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Sample records for apsidal motion rate

  1. Apsidal motion in eclipsing binary GG Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilan, E.; Bulut, I.

    2016-03-01

    The study of apsidal motion in binary stars with eccentric orbit is well known as an important source of information for the stellar internal structure as well as the possibility of verification of general relativity. In this study, the apsidal motion of the eccentric eclipsing binary GG Ori (P = 6.631 days, e = 0.22) has been analyzed using the times of minimum light taken from the literature and databases and the elements of apsidal motion have been computed. The method described by Giménez and García-Pelayo (1983) has been used for the apsidal motion analysis.

  2. APSIDAL MOTION IN ECCENTRIC ECLIPSING BINARY WW CAMELOPARDALIS

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, M.; Kotkova, L.; Kocian, R.; Dreveny, R.; Hanzl, D.

    2010-03-15

    WW Camelopardalis is a relatively bright eclipsing binary system with a slightly eccentric orbit. A dozen of its new eclipse times were measured as part of our long-term observational project of eccentric eclipsing binaries. Based on a new solution of the current O - C diagram, we found for the first time an apsidal motion in good agreement with theory. Its period is about 370 {+-} 50 years. The determined internal structure constant is close to the theoretically expected value. The relativistic effect is significant, being about 13% of the total apsidal motion rate.

  3. Generalized Solution for Binary Star Ephemerides and Apsidal Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hamme, W. V.; Wilson, R. E.

    1998-12-01

    We demonstrate generalized determination of apsidal motion rates (domega /dt's), orbital periods (P's), and period changes (dP/dt's) in binary stars. Our method can use eclipses but is not restricted to eclipse data. A general binary star program solves for domega /dt and/or ephemeris parameters together with other binary star quantities, and combines radial velocities and light curves within a coherent analysis. We can use data that may have large timewise gaps and may be far less than optimally distributed over time. The method is particularly useful when the apsidal period is long and eclipse timings cover only a small part of the cycle. We show apsidal motion results for AS Cam and find a domega /dt of 18.20+/-0.66 arcdeg /100;yr. This result compares to a domega /dt of 13.2+/-1.8 arcdeg /100;yr obtained from a traditional weighted least squares fit to almost 100 years of times of minima, which is 3.3 times smaller than predicted by theory. Other published estimates for the apsidal motion rate are 15.0+/-5.3 arcdeg /100;yr by Maloney, Guinan & Mukherjee (1991, AJ, 102, 256), and 18.3+/-2.6 arcdeg /100;yr by Wolf, \\u{S}arounova & Diethelm (1996, A&AS, 116, 463). Apsidal motion determined from times of minima depends on the value of the eccentricity e. Our result is for e = 0.1633, obtained from the light and velocity solution. The new domega /dt from the general analysis is 2.4 times smaller than theory, with a standard error 3 times smaller than in the traditional method. Our apsidal period of 1978+/-71 year is based on only 30 years of light and velocity curves, or 1.5% of the cycle. The method also works well in measuring period changes in long period giant binaries (such as symbiotics), considering that these stars are typically observed in fragments and that very few show eclipses that are useful as timing ticks. Our dP/dt results for the symbiotic binary AG Peg have implications for its future evolution. Natural extensions of the idea can include other

  4. Apsidal motion in the massive binary HD 152218

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauw, G.; Rosu, S.; Noels, A.; Mahy, L.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Godart, M.; Dupret, M.-A.; Gosset, E.

    2016-10-01

    Massive binary systems are important laboratories in which to probe the properties of massive stars and stellar physics in general. In this context, we analysed optical spectroscopy and photometry of the eccentric short-period early-type binary HD 152218 in the young open cluster NGC 6231. We reconstructed the spectra of the individual stars using a disentangling code. The individual spectra were then compared with synthetic spectra obtained with the CMFGEN model atmosphere code. We furthermore analysed the light curve of the binary and used it to constrain the orbital inclination and to derive absolute masses of (19.8 ± 1.5) and (15.0 ± 1.1) M⊙. Combining radial velocity measurements from over 60 yr, we show that the system displays apsidal motion at a rate of (2.04+ .23-.24)° yr-1. Solving the Clairaut-Radau equation, we used stellar evolution models, obtained with the CLES code, to compute the internal structure constants and to evaluate the theoretically predicted rate of apsidal motion as a function of stellar age and primary mass. In this way, we determine an age of 5.8 ± 0.6 Myr for HD 152218, which is towards the higher end of, but compatible with, the range of ages of the massive star population of NGC 6231 as determined from isochrone fitting.

  5. New Apsidal-motion Elements of the Massive Archetype System Y Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Marek; Harmanec, P.; Holmgren, D. E.; Božic, H.; Guinan, E. F.; Mayer, P.; Kang, Y. W.; Yang, S.; Svoboda, P.

    2013-06-01

    New apsidal-motion elements for the massive O type eccentric eclipsing binary Y Cygni are presented. All available times of minima, both newly observed and published in the literature, are analyzed by the Gimenez & Garcia-Pelayo method. These results are confronted with those derived by the solutions of all available radial velocity and photometric observations. An improved value of the mean internal structure constant k2 (for the two nearly identical binary components) is derived. The relativistic effects are weak, being about 5% of the total apsidal motion rate. Ephemerides for predicting primary and secondary eclipses are also given.

  6. The unique eclipsing binary system V541 Cygni with relativistic apsidal motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaliullin, K. F.

    1985-12-01

    The first photoelectric light curve has been obtained for the binary star V541 Cygni (B8.5 V+B8.7 V, P = 15d.34) discovered by Kulikowski (1948). The light curve exhibits extremely narrow and deep minima of almost equal depth. Photometric elements are determined. Very small relative radii, orbital inclination close to π/2, high eccentricity (e = 0.474), and favorable orientation of the line of apsides with respect to an observer, as well as close similarity of the components, render the V541 Cyg system unique among eclipsing binaries. The apsidal motion in this system has been detected. The observed rotation rate of the line of apsides, ωobs = 0°.090±0°.013 yr-1, agrees within the errors with the prediction by general relativity.

  7. Apsidal motion of two eclipsing binaries: V796 Cyg and V2783 Ori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulut, A.; Bulut, I.; ćiçek, C.; Erdem, A.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the orbital period variations of two eclipsing binary systems showing apsidal motion were studied. Their O - C diagrams were analysed using all reliable eclipse timings and the elements of apsidal motion of two systems were improved. We found periods of apsidal motion of V796 Cyg and V2783 Ori to be 32.7 ± 0.2 years and 415 ± 50 years, respectively.

  8. APSIDAL MOTIONS OF 27 BINARY SYSTEMS IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Kyeongsoo; Kim, Seung-Lee; Lee, Jae Woo; Lee, Chung-Uk; Yushchenko, Alexander V.; Kang, Young-Woon E-mail: kangyw@sejong.ac.kr

    2015-07-15

    We present the periods of apsidal motion for 27 early-type eclipsing binaries with high eccentricity located in the Small Magellanic Cloud. New times of minima were derived from the light curves constructed by the MACHO, Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE)-II, and OGLE-III survey data. The eclipse timing diagrams of the binary systems were analyzed using those timings and the elements of apsidal motions were obtained in detail for the first time. The apsidal motion periods of all systems were estimated by detailed analysis of both eclipse timings and light curves; a strong correlation value between both methods is shown. We confirm that OGLE-SMC-ECL-2194 shows the shortest known apsidal motion period of 7.1 yr in a detached system with main sequence stars. Nineteen systems show intermediate apsidal motion periods between 10 and 100 yr, and seven systems exhibit long apsidal periods of more than 100 yr.

  9. Eclipsing binary stars as tests of gravity theories - The apsidal motion of AS Camelopardalis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Frank P.; Guinan, Edward F.; Boyd, Patricia T.

    1989-01-01

    AS Camelopardalis is an 8th-magnitude eclipsing binary that consists of two main-sequence (B8 V and a B9.5 V) components in an eccentric orbit (e = 0.17) with an orbital period of 3.43 days. Like the eccentric eclipsing system DI Herculis, and a few other systems, AS Cam is an important test case for studying relativistic apsidal motion. In these systems, the theoretical general relativistic apsidal motion is comparable to that expected from classical effects arising from tidal and rotational deformation of the stellar components. Accurate determinations of the orbital and stellar properties of AS Cam have been made by Hilditch (1972) and Khalliulin and Kozyreva (1983) that permit the theoretical relativistic and classical contributions to the apsidal motion to be determined reasonably well. All the published timings of primary and secondary minima have been gathered and supplemented with eclipse timings from 1899 to 1920 obtained from the Harvard plate collection. Least-squares solutions of the eclipse timings extending over an 80 yr interval yield a smaller than expected apsidal motion, in agreement with that found by Khalliulin and Kozyreva from a smaller set of data. The observed apsidal motion for AS Cam is about one-third that expected from the combined relativistic and classical effects. Thus, AS Cam joins DI Her in having an observed apsidal motion significantly less than that predicted from theory.

  10. Apsidal motion in southern eccentric eclipsing binaries: GL Car, QX Car, NO Pup and V366 Pup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, M.; Zejda, M.; de Villiers, S. N.

    2008-08-01

    The study of apsidal motion in eccentric eclipsing binaries (EEB) provides an important observational test of theoretical models of stellar structure and evolution. The Southern hemisphere contains many interesting and also neglected binary systems. New accurate photoelectric times of minimum light have been obtained for the detached early-type Southern hemisphere EEB GL Car (P = 2.42d,e = 0.15), QX Car (4.48d, 0.15), NO Pup (1.26d, 0.13) and V366 Pup (2.48d, 0.47). The O-C diagrams are analysed using all reliable timings found in the literature and improved or new values for the elements of the apsidal motion are computed. We find more precise, relatively short periods of apsidal motion of about 25.2, 362, 38.3 and 285yr and corresponding internal structure constants, log k2, -1.88, -2.08, -2.32 and -2.38 for GL Car, QX Car, NO Pup and V366 Pup, respectively, with the assumption that the component stars rotate pseudo-synchronously. The relativistic effects are small, being about 3-12 per cent of the total apsidal motion rate in all systems. Based on observations made at the South Africa Astronomical Observatory, Sutherland, South Africa and Mt John University Observatory, University of Canterbury, Lake Tekapo, New Zealand. E-mail: wolf@cesnet.cz

  11. Orbital evolution and search for eccentricity and apsidal motion in the eclipsing HMXB 4U 1700-37

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nazma; Paul, Biswajit

    2016-09-01

    In the absence of detectable pulsations in the eclipsing high-mass X-ray binary 4U 1700-37, the orbital period decay is necessarily determined from the eclipse timing measurements. We have used the earlier reported mid-eclipse time measurements of 4U 1700-37 together with the new measurements from long-term light curves obtained with the all sky monitors RXTE-ASM, Swift-BAT and MAXI-GSC, as well as observations with RXTE-PCA, to measure the long-term orbital evolution of the binary. The orbital period decay rate of the system is estimated to be {dot{P}}/P = -(4.7 ± 1.9) × 10^{-7} yr-1, smaller compared to its previous estimates. We have also used the mid-eclipse times and the eclipse duration measurements obtained from 10-years-long X-ray light curve with Swift-BAT to separately put constraints on the eccentricity of the binary system and attempted to measure any apsidal motion. For an apsidal motion rate greater than 5 deg yr-1, the eccentricity is found to be less than 0.008, which limits our ability to determine the apsidal motion rate from the current data. We discuss the discrepancy of the current limit of eccentricity with the earlier reported values from radial velocity measurements of the companion star.

  12. APSIDAL MOTION AND A LIGHT CURVE SOLUTION FOR 13 LMC ECCENTRIC ECLIPSING BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zasche, P.; Wolf, M.; Vraštil, J.; Pilarcik, L.

    2015-12-15

    New CCD observations for 13 eccentric eclipsing binaries from the Large Magellanic Cloud were carried out using the Danish 1.54 m telescope located at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. These systems were observed for their times of minimum and 56 new minima were obtained. These are needed for accurate determination of the apsidal motion. Besides that, in total 436 times of minimum were derived from the photometric databases OGLE and MACHO. The O – C diagrams of minimum timings for these B-type binaries were analyzed and the parameters of the apsidal motion were computed. The light curves of these systems were fitted using the program PHOEBE, giving the light curve parameters. We derived for the first time relatively short periods of the apsidal motion ranging from 21 to 107 years. The system OGLE-LMC-ECL-07902 was also analyzed using the spectra and radial velocities, resulting in masses of 6.8 and 4.4 M{sub ⊙} for the eclipsing components. For one system (OGLE-LMC-ECL-20112), the third-body hypothesis was also used to describe the residuals after subtraction of the apsidal motion, resulting in a period of about 22 years. For several systems an additional third light was also detected, which makes these systems suspect for triplicity.

  13. The apsidal motion of the eccentric eclipsing binary DI Herculis - An apparent discrepancy with general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinan, E. F.; Maloney, F. P.

    1985-01-01

    The apsidal motion of the eccentric eclipsing binary DI Herculis (HD 175227) is determined from an analysis of the available observations and eclipse timings from 1959 to 1984. Least squares solutions to the primary and secondary minima extending over an 84-yr interval yielded a small advance of periastron omega dot of 0.65 deg/100 yr + or - 0.18/100 yr. The observed advance of the periastron is about one seventh of the theoretical value of 4.27 deg/100 yr that is expected from the combined relativistic and classical effects. The discrepancy is about -3.62 deg/100 yr, or a magnitude of about 20 sigma. Classical mechanisms which explain the discrepancy are discussed, together with the possibility that there may be problems with general relativity itself.

  14. The apsidal motion of the eccentric eclipsing binary DI Herculis - An apparent discrepancy with general relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinan, E. F.; Maloney, F. P.

    1985-01-01

    The apsidal motion of the eccentric eclipsing binary DI Herculis (HD 175227) is determined from an analysis of the available observations and eclipse timings from 1959 to 1984. Least squares solutions to the primary and secondary minima extending over an 84-yr interval yielded a small advance of periastron omega dot of 0.65 deg/100 yr + or - 0.18/100 yr. The observed advance of the periastron is about one seventh of the theoretical value of 4.27 deg/100 yr that is expected from the combined relativistic and classical effects. The discrepancy is about -3.62 deg/100 yr, or a magnitude of about 20 sigma. Classical mechanisms which explain the discrepancy are discussed, together with the possibility that there may be problems with general relativity itself.

  15. Holding or Breaking with Ptolemy's Generalization: Considerations about the Motion of the Planetary Apsidal Lines in Medieval Islamic Astronomy.

    PubMed

    Mozaffari, S Mohammad

    2017-03-01

    Argument In the Almagest, Ptolemy finds that the apogee of Mercury moves progressively at a speed equal to his value for the rate of precession, namely one degree per century, in the tropical reference system of the ecliptic coordinates. He generalizes this to the other planets, so that the motions of the apogees of all five planets are assumed to be equal, while the solar apsidal line is taken to be fixed. In medieval Islamic astronomy, one change in this general proposition took place because of the discovery of the motion of the solar apogee in the ninth century, which gave rise to lengthy discussions on the speed of its motion. Initially Bīrūnī and later Ibn al-Zarqālluh assigned a proper motion to it, although at different rates. Nevertheless, appealing to the Ptolemaic generalization and interpreting it as a methodological axiom, the dominant idea became to extend it in order to include the motion of the solar apogee as well. Another change occurred after correctly making a distinction between the motion of the apogees and the rate of precession. Some Western Islamic astronomers generalized Ibn al-Zarqālluh's proper motion of the solar apogee to the apogees of the planets. Analogously, Ibn al-Shāṭir maintained that the motion of the apogees is faster than precession. Nevertheless, the Ptolemaic generalization in the case of the equality of the motions of the apogees remained untouchable, despite the notable development of planetary astronomy, in both theoretical and observational aspects, in the late Islamic period.

  16. V346 Centauri: Early-type eclipsing binary with apsidal motion and abrupt change of orbital period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Pavel; Harmanec, Petr; Wolf, Marek; Nemravová, Jana; Prša, Andrej; Frémat, Yves; Zejda, Miloslav; Liška, Jiři; Juryšek, Jakub; Hoňková, Kateřina; Mašek, Martin

    2016-06-01

    New physical elements of the early B-type eclipsing binary V346 Cen are derived using the HARPS spectra downloaded from the ESO archive and also numerous photometric observations from various sources. A model of the observed times of primary and secondary minima that fits them best is a combination of the apsidal motion and an abrupt decrease in the orbital period from 6.^d322123 to 6.^d321843 (shortening by 24 s), which occurred somewhere around JD 2 439 000. Assumption of a secularly decreasing orbital period provides a significantly worse fit. Local times of minima and the final solution of the light curve were obtained with the program PHOEBE. Radial velocities of both binary components, free of line blending, were derived via 2D cross-correlation with a program built on the principles of the program TODCOR. The oxygen lines in the secondary spectra are weaker than those in the model spectra of solar chemical composition. Using the component spectra disentangled with the program KOREL, we find that both components rotate considerably faster than would correspond to the synchronization at periastron. The apside rotation known from earlier studies is confirmed and compared to the theoretical value. Based on observations made with the ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under programmes ID 083.D-0040(A), 085.C-0614(A), and 178.D-0361(B).Tables A.2-A.6 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A129

  17. Probing the Masses of the PSR JO621+1002 Binary System Through Relativistic Apsidal Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaver, Eric M.; Nice, David J.; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Camilo, Fernando; Lyne, Andrew G.; Stairs, Ingrid H.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Orbital, spin and astrometric parameters of the millisecond pulsar PSR J0621+1002 have been determined through six years of timing observations at three radio telescopes. The chief result is a measurement of the rate of periastron advance, omega=0 deg.0116 +/-0 deg.0008/yr. Interpreted as a general relativistic effect, this implies the sum of the pulsar mass, m(1), and the companion mass, m(2), to be M=m(1)+m(2)= 2.81 +/-0.30 solar mass. The Keplerian parameters rule out certain combinations of m(1) and m(2), as does the non-detection of Shapiro delay in the pulse arrival times. These constraints, together with the assumption that the companion is a white dwarf, lead to the maximum likelihood values m(1)=1.69((sup +0.30)(sub -0.30)) solar mass and m(2)=0.98((sup +0.32)(sub -0.12) solar mass (68% confidence). The other major finding is that the pulsar experiences dramatic variability in its dispersion measure (DM), with gradients as steep as 0.013 pc/cu cm/yr. A structure function analysis of the DM variations uncovers spatial fluctuations in the interstellar electron density that cannot be fit to a single power law, unlike the Kolmogorov turbulent spectrum that has been seen in the direction of other pulsars. Other results from the timing analysis include the first measurements of the pulsar's proper motion, mu=3.5+/-0.3 mas/yr, and of its spin-down rate, dP/dt=4.7 x 10(exp -20), which, when corrected for kinematic biases and combined with the pulse period, P=28.8 ms, gives a characteristic age of 1.1 x 10(exp 10) yr and a surface magnetic field strength of 1.2 x 10 (exp 9) G.

  18. The α CrB binary system: A new radial velocity curve, apsidal motion, and the alignment of rotation and orbit axes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Schröder, K.-P.; Rauw, G.; Hempelmann, A.; Mittag, M.; González-Pérez, J. N.; Czesla, S.; Wolter, U.; Jack, D.

    2016-02-01

    We present a new radial velocity curve for the two components of the eclipsing spectroscopic binary α CrB. This binary consists of two main-sequence stars of types A and G in a 17.3599-day orbit, according to the data from our robotic TIGRE facility that is located in Guanajuato, Mexico. We used a high-resolution solar spectrum to determine the radial velocities of the weak secondary component by cross-correlation and wavelength referencing with telluric lines for the strongly rotationally broadened primary lines (v sin(i) = 138 km s-1) to obtain radial velocities with an accuracy of a few hundred m/s. We combined our new RV data with older measurements, dating back to 1908 in the case of the primary, to search for evidence of apsidal motion. We find an apsidal motion period between 6600 and 10 600 yr. This value is consistent with the available data for both the primary and secondary and is also consistent with the assumption that the system has aligned orbit and rotation axes.

  19. Numerical simulations, analytical expressions, and observations of apsidal and nodal superhumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery-Bobertz, Michele Marie

    2004-10-01

    We use theory and numerical simulations, as constrained by observations, to better understand nodal and apsidal superhumps in Cataclysmic Variable (CV) systems. We verify the postulated tilted accretion disk theory by generating artificial light curves and associated Fourier transforms containing nodal and/or apsidal superhumps from numerical simulations of tilted accretion disks. We consider main sequence secondaries only. Apsidal superhumps are adequately described by dynamical motions of particles in a progradely precessing accretion disk due to a tidally perturbing secondary less the pressure effects due to the spiral arms. Nodal superhumps are numerically and kinematically described by the secondary tidally inducing a retrograde precession of a disk tilted out of the orbital plane ˜3° 10°. We suggest that disk tilt is neither caused by thermal instabilities nor tidal instabilities that induce apsidal precession. We find that the disk cannot remain tilted by a steady accretion rate typical of SU UMa's that strikes the inner disk. We find that the accretion disk tilt is a pattern that the disk and secondary pass through, and that the secondary maintains facing the minor axis of the elliptical accretion disk. We extend the mass ratio lower to q = 0.025 and the upper limit to q = 0.35 for apsidally precessing systems. We find no mass ratio limit on nodal precession in our simulations with an imposed disk tilt. Our analytical expressions and numerical simulations agree with observations, on average. For nodal precession, we apply the lunisolar precessional theory to CVs. The ratio of our analytical expressions and numerical simulations of apsidal to-nodal precessions is nearly 2:1, the same ratio found in observations and in the lunisolar precessional theory. We question whether V1159 Ori and ER UMa truly are nodally precessing systems. We suggest that TV Col has a non-main sequence secondary and that an extended campaign be conducted. We find that primary mass

  20. Short apsidal period of three eccentric eclipsing binaries discovered in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Kyeongsoo; Lee, Chung-Uk; Kim, Seung-Lee; Kang, Young-Woon

    2014-06-01

    We present new elements of apsidal motion in three eccentric eclipsing binaries located in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The apsidal motions of the systems were analyzed using both light curves and eclipse timings. The OGLE-III data obtained during the long period of 8 yr (2002-2009) allowed us to determine the apsidal motion period from their analyses. The existence of third light in all selected systems was investigated by light curve analysis. The O – C diagrams of EROS 1018, EROS 1041, and EROS 1054 were analyzed using the 30, 44, and 26 new times of minimum light, respectively, determined from full light curves constructed from EROS, MACHO, OGLE-II, OGLE-III, and our own observations. This enabled a detailed study of the apsidal motion in these systems for the first time. All of the systems have a significant apsidal motion below 100 yr. In particular, EROS 1018 shows a very fast apsidal period of 19.9 ± 2.2 yr in a detached system.

  1. Short Apsidal Period of Three Eccentric Eclipsing Binaries Discovered in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Kyeongsoo; Lee, Chung-Uk; Kim, Seung-Lee; Kang, Young-Woon

    2014-06-01

    We present new elements of apsidal motion in three eccentric eclipsing binaries located in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The apsidal motions of the systems were analyzed using both light curves and eclipse timings. The OGLE-III data obtained during the long period of 8 yr (2002-2009) allowed us to determine the apsidal motion period from their analyses. The existence of third light in all selected systems was investigated by light curve analysis. The O - C diagrams of EROS 1018, EROS 1041, and EROS 1054 were analyzed using the 30, 44, and 26 new times of minimum light, respectively, determined from full light curves constructed from EROS, MACHO, OGLE-II, OGLE-III, and our own observations. This enabled a detailed study of the apsidal motion in these systems for the first time. All of the systems have a significant apsidal motion below 100 yr. In particular, EROS 1018 shows a very fast apsidal period of 19.9 ± 2.2 yr in a detached system.

  2. The role of solar apsidal resonance in the evolution of geostationary transfer orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Gurfil, Pini

    2017-04-01

    Subjected to multiple perturbations and their complex interplay, the dynamical evolution of geostationary transfer orbits (GTOs) is sensitive to initial conditions and model parameters. As one of the most remarkable outcomes of multiple perturbations, the solar apsidal resonance, i.e., the 1:1 resonance between the solar orbital motion and the rotation of the orbital apsidal line caused by Earth's oblateness, is an important feature of the GTO evolution. It occurs when the semi-major axis is reduced by the atmospheric drag to the critical value, with which the rotation of the orbital apsidal line is commensurate with the solar orbital motion. In the present paper, we show that the solar apsidal resonance plays an important role in the evolution and decay of GTOs. To do so, we first explain the underlying dynamical mechanism of the solar apsidal resonance, which is the U-turn of the solar azimuth with respect to the orbital apsidal line and the resulting monotonic increase or decrease of the eccentricity. The resonance is then classified into three kinds, and their causes and effects are analyzed. Previous studies have regarded the solar apsidal resonance as a mechanism extending the orbital lifetime. However, we find that in most cases the GTO will re-enter Earth's atmosphere soon or only several years after the resonance, and so the solar apsidal resonance can be regarded as the prelude to the GTO final re-entry. Finally, the sensitivity of orbital dynamics is studied through numerical simulations. It is shown that the high sensitivity of the dynamics can be attributed to the resonance, which is difficult to predict or manage. With the initial state, it is possible to predict the orbit evolution of GTO only before the solar apsidal resonance. To predict the lifetime of GTO, new measurements on the orbit after the resonance are required.

  3. KIC 3749404: a heartbeat star with rapid apsidal advance indicative of a tertiary component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambleton, K.; Kurtz, D. W.; Prša, A.; Quinn, S. N.; Fuller, J.; Murphy, S. J.; Thompson, S. E.; Latham, D. W.; Shporer, A.

    2016-12-01

    Heartbeat stars are eccentric (e > 0.2) ellipsoidal variables whose light curves resemble a cardiogram. We present the observations and corresponding model of KIC 3749404, a highly eccentric (e = 0.66), short period (P = 20.3 d) heartbeat star with tidally induced pulsations. A binary star model was created using PHOEBE, which we modified to include tidally induced pulsations and Doppler boosting. The morphology of the photometric periastron variation (heartbeat) depends strongly on the eccentricity, inclination and argument of periastron. We show that the inclusion of tidally induced pulsations in the model significantly changes the parameter values, specifically the inclination and those parameters dependent on it. Furthermore, we determine the rate of apsidal advance by modelling the periastron variation at the beginning and end of the 4-yr Kepler data set and dividing by the elapsed time. We compare the model with the theoretical expectations for classical and general relativistic apsidal motion and find the observed rate to be two orders of magnitude greater than the theoretical rate. We find that the observed rate cannot be explained by tidally induced pulsations alone and consequently hypothesize the presence of a third body in the system.

  4. TIDALLY INDUCED APSIDAL PRECESSION IN DOUBLE WHITE DWARFS: A NEW MASS MEASUREMENT TOOL WITH LISA

    SciTech Connect

    Valsecchi, F.; Farr, W. M.; Willems, B.; Deloye, C. J.; Kalogera, V.

    2012-02-01

    Galactic interacting double white dwarfs (DWDs) are guaranteed gravitational wave (GW) sources for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna GW detector, with more than 10{sup 4} binaries expected to be detected over the mission's lifetime. Part of this population is expected to be eccentric, and here we investigate the potential for constraining the white dwarf (WD) properties through apsidal precession in these binaries. We analyze the tidal, rotational, and general relativistic contributions to apsidal precession by using detailed He WD models, where the evolution of the star's interior is followed throughout the cooling phase. In agreement with previous studies of zero-temperature WDs, we find that apsidal precession in eccentric DWDs can lead to a detectable shift in the emitted GW signal when binaries with cool (old) components are considered. This shift increases significantly for hot (young) WDs. We find that apsidal motion in hot (cool) DWDs is dominated by tides at orbital frequencies above {approx}> 10{sup -4} Hz (10{sup -3} Hz). The analysis of apsidal precession in these sources while ignoring the tidal component would lead to an extreme bias in the mass determination, and could lead us to misidentify WDs as neutron stars or black holes. We use the detailed WD models to show that for older, cold WDs, there is a unique relationship that ties the radius and apsidal precession constant to the WD masses, therefore allowing tides to be used as a tool to constrain the source masses.

  5. Apsidal rotation in the eclipsing binary AG Persei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Robert H.; Woodward, Edith J.

    1987-01-01

    New three-filter light curves of AG Per are given. These yield times of minimum light in accord with the known rate of apsidal rotation but do not improve that rate. These light curves and all other published historical ones have been treated with the code EBOP and are shown to give largely consistent geometric and photometric parameters no matter which orientation of the orbit is displayed to the observer.

  6. An extension of Newton's apsidal precession theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valluri, S. R.; Yu, P.; Smith, G. E.; Wiegert, P. A.

    2005-04-01

    Newton's apsidal precession theorem in Proposition 45 of Book I of the `Principia' has great mathematical, physical, astronomical and historical interest. The lunar theory and the precession of the perihelion of the planet Mercury are but two examples of the applications of this theorem. We have examined the precession of orbits under varying force laws as measured by the apsidal angle θ(N, e), where N is the index for the centripetal force law, for varying eccentricity e. The paper derives a general function for the apsidal angle, dependent only on e and N as the potential is spherically symmetric. Further, we explore approximate ways of the solution of this equation, in the neighbourhood of N= 2 which happens to be the case of greatest historical interest. Exact solutions are derived where they are possible. The first derivatives ∂θ/∂N and ∂θ/∂h[where h(N, e) is the angular momentum] are analytically expressed in the neighbourhood of N= 2 (case of the inverse square law). The value of ∂θ/∂N is computed numerically as well for 1 <=N < 3. The resulting integrals are interesting improper integrals with singularities at both limits. Some of the integrals, especially for N= 2, can be given in closed form in terms of generalized hypergeometric functions which are reducible in terms of algebraic and logarithmic functions. No evidence was found for isolated cases of zero precession as e was increased. The N= 1 case of the logarithmic potential is also briefly discussed in view of its interest for the dynamics of eccentric orbits and its relevance to realistic galaxy models. The possibility of apsidal precession was also examined for a few cases of high-eccentricity asteroids and extrasolar planets. We find that these systems may provide interesting new laboratories for studies of gravity.

  7. Eccentricity Inferences in Multi-planet systems with Transit Timing: Degeneracies and Apsidal Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Van Laerhoven, Christa L.; Ford, Eric B.

    2016-05-01

    Hundreds of multi-transiting systems discovered by the Kepler mission show Transit Timing Variations (TTV). In cases where the TTVs are uniquely attributable to transiting planets, the TTVs enable precise measurements of planetary masses and orbital parameters. Of particular interest are the constraints on eccentricity vectors that can be inferred in systems of low-mass exoplanets.The TTVs in these systems are dominated by a signal caused by near-resonant mean motions. This causes the well-known near-degeneracy between planetary masses and orbital eccentricities. In addition, it causes a degeneracy between the eccentricities of interacting planet pairs.For many systems, the magnitude of individual eccentricities are weakly constrained, yet the data typically provide a tight constraint on the posterior joint distribution for the eccentricity vector components. This permits tight constraints on the relative eccentricity and degree of alignment of interacting planets.For a sample of two and three-planet systems with TTVs, we highlight the effects of these correlations. While the most eccentric orbital solutions for these systems show apsidal alignment, this is often due to the degeneracy that causes correlated constraints on the eccentricity vector components. We compare the likelihood of apsidal alignment for two choices of eccentricity prior: a wide prior using a Rayleigh distribution of scale length 0.1 and a narrower prior with scale length 0.02. In all cases the narrower prior decreased the fraction of samples that exhibited apsidal alignment. However, apsidal alignment persisted in the majority of cases with a narrower eccentricity prior. For a sample of our TTV solutions, we ran simulations of these systems over secular timescales, and decomposed their eccentricity eigenmodes over time, confirming that in most cases, the eccentricities were dominated by parallel eigenmodes which favor apsidal alignment.

  8. Dynamics of the Trans-Neptune Region: Apsidal Waves in the Kuiper Belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, William R.; Hahn, Joseph M.

    1998-01-01

    The role of apsidal density waves propagating in a primordial trans-Neptune disk (i.e., Kuiper belt) is investigated. It is shown that Neptune launches apsidal waves at its secular resonance near 40 AU that propagate radially outward, deeper into the particle disk. The wavelength of apsidal waves is considerably longer than waves that might be launched at Lindblad resonances, because the pattern speed, g(sub s), resulting from the apsis precession of Neptune is much slower than its mean motion, Omega(sub s). If the early Kuiper belt had a sufficient surface density, sigma, the disk's wave response to Neptune's secular perturbation would have spread the disturbing torque radially over a collective scale lambda(sub *) approx. = r(2(mu)(sub d)Omega/ absolute value of r dg/dr)(sup 1/2), where mu(sub d)equivalent pi(sigma)r(exp 2)/(1 solar mass) and Omega(r) and g(r) are respectively the mean motion and precession frequency of the disk particles. This results in considerably smaller eccentricities at resonance than had the disk particles been treated as noninteracting test particles. Consequently, particles are less apt to be excited into planet-crossing orbits, implying that the erosion timescales reported by earlier test-particle simulations of the Kuiper belt may be underestimated. It is also shown that the torque the disk exerts upon the planet (due to its gravitational attraction for the disk's spiral wave pattern) damps the planet's eccentricity and further inhibits the planet's ability to erode the disk. Key words: celestial mechanics, stellar dynamics - comets: general minor planets, asteroids

  9. Alternating and Sequential Motion Rates in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, John E.; Cotton, Susan; Perry, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Background: Alternating motion rate (AMR) and sequential motion rate (SMR) are tests of articulatory diadochokinesis that are widely used in the evaluation of motor speech. However, there are no quality normative data available for adults aged 65 years and older. Aims: There were two aims: (1) to obtain a representative, normative dataset of…

  10. Modeling rate sensitivity of exercise transient responses to limb motion.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Stanley M; Kato, Takahide

    2014-10-01

    Transient responses of ventilation (V̇e) to limb motion can exhibit predictive characteristics. In response to a change in limb motion, a rapid change in V̇e is commonly observed with characteristics different than during a change in workload. This rapid change has been attributed to a feed-forward or adaptive response. Rate sensitivity was explored as a specific hypothesis to explain predictive V̇e responses to limb motion. A simple model assuming an additive feed-forward summation of V̇e proportional to the rate of change of limb motion was studied. This model was able to successfully account for the adaptive phase correction observed during human sinusoidal changes in limb motion. Adaptation of rate sensitivity might also explain the reduction of the fast component of V̇e responses previously reported following sudden exercise termination. Adaptation of the fast component of V̇e response could occur by reduction of rate sensitivity. Rate sensitivity of limb motion was predicted by the model to reduce the phase delay between limb motion and V̇e response without changing the steady-state response to exercise load. In this way, V̇e can respond more quickly to an exercise change without interfering with overall feedback control. The asymmetry between responses to an incremental and decremental ramp change in exercise can also be accounted for by the proposed model. Rate sensitivity leads to predicted behavior, which resembles responses observed in exercise tied to expiratory reserve volume. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Finding Planet Nine: apsidal anti-alignment Monte Carlo results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, C.; de la Fuente Marcos, R.

    2016-10-01

    The distribution of the orbital elements of the known extreme trans-Neptunian objects or ETNOs has been found to be statistically incompatible with that of an unperturbed asteroid population following heliocentric or, better, barycentric orbits. Such trends, if confirmed by future discoveries of ETNOs, strongly suggest that one or more massive perturbers could be located well beyond Pluto. Within the trans-Plutonian planets paradigm, the Planet Nine hypothesis has received much attention as a robust scenario to explain the observed clustering in physical space of the perihelia of seven ETNOs which also exhibit clustering in orbital pole position. Here, we revisit the subject of clustering in perihelia and poles of the known ETNOs using barycentric orbits, and study the visibility of the latest incarnation of the orbit of Planet Nine applying Monte Carlo techniques and focusing on the effects of the apsidal anti-alignment constraint. We provide visibility maps indicating the most likely location of this putative planet if it is near aphelion. We also show that the available data suggest that at least two massive perturbers are present beyond Pluto.

  12. Human heart rate variability relation is unchanged during motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, T. J.; Berger, R. D.; Oman, C. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    In a study of 18 human subjects, we applied a new technique, estimation of the transfer function between instantaneous lung volume (ILV) and instantaneous heart rate (HR), to assess autonomic activity during motion sickness. Two control recordings of ILV and electrocardiogram (ECG) were made prior to the development of motion sickness. During the first, subjects were seated motionless, and during the second they were seated rotating sinusoidally about an earth vertical axis. Subjects then wore prism goggles that reverse the left-right visual field and performed manual tasks until they developed moderate motion sickness. Finally, ILV and ECG were recorded while subjects maintained a relatively constant level of sickness by intermittent eye closure during rotation with the goggles. Based on analyses of ILV to HR transfer functions from the three conditions, we were unable to demonstrate a change in autonomic control of heart rate due to rotation alone or due to motion sickness. These findings do not support the notion that moderate motion sickness is manifested as a generalized autonomic response.

  13. Human heart rate variability relation is unchanged during motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, T. J.; Berger, R. D.; Oman, C. M.; Cohen, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    In a study of 18 human subjects, we applied a new technique, estimation of the transfer function between instantaneous lung volume (ILV) and instantaneous heart rate (HR), to assess autonomic activity during motion sickness. Two control recordings of ILV and electrocardiogram (ECG) were made prior to the development of motion sickness. During the first, subjects were seated motionless, and during the second they were seated rotating sinusoidally about an earth vertical axis. Subjects then wore prism goggles that reverse the left-right visual field and performed manual tasks until they developed moderate motion sickness. Finally, ILV and ECG were recorded while subjects maintained a relatively constant level of sickness by intermittent eye closure during rotation with the goggles. Based on analyses of ILV to HR transfer functions from the three conditions, we were unable to demonstrate a change in autonomic control of heart rate due to rotation alone or due to motion sickness. These findings do not support the notion that moderate motion sickness is manifested as a generalized autonomic response.

  14. Interactive-rate Motion Planning for Concentric Tube Robots.

    PubMed

    Torres, Luis G; Baykal, Cenk; Alterovitz, Ron

    2014-05-01

    Concentric tube robots may enable new, safer minimally invasive surgical procedures by moving along curved paths to reach difficult-to-reach sites in a patient's anatomy. Operating these devices is challenging due to their complex, unintuitive kinematics and the need to avoid sensitive structures in the anatomy. In this paper, we present a motion planning method that computes collision-free motion plans for concentric tube robots at interactive rates. Our method's high speed enables a user to continuously and freely move the robot's tip while the motion planner ensures that the robot's shaft does not collide with any anatomical obstacles. Our approach uses a highly accurate mechanical model of tube interactions, which is important since small movements of the tip position may require large changes in the shape of the device's shaft. Our motion planner achieves its high speed and accuracy by combining offline precomputation of a collision-free roadmap with online position control. We demonstrate our interactive planner in a simulated neurosurgical scenario where a user guides the robot's tip through the environment while the robot automatically avoids collisions with the anatomical obstacles.

  15. Motion-compensated non-contact detection of heart rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Yuejin; Liu, Xiaohua

    2015-12-01

    A new non-contact heart rate detection method based on the dual-wavelength technique is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. It is a well-known fact that the differences in the circuits of two detection modules result in different responses of two modules for motion artifacts. This poses a great challenge to compensate the motion artifacts during measurements. In order to circumvent this problem, we have proposed the amplitude spectrum and phase spectrum adaptive filter. Comparing with the time-domain adaptive filter and independent component analysis, the amplitude spectrum and phase spectrum adaptive filter can suppress the interference caused by the two circuit differences and effectively compensate the motion artifacts. To make the device is much compact and portable, a photoelectric probe is designed. The measurement distance is from several centimeters up to several meters. Moreover, the data obtained by using this non-contact detection system is compared with those of the conventional finger blood volume pulse (BVP) sensor by simultaneously measuring the heart rate of the subject. The data obtained from the proposed non-contact system are consistent and comparable with that of the BVP sensor.

  16. Realistic glottal motion and airflow rate during human breathing.

    PubMed

    Scheinherr, Adam; Bailly, Lucie; Boiron, Olivier; Lagier, Aude; Legou, Thierry; Pichelin, Marine; Caillibotte, Georges; Giovanni, Antoine

    2015-09-01

    The glottal geometry is a key factor in the aerosol delivery efficiency for treatment of lung diseases. However, while glottal vibrations were extensively studied during human phonation, the realistic glottal motion during breathing is poorly understood. Therefore, most current studies assume an idealized steady glottis in the context of respiratory dynamics, and thus neglect the flow unsteadiness related to this motion. This is particularly important to assess the aerosol transport mechanisms in upper airways. This article presents a clinical study conducted on 20 volunteers, to examine the realistic glottal motion during several breathing tasks. Nasofibroscopy was used to investigate the glottal geometrical variations simultaneously with accurate airflow rate measurements. In total, 144 breathing sequences of 30s were recorded. Regarding the whole database, two cases of glottal time-variations were found: "static" or "dynamic" ones. Typically, the peak value of glottal area during slow breathing narrowed from 217 ± 54 mm(2) (mean ± STD) during inspiration, to 178 ± 35 mm(2) during expiration. Considering flow unsteadiness, it is shown that the harmonic approximation of the airflow rate underevaluates the inertial effects as compared to realistic patterns, especially at the onset of the breathing cycle. These measurements provide input data to conduct realistic numerical simulations of laryngeal airflow and particle deposition. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Rate limiting domain and loop motions in arginine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Davulcu, Omar; Skalicky, Jack J.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Arginine kinase catalyzes the reversible transfer of a phosphoryl group between ATP and arginine. It is the arthropod homolog of creatine kinase, buffering cellular ATP levels. Crystal structures of arginine kinase, in substrate-free and substrate-bound forms, have revealed large conformational changes associated with the catalytic cycle. Recent NMR identified movements of the N-terminal domain and a loop comprising residues I182-G209 with conformational exchange rates in the substrate-free enzyme similar to the turnover rate. Here, to understand whether these motions might be rate-limiting, activation barriers for both the intrinsic dynamics and enzyme turnover are determined using measurements over a temperature range of 15 to 30°C. 15N transverse relaxation dispersion yields activation barriers of 46 ± 8 and 34 ± 12 kJ/mol for of the N-terminal domain and I182-G209 loop, respectively. An activation barrier of 34 ± 13 kJ/mol was obtained for enzyme turnover from steady-state kinetics. The similarity between the activation barriers is indeed consistent with turnover being limited by backbone conformational dynamics, and pinpoints the locations of potentially rate limiting motions. PMID:21425868

  18. 76 FR 1152 - Crosstex LIG, LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Crosstex LIG, LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing... file a motion to intervene or to protest this filing must file in accordance with Rules 211 and 214 of... or motion to intervene, as appropriate. Such notices, motions, or protests must be filed on or before...

  19. Heart Rate and Motion Analysis by GPS in Beach Soccer

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Julen; Casamichana, David

    2010-01-01

    Although beach soccer has become increasingly popular in recent years very little scientific research has been conducted into the sport. A pilot study was carried out with the aim of examining the physiological (heart rate) and physical (motion analysis) responses of beach soccer players during competitive matches. Ten players (age 25.5 ± 0.5 years; height 1.80 ± 0.08 m; weight 78.2 ± 5.6 kg.) were studied over five beach soccer matches. The physiological demands were analysed by measuring heart rate (HR) using telemetric devices, while the physical profile was evaluated by recording motion and speed by means of GPS devices. During competitive matches, players obtained a HRmean of 165.2 bpm (86.5% HRmax), with 59.3% of the time participating (TP) corresponding to values above 90% of the HRmax. The distance covered per minute of participation was 97.7 m, with 9.5% of this distance corresponding to high-intensity running and 2.5% to sprint; the work:rest ratio was 1.4:1 and the maximum speed 21.7 km·h-1. These results showed that beach soccer is an intermittent physical activity of greater intensity than other team games. It requires a major contribution from the anaerobic system as emphasis is placed on players making quick bursts of high-intensity activity separated by brief rest periods. Key points The distance covered per minute of play is around 100 m. Beach soccer is an intermittent sport with a work:rest ratio of 1.4:1. The playing surface in beach soccer is an important handicap to obtain maximum speeds. Beach soccer has a high physiological intensity, with more than half of the game is spent at intensities above 90 % of the HRmax. PMID:24149392

  20. How Fast Is Your Body Motion? Determining a Sufficient Frame Rate for an Optical Motion Tracking System Using Passive Markers.

    PubMed

    Song, Min-Ho; Godøy, Rolf Inge

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses how to determine a sufficient frame (sampling) rate for an optical motion tracking system using passive reflective markers. When using passive markers for the optical motion tracking, avoiding identity confusion between the markers becomes a problem as the speed of motion increases, necessitating a higher frame rate to avoid a failure of the motion tracking caused by marker confusions and/or dropouts. Initially, one might believe that the Nyquist-Shannon sampling rate estimated from the assumed maximal temporal variation of a motion (i.e. a sampling rate at least twice that of the maximum motion frequency) could be the complete solution to the problem. However, this paper shows that also the spatial distance between the markers should be taken into account in determining the suitable frame rate of an optical motion tracking with passive markers. In this paper, a frame rate criterion for the optical tracking using passive markers is theoretically derived and also experimentally verified using a high-quality optical motion tracking system. Both the theoretical and the experimental results showed that the minimum frame rate is proportional to the ratio between the maximum speed of the motion and the minimum spacing between markers, and may also be predicted precisely if the proportional constant is known in advance. The inverse of the proportional constant is here defined as the tracking efficiency constant and it can be easily determined with some test measurements. Moreover, this newly defined constant can provide a new way of evaluating the tracking algorithm performance of an optical tracking system.

  1. How Fast Is Your Body Motion? Determining a Sufficient Frame Rate for an Optical Motion Tracking System Using Passive Markers

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min-Ho; Godøy, Rolf Inge

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses how to determine a sufficient frame (sampling) rate for an optical motion tracking system using passive reflective markers. When using passive markers for the optical motion tracking, avoiding identity confusion between the markers becomes a problem as the speed of motion increases, necessitating a higher frame rate to avoid a failure of the motion tracking caused by marker confusions and/or dropouts. Initially, one might believe that the Nyquist-Shannon sampling rate estimated from the assumed maximal temporal variation of a motion (i.e. a sampling rate at least twice that of the maximum motion frequency) could be the complete solution to the problem. However, this paper shows that also the spatial distance between the markers should be taken into account in determining the suitable frame rate of an optical motion tracking with passive markers. In this paper, a frame rate criterion for the optical tracking using passive markers is theoretically derived and also experimentally verified using a high-quality optical motion tracking system. Both the theoretical and the experimental results showed that the minimum frame rate is proportional to the ratio between the maximum speed of the motion and the minimum spacing between markers, and may also be predicted precisely if the proportional constant is known in advance. The inverse of the proportional constant is here defined as the tracking efficiency constant and it can be easily determined with some test measurements. Moreover, this newly defined constant can provide a new way of evaluating the tracking algorithm performance of an optical tracking system. PMID:26967900

  2. 76 FR 76712 - Pelico Pipeline, LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ...] Pelico Pipeline, LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline Take notice that on... desiring to participate in this rate proceeding must file a motion to intervene or to protest this filing... to become a party must file a notice of intervention or motion to intervene, as appropriate. Such...

  3. 18 CFR 154.206 - Motion to place suspended rates into effect.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...(a)(9), that it reserves its right to file motion to place the proposed change of rate, charge... TARIFFS Procedures for Changing Tariffs § 154.206 Motion to place suspended rates into effect. (a) If, prior to the end of the suspension period, the Commission has issued an order requiring changes in the...

  4. Projecting Rate of Change in the Context of Motion onto the Context of Money

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jennifer Anne; Confrey, Jere

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports a study designed to probe the abstraction ability that US Algebra I students can achieve in moving the concepts rate of change and accumulation between motion and money contexts. The Algebra I students used the technologies motion detectors and Interactive Banking software during a replacement unit focused on slope, ratio, and…

  5. Improving Pulse Rate Measurements during Random Motion Using a Wearable Multichannel Reflectance Photoplethysmograph.

    PubMed

    Warren, Kristen M; Harvey, Joshua R; Chon, Ki H; Mendelson, Yitzhak

    2016-03-07

    Photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms are used to acquire pulse rate (PR) measurements from pulsatile arterial blood volume. PPG waveforms are highly susceptible to motion artifacts (MA), limiting the implementation of PR measurements in mobile physiological monitoring devices. Previous studies have shown that multichannel photoplethysmograms can successfully acquire diverse signal information during simple, repetitive motion, leading to differences in motion tolerance across channels. In this paper, we investigate the performance of a custom-built multichannel forehead-mounted photoplethysmographic sensor under a variety of intense motion artifacts. We introduce an advanced multichannel template-matching algorithm that chooses the channel with the least motion artifact to calculate PR for each time instant. We show that for a wide variety of random motion, channels respond differently to motion artifacts, and the multichannel estimate outperforms single-channel estimates in terms of motion tolerance, signal quality, and PR errors. We have acquired 31 data sets consisting of PPG waveforms corrupted by random motion and show that the accuracy of PR measurements achieved was increased by up to 2.7 bpm when the multichannel-switching algorithm was compared to individual channels. The percentage of PR measurements with error ≤ 5 bpm during motion increased by 18.9% when the multichannel switching algorithm was compared to the mean PR from all channels. Moreover, our algorithm enables automatic selection of the best signal fidelity channel at each time point among the multichannel PPG data.

  6. Improving Pulse Rate Measurements during Random Motion Using a Wearable Multichannel Reflectance Photoplethysmograph

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Kristen M.; Harvey, Joshua R.; Chon, Ki H.; Mendelson, Yitzhak

    2016-01-01

    Photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms are used to acquire pulse rate (PR) measurements from pulsatile arterial blood volume. PPG waveforms are highly susceptible to motion artifacts (MA), limiting the implementation of PR measurements in mobile physiological monitoring devices. Previous studies have shown that multichannel photoplethysmograms can successfully acquire diverse signal information during simple, repetitive motion, leading to differences in motion tolerance across channels. In this paper, we investigate the performance of a custom-built multichannel forehead-mounted photoplethysmographic sensor under a variety of intense motion artifacts. We introduce an advanced multichannel template-matching algorithm that chooses the channel with the least motion artifact to calculate PR for each time instant. We show that for a wide variety of random motion, channels respond differently to motion artifacts, and the multichannel estimate outperforms single-channel estimates in terms of motion tolerance, signal quality, and PR errors. We have acquired 31 data sets consisting of PPG waveforms corrupted by random motion and show that the accuracy of PR measurements achieved was increased by up to 2.7 bpm when the multichannel-switching algorithm was compared to individual channels. The percentage of PR measurements with error ≤ 5 bpm during motion increased by 18.9% when the multichannel switching algorithm was compared to the mean PR from all channels. Moreover, our algorithm enables automatic selection of the best signal fidelity channel at each time point among the multichannel PPG data. PMID:26959034

  7. Lightweight wrist photoplethysmography for heavy exercise: motion robust heart rate monitoring algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Insoo

    2015-01-01

    The challenge of heart rate monitoring based on wrist photoplethysmography (PPG) during heavy exercise is addressed. PPG is susceptible to motion artefacts, which have to be mitigated for accurate heart rate estimation. Motion artefacts are particularly apparent for wrist devices, for example, a smart watch, because of the high mobility of the arms. Proposed is a low complexity highly accurate heart rate estimation method for continuous heart rate monitoring using wrist PPG. The proposed method achieved 2.57% mean absolute error in a test data set where subjects ran for a maximum speed of 17 km/h. PMID:26609397

  8. 76 FR 41240 - Northwest Natural Gas Company; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Northwest Natural Gas Company; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case... file a motion to intervene or to protest this filing must file in accordance with Rules 211 and 214 of... or motion to intervene, as appropriate. Such notices, motions, or protests must be filed on or before...

  9. Optimal temporal interpolation filter for motion-compensated frame rate up conversion.

    PubMed

    Dane, Gökçe; Nguyen, Truong Q

    2006-04-01

    Frame rate up conversion (FRUC) methods that employ motion have been proven to provide better image quality compared to nonmotion-based methods. While motion-based methods improve the quality of interpolation, artifacts are introduced in the presence of incorrect motion vectors. In this paper, we study the design problem of optimal temporal interpolation filter for motion-compensated FRUC (MC-FRUC). The optimal filter is obtained by minimizing the prediction error variance between the original frame and the interpolated frame. In FRUC applications, the original frame that is skipped is not available at the decoder, so models for the power spectral density of the original signal and prediction error are used to formulate the problem. The closed-form solution for the filter is obtained by Lagrange multipliers and statistical motion vector error modeling. The effect of motion vector errors on resulting optimal filters and prediction error is analyzed. The performance of the optimal filter is compared to nonadaptive temporal averaging filters by using two different motion vector reliability measures. The results confirm that to improve the quality of temporal interpolation in MC, the interpolation filter should be designed based on the reliability of motion vectors and the statistics of the MC prediction error.

