with HST/WFPC2 data and previously published spatially resolved kinematics. We find that NGC 5845 is similar to compact quiescent galaxies at z {approx} 2 in terms of size versus dynamical mass (r{sub e}-M{sub dyn}), effective velocity dispersion versus size ({sigma}{sub e}-r{sub e}), and effective velocity dispersion versus dynamical mass ({sigma}{sub e}-M{sub dyn}). The galaxy has a prominent rotating disk evident in both the photometry and the kinematics: it extends to well beyond {approx}> 1/3 effective radius and contribute to {approx}> 1/4 of the total light of the galaxy. Our results lend support to the idea that a fraction of z {approx} 2 compact galaxies have prominent disks and positive mass-to-light ratio gradients, although we caution that NGC 5845 may have had a different formation history than the more massive compact quiescent galaxies at z {approx} 2.

  13. PROBING THE DAWN OF GALAXIES AT z {approx} 9-12: NEW CONSTRAINTS FROM HUDF12/XDF AND CANDELS DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Oesch, P. A.; Illingworth, G. D.; Magee, D.; Van Dokkum, P. G.; Trenti, M.; Stiavelli, M.; Gonzalez, V.

    2013-08-10

    We present a comprehensive analysis of z > 8 galaxies based on ultra-deep WFC3/IR data. We exploit all the WFC3/IR imaging over the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field from the HUDF09 and the new HUDF12 program, in addition to the HUDF09 parallel field data, as well as wider area imaging over GOODS-South. Galaxies are selected based on the Lyman break technique in three samples centered around z {approx} 9, z {approx} 10, and z {approx} 11, with seven z {approx} 9 galaxy candidates, and one each at z {approx} 10 and z {approx} 11. We confirm a new z {approx} 10 candidate (with z = 9.8 {+-} 0.6) that was not convincingly identified in our first z {approx} 10 sample. Using these candidates, we perform one of the first estimates of the z {approx} 9 UV luminosity function (LF) and improve our previous constraints at z {approx} 10. Extrapolating the lower redshift UV LF evolution should have revealed 17 z {approx} 9 and 9 z {approx} 10 sources, i.e., a factor {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign and 9 Multiplication-Sign larger than observed. The inferred star formation rate density (SFRD) in galaxies above 0.7 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} decreases by 0.6 {+-} 0.2 dex from z {approx} 8 to z {approx} 9, in excellent agreement with previous estimates. From a combination of all current measurements, we find a best estimate of a factor 10 Multiplication-Sign decrease in the SFRD from z {approx} 8 to z {approx} 10, following (1 + z){sup -11.4{+-}3.1}. Our measurements thus confirm our previous finding of an accelerated evolution beyond z {approx} 8, and signify a very rapid build-up of galaxies with M{sub UV} < -17.7 mag within only {approx}200 Myr from z {approx} 10 to z {approx} 8, in the heart of cosmic reionization.

  14. Application of chemometrics in determination of the acid dissociation constants (pKa) of several benzodiazepine derivatives as poorly soluble drugs in the presence of ionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Shayesteh, Tavakol Heidary; Radmehr, Moojan; Khajavi, Farzad; Mahjub, Reza

    2015-03-10

    In this study, the acid dissociation constants (pKa) of some benzodiazepine derivatives including chlordiazepoxide, clonazepam, lorazepam, and oxazepam in aqueous micellar solution were determined spectrophotometrically at an ionic strength of 0.1M at 25°C. The effect of cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a cationic and sodium n-dodecyl sulfate(SDS) as an anionic surfactant on the absorption spectra of benzodiazepine drugs at different pH values were studied. The acidity constants of all related species are estimated by considering the surfactant concept and the application of chemometric methods using the whole spectral fitting of the collected data to an established factor analysis model. DATAN® software (Ver. 5.0, Multid Analyses AB, and Goteborg, Sweden) was applied to determine the acidity constants. In this study, a simple and fast method to determine the ionization constant (pKa) of poorly soluble drugs was developed using surfactants. The acidity constant (i.e. pKa) for chlordiazepoxide, clonazepam, lorazepam, and oxazepam were reported as 4.62, pKa1 value of 1.52 and pKa2 value of 10.51, pKa1 value of 1.53 and pKa2 value of 10.92 and pKa1 value 1.63 and pKa2 value of 11.21 respectively. The results showed that the peak values in the spectrophotometric absorption spectra of drugs are influenced by the presence of anionic and cationic surfactants. According to the results, by changing the SDS concentration from 0 to 0.05M, the pKa of chlordiazepoxide was increased to 5.9, the pKa1 of lorazepam was decreased to 0.1 while the pKa2 was increased to 11.5. Increase in SDS concentration has not shown significant alteration in pKa of clonazepam and oxazepam. Results indicate that by Changing the CTAB concentration from 0 to 0.05M, the pKa of chlordiazepoxide was reduced to 4.4, the pKa1 of clonazepam was decreased to 0.1 and the pKa2 was decreased to 9.1, the pKa1 of lorazepam was decreased to 0.4 and the pKa2 was decreased to 9.4, the pKa1 of oxazepam was

  15. HEAVILY OBSCURED AGN IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z approx = 2

    SciTech Connect

    Treister, E.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Virani, Shanil; Gawiser, Eric; Lira, Paulina; Damen, Maaike; Taylor, Edward N.; Justham, Stephen; Koekemoer, Anton M.

    2009-11-20

    We study the properties of a sample of 211 heavily obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates in the extended Chandra Deep Field-South selecting objects with f {sub 24m}u{sub m}/f{sub R} > 1000 and R - K>4.5. Of these, 18 were detected in X-rays and found to be obscured AGNs with neutral hydrogen column densities of approx10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}. In the X-ray-undetected sample, the following evidence suggests a large fraction of heavily obscured (Compton-thick) AGN: (1) The stacked X-ray signal of the sample is strong, with an observed ratio of soft to hard X-ray counts consistent with a population of approx90% heavily obscured AGNs combined with 10% star-forming galaxies. (2) The X-ray-to-mid-IR ratios for these sources are significantly larger than that of star-forming galaxies and approx2 orders of magnitude smaller than for the general AGN population, suggesting column densities of N {sub H} approx> 5 x 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}. (3) The Spitzer near- and mid-IR colors of these sources are consistent with those of the X-ray-detected samples if the effects of dust self-absorption are considered. Spectral fitting to the rest-frame UV/optical light (dominated by the host galaxy) returns stellar masses of approx10{sup 11} M{sub sun} and (E(B - V)) = 0.5, and reveals evidence for a significant young stellar population, indicating that these sources are experiencing considerable star formation. This sample of heavily obscured AGN candidates implies a space density at z approx 2 of approx10{sup -5} Mpc{sup -3}, finding a strong evolution in the number of L{sub X} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} sources from z = 1.5 to 2.5, possibly consistent with a short-lived heavily obscured phase before an unobscured quasar is visible.

  16. THE STRUCTURE OF MASSIVE QUIESCENT GALAXIES AT Z {approx} 3 IN THE CANDELS-COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Lulu; Chen Yang; Pan Zhizheng; Lv Xuanyi; Li Jinrong; Lin Lin; Kong Xu; Fang Guanwen

    2013-07-10

    In this Letter, we use a two-color (J - L) versus (V - J) selection criterion to search massive quiescent galaxy (QG) candidates at 2.5 {<=} z {<=} 4.0 in the CANDELS-COSMOS field. We construct an H{sub F160W}-selected catalog and complement it with public auxiliary data. We finally obtain 19 passive VJL-selected (hereafter pVJL) galaxies as the possible massive QG candidates at z {approx} 3 by several constrains. We find the sizes of our pVJL galaxies are on average three to four times smaller than those of local early-type galaxies (ETGs) with analogous stellar mass. The compact size of these z {approx} 3 galaxies can be modeled by assuming their formation at z{sub form} {approx} 4-6 according to the dissipative collapse of baryons. Up to z < 4, the mass-normalized size evolution can be described by r{sub e} {proportional_to}(1 + z){sup -1.0}. Low Sersic index and axis ratio, with median values n {approx}1.5 and b/a {approx} 0.65, respectively, indicate that most of the pVJL galaxies are disk-dominated. Despite large uncertainty, the inner region of the median mass profile of our pVJL galaxies is similar to those of QGs at 0.5 < z < 2.5 and local ETGs. It indicates that local massive ETGs have been formed according to an inside-out scenario: the compact galaxies at high redshift make up the cores of local massive ETGs and then build up the outskirts according to dissipationless minor mergers.

  17. INTERMEDIATE-MASS HOT CORES AT {approx}500 AU: DISKS OR OUTFLOWS?

    SciTech Connect

    Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M.; Fuente, Asuncion; Alonso-Albi, Tomas; Fontani, Francesco; Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro; Boissier, Jeremie; Pietu, Vincent; Neri, Roberto; Busquet, Gemma; Estalella, Robert; Zapata, Luis A.; Zhang, Qizhou; Ho, Paul T. P.; Audard, Marc

    2011-12-20

    Observations with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer in the most extended configuration toward two intermediate-mass star-forming regions, IRAS 22198+6336 and AFGL 5142, reveal the presence of several complex organic molecules at {approx}500 AU scales, confirming the presence of hot cores in both regions. The hot cores are not rich in CN-bearing molecules, as often seen in massive hot cores, and are mainly traced by CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH, (CH{sub 2}OH){sub 2}, CH{sub 3}COCH{sub 3}, and CH{sub 3}OH, with, additionally, CH{sub 3}CHO, CH{sub 3}OD, and HCOOD for IRAS 22198+6336, and C{sub 6}H and O{sup 13}CS for AFGL 5142. The emission of complex molecules is resolved down to sizes of {approx}300 and {approx}600 AU, for IRAS 22198+6336 and AFGL 5142, respectively, and most likely is tracing protostellar disks rather than flattened envelopes or toroids as is usually found. This is especially clear for the case of IRAS 22198+6336, where we detect a velocity gradient for all the mapped molecules perpendicular to the most chemically rich outflow of the region, yielding a dynamic mass {approx}> 4 M{sub Sun }. As for AFGL 5142, the hot core emission is resolved into two elongated cores separated {approx}1800 AU. A detailed comparison of the complex molecule peaks to the new CO (2-1) data and H{sub 2}O maser data from the literature suggests also that for AFGL 5142 the complex molecules are mainly associated with disks, except for a faint and extended molecular emission found to the west, which is possibly produced in the interface between one of the outflows and the dense surrounding gas.

  18. HOST GALAXIES OF LUMINOUS TYPE 2 QUASARS AT z {approx} 0.5

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xin; Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Krolik, Julian H.; Heckman, Timothy M.

    2009-09-10

    We present deep Gemini GMOS optical spectroscopy of nine luminous quasars at redshifts z {approx} 0.5, drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey type 2 quasar sample. Our targets were selected to have high intrinsic luminosities (M{sub V} < -26 mag) as indicated by the [O III] {lambda}5007 A emission-line luminosity (L[{sub OIII}]). Our sample has a median black hole mass of {approx}10{sup 8.8} M{sub sun} inferred assuming the local M {sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation and a median Eddington ratio of {approx}0.7, using stellar velocity dispersions {sigma}{sub *} measured from the G band. We estimate the contamination of the stellar continuum from scattered quasar light based on the strength of broad H{beta}, and provide an empirical calibration of the contamination as a function of L {sub [OIII]}; the scattered-light fraction is {approx}30% of L{sub 5100} for objects with L {sub [OIII]} = 10{sup 9.5} L{sub sun}. Population synthesis indicates that young poststarburst populations (<0.1 Gyr) are prevalent in luminous type 2 quasars, in addition to a relatively old population (>1 Gyr) which dominates the stellar mass. Broad emission complexes around He II {lambda}4686 A with luminosities up to 10{sup 8.3} L{sub sun} are unambiguously detected in three out of the nine targets, indicative of Wolf-Rayet (WR) populations. Population synthesis shows that {approx}5 Myr poststarburst populations contribute substantially to the luminosities (>50% of L{sub 5100}) of all three objects with WR detections. We find two objects with double cores and four with close companions. Our results may suggest that luminous type 2 quasars trace an early stage of galaxy interaction, perhaps responsible for both the quasar and the starburst activity.

  19. A Constant Pressure Bomb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, F W

    1924-01-01

    This report describes a new optical method of unusual simplicity and of good accuracy suitable to study the kinetics of gaseous reactions. The device is the complement of the spherical bomb of constant volume, and extends the applicability of the relationship, pv=rt for gaseous equilibrium conditions, to the use of both factors p and v. The method substitutes for the mechanical complications of a manometer placed at some distance from the seat of reaction the possibility of allowing the radiant effects of reaction to record themselves directly upon a sensitive film. It is possible the device may be of use in the study of the photoelectric effects of radiation. The method makes possible a greater precision in the measurement of normal flame velocities than was previously possible. An approximate analysis shows that the increase of pressure and density ahead of the flame is negligible until the velocity of the flame approaches that of sound.

  20. DEEP NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF PASSIVELY EVOLVING GALAXIES AT z {approx}> 1.4

    SciTech Connect

    Onodera, M.; Carollo, M.; Lilly, S.; Renzini, A.; Mancini, C.; Cappellari, M.; Strazzullo, V.; Daddi, E.; Gobat, R.; McCracken, H. J.; Ilbert, O.; Capak, P.; Cimatti, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Kong, X.; Motohara, K.; Ohta, K.; and others

    2012-08-10

    We present the results of new near-IR spectroscopic observations of passive galaxies at z {approx}> 1.4 in a concentration of BzK-selected galaxies in the COSMOS field. The observations have been conducted with Subaru/MOIRCS, and have resulted in absorption lines and/or continuum detection for 18 out of 34 objects. This allows us to measure spectroscopic redshifts for a sample that is almost complete to K{sub AB} = 21. COSMOS photometric redshifts are found in fair agreement overall with the spectroscopic redshifts, with a standard deviation of {approx}0.05; however, {approx}30% of objects have photometric redshifts systematically underestimated by up to {approx}25%. We show that these systematic offsets in photometric redshifts can be removed by using these objects as a training set. All galaxies fall in four distinct redshift spikes at z = 1.43, 1.53, 1.67, and 1.82, with this latter one including seven galaxies. SED fits to broadband fluxes indicate stellar masses in the range of {approx}4-40 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} and that star formation was quenched {approx}1 Gyr before the cosmic epoch at which they are observed. The spectra of several individual galaxies have allowed us to measure their H{delta}{sub F} indices and the strengths of the 4000 A break, which confirms their identification as passive galaxies, as does a composite spectrum resulting from the co-addition of 17 individual spectra. The effective radii of the galaxies have been measured on the COSMOS HST/ACS i{sub F814W}-band image, confirming the coexistence at these redshifts of passive galaxies, which are substantially more compact than their local counterparts with others that follow the local effective radius-stellar mass relation. For the galaxy with the best signal-to-noise spectrum we were able to measure a velocity dispersion of 270 {+-} 105 km s{sup -1} (error bar including systematic errors), indicating that this galaxy lies closely on the virial relation given its stellar

  1. LOW-METALLICITY STAR FORMATION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES AT z {approx} 8

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Y.; Shioya, Y.; Trump, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    Based on the recent very deep near-infrared imaging of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field with WFC3 on the Hubble Space Telescope, five groups published the most probable samples of galaxies at z {approx} 8, selected by the so-called dropout method or photometric redshift; e.g., Y{sub 105}-dropouts (Y{sub 105} - J{sub 125} > 0.8). These studies are highly useful for investigating both the early star formation history of galaxies and the sources of cosmic re-ionization. In order to better understand these issues, we carefully examine whether there are low-z interlopers in the samples of z {approx} 8 galaxy candidates. We focus on the strong emission-line galaxies at z {approx} 2 in this paper. Such galaxies may be selected as Y{sub 105}-dropouts since the [O III] {lambda}5007 emission line is redshifted into the J{sub 125} band. We have found that the contamination from such low-z interlopers is negligibly small. Therefore, all objects found by the five groups are free from this type of contamination. However, it remains difficult to extract real z {approx} 8 galaxies because all the sources are very faint and the different groups have found different candidates. With this in mind, we construct a robust sample of eight galaxies at z {approx} 8 from the objects found by the five groups: each of these eight objects has been selected by at least two groups. Using this sample, we discuss their UV continuum slope. We also discuss the escape fraction of ionizing photons adopting various metallicities. Our analysis suggests that massive stars forming in low-metallicity gas (Z {approx} 5 x 10{sup -4} Z{sub sun}) can be responsible for the completion of cosmic re-ionization if the escape fraction of the ionizing continuum from galaxies is as large as 0.5, and this is consistent with the observed blue UV continua.

  2. CANDELS: THE PROGENITORS OF COMPACT QUIESCENT GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Barro, Guillermo; Faber, S. M.; Koo, David C.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Mozena, Mark; McGrath, Elizabeth; Cheung, Edmond; Fang, Jerome; Williams, Christina C.; Van der Wel, Arjen; Wuyts, Stijn; Bell, Eric F.; Croton, Darren J.; Ceverino, Daniel; Dekel, Avishai; Ashby, M. L. N.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Fontana, Adriano; and others

    2013-03-10

    We combine high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 images with multi-wavelength photometry to track the evolution of structure and activity of massive (M{sub *} > 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }) galaxies at redshifts z = 1.4-3 in two fields of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey. We detect compact, star-forming galaxies (cSFGs) whose number densities, masses, sizes, and star formation rates (SFRs) qualify them as likely progenitors of compact, quiescent, massive galaxies (cQGs) at z = 1.5-3. At z {approx}> 2, cSFGs present SFR = 100-200 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, yet their specific star formation rates (sSFR {approx} 10{sup -9} yr{sup -1}) are typically half that of other massive SFGs at the same epoch, and host X-ray luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs) 30 times ({approx}30%) more frequently. These properties suggest that cSFGs are formed by gas-rich processes (mergers or disk-instabilities) that induce a compact starburst and feed an AGN, which, in turn, quench the star formation on dynamical timescales (few 10{sup 8} yr). The cSFGs are continuously being formed at z = 2-3 and fade to cQGs down to z {approx} 1.5. After this epoch, cSFGs are rare, thereby truncating the formation of new cQGs. Meanwhile, down to z = 1, existing cQGs continue to enlarge to match local QGs in size, while less-gas-rich mergers and other secular mechanisms shepherd (larger) SFGs as later arrivals to the red sequence. In summary, we propose two evolutionary tracks of QG formation: an early (z {approx}> 2), formation path of rapidly quenched cSFGs fading into cQGs that later enlarge within the quiescent phase, and a late-arrival (z {approx}< 2) path in which larger SFGs form extended QGs without passing through a compact state.

  3. Cosmological constant, fine structure constant and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hao; Zou, Xiao-Bo; Li, Hong-Yu; Xue, Dong-Ze

    2017-01-01

    In the present work, we consider the cosmological constant model Λ ∝ α ^{-6}, which is well motivated from three independent approaches. As is well known, the hint of varying fine structure constant α was found in 1998. If Λ ∝ α ^{-6} is right, it means that the cosmological constant Λ should also be varying. Here, we try to develop a suitable framework to model this varying cosmological constant Λ ∝ α ^{-6}, in which we view it from an interacting vacuum energy perspective. Then we consider the observational constraints on these models by using the 293 Δ α /α data from the absorption systems in the spectra of distant quasars. We find that the model parameters can be tightly constrained to the very narrow ranges of O(10^{-5}) typically. On the other hand, we can also view the varying cosmological constant model Λ ∝ α ^{-6} from another perspective, namely it can be equivalent to a model containing "dark energy" and "warm dark matter", but there is no interaction between them. We find that this is also fully consistent with the observational constraints on warm dark matter.

  4. THE GALAXY ENVIRONMENT OF A QSO AT z {approx} 5.7

    SciTech Connect

    Banados, Eduardo; Venemans, Bram; Walter, Fabian; Kurk, Jaron; Overzier, Roderik; Ouchi, Masami

    2013-08-20

    High-redshift quasars are believed to reside in massive halos in the early universe and should therefore be located in fields with overdensities of galaxies, which are thought to evolve into galaxy clusters seen in the local universe. However, despite many efforts, the relationship between galaxy overdensities and z {approx} 6 quasars is ambiguous. This can possibly be attributed to the difficulty of finding galaxies with accurate redshifts in the vicinity of z {approx} 6 quasars. So far, overdensity searches around z {approx} 6 quasars have been based on studies of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs), which probe a redshift range of {Delta}z Almost-Equal-To 1. This range is large enough to select galaxies that may not be physically related to the quasar. We use deep narrow- and broadband imaging to study the environment of the z = 5.72 quasar ULAS J0203+0012. The redshift range probed by our narrow-band selection of Lyman alpha emitters (LAEs) is {Delta}z Almost-Equal-To 0.1, which is significantly narrower than the LBG searches. This is the first time that LAEs were searched for near a z {approx} 6 quasar, in an effort to provide clues about the environments of quasars at the end of the epoch of reionization. We find no enhancement of LAEs in the surroundings of ULAS J0203+0012 in comparison with blank fields. We explore different explanations and interpretations for this non-detection of a galaxy overdensity, including that (1) the strong ionization from the quasar may prevent galaxy formation in its immediate vicinity and (2) high-redshift quasars may not reside in the center of the most massive dark matter halos.

  5. QUIET-TIME INTERPLANETARY {approx}2-20 keV SUPERHALO ELECTRONS AT SOLAR MINIMUM

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Linghua; Lin, Robert P.; Salem, Chadi; Pulupa, Marc; Larson, Davin E.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Yoon, Peter H.

    2012-07-01

    We present a statistical survey of {approx}2-20 keV superhalo electrons in the solar wind measured by the SupraThermal Electron instrument on board the two STEREO spacecraft during quiet-time periods from 2007 March through 2009 March at solar minimum. The observed superhalo electrons have a nearly isotropic angular distribution and a power-law spectrum, f{proportional_to}v{sup -{gamma}}, with {gamma} ranging from 5 to 8.7, with nearly half between 6.5 and 7.5, and an average index of 6.69 {+-} 0.90. The observed power-law spectrum varies significantly on a spatial scale of {approx}>0.1 AU and a temporal scale of {approx}>several days. The integrated density of quiet-time superhalo electrons at 2-20 keV ranges from {approx}10{sup -8} cm{sup -3} to 10{sup -6} cm{sup -3}, about 10{sup -9}-10{sup -6} of the solar wind density, and, as well as the power-law spectrum, shows no correlation with solar wind proton density, velocity, or temperature. The density of superhalo electrons appears to show a solar-cycle variation at solar minimum, while the power-law spectral index {gamma} has no solar-cycle variation. These quiet-time superhalo electrons are present even in the absence of any solar activity-e.g., active regions, flares or microflares, type III radio bursts, etc.-suggesting that they may be accelerated by processes such as resonant wave-particle interactions in the interplanetary medium, or possibly by nonthermal processes related to the acceleration of the solar wind such as nanoflares, or by acceleration at the CIR forward shocks.

  6. EARLY STAGES OF CLUSTER FORMATION: FRAGMENTATION OF MASSIVE DENSE CORES DOWN TO {approx}< 1000 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M.; Fuente, Asuncion; Estalella, Robert; Ho, Paul T. P.; Zhang, Qizhou; Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro; Fontani, Francesco; Cesaroni, Riccardo; Busquet, Gemma; Commercon, Benoit; Hennebelle, Patrick; Boissier, Jeremie; Zapata, Luis A.

    2013-01-10

    In order to study the fragmentation of massive dense cores, which constitute the cluster cradles, we observed the continuum at 1.3 mm and the CO (2-1) emission of four massive cores with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer in the most extended configuration. We detected dust condensations down to {approx}0.3 M {sub Sun} and separate millimeter sources down to 0.''4 or {approx}< 1000 AU, comparable to the sensitivities and separations reached in optical/infrared studies of clusters. The CO (2-1) high angular resolution images reveal high-velocity knots usually aligned with previously known outflow directions. This, in combination with additional cores from the literature observed at similar mass sensitivity and spatial resolution, allowed us to build a sample of 18 protoclusters with luminosities spanning three orders of magnitude. Among the 18 regions, {approx}30% show no signs of fragmentation, while 50% split up into {approx}> 4 millimeter sources. We compiled a list of properties for the 18 massive dense cores, such as bolometric luminosity, total mass, and mean density, and found no correlation of any of these parameters with the fragmentation level. In order to investigate the combined effects of the magnetic field, radiative feedback, and turbulence in the fragmentation process, we compared our observations to radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations and found that the low-fragmented regions are reproduced well in the magnetized core case, while the highly fragmented regions are consistent with cores where turbulence dominates over the magnetic field. Overall, our study suggests that the fragmentation in massive dense cores could be determined by the initial magnetic field/turbulence balance in each particular core.

  7. THE SINS/zC-SINF SURVEY of z {approx} 2 GALAXY KINEMATICS: OUTFLOW PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Sarah F.; Genzel, Reinhard; Foerster-Schreiber, Natascha M.; Buschkamp, Peter; Davies, Ric; Eisenhauer, Frank; Kurk, Jaron; Lutz, Dieter; Griffin, Kristen Shapiro; Mancini, Chiara; Renzini, Alvio; Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Peng, Yingjie; Bouche, Nicolas; Burkert, Andreas; Cresci, Giovanni; Genel, Shy; Hicks, Erin K. S.; Naab, Thorsten; and others

    2012-12-10

    Using SINFONI H{alpha}, [N II], and [S II] AO data of 27 z {approx} 2 star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from the SINS and zC-SINF surveys, we explore the dependence of outflow strength (via the broad flux fraction) on various galaxy parameters. For galaxies that have evidence for strong outflows, we find that the broad emission is spatially extended to at least the half-light radius ({approx}a few kpc). Decomposition of the [S II] doublet into broad and narrow components suggests that this outflowing gas probably has a density of {approx}10-100 cm{sup -3}, less than that of the star-forming gas (600 cm{sup -3}). There is a strong correlation of the H{alpha} broad flux fraction with the star formation surface density of the galaxy, with an apparent threshold for strong outflows occurring at 1 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. Above this threshold, we find that SFGs with log m{sub *} > 10 have similar or perhaps greater wind mass-loading factors ({eta} = M-dot{sub out}/SFR) and faster outflow velocities than lower mass SFGs, suggesting that the majority of outflowing gas at z {approx} 2 may derive from high-mass SFGs. The mass-loading factor is also correlated with the star formation rate (SFR), galaxy size, and inclination, such that smaller, more star-forming, and face-on galaxies launch more powerful outflows. We propose that the observed threshold for strong outflows and the observed mass loading of these winds can be explained by a simple model wherein break-out of winds is governed by pressure balance in the disk.

  8. ON THE SPECTRAL HARDENING AT {approx}>300 keV IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G.; Kong, X.; Zank, G.; Chen, Y.

    2013-05-20

    It has long been noted that the spectra of observed continuum emissions in many solar flares are consistent with double power laws with a hardening at energies {approx}>300 keV. It is now widely believed that at least in electron-dominated events, the hardening in the photon spectrum reflects an intrinsic hardening in the source electron spectrum. In this paper, we point out that a power-law spectrum of electrons with a hardening at high energies can be explained by the diffusive shock acceleration of electrons at a termination shock with a finite width. Our suggestion is based on an early analytical work by Drury et al., where the steady-state transport equation at a shock with a tanh profile was solved for a p-independent diffusion coefficient. Numerical simulations with a p-dependent diffusion coefficient show hardenings in the accelerated electron spectrum that are comparable with observations. One necessary condition for our proposed scenario to work is that high-energy electrons resonate with the inertial range of the MHD turbulence and low-energy electrons resonate with the dissipation range of the MHD turbulence at the acceleration site, and the spectrum of the dissipation range {approx}k {sup -2.7}. A {approx}k {sup -2.7} dissipation range spectrum is consistent with recent solar wind observations.

  9. A Probable Approx. 2400 Year Solar Quasi-cycle in Atmospheric Delta C-14

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.; Jirikowic, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    A 2200 to 2600 year quasi-periodicity is present in atmospheric delta C-14 records after removal of long-term trends due to the geomagnetic dipole amplitude variation. This periodicity consists of both a long-term variation of the mean and a superposed, approximately recurring pattern of century-scale variations. The strongest of these latter variations occur near maxima of the approx. 2400 year delta C-14 cycles. The residual record can be modeled to first order as an amplitude modulation of a century-scale periodic forcing function by a approx. 2400 year periodic forcing function. During the last millennium, the largest century-scale variations (occurring near the most recent 2400 year delta C-14 maximum) are known to be mainly a consequence of the pronounced Maunder, Sporer, and Wolf solar activity minima, as verified by independent proxy solar activity records. Therefore, during this period, amplitude modulation has been occurring primarily in the sun and not in the terrestrial radiocarbon system. It is therefore inferred that the approx. 2400 year forcing function is mainly solar although some secondary terrestrial feedback into the delta C-14 record is likely. This conclusion has implications for the predictability of future pronounced solar activity minima and for the interpretation of certain minor Holocene climatic variations.

  10. Grothendieck's constant and local models for noisy entangled quantum states

    SciTech Connect

    Acin, Antonio; Gisin, Nicolas; Toner, Benjamin

    2006-06-15

    We relate the nonlocal properties of noisy entangled states to Grothendieck's constant, a mathematical constant appearing in Banach space theory. For two-qubit Werner states {rho}{sub p}{sup W}=p|{psi}{sup -}><{psi}{sup -}|+(1-p)1/4, we show that there is a local model for projective measurements if and only if p{<=}1/K{sub G}(3), where K{sub G}(3) is Grothendieck's constant of order 3. Known bounds on K{sub G}(3) prove the existence of this model at least for p < or approx. 0.66, quite close to the current region of Bell violation, p{approx}0.71. We generalize this result to arbitrary quantum states.

  11. Electron transport and electron energy distributions within the wurtzite and zinc-blende phases of indium nitride: Response to the application of a constant and uniform electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqua, Poppy; Hadi, Walid A.; Salhotra, Amith K.; O'Leary, Stephen K.; Shur, Michael S.

    2015-03-28

    Within the framework of an ensemble semi-classical three-valley Monte Carlo electron transport simulation approach, we critically contrast the nature of the electron transport that occurs within the wurtzite and zinc-blende phases of indium nitride in response to the application of a constant and uniform electric field. We use the electron energy distribution and its relationship with the electron transport characteristics in order to pursue this analysis. For the case of zinc-blende indium nitride, only a peak corresponding to the electrons within the lowest energy conduction band valley is observed, this peak being seen to broaden and shift to higher energies in response to increases in the applied electric field strength, negligible amounts of upper energy conduction band valley occupancy being observed. In contrast, for the case of wurtzite indium nitride, in addition to the aforementioned lowest energy conduction band valley peak in the electron energy distribution, and its broadening and shifting to higher energies in response to increases in the applied electric field strength, beyond a certain critical electric field strength, 30 kV/cm for the case of this particular material, upper energy conduction band valley occupancy is observed, this occupancy being further enhanced in response to further increases in the applied electric field strength. Reasons for these results are provided. The potential for device consequences is then commented upon.

  12. Determination of Paris' law constants and crack length evolution via Extended and Unscented Kalman filter: An application to aircraft fuselage panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiwei; Binaud, Nicolas; Gogu, Christian; Bes, Christian; Fu, Jian

    2016-12-01

    Prediction of fatigue crack length in aircraft fuselage panels is one of the key issues for aircraft structural safety since it helps prevent catastrophic failures. Accurate estimation of crack length propagation is also meaningful for helping develop aircraft maintenance strategies. Paris' law is often used to capture the dynamics of fatigue crack propagation in metallic material. However, uncertainties are often present in the crack growth model, measured crack size and pressure differential in each flight and need to be accounted for accurate prediction. The aim of this paper is to estimate the two unknown Paris' law constants m and C as well as the crack length evolution by taking into account these uncertainties. Due to the nonlinear nature of the Paris' law, we propose here an on-line estimation algorithm based on two widespread nonlinear filtering techniques, Extended Kalman filter (EKF) and Unscented Kalman filter (UKF). The numerical experiments indicate that both EKF and UKF estimated the crack length well and accurately identified the unknown parameters. Although UKF is theoretical superior to EKF, in this Paris' law application EKF is comparable in accuracy to UKF and requires less computational expense.

  13. FIR MEASUREMENTS OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z {approx}< 1.0: DUST ATTENUATION FROM PACS-HERSCHEL

    SciTech Connect

    Oteo, I.; Bongiovanni, A.; Perez Garcia, A. M.; Cepa, J.; Ederoclite, A.; Pintos-Castro, I.; Sanchez-Portal, M.; Altieri, B.; Lutz, D.; Berta, S.; Magnelli, B.; Popesso, P.; Le Floc'h, E.; Pozzi, F.; Daddi, E.; Riguccini, L.; Aussel, H.; Elbaz, D.; Cimatti, A.

    2011-07-01

    One remaining open question regarding the physical properties of Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) is their dust content and evolution with redshift. The variety of results is large and with those reported by now it is difficult to establish clear relations between dust, other fundamental parameters of galaxies (star formation rate, metallicity, or age), and redshift. In this Letter, we report Herschel PACS-100 {mu}m, PACS-160 {mu}m, and Spitzer MIPS-24 {mu}m detections of a sample of spectroscopically GALEX selected LAEs at z {approx} 0.3 and {approx}1.0. Five out of ten and one out of two LAEs are detected in, at least, one PACS band at z {approx} 0.3 and {approx}1.0, respectively. These measurements have a great importance given that they allow us to quantify, for the first time, the dust content in LAEs from direct FIR observations. MIPS-24 {mu}m detections allow us to determine the IR properties of the PACS-undetected LAEs. We obtain that mid-IR/FIR-detected star-forming (SF) LAEs at z {approx} 0.3 have dust content within 0.75 {approx}< A{sub 1200{sub A}} {approx}< 2.0, with a median value of A{sub 1200{sub A}} {approx} 1.1. This range broadens up to 0.75 {approx}< A{sub 1200{sub A}} {approx}< 2.5 when considering the LAEs at z {approx} 1.0. Only one SF LAE is undetected both in MIPS-24 {mu}m and PACS, with A{sub 1200{sub A}} {approx}< 0.75. These results seem to be larger than those reported for high-redshift LAEs and, therefore, although an evolutionary trend is not clearly seen, it could point out that low-redshift LAEs are dustier than high-redshift ones. However, the diverse methods used could introduce a systematic offset in the results.

  14. CANDELS: CONSTRAINING THE AGN-MERGER CONNECTION WITH HOST MORPHOLOGIES AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kocevski, Dale D.; Faber, S. M.; Mozena, Mark; Trump, Jonathan R.; Koo, David C.; Nandra, Kirpal; Brusa, Marcella; Wuyts, Stijn; Rangel, Cyprian; Laird, Elise S.; Bell, Eric F.; Alexander, David M.; Bournaud, Frederic; Conselice, Christopher J.; Dekel, Avishai; and others

    2012-01-10

    Using Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 imaging taken as part of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey, we examine the role that major galaxy mergers play in triggering active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity at z {approx} 2. Our sample consists of 72 moderate-luminosity (L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 42-44} erg s{sup -1}) AGNs at 1.5 < z < 2.5 that are selected using the 4 Ms Chandra observations in the Chandra Deep Field South, the deepest X-ray observations to date. Employing visual classifications, we have analyzed the rest-frame optical morphologies of the AGN host galaxies and compared them to a mass-matched control sample of 216 non-active galaxies at the same redshift. We find that most of the AGNs reside in disk galaxies (51.4{sup +5.8}{sub -5.9}%), while a smaller percentage are found in spheroids (27.8{sup +5.8}{sub -4.6}%). Roughly 16.7{sup +5.3}{sub -3.5}% of the AGN hosts have highly disturbed morphologies and appear to be involved in a major merger or interaction, while most of the hosts (55.6{sup +5.6}{sub -5.9}%) appear relatively relaxed and undisturbed. These fractions are statistically consistent with the fraction of control galaxies that show similar morphological disturbances. These results suggest that the hosts of moderate-luminosity AGNs are no more likely to be involved in an ongoing merger or interaction relative to non-active galaxies of similar mass at z {approx} 2. The high disk fraction observed among the AGN hosts also appears to be at odds with predictions that merger-driven accretion should be the dominant AGN fueling mode at z {approx} 2, even at moderate X-ray luminosities. Although we cannot rule out that minor mergers are responsible for triggering these systems, the presence of a large population of relatively undisturbed disk-like hosts suggests that the stochastic accretion of gas plays a greater role in fueling AGN activity at z {approx} 2 than previously thought.

  15. THE DUST PROPERTIES OF z {approx} 3 MIPS-LBGs FROM PHOTOCHEMICAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, X. L.; Pipino, A.; Matteucci, F.

    2013-05-10

    The stacked spectral energy distribution (SED) 24 {mu}m Lyman break galaxies (MIPS-LBGs) detected by the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) is fitted by means of the spectrophotometric model GRASIL with an ''educated'' fitting approach which benefits from the results of chemical evolution models. The star formation rate-age-metallicity degeneracies of SED modeling are broken by using star formation history (SFH) and chemical enrichment history suggested by chemical models. The dust mass, dust abundance, and chemical pattern of elements locked in the dust component are also directly provided by chemical models. Using our new ''fitting'' approach, we derive the total mass M{sub tot}, stellar mass M{sub *}, gas mass M{sub g} , dust mass M{sub d} , age, and star formation rate (SFR) of the stacked MIPS-LBG in a self-consistent way. Our estimate of M{sub *} = 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} of the stacked MIPS-LBG agrees with other works based on UV-optical SED fitting. We suggest that the MIPS-LBGs at z {approx} 3 are young (0.3-0.6 Gyr), massive (M{sub tot} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }), dusty (M{sub d} {approx} 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }), and metal-rich (Z {approx} Z{sub Sun }) progenitors of elliptical galaxies undergoing a strong burst of star formation (SFR {approx} 200 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}). Our estimate of M{sub d} = 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} of the stacked MIPS-LBG is about a factor of eight lower than the estimated value based on single temperature graybody fitting, suggesting that self-consistent SED models are needed to estimate dust mass. By comparing with Milky Way molecular cloud and dust properties, we suggest that denser and dustier environments and flatter dust size distribution are likely in high-redshift massive star-forming galaxies. These dust properties, as well as the different types of SFHs, can cause different SED shapes between high-redshift star-forming ellipticals and local starburst templates. This discrepancy

  16. Solar and stellar system tests of the cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Sereno, Mauro; Jetzer, Philippe

    2006-03-15

    Some tests of gravity theories--periastron shift, geodetic precession, change in mean motion and gravitational redshift--are applied in solar and stellar systems to constrain the cosmological constant. We thus consider a length scale range from {approx}10{sup 8} to {approx}10{sup 15} km. Best bounds from the solar system come from perihelion advance and change in mean motion of Earth and Mars, {lambda} < or approx. 10{sup -36} km{sup -2}. Such a limit falls very short to estimates from observational cosmology analyses but a future experiment performing radio ranging observations of outer planets could improve it by 4 orders of magnitude. Beyond the solar system, together with future measurements of periastron advance in wide binary pulsars, gravitational redshift of white dwarfs can provide bounds competitive with Mars data.

  17. On the Khinchin Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.; Crandall, Richard E.; Craw, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We prove known identities for the Khinchin constant and develop new identities for the more general Hoelder mean limits of continued fractions. Any of these constants can be developed as a rapidly converging series involving values of the Riemann zeta function and rational coefficients. Such identities allow for efficient numerical evaluation of the relevant constants. We present free-parameter, optimizable versions of the identities, and report numerical results.

  18. STAR FORMATION HISTORIES IN A CLUSTER ENVIRONMENT AT z {approx} 0.84

    SciTech Connect

    Demarco, R.; Gobat, R.; Lidman, C.; Rettura, A.; Nonino, M.; Van der Wel, A.; Jee, M. J.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Ford, H. C.; Postman, M.

    2010-12-10

    We present a spectrophotometric analysis of galaxies belonging to the dynamically young, massive cluster RX J0152.7-1357 at z {approx} 0.84, aimed at understanding the effects of the cluster environment on the star formation history (SFH) of cluster galaxies and the assembly of the red sequence (RS). We use VLT/FORS spectroscopy, ACS/WFC optical, and NTT/SofI near-IR data to characterize SFHs as a function of color, luminosity, morphology, stellar mass, and local environment from a sample of 134 spectroscopic members. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, individual galaxy spectra are stacked according to these properties. Moreover, the D4000, Balmer, CN3883, Fe4383, and C4668 indices are also quantified. The SFH analysis shows that galaxies in the blue faint-end of the RS have on average younger stars ({Delta}t {approx} 2 Gyr) than those in the red bright-end. We also found, for a given luminosity range, differences in age ({Delta}t {approx} 0.5-1.3 Gyr) as a function of color, indicating that the intrinsic scatter of the RS may be due to age variations. Passive galaxies in the blue faint-end of the RS are preferentially located in the low density areas of the cluster, likely being objects entering the RS from the 'blue cloud'. It is likely that the quenching of the star formation of these RS galaxies is due to interaction with the intracluster medium. Furthermore, the SFH of galaxies in the RS as a function of stellar mass reveals signatures of 'downsizing' in the overall cluster.

  19. An investigation of accelerating mode and decelerating mode constant-momentum mass spectrometry and their application to a residual gas analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Y. S.

    1977-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of constant momentum mass spectrometry was made. A maximum resolving power for the decelerating mode constant momentum mass spectrometer was shown theoretically to exist for a beam of ions of known energy. A vacuum system and an electron beam ionization source was constructed. Supporting electronics for a residual gas analyzer were built. Experimental investigations of various types of accelerating and decelerating impulsive modes of a constant momentum mass spectrometer as applied to a residual gas analyzer were made. The data indicate that the resolving power for the decelerating mode is comparable to that of the accelerating mode.

  20. Multi-input, multi-output regulator design for constant disturbances and non-zero set points with application to automatic landing in a crosswind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holley, W. E.; Bryson, A. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Undesirable steady offsets result when a stationary, linear regulator using state feedback is subjected to constant disturbances and/or non-zero setspoints. To eliminate these offsets, the disturbances and non-zero setpoints can be fed forward to the control. Only when the number of outputs is less than or equal to the number of control inputs can the outputs be maintained at arbitrary non-zero setpoints. The state and the disturbance may be estimated using a constant gain Kalman filter or by modeling the constant disturbances as exponentially correlated processes with long correlation times.

  1. SHOCKED SUPERWINDS FROM THE z {approx} 2 CLUMPY STAR-FORMING GALAXY, ZC406690

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Sarah F.; Genzel, Reinhard; Shapiro Griffin, Kristen; Davies, Ric; Foerster-Schreiber, Natascha M.; Tacconi, Linda J.; Kurk, Jaron; Wuyts, Stijn; Genel, Shy; Buschkamp, Peter; Eisenhauer, Frank; Lutz, Dieter; Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Renzini, Alvio; Mancini, Chiara; Bouche, Nicolas; Burkert, Andreas; Cresci, Giovanni; Hicks, Erin; and others

    2012-06-20

    We have obtained high-resolution data of the z {approx} 2 ring-like, clumpy star-forming galaxy (SFG) ZC406690 using the VLT/SINFONI with adaptive optics (in K band) and in seeing-limited mode (in H and J bands). Our data include all of the main strong optical emission lines: [O II], [O III], H{alpha}, H{beta}, [N II], and [S II]. We find broad, blueshifted H{alpha} and [O III] emission line wings in the spectra of the galaxy's massive, star-forming clumps ({sigma} {approx} 85 km s{sup -1}) and even broader wings (up to 70% of the total H{alpha} flux, with {sigma} {approx} 290 km s{sup -1}) in regions spatially offset from the clumps by {approx}2 kpc. The broad emission likely originates from large-scale outflows with mass outflow rates from individual clumps that are 1-8 Multiplication-Sign the star formation rate (SFR) of the clumps. Based on emission line ratio diagnostics ([N II]/H{alpha} and [S II]/H{alpha}) and photoionization and shock models, we find that the emission from the clumps is due to a combination of photoionization from the star-forming regions and shocks generated in the outflowing component, with 5%-30% of the emission deriving from shocks. In terms of the ionization parameter (6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 8} cm s{sup -1}, based on both the SFR and the O{sub 32} ratio), density (local electron densities of 300-1800 cm{sup -3} in and around the clumps, and ionized gas column densities of 1200-8000 M{sub Sun }pc{sup -2}), and SFR (10-40 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}), these clumps more closely resemble nuclear starburst regions of local ultraluminous infrared galaxies and dwarf irregulars than H II regions in local galaxies. However, the star-forming clumps are not located in the nucleus as in local starburst galaxies but instead are situated in a ring several kpc from the center of their high-redshift host galaxy, and have an overall disk-like morphology. The two brightest clumps are quite different in terms of their internal properties

  2. INFRARED LUMINOSITIES AND DUST PROPERTIES OF z approx 2 DUST-OBSCURED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bussmann, R. S.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, B. T.; Borys, C.; Desai, V.; Sheth, K.; Soifer, B. T.; Le Floc'h, E.; Melbourne, J.

    2009-11-01

    We present SHARC-II 350 mum imaging of twelve 24 mum bright (F{sub 24m}u{sub m} > 0.8 mJy) Dust-Obscured Galaxies (DOGs) and Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) 1 mm imaging of a subset of two DOGs. These objects are selected from the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. Detections of four DOGs at 350 mum imply infrared (IR) luminosities which are consistent to within a factor of 2 of expectations based on a warm-dust spectral energy distribution (SED) scaled to the observed 24 mum flux density. The 350 mum upper limits for the 8 non-detected DOGs are consistent with both Mrk 231 and M82 (warm-dust SEDs), but exclude cold dust (Arp 220) SEDs. The two DOGs targeted at 1 mm were not detected in our CARMA observations, placing strong constraints on the dust temperature: T{sub dust} > 35-60 K. Assuming these dust properties apply to the entire sample, we find dust masses of approx3 x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}. In comparison to other dusty z approx 2 galaxy populations such as submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) and other Spitzer-selected high-redshift sources, this sample of DOGs has higher IR luminosities (2 x 10{sup 13} L{sub sun} versus 6 x 10{sup 12} L{sub sun} for the other galaxy populations) that are driven by warmer dust temperatures (>35-60 K versus approx30 K) and lower inferred dust masses (3 x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun} versus 3 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}). Wide-field Herschel and Submillimeter Common-User Bolometer Array-2 surveys should be able to detect hundreds of these power-law-dominated DOGs. We use the existing Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer/InfraRed Array Camera data to estimate stellar masses of these sources and find that the stellar to gas mass ratio may be higher in our 24 mum bright sample of DOGs than in SMGs and other Spitzer-selected sources. Although much larger sample sizes are needed to provide a definitive conclusion, the data are consistent with an evolutionary trend in which the formation of massive galaxies

  3. New supersymmetric quartet of nuclei in the A{approx}190 mass region

    SciTech Connect

    Barea, J.; Bijker, R.; Frank, A.; Graw, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Wirth, H.-F.; Christen, S.; Jolie, J.; Tonev, D.; Balodis, M.; Berzins, J.; Kramere, N.; Egidy, T. von

    2009-03-15

    We present evidence for a new supersymmetric quartet in the A{approx}190 region of the nuclear mass table. New experimental information on transfer and neutron capture reactions to the odd-odd nucleus {sup 194}Ir strongly suggests the existence of a new supersymmetric quartet, consisting of the {sup 192,193}Os and {sup 193,194}Ir nuclei. We make explicit predictions for the odd-neutron nucleus {sup 193}Os and suggest that its spectroscopic properties be measured in dedicated experiments.

  4. Fundamental Physical Constants

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 121 CODATA Fundamental Physical Constants (Web, free access)   This site, developed in the Physics Laboratory at NIST, addresses three topics: fundamental physical constants, the International System of Units (SI), which is the modern metric system, and expressing the uncertainty of measurement results.

  5. Derivation of the VNIR (0.4-4.0 µm) Optical Constants of Nontronite and an Application to Mars: Modeling Single Scattering Albedo of Candidate Martian Dust Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roush, T. L.; Brown, A. J.

    2008-03-01

    We derive optical constants of nontronite using two scattering theories. Mie scattering models compare palagonite and nontronite as putative martian atmospheric dust and show the importance of knowing these optical contants for quantitative interpretation of CRISM spectra.

  6. A Computer Simulation Method for the Calculation of Equilibrium Constants for the Formation of Physical Clusters of Molecules: Application to Small Water Clusters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    areas of chemical physics. First, the values of K 2and K 3are related to the second and third virial coefficients of the substance. Second , the theory of...equilibrium constants for dimer and trimer formation are simply related to the second and third virial coefficients . Here we discuss our choice of the Rn and...containment sphere at low temperatures. The equilibrium constant for dimer formation can be related to the second virial coefficient for the gas under

  7. Analytical continuation in coupling constant method; application to the calculation of resonance energies and widths for organic molecules: Glycine, alanine and valine and dimer of formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, P.; Matejčík, Š.; Mach, P.; Urban, J.; Paidarová, I.; Horáček, J.

    2013-06-01

    The method of analytic continuation in the coupling constant (ACCC) in combination with use of the statistical Padé approximation is applied to the determination of resonance energy and width of some amino acids and formic acid dimer. Standard quantum chemistry codes provide accurate data which can be used for analytic continuation in the coupling constant to obtain the resonance energy and width of organic molecules with a good accuracy. The obtained results are compared with the existing experimental ones.

  8. Calculation of S-matrix poles by means of analytic continuation in the coupling constant: Application to the 2Πg state of N2-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horáček, J.; Mach, P.; Urban, J.

    2010-09-01

    The method of analytic continuation in the coupling constant in combination with use of the statistical Padé approximation is applied to the determination of resonance energy and width of the 2Πg state of N2-. It is shown that standard quantum chemistry codes provide accurate data which can be used for analytic continuation in the coupling constant, and the resonance energy and width can be inferred with an accuracy comparable to other more elaborate methods.

  9. KECK-I MOSFIRE SPECTROSCOPY OF THE z {approx} 12 CANDIDATE GALAXY UDFj-39546284

    SciTech Connect

    Capak, P.; Faisst, A.; Tacchella, S.; Carollo, M.; Vieira, J. D.; Scoville, N. Z.

    2013-08-10

    We report the results of deep (4.6 hr) H-band spectroscopy of the well studied z {approx} 12 H-band dropout galaxy candidate UDFj-39546284 with MOSFIRE on Keck-I. These data reach a sensitivity of 5-10 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -19} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} per 4.4 A resolution element between sky lines. Previous papers have argued that this source could either be a large equivalent width line emitting galaxy at 2 < z < 3.5 or a luminous galaxy at z {approx} 12. We find a 2.2{sigma} peak associated with a line candidate in deep Hubble Space Telescope Wide-Field Camera 3 Infrared grism observations, but at a lower flux than expected. After considering several possibilities, we conclude these data cannot conclusively confirm or reject the previous line detection, and significantly deeper spectroscopic observations are required. We also search for low-redshift emission lines in 10 other 7 < z < 10 z, Y, and J-dropout candidates in our mask and find no significant detections.

  10. THE EARLY EARLY TYPE: DISCOVERY OF A PASSIVE GALAXY AT z{sub spec} {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Gobat, R.; Strazzullo, V.; Daddi, E.; Bethermin, M.; Renzini, A.; Dickinson, M.; Cimatti, A.

    2012-11-10

    We present the discovery of a massive, quiescent galaxy at z = 2.99. We have obtained an Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 spectrum of this object and measured its redshift from the detection of a deep 4000 A break consistent with an old population and a high metallicity. By stellar population modeling of both its grism spectrum and broadband photometry, we derive an age of {approx}0.7 Gyr, implying a formation redshift of z > 4, and a mass >10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }. Although this passive galaxy is the most distant confirmed so far, we find that it is slightly less compact than other z > 2 early types of similar mass, being overall more analogous to those z {approx} 1.6 field early-type galaxies. The discovery of this object shows that early-type galaxies are detectable to at least z = 3 and suggests that the diversity of structural properties found in z = 1.4-2 ellipticals to earlier epochs could have its origin in a variety of formation histories among their progenitors.

  11. THE ASSEMBLY OF MILKY-WAY-LIKE GALAXIES SINCE z {approx} 2.5

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Leja, Joel; Nelson, Erica June; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Patel, Shannon; Fumagalli, Mattia; Franx, Marijn; Labbe, Ivo; Brammer, Gabriel; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Lundgren, Britt; Conroy, Charlie; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha; Wuyts, Stijn; Kriek, Mariska; Marchesini, Danilo; Rix, Hans-Walter; Van der Wel, Arjen

    2013-07-10

    Galaxies with the mass of the Milky Way dominate the stellar mass density of the universe but it is uncertain how and when they were assembled. Here we study progenitors of these galaxies out to z = 2.5, using data from the 3D-HST and CANDELS Treasury surveys. We find that galaxies with present-day stellar masses of log (M) Almost-Equal-To 10.7 built {approx}90% of their stellar mass since z = 2.5, with most of the star formation occurring before z = 1. In marked contrast to the assembly history of massive elliptical galaxies, mass growth is not limited to large radii: the mass in the central 2 kpc of the galaxies increased by a factor of 3.2{sup +0.8}{sub -0.7} between z = 2.5 and z = 1. We therefore rule out simple models in which bulges were fully assembled at high redshift and disks gradually formed around them. Instead, bulges (and black holes) likely formed in lockstep with disks, through bar instabilities, migration, or other processes. We find that after z = 1 the growth in the central regions gradually stopped and the disk continued to be built up, consistent with recent studies of the gas distributions in z {approx} 1 galaxies and the properties of many spiral galaxies today.

  12. Confirmation of Small Dynamical and Stellar Masses for Extreme Emission Line Galaxies at z Approx. 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maseda, Michael V.; van Der Wel, Arjen; da Cunha, Elisabete; Rix, Hans-Walter; Pacifici, Camilla; Momcheva, Ivelina; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Franx, Marijn; van Dokkum, Pieter; Bell, Eric F.; Fumagalli, Mattia; Grogin, Norman A.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lundgren, Britt F.; Marchesini, Danilo; Nelson, Eric J.; Patel, Shannon G.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Straughn, Amber N.; Trump. Jonathan R.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Wuyts, Stijn

    2013-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations from the Large Binocular Telescope and the Very Large Telescope reveal kinematically narrow lines (approx. 50 km/s) for a sample of 14 extreme emission line galaxies at redshifts 1.4 < z < 2.3. These measurements imply that the total dynamical masses of these systems are low (< or approx. 3 × 10(exp 9) M). Their large [O III] (lambda)5007 equivalent widths (500-1100 Angstroms) and faint blue continuum emission imply young ages of 10-100 Myr and stellar masses of 10(exp 8)-10(exp 9)M, confirming the presence of a violent starburst. The dynamical masses represent the first such determinations for low-mass galaxies at z > 1. The stellar mass formed in this vigorous starburst phase represents a large fraction of the total (dynamical) mass, without a significantly massive underlying population of older stars. The occurrence of such intense events in shallow potentials strongly suggests that supernova-driven winds must be of critical importance in the subsequent evolution of these systems.

  13. Evaluation of three neutral capillary coatings for the determination of analyte-cyclodextrin binding constants by affinity capillary electrophoresis. Application to N,N'-disubstituted piperazine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Danel, Cécile; Melnyk, Patricia; Azaroual, Nathalie; Larchanché, Paul-Emmanuel; Goossens, Jean-François; Vaccher, Claude

    2016-07-15

    The performances of three neutral static coatings (hydroxypropyl cellulose, polyethylene oxide and poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) have been evaluated in order to determine the binding constants of the complexes formed between four polycationic compounds (piperazine derivatives) and four cyclodextrins of pharmaceutical interest (β-CD, HP-β-CD, Me-β-CD and sulfobutyl ether-β-CD) by affinity capillary electrophoresis. The physically-adsorbed poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) coating proves to be the more efficient to mask the silanol groups of the capillary wall since the lowest electroosmotic flow was measured for this coating. Moreover, it drastically reduces the adsorption of the compounds since it allows a correct repeatability of their migration time, higher efficiencies of the peaks and no baseline shift. Then, it was verified for four complexes that this coating allows a correct determination of the binding constants avoiding the CD adsorption which is responsible of an undervaluation of binding constants. The highest binding constants are obtained using the anionic sulfobutyl ether-β-CD (SBE-β-CD). The structure of the complex formed between the tacrine derivative and the SBE-β-CD was further investigated through 2D ROESY NMR experiments and structure-binding constant relationships. Results suggest that the inclusion in the SBE-β-CD cavity occurs through the aliphatic ring portion of the tacrine moiety.

  14. ON STAR FORMATION RATES AND STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF GALAXIES OUT TO z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Wuyts, Stijn; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Lutz, Dieter; Nordon, Raanan; Berta, Stefano; Genzel, Reinhard; Magnelli, Benjamin; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Altieri, Bruno; Andreani, Paola; Aussel, Herve; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Cimatti, Andrea; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Maiolino, Roberto; McGrath, Elizabeth J.

    2011-09-01

    We compare multi-wavelength star formation rate (SFR) indicators out to z {approx} 3 in the GOODS-South field. Our analysis uniquely combines U to 8 {mu}m photometry from FIREWORKS, MIPS 24 {mu}m and PACS 70, 100, and 160 {mu}m photometry from the PEP, and H{alpha} spectroscopy from the SINS survey. We describe a set of conversions that lead to a continuity across SFR indicators. A luminosity-independent conversion from 24 {mu}m to total infrared luminosity yields estimates of L{sub IR} that are in the median consistent with the L{sub IR} derived from PACS photometry, albeit with significant scatter. Dust correction methods perform well at low-to-intermediate levels of star formation. They fail to recover the total amount of star formation in systems with large SFR{sub IR}/SFR{sub UV} ratios, typically occuring at the highest SFRs (SFR{sub UV+IR} {approx}> 100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) and redshifts (z {approx}> 2.5) probed. Finally, we confirm that H{alpha}-based SFRs at 1.5 < z < 2.6 are consistent with SFR{sub SED} and SFR{sub UV+IR} provided extra attenuation toward H II regions is taken into account (A{sub V,neb} = A{sub V,continuum}/0.44). With the cross-calibrated SFR indicators in hand, we perform a consistency check on the star formation histories inferred from spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling. We compare the observed SFR-M relations and mass functions at a range of redshifts to equivalents that are computed by evolving lower redshift galaxies backward in time. We find evidence for underestimated stellar ages when no stringent constraints on formation epoch are applied in SED modeling. We demonstrate how resolved SED modeling, or alternatively deep UV data, may help to overcome this bias. The age bias is most severe for galaxies with young stellar populations and reduces toward older systems. Finally, our analysis suggests that SFHs typically vary on timescales that are long (at least several 100 Myr) compared to the galaxies' dynamical time.

  15. LBT/LUCIFER OBSERVATIONS OF THE z {approx} 2 LENSED GALAXY J0900+2234

    SciTech Connect

    Bian Fuyan; Fan Xiaohui; Bechtold, Jill; McGreer, Ian D.; Just, Dennis W.; Sand, David J.; Green, Richard F.; Thompson, David; Peng, Chien Y.; Seifert, Walter; Ageorges, Nancy; Buschkamp, Peter; Juette, Marcus; Knierim, Volker

    2010-12-20

    We present rest-frame optical images and spectra of the gravitationally lensed, star-forming galaxy J0900+2234 (z = 2.03). The observations were performed with the newly commissioned LUCIFER1 near-infrared (NIR) instrument mounted on the Large Binocular Telescope. We fitted lens models to the rest-frame optical images and found that the galaxy has an intrinsic effective radius of 7.4 {+-} 0.8 kpc with a lens magnification factor of about 5 for the A and B components. We also discovered a new arc belonging to another lensed high-z source galaxy, which makes this lens system a potential double Einstein ring system. Using the high signal-to-noise ratio rest-frame spectra covered by the H + K band, we detected H{beta}, [O III], H{alpha}, [N II], and [S II] emission lines. Detailed physical properties of this high-z galaxy were derived. The extinction toward the ionized H II regions (E{sub g} (B - V)) was computed from the flux ratio of H{alpha} and H{beta} and appears to be much higher than that toward the stellar continuum (E{sub s} (B - V)), derived from the optical and NIR broadband photometry fitting. The metallicity was estimated using N2 and O3N2 indices. It is in the range of 1/5 - 1/3 solar abundance, which is much lower than for typical z {approx} 2 star-forming galaxies. From the flux ratio of [S II]{lambda}6717 and [S II]{lambda}6732, we found that the electron number density of the H II regions in the high-z galaxy was {approx_equal}1000 cm{sup -3}, consistent with other z {approx} 2 galaxies but much higher than that in local H II regions. The star formation rate was estimated via the H{alpha} luminosity, after correction for the lens magnification, to be about 365 {+-} 69 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. Combining the FWHM of H{alpha} emission lines and the half-light radius, we found that the dynamical mass of the lensed galaxy is (5.8 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}. The gas mass is (5.1 {+-} 1.1) x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun} from the H{alpha} flux surface density

  16. The cosmological constant problem

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgov, A.D.

    1989-05-01

    A review of the cosmological term problem is presented. Baby universe model and the compensating field model are discussed. The importance of more accurate data on the Hubble constant and the Universe age is stressed. 18 refs.

  17. Science Is Constantly Cool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichinger, John

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students attempt to keep water at a constant temperature. Helps students in grades three to six hone their skills in prediction, observation, measurement, data collection, graphing, data analysis, and communication. (JRH)

  18. Development of procedures for calculating stiffness and damping properties of elastomers in engineering applications. Part 2: Elastomer characteristics at constant temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, P. K.; Tessarzik, J. M.; Cziglenyi, L.

