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Sample records for apt superconducting cavities

  1. Static and dynamic analysis of the APT superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Schrage, D.; Swensen, E.; Rusnak, B.

    1995-09-01

    Static and dynamic analysis of 4-, 6-, and 12-cell {beta}=0.428 niobium cavities proposed for the superconducting linac for the Accelerator Production of Tritium were carried out using COSMOS/M{copyright}, a commercial finite-element code. The benefits of external stiffeners, the tuning sensitivities, and the mechanical resonant frequencies are reported.

  2. Developments of 700-Mhz 5-Cell Superconducting Cavities for APT

    SciTech Connect

    T. Tajima; K. C. D. Chan; R. C. Gentzlinger; W. B. Haynes; J. P. Kelley; F. L. Krawczyk; M. A. Madrid; D. I. Montoya; D. L. Schrage; A. H. Shapiro; J. Mammosser

    2001-07-01

    We have manufactured a total of six {beta} = 0.64, 700-MHz 5-cell cavities. The APT (Accelerator Production of Tritium) specification requires Q{sub 0} > 5 x 10{sup 9} at an accelerating field of 5 MV/m. So far, the results of vertical tests have shown maximum accelerating fields of 12 MV/m (peak surface field of 41 MV/m) and maximum low-field Q{sub 0} of 3.6 x 10{sup 10} at 2 K. The present limitations are available input power, field emission and quench. This type of cavities will also be used for an ADTF (Accelerator-Driven Test Facility) for AAA (Advanced Accelerator Applications) project.

  3. DESIGN AND FABRICATION OF SCRF CAVITIES FOR THE APT CONTINUOUS-WAVE PROTON LINAC.

    SciTech Connect

    Gentzlinger, R.C.; Haynes, W. B.; Chan, K. D.; Kelley, J. P.; Krawczyk, F. L.; Kuzminski, J.; Mitchell R.; Montoya, D. I.; Rusnak, B.; Safa, H.; Schrage, D. L.; Tajima, T.

    2001-01-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory, a prototype design of proton superconducting cavities has been developed for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project. These cavities are designed for b=0.64. They have five cells and operate at 700 MHz. They will operate at 2.15 K in a liquid-helium bath contained in an unalloyed, Grade 2 titanium vessel. Six cavities were manufactured with RRR-250 niobium, one by Los Alamos and five by industry. This paper discusses both the design and fabrication of the cavity and helium vessel, and the experience gained during the fabrication process.

  4. Aeropropulsion Technology (APT). Task 23 - Stator Seal Cavity Flow Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidegger, N. J.; Hall, E. J.; Delaney, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    The focus of NASA Contract NAS3-25950 Task 23 was to numerically investigate the flow through an axial compressor inner-banded stator seal cavity. The Allison/NASA developed ADPAC code was used to obtain all flow predictions. Flow through a labyrinth stator seal cavity of a high-speed compressor was modeled by coupling the cavity flow path and the main flow path of the compressor. A grid resolution study was performed to guarantee adequate grid spacing was used. Both unsteady rotor-stator-rotor interactions and steady-state isolated blade calculations were performed with and without the seal cavity present. A parameterized seal cavity study of the high-speed stator seal cavity collected a series of solutions for geometric variations. The parameter list included seal tooth gap, cavity depth, wheel speed, radial mismatch of hub flowpath, axial trench gap, hub corner treatments, and land edge treatments. Solution data presented includes radial and pitchwise distributions of flow variables and particle traces describing the flow character.

  5. Piezoelectric tunable microwave superconducting cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, N. C.; Fan, Y.; Tobar, M. E.

    2016-09-01

    In the context of engineered quantum systems, there is a demand for superconducting tunable devices, able to operate with high-quality factors at power levels equivalent to only a few photons. In this work, we developed a 3D microwave re-entrant cavity with such characteristics ready to provide a very fine-tuning of a high-Q resonant mode over a large dynamic range. This system has an electronic tuning mechanism based on a mechanically amplified piezoelectric actuator, which controls the resonator dominant mode frequency by changing the cavity narrow gap by very small displacements. Experiments were conducted at room and dilution refrigerator temperatures showing a large dynamic range up to 4 GHz and 1 GHz, respectively, and were compared to a finite element method model simulated data. At elevated microwave power input, nonlinear thermal effects were observed to destroy the superconductivity of the cavity due to the large electric fields generated in the small gap of the re-entrant cavity.

  6. Demonstration of superconducting micromachined cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Brecht, T. Reagor, M.; Chu, Y.; Pfaff, W.; Wang, C.; Frunzio, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2015-11-09

    Superconducting enclosures will be key components of scalable quantum computing devices based on circuit quantum electrodynamics. Within a densely integrated device, they can protect qubits from noise and serve as quantum memory units. Whether constructed by machining bulk pieces of metal or microfabricating wafers, 3D enclosures are typically assembled from two or more parts. The resulting seams potentially dissipate crossing currents and limit performance. In this letter, we present measured quality factors of superconducting cavity resonators of several materials, dimensions, and seam locations. We observe that superconducting indium can be a low-loss RF conductor and form low-loss seams. Leveraging this, we create a superconducting micromachined resonator with indium that has a quality factor of two million, despite a greatly reduced mode volume. Inter-layer coupling to this type of resonator is achieved by an aperture located under a planar transmission line. The described techniques demonstrate a proof-of-principle for multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits for scalable quantum computing.

  7. Demonstration of superconducting micromachined cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, T.; Reagor, M.; Chu, Y.; Pfaff, W.; Wang, C.; Frunzio, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    Superconducting enclosures will be key components of scalable quantum computing devices based on circuit quantum electrodynamics. Within a densely integrated device, they can protect qubits from noise and serve as quantum memory units. Whether constructed by machining bulk pieces of metal or microfabricating wafers, 3D enclosures are typically assembled from two or more parts. The resulting seams potentially dissipate crossing currents and limit performance. In this letter, we present measured quality factors of superconducting cavity resonators of several materials, dimensions, and seam locations. We observe that superconducting indium can be a low-loss RF conductor and form low-loss seams. Leveraging this, we create a superconducting micromachined resonator with indium that has a quality factor of two million, despite a greatly reduced mode volume. Inter-layer coupling to this type of resonator is achieved by an aperture located under a planar transmission line. The described techniques demonstrate a proof-of-principle for multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits for scalable quantum computing.

  8. Developing of superconducting niobium cavities for accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pobol, I. L.; Yurevich, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    The results of a study of structure and mechanical properties of welding joints, superconducting characteristics of the material after joining of welded components of superconducting radio frequency cavities are presented. The paper also describes the results of testing of the RF 1.3 GHz single-cell niobium cavity manufactured in the PTI NAS Belarus.

  9. Degreasing and cleaning superconducting RF Niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Rauchmiller, Michael; Kellett, Ron; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    The purpose and scope of this report is to detail the steps necessary for degreasing and cleaning of superconducting RF Niobium cavities in the A0 clean room. It lists the required equipment and the cleaning procedure.

  10. Compact Superconducting Crabbing and Deflecting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika

    2012-09-01

    Recently, new geometries for superconducting crabbing and deflecting cavities have been developed that have significantly improved properties over those the standard TM{sub 110} cavities. They are smaller, have low surface fields, high shunt impedance and, more importantly for some of them, no lower-order-mode with a well-separated fundamental mode. This talk will present the status of the development of these cavities.

  11. Superconducting cavity driving with FPGA controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Koprek, Waldemar; Poźniak, Krzysztof T.; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Simrock, Stefan; Brandt, Alexander; Chase, Brian; Carcagno, Ruben; Cancelo, Gustavo; Koeth, Timothy W.

    2006-12-01

    A digital control of superconducting cavities for a linear accelerator is presented. FPGA-based controller, supported by Matlab system, was applied. Electrical model of a resonator was used for design of a control system. Calibration of the signal path is considered. Identification of cavity parameters has been carried out for adaptive control algorithm. Feed-forward and feedback modes were applied in operating the cavities. Required performance has been achieved; i.e. driving on resonance during filling and field stabilization during flattop time, while keeping reasonable level of the power consumption. Representative results of the experiments are presented for different levels of the cavity field gradient.

  12. Superconducting cavities and modulated RF

    SciTech Connect

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1981-02-01

    If a cavity has an infinite Q/sub o/, 81.5% of the energy contained in a pulse incident upon the cavity is transferred into the cavity by the end of the pulse if the cavity Q/sub e/ is chosen so that the cavity time constant is 0.796 pulse width (T/sub a/). As Q/sug o/ decreases, the energy in the cavity at the end of the pulse decreases very slowly as long as T/sub a/ is much less than the unloaded cavity time constant, T/sub co/. SC cavities with very high Q/sub o/ enable one to obtain very high gradients with a low power cw source. At high gradients, however, one often does not attain the high Q/sub o/ predicted by theory. Therefore, if one is inteerested in attaining maximum energy in the cavity, as is the case for RF processing and diagnostics, for a given available source energy there is no point in keeping the power on for longer than 0.1 T/sub co/ because the energy expended after 0.1 T/sub co/ is wasted. Therefore, to attain high fields at moderate Q/sub o/, pulsed operation is indicated. This note derives the fields and energy stored and dissipated in the cavity when Q/sub e/ is optimized for a given T/sub a/. It shows how to use this data to measure Q/sub o/ of an SC cavity as a function of field level, how to process the cavity with high RF fields, how to operate SC cavities in the pulsed mode to obtain higher efficiencies and gradients. Experimental results are also reported.

  13. Dissipative hydride precipitates in superconducting niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Romanenko, A.; Cooley, L.D.; Ciovati, G.; Wu, G.; /Argonne

    2011-10-01

    We report the first direct observation of the microstructural features exhibiting RF losses at high surface magnetic fields of above 100 mT in field emission free superconducting niobium cavities. The lossy areas were identified by advanced thermometry. Surface investigations using different techniques were carried out on cutout samples from lossy areas and showed the presence of dendritic niobium hydrides. This finding has possible implications to the mechanisms of RF losses in superconducting niobium at all field levels.

  14. In-situ proton irradiation and measurement of superconducting rf cavities under cryogenic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rusnak, B.; Haynes, W.B.; Chan, K.C.D.

    1997-08-01

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Project is investigating using a superconducting linac for the high-energy portion of the accelerator. As this accelerator would be used to accelerate a high-current (100-mA) CW proton beam up to 1700 MeV, it is important to determine the effects of stray-beam impingement on the superconducting properties of a 700-MHz niobium cavity. To accomplish this, two 3000-MHz elliptical niobium cavities were placed in a cryostat, cooled to nominally 2 K in sub-atmospheric liquid helium, and irradiated with 798-MeV protons at up to 490 {pi}A average current. The elliptically shaped beam passed through the equatorial regions of both cavities in order to maximize sensitivity to any changes in the superconducting-surface resistance. Over the course of the experiment, 6x10{sup 16} protons were passed through the cavities. After irradiation, the cavities were warmed to 250 K, then recooled to investigate the effects of a room-temperature annealing cycle on the superconducting properties of the irradiated cavities. A detailed description of the experiment and the results shall be presented. These results are important to employing superconducting-rf technology to future high-intensity proton accelerators for use in research and transmutation technologies.

  15. Eccentric superconducting RF cavity separator structure

    DOEpatents

    Aggus, John R.; Giordano, Salvatore T.; Halama, Henry J.

    1976-01-01

    Accelerator apparatus having an eccentric-shaped, iris-loaded deflecting cavity for an rf separator for a high energy high momentum, charged particle accelerator beam. In one embodiment, the deflector is superconducting, and the apparatus of this invention provides simplified machining and electron beam welding techniques. Model tests have shown that the electrical characteristics provide the desired mode splitting without adverse effects.

  16. Clamshell microwave cavities having a superconductive coating

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, D. Wayne; Arendt, Paul N.; Piel, Helmut

    1994-01-01

    A microwave cavity including a pair of opposing clamshell halves, such halves comprised of a metal selected from the group consisting of silver, copper, or a silver-based alloy, wherein the cavity is further characterized as exhibiting a dominant TE.sub.011 mode is provided together with an embodiment wherein the interior concave surfaces of the clamshell halves are coated with a superconductive material. In the case of copper clamshell halves, the microwave cavity has a Q-value of about 1.2.times.10.sup.5 as measured at a temperature of 10K and a frequency of 10 GHz.

  17. Beam Dynamics in the Cebaf Superconducting Cavities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zenghai

    1995-01-01

    This work is a study of beam dynamics in the CEBAF superconducting cavities under the influence of the fields generated by externally applied RF and beam particles. A full 3-D modeling of the CEBAF 5-cell superconducting cavity is carried out. Details of the modeling with MAFIA are discussed. Multipole fields due to the asymmetric couplers are studied by means of 3-D Fourier transforms. The cavity steering and focusing of the multipole fields are studied. Experimental measurements of these effects are performed to validate the modeling. Evaluation of the cavity misalignment is discussed. The emittance degradation effects in the CEBAF superconducting linacs and an FEL driver linac due to the head-tail effects of the cavity steering and the x - y coupling effects of the multipole fields are studied. The beam-cavity interactions for cases of v _{s}, v_{t} not= c are studied. The Lindman boundary condition is implemented to accommodate simulation of infinite long beam pipes of the beam line. A fourth-order finite-difference algorithm is derived in cylindrical coordinates to reduce the frequency dependent truncation errors, which were discovered in the process of calculating wake fields of very short bunches, of the second-order Yee algorithm. The effects of the slippage between the source particle and the test particle are considered in the wake function calculations. Radial scaling relations are obtained for calculating the wake functions on the axis from the integrated value at the beam pipe radius. The scaling found not only depends on the beam energy but also depends on the bunch length of the beam and the opening of the cavity. The conditions for the validity of the ultrarelativistic treatment of the wakefield are discussed. The emittance growth and the energy spread due to the combined effects of the cavity multipole fields and the wakefields in a 40 MeV IR FEL driver linac are studied.

  18. Fast thermometry for superconducting rf cavity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Orris, Darryl; Bellantoni, Leo; Carcagno, Ruben H.; Edwards, Helen; Harms, Elvin Robert; Khabiboulline, Timergali N.; Kotelnikov, Sergey; Makulski, Andrzej; Nehring, Roger; Pischalnikov, Yuriy; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Fast readout of strategically placed low heat capacity thermometry can provide valuable information of Superconducting RF (SRF) cavity performance. Such a system has proven very effective for the development and testing of new cavity designs. Recently, several resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) were installed in key regions of interest on a new 9 cell 3.9 GHz SRF cavity with integrated HOM design at FNAL. A data acquisition system was developed to read out these sensors with enough time and temperature resolution to measure temperature changes on the cavity due to heat generated from multipacting or quenching within power pulses. The design and performance of the fast thermometry system will be discussed along with results from tests of the 9 cell 3.9GHz SRF cavity.

  19. Fast tuning of superconducting microwave cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Sandberg, M.; Wilson, C. M.; Persson, F.; Johansson, G.; Shumeiko, V.; Bauch, T.; Duty, T.; Delsing, P.

    2008-11-07

    Photons are fundamental excitations of electromagnetic fields and can be captured in cavities. For a given cavity with a certain size, the fundamental mode has a fixed frequency f which gives the photons a specific 'color'. The cavity also has a typical lifetime {tau}, which results in a finite linewidth {delta}f. If the size of the cavity is changed fast compared to {tau}, and so that the frequency change {delta}f>>{delta}f, then it is possible to change the 'color' of the captured photons. Here we demonstrate superconducting microwave cavities, with tunable effective lengths. The tuning is obtained by varying a Josephson inductance at one end of the cavity. We show data on four different samples and demonstrate tuning by several hundred linewidths in a time {delta}t<<{tau}. Working in the few photon limit, we show that photons stored in the cavity at one frequency will leak out from the cavity with the new frequency after the detuning. The characteristics of the measured devices make them suitable for different applications such as dynamic coupling of qubits and parametric amplification.

  20. The superconducting cavity stability ruby maser oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dick, G. J.; Strayer, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    Analysis of an application of the rudy maser to a superconducting Cavity Stabilized oscillator shows many attractive features. These derive from the mechancial stability inherent in an all-cryogenic design and from the properties of the ruby maser itself. A multiple-cavity design has been developed to allow physical separation of the high-Q superconducting cavity and the ruby element with its requried applied magnetic field. Mode selection is accomplished in this design by tuning the ruby by means of the applied field. We conclude that such an oscillator would perform well, even with cavity Q's as low as 10 to the 8th power allowing the use of a superconductor-on-sapphire resonator with its greater rigidity and lower thermal expansion. A first test of the Superconducting Cavity Stabilized Maser Oscillator (SCSMO) confirms the efficacy of the multiple-cavity design and the applicability of the ruby maser. Frequency variation less than 4x10 to the minus 11th power was measured in the stabilized mode and is attributed to the reference oscillator and to instabilities in the pump source. Variation of 10 to the minus 10th power was observed in the low-Q unstabilized mode, again attributable to pump fluctuations. Even so, direct scaling to a Q of 10 the 9th power predicts a stability better than 10 to the minus 15th power. Together with results showing the lowest losses to date in sapphire at microwave frequencies, and preliminary experiments on superconductor-on-sapphire resonators, frequency stability, levels as low as 10 to the minus 17th power are indicated.

  1. Plasma processing of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Janardan

    The development of plasma processing technology of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities not only provides a chemical free and less expensive processing method, but also opens up the possibility for controlled modification of the inner surfaces of the cavity for better superconducting properties. The research was focused on the transition of plasma etching from two dimensional flat surfaces to inner surfaces of three dimensional (3D) structures. The results could be applicable to a variety of inner surfaces of 3D structures other than SRF cavities. Understanding the Ar/Cl2 plasma etching mechanism is crucial for achieving the desired modification of Nb SRF cavities. In the process of developing plasma etching technology, an apparatus was built and a method was developed to plasma etch a single cell Pill Box cavity. The plasma characterization was done with the help of optical emission spectroscopy. The Nb etch rate at various points of this cavity was measured before processing the SRF cavity. Cylindrical ring-type samples of Nb placed on the inner surface of the outer wall were used to measure the dependence of the process parameters on plasma etching. The measured etch rate dependence on the pressure, rf power, dc bias, temperature, Cl2 concentration and diameter of the inner electrode was determined. The etch rate mechanism was studied by varying the temperature of the outer wall, the dc bias on the inner electrode and gas conditions. In a coaxial plasma reactor, uniform plasma etching along the cylindrical structure is a challenging task due to depletion of the active radicals along the gas flow direction. The dependence of etch rate uniformity along the cylindrical axis was determined as a function of process parameters. The formation of dc self-biases due to surface area asymmetry in this type of plasma and its variation on the pressure, rf power and gas composition was measured. Enhancing the surface area of the inner electrode to reduce the

  2. Superconducting cavity material for the European XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Brinkmann, A.; Iversen, J.; Matheisen, A.; Navitski, A.; Tamashevich, Y.; Michelato, P.; Monaco, L.

    2015-08-01

    Analysis of the strategy for superconducting cavity material procurement and quality management is done on the basis of the experience with the cavity production for the European x-ray free electron laser (EXFEL) facility. An adjustment of the material specification to EXFEL requirements, procurement of material, quality control (QC), documentation, and shipment to cavity producers have been worked out and carried out by DESY. A multistep process of qualification of the material suppliers included detailed material testing, single- and nine-cell cavity fabrication, and cryogenic radiofrequency tests. Production of about 25 000 semi-finished parts of high purity niobium and niobium-titanium alloy in a period of three years has been divided finally between companies Heraeus, Tokyo Denkai, Ningxia OTIC, and PLANSEE. Consideration of large-grain (LG) material as a possible option for the EXFEL has resulted in the production of one cryogenic module consisting of seven (out of eight) LG cavities. LG materials fulfilled the EXFEL requirements and showed even 25% to 30% higher unloaded quality factor. A possible shortage of the required quantity of LG material on the market led, however, to the choice of conventional fine-grain (FG) material. Eddy-current scanning (ECS) has been applied as an additional QC tool for the niobium sheets and contributed significantly to the material qualification and sorting. Two percent of the sheets have been rejected, which potentially could affect up to one-third of the cavities. The main imperfections and defects in the rejected sheets have been analyzed. Samples containing foreign material inclusions have been extracted from the sheets and electrochemically polished. Some inclusions remained even after 150 μm surface layer removal. Indications of foreign material inclusions have been found in the industrially fabricated and treated cavities and a deeper analysis of the defects has been performed.

  3. Superconducting drift-tube cavity development for the RIA driver.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K. W.; Kelly, M. P.; Fuerst, J. D.

    2002-09-23

    This paper reports the design and development of two intermediate-velocity superconducting cavities and design of an associated cryomodule for the RIA driver linac. The two cavity types are a 115 MHz, {beta}{sub GEOM} = 0.15 quarter-wave resonant (QWR) cavity, and a 173 MHz, {beta}{sub GEOM} = 0.26 half-wave loaded cavity. Both cavities are well-corrected for dipole and quadrupole asymmetries in the accelerating field. The cryomodule is being designed to incorporate a separate vacuum system for cavity vacuum to provide a particulate-free environment for the superconducting cavities.

  4. First Characterization of a Fully Superconducting RF Photoinjector Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, A; Barday, R; Jankowiak, A; Kamps, T; Knobloch, J; Kugeler, O; Matveenko, A N; Quast, T; Rudolph, J; Schubert, S G; Volker, J; Kneisel, P; Nietubyc, R; Sekutowicz, J K; Smedley, J; Volkov, V; Weinberg, G; Will, I

    2011-09-01

    As a first step towards a high brightness, high average current electron source for the BERLinPro ERL a fully superconducting photo-injector was developed by HZB in collaboration with JLab, DESY and the A. Soltan Institute. This cavity-injector ensemble is made up of a 1.6-cell superconducting cavity with a superconducting lead cathode deposited on the half-cell backwall. A superconducting solenoid is used for emittance compensation. This system, including a diagnostics beamline, has been installed in the HoBiCaT facility to serve as a testbed for beam dynamics studies and to test the combination SRF cavity and superconducting solenoid. This paper summarizes the characterization of the cavity in this configuration including Q measurements, dark current tests and field-stability analyses.

  5. APT Blanket Thermal Analysis of Cavity Flood Cooling with a Beam Window Break

    SciTech Connect

    Shadday, M.A.

    1999-11-19

    The cavity flood system is designed to be the primary safeguard for the integrity of the blanket modules and target assemblies during loss of coolant accidents, LOCA''s. In the unlikely event that the internal flow passages in a blanket module or a target assembly dryout, decay heat in the metal structures will be dissipated to the cavity flood system through the module or assembly walls. This study supplements the two previous studies by demonstrating that the cavity flood system can adequately cool the blanket modules when the cavity vessel beam window breaks.

  6. Multipacting Analysis of the Superconducting Parallel-bar Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    S.U. De Silva, J.R. Delayen,

    2011-03-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is a deflecting/crabbing cavity with attractive properties, compared to other conventional designs, that is being considered for a number of applications. Multipacting can be a limiting factor to the performance of in any superconducting structure. In the parallel-bar cavity the main contribution to the deflection is due to the transverse deflecting voltage, between the parallel bars, making the design potentially prone to multipacting. This paper presents the results of analytical calculations and numerical simulations of multipacting in the parallel-bar cavity with resonant voltage, impact energies and corresponding particle trajectories.

  7. Superconducting spoke cavities for high-velocity applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, Christopher S.; Delayen, Jean R.

    2013-10-01

    To date, superconducting spoke cavities have been designed, developed, and tested for particle velocities up to {beta}{sub 0}~0.6, but there is a growing interest in possible applications of multispoke cavities for high-velocity applications. We have explored the design parameter space for low-frequency, high-velocity, double-spoke superconducting cavities in order to determine how each design parameter affects the electromagnetic properties, in particular the surface electromagnetic fields and the shunt impedance. We present detailed design for cavities operating at 325 and 352 MHz and optimized for {beta}{sub 0}~=0.82 and 1.

  8. Compact he II Cooling System for Superconducting Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, M.; Yazawa, T.; Tosaka, T.; Kuriyama, T.; Kakutani, N.; Ota, T.; Nakayama, K.; Saito, K.

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes a compact He II cooling system for superconducting cavities. The cooling system mainly comprises a vacuum vessel, an 80 K liquid nitrogen bath, a 4 K He I bath, a He II bath, an evacuation pump, a single-stage GM cryocooler for the 80 K bath, and a 4 K GM cryocooler for the 4 K He I bath. Superfluid helium is generated and refilled into the He II bath via a heat exchanger and a JT valve by operating the evacuation pump. The refrigeration capacity attained was more than 10 W at 1.8 K. The cooling system was connected with a single-cell cavity cryostat. A superconducting cavity was immersed in superfluid helium. He II was supplied to the cavity vessel from the cooling system and evaporated helium gas was returned to it. High electric fields were obtained during superconducting cavity operations.

  9. A new microphonics measurement method for superconducting RF cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zheng; He, Yuan; Chang, Wei; Powers, Tom; Yue, Wei-ming; Zhu, Zheng-long; Chen, Qi

    2014-12-01

    Mechanical vibrations of the superconducting cavity, also known as microphonics, cause shifts in the resonant frequency of the cavity. In addition to requiring additional RF power, these frequency shifts can contribute to errors in the closed loop phase and amplitude regulation. In order to better understand these effects, a new microphonics measurement method was developed, and the method was successfully used to measure microphonics on the half-wave superconducting cavity when it was operated in a production style cryostat. The test cryostat held a single β=0.1 half-wave cavity which was operated at 162.5 MHz Yue et al. (2013) and Wang et al. (2013) [1,2]. It is the first time that the National Instruments PXIe-5641R intermediate frequency transceiver has been used for microphonics measurements in superconducting cavities. The new microphonics measurement method and results will be shown and analyzed in this paper.

  10. A new microphonics measurement method for superconducting RF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zheng; He, Yuan; Chang, Wei; Powers, Tom; Yue, Wei-ming; Zhu, Zheng-long; Chen, Qi

    2014-09-01

    Mechanical vibrations of the superconducting cavity, also known as microphonics, cause shifts in the resonant frequency of the cavity. In addition to requiring additional RF power, these frequency shifts can contribute to errors in the closed loop phase and amplitude regulation. In order to better understand these effects, a new microphonics measurement method was developed, and the method was successfully used to measure microphonics on the half-wave superconducting cavity when it was operated in a production style cryostat. The test cryostat held a single β=0.1 half-wave cavity which was operated at 162.5 MHz [1] and [2]. It's the first time that the National Instruments PXIe-5641R intermediate frequency transceiver has been used for microphonics measurements in superconducting cavities. The new microphonics measurement method and results will be shown and analyzed in this paper.

  11. 1.3 GHz superconducting RF cavity program at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, C.M.; Arkan, T.; Barbanotti, S.; Carter, H.; Champion, M.; Cooley, L.; Cooper, C.; Foley, M.; Ge, M.; Grimm, C.; Harms, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    At Fermilab, 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are prepared, qualified, and assembled into cryomodules (CMs) for Project X, an International Linear Collider (ILC), or other future projects. The 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program includes targeted R&D on 1-cell 1.3 GHz cavities for cavity performance improvement. Production cavity qualification includes cavity inspection, surface processing, clean assembly, and one or more cryogenic low-power CW qualification tests which typically include performance diagnostics. Qualified cavities are welded into helium vessels and are cryogenically tested with pulsed high-power. Well performing cavities are assembled into cryomodules for pulsed high-power testing in a cryomodule test facility, and possible installation into a beamline. The overall goals of the 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program, supporting facilities, and accomplishments are described.

  12. Calculation of mechanical vibration frequencies of stiffened superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S.J.; Spalek, G.

    1992-09-01

    We calculated the frequencies of transverse and longitudinal mechanical-vibration modes of the HEPL- modified, CERN/DESY four-cell superconducting cavity, using finite-element techniques. We compared the results of these calculations, including the stiffening of the cavity with rods, with mode frequencies measured at HEPL. The correlation between data was significant. The same techniques were also used to design and optimize the stiffening scheme for the seven-cell 805-MHz superconducting cavity being developed at Los Alamos. In this report, we describe the final stiffening scheme and the results of our calculations.

  13. Calculation of mechanical vibration frequencies of stiffened superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Black, S.J.; Spalek, G.

    1992-01-01

    We calculated the frequencies of transverse and longitudinal mechanical-vibration modes of the HEPL- modified, CERN/DESY four-cell superconducting cavity, using finite-element techniques. We compared the results of these calculations, including the stiffening of the cavity with rods, with mode frequencies measured at HEPL. The correlation between data was significant. The same techniques were also used to design and optimize the stiffening scheme for the seven-cell 805-MHz superconducting cavity being developed at Los Alamos. In this report, we describe the final stiffening scheme and the results of our calculations.

  14. Superfluid helium cryogenic systems for superconducting RF cavities at KEK

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, H.; Hara, K.; Honma, T.; Hosoyama, K.; Kojima, Y.; Nakanishi, K.; Kanekiyo, T.; Morita, S.

    2014-01-29

    Recent accelerator projects at KEK, such as the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) for R and D of the International Linear Collider (ILC) project and the compact Energy Recovery Linac (cERL), employ superconducting RF cavities made of pure niobium, which can generate high gradient acceleration field. Since the operation temperature of these cavities is selected to be 2 K, we have developed two 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems for stable operation of superconducting RF cavities for each of STF and cERL. These two 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems are identical in principle. Since the operation mode of the cavities is different for STF and cERL, i.e. the pulse mode for STF and the continuous wave mode for cERL, the heat loads from the cavities are quite different. The 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems mainly consists of ordinary helium liquefiers/refrigerators, 2 K refrigerator cold boxes, helium gas pumping systems and high-performance transfer lines. The 2 K refrigerators and the high-performance transfer lines are designed by KEK. Some superconducting RF cavity cryomodules have been already connected to the 2 K superfluid helium cryogenic systems for STF and cERL respectively, and cooled down to 2 K successfully.

  15. Improved surface treatment of the superconducting TESLA cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilje, L.; Antoine, C.; Benvenuti, C.; Bloess, D.; Charrier, J.-P.; Chiaveri, E.; Ferreira, L.; Losito, R.; Matheisen, A.; Preis, H.; Proch, D.; Reschke, D.; Safa, H.; Schmüser, P.; Trines, D.; Visentin, B.; Wenninger, H.

    2004-01-01

    The proposed linear electron-positron collider TESLA is based on 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities for particle acceleration. For a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV, an accelerating field of 23.4 MV/m is required which is reliably achieved with a niobium surface preparation by chemical etching. An upgrade of the collider to 800 GeV requires an improved cavity preparation technique. In this paper, results are presented on single-cell cavities which demonstrate that fields of up to 40 MV/m are accessible by electrolytic polishing of the inner surface of the cavity.

  16. The progress in developing superconducting third harmonic cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, Nikolay; Edwards, Helen; Foley, Mike; Gonin, Ivan; Harms, Elvin; Khabiboulline, Timergali; Mitchell, Donald; Olis, Daniel; Rowe, Allan; /Fermilab

    2006-06-01

    The XFEL and TTF facilities are planning to use section with a few third harmonic cavities (3.9GHz) upstream of the bunch compressor to improve beam performance [1-2]. Fermilab is developing superconducting third harmonic section for the TTFII upgrade. This section will include four cavities equipped with couplers and blade tuners installed in cryostat. Up to now, two cavities are complete and one of them is under test. The status of the cavity development and preliminary test results are presented in this paper.

  17. Design Optimization of Superconducting Parallel-bar Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, Jean R.; De Silva, Payagalage Suba

    2009-11-01

    The parallel-bar structure is a new superconducting geometry [1] whose features and properties may have significant advantages over conventional superconducting deflecting and crabbing cavities for a number of applications. Jefferson Lab is in need for a 499 MHz, 11 GeV rf separator as part of its 12 GeV upgrade program. We report on design optimization studies performed to-date for this and other applications.

  18. Shielding Studies for Superconducting RF Cavities at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, Camille; Rakhno, Igor; /Fermilab

    2010-07-20

    A semi-empirical method that allows us to predict intensity of generated field emission in superconducting RF cavities is described. Spatial, angular and energy distributions of the generated radiation are calculated with the FISHPACT code. The Monte Carlo code MARS15 is used for modeling the radiation transport in matter. A comparison with dose rate measurements performed in the Fermilab Vertical Test Facility for ILC-type cavities with accelerating gradients up to 35 MV/m is presented as well.

  19. Status of Nb-Pb Superconducting RF-Gun Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Sekutowicz, J.; Iversen, J.; Klinke, D.; Kostin, D.; Moller, W.; Muhs, A.; Kneisel, P.; Smedley, J.; Rao, T.; Strzyzewski, P.; Li, Z.; Ko, K.; Xiao, L.; Lefferts, R.; Lipski, A.; Ferrario, M.; /Frascati

    2007-11-09

    We report on the progress and status of an electron RFgun made of two superconductors: niobium and lead [1]. The presented design combines the advantages of the RF performance of bulk niobium superconducting cavities and the reasonably high quantum efficiency of lead. The design of RF-gun and performance of 3 test cavities without and with the emitting lead spot are reported in this contribution. Measured quantum efficiency for lead at 2K is presented briefly. More details are reported in [9].

  20. Status of Nb-Pb superconducting RF-gun cavities

    SciTech Connect

    J. Sekutowicz; J. Iversen; D. Klinke; D. Kostin; W. Möller; A. Muhs; P. Kneisel; J. Smedley; T. Rao; P. Strzyżewski; Z. Li; K. Ko; L. Xiao; R. Lefferts; A. Lipski; M. Ferrario

    2007-06-01

    We report on the progress in the status of an electron RF-gun made of two superconductors: niobium and lead. The presented design combines the advantages of the RF performance of bulk niobium superconducting cavities and the reasonably high quantum efficiency of lead. Measured values of quantum efficiency for lead at 2K and the RF-performance of three half-cell niobium cavities with the lead spot exposed to high electric fields are reported in this contribution.

  1. Large Grain Superconducting RF Cavities at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, W.; Brinkmann, A.; Ermakov, A.; Iversen, J.; Kreps, G.; Matheisen, A.; Proch, D.; Reschke, D.; Singer, X.; Spiwek, M.; Wen, H.; Brokmeier, H. G.

    2007-08-09

    The DESY R and D program on cavities fabricated from large grain niobium explores the potential of this material for the production of approx. 1000 nine-cell cavities for the European XFEL. The program investigates basic material properties, comparing large grain material to standard sheet niobium, as well as fabrication and preparation aspects. Several single-cell cavities of TESLA shape have been fabricated from large grain niobium. A gradient up to 41 MV/m at Q0 = 1.4{center_dot}1010 (TB = 2K) was measured after electropolishing. The first three large grain nine-cell cavities worldwide have been produced under contract of DESY with ACCEL Instruments Co. The first tests have shown that all three cavities reach an accelerating gradient up to 30 MV/m after BCP (Buffered Chemical Polishing) treatment, what exceeds the XFEL requirements for RF test in the vertical cryostat.

  2. Superconducting cavity tuner performance at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, J.; Preble, J.; Schneider, W.

    1993-06-01

    At the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), a 4 GeV, multipass CW electron beam is to be accelerated by 338 SRF, 5-cell niobium cavities operating at a resonant frequency of 1497 MHz. Eight cavities arranged as four pairs comprise a cyromodule, a croygenically isolated linac subdivision. The frequency is controlled by a mechanical tune attached to the first and fifth cell of the cavity which elastically deforms the cavity and thereby alters its resonant frequency. The tuner is driven by a stepper motor mounted external to the cryomodule that transfers torque through two rotary feedthroughs. A linear variable differential transducer (LVDT) mounted on the tuner monitors the displacement, and two limit switches interlock the movement beyond a 400 kHz bandwidth. Since the cavity has a loaded Q of 6.6 {center_dot} 10{sup 6}, the control system must maintain the frequency of the cavity to within {plus_minus} 50 Hz of the drive frequency for efficient coupling. This requirement is somewhat difficult to achieve since the difference in thermal contractions of the cavity and the tuner creates a frequency hystersis of approximately 10 kHz. The cavity is also subject to frequency shifts due to pressure fluctuations of the helium bath as well as radiation pressure. This requires that each cavity be characterized in terms of frequency change as a function of applied motor steps to allow proper tuning operations. This paper describes the electrical and mechanical performance of the cavity tuner during the commissioning and operation of the cryomodulus manufactured to date.

  3. The ``Q disease'' in Superconducting Niobium RF Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knobloch, J.

    2003-07-01

    Superconducting niobium cavities can achieve quality (Q0) factors of 1010-1011, more than six orders of magnitude higher than conventional copper cavities. However, to maintain this performance at high accelerating gradient (20 MV/m) the radio-frequency (rf) surface must be damage and dust free. Cavity preparation techniques therefore routinely include a chemical etch or electropolishing. Under certain conditions, these (and other) treatments can contaminate the niobium with hydrogen. Hydrides may then form when the cavity is cooled through 150 K, even if only a few atomic percent hydrogen are present. If hydrides are formed, the cavity quality can degrade substantially (Q disease). A rapid cooldown often inhibits the hydride formation. Other "cures" include degassing cavities at 900 °C to eliminate the hydrogen. A historical review of the Q disease is provided here, with the emphasis being placed on its discovery, symptoms, mechanism, and cures.

  4. A 3D printed superconducting aluminium microwave cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creedon, Daniel L.; Goryachev, Maxim; Kostylev, Nikita; Sercombe, Timothy B.; Tobar, Michael E.

    2016-07-01

    3D printing of plastics, ceramics, and metals has existed for several decades and has revolutionized many areas of manufacturing and science. Printing of metals, in particular, has found a number of applications in fields as diverse as customized medical implants, jet engine bearings, and rapid prototyping in the automotive industry. Although many techniques are used for 3D printing metals, they commonly rely on computer controlled melting or sintering of a metal alloy powder using a laser or electron beam. The mechanical properties of parts produced in such a way have been well studied, but little attention has been paid to their electrical properties. Here we show that a microwave cavity (resonant frequencies 9.9 and 11.2 GHz) 3D printed using an Al-12Si alloy exhibits superconductivity when cooled below the critical temperature of aluminium (1.2 K), with a performance comparable with the common 6061 alloy of aluminium. Superconducting cavities find application in numerous areas of physics, from particle accelerators to cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments. The result is achieved even with a very large concentration of non-superconducting silicon in the alloy of 12.18%, compared with Al-6061, which has between 0.4% and 0.8%. Our results may pave the way for the possibility of 3D printing superconducting cavity configurations that are otherwise impossible to machine.

  5. Entangling a nanomechanical resonator and a superconducting microwave cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Vitali, D.; Tombesi, P.; Woolley, M. J.; Doherty, A. C.; Milburn, G. J.

    2007-10-15

    We propose a scheme able to entangle at the steady state a nanomechanical resonator with a microwave cavity mode of a driven superconducting coplanar waveguide. The nanomechanical resonator is capacitively coupled with the central conductor of the waveguide and stationary entanglement is achievable up to temperatures of tens of milliKelvin.

  6. Transient Microphonic Effects In Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Powers; G. Davis; Lawrence King

    2005-07-10

    A number of experiments were performed on an installed and operational 5-cell CEBAF cavity to determine the minimum time required to reestablish stable gradient after a cavity window arc trip. Once it was determined that gradient could be reestablished within 10 ms by applying constant power RF signal in and a voltage controlled Oscillator-phase locked loop based system (VCO-PLL), a second experiment was performed to determine if stable gradient could be reestablished using a fixed frequency RF system with a simple gradient based closed loop control system. During this test, instabilities were observed in the cavity forward power signal, which were determined to be microphonic in nature. These microphonic effects were quantified using a cavity resonance monitor and a VCO{_}PLL RF system. Two types of microphonic effects were observed depending on the type of arc event. If the arc occurred in the vacuum space between the warm and cold windows, the transient frequency shift was about 75 Hz peak-to-peak. If the arc occurred on the cavity side of the cold window the transient frequency shift was about 400 Hz peak-to-peak. The background microphonics level for the tested cavity was approximately 30 Hz peak-to-peak. Experimental results, analysis of the resultant klystron power transients, the decay time of the transients, and the implications with respect to fast reset algorithms will be presented.

  7. Surface characterization of niobium for superconducting RF cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chaoyue

    Surface characterization techniques including point contact tunneling (PCT) spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy have been employed to study the surface of niobium (Nb) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. PCT spectroscopy provides a direct means of measuring the surface superconductivity, which is closely correlated with the cavity's performance characterized by the quality factor Q. Cavities with remarkably high Q show near ideal tunneling spectra with sharp coherent peaks and low zero bias conductance, consistent with the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) density of stats (DOS), and bulk gap parameter, Delta = 1.55-1.6 meV. Cavities with Q-drop often exhibit strong non-uniform heating during RF operations, with high loss regions identified as hot spots. PCT spectra on hot spots reveal suppressed superconductivity, broadened DOS and Kondo tunneling, consistent with magnetic impurities on the surface. Raman spectra on hot spots indicate the presence of various impurities on the surface including amorphous carbon, C-H chain compounds and NbC, providing insights into the formation of hot spots. The origin of the impurities is unclear at present but it is suggested that particular processing steps in SRF cavity fabrication may be responsible.

  8. CARE activities on superconducting RF cavities at INFN Milano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosotti, A.; Pierini, P.; Michelato, P.; Pagani, C.; Paparella, R.; Panzeri, N.; Monaco, L.; Paulon, R.; Novati, M.

    2005-09-01

    The SC RF group at INFN Milano-LASA is involved both in the TESLA/TTF collaboration and in the research and design activity on superconducting cavities for proton accelerators. Among these activities, some are supported by the European community within the CARE project. In the framework of the JRASRF collaboration we are developing a coaxial blade tuner for ILC (International Linear Collider) cavities, integrated with piezoelectric actuators for the compensation of the Lorenz force detuning and microphonics perturbation. Another activity, regarding the improved component design on SC technology, based on the information retrieving about the status of art on ancillaries and experience of various laboratories involved in SCRF, has started in our laboratory. Finally, in the framework of the HIPPI collaboration, we are testing two low beta superconducting cavities, built for the Italian TRASCO project, to verify the possibility to use them for pulsed operation. All these activities will be described here, together with the main results and the future perspectives.

  9. Temperature Mapping of Nitrogen-doped Niobium Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Makita, Junki; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati

    2015-09-01

    It was recently shown that diffusing nitrogen on the inner surface of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities at high temperature can improve the quality factor of the niobium cavity. However, a reduction of the quench field is also typically found. To better understand the location of rf losses and quench, we used a thermometry system to map the temperature of the outer surface of ingot Nb cavities after nitrogen doping and electropolishing. Surface temperature of the cavities was recorded while increasing the rf power and also during the quenching. The results of thermal mapping showed no precursor heating on the cavities and quenching to be ignited near the equator where the surface magnetic field is maximum. Hot-spots at the equator area during multipacting were also detected by thermal mapping.

  10. Magnetic flux studies in horizontally cooled elliptical superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Martinello, M. Checchin, M.; Grassellino, A. Crawford, A. C.; Melnychuk, O.; Romanenko, A.; Sergatskov, D. A.

    2015-07-28

    Previous studies on magnetic flux expulsion as a function of cooldown procedures for elliptical superconducting radio frequency (SRF) niobium cavities showed that when the cavity beam axis is placed parallel to the helium cooling flow and sufficiently large thermal gradients are achieved, all magnetic flux could be expelled and very low residual resistance could be achieved. In this paper, we investigate flux trapping for the case of resonators positioned perpendicularly to the helium cooling flow, which is more representative of how SRF cavities are cooled in accelerators and for different directions of the applied magnetic field surrounding the resonator. We show that different field components have a different impact on the surface resistance, and several parameters have to be considered to fully understand the flux dynamics. A newly discovered phenomenon of concentration of flux lines at the cavity top leading to temperature rise at the cavity equator is presented.