  10. Evaluation of the relationship between motion sickness symptomatology and blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.; Lackner, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the development of symptoms of motion sickness and changes in blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature. Twelve subjects were each evaluated four times using the vestibular-visual interaction test (Graybiel and Lackner, 1980). The results were analyzed both within and across individual subjects. Neither a systematic group nor consistent individual relationship was found between the physiological parameters and the appearance of symptoms of motion sickness. These findings suggest that biofeedback control of the physiological variables studied is not likely to prevent the expression of motion sickness symptomatology.

  11. Evaluation of the relationship between motion sickness symptomatology and blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.; Lackner, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the development of symptoms of motion sickness and changes in blood pressure, heart rate, and body temperature. Twelve subjects were each evaluated four times using the vestibular-visual interaction test (Graybiel and Lackner, 1980). The results were analyzed both within and across individual subjects. Neither a systematic group nor consistent individual relationship was found between the physiological parameters and the appearance of symptoms of motion sickness. These findings suggest that biofeedback control of the physiological variables studied is not likely to prevent the expression of motion sickness symptomatology.

  12. Heart rate monitoring from wrist-type PPG based on singular spectrum analysis with motion decision.

    PubMed

    Yang Wang; Zhiwen Liu; Bin Dong

    2016-08-01

    Heart rate (HR) monitoring is necessary for daily healthcare. Wrist-type photoplethsmography (PPG) is a convenient and non-invasive technique for HR monitoring. However, motion artifacts (MA) caused by subjects' movements can extremely interfere the results of HR monitoring. In this paper, we propose a high accuracy method using motion decision, singular spectrum analysis (SSA) and spectral peak searching for daily HR estimation. The proposed approach was evaluated on 8 subjects under a series of different motion states. Compared with electrocardiogram (ECG) recorded simultaneously, the experimental results indicated that the averaged absolute estimation error was 2.33 beats per minute (BPM).

  13. Motion sickness in cats - A symptom rating scale used in laboratory and flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suri, K. B.; Daunton, N. G.; Crampton, G. H.

    1979-01-01

    The cat is proposed as a model for the study of motion and space sickness. Development of a scale for rating the motion sickness severity in the cat is described. The scale is used to evaluate an antimotion sickness drug, d-amphetamine plus scopolamine, and to determine whether it is possible to predict sickness susceptibility during parabolic flight, including zero-G maneuvers, from scores obtained during ground based trials.

  14. Motion sickness in cats - A symptom rating scale used in laboratory and flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suri, K. B.; Daunton, N. G.; Crampton, G. H.

    1979-01-01

    The cat is proposed as a model for the study of motion and space sickness. Development of a scale for rating the motion sickness severity in the cat is described. The scale is used to evaluate an antimotion sickness drug, d-amphetamine plus scopolamine, and to determine whether it is possible to predict sickness susceptibility during parabolic flight, including zero-G maneuvers, from scores obtained during ground based trials.

  15. The Influence of the MPAA's Film Rating System on Motion Picture Attendance: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Bruce A.

    A study was undertaken to design and implement an experimental instrument for testing the influence of the Motion Picture Association of America's (MPAA) film rating system on movie attendance. Sixty-five high school students were given synopses of four different fictional films, each of which had been assigned an MPAA rating of G (approved for…

  16. 76 FR 39869 - Lee 8 Storage Partnership; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Lee 8 Storage Partnership; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case...,150 (May 20, 2010). Any person desiring to participate in this rate proceeding must file a motion to... the proceeding. Any person wishing to become a party must file a notice of intervention or motion to...

  17. 76 FR 2902 - National Fuel Gas Distribution Corporation; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline January 11, 2011. Take notice that on January 10, 2011...). Any person desiring to participate in this rate proceeding must file a motion to intervene or to... proceeding. Any person wishing to become a party must file a notice of intervention or motion to intervene...

  18. 76 FR 51969 - New Mexico Gas Company, Inc.; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission New Mexico Gas Company, Inc.; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case...,150 (May 20, 2010). Any person desiring to participate in this rate proceeding must file a motion to... the proceeding. Any person wishing to become a party must file a notice of intervention or motion to...

  19. 76 FR 40907 - Ohio Valley Hub, LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Ohio Valley Hub, LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing... desiring to participate in this rate proceeding must file a motion to intervene or to protest this filing... to become a party must file a notice of intervention or motion to intervene, as appropriate. Such...

  20. 76 FR 1152 - Crosstex North Texas Pipeline, L.P.; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Crosstex North Texas Pipeline, L.P.; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate... desiring to participate in this rate proceeding must file a motion to intervene or to protest this filing... to become a party must file a notice of intervention or motion to intervene, as appropriate. Such...

  1. 76 FR 23808 - Humble Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-28

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Humble Gas Pipeline Company; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case...,150 (May 20, 2010). Any person desiring to participate in this rate proceeding must file a motion to... the proceeding. Any person wishing to become a party must file a notice of intervention or motion to...

  2. 76 FR 81927 - EasTrans, LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission EasTrans, LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline...). Any person desiring to participate in this rate proceeding must file a motion to intervene or to... proceeding. Any person wishing to become a party must file a notice of intervention or motion to intervene...

  3. 75 FR 73075 - Calpine Texas Pipeline, L.P.; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Calpine Texas Pipeline, L.P.; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case.... (Calpine Texas) filed a motion to extend the date for filing its next rate case to August 22, 2013. Calpine... file a motion to intervene or to protest this filing must file in accordance with Rules 211 and 214 of...

  4. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic of motion. Contents include: (1) "First Word" (Zach Tobias); (2) "Cosmic Collisions" (Robert Irion); (3) "The Mobile Cell" (Karen E. Kalumuck); (4) "The Paths of Paths" (Steven Vogel); (5) "Fragments" (Pearl Tesler); (6) "Moving Pictures" (Amy Snyder); (7) "Plants on the Go" (Katharine…

  5. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhart, James B.; Nussbaum, Rudi H.

    This monograph was written for the Conference on the New Instructional Materials in Physics held at the University of Washington in summer, 1965. It is intended for use in an introductory course in college physics. It consists of an extensive qualitative discussion of motion followed by a detailed development of the quantitative methods needed to…

  6. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic of motion. Contents include: (1) "First Word" (Zach Tobias); (2) "Cosmic Collisions" (Robert Irion); (3) "The Mobile Cell" (Karen E. Kalumuck); (4) "The Paths of Paths" (Steven Vogel); (5) "Fragments" (Pearl Tesler); (6) "Moving Pictures" (Amy Snyder); (7) "Plants on the Go" (Katharine…

  7. Fuzzy entropy based motion artifact detection and pulse rate estimation for fingertip photoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Paradkar, Neeraj; Chowdhury, Shubhajit Roy

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a fingertip photoplethysmography (PPG) based technique to estimate the pulse rate of the subject. The PPG signal obtained from a pulse oximeter is used for the analysis. The input samples are corrupted with motion artifacts due to minor motion of the subjects. Entropy measure of the input samples is used to detect the motion artifacts and estimate the pulse rate. A three step methodology is adapted to identify and classify signal peaks as true systolic peaks or artifact. CapnoBase database and CSL Benchmark database are used to analyze the technique and pulse rate estimation was performed with positive predictive value and sensitivity figures of 99.84% and 99.32% respectively for CapnoBase and 98.83% and 98.84% for CSL database respectively.

  8. Objective monitoring of physical activity using motion sensors and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Freedson, P S; Miller, K

    2000-06-01

    Although neither motion sensors nor heart rate are perfect markers of physical activity, they certainly eliminate subjectivity of obtaining physical activity information. The objective method of choice depends on how the measurement will be used. For example, if walking behavior is the desired outcome, then a pedometer may be sufficient. If patterns and intensity of activity over longer periods of times such as a week or longer are needed, then an accelerometer with large memory capacity should be selected. In the future, efforts should be directed towards developing an objective motion sensor as inexpensive as a pedometer but with the data acquisition capabilities of the CSA or Tritrac accelerometer. Providing simultaneous heart rate with motion is also recommended to further verify that elevated heart rate does in fact represent a physical activity response. As the cost of the electronic components continues to decrease, these activity monitor configurations may become possible.

  9. A class of warm Jupiters with mutually inclined, apsidally misaligned close friends.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Rebekah I; Chiang, Eugene

    2014-10-10

    The orbits of giant extrasolar planets often have surprisingly small semimajor axes, large eccentricities, or severe misalignments between their orbit normals and their host stars' spin axes. In some formation scenarios invoking Kozai-Lidov oscillations, an external planetary companion drives a planet onto an orbit having these properties. The mutual inclinations for Kozai-Lidov oscillations can be large and have not been confirmed observationally. Here we present evidence that observed eccentric warm Jupiters with eccentric giant companions have mutual inclinations that oscillate between 35° and 65°. Our inference is based on the pairs' observed apsidal separations, which cluster near 90°. The near-orthogonality of periapse directions is effected by the outer companion's quadrupolar and octupolar potentials. These systems may be undergoing a stalled version of tidal migration that produces warm Jupiters over hot Jupiters, and they provide evidence for a population of multiplanet systems that are not flat and have been sculpted by Kozai-Lidov oscillations. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Sensitive, high-strain, high-rate bodily motion sensors based on graphene-rubber composites.

    PubMed

    Boland, Conor S; Khan, Umar; Backes, Claudia; O'Neill, Arlene; McCauley, Joe; Duane, Shane; Shanker, Ravi; Liu, Yang; Jurewicz, Izabela; Dalton, Alan B; Coleman, Jonathan N

    2014-09-23

    Monitoring of human bodily motion requires wearable sensors that can detect position, velocity and acceleration. They should be cheap, lightweight, mechanically compliant and display reasonable sensitivity at high strains and strain rates. No reported material has simultaneously demonstrated all the above requirements. Here we describe a simple method to infuse liquid-exfoliated graphene into natural rubber to create conducting composites. These materials are excellent strain sensors displaying 10(4)-fold increases in resistance and working at strains exceeding 800%. The sensitivity is reasonably high, with gauge factors of up to 35 observed. More importantly, these sensors can effectively track dynamic strain, working well at vibration frequencies of at least 160 Hz. At 60 Hz, we could monitor strains of at least 6% at strain rates exceeding 6000%/s. We have used these composites as bodily motion sensors, effectively monitoring joint and muscle motion as well and breathing and pulse.

  11. Alternating Motion Rate as an Index of Speech Motor Disorder in Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yu-Tsai; Kent, Ray D.; Duffy, Joseph R.; Thomas, Jack E.; Weismer, Gary

    2004-01-01

    The task of syllable alternating motion rate (AMR) (also called diadochokinesis) is suitable for examining speech disorders of varying degrees of severity and in individuals with varying levels of linguistic and cognitive ability. However, very limited information on this task has been published for subjects with traumatic brain injury (TBI). This…

  12. Electronic Motion Sensors and Heart Rate as Measures of Physical Activity in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedson, Patty S.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews several mechanical and electronic techniques for monitoring physical activity in children. The paper focuses on motion sensors (Large Scale Integrated Sensor and Caltrac Accelerometer) and heart rate, and it presents recommendations for establishing general guidelines for appropriate use of such monitoring devices with children. (SM)

  13. Alternating Motion Rate as an Index of Speech Motor Disorder in Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yu-Tsai; Kent, Ray D.; Duffy, Joseph R.; Thomas, Jack E.; Weismer, Gary

    2004-01-01

    The task of syllable alternating motion rate (AMR) (also called diadochokinesis) is suitable for examining speech disorders of varying degrees of severity and in individuals with varying levels of linguistic and cognitive ability. However, very limited information on this task has been published for subjects with traumatic brain injury (TBI). This…

  14. Inspiratory flow rate, not type of incentive spirometry device, influences chest wall motion in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Chang, Angela T; Palmer, Kerry R; McNaught, Jessie; Thomas, Peter J

    2010-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of flow rates and spirometer type on chest wall motion in healthy individuals. Twenty-one healthy volunteers completed breathing trials to either two times tidal volume (2xV(T)) or inspiratory capacity (IC) at high, low, or natural flow rates, using a volume- or flow-oriented spirometer. The proportions of rib cage movement to tidal volume (%RC/V(T)), chest wall diameters, and perceived level of exertion (RPE) were compared. Low and natural flow rates resulted in significantly lower %RC/V(T) compared to high flow rate trials (p=0.001) at 2xV(T). Low flow trials also resulted in significantly less chest wall motion in the upper anteroposterior direction than high and natural flow rates (p<0.001). At IC, significantly greater movement occurred in the abdominal lateral direction during low flow compared to high and natural flow trials (both p<0.003). RPE was lower for the low flow trials compared to high flow trials at IC and 2xV(T) (p<0.01). In healthy individuals, inspiratory flow (not device type) during incentive spirometry determines the resultant breathing pattern. High flow rates result in greater chest wall motion than low flow rates.

  15. The rate of collisions due to Brownian or gravitational motion of small drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Xiaoguang; Davis, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative predictions of the collision rate of two spherical drops undergoing Brownian diffusion or gravitational sedimentation are presented. The diffusion equation for relative Brownian motion of two drops is derived, and the relative motion of pairs of drops in gravitational sedimentation is traced via a trajectory analysis in order to develop theoretical models to determine the collision efficiencies, both with and without interparticle forces applied between the drops. It is concluded that finite collision rates between nondeforming fluid drops are possible for Brownian diffusion or gravitational sedimentation in the absence of attractive forces, in stark contrast to the prediction that lubrication forces prevent rigid spheres from contacting each other unless an attractive force that becomes infinite as the separation approaches zero is applied. Collision rates are shown to increase as the viscosity of the drop-phase decreases. In general, hydrodynamic interactions reduce the collision rates more for gravitational collisions than for Brownian collisions.

  16. Magnetic field twist driven by remote convective motions: Characteristics and twist rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zheng-Zhi; Hassam, A. B.

    1987-01-01

    It is generally believed that convective motions below the solar photosphere induce a twist in the coronal magnetic field as a result of frozen-in physics. A question of interest is how much twist can one expect from a persistent convective motion, given the fact that dissipative effects will eventually figure. This question is examined by considering a model problem: two conducting plates, with finite resistivity, are set in sheared motion and forced at constant relative speed. A resistive plasma is between the plates and an initially vertical magnetic field connects the plates. The time rate of tilt experienced by the field is obtained as a function of Hartmann number and the resistivity ratio. Both analytical and numerical approaches are considered.

  17. Frequency-locked pulse sequencer for high-frame-rate monochromatic tissue motion imaging.

    PubMed

    Azar, Reza Zahiri; Baghani, Ali; Salcudean, Septimiu E; Rohling, Robert

    2011-04-01

    To overcome the inherent low frame rate of conventional ultrasound, we have previously presented a system that can be implemented on conventional ultrasound scanners for high-frame-rate imaging of monochromatic tissue motion. The system employs a sector subdivision technique in the sequencer to increase the acquisition rate. To eliminate the delays introduced during data acquisition, a motion phase correction algorithm has also been introduced to create in-phase displacement images. Previous experimental results from tissue- mimicking phantoms showed that the system can achieve effective frame rates of up to a few kilohertz on conventional ultrasound systems. In this short communication, we present a new pulse sequencing strategy that facilitates high-frame-rate imaging of monochromatic motion such that the acquired echo signals are inherently in-phase. The sequencer uses the knowledge of the excitation frequency to synchronize the acquisition of the entire imaging plane to that of an external exciter. This sequencing approach eliminates any need for synchronization or phase correction and has applications in tissue elastography, which we demonstrate with tissue-mimicking phantoms.

  18. Motion correction for improved estimation of heart rate using a visual spectrum camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarbox, Elizabeth A.; Rios, Christian; Kaur, Balvinder; Meyer, Shaun; Hirt, Lauren; Tran, Vy; Scott, Kaitlyn; Ikonomidou, Vasiliki

    2017-05-01

    Heart rate measurement using a visual spectrum recording of the face has drawn interest over the last few years as a technology that can have various health and security applications. In our previous work, we have shown that it is possible to estimate the heart beat timing accurately enough to perform heart rate variability analysis for contactless stress detection. However, a major confounding factor in this approach is the presence of movement, which can interfere with the measurements. To mitigate the effects of movement, in this work we propose the use of face detection and tracking based on the Karhunen-Loewe algorithm in order to counteract measurement errors introduced by normal subject motion, as expected during a common seated conversation setting. We analyze the requirements on image acquisition for the algorithm to work, and its performance under different ranges of motion, changes of distance to the camera, as well and the effect of illumination changes due to different positioning with respect to light sources on the acquired signal. Our results suggest that the effect of face tracking on visual-spectrum based cardiac signal estimation depends on the amplitude of the motion. While for larger-scale conversation-induced motion it can significantly improve estimation accuracy, with smaller-scale movements, such as the ones caused by breathing or talking without major movement errors in facial tracking may interfere with signal estimation. Overall, employing facial tracking is a crucial step in adapting this technology to real-life situations with satisfactory results.

  19. High-frame-rate, motion-compensated 25.4 megapixel image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamasz, Stacy R.; Farrier, Michael G.; Ma, Shing-Fat F.; Sabila, Robert W.; Chamberlain, Savvas G.

    1994-05-01

    The applicability of large-area full-frame CCD image sensor technology to large optical format aerial reconnaissance applications has been recently demonstrated. The requirements of low-contrast, high-resolution imaging at high frame rates have generated the need for a manufacturable, multitap, small-pitch, wafer-scale CCD image sensor technology. The added requirement of incorporation of electronic motion compensation at the focal plane has generated the need for multisegmented full-frame area array architectures. Characterization results from the newly developed 5040 X 5040 element, eight-tap, full-frame image sensor with multisegmentation for electronic motion compensation are discussed. Experimental determination of resistive-capacitive time constants for metal strapped vertical clock busses on wafer-scale sensors is discussed.

  20. Motion artifact cancellation and outlier rejection for clip-type ppg-based heart rate sensor.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Takunori; Hara, Shinsuke; Okuhata, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Hajime; Kawabata, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate sensing can be used to not only understand exercise intensity but also detect life-critical condition during sports activities. To reduce stress during exercise and attach heart rate sensor easily, we developed a clip-type photoplethysmography (PPG)-based heart rate sensor. The sensor can be attached just by hanging it to the waist part of undershorts, and furthermore, it employs the motion artifact (MA) cancellation technique. However, due to its low contact pressure, sudden jumps and drops, which are called "outliers," are often observed in the sensed heart rate, so we also developed a simple outlier rejection technique. By an experiment using five male subjects (4 sets per subject), we confirmed the MA cancellation and outlier rejection capabilities.

  1. Interfraction patient motion and implant displacement in prostate high dose rate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, C. D.; Kron, T.; Leahy, M.; Duchesne, G.; Williams, S.; Tai, K. H.; Haworth, A.; Herschtal, A.; Foroudi, F.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To quantify movement of prostate cancer patients undergoing treatment, using an in-house developed motion sensor in order to determine a relationship between patient movement and high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy implant displacement. Methods: An electronic motion sensor was developed based on a three axis accelerometer. HDR brachytherapy treatment for prostate is delivered at this institution in two fractions 24 h apart and 22 patients were monitored for movement over the interval between fractions. The motion sensors functioned as inclinometers, monitoring inclination of both thighs, and the inclination and roll of the abdomen. The implanted HDR brachytherapy catheter set was assessed for displacement relative to fiducial markers in the prostate. Angle measurements and angle differences over a 2 s time base were binned, and the standard deviations of the resulting frequency distributions used as a metric for patient motion in each monitored axis. These parameters were correlated to measured catheter displacement using regression modeling. Results: The mean implant displacement was 12.6 mm in the caudal direction. A mean of 19.95 h data was recorded for the patient cohort. Patients generally moved through a limited range of angles with a mean of the exception of two patients who spent in excess of 2 h lying on their side. When tested for a relationship between movement in any of the four monitored axes and the implant displacement, none was significant. Conclusions: It is not likely that patient movement influences HDR prostate implant displacement. There may be benefits to patient comfort if nursing protocols were relaxed to allow patients greater freedom to move while the implant is in situ.

  2. Clinical significance of exercise-induced left ventricular wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate

    SciTech Connect

    Kimchi, A.; Rozanski, A.; Fletcher, C.; Maddahi, J.; Swan, H.J.; Berman, D.S.

    1987-10-01

    We studied the relationship between the heart rate at the time of onset of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality and the severity of coronary artery disease in 89 patients who underwent exercise equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography as part of their evaluation for coronary artery disease. Segmental wall motion was scored with a five-point system (3 = normal; -1 = dyskinesis); a decrease of one score defined the onset of wall motion abnormality. The onset of wall motion abnormality at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate had 100% predictive accuracy for coronary artery disease and higher sensitivity than the onset of ischemic ST segment depression at similar heart rate during exercise: 36% (25 of 69 patients with coronary disease) vs 19% (13 of 69 patients), p = 0.01. Wall motion abnormality occurring at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate was present in 49% of patients (23 of 47) with critical stenosis (greater than or equal to 90% luminal diameter narrowing), and in only 5% of patients (2 of 42) without such severe stenosis, p less than 0.001. The sensitivity of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate for the presence of severe coronary artery disease was similar to that of a deterioration in wall motion by more than two scores during exercise (49% vs 53%) or an absolute decrease of greater than or equal to 5% in exercise left ventricular ejection fraction (49% vs 45%).

  3. Influence of motion picture rating on adolescent response to movie smoking.

    PubMed

    Sargent, James D; Tanski, Susanne; Stoolmiller, Mike

    2012-08-01

    To examine the association between movie smoking exposure (MSE) and adolescent smoking according to rating category. A total of 6522 US adolescents were enrolled in a longitudinal survey conducted at 8-month intervals; 5503 subjects were followed up at 8 months, 5019 subjects at 16 months, and 4575 subjects at 24 months. MSE was estimated from 532 recent box-office hits, blocked into 3 Motion Picture Association of America rating categories: G/PG, PG-13, and R. A survival model evaluated time to smoking onset. Median MSE in PG-13-rated movies was ∼3 times higher than median MSE from R-rated movies, but their relation with smoking was essentially the same, with adjusted hazard ratios of 1.49 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.23-1.81) and 1.33 (95% CI: 1.23-1.81) for each additional 500 occurrences of MSE respectively. MSE from G/PG-rated movies was small and had no significant relationship with adolescent smoking. Attributable risk estimates showed that adolescent smoking would be reduced by 18% (95% CI: 14-21) if smoking in PG-13-rated movies was reduced to the fifth percentile. In comparison, making all parents maximally authoritative in their parenting would reduce adolescent smoking by 16% (95% CI: 12-19). The equivalent effect of PG-13-rated and R-rated MSE suggests it is the movie smoking that prompts adolescents to smoke, not other characteristics of R-rated movies or adolescents drawn to them. An R rating for movie smoking could substantially reduce adolescent smoking by eliminating smoking from PG-13 movies.

  4. Influence of Motion Picture Rating on Adolescent Response to Movie Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Tanski, Susanne; Stoolmiller, Mike

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between movie smoking exposure (MSE) and adolescent smoking according to rating category. METHODS: A total of 6522 US adolescents were enrolled in a longitudinal survey conducted at 8-month intervals; 5503 subjects were followed up at 8 months, 5019 subjects at 16 months, and 4575 subjects at 24 months. MSE was estimated from 532 recent box-office hits, blocked into 3 Motion Picture Association of America rating categories: G/PG, PG-13, and R. A survival model evaluated time to smoking onset. RESULTS: Median MSE in PG-13–rated movies was ∼3 times higher than median MSE from R-rated movies, but their relation with smoking was essentially the same, with adjusted hazard ratios of 1.49 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.23–1.81) and 1.33 (95% CI: 1.23–1.81) for each additional 500 occurrences of MSE respectively. MSE from G/PG-rated movies was small and had no significant relationship with adolescent smoking. Attributable risk estimates showed that adolescent smoking would be reduced by 18% (95% CI: 14–21) if smoking in PG-13–rated movies was reduced to the fifth percentile. In comparison, making all parents maximally authoritative in their parenting would reduce adolescent smoking by 16% (95% CI: 12–19). CONCLUSIONS: The equivalent effect of PG-13-rated and R-rated MSE suggests it is the movie smoking that prompts adolescents to smoke, not other characteristics of R-rated movies or adolescents drawn to them. An R rating for movie smoking could substantially reduce adolescent smoking by eliminating smoking from PG-13 movies. PMID:22778305

  5. Analysis and Visualization of 3D Motion Data for UPDRS Rating of Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Piro, Neltje E; Piro, Lennart K; Kassubek, Jan; Blechschmidt-Trapp, Ronald A

    2016-06-21

    Remote monitoring of Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients with inertia sensors is a relevant method for a better assessment of symptoms. We present a new approach for symptom quantification based on motion data: the automatic Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) classification in combination with an animated 3D avatar giving the neurologist the impression of having the patient live in front of him. In this study we compared the UPDRS ratings of the pronation-supination task derived from: (a) an examination based on video recordings as a clinical reference; (b) an automatically classified UPDRS; and (c) a UPDRS rating from the assessment of the animated 3D avatar. Data were recorded using Magnetic, Angular Rate, Gravity (MARG) sensors with 15 subjects performing a pronation-supination movement of the hand. After preprocessing, the data were classified with a J48 classifier and animated as a 3D avatar. Video recording of the movements, as well as the 3D avatar, were examined by movement disorder specialists and rated by UPDRS. The mean agreement between the ratings based on video and (b) the automatically classified UPDRS is 0.48 and with (c) the 3D avatar it is 0.47. The 3D avatar is similarly suitable for assessing the UPDRS as video recordings for the examined task and will be further developed by the research team.

  6. Comparison between red, green and blue light reflection photoplethysmography for heart rate monitoring during motion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihyoung; Matsumura, Kenta; Yamakoshi, Ken-ichi; Rolfe, Peter; Tanaka, Shinobu; Yamakoshi, Takehiro

    2013-01-01

    Reflection photoplethysmography (PPG) using 530 nm (green) wavelength light has the potential to be a superior method for monitoring heart rate (HR) during normal daily life due to its relative freedom from artifacts. However, little is known about the accuracy of pulse rate (PR) measured by 530 nm light PPG during motion. Therefore, we compared the HR measured by electrocadiography (ECG) as a reference with PR measured by 530, 645 (red), and 470 nm (blue) wavelength light PPG during baseline and while performing hand waving in 12 participants. In addition, we examined the change of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by motion for each of the three wavelengths used for the PPG. The results showed that the limit of agreement in Bland-Altman plots between the HR measured by ECG and PR measured by 530 nm light PPG (±0.61 bpm) was smaller than that achieved when using 645 and 470 nm light PPG (±3.20 bpm and ±2.23 bpm, respectively). The ΔSNR (the difference between baseline and task values) of 530 and 470nm light PPG was significantly smaller than ΔSNR for red light PPG. In conclusion, 530 nm light PPG could be a more suitable method than 645 and 470nm light PPG for monitoring HR in normal daily life.

  7. The effect of electrode surface roughness on the motional heating rate of electromagnetic trapped ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kuan-Yu; Low, Guang Hao; Chuang, Isaac

    Electric field noise is a major source of motional heating in trapped ion quantum computation. While it is well known that this noise is influenced by trap electrode geometry in patch potential and surface adsorbate models, this has only been analyzed for smooth surfaces. We investigate the dependence of electric field noise on the roughness of surface electrodes by deriving a Green's function describing this roughness, and evaluating its effects on adsorbate-surface binding energies. At cryogenic temperature, surface roughness is found to exponentially enhance or suppress heating rate, depending on the density distribution of surface adsorbates. Our result suggests that heating rates can be tuned over orders of magnitude by careful engineering of electrode surface profiles.

  8. Real-time 3D ultrasound fetal image enhancment techniques using motion-compensated frame rate up-conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gun-Ill; Park, Rae-Hong; Song, Young-Seuk; Kim, Cheol-An; Hwang, Jae-Sub

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, we present a motion compensated frame rate up-conversion method for real-time three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound fetal image enhancement. The conventional mechanical scan method with one-dimensional (1-D) array converters used for 3-D volume data acquisition has a slow frame rate of multi-planar images. This drawback is not an issue for stationary objects, however in ultrasound images showing a fetus of more than about 25 weeks, we perceive abrupt changes due to fast motions. To compensate for this defect, we propose the frame rate up-conversion method by which new interpolated frames are inserted between two input frames, giving smooth renditions to human eyes. More natural motions can be obtained by frame rate up-conversion. In the proposed algorithm, we employ forward motion estimation (ME), in which motion vectors (MVs) ar estimated using a block matching algorithm (BMA). To smooth MVs over neighboring blocks, vector median filtering is performed. Using these smoothed MVs, interpolated frames are reconstructed by motion compensation (MC). The undesirable blocking artifacts due to blockwise processing are reduced by block boundary filtering using a Gaussian low pass filter (LPF). The proposed method can be used in computer aided diagnosis (CAD), where more natural 3-D ultrasound images are displayed in real-time. Simulation results with several real test sequences show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  9. 77 FR 13120 - American Midstream (Louisiana Intrastate) LLC ; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission American Midstream (Louisiana Intrastate) LLC ; Notice of Motion for... Intrastate) LLC (AMLI) filed a motion requesting an extension consistent with the Federal Energy Regulatory... desiring to participate in this proceeding must file a motion to intervene or to protest this filing must...

  10. 76 FR 76711 - DCP Raptor Pipeline, LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ...] DCP Raptor Pipeline, LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline Take notice that on November 30, 2011, DCP Raptor Pipeline, LLC (Raptor) filed a request for an extension consistent..., Raptor requests that the date for its next rate filing be extended to September 1, 2014, which is...

  11. 75 FR 70752 - ONEOK WesTex Transmission, LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ONEOK WesTex Transmission, LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline November 10, 2010. Take notice that on November 2, 2010, ONEOK WesTex Transmission, LLC (OWT) filed a request to extend the date for filing its next rate case to January 3,...

  12. 76 FR 76711 - Overland Trail Transmission, LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ...-003] Overland Trail Transmission, LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline Take notice that on November 30, 2011, Overland Trail Transmission, LLC (OTTCO) filed a request for an... rates charges by section 311 and Hinshaw pipelines to extend the cycle for such reviews from three...

  13. 76 FR 79170 - Southcross CCNG Transmission Ltd.; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Southcross CCNG Transmission Ltd.; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline Take notice that on December 13, 2011, Southcross CCNG Transmission Ltd... concerning periodic reviews of rates charges by section 311 and Hinshaw pipelines to extend the cycle...

  14. 76 FR 18754 - J-W Pipeline Company; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission J-W Pipeline Company; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline Take notice that on March 28, 2011, J-W Pipeline Company (J-W) filed a request for an extension...\\ Therefore, J-W requests that the date for its next rate filing be extended to November 21, 2013, which...

  15. 75 FR 56093 - Eagle Rock Desoto Pipeline, LP; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Rock Desoto Pipeline, LP; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline September 8, 2010. Take notice that on September 8, 2010, Eagle Rock Desoto Pipeline, L.P. (Eagle Rock) filed a request to extend the date for filing its next rate case to May 1, 2012. Eagle Rock...

  16. Fast intracellular motion in the living cell by video rate reflection confocal laser scanning microscopy

    PubMed Central

    VESELY, PAVEL; BOYDE, ALAN

    2001-01-01

    Fast intracellular motion (FIM) was first revealed by back scattered light (BSL) imaging in video rate confocal scanning laser microscopy (VRCSLM), beyond the limits of spatial and temporal resolution obtainable with conventional optical microscopy. BSL imaging enabled visualisation of intra and extracellular motion with resolution in space down to 0.2 μm and in time to 1/25th of a second. Mapping the cell space at 0.2 μm×0.2 μm (XY = in instantaneous best focal plane)×0.5 μm (Z = height/depth, optic axis direction) volume steps revealed a communication layer above the known contact layer and an integrated dynamic spatial network (IDSN) towards the cell centre. FIM was originally observed as localised quasichaotic dancing (dithering) or reflecting patches/spots in the cell centre, faster in the darker nuclear space. Later, a second type of FIM was recognised which differed by the presence of a varied proportion of centrifugal and centripetal directional movements and/or jumping of patches/spots in the cell centre and outside the nuclear space. The first type is characteristic for cells in slightly adverse conditions while the second type has so far only been found in eutrophic cells. Temporal speeding up and coarsening of FIM, followed by slowing and eventually cessation at cell death, was found on exposure to strong stressors. It was concluded that the state of FIM provides instantaneous information about individual cell reactions to actual treatment and about cell survival. A putative switch between the first and second type FIM could be considered as an indicator of timing of cellular processes. The significance of FIM for the biology of the cell is seen in the rapid assessment of the condition of an individual live cell investigated by combination of various methods. Requirements for further development of this approach are outlined. PMID:11465857

  17. Perceived physical and social causality in animated motions: spontaneous reports and ratings.

    PubMed

    Schlottmann, Anne; Ray, Elizabeth D; Mitchell, Anne; Demetriou, Nathalie

    2006-01-01

    Michotte argued that we perceive cause-and-effect, without contributions from reasoning or learning, even in displays of two-dimensional moving shapes. Two studies extend this line of work from perception of mechanical to social causality. We compared verbal reports with structured ratings of causality to gain a better understanding of the extent to which perceptual causality occurs spontaneously or depends on instruction or context. A total of 120 adult observers (72 in the main experiment, 48 in an initial experiment) saw 12 (or 8) different computer animations of shape A moving up to B, which in turn moved away. Animations factorially varied the temporal and spatial relations of the shapes, and whether they moved rigidly or in a non-rigid, animal-like manner. Impressions of social as well as physical causality appeared in both free reports and ratings. Perception of physical causality was stronger than perception of social causality, particularly in free reports. No differences of this nature appear in infants and children, so the asymmetry may reflect learnt knowledge. Physical causality was relatively unspecific initially, but discrimination of causal and delayed control events improved with exposure to multiple events. Experience seems to affect the causal illusion even over a short timeframe; the idea of 'one-trial causality' may be somewhat misleading. Regardless of such effects on the absolute level of responses, the different measures showed similar patterns of variation with the spatio-temporal configuration and type of motion. The good fit of ratings and reports validates much recent work in this area.

  18. Quality Control of Structural MRI Images Applied Using FreeSurfer—A Hands-On Workflow to Rate Motion Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Backhausen, Lea L.; Herting, Megan M.; Buse, Judith; Roessner, Veit; Smolka, Michael N.; Vetter, Nora C.

    2016-01-01

    In structural magnetic resonance imaging motion artifacts are common, especially when not scanning healthy young adults. It has been shown that motion affects the analysis with automated image-processing techniques (e.g., FreeSurfer). This can bias results. Several developmental and adult studies have found reduced volume and thickness of gray matter due to motion artifacts. Thus, quality control is necessary in order to ensure an acceptable level of quality and to define exclusion criteria of images (i.e., determine participants with most severe artifacts). However, information about the quality control workflow and image exclusion procedure is largely lacking in the current literature and the existing rating systems differ. Here, we propose a stringent workflow of quality control steps during and after acquisition of T1-weighted images, which enables researchers dealing with populations that are typically affected by motion artifacts to enhance data quality and maximize sample sizes. As an underlying aim we established a thorough quality control rating system for T1-weighted images and applied it to the analysis of developmental clinical data using the automated processing pipeline FreeSurfer. This hands-on workflow and quality control rating system will aid researchers in minimizing motion artifacts in the final data set, and therefore enhance the quality of structural magnetic resonance imaging studies. PMID:27999528

  19. Physiological demands of women's rugby union: time-motion analysis and heart rate response.

    PubMed

    Virr, Jody Lynn; Game, Alex; Bell, Gordon John; Syrotuik, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the physical demands of women's rugby union match play using time-motion analysis and heart rate (HR) response. Thirty-eight premier club level female rugby players, ages 18-34 years were videotaped and HRs monitored for a full match. Performances were coded into 12 different movement categories: 5 speeds of locomotion (standing, walking, jogging, striding, sprinting), 4 forms of intensive non-running exertion (ruck/maul/tackle, pack down, scrum, lift) and 3 discrete activities (kick, jump, open field tackle). The main results revealed that backs spend significantly more time sprinting and walking whereas forwards spend more time in intensive non-running exertion and jogging. Forwards also had a significantly higher total work frequency compared to the backs, but a higher total rest frequency compared to the backs. In terms of HR responses, forwards displayed higher mean HRs throughout the match and more time above 80% of their maximum HR than backs. In summary, women's rugby union is characterised by intermittent bursts of high-intensity activity, where forwards and backs have similar anaerobic energy demands, but different specific match demands.

  20. SU-E-T-244: Motion Control Challenges in High Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hyvarinen, M; Leventouri, T; Pella, S; Dumitru, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy dose distribution is highly localized and has a very sharp fall-off. Thus the one of the most important part of the treatment is the localization and immobilization of the applicator from the implantation to the setup verification to the treatment delivery. The smallest motions of the patient can induce a small rotation, tilt, or translational movement of the applicator that can convert into miss of a significant part of the tumor or to over irradiating a nearby critical organ.The purpose of this study is to revise most of the HDR types of treatments with their applicators and their localization challenges. Since every millimeter of misplacement counts the study will look into the necessity of increasing the immobilization for several types of applicators. Methods: The study took over 136 plans generated by the treatment planning system (TPS) looking into the applicator placement in regard to the organs at risk (OR) and simulated the three possible displacements at the hottest dose point on the critical organ for several accessories to evaluate the variation of the delivered dose at the point due to the displacement. Results: Many of the present immobilization devices produced for external radiotherapy can be used to improve the localization of HDR applicators during transportation of the patient and during treatment. Conclusion: This study data indicates that an improvement of the immobilization devices for HDR is absolutely necessary. Better applicator fixation devices are required too. Developing new immobilization devices for all the applicators is recommended.

  1. 76 FR 36913 - Washington Gas Light Company; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Washington Gas Light Company; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline Take notice that on June 15, 2011, Washington Gas Light Company (Washington Gas) filed...

  2. 77 FR 55469 - Kinder Morgan Border Pipeline LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ... (Commission) revised policy of periodic review from a triennial to a five year period. The Commission, in Order No. 735, modified its policy concerning periodic reviews of rates charges by section 311 and... to become a party must file a notice of intervention or motion to intervene, as appropriate. Such...

  3. Ride quality - An exploratory study and criteria development. [visual motion simulator measurement of response ratings of ride quality of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The Langley six degree of freedom visual motion simulator has been used to measure subjective response ratings of the ride quality of eight segments of flight, representative of a wide variation in comfort estimates. The results indicate that the use of simulators for this purpose appears promising. A preliminary approach for the development of criteria for ride quality ratings based on psychophysical precepts is included.

  4. Time-motion analysis, heart rate, and physiological characteristics of international canoe polo athletes.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Scott C; Kennedy, Michael D; Bell, Gordon J

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the time international canoe polo players spend performing various game activities, measure heart rate (HR) responses during games, and describe the physiological profile of elite players. Eight national canoe polo players were videotaped and wore HR monitors during 3 games at a World Championship and underwent fitness testing. The mean age, height, and weight were 25 ± 1 years, 1.82 ± 0.04 m, and 81.9 ± 10.9 kg, respectively. Time-motion analysis of 3 games indicated that the players spent 29 ± 3% of the game slow and moderate forward paddling, 28 ± 5% contesting, 27 ± 5% resting and gliding, 7 ± 1% turning, 5 ± 1% backward paddling, 2 ± 1% sprinting, and 2 ± 1% dribbling. Sixty-nine (±20)% of the game time was played at an HR intensity above the HR that corresponded to the ventilatory threshold (VT) that was determined during the peak V[Combining Dot Above]O2 test. Peak oxygen uptake and VT were 3.3 ± 0.3 and 2.2 ± 0.3 L·min, respectively, on a modified Monark arm crank ergometer. Arm crank peak 5-second anaerobic power was 379 W. The majority of the time spent during international canoe polo games involved slow-to-moderate forward paddling, contesting for the ball, and resting and gliding. Canoe polo games are played at a high intensity indicated by the HR responses, and the physiological characteristics suggest that these athletes had high levels of upper body aerobic and anaerobic fitness levels.

  5. Alternating Motion Rate to Distinguish Elderly People With History of Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kera, Takeshi; Edahiro, Ayako; Hirano, Hirohiko; Kawai, Hisashi; Yoshida, Hideyo; Kojima, Motonaga; Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Ihara, Kazushige; Obuchi, Shuichi

    2016-12-01

    Under the hypothesis that elderly people in the community may have deficient oropharyngeal dysfunction, the purpose of this case-control study was to compare oral and physical characteristics in elderly people with and without a history of pneumonia and to identify factors distinguishing them. In 2014, we examined 1,311 elderly people who agreed to participate in a longitudinal and intervention study for the community-dwelling elderly. We looked at such physical characteristics as body composition, grip power, gait, and balance and at oropharyngeal characteristics, such as alternating motion rate (AMR) in speech and the repetitive saliva-swallowing test (RSST). The subjects were also asked about past history of pneumonia and other morbid conditions. From that information, we extracted 24 subjects reporting to have had pneumonia within the previous 5 y as well as 172 other subjects who matched the pneumonia subjects with respect to age, sex, and number of other morbidities to form 2 groups for comparisons. We also subjected the data to a logistic regression analysis, with having or not having pneumonia as the dependent variable, oral and physical characteristics as independent variables, and age and sex as covariates. No significant differences were seen in physical characteristics between the 2 groups. Among the oropharyngeal characteristics, AMR was significantly lower in the pneumonia subjects (P = .005, effect size = 0.20), whereas RSST exhibited no significant difference between the 2 groups. Logistic regression revealed AMR to be the only factor related to pneumonia (P = .002, odds ratio 0.169, 95% CI 0.056-0.508). In community-dwelling elderly people, association of pneumonia with skilled tongue control (AMR) rather than with swallowing (RSST) prompts a reexamination of what constitutes being at risk for pneumonia. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  6. Seismic hazard in Hawaii: High rate of large earthquakes and probabilistics ground-motion maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, F.W.; Frankel, A.D.; Mueller, C.S.; Wesson, R.L.; Okubo, P.G.

    2001-01-01

    The seismic hazard and earthquake occurrence rates in Hawaii are locally as high as that near the most hazardous faults elsewhere in the United States. We have generated maps of peak ground acceleration (PGA) and spectral acceleration (SA) (at 0.2, 0.3 and 1.0 sec, 5% critical damping) at 2% and 10% exceedance probabilities in 50 years. The highest hazard is on the south side of Hawaii Island, as indicated by the MI 7.0, MS 7.2, and MI 7.9 earthquakes, which occurred there since 1868. Probabilistic values of horizontal PGA (2% in 50 years) on Hawaii's south coast exceed 1.75g. Because some large earthquake aftershock zones and the geometry of flank blocks slipping on subhorizontal decollement faults are known, we use a combination of spatially uniform sources in active flank blocks and smoothed seismicity in other areas to model seismicity. Rates of earthquakes are derived from magnitude distributions of the modem (1959-1997) catalog of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory's seismic network supplemented by the historic (1868-1959) catalog. Modern magnitudes are ML measured on a Wood-Anderson seismograph or MS. Historic magnitudes may add ML measured on a Milne-Shaw or Bosch-Omori seismograph or MI derived from calibrated areas of MM intensities. Active flank areas, which by far account for the highest hazard, are characterized by distributions with b slopes of about 1.0 below M 5.0 and about 0.6 above M 5.0. The kinked distribution means that large earthquake rates would be grossly under-estimated by extrapolating small earthquake rates, and that longer catalogs are essential for estimating or verifying the rates of large earthquakes. Flank earthquakes thus follow a semicharacteristic model, which is a combination of background seismicity and an excess number of large earthquakes. Flank earthquakes are geometrically confined to rupture zones on the volcano flanks by barriers such as rift zones and the seaward edge of the volcano, which may be expressed by a magnitude

  7. EFFECTS OF TURBULENCE, ECCENTRICITY DAMPING, AND MIGRATION RATE ON THE CAPTURE OF PLANETS INTO MEAN MOTION RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchum, Jacob A.; Adams, Fred C.; Bloch, Anthony M.

    2011-01-01

    Pairs of migrating extrasolar planets often lock into mean motion resonance as they drift inward. This paper studies the convergent migration of giant planets (driven by a circumstellar disk) and determines the probability that they are captured into mean motion resonance. The probability that such planets enter resonance depends on the type of resonance, the migration rate, the eccentricity damping rate, and the amplitude of the turbulent fluctuations. This problem is studied both through direct integrations of the full three-body problem and via semi-analytic model equations. In general, the probability of resonance decreases with increasing migration rate, and with increasing levels of turbulence, but increases with eccentricity damping. Previous work has shown that the distributions of orbital elements (eccentricity and semimajor axis) for observed extrasolar planets can be reproduced by migration models with multiple planets. However, these results depend on resonance locking, and this study shows that entry into-and maintenance of-mean motion resonance depends sensitively on the migration rate, eccentricity damping, and turbulence.

  8. Complexity control of fast motion estimation in H.264/MPEG-4 AVC with rate-distortion-complexity optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mo; Forchhammer, Søren; Aghito, Shankar M.

    2007-01-01

    A complexity control algorithm for H.264 advanced video coding is proposed. The algorithm can control the complexity of integer inter motion estimation for a given target complexity. The Rate-Distortion-Complexity performance is improved by a complexity prediction model, simple analysis of the past statistics and a control scheme. The algorithm also works well for scene change condition. Test results for coding interlaced video (720 x576 PAL) are reported.

  9. The effects of autogenic-feedback training on motion sickness severity and heart rate variability in astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toscano, William B.; Cowings, Patricia S.

    1994-01-01

    Space motion sickness (SMS) affects 50 percent of all people during early days of spaceflight. This study describes the results of two Shuttle flight experiments in which autogenic-feedback training (AFT), a physiological conditioning method, was tested as a treatment for this disorder. Of the six who were designated as flight subjects (two women and four men), three were given treatment and three served as controls (i.e., no AFT). Treatment subjects were given 6 hours of preflight AFT. Preflight results showed that AFT produced a significant increase in tolerance to rotating chair motion sickness tests. Further, this increased tolerance was associated with changes in specific physiological responses and reports of reduced malaise. Flight results showed that two of the three control subjects experienced repeated vomiting on the first mission day, while one subject experienced only moderate malaise. Of the three treatment subjects, one experienced mild discomfort, one moderate discomfort, and one severe motion sickness. Only the three control subjects took medication for symptom suppression. Measures of cardiac function reflective of vagal control were shown to be affected especially strongly on the first day of space flight. AFT given for control of heart rate, respiration, and other autonomic activity influenced both the vagal control measures and SMS. These data suggest that AFT may be an effective treatment for space motion sickness; however, this cannot be demonstrated conclusively with the small number of subjects described.

  10. Quantifying melt production and degassing rate at mid-ocean ridges from global mantle convection models with plate motion history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingming; Black, Benjamin; Zhong, Shijie; Manga, Michael; Rudolph, Maxwell L.; Olson, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The Earth's surface volcanism exerts first-order controls on the composition of the atmosphere and the climate. On Earth, the majority of surface volcanism occurs at mid-ocean ridges. In this study, based on the dependence of melt fraction on temperature, pressure, and composition, we compute melt production and degassing rate at mid-ocean ridges from three-dimensional global mantle convection models with plate motion history as the surface velocity boundary condition. By incorporating melting in global mantle convection models, we connect deep mantle convection to surface volcanism, with deep and shallow mantle processes internally consistent. We compare two methods to compute melt production: a tracer method and an Eulerian method. Our results show that melt production at mid-ocean ridges is mainly controlled by surface plate motion history, and that changes in plate tectonic motion, including plate reorganizations, may lead to significant deviation of melt production from the expected scaling with seafloor production rate. We also find a good correlation between melt production and degassing rate beneath mid-ocean ridges. The calculated global melt production and CO2 degassing rate at mid-ocean ridges varies by as much as a factor of 3 over the past 200 Myr. We show that mid-ocean ridge melt production and degassing rate would be much larger in the Cretaceous, and reached maximum values at ˜150-120 Ma. Our results raise the possibility that warmer climate in the Cretaceous could be due in part to high magmatic productivity and correspondingly high outgassing rates at mid-ocean ridges during that time.

  11. Combining High Rate GPS and Strong Motion Data: A Kalman Filter Formulation for Real-Time Displacement Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melgar Moctezuma, D.; Bock, Y.; Crowell, B. W.

    2010-12-01

    Displacement waveforms in seismology are traditionally obtained by integration, polynomial fitting and filtering of strong motion records. The displacements so obtained are band-limited since the low frequency components (including the static deformation) are not accurately determined. Additionally there is no objective way of determining the proper parameters for this numerical process (filter corner frequency, polynomial order, etc.) and they have to be tailored by each researcher to what “works best” for every station-event pair. This hinders the automatization of the process, the application to large networks, and real-time processing. We demonstrate a new technique that utilizes elements from the theory of stochastic estimation and control to derive a multi-rate Kalman filter that fuses data from strong motion and GPS instruments in order to obtain real-time total (dynamic and static) displacement waveforms. The filter allows one to combine data streams with different sampling rates. Our formulation assumes Gaussian white noise in both accelerometer and GPS observations, whose variances are determined objectively from pre-event windows for each data type. We demonstrate the multi-rate Kalman filter with two examples: (1) Outdoor experiments at the NEES Large High-Performance Outdoor Shake Table at UCSD in which real recorded seismograms from the 1971 San Fernando and 1994 Northridge earthquakes were utilized as input, with observations taken by 250 Hz accelerometers and 50 Hz GPS receivers; (2) Data from the April 4, 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake (Mw 7.2) collected by 100 Hz strong motion recordings from stations of the California Integrated Seismic Network (CISN) and 1 Hz GPS data from the California Real Time Network (CRTN), at co-located stations as far as 300 km from the epicenter. Spectral analysis of the resulting displacement waveforms shows some limitations in the Kalman filter’s real-time epoch-by-epoch formulation that depend on the slower

  12. Real-time coseismic displacements from tightly-integrated processing of high-rate GNSS and strong motion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingxing; Ge, Maorong; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Rongjiang; Klotz, Jürgen; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2013-04-01

    Precise point positioning (PPP), which can provide "absolute" coseismic displacements with respect to a global reference frame (defined by the satellite orbits and clocks) with a stand-alone GNSS receiver, is advantageous and being used more and more widely for high-rate GNSS seismology. Following the availability of real-time high-rate GNSS observations and precise satellite orbit and clock products, the interest in the real-time PPP technique has greatly increased to construct displacement waveforms and to invert for source parameters of earthquakes in real time. Furthermore, PPP ambiguity fixing approaches developed in recent years provide an important promise to overcome the accuracy limitation of the traditional PPP float solution and to achieve comparable accuracy with relative/network positioning. The main weaknesses of current GNSS measurements are the lower sampling rates (1~50Hz) and the larger high-frequency noise contribution compared to the seismic sensors. Strong motion sensors are able to sample at very high rates (e.g. 200Hz) and perform very well in the high-frequency range as it is much more sensitive to ground motions than GNSS receiver, especially in the vertical direction. However, the double integration is accompanied by unphysical drifts due to sensor rotation and tilt, hysteresis, and imprecision in the numerical integration process. GNSS and seismic instruments are mutually beneficial for geophysical applications because weaknesses of one observation technique are offset by strengths in the other. In order to take full use of the complementary of GNSS and strong motion sensors, we propose an approach of integrating the strong motion data into the real-time ambiguity-fixed PPP processing. A tightly-integrated filter is developed to estimate coseismic displacements from raw GNSS phase and pseudorange observations and raw strong motion data. The performance of the proposed tightly-integrated approach was demonstrated using the collocated high-rate

  13. Inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging of targets with complex motions based on modified chirp rate-quadratic chirp rate distribution for cubic phase signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanyan, Li; Tao, Su; Jibin, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    For targets with complex motions, the time-varying Doppler frequency deteriorates inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) images. After range alignment and phase adjustment, azimuth echoes in a range cell can be modeled as multicomponent cubic phase signals (CPSs). The chirp rate and the quadratic chirp rate of the CPS are identified as the causes of the time-varying Doppler frequency; thus, it is necessary to estimate these two parameters correctly to obtain a well-focused ISAR image. The parameter-estimation algorithm based on the modified chirp rate-quadratic chirp rate distribution (M-CRQCRD) is proposed for the CPS and applied to the ISAR imaging of targets with complex motions. The computational cost of M-CRQCRD is low, because it can be implemented by the fast Fourier transform (FFT) and the nonuniform FFT easily. Compared to two representative parameter-estimation algorithms, the M-CRQCRD can acquire a higher antinoise performance due to the introduction of an optimal lag-time. Through simulations and analyses for the synthetic radar data, the effectiveness of the M-CRQCRD and the imaging algorithm based on the M-CRQCRD are verified.

  14. Parental attitudes about cigarette smoking and alcohol use in the Motion Picture Association of America rating system.