    1974-01-01

    Dynamic properties of a commerical polybutadiene compound were determined at a constant temperature of 32 C by a forced-vibration resonant mass type of apparatus. The constant thermal state of the elastomer was ensured by keeping the ambient temperature constant and by limiting the power dissipation in the specimen. Experiments were performed with both compression and shear specimens at several preloads (nominal strain varying from 0 to 5 percent), and the results are reported in terms of a complex stiffness as a function of frequency. Very weak frequency dependence is observed and a simple power law type of correlation is shown to represent the data well. Variations in the complex stiffness as a function of preload are also found to be small for both compression and shear specimens.

  19. CONSTRAINTS ON THE FAINT END OF THE QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z {approx} 5 IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, H.; Matsuoka, K.; Kajisawa, M.; Nagao, T.; Taniguchi, Y.; Shioya, Y.; Enoki, M.; Capak, P.; Masters, D.; Scoville, N. Z.; Civano, F.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Morokuma, T.; Salvato, M.; Schinnerer, E.

    2012-09-10

    We present the result of our low-luminosity quasar survey in the redshift range of 4.5 {approx}< z {approx}< 5.5 in the COSMOS field. Using the COSMOS photometric catalog, we selected 15 quasar candidates with 22 < i' < 24 at z {approx} 5 that are {approx}3 mag fainter than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars in the same redshift range. We obtained optical spectra for 14 of the 15 candidates using FOCAS on the Subaru Telescope and did not identify any low-luminosity type-1 quasars at z {approx} 5, while a low-luminosity type-2 quasar at z {approx} 5.07 was discovered. In order to constrain the faint end of the quasar luminosity function at z {approx} 5, we calculated the 1{sigma} confidence upper limits of the space density of type-1 quasars. As a result, the 1{sigma} confidence upper limits on the quasar space density are {Phi} < 1.33 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} Mpc{sup -3} mag{sup -1} for -24.52 < M{sub 1450} < -23.52 and {Phi} < 2.88 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} Mpc{sup -3} mag{sup -1} for -23.52 < M{sub 1450} < -22.52. The inferred 1{sigma} confidence upper limits of the space density are then used to provide constraints on the faint-end slope and the break absolute magnitude of the quasar luminosity function at z {approx} 5. We find that the quasar space density decreases gradually as a function of redshift at low luminosity (M{sub 1450} {approx} -23), being similar to the trend found for quasars with high luminosity (M{sub 1450} < -26). This result is consistent with the so-called downsizing evolution of quasars seen at lower redshifts.

  20. Identification of the predicted 5s-4f level crossing optical lines with applications to metrology and searches for the variation of fundamental constants.

    PubMed

    Windberger, A; Crespo López-Urrutia, J R; Bekker, H; Oreshkina, N S; Berengut, J C; Bock, V; Borschevsky, A; Dzuba, V A; Eliav, E; Harman, Z; Kaldor, U; Kaul, S; Safronova, U I; Flambaum, V V; Keitel, C H; Schmidt, P O; Ullrich, J; Versolato, O O

    2015-04-17

    We measure optical spectra of Nd-like W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt ions of particular interest for studies of a possibly varying fine-structure constant. Exploiting characteristic energy scalings we identify the strongest lines, confirm the predicted 5s-4f level crossing, and benchmark advanced calculations. We infer two possible values for optical M2/E3 and E1 transitions in Ir^{17+} that have the highest predicted sensitivity to a variation of the fine-structure constant among stable atomic systems. Furthermore, we determine the energies of proposed frequency standards in Hf^{12+} and W^{14+}.

  1. STELLAR KINEMATICS OF z {approx} 2 GALAXIES AND THE INSIDE-OUT GROWTH OF QUIESCENT GALAXIES {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Sande, Jesse; Franx, Marijn; Bouwens, Rychard J.; Kriek, Mariska; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Bezanson, Rachel; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Quadri, Ryan F.; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2013-07-10

    Using stellar kinematics measurements, we investigate the growth of massive, quiescent galaxies from z {approx} 2 to today. We present X-Shooter spectra from the UV to NIR and dynamical mass measurements of five quiescent massive (>10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }) galaxies at z {approx} 2. This triples the sample of z > 1.5 galaxies with well-constrained ({delta}{sigma} < 100 km s{sup -1}) velocity dispersion measurements. From spectral population synthesis modeling we find that these galaxies have stellar ages that range from 0.5 to 2 Gyr, with no signs of ongoing star formation. We measure velocity dispersions (290-450 km s{sup -1}) from stellar absorption lines and find that they are 1.6-2.1 times higher than those of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at the same mass. Sizes are measured using GALFIT from Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 H{sub 160} and UDS K-band images. The dynamical masses correspond well to the spectral energy distribution based stellar masses, with dynamical masses that are {approx}15% higher. We find that M{sub *}/M{sub dyn} may decrease slightly with time, which could reflect the increase of the dark matter fraction within an increasing effective radius. We combine different stellar kinematic studies from the literature and examine the structural evolution from z {approx} 2 to z {approx} 0: we confirm that at fixed dynamical mass, the effective radius increases by a factor of {approx}2.8, and the velocity dispersion decreases by a factor of {approx}1.7. The mass density within one effective radius decreases by a factor of {approx}20, while within a fixed physical radius (1 kpc) it decreases only mildly (factor of {approx}2). When we allow for an evolving mass limit by selecting a population of galaxies at fixed number density, a stronger size growth with time is found (factor of {approx}4), velocity dispersion decreases by a factor of {approx}1.4, and interestingly, the mass density within 1 kpc is consistent with no evolution

  2. Magnetic Rotation in {sup 106}Ag and Systematics of A{approx}110 Mass Region

    SciTech Connect

    He, C. Y.; Zhu, L. H.; Wu, X. G.; Wen, S. X.; Li, G. S.; Liu, Y.; Wang, Z. M.; Li, X. Q.; Ma, R. G.; Yang, C. X.; Cui, X. Z.

    2008-11-11

    The high spin states of {sup 106}Ag were populated via the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 100}Mo({sup 11}B,5n){sup 106}Ag at a beam energy of 60 MeV. A new level scheme of {sup 106}Ag is built on basis of the present experiment. The positive parity band with the configuration of {pi}g{sub 9/2} x V[h{sub 11/2}{sup 2}(g{sub 7/2}/d{sub 5/2})] is discussed on the ground of shears mechanism. Theoretical calculation of the effective interaction performed by TAC model agrees well with the experimental value. Systematics study shows that Ag isotopes are probably at the boundary of magnetic rotation in A{approx}110 mass region.

  3. Microscopic analysis of nuclear quantum phase transitions in the N{approx_equal}90 region

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z. P.; Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.; Meng, J.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Ring, P.

    2009-05-15

    The analysis of shape transitions in Nd isotopes, based on the framework of relativistic energy-density functionals and restricted to axially symmetric shapes in T. Niksic, D. Vretenar, G. A. Lalazissis, and P. Ring [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 092502 (2007)], is extended to the region Z=60,62,64 with N{approx_equal}90 and includes both {beta} and {gamma} deformations. Collective excitation spectra and transition probabilities are calculated starting from a five-dimensional Hamiltonian for quadrupole vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom, with parameters determined by constrained self-consistent relativistic mean-field calculations for triaxial shapes. The results reproduce available data and show that there is an abrupt change of structure at N=90 that can be approximately characterized by the X(5) analytic solution at the critical point of the first-order quantum phase transition between spherical and axially deformed shapes.

  4. Regularizing cosmological singularities by varying physical constants

    SciTech Connect

    Dąbrowski, Mariusz P.; Marosek, Konrad E-mail: k.marosek@wmf.univ.szczecin.pl

    2013-02-01

    Varying physical constant cosmologies were claimed to solve standard cosmological problems such as the horizon, the flatness and the Λ-problem. In this paper, we suggest yet another possible application of these theories: solving the singularity problem. By specifying some examples we show that various cosmological singularities may be regularized provided the physical constants evolve in time in an appropriate way.

  5. Water dimer equilibrium constant of saturated vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malomuzh, N. P.; Mahlaichuk, V. N.; Khrapatyi, S. V.

    2014-08-01

    The value and temperature dependence of the dimerization constant for saturated water vapor are determined. A general expression that links the second virial coefficient and the dimerization constant is obtained. It is shown that the attraction between water monomers and dimers is fundamental, especially at T > 350 K. The range of application for the obtained results is determined.

  6. A PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT OF z {approx} 9.4 FOR GRB 090429B

    SciTech Connect

    Cucchiara, A.; Fox, D. B.; Wu, X. F.; Toma, K.; Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Rowlinson, A.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Berger, E.; Kruehler, T.; Greiner, J.; Olivares, F. E.; Yoldas, A. Kuepcue; Amati, L.; Sakamoto, T.; Roth, K.; Stephens, A.; Fritz, Alexander; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Hjorth, J.

    2011-07-20

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) serve as powerful probes of the early universe, with their luminous afterglows revealing the locations and physical properties of star-forming galaxies at the highest redshifts, and potentially locating first-generation (Population III) stars. Since GRB afterglows have intrinsically very simple spectra, they allow robust redshifts from low signal-to-noise spectroscopy, or photometry. Here we present a photometric redshift of z {approx} 9.4 for the Swift detected GRB 090429B based on deep observations with Gemini-North, the Very Large Telescope, and the GRB Optical and Near-infrared Detector. Assuming a Small Magellanic Cloud dust law (which has been found in a majority of GRB sight lines), the 90% likelihood range for the redshift is 9.06 < z < 9.52, although there is a low-probability tail toward somewhat lower redshifts. Adopting Milky Way or Large Magellanic Cloud dust laws leads to very similar conclusions, while a Maiolino law does allow somewhat lower redshift solutions, though in all cases the most likely redshift is found to be z > 7. The non-detection of the host galaxy to deep limits (Y(AB) {approx} 28, which would correspond roughly to 0.001L* at z = 1) in our late-time optical and infrared observations with the Hubble Space Telescope strongly supports the extreme-redshift origin of GRB 090429B, since we would expect to have detected any low-z galaxy, even if it were highly dusty. Finally, the energetics of GRB 090429B are comparable to those of other GRBs and suggest that its progenitor is not greatly different from those of lower redshift bursts.

  7. ON INFERRING EXTINCTION LAWS IN z {approx} 6 QUASARS AS SIGNATURES OF SUPERNOVA DUST

    SciTech Connect

    Hjorth, Jens; Vreeswijk, Paul M.; Gall, Christa; Watson, Darach E-mail: paul.vreeswijk@weizmann.ac.il E-mail: darach@dark-cosmology.dk

    2013-05-10

    Unusual extinction curves of high-redshift QSOs have been taken as evidence that dust is primarily produced by supernovae at high redshift. In particular, the 3000 A Todini-Ferrara-Maiolino kink in the extinction curve of the z = 6.20 SDSS J1048+4637 has been attributed to supernova dust. Here we discuss the challenges in inferring robust extinction curves of high-redshift QSOs and critically assess previous claims of detection of supernova dust. In particular, we address the sensitivity to the choice of intrinsic QSO spectrum, the need for a long wavelength baseline, and the drawbacks in fitting theoretical extinction curves. In a sample of 21 QSOs at z {approx} 6 we detect significant ultraviolet extinction using existing broadband optical, near-infrared, and Spitzer photometry. The median extinction curve is consistent with a Small Magellanic Cloud curve with A{sub 1450} {approx} 0.7 mag and does not exhibit any conspicuous (rest frame) 2175 A or 3000 A features. For two QSOs, SDSS J1044-0125 at z = 5.78 and SDSS J1030+0524 at z = 6.31, we further present X-shooter spectra covering the wavelength range 0.9-2.5 {mu}m. The resulting non-parametric extinction curves do not exhibit the 3000 A kink. Finally, in a re-analysis of literature spectra of SDSS J1048+4637, we do not find evidence for a conspicuous kink. We conclude that the existing evidence for a 3000 A feature is weak and that the overall dust properties at high and low redshifts show no significant differences. This, however, does not preclude supernovae from dominating the dust budget at high redshift.

  8. PLANET ENGULFMENT BY {approx}1.5-3 M{sub sun} RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Kunitomo, M.; Ikoma, M.; Sato, B.; Ida, S.; Katsuta, Y.

    2011-08-20

    Recent radial-velocity surveys for GK clump giants have revealed that planets also exist around {approx}1.5-3 M{sub sun} stars. However, no planets have been found inside 0.6 AU around clump giants, in contrast to solar-type main-sequence stars, many of which harbor short-period planets such as hot Jupiters. In this study, we examine the possibility that planets were engulfed by host stars evolving on the red-giant branch (RGB). We integrate the orbital evolution of planets in the RGB and helium-burning phases of host stars, including the effects of stellar tide and stellar mass loss. Then we derive the critical semimajor axis (or the survival limit) inside which planets are eventually engulfed by their host stars after tidal decay of their orbits. Specifically, we investigate the impact of stellar mass and other stellar parameters on the survival limit in more detail than previous studies. In addition, we make detailed comparisons with measured semimajor axes of planets detected so far, which no previous study has done. We find that the critical semimajor axis is quite sensitive to stellar mass in the range between 1.7 and 2.1 M{sub sun}, which suggests a need for careful comparison between theoretical and observational limits of the existence of planets. Our comparison demonstrates that all planets orbiting GK clump giants that have been detected are beyond the survival limit, which is consistent with the planet-engulfment hypothesis. However, on the high-mass side (>2.1M{sub sun}), the detected planets are orbiting significantly far from the survival limit, which suggests that engulfment by host stars may not be the main reason for the observed lack of short-period giant planets. To confirm our conclusion, the detection of more planets around clump giants, especially with masses {approx}> 2.5M{sub sun}, is required.

  9. Smoluchowski Equations for Agglomeration in Conditions of Variable Temperature and Pressure and a New Scaling of Rate Constants: Application to Nozzle-Beam Expansion.

    PubMed

    Chaiken, J; Goodisman, J; Kornilov, O

    2015-07-09

    The Smoluchowski equations provide a rigorous and efficient means for including multiple kinetic pathways when modeling coalescence growth systems. Originally written for a constant temperature and volume system, the equations must be modified if temperature and pressure vary during the coalescence time. In this paper, the equations are generalized, and adaptations appropriate to the situation presented by supersonic nozzle beam expansions are described. Given rate constants for all the cluster-cluster reactions, solution of the Smoluchowski equations would yield the abundances of clusters of all sizes at all times. This is unlikely, but we show that if these rate constants scale with the sizes of the reacting partners, the asymptotic (large size and large time) form of the cluster size distribution can be predicted. Experimentally determined distributions for He fit the predicted asymptotic distribution very well. Deviations between predicted and observed distributions allow identification of special cluster sizes that is, magic numbers. Furthermore, fitting an observed distribution to the theoretical form yields the base agglomeration cross section, from which all cluster-cluster rate constants may be obtained by scaling. Comparing the base cross section to measures of size and reactivity gives information about the coalescence process.

  10. The effect of PECVD plasma decomposition on the wettability and dielectric constant changes in silicon modified DLC films for potential MEMS and low stiction applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ogwu, A. A.; Okpalugo, T. I. T.; McLaughlin, J. A. D.

    2012-09-15

    We have carried out investigations aimed at understanding the mechanism responsible for a water contact angle increase of up to ten degrees and a decrease in dielectric constant in silicon modified hydrogenated amorphous carbon films compared to unmodified hydrogenated amorphous carbon films. Our investigations based on surface chemical constituent analysis using Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), SIMS, FTIR, contact angle / surface energy measurements and spectroscopic ellipsometry suggests the presence of hydrophobic chemical entities on the surface of the films. This observation is consistent with earlier theoretical plasma chemistry predictions and observed Raman peak shifts in the films. These surface hydrophobic entities also have a lower polarizability than the bonds in the un-modified films thereby reducing the dielectric constant of the silicon modified films measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Ellipsometric dielectric constant measurement is directly related to the surface energy through Hamaker's constant. Our current finding is expected to be of benefit to understanding stiction, friction and lubrication in areas that range from nano-tribology to microfluidics.

  11. Quasirelativistic theory for the magnetic shielding constant. III. Quasirelativistic second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory and its application to tellurium compounds.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ryoichi; Nakatsuji, Hiroshi

    2005-07-22

    The quasirelativistic (QR) generalized unrestricted Hartree-Fock method for the magnetic shielding constant [R. Fukuda, M. Hada, and H. Nakatsuji, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 1015 (2003); R. Fukuda, M. Hada, and H. Nakatsuji, J. Chem. Phys.118, 1027 (2003)] has been extended to include the electron correlation effect in the level of the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2). We have implemented the energy gradient and finite-perturbation methods to calculate the magnetic shielding constant at the QR MP2 level and applied to the magnetic shielding constants and the NMR chemical shifts of 125Te nucleus in various tellurium compounds. The calculated magnetic shielding constants and NMR chemical shifts well reproduced the experimental values. The relations of the chemical shifts with the natures of ligands, and the tellurium oxidation states were investigated. The chemical shifts in different valence states were explained by the paramagnetic shielding and spin-orbit terms. The tellurium 5p electrons are the dominant origin of the chemical shifts in the Te I and Te II compounds and the chemical shifts were explained by the p-hole mechanism. The tellurium d electrons also play an important role in the chemical shifts of the hypervalent compounds.

  12. The application of PID parameter self-tuning fuzzy controller in the constant-power speed control system of heading machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jun; Hou, Jian; Shen, Dong

    2013-03-01

    This article describes the control system of PID parameter self-tuning fuzzy controller. For cutting the coal of different hardness, adopt fuzzy techniques, automatically adjust the feed speed of operating mechanism, and maintain the control of operating mechanism of heading machine with constant power.

  13. Constant-energetics physical-space forcing methods for improved convergence to homogeneous-isotropic turbulence with application to particle-laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassenne, Maxime; Urzay, Javier; Park, George I.; Moin, Parviz

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates control-based forcing methods for incompressible homogeneous-isotropic turbulence forced linearly in physical space which result in constant turbulent kinetic energy, constant turbulent dissipation (also constant enstrophy), or a combination of the two based on a least-squares error minimization. The methods consist of proportional controllers embedded in the forcing coefficients. During the transient, the controllers adjust the forcing coefficients such that the controlled quantity achieves very early a minimal relative error with respect to its target stationary value. Comparisons of these forcing methods are made with the non-controlled approaches of Rosales and Meneveau ["Linear forcing in numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence: Physical space implementations and convergence properties," Phys. Fluids 17, 095106 (2005)] and Carroll and Blanquart ["A proposed modification to Lundgren's physical space velocity forcing method for isotropic turbulence," Phys. Fluids 25, 105114 (2013)], using direct numerical simulations (DNS) and large-eddy simulations (LES). The results indicate that the proposed constant-energetics forcing methods shorten the transient period from a user-defined artificial flow field to Navier-Stokes turbulence while maintaining steadier statistics. Additionally, the proposed method of constant kinetic-energy forcing behaves more robustly in coarse LES when initial conditions are employed that favor the occurrence of subgrid-scale backscatter, whereas the other approaches fail to provide physical turbulent flow fields. For illustration, the proposed forcing methods are applied to dilute particle-laden homogeneous-isotropic turbulent flows; the results serve to highlight the influences of the forcing strategies on the disperse-phase statistics.

  14. THE DETECTION OF THE LARGE-SCALE ALIGNMENT OF MASSIVE GALAXIES AT z {approx} 0.6

    SciTech Connect

    Li Cheng; Jing, Y. P.; Faltenbacher, A.; Wang Jie

    2013-06-10

    We report on the detection of the alignment between galaxies and large-scale structure at z {approx} 0.6 based on the CMASS galaxy sample from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopy Survey Data Release 9. We use two statistics to quantify the alignment signal: (1) the alignment two-point correlation function that probes the dependence of galaxy clustering at a given separation in redshift space on the projected angle ({theta}{sub p}) between the orientation of galaxies and the line connecting to other galaxies, and (2) the cos (2{theta})-statistic that estimates the average of cos (2{theta}{sub p}) for all correlated pairs at a given separation s. We find a significant alignment signal out to about 70 h {sup -1} Mpc in both statistics. Applications of the same statistics to dark matter halos of mass above 10{sup 12} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun} in a large cosmological simulation show scale-dependent alignment signals similar to the observation, but with higher amplitudes at all scales probed. We show that this discrepancy may be partially explained by a misalignment angle between central galaxies and their host halos, though detailed modeling is needed in order to better understand the link between the orientations of galaxies and host halos. In addition, we find systematic trends of the alignment statistics with the stellar mass of the CMASS galaxies, in the sense that more massive galaxies are more strongly aligned with the large-scale structure.

  15. NO EVIDENCE FOR EVOLUTION IN THE FAR-INFRARED-RADIO CORRELATION OUT TO z {approx} 2 IN THE EXTENDED CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Minnie Y.; Huynh, Minh T.; Helou, George; Norris, Ray P.; Dickinson, Mark; Frayer, Dave; Monkiewicz, Jacqueline A.

    2011-04-20

    We investigate the 70 {mu}m far-infrared-radio correlation (FRC) of star-forming galaxies in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS) out to z > 2. We use 70 {mu}m data from the Far-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (FIDEL), which comprises the most sensitive ({approx}0.8 mJy rms) and extensive far-infrared deep field observations using MIPS on the Spitzer Space Telescope, and 1.4 GHz radio data ({approx}8 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1} rms) from the Very Large Array. In order to quantify the evolution of the FRC, we use both survival analysis and stacking techniques, which we find give similar results. We also calculate the FRC using total infrared luminosity and rest-frame radio luminosity, q{sub TIR}, and find that q{sub TIR} is constant (within 0.22) over the redshift range 0-2. We see no evidence for evolution in the FRC at 70 {mu}m, which is surprising given the many factors that are expected to change this ratio at high redshifts.

  16. Dielectric Constant of Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Kenneth S.; Ackmann, James J.

    1997-03-01

    We have used a finite element method to calculate the dielectric constant of a cubic array of spheres. Extensive calculations support preliminary conclusions reported previously (K. Mendelson and J. Ackmann, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 41), 657 (1996).. At frequencies below 100 kHz the real part of the dielectric constant (ɛ') shows oscillations as a function of the volume fraction of suspension. These oscillations disappear at low conductivities of the suspending fluid. Measurements of the dielectric constant (J. Ackmann, et al., Ann. Biomed. Eng. 24), 58 (1996). (H. Fricke and H. Curtis, J. Phys. Chem. 41), 729 (1937). are not sufficiently sensitive to show oscillations but appear to be consistent with the theoretical results.

  17. Elastic constants of calcite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  18. Low-Dielectric-Constant Polyimide Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorogy, William E., Jr.; Proctor, K. Mason; St. Clair, Anne K.

    1994-01-01

    In experiments performed at NASA Langley Research Center, low-dielectric-constant polyimide fibers produced by use of resin extrusion. These fibers also have high thermal stability and good tensile properties. Useful in industrial and aerospace applications in which fibers required to have dielectric constants less than 3, high thermal stability, and tensile properties in range of those of standard textile fibers. Potential applications include use in printed circuit-boards and in aircraft composites.

  19. Dielectric-constant gas thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaiser, Christof; Zandt, Thorsten; Fellmuth, Bernd

    2015-10-01

    The principles, techniques and results from dielectric-constant gas thermometry (DCGT) are reviewed. Primary DCGT with helium has been used for measuring T-T90 below the triple point of water (TPW), where T is the thermodynamic temperature and T90 is the temperature on the international temperature scale of 1990 (ITS-90), and, in an inverse regime with T as input quantity, for determining the Boltzmann constant at the TPW. Furthermore, DCGT allows the determination of several important material properties including the polarizability of neon and argon as well as the virial coefficients of helium, neon, and argon. With interpolating DCGT (IDCGT), the ITS-90 has been approximated in the temperature range from 4 K to 25 K. An overview and uncertainty budget for each of these applications of DCGT is provided, accompanied by corroborating evidence from the literature or, for IDCGT, a CIPM key comparison.

  20. PROBING THE FAINT END OF THE QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z{approx} 4 IN THE COSMOS FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, H.; Nagao, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Ideue, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.; Shioya, Y.; Trump, J. R.; Comastri, A.; Enoki, M.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Morokuma, T.; Murayama, T.; Saito, T.; Silverman, J. D.; Salvato, M.; Schinnerer, E.

    2011-02-20

    We searched for quasars that are {approx}3 mag fainter than the SDSS quasars in the redshift range 3.7 {approx}< z {approx}< 4.7 in the COSMOS field to constrain the faint end of the quasar luminosity function (QLF). Using optical photometric data, we selected 31 quasar candidates with 22 < i' < 24 at z {approx} 4. We obtained optical spectra for most of these candidates using FOCAS on the Subaru telescope and identified eight low-luminosity quasars at z {approx} 4. In order to derive the QLF based on our spectroscopic follow-up campaign, we estimated the photometric completeness of our quasar survey through detailed Monte Carlo simulations. Our QLF at z {approx} 4 has a much shallower faint-end slope ({beta} = -1.67{sup +0.11}{sub -0.17}) than that obtained by other recent surveys in the same redshift. Our result is consistent with the scenario of downsizing evolution of active galactic nuclei inferred by recent optical and X-ray quasar surveys at lower redshifts.

  1. Separating expansion from contraction in spherically symmetric models with a perfect fluid: Generalization of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff condition and application to models with a cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Mimoso, Jose P.; Le Delliou, Morgan; Mena, Filipe C.

    2010-06-15

    We investigate spherically symmetric perfect-fluid spacetimes and discuss the existence and stability of a dividing shell separating expanding and collapsing regions. We perform a 3+1 splitting and obtain gauge invariant conditions relating the intrinsic spatial curvature of the shells to the Misner-Sharp mass and to a function of the pressure that we introduce and that generalizes the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equilibrium condition. We find that surfaces fulfilling those two conditions fit, locally, the requirements of a dividing shell, and we argue that cosmological initial conditions should allow its global validity. We analyze the particular cases of the Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi dust models with a cosmological constant as an example of a cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant ({Lambda}-CDM model) and its generalization to contain a central perfect-fluid core. These models provide simple but physically interesting illustrations of our results.

  2. Application of the Bahe's pseudolattice-theory to water-1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (bmimBF(4)) mixtures at 298.15K Part I. Autoprotolysis constants.

    PubMed

    Bou Malham, I; Letellier, P; Turmine, M

    2007-04-15

    The autoprotolysis constants (K(s)) of water - 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (bmimBF(4)) mixtures were determined at 298K over the composition range of 0 to 77.43vol.% bmimBF(4) using potentiometric method with a glass electrode. A slight increase in the autoprotolysis constant was observed when the salt was added to the water. The value of the ionic product of the medium then decreases as the bmimBF(4) content increases from about 20vol.%. The acid-base properties of these media were perfectly described by Bahe's approaches that were completed by Varela et al. concerning structured electrolyte solutions with large short-range interactions.

  3. Study of the hydrolysis and ionization constants of Schiff base from pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and n-hexylamine in partially aqueous solvents. An application to phosphorylase b.

    PubMed Central

    Donoso, J; Muñoz, F; García Del Vado, A; Echevarría, G; García Blanco, F

    1986-01-01

    Formation and hydrolysis rate constants as well as equilibrium constants of the Schiff base derived from pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and n-hexylamine were determined between pH 3.5 and 7.5 in ethanol/water mixtures (3:17, v/v, and 49:1, v/v). The results indicate that solvent polarity scarcely alters the values of these constants but that they are dependent on the pH. Spectrophotometric titration of this Schiff base was also carried out. We found that a pKa value of 6.1, attributed in high-polarity media to protonation of the pyridine nitrogen atom, is independent of solvent polarity, whereas the pKa of the monoprotonated form of the imine falls from 12.5 in ethanol/water (3:17) to 11.3 in ethanol/water (49:1). Fitting of the experimental results for the hydrolysis to a theoretical model indicates the existence of a group with a pKa value of 6.1 that is crucial in the variation of kinetic constant of hydrolysis with pH. Studies of the reactivity of the coenzyme (pyridoxal 5'-phosphate) of glycogen phosphorylase b with hydroxylamine show that this reaction only occurs when the pH value of solution is below 6.5 and the hydrolysis of imine bond has started. We propose that the decrease in activity of phosphorylase b when the pH value is less than 6.2 must be caused by the cleavage of enzyme-coenzyme binding and that this may be related with protonation of the pyridine nitrogen atom of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. PMID:3099764

  4. Computation of constant mean curvature surfaces: Application to the gas-liquid interface of a pressurized fluid on a superhydrophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Lobaton, E J; Salamon, T R

    2007-10-01

    The interface shape separating a gas layer within a superhydrophobic surface consisting of a square lattice of posts from a pressurized liquid above the surface is computed numerically. The interface shape is described by a constant mean curvature surface that satisfies the Young-Laplace equation with the three-phase gas-liquid-solid contact line assumed pinned at the post outer edge. The numerical method predicts the existence of constant mean curvature solutions from the planar, zero curvature solution up to a maximum curvature that is dependent on the post shape, size and pitch. An overall force balance between surface tension and pressure forces acting on the interface yields predictions for the maximum curvature that agree with the numerical simulations to within one percent for convex shapes such as circular and square posts, but significantly over predicts the maximum curvature for non-convex shapes such as a circular post with a sinusoidal surface perturbation. Changing the post shape to increase the contact line length, while maintaining constant post area, results in increases of 2 to 12% in the maximum computable curvature for contact line length increases of 11 to 77%. Comparisons are made to several experimental studies for interface shape and pressure stability.

  5. A POPULATION OF DUST-RICH QUASARS AT z {approx} 1.5

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Y. Sophia; Elvis, Martin; Huang Jiasheng; Fazio, Giovanni; Trichas, Markos; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Omont, Alain; Bock, Jamie; Vieira, Joaquin D.; Cooray, Asantha; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Ibar, Edo; Magdis, Georgios E.; Rigopoulou, Dimitra; Oliver, Seb J.; Page, Mathew J.; Symeonidis, Myrto; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Roseboom, Isaac G.; Scott, Douglas; and others

    2012-07-01

    We report Herschel SPIRE (250, 350, and 500 {mu}m) detections of 32 quasars with redshifts 0.5 {<=}z < 3.6 from the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES). These sources are from a MIPS 24 {mu}m flux-limited sample of 326 quasars in the Lockman Hole Field. The extensive multi-wavelength data available in the field permit construction of the rest-frame spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from ultraviolet to the mid-infrared for all sources, and to the far-infrared (FIR) for the 32 objects. Most quasars with Herschel FIR detections show dust temperatures in the range of 25-60 K, with a mean of 34 K. The FIR luminosities range from 10{sup 11.3} to 10{sup 13.5} L{sub Sun }, qualifying most of their hosts as ultra- or hyper-luminous infrared galaxies. These FIR-detected quasars may represent a dust-rich population, but with lower redshifts and fainter luminosities than quasars observed at {approx}1 mm. However, their FIR properties cannot be predicted from shorter wavelengths (0.3-20 {mu}m, rest frame), and the bolometric luminosities derived using the 5100 A index may be underestimated for these FIR-detected quasars. Regardless of redshift, we observed a decline in the relative strength of FIR luminosities for quasars with higher near-infrared luminosities.

  6. Classification of Superdeformed Bands in the Mass A{approx}60 Region

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, L.-L.; Rudolph, D.; Fahlander, C.; Johansson, E. K.; Carlsson, B. G.; Ragnarsson, I.; Torres, D. A.

    2008-11-11

    The experimental knowledge of the {sub 29}{sup 61}Cu{sub 32} and {sub 30}{sup 61}Zn{sub 31} nuclei has been largely extended via the joint results from three experiments. The fusion-evaporation reaction used a {sup 36}Ar beam and a {sup 28}Si target foil to produce the two nuclei via the evaporation of either three protons ({sup 61}Cu) or two protons and a neutron ({sup 61}Zn). The experimental set-ups comprised the Ge-array GAMMASPHERE as well as neutron and charged-particle detectors placed around the target position.The resulting level schemes include around ten rotational superdeformed structures in each isotope. Most of them are linked to normally deformed states and in many cases spins and parities of the low-lying states in each structure have been determined.The collective structures are compared with results from configuration dependent Cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky calculations. The different structures are in general well understood from the calculation but the results do also suggest modifications of the standard Nilsson parameters in the mass A{approx}60 region.

  7. BLACK-HOLE-BULGE RELATIONSHIP OF POST-STARBURST QUASARS AT z {approx} 0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Hiner, Kyle D.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Wold, Margrethe; Brotherton, Michael S.; Cales, Sabrina L. E-mail: gabriela.canalizo@ucr.edu E-mail: mbrother@uwyo.edu

    2012-09-10

    The M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation has been studied extensively for local galaxies, but to date there have been scarce few direct measurements of stellar velocity dispersions for systems beyond the local universe. We investigate black hole and host galaxy properties of six 'post-starburst quasars' (PSQs) at z {approx} 0.3. Spectra of these objects simultaneously display features from the active nucleus including broad emission lines and a host galaxy Balmer absorption series indicative of the post-starburst stellar population. These are the first measurements of {sigma}{sub *} in such objects, and we significantly increase the number of directly measured non-local objects on the M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} diagram. The 'PSQs' of our sample fall on or above the locally defined M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation, a result that is consistent with previous M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} studies of samples at z > 0.1. However, they are generally consistent with the M{sub BH}-L{sub bulge} relation. Furthermore, their location on the Faber-Jackson relation suggests that some of the bulges may be dynamically peculiar.

  8. SATELLITES AROUND MASSIVE GALAXIES SINCE z {approx} 2: CONFRONTING THE MILLENNIUM SIMULATION WITH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Quilis, Vicent; Trujillo, Ignacio

    2012-06-20

    Minor merging has been postulated as the most likely evolutionary path to produce the increase in size and mass observed in the massive galaxies since z {approx} 2. In this Letter, we directly test this hypothesis, comparing the population of satellites around massive galaxies in cosmological simulations versus the observations. We use state-of-the-art, publically available, Millennium I and II simulations, and the associated semi-analytical galaxy catalogs to explore the time evolution of the fraction of massive galaxies that have satellites, the number of satellites per galaxy, the projected distance at which the satellites locate from the host galaxy, and the mass ratio between the host galaxies and their satellites. The three virtual galaxy catalogs considered here overproduce the fraction of galaxies with satellites by a factor ranging between 1.5 and 6 depending on the epoch, whereas the mean projected distance and ratio of the satellite mass over host mass are in closer agreement with data. The larger pull of satellites in the semi-analytical samples could suggest that the size evolution found in previous hydrodynamical simulations is an artifact due to the larger number of infalling satellites compared to the real universe. These results advise us to revise the physical ingredients implemented in the semi-analytical models in order to reconcile the observed and computed fraction of galaxies with satellites, and eventually, it would leave some room for other mechanisms explaining the galaxy size growth not related to the minor merging.

  9. Redshift in Hubble's constant.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temple-Raston, M.

    1997-01-01

    A topological field theory with Bogomol'nyi solitons is examined. The Bogomol'nyi solitons have much in common with the instanton in Yang-Mills theory; consequently the author called them 'topological instantons'. When periodic boundary conditions are imposed, the field theory comments indirectly on the speed of light within the theory. In this particular model the speed of light is not a universal constant. This may or may not be relevant to the current debate in astronomy and cosmology over the large values of the Hubble constant obtained by the latest generation of ground- and space-based telescopes. An experiment is proposed to detect spatial variation in the speed of light.

  10. Wall of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-02-15

    We consider the signatures of a domain wall produced in the spontaneous symmetry breaking involving a dilatonlike scalar field coupled to electromagnetism. Domains on either side of the wall exhibit slight differences in their respective values of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}. If such a wall is present within our Hubble volume, absorption spectra at large redshifts may or may not provide a variation in {alpha} relative to the terrestrial value, depending on our relative position with respect to the wall. This wall could resolve the contradiction between claims of a variation of {alpha} based on Keck/Hires data and of the constancy of {alpha} based on Very Large Telescope data. We derive the properties of the wall and the parameters of the underlying microscopic model required to reproduce the possible spatial variation of {alpha}. We discuss the constraints on the existence of the low-energy domain wall and describe its observational implications concerning the variation of the fundamental constants.

  11. Percolation with Constant Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottram, Edward

    2014-06-01

    We introduce and study a model of percolation with constant freezing ( PCF) where edges open at constant rate , and clusters freeze at rate independently of their size. Our main result is that the infinite volume process can be constructed on any amenable vertex transitive graph. This is in sharp contrast to models of percolation with freezing previously introduced, where the limit is known not to exist. Our interest is in the study of the percolative properties of the final configuration as a function of . We also obtain more precise results in the case of trees. Surprisingly the algebraic exponent for the cluster size depends on the degree, suggesting that there is no lower critical dimension for the model. Moreover, even for , it is shown that finite clusters have algebraic tail decay, which is a signature of self organised criticality. Partial results are obtained on , and many open questions are discussed.

  12. Constant-pressure Blowers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, E

    1940-01-01

    The conventional axial blowers operate on the high-pressure principle. One drawback of this type of blower is the relatively low pressure head, which one attempts to overcome with axial blowers producing very high pressure at a given circumferential speed. The Schicht constant-pressure blower affords pressure ratios considerably higher than those of axial blowers of conventional design with approximately the same efficiency.

  13. Johnson-Cook Strength Model Constants for VascoMax 300 and 1080 Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Cinnamon, J. D.; Palazotto, A. N.; Kennan, Z.; Brar, N. S.; Bajaj, D.

    2006-07-28

    High strength steels, VascoMax 300 and 1080, are characterized under tension at strain rates of {approx}1/s, {approx}500/s, {approx}1000/s, and {approx}1500/s and at high temperatures using the quasi-static and split Hopkinson bar techniques. The data on 1080 steel exhibited a typical strain hardening response, whereas Vasco-Max 300 steel showed diminishing flow stress beyond yielding because of localized necking in gauge section of the tested specimens. The tension data are analyzed to determine the Johnson-Cook (J-C) strength model constants for the two steels. The flow stress values for VascoMax are adjusted to account for necking, and the corrected J-C model is developed.

  14. DEEP LBT/LUCI SPECTROSCOPY OF AN Ly{alpha} EMITTER CANDIDATE AT z {approx_equal} 7.7

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Linhua; Bian Fuyan; Fan Xiaohui; McGreer, Ian D.; Stark, Daniel P.; Clement, Benjamin; Egami, Eiichi; Krug, Hannah B.

    2013-07-01

    We present deep spectroscopic observations of an Ly{alpha} emitter (LAE) candidate at z {approx_equal} 7.7 using the infrared spectrograph LUCI on the 2 Multiplication-Sign 8.4 m Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The candidate is the brightest among the four z {approx_equal} 7.7 LAE candidates found in a narrowband imaging survey by Krug et al. Our spectroscopic data include a total of 7.5 hr of integration with LBT/LUCI and are deep enough to significantly (3.2{sigma}-4.9{sigma}) detect the Ly{alpha} emission line of this candidate based on its Ly{alpha} flux 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} estimated from the narrowband photometry. However, we do not find any convincing signal at the expected position of its Ly{alpha} emission line, suggesting that this source is not an LAE at z {approx_equal} 7.7. The non-detection in this work, together with the previous studies of z {approx_equal} 7.7 LAEs, puts a strong constraint on the bright-end Ly{alpha} luminosity function (LF) at z {approx_equal} 7.7. We find a rapid evolution of the Ly{alpha} LF from z {approx_equal} 6.5 to 7.7: the upper limit of the z {approx_equal} 7.7 LF is more than five times lower than the z {approx_equal} 6.5 LF at the bright end (f{>=} 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} or L{>=} 6.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}). This is likely caused by an increasing neutral fraction in the intergalactic medium that substantially attenuates Ly{alpha} emission at z {approx_equal} 7.7.

  15. The Hubble Constant.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Neal

    2015-01-01

    I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. There are two broad categories of measurements. The first uses individual astrophysical objects which have some property that allows their intrinsic luminosity or size to be determined, or allows the determination of their distance by geometric means. The second category comprises the use of all-sky cosmic microwave background, or correlations between large samples of galaxies, to determine information about the geometry of the Universe and hence the Hubble constant, typically in a combination with other cosmological parameters. Many, but not all, object-based measurements give H0 values of around 72-74 km s(-1) Mpc(-1), with typical errors of 2-3 km s(-1) Mpc(-1). This is in mild discrepancy with CMB-based measurements, in particular those from the Planck satellite, which give values of 67-68 km s(-1) Mpc(-1) and typical errors of 1-2 km s(-1) Mpc(-1). The size of the remaining systematics indicate that accuracy rather than precision is the remaining problem in a good determination of the Hubble constant. Whether a discrepancy exists, and whether new physics is needed to resolve it, depends on details of the systematics of the object-based methods, and also on the assumptions about other cosmological parameters and which datasets are combined in the case of the all-sky methods.

  16. In situ generation of a hydroxyl radical by nanoporous activated carbon derived from rice husk for environmental applications: kinetic and thermodynamic constants.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, S; Sekaran, G

    2014-03-07

    The objective of this investigation is to evaluate the hydroxyl radical (˙OH) generation using nanoporous activated carbon (NPAC), derived from rice husk, and dissolved oxygen in water. The in situ production of the ˙OH radical was confirmed through the DMPO spin trapping method in EPR spectroscopy and quantitative determination by a deoxyribose assay procedure. NPAC served as a heterogeneous catalyst to degrade 2-deoxy-d-ribose (a reference compound) using hydroxyl radical generated from dissolved oxygen in water at temperatures in the range 313-373 K and pH 6, with first order rate constants (k = 9.2 × 10(-2) min(-1), k = 1.2 × 10(-1) min(-1), k = 1.3 × 10(-1) min(-1) and k = 1.68 × 10(-1) min(-1)). The thermodynamic constants for the generation of hydroxyl radicals by NPAC and dissolved oxygen in water were ΔG -1.36 kJ mol(-1) at 313 K, ΔH 17.73 kJ mol(-1) and ΔS 61.01 J mol(-1) K(-1).

  17. New Measurement of the Electron Magnetic Moment and the Fine Structure Constant: A First Application of a One-Electron Quantum Cyclotron

    ScienceCinema

    Gabrielse, Gerald [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2016-07-12

    Remarkably, the famous UW measurement of the electron magnetic moment has stood since 1987. With QED theory, this measurement has determined the accepted value of the fine structure constant. This colloquium is about a new Harvard measurement of these fundamental constants. The new measurement has an uncertainty that is about six times smaller, and it shifts the values by 1.7 standard deviations. One electron suspended in a Penning trap is used for the new measurement, like in the old measurement. What is different is that the lowest quantum levels of the spin and cyclotron motion are resolved, and the cyclotron as well as spin frequencies are determined using quantum jump spectroscopy. In addition, a 0.1 mK Penning trap that is also a cylindrical microwave cavity is used to control the radiation field, to suppress spontaneous emission by more than a factor of 100, to control cavity shifts, and to eliminate the blackbody photons that otherwise stimulate excitations from the cyclotron ground state. Finally, great signal-to-noise for one-quantum transitions is obtained using electronic feedback to realize the first one-particle self-excited oscillator. The new methods may also allow a million times improved measurement of the 500 times small antiproton magnetic moment.

  18. THE FIRST Hi-GAL OBSERVATIONS OF THE OUTER GALAXY: A LOOK AT STAR FORMATION IN THE THIRD GALACTIC QUADRANT IN THE LONGITUDE RANGE 216. Degree-Sign 5 {approx}< l {approx}< 225. Degree-Sign 5

    SciTech Connect

    Elia, D.; Molinari, S.; Schisano, E.; Pestalozzi, M.; Benedettini, M.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Pezzuto, S.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Fukui, Y.; Hayakawa, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Olmi, L.; Veneziani, M.; Schneider, N.; Piazzo, L.; Mizuno, A.; Onishi, T.; Polychroni, D.; Maruccia, Y.

    2013-07-20

    We present the first Herschel PACS and SPIRE photometric observations in a portion of the outer Galaxy (216. Degree-Sign 5 {approx}< l {approx}< 225. Degree-Sign 5 and -2 Degree-Sign {approx}< b {approx}< 0 Degree-Sign ) as a part of the Hi-GAL survey. The maps between 70 and 500 {mu}m, the derived column density and temperature maps, and the compact source catalog are presented. NANTEN CO(1-0) line observations are used to derive cloud kinematics and distances so that we can estimate distance-dependent physical parameters of the compact sources (cores and clumps) having a reliable spectral energy distribution that we separate into 255 proto-stellar and 688 starless sources. Both typologies are found in association with all the distance components observed in the field, up to {approx}5.8 kpc, testifying to the presence of star formation beyond the Perseus arm at these longitudes. Selecting the starless gravitationally bound sources, we identify 590 pre-stellar candidates. Several sources of both proto- and pre-stellar nature are found to exceed the minimum requirement for being compatible with massive star formation based on the mass-radius relation. For the pre-stellar sources belonging to the Local arm (d {approx}< 1.5 kpc) we study the mass function whose high-mass end shows a power law N(log M){proportional_to}M {sup -1.0{+-}0.2}. Finally, we use a luminosity versus mass diagram to infer the evolutionary status of the sources, finding that most of the proto-stellar sources are in the early accretion phase (with some cases compatible with a Class I stage), while for pre-stellar sources, in general, accretion has not yet started.

  19. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE MORPHOLOGIES OF z {approx} 2 DUST-OBSCURED GALAXIES. II. BUMP SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Bussmann, R. S.; Dey, Arjun; Lotz, J.; Jannuzi, B. T.; Armus, L.; Desai, V.; Soifer, B. T.; Brown, M. J. I.; Eisenhardt, P.; Higdon, J.; Higdon, S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Melbourne, J.; Weedman, D.

    2011-05-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope imaging of 22 ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at z {approx} 2 with extremely red R - [24] colors (called dust-obscured galaxies, or DOGs) which have a local maximum in their spectral energy distribution (SED) at rest-frame 1.6 {mu}m associated with stellar emission. These sources, which we call 'bump DOGs', have star formation rates (SFRs) of 400-4000 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and have redshifts derived from mid-IR spectra which show strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission-a sign of vigorous ongoing star formation. Using a uniform morphological analysis, we look for quantifiable differences between bump DOGs, power-law DOGs (Spitzer-selected ULIRGs with mid-IR SEDs dominated by a power law and spectral features that are more typical of obscured active galactic nuclei than starbursts), submillimeter-selected galaxies, and other less-reddened ULIRGs from the Spitzer Extragalactic First Look Survey. Bump DOGs are larger than power-law DOGs (median Petrosian radius of 8.4 {+-} 2.7 kpc versus 5.5 {+-} 2.3 kpc) and exhibit more diffuse and irregular morphologies (median M{sub 20} of -1.08 {+-} 0.05 versus -1.48 {+-} 0.05). These trends are qualitatively consistent with expectations from simulations of major mergers in which merging systems during the peak SFR period evolve from M{sub 20} = -1.0 to M{sub 20} = -1.7. Less-obscured ULIRGs (i.e., non-DOGs) tend to have more regular, centrally peaked, single-object morphologies rather than diffuse and irregular morphologies. This distinction in morphologies may imply that less-obscured ULIRGs sample the merger near the end of the peak SFR period. Alternatively, it may indicate that the intense star formation in these less-obscured ULIRGs is not the result of a recent major merger.

  20. EVIDENCE FOR WIDESPREAD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY AMONG MASSIVE QUIESCENT GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Karen P.; Rasmussen, Jesper; Toft, Sune; Zirm, Andrew W.

    2013-02-10

    We quantify the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in a mass-complete (M {sub *} > 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M {sub Sun }) sample of 123 star-forming and quiescent galaxies at 1.5 {<=} z {<=} 2.5, using X-ray data from the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) survey. 41% {+-} 7% of the galaxies are detected directly in X-rays, 22% {+-} 5% with rest-frame 0.5-8 keV luminosities consistent with hosting luminous AGNs (L {sub 0.5-8keV} > 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}). The latter fraction is similar for star-forming and quiescent galaxies, and does not depend on galaxy stellar mass, suggesting that perhaps luminous AGNs are triggered by external effects such as mergers. We detect significant mean X-ray signals in stacked images for both the individually non-detected star-forming and quiescent galaxies, with spectra consistent with star formation only and/or a low-luminosity AGN in both cases. Comparing star formation rates inferred from the 2-10 keV luminosities to those from rest-frame IR+UV emission, we find evidence for an X-ray excess indicative of low-luminosity AGNs. Among the quiescent galaxies, the excess suggests that as many as 70%-100% of these contain low- or high-luminosity AGNs, while the corresponding fraction is lower among star-forming galaxies (43%-65%). Our discovery of the ubiquity of AGNs in massive, quiescent z {approx} 2 galaxies provides observational support for the importance of AGNs in impeding star formation during galaxy evolution.

  1. THE RELATION BETWEEN BLACK HOLE MASS AND HOST SPHEROID STELLAR MASS OUT TO z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bennert, Vardha N.; Auger, Matthew W.; Treu, Tommaso; Woo, Jong-Hak; Malkan, Matthew A. E-mail: tt@physics.ucsb.edu E-mail: woo@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2011-12-01

    We combine Hubble Space Telescope images from the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey with archival Very Large Telescope and Keck spectra of a sample of 11 X-ray-selected broad-line active galactic nuclei in the redshift range 1 < z < 2 to study the black-hole-mass-stellar-mass relation out to a look-back time of 10 Gyr. Stellar masses of the spheroidal component (M{sub sph,*}) are derived from multi-filter surface photometry. Black hole masses (M{sub BH}) are estimated from the width of the broad Mg II emission line and the 3000 A nuclear luminosity. Comparing with a uniformly measured local sample and taking into account selection effects, we find evolution in the form M{sub BH}/M{sub sph,*}{proportional_to}(1 + z){sup 1.96{+-}}0{sup .55}, in agreement with our earlier studies based on spheroid luminosity. However, this result is more accurate because it does not require a correction for luminosity evolution and therefore avoids the related and dominant systematic uncertainty. We also measure total stellar masses (M{sub host,*}). Combining our sample with data from the literature, we find M{sub BH}/M{sub host,*}{proportional_to}(1 + z){sup 1.15{+-}0.15}, consistent with the hypothesis that black holes (in the range M{sub BH} {approx} 10{sup 8-9} M{sub Sun }) pre-date the formation of their host galaxies. Roughly, one-third of our objects reside in spiral galaxies; none of the host galaxies reveal signs of interaction or major merger activity. Combined with the slower evolution in host stellar masses compared to spheroid stellar masses, our results indicate that secular evolution or minor mergers play a non-negligible role in growing both BHs and spheroids.

  2. EVIDENCE FOR COLD ACCRETION: PRIMITIVE GAS FLOWING ONTO A GALAXY AT z {approx} 0.274

    SciTech Connect

    Ribaudo, Joseph; Lehner, Nicolas; Christopher Howk, J.; Werk, Jessica K.; Xavier Prochaska, J.; Tumlinson, Jason

    2011-12-20

    We present UV and optical observations from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope and Keck of a z = 0.27395 Lyman limit system (LLS) seen in absorption against the QSO PG1630+377. We detect H I absorption with log N(H I) = 17.06 {+-} 0.05 as well as Mg II, C III, Si III, and O VI in this system. The column densities are readily explained if this is a multi-phase system, with the intermediate and low ions arising in a very low metallicity ([Mg/H] = -1.71 {+-} 0.06) photoionized gas. We identify via Keck spectroscopy and Large Binocular Telescope imaging a 0.3 L{sub *} star-forming galaxy projected 37 kpc from the QSO at nearly identical redshift (z = 0.27406 and {Delta}v = -26 km s{sup -1}) with near solar metallicity ([O/H] = -0.20 {+-} 0.15). The presence of very low metallicity gas in the proximity of a near-solar metallicity, sub-L{sub *} galaxy strongly suggests that the LLS probes gas infalling onto the galaxy. A search of the literature reveals that such low-metallicity LLSs are not uncommon. We found that 50% (4/8) of the well-studied z {approx}< 1 LLSs have metallicities similar to the present system and show sub-L{sub *} galaxies with {rho} < 100 kpc in those fields where redshifts have been surveyed. We argue that the properties of these primitive LLSs and their host galaxies are consistent with those of cold mode accretion streams seen in galaxy simulations.

  3. Rotational state dependence of rate constants for the reaction of ions with asymmetric top molecules at very low temperatures: application to the N+/H2O system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubernet, M. L.; McCarroll, R.

    1990-12-01

    The adiabatic rotational state method is applied to the study of reactions between ions and polar asymmetric top molecules at very low temperatures. Detailed results of the calculated rate coefficients for the reaction of N+ with H2O are presented. A strong dependence of the rate coefficients on the initial rotational state is observed at low temperatures. In the case of a thermal distribution of rotational states, where the rate constants are summed over a Boltzman distribution, the replacement of the asymmetric top by an average symmetric top, which leads to a considerable simplification of the calculations, appears to be satisfactory. On the other hand, for a non thermal distribution, no such simplifying assumption can be made. In particular, the rate coefficient for a specific initial rotational state is quite sensitive to the orientation of the dipole moment.

  4. Optical constants of V{sub 1{minus}x}W{sub x}O{sub 2} thermochromic films and their application to the selective radiating material

    SciTech Connect

    Tazawa, Masato; Jin, P.; Tanemura, Sakae

    1995-12-31

    Tungsten doped vanadium oxide (V{sub 1{minus}x}W{sub x}O{sub 2}) films are known to be reliable thermochromic materials for their semiconductor/metal transition temperature which can be controlled by the doping level x. In this paper, firstly, the optical constants of V{sub 1{minus}x}W{sub x}O{sub 2} films on glass substrate were determined from the reflectance spectra and the transmittance spectra measured at 25 C and 80 C in the wavelength region from 300 to 2,500 nm. In the determination the authors used Drude model in the high temperature metallic-phase and the least square method in the low temperature semiconductor-phase. The calculated reflectance spectra and the transmittance spectra using the Drude model with adequate values of the parameters are consistent with the measured ones in whole spectral region in the high temperature phase. Secondarily, the authors carried out a simulation of radiative cooling power of some selective radiating materials whose substrates were V{sub 1{minus}x}W{sub x}O{sub 2} films, using the optical constants in IR region obtained by the extrapolation of the obtained ones in visible and near IR region. As the high temperature phase of V{sub 1{minus}x}W{sub x}O{sub 2} has high reflectivity, the authors can use this thermochromic film as a substrate of the selective radiating material which consists of an adequate film on a high reflective substrate. The simulation shows the capability of automatic temperature control of the radiative cooling system tandemed by SiO film, V{sub 1{minus}x}W{sub x}O{sub 2} film, and the black substrate by different doping level x.

  5. SPITZER EVIDENCE FOR A LATE-HEAVY BOMBARDMENT AND THE FORMATION OF UREILITES IN {eta} CORVI At {approx}1 Gyr

    SciTech Connect

    Lisse, C. M.; Wyatt, M. C.; Chen, C. H.; Morlok, A.; Watson, D. M.; Manoj, P.; Sheehan, P.; Currie, T. M.; Thebault, P.; Sitko, M. L. E-mail: wyatt@ast.cam.ac.uk E-mail: a.morlok@open.ac.uk E-mail: manoj@pas.rochester.edu E-mail: thayne.m.currie@nasa.gov E-mail: sitko@spacescience.org

    2012-03-10

    We have analyzed Spitzer and NASA/IRTF 2-35 {mu}m spectra of the warm, {approx}350 K circumstellar dust around the nearby MS star {eta} Corvi (F2V, 1.4 {+-} 0.3 Gyr). The spectra show clear evidence for warm, water- and carbon-rich dust at {approx}3 AU from the central star, in the system's terrestrial habitability zone. Spectral features due to ultra-primitive cometary material were found, in addition to features due to impact produced silica and high-temperature carbonaceous phases. At least 9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} kg of 0.1-100 {mu}m warm dust is present in a collisional equilibrium distribution with dn/da {approx} a{sup -3.5}, the equivalent of a 130 km radius Kuiper Belt object (KBO) of 1.0 g cm{sup 3} density and similar to recent estimates of the mass delivered to the Earth at 0.6-0.8 Gyr during the late-heavy bombardment. We conclude that the parent body was a Kuiper Belt body or bodies which captured a large amount of early primitive material in the first megayears of the system's lifetime and preserved it in deep freeze at {approx}150 AU. At {approx}1.4 Gyr they were prompted by dynamical stirring of their parent Kuiper Belt into spiraling into the inner system, eventually colliding at 5-10 km s{sup -1} with a rocky planetary body of mass {<=}M{sub Earth} at {approx}3 AU, delivering large amounts of water (>0.1% of M{sub Earth'sOceans}) and carbon-rich material. The Spitzer spectrum also closely matches spectra reported for the Ureilite meteorites of the Sudan Almahata Sitta fall in 2008, suggesting that one of the Ureilite parent bodies was a KBO.

  6. SDWFS-MT-1: A SELF-OBSCURED LUMINOUS SUPERNOVA AT z {approx_equal} 0.2

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlowski, Szymon; Kochanek, C. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Thompson, T. A.; Assef, R. J.; Szczygiel, D. M.; Stern, D.; Griffith, R.; Prieto, J. L.; Drake, A. J.; Harrison, F.; Madsen, K.; Wozniak, P. R.; Nugent, P.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Beshore, E.; Larson, S.; Brown, M. J. I.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, B. T.

    2010-10-20

    We report the discovery of a 6 month long mid-infrared transient, SDWFS-MT-1 (aka SN 2007va), in the Spitzer Deep, Wide-Field Survey of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Booetes field. The transient, located in a z = 0.19 low-luminosity (M{sub [4.5]} {approx_equal} -18.6 mag, L/L{sub *} {approx_equal} 0.01) metal-poor (12 + log(O/H) {approx_equal} 7.8) irregular galaxy, peaked at a mid-infrared absolute magnitude of M{sub [4.5]} {approx_equal} -24.2 in the 4.5 {mu}m Spitzer/IRAC band and emitted a total energy of at least 10{sup 51} erg. The optical emission was likely fainter than the mid-infrared, although our constraints on the optical emission are poor because the transient peaked when the source was 'behind' the Sun. The Spitzer data are consistent with emission by a modified blackbody with a temperature of {approx}1350 K. We rule out a number of scenarios for the origin of the transient such as a Galactic star, active galactic nucleus activity, {gamma}-ray burst, tidal disruption of a star by a black hole, and gravitational lensing. The most plausible scenario is a supernova (SN) exploding inside a massive, optically thick circumstellar medium, composed of multiple shells of previously ejected material. If the proposed scenario is correct, then a significant fraction ({approx}10%) of the most luminous SN may be self-enshrouded by dust not only before but also after the SN occurs. The spectral energy distribution of the progenitor of such an SN would be a slightly cooler version of {eta} Carinae peaking at 20-30 {mu}m.

  7. Change is a Constant.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H; Provencher, Matthew T; Brand, Jefferson C; Rossi, Michael J; Poehling, Gary G

    2015-06-01

    In 2015, Henry P. Hackett, Managing Editor, Arthroscopy, retires, and Edward A. Goss, Executive Director, Arthroscopy Association of North America (AANA), retires. Association is a positive constant, in a time of change. With change comes a need for continuing education, research, and sharing of ideas. While the quality of education at AANA and ISAKOS is superior and most relevant, the unique reason to travel and meet is the opportunity to interact with innovative colleagues. Personal interaction best stimulates new ideas to improve patient care, research, and teaching. Through our network, we best create innovation.

  8. Cosmology with varying constants.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carlos J A P

    2002-12-15

    The idea of possible time or space variations of the 'fundamental' constants of nature, although not new, is only now beginning to be actively considered by large numbers of researchers in the particle physics, cosmology and astrophysics communities. This revival is mostly due to the claims of possible detection of such variations, in various different contexts and by several groups. I present the current theoretical motivations and expectations for such variations, review the current observational status and discuss the impact of a possible confirmation of these results in our views of cosmology and physics as a whole.

  9. COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH OBSERVATIONS OF WARM INTERVENING GAS AT z {approx} 0.325 TOWARD 3C 263

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, Anand; Savage, Blair D.; Wakker, Bart P. E-mail: savage@astro.wisc.edu

    2012-06-10

    We present HST/COS high-S/N observations of the z = 0.32566 multiphase absorber toward 3C 263. The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) data show absorption from H I (Ly{alpha} to Ly{theta}), O VI, C III, N III, Si III, and C II. The Ne VIII in this absorber is detected in the FUSE spectrum along with O III, O IV, and N IV. The low and intermediate ions are kinematically aligned with each other and H I and display narrow line widths of b {approx} 6-8 km s{sup -1}. The O VI {lambda}{lambda}1031, 1037 lines are kinematically offset by {Delta}v {approx} 12 km s{sup -1} from the low ions and are a factor of {approx}4 broader. All metal ions except O VI and Ne VIII are consistent with an origin in gas photoionized by the extragalactic background radiation. The bulk of the observed H I is also traced by this photoionized medium. The metallicity in this gas phase is Z {approx}> 0.15 Z{sub Sun} with carbon having near-solar abundances. The O VI and Ne VIII favor an origin in collisionally ionized gas at T = 5.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K. The H I absorption associated with this warm absorber is a broad-Ly{alpha} absorber (BLA) marginally detected in the COS spectrum. This warm gas phase has a metallicity of [X/H] {approx}-0.12 dex, and a total hydrogen column density of N( H) {approx} 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -2}, which is {approx}2 dex higher than what is traced by the photoionized gas. Simultaneous detection of O VI, Ne VIII, and BLAs in an absorber can be a strong diagnostic of gas with T {approx} 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} K corresponding to the warm phase of the warm-hot intergalactic medium or shock-heated gas in the extended halos of galaxies.

  10. Hadron spectrum, quark masses, and decay constants from light overlap fermions on large lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Galletly, D.; Horsley, R.; Guertler, M.; Perlt, H.; Schiller, A.; Rakow, P. E. L.; Schierholz, G.; Streuer, T.