  11. R&D of BEPCII 500 MHz superconducting cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, YaPing; Wang, GuangWei; Pan, WeiMin; Li, JiZhen; Liu, DeGui; Sun, Yi; Li, ZhongQuan; Dai, JianPing; Li, ShaoPeng; He, Kun; Wang, GuoPing; Zhao, GuangYuan; Ma, Qiang; Lin, HaiYing; Sha, Peng; Wang, QunYao; Qiu, Feng; Meng, FanBo; Li, Han

    2011-12-01

    Beijing Electron-Positron Collider Upgrade (BEPCII) adopts two 500 MHz superconducting cavities (SCCs) in each ring for higher accelerated gradient, higher Q and lower impedance (Wang et al. The proceedings of SRF'07). There's no spare cavity due to the limited time and funding during BEPCII construction. If any serious trouble happened on either one of the two cavities and could not be recovered in a short time, the operation of BEPCII facility will be affected. Therefore, since 2009 three spare cavities have been fabricated in China to ensure reliable operation, and two of them have been successfully vertically tested in January and July 2011. This paper will briefly present the manufacture, post-process and vertical test performance of the 500 MHz spare cavities.

  12. Fundamental Research in Superconducting RF Cavity Design

    SciTech Connect

    Georg Hoffstaetter

    2012-11-13

    This is a 3-year SRF R&D proposal with two main goals: 1) to benefit near term high gradient SRF applications by understanding the causes of quench at high fields in present-day niobium cavities 2) to open the long-range prospects for SRF applications by experimentally verifying the recent exciting theoretical predication for new cavity materials such as Nb3Sn and MgB2. These predictions shwo that ultimately gradients of 100Mv/m to 200MV/m may become possible as material imperfections are overcome.

  13. Transient ponderomotive effects in superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk Davis; Thomas Powers

    2005-07-10

    A number of experiments were performed on an installed and operational 5-cell CEBAF cavity to determine the minimum time required to re-establish stable gradient after a cavity window arc trip. Once it was determined that gradient could be re-established within 10 ms by applying constant power RF signal in a voltage controlled Oscillator-phase locked loop based system (VCO-PLL), a second experiment was performed to determine if stable gradient could be re-established using a fixed frequency RF system with a simple gradient based closed loop control system. During this test, fluctuations were observed in the cavity forward power signal, the source of which was later determined to be pondero-motive in nature. These ponderomotive induced vibrations were quantified using a cavity resonance monitor and a VCO-PLL RF system. Experimental results, analysis of the resultant klystron power transients, the decay time of the transients, and the implications with respect to fast reset algorithms will be presented.

  14. Superconducting Prototype Cavities for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati

    2001-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source project includes a superconducting linac section in the energy range from 186 MeV to 1000 MeV. For this energy range two types of cavities are needed with geometrical {beta} values of {beta} = 0.61 and {beta} = 0.81. An aggressive cavity prototyping program is being pursued at Jefferson Lab, which calls for fabricating and testing four {beta} = 0.61 cavities and two {beta} = 0.81 cavities. Both types consist of six cells made from high purity niobium and feature one HOM coupler on each beam pipe and a port for a high power coaxial input coupler. Three of the four {beta} = 0.61 cavities will be used for a cryomodule test in early 2002. At this time four medium beta cavities and one high beta cavity have been completed at JLab. The first tests on the {beta} = 0.61 and {beta} = 0.81 exceeded the design values for gradient and Q value: E{sub acc} = 10.1 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1K for the {beta} = 0.61 and E{sub acc} = 12.3 MV/m and Q = 5 x 10{sup 9} at 2.1 K for the {beta} = 0.81. One of the medium beta cavities has been equipped with an integrated helium vessel and measurements of the static Lorentz force detuning have been done and compared to the ''bare'' cavities. In addition two single cell cavities have been fabricated, equipped with welded-on HOM couplers. They are being used to evaluate the HOM couplers with respect to multipacting, fundamental mode rejection and HOM damping as far as possible in a single cell. This paper describes the cavity design with respect to electromagnetic and mechanical features, the fabrication efforts and the results obtained with the different cavities existing at the time of this workshop.

  15. Wake Field Effects in the APT Linac.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurennoy, Sergey

    1998-04-01

    The 1.7-GeV 100-mA CW proton linac is now under design for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Project. While wake-field effects are usually considered negligible in proton linacs, an analysis for the APT accelerator has been performed to exclude potential problems at such a high current leading to beam losses. Loss factors and resonance frequency spectra of various discontinuities of the vacuum chamber are investigated, both analytically and using 2-D and 3-D simulation codes with a single bunch as well as with many bunches. The only noticeable effect is the HOM heating of the 5-cell superconducting cavities. However, it has an acceptable level and will be further reduced by HOM couplers.

  16. Minimization of power consumption during charging of superconducting accelerating cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Anirban Krishna; Ziemann, Volker; Ruber, Roger; Goryashko, Vitaliy

    2015-11-01

    The radio frequency cavities, used to accelerate charged particle beams, need to be charged to their nominal voltage after which the beam can be injected into them. The standard procedure for such cavity filling is to use a step charging profile. However, during initial stages of such a filling process a substantial amount of the total energy is wasted in reflection for superconducting cavities because of their extremely narrow bandwidth. The paper presents a novel strategy to charge cavities, which reduces total energy reflection. We use variational calculus to obtain analytical expression for the optimal charging profile. Energies, reflected and required, and generator peak power are also compared between the charging schemes and practical aspects (saturation, efficiency and gain characteristics) of power sources (tetrodes, IOTs and solid state power amplifiers) are also considered and analysed. The paper presents a methodology to successfully identify the optimal charging scheme for different power sources to minimize total energy requirement.

  17. Superconducting Cavities for Proton and Ion Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Jean Delayen

    2005-05-22

    In the last decade, one of the most active areas in the applications of the superconducting rf (SRF) technology has been for the acceleration of ions to medium energy ({approx}1 GeV/amu) and high power. One such accelerator is under construction in the US while others are being proposed in the US, Japan, and Europe. These new facilities require SRF accelerating structures operating in a velocity region that has until recently been unexplored, and new types of structures optimized for the velocity range from {approx}0.2 to {approx}0.8 c have been developed. We will review the requirements imposed by such applications, the properties of the low- and intermediate-velocity structures which have been developed for them and the status of their development.

  18. Cathodic arc grown niobium films for RF superconducting cavity applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; Lorkiewicz, J.; Tazzari, S.; Langner, J.; Strzyzewski, P.; Sadowski, M.; Andreone, A.; Cifariello, G.; Di Gennaro, E.; Lamura, G.; Russo, R.

    2006-07-01

    Experimental results on the characterization of the linear and non-linear microwave properties of niobium film produced by UHV cathodic arc deposition are presented. Surface impedance Zs as a function of RF field and intermodulation distortion (IMD) measurement have been carried out by using a dielectrically loaded resonant cavity operating at 7 GHz. The experimental data show that these samples have a lower level of intrinsic non-linearities at low temperature and low circulating power in comparison with Nb samples grown by sputtering. These results make UHV cathodic arc deposition a promising technique for the improvement of RF superconducting cavities for particle accelerators.

  19. Fast Ferroelectric L-Band Tuner for Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-07-03

    Design, analysis, and low-power tests are described on a ferroelectric tuner concept that could be used for controlling external coupling to RF cavities for the superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) in the electron cooler of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The tuner configuration utilizes several small donut-shaped ferroelectric assemblies, which allow the design to be simpler and more flexible, as compared to previous designs. Design parameters for 704 and 1300 MHz versions of the tuner are given. Simulation results point to efficient performance that could reduce by a factor-of-ten the RF power levels required for driving superconducting cavities in the BNL ERL.

  20. Operating experience with high beta superconducting rf cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.; Doolittle, L.R.; Benesch, J.F.

    1993-06-01

    The number of installed and operational {beta} = 1 superconducting rf cavities has grown significantly over the last two years in accelerator laboratories in Europe, Japan and the US. The total installed acceleration capability as of mid-1993 is approximately 1 GeV at nominal gradients. Major installations at CERN, DESY, KEK and CEBAF have provided large increments to the installed base and valuable operational experience. A selection of test data and operational experience gathered to date is reviewed.

  1. Recent developments in superconducting cavity RF control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simrock, Stefan

    2005-02-01

    Presently a large number of superconducting accelerators under construction or proposed impose stringent requirements on the rf control of the accelerating fields, operability, and reliability. The accelerator application range from linear colliders, UV-FELs and X-FELs, ERL based light sources, high power proton accelerators to heavy ion accelerators. Examples are TESLA and NLC, the European XFEL and Lux, the Cornell ERL based light source, the high power ERL based IR-FEL at JLAB, the neutron spallation source SNS, the heavy ion accelerator RIA, and the energy upgrade of the CEBAF accelerator at JLAB. The requirements on the rf systems range from low to high current, medium to high gradient, and relativistic to non-relativistics beam. With the technology in analog and digital electronics developing rapidly, the technology for rf feedback system is changing more and more from analog or hybrid systems towards fully digital systems. Todays DSPs and FPGAs can process sophisticated feedback algorithms on a time scale of some 100 ns to a few us with ADCs and DACs with about 100 MHz bandwidth at 14 bit and latencies less than 100 ns available to inter-face to the field detectors and field control actuators. Also fast analog multiplier technology allows for field detection and actuators for rf control with high linearity, measurement and control bandwidth while maintaining low noise levels.

  2. Nonlinear RF spurious in a cylindrical cavity with superconducting endplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateu, Jordi; Collado, Carlos; Shaw, Timothy J.; O'Callaghan, Juan M.

    2002-08-01

    We have developed a method to calculate the distribution of fundamental and spurious fields in a metallic cylindrical cavity with superconducting endplates in which signals at two different frequencies are injected. The nonlinearity in the superconductor produces the typical intermodulation effects if the frequencies of the injected signals are sufficiently close to each other and near a resonant mode. Our method uses harmonic balance to match the fields in the cavity with the currents on the endplates. The method can be used for a variety of nonlinear models of the superconducting endplate, and could be the base for a nondestructive procedure to extract the nonlinear parameters of an HTS sample from RF measurements. Our analysis is restricted to the TE0 1 1 mode, but the method can be applied to any propagating mode in the cylindrical cavity. Closed-form equations for the case of square-law nonlinearities in the superconductor are derived and used to check the validity of the harmonic balance calculation.

  3. Superconducting Accelerating Cavity Pressure Sensitivity Analysis and Stiffening

    SciTech Connect

    Rodnizki, J; Ben Aliz, Y; Grin, A; Horvitz, Z; Perry, A; Weissman, L; Davis, G Kirk; Delayen, Jean R.

    2014-12-01

    The Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) design is based on a 40 MeV 5 mA light ions superconducting RF linac. Phase-I of SARAF delivers up to 2 mA CW proton beams in an energy range of 1.5 - 4.0 MeV. The maximum beam power that we have reached is 5.7 kW. Today, the main limiting factor to reach higher ion energy and beam power is related to the HWR sensitivity to the liquid helium coolant pressure fluctuations. The HWR sensitivity to helium pressure is about 60 Hz/mbar. The cavities had been designed, a decade ago, to be soft in order to enable tuning of their novel shape. However, the cavities turned out to be too soft. In this work we found that increasing the rigidity of the cavities in the vicinity of the external drift tubes may reduce the cavity sensitivity by a factor of three. A preliminary design to increase the cavity rigidity is presented.

  4. Coupling graphene mechanical resonators to superconducting microwave cavities.

    PubMed

    Weber, P; Güttinger, J; Tsioutsios, I; Chang, D E; Bachtold, A

    2014-05-14

    Graphene is an attractive material for nanomechanical devices because it allows for exceptional properties, such as high frequencies, quality factors, and low mass. An outstanding challenge, however, has been to obtain large coupling between the motion and external systems for efficient readout and manipulation. Here, we report on a novel approach, in which we capacitively couple a high-Q graphene mechanical resonator (Q ≈ 10(5)) to a superconducting microwave cavity. The initial devices exhibit a large single-photon coupling of ∼10 Hz. Remarkably, we can electrostatically change the graphene equilibrium position and thereby tune the single photon coupling, the mechanical resonance frequency, and the sign and magnitude of the observed Duffing nonlinearity. The strong tunability opens up new possibilities, such as the tuning of the optomechanical coupling strength on a time scale faster than the inverse of the cavity line width. With realistic improvements, it should be possible to enter the regime of quantum optomechanics. PMID:24745803

  5. Design Sensitivities of the Superconducting Parallel-Bar Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Subashini U.; Delayen, Jean D.

    2010-09-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar cavity has properties that makes it attractive as a deflecting or crabbing rf structure. For example it is under consideration as an rf separator for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and as a crabbing structure for a possible LHC luminosity upgrade. In order to maintain the purity of the deflecting mode and avoid mixing with the near accelerating mode caused by geometrical imperfection, a minimum frequency separation is needed which depends on the expected deviations from perfect symmetry. We have done an extensive analysis of the impact of several geometrical imperfections on the properties of the parallel-bar cavities and the effects on the beam, and present the results in this paper.

  6. Piezoelectric Tuner Compensation of Lorentz Detuning in Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Jean Delayen; G. Davis

    2003-09-01

    Pulsed operation of superconducting cavities can induce large variations of the resonant frequency through excitation of the mechanical modes by the radiation pressure. The phase and amplitude control system must be able to accommodate this frequency variation; this can be accomplished by increasing the capability of the rf power source. Alternatively, a piezo electric tuner can be activated at the same repetition rate as the rf to counteract the effect of the radiation pressure. We have demonstrated such a system on the prototype medium beta SNS cryomodule with a reduction of the dynamic Lorentz detuning during the rf pulse by a factor of 3. Piezo electric tuners can also be used to reduce the level of microphonics in low-current cw accelerators. We have measured the amplitude and phase of the transfer function of the piezo control system (from input voltage to cavity frequency) up to several kHz.

  7. Piezoelectric Tuner Compensation of Lorentz Detuning in Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    G. Davis; Jean Delayen

    2003-05-12

    Pulsed operation of superconducting cavities can induce large variations of the resonant frequency through excitation of the mechanical modes by the radiation pressure. The phase and amplitude control system must be able to accommodate this frequency variation; this can be accomplished by increasing the capability of the rf power source. Alternatively, a piezo electric tuner can be activated at the same repetition rate as the rf to counteract the effect of the radiation pressure. We have demonstrated such a system on the prototype medium beta SNS cryomodule [1] with a reduction of the dynamic Lorentz detuning during the rf pulse by a factor of 3. We have also measured the amplitude and phase of the transfer function of the piezo control system (from input voltage to cavity frequency) up to several kHz [2].

  8. Fast Ferroelectric L-Band Tuner for Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2011-03-01

    Analysis and modeling is presented for a fast microwave tuner to operate at 700 MHz which incorporates ferroelectric elements whose dielectric permittivity can be rapidly altered by application of an external voltage. This tuner could be used to correct unavoidable fluctuations in the resonant frequency of superconducting cavities in accelerator structures, thereby greatly reducing the RF power needed to drive the cavities. A planar test version of the tuner has been tested at low levels of RF power, but at 1300 MHz to minimize the physical size of the test structure. This test version comprises one-third of the final version. The tests show performance in good agreement with simulations, but with losses in the ferroelectric elements that are too large for practical use, and with issues in bonding of ferroelectric elements to the metal walls of the tuner structure.

  9. Superconducting NbTiN thin films for superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavity applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Burton, Matthew C.; Beebe, Melissa R.; Yang, Kaida; Lukaszew, Rosa A.; Valente-Feliciano, Anne -Marie; Reece, Charles

    2016-02-12

    Current superconducting radio frequency technology, used in various particle accelerator facilities across the world, is reliant upon bulk niobium superconducting cavities. Due to technological advancements in the processing of bulk Nb cavities, the facilities have reached accelerating fields very close to a material-dependent limit, which is close to 50 MV/m for bulk Nb. One possible solution to improve upon this fundamental limitation was proposed a few years ago by Gurevich [Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 012511 (2006)], consisting of the deposition of alternating thin layers of superconducting and insulating materials on the interior surface of the cavities. The use of type-IImore » superconductors with Tc > TcNb and Hc > HcNb, (e.g., Nb3Sn, NbN, or NbTiN) could potentially greatly reduce the surface resistance (Rs) and enhance the accelerating field, if the onset of vortex penetration is increased above HcNb, thus enabling higher field gradients. Although Nb3Sn may prove superior, it is not clear that it can be grown as a suitable thin film for the proposed multilayer approach, since very high temperature is typically required for its growth, hindering achieving smooth interfaces and/or surfaces. On the other hand, since NbTiN has a smaller lower critical field (Hc1) and higher critical temperature (Tc) than Nb and increased conductivity compared to NbN, it is a promising candidate material for this new scheme. Here, the authors present experimental results correlating filmmicrostructure with superconducting properties on NbTiN thin film coupon samples while also comparing filmsgrown with targets of different stoichiometry. In conclusion, it is worth mentioning that the authors have achieved thin films with bulk-like lattice parameter and transition temperature while also achieving Hc1 values larger than bulk for films thinner than their London penetration depths.« less

  10. A PROCEDURE TO SET PHASE AND AMPLITUDE OF THE RF IN THE SNS LINAC'S SUPERCONDUCTING CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    L.M. YOUNG

    2001-06-01

    This paper describes a procedure to set the phase and amplitude of the RF fields in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac's superconducting cavities. The linac uses superconducting cavities to accelerate the H{sup -} ion beam from the normal conducting linac at 185 MeV to a final energy of {approx}1 GeV. There are two types of cavities in the linac, 33 cavities with a geometric beta of 0.61 and 48 cavities with a geometric beta of 0.81. The correct phase setting of any single superconducting cavity depends on the RF phase and amplitude of all the preceding superconducting cavities. For the beam to be properly accelerated it must arrive at each cavity with a relative phase ({phi}{sub s}), called the synchronous phase, of about -20 degrees. That is, it must arrive early with respect to the phase at which it would gain the maximum energy by 20 degrees. This timing provides the longitudinal focusing. Beam particles arriving slightly later gain more energy and move faster relative to the synchronous beam particle. The problem is to set the phase and amplitude of each cavity in the linac so that the synchronous particle arrives at each cavity with the correct phase. The amplitude of each superconducting cavity will be adjusted as high as possible constrained only by the available RF power and the breakdown field of the cavity.

  11. A general approach for the calculation of intermodulation distortion in cavities with superconducting endplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateu, J.; Collado, C.; Menéndez, O.; O'Callaghan, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    We report on a general procedure to calculate intermodulation distortion in cavities with superconducting endplates that is applicable to the dielectric-loaded cavities currently used for measurement of surface resistance in high-temperature superconductors. The procedure would enable the use such cavities for intermodulation characterization of unpatterned superconducting films, and would remove the uncertainty of measuring intermodulation on patterned devices, in which the effect of patterning damage might influence the outcome of the measurements. We have verified the calculation method by combining superconducting and copper endplates in a rutile-loaded cavity.

  12. Investigation of Microscopic Materials Limitations of Superconducting RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Anlage, Steven

    2014-07-23

    The high-field performance of SRF cavities is often limited by breakdown events below the intrinsic limiting surface fields of Nb, and there is abundant evidence that these breakdown events are localized in space inside the cavity. Also, there is a lack of detailed understanding of the causal links between surface treatments and ultimate RF performance at low temperatures. An understanding of these links would provide a clear roadmap for improvement of SRF cavity performance, and establish a cause-and-effect ‘RF materials science’ of Nb. We propose two specific microscopic approaches to addressing these issues. First is a spatially-resolved local microwave-microscope probe that operates at SRF frequencies and temperatures to discover the microscopic origins of breakdown, and produce quantitative measurements of RF critical fields of coatings and films. Second, RF Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) has allowed visualization of RF current flow and sources of nonlinear RF response in superconducting devices with micro-meter spatial resolution. The LSM will be used in conjunction with surface preparation and characterization techniques to create definitive links between physical and chemical processing steps and ultimate cryogenic microwave performance. We propose to develop RF laser scanning microscopy of small-sample Nb pieces to establish surface-processing / RF performance relations through measurement of RF current distributions on micron-length scales and low temperatures.

  13. Design and Development of Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Payagalage Subashini Uddi De Silva, Jean Delayen

    2012-07-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is a deflecting/crabbing cavity with attractive properties that is being considered for a number of applications. We present the designs of a 499 MHz deflecting cavity developed for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade and a 400 MHz crabbing cavity for the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade. Prototypes of these two cavities are now under development and fabrication.

  14. High-gradient, pulsed operation of superconducting niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1984-02-01

    Tests performed on several Niobium TM/sub 010/ cavities at frequencies of about 2856 MHz using a high-power, pulsed method indicate that, at the end of the charging pulse, peak surface magnetic fields of up to approx. 1300 Oe, corresponding to a peak surface electric field of approx. 68 MV/m, can be reached at 4.2/sup 0/K without appreciable average losses. Further studies of the properties of superconductors under pulsed operation might shed light on fundamental properties of rf superconductivity, as well as lead to the possibility of applying the pulse method to the operation of high-gradient linear colliders. 7 references, 30 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Design of RF power coupler for superconducting cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutsaev, S. V.; Kelly, M. P.; Ostroumov, P. N.

    2012-11-01

    A new power coupler has been designed and is being prototyped by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for use with any of the ANL proposed superconducting (SC) half- or quarter-wave cavities for SARAF [1] and Project-X [2]. The 50 Ohm coaxial capacitive coupler is required to operate in the CW regime with up to 15 kW of forward power and under any condition for the reflected power. A key feature is a moveable copper plated stainless steel bellows which will permit up to 3 cm of axial stroke and adjustment of the external quality factor by roughly one order of magnitude in the range of 105 to 106. The mechanical and vacuum design includes two ceramic windows, one operating at room temperature and another at 70 Kelvin. The two window design allows the portion of the coupler assembled onto the SC cavity in the clean room to be compact and readily cleanable. Other design features include thermal intercepts to provide a large margin for RF heating and a mechanical guide assembly to operate cold and under vacuum with high reliability.

  16. Application of superconducting magnesium diboride (MGB2) in superconducting radio frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Teng

    The superconductivity in magnesium diboride (MgB2) was discovered in 2001. As a BCS superconductor, MgB2 has a record-high Tc of 39 K, high Jc of > 107 A/cm2 and no weak link behavior across the grain boundary. All these superior properties endorsed that MgB2 would have great potential in both power applications and electronic devices. In the past 15 years, MgB2 based power cables, microwave devices, and commercial MRI machines emerged and the next frontier are superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. SRF cavities are one of the leading accelerator technologies. In SRF cavities, applied microwave power generates electrical fields that accelerate particle beams. Compared with other accelerator techniques, SRF cavity accelerators feature low loss, high acceleration gradients and the ability to accelerate continuous particle beams. However, current SRF cavities are made from high-purity bulk niobium and work at 2 K in superfluid helium. The construction and operational cost of SRF cavity accelerators are very expensive. The demand for SRF cavity accelerators has been growing rapidly in the past decade. Therefore, a lot of effort has been devoted to the enhancement of the performance and the reduction of cost of SRF cavities. In 2010, an acceleration gradient of over 50 MV/m has been reported for a Nb-based SRF cavity. The magnetic field at the inner surface of such a cavity is ~ 1700 Oe, which is close to the thermodynamic critical field of Nb. Therefore, new materials and technologies are required to raise the acceleration gradient of future SRF cavity accelerators. Among all the proposed approaches, using MgB2 thin films to coat the inner surface of SRF cavities is one of the promising tactics with the potential to raise both the acceleration gradient and the operation temperature of SRF cavity accelerators. In this work, I present my study on MgB2 thin films for their application in SRF cavities. C-epitaxial MgB2 thin films grown on SiC(0001) substrates

  17. Microphonics detuning compensation in 3.9 GHZ superconducting RF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ruben Carcagno et al.

    2003-10-20

    Mechanical vibrations can detune superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities unless a tuning mechanism counteracting the vibrations is present. Due to their narrow operating bandwidth and demanding mechanical structure, the 13-cell 3.9GHz SCRF cavities for the Charged Kaons at Main Injector (CKM) experiment at Fermilab are especially susceptible to this microphonic phenomena. We present early results correlating RF frequency detuning with cavity vibration measurements for CKM cavities; initial detuning compensation results with piezoelectric actuators are also presented.

  18. First results of testing 3.9 GHz TM(010) superconducting cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.A.; Bellantoni, L.; Berenc, T.G.; Edwards, H.T.; Gonin, I.V.; Khabiboulline, T.N.; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    Fermilab is developing third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting cavity to improve performances of A0 and TTF photoinjectors. In frame of this project we have built and tested two nine-cell copper models and one 3-cell niobium cavity. Properties of the high order modes were carefully studied in a chain of two copper cavities at room temperature. In paper we discuss results of cold tests of the 3-cell cavity before and after BCP.

  19. Simulation Study of Electronic Damping of Microphonic Vibrations in Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Alicia Hofler; Jean Delayen

    2005-05-01

    Electronic damping of microphonic vibrations in superconducting rf cavities involves an active modulation of the cavity field amplitude in order to induce ponderomotive forces that counteract the effect of ambient vibrations on the cavity frequency. In lightly beam loaded cavities, a reduction of the microphonics-induced frequency excursions leads directly to a reduction of the rf power required for phase and amplitude stabilization. Jefferson Lab is investigating such an electronic damping scheme that could be applied to the JLab 12 GeV upgrade, the RIA driver, and possibly to energy-recovering superconducting linacs. This paper discusses a model and presents simulation results for electronic damping of microphonic vibrations.

  20. Prediction and suppression of beam breakup instability in multicell superconducting cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V.

    2009-01-01

    Beam breakup instability in superconducting cavities is a serious problem. In this work, a four-cell LEP cavity installed in the KAERI linear accelerator is considered as an example. Dependence of the breakup instability threshold currents on the characteristics of a dipole mode was determined both analytically and numerically. An efficient technique to suppress breakup instability using rf beam focusing within a cavity is suggested. The technique involves applying TE-type monopole higher-order modes and is useful for multicell superconducting cavities with many trapped high-Q dipole modes.

  1. Introduction of DC line structures into a superconducting microwave 3D cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Wei-Cheng; Deng, Guang-Wei; Li, Shu-Xiao; Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2015-02-15

    We report a technique that can noninvasively add multiple DC wires into a 3D superconducting microwave cavity for electronic devices that require DC electrical terminals. We studied the influence of our DC lines on the cavity performance systematically. We found that the quality factor of the cavity is reduced if any of the components of the electrical wires cross the cavity equipotential planes. Using this technique, we were able to incorporate a quantum dot (QD) device into a 3D cavity. We then controlled and measured the QD transport signal using the DC lines. We have also studied the heating effects of the QD by the microwave photons in the cavity.

  2. Prototype superconducting triple-spoke cavity for beta = 0.63.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K. W.; Kelly, M. P.; Fuerst, J. D.; Kedzie, M.; Conway, Z. A.; Physics

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the development status of a 345 MHz, three-spoke-loaded, TEM-class superconducting cavity with a transit-time factor peaked at = v/c = 0.63. The cavity has a 4 cm diameter beam aperture, a transverse diameter of 45.8 cm, and an interior length of 85 cm. The cavity is the second of two three-spoke loaded cavities being developed for the RIA driver linac and other high-intensity ion linac applications. Construction of a prototype niobium cavity has been completed and the cavity has been chemically processed. Results of initial cold tests are discussed.

  3. Superconducting triple-spoke cavity for beta = 0.5 ions.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K. W.; Kelly, M. P.; Fuerst, J. D.; Kedzie, M.; Conway, Z. A.; Physics

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the development status of a 345 MHz, three-spoke-loaded, TEM-class superconducting cavity with a transit-time factor peaked at = v/c = 0.63. The cavity has a 4 cm diameter beam aperture, a transverse diameter of 45.8 cm, and an interior length of 85 cm. The cavity is the second of two three-spoke loaded cavities being developed for the RIA driver linac and other high-intensity ion linac applications. Construction of a prototype niobium cavity has been completed and the cavity has been chemically processed. Results of initial cold tests are discussed.

  4. Qualification of niobium materials for superconducting radio frequency cavity applications: View of a condensed matter physicist

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, S. B.; Myneni, G. R.

    2015-12-04

    We address the issue of qualifications of the niobium materials to be used for superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavity fabrications, from the point of view of a condensed matter physicist/materials scientist. We focus on the particular materials properties of niobium required for the functioning a SCRF cavity, and how to optimize the same properties for the best SCRF cavity performance in a reproducible manner. In this way the niobium materials will not necessarily be characterized by their purity alone, but in terms of those materials properties, which will define the limit of the SCRF cavity performance and also other related material properties, which will help to sustain this best SCRF cavity performance. Furthermore we point out the need of standardization of the post fabrication processing of the niobium-SCRF cavities, which does not impair the optimized superconducting and thermal properties of the starting niobium-materials required for the reproducible performance of the SCRF cavities according to the design values.

  5. A receiver design for the superconducting cavity-maser oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, R. T.; Dick, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    A new frequency standard was demonstrated with the aid of a double phase locked loop (PLL) receiver. A superconducting cavity maser oscillator (SCMO) and a hydrogen maser are combined to show the medium term performance of the hydrogen maser together with improved short term performance made possible by the SCMO. The receiver, which generates a 100 MHz signal with reduced noise, is phase locked to (and may be used in place of) the 100 MHz hydrogen maser output. The maser signal, 2.69xxx-GHz SCMO output, and a 100 MHz quartz crystal oscillator are optimally combined by the receiver. A measured two source fractional frequency stability of 2 x 10(exp -14) was obtained for a measuring time of r = 1 sec, and 1 x 10(exp -15) at r = 1,000 sec. The 1 sec value is approx. 10 times lower than that for hydrogen masers, while the 1,000 sec value is identical to hydrogen maser performance. The design is based on phase noise models for the hydrogen maser, the SCMO, and quartz crystal oscillators for offset frequencies down to 1 x 10(exp -6) Hz.

  6. Laser nitriding for niobium superconducting radio-frequency accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Senthilraja Singaravelu, John Klopf, Gwyn Williams, Michael Kelley

    2010-10-01

    Particle accelerators are a key tool for scientific research ranging from fundamental studies of matter to analytical studies at light sources. Cost-forperformance is critical, both in terms of initial capital outlay and ongoing operating expense, especially for electricity. It depends on the niobium superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator cavities at the heart of most of these machines. Presently Nb SRF cavities operate near 1.9 K, well (and expensively) below the 4.2 K atmospheric boiling point of liquid He. Transforming the 40 nm thick active interior surface layer from Nb to delta NbN (Tc = 17 K instead of 9.2 K) appears to be a promising approach. Traditional furnace nitriding appears to have not been successful for this. Further, exposing a complete SRF cavity to the time-temperature history required for nitriding risks mechanical distortion. Gas laser nitriding instead has been applied successfully to other metals [P.Schaaf, Prog. Mat. Sci. 47 (2002) 1]. The beam dimensions and thermal diffusion length permit modeling in one dimension to predict the time course of the surface temperature for a range of per-pulse energy densities. As with the earlier work, we chose conditions just sufficient for boiling as a reference point. We used a Spectra Physics HIPPO nanosecond laser (l = 1064 nm, Emax= 0.392 mJ, beam spot@ 34 microns, PRF =15 – 30 kHz) to obtain an incident fluence of 1.73 - 2.15 J/cm2 for each laser pulse at the target. The target was a 50 mm diameter SRF-grade Nb disk maintained in a nitrogen atmosphere at a pressure of 550 – 625 torr and rotated at a constant speed of 9 rpm. The materials were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The SEM images show a sharp transition with fluence from a smooth, undulating topography to significant roughening, interpreted here as the onset of ablation. EPMA measurements of N/Nb atom ratio as a function of depth found a constant

  7. Operation of the 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity in RHIC during run 14

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Hayes, T.; Mernick, K.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.; Zaltsman, A.

    2015-09-11

    A 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity was designed and installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). It is the first superconducting quarter wave resonator (QWR) operating in a high-energy storage ring. We discuss herein the cavity operation with Au+Au collisions, and with asymmetrical Au+He3 collisions. The cavity is a storage cavity, meaning that it becomes active only at the energy of experiment, after the acceleration cycle is completed. With the cavity at 300 kV, an improvement in luminosity was detected from direct measurements, and the bunch length has been reduced. The uniqueness of the QWR demands an innovative design of the higher order mode dampers with high-pass filters, and a distinctive fundamental mode damper that enables the cavity to be bypassed during the acceleration stage.

  8. Cryogenic Test of a Coaxial Coupling Scheme for Fundamental and Higher Order Modes in Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    J.K. Sekutowicz, P. Kneisel

    2009-05-01

    A coaxial coupling device located in the beam pipe of the TESLA type superconducting cavities provides for better propagation of Higher Order Modes (HOMs) and their strong damping in appropriate HOM couplers. Additionally, it also provides efficient coupling for fundamental mode RF power into the superconducting cavity. The whole coupling device can be designed as a detachable system. If appropriately dimensioned, the magnetic field can be minimized to a negligible level at the flange position. This scheme, presented previously*, provides for several advantages: strong HOM damping, flangeable solution, exchangeability of the HOM damping device on a cavity, less complexity of the superconducting cavity, possible cost advantages. This contribution will describe the results of the first cryogenic test.

  9. Progress on the high-current 704 MHz superconducting RF cavity at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Xu W.; Astefanous, C.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; et al

    2012-05-20

    The 704 MHz high current superconducting cavity has been designed with consideration of both performance of fundamental mode and damping of higher order modes. A copper prototype cavity was fabricated by AES and delivered to BNL. RF measurements were carried out on this prototype cavity, including fundamental pass-band and HOM spectrum measurements, HOM studies using bead-pull setup, prototyping of antenna-type HOM couplers. The measurements show that the cavity has very good damping for the higher-order modes, which was one of the main goals for the high current cavity design. 3D cavity models were simulated with Omega3P code developed by SLAC to compare with the measurements. The paper describes the cavity design, RF measurement setups and results for the copper prototype. The progress with the niobium cavity fabrication will also be described.

  10. Defect Detection in Superconducting Radiofrequency Cavity Surface Using C + + and OpenCV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, Samantha; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) uses superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities to accelerate an electron beam. If theses cavities have a small particle or defect, it can degrade the performance of the cavity. The problem at hand is inspecting the cavity for defects, little bubbles of niobium on the surface of the cavity. Thousands of pictures have to be taken of a single cavity and then looked through to see how many defects were found. A C + + program with Open Source Computer Vision (OpenCV) was constructed to reduce the number of hours searching through the images and finds all the defects. Using this code, the SRF group is now able to use the code to identify defects in on-going tests of SRF cavities. Real time detection is the next step so that instead of taking pictures when looking at the cavity, the camera will detect all the defects.

  11. Updating the CSNS injector linac to 250 MeV with superconducting double-spoke cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi-Hui; Fu, Shi-Nian

    2015-03-01

    In order to update the beam power from 100 kW to 500 kW in the China Spallation neutron source (CSNS) Phase II, one of the important measures is to replace the 80 m long beam transport line between the present 80 MeV linac injector and the rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) to another kind of acceleration structure. In this paper, we proposed a scheme based on 324 MHz double-spoke superconducting cavities. Unlike the superconducting elliptical cavity and normal conducting coupled cavity linac (CCL) structure, the double-spoke cavity belongs to the TE mode structure and has a smaller transverse dimension compared with that of the TH mode one. It can work at base frequency as the drift tube Linac (DTL) section, so that the cost and complexity of the RF system will be much decreased, and the behaviors of the beam dynamics are also improved significantly because of the low charge density and larger longitudinal acceptance. Furthermore, because of the relatively longer interactive length between the charged particle and the electromagnetic field per cell, it needs relatively less cell numbers and it has larger velocity acceptance compared with the double frequency TH structures. The superconducting section consists of 14 periods, each of which includes 3 superconducting cavities encapsulated in one cryomodule and a doublet in room temperate. The general considerations on cavity and beam dynamics design are discussed and the main results are presented. Supported by National Nature Sciences Foundation of China (11375122, 91126003) and China ADS Project

  12. Q disease on 350-MHZ superconducting spoke cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.; Edwards, R. L.; Krawczyk, F. L.; Liu, Jianfei; Schrage, D. L.; Shapiro, A. H.

    2003-01-01

    Q disease, i.e., an increase of RF surface resistance due to hydride precipitation, has been investigated with 350-MHz spoke cavities. This phenomenon was studied extensively in early 1990s with cavities at frequencies >1 GHz. This is possibly due to the fact that the lower-frequency cavities were believed to show insignificant effect. However, early 500-MHz KEK elliptical cavities and JAERI 130-MHz quarter wave resonators have shown significant Q degradation, suggesting that this disease can be a serious problem with lower-frequency cavities as well. Since there were no quantitative data with 350-MHz cavities, we decided to measure our two spoke cavities. Our spoke cavities were made of RRR{approx}250 niobium and were chemically polished {approx}150 microns. A few series of systematic tests have shown that our spoke cavities do not show any Q{sub 0} degradation up to {approx}24 hours of holding the cavity at 100 K. However it starts showing degradation if it is held for a longer time and the additional loss due to the Q disease increases linearly. It was also found that our spoke cavity recovers from Q disease if it is warmed up to 150 K or higher for 12 hours.

  13. Status of 3.9 GHz superconducting RF cavity technology at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, E.; Arkan, T.; Bellantoni, L.; Carter, H.; Edwards, H.; Foley, M.; Khabiboulline, T.; Mitchell, D.; Olis, D.; Rowe, A.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Fermilab is involved in an effort to assemble 3.9 GHz superconducting RF cavities into a four cavity cryomodule for use at the DESY TTF/FLASH facility as a third harmonic structure. The design gradient of the cavities is 14 MV/m. This effort involves design, fabrication, intermediate testing, assembly, and eventual delivery of the cryomodule. We report on all facets of this enterprise from design through future plans. Included will be test results of single 9-cell cavities, lessons learned, and current status.

  14. Analysis of HOM Properties of Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    S.U. De Silva, J.R. Delayen

    2011-07-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is currently being considered for a number of deflecting and crabbing applications due to improved properties and compact design geometries. The 499 MHz deflecting cavity proposed for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and the 400 MHz crab cavity for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade are two of the major applications. For high current applications the higher order modes must be damped to acceptable levels to eliminate any beam instabilities. The frequencies and R/Q of the HOMs and mode separation are evaluated and compared for different parallel-bar cavity designs.

  15. Designs of Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting Cavities for Deflecting/Crabbing Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J. R.; De Silva, S. U.

    2011-07-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is a deflecting/crabbing cavity with attractive properties, compared to other conventional designs, that is currently being considered for a number of applications. The new parallel-bar design with curved loading elements and circular or elliptical outer conductors have improved properties compared to the designs with rectangular outer conductors. We present the designs proposed as deflecting cavities for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and for Project-X and as crabbing cavities for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade and electron-ion collider at Jefferson Lab.

  16. Method for determining hydrogen mobility as a function of temperature in superconducting niobium cavities

    DOEpatents

    May, Robert

    2008-03-11

    A method for determining the mobility of hydrogen as a function of temperature in superconducting niobium cavities comprising: 1) heating a cavity under test to remove free hydrogen; 2) introducing hydrogen-3 gas into the cavity; 3) cooling the cavity to allow absorption of hydrogen-3; and 4) measuring the amount of hydrogen-3 by: a) cooling the cavity to about 4.degree. K while flowing a known and regulated amount of inert carrier gas such as argon or helium into the cavity; b) allowing the cavity to warm at a stable rate from 4.degree. K to room temperature as it leaves the chamber; and c) directing the exit gas to an ion chamber radiation detector.

  17. Superconducting RF Deflecting Cavity Design and Prototype for Short X-ray Pulse Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Jiaru; Chen, H.; Tang, C.-X.; Cheng, Guangfeng; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter; Rimmer, Robert; Slack, Gary; Turlington, Larry; Wang, Haipeng; Li, D.; Nassiri, Alireza; Waldschmidt, G.J.

    2008-07-01

    Deflecting RF cavities are proposed to be used in generating short x-ray pulses (on ~1-picosecond order) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)* using a novel scheme by Zholents**. To meet the required deflecting voltage, impedance budget from higher order, lower order and the same order modes (HOM, LOM and SOM) of the APS storage ring, extensive deflecting cavity design studies have been conducted with numerical simulations and cavity prototypes. In this paper, we report recent progress on a single cell S-band (2.8-GHz) superconducting deflecting cavity design with waveguide damping. A copper and a niobium prototype cavity were fabricated and tested, respectively to benchmark the cavity and damping designs. A new damping scheme has been proposed which provides stronger damping to both HOM and LOM by directly coupling to a damping waveguide on the cavity equator.

  18. Test Sequence for Superconducting XFEL Cavities in the Accelerator Module Test Facility (AMTF) at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffran, J.; Petersen, B.; Reschke, D.; Swierblewski, J.

    The European XFEL is a new research facility currently under construction at DESY in the Hamburg area in Germany. From 2016 onwards, it will generate extremely intense X-ray flashes that will be used by researchers from all over the world. The main part of the superconducting European XFEL linear accelerator consists of 100 accelerator modules with 800 RF-cavities inside. The accelerator modules, superconducting magnets and cavities will be tested in the accelerator module test facility (AMTF) at DESY. This paper gives an overview of the test sequences for the superconducting cavities, applied in the preparation area and at the two cryostats (XATC) of the AMTF-hall, and describes the complete area. In addition it summarizes the tests and lessons learnt until the middle of 2014.

  19. A Qubit-Coupled Nanomechanical Resonator Integrated with a Superconducting CPW Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yu; Rouxinol, Francisco; Shim, Seung-Bo; Lahaye, Matt

    2014-03-01

    In this work we discuss some of our first results integrating a qubit-coupled nanomechanical resonator with a superconducting transmission line resonator. This hybrid circuit QED system is composed of a capacitively-coupled superconducting charge-type qubit and UHF-range flexural nanoresonator, which are both embedded within a superconducting niobium coplanar waveguide (CPW) cavity. Phase-sensitive transmission measurements of the CPW cavity are used to spectroscopically probe the qubit-coupled nanoresonator via the qubit-state-dependent dispersive shift of the cavity frequency. We will discuss the design and measurement of the latest generation of these devices and the prospects for using this system to read-out the number-states statistics of a nanomechanical resonator at low thermal occupancy. NSF-DMR Career Award 1056423.

  20. A study on the effect of tantalum-impurity content on the superconducting properties of niobium materials used for making superconducting radio frequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    S B Roy, L S Sharath Chandra, M K Chattopadhyay, M K Tiwari, G S Lodha, G R Myneni

    2012-10-01

    Niobium materials in highly pure form are used in the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavities. We present here a study of the superconducting properties of such niobium materials that have been used in the fabrication of high accelerating gradient superconducting radio frequency cavities after determining their tantalum-impurity contents using a synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy technique. Our results show that there is a small change in superconducting parameters such as T{sub C},H{sub C1} and H{sub C2} when the tantalum-impurity content varies from ≈150 to ≈1300 ppm. In contrast, a buffered chemical polishing of the same niobium samples changes all these superconducting parameters more significantly. The implications of these results on the performance of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities are discussed.

  1. Superconducting RF cavities and magnets for a 4-TeV energy muon collider

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Q.S. |; Green, M.; Neuffer, D.; Summers, D.; Simrock, S.; Willen, E.

    1997-11-01

    The accelerators must take the muon beams from {approximately} 100 MeV to 2 TeV energies within the muon lifetime for a 4 TeV energy muon collider. These constraints plus the muon decay heating seriously challenge the designs of the superconducting RF (SRF) cavities and magnets in the accelerators and collider ring. The multiple superconducting recirculation linac and the very rap8id-cycling superconducting synchrotron approach are both studied. The authors briefly introduce the technical considerations and preliminary designs of the SRF systems and magnets.

  2. Superconducting Materials Testing with a High-Q Copper RF Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, S.G.; Dolgashev, V.; Bowden, G.; Lewandowski, J.; Nantista, C.D.; Canabal, A.; Tajima, T.; Capmpisi, I.E.; /Oak Ridge

    2007-11-07

    Superconducting RF is of increasing importance in particle accelerators. We have developed a resonant cavity with high quality factor and an interchangeable wall for testing of superconducting materials. A compact TE01 mode launcher attached to the coupling iris selectively excites the azimuthally symmetric cavity mode, which allows a gap at the detachable wall and is free of surface electric fields that could cause field emission, multipactor, and RF breakdown. The shape of the cavity is tailored to focus magnetic field on the test sample. We describe cryogenic experiments conducted with this cavity. An initial experiment with copper benchmarked our apparatus. This was followed by tests with Nb and MgB2. In addition to characterizing the onset of superconductivity with temperature, our cavity can be resonated with a high power klystron to determine the surface magnetic field level sustainable by the material in the superconducting state. A feedback code is used to make the low level RF drive track the resonant frequency.