    PubMed

    Longacre, Meghan R; Adachi-Mejia, Anna M; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Gibson, Jennifer J; Beach, Michael L; Dalton, Madeline A

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate whether parents want smoking and alcohol use to be considered in movie ratings. Data were collected as part of a longitudinal study of adolescent health behavior involving 2564 parent/child dyads from northern New England. Parents (n = 2401) were surveyed at wave 2 about movie ratings. Qualitative interviews were conducted with a subset of parents (n = 62) 15 months later. Participants were surveyed by telephone. Most parents (94.9%; n = 2279) were mothers, 52.5% were younger than 40 years, and 90.6% were white, and children were aged 9 to 15 years. Whether cigarette and alcohol use should be included as movie ratings criteria and if movies with cigarette or alcohol use should be rated R. About 52% (n = 1242) and 66% (n = 1579) of parents believed cigarette or alcohol use, respectively, should be used as movie ratings criteria; 28.9% (n = 693) supported an R rating for movies with smoking and 41.9% (n = 1003) supported R ratings for alcohol. In adjusted models, parents were more likely to support adding cigarette and alcohol use as ratings criteria if they believed the current ratings were not useful, they restricted their children from watching R-rated movies, and they were nondrinkers. Nonsmoking parents were more likely to support an R rating for smoking. Interviews revealed that parents may underestimate the impact of movie smoking and drinking. Although a majority of parents supported including smoking or drinking in ratings criteria, fewer favored R ratings. Parental support could be a key factor in determining the impact of modifications to the Motion Picture Association of America rating system.

  15. Parental Attitudes About Cigarette Smoking and Alcohol Use in the Motion Picture Association of America Rating System

    PubMed Central

    Longacre, Meghan R.; Adachi-Mejia, Anna M.; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Gibson, Jennifer J.; Beach, Michael L.; Dalton, Madeline A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether parents want smoking and alcohol use to be considered in movie ratings. Design Data were collected as part of a longitudinal study of adolescent health behavior involving 2564 parent/child dyads from northern New England. Parents (n=2401) were surveyed at wave 2 about movie ratings. Qualitative interviews were conducted with a subset of parents (n=62) 15 months later. Setting Participants were surveyed by telephone. Participants Most parents (94.9%; n=2279) were mothers, 52.5% were younger than 40 years, and 90.6% were white, and children were aged 9 to 15 years. Main Outcome Measures Whether cigarette and alcohol use should be included as movie ratings criteria and if movies with cigarette or alcohol use should be rated R. Results About 52% (n=1242) and 66% (n=1579) of parents believed cigarette or alcohol use, respectively, should be used as movie ratings criteria; 28.9% (n=693) supported an R rating for movies with smoking and 41.9% (n=1003) supported R ratings for alcohol. In adjusted models, parents were more likely to support adding cigarette and alcohol use as ratings criteria if they believed the current ratings were not useful, they restricted their children from watching R-rated movies, and they were nondrinkers. Nonsmoking parents were more likely to support an R rating for smoking. Interviews revealed that parents may underestimate the impact of movie smoking and drinking. Conclusions Although a majority of parents supported including smoking or drinking in ratings criteria, fewer favored R ratings. Parental support could be a key factor in determining the impact of modifications to the Motion Picture Association of America rating system. PMID:19255388

  16. Auger decay rates of core hole states using equation of motion coupled cluster method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aryya; Vaval, Nayana; Pal, Sourav

    2017-01-01

    The recent development of Linac coherent light source high intense X-ray laser makes it possible to create double core ionization in the molecule. The generation of double core hole state and its decay is identified by Auger spectroscopy. The decay of this double core hole (DCH) states can be used as a powerful spectroscopic tool in chemical analysis. In the present work, we have implemented a promising approach, known as CAP-EOMCC method, which is a combination of complex absorbing potential (CAP) and equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOMCC) approach to calculate the lifetime of single and double core hole states. We have applied this method to calculate the lifetime of the single core hole (K-LL) and double core hole (KK-KLL) states of CH4, NH3 and HF molecules. The predicted lifetime is found to be extremely short.

  17. A Robust Random Forest-Based Approach for Heart Rate Monitoring Using Photoplethysmography Signal Contaminated by Intense Motion Artifacts.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yalan; He, Wenwen; Cheng, Yunfei; Huang, Wenxia; Zhang, Zhilin

    2017-02-16

    The estimation of heart rate (HR) based on wearable devices is of interest in fitness. Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a promising approach to estimate HR due to low cost; however, it is easily corrupted by motion artifacts (MA). In this work, a robust approach based on random forest is proposed for accurately estimating HR from the photoplethysmography signal contaminated by intense motion artifacts, consisting of two stages. Stage 1 proposes a hybrid method to effectively remove MA with a low computation complexity, where two MA removal algorithms are combined by an accurate binary decision algorithm whose aim is to decide whether or not to adopt the second MA removal algorithm. Stage 2 proposes a random forest-based spectral peak-tracking algorithm, whose aim is to locate the spectral peak corresponding to HR, formulating the problem of spectral peak tracking into a pattern classification problem. Experiments on the PPG datasets including 22 subjects used in the 2015 IEEE Signal Processing Cup showed that the proposed approach achieved the average absolute error of 1.65 beats per minute (BPM) on the 22 PPG datasets. Compared to state-of-the-art approaches, the proposed approach has better accuracy and robustness to intense motion artifacts, indicating its potential use in wearable sensors for health monitoring and fitness tracking.

  18. A Robust Random Forest-Based Approach for Heart Rate Monitoring Using Photoplethysmography Signal Contaminated by Intense Motion Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yalan; He, Wenwen; Cheng, Yunfei; Huang, Wenxia; Zhang, Zhilin

    2017-01-01

    The estimation of heart rate (HR) based on wearable devices is of interest in fitness. Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a promising approach to estimate HR due to low cost; however, it is easily corrupted by motion artifacts (MA). In this work, a robust approach based on random forest is proposed for accurately estimating HR from the photoplethysmography signal contaminated by intense motion artifacts, consisting of two stages. Stage 1 proposes a hybrid method to effectively remove MA with a low computation complexity, where two MA removal algorithms are combined by an accurate binary decision algorithm whose aim is to decide whether or not to adopt the second MA removal algorithm. Stage 2 proposes a random forest-based spectral peak-tracking algorithm, whose aim is to locate the spectral peak corresponding to HR, formulating the problem of spectral peak tracking into a pattern classification problem. Experiments on the PPG datasets including 22 subjects used in the 2015 IEEE Signal Processing Cup showed that the proposed approach achieved the average absolute error of 1.65 beats per minute (BPM) on the 22 PPG datasets. Compared to state-of-the-art approaches, the proposed approach has better accuracy and robustness to intense motion artifacts, indicating its potential use in wearable sensors for health monitoring and fitness tracking. PMID:28212327

  19. Controlling the rate of shuttling motions in [2]rotaxanes by electrostatic interactions: a cation as solvent-tunable brake.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pradyut; Federwisch, Guido; Kogej, Michael; Schalley, Christoph A; Haase, Detlev; Saak, Wolfgang; Lützen, Arne; Gschwind, Ruth M

    2005-08-07

    A series of rotaxanes, with phenolic axle centerpieces and tetralactam macrocycles as the wheels, has been prepared in good yields. The threaded rotaxane structure is confirmed in the gas phase by tandem mass spectrometric experiments through a detailed fragmentation pattern analysis, in solution by NMR spectroscopy, and in the solid state through X-ray crystallography. A close inspection of the 1H,1H NOESY and 1H,1H ROESY NMR data reveals the wheel to travel along the axle between two degenerate diamide "stations" close to the two stoppers. By deprotonation of a phenolic OH group in the axle centerpiece with Schwesinger's P1 base, surprisingly no additional shuttling station is generated at the axle center, although the wheel could form rather strong hydrogen bonds with the phenolate. Instead, the wheel continues to travel between the two diamide stations. Experimental data from 1H,1H NOESY spectra, together with theoretical calculations, show that strong electrostatic interactions between the phenolate moiety and the P1 cation displace the wheel from the "phenolate station". The cation acts as a "brake" for the shuttling movement. Instead of suppressing the shuttling motion completely, as observed in other rotaxanes, our rotaxane is the first system in which electrostatic interactions modulate the speed of the mechanical motion between a fast and a slow motion state as a response to a reversible external stimulus. By tuning these electrostatic interactions through solvent effects, the rate of movement can be influenced significantly, when for example different amounts of DMSO are added to dichloromethane. Besides the shuttling motion, circumrotation of the wheel around the axle is observed and analyzed by variable temperature NMR spectroscopy. Force field and AM1 calculations are in good agreement with the experimental findings.

  20. Slip-rate measurements on the Karakorum Fault may imply secular variations in fault motion.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, M-L; Ryerson, F J; Tapponnier, P; Finkel, R C; Van Der Woerd, J; Haibing, Li; Qing, Liu

    2005-01-21

    Beryllium-10 surface exposure dating of offset moraines on one branch of the Karakorum Fault west of the Gar basin yields a long-term (140- to 20-thousand-year) right-lateral slip rate of approximately 10.7 +/- 0.7 millimeters per year. This rate is 10 times larger than that inferred from recent InSAR analyses ( approximately 1 +/- 3 millimeters per year) that span approximately 8 years and sample all branches of the fault. The difference in slip-rate determinations suggests that large rate fluctuations may exist over centennial or millennial time scales. Such fluctuations would be consistent with mechanical coupling between the seismogenic, brittle-creep, and ductile shear sections of faults that reach deep into the crust.

  1. Comparative evaluation of susceptibility to motion artifact in different wearable systems for monitoring respiratory rate.

    PubMed

    Lanatà, Antonio; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale; Nardini, Elena; Loriga, Giannicola; Paradiso, Rita; De-Rossi, Danilo

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to comparatively evaluate the performance of different wearable systems based on indirect breathing monitoring in terms of susceptibility to motion artifacts. These performances are compared with direct respiratory measurements using a spirometer, which is accurate, reliable, and less sensitive to movement artifacts, but cannot be integrated into truly wearable form. Experiments were carried out on four indirect methods implemented into wearable systems, inductive plethysmography, impedance plethysmography, piezoresistive pneumography, and piezoelectric pneumography, to ascertain the performance of each of them in terms of noise due to movement artifacts, as well as to study the effects of different movements or gestures during each test. A group of volunteers was asked to wear all of the breath monitoring systems simultaneously along with the face mask of the spirometer while carrying out four physical exercises in a gym under controlled conditions. Data are analyzed in the time and frequency domain to estimate the frequency respiration from each wearable system and compare it with those of the spirometer. Results confirmed that all the wearable systems are somehow affected by movement artifacts, but statistical investigation showed that for most of the physical exercises, three out of four, piezoelectric pneumography provided best performance in terms of robustness and reduced susceptibility to movement artifacts.

  2. 76 FR 79170 - Southcross Mississippi Pipeline, L.P.; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Southcross Mississippi Pipeline, L.P.; Notice of Motion for Extension of... proceeding must file a motion to intervene, or to protest this filing must file in accordance with Rules 211... notice of intervention or motion to intervene, as appropriate. Such notices, motions, or protests must be...

  3. The forward rate of binding of surface-tethered reactants: effect of relative motion between two surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, K C; Hammer, D A

    1999-01-01

    The reaction of molecules confined to two dimensions is of interest in cell adhesion, specifically for the reaction between cell surface receptors and substrate-bound ligand. We have developed a model to describe the overall rate of reaction of species that are bound to surfaces under relative motion, such that the Peclet number is order one or greater. The encounter rate between reactive species is calculated from solution of the two-dimensional convection-diffusion equation. The probability that each encounter will lead to binding depends on the intrinsic rate of reaction and the encounter duration. The encounter duration is obtained from the theory of first passage times. We find that the binding rate increases with relative velocity between the two surfaces, then reaches a plateau. This plateau indicates that the increase in the encounter rate is counterbalanced by the decrease in the encounter duration as the relative velocity increases. The binding rate is fully described by two dimensionless parameters, the Peclet number and the Damköhler number. We use this model to explain data from the cell adhesion literature by incorporating these rate laws into "adhesive dynamics" simulations to model the binding of a cell to a surface under flow. Leukocytes are known to display a "shear threshold effect" when binding selectin-coated surfaces under shear flow, defined as an increase in bind rate with shear; this effect, as calculated here, is due to an increase in collisions between receptor and ligand with increasing shear. The model can be used to explain other published data on the effect of wall shear rate on the binding of cells to surfaces, specifically the mild decrease in binding within a fixed area with increasing shear rate. PMID:10049312

  4. Analysis and Visualization of 3D Motion Data for UPDRS Rating of Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Piro, Neltje E.; Piro, Lennart K.; Kassubek, Jan; Blechschmidt-Trapp, Ronald A.

    2016-01-01

    Remote monitoring of Parkinson’s Disease (PD) patients with inertia sensors is a relevant method for a better assessment of symptoms. We present a new approach for symptom quantification based on motion data: the automatic Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) classification in combination with an animated 3D avatar giving the neurologist the impression of having the patient live in front of him. In this study we compared the UPDRS ratings of the pronation-supination task derived from: (a) an examination based on video recordings as a clinical reference; (b) an automatically classified UPDRS; and (c) a UPDRS rating from the assessment of the animated 3D avatar. Data were recorded using Magnetic, Angular Rate, Gravity (MARG) sensors with 15 subjects performing a pronation-supination movement of the hand. After preprocessing, the data were classified with a J48 classifier and animated as a 3D avatar. Video recording of the movements, as well as the 3D avatar, were examined by movement disorder specialists and rated by UPDRS. The mean agreement between the ratings based on video and (b) the automatically classified UPDRS is 0.48 and with (c) the 3D avatar it is 0.47. The 3D avatar is similarly suitable for assessing the UPDRS as video recordings for the examined task and will be further developed by the research team. PMID:27338400

  5. The dissociation and recombination rates of CH4 through the Ni(111) surface: The effect of lattice motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenji; Zhao, Yi

    2017-07-01

    Methane dissociation is a prototypical system for the study of surface reaction dynamics. The dissociation and recombination rates of CH4 through the Ni(111) surface are calculated by using the quantum instanton method with an analytical potential energy surface. The Ni(111) lattice is treated rigidly, classically, and quantum mechanically so as to reveal the effect of lattice motion. The results demonstrate that it is the lateral displacements rather than the upward and downward movements of the surface nickel atoms that affect the rates a lot. Compared with the rigid lattice, the classical relaxation of the lattice can increase the rates by lowering the free energy barriers. For instance, at 300 K, the dissociation and recombination rates with the classical lattice exceed the ones with the rigid lattice by 6 and 10 orders of magnitude, respectively. Compared with the classical lattice, the quantum delocalization rather than the zero-point energy of the Ni atoms further enhances the rates by widening the reaction path. For instance, the dissociation rate with the quantum lattice is about 10 times larger than that with the classical lattice at 300 K. On the rigid lattice, due to the zero-point energy difference between CH4 and CD4, the kinetic isotope effects are larger than 1 for the dissociation process, while they are smaller than 1 for the recombination process. The increasing kinetic isotope effect with decreasing temperature demonstrates that the quantum tunneling effect is remarkable for the dissociation process.

  6. A hip joint simulator study using simplified loading and motion cycles generating physiological wear paths and rates.

    PubMed

    Barbour, P S; Stone, M H; Fisher, J

    1999-01-01

    In some designs of hip joint simulator the cost of building a highly complex machine has been offset with the requirement for a large number of test stations. The application of the wear results generated by these machines depends on their ability to reproduce physiological wear rates and processes. In this study a hip joint simulator has been shown to reproduce physiological wear using only one load vector and two degrees of motion with simplified input cycles. The actual path of points on the femoral head relative to the acetabular cup were calculated and compared for physiological and simplified input cycles. The in vitro wear rates were found to be highly dependent on the shape of these paths and similarities could be drawn between the shape of the physiological paths and the simplified elliptical paths.

  7. Heart rate, blood lactate concentration, and time-motion analysis of female basketball players during competition.

    PubMed

    Matthew, Dionne; Delextrat, Anne

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the physiological demands and movement patterns of female basketball players after changes in the rules of the game. Nine varsity players were studied during nine official games. Each game was videotaped to identify the frequencies of the main movements performed, heart rate was recorded continuously, and blood samples were collected to determine blood lactate concentration when the competition rules allowed. The main results showed that the players performed on average 652 +/- 128 movements per game, which corresponded to a change in activity every 2.82 s. Mean heart rate was 165 +/- 9 beats . min(-1) (89.1% of maximum heart rate) for total time and 170 +/- 8 beats . min(-1) (92.5% of maximum) for live time. Mean blood lactate concentration was 5.2 +/- 2.7 mmol . l(-1) (55.9% of maximum blood lactate concentration). In addition, heart rates were significantly higher in the first half than the second half of games. These results indicate: (1) a greater physiological load compared with previous studies on female players tested before the rules modification (Beam & Merrill, 1994; McArdle et al., 1971) and (2) lower movement frequencies compared with male players competing under modern rules (Ben Abdelkrim et al., 2007). These observations must be taken into account by coaches and conditioning specialists working with female players.

  8. Magma production rate along the Ninetyeast Ridge and its relationship to Indian plate motion and Kerguelen hot spot activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreejith, K. M.; Krishna, K. S.

    2015-02-01

    The Ninetyeast Ridge, a linear trace of the Kerguelen hot spot in the Indian Ocean, was emplaced on a rapidly drifting Indian plate. Magma production rates along the ridge track are computed using gravity-derived excess crustal thickness data. The production rates change between 2 and 15 m3/s over timescales of 3-16 Myr. Major variations in magma production rates are primarily associated with significant changes in the Indian plate velocity with low-production phases linked to high plate velocity periods. The lowest magma production rate (2 m3/s) at 62 Ma is associated with the rapid northward drift of Indian plate under the influence of the Reunion mantle plume. The contemporaneous slowing of the African plate coincides with increase in magma production rate along the Walvis Ridge in the Atlantic Ocean. The present study suggests that variations in the Indian plate motion and frequent ridge jumps have a major role in controlling the magma production, particularly on long-period cycles (~16 Myr). Short-period variations (~5 Myr) in magma productions may be associated with intrinsic changes in the plume, possibly due to the presence of solitary waves in the plume conduit.

  9. A novel machine learning-enabled framework for instantaneous heart rate monitoring from motion-artifact-corrupted electrocardiogram signals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingxue; Zhou, Dian; Zeng, Xuan

    2016-11-01

    This paper proposes a novel machine learning-enabled framework to robustly monitor the instantaneous heart rate (IHR) from wrist-electrocardiography (ECG) signals continuously and heavily corrupted by random motion artifacts in wearable applications. The framework includes two stages, i.e. heartbeat identification and refinement, respectively. In the first stage, an adaptive threshold-based auto-segmentation approach is proposed to select out heartbeat candidates, including the real heartbeats and large amounts of motion-artifact-induced interferential spikes. Then twenty-six features are extracted for each candidate in time, spatial, frequency and statistical domains, and evaluated by a spare support vector machine (SVM) to select out ten critical features which can effectively reveal residual heartbeat information. Afterwards, an SVM model, created on the training data using the selected feature set, is applied to find high confident heartbeats from a large number of candidates in the testing data. In the second stage, the SVM classification results are further refined by two steps: (1) a rule-based classifier with two attributes named 'continuity check' and 'locality check' for outlier (false positives) removal, and (2) a heartbeat interpolation strategy for missing-heartbeat (false negatives) recovery. The framework is evaluated on a wrist-ECG dataset acquired by a semi-customized platform and also a public dataset. When the signal-to-noise ratio is as low as  -7 dB, the mean absolute error of the estimated IHR is 1.4 beats per minute (BPM) and the root mean square error is 6.5 BPM. The proposed framework greatly outperforms well-established approaches, demonstrating that it can effectively identify the heartbeats from ECG signals continuously corrupted by intense motion artifacts and robustly estimate the IHR. This study is expected to contribute to robust long-term wearable IHR monitoring for pervasive heart health and fitness management.

  10. Estimating Brownian motion dispersal rate, longevity and population density from spatially explicit mark-recapture data on tropical butterflies.

    PubMed

    Tufto, Jarle; Lande, Russell; Ringsby, Thor-Harald; Engen, Steinar; Saether, Bernt-Erik; Walla, Thomas R; DeVries, Philip J

    2012-07-01

    1. We develop a Bayesian method for analysing mark-recapture data in continuous habitat using a model in which individuals movement paths are Brownian motions, life spans are exponentially distributed and capture events occur at given instants in time if individuals are within a certain attractive distance of the traps. 2. The joint posterior distribution of the dispersal rate, longevity, trap attraction distances and a number of latent variables representing the unobserved movement paths and time of death of all individuals is computed using Gibbs sampling. 3. An estimate of absolute local population density is obtained simply by dividing the Poisson counts of individuals captured at given points in time by the estimated total attraction area of all traps. Our approach for estimating population density in continuous habitat avoids the need to define an arbitrary effective trapping area that characterized previous mark-recapture methods in continuous habitat. 4. We applied our method to estimate spatial demography parameters in nine species of neotropical butterflies. Path analysis of interspecific variation in demographic parameters and mean wing length revealed a simple network of strong causation. Larger wing length increases dispersal rate, which in turn increases trap attraction distance. However, higher dispersal rate also decreases longevity, thus explaining the surprising observation of a negative correlation between wing length and longevity. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2012 British Ecological Society.

  11. A multi-channel opto-electronic sensor to accurately monitor heart rate against motion artefact during exercise.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Abdullah; Hu, Sijung; Azorin-Peris, Vicente; Barrett, Laura; Esliger, Dale; Hayes, Matthew; Akbare, Shafique; Achart, Jérôme; Kuoch, Sylvain

    2015-10-12

    This study presents the use of a multi-channel opto-electronic sensor (OEPS) to effectively monitor critical physiological parameters whilst preventing motion artefact as increasingly demanded by personal healthcare. The aim of this work was to study how to capture the heart rate (HR) efficiently through a well-constructed OEPS and a 3-axis accelerometer with wireless communication. A protocol was designed to incorporate sitting, standing, walking, running and cycling. The datasets collected from these activities were processed to elaborate sport physiological effects. t-test, Bland-Altman Agreement (BAA), and correlation to evaluate the performance of the OEPS were used against Polar and Mio-Alpha HR monitors. No differences in the HR were found between OEPS, and either Polar or Mio-Alpha (both p > 0.05); a strong correlation was found between Polar and OEPS (r: 0.96, p < 0.001); the bias of BAA 0.85 bpm, the standard deviation (SD) 9.20 bpm, and the limits of agreement (LOA) from -17.18 bpm to +18.88 bpm. For the Mio-Alpha and OEPS, a strong correlation was found (r: 0.96, p < 0.001); the bias of BAA 1.63 bpm, SD 8.62 bpm, LOA from -15.27 bpm to +18.58 bpm. These results demonstrate the OEPS to be capable of carrying out real time and remote monitoring of heart rate.

  12. A Multi-Channel Opto-Electronic Sensor to Accurately Monitor Heart Rate against Motion Artefact during Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Alzahrani, Abdullah; Hu, Sijung; Azorin-Peris, Vicente; Barrett, Laura; Esliger, Dale; Hayes, Matthew; Akbare, Shafique; Achart, Jérôme; Kuoch, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the use of a multi-channel opto-electronic sensor (OEPS) to effectively monitor critical physiological parameters whilst preventing motion artefact as increasingly demanded by personal healthcare. The aim of this work was to study how to capture the heart rate (HR) efficiently through a well-constructed OEPS and a 3-axis accelerometer with wireless communication. A protocol was designed to incorporate sitting, standing, walking, running and cycling. The datasets collected from these activities were processed to elaborate sport physiological effects. t-test, Bland-Altman Agreement (BAA), and correlation to evaluate the performance of the OEPS were used against Polar and Mio-Alpha HR monitors. No differences in the HR were found between OEPS, and either Polar or Mio-Alpha (both p > 0.05); a strong correlation was found between Polar and OEPS (r: 0.96, p < 0.001); the bias of BAA 0.85 bpm, the standard deviation (SD) 9.20 bpm, and the limits of agreement (LOA) from −17.18 bpm to +18.88 bpm. For the Mio-Alpha and OEPS, a strong correlation was found (r: 0.96, p < 0.001); the bias of BAA 1.63 bpm, SD 8.62 bpm, LOA from −15.27 bpm to +18.58 bpm. These results demonstrate the OEPS to be capable of carrying out real time and remote monitoring of heart rate. PMID:26473860

  13. Effects of Three Recovery Protocols on Range of Motion, Heart Rate, Rating of Perceived Exertion, and Blood Lactate in Baseball Pitchers During a Simulated Game.

    PubMed

    Warren, Courtney D; Szymanski, David J; Landers, Merrill R

    2015-11-01

    Baseball pitching has been described as an anaerobic activity from a bioenergetics standpoint with short bouts of recovery. Depending on the physical conditioning and muscle fiber composition of the pitcher as well as the number of pitches thrown per inning and per game, there is the possibility of pitchers fatiguing during a game, which could lead to a decrease in pitching performance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 3 recovery protocols: passive recovery, active recovery (AR), and electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) on range of motion (ROM), heart rate (HR), rating of perceived exertion (RPE), and blood lactate concentration in baseball pitchers during a simulated game. Twenty-one Division I intercollegiate baseball pitchers (age = 20.4 ± 1.4 years; height = 185.9 ± 8.4 cm; weight = 86.5 ± 8.9 kg; percent body fat = 11.2 ± 2.6) volunteered to pitch 3 simulated 5-inning games, with a maximum of 70 fastballs thrown per game while wearing an HR monitor. Range of motion was measured pre, post, and 24 hours postpitching for shoulder internal and external rotation at 90° and elbow flexion and extension. Heart rate was recorded after each pitch and after every 30 seconds of the 6-minute recovery period. Rating of perceived exertion was recorded after the last pitch of each inning and after completing each 6-minute recovery period. Immediately after throwing the last pitch of each inning, postpitching blood lactate concentration (PPLa-) was measured. At the end of the 6-minute recovery period, before the next inning started, postrecovery blood lactate concentration (PRLa-) was measured. Pitchers were instructed to throw each pitch at or above 95% of their best-pitched fastball. This was enforced to ensure that each pitcher was throwing close to maximal effort for all 3 simulated games. All data presented represent group mean values. Results revealed that the method of recovery protocol did not significantly influence ROM (p > 0

  14. Material Parameter Determination of an L4-L5 Motion Segment Finite Element Model Under High Loading Rates.

    PubMed

    Pyles, C O; Zhang, J; Demetropoulos, C K; Bradfield, C A; Ott, K A; Armiger, R S; Merkle, A C

    2015-01-01

    Underbody blast (UBB) events impart vertical loads through a victim’s lumbar spine, resulting in fracture, paralysis, and disc rupture. Validated biofidelic lumbar models allow characterization of injury mechanisms and development of personal protective equipment. Previous studies have focused on lumbar mechanics under quasi-static loading. However, it is unclear how the role and response of individual spinal components of the lumbar spine change under dynamic loading. The present study leverages high-rate impacts of progressively dissected two-vertebra lumbar motion segments and Split-Hopkinson pressure bar tissue characterization to identify and validate material properties of a high-fidelity lumbar spine finite element model for UBB. The annulus fibrosus was modeled as a fiber-reinforced Mooney-Rivlin material, while ligaments were represented by nonlinear spring elements. Optimization and evaluation of material parameters was achieved by minimizing the root-mean-square (RMS) of compressive displacement and sagittal rotation for selected experimental conditions. Applying dynamic based material models and parameters resulted in a 0.42% difference between predicted and experiment axial compression during impact loading. This dynamically optimized lumbar model is suited for cross validation against whole-lumbar loading scenarios, and prediction of injury during UBB and other dynamic events.

  15. Modulation of the reaction rate of regulating protein induces large morphological and motional change of amoebic cell.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Shin I; Sasai, Masaki

    2007-03-21

    Morphologies of moving amoebae are categorized into two types. One is the "neutrophil" type in which the long axis of cell roughly coincides with its moving direction. This type of cell extends a leading edge at the front and retracts a narrow tail at the rear, whose shape has been often drawn as a typical amoeba in textbooks. The other one is the "keratocyte" type with widespread lamellipodia along the front side arc. Short axis of cell in this type roughly coincides with its moving direction. In order to understand what kind of molecular feature causes conversion between two types of morphologies, and how two typical morphologies are maintained, a mathematical model of amoebic cells is developed. This model describes movement of cell and intracellular reactions of activator, inhibitor and actin filaments in a unified way. It is found that the producing rate of activator is a key factor of conversion between two types. This model also explains the observed data that the keratocyte type cells tend to rapidly move along a straight line. The neutrophil type cells move along a straight line when the moving velocity is small, but they show fluctuated motions deviating from a line when they move as fast as the keratocyte type cells. Efficient energy consumption in the neutrophil type cells is predicted.

  16. Development of the wake behind a circular cylinder impulsively started into rotatory and rectilinear motion: Intermediate rotation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yen-Ming; Ou, Yuh-Roung; Pearlstein, Arne J.

    1991-01-01

    The temporal development of two-dimensional viscous incompressible flow generated by a circular cylinder started impulsively into steady rotatory and rectilinear motion is studied by integration of a velocity/vorticity formulation of the governing equations, using an explicit finite-difference/pseudo-spectral technique and an implementation of the Biot-Savart law. Results are presented for a Reynolds number of 200 (based on the cylinder diameter 2a and the magnitude U of the rectilinear velocity) for several values of the angular/rectilinear speed ratio alpha = (omega x a)/U (where omega is the angular speed) up to 3.25. Several aspects of the kinematics and dynamics of the flow not considered earlier are discussed. For higher values of alpha, the results indicate that for Re = 200, vortex shedding does indeed occur for alpha = 3.25. The shedding process is; however, very different from that which gives rise to the usual Karman vortex street for alpha = 0. In particular, consecutive vortices shed by the body can be shed from the same side and be of the same sense, in contrast to the nonrotating case, in which mirror-image vortices of opposite sense are shed alternately on opposite sides of the body. The implications of the results are discussed in relation to the possibility of suppressing vortex shedding by open or closed-loop control of the rotation rate.

  17. Self-rated disability, fear-avoidance beliefs, nonorganic pain behaviors are important mediators of ranges of active motion in chronic whiplash patients.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Howard; Guerriero, Rocco; Kavanaugh, Shawn; Soave, David; Puhl, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    The influence of self-rated disability and fear-avoidance beliefs on whiplash sufferers in their performance of active ranges of motion has not been studied well. We undertook a cross-sectional study to determine this. Chronic whiplash subjects completed a standard clinical examination. They completed the Neck Disability Index (NDI), the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK) and pain visual analog scale (VAS). Active ranges of motion (goniometer) and cervical nonorganic simulation signs (C-NOSS) were obtained by the examiner. Univariate and multivariable analyses were conducted on these scores. Sixty-four subjects (37 female) with a mean age of 41.4 (SD 16.1) years completed all scores. NDI, pain VAS and C-NOSS correlated significantly with ROM. In a multivariable model, only the NDI score contributed significantly to the variance of the ROM scores (14%). As chronic whiplash sufferers perform ROM in a clinical examination, these ranges are importantly influenced by their self-perceived disability. Cervical nonorganic simulation signs can be helpful in distinguishing high from very high levels of disability and motion restriction. The lack of correlation with the TSK may present a challenge to the Fear Avoidance Model in whiplash. Implications for Rehabilitation Self-ratings of disability in chronic whiplash sufferers are influenced by their fear-avoidance beliefs. While self-ratings of disability are known to predict chronicity of whiplash, there is less known about how these ratings affect impairment assessment during recovery. This study shows that self-ratings of disability influence the presentation of impairment by chronic whiplash sufferers with respect to their ranges of neck motion. Signs of nonorganic behavior also influence ranges of motion and self-ratings of disability. These findings should be incorporated into the interpretation of impairment findings in chronic whiplash sufferers in order to improve management.

  18. Heart-Rate Dependent Improvement in Image Quality and Diagnostic Accuracy of Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography by Novel Intra-cycle Motion Correction Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Iksung; Elmore, Kimberly; Hartaigh, Bríain ó; Schulman-Marcus, Josh; Granser, Heidi; Valenti, Valentina; Xiong, Guanglei; Carrascosa, Patricia M; Min, James K

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the effect of a novel intra-cycle motion correction algorithm (MCA) on diagnostic accuracy of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) Methods Coronary artery phantom models were scanned at static and heart rates (HR) simulation of 60–100 beat/min and reconstructed with a conventional algorithm (CA) and MCA. Results Among 144 coronary segments, improvements in image interpretability, quality and diagnostic accuracy by MCA were observed for HRs of 80 and 100 (P<0.05 for all), but not for HR of 60. Conclusion Novel intra-cycle motion correction algorithm demonstrates improved heart-rate dependent image interpretability, and quality and accuracy, particularly at higher heart rates. PMID:25649255

  19. Investigation of visually induced motion sickness in dynamic 3D contents based on subjective judgment, heart rate variability, and depth gaze behavior.

    PubMed

    Wibirama, Sunu; Hamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Visually induced motion sickness (VIMS) is an important safety issue in stereoscopic 3D technology. Accompanying subjective judgment of VIMS with objective measurement is useful to identify not only biomedical effects of dynamic 3D contents, but also provoking scenes that induce VIMS, duration of VIMS, and user behavior during VIMS. Heart rate variability and depth gaze behavior are appropriate physiological indicators for such objective observation. However, there is no information about relationship between subjective judgment of VIMS, heart rate variability, and depth gaze behavior. In this paper, we present a novel investigation of VIMS based on simulator sickness questionnaire (SSQ), electrocardiography (ECG), and 3D gaze tracking. Statistical analysis on SSQ data shows that nausea and disorientation symptoms increase as amount of dynamic motions increases (nausea: p<;0.005; disorientation: p<;0.05). To reduce VIMS, SSQ and ECG data suggest that user should perform voluntary gaze fixation at one point when experiencing vertical motion (up or down) and horizontal motion (turn left and right) in dynamic 3D contents. Observation of 3D gaze tracking data reveals that users who experienced VIMS tended to have unstable depth gaze than ones who did not experience VIMS.

  20. Conceptualizing Mathematics "Motion Problems"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeough, William J.

    1970-01-01

    Describes an instructional method in secondary school mathematics applicable to physics instruction, to develop conceptual understanding of motion word problems. Distance, rate, and time are defined, used as variables and considered with relative motion as a unifying concept. (JM)

  1. The reliability of lumbar motion palpation using continuous analysis and confidence ratings: choosing a relevant index of agreement

    PubMed Central

    Cooperstein, Robert; Young, Morgan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Most studies show motion palpation unreliable. This study’s primary objective was assessing its reliability using a continuous measure methods, most-fixated level paradigm, stratified by examiners’ confidence; and the secondary objective was comparing various indices of examiner agreement. Methods: Thirty-four minimally symptomatic participants were palpated in side posture by two experienced examiners. Interexaminer differences in identifying the most-fixated level and degree of examiner confidence were recorded. Indices of agreement were: Intraclass correlation coefficient, Mean and Median Examiner Absolute Examiner Differences, Root-Mean-Square Error and Bland-Altman Limits of Agreement. Results: Three of four reliability indices (excluding intraclass correlation) suggested on average examiners agreed on the most fixated motion segment, and agreement increased with confidence. Statistical measures of data dispersion were low. The analyses of subgroups were “fragile” due to small sample size. Discussion: Although subject homogeneity lowered ICC levels, the other reliability measures were not similarly impacted. Continuous measures statistical analysis demonstrates examiner agreement in situations where discrete analysis with kappa may not. Conclusion: Continuous analysis for the lumbar most-fixated level is reliable. Future studies will need a larger sample size to properly analyze subgroups based on examiner confidence. PMID:27385834

  2. A fault slip model of the 2016 Meinong, Taiwan, earthquake from near-source strong motion and high-rate GPS waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Ruey-Juin; Wen, Yi-Ying; Tseng, Po-Ching; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Cheu, Chi-Yu; Hsieh, Min-Che; Ching, Kuo-En

    2017-04-01

    The 6 February 2016 MW 6.5 Meinong earthquake (03:57:26.1 local time) occurred at about 30 km ESE of the Tainan city with a focal depth of 14.6 km. It is a mid-crust moderate-sized event, however, produced widespread strong shaking in the 30-km-away Tainan city and caused about 10 buildings collapsed and 117 death. Furthermore, the earthquake created a 20 x 10 km2 dome-shaped structure with a maximum uplift of 13 cm in between the epicenter and the Tainan city. We collected 81 50-Hz GPS and 130 strong motion data recorded within 60 km epicentral distances. High-rate GPS data are processed with GIPSY 6.4 and the calculated GPS displacement wavefield record section shows 40-60 cm Peak Ground Displacement (PGD) concentrated at 25-30 km WNW of the epicenter. The large PGDs correspond to 65-85 cm/sec PGV, which are significantly larger than the near-fault ground motion collected from moderate-sized earthquakes occurred worldwide. To investigate the source properties of the causative fault, considering the azimuthal coverage and data quality, we selected waveform data from 10 50-Hz GPS stations and 10 free-field 200-Hz strong motion stations to invert for the finite source parameters using the non-negative least squares approach. A bandpass filter of 0.05-0.5 Hz is applied to both high-rate GPS data and strong motion data, with sampling rate of 0.1 sec. The fault plane parameters (strike 281 degrees, dip 24 degrees) derived from Global Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) are used in the finite fault inversion. The results of our joint GPS and strong motion data inversion indicates two major slip patches. The first large-slip patch occurred just below the hypocenter propagating westward at a 15-25 km depth range. The second high-slip patch appeared at 5-10 km depth slipping westward under the western side of the erected structure shown by InSAR image. These two large-slip patches appeared to devoid of aftershock seismicity, which concentrated mainly at the low-slip zones.

  3. A Novel Time-Varying Spectral Filtering Algorithm for Reconstruction of Motion Artifact Corrupted Heart Rate Signals During Intense Physical Activities Using a Wearable Photoplethysmogram Sensor.

    PubMed

    Salehizadeh, Seyed M A; Dao, Duy; Bolkhovsky, Jeffrey; Cho, Chae; Mendelson, Yitzhak; Chon, Ki H

    2015-12-23

    Accurate estimation of heart rates from photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals during intense physical activity is a very challenging problem. This is because strenuous and high intensity exercise can result in severe motion artifacts in PPG signals, making accurate heart rate (HR) estimation difficult. In this study we investigated a novel technique to accurately reconstruct motion-corrupted PPG signals and HR based on time-varying spectral analysis. The algorithm is called Spectral filter algorithm for Motion Artifacts and heart rate reconstruction (SpaMA). The idea is to calculate the power spectral density of both PPG and accelerometer signals for each time shift of a windowed data segment. By comparing time-varying spectra of PPG and accelerometer data, those frequency peaks resulting from motion artifacts can be distinguished from the PPG spectrum. The SpaMA approach was applied to three different datasets and four types of activities: (1) training datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 12 subjects while performing treadmill exercise from 1 km/h to 15 km/h; (2) test datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 11 subjects while performing forearm and upper arm exercise. (3) Chon Lab dataset including 10 min recordings from 10 subjects during treadmill exercise. The ECG signals from all three datasets provided the reference HRs which were used to determine the accuracy of our SpaMA algorithm. The performance of the SpaMA approach was calculated by computing the mean absolute error between the estimated HR from the PPG and the reference HR from the ECG. The average estimation errors using our method on the first, second and third datasets are 0.89, 1.93 and 1.38 beats/min respectively, while the overall error on all 33 subjects is 1.86 beats/min and the performance on only treadmill experiment datasets (22 subjects) is 1.11 beats/min. Moreover, it was found that dynamics of heart rate variability can be

  4. A Novel Time-Varying Spectral Filtering Algorithm for Reconstruction of Motion Artifact Corrupted Heart Rate Signals During Intense Physical Activities Using a Wearable Photoplethysmogram Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Salehizadeh, Seyed M. A.; Dao, Duy; Bolkhovsky, Jeffrey; Cho, Chae; Mendelson, Yitzhak; Chon, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimation of heart rates from photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals during intense physical activity is a very challenging problem. This is because strenuous and high intensity exercise can result in severe motion artifacts in PPG signals, making accurate heart rate (HR) estimation difficult. In this study we investigated a novel technique to accurately reconstruct motion-corrupted PPG signals and HR based on time-varying spectral analysis. The algorithm is called Spectral filter algorithm for Motion Artifacts and heart rate reconstruction (SpaMA). The idea is to calculate the power spectral density of both PPG and accelerometer signals for each time shift of a windowed data segment. By comparing time-varying spectra of PPG and accelerometer data, those frequency peaks resulting from motion artifacts can be distinguished from the PPG spectrum. The SpaMA approach was applied to three different datasets and four types of activities: (1) training datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 12 subjects while performing treadmill exercise from 1 km/h to 15 km/h; (2) test datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 11 subjects while performing forearm and upper arm exercise. (3) Chon Lab dataset including 10 min recordings from 10 subjects during treadmill exercise. The ECG signals from all three datasets provided the reference HRs which were used to determine the accuracy of our SpaMA algorithm. The performance of the SpaMA approach was calculated by computing the mean absolute error between the estimated HR from the PPG and the reference HR from the ECG. The average estimation errors using our method on the first, second and third datasets are 0.89, 1.93 and 1.38 beats/min respectively, while the overall error on all 33 subjects is 1.86 beats/min and the performance on only treadmill experiment datasets (22 subjects) is 1.11 beats/min. Moreover, it was found that dynamics of heart rate variability can be

  5. The effectiveness of the motion picture association of America's rating system in screening explicit violence and sex in top-ranked movies from 1950 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Nalkur, Priya G; Jamieson, Patrick E; Romer, Daniel

    2010-11-01

    Youth exposure to explicit film violence and sex is linked to adverse health outcomes and is a serious public health concern. The Motion Picture Association of America's (MPAA's) rating system's effectiveness in reducing youth exposure to harmful content has been questioned. To determine the MPAA's rating system's effectiveness in screening explicit violence and sex since the system's initiation (1968) and the introduction of the PG-13 category (1984). Also, to examine evidence of less restrictive ratings over time ("ratings creep"). Top-grossing movies from 1950 to 2006 (N = 855) were coded for explicitness of violent and sexual content. Trends in rating assignments and in the content of different rating categories since 1968 were assessed. The explicitness of violent and sexual content significantly increased following the rating system's initiation. The system did not differentiate violent content as well as sexual content, and ratings creep was only evident for violent films. Explicit violence in R-rated films increased, while films that would previously have been rated R were increasingly assigned to PG-13. This pattern was not evident for sex; only R-rated films exhibited higher levels of explicit sex compared to preratings period. While relatively effective for screening explicit sex, the rating system has allowed increasingly violent content into PG-13 films, thereby increasing youth access to more harmful content. Assignment of films in the current rating system should be more sensitive to the link between violent media exposure and youth violence. Copyright © 2010 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reaction Rate Constants of CH4(ads) ⇌ CH3(ads) + H(ads) on Ni(111): The Effect of Lattice Motion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenji; Zhao, Yi

    2015-12-31

    Methane dissociation on metal surfaces is of great commercial importance. The dissociation and recombination rate constants of CH4 on Ni(111) are calculated using the quantum instanton approach with the path integral Monte Carlo method. The Ni(111) lattice is treated rigidly, classically, and quantum mechanically to reveal the effects of lattice motion and quantum tunneling. For the dissociation of CH4, the rates have the smallest value on the rigid lattice, while they possess the largest value on the quantum lattice. For instance, at 300 K, the rates on the classical and quantum lattices are 5 and 12 times larger than that on the rigid lattice, respectively. The curve of the Arrhenius plot for the dissociation rates on the rigid lattice demonstrates that the quantum tunneling effect of the ruptured H atom is remarkable, while the nearly invariable dissociation rates at low temperatures on the quantum lattice confirm that the thermally assisted tunneling should be dominant at low temperatures. For the recombination of CH4, the quantum lattice still has rates that are much larger than that of the rigid lattice. For instance, the ratio of the recombination rates on the quantum and rigid lattices is 12 at 300 K. The quantum tunneling effect seems to play a minor role in the recombination rates on the rigid lattice; however, the thermally assisted tunneling is still very significant for the recombination process.

  7. Electromechanical actuator with controllable motion, fast response rate, and high-frequency resonance based on graphene and polydiacetylene.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiajie; Huang, Lu; Li, Na; Huang, Yi; Wu, Yingpeng; Fang, Shaoli; Oh, Jiyoung; Kozlov, Mikhail; Ma, Yanfeng; Li, Feifei; Baughman, Ray; Chen, Yongsheng

    2012-05-22

    Although widely investigated, novel electromechanical actuators with high overall actuation performance are still in urgent need for various practical and scientific applications, such as robots, prosthetic devices, sensor switches, and sonar projectors. In this work, combining the properties of unique environmental perturbations-actuated deformational isomerization of polydiacetylene (PDA) and the outstanding intrinsic features of graphene together for the first time, we design and fabricate an electromechanical bimorph actuator composed of a layer of PDA crystal and a layer of flexible graphene paper through a simple yet versatile solution approach. Under low applied direct current (dc), the graphene-PDA bimorph actuator with strong mechanical strength can generate large actuation motion (curvature is about 0.37 cm(-1) under a current density of 0.74 A/mm(2)) and produce high actuation stress (more than 160 MPa/g under an applied dc of only 0.29 A/mm(2)). When applying alternating current (ac), this actuator can display reversible swing behavior with long cycle life under high frequencies even up to 200 Hz; significantly, while the frequency and the value of applied ac and the state of the actuators reach an appropriate value, the graphene-PDA actuator can produce a strong resonance and the swing amplitude will jump to a peak value. Moreover, this stable graphene-PDA actuator also demonstrates rapidly and partially reversible electrochromatic phenomenon when applying an ac. Two mechanisms-the dominant one, electric-induced deformation, and a secondary one, thermal-induced expansion of PDA-are proposed to contribute to these interesting actuation performances of the graphene-PDA actuators. On the basis of these results, a mini-robot with controllable direction of motion based on the graphene-PDA actuator is designed to illustrate the great potential of our discoveries for practical use. Combining the unique actuation mechanism and many outstanding properties of

  8. Constraining Rates of Neoarchean Plate Motion through Magnetostratigraphy and Integrated High-Precision Geochronology of the Fortescue Group, Pilbara, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasbohm, J.; Maloof, A. C.; Schoene, B.; Weiss, B. P.

    2015-12-01

    Plate tectonics influences the global climate and carbon cycle. Continental arrangement affects Earth's albedo, and rates of plate motion control heat flux from the interior and rate of volcanic degassing. While rates of Phanerozoic plate movements and magnetic field reversals have been well studied, little is known about these phenomena in Earth's early tectonic history due to a paucity of unaltered Archean rocks retaining primary magnetization. Archean tectonics and an active geodynamo would have played an important role in creating environments suitable for life. A magnetostratigraphic study integrated with high-precision geochronology has the potential to quantify plate velocities and magnetic field reversal rates. The 2.7 Ga Fortescue Group on the Pilbara craton in Western Australia is one of the oldest and best-preserved basalt successions. The Fortescue records two intervals of potentially rapid cratonic motion, but velocity estimates ranging from 4-50 cm/yr suffer from current ages' analytical errors on the order of a few Ma. We measured five stratigraphic sections across these intervals, and collected paleomagnetic and geochronology samples at known stratigraphic heights. With our calculated virtual geomagnetic poles and U-Pb CA-ID-TIMS zircon ages with precision and accuracy of <1 Ma, we can more precisely quantify the velocity of the Pilbara craton as it underwent a ~10,000 km displacement during the eruptive history of the group's lowest stratigraphic unit, the Mount Roe Basalt, and a more modest displacement of ~2000 km during the deposition of the Tumbiana Formation and Maddina Basalt. We also observe and constrain the age of a previously undescribed magnetic field reversal in the Tumbiana Formation, doubling the described magnetic field reversal rate to four reversals over the 60 Ma depositional history of the Fortescue. Our calculated plate velocities will enlighten the debate on the role of tectonics in the cooling of early Earth.

  9. Rate-controlling two-proton transfer coupled with heavy-atom motion in the 2-pyridinone-catalyzed mutarotation of tetramethylglucose. Experimental and calculated deuterium isotope effects

    SciTech Connect

    Engdahl, K.A.; Bivehed, H.; Ahlberg, P.; Saunders, W.H. Jr.

    1983-07-13

    Primary and secondary deuterium isotope effects have been measured by polarimetry, and primary isotope effects have been calculated for the classical bifunctional catalysis: 2-pyridinone-catalyzed mutarotation of 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-methyl-..cap alpha..-D-glucopyranose (..cap alpha..-TMG) in benzene. From the positively curved plot of the specific rate of epimerization vs. the mole fraction of /sup 2/H in the ''pool'' of OH and NH hydrogens, the isotope effects k/sub HH//k/sub DD/ = 3.66 +/- 0.09, k/sub HH//k/sub DH/ = 1.5, and k/sub HH//k/sub HD/ = 2.4 have been calculated. A secondary isotope effect of 1.14 +/- 0.02 has been measured by using ..cap alpha..-TMG and (1-/sup 2/H)-2,3,4,6-tetra-O-methyl-..cap alpha..-D-glucopyranose ((l-/sup 2/H)-..cap alpha..-TMG), the synthesis of which is described in detail, together with those for (N-/sup 2/H)-2-pyridinone and (1-O-/sup 2/H)-2,3,4,6-tetra-O-methyl-..cap alpha..-D-glucopyranose ((1-O-/sup 2/H)-..cap alpha..-TMG). The rate data obtained have also been analyzed by fractionation theory, yielding approximately equal fractionation factors (0.5). The interpretation of the results has been assisted by calculations of the primary deuterium isotope effects using the BEBOVIB IV program. Two models involving small and considerable coupling, respectively, of the transferring protons to heavy-atom motion have been considered. In the favored structure for the transition state of the rate-limiting step, two protons are in transit, and their motion is governed either by a potential with a barrier or by one without. Their motion is considerably coupled to the heavy-atom motion (i.e., the breakage of the ring C-O bond), and tunnel corrections to the isotope effects are found to be negligible.

  10. Balance Maintenance in High-Speed Motion of Humanoid Robot Arm-Based on the 6D Constraints of Momentum Change Rate

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Da-song; Chu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Based on the 6D constraints of momentum change rate (CMCR), this paper puts forward a real-time and full balance maintenance method for the humanoid robot during high-speed movement of its 7-DOF arm. First, the total momentum formula for the robot's two arms is given and the momentum change rate is defined by the time derivative of the total momentum. The author also illustrates the idea of full balance maintenance and analyzes the physical meaning of 6D CMCR and its fundamental relation to full balance maintenance. Moreover, discretization and optimization solution of CMCR has been provided with the motion constraint of the auxiliary arm's joint, and the solving algorithm is optimized. The simulation results have shown the validity and generality of the proposed method on the full balance maintenance in the 6 DOFs of the robot body under 6D CMCR. This method ensures 6D dynamics balance performance and increases abundant ZMP stability margin. The resulting motion of the auxiliary arm has large abundance in joint space, and the angular velocity and the angular acceleration of these joints lie within the predefined limits. The proposed algorithm also has good real-time performance. PMID:24883404

  11. Balance maintenance in high-speed motion of humanoid robot arm-based on the 6D constraints of momentum change rate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da-song; Xiong, Rong; Wu, Jun; Chu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Based on the 6D constraints of momentum change rate (CMCR), this paper puts forward a real-time and full balance maintenance method for the humanoid robot during high-speed movement of its 7-DOF arm. First, the total momentum formula for the robot's two arms is given and the momentum change rate is defined by the time derivative of the total momentum. The author also illustrates the idea of full balance maintenance and analyzes the physical meaning of 6D CMCR and its fundamental relation to full balance maintenance. Moreover, discretization and optimization solution of CMCR has been provided with the motion constraint of the auxiliary arm's joint, and the solving algorithm is optimized. The simulation results have shown the validity and generality of the proposed method on the full balance maintenance in the 6 DOFs of the robot body under 6D CMCR. This method ensures 6D dynamics balance performance and increases abundant ZMP stability margin. The resulting motion of the auxiliary arm has large abundance in joint space, and the angular velocity and the angular acceleration of these joints lie within the predefined limits. The proposed algorithm also has good real-time performance.

  12. Non-contact heart rate monitoring method for elderly people In bed with random body motions using 24 GHz dual radars located beneath the mattress in clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, M; Yoshida, Y; Kubota, M; Kurita, A; Matsui, T

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a non-contact heart rate monitoring system for elderly people In bed using two radars placed on the bed base. The system is designed to increase accuracy despite body motion noise and change of body position and sleeping posture In bed. In order to achieve this, we combined an automatic gaIn control (AGC) method with a real-time radar-output channel selection method which is based on a spectrum shape analysis (SSA). Field tests were carried out with elderly subjects at a nursing home. The accuracy was maintained because the system successfully avoided the null detection point (NDP) problem, respiratory harmonic interference and intermodulation problems. The heart rate accuracy (r = 0.703) was higher than that of the conventional method. The system was proved to be effective In monitoring vital signs without the need for any physical contact with the subjects.