    2007-04-01

    We present results from a simulation of quenched overlap fermions with Luescher-Weisz gauge field action on lattices up to 24{sup 3}48 and for pion masses down to {approx_equal}250 MeV. Among the quantities we study are the pion, rho, and nucleon masses; the light and strange quark masses; and the pion decay constant. The renormalization of the scalar and axial vector currents is done nonperturbatively in the RI-MOM scheme. The simulations are performed at two different lattice spacings, a{approx_equal}0.1 fm and {approx_equal}0.15 fm, and on two different physical volumes, to test the scaling properties of our action and to study finite volume effects. We compare our results with the predictions of chiral perturbation theory and compute several of its low-energy constants. The pion mass is computed in sectors of fixed topology as well.

  11. z {approx} 7 GALAXY CANDIDATES FROM NICMOS OBSERVATIONS OVER THE HDF-SOUTH AND THE CDF-SOUTH AND HDF-NORTH GOODS FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Bouwens, Rychard J.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Gonzalez, Valentino; Holden, Brad; Magee, Dan; Labbe, Ivo; Franx, Marijn; Conselice, Christopher J.; Blakeslee, John; Van Dokkum, Pieter; Marchesini, Danilo; Zheng Wei

    2010-12-20

    We use {approx}88 arcmin{sup 2} of deep ({approx}>26.5 mag at 5{sigma}) NICMOS data over the two GOODS fields and the HDF-South to conduct a search for bright z {approx}> 7 galaxy candidates. This search takes advantage of an efficient preselection over 58 arcmin{sup 2} of NICMOS H{sub 160}-band data where only plausible z {approx}> 7 candidates are followed up with NICMOS J{sub 110}-band observations. {approx}248 arcmin{sup 2} of deep ground-based near-infrared data ({approx}>25.5 mag, 5{sigma}) are also considered in the search. In total, we report 15 z{sub 850}-dropout candidates over this area-7 of which are new to these search fields. Two possible z {approx} 9 J{sub 110}-dropout candidates are also found, but seem unlikely to correspond to z {approx} 9 galaxies (given the estimated contamination levels). The present z {approx} 9 search is used to set upper limits on the prevalence of such sources. Rigorous testing is undertaken to establish the level of contamination of our selections by photometric scatter, low-mass stars, supernovae, and spurious sources. The estimated contamination rate of our z {approx} 7 selection is {approx}24%. Through careful simulations, the effective volume available to our z {approx}> 7 selections is estimated and used to establish constraints on the volume density of luminous (L*{sub z{sub ={sub 3}}}, or {approx}-21 mag) galaxies from these searches. We find that the volume density of luminous star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 7 is 13{sup +8}{sub -5} times lower than at z {approx} 4 and >25 times lower (1{sigma}) at z {approx} 9 than at z {approx} 4. This is the most stringent constraint yet available on the volume density of {approx}>L*{sub z{sub ={sub 3}}} galaxies at z {approx} 9. The present wide-area, multi-field search limits cosmic variance to {approx}<20%. The evolution we find at the bright end of the UV LF is similar to that found from recent Subaru Suprime-Cam, HAWK-I or ERS WFC3/IR searches. The present paper also

  12. Determination of anisotropic optical constants and surface coverage of molecular films using polarized visible ATR spectroscopy. Application to adsorbed cytochrome c films.

    PubMed

    Runge, Anne F; Rasmussen, Nicole C; Saavedra, S Scott; Mendes, Sergio B

    2005-01-13

    This article describes a method to determine the anisotropic optical constants and surface coverage of molecular films using polarized attenuated total reflectance (ATR) absorbance measurements. We have extended the transfer-matrix formalism to describe birefringent and dichroic films in ATR geometries and have combined it with an iterative numerical procedure to determine the anisotropic values of both the real (n) and imaginary (k) parts of the complex refractive index of the film under investigation. Anisotropic values of the imaginary part of the refractive index (k) allow for the determination of the surface coverage and one order parameter of the film. To illustrate this approach, we have used cytochrome c (cyt c) protein films adsorbed to glass and indium tin oxide (ITO) surfaces. Experimental results show that cyt c films on these surfaces, which were formed under identical conditions, have significant differences in their surface coverages (11.2 +/- 0.4 pmol/cm(2) on glass and 21.7 +/- 0.9 pmol/cm(2) on ITO); however, their order parameters are similar (0.30 +/- 0.02 on glass and 0.36 +/- 0.04 on ITO).

  13. Application of a Genetic Algorithm to the Optimization of Rate Constants in Chemical Kinetic Models for Combustion Simulation of HCCI Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Kyu; Ito, Kazuma; Yoshihara, Daisuke; Wakisaka, Tomoyuki

    For numerically predicting the combustion processes in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines, practical chemical kinetic models have been explored. A genetic algorithm (GA) has been applied to the optimization of the rate constants in detailed chemical kinetic models, and a detailed kinetic model (592 reactions) for gasoline reference fuels with arbitrary octane number between 60 and 100 has been obtained from the detailed reaction schemes for iso-octane and n-heptane proposed by Golovitchev. The ignition timing in a gasoline HCCI engine has been predicted reasonably well by zero-dimensional simulation using the CHEMKIN code with this detailed kinetic model. An original reduced reaction scheme (45 reactions) for dimethyl ether (DME) has been derived from Curran’s detailed scheme, and the combustion process in a DME HCCI engine has been predicted reasonably well in a practical computation time by three-dimensional simulation using the authors’ GTT code, which has been linked to the CHEMKIN subroutines with the proposed reaction scheme and also has adopted a modified eddy dissipation combustion model.

  14. [111]-oriented PIN-PMN-PT crystals with ultrahigh dielectric permittivity and high frequency constant for high-frequency transducer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fei; Zhang, Shujun; Luo, Jun; Geng, Xuecang; Xu, Zhuo; Shrout, Thomas R.

    2016-08-01

    The electromechanical properties of [111]-oriented tetragonal Pb(In1/2Nb1/2O3)-Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3O3)-PbTiO3 (PIN-PMN-PT) crystals were investigated for potential high frequency ultrasonic transducers. The domain-engineered tetragonal crystals exhibit an ultrahigh free dielectric permittivity ɛ33T > 10 000 with a moderate electromechanical coupling factor k33 ˜ 0.79, leading to a high clamped dielectric permittivity ɛ33S of 2800, significantly higher than those of the rhombohedral relaxor-PT crystals and high-K (dielectric permittivity) piezoelectric ceramics. Of particular significance is that the [111]-oriented tetragonal crystals were found to possess high elastic stiffness, with frequency constant N33 of ˜2400 Hz m, allowing relatively easy fabrication of high-frequency transducers. In addition, no scaling effect of piezoelectric and dielectric properties was observed down to thickness of 0.1 mm, corresponding to an operational frequency of ˜24 MHz. These advantages of [111]-oriented tetragonal PIN-PMN-PT crystals will benefit high-frequency ultrasonic array transducers, allowing for high sensitivity, broad bandwidth, and reduced noise/crosstalk.

  15. The Hubble Constant.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Neal

    2007-01-01

    I review the current state of determinations of the Hubble constant, which gives the length scale of the Universe by relating the expansion velocity of objects to their distance. In the last 20 years, much progress has been made and estimates now range between 60 and 75 km s(-1) Mpc(-1), with most now between 70 and 75 km s(-1) Mpc(-1), a huge improvement over the factor-of-2 uncertainty which used to prevail. Further improvements which gave a generally agreed margin of error of a few percent rather than the current 10% would be vital input to much other interesting cosmology. There are several programmes which are likely to lead us to this point in the next 10 years.

  16. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-manometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment.

  17. When constants are important

    SciTech Connect

    Beiu, V.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper the authors discuss several complexity aspects pertaining to neural networks, commonly known as the curse of dimensionality. The focus will be on: (1) size complexity and depth-size tradeoffs; (2) complexity of learning; and (3) precision and limited interconnectivity. Results have been obtained for each of these problems when dealt with separately, but few things are known as to the links among them. They start by presenting known results and try to establish connections between them. These show that they are facing very difficult problems--exponential growth in either space (i.e. precision and size) and/or time (i.e., learning and depth)--when resorting to neural networks for solving general problems. The paper will present a solution for lowering some constants, by playing on the depth-size tradeoff.

  18. The Hubble constant.

    PubMed Central

    Tully, R B

    1993-01-01

    Five methods of estimating distances have demonstrated internal reproducibility at the level of 5-20% rms accuracy. The best of these are the cepheid (and RR Lyrae), planetary nebulae, and surface-brightness fluctuation techniques. Luminosity-line width and Dn-sigma methods are less accurate for an individual case but can be applied to large numbers of galaxies. The agreement is excellent between these five procedures. It is determined that Hubble constant H0 = 90 +/- 10 km.s-1.Mpc-1 [1 parsec (pc) = 3.09 x 10(16) m]. It is difficult to reconcile this value with the preferred world model even in the low-density case. The standard model with Omega = 1 may be excluded unless there is something totally misunderstood about the foundation of the distance scale or the ages of stars. PMID:11607391

  19. Unitaxial constant velocity microactuator

    DOEpatents

    McIntyre, T.J.

    1994-06-07

    A uniaxial drive system or microactuator capable of operating in an ultra-high vacuum environment is disclosed. The mechanism includes a flexible coupling having a bore therethrough, and two clamp/pusher assemblies mounted in axial ends of the coupling. The clamp/pusher assemblies are energized by voltage-operated piezoelectrics therewithin to operatively engage the shaft and coupling causing the shaft to move along its rotational axis through the bore. The microactuator is capable of repeatably positioning to sub-nanometer accuracy while affording a scan range in excess of 5 centimeters. Moreover, the microactuator generates smooth, constant velocity motion profiles while producing a drive thrust of greater than 10 pounds. The system is remotely controlled and piezoelectrically driven, hence minimal thermal loading, vibrational excitation, or outgassing is introduced to the operating environment. 10 figs.

  20. THE RADIAL DISTRIBUTION OF STAR FORMATION IN GALAXIES AT z {approx} 1 FROM THE 3D-HST SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Erica June; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Leja, Joel; Brammer, Gabriel; Lundgren, Britt; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Rix, Hans-Walter; Van der Wel, Arjen; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha; Wuyts, Stijn; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Labbe, Ivo; Patel, Shannon; Kriek, Mariska; Schmidt, Kasper B.

    2013-01-20

    The assembly of galaxies can be described by the distribution of their star formation as a function of cosmic time. Thanks to the WFC3 grism on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) it is now possible to measure this beyond the local Universe. Here we present the spatial distribution of H{alpha} emission for a sample of 54 strongly star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 1 in the 3D-HST Treasury survey. By stacking the H{alpha} emission, we find that star formation occurred in approximately exponential distributions at z {approx} 1, with a median Sersic index of n = 1.0 {+-} 0.2. The stacks are elongated with median axis ratios of b/a = 0.58 {+-} 0.09 in H{alpha} consistent with (possibly thick) disks at random orientation angles. Keck spectra obtained for a subset of eight of the galaxies show clear evidence for rotation, with inclination corrected velocities of 90-330 km s{sup -1}. The most straightforward interpretation of our results is that star formation in strongly star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 1 generally occurred in disks. The disks appear to be 'scaled-up' versions of nearby spiral galaxies: they have EW(H{alpha}) {approx} 100 A out to the solar orbit and they have star formation surface densities above the threshold for driving galactic scale winds.

  1. SN 2008jb: A 'LOST' CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA IN A STAR-FORMING DWARF GALAXY AT {approx}10 Mpc

    SciTech Connect

    Prieto, J. L.; Lee, J. C.; Drake, A. J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; McNaught, R.; Garradd, G.; Beacom, J. F.; Beshore, E.; Catelan, M.; Pojmanski, G.; Stanek, K. Z.; Szczygiel, D. M.

    2012-01-20

    We present the discovery and follow-up observations of SN 2008jb, a core-collapse supernova in the southern dwarf irregular galaxy ESO 302-14 (M{sub B} = -15.3 mag) at 9.6 Mpc. This nearby transient was missed by galaxy-targeted surveys and was only found in archival optical images obtained by the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey and the All-Sky Automated Survey. The well-sampled archival photometry shows that SN 2008jb was detected shortly after explosion and reached a bright optical maximum, V{sub max} {approx_equal} 13.6 mag (M{sub V,max} {approx_equal} -16.5). The shape of the light curve shows a plateau of {approx}100 days, followed by a drop of {approx}1.4 mag in the V band to a slow decline with an approximate {sup 56}Co decay slope. The late-time light curve is consistent with 0.04 {+-} 0.01 M{sub Sun} of {sup 56}Ni synthesized in the explosion. A spectrum of the supernova obtained two years after explosion shows a broad, boxy H{alpha} emission line, which is unusual for normal Type II-Plateau supernovae at late times. We detect the supernova in archival Spitzer and WISE images obtained 8-14 months after explosion, which show clear signs of warm (600-700 K) dust emission. The dwarf irregular host galaxy, ESO 302-14, has a low gas-phase oxygen abundance, 12 + log(O/H) = 8.2 ({approx}1/5 Z{sub Sun }), similar to those of the Small Magellanic Cloud and the hosts of long gamma-ray bursts and luminous core-collapse supernovae. This metallicity is one of the lowest among local ({approx}< 10 Mpc) supernova hosts. We study the host environment using GALEX far-UV, R-band, and H{alpha} images and find that the supernova occurred in a large star formation complex. The morphology of the H{alpha} emission appears as a large shell (R {approx_equal} 350 pc) surrounding the FUV and optical emission. Using the H{alpha}-to-FUV ratio and FUV and R-band luminosities, we estimate an age of {approx}9 Myr and a total mass of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun

  2. Reconstructing the Gamma-Ray Photon Optical Depth of the Universe To Z Approx. 4 from Multiwavelength Galaxy Survey Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helgason, Kari; Kashlinsky, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Reconstructing the Gamma-Ray Photon Optical Depth of the Universe To Z Approx. 4fFrom Multiwavelength Galaxy Survey Data We reconstruct the gamma-ray opacity of the universe out to z approx. < 3–4 using an extensive library of 342 observed galaxy luminosity function (LF) surveys extending to high redshifts .We cover the whole range from UV to mid-IR (0.15–25 micron ) providing for the first time a robust empirical calculation of the gamma gamma optical depth out to several TeV. Here, we use the same database as Helgason et al. where the extragalactic background light was reconstructed from LFs out to 4.5 micron and was shown to recover observed galaxy counts to high accuracy. We extend our earlier library Of LFs to 25micron such that it covers the energy range of pair production with gamma -rays (1) in the entire Fermi/LAT energy range, and (2) at higher TeV energies probed by ground-based Cherenkov telescopes. In the absence of significant contributions to the cosmic diffuse background from unknown populations, such as the putative Population III era sources, the universe appears to be largely transparent to gamma-rays at all Fermi/LAT energies out to z approx.. 2 whereas it becomes opaque to TeV photons already at z approx. < 0.2 and reaching tau approx 10 at z = 1. Comparing with the currently available Fermi/LAT gamma-ray burst and blazar data shows that there is room for significant emissions originating in the first stars era.

  3. Mg II ABSORPTION CHARACTERISTICS OF A VOLUME-LIMITED SAMPLE OF GALAXIES AT z {approx} 0.1

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Cooke, Jeff E-mail: cooke@uci.edu

    2009-12-15

    We present an initial survey of Mg II absorption characteristics in the halos of a carefully constructed, volume-limited subsample of galaxies embedded in the spectroscopic part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We observed quasars near sightlines to 20 low-redshift (z {approx} 0.1), luminous (M {sub r} + 5log h {<=}-20.5) galaxies in SDSS DR4 and DR6 with the LRIS-B spectrograph on the Keck I telescope. The primary systematic criteria for the targeted galaxies are a redshift z {approx}> 0.1 and the presence of an appropriate bright background quasar within a projected 75 h {sup -1} kpc of its center, although we preferentially sample galaxies with lower impact parameters and slightly more star formation within this range. Of the observed systems, six exhibit strong (W {sub eq}(2796) {>=} 0.3 A) Mg II absorption at the galaxy's redshift, six systems have upper limits which preclude strong Mg II absorption, while the remaining observations rule out very strong (W {sub eq}(2796) {>=} 1-2 A) absorption. The absorbers fall at higher impact parameters than many non-absorber sightlines, indicating a covering fraction f{sub c} {approx}< 0.4 for {>=}0.3 A absorbers at z {approx} 0.1, even at impact parameters {<=}35 h {sup -1} kpc (f {sub c} {approx} 0.25). The data are consistent with a possible dependence of covering fraction and/or absorption halo size on the environment or star-forming properties of the central galaxy.

  4. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z {approx} 0.3 FROM UV-TO-FIR MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Oteo, I.; Bongiovanni, A.; Perez Garcia, A. M.; Cepa, J.; Pintos-Castro, I.; Ederoclite, A.; Sanchez-Portal, M.; Altieri, B.; Perez-Martinez, R.; Andreani, P.; Aussel, H.; Daddi, E.; Elbaz, D.; Le Floc'h, E.; Cimatti, A.; and others

    2012-06-01

    The analysis of the physical properties of low-redshift Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) can provide clues in the study of their high-redshift analogs. At z {approx} 0.3, LAEs are bright enough to be detected over almost the entire electromagnetic spectrum and it is possible to carry out a more precise and complete study than at higher redshifts. In this work, we examine the UV and IR emission, dust attenuation, star formation rate (SFR), and morphology of a sample of 23 GALEX-discovered star-forming LAEs at z {approx} 0.3 with direct UV (GALEX), optical (ACS), and FIR (PACS and MIPS) data. Using the same UV and IR limiting luminosities, we find that LAEs at z {approx} 0.3 tend to be less dusty, have slightly higher total SFRs, have bluer UV continuum slopes, and are much smaller than other galaxies that do not exhibit Ly{alpha} emission in their spectrum (non-LAEs). These results suggest that at z {approx} 0.3, Ly{alpha} photons tend to escape from small galaxies with low dust attenuation. Regarding their morphology, LAEs belong to Irr/merger classes, unlike non-LAEs. Size and morphology represent the most noticeable difference between LAEs and non-LAEs at z {approx} 0.3. Furthermore, the comparison of our results with those obtained at higher redshifts indicates either that the Ly{alpha} technique picks up different kind of galaxies at different redshifts or that the physical properties of LAEs are evolving with redshift.

  5. EVIDENCE FOR A WIDE RANGE OF ULTRAVIOLET OBSCURATION IN z {approx} 2 DUSTY GALAXIES FROM THE GOODS-HERSCHEL SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, Kyle; Dickinson, Mark; Dey, Arjun; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Pope, Alexandra; Magnelli, Benjamin; Pannella, Maurilio; Aussel, Herve; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Buat, Veronique; Bussmann, Shane; Hwang, Ho Seong; Charmandaris, Vassilis; Dannerbauer, Helmut; Lin Lihwai; Magdis, Georgios; Morrison, Glenn; and others

    2012-11-01

    Dusty galaxies at z {approx} 2 span a wide range of relative brightness between rest-frame mid-infrared (8 {mu}m) and ultraviolet wavelengths. We attempt to determine the physical mechanism responsible for this diversity. Dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs), which have rest-frame mid-IR to UV flux density ratios {approx}> 1000, might be abnormally bright in the mid-IR, perhaps due to prominent emission from active galactic nuclei and/or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or abnormally faint in the UV. We use far-infrared data from the GOODS-Herschel survey to show that most DOGs with 10{sup 12} L {sub Sun} {approx}< L {sub IR} {approx}< 10{sup 13} L {sub Sun} are not abnormally bright in the mid-IR when compared to other dusty galaxies with similar IR (8-1000 {mu}m) luminosities. We observe a relation between the median IR to UV luminosity ratios and the median UV continuum power-law indices for these galaxies, and we find that only 24% have specific star formation rates that indicate the dominance of compact star-forming regions. This circumstantial evidence supports the idea that the UV- and IR-emitting regions in these galaxies are spatially coincident, which implies a connection between the abnormal UV faintness of DOGs and dust obscuration. We conclude that the range in rest-frame mid-IR to UV flux density ratios spanned by dusty galaxies at z {approx} 2 is due to differing amounts of UV obscuration. Of galaxies with these IR luminosities, DOGs are the most obscured. We attribute differences in UV obscuration to either (1) differences in the degree of alignment between the spatial distributions of dust and massive stars or (2) differences in the total dust content.

  6. THE DEPENDENCE OF STAR FORMATION RATES ON STELLAR MASS AND ENVIRONMENT AT z approx 0.8

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Shannon G.; Holden, Bradford P.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Franx, Marijn

    2009-11-01

    We examine the star formation rates (SFRs) of galaxies in a redshift slice encompassing the z = 0.834 cluster RX J0152.7 - 1357. We used a low-dispersion prism in the Inamori Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph to identify galaxies with z {sub AB} < 23.3 mag in diverse environments around the cluster out to projected distances of approx8 Mpc from the cluster center. We utilize a mass-limited sample (M > 2 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) of 330 galaxies that were imaged by Spitzer MIPS at 24 mum to derive SFRs and study the dependence of specific SFR (SSFR) on stellar mass and environment. We find that the SFR and SSFR show a strong decrease with increasing local density, similar to the relation at z approx 0. Our result contrasts with other work at z approx 1 that finds the SFR-density trend to reverse for luminosity-limited samples. These other results appear to be driven by star formation (SF) in lower mass systems (M approx 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}). Our results imply that the processes that shut down SF are present in groups and other dense regions in the field. Our data also suggest that the lower SFRs of galaxies in higher density environments may reflect a change in the ratio of star-forming to non-star-forming galaxies, rather than a change in SFRs. As a consequence, the SFRs of star-forming galaxies, in environments ranging from small groups to clusters, appear to be similar and largely unaffected by the local processes that truncate SF at z approx 0.8.

  7. Tunable band alignment and dielectric constant of solution route fabricated Al/HfO2/Si gate stack for CMOS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Arvind; Mondal, Sandip; Koteswara Rao, K. S. R.

    2017-02-01

    The solution route deposition method will reduce the fabrication cost, and it is compatible with existing Si technology. Here, we systematically investigate the impact of annealing temperature on the electrical and dielectric properties along with the band alignment of HfO2 thin films with silicon. The films were fabricated using the hafnium isopropoxide adduct precursor, which is environment friendly and non-toxic in ambient conditions. We have analyzed the band alignment of HfO2/Si stack by using ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopic and current-voltage (J-V) plot to understand its impact on electrical transport. The bandgap of HfO2 films estimated from Plasmon energy loss spectra is 5.9 eV. The composition analysis is done with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy that suggests a good stoichiometric ratio of 1:1.96. The atomic force microscopy studies display a smooth surface with the roughness of 1.4 Å without any cracks in the films. It is found that the current conduction mechanisms and barrier heights at both the interfaces are influenced by the annealing temperature; a temperature of 450 °C results in an optimum performance. Interestingly, the high value of dielectric constant (23) in the amorphous phase is attributed to the existence of cubic like short range order in HfO2 films. Moreover, a low leakage current density of 1.4 × 10-9 A/cm2 at -1 V and 1.48 × 10-8 A/cm2 at +1 V in gate and substrate injection modes is achieved. The obtained defect activation energies of 0.91 eV, 0.87 eV, and 0.93 eV for the films annealed at 350 °C, 450 °C, and 550 °C lay below the conduction band edge of HfO2. These energy levels are ascribed to three and four fold oxygen vacancy related traps. The formation of dipoles at the interface, change in the microstructure, and oxygen migration at the interfacial layer are the possible causes for the observed parametric variations in the metal-insulator-semiconductor structure. The electrical properties can be tuned by

  8. Infrared optical constants of crystalline sodium chloride dihydrate: application to study the crystallization of aqueous sodium chloride solution droplets at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Robert; Möhler, Ottmar; Schnaiter, Martin

    2012-08-23

    Complex refractive indices of sodium chloride dihydrate, NaCl·2H(2)O, have been retrieved in the 6000-800 cm(-1) wavenumber regime from the infrared extinction spectra of crystallized aqueous NaCl solution droplets. The data set is valid in the temperature range from 235 to 216 K and was inferred from crystallization experiments with airborne particles performed in the large coolable aerosol and cloud chamber AIDA at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. The retrieval concept was based on the Kramers-Kronig relationship for a complex function of the optical constants n and k whose imaginary part is proportional to the optical depth of a small particle absorption spectrum in the Rayleigh approximation. The appropriate proportionality factor was inferred from a fitting algorithm applied to the extinction spectra of about 1 μm sized particles, which, apart from absorption, also featured a pronounced scattering contribution. NaCl·2H(2)O is the thermodynamically stable crystalline solid in the sodium chloride-water system below the peritectic at 273.3 K; above 273.3 K, the anhydrous NaCl is more stable. In contrast to anhydrous NaCl crystals, the dihydrate particles reveal prominent absorption signatures at mid-infrared wavelengths due to the hydration water molecules. Formation of NaCl·2H(2)O was only detected at temperatures clearly below the peritectic and was first evidenced in a crystallization experiment conducted at 235 K. We have employed the retrieved refractive indices of NaCl·2H(2)O to quantify the temperature dependent partitioning between anhydrous and dihydrate NaCl particles upon crystallization of aqueous NaCl solution droplets. It was found that the temperature range from 235 to 216 K represents the transition regime where the composition of the crystallized particle ensemble changes from almost only NaCl to almost only NaCl·2H(2)O particles. Compared to the findings on the NaCl/NaCl·2H(2)O partitioning from a recent study conducted with micron

  9. QSAR model reproducibility and applicability: a case study of rate constants of hydroxyl radical reaction models applied to polybrominated diphenyl ethers and (benzo-)triazoles.

    PubMed

    Roy, Partha Pratim; Kovarich, Simona; Gramatica, Paola

    2011-08-01

    The crucial importance of the three central OECD principles for quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model validation is highlighted in a case study of tropospheric degradation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by OH, applied to two CADASTER chemical classes (PBDEs and (benzo-)triazoles). The application of any QSAR model to chemicals without experimental data largely depends on model reproducibility by the user. The reproducibility of an unambiguous algorithm (OECD Principle 2) is guaranteed by redeveloping MLR models based on both updated version of DRAGON software for molecular descriptors calculation and some freely available online descriptors. The Genetic Algorithm has confirmed its ability to always select the most informative descriptors independently on the input pool of variables. The ability of the GA-selected descriptors to model chemicals not used in model development is verified by three different splittings (random by response, K-ANN and K-means clustering), thus ensuring the external predictivity of the new models, independently of the training/prediction set composition (OECD Principle 5). The relevance of checking the structural applicability domain becomes very evident on comparing the predictions for CADASTER chemicals, using the new models proposed herein, with those obtained by EPI Suite.

  10. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Constant-rate aquifer... COMMISSION REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF PROJECTS Application Procedure § 806.12 Constant-rate aquifer testing. (a... withdraw or increase a withdrawal of groundwater shall perform a constant-rate aquifer test in...

  11. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Constant-rate aquifer... COMMISSION REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF PROJECTS Application Procedure § 806.12 Constant-rate aquifer testing. (a... withdraw or increase a withdrawal of groundwater shall perform a constant-rate aquifer test in...

  12. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Constant-rate aquifer... COMMISSION REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF PROJECTS Application Procedure § 806.12 Constant-rate aquifer testing. (a... withdraw or increase a withdrawal of groundwater shall perform a constant-rate aquifer test in...

  13. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Constant-rate aquifer... COMMISSION REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF PROJECTS Application Procedure § 806.12 Constant-rate aquifer testing. (a... withdraw or increase a withdrawal of groundwater shall perform a constant-rate aquifer test in...

  14. 18 CFR 806.12 - Constant-rate aquifer testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Constant-rate aquifer... COMMISSION REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF PROJECTS Application Procedure § 806.12 Constant-rate aquifer testing. (a... withdraw or increase a withdrawal of groundwater shall perform a constant-rate aquifer test in...

  15. COSMOLOGICAL EVOLUTION OF SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES. I. MASS FUNCTION AT 0 < z {approx}< 2

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yanrong; Wang Jianmin; Ho, Luis C. E-mail: wangjm@mail.ihep.ac.cn

    2011-11-20

    We present the mass function of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) over the redshift range z = 0-2, using the latest deep luminosity and mass functions of field galaxies to constrain the masses of their spheroids, which we relate to SMBH mass through the empirical correlation between SMBH and spheroid mass (the M{sub .}-M{sub sph} relation). In addition to luminosity fading of the stellar content of the spheroids, we carefully consider the variation of the bulge-to-total luminosity ratio of the galaxy populations and the M{sub .}/M{sub sph} ratio, which, according to numerous recent studies, evolves rapidly with redshift. The SMBH mass functions derived from the galaxy luminosity and mass functions show very good agreement, both in shape and in normalization. The resultant SMBH mass function and integrated mass density for the local epoch (z Almost-Equal-To 0) match well those derived independently by other studies. Consistent with other evidence for cosmic downsizing, the upper end of the mass function remains roughly constant since z Almost-Equal-To 2, while the space density of lower mass black holes undergoes strong evolution. We carefully assess the impact of various sources of uncertainties on our calculations. A companion paper uses the mass function derived in this work to determine the radiative efficiency of black hole accretion and constraints that can be imposed on the cosmological evolution of black hole spin.

  16. COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH AND FUSE OBSERVATIONS OF T {approx} 10{sup 5} K GAS IN A NEARBY GALAXY FILAMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, Anand; Wakker, Bart P.; Savage, Blair D.; Keeney, Brian A.; Shull, J. Michael; Stocke, John T.; Sembach, Kenneth R. E-mail: wakker@astro.wisc.ed

    2010-10-01

    We present a clear detection of a broad Ly{alpha} absorber (BLA) with a matching O VI line in the nearby universe. The BLA is detected at z(Ly{alpha})=0.01028 in the high signal-to-noise ratio spectrum of Mrk 290 obtained using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. The Ly{alpha} absorption has two components, with b(H i) = 55{+-}1 km s{sup -1} and b(H i) = 33{+-}1 km s{sup -1}, separated in velocity by v {approx} 115 km s{sup -1}. The O VI, detected by the Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer at z(O vi) = 0.01027, has a b(O vi) = 29{+-}3 km s{sup -1} and is kinematically well aligned with the broader H I component. The non-detection of other ions such as C II, Si II, Fe II, C III, Si III, C IV, Si IV, and N V at the same velocity as the BLA and the O VI implies that the absorber is tracing highly ionized gas. The different line widths of the BLA and O VI suggest a temperature of T = 1.4 x 10{sup 5} K in the absorber. Photoionization, collisional ionization equilibrium as well as non-equilibrium collisional ionization models do not explain the ion ratios at this temperature. The observed line strength ratios and line widths favor an ionization scenario in which both ion-electron collisions and UV photons contribute to the ionization in the gas. Such a model requires a low metallicity of {approx}-1.7 dex, ionization parameter of log U {approx} -1.4, a large total hydrogen column density of N(H) {approx} 4 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -2}, and a path length of {approx}400 kpc. The line of sight to Mrk 290 intercepts at the redshift of the absorber, a megaparsec scale filamentary structure extending over {approx}20{sup 0} in the sky, with several luminous galaxies distributed within {approx}1.5 h {sup -1} Mpc projected distance from the absorber. The collisionally ionized gas phase of this absorber is most likely tracing a shock-heated gaseous structure, consistent with a few different scenarios for the origin including an overdense region of the warm-hot intergalactic medium in

  17. THE MOST METAL-POOR STARS. IV. THE TWO POPULATIONS WITH [Fe/H] {approx}< -3.0

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, John E.; Yong, David; Bessell, M. S.; Asplund, M. E-mail: bessell@mso.anu.edu.au; and others

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the carbon-normal and carbon-rich populations of Galactic halo stars having [Fe/H] {approx}< -3.0, utilizing chemical abundances from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise model-atmosphere analyses. The C-rich population represents {approx}28% of stars below [Fe/H] = -3.1, with the present C-rich sample comprising 16 CEMP-no stars, and two others with [Fe/H] {approx} -5.5 and uncertain classification. The population is O-rich ([O/Fe] {approx}> +1.5); the light elements Na, Mg, and Al are enhanced relative to Fe in half the sample; and for Z > 20 (Ca) there is little evidence for enhancements relative to solar values. These results are best explained in terms of the admixing and processing of material from H-burning and He-burning regions as achieved by nucleosynthesis in zero-heavy-element models in the literature of 'mixing and fallback' supernovae (SNe); of rotating, massive, and intermediate-mass stars; and of Type II SNe with relativistic jets. The available (limited) radial velocities offer little support for the C-rich stars with [Fe/H] < -3.1 being binary. More data are required before one could conclude that binarity is key to an understanding of this population. We suggest that the C-rich and C-normal populations result from two different gas cooling channels in the very early universe of material that formed the progenitors of the two populations. The first was cooling by fine-structure line transitions of C II and O I (to form the C-rich population); the second, while not well defined (perhaps dust-induced cooling?), led to the C-normal group. In this scenario, the C-rich population contains the oldest stars currently observed.

  18. TWO LENSED z {approx_equal} 3 LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES DISCOVERED IN THE SDSS GIANT ARCS SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Koester, Benjamin P.; Gladders, Michael D.; Sharon, Keren; Wuyts, Eva; Bayliss, Matthew B.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Rigby, J. R.; Dahle, Hakon

    2010-11-01

    We report the discovery of two strongly lensed z {approx} 3 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) discovered as u-band dropouts as part of the SDSS Giant Arcs Survey (SGAS). The first, SGAS J122651.3+215220 at z = 2.9233, is lensed by one of several sub-clusters, SDSS J1226+2152, in a complex massive cluster at z = 0.43. Its (g, r, i) magnitudes are (21.14, 20.60, 20.51) which translate to surface brightnesses, {mu} {sub g,r,i}, of (23.78, 23.11, 22.81). The second, SGAS J152745.1+065219, is an LBG at z = 2.7593 lensed by the foreground SDSS J1527+0652 at z = 0.39, with (g, r, z) = (20.90, 20.52, 20.58) and {mu} {sub g,r,z} = (25.15, 24.52, 24.12). Moderate resolution spectroscopy confirms the redshifts suggested by photometric breaks and shows both absorption and emission features typical of LBGs. Lens mass models derived from combined imaging and spectroscopy reveal that SGAS J122651.3+215220 is a highly magnified source (M {approx_equal} 40), while SGAS J152745.1+065219 is magnified by no more than M {approx_equal} 15. Compared with LBG survey results, the luminosities and lensing-corrected magnitudes suggest that SGAS J122651.3+215220 is among the faintest {approx_equal}20% of LBGs in that sample. SGAS J152745.1+065219, on the other hand, has an unlensed r-band apparent magnitude similar to that of the 'Cosmic Eye', which places it near the mean of LBG survey results over similar redshifts.

  19. Nonperturbative renormalization of meson decay constants in quenched QCD for a renormalization group improved gauge action

    SciTech Connect

    Ide, K.; Aoki, S.; Kanaya, K.; Taniguchi, Y.; Burkhalter, R.; Ishikawa, K.-I.; Ishizuka, N.; Iwasaki, Y.; Ukawa, A.; Yoshie, T.; Fukugita, M.; Hashimoto, S.; Kaneko, T.; Kuramashi, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Lesk, V.; Umeda, T.; Okawa, M.

    2004-10-01

    Renormalization constants (Z-factors ) of vector and axial-vector currents are determined nonperturbatively in quenched QCD for a renormalization group improved gauge action and a tadpole-improved clover quark action using the Schroedinger functional method. Nonperturbative values of Z-factors turn out to be smaller than 1-loop perturbative values by O(15%) at a lattice spacing of a{sup -1}{approx_equal} 1 GeV. The pseudoscalar and vector meson decay constants calculated with the nonperturbative Z-factors show a much better scaling behavior compared to previous results obtained with tadpole-improved one-loop Z-factors. In particular, the nonperturbative Z-factors normalized at infinite physical volume show that the scaling violations of the decay constants are within about 10% up to the lattice spacing a{sup -1}{approx}1 GeV. The continuum estimates obtained from data in the range a{sup -1}{approx} 1-2 GeV agree with those determined from finer lattices (a{sup -1}{approx}2-4 GeV) with the standard action.

  20. DUST-CORRECTED COLORS REVEAL BIMODALITY IN THE HOST-GALAXY COLORS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AT z {approx} 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cardamone, Carolin N.; Megan Urry, C.; Brammer, Gabriel; Schawinski, Kevin; Treister, Ezequiel; Gawiser, Eric

    2010-09-20

    Using new, highly accurate photometric redshifts from the MUSYC medium-band survey in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (ECDF-S), we fit synthetic stellar population models to compare active galactic nucleus (AGN) host galaxies to inactive galaxies at 0.8 {<=} z {<=} 1.2. We find that AGN host galaxies are predominantly massive galaxies on the red sequence and in the green valley of the color-mass diagram. Because both passive and dusty galaxies can appear red in optical colors, we use rest-frame near-infrared colors to separate passively evolving stellar populations from galaxies that are reddened by dust. As with the overall galaxy population, {approx}25% of the 'red' AGN host galaxies and {approx}75% of the 'green' AGN host galaxies have colors consistent with young stellar populations reddened by dust. The dust-corrected rest-frame optical colors are the blue colors of star-forming galaxies, which imply that these AGN hosts are not passively aging to the red sequence. At z {approx} 1, AGN activity is roughly evenly split between two modes of black hole growth: the first in passively evolving host galaxies, which may be heating up the galaxy's gas and preventing future episodes of star formation, and the second in dust-reddened young galaxies, which may be ionizing the galaxy's interstellar medium and shutting down star formation.

  1. MULTI-WAVELENGTH VIEW OF KILOPARSEC-SCALE CLUMPS IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Yicheng; Giavalisco, Mauro; Cassata, Paolo; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M.

    2012-10-01

    This paper studies the properties of kiloparsec-scale clumps in star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 2 through multi-wavelength broadband photometry. A sample of 40 clumps is identified from Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) z-band images through auto-detection and visual inspection from 10 galaxies with 1.5 < z < 2.5 in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, where deep and high-resolution HST/WFC3 and ACS images enable us to resolve structures of z {approx} 2 galaxies down to the kiloparsec scale in the rest-frame UV and optical bands and to detect clumps toward the faint end. The physical properties of clumps are measured through fitting spatially resolved seven-band (BVizYJH) spectral energy distribution to models. On average, the clumps are blue and have similar median rest-frame UV-optical color as the diffuse components of their host galaxies, but the clumps have large scatter in their colors. Although the star formation rate (SFR)-stellar mass relation of galaxies is dominated by the diffuse components, clumps emerge as regions with enhanced specific star formation rates, contributing individually {approx}10% and together {approx}50% of the SFR of the host galaxies. However, the contributions of clumps to the rest-frame UV/optical luminosity and stellar mass are smaller, typically a few percent individually and {approx}20% together. On average, clumps are younger by 0.2 dex and denser by a factor of eight than diffuse components. Clump properties have obvious radial variations in the sense that central clumps are redder, older, more extincted, denser, and less active on forming stars than outskirt clumps. Our results are broadly consistent with a widely held view that clumps are formed through gravitational instability in gas-rich turbulent disks and would eventually migrate toward galactic centers and coalesce into bulges. Roughly 40% of the galaxies in our sample contain a massive clump that could be identified as a proto-bulge, which

  2. THE WYOMING SURVEY FOR H{alpha}. III. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH LOOK AT ATTENUATION BY DUST IN GALAXIES OUT TO z {approx} 0.4

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Carolynn A.; Dale, Daniel A.; Barlow, Rebecca J.; Cohen, Seth A.; Cook, David O.; Johnson, L. C.; Kattner, ShiAnne M.; Staudaher, Shawn M.; Lee, Janice C.

    2010-07-15

    We report results from the Wyoming Survey for H{alpha} (WySH), a comprehensive four-square degree survey to probe the evolution of star-forming galaxies over the latter half of the age of the universe. We have supplemented the H{alpha} data from WySH with infrared data from the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Survey and ultraviolet data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer Deep Imaging Survey. This data set provides a multi-wavelength look at the evolution of the attenuation by dust, and here we compare a traditional measure of dust attenuation (L(TIR)/L(FUV)) to a diagnostic based on a recently developed robust star formation rate (SFR) indicator, [Ha{sub obs}+24{mu}m]/Ha{sub obs}. With such data over multiple epochs, the evolution in the attenuation by dust with redshift can be assessed. We present results from the ELAIS-N1 and Lockman Hole regions at z {approx} 0.16, 0.24, 0.32, and 0.40. While the ensemble averages of both diagnostics are relatively constant from epoch to epoch, each epoch individually exhibits a larger attenuation by dust for higher SFRs. Hence, an epoch-to-epoch comparison at a fixed SFR suggests a mild decrease in dust attenuation with redshift.

  3. Is Planck's quantization constant unique?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, George

    2016-07-01

    A cornerstone of Quantum Mechanics is the existence of a non-zero least action, the Planck constant. However, the basic concepts and theoretical developments of Quantum Mechanics are independent of its specific numerical value. A different constant h _{*}, similar to the Planck constant h, but ˜12 orders of magnitude larger, characterizes plasmas. The study of >50 different geophysical, space, and laboratory plasmas, provided the first evidence for the universality and the quantum nature of h _{*}, revealing that it is a new quantization constant. The recent results show the diagnostics for determining whether plasmas are characterized by the Planck or the new quantization constant, compounding the challenge to reconcile both quantization constants in quantum mechanics.

  4. GALAXY EVOLUTION IN OVERDENSE ENVIRONMENTS AT HIGH REDSHIFT: PASSIVE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES IN A CLUSTER AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Strazzullo, V.; Gobat, R.; Daddi, E.; Onodera, M.; Carollo, M.; Dickinson, M.; Renzini, A.; Arimoto, N.; Cimatti, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Chary, R.-R.

    2013-08-01

    We present a study of galaxy populations in the central region of the IRAC-selected, X-ray-detected galaxy cluster Cl J1449+0856 at z = 2. Based on a sample of spectroscopic and photometric cluster members, we investigate stellar populations and the morphological structure of cluster galaxies over an area of {approx}0.7 Mpc{sup 2} around the cluster core. The cluster stands out as a clear overdensity both in redshift space and in the spatial distribution of galaxies close to the center of the extended X-ray emission. The cluster core region (r < 200 kpc) shows a clearly enhanced passive fraction with respect to field levels. However, together with a population of massive, passive galaxies mostly with early-type morphologies, the cluster core also hosts massive, actively star-forming, often highly dust reddened sources. Close to the cluster center, a multi-component system of passive and star-forming galaxies could represent the future brightest cluster galaxy still forming. We observe a clear correlation between passive stellar populations and an early-type morphology, in agreement with field studies at similar redshift. Passive early-type galaxies in this cluster are typically a factor of 2-3 smaller than similarly massive early types at z {approx} 0. On the other hand, these same objects are on average larger by a factor of {approx}2 than field early-types at similar redshift, lending support to recent claims of an accelerated structural evolution in high-redshift dense environments. These results point toward the early formation of a population of massive galaxies, already evolved both in their structure and stellar populations, coexisting with still actively forming massive galaxies in the central regions of young clusters 10 billion years ago.

  5. DETECTIONS OF WATER ICE, HYDROCARBONS, AND 3.3 {mu}m PAH IN z {approx} 2 ULIRGs

    SciTech Connect

    Sajina, Anna; Spoon, Henrik; Yan Lin; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Fadda, Dario; Elitzur, Moshe

    2009-09-20

    We present the first detections of the 3 {mu}m water ice and 3.4 {mu}m amorphous hydrocarbon (HAC) absorption features in z {approx} 2 ULIRGs. These are based on deep rest-frame 2-8 {mu}m Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectra of 11 sources selected for their appreciable silicate absorption. The HAC-to-silicate ratio for our z {approx} 2 sources is typically higher by a factor of 2-5 than that observed in the Milky Way. This HAC 'excess' suggests compact nuclei with steep temperature gradients as opposed to predominantly host obscuration. Beside the above molecular absorption features, we detect the 3.3 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission feature in one of our sources with three more individual spectra showing evidence for it. Stacking analysis suggests that water ice, hydrocarbons, and PAH are likely present in the bulk of this sample even when not individually detected. The most unexpected result of our study is the lack of clear detections of the 4.67 {mu}m CO gas absorption feature. Only three of the sources show tentative signs of this feature at significantly lower levels than has been observed in local ULIRGs. Overall we find that the closest local analogs to our sources, in terms of 3-4 {mu}m color, HAC-to-silicate and ice-to-silicate ratios, as well as low PAH equivalent widths, are sources dominated by deeply obscured nuclei. Such sources form only a small fraction of ULIRGs locally and are commonly believed to be dominated by buried active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our sample suggests that, in an absolute number, such buried AGNs are at least an order of magnitude more common at z {approx} 2 than today. The presence of PAH suggests that significant levels of star formation are present even if the obscured AGNs typically dominate the power budget.

  6. PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z {approx} 4.86 IN THE COSMOS 2 SQUARE DEGREE FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Shioya, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.; Nagao, T.; Saito, T.; Trump, J.; Sasaki, S. S.; Ideue, Y.; Nakajima, A.; Matsuoka, K.; Murayama, T.; Scoville, N. Z.; Capak, P.; Ellis, R. S.; Sanders, D. B.; Kartaltepe, J.; Mobasher, B.; Aussel, H.; Koekemoer, A.; Carilli, C.; Garilli, B.

    2009-05-01

    We present results of a survey for Ly{alpha} emitters at z {approx} 4.86 based on optical narrowband ({lambda} {sub c} = 7126 A, {delta}{lambda} = 73 A) and broadband (B, V, r', i', and z') observations of the Cosmic Evolution Survey field using Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. We find 79 Ly{alpha} emitter (LAE) candidates at z {approx} 4.86 over a contiguous survey area of 1.83 deg{sup 2}, down to the Ly{alpha} line flux of 1.47 x 10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. We obtain the Ly{alpha} luminosity function with a best-fit Schechter parameters of log L* = 42.9{sup +0.5} {sub -0.3} erg s{sup -1} and {phi}* = 1.2{sup +8.0} {sub -1.1} x 10{sup -4} Mpc{sup -3} for {alpha} = -1.5 (fixed). The two-point correlation function for our LAE sample is {xi}(r) = (r/4.4{sup +5.7} {sub -2.9} Mpc){sup -1.90{+-}}{sup 0.22}. In order to investigate the field-to-field variations of the properties of Ly{alpha} emitters, we divide the survey area into nine tiles of 0.{sup 0}5 x 0.{sup 0}5 each. We find that the number density varies with a factor of {approx_equal}2 from field to field with high statistical significance. However, we find no significant field-to-field variance when we divide the field into four tiles with 0.{sup 0}7 x 0.{sup 0}7 each. We conclude that at least 0.5 deg{sup 2} survey area is required to derive averaged properties of LAEs at z {approx} 5, and our survey field is wide enough to overcome the cosmic variance.

  7. Description of superdeformed nuclei in the A{approx}190 region by generalized deformed su{sub q}(2)

    SciTech Connect

    Alharbi, H. H.; Alhendi, H. A.; Alhakami, F. S.

    2009-05-15

    The generalized deformed su{sub q}(2) model is applied to 79 superdeformed bands in the region A{approx}190. The transition energies and the moments of inertia are calculated within the model and their validity is investigated by comparing them with the experimental data. Both the standard su{sub q}(2) and the generalized one fail to account for the uprising and the downturn of the dynamic moments of inertia. Both models, however, show remarkable agreement with the available experimental data at low angular frequency (({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}{<=}0.25 MeV)

  8. QCD coupling constants and VDM

    SciTech Connect

    Erkol, G.; Ozpineci, A.; Zamiralov, V. S.

    2012-10-23

    QCD sum rules for coupling constants of vector mesons with baryons are constructed. The corresponding QCD sum rules for electric charges and magnetic moments are also derived and with the use of vector-meson-dominance model related to the coupling constants. The VDM role as the criterium of reciprocal validity of the sum rules is considered.

  9. Constant-Pressure Hydraulic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galloway, C. W.

    1982-01-01

    Constant output pressure in gas-driven hydraulic pump would be assured in new design for gas-to-hydraulic power converter. With a force-multiplying ring attached to gas piston, expanding gas would apply constant force on hydraulic piston even though gas pressure drops. As a result, pressure of hydraulic fluid remains steady, and power output of the pump does not vary.

  10. A Luminosity Function of Ly(alpha)-Emitting Galaxies at Z [Approx. Equal to] 4.5(Sup 1),(Sup 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Steve; Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Stern, Daniel; Wang, JunXian; Dey, Arjun; Spinrad, Hyron; Jannuzi, Buell T.

    2007-01-01

    We present a catalog of 59 z [approx. equal to] 4:5 Ly(alpha)-emitting galaxies spectroscopically confirmed in a campaign of Keck DEIMOS follow-up observations to candidates selected in the Large Are (LALA) narrowband imaging survey.We targeted 97 candidates for spectroscopic follow-up; by accounting for the variety of conditions under which we performed spectroscopy, we estimate a selection reliability of approx.76%. Together with our previous sample of Keck LRIS confirmations, the 59 sources confirmed herein bring the total catalog to 73 spectroscopically confirmed z [approx. equal to] 4:5 Ly(alpha)- emitting galaxies in the [approx. equal to] 0.7 deg(exp 2) covered by the LALA imaging. As with the Keck LRIS sample, we find that a nonnegligible fraction of the co rest-frame equivalent widths (W(sub lambda)(sup rest)) that exceed the maximum predicted for normal stellar populations: 17%-31%(93%confidence) of the detected galaxies show (W(sub lambda)(sup rest)) 12%-27% (90% confidence) show (W(sub lambda)(sup rest)) > 240 A. We construct a luminosity function of z [approx. equal to] 4.5 Ly(alpha) emission lines for comparison to Ly(alpha) luminosity function < 6.6. We find no significant evidence for Ly(alpha) luminosity function evolution from z [approx. equal to] 3 to z [approx. equal to] 6. This result supports the conclusion that the intergalactic me largely reionized from the local universe out to z [approx. equal to] 6.5. It is somewhat at odds with the pronounced drop in the cosmic star formation rate density recently measured between z approx. 3 an z approx. 6 in continuum-selected Lyman-break galaxies, and therefore potentially sheds light on the relationship between the two populations.

  11. Experimental investigation of neutron emissions during thermal cycling of TiD{sub x} (x {approx} 2.00)

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.F.; Cuevas, F.; Alguero, M.; Sanchez, C.

    1997-03-01

    The production of neutrons from D + D reactions in thermally cycled titanium deuteride (TiD{sub x}) (x {approx} 2) is investigated in depth. Special attention is given to cubic-tetragonal ({delta} - {epsilon}) phase transition that TiD{sub x} experiences near room temperature as a possible triggering mechanism of `cold nuclear fusion reactions.` The TiD{sub x} (x {approx} 2.00) samples, possessing well-known properties about the {delta} - {epsilon} transition, are cycled at temperatures (from -60 to 60{degree} C) where the phase transition takes place. The cold fusion signature is investigated by measuring the neutron flux of the sample during the experiments. No significant neutron signal above the background level is found during thermal cycling of the TiD{sub x} samples. It is concluded that in the samples investigated, no correlation exists between the {delta} - {epsilon} transition and the trigger of the D + D reactions. Background deviations give an upper limit of the rate of the D + D {yields} {sup 3}He + n reaction of {lambda} < 10{sup -23} fusion/p-d.s. 32 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. THE SINS/zC-SINF SURVEY OF z {approx} 2GALAXY KINEMATICS: THE NATURE OF DISPERSION-DOMINATED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Sarah F.; Genzel, Reinhard; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Buschkamp, Peter; Davies, Ric; Eisenhauer, Frank; Kurk, Jaron; Lutz, Dieter; Shapiro Griffin, Kristen; Mancini, Chiara; Renzini, Alvio; Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Peng, Yingjie; Bouche, Nicolas; Burkert, Andreas; Cresci, Giovanni; Genel, Shy; Hicks, Erin K. S.; Naab, Thorsten; and others

    2013-04-20

    We analyze the spectra, spatial distributions, and kinematics of H{alpha}, [N II], and [S II] emission in a sample of 38, z {approx} 2.2 UV/optically selected star-forming galaxies (SFGs) from the SINS and zC-SINF surveys, 34 of which were observed in the adaptive optics mode of SINFONI and 30 of those contain data presented for the first time here. This is supplemented by kinematic data from 43 z {approx} 1-2.5 galaxies from the literature. None of these 81 galaxies is an obvious major merger. We find that the kinematic classification of high-z SFGs as ''dispersion dominated'' or ''rotation dominated'' correlates most strongly with their intrinsic sizes. Smaller galaxies are more likely ''dispersion-dominated'' for two main reasons: (1) the rotation velocity scales linearly with galaxy size but intrinsic velocity dispersion does not depend on size or may even increase in smaller galaxies, and as such, their ratio is systematically lower for smaller galaxies, and (2) beam smearing strongly decreases large-scale velocity gradients and increases observed dispersion much more for galaxies with sizes at or below the resolution. Dispersion-dominated SFGs may thus have intrinsic properties similar to ''rotation-dominated'' SFGs, but are primarily more compact, lower mass, less metal enriched, and may have higher gas fractions, plausibly because they represent an earlier evolutionary state.

  13. MOIRCS DEEP SURVEY. VI. NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF K-SELECTED STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Akiyama, Masayuki; Kajisawa, Masaru; Tokoku, Chihiro; Yamada, Toru; Ichikawa, Takashi; Alexander, David M.; Ohta, Kouji; Suzuki, Ryuji; Tanaka, Ichi; Omata, Koji; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Uchimoto, Yuka K.; Konishi, Masahiro; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Brandt, Niel

    2010-07-20

    We present the results of near-infrared multi-object spectroscopic observations for 37 BzK-color-selected star-forming galaxies conducted with MOIRCS on the Subaru Telescope. The sample is drawn from the K{sub s} -band-selected catalog of the MOIRCS Deep Survey in the GOODS-N region. About half of our samples are selected from the publicly available 24 {mu}m-source catalog of the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. H{alpha} emission lines are detected from 23 galaxies, of which the median redshift is 2.12. We derived the star formation rates (SFRs) from extinction-corrected H{alpha} luminosities. The extinction correction is estimated from the spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting of multiband photometric data covering UV to near-infrared wavelengths. The Balmer decrement of the stacked emission lines shows that the amount of extinction for the ionized gas is larger than that for the stellar continuum. From a comparison of the extinction-corrected H{alpha} luminosity and other SFR indicators, we found that the relation between the dust properties of stellar continuum and ionized gas is different depending on the intrinsic SFR (differential extinction). We compared SFRs estimated from extinction-corrected H{alpha} luminosities with stellar masses estimated from SED fitting. The comparison shows no correlation between SFR and stellar mass. Some galaxies with stellar mass smaller than {approx}10{sup 10} M{sub sun} show SFRs higher than {approx}100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. The specific SFRs (SSFRs) of these galaxies are remarkably high; galaxies which have SSFR higher than {approx}10{sup -8} yr{sup -1} are found in eight of the present sample. From the best-fit parameters of SED fitting for these high-SSFR galaxies, we find that the average age of the stellar population is younger than 100 Myr, which is consistent with the implied high SSFR. The large SFR implies the possibility that the high-SSFR galaxies significantly

  14. Reliability concerns with logical constants in Xilinx FPGA designs

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Heather M; Graham, Paul; Morgan, Keith; Ostler, Patrick; Allen, Greg; Swift, Gary; Tseng, Chen W

    2009-01-01

    In Xilinx Field Programmable Gate Arrays logical constants, which ground unused inputs and provide constants for designs, are implemented in SEU-susceptible logic. In the past, these logical constants have been shown to cause the user circuit to output bad data and were not resetable through off-line rcconfiguration. In the more recent devices, logical constants are less problematic, though mitigation should still be considered for high reliability applications. In conclusion, we have presented a number of reliability concerns with logical constants in the Xilinx Virtex family. There are two main categories of logical constants: implicit and explicit logical constants. In all of the Virtex devices, the implicit logical constants are implemented using half latches, which in the most recent devices are several orders of magnitudes smaller than configuration bit cells. Explicit logical constants are implemented exclusively using constant LUTs in the Virtex-I and Virtex-II, and use a combination of constant LUTs and architectural posts to the ground plane in the Virtex-4. We have also presented mitigation methods and options for these devices. While SEUs in implicit and some types of explicit logical constants can cause data corrupt, the chance of failure from these components is now much smaller than it was in the Virtex-I device. Therefore, for many cases, mitigation might not be necessary, except under extremely high reliability situations.

  15. EXPANDED SEARCH FOR z {approx} 10 GALAXIES FROM HUDF09, ERS, AND CANDELS DATA: EVIDENCE FOR ACCELERATED EVOLUTION AT z > 8?

    SciTech Connect

    Oesch, P. A.; Illingworth, G. D.; Gonzalez, V.; Magee, D.; Trenti, M.; Carollo, C. M.; Van Dokkum, P. G.

    2012-02-01

    We search for z {approx} 10 galaxies over {approx}160 arcmin{sup 2} of Wide-Field Camera 3 (WFC3)/IR data in the Chandra Deep Field South, using the public HUDF09, Early Release Science, and CANDELS surveys, that reach to 5{sigma} depths ranging from 26.9 to 29.4 in H{sub 160} AB mag. z {approx}> 9.5 galaxy candidates are identified via J{sub 125} - H{sub 160} > 1.2 colors and non-detections in any band blueward of J{sub 125}. Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) photometry is key for separating the genuine high-z candidates from intermediate-redshift (z {approx} 2-4) galaxies with evolved or heavily dust obscured stellar populations. After removing 16 sources of intermediate brightness (H{sub 160} {approx} 24-26 mag) with strong IRAC detections, we only find one plausible z {approx} 10 galaxy candidate in the whole data set, previously reported in Bouwens et al.. The newer data cover a 3 Multiplication-Sign larger area and provide much stronger constraints on the evolution of the UV luminosity function (LF). If the evolution of the z {approx} 4-8 LFs is extrapolated to z {approx} 10, six z {approx} 10 galaxies are expected in our data. The detection of only one source suggests that the UV LF evolves at an accelerated rate before z {approx} 8. The luminosity density is found to increase by more than an order of magnitude in only 170 Myr from z {approx} 10 to z {approx} 8. This increase is {>=}4 Multiplication-Sign larger than expected from the lower redshift extrapolation of the UV LF. We are thus likely witnessing the first rapid buildup of galaxies in the heart of cosmic reionization. Future deep Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/IR data, reaching to well beyond 29 mag, can enable a more robust quantification of the accelerated evolution around z {approx} 10.

  16. Laboratory measurement of the complex dielectric constant of soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiebe, M. L.

    1971-01-01

    The dielectric constant of a material is an extremely important parameter when considering passive radiometric remote sensing applications. This is because the emitted energy measured by a microwave radiometer is dependent on the dielectric constant of the surface being scanned. Two techniques of measuring dielectric constants are described. The first method involves a dielectric located in air. The second method uses basically the same theoretical approach, but the dielectric under consideration is located inside a section of waveguide.

  17. GAS MOTION STUDY OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z {approx} 2 USING FUV AND OPTICAL SPECTRAL LINES {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Takuya; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Rauch, Michael; Janice Lee; Okamura, Sadanori

    2013-03-01

    We present the results of Magellan/MMIRS and Keck/NIRSPEC spectroscopy for five Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) at z {approx_equal} 2.2 for which high-resolution FUV spectra from Magellan/MagE are available. We detect nebular emission lines including H{alpha} on the individual basis and low-ionization interstellar (LIS) absorption lines in a stacked FUV spectrum, and measure average offset velocities of the Ly{alpha} line, {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}}, and LIS absorption lines, {Delta}v {sub abs}, with respect to the systemic velocity defined by the nebular lines. For a sample of eight z {approx} 2-3 LAEs without active galactic nucleus from our study and the literature, we obtain {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} = 175 {+-} 35 km s{sup -1}, which is significantly smaller than that of Lyman-break Galaxies (LBGs), {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} {approx_equal} 400 km s{sup -1}. The stacked FUV spectrum gives {Delta}v {sub abs} = -179 {+-} 73 km s{sup -1}, comparable to that of LBGs. These positive {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} and negative {Delta}v {sub abs} suggest that LAEs also have outflows. In contrast to LBGs, however, the LAEs' {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} is as small as |{Delta}v {sub abs}|, suggesting low neutral hydrogen column densities. Such a low column density with a small number of resonant scattering may cause the observed strong Ly{alpha} emission of LAEs. We find an anti-correlation between Ly{alpha} equivalent width (EW) and {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} in a compilation of LAE and LBG samples. Although its physical origin is not clear, this anti-correlation result appears to challenge the hypothesis that a strong outflow, by means of a reduced number of resonant scattering, produces a large EW. If LAEs at z > 6 have similarly small {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} values, constraints on the reionization history derived from the Ly{alpha} transmissivity may need to be revised.