  3. Optimization Studies for Radiation Shielding of a Superconducting RF Cavity Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, Camille M.; Rakhno, Igor; /Fermilab

    2010-07-09

    Test facilities for high-gradient superconducting RF cavities must be shielded for particle radiation, which is generated by field emitted electrons in the cavities. A major challenge for the shielding design is associated with uncertainty in modeling the field emission. In this work, a semi-empirical method that allows us to predict the intensity of the generated field emission is described. Spatial, angular and energy distributions of the generated radiation are calculated with the FISHPACT code. The Monte Carlo code MARS15 is used for modeling the radiation transport in matter. The detailed distributions of the generated field emission are used for studies with 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting RF cavities in the Fermilab Vertical Cavity Test Facility. This approach allows us to minimize the amount of shielding inside cryostat which is an essential operational feature.

  4. Superconducting Thin Films for SRF Cavity Applications: A Route to Higher Field Gradient Linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, Wiliam Michael

    Many linear accelerator (linac) applications rely on the use of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. In order to overcome the current field gradient limits imposed by the use of bulk niobium, a model involving the deposition of alternating superconducting-insulating-superconducting (SIS) thin films onto the interior surface of SRF cavities has been proposed. Since SRF performance is a surface phenomenon, the critical surface of these cavities is less than 1 micron thick, thus enabling the use of thin films. Before such approach can successfully be implemented fundamental studies correlating the microstructure and superconducting properties of thin films are needed. To this end the effect of grain boundary density and interfacial strain in thin films has been explored. Thin films with a smaller grain boundary density were found to have better superconducting properties than films with a larger grain boundary density. Interfacial strain due to a lattice mismatch between the film and substrate lead to two regions in films, one strained region near the interface and one relaxed region away from the interface. The presence of two regions in the film resulted in two types of superconducting behavior. Niobium films were deposited onto copper surfaces to help understand why previous attempts of implementing niobium coated copper cavities in order to exploit the better thermal properties of copper had varying degrees of success. It was found that an increased growth temperature produced niobium films with larger grains and correspondingly better superconducting properties. Proof of principle multilayer samples were prepared to test the SIS model. For the first time, multilayers were produced that were capable of shielding an underlying niobium film from vortex penetration beyond the lower critical field of bulk niobium. This result provides evidence supporting the feasibility of the SIS model.

  5. Investigation and Prediction of RF Window Performance in APT Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Humphries, S. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    The work described in this report was performed between November 1996 and May 1997 in support of the APT (Accelerator Production of Tritium) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The goal was to write and to test computer programs for charged particle orbits in RF fields. The well-documented programs were written in portable form and compiled for standard personal computers for easy distribution to LANL researchers. They will be used in several APT applications including the following. Minimization of multipactor effects in the moderate {beta} superconducting linac cavities under design for the APT accelerator. Investigation of suppression techniques for electron multipactoring in high-power RF feedthroughs. Modeling of the response of electron detectors for the protection of high power RF vacuum windows. In the contract period two new codes, Trak{_}RF and WaveSim, were completed and several critical benchmark etests were carried out. Trak{_}RF numerically tracks charged particle orbits in combined electrostatic, magnetostatic and electromagnetic fields. WaveSim determines frequency-domain RF field solutions and provides a key input to Trak{_}RF. The two-dimensional programs handle planar or cylindrical geometries. They have several unique characteristics.

  6. Three-dimensional self-consistent simulations of multipacting in superconducting radio frequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Chet Nieter

    2010-12-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities are a popular choice among researchers designing new accelerators because of the reduced power losses due to surface resistance. However, SRF cavities still have unresolved problems, including the loss of power to stray electrons. Sources of these electrons are field emission from the walls and ionization of background gas, but the predominant source is secondary emission yield (SEY) from electron impact. When the electron motion is in resonance with the cavity fields the electrons strike the cavity surface repeatedly creating a resonant build up of electrons referred to as multipacting. Cavity shaping has successfully reduced multipacting for cavities used in very high energy accelerators. However, multipacting is still a concern for the cavity power couplers, where shaping is not possible, and for cavities used to accelerate particles at moderate velocities. This Phase II project built upon existing models in the VORPAL simulation framework to allow for simulations of multipacting behavior in SRF cavities and their associated structures. The technical work involved allowed existing models of secondary electron generation to work with the complex boundary conditions needed to model the cavity structures. The types of data produced by VORPAL were also expanded to include data common used by cavity designers to evaluate cavity performance. Post-processing tools were also modified to provide information directly related to the conditions that produce multipacting. These new methods were demonstrated by running simulations of a cavity design being developed by researchers at Jefferson National Laboratory to attempt to identify the multipacting that would be an issue for the cavity design being considered. These simulations demonstrate that VORPAL now has the capabilities to assist researchers working with SRF cavities to understand and identify possible multipacting issues with their cavity designs.

  7. Wakefield calculation for superconducting TM110 cavity without azimuthal symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bellantoni, Leo; Burt, Graeme; /Lancaster U.

    2006-08-01

    The 3.9GHz TM{sub 110} mode deflecting cavity developed at FNAL has many applications, including use as a longitudinal bunch profile diagnostic, and as a crab cavity candidate for the ILC. These applications involve beams with substantial time structure. For the 13-cell version intended for the bunch profile application, long-range wakes have been evaluated in the frequency domain and short-range wakes have been evaluated in the time domain. Higher-order interactions of the main field in the cavity with the beam have also been parameterized. Pedagogic derivations are included as appendices.

  8. Preliminary Results from a superconducting photocathode sample cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Kneisel; Jacek Sekutowicz; R. Lefferts; A. Lipski

    2005-05-01

    Pure niobium has been proposed as a photocathode material to extract directly photo-currents from the surface of a RF-gun cavity [1]. However, the quantum efficiency of niobium is {approx}3 {center_dot} 10{sup -4}, whereas electro- or vacuum deposited lead has an {approx} 10 times higher quantum efficiency. We have designed and tested a photo-injector niobium cavity, which can be used to insert photo-cathodes made of different materials in the high electric field region of the cavity. Experiments have been conducted with niobium and lead, which show that neither the Q- values of the cavity nor the obtainable surface fields are significantly lowered. This paper reports about the results from these tests.

  9. Multipole Field Effects for the Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Payagalage Subashini Uddika; Delayen, Jean Roger

    2012-09-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity is currently being considered as one of the design options in rf separation for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and for the crabbing cavity for the proposed LHC luminosity upgrade. Knowledge of multipole field effects is important for accurate beam dynamics study of rf structures. The multipole components can be accurately determined numerically using the electromagnetic surface field data in the rf structure. This paper discusses the detailed analysis of those components for the fundamental deflecting/crabbing mode and higher order modes in the parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavity.

  10. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kneisel, P.; Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P.; Saito, K.; Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Myneni, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. The large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities mademore » from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of Eacc=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.« less

  11. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kneisel, P.; Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P.; Saito, K.; Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Myneni, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. The large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of Eacc=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.

  12. Review of ingot niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency accelerating cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kneisel, P.; Ciovati, G.; Dhakal, P.; Saito, K.; Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Myneni, G. R.

    2015-02-01

    As a result of collaboration between Jefferson Lab and niobium manufacturer Companhia Brasileira de Metalurgia e Mineração (CBMM), ingot niobium was explored as a possible material for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity fabrication. The first single cell cavity from large-grain high purity niobium was fabricated and successfully tested at Jefferson Lab in 2004. This work triggered research activities in other SRF laboratories around the world. Large-grain (LG) niobium became not only an interesting alternative material for cavity builders, but also material scientists and surface scientists were eager to participate in the development of this technology. Many single cell cavities made from material of different suppliers have been tested successfully and several multi-cell cavities have shown performances comparable to the best cavities made from standard fine-grain niobium. Several 9-cell cavities fabricated by Research Instruments and tested at DESY exceeded the best performing fine grain cavities with a record accelerating gradient of Eacc=45.6 MV/m. The quality factor of those cavities was also higher than that of fine-grain (FG) cavities processed with the same methods. Such performance levels push the state-of-the art of SRF technology and are of great interest for future accelerators. This contribution reviews the development of ingot niobium technology and highlights some of the differences compared to standard FG material and opportunities for further developments.

  13. Design and study of a high-current 5-cell superconducting rf cavity.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z.; Nassiri, A.; Waldschmidt, G. )

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory is considering the development of a superconducting linac-based fourth-generation hard X-ray source to meet future scientific needs of the hard X-ray user community. This work specifically focuses on the design of an optimized 5-cell superconducting radio-frequency structure well suited for a high-energy, high-beam-current energy recovery linac. The cavity design parameters are based on the APS storage ring nominal 7 GeV and 100 mA beam operation. A high-current 5-cell cw superconducting cavity operating at 1.4 GHz has been designed. In order to achieve a high current, the accelerating cavity shape has been optimized and large end-cell beam pipes have been adopted. The beam break-up threshold of the cavity has been estimated using the code TDBBU, which predicts a high threshold beam current for a 7 GeV energy recovery linac model. A copper prototype cavity has been fabricated that uses half-cell modules, initially assembled by clamping the cells together.

  14. Strong vacuum squeezing from bichromatically driven Kerrlike cavities: from optomechanics to superconducting circuits

    PubMed Central

    Garcés, Rafael; de Valcárcel, Germán J.

    2016-01-01

    Squeezed light, displaying less fluctuation than vacuum in some observable, is key in the flourishing field of quantum technologies. Optical or microwave cavities containing a Kerr nonlinearity are known to potentially yield large levels of squeezing, which have been recently observed in optomechanics and nonlinear superconducting circuit platforms. Such Kerr-cavity squeezing however suffers from two fundamental drawbacks. First, optimal squeezing requires working close to turning points of a bistable cycle, which are highly unstable against noise thus rendering optimal squeezing inaccessible. Second, the light field has a macroscopic coherent component corresponding to the pump, making it less versatile than the so-called squeezed vacuum, characterised by a null mean field. Here we prove analytically and numerically that the bichromatic pumping of optomechanical and superconducting circuit cavities removes both limitations. This finding should boost the development of a new generation of robust vacuum squeezers in the microwave and optical domains with current technology. PMID:26916946

  15. Coupling erbium spins to a three-dimensional superconducting cavity at zero magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Hui; Fernandez-Gonzalvo, Xavier; Longdell, Jevon J.

    2016-08-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the coupling at zero magnetic field of an isotopically pure erbium-doped yttrium orthosilicate crystal (167Er:YSO ) to a three-dimensional superconducting cavity with a Q factor of 105. A tunable loop-gap resonator is used and its resonance frequency is tuned to observe the hyperfine transitions of the erbium sample. The observed spectrum differs from what is predicted by the published spin Hamiltonian parameters. The narrow cavity linewidth also enables the observation of asymmetric line shapes for these hyperfine transitions. Such a broadly tunable superconducting cavity (from 1.6 to 4.0 GHz in the current design) is a promising device for building hybrid quantum systems.

  16. High fidelity all-microwave controlled-phase gate for superconducting qubits by cavity vacuum displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, Hanhee; Zhou, D.; Reed, M. D.; Kirchmair, G.; Frunzio, L.; Girvin, S. M.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a new all-microwave controlled phase entangling gate for the superconducting qubits in the three-dimensional circuit QED (3D cQED) architecture. The gate exploits the strong coupling between qubits and a cavity, wherein the cavity frequency dispersively shifts depending on the qubit register state. We off-resonantly displace the cavity vacuum state; each computational state evolves a different phase due to the dispersive coupling, yielding a conditional phase. While designed to exploit the advantages of the 3D cQED architecture, the gate requires only dispersive coupling, making the gate applicable to a wide variety of superconducting qubit architectures. We demonstrate 98% gate fidelity evaluated by quantum process tomography, and will discuss how appropriate choices of system parameters could increase this number and how we could minimize the gate infidelity due to measurement induced dephasing and non-adiabatic gate procedure.

  17. Strong Meissner screening change in superconducting radio frequency cavities due to mild baking

    SciTech Connect

    Romanenko, A. Grassellino, A.; Barkov, F.; Suter, A.; Salman, Z.; Prokscha, T.

    2014-02-17

    We investigate “hot” regions with anomalous high field dissipation in bulk niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities for particle accelerators by using low energy muon spin rotation (LE-μSR) on corresponding cavity cutouts. We demonstrate that superconducting properties at the hot region are well described by the non-local Pippard/BCS model for niobium in the clean limit with a London penetration depth λ{sub L}=23±2 nm. In contrast, a cutout sample from the 120 ∘C baked cavity shows a much larger λ>100 nm and a depth dependent mean free path, likely due to gradient in vacancy concentration. We suggest that these vacancies can efficiently trap hydrogen and hence prevent the formation of hydrides responsible for rf losses in hot regions.

  18. Mirror smooth superconducting RF cavities by mechanical polishing with minimal acid use

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, C.A.; Cooley, L.D.; /Fermilab

    2011-02-01

    A new mechanical technique for polishing the inside surface of niobium superconducting RF (SRF) cavities has been developed. Mirror-like finishes, the smoothest observed in cavities so far, were produced after fine polishing, with < 15 nm RMS roughness over 1 mm{sup 2} scan area. This is an order of magnitude less than the typical roughness produced by electropolishing. The processing equipment has advantages of modest installed and operating costs, simple associated technology, and no large quantities of acutely toxic chemicals or special handling procedures. Cavity quality factors above 10{sup 10} were maintained well above the 35 MV m{sup -1} benchmark for electropolished cavities, and this was achieved with an intermediate finish not as smooth as the final polish. Repair of a weld defect, which is intrinsic to this process, was also demonstrated. These transformational aspects could enable a new SRF cavity processing paradigm for future large scale particle accelerators such as the International Linear Collider.

  19. Mechanical Study of Superconducting Parallel-Bar Deflecting/Crabbing Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    H. Park, J.R. Delayen, S.U. De Silva

    2011-07-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar deflecting/crabbing cavities have improved properties compared to conventional cavity structures. It is currently being considered for number of applications. The mechanical design analysis is performed on two designs of the 499 MHz parallel-bar deflecting cavity for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade. The main purpose of the mechanical study is to examine the structural stability of the cavities under the operating conditions in the accelerators. The study results will suggest the need for additional structural strengthening. Also the study results will help to develop a concept of the tuning method. If the cavity is to be installed in the accelerator it should satisfy a certain design parameters due to the safety requirements (for example, pressure system requirements) which are much severe condition than the actual operating condition.

  20. Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made from medium and low-purity niobium ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made of ingot niobium with residual resistivity ratio (RRR) greater than 250 have proven to have similar or better performance than fine-grain Nb cavities of the same purity, after standard processing. The high purity requirement contributes to the high cost of the material. As superconducting accelerators operating in continuous-wave typically require cavities to operate at moderate accelerating gradients, using lower purity material could be advantageous not only to reduce cost but also to achieve higher Q 0-values. In this contribution we present the results from cryogenic RF tests of 1.3-1.5 GHz single-cell cavities made of ingot Nb of medium (RRR = 100-150) and low (RRR = 60) purity from different suppliers. Cavities made of medium-purity ingots routinely achieved peak surface magnetic field values greater than 70 mT with an average Q 0-value of 2 × 1010 at 2 K after standard processing treatments. The performances of cavities made of low-purity ingots were affected by significant pitting of the surface after chemical etching.

  1. Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made from medium and low-purity niobium ingots

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2016-04-07

    Superconducting radio-frequency cavities made of ingot niobium with residual resistivity ratio (RRR) greater than 250 have proven to have similar or better performance than fine-grain Nb cavities of the same purity, after standard processing. The high purity requirement contributes to the high cost of the material. As superconducting accelerators operating in continuous-wave typically require cavities to operate at moderate accelerating gradients, using lower purity material could be advantageous not only to reduce cost but also to achieve higher Q0-values. In this contribution we present the results from cryogenic RF tests of 1.3–1.5 GHz single-cell cavities made of ingot Nb ofmore » medium (RRR = 100–150) and low (RRR = 60) purity from different suppliers. Cavities made of medium-purity ingots routinely achieved peak surface magnetic field values greater than 70 mT with an average Q0-value of 2 × 1010 at 2 K after standard processing treatments. As a result, the performances of cavities made of low-purity ingots were affected by significant pitting of the surface after chemical etching.« less

  2. RF Conditioning and Testing of Fundamental Power Couplers for SNS Superconducting Cavity Production

    SciTech Connect

    M. Stirbet; G.K. Davis; M. A. Drury; C. Grenoble; J. Henry; G. Myneni; T. Powers; K. Wilson; M. Wiseman; I.E. Campisi; Y.W. Kang; D. Stout

    2005-05-16

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) makes use of 33 medium beta (0.61) and 48 high beta (0.81) superconducting cavities. Each cavity is equipped with a fundamental power coupler, which should withstand the full klystron power of 550 kW in full reflection for the duration of an RF pulse of 1.3 msec at 60 Hz repetition rate. Before assembly to a superconducting cavity, the vacuum components of the coupler are submitted to acceptance procedures consisting of preliminary quality assessments, cleaning and clean room assembly, vacuum leak checks and baking under vacuum, followed by conditioning and RF high power testing. Similar acceptance procedures (except clean room assembly and baking) were applied for the airside components of the coupler. All 81 fundamental power couplers for SNS superconducting cavity production have been RF power tested at JLAB Newport News and, beginning in April 2004 at SNS Oak Ridge. This paper gives details of coupler processing and RF high power-assessed performances.

  3. Fiber Optic Based Thermometry System for Superconducting RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kochergin, Vladimir

    2013-05-06

    Thermometry is recognized as the best technique to identify and characterize losses in SRF cavities. The most widely used and reliable apparatus for temperature mapping at cryogenic temperatures is based on carbon resistors (RTDs). The use of this technology on multi-cell cavities is inconvenient due to the very large number of sensors required to obtain sufficient spatial resolution. Recent developments make feasible the use of multiplexible fiber optic sensors for highly distributed temperature measurements. However, sensitivity of multiplexible cryogenic temperature sensors was found extending only to 12K at best and thus was not sufficient for SRF cavity thermometry. During the course of the project the team of MicroXact, JLab and Virginia Tech developed and demonstrated the multiplexible fiber optic sensor with adequate response below 20K. The demonstrated temperature resolution is by at least a factor of 60 better than that of the best multiplexible fiber optic temperature sensors reported to date. The clear path toward at least 10times better temperature resolution is shown. The first to date temperature distribution measurements with ~2.5mm spatial resolution was done with fiber optic sensors at 2K to4K temperatures. The repeatability and accuracy of the sensors were verified only at 183K, but at this temperature both parameters significantly exceeded the state of the art. The results of this work are expected to find a wide range of applications, since the results are enabling the whole new testing capabilities, not accessible before.

  4. Development of Ultra High Gradient and High Q{sub 0} Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Rongli; Clemens, William A.; Follkie, James E.; Harris, Teena M.; Kushnick, Peter W.; Machie, Danny; Martin, Robert E.; Palczewski, Ari D.; Perry, Era A.; Slack, Gary L.; Williams, R. S.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Hao, J. K.; Li, Y. M.; Liu, K. X.

    2013-06-01

    We report on the recent progress at Jefferson Lab in developing ultra high gradient and high Q{sub 0} superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for future SRF based machines. A new 1300 MHz 9-cell prototype cavity is being fabricated. This cavity has an optimized shape in terms of the ratio of the peak surface field (both magnetic and electric) to the acceleration gradient, hence the name low surface field (LSF) shape. The goal of the effort is to demonstrate an acceleration gradient of 50 MV/m with Q{sub 0} of 10{sup 10} at 2 K in a 9-cell SRF cavity. Fine-grain niobium material is used. Conventional forming, machining and electron beam welding method are used for cavity fabrication. New techniques are adopted to ensure repeatable, accurate and inexpensive fabrication of components and the full assembly. The completed cavity is to be first mechanically polished to a mirror-finish, a newly acquired in-house capability at JLab, followed by the proven ILC-style processing recipe established already at JLab. In parallel, new single-cell cavities made from large-grain niobium material are made to further advance the cavity treatment and processing procedures, aiming for the demonstration of an acceleration gradient of 50 MV/m with Q{sub 0} of 2-10{sup 10} at 2K.

  5. Flux pinning characteristics in cylindrical ingot niobium used in superconducting radio frequency cavity fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Dhavale Ashavai, Pashupati Dhakal, Anatolii A Polyanskii, Gianluigi Ciovati

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of from DC magnetization and penetration depth measurements of cylindrical bulk large-grain (LG) and fine-grain (FG) niobium samples used for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The surface treatment consisted of electropolishing and low temperature baking as they are typically applied to SRF cavities. The magnetization data were fitted using a modified critical state model. The critical current density Jc and pinning force Fp are calculated from the magnetization data and their temperature dependence and field dependence are presented. The LG samples have lower critical current density and pinning force density compared to FG samples which implies a lower flux trapping efficiency. This effect may explain the lower values of residual resistance often observed in LG cavities than FG cavities.

  6. Superconducting Cavity Electromechanics on a Silicon-on-Insulator Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieterle, Paul B.; Kalaee, Mahmoud; Fink, Johannes M.; Painter, Oskar

    2016-07-01

    Fabrication processes involving anhydrous hydrofluoric vapor etching are developed to create high-Q aluminum superconducting microwave resonators on free-standing silicon membranes formed from a silicon-on-insulator wafer. Using this fabrication process, a high-impedance 8.9-GHz coil resonator is coupled capacitively with a large participation ratio to a 9.7-MHz micromechanical resonator. Two-tone microwave spectroscopy and radiation pressure backaction are used to characterize the coupled system in a dilution refrigerator down to temperatures of Tf=11 mK , yielding a measured electromechanical vacuum coupling rate of g0/2 π =24.6 Hz and a mechanical resonator Q factor of Qm=1.7 ×1 07. Microwave backaction cooling of the mechanical resonator is also studied, with a minimum phonon occupancy of nm≈16 phonons being realized at an elevated fridge temperature of Tf=211 mK .

  7. Preparing Greenberger--Horne--Zeilinger Entangled Photon Fock States of Three Cavities Coupled by a Superconducting Flux Qutrit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhen-Fei; Su, Qi-Ping; Yang, Chui-Ping

    2013-08-01

    We propose a way to prepare Greenberger--Horne--Zeilinger (GHZ) entangled photon Fock states of three cavities, by using a superconducting flux qutrit coupled to the cavities. This proposal does not require the use of classical microwave pulses and measurement during the entire operation. Thus, the operation is greatly simplified and the circuit engineering complexity and cost is much reduced. The proposal is quite general and can be applied to generate three-cavity GHZ entangled photon Fock states when the three cavities are coupled by a different three-level physical system such as a superconducting charge qutrit, a transmon qutrit, or a quantum dot.

  8. Fast 704 MHz Ferroelectric Tuner for Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-04-12

    The Omega-P SBIR project described in this Report has as its goal the development, test, and evaluation of a fast electrically-controlled L-band tuner for BNL Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) in the Electron Ion Collider (EIC) upgrade of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The tuner, that employs an electrically-controlled ferroelectric component, is to allow fast compensation to cavity resonance changes. In ERLs, there are several factors which significantly affect the amount of power required from the wall-plug to provide the RF-power level necessary for the operation. When beam loading is small, the power requirements are determined by (i) ohmic losses in cavity walls, (ii) fluctuations in amplitude and/or phase for beam currents, and (iii) microphonics. These factors typically require a substantial change in the coupling between the cavity and the feeding line, which results in an intentional broadening of the cavity bandwidth, which in turn demands a significant amount of additional RF power. If beam loading is not small, there is a variety of beam-drive phase instabilities to be managed, and microphonics will still remain an issue, so there remain requirements for additional power. Moreover ERL performance is sensitive to changes in beam arrival time, since any such change is equivalent to phase instability with its vigorous demands for additional power. In this Report, we describe the new modular coaxial tuner, with specifications suitable for the 704 MHz ERL application. The device would allow changing the RF-coupling during the cavity filling process in order to effect significant RF power savings, and also will provide rapid compensation for beam imbalance and allow for fast stabilization against phase fluctuations caused by microphonics, beam-driven instabilities, etc. The tuner is predicted to allow a reduction of about ten times in the required power from the RF source, as compared to a compensation system

  9. Isogeometric simulation of Lorentz detuning in superconducting accelerator cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corno, Jacopo; de Falco, Carlo; De Gersem, Herbert; Schöps, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Cavities in linear accelerators suffer from eigenfrequency shifts due to mechanical deformation caused by the electromagnetic radiation pressure, a phenomenon known as Lorentz detuning. Estimating the frequency shift up to the needed accuracy by means of standard Finite Element Methods, is a complex task due to the non exact representation of the geometry and due to the necessity for mesh refinement when using low order basis functions. In this paper, we use Isogeometric Analysis for discretizing both mechanical deformations and electromagnetic fields in a coupled multiphysics simulation approach. The combined high-order approximation of both leads to high accuracies at a substantially lower computational cost.

  10. Coherent-state storage and retrieval between superconducting cavities using parametric frequency conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Sirois, A. J.; Castellanos-Beltran, M. A.; DeFeo, M. P.; Ranzani, L.; Lecocq, F.; Simmonds, R. W.; Teufel, J. D.; Aumentado, J.

    2015-04-27

    In superconducting quantum information, machined aluminum superconducting cavities have proven to be a well-controlled, low-dissipation electromagnetic environment for quantum circuits such as qubits. They can possess large internal quality factors, Q{sub int} > 10{sup 8}, and present the possibility of storing quantum information for times far exceeding those of microfabricated circuits. However, in order to be useful as a storage element, these cavities require a fast “read/write” mechanism—in other words, they require tunable coupling between other systems of interest such as other cavity modes and qubits, as well as any associated readout hardware. In this work, we demonstrate these qualities in a simple dual cavity architecture in which a low-Q “readout” mode is parametrically coupled to a high-Q “storage” mode, allowing us to store and retrieve classical information. Specifically, we employ a flux-driven Josephson junction-based coupling scheme to controllably swap coherent states between two cavities, demonstrating full, sequenced control over the coupling rates between modes.

  11. A new 2 Kelvin Superconducting Half-Wave Cavity Cryomodule for PIP-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Z. A.; Barcikowski, A.; Cherry, G. L.; Fischer, R. L.; Gerbick, S. M.; Jansma, W. G.; Kedzie, M. J.; Kelly, M. P.; Kim, S.-h.; Lebedev, V. A.; MacDonald, S. W. T.; Nicol, T. H.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Reid, T. C.; Shepard, K. W.; White, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed and is implementing a novel 2 K superconducting cavity cryomodule operating at 162.5 MHz. This cryomodule is designed for the acceleration of 2 mA H-/proton beams from 2.1 to 10 MeV as part of the Fermilab Proton Improvement Project-II (PIP-II). This work is an evolution of techniques recently implemented in two previous heavy-ion accelerator cryomodules now operating at Argonne National Laboratory. The 2 K cryomodule is comprised of 8 half-wave cavities operated in the continuous wave mode with 8 superconducting magnets, one in front of each cavity. All of the solenoids and cavities operate off of a single gravity fed 2 K helium cryogenic system expected to provide up to 50 W of 2 K cooling. Here we review the mechanical design of the cavities and cryomodule which were developed using methods similar to those required in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. This will include an overview of the cryomodule layout, the alignment of the accelerator components via modifications of the cryomodule vacuum vessel and provide a status report on the cryomodule assembly.

  12. A technique for monitoring fast tuner piezoactuator preload forces for superconducting rf cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Pischalnikov, Y.; Branlard, J.; Carcagno, R.; Chase, B.; Edwards, H.; Orris, D.; Makulski, A.; McGee, M.; Nehring, R.; Poloubotko, V.; Sylvester, C.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The technology for mechanically compensating Lorentz Force detuning in superconducting RF cavities has already been developed at DESY. One technique is based on commercial piezoelectric actuators and was successfully demonstrated on TESLA cavities [1]. Piezo actuators for fast tuners can operate in a frequency range up to several kHz; however, it is very important to maintain a constant static force (preload) on the piezo actuator in the range of 10 to 50% of its specified blocking force. Determining the preload force during cool-down, warm-up, or re-tuning of the cavity is difficult without instrumentation, and exceeding the specified range can permanently damage the piezo stack. A technique based on strain gauge technology for superconducting magnets has been applied to fast tuners for monitoring the preload on the piezoelectric assembly. The design and testing of piezo actuator preload sensor technology is discussed. Results from measurements of preload sensors installed on the tuner of the Capture Cavity II (CCII)[2] tested at FNAL are presented. These results include measurements during cool-down, warmup, and cavity tuning along with dynamic Lorentz force compensation.

  13. Enhanced electromechanical coupling of a nanomechanical resonator to coupled superconducting cavities

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng-Bo; Li, Hong-Rong; Li, Fu-Li

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the electromechanical coupling between a nanomechanical resonator and two parametrically coupled superconducting coplanar waveguide cavities that are driven by a two-mode squeezed microwave source. We show that, with the selective coupling of the resonator to the cavity Bogoliubov modes, the radiation-pressure type coupling can be greatly enhanced by several orders of magnitude, enabling the single photon strong coupling to be reached. This allows the investigation of a number of interesting phenomena such as photon blockade effects and the generation of nonclassical quantum states with electromechanical systems. PMID:26753744

  14. Use of an Injection Locked Magnetron to Drive a Superconducting RF Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Haipeng Wang, Robert Rimmer, G. Davis, Imran Tahir, Amos Dexter, Greame Burt, Richard Carter

    2010-05-01

    The use of an injection locked CW magnetron to drive a 2.45 GHz superconducting RF cavity has been successfully demonstrated. With a locking power less than -27 dB with respect to the output and with a phase control system acting on the locking signal, cavity phase was accurately controlled for hours at a time without loss of lock whilst suppressing microphonics. The phase control accuracy achieved was 0.8 deg. r.m.s. The main contributing disturbance limiting ultimate phase control was power supply ripple from the low specification switch mode power supply used for the experiment.

  15. Low-Level RF Control of Microphonics in Superconducting Spoke-Loaded Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, Z.A.; Kelly, M.P.; Sharamentov, S.I.; Shepard, K.W.; Davis, G.; Delayen, Jean; Doolittle, Lawrence

    2007-10-01

    This paper presents the results of cw RF frequency control and RF phase-stabilization experiments performed with a piezoelectric fast tuner mechanically coupled to a superconducting, 345 MHz, Ë = 0.5 triple-spoke-loaded cavity operating at 4.2K. The piezoelectric fast tuner damped low-frequency microphonic-noise by an order of magnitude. Two methods of RF phase-stabilization were characterized: overcoupling with negative phase feedback, and also fast mechanical tuner feedback. The Ë = 0.5 triple-spoke-loaded cavity RF field amplitude and phase errors were controlled to ±0.5% and ±30 respectively.

  16. Low-level RF control of superconducting microphonics in spoke-loaded cavities.

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, Z. A.; Kelly, M. P.; Sharamentov, S. I.; Shepard, K. W.; Davis, G. K.; Delayen, J. R.; Doolittle, L. R.; TJNAF; LBNL

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of cw RF frequency control and RF phase-stabilization experiments performed with a piezoelectric fast tuner mechanically coupled to a superconducting, 345 MHz, {beta} = 0.5 triple-spoke-loaded cavity operating at 4.2K. The piezoelectric fast tuner damped low-frequency microphonic-noise by an order of magnitude. Two methods of RF phase-stabilization were characterized: overcoupling with negative phase feedback, and also fast mechanical tuner feedback. The {beta} = 0.5 triple-spoke-loaded cavity RF field amplitude and phase errors were controlled to {+-} 0.5% and {+-} 30 respectively.

  17. Modifications of Superconducting Properties of Niobium Caused by Nitrogen Doping Recipes for High Q Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Vostrikov, Alexander; Checchin, Mattia; Grassellino, Anna; Kim, Young-Kee; Romanenko, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    A study is presented on the superconducting properties of niobium used for the fabrication of the SRF cavities after treating by recently discovered nitrogen doping methods. Cylindrical niobium samples have been subjected to the standard surface treatments applied to the cavities (electro-polishing, l 20°C bake) and compared with samples treated by additional nitrogen doping recipes routinely used to reach ultra-high quality factor values (>3· 1010 at 2 K, 16 MV/m). The DC magnetization curves and the complex magnetic AC susceptibility have been measured. Evidence for the lowered field of first flux penetration after nitrogen doping is found suggesting a correlation with the lowered quench fields. Superconducting critical temperatures Tc = 9.25 K are found to be in agreement with previous measurements, and no strong effect on the critical surface field (Bd) from nitrogen doping was found.

  18. Realization of universal quantum cloning with superconducting quantum-interference device qubits in a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Yu, Ya-Fei; Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Liu, Song-Hao

    2008-03-01

    We propose a scheme to realize a 1→2 universal quantum cloning machine with superconducting quantum interference device qubits, embedded in a high- Q cavity. The controlled-NOT operations are derived to present our scheme, and the two-photon Raman resonance processes are used to increase the operation rate. Compared with previous works, our scheme has advantages in the experimental realization and further utilization.

  19. Design of coupler for the NSLS-II storage ring superconducting RF cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Yeddulla, M.; Rose, J.

    2011-03-28

    NSLS-II is a 3GeV, 500mA, high brightness, 1 MW beam power synchrotron facility that is designed with four superconducting cavities working at 499.68 MHz. To operate the cavities in over-damped coupling condition, an External Quality Factor (Qext) of {approx}65000 is required. We have modified the existing coupler for the CESR-B cavity which has a Qext of {approx}200,000 to meet the requirements of NSLS-II. CESR-B cavity has an aperture coupler with a coupler 'tongue' connecting the cavity to the waveguide. We have optimized the length, width and thickness of the 'tongue' as well as the width of the aperture to increase the coupling using the three dimensional electromagnetic field solver, HFSS. Several possible designs will be presented. We have modified the coupler of the CESR-B cavity to be used in the storage ring at the NSLS-II project using HFSS and verified using CST Microwave Studio. Using a combination of increasing the length and width of the coupler tongue and increasing the width of the aperture, the external Q of the cavity coupler was decreased to {approx}65000 as required for the design of the NSLS-II storage ring design.

  20. Hybrid Physical Chemical Vapor Deposition of Superconducting Magnesium Diboride Coatings for Large Scale Radio Frequency Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Namhoon; Withanage, Wenura; Tan, Teng; Wolak, Matthaeus; Xi, Xiaoxing

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium diboride (MgB2) is considered to be a great candidate for next generation superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities due to its higher critical temperature Tc (40 K) and increased thermodynamic critical field Hc compared to other conventional superconductors. These properties significantly reduce the BCS surface resistance (RsBCS)and residual resistance (Rres) according to theoretical studies and suggest the possibility of an enhanced accelerating field (Eacc) . We have investigated the possibility of coating the inner surface of a 3 GHz SRF cavity with MgB2 by using a hybrid physical-vapor deposition (HPCVD) system which was modified for this purpose. To simulate a real 3 GHz SRF cavity, a stainless steel mock cavity has been employed for the study. The film quality was characterized on small substrates that were placed at selected locations within the cavity. MgB2 films on stainless steel foils, niobium pieces and SiC substrates showed transition temperatures of above 36 K. Dielectric resonance measurements resulted in promising Q values as obtained for the MgB2 films grown on the various substrates. By employing the HPCVD technique, a uniform film was achieved across the cavity interior, demonstrating the feasibility of HPCVD for MgB2 coatings for SRF cavities.

  1. Design of a horizontal test cryostat for superconducting RF cavities for the FREIA facility at Uppsala University

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier, N. R.; Thermeau, J.-P.; Bujard, P.; Junquera, T.; Hermansson, L.; Kern, R. Santiago; Ruber, R.

    2014-01-29

    Uppsala University is constructing a large scale facility, called FREIA (Facility for Research Instrumentation and Accelerator Development). FREIA includes a helium liquefier and an accelerator test facility and has the capacity to test superconducting radio-frequency (RF) cavities with the same RF system and RF power level as in an accelerator. A central element of FREIA is a horizontal test cryostat connected in closed loop to a helium liquefier. This cryostat can house two fully equipped (tuners, piezo, power coupler, helium tank) superconducting cavities to perform full RF high power tests and operate at temperatures between 1.8 K and 4.2 K. The cryostat is designed to accommodate a large array of superconducting cavities and magnets, among which the European Spallation Source (ESS) type spoke and high-β elliptical cavities as well as TESLA/ILC type elliptical cavities. The present status of the project and the design of the cryostat are reported.

  2. Progress on the Development of a Superconducting Connection for Niobium Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Kneisel, Gianluigi Ciovati, Jacek Sekutowicz ,Larry Turlington

    2009-06-01

    The availability of a superconducting connection between adjacent niobium radio-frequency (RF) cavities with the capability to carry up to 30 mT of the magnetic flux would be particularly of great benefit to layouts of long accelerators like the International Linear Collider (ILC). It would shorten the distances between structures and therefore the total length of an accelerator with the associated cost reductions. In addition, the superconducting connection would be ideal for a superstructure – two multi-cell cavities connected through a half wavelength long beam pipe providing the coupling. Two single-cell niobium cavities have been designed with Nb-1Zr flanges welded to one of the irises to allow a connection between them with a niobium gasket. A transition to the normal-conducting state of the connection due to the applied RF field causes a reduction of the cavities’ quality factor. The cavity design will be presented in this contribution along with possible choices of materials for the joint.

  3. On the Mystery of using Helium's second Sound for Quench Detection of a Superconducting Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, R.; Markham, S.

    The detection of a second sound wave, excited by a quench, has become a valuable tool in diagnosing hot spots and performance limitations of superconducting cavities. Several years ago, Cornell developed a convenient detector (OSTs) for these waves that nowadays are used world-wide. In a usual set-up, many OSTs surround the cavity and the quench location is determined by triangulation of the different OST signals. Convenient as the method is there is a small remaining mystery: taking the well-known velocity of the second sound wave, the quench seems to come from a place slightly beyond the cavity's outer surface. We will present a model that might help explaining the discrepancy.

  4. Summary of performance of superconducting radio-frequency cavities built from CBMM niobium ingots

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi Dhakal, Pashupati Kneisel, Peter Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2015-12-04

    Several Nb ingots have been provided by CBMM to Jefferson Lab since 2004 as part of an R&D collaboration aimed at evaluating the performance of superconducting radio-frequency cavities built from ingots with different purity, as a results of different ingot production processes. Approximately 32 multi- and single-cell cavities with resonant frequency between ∼1.3-2.3 GHz were built, treated and tested at 2 K at Jefferson Lab between 2004 and 2014. The average peak surface field achieved in cavities made of RRR∼260 and RRR∼100-150 ingots was (119 ± 4) mT and (100 ± 8) mT, respectively. Higher quality factor values at 2.0 K have been measured in medium-purity, compared to higher purity material.

  5. Cryogenic Test of a 750 MHz Superconducting RF Dipole Crabbing Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Castilla, Alejandro; Delayen, Jean R.; Park, HyeKyoung

    2014-07-01

    A superconducting rf dipole cavity has been designed to address the challenges of a high repetition rate (750 MHz), high current for both electron/ion species (0.5/3 A per bunch), and large crossing angle (50 mrad) at the interaction points (IPs) crabbing system for the Medium Energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab. The cavity prototype built at Niowave, Inc. has been tested at the Jefferson Lab facilities. In this work we present a detailed analysis of the prototype cavity performance at 4 K and 2 K, corroborating the absence of hard multipacting barriers that could limit the desired transverse fields, along with the surface resistance (Rs) temperature dependency.

  6. A proposal for the realization of universal quantum gates via superconducting qubits inside a cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Obada, A.-S.F.; Hessian, H.A.; Mohamed, A.-B.A.; Homid, Ali H.

    2013-07-15

    A family of quantum logic gates is proposed via superconducting (SC) qubits coupled to a SC-cavity. The Hamiltonian for SC-charge qubits inside a single mode cavity is considered. Three- and two-qubit operations are generated by applying a classical magnetic field with the flux. Therefore, a number of quantum logic gates are realized. Numerical simulations and calculation of the fidelity are used to prove the success of these operations for these gates. -- Highlights: •A family of quantum logic gates is proposed via SC-qubits coupled to a cavity. •Three- and two-qubit operations are generated via a classical field with the flux. •Numerical simulations and calculation of the fidelity are used to prove the success of these operations for these gates.

  7. Comparison of higher order modes damping techniques for 800 MHz single cell superconducting cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashkov, Ya. V.; Sobenin, N. P.; Petrushina, I. I.; Zobov, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    At present, applications of 800 MHz harmonic cavities in both bunch lengthening and shortening regimes are under consideration and discussion in the framework of the High Luminosity LHC project. In this paper we study electromagnetic characteristics of high order modes (HOMs) for a single cell 800 MHz superconducting cavity and arrays of such cavities connected by drifts tubes. Different techniques for the HOMs damping such as beam pipe grooves, coaxial-notch loads, fluted beam pipes etc. are investigated and compared. The influence of the sizes and geometry of the drift tubes on the HOMs damping is analyzed. The problems of a multipacting discharge in the considered structures are discussed and the operating frequency detuning due to the Lorentz force is evaluated.

  8. Effects of liquid helium bubble formation in a superconducting cavity cryogenic system

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, X.; Wang, E.; Xin, T.

    2011-03-01

    We constructed a simple prototype model based on the geometry of the 56 MHz superconducting cavity for RHIC. We studied the formation, in this prototype, of bubbles of liquid helium and their thermal effects on the cavity. We found that due to the low viscosity of the liquid helium, and its small surface tension, no large bubbles formed. The tiny bubbles, generated from most of the area, behaved like light gas travelling in a free space and escaped from the trapping region. The bubbles that were generated in the trapping area, due to its descending geometry, are much bigger than the other bubbles, but due to the liquid flow generated by heating, they still are negligible compared to the size of the trapping region. We expected that the effects of bubbles in our 56 MHz cavity during operation might well be negligible.

  9. Compact superconducting rf-dipole cavity designs for deflecting and crabbing applications

    SciTech Connect

    De Silva, Subashini; Delayen, Jean R.; Castilla, Alejandro

    2013-06-01

    Over the years the superconducting parallel-bar design has evolved into an rf-dipole cavity with improved properties. The new rf-dipole design is considered for a number of deflecting and crabbing applications. Some of those applications are the 499 MHz rf separator system for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade, the 400 MHz crabbing cavity system for the proposed LHC high luminosity upgrade, and the 750 MHz crabbing cavity for the medium energy electron-ion collider in Jefferson Lab. In this paper we present the optimized rf design in terms of rf performance including rf properties, higher order modes (HOM) properties, multipacting and multipole expansion for the above mentioned applications.

  10. Fundamental and HOM Coupler Design for the Superconducting Parallel-Bar Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    S.U. De Silva, J.R. Delayen,

    2011-03-01

    The superconducting parallel-bar cavity is currently being considered as a deflecting system for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade and as a crabbing cavity for a possible LHC luminosity upgrade. Currently the designs are optimized to achieve lower surface fields within the dimensional constraints for the above applications. A detailed analysis of the fundamental input power coupler design for the parallel-bar cavity is performed considering beam loading and the effects of microphonics. For higher beam loading the damping of the HOMs is vital to reduce beam instabilities generated due to the wake fields. An analysis of threshold impedances for each application and impedances of the modes that requires damping are presented in this paper with the design of HOM couplers.

  11. Surface analyses of electropolished niobium samples for superconducting radio frequency cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Tyagi, P. V.; Nishiwaki, M.; Saeki, T.; Sawabe, M.; Hayano, H.; Noguchi, T.; Kato, S.

    2010-07-15

    The performance of superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities is sometimes limited by contaminations present on the cavity surface. In the recent years extensive research has been done to enhance the cavity performance by applying improved surface treatments such as mechanical grinding, electropolishing (EP), chemical polishing, tumbling, etc., followed by various rinsing methods such as ultrasonic pure water rinse, alcoholic rinse, high pressure water rinse, hydrogen per oxide rinse, etc. Although good cavity performance has been obtained lately by various post-EP cleaning methods, the detailed nature about the surface contaminants is still not fully characterized. Further efforts in this area are desired. Prior x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses of EPed niobium samples treated with fresh EP acid, demonstrated that the surfaces were covered mainly with the niobium oxide (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}) along with carbon, in addition a small quantity of sulfur and fluorine were also found in secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis. In this article, the authors present the analyses of surface contaminations for a series of EPed niobium samples located at various positions of a single cell niobium cavity followed by ultrapure water rinsing as well as our endeavor to understand the aging effect of EP acid solution in terms of contaminations presence at the inner surface of the cavity with the help of surface analytical tools such as XPS, SIMS, and scanning electron microscope at KEK.