  13. Classifying Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duzen, Carl; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents a series of activities that utilizes a leveling device to classify constant and accelerated motion. Applies this classification system to uniform circular motion and motion produced by gravitational force. (MDH)

  14. Classifying Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duzen, Carl; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents a series of activities that utilizes a leveling device to classify constant and accelerated motion. Applies this classification system to uniform circular motion and motion produced by gravitational force. (MDH)

  15. Strong Erosion-Driven Nongravitational Effects in Orbital Motions of the Kreutz Sungrazing System’s Dwarf Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek; Kracht, Rainer

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the relationships among the angular orbital elements—the longitude of the ascending node Ω, the inclination i, and the argument of perihelion ω—of the Kreutz system’s faint, dwarf sungrazers observed only with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/STEREO coronagraphs; their published orbits were derived using a parabolic, purely gravitational approximation. In a plot of i against Ω the bright Kreutz sungrazers (such as C/1843 D1, C/1882 R1, C/1963 R1, etc.) fit a curve of fixed apsidal orientation, whereas the dwarf members are distributed along a curve that makes with the apsidal curve an angle of 15°. The dwarf sungrazers’ perihelion longitude is statistically invariable, but their perihelion latitude increases systematically with Ω. We find that this trend can be explained by a strong erosion-driven nongravitational acceleration normal to the orbit plane, confirmed for several test dwarf Kreutz sungrazers by orbital solutions with nongravitational terms incorporated directly in the equations of motion on a condition of fixed apsidal orientation. Proceeding in three steps, we first apply Marsden et al.'s standard formalism, solving for the normal acceleration only, and eventually relax additional constraints on the nongravitational law and the acceleration’s radial and transverse components. The resulting nongravitational accelerations on the dwarf sungrazers exceed the maximum for cataloged comets in nearly parabolic orbits by up to three orders of magnitude, topping in exceptional cases the Sun’s gravitational acceleration! A mass-loss model suggests that the dwarf sungrazers’ nuclei fragment copiously and their dimensions diminish rapidly near the Sun, implying the objects’ imminent demise shortly before they reach perihelion.

  16. STRONG EROSION-DRIVEN NONGRAVITATIONAL EFFECTS IN ORBITAL MOTIONS OF THE KREUTZ SUNGRAZING SYSTEM’S DWARF COMETS

    SciTech Connect

    Sekanina, Zdenek; Kracht, Rainer E-mail: R.Kracht@t-online.de

    2015-03-10

    We investigate the relationships among the angular orbital elements—the longitude of the ascending node Ω, the inclination i, and the argument of perihelion ω—of the Kreutz system’s faint, dwarf sungrazers observed only with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/STEREO coronagraphs; their published orbits were derived using a parabolic, purely gravitational approximation. In a plot of i against Ω the bright Kreutz sungrazers (such as C/1843 D1, C/1882 R1, C/1963 R1, etc.) fit a curve of fixed apsidal orientation, whereas the dwarf members are distributed along a curve that makes with the apsidal curve an angle of 15°. The dwarf sungrazers’ perihelion longitude is statistically invariable, but their perihelion latitude increases systematically with Ω. We find that this trend can be explained by a strong erosion-driven nongravitational acceleration normal to the orbit plane, confirmed for several test dwarf Kreutz sungrazers by orbital solutions with nongravitational terms incorporated directly in the equations of motion on a condition of fixed apsidal orientation. Proceeding in three steps, we first apply Marsden et al.'s standard formalism, solving for the normal acceleration only, and eventually relax additional constraints on the nongravitational law and the acceleration’s radial and transverse components. The resulting nongravitational accelerations on the dwarf sungrazers exceed the maximum for cataloged comets in nearly parabolic orbits by up to three orders of magnitude, topping in exceptional cases the Sun’s gravitational acceleration! A mass-loss model suggests that the dwarf sungrazers’ nuclei fragment copiously and their dimensions diminish rapidly near the Sun, implying the objects’ imminent demise shortly before they reach perihelion.

  17. Effect of a novel vendor-specific motion-correction algorithm on image quality and diagnostic accuracy in persons undergoing coronary CT angiography without rate-control medications.

    PubMed

    Leipsic, Jonathon; Labounty, Troy M; Hague, Cameron J; Mancini, G B John; O'Brien, Julie M; Wood, David A; Taylor, Carolyn M; Cury, Ricardo C; Earls, James P; Heilbron, Brett G; Ajlan, Amr M; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Min, James K

    2012-01-01

    Although coronary CT angiography (CTA) shows high diagnostic performance for detection and exclusion of obstructive coronary artery disease, limited temporal resolution of current-generation CT scanners may allow for motion artifacts, which may result in nonevaluable coronary segments. We assessed a novel vendor-specific motion-correction algorithm for its effect on image quality and diagnostic accuracy. Thirty-six consecutive patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing coronary CTA without rate control and invasive coronary angiography as part of an evaluation for transcatheter aortic valve replacement. We compared image quality and diagnostic accuracy between standard (STD) and motion-corrected (MC) reconstructions. Coronary CTAs were interpreted in an intent-to-diagnose fashion by 2 experienced readers; a third reader provided consensus for interpretability and obstructive coronary stenosis (≥50% stenosis). All studies were interpreted with and without motion correction using both 45% and 75% of the R-R interval for reconstructions. Quantitative coronary angiography was performed by a core laboratory. Mean age was 83.0 ± 6.4 years; 47% were men. Overall image quality (graded 1-4) was higher with the use of MC versus STD reconstructions (2.9 ± 0.9 vs 2.4 ± 1.0; P < 0.001). MC reconstructions showed higher interpretability on a per-segment [97% (392/406) vs 88% (357/406); P < 0.001] and per-artery [96% (128/134) vs 84% (112/134); P = 0.002] basis, with no difference on a per-patient level [92% (33/36) vs 89% (32/36); P = 1.0]. Diagnostic accuracy by MC reconstruction was higher than STD reconstruction on a per-segment [91% (370/406) vs 78% (317/406); P < 0.001] and per-artery level [86% (115/134) vs 72% (96/134); P = 0.007] basis, with no significant difference on a per-patient level [86% (31/36) vs 69% (25/36); P = 0.16]. The use of a novel MC algorithm improves image quality, interpretability, and diagnostic accuracy in persons undergoing coronary CTA

  18. A method to characterize in vivo tendon force-strain relationship by combining ultrasonography, motion capture and loading rates.

    PubMed

    Gerus, Pauline; Rao, Guillaume; Berton, Eric

    2011-08-11

    The ultrasonography contributes to investigate in vivo tendon force-strain relationship during isometric contraction. In previous studies, different methods are available to estimate the tendon strain, using different loading rates and models to fit the tendon force-strain relationship. This study was aimed to propose a standard method to characterize the in vivo tendon force-strain relationship. We investigated the influence on the force-strain relationship for medialis gastrocnemius (MG) of (1) one method which takes into account probe and joint movements to estimate the instantaneous tendon length, (2) models used to fit the force-strain relationship for uniaxial test (polynomial vs. Ogden), and (3) the loading rate on tendon strain. Subjects performed ramp-up contraction during isometric contractions at two different target speeds: 1.5s and minimal time with ultrasound probe fixed over the muscle-tendon junction of the MG muscle. The used method requires three markers on ultrasound probe and a marker on calcaneum to take into account all movements, and was compared to the strain estimated using ultrasound images only. The method using ultrasound image only overestimated the tendon strain from 40% of maximal force. The polynomial model showed similar fitting results than the Ogden model (R²=0.98). A loading rate effect was found on tendon strain, showing a higher strain when loading rate decreases. The characterization of tendon force-strain relationship needs to be standardized by taking into account all movements to estimate tendon strain and controlling the loading rate. The polynomial model appears to be appropriate to represent the tendon force-strain relationship.

  19. High-rate precise point positioning (PPP) to measure seismic wave motions: An experimental comparison of GPS PPP with inertial measurement units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Peiliang; Shi, Chuang; Fang, Rongxin; Liu, Jingnan; Niu, Xiaoji; Zhang, Quan; Yanagidani, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    High-rate GPS has been widely used to construct displacement waveforms and to invert for source parameters of earthquakes. Almost all works on internal and external evaluation of high-rate GPS accuracy are based on GPS relative positioning. We build an experimental platform to externally evaluate the accuracy of 50 Hz PPP displacement waveforms. Since the shake table allows motion in any of six degrees of freedom, we install an inertial measurement unit (IMU) to measure the attitude of the platform and transform the IMU displacements into the GPS coordinate system. The experimental results have shown that high-rate PPP can produce absolute horizontal displacement waveforms at the accuracy of 2 to 4 millimeters and absolute vertical displacement waveforms at the sub-centimeter level of accuracy within a short period of time. The significance of the experiments indicates that high-rate PPP is capable of detecting absolute seismic displacement waveforms at the same high accuracy as GPS relative positioning techniques but requires no fixed datum station. We have also found a small scaling error of IMU and a small time offset of misalignment between high-rate PPP and IMU displacement waveforms by comparing the amplitudes of and cross-correlating both the displacement waveforms. For more details on this talk, one can now get access to the on-line-first version of our Journal of Geodesy paper: J Geod, DOI 10.1007/s00190-012-0606-z

  20. GPS and InSAR constraints on vertical tectonic motion improve the estimate of slip rate of the San Andreas Fault in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, William; Johnson, Kaj; Blewitt, Geoff; Kreemer, Corné; Weldon, Ray; Burgette, Reed

    2014-05-01

    The San Andreas fault (SAF) is the fastest slipping member of a complex plate boundary system that poses a looming earthquake hazard to millions of people in southern California. Seismic hazard analysis products rely on accurate estimates of fault slip rate in order to best forecast the shaking from future damaging earthquakes. Data from geodetic GPS networks such as the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory, SCIGN, and other municipal networks place strong constraints on faults slip rates. However, models based geodetic measurements in the eastern Transverse Ranges suffer from uncertainties in fault dip, slip history, and viscoelastic Earth structure. Part of the problem is that data are commonly limited to horizontal interseismic rates of motion at GPS stations. Here we present results of integrated analysis of GPS and space-based InSAR data that together provide a high-resolution three-component estimation of the interseismic velocity field around the SAF. Aligning the InSAR to GPS mitigates long wavelength errors in InSAR while increasing the density of measurements between geographically sparse GPS stations. We use solutions from our GPS mega-network analysis of over 12,000 globally distributed stations processed using the GIPSY-OASIS software. Solutions are aligned to our new North America fixed reference frame (NA12), which provides strong vertical reference to compare rates across the plate boundary. Vertical data are considered if the station has at least 4 years of data, have time series that are fit well by a linear plus seasonal terms plus steps from known equipment changes and earthquakes. We use over 750 ERS and ENVISAT radar scenes from between 1992 and 2009 obtained from the WinSAR archive, including 4 frames from 5 tracks to form over 10,000 interferograms, providing line-of-sight (LOS) velocities for overlapping domains. To separate the contributions from vertical and horizontal signals, we align the InSAR LOS rates to the GPS LOS rates and

  1. A High-Resolution GPS Motion Record of Variations in the Rate of Glacial Speed Related to Water Inputs on Yahtse Glacier, South Central Alaska 2009-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia, J. Z.; Larsen, C. F.

    2015-12-01

    Yahtse Glacier is a temperate grounded tidewater glacier 64 kilometers long, the largest of four that terminate into Icy Bay, Alaska. In 1990 Yahtse completed the retreat phase of the tidewater glacier cycle and began its re-advance, advancing two kilometers thus far. The three-year study of the dynamics of Yahtse began in June 2009 with the initial deployment of five GPS rovers on tetrahedrons, two permanent GPS rovers that were drilled into the ice and two GPS base stations as well as several seismometers and time lapse cameras. We have acquired a three year long time-series of high-resolution GPS data on several stations deployed along the centerline of Yahtse Glacier and in a central strain diamond formation located several meters from the icefall from 2009 - 2011. The GPS motion record revealed multiple short-duration (on the order of days) speed-up events throughout the spring and summer months superimposed on the seasonal acceleration and deceleration of Yahtse Glacier on all three years of observations. Through an analysis of the GPS motion record along with simultaneously collected weather data we found a relationship between the timing of large water input events and the observed speed-up events. This data enables us to understand how the englacial drainage network is developing seasonally and annually. Only through understanding the drainage system numerically will we be able to develop accurate predictions of the glaciers future rate of advance with respect to the changing climate conditions in south central Alaska.

  2. Influence of the motion correction algorithm on the quality and interpretability of images of single-source 64-detector coronary CT angiography among patients grouped by heart rate.

    PubMed

    Machida, Haruhiko; Lin, Xiao-Zhu; Fukui, Rika; Shen, Yun; Suzuki, Shigeru; Tanaka, Isao; Ishikawa, Takuya; Tate, Etsuko; Ueno, Eiko

    2015-02-01

    We retrospectively investigated the effect of the motion correction algorithm (MCA) on image quality and interpretability by heart rate (HR) in coronary CT angiography (CCTA). For 105 patients (6 HR groups) undergoing CCTA, 2 readers independently graded the image quality of the 4 major coronary arteries reconstructed with and without MCA at diastole with HR ≤64 bpm and at systole and diastole ≥65 bpm using a 5-point scale. For each HR group and cardiac phase, we compared per-vessel and per-segment image quality using Wilcoxon signed rank test and percentages of interpretable image quality (scores 3-5) among without MCA at diastole with HR ≤64 bpm, as a reference, with MCA at diastole ≤69 bpm and at systole 70-79 bpm using the chi-square test. The motion correction algorithm reconstruction provided similar or better image quality and interpretability in all groups, with 96-100 % per-vessel (P = 0.008 for the right coronary artery; otherwise, P > 0.05) and 99 % per-segment interpretable image quality (P = 0.0002) at diastole with HR ≤69 bpm and at systole 70-79 bpm compared to the reference (88-100 and 97 %, respectively). MCA reconstruction preserved image quality and interpretability of CCTA with HR ≤79 bpm.

  3. Validity of a combined heart rate and motion sensor for the measurement of free-living energy expenditure in very active individuals.

    PubMed

    Santos, Diana A; Silva, Analiza M; Matias, Catarina N; Magalhães, João P; Fields, David A; Minderico, Cláudia S; Ekelund, Ulf; Sardinha, Luís B

    2014-07-01

    The correct assessment of energy expenditure in very active individuals is important to ensure that dietary energy intake is sufficient. We aimed to validate a combined heart rate (HR) and motion sensor in estimating total (TEE) and activity energy expenditure (AEE) in males and females with high physical activity levels. Cross-sectional. Doubly-labelled water (DLW) was used to assess 7-day TEE in 12 male and female elite junior basketball players, aged 16-17 years. Resting energy expenditure (REE) was assessed with indirect calorimetry and AEE was calculated (AEE=TEE-RMR-0.1×TEE). Simultaneously, TEE and AEE were measured by combined HR and motion sensing. Individual HR calibration was performed with step-test. TEE and AEE were estimated from accelerometry and HR with individual (ACC+HRstep) and group calibration (ACC+HRgroup). No mean differences were found between TEE and AEE from the ACC+HRstep and ACC+HRgroup with DLW. TEE values (kJ/day) from ACC+HRgroup and ACC+HRstep explained TEE from DLW by ∼60% and 53%, respectively whereas AEE (kJ/day) estimated by ACC+HRgroup and ACC+HRstep explained 53% and 41% of the variability of AEE from the reference method. Concordance correlation coefficients for TEE and AEE using ACC+HRgroup were 0.74 and 0.69, correspondingly while for ACC+HRstep values of 0.69 and 0.45 were found. Large limits of agreement were found for TEE and AEE using both ACC+HRgroup and ACC+HRstep. ACC+HR models are a valid alternative to estimate TEE but not AEE in a group of highly active individuals however the considerable rate of equipment failure (∼50%) limits its usefulness. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Scalable motion vector coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbarien, Joeri; Munteanu, Adrian; Verdicchio, Fabio; Andreopoulos, Yiannis; Cornelis, Jan P.; Schelkens, Peter

    2004-11-01

    Modern video coding applications require transmission of video data over variable-bandwidth channels to a variety of terminals with different screen resolutions and available computational power. Scalable video coding is needed to optimally support these applications. Recently proposed wavelet-based video codecs employing spatial domain motion compensated temporal filtering (SDMCTF) provide quality, resolution and frame-rate scalability while delivering compression performance comparable to that of the state-of-the-art non-scalable H.264-codec. These codecs require scalable coding of the motion vectors in order to support a large range of bit-rates with optimal compression efficiency. Scalable motion vector coding algorithms based on the integer wavelet transform followed by embedded coding of the wavelet coefficients were recently proposed. In this paper, a new and fundamentally different scalable motion vector codec (MVC) using median-based motion vector prediction is proposed. Extensive experimental results demonstrate that the proposed MVC systematically outperforms the wavelet-based state-of-the-art solutions. To be able to take advantage of the proposed scalable MVC, a rate allocation mechanism capable of optimally dividing the available rate among texture and motion information is required. Two rate allocation strategies are proposed and compared. The proposed MVC and rate allocation schemes are incorporated into an SDMCTF-based video codec and the benefits of scalable motion vector coding are experimentally demonstrated.

  5. The Effect of Recovery Duration on Vastus Lateralis Oxygenation, Heart Rate, Perceived Exertion and Time Motion Descriptors during Small Sided Football Games

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Scott; Kerhervé, Hugo; Lovell, Geoff P.; Gorman, Adam D.; Solomon, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Small sided games (SSG) of football are an effective and efficient format to simultaneously train the physiological, technical, and tactical components of football. The duration of the recovery period between bouts of SSG will affect the physiological response to subsequent bouts. It was hypothesised that decreasing the duration of recovery periods separating serial SSG bouts would increase physiological, and perceptual responses, and decrease high speed running, and distance during SSG bouts. Methods Twelve experienced footballers (mean ± SD; age 21 ± 3 yrs; VO2peak 64 ± 7 ml·min·kg−1; playing experience 15 ± 3 yrs) completed two SSG sessions. Each SSG consisted of 3 vs. 3 players and 6 bouts of 2 min duration, with bouts separated by either 30 s recovery (REC-30) or 120 s recovery (REC-120). Deoxygenated haemoglobin (HHb) in the vastus lateralis (VL) (using near infrared spectroscopy), heart rate (HR) and time motion descriptors (TMD) (speed and distance) were measured continuously during the SSG sessions and perceived exertion (RPE) was measured for each bout. Results During the recovery periods, in REC-30 compared to REC-120, there was a significant (p < 0.05) main effect of a higher HHb and HR. During the bouts, in REC-30 compared to REC-120, there were no significant differences in HHb, HR, RPE, or TMD, but within both REC-30 and REC-120 there were significant increases as a function of bout number in RPE. Conclusions Although a four-fold increase in recovery period allowed a significant increase in the recovery of HHb and HR, this did not increase the physiological, and perceptual responses, or time motion descriptors during the bouts. These results could have been due to the regulation of effort (pacing), in these experienced players performing an exercise task to which they were well adapted. PMID:26919064

  6. Real-time transmission of full-motion echocardiography over a high-speed data network: impact of data rate and network quality of service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Main, M. L.; Foltz, D.; Firstenberg, M. S.; Bobinsky, E.; Bailey, D.; Frantz, B.; Pleva, D.; Baldizzi, M.; Meyers, D. P.; Jones, K.; hide

    2000-01-01

    With high-resolution network transmission required for telemedicine, education, and guided-image acquisition, the impact of errors and transmission rates on image quality needs evaluation. METHODS: We transmitted clinical echocardiograms from 2 National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) research centers with the use of Motion Picture Expert Group-2 (MPEG-2) encoding and asynchronous transmission mode (ATM) network protocol over the NASA Research and Education Network. Data rates and network quality (cell losses [CLR], errors [CER], and delay variability [CVD]) were altered and image quality was judged. RESULTS: At speeds of 3 to 5 megabits per second (Mbps), digital images were superior to those on videotape; at 2 Mbps, images were equivalent. Increasing CLR caused occasional, brief pauses. Extreme CER and CDV increases still yielded high-quality images. CONCLUSIONS: Real-time echocardiographic acquisition, guidance, and transmission is feasible with the use of MPEG-2 and ATM with broadcast quality seen above 3 Mbps, even with severe network quality degradation. These techniques can be applied to telemedicine and used for planned echocardiography aboard the International Space Station.

  7. Real-time transmission of full-motion echocardiography over a high-speed data network: impact of data rate and network quality of service.

    PubMed

    Main, M L; Foltz, D; Firstenberg, M S; Bobinsky, E; Bailey, D; Frantz, B; Pleva, D; Baldizzi, M; Meyers, D P; Jones, K; Spence, M C; Freeman, K; Morehead, A; Thomas, J D

    2000-08-01

    With high-resolution network transmission required for telemedicine, education, and guided-image acquisition, the impact of errors and transmission rates on image quality needs evaluation. We transmitted clinical echocardiograms from 2 National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) research centers with the use of Motion Picture Expert Group-2 (MPEG-2) encoding and asynchronous transmission mode (ATM) network protocol over the NASA Research and Education Network. Data rates and network quality (cell losses [CLR], errors [CER], and delay variability [CVD]) were altered and image quality was judged. At speeds of 3 to 5 megabits per second (Mbps), digital images were superior to those on videotape; at 2 Mbps, images were equivalent. Increasing CLR caused occasional, brief pauses. Extreme CER and CDV increases still yielded high-quality images. Real-time echocardiographic acquisition, guidance, and transmission is feasible with the use of MPEG-2 and ATM with broadcast quality seen above 3 Mbps, even with severe network quality degradation. These techniques can be applied to telemedicine and used for planned echocardiography aboard the International Space Station.

  8. Real-time transmission of full-motion echocardiography over a high-speed data network: impact of data rate and network quality of service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Main, M. L.; Foltz, D.; Firstenberg, M. S.; Bobinsky, E.; Bailey, D.; Frantz, B.; Pleva, D.; Baldizzi, M.; Meyers, D. P.; Jones, K.; Spence, M. C.; Freeman, K.; Morehead, A.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    With high-resolution network transmission required for telemedicine, education, and guided-image acquisition, the impact of errors and transmission rates on image quality needs evaluation. METHODS: We transmitted clinical echocardiograms from 2 National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) research centers with the use of Motion Picture Expert Group-2 (MPEG-2) encoding and asynchronous transmission mode (ATM) network protocol over the NASA Research and Education Network. Data rates and network quality (cell losses [CLR], errors [CER], and delay variability [CVD]) were altered and image quality was judged. RESULTS: At speeds of 3 to 5 megabits per second (Mbps), digital images were superior to those on videotape; at 2 Mbps, images were equivalent. Increasing CLR caused occasional, brief pauses. Extreme CER and CDV increases still yielded high-quality images. CONCLUSIONS: Real-time echocardiographic acquisition, guidance, and transmission is feasible with the use of MPEG-2 and ATM with broadcast quality seen above 3 Mbps, even with severe network quality degradation. These techniques can be applied to telemedicine and used for planned echocardiography aboard the International Space Station.

  9. Motion Sickness

    MedlinePlus

    Motion sickness is a common problem in people traveling by car, train, airplanes, and especially boats. Anyone ... children, pregnant women, and people taking certain medicines. Motion sickness can start suddenly, with a queasy feeling ...

  10. Plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The motion of tectonic plates on the earth is characterized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the NUVEL-1 global model of current plate motions, diffuse plate boundaries and the oceanic lithosphere, the relation between plate motions and distributed deformations, accelerations and the steadiness of plate motions, the distribution of current Pacific-North America motion across western North America and its margin, plate reconstructions and their uncertainties, hotspots, and plate dynamics. A comprehensive bibliography is provided. 126 refs.

  11. Heart Rate, Time-Motion, and Body Impacts When Changing the Number of Teammates and Opponents in Soccer Small-Sided Games.

    PubMed

    Torres-Ronda, Lorena; Gonçalves, Bruno; Marcelino, Rui; Torrents, Carlota; Vicente, Emili; Sampaio, Jaime

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the internal (heart rate) and external load (body load, distance covered, and exertion index) during different types of unbalanced soccer small-sided games (SSGs) in professional (PRO) and amateur (AMA) players. In 2 separated sessions (PRO and AMA), participants played 3 SSG formats (4vs3, 4vs5, and 4v7). Data were analyzed from the fixed team's perspective (4vsX) according to the number of opponents (3, 5 and 7) and from the variable team (3 + Xvs4) according to the teammates (without teammates, 2 and 4 teammates). The time-motion and body impact data were collected using a nondifferential global positioning system with integrated heart rate measurement. Differences in internal and external workload between the game formats were compared using Cohen's dunb effect sizes with 95% confidence intervals. Results reveal that the higher the number of players involved in the task, the lower the internal and external workload. The analysis also showed different teammates and opposition-related trends that need to be considered when planning and monitoring training performance. Playing in low-inferiority (4vs3 and 4vs5) had higher physiologic impact to players than the other higher unbalanced situations. This evidence was similar to both PRO and AMA players; however, the PRO presented higher physical and lower physiological responses across games. Our results suggest that coaches should consider the usage of unbalanced SSG formats to simultaneously facilitate the emergence of defensive and offensive proficient scenarios also representing opportunities to increase the practice workload.

  12. Investigating source directivity for the 2012 Ml5.9 Emilia (Northern Italy) earthquake by jointly using High-rate GPS and Strong motion data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avallone, A.; Herrero, A.; Latorre, D.; Rovelli, A.; D'Anastasio, E.

    2012-12-01

    On May, 20th 2012, the Ferrara and Modena provinces (Emilia Romagna, Northern Italy) were struck by a moderate magnitude earthquake (Ml 5.9). The focal mechanism is consistent with a ~E-W-striking thrust fault. The mainshock was recorded by 29 high-rate sampling (1-Hz) continuous GPS (HRGPS) stations belonging to scientific or commercial networks and by 55 strong motion (SM) stations belonging to INGV (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia) and RAN (Rete Accelerometrica Nazionale) networks, respectively. The spatial distribution of both HRGPS and SM stations with respect to the mainshock location allows a satisfactory azimuthal coverage of the area. To investigate directivity effects during the mainshock occurrence, we analyze the spatial variation of the peak ground displacement (PGD) measured either for HRGPS or SM sites, using different methods. For each HRGPS and SM site, we rotated the horizontal time series to the azimuth direction and we estimated the GPS-related and the SM-related peak ground displacement (G-PGD and S-PGD, respectively) retrieved by transverse component. However, in contrast to GPS displacements, the double integration of the SM data can be affected by the presence of drifts and, thus, they have to be corrected by quasi-manual procedures. To more properly compare the G-PGDs to the S-PGDs, we used the response spectrum. A response spectrum is simply the response of a series of oscillators of varying natural frequency, that are forced into motion by the same input. The asymptotic value of the displacement response spectrum is the peak ground displacement. Thus, for each HRGPS and SM site, we computed the value of this asymptotic trend (G-PGDrs and S-PGDrs, respectively). This method allows simple automatic procedures. The consistency of the PGDs derived from HRGPS and SM is also evaluated for sites where the two instruments are collocated. The PGDs obtained by the two different methods and the two different data types suggest a

  13. Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavenda, B. H.

    1985-02-01

    Brownian motion, the doubly random motion of small particles suspended in a liquid due to molecular collisions, and its implications and applications in the history of modern science are discussed. Topics examined include probabilistic phenomena, the kinetic theory of gases, Einstein's atomic theory of Brownian motion, particle displacement, diffusion measurements, the determination of the mass of the atom and of Avogadro's number, the statistical mechanics of thermodynamics, nonequilibrium systems, Langevin's equation of motion, time-reversed evolution, mathematical analogies, and applications in economics and radio navigation. Diagrams and drawings are provided.

  14. Near-source high-rate GPS, strong motion and InSAR observations to image the 2015 Lefkada (Greece) Earthquake rupture history.

    PubMed

    Avallone, Antonio; Cirella, Antonella; Cheloni, Daniele; Tolomei, Cristiano; Theodoulidis, Nikos; Piatanesi, Alessio; Briole, Pierre; Ganas, Athanassios

    2017-09-04

    The 2015/11/17 Lefkada (Greece) earthquake ruptured a segment of the Cephalonia Transform Fault (CTF) where probably the penultimate major event was in 1948. Using near-source strong motion and high sampling rate GPS data and Sentinel-1A SAR images on two tracks, we performed the inversion for the geometry, slip distribution and rupture history of the causative fault with a three-step self-consistent procedure, in which every step provided input parameters for the next one. Our preferred model results in a ~70° ESE-dipping and ~13° N-striking fault plane, with a strike-slip mechanism (rake ~169°) in agreement with the CTF tectonic regime. This model shows a bilateral propagation spanning ~9 s with the activation of three main slip patches, characterized by rise time and peak slip velocity in the ranges 2.5-3.5 s and 1.4-2.4 m/s, respectively, corresponding to 1.2-1.8 m of slip which is mainly concentrated in the shallower (<10 km) southern half of the causative fault. The inferred slip distribution and the resulting seismic moment (M0 = 1.05 × 10(19) N m) suggest a magnitude of M w 6.6. Our best solution suggests that the occurrence of large (M w  > 6) earthquakes to the northern and to the southern boundaries of the 2015 causative fault cannot be excluded.

  15. Effects of pacing, status and unbalance in time motion variables, heart rate and tactical behaviour when playing 5-a-side football small-sided games.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Jaime E; Lago, Carlos; Gonçalves, Bruno; Maçãs, Victor M; Leite, Nuno

    2014-03-01

    To compare time-motion variables, heart rate and players' tactical behaviour according to game pace (slow, normal or fast), status (winning and losing) and team unbalance (superiority and inferiority) in football 5-a-side small-sided games. To identify the most discriminating variables in classifying performances according to these constraints. Cross-sectional field study. The data were gathered using global positioning systems (5 Hz) in 5-a-side small-sided games (7 × 5 min) played by twenty-four footballers. The tactical performance was measured using dynamical positioning variables, processed by non-linear signal processing techniques (approximate entropy). ANOVA models were used to compare between constraints and discriminant analyses to identify the variables that best discriminate between pacing and status × unbalance constraints. The fast paced games had the highest mean speed value, followed by normal and slow paced games (8.2 ± 0.6 km h(-1), 7.8 ± 0.5 km h(-1) and 6.2 ± 0.4 km h(-1), respectively). The stronger predictor variables of pacing were the randomness in distance to team centroid and the distances covered above 13 km h(-1). The results also changed according to game status and team unbalance. The strongest predictor variables were the distance covered below 6.9 km h(-1), distance and randomness to team centroid, with higher values when winning in superiority conditions. Practice task design manipulating game pace, status and team unbalance significantly influenced the emergent behavioural dynamics. Collective positioning variables were more accurate in discriminating these constraints and, therefore, need to be considered when planning and monitoring performance. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. High frame rate and high line density ultrasound imaging for local pulse wave velocity estimation using motion matching: A feasibility study on vessel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Li, Fubing; He, Qiong; Huang, Chengwu; Liu, Ke; Shao, Jinhua; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-04-01

    Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is an ultrasound-based method to visualize the propagation of pulse wave and to quantitatively estimate regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) of the arteries within the imaging field of view (FOV). To guarantee the reliability of PWV measurement, high frame rate imaging is required, which can be achieved by reducing the line density of ultrasound imaging or transmitting plane wave at the expense of spatial resolution and/or signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this study, a composite, full-view imaging method using motion matching was proposed with both high temporal and spatial resolution. Ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data of 4 sub-sectors, each with 34 beams, including a common beam, were acquired successively to achieve a frame rate of ∼507 Hz at an imaging depth of 35 mm. The acceleration profiles of the vessel wall estimated from the common beam were used to reconstruct the full-view (38-mm width, 128-beam) image sequence. The feasibility of mapping local PWV variation along the artery using PWI technique was preliminarily validated on both homogeneous and inhomogeneous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel vessel phantoms. Regional PWVs for the three homogeneous phantoms measured by the proposed method were in accordance with the sparse imaging method (38-mm width, 32-beam) and plane wave imaging method. Local PWV was estimated using the above-mentioned three methods on 3 inhomogeneous phantoms, and good agreement was obtained in both the softer (1.91±0.24 m/s, 1.97±0.27 m/s and 1.78±0.28 m/s) and the stiffer region (4.17±0.46 m/s, 3.99±0.53 m/s and 4.27±0.49 m/s) of the phantoms. In addition to the improved spatial resolution, higher precision of local PWV estimation in low SNR circumstances was also obtained by the proposed method as compared with the sparse imaging method. The proposed method might be helpful in disease detections through mapping the local PWV of the vascular wall. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. NMR relaxation rate studies of molecular motions in NaSn, the Laves-phase metal hydride C15-ZrCr(2)H(x) and carbon/epoxy composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoddard, Ronald Dean

    Here I present studies of molecular motions in three very different systems: NaSn, which exhibits motion characteristic of both a superionic conductor and a rotor crystal; C15-ZrCrsb2Hsbx (x < 0.5), a metal hydride which exhibits unusual characteristics in its hydrogen motion; and, finally a study of the relationship between Tsb2 and the degree of cure of carbon/epoxy materials. NaSn is characterized by Nasp+ ions and stable (Snsb4)sp{4-} tetrahedra. At high temperatures NaSn displays a disordered solid phase (alpha-NaSn). The presence of Nasp+ ions suggests that alpha-NaSn may be a superionic conductor (translationally disordered) and the presence of stable Snsb4 tetrahedra suggests it may be a rotor crystal (organizationally disordered). The purpose of this study is to gain better understanding of the motions in alpha-NaSn by monitoring Na and Sn motion using sp{23}Na and sp{119}Sn NMR, respectively. C15-ZrCrsb2Hsbx (x < 0.5) is a Laves phase metal hydride which displays extremely rapid hydrogen motion and a Tsb1 peak which cannot be explained by a model employing a single correlation time for the motion. A model employing a Gaussian distribution of correlation times has been used to successfully fit Tsb1, but the origin of this distribution in a crystalline solid solution is not known. The purpose of this study is to better understand the low temperature hydrogen motions occurring in C15-ZrCrsb2Hsbx by extending the previous NMR measurements using Tsb1p and Tsb1D, experiments which effectively push the relaxation peak to lower temperatures. New techniques for manufacturing carbon/epoxy components are under development which require partial curing of the material. At present, no method for monitoring partial curing exists. Tsb2 is a promising monitor of degree of cure because of its sensitivity to changes rates of molecular motions. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the sensitivity of Tsb2 to changes in molecular motion due to curing, and to find a

  18. New Data on Quaternary Surface Offset and Slip Rates of the Oquirrh Fault (Utah, USA) from DSMs made with Structure-from-Motion Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunds, M. P.; Andreini, J.; Larsen, K.; Fletcher, A.; Arnold, M.; Toke, N. A.

    2016-12-01

    We generated two high-resolution digital surface models (DSMs) using imagery collected with inexpensive quadcopters and processed with structure-from-motion software to measure offsets of pluvial Lake Bonneville shorelines along the Oquirrh Fault in Utah, USA. The Oquirrh Fault is a west-dipping normal fault that bounds the populous Tooele Valley and is likely contiguous with the East Great Salt Lake Fault to the north and Southern Oquirrh and Topliff Hill Faults to the south, forming a fault system >200 km long, the second longest in Utah. However, knowledge of the fault's parameters is based primarily on one trenching study on the northern section of the fault (Olig et al., 1996). The two DSMs were made using a 24 Mpixel Sony A5100 and 12 Mpixel GoPro camera, have 5 and 10 cm pixels, and span 3.9 km of the fault's trace at the boundary between its central and southern sections. Vertical RMS error of the DSMs relative to bare-ground checkpoints is 5.8 and 9.5 cm for the Sony and GoPro-derived DSMs, respectively. Shoreline features interpreted to have formed < 14,000, 18,000-23,000, and > 23,000 ybp (Godsey et al., 2011; Oviatt, 2015) are offset 2.8-3.0, 5.6-6.7, and 8.1-9.3 m, respectively. From these offsets we infer three surface-rupturing earthquakes with displacements of 2.8-3.0, 2.6-3.8, and 1.3-3.8 m, and estimate the slip rate to be 0.24 - 0.37 mm/yr. These results are consistent with those of the prior study to the north, suggesting co-rupturing of the northern, central and northernmost part of the southern section of the fault. In addition, the inferred large single event displacements suggest even longer surface ruptures. We have used the same methods to construct 5 cm pixel DSMs up to 4.4 km2 in area to support several additional paleoseismological, paleotsunami, and neotectonic investigations, which highlights the many benefits to geoscience research of the capacity to quickly produce accurate, high resolution DSMs from inexpensive equipment.

  19. Circular Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Paul D.

    1995-01-01

    Provides a period-long activity using battery powered cars rolling in a circular motion on a tile floor. Students measure the time and distance as the car moves to derive the equation for centripetal acceleration. (MVL)

  20. Circular Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Paul D.

    1995-01-01

    Provides a period-long activity using battery powered cars rolling in a circular motion on a tile floor. Students measure the time and distance as the car moves to derive the equation for centripetal acceleration. (MVL)

  1. A Robust Motion Artifact Detection Algorithm for Accurate Detection of Heart Rates from Photoplethysmographic Signals using Time-Frequency Spectral Features.

    PubMed

    Dao, Duy; Salehizadeh, S M A; Noj, Yeon; Chong, Jo Woon; Cho, Chae; Mcmanus, Dave; Darling, Chad E; Mendelson, Yitzhak; Chon, Ki H

    2016-10-21

    Motion and noise artifacts (MNAs) impose limits on the usability of the photoplethysmogram (PPG), particularly in the context of ambulatory monitoring. MNAs can distort PPG, causing erroneous estimation of physiological parameters such as heart rate (HR) and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2). In this study we present a novel approach, "TifMA," based on using the Time-frequency spectrum of PPG to first detect the MNA-corrupted data and next discard the non-usable part of the corrupted data. The term "non-usable" refers to segments of PPG data from which the HR signal cannot be recovered accurately. Two sequential classification procedures were included in the TifMA algorithm. The first classifier distinguishes between MNA-corrupted and MNA-free PPG data. Once a segment of data is deemed MNA-corrupted, the next classifier determines whether the HR can be recovered from the corrupted segment or not. A support vector machine (SVM) classifier was used to build a decision boundary for the first classification task using data segments from a training data set. Features from time-frequency spectra of PPG were extracted to build the detection model. Five datasets were considered for evaluating TifMA performance: (1) and (2) were lab-controlled PPG recordings from forehead and finger pulse oximeter sensors with subjects making random movements, (3) and (4) were actual patient PPG recordings from UMass Memorial Medical Center with random free movements and (5) was a lab-controlled PPG recording dataset measured at the forehead while the subjects ran on a treadmill. The first dataset was used to analyze the noise sensitivity of the algorithm. Datasets 2-4 were used to evaluate the MNA detection phase of the algorithm. The results from the first phase of the algorithm (MNA detection) were compared to results from three existing MNA detection algorithms: the Hjorth, kurtosis-Shannon Entropy and time-domain variability-SVM approaches. This last is an approach recently developed

  2. iPhone 4s Photoplethysmography: Which Light Color Yields the Most Accurate Heart Rate and Normalized Pulse Volume Using the iPhysioMeter Application in the Presence of Motion Artifact?

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Kenta; Rolfe, Peter; Lee, Jihyoung; Yamakoshi, Takehiro

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in information and communication technologies has made it possible to measure heart rate (HR) and normalized pulse volume (NPV), which are important physiological indices, using only a smartphone. This has been achieved with reflection mode photoplethysmography (PPG), by using a smartphone’s embedded flash as a light source and the camera as a light sensor. Despite its widespread use, the method of PPG is susceptible to motion artifacts as physical displacements influence photon propagation phenomena and, thereby, the effective optical path length. Further, it is known that the wavelength of light used for PPG influences the photon penetration depth and we therefore hypothesized that influences of motion artifact could be wavelength-dependant. To test this hypothesis, we made measurements in 12 healthy volunteers of HR and NPV derived from reflection mode plethysmograms recorded simultaneously at three different spectral regions (red, green and blue) at the same physical location with a smartphone. We then assessed the accuracy of the HR and NPV measurements under the influence of motion artifacts. The analyses revealed that the accuracy of HR was acceptably high with all three wavelengths (all rs > 0.996, fixed biases: −0.12 to 0.10 beats per minute, proportional biases: r = −0.29 to 0.03), but that of NPV was the best with green light (r = 0.791, fixed biases: −0.01 arbitrary units, proportional bias: r = 0.11). Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio obtained with green and blue light PPG was higher than that of red light PPG. These findings suggest that green is the most suitable color for measuring HR and NPV from the reflection mode photoplethysmogram under motion artifact conditions. We conclude that the use of green light PPG could be of particular benefit in ambulatory monitoring where motion artifacts are a significant issue. PMID:24618594

  3. Brownian Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavenda, Bernard H.

    1985-01-01

    Explains the phenomenon of Brownian motion, which serves as a mathematical model for random processes. Topics addressed include kinetic theory, Einstein's theory, particle displacement, and others. Points out that observations of the random course of a particle suspended in fluid led to the first accurate measurement of atomic mass. (DH)

  4. Brownian Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavenda, Bernard H.

    1985-01-01

    Explains the phenomenon of Brownian motion, which serves as a mathematical model for random processes. Topics addressed include kinetic theory, Einstein's theory, particle displacement, and others. Points out that observations of the random course of a particle suspended in fluid led to the first accurate measurement of atomic mass. (DH)

  5. Chaos in navigation satellite orbits caused by the perturbed motion of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengren, Aaron J.; Alessi, Elisa Maria; Rossi, Alessandro; Valsecchi, Giovanni B.

    2015-06-01

    Numerical simulations carried out over the past decade suggest that the orbits of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems are unstable, resulting in an apparent chaotic growth of the eccentricity. Here, we show that the irregular and haphazard character of these orbits reflects a similar irregularity in the orbits of many celestial bodies in our Solar system. We find that secular resonances, involving linear combinations of the frequencies of nodal and apsidal precession and the rate of regression of lunar nodes, occur in profusion so that the phase space is threaded by a devious stochastic web. As in all cases in the Solar system, chaos ensues where resonances overlap. These results may be significant for the analysis of disposal strategies for the four constellations in this precarious region of space.

  6. 38 CFR 4.59 - Painful motion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.59 Painful motion. With any form of arthritis... intent of the schedule is to recognize painful motion with joint or periarticular pathology as productive...

  7. 38 CFR 4.59 - Painful motion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.59 Painful motion. With any form of arthritis... intent of the schedule is to recognize painful motion with joint or periarticular pathology as productive...

  8. 38 CFR 4.59 - Painful motion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.59 Painful motion. With any form of arthritis... intent of the schedule is to recognize painful motion with joint or periarticular pathology as productive...

  9. 38 CFR 4.59 - Painful motion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.59 Painful motion. With any form of arthritis... intent of the schedule is to recognize painful motion with joint or periarticular pathology as productive...

  10. 38 CFR 4.59 - Painful motion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.59 Painful motion. With any form of arthritis... intent of the schedule is to recognize painful motion with joint or periarticular pathology as productive...

  11. Dislocation motion and instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yichao; Chapman, Stephen Jonathan; Acharya, Amit

    2013-08-01

    The Peach-Koehler expression for the stress generated by a single (non-planar) curvilinear dislocation is evaluated to calculate the dislocation self stress. This is combined with a law of motion to give the self-induced motion of a general dislocation curve. A stability analysis of a rectilinear, uniformly translating dislocation is then performed. The dislocation is found to be susceptible to a helical instability, with the maximum growth rate occurring when the dislocation is almost, but not exactly, pure screw. The non-linear evolution of the instability is determined numerically, and implications for slip band formation and non-Schmid behavior in yielding are discussed.

  12. Diurnal polar motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, P.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical theory is developed to describe diurnal polar motion in the earth which arises as a forced response due to lunisolar torques and tidal deformation. Doodson's expansion of the tide generating potential is used to represent the lunisolar torques. Both the magnitudes and the rates of change of perturbations in the earth's inertia tensor are included in the dynamical equations for the polar motion so as to account for rotational and tidal deformation. It is found that in a deformable earth with Love's number k = 0.29, the angular momentum vector departs by as much as 20 cm from the rotation axis rather than remaining within 1 or 2 cm as it would in a rigid earth. This 20 cm separation is significant in the interpretation of submeter polar motion observations because it necessitates an additional coordinate transformation in order to remove what would otherwise be a 20 cm error source in the conversion between inertial and terrestrial reference systems.

  13. [Motion sickness].

    PubMed

    Taillemite, J P; Devaulx, P; Bousquet, F

    1997-01-01

    Motion sickness is a general term covering sea-sickness, car-sickness, air-sickness, and space-sickness. Symptoms can occur when a person is exposed to unfamiliar movement whether real or simulated. Despite progress in the technology and comfort of modern transportation (planes, boats, and overland vehicles), a great number of travelers still experience motion sickness. Bouts are characterized by an initial phase of mild discomfort followed by neurologic and gastro-intestinal manifestations. The delay in onset depends on specific circumstances and individual susceptibility. Attacks are precipitated by conflicting sensory, visual, and vestibular signals but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Most medications used for prevention and treatment (e.g. anticholinergics and antihistamines) induce unwanted sedation. Furthermore no one drug is completely effective or preventive under all conditions.

  14. Space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homick, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    Research on the etiology, prediction, treatment and prevention of space motion sickness, designed to minimize the impact of this syndrome which was experienced frequently and with severity by individuals on the Skylab missions, on Space Shuttle crews is reviewed. Theories of the cause of space motion sickness currently under investigation by NASA include sensory conflict, which argues that motion sickness symptoms result from a mismatch between the total pattern of information from the spatial senses and that stored from previous experiences, and fluid shift, based upon the redistribution of bodily fluids that occurs upon continued exposure to weightlessness. Attempts are underway to correlate space motion sickness susceptibility to different provocative environments, vestibular and nonvestibular responses, and the rate of acquisition and length of retention of sensory adaptation. Space motion sickness countermeasures under investigation include various drug combinations, of which the equal combination of promethazine and ephedrine has been found to be as effective as the scopolomine and dexedrine combination, and vestibular adaptation and biofeedback training and autogenic therapy.

  15. Seismic Sources and Recurrence Rates as Adopted by USGS Staff for the Production of the 1982 and 1990 Probabilistic Ground Motion Maps for Alaska and the Conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, Stanley L.; Perkins, David M.

    1995-01-01

    The construction of a probabilistic ground-motion hazard map for a region follows a sequence of analyses beginning with the selection of an earthquake catalog and ending with the mapping of calculated probabilistic ground-motion values (Hanson and others, 1992). An integral part of this process is the creation of sources used for the calculation of earthquake recurrence rates and ground motions. These sources consist of areas and lines that are representative of geologic or tectonic features and faults. After the design of the sources, it is necessary to arrange the coordinate points in a particular order compatible with the input format for the SEISRISK-III program (Bender and Perkins, 1987). Source zones are usually modeled as a point-rupture source. Where applicable, linear rupture sources are modeled with articulated lines, representing known faults, or a field of parallel lines, representing a generalized distribution of hypothetical faults. Based on the distribution of earthquakes throughout the individual source zones (or a collection of several sources), earthquake recurrence rates are computed for each of the sources, and a minimum and maximum magnitude is assigned. Over a period of time from 1978 to 1980 several conferences were held by the USGS to solicit information on regions of the United States for the purpose of creating source zones for computation of probabilistic ground motions (Thenhaus, 1983). As a result of these regional meetings and previous work in the Pacific Northwest, (Perkins and others, 1980), California continental shelf, (Thenhaus and others, 1980), and the Eastern outer continental shelf, (Perkins and others, 1979) a consensus set of source zones was agreed upon and subsequently used to produce a national ground motion hazard map for the United States (Algermissen and others, 1982). In this report and on the accompanying disk we provide a complete list of source areas and line sources as used for the 1982 and later 1990 seismic

  16. Muon motion in titanium hydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempton, J. R.; Petzinger, K. G.; Kossler, W. J.; Schone, H. E.; Hitti, B. S.; Stronach, C. E.; Adu, N.; Lankford, W. F.; Reilly, J. J.; Seymour, E. F. W.

    1988-01-01

    Motional narrowing of the transverse-field muon spin rotation signal was observed in gamma-TiH(x) for x = 1.83, 1.97, and 1.99. An analysis of the data for TiH1.99 near room temperature indicates that the mechanism responsible for the motion of the muon out of the octahedral site is thermally activated diffusion with an attempt frequency comparable to the optical vibrations of the lattice. Monte Carlo calculations to simulate the effect of muon and proton motion upon the muon field-correlation time were used to interpret the motional narrowing in TiH1.97 near 500 K. The interpretation is dependent upon whether the Bloembergen, Purcell, and Pound (BPP) theory or an independent spin-pair relaxation model is used to obtain the vacancy jump rate from proton NMR T1 measurements. Use of BPP theory shows that the field-correction time can be obtained if the rate of motion of the muon with respect to the rate of the motion for the protons is decreased. An independent spin-pair relaxation model indicates that the field-correlation time can be obtained if the rate of motion for the nearest-neighbor protons is decreased.

  17. Muon motion in titanium hydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempton, J. R.; Petzinger, K. G.; Kossler, W. J.; Schone, H. E.; Hitti, B. S.; Stronach, C. E.; Adu, N.; Lankford, W. F.; Reilly, J. J.; Seymour, E. F. W.

    1988-01-01

    Motional narrowing of the transverse-field muon spin rotation signal was observed in gamma-TiH(x) for x = 1.83, 1.97, and 1.99. An analysis of the data for TiH1.99 near room temperature indicates that the mechanism responsible for the motion of the muon out of the octahedral site is thermally activated diffusion with an attempt frequency comparable to the optical vibrations of the lattice. Monte Carlo calculations to simulate the effect of muon and proton motion upon the muon field-correlation time were used to interpret the motional narrowing in TiH1.97 near 500 K. The interpretation is dependent upon whether the Bloembergen, Purcell, and Pound (BPP) theory or an independent spin-pair relaxation model is used to obtain the vacancy jump rate from proton NMR T1 measurements. Use of BPP theory shows that the field-correction time can be obtained if the rate of motion of the muon with respect to the rate of the motion for the protons is decreased. An independent spin-pair relaxation model indicates that the field-correlation time can be obtained if the rate of motion for the nearest-neighbor protons is decreased.

  18. Decadal variations in geophysical processes and asymmetries in the solar motion about the Solar System's barycentre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorenkov, Nikolay; Wilson, Ian; Khlystov, Anatoly

    2010-05-01

    Motion (SIM). Over the last 800 years, the Earth has experience exceptionally strong tidal forces in the years 1247, 1433, 1610, 1787 and 1974 (Keeling and Whorf, 1997). He shows that these exceptionally strong tidal forces closely correspond in time to the first peak in the asymmetry of the SIM that occurs just after a period low asymmetry. These first peaks in asymmetry in the SIM occur in the years 1251, 1432, 1611, 1791, and 1971, closely correspond the years of peak tidal force. Thus, there appear to be periodic alignments between the lunar apsides, syzygies and lunar nodes that occur at almost exactly the same times that the SIM becomes most asymmetric for the first time after a period of low asymmetry in the SIM. It means that precession and stretching of the Lunar orbit (i.e. the factors that control the long-term variation of the lunar tides that are experienced here on Earth) are almost perfectly synchronized with the SIM. If the Solar system just consisted of Jupiter and the Sun, the barycentre of the Solar System would move in an almost circular orbit located just above the surface of the Sun (i.e. about 1.08 solar radii), called the sub-Jupiter point. Hence, the actual motion of the barycentre about the centre of the Sun (or equivalently the Sun about the barycentre) can be considered as a combination of the smooth symmetrical motion produced by Jupiter, combined with an additional, often asymmetric motion, caused by the other three Jovan planets (principally, Saturn and Neptune). The distance of the centre-of-mass from the Sub-Jupiter point is an excellent indicator of the level of asymmetry of the Sun's orbital motion, at any given time. A.I.Khlystov et al., (1992,1995) showed that the Earth and the other planets move in ellipses with the Sun at one foci, while at the same time they (effectively) share in the motion of the Sun around barycenter of the solar system. From the above results two important conclusions follows: 1) The movement of each planet is

  19. Objective Motion Cueing Criteria Investigation Based on Three Flight Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaal, Petrus M. T.; Schroeder, Jeffery A.; Chung, William W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper intends to help establish fidelity criteria to accompany the simulator motion system diagnostic test specified by the International Civil Aviation Organization. Twelve air- line transport pilots flew three tasks in the NASA Vertical Motion Simulator under four different motion conditions. The experiment used three different hexapod motion configurations, each with a different tradeoff between motion filter gain and break frequency, and one large motion configuration that utilized as much of the simulator's motion space as possible. The motion condition significantly affected: 1) pilot motion fidelity ratings, and sink rate and lateral deviation at touchdown for the approach and landing task, 2) pilot motion fidelity ratings, roll deviations, maximum pitch rate, and number of stick shaker activations in the stall task, and 3) heading deviation after an engine failure in the takeoff task. Significant differences in pilot-vehicle performance were used to define initial objective motion cueing criteria boundaries. These initial fidelity boundaries show promise but need refinement.