  18. THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: CLUSTERING DEPENDENCE ON GALAXY STELLAR MASS AND STAR FORMATION RATE AT z {approx} 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mostek, Nick; Coil, Alison L.; Cooper, Michael; Davis, Marc; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2013-04-10

    We present DEEP2 galaxy clustering measurements at z {approx} 1 as a function of stellar mass, star formation rate (SFR), and specific SFR (sSFR). We find a strong positive correlation between stellar mass and clustering amplitude on 1-10 h {sup -1} Mpc scales for blue, star-forming galaxies with 9.5 < log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) < 11 and no dependence for red, quiescent galaxies with 10.5 < log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) < 11.5. Using recently re-calibrated DEEP2 SFRs from restframe B-band magnitude and optical colors, we find that within the blue galaxy population at z {approx} 1 the clustering amplitude increases strongly with increasing SFR and decreasing sSFR. For red galaxies there is no significant correlation between clustering amplitude and either SFR or sSFR. Blue galaxies with high SFR or low sSFR are as clustered on large scales as red galaxies. We find that the clustering trend observed with SFR can be explained mostly, but not entirely, by the correlation between stellar mass and clustering amplitude for blue galaxies. We also show that galaxies above the star-forming 'main sequence' are less clustered than galaxies below the main sequence, at a given stellar mass. These results are not consistent with the high-sSFR population being dominated by major mergers. We also measure the clustering amplitude on small scales ({<=}0.3 h {sup -1} Mpc) and find an enhanced clustering signal relative to the best-fit large-scale power law for red galaxies with high stellar mass, blue galaxies with high SFR, and both red and blue galaxies with high sSFR. The increased small-scale clustering for galaxies with high sSFRs is likely linked to triggered star formation in interacting galaxies. These measurements provide strong constraints on galaxy evolution and halo occupation distribution models at z {approx} 1.

  19. THE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF z {approx} 2 DUST-OBSCURED GALAXIES AND SUBMILLIMETER-SELECTED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bussmann, R. S.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, B. T.; Armus, L.; Desai, V.; Soifer, B. T.; Brown, M. J. I.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Melbourne, J.

    2012-01-10

    The Spitzer Space Telescope has identified a population of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at z {approx} 2 that may play an important role in the evolution of massive galaxies. We measure the stellar masses (M{sub *}) of two populations of Spitzer-selected ULIRGs that have extremely red R - [24] colors (dust-obscured galaxies, or DOGs) and compare our results with submillimeter-selected galaxies (SMGs). One set of 39 DOGs has a local maximum in their mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectral energy distribution (SED) at rest frame 1.6 {mu}m associated with stellar emission ({sup b}ump DOGs{sup )}, while the other set of 51 DOGs have power-law mid-IR SEDs that are typical of obscured active galactic nuclei ({sup p}ower-law DOGs{sup )}. We measure M{sub *} by applying Charlot and Bruzual stellar population synthesis models to broadband photometry in the rest-frame ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared of each of these populations. Assuming a simple stellar population and a Chabrier initial mass function, we find that power-law DOGs and bump DOGs are on average a factor of 2 and 1.5 more massive than SMGs, respectively (median and inter-quartile M{sub *} values for SMGs, bump DOGs, and power-law DOGs are log(M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) = 10.42{sup +0.42}{sub -0.36}, 10.62{sup +0.36}{sub -0.32}, and 10.71{sup +0.40}{sub -0.34}, respectively). More realistic star formation histories drawn from two competing theories for the nature of ULIRGs at z {approx} 2 (major merger versus smooth accretion) can increase these mass estimates by up to 0.5 dex. A comparison of our stellar masses with the instantaneous star formation rate (SFR) in these z {approx} 2 ULIRGs provides a preliminary indication supporting high SFRs for a given M{sub *}, a situation that arises more naturally in major mergers than in smooth accretion-powered systems.

  20. Oxygen Michaelis constants for tyrosinase.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-López, J N; Ros, J R; Varón, R; García-Cánovas, F

    1993-01-01

    The Michaelis constant of tyrosinase for oxygen in the presence of monophenols and o-diphenols, which generate a cyclizable o-quinone, has been studied. This constant depends on the nature of the monophenol and o-diphenol and is always lower in the presence of the former than of the latter. From the mechanism proposed for tyrosinase and from its kinetic analysis [Rodríguez-López, J. N., Tudela, J., Varón, R., García-Carmona, F. and García-Cánovas, F. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 3801-3810] a quantitative ratio has been established between the Michaelis constants for oxygen in the presence of monophenols and their o-diphenols. This ratio is used for the determination of the Michaelis constant for oxygen with monophenols when its value cannot be calculated experimentally. PMID:8352753

  1. Avogadro's Number and Avogadro's Constant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, R. O.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses three possible methods of thinking about the implications of the definitions of the Avogadro constant and number. Indicates that there is only one way to arrive at a simple and standard conclusion. (CC)

  2. Varying Constants, Gravitation and Cosmology.

    PubMed

    Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental constants are a cornerstone of our physical laws. Any constant varying in space and/or time would reflect the existence of an almost massless field that couples to matter. This will induce a violation of the universality of free fall. Thus, it is of utmost importance for our understanding of gravity and of the domain of validity of general relativity to test for their constancy. We detail the relations between the constants, the tests of the local position invariance and of the universality of free fall. We then review the main experimental and observational constraints that have been obtained from atomic clocks, the Oklo phenomenon, solar system observations, meteorite dating, quasar absorption spectra, stellar physics, pulsar timing, the cosmic microwave background and big bang nucleosynthesis. At each step we describe the basics of each system, its dependence with respect to the constants, the known systematic effects and the most recent constraints that have been obtained. We then describe the main theoretical frameworks in which the low-energy constants may actually be varying and we focus on the unification mechanisms and the relations between the variation of different constants. To finish, we discuss the more speculative possibility of understanding their numerical values and the apparent fine-tuning that they confront us with.

  3. ON THE FORMATION TIMESCALE OF MASSIVE CLUSTER ELLIPTICALS BASED ON DEEP NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Masayuki; Kodama, Tadayuki; Koyama, Yusei; Toft, Sune; Zirm, Andrew; Marchesini, Danilo; De Breuck, Carlos; Kurk, Jaron; Tanaka, Ichi

    2013-08-01

    We present improved constraints on the formation timescale of massive cluster galaxies based on rest-frame optical spectra of galaxies in a forming cluster located at z = 2.16. The spectra are obtained with MOIRCS on the Subaru Telescope with an integration time of {approx}7 hr. We achieve accurate redshift measurements by fitting spectral energy distributions using the spectra and broadband photometry simultaneously, allowing us to identify probable cluster members. Clusters at low redshifts are dominated by quiescent galaxies, but we find that quiescent galaxies and star-forming galaxies coexist in this z = 2 system. Interestingly, the quiescent galaxies form a weak red sequence in the process of forming. By stacking the spectra of star-forming galaxies, we observe strong emission lines such as [O II] and [O III] and we obtain a tentative hint of active galactic nucleus activities in these galaxies. On the other hand, the stacked spectrum of the quiescent galaxies reveals a clear 4000 A break with a possible Ca II H+K absorption feature and strong emission lines such as [O II] are absent in the spectrum, confirming the quiescent nature of these galaxies. We then perform detailed spectral analyses of the stacked spectrum, which suggest that these massive quiescent galaxies formed at redshifts between 3 and 4 on a timescale of {approx}< 0.5 Gyr. This short formation timescale is not reproduced in recent numerical simulations. We discuss possible mechanisms for how these galaxies form 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} stellar mass on a short timescale and become red and quiescent by z = 2.

  4. THE ORIGIN AND EVOLUTION OF METALLICITY GRADIENTS: PROBING THE MODE OF MASS ASSEMBLY AT z {approx_equal} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Tucker; Ellis, Richard S.; Richard, Johan; Jullo, Eric

    2013-03-01

    We present and discuss measurements of the gas-phase metallicity gradient in four gravitationally lensed galaxies at z = 2.0-2.4 based on adaptive optics-assisted imaging spectroscopy with the Keck II telescope. Three galaxies with well-ordered rotation reveal metallicity gradients with lower gas-phase metallicities at larger galactocentric radii. Two of these display gradients much steeper than found locally, while a third has one similar to that seen in local disk galaxies. The fourth galaxy exhibits complex kinematics indicative of an ongoing merger and reveals an 'inverted' gradient with lower metallicity in the central regions. By comparing our sample to similar data in the literature for lower redshift galaxies, we determine that, on average, metallicity gradients must flatten by a factor of 2.6 {+-} 0.9 between z = 2.2 and the present epoch. This factor is in rough agreement with the size growth of massive galaxies, suggesting that inside-out growth can account for the evolution of metallicity gradients. Since the addition of our new data provides the first indication of a coherent picture of this evolution, we develop a simple model of chemical evolution to explain the collective data. We find that metallicity gradients and their evolution can be explained by the inward radial migration of gas together with a radial variation in the mass loading factor governing the ratio of outflowing gas to the local star formation rate. Average mass loading factors of {approx}< 2 are inferred from our model in good agreement with direct measurements of outflowing gas in z {approx_equal} 2 galaxies.

  5. FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC MEASUREMENTS OF [O III] EMISSION FROM Ly{alpha} SELECTED FIELD GALAXIES AT z {approx} 3.1

    SciTech Connect

    McLinden, Emily M.; Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Hibon, Pascale; Richardson, Mark L. A.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Cresci, Giovanni; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Pasquali, Anna; Bian Fuyan; Fan Xiaohui; Woodward, Charles E.

    2011-04-01

    We present the first spectroscopic measurements of the [O III] 5007 A line in two z {approx} 3.1 Ly{alpha} emitting galaxies (LAEs) using the new near-infrared instrument LUCIFER1 on the 8.4 m Large Binocular Telescope. We also describe the optical imaging and spectroscopic observations used to identify these LAEs. Using the [O III] line we have measured accurate systemic redshifts for these two galaxies, and discovered a velocity offset between the [O III] and Ly{alpha} lines in both, with the Ly{alpha} line peaking 342 and 125 km s{sup -1} redward of the systemic velocity. These velocity offsets imply that there are powerful outflows in high-redshift LAEs. They also ease the transmission of Ly{alpha} photons through the interstellar medium and intergalactic medium around the galaxies. By measuring these offsets directly, we can refine both Ly{alpha}-based tests for reionization, and Ly{alpha} luminosity function measurements where the Ly{alpha} forest affects the blue wing of the line. Our work also provides the first direct constraints on the strength of the [O III] line in high-redshift LAEs. We find [O III] fluxes of 7 and 36 x10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} in two z {approx} 3.1 LAEs. These lines are strong enough to dominate broadband flux measurements that include the line (in this case, K{sub s} -band photometry). Spectral energy distribution fits that do not account for the lines would therefore overestimate the 4000 A (and/or Balmer) break strength in such galaxies, and hence also the ages and stellar masses of such high-z galaxies.

  6. Improved dielectric constant and breakdown strength of γ-phase dominant super toughened polyvinylidene fluoride/TiO2 nanocomposite film: an excellent material for energy storage applications and piezoelectric throughput.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Mehebub; Ghosh, Sujoy Kumar; Sarkar, Debabrata; Sen, Shrabanee; Mandal, Dipankar

    2017-01-06

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) embedded γ-phase containing polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) nanocomposite (PNC) film turns to an excellent material for energy storage application due to an increased dielectric constant (32 at 1 kHz), enhanced electric breakdown strength (400 MV m(-1)). It also exhibits a high energy density of 4 J cm(-3) which is 25 times higher than that of virgin PVDF. 98% of the electroactive γ-phase has been acheived by the incorporation of TiO2 NPs and the resulting PNC behaves like a super-toughened material due to a dramatic improvement (more than 80%) in the tensile strength. Owing to their electroactive nature and extraordinary mechanical properties, PNC films have a strong ability to fabricate the piezoelectric nanogenerators (PNGs) that have recently been an area of focus regarding mechanical energy harvesting. The feasibility of piezoelectric voltage generation from PNGs is demostrated under the rotating fan that also promises further utility such as rotational speed (RPM) determination.

  7. Improved dielectric constant and breakdown strength of γ-phase dominant super toughened polyvinylidene fluoride/TiO2 nanocomposite film: an excellent material for energy storage applications and piezoelectric throughput

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehebub Alam, Md; Ghosh, Sujoy Kumar; Sarkar, Debabrata; Sen, Shrabanee; Mandal, Dipankar

    2017-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) embedded γ-phase containing polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) nanocomposite (PNC) film turns to an excellent material for energy storage application due to an increased dielectric constant (32 at 1 kHz), enhanced electric breakdown strength (400 MV m-1). It also exhibits a high energy density of 4 J cm-3 which is 25 times higher than that of virgin PVDF. 98% of the electroactive γ-phase has been acheived by the incorporation of TiO2 NPs and the resulting PNC behaves like a super-toughened material due to a dramatic improvement (more than 80%) in the tensile strength. Owing to their electroactive nature and extraordinary mechanical properties, PNC films have a strong ability to fabricate the piezoelectric nanogenerators (PNGs) that have recently been an area of focus regarding mechanical energy harvesting. The feasibility of piezoelectric voltage generation from PNGs is demostrated under the rotating fan that also promises further utility such as rotational speed (RPM) determination.

  8. PROBING THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY AND INITIAL MASS FUNCTION OF THE z {approx} 2.5 LENSED GALAXY SMM J163554.2+661225 WITH HERSCHEL

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, Keely D.; Papovich, Casey; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Egami, Eiichi; Rieke, Marcia; Rigby, Jane R.; Rudnick, Gregory; Smith, J.-D. T.

    2011-12-01

    We present the analysis of Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver far-infrared (FIR) observations of the z = 2.515 lensed galaxy SMM J163554.2+661225. Combining new 250, 350, and 500 {mu}m observations with existing data, we make an improved fit to the FIR spectral energy distribution of this galaxy. We find a total infrared (IR) luminosity of L(8-1000 {mu}m) = 6.9 {+-} 0.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }, a factor of three more precise over previous L{sub IR} estimates for this galaxy, and one of the most accurate measurements for any galaxy at these redshifts. This FIR luminosity implies an unlensed star formation rate (SFR) for this galaxy of 119 {+-} 10 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, which is a factor of 1.9 {+-} 0.35 lower than the SFR derived from the nebular Pa{alpha} emission line (a 2.5{sigma} discrepancy). Both SFR indicators assume an identical Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) with slope {Gamma} = 2.35 over a mass range of 0.1-100 M{sub Sun }; thus this discrepancy suggests that more ionizing photons may be necessary to account for the higher Pa{alpha}-derived SFR. We examine a number of scenarios and find that the observations can be explained with a varying star formation history (SFH) due to an increasing SFR, paired with a slight flattening of the IMF. If the SFR is constant in time, then larger changes need to be made to the IMF by either increasing the upper mass cutoff to {approx}200 M{sub Sun }, or a flattening of the IMF slope to 1.9 {+-} 0.15, or a combination of the two. These scenarios result in up to double the number of stars with masses above 20 M{sub Sun }, which produce the requisite increase in ionizing photons over a Salpeter IMF with a constant SFH.

  9. Damping constant estimation in magnetoresistive readers

    SciTech Connect

    Stankiewicz, Andrzej Hernandez, Stephanie

    2015-05-07

    The damping constant is a key design parameter in magnetic reader design. Its value can be derived from bulk or sheet film ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) line width. However, dynamics of nanodevices is usually defined by presence of non-uniform modes. It triggers new damping mechanisms and produces stronger damping than expected from traditional FMR. This work proposes a device-level technique for damping evaluation, based on time-domain analysis of thermally excited stochastic oscillations. The signal is collected using a high bandwidth oscilloscope, by direct probing of a biased reader. Recorded waveforms may contain different noise signals, but free layer FMR is usually a dominating one. The autocorrelation function is a reflection of the damped oscillation curve, averaging out stochastic contributions. The damped oscillator formula is fitted to autocorrelation data, producing resonance frequency and damping constant values. Restricting lag range allows for mitigation of the impact of other phenomena (e.g., reader instability) on the damping constant. For a micromagnetically modeled reader, the technique proves to be much more accurate than the stochastic FMR line width approach. Application to actual reader waveforms yields a damping constant of ∼0.03.

  10. Constant fields and constant gradients in open ionic channels.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, D P; Barcilon, V; Eisenberg, R S

    1992-01-01

    Ions enter cells through pores in proteins that are holes in dielectrics. The energy of interaction between ion and charge induced on the dielectric is many kT, and so the dielectric properties of channel and pore are important. We describe ionic movement by (three-dimensional) Nemst-Planck equations (including flux and net charge). Potential is described by Poisson's equation in the pore and Laplace's equation in the channel wall, allowing induced but not permanent charge. Asymptotic expansions are constructed exploiting the long narrow shape of the pore and the relatively high dielectric constant of the pore's contents. The resulting one-dimensional equations can be integrated numerically; they can be analyzed when channels are short or long (compared with the Debye length). Traditional constant field equations are derived if the induced charge is small, e.g., if the channel is short or if the total concentration gradient is zero. A constant gradient of concentration is derived if the channel is long. Plots directly comparable to experiments are given of current vs voltage, reversal potential vs. concentration, and slope conductance vs. concentration. This dielectric theory can easily be tested: its parameters can be determined by traditional constant field measurements. The dielectric theory then predicts current-voltage relations quite different from constant field, usually more linear, when gradients of total concentration are imposed. Numerical analysis shows that the interaction of ion and channel can be described by a mean potential if, but only if, the induced charge is negligible, that is to say, the electric field is spatially constant. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:1376159

  11. Effective cosmological constant induced by stochastic fluctuations of Newton's constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cesare, Marco; Lizzi, Fedele; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2016-09-01

    We consider implications of the microscopic dynamics of spacetime for the evolution of cosmological models. We argue that quantum geometry effects may lead to stochastic fluctuations of the gravitational constant, which is thus considered as a macroscopic effective dynamical quantity. Consistency with Riemannian geometry entails the presence of a time-dependent dark energy term in the modified field equations, which can be expressed in terms of the dynamical gravitational constant. We suggest that the late-time accelerated expansion of the Universe may be ascribed to quantum fluctuations in the geometry of spacetime rather than the vacuum energy from the matter sector.

  12. Optical constants of solid methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Thompson, W. R.; Sagan, C.; Arakawa, E. T.; Bruel, C.; Judish, J. P.; Khanna, R. K.; Pollack, J. B.

    1989-01-01

    Methane is the most abundant simple organic molecule in the outer solar system bodies. In addition to being a gaseous constituent of the atmospheres of the Jovian planets and Titan, it is present in the solid form as a constituent of icy surfaces such as those of Triton and Pluto, and as cloud condensate in the atmospheres of Titan, Uranus, and Neptune. It is expected in the liquid form as a constituent of the ocean of Titan. Cometary ices also contain solid methane. The optical constants for both solid and liquid phases of CH4 for a wide temperature range are needed for radiative transfer calculations, for studies of reflection from surfaces, and for modeling of emission in the far infrared and microwave regions. The astronomically important visual to near infrared measurements of solid methane optical constants are conspicuously absent from the literature. Preliminary results are presented of the optical constants of solid methane for the 0.4 to 2.6 micron region. K is reported for both the amorphous and the crystalline (annealed) states. Using the previously measured values of the real part of the refractive index, n, of liquid methane at 110 K n is computed for solid methane using the Lorentz-Lorentz relationship. Work is in progress to extend the measurements of optical constants n and k for liquid and solid to both shorter and longer wavelengths, eventually providing a complete optical constants database for condensed CH4.

  13. Enhanced nonlinearity of the propagation constant of a long-range surface-plasma wave

    SciTech Connect

    Sarid, D.; Deck, R.T.; Fasano, J.J.

    1982-10-01

    We calculate the power-dependent propagation constant of a surface-plasma wave as a function of the thickness of the metal film on which it propagates when the metal film is bounded by a nonlinear semiconductor. In the case of a Cu film bounded by InSb at a wavelength of approx.5 ..mu..m and a temperature of 5 K, we find that the effect of the nonlinearity on the propagation constant is enhanced by a factor of 10 as the metal thickness decreases from 120 to 15 nm.

  14. THE UV LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES VIA DROPOUT SELECTION AT REDSHIFTS z {approx} 7 AND 8 FROM THE 2012 ULTRA DEEP FIELD CAMPAIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Schenker, Matthew A.; Ellis, Richard S.; Robertson, Brant E.; Schneider, Evan; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Stark, Daniel P.; McLure, Ross J.; Dunlop, James S.; Bowler, Rebecca A. A.; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Rogers, Alexander B.; Cirasuolo, Michele; Koekemoer, Anton; Charlot, Stephane; Furlanetto, Steven R.

    2013-05-10

    We present a catalog of high-redshift star-forming galaxies selected to lie within the redshift range z {approx_equal} 7-8 using the Ultra Deep Field 2012 (UDF12), the deepest near-infrared (near-IR) exposures yet taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). As a result of the increased near-IR exposure time compared to previous HST imaging in this field, we probe {approx}0.65 (0.25) mag fainter in absolute UV magnitude, at z {approx} 7 (8), which increases confidence in a measurement of the faint end slope of the galaxy luminosity function. Through a 0.7 mag deeper limit in the key F105W filter that encompasses or lies just longward of the Lyman break, we also achieve a much-refined color-color selection that balances high redshift completeness and a low expected contamination fraction. We improve the number of dropout-selected UDF sources to 47 at z {approx} 7 and 27 at z {approx} 8. Incorporating brighter archival and ground-based samples, we measure the z {approx_equal} 7 UV luminosity function to an absolute magnitude limit of M{sub UV} = -17 and find a faint end Schechter slope of {alpha}=-1.87{sup +0.18}{sub -0.17}. Using a similar color-color selection at z {approx_equal} 8 that takes our newly added imaging in the F140W filter into account, and incorporating archival data from the HIPPIES and BoRG campaigns, we provide a robust estimate of the faint end slope at z {approx_equal} 8, {alpha}=-1.94{sup +0.21}{sub -0.24}. We briefly discuss our results in the context of earlier work and that derived using the same UDF12 data but with an independent photometric redshift technique.

  15. THE ROLE OF GALAXY INTERACTION IN ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY AT z {approx_equal} 1.2

    SciTech Connect

    Ideue, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.; Shioya, Y.; Kajisawa, M.; Nagao, T.; Trump, J. R.; Iovino, A.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Le Fevre, O.; Ilbert, O.; Scoville, N. Z.

    2012-03-01

    In order to understand environmental effects on star formation in high-redshift galaxies, we investigate the physical relationships between the star formation activity, stellar mass, and environment for z {approx_equal} 1.2 galaxies in the 2 deg{sup 2} COSMOS field. We estimate star formation using the [O II]{lambda}3727 emission line and environment from the local galaxy density. Our analysis shows that for massive galaxies (M{sub *} {approx}> 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }), the fraction of [O II] emitters in high-density environments ({Sigma}{sub 10th} {approx}> 3.9 Mpc{sup -2}) is 1.7 {+-} 0.4 times higher than in low-density environments ({Sigma}{sub 10th} {approx}< 1.5 Mpc{sup -2}), while the [O II] emitter fraction does not depend on environment for low-mass M{sub *} {approx}< 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} galaxies. In order to understand what drives these trends, we investigate the role of companion galaxies in our sample. We find that the fraction of [O II] emitters in galaxies with companions is 2.4 {+-} 0.5 times as high as that in galaxies without companions at M{sub *} {approx}> 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. In addition, massive galaxies are more likely to have companions in high-density environments. However, although the number of star-forming galaxies increases for massive galaxies with close companions and in dense environments, the average star formation rate of star-forming galaxies at a given mass is independent of environment and the presence/absence of a close companion. These results suggest that interactions and/or mergers in a high-density environment could induce star formation in massive galaxies at z {approx} 1.2, increasing the fraction of star-forming galaxies with M{sub *} {approx}> 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }.

  16. Stellar Populations of Lyman Break Galaxies at z approx. to 1-3 in the HST/WFC3 Early Release Science Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathi, N. P.; Cohen, S. H.; Ryan, R. E., Jr.; Finkelstein, S. L.; McCarthy, P. J.; Windhorst, R. A.; Yan, H.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Rutkowski, M. J.; OConnell, R. W.; Straughn, A. N.; Balick, B.; Bond, H. E.; Calzetti, D.; Disney, M. J.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, D. N. B.; Holtzman, J. A.; Kimble, R. A.; Paresce, F.; Saha, A.; Silk, J. I.; Tauger, J. T.; Young, E. T.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of Lyman break galaxies . (LBGs) at z approx = 1-3 selected using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) UVIS channel filters. These HST /WFC3 obse,rvations cover about 50 arcmin2 in the GOODS-South field as a part of the WFC3 Early Release Science program. These LBGs at z approx = 1-3 are selected using dropout selection criteria similar to high redshift LBGs. The deep multi-band photometry in this field is used to identify best-fit SED models, from which we infer the following results: (1) the photometric redshift estimate of these dropout selected LBGs is accurate to within few percent; (2) the UV spectral slope f3 is redder than at high redshift (z > 3), where LBGs are less dusty; (3) on average, LBGs at .z approx = 1-3 are massive, dustier and more highly star-forming, compared to LBGs at higher redshifts with similar luminosities, though their median values are similar within 1a uncertainties. This could imply that identical dropout selection technique, at all. redshifts, find physically similar galaxies; and (4) the stellar masses of these LBGs are directly proportional to their UV luminosities with a logarithmic slope of approx 0.46, and star-formation rates are proportional to their stellar masses with a logarithmic slope of approx 0.90. These relations hold true - within luminosities probed in this study - for LBGs from z approx = 1.5 to 5. The star-forming galaxies selected using other color-based techniques show similar correlations at z approx = 2, but to avoid any selection biases, and for direct comparison with LBGs at z > 3, a true Lyman break selection at z approx = 2 is essential. The future HST UV surveys,. both wider and deeper, covering a large luminosity range are important to better understand LBG properties, and their evolution.

  17. Inconstant Planck’s constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangano, Gianpiero; Lizzi, Fedele; Porzio, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Motivated by the Dirac idea that fundamental constants are dynamical variables and by conjectures on quantum structure of space-time at small distances, we consider the possibility that Planck constant ℏ is a time depending quantity, undergoing random Gaussian fluctuations around its measured constant mean value, with variance σ2 and a typical correlation timescale Δt. We consider the case of propagation of a free particle and a one-dimensional harmonic oscillator coherent state, and show that the time evolution in both cases is different from the standard behavior. Finally, we discuss how interferometric experiments or exploiting coherent electromagnetic fields in a cavity may put effective bounds on the value of τ = σ2Δt.

  18. Optical constants of liquid and solid methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martonchik, John V.; Orton, Glenn S.

    1994-01-01

    The optical constants n(sub r) + in(sub i) of liquid methane and phase 1 solid methane were determined over the entire spectral range by the use of various data sources published in the literature. Kramers-Kronig analyses were performed on the absorption spectra of liquid methane at the boiling point (111 K) and the melting point (90 K) and on the absorption spectra of phase 1 solid methane at the melting point and at 30 K. Measurements of the static dielectric constant at these temperatures and refractive indices determined over limited spectral ranges were used as constraints in the analyses. Applications of methane optical properties to studies of outer solar system bodies are described.

  19. Optical constants of solid methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N.; Thompson, W. R.; Sagan, C.; Arakawa, E. T.; Bruel, C.; Judish, J. P.; Khanna, R. K.; Pollack, J. B.

    1990-01-01

    Methane is the most abundant simple organic molecule in the outer solar system bodies. In addition to being a gaseous constituent of the atmospheres of the Jovian planets and Titan, it is present in the solid form as a constituent of icy surfaces such as those of Triton and Pluto, and as cloud condensate in the atmospheres of Titan, Uranus, and Neptune. It is expected in the liquid form as a constituent of the ocean of Titan. Cometary ices also contain solid methane. The optical constants for both solid and liquid phases of CH4 for a wide temperature range are needed for radiative transfer calculations, for studies of reflection from surfaces, and for modeling of emission in the far infrared and microwave regions. The astronomically important visual to near infrared measurements of solid methane optical constants are conspicuously absent from the literature. Preliminary results are presented on the optical constants of solid methane for the 0.4 to 2.6 micrometer region. Deposition onto a substrate at 10 K produces glassy (semi-amorphous) material. Annealing this material at approximately 33 K for approximately 1 hour results in a crystalline material as seen by sharper, more structured bands and negligible background extinction due to scattering. The constant k is reported for both the amorphous and the crystalline (annealed) states. Typical values (at absorption maxima) are in the .001 to .0001 range. Below lambda = 1.1 micrometers the bands are too weak to be detected by transmission through the films less than or equal to 215 micrometers in thickness, employed in the studies to date. Using previously measured values of the real part of the refractive index, n, of liquid methane at 110 K, n is computed for solid methane using the Lorentz-Lorenz relationship. Work is in progress to extend the measurements of optical constants n and k for liquid and solid to both shorter and longer wavelengths, eventually providing a complete optical constants database for

  20. DEEP KECK u-BAND IMAGING OF THE HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP FIELD: A CATALOG OF z approx 3 LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rafelski, Marc; Wolfe, Arthur M.; Cooke, Jeff; Chen, H.-W.; Armandroff, Taft E.; Wirth, Gregory D. E-mail: awolfe@ucsd.ed E-mail: hchen@oddjob.uchicago.ed E-mail: gwirth@keck.hawaii.ed

    2009-10-01

    We present a sample of 407 z approx 3 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) to a limiting isophotal u-band magnitude of 27.6 mag in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The LBGs are selected using a combination of photometric redshifts and the u-band drop-out technique enabled by the introduction of an extremely deep u-band image obtained with the Keck I telescope and the blue channel of the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer. The Keck u-band image, totaling 9 hr of integration time, has a 1sigma depth of 30.7 mag arcsec{sup -2}, making it one of the most sensitive u-band images ever obtained. The u-band image also substantially improves the accuracy of photometric redshift measurements of approx50% of the z approx 3 LBGs, significantly reducing the traditional degeneracy of colors between z approx 3 and z approx 0.2 galaxies. This sample provides the most sensitive, high-resolution multi-filter imaging of reliably identified z approx 3 LBGs for morphological studies of galaxy formation and evolution and the star formation efficiency of gas at high redshift.

  1. Cosmological constant from quantum spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majid, Shahn; Tao, Wen-Qing

    2015-06-01

    We show that a hypothesis that spacetime is quantum with coordinate algebra [xi,t ]=λPxi , and spherical symmetry under rotations of the xi, essentially requires in the classical limit that the spacetime metric is the Bertotti-Robinson metric, i.e., a solution of Einstein's equations with a cosmological constant and a non-null electromagnetic field. Our arguments do not give the value of the cosmological constant or the Maxwell field strength, but they cannot both be zero. We also describe the quantum geometry and the full moduli space of metrics that can emerge as classical limits from this algebra.

  2. On flows having constant vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Paul H.; Wu, Cheng-Chin

    2011-10-01

    Constant vorticity flows of a uniform fluid in a rigid ellipsoidal container rotating at a variable rate are considered. These include librationally driven and precessionally driven flows. The well-known Poincaré solution for precessionally driven flow in a spheroid is generalized to an ellipsoid with unequal principal axes. The dynamic stability of these flows is investigated, and of other flows in which the angular velocity of the container is constant in time. Solutions for the Chandler wobble are discussed. The role of an invariant, called here the Helmholtzian, is examined.

  3. Vibrational force constants for acetaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolova, B.

    1990-05-01

    The vibrational force field of ethanal (acetaldehyde), CH 3CHO, is refined by using procedures with differential increments for the force constants (Commun. Dep. Chem., Bulg. Acad. Sci., 21/3 (1988) 433). The characteristics general valence force constants of the high-dimensional symmetry classes of ethanal, A' of tenth and A″ of fifth order, are determined for the experimental assignment of bands. The low barrier to hindered internal rotation about the single carbon—carbon bond is quantitatively estimated on the grounds of normal vibrational analysis.

  4. Cosmologies with variable gravitational constant

    SciTech Connect

    Narkikar, J.V.

    1983-03-01

    In 1937 Dirac presented an argument, based on the socalled large dimensionless numbers, which led him to the conclusion that the Newtonian gravitational constant G changes with epoch. Towards the end of the last century Ernst Mach had given plausible arguments to link the property of inertia of matter to the large scale structure of the universe. Mach's principle also leads to cosmological models with a variable gravitational constant. Three cosmologies which predict a variable G are discussed in this paper both from theoretical and observational points of view.

  5. Note: Determination of torsional spring constant of atomic force microscopy cantilevers: combining normal spring constant and classical beam theory.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Asencio, R; Thormann, E; Rutland, M W

    2013-09-01

    A technique has been developed for the calculation of torsional spring constants for AFM cantilevers based on the combination of the normal spring constant and plate/beam theory. It is easy to apply and allow the determination of torsional constants for stiff cantilevers where the thermal power spectrum is difficult to obtain due to the high resonance frequency and low signal/noise ratio. The applicability is shown to be general and this simple approach can thus be used to obtain torsional constants for any beam shaped cantilever.

  6. THE CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM OF MASSIVE GALAXIES AT z {approx} 3: A TEST FOR STELLAR FEEDBACK, GALACTIC OUTFLOWS, AND COLD STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Sijing; Madau, Piero; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Guedes, Javiera; Mayer, Lucio; Wadsley, James

    2013-03-10

    We present new results on the kinematics, thermal and ionization state, and spatial distribution of metal-enriched gas in the circumgalactic medium (CGM) of massive galaxies at redshift {approx}3, using the Eris suite of cosmological hydrodynamic ''zoom-in'' simulations. The reference run adopts a blastwave scheme for supernova feedback that produces large-scale galactic outflows, a star formation recipe based on a high gas density threshold, metal-dependent radiative cooling, and a model for the diffusion of metals and thermal energy. The effect of the local UV radiation field is added in post-processing. The CGM (defined as all gas at R > 0.2 R{sub vir} = 10 kpc, where R{sub vir} is the virial radius) contains multiple phases having a wide range of physical conditions, with more than half of its heavy elements locked in a warm-hot component at T > 10{sup 5} K. Synthetic spectra, generated by drawing sightlines through the CGM, produce interstellar absorption-line strengths of Ly{alpha}, C II, C IV, Si II, and Si IV as a function of the galactocentric impact parameter (scaled to the virial radius) that are in broad agreement with those observed at high redshift by Steidel et al. The covering factor of absorbing material declines less rapidly with impact parameter for Ly{alpha} and C IV compared to C II, Si IV, and Si II, with Ly{alpha} remaining strong (W{sub Ly{alpha}} > 300 mA) to {approx}> 5 R{sub vir} = 250 kpc. Only about one third of all the gas within R{sub vir} is outflowing. The fraction of sightlines within one virial radius that intercept optically thick, N{sub H{sub I}}>10{sup 17.2} cm{sup -2} material is 27%, in agreement with recent observations by Rudie et al. Such optically thick absorption is shown to trace inflowing ''cold'' streams that penetrate deep inside the virial radius. The streams, enriched to metallicities above 0.01 solar by previous episodes of star formation in the main host and in nearby dwarfs, are the origin of strong (N{sub C

  7. CO J = 2-1 LINE EMISSION IN CLUSTER GALAXIES AT z {approx} 1: FUELING STAR FORMATION IN DENSE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wagg, Jeff; Pope, Alexandra; Alberts, Stacey; Armus, Lee; Desai, Vandana; Brodwin, Mark; Bussmann, Robert S.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Melbourne, Jason; Stern, Daniel

    2012-06-20

    We present observations of CO J = 2-1 line emission in infrared-luminous cluster galaxies at z {approx} 1 using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our two primary targets are optically faint, dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) found to lie within 2 Mpc of the centers of two massive (>10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }) galaxy clusters. CO line emission is not detected in either DOG. We calculate 3{sigma} upper limits to the CO J = 2-1 line luminosities, L'{sub CO} < 6.08 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} and <6.63 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}. Assuming a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor derived for ultraluminous infrared galaxies in the local universe, this translates to limits on the cold molecular gas mass of M{sub H{sub 2}}< 4.86 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} and M{sub H{sub 2}}< 5.30 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }. Both DOGs exhibit mid-infrared continuum emission that follows a power law, suggesting that an active galactic nucleus (AGN) contributes to the dust heating. As such, estimates of the star formation efficiencies in these DOGs are uncertain. A third cluster member with an infrared luminosity, L{sub IR} < 7.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }, is serendipitously detected in CO J = 2-1 line emission in the field of one of the DOGs located roughly two virial radii away from the cluster center. The optical spectrum of this object suggests that it is likely an obscured AGN, and the measured CO line luminosity is L'{sub CO} = (1.94 {+-} 0.35) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}, which leads to an estimated cold molecular gas mass M{sub H{sub 2}}= (1.55{+-}0.28) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. A significant reservoir of molecular gas in a z {approx} 1 galaxy located away from the cluster center demonstrates that the fuel can exist to drive an increase in star formation and AGN activity at the outskirts of high-redshift clusters.

  8. Energy conservation and constants variation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraiselburd, L.; Miller Bertolami, M. M.; Sisterna, P.; Vucetich, H.

    If fundamental constants vary, the internal energy of macroscopic bodies should change. This should produce observable effects. It is shown that those effects can produce upper bounds on the variation of much lower than those coming from Eötvös experiments.

  9. Variations of the solar constant

    SciTech Connect

    Sofia, S.

    1981-12-01

    The variations in data received from rocket-borne and balloon-borne instruments are discussed. Indirect techniques to measure and monitor the solar constant are presented. Emphasis is placed on the correlation of data from the Solar Maximum Mission and the Nimbus 7 satellites. Abstracts of individual items from the workshop were prepared separately for the data base.

  10. STELLAR POPULATIONS OF LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES AT z {approx_equal} 1-3 IN THE HST/WFC3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hathi, N. P.; McCarthy, P. J.; Cohen, S. H.; Windhorst, R. A.; Rutkowski, M. J.; Ryan, R. E. Jr.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Bond, H. E.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Yan, H.; O'Connell, R. W.; Straughn, A. N.; Kimble, R. A.; Balick, B.; Calzetti, D.; Disney, M. J.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, D. N. B.; Holtzman, J. A.; and others

    2013-03-10

    We analyze the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z {approx_equal} 1-3 selected using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) UVIS channel filters. These HST/WFC3 observations cover about 50 arcmin{sup 2} in the GOODS-South field as a part of the WFC3 Early Release Science program. These LBGs at z {approx_equal} 1-3 are selected using dropout selection criteria similar to high-redshift LBGs. The deep multi-band photometry in this field is used to identify best-fit SED models, from which we infer the following results: (1) the photometric redshift estimate of these dropout-selected LBGs is accurate to within few percent; (2) the UV spectral slope {beta} is redder than at high redshift (z > 3), where LBGs are less dusty; (3) on average, LBGs at z {approx_equal} 1-3 are massive, dustier, and more highly star forming, compared to LBGs at higher redshifts with similar luminosities (0.1L* {approx}< L {approx}< 2.5L*), though their median values are similar within 1{sigma} uncertainties. This could imply that identical dropout selection technique, at all redshifts, finds physically similar galaxies; and (4) the stellar masses of these LBGs are directly proportional to their UV luminosities with a logarithmic slope of {approx}0.46, and star formation rates are proportional to their stellar masses with a logarithmic slope of {approx}0.90. These relations hold true-within luminosities probed in this study-for LBGs from z {approx_equal} 1.5 to 5. The star-forming galaxies selected using other color-based techniques show similar correlations at z {approx_equal} 2, but to avoid any selection biases, and for direct comparison with LBGs at z > 3, a true Lyman break selection at z {approx_equal} 2 is essential. The future HST UV surveys, both wider and deeper, covering a large luminosity range are important to better understand LBG properties and their evolution.

  11. New Quasar Studies Keep Fundamental Physical Constant Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Very Large Telescope sets stringent limit on possible variation of the fine-structure constant over cosmological time Summary Detecting or constraining the possible time variations of fundamental physical constants is an important step toward a complete understanding of basic physics and hence the world in which we live. A step in which astrophysics proves most useful. Previous astronomical measurements of the fine structure constant - the dimensionless number that determines the strength of interactions between charged particles and electromagnetic fields - suggested that this particular constant is increasing very slightly with time. If confirmed, this would have very profound implications for our understanding of fundamental physics. New studies, conducted using the UVES spectrograph on Kueyen, one of the 8.2-m telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope array at Paranal (Chile), secured new data with unprecedented quality. These data, combined with a very careful analysis, have provided the strongest astronomical constraints to date on the possible variation of the fine structure constant. They show that, contrary to previous claims, no evidence exist for assuming a time variation of this fundamental constant. PR Photo 07/04: Relative Changes with Redshift of the Fine Structure Constant (VLT/UVES) A fine constant To explain the Universe and to represent it mathematically, scientists rely on so-called fundamental constants or fixed numbers. The fundamental laws of physics, as we presently understand them, depend on about 25 such constants. Well-known examples are the gravitational constant, which defines the strength of the force acting between two bodies, such as the Earth and the Moon, and the speed of light. One of these constants is the so-called "fine structure constant", alpha = 1/137.03599958, a combination of electrical charge of the electron, the Planck constant and the speed of light. The fine structure constant describes how electromagnetic forces hold

  12. Constant-bandwidth constant-temperature hot-wire anemometer.

    PubMed

    Ligeza, P

    2007-07-01

    A constant-temperature anemometer (CTA) enables the measurement of fast-changing velocity fluctuations. In the classical solution of CTA, the transmission band is a function of flow velocity. This is a minor drawback when the mean flow velocity does not significantly change, though it might lead to dynamic errors when flow velocity varies over a considerable range. A modification is outlined, whereby an adaptive controller is incorporated in the CTA system such that the anemometer's transmission band remains constant in the function of flow velocity. For that purpose, a second feedback loop is provided, and the output signal from the anemometer will regulate the controller's parameters such that the transmission bandwidth remains constant. The mathematical model of a CTA that has been developed and model testing data allow a through evaluation of the proposed solution. A modified anemometer can be used in measurements of high-frequency variable flows in a wide range of velocities. The proposed modification allows the minimization of dynamic measurement errors.

  13. Synthesis and structural characterization of Al{sub 7}C{sub 3}N{sub 3}-homeotypic aluminum silicon oxycarbonitride, (Al{sub 7-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub z}N{sub 6-y-z}) (x{approx}1.2, y{approx}1.0 and z{approx}3.5)

    SciTech Connect

    Urushihara, Daisuke; Kaga, Motoaki; Asaka, Toru; Nakano, Hiromi; Fukuda, Koichiro

    2011-08-15

    A new aluminum silicon oxycarbonitride, (Al{sub 5.8}Si{sub 1.2})(O{sub 1.0}C{sub 3.5}N{sub 1.5}), has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The title compound is hexagonal with space group P6{sub 3}/mmc and unit-cell dimensions a=0.322508(4) nm, c=3.17193(4) nm and V=0.285717(6) nm{sup 3}. The atom ratios of Al:Si and those of O:C:N were, respectively, determined by EDX and EELS. The initial structural model was successfully derived from the XRPD data by the direct methods and further refined by the Rietveld method. The crystal is most probably composed of four types of domains with nearly the same fraction, each of which is isotypic to Al{sub 7}C{sub 3}N{sub 3} with space group P6{sub 3}mc. The existence of another new oxycarbonitride (Al{sub 6.6}Si{sub 1.4})(O{sub 0.7}C{sub 4.3}N{sub 2.0}), which must be homeotypic to Al{sub 8}C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, has been also demonstrated by XRPD and TEM. - Graphical abstract: A new oxycarbonitride discovered in the Al-Si-O-C-N system, (Al{sub 7-x}Si{sub x})(O{sub y}C{sub z}N{sub 6-y-z}) (x{approx}1.2, y{approx}1.0 and z{approx}3.5). The crystal is composed of four types of domains (I, II, III and IV), and hence the structure is represented by a split-atom model. Individual crystal structures can be regarded as layered structures, which consist of A-type [(Al, Si){sub 4}(O, C, N){sub 4}] unit layers and B-type [(Al, Si)(O, C, N){sub 2}] single layers. Highlights: > (Al{sub 5.8}Si{sub 1.2})(O{sub 1.0}C{sub 3.5}N{sub 1.5}) as a new aluminum silicon oxycarbonitride. > Crystal structure is determined and represented by a split-atom model. > Existence of another new oxycarbonitride (Al{sub 6.6}Si{sub 1.4})(O{sub 0.7}C{sub 4.3}N{sub 2.0}) is demonstrated. > Both new materials are formed by oxidation and nitridation of (Al, Si){sub 6}(O, C){sub 5}.

  14. WAVELENGTH ACCURACY OF THE KECK HIRES SPECTROGRAPH AND MEASURING CHANGES IN THE FINE STRUCTURE CONSTANT

    SciTech Connect

    Griest, Kim; Whitmore, Jonathan B.; Wolfe, Arthur M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Howk, J. Christopher; Marcy, Geoffrey W. E-mail: jonathan.b.whitmore@gmail.co

    2010-01-01

    We report on an attempt to accurately wavelength calibrate four nights of data taken with the Keck HIRES spectrograph on QSO PHL957, for the purpose of determining whether the fine structure constant was different in the past. Using new software and techniques, we measured the redshifts of various Ni II, Fe II, Si II, etc. lines in a damped Lyalpha system at z = 2.309. Roughly half the data were taken through the Keck iodine cell which contains thousands of well calibrated iodine lines. Using these iodine exposures to calibrate the normal Th-Ar Keck data pipeline output, we found absolute wavelength offsets of 500 m s{sup -1} to 1000 m s{sup -1} with drifts of more than 500 m s{sup -1} over a single night, and drifts of nearly 2000 m s{sup -1} over several nights. These offsets correspond to an absolute redshift of uncertainty of about DELTAz approx 10{sup -5}(DELTAlambda approx 0.02 A), with daily drifts of around DELTAz approx 5 x 10{sup -6} (DELTAlambda approx 0.01 A), and multiday drifts of nearly DELTAz approx 2 x 10{sup -5}(approx0.04 A). The causes of the wavelength offsets are not known, but since claimed shifts in the fine structure constant would result in velocity shifts of less than 100 m s{sup -1}, this level of systematic uncertainty may make it difficult to use Keck HIRES data to constrain the change in the fine structure constant. Using our calibrated data, we applied both our own fitting software and standard fitting software to measure DELTAalpha/alpha, but discovered that we could obtain results ranging from significant detection of either sign, to strong null limits, depending upon which sets of lines and which fitting method were used. We thus speculate that the discrepant results on DELTAalpha/alpha reported in the literature may be due to random fluctuations coming from underestimated systematic errors in wavelength calibration and fitting procedure.

  15. SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF THREE z-DROPOUT GALAXIES AT z = 6.844-7.213: DEMOGRAPHICS OF Ly{alpha} EMISSION IN z {approx} 7 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Yoshiaki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Ouchi, Masami; Mobasher, Bahram; Nayyeri, Hooshang; Dickinson, Mark; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Penner, Kyle; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Stern, Daniel; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Spinrad, Hyron

    2012-01-10

    We present the results of our ultra-deep Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy of z-dropout galaxies in the Subaru Deep Field and Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey's northern field. For 3 out of 11 objects, we detect an emission line at {approx}1 {mu}m with a signal-to-noise ratio of {approx}10. The lines show asymmetric profiles with high weighted skewness values, consistent with being Ly{alpha}, yielding redshifts of z = 7.213, 6.965, and 6.844. Specifically, we confirm the z = 7.213 object in two independent DEIMOS runs with different spectroscopic configurations. The z = 6.965 object is a known Ly{alpha} emitter, IOK-1, for which our improved spectrum at a higher resolution yields a robust skewness measurement. The three z-dropouts have Ly{alpha} fluxes of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} and rest-frame equivalent widths EW{sup Ly{alpha}}{sub 0} = 33-43 A. Based on the largest spectroscopic sample of 43 z-dropouts, which is the combination of our and previous data, we find that the fraction of Ly{alpha}-emitting galaxies (EW{sup Ly{alpha}}{sub 0} > 25 A) is low at z {approx} 7; 17% {+-} 10% and 24% {+-} 12% for bright (M{sub UV} {approx_equal} -21) and faint (M{sub UV} {approx_equal} -19.5) galaxies, respectively. The fractions of Ly{alpha}-emitting galaxies drop from z {approx} 6 to 7 and the amplitude of the drop is larger for faint galaxies than for bright galaxies. These two pieces of evidence would indicate that the neutral hydrogen fraction of the intergalactic medium increases from z {approx} 6 to 7 and that the reionization proceeds from high- to low-density environments, as suggested by an inside-out reionization model.

  16. CENTRAL STELLAR MASS DEFICITS IN THE BULGES OF LOCAL LENTICULAR GALAXIES, AND THE CONNECTION WITH COMPACT z {approx} 1.5 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Dullo, Bililign T.; Graham, Alister W.

    2013-05-01

    We have used the full radial extent of images from the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 to extract surface brightness profiles from a sample of six, local lenticular galaxy candidates. We have modeled these profiles using a core-Sersic bulge plus an exponential disk model. Our fast rotating lenticular disk galaxies with bulge magnitudes M{sub V} {approx}< -21.30 mag have central stellar deficits, suggesting that these bulges may have formed from ''dry'' merger events involving supermassive black holes (BHs) while their surrounding disk was subsequently built up, perhaps via cold gas accretion scenarios. The central stellar mass deficits M{sub def} are roughly 0.5-2 M{sub BH} (BH mass), rather than {approx}10-20 M{sub BH} as claimed from some past studies, which is in accord with core-Sersic model mass deficit measurements in elliptical galaxies. Furthermore, these bulges have Sersic indices n {approx}3, half-light radii R{sub e} < 2 kpc and masses >10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }, and therefore appear to be descendants of the compact galaxies reported at z {approx} 1.5-2. Past studies which have searched for these local counterparts by using single-component galaxy models to provide the z {approx} 0 size comparisons have overlooked these dense, compact, and massive bulges in today's early-type disk galaxies. This evolutionary scenario not only accounts for what are today generally old bulges-which must be present in z {approx} 1.5 images-residing in what are generally young disks, but it eliminates the uncomfortable suggestion of a factor of three to five growth in size for the compact, z {approx} 1.5 galaxies that are known to possess infant disks.

  17. Three pion nucleon coupling constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Arriola, E.; Amaro, J. E.; Navarro Pérez, R.

    2016-08-01

    There exist four pion nucleon coupling constants, fπ0pp, - fπ0nn, fπ+pn/2 and fπ-np/2 which coincide when up and down quark masses are identical and the electron charge is zero. While there is no reason why the pion-nucleon-nucleon coupling constants should be identical in the real world, one expects that the small differences might be pinned down from a sufficiently large number of independent and mutually consistent data. Our discussion provides a rationale for our recent determination fp2 = 0.0759(4),f 02 = 0.079(1),f c2 = 0.0763(6), based on a partial wave analysis of the 3σ self-consistent nucleon-nucleon Granada-2013 database comprising 6713 published data in the period 1950-2013.

  18. Methodology for extracting local constants from petroleum cracking flows

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Shen-Lin; Lottes, Steven A.; Zhou, Chenn Q.

    2000-01-01

    A methodology provides for the extraction of local chemical kinetic model constants for use in a reacting flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer code with chemical kinetic computations to optimize the operating conditions or design of the system, including retrofit design improvements to existing systems. The coupled CFD and kinetic computer code are used in combination with data obtained from a matrix of experimental tests to extract the kinetic constants. Local fluid dynamic effects are implicitly included in the extracted local kinetic constants for each particular application system to which the methodology is applied. The extracted local kinetic model constants work well over a fairly broad range of operating conditions for specific and complex reaction sets in specific and complex reactor systems. While disclosed in terms of use in a Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) riser, the inventive methodology has application in virtually any reaction set to extract constants for any particular application and reaction set formulation. The methodology includes the step of: (1) selecting the test data sets for various conditions; (2) establishing the general trend of the parametric effect on the measured product yields; (3) calculating product yields for the selected test conditions using coupled computational fluid dynamics and chemical kinetics; (4) adjusting the local kinetic constants to match calculated product yields with experimental data; and (5) validating the determined set of local kinetic constants by comparing the calculated results with experimental data from additional test runs at different operating conditions.

  19. Renormalization constants from string theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Vecchia, P.; Magnea, L.; Lerda, A.; Russo, R.; Marotta, R.

    The authors review some recent results on the calculation of renormalization constants in Yang-Mills theory using open bosonic strings. The technology of string amplitudes, supplemented with an appropriate continuation off the mass shell, can be used to compute the ultraviolet divergences of dimensionally regularized gauge theories. The results show that the infinite tension limit of string amplitudes corresponds to the background field method in field theory.

  20. NEAR-INFRARED SURVEY OF THE GOODS-NORTH FIELD: SEARCH FOR LUMINOUS GALAXY CANDIDATES AT z {approx}> 6.5 {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Hathi, Nimish P.; Mobasher, Bahram; Capak, Peter; Wang, Wei-Hao; Ferguson, Henry C.

    2012-09-20

    We present near-infrared (NIR; J and K{sub s}) survey of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey-North (GOODS-N) field. The publicly available imaging data were obtained using the MOIRCS instrument on the 8.2 m Subaru and the WIRCam instrument on the 3.6 m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). These observations fulfill a serious wavelength gap in the GOODS-N data, i.e., lack of deep NIR observations. We combine the Subaru/MOIRCS and CFHT/WIRCam archival data to generate deep J- and K{sub s}-band images, covering the full GOODS-N field ({approx}169 arcmin{sup 2}) to an AB magnitude limit of {approx}25 mag (3{sigma}). We applied z{sub 850}-band dropout color selection criteria, using the NIR data generated here. We have identified two possible Lyman break galaxy (LBG) candidates at z {approx}> 6.5 with J {approx}< 24.5. The first candidate is a likely LBG at z {approx_equal} 6.5 based on a weak spectral feature tentatively identified as Ly{alpha} line in the deep Keck/DEIMOS spectrum, while the second candidate is a possible LBG at z {approx_equal} 7 based on its photometric redshift. These z{sub 850}-dropout objects, if confirmed, are among the brightest such candidates found so far. At z {approx}> 6.5, their star formation rate is estimated as 100-200 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. If they continue to form stars at this rate, they assemble a stellar mass of {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} after about 400 million years, becoming the progenitors of massive galaxies observed at z {approx_equal} 5. We study the implication of the z{sub 850}-band dropout candidates discovered here, in constraining the bright end of the luminosity function and understanding the nature of high-redshift galaxies.

  1. CLASH: DISCOVERY OF A BRIGHT z {approx_equal} 6.2 DWARF GALAXY QUADRUPLY LENSED BY MACS J0329.6-0211

    SciTech Connect

    Zitrin, A.; Moustakas, J.; Bradley, L.; Coe, D.; Postman, M.; Koekemoer, A.; Moustakas, L. A.; Shu, X.; Zheng, W.; Ford, H.; Benitez, N.; Bouwens, R.; Broadhurst, T.; Host, O.; Jouvel, S.; Meneghetti, M.; Rosati, P.; Donahue, M.; Grillo, C.; Kelson, D.; and others

    2012-03-15

    We report the discovery of a z{sub phot} = 6.18{sup +0.05}{sub -0.07} (95% confidence level) dwarf galaxy, lensed into four images by the galaxy cluster MACS J0329.6-0211 (z{sub l} = 0.45). The galaxy is observed as a high-redshift dropout in HST/ACS/WFC3 CLASH and Spitzer/IRAC imaging. Its redshift is securely determined due to a clear detection of the Lyman break in the 18-band photometry, making this galaxy one of the highest-redshift multiply lensed objects known to date with an observed magnitude of F125W =24.00 {+-} 0.04 AB mag for its most magnified image. We also present the first strong-lensing analysis of this cluster uncovering 15 additional multiply imaged candidates of five lower-redshift sources spanning the range z{sub s} {approx_equal} 2-4. The mass model independently supports the high photometric redshift and reveals magnifications of 11.6{sup +8.9}{sub -4.1}, 17.6{sup +6.2}{sub -3.9}, 3.9{sup +3.0}{sub -1.7}, and 3.7{sup +1.3}{sub -0.2}, respectively, for the four images of the high-redshift galaxy. By delensing the most magnified image we construct an image of the source with a physical resolution of {approx}200 pc when the universe was {approx}0.9 Gyr old, where the z {approx_equal} 6.2 galaxy occupies a source-plane area of approximately 2.2 kpc{sup 2}. Modeling the observed spectral energy distribution using population synthesis models, we find a demagnified stellar mass of {approx}10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }, subsolar metallicity (Z/Z{sub Sun} {approx} 0.5), low dust content (A{sub V} {approx} 0.1 mag), a demagnified star formation rate (SFR) of {approx}3.2 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, and a specific SFR of {approx}3.4 Gyr{sup -1}, all consistent with the properties of local dwarf galaxies.

  2. THE EXTENDED HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE SUPERNOVA SURVEY: THE RATE OF CORE COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE TO z {approx} 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlen, Tomas; Riess, Adam G.; Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Mattila, Seppo; Kankare, Erkki; Mobasher, Bahram

    2012-09-20

    We use a sample of 45 core collapse supernovae detected with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope to derive the core collapse supernova rate in the redshift range 0.1 < z < 1.3. In redshift bins centered on (z) = 0.39, (z) = 0.73, and (z) = 1.11, we find rates of 3.00{sup +1.28}{sub -0.94} {sup +1.04}{sub -0.57}, 7.39{sup +1.86}{sub -1.52} {sup +3.20}{sub -1.60}, and 9.57{sup +3.76}{sub -2.80} {sup +4.96}{sub -2.80}, respectively, given in units of yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} 10{sup -4} h {sup 3}{sub 70}. The rates have been corrected for host galaxy extinction, including supernovae missed in highly dust-enshrouded environments in infrared bright galaxies. The first errors are statistical while the second ones are the estimated systematic errors. We perform a detailed discussion of possible sources of systematic errors and note that these start to dominate over statistical errors at z > 0.5, emphasizing the need to better control the systematic effects. For example, a better understanding of the amount of dust extinction in the host galaxies and knowledge of the supernova luminosity function, in particular the fraction of faint M {approx}> -15 supernovae, is needed to better constrain the rates. When comparing our results with the core collapse supernova rate based on the star formation rate, we find a good agreement, consistent with the supernova rate following the star formation rate, as expected.

  3. FOCUSING COSMIC TELESCOPES: EXPLORING REDSHIFT z approx 5-6 GALAXIES WITH THE BULLET CLUSTER 1E0657 - 56

    SciTech Connect

    Bradac, Marusa; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Phil; Applegate, Douglas; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Clowe, Douglas; Forman, William; Jones, Christine; Schneider, Peter; Zaritsky, Dennis

    2009-12-01

    The gravitational potential of clusters of galaxies acts as a cosmic telescope allowing us to find and study galaxies at fainter limits than otherwise possible and thus probe closer to the epoch of formation of the first galaxies. We use the Bullet cluster 1E0657 - 56 (z = 0.296) as a case study, because its high mass and merging configuration makes it one of the most efficient cosmic telescopes we know. We develop a new algorithm to reconstruct the gravitational potential of the Bullet cluster based on a non-uniform adaptive grid, combining strong and weak gravitational lensing data derived from deep Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys F606W-F775W-F850LP and ground-based imaging. We exploit this improved mass map to study z approx 5-6 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs), which we detect as dropouts. One of the LBGs is multiply imaged, providing a geometric confirmation of its high redshift, and is used to further improve our mass model. We quantify the uncertainties in the magnification map reconstruction in the intrinsic source luminosity, and in the volume surveyed, and show that they are negligible compared to sample variance when determining the luminosity function of high-redshift galaxies. With shallower and comparable magnitude limits to Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) and Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS), the Bullet cluster observations, after correcting for magnification, probe deeper into the luminosity function of the high-redshift galaxies than GOODS and only slightly shallower than HUDF. We conclude that accurately focused cosmic telescopes are the most efficient way to sample the bright end of the luminosity function of high-redshift galaxies and-in case they are multiply imaged-confirm their redshifts.

  4. [O III] EMISSION AND GAS KINEMATICS IN A LYMAN-ALPHA BLOB AT z {approx} 3.1

    SciTech Connect

    McLinden, Emily M.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Hibon, Pascale; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Tilvi, Vithal

    2013-04-10

    We present spectroscopic measurements of the [O III] emission line from two subregions of strong Ly{alpha} emission in a radio-quiet Lyman-alpha blob (LAB). The blob under study is LAB1 at z {approx} 3.1, and the [O III] detections are from the two Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) embedded in the blob halo. The [O III] measurements were made with LUCIFER on the 8.4 m Large Binocular Telescope and NIRSPEC on 10 m Keck Telescope. Comparing the redshift of the [O III] measurements to Ly{alpha} redshifts from SAURON allows us to take a step toward understanding the kinematics of the gas in the blob. Using both LUCIFER and NIRSPEC we find velocity offsets between the [O III] and Ly{alpha} redshifts that are modestly negative or consistent with 0 km s{sup -1} in both subregions studied (ranging from -72 {+-} 42- + 6 {+-} 33 km s{sup -1}). A negative offset means Ly{alpha} is blueshifted with respect to [O III] a positive offset then implies Ly{alpha} is redshifted with respect to [O III]. These results may imply that outflows are not primarily responsible for Lyman alpha escape in this LAB, since outflows are generally expected to produce a positive velocity offset. In addition, we present an [O III] line flux upper limit on a third region of LAB1, a region that is unassociated with any underlying galaxy. We find that the [O III] upper limit from the galaxy-unassociated region of the blob is at least 1.4-2.5 times fainter than the [O III] flux from one of the LBG-associated regions and has an [O III] to Ly{alpha} ratio measured at least 1.9-3.4 times smaller than the same ratio measured from one of the LBGs.

  5. WHY IS THE SOLAR CONSTANT NOT A CONSTANT?

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K. J.; Xu, J. C.; Gao, P. X.; Yang, L. H.; Liang, H. F.; Zhan, L. S.

    2012-03-10

    In order to probe the mechanism of variations of the solar constant on the inter-solar-cycle scale, the total solar irradiance (TSI; the so-called solar constant) in the time interval of 1978 November 7 to 2010 September 20 is decomposed into three components through empirical mode decomposition and time-frequency analyses. The first component is the rotation signal, counting up to 42.31% of the total variation of TSI, which is understood to be mainly caused by large magnetic structures, including sunspot groups. The second is an annual-variation signal, counting up to 15.17% of the total variation, the origin of which is not known at this point in time. Finally, the third is the inter-solar-cycle signal, counting up to 42.52%, which is inferred to be caused by the network magnetic elements in quiet regions, whose magnetic flux ranges from (4.27-38.01) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} Mx.