  12. Microwave induced plasma discharge in multi-cell superconducting radio-frequency cavity.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shahid; Mammosser, John D

    2015-07-01

    A R&D effort for in situ cleaning of 1.5 GHz Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities at room temperature using the plasma processing technique has been initiated at Jefferson Lab. This is a step toward the cleaning of cryomodules installed in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). For this purpose, we have developed an understanding of plasma discharge in a 5-cell CEBAF-type SRF cavity having configurations similar to those in the main accelerator. The focus of this study involves the detailed investigations of developing a plasma discharge inside the cavity volume and avoids the breakdown condition in the vicinity of the ceramic RF window. A plasma discharge of the gas mixture Ar-O2 (90%:10%) can be established inside the cavity volume by the excitation of a resonant 4π/5 TM010-mode driven by a klystron. The absence of any external magnetic field for generating the plasma is suitable for cleaning cavities installed in a complex cryomodule assembly. The procedures developed in these experimental investigations can be applied to any complex cavity structure. Details of these experimental measurements and the observations are discussed in the paper. PMID:26233368

  13. Radiation shielding for superconducting RF cavity test facility at A0

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanaraj, N.; Ginsburg, C.; Rakhno, I.; Wu, G.; /Fermilab

    2008-11-01

    The results of Monte Carlo radiation shielding study performed with the MARS15 code for the vertical test facility at the A0 north cave enclosure at Fermilab are presented and discussed. The vertical test facility at the A0 north cave is planned to be used for testing 1.3 GHz single-cell superconducting RF cavities with accelerating length of 0.115 m. The operations will be focused on high accelerating gradients--up to 50 MV/m. In such a case the facility can be a strong radiation source [1]. When performing a radiation shielding design for the facility one has to take into account gammas generated due to interactions of accelerated electrons with cavity walls and surroundings (for example, range of 3.7-MeV electrons in niobium is approximately 3.1 mm while the thickness of the niobium walls of such RF cavities is about 2.8 mm). The electrons are usually the result of contamination in the cavity. The radiation shielding study was performed with the MARS15 Monte Carlo code [2]. A realistic model of the source term has been used that describes spatial, energy and angular distributions of the field-emitted electrons inside the RF cavities. The results of the calculations are normalized using the existing experimental data on measured dose rate in the vicinity of such RF cavities.

  14. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Pashupati Dhakal, Gianluigi Ciovati, Wayne Rigby, John Wallace, Ganapati Rao Myneni

    2012-06-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low ({approx}120 deg C) and high ({approx}800 deg C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 deg C with a maximum pressure of {approx}1 x 10{sup -5} Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 deg C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 deg C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of {approx}2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  15. Microwave induced plasma discharge in multi-cell superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Shahid; Mammosser, John D.

    2015-07-15

    A R&D effort for in situ cleaning of 1.5 GHz Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities at room temperature using the plasma processing technique has been initiated at Jefferson Lab. This is a step toward the cleaning of cryomodules installed in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). For this purpose, we have developed an understanding of plasma discharge in a 5-cell CEBAF-type SRF cavity having configurations similar to those in the main accelerator. The focus of this study involves the detailed investigations of developing a plasma discharge inside the cavity volume and avoids the breakdown condition in the vicinity of the ceramic RF window. A plasma discharge of the gas mixture Ar–O{sub 2} (90%:10%) can be established inside the cavity volume by the excitation of a resonant 4π/5 TM{sub 010}-mode driven by a klystron. The absence of any external magnetic field for generating the plasma is suitable for cleaning cavities installed in a complex cryomodule assembly. The procedures developed in these experimental investigations can be applied to any complex cavity structure. Details of these experimental measurements and the observations are discussed in the paper.

  16. Microwave induced plasma discharge in multi-cell superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Shahid; Mammosser, John D.

    2015-07-01

    A R&D effort for in situ cleaning of 1.5 GHz Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities at room temperature using the plasma processing technique has been initiated at Jefferson Lab. This is a step toward the cleaning of cryomodules installed in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). For this purpose, we have developed an understanding of plasma discharge in a 5-cell CEBAF-type SRF cavity having configurations similar to those in the main accelerator. The focus of this study involves the detailed investigations of developing a plasma discharge inside the cavity volume and avoids the breakdown condition in the vicinity of the ceramic RF window. A plasma discharge of the gas mixture Ar-O2 (90%:10%) can be established inside the cavity volume by the excitation of a resonant 4π/5 TM010-mode driven by a klystron. The absence of any external magnetic field for generating the plasma is suitable for cleaning cavities installed in a complex cryomodule assembly. The procedures developed in these experimental investigations can be applied to any complex cavity structure. Details of these experimental measurements and the observations are discussed in the paper.

  17. Microwave induced plasma discharge in multi-cell superconducting radio-frequency cavity.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shahid; Mammosser, John D

    2015-07-01

    A R&D effort for in situ cleaning of 1.5 GHz Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities at room temperature using the plasma processing technique has been initiated at Jefferson Lab. This is a step toward the cleaning of cryomodules installed in the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). For this purpose, we have developed an understanding of plasma discharge in a 5-cell CEBAF-type SRF cavity having configurations similar to those in the main accelerator. The focus of this study involves the detailed investigations of developing a plasma discharge inside the cavity volume and avoids the breakdown condition in the vicinity of the ceramic RF window. A plasma discharge of the gas mixture Ar-O2 (90%:10%) can be established inside the cavity volume by the excitation of a resonant 4π/5 TM010-mode driven by a klystron. The absence of any external magnetic field for generating the plasma is suitable for cleaning cavities installed in a complex cryomodule assembly. The procedures developed in these experimental investigations can be applied to any complex cavity structure. Details of these experimental measurements and the observations are discussed in the paper.

  18. Analysis and active compensation of microphonics in continuous wave narrow-bandwidth superconducting cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, A.; Anders, W.; Kugeler, O.; Knobloch, J.

    2010-08-01

    Many proposals for next generation light sources based on single pass free electron lasers or energy recovery linac facilities require a continuous wave (cw) driven superconducting linac. The effective beam loading in such machines is very small and in principle the cavities can be operated at a bandwidth of a few Hz and with less than a few kW of rf power. However, a power reserve is required to ensure field stability. A major error source is the mechanical microphonics detuning of the niobium cavities. To understand the influence of cavity detuning on longitudinal beam stability, a measurement program has been started at the horizontal cavity test facility HoBiCaT at HZB to study TESLA-type cavities. The microphonics detuning spectral content, peak detuning values, and the driving terms for these mechanical oscillations have been analyzed. In combination with the characterization of cw-adapted fast tuning systems based on the piezoelectric effect this information has been used to design a detuning compensation algorithm. It has been shown that a compensation factor between 2-7 is achievable, reducing the typical detuning of 2-3 Hz rms to below 0.5 Hz rms. These results were included in rf-control simulations of the cavities, and it was demonstrated that a phase stability below 0.02° can be achieved.

  19. Comparative Simulation Studies of Multipacting in Higher-Order-Mode Couplers of Superconducting RF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. M.; Liu, Kexin; Geng, Rongli

    2014-02-01

    Multipacting (MP) in higher-order-mode (HOM) couplers of the International Linear Collider (ILC) baseline cavity and the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) 12 GeV upgrade cavity is studied by using the ACE3P suites, developed by the Advanced Computations Department at SLAC. For the ILC cavity HOM coupler, the simulation results show that resonant trajectories exist in three zones, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 0.6-1.6 MV/m, 21-34 MV/m, 32-35 MV/m, and > 40MV/m, respectively. For the CEBAF 12 GeV upgrade cavity HOM coupler, resonant trajectories exist in one zone, corresponding to an accelerating gradient range of 6-13 MV/m. Potential implications of these MP barriers are discussed in the context of future high energy pulsed as well as medium energy continuous wave (CW) accelerators based on superconducting radio frequency cavities. Frequency scaling of MP's predicted in HOM couplers of the ILC, CBEAF upgrade, SNS and FLASH third harmonic cavity is given and found to be in good agreement with the analytical result based on the parallel plate model.

  20. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Rigby, Wayne; Wallace, John; Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2012-06-01

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low (∼120 °C) and high (∼800 °C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 °C with a maximum pressure of ∼1 × 10(-5) Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 °C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 °C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of ∼2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  1. Mechanical design of 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity for RHIC collider

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, C.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Chang, X.; McIntyre, G.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wu, Q.

    2011-03-28

    A 56 MHz Superconducting RF Cavity operating at 4.4K is being constructed for the RHIC collider. This cavity is a quarter wave resonator with beam transmission along the centerline. This cavity will increase collision luminosity by providing a large longitudinal bucket for stored bunches of RHIC ion beam. The major components of this assembly are the niobium cavity with the mechanical tuner, its titanium helium vessel and vacuum cryostat, the support system, and the ports for HOM and fundamental dampers. The cavity and its helium vessel must meet equivalent safety with the ASME pressure vessel code and it must not be sensitive to frequency shift due to pressure fluctuations from the helium supply system. Frequency tuning achieved by a two stage mechanical tuner is required to meet performance parameters. This tuner mechanism pushes and pulls the tuning plate in the gap of niobium cavity. The tuner mechanism has two separate drive systems to provide both coarse and fine tuning capabilities. This paper discusses the design detail and how the design requirements are met.

  2. Design and performance of a new induction furnace for heat treatment of superconducting radiofrequency niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Rigby, Wayne; Wallace, John

    2012-06-15

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities made of high purity niobium (Nb) are the building blocks of many modern particle accelerators. The fabrication process includes several cycles of chemical and heat treatment at low ({approx}120 Degree-Sign C) and high ({approx}800 Degree-Sign C) temperatures. In this contribution, we describe the design and performance of an ultra-high-vacuum furnace which uses an induction heating system to heat treat SRF cavities. Cavities are heated by radiation from the Nb susceptor. By using an all-niobium hot zone, contamination of the Nb cavity by foreign elements during heat treatment is minimized and allows avoiding subsequent chemical etching. The furnace was operated up to 1400 Degree-Sign C with a maximum pressure of {approx}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} Torr and the maximum achievable temperature is estimated to be higher than 2000 Degree-Sign C. Initial results on the performance of a single cell 1.5 GHz cavity made of ingot Nb heat treated at 1200 Degree-Sign C using this new induction furnace and without subsequent chemical etching showed a reduction of the RF losses by a factor of {approx}2 compared to cavities made of fine-grain Nb which underwent standard chemical and heat treatments.

  3. Effect of low temperature baking on the RF properties of niobium superconducting cavities for particle accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati

    2004-03-01

    Radio-frequency superconducting (SRF) cavities are widely used to accelerate a charged particle beam in particle accelerators. The performance of SRF cavities made of bulk niobium has significantly improved over the last ten years and is approaching the theoretical limit for niobium. Nevertheless, RF tests of niobium cavities are still showing some ''anomalous'' losses that require a better understanding in order to reliably obtain better performance. These losses are characterized by a marked dependence of the surface resistance on the surface electromagnetic field and can be detected by measuring the quality factor of the resonator as a function of the peak surface field. A low temperature (100 C-150 C) ''in situ'' bake under ultra-high vacuum has been successfully applied as final preparation of niobium RF cavities by several laboratories over the last few years. The benefits reported consist mainly of an improvement of the cavity quality factor at low field and a recovery from ''anomalous'' losses (so-called ''Q-drop'') without field emission at higher field. A series of experiments with a CEBAF single-cell cavity have been carried out at Jefferson Lab to carefully investigate the effect of baking at progressively higher temperatures for a fixed time on all the relevant material parameters. Measurements of the cavity quality factor in the temperature range 1.37 K-280 K and resonant frequency shift between 6 K-9.3 K provide information about the surface resistance, energy gap, penetration depth and mean free path. The experimental data have been analyzed with the complete BCS theory of superconductivity. The hydrogen content of small niobium samples inserted in the cavity during its surface preparation was analyzed with Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA). The single-cell cavity has been tested at three different temperatures before and after baking to gain some insight on thermal conductivity and Kapitza resistance and the data are compared with different models

  4. WAFER TEST CAVITY -Linking Surface Microstructure to RF Performance: a ‘Short-­Sample Test Facility’ for characterizing superconducting materials for SRF cavities.

    SciTech Connect

    Pogue, Nathaniel; Comeaux, Justin; McIntyre, Peter

    2014-05-30

    The Wafer Test cavity was designed to create a short sample test system to determine the properties of the superconducting materials and S-I-S hetero-structures. The project, funded by ARRA, was successful in accomplishing several goals to achieving a high gradient test system for SRF research and development. The project led to the design and construction of the two unique cavities that each severed unique purposes: the Wafer test Cavity and the Sapphire Test cavity. The Sapphire Cavity was constructed first to determine the properties of large single crystal sapphires in an SRF environment. The data obtained from the cavity greatly altered the design of the Wafer Cavity and provided the necessary information to ascertain the Wafer Test cavity’s performance.

  5. Realizing a partial general quantum cloning machine with superconducting quantum-interference devices in a cavity QED

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Baolong; Yang Zhen; Ye Liu

    2009-05-15

    We propose a scheme for implementing a partial general quantum cloning machine with superconducting quantum-interference devices coupled to a nonresonant cavity. By regulating the time parameters, our system can perform optimal symmetric (asymmetric) universal quantum cloning, optimal symmetric (asymmetric) phase-covariant cloning, and optimal symmetric economical phase-covariant cloning. In the scheme the cavity is only virtually excited, thus, the cavity decay is suppressed during the cloning operations.

  6. Conceptual Design for Replacement of the DTL and CCL with Superconducting RF Cavities in the Spallation Neutron Source Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, Mark S; Doleans, Marc; Kim, Sang-Ho

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source Linac utilizes normal conducting RF cavities in the low energy section from 2.5 MeV to 186 MeV. Six Drift Tube Linac (DTL) structures accelerate the beam to 87 MeV, and four Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) structures provide further acceleration to 186 MeV. The remainder of the Linac is comprised of 81 superconducting cavities packaged in 23 cryomodules to provide final beam energy of approximately 1 GeV. The superconducting Linac has proven to be substantially more reliable than the normal conducting Linac despite the greater number of stations and the complexity associated with the cryogenic plant and distribution. A conceptual design has been initiated on a replacement of the DTL and CCL with superconducting RF cavities. The motivation, constraints, and conceptual design are presented.

  7. A novel approach to characterizing the surface topography of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hui Tian, Guilhem Ribeill, Chen Xu, Charles E. Reece, Michael J. Kelley

    2011-03-01

    As superconducting niobium radio-frequency (SRF) cavities approach fundamental material limits, there is increased interest in understanding the details of topographical influences on realized performance limitations. Micro- and nano-roughness are implicated in both direct geometrical field enhancements as well as complications of the composition of the 50 nm surface layer in which the super-currents typically flow. Interior surface chemical treatments such as buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electropolishing (EP) used to remove mechanical damage leave surface topography, including pits and protrusions of varying sharpness. These may promote RF magnetic field entry, locally quenching superconductivity, so as to degrade cavity performance. A more incisive analysis of surface topography than the widely used average roughness is needed. In this study, a power spectral density (PSD) approach based on Fourier analysis of surface topography data acquired by both stylus profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) is introduced to distinguish the scale-dependent smoothing effects, resulting in a novel qualitative and quantitative description of Nb surface topography. The topographical evolution of the Nb surface as a function of different steps of well-controlled EP is discussed. This study will greatly help to identify optimum EP parameter sets for controlled and reproducible surface levelling of Nb for cavity production.

  8. Effect of non-uniform surface resistance on the quality factor of superconducting niobium cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Weiwei; Lu, Xiangyang; Yang, Ziqin; Zhao, Jifei; Yang, Deyu; Yang, Yujia

    2016-08-01

    The formula Rs = G /Q0 is commonly used in the calculation of the surface resistance of radio frequency niobium superconducting cavities. The applying of such equation is under the assumption that surface resistance is consistent over the cavity. However, the distribution of the magnetic field varies over the cavity. The magnetic field in the equator is much higher than that in the iris. According to Thermal Feedback Theory, it leads non-uniform distribution of the density of heat flux, which results in a different temperature distribution along the cavity inter surface. The BCS surface resistance, which depends largely on the temperature, is different in each local inner surface. In this paper, the effect of surface non-uniform resistance on the quality factor has been studied, through the calculation of Q0 in the original definition of it. The results show that it is necessary to consider the non-uniform distribution of magnetic field when the accelerating field is above 20 MV/m for TESLA cavities. Also, the effect of inhomogeneity of residual resistance on the quality factor is discussed. Its distribution barely affects the quality factor.

  9. New results of development on high efficiency high gradient superconducting rf cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Rongli; Li, Z. K.; Hao, Z. K.; Liu, K. X.; Zhao, H. Y.; Adolphsen, C.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the latest results of development on high-efficiency high-gradient superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Several 1-cell cavities made of large-grain niobium (Nb) were built, processed and tested. Two of these cavities are of the Low Surface Field (LSF) shape. Series of tests were carried out following controlled thermal cycling. Experiments toward zero-field cooling were carried out. The best experimentally achieved results are Eacc = 41 MV/m at Q0 = 6.5×1010 at 1.4 K by a 1-cell 1.3 GHz large-grain Nb TTF shape cavity and Eacc = 49 MV/m at Q0 = 1.5×1010 at 1.8 K by a 1-cell 1.5 GHz large-grain Nb CEBAF upgrade low-loss shape cavity.

  10. A preliminary quadrupole asymmetry study of a β=0.12 superconducting single spoke cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zi-Qin; Lu, Xiang-Yang; Yang, Liu; Luo, Xing; Zhou, Kui; Quan, Sheng-Wen

    2014-10-01

    An Accelerator Driven System (ADS) has been launched in China for nuclear waste transmutation. For the application of high intensity proton beam acceleration, the quadrupole asymmetry effect needs to be carefully evaluated for cavities. Single spoke cavities are the main accelerating structures in the low energy front-end. The single spoke cavity has small transverse electromagnetic field asymmetry, which may lead to transverse RF defocusing asymmetry and beam envelope asymmetry. A superconducting single spoke resonator (PKU-2 Spoke) of β=0.12 and f=325 MHz with a racetrack-shaped inner conductor has been designed at Peking university. The study of its RF field quadrupole asymmetry and its effect on transverse momentum change has been performed. The quadrupole asymmetry study has also been performed on a β=0.12 and f=325 MHz ring-shaped single spoke cavity. Our results show that the quadrupole asymmetry is very small for both the racetrack-shaped and the ring-shaped single spoke cavity.

  11. A 1.8 K test facility for superconducting RF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Horlitz, G.; Knopf, U.; Lange, R.; Petersen, B.; Sellmann, D.; Trines, D.; Peterson, T.

    1994-04-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of superconducting RF technology for a high energy e{sup +}/e{sup {minus}} collider, a research and development program has begun with collaborators from Europe, Asia, and North America. The immediate goal of the R&D program is to build and operate a 50 meter-long linac at DESY with 1.3 GHz superconducting RF cavities at a temperature of 1.8 K - 2.0 K and an accelerating gradient of 15 MV/meter. The refrigeration for the test system at DESY initially will have a capacity of about 100 W at 1.8 K, distributed among three test cryostats. In a second step, refrigeration will be upgraded to 200 W at 1.8 K in order to supply the 50 meter test linac. This paper describes the cryogenics of this test system.

  12. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ciovati, G.; Anlage, Steven M.; Baldwin, C.; Cheng, G.; Flood, R.; Jordan, K.; Kneisel, P.; Morrone, M.; Nemes, G.; Turlington, L.; et al

    2012-03-16

    An apparatus was created to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about one order of magnitude better than with earlier methods. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was obtained with 240 mW laser power and 1 Hz modulation frequency. The various components of the apparatus, the experimental procedure and results are discussed in details in this contribution.

  13. Encoding quantum information in a stabilized manifold of a superconducting cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touzard, S.; Leghtas, Z.; Mundhada, S. O.; Axline, C.; Reagor, M.; Chou, K.; Blumoff, J.; Sliwa, K. M.; Shankar, S.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Mirrahimi, M.; Devoret, M. H.

    In a superconducting Josephson circuit architecture, we activate a multi-photon process between two modes by applying microwave drives at specific frequencies. This creates a pairwise exchange of photons between a high-Q cavity and the environment. The resulting open dynamical system develops a two-dimensional quasi-energy ground state manifold. Can we encode, protect and manipulate quantum information in this manifold? We experimentally investigate the convergence and escape rates in and out of this confined subspace. Finally, using quantum Zeno dynamics, we aim to perform gates which maintain the state in the protected manifold at all times. Work supported by: ARO, ONR, AFOSR and YINQE.

  14. Insights to Superconducting Radio-Frequency Cavity Processing from First Principles Calculations and Spectroscopic Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Denise Christine

    2013-03-01

    Insights to the fundamental processes that occur during the manufacturing of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities are provided via analyses of density functional theory calculations and Raman, infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. I show that during electropolishing fluorine is bound and released by the reaction of the acid components in the solution: HF + H2SO4 <-> HFSO3 + H2O. This result implies that new recipes can possibly be developed on the principle of controlled release of fluorine by a chemical reaction. I also show that NMR or Raman spectroscopy can be used to monitor the free fluorine when polishing with the standard electropolishing recipe. Density functional theory was applied to calculate the properties of common processing impurities – hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon – in the niobium. These impurities lower the superconducting transition temperature of niobium, and hydride precipitates are at best weakly superconducting. I modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities, and explain the phase changes in the niobium hydrogen system based on the charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen and the strain field inside of the niobium. I also present evidence for a niobium lattice vacancy serving as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. In considering the other chemical impurities in niobium, I show that the absorption of oxygen into a niobium lattice vacancy is preferred over the absorption of hydrogen, which indicates that oxygen can block these phase nucleation centers. I also show that dissolved oxygen atoms can trap dissolved hydrogen atoms to prevent niobium hydride phase formation. Nitrogen and carbon were studied in less depth, but behaved similarly to oxygen. Based on these results and a literature survey, I propose a mechanism for the success of the low-temperature anneal applied to niobium SRF cavities. Finally, I

  15. InSb nanowire double quantum dots coupled to a superconducting microwave cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R.; Deacon, R. S.; Car, D.; Bakkers, E. P. A. M.; Ishibashi, K.

    2016-05-01

    By employing a micrometer precision mechanical transfer technique, we embed individual InSb nanowires into a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator. We investigate the characteristics of a double quantum dot formed in an InSb nanowire interacting with a single mode microwave field. The charge stability diagram can be obtained from the amplitude and phase response of the resonator independently from the dc transport measurement. As the charge transits between dot-dot, or dot-lead, the change of resonator transmission is compared and the charge-cavity coupling strength is extracted to be in the magnitude of several MHz.

  16. Laser Processing on the Surface of Niobium Superconducting Radio-Frequency Accelerator Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singaravelu, Senthilraja; Klopf, Michael; Krafft, Geoffrey; Kelley, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Superconducting Radio frequency (SRF) niobium cavities are at the heart of an increasing number of particle accelerators.~ Their performance is dominated by a several nm thick layer at the interior surface. ~Maximizing its smoothness is found to be critical and aggressive chemical treatments are employed to this end.~ We describe laser-induced surface melting as an alternative ``greener'' approach.~ Modeling guided selection of parameters for irradiation with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser.~ The resulting topography was examined by SEM, AFM and Stylus Profilometry.

  17. STATUS OF THE APT MATERIALS HANDBOOK.

    SciTech Connect

    P. RITTENHOUSE

    2000-11-01

    The ''Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Materials Handbook'' has been developed and prepared by the APT project to provide a controlled source of extensively reviewed and quality-qualified materials data and information for use in all phases of the project, from conceptual and preliminary design through construction and operation. As originally planned, the Handbook was to provide data and information on all materials associated with all APT systems and components. This includes the accelerator and its commissioning beam stops, the Target/Blanket (T/B) system (beam window, target and blanket modules, cavity vessel, vessel internals, and shields), the tritium separation plant, the balance-of-plant (BOP), and the site and buildings. The current version of the Handbook (Revision 1) provides relatively complete coverage for T/B and tritium systems materials, and its next issue will give increased attention to data for materials of the accelerator.

  18. Performance analysis of superconducting rf cavities for the CERN rare isotope accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calatroni, S.; Miyazaki, A.; Rosaz, G.; Sublet, A.; Venturini Delsolaro, W.; Vaglio, R.; Palmieri, V.

    2016-09-01

    The first cryomodule of the new HIE-ISOLDE rare isotope accelerator has recently been commissioned with beam at CERN, with the second cryomodule ready for installation. Each cryomodule contains five superconducting low-beta quarter wave cavities, produced with the technology of sputtering a thin niobium film onto the copper substrate (Nb /Cu ). This technology has several benefits compared to the bulk niobium solution, but also drawbacks among which the most relevant is the increase of surface resistance with accelerating field. Recent work has established the possible connection of this phenomenon to local defects in the Nb /Cu interface, which may lead to increased thermal impedance and thus local thermal runaway. We have analyzed the performance of the HIE-ISOLDE cavities series production, as well as of a few prototypes', in terms of this model, and found a strong correlation between the rf properties and one of the model characteristic quantities, namely the total surface having increased interface thermal impedance.

  19. Analysis of the medium field Q-slope in superconducting cavities made of bulk niobium

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati; J. Halbritter

    2005-07-10

    The quality factor of superconducting radio-frequency cavities made of high purity, bulk niobium increases with rf field in the medium field range (peak surface magnetic field between 20 and about 100 mT). The causes for this effect are not clear yet. The dependence of the surface resistance on the peak surface magnetic field is typically linear and quadratic. This contribution will present an analysis of the medium field Q-slope data measured on cavities treated with buffered chemical polishing (BCP) at Jefferson Lab, as function of different treatments such as post-purification and low-temperature baking. The data have been compared with a model involving a combination of heating and of hysteresis losses due to ''strong-links'' formed or weakened at niobium surfaces during oxidation, which correlate to {delta}{Delta}/kT{sub c} changes by baking.

  20. Surface characterization of Nb samples electropolished together with real superconducting rf accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Xin Zhao; Geng, Rong -Li; Tyagi, P. V.; Hayano, Hitoshi; Kato, Shigeki; Nishiwaki, Michiru; Saeki, Takayuki; Sawabe, Motoaki

    2010-12-30

    Here, we report the results of surface characterizations of niobium (Nb) samples electropolished together with a single cell superconducting radio-frequency accelerator cavity. These witness samples were located in three regions of the cavity, namely at the equator, the iris and the beam-pipe. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) was utilized to probe the chemical composition of the topmost four atomic layers. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray for elemental analysis (SEM/EDX) was used to observe the surface topography and chemical composition at the micrometer scale. A few atomic layers of sulfur (S) were found covering the samples non-uniformly. Niobium oxide granules with a sharp geometry were observed on every sample. Some Nb-O granules appeared to also contain sulfur.

  1. Application of FPGA technology for control of superconducting TESLA cavities in free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.

    2006-10-01

    Contemporary fundamental research in physics, biology, chemistry, pharmacology, material technology and other uses frequently methods basing on collision of high energy particles or penetration of matter with ultra-short electromagnetic waves. Kinetic energy of involved particles, considerably greater than GeV, is generated in accelerators of unique construction. The paper presents a digest of working principles of accelerators. There are characterized research methods which use accelerators. A method to stabilize the accelerating EM field in superconducting (SC) resonant cavity was presented. An example was given of usage of TESLA cavities in linear accelerator propelling the FLASH free electron laser (FEL) in DESY, Hamburg. Electronic and photonic control system was debated. The system bases on advanced FPGA circuits and cooperating fast DSP microprocessor chips. Examples of practical solutions were described. Test results of the debated systems in the real-time conditions were given.

  2. Surface Science Laboratory for Studying the Surfaces of Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Andy Wu

    2003-09-01

    A Surface Science Laboratory (SSL) has been established at JLab to study surfaces relevant to superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Current operational facilities include a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive x-ray analysis, a secondary ion mass spectrometry, a metallographic optical microscope, a transmission electron microscope, a high precision and large scan area 3-D profilometer, a scanning field emission microscope, and a fully equipped sample preparation room. A scanning Auger microscope is being commissioned, and will be available for routine usage soon. Results from typical examples of the R&D projects on SRF cavities that were supported in the past through the use of the facilities in the SSL will be briefly reported.

  3. Surface characterization of Nb samples electropolished together with real superconducting rf accelerator cavities

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xin Zhao; Geng, Rong -Li; Tyagi, P. V.; Hayano, Hitoshi; Kato, Shigeki; Nishiwaki, Michiru; Saeki, Takayuki; Sawabe, Motoaki

    2010-12-30

    Here, we report the results of surface characterizations of niobium (Nb) samples electropolished together with a single cell superconducting radio-frequency accelerator cavity. These witness samples were located in three regions of the cavity, namely at the equator, the iris and the beam-pipe. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) was utilized to probe the chemical composition of the topmost four atomic layers. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray for elemental analysis (SEM/EDX) was used to observe the surface topography and chemical composition at the micrometer scale. A few atomic layers of sulfur (S) were found covering the samples non-uniformly. Niobium oxide granulesmore » with a sharp geometry were observed on every sample. Some Nb-O granules appeared to also contain sulfur.« less

  4. Design of an accelerating cavity for the Superconducting Super Collider Low-Energy Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrichs, C.C.; Walling, L. ); Campbell, B.M. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the history and current status of the design of the accelerator cavity to be incorporated into the Low-Energy Booster (LEB) of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The LEB is a proton synchrotron, 540 meters in circumference, and having 108 buckets around the ring. Acceleration programs, each 50 msec long, take place at a rate of 10 per second. The beta change of the particles from injection to extraction is from 0.8 to 0.997. Since the rf excitation frequency must track beta, the rf frequency must shift from 47.5 to 60 MHz over the 50-msec acceleration program. The cavity will use ferrite in a perpendicular control bias mode to effect the require tuning. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Precision vector control of a superconducting RF cavity driven by an injection locked magnetron

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chase, Brian; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Cullerton, Ed; Varghese, Philip

    2015-03-01

    The technique presented in this paper enables the regulation of both radio frequency amplitude and phase in narrow band devices such as a Superconducting RF (SRF) cavity driven by constant power output devices i.e. magnetrons [1]. The ability to use low cost high efficiency magnetrons for accelerator RF power systems, with tight vector regulation, presents a substantial cost savings in both construction and operating costs - compared to current RF power system technology. An operating CW system at 2.45 GHz has been experimentally developed. Vector control of an injection locked magnetron has been extensively tested and characterized with a SRFmore » cavity as the load. Amplitude dynamic range of 30 dB, amplitude stability of 0.3% r.m.s, and phase stability of 0.26 degrees r.m.s. has been demonstrated.« less

  6. Precision vector control of a superconducting RF cavity driven by an injection locked magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, Brian; Pasquinelli, Ralph; Cullerton, Ed; Varghese, Philip

    2015-03-01

    The technique presented in this paper enables the regulation of both radio frequency amplitude and phase in narrow band devices such as a Superconducting RF (SRF) cavity driven by constant power output devices i.e. magnetrons [1]. The ability to use low cost high efficiency magnetrons for accelerator RF power systems, with tight vector regulation, presents a substantial cost savings in both construction and operating costs - compared to current RF power system technology. An operating CW system at 2.45 GHz has been experimentally developed. Vector control of an injection locked magnetron has been extensively tested and characterized with a SRF cavity as the load. Amplitude dynamic range of 30 dB, amplitude stability of 0.3% r.m.s, and phase stability of 0.26 degrees r.m.s. has been demonstrated.

  7. Preliminary studies of Electric and Magnetic Field Effects in Superconducting Niobium Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel; Ganapati Myneni; Jacek Sekutowicz; A. Brinkmann; W. Singer; J. Halbritter

    2003-05-01

    Superconducting cavities made from high purity niobium with RRR > 200 often show pronounced features in the Q vs. E{sub acc} dependence such as a peak at low gradients, a B{sup 2}-slope at intermediate fields and a steep degradation of Q-values (''Q-drop'') at gradients above E{sub acc} {approx} 20 MV/m without field emission loading. Whereas the B{sup 2}-slope is in line with ''global'' heating [2] there are still different models to explain the observed ''Q-drop''. The model of ref. [1] is based on magnetic field enhancements at grain boundaries in the equator weld region of the cavity and local heating. These grain boundaries become normal conducting, when their critical magnetic field is reached and contribute gradually to the losses in the cavity as long as they are thermally stable. The model proposed in ref. [2] is based on effects taking place in the metal-oxide interface on the niobium surface. The major contribution to the RF absorption is coming from interface tunnel exchange between electronic states of superconducting Nb with their energy gap and localized states of the dielectric Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}. An experimental program was started at JLab to settle the mechanisms behind B{sup 2}-slope and the Q-drop. A modified CEBAF single cell cavity is excited in either TM{sub 010} or TE{sub 011} modes and the Q vs. E{sub acc} dependences are measured as a function of various surface treatments such as BCP, electropolishing, high temperature heat treatment and ''in-situ'' baking. In addition, a special two-cell cavity was designed, which allows the excitation of the 0- and {pi}-modes of the TM{sub 010} passband, which ''scan'' different areas of the cavity surface with high electric and magnetic fields, respectively. This contribution reports about the design and first measurements with both types of cavities.

  8. Investigation of the superconducting properties of niobium radio-frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    Radio-frequency (rf) superconducting cavities are widely used to increase the energy of a charged particle beam in particle accelerators. The maximum gradients of cavities made of bulk niobium have constantly improved over the last ten years and they are approaching the theoretical limit of the material. Nevertheless, rf tests of niobium cavities are still showing some "anomalous" losses (so-called "Q-drop"), characterized by a marked increase of the surface resistance at high rf fields, in absence of field emission. A low temperature "in-situ" baking under ultra-high vacuum has been successfully applied by several laboratories to reduce those losses and improve the cavity's quality factor. Several models have been proposed to explain the cause of the Q-drop and the baking effect. We investigated the effect of baking on niobium material parameters by measuring the temperature dependence of a cavity's surface impedance and comparing it with the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer's theory of superconductivity. It was found that baking allows interstitial oxygen to diffuse from the surface deeper into the bulk. This produces a significant reduction of the normal electrons' mean free path, which causes an increase of the quality factor. The optimum baking parameters are 120°C for 24-48 h. We were also able to identify the origin of the Q-drop as due to a high magnetic field, rather then electric field, by measuring the quality factor of a cavity as function of the rf field in a resonant mode with only magnetic field present on the surface. With the aid of a thermometry system, we were able to localize the losses in the high magnetic field region. We measured the Q-drop in cavities which had undergone different treatments, such as anodization, electropolishing and post-purification, and with different metallurgical properties and we study the effectiveness of baking in each case. As a result, none of the models proposed so far can explain all the experimental observations. We

  9. Linear beam dynamics and ampere class superconducting RF cavities at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calaga, Rama R.

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a hadron collider designed to collide a range of ions from protons to gold. RHIC operations began in 2000 and has successfully completed five physics runs with several species including gold, deuteron, copper, and polarized protons. Linear optics and coupling are fundamental issues affecting the collider performance. Measurement and correction of optics and coupling are important to maximize the luminosity and sustain stable operation. A numerical approach, first developed at SLAC, was implemented to measure linear optics from coherent betatron oscillations generated by ac dipoles and recorded at multiple beam position monitors (BPMs) distributed around the collider. The approach is extended to a fully coupled 2D case and equivalence relationships between Hamiltonian and matrix formalisms are derived. Detailed measurements of the transverse coupling terms are carried out at RHIC and correction strategies are applied to compensate coupling both locally and globally. A statistical approach to determine BPM reliability and performance over the past three runs and future improvements also discussed. Aiming at a ten-fold increase in the average heavy-ion luminosity, electron cooling is the enabling technology for the next luminosity upgrade (RHIC II). Cooling gold ion beams at 100 GeV/nucleon requires an electron beam of approximately 54 MeV and a high average current in the range of 50-200 mA. All existing e-Coolers are based on low energy DC accelerators. The only viable option to generate high current, high energy, low emittance CW electron beam is through a superconducting energy-recovery linac (SC-ERL). In this option, an electron beam from a superconducting injector gun is accelerated using a high gradient (˜ 20 MV/m) superconducting RF (SRF) cavity. The electrons are returned back to the cavity with a 180° phase shift to recover the energy back into the cavity before being dumped. A design and development of a half

  10. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-09-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density-functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest-energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

  11. Advances in development of Nb3Sn superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posen, Sam; Liepe, Matthias

    2014-11-01

    A 1.3 GHz Nb3Sn superconducting radio-frequency cavity prepared with a modified annealing step reached Bp k>50 mT , well above Bc 1=25 ±7 mT , without the strong Q -slope observed in previous Nb3Sn cavities. At 4.2 K, it has a Q0 of approximately 1 ×1 010 at >10 MV /m , far outperforming Nb at useable gradients. At 2 K, quench occurred at ˜55 mT , apparently due to a defect, so additional treatment may increase the maximum gradient. Material parameters of the coating were extracted from Q vs T data, including a Tc of 18.0 ±0.1 K , close to the maximum literature value. High power pulses were used to reach fields far higher than in CW measurements, and near Tc, quench fields close to the superheating field were observed. Based on a review of previous experience with Nb3Sn cavities, a speculative mechanism involving weak link grain boundaries is presented to explain how the modified annealing step could be the cause of the absence of strong Q -slope. Finally, an analysis of the progress to date provides hints that the path forward for Nb3Sn cavities should focus on minimizing defects.

  12. Development of fundamental power coupler for high-current superconducting RF cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Jain P.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Xu, W.

    2012-05-20

    Brookhaven National Laboratory took a project of developing a 704 MHz five-cell superconducting RF cavity for high-current linacs, including Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) for planned electron-hadron collider eRHIC. The cavity will be fed by a high-power RF amplifier using a coaxial Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC), which delivers 20 kW of CW RF power to the cavity. The design of FPC is one of the important aspects as one has to take into account the heat losses dissipated on the surface of the conductor by RF fields along with that of the static heat load. Using a simple simulation model we show the temperature profile and the heat load dissipated along the coupler length. To minimize the heat load on FPC near the cavity end, a thermal intercept is required at an appropriate location on FPC. A 10 K intercept was chosen and its location optimized with our simulation code. The requirement on the helium gas flow rate for the effective heat removal from the thermal intercept is also discussed.

  13. Characteristics and fabrication of a 499 MHz superconducting deflecting cavity for the Jefferson Lab 12 geV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    HyeKyoung Park, S.U. De Silva, J.R. Delayen

    2012-07-01

    A 499 MHz parallel bar superconducting deflecting cavity has been designed and optimized for a possible implementation at the Jefferson Lab. Previously the mechanical analysis, mainly stress, was performed. Since then pressure sensitivity was studied further and the cavity parts were fabricated. The prototype cavity is not completed due to the renovation at Jefferson Lab which resulted in the temporary shutdown of the electron beam welding facility. This paper will present the analysis results and facts encountered during fabrication. The unique geometry of the cavity and its required mechanical strength present interesting manufacturing challenges.

  14. Assessment of Alternative RF Linac Structures for APT

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-26

    The APT program has been examining both normal and superconducting variants of the APT linac for the past two years. A decision on which of the two will be the selected technology will depend upon several considerations including the results of ongoing feasibility experiments, the performance and overall attractiveness of each of the design concepts, and an assessment of the system-level features of both alternatives. The primary objective of the Assessment of Alternative RF Linac Structures for APT study reported herein was to assess and compare, at the system-level, the performance, capital and life cycle costs, reliability/availability/maintainability (RAM) and manufacturing schedules of APT RF linear accelerators based upon both superconducting and normal conducting technologies. A secondary objective was to perform trade studies to explore opportunities for system optimization, technology substitution and alternative growth pathways and to identify sensitivities to design uncertainties.

  15. Microwave power coupler for a superconducting multiple-cell cavity for accelerator application and its testing procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianjian

    2008-12-01

    Superconducting cavity resonators offer the advantage of high field intensity for a given input power, making them an attractive contender for particle accelerator applications. Power coupling into a superconducting cavity employed in a particle accelerator requires unique provisions to maintain high vacuum and cryogenic temperature on the cavity side, while operating with ambient conditions on the source side. Components introduced to fulfill mechanical requirements must show negligible obstruction of the propagation of the microwave with absence of critical locations that may give rise to electron multipaction, leading to a multiple section design, instead of an aperture, a probe, or a loop structure as found in conventional cavities. A coaxial power coupler for a superconducting multiple-cell cavity at 3.9 GHz has been developed. The cavity is intended to be employed as an accelerator to provide enhanced electron beam quality in a free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) user facility. The design of the coupler called for two windows to sustain high vacuum in the cavity and two bellows to accommodate mechanical dimensional changes resulting from cryogenics. Suppression of multipacting was accomplished by the choice of conductor dimensions and materials with low second yield coefficients. Prior to integration with the cavity, the coupler was tested for intrinsic properties in a back-to-back configuration and conditioned for high-power operation with increasing power input. Maximum incident power was measured to be 61 kW. When integrated with the superconducting cavity, a loaded quality factor of 9 x 10 5 was measured by transient method. Coupler return loss and insertion loss were estimated to be around -21 dB and -0.2 dB, respectively.

  16. Optomechanical coupling between a multilayer graphene mechanical resonator and a superconducting microwave cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, V.; Bosman, S. J.; Schneider, B. H.; Blanter, Y. M.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Steele, G. A.

    2014-10-01

    The combination of low mass density, high frequency and high quality factor, Q, of mechanical resonators made of two-dimensional crystals such as graphene make them attractive for applications in force/mass sensing and exploring the quantum regime of mechanical motion. Microwave optomechanics with superconducting cavities offers exquisite position sensitivity and enables the preparation and detection of mechanical systems in the quantum ground state. Here, we demonstrate coupling between a multilayer graphene resonator with quality factors up to 220,000 and a high-Q superconducting cavity. Using thermomechanical noise as calibration, we achieve a displacement sensitivity of 17 fm Hz-1/2. Optomechanical coupling is demonstrated by optomechanically induced reflection and absorption of microwave photons. We observe 17 dB of mechanical microwave amplification and signatures of strong optomechanical backaction. We quantitatively extract the cooperativity C, a characterization of coupling strength, from the measurement with no free parameters and find C = 8, which is promising for the quantum regime of graphene motion.

  17. Optomechanical coupling between a multilayer graphene mechanical resonator and a superconducting microwave cavity.

    PubMed

    Singh, V; Bosman, S J; Schneider, B H; Blanter, Y M; Castellanos-Gomez, A; Steele, G A

    2014-10-01

    The combination of low mass density, high frequency and high quality factor, Q, of mechanical resonators made of two-dimensional crystals such as graphene make them attractive for applications in force/mass sensing and exploring the quantum regime of mechanical motion. Microwave optomechanics with superconducting cavities offers exquisite position sensitivity and enables the preparation and detection of mechanical systems in the quantum ground state. Here, we demonstrate coupling between a multilayer graphene resonator with quality factors up to 220,000 and a high-Q superconducting cavity. Using thermomechanical noise as calibration, we achieve a displacement sensitivity of 17 fm Hz(-1/2). Optomechanical coupling is demonstrated by optomechanically induced reflection and absorption of microwave photons. We observe 17 dB of mechanical microwave amplification and signatures of strong optomechanical backaction. We quantitatively extract the cooperativity C, a characterization of coupling strength, from the measurement with no free parameters and find C = 8, which is promising for the quantum regime of graphene motion. PMID:25150717

  18. APT: Aperture Photometry Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laher, Russ

    2012-08-01

    Aperture Photometry Tool (APT) is software for astronomers and students interested in manually exploring the photometric qualities of astronomical images. It has a graphical user interface (GUI) which allows the image data associated with aperture photometry calculations for point and extended sources to be visualized and, therefore, more effectively analyzed. Mouse-clicking on a source in the displayed image draws a circular or elliptical aperture and sky annulus around the source and computes the source intensity and its uncertainty, along with several commonly used measures of the local sky background and its variability. The results are displayed and can be optionally saved to an aperture-photometry-table file and plotted on graphs in various ways using functions available in the software. APT is geared toward processing sources in a small number of images and is not suitable for bulk processing a large number of images, unlike other aperture photometry packages (e.g., SExtractor). However, APT does have a convenient source-list tool that enables calculations for a large number of detections in a given image. The source-list tool can be run either in automatic mode to generate an aperture photometry table quickly or in manual mode to permit inspection and adjustment of the calculation for each individual detection. APT displays a variety of useful graphs, including image histogram, and aperture slices, source scatter plot, sky scatter plot, sky histogram, radial profile, curve of growth, and aperture-photometry-table scatter plots and histograms. APT has functions for customizing calculations, including outlier rejection, pixel “picking” and “zapping,” and a selection of source and sky models. The radial-profile-interpolation source model, accessed via the radial-profile-plot panel, allows recovery of source intensity from pixels with missing data and can be especially beneficial in crowded fields.