  20. Motion-Matching: A Challenge Game to Generate Motion Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, David; Adams, Betty; Brookes, David; Milner-Bolotin, Marina; Undreiu, Adriana

    2009-10-01

    Motion is a topic that is taught from elementary grades through to university at various levels of sophistication. It is an area that can be challenging for learning in a conceptually meaningful way, and formal kinematics instruction can sometimes seem dry and boring. Thus, the nature of students' initial introduction to motion is important in sparking their interest, shaping their perspective, and developing conceptual understanding of motion. The kinematic concepts we want students to acquire for basic motions are: position, time, speed, direction, velocity, velocity change, change rate, and acceleration, all with respect to a frame of reference. In this article we describe a challenge game used as an "opener" to motion, in which students themselves essentially generate these concepts, in everyday language, from a perceived need for them.

  1. Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    MOOG, Inc. supplies hydraulic actuators for the Space Shuttle. When MOOG learned NASA was interested in electric actuators for possible future use, the company designed them with assistance from Marshall Space Flight Center. They also decided to pursue the system's commercial potential. This led to partnership with InterActive Simulation, Inc. for production of cabin flight simulators for museums, expositions, etc. The resulting products, the Magic Motion Simulator 30 Series, are the first electric powered simulators. Movements are computer-guided, including free fall to heighten the sense of moving through space. A projection system provides visual effects, and the 11 speakers of a digital laser based sound system add to the realism. The electric actuators are easier to install, have lower operating costs, noise, heat and staff requirements. The U.S. Space & Rocket Center and several other organizations have purchased the simulators.

  2. Locomotor, Heart-Rate, and Metabolic Power Characteristics of Youth Women's Field Hockey: Female Athletes in Motion (FAiM) Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vescovi, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the locomotor, heart-rate, and metabolic power characteristics of high-level youth female field hockey matches. Method: Players from the U21 and U17 Canadian women's national teams were monitored during a 4-match test series using Global Positioning System technology. Position (forward,…

  3. Locomotor, Heart-Rate, and Metabolic Power Characteristics of Youth Women's Field Hockey: Female Athletes in Motion (FAiM) Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vescovi, Jason D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the locomotor, heart-rate, and metabolic power characteristics of high-level youth female field hockey matches. Method: Players from the U21 and U17 Canadian women's national teams were monitored during a 4-match test series using Global Positioning System technology. Position (forward,…

  4. Plate motion and deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Minster, B.; Prescott, W.; Royden, L.

    1991-02-01

    Our goal is to understand the motions of the plates, the deformation along their boundaries and within their interiors, and the processes that control these tectonic phenomena. In the broadest terms, we must strive to understand the relationships of regional and local deformation to flow in the upper mantle and the rheological, thermal and density structure of the lithosphere. The essential data sets which we require to reach our goal consist of maps of current strain rates at the earth's surface and the distribution of integrated deformation through time as recorded in the geologic record. Our success will depend on the effective synthesis of crustal kinematics with a variety of other geological and geophysical data, within a quantitative theoretical framework describing processes in the earth's interior. Only in this way can we relate the snapshot of current motions and earth structure provided by geodetic and geophysical data with long-term processes operating on the time scales relevant to most geological processes. The wide-spread use of space-based techniques, coupled with traditional geological and geophysical data, promises a revolution in our understanding of the kinematics and dynamics of plate motions over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales and in a variety of geologic settings. The space-based techniques that best address problems in plate motion and deformation are precise space-geodetic positioning -- on land and on the seafloor -- and satellite acquisition of detailed altimetric and remote sensing data in oceanic and continental areas. The overall science objectives for the NASA Solid Earth Science plan for the 1990's, are to Understand the motion and deformation of the lithosphere within and across plate boundaries'', and to understand the dynamics of the mantle, the structure and evolution of the lithosphere, and the landforms that result from local and regional deformation. 57 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Auditory Motion Elicits a Visual Motion Aftereffect

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Christopher C.; Ehrsson, H. Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The visual motion aftereffect is a visual illusion in which exposure to continuous motion in one direction leads to a subsequent illusion of visual motion in the opposite direction. Previous findings have been mixed with regard to whether this visual illusion can be induced cross-modally by auditory stimuli. Based on research on multisensory perception demonstrating the profound influence auditory perception can have on the interpretation and perceived motion of visual stimuli, we hypothesized that exposure to auditory stimuli with strong directional motion cues should induce a visual motion aftereffect. Here, we demonstrate that horizontally moving auditory stimuli induced a significant visual motion aftereffect—an effect that was driven primarily by a change in visual motion perception following exposure to leftward moving auditory stimuli. This finding is consistent with the notion that visual and auditory motion perception rely on at least partially overlapping neural substrates. PMID:27994538

  6. Source rupture process of the 5 September 2012 Costa Rica Mw=7.6 thrust event from joint inversion of high-rate GPS, strong motion, and teleseismic P wave data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, T.; Yue, H.; Rivera, L. A.; Schwartz, S. Y.; Protti, M.

    2013-05-01

    On 5 September 2012, a large thrust event (Mw=7.6) ruptured a densely instrumented seismic gap on the shallow plate boundary beneath the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica. Networks of strong motion accelerometers, broadband and short-period sensors, and high-rate (5-sps) GPS stations recorded ground motions directly above the rupture zone, providing a unique opportunity to study the detailed source process of a large shallow megathrust rupture using nearby land observations. An inland and relatively deep hypocenter (10.086°N, 85.305°W, 40 km) was estimated by the USGS, and teleseismic W-phase inversions also indicate a relatively large (30-40 km) centroid depth. Hypocenter relocation performed using the local seismic network data indicates that the event initiated with small emergent seismic waves from a hypocenter ~10 km offshore (9.80°N, 85.53°W) 15 km deep on the megathrust. The local origin time (14:42:05) is 3 s earlier than the USGS origin time, compatible with the shallower source depth. A joint finite-fault inversion of 0.2 Hz lowpass-filtered hr-GPS recordings, <0.4 Hz ground velocity recordings from regional strong-motion sensors, and teleseismic P waves reveals that the primary slip zone is located beneath the Nicoya coastline up-dip from the USGS location. Complete ground motions are computed for the hr-GPS stations using a 1D regional velocity model and a wavenumber integration program from Robert Herrmann. The large-slip region extends ~50 km along strike and ~30 km along dip, with a centroid depth of ~23 km. The maximum slip is ~4 meters and Mw=7.6, consistent with teleseismic estimates. The inversion indicates that the rupture propagated down-dip from the offshore hypocenter with a rupture velocity of ~2.5 km/s. The inversion has limited resolution of any offshore slip, but slip occurred in a region about 30 km offshore along the northern half of the rupture zone. We consider the relationship between coseismic slip location, aftershocks and adjacent

  7. Collective motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicsek, Tamás; Zafeiris, Anna

    2012-08-01

    We review the observations and the basic laws describing the essential aspects of collective motion - being one of the most common and spectacular manifestation of coordinated behavior. Our aim is to provide a balanced discussion of the various facets of this highly multidisciplinary field, including experiments, mathematical methods and models for simulations, so that readers with a variety of background could get both the basics and a broader, more detailed picture of the field. The observations we report on include systems consisting of units ranging from macromolecules through metallic rods and robots to groups of animals and people. Some emphasis is put on models that are simple and realistic enough to reproduce the numerous related observations and are useful for developing concepts for a better understanding of the complexity of systems consisting of many simultaneously moving entities. As such, these models allow the establishing of a few fundamental principles of flocking. In particular, it is demonstrated, that in spite of considerable differences, a number of deep analogies exist between equilibrium statistical physics systems and those made of self-propelled (in most cases living) units. In both cases only a few well defined macroscopic/collective states occur and the transitions between these states follow a similar scenario, involving discontinuity and algebraic divergences.

  8. Motion restraining device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, A. G. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A motion-restraining device for dissipating at a controlled rate the force of a moving body is discussed. The device is characterized by a drive shaft adapted to be driven in rotation by a moving body connected to a tape wound about a reel mounted on the drive shaft, and an elongated pitman link having one end pivotally connected to the crankshaft and the opposite end thereof connected with the mass through an energy dissipating linkage. A shuttle is disposed within a slot and guided by rectilinear motion between a pair of spaced impact surfaces. Reaction forces applied at impact of the shuttle with the impact surfaces include oppositely projected force components angularly related to the direction of the applied impact forces.

  9. Using motion parallax for laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Su, He; Li, Jianmin; Zhang, Huaifeng; Li, Jinhua; Wang, Shuxin

    2016-09-01

    In typical stereo display systems, the reproduced 3D scene is distorted when the observer moves. Motion parallax is an important depth cue that has the ability to correct this distortion. More importantly, motion parallax enables the observer to look around objects to provide a better view. A robotically assisted laparoscope prototype was designed to provide motion parallax. A study to adjust the camera-head mapping ratio (gain of motion parallax) was performed. A series of phantom tests was conducted to test the effectiveness of motion parallax. The experimental results showed that the motion parallax was effective, and the gain of motion parallax was subjective. For a regular laparoscope view distance, larger image zooming rates required smaller gain; for the same equivalent image size, further observer distance decreased the optimal gain. Motion parallax could be used for improved visualization in laparoscopic surgery. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Visual motion aftereffect from understanding motion language.

    PubMed

    Dils, Alexia Toskos; Boroditsky, Lera

    2010-09-14

    Do people spontaneously form visual mental images when understanding language, and if so, how truly visual are these representations? We test whether processing linguistic descriptions of motion produces sufficiently vivid mental images to cause direction-selective motion adaptation in the visual system (i.e., cause a motion aftereffect illusion). We tested for motion aftereffects (MAEs) following explicit motion imagery, and after processing literal or metaphorical motion language (without instructions to imagine). Intentionally imagining motion produced reliable MAEs. The aftereffect from processing motion language gained strength as people heard more and more of a story (participants heard motion stories in four installments, with a test after each). For the last two story installments, motion language produced reliable MAEs across participants. Individuals differed in how early in the story this effect appeared, and this difference was predicted by the strength of an individual's MAE from imagining motion. Strong imagers (participants who showed the largest MAEs from imagining motion) were more likely to show an MAE in the course of understanding motion language than were weak imagers. The results demonstrate that processing language can spontaneously create sufficiently vivid mental images to produce direction-selective adaptation in the visual system. The timecourse of adaptation suggests that individuals may differ in how efficiently they recruit visual mechanisms in the service of language understanding. Further, the results reveal an intriguing link between the vividness of mental imagery and the nature of the processes and representations involved in language understanding.

  11. Dynamics of the 3/1 planetary mean-motion resonance: an application to the HD60532 b-c planetary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, A. J.; Michtchenko, T. A.; Tadeu dos Santos, M.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we use a semi-analytical approach to analyze the global structure of the phase space of the planar planetary 3/1 mean-motion resonance. The case where the outer planet is more massive than its inner companion is considered. We show that the resonant dynamics can be described using two fundamental parameters, the total angular momentum and the spacing parameter. The topology of the Hamiltonian function describing the resonant behaviour is investigated on a large domain of the phase space without time-expensive numerical integrations of the equations of motion, and without any restriction on the magnitude of the planetary eccentricities. The families of the Apsidal Corotation Resonances (ACR) parameterized by the planetary mass ratio are obtained and their stability is analyzed. The main dynamical features in the domains around the ACR are also investigated in detail by means of spectral analysis techniques, which allow us to detect the regions of different regimes of motion of resonant systems. The construction of dynamical maps for various values of the total angular momentum shows the evolution of domains of stable motion with the eccentricities, identifying possible configurations suitable for exoplanetary systems.

  12. Human comfort response to dominant random motions in longitudinal modes of aircraft motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of random vertical and longitudinal accelerations and pitching velocity passenger ride comfort responses were examined on the NASA Langley Visual Motion Simulator. Effects of power spectral density shape were studied for motions where the peak was between 0 and 2 Hz. The subjective rating data and the physical motion data obtained are presented without interpretation or detailed analysis. There existed motions in all other degrees of freedom as well as the particular pair of longitudinal airplane motions studied. These unwanted motions, caused by the characteristics of the simulator may have introduced some interactive effects on passenger responses.

  13. Submarine Landslides and Gas Hydrates: Using a Rate and State Friction Model to Describe Incipient Motion Triggered by the Dissociation of High Saturation Hydrate Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handwerger, A. L.; Rempel, A. W.; Skarbek, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    The dissociation of gas hydrates along the continental shelf can potentially trigger submarine landslides. The hazard produced by such landslides can generate tsunamis, damage or destroy infrastructure, and result in a catastrophic release of methane to the ocean and atmosphere. Here we develop a 1D numerical model to identify the conditions under which the dissociation of gas hydrates can trigger submarine landslides. In particular we focus on high saturation hydrate anomalies (e.g., lenses and nodules) that unload the sediment particle contacts and prevent normal consolidation. These areas are of interest because upon dissociation they can generate excess pore pressure from rapid consolidation and from fluid flow due to changes in the averaged density of pore constituents. Our model tracks the evolution of pore pressure and effective stress as the hydrate anomalies decay using lab derived constitutive relationships from consolidation experiments. To quantify the potential for slope failure, we use a rate- and state-dependent frictional model adapted from standard fault mechanics treatments to assess the stability of finite slip patches subjected to these excess pore pressures. We find that submarine landslides will occur if the size of the slip patch exceeds a critical nucleation length. Thus, excess pore pressures generated by hydrate dissociation have the potential to trigger submarine landslides, if not significantly weaken the sediment such that external forces (e.g., nearby earthquakes) can trigger failure. Our results illustrate the fundamental mechanisms through which the dissociation of gas hydrates can pose a significant geohazard. Further tests using this model will help to better assess the risks of hydrate-triggered slope failure in a changing environment

  14. Self Motion Perception and Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    The studies conducted in this research project examined several aspects of motion sickness in animal models. A principle objective of these studies was to investigate the neuroanatomy that is important in motion sickness with the objectives of examining both the utility of putative models and defining neural mechanisms that are important in motion sickness.

  15. Self-Motion Perception and Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Motion sickness typically is considered a bothersome artifact of exposure to passive motion in vehicles of conveyance. This condition seldom has significant impact on the health of individuals because it is of brief duration, it usually can be prevented by simply avoiding the eliciting condition and, when the conditions that produce it are unavoidable, sickness dissipates with continued exposure. The studies conducted examined several aspects of motion sickness in animal models. A principle objective of these studies was to investigate the neuroanatomy that is important in motion sickness with the objectives of examining both the utility of putative models and defining neural mechanisms that are important in motion sickness.

  16. Accuracy of a combined heart rate and motion sensor for assessing energy expenditure in free-living adults during a double-blind crossover caffeine trial using doubly labeled water as the reference method.

    PubMed

    Silva, A M; Santos, D A; Matias, C N; Júdice, P B; Magalhães, J P; Ekelund, U; Sardinha, L B

    2015-01-01

    A combined heart rate (HR) and motion sensor (Actiheart) has been proposed as an accurate method for assessing total energy expenditure (TEE) and physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE). However, the extent to which factors such as caffeine may affect the accuracy by which the estimated HR-related PAEE contribution will affect TEE and PAEE estimates is unknown. Therefore, we examined the validity of Actiheart in estimating TEE and PAEE in free-living adults under a caffeine trial compared with doubly labeled water (DLW) as reference criterion. Using a double-blind crossover trial (Clinicaltrials.gov ID: #NCT01477294) with two conditions (4-day each with a 3-day-washout period), randomly ordered as caffeine (5 mg/kg per day) and placebo (malt-dextrine) intake, TEE was measured by DLW in 17 physically active men (20-38 years) who were non-caffeine users. In each condition, resting energy expenditure (REE) was assessed by indirect calorimetry and PAEE was calculated as (TEE-(REE+0.1 TEE)). Simultaneously, PAEE and TEE were estimated by Actiheart using an individual calibration (ACC+HRstep). Under caffeine, ACC+HRstep explained 76 and 64% of TEE and PAEE from DLW, respectively; corresponding results for the placebo condition were 82 and 66%. No mean bias was found between ACC+HRstep and DLW for TEE (caffeine:-468 kJ per day; placebo:-407 kJ per day), although PAEE was slightly underestimated (caffeine:-856 kJ per day; placebo:-1147 kJ per day). Similar limits of agreement were observed in both conditions ranging from -2066 to 3002 and from -3488 to 1776 kJ per day for TEE and PAEE, respectively. Regardless of caffeine intake, the combined HR and motion sensor is valid for estimating free-living energy expenditure in a group of healthy men but is less accurate for an individual assessment.

  17. Slow and fast motion of cracks in inelastic solids. Part 1: Slow growth of cracks in a rate sensitive tresca solid. Part 2: Dynamic crack represented by the Dugdale model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wnuk, M. P.; Sih, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    An extension is proposed of the classical theory of fracture to viscoelastic and elastic-plastic materials in which the plasticity effects are confined to a narrow band encompassing the crack front. It is suggested that the Griffith-Irwin criterion of fracture, which requires that the energy release rate computed for a given boundary value problem equals the critical threshold, ought to be replaced by a differential equation governing the slow growth of a crack prior to the onset of rapid propagation. A new term which enters the equation of motion in the dissipative media is proportional to the energy lost within the end sections of the crack, and thus reflects the extent of inelastic behavior of a solid. A concept of apparent surface energy is introduced to account for the geometry dependent and the rate dependent phenomena which influence toughness of an inelastic solid. Three hypotheses regarding the condition for fracture in the subcritical range of load are compared. These are: (1) constant fracture energy (Cherepanov), (2) constant opening displacement at instability (Morozov) and (3) final stretch criterion (Wnuk).

  18. Theoretical motions of hydrofoil systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imlay, Frederick H

    1948-01-01

    Results are presented of an investigation that has been undertaken to develop theoretical methods of treating the motions of hydrofoil systems and to determine some of the important parameters. Variations of parameters include three distributions of area between the hydrofoils, two rates of change of downwash angle with angle of attack, three depths of immersion, two dihedral angles, two rates of change of lift with immersion, three longitudinal hydrofoil spacings, two radii of gyration in pitching, and various horizontal and vertical locations of the center of gravity. Graphs are presented to show locations of the center of gravity for stable motion, values of the stability roots, and motions following the sudden application of a vertical force or a pitching moment to the hydrofoil system for numerous sets of values of the parameters.

  19. Motion vector quantization for video coding.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y Y; Woods, J W

    1995-01-01

    A new algorithm is developed for the vector quantization of motion vectors. This algorithm, called motion vector quantization (MVQ), simultaneously estimates and vector quantizes the motion vectors by reinterpreting the block matching algorithm as a type of vector quantization. An iterative design algorithm, based on this concept, is developed. In addition to reducing rate for fixed length encoding, the algorithm also reduces the computation considerably. We include coding simulation results on the Flower Garden sequence.

  20. Yaw Motion Cues in Helicopter Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Jeffrey A.; Johnson, Walter W.

    1996-01-01

    A piloted simulation that examined the effects of yaw motion cues on pilot-vehicle performance, pilot workload, and pilot motion perception was conducted on the NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator. The vehicle model that was used represented an AH-64 helicopter. Three tasks were performed in which only combinations of vehicle yaw and vertical displacement were allowed. The commands issued to the motion platform were modified to present the following four motion configurations for a pilot located forward of the center of rotation: (1) only the linear translations, (2) only the angular rotation, (3) both the linear translations and the angular rotation, and (4) no motion. The objective data indicated that pilot-vehicle performance was reduced and the necessary control activity increased when linear motion was removed; however, the lack of angular rotation did not result in a measured degradation for almost all cases. Also, pilots provided subjective assessments of their compensation required, the motion fidelity, and their judgment of whether or not linear or rotational cockpit motion was present. Ratings of compensation and fidelity were affected only by linear acceleration, and the rotational motion had no significant impact. Also, when only linear motion was present, pilots typically reported the presence of rotation. Thus, linear acceleration cues, not yaw rotational cues, appear necessary to simulate hovering flight.

  1. Human comfort response to random motions with a dominant pitching motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of random pitching velocities on passenger ride comfort response were examined on the NASA Langley Visual Motion Simulator. The effects of power spectral density shape and frequency ranges from 0 to 2 Hz were studied. The subjective rating data and the physical motion data obtained are presented. No attempt at interpretation or detailed analysis of the data is made. Motions in all degrees of freedom existed as well as the intended pitching motion, because of the characteristics of the simulator. These unwanted motions may have introduced some interactive effects on passenger responses which should be considered in any analysis of the data.

  2. Human comfort response to random motions with combined yawing and rolling motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. W., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of random yawing and rolling velocities on passenger ride comfort responses were examined on a visual motion simulator. The effects of power spectral density shape and frequency ranges of peak power from 0 to 2 Hz were studied. The subjective rating data and the physical motion data obtained are presented. No attempt at interpretation or detailed analysis of the data is made. There existed during this study motions in all other degrees of freedom as well as the yawing and rolling motions, because of the characteristics of the simulator. These unwanted motions may have introduced some interactive effects on passenger responses which should be considered in any analysis of the data.

  3. Wide area Hyperspectral Motion Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-02-03

    interest . However, traditional kinematic data based tracking algorithms have challenges in wide area motion imagery due to a relatively low...sampling rate , low spatial resolution, occlusions, changes in lighting, and multiple confusers. Recent studies have shown that incorporating hyperspectral...For example, to cover 64 km2 at a ground sampling distance of 0.5m, an update rate of 1Hz, and up to 256 spectral bands, a dispersive grating

  4. Motion regularization for matting motion blurred objects.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hai Ting; Tai, Yu-Wing; Brown, Michael S

    2011-11-01

    This paper addresses the problem of matting motion blurred objects from a single image. Existing single image matting methods are designed to extract static objects that have fractional pixel occupancy. This arises because the physical scene object has a finer resolution than the discrete image pixel and therefore only occupies a fraction of the pixel. For a motion blurred object, however, fractional pixel occupancy is attributed to the object’s motion over the exposure period. While conventional matting techniques can be used to matte motion blurred objects, they are not formulated in a manner that considers the object’s motion and tend to work only when the object is on a homogeneous background. We show how to obtain better alpha mattes by introducing a regularization term in the matting formulation to account for the object’s motion. In addition, we outline a method for estimating local object motion based on local gradient statistics from the original image. For the sake of completeness, we also discuss how user markup can be used to denote the local direction in lieu of motion estimation. Improvements to alpha mattes computed with our regularization are demonstrated on a variety of examples.

  5. Comparative orbital evolution of transient Uranian co-orbitals: exploring the role of ephemeral multibody mean motion resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, C.; de la Fuente Marcos, R.

    2014-07-01

    Uranus has three known co-orbitals: 83982 Crantor (2002 GO9), 2010 EU65 and 2011 QF99. All of them were captured in their current resonant state relatively recently. Here, we perform a comparative analysis of the orbital evolution of these transient co-orbitals to understand better how they got captured in the first place and what makes them dynamically unstable. We also look for additional temporary Uranian co-orbital candidates among known objects. Our N-body simulations show that the long-term stability of 2011 QF99 is controlled by Jupiter and Neptune; it briefly enters the 1:7 mean motion resonance with Jupiter and the 2:1 with Neptune before becoming a Trojan and prior to leaving its tadpole orbit. During these ephemeral two-body mean motion resonance episodes, apsidal corotation resonances are also observed. For known co-orbitals, Saturn is the current source of the main destabilizing force but this is not enough to eject a minor body from the 1:1 commensurability with Uranus. These objects must enter mean motion resonances with Jupiter and Neptune in order to be captured or become passing Centaurs. Asteroid 2010 EU65, a probable visitor from the Oort cloud, may have been stable for several Myr due to its comparatively low eccentricity. Additionally, we propose 2002 VG131 as the first transient quasi-satellite candidate of Uranus. Asteroid 1999 HD12 may signal the edge of Uranus' co-orbital region. Transient Uranian co-orbitals are often submitted to complex multibody ephemeral mean motion resonances that trigger the switching between resonant co-orbital states, making them dynamically unstable. In addition, we show that the orbital properties and discovery circumstances of known objects can be used to outline a practical strategy by which additional Uranus' co-orbitals may be found.

  6. Managing Motion Sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166982.html Managing Motion Sickness You may never love some pursuits, like ... there anything you can do to quell your motion sickness so you can join in the fun? ...

  7. Essay on Gyroscopic Motions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tea, Peter L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Explains gyroscopic motions to college freshman or high school seniors who have learned about centripetal acceleration and the transformations of a couple. Contains several figures showing the direction of forces and motion. (YP)

  8. Limited range of motion

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003173.htm Limited range of motion To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Limited range of motion is a term meaning that a joint or ...

  9. Objects in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    One thing scientists study is how objects move. A famous scientist named Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) spent a lot of time observing objects in motion and came up with three laws that describe how things move. This explanation only deals with the first of his three laws of motion. Newton's First Law of Motion says that moving objects will continue…

  10. Objects in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    One thing scientists study is how objects move. A famous scientist named Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) spent a lot of time observing objects in motion and came up with three laws that describe how things move. This explanation only deals with the first of his three laws of motion. Newton's First Law of Motion says that moving objects will continue…

  11. The Eclipsing Binary Di Herculis: One Mystery Solved, But Another Takes Its Place

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Nicole; Guinan, E.; Maloney, F.

    2010-01-01

    The 8th-mag eclipsing binary DI Herculis has perplexed scientists for the past few decades due to its anomalously slow apsidal motion rate. DI Her consists of two main-sequence stars (B5V, B6V), with P(orb) = 10.55 days, and eccentricity(e= 0.489). Since the apsidal motion is dominated by General Relativity, the system is one of the few tests available for verifying the theory. Combining the expected classical (1.93°/100 yr) and relativistic (2.34°/100 yr) effects, the predicted apsidal motion rate is 4.27°/100 yr. Our recent determination of the apsidal motion yields 1.33°+/-0.25 /100 yr, based on eclipse timings from 1936-2008. Recently, Albrecht et al (2009, Nature 461) have apparently solved the apsidal motion anomaly of DI Her, finding that the axes of both stars are significantly inclined from the normal to the orbital plane. This was determined from the radial velocity curves and observing the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect during primary and secondary eclipses. Having significantly misaligned axes of rotation produces a perturbation that greatly reduces the classical apsidal motion effect, thus explaining the observed small apsidal motion rate. Even though this discovery apparently solves the problem, it raises new questions as to how the axes are so tilted. Additionally, tilted axes are expected to contribute to other orbital effects, such as changes in orbital inclination, which have not yet observed from the apparent constancy in eclipse depths over time. We have also searched for evidence of small periodic oscillations in the eclipse timings and found no evidence of a light travel time effect arising from a possible tertiary component. Further, we find evidence that the projected rotation axes of the stars may be precessing, since it appears that the value of V(rot)sini has increased over the past 30 years. This research was supported by NSF/RUI Grants AST05-07536/42.

  12. Dual motion valve with single motion input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belew, Robert (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A dual motion valve includes two dual motion valve assemblies with a rotary input which allows the benefits of applying both rotary and axial motion to a rotary sealing element with a plurality of ports. The motion of the rotary sealing element during actuation provides axial engagement of the rotary sealing element with a stationary valve plate which also has ports. Fluid passages are created through the valve when the ports of the rotary sealing element are aligned with the ports of the stationary valve plate. Alignment is achieved through rotation of the rotary sealing element with respect to the stationary valve plate. The fluid passages provide direct paths which minimize fluid turbulence created in the fluid as it passes through the valve.

  13. General autonomic components of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Suter, Steve; Toscano, William B.; Kamiya, Joe; Naifeh, Karen

    1986-01-01

    This report refers to a body of investigations directed toward the examination of autonomic nervous system responses to motion sickness. Heart rate, respiration rate, finger pulse volume, and basal skin resistance were measured on 127 men and women before, during, and after exposure to a nauseogenic rotating chair test. Significant changes in all autonomic responses were observed across the tests (p less than .05). Significant differences in autonomic responses among groups divided according to motion sickness susceptibility were also observed (p less than .05). Results suggest that the examination of autonomic responses as an objective indicator of motion sickness malaise is warranted and may contribute to the overall understanding of the syndrome.

  14. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions. Motions...

  15. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions. Motions...

  16. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions. Motions...

  17. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions. Motions...

  18. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions. Motions...

  19. 29 CFR 541.709 - Motion picture producing industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Motion picture producing industry. 541.709 Section 541.709... SALES EMPLOYEES Definitions and Miscellaneous Provisions § 541.709 Motion picture producing industry... motion picture producing industry who is compensated at a base rate of at least $695 a week (exclusive...

  20. 29 CFR 541.709 - Motion picture producing industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motion picture producing industry. 541.709 Section 541.709... SALES EMPLOYEES Definitions and Miscellaneous Provisions § 541.709 Motion picture producing industry... motion picture producing industry who is compensated at a base rate of at least $695 a week (exclusive of...

  1. 29 CFR 541.709 - Motion picture producing industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Motion picture producing industry. 541.709 Section 541.709... SALES EMPLOYEES Definitions and Miscellaneous Provisions § 541.709 Motion picture producing industry... motion picture producing industry who is compensated at a base rate of at least $695 a week (exclusive of...

  2. 29 CFR 541.709 - Motion picture producing industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Motion picture producing industry. 541.709 Section 541.709... SALES EMPLOYEES Definitions and Miscellaneous Provisions § 541.709 Motion picture producing industry... motion picture producing industry who is compensated at a base rate of at least $695 a week (exclusive of...

  3. 29 CFR 541.709 - Motion picture producing industry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Motion picture producing industry. 541.709 Section 541.709... SALES EMPLOYEES Definitions and Miscellaneous Provisions § 541.709 Motion picture producing industry... motion picture producing industry who is compensated at a base rate of at least $695 a week (exclusive of...

  4. Prosthetic hand control using motion discrimination from EMG signals.

    PubMed

    Kurisu, Naoyuki; Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Koizumi, Takayuki

    2009-01-01

    In this report, we improve the motion discrimination method from electromyogram (EMG) for a prosthetic hand and propose prosthetic hand control. In the past, we proved that a motion discrimination method using conic models could discriminate three hand motions without the incorrect discriminations that the elbow motions cause. In this research, to increase discrimination accuracy of motion discrimination using conic models, we propose a feature extraction method using quadratic polynomials. Additionally, because many prosthetic hands using motion discrimination have constant motion speed that can't be controlled, we propose an angular velocity generation method using multiple regression models. We verified these methods by controlling the 3D hand model. In the experiment, the proposed method could discriminate five motions at a rate of above 90 percent without the incorrect discriminations that elbow motions cause. Moreover, the wrist joint angle of the 3D hand model could be controlled by standard variation of 3[deg] or less.

  5. Motion through syntactic frames.

    PubMed

    Feist, Michele I

    2010-04-01

    The introduction of Talmy's (1985, 2000) typology sparked significant interest in linguistic relativity in the arena of motion language. Through careful analysis of the conflation patterns evident in the language of motion events, Talmy noted that one class of languages, V-languages, tends to encode path along with the fact of motion in motion verbs, while a second class, S-languages, tends to encode manner. In the experimental literature, it was reasoned that speakers may be expected to extend novel verbs in accordance with the lexicalization patterns of their native languages. However, the results regarding this prediction are mixed. In this paper, I examine the interplay between the meaning encoded in the motion verb itself and the meaning encoded in the motion description construction, offering a Gricean explanation for co-occurrence patterns and, by extension, for the mixed results. I then explore the implications of this argument for research on possible language effects on thought in this domain.

  6. Motion Tracking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Integrated Sensors, Inc. (ISI), under NASA contract, developed a sensor system for controlling robot vehicles. This technology would enable a robot supply vehicle to automatically dock with Earth-orbiting satellites or the International Space Station. During the docking phase the ISI-developed sensor must sense the satellite's relative motion, then spin so the robot vehicle can adjust its motion to align with the satellite and slowly close until docking is completed. ISI used the sensing/tracking technology as the basis of its OPAD system, which simultaneously tracks an object's movement in six degrees of freedom. Applications include human limb motion analysis, assembly line position analysis and auto crash dummy motion analysis. The NASA technology is also the basis for Motion Analysis Workstation software, a package to simplify the video motion analysis process.

  7. Bacterial motion in narrow capillaries

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Liyan; Wasnik, Vaibhav; Emberly, Eldon

    2014-01-01

    Motile bacteria often have to pass through small tortuous pores in soil or tissue of higher organisms. However, their motion in this prevalent type of niche is not fully understood. Here, we modeled it with narrow glass capillaries and identified a critical radius (Rc) for bacterial motion. Near the surface of capillaries narrower than that, the swimming trajectories are helices. In larger capillaries, they swim in distorted circles. Under non-slip condition, the peritrichous Escherichia coli swam in left-handed helices with an Rc of ∼10 μm near glass surface. However, slipping could occur in the fast monotrichous Pseudomonas fluorescens, when a speed threshold was exceeded, and thus both left-handed and right-handed helices were executed in glass capillaries. In the natural non-cylindrical pores, the near-surface trajectories would be spirals and twisted loops. Engaging in such motions reduces the bacterial migration rate. With a given pore size, the run length and the tumbling angle of the bacterium determine the probability and duration of their near-surface motion. Shear flow and chemotaxis potentially enhance it. Based on this observation, the puzzling previous observations on bacterial migration in porous environments can be interpreted. PMID:25764548

  8. Detecting motion through dynamic refraction.

    PubMed

    Alterman, Marina; Schechner, Yoav Y; Perona, Pietro; Shamir, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Refraction causes random dynamic distortions in atmospheric turbulence and in views across a water interface. The latter scenario is experienced by submerged animals seeking to detect prey or avoid predators, which may be airborne or on land. Man encounters this when surveying a scene by a submarine or divers while wishing to avoid the use of an attention-drawing periscope. The problem of inverting random refracted dynamic distortions is difficult, particularly when some of the objects in the field of view (FOV) are moving. On the other hand, in many cases, just those moving objects are of interest, as they reveal animal, human, or machine activity. Furthermore, detecting and tracking these objects does not necessitate handling the difficult task of complete recovery of the scene. We show that moving objects can be detected very simply, with low false-positive rates, even when the distortions are very strong and dominate the object motion. Moreover, the moving object can be detected even if it has zero mean motion. While the object and distortion motions are random and unknown, they are mutually independent. This is expressed by a simple motion feature which enables discrimination of moving object points versus the background.

  9. Conditional replenishment using motion prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hein, D. N.; Jones, H. W., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Conditional replenishment is an interframe video compression method that uses correlation in time to reduce video transmission rates. This method works by detecting and sending only the changing portions of the image and by having the receiver use the video data from the previous frame for the non-changing portion. The amount of compression that can be achieved through this technique depends to a large extent on the rate of change within the image, and can vary from 10 to 1 to less than 2 to 1. An additional 3 to 1 reduction in rate is obtained by the intraframe coding of data blocks using a 2-dimensional variable rate Hadamard transform coder. A further additional 2 to 1 rate reduction is achieved by using motion prediction. Motion prediction works by measuring the relative displacements of a subpicture from one frame to the next. The subpicture can then be transmitted by sending only the value of the 2-dimensional displacement. Computer simulations have demonstrated that data rates of 2 to 4 Mega-bits/second can be achieved while still retaining good fidelity in the image.

  10. Measurement of visual motion

    SciTech Connect

    Hildreth, E.C.

    1984-01-01

    This book examines the measurement of visual motion and the use of relative movement to locate the boundaries of physical objects in the environment. It investigates the nature of the computations that are necessary to perform this analysis by any vision system, biological or artificial. Contents: Introduction. Background. Computation of the Velocity Field. An Algorithm to Compute the Velocity Field. The Computation of Motion Discontinuities. Perceptual Studies of Motion Measurement. The Psychophysics of Discontinuity Detection. Neurophysiological Studies of Motion. Summary and Conclusions. References. Author and Subject Indexes.

  11. The Personal Motion Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Brian Vandellyn

    1993-01-01

    The Neutral Body Posture experienced in microgravity creates a biomechanical equilibrium by enabling the internal forces within the body to find their own balance. A patented reclining chair based on this posture provides a minimal stress environment for interfacing with computer systems for extended periods. When the chair is mounted on a 3 or 6 axis motion platform, a generic motion simulator for simulated digital environments is created. The Personal Motion Platform provides motional feedback to the occupant in synchronization with their movements inside the digital world which enhances the simulation experience. Existing HMD based simulation systems can be integrated to the turnkey system. Future developments are discussed.

  12. EDITORIAL: Nanotechnology in motion Nanotechnology in motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2012-02-01

    , Toshio Ando from the University of Kanazawa provides an overview of developments that have allowed atomic force microscopy to move from rates of the order of one frame a minute to over a thousand frames per second in constant height mode, as reported by Mervyn Miles and colleagues at Bristol University and University College London [8]. Among the pioneers in the field, Ando's group demonstrated the ability to record the Brownian motion of myosin V molecules on mica with image capture rates of 100 x 100 pixels in 80 ms over a decade ago [9]. The developments unleash the potential of atomic force microscopy to observe the dynamics of biological and materials systems. If seeing is believing, the ability to present real motion pictures of the nanoworld cannot fail to capture the public imagination and stimulate burgeoning new avenues of scientific endeavour. Nearly 350 years on from the publication Micrographia, images in microscopy have moved from the page to the movies. References [1] Binnig G, Quate C F, and Gerber Ch 1986 Phys. Rev. Lett. 56 930-3 [2] Ando T 2012 Nanotechnology 23 062001 [3] J G 1934 Nature 134 635-6 [4] Bharadwaj P, Anger P and Novotny L 2007 Nanotechnology 18 044017 [5] The Nobel Prize in Physics 1986 Nobelprize.org [6] Kim K K, Reina A, Shi Y, Park H, Li L-J, Lee Y H and Kong J 2010 Nanotechnology 21 285205 [7] Phillips D B, Grieve J A, Olof S N, Kocher S J, Bowman R, Padgett M J, Miles M J and Carberry D M 2011 Nanotechnology 22 285503 [8] Picco L M, Bozec L, Ulcinas A, Engledew D J, Antognozzi M, Horton M A and Miles M J 2007 Nanotechnology 18 044030 [9] Ando T, Kodera N, Takai E, Maruyama D, Saito K and Toda A 2001 Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 98 12468

  13. Comparison of physiological motion filters for in vivo cardiac ARFI.

    PubMed

    Giannantonio, Doug M; Dumont, Douglas M; Trahey, Gregg E; Byram, Brett C

    2011-04-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is being utilized to investigate mechanical properties ofcardiac tissue. The underlying physiological motion, however, presents a major challenge. This paper aims to investigate the effectiveness of various physiological motion filters using in vivo canine data with a simulated ARFI push pulse. Ideally, the motion filter will exactly model the physiological motion and, when subtracted from the total displacement, leave only the simulated ARFI displacement profile. We investigated three temporal quadratic motion filters: (1)interpolation, (2) extrapolation and (3) a weighted technique. Additionally, the various motion filters were compared when using 1-D versus 2-D autocorrelation methods to estimate motion. It was found that 2D-autocorrelation always produced better physiological motion estimates regardless of the type of filter used. The extrapolation filter gives the most accurate estimate of the physiological motion at times immediately after the ARFI push (0.1 ms) while a close-time interpolation filter using displacement estimates at times before full tissue recovery gives the most accurate estimates at later times after the ARFI push (0.7 ms). While improvements to the motion filter during atrial systole and the onset of ventricular systole are needed, the weighted, close-time interpolation and extrapolation motion filters all offer promising results for estimating cardiac physiological motion more accurately, while allowing faster ARFI frame rates than previous motion filters. This study demonstrates the ability to eliminate physiological motion in a clinically-feasible manner, opening the door for more extensive clinical experimentation.

  14. General Automatic Components of Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suter, S.; Toscano, W. B.; Kamiya, J.; Naifeh, K.

    1985-01-01

    A body of investigations performed in support of experiments aboard the space shuttle, and designed to counteract the symptoms of Space Adaptation Syndrome, which resemble those of motion sickness on Earth is reviewed. For these supporting studies, the automatic manifestations of earth-based motion sickness was examined. Heart rate, respiration rate, finger pulse volume and basal skin resistance were measured on 127 men and women before, during and after exposure to nauseogenic rotating chair tests. Significant changes in all autonomic responses were observed across the tests. Significant differences in autonomic responses among groups divided according to motion sickness susceptibility were also observed. Results suggest that the examination of autonomic responses as an objective indicator of motion sickness malaise is warranted and may contribute to the overall understanding of the syndrome on Earth and in Space.

  15. Motion compensator for holographic motion picture camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    When reference beam strikes target it undergoes Doppler shift dependent upon target velocity. To compensate, object beam is first reflected from rotating cylinder that revolves in direction opposite to target but at same speed. When beam strikes target it is returned to original frequency and is in phase with reference beam. Alternatively this motion compensator may act on reference beam.

  16. Exploring the motion advantage: evaluating the contribution of familiarity and differences in facial motion.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Natalie; Lander, Karen

    2017-05-01

    Seeing a face move can improve familiar face recognition, face matching, and learning. More specifically, familiarity with a face may facilitate the learning of an individual's "dynamic facial signature". In the outlined research we examine the relationship between participant ratings of familiarity, the distinctiveness of motion, the amount of facial motion, and the recognition of familiar moving faces (Experiment 1) as well as the magnitude of the motion advantage (Experiment 2). Significant positive correlations were found between all factors. Findings suggest that faces rated as moving a lot and in a distinctive manner benefited the most from being seen in motion. Additionally findings indicate that facial motion information becomes a more important cue to recognition the more familiar a face is, suggesting that "dynamic facial signatures" continue to be learnt over time and integrated within the face representation. Results are discussed in relation to theoretical explanations of the moving face advantage.

  17. Human comfort response to random motions with a dominant vertical motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Subjective ride comfort response ratings were measured on the Langley Visual Motion Simulator with vertical acceleration inputs with various power spectra shapes and magnitudes. The data obtained are presented.

  18. Making Sense of Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    When watching a small child with a toy car, it is seen that interest in motion comes early. Children often suggest speed through sounds such as "RRRrrrRRRooooommMMMmmmm" as the toy car is made to speed up, slow down, or accelerate through a turn. Older children start to consider force and motion studies in more detail, and experiences in school…

  19. Body Motion and Graphing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemirovsky, Ricardo; Tierney, Cornelia; Wright, Tracy

    1998-01-01

    Analyzed two children's use of a computer-based motion detector to make sense of symbolic expressions (Cartesian graphs). Found three themes: (1) tool perspectives, efforts to understand graphical responses to body motion; (2) fusion, emergent ways of talking and behaving that merge symbols and referents; and (3) graphical spaces, when changing…

  20. Measuring mandibular motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Rositano, S.; Taylor, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Mandibular motion along three axes is measured by three motion transducers on floating yoke that rests against mandible. System includes electronics to provide variety of outputs for data display and processing. Head frame is strapped to test subject's skull to provide fixed point of reference for transducers.

  1. Teaching Projectile Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    Described is a novel approach to the teaching of projectile motion of sixth form level. Students are asked to use an analogue circuit to observe projectile motion and to graph the experimental results. Using knowledge of basic dynamics, students are asked to explain the shape of the curves theoretically. (Author/MA)

  2. Measuring mandibular motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Rositano, S.; Taylor, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Mandibular motion along three axes is measured by three motion transducers on floating yoke that rests against mandible. System includes electronics to provide variety of outputs for data display and processing. Head frame is strapped to test subject's skull to provide fixed point of reference for transducers.

  3. Teaching Projectile Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    Described is a novel approach to the teaching of projectile motion of sixth form level. Students are asked to use an analogue circuit to observe projectile motion and to graph the experimental results. Using knowledge of basic dynamics, students are asked to explain the shape of the curves theoretically. (Author/MA)

  4. Making Sense of Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    When watching a small child with a toy car, it is seen that interest in motion comes early. Children often suggest speed through sounds such as "RRRrrrRRRooooommMMMmmmm" as the toy car is made to speed up, slow down, or accelerate through a turn. Older children start to consider force and motion studies in more detail, and experiences in school…

  5. Aristotle, Motion, and Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Jane

    Aristotle rejects a world vision of changing reality as neither useful nor beneficial to human life, and instead he reaffirms both change and eternal reality, fuses motion and rest, and ends up with "well-behaved" changes. This concept of motion is foundational to his world view, and from it emerges his theory of knowledge, philosophy of…

  6. Objects in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2008-01-01

    Objects in motion attract children. The following activity helps children explore the motion of bodies riding in a vehicle and safely demonstrates the answer to their questions, "Why do I need a seatbelt?" Children will enjoy moving the cup around, even if all they "see" is a cup rather than understanding it represents a car. They will understand…

  7. Objects in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2008-01-01

    Objects in motion attract children. The following activity helps children explore the motion of bodies riding in a vehicle and safely demonstrates the answer to their questions, "Why do I need a seatbelt?" Children will enjoy moving the cup around, even if all they "see" is a cup rather than understanding it represents a car. They will understand…

  8. Motion compensated digital tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    van der Reijden, Anneke; van Herk, Marcel; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2013-12-01

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) is a limited angle image reconstruction method for cone beam projections that offers patient surveillance capabilities during VMAT based SBRT delivery. Motion compensation (MC) has the potential to mitigate motion artifacts caused by respiratory motion, such as blur. The purpose of this feasibility study was therefore to develop and evaluate motion-compensated DTS (MC-DTS). MC-DTS images were reconstructed by back projection of X-ray projection images acquired over 30° arcs. Back projection lines were deformed according to an a priori motion model derived from the 4D planning CT. MC-DTS was evaluated on a respiratory motion phantom and 3 lung cancer patients. Respiratory artifact reduction was assessed visually and quantified by fitting a cumulative Gaussian function to profiles along the background-GTV transition in the CC direction. MC reconstruction was fast enough to keep up with image acquisition and considerably reduced motion blur visually. Quantitatively, MC reduced the background-GTV transition distance by 49%. Motion compensation considerably improved the image quality of DTS images of lung cancer patients, giving an opportunity for more accurate DTS guidance and intra-fraction monitoring concurrent with VMAT delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Naive Conceptions of Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloskey, Michael

    Two experiments were conducted to characterize the system of beliefs that make up the naive impetus theory of motion and to determine what effects physics instruction has on students' conceptions of motion. Thirteen college students were asked to solve several quantitative problems and were interviewed about their answers in the first experiment.…

  10. Object motion analysis study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of optical data processing (ODP) techniques for motion analysis in two-dimensional imagery was studied. The basic feasibility of this approach was demonstrated, but inconsistent performance of the photoplastic used for recording spatial filters prevented totally automatic operation. Promising solutions to the problems encountered are discussed, and it is concluded that ODP techniques could be quite useful for motion analysis.

  11. Naive Conceptions of Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloskey, Michael

    Two experiments were conducted to characterize the system of beliefs that make up the naive impetus theory of motion and to determine what effects physics instruction has on students' conceptions of motion. Thirteen college students were asked to solve several quantitative problems and were interviewed about their answers in the first experiment.…

  12. Stochastic ground motion simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Xiaodan, Sun; Beer, Michael; Kougioumtzoglou, Ioannis A.; Patelli, Edoardo; Siu-Kui Au, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Strong earthquake ground motion records are fundamental in engineering applications. Ground motion time series are used in response-history dynamic analysis of structural or geotechnical systems. In such analysis, the validity of predicted responses depends on the validity of the input excitations. Ground motion records are also used to develop ground motion prediction equations(GMPEs) for intensity measures such as spectral accelerations that are used in response-spectrum dynamic analysis. Despite the thousands of available strong ground motion records, there remains a shortage of records for large-magnitude earthquakes at short distances or in specific regions, as well as records that sample specific combinations of source, path, and site characteristics.

  13. Present-day plate motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minster, J. B.; Jordan, T. H.

    1977-01-01

    A data set comprising 110 spreading rates, 78 transform fault azimuths and 142 earthquake slip vectors was inverted to yield a new instantaneous plate motion model, designated RM2. The mean averaging interval for the relative motion data was reduced to less than 3 My. A detailed comparison of RM2 with angular velocity vectors which best fit the data along individual plate boundaries indicates that RM2 performs close to optimally in most regions, with several notable exceptions. On the other hand, a previous estimate (RM1) failed to satisfy an extensive set of new data collected in the South Atlantic Ocean. It is shown that RM1 incorrectly predicts the plate kinematics in the South Atlantic because the presently available data are inconsistent with the plate geometry assumed in deriving RM1. It is demonstrated that this inconsistency can be remedied by postulating the existence of internal deformation with the Indian plate, although alternate explanations are possible.

  14. Visual-Motion Cueing in Altitude and Yaw Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Walter W.; Schroeder, Jeffery; Statler, Irving C. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Research conducted using the Vertical Motion Simulator at the NASA Ames Research Center examined the contributions of platform motion and visual level-of-detail (LOD) cueing to tasks that required altitude and/or yaw control in a simulated AH-64 Apache helicopter. Within the altitude control tasks the LOD manipulation caused optical density to change across altitudes by a small, moderate, or large amount; while platform motion was either present or absent. The results from these tasks showed that both constant optical density and platform motion improved altitude awareness in an altitude repositioning task, while the presence of platform motion also led to improved performance in a vertical rate control task. The yaw control tasks had pilots'sit 4.5 ft in front of the center of rotation, thus subjecting them to both rotational and lateral motions during a yaw. The pilots were required to regulate their yaw, while the platform motion was manipulated in order to present all combinations of the resulting rotational and lateral motion components. Ratings of simulation fidelity and sensed platform motion showed that the pilots were relatively insensitive to the rotational component, but highly aware of the lateral component. Together these findings show that: 1) platform motion cues are important when speed regulation is required during altitude change; 2) platform motion contributes to the perception of movement amplitude; 3) lateral, but not rotational, motion cues are essential to the perception of vehicle yaw; and 4) LOD management yielding constant optical density across altitudes improves altitude awareness.

  15. Motion sickness in migraine sufferers.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Dawn A; Furman, Joseph M; Balaban, Carey D

    2005-12-01

    Motion sickness commonly occurs after exposure to actual motion, such as car or amusement park rides, or virtual motion, such as panoramic movies. Motion sickness symptoms may be disabling, significantly limiting business, travel and leisure activities. Motion sickness occurs in approximately 50% of migraine sufferers. Understanding motion sickness in migraine patients may improve understanding of the physiology of both conditions. Recent literature suggests important relationships between the trigeminal system and vestibular nuclei that may have implications for both motion sickness and migraine. Studies demonstrating an important relationship between serotonin receptors and motion sickness susceptibility in both rodents and humans suggest possible new motion sickness prevention therapies.

  16. Motion Planning for Rigid Body Robots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    Given a non-holonomic disc robot D, its motion constraints in terms of maximum curvature (Kmax) and rate of change of curvature (Kmax), a set W of...further Kmax, constraint to avoid turns that exceed the rate of change of curvature constraint.

  17. Reduction of Periodic Motion Artifacts in Photoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Wijshoff, Ralph W C G R; Mischi, Massimo; Aarts, Ronald M

    2017-01-01

    Periodic motion artifacts affect photoplethysmography (PPG) signals in activities of daily living (ADL), cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX), and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This hampers measurement of interbeat intervals (IBIs) and oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ). Our objective was to develop a generic algorithm to remove periodic motion artifacts, recovering artifact-reduced PPG signals for beat-to-beat analysis. The algorithm was retrospectively evaluated on forehead PPG signals measured while walking on a treadmill. The step rate was tracked in a motion reference signal via a second-order generalized integrator with a frequency-locked loop. Two reference signals were compared: sensor motion relative to the skin ( ∆x[n]) measured via self-mixing interferometry and head motion ( av[n] ) measured via accelerometry. The step rate was used in a quadrature harmonic model to estimate the artifacts. Quadrature components need only two coefficients per frequency leading to a short filter and prevent undesired frequency-shifted components in the artifact estimate. Subtracting the estimate from the measured signal reduced the artifacts. Compared to ∆x[n] , av[n] had a better signal-to-noise ratio and more consistently contained a component at the step rate. Artifact reduction was effective for distinct step rate and pulse rate, since the artifact-reduced signals provided more stable IBI and SpO 2 measurements. Accelerometry provided a more reliable motion reference signal. The proposed algorithm can be of significance for monitoring in ADL, CPX, or CPR, by providing artifact-reduced PPG signals for improved IBI and SpO 2 measurements during periodic motion.

  18. Visualizing motion in video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Lisa M.; Crayne, Susan

    2000-05-01

    In this paper, we present a visualization system and method for measuring, inspecting and analyzing motion in video. Starting from a simple motion video, the system creates a still image representation which we call a digital strobe photograph. Similar to visualization techniques used in conventional film photography to capture high-speed motion using strobe lamps or very fast shutters, and to capture time-lapse motion where the shutter is left open, this methodology creates a single image showing the motion of one or a small number of objects over time. Based on digital background subtraction, we assume that the background is stationary or at most slowing changing and that the camera position is fixed. The method is capable of displaying the motion based on a parameter indicating the time step between successive movements. It can also overcome problems of visualizing movement that is obscured by previous movements. The method is used in an educational software tool for children to measure and analyze various motions. Examples are given using simple physical objects such as balls and pendulums, astronomical events such as the path of the stars around the north pole at night, or the different types of locomotion used by snakes.