  6. On the Universality of the Kolmogorov Constant in Numerical Simulations of Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeung, P. K.; Zhou, Ye

    1997-01-01

    Motivated by a recent survey of experimental data, we examine data on the Kolmogorov spectrum constant in numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence, using results both from previous studies and from new direct numerical simulations over a range of Reynolds numbers (up to 240 on the Taylor scale) at grid resolutions up to 512(exp 3). It is noted that in addition to k(exp -5/3) scaling, identification of a true inertial range requires spectral isotropy in the same wavenumber range. We found that a plateau in the compensated three-dimensional energy spectrum at k(eta) approx. = 0.1 - -0.2, commonly used to infer the Kolmogorov constant from the compensated three-dimensional energy spectrum, actually does not represent proper inertial range behavior. Rather, a proper, if still approximate, inertial range emerges at k(eta) approx. = 0.02 - 0.05 when R(sub lambda) increases beyond 140. The new simulations indicate proportionality constants C(sub 1) and C in the one- and three-dimensional energy spectra respectively about 0.60 and 1.62. If the turbulence were perfectly isotropic then use of isotropy relations in wavenumber space (C(sub 1) = 18/55 C) would imply that C(sub 1) approx. = 0.53 for C = 1.62, in excellent agreement with experiments. However the one- and three-dimensional estimates are not fully consistent, because of departures (due to numerical and statistical limitations) from isotropy of the computed spectra at low wavenumbers. The inertial scaling of structure functions in physical space is briefly addressed. Since DNS is still restricted to moderate Reynolds numbers, an accurate evaluation of the Kolmogorov constant is very difficult. We focus on providing new insights on the interpretation of Kolmogorov 1941 similarity in the DNS literature and do not consider issues pertaining to the refined similarity hypotheses of Kolmogorov (K62).

  7. Millikan's measurement of Planck's constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Allan

    2013-12-01

    Robert Millikan is famous for measuring the charge of the electron. His result was better than any previous measurement and his method established that there was a fundamental unit of charge, or charge quantization. He is less well-known for his measurement of Planck's constant, although, as discussed below, he is often mistakenly given credit for providing significant evidence in support of Einstein's photon theory of light.1 His Nobel Prize citation was "for his work on the elementary electric charge of electricity and the photoelectric effect," an indication of the significance of his work on the photoelectric effect.

  8. Chandra Independently Determines Hubble Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-08-01

    A critically important number that specifies the expansion rate of the Universe, the so-called Hubble constant, has been independently determined using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This new value matches recent measurements using other methods and extends their validity to greater distances, thus allowing astronomers to probe earlier epochs in the evolution of the Universe. "The reason this result is so significant is that we need the Hubble constant to tell us the size of the Universe, its age, and how much matter it contains," said Max Bonamente from the University of Alabama in Huntsville and NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Ala., lead author on the paper describing the results. "Astronomers absolutely need to trust this number because we use it for countless calculations." Illustration of Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect Illustration of Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect The Hubble constant is calculated by measuring the speed at which objects are moving away from us and dividing by their distance. Most of the previous attempts to determine the Hubble constant have involved using a multi-step, or distance ladder, approach in which the distance to nearby galaxies is used as the basis for determining greater distances. The most common approach has been to use a well-studied type of pulsating star known as a Cepheid variable, in conjunction with more distant supernovae to trace distances across the Universe. Scientists using this method and observations from the Hubble Space Telescope were able to measure the Hubble constant to within 10%. However, only independent checks would give them the confidence they desired, considering that much of our understanding of the Universe hangs in the balance. Chandra X-ray Image of MACS J1149.5+223 Chandra X-ray Image of MACS J1149.5+223 By combining X-ray data from Chandra with radio observations of galaxy clusters, the team determined the distances to 38 galaxy clusters ranging from 1.4 billion to 9.3 billion

  9. Assessing uncertainty in physical constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrion, Max; Fischhoff, Baruch

    1986-09-01

    Assessing the uncertainty due to possible systematic errors in a physical measurement unavoidably involves an element of subjective judgment. Examination of historical measurements and recommended values for the fundamental physical constants shows that the reported uncertainties have a consistent bias towards underestimating the actual errors. These findings are comparable to findings of persistent overconfidence in psychological research on the assessment of subjective probability distributions. Awareness of these biases could help in interpreting the precision of measurements, as well as provide a basis for improving the assessment of uncertainty in measurements.

  10. THE RELATIVE ABUNDANCE OF COMPACT AND NORMAL MASSIVE EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES AND ITS EVOLUTION FROM REDSHIFT z {approx} 2 TO THE PRESENT

    SciTech Connect

    Cassata, P.; Giavalisco, M.; Guo Yicheng; Salimbeni, S.; Renzini, A.; Ferguson, H.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Grogin, N. A.; Dahlen, T.; Lotz, J. M.; Scarlata, C.; Conselice, C. J.; Dickinson, M.; Lin Lihwai

    2011-12-10

    We report on the evolution of the number density and size of early-type galaxies (ETGs) from z {approx} 2 to z {approx} 0. We select a sample of 563 massive (M > 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }), passively evolving (specific star formation rate <10{sup -2} Gyr{sup -1}), and morphologically spheroidal galaxies at 0 < z < 2.5, using the panchromatic photometry and spectroscopic redshifts available in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Surveys fields. We combine Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Camera 3 Hubble Space Telescope images to study the morphology of our galaxies in their optical rest frame in the entire 0 < z < 2.5 range. We find that throughout the explored redshift range the passive galaxies selected with our criteria have weak morphological K-correction, with size being slightly smaller in the optical than in the UV rest frame (by {approx}20% and {approx}10% at z > 1.2 and z < 1.2, respectively). We measure a significant evolution of the mass-size relation of ETGs, with a fractional increment that is almost independent of the stellar mass. ETGs formed at z > 1 appear to be preferentially small, and the evolution of the mass-size relation at z < 1 is driven by both the continuous size growth of the compact galaxies and the appearance of new ETGs with large sizes. We also find that the number density of all passive ETGs increases rapidly, by a factor of five, from z {approx} 2 to z {approx} 1, and then more mildly by another factor of 1.5 from z {approx} 1 to z {approx} 0. We interpret these results as evidence that the bulk of the ETGs are formed at 1 < z < 3 through a mechanism that leaves very compact remnants. At z < 1 the compact ETGs grow gradually in size, becoming normal-size galaxies, and at the same time new ETGs with normal-large sizes are formed.

  11. Determination of Constitutive Model Constants from Cylinder Impact Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    HONEYWELL, INC./ARMAMENT SYSTEMS DIVISION) FOR NAVAL SURFACE WARFARE CENTER RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT DECEMBER 1988 Approved for public release...primary application is for higher strain rates, and the strain rate constant was therefore selected to give better correlation with the higher strain...to that of the test data. The new constants (C and C2) were obtained in conjunction with the previous values of C. and C4, as talen from Reference 2

  12. Cosmological constant and local gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabeu, Jose; Espinoza, Catalina; Mavromatos, Nick E.

    2010-04-15

    We discuss the linearization of Einstein equations in the presence of a cosmological constant, by expanding the solution for the metric around a flat Minkowski space-time. We demonstrate that one can find consistent solutions to the linearized set of equations for the metric perturbations, in the Lorentz gauge, which are not spherically symmetric, but they rather exhibit a cylindrical symmetry. We find that the components of the gravitational field satisfying the appropriate Poisson equations have the property of ensuring that a scalar potential can be constructed, in which both contributions, from ordinary matter and {Lambda}>0, are attractive. In addition, there is a novel tensor potential, induced by the pressure density, in which the effect of the cosmological constant is repulsive. We also linearize the Schwarzschild-de Sitter exact solution of Einstein's equations (due to a generalization of Birkhoff's theorem) in the domain between the two horizons. We manage to transform it first to a gauge in which the 3-space metric is conformally flat and, then, make an additional coordinate transformation leading to the Lorentz gauge conditions. We compare our non-spherically symmetric solution with the linearized Schwarzschild-de Sitter metric, when the latter is transformed to the Lorentz gauge, and we find agreement. The resulting metric, however, does not acquire a proper Newtonian form in terms of the unique scalar potential that solves the corresponding Poisson equation. Nevertheless, our solution is stable, in the sense that the physical energy density is positive.

  13. Stability constant estimator user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, B.P.; Castleton, K.J.; Rustad, J.R.

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of the Stability Constant Estimator (SCE) program is to estimate aqueous stability constants for 1:1 complexes of metal ions with ligands by using trends in existing stability constant data. Such estimates are useful to fill gaps in existing thermodynamic databases and to corroborate the accuracy of reported stability constant values.

  14. Constant magnification optical tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazer, R. E. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A constant magnification optical tracking system for continuously tracking of a moving object is described. In the tracking system, a traveling objective lens maintains a fixed relationship with an object to be optically tracked. The objective lens was chosen to provide a collimated light beam oriented in the direction of travel of the moving object. A reflective surface is attached to the traveling objective lens for reflecting an image of the moving object. The object to be tracked is a free-falling object which is located at the focal point of the objective lens for at least a portion of its free-fall path. A motor and control means is provided for mantaining the traveling objective lens in a fixed relationship relative to the free-falling object, thereby keeping the free-falling object at the focal point and centered on the axis of the traveling objective lens throughout its entire free-fall path.

  15. Philicities, Fugalities, and Equilibrium Constants.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Herbert; Ofial, Armin R

    2016-05-17

    The mechanistic model of Organic Chemistry is based on relationships between rate and equilibrium constants. Thus, strong bases are generally considered to be good nucleophiles and poor nucleofuges. Exceptions to this rule have long been known, and the ability of iodide ions to catalyze nucleophilic substitutions, because they are good nucleophiles as well as good nucleofuges, is just a prominent example for exceptions from the general rule. In a reaction series, the Leffler-Hammond parameter α = δΔG(⧧)/δΔG° describes the fraction of the change in the Gibbs energy of reaction, which is reflected in the change of the Gibbs energy of activation. It has long been considered as a measure for the position of the transition state; thus, an α value close to 0 was associated with an early transition state, while an α value close to 1 was considered to be indicative of a late transition state. Bordwell's observation in 1969 that substituent variation in phenylnitromethanes has a larger effect on the rates of deprotonation than on the corresponding equilibrium constants (nitroalkane anomaly) triggered the breakdown of this interpretation. In the past, most systematic investigations of the relationships between rates and equilibria of organic reactions have dealt with proton transfer reactions, because only for few other reaction series complementary kinetic and thermodynamic data have been available. In this Account we report on a more general investigation of the relationships between Lewis basicities, nucleophilicities, and nucleofugalities as well as between Lewis acidities, electrophilicities, and electrofugalities. Definitions of these terms are summarized, and it is suggested to replace the hybrid terms "kinetic basicity" and "kinetic acidity" by "protophilicity" and "protofugality", respectively; in this way, the terms "acidity" and "basicity" are exclusively assigned to thermodynamic properties, while "philicity" and "fugality" refer to kinetics

  16. Omnidirectional antenna having constant phase

    DOEpatents

    Sena, Matthew

    2017-04-04

    Various technologies presented herein relate to constructing and/or operating an antenna having an omnidirectional electrical field of constant phase. The antenna comprises an upper plate made up of multiple conductive rings, a lower ground-plane plate, a plurality of grounding posts, a conical feed, and a radio frequency (RF) feed connector. The upper plate has a multi-ring configuration comprising a large outer ring and several smaller rings of equal size located within the outer ring. The large outer ring and the four smaller rings have the same cross-section. The grounding posts ground the upper plate to the lower plate while maintaining a required spacing/parallelism therebetween.

  17. 46 CFR 153.372 - Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures... COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.372 Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia). When table 1 references...

  18. 46 CFR 153.372 - Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures... COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.372 Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia). When table 1 references...

  19. 46 CFR 153.372 - Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures... COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.372 Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia). When table 1 references...

  20. 46 CFR 153.372 - Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures... COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.372 Gauges and vapor return for cargo vapor pressures exceeding 100 kPa (approx. 14.7 psia). When table 1 references...

  1. Quantum electrodynamics and fundamental constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wundt, Benedikt Johannes Wilhelm

    The unprecedented precision achieved both in the experimental measurements as well as in the theoretical description of atomic bound states make them an ideal study object for fundamental physics and the determination of fundamental constants. This requires a careful study of the effects from quantum electrodynamics (QED) on the interaction between the electron and the nucleus. The two theoretical approaches for the evaluation of QED corrections are presented and discussed. Due to the presence of two energy scales from the binding potential and the radiation field, an overlapping parameter has to be used in both approaches in order to separate the energy scales. The different choices for the overlapping parameter in the two methods are further illustrated in a model example. With the nonrelativistic theory, relativistic corrections in order ( Zalpha)2 to the two-photon decay rate of ionic states are calculated, as well as the leading radiative corrections of alpha( Zalpha)2ln[(Zalpha)-2 ]. It is shown that the corrections is gauge-invariant under a "hybrid" gauge transformation between Coulomb and Yennie gauge. Furthermore, QED corrections for Rydberg states in one-electron ions are investigated. The smallness of the corrections and the absence of nuclear size corrections enable very accurate theoretical predictions. Measuring transition frequencies and comparing them to the theoretical predictions, QED theory can be tested more precisely. In turn, this could yield a more accurate value for the Rydberg constant. Using a transition in a nucleus with a well determined mass, acting as a reference, a comparison to transition in other nuclei can even allow to determined nuclear masses. Finally, in order to avoid an additional uncertainty in nuclei with non zero nuclear spin, QED self-energy corrections to the hyperfine structure up to order alpha(Zalpha)2Delta EHFS are determined for highly excited Rydberg states.

  2. HST-WFC3 Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Quenched Galaxies at zeta approx 1.5 from the WISP Survey: Stellar Populations Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedregal, A. G.; Scarlata, C.; Henry, A. L.; Atek, H.; Rafelski, M.; Teplitz, H. I.; Dominguez, A.; Siana, B.; Colbert, J. W.; Malkan, M.; Ross, N. R.; Martin, C. L.; Dressler, A.; Bridge, C.; Hathi, N. P.; Masters, D.; McCarthy, P. J.; Rutkowski, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    We combine Hubble Space Telescope (HST) G102 and G141 near-IR (NIR) grism spectroscopy with HST/WFC3- UVIS, HST/WFC3-IR, and Spitzer/IRAC [3.6 microns] photometry to assemble a sample of massive (log(Mstar/M solar mass) at approx 11.0) and quenched (specific star formation rate < 0.01 G/yr(exp -1) galaxies at zeta approx 1.5. Our sample of 41 galaxies is the largest with G102+G141 NIR spectroscopy for quenched sources at these redshifts. In contrast to the local universe, zeta approx 1.5 quenched galaxies in the high-mass range have a wide range of stellar population properties. We find that their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are well fitted with exponentially decreasing star formation histories and short star formation timescales (tau less than or equal to 100 M/yr). Quenched galaxies also show a wide distribution in ages, between 1 and 4 G/yr. In the (u - r)0-versus-mass space quenched galaxies have a large spread in rest-frame color at a given mass. Most quenched galaxies populate the zeta appro. 1.5 red sequence (RS), but an important fraction of them (32%) have substantially bluer colors. Although with a large spread, we find that the quenched galaxies on the RS have older median ages (3.1 G/yr) than the quenched galaxies off the RS (1.5 G/yr). We also show that a rejuvenated SED cannot reproduce the observed stacked spectra of (the bluer) quenched galaxies off the RS. We derive the upper limit on the fraction of massive galaxies on the RS at zeta approx 1.5 to be <43%.We speculate that the young quenched galaxies off the RS are in a transition phase between vigorous star formation at zeta > 2 and the zeta approx 1.5 RS. According to their estimated ages, the time required for quenched galaxies off the RS to join their counterparts on the z approx. 1.5 RS is of the order of approx. 1G/yr.

  3. PHOTOMETRIC CONSTRAINTS ON THE REDSHIFT OF z {approx} 10 CANDIDATE UDFj-39546284 FROM DEEPER WFC3/IR+ACS+IRAC OBSERVATIONS OVER THE HUDF

    SciTech Connect

    Bouwens, R. J.; Labbe, I.; Franx, M.; Smit, R.; Oesch, P. A.; Illingworth, G. D.; Magee, D.; Gonzalez, V.; Brammer, G.; Spitler, L. R.; Trenti, M.; Carollo, C. M.

    2013-03-01

    Ultra-deep WFC3/IR observations on the HUDF from the HUDF09 program revealed just one plausible z {approx} 10 candidate, UDFj-39546284. UDFj-39546284 had all the properties expected of a galaxy at z {approx} 10 showing (1) no detection in the deep ACS+WFC3 imaging data blueward of the F160W band, exhibiting (2) a blue spectral slope redward of the break, and showing (3) no prominent detection in deep IRAC observations. The new, similarly deep WFC3/IR HUDF12 F160W observations over the HUDF09/XDF allow us to further assess this candidate. These observations show that this candidate, previously only detected at {approx}5.9{sigma} in a single band, clearly corresponds to a real source. It is detected at {approx}5.3{sigma} in the new H{sub 160}-band data and at {approx}7.8{sigma} in the full 85-orbit H{sub 160}-band stack. Interestingly, the non-detection of the source (<1{sigma}) in the new F140W observations suggests a higher redshift. Formally, the best-fit redshift of the source utilizing all the WFC3+ACS (and IRAC+K{sub s} -band) observations is 11.8 {+-} 0.3. However, we consider the z {approx} 12 interpretation somewhat unlikely, since the source would either need to be {approx}20 Multiplication-Sign more luminous than expected or show very high-EW Ly{alpha} emission (which seems improbable given the extensive neutral gas prevalent early in the reionization epoch). Lower-redshift solutions fail if only continuum models are allowed. Plausible lower-redshift solutions require that the H{sub 160}-band flux be dominated by line emission such as H{alpha} or [O III] with extreme EWs. The tentative detection of line emission at 1.6 {mu}m in UDFj-39546284 in a companion paper suggests that such emission may have already been found.

  4. STELLAR POPULATIONS OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z {approx} 6-7: CONSTRAINTS ON THE ESCAPE FRACTION OF IONIZING PHOTONS FROM GALAXY BUILDING BLOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Yoshiaki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Okamura, Sadanori; Masami Ouchi; Dunlop, James; Farrah, Duncan; McLure, Ross

    2010-12-01

    We investigate the stellar populations of Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) at z = 5.7 and 6.6 in a 0.65 deg{sup 2} sky of the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) Field, using deep images taken with the Subaru/Suprime-Cam, United Kingdom Infrared Telescope/Wide Field Infrared Camera, and Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). We produce stacked multiband images at each redshift from 165 (z = 5.7) and 91 (z = 6.6) IRAC-undetected objects to derive typical spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of z {approx} 6-7 LAEs for the first time. The stacked LAEs have as blue UV continua as the Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) z-dropout galaxies of similar M{sub UV}, with a spectral slope {beta} {approx} -3, but at the same time they have red UV-to-optical colors with detection in the 3.6 {mu}m band. Using SED fitting we find that the stacked LAEs have low stellar masses of {approx}(3-10) x 10{sup 7} M{sub sun}, very young ages of {approx}1-3 Myr, negligible dust extinction, and strong nebular emission from the ionized interstellar medium, although the z = 6.6 object is fitted similarly well with high-mass models without nebular emission; inclusion of nebular emission reproduces the red UV-to-optical colors while keeping the UV colors sufficiently blue. We infer that typical LAEs at z {approx} 6-7 are building blocks of galaxies seen at lower redshifts. We find a tentative decrease in the Ly{alpha} escape fraction from z = 5.7 to 6.6, which may imply an increase in the intergalactic medium neutral fraction. From the minimum contribution of nebular emission required to fit the observed SEDs, we place an upper limit on the escape fraction of ionizing photons of f {sup ion}{sub esc} {approx} 0.6 at z = 5.7 and {approx}0.9 at z = 6.6. We also compare the stellar populations of our LAEs with those of stacked HST/WFC3 z-dropout galaxies.

  5. Superintegrable systems on spaces of constant curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Gonera, Cezary Kaszubska, Magdalena

    2014-07-15

    Construction and classification of two-dimensional (2D) superintegrable systems (i.e. systems admitting, in addition to two global integrals of motion guaranteeing the Liouville integrability, the third global and independent one) defined on 2D spaces of constant curvature and separable in the so-called geodesic polar coordinates are presented. The method proposed is applicable to any value of curvature including the case of Euclidean plane, sphere and hyperbolic plane. The main result is a generalization of Bertrand’s theorem on 2D spaces of constant curvature and covers most of the known separable and superintegrable models on such spaces (in particular, the so-called Tremblay–Turbiner–Winternitz (TTW) and Post–Winternitz (PW) models which have recently attracted some interest). -- Highlights: •Classifying 2D superintegrable, separable (polar coordinates) systems on S{sup 2}, R{sup 2}, H{sup 2}. •Construction of radial, angular potentials leading to superintegrability. •Generalization of Bertrand’s theorem covering known models, e.g. Higgs, TTW, PW, and Coulomb.

  6. Exercise Device Would Exert Selectable Constant Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Damon C.

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus called the resistive exercise device (RED) has been proposed to satisfy a requirement for exercise equipment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) that could passively exert a selectable constant load on both the outward and return strokes. The RED could be used alone; alternatively, the RED could be used in combination with another apparatus called the treadmill with vibration isolation and stabilization (TVIS), in which case the combination would be called the subject load device (SLD). The basic RED would be a passive device, but it could incorporate an electric motor to provide eccentric augmentation (augmentation to make the load during inward movement greater than the load during outward movement). The RED concept represents a unique approach to providing a constant but selectable resistive load for exercise for the maintenance and development of muscles. Going beyond the original ISS application, the RED could be used on Earth as resistive weight training equipment. The advantage of the RED over conventional weight-lifting equipment is that it could be made portable and lightweight.

  7. Incommensurate structure of GdBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5+{delta}}({delta}{approx}0.38)

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizawa, N.; Asaka, T.; Kudo, T.; Fukuda, K.; Abe, N.; Arima, T.

    2013-02-15

    The incommensurate structure of the GdBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5+{delta}} ({delta}{approx}0.38) paramagnetic phase was studied using the single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The basic structure of the compound is a double-layered perovskite with an alternating layer sequence of [GdO{sub {delta}}]-[CoO{sub 2}]-[BaO]-[CoO{sub 2}] along the c axis. The crystal belongs to the five-dimensional superspace group P4/mmm({alpha}00)0000(0{alpha}0)0000, {alpha}=0.3368(1), with a 1 Multiplication-Sign 1 Multiplication-Sign 2-type tetragonal fundamental unit cell of a=3.8934(1) A and c=7.5267(1) A. The structure was refined to R=0.028 for all the observed 2216 reflections with I>3{sigma}(I), including 331 main reflections (R=0.017), 1039 observed first-order satellites (R=0.033), and 846 observed second-order satellites (R=0.045). The crystal has oxygen deficiency that occurs only in the [GdO{sub {delta}}] layer; however, it causes many positional modulations of the constituent atoms throughout the crystal in association with a valence fluctuation of Co between the divalent and trivalent states. Because the value of {alpha} was very close to 1/3, the structure was also investigated using both the commensurately modulated approach and the conventional three-dimensional approach assuming a 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 Multiplication-Sign 2 supercell of P4/mmm symmetry. These approaches successfully reproduced a prime structure of the compound that consists of intersecting CoO{sub 5} pyramidal arrays parallel to a or b axes. The bond valence sum and the charge neutrality principle suggested that the divalent and trivalent cobalt cations are distributed in an ordered way. The incommensurate approach also indicated the possible presence of a local disorder having a structural similarity with that of a high-temperature modification. - Graphical abstract: Changes in the Co-O3 bond length and bond valence sum of Co on the t-u section in the five-dimensional superspace and the local distortion of Co

  8. THE ASSEMBLY HISTORY OF DISK GALAXIES. I. THE TULLY-FISHER RELATION TO z {approx_equal} 1.3 FROM DEEP EXPOSURES WITH DEIMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Sarah H.; Sullivan, Mark; Bundy, Kevin; Ellis, Richard S.; Treu, Tommaso

    2011-11-10

    We present new measures of the evolving scaling relations between stellar mass, luminosity and rotational velocity for a morphologically inclusive sample of 129 disk-like galaxies with z{sub AB} < 22.5 in the redshift range 0.2 approx}90% of our sample, and we model the HST-resolved bulge and disk components in order to accurately de-project our measured velocities, accounting for seeing and dispersion. We demonstrate the merit of these advances by recovering an intrinsic scatter on the stellar mass Tully-Fisher relation a factor of two to three less than in previous studies at intermediate redshift and comparable to that of locally determined relations. With our increased precision, we find that the relation is well established by (z) {approx} 1, with no significant evolution to (z) {approx} 0.3, {Delta}M{sub *} {approx} 0.04 {+-} 0.07 dex. A clearer trend of evolution is seen in the B-band Tully-Fisher relation corresponding to a decline in luminosity of {Delta}M{sub B} {approx} 0.85 {+-} 0.28 magnitudes at fixed velocity over the same redshift range, reflecting the changes in star formation over this period. As an illustration of the opportunities possible when gas masses are available for a sample such as ours, we show how our dynamical and stellar mass data can be used to evaluate the likely contributions of baryons and dark matter to the assembly history of spiral galaxies.

  9. A CANDELS WFC3 GRISM STUDY OF EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2: A MIX OF NUCLEAR ACTIVITY AND LOW-METALLICITY STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Kocevski, Dale D.; McGrath, Elizabeth J.; Koo, David C.; Faber, S. M.; Mozena, Mark; Yesuf, Hassen; Scarlata, Claudia; Bell, Eric F.; Laird, Elise S.; Rangel, Cyprian; Yan Renbin; Atek, Hakim; Dickinson, Mark; Donley, Jennifer L.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A.; Dunlop, James S.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; and others

    2011-12-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) slitless grism spectroscopy of 28 emission-line galaxies at z {approx} 2, in the GOODS-S region of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey. The high sensitivity of these grism observations, with >1{sigma} detections of emission lines to f > 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -18} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}, means that the galaxies in the sample are typically {approx}7 times less massive (median M{sub *} = 10{sup 9.5} M{sub Sun }) than previously studied z {approx} 2 emission-line galaxies. Despite their lower mass, the galaxies have [O III]/H{beta} ratios which are very similar to previously studied z {approx} 2 galaxies and much higher than the typical emission-line ratios of local galaxies. The WFC3 grism allows for unique studies of spatial gradients in emission lines, and we stack the two-dimensional spectra of the galaxies for this purpose. In the stacked data the [O III] emission line is more spatially concentrated than the H{beta} emission line with 98.1% confidence. We additionally stack the X-ray data (all sources are individually undetected), and find that the average L{sub [OIII]}/L{sub 0.5-10keV} ratio is intermediate between typical z {approx} 0 obscured active galaxies and star-forming galaxies. Together the compactness of the stacked [O III] spatial profile and the stacked X-ray data suggest that at least some of these low-mass, low-metallicity galaxies harbor weak active galactic nuclei.

  10. Three applications of path integrals: equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects, and the temperature dependence of the rate constant of the [1,5] sigmatropic hydrogen shift in (Z)-1,3-pentadiene.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Tomáš; Vaníček, Jiří

    2010-11-01

    Recent experiments have confirmed the importance of nuclear quantum effects even in large biomolecules at physiological temperature. Here we describe how the path integral formalism can be used to describe rigorously the nuclear quantum effects on equilibrium and kinetic properties of molecules. Specifically, we explain how path integrals can be employed to evaluate the equilibrium (EIE) and kinetic (KIE) isotope effects, and the temperature dependence of the rate constant. The methodology is applied to the [1,5] sigmatropic hydrogen shift in pentadiene. Both the KIE and the temperature dependence of the rate constant confirm the importance of tunneling and other nuclear quantum effects as well as of the anharmonicity of the potential energy surface. Moreover, previous results on the KIE were improved by using a combination of a high level electronic structure calculation within the harmonic approximation with a path integral anharmonicity correction using a lower level method.

  11. Dependence of rate constants on vibrational temperatures - An Arrhenius description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, D. I.; Johnson, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    An interpretation of the variation of rate constants with vibrational temperature is proposed which introduces parameters analogous to those of the classical Arrhenius expression. The constancy of vibrational activation energy is studied for the dissociaton of NO, the ion-molecular reaction of O(+) with N2, and the atom exchange reaction of I with H2. It is found that when a Boltzmann distribution for vibrational states is applicable, the variation of the rate constant with the vibrational temperature can be used to define a vibrational activation energy. The method has application to exchange reactions where a vibrational energy threshold exists.

  12. Is There a Cosmological Constant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanek, Christopher

    2002-07-01

    The grant contributed to the publication of 18 refereed papers and 5 conference proceedings. The primary uses of the funding have been for page charges, travel for invited talks related to the grant research, and the support of a graduate student, Charles Keeton. The refereed papers address four of the primary goals of the proposal: (1) the statistics of radio lenses as a probe of the cosmological model (#1), (2) the role of spiral galaxies as lenses (#3), (3) the effects of dust on statistics of lenses (#7, #8), and (4) the role of groups and clusters as lenses (#2, #6, #10, #13, #15, #16). Four papers (#4, #5, #11, #12) address general issues of lens models, calibrations, and the relationship between lens galaxies and nearby galaxies. One considered cosmological effects in lensing X-ray sources (#9), and two addressed issues related to the overall power spectrum and theories of gravity (#17, #18). Our theoretical studies combined with the explosion in the number of lenses and the quality of the data obtained for them is greatly increasing our ability to characterize and understand the lens population. We can now firmly conclude both from our study of the statistics of radio lenses and our survey of extinctions in individual lenses that the statistics of optically selected quasars were significantly affected by extinction. However, the limits on the cosmological constant remain at lambda < 0.65 at a 2-sigma confidence level, which is in mild conflict with the results of the Type la supernova surveys. We continue to find that neither spiral galaxies nor groups and clusters contribute significantly to the production of gravitational lenses. The lack of group and cluster lenses is strong evidence for the role of baryonic cooling in increasing the efficiency of galaxies as lenses compared to groups and clusters of higher mass but lower central density. Unfortunately for the ultimate objective of the proposal, improved constraints on the cosmological constant, the next

  13. Is There a Cosmological Constant?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kochanek, Christopher; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The grant contributed to the publication of 18 refereed papers and 5 conference proceedings. The primary uses of the funding have been for page charges, travel for invited talks related to the grant research, and the support of a graduate student, Charles Keeton. The refereed papers address four of the primary goals of the proposal: (1) the statistics of radio lenses as a probe of the cosmological model (#1), (2) the role of spiral galaxies as lenses (#3), (3) the effects of dust on statistics of lenses (#7, #8), and (4) the role of groups and clusters as lenses (#2, #6, #10, #13, #15, #16). Four papers (#4, #5, #11, #12) address general issues of lens models, calibrations, and the relationship between lens galaxies and nearby galaxies. One considered cosmological effects in lensing X-ray sources (#9), and two addressed issues related to the overall power spectrum and theories of gravity (#17, #18). Our theoretical studies combined with the explosion in the number of lenses and the quality of the data obtained for them is greatly increasing our ability to characterize and understand the lens population. We can now firmly conclude both from our study of the statistics of radio lenses and our survey of extinctions in individual lenses that the statistics of optically selected quasars were significantly affected by extinction. However, the limits on the cosmological constant remain at lambda < 0.65 at a 2-sigma confidence level, which is in mild conflict with the results of the Type la supernova surveys. We continue to find that neither spiral galaxies nor groups and clusters contribute significantly to the production of gravitational lenses. The lack of group and cluster lenses is strong evidence for the role of baryonic cooling in increasing the efficiency of galaxies as lenses compared to groups and clusters of higher mass but lower central density. Unfortunately for the ultimate objective of the proposal, improved constraints on the cosmological constant, the next

  14. Generating Constant Weight Binary Codes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, D.G.

    2008-01-01

    The determination of bounds for A(n, d, w), the maximum possible number of binary vectors of length n, weight w, and pairwise Hamming distance no less than d, is a classic problem in coding theory. Such sets of vectors have many applications. A description is given of how the problem can be used in a first-year undergraduate computational…

  15. HST eclipse mapping of dwarf nova OY Carinae in quiescence: An 'Fe II curtain' with Mach approx. = 6 velocity dispersion veils the white dwarf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Keith; Marsh, T. R.; Cheng, F. H.; Hubeny, Ivan; Lanz, Theirry

    1994-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the eclipsing dwarf nova OY Car in its quiescent state are used to isolate the ultraviolet spectrum (1150-2500 A at 9.2 A Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) resolution) of the white dwarf, the accretion disk, and the bright spot. The white dwarf spectrum has a Stark-broadened photospheric L(alpha) absorption, but is veiled by a forest of blended Fe II features that we attribute to absorption by intervening disk material. A fit gives T(sub w) approx. = 16.5 x 10(exp 3) K for the white dwarf with a solar-abundance, log g = 8 model atmosphere, and T approx. = 10(exp 4) K, n(sub e) approx. = 10(exp 13)/cu cm, N(sub H) approx. = 10(exp 22) sq cm, and velocity dispersion delta V approx. = 60 km/s for the veil of homogeneous solar-abundance local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) gas. The veil parameters probably measure characteristic physical conditions in the quiescent accretion disk or its chromosphere. The large velocity dispersion is essential for a good fit; it lowers (chi square)/778 from 22 to 4. Keplerian shear can produce the velocity dispersion if the veiling gas is located at R approx. = 5 R(sub W) with (delta R)/R approx. = 0.3, but this model leaves an unobscured view to the upper hemisphere of the white dwarf, incompatible with absorptions that are up to 80% deep. The veiling gas may be in the upper atmosphere of the disk near its outer rim, but we then require supersonic (Mach approx. = 6) but sub-Keplerian (delta V/V(sub Kep) approx. = 0.07) velocity disturbances in this region to produce both the observed radial velocity dispersion and vertical motions sufficient to elevate the gas to z/R = cos i = 0.12. Such motions might be driven by the gas stream, since it may take several Kepler periods to reestablish the disk's vertical hydrostatic equilibrium. The temperature and column density of the gas we see as Fe II absorption in the ultraviolet are similar to what is required to produce the strong Balmer jump and

  16. Simulating Supercapacitors: Can We Model Electrodes As Constant Charge Surfaces?

    PubMed

    Merlet, Céline; Péan, Clarisse; Rotenberg, Benjamin; Madden, Paul A; Simon, Patrice; Salanne, Mathieu

    2013-01-17

    Supercapacitors based on an ionic liquid electrolyte and graphite or nanoporous carbon electrodes are simulated using molecular dynamics. We compare a simplified electrode model in which a constant, uniform charge is assigned to each carbon atom with a realistic model in which a constant potential is applied between the electrodes (the carbon charges are allowed to fluctuate). We show that the simulations performed with the simplified model do not provide a correct description of the properties of the system. First, the structure of the adsorbed electrolyte is partly modified. Second, dramatic differences are observed for the dynamics of the system during transient regimes. In particular, upon application of a constant applied potential difference, the increase in the temperature, due to the Joule effect, associated with the creation of an electric current across the cell follows Ohm's law, while unphysically high temperatures are rapidly observed when constant charges are assigned to each carbon atom.

  17. Convexity and concavity constants in Lorentz and Marcinkiewicz spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminska, Anna; Parrish, Anca M.

    2008-07-01

    We provide here the formulas for the q-convexity and q-concavity constants for function and sequence Lorentz spaces associated to either decreasing or increasing weights. It yields also the formula for the q-convexity constants in function and sequence Marcinkiewicz spaces. In this paper we extent and enhance the results from [G.J.O. Jameson, The q-concavity constants of Lorentz sequence spaces and related inequalities, Math. Z. 227 (1998) 129-142] and [A. Kaminska, A.M. Parrish, The q-concavity and q-convexity constants in Lorentz spaces, in: Banach Spaces and Their Applications in Analysis, Conference in Honor of Nigel Kalton, May 2006, Walter de Gruyter, Berlin, 2007, pp. 357-373].

  18. Radical telomerization of vinyltrimethylsilane by bromoform and partial chain-transfer constants

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil'eva, T.T.; Kochetkova, V.A.; Nelyubin, B.V.; Freidlina, R.Kh.

    1986-12-20

    The telomerization of vinyltrimethylsilane by bromoform initiated by benzoyl peroxide occurs because of scission of the C-Br bond in bromoform and gives telomers of structure CHBr/sub 2/(CH/sub 2/CHSiMe/sub 3/)/sub n/Br, where n = 1, 2. The first partial chain-transfer constant C/sub 1/ approx. = 120. When the vinyltrimethylsilane/bromoform ratio is less than or equal to 5, by-product tetrabromo derivatives CBr/sub 3/CH/sub 2/CHBrSiMe/sub 3/ and CBr/sub 2/(CH/sub 2/CHBrSiMe/sub 3/)/sub 2/ are formed.

  19. THE ASSEMBLY OF THE RED SEQUENCE AT z {approx} 1: THE COLOR AND SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF GALAXIES IN THE Cl1604 SUPERCLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Lemaux, B. C.; Gal, R. R.; Lubin, L. M.; Fassnacht, C. D.; and others

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the properties of the 525 spectroscopically confirmed members of the Cl1604 supercluster at z {approx} 0.9 as part of the Observations of Redshift Evolution in Large Scale Environments survey. In particular, we focus on the photometric, stellar mass, morphological, and spectral properties of the 305 member galaxies of the eight clusters and groups that comprise the Cl1604 supercluster. Using an extensive Keck Low-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS)/DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph (DEIMOS) spectroscopic database in conjunction with ten-band ground-based, Spitzer, and Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we investigate the buildup of the red sequence in groups and clusters at high redshift. Nearly all of the brightest and most massive red-sequence galaxies present in the supercluster environment are found to lie within the bounds of the cluster and group systems, with a surprisingly large number of such galaxies present in low-mass group systems. Despite the prevalence of these red-sequence galaxies, we find that the average cluster galaxy has a spectrum indicative of a star-forming galaxy, with a star formation rate between those of z {approx} 1 field galaxies and moderate-redshift cluster galaxies. The average group galaxy is even more active, exhibiting spectral properties indicative of a starburst. The presence of massive, red galaxies and the high fraction of starbursting galaxies present in the group environment suggest that significant processing is occurring in group environments at z {approx} 1 and earlier. There is a deficit of low-luminosity red-sequence galaxies in all Cl1604 clusters and groups, suggesting that such galaxies transition to the red sequence at later times. Extremely massive ({approx}10{sup 12} M{sub sun}) red-sequence galaxies routinely observed in rich clusters at z {approx} 0 are also absent from the Cl1604 clusters and groups. We suggest that such galaxies form at later times through merging processes. There are

  20. THE OPTICALLY UNBIASED GRB HOST (TOUGH) SURVEY. VI. RADIO OBSERVATIONS AT z {approx}< 1 AND CONSISTENCY WITH TYPICAL STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Michalowski, M. J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Kamble, A.; Kaplan, D. L.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Kruehler, T.; Reinfrank, R. F.; Bonavera, L.; Ibar, E.; Garrett, M. A.; Jakobsson, P.; Levan, A. J.; Massardi, M.; Pal, S.; Sollerman, J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Van der Horst, A. J.; and others

    2012-08-20

    The objective of this paper is to determine the level of obscured star formation activity and dust attenuation in a sample of gamma-ray burst (GRB) hosts, and to test the hypothesis that GRB hosts have properties consistent with those of the general star-forming galaxy populations. We present a radio continuum survey of all z < 1 GRB hosts in The Optically Unbiased GRB Host (TOUGH) sample supplemented with radio data for all (mostly pre-Swift) GRB-SN hosts discovered before 2006 October. We present new radio data for 22 objects and have obtained a detection for three of them (GRB 980425, 021211, 031203; none in the TOUGH sample), increasing the number of radio-detected GRB hosts from two to five. The star formation rate (SFR) for the GRB 021211 host of {approx}825 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, the highest ever reported for a GRB host, places it in the category of ultraluminous infrared galaxies. We found that at least {approx}63% of GRB hosts have SFR < 100 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} and at most {approx}8% can have SFR > 500 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. For the undetected hosts the mean radio flux (<35 {mu}Jy 3{sigma}) corresponds to an average SFR < 15 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Moreover, {approx}> 88% of the z {approx}< 1 GRB hosts have ultraviolet dust attenuation A{sub UV} < 6.7 mag (visual attenuation A{sub V} < 3 mag). Hence, we did not find evidence for large dust obscuration in a majority of GRB hosts. Finally, we found that the distributions of SFRs and A{sub UV} of GRB hosts are consistent with those of Lyman break galaxies, H{alpha} emitters at similar redshifts, and of galaxies from cosmological simulations. The similarity of the GRB population with other star-forming galaxies is consistent with the hypothesis that GRBs, a least at z {approx}< 1, trace a large fraction of all star formation, and are therefore less biased indicators than once thought.

  1. The Not so Constant Gravitational "Constant" G as a Function of Quantum Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxmilian Caligiuri, Luigi

    Gravitation is still the less understood among the fundamental forces of Nature. The ultimate physical origin of its ruling constant G could give key insights in this understanding. According to the Einstein's Theory of General Relativity, a massive body determines a gravitational potential that alters the speed of light, the clock's rate and the particle size as a function of the distance from its own center. On the other hand, it has been shown that the presence of mass determines a modification of Zero-Point Field (ZPF) energy density within its volume and in the space surrounding it. All these considerations strongly suggest that also the constant G could be expressed as a function of quantum vacuum energy density somehow depending on the distance from the mass whose presence modifies the ZPF energy structure. In this paper, starting from a constitutive medium-based picture of space, it has been formulated a model of gravitational constant G as a function of Planck's time and Quantum Vacuum energy density in turn depending on the radial distance from center of the mass originating the gravitational field, supposed as spherically symmetric. According to this model, in which gravity arises from the unbalanced physical vacuum pressure, gravitational "constant" G is not truly unchanging but slightly varying as a function of the distance from the mass source of gravitational potential itself. An approximate analytical form of such dependence has been discussed. The proposed model, apart from potentially having deep theoretical consequences on the commonly accepted picture of physical reality (from cosmology to matter stability), could also give the theoretical basis for unthinkable applications related, for example, to the field of gravity control and space propulsion.

  2. Experimental determination of optical constants in the vacuum ultra violet wavelength region between 80 and 140 nm: A reflectance versus thickness method and its application to ZnSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridou, Françoise; Cuniot-Ponsard, Mireille; Desvignes, Jean-Michel

    2007-03-01

    The 80-120 nm spectral range is a key domain for solar physics. Below 105 nm solids do not transmit light and the reflectance of available mirrors is particularly low which makes optical measurements specifically difficult. Optical constants of the materials may consequently be unavailable or unreliable. We present here a two media reflectance method at normal incidence suited to this VUV range, in which the variable is not the incidence angle but the thickness of the top layer made of the material to be analyzed. The real (n) and imaginary (k) parts of the complex index are directly and graphically determined in the (n, k) plane as the common intersection point of isoreflectance curves corresponding to samples different only in the thickness of the top layer. The method is tested and illustrated with ZnSe films evaporated on Al covered float glass substrates. In the literature, the reflectance magnitudes measured on ZnSe crystals differ strongly from an author to the other, leading to discrepant data for ZnSe in the VUV domain. We obtain precise and reliable values of (n, k), which fit the experimental values determined on freshly cleaved ZnSe crystals by J.L. Freeouf and the theoretical values calculated from the electronic band structure of ZnSe by John P. Walter and Marvin L. Cohen, but strongly differ from the optical constants selected by E.D. Palik in his tables.

  3. Henry's law constant, octanol-air partition coefficient and supercooled liquid vapor pressure of carbazole as a function of temperature: application to gas/particle partitioning in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Odabasi, Mustafa; Cetin, Banu; Sofuoglu, Aysun

    2006-02-01

    The Henry's law constant for carbazole was experimentally determined between 5 and 35 degrees C using a gas-stripping technique. The following equation was obtained for dimensionless Henry's law constant (H') versus temperature (T, K): ln H' = -3982(T,K)(-1) + 1.01. Temperature-dependent octanol-air partition coefficients (KOA) and supercooled liquid vapor pressures (PL,Pa) of carbazole were also determined using the GC retention time method. The temperature dependence of KOA and PL were explained by the following: log KOA = 4076/(T,K) - 5.65, log PL(Pa) = -3948(T,K)(- 1) + 11.48. The gas and particle-phase carbazole concentrations measured previously in Chicago, IL in 1995 was used for gas/particle partitioning modeling. Octanol based absorptive partitioning model consistently underpredicted the gas/particle partition coefficients (Kp) for all sampling periods. However, overall there was a good agreement between the measured Kp and soot-based model predictions.

  4. THE NEWFIRM MEDIUM-BAND SURVEY: PHOTOMETRIC CATALOGS, REDSHIFTS, AND THE BIMODAL COLOR DISTRIBUTION OF GALAXIES OUT TO z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, Katherine E.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Brammer, Gabriel; Muzzin, Adam; Bezanson, Rachel; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Lundgren, Britt; Nelson, Erica J.; Tal, Tomer; Wake, David A.; Labbe, Ivo; Williams, Rik J.; Kriek, Mariska; Marchesini, Danilo; Quadri, Ryan F.; Franx, Marijn; Illingworth, Garth D.

    2011-07-10

    We present deep near-IR (NIR) medium-bandwidth photometry over the wavelength range 1-1.8 {mu}m in the All-wavelength Extended Groth strip International Survey (AEGIS) and Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) fields. The observations were carried out using the NOAO Extremely Wide-Field Infrared Imager (NEWFIRM) on the Mayall 4 m Telescope on Kitt Peak as part of the NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey (NMBS), an NOAO survey program. In this paper, we describe the full details of the observations, data reduction, and photometry for the survey. We also present a public K-selected photometric catalog, along with accurate photometric redshifts. The redshifts are computed with 37 (20) filters in the COSMOS (AEGIS) fields, combining the NIR medium-bandwidth data with existing UV (Galaxy Evolution Explorer), visible and NIR (Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and Subaru Telescope), and mid-IR (Spitzer/IRAC) imaging. We find excellent agreement with publicly available spectroscopic redshifts, with {sigma}{sub z}/(1 + z) {approx} 1%-2% for {approx}4000 galaxies at z = 0-3. The NMBS catalogs contain {approx}13,000 galaxies at z > 1.5 with accurate photometric redshifts and rest-frame colors. Due to the increased spectral resolution obtained with the five NIR medium-band filters, the median 68% confidence intervals of the photometric redshifts of both quiescent and star-forming galaxies are a factor of about two times smaller when comparing catalogs with medium-band NIR photometry to NIR broadband photometry. We show evidence for a clear bimodal color distribution between quiescent and star-forming galaxies that persists to z {approx} 3, a higher redshift than has been probed so far.

  5. THE MORPHOLOGY OF PASSIVELY EVOLVING GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2 FROM HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/WFC3 DEEP IMAGING IN THE HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Cassata, P.; Giavalisco, M.; Guo Yicheng; Salimbeni, S.; Ferguson, H.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Casertano, S.; Grogin, N.; Lucas, R. A.; Renzini, A.; Fontana, A.; Dickinson, M.; Lotz, J. M.; Conselice, C. J.; Papovich, C.; Straughn, A.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Moustakas, L.

    2010-05-01

    We present near-IR images, obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope and the WFC3/IR camera, of six passive and massive galaxies at redshift 1.3 < z < 2.4 (specific star formation rate <10{sup -2} Gyr{sup -1}; stellar mass M {approx} 10{sup 11} M {sub sun}), selected from the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey. These images, which have a spatial resolution of {approx}1.5 kpc, provide the deepest view of the optical rest-frame morphology of such systems to date. We find that the light profile of these galaxies is regular and well described by a Sersic model with index typical of today's spheroids. Their size, however, is generally much smaller than today's early types of similar stellar masses, with four out of six galaxies having r{sub e} {approx} 1 kpc or less, in quantitative agreement with previous similar measures made at rest-frame UV wavelengths. The images reach limiting surface brightness {mu}{approx} 26.5 mag arcsec{sup -2} in the F160W bandpass; yet, there is no evidence of a faint halo in the galaxies of our sample, even in their stacked image. We also find that these galaxies have very weak 'morphological k-correction' between the rest-frame UV (from the Advanced Camera for Surveys z band) and the rest-frame optical (WFC3 H band): the Sersic index, physical size, and overall morphology are independent or only mildly dependent on the wavelength, within the errors.

  6. The Contribution of z < or Approx. 6 Sources to the Spatial Coherence in the Unresolved Cosmic Near-Infrared and X-Ray Backgrounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helgason, K.; Cappelluti, N.; Hasinger, G.; Kashlinsky, A.; Ricotti, M.

    2014-01-01

    A spatial clustering signal has been established in Spitzer/IRAC measurements of the unresolved cosmic near-infrared background (CIB) out to large angular scales, approx. 1deg. This CIB signal, while significantly exceeding the contribution from the remaining known galaxies, was further found to be coherent at a highly statistically significant level with the unresolved soft cosmic X-ray background (CXB). This measurement probes the unresolved CXB to very faint source levels using deep near-IR source subtraction.We study contributions from extragalactic populations at low to intermediate redshifts to the measured positive cross-power signal of the CIB fluctuations with the CXB. We model the X-ray emission from active galactic nuclei (AGNs), normal galaxies, and hot gas residing in virialized structures, calculating their CXB contribution including their spatial coherence with all infrared emitting counterparts. We use a halo model framework to calculate the auto and cross-power spectra of the unresolved fluctuations based on the latest constraints of the halo occupation distribution and the biasing of AGNs, galaxies, and diffuse emission. At small angular scales (1), the 4.5microns versus 0.5-2 keV coherence can be explained by shot noise from galaxies and AGNs. However, at large angular scales (approx.10), we find that the net contribution from the modeled populations is only able to account for approx. 3% of the measured CIB×CXB cross-power. The discrepancy suggests that the CIB×CXB signal originates from the same unknown source population producing the CIB clustering signal out to approx. 1deg.

  7. Determination of Acidity Constants by Gradient Flow-Injection Titration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conceicao, Antonio C. L.; Minas da Piedade, Manuel E.

    2006-01-01

    A three-hour laboratory experiment, designed for an advanced undergraduate course in instrumental analysis that illustrates the application of the gradient chamber flow-injection titration (GCFIT) method with spectrophotometric detection to determine acidity constants is presented. The procedure involves the use of an acid-base indicator to obtain…

  8. Manganese nanoclusters and MnSi{sub {approx}1.7} nanowires formed on Si(110): A comparative x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Zou Zhiqiang; Shi Gaoming; Liu Xiaoyong; Sun Limin

    2013-01-14

    The growth of Mn on a Si(110) surface at room temperature (RT) and 550 Degree-Sign C has been investigated by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). STM observation shows that the growth at 550 Degree-Sign C results in the formation of nanowires (NWs), while that at RT produces only nanoclusters. The Mn 2p XPS spectra unambiguously reveal that the NWs are composed of MnSi{sub {approx}1.7} and the nanoclusters are composed of Mn. Curve-fitting analysis of the spectra shows that 64.9% of the NWs were oxidized due to atmospheric exposure during sample transfer, while the Mn nanoclusters were completely oxidized under the same conditions. This fact indicates that the MnSi{sub {approx}1.7} NWs have better oxidation resistance than the Mn clusters, which can be attributed to the protection effect of the SiO{sub 2} layer formed on the NWs and the smaller surface to volume ratio of the NWs comparing with the clusters. The binding energy of Mn 2p for the NWs exhibits a negative shift of {approx}0.5 eV with respect to the Mn metallic state, which is similar to the silicide state of earlier transition metals Ti and Cr, but different from that of later transition metals Fe and Ni. This negative shift can be attributed to the contribution of Madelung potential.

  9. HST WFC3/IR OBSERVATIONS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS HOST GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2: SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES GROW IN DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Schawinski, Kevin; Urry, C. Megan; Treister, Ezequiel; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Simmons, Brooke; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2011-02-01

    We present the rest-frame optical morphologies of active galactic nucleus (AGN) host galaxies at 1.5 < z < 3, using near-infrared imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3, the first such study of AGN host galaxies at these redshifts. The AGNs are X-ray-selected from the Chandra Deep Field South and have typical luminosities of 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}approx}80%) of the host galaxies of these AGNs have low Sersic indices indicative of disk-dominated light profiles, suggesting that secular processes govern a significant fraction of the cosmic growth of black holes. That is, many black holes in the present-day universe grew much of their mass in disk-dominated galaxies and not in early-type galaxies or major mergers. The properties of the AGN host galaxies are furthermore indistinguishable from their parent galaxy population and we find no strong evolution in either effective radii or morphological mix between z {approx} 2 and z {approx} 0.05.

  10. Apparatus producing constant cable tension for intermittent demand

    DOEpatents

    Lauritzen, T.

    1984-05-23

    This invention relates to apparatus for producing constant tension in cable or the like when it is unreeled and reeled from a drum or spool under conditions of intermittent demand. The invention is particularly applicable to the handling of superconductive cable, but the invention is also applicable to the unreeling and reeling of other strands, such as electrical cable, wire, cord, other cables, fish line, wrapping paper and numerous other materials.

  11. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of tungsten carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Balasubramanian, K.

    2000-05-01

    Spectroscopic constants (R{sub e},{omega}{sub e},T{sub e},{mu}{sub e}) and potential energy curves for 40 low-lying electronic states of the diatomic tungsten carbide (WC) were obtained using the complete active space multiconfiguration self-consistent field followed by the multireference singles+doubles configuration interaction and full first- and second-order configuration interaction calculations that included up to 6.4 mil configurations. Spin-orbit effects were included through the enhanced relativistic configuration interaction method described here for 28 electronic states of WC lying below {approx}20 000 cm-1. The spin-orbit splitting of the ground state of WC was found to be very large (4394 cm-1). The ground and excited electronic states of the W atom were also computed and were found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. The nature of bonding was analyzed through the composition of orbitals, leading configurations, Mulliken populations, and dipole moments. The dissociation energy of WC was computed including spin-orbit and electron correlation effects. The recent photoelectron spectra of WC{sup -} were assigned on the basis of our computed results. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  12. THE COSMOS-WIRCam NEAR-INFRARED IMAGING SURVEY. I. BzK-SELECTED PASSIVE AND STAR-FORMING GALAXY CANDIDATES AT z approx> 1.4

    SciTech Connect

    McCracken, H. J.; Mellier, Y.; Capak, P.; Salvato, M.; Scoville, N. Z.; Aussel, H.; Daddi, E.; Sanders, D. B.; Ilbert, O.; Kneib, J.-P.; Le Fevre, O.; Kartaltepe, J.; Willott, C. J.; Mancini, C.; Renzini, A.; Cook, R.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Murayama, T.; Shioya, Y.

    2010-01-01

    We present a new near-infrared survey covering the 2 deg{sup 2} COSMOS field conducted using WIRCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. By combining our near-infrared data with Subaru B and z images, we construct a deep, wide-field optical-infrared catalog. At K{sub s} < 23 (AB magnitudes), our survey completeness is greater than 90% and 70% for stars and galaxies, respectively, and contains 143,466 galaxies and 13,254 stars. Using the BzK diagram, we divide our galaxy catalog into quiescent and star-forming galaxy candidates. At z approx 2, our catalogs contain 3931 quiescent and 25,757 star-forming galaxies representing the largest and most secure sample at these depths and redshifts to date. Our counts of quiescent galaxies turns over at K{sub s} approx 22, an effect that we demonstrate cannot be due to sample incompleteness. Both the number of faint and bright quiescent objects in our catalogs exceed the predictions of a recent semi-analytic model of galaxy formation, indicating potentially the need for further refinements in the amount of merging and active galactic nucleus feedback at z approx 2 in these models. We measure the angular correlation function for each sample and find that the slope of the field galaxy correlation function flattens to 1.5 by K{sub s} approx 23. At small angular scales, the angular correlation function for passive BzK galaxies is considerably in excess of the clustering of dark matter. We use precise 30-band photometric redshifts to derive the spatial correlation length and the redshift distributions for each object class. At K{sub s} < 22, we find r {sup g}amma{sup /1.8}{sub 0} = 7.0 +- 0.5h {sup -1} Mpc for the passive BzK candidates and 4.7 +- 0.8 h {sup -1} Mpc for the star-forming BzK galaxies. Our pBzK galaxies have an average photometric redshift of z{sub p} approx 1.4, in approximate agreement with the limited spectroscopic information currently available. The stacked K{sub s} image will be made publicly available from

  13. Statistical Modelling of the Soil Dielectric Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usowicz, Boguslaw; Marczewski, Wojciech; Bogdan Usowicz, Jerzy; Lipiec, Jerzy

    2010-05-01

    the soil type, and that way it enables clear comparing to results from other soil type dependent models. The paper is focused on proper representing possible range of porosity in commonly existing soils. This work is done with aim of implementing the statistical-physical model of the dielectric constant to a use in the model CMEM (Community Microwave Emission Model), applicable to SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity ESA Mission) data. The input data to the model clearly accepts definition of soil fractions in common physical measures, and in opposition to other empirical models, does not need calibrating. It is not dependent on recognition of the soil by type, but instead it offers the control of accuracy by proper determination of the soil compound fractions. SMOS employs CMEM being funded only by the sand-clay-silt composition. Common use of the soil data, is split on tens or even hundreds soil types depending on the region. We hope that only by determining three element compounds of sand-clay-silt, in few fractions may help resolving the question of relevance of soil data to the input of CMEM, for SMOS. Now, traditionally employed soil types are converted on sand-clay-silt compounds, but hardly cover effects of other specific properties like the porosity. It should bring advantageous effects in validating SMOS observation data, and is taken for the aim in the Cal/Val project 3275, in the campaigns for SVRT (SMOS Validation and Retrieval Team). Acknowledgements. This work was funded in part by the PECS - Programme for European Cooperating States, No. 98084 "SWEX/R - Soil Water and Energy Exchange/Research".

  14. Behavior near constant solutions of functional differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    Techniques have been developed to determine in a systematic way the local behavior near constant solutions. Local integral manifolds play a very important role in this development, as they have also for ordinary differential equations. An attempt is made to indicate a few more applications of these methods to some problems in bifurcation in the spirit of Sotomayor (to appear) and to a growth model of Cooke and Yorke (to appear). It is also shown how to prove a theorem on stability under constantly acting disturbances using these methods.

  15. Functionalised graphene sheets as effective high dielectric constant fillers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A new functionalised graphene sheet (FGS) filled poly(dimethyl)siloxane insulator nanocomposite has been developed with high dielectric constant, making it well suited for applications in flexible electronics. The dielectric permittivity increased tenfold at 10 Hz and 2 wt.% FGS, while preserving low dielectric losses and good mechanical properties. The presence of functional groups on the graphene sheet surface improved the compatibility nanofiller/polymer at the interface, reducing the polarisation process. This study demonstrates that functionalised graphene sheets are ideal nanofillers for the development of new polymer composites with high dielectric constant values. PACS: 78.20.Ci, 72.80.Tm, 62.23.Kn PMID:21867505

  16. Solar Constant (SOLCON) Experiment: Ground Support Equipment (GSE) software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, M. Alan; Thomas, Susan; Wilson, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The Solar Constant (SOLCON) Experiment, the objective of which is to determine the solar constant value and its variability, is scheduled for launch as part of the Space Shuttle/Atmospheric Laboratory for Application and Science (ATLAS) spacelab mission. The Ground Support Equipment (GSE) software was developed to monitor and analyze the SOLCON telemetry data during flight and to test the instrument on the ground. The design and development of the GSE software are discussed. The SOLCON instrument was tested during Davos International Solar Intercomparison, 1989 and the SOLCON data collected during the tests are analyzed to study the behavior of the instrument.

  17. Low power, constant-flow air pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Polito, M.D.; Albert, B.

    1994-01-01

    A rugged, yet small and lightweight constant-flow air pump system has been designed. Flow control is achieved using a novel approach which is three times more power efficient than previous designs. The resultant savings in battery size and weight makes these pumps ideal for sampling air on balloon platforms. The pump package includes meteorological sensors and an onboard computer that stores time and sensor data and turns the constant-flow pump circuit on/off. Some applications of these systems are also presented in this report.

  18. The cosmological constant: Plus CA change, plus C`est La Meme Chose

    SciTech Connect

    Frieman, J.A.

    1998-02-01

    Recent measurements of the cosmological parameters have renewed interest in the cosmological constant {Lambda}. I briefly review the current status of these measurements and the corresponding arguments for and against cosmological models with non-zero {Lambda}. I outline a scenario which attempts to incorporate non-zero vacuum energy into the framework of particle physics, based on an ultra-light pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson. With global spontaneous symmetry breaking scale f {approx_equal} 10{sup 18} GeV and explicit breaking scale comparable to MSW neutrino masses, M {approximately} 10{sup -3} eV, such a field, which acquires a mass M{sub {phi}} {approximately} M{sup 2}/f {approximately} H{sub 0}, would have become dynamical at recent epochs and currently dominate the energy density of the universe. The field acts as an effective cosmological constant for several expansion times and then relaxes into a condensate of coherent non-relativistic bosons. Such a model can reconcile dynamical estimates of the density parameter, {Omega}{sub m} {approximately} 0.2, with a spatially flat universe, and can yield an expansion age H{sub 0}t{sub 0} {approx_equal} 1 while remaining consistent with limits from gravitational lens statistics.

  19. Nonlocal effective gravitational field equations and the running of Newton's constant G

    SciTech Connect

    Hamber, H.W.; Williams, R.M.