  19. The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Project*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisowski, Paul W.

    1997-05-01

    A reliable supply of tritium is necessary to maintain the United States' nuclear defense capability. Because tritium decays to ^3He at the rate of 5.5 percent per year, it must be replenished continously. To make the required amount of tritium using an accelerator, neutrons will be generated by high-energy proton reactions with tungsten and lead, moderated in light water, and captured in ^3He. The plant will be operational in 2007 at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site in South Carolina. It will consist of a proton linear accelerator, tritium-production target/blankets, tritium-extraction, and conventional balance-of-plant systems. The accelerator will be a radio-frequency linac operating at 100 percent duty factor. It will have a combination of normal-conducting copper structures to accelerate a 100-mA beam to 217 MeV followed by superconducting niobium cavities to boost the beam energy to 1700 MeV. After acceleration, a high-energy transport system will expand the beam to a rectangular, 16-cm wide by 160-cm high distribution and deliver it to one of two identical target/blanket assemblies where tritium production and extraction will take place. Inside a target/blanket the proton beam will strike heavy-water cooled tungsten rods to produce neutrons. The tungsten will be surrounded by a decoupler consisting of aluminum tubes containing ^3He to reduce parasitic capture. Additional lead modules with aluminum tubes containing ^3He will lie outside the central region. The lead will produce additional neutrons from spallation and (n,xn) reactions. Light water coolant continuously circulated through the lead will moderate the neutrons to low energy, where they will be efficiently captured by ^3He gas to produce tritium. Tritium will be removed by continuous separation using permeation through a heated palladium-silver alloy membrane. Once separated, standard cryogenic distillation techniques will be used to isotopically purify the tritium. This presentation

  20. Physical Properties of Niobium and Specifications for Fabrication of Superconducting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Antoine, C.; Foley, M.; Dhanaraj, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01

    It is important to distinguish among the properties of niobium, the ones that are related to the cavity's SRF performances, the formability of the material, and the mechanical behavior of the formed cavity. In general, the properties that dictate each of the above mentioned characteristics have a detrimental effect on one another and in order to preserve the superconducting properties without subduing the mechanical behavior, a balance has to be established. Depending on the applications, some parameters become less important and an understanding of the physical origin of the requirements might help in this optimization. SRF applications require high purity niobium (high RRR), but pure niobium is very soft from fabrication viewpoint. Moreover conventional fabrication techniques tend to override the effects of any metallurgical process meant to strengthen it. As those treatments dramatically affect the forming of the material they should be avoided. These unfavorable mechanical properties have to be accounted for in the design of the cavities rather than in the material specification. The aim of this paper is to review the significance of the important mechanical properties used to characterize niobium and to present the optimal range of values. Most of the following information deals with the specification of sheets for cell forming unless otherwise noted.

  1. Superconducting Cavity Cryomodule Designs for the Next Generation of CW Linacs: Challenges and Options

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, Thomas; Orlov, Yuriy; Peterson, Thomas; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav

    2014-07-01

    The designs of nearly all superconducting RF (SRF) linacs over the last several years, with one notable exception being CEBAF at Jefferson Lab, have assumed pulsed beam operation with relatively low duty factors. These include the XFEL at DESY, the ILC, the original configuration for Project X at Fermilab, as well as several others. Recently proposed projects, on the other hand, including the LCLS-II at SLAC, the newly configured low and medium energy sections for Project X, and FRIB at Michigan State, to name a few, assume continuous wave or CW operation on quite a large scale with ambitious gradients and cavity performance requirements. This has implications in the cavity design as well as in many parts of the overall cryomodule due to higher dynamic heat loads in the cavities themselves and higher heat loads in the input and high-order-mode (HOM) couplers. Piping internal to the cryomodule, the effectiveness of thermal intercepts, the size of integrated heat exchangers, and many other aspects of the overall design are also affected. This paper will describe some of these design considerations as we move toward the next generation of accelerator projects.

  2. Large Area Superconducting TES Spiderweb Bolometer for Multi-mode Cavity Microwave Detect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasotti, M.; Bagliani, D.; Corsini, D.; De Bernardis, P.; Gatti, F.; Gualtieri, R.; Lamagna, L.; Masi, S.; Pizzigoni, G.; Schillaci, A.

    2014-05-01

    For the cosmic microwave background, the increase of the sensitivity of present superconducting TES Spiderweb Bolometers can be done coupling them to a large set of modes of the EM radiation inside the cavity. This will require a proper shaping of the horn-cavity assembly for the focal plane of the microwave telescope and the use of large area bolometers. Large area spiderweb bolometers of 8 mm diameter and a mesh size of 250 μm are fabricated in order to couple with approximately the first 20 modes of the cavity at about 140 GHz. These bolometers are fabricated with micro machining techniques from silicon wafer covered with SiO2 - Si3N4 CVD thick films, 0.3 μm and 1 μm respectively. The sensor is a Ti/Au/Ti 3 layer TES sensor with Tc tuned in the 330-380 mK and 2 mK transition width. The TES is electronically coupled to the EM gold absorber that is grown on to the spiderweb mesh in order to sense the temperature of the electron gas heated by the EM radiation. The gold absorber mesh has 5 um beam size over a Si3N4 10 μm beam size supporting mesh. The Si3N4 mesh is then fully suspended by means of DRIE back etching of the Si substrate. Here we present the first results of these large area bolometers.

  3. A NEW TEMPERATURE AND X-RAY MAPPING SYSTEM FOR 700-MHZ 5-CELL SUPERCONDUCTING CAVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    T. TAJIMA; R. C. GENTZLINGER; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    A new system to map temperature and X-ray radiation around the external surface of 700-MHz 5-cell superconducting cavities has been developed. It consists of an aluminum cylinder that is equipped with six modules of sensors. Eighty-one carbon resistors (temperature sensors) and seventy-one PIN diodes (X-ray sensors) are attached. This cylinder surrounds the 5-cell cavity and rotates about the cavity axis in about 6 minutes. A new feature, compared to the ones developed in the past, is its brush-contact mechanism on the outer surface of the aluminum cylinder, which enables the sensor array to rotate continuously in the same direction during the test. Although the present mechanism allows only one direction of rotation, it does not seem to be difficult to modify for both directions if electrical connections work in this manner. This paper describes the details of the structure and associated mechanisms as well as future schedule and plans of operation.

  4. APT accelerator. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.; Rusthoi, D.

    1995-03-01

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project, sponsored by Department of Energy Defense Programs (DOE/DP), involves the preconceptual design of an accelerator system to produce tritium for the nation`s stockpile of nuclear weapons. Tritium is an isotope of hydrogen used in nuclear weapons, and must be replenished because of radioactive decay (its half-life is approximately 12 years). Because the annual production requirements for tritium has greatly decreased since the end of the Cold War, an alternative approach to reactors for tritium production, based on a linear accelerator, is now being seriously considered. The annual tritium requirement at the time this study was undertaken (1992-1993) was 3/8 that of the 1988 goal, usually stated as 3/8-Goal. Continued reduction in the number of weapons in the stockpile has led to a revised (lower) production requirement today (March, 1995). The production requirement needed to maintain the reduced stockpile, as stated in the recent Nuclear Posture Review (summer 1994) is approximately 3/16-Goal, half the previous level. The Nuclear Posture Review also requires that the production plant be designed to accomodate a production increase (surge) to 3/8-Goal capability within five years, to allow recovery from a possible extended outage of the tritium plant. A multi-laboratory team, collaborating with several industrial partners, has developed a preconceptual APT design for the 3/8-Goal, operating at 75% capacity. The team has presented APT as a promising alternative to the reactor concepts proposed for Complex-21. Given the requirements of a reduced weapons stockpile, APT offers both significant safety, environmental, and production-fexibility advantages in comparison with reactor systems, and the prospect of successful development in time to meet the US defense requirements of the 21st Century.

  5. First demonstration and performance of an injection locked continuous wave magnetron to phase control a superconducting cavity

    SciTech Connect

    A.C. Dexter, G. Burt, R.G. Carter, I. Tahir, H. Wang, K. Davis, R. Rimmer

    2011-03-01

    The applications of magnetrons to high power proton and cw electron linacs are discussed. An experiment is described where a 2.45 GHz magnetron has been used to drive a single cell superconducting cavity. With the magnetron injection locked, a modest phase control accuracy of 0.95° rms has been demonstrated. Factors limiting performance have been identified.

  6. Characterization of Nb Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities Based On In-Situ STEM And EELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Runzhe

    Niobium, a 4d transition metal, has the highest superconducting transition temperature (Tc=9.2K) of any elemental superconductor as type II superconductor with coherent length, sigma approximately that of the penetration length, lambda. Pure niobium is grey in color and very soft, which makes this metal easily fabricable into different shapes for superconducting radio- frequency (SRF) cavities. Such cavities are used in some modern accelerators (SNS, CEBAF, XFEL), and are intended for usage in the next generation of particle accelerators, such as ILC. Since the crucial part of the cavities is top 100 nm of Nb near the inner cavity surface, considering the penetration depth is around 40 nm, it has attracted more and more attention in improving the surface process for optimizing the performance of the cavities. Nowadays, the main treatment of the Nb surface includes electro polishing (EP), buffered chemical polishing (BCP), high temperature baking (800 °C, 1000 °C and 1200 °C) and mild baking (120 °C). Firstly, the two half cells are welded together and the weld line is quite rough; there exists a lot of visible pits and defects on the inner shell of cavities. In this Ph.D. thesis, novel techniques in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) that can be used to analyze the atomic scale structure-property relationship, both at room tem- perature and high/LN 2 temperature, are explored. Specifically, by using correlated Z-contrast imaging and electron energy loss spectrum (EELS), the structure, composition and bonding can be characterized directly on the atomic scale, also, light atoms, like H, O and C, are visible in ABF images. For the examining the defect behavior on the cavity surface, heating and cold stages are involved to simulate the baking treatment and low-temperature environments. These studies will serve as an important reference for qualifying different surface treatments to further improve SRF cavities' performance. The experimental results

  7. Coherence and multimode correlations from vacuum fluctuations in a microwave superconducting cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lähteenmäki, Pasi; Paraoanu, Gheorghe Sorin; Hassel, Juha; Hakonen, Pertti J.

    2016-08-01

    The existence of vacuum fluctuations is one of the most important predictions of modern quantum field theory. In the vacuum state, fluctuations occurring at different frequencies are uncorrelated. However, if a parameter in the Lagrangian of the field is modulated by an external pump, vacuum fluctuations stimulate spontaneous downconversion processes, creating squeezing between modes symmetric with respect to half of the frequency of the pump. Here we show that by double parametric pumping of a superconducting microwave cavity, it is possible to generate another type of correlation, namely coherence between photons in separate frequency modes. The coherence correlations are tunable by the phases of the pumps and are established by a quantum fluctuation that stimulates the simultaneous creation of two photon pairs. Our analysis indicates that the origin of this vacuum-induced coherence is the absence of which-way information in the frequency space.

  8. Phase noise analysis of the sapphire loaded superconducting niobium cavity oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobar, Michael; Blair, David G.

    1994-02-01

    Measured phase noise of two GaAs FET amplifiers and a varactor phase shifter at 9.7 GHz reveal that optimum bias conditions change when cooling from room to liquid helium temperatures. This understanding enables optimization of the electronic noise in an all cryogenic tunable sapphire loaded superconducting cavity (SLOSC) X-Band loop oscillator. The measured phase noise was limited by vibrations of the tuning mechanism. In a fixed frequency SLOSC oscillator the phase noise was limited by the amplifier noise, and has been measured to be -140 dBc/Hz at 1 kHz from the unfiltered port of loop oscillator. Comparison of component and oscillator phase noise allows us to calculate the phase noise at the filtered port to be -175 dBc/ Hz at 1 kHz offset.

  9. Coherence and multimode correlations from vacuum fluctuations in a microwave superconducting cavity.

    PubMed

    Lähteenmäki, Pasi; Paraoanu, Gheorghe Sorin; Hassel, Juha; Hakonen, Pertti J

    2016-01-01

    The existence of vacuum fluctuations is one of the most important predictions of modern quantum field theory. In the vacuum state, fluctuations occurring at different frequencies are uncorrelated. However, if a parameter in the Lagrangian of the field is modulated by an external pump, vacuum fluctuations stimulate spontaneous downconversion processes, creating squeezing between modes symmetric with respect to half of the frequency of the pump. Here we show that by double parametric pumping of a superconducting microwave cavity, it is possible to generate another type of correlation, namely coherence between photons in separate frequency modes. The coherence correlations are tunable by the phases of the pumps and are established by a quantum fluctuation that stimulates the simultaneous creation of two photon pairs. Our analysis indicates that the origin of this vacuum-induced coherence is the absence of which-way information in the frequency space. PMID:27562246

  10. Multichannel vector field control module for LLRF control of superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Varghese, P; Chase, B.; Barnes, B.; Branlard, J.; Joireman, P.W.; Klepec, D.; Mavric, U.; Tupikov, V.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The field control of multiple superconducting RF cavities with a single Klystron, such as the proposed RF scheme for the ILC, requires high density (number of RF channels) signal processing hardware so that vector control may be implemented with minimum group delay. The MFC (Multichannel Field Control) module is a 33-channel, FPGA based down-conversion and signal processing board in a single VXI slot, with 4 channels of high speed DAC outputs. A 32-bit, 400MHz floating point DSP provides additional computational and control capability for calibration and implementation of more complex control algorithms. Multiple high speed serial transceivers on the front panel and the backplane bus allow a flexible architecture for inter-module real time data exchanges. An interface CPLD supports the VXI bus protocol for communication to a Slot0 CPU, with Ethernet connections for remote in system programming of the FPGA and DSP as well as data acquisition.

  11. Laser polishing of niobium for application to superconducting radio frequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Singaravelu, Senthil; Klopf, John Michael; Xu, Chen; Krafft, Geoffrey; Kelley, Michael J.

    2012-09-01

    Superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities are at the heart of an increasing number of particle accelerators. Their performance is dominated by a several nanometer thick layer at the interior surface. Maximizing the smoothness of this surface is critical, and aggressive chemical treatments are now employed to this end. The authors describe laser-induced surface melting as an alternative 'greener' approach. Selection of laser parameters guided by modeling achieved melting that reduced the surface roughness from the fabrication process. The resulting topography was examined by scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope (AFM). Plots of power spectral density computed from the AFM data give further insight into the effect of laser melting on the topography of the mechanically polished (only) niobium.

  12. Reclamation of niobium compounds from ionic liquid electrochemical polishing of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Wixtrom, Alex I.; Buhler, Jessica E.; Reece, Charles E.; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M.

    2013-06-01

    Recent research has shown that choline chloride (vitamin B4)-based solutions can be used as a greener alternative to acid-based electrochemical polishing solutions. This study demonstrated a successful method for electrochemical deposition of niobium compounds onto the surface of copper substrates using a novel choline chloride-based ionic liquid. Niobium ions present in the ionic liquid solution were dissolved into the solution prior to deposition via electrochemical polishing of solid niobium. A black coating was clearly visible on the surface of the Cu following deposition. This coating was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF). This ionic liquid-based electrochemical deposition method effectively recycles previously dissolved niobium from electrochemical polishing of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities.

  13. Coherence and multimode correlations from vacuum fluctuations in a microwave superconducting cavity

    PubMed Central

    Lähteenmäki, Pasi; Paraoanu, Gheorghe Sorin; Hassel, Juha; Hakonen, Pertti J.

    2016-01-01

    The existence of vacuum fluctuations is one of the most important predictions of modern quantum field theory. In the vacuum state, fluctuations occurring at different frequencies are uncorrelated. However, if a parameter in the Lagrangian of the field is modulated by an external pump, vacuum fluctuations stimulate spontaneous downconversion processes, creating squeezing between modes symmetric with respect to half of the frequency of the pump. Here we show that by double parametric pumping of a superconducting microwave cavity, it is possible to generate another type of correlation, namely coherence between photons in separate frequency modes. The coherence correlations are tunable by the phases of the pumps and are established by a quantum fluctuation that stimulates the simultaneous creation of two photon pairs. Our analysis indicates that the origin of this vacuum-induced coherence is the absence of which-way information in the frequency space. PMID:27562246

  14. Strong magnetic coupling of an ultracold gas to a superconducting waveguide cavity.

    PubMed

    Verdú, J; Zoubi, H; Koller, Ch; Majer, J; Ritsch, H; Schmiedmayer, J

    2009-07-24

    Placing an ensemble of 10;{6} ultracold atoms in the near field of a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator with a quality factor Q approximately 10;{6}, one can achieve strong coupling between a single microwave photon in the coplanar waveguide resonator and a collective hyperfine qubit state in the ensemble with g_{eff}/2pi approximately 40 kHz larger than the cavity linewidth of kappa/2pi approximately 7 kHz. Integrated on an atomchip, such a system constitutes a hybrid quantum device, which also can be used to interconnect solid-state and atomic qubits, study and control atomic motion via the microwave field, observe microwave superradiance, build an integrated micromaser, or even cool the resonator field via the atoms.

  15. Low temperature laser scanning microscopy of a superconducting radio-frequency cavity.

    PubMed

    Ciovati, G; Anlage, Steven M; Baldwin, C; Cheng, G; Flood, R; Jordan, K; Kneisel, P; Morrone, M; Nemes, G; Turlington, L; Wang, H; Wilson, K; Zhang, S

    2012-03-01

    An apparatus was developed to obtain, for the first time, 2D maps of the surface resistance of the inner surface of an operating superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity by a low-temperature laser scanning microscopy technique. This allows identifying non-uniformities of the surface resistance with a spatial resolution of about 2.4 mm and surface resistance resolution of ~1 μΩ at 3.3 GHz. A signal-to-noise ratio of about 10 dB was obtained with 240 mW laser power and 1 Hz modulation frequency. The various components of the apparatus, the experimental procedure and results are discussed in detail in this contribution.

  16. Higher order mode damping in a five-cell superconducting rf cavity with a photonic band gap coupler cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.; Simakov, Evgenya I.; Boulware, Chase H.; Grimm, Terry L.; Rogacki, Adam R.

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of higher order mode (HOM) damping in the first multicell superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity with a photonic band gap (PBG) coupler cell. Achieving higher average beam currents is particularly desirable for future light sources and particle colliders based on SRF energy-recovery linacs (ERLs). Beam current in ERLs is limited by the beam breakup instability, caused by parasitic HOMs interacting with the beam in accelerating cavities. A PBG cell incorporated in an accelerating cavity can reduce the negative effect of HOMs by providing a frequency selective damping mechanism, thus allowing significantly higher beam currents. The five-cell cavity with a PBG cell was designed and optimized for HOM damping. Monopole and dipole HOMs were simulated. The SRF cavity was fabricated and tuned. External quality factors for some HOMs were measured in a cold test. The measurements agreed well with the simulations.

  17. Defect detection inside superconducting 1.3 GHz cavities by means of x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertucci, M.; Michelato, P.; Moretti, M.; Navitski, A.; Pagani, C.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence probe for detection of foreign material inclusions on the inner surface of superconducting cavities has been developed and tested. The setup detects trace element content such as a few micrograms of impurities responsible for thermal breakdown phenomena limiting the cavity performance. The setup has been customized for the geometry of 1.3 GHz TESLA-type niobium cavities and focuses on the surface of equator area at around 103 mm from the centre axis of the cavities with around 20 mm detection spot. More precise localization of inclusions can be reconstructed by means of angular or lateral displacement of the cavity. Preliminary tests confirmed a very low detection limit for elements laying in the high efficiency spectrum zone (from 5 to 10 keV), and a high angular resolution allowing an accurate localization of defects within the equator surface.

  18. Defect detection inside superconducting 1.3 GHz cavities by means of x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, M; Michelato, P; Moretti, M; Navitski, A; Pagani, C

    2016-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence probe for detection of foreign material inclusions on the inner surface of superconducting cavities has been developed and tested. The setup detects trace element content such as a few micrograms of impurities responsible for thermal breakdown phenomena limiting the cavity performance. The setup has been customized for the geometry of 1.3 GHz TESLA-type niobium cavities and focuses on the surface of equator area at around 103 mm from the centre axis of the cavities with around 20 mm detection spot. More precise localization of inclusions can be reconstructed by means of angular or lateral displacement of the cavity. Preliminary tests confirmed a very low detection limit for elements laying in the high efficiency spectrum zone (from 5 to 10 keV), and a high angular resolution allowing an accurate localization of defects within the equator surface. PMID:26827305

  19. Development of a cryogenic radiation detector for mapping radio frequency superconducting cavity field emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Danny Dotson; John Mammosser

    2005-05-01

    Field emissions in a super conducting helium cooled RF cavity and the production of radiation (mostly X-Rays) have been measured externally on cryomodules at Jefferson Lab since 1991. External measurements are limited to radiation energies above 100 keV due to shielding of the stainless steel cryogenic body. To measure the onset of and to map field emissions from a superconducting cavity requires the detecting instrument be inside the shield and within the liquid Helium. Two possible measurement systems are undergoing testing at JLab. A CsI detector array set on photodiodes and an X-Ray film camera with a fixed aperture. Several devices were tested in the cell with liquid Helium without success. The lone survivor, a CsI array, worked but saturated at high power levels due to backscatter. The array was encased in a lead shield with a slit opening set to measure the radiation emitted directly from the cell eliminating a large portion of the backscatter. This is a work in progress and te sting should be complete before the PAC 05. The second system being tested is passive. It is a shielded box with an aperture to expose radiation diagnostic film located inside to direct radiation from the cell. Developing a technique for mapping field emissions in cryogenic cells will assist scientists and engineers in pinpointing any surface imperfections for examination.

  20. APT CCDTL and CCL thermal/mechanical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, D. W.; Smith, Peter; Spalek, G.

    2001-01-01

    Design automation techniques are being developed to facilitate the design of the normal conducting Coupled-Cavity Drift Tube LINAC (CCDTL) and Coupled-Cavity LINAC (CCL) for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT). The cavity geometry is generated from automated RF design codes and fed directly into a 3-D multiphysics code which calculates the RF heat loads and cavity distortions due to the heat loads. The resulting frequency change in the cavity is determined by the Slater perturbation formulation. Cooling is located to minimize these distortions. The application and their status as applied to the APT CCL will be discussed. In particular, the use of specific codes to reduce the peak thermal stress around the coupling slots in these cw (continuous wave) RF cavities will be presented.

  1. Surface polishing of niobium for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Liang

    2014-08-01

    Niobium cavities are important components in modern particle accelerators based on superconducting radio frequency (SRF) technology. The interior of SRF cavities are cleaned and polished in order to produce high accelerating field and low power dissipation on the cavity wall. Current polishing methods, buffered chemical polishing (BCP) and electro-polishing (EP), have their advantages and limitations. We seek to improve current methods and explore laser polishing (LP) as a greener alternative of chemical methods. The topography and removal rate of BCP at different conditions (duration, temperature, sample orientation, flow rate) was studied with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Differential etching on different crystal orientations is the main contributor to fine grain niobium BCP topography, with gas evolution playing a secondary role. The surface of single crystal and bi-crystal niobium is smooth even after heavy BCP. The topography of fine grain niobium depends on total removal. The removal rate increases with temperature and surface acid flow rate within the rage of 0~20 °C, with chemical reaction being the possible dominate rate control mechanism. Surface flow helps to regulate temperature and avoid gas accumulation on the surface. The effect of surface flow rate on niobium EP was studied with optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and power spectral density (PSD) analysis. Within the range of 0~3.7 cm/s, no significant difference was found on the removal rate and the macro roughness. Possible improvement on the micro roughness with increased surface flow rate was observed. The effect of fluence and pulse accumulation on niobium topography during LP was studied with optical microscopy, SEM, AFM, and PSD analysis. Polishing on micro scale was achieved within fluence range of 0.57~0.90 J/cm2, with pulse accumulation adjusted accordingly. Larger area treatment was proved possible by

  2. Superconducting Multi-Cell Deflecting Cavity for Short-Pulse X-Ray Generation at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    G.J. Waldschmidt, L.H. Morrison, R. Nassiri, R.A. Rimmer, K. Tian, H. Wang

    2009-05-01

    A superconducting multi-cell cavity for the production of short x-ray pulses at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) has been explored as an alternative to a single-cell cavity design in order to improve the packing factor and potentially reduce the number of high-power RF systems and low-level RF controls required. The cavity will operate at 2815 MHz in the APS storage ring and will require heavy damping of parasitic modes to maintain stable beam operation. Novel on-cell dampers, attached directly to the cavity body, have been utilized by taking advantage of the magnetic field null on the equatorial plane in order to enhance damping. Design issues and simulation results will be discussed.

  3. Dependence of the residual surface resistance of superconducting radio frequency cavities on the cooling dynamics around T{sub c}

    SciTech Connect

    Romanenko, A. Grassellino, A. Melnychuk, O.; Sergatskov, D. A.

    2014-05-14

    We report a strong effect of the cooling dynamics through T{sub c} on the amount of trapped external magnetic flux in superconducting niobium cavities. The effect is similar for fine grain and single crystal niobium and all surface treatments including electropolishing with and without 120 °C baking and nitrogen doping. Direct magnetic field measurements on the cavity walls show that the effect stems from changes in the flux trapping efficiency: slow cooling leads to almost complete flux trapping and higher residual resistance, while fast cooling leads to the much more efficient flux expulsion and lower residual resistance.

  4. Probing the fundamental limit of niobium in high radiofrequency fields by dual mode excitation in superconducting radiofrequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory; Geng, Rongli; Palczewski, Ari

    2011-07-01

    We have studied thermal breakdown in several multicell superconducting radiofrequency cavity by simultaneous excitation of two TM{sub 010} passband modes. Unlike measurements done in the past, which indicated a clear thermal nature of the breakdown, our measurements present a more complex picture with interplay of both thermal and magnetic effects. JLab LG-1 that we studied was limited at 40.5 MV/m, corresponding to B{sub peak} = 173 mT, in 8{pi}/9 mode. Dual mode measurements on this quench indicate that this quench is not purely magnetic, and so we conclude that this field is not the fundamental limit in SRF cavities.

  5. Final Report - Development of a Multi-Spoke Superconducting Cavity for Nuclear Physics, Light Sources, and Driven Systems Applications (ODU Contribution)

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, Jean

    2014-11-14

    This report summarizes the work done by Old Dominion University, in collaboration with the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility toward the development of high-velocity superconducting spoke cavities.

  6. Design of 250-MW CW RF system for APT

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, D.

    1997-09-01

    The design for the RF systems for the APT (Accelerator Production of Tritium) proton linac will be presented. The linac produces a continuous beam power of 130 MW at 1300 MeV with the installed capability to produce up to a 170 MW beam at 1700 MeV. The linac is comprised of a 350 MHz RFQ to 7 MeV followed in sequence by a 700 MHz coupled-cavity drift tube linac, coupled-cavity linac, and superconducting (SC) linac to 1700 MeV. At the 1700 MeV, 100 mA level the linac requires 213 MW of continuous-wave (CW) RF power. This power will be supplied by klystrons with a nominal output power of 1.0 MW. 237 kystrons are required with all but three of these klystrons operating at 700 MHz. The klystron count includes redundancy provisions that will be described which allow the RF systems to meet an operational availability in excess of 95 percent. The approach to achieve this redundancy will be presented for both the normal conducting (NC) and SC accelerators. Because of the large amount of CW RF power required for the APT linac, efficiency is very important to minimize operating cost. Operation and the RF system design, including in-progress advanced technology developments which improve efficiency, will be discussed. RF system performance will also be predicted. Because of the simultaneous pressures to increase RF system reliability, reduce tunnel envelope, and minimize RF system cost, the design of the RF vacuum windows has become an important issue. The power from a klystron will be divided into four equal parts to minimize the stress on the RF vacuum windows. Even with this reduction, the RF power level at the window is at the upper boundary of the power levels employed at other CW accelerator facilities. The design of a 350 MHz, coaxial vacuum window will be presented as well as test results and high power conditioning profiles. The transmission of 950 kW, CW, power through this window has been demonstrated with only minimal high power conditioning.

  7. Etching of Niobium Sample Placed on Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavity Surface in Ar/CL2 Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Janardan Upadhyay, Larry Phillips, Anne-Marie Valente

    2011-09-01

    Plasma based surface modification is a promising alternative to wet etching of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. It has been proven with flat samples that the bulk Niobium (Nb) removal rate and the surface roughness after the plasma etchings are equal to or better than wet etching processes. To optimize the plasma parameters, we are using a single cell cavity with 20 sample holders symmetrically distributed over the cell. These holders serve the purpose of diagnostic ports for the measurement of the plasma parameters and for the holding of the Nb sample to be etched. The plasma properties at RF (100 MHz) and MW (2.45 GHz) frequencies are being measured with the help of electrical and optical probes at different pressures and RF power levels inside of this cavity. The niobium coupons placed on several holders around the cell are being etched simultaneously. The etching results will be presented at this conference.

  8. Impact of nitrogen doping of niobium superconducting cavities on the sensitivity of surface resistance to trapped magnetic flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnella, Dan; Kaufman, John; Liepe, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Future particle accelerators such as the SLAC "Linac Coherent Light Source-II" (LCLS-II) and the proposed Cornell Energy Recovery Linac require hundreds of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) niobium cavities operating in continuous wave mode. In order to achieve economic feasibility of projects such as these, the cavities must achieve a very high intrinsic quality factor (Q0) to keep cryogenic losses within feasible limits. To reach these high Q0's in the case of LCLS-II, nitrogen-doping of niobium cavities has been selected as the cavity preparation technique. When dealing with Q0's greater than 1 × 1010, the effects of ambient magnetic field on Q0 become significant. Here, we show that the sensitivity to RF losses from trapped magnetic field in a cavity's walls is strongly dependent on the cavity preparation. Specifically, standard electropolished and 120 °C baked cavities show a sensitivity of residual resistance from trapped magnetic flux of ˜0.6 and ˜0.8 nΩ/mG trapped, respectively, while nitrogen-doped cavities show a higher sensitivity of residual resistance from trapped magnetic flux of ˜1 to 5 nΩ/mG trapped. We show that this difference in sensitivities is directly related to the mean free path of the RF surface layer of the niobium: shorter mean free paths lead to less sensitivity of residual resistance to trapped magnetic flux in the dirty limit (ℓ ≪ ξ0), while longer mean free paths lead to lower sensitivity of residual resistance to trapped magnetic flux in the clean limit (ℓ ≫ ξ0). These experimental results are also shown to have good agreement with recent theoretical predictions for pinned vortex lines oscillating in RF fields.

  9. Deuterium accelerator experiments for APT.

    SciTech Connect

    Causey, Rion A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Hertz, Kristin L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Cowgill, Donald F. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories in California initiated an experimental program to determine whether tritium retention in the tube walls and permeation through the tubes into the surrounding coolant water would be a problem for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT), and to find ways to mitigate the problem, if it existed. Significant holdup in the tube walls would limit the ability of APT to meet its production goals, and high levels of permeation would require a costly cleanup system for the cooling water. To simulate tritium implantation, a 200 keV accelerator was used to implant deuterium into Al 6061-T and SS3 16L samples at temperatures and particle fluxes appropriate for APT, for times varying between one week and five months. The implanted samples were characterized to determine the deuterium retention and Permeation. During the implantation, the D(d,p)T nuclear reaction was used to monitor the build-up of deuterium in the implant region of the samples. These experiments increased in sophistication, from mono-energetic deuteron implants to multi-energetic deuteron and proton implants, to more accurately reproduce the conditions expected in APT. Micron-thick copper, nickel, and anodized aluminum coatings were applied to the front surface of the samples (inside of the APT walls) in an attempt to lower retention and permeation. The reduction in both retention and permeation produced by the nickel coatings, and the ability to apply them to the inside of the APT tubes, indicate that both nickel-coated Al 6061-T6 and nickel-coated SS3 16L tubes would be effective for use in APT. The results of this work were submitted to the Accelerator Production of Tritium project in document number TPO-E29-Z-TNS-X-00050, APT-MP-01-17.

  10. Effects of Electric and Magnetic Fields on the Performance of a Superconducting Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel; Jacek Sekutowicz; Waldemar Singer

    2005-05-01

    A special two-cell cavity was designed to obtain surface field distributions suitable for investigation of electric and magnetic field effects on cavity performance. The cavity design and preliminary results were presented in a previous contribution. The bulk niobium cavity was heat-treated in a vacuum furnace at 1250 C to improve thermal conductivity. Three seamless hydroformed Nb/Cu cavities of the same design were fabricated to investigate the role of the electron beam welds located in high field areas. This paper will present RF test results at 2 K for the bulk niobium and one of the seamless cavities.

  11. Topographic power spectral density study of the effect of surface treatment processes on niobium for superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Reece, Hui Tian, Michael Kelley, Chen Xu

    2012-04-01

    Microroughness is viewed as a critical issue for attaining optimum performance of superconducting radio frequency accelerator cavities. The principal surface smoothing methods are buffered chemical polish (BCP) and electropolish (EP). The resulting topography is characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The power spectral density (PSD) of AFM data provides a more thorough description of the topography than a single-value roughness measurement. In this work, one dimensional average PSD functions derived from topography of BCP and EP with different controlled starting conditions and durations have been fitted with a combination of power law, K correlation, and shifted Gaussian models to extract characteristic parameters at different spatial harmonic scales. While the simplest characterizations of these data are not new, the systematic tracking of scale-specific roughness as a function of processing is new and offers feedback for tighter process prescriptions more knowledgably targeted at beneficial niobium topography for superconducting radio frequency applications.

  12. Testing of vacuum system for APT/LEDA RFQ

    SciTech Connect

    Behne, D; Berg, J; DaCosta, M; Harper, M; Kishiyama, K; Schrage, D; Shen, S; Spinos, F; Valdiviez, R

    1999-03-25

    The authors have designed, built and operated two vacuum systems for the RFQ (Radio Frequency Quadrupole) in the APT/LEDA (Accelerator Production of Tritium/Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator)linac: a cryopump system for the RFQ cavity and a non-evaporable getter (NEG) pump system for the RF window system. They were designed to provide very high hydrogen pump speed (> 2 x 10{sup 4} L/s) and sorption capacity. Both systems underwent performance tests in mock assembly before the installation. This paper presents the mock test results of both vacuum systems. It also discusses the preliminary test results from the commissioning of the APT/LEDA RFQ.

  13. Cold RF test and associated mechanical features correlation of a TESLA-style 9-cell superconducting niobium cavity built in China

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Jing; Quan, Sheng-Wen; Zhang, Bao-Cheng; Lin, Lin; Hao, Jian-Kui; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Wen-Can; He, Fei-Si; Jin, Song; Wang, Fang; Liu, Ke-Xin; Geng, R L; Zhao, Kui

    2012-02-01

    The RF performance of a 1.3 GHz 9-cell superconducting niobium cavity was evaluated at cryogenic temperatures following surface processing by using the standard ILC-style recipe. The cavity is a TESLA-style 9-cell superconducting niobium cavity, with complete end group components including a higher order mode coupler, built in China for practical applications. An accelerating gradient of 28.6 MV/m was achieved at an unloaded quality factor of 4 x 10{sup 9}. The morphological property of mechanical features on the RF surface of this cavity was characterized through optical inspection. Correlation between the observed mechanical features and the RF performance of the cavity is attempted.

  14. Conceptual design of a sapphire loaded coupler for superconducting radio-frequency 1.3 GHz cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chen; Tantawi, Sami

    2016-02-01

    This paper explores a hybrid mode rf structure that served as a superconducting radio-frequency coupler. This application achieves a reflection S(1 ,1 ) varying from 0 to -30 db and delivers cw power at 7 KW. The coupler has good thermal isolation between the 2 and 300 K sections due to vacuum separation. Only one single hybrid mode can propagate through each section, and no higher order mode is coupled. The analytical and numerical analysis for this coupler is given and the design is optimized. The coupling mechanism to the cavity is also discussed.

  15. Development of a broadband reflective T-filter for voltage biasing high-Q superconducting microwave cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Yu; Rouxinol, Francisco; LaHaye, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    We present the design of a reflective stop-band filter based on quasi-lumped elements that can be utilized to introduce large dc and low-frequency voltage biases into a low-loss superconducting coplanar waveguide (CPW) cavity. Transmission measurements of the filter are seen to be in good agreement with simulations and demonstrate insertion losses greater than 20 dB in the range of 3–10 GHz. Moreover, transmission measurements of the CPW's fundamental mode demonstrate that loaded quality factors exceeding 10{sup 5} can be achieved with this design for dc voltages as large as 20 V and for the cavity operated in the single-photon regime. This makes the design suitable for use in a number of applications including qubit-coupled mechanical systems and circuit QED.

  16. Investigation of local losses as a function of material removal in a large-grain superconducting niobium cavity

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ciovati, P. Kneisel

    2008-01-02

    The performance of a superconducting radio-frequency (RF) cavity made of residual resistivity ratio (RRR) > 200 large-grain niobium has been investigated as a function of material removal, between 70 and 240 mu-m, by buffered chemical polishing (BCP). Temperature maps of the cavity surface at 1.7 and 2 K were taken for each step of chemical etching and revealed localized losses (hot-spots), which contribute to the degradation of the cavity quality factor as a function of the RF surface field. It was found that the number of hot-spots decreased for larger material removal. Interestingly, the losses at the hot-spots at different locations evolved differently for successive material removal. The cavity achieved peak surface magnetic fields of about of 130 mT and was limited mostly by thermal quench. By measuring the temperature dependence of the surface resistance (Rs) at low field between 4.2 K and 1.7 K, the variation of material parameters such as the energy gap at 0 K, the residual resistance and the mean free path as a function of material removal could also be investigated. This contribution shows the results of the RF tests along with the temperature maps and the analysis of the losses caused by the "hot-spots."

  17. THE Low-level Radio Frequency System for the superconducting cavities of National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H.; Rose, J.; Holub, B.; Cupolo, J.; Oliva, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    A digital low-level radio frequency (LLRF) field controller has been developed for the storage ring of The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II). The primary performance goal for the LLRF is to support the required RF operation of the superconducting cavities with a beam current of 500mA and a 0.14 degree or better RF phase stability. The digital field controller is FPGA-based, in a standard format 19-inch/I-U chassis. It has an option of high-level control support with MATLAB running on a local host computer through a USB2.0 port. The field controller has been field tested with the high-power superconducting RF (SRF) at Canadian light Source, and successfully stored a high beam current of 250 mA. The test results show that required specifications for the cavity RF field stability are met. This digital field controller is also currently being used as a development platform for other functional modules in the NSLS-II RF systems.

  18. A high gradient test of a single-cell superconducting radio frequency cavity with a feedback waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostin, Roman; Avrakhov, Pavel; Kanareykin, Alexei; Solyak, Nikolay; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav; Kazakov, Sergey; Wu, Genfa; Khabiboulline, Timergali; Rowe, Allan; Rathke, John

    2015-09-01

    The most severe problem of the international linear collider (ILC-type) is its high cost, resulting in part from the enormous length of the collider. This length is determined mainly by the achievable accelerating gradient in the RF system of the collider. In current technology, the maximum acceleration gradient in superconducting (SC) structures is determined mainly by the value of the surface RF magnetic field. In order to increase the gradient, a superconducting traveling wave accelerating (STWA) structure is suggested. Utilization of STWA structure with small phase advance per cell for future high energy linear colliders such as ILCs may provide an accelerating gradient 1.2-1.4 times larger [1] than a standing wave structure. However, STWA structure requires a feedback waveguide for power redirecting from the end of the structure back to the front end of accelerating structure. Recent tests of a 1.3 GHz model of a single-cell cavity with waveguide feedback demonstrated an accelerating gradient comparable to the gradient of a single-cell ILC-type cavity from the same manufacturer [2]. In the present paper, high gradient test results are presented.

  19. Model for initiation of quality factor degradation at high accelerating fields in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyuba, A.; Romanenko, A.; Cooley, L. D.

    2010-12-01

    A model for the onset of the reduction in superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity quality factor, the so-called Q-drop, at high accelerating electric fields is presented. Since magnetic fields at the cavity equator are tied to accelerating electric fields by a simple geometric factor, the onset of magnetic flux penetration determines the onset of Q-drop. We consider breakdown of the surface barrier at triangular grooves to predict the magnetic field of first flux penetration Hpen. Such defects were argued to be the worst case by Buzdin and Daumens (1998 Physica C 294 257), whose approach, moreover, incorporates both the geometry of the groove and local contamination via the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ. Since previous Q-drop models focused on either topography or contamination alone, the proposed model allows new comparisons of one effect in relation to the other. The model predicts equivalent reduction of Hpen when either roughness or contamination were varied alone, so smooth but dirty surfaces limit cavity performance about as much as rough but clean surfaces do. Still lower Hpen was predicted when both effects were combined, i.e. contamination should exacerbate the negative effects of roughness and vice versa. To test the model with actual data, coupons were prepared by buffered chemical polishing and electropolishing, and stylus profilometry was used to obtain distributions of angles. From these data, curves for surface resistance generated by simple flux flow as a function of magnetic field were generated by integrating over the distribution of angles for reasonable values of κ. This showed that combined effects of roughness and contamination indeed reduce the Q-drop onset field by ~ 20%, and that contamination contributes to Q-drop as much as roughness. The latter point may be overlooked by SRF cavity research, since access to the cavity interior by spectroscopy tools is very difficult, whereas optical images have become commonplace. The model was

  20. In-situ plasma processing to increase the accelerating gradients of superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doleans, M.; Tyagi, P. V.; Afanador, R.; McMahan, C. J.; Ball, J. A.; Barnhart, D. L.; Blokland, W.; Crofford, M. T.; Degraff, B. D.; Gold, S. W.; Hannah, B. S.; Howell, M. P.; Kim, S.-H.; Lee, S.-W.; Mammosser, J.; Neustadt, T. S.; Saunders, J. W.; Stewart, S.; Strong, W. H.; Vandygriff, D. J.; Vandygriff, D. M.

    2016-03-01

    A new in-situ plasma processing technique is being developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to improve the performance of the cavities in operation. The technique utilizes a low-density reactive oxygen plasma at room temperature to remove top surface hydrocarbons. The plasma processing technique increases the work function of the cavity surface and reduces the overall amount of vacuum and electron activity during cavity operation; in particular it increases the field emission onset, which enables cavity operation at higher accelerating gradients. Experimental evidence also suggests that the SEY of the Nb surface decreases after plasma processing which helps mitigating multipacting issues. In this article, the main developments and results from the plasma processing R&D are presented and experimental results for in-situ plasma processing of dressed cavities in the SNS horizontal test apparatus are discussed.

  1. 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating 9-cell cavity vertical test results

    SciTech Connect

    Khabiboulline, Timergali; Cooper, Charles; Dhanaraj, Nandhini; Edwards, Helen; Foley, Mike; Harms, Elvin; Mitchell, Donald; Rowe, Allan; Solyak, Nikolay; Moeller, Wolf-Dietrich; /DESY

    2007-06-01

    The 3rd harmonic 3.9GHz accelerating cavity was proposed to improve the beam performance of the FLASH (TTF/DESY) facility [1]. In the frame of a collaborative agreement, Fermilab will provide DESY with a cryomodule containing a string of four cavities. In addition, a second cryomodule with one cavity will be fabricated for installation in the Fermilab photo-injector, which will be upgraded for the ILC accelerator test facility. The first 9-cell Nb cavities were tested in a vertical setup and they didn't reach the designed accelerating gradient [2]. The main problem was a multipactor in the HOM couplers, which lead to overheating and quenching of the HOM couplers. New HOM couplers with improved design are integrated in the next 9-cell cavities. In this paper we present all results of the vertical tests.