  19. Motion stability. Analytical mechanics. Motion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrosov, V. M.; Demin, V. G.

    Topics discussed include the optimal control of trajectory ensembles, the stability of orbital systems, the dynamics of gyroscopic systems, the control of linear delay-differential systems, singular perturbations in problems of optimal control, and resonance problems in the theory of motion stability. Also considered are the comparison principle in the dynamics of distributed parameter systems, the development of an integrated walking robot, stability and stabilization in differential games, geometric methods to describe rigid-body dynamics, and spin-stabilized satellites.

  20. Motion Recognition and Modifying Motion Generation for Imitation Robot Based on Motion Knowledge Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuzawa, Yuki; Kato, Shohei; Kanoh, Masayoshi; Itoh, Hidenori

    A knowledge-based approach to imitation learning of motion generation for humanoid robots and an imitative motion generation system based on motion knowledge learning and modification are described. The system has three parts: recognizing, learning, and modifying parts. The first part recognizes an instructed motion distinguishing it from the motion knowledge database by the continuous hidden markov model. When the motion is recognized as being unfamiliar, the second part learns it using locally weighted regression and acquires a knowledge of the motion. When a robot recognizes the instructed motion as familiar or judges that its acquired knowledge is applicable to the motion generation, the third part imitates the instructed motion by modifying a learned motion. This paper reports some performance results: the motion imitation of several radio gymnastics motions.

  1. Generalized compliant motion primitive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backes, Paul G.

    1994-08-01

    This invention relates to a general primitive for controlling a telerobot with a set of input parameters. The primitive includes a trajectory generator; a teleoperation sensor; a joint limit generator; a force setpoint generator; a dither function generator, which produces telerobot motion inputs in a common coordinate frame for simultaneous combination in sensor summers. Virtual return spring motion input is provided by a restoration spring subsystem. The novel features of this invention include use of a single general motion primitive at a remote site to permit the shared and supervisory control of the robot manipulator to perform tasks via a remotely transferred input parameter set.

  2. Inflation and cyclotron motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greensite, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    We consider, in the context of a braneworld cosmology, the motion of the Universe coupled to a four-form gauge field, with constant field strength, defined in higher dimensions. It is found, under rather general initial conditions, that in this situation there is a period of exponential inflation combined with cyclotron motion in the inflaton field space. The main effect of the cyclotron motion is that slow roll conditions on the inflaton potential, which are typically necessary for exponential inflation, can be evaded. There are Landau levels associated with the four-form gauge field, and these correspond to quantum excitations of the inflaton field satisfying unconventional dispersion relations.

  3. Motion Alters Color Appearance

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sang-Wook; Kang, Min-Suk

    2016-01-01

    Chromatic induction compellingly demonstrates that chromatic context as well as spectral lights reflected from an object determines its color appearance. Here, we show that when one colored object moves around an identical stationary object, the perceived saturation of the stationary object decreases dramatically whereas the saturation of the moving object increases. These color appearance shifts in the opposite directions suggest that normalization induced by the object’s motion may mediate the shift in color appearance. We ruled out other plausible alternatives such as local adaptation, attention, and transient neural responses that could explain the color shift without assuming interaction between color and motion processing. These results demonstrate that the motion of an object affects both its own color appearance and the color appearance of a nearby object, suggesting a tight coupling between color and motion processing. PMID:27824098

  4. Vision and Motion Pictures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grambo, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    Presents activities on persistence of vision that involve students in a hands-on approach to the study of early methods of creating motion pictures. Students construct flip books, a Zoetrope, and an early movie machine. (DDR)

  5. Motion Sickness: First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... soon as the motion stops. The more you travel, the more easily you'll adjust to being ... at least 30 to 60 minutes before you travel. Expect drowsiness as a side effect. Consider scopolamine ( ...

  6. A Projectile Motion Bullseye.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1985-01-01

    Explains a projectile motion experiment involving a bow and arrow. Procedures to measure "muzzle" velocity, bow elastic potential energy, range, flight time, wind resistance, and masses are considered. (DH)

  7. Projectile Motion Details.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnick, Jeffrey W.

    1994-01-01

    Presents an exercise that attempts to correct for the common discrepancies between theoretical and experimental predictions concerning projectile motion using a spring-loaded projectile ball launcher. Includes common correction factors for student use. (MVL)

  8. Toying with Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galus, Pamela J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a variety of activities that support the development of an understanding of Newton's laws of motion. Activities use toy cars, mobile roads, and a seat-of-nails. Includes a scoring rubric. (DDR)

  9. Projectile Motion Details.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnick, Jeffrey W.

    1994-01-01

    Presents an exercise that attempts to correct for the common discrepancies between theoretical and experimental predictions concerning projectile motion using a spring-loaded projectile ball launcher. Includes common correction factors for student use. (MVL)

  10. A Projectile Motion Bullseye.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1985-01-01

    Explains a projectile motion experiment involving a bow and arrow. Procedures to measure "muzzle" velocity, bow elastic potential energy, range, flight time, wind resistance, and masses are considered. (DH)

  11. Projectile Motion with Mathematica.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Alwis, Tilak

    2000-01-01

    Describes how to use the computer algebra system (CAS) Mathematica to analyze projectile motion with and without air resistance. These experiments result in several conjectures leading to theorems. (Contains 17 references.) (Author/ASK)

  12. Projectile Motion with Mathematica.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Alwis, Tilak

    2000-01-01

    Describes how to use the computer algebra system (CAS) Mathematica to analyze projectile motion with and without air resistance. These experiments result in several conjectures leading to theorems. (Contains 17 references.) (Author/ASK)

  13. Mathisson's helical motions demystified

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, L. Filipe; Natário, José; Zilhão, Miguel

    2012-07-01

    The motion of spinning test particles in general relativity is described by Mathisson-Papapetrou-Dixon equations, which are undetermined up to a spin supplementary condition, the latter being today still an open question. The Mathisson-Pirani (MP) condition is known to lead to rather mysterious helical motions which have been deemed unphysical, and for this reason discarded. We show that these assessments are unfounded and originate from a subtle (but crucial) misconception. We discuss the kinematical explanation of the helical motions, and dynamically interpret them through the concept of hidden momentum, which has an electromagnetic analogue. We also show that, contrary to previous claims, the frequency of the helical motions coincides exactly with the zitterbewegung frequency of the Dirac equation for the electron.

  14. Toying with Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galus, Pamela J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a variety of activities that support the development of an understanding of Newton's laws of motion. Activities use toy cars, mobile roads, and a seat-of-nails. Includes a scoring rubric. (DDR)

  15. Explanations of Superluminal Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuer, P. A. G.

    Recent developments in models of core-jet sources with apparent superluminal motions are reviewed. Emphasis is given to new versions of the so-called "Christmas tree" model and the relativistic beaming model.

  16. Stroboscopic Goggles for Reduction of Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Somers, Jeffrey T.

    2005-01-01

    A device built around a pair of electronic shutters has been demonstrated to be effective as a prototype of stroboscopic goggles or eyeglasses for preventing or reducing motion sickness. The momentary opening of the shutters helps to suppress a phenomenon that is known in the art as retinal slip and is described more fully below. While a number of different environmental factors can induce motion sickness, a common factor associated with every known motion environment is sensory confusion or sensory mismatch. Motion sickness is a product of misinformation arriving at a central point in the nervous system from the senses from which one determines one s spatial orientation. When information from the eyes, ears, joints, and pressure receptors are all in agreement as to one s orientation, there is no motion sickness. When one or more sensory input(s) to the brain is not expected, or conflicts with what is anticipated, the end product is motion sickness. Normally, an observer s eye moves, compensating for the anticipated effect of motion, in such a manner that the image of an object moving relatively to an observer is held stationary on the retina. In almost every known environment that induces motion sickness, a change in the gain (in the signal-processing sense of gain ) of the vestibular system causes the motion of the eye to fail to hold images stationary on the retina, and the resulting motion of the images is termed retinal slip. The present concept of stroboscopic goggles or eyeglasses (see figure) is based on the proposition that prevention of retinal slip, and hence, the prevention of sensory mismatch, can be expected to reduce the tendency toward motion sickness. A device according to this concept helps to prevent retinal slip by providing snapshots of the visual environment through electronic shutters that are brief enough that each snapshot freezes the image on each retina. The exposure time for each snapshot is less than 5 ms. In the event that a higher

  17. Motion recognition from contact force measurement.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Takumi; Venture, Gentiane

    2013-01-01

    Optical motion capture systems, which are used in broad fields of research, are costly; they need large installation space and calibrations. We find difficulty in applying it in typical homes and care centers. Therefore we propose to use low cost contact force measurement systems to develop rehabilitation and healthcare monitoring tools. Here, we propose a novel algorithm for motion recognition using the feature vector from force data solely obtained during a daily exercise program. We recognized 7 types of movement (Radio Exercises) of two candidates (mean age 22, male). The results show that the recognition rate of each motion has high score (mean: 86.9%). The results also confirm that there is a clustering of each movement in personal exercises data, and a similarity of the clustering even for different candidates thus that motion recognition is possible using contact force data.

  18. Combined pitching and yawing motion of airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baranoff, A V; Hopf, L

    1931-01-01

    This report treats the following problems: The beginning of the investigated motions is always a setting of the lateral controls, i.e., the rudder or the ailerons. Now, the first interesting question is how the motion would proceed if these settings were kept unchanged for some time; and particularly, what upward motion would set in, how soon, and for how long, since therein lie the dangers of yawing. Two different motions ensue with a high rate of turn and a steep down slope of flight path in both but a marked difference in angle of attack and consequently different character in the resultant aerodynamic forces: one, the "corkscrew" dive at normal angle, and the other, the "spin" at high angle.

  19. ITRF2014 plate motion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altamimi, Zuheir; Métivier, Laurent; Rebischung, Paul; Rouby, Hélène; Collilieux, Xavier

    2017-06-01

    For various geodetic and geophysical applications, users need to have access to a plate motion model (PMM) that is consistent with the ITRF2014 frame. This paper describes the approach used for determining a PMM from the horizontal velocities of a subset of the ITRF2014 sites away from plate boundaries, Glacial Isostatic Adjustment regions and other deforming zones. In theory it would be necessary to include in the inversion model a translational motion vector (called in this paper origin rate bias, ORB) that would represent the relative motion between the ITRF2014 origin (long-term averaged centre of mass of the Earth as sensed by SLR) and the centre of tectonic plate motion. We show that in practice, the magnitude of the estimated ORB is strongly dependent on the selection of ITRF2014 sites used for the PMM adjustment. Its Z-component can in particular range between 0 and more than 1 mm yr-1 depending on the station network used, preventing any geophysical interpretation of the estimated value. Relying on rigorous statistical criteria, the site selection finally adopted for the ITRF2014-PMM adjustment leads to a relatively small ORB (0.30 ± 0.18 mm yr-1 in the Z-component), which is statistically insignificant at the 2-sigma level, but also according to an F-ratio test. Therefore we opted for an ITRF2014-PMM without estimating the ORB, which in turn accommodates geodetic applications that require access to the ITRF2014 frame through pure plate rotation poles.

  20. PROMOTIONS: PROper MOTION Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleb Wherry, John; Sahai, R.

    2009-05-01

    We report on the development of a software tool (PROMOTIONS) to streamline the process of measuring proper motions of material in expanding nebulae. Our tool makes use of IDL's widget programming capabilities to design a unique GUI that is used to compare images of the objects from two epochs. The software allows us to first orient and register the images to a common frame of reference and pixel scale, using field stars in each of the images. We then cross-correlate specific morphological features in order to determine their proper motions, which consist of the proper motion of the nebula as a whole (PM-neb), and expansion motions of the features relative to the center. If the central star is not visible (quite common in bipolar nebulae with dense dusty waists), point-symmetric expansion is assumed and we use the average motion of high-quality symmetric pairs of features on opposite sides of the nebular center to compute PM-neb. This is then subtracted out to determine the individual movements of these and additional features relative to the nebular center. PROMOTIONS should find wide applicability in measuring proper motions in astrophysical objects such as the expanding outflows/jets commonly seen around young and dying stars. We present first results from using PROMOTIONS to successfully measure proper motions in several pre-planetary nebulae (transition objects between the red giant and planetary nebula phases), using images taken 7-10 years apart with the WFPC2 and ACS instruments on board HST. The authors are grateful to NASA's Undergradute Scholars Research Program (USRP) for supporting this research.

  1. Motion of the Scotia sea plates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, C.; Livermore, R.; Pollitz, F.

    2003-01-01

    Earthquake data from the Scotia Arc to early 2002 are reviewed in the light of satellite gravity and other data in order to derive a model for the motion of plates in the Scotia Sea region. Events with magnitude ???5, which occurred on or near the boundaries of the Scotia and Sandwich plates, and for which Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) solutions are available, are examined. The newer data fill some of the previous sampling gaps along the boundaries of the Scotia and Sandwich plates, and provide tighter constraints on relative motions. Variations in the width of the Brunhes anomaly on evenly spaced marine magnetic profiles over the East Scotia Ridge provide new estimates of Scotia-Sandwich plate spreading rates. Since there are no stable fracture zones in the east Scotia Sea, the mean azimuth of sea floor fabric mapped by sidescan is used to constrain the direction of spreading. 18 new rate estimates and four azimuths from the East Scotia Ridge are combined with 68 selected earthquake slip vectors from the boundaries of the Scotia Sea in a least-squares inversion for the best-fitting set of Euler poles and angular rotation rates describing the 'present-day' motions of the Scotia and Sandwich plates relative to South America and Antarctica. Our preferred model (TLP2003) gives poles that are similar to previous estimates, except for Scotia Plate motion with respect to South America, which is significantly different from earlier estimates; predicted rates of motion also differ slightly. Our results are much more robust than earlier work. We examine the implications of the model for motion and deformation along the various plate boundaries, with particular reference to the North and South Scotia Ridges, where rates are obtained by closure.

  2. Motion cues that make an impression: Predicting perceived personality by minimal motion information.

    PubMed

    Koppensteiner, Markus

    2013-11-01

    The current study presents a methodology to analyze first impressions on the basis of minimal motion information. In order to test the applicability of the approach brief silent video clips of 40 speakers were presented to independent observers (i.e., did not know speakers) who rated them on measures of the Big Five personality traits. The body movements of the speakers were then captured by placing landmarks on the speakers' forehead, one shoulder and the hands. Analysis revealed that observers ascribe extraversion to variations in the speakers' overall activity, emotional stability to the movements' relative velocity, and variation in motion direction to openness. Although ratings of openness and conscientiousness were related to biographical data of the speakers (i.e., measures of career progress), measures of body motion failed to provide similar results. In conclusion, analysis of motion behavior might be done on the basis of a small set of landmarks that seem to capture important parts of relevant nonverbal information.

  3. Optimal displacement in apparent motion and quadrature models of motion sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1990-01-01

    A grating appears to move if it is displaced by some amount between two brief presentations, or between multiple successive presentations. A number of recent experiments have examined the influence of displacement size upon either the sensitivity to motion, or upon the induced motion aftereffect. Several recent motion models are based upon quadrature filters that respond in opposite quadrants in the spatiotemporal frequency plane. Predictions of the quadrature model are derived for both two-frame and multiframe displays. Quadrature models generally predict an optimal displacement of 1/4 cycle for two-frame displays, but in the multiframe case the prediction depends entirely on the frame rate.

  4. Yugoslav strong motion network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailov, Vladimir

    1985-04-01

    Data concerning ground motion and the response of structures during strong earthquakes are necessary for seismic hazard evaluation and the definition of design criteria for structures to be constructed in seismically active zones. The only way to obtain such data is the installation of a strong-motion instrument network. The Yugoslav strong-motion programme was created in 1972 to recover strong-motion response data used by the structural engineering community in developing earthquake resistant design. Instruments, accelerographs SMA-1 and seismoscopes WM-1, were installed in free-field stations and on structures (high-rise buildings, dams, bridges, etc.). A total number of 176 accelerographs and 137 seismoscopes have been installed and are operating in Yugoslavia. The strong-motion programme in Yugoslavia consists of five subactivities: network design, network operation, data processing, network management and research as well as application. All these activities are under the responsibility of IZIIS in cooperation with the Yugoslav Association of Seismology. By 1975 in the realisation of this project participated the CALTECH as cooperative institution in the joint American-Yugoslav cooperative project. The results obtained which are presented in this paper, and their application in the aseismic design justify the necessity for the existence of such a network in Yugoslavia.

  5. Ultraslow scaled Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodrova, Anna S.; Chechkin, Aleksei V.; Cherstvy, Andrey G.; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-06-01

    We define and study in detail utraslow scaled Brownian motion (USBM) characterized by a time dependent diffusion coefficient of the form D(t)≃ 1/t. For unconfined motion the mean squared displacement (MSD) of USBM exhibits an ultraslow, logarithmic growth as function of time, in contrast to the conventional scaled Brownian motion. In a harmonic potential the MSD of USBM does not saturate but asymptotically decays inverse-proportionally to time, reflecting the highly non-stationary character of the process. We show that the process is weakly non-ergodic in the sense that the time averaged MSD does not converge to the regular MSD even at long times, and for unconfined motion combines a linear lag time dependence with a logarithmic term. The weakly non-ergodic behaviour is quantified in terms of the ergodicity breaking parameter. The USBM process is also shown to be ageing: observables of the system depend on the time gap between initiation of the test particle and start of the measurement of its motion. Our analytical results are shown to agree excellently with extensive computer simulations.

  6. The Particle--Motion Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demana, Franklin; Waits, Bert K.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses solutions to real-world linear particle-motion problems using graphing calculators to simulate the motion and traditional analytic methods of calculus. Applications include (1) changing circular or curvilinear motion into linear motion and (2) linear particle accelerators in physics. (MDH)

  7. The Particle--Motion Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demana, Franklin; Waits, Bert K.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses solutions to real-world linear particle-motion problems using graphing calculators to simulate the motion and traditional analytic methods of calculus. Applications include (1) changing circular or curvilinear motion into linear motion and (2) linear particle accelerators in physics. (MDH)

  8. A Stick Motion Compensation System with a Dynamic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Matsubara, Atsushi; Kakino, Yoshiaki; Tsutsui, Kazuhiko

    This paper deals with a stick motion compensation system. Stick motion is trajectory error that happens just after a quadrant change in circular motion on NC machine tools. Recently cylindrical machining with an end mill is often executed instead of boring machining with a bore tool. That is why the accuracy with end mill machining is becoming important. Stick motion extremely damages the accuracy and the quality of the circular parts or free form surfaces on workpieces. In the conventional compensation system, tuning parameters for each combination of radius and feed rate is needed. This research proposes a new stick motion compensation system. The new system has a dynamic model that simulates the friction. The simulated friction consists of two components. One is spring resistance in proportion to a reverse distance from a quadrant change. The other is viscous damping friction in proportion to velocity. The system can compensate stick motions suitably for wide range conditions of radii and feed rate.

  9. Image segmentation via motion vector estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Malek, Aiman A.; Hasekioglu, Orkun; Bloomer, John J.

    1990-07-01

    In the visual world moving edges in the periphery represent vital pieces of information that directs the human foveation mechanism to selectively gather information around these specific locations. This computationally efficient approach of allocating resources at key locations has inspired computer visionists to develop new target detection and hacking algorithms based on motion detection in image sequences. In this study we implemented a recursive algorithm for estimating motion vector fields for each pixel in a sequence of Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) images. Velocity information is used to segment the image and perform linear quadratic and acceleration-based frame interpolation to produce an apparent frame rate increase. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of low-rate digital fluoroscopy hence less exposure risks while preserving image quality. Furthermore the technique can be useful in the medical Picture Archival and Communication Systems (PACS) where image data can be compressed by storing and transmiting only the motion fields associated with the moving pixels. 1.

  10. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  11. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, Jr., James S.

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over time can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.

  12. Motion detector and analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Unruh, W.P.

    1987-03-23

    Method and apparatus are provided for deriving positive and negative Doppler spectrum to enable analysis of objects in motion, and particularly, objects having rotary motion. First and second returned radar signals are mixed with internal signals to obtain an in-phase process signal and a quadrature process signal. A broad-band phase shifter shifts the quadrature signal through 90/degree/ relative to the in-phase signal over a predetermined frequency range. A pair of signals is output from the broad-band phase shifter which are then combined to provide a first side band signal which is functionally related to a negative Doppler shift spectrum. The distinct positive and negative Doppler spectra may then be analyzed for the motion characteristics of the object being examined.

  13. Brownian motion of graphene.

    PubMed

    Maragó, Onofrio M; Bonaccorso, Francesco; Saija, Rosalba; Privitera, Giulia; Gucciardi, Pietro G; Iatì, Maria Antonia; Calogero, Giuseppe; Jones, Philip H; Borghese, Ferdinando; Denti, Paolo; Nicolosi, Valeria; Ferrari, Andrea C

    2010-12-28

    Brownian motion is a manifestation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem of statistical mechanics. It regulates systems in physics, biology, chemistry, and finance. We use graphene as prototype material to unravel the consequences of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem in two dimensions, by studying the Brownian motion of optically trapped graphene flakes. These orient orthogonal to the light polarization, due to the optical constants anisotropy. We explain the flake dynamics in the optical trap and measure force and torque constants from the correlation functions of the tracking signals, as well as comparing experiments with a full electromagnetic theory of optical trapping. The understanding of optical trapping of two-dimensional nanostructures gained through our Brownian motion analysis paves the way to light-controlled manipulation and all-optical sorting of biological membranes and anisotropic macromolecules.

  14. Prospective motion correction using tracking coils.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lei; Schmidt, Ehud J; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho; Santos, Juan; Hoge, William S; Tempany-Afdhal, Clare; Butts-Pauly, Kim; Dumoulin, Charles L

    2013-03-01

    Intracavity imaging coils provide higher signal-to-noise than surface coils and have the potential to provide higher spatial resolution in shorter acquisition times. However, images from these coils suffer from physiologically induced motion artifacts, as both the anatomy and the coils move during image acquisition. We developed prospective motion-correction techniques for intracavity imaging using an array of tracking coils. The system had <50 ms latency between tracking and imaging, so that the images from the intracavity coil were acquired in a frame of reference defined by the tracking array rather than by the system's gradient coils. Two-dimensional gradient-recalled and three-dimensional electrocardiogram-gated inversion-recovery-fast-gradient-echo sequences were tested with prospective motion correction using ex vivo hearts placed on a moving platform simulating both respiratory and cardiac motion. Human abdominal tests were subsequently conducted. The tracking array provided a positional accuracy of 0.7 ± 0.5 mm, 0.6 ± 0.4 mm, and 0.1 ± 0.1 mm along the X, Y, and Z directions at a rate of 20 frames-per-second. The ex vivo and human experiments showed significant image quality improvements for both in-plane and through-plane motion correction, which although not performed in intracavity imaging, demonstrates the feasibility of implementing such a motion-correction system in a future design of combined tracking and intracavity coil. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Motion Information Inferring Scheme for Multi-View Video Coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Han-Suh; Jeon, Yong-Joon; Jeon, Byeong-Moon

    This letter proposes a motion information inferring scheme for multi-view video coding motivated by the idea that the aspect of motion vector between the corresponding positions in the neighboring view pair is quite similar. The proposed method infers the motion information from the corresponding macroblock in the neighboring view after RD optimization with the existing prediction modes. This letter presents evaluation showing that the method significantly enhances the efficiency especially at high bit rates.

  16. de Gennes Narrowing Describes the Relative Motion of Protein Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Liang; Smolin, Nikolai; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2014-04-01

    The relative motion of structural domains is essential for the biological function of many proteins. Here, by analyzing neutron scattering data and performing molecular dynamics simulations, we find that interdomain motion in several proteins obeys the principle of de Gennes narrowing, in which the wave vector dependence of the interdomain diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to the interdomain structure factor. Thus, the rate of interdomain motion is inversely proportional to the probability distribution of the spatial configurations of domains.

  17. Vertical Heterophoria and Susceptibility to Visually-induced Motion Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Danielle N.; Bedell, Harold E.

    2013-01-01

    Motion sickness is reported to be a common symptom in patients with vertical heterophoria. The goal of this study was to assess the relationship between vertical phoria and susceptibility to motion sickness in a non-clinical sample of 43 subjects. Vertical phoria was measured with a Maddox rod after 30 s of occlusion. To evaluate susceptibility to motion sickness, subjects read text while sitting inside a rotating optokinetic drum for 10 min. Subjects rated their level of motion sickness at 1 min intervals during drum rotation and the magnitude of 13 motion-sickness symptoms after drum rotation ended. The magnitude of vertical phoria ranged from 0 to 2.13 prism diopters (pd) with a mean of 0.46 pd and correlated significantly with both the maximum rating of motion sickness during drum rotation and the summed symptom score following rotation. A vertical phoria of 0.75 pd discriminated best between subjects with low vs. high summed motion-sickness-symptom scores (p < 0.0001). Introducing a prism to artificially increase the phoria of 12 subjects with vertical phorias < 0.75 pd increased motion-sickness symptoms in only 1 subject. Prisms that reduced the phoria of subjects with vertical phorias > 0.75 pd reduced motion-sickness symptoms in 2 of the 4 subjects tested. The results confirm an association between vertical phoria and motion sickness, but suggest the relationship may not be causal. PMID:22390327

  18. The “Lunching” Effect: Pigeons track motion towards food more than motion away from it

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Felipe; Sanabria, Federico; Shelley, David; Killeen, Peter R.

    2009-01-01

    Four experiments measured pigeons' pecking at a small touch-screen image (the CS) that moved toward or away from a source of food (the US). The image's effectiveness as a CS was dependent on its motion, direction, and distance relative to the US. Pecking to the CS increased with proximity to the US when the CS moved toward the US (Experiment 1). This held true even when a departing CS signalled a US of greater magnitude (Experiment 2). Response rates to stationary stimuli were greater the closer they were to the hopper; but rate was less than when the same spot was part of a motion toward food, and greater than when it was part of a motion away (Experiment 3). The rate of responding in all three cases (motion toward, stationary, motion away) decreased exponentially with distance from the hopper. The distance and motion effects observed under these Pavlovian contingencies were different when pecking to the spot was required for reinforcement (Experiment 4). PMID:19591911

  19. Extended rate equations

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.

    1981-01-30

    The equations of motion are discussed which describe time dependent population flows in an N-level system, reviewing the relationship between incoherent (rate) equations, coherent (Schrodinger) equations, and more general partially coherent (Bloch) equations. Approximations are discussed which replace the elaborate Bloch equations by simpler rate equations whose coefficients incorporate long-time consequences of coherence.

  20. Motions Recognized through Visual Scene by Pilots and Flight Simulator Tests with Only Lateral-Directional Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Masahito; Kobayashi, Osamu

    A flight simulator must exactly simulate the aircraft motion. So, engineers check if the solution of equations of motion, the calculation of flight positions and attitudes, and then, the drawn-up of visual scenery from cockpit windows according to the calculated positions and attitudes are correct. This paper proposes an additional check if the aircraft motion perceived from visual scenery by pilot is same as the calculated motion. This opinion is applied to the simulation case that just lateral-directional flying qualities are evaluated, and it is found that the pitching motion rate (q) and Euler’s pitch attitude rate (Θ) should not be perfectly neglected (i.e. q=Θ=0) but (q and Θ) should be given assuming steady level turn flight should be given. The flight simulator test showed that the pilot felt more real flight motion and controlled some harder than in the condition of q=Θ=0.

  1. Analysis of swimming motions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallenstein, J.; Huston, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of swimming motion with specific attention given to the flutter kick, the breast-stroke kick, and the breast stroke. The analysis is completely theoretical. It employs a mathematical model of the human body consisting of frustrums of elliptical cones. Dynamical equations are written for this model including both viscous and inertia forces. These equations are then applied with approximated swimming strokes and solved numerically using a digital computer. The procedure is to specify the input of the swimming motion. The computer solution then provides the output displacement, velocity, and rotation or body roll of the swimmer.

  2. Analysis of swimming motions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallenstein, J.; Huston, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of swimming motion with specific attention given to the flutter kick, the breast-stroke kick, and the breast stroke. The analysis is completely theoretical. It employs a mathematical model of the human body consisting of frustrums of elliptical cones. Dynamical equations are written for this model including both viscous and inertia forces. These equations are then applied with approximated swimming strokes and solved numerically using a digital computer. The procedure is to specify the input of the swimming motion. The computer solution then provides the output displacement, velocity, and rotation or body roll of the swimmer.

  3. Motion in microfluidic ratchets.

    PubMed

    Caballero, D; Katuri, J; Samitier, J; Sánchez, S

    2016-11-15

    The ubiquitous random motion of mesoscopic active particles, such as cells, can be "rectified" or directed by embedding the particles in systems containing local and periodic asymmetric cues. Incorporated on lab-on-a-chip devices, these microratchet-like structures can be used to self-propel fluids, transport particles, and direct cell motion in the absence of external power sources. In this Focus article we discuss recent advances in the use of ratchet-like geometries in microfluidics which could open new avenues in biomedicine for applications in diagnosis, cancer biology, and bioengineering.

  4. Noncommutative Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Willien O.; Almeida, Guilherme M. A.; Souza, Andre M. C.

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the classical Brownian motion of a particle in a two-dimensional noncommutative (NC) space. Using the standard NC algebra embodied by the symplectic Weyl-Moyal formalism we find that noncommutativity induces a nonvanishing correlation between both coordinates at different times. The effect stands out as a signature of spatial noncommutativity and thus could offer a way to experimentally detect the phenomena. We further discuss some limiting scenarios and the trade-off between the scale imposed by the NC structure and the parameters of the Brownian motion itself.

  5. Hand in Motion Reveals Mind in Motion

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Jonathan B.; Dale, Rick; Farmer, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, researchers have measured hand movements en route to choices on a screen to understand the dynamics of a broad range of psychological processes. We review this growing body of research and explain how manual action exposes the real-time unfolding of underlying cognitive processing. We describe how simple hand motions may be used to continuously index participants’ tentative commitments to different choice alternatives during the evolution of a behavioral response. As such, hand-tracking can provide unusually high-fidelity, real-time motor traces of the mind. These motor traces cast novel theoretical and empirical light onto a wide range of phenomena and serve as a potential bridge between far-reaching areas of psychological science – from language, to high-level cognition and learning, to social cognitive processes. PMID:21687437

  6. Induced motion at texture-defined motion boundaries.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, A; Benton, C P; McOwan, P W

    1999-01-01

    When a static textured background is covered and uncovered by a moving bar of the same mean luminance we can clearly see the motion of the bar. Texture-defined motion provides an example of a naturally occurring second-order motion. Second-order motion sequences defeat standard spatio-temporal energy models of motion perception. It has been proposed that second-order stimuli are analysed by separate systems, operating in parallel with luminance-defined motion processing, which incorporate identifiable pre-processing stages that make second-order patterns visible to standard techniques. However, the proposal of multiple paths to motion analysis remains controversial. Here we describe the behaviour of a model that recovers both luminance-defined and an important class of texture-defined motion. The model also accounts for the induced motion that is seen in some texture-defined motion sequences. We measured the perceived direction and speed of both the contrast envelope and induced motion in the case of a contrast modulation of static noise textures. Significantly, the model predicts the perceived speed of the induced motion seen at second-order texture boundaries. The induced motion investigated here appears distinct from classical induced effects resulting from motion contrast or the movement of a reference frame. PMID:10643088

  7. Strong Motion Recording in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archuleta, R. J.; Fletcher, J. B.; Shakal, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    The United States strong motion program began in 1932 when the Coast and Geodetic Survey (C&GS) installed eight strong motion accelerographs in California. During the March 1933 Long Beach earthquake, three of these produced the first strong motion records. With this success the C&GS expanded the number of accelerographs to 71 by 1964. With development of less expensive, mass-produced accelerographs the number of strong motion accelerographs expanded to ~575 by 1972. Responsibilities for operating the network and disseminating data were transferred to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in 1970 and then to the U.S. Geological Survey in 1973. In 1972 the California Legislature established the California Strong Motion Instrumentation Program (CSMIP). CSMIP operates accelerographs at 812 ground stations, with multi-channel accelerographs in 228 buildings, 125 lifelines and 37 geotechnical arrays, in California. The USGS and the ANSS effort operate accelerographs at 1584 ground stations, 96 buildings, 14 bridges, 70 dams, and 15 multi-channel geotechnical arrays. The USC Los Angeles array has 78 ground stations; UCSB operates 5 geotechnical arrays; other government and private institutions also operate accelerographs. Almost all accelerographs are now digital with a sampling rate of 200 Hz. Most of the strong motion data can be downloaded from the Center for Engineering Strong Motion Data (http://strongmotioncenter.org). As accelerographs have become more sophisticated, the concept of what constitutes strong motion has blurred because small earthquakes (M ~3) are well recorded on accelerometers as well as seismometers. However, when accelerations are over ~10%g and velocities over ~1 cm/s, the accelerometers remain on scale, providing the unclipped data necessary to analyze the ground motion and its consequences. Strong motion data are essential to the development of ground motion prediction equations, understanding structural response, performance

  8. Coupling between corotation and Lindblad resonances in the presence of secular precession rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Moutamid, Maryame; Sicardy, Bruno; Renner, Stéfan

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the dynamics of two satellites with masses and orbiting a massive central planet in a common plane, near a first order mean motion resonance ( m integer). We consider only the resonant terms of first order in eccentricity in the disturbing potential of the satellites, plus the secular terms causing the orbital apsidal precessions. We obtain a two-degrees-of-freedom system, associated with the two critical resonant angles and , where and are the mean longitude and longitude of periapsis of , respectively, and where the primed quantities apply to . We consider the special case where (restricted problem). The symmetry between the two angles and is then broken, leading to two different kinds of resonances, classically referred to as corotation eccentric resonance (CER) and Lindblad eccentric Resonance (LER), respectively. We write the four reduced equations of motion near the CER and LER, that form what we call the CoraLin model. This model depends upon only two dimensionless parameters that control the dynamics of the system: the distance between the CER and LER, and a forcing parameter that includes both the mass and the orbital eccentricity of the disturbing satellite. Three regimes are found: for the system is integrable, for of order unity, it exhibits prominent chaotic regions, while for large compared to 2, the behavior of the system is regular and can be qualitatively described using simple adiabatic invariant arguments. We apply this model to three recently discovered small Saturnian satellites dynamically linked to Mimas through first order mean motion resonances: Aegaeon, Methone and Anthe. Poincaré surfaces of section reveal the dynamical structure of each orbit, and their proximity to chaotic regions. This work may be useful to explore various scenarii of resonant capture for those satellites.

  9. A test of alternative Caribbean plate relative motion models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Seth; Demets, Charles; Gordon, Richard G.; Brodholt, John; Argus, Don

    1988-01-01

    The new NUVEL-1 data set for global relative plate motions is used here to discriminate between the two prevailing models for Caribbean plate motion. One model, by Jordan (1975), assumes that North America-Caribbean motion is reflected by the spreading rate inferred from magnetic anomalies at the Cayman Spreading Center and the azimuths of nearby transforms. The other model, by Sykes et al. (1982), uses rates and azimuths inferred from the geometry of the Lesser Antilles Wadati-Benioff zone. Overall, it is found that the data fit the Jordan geometry better, that the data used in global plate motion models are more suitable than rates and azimuths inferred from the geometry of the Wadati-Benioff zone for determining relative motions, and that incorporation of all relevant plate boundaries is essential.

  10. A world in motion

    SciTech Connect

    Boynton, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    A World in Motion is a physical science curriculum supplement for grades four, five, and six which responds to the need to promote and teach sound science and mathematics concepts. Using the A World in Motion kits, teachers work in partnership with practicing engineer or scientists volunteers to provide students with fun, exciting, and relevant hands-on science and math experiences. During the A World in Motion experience, students work together in {open_quotes}Engineering Design Teams{close_quotes} exploring physics concepts through a series of activities. Each student is assigned a role as either a facilities engineer, development engineer, test engineer, or project engineer and is given responsibilities paralleling those of engineers in industry. The program culminates in a {open_quotes}Design Review{close_quotes} where students can communicate their results, demonstrate their designs, and receive recognition for their efforts. They are given a chance to take on responsibility and build self-esteem. Since January 1991, over 12,000 volunteers engineers have been involved with the program, with a distribution of 20,000 A World in Motion kit throughout the U.S. and Canada.

  11. Projectile Motion Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucie, Pierre

    1979-01-01

    Analyzes projectile motion using symmetry and simple geometry. Deduces the direction of velocity at any point, range, time of flight, maximum height, safety parabola, and maximum range for a projectile launched upon a plane inclined at any angle with respect to the horizontal. (Author/GA)

  12. Solar Motion from Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treschman, Keith

    2009-01-01

    At noon throughout the year the Sun has a north-south and east-west motion around the meridian. Earliest/latest sunrises and sunsets do not occur at the solstices and the effect is more pronounced with decreasing latitude. This phenomenon is calculated for 25 Australian cities and the following observations are recorded: (1) The latest sunrise…

  13. Wiimote Experiments: Circular Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouh, Minjoon; Holz, Danielle; Kawam, Alae; Lamont, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The advent of new sensor technologies can provide new ways of exploring fundamental physics. In this paper, we show how a Wiimote, which is a handheld remote controller for the Nintendo Wii video game system with an accelerometer, can be used to study the dynamics of circular motion with a very simple setup such as an old record player or a…

  14. Theory of orthodontic motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepe, S.; Pepe, W. D.; Strauss, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    A general theory of orthodontic motion is developed that can be applied to determine the forces necessary to induce a given tooth to move to the predetermined desirable position. It is assumed that the natural (nonorthodontic) forces may be represented by a periodic function and the orthodontic forces may be superimposed upon the natural forces. A simple expression is derived for the applied stress.

  15. Planets in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2005-01-01

    All the planets in the solar system revolve around the Sun in the same direction, clockwise when viewed from above the North Pole. This is referred to as direct motion. From the perspective on the Earth's surface, the planets travel east across the sky in relation to the background of stars. The Sun also moves eastward daily, but this is an…

  16. Projectile Motion Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucie, Pierre

    1979-01-01

    Analyzes projectile motion using symmetry and simple geometry. Deduces the direction of velocity at any point, range, time of flight, maximum height, safety parabola, and maximum range for a projectile launched upon a plane inclined at any angle with respect to the horizontal. (Author/GA)

  17. Choosing a Motion Detector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, David M.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the characteristics of three types of motion detectors: Doppler radar, infrared, and ultrasonic wave, and how they are used on school buses to prevent students from being killed by their own school bus. Other safety devices cited are bus crossing arms and a camera monitor system. (MLF)

  18. Solar Motion from Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treschman, Keith

    2009-01-01

    At noon throughout the year the Sun has a north-south and east-west motion around the meridian. Earliest/latest sunrises and sunsets do not occur at the solstices and the effect is more pronounced with decreasing latitude. This phenomenon is calculated for 25 Australian cities and the following observations are recorded: (1) The latest sunrise…

  19. Wiimote Experiments: Circular Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouh, Minjoon; Holz, Danielle; Kawam, Alae; Lamont, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The advent of new sensor technologies can provide new ways of exploring fundamental physics. In this paper, we show how a Wiimote, which is a handheld remote controller for the Nintendo Wii video game system with an accelerometer, can be used to study the dynamics of circular motion with a very simple setup such as an old record player or a…

  20. Marbles in Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Helen; Meyers, Bernice; Schmidt, William

    1999-01-01

    Marbles were successfully used to help primary students develop concepts of motion. Marble-unit activities began with shaking and rattling inference bags and predicting by listening just how many marbles were in each bag. Students made qualitative and quantitative observations of the marbles, manipulated marbles with a partner, and observed…

  1. Introducing Simple Harmonic Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roche, John

    2002-01-01

    Explains the origin and significance of harmonic motion which is an important topic that has wide application in the world. Describes the phenomenon by using an auxiliary circle to help illustrate the key relationships between acceleration, displacement, time, velocity, and phase. (Contains 16 references.) (Author/YDS)

  2. Theory of orthodontic motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepe, S.; Pepe, W. D.; Strauss, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    A general theory of orthodontic motion is developed that can be applied to determine the forces necessary to induce a given tooth to move to the predetermined desirable position. It is assumed that the natural (nonorthodontic) forces may be represented by a periodic function and the orthodontic forces may be superimposed upon the natural forces. A simple expression is derived for the applied stress.

  3. Superluminal motion (review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malykin, G. B.; Romanets, E. A.

    2012-06-01

    Prior to the development of Special Relativity, no restrictions were imposed on the velocity of the motion of particles and material bodies, as well as on energy transfer and signal propagation. At the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century, it was shown that a charge that moves at a velocity faster than the speed of light in an optical medium, in particular, in vacuum, gives rise to impact radiation, which later was termed the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation. Shortly after the development of Special Relativity, some researchers considered the possibility of superluminal motion. In 1923, the Soviet physicist L.Ya. Strum suggested the existence of tachyons, which, however, have not been discovered yet. Superluminal motions can occur only for images, e.g., for so-called "light spots," which were considered in 1972 by V.L. Ginzburg and B.M. Bolotovskii. These spots can move with a superluminal phase velocity but are incapable of transferring energy and information. Nevertheless, these light spots may induce quite real generation of microwave radiation in closed waveguides and create the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation in vacuum. In this work, we consider various paradoxes, illusions, and artifacts associated with superluminal motion.

  4. Planets in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2005-01-01

    All the planets in the solar system revolve around the Sun in the same direction, clockwise when viewed from above the North Pole. This is referred to as direct motion. From the perspective on the Earth's surface, the planets travel east across the sky in relation to the background of stars. The Sun also moves eastward daily, but this is an…

  5. Marbles in Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Helen; Meyers, Bernice; Schmidt, William

    1999-01-01

    Marbles were successfully used to help primary students develop concepts of motion. Marble-unit activities began with shaking and rattling inference bags and predicting by listening just how many marbles were in each bag. Students made qualitative and quantitative observations of the marbles, manipulated marbles with a partner, and observed…

  6. Wiimote Experiments: Circular Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouh, Minjoon; Holz, Danielle; Kawam, Alae; Lamont, Mary

    2013-03-01

    The advent of new sensor technologies can provide new ways of exploring fundamental physics. In this paper, we show how a Wiimote, which is a handheld remote controller for the Nintendo Wii video game system with an accelerometer, can be used to study the dynamics of circular motion with a very simple setup such as an old record player or a bicycle wheel.

  7. A Harmonic Motion Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, P.; Krakower, Zeev

    2010-01-01

    We present a unit comprising theory, simulation and experiment for a body oscillating on a vertical spring, in which the simultaneous use of a force probe and an ultrasonic range finder enables one to explore quantitatively and understand many aspects of simple and damped harmonic motions. (Contains 14 figures.)

  8. Linear motion valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, J. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The linear motion valve is described. The valve spool employs magnetically permeable rings, spaced apart axially, which engage a sealing assembly having magnetically permeable pole pieces in magnetic relationship with a magnet. The gap between the ring and the pole pieces is sealed with a ferrofluid. Depletion of the ferrofluid is minimized.

  9. Choosing a Motion Detector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, David M.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the characteristics of three types of motion detectors: Doppler radar, infrared, and ultrasonic wave, and how they are used on school buses to prevent students from being killed by their own school bus. Other safety devices cited are bus crossing arms and a camera monitor system. (MLF)

  10. A Harmonic Motion Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, P.; Krakower, Zeev

    2010-01-01

    We present a unit comprising theory, simulation and experiment for a body oscillating on a vertical spring, in which the simultaneous use of a force probe and an ultrasonic range finder enables one to explore quantitatively and understand many aspects of simple and damped harmonic motions. (Contains 14 figures.)

  11. Motion dominance in binocular rivalry depends on extraretinal motions.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Ryohei; Motoyoshi, Isamu; Sato, Takao

    2016-01-01

    In binocular rivalry, moving stimulus is dominant over stationary stimulus. This is called motion dominance. The motion here is usually a motion defined on the retina (retinal motion). However, motion can be defined in several different coordinates. It can be defined with respect to objects in the background (object-based motion) or to observers' head or body (spatiotopic motion), as well as to the retinal coordinate. In this study, we examined the role of motions defined by these three coordinates. A dichoptic pair of gratings was presented to create a binocular rivalry, one of which was moving and the other stationary. A fixation point and a reference background were either moving with the grating or stationary, depending on the condition. Different combinations of the three types of motions were created by having the observer track the fixation point or the background when they are moving. It was found that the retinal motion does not necessarily yield motion dominance, and that the motion dominance is determined by the combination of motions defined by different coordinate systems.

  12. Reducing motion artifacts in photoplethysmograms by using relative sensor motion: phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijshoff, Ralph W. C. G. R.; Mischi, Massimo; Veen, Jeroen; van der Lee, Alexander M.; Aarts, Ronald M.

    2012-11-01

    Currently, photoplethysmograms (PPGs) are mostly used to determine a patient's blood oxygenation and pulse rate. However, PPG morphology conveys more information about the patient's cardiovascular status. Extracting this information requires measuring clean PPG waveforms that are free of artifacts. PPGs are highly susceptible to motion, which can distort the PPG-derived data. Part of the motion artifacts are considered to result from sensor-tissue motion and sensor deformation. It is hypothesized that these motion artifacts correlate with movement of the sensor with respect to the skin. This hypothesis has been proven true in a laboratory setup. In vitro PPGs have been measured in a skin perfusion phantom that is illuminated by a laser diode. Optical motion artifacts are generated in the PPG by translating the laser diode with respect to the PPG photodiode. The optical motion artifacts have been reduced significantly in vitro, by using a normalized least-mean-square algorithm with only a single coefficient that uses the laser's displacement as a reference for the motion artifacts. Laser displacement has been measured accurately via self-mixing interferometry by a compact laser diode with a ball lens integrated into the package, which can be easily integrated into a commercial sensor.

  13. Constraints on Planet Nine’s Orbit and Sky Position within a Framework of Mean-motion Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millholland, Sarah; Laughlin, Gregory

    2017-03-01

    A number of authors have proposed that the statistically significant orbital alignment of the most distant Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) is evidence of an as-yet undetected planet in the outer solar system, now referred to colloquially as “Planet Nine.” Dynamical simulations by Batygin & Brown have provided constraints on the range of the planet’s possible orbits and sky locations. We extend these investigations by exploring the suggestion of Malhotra et al. that Planet Nine is in small integer ratio mean-motion resonances (MMRs) with several of the most distant KBOs. We show that the observed KBO semimajor axes present a set of commensurabilities with an unseen planet at ∼654 au (P ∼ 16,725 years) that has a greater than 98% chance of stemming from a sequence of MMRs rather than from a random distribution. We describe and implement a Monte-Carlo optimization scheme that drives billion-year dynamical integrations of the outer solar system to pinpoint the orbital properties of perturbers that are capable of maintaining the KBOs’ apsidal alignment. This optimization exercise suggests that the unseen planet is most consistently represented with mass, m ∼ 6–12 M ⊕, semimajor axis, a ∼ 654 au, eccentricity, e ∼ 0.45, inclination, i ∼ 30°, argument of periastron, ω ∼ 150°, longitude of ascending node, Ω ∼ 50°, and mean anomaly, M ∼ 180°. A range of sky locations relative to this fiducial ephemeris are possible. We find that the region 30° ≲ R.A. ≲ 50°, ‑20° ≲ decl. ≲ 20° is promising.

  14. Awake Animal Imaging Motion Tracking Software

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, James

    2010-03-15

    The Awake Animal Motion Tracking Software code calculates the 3D movement of the head motion of a live, awake animal during a medical imaging scan. In conjunction with markers attached to the head, images acquired from multiple cameras are processed and marker locations precisely determined. Using off-line camera calibration data, the 3D positions of the markers are calculated along with a 6 degree of freedom position and orientation (pose) relative to a fixed initial position. This calculation is performed in real time at frame rates up to 30 frames per second. A time stamp with microsecond accuracy from a time base source is attached to each pose measurement.

  15. Orbital motion of a freely coning solar sail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, K. L.

    1983-12-01

    This paper addresses orbital perturbations in the two-body problem of an Earth-orbiting solar sail undergoing free coning motion in a circular orbit. The coning motion controls both the magnitude and direction of the solar radiation pressure force. The equations of motion are expanded from the Language planetary equations in their acceleration component form and are solved assuming small changes in the orbital elements over the period of one orbit. Resonances are observed between the mean motion of the sail and its precession rate. The one-to-one resonance case is examined and numerical methods are employed to verify the analytic results for the circular orbit case.

  16. Phytoplankton's motion in turbulent ocean.

    PubMed

    Fouxon, Itzhak; Leshansky, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    We study the influence of turbulence on upward motion of phytoplankton. Interaction with the flow is described by the Pedley-Kessler model considering spherical microorganisms. We find a range of parameters when the upward drift is only weakly perturbed or when turbulence completely randomizes the drift direction. When the perturbation is small, the drift is either determined by the local vorticity or is Gaussian. We find a range of parameters where the phytoplankton interaction with the flow can be described consistently as diffusion of orientation in effective potential. By solving the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation we find exponential steady-state distribution of phytoplankton's propulsion orientation. We further identify the range of parameters where phytoplankton's drift velocity with respect to the flow is determined uniquely by its position. In this case, one can describe phytoplankton's motion by a smooth flow and phytoplankton concentrates on fractal. We find fractal dimensions and demonstrate that phytoplankton forms vertical stripes in space with a nonisotropic pair-correlation function of concentration increased in the vertical direction. The probability density function of the distance between two particles obeys power law with the negative exponent given by the ratio of integrals of the turbulent energy spectrum. We find the regime of strong clustering where the exponent is of order one so that turbulence increases the rate of collisions by a large factor. The predictions hold for Navier-Stokes turbulence and stand for testing.

  17. An R-D optimized transcoding resilient motion vector selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminlou, Alireza; Semsarzadeh, Mehdi; Fatemi, Omid

    2014-12-01

    Selection of motion vector (MV) has a significant impact on the quality of an encoded, and particularly a transcoded video, in terms of rate-distortion (R-D) performance. The conventional motion estimation process, in most existing video encoders, ignores the rate of residuals by utilizing rate and distortion of motion compensation step. This approach implies that the selected MV depends on the quantization parameter. Hence, the same MV that has been selected for high bit rate compression may not be suitable for low bit rate ones when transcoding the video with motion information reuse technique, resulting in R-D performance degradation. In this paper, we propose an R-D optimized motion selection criterion that takes into account the effect of residual rate in MV selection process. Based on the proposed criterion, a new two-piece Lagrange multiplier selection is introduced for motion estimation process. Analytical evaluations indicate that our proposed scheme results in MVs that are less sensitive to changes in bit rate or quantization parameter. As a result, MVs in the encoded bitstream may be used even after the encoded sequence has been transcoded to a lower bit rate one using re-quantization. Simulation results indicate that the proposed technique improves the quality performance of coding and transcoding without any computational overhead.

  18. Alert Response to Motion Onset in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Eric Y.; Marre, Olivier; Fisher, Clark; Schwartz, Greg; Levy, Joshua; da Silveira, Rava Azeredo

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that motion onset is very effective at capturing attention and is more salient than smooth motion. Here, we find that this salience ranking is present already in the firing rate of retinal ganglion cells. By stimulating the retina with a bar that appears, stays still, and then starts moving, we demonstrate that a subset of salamander retinal ganglion cells, fast OFF cells, responds significantly more strongly to motion onset than to smooth motion. We refer to this phenomenon as an alert response to motion onset. We develop a computational model that predicts the time-varying firing rate of ganglion cells responding to the appearance, onset, and smooth motion of a bar. This model, termed the adaptive cascade model, consists of a ganglion cell that receives input from a layer of bipolar cells, represented by individual rectified subunits. Additionally, both the bipolar and ganglion cells have separate contrast gain control mechanisms. This model captured the responses to our different motion stimuli over a wide range of contrasts, speeds, and locations. The alert response to motion onset, together with its computational model, introduces a new mechanism of sophisticated motion processing that occurs early in the visual system. PMID:23283327

  19. Sub-block motion derivation for merge mode in HEVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Wei-Jung; Chen, Ying; Chen, Jianle; Zhang, Li; Karczewicz, Marta; Li, Xiang

    2016-09-01

    The new state-of-the-art video coding standard, H.265/HEVC, has been finalized in 2013 and it achieves roughly 50% bit rate saving compared to its predecessor, H.264/MPEG-4 AVC. In this paper, two additional merge candidates, advanced temporal motion vector predictor and spatial-temporal motion vector predictor, are developed to improve motion information prediction scheme under the HEVC structure. The proposed method allows each Prediction Unit (PU) to fetch multiple sets of motion information from multiple blocks smaller than the current PU. By splitting a large PU into sub-PUs and filling motion information for all the sub-PUs of the large PU, signaling cost of motion information could be reduced. This paper describes above-mentioned techniques in detail and evaluates their coding performance benefits based on the common test condition during HEVC development. Simulation results show that 2.4% performance improvement over HEVC can be achieved.