    2005-08-15

    Nonperturbative studies of quantum gravity have recently suggested the possibility that the strength of gravitational interactions might slowly increase with distance. Here a set of generally covariant effective field equations are proposed, which are intended to incorporate the gravitational, vacuum-polarization induced, running of Newton's constant G. One attractive feature of this approach is that, from an underlying quantum gravity perspective, the resulting long-distance (or large time) effective gravitational action inherits only one adjustable parameter {xi}, having the units of a length, arising from dimensional transmutation in the gravitational sector. Assuming the above scenario to be correct, some simple predictions for the long-distance corrections to the classical standard model Robertson-Walker metric are worked out in detail, with the results formulated as much as possible in a model-independent framework. It is found that the theory, even in the limit of vanishing renormalized cosmological constant, generally predicts an accelerated power-law expansion at later times t{approx}{xi}{approx}1/H.

  20. ATP sulfurylase-dependent assays for inorganic pyrophosphate: applications to determining the equilibrium constant and reverse direction kinetics of the pyrophosphatase reaction, magnesium binding to orthophosphate, and unknown concentrations of pyrophosphate.

    PubMed

    Daley, L A; Renosto, F; Segel, I H

    1986-09-01

    A continuous, coupled, spectrophotometric assay is described in which the enzyme ATP sulfurylase is employed to measure the concentration of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) at equilibrium with known concentrations of inorganic orthophosphate (Pi) in the presence of excess inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPitase). In agreement with previous reports, the apparent equilibrium constant (Keq,app) of the PPi hydrolysis reaction was shown to decrease as the concentration of Mg2+ is increased. At pH 7.3, 30 degrees C, in the presence of 150 mM NaCl and 1 mM free Mg2+, Keq,app (calculated as [Pi]t2/[PPi]t) was 1950. Measurements of Keq,app at different total concentrations of Mg2+ and Pi permitted the determination of K0, the dissociation constant of the Mg-Pi complex. In 0.05 M Tris-Cl, pH 8.0, at 30 degrees C, K0 was 3.6 mM. In the presence of excess ATP sulfurylase, yeast PPitase catalyzed PPi formation from Pi with a specific activity (Vmax) of 9 units X mg protein-1 at pH 8.0, 30 degrees C, and 1 mM free Mg2+. Half-maximum reverse reaction velocity was observed at a total Pi concentration of 18 mM. (Under the same conditions, Vmax of the PPi hydrolysis reaction was 530 units X mg protein-1.) A radiochemical end point ("reaction-to-completion") assay for measuring unknown concentrations of PPi was devised. In the presence of excess 35S-adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate ([35S]APS) as the cosubstrate, 35SO2-4 formation was stoichiometric with added PPi. (The 35SO2-4 and [35S]APS are separated by adsorption of the latter onto charcoal.) The sensitivity of the assay can be adjusted by varying the specific radioactivity of the [35S]APS. In the absence of interfering substances, as little as 2 pmol of PPi per 1.0 ml assay volume can be measured. The sensitivity of the assay is reduced in the presence of ATP plus perchlorate (which synergistically inhibit the enzyme). However, if the bulk of the ATP is removed from perchloric acid extracts of tissues with glucose and hexokinase, initial

  1. Emergent cosmological constant from colliding electromagnetic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Halilsoy, M.; Mazharimousavi, S. Habib; Gurtug, O. E-mail: habib.mazhari@emu.edu.tr

    2014-11-01

    In this study we advocate the view that the cosmological constant is of electromagnetic (em) origin, which can be generated from the collision of em shock waves coupled with gravitational shock waves. The wave profiles that participate in the collision have different amplitudes. It is shown that, circular polarization with equal amplitude waves does not generate cosmological constant. We also prove that the generation of the cosmological constant is related to the linear polarization. The addition of cross polarization generates no cosmological constant. Depending on the value of the wave amplitudes, the generated cosmological constant can be positive or negative. We show additionally that, the collision of nonlinear em waves in a particular class of Born-Infeld theory also yields a cosmological constant.

  2. Harmonic undulator radiations with constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeevakhan, Hussain; Mishra, G.

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic undulators has been analysed in the presence of constant magnetic field along the direction of main undulator field. The spectrum modifications in harmonic undulator radiations and intensity degradation as a function of constant magnetic field magnitude at fundamental and third harmonics have been evaluated with a numerical integration method and generalised Bessel function. The role of harmonic field to overcome the intensity reduction due to constant magnetic field and energy spread in electron beam has also been demonstrated.

  3. Constant voltage electro-slag remelting control

    DOEpatents

    Schlienger, M.E.

    1996-10-22

    A system for controlling electrode gap in an electro-slag remelt furnace has a constant regulated voltage and an electrode which is fed into the slag pool at a constant rate. The impedance of the circuit through the slag pool is directly proportional to the gap distance. Because of the constant voltage, the system current changes are inversely proportional to changes in gap. This negative feedback causes the gap to remain stable. 1 fig.

  4. Path integral calculation of thermal rate constants within the quantum instanton approximation: application to the H + CH4 --> H2 + CH3 hydrogen abstraction reaction in full Cartesian space.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Miller, William H

    2004-02-15

    The quantum instanton approximation for thermal rate constants of chemical reactions [Miller, Zhao, Ceotto, and Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 1329 (2003)], which is modeled after the earlier semiclassical instanton approach, is applied to the hydrogen abstraction reaction from methane by a hydrogen atom, H + CH4 --> H2 + CH3, using a modified and recalibrated version of the Jordan-Gilbert potential surface. The quantum instanton rate is evaluated using path integral Monte Carlo approaches based on the recently proposed implementation schemes [Yamamoto and Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 3086 (2004)]. The calculations were carried out using the Cartesian coordinates of all the atoms (thus involving 18 degrees of freedom), thereby taking explicit account of rotational effects of the whole system and also allowing the equivalent treatment of the four methane hydrogens. To achieve such a treatment, we present extended forms of the path integral estimators for relevant quantities that may be used for general N-atom systems with any generalized reaction coordinates. The quantum instanton rates thus obtained for the temperature range T = 200-2000 K show good agreement with available experimental data, which gives support to the accuracy of the underlying potential surface used.

  5. Highly efficient perturbative + variational strategy based on orthogonal valence bond theory for the evaluation of magnetic coupling constants. Application to the trinuclear Cu(ii) site of multicopper oxidases.

    PubMed

    Tenti, Lorenzo; Maynau, Daniel; Angeli, Celestino; Calzado, Carmen J

    2016-07-21

    A new strategy based on orthogonal valence-bond analysis of the wave function combined with intermediate Hamiltonian theory has been applied to the evaluation of the magnetic coupling constants in two AF systems. This approach provides both a quantitative estimate of the J value and a detailed analysis of the main physical mechanisms controlling the coupling, using a combined perturbative + variational scheme. The procedure requires a selection of the dominant excitations to be treated variationally. Two methods have been employed: a brute-force selection, using a logic similar to that of the CIPSI approach, or entanglement measures, which identify the most interacting orbitals in the system. Once a reduced set of excitations (about 300 determinants) is established, the interaction matrix is dressed at the second-order of perturbation by the remaining excitations of the CI space. The diagonalization of the dressed matrix provides J values in good agreement with experimental ones, at a very low-cost. This approach demonstrates the key role of d → d* excitations in the quantitative description of the magnetic coupling, as well as the importance of using an extended active space, including the bridging ligand orbitals, for the binuclear model of the intermediates of multicopper oxidases. The method is a promising tool for dealing with complex systems containing several active centers, as an alternative to both pure variational and DFT approaches.

  6. Recoupling pulse sequences with constant phase increments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaneja, Navin; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-10-01

    The paper studies a family of recoupling pulse sequences in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid state NMR, that are characterized by constant phase increments at regular intervals. These pulse sequences can be employed for both homonuclear and heteronuclear recoupling experiments and are robust to dispersion in chemical shifts and rf-inhomogeneity. The homonuclear pulse sequence consists of a building block (2 π) ϕp , where ϕp =p (n - 1) π/n, where n is number of blocks in a rotor period and p = 0, 1, 2, … . The pulse sequence repeats itself every rotor period when n is odd and every two rotor period when n is even. The heteronuclear recoupling pulse sequence consists of a building block (2 π) ϕ1p and (2 π) ϕ2p on channel I and S, where ϕ1p = p (2 n - 3) π/2 n, ϕ2p = p (2 n - 1) π/2 n and n is number of blocks in a rotor period. The recoupling pulse sequences mix the z magnetization. Experimental quantification of this method is shown for 13Cα -13CO , homonuclear recoupling in a sample of Glycine and 15N -13Cα , heteronuclear recoupling in Alanine. Application of this method is demonstrated on a sample of tripeptide N-formyl-[U-13C ,15N ]- Met-Leu-Phe-OH (MLF).

  7. Accurate lineshape spectroscopy and the Boltzmann constant

    PubMed Central

    Truong, G.-W.; Anstie, J. D.; May, E. F.; Stace, T. M.; Luiten, A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Spectroscopy has an illustrious history delivering serendipitous discoveries and providing a stringent testbed for new physical predictions, including applications from trace materials detection, to understanding the atmospheres of stars and planets, and even constraining cosmological models. Reaching fundamental-noise limits permits optimal extraction of spectroscopic information from an absorption measurement. Here, we demonstrate a quantum-limited spectrometer that delivers high-precision measurements of the absorption lineshape. These measurements yield a very accurate measurement of the excited-state (6P1/2) hyperfine splitting in Cs, and reveals a breakdown in the well-known Voigt spectral profile. We develop a theoretical model that accounts for this breakdown, explaining the observations to within the shot-noise limit. Our model enables us to infer the thermal velocity dispersion of the Cs vapour with an uncertainty of 35 p.p.m. within an hour. This allows us to determine a value for Boltzmann's constant with a precision of 6 p.p.m., and an uncertainty of 71 p.p.m. PMID:26465085

  8. Reaction rate constant for radiative association of CF+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ã-ström, Jonatan; Bezrukov, Dmitry S.; Nyman, Gunnar; Gustafsson, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations (C+) and fluorine atoms (F) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition 11Π → X1Σ+ and rovibrational transitions on the X1Σ+ and a3Π potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit-Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius-Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of <3%. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of 10-250 K, the rate constant is about 10-21 cm3 s-1, rising toward 10-16 cm3 s-1 for a temperature of 30 000 K.

  9. Vibrational Constants for Triatomic Molecules from Fourth-Order Perturbation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Devin A.; Gong, Justin Z.; Stanton, John F.

    2013-06-01

    The second vibrational anharmonicity constants (y_{ijk}) for general non-linear triatomic molecules as derived from fourth-order Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory (VPT4) are presented. The derived constants include all force field and Coriolis terms from the Watson Hamiltonian except for the pseudopotential. The basic theory of VPT4 is discussed, particularly with application to molecular constants, as well as the computational methods used to derive the specific constants. Finally, the constants are analyzed in the context of model systems such as Morse and double-well potentials.

  10. A 158 {mu}m [C II] LINE SURVEY OF GALAXIES AT z {approx} 1-2: AN INDICATOR OF STAR FORMATION IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, G. J.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Ferkinhoff, C.; Nikola, T.; Parshley, S. C.; Benford, D. J.; Staguhn, J. G.; Fiolet, N. E-mail: steve@mpe.mpg.d

    2010-12-01

    We have detected the 158 {mu}m [C II] line from 12 galaxies at z {approx} 1-2. This is the first survey of this important star formation tracer at redshifts covering the epoch of maximum star formation in the universe and quadruples the number of reported high-z [C II] detections. The line is very luminous, between <0.024% and 0.65% of the far-infrared (FIR) continuum luminosity of our sources, and arises from photodissociation regions on molecular cloud surfaces. An exception is PKS 0215+015, where half of the [C II] emission could arise from X-ray-dominated regions near the central active galactic nucleus (AGN). The L{sub [C{sub II}]}/L{sub FIR} ratio in our star formation-dominated systems is {approx}8 times larger than that of our AGN-dominated systems. Therefore this ratio selects for star formation-dominated systems. Furthermore, the L{sub [C{sub II}]}/L{sub FIR} and L{sub [C{sub II}]}/L{sub (CO(1-0))} ratios in our star-forming galaxies and nearby starburst galaxies are the same, so that luminous star-forming galaxies at earlier epochs (z {approx} 1-2) appear to be scaled-up versions of local starbursts entailing kiloparsec-scale starbursts. Most of the FIR and [C II] radiation from our AGN-dominated sample (excepting PKS 0215+015) also arises from kiloparsec-scale star formation, but with far-UV radiation fields {approx}8 times more intense than in our star formation-dominated sample. We speculate that the onset of AGN activity stimulates large-scale star formation activity within AGN-dominated systems. This idea is supported by the relatively strong [O III] line emission, indicating very young stars, that was recently observed in high-z composite AGN/starburst systems. Our results confirm the utility of the [C II] line, and in particular, the L{sub [C{sub II}]}/L{sub (FIR)} and L{sub [C{sub II}]}/L{sub CO(1-0)} ratios as tracers of star formation in galaxies at high redshifts.

  11. {beta}-decay half-lives and {beta}-delayed neutron emission probabilities of nuclei in the region A < or approx. 110, relevant for the r process

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, J.; Galaviz, D.; Matos, M.; Montes, F.; Hennrich, S.; Kessler, R.; Schertz, F.; Aprahamian, A.; Quinn, M.; Woehr, A.; Arndt, O.; Pfeiffer, B.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Estrade, A.; Lorusso, G.; Schatz, H.; Kratz, K.-L.; Mantica, P. F.; Moeller, P.

    2009-03-15

    Measurements of {beta}-decay properties of A < or approx. 110 r-process nuclei have been completed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. {beta}-decay half-lives for {sup 105}Y, {sup 106,107}Zr, and {sup 111}Mo, along with {beta}-delayed neutron emission probabilities of {sup 104}Y, {sup 109,110}Mo and upper limits for {sup 105}Y, {sup 103-107}Zr, and {sup 108,111}Mo have been measured for the first time. Studies on the basis of the quasi-random-phase approximation are used to analyze the ground-state deformation of these nuclei.

  12. A REST-FRAME OPTICAL VIEW ON z {approx} 4 GALAXIES. I. COLOR AND AGE DISTRIBUTIONS FROM DEEP IRAC PHOTOMETRY OF THE IUDF10 AND GOODS SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Oesch, P. A.; Illingworth, G. D.; Gonzalez, V.; Holden, B. P.; Magee, D.; Trenti, M.; Van Dokkum, P. G.

    2013-08-01

    We present a study of rest-frame UV-to-optical color distributions for z {approx} 4 galaxies based on the combination of deep HST/ACS+WFC3/IR data with Spitzer/IRAC imaging. In particular, we use new, ultra-deep data from the IRAC Ultradeep Field program (IUDF10), together with previous, public IRAC data over the GOODS fields. Our sample contains a total of {approx}2600 galaxies selected as B-dropout Lyman-break Galaxies in the HUDF and its deep parallel field HUDF09-2, as well as GOODS-North/South. This sample is used to investigate the UV continuum slopes {beta} and Balmer break colors (J{sub 125} - [4.5]) as a function of rest-frame optical luminosity (using [4.5] to avoid optical emission lines). We find that galaxies at M{sub z} < -21.5 (roughly corresponding to L{sup *}{sub z{approx}4}) are significantly redder than their lower luminosity counterparts. The UV continuum slopes and the J{sub 125} - [4.5] colors are well correlated, indicating that the dust reddening at these redshifts is better described by an SMC-like extinction curve, rather than the typically assumed Calzetti reddening. After dust correction, we find that the galaxy population shows mean stellar population ages in the range 10{sup 8.5} to 10{sup 9} yr, with a dispersion of {approx}0.5 dex, and only weak trends as a function of luminosity. Only a small fraction of galaxies shows Balmer break colors consistent with extremely young ages, younger than 100 Myr. Under the assumption of smooth star-formation histories, this fraction is 12%-19% for galaxies at M{sub z} < -19.75. Our results are consistent with a gradual build-up of stars and dust in galaxies at z > 4 with only a small fraction of stars being formed in short, intense bursts of star-formation.

  13. Calorimetric investigation of proton linkage by monitoring both the enthalpy and association constant of binding: application to the interaction of the Src SH2 domain with a high-affinity tyrosyl phosphopeptide.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, J M; Waksman, G

    1998-11-03

    The binding of Src homology 2 (SH2) domains to tyrosyl phosphopeptides depends on electrostatic interactions between the phosphotyrosine and its binding site. To probe the role of these interactions, we have used isothermal titration calorimetry to study the pH dependence of the binding of the SH2 domain of the Src kinase to a high-affinity tyrosyl phosphopeptide. Two independent approaches were employed. In a first series of experiments that focused on determining the peptide's association constant between pH 5.0 and 9.0, two ionizable groups were characterized. One group, with free and bound pKas of 6.2 and 4.4, respectively, could be identified as the phosphate in the phosphotyrosine while the other group, with free and bound pKas of 8.2 and 8.5, respectively, could be only tentatively assigned to a cysteine in the phosphotyrosine binding pocket. Further information on the linkage between peptide binding and protonation of the phosphotyrosine was obtained from a second series of experiments, which focused on determining the peptide binding enthalpy at low values of pH in several buffers with different ionization enthalpies. These data provided free and bound pKa values for the phosphotyrosine identical to those derived from the first series of experiments, and hence demonstrated for the first time that the two approaches provide identical information regarding proton linkage. In addition, the second series of experiments also determined the intrinsic enthalpy of binding of both the protonated and deprotonated phosphate forms of the peptide. These two sets of experiments provided a complete energetic profile of the linkage between phosphate ionization and peptide binding. From this profile, it was determined that the PO32- form of the peptide binds 2.3 kcal mol-1 more favorably than the PO3H1- form due entirely to a more favorable entropy of binding.

  14. Tuning the Spring Constant of Cantilever-free Probe Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelsdoerfer, Daniel J.; Brown, Keith A.; Boya, Radha; Shim, Wooyoung; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2013-03-01

    The versatility of atomic force microscope (AFM) based techniques such as scanning probe lithography is due in part to the utilization of a cantilever that can be fabricated to match a desired application. In contrast, cantilever-free scanning probe lithography utilizes a low cost array of probes on a compliant backing layer that allows for high throughput nanofabrication but lacks the tailorability afforded by the cantilever in traditional AFM. Here, we present a method to measure and tune the spring constant of probes in a cantilever-free array by adjusting the mechanical properties of the underlying elastomeric layer. Using this technique, we are able to fabricate large-area silicon probe arrays with spring constants that can be tuned in the range from 7 to 150 N/m. This technique offers an advantage in that the spring constant depends linearly on the geometry of the probe, which is in contrast to traditional cantilever-based lithography where the spring constant varies as the cube of the beam width and thickness. To illustrate the benefit of utilizing a probe array with a lower spring constant, we pattern a block copolymer on a delicate 50 nm thick silicon nitride window.

  15. The time constant of the somatogravic illusion.

    PubMed

    Correia Grácio, B J; de Winkel, K N; Groen, E L; Wentink, M; Bos, J E

    2013-02-01

    Without visual feedback, humans perceive tilt when experiencing a sustained linear acceleration. This tilt illusion is commonly referred to as the somatogravic illusion. Although the physiological basis of the illusion seems to be well understood, the dynamic behavior is still subject to discussion. In this study, the dynamic behavior of the illusion was measured experimentally for three motion profiles with different frequency content. Subjects were exposed to pure centripetal accelerations in the lateral direction and were asked to indicate their tilt percept by means of a joystick. Variable-radius centrifugation during constant angular rotation was used to generate these motion profiles. Two self-motion perception models were fitted to the experimental data and were used to obtain the time constant of the somatogravic illusion. Results showed that the time constant of the somatogravic illusion was on the order of two seconds, in contrast to the higher time constant found in fixed-radius centrifugation studies. Furthermore, the time constant was significantly affected by the frequency content of the motion profiles. Motion profiles with higher frequency content revealed shorter time constants which cannot be explained by self-motion perception models that assume a fixed time constant. Therefore, these models need to be improved with a mechanism that deals with this variable time constant. Apart from the fundamental importance, these results also have practical consequences for the simulation of sustained accelerations in motion simulators.

  16. Cosmological constant from the emergent gravity perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, T.; Padmanabhan, Hamsa

    2014-05-01

    Observations indicate that our universe is characterized by a late-time accelerating phase, possibly driven by a cosmological constant Λ, with the dimensionless parameter Λ {LP2} ˜= 10-122, where LP = (Għ/c3)1/2 is the Planck length. In this review, we describe how the emergent gravity paradigm provides a new insight and a possible solution to the cosmological constant problem. After reviewing the necessary background material, we identify the necessary and sufficient conditions for solving the cosmological constant problem. We show that these conditions are naturally satisfied in the emergent gravity paradigm in which (i) the field equations of gravity are invariant under the addition of a constant to the matter Lagrangian and (ii) the cosmological constant appears as an integration constant in the solution. The numerical value of this integration constant can be related to another dimensionless number (called CosMIn) that counts the number of modes inside a Hubble volume that cross the Hubble radius during the radiation and the matter-dominated epochs of the universe. The emergent gravity paradigm suggests that CosMIn has the numerical value 4π, which, in turn, leads to the correct, observed value of the cosmological constant. Further, the emergent gravity paradigm provides an alternative perspective on cosmology and interprets the expansion of the universe itself as a quest towards holographic equipartition. We discuss the implications of this novel and alternate description of cosmology.

  17. The crystal structure of the new ternary antimonide Dy{sub 3}Cu{sub 20+x}Sb{sub 11-x} (x{approx}2)

    SciTech Connect

    Fedyna, L.O.; Bodak, O.I. . E-mail: bodak@franko.lviv.ua; Fedorchuk, A.O.; Tokaychuk, Ya.O.

    2005-06-15

    New ternary antimonide Dy{sub 3}Cu{sub 20+x}Sb{sub 11-x} (x{approx}2) was synthesized and its crystal structure was determined by direct methods from X-ray powder diffraction data (diffractometer DRON-3M, CuK{alpha}-radiation, R{sub I}=6.99%,R{sub p}=12.27%,R{sub wp}=11.55%). The compound crystallizes with the own cubic structure type: space group F4-bar 3m, Pearson code cF272, a=16.6150(2)A,Z=8. The structure of the Dy{sub 3}Cu{sub 20}Sb{sub 11-x} (x{approx}2) can be obtained from the structure type BaHg{sub 11} by doubling of the lattice parameter and subtraction of 16 atoms. The studied structure was compared with the structures of known compounds, which crystallize in the same space group with similar cell parameters.

  18. INFRARED SPECTRA AND OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF NITRILE ICES RELEVANT TO TITAN's ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Marla H.; Hudson, Reggie; Ferrante, Robert F.; James Moore, W.

    2010-11-15

    Spectra and optical constants of nitrile ices known or suspected to be in Titan's atmosphere are presented from 2.0 to 333.3 {mu}m ({approx}5000-30 cm{sup -1}). These results are relevant to the ongoing modeling of Cassini CIRS observations of Titan's winter pole. Ices studied are: HCN, hydrogen cyanide; C{sub 2}N{sub 2}, cyanogen; CH{sub 3}CN, acetonitrile; C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN, propionitrile; and HC{sub 3}N, cyanoacetylene. For each of these molecules, we also report new cryogenic measurements of the real refractive index, n, determined in both the amorphous and crystalline phases at 670 nm. These new values have been incorporated into our optical constant calculations. Spectra were measured and optical constants were calculated for each nitrile at a variety of temperatures, including, but not limited to, 20, 35, 50, 75, 95, and 110 K, in both the amorphous phase and the crystalline phase. This laboratory effort used a dedicated FTIR spectrometer to record transmission spectra of thin-film ice samples. Laser interference was used to measure film thickness during condensation onto a transparent cold window attached to the tail section of a closed-cycle helium cryostat. Optical constants, real (n) and imaginary (k) refractive indices, were determined using Kramers-Kronig analysis. Our calculation reproduces the complete spectrum, including all interference effects.

  19. {psi}{psi} condensate in constant magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anguiano-Galicia, M. de J; Bashir, A.; Raya, A.

    2007-12-15

    We solve the Dirac equation in the presence of a constant magnetic field in (3+1) and (2+1) dimensions. Quantizing the fermion field, we calculate the {psi}{psi} condensate from first principles for parity conserving and violating Lagrangians for arbitrary field strength. We make a comparison with the results already known in the literature for some particular cases and point out the relevance of our work for possible physical applications.

  20. The second acidic constant of salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Porto, Raffaella; De Tommaso, Gaetano; Furia, Emilia

    2005-01-01

    The second dissociation constant of salicylic acid (H2L) has been determined, at 25 degrees C, in NaCl ionic media by UV spectrophotometric measurements. The investigated ionic strength values were 0.16, 0.25, 0.50, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 M. The protolysis constants calculated at the different ionic strengths yielded, with the Specific Interaction Theory, the infinite dilution constant, log beta1(0) = 13.62 +/- 0.03, for the equilibrium L2- + H+ <==> HL-. The interaction coefficient between Na+ and L2-, b(Na+, L2-) = 0.02 +/- 0.07, has been also calculated.

  1. Laser Propulsion and the Constant Momentum Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, C. William; Mead, Franklin B. Jr.; Knecht, Sean D.

    2004-03-30

    We show that perfect propulsion requires a constant momentum mission, as a consequence of Newton's second law. Perfect propulsion occurs when the velocity of the propelled mass in the inertial frame of reference matches the velocity of the propellant jet in the rocket frame of reference. We compare constant momentum to constant specific impulse propulsion, which, for a given specification of the mission delta V, has an optimum specific impulse that maximizes the propelled mass per unit jet kinetic energy investment. We also describe findings of more than 50 % efficiency for conversion of laser energy into jet kinetic energy by ablation of solids.

  2. Improved Lebesgue constants on the triangle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrichs, Wilhelm

    2005-08-01

    New sets of points with improved Lebesgue constants in the triangle are calculated. Starting with the Fekete points a direct minimization process for the Lebesgue constant leads to better results. The points and corresponding quadrature weigths are explicitly given. It is quite surprising that the optimal points are not symmetric. The points along the boundary of the triangle are the 1D Gauss-Lobatto points. For all degrees, our points yield the smallest Lebesgue constants currently known. Numerical examples are presented, which show the improved interpolation properties of our nodes.

  3. The cosmological constant and cold dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efstathiou, G.; Sutherland, W. J.; Maddox, S. J.

    1990-12-01

    It is argued here that the success of the cosmological cold dark matter (CDM) model can be retained and the new observations of very large scale cosmological structures can be accommodated in a spatially flat cosmology in which as much as 80 percent of the critical density is provided by a positive cosmological constant. In such a universe, expansion was dominated by CDM until a recent epoch, but is now governed by the cosmological constant. This constant can also account for the lack of fluctuations in the microwave background and the large number of certain kinds of objects found at high redshift.

  4. Investigation on Amari's dynamical neural field with global constant inhibition.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dequan; Peng, Jigen

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the properties of Amari's dynamical neural field with global constant inhibition induced by its kernel are investigated. Amari's dynamical neural field illustrates many neurophysiological phenomena successfully and has been applied to unsupervised learning like data clustering in recent years. In its applications, the stationary solution to Amari's dynamical neural field plays an important role that the underlying patterns being perceived are usually presented as the excited region in it. However, the type of stationary solution to dynamical neural field with typical kernel is often sensitive to parameters of its kernel that limits its range of application. Different from dynamical neural field with typical kernel that have been discussed a lot, there are few theoretical results on dynamical neural field with global constant inhibitory kernel that has already shown better performance in practice. In this paper, some important results on existence and stability of stationary solution to dynamical neural field with global constant inhibitory kernel are obtained. All of these results show that such kind of dynamical neural field has better potential for missions like data clustering than those with typical kernels, which provide a theoretical basis of its further extensive application.

  5. Constants and Pseudo-Constants of Coupled Beam Motion in the PEP-II Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.J.; Colocho, W.S.; Wang, M.H.; Yan, Y.T.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2011-11-01

    Constants of beam motion help as cross checks to analyze beam diagnostics and the modeling procedure. Pseudo-constants, like the betatron mismatch parameter or the coupling parameter det C, are constant till certain elements in the beam line change them. This can be used to visually find the non-desired changes, pinpointing errors compared with the model.

  6. Marshak waves: Constant flux vs constant T-a (slight) paradigm shift

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M.D.

    1994-12-22

    We review the basic scaling laws for Marshak waves and point out the differences in results for wall loss, albedo, and Marshak depth when a constant absorbed flux is considered as opposed to a constant absorbed temperature. Comparisons with LASNEX simulations and with data are presented that imply that a constant absorbed flux is a more appropriate boundary condition.

  7. COLOR AND STELLAR POPULATION GRADIENTS IN PASSIVELY EVOLVING GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2 FROM HST/WFC3 DEEP IMAGING IN THE HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Yicheng; Giavalisco, Mauro; Cassata, Paolo; Salimbeni, Sara; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton; Grogin, Norman A.; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Dickinson, Mark; Renzini, Alvio; Papovich, Casey; Tundo, Elena; Fontana, Adriano

    2011-07-01

    We report the detection of color gradients in six massive (stellar mass (M{sub star}) > 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}) and passively evolving (specific star formation rate <10{sup -11} yr{sup -1}) galaxies at redshift 1.3 < z < 2.5 identified in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field using ultra-deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys and WFC3/IR images. After carefully matching the different point-spread functions, we obtain color maps and multi-band optical/near-IR photometry (BVizYJH) in concentric annuli, from the smallest resolved radial distance ({approx}1.7 kpc) up to several times the H-band effective radius. We find that the inner regions of these galaxies have redder rest-frame UV-optical colors (U - V, U - B, and B - V) than the outer parts. The slopes of the color gradient have no obvious dependence on the redshift and on the stellar mass of the galaxies. They do mildly depend, however, on the overall dust obscuration (E(B - V)) and rest-frame (U - V) color, with more obscured or redder galaxies having steeper color gradients. The z {approx} 2 color gradients are also steeper than those of local early-type ones. The gradient of a single parameter (age, extinction, or metallicity) cannot fully explain the observed color gradients. Fitting the spatially resolved HST seven-band photometry to stellar population synthesis models, we find that, regardless of assumptions on the metallicity gradient, the redder inner regions of the galaxies have slightly higher dust obscuration than the bluer outer regions, implying that dust partly contributes to the observed color gradients, although the magnitude depends on the assumed extinction law. Due to the age-metallicity degeneracy, the derived age gradient depends on the assumptions for the metallicity gradient. We discuss the implications of a number of assumptions for metallicity gradients on the formation and evolution of these galaxies. We find that the evolution of the mass-size relationship from z {approx} 2

  8. DISCOVERY OF COLD, PRISTINE GAS POSSIBLY ACCRETING ONTO AN OVERDENSITY OF STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT REDSHIFT z {approx} 1.6

    SciTech Connect

    Giavalisco, Mauro; Salimbeni, Sara; Tripp, Todd M.; Cassata, Paolo; Guo Yicheng; Tang Yuping; Vanzella, Eros; Nonino, Mario; Dickinson, Mark; Renzini, Alvio; Ferguson, Henry C.; Cimatti, Andrea; Kurk, Jaron; Mignoli, Marco

    2011-12-10

    We report the discovery of large amounts of cold (T {approx} 10{sup 4} K), chemically young gas in an overdensity of galaxies at redshift z Almost-Equal-To 1.6 located in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey southern field. The gas is identified thanks to the ultra-strong Mg II {lambda}2800 absorption features it imprints onto the rest-frame UV spectra of galaxies in the background of the overdensity. There is no evidence that the optically thick gas is part of any massive galaxy (i.e., M{sub star} > 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }), but rather is associated with the overdensity; less massive and fainter galaxies (25.5 mag < z < 27.5 mag) have too large an impact parameter to be causing ultra-strong absorption systems, based on our knowledge of such systems. The lack of corresponding Fe II absorption features, not detected even in co-added spectra, suggests that the gas is chemically more pristine than the interstellar medium and outflows of star-forming galaxies at similar redshift, including the galaxies of the overdensity itself, and comparable to the most metal-poor stars in the Milky Way halo. A crude estimate of the projected covering factor of the high-column-density gas (N{sub H} {approx}> 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2}) based on the observed fraction of galaxies with ultra-strong absorbers is C{sub F} Almost-Equal-To 0.04. A broad, continuum absorption profile extending to the red of the interstellar Mg II absorption line by {approx}< 2000 km s{sup -1} is possibly detected in two independent co-added spectra of galaxies belonging to the overdensity, consistent with a large-scale infall motion of the gas onto the overdensity and its galaxies. Overall, these findings provide the first tentative evidence of accretion of cold, chemically young gas onto galaxies at high redshift, possibly feeding their star formation activity. We suggest the fact that the galaxies are members of a large structure, as opposed to field galaxies, might play a significant

  9. REDDENING AND EXTINCTION TOWARD THE GALACTIC BULGE FROM OGLE-III: THE INNER MILKY WAY'S R{sub V} {approx} 2.5 EXTINCTION CURVE

    SciTech Connect

    Nataf, David M.; Gould, Andrew; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Skowron, Jan; Fouque, Pascal; Gonzalez, Oscar A.; Udalski, Andrzej; Szymanski, Michal K.; Kubiak, Marcin; Pietrzynski, Grzegorz; Soszynski, Igor; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof; Wyrzykowski, Lukasz; Poleski, Radoslaw

    2013-06-01

    We combine VI photometry from OGLE-III with VISTA Variables in The Via Lactea survey and Two Micron All Sky Survey measurements of E(J - K{sub s} ) to resolve the longstanding problem of the non-standard optical extinction toward the Galactic bulge. We show that the extinction is well fit by the relation A{sub I} = 0.7465 Multiplication-Sign E(V - I) + 1.3700 Multiplication-Sign E(J - K{sub s} ), or, equivalently, A{sub I} = 1.217 Multiplication-Sign E(V - I)(1 + 1.126 Multiplication-Sign (E(J - K{sub s} )/E(V - I) - 0.3433)). The optical and near-IR reddening law toward the inner Galaxy approximately follows an R{sub V} Almost-Equal-To 2.5 extinction curve with a dispersion {sigma}{sub R{sub V}}{approx}0.2, consistent with extragalactic investigations of the hosts of Type Ia SNe. Differential reddening is shown to be significant on scales as small as our mean field size of 6'. The intrinsic luminosity parameters of the Galactic bulge red clump (RC) are derived to be (M{sub I,RC},{sigma}{sub I,RC,0}, (V-I){sub RC,0},{sigma}{sub (V-I){sub R{sub C}}}, (J-K{sub s}){sub RC,0}) = (-0.12, 0.09, 1.06, 0.121, 0.66). Our measurements of the RC brightness, brightness dispersion, and number counts allow us to estimate several Galactic bulge structural parameters. We estimate a distance to the Galactic center of 8.20 kpc. We measure an upper bound on the tilt {alpha} Almost-Equal-To 40 Degree-Sign between the bulge's major axis and the Sun-Galactic center line of sight, though our brightness peaks are consistent with predictions of an N-body model oriented at {alpha} Almost-Equal-To 25 Degree-Sign . The number of RC stars suggests a total stellar mass for the Galactic bulge of {approx}2.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} if one assumes a canonical Salpeter initial mass function (IMF), or {approx}1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} if one assumes a bottom-light Zoccali IMF.

  10. A KINEMATIC APPROACH TO ASSESSING ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS: STAR-FORMING GALAXIES IN A z {approx} 0.9 SpARCS CLUSTER USING SPITZER 24 {mu}m OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, A. G.; Webb, T. M. A.; Muzzin, A.; Van der Burg, R. F. J.; Wilson, G.; Yee, H. K. C.

    2013-05-10

    We present an infrared study of a z = 0.872 cluster, SpARCS J161314+564930, with the primary aim of distinguishing the dynamical histories of spectroscopically confirmed star-forming members to assess the role of cluster environment. We utilize deep MIPS imaging and a mass-limited sample of 85 spectroscopic members to identify 16 24 {mu}m bright sources within the cluster, and measure their 24 {mu}m star formation rates (SFRs) down to {approx}6 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Based on their line-of-sight velocities and stellar ages, MIPS cluster members appear to be an infalling population that was recently accreted from the field with minimal environmental dependency on their star formation. However, we identify a double-sequenced distribution of star-forming galaxies among the members, with one branch exhibiting declining specific SFRs with mass. The members along this sub-main sequence contain spectral features suggestive of passive galaxies. Using caustic diagrams, we kinematically identify these galaxies as a virialized and/or backsplash population. Moreover, we find a mix of dynamical histories at all projected radii, indicating that standard definitions of environment (i.e., radius and density) are contaminated with recently accreted interlopers, which could contribute to a lack of environmental trends for star-forming galaxies. A cleaner narrative of their dynamical past begins to unfold when using a proxy for accretion histories through profiles of constant (r/r{sub 200}) Multiplication-Sign ({Delta}v/{sigma}{sub v}); galaxies accreted at earlier times possess lower values of (r/r{sub 200}) Multiplication-Sign ({Delta}v/{sigma}{sub v}) with minimal contamination from the distinct infalling population. Therefore, adopting a time-averaged definition for density (as traced by accretion histories) rather than an instantaneous density yields a depressed specific SFR within the dynamical cluster core.

  11. BLACK HOLE MASS AND EDDINGTON RATIO DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS OF X-RAY-SELECTED BROAD-LINE AGNs AT z {approx} 1.4 IN THE SUBARU XMM-NEWTON DEEP FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Nobuta, K.; Akiyama, M.; Ueda, Y.; Hiroi, K.; Ohta, K.; Iwamuro, F.; Yabe, K.; Moritani, Y.; Sumiyoshi, M.; Maihara, T.; Watson, M. G.; Silverman, J.; Tamura, N.; Kimura, M.; Takato, N.; Dalton, G.; Lewis, I.; Bonfield, D.; Lee, H.; Curtis-Lake, E.; and others

    2012-12-20

    In order to investigate the growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs), we construct the black hole mass function (BHMF) and Eddington ratio distribution function (ERDF) of X-ray-selected broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z {approx} 1.4 in the Subaru XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) field. A significant part of the accretion growth of SMBHs is thought to take place in this redshift range. Black hole masses of X-ray-selected broad-line AGNs are estimated using the width of the broad Mg II line and 3000 A monochromatic luminosity. We supplement the Mg II FWHM values with the H{alpha} FWHM obtained from our NIR spectroscopic survey. Using the black hole masses of broad-line AGNs at redshifts between 1.18 and 1.68, the binned broad-line AGN BHMFs and ERDFs are calculated using the V{sub max} method. To properly account for selection effects that impact the binned estimates, we derive the corrected broad-line AGN BHMFs and ERDFs by applying the maximum likelihood method, assuming that the ERDF is constant regardless of the black hole mass. We do not correct for the non-negligible uncertainties in virial BH mass estimates. If we compare the corrected broad-line AGN BHMF with that in the local universe, then the corrected BHMF at z = 1.4 has a higher number density above 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} but a lower number density below that mass range. The evolution may be indicative of a downsizing trend of accretion activity among the SMBH population. The evolution of broad-line AGN ERDFs from z = 1.4 to 0 indicates that the fraction of broad-line AGNs with accretion rates close to the Eddington limit is higher at higher redshifts.

  12. How the cosmological constant affects gravastar formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, R.; Silva, M.F.A. da; Rocha, P. E-mail: mfasnic@gmail.com

    2009-12-01

    Here we generalized a previous model of gravastar consisted of an internal de Sitter spacetime, a dynamical infinitely thin shell with an equation of state, but now we consider an external de Sitter-Schwarzschild spacetime. We have shown explicitly that the final output can be a black hole, a ''bounded excursion'' stable gravastar, a stable gravastar, or a de Sitter spacetime, depending on the total mass of the system, the cosmological constants, the equation of state of the thin shell and the initial position of the dynamical shell. We have found that the exterior cosmological constant imposes a limit to the gravastar formation, i.e., the exterior cosmological constant must be smaller than the interior cosmological constant. Besides, we have also shown that, in the particular case where the Schwarzschild mass vanishes, no stable gravastar can be formed, but we still have formation of black hole.

  13. The Cosmological Constant in Quantum Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Zhongchao

    2008-10-10

    Hawking proposed that the cosmological constant is probably zero in quantum cosmology in 1984. By using the right configuration for the wave function of the universe, a complete proof is found very recently.

  14. The Rate Constant for Fluorescence Quenching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legenza, Michael W.; Marzzacco, Charles J.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment that utilizes fluorescence intensity measurements from a Spectronic 20 to determine the rate constant for the fluorescence quenching of various aromatic hydrocarbons by carbon tetrachloride in an ethanol solvent. (MLH)

  15. The Solar Constant: A Take Home Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, B. G.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes a method that uses energy from the sun, absorbed by aluminum discs, to melt ice, and allows the determination of the solar constant. The take-home equipment includes Styrofoam cups, a plastic syringe, and aluminum discs. (MLH)

  16. Dielectric constant of water in the interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-07-01

    We define the dielectric constant (susceptibility) that should enter the Maxwell boundary value problem when applied to microscopic dielectric interfaces polarized by external fields. The dielectric constant (susceptibility) of the interface is defined by exact linear-response equations involving correlations of statistically fluctuating interface polarization and the Coulomb interaction energy of external charges with the dielectric. The theory is applied to the interface between water and spherical solutes of altering size studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effective dielectric constant of interfacial water is found to be significantly lower than its bulk value, and it also depends on the solute size. For TIP3P water used in MD simulations, the interface dielectric constant changes from 9 to 4 when the solute radius is increased from ˜5 to 18 Å.

  17. Beyond lensing by the cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraoni, Valerio; Lapierre-Léonard, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    The long-standing problem of whether the cosmological constant affects directly the deflection of light caused by a gravitational lens is reconsidered. We use a new approach based on the Hawking quasilocal mass of a sphere grazed by light rays and on its splitting into local and cosmological parts. Previous literature restricted to the cosmological constant is extended to any form of dark energy accelerating the universe in which the gravitational lens is embedded.

  18. Inflation with a constant rate of roll

    SciTech Connect

    Motohashi, Hayato; Starobinsky, Alexei A.; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi E-mail: alstar@landau.ac.ru

    2015-09-01

    We consider an inflationary scenario where the rate of inflaton roll defined by {sup ··}φ/H φ-dot remains constant. The rate of roll is small for slow-roll inflation, while a generic rate of roll leads to the interesting case of 'constant-roll' inflation. We find a general exact solution for the inflaton potential required for such inflaton behaviour. In this model, due to non-slow evolution of background, the would-be decaying mode of linear scalar (curvature) perturbations may not be neglected. It can even grow for some values of the model parameter, while the other mode always remains constant. However, this always occurs for unstable solutions which are not attractors for the given potential. The most interesting particular cases of constant-roll inflation remaining viable with the most recent observational data are quadratic hilltop inflation (with cutoff) and natural inflation (with an additional negative cosmological constant). In these cases even-order slow-roll parameters approach non-negligible constants while the odd ones are asymptotically vanishing in the quasi-de Sitter regime.

  19. Inflation with a constant rate of roll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motohashi, Hayato; Starobinsky, Alexei A.; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2015-09-01

    We consider an inflationary scenario where the rate of inflaton roll defined by ̈phi/H dot phi remains constant. The rate of roll is small for slow-roll inflation, while a generic rate of roll leads to the interesting case of 'constant-roll' inflation. We find a general exact solution for the inflaton potential required for such inflaton behaviour. In this model, due to non-slow evolution of background, the would-be decaying mode of linear scalar (curvature) perturbations may not be neglected. It can even grow for some values of the model parameter, while the other mode always remains constant. However, this always occurs for unstable solutions which are not attractors for the given potential. The most interesting particular cases of constant-roll inflation remaining viable with the most recent observational data are quadratic hilltop inflation (with cutoff) and natural inflation (with an additional negative cosmological constant). In these cases even-order slow-roll parameters approach non-negligible constants while the odd ones are asymptotically vanishing in the quasi-de Sitter regime.

  20. RNA structure and scalar coupling constants

    SciTech Connect

    Tinoco, I. Jr.; Cai, Z.; Hines, J.V.; Landry, S.M.; SantaLucia, J. Jr.; Shen, L.X.; Varani, G.

    1994-12-01

    Signs and magnitudes of scalar coupling constants-spin-spin splittings-comprise a very large amount of data that can be used to establish the conformations of RNA molecules. Proton-proton and proton-phosphorus splittings have been used the most, but the availability of {sup 13}C-and {sup 15}N-labeled molecules allow many more coupling constants to be used for determining conformation. We will systematically consider the torsion angles that characterize a nucleotide unit and the coupling constants that depend on the values of these torsion angles. Karplus-type equations have been established relating many three-bond coupling constants to torsion angles. However, one- and two-bond coupling constants can also depend on conformation. Serianni and coworkers measured carbon-proton coupling constants in ribonucleosides and have calculated their values as a function of conformation. The signs of two-bond coupling can be very useful because it is easier to measure a sign than an accurate magnitude.

  1. Irradiation creep and void swelling of two LMR heat of HT9 at {approx}400{degrees}C and 165 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.

    1996-04-01

    Two nominally identical heats of HT9 ferritic-martensitic steel were produced, fabricated into pressurized tubes, and then irradiated in FFTF, using identical procedures. After reaching 165 dpa at {approx}400C, small differences in strains associated with both phase-related change in lattice parameter and void swelling were observed in comparing the two heats. The creep strains, while different, exhibited the same functional relationship to the swelling behavior. The derived creep coefficients, the one associated with creep in the absence of swelling and the one directly responsive to swelling, were essentially identical for the two heats. Even more significantly, the creep coefficients for this bcc ferritic-martensitic steel appear to be very similar and possibly identical to those routinely derived from creep experiments on fcc austenitic steels.

  2. Rate constant for OH with selected large alkanes : shock-tube measurements and an improved group scheme.

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Michael, J. V.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2009-04-06

    High-temperature rate constant experiments on OH with the five large (C{sub 5}-C{sub 8}) saturated hydrocarbons n-heptane, 2,2,3,3-tetramethylbutane (2,2,3,3-TMB), n-pentane, n-hexane, and 2,3-dimethylbutane (2,3-DMB) were performed with the reflected-shock-tube technique using multipass absorption spectrometric detection of OH radicals at 308 nm. Single-point determinations at {approx}1200 K on n-heptane, 2,2,3,3-TMB, n-hexane, and 2,3-DMB were previously reported by Cohen and co-workers; however, the present work substantially extends the database to both lower and higher temperature. The present experiments span a wide temperature range, 789-1308 K, and represent the first direct measurements of rate constants at T > 800 K for n-pentane. The present work utilized 48 optical passes corresponding to a total path length of {approx}4.2 m. As a result of this increased path length, the high OH concentration detection sensitivity permitted pseudo-first-order analyses for unambiguously measuring rate constants.

  3. QUIESCENT GALAXIES IN THE 3D-HST SURVEY: SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF A LARGE NUMBER OF GALAXIES WITH RELATIVELY OLD STELLAR POPULATIONS AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, Katherine E.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Skelton, Rosalind; Nelson, Erica J.; Brammer, Gabriel; Franx, Marijn; Labbe, Ivo; Fumagalli, Mattia; Patel, Shannon G.; Kriek, Mariska; Lundgren, Britt F.; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2013-06-20

    Quiescent galaxies at z {approx} 2 have been identified in large numbers based on rest-frame colors, but only a small number of these galaxies have been spectroscopically confirmed to show that their rest-frame optical spectra show either strong Balmer or metal absorption lines. Here, we median stack the rest-frame optical spectra for 171 photometrically quiescent galaxies at 1.4 < z < 2.2 from the 3D-HST grism survey. In addition to H{beta} ({lambda}4861 A), we unambiguously identify metal absorption lines in the stacked spectrum, including the G band ({lambda}4304 A), Mg I ({lambda}5175 A), and Na I ({lambda}5894 A). This finding demonstrates that galaxies with relatively old stellar populations already existed when the universe was {approx}3 Gyr old, and that rest-frame color selection techniques can efficiently select them. We find an average age of 1.3{sup +0.1}{sub -0.3} Gyr when fitting a simple stellar population to the entire stack. We confirm our previous result from medium-band photometry that the stellar age varies with the colors of quiescent galaxies: the reddest 80% of galaxies are dominated by metal lines and have a relatively old mean age of 1.6{sup +0.5}{sub -0.4} Gyr, whereas the bluest (and brightest) galaxies have strong Balmer lines and a spectroscopic age of 0.9{sup +0.2}{sub -0.1} Gyr. Although the spectrum is dominated by an evolved stellar population, we also find [O III] and H{beta} emission. Interestingly, this emission is more centrally concentrated than the continuum with L{sub OIII}=1.7{+-}0.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}, indicating residual central star formation or nuclear activity.

  4. KECK SPECTROSCOPY OF FAINT 3 < z < 7 LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES. III. THE MEAN ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRUM AT z {approx_equal} 4

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Tucker; Ellis, Richard S.; Stark, Daniel P.

    2012-05-20

    We present and discuss the mean rest-frame ultraviolet spectrum for a sample of 81 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) selected to be B-band dropouts at z {approx_equal} 4. The sample is mostly drawn from our ongoing Keck/DEIMOS survey in the GOODS fields and augmented with archival Very Large Telescope data. In general, we find similar spectroscopic trends to those found in earlier surveys of LBGs at z = 3. Specifically, low-ionization absorption lines which trace neutral outflowing gas are weaker in galaxies with stronger Ly{alpha} emission, bluer UV spectral slopes, lower stellar masses, lower UV luminosities, and smaller half-light radii. This is consistent with a physical picture whereby star formation drives outflows of neutral gas which scatter Ly{alpha} and produce strong low-ionization absorption lines, while increasing galaxy stellar mass, size, metallicity, and dust content. Typical galaxies are thus expected to have stronger Ly{alpha} emission and weaker low-ionization absorption at earlier times, and we indeed find somewhat weaker low-ionization absorption at higher redshifts. In conjunction with earlier results from our survey, we argue that the reduced low-ionization absorption is likely caused by lower covering fraction and/or velocity range of outflowing neutral gas at earlier epochs. Although low-ionization absorption decreases at higher redshift, fine-structure emission lines are stronger, suggesting a greater concentration of neutral gas at small galactocentric radius ({approx}< 5 kpc). Our continuing survey will enable us to extend these diagnostics more reliably to higher redshift and determine the implications for the escape fraction of ionizing photons which governs the role of early galaxies in cosmic reionization.

  5. THE BULK OF THE BLACK HOLE GROWTH SINCE z {approx} 1 OCCURS IN A SECULAR UNIVERSE: NO MAJOR MERGER-AGN CONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Cisternas, Mauricio; Jahnke, Knud; Inskip, Katherine J.; Robaina, Aday R.; Andrae, Rene; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Lisker, Thorsten; Scodeggio, Marco; Sheth, Kartik; Capak, Peter; Trump, Jonathan R.; Impey, Chris D.; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Lusso, Elisabeta; Brusa, Marcella; Cappelluti, Nico; Civano, Francesca; Ilbert, Olivier; Leauthaud, Alexie

    2011-01-10

    What is the relevance of major mergers and interactions as triggering mechanisms for active galactic nuclei (AGNs) activity? To answer this long-standing question, we analyze 140 XMM-Newton-selected AGN host galaxies and a matched control sample of 1264 inactive galaxies over z {approx} 0.3-1.0 and M{sub *} < 10{sup 11.7} M{sub sun} with high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging from the COSMOS field. The visual analysis of their morphologies by 10 independent human classifiers yields a measure of the fraction of distorted morphologies in the AGN and control samples, i.e., quantifying the signature of recent mergers which might potentially be responsible for fueling/triggering the AGN. We find that (1) the vast majority (>85%) of the AGN host galaxies do not show strong distortions and (2) there is no significant difference in the distortion fractions between active and inactive galaxies. Our findings provide the best direct evidence that, since z {approx} 1, the bulk of black hole (BH) accretion has not been triggered by major galaxy mergers, therefore arguing that the alternative mechanisms, i.e., internal secular processes and minor interactions, are the leading triggers for the episodes of major BH growth. We also exclude an alternative interpretation of our results: a substantial time lag between merging and the observability of the AGN phase could wash out the most significant merging signatures, explaining the lack of enhancement of strong distortions on the AGN hosts. We show that this alternative scenario is unlikely due to (1) recent major mergers being ruled out for the majority of sources due to the high fraction of disk-hosted AGNs, (2) the lack of a significant X-ray signal in merging inactive galaxies as a signature of a potential buried AGN, and (3) the low levels of soft X-ray obscuration for AGNs hosted by interacting galaxies, in contrast to model predictions.

  6. Quiescent Galaxies in the 3D-HST Survey: Spectroscopic Confirmation of a Large Number of Galaxies With Relatively Old Stellar Populations at z Approx. 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tease, Katherine Whitaker; vanDokkum, Pieter G.; Brammer, Gabriel; Momcheva, Ivelina; Skelton, Rosalind; Franx, Marijin; Kriek, Mariska; Labbe, Ivo; Fumagalli, Mattia; Lundgren, Britt F.; Nelson, Erica J.; Patel, Shannon G.; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2013-01-01

    Quiescent galaxies at z approx. 2 have been identified in large numbers based on rest-frame colors, but only a small number of these galaxies have been spectroscopically confirmed to show that their rest-frame optical spectra show either strong Balmer or metal absorption lines. Here, we median stack the rest-frame optical spectra for 171 photometrically quiescent galaxies at 1.4 < z < 2.2 from the 3D-HST grism survey. In addition to H (4861 ),we unambiguously identify metal absorption lines in the stacked spectrum, including the G band (4304 ),Mgi (5175 ), and Na i (5894 ). This finding demonstrates that galaxies with relatively old stellar populations already existed when the universe was approx. 3 Gyr old, and that rest-frame color selection techniques can efficiently select them. We find an average age of 1.3+0.10.3 Gyr when fitting a simple stellar population to the entire stack. We confirm our previous result from medium-band photometry that the stellar age varies with the colors of quiescent galaxies: the reddest 80 of galaxies are dominated by metal lines and have a relatively old mean age of 1.6+0.50.4 Gyr, whereas the bluest (and brightest) galaxies have strong Balmer lines and a spectroscopic age of 0.9+0.20.1 Gyr. Although the spectrum is dominated by an evolved stellar population, we also find [O iii] and H emission. Interestingly, this emission is more centrally concentrated than the continuum with LOiii = 1.7+/- 0.3 x 10(exp 40) erg/s, indicating residual central star formation or nuclear activity.

  7. ULTRA-DEEP HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING OF THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD: THE INITIAL MASS FUNCTION OF STARS WITH M {approx}< 1 M {sub Sun}

    SciTech Connect

    Kalirai, Jason S.; Anderson, Jay; Dotter, Aaron; Reid, I. Neill; Richer, Harvey B.; Fahlman, Gregory G.; Hansen, Brad M. S.; Rich, R. Michael; Hurley, Jarrod; Shara, Michael M. E-mail: jayander@stsci.edu E-mail: richer@astro.ubc.ca E-mail: hansen@astro.ucla.edu E-mail: jhurley@swin.edu.au

    2013-02-15

    We present a new measurement of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) based on ultra-deep, high-resolution photometry of >5000 stars in the outskirts of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) galaxy. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys observations reveal this rich, cospatial population behind the foreground globular cluster 47 Tuc, which we targeted for 121 HST orbits. The stellar main sequence of the SMC is measured in the F606W, F814W color-magnitude diagram down to {approx}30th magnitude, and is cleanly separated from the foreground star cluster population using proper motions. We simulate the SMC population by extracting stellar masses (single and unresolved binaries) from specific IMFs and converting those masses to luminosities in our bandpasses. The corresponding photometry for these simulated stars is drawn directly from a rich cloud of 4 million artificial stars, thereby accounting for the real photometric scatter and completeness of the data. Over a continuous and well-populated mass range of M = 0.37-0.93 M {sub Sun} (e.g., down to a {approx}75% completeness limit at F606W = 28.7), we demonstrate that the IMF is well represented by a single power-law form with slope {alpha} = -1.90 ({sup +0.15} {sub -0.10}) (3{sigma} error) (e.g., dN/dM{proportional_to} M {sup {alpha}}). This is shallower than the Salpeter slope of {alpha} = -2.35, which agrees with the observed stellar luminosity function at higher masses. Our results indicate that the IMF does not turn over to a more shallow power-law form within this mass range. We discuss implications of this result for the theory of star formation, the inferred masses of galaxies, and the (lack of a) variation of the IMF with metallicity.

  8. The modified Black-Scholes model via constant elasticity of variance for stock options valuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edeki, S. O.; Owoloko, E. A.; Ugbebor, O. O.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the classical Black-Scholes option pricing model is visited. We present a modified version of the Black-Scholes model via the application of the constant elasticity of variance model (CEVM); in this case, the volatility of the stock price is shown to be a non-constant function unlike the assumption of the classical Black-Scholes model.

  9. Preliminary results of solar constant observations with the SOLCON experiment on ATLAS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crommelynck, D.; Domingo, V.; Barkstrom, B.; Lee, R. B., II; Donaldson, J.; Telljohann, U; Warren, L.; Fichot, A.

    1994-01-01

    A brief description is given of the Solar Constant (SOLCAN) experiment on Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS) 1, its scientific and technical objectives, as well as its measurement principle and its on board chronology of operations. A preliminary value of the solar constant during the third solar operation of the mission is also provided.

  10. Running Newton constant, improved gravitational actions, and galaxy rotation curves

    SciTech Connect

    Reuter, M.; Weyer, H.

    2004-12-15

    A renormalization group (RG) improvement of the Einstein-Hilbert action is performed which promotes Newton's constant and the cosmological constant to scalar functions on spacetime. They arise from solutions of an exact RG equation by means of a 'cutoff identification' which associates RG scales to the points of spacetime. The resulting modified Einstein equations for spherically symmetric, static spacetimes are derived and analyzed in detail. The modifications of the Newtonian limit due to the RG evolution are obtained for the general case. As an application, the viability of a scenario is investigated where strong quantum effects in the infrared cause Newton's constant to grow at large (astrophysical) distances. For two specific RG trajectories exact vacuum spacetimes modifying the Schwarzschild metric are obtained by means of a solution-generating Weyl transformation. Their possible relevance to the problem of the observed approximately flat galaxy rotation curves is discussed. It is found that a power law running of Newton's constant with a small exponent of the order 10{sup -6} would account for their non-Keplerian behavior without having to postulate the presence of any dark matter in the galactic halo.

  11. (In)validity of the constant field and constant currents assumptions in theories of ion transport.

    PubMed Central

    Syganow, A; von Kitzing, E

    1999-01-01

    Constant electric fields and constant ion currents are often considered in theories of ion transport. Therefore, it is important to understand the validity of these helpful concepts. The constant field assumption requires that the charge density of permeant ions and flexible polar groups is virtually voltage independent. We present analytic relations that indicate the conditions under which the constant field approximation applies. Barrier models are frequently fitted to experimental current-voltage curves to describe ion transport. These models are based on three fundamental characteristics: a constant electric field, negligible concerted motions of ions inside the channel (an ion can enter only an empty site), and concentration-independent energy profiles. An analysis of those fundamental assumptions of barrier models shows that those approximations require large barriers because the electrostatic interaction is strong and has a long range. In the constant currents assumption, the current of each permeating ion species is considered to be constant throughout the channel; thus ion pairing is explicitly ignored. In inhomogeneous steady-state systems, the association rate constant determines the strength of ion pairing. Among permeable ions, however, the ion association rate constants are not small, according to modern diffusion-limited reaction rate theories. A mathematical formulation of a constant currents condition indicates that ion pairing very likely has an effect but does not dominate ion transport. PMID:9929480

  12. Second Yamabe constant on Riemannian products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Guillermo

    2017-04-01

    Let (Mm , g) be a closed Riemannian manifold (m ≥ 2) of positive scalar curvature and (Nn , h) any closed manifold. We study the asymptotic behaviour of the second Yamabe constant and the second N-Yamabe constant of (M × N , g + th) as t goes to + ∞. We obtain that lim t → + ∞Y2(M × N , [ g + th ]) =2 2/m+n Y(M ×Rn , [ g +ge ]) . If n ≥ 2, we show the existence of nodal solutions of the Yamabe equation on (M × N , g + th) (provided t large enough). When sg is constant, we prove that lim t → + ∞ YN2 (M × N , g + th) =2 2/m+n YRn(M ×Rn , g +ge) . Also we study the second Yamabe invariant and the second N-Yamabe invariant.

  13. Construction and experimental testing of the constant-bandwidth constant-temperature anemometer.

    PubMed

    Ligeza, P

    2008-09-01

    A classical constant-temperature hot-wire anemometer enables the measurement of fast-changing flow velocity fluctuations, although its transmission bandwidth is a function of measured velocity. This may be a source of significant dynamic errors. Incorporation of an adaptive controller into the constant-temperature system results in hot-wire anemometer operating with a constant transmission bandwidth. The construction together with the results of experimental testing of a constant-bandwidth hot-wire anemometer prototype are presented in this article. During the testing, an approximately constant transmission bandwidth of the anemometer was achieved. The constant-bandwidth hot-wire anemometer can be used in measurements of high-frequency variable flows characterized by a wide range of velocity changes.

  14. Determination of Relative Counterion Binding Constant to Cationic Micelles.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Khalisanni; Noh, Muhammad Azri Mohd; Zain, Sharifuddin Md; Khan, M Niyaz

    2017-04-01

    The efficiency of counterion affinity towards ionic micelles is often described in terms of the degree of counterion binding (β X ) to ionic micelles or the conventional ion-exchange constant ([Formula: see text]) or relative binding constant ([Formula: see text]) of X (-) and Br(-) counterions. This review describes the use of ionized phenyl salicylate ions, PSa(-), as a new probe to determine [Formula: see text] values using a semiempirical spectrophotometric method. The value of [Formula: see text] is found to be comparable to reported values obtained using different probes by the semiempirical kinetic method as well as different physical methods. Application of semiempirical methods for calculation of [Formula: see text] or [Formula: see text] values involves an inherent assumption that these values are independent of the physicochemical characteristics of the probe molecule.