  2. Production of Seamless Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities from Ultra-fine Grained Niobium, Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Roy Crooks, Ph.D., P.E.

    2009-10-31

    The positron and electron linacs of the International Linear Collider (ILC) will require over 14,000, nine-cell, one meter length, superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities [ILC Reference Design Report, 2007]. Manufacturing on this scale will benefit from more efficient fabrication methods. The current methods of fabricating SRF cavities involve deep drawing of the halves of each of the elliptical cells and joining them by high-vacuum, electron beam welding, with at least 19 circumferential welds per cavity. The welding is costly and has undesirable effects on the cavity surfaces, including grain-scale surface roughening at the weld seams. Hydroforming of seamless tubes avoids welding, but hydroforming of coarse-grained seamless tubes results in strain-induced surface roughening. Surface roughness limits accelerating fields, because asperities prematurely exceed the critical magnetic field and become normal conducting. This project explored the technical and economic feasibility of an improved processing method for seamless tubes for hydroforming. Severe deformation of bulk material was first used to produce a fine structure, followed by extrusion and flow-forming methods of tube making. Extrusion of the randomly oriented, fine-grained bulk material proceeded under largely steady-state conditions, and resulted in a uniform structure, which was found to be finer and more crystallographically random than standard (high purity) RRR niobium sheet metal. A 165 mm diameter billet of RRR grade niobium was processed into five, 150 mm I.D. tubes, each over 1.8 m in length, to meet the dimensions used by the DESY ILC hydroforming machine. Mechanical properties met specifications. Costs of prototype tube production were approximately twice the price of RRR niobium sheet, and are expected to be comparable with economies of scale. Hydroforming and superconducting testing will be pursued in subsequent collaborations with DESY and Fermilab. SRF Cavities are used to construct

  3. Characterization of etch pits found on a large-grain bulk niobium superconducting radio-frequency resonant cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Ciovati, G.; Bieler, T. R.

    2010-12-15

    The performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) resonant cavities made of bulk niobium is limited by nonlinear localized effects. Surface analysis of regions of higher power dissipation is thus of intense interest. Such areas (referred to as “hotspots”) were identified in a large-grain single-cell cavity that had been buffered-chemical polished and dissected for examination by high resolution electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction microscopy (EBSD), and optical microscopy. Pits with clearly discernible crystal facets were observed in both “hotspot” and “coldspot” specimens. The pits were found in-grain, at bicrystal boundaries, and on tricrystal junctions. They are interpreted as etch pits induced by crystal defects (e.g. dislocations). All coldspots examined had a qualitatively lower density of etch pits or relatively smooth tricrystal boundary junctions. EBSD mapping revealed the crystal orientation surrounding the pits. Locations with high pit density are correlated with higher mean values of the local average misorientation angle distributions, indicating a higher geometrically necessary dislocation content. In addition, a survey of the samples by energy dispersive x-ray analysis did not show any significant contamination of the samples’ surface. In conclusion, the local magnetic field enhancement produced by the sharp-edge features observed on the samples is not sufficient to explain the observed degradation of the cavity quality factor, which starts at peak surface magnetic field as low as 20 mT.

  4. Characterization of etch pits found on a large-grain bulk niobium superconducting radio-frequency resonant cavity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhao, Xin; Ciovati, G.; Bieler, T. R.

    2010-12-15

    The performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) resonant cavities made of bulk niobium is limited by nonlinear localized effects. Surface analysis of regions of higher power dissipation is thus of intense interest. Such areas (referred to as “hotspots”) were identified in a large-grain single-cell cavity that had been buffered-chemical polished and dissected for examination by high resolution electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction microscopy (EBSD), and optical microscopy. Pits with clearly discernible crystal facets were observed in both “hotspot” and “coldspot” specimens. The pits were found in-grain, at bicrystal boundaries, and on tricrystal junctions. They are interpreted as etch pits induced bymore » crystal defects (e.g. dislocations). All coldspots examined had a qualitatively lower density of etch pits or relatively smooth tricrystal boundary junctions. EBSD mapping revealed the crystal orientation surrounding the pits. Locations with high pit density are correlated with higher mean values of the local average misorientation angle distributions, indicating a higher geometrically necessary dislocation content. In addition, a survey of the samples by energy dispersive x-ray analysis did not show any significant contamination of the samples’ surface. In conclusion, the local magnetic field enhancement produced by the sharp-edge features observed on the samples is not sufficient to explain the observed degradation of the cavity quality factor, which starts at peak surface magnetic field as low as 20 mT.« less

  5. Engineering entangled microwave photon states through multiphoton interactions between two cavity fields and a superconducting qubit

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan-Jun; Wang, Changqing; Zhu, Xiaobo; Liu, Yu-xi

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that there are not only transverse but also longitudinal couplings between microwave fields and a superconducting qubit with broken inversion symmetry of the potential energy. Using multiphoton processes induced by longitudinal coupling fields and frequency matching conditions, we design a universal algorithm to produce arbitrary superpositions of two-mode photon states of microwave fields in two separated transmission line resonators, which are coupled to a superconducting qubit. Based on our algorithm, we analyze the generation of evenly-populated states and NOON states. Compared to other proposals with only single-photon process, we provide an efficient way to produce entangled microwave photon states when the interactions between superconducting qubits and microwave fields are in the strong and ultrastrong regime. PMID:27033558

  6. Engineering entangled microwave photon states through multiphoton interactions between two cavity fields and a superconducting qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yan-Jun; Wang, Changqing; Zhu, Xiaobo; Liu, Yu-Xi

    2016-04-01

    It has been shown that there are not only transverse but also longitudinal couplings between microwave fields and a superconducting qubit with broken inversion symmetry of the potential energy. Using multiphoton processes induced by longitudinal coupling fields and frequency matching conditions, we design a universal algorithm to produce arbitrary superpositions of two-mode photon states of microwave fields in two separated transmission line resonators, which are coupled to a superconducting qubit. Based on our algorithm, we analyze the generation of evenly-populated states and NOON states. Compared to other proposals with only single-photon process, we provide an efficient way to produce entangled microwave photon states when the interactions between superconducting qubits and microwave fields are in the strong and ultrastrong regime.

  7. Superconducting accelerator cavity with a heat affected zone having a higher RRR

    DOEpatents

    Brawley, John; Phillips, H. Lawrence

    2000-01-01

    An improved method for welding accelerator cavities without the need for time consuming and expensive faying surface treatments comprising electron beam welding such cavities in a vacuum welding chamber within a vacuum envelope and using the following welding parameters: a beam voltage of between about 45 KV and 55 KV; a beam current between about 38 ma and 47 ma; a weld speed of about 15 cm/min; and a sharp focus and a rhombic raster of between about 9 KHz and 10 Khz. A welded cavity made according to the method of the present invention is also described.

  8. Superconductive wire

    DOEpatents

    Korzekwa, David A.; Bingert, John F.; Peterson, Dean E.; Sheinberg, Haskell

    1995-01-01

    A superconductive article is made by inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity.

  9. Superconductive wire

    DOEpatents

    Korzekwa, D.A.; Bingert, J.F.; Peterson, D.E.; Sheinberg, H.

    1995-07-18

    A superconductive article is made by inserting a rigid mandrel into an internal cavity of a first metallic tube, said tube having an interior surface and an exterior surface, said interior surface defining the interior cavity, forming a layer of a superconductive material or superconductive precursor upon the exterior surface of said first metallic tube, machining the layer of superconductive material or superconductive precursor to a predetermined diameter to form an intermediate article configured for insertion into a second metallic tube having an interior diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter, inserting the machined intermediate article into a second metallic tube having an internal diameter corresponding to the predetermined diameter of the intermediate article to form a composite intermediate article, reducing or ironing the composite intermediate article to a predetermined cross-sectional diameter, and sintering the reduced or ironed composite intermediate article at temperatures and for time sufficient for the superconductive material or superconductive precursor to exhibit superconductivity. 2 figs.

  10. Design and Prototype Progress toward a Superconducting Crab Cavity Cryomodule for the APS

    SciTech Connect

    Haipeng Wang, Guangfeng Cheng, Gianluigi Ciovati, James Henry, Peter Kneisel, Robert Rimmer, Gary Slack, Larry Turlington, Geoff waldschmidt, Alireza Nassiri

    2010-05-01

    A squashed, elliptical supercondconducting (SC) cavity with waveguide dampers on the beam pipes has currently been chosen as the baseline design [1] for the Short Pulse X-ray (SPX) project at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). An alternate cavity design, with a waveguide damper located directly on the cavity cell for improved damping characteristics, has also been designed and cold-tested with promising results. In either case, eight cavities would be operated CW in a single cryomodule at 2K to produce an electron bunch chirp of 4MV at a frequency of 2.815 GHz. Detailed analysis of multipactoring (MP), Lorentz force detuning (LFD), and the thermal properties of the baseline design has led to an engineering specification of the basic parameters of the cryomodule.

  11. DESIGN AND PRELIMINARY TEST OF THE 1500 MHZ NSLS-II PASSIVE SUPERCONDUCTING RF CAVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.; Gash, W.; Kosciuk, B.; Ravindranath, V.; Sikora, B.; Sharma, S.; Towne, N.; Grimm, T.L.; Boulware, C.H.; Krizmanich, C.; Kuhlman, B.; Miller, N.; Siegel, B.; Winowski, M.

    2011-03-28

    NSLS-II is a new ultra-bright 3 GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. Ion clearing gaps are required to suppress ion effects on the beam. The natural bunch length of 3mm is planned to be lengthened by means of a third harmonic cavity in order to increase the Touschek limited lifetime. Earlier work described the design alternatives and the geometry selected for a copper prototype. We subsequently have iterated the design to lower the R/Q of the cavity and to increase the diameter of the beam pipe ferrite HOM dampers to reduce the wakefield heating. A niobium cavity and full cryomodule including LN2 shield, magnetic shield and insulating vacuum vessel have been fabricated and installed. A passive SRF 3rd harmonic cavity consisting of two tightly coupled cells has been designed and fabricated for NSLS-II. Initial cold tests of this cavity are very promising. These tests have verified that the cavity frequency and mode separation between the 0 and {pi}-modes can be set at manufacture. Further, the frequency separation can be maintained over wide tuning ranges necessary for operation. Future work includes HOM damper and motorized tuner development.

  12. Design of a Tunable 3D Microwave Cavity for Use in Coupling to Quantum Superconducting Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, C. J.; Budoyo, R. P.; Voigt, K. D.; Hertzberg, J. B.; Anderson, J. R.; Lobb, C. J.; Wellstood, F. C.

    2015-03-01

    We have designed a tunable 3D cavity system for use with transmon qubits. We use an rf SQUID loop as a variable inductive element that perturbs the cavity modes and produces a shift in the cavity frequency that depends on the flux applied to the loop. Our 3D cavity is made of aluminum and has a lowest mode TE101 frequency of 6.2 GHz. Following a method developed by E. U. Condon, we estimate our cavity to have an effective inductance of 100 nH. Our inductive SQUID loop is made of thermally deposited aluminum on a sapphire substrate, with dimensions 250 μm x 250 μm, which yields an expected geometric inductance of 0.9 nH. We use a single junction in our inductive loop with a critical current of approximately 1 μA. We tune the effective inductance of the loop by using a modulation coil that is well isolated from the cavity at the resonance frequency. Work supported by the Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials, Physics Dept., Univ. of Maryland.

  13. Superconductivity:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacchetti, N.

    In this paper a short historical account of the discovery of superconductivity and of its gradual development is given. The physical interpretation of its various aspects took about forty years (from 1911 to 1957) to reach a successful description of this phenomenon in terms of a microscopic theory At the very end it seemed that more or less everything could be reasonably interpreted even if modifications and refinements of the original theory were necessary. In 1986 the situation changed abruptly when a cautious but revolutionary paper appeared showing that superconductivity was found in certain ceramic oxides at temperatures above those up to then known. A rush of frantic experimental activity started world-wide and in less than one year it was shown that superconductivity is a much more widespread phenomenon than deemed before and can be found at temperatures well above the liquid air boiling point. The complexity and the number of the substances (mainly ceramic oxides) involved call for a sort of modern alchemy if compounds with the best superconducting properties are to be manufactured. We don't use the word alchemy in a deprecatory sense but just to emphasise that till now nobody can say why these compounds are what they are: superconductors.

  14. Waste management plan for the APT

    SciTech Connect

    England, J.L.

    1997-08-22

    This revision of the APT Waste Management Plan details the waste management requirements and issues specific to the APT plant for design considerations, construction, and operation. The APT Waste Management Plan is by its nature a living document and will be reviewed at least annually and revised as required.

  15. The external Q factor of a dual-feed coupling for superconducting radio frequency cavities: theoretical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Dai, J; Belomestnykh, S; Ben-Zvi, I; Xu, Wencan

    2013-11-01

    We propose a theoretical model based on network analysis to study the external quality factor (Q factor) of dual-feed coupling for superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. Specifically, we apply our model to the dual-feed 704 MHz half-cell SRF gun for Brookhaven National Laboratory's prototype Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). The calculations show that the external Q factor of this dual-feed system is adjustable from 10(4) to 10(9) provided that the adjustment range of a phase shifter covers 0°-360°. With a period of 360°, the external Q factor of the coupling system changes periodically with the phase difference between the two coupling arms. When the RF phase of both coupling arms is adjusted simultaneously in the same direction, the external Q factor of the system also changes periodically, but with a period of 180°.

  16. Nanostructural features degrading the performance of superconducting radio frequency niobium cavities revealed by transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Trenikhina, Y.; Romanenko, A.; Kwon, J.; Zuo, J.-M.; Zasadzinski, J. F.

    2015-04-21

    Nanoscale defect structure within the magnetic penetration depth of ∼100 nm is key to the performance limitations of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities. Using a unique combination of advanced thermometry during cavity RF measurements, and TEM structural and compositional characterization of the samples extracted from cavity walls, we discover the existence of nanoscale hydrides in electropolished cavities limited by the high field Q slope, and show the decreased hydride formation in the electropolished cavity after 120 °C baking. Furthermore, we demonstrate that adding 800 °C hydrogen degassing followed by light buffered chemical polishing restores the hydride formation to the pre-120 °C bake level. We also show absence of niobium oxides along the grain boundaries and the modifications of the surface oxide upon 120 °C bake.

  17. R&D for the Sponge Cleaning of Superconducting RF Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Saeki, T; Hayano, H; Kato, S; Nishiwaki, M; Sawabe, M; Ueno, K; Watanabe, K; Clemens, W A; Geng, R L; Manus, R

    2009-05-01

    The Electro-polishing process is the best candidate of final surface treatment for the production of ILC cavities. Nevertheless, the broad distribution of the gradient caused by field emitters in cavities is sitll a serious problem for the EP process. Ethanole- and degreaser-rinse processes after the EP process were found to be effective to decrease the field emmitter in recent studies, however, these are not perfect yet. We tried to test the sponge cleaning as the post EP process to remove the field emitter inside the cavcity. This article describe the results of series tests with a proto-type sponge-cleaning tool for single-cell cavity at KEK.

  18. R&D for the Post-EP Processes of Superconducting RF Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Saeki, Takayuki; Funahashi, Y.; Hayano, H.; Kato, Seigo; Nishiwaki, Michiru; Sawabe, Motoaki; Ueno, Kenji; Watanabe, K.; Antoine, Claire; Berry, Stefurn; Eozenou, F.; Gasser, Y.; Visentin, B.; Clemens, William A.; Geng, Rongli; Manus, Robert; Tyagi, Puneet

    2009-11-01

    The Electro-Polishing (EP) process is the best candidate of final surface treatment for the production of ILC cavities. Nevertheless, the broad distribution of the gradient caused by field emitters in cavities is sitll a serious problem for the EP process. A candidate source of field emitter is the sulfur component which is produced in the EP process and remains the inner-surface of cavities. We studied the effect of Ethanole- and degreaser-rinse processes after the EP process by a unique method. Moreover, we tried to test the sponge cleaning as the post-EP process to remove the field emitter inside the cavcity. This article describe the results of series tests of the post-EP process at KEK.

  19. Cavities

    MedlinePlus

    ... The tooth may hurt even without stimulation (spontaneous toothache). If irreversible damage to the pulp occurs and ... To detect cavities early, a dentist inquires about pain, examines the teeth, probes the teeth with dental instruments, and may take x-rays. People should ...

  20. Beam Position Monitoring with Cavity Higher Order Modes in the Superconducting Linac FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Baboi, N.; Molloy, S.; Eddy, N.; Frisch, J.; Hendrickson, L.; Hensler, O.; McCormick, D.; May, J.; Nagaitsev, S.; Napoly, O.; Paparella, R.C.; Petrosian, L.; Piccolli, L.; Rechenmacher, R.; Ross, M.; Simon, C.; Smith, T.; Watanabe, K.; Wendt, M.; /DESY /SLAC /Fermilab /DAPNIA, Saclay /KEK, Tsukuba

    2007-03-20

    FLASH (Free Electron Laser in Hamburg) is a user facility for a high intensity VUV-light source [1]. The radiation wavelength is tunable in the range from about 40 to 13 nm by changing the electron beam energy from 450 to 700 MeV. The accelerator is also a test facility for the European XFEL (X-ray Free Electron Laser) to be built in Hamburg [2] and the project study ILC (International Linear Collider) [3]. The superconducting TESLA technology is tested at this facility, together with other accelerator components.

  1. Cryogenic testing of the 2.1 GHz five-cell superconducting RF cavity with a photonic band gap coupler cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Temkin, Richard J.; Haynes, W. Brian; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.; Simakov, Evgenya I.; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Boulware, Chase H.; Grimm, Terrence L.; Rogacki, Adam R.

    2016-05-01

    We present results from cryogenic tests of the multi-cell superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity with a photonic band gap (PBG) coupler cell. Achieving high average beam currents is particularly desirable for future light sources and particle colliders based on SRF energy-recovery-linacs (ERLs). Beam current in ERLs is limited by the beam break-up instability, caused by parasitic higher order modes (HOMs) interacting with the beam in accelerating cavities. A PBG cell incorporated in an accelerating cavity can reduce the negative effect of HOMs by providing a frequency selective damping mechanism, thus allowing significantly higher beam currents. The multi-cell cavity was designed and fabricated of niobium. Two cryogenic (vertical) tests were conducted. The high unloaded Q-factor was demonstrated at a temperature of 4.2 K at accelerating gradients up to 3 MV/m. The measured value of the unloaded Q-factor was 1.55 × 108, in agreement with prediction.

  2. Decrease of the surface resistance in superconducting niobium resonator cavities by the microwave field

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Gurevich, Alexander V.

    2014-03-03

    Measurements of the quality factor, Q, of Nb superconducting microwave resonators often show that Q increases by {approx_equal} 10%–30% with increasing radio-frequency (rf) field, H, up to {approx} 15-20 mT. Recent high temperature heat treatments can amplify this rf field-induced increase of Q up to {approx_equal} 50%–100% and extend it to much higher fields, but the mechanisms of the enhancement of Q(H) remain unclear. Here, we suggest a method to reveal these mechanisms by measuring temperature dependencies of Q at different rf field amplitudes. We show that the increase of Q(H) does not come from a field dependent quasi-particles activation energy or residual resistance, but rather results from the smearing of the density of state by the rf field.

  3. Large Dispersive Shift of Cavity Resonance Induced by a Superconducting Flux Qubit in the Straddling Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, Kunihiro; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Billangeon, Pierre-M.; Lin, Zhirong; Nakamura, Yasunobu; Tsai, Jaw-Shen; Koshino, Kazuki

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate enhancement of the dispersive frequency shift in a coplanar waveguide resonator induced by a capacitively coupled superconducting flux qubit in the straddling regime. The magnitude of the observed shift, 80 MHz for the qubit-resonator detuning of 5 GHz, is quantitatively explained by the generalized Rabi model which takes into account the contribution of the qubit higher energy levels. By applying the enhanced dispersive shift to the qubit readout, we achieved 90 % contrast of the Rabi oscillations which is mainly limited by the energy relaxation of the qubit. We also discuss the qubit readout using a Josephson parametric amplifier. This work was supported by the MEXT Kakenhi ``Quantum Cybernetics'', the JSPS through its FIRST Program, and the NICT Commissioned Research.

  4. All-microwave cavity-mediated three-qubit gate between superconducting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economou, Sophia; Barnes, Ed

    While single-qubit and entangling two-qubit operations are universal for quantum computing, in practice the availability of a single-shot multi-qubit entangling gate can be faster and of higher fidelity. For the case of three qubits coupled to a common cavity mode, we show that a high fidelity, fast CCZ gate can be implemented. Our proposal is based on partial spectrum engineering and pulse shaping. Because our approach does not rely on frequency selectivity, instead driving more than one transitions simultaneously, our three-qubit gate can be achieved on a timescale comparable to that of a two-qubit gate. Our protocol generalizes our recently introduced SWIPHT two-qubit gates.

  5. Evaluation of the Propensity of Niobium to Absorb Hydrogen During Fabrication of Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities for Particle Accelerators.

    PubMed

    Ricker, R E; Myneni, G R

    2010-01-01

    During the fabrication of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) particle accelerator cavities procedures are used that chemically or mechanically remove the passivating surface film of niobium pentoxide (Nb2O5). Removal of this film will expose the underlying niobium metal and allow it to react with the processing environment. If these reactions produce hydrogen at sufficient concentrations and rates, then hydrogen will be absorbed and diffuse into the metal. High hydrogen activities could result in supersaturation and the nucleation of hydride phases. If the metal repassivates at the conclusion of the processing step and the passive film blocks hydrogen egress, then the absorbed hydrogen or hydrides could be retained and alter the performance of the metal during subsequent processing steps or in-service. This report examines the feasibility of this hypothesis by first identifying the postulated events, conditions, and reactions and then determining if each is consistent with accepted scientific principles, literature, and data. Established precedent for similar events in other systems was found in the scientific literature and thermodynamic analysis found that the postulated reactions were not only energetically favorable, but produced large driving forces. The hydrogen activity or fugacity required for the reactions to be at equilibrium was determined to indicate the propensity for hydrogen evolution, absorption, and hydride nucleation. The influence of processing conditions and kinetics on the proximity of hydrogen surface coverage to these theoretical values is discussed. This examination found that the hypothesis of hydrogen absorption during SRF processing is consistent with published scientific literature and thermodynamic principles.

  6. Stability and Resolution Studies of HOMBPMs for the 1.3 GHz Superconducting Accelerating Cavities at FLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, L.; Baboi, N.; Jones, R. M.

    HOMBPMs (HOM based Beam Position Monitors) are installed at the FLASH facility at DESY, Hamburg. These are aimed at aligning the beam and monitoring the beam position. Over time, the accuracy of beam position prediction is degraded. This is due to instability issues in the 1.3 GHz and 3.9 GHz superconducting cavities and associated electronics. In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time a measurement technique which is stable and can be relied upon over a period of three months with unprecedented resolution (below 4 μm horizontally and 2 μm vertically). We attribute this improvement in stability to a focused campaign on various signal processing and analysis techniques. These techniques include SVD (Singular Value Decomposition), ANN (Artificial Neural Network) and PLS (Partial Least Square). We found the best resolution and computational power using the latter method, PLS. These techniques are directly applicable to the HOMBPM system at the European XFEL that is currently under construction. However, they are in many ways generic and hence applicable to other measurement methods.

  7. An improved oxygen diffusion model to explain the effect of low-temperature baking on high field losses in niobium superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2006-07-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) superconducting cavities made of high purity niobium are widely used to accelerate charged particle beams in particle accelerators. The major limitation to achieve RF field values approaching the theoretical limit for niobium is represented by ''anomalous'' losses which degrade the quality factor of the cavities starting at peak surface magnetic fields of about 100 mT, in absence of field emission. These high field losses are often referred to as ''Q-drop''. It has been observed that the Q-drop is drastically reduced by baking the cavities at 120 C for about 48 h under ultrahigh vacuum. An improved oxygen diffusion model for the niobium-oxide system is proposed to explain the benefit of the low-temperature baking on the Q-drop in niobium superconducting rf cavities. The model shows that baking at 120 C for 48 h allows oxygen to diffuse away from the surface, and therefore increasing the lower critical field towards the value for pure niobium.

  8. A study of beam position diagnostics using beam-excited dipole modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at a free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei; Baboi, Nicoleta; Jones, Roger M; Shinton, Ian R R; Flisgen, Thomas; Glock, Hans-Walter

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the feasibility of beam position diagnostics using higher order mode (HOM) signals excited by an electron beam in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, three modal choices have been narrowed down to fulfill different diagnostics requirements. These are localized dipole beam-pipe modes, trapped cavity modes from the fifth dipole band, and propagating modes from the first two dipole bands. These modes are treated with various data analysis techniques: modal identification, direct linear regression (DLR), and singular value decomposition (SVD). Promising options for beam diagnostics are found from all three modal choices. This constitutes the first prediction, subsequently confirmed by experiments, of trapped HOMs in third harmonic cavities, and also the first direct comparison of DLR and SVD in the analysis of HOM-based beam diagnostics.

  9. A study of beam position diagnostics using beam-excited dipole modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at a free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Pei; Baboi, Nicoleta; Jones, Roger M.; Shinton, Ian R. R.; Flisgen, Thomas; Glock, Hans-Walter

    2012-08-15

    We investigate the feasibility of beam position diagnostics using higher order mode (HOM) signals excited by an electron beam in the third harmonic 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, three modal choices have been narrowed down to fulfill different diagnostics requirements. These are localized dipole beam-pipe modes, trapped cavity modes from the fifth dipole band, and propagating modes from the first two dipole bands. These modes are treated with various data analysis techniques: modal identification, direct linear regression (DLR), and singular value decomposition (SVD). Promising options for beam diagnostics are found from all three modal choices. This constitutes the first prediction, subsequently confirmed by experiments, of trapped HOMs in third harmonic cavities, and also the first direct comparison of DLR and SVD in the analysis of HOM-based beam diagnostics.

  10. Measurement of groove features and dimensions of the vertical test cathode and the choke joint of the superconducting electron gun cavity of the Energy Recovery LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Hammons, L.; Ke, M.

    2011-10-13

    A testing program for the superconducting electron gun cavity that has been designed for the Energy Recovery LINAC is being planned. The goal of the testing program is to characterize the RF properties of the gun cavity at superconducting temperatures and, in particular, to study multipacting that is suspected to be occurring in the choke joint of the cavity where the vertical test cathode is inserted. The testing program will seek to understand the nature and cause of this multipacting and attempt to eliminate it, if possible, by supplying sufficient voltage to the cavity. These efforts are motivated by the multipacting issues that have been observed in the processing of the fine-grain niobium gun cavity. This cavity, which is being processed at Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory for Brookhaven, has encountered multipacting at a gradient of approximately 3 MV/m and, to date, has resisted efforts at elimination. Because of this problem, a testing program is being established here in C-AD that will use the large-grain niobium gun cavity that currently resides at Brookhaven and has been used for room-temperature measurements. The large-grain and fine-cavities are identical in every aspect of construction and only differ in niobium grain size. Thus, it is believed that testing and conditioning of the large-grain cavity should yield important insights about the fine-grain cavity. One element of this testing program involves characterizing the physical features of the choke joint of the cavity where the multipacting is believed to be occurring and, in particular the grooves of the joint. The configuration of the cavity and the vertical test cathode is shown in Figure 1. In addition, it is important to characterize the groove of the vertical test cathode. The grooved nature of these two components was specifically designed to prevent multipacting. However, it is suspected that, because of the chemical processing that the fine-grain gun cavity underwent along with the

  11. Evaluation of the Propensity of Niobium to Absorb Hydrogen During Fabrication of Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities for Particle Accelerators

    PubMed Central

    Ricker, R. E.; Myneni, G. R.

    2010-01-01

    During the fabrication of niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) particle accelerator cavities procedures are used that chemically or mechanically remove the passivating surface film of niobium pentoxide (Nb2O5). Removal of this film will expose the underlying niobium metal and allow it to react with the processing environment. If these reactions produce hydrogen at sufficient concentrations and rates, then hydrogen will be absorbed and diffuse into the metal. High hydrogen activities could result in supersaturation and the nucleation of hydride phases. If the metal repassivates at the conclusion of the processing step and the passive film blocks hydrogen egress, then the absorbed hydrogen or hydrides could be retained and alter the performance of the metal during subsequent processing steps or in-service. This report examines the feasibility of this hypothesis by first identifying the postulated events, conditions, and reactions and then determining if each is consistent with accepted scientific principles, literature, and data. Established precedent for similar events in other systems was found in the scientific literature and thermodynamic analysis found that the postulated reactions were not only energetically favorable, but produced large driving forces. The hydrogen activity or fugacity required for the reactions to be at equilibrium was determined to indicate the propensity for hydrogen evolution, absorption, and hydride nucleation. The influence of processing conditions and kinetics on the proximity of hydrogen surface coverage to these theoretical values is discussed. This examination found that the hypothesis of hydrogen absorption during SRF processing is consistent with published scientific literature and thermodynamic principles. PMID:27134791

  12. P-APT - PORTABLE AUTOMATICALLY PROGRAMMED TOOLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poland, J.

    1994-01-01

    The APT code is one of the most widely used software tools for complex numerically controlled (N/C) machining. APT is an acronym for Automatically Programmed Tool and is used to denote the programming language. Development of the APT language and software system was begun in the late 1950's as a U. S. government sponsored industry and university research effort. APT is a "problem oriented" language that was developed for the explicit purpose of aiding the N/C machine tools. The original APT program contained undocumented nonstandard FORTRAN, thus making porting of the processor to different operating systems difficult. P-APT (Portable APT) is a revised version of APT that was written to conform to the FORTRAN 77 standard. All machine-dependent code has either been replaced or isolated and documented. Machine-tool instructions and geometry definitions are written in the APT language to constitute a "part program". The APT part program is processed by the P-APT software to produce a cutter location (CL) file. This CL file may then be processed by user supplied post processors to convert the CL data into a form suitable for a particular N/C machine tool. This current offering of the P-APT system represents an adaptation, with enhancements, of the public domain version of APT IV/SSX8. Enhancements include the super pocket feature that allows concave pockets with curved sides and islands. The P-APT system software is organized into two separate programs: the load complex and the APT processor. The load complex handles the table initiation phase and is usually only run when changes to the P-APT processor capabilities are made. This phase initializes character recognition and syntax tables for the P-APT processor by creating FORTRAN block data programs. The P-APT processor consists of four components: the translator, the execution complex, the subroutine library, and the CL editor. The translator examines each APT statement in the part program for recognizable structure

  13. ESDAPT - APT PROGRAMMING EDITOR AND INTERPRETER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premack, T.

    1994-01-01

    ESDAPT is a graphical programming environment for developing APT (Automatically Programmed Tool) programs for controlling numerically controlled machine tools. ESDAPT has a graphical user interface that provides the user with an APT syntax sensitive text editor and windows for displaying geometry and tool paths. APT geometry statement can also be created using menus and screen picks. ESDAPT interprets APT geometry statements and displays the results in its view windows. Tool paths are generated by batching the APT source to an APT processor (COSMIC P-APT recommended). The tool paths are then displayed in the view windows. Hardcopy output of the view windows is in color PostScript format. ESDAPT is written in C-language, yacc, lex, and XView for use on Sun4 series computers running SunOS. ESDAPT requires 4Mb of disk space, 7Mb of RAM, and MIT's X Window System, Version 11 Release 4, or OpenWindows version 3 for execution. Program documentation in PostScript format and an executable for OpenWindows version 3 are provided on the distribution media. The standard distribution medium for ESDAPT is a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge (Sun QIC-24) in UNIX tar format. This program was developed in 1992.

  14. Design and simulation of 3½-cell superconducting gun cavity and beam dynamics studies of the SASE-FEL System at the Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, H. Duran; Cakir, R.; Porsuk, D.

    2015-06-01

    Design and simulation of a superconducting gun cavity with 3½ cells have been studied in order to give the first push to the electron beam for the linear accelerating system at The Institute of Accelerator Technologies at Ankara University. Electrons are accelerated through the gun cavity with the help of the Radiofrequency power suppliers from cryogenic systems. Accelerating gradient should be as high as possible to accelerate electron beam inside the cavity. In this study, electron beam reaches to 9.17 MeV energy at the end of the gun cavity with the accelerating gradient; Ec=19.21 MV/m. 1.3 GHz gun cavity consists of three TESLA-like shaped cells while the special designed gun-cell includes a cathode plug. Optimized important beam parameters inside the gun cavity, average beam current 3 mA, transverse emittance 2.5 mm mrad, repetition rate 30 MHz and other parameters are obtained for the SASE-FEL System. The Superfish/Poisson program is used to design each cell of the superconducting cavity. Superconducting gun cavity and Radiofrequency properties are studied by utilizing 2D Superfish/Poisson, 3D Computer Simulation Technology Microwave Studio, and 3D Computer Simulation Technology Particle Studio. Superfish/Poisson is also used to optimize the geometry of the cavity cells to get the highest accelerating gradient. The behavior of the particles along the beamline is included in this study. ASTRA Code is used to track the particles.

  15. Space applications of superconductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, D. B.; Vorreiter, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    Some potential applications of superconductivity in space are summarized, e.g., the use of high field magnets for cosmic ray analysis or energy storage and generation, space applications of digital superconducting devices, such as the Josephson switch and, in the future, a superconducting computer. Other superconducting instrumentation which could be used in space includes: low frequency superconducting sensors, microwave and infrared detectors, instruments for gravitational studies, and high-Q cavities for use as stabilizing elements in clocks and oscillators.

  16. Possible influence of surface oxides on the optical response of high-purity niobium material used in the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nageshwar; Deo, M. N.; Roy, S. B.

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the possible influence of surface oxides on the optical properties of a high-purity niobium (Nb) material for fabrication of superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities. Various peaks in the infrared region were identified using Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Optical response functions such as complex refractive index, dielectric and conductivity of niobium were compared with the existing results on oxides free Nb and Cu. It was observed that the presence of a mixture of niobium-oxides, and probably near other surface impurities, appreciably influence the conducting properties of the material causing deviation from the typical metallic characteristics. In this way, the key result of this work is the observation, identification of vibrational modes of some of surface complexes and study of its influences on the optical responses of materials. This method of spectroscopic investigation will help in understanding the origin of degradation of performance of SCRF cavities.

  17. Proof-of-principle demonstration of Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting radiofrequency cavities for high Q{sub 0} applications

    SciTech Connect

    Posen, S. Liepe, M.; Hall, D. L.

    2015-02-23

    Many future particle accelerators require hundreds of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities operating with high duty factor. The large dynamic heat load of the cavities causes the cryogenic plant to make up a significant part of the overall cost of the facility. This contribution can be reduced by replacing standard niobium cavities with ones coated with a low-dissipation superconductor such as Nb{sub 3}Sn. In this paper, we present results for single cell cavities coated with Nb{sub 3}Sn at Cornell. Five coatings were carried out, showing that at 4.2 K, high Q{sub 0} out to medium fields was reproducible, resulting in an average quench field of 14 MV/m and an average 4.2 K Q{sub 0} at quench of 8 × 10{sup 9}. In each case, the peak surface magnetic field at quench was well above H{sub c1}, showing that it is not a limiting field in these cavities. The coating with the best performance had a quench field of 17 MV/m, exceeding gradient requirements for state-of-the-art high duty factor SRF accelerators. It is also shown that—taking into account the thermodynamic efficiency of the cryogenic plant—the 4.2 K Q{sub 0} values obtained meet the AC power consumption requirements of state-of-the-art high duty factor accelerators, making this a proof-of-principle demonstration for Nb{sub 3}Sn cavities in future applications.

  18. FPGA technology application in a fast measurement and control system for the TESLA superconducting cavity of a FLASH free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.

    2007-08-01

    Contemporary basic research in physics, biology, chemistry, pharmacology, material technology and other branches uses methods based on sample penetration (and the effect measurement) with pulsed ultra-short EM waves of very high beam intensity. This paper is an overview of a free electron laser (FEL) used in such methods. A method for the stabilization of the EM field in a superconducting 'TESLA' cavity accelerator for electrons is presented. This requires precise measurements of the field. The SC accelerator is a basic part of the FEL. The given example concerns the FLASH machine in DESY. The presented, high power EM field stabilization system is based on FPGA circuits with embedded fast hardware multiplication blocks. Examples of a few families of such new generation practically designed and constructed system realizations are given. The system is referred to as the SIMCON (from the microwave superconducting cavity SIMulator and CONtroller). SIMCONs consist of either single-module, multi-module configurable or multichannel distributed units. The SIMCON system stabilizes the EM field by a very fast feedback loop with an adaptation process, supplemented with a feed-forward. The following are presented: a parametric hardware description (firmware) in the form of behavioural VHDL algorithms; implementation results in VirtexIIPro circuits; examples of measurements of high power EM field stability performed under the nominal conditions of accelerator work.

  19. Atom probe tomography (APT) of carbonate minerals.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Laiginhas, Fernando; Reinhard, David A; Prosa, Ty J; Martens, Rich L

    2016-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) combines the highest spatial resolution with chemical data at atomic scale for the analysis of materials. For geological specimens, the process of field evaporation and molecular ion formation and interpretation is not yet entirely understood. The objective of this study is to determine the best conditions for the preparation and analysis by APT of carbonate minerals, of great importance in the interpretation of geological processes, focusing on the bulk chemical composition. Results show that the complexity of the mass spectrum is different for calcite and dolomite and relates to dissimilarities in crystalochemical parameters. In addition, APT bulk chemistry of calcite closely matches the expected stoichiometry but fails to provide accurate atomic percentages for elements in dolomite under the experimental conditions evaluated in this work. For both calcite and dolomite, APT underestimates the amount of oxygen based on their chemical formula, whereas it is able to detect small percentages of elemental substitutions in crystal lattices. Overall, our results demonstrate that APT of carbonate minerals is possible, but further optimization of the experimental parameters are required to improve the use of atom probe tomography for the correct interpretation of mineral geochemistry. PMID:26519815

  20. Atom probe tomography (APT) of carbonate minerals.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Laiginhas, Fernando; Reinhard, David A; Prosa, Ty J; Martens, Rich L

    2016-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) combines the highest spatial resolution with chemical data at atomic scale for the analysis of materials. For geological specimens, the process of field evaporation and molecular ion formation and interpretation is not yet entirely understood. The objective of this study is to determine the best conditions for the preparation and analysis by APT of carbonate minerals, of great importance in the interpretation of geological processes, focusing on the bulk chemical composition. Results show that the complexity of the mass spectrum is different for calcite and dolomite and relates to dissimilarities in crystalochemical parameters. In addition, APT bulk chemistry of calcite closely matches the expected stoichiometry but fails to provide accurate atomic percentages for elements in dolomite under the experimental conditions evaluated in this work. For both calcite and dolomite, APT underestimates the amount of oxygen based on their chemical formula, whereas it is able to detect small percentages of elemental substitutions in crystal lattices. Overall, our results demonstrate that APT of carbonate minerals is possible, but further optimization of the experimental parameters are required to improve the use of atom probe tomography for the correct interpretation of mineral geochemistry.

  1. Familiarity and Aptness in Metaphor Comprehension.

    PubMed

    Damerall, Alison Whiteford; Kellogg, Ronald T

    2016-01-01

    The career of metaphor hypothesis suggests that novel metaphors are understood through a search for shared features between the topic and vehicle, but with repeated exposure, the figurative meaning is understood directly as a new category is established. The categorization hypothesis argues that instead good or apt metaphors are understood through a categorization process, whether or not they are familiar. Only poor metaphors ever invoke a literal comparison. In Experiment 1, with aptness equated, we found that high familiarity speeded comprehension time over low-familiarity metaphors. In Experiment 2a, providing a literal prime failed to facilitate interpretation of low-familiarity metaphors, contrary to the career of metaphor hypothesis. In Experiment 2b, with familiarity equated, high- and low-aptness metaphors did not differ, contrary to the categorization hypothesis. PMID:27029106

  2. Familiarity and Aptness in Metaphor Comprehension.

    PubMed

    Damerall, Alison Whiteford; Kellogg, Ronald T

    2016-01-01

    The career of metaphor hypothesis suggests that novel metaphors are understood through a search for shared features between the topic and vehicle, but with repeated exposure, the figurative meaning is understood directly as a new category is established. The categorization hypothesis argues that instead good or apt metaphors are understood through a categorization process, whether or not they are familiar. Only poor metaphors ever invoke a literal comparison. In Experiment 1, with aptness equated, we found that high familiarity speeded comprehension time over low-familiarity metaphors. In Experiment 2a, providing a literal prime failed to facilitate interpretation of low-familiarity metaphors, contrary to the career of metaphor hypothesis. In Experiment 2b, with familiarity equated, high- and low-aptness metaphors did not differ, contrary to the categorization hypothesis.

  3. Interrogation of duplicitous stars with an APT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, Bernard W.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results from intensive spectroscopic and APT monitoring of two interacting binary systems are presented. Both V644 Mon (Be + K:) and HD 37453 (F5 II + B) show complex, composite, and variable spectral. APT observations extending over three years show both stars to vary by 0.1-0.2 mag in V. The photometric variability of V644 Mon appears to be irregular, though there is some evidence for periodic behavior in the 50-60 day range. HD 37453 has an orbital period of 66.75 days; the best-fit photometric period is not quite half this value, indicating the star is an ellipsoidal variable.

  4. Effect of high temperature heat treatments on the quality factor of a large-grain superconducting radio-frequency niobium cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, P.; Ciovati, G.; Myneni, G. R.; Gray, K. E.; Groll, N.; Maheshwari, P.; McRae, D. M.; Pike, R.; Proslier, T.; Stevie, F.; Walsh, R. P.; Yang, Q.; Zasadzinzki, J.

    2013-04-01

    Large-grain Nb has become a viable alternative to fine-grain Nb for the fabrication of superconducting radio-frequency cavities. In this contribution we report the results from a heat treatment study of a large-grain 1.5 GHz single-cell cavity made of “medium purity” Nb. The baseline surface preparation prior to heat treatment consisted of standard buffered chemical polishing. The heat treatment in the range 800–1400°C was done in a newly designed vacuum induction furnace. Q{sub 0} values of the order of 2×10{sup 10} at 2.0 K and peak surface magnetic field (B{sub p}) of 90 mT were achieved reproducibly. A Q{sub 0} value of (5±1)×10{sup 10} at 2.0 K and B{sub p}=90mT was obtained after heat treatment at 1400°C. This is the highest value ever reported at this temperature, frequency, and field. Samples heat treated with the cavity at 1400°C were analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive x ray, point-contact tunneling, and x-ray diffraction, and revealed a complex surface composition which includes titanium oxide, increased carbon, and nitrogen content but reduced hydrogen concentration compared to a non-heat-treated sample.

  5. Dependence of trapped-flux-induced surface resistance of a large-grain Nb superconducting radio-frequency cavity on spatial temperature gradient during cooldown through Tc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shichun; Kubo, Takayuki; Geng, R. L.

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies by Romanenko et al. revealed that cooling down a superconducting cavity under a large spatial temperature gradient decreases the amount of trapped flux and leads to reduction of the residual surface resistance. In the present paper, the flux expulsion ratio and the trapped-flux-induced surface resistance of a large-grain cavity cooled down under a spatial temperature gradient up to 80 K /m are studied under various applied magnetic fields from 5 to 20 μ T . We show the flux expulsion ratio improves as the spatial temperature gradient increases, independent of the applied magnetic field: our results support and enforce the previous studies. We then analyze all rf measurement results obtained under different applied magnetic fields together by plotting the trapped-flux-induced surface resistance normalized by the applied magnetic field as a function of the spatial temperature gradient. All the data can be fitted by a single curve, which defines an empirical formula for the trapped-flux-induced surface resistance as a function of the spatial temperature gradient and applied magnetic field. The formula can fit not only the present results but also those obtained by Romanenko et al. previously. The sensitivity rfl of surface resistance from trapped magnetic flux of fine-grain and large-grain niobium cavities and the origin of d T /d s dependence of Rfl/Ba are also discussed.