  20. An "Emergent Model" for Rate of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Sandra; Pierce, Robyn

    2008-01-01

    Does speed provide a "model for" rate of change in other contexts? Does JavaMathWorlds (JMW), animated simulation software, assist in the development of the "model for" rate of change? This project investigates the transference of understandings of rate gained in a motion context to a non-motion context. Students were 27 14-15 year old students at…

  1. Linking Protein Motion to Enzyme Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Priyanka; Abeysinghe, Thelma; Kohen, Amnon

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme motions on a broad range of time scales can play an important role in various intra- and intermolecular events, including substrate binding, catalysis of the chemical conversion, and product release. The relationship between protein motions and catalytic activity is of contemporary interest in enzymology. To understand the factors influencing the rates of enzyme-catalyzed reactions, the dynamics of the protein-solvent-ligand complex must be considered. The current review presents two case studies of enzymes—dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and thymidylate synthase (TSase)—and discusses the role of protein motions in their catalyzed reactions. Specifically, we will discuss the utility of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and their temperature dependence as tools in probing such phenomena. PMID:25591120

  2. Secular motion around synchronously orbiting planetary satellites.

    PubMed

    Lara, Martin; San-Juan, Juan F; Ferrer, Sebastián

    2005-12-01

    We investigate the secular motion of a spacecraft around the natural satellite of a planet. The satellite rotates synchronously with its mean motion around the planet. Our model takes into account the gravitational potential of the satellite up to the second order, and the third-body perturbation in Hill's approximation. Close to the satellite, the ratio of rotation rate of the satellite to mean motion of the orbiter is small. When considering this ratio as a small parameter, the Coriolis effect is a first-order perturbation, while the third-body tidal attraction, the ellipticity effect, and the oblateness perturbation remain at higher orders. Then, we apply perturbation theory and find that a third-order approach is enough to show the influence of the satellite's ellipticity in the pericenter dynamics. Finally, we discuss the averaged system in the three-dimensional parametric space, and provide a global description of the flow.

  3. Linking protein motion to enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Priyanka; Abeysinghe, Thelma; Kohen, Amnon

    2015-01-13

    Enzyme motions on a broad range of time scales can play an important role in various intra- and intermolecular events, including substrate binding, catalysis of the chemical conversion, and product release. The relationship between protein motions and catalytic activity is of contemporary interest in enzymology. To understand the factors influencing the rates of enzyme-catalyzed reactions, the dynamics of the protein-solvent-ligand complex must be considered. The current review presents two case studies of enzymes-dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and thymidylate synthase (TSase)-and discusses the role of protein motions in their catalyzed reactions. Specifically, we will discuss the utility of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and their temperature dependence as tools in probing such phenomena.

  4. Exit from Synchrony in Joint Improvised Motion

    PubMed Central

    Dahan, Assi; Noy, Lior; Hart, Yuval; Mayo, Avi; Alon, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Motion synchrony correlates with effective and well-rated human interaction. However, people do not remain locked in synchrony; Instead, they repeatedly enter and exit synchrony. In many important interactions, such as therapy, marriage and parent-infant communication, it is the ability to exit and then re-enter synchrony that is thought to build strong relationship. The phenomenon of entry into zero-phase synchrony is well-studied experimentally and in terms of mathematical modeling. In contrast, exit-from-synchrony is under-studied. Here, we focus on human motion coordination, and examine the exit-from-synchrony phenomenon using experimental data from the mirror game paradigm, in which people perform joint improvised motion, and from human tracking of computer-generated stimuli. We present a mathematical mechanism that captures aspects of exit-from-synchrony in human motion. The mechanism adds a random motion component when the accumulated velocity error between the players is small. We introduce this mechanism to several models for human coordinated motion, including the widely studied HKB model, and the predictor-corrector model of Noy, Dekel and Alon. In all models, the new mechanism produces realistic simulated behavior when compared to experimental data from the mirror game and from tracking of computer generated stimuli, including repeated entry and exit from zero-phase synchrony that generates a complexity of motion similar to that of human players. We hope that these results can inform future research on exit-from-synchrony, to better understand the dynamics of coordinated action of people and to enhance human-computer and human-robot interaction. PMID:27711185

  5. Visible Motion Blur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B. (Inventor); Ahumada, Albert J. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of measuring motion blur is disclosed comprising obtaining a moving edge temporal profile r(sub 1)(k) of an image of a high-contrast moving edge, calculating the masked local contrast m(sub1)(k) for r(sub 1)(k) and the masked local contrast m(sub 2)(k) for an ideal step edge waveform r(sub 2)(k) with the same amplitude as r(sub 1)(k), and calculating the measure or motion blur Psi as a difference function, The masked local contrasts are calculated using a set of convolution kernels scaled to simulate the performance of the human visual system, and Psi is measured in units of just-noticeable differences.

  6. Dynamics of Oceanic Motions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-31

    Sciences, Harvard University This project researched the dynamics of oceanic motions: aspects of the theory and mod- eling of fundamental dynamical and...84-C-0461 Published 1. Pinardi, N. (1985) Quasigeostrophic Energetics and Oceanic Mesoscale Dynamics, Harvard University , Cambridge, MA (Ph.D. Thesis...Layer Model to the Harvard Quasigeostrophic Model, Harvard University , Cam- bridge, MA (Ph.D. thesis). 15. Robinson, A.R., M.A. Spell and N. Pinardi

  7. Motion of the Esophagus Due to Cardiac Motion

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Jacob; Yang, Jinzhong; Pan, Tinsu; Court, Laurence E.

    2014-01-01

    When imaging studies (e.g. CT) are used to quantify morphological changes in an anatomical structure, it is necessary to understand the extent and source of motion which can give imaging artifacts (e.g. blurring or local distortion). The objective of this study was to assess the magnitude of esophageal motion due to cardiac motion. We used retrospective electrocardiogram-gated contrast-enhanced computed tomography angiography images for this study. The anatomic region from the carina to the bottom of the heart was taken at deep-inspiration breath hold with the patients' arms raised above their shoulders, in a position similar to that used for radiation therapy. The esophagus was delineated on the diastolic phase of cardiac motion, and deformable registration was used to sequentially deform the images in nearest-neighbor phases among the 10 cardiac phases, starting from the diastolic phase. Using the 10 deformation fields generated from the deformable registration, the magnitude of the extreme displacements was then calculated for each voxel, and the mean and maximum displacement was calculated for each computed tomography slice for each patient. The average maximum esophageal displacement due to cardiac motion for all patients was 5.8 mm (standard deviation: 1.6 mm, maximum: 10.0 mm) in the transverse direction. For 21 of 26 patients, the largest esophageal motion was found in the inferior region of the heart; for the other patients, esophageal motion was approximately independent of superior-inferior position. The esophagus motion was larger at cardiac phases where the electrocardiogram R-wave occurs. In conclusion, the magnitude of esophageal motion near the heart due to cardiac motion is similar to that due to other sources of motion, including respiratory motion and intra-fraction motion. A larger cardiac motion will result into larger esophagus motion in a cardiac cycle. PMID:24586540

  8. Motion of the esophagus due to cardiac motion.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Jacob; Yang, Jinzhong; Pan, Tinsu; Court, Laurence E

    2014-01-01

    When imaging studies (e.g. CT) are used to quantify morphological changes in an anatomical structure, it is necessary to understand the extent and source of motion which can give imaging artifacts (e.g. blurring or local distortion). The objective of this study was to assess the magnitude of esophageal motion due to cardiac motion. We used retrospective electrocardiogram-gated contrast-enhanced computed tomography angiography images for this study. The anatomic region from the carina to the bottom of the heart was taken at deep-inspiration breath hold with the patients' arms raised above their shoulders, in a position similar to that used for radiation therapy. The esophagus was delineated on the diastolic phase of cardiac motion, and deformable registration was used to sequentially deform the images in nearest-neighbor phases among the 10 cardiac phases, starting from the diastolic phase. Using the 10 deformation fields generated from the deformable registration, the magnitude of the extreme displacements was then calculated for each voxel, and the mean and maximum displacement was calculated for each computed tomography slice for each patient. The average maximum esophageal displacement due to cardiac motion for all patients was 5.8 mm (standard deviation: 1.6 mm, maximum: 10.0 mm) in the transverse direction. For 21 of 26 patients, the largest esophageal motion was found in the inferior region of the heart; for the other patients, esophageal motion was approximately independent of superior-inferior position. The esophagus motion was larger at cardiac phases where the electrocardiogram R-wave occurs. In conclusion, the magnitude of esophageal motion near the heart due to cardiac motion is similar to that due to other sources of motion, including respiratory motion and intra-fraction motion. A larger cardiac motion will result into larger esophagus motion in a cardiac cycle.

  9. Pit disassembly motion control

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, L.; Pittman, P. C.

    2001-01-01

    A Department of Energy (DOE) Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) is being designed for the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The facility will recover plutonium from excess nuclear weapon pits defined in START II and START III treaties. The plutonium will be stored and used to produce mixed oxide reactor fuel at another new DOE facility. Because of radiation dose issues, much of the pit disassembly work and material transfer will be automated. Automated material handling systems will interface with disassembly lathes, conversion reactors that produce oxide for storage, robotic container welding stations, vault retrieval systems, and nondestructive assay (NDA) instrumentation. The goal is to use common motion control hardware for material transfer and possibly common motion controllers for the unique PDCF systems. The latter is complicated by the different directions manufactures are considering for distributed control, such as Firewire, SERCOS, etc., and by the unique control requirements of machines such as lathes compared to controls for an integrated NDA system. The current design approach is to standardize where possible, use network cables to replace wire bundles where possible, but to first select hardware and motion controllers that meet specific machine or process requirements.

  10. Aging scaled Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safdari, Hadiseh; Chechkin, Aleksei V.; Jafari, Gholamreza R.; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Scaled Brownian motion (SBM) is widely used to model anomalous diffusion of passive tracers in complex and biological systems. It is a highly nonstationary process governed by the Langevin equation for Brownian motion, however, with a power-law time dependence of the noise strength. Here we study the aging properties of SBM for both unconfined and confined motion. Specifically, we derive the ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements and analyze their behavior in the regimes of weak, intermediate, and strong aging. A very rich behavior is revealed for confined aging SBM depending on different aging times and whether the process is sub- or superdiffusive. We demonstrate that the information on the aging factorizes with respect to the lag time and exhibits a functional form that is identical to the aging behavior of scale-free continuous time random walk processes. While SBM exhibits a disparity between ensemble and time averaged observables and is thus weakly nonergodic, strong aging is shown to effect a convergence of the ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacement. Finally, we derive the density of first passage times in the semi-infinite domain that features a crossover defined by the aging time.

  11. Aging scaled Brownian motion.

    PubMed

    Safdari, Hadiseh; Chechkin, Aleksei V; Jafari, Gholamreza R; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Scaled Brownian motion (SBM) is widely used to model anomalous diffusion of passive tracers in complex and biological systems. It is a highly nonstationary process governed by the Langevin equation for Brownian motion, however, with a power-law time dependence of the noise strength. Here we study the aging properties of SBM for both unconfined and confined motion. Specifically, we derive the ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements and analyze their behavior in the regimes of weak, intermediate, and strong aging. A very rich behavior is revealed for confined aging SBM depending on different aging times and whether the process is sub- or superdiffusive. We demonstrate that the information on the aging factorizes with respect to the lag time and exhibits a functional form that is identical to the aging behavior of scale-free continuous time random walk processes. While SBM exhibits a disparity between ensemble and time averaged observables and is thus weakly nonergodic, strong aging is shown to effect a convergence of the ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacement. Finally, we derive the density of first passage times in the semi-infinite domain that features a crossover defined by the aging time.

  12. Speed tuning of motion segmentation and discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, G. S.; Mestre, D. R.; Stone, L. S.

    1999-01-01

    Motion transparency requires that the visual system distinguish different motion vectors and selectively integrate similar motion vectors over space into the perception of multiple surfaces moving through or over each other. Using large-field (7 degrees x 7 degrees) displays containing two populations of random-dots moving in the same (horizontal) direction but at different speeds, we examined speed-based segmentation by measuring the speed difference above which observers can perceive two moving surfaces. We systematically investigated this 'speed-segmentation' threshold as a function of speed and stimulus duration, and found that it increases sharply for speeds above approximately 8 degrees/s. In addition, speed-segmentation thresholds decrease with stimulus duration out to approximately 200 ms. In contrast, under matched conditions, speed-discrimination thresholds stay low at least out to 16 degrees/s and decrease with increasing stimulus duration at a faster rate than for speed segmentation. Thus, motion segmentation and motion discrimination exhibit different speed selectivity and different temporal integration characteristics. Results are discussed in terms of the speed preferences of different neuronal populations within the primate visual cortex.

  13. Molecular Motions During Physical Aging in Polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurau, Courtney T.; Ediger, M. D.

    2001-03-01

    A photobleaching method has been used to observe the segmental dynamics of a polystyrene melt during isothermal physical aging. Both rotational and translational diffusion measurements were performed by monitoring the motion of dilute tetracene probes dispersed in the polymer matrix. Following a temperature quench from T_g+2K into the glass, either probe rotational relaxation from an induced anisotropic state, or translational diffusion across a holographic grating, was periodically measured as a function of aging time. Rotation and translation times changed by nearly an order of magnitude during aging. The equilibration times ranged from 10^4-10^7s for the 3 temperatures investigted (T_g-1.4K-T_g-4.6K). Rotational and translational motion age differently. Immediately following a quench, the segmental motions sampled by probe rotation respond more rapidly to the perturbation than the motions sampled by translational motion. At 10^2s, rotational aging has relaxed 60translation shows only a 20T_g-4.5K, it appears that translational diffusion reaches equilibrium before rotation. These differences in aging behavior indicate a change in the distribution of relaxation times throughout the aging process, and may help elucidate the behavior of different observables aging at different rates.

  14. Speed tuning of motion segmentation and discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, G. S.; Mestre, D. R.; Stone, L. S.

    1999-01-01

    Motion transparency requires that the visual system distinguish different motion vectors and selectively integrate similar motion vectors over space into the perception of multiple surfaces moving through or over each other. Using large-field (7 degrees x 7 degrees) displays containing two populations of random-dots moving in the same (horizontal) direction but at different speeds, we examined speed-based segmentation by measuring the speed difference above which observers can perceive two moving surfaces. We systematically investigated this 'speed-segmentation' threshold as a function of speed and stimulus duration, and found that it increases sharply for speeds above approximately 8 degrees/s. In addition, speed-segmentation thresholds decrease with stimulus duration out to approximately 200 ms. In contrast, under matched conditions, speed-discrimination thresholds stay low at least out to 16 degrees/s and decrease with increasing stimulus duration at a faster rate than for speed segmentation. Thus, motion segmentation and motion discrimination exhibit different speed selectivity and different temporal integration characteristics. Results are discussed in terms of the speed preferences of different neuronal populations within the primate visual cortex.

  15. Motion estimation in beating heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Ortmaier, Tobias; Gröger, Martin; Boehm, Dieter H; Falk, Volkmar; Hirzinger, Gerd

    2005-10-01

    Minimally invasive beating-heart surgery offers substantial benefits for the patient, compared to conventional open surgery. Nevertheless, the motion of the heart poses increased requirements to the surgeon. To support the surgeon, algorithms for an advanced robotic surgery system are proposed, which offer motion compensation of the beating heart. This implies the measurement of heart motion, which can be achieved by tracking natural landmarks. In most cases, the investigated affine tracking scheme can be reduced to an efficient block matching algorithm allowing for realtime tracking of multiple landmarks. Fourier analysis of the motion parameters shows two dominant peaks, which correspond to the heart and respiration rates of the patient. The robustness in case of disturbance or occlusion can be improved by specially developed prediction schemes. Local prediction is well suited for the detection of single tracking outliers. A global prediction scheme takes several landmarks into account simultaneously and is able to bridge longer disturbances. As the heart motion is strongly correlated with the patient's electrocardiogram and respiration pressure signal, this information is included in a novel robust multisensor prediction scheme. Prediction results are compared to those of an artificial neural network and of a linear prediction approach, which shows the superior performance of the proposed algorithms.

  16. Anomalous Motion Illusion Contributes to Visual Preference

    PubMed Central

    Stevanov, Jasmina; Spehar, Branka; Ashida, Hiroshi; Kitaoka, Akiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the magnitude of illusory motion in the variants of the “Rotating Snakes” pattern and the visual preference among such patterns. In Experiment 1 we manipulated the outer contour and the internal geometrical structure of the figure to test for corresponding modulations in the perceived illusion magnitude. The strength of illusory motion was estimated by the method of adjustment where the speed of a standard moving figure was matched to the speed of the perceived illusory motion in test figures. We observed modulation of the perceived strength of illusory motion congruent with our geometrical manipulations. In Experiment 2, we directly compared the magnitude of the perceived illusory motion and the preference for these patterns by a method of paired comparison. Images differing in illusion magnitude showed corresponding differences in the reported preference for these patterns. In addition, further analysis revealed that the geometry and lower level image characteristics also substantially contributed to the observed preference ratings. Together these results support the idea that presence of illusory effect and geometrical characteristics determine affective preference for images, as they may be regarded as more interesting, surprising, or fascinating. PMID:23226138

  17. The Average of Rates and the Average Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Defines arithmetic, harmonic, and weighted harmonic means, and discusses their properties. Describes the application of these properties in problems involving fuel economy estimates and average rates of motion. Gives example problems and solutions. (CW)

  18. The Average of Rates and the Average Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Defines arithmetic, harmonic, and weighted harmonic means, and discusses their properties. Describes the application of these properties in problems involving fuel economy estimates and average rates of motion. Gives example problems and solutions. (CW)

  19. Form-Cue Invariant Motion Processing in Primate Visual Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, Thomas D.

    1992-02-01

    The direction and rate at which an object moves are normally not correlated with the manifold physical cues (for example, brightness and texture) that enable it to be seen. As befits its goals, human perception of visual motion largely evades this diversity of cues for image form; direction and rate of motion are perceived (with few exceptions) in a fashion that does not depend on the physical characteristics of the object. The middle temporal visual area of the primate cerebral cortex contains many neurons that respond selectively to motion in a particular direction and is an integral part of the neural substrate for perception of motion. When stimulated with moving patterns characterized by one of three very diverse cues for form, many middle temporal neurons exhibited similar directional tuning. This lack of sensitivity for figural cue characteristics may allow the uniform perception of motion of objects having a broad spectrum of physical cues.

  20. Liquid Motion Experiment Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato David J.; Dalton, Penni J.; Dodge, Franklin T.; Green, Steve

    1998-01-01

    The Liquid Motion Experiment (LME), designed to study the effects of liquid motion in rotating tanks, was flown on STS 84. LME was essentially a spin table that created a realistic nutation motion of scale-model tanks containing liquid. TWo spherical and two cylindrical transparent tanks were tested simultaneously, and three sets of such tanks were employed to vary liquid viscosity, fill level, and propellant management device (PMD) design. All the tanks were approximately 4.5 inches diameter. The primary test measurements were the radial and tangential torques exerted on the tanks by the liquid. Resonant frequencies and damping of the liquid oscillations were determined by sine sweep tests. For a given tank shape, the resonant frequency depended on fill level. For the cylindrical tanks, the resonances had somewhat different frequencies for the tangential axis (0.55 to 0.75 times spin rate) and the radial axis (0.73 to 0.78 times spin rate), and the tangential axis resonance agreed more closely with available analytical models. For the spherical tanks, the resonant frequencies were between 0.74 to 0.77 times the spin rate and were the same for the tangential and radial axes. The damping coefficients varied from about I% to 3% of critical, depending on tank shape, fill level, and liquid viscosity. 'Me viscous energy dissipation rates of the liquid oscillations were determined from sine dwell tests. The LME energy dissipation rates varied from 0.3 to 0.5 times the estimates obtained from scaling previous ground tests and spacecraft flight data. The PNDs sometimes enhanced the resonances and energy dissipation rates and sometimes decreased them, which points out the need to understand better the effects of PMD on liquid motion as a function of PMD and tank design.

  1. Autoadaptive motion modelling for MR-based respiratory motion estimation.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Christian F; Kolbitsch, Christoph; McClelland, Jamie R; Rueckert, Daniel; King, Andrew P

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory motion poses significant challenges in image-guided interventions. In emerging treatments such as MR-guided HIFU or MR-guided radiotherapy, it may cause significant misalignments between interventional road maps obtained pre-procedure and the anatomy during the treatment, and may affect intra-procedural imaging such as MR-thermometry. Patient specific respiratory motion models provide a solution to this problem. They establish a correspondence between the patient motion and simpler surrogate data which can be acquired easily during the treatment. Patient motion can then be estimated during the treatment by acquiring only the simpler surrogate data. In the majority of classical motion modelling approaches once the correspondence between the surrogate data and the patient motion is established it cannot be changed unless the model is recalibrated. However, breathing patterns are known to significantly change in the time frame of MR-guided interventions. Thus, the classical motion modelling approach may yield inaccurate motion estimations when the relation between the motion and the surrogate data changes over the duration of the treatment and frequent recalibration may not be feasible. We propose a novel methodology for motion modelling which has the ability to automatically adapt to new breathing patterns. This is achieved by choosing the surrogate data in such a way that it can be used to estimate the current motion in 3D as well as to update the motion model. In particular, in this work, we use 2D MR slices from different slice positions to build as well as to apply the motion model. We implemented such an autoadaptive motion model by extending our previous work on manifold alignment. We demonstrate a proof-of-principle of the proposed technique on cardiac gated data of the thorax and evaluate its adaptive behaviour on realistic synthetic data containing two breathing types generated from 6 volunteers, and real data from 4 volunteers. On synthetic data

  2. GROUND MOTION ASSESSMENT BASED ON WEAK MOTION DATA IN TAIWAN Ground Motion Assessment Based on Weak Motion Data in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinci, A.; D'Amico, S.; Malagnini, L.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we characterize the scaling of the ground motions for frequencies ranging between 0.25 and 5 Hz, obtaining results for seismic attenuation, geometrical spreading, and source parameters in Taiwan. We regressed this large number of weak-motion data in order to characterize the regional propagation and the absolute source scaling. Stochastic simulations are generated for finite-fault ruptures using the obtained parameters to predict the absolute peaks of the ground acceleration and velocity for several magnitude and distance range, as well as beyond the magnitude range of the weak-motion data set on which they are calculated. The predictions are then compared with recorded strong motion data and empirical ground motion prediction equation obtained for the study region. We showed that our regional parameters, obtained from independent weak-motion database, may be applied for evaluation of ground motion parameters for earthquakes of magnitude up to 7.6.

  3. Human motion analysis and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prussing, Keith; Cathcart, J. Michael; Kocher, Brian

    2011-06-01

    Georgia Tech has investigated methods for the detection and tracking of personnel in a variety of acquisition environments. This research effort focused on a detailed phenomenological analysis of human physiology and signatures with the subsequent identification and characterization of potential observables. As a fundamental part of this research effort, Georgia Tech collected motion capture data on an individual for a variety of walking speeds, carrying loads, and load distributions. These data formed the basis for deriving fundamental properties of the individual's motion and supported the development of a physiologically-based human motion model. Subsequently this model aided the derivation and analysis of motion-based observables, particularly changes in the motion of various body components resulting from load variations. This paper will describe the data acquisition process, development of the human motion model, and use of the model in the observable analysis. Video sequences illustrating the motion data and modeling results will also be presented.

  4. Rotational motion of Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambaux, N.; Asmar, S. W.; Konopliv, A. S.

    2012-09-01

    Vesta is the second most massive body of the asteroid belt and contains a giant impact and a differentiated interior. Constraints on internal structure can be inferred from various observations such as gravity field measurements [1]. Especially, detailed knowledge of the rotational motion can help constrain the mass distribution inside the body, which in turn can lead to information on its history. Here, we compute the polar motion, precession-nutation, and length-of-day variations of Vesta. The Vesta's Pole position in space has been obtained by Dawn mission [1] and the orbital pole of Vesta at J2000 can be obtained from the Horizons ephemerides [2]. The obliquity, defined as the angle between the normal to the orbital plane and the figure axis, brings information on the moment of inertia if it has reached its equilibrium position [3], the present value from observations is around 27 degrees. That is far from the ˜ 0.03 deg expected for the equilibrium position. In addition, the required timescale to fully damped the obliquity appears to be very long following the same approach developed in [4]. Thus, it appears that the obliquity of Vesta has not yet relaxed in its Cassini state. The figure of Vesta appears to be triaxial and the Sun exerts a non-zero torque. By following the approach developed for the Earth [e.g. 5] and Ceres [4], we compute the nutation of Vesta. The nutational motion of Vesta is dominated by the semi-annual nutation (996 milli-arcseconds or 1.26 m surface displacement) related to the large obliquity of Vesta, and then terms related to harmonics and also to the planet's mean longitude. The detection of such small displacement requires tracking of Vesta's surface with high precision. The precession time of the axis of Vesta is very long, about 179,000 years.

  5. Space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderploeg, J. M.; Stewart, D. F.; Davis, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Space motion sickness clinical characteristics, time course, prediction of susceptibility, and effectiveness of countermeasures were evaluated. Although there is wide individual variability, there appear to be typical patterns of symptom development. The duration of symptoms ranges from several hours to four days with the majority of individuals being symptom free by the end of third day. The etiology of this malady remains uncertain but evidence points to reinterpretation of otolith inputs as being a key factor in the response of the neurovestibular system. Prediction of susceptibility and severity remains unsatisfactory. Countermeasures tried include medications, preflight adaptation, and autogenic feedback training. No countermeasure is entirely successful in eliminating or alleviating symptoms.

  6. Motion dynamics of submersibles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalske, Seppo

    1991-04-01

    A literature survey of motion dynamics of subsea vehicles of a general shape was performed. Hydrodynamic tests were carried out with an existing tethered remotely operated vehicle and with its full scale model. The experiments give data of maneuvering capabilities, and of hydrodynamic characteristics of small subsea vehicles. A simulation method was developed on this basis to compute the vehicle trajectory in the time domain as a function of different control commands. The method can be applied to any subsea vehicle controlled by thruster units.

  7. Motion analysis report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badler, N. I.

    1985-01-01

    Human motion analysis is the task of converting actual human movements into computer readable data. Such movement information may be obtained though active or passive sensing methods. Active methods include physical measuring devices such as goniometers on joints of the body, force plates, and manually operated sensors such as a Cybex dynamometer. Passive sensing de-couples the position measuring device from actual human contact. Passive sensors include Selspot scanning systems (since there is no mechanical connection between the subject's attached LEDs and the infrared sensing cameras), sonic (spark-based) three-dimensional digitizers, Polhemus six-dimensional tracking systems, and image processing systems based on multiple views and photogrammetric calculations.

  8. Utilization of wave motion

    SciTech Connect

    Lochner, J. P.

    1981-02-24

    A power unit comprises a resonator having a mouth located in the sea and containing a body of water and an air cushion above the body of water. This resonator can have a neck defining a relatively small flow area compared with the surface area of the body of water immediately below the cushion. The air cushion is controlled to cause the water to resonate in response to pressure fluctuations resulting from wave motions in the sea, thereby developing fluctuations of increased pressure. The unit is constructed so that the increased pressure fluctuations create a fluid flow, which is then utilized in a suitable manner.

  9. Space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderploeg, J. M.; Stewart, D. F.; Davis, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    Space motion sickness clinical characteristics, time course, prediction of susceptibility, and effectiveness of countermeasures were evaluated. Although there is wide individual variability, there appear to be typical patterns of symptom development. The duration of symptoms ranges from several hours to four days with the majority of individuals being symptom free by the end of third day. The etiology of this malady remains uncertain but evidence points to reinterpretation of otolith inputs as being a key factor in the response of the neurovestibular system. Prediction of susceptibility and severity remains unsatisfactory. Countermeasures tried include medications, preflight adaptation, and autogenic feedback training. No countermeasure is entirely successful in eliminating or alleviating symptoms.

  10. Infrasonic induced ground motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ting-Li

    On January 28, 2004, the CERI seismic network recorded seismic signals generated by an unknown source. Our conclusion is that the acoustic waves were initiated by an explosive source near the ground surface. The meteorological temperature and effective sound speed profiles suggested existence of an efficient near-surface waveguide that allowed the acoustic disturbance to propagate to large distances. An explosion occurring in an area of forest and farms would have limited the number of eyewitnesses. Resolution of the source might be possible by experiment or by detailed analysis of the ground motion data. A seismo-acoustic array was built to investigate thunder-induced ground motions. Two thunder events with similar N-wave waveforms but different horizontal slownesses are chosen to evaluate the credibility of using thunder as a seismic source. These impulsive acoustic waves excited P and S reverberations in the near surface that depend on both the incident wave horizontal slowness and the velocity structure in the upper 30 meters. Nineteen thunder events were chosen to further investigate the seismo-acoustic coupling. The consistent incident slowness differences between acoustic pressure and ground motions suggest that ground reverberations were first initiated somewhat away from the array. Acoustic and seismic signals were used to generate the time-domain transfer function through the deconvolution technique. Possible non-linear interaction for acoustic propagation into the soil at the surface was observed. The reverse radial initial motions suggest a low Poisson's ratio for the near-surface layer. The acoustic-to-seismic transfer functions show a consistent reverberation series of the Rayleigh wave type, which has a systematic dispersion relation to incident slownesses inferred from the seismic ground velocity. Air-coupled Rayleigh wave dispersion was used to quantitatively constrain the near-surface site structure with constraints afforded by near-surface body

  11. Human comfort response to random motions with a dominant longitudinal motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Subjective ride comfort response ratings were measured on the Langley Visual Motion Simulator with longitudinal acceleration inputs with various power spectra shapes and magnitudes. The results show only little influence of spectra shape on comfort response. The effects of magnitude on comfort response indicate the applicability of psychophysical precepts for comfort modeling.

  12. Human comfort response to random motions with a dominant transverse motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Subjective ride comfort response ratings were measured on the Langley Visual Motion Simulator with transverse acceleration inputs with various power spectra shapes and magnitudes. The results show only little influence of spectra shape on comfort response. The effects of magnitude on comfort response indicate the applicability of psychophysical precepts for comfort modeling.

  13. Human confort response to random motions with a dominant rolling motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Subjective ride comfort response ratings were measured on a visual motion simulator with rolling velocity inputs with various power spectra shapes and magnitudes. The results show only little influence of spectra shape on comfort response. The effects of magnitude on comfort response indicate the applicability of psychophysical precepts for comfort modeling.

  14. Atypical Integration of Motion Signals in Autism Spectrum Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Caroline E.; Martin, Alex; Baker, Chris I.; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Vision in Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC) is characterized by enhanced perception of local elements, but impaired perception of global percepts. Deficits in coherent motion perception seem to support this characterization, but the roots and robustness of such deficits remain unclear. We aimed to investigate the dynamics of the perceptual decision-making network known to support coherent motion perception. In a series of forced-choice coherent motion perception tests, we parametrically varied a single stimulus dimension, viewing duration, to test whether the rate at which evidence is accumulated towards a global decision is atypical in ASC. 40 adult participants (20 ASC) performed a classic motion discrimination task, manually indicating the global direction of motion in a random-dot kinematogram across a range of coherence levels (2–75%) and stimulus-viewing durations (200–1500 ms). We report a deficit in global motion perception at short viewing durations in ASC. Critically, however, we found that increasing the amount of time over which motion signals could be integrated reduced the magnitude of the deficit, such that at the longest duration there was no difference between the ASC and control groups. Further, the deficit in motion integration at the shortest duration was significantly associated with the severity of autistic symptoms in our clinical population, and was independent from measures of intelligence. These results point to atypical integration of motion signals during the construction of a global percept in ASC. Based on the neural correlates of decision-making in global motion perception our findings suggest the global motion deficit observed in ASC could reflect a slower or more variable response from the primary motion area of the brain or longer accumulation of evidence towards a decision-bound in parietal areas. PMID:23185249

  15. Prospective motion correction using tracking coils

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lei; Schmidt, Ehud J; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho; Santos, Juan; Hoge, William S.; Tempany-Afdhal, Clare; Butts-Pauly, Kim; Dumoulin, Charles L

    2012-01-01

    Intra-cavity imaging coils provide higher signal-to-noise than surface coils, and have the potential to provide higher spatial resolution in shorter acquisition times. However, images from these coils suffer from physiologically-induced motion artifacts, since both the anatomy and the coils move during image acquisition. We developed prospective motion correction techniques for intra-cavity imaging using an array of tracking coils. The system had <50ms latency between tracking and imaging, so that the images from the intra-cavity coil were acquired in a frame of reference defined by the tracking array rather than by the system’s gradient coils. 2D Gradient-Recalled (GRASS) and 3D ECG-gated Inversion-Recovery-Fast-Gradient-Echo (IR-FGRE) sequences were tested with prospective motion correction using ex-vivo hearts placed on a moving platform simulating both respiratory and cardiac motion. Human abdominal tests were subsequently conducted. The tracking array provided a positional accuracy of 0.7±0.5mm, 0.6±0.4mm, and 0.1±0.1mm along the X, Y and Z directions at a rate of 20 frames-per-second. The ex-vivo and human experiments showed significant image quality improvements for both in-plane and through-plane motion correction, which although not performed in intra-cavity imaging, demonstrates the feasibility of implementing such a motion correction system in a future design of combined tracking and intra-cavity coil. PMID:22565377

  16. Algebraic Nonlinear Collective Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troupe, J.; Rosensteel, G.

    1998-11-01

    Finite-dimensional Lie algebras of vector fields determine geometrical collective models in quantum and classical physics. Every set of vector fields on Euclidean space that generates the Lie algebra sl(3, R) and contains the angular momentum algebra so(3) is determined. The subset of divergence-free sl(3, R) vector fields is proven to be indexed by a real numberΛ. TheΛ=0 solution is the linear representation that corresponds to the Riemann ellipsoidal model. The nonlinear group action on Euclidean space transforms a certain family of deformed droplets among themselves. For positiveΛ, the droplets have a neck that becomes more pronounced asΛincreases; for negativeΛ, the droplets contain a spherical bubble of radius |Λ|1/3. The nonlinear vector field algebra is extended to the nonlinear general collective motion algebra gcm(3) which includes the inertia tensor. The quantum algebraic models of nonlinear nuclear collective motion are given by irreducible unitary representations of the nonlinear gcm(3) Lie algebra. These representations model fissioning isotopes (Λ>0) and bubble and two-fluid nuclei (Λ<0).

  17. Waves in Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGourty, L.; Rideout, K.

    2005-12-01

    "Waves in Motion" This teaching unit was created by Leslie McGourty and Ken Rideout under the Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program at MIT Haystack Observatory during the summer of 2005. The RET program is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation. The goals of this teaching unit are to deepen students' understanding about waves, wave motion, and the electromagnetic spectrum as a whole. Specifically students will comprehend the role radio waves play in our daily lives and in the investigation of the universe. The lessons can be used in a high school physics, earth science or astronomy curriculum. The unit consists of a series of interlocking lectures, activities, and investigations that can be used as stand alone units to supplement a teacher's existing curriculum, as an independent investigation for a student, or as a long exploration into radio astronomy with a theme of waves in space: how and where they carry their information. Special emphasis is given to the Relativity theories in honor of the "World Year of Physics" to celebrate Einstein's 1905 contributions. The lessons are currently being implemented at the high school level, the preliminary results of which will be presented. At the end of the academic year, the units will be evaluated and updated, reflecting student input and peer review after which they will be posted on the internet for teachers to use in their classrooms.

  18. Tiling motion patches.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Kyunglyul; Kim, Manmyung; Hwang, Youngseok; Lee, Jehee

    2013-11-01

    Simulating multiple character interaction is challenging because character actions must be carefully coordinated to align their spatial locations and synchronized with each other. We present an algorithm to create a dense crowd of virtual characters interacting with each other. The interaction may involve physical contacts, such as hand shaking, hugging, and carrying a heavy object collaboratively. We address the problem by collecting deformable motion patches, each of which describes an episode of multiple interacting characters, and tiling them spatially and temporally. The tiling of motion patches generates a seamless simulation of virtual characters interacting with each other in a nontrivial manner. Our tiling algorithm uses a combination of stochastic sampling and deterministic search to address the discrete and continuous aspects of the tiling problem. Our tiling algorithm made it possible to automatically generate highly complex animation of multiple interacting characters. We achieve the level of interaction complexity far beyond the current state of the art that animation techniques could generate, in terms of the diversity of human behaviors and the spatial/temporal density of interpersonal interactions.

  19. Tiling Motion Patches.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Kyunglyul; Kim, Manmyung; Hwang, Youngseok; Lee, Jehee

    2013-05-08

    Simulating multiple character interaction is challenging because character actions must be carefully coordinated to align their spatial locations and synchronized with each other. We present an algorithm to create a dense crowd of virtual characters interacting with each other. The interaction may involve physical contacts, such as hand shaking, hugging, and carrying a heavy object collaboratively. We address the problem by collecting deformable motion patches, each of which describes an episode of multiple interacting characters, and tiling them spatially and temporally. The tiling of motion patches generates a seamless simulation of virtual characters interacting with each other in a non-trivial manner. Our tiling algorithm uses a combination of stochastic sampling and deterministic search to address the discrete and continuous aspects of the tiling problem. Our tiling algorithm made it possible to automatically generate highly-complex animation of multiple interacting characters. We achieved the level of complexity far beyond the current state-of-the-art animation techniques could generate, in terms of the diversity of human behaviors and the spatial/temporal density of interpersonal interactions.

  20. Photonic Equations of Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, A B; Crenshaw, M E

    2004-09-17

    Although the concept of the photon as a quantum particle is sharpened by the quantization of the energy of the classical radiation field in a cavity, the photon's spin has remained a classical degree of freedom. The photon is considered a spin-1 particle, although only two classical polarization states transverse to its direction of propagation are allowed. Effectively therefore the photon is a spin-1/2 particle, although it still obeys Bose-Einstein statistics because the photon-photon interaction is zero. Here they show that the two polarization states of the photon can be quantized using Pauli's spin vector, such that a suitable equation of motion for the photon is Dirac's relativistic wave equation for zero mass and zero charge. Maxwell's equations for a free photon are inferred from the Dirac-field formalism and thus provide proof of this claim. For photons in the presence of electronic sources for electromagnetic fields we posit Lorentz-invariant inhomogeneous photonic equations of motion. Electro-dynamic operator equations are inferred from this modified Dirac-field formalism which reduce to Maxwell's equations if spin-dependent terms in the radiation-matter interaction are dropped.

  1. Integrated Reproduction of Human Motion Components by Motion Copying System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunashima, Noboru; Katsura, Seiichiro

    Currently, the development of leading-edge technology for recording and loading human motion on the basis of haptic information is required in the field of manufacturing and human support. Human movement is an assembly of motion components. Since human movements should be supported by a robot in real time, it is necessary to integrate the morion components, which were saved earlier. Once such motion integration is realized, future technology for use in daily human life is developed. This paper proposes the integrated reproduction of the decomposed components of human motion by using a motion copying system. This system is the key technology for the realization of the acquisition, saving and reproduction of the real-world haptic information. By the proposed method, it is possible not only to achieve expert skill acquisition, skill transfer to robots, and power assist for each motion component but also to open up new areas of applications.

  2. Kink pair production and dislocation motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, S. P.

    2016-12-01

    The motion of extended defects called dislocations controls the mechanical properties of crystalline materials such as strength and ductility. Under moderate applied loads, this motion proceeds via the thermal nucleation of kink pairs. The nucleation rate is known to be a highly nonlinear function of the applied load, and its calculation has long been a theoretical challenge. In this article, a stochastic path integral approach is used to derive a simple, general, and exact formula for the rate. The predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental and computational investigations, and unambiguously explain the origin of the observed extreme nonlinearity. The results can also be applied to other systems modelled by an elastic string interacting with a periodic potential, such as Josephson junctions in superconductors.

  3. Kink pair production and dislocation motion

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, S. P.

    2016-01-01

    The motion of extended defects called dislocations controls the mechanical properties of crystalline materials such as strength and ductility. Under moderate applied loads, this motion proceeds via the thermal nucleation of kink pairs. The nucleation rate is known to be a highly nonlinear function of the applied load, and its calculation has long been a theoretical challenge. In this article, a stochastic path integral approach is used to derive a simple, general, and exact formula for the rate. The predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental and computational investigations, and unambiguously explain the origin of the observed extreme nonlinearity. The results can also be applied to other systems modelled by an elastic string interacting with a periodic potential, such as Josephson junctions in superconductors. PMID:28004834

  4. Categorizing identity from facial motion.

    PubMed

    Girges, Christine; Spencer, Janine; O'Brien, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Advances in marker-less motion capture technology now allow the accurate replication of facial motion and deformation in computer-generated imagery (CGI). A forced-choice discrimination paradigm using such CGI facial animations showed that human observers can categorize identity solely from facial motion cues. Animations were generated from motion captures acquired during natural speech, thus eliciting both rigid (head rotations and translations) and nonrigid (expressional changes) motion. To limit interferences from individual differences in facial form, all animations shared the same appearance. Observers were required to discriminate between different videos of facial motion and between the facial motions of different people. Performance was compared to the control condition of orientation-inverted facial motion. The results show that observers are able to make accurate discriminations of identity in the absence of all cues except facial motion. A clear inversion effect in both tasks provided consistency with previous studies, supporting the configural view of human face perception. The accuracy of this motion capture technology thus allowed stimuli to be generated that closely resembled real moving faces. Future studies may wish to implement such methodology when studying human face perception.

  5. New motion illusion caused by pictorial motion lines.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Takahiro; Miura, Kayo

    2008-01-01

    Motion lines (MLs) are a pictorial technique used to represent object movement in a still picture. This study explored how MLs contribute to motion perception. In Experiment 1, we reported the creation of a motion illusion caused by MLs: random displacements of objects with MLs on each frame were perceived as unidirectional global motion along the pictorial motion direction implied by MLs. In Experiment 2, we showed that the illusory global motion in the peripheral visual field captured the perceived motion direction of random displacement of objects without MLs in the central visual field, and confirmed that the results in Experiment 1 did not stem simply from response bias, but resulted from perceptual processing. In Experiment 3, we showed that the spatial arrangement of orientation information rather than ML length is important for the illusory global motion. Our results indicate that the ML effect is based on perceptual processing rather than response bias, and that comparison of neighboring orientation components may underlie the determination of pictorial motion direction with MLs.

  6. 24 CFR 26.16 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Motions. 26.16 Section 26.16... PROCEDURES Hearings Before Hearing Officers Pleadings and Motions § 26.16 Motions. (a) Motions. Requests for... a motion. All motions from the commencement of the action until the issuance of a decision shall be...

  7. 24 CFR 26.16 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Motions. 26.16 Section 26.16... PROCEDURES Hearings Before Hearing Officers Pleadings and Motions § 26.16 Motions. (a) Motions. Requests for... a motion. All motions from the commencement of the action until the issuance of a decision shall be...

  8. 24 CFR 26.16 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Motions. 26.16 Section 26.16... PROCEDURES Hearings Before Hearing Officers Pleadings and Motions § 26.16 Motions. (a) Motions. Requests for... a motion. All motions from the commencement of the action until the issuance of a decision shall be...

  9. 24 CFR 26.16 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Motions. 26.16 Section 26.16... PROCEDURES Hearings Before Hearing Officers Pleadings and Motions § 26.16 Motions. (a) Motions. Requests for... a motion. All motions from the commencement of the action until the issuance of a decision shall be...

  10. 24 CFR 26.16 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Motions. 26.16 Section 26.16... PROCEDURES Hearings Before Hearing Officers Pleadings and Motions § 26.16 Motions. (a) Motions. Requests for... a motion. All motions from the commencement of the action until the issuance of a decision shall be...

  11. Directional performance in motion transparency.

    PubMed

    Braddick, Oliver J; Wishart, Keith A; Curran, William

    2002-05-01

    Motion transparency provides a challenging test case for our understanding of how visual motion, and other attributes, are computed and represented in the brain. However, previous studies of visual transparency have used subjective criteria which do not confirm the existence of independent representations of the superimposed motions. We have developed measures of performance in motion transparency that require observers to extract information about two motions jointly, and therefore test the information that is simultaneously represented for each motion. Observers judged whether two motions were at 90 degrees to one another; the base direction was randomized so that neither motion taken alone was informative. The precision of performance was determined by the standard deviations (S.D.s) of probit functions fitted to the data. Observers also made judgments of orthogonal directions between a single motion stream and a line, for one of two transparent motions against a line and for two spatially segregated motions. The data show that direction judgments with transparency can be made with comparable accuracy to segregated (non-transparent) conditions, supporting the idea that transparency involves the equivalent representation of two global motions in the same region. The precision of this joint direction judgment is, however, 2-3 times poorer than that for a single motion stream. The precision in directional judgment for a single stream is reduced only by a factor of about 1.5 by superimposing a second stream. The major effect in performance, therefore, appears to be associated with the need to compute and compare two global representations of motion, rather than with interference between the dot streams per se. Experiment 2 tested the transparency of motions separated by a range of angles from 5 degrees to 180 degrees by requiring subjects to set a line matching the perceived direction of each motion. The S.D.s of these settings demonstrated that directions of

  12. What you thought you knew about motion sickness isn't necessarily so

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, P. S.; Malmstrom, F. V.

    1984-01-01

    Motion sickness symptoms, stimuli, and drug therapy are discussed. Autogenic feedback training (AFT) methods of preventing motion sickness are explained. Research with AFT indicates that participants who had AFT could withstand longer periods of Coriolis acceleration, participants with high or low susceptibility to motion sickness could control their symptoms with AFT, AFT for Coriolis acceleration is transferable to other motion sickness stimuli, and most people can learn AFT, though with varying rates of learning.

  13. Tvashtar in Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This five-frame sequence of New Horizons images captures the giant plume from Io's Tvashtar volcano. Snapped by the probe's Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) as the spacecraft flew past Jupiter earlier this year, this first-ever 'movie' of an Io plume clearly shows motion in the cloud of volcanic debris, which extends 330 kilometers (200 miles) above the moon's surface. Only the upper part of the plume is visible from this vantage point -- the plume's source is 130 kilometers (80 miles) below the edge of Io's disk, on the far side of the moon.

    The appearance and motion of the plume is remarkably similar to an ornamental fountain on Earth, replicated on a gigantic scale. The knots and filaments that allow us to track the plume's motion are still mysterious, but this movie is likely to help scientists understand their origin, as well as provide unique information on the plume dynamics.

    Io's hyperactive nature is emphasized by the fact that two other volcanic plumes are also visible off the edge of Io's disk: Masubi at the 7 o'clock position, and a very faint plume, possibly from the volcano Zal, at the 10 o'clock position. Jupiter illuminates the night side of Io, and the most prominent feature visible on the disk is the dark horseshoe shape of the volcano Loki, likely an enormous lava lake. Boosaule Mons, which at 18 kilometers (11 miles) is the highest mountain on Io and one of the highest mountains in the solar system, pokes above the edge of the disk on the right side.

    The five images were obtained over an 8-minute span, with two minutes between frames, from 23:50 to 23:58 Universal Time on March 1, 2007. Io was 3.8 million kilometers (2.4 million miles) from New Horizons; the image is centered at Io coordinates 0 degrees north, 342 degrees west.

    The pictures were part of a sequence designed to look at Jupiter's rings, but planners included Io in the sequence because the moon was passing behind Jupiter's rings at the time.

  14. Tvashtar in Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This five-frame sequence of New Horizons images captures the giant plume from Io's Tvashtar volcano. Snapped by the probe's Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) as the spacecraft flew past Jupiter earlier this year, this first-ever 'movie' of an Io plume clearly shows motion in the cloud of volcanic debris, which extends 330 kilometers (200 miles) above the moon's surface. Only the upper part of the plume is visible from this vantage point -- the plume's source is 130 kilometers (80 miles) below the edge of Io's disk, on the far side of the moon.

    The appearance and motion of the plume is remarkably similar to an ornamental fountain on Earth, replicated on a gigantic scale. The knots and filaments that allow us to track the plume's motion are still mysterious, but this movie is likely to help scientists understand their origin, as well as provide unique information on the plume dynamics.

    Io's hyperactive nature is emphasized by the fact that two other volcanic plumes are also visible off the edge of Io's disk: Masubi at the 7 o'clock position, and a very faint plume, possibly from the volcano Zal, at the 10 o'clock position. Jupiter illuminates the night side of Io, and the most prominent feature visible on the disk is the dark horseshoe shape of the volcano Loki, likely an enormous lava lake. Boosaule Mons, which at 18 kilometers (11 miles) is the highest mountain on Io and one of the highest mountains in the solar system, pokes above the edge of the disk on the right side.

    The five images were obtained over an 8-minute span, with two minutes between frames, from 23:50 to 23:58 Universal Time on March 1, 2007. Io was 3.8 million kilometers (2.4 million miles) from New Horizons; the image is centered at Io coordinates 0 degrees north, 342 degrees west.

    The pictures were part of a sequence designed to look at Jupiter's rings, but planners included Io in the sequence because the moon was passing behind Jupiter's rings at the time.

  15. Cervical Spinal Motion During Intubation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    Ten fresh human cadavers were intubated while recording cervical motion using a cinefluoroscopic technique. Segmental cervical motion from the...performed using no external stabilization, Gardner-Wells traction and manual in-line cervical immobilization. The data are currently being analyzed. A...paper entitled Segmental cervical spine motion during orotracheal intubation of the intact and injured spine with and without external stabilization was published in the Journal of Neurosurgery.

  16. Motion trajectories and object properties influence perceived direction of motion.

    PubMed

    Magnussen, Camilla M; Orbach, Harry S; Loffler, Gunter

    2013-10-18

    Judging the motion of objects is a fundamental task that the visual system executes in everyday life in order for us to navigate and interact safely with our surroundings. A number of strategies have been suggested to explain how the visual system uses motion information from different points of an object to compute veridical directions of motion. These include combining ambiguous signals from object contours via a vector summation (VS) or intersection of constraints (IOC) calculation, pooling information using a maximum likelihood or tracking object features. We measured the perceived direction of motion for a range of cross-shaped stimuli (composed of two superimposed lines) to test how accurately humans perceive their motion and compared data to predictions from these strategies. Crosses of different shapes (defined by the angle between the component lines) translated along 16 directions of motion with constant speed. The crosses either moved along one of their symmetry axes (balanced conditions with line components equidistant to the direction of motion) or had their symmetry axis tilted relative to the motion (unbalanced conditions) Data show reproducible differences between observers, including occasional bimodal behaviour, and exhibit the following common patterns. There is a general dependence on direction of motion: For all conditions, when motion is along cardinal axes (horizontal and vertical), perception is largely veridical. For non-cardinal directions, biases are typically small (<10 deg) when crosses are balanced but large biases occur (≥30 deg) when crosses are tilted relative to their direction of motion. Factors influencing the pattern of biases are the shape and tilt of the cross as well as the proximity of its direction of motion to cardinal axes. The dependence of the biases on the direction of motion is inconsistent with any isotropic mechanisms including VS, IOC, maximum likelihood or feature tracking. Instead, perception is biased by a

  17. Effect of vertical motion on current meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kallio, Nicholas A.

    1966-01-01

    The effect of vertical motion on the performance of current meters at various stream velocities was evaluated to determine whether accurate discharge measurements can be made from a bobbing boat. Three types of current meters--Ott, Price, and vane types--were tested under conditions simulating a bobbing boat. A known frequency and amplitude of vertical motion were imparted to the current meter, and the related effect on the measured stream velocity was determined. One test of the Price meter was made under actual conditions, using a boat and standard measuring gear. The results of the test under actual conditions verified those obtained by simulating the vertical movements of a boat. The tests show that for stream velocities below 2.5 feet per second the accuracy of all three meters is significantly affected when the meters are subjected to certain conditions of vertical motion that can occur during actual field operations. Both the rate of vertical motion and the frequency of vertical oscillation affect the registration of the meter. The results of these tests, presented in the form of graphs and tables, can be used as a guide to determine whether wind and stream flow are within an acceptable range for a reliable discharge measurement from a boat.

  18. Strong motion duration and earthquake magnitude relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, M.W.; Short, S.A.; Kennedy, R.P.

    1992-06-01

    Earthquake duration is the total time of ground shaking from the arrival of seismic waves until the return to ambient conditions. Much of this time is at relatively low shaking levels which have little effect on seismic structural response and on earthquake damage potential. As a result, a parameter termed ``strong motion duration`` has been defined by a number of investigators to be used for the purpose of evaluating seismic response and assessing the potential for structural damage due to earthquakes. This report presents methods for determining strong motion duration and a time history envelope function appropriate for various evaluation purposes, for earthquake magnitude and distance, and for site soil properties. There are numerous definitions of strong motion duration. For most of these definitions, empirical studies have been completed which relate duration to earthquake magnitude and distance and to site soil properties. Each of these definitions recognizes that only the portion of an earthquake record which has sufficiently high acceleration amplitude, energy content, or some other parameters significantly affects seismic response. Studies have been performed which indicate that the portion of an earthquake record in which the power (average rate of energy input) is maximum correlates most closely with potential damage to stiff nuclear power plant structures. Hence, this report will concentrate on energy based strong motion duration definitions.