  15. Atomic weights: no longer constants of nature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Holden, Norman E.

    2011-01-01

    Many of us were taught that the standard atomic weights we found in the back of our chemistry textbooks or on the Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements hanging on the wall of our chemistry classroom are constants of nature. This was common knowledge for more than a century and a half, but not anymore. The following text explains how advances in chemical instrumentation and isotopic analysis have changed the way we view atomic weights and why they are no longer constants of nature

  16. Cosmological constant in scale-invariant theories

    SciTech Connect

    Foot, Robert; Kobakhidze, Archil; Volkas, Raymond R.

    2011-10-01

    The incorporation of a small cosmological constant within radiatively broken scale-invariant models is discussed. We show that phenomenologically consistent scale-invariant models can be constructed which allow a small positive cosmological constant, providing certain relation between the particle masses is satisfied. As a result, the mass of the dilaton is generated at two-loop level. Another interesting consequence is that the electroweak symmetry-breaking vacuum in such models is necessarily a metastable ''false'' vacuum which, fortunately, is not expected to decay on cosmological time scales.

  17. TOPICAL REVIEW The cosmological constant puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Steven D.

    2011-04-01

    The accelerating expansion of the Universe points to a small positive vacuum energy density and negative vacuum pressure. A strong candidate is the cosmological constant in Einstein's equations of general relativity. Possible contributions are zero-point energies and the condensates associated with spontaneous symmetry breaking. The vacuum energy density extracted from astrophysics is 1056 times smaller than the value expected from quantum fields and standard model particle physics. Is the vacuum energy density time dependent? We give an introduction to the cosmological constant puzzle and ideas how to solve it.

  18. Dielectric constants of soils at microwave frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, F. E.; Williams, D.

    1972-01-01

    A knowledge of the complex dielectric constant of soils is essential in the interpretation of microwave airborne radiometer data of the earth's surface. Measurements were made at 37 GHz on various soils from the Phoenix, Ariz., area. Extensive data have been obtained for dry soil and soil with water content in the range from 0.6 to 35 percent by dry weight. Measurements were made in a two arm microwave bridge and results were corrected for reflections at the sample interfaces by solution of the parallel dielectric plate problem. The maximum dielectric constants are about a factor of 3 lower than those reported for similar soils at X-band frequencies.

  19. Environmental dependence of masses and coupling constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Pospelov, Maxim

    2008-02-15

    We construct a class of scalar field models coupled to matter that lead to the dependence of masses and coupling constants on the ambient matter density. Such models predict a deviation of couplings measured on the Earth from values determined in low-density astrophysical environments, but do not necessarily require the evolution of coupling constants with the redshift in the recent cosmological past. Additional laboratory and astrophysical tests of {delta}{alpha} and {delta}(m{sub p}/m{sub e}) as functions of the ambient matter density are warranted.

  20. Microfabricated microengine with constant rotation rate

    DOEpatents

    Romero, Louis A.; Dickey, Fred M.

    1999-01-01

    A microengine uses two synchronized linear actuators as a power source and converts oscillatory motion from the actuators into constant rotational motion via direct linkage connection to an output gear or wheel. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque at a constant rotation to a micromechanism. The output gear can have gear teeth on its outer perimeter for directly contacting a micromechanism requiring mechanical power. The gear is retained by a retaining means which allows said gear to rotate freely. The microengine is microfabricated of polysilicon on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication.

  1. Microfabricated microengine with constant rotation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, L.A.; Dickey, F.M.

    1999-09-21

    A microengine uses two synchronized linear actuators as a power source and converts oscillatory motion from the actuators into constant rotational motion via direct linkage connection to an output gear or wheel. The microengine provides output in the form of a continuously rotating output gear that is capable of delivering drive torque at a constant rotation to a micromechanism. The output gear can have gear teeth on its outer perimeter for directly contacting a micromechanism requiring mechanical power. The gear is retained by a retaining means which allows said gear to rotate freely. The microengine is microfabricated of polysilicon on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication.

  2. Our Universe from the cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Barrau, Aurélien; Linsefors, Linda E-mail: linda.linsefors@lpsc.in2p3.fr

    2014-12-01

    The issue of the origin of the Universe and of its contents is addressed in the framework of bouncing cosmologies, as described for example by loop quantum gravity. If the current acceleration is due to a true cosmological constant, this constant is naturally conserved through the bounce and the Universe should also be in a (contracting) de Sitter phase in the remote past. We investigate here the possibility that the de Sitter temperature in the contracting branch fills the Universe with radiation that causes the bounce and the subsequent inflation and reheating. We also consider the possibility that this gives rise to a cyclic model of the Universe and suggest some possible tests.

  3. Degravitation of the cosmological constant in bigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platscher, Moritz; Smirnov, Juri

    2017-03-01

    In this article the phenomenon of degravitation of the cosmological constant is studied in the framework of bigravity. It is demonstrated that despite a sizable value of the cosmological constant its gravitational effect can be only mild. The bigravity framework is chosen for this demonstration as it leads to a consistent, ghost-free theory of massive gravity. We show that degravitation takes place in the limit where the physical graviton is dominantly a gauge invariant metric combination. We present and discuss several phenomenological consequences expected in this regime.

  4. Porous low dielectric constant materials for microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Baklanov, Mikhail R; Maex, Karen

    2006-01-15

    Materials with a low dielectric constant are required as interlayer dielectrics for the on-chip interconnection of ultra-large-scale integration devices to provide high speed, low dynamic power dissipation and low cross-talk noise. The selection of chemical compounds with low polarizability and the introduction of porosity result in a reduced dielectric constant. Integration of such materials into microelectronic circuits, however, poses a number of challenges, as the materials must meet strict requirements in terms of properties and reliability. These issues are the subject of the present paper.

  5. Atomic Weights No Longer Constants of Nature

    SciTech Connect

    Coplen, T.B.; Holden, N.

    2011-03-01

    Many of us grew up being taught that the standard atomic weights we found in the back of our chemistry textbooks or on the Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements hanging on the wall of our chemistry classroom are constants of nature. This was common knowledge for more than a century and a half, but not anymore. The following text explains how advances in chemical instrumentation and isotopic analysis has changed the way we view atomic weights and why they are no longer constants of nature.

  6. Correlations Between the Cosmic X-Ray and Microwave Backgrounds: Constraints on a Cosmological Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boughn, S. P.; Crittenden, R. G.; Turok, N. G.

    1998-01-01

    In universes with significant curvature or cosmological constant, cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are created very recently via the Rees-Sciama or integrated Sachs-Wolfe effects. This causes the CMB anisotropies to become partially correlated with the local matter density (z less than 4). We examine the prospects of using the hard (2- 10 keV) X-ray background as a probe of the local density and the measured correlation between the HEAO1 A2 X-ray survey and the 4-year COBE-DMR map to obtain a constraint on the cosmological constant. The 95% confidence level upper limit on the cosmological constant is OMega(sub Lambda) less than or equal to 0.5, assuming that the observed fluctuations in the X-ray map result entirely from large scale structure. (This would also imply that the X-rays trace matter with a bias factor of b(sub x) approx. = 5.6 Omega(sub m, sup 0.53)). This bound is weakened considerably if a large portion of the X-ray fluctuations arise from Poisson noise from unresolved sources. For example, if one assumes that the X-ray bias is b(sub x) = 2, then the 95% confidence level upper limit is weaker, Omega(sub Lambda) less than or equal to 0.7. More stringent limits should be attainable with data from the next generation of CMB and X-ray background maps.

  7. Dynamic Characteristics of The DSI-Type Constant-Flow Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yuan; Hu, Sheng-Yan; Chou, Hsien-Chin; Lee, Hsing-Han

    Constant flow valves have been presented in industrial applications or academic studies, which compensate recess pressures of a hydrostatic bearing to resist load fluctuating. The flow rate of constant-flow valves can be constant in spite of the pressure changes in recesses, however the design parameters must be specified. This paper analyzes the dynamic responses of DSI-type constant-flow valves that is designed as double pistons on both ends of a spool with single feedback of working pressure and regulating restriction at inlet. In this study the static analysis presents the specific relationships among design parameters for constant flow rate and the dynamic analyses give the variations around the constant flow rate as the working pressure fluctuates.

  8. High Temperature Elastic Constants of Langatate from RUS Measurements up to 1100 degrees C

    SciTech Connect

    Shyam, Amit; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the langatate (LGT) elastic constants measured from room temperature (25 C) to 1100 C using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS). The constants were extracted by fitting the resonant peaks with those calculated by Lagrangian mechanics at each temperature where the RUS measurements were taken. In addition, the RUS technique was used to extract the piezoelectric constants in the 25 C to 120 C temperature range. This work also publishes a set of temperature coefficients for the elastic constants up to 1100 C. For the measurements, six parallelepiped LGT samples were aligned, cut, ground, and polished at the University of Maine. The samples were aligned to two different crystal orientations, to increase the reliability of the constant fitting. The extraction of LGT elastic constants up to 1100 C presented in this paper represents a critical step towards the design and fabrication of LGT acoustic wave devices for high temperature and harsh environment applications.

  9. THE GEMINI CLUSTER ASTROPHYSICS SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY (GCLASS): THE ROLE OF ENVIRONMENT AND SELF-REGULATION IN GALAXY EVOLUTION AT z {approx} 1

    SciTech Connect

    Muzzin, Adam; Van Dokkum, Pieter; Wilson, Gillian; Rettura, Alessandro; Yee, H. K. C.; Gilbank, David; Hoekstra, Henk; Franx, Marijn; Demarco, Ricardo; Nantais, Julie; Balogh, Michael; Ellingson, Erica; Hicks, Amalia; Noble, Allison; Webb, Tracy; Lacy, Mark; Lidman, Chris; Surace, Jason

    2012-02-20

    We evaluate the effects of environment and stellar mass on galaxy properties at 0.85 9.3 the well-known correlations between environment and properties such as star-forming fraction (f{sub SF}), star formation rate (SFR), specific SFR (SSFR), D{sub n}(4000), and color are already in place at z {approx} 1. We separate the effects of environment and stellar mass on galaxies by comparing the properties of star-forming and quiescent galaxies at fixed environment and fixed stellar mass. The SSFR of star-forming galaxies at fixed environment is correlated with stellar mass; however, at fixed stellar mass it is independent of environment. The same trend exists for the D{sub n}(4000) measures of both the star-forming and quiescent galaxies and shows that their properties are determined primarily by their stellar mass, not by their environment. Instead, it appears that environment's primary role is to control the fraction of star-forming galaxies. Using the spectra we identify candidate poststarburst galaxies and find that those with 9.3 < log M{sub *}/M{sub Sun} < 10.7 are 3.1 {+-} 1.1 times more common in high-density regions compared to low-density regions. The clear association of poststarbursts with high-density regions as well as the lack of a correlation between the SSFRs and D{sub n}(4000)s of star-forming galaxies with their environment strongly suggests that at z {approx} 1 the environmental-quenching timescale must be rapid. Lastly, we construct a simple quenching model which demonstrates that the lack of a correlation between the D{sub n}(4000) of quiescent galaxies and their environment results naturally if self quenching dominates over environmental quenching at z > 1, or if the evolution of the self-quenching rate mirrors the evolution of the

  10. PROBING THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM OF z {approx} 1 ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES THROUGH INTERFEROMETRIC OBSERVATIONS OF CO AND SPITZER MID-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, Alexandra; Kirkpatrick, Allison; Wagg, Jeff; Frayer, David; Armus, Lee; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Desai, Vandana; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Gabor, Jared

    2013-08-01

    We explore the relationship between gas, dust, and star formation in a sample of 12 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at high-redshift compared to a similar sample of local galaxies. We present new CO observations and/or Spitzer mid-IR spectroscopy for six 70 {mu}m selected galaxies at z {approx} 1 in order to quantify the properties of the molecular gas reservoir, the contribution of an active galactic nucleus (AGN) to the mid-IR luminosity, and the star formation efficiency (SFE = L{sub IR}/L{sup '}{sub CO}). The mid-IR spectra show strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission, and our spectral decomposition suggests that the AGN makes a minimal contribution (<25%) to the mid-IR luminosity. The 70 {mu}m selected ULIRGs, which we find to be spectroscopic close pairs, are observed to have high SFE, similar to local ULIRGs and high-redshift submillimeter galaxies, consistent with enhanced IR luminosity due to an ongoing major merger. Combined with existing observations of local and high-redshift ULIRGs, we further compare the PAH, IR, and CO luminosities. We show that the ratio L{sub PAH,6.2}/L{sub IR} decreases with increasing IR luminosity for both local and high-redshift galaxies, but the trend for high-redshift galaxies is shifted to higher IR luminosities; the average L{sub PAH,6.2}/L{sub IR} ratio at a given L{sub IR} is {approx}3 times higher at high-redshift. When we normalize by the molecular gas, we find this trend to be uniform for galaxies at all redshifts and that the molecular gas is correlated with the PAH dust emission. The similar trends seen in the [C II] to molecular gas ratios in other studies suggests that PAH emission, like [C II], continues to be a good tracer of photodissociation regions even at high-redshift. Together the CO, PAH, and far-IR fine structure lines should be useful for constraining the interstellar medium conditions in high-redshift galaxies.

  11. Spray Gun With Constant Mixing Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Conceptual mechanism mounted in handle of spray gun maintains constant ratio between volumetric flow rates in two channels leading to spray head. With mechanism, possible to keep flow ratio near 1:1 (or another desired ratio) over range of temperatures, orifice or channel sizes, or clogging conditions.

  12. Variations of the Solar Constant. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofia, S. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The variations in data received from rocket-borne and balloon-borne instruments are discussed. Indirect techniques to measure and monitor the solar constant are presented. Emphasis is placed on the correlation of data from the Solar Maximum Mission and the Nimbus 7 satellites.

  13. Teaching Nanochemistry: Madelung Constants of Nanocrystals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Mark D.; Baker, A. David

    2010-01-01

    The Madelung constants for binary ionic nanoparticles are determined. The computational method described here sums the Coulombic interactions of each ion in the particle without the use of partial charges commonly used for bulk materials. The results show size-dependent lattice energies. This is a useful concept in teaching how properties such as…

  14. Sensing Position With Approximately Constant Contact Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturdevant, Jay

    1996-01-01

    Computer-controlled electromechanical system uses number of linear variable-differential transformers (LVDTs) to measure axial positions of selected points on surface of lens, mirror, or other precise optical component with high finish. Pressures applied to pneumatically driven LVDTs adjusted to maintain small, approximately constant contact forces as positions of LVDT tips vary.

  15. A tunable CMOS constant current source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thelen, D.

    1991-01-01

    A constant current source has been designed which makes use of on chip electrically erasable memory to adjust the magnitude and temperature coefficient of the output current. The current source includes a voltage reference based on the difference between enhancement and depletion transistor threshold voltages. Accuracy is +/- 3% over the full range of power supply, process variations, and temperature using eight bits for tuning.

  16. Spectral curve fitting of dielectric constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzi, M.; Ennis, C.; Robertson, E. G.

    2017-01-01

    Optical constants are important properties governing the response of a material to incident light. It follows that they are often extracted from spectra measured by absorbance, transmittance or reflectance. One convenient method to obtain optical constants is by curve fitting. Here, model curves should satisfy Kramer-Kronig relations, and preferably can be expressed in closed form or easily calculable. In this study we use dielectric constants of three different molecular ices in the infrared region to evaluate four different model curves that are generally used for fitting optical constants: (1) the classical damped harmonic oscillator, (2) Voigt line shape, (3) Fourier series, and (4) the Triangular basis. Among these, only the classical damped harmonic oscillator model strictly satisfies the Kramer-Kronig relation. If considering the trade-off between accuracy and speed, Fourier series fitting is the best option when spectral bands are broad while for narrow peaks the classical damped harmonic oscillator and the Triangular basis fitting model are the best choice.

  17. Can compactifications solve the cosmological constant problem?

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzberg, Mark P.; Masoumi, Ali

    2016-06-30

    Recently, there have been claims in the literature that the cosmological constant problem can be dynamically solved by specific compactifications of gravity from higher-dimensional toy models. These models have the novel feature that in the four-dimensional theory, the cosmological constant Λ is much smaller than the Planck density and in fact accumulates at Λ=0. Here we show that while these are very interesting models, they do not properly address the real cosmological constant problem. As we explain, the real problem is not simply to obtain Λ that is small in Planck units in a toy model, but to explain why Λ is much smaller than other mass scales (and combinations of scales) in the theory. Instead, in these toy models, all other particle mass scales have been either removed or sent to zero, thus ignoring the real problem. To this end, we provide a general argument that the included moduli masses are generically of order Hubble, so sending them to zero trivially sends the cosmological constant to zero. We also show that the fundamental Planck mass is being sent to zero, and so the central problem is trivially avoided by removing high energy physics altogether. On the other hand, by including various large mass scales from particle physics with a high fundamental Planck mass, one is faced with a real problem, whose only known solution involves accidental cancellations in a landscape.

  18. Unified Technical Concepts. Module 12: Time Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This concept module on time constants is one of thirteen modules that provide a flexible, laboratory-based physics instructional package designed to meet the specialized needs of students in two-year, postsecondary technical schools. Each of the thirteen concept modules discusses a single physics concept and how it is applied to each energy…

  19. Man's Size in Terms of Fundamental Constants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press, William H.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews calculations that derive an order of magnitude expression for the size of man in terms of fundamental constants, assuming that man satifies these three properties: he is made of complicated molecules; he requires an atmosphere which is not hydrogen and helium; he is as large as possible. (CS)

  20. The Elastic Constants for Wrought Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templin, R L; Hartmann, E C

    1945-01-01

    There are several constants which have been devised as numerical representations of the behavior of metals under the action of loadings which stress the metal within the range of elastic action. Some of these constants, such as Young's modulus of elasticity in tension and compression, shearing modulus of elasticity, and Poisson's ratio, are regularly used in engineering calculations. Precise tests and experience indicate that these elastic constants are practically unaffected by many of the factors which influence the other mechanical properties of materials and that a few careful determinations under properly controlled conditions are more useful and reliable than many determinations made under less favorable conditions. It is the purpose of this paper to outline the methods employed by the Aluminum Research Laboratories for the determination of some of these elastic constants, to list the values that have been determined for some of the wrought aluminum alloys, and to indicate the variations in the values that may be expected for some of the commercial products of these alloys.

  1. Constant capacitance in nanopores of carbon monoliths.

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, Alejandra; Moreno-Fernández, Gelines; Lobato, Belén; Centeno, Teresa A

    2015-06-28

    The results obtained for binder-free electrodes made of carbon monoliths with narrow micropore size distributions confirm that the specific capacitance in the electrolyte (C2H5)4NBF4/acetonitrile does not depend significantly on the micropore size and support the foregoing constant result of 0.094 ± 0.011 F m(-2).

  2. UV-CONTINUUM SLOPES AT z {approx} 4-7 FROM THE HUDF09+ERS+CANDELS OBSERVATIONS: DISCOVERY OF A WELL-DEFINED UV COLOR-MAGNITUDE RELATIONSHIP FOR z {>=} 4 STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bouwens, R. J.; Franx, M.; Labbe, I.; Smit, R.; Illingworth, G. D.; Oesch, P.A.; Gonzalez, V.; Magee, D.; Van Dokkum, P.; Carollo, C. M.

    2012-08-01

    Ultra-deep Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and WFC3/IR HUDF+HUDF09 data, along with the wide-area GOODS+ERS+CANDELS data over the CDF-S GOODS field, are used to measure UV colors, expressed as the UV-continuum slope {beta}, of star-forming galaxies over a wide range of luminosity (0.1L*{sub z=3} to 2L*{sub z=3}) at high redshift (z {approx} 7 to z {approx} 4). {beta} is measured using all ACS and WFC3/IR passbands uncontaminated by Ly{alpha} and spectral breaks. Extensive tests show that our {beta} measurements are only subject to minimal biases. Using a different selection procedure, Dunlop et al. recently found large biases in their {beta} measurements. To reconcile these different results, we simulated both approaches and found that {beta} measurements for faint sources are subject to large biases if the same passbands are used both to select the sources and to measure {beta}. High-redshift galaxies show a well-defined rest-frame UV color-magnitude (CM) relationship that becomes systematically bluer toward fainter UV luminosities. No evolution is seen in the slope of the UV CM relationship in the first 1.5 Gyr, though there is a small evolution in the zero point to redder colors from z {approx} 7 to z {approx} 4. This suggests that galaxies are evolving along a well-defined sequence in the L{sub UV}-color ({beta}) plane (a 'star-forming sequence'?). Dust appears to be the principal factor driving changes in the UV color {beta} with luminosity. These new larger {beta} samples lead to improved dust extinction estimates at z {approx} 4-7 and confirm that the extinction is essentially zero at low luminosities and high redshifts. Inclusion of the new dust extinction results leads to (1) excellent agreement between the star formation rate (SFR) density at z {approx} 4-8 and that inferred from the stellar mass density; and (2) to higher specific star formation rates (SSFRs) at z {approx}> 4, suggesting that the SSFR may evolve modestly (by factors of {approx}2) from

  3. When is the growth index constant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polarski, David; Starobinsky, Alexei A.; Giacomini, Hector

    2016-12-01

    The growth index γ is an interesting tool to assess the phenomenology of dark energy (DE) models, in particular of those beyond general relativity (GR). We investigate the possibility for DE models to allow for a constant γ during the entire matter and DE dominated stages. It is shown that if DE is described by quintessence (a scalar field minimally coupled to gravity), this behaviour of γ is excluded either because it would require a transition to a phantom behaviour at some finite moment of time, or, in the case of tracking DE at the matter dominated stage, because the relative matter density Ωm appears to be too small. An infinite number of solutions, with Ωm and γ both constant, are found with wDE = 0 corresponding to Einstein-de Sitter universes. For all modified gravity DE models satisfying Geff >= G, among them the f(R) DE models suggested in the literature, the condition to have a constant wDE is strongly violated at the present epoch. In contrast, DE tracking dust-like matter deep in the matter era, but with Ωm <1, requires Geff > G and an example is given using scalar-tensor gravity for a range of admissible values of γ. For constant wDE inside GR, departure from a quasi-constant value is limited until today. Even a large variation of wDE may not result in a clear signature in the change of γ. The change however is substantial in the future and the asymptotic value of γ is found while its slope with respect to Ωm (and with respect to z) diverges and tends to ‑∞.

  4. THE GALACTIC O-STAR SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY. I. CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM AND BRIGHT NORTHERN STARS IN THE BLUE-VIOLET AT R {approx} 2500

    SciTech Connect

    Sota, A.; Maiz Apellaniz, J.; Alfaro, E. J.; Barba, R. H.; Morrell, N. I.; Gamen, R. C.

    2011-04-01

    We present the first installment of a massive spectroscopic survey of Galactic O stars, based on new, high signal-to-noise ratio, R {approx} 2500 digital observations from both hemispheres selected from the Galactic O-Star Catalog of MaIz Apellaniz et al. and Sota et al. The spectral classification system is rediscussed and a new atlas is presented, which supersedes previous versions. Extensive sequences of exceptional objects are given, including types Ofc, ON/OC, Onfp, Of?p, Oe, and double-lined spectroscopic binaries. The remaining normal spectra bring this first sample to 184 stars, which is close to complete to B = 8 and north of {delta} = -20{sup 0} and includes all of the northern objects in MaIz Apellaniz et al. that are still classified as O stars. The systematic and random accuracies of these classifications are substantially higher than previously attainable, because of the quality, quantity, and homogeneity of the data and analysis procedures. These results will enhance subsequent investigations in Galactic astronomy and stellar astrophysics. In the future, we will publish the rest of the survey, beginning with a second paper that will include most of the southern stars in MaIz Apellaniz et al.

  5. Precision Measurements of the Nucleon Strange Form Factors at Q{sup 2}{approx}0.1 GeV{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Acha, A.; Markowitz, P.; Aniol, K. A.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Armstrong, D. S.; Averett, T.; Bailey, S. L.; Finn, J. M.; Fuchs, S. A.; Glesener, L. E.; Grimm, K.; Holmstrom, T.; Katich, J.; Kelleher, A.; Moffit, B.; Phillips, S. K.; Sulkosky, V.; Arrington, J.; Barber, J.; Fuoti, K.

    2007-01-19

    We report new measurements of the parity-violating asymmetry A{sub PV} in elastic scattering of 3 GeV electrons off hydrogen and {sup 4}He targets with <{theta}{sub lab}>{approx_equal}6.0 deg. . The {sup 4}He result is A{sub PV}=(+6.40{+-}0.23(stat){+-}0.12(syst))x10{sup -6}. The hydrogen result is A{sub PV}=(-1.58{+-}0.12(stat){+-}0.04(syst))x10{sup -6}. These results significantly improve constraints on the electric and magnetic strange form factors G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s}. We extract G{sub E}{sup s}=0.002{+-}0.014{+-}0.007 at =0.077 GeV{sup 2}, and G{sub E}{sup s}+0.09G{sub M}{sup s}=0.007{+-}0.011{+-}0.006 at =0.109 GeV{sup 2}, providing new limits on the role of strange quarks in the nucleon charge and magnetization distributions.

  6. A FIRST GLIMPSE INTO THE FAR-IR PROPERTIES OF HIGH-z UV-SELECTED GALAXIES: HERSCHEL/PACS OBSERVATIONS OF z {approx} 3 LBGS

    SciTech Connect

    Magdis, G. E.; Elbaz, D.; Hwang, H. S.; Daddi, E.; Aussel, H.; Altieri, B.; Andreani, P.; Berta, S.; Foerster Schreiber, N.; Genzel, R.; Lutz, D.; Cava, A.; Bongiovanni, A.; Cepa, J.; Cimatti, A.; Dickinson, M.; Dominguez, H.; Huang, J.-S.; Maiolino, R.

    2010-09-10

    We present first insights into the far-IR properties for a sample of IRAC and MIPS 24 {mu}m detected Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z {approx} 3, as derived from observations in the northern field of the Great Observatories Origins Survey (GOODS-N) carried out with the PACS instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory. Although none of our galaxies are detected by Herschel, we employ a stacking technique to construct, for the first time, the average spectral energy distribution (SED) of infrared luminous LBGs from UV to radio wavelengths. We derive a median IR luminosity of L {sub IR} = 1.6 x 10{sup 12} L {sub sun}, placing the population in the class of ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). Complementing our study with existing multi-wavelength data, we put constraints on the dust temperature of the population and find that for their L {sub IR}, MIPS-LBGs are warmer than submillimeter-luminous galaxies while they fall in the locus of the L {sub IR}-T {sub d} relation of the local ULIRGs. This, along with estimates based on the average SED, explains the marginal detection of LBGs in current submillimeter surveys and suggests that these latter studies introduce a bias toward the detection of colder ULIRGs in the high-z universe, while missing high-z ULIRGS with warmer dust.

  7. Results on search for a QGP with a TPC magnetic spectrometer at AGS and plans for an approx 4. pi. TPC magnetic spectrometer at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenbaum, S.J. City Univ. of New York, NY )

    1991-01-01

    In the first part of this paper a search for a Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) with a TPC Magnetic Spectrometer at AGS by the BNL/CCNY/Johns Hopkins/Rice (E-810) Collaboration is discussed. At AGS energies the expected increase in baryon density is near maximum. If a QGP is formed even rarely this approach provides a sensitive method for its detection. We have found some interesting phenomena including strangeness enhancement, multi-{Lambda} and K{sub s}{sup 0} events and an increased slope for {pi}{sup {minus}} (corresponding to a reduced temperature) in the usual temperature plot for p{sub {perpendicular}} < 0.2 GeV/c. We plan to increase the statistics with the 14.5 GeV/c {times} A Si ions on targets from light to heavy and then to continue the program with incident Au ions. In Part 2 we discuss the BNL/CCNY/Notre Dame/Rice proposal for an {approx} 4{pi} TPC Magnetic Spectrometer for RHIC which we believe will be a sensitive probe for hadronic QGP signals, and also capable of observing departures from QCD should they occur. 8 refs., 12 figs.

  8. Influence of incomplete fusion on complete fusion: Observation of a large incomplete fusion fraction at E {approx_equal}5-7 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Pushpendra P.; Singh, B. P.; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Unnati,; Singh, Devendra P.; Prasad, R.; Kumar, Rakesh; Golda, K. S.

    2008-01-15

    Experiments have been carried out to explore the reaction dynamics leading to incomplete fusion of heavy ions at moderate excitation energies. Excitation functions for {sup 168}Lu{sup m}, {sup 167}Lu, {sup 167}Yb, {sup 166}Tm, {sup 179}Re, {sup 177}Re, {sup 177}W, {sup 178}Ta, and {sup 177}Hf radio-nuclides populated via complete and/or incomplete fusion of {sup 16}O with {sup 159}Tb and {sup 169}Tm have been studied over the wide projectile energy range E{sub proj}{approx_equal}75-95 MeV. Recoil-catcher technique followed by off-line {gamma}-spectrometry has been employed in the present measurements. Experimental data have been compared with the predictions of theoretical model code PACE2. The experimentally measured production cross sections of {alpha}-emitting channels were found to be larger as compared to the theoretical model predictions and may be attributed to incomplete fusion at these energies. During the analysis of experimental data, incomplete fusion has been found to be competing with complete fusion. As such, an attempt has been made to estimate the incomplete fusion fraction for both the systems, and has been found to be sensitive for projectile energy and mass asymmetry of interacting partners.

  9. Time place learning and activity profile under constant light and constant dark in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Moura, Clarissa de Almeida; Lima, Jéssica Polyana da Silva; Silveira, Vanessa Augusta Magalhães; Miguel, Mário André Leocadio; Luchiari, Ana Carolina

    2017-05-01

    The ability to learn about the signs of variability in space and time is known as time place learning (TPL). To adjust their circadian rhythms, animals use stimuli that change regularly, such as the light-dark cycle, temperature, food availability or even social stimuli. Because light-dark cycle is the most important environmental temporal cue, we asked how a diurnal animal would perform TPL if this cue was removed. Zebrafish has been extensively studied in the chronobiology area due to it diurnal chronotype, thus, we studied the effects of constant light and constant dark on the time-place learning and activity profile in zebrafish. Our data show that while under constant light and dark condition zebrafish was not able of TPL, after 30days under the constant conditions, constant light led to higher activity level and less significant (robust) 24h rhythm.

  10. Differential measurement of the coupling constant between laser eigenstates

    SciTech Connect

    Brunel, M.; Vallet, M.; Le Floch, A.; Bretenaker, F.

    1997-04-01

    The possibility to measure the coupling constant C between eigenstates in a laser is demonstrated. Spatial separation of orthogonally polarized modes is shown to provide a simple differential tool to measure their coupling. The difference in the behaviors of linear and helicoidal eigenstates enlightens the influence of the nature of the eigenstates on their interaction in the active medium. The obtained experimental values are C=0.16 for linear and C=0.4 for helicoidal eigenstates in a longitudinally monomode Nd:YAG laser. The method is applicable to most kinds of laser. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Electronic transport in two-dimensional high dielectric constant nanosystems

    PubMed Central

    Ortuño, M.; Somoza, A. M.; Vinokur, V. M.; Baturina, T. I.

    2015-01-01

    There has been remarkable recent progress in engineering high-dielectric constant two dimensional (2D) materials, which are being actively pursued for applications in nanoelectronics in capacitor and memory devices, energy storage, and high-frequency modulation in communication devices. Yet many of the unique properties of these systems are poorly understood and remain unexplored. Here we report a numerical study of hopping conductivity of the lateral network of capacitors, which models two-dimensional insulators, and demonstrate that 2D long-range Coulomb interactions lead to peculiar size effects. We find that the characteristic energy governing electronic transport scales logarithmically with either system size or electrostatic screening length depending on which one is shorter. Our results are relevant well beyond their immediate context, explaining, for example, recent experimental observations of logarithmic size dependence of electric conductivity of thin superconducting films in the critical vicinity of superconductor-insulator transition where a giant dielectric constant develops. Our findings mark a radical departure from the orthodox view of conductivity in 2D systems as a local characteristic of materials and establish its macroscopic global character as a generic property of high-dielectric constant 2D nanomaterials. PMID:25860804

  12. Electronic transport in two-dimensional high dielectric constant nanosystems

    DOE PAGES

    Ortuño, M.; Somoza, A. M.; Vinokur, V. M.; ...

    2015-04-10

    There has been remarkable recent progress in engineering high-dielectric constant two dimensional (2D) materials, which are being actively pursued for applications in nanoelectronics in capacitor and memory devices, energy storage, and high-frequency modulation in communication devices. Yet many of the unique properties of these systems are poorly understood and remain unexplored. Here we report a numerical study of hopping conductivity of the lateral network of capacitors, which models two-dimensional insulators, and demonstrate that 2D long-range Coulomb interactions lead to peculiar size effects. We find that the characteristic energy governing electronic transport scales logarithmically with either system size or electrostatic screeningmore » length depending on which one is shorter. Our results are relevant well beyond their immediate context, explaining, for example, recent experimental observations of logarithmic size dependence of electric conductivity of thin superconducting films in the critical vicinity of superconductor-insulator transition where a giant dielectric constant develops. Our findings mark a radical departure from the orthodox view of conductivity in 2D systems as a local characteristic of materials and establish its macroscopic global character as a generic property of high-dielectric constant 2D nanomaterials.« less

  13. Electronic transport in two-dimensional high dielectric constant nanosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Ortuño, M.; Somoza, A. M.; Vinokur, V. M.; Baturina, T. I.

    2015-04-10

    There has been remarkable recent progress in engineering high-dielectric constant two dimensional (2D) materials, which are being actively pursued for applications in nanoelectronics in capacitor and memory devices, energy storage, and high-frequency modulation in communication devices. Yet many of the unique properties of these systems are poorly understood and remain unexplored. Here we report a numerical study of hopping conductivity of the lateral network of capacitors, which models two-dimensional insulators, and demonstrate that 2D long-range Coulomb interactions lead to peculiar size effects. We find that the characteristic energy governing electronic transport scales logarithmically with either system size or electrostatic screening length depending on which one is shorter. Our results are relevant well beyond their immediate context, explaining, for example, recent experimental observations of logarithmic size dependence of electric conductivity of thin superconducting films in the critical vicinity of superconductor-insulator transition where a giant dielectric constant develops. Our findings mark a radical departure from the orthodox view of conductivity in 2D systems as a local characteristic of materials and establish its macroscopic global character as a generic property of high-dielectric constant 2D nanomaterials.

  14. Reaction rate constant for radiative association of CF(.).

    PubMed

    Öström, Jonatan; Bezrukov, Dmitry S; Nyman, Gunnar; Gustafsson, Magnus

    2016-01-28

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations (C(+)) and fluorine atoms (F) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition 1(1)Π → X(1)Σ(+) and rovibrational transitions on the X(1)Σ(+) and a(3)Π potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit-Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius-Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of <3%. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of 10-250 K, the rate constant is about 10(-21) cm(3) s(-1), rising toward 10(-16) cm(3) s(-1) for a temperature of 30,000 K.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of solutions at constant chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, C.; Salvalaglio, M.; Parrinello, M.

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamics studies of chemical processes in solution are of great value in a wide spectrum of applications, which range from nano-technology to pharmaceutical chemistry. However, these calculations are affected by severe finite-size effects, such as the solution being depleted as the chemical process proceeds, which influence the outcome of the simulations. To overcome these limitations, one must allow the system to exchange molecules with a macroscopic reservoir, thus sampling a grand-canonical ensemble. Despite the fact that different remedies have been proposed, this still represents a key challenge in molecular simulations. In the present work, we propose the Constant Chemical Potential Molecular Dynamics (CμMD) method, which introduces an external force that controls the environment of the chemical process of interest. This external force, drawing molecules from a finite reservoir, maintains the chemical potential constant in the region where the process takes place. We have applied the CμMD method to the paradigmatic case of urea crystallization in aqueous solution. As a result, we have been able to study crystal growth dynamics under constant supersaturation conditions and to extract growth rates and free-energy barriers.

  16. Reaction rate constant for radiative association of CF{sup +}

    SciTech Connect

    Öström, Jonatan Gustafsson, Magnus; Bezrukov, Dmitry S.; Nyman, Gunnar

    2016-01-28

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations (C{sup +}) and fluorine atoms (F) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition 1{sup 1}Π → X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and rovibrational transitions on the X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and a{sup 3}Π potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit–Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius–Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of <3%. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of 10–250 K, the rate constant is about 10{sup −21} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1}, rising toward 10{sup −16} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1} for a temperature of 30 000 K.

  17. Electronic transport in two-dimensional high dielectric constant nanosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortuño, M.; Somoza, A. M.; Vinokur, V. M.; Baturina, T. I.

    2015-04-01

    There has been remarkable recent progress in engineering high-dielectric constant two dimensional (2D) materials, which are being actively pursued for applications in nanoelectronics in capacitor and memory devices, energy storage, and high-frequency modulation in communication devices. Yet many of the unique properties of these systems are poorly understood and remain unexplored. Here we report a numerical study of hopping conductivity of the lateral network of capacitors, which models two-dimensional insulators, and demonstrate that 2D long-range Coulomb interactions lead to peculiar size effects. We find that the characteristic energy governing electronic transport scales logarithmically with either system size or electrostatic screening length depending on which one is shorter. Our results are relevant well beyond their immediate context, explaining, for example, recent experimental observations of logarithmic size dependence of electric conductivity of thin superconducting films in the critical vicinity of superconductor-insulator transition where a giant dielectric constant develops. Our findings mark a radical departure from the orthodox view of conductivity in 2D systems as a local characteristic of materials and establish its macroscopic global character as a generic property of high-dielectric constant 2D nanomaterials.

  18. Time constant determination for electrical equivalent of biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Ashutosh Kumar; Dutta-Gupta, Shourya; Kumar, Ravi; Tewari, Abhishek; Basu, Bikramjit

    2009-04-01

    The electric field interactions with biological cells are of significant interest in various biophysical and biomedical applications. In order to study such important aspect, it is necessary to evaluate the time constant in order to estimate the response time of living cells in the electric field (E-field). In the present study, the time constant is evaluated by considering the hypothesis of electrical analog of spherical shaped cells and assuming realistic values for capacitance and resistivity properties of cell/nuclear membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus. In addition, the resistance of cytoplasm and nucleoplasm was computed based on simple geometrical considerations. Importantly, the analysis on the basis of first principles shows that the average values of time constant would be around 2-3 μs, assuming the theoretical capacitance values and the analytically computed resistance values. The implication of our analytical solution has been discussed in reference to the cellular adaptation processes such as atrophy/hypertrophy as well as the variation in electrical transport properties of cellular membrane/cytoplasm/nuclear membrane/nucleoplasm.

  19. Gladstone-Dale constant for CF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burner, A. W., Jr.; Goad, W. K.

    1980-05-01

    The Gladstone-Dale constant, which relates the refractive index to density, was measured for CF4 by counting fringes of a two-beam interferometer, one beam of which passes through a cell containing the test gas. The experimental approach and sources of systematic and imprecision errors are discussed. The constant for CF4 was measured at several wavelengths in the visible region of the spectrum. A value of 0.122 cu cm/g with an uncertainty of plus or minus 0.001 cu cm/g was determined for use in the visible region. A procedure for noting the departure of the gas density from the ideal-gas law is discussed.

  20. On determining dose rate constants spectroscopically

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, M.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To investigate several aspects of the Chen and Nath spectroscopic method of determining the dose rate constants of {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds [Z. Chen and R. Nath, Phys. Med. Biol. 55, 6089-6104 (2010)] including the accuracy of using a line or dual-point source approximation as done in their method, and the accuracy of ignoring the effects of the scattered photons in the spectra. Additionally, the authors investigate the accuracy of the literature's many different spectra for bare, i.e., unencapsulated {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd sources. Methods: Spectra generated by 14 {sup 125}I and 6 {sup 103}Pd seeds were calculated in vacuo at 10 cm from the source in a 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 0.05 cm{sup 3} voxel using the EGSnrc BrachyDose Monte Carlo code. Calculated spectra used the initial photon spectra recommended by AAPM's TG-43U1 and NCRP (National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements) Report 58 for the {sup 125}I seeds, or TG-43U1 and NNDC(2000) (National Nuclear Data Center, 2000) for {sup 103}Pd seeds. The emitted spectra were treated as coming from a line or dual-point source in a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the dose rate constant. The TG-43U1 definition of the dose rate constant was used. These calculations were performed using the full spectrum including scattered photons or using only the main peaks in the spectrum as done experimentally. Statistical uncertainties on the air kerma/history and the dose rate/history were Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 0.2%. The dose rate constants were also calculated using Monte Carlo simulations of the full seed model. Results: The ratio of the intensity of the 31 keV line relative to that of the main peak in {sup 125}I spectra is, on average, 6.8% higher when calculated with the NCRP Report 58 initial spectrum vs that calculated with TG-43U1 initial spectrum. The {sup 103}Pd spectra exhibit an average 6.2% decrease in the 22.9 keV line relative to the main peak when

  1. Constant envelope chirped OFDM power efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dida, Mussa A.; Hao, Huan; Anjum, M. R.; Ran, Tao

    2016-10-01

    Fractional Fourier OFDM or simply chirped OFDM performs better in time-frequency selective channel than its convectional OFDM. Although chirped OFDM outperforms OFDM it still inherits Peak to Average Power Ratio (PAPR) drawback as a convectional OFDM. To eliminate PAPR drawback Constant Envelope OFDM was developed and for better performance in time frequency selective channel Constant Envelope Fractional Fourier OFDM (CE-COFDM) is used. Its BER performance is analyzed and compared to chirped OFDM and OFDM in AWGN and Rayleigh channel. The simulations show the BER performance of CE-COFDM is the same as chirped OFDM and OFDM. The power efficiency of CE-COFDM is also studied and different simulations performed shows CE-COFDM is more power efficient than chirped OFDM and convectional OFDM for class A and class B Linear Power Amplifier (LPA).

  2. BOREAS RSS-17 Dielectric Constant Profile Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); McDonald, Kyle C.; Zimmerman, Reiner; Way, JoBea

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-17 team acquired and analyzed imaging radar data from the ESA's ERS-1 over a complete annual cycle at the BOREAS sites in Canada in 1994 to detect shifts in radar backscatter related to varying environmental conditions. This data set consists of dielectric constant profile measurements from selected trees at various BOREAS flux tower sites. The relative dielectric constant was measured at C-band (frequency = 5 GHz) as a function of depth into the trunk of three trees at each site, Measurements were made during April 1994 with an Applied Microwave Corporation field PDP fitted with a 0.358-cm (0.141-inch) diameter coaxial probe tip. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  3. Some Dynamical Effects of the Cosmological Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axenides, M.; Floratos, E. G.; Perivolaropoulos, L.

    Newton's law gets modified in the presence of a cosmological constant by a small repulsive term (antigravity) that is proportional to the distance. Assuming a value of the cosmological constant consistent with the recent SnIa data (Λ~=10-52 m-2), we investigate the significance of this term on various astrophysical scales. We find that on galactic scales or smaller (less than a few tens of kpc), the dynamical effects of the vacuum energy are negligible by several orders of magnitude. On scales of 1 Mpc or larger however we find that the vacuum energy can significantly affect the dynamics. For example we show that the velocity data in the local group of galaxies correspond to galactic masses increased by 35% in the presence of vacuum energy. The effect is even more important on larger low density systems like clusters of galaxies or superclusters.

  4. Fast Constant Weight Codeword to Index Converter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Side_channel_attack. [5] D. E. Knuth , The Art of Computer Programming, “Generating all com- binations and partitions,” Vol. 4...Fast Constant Weight Codeword to Index Converter J. T. Butler T. Sasao Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Department of Computer ...represen- tation. The middle column shows how this value is computed according to (1). The rightmost column of Table I shows the corresponding 6 bit

  5. Mars Pathfinder Project: Planetary Constants and Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Robin

    1995-01-01

    This document provides a common set of astrodynamic constants and planetary models for use by the Mars Pathfinder Project. It attempts to collect in a single reference all the quantities and models in use across the project during development and for mission operations. These models are central to the navigation and mission design functions, but they are also used in other aspects of the project such as science observation planning and data reduction.

  6. Gravitational constant in multiple field gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Abedi, Habib; Abbassi, Amir M. E-mail: amabasi@khayam.ut.ac.ir

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, we consider general form of the Lagrangian  f(R, φ{sup I}, X) , that is a function of the Ricci scalar, multiple scalar fields and non-canonical kinetic terms. We obtain the effective Newton's constant deep inside the Hubble radius. We use Jordan and Einstein frames, and study the conservation of energy-momentum tensor.

  7. High Dielectric Constant Polymer Film Capacitors (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    film, and the test of our first generation prototype capacitors . High-K Polymeric Dielectrics Commercial polypropylene (PP) capacitor film has a...1994). 2. Maurizio Rabuffi and Guido Picci, “Status Quo and Future Prospects for Metallized Polypropylene Energy Storage Capacitors ”, IEEE Trans...AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2010-2126 HIGH DIELECTRIC CONSTANT POLYMER FILM CAPACITORS (PREPRINT) Shihai Zhang, Brian Zellers, Dean Anderson, Paul

  8. On the coexistence of copper-molybdenum bronzes: Cu{sub x}MoO{sub 3} (0.2 < x < 0.25; typically x {approx} 0.23) and Cu{sub y}MoO{sub 3-z} (0.1 < y < 0.2; typically y {approx} 0.15) in the Cu-MoO{sub 2}-O quasi-ternary system

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, T.E.; Skou, E.M.

    2010-11-15

    Two copper-molybdenum bronzes: Cu{sub y}MoO{sub 3-z} (0.1 < y < 0.2; typically y {approx} 0.15) and Cu{sub x}MoO{sub 3} (0.2 < x < 0.25; typically x {approx} 0.23) were prepared as glistening black polycrystalline materials by the solid state reaction of Cu and MoO{sub 3} at 600 {sup o}C under argon in Pt crucibles. Powder XRD showed that the material with global composition '0.1Cu.MoO{sub 3}' comprises {approx}Cu{sub 0.15}MoO{sub 3} and MoO{sub 3}; whilst '0.2Cu.MoO{sub 3}' comprises {approx}Cu{sub 0.15}MoO{sub 3} and {approx}Cu{sub 0.23}MoO{sub 3}. DTA performed on '0.2Cu.MoO{sub 3}' reveals a reversible solid state phase transition {approx}520 {sup o}C under argon. Reacting equimolar amounts of Cu{sub 2}O and MoO{sub 2} at 600 {sup o}C in a Cu crucible under argon yields: Cu{sub 6}Mo{sub 5}O{sub 18}, Cu and MoO{sub 2}. A tentative subsolidus Cu-MoO{sub 2}-O isothermal ({approx}25 {sup o}C) phase diagram under argon is drawn from these data. Oxidation states of Cu and Mo within this system are discussed.

  9. Borehole measurement of the Newtonian gravitational constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsui, Albert T.

    1987-08-01

    Gravimetric measurements in a borehole within the Michigan Basin, obtained in September 1983, were utilized to estimate the Newtonian gravitational constant. Gravitational constants are computed using gravity measurements from two stations along the same vertical and by knowing the total rock mass sandwiched between these two stations. The calculation of rock formation density using a gamma-gamma density log is described. The gravity values are analyzed in terms of reference surface values, and it is observed that the gravity increases with depth. Borehole measurement determined gravity constant values ranged from 6.6901 + or - 0.0668 x 10 to the -11th cu m/kg sec sq (at station separation 264.5 + or - 0.5 m) to 6.7000 + or - 0.0650 x 10 to the -11th cu m/kg sec sq (at 1163.5 + or - 0.5 m), which are higher than the laboratory value of Luther and Towler (1982) of 6.672 + or - 0.0004 x 10 to the -11th cu m/kg sec sq. It is noted that the data correlate well with the values of Stacey (1981).

  10. Cosmological constant, near brane behavior and singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautason, Fridrik Freyr; Junghans, Daniel; Zagermann, Marco

    2013-09-01

    We show that the classical cosmological constant in type II flux compactifications can be written as a sum of terms from the action of localized sources plus a specific contribution from non-trivial background fluxes. Exploiting two global scaling symmetries of the classical supergravity action, we find that the flux contribution can in many interesting cases be set to zero such that the cosmological constant is fully determined by the boundary conditions of the fields in the near-source region. This generalizes and makes more explicit previous arguments in the literature. We then discuss the problem of putting -branes at the tip of the Klebanov-Strassler throat glued to a compact space in type IIB string theory so as to engineer a de Sitter solution. Our result for the cosmological constant and a simple global argument indicate that inserting a fully localized and backreacting -brane into such a background yields a singular energy density for the NSNS and RR 3-form field strengths at the -brane. This argument does not rely on partial smearing of the -brane or a linearization of field equations, but on a few general assumptions that we also discuss carefully.

  11. Emergent gravity in spaces of constant curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Orlando; Haddad, Matthew

    2017-03-01

    In physical theories where the energy (action) is localized near a submanifold of a constant curvature space, there is a universal expression for the energy (or the action). We derive a multipole expansion for the energy that has a finite number of terms, and depends on intrinsic geometric invariants of the submanifold and extrinsic invariants of the embedding of the submanifold. This is the second of a pair of articles in which we try to develop a theory of emergent gravity arising from the embedding of a submanifold into an ambient space equipped with a quantum field theory. Our theoretical method requires a generalization of a formula due to by Hermann Weyl. While the first paper discussed the framework in Euclidean (Minkowski) space, here we discuss how this framework generalizes to spaces of constant sectional curvature. We focus primarily on anti de Sitter space. We then discuss how such a theory can give rise to a cosmological constant and Planck mass that are within reasonable bounds of the experimental values.

  12. Time constants of flat superconducting cables

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, S.; Yamamoto, J.

    1997-06-01

    The frequency dependence of coupling losses is calculated for flat superconducting cables, including the electromagnetic coupling between different current loops on the cable. It is shown that there are two characteristic time constants for both parallel and transverse coupling losses. The values of these time constants {tau}{sub 0} and {tau}{sub 1} are calculated by introducing effective inductances for the current loops. In both cases, {tau}{sub 1} is considerably smaller than {tau}{sub 0}. As the most important methods of determining {tau}{sub 0} from AC losses - namely, the limiting slope of loss/cycle at zero frequency and the position of the maximum loss/cycle vs. frequency - estimate {tau}{sub 0} and {tau}{sub 1}, respectively, the results are important for practical measurements and evaluation of time constants from AC losses. At larger frequencies, the losses are more likely to those in normal conductors (skin effect). The calculation schemes can be applied to cables with closely wound strands (like the cable-in-conduit conductors), too. However, several other effects should be considered being different and/or more important with respect to other cable types (demagnetization factor of strands and cables, larger regions near the cable edges, smaller number of strands and subcables, etc.).

  13. Constant load and constant volume response of municipal solid waste in simple shear.

    PubMed

    Zekkos, Dimitrios; Fei, Xunchang

    2016-09-28

    Constant load and constant volume simple shear testing was conducted on relatively fresh municipal solid waste (MSW) from two landfills in the United States, one in Michigan and a second in Texas, at respective natural moisture content below field capacity. The results were assessed in terms of two failure strain criteria, at 10% and 30% shear strain, and two interpretations of effective friction angle. Overall, friction angle obtained assuming that the failure plane is horizontal and at 10% shear strain resulted in a conservative estimation of shear strength of MSW. Comparisons between constant volume and constant load simple shear testing results indicated significant differences in the shear response of MSW with the shear resistance in constant volume being lower than the shear resistance in constant load. The majority of specimens were nearly uncompacted during specimen preparation to reproduce the state of MSW in bioreactor landfills or in uncontrolled waste dumps. The specimens had identical percentage of <20mm material but the type of <20mm material was different. The <20mm fraction from Texas was finer and of high plasticity. MSW from Texas was overall weaker in both constant load and constant volume conditions compared to Michigan waste. The results of these tests suggest the possibility of significantly lower shear strength of MSW in bioreactor landfills where waste is placed with low compaction effort and constant volume, i.e., "undrained", conditions may occur. Compacted MSW specimens resulted in shear strength parameters that are higher than uncompacted specimens and closer to values reported in the literature. However, the normalized undrained shear strength in simple shear for uncompacted and compacted MSW was still higher than the normalized undrained shear strength reported in the literature for clayey and silty soils.

  14. Rate constants from instanton theory via a microcanonical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Sean R.; Löhle, Andreas; Kästner, Johannes

    2017-02-01

    Microcanonical instanton theory offers the promise of providing rate constants for chemical reactions including quantum tunneling of atoms over the whole temperature range. We discuss different rate expressions, which require the calculation of stability parameters of the instantons. The traditional way of obtaining these stability parameters is shown to be numerically unstable in practical applications. We provide three alternative algorithms to obtain such stability parameters for non-separable systems, i.e., systems in which the vibrational modes perpendicular to the instanton path couple to movement along the path. We show the applicability of our algorithms on two molecular systems: H2 + OH → H2O + H using a fitted potential energy surface and HNCO + H → NH2CO using a potential obtained on-the-fly from density functional calculations.

  15. New improved massive gravity and three-dimensional spacetimes of constant curvature and constant torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dereli, Tekin; Yetişmişoǧlu, Cem

    2016-09-01

    We derive the field equations for topologically massive gravity coupled with the most general quadratic curvature terms using the language of exterior differential forms and a first order constrained variational principle. We find variational field equations both in the presence and absence of torsion. We then show that spaces of constant negative curvature (i.e. the anti-de Sitter space AdS3) and constant torsion provide exact solutions.

  16. History and progress on accurate measurements of the Planck constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Richard

    2013-01-01

    techniques and discoveries in quantum mechanics steadily reduced the uncertainty of h. The central part of this review describes the technical details of the watt balance technique, which is a combination of the mechanical and electronic measurements that now determine h as a direct result, i.e. not requiring measured values of additional fundamental constants. The first technical section describes the basics and some of the common details of many watt balance designs. Next is a review of the ongoing advances at the (currently) seven national metrology institutions where these experiments are pursued. A final summary of the recent h determinations of the last two decades shows how history keeps repeating itself; there is again a question of whether there is a shift in the newest results, albeit at uncertainties that are many orders of magnitude less than the original experiments. The conclusion is that there is room for further development to resolve these differences and find new ideas for a watt balance system with a more universal application. Since the next generation of watt balance experiments are expected to become kilogram realization standards, the historical record suggests that there is yet a need for proof that Planck constant results are finally reproducible at an acceptable uncertainty.

  17. History and progress on accurate measurements of the Planck constant.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Richard

    2013-01-01

    improved techniques and discoveries in quantum mechanics steadily reduced the uncertainty of h. The central part of this review describes the technical details of the watt balance technique, which is a combination of the mechanical and electronic measurements that now determine h as a direct result, i.e. not requiring measured values of additional fundamental constants. The first technical section describes the basics and some of the common details of many watt balance designs. Next is a review of the ongoing advances at the (currently) seven national metrology institutions where these experiments are pursued. A final summary of the recent h determinations of the last two decades shows how history keeps repeating itself; there is again a question of whether there is a shift in the newest results, albeit at uncertainties that are many orders of magnitude less than the original experiments. The conclusion is that there is room for further development to resolve these differences and find new ideas for a watt balance system with a more universal application. Since the next generation of watt balance experiments are expected to become kilogram realization standards, the historical record suggests that there is yet a need for proof that Planck constant results are finally reproducible at an acceptable uncertainty.

  18. Elucidation of constant current density molecular plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vascon, A.; Santi, S.; Isse, A. A.; Reich, T.; Drebert, J.; Christ, H.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.

    2012-12-01

    The production of thin layers by means of constant current or constant voltage electrolysis in organic media is commonly known as molecular plating. Despite the fact that this method has been applied for decades and is known to be among the most efficient ones for obtaining quantitative deposition, a full elucidation of the molecular plating is still lacking. In order to get a general understanding of the process and hence set the basis for further improvements of the method, constant current density electrolysis experiments were carried out in a mixture of isopropanol and isobutanol containing millimolar amounts of HNO3 together with [Nd(NO3)3·6H2O] used as a model electrolyte. The process was investigated by considering the influence of different parameters, namely the electrolyte concentrations (i.e., Nd(NO3)3·6H2O: 0.11, 0.22, 0.44 mM, and HNO3: 0.3, 0.4 mM), the applied current (i.e., 2 mA and 6 mA), and the surface roughness of the deposition substrates (i.e., a few tens to several hundreds of nm). The response of the process to changes of these parameters was monitored recording cell potential curves, which showed to be strongly influenced by the investigated conditions. The produced layers were characterized using γ-ray spectroscopy for the evaluation of Nd deposition yields, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for chemical analysis of the surfaces, and atomic force microscopy for surface roughness evaluation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results clearly indicate that Nd is present only as Nd3+ on the cathodic surface after molecular plating. The results obtained from this characterization and some basic features inferred from the study of the cell potential curves were used to interpret the different behaviours of the deposition processes as a consequence of the applied variables.

  19. Frequency-constant Q, unity and disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Hargreaves, N.D.

    1995-12-31

    In exploration geophysics we obtain information about the earth by observing its response to different types of applied force. The response can cover the full range of possible Q values (where Q, the quality factor, is a measure of energy dissipation), from close to infinity in the case of deep crustal seismic to close to 0 in the case of many electromagnetic methods. When Q is frequency-constant, however, the various types of response have a common scaling behavior and can be described as being self-affine. The wave-equation then takes on a generalised form, changing from the standard wave-equation at Q = {infinity} to the diffusion equation at Q = 0, via lossy, diffusive, propagation at intermediate Q values. Solutions of this wave-diffusion equation at any particular Q value can be converted to an equivalent set of results for any other Q value. In particular it is possible to convert from diffusive to wave propagation by a mapping from Q < {infinity} to Q = {infinity}. In the context of seismic sounding this is equivalent to applying inverse Q-filtering; in a more general context the mapping integrates different geophysical observations by referencing them to the common result at Q = {infinity}. The self-affinity of the observations for frequency-constant Q is an expression of scale invariance in the fundamental physical properties of the medium of propagation, this being the case whether the mechanism of diffusive propagation is scattering of intrinsic attenuation. Scale invariance, or fractal scaling, is a general property of disordered systems; the assumption of frequency-constant Q not only implies a unity between different geophysical observations, but also suggests that it is the disordered nature of the earth`s sub-surface that is the unifying factor.

  20. Axionic band structure of the cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    We argue that theories with multiple axions generically contain a large number of vacua that can account for the smallness of the cosmological constant. In a theory with N axions, the dominant instantons with charges 풬 determine the discrete symmetry of vacua. Subleading instantons break the leading periodicity and lift the vacuum degeneracy. For generic integer charges the number of distinct vacua is given by √{det (풬⊤풬 ) }∝eN. Our construction motivates the existence of a landscape with a vast number of vacua in a large class of four-dimensional effective theories.

  1. Optical constants of minerals and rocks.

    PubMed

    Aronson, J R; Strong, P F

    1975-12-01

    Lorentz line parameters (and estimates of their standard deviations) have been empirically derived from measured reflectance data for muscovite mica, an anorthosite, a diopsidic pyroxenite, an almandite-pyrope garnet, and a soda lime glass. These parameters provide a useful starting point for computer calculations requiring optical constants as a function of frequency and are therefore given here. A novel method of fitting the reflectance data by least squares is described in detail, as is the statistical procedure for estimating the standard deviations of the parameters found.

  2. TASI Lectures on the cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Bousso, Raphael

    2007-08-30

    The energy density of the vacuum, Lambda, is at least 60 orders of magnitude smaller than several known contributions to it. Approaches to this problem are tightly constrained by data ranging from elementary observations to precision experiments. Absent overwhelming evidence to the contrary, dark energy can only be interpreted as vacuum energy, so the venerable assumption that Lambda=0 conflicts with observation. The possibility remains that Lambda is fundamentally variable, though constant over large spacetime regions. This can explain the observed value, but only in a theory satisfying a number of restrictive kinematic and dynamical conditions. String theory offers a concrete realization through its landscape of metastable vacua.

  3. Radiation balances and the solar constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crommelynck, D.

    1981-01-01

    The radiometric concepts are defined in order to consider various types of radiation balances and relate them to the diabetic form of the energy balance. Variability in space and time of the components of the radiation field are presented. A specific concept for sweeping which is tailored to the requirements is proposed. Finally, after establishing the truncated character of the present knowledge of the radiation balance. The results of the last observations of the solar constant are given. Ground and satellite measurement techniques are discussed.

  4. Solitons in curved space of constant curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Batz, Sascha; Peschel, Ulf

    2010-05-15

    We consider spatial solitons as, for example, self-confined optical beams in spaces of constant curvature, which are a natural generalization of flat space. Due to the symmetries of these spaces we are able to define respective dynamical parameters, for example, velocity and position. For positively curved space we find stable multiple-hump solitons as a continuation from the linear modes. In the case of negatively curved space we show that no localized solution exists and a bright soliton will always decay through a nonlinear tunneling process.

  5. Constant-Elasticity-of-Substitution Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiter, G.

    1986-01-01

    Program simulates constant elasticity-of-substitution (CES) production function. CES function used by economic analysts to examine production costs as well as uncertainties in production. User provides such input parameters as price of labor, price of capital, and dispersion levels. CES minimizes expected cost to produce capital-uncertainty pair. By varying capital-value input, one obtains series of capital-uncertainty pairs. Capital-uncertainty pairs then used to generate several cost curves. CES program menu driven and features specific print menu for examining selected output curves. Program written in BASIC for interactive execution and implemented on IBM PC-series computer.