  6. Ultra-high quality factors in superconducting niobium cavities in ambient magnetic fields up to 190 mG

    SciTech Connect

    Romanenko, A. Grassellino, A.; Crawford, A. C.; Sergatskov, D. A.; Melnychuk, O.

    2014-12-08

    Ambient magnetic field, if trapped in the penetration depth, leads to the residual resistance and therefore sets the limit for the achievable quality factors in superconducting niobium resonators for particle accelerators. Here, we show that a complete expulsion of the magnetic flux can be performed and leads to: (1) record quality factors Q > 2 × 10{sup 11} up to accelerating gradient of 22 MV/m; (2) Q ∼ 3 × 10{sup 10} at 2 K and 16 MV/m in up to 190 mG magnetic fields. This is achieved by large thermal gradients at the normal/superconducting phase front during the cooldown. Our findings open up a way to ultra-high quality factors at low temperatures and show an alternative to the sophisticated magnetic shielding implemented in modern superconducting accelerators.

  7. Testing of vacuum pumps for APT/LEDA RFQ

    SciTech Connect

    Kishiyama, K.; Shen, S.; Behne, D.; Wilson, N.G.; Schrage, D.; Valdiviez, R.

    1998-12-31

    Two vacuum systems were designed and built for the RFQ (Radio Frequency Quadrupole) cavity in the APT/LEDA (Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator) linac. The gas load from the proton beam required very high hydrogen pump speed and capacity, The gas load from the high power RF windows also required very high hydrogen pump speed for the RF window vacuum system. Cryopumps were chosen for the RFQ vacuum system and ST185 sintered nonevaporable getter (NEG) cartridges were chosen for the RF window vacuum system. Hydrogen pump speed and capacity measurements were carried out for a commercial cryopump and a NEG pump. This paper will discuss the test procedures and the results of the measurements.

  8. Cavity Photons as a Probe for Charge Relaxation Resistance and Photon Emission in a Quantum Dot Coupled to Normal and Superconducting Continua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhat, L. E.; Viennot, J. J.; Dartiailh, M. C.; Desjardins, M. M.; Kontos, T.; Cottet, A.

    2016-04-01

    Microwave cavities have been widely used to investigate the behavior of closed few-level systems. Here, we show that they also represent a powerful probe for the dynamics of charge transfer between a discrete electronic level and fermionic continua. We have combined experiment and theory for a carbon nanotube quantum dot coupled to normal metal and superconducting contacts. In equilibrium conditions, where our device behaves as an effective quantum dot-normal metal junction, we approach a universal photon dissipation regime governed by a quantum charge relaxation effect. We observe how photon dissipation is modified when the dot admittance turns from capacitive to inductive. When the fermionic reservoirs are voltage biased, the dot can even cause photon emission due to inelastic tunneling to/from a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer peak in the density of states of the superconducting contact. We can model these numerous effects quantitatively in terms of the charge susceptibility of the quantum dot circuit. This validates an approach that could be used to study a wide class of mesoscopic QED devices.

  9. Optimizing the configuration of a superconducting photonic band gap accelerator cavity to increase the maximum achievable gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Kurennoy, Sergey S.; O'Hara, James F.; Olivas, Eric R.; Shchegolkov, Dmitry Yu.

    2014-02-01

    We present a design of a superconducting rf photonic band gap (SRF PBG) accelerator cell with specially shaped rods in order to reduce peak surface magnetic fields and improve the effectiveness of the PBG structure for suppression of higher order modes (HOMs). The ability of PBG structures to suppress long-range wakefields is especially beneficial for superconducting electron accelerators for high power free-electron lasers (FELs), which are designed to provide high current continuous duty electron beams. Using PBG structures to reduce the prominent beam-breakup phenomena due to HOMs will allow significantly increased beam-breakup thresholds. As a result, there will be possibilities for increasing the operation frequency of SRF accelerators and for the development of novel compact high-current accelerator modules for the FELs.

  10. LEDA and APT beam diagnostics instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Gilpatrick, J.D.; Johnson, K.F.; Hodapp, T.R.

    1997-10-01

    A 20-MeV 100-mA-cw proton-accelerator, Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA), is presently being developed, fabricated, and tested at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The beam diagnostic instrumentation for LEDA and the final 1700-GeV Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) are classified into two categories: operation and characterization instrumentation. The operational instrumentation does not intercept or minimally-intercepts the beam and are sufficiently prompt and robust to provide accurate information to the operators and commissioners during full-current cw beam operation. The characterization instrumentation, primarily utilized during commissioning project-phases, operates under more traditional 100-mA-peak and approximately 0.1-mA-average beam-current conditions. This paper will review some of the LEDA and APT operational beam diagnostic instrumentation.

  11. Beam transfer between the coupled cavity linac and the low energy booster synchrotron for the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider)

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandari, R.K.; Penner, S.

    1990-09-01

    Ion optical design of the transfer line, which will be used to inject H{sup {minus}} beam at 600 MeV from the Coupled Cavity Linac (CCL) into the Low Energy Booster (LEB) synchrotron, is described. Space charge effects of up to 50 mA average beam current have been taken into account.

  12. APT cost scaling: Preliminary indications from a Parametric Costing Model (PCM)

    SciTech Connect

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-02-03

    A Parametric Costing Model has been created and evaluate as a first step in quantitatively understanding important design options for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) concept. This model couples key economic and technical elements of APT in a two-parameter search of beam energy and beam power that minimizes costs within a range of operating constraints. The costing and engineering depth of the Parametric Costing Model is minimal at the present {open_quotes}entry level{close_quotes}, and is intended only to demonstrate a potential for a more-detailed, cost-based integrating design tool. After describing the present basis of the Parametric Costing Model and giving an example of a single parametric scaling run derived therefrom, the impacts of choices related to resistive versus superconducting accelerator structures and cost of electricity versus plant availability ({open_quotes}load curve{close_quotes}) are reported. Areas of further development and application are suggested.

  13. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1998-05-19

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The SRF window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The SRF window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the SRF window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  14. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  15. The Assessment of Afterschool Program Practices Tool (APT): Findings from the APT Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Allison; Surr, Wendy; Richer, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    The Assessment of Afterschool Program Practices Tool ("APT"), developed by the National Institute of Out-of-School Time (NIOST), is an observational instrument designed to measure the aspects of afterschool program quality that research suggests contribute to the 21st century skills, attitudes, and behaviors youth need to be successful in school…

  16. Low to high energy beamstops for APT

    SciTech Connect

    Doll, D.; Hagan, T. van; Redler, K.; Tooker, J.; Baxter, A.; Schneider, D.; Spinos, F.; Fikani, M.; Funk, W.

    1998-12-31

    Beamstops are required for commissioning and operation of accelerators. The family of beamstops currently being developed for the DOE-sponsored Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program is addressed. The operational range encompasses proton energies of 6.7 MeV at the beginning of the RFQ to 1.7 GeV at the target/blanket, and both pulsed and cw operating modes. An additional beamstop was needed on a companion test facility to validate ion injector performance. This first of the series of beamstops has been built and operated; the second is under construction and will be operational by mid-1998. Particle stopping distance and duty factor drive the size and heat transfer capacity of these beamstops; the need for low neutron production and activation potential drives the material selection. At energies above 6.7 MeV, the preferred beamstop material is graphite with aluminum the choice for structures and helium the choice for coolant. Boronated water is the preferred shielding below 70 MeV, but is less suitable at higher energies because of the creation of Be-7. The evolution of the low-energy demonstration accelerator (LEDA) to 20 MeV and remaining APT beamstops are presented with performance ramifications and the status of the hardware and testing.

  17. Reduction of helium loss from a superconducting accelerating cavity during initial cool-down and cryostat exchange by pre-cooling the re-condensing cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, B. E.; Minehara, E. J.; Hayashizaki, N.; Oshima, N.; Suzuki, R.

    2015-03-01

    A Zero-Boil-Off (ZBO) cryostat is designed to realize a compact, stand-alone cryogenic system for the AIST superconducting accelerator (SCA). Under normal operation there is no evaporative helium loss from the cryomodule and therefore operating costs associated with the supply of liquid helium can be eliminated. The only significant loss of helium from the module occurs during the initial cavity cool-down procedure or when the re-condensing cryostat is replaced. It takes about 3 h to cool down the cryostat head from room temperature (300 K) to 4 K. During this time around 100 L of liquid helium is lost due to evaporation. By pre-cooling the cryostat inside a low heat load vacuum tube before transfer to the cryomodule, this evaporative loss could be essentially eliminated, significantly reducing the volume of liquid helium required for the initial cryomodule cool-down. The pre-cooling system also provides an efficient method to test the cryostat prior to use.

  18. Process development for cladding APT tungsten targets

    SciTech Connect

    Horner, M H; Barber, R; Dalder, E

    2000-11-27

    This report describes development of processes for cladding APT Target tungsten components with a thin layer (0.127-mm) of Alloy 718, Alloy 600 or 316L stainless steel alloy. The application requires that the cladding be thermally bonded to the tungsten in order to transfer heat generated in the tungsten volume to a surrounding coolant. High temperature diffusion bonding using the hot isostatic processing (HIP) technique was selected as the method for creating a metallurgical bond between pure tungsten tubes and rods and the cladding materials. Bonding studies using a uniaxially loaded vacuum hot press were conducted in preliminary experiments to determine acceptable time-temperature conditions for diffusion bonding. The results were successfully applied in cladding tungsten rods and tubes with these alloys. Temperatures 800-810 C were suitable for cladding tungsten with Alloy 600 and 316L stainless steel alloy, whereas tungsten was clad with Alloy 718 at 1020 C.

  19. Conceptual Design of an APT Reusable Spaceplane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corpino, S.; Viola, N.

    This paper concerns the conceptual design of an Aerial Propellant Transfer reusable spaceplane carried out during our PhD course under the supervision of prof. Chiesa. The new conceptual design methodology employed in order to develop the APT concept and the main characteristics of the spaceplane itself will be presented and discussed. The methodology for conceptual design has been worked out during the last three years. It was originally thought for atmospheric vehicle design but, thanks to its modular structure which makes it very flexible, it has been possible to convert it to space transportation systems design by adding and/or modifying a few modules. One of the major improvements has been for example the conception and development of the mission simulation and trajectory optimisation module. The methodology includes as main characteristics and innovations the latest techniques of geometric modelling and logistic, operational and cost aspects since the first stages of the project. Computer aided design techniques are used to obtain a better definition of the product at the end of the conceptual design phase and virtual reality concepts are employed to visualise three-dimensional installation and operational aspects, at least in part replacing full-scale mock- ups. The introduction of parametric three-dimensional CAD software integrated into the conceptual design methodology represents a great improvement because it allows to carry out different layouts and to assess them immediately. It is also possible to link the CAD system to a digital prototyping software which combines 3D visualisation and assembly analysis, useful to define the so-called Digital Mock-Up at Conceptual Level (DMUCL) which studies the integration between the on board systems, sized with simulation algorithms, and the airframe. DMUCL represents a very good means to integrate the conceptual design with a methodology turned towards dealing with Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and

  20. View factors between APT target components

    SciTech Connect

    Kidman, R.B.

    1998-07-01

    In a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in the accelerator production of tritium (APT) target/blanket, radiation heat transfer determines the temperature of the target components. Radiation heat-transfer analysis can only proceed if accurate component-to-component view factors are available. The authors describe and demonstrate the numerical method used to compute the view factors (also called angle factors, configuration factors, and shape factors) between complicated objects. The method is verified on simple objects that have analytic solutions, and then it is used to predict the view factors between the target components of the accelerator production of tritium target/blanket. The method is practical, easy to apply, and can accommodate difficult levels of realism.

  1. Electromagnetic SCRF Cavity Tuner

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.; Borissov, E.; Foster, G.W.; Makulski, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Khabiboulline, T.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    A novel prototype of SCRF cavity tuner is being designed and tested at Fermilab. This is a superconducting C-type iron dominated magnet having a 10 mm gap, axial symmetry, and a 1 Tesla field. Inside the gap is mounted a superconducting coil capable of moving {+-} 1 mm and producing a longitudinal force up to {+-} 1.5 kN. The static force applied to the RF cavity flanges provides a long-term cavity geometry tuning to a nominal frequency. The same coil powered by fast AC current pulse delivers mechanical perturbation for fast cavity tuning. This fast mechanical perturbation could be used to compensate a dynamic RF cavity detuning caused by cavity Lorentz forces and microphonics. A special configuration of magnet system was designed and tested.

  2. The importance of being apt: metaphor comprehension in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Roncero, Carlos; de Almeida, Roberto G.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effect of aptness in the comprehension of copular metaphors (e.g., Lawyers are sharks) by Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients. Aptness is the extent to which the vehicle (e.g., shark) captures salient properties of the topic (e.g., lawyers). A group of AD patients provided interpretations for metaphors that varied both in aptness and familiarity. Compared to healthy controls, AD patients produced worse interpretations, but interpretation ability was related to a metaphor's aptness rather than to its familiarity level, and patients with superior abstraction ability produced better interpretations. Therefore, the ability to construct figurative interpretations for metaphors is not always diminished in AD patients nor is it dependent only on the novelty level of the expression. We show that Alzheimer's patients' capacity to build figurative interpretations for metaphors is related to both item variables, such as aptness, and participant variables, such as abstraction ability. PMID:25520642

  3. Automated Portable Test (APT) System: overview and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittner, A. C.; Smith, M. G.; Kennedy, R. S.; Staley, C. F.; Harbeson, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    The Automated Portable Test (APT) System is a notebook-sized, computer-based, human-performance and subjective-status assessment system. It is now being used in a wide range of environmental studies (e.g., simulator aftereffects, flight tests, drug effects, and hypoxia). Three questionnaires and 15 performance tests have been implemented, and the adaptation of 30 more tests is underway or is planned. The APT System is easily transportable, is inexpensive, and has the breadth of expansion options required for field and laboratory applications. The APT System is a powerful and expandable tool for human assessment in remote and unusual environments.

  4. Passivated niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Hjorvarsson, Bjorgvin; Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2006-12-19

    A niobium cavity exhibiting high quality factors at high gradients is provided by treating a niobium cavity through a process comprising: 1) removing surface oxides by plasma etching or a similar process; 2) removing hydrogen or other gases absorbed in the bulk niobium by high temperature treatment of the cavity under ultra high vacuum to achieve hydrogen outgassing; and 3) assuring the long term chemical stability of the niobium cavity by applying a passivating layer of a superconducting material having a superconducting transition temperature higher than niobium thereby reducing losses from electron (cooper pair) scattering in the near surface region of the interior of the niobium cavity. According to a preferred embodiment, the passivating layer comprises niobium nitride (NbN) applied by reactive sputtering.

  5. Spectral investigation of hot-spot and cavity resonance effects on the terahertz radiation emitted from high-Tc superconducting Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ single crystal mesa structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadowaki, Kazuo; Watanabe, Chiharu; Minami, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Takanari; Klemm, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Terahertz (THz) electromagnetic radiation emitted from high-Tc superconducting Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ mesa structures in the case of single mesa and series-connected mesas is investigated by the FTIR spectroscopic technique while observing its temperature distribution simultaneously by a SiC photoluminescence technique. Changing the bias level, sudden jumps of the hot-spot position were clearly observed. Although the radiation intensity changes drastically associated with the jump of the hot spot position, the frequency is unaffected as long as the voltage per junction is kept constant. Since the frequency of the intense radiation satisfies the cavity resonance condition, we confirmed that the cavity resonance is of primarily importance for the synchronization of whole intrinsic Josephson junctions in the mesa for high power radiation. This work was supported in part by the Grant-in-Aid for challenging Exploratory Research, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science & Technology (MEXT).

  6. Confinement and Tritium Stripping Systems for APT Tritium Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, R.H.; Heung, L.K.

    1997-10-20

    This report identifies functions and requirements for the tritium process confinement and clean-up system (PCCS) and provides supporting technical information for the selection and design of tritium confinement, clean-up (stripping) and recovery technologies for new tritium processing facilities in the Accelerator for the Production of Tritium (APT). The results of a survey of tritium confinement and clean-up systems for large-scale tritium handling facilities and recommendations for the APT are also presented.

  7. Associated Particle Tagging (APT) in Magnetic Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Baciak, James E.; Stave, Sean C.; Chichester, David; Dale, Daniel; Kim, Yujong; Harmon, Frank

    2012-10-16

    Summary In Brief The Associated Particle Tagging (APT) project, a collaboration of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Idaho State University (ISU)/Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), has completed an exploratory study to assess the role of magnetic spectrometers as the linchpin technology in next-generation tagged-neutron and tagged-photon active interrogation (AI). The computational study considered two principle concepts: (1) the application of a solenoidal alpha-particle spectrometer to a next-generation, large-emittance neutron generator for use in the associated particle imaging technique, and (2) the application of tagged photon beams to the detection of fissile material via active interrogation. In both cases, a magnetic spectrometer momentum-analyzes charged particles (in the neutron case, alpha particles accompanying neutron generation in the D-T reaction; in the tagged photon case, post-bremsstrahlung electrons) to define kinematic properties of the relevant neutral interrogation probe particle (i.e. neutron or photon). The main conclusions of the study can be briefly summarized as follows: Neutron generator: • For the solenoidal spectrometer concept, magnetic field strengths of order 1 Tesla or greater are required to keep the transverse size of the spectrometer smaller than 1 meter. The notional magnetic spectrometer design evaluated in this feasibility study uses a 5-T magnetic field and a borehole radius of 18 cm. • The design shows a potential for 4.5 Sr tagged neutron solid angle, a factor of 4.5 larger than achievable with current API neutron-generator designs. • The potential angular resolution for such a tagged neutron beam can be less than 0.5o for modest Si-detector position resolution (3 mm). Further improvement in angular resolution can be made by using Si-detectors with better position resolution. • The report documents several features of a notional generator design incorporating the

  8. APT/LEDA RFQ vacuum pumping system

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, S., LLNL

    1997-07-21

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of a vacuum pumping system for the ATP/LEDA (Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator) RFQ (Radio Frequency Quadrupole) linac. Resulted from the lost proton beam, gas streaming from the LEBT (Low Energy Beam Transport) and out-gassing from the surfaces of the RFQ cavity and vacuum plumbing, the total gas load will be on the order of 7.2 x 10{sup -4} Torr-liters/sec, consisting mainly of hydrogen. The system is designed to pump on a continual basis with redundancy to ensure that the minimal operating vacuum level of 1 x 10{sup -6} Torr is maintained even under abnormal conditions. Details of the design, performance analysis and the preliminary test results of the cryogenic pumps are presented.

  9. Quench studies of ILC cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Eremeev, Grigory; Geng, Rongli; Palczewski, Ari; Dai, Jin

    2011-07-01

    Quench limits accelerating gradient in SRF cavities to a gradient lower than theoretically expected for superconducting niobium. Identification of the quenching site with thermometry and OST, optical inspection, and replica of the culprit is an ongoing effort at Jefferson Lab aimed at better understanding of this limiting phenomenon. In this contribution we present our finding with several SRF cavities that were limited by quench.

  10. The evaluation of OSTA's APT and ASVT programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The results of an evaluation of NASA's Applications Pilot Test (APT) and Applications System Verification and Transfer (AVST) Programs are presented. These programs sponsor cooperative projects between NASA and potential users of remote sensing (primarily LANDSAT) technology from federal and state government and the private sector. Fifteen specific projects, seven APT's and eight ASVT's, are examined as mechanisms for technology development, test, and transfer by comparing their results against stated objectives. Interviews with project managers from NASA field centers and user agency representatives provide the basis for project evaluation from NASA and user perspectives.

  11. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry L.; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  12. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry Lawrence; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  13. APT: Costs and Benefits of a Hybrid Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dijkstra, Ton; Haverkort, Marco

    2004-01-01

    In their keynote contribution, Truscott and Sharwood Smith offer a general model of language development from a processing perspective. As they state, their model is very ambitious: Their "acquisition by processing" theory (APT) aims not only at explaining both first and second language acquisition but also real-time processing in language…

  14. APT Blanket System Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Based on Initial Conceptual Design - Case 2: with Beam Shutdown Only

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07

    This report is one of a series of reports that document normal operation and accident simulations for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) blanket heat removal system. These simulations were performed for the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report. This report documents the results of simulations of a Loss-of-Flow Accident (LOFA) where power is lost to all of the pumps that circulate water in the blanket region, the accelerator beam is shut off and neither the residual heat removal nor cavity flood systems operate.

  15. Normal Operation (NO) of APT Blanket System and its Components Based on Initial Conceptual Design

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07

    This report is one of a series of reports documenting accident scenario simulations for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) blanket heat removal systems. The simulations were performed in support of the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) for the APT.

  16. Alignment and steering scenarios for the APT linac

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, J.E.; Gray, E.R.; Nath, S.; Takeda, H.; Wood, R.L.; Young, L.M.; Crandall, K.R.

    1996-09-01

    The Accelerator for the Production of Tritium (APT) requires a very high proton beam current (100 mA cw). Requirement for hands-on maintenance limits the beam spill to less than 0.2 nA/m along most of the linac. To achieve this, it is important to understand the effects of fabrication, installation and operational errors, establish realistic tolerances, and develop techniques for mitigating their consequences. A new code, PARTREX, statistically evaluates the effects of alignment, quadrupole field, and rf phase and amplitude errors in the linac. This paper reviews the effects of quadrupole misalignments and present two steering algorithms that minimize the potential for particle loss from the beam halo. These algorithms were tested on the 8-to-20 MeV portion of the APT linac.

  17. The APT/ERE planning and scheduling manifesto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Mark; Bresina, John; Swanson, Keith; Philips, Andy; Levinson, Rich

    1991-01-01

    The Entropy Reduction Engine, ERE project, is focusing on the construction of integrated planning and scheduling systems. Specifically, the project is studying the problem of integrating planning and scheduling in the context of the closed loop plan use. The results of this research are particularly relevant when there is some element of dynamism in the environment, and thus some chance that a previously formed plan will fail. After a preliminary study of the APT management and control problem, it was felt that it presents an excellent opportunity to show some of the ERE Project's technical results. Of course, the alignment between technology and problem is not perfect, so planning and scheduling for APTs presents some new and difficult challenges as well.

  18. APT/LEDA RFQ and support frame structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, S.

    1997-04-01

    This report documents structural analysis of the Accelerator Production of Tritium Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (APT/LEDA) Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator structure and its associated support frame. This work was conducted for the Department of Energy in support of the APT/LEDA. Structural analysis of the RFQ was performed to quantify stress levels and deflections due to both vacuum loading and gravity loading. This analysis also verified the proposed support scheme geometry and quantified interface loads. This analysis also determined the necessary stiffness and strength requirements of the RFQ support frame verifying the conceptual design geometry and allowing specification of individual frame elements. Complete structural analysis of the frame was completed subsequently. This report details structural analysis of the RFQ assembly with regard to gravity and vacuum loads only. Thermally induced stresses from the Radio Frequency (RF) surface resistance heating were not considered.

  19. Probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis of APT blanket tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Barsell, A. W.; Kern, K. T.

    2001-01-01

    A probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) model that is specific to the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) helium tubes was developed. The model performs Monte Carlo analyses of potential failure modes caused by cyclic stresses generated by beam trips and depressurizations 60m normal operation, coupled with material aging due to irradiation. Dominant failure probabilities are due to crack through-growth while brittle fracture and ductile tearing have lower probability. Failure mechanisms of global plastic collapse and buckling or crack initiation mechanisms of fatigue or local fracture (upon loss of ductility) have negligible probability. For the population of (7,311) tubes in the APT blanket, the worst-case, annual probability of one tube failing is 3 percent. The probability of 2 or more failures is substantially lower; therefore, unavailability impacts are driven by single failure. The average annual loss of production (unavailability) is below about 0.2 percent. Helium outflow and water inflow rates were characterized for the failures.

  20. Acyl protein thioesterase 1 and 2 (APT-1, APT-2) inhibitors palmostatin B, ML348 and ML349 have different effects on NRAS mutant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Vujic, Igor; Sanlorenzo, Martina; Esteve-Puig, Rosaura; Vujic, Marin; Kwong, Andrew; Tsumura, Aaron; Murphy, Ryan; Moy, Adrian; Posch, Christian; Monshi, Babak; Rappersberger, Klemens; Ortiz-Urda, Susana

    2016-02-01

    Oncogenic NRAS mutations are frequent in melanoma and lead to increased downstream signaling and uncontrolled cell proliferation. Since the direct inhibition of NRAS is not possible yet, modulators of NRAS posttranslational modifications have become an area of interest. Specifically, interfering with NRAS posttranslational palmitoylation/depalmitoylation cycle could disturb proper NRAS localization, and therefore decrease cell proliferation and downstream signaling. Here, we investigate the expression and function of NRAS depalmitoylating acyl protein thioesterases 1 and 2 (APT-1, APT-2) in a panel of NRAS mutant melanoma cells. First, we show that all melanoma cell lines examined express APT-1 and APT-2. Next, we show that siRNA mediated APT-1 and APT-2 knock down and that the specific APT-1 and -2 inhibitors ML348 and ML349 have no biologically significant effects in NRAS mutant melanoma cells. Finally, we test the dual APT-1 and APT-2 inhibitor palmostatin B and conclude that palmostatin B has effects on NRAS downstream signaling and cell viability in NRAS mutant melanoma cells, offering an interesting starting point for future studies. PMID:26771141

  1. Crab Cavities for Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.; Carter, R.; Dexter, A.; Tahir, I.; Beard, C.; Dykes, M.; Goudket, P.; Kalinin, A.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Shulte, D.; Jones, Roger M.; Bellantoni, L.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Khabouline, T.; Latina, A.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  2. Quartz crystal and superconductive resonators and oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Besson, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    A general overview of piezoelectric resonators is given with emphasis on evolution of the resonator design. Superconducting cavities and crystals at low temperature and the use of resonant frequencies are also discussed.

  3. Spectral investigation of hot spot and cavity resonance effects on the terahertz radiation from high-T(c) superconducting Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+δ) mesas.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, C; Minami, H; Yamamoto, T; Kashiwagi, T; Klemm, R A; Kadowaki, K

    2014-04-30

    Terahertz (THz) electromagnetic radiation emitted from single and series-connected rectangular mesa devices of high-Tc superconducting Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ is investigated spectroscopically during simultaneous temperature distribution observations using a microcrystalline SiC photoluminescence technique. In single mesas, a hot-spot region with its temperature T locally exceeding Tc was observed to jump suddenly in position under small current I-bias changes. Although these hot-spot position jumps cause large changes in the output power with small changes in I, as long as the voltage V per junction number N is kept constant, they do not affect the output frequency f, which is given by the ac Josephson frequency fJ. f can lock onto that of a particular mesa cavity resonance frequency fc, which enhances the emission power and serves as the primary mechanism for the synchronization of the emissions from each of the intrinsic Josephson junctions in the mesa.

  4. Aviopret APT 1 - A new instrument for photo-interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehle, J.

    1980-03-01

    The Aviopret Wild APT 1 is a photo-interpretation stereoscope in the middle price range, having a high performance and offering considerable user convenience. It is equipped with a 5 times zoom and the aerial photographs can be displaced relative to the viewing optics by means of a parallel-guided picture carriage. The instrument can be supplemented with a viewing provision for a second observer and also by a photographic attachment. This first describes the basic instrument and its accessories, followed by a note on its performance parameters. It concludes with a description of its range of applications and working techniques.

  5. STS-79 astronauts Blaha and Apt on middeck during TCDT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A camera inside the flight deck of the Space Shuttle Atlantis previews crew seating assignments come launch day. Shown here in the middeck are Mission Specialists John E. Blaha and Jay Apt. On the flight deck are Mission Specialists Tom Akers and Carl E. Walz, and Commander William F. Readdy and Pilot Terrence W. Wilcutt. This photo was taken during the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT), a dress rehearsal for launch. Atlantis is scheduled for liftoff on STS-79 no earlier than Sept. 12.

  6. Superconducting transistor

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Kenneth E.

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting transistor is formed by disposing three thin films of superconducting material in a planar parallel arrangement and insulating the films from each other by layers of insulating oxides to form two tunnel junctions. One junction is biased above twice the superconducting energy gap and the other is biased at less than twice the superconducting energy gap. Injection of quasiparticles into the center film by one junction provides a current gain in the second junction.

  7. Shape Determination for Deformed Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Lie-Quan; Akcelik, Volkan; Chen, Sheng; Ge, Lixin; Li, Zenghai; Ng, Cho; Xiao, Liling; Ko, Kwok; Ghattas, Omar; /Texas U.

    2006-10-04

    A realistic superconducting RF cavity has its shape deformed comparing to its designed shape due to the loose tolerance in the fabrication process and the frequency tuning for its accelerating mode. A PDE-constrained optimization problem is proposed to determine the deformation of the cavity. A reduce space method is used to solve the PDE-constrained optimization problem where design sensitivities were computed using a continuous adjoint approach. A proof-of-concept example is given in which the deformation parameters of a single cavity-cell with two different types of deformation were computed.

  8. Superconducting Radio Frequency Technology: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Kneisel

    2003-06-01

    Superconducting RF cavities are becoming more often the choice for larger scale particle accelerator projects such as linear colliders, energy recovery linacs, free electron lasers or storage rings. Among the many advantages compared to normal conducting copper structures, the superconducting devices dissipate less rf power, permit higher accelerating gradients in CW operation and provide better quality particle beams. In most cases these accelerating cavities are fabricated from high purity bulk niobium, which has superior superconducting properties such as critical temperature and critical magnetic field when compared to other superconducting materials. Research during the last decade has shown, that the metallurgical properties--purity, grain structure, mechanical properties and oxidation behavior--have significant influence on the performance of these accelerating devices. This contribution attempts to give a short overview of the superconducting RF technology with emphasis on the importance of the material properties of the high purity niobium.

  9. Research on application of several tracking detectors in APT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi

    2005-01-01

    APT system is the key technology in free space optical communication system, and acquisition and tracking detector is the key component in PAT system. There are several candidate detectors that can be used in PAT system, such as CCD, QAPD and CMOS Imager etc. The characteristics of these detectors are quite different, i.e., the structures and the working schemes. This paper gives thoroughly compare of the usage and working principle of CCD and CMOS imager, and discusses the key parameters like tracking error, noise analyses, power analyses etc. Conclusion is given at the end of this paper that CMOS imager is a good candidate detector for PAT system in free space optical communication system.

  10. RRR Characteristics for SRF cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yoochul; Hyun, Myungook; Joung, Mijoung

    2015-10-01

    The first heavy ion accelerator is being constructed by the rare isotope science project (RISP) launched by the Institute of Basic Science (IBS) in South Korea. Four different types of superconducting cavities were designed, and prototypes such as a quarter-wave resonator (QWR), a half-wave resonator (HWR) and a single-spoke resonator (SSR) were fabricated. One of the critical factors determining the performances of superconducting cavities is the residual resistance ratio (RRR). The RRR values essentially represent how pure niobium is and how fast niobium can transmit heat. In general, the RRR degrades during electron beam welding due to impurity incorporation. Thus, it is important to maintain the RRR above a certain value at which a niobium cavity shows target performance. In this study, RRR degradation related with electron beam welding conditions, for example, the welding power, welding speed, and vacuum level, will be discussed.

  11. APT cooling water supply make-up trade study. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, R.W.; Hink, R.

    1996-08-08

    In the conceptual design of the APT cooling water system, several options exist for the design of the system(s) which serve as the ultimate heat sink. This study will evaluate alternative methods of providing an ultimate heat sink to the APT.

  12. Potassium hydroxide: an alternative reagent to perform the modified apt test.

    PubMed

    Chicaiza, Henry; Hellstrand, Karl; Lerer, Trudy; Smith, Sharon; Sylvester, Francisco

    2014-09-01

    We tested the performance of potassium hydroxide (KOH) in the modified Apt test under different experimental conditions using sodium hydroxide as a positive control. Like sodium hydroxide, KOH differentiated fresh fetal and adult blood stains on a cloth but not dried blood. KOH may be used to perform the Apt test at the bedside.

  13. User's manual for the Automated Paneling Technique (APT) and the Wing Body Aerodynamic Technique (WABAT) programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studwell, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    User instructions for the Tektronix Graphics Package of the Automated Paneling Technique (APT) and the Wing and Body Aerodynamic Technique (WABAT) Programs are provided. Responses to plot package messages which the user must make to activate plot package operations and options are described. Modifications to the APT and WABAT input run streams, to affect the graphic interface, are also covered.

  14. Superconducting Cable

    DOEpatents

    Hughey, Raburn L.; Sinha, Uday K.; Reece, David S.; Muller, Albert C.

    2005-07-22

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  15. Superconducting Cable

    DOEpatents

    Hughey, Raburn L.; Sinha, Uday K.; Reece, David S.; Muller, Albert C.

    2005-03-08

    In order to provide a flexible oxide superconducting cable which is reduced in AC loss, tape-shaped superconducting wires covered with a stabilizing metal are wound on a flexible former. The superconducting wires are preferably laid on the former at a bending strain of not more than 0.2%. In laying on the former, a number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on a core member in a side-by-side manner, to form a first layer. A prescribed number of tape-shaped superconducting wires are laid on top of the first layer in a side-by-side manner, to form a second layer. The former may be made of a metal, plastic, reinforced plastic, polymer, or a composite and provides flexibility to the superconducting wires and the cable formed therewith.

  16. APT mass spectrometry and SEM data for CdTe solar cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Li, Chen; Paudel, Naba R.; Yan, Yanfa; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Guo, Wei

    2016-03-16

    Atom probe tomography (APT) data acquired from a CAMECA LEAP 4000 XHR for the CdS/CdTe interface for a non-CdCl2 treated CdTe solar cell as well as the mass spectrum of an APT data set including a GB in a CdCl2-treated CdTe solar cell are presented. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) data showing the evolution of sample preparation for APT and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) electron beam induced current (EBIC) are also presented. As a result, these data show mass spectrometry peak decomposition of Cu and Te within an APT dataset, the CdS/CdTe interface of an untreated CdTe solar cell, preparationmore » of APT needles from the CdS/CdTe interface in superstrate grown CdTe solar cells, and the preparation of a cross-sectional STEM EBIC sample.« less

  17. JLab SRF Cavity Fabrication Errors, Consequences and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Marhauser

    2011-09-01

    Today, elliptical superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are preferably made from deep-drawn niobium sheets as pursued at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The fabrication of a cavity incorporates various cavity cell machining, trimming and electron beam welding (EBW) steps as well as surface chemistry that add to forming errors creating geometrical deviations of the cavity shape from its design. An analysis of in-house built cavities over the last years revealed significant errors in cavity production. Past fabrication flaws are described and lessons learned applied successfully to the most recent in-house series production of multi-cell cavities.

  18. Research & Development on Superconducting Niobium Materials via Magnetic Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    S. B. Roy, V. C. Sahni, and G. R. Myneni

    2011-03-01

    We present a study of superconducting properties of both large grain (1 mm average grain size) and small grain (50 micron average grain size) Niobium materials containing varying amounts of Tantalum impurities that have been used in the fabrication of high accelerating gradient superconducting radio frequency cavities. We found that a buffered chemical polishing of these Niobium samples causes a distinct reduction in the superconducting parameters like TC, wt- ppm to 1300 wt-ppm. Implications of these results on the performance of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities are discussed, especially the anomalous high field RF losses that have been reported in the literature.

  19. Superconducting Structure

    DOEpatents

    Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2005-09-13

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  20. Superconducting structure

    DOEpatents

    Kwon, Chuhee; Jia, Quanxi; Foltyn, Stephen R.

    2003-04-01

    A superconductive structure including a dielectric oxide substrate, a thin buffer layer of a superconducting material thereon; and, a layer of a rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film thereon the thin layer of yttrium-barium-copper oxide, the rare earth selected from the group consisting of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium, erbium, neodymium, dysprosium, holmium, lutetium, a combination of more than one element from the rare earth group and a combination of one or more elements from the rare earth group with yttrium, the buffer layer of superconducting material characterized as having chemical and structural compatibility with the dielectric oxide substrate and the rare earth-barium-copper oxide superconducting film is provided.

  1. Advanced buck converter power supply ABCPS for APT

    SciTech Connect

    Street, R.; Overett, T.; Bowles, E.

    1998-12-31

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is planning to fabricate an Accelerator for the Production of Tritium (APT) at their Savannah River Site, to provide Tritium for national defense. The 1700 million electron volt (MeV) proton beam accelerator will be powered by radio frequency (RF) klystrons. A direct current (DC) power supply is required for each of the approximately two hundred and fifty 1-megawatt (MW) continuous wave klystrons in the RF power system. The requirements are that the power supply meet output performance specifications, provide fault protection for the klystron, have high efficiency, high reliability, good maintainability, and be readily manufacturable. As the power supplies are one of the largest cost elements in the accelerator, a technology review was made to determine the most economical approach to satisfy the requirements. A switch-mode power supply employing a buck-regulator was identified as being potentially the lowest cost approach. As the switch represents a certain development risk, a small-scale prototype has been constructed for evaluation, and has resulted in the decision to fabricate a full-scale prototype power supply. A description of the hardware will be presented.

  2. Users manual for the Automated Performance Test System (APTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, N. E.; Kennedy, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    The characteristics of and the user information for the Essex Automated Performance Test System (APTS) computer-based portable performance assessment battery are given. The battery was developed to provide a menu of performance test tapping the widest possible variety of human cognitive and motor functions, implemented on a portable computer system suitable for use in both laboratory and field settings for studying the effects of toxic agents and other stressors. The manual gives guidance in selecting, administering and scoring tests from the battery, and reviews the data and studies underlying the development of the battery. Its main emphasis is on the users of the battery - the scientists, researchers and technicians who wish to examine changes in human performance across time or as a function of changes in the conditions under which test data are obtained. First the how to information needed to make decisions about where and how to use the battery is given, followed by the research background supporting the battery development. Further, the development history of the battery focuses largely on the logical framework within which tests were evaluated.

  3. Superconducting Resonators: Protecting Schrodinger's Cat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, Jose; Mauskopf, Philip

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade, superconducting resonators have played a fundamental role in various novel astronomical detectors and quantum information processors. One example is the microwave kinetic inductance detector that is able to resolve photon energies by measuring shifts in its resonant frequency. Similar resonators have been integrated with superconducting qubits, specifically the transmon, to substantially improve quantum coherence times. The purpose of this investigation is to survey various resonant structures within the requirements of circuit quantum electrodynamics giving special attention to quality factors, TLS noise, and quasi-particle generation. Specifically, planar and three dimensional cavities with varying geometries and materials are characterized - primarily focusing on NbTiN and Nb.

  4. Basis for low beam loss in the high-current APT linac

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Gray, E.R.; Krawczyk, F.L.; Kurennoy, S.S.; Lawrence, G.P.; Ryne, R.D.; Crandall, K.R.

    1998-12-31

    The present evidence that the APT proton linac design will meet its goal of low beam loss operation. The conclusion has three main bases: (1) extrapolation from the understanding of the performance of the 800-MeV LANSCE proton linac at Los Alamos, (2) the theoretical understanding of the dominant halo-forming mechanism in the APT accelerator from physics models and multiparticle simulations, and (3) the conservative approach and key principles underlying the design of the APT linac, which are aimed at minimizing beam halo and providing large apertures to reduce beam loss to a very low value.

  5. Applicability of APT aided-inertial system to crustal movement monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soltz, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The APT system, its stage of development, hardware, and operations are described. The algorithms required to perform the real-time functions of navigation and profiling are presented. The results of computer simulations demonstrate the feasibility of APT for its primary mission: topographic mapping with an accuracy of 15 cm in the vertical. Also discussed is the suitability of modifying APT for the purpose of making vertical crustal movement measurements accurate to 2 cm in the vertical, and at least marginal feasibility is indicated.

  6. Design of the ILC Crab Cavity System

    SciTech Connect

    Adolphsen, C.; Beard, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Burt, G.; Carter, R.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Dexter, A.; Dykes, M.; Edwards, H.; Goudket, P; Jenkins, R.; Jones, R.M.; Kalinin, A.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ko, K.; Latina, A.; Li, Z.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Ng, C.; /SLAC /Daresbury /Fermilab /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /CERN

    2007-08-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) has a 14 mrad crossing angle in order to aid extraction of spent bunches. As a result of the bunch shape at the interaction point, this crossing angle at the collision causes a large luminosity loss which can be recovered by rotating the bunches prior to collision using a crab cavity. The ILC baseline crab cavity is a 9-cell superconducting dipole cavity operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz. In this paper the design of the ILC crab cavity and its phase control system, as selected for the RDR in February 2007 is described in fuller detail.

  7. Shape Determination for Deformed Electromagnetic Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Akcelik, Volkan; Ko, Kwok; Lee, Lie-Quan; Li, Zhenghai; Ng, Cho-Kuen; Xiao, Liling; /SLAC

    2007-12-10

    The measured physical parameters of a superconducting cavity differ from those of the designed ideal cavity. This is due to shape deviations caused by both loose machine tolerances during fabrication and by the tuning process for the accelerating mode. We present a shape determination algorithm to solve for the unknown deviations from the ideal cavity using experimentally measured cavity data. The objective is to match the results of the deformed cavity model to experimental data through least-squares minimization. The inversion variables are unknown shape deformation parameters that describe perturbations of the ideal cavity. The constraint is the Maxwell eigenvalue problem. We solve the nonlinear optimization problem using a line-search based reduced space Gauss-Newton method where we compute shape sensitivities with a discrete adjoint approach. We present two shape determination examples, one from synthetic and the other from experimental data. The results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is very effective in determining the deformed cavity shape.

  8. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    B. Hall, G. Burt, C. Lingwood, R. Rimmer, H. Wang

    2010-05-23

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  9. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    B. Hall,G. Burt,C. Lingwood,Robert Rimmer,Haipeng Wang; Hall, B.; Burt, G.; Lingwood, C.; Rimmer, Robert; Wang, Haipeng

    2010-05-01

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  10. Cooling arrangement for a superconducting coil

    DOEpatents

    Herd, K.G.; Laskaris, E.T.

    1998-06-30

    A superconducting device is disclosed, such as a superconducting rotor for a generator or motor. A vacuum enclosure has an interior wall surrounding a cavity containing a vacuum. A superconductive coil is placed in the cavity. A generally-annularly-arranged, thermally-conductive sheet has an inward-facing surface contacting generally the entire outward-facing surface of the superconductive coil. A generally-annularly-arranged coolant tube contains a cryogenic fluid and contacts a generally-circumferential portion of the outward-facing surface of the sheet. A generally-annularly-arranged, thermally-insulative coil overwrap generally circumferentially surrounds the sheet. The coolant tube and the inward-facing surface of the coil overwrap together contact generally the entire outward-facing surface of the sheet. 3 figs.

  11. Cooling arrangement for a superconducting coil

    DOEpatents

    Herd, Kenneth Gordon; Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon

    1998-06-30

    A superconducting device, such as a superconducting rotor for a generator or motor. A vacuum enclosure has an interior wall surrounding a cavity containing a vacuum. A superconductive coil is placed in the cavity. A generally-annularly-arranged, thermally-conductive sheet has an inward-facing surface contacting generally the entire outward-facing surface of the superconductive coil. A generally-annularly-arranged coolant tube contains a cryogenic fluid and contacts a generally-circumferential portion of the outward-facing surface of the sheet. A generally-annularly-arranged, thermally-insulative coil overwrap generally circumferentially surrounds the sheet. The coolant tube and the inward-facing surface of the coil overwrap together contact generally the entire outward-facing surface of the sheet.

  12. Analysis of a teleportation scheme involving cavity field states in a linear superposition of Fock states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, C. R.; Guerra, E. S.; Jalbert, Ginette

    2008-04-01

    We analyse a teleportation scheme of cavity field states. The experimental sketch discussed makes use of cavity quantum electrodynamics involving the interaction of Rydberg atoms with superconducting (micromaser) cavities as well as with classical microwave (Ramsey) cavities. In our scheme the Ramsey cavities and the atoms play the role of auxiliary systems used to teleport a field state, which is formed by a linear superposition of vacuum |∅> and the one-photon state |1>, from a micromaser cavity to another.