  19. The perception of linear self-motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durgin, Frank H.; Fox, Laura F.; Schaffer, Evan; Whitaker, Rabi

    2005-03-01

    VR lends itself to the study of intersensory calibration in self-motion perception. However, proper calibration of visual and locomotor self-motion in VR is made complicated by the compression of perceived distance and by unfamiliar modes of locomotion. Although adaptation is fairly rapid with exposure to novel sensorimotor correlations, here it is shown that good initial calibration is found when both (1) the virtual environment is richly structured in near space and (2) locomotion is on solid ground. Previously it had been observed that correct visual speeds seem too slow when walking on a treadmill. Several principles may be involved, including inhibitory sensory prediction, distance compression, and missing peripheral flow in the reduced FOV. However, though a richly-structured near-space environment provides higher rates of peripheral flow, its presence does not improve calibration when walking on a treadmill. Conversely, walking on solid ground still shows relatively poor calibration in an empty (though well-textured) virtual hallway. Because walking on solid ground incorporates well-calibrated mechanisms that can assess speed of self-motion independent of vision, these observations suggest that near space may have been better calibrated in the HMD. Near-space obstacle avoidance systems may also be involved. Order effects in the data from the treadmill experiment indicate that recalibration of self-motion perception occurred during the experiment.

  20. Collective motion of dimers.

    PubMed

    Penington, Catherine J; Korvasová, Karolína; Hughes, Barry D; Landman, Kerry A

    2012-11-01

    We consider a discrete agent-based model on a one-dimensional lattice and a two-dimensional square lattice, where each agent is a dimer occupying two sites. Agents move by vacating one occupied site in favor of a nearest-neighbor site and obey either a strict simple exclusion rule or a weaker constraint that permits partial overlaps between dimers. Using indicator variables and careful probability arguments, a discrete-time master equation for these processes is derived systematically within a mean-field approximation. In the continuum limit, nonlinear diffusion equations that describe the average agent occupancy of the dimer population are obtained. In addition, we show that multiple species of interacting subpopulations give rise to advection-diffusion equations. Averaged discrete simulation data compares very well with the solution to the continuum partial differential equation models. Since many cell types are elongated rather than circular, this work offers insight into population-level behavior of collective cellular motion.

  1. ANALYSIS OF AIRCRAFT MOTIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed by Ames Research Center, in cooperation with the National Transportation Safety Board, as a technique for deriving time histories of an aircraft's motion from Air Traffic Control (ATC) radar records. This technique uses the radar range and azimuth data, along with the downlinked altitude data, to derive an expanded set of data which includes airspeed, lift, attitude angles (pitch, roll, and heading), etc. This technique should prove useful as a source of data in the investigation of commercial airline accidents and in the analysis of accidents involving aircraft which do not have onboard data recorders (e.g., military, short-haul, and general aviation). The technique used to determine the aircraft motions involves smoothing of raw radar data. These smoothed results, in combination with other available information (wind profiles and aircraft performance data), are used to derive the expanded set of data. This program uses a cubic least-square fit to smooth the raw data. This moving-arc procedure provides a smoothed time history of the aircraft position, the inertial velocities, and accelerations. Using known winds, these inertial data are transformed to aircraft stability axes to provide true airspeed, thrust-drag, lift, and roll angle. Further derivation, based on aircraft dependent performance data, can determine the aircraft angle of attack, pitch, and heading angle. Results of experimental tests indicate that values derived from ATC radar records using this technique agree favorably with airborne measurements. This program is written in FORTRAN IV to be executed in the batch mode, and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of 64k (octal) of 60 bit words.

  2. Relativistic Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, Jörn; Hänggi, Peter

    2009-02-01

    Over the past one hundred years, Brownian motion theory has contributed substantially to our understanding of various microscopic phenomena. Originally proposed as a phenomenological paradigm for atomistic matter interactions, the theory has since evolved into a broad and vivid research area, with an ever increasing number of applications in biology, chemistry, finance, and physics. The mathematical description of stochastic processes has led to new approaches in other fields, culminating in the path integral formulation of modern quantum theory. Stimulated by experimental progress in high energy physics and astrophysics, the unification of relativistic and stochastic concepts has re-attracted considerable interest during the past decade. Focusing on the framework of special relativity, we review, here, recent progress in the phenomenological description of relativistic diffusion processes. After a brief historical overview, we will summarize basic concepts from the Langevin theory of nonrelativistic Brownian motions and discuss relevant aspects of relativistic equilibrium thermostatistics. The introductory parts are followed by a detailed discussion of relativistic Langevin equations in phase space. We address the choice of time parameters, discretization rules, relativistic fluctuation-dissipation theorems, and Lorentz transformations of stochastic differential equations. The general theory is illustrated through analytical and numerical results for the diffusion of free relativistic Brownian particles. Subsequently, we discuss how Langevin-type equations can be obtained as approximations to microscopic models. The final part of the article is dedicated to relativistic diffusion processes in Minkowski spacetime. Since the velocities of relativistic particles are bounded by the speed of light, nontrivial relativistic Markov processes in spacetime do not exist; i.e., relativistic generalizations of the nonrelativistic diffusion equation and its Gaussian solutions

  3. ANALYSIS OF AIRCRAFT MOTIONS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    This program was developed by Ames Research Center, in cooperation with the National Transportation Safety Board, as a technique for deriving time histories of an aircraft's motion from Air Traffic Control (ATC) radar records. This technique uses the radar range and azimuth data, along with the downlinked altitude data, to derive an expanded set of data which includes airspeed, lift, attitude angles (pitch, roll, and heading), etc. This technique should prove useful as a source of data in the investigation of commercial airline accidents and in the analysis of accidents involving aircraft which do not have onboard data recorders (e.g., military, short-haul, and general aviation). The technique used to determine the aircraft motions involves smoothing of raw radar data. These smoothed results, in combination with other available information (wind profiles and aircraft performance data), are used to derive the expanded set of data. This program uses a cubic least-square fit to smooth the raw data. This moving-arc procedure provides a smoothed time history of the aircraft position, the inertial velocities, and accelerations. Using known winds, these inertial data are transformed to aircraft stability axes to provide true airspeed, thrust-drag, lift, and roll angle. Further derivation, based on aircraft dependent performance data, can determine the aircraft angle of attack, pitch, and heading angle. Results of experimental tests indicate that values derived from ATC radar records using this technique agree favorably with airborne measurements. This program is written in FORTRAN IV to be executed in the batch mode, and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of 64k (octal) of 60 bit words.

  4. Earthquake ground motion: Chapter 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luco, Nicolas; Valley, Michael; Crouse, C.B.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the effort in seismic design of buildings and other structures is focused on structural design. This chapter addresses another key aspect of the design process—characterization of earthquake ground motion. Section 3.1 describes the basis of the earthquake ground motion maps in the Provisions and in ASCE 7. Section 3.2 has examples for the determination of ground motion parameters and spectra for use in design. Section 3.3 discusses and provides an example for the selection and scaling of ground motion records for use in response history analysis.

  5. A true polar wander model for Neoproterozoic plate motions

    SciTech Connect

    Ripperdan, R.L. )

    1992-01-01

    Recent paleogeographic reconstructions for the interval 750--500 Ma (Neoproterozoic to Late Cambrian) require rapid rates of plate motion and/or rotation around an equatorial Euler pole to accommodate reconstructions for the Early Paleozoic. Motions of this magnitude appear to be very uncommon during the Phanerozoic. A model for plate motions based on the hypothesis that discrete intervals of rapid true polar wander (RTPW) occurred during the Neoproterozoic can account for the paleogeographic changes with minimum amounts of plate motion. The model uses the paleogeographic reconstructions of Hoffman (1991). The following constraints were applied during derivation of the model: (1) relative motions between major continental units were restricted to be combinations of great circle or small circle translations with Euler poles of rotation = spin axis; (2) maximum rates of relative translational plate motion were 0.2 m/yr. Based on these constraints, two separate sets of synthetic plate motion trajectories were determined. The sequence of events in both can be summarized as: (1) A rapid true polar wander event of ca 90[degree] rafting a supercontinent to the spin axis; (2) breakup of the polar supercontinent into two fragments, one with the Congo, West Africa, Amazonia, and Baltica cratons, the other with the Laurentia, East Gondwana, and Kalahari cratons; (3) great circle motion of the blocks towards the equator; (4) small circle motion leading to amalgamation of Gondwana and separation of Laurentia and Baltica. In alternative 1, rifting initiates between East Antarctica and Laurentia and one episode of RTPW is required. Alternative 2 requires two episodes of RTPW; and that rifting occurred first along the eastern margin and later along the western margin of Laurentia. Synthetic plate motion trajectories are compared to existing paleomagnetic and geological data, and implications of the model for paleoclimatic changes during the Neoproterozoic are discussed.

  6. A rigid motion correction method for helical computed tomography (CT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.-H.; Nuyts, J.; Kyme, A.; Kuncic, Z.; Fulton, R.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a method to compensate for six degree-of-freedom rigid motion in helical CT of the head. The method is demonstrated in simulations and in helical scans performed on a 16-slice CT scanner. Scans of a Hoffman brain phantom were acquired while an optical motion tracking system recorded the motion of the bed and the phantom. Motion correction was performed by restoring projection consistency using data from the motion tracking system, and reconstructing with an iterative fully 3D algorithm. Motion correction accuracy was evaluated by comparing reconstructed images with a stationary reference scan. We also investigated the effects on accuracy of tracker sampling rate, measurement jitter, interpolation of tracker measurements, and the synchronization of motion data and CT projections. After optimization of these aspects, motion corrected images corresponded remarkably closely to images of the stationary phantom with correlation and similarity coefficients both above 0.9. We performed a simulation study using volunteer head motion and found similarly that our method is capable of compensating effectively for realistic human head movements. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first practical demonstration of generalized rigid motion correction in helical CT. Its clinical value, which we have yet to explore, may be significant. For example it could reduce the necessity for repeat scans and resource-intensive anesthetic and sedation procedures in patient groups prone to motion, such as young children. It is not only applicable to dedicated CT imaging, but also to hybrid PET/CT and SPECT/CT, where it could also ensure an accurate CT image for lesion localization and attenuation correction of the functional image data.

  7. Simulation System Fidelity Assessment at the Vertical Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, Steven D.; Reardon, Scott E.; Tobias, Eric L.; Aponso, Bimal L.

    2013-01-01

    Fidelity is a word that is often used but rarely understood when talking about groundbased simulation. Assessing the cueing fidelity of a ground based flight simulator requires a comparison to actual flight data either directly or indirectly. Two experiments were conducted at the Vertical Motion Simulator using the GenHel UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter math model that was directly compared to flight data. Prior to the experiment the simulator s motion and visual system frequency responses were measured, the aircraft math model was adjusted to account for the simulator motion system delays, and the motion system gains and washouts were tuned for the individual tasks. The tuned motion system fidelity was then assessed against the modified Sinacori criteria. The first experiments showed similar handling qualities ratings (HQRs) to actual flight for a bob-up and sidestep maneuvers. The second experiment showed equivalent HQRs between flight and simulation for the ADS33 slalom maneuver for the two pilot participants. The ADS33 vertical maneuver HQRs were mixed with one pilot rating the flight and simulation the same while the second pilot rated the simulation worse. In addition to recording HQRs on the second experiment, an experimental Simulation Fidelity Rating (SFR) scale developed by the University of Liverpool was tested for applicability to engineering simulators. A discussion of the SFR scale for use on the Vertical Motion Simulator is included in this paper.

  8. Motion-Matching: A Challenge Game to Generate Motion Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, David; Adams, Betty; Brookes, David; Milner-Bolotin, Marina; Undreiu, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    Motion is a topic that is taught from elementary grades through to university at various levels of sophistication. It is an area that can be challenging for learning in a conceptually meaningful way, and formal kinematics instruction can sometimes seem dry and boring. Thus, the nature of students' initial introduction to motion is important in…

  9. Motion-Matching: A Challenge Game to Generate Motion Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, David; Adams, Betty; Brookes, David; Milner-Bolotin, Marina; Undreiu, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    Motion is a topic that is taught from elementary grades through to university at various levels of sophistication. It is an area that can be challenging for learning in a conceptually meaningful way, and formal kinematics instruction can sometimes seem dry and boring. Thus, the nature of students' initial introduction to motion is important in…

  10. Motion sickness increases functional connectivity between visual motion and nausea-associated brain regions.

    PubMed

    Toschi, Nicola; Kim, Jieun; Sclocco, Roberta; Duggento, Andrea; Barbieri, Riccardo; Kuo, Braden; Napadow, Vitaly

    2017-01-01

    The brain networks supporting nausea not yet understood. We previously found that while visual stimulation activated primary (V1) and extrastriate visual cortices (MT+/V5, coding for visual motion), increasing nausea was associated with increasing sustained activation in several brain areas, with significant co-activation for anterior insula (aIns) and mid-cingulate (MCC) cortices. Here, we hypothesized that motion sickness also alters functional connectivity between visual motion and previously identified nausea-processing brain regions. Subjects prone to motion sickness and controls completed a motion sickness provocation task during fMRI/ECG acquisition. We studied changes in connectivity between visual processing areas activated by the stimulus (MT+/V5, V1), right aIns and MCC when comparing rest (BASELINE) to peak nausea state (NAUSEA). Compared to BASELINE, NAUSEA reduced connectivity between right and left V1 and increased connectivity between right MT+/V5 and aIns and between left MT+/V5 and MCC. Additionally, the change in MT+/V5 to insula connectivity was significantly associated with a change in sympathovagal balance, assessed by heart rate variability analysis. No state-related connectivity changes were noted for the control group. Increased connectivity between a visual motion processing region and nausea/salience brain regions may reflect increased transfer of visual/vestibular mismatch information to brain regions supporting nausea perception and autonomic processing. We conclude that vection-induced nausea increases connectivity between nausea-processing regions and those activated by the nauseogenic stimulus. This enhanced low-frequency coupling may support continual, slowly evolving nausea perception and shifts toward sympathetic dominance. Disengaging this coupling may be a target for biobehavioral interventions aimed at reducing motion sickness severity.

  11. Neurons compute internal models of the physical laws of motion.

    PubMed

    Angelaki, Dora E; Shaikh, Aasef G; Green, Andrea M; Dickman, J David

    2004-07-29

    A critical step in self-motion perception and spatial awareness is the integration of motion cues from multiple sensory organs that individually do not provide an accurate representation of the physical world. One of the best-studied sensory ambiguities is found in visual processing, and arises because of the inherent uncertainty in detecting the motion direction of an untextured contour moving within a small aperture. A similar sensory ambiguity arises in identifying the actual motion associated with linear accelerations sensed by the otolith organs in the inner ear. These internal linear accelerometers respond identically during translational motion (for example, running forward) and gravitational accelerations experienced as we reorient the head relative to gravity (that is, head tilt). Using new stimulus combinations, we identify here cerebellar and brainstem motion-sensitive neurons that compute a solution to the inertial motion detection problem. We show that the firing rates of these populations of neurons reflect the computations necessary to construct an internal model representation of the physical equations of motion.

  12. Motion Predicts Clinical Callus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Elkins, Jacob; Marsh, J. Lawrence; Lujan, Trevor; Peindl, Richard; Kellam, James; Anderson, Donald D.; Lack, William

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mechanotransduction is theorized to influence fracture-healing, but optimal fracture-site motion is poorly defined. We hypothesized that three-dimensional (3-D) fracture-site motion as estimated by finite element (FE) analysis would influence callus formation for a clinical series of supracondylar femoral fractures treated with locking-plate fixation. Methods: Construct-specific FE modeling simulated 3-D fracture-site motion for sixty-six supracondylar femoral fractures (OTA/AO classification of 33A or 33C) treated at a single institution. Construct stiffness and directional motion through the fracture were investigated to assess the validity of construct stiffness as a surrogate measure of 3-D motion at the fracture site. Callus formation was assessed radiographically for all patients at six, twelve, and twenty-four weeks postoperatively. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses examined the effects of longitudinal motion, shear (transverse motion), open fracture, smoking, and diabetes on callus formation. Construct types were compared to determine whether their 3-D motion profile was associated with callus formation. Results: Shear disproportionately increased relative to longitudinal motion with increasing bridge span, which was not predicted by our assessment of construct stiffness alone. Callus formation was not associated with open fracture, smoking, or diabetes at six, twelve, or twenty-four weeks. However, callus formation was associated with 3-D fracture-site motion at twelve and twenty-four weeks. Longitudinal motion promoted callus formation at twelve and twenty-four weeks (p = 0.017 for both). Shear inhibited callus formation at twelve and twenty-four weeks (p = 0.017 and p = 0.022, respectively). Titanium constructs with a short bridge span demonstrated greater longitudinal motion with less shear than did the other constructs, and this was associated with greater callus formation (p < 0.001). Conclusions: In this study of

  13. The use of vestibular models for design and evaluation of flight simulator motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bussolari, Steven R.; Young, Laurence R.; Lee, Alfred T.

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative models for the dynamics of the human vestibular system are applied to the design and evaluation of flight simulator platform motion. An optimal simulator motion control algorithm is generated to minimize the vector difference between perceived spatial orientation estimated in flight and in simulation. The motion controller has been implemented on the Vertical Motion Simulator at NASA Ames Research Center and evaluated experimentally through measurement of pilot performance and subjective rating during VTOL aircraft simulation. In general, pilot performance in a longitudinal tracking task (formation flight) did not appear to be sensitive to variations in platform motion condition as long as motion was present. However, pilot assessment of motion fidelity by means of a rating scale designed for this purpose, were sensitive to motion controller design. Platform motion generated with the optimal motion controller was found to be generally equivalent to that generated by conventional linear crossfeed washout. The vestibular models are used to evaluate the motion fidelity of transport category aircraft (Boeing 727) simulation in a pilot performance and simulator acceptability study at the Man-Vehicle Systems Research Facility at NASA Ames Research Center. Eighteen airline pilots, currently flying B-727, were given a series of flight scenarios in the simulator under various conditions of simulator motion. The scenarios were chosen to reflect the flight maneuvers that these pilots might expect to be given during a routine pilot proficiency check. Pilot performance and subjective rating of simulator fidelity was relatively insensitive to the motion condition, despite large differences in the amplitude of motion provided. This lack of sensitivity may be explained by means of the vestibular models, which predict little difference in the modeled motion sensations of the pilots when different motion conditions are imposed.

  14. Microsaccades drive illusory motion in the Enigma illusion.

    PubMed

    Troncoso, Xoana G; Macknik, Stephen L; Otero-Millan, Jorge; Martinez-Conde, Susana

    2008-10-14

    Visual images consisting of repetitive patterns can elicit striking illusory motion percepts. For almost 200 years, artists, psychologists, and neuroscientists have debated whether this type of illusion originates in the eye or in the brain. For more than a decade, the controversy has centered on the powerful illusory motion perceived in the painting Enigma, created by op-artist Isia Leviant. However, no previous study has directly correlated the Enigma illusion to any specific physiological mechanism, and so the debate rages on. Here, we show that microsaccades, a type of miniature eye movement produced during visual fixation, can drive illusory motion in Enigma. We asked subjects to indicate when illusory motion sped up or slowed down during the observation of Enigma while we simultaneously recorded their eye movements with high precision. Before "faster" motion periods, the rate of microsaccades increased. Before "slower/no" motion periods, the rate of microsaccades decreased. These results reveal a direct link between microsaccade production and the perception of illusory motion in Enigma and rule out the hypothesis that the origin of the illusion is purely cortical.

  15. Fractional Brownian motion and long term clinical trial recruitment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Lai, Dejian

    2011-05-01

    Prediction of recruitment in clinical trials has been a challenging task. Many methods have been studied, including models based on Poisson process and its large sample approximation by Brownian motion (BM), however, when the independent incremental structure is violated for BM model, we could use fractional Brownian motion to model and approximate the underlying Poisson processes with random rates. In this paper, fractional Brownian motion (FBM) is considered for such conditions and compared to BM model with illustrated examples from different trials and simulations.

  16. Flight simulator platform motion and air transport pilot training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Alfred T.; Bussolari, Steven R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of a flight simulator platform motion on the performance and training of a pilot was evaluated using subjective ratings and objective performance data obtained on experienced B-727 pilots and pilots with no prior heavy aircraft flying experience flying B-727-200 aircraft simulator used by the FAA in the upgrade and transition training for air carrier operations. The results on experienced pilots did not reveal any reliable effects of wide variations in platform motion design. On the other hand, motion variations significantly affected the behavior of pilots without heavy-aircraft experience. The effect was limited to pitch attitude control inputs during the early phase of landing training.

  17. Topographic Structure from Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonstad, M. A.; Dietrich, J. T.; Courville, B. C.; Jensen, J.; Carbonneau, P.

    2011-12-01

    The production of high-resolution topographic datasets is of increasing concern and application throughout the geomorphic sciences, and river science is no exception. Consequently, a wide range of topographic measurement methods have evolved. Despite the range of available methods, the production of high resolution, high quality digital elevation models (DEMs) generally requires a significant investment in personnel time, hardware and/or software. However, image-based methods such as digital photogrammetry have steadily been decreasing in costs. Initially developed for the purpose of rapid, inexpensive and easy three dimensional surveys of buildings or small objects, the "structure from motion" photogrammetric approach (SfM) is a purely image based method which could deliver a step-change if transferred to river remote sensing, and requires very little training and is extremely inexpensive. Using the online SfM program Microsoft Photosynth, we have created high-resolution digital elevation models (DEM) of rivers from ordinary photographs produced from a multi-step workflow that takes advantage of free and open source software. This process reconstructs real world scenes from SfM algorithms based on the derived positions of the photographs in three-dimensional space. One of the products of the SfM process is a three-dimensional point cloud of features present in the input photographs. This point cloud can be georeferenced from a small number of ground control points collected via GPS in the field. The georeferenced point cloud can then be used to create a variety of digital elevation model products. Among several study sites, we examine the applicability of SfM in the Pedernales River in Texas (USA), where several hundred images taken from a hand-held helikite are used to produce DEMs of the fluvial topographic environment. This test shows that SfM and low-altitude platforms can produce point clouds with point densities considerably better than airborne LiDAR, with

  18. An open architecture motion controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossol, Lothar

    1994-01-01

    Nomad, an open architecture motion controller, is described. It is formed by a combination of TMOS, C-WORKS, and other utilities. Nomad software runs in a UNIX environment and provides for sensor-controlled robotic motions, with user replaceable kinematics. It can also be tailored for highly specialized applications. Open controllers such as Nomad should have a major impact on the robotics industry.

  19. Statistical description of tectonic motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, Duncan Carr

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes investigations regarding tectonic motions. The topics discussed include statistics of crustal deformation, Earth rotation studies, using multitaper spectrum analysis techniques applied to both space-geodetic data and conventional astrometric estimates of the Earth's polar motion, and the development, design, and installation of high-stability geodetic monuments for use with the global positioning system.

  20. The Man Who Mastered Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radetsky, Peter

    1986-01-01

    Explains the principles of the science of motion and examines Thomas Kane's deductive approach to the study of dynamics. Also recounts Kane's advances in explaining classic mechanics and discusses the advantages of his methods in the formulation of equations of motion and in applications to space technology. (ML)

  1. Motion sickness on tilting trains

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Bernard; Dai, Mingjia; Ogorodnikov, Dmitri; Laurens, Jean; Raphan, Theodore; Müller, Philippe; Athanasios, Alexiou; Edmaier, Jürgen; Grossenbacher, Thomas; Stadtmüller, Klaus; Brugger, Ueli; Hauser, Gerald; Straumann, Dominik

    2011-01-01

    Trains that tilt on curves can go faster, but passengers complain of motion sickness. We studied the control signals and tilts to determine why this occurs and how to maintain speed while eliminating motion sickness. Accelerometers and gyros monitored train and passenger yaw and roll, and a survey evaluated motion sickness. The experimental train had 3 control configurations: an untilted mode, a reactive mode that detected curves from sensors on the front wheel set, and a predictive mode that determined curves from the train's position on the tracks. No motion sickness was induced in the untilted mode, but the train ran 21% slower than when it tilted 8° in either the reactive or predictive modes (113 vs. 137 km/h). Roll velocities rose and fell faster in the predictive than the reactive mode when entering and leaving turns (0.4 vs. 0.8 s for a 4°/s roll tilt, P<0.001). Concurrently, motion sickness was greater (P<0.001) in the reactive mode. We conclude that the slower rise in roll velocity during yaw rotations on entering and leaving curves had induced the motion sickness. Adequate synchronization of roll tilt with yaw velocity on curves will reduce motion sickness and improve passenger comfort on tilting trains.—Cohen, B., Dai, M., Ogorodnikov, D., Laurens, J., Raphan, T., Müller, P., Athanasios, A., Edmaier, J., Grossenbacher, T., Stadtmüller, K., Brugger, U., Hauser, G., Straumann, D. Motion sickness on tilting trains. PMID:21788449

  2. The Man Who Mastered Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radetsky, Peter

    1986-01-01

    Explains the principles of the science of motion and examines Thomas Kane's deductive approach to the study of dynamics. Also recounts Kane's advances in explaining classic mechanics and discusses the advantages of his methods in the formulation of equations of motion and in applications to space technology. (ML)

  3. Pendulum Motion in Main Parachute Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Eric S.; Machin, Ricardo A.

    2015-01-01

    The coupled dynamics of a cluster of parachutes to a payload are notoriously difficult to predict. Often the payload is designed to be insensitive to the range of attitude and rates that might occur, but spacecraft generally do not have the mass and volume budgeted for this robust of a design. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Orion Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) implements a cluster of three mains for landing. During testing of the Engineering Development Unit (EDU) design, it was discovered that with a cluster of two mains (a fault tolerance required for human rating) the capsule coupled to the parachute cluster could get into a limit cycle pendulum motion which would exceed the spacecraft landing capability. This pendulum phenomenon could not be predicted with the existing models and simulations. A three phased effort has been undertaken to understand the consequence of the pendulum motion observed, and explore potential design changes that would mitigate this phenomenon. This paper will review the early analysis that was performed of the pendulum motion observed during EDU testing, summarize the analysis ongoing to understand the root cause of the pendulum phenomenon, and discuss the modeling and testing that is being pursued to identify design changes that would mitigate the risk.

  4. The influence of sleep deprivation and oscillating motion on sleepiness, motion sickness, and cognitive and motor performance.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Janna; Ventura, Joel; Bakshi, Avijit; Pierobon, Alberto; Lackner, James R; DiZio, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Our goal was to determine how sleep deprivation, nauseogenic motion, and a combination of motion and sleep deprivation affect cognitive vigilance, visual-spatial perception, motor learning and retention, and balance. We exposed four groups of subjects to different combinations of normal 8h sleep or 4h sleep for two nights combined with testing under stationary conditions or during 0.28Hz horizontal linear oscillation. On the two days following controlled sleep, all subjects underwent four test sessions per day that included evaluations of fatigue, motion sickness, vigilance, perceptual discrimination, perceptual learning, motor performance and learning, and balance. Sleep loss and exposure to linear oscillation had additive or multiplicative relationships to sleepiness, motion sickness severity, decreases in vigilance and in perceptual discrimination and learning. Sleep loss also decelerated the rate of adaptation to motion sickness over repeated sessions. Sleep loss degraded the capacity to compensate for novel robotically induced perturbations of reaching movements but did not adversely affect adaptive recovery of accurate reaching. Overall, tasks requiring substantial attention to cognitive and motor demands were degraded more than tasks that were more automatic. Our findings indicate that predicting performance needs to take into account in addition to sleep loss, the attentional demands and novelty of tasks, the motion environment in which individuals will be performing and their prior susceptibility to motion sickness during exposure to provocative motion stimulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The tactile motion aftereffect suggests an intensive code for speed in neurons sensitive to both speed and direction of motion

    PubMed Central

    Birznieks, I.; Vickery, R. M.; Holcombe, A. O.; Seizova-Cajic, T.

    2016-01-01

    Neurophysiological studies in primates have found that direction-sensitive neurons in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) generally increase their response rate with increasing speed of object motion across the skin and show little evidence of speed tuning. We employed psychophysics to determine whether human perception of motion direction could be explained by features of such neurons and whether evidence can be found for a speed-tuned process. After adaptation to motion across the skin, a subsequently presented dynamic test stimulus yields an impression of motion in the opposite direction. We measured the strength of this tactile motion aftereffect (tMAE) induced with different combinations of adapting and test speeds. Distal-to-proximal or proximal-to-distal adapting motion was applied to participants' index fingers using a tactile array, after which participants reported the perceived direction of a bidirectional test stimulus. An intensive code for speed, like that observed in SI neurons, predicts greater adaptation (and a stronger tMAE) the faster the adapting speed, regardless of the test speed. In contrast, speed tuning of direction-sensitive neurons predicts the greatest tMAE when the adapting and test stimuli have matching speeds. We found that the strength of the tMAE increased monotonically with adapting speed, regardless of the test speed, showing no evidence of speed tuning. Our data are consistent with neurophysiological findings that suggest an intensive code for speed along the motion processing pathways comprising neurons sensitive both to speed and direction of motion. PMID:26823511

  6. Plate motions and deformations from geologic and geodetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, T. H.

    A satellite laser ranging experiment conducted by NASA since 1972 has measured the relative motion between the North America and Pacific plates in California. Based on these measurements, the 896-km distance between San Diego and Quincy, California, is shortening at 62 + or - 9 mm/yr. This geodetic estimate is consistent with the rate of motion between the two plates, calculated from geological data to be 53 + or - 3 mm/yr averaged over the past few million years.

  7. Geodesic motion in a Kaluza-Klein bubble spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, D. R.; Matlin, M. D.

    1989-05-01

    The motion of massive and massless test particles in the geometry of the five-dimensional ``Witten bubble'' spacetime is explored by obtaining the effective radial potential governing this motion. It is found that massive particles are always in bound orbits. Massless particle orbits have a turning point near the bubble wall, but extend to infinity. These results are consistent with the conception of the bubble wall as a perfectly reflecting, expanding sphere whose expansion rate increases with time.

  8. Plate motions and deformations from geologic and geodetic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. H.

    1986-01-01

    A satellite laser ranging experiment conducted by NASA since 1972 has measured the relative motion between the North America and Pacific plates in California. Based on these measurements, the 896-km distance between San Diego and Quincy, California, is shortening at 62 + or - 9 mm/yr. This geodetic estimate is consistent with the rate of motion between the two plates, calculated from geological data to be 53 + or - 3 mm/yr averaged over the past few million years.

  9. TWO SUPER-EARTHS ORBITING THE SOLAR ANALOG HD 41248 ON THE EDGE OF A 7:5 MEAN MOTION RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, J. S.; Tuomi, M.; Brasser, R.; Ivanyuk, O.; Murgas, F.

    2013-07-01

    There are a growing number of multi-planet systems known to be orbiting their host stars with orbital periods that place them in mean motion resonances (MMRs). These systems are generally in first-order resonances and dynamical studies have focused their efforts on understanding the origin and evolution of such dynamically resonant commensurabilities. Here we report the discovery of two super-Earths that are close to a second-order dynamical resonance orbiting the metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -0.43 dex) and inactive G2V star HD 41428. We analyzed 62 HARPS archival radial velocities for this star that, until now, exhibited no evidence for planetary companions. Using our new Bayesian Doppler signal detection algorithm, we find two significant signals in the data, with periods of 18.357 days and 25.648 days, indicating they could be part of a 7:5 second-order MMR. Both semi-amplitudes are below 3 m s{sup -1} and the minimum masses of the pair are 12.3 and 8.6 M{sub Circled-Plus }, respectively. Our simulations found that apsidal alignment stabilizes the system, and even though libration of the resonant angles was not seen, the system is affected by the presence of the resonance and could still occupy the 7:5 commensurability, which would be the first planetary configuration in such a dynamical resonance. Given the multitude of low-mass multi-planet systems that will be discovered in the coming years, we expect that more of these second-order resonant configurations will emerge from the data, highlighting the need for a better understanding of the dynamical interactions between forming planetesimals.

  10. Crowding of biological motion stimuli.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Hanako; Watanabe, Katsumi; Cavanagh, Patrick

    2013-03-26

    It is difficult to identify a target in the peripheral visual field when it is flanked by distractors. In the present study, we investigated this "crowding" effect for biological motion stimuli. Three walking biological motion stimuli were presented horizontally in the periphery with various distances between them, and observers reported the walking direction of the central figure. When the inter-walker distance was small, discriminating the direction became difficult. Moreover, the reported direction for the central target was not simply noisier, but reflected a degree of pooling of the three directions from the target and two flankers. However, when the two flanking distractors were scrambled walking biological motion stimuli, crowding was not seen. This result suggests that the crowding of biological motion stimuli occurs at a high-level of motion perception.

  11. The Equations of Oceanic Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Peter

    2006-10-01

    Modeling and prediction of oceanographic phenomena and climate is based on the integration of dynamic equations. The Equations of Oceanic Motions derives and systematically classifies the most common dynamic equations used in physical oceanography, from large scale thermohaline circulations to those governing small scale motions and turbulence. After establishing the basic dynamical equations that describe all oceanic motions, M|ller then derives approximate equations, emphasizing the assumptions made and physical processes eliminated. He distinguishes between geometric, thermodynamic and dynamic approximations and between the acoustic, gravity, vortical and temperature-salinity modes of motion. Basic concepts and formulae of equilibrium thermodynamics, vector and tensor calculus, curvilinear coordinate systems, and the kinematics of fluid motion and wave propagation are covered in appendices. Providing the basic theoretical background for graduate students and researchers of physical oceanography and climate science, this book will serve as both a comprehensive text and an essential reference.

  12. The Perception of Auditory Motion

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Johahn

    2016-01-01

    The growing availability of efficient and relatively inexpensive virtual auditory display technology has provided new research platforms to explore the perception of auditory motion. At the same time, deployment of these technologies in command and control as well as in entertainment roles is generating an increasing need to better understand the complex processes underlying auditory motion perception. This is a particularly challenging processing feat because it involves the rapid deconvolution of the relative change in the locations of sound sources produced by rotational and translations of the head in space (self-motion) to enable the perception of actual source motion. The fact that we perceive our auditory world to be stable despite almost continual movement of the head demonstrates the efficiency and effectiveness of this process. This review examines the acoustical basis of auditory motion perception and a wide range of psychophysical, electrophysiological, and cortical imaging studies that have probed the limits and possible mechanisms underlying this perception. PMID:27094029

  13. Ageing single file motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzler, R.; Sanders, L.; Lomholt, M. A.; Lizana, L.; Fogelmark, K.; Ambjörnsson, Tobias

    2014-12-01

    The mean squared displacement of a tracer particle in a single file of identical particles with excluded volume interactions shows the famed Harris scaling ≃ K1/2t1/2 as function of time. Here we study what happens to this law when each particle of the single file interacts with the environment such that it is transiently immobilised for times τ with a power-law distribution ψ(τ) ≃ (τ★)α, and different ranges of the exponent α are considered. We find a dramatic slow-down of the motion of a tracer particle from Harris' law to an ultraslow, logarithmic time evolution ≃ K0 log 1/2(t) when 0 < α < 1. In the intermediate case 1 < α < 2, we observe a power-law form for the mean squared displacement, with a modified scaling exponent as compared to Harris' law. Once α is larger than two, the Brownian single file behaviour and thus Harris' law are restored. We also point out that this process is weakly non-ergodic in the sense that the time and ensemble averaged mean squared displacements are disparate.

  14. Motion words selectively modulate direction discrimination sensitivity for threshold motion

    PubMed Central

    Pavan, Andrea; Skujevskis, Māris; Baggio, Giosuè

    2013-01-01

    Can speech selectively modulate the sensitivity of a sensory system so that, in the presence of a suitable linguistic context, the discrimination of certain perceptual features becomes more or less likely? In this study, participants heard upward or downward motion words followed by a single visual field of random dots moving upwards or downwards. The time interval between the onsets of the auditory and the visual stimuli was varied parametrically. Motion direction could be either discriminable (suprathreshold motion) or non-discriminable (threshold motion). Participants had to judge whether the dots were moving upward or downward. Results show a double dissociation between discrimination sensitivity (d′) and reaction times depending on whether vertical motion was above or at threshold. With suprathreshold motion, responses were faster for congruent directions of words and dots, but sensitivity was equal across conditions. With threshold motion, sensitivity was higher for congruent directions of words and dots, but responses were equally fast across conditions. The observed differences in sensitivity and response times were largest when the dots appeared 450 ms after word onset, that is, consistently with electrophysiology, at the time the up/down semantics of the word had become available. These data suggest that word meanings can alter the balance between signal and noise within the visual system and affect the perception of low-level sensory features. PMID:23596407

  15. SOME ASPECTS OF PROTOPLASMIC MOTION

    PubMed Central

    Osterhout, W. J. V.

    1952-01-01

    In Nitella the protoplasm forms a layer about 15 microns thick surrounding a large central vacuole. The outer part of the protoplasm is a gel, the inner layer is a sol which is in continual motion travelling the entire length of the cell in opposite directions on opposite sides and thus making a complete circuit (cyclosis). If we have a cell devoid of motion and if we regard the protoplasm in any region as made up of successive portions, A, B, C, D, etc., as we pass from left to right) we may suppose that a reaction starts in B which results in a temporary loss of volume by electrostriction, so that liquid moves from A to B to fill the void thus created. The same reaction then occurs at C causing liquid to flow from B to C and so on. The protoplasmic movement can be controlled by agents which affect the viscosity of the protoplasm or the reactions which cause the flow. Certain reagents such as lead acetate stop the flow temporarily. When the motion is stopped in any region by killing or by applying lead acetate, the motion goes on for a time in adjoining regions. When motion stops in all of the cell or in certain parts, it resumes in the same direction as it had before stoppage occurred. Under normal conditions each of the two sides of the cell (on opposite sides of the white line) has its own characteristic direction of motion which remains unchanged after a temporary stoppage of motion in all parts of the cell. Hence the two sides differ and we have what may be called lateral polarity. There is also longitudinal polarity as the opposite ends of the cell are unlike since shoots grow out at one end and roots at the opposite end. The explanation suggested to account for motion in Nitella may apply to other kinds of motion including the motion of cilia and of flagella. PMID:14898033

  16. Geophysical Effects of the Earth's Monthly Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorenkov, N. S.; Zhigailo, T. S.

    The generation of a lunar tidal force is a major geophysical effect of the Earth's monthly motion.It is shown that synoptic processes vary simultaneously with tidal oscillations of the Earth's rotation rate and weather exhibits changes near their extremes, i.e., when the Earth is in certain positions on its monthly orbit.It is found that the quasi-biennial oscillation of the wind direction in the equatorial stratosphere is a combined oscillation caused by three periodic processes experienced by the atmosphere: (a) lunisolar tides, (b) the precession of the orbit of the Earth's monthly rotation around the barycenter of the Earth-Moon system, and (c) the motion of the perigee of this orbit.Interference of the 1.20-year Chandler wobble with sidereal, anomalistic, and synodic lunar oscillations gives rise to beats, i.e., to slow periodic variations in the wobble amplitude with periods of 32 to 51 years.

  17. Estimation, transmission, and distribution of motion information in future image communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupeau, Bertrand

    1993-10-01

    There is no doubt that in a near future a large number of image processing techniques will be based on motion compensation, making thus very common the cascading of several 'motion compensated' devices in the same image chain. A reference scheme for the optimum use of motion compensation in future image communication networks is presented. Motion estimation is performed once only, at a very early stage of the process chain, then motion information is encoded, transmitted in a separate data channel and distributed to the cascaded motion compensated processes. The distribution scenario must take into consideration the various transformations performed on the image signal since its origination so that the motion information distributed is always consistent with the pictures to process. The problems of the representation of motion relatively to a given source image signal and of its adjustment to new frame rate environments are especially addressed.

  18. The Influence of Motion Cues on Driver-Vehicle Performance in a Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repa, B. S.; Leucht, P. M.; Wierwille, W. W.

    1981-01-01

    Four different motion base configurations were studied on driving simulator. Differently responding vehicles were simulated on each motion configurations and the effects of the vehicle characteristics on driver vehicle system performance, driver control activity, and driver opinion ratings of vehicle performance during driving are compared for different motion configurations. Data show that: (1)) the effects of changes in vehicle characteristics on the different objective and subjective measures of driver vehicle performance are not disguised by the lack of physical motion; (2) fixed base simulator can be used to draw inferences despite the lack of motion; (3) the presence of motion tends to reduce path keeping errors and driver control activity; (4) roll and yaw motions are recommended because of their marked influence on driver vehicle performance (5) the importance of motion increases as the driving maneuvers become more extreme.

  19. Video coding with lifted wavelet transforms and complementary motion-compensated signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flierl, Markus H.; Vandergheynst, Pierre; Girod, Bernd

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates video coding with wavelet transforms applied in the temporal direction of a video sequence. The wavelets are implemented with the lifting scheme in order to permit motion compensation between successive pictures. We improve motion compensation in the lifting steps and utilize complementary motion-compensated signals. Similar to superimposed predictive coding with complementary signals, this approach improves compression efficiency. We investigate experimentally and theoretically complementary motion-compensated signals for lifted wavelet transforms. Experimental results with the complementary motion-compensated Haar wavelet and frame-adaptive motion compensation show improvements in coding efficiency of up to 3 dB. The theoretical results demonstrate that the lifted Haar wavelet scheme with complementary motion-compensated signals is able to approach the bound for bit-rate savings of 2 bits per sample and motion-accuracy step when compared to optimum intra-frame coding of the input pictures.

  20. Effect of plasma motion on tearing modes in cylindrical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, J. Q.; Peng, X. D.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of equilibrium plasma motion on the resistive m/n = 2/1 tearing mode (TM) in low β plasmas is investigated in cylindrical geometry (with m and n being poloidal and toroidal mode numbers). Without equilibrium plasma motion but with viscosity, the TM stability is mainly determined by the Reynolds number S and reaches maximum near S = 104, which is consistent with previous findings. The poloidal plasma rotation has stabilizing effect on TM; however, the rotation shear has destabilization effect in the low viscosity regime. The axial plasma motion has strong stabilizing effect on TM in the low viscosity regime for Prandtl number Pr < 1, while its shear has slight stabilizing effect with the decrease of growth rate less than 15%. When the axial velocity becomes large enough, the mode frequency tends to be independent of the Prandtl number. In the presence of parallel plasma motion, the growth rate is determined by the axial component at low parallel velocity, while determined by poloidal component at large parallel velocity. The parallel plasma motion drives the TM rotating in the opposite direction. It is shown that the equilibrium motion reduces the growth rate of TM by changing the phase difference and coupling coefficient between potential perturbation and magnetic flux perturbation (deviating from π/2 ), which results in a lower mode frequency. Compared to the role of velocity shear, the magnitude of plasma velocity itself at the m/n = 2/1 rational surface is dominant in determining the TM characteristics.

  1. Several methods of smoothing motion capture data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jingjing; Miao, Zhenjiang; Wang, Zhifei; Zhang, Shujun

    2011-06-01

    Human motion capture and editing technologies are widely used in computer animation production. We can acquire original motion data by human motion capture system, and then process it by motion editing system. However, noise embed in original motion data maybe introduced by extracting the target, three-dimensional reconstruction process, optimizing algorithm and devices itself in human motion capture system. The motion data must be modified before used to make videos, otherwise the animation figures will be jerky and their behavior is unnatural. Therefore, motion smoothing is essential. In this paper, we compare and summarize three methods of smoothing original motion capture data.

  2. A model for the pilot's use of motion cues in roll-axis tracking tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, W. H.; Junker, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    Simulated target-following and disturbance-regulation tasks were explored with subjects using visual-only and combined visual and motion cues. The effects of motion cues on task performance and pilot response behavior were appreciably different for the two task configurations and were consistent with data reported in earlier studies for similar task configurations. The optimal-control model for pilot/vehicle systems provided a task-independent framework for accounting for the pilot's use of motion cues. Specifically, the availability of motion cues was modeled by augmenting the set of perceptual variables to include position, rate, acceleration, and accleration-rate of the motion simulator, and results were consistent with the hypothesis of attention-sharing between visual and motion variables. This straightforward informational model allowed accurate model predictions of the effects of motion cues on a variety of response measures for both the target-following and disturbance-regulation tasks.

  3. 38 CFR 18b.35 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motions. 18b.35 Section... Hearing § 18b.35 Motions. Motions and petitions shall state the relief sought, the authority relied upon... to writing and filed and served on all parties in the same manner as a formal motion. Motions...

  4. 7 CFR 1.327 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Motions. 1.327 Section 1.327 Agriculture Office of the... Program Fraud Civil Remedies Act of 1986 § 1.327 Motions. (a) Motions shall state the relief sought, the... parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or at the hearing, all motions shall...

  5. 20 CFR 498.213 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Motions. 498.213 Section 498.213 Employees... § 498.213 Motions. (a) An application to the ALJ for an order or ruling will be by motion. Motions will... the ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or...

  6. 40 CFR 164.60 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motions. 164.60 Section 164.60... (Other Than Expedited Hearings) Motions § 164.60 Motions. (a) General. All motions, except those made..., and shall be filed with the hearing clerk and served on all parties. (b) Response to motions. Within...

  7. 22 CFR 1422.10 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Motions. 1422.10 Section 1422.10 Foreign... § 1422.10 Motions. (a) General. (1) A motion shall state briefly the order or relief sought and the grounds for the motion: Provided, however, That a motion to intervene will not be entertained by the...

  8. 22 CFR 1422.10 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Motions. 1422.10 Section 1422.10 Foreign... § 1422.10 Motions. (a) General. (1) A motion shall state briefly the order or relief sought and the grounds for the motion: Provided, however, That a motion to intervene will not be entertained by the...

  9. 5 CFR 185.130 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Motions. 185.130 Section 185.130... § 185.130 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions... the ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or...

  10. 40 CFR 305.23 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Motions. 305.23 Section 305.23... Motions. (a) General. All motions, except those made orally on the record during a hearing, shall: be in... motions shall be served as provided by § 305.5(b)(2)(i). (b) Response to motions. A party's response to...

  11. 45 CFR 672.9 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Motions. 672.9 Section 672.9 Public Welfare... PROCEDURES § 672.9 Motions. (a) General. All motions, except those made orally on the record during a hearing... memorandum relied upon. (b) Response to motions. A party must file a response to any written motion within...

  12. 38 CFR 18b.35 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Motions. 18b.35 Section... Hearing § 18b.35 Motions. Motions and petitions shall state the relief sought, the authority relied upon... to writing and filed and served on all parties in the same manner as a formal motion. Motions...

  13. 38 CFR 18b.35 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Motions. 18b.35 Section... Hearing § 18b.35 Motions. Motions and petitions shall state the relief sought, the authority relied upon... to writing and filed and served on all parties in the same manner as a formal motion. Motions...

  14. 40 CFR 305.23 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Motions. 305.23 Section 305.23... Motions. (a) General. All motions, except those made orally on the record during a hearing, shall: be in... motions shall be served as provided by § 305.5(b)(2)(i). (b) Response to motions. A party's response to...

  15. 12 CFR 1081.212 - Dispositive motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dispositive motions. 1081.212 Section 1081.212... Initiation of Proceedings and Prehearing Rules § 1081.212 Dispositive motions. (a) Dispositive motions. This section governs the filing of motions to dismiss and motions for summary disposition. The filing of any...

  16. 22 CFR 1423.22 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Motions. 1423.22 Section 1423.22 Foreign... PROCEEDINGS § 1423.22 Motions. (a) Filing of Motions. (1) Motions made prior to a hearing and any response... issuance of a complaint by the Regional Director any motion to postpone the hearing should be filed with...

  17. 24 CFR 180.430 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Motions. 180.430 Section 180.430....430 Motions. (a) Motions. Any application for an order or other request shall be made by a motion... relief requested and the basis therefor. Motions made during an appearance before the ALJ shall be stated...

  18. 24 CFR 180.430 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Motions. 180.430 Section 180.430....430 Motions. (a) Motions. Any application for an order or other request shall be made by a motion... relief requested and the basis therefor. Motions made during an appearance before the ALJ shall be stated...

  19. 20 CFR 498.213 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Motions. 498.213 Section 498.213 Employees... § 498.213 Motions. (a) An application to the ALJ for an order or ruling will be by motion. Motions will... the ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or...

  20. 7 CFR 1.327 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Motions. 1.327 Section 1.327 Agriculture Office of the... Program Fraud Civil Remedies Act of 1986 § 1.327 Motions. (a) Motions shall state the relief sought, the... parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or at the hearing, all motions shall...

  1. 29 CFR 1603.208 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motions. 1603.208 Section 1603.208 Labor Regulations... GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE RIGHTS ACT OF 1991 Hearings § 1603.208 Motions. (a) All motions shall state the specific relief requested. All motions shall be in writing, except that a motion may be made orally during a...

  2. 24 CFR 180.430 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Motions. 180.430 Section 180.430....430 Motions. (a) Motions. Any application for an order or other request shall be made by a motion... relief requested and the basis therefor. Motions made during an appearance before the ALJ shall be stated...

  3. 29 CFR 1603.208 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Motions. 1603.208 Section 1603.208 Labor Regulations... GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE RIGHTS ACT OF 1991 Hearings § 1603.208 Motions. (a) All motions shall state the specific relief requested. All motions shall be in writing, except that a motion may be made orally during a...

  4. 22 CFR 1423.22 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Motions. 1423.22 Section 1423.22 Foreign... PROCEEDINGS § 1423.22 Motions. (a) Filing of Motions. (1) Motions made prior to a hearing and any response... issuance of a complaint by the Regional Director any motion to postpone the hearing should be filed with...

  5. 29 CFR 1603.208 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Motions. 1603.208 Section 1603.208 Labor Regulations... GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE RIGHTS ACT OF 1991 Hearings § 1603.208 Motions. (a) All motions shall state the specific relief requested. All motions shall be in writing, except that a motion may be made orally during a...

  6. 40 CFR 305.23 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Motions. 305.23 Section 305.23... Motions. (a) General. All motions, except those made orally on the record during a hearing, shall: be in... motions shall be served as provided by § 305.5(b)(2)(i). (b) Response to motions. A party's response to...

  7. 7 CFR 1.327 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Motions. 1.327 Section 1.327 Agriculture Office of the... Program Fraud Civil Remedies Act of 1986 § 1.327 Motions. (a) Motions shall state the relief sought, the... parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or at the hearing, all motions shall...

  8. 5 CFR 185.130 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Motions. 185.130 Section 185.130... § 185.130 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions... the ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or...

  9. 22 CFR 1422.10 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Motions. 1422.10 Section 1422.10 Foreign... § 1422.10 Motions. (a) General. (1) A motion shall state briefly the order or relief sought and the grounds for the motion: Provided, however, That a motion to intervene will not be entertained by the...

  10. 45 CFR 81.56 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Motions. 81.56 Section 81.56 Public Welfare... 80 OF THIS TITLE Proceedings Prior to Hearing § 81.56 Motions. Motions and petitions shall state the... as a formal motion. Motions, answers, and replies shall be addressed to the presiding officer, if the...

  11. 22 CFR 224.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Motions. 224.28 Section 224.28 Foreign....28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall... ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or at...

  12. 40 CFR 305.23 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motions. 305.23 Section 305.23... Motions. (a) General. All motions, except those made orally on the record during a hearing, shall: be in... motions shall be served as provided by § 305.5(b)(2)(i). (b) Response to motions. A party's response to...

  13. 22 CFR 1422.10 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Motions. 1422.10 Section 1422.10 Foreign... § 1422.10 Motions. (a) General. (1) A motion shall state briefly the order or relief sought and the grounds for the motion: Provided, however, That a motion to intervene will not be entertained by the...

  14. 20 CFR 498.213 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Motions. 498.213 Section 498.213 Employees... § 498.213 Motions. (a) An application to the ALJ for an order or ruling will be by motion. Motions will... the ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or...

  15. 45 CFR 81.56 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Motions. 81.56 Section 81.56 Public Welfare... 80 OF THIS TITLE Proceedings Prior to Hearing § 81.56 Motions. Motions and petitions shall state the... as a formal motion. Motions, answers, and replies shall be addressed to the presiding officer, if the...

  16. 22 CFR 224.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Motions. 224.28 Section 224.28 Foreign....28 Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall... ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or at...

  17. 20 CFR 498.213 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Motions. 498.213 Section 498.213 Employees... § 498.213 Motions. (a) An application to the ALJ for an order or ruling will be by motion. Motions will... the ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or...

  18. 22 CFR 521.28 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Motions. 521.28 Section 521.28 Foreign... Motions. (a) Any application to the ALJ for an order or ruling shall be by motion. Motions shall state the... served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or at the hearing...

  19. 20 CFR 498.213 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Motions. 498.213 Section 498.213 Employees... § 498.213 Motions. (a) An application to the ALJ for an order or ruling will be by motion. Motions will... the ALJ and served on all other parties. (b) Except for motions made during a prehearing conference or...

  20. 38 CFR 18b.35 - Motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Motions. 18b.35 Section... Hearing § 18b.35 Motions. Motions and petitions shall state the relief sought, the authority relied upon... to writing and filed and served on all parties in the same manner as a formal motion. Motions...