  6. Low-Cost Constant Temperature Heating Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevlin, Charles G.; Coppersmith, Ward; Fish, Christopher; Vlock, Stanley; Vellema, William

    1997-08-01

    A simple constant temperature heat block was constructed from readily available materials. The configuration of the heating block can be constructed to meet the needs of any laboratory. Some highlights of this temperature controller include the elimination of dangerous flames and cumbersome water baths, maintenance of temperature over a wide range within 1 °C and compact electronics. In addition, the IC power supply circuit is self-contained thus eliminating the need for bulky transformers and additional power related circuitry. Secondary school and undergraduate laboratories can build many units for the cost of a commercially comparable one while simultaneously putting to practice several electronic principles taught in most instrumental analysis courses.

  7. Information carrying capacity of a cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simidzija, Petar; Martín-Martínez, Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the exchange of information in different cosmological backgrounds when sender and receiver are timelike separated and communicate through massless fields (without the exchange of light signals). Remarkably, we show that the dominance of a cosmological constant makes the amount of recoverable information imprinted in the field by the sender extremely resilient: it does not decay in time or with the spatial separation of the sender and receiver, and it actually increases with the rate of expansion of the Universe. This is in stark contrast with the information carried by conventional light signals and with previous results on timelike communication through massless fields in matter-dominated cosmologies.

  8. Rugged constant-temperature thermal anemometer.

    PubMed

    Palma, J; Labbé, R

    2016-12-01

    Here we report a robust thermal anemometer which can be easily built. It was conceived to measure outdoor wind speeds and for airspeed monitoring in wind tunnels and other indoor uses. It works at a constant, low temperature of approximately 90 °C, so that an independent measurement of the air temperature is required to give a correct speed reading. Despite the size and high thermal inertia of the probe, the test results show that this anemometer is capable of measuring turbulent fluctuations up to ∼100 Hz in winds of ∼14 m/s, which corresponds to a scale similar to the length of the probe.

  9. On inflation, cosmological constant, and SUSY breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Linde, Andrei

    2016-11-02

    We consider a broad class of inflationary models of two unconstrained chiral superfields, the stabilizer S and the inflaton Φ, which can describe inflationary models with nearly arbitrary potentials. These models include, in particular, the recently introduced theories of cosmological attractors, which provide an excellent fit to the latest Planck data. We show that by adding to the superpotential of the fields S and Φ a small term depending on a nilpotent chiral superfield P one can break SUSY and introduce a small cosmological constant without affecting main predictions of the original inflationary scenario.

  10. On inflation, cosmological constant, and SUSY breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linde, Andrei

    2016-11-01

    We consider a broad class of inflationary models of two unconstrained chiral superfields, the stabilizer S and the inflaton Φ, which can describe inflationary models with nearly arbitrary potentials. These models include, in particular, the recently introduced theories of cosmological attractors, which provide an excellent fit to the latest Planck data. We show that by adding to the superpotential of the fields S and Φ a small term depending on a nilpotent chiral superfield P one can break SUSY and introduce a small cosmological constant without affecting main predictions of the original inflationary scenario.

  11. Solution strategies for constant acceleration problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheaton, S. M.; Binder, P.-M.

    2017-03-01

    We discuss strategies for the general solution of single-step 1D constant acceleration problems. In a slightly restricted form, these problems have five variables (Δx, v 0, v, a and t) and two independent equations, so three variables must be given to solve for the other two, giving 10 cases. Instead of the haphazard solution of individual problems, we advocate teaching a strategy for tackling the entire class of problems. We enumerate the possible strategies, and present in detail one which reveals a number of interesting special cases and also allows the possibility of developing an automatic problem generator and solver.

  12. Infrared Spectra and Optical Constants of Nitrile Ices Relevant to Titan's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Carrie; Ferrante, Robert F.; Moore, W. James; Hudson, Reggie; Moore, Marla H.

    2011-01-01

    Spectra and optical constants of nitrile ices known or suspected to be in Titan?s atmosphere have been determined from 2.0 to 333.3 microns (approx.5000 to 30/cm). These results are relevant to the ongoing modeling of Cassini CIRS observations of Titan?s winter pole. Ices studied were: HCN, hydrogen cyanide; C2N2, cyanogen; CH3CN, acetonitrile; C2H5CN, propionitrile; and HC3N, cyanoacetylene. Optical constants were calculated, using Kramers-Kronig analysis, for each nitrile ice?s spectrum measured at a variety of temperatures, in both the amorphous- and crystalline phases. Spectra were also measured for many of the nitriles after quenching at the annealing temperature and compared with those of annealed ices. For each of these molecules we also measured the real component, n, of the refractive index for amorphous and crystalline phases at 670 nm. Several examples of the information contained in these new data sets and their usefulness in modeling Titan?s observed features will be presented (e.g., the broad emission feature at 160/cm; Anderson and Samuelson, 2011).

  13. A monolithic constant-fraction discriminator using distributed R-C delay-line shaping

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, M.L.; Young, G.R.; Xu, M.

    1995-06-01

    A monolithic, CMOS, constant-fraction discriminator (CFD) was fabricated in the Orbit Semiconductor, 1.2 {mu} N-well process. This circuit uses an on-chip, distributed, R-C delay-line to realize the constant-fraction shaping. The delay-line is constructed from a narrow, 500-{mu} serpentine layer of polysilicon above a wide, grounded, second layer of polysilicon. This R-C delay-line generates about 1.1 ns of delay for 5 ns risetime signals with a slope degradation of only {approx_equal} 15% and an amplitude reduction of about 6.1%. The CFD also features an automatic walk adjustment. The entire circuit, including the delay line, has a 200 {mu} pitch and is 950 {mu} long. The walk for a 5 ns risetime signal was measured as {plus_minus} 100 ps over the 100:1 dynamic range from {minus}15 mV to {minus}1.5 mV. to {minus}1.5 V. The CFD consumes 15 mW.

  14. Time constants in thermal laser medicine: II. Distributions of time constants and thermal relaxation of tissue.

    PubMed

    van Gemert, M J; Lucassen, G W; Welch, A J

    1996-08-01

    The thermal response of a semi-infinite medium in air, irradiated by laser light in a cylindrical geometry, cannot accurately be approximately by single radial and axial time constants for heat conduction. This report presents an analytical analysis of hear conduction where the thermal response is expressed in terms of distributions over radial and axial time constants. The source term for heat production is written as the product of a Gaussian shaped radial term and an exponentially shaped axial term. The two terms are expanded in integrals over eigenfunctions of the radial and axial parts of the Laplace heat conduction operator. The result is a double integral over the coupled distributions of the two time constants to compute the temperature rise as a function of time and of axial and radial positions. The distribution of axial time constants is a homogeneous slowly decreasing function of spatial frequency (v) indicating that one single axial time constant cannot reasonably characterize axial heat conduction. The distribution of radial time constants is a function centred around a distinguished maximum in the spatial frequency (lambda) close to the single radial time constant value used previously. This suggests that one radial time constant to characterize radial heat conduction may be a useful concept. Special cases have been evaluated analytically, such as short and long irradiation times, axial or radial heat conduction (shallow or deep penetrating laser beams) and, especially, thermal relaxation (cooling) of the tissue. For shallow penetrating laser beams the asymptotic cooling rate is confirmed to be proportional to [(t)0.5-(t-tL)0.5] which approaches 1/t0.5 for t > tL, where t is the time and tL is the laser pulse duration. For deep penetrating beams this is proportional to 1/(t-tL). For intermediate penetration, i.e. penetration depths about equal to spot size diameters, this is proportional to 1/(t-tL)1.5. The double integral has been evaluated

  15. THE SLOW DEATH (OR REBIRTH?) OF EXTENDED STAR FORMATION IN z {approx} 0.1 GREEN VALLEY EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jerome J.; Faber, S. M.; Graves, Genevieve J.; Rich, R. Michael

    2012-12-10

    UV observations in the local universe have uncovered a population of early-type galaxies with UV flux consistent with low-level recent or ongoing star formation. Understanding the origin of such star formation remains an open issue. We present resolved UV-optical photometry of a sample of 19 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) early-type galaxies at z {approx} 0.1 drawn from the sample originally selected by Salim and Rich to lie in the bluer part of the green valley in the UV-optical color-magnitude diagram as measured by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). Utilizing high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) far-UV imaging provides unique insight into the distribution of UV light in these galaxies, which we call ''extended star-forming early-type galaxies'' (ESF-ETGs) because of extended UV emission that is indicative of recent star formation. The UV-optical color profiles of all ESF-ETGs show red centers and blue outer parts. Their outer colors require the existence of a significant underlying population of older stars in the UV-bright regions. An analysis of stacked SDSS spectra reveals weak LINER-like emission in their centers. Using a cross-matched SDSS DR7/GALEX GR6 catalog, we search for other green valley galaxies with similar properties to these ESF-ETGs and estimate that Almost-Equal-To 13% of dust-corrected green valley galaxies of similar stellar mass and UV-optical color are likely ESF-candidates, i.e., ESF-ETGs are not rare. Our results are consistent with star formation that is gradually declining in existing disks, i.e., the ESF-ETGs are evolving onto the red sequence for the first time, or with rejuvenated star formation due to accreted gas in older disks provided that the gas does not disrupt the structure of the galaxy and the resulting star formation is not too recent and bursty. ESF-ETGs may typify an important subpopulation of galaxies that can linger in the green valley for up to several Gyrs, based on their resemblance to nearby gas

  16. RESOLVING THE DYNAMICAL MASS OF A z {approx} 1.3 QUASI-STELLAR OBJECT HOST GALAXY USING SINFONI AND LASER GUIDE STAR ASSISTED ADAPTIVE OPTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Inskip, K. J.; Jahnke, K.; Rix, H.-W.; Van de Ven, G.

    2011-10-01

    Recent studies of the tight scaling relations between the masses of supermassive black holes (BHs) and their host galaxies have suggested that in the past BHs constituted a larger fraction of their host galaxies' mass. However, these arguments are limited by selection effects and difficulties in determining robust host galaxy masses at high redshifts. Here we report the first results of a new, complementary diagnostic route: we directly determine a dynamical host galaxy mass for the z = 1.3 luminous quasar J090543.56+043347.3 through high spatial resolution (0.''47, 4 kpc FWHM) observations of the host galaxy gas kinematics over 30 x 40 kpc using the European Southern Observatory/Very Large Telescope/SINFONI with laser guide star adaptive optics. Combining our result of M{sub dyn} = 2.05{sup +1.68}{sub -0.74} x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} (within a radius 5.25 {+-} 1.05 kpc) with M{sub BH,MgII} = 9.02 {+-} 1.43 x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}, M{sub BH,H{alpha}} = 2.83{sup +1.93}{sub -1.13} x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}, we find that the ratio of BH mass to host galaxy dynamical mass for J090543.56+043347.3 matches the present-day relation for M{sub BH} versus M{sub Bulge,Dyn}, well within the IR scatter, and deviating at most by a factor of two from the mean. J090543.56+043347.3 displays clear signs of an ongoing tidal interaction and of spatially extended star formation at a rate of 50-100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, above the cosmic average for a galaxy of this mass and redshift. We argue that its subsequent evolution may move J090543.56+043347.3 even closer to the z = 0 relation for M{sub BH} versus M{sub Bulge,Dyn}. Our results support the picture in which any substantive evolution in these relations must occur prior to z {approx} 1.3. Having demonstrated the power of this modeling approach, we are currently analyzing similar data on seven further objects to better constrain such evolution.

  17. Large dielectric constant ({epsilon}/{epsilon}{sub 0}>6000) Ba{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 0.6}TiO{sub 3} thin films for high-performance microwave phase shifters

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, C. M.; Rivkin, T. V.; Parilla, P. A.; Perkins, J. D.; Ginley, D. S.; Kozyrev, A. B.; Oshadchy, V. N.; Pavlov, A. S.

    2000-04-03

    We deposited epitaxial Ba{sub 0.4}Sr{sub 0.6}TiO{sub 3} (BST) films via laser ablation on MgO and LaAlO{sub 3} (LAO) substrates for tunable microwave devices. Postdeposition anneals ({approx}1100 degree sign C in O{sub 2}) improved the morphology and overall dielectric properties of films on both substrates, but shifted the temperature of maximum dielectric constant (T{sub max}) up for BST/LAO and down for BST/MgO. These substrate-dependent T{sub max} shifts had opposite effects on the room-temperature dielectric properties. Overall, BST films on MgO had the larger maximum dielectric constant ({epsilon}/{epsilon}{sub 0}{>=}6000) and tunability ({delta}{epsilon}/{epsilon}{>=}65%), but these maxima occurred at 227 K. 30 GHz phase shifters made from similar films had figures of merit (ratio of maximum phase shift to insertion loss) of {approx}45 degree sign /dB and phase shifts of {approx}400 degree sign under 500 V ({approx}13 V/{mu}m) bias, illustrating their utility for many frequency-agile microwave devices. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Local Pain Dynamics during Constant Exhaustive Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Hristovski, Robert; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to delineate the topological dynamics of pain and discomfort during constant exercise performed until volitional exhaustion. Eleven physical education students were tested while cycling and running at a “hard” intensity level (e.g., corresponding to Borg’s RPE (6–20) = 15). During the tests, participants reported their discomfort and pain on a body map every 15s. “Time on task” for each participant was divided into five equal non-overlapping temporal windows within which their ratings were considered for analysis. The analyses revealed that the number of body locations with perceived pain and discomfort increased throughout the five temporal windows until reaching the mean (± SE) values of 4.2 ± 0.7 and 4.1 ± 0.6 in cycling and running, respectively. The dominant locations included the quadriceps and hamstrings during cycling and quadriceps and chest during running. In conclusion, pain seemed to spread throughout the body during constant cycling and running performed up to volitional exhaustion with differences between cycling and running in the upper body but not in the lower body dynamics. PMID:26421436

  19. Variable energy constant current accelerator structure

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1990-01-01

    A variable energy, constant current ion beam accelerator structure is disclosed comprising an ion source capable of providing the desired ions, a pre-accelerator for establishing an initial energy level, a matching/pumping module having means for focusing means for maintaining the beam current, and at least one main accelerator module for continuing beam focus, with means capable of variably imparting acceleration to the beam so that a constant beam output current is maintained independent of the variable output energy. In a preferred embodiment, quadrupole electrodes are provided in both the matching/pumping module and the one or more accelerator modules, and are formed using four opposing cylinder electrodes which extend parallel to the beam axis and are spaced around the beam at 90.degree. intervals with opposing electrodes maintained at the same potential. Adjacent cylinder electrodes of the quadrupole structure are maintained at different potentials to thereby reshape the cross section of the charged particle beam to an ellipse in cross section at the mid point along each quadrupole electrode unit in the accelerator modules. The beam is maintained in focus by alternating the major axis of the ellipse along the x and y axis respectively at adjacent quadrupoles. In another embodiment, electrostatic ring electrodes may be utilized instead of the quadrupole electrodes.

  20. Constant domain-regulated antibody catalysis.

    PubMed

    Sapparapu, Gopal; Planque, Stephanie; Mitsuda, Yukie; McLean, Gary; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Paul, Sudhir

    2012-10-19

    Some antibodies contain variable (V) domain catalytic sites. We report the superior amide and peptide bond-hydrolyzing activity of the same heavy and light chain V domains expressed in the IgM constant domain scaffold compared with the IgG scaffold. The superior catalytic activity of recombinant IgM was evident using two substrates, a small model peptide that is hydrolyzed without involvement of high affinity epitope binding, and HIV gp120, which is recognized specifically by noncovalent means prior to the hydrolytic reaction. The catalytic activity was inhibited by an electrophilic phosphonate diester, consistent with a nucleophilic catalytic mechanism. All 13 monoclonal IgMs tested displayed robust hydrolytic activities varying over a 91-fold range, consistent with expression of the catalytic functions at distinct levels by different V domains. The catalytic activity of polyclonal IgM was superior to polyclonal IgG from the same sera, indicating that on average IgMs express the catalytic function at levels greater than IgGs. The findings indicate a favorable effect of the remote IgM constant domain scaffold on the integrity of the V-domain catalytic site and provide a structural basis for conceiving antibody catalysis as a first line immune function expressed at high levels prior to development of mature IgG class antibodies.

  1. Local constants of motion imply information propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesdorf, M.; Werner, A. H.; Goihl, M.; Eisert, J.; Brown, W.

    2015-11-01

    Interacting quantum many-body systems are expected to thermalize, in the sense that the evolution of local expectation values approaches a stationary value resembling a thermal ensemble. This intuition is notably contradicted in systems exhibiting many-body localisation (MBL). In stark contrast to the non-interacting case of Anderson localisation, the entanglement of states grows without limit over time, albeit slowly. In this work, we establish a novel link between quantum information theory and notions of condensed matter physics, capturing this phenomenon in the Heisenberg picture. We show that the mere existence of local constants of motion, often taken as the defining property of MBL, together with a generic spectrum of the Hamiltonian, is already sufficient to rigorously prove information propagation: these systems can be used to send a classical bit over arbitrary distances, in that the impact of a local perturbation can be detected arbitrarily far away. This counterintuitive result is compatible with and further corroborates the intuition of a slow entanglement growth following global quenches in MBL systems. We perform a detailed perturbation analysis of quasi-local constants of motion and also show that they indeed can be used to construct efficient spectral tensor networks, as recently suggested. Our results provide a detailed and at the same time model-independent picture of information propagation in MBL systems.

  2. Fundamental Approach to the Cosmological Constant Issue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Moshe

    We use a Riemannian four-dimensional presentation for gravitation in which the coordinates are distances and velocity rather than the traditional space and time. We solve the field equations and show that there are three possibilities for the Universe to expand. The theory describes the Universe as having a three-phase evolution with a decelerating expansion, followed by a constant and an accelerating expansion, and it predicts that the Universe is now in the latter phase. It is shown, assuming Ωm = 0.245, that the time at which the Universe goes over from a decelerating to an accelerating expansion, occurs at 8.5 Gyr ago, at which time the cosmic radiation temperature was 146K. Recent observations show that the Universe's growth is accelerating. Our theory confirms these recent experimental results. The theory predicts also that now there is a positive pressure in the Universe. Although the theory has no cosmological constant, we extract from it its equivalence and show that Λ = 1.934 × 10-35 s-2. This value of Λ is in excellent agreement with measurements. It is also shown that the three-dimensional space of the Universe is Euclidean, as the Boomerang experiment shows.

  3. Local Pain Dynamics during Constant Exhaustive Exercise.

    PubMed

    Slapsinskaite, Agne; Razon, Selen; Balagué Serre, Natàlia; Hristovski, Robert; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to delineate the topological dynamics of pain and discomfort during constant exercise performed until volitional exhaustion. Eleven physical education students were tested while cycling and running at a "hard" intensity level (e.g., corresponding to Borg's RPE (6-20) = 15). During the tests, participants reported their discomfort and pain on a body map every 15s. "Time on task" for each participant was divided into five equal non-overlapping temporal windows within which their ratings were considered for analysis. The analyses revealed that the number of body locations with perceived pain and discomfort increased throughout the five temporal windows until reaching the mean (± SE) values of 4.2 ± 0.7 and 4.1 ± 0.6 in cycling and running, respectively. The dominant locations included the quadriceps and hamstrings during cycling and quadriceps and chest during running. In conclusion, pain seemed to spread throughout the body during constant cycling and running performed up to volitional exhaustion with differences between cycling and running in the upper body but not in the lower body dynamics.

  4. A Constant-Force Resistive Exercise Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colosky, Paul; Ruttley, Tara

    2010-01-01

    A constant-force resistive exercise unit (CFREU) has been invented for use in both normal gravitational and microgravitational environments. In comparison with a typical conventional exercise machine, this CFREU weighs less and is less bulky: Whereas weight plates and associated bulky supporting structures are used to generate resistive forces in typical conventional exercise machines, they are not used in this CFREU. Instead, resistive forces are generated in this CFREU by relatively compact, lightweight mechanisms based on constant-torque springs wound on drums. Each such mechanism is contained in a module, denoted a resistive pack, that includes a shaft for making a torque connection to a cable drum. During a stroke of resistive exercise, the cable is withdrawn from the cable drum against the torque exerted by the resistance pack. The CFREU includes a housing, within which can be mounted one or more resistive pack(s). The CFREU also includes mechanisms for engaging any combination of (1) one or more resistive pack(s) and (2) one or more spring(s) within each resistive pack to obtain a desired level of resistance.

  5. Holographic dark energy with cosmological constant

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yazhou; Li, Nan; Zhang, Zhenhui; Li, Miao E-mail: mli@itp.ac.cn E-mail: zhangzhh@mail.ustc.edu.cn

    2015-08-01

    Inspired by the multiverse scenario, we study a heterotic dark energy model in which there are two parts, the first being the cosmological constant and the second being the holographic dark energy, thus this model is named the ΛHDE model. By studying the ΛHDE model theoretically, we find that the parameters d and Ω{sub hde} are divided into a few domains in which the fate of the universe is quite different. We investigate dynamical behaviors of this model, and especially the future evolution of the universe. We perform fitting analysis on the cosmological parameters in the ΛHDE model by using the recent observational data. We find the model yields χ{sup 2}{sub min}=426.27 when constrained by Planck+SNLS3+BAO+HST, comparable to the results of the HDE model (428.20) and the concordant ΛCDM model (431.35). At 68.3% CL, we obtain −0.07<Ω{sub Λ0}<0.68 and correspondingly 0.04<Ω{sub hde0}<0.79, implying at present there is considerable degeneracy between the holographic dark energy and cosmological constant components in the ΛHDE model.

  6. Constant-mesh, multiple-shaft transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Rea, J.E.; Mills, D.D.; Sewell, J.S.

    1992-04-21

    This patent describes a multiple-shaft, constant-mesh transmission adapted to establish selectively a reverse torque delivery path and a forward drive torque delivery path and having a torque input means including a torque input shaft, a mainshaft aligned with the input shaft, a countershaft geared to the input shaft in spaced, parallel relationship with respect to the mainshaft, a torque output shaft joined to the mainshaft; multiple mainshaft gear elements journalled on the main airshaft, multiple cluster gear elements carried by the countershaft in meshing engagement with the mainshaft gear elements, one of the cluster gear elements being rotatably journalled on the countershaft; a reverse idle gear, a reverse gear journalled on the countershaft, the reverse idler gear being in constant mesh with the reverse gear and one of the mainshaft gear elements; first clutch means for connecting selectively the reverse gear and the countershaft; second synchronizer clutch means for connecting selectively the one of the mainshaft gear elements to the mainshaft; and third synchronizer clutch means for selectively connecting another of the mainshaft gear elements to the mainshaft; the first clutch means being a double-acting clutch with a first common axially movable clutch element adapted upon movement in one axial direction to drivably connected the reverse gear to the countershaft and adapted upon movement in the opposite axial direction to connect the one cluster gear element to the countershaft.

  7. Holographic dark energy with cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yazhou; Li, Miao; Li, Nan; Zhang, Zhenhui

    2015-08-01

    Inspired by the multiverse scenario, we study a heterotic dark energy model in which there are two parts, the first being the cosmological constant and the second being the holographic dark energy, thus this model is named the ΛHDE model. By studying the ΛHDE model theoretically, we find that the parameters d and Ωhde are divided into a few domains in which the fate of the universe is quite different. We investigate dynamical behaviors of this model, and especially the future evolution of the universe. We perform fitting analysis on the cosmological parameters in the ΛHDE model by using the recent observational data. We find the model yields χ2min=426.27 when constrained by Planck+SNLS3+BAO+HST, comparable to the results of the HDE model (428.20) and the concordant ΛCDM model (431.35). At 68.3% CL, we obtain -0.07<ΩΛ0<0.68 and correspondingly 0.04<Ωhde0<0.79, implying at present there is considerable degeneracy between the holographic dark energy and cosmological constant components in the ΛHDE model.

  8. The load dependence of rate constants.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Sam

    2008-06-07

    As experimental techniques in biophysics have progressed at the single molecule level, there has been considerable interest in understanding how external mechanical influences (such as load) affect chemical reactions. The majority of biophysical studies investigating load-dependent kinetics use an equation where the rate constant exponentially depends on force, which is sometimes called Bell's equation. This equation requires the determination of two parameters that describe the potential energy-strain function: k(0), which is the reaction rate in the absence of load, and x(c), which is the difference in strain between the reactant and transition states. However, there have been theoretical studies based on Kramers' theory suggesting that the rate constant should have load-dependent pre-exponential terms and nonlinear load-dependent terms in the exponential. Kramers' theory requires an exact knowledge of the potential energy-strain function, which is in general not known for an experimental system. Here, we derive a general approximation of Kramers' theory where the potential energy-strain function is described by five parameters, which can, for small loads, be reduced to four-, three-, and finally to two parameters (Bell's equation). We then use an idealized physical system to validate our approximations to Kramers' theory and show how they can predict parameters of interest (such as k(0) and x(c)) better than Bell's equation. Finally, we show previously published experimental data that are not well fitted by Bell's equation but are adequately fitted by these more exact equations.

  9. Reaction rate constant for OH + HOONO/sub 2/. -->. products over the temperature range 246 to 324 K

    SciTech Connect

    Trevor, P.L.; Black, G.; Barker, J.R.

    1982-04-29

    Absolute bimolecular reaction rate constants for the title reaction have been determined for temperatures ranging from 246 to 324 K. The laser flash-photolysis resonance-fluorescence (LFPRF) technique was used to generate O(/sup 1/D) which reacted with H/sub 2/ and/or H/sub 2/O to produce OH radicals. The bimolecular rate constants for the title reaction showed no dependence on total (He) pressure over the range approx. 3 to 15 torr, and they did not depend upon initial (OH) or upon its mode of formation. The H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ impurity was explicitly measured in all experiments, and the rate constants were corrected for its contribution. A weighted least-squares analysis of the data obtained at nine temperatures (226 data points) gave the Arrhenius expression (k +- 1sigma) = (8.05 +- 5.69) x 10/sup -12/ exp (-193 +- 194/T) cm/sup 3/ s/sup -1/ with covariance 1.098 x 10/sup -9/. A simple weighted average (temperature independent) fits the data just as well, and when the effects of systematic errors are taken into account, our recommended rate constant is (k +- 2sigma) = (4.0 +- 1.6) x 10/sup -12/ cm/sup 3/ s/sup -1/.

  10. Search for a Variation of Fundamental Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubachs, W.

    2013-06-01

    Since the days of Dirac scientists have speculated about the possibility that the laws of nature, and the fundamental constants appearing in those laws, are not rock-solid and eternal but may be subject to change in time or space. Such a scenario of evolving constants might provide an answer to the deepest puzzle of contemporary science, namely why the conditions in our local Universe allow for extreme complexity: the fine-tuning problem. In the past decade it has been established that spectral lines of atoms and molecules, which can currently be measured at ever-higher accuracies, form an ideal test ground for probing drifting constants. This has brought this subject from the realm of metaphysics to that of experimental science. In particular the spectra of molecules are sensitive for probing a variation of the proton-electron mass ratio μ, either on a cosmological time scale, or on a laboratory time scale. A comparison can be made between spectra of molecular hydrogen observed in the laboratory and at a high redshift (z=2-3), using the Very Large Telescope (Paranal, Chile) and the Keck telescope (Hawaii). This puts a constraint on a varying mass ratio Δμ/μ at the 10^{-5} level. The optical work can also be extended to include CO molecules. Further a novel direction will be discussed: it was discovered that molecules exhibiting hindered internal rotation have spectral lines in the radio-spectrum that are extremely sensitive to a varying proton-electron mass ratio. Such lines in the spectrum of methanol were recently observed with the radio-telescope in Effelsberg (Germany). F. van Weerdenburg, M.T. Murphy, A.L. Malec, L. Kaper, W. Ubachs, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 180802 (2011). A. Malec, R. Buning, M.T. Murphy, N. Milutinovic, S.L. Ellison, J.X. Prochaska, L. Kaper, J. Tumlinson, R.F. Carswell, W. Ubachs, Mon. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc. 403, 1541 (2010). E.J. Salumbides, M.L. Niu, J. Bagdonaite, N. de Oliveira, D. Joyeux, L. Nahon, W. Ubachs, Phys. Rev. A 86, 022510

  11. Theoretical Evaluation of the Transient Response of Constant Head and Constant Flow-Rate Permeability Tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, M.; Takahashi, M.; Morin, R.H.; Esaki, T.

    1998-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented that compares the response characteristics of the constant head and the constant flowrate (flow pump) laboratory techniques for quantifying the hydraulic properties of geologic materials having permeabilities less than 10-10 m/s. Rigorous analytical solutions that describe the transient distributions of hydraulic gradient within a specimen are developed, and equations are derived for each method. Expressions simulating the inflow and outflow rates across the specimen boundaries during a constant-head permeability test are also presented. These solutions illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of each method, including insights into measurement accuracy and the validity of using Darcy's law under certain conditions. The resulting observations offer practical considerations in the selection of an appropriate laboratory test method for the reliable measurement of permeability in low-permeability geologic materials.

  12. Hawking temperature of constant curvature black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Ronggen; Myung, Yun Soo

    2011-05-15

    The constant curvature (CC) black holes are higher dimensional generalizations of Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black holes. It is known that these black holes have the unusual topology of M{sub D-1}xS{sup 1}, where D is the spacetime dimension and M{sub D-1} stands for a conformal Minkowski spacetime in D-1 dimensions. The unusual topology and time-dependence for the exterior of these black holes cause some difficulties to derive their thermodynamic quantities. In this work, by using a globally embedding approach, we obtain the Hawking temperature of the CC black holes. We find that the Hawking temperature takes the same form when using both the static and global coordinates. Also, it is identical to the Gibbons-Hawking temperature of the boundary de Sitter spaces of these CC black holes.

  13. Black holes and the positive cosmological constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Sourav

    2013-02-01

    We address some aspects of black hole spacetimes endowed with a positive cosmological constant, i.e. black holes located inside a cosmological event horizon. First we establish a general criterion for existence of cosmological event horizons. Using the geometrical set up built for this, we study classical black hole no hair theorems for both static and stationary axisymmetric spacetimes. We discuss cosmic Nielsen-Olesen strings as hair in Schwarzschild-de Sitter spacetime. We also give a general calculation for particle creation by a Killing horizon using complex path analysis and using this we study particle creation in Schwarzschild-de Sitter spacetime by both black hole and the cosmological event horizons.

  14. Induction synchrotron with a constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolbilov, G. V.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the possibility of accelerating charged particles in a "nearly constant" orbit in a timeconstant magnetic field is discussed. The closed trajectories of the accelerated particles are formed by azimuthally set short bending magnet sections, each comprised of two particle-deflecting magnetic dipoles in which the incidence and deflection angles do not depend on the particle energy. The sign-alternating focusing of the beam is carried out by the dipole fields and quadrupole lenses placed between the bending sections. The particles are accelerated by pulses of the electric field of the induction sections. The inductive pulses and the beam pulses are synchronized by a beam-transit time transducer. The stability of the longitudinal oscillations is determined by the shape of the top of the accelerating pulse. The nonresonance acceleration method does not require preaccelerators and boosters.

  15. Constant field gradient planar coupled cavity structure

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Yoon W.; Kustom, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    A cavity structure having at least two opposing planar housing members spaced apart to accommodate the passage of a particle beam through the structure between the members. Each of the housing members have a plurality of serially aligned hollows defined therein, and also passages, formed in the members, which interconnect serially adjacent hollows to provide communication between the hollows. The opposing planar housing members are spaced and aligned such that the hollows in one member cooperate with corresponding hollows in the other member to form a plurality of resonant cavities aligned along the particle beam within the cavity structure. To facilitate the obtaining of a constant field gradient within the cavity structure, the passages are configured so as to be incrementally narrower in the direction of travel of the particle beam. In addition, the spacing distance between the opposing housing members is configured to be incrementally smaller in the direction of travel of the beam.

  16. Constant field gradient planar coupled cavity structure

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Y.W.; Kustom, R.L.

    1999-07-27

    A cavity structure is disclosed having at least two opposing planar housing members spaced apart to accommodate the passage of a particle beam through the structure between the members. Each of the housing members have a plurality of serially aligned hollows defined therein, and also passages, formed in the members, which interconnect serially adjacent hollows to provide communication between the hollows. The opposing planar housing members are spaced and aligned such that the hollows in one member cooperate with corresponding hollows in the other member to form a plurality of resonant cavities aligned along the particle beam within the cavity structure. To facilitate the obtaining of a constant field gradient within the cavity structure, the passages are configured so as to be incrementally narrower in the direction of travel of the particle beam. In addition, the spacing distance between the opposing housing members is configured to be incrementally smaller in the direction of travel of the beam. 16 figs.

  17. Automatic gesture analysis using constant affine velocity.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Jenny; Boulanger, Pierre; Pham, Minh Tu; Moreau, Richard; Prieto, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Hand human gesture recognition has been an important research topic widely studied around the world, as this field offers the ability to identify, recognize, and analyze human gestures in order to control devices or to interact with computer interfaces. In particular, in medical training, this approach is an important tool that can be used to obtain an objective evaluation of a procedure performance. In this paper, some obstetrical gestures, acquired by a forceps, were studied with the hypothesis that, as the scribbling and drawing movements, they obey the one-sixth power law, an empirical relationship which connects path curvature, torsion, and euclidean velocity. Our results show that obstetrical gestures have a constant affine velocity, which is different for each type of gesture and based on this idea this quantity is proposed as an appropriate classification feature in the hand human gesture recognition field.

  18. Measuring the RC time constant with Arduino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, N. S. A.

    2016-11-01

    In this work we use the Arduino UNO R3 open source hardware platform to assemble an experimental apparatus for the measurement of the time constant of an RC circuit. With adequate programming, the Arduino is used as a signal generator, a data acquisition system and a basic signal visualisation tool. Theoretical calculations are compared with direct observations from an analogue oscilloscope. Data processing and curve fitting is performed on a spreadsheet. The results obtained for the six RC test circuits are within the expected interval of values defined by the tolerance of the components. The hardware and software prove to be adequate to the proposed measurements and therefore adaptable to a laboratorial teaching and learning context.

  19. Constant-parameter capture-recapture models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brownie, C.; Hines, J.E.; Nichols, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Jolly (1982, Biometrics 38, 301-321) presented modifications of the Jolly-Seber model for capture-recapture data, which assume constant survival and/or capture rates. Where appropriate, because of the reduced number of parameters, these models lead to more efficient estimators than the Jolly-Seber model. The tests to compare models given by Jolly do not make complete use of the data, and we present here the appropriate modifications, and also indicate how to carry out goodness-of-fit tests which utilize individual capture history information. We also describe analogous models for the case where young and adult animals are tagged. The availability of computer programs to perform the analysis is noted, and examples are given using output from these programs.

  20. Running cosmological constant with observational tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Lee, Chung-Chi; Zhang, Kaituo

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the running cosmological constant model with dark energy linearly proportional to the Hubble parameter, Λ = σH +Λ0, in which the ΛCDM limit is recovered by taking σ = 0. We derive the linear perturbation equations of gravity under the Friedmann-Lemaïtre-Robertson-Walker cosmology, and show the power spectra of the CMB temperature and matter density distribution. By using the Markov chain Monte Carlo method, we fit the model to the current observational data and find that σH0 /Λ0 ≲ 2.63 ×10-2 and 6.74 ×10-2 for Λ (t) coupled to matter and radiation-matter, respectively, along with constraints on other cosmological parameters.

  1. Simple Pendulum Determination of the Gravitational Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, Harold V.; Faller, James E.

    2010-09-10

    We determined the Newtonian constant of gravitation G by interferometrically measuring the change in spacing between two free-hanging pendulum masses caused by the gravitational field from large tungsten source masses. We find a value for G of (6.672 34{+-}0.000 14)x10{sup -11} m{sup 3} kg{sup -1} s{sup -2}. This value is in good agreement with the 1986 Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) value of (6.672 59{+-}0.000 85)x10{sup -11} m{sup 3} kg{sup -1} s{sup -2}[Rev. Mod. Phys. 59, 1121 (1987)] but differs from some more recent determinations as well as the latest CODATA recommendation of (6.674 28{+-}0.000 67)x10{sup -11} m{sup 3} kg{sup -1} s{sup -2}[Rev. Mod. Phys. 80, 633 (2008)].

  2. Constant-force approach to discontinuous potentials.

    PubMed

    Orea, Pedro; Odriozola, Gerardo

    2013-06-07

    Aiming to approach the thermodynamical properties of hard-core systems by standard molecular dynamics simulation, we propose setting a repulsive constant-force for overlapping particles. That is, the discontinuity of the pair potential is replaced by a linear function with a large negative slope. Hence, the core-core repulsion, usually modeled with a power function of distance, yields a large force as soon as the cores slightly overlap. This leads to a quasi-hardcore behavior. The idea is tested for a triangle potential of short range. The results obtained by replica exchange molecular dynamics for several repulsive forces are contrasted with the ones obtained for the discontinuous potential and by means of replica exchange Monte Carlo. We found remarkable agreements for the vapor-liquid coexistence densities as well as for the surface tension.

  3. Molecular dynamics at constant Cauchy stress.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ronald E; Tadmor, Ellad B; Gibson, Joshua S; Bernstein, Noam; Pavia, Fabio

    2016-05-14

    The Parrinello-Rahman algorithm for imposing a general state of stress in periodic molecular dynamics simulations is widely used in the literature and has been implemented in many readily available molecular dynamics codes. However, what is often overlooked is that this algorithm controls the second Piola-Kirchhoff stress as opposed to the true (Cauchy) stress. This can lead to misinterpretation of simulation results because (1) the true stress that is imposed during the simulation depends on the deformation of the periodic cell, (2) the true stress is potentially very different from the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff stress, and (3) the true stress can vary significantly during the simulation even if the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff is constant. We propose a simple modification to the algorithm that allows the true Cauchy stress to be controlled directly. We then demonstrate the efficacy of the new algorithm with the example of martensitic phase transformations under applied stress.

  4. Universal equations and constants of turbulent motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumert, H. Z.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a parameter-free theory of shear-generated turbulence at asymptotically high Reynolds numbers in incompressible fluids. It is based on a two-fluids concept. Both components are materially identical and inviscid. The first component is an ensemble of quasi-rigid dipole-vortex tubes (vortex filaments, excitations) as quasi-particles in chaotic motion. The second is a superfluid performing evasive motions between the tubes. The local dipole motions follow Helmholtz' law. The vortex radii scale with the energy-containing length scale. Collisions between quasi-particles lead either to annihilation (likewise rotation, turbulent dissipation) or to scattering (counterrotation, turbulent diffusion). There are analogies with birth and death processes of population dynamics and their master equations and with Landau's two-fluid theory of liquid helium. For free homogeneous decay the theory predicts the turbulent kinetic energy to follow t-1. With an adiabatic wall condition it predicts the logarithmic law with von Kármán's constant as 1/\\sqrt {2\\,\\pi }= 0.399 . Likewise rotating couples form localized dissipative patches almost at rest (→ intermittency) wherein under local quasi-steady conditions the spectrum evolves into an ‘Apollonian gear’ as discussed first by Herrmann (1990 Correlation and Connectivity (Dordrecht: Kluwer) pp 108-20). Dissipation happens exclusively at scale zero and at finite scales this system is frictionless and reminds of Prigogine's (1947 Etude Thermodynamique des Phenomenes Irreversibles (Liege: Desoer) p 143) law of minimum (here: zero) entropy production. The theory predicts further the prefactor of the 3D-wavenumber spectrum (a Kolmogorov constant) as \\frac {1}{3}(4\\,\\pi )^{2/3}=1.802 , well within the scatter range of observational, experimental and direct numerical simulation results.

  5. Isotope shift constant and nuclear charge model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Z.; Redi, O.; Stroke, H. H.

    1992-04-01

    We use the method of Zimmermann [Z. Phys. A 321 (1985) 23-30], which he used to calculate the isotope shift constant for a uniform nuclear charge distribution, to obtain it for a diffuse nuclear charge model. The two models give results that differ slightly on the level of precision of current experiments. The same parameters are used to calculate the model sensitivity of the contributions to the isotope shifts of higher moments of the nuclear charge distribution as formulated by Seltzer [Phys. Rev. 188 (1969) 1916-1919]. These are found to be essentially model independent. Tables are given of the numerical calculations. Nous employons la méthode de Zimmermann [Z. Phys. A 321 (1985) 23-30], qu'il avait utilisé dans un calcul de la constante du déplacement isotopique pour une distribution de charge uniforme, pour l'obtenir avec un modèle de charge nucléaire avec forme quasi-trapézoïdale. Les deux modèles donnent des résultats dont la difference excède de peu la précision des mesures actuelles. Les mêmes paramètres sont utilisés pour comparer la dépendance aux deux modèles de la contribution au déplacement isotopique des moments plus élevés de la distribution de la charge nucléaire dans la formulation de Seltzer [Phys. Rev. 188 (1969) 1916-1919]. On trouve que ces contributions sont essentiellement indépendantes du modèle. Des tables de calculs numériques sont présentées.

  6. SPATIALLY RESOLVED H{alpha} MAPS AND SIZES OF 57 STRONGLY STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z {approx} 1 FROM 3D-HST: EVIDENCE FOR RAPID INSIDE-OUT ASSEMBLY OF DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Erica June; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Bezanson, Rachel; Lundgren, Britt; Brammer, Gabriel; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Patel, Shannon; Labbe, Ivo; Rix, Hans-Walter; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Kriek, Mariska; Quadri, Ryan

    2012-03-10

    We investigate the buildup of galaxies at z {approx} 1 using maps of H{alpha} and stellar continuum emission for a sample of 57 galaxies with rest-frame H{alpha} equivalent widths >100 A in the 3D-HST grism survey. We find that the H{alpha} emission broadly follows the rest-frame R-band light but that it is typically somewhat more extended and clumpy. We quantify the spatial distribution with the half-light radius. The median H{alpha} effective radius r{sub e} (H{alpha}) is 4.2 {+-} 0.1 kpc but the sizes span a large range, from compact objects with r{sub e} (H{alpha}) {approx} 1.0 kpc to extended disks with r{sub e} (H{alpha}) {approx} 15 kpc. Comparing H{alpha} sizes to continuum sizes, we find =1.3 {+-} 0.1 for the full sample. That is, star formation, as traced by H{alpha}, typically occurs out to larger radii than the rest-frame R-band stellar continuum; galaxies are growing their radii and building up from the inside out. This effect appears to be somewhat more pronounced for the largest galaxies. Using the measured H{alpha} sizes, we derive star formation rate surface densities, {Sigma}{sub SFR}. We find that {Sigma}{sub SFR} ranges from {approx}0.05 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2} for the largest galaxies to {approx}5 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2} for the smallest galaxies, implying a large range in physical conditions in rapidly star-forming z {approx} 1 galaxies. Finally, we infer that all galaxies in the sample have very high gas mass fractions and stellar mass doubling times <500 Myr. Although other explanations are also possible, a straightforward interpretation is that we are simultaneously witnessing the rapid formation of compact bulges and large disks at z {approx} 1.

  7. THE EVOLUTION OF THE REST-FRAME V-BAND LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM z = 4: A CONSTANT FAINT-END SLOPE OVER THE LAST 12 Gyr OF COSMIC HISTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Marchesini, Danilo; Stefanon, Mauro; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2012-04-01

    We present the rest-frame V-band luminosity function (LF) of galaxies at 0.4 {<=} z < 4.0, measured from a near-infrared selected sample constructed from the NMBS, the FIRES, the FIREWORKS, and the ultra-deep NICMOS and WFC3 observations in the HDFN, HUDF, and GOODS-CDFS, all having high-quality optical-to-mid-infrared data. This unique sample combines data from surveys with a large range of depths and areas in a self-consistent way, allowing us to (1) minimize the uncertainties due to cosmic variance; and (2) simultaneously constrain the bright and faint ends with unprecedented accuracy over the targeted redshift range, probing the LF down to 0.1L* at z {approx} 3.9. We find that (1) the faint end is fairly flat and with a constant slope from z = 4, with {alpha} = -1.27 {+-} 0.05; (2) the characteristic magnitude has dimmed by 1.3 mag from z {approx} 3.7 to z = 0.1; (3) the characteristic density has increased by a factor of {approx}8 from z {approx} 3.7 to z = 0.1, with 50% of this increase from z {approx} 4 to z {approx} 1.8; and (4) the luminosity density peaks at z Almost-Equal-To 1-1.5, increasing by a factor of {approx}4 from z = 4.0 to z Almost-Equal-To 1-1.5, and subsequently decreasing by a factor of {approx}1.5 by z = 0.1. We find no evidence for a steepening of the faint-end slope with redshift out to z = 4, in contrast with previous observational claims and theoretical predictions. The constant faint-end slope suggests that the efficiency of stellar feedback may evolve with redshift. Alternative interpretations are discussed, such as different masses of the halos hosting faint galaxies at low and high redshifts and/or environmental effects.

  8. Infrared Spectra and Optical Constants of Elusive Amorphous Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.

    2015-01-01

    New and accurate laboratory results are reported for amorphous methane (CH4) ice near 10 K for the study of the interstellar medium (ISM) and the outer Solar System. Near- and mid-infrared (IR) data, including spectra, band strengths, absorption coefficients, and optical constants, are presented for the first time for this seldom-studied amorphous solid. The apparent IR band strength near 1300 cm(exp -1) (7.69 micrometer) for amorphous CH4 is found to be about 33% higher than the value long used by IR astronomers to convert spectral observations of interstellar CH4 into CH4 abundances. Although CH4 is most likely to be found in an amorphous phase in the ISM, a comparison of results from various laboratory groups shows that the earlier CH4 band strength at 1300 cm(exp -1) (7.69 micrometer) was derived from IR spectra of ices that were either partially or entirely crystalline CH4 Applications of the new amorphous-CH4 results are discussed, and all optical constants are made available in electronic form.

  9. Constant volume gas cell optical phase-shifter

    DOEpatents

    Phillion, Donald W.

    2002-01-01

    A constant volume gas cell optical phase-shifter, particularly applicable for phase-shifting interferometry, contains a sealed volume of atmospheric gas at a pressure somewhat different than atmospheric. An optical window is present at each end of the cell, and as the length of the cell is changed, the optical path length of a laser beam traversing the cell changes. The cell comprises movable coaxial tubes with seals and a volume equalizing opening. Because the cell is constant volume, the pressure, temperature, and density of the contained gas do not change as the cell changes length. This produces an exactly linear relationship between the change in the length of the gas cell and the change in optical phase of the laser beam traversing it. Because the refractive index difference between the gas inside and the atmosphere outside is very much the same, a large motion must be made to change the optical phase by the small fraction of a wavelength that is required by phase-shifting interferometry for its phase step. This motion can be made to great fractional accuracy.

  10. THE WYOMING SURVEY FOR H{alpha}. II. H{alpha} LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AT z{approx} 0.16, 0.24, 0.32, AND 0.40

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Daniel A.; Cook, David O.; Moore, Carolynn A.; Staudaher, Shawn M.; Barlow, Rebecca J.; Cohen, Seth A.; Johnson, L. Clifton; Kattner, ShiAnne M.; Schuster, Micah D.

    2010-04-01

    The Wyoming Survey for H{alpha}, or WySH, is a large-area, ground-based imaging survey for H{alpha}-emitting galaxies at redshifts of z {approx} 0.16, 0.24, 0.32, and 0.40. The survey spans up to 4 deg{sup 2} in a set of fields of low Galactic cirrus emission, using twin narrowband filters at each epoch for improved stellar continuum subtraction. H{alpha} luminosity functions are presented for each {delta}z {approx} 0.02 epoch based on a total of nearly 1200 galaxies. These data clearly show an evolution with look-back time in the volume-averaged cosmic star formation rate. Integrals of Schechter fits to the incompleteness- and extinction-corrected H{alpha} luminosity functions indicate star formation rates per comoving volume of 0.010, 0.013, 0.020, 0.022 h {sub 70} M {sub sun} yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} at z {approx} 0.16, 0.24, 0.32, and 0.40, respectively. Combined statistical and systematic measurement uncertainties are on the order of 25%, while the effects of cosmic variance are at the 20% level. The bulk of this evolution is driven by changes in the characteristic luminosity L {sub *} of the H{alpha} luminosity functions, with L {sub *} for the earlier two epochs being a factor of 2 larger than L {sub *} at the latter two epochs; it is more difficult with this data set to decipher systematic evolutionary differences in the luminosity function amplitude and faint-end slope. Coupling these results with a comprehensive compilation of results from the literature on emission line surveys, the evolution in the cosmic star formation rate density over 0 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.5 is measured.

  11. THE LBT BOOeTES FIELD SURVEY. I. THE REST-FRAME ULTRAVIOLET AND NEAR-INFRARED LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AND CLUSTERING OF BRIGHT LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES AT Z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect

    Bian Fuyan; Fan Xiaohui; Jiang Linhua; McGreer, Ian; Dave, Romeel; Dey, Arjun; Green, Richard F.; Maiolino, Roberto; Walter, Fabian; Lee, Kyoung-Soo

    2013-09-01

    We present a deep LBT/LBC U{sub spec}-band imaging survey (9 deg{sup 2}) covering the NOAO Booetes field. A total of 14,485 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z {approx} 3 are selected, which are used to measure the rest-frame UV luminosity function (LF). The large sample size and survey area reduce the LF uncertainties due to Poisson statistics and cosmic variance by {>=}3 compared to previous studies. At the bright end, the LF shows excess power compared to the best-fit Schechter function, which can be attributed to the contribution of z {approx} 3 quasars. We compute the rest-frame near-infrared LF and stellar mass function (SMF) of z {approx} 3 LBGs based on the R-band and [4.5 {mu}m]-band flux relation. We investigate the evolution of the UV LFs and SMFs between z {approx} 7 and z {approx} 3, which supports a rising star formation history in the LBGs. We study the spatial correlation function of two bright LBG samples and estimate their average host halo mass. We find a tight relation between the host halo mass and the galaxy star formation rate (SFR), which follows the trend predicted by the baryonic accretion rate onto the halo, suggesting that the star formation in LBGs is fueled by baryonic accretion through the cosmic web. By comparing the SFRs with the total baryonic accretion rates, we find that cosmic star formation efficiency is about 5%-20% and it does not evolve significantly with redshift, halo mass, or galaxy luminosity.

  12. Enhanced optical constants of nanocrystalline yttrium oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ramana, C. V.; Mudavakkat, V. H.; Bharathi, K. Kamala; Atuchin, V. V.; Pokrovsky, L. D.; Kruchinin, V. N.

    2011-01-17

    Yttrium oxide (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) films with an average crystallite-size (L) ranging from 5 to 40 nm were grown by sputter-deposition onto Si(100) substrates. The optical properties of grown Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were evaluated using spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements. The size-effects were significant on the optical constants and their dispersion profiles of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} films. A significant enhancement in the index of refraction (n) is observed in well-defined Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocrystalline films compared to that of amorphous Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. A direct, linear L-n relationship found for Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} films suggests that tuning optical properties for desired applications can be achieved by controlling the size at the nanoscale dimensions.

  13. Coupling constant metamorphosis, the Staeckel transform and superintegrability

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Sarah

    2010-12-23

    This paper is dedicated to the memory of Marcos Moshinsky. In this paper, we discuss the important role that coupling constant metamorphosis (CCM) and the Staeckel transform have played in the analysis of superintegrable systems. We explain the relation between the two and in particular show that they coincide when transforming between second-order superintegrable systems. Unlike in the case of second-order superintegrability, the quantum analog of CCM has only been proven for a subclass of systems with integrals of a specific form. We give the proof and as an application show the mapping of a family of superintegrable deformations of the simple harmonic oscillator to an associated family of superintegrable deformations of the Kepler-Coulomb potential.

  14. Dissipation scaling in constant-pressure turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedic, Jovan; Tavoularis, Stavros; Marusic, Ivan

    2016-11-01

    We use previous direct numerical simulations and experimental data to investigate the streamwise and wall-normal evolution of the dissipation parameter Cɛ (namely the dissipation rate scaled by appropriate powers of the local turbulent kinetic energy and integral length scale) in the outer region of spatially evolving turbulent boundary layers. For Reθ >= 10 , 000 , Cɛ is essentially constant in the streamwise direction, but varies measurably in the wall-normal direction. For lower Reθ , however, Cɛ changes in both directions. The constancy of Cɛ is a central assumption of turbulence models based on the eddy viscosity concept and so they would inadequately represent wall bounded flows as they evolve spatially, a scenario that is common in engineering and atmospheric science applications. Accounting for the dependence of Cɛ on the local Reλ provides a means for possibly improving such models. Funding provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

  15. Spatial and temporal variations of fundamental constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshakov, S. A.; Agafonova, I. I.; Molaro, P.; Reimers, D.

    2010-11-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in the electron-to-proton mass ratio, μ, and in the fine-structure constant, α, are not present in the Standard Model of particle physics but they arise quite naturally in grant unification theories, multidimensional theories and in general when a coupling of light scalar fields to baryonic matter is considered. The light scalar fields are usually attributed to a negative pressure substance permeating the entire visible Universe and known as dark energy. This substance is thought to be responsible for a cosmic acceleration at low redshifts, z < 1. A strong dependence of μ and α on the ambient matter density is predicted by chameleon-like scalar field models. Calculations of atomic and molecular spectra show that different transitions have different sensitivities to changes in fundamental constants. Thus, measuring the relative line positions, Δ V, between such transitions one can probe the hypothetical variability of physical constants. In particular, interstellar molecular clouds can be used to test the matter density dependence of μ, since gas density in these clouds is ~15 orders of magnitude lower than that in terrestrial environment. We use the best quality radio spectra of the inversion transition of NH3 (J,K)=(1,1) and rotational transitions of other molecules to estimate the radial velocity offsets, Δ V ≡ Vrot - Vinv. The obtained value of Δ V shows a statistically significant positive shift of 23±4stat±3sys m s-1 (1σ). Being interpreted in terms of the electron-to-proton mass ratio variation, this gives Δμ/μ = (22±4stat±3sys)×10-9. A strong constraint on variation of the quantity F = α2/μ in the Milky Way is found from comparison of the fine-structure transition J=1-0 in atomic carbon C i with the low-J rotational lines in carbon monoxide 13CO arising in the interstellar molecular clouds: |Δ F/F| < 3×10-7. This yields |Δ α/α| < 1.5×10-7 at z = 0. Since extragalactic absorbers have gas densities

  16. Kinetic performance limits of constant pressure versus constant flow rate gradient elution separations. Part I: theory.

    PubMed

    Broeckhoven, K; Verstraeten, M; Choikhet, K; Dittmann, M; Witt, K; Desmet, G

    2011-02-25

    We report on a general theoretical assessment of the potential kinetic advantages of running LC gradient elution separations in the constant-pressure mode instead of in the customarily used constant-flow rate mode. Analytical calculations as well as numerical simulation results are presented. It is shown that, provided both modes are run with the same volume-based gradient program, the constant-pressure mode can potentially offer an identical separation selectivity (except from some small differences induced by the difference in pressure and viscous heating trajectory), but in a significantly shorter time. For a gradient running between 5 and 95% of organic modifier, the decrease in analysis time can be expected to be of the order of some 20% for both water-methanol and water-acetonitrile gradients, and only weakly depending on the value of V(G)/V₀ (or equivalently t(G)/t₀). Obviously, the gain will be smaller when the start and end composition lie closer to the viscosity maximum of the considered water-organic modifier system. The assumptions underlying the obtained results (no effects of pressure and temperature on the viscosity or retention coefficient) are critically reviewed, and can be inferred to only have a small effect on the general conclusions. It is also shown that, under the adopted assumptions, the kinetic plot theory also holds for operations where the flow rate varies with the time, as is the case for constant-pressure operation. Comparing both operation modes in a kinetic plot representing the maximal peak capacity versus time, it is theoretically predicted here that both modes can be expected to perform equally well in the fully C-term dominated regime (where H varies linearly with the flow rate), while the constant pressure mode is advantageous for all lower flow rates. Near the optimal flow rate, and for linear gradients running from 5 to 95% organic modifier, time gains of the order of some 20% can be expected (or 25-30% when accounting for

  17. Influence of joint angle on EMG-torque model during constant-posture, quasi-constant-torque contractions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pu; Liu, Lukai; Martel, Francois; Rancourt, Denis; Clancy, Edward A

    2013-10-01

    Electromyogram (EMG)-torque modeling is of value to many different application areas, including ergonomics, clinical biomechanics and prosthesis control. One important aspect of EMG-torque modeling is the ability to account for the joint angle influence. This manuscript describes an experimental study which relates the biceps/triceps surface EMG of 12 subjects to elbow torque at seven joint angles (spanning 45-135°) during constant-posture, quasi-constant-torque contractions. Advanced EMG amplitude (EMGσ) estimation processors (i.e., whitened, multiple-channel) were investigated and three non-linear EMGσ-torque models were evaluated. When EMG-torque models were formed separately for each of the seven distinct joint angles, a minimum "gold standard" error of 4.23±2.2% MVCF90 resulted (i.e., error relative to maximum voluntary contraction at 90° flexion). This model structure, however, did not directly facilitate interpolation across angles. The best model which did so (i.e., parameterized the angle dependence), achieved an error of 4.17±1.7% MVCF90. Results demonstrated that advanced EMGσ processors lead to improved joint torque estimation. We also contrasted models that did vs. did not account for antagonist muscle co-contraction. Models that accounted for co-contraction estimated individual flexion muscle torques that were ∼29% higher and individual extension muscle torques that were ∼68% higher.

  18. Using the pseudophase kinetic model to interpret chemical reactivity in ionic emulsions: determining antioxidant partition constants and interfacial rate constants.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qing; Bravo-Díaz, Carlos; Romsted, Laurence S

    2013-06-15

    Kinetic results obtained in cationic and anionic emulsions show for the first time that pseudophase kinetic models give reasonable estimates of the partition constants of reactants, here t-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ) between the oil and interfacial region, P(O)(I), and the water and interfacial region, P(W)(I), and of the interfacial rate constant, k(I), for the reaction with an arenediazonium ion in emulsions containing a 1:1 volume ratio of a medium chain length triglyceride, MCT, and aqueous acid or buffer. The results provide: (a) an explanation for the large difference in pH, >4 pH units, required to run the reaction in CTAB (pH 1.54, added HBr) and SDS (pH 5.71, acetate buffer) emulsions; (b) reasonable estimates of PO(I) and k(I) in the CTAB emulsions; (c) a sensible interpretation of added counterion effects based on ion exchange in SDS emulsions (Na(+)/H3O(+) ion exchange in the interfacial region) and Donnan equilibrium in CTAB emulsions (Br(-) increasing the interfacial H3O(+)); and (d) the significance of the effect of the much greater solubility of TBHQ in MCT versus octane, 1000/1, as the oil. These results should aid in interpreting the effects of ionic surfactants on chemical reactivity in emulsions in general and in selecting the most efficient antioxidant for particular food applications.

  19. A New Method for Determining the Optical Constants of Highly Transparent Solids.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingcan; Wang, Chengchao; Zhao, Junming; Liu, Linhua

    2017-01-01

    Highly transparent substrates are of interest for a variety of applications, but it is difficult to measure their optical constants precisely, especially the absorption index in the transparent spectral region. In this paper, a combination technique (DOPTM-EM) using both the double optical pathlength transmission method (DOPTM) and the ellipsometry method (EM) is presented to obtain the optical constants of highly transparent substrates, which overcomes the deficiencies of both the two methods. The EM cannot give accurate result of optical constants when the absorption index is very weak. The DOPTM is suitable to retrieve the weak absorption index; however, two sets of solutions exist for the retrieved refractive index and absorption index, and only one is the true value that needs to be identified. In the DOPTM-EM, the optical constants are measured first by using the EM and set as the initial value in the gradient-based inverse method used in the DOPTM, which ensures only the true optical constants are retrieved. The new method simultaneously obtains the refractive index and the absorption index of highly transparent substrate without relying on the Kramers-Kronig relation. The optical constants of three highly transparent substrates (polycrystalline BaF2, CaF2, and MgF2) were experimentally determined within wavelength range from ultraviolet to infrared regions (0.2-14 µm). The presented method will facilitate the measurement of optical constants for highly transparent materials.

  20. An Alcohol Test for Drifting Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, P.; Bagdonaite, J.; Ubachs, W.; Bethlem, H. L.; Kleiner, I.; Xu, L.-H.

    2013-06-01

    The Standard Model of physics is built on the fundamental constants of nature, however without providing an explanation for their values, nor requiring their constancy over space and time. Molecular spectroscopy can address this issue. Recently, we found that microwave transitions in methanol are extremely sensitive to a variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio μ, due to a fortuitous interplay between classically forbidden internal rotation and rotation of the molecule as a whole. In this talk, we will explain the origin of this effect and how the sensitivity coefficients in methanol are calculated. In addition, we set a limit on a possible cosmological variation of μ by comparing transitions in methanol observed in the early Universe with those measured in the laboratory. Based on radio-astronomical observations of PKS1830-211, we deduce a constraint of Δμ/μ=(0.0± 1.0)× 10^{-7} at redshift z = 0.89, corresponding to a look-back time of 7 billion years. While this limit is more constraining and systematically more robust than previous ones, the methanol method opens a new search territory for probing μ-variation on cosmological timescales. P. Jansen, L.-H. Xu, I. Kleiner, W. Ubachs, and H.L. Bethlem Phys. Rev. Lett. {106}(100801) 2011. J. Bagdonaite, P. Jansen, C. Henkel, H.L. Bethlem, K.M. Menten, and W. Ubachs Science {339}(46) 2013.