  13. Bipolaronic superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Ranninger, J.

    1981-08-01

    Superconducting properties of narrow-band electrons are examined in the strong-coupling limit. It is shown that bipolarons (localized spatially nonoverlapping Cooper pairs) formed by strong electron-phonon interaction have under certain conditions superconducting properties which are characteristic of superfluid charged Bose systems. They represent an example of the "molecular" superconductivity proposed by Schafroth, Butler, and Blatt

    [Helv. Phys. Acta 30 93 (1957)]
    . The Meissner effect and the penetration depth of bipolaronic superconductors are examined. The relationship between Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superconductors and bipolaronic ones is discussed.

  14. Bipolaronic superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, A.; Ranninger, J.

    1981-08-01

    Superconducting properties of narrow-band electrons are examined in the strong-coupling limit. It is shown that bipolarons (localized spatially nonoverlapping Cooper pairs) formed by strong electron-phonon interaction have under certain conditions superconducting properties which are characteristic of superfluid charged Bose system. They represent an example of the ''molecular'' superconductivity proposed by Schafroth, Butler, and Blatt. The Meissner effect and the penetration depth of bipolaronic superconductor are examined. The relationship between Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superconductors and bipolaronic ones is discussed.

  15. Nb-Pb Superconducting RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Sekutowicz, J.; Iversen, J.; Kreps, G.; Moller, W.D.; Singer, W.; Singer, X.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Smedley, J.; Rao, T.; Ferrario, M.; Kneisel, P.; Langner, J.; Strzyzewski, P.; Lefferts, R.; Lipski, A.; Szalowski, K.; Ko, K.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2006-03-29

    We report on the status of an electron RF-gun made of two superconductors: niobium and lead. The presented design combines the advantages of the RF performance of bulk niobium superconducting cavities and the reasonably high quantum efficiency of lead, as compared to other superconducting metals. The concept, mentioned in a previous paper, follows the attractive approach of all niobium superconducting RF-gun as it has been proposed by the BNL group. Measured values of quantum efficiency for lead at various photon energies, analysis of recombination time of photon-broken Cooper pairs for lead and niobium, and preliminary cold test results are discussed in this paper.

  16. Nb-Pb superconducting RF gun

    SciTech Connect

    J. Sekutowicz; J. Iversen; G. Kreps; W.D. Moller; W. Singer; X. Singer; I. Ben-Zvi; A. Burrill; J. Smedley; T. Rao; M. Ferrario; P. Kneisel; J. Langner; P. Strzyzewski; R. Lefferts; A. Lipski; K. Szalowski; K. Ko; L. Xiao

    2006-04-14

    We report on the status of an electron RF-gun made of two superconductors: niobium and lead. The presented design combines the advantages of the RF performance of bulk niobium superconducting cavities and the reasonably high quantum efficiency of lead, as compared to other superconducting metals. The concept, mentioned in a previous paper, follows the attractive approach of all niobium superconducting RF-gun as it has been proposed by the BNL group. Measured values of quantum efficiency for lead at various photon energies, analysis of recombination time of photon-broken Cooper pairs for lead and niobium, and preliminary cold test results are discussed in this paper.

  17. APT - NASA ENHANCED VERSION OF AUTOMATICALLY PROGRAMMED TOOL SOFTWARE - STAND-ALONE VERSION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premo, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    The APT code is one of the most widely used software tools for complex numerically controlled (N/C) machining. APT is an acronym for Automatically Programmed Tools and is used to denote both a language and the computer software that processes that language. Development of the APT language and software system was begun over twenty years ago as a U. S. government sponsored industry and university research effort. APT is a "problem oriented" language that was developed for the explicit purpose of aiding the N/C machine tools. Machine-tool instructions and geometry definitions are written in the APT language to constitute a "part program." The APT part program is processed by the APT software to produce a cutter location (CL) file. This CL file may then be processed by user supplied post processors to convert the CL data into a form suitable for a particular N/C machine tool. This June, 1989 offering of the APT system represents an adaptation, with enhancements, of the public domain version of APT IV/SSX8 to the DEC VAX-11/780 for use by the Engineering Services Division of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Enhancements include the super pocket feature which allows concave and convex polygon shapes of up to 40 points including shapes that overlap, that leave islands of material within the pocket, and that have one or more arcs as part of the pocket boundary. Recent modifications to APT include a rework of the POCKET subroutine and correction of an error that prevented the use within a macro of a macro variable cutter move statement combined with macro variable double check surfaces. Former modifications included the expansion of array and buffer sizes to accommodate larger part programs, and the insertion of a few user friendly error messages. The APT system software on the DEC VAX-11/780 is organized into two separate programs: the load complex and the APT processor. The load complex handles the table initiation phase and is usually only run when changes to the

  18. Design of half-reentrant SRF cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meidlinger, M.; Grimm, T. L.; Hartung, W.

    2006-07-01

    The shape of a TeSLA inner cell can be improved to lower the peak surface magnetic field at the expense of a higher peak surface electric field by making the cell reentrant. Such a single-cell cavity was designed and tested at Cornell, setting a world record accelerating gradient [V. Shemelin et al., An optimized shape cavity for TESLA: concept and fabrication, 11th Workshop on RF Superconductivity, Travemünde, Germany, September 8-12, 2003; R. Geng, H. Padamsee, Reentrant cavity and first test result, Pushing the Limits of RF Superconductivity Workshop, Argonne National Laboratory, September 22-24, 2004]. However, the disadvantage to a cavity is that liquids become trapped in the reentrant portion when it is vertically hung during high pressure rinsing. While this was overcome for Cornell’s single-cell cavity by flipping it several times between high pressure rinse cycles, this may not be feasible for a multi-cell cavity. One solution to this problem is to make the cavity reentrant on only one side, leaving the opposite wall angle at six degrees for fluid drainage. This idea was first presented in 2004 [T.L. Grimm et al., IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity 15(6) (2005) 2393]. Preliminary designs of two new half-reentrant (HR) inner cells have since been completed, one at a high cell-to-cell coupling of 2.1% (high- kcc HR) and the other at 1.5% (low- kcc HR). The parameters of a HR cavity are comparable to a fully reentrant cavity, with the added benefit that a HR cavity can be easily cleaned with current technology.

  19. Development of spoke cavities for RIA.

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, K. W.; Kelly, M. P.; Fuerst, J.; Kedzie, M.; Conway, Z. A.; Physics

    2006-07-15

    This paper reports the development status of 345 MHz, 4 cm beam aperture, three-spoke-loaded, TEM-class superconducting cavities for particle velocities 0.4 < v/c < 0.8. Two prototype cavities have been operated cw at 4.2 K at accelerating gradients above 10 MV/m. Results of cold tests, including mechanical properties and microphonic behavior, are presented.

  20. Resonance control in SRF cavities at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Schappert, W.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Scorrano, M.; /INFN, Pisa

    2011-03-01

    The Lorentz force can dynamically detune pulsed Superconducting RF cavities. Considerable additional RF power can be required to maintain the accelerating gradient if no effort is made to compensate for this detuning. Compensation systems using piezo actuators have been used successfully at DESY and elsewhere to control Lorentz Force Detuning (LFD). Recently, Fermilab has developed an adaptive compensation system for cavities in the Horizontal Test Stand, in the SRF Accelerator Test Facility, and for the proposed Project X.

  1. Nano-fabricated superconducting radio-frequency composites, method for producing nano-fabricated superconducting rf composites

    DOEpatents

    Norem, James H.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2013-06-11

    Superconducting rf is limited by a wide range of failure mechanisms inherent in the typical manufacture methods. This invention provides a method for fabricating superconducting rf structures comprising coating the structures with single atomic-layer thick films of alternating chemical composition. Also provided is a cavity defining the invented laminate structure.

  2. Rebuild of Capture Cavity 1 at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, E.; Arkan, T.; Borissov, E.; Dhanaraj, N.; Hocker, A.; Orlov, Y.; Peterson, T.; Premo, K.

    2014-01-01

    The front end of the proposed Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator at Fermilab employs two single cavity cryomodules, known as 'Capture Cavity 1' and 'Capture Cavity 2', for the first stage of acceleration. Capture Cavity 1 was previously used as the accelerating structure for the A0 Photoinjector to a peak energy of ~14 MeV. In its new location a gradient of ~25 MV/m is required. This has necessitated a major rebuild of the cryomodule including replacement of the cavity with a higher gradient one. Retrofitting the cavity and making upgrades to the module required significant redesign. The design choices and their rationale, summary of the rebuild, and early test results are presented.

  3. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, B.; Burt, G.; Smith, J. D.A.; Rimmer, R.; Wang, H.; Delayen, J.; Calaga, R.

    2009-05-01

    In 2017 the LHC is envisioned to increase its luminosity via an upgrade. This upgrade is likely to require a large crossing angle hence a crab cavity is required to align the bunches prior to collision. There are two possible schemes for crab cavity implementation, global and local. In a global crab cavity the crab cavity is far from the IP and the bunch rotates back and forward as it traverses around the accelerator in a closed orbit. For this scheme a two-cell elliptical squashed cavity at 800 MHz is preferred. To avoid any potential beam instabilities all the parasitic modes of the cavities must be damped strongly, however crab cavities have lower order and same order modes in addition to the usual higher order modes and hence a novel damping scheme must be used to provide sufficient damping of these modes. In the local scheme two crab cavities are placed at each side of the IP two start and stop rotation of the bunches. This would require crab cavities much smaller transversely than in the global scheme but the frequency cannot be increased any higher due to the long bunch length of the LHC beam. This will require a novel compact crab cavity design. A superconducting version of a two rod coaxial deflecting cavity as a suitable design is proposed in this paper.

  4. PREFACE: Superconducting materials Superconducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charfi Kaddour, Samia; Singleton, John; Haddad, Sonia

    2011-11-01

    The discovery of superconductivity in 1911 was a great milestone in condensed matter physics. This discovery has resulted in an enormous amount of research activity. Collaboration among chemists and physicists, as well as experimentalists and theoreticians has given rise to very rich physics with significant potential applications ranging from electric power transmission to quantum information. Several superconducting materials have been synthesized. Crucial progress was made in 1987 with the discovery of high temperature superconductivity in copper-based compounds (cuprates) which have revealed new fascinating properties. Innovative theoretical tools have been developed to understand the striking features of cuprates which have remained for three decades the 'blue-eyed boy' for researchers in superconductor physics. The history of superconducting materials has been notably marked by the discovery of other compounds, particularly organic superconductors which despite their low critical temperature continue to attract great interest regarding their exotic properties. Last but not least, the recent observation of superconductivity in iron-based materials (pnictides) has renewed hope in reaching room temperature superconductivity. However, despite intense worldwide studies, several features related to this phenomenon remain unveiled. One of the fundamental key questions is the mechanism by which superconductivity takes place. Superconductors continue to hide their 'secret garden'. The new trends in the physics of superconductivity have been one of the two basic topics of the International Conference on Conducting Materials (ICoCoM2010) held in Sousse,Tunisia on 3-7 November 2010 and organized by the Tunisian Physical Society. The conference was a nice opportunity to bring together participants from multidisciplinary domains in the physics of superconductivity. This special section contains papers submitted by participants who gave an oral contribution at ICoCoM2010

  5. Cavity magnomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X.

    2016-01-01

    A dielectric body couples with electromagnetic fields through radiation pressure and electrostrictive forces, which mediate phonon-photon coupling in cavity optomechanics. In a magnetic medium, according to the Korteweg-Helmholtz formula, which describes the electromagnetic force density acting on a medium, magneostrictive forces should arise and lead to phonon-magnon interaction. We report such a coupled phonon-magnon system based on ferrimagnetic spheres, which we term as cavity magnomechanics, by analogy to cavity optomechanics. Coherent phonon-magnon interactions, including electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption, are demonstrated. Because of the strong hybridization of magnon and microwave photon modes and their high tunability, our platform exhibits new features including parametric amplification of magnons and phonons, triple-resonant photon-magnon-phonon coupling, and phonon lasing. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnomechanics and its application as a new information transduction platform based on coherent coupling between photons, phonons, and magnons. PMID:27034983

  6. Cavity magnomechanics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xufeng; Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong X

    2016-03-01

    A dielectric body couples with electromagnetic fields through radiation pressure and electrostrictive forces, which mediate phonon-photon coupling in cavity optomechanics. In a magnetic medium, according to the Korteweg-Helmholtz formula, which describes the electromagnetic force density acting on a medium, magneostrictive forces should arise and lead to phonon-magnon interaction. We report such a coupled phonon-magnon system based on ferrimagnetic spheres, which we term as cavity magnomechanics, by analogy to cavity optomechanics. Coherent phonon-magnon interactions, including electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption, are demonstrated. Because of the strong hybridization of magnon and microwave photon modes and their high tunability, our platform exhibits new features including parametric amplification of magnons and phonons, triple-resonant photon-magnon-phonon coupling, and phonon lasing. Our work demonstrates the fundamental principle of cavity magnomechanics and its application as a new information transduction platform based on coherent coupling between photons, phonons, and magnons. PMID:27034983

  7. Status of the ILC Crab Cavity Development

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.; Bellantoni, L.; Grimm, T.; Li, Z.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2011-10-20

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) will require two dipole cavities to 'crab' the electron and positron bunches prior to their collision. It is proposed to use two 9 cell SCRF dipole cavities operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz, with a transverse gradient of 3.8MV/m in order to provide the required transverse kick. Extensive numerical modelling of this cavity and its couplers has been performed. Aluminium prototypes have been manufactured and tested to measure the RF properties of the cavity and couplers. In addition single cell niobium prototypes have been manufactured and tested in a vertical cryostat. The International Collider (ILC) [1] collides bunches of electrons and positrons at a crossing angle of 14 mrad. The angle between these bunches causes a loss in luminosity due to geometric effects [2]. The luminosity lost from this geometric effect can be recovered by rotating the bunches into alignment prior to collision. One possible method of rotating the bunches is to use a crab cavity [3]. A crab cavity is a transverse defecting cavity, where the phase of the cavity is such that the head and tail of the bunch receive equal and opposite kicks. As the bunches are only 500 nm wide in the horizontal plane, the cavity phase must be strictly controlled to avoid the bunch centre being deflected too much. In order to keep the phase stability within the required limits it is required that the cavity be superconducting to avoid thermal effects in both the cavity and its RF source. At the location of the crab cavity in the ILC there is only 23 cm separation between the centre of the cavity and the extraction line, hence the cavity must be small enough to fit in this space. This, along with the difficulty of making high frequency SRF components, set the frequency of the cavity to 3.9 GHz.

  8. Superconducting materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ruvalds, J.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Fermi liquid nesting in high temperature superconductors; optical properties of high temperature superconductors; Hall effect in superconducting La{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4}; source of high transition temperatures; and prospects for new superconductors.

  9. Superconducting Microelectronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Richard W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses superconducting microelectronics based on the Josephson effect and its advantages over conventional integrated circuits in speed and sensitivity. Considers present uses in standards laboratories (voltage) and in measuring weak magnetic fields. Also considers future applications in superfast computer circuitry using Superconducting…

  10. Superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics on superconducting magnets: D19B and -C: The next steps for a record-setting magnet; D20: The push beyond 10 T: Beyond D20: Speculations on the 16-T regime; other advanced magnets for accelerators; spinoff applications; APC materials development; cable and cabling-machine development; and high-{Tc} superconductor at low temperature.

  11. Development of superconducting bonding for multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, Teresa; Axline, Christopher; Chu, Yiwen; Pfaff, Wolfgang; Frunzio, Luigi; Devoret, Michel; Schoelkopf, Robert

    Future quantum computers are likely to take the shape of multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits. The proposed physical architecture retains the superb coherence of 3D structures while achieving superior scalability and compatibility with planar circuitry and integrated readout electronics. This hardware platform utilizes known techniques of bulk etching in silicon wafers and requires metallic bonding of superconducting materials. Superconducting wafer bonding is a crucial tool in need of development. Whether micromachined in wafers or traditionally machined in bulk metal, 3D cavities typically posses a seam where two parts meet. Ideally, this seam consists of a perfect superconducting bond. Pursuing this goal, we have developed a new understanding of seams as a loss mechanism that is applicable to 3D cavities in general. We present quality factor measurements of both 3D cavities and 2D stripline resonators to study the losses of superconducting bonds.

  12. Low and Intermediate Beta Cavity Design - A Tutorial

    SciTech Connect

    Jean Delayen

    2003-09-01

    The design of low-velocity superconducting structures has been an active area of the superconducting rf (srf) technology for more than 3 decades. More recently, with the growing interest in medium-energy ion and proton accelerators, a sustained world-wide effort has been directed toward the development of the superconducting structures for the intermediate velocity region. In this tutorial we address the design issues that are specific to low- and medium-velocity superconducting cavities. Simple electrostatic and electrodynamic models based on transmission lines are presented, and scaling laws are derived.

  13. Study of surface functionalization on IDE by using 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES) for cervical cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raqeema, S.; Hashim, U.; Azizah, N.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presented the study of surface functionalization on IDE by using 3-Aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES). The DNA nanochip based interdigitated (IDE) has been proposed to optimized the sensitivity of the device due to the cervical cancer detection. The DNA nanochip will be more efficient using surface modification of TiO2 nanoparticles with 3-Aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES). Furthermore, APTES gain the better functionalization of the adsorption mechanism on IDE. The combination of the DNA probe and the HPV target will produce more sensitivity and speed of the DNA nanochip due to their properties. The IDE has been characterized using current-voltage (IV) measurement. This functionalization of the surface would be applicable, sensitive, selective and low cost for cervical cancer detection.

  14. Albany Particle Training and Testing Tower (APT3) - A Remote Interactive Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Hasan

    We have built a prototype time-of-flight system named Albany Particle Testing and Training Tower (APT3) based on scintillation counters (Lucite or Poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA)) with dimensions (50 x 8 x 5 cm3). The CAMAC based data acquisition (DAQ) system and control setup to collect and process information from a scintillation detector using LabVIEW (v.8) has been developed. We have also studied the timing resolution of APT3 setup as a function of the hit position of the particle beam (cosmic muons) from the scintillation counter and as a function of the high voltage applied to the scintillation counter. After locating the best position of the cosmic beam from the scintillation counter and the best value of high voltage for the scintillation counter, we have achieved a resolution of the order of 100 ps for APT 3 setup.

  15. Evaluation of medical isotope production with the accelerator production of tritium (APT) facility

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, R.W.; Frey, G.D.; McLean, D.C., Jr; Spicer, K.M.; Davis, S.E.; Baron, S.; Frysinger, J.R.; Blanpied, G.; Adcock, D.

    1997-07-10

    The accelerator production of tritium (APT) facility, with its high beam current and high beam energy, would be an ideal supplier of radioisotopes for medical research, imaging, and therapy. By-product radioisotopes will be produced in the APT window and target cooling systems and in the tungsten target through spallation, neutron, and proton interactions. High intensity proton fluxes are potentially available at three different energies for the production of proton- rich radioisotopes. Isotope production targets can be inserted into the blanket for production of neutron-rich isotopes. Currently, the major production sources of radioisotopes are either aging or abroad, or both. The use of radionuclides in nuclear medicine is growing and changing, both in terms of the number of nuclear medicine procedures being performed and in the rapidly expanding range of procedures and radioisotopes used. A large and varied demand is forecast, and the APT would be an ideal facility to satisfy that demand.

  16. Photoemission tests of a Pb/Nb superconducting photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    J. Smedley; J. Iversen; D. Klinke; D. Kostin; W.-D. Moller; A. Muhs; J. S. Sekutowicz; P. Kneisel; R. S. Lefferts, A. R. Lipski; T. Rao

    2007-06-01

    We report recent progress in the development of a hybrid lead/niobium superconducting (SC) injector. The goal of this effort is to produce an all-SC injector with the SCRF properties of a niobium cavity along with the superior quantum efficiency (QE) of a lead photocathode. Two prototype hybrid injectors have been constructed, one utilizing a cavity with a removable cathode plug, and a second consisting of an all-niobium cavity arc-deposited with lead in the cathode region. We present the results of QE measurements on these cavities, along with tests of the effect of the laser on the cavity RF performance.

  17. Magnetic design and measurement of nonlinear multipole magnets for the APT beam expander system

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, D.B.; Shafer, R.E.; Martinez, R.P.; Walstrom, P.L.; Kahn, S.; Jain, A.; Wanderer, P.

    1997-10-01

    Two prototype nonlinear multipole magnets have been designed for use in the 800-MeV beam test of the APT beam-expansion concept at LANSCE. The iron-dominated magnets each consist of three independent coils, two for producing a predominantly octupole field with a tunable duodecapole component, and one for canceling the residual quadrupole field. Two such magnets, one for shaping each transverse plane, are required to produce a rectangular, uniform beam current density distribution with sharp edges on the APT target. This report will describe the magnetic design of these magnets, along with field measurements, and a comparison to the magnetic design.

  18. TESLA cavity driving with FPGA controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarski, Tomasz; Pozniak, Krzysztof; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Simrock, Stefan

    2005-09-01

    The digital control of the TESLA (TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator) resonator is presented. The laboratory setup of the CHECHIA cavity in DESY-Hamburg has been driven by the FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) technology system. This experiment focused attention to the general recognition of the cavity features and projected control methods. The electrical model of the resonator is taken as a consideration origin. The calibration of the signal channel is considered as a key preparation for an efficient cavity driving. The identification of the resonator parameters is confirmed as a proper approach for the required performance: driving on resonance during filling and field stabilization during flattop time with reasonable power consumption. The feed-forward and feedback modes were applied successfully for the CHECHIA cavity driving. Representative results of experiments are presented for different levels of the cavity field gradient.

  19. The superconducting solenoid magnets for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2002-12-22

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a channel of superconducting solenoid magnets. The magnets in MICE are around the RF cavities, absorbers (liquid or solid) and the primary particle detectors [1], [2]. The MICE superconducting solenoid system consists of eighteen coils that are grouped in three types of magnet assemblies. The cooling channel consists of two complete cell of an SFOFO cooling channel. Each cell consists of a focusing coil pair around an absorber and a coupling coil around a RF cavity that re-accelerates the muons to their original momentum. At the ends of the experiment are uniform field solenoids for the particle detectors and a set of matching coils used to match the muon beam to the cooling cells. Three absorbers are used instead of two in order to shield the detectors from dark currents generated by the RF cavities at high operating acceleration gradients.

  20. Color superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wilczek, F.

    1997-09-22

    The asymptotic freedom of QCD suggests that at high density - where one forms a Fermi surface at very high momenta - weak coupling methods apply. These methods suggest that chiral symmetry is restored and that an instability toward color triplet condensation (color superconductivity) sets in. Here I attempt, using variational methods, to estimate these effects more precisely. Highlights include demonstration of a negative pressure in the uniform density chiral broken phase for any non-zero condensation, which we take as evidence for the philosophy of the MIT bag model; and demonstration that the color gap is substantial - several tens of MeV - even at modest densities. Since the superconductivity is in a pseudoscalar channel, parity is spontaneously broken.

  1. SUPERCONDUCTING PHOTOCATHODES.

    SciTech Connect

    SMEDLEY, J.; RAO, T.; WARREN, J.; SEKUTOWICZ, LANGNER, J.; STRZYZEWSKI, P.; LEFFERS, R.; LIPSKI, A.

    2005-10-09

    We present the results of our investigation of lead and niobium as suitable photocathode materials for superconducting RF injectors. Quantum efficiencies (QE) have been measured for a range of incident photon energies and a variety of cathode preparation methods, including various lead plating techniques on a niobium substrate. The effects of operating at ambient and cryogenic temperatures and different vacuum levels on the cathode QE have also been studied.

  2. The ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Darve, Christine; Bosland, Pierre; Devanz, Guillaume; Renard, Bertrand; Olivier, Gilles; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-29

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today’s leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. The superconducting section of the Linac accelerates the beam from 80 MeV to 2.0 GeV. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain four elliptical Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 704.42 MHz. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design, the prototyping and the expected operation of the ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules. An Elliptical Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator (ECCTD) will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  3. The ESS spoke cavity cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Bousson, Sebastien; Duthil, Patxi; Reynet, Denis; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-29

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today’s leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design and expected operation of the ESS spoke cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain two double spoke bulk Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 352.21 MHz. The superconducting section of the Spoke Linac accelerates the beam from 90 MeV to 220 MeV. A Spoke Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  4. Superconducting magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Extensive computer based engineering design effort resulted in optimization of a superconducting magnet design with an average bulk current density of approximately 12KA/cm(2). Twisted, stranded 0.0045 inch diameter NbTi superconductor in a copper matrix was selected. Winding the coil from this bundle facilitated uniform winding of the small diameter wire. Test coils were wound using a first lot of the wire. The actual packing density was measured from these. Interwinding voltage break down tests on the test coils indicated the need for adjustment of the wire insulation on the lot of wire subsequently ordered for construction of the delivered superconducting magnet. Using the actual packing densities from the test coils, a final magnet design, with the required enhancement and field profile, was generated. All mechanical and thermal design parameters were then also fixed. The superconducting magnet was then fabricated and tested. The first test was made with the magnet immersed in liquid helium at 4.2K. The second test was conducted at 2K in vacuum. In the latter test, the magnet was conduction cooled from the mounting flange end.

  5. Clinical performance of porcelain laminate veneers: outcomes of the aesthetic pre-evaluative temporary (APT) technique.

    PubMed

    Gurel, Galip; Morimoto, Susana; Calamita, Marcelo A; Coachman, Christian; Sesma, Newton

    2012-12-01

    This article evaluates the long-term clinical performance of porcelain laminate veneers bonded to teeth prepared with the use of an additive mock-up and aesthetic pre-evaluative temporary (APT) technique over a 12-year period. Sixty-six patients were restored with 580 porcelain laminate veneers. The technique, used for diagnosis, esthetic design, tooth preparation, and provisional restoration fabrication, was based on the APT protocol. The influence of several factors on the durability of veneers was analyzed according to pre- and postoperative parameters. With utilization of the APT restoration, over 80% of tooth preparations were confined to the dental enamel. Over 12 years, 42 laminate veneers failed, but when the preparations were limited to the enamel, the failure rate resulting from debonding and microleakage decreased to 0%. Porcelain laminate veneers presented a successful clinical performance in terms of marginal adaptation, discoloration, gingival recession, secondary caries, postoperative sensitivity, and satisfaction with restoration shade at the end of 12 years. The APT technique facilitated diagnosis, communication, and preparation, providing predictability for the restorative treatment. Limiting the preparation depth to the enamel surface significantly increases the performance of porcelain laminate veneers.

  6. Role of the Apt1 Protein in Polysaccharide Secretion by Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Juliana; Oliveira, Débora L.; Joffe, Luna S.; Hu, Guanggan; Gazos-Lopes, Felipe; Fonseca, Fernanda L.; Almeida, Igor C.; Frases, Susana; Kronstad, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Flippases are key regulators of membrane asymmetry and secretory mechanisms. Vesicular polysaccharide secretion is essential for the pathogenic mechanisms of Cryptococcus neoformans. On the basis of the observations that flippases are required for polysaccharide secretion in plants and the putative Apt1 flippase is required for cryptococcal virulence, we analyzed the role of this enzyme in polysaccharide release by C. neoformans, using a previously characterized apt1Δ mutant. Mutant and wild-type (WT) cells shared important phenotypic characteristics, including capsule morphology and dimensions, glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) composition, molecular size, and serological properties. The apt1Δ mutant, however, produced extracellular vesicles (EVs) with a lower GXM content and different size distribution in comparison with those of WT cells. Our data also suggested a defective intracellular GXM synthesis in mutant cells, in addition to changes in the architecture of the Golgi apparatus. These findings were correlated with diminished GXM production during in vitro growth, macrophage infection, and lung colonization. This phenotype was associated with decreased survival of the mutant in the lungs of infected mice, reduced induction of interleukin-6 (IL-6) cytokine levels, and inefficacy in colonization of the brain. Taken together, our results indicate that the lack of APT1 caused defects in both GXM synthesis and vesicular export to the extracellular milieu by C. neoformans via processes that are apparently related to the pathogenic mechanisms used by this fungus during animal infection. PMID:24337112

  7. Role of the Apt1 protein in polysaccharide secretion by Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Juliana; Oliveira, Débora L; Joffe, Luna S; Hu, Guanggan; Gazos-Lopes, Felipe; Fonseca, Fernanda L; Almeida, Igor C; Frases, Susana; Kronstad, James W; Rodrigues, Marcio L

    2014-06-01

    Flippases are key regulators of membrane asymmetry and secretory mechanisms. Vesicular polysaccharide secretion is essential for the pathogenic mechanisms of Cryptococcus neoformans. On the basis of the observations that flippases are required for polysaccharide secretion in plants and the putative Apt1 flippase is required for cryptococcal virulence, we analyzed the role of this enzyme in polysaccharide release by C. neoformans, using a previously characterized apt1Δ mutant. Mutant and wild-type (WT) cells shared important phenotypic characteristics, including capsule morphology and dimensions, glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) composition, molecular size, and serological properties. The apt1Δ mutant, however, produced extracellular vesicles (EVs) with a lower GXM content and different size distribution in comparison with those of WT cells. Our data also suggested a defective intracellular GXM synthesis in mutant cells, in addition to changes in the architecture of the Golgi apparatus. These findings were correlated with diminished GXM production during in vitro growth, macrophage infection, and lung colonization. This phenotype was associated with decreased survival of the mutant in the lungs of infected mice, reduced induction of interleukin-6 (IL-6) cytokine levels, and inefficacy in colonization of the brain. Taken together, our results indicate that the lack of APT1 caused defects in both GXM synthesis and vesicular export to the extracellular milieu by C. neoformans via processes that are apparently related to the pathogenic mechanisms used by this fungus during animal infection.

  8. Medical Isotope Production With The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M.; Cappiello, M.; Pitcher, E.; O`Brien, H.

    1998-08-01

    In order to meet US tritium needs to maintain the nuclear weapons deterrent, the Department of Energy (DOE) is pursuing a dual track program to provide a new tritium source. A record of decision is planned for late in 1998 to select either the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) or the Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR) as the technology for new tritium production in the next century. To support this decision, an APT Project was undertaken to develop an accelerator design capable of producing 3 kg of tritium per year by 2007 (START I requirements). The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was selected to lead this effort with Burns and Roe Enterprises, Inc. (BREI) / General Atomics (GA) as the prime contractor for design, construction, and commissioning of the facility. If chosen in the downselect, the facility will be built at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and operated by the SRS Maintenance and Operations (M{ampersand}O) contractor, the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), with long-term technology support from LANL. These three organizations (LANL, BREI/GA, and WSRC) are working together under the direction of the APT National Project Office which reports directly to the DOE Office of Accelerator Production which has program authority and responsibility for the APT Project.

  9. Modification of silicon nitride surfaces with GOPES and APTES for antibody immobilization: computational and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dien To, Thien; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Nhat Thanh Phan, Khoa; Thu Thi Truong, An; Doan, Tin Chanh Duc; Mau Dang, Chien

    2015-12-01

    Chemical modification of silicon nitride (SiN) surfaces by silanization has been widely studied especially with 3-(aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) and 3-(glycidyloxypropyl) dimethylethoxysilane (GOPES). However few reports performed the experimental and computational studies together. In this study, surface modification of SiN surfaces with GOPES and APTES covalently bound with glutaraldehyde (GTA) was investigated for antibody immobilization. The monoclonal anti-cytokeratin-FITC (MACF) antibody was immobilized on the modified SiN surfaces. The modified surfaces were characterized by water contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. The FITC-fluorescent label indicated the existence of MACF antibody on the SiN surfaces and the efficiency of the silanization reaction. Absorption of APTES and GOPES on the oxidized SiN surfaces was computationally modeled and calculated by Materials Studio software. The computational and experimental results showed that modification of the SiN surfaces with APTES and GTA was more effective than the modification with GOPES.

  10. Real-time visual simulation of APT system based on RTW and Vega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Shuai; Fu, Chengyu; Tang, Tao

    2012-10-01

    The Matlab/Simulink simulation model of APT (acquisition, pointing and tracking) system is analyzed and established. Then the model's C code which can be used for real-time simulation is generated by RTW (Real-Time Workshop). Practical experiments show, the simulation result of running the C code is the same as running the Simulink model directly in the Matlab environment. MultiGen-Vega is a real-time 3D scene simulation software system. With it and OpenGL, the APT scene simulation platform is developed and used to render and display the virtual scenes of the APT system. To add some necessary graphics effects to the virtual scenes real-time, GLSL (OpenGL Shading Language) shaders are used based on programmable GPU. By calling the C code, the scene simulation platform can adjust the system parameters on-line and get APT system's real-time simulation data to drive the scenes. Practical application shows that this visual simulation platform has high efficiency, low charge and good simulation effect.

  11. Draft safety review plan for accelerator production of tritium (APT) project

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this ``living`` Safety Review Plan (SRP) is to describe the products and processes that will be followed to conduct a systematic review of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Facility Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR), and subsequently to prepare a draft Safety Evaluation Report (SER) on the PSAR. This plan is prepared for and will be implemented by the APT Independent Safety Review Committee (ISRC) over the period July 1, 1997 through September 30, 1998, in accordance with provisions established in DOE-STD-1104-96. A core team of DOE, INEEL, and AMPARO Corporation engineers and scientists will prepare the initial draft SER with assistance from other ISRC team members on an as needed basis. Guidelines for preparing the draft SER are presented in Section 7 of this SRP. The PSAR reviews will focus exclusively on safety. The ever-present two-part question will be: Does the subject matter have safety significance? If so, does the APT structural, system, component, and/or process engineering design ensure an acceptable margin of safety? The APT mission, efficiency, and cost are not considerations of this plan. A more detailed discussion of the review philosophy is presented in Section 5 of this SRP.

  12. APT Blanket Detailed Bin Model Based on Initial Plate-Type Design -3D FLOWTRAN-TF Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07

    This report provides background information for a series of reports documenting accident scenario simulations for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) blanket heat removal systems. The simulations were performed in support of the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the APT. This report gives a brief description of the FLOWTRAN-TF code which was used for detailed blanket bin modeling.

  13. Characterizing Ensembles of Superconducting Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Adam; Birenbaum, Jeff; Hover, David; Rosenberg, Danna; Weber, Steven; Yoder, Jonilyn L.; Kerman, Jamie; Gustavsson, Simon; Kamal, Archana; Yan, Fei; Oliver, William

    We investigate ensembles of up to 48 superconducting qubits embedded within a superconducting cavity. Such arrays of qubits have been proposed for the experimental study of Ising Hamiltonians, and efficient methods to characterize and calibrate these types of systems are still under development. Here we leverage high qubit coherence (> 70 μs) to characterize individual devices as well as qubit-qubit interactions, utilizing the common resonator mode for a joint readout. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002. The views and conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies or endorsements, either expressed or implied, of ODNI, IARPA, or the US Government.

  14. RIA Superconducting Drift Tube Linac R & D

    SciTech Connect

    J. Popielarski; J. Bierwagen; S. Bricker; C. Compton; J. DeLauter; P. Glennon; T. Grimm; W. Hartung; D. Harvell; M. Hodek; M. Johnson; F. Marti; P. Miller; A. Moblo; D. Norton; L. Popielarski; J. Wlodarczak; R. C. York; A. Zeller

    2009-05-22

    Cavity and cryomodule development work for a superconducting ion linac has been underway for several years at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. The original application of the work was the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator. At present, the work is being continued for use with the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). The baseline linac for FRIB requires 4 types of superconducting cavities to cover the velocity range needed to accelerate an ion beam to 200 MeV/u: 2 types of quarter-wave resonator (QWR) and 2 types of half-wave resonator (HWR). Superconducting solenoids are used for focussing. Active and passive shielding is required to ensure that the solenoids’ field does not degrade the cavity performance. First prototypes of both QWR types and one HWR type have been fabricated and tested. A prototype solenoid has been procured and tested. A test cryomodule has been fabricated and tested. The test cryomodule contains one QWR, one HWR, one solenoid, and one super-ferric quadrupole. This report covers the design, fabrication, and testing of this cryomodule

  15. Preparation of Macroscopic Quantum Superposition States of Cavity Modes Using rf-SQUIDs in a Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo

    2008-06-01

    We propose a potential scheme of preparing Schrödinger-cat state of the cavity mode by placing an rf-superconducting quantum interference device (rf-SQUID) in a single-mode microwave cavity. By properly adjusting the detuning and the strength regarding the radiation fields, we show how to generate single-mode Schrödinger-cat state. Generalizing this method we discuss the generation of the engtangled coherent states. The experimental feasibility of our scheme is discussed under consideration of the cavity decay.

  16. Rossendorf SRF-Gun Cavity Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, A.; Buettig, H.; Janssen, D.; Justus, M.; Lehnert, U.; Michel, P.; Moeller, K.; Murcek, P.; Schamlott, A.; Schneider, Ch.; Schurig, R.; Staufenbiel, F.; Teichert, J.; Xiang, R.; Kamps, T.; Rudolph, J.; Schenk, M.; Klemz, G.; Will, I.; Volkov, V.

    2009-08-04

    At the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf the development and the setup of the 2nd superconducting radio frequency photo electron injector (SRF-Photo-Gun) is finished. This new injector is placed next to the existing thermionic gun of the superconducting linear accelerator ELBE. A connection between the accelerator and the SRF-Gun will provide improved beam parameters for the users at the second half of 2009. At the moment the commissioning is fully under way. We will report on important results concerning cavity commissioning like measurements of: Q vs. E, microphonics, Lorentz detuning, tuner parameters, pressure sensibility and in-situ fundamental mode field distribution calculated from measured pass band.

  17. Quantum trajectories of superconducting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Steven J.; Murch, Kater W.; Kimchi-Schwartz, Mollie E.; Roch, Nicolas; Siddiqi, Irfan

    2016-08-01

    In this review, we discuss recent experiments that investigate how the quantum sate of a superconducting qubit evolves during measurement. We provide a pedagogical overview of the measurement process, when the qubit is dispersively coupled to a microwave frequency cavity, and the qubit state is encoded in the phase of a microwave tone that probes the cavity. A continuous measurement record is used to reconstruct the individual quantum trajectories of the qubit state, and quantum state tomography is performed to verify that the state has been tracked accurately. Furthermore, we discuss ensembles of trajectories, time-symmetric evolution, two-qubit trajectories, and potential applications in measurement-based quantum error correction. xml:lang="fr"

  18. APT Blanket System Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Based on Initial Conceptual Design - Case 4: External Pressurizer Surge Line Break Near Inlet Header

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07

    This report is one of a series of reports documenting accident scenario simulations for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) blanket heat removal systems. The simulations were performed in support of the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) for the APT.

  19. ADPF spoke cavity cryomodule concept

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, J. P.; Roybal, P. L.; La Fave, R. P.; Waynert, J. A.; Schrage, D. L.; Schmierer, E. N.; Krawczyk, F. L.; Garnett, R. W.

    2001-01-01

    The Accelerator Driven Test Facility (ADTF) is being developed as a reactor concepts test bed for transmutation of nuclear waste. A 13.3 mA continuous-wave (CW) proton beam will be accelerated to 600 MeV and impinged on a spallation target. The subsequent neutron shower is used to create a nuclear reaction within a subcritical assembly of waste material that reduces the waste half-life from the order of 10{sup 5} years to 10{sup 2} years. Additionally, significant energy is produced that can be used to generate electrical power. The ADTF proton accelerator consists of room-temperature (RT) structures that accelerate the beam to 6.7-MeV and superconducting (SC) elements that boost the beam's energy to 600-MeV. Traditional SC elliptical cavities experience structural difficulties at low energies due to their geometry. Therefore, stiff-structured SC spoke cavities have been adopted for the energy range between 6.7 and 109 MeV. Elliptical cavities are used at the higher energies. This paper describes a multi-spoke-cavity cryomodule concept for ADTF.

  20. Plasma Treatment of Niobium SRF Cavity Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    J. Upadhyay, M. Raskovic, L. Vuskovic, S. Popovic, A.-M. Valente-Feliciano, L. Phillips

    2010-05-01

    Plasma based surface modification provides an excellent opportunity to eliminate non- superconductive pollutants in the penetration depth region of the SRF cavity surface and to remove mechanically damaged surface layer improving surface roughness. We have demonstrated on flat samples that plasma etching in Ar / Cl2 of bulk Nb is a viable alternative surface preparation technique to BCP and EP methods, with comparable etching rates. The geometry of SRF cavities made of bulk Nb defines the use of asymmetric RF discharge configuration for plasma etching. In a specially designed single cell cavity with sample holders, discharge parameters are combined with etched surface diagnostics to obtain optimum combination of etching rates, roughness and homogeneity in a variety of discharge types, conditions, and sequences. The optimized experimental conditions will ultimately be applied to single cell SRF cavities.

  1. Design considerations for high-current superconducting ion linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Delayen, J.R.; Bohn, C.L.; Micklich, B.J.; Roche, C.T.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1993-08-01

    Superconducting linacs may be a viable option for high-current applications such as fusion materials irradiation testing, spallation neutron source, transmutation of radioactive waste, tritium production, and energy production. These linacs must run reliably for many years and allow easy routine maintenance. Superconducting cavities operate efficiently with high cw gradients, properties which help to reduce operating and capital costs, respectively. However, cost-effectiveness is not the sole consideration in these applications. For example, beam impingement must be essentially eliminated to prevent unsafe radioactivation of the accelerating structures, and thus large apertures are needed through which to pass the beam. Because of their high efficiency, superconducting cavities can be designed with very large bore apertures, thereby reducing the effect of beam impingement. Key aspects of high-current cw superconducting linac designs are explored in this context.

  2. Target designs for Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) utilizing lithium-aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Todosow, M.; Van Tuyle, G.J.

    1996-03-01

    A number of accelerator-driven spallation neutron-source target/blanket systems have been developed for production of tritium under the APT Program. The two systems described in this paper employ a proton linear accelerator, and a target which contains a heavy-metal(s) for the production of neutrons via spallation, and solid lithium-aluminum for the production of tritium via neutron capture. lie lithium-aluminum technology is based on that employed at Savannah River for tritium production since the 1950`s. In the APT concept tritium is produced without the presence of fissionable materials; therefore, no high-level waste is produced, and the ES&H concerns are significantly reduced compared to reactor systems.

  3. Cavity QED in a molecular ion trap

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, D. I.; Bishop, Lev S.; Chuang, I. L.; DeMille, D.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2011-01-15

    We propose a class of experiments using rotational states of dipolar molecular ions trapped near an on-chip superconducting microwave cavity. Molecular ions have several advantages over neutral molecules for such cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments. In particular, ions can be loaded easily into deep rf traps and are held independent of their internal state. An analysis of the detection efficiency for, and coherence properties of, the molecular ions is presented. We discuss approaches for manipulating quantum information and performing high-resolution rotational spectroscopy using this system.

  4. Breakthrough: Record-Setting Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2012-03-01

    Gianluigi "Gigi" Ciovati, a superconducting radiofrequency scientist, discusses how scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab in Newport News, VA, used ARRA funds to fabricate a niobium cavity for superconducting radiofrequency accelerators that has set a world record for energy efficiency. Jefferson Lab's scientists developed a new, super-hot treatment process that could soon make it possible to produce cavities more quickly and at less cost, benefitting research and healthcare around the world. Accelerators are critical to our efforts to study the structure of matter that builds our visible universe. They also are used to produce medical isotopes and particle beams for diagnosing and eradicating disease. And they offer the potential to power future nuclear power plants that produce little or no radioactive waste.around the world. Accelerators are critical to our efforts to study the structure of matter that builds our visible universe. They also are used to produce medical isotopes and particle beams for diagnosing and eradicating disease. And they offer the potential to power future nuclear power plants that produce little or no radioactive waste.

  5. Breakthrough: Record-Setting Cavity

    ScienceCinema

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2016-07-12

    Gianluigi "Gigi" Ciovati, a superconducting radiofrequency scientist, discusses how scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab in Newport News, VA, used ARRA funds to fabricate a niobium cavity for superconducting radiofrequency accelerators that has set a world record for energy efficiency. Jefferson Lab's scientists developed a new, super-hot treatment process that could soon make it possible to produce cavities more quickly and at less cost, benefitting research and healthcare around the world. Accelerators are critical to our efforts to study the structure of matter that builds our visible universe. They also are used to produce medical isotopes and particle beams for diagnosing and eradicating disease. And they offer the potential to power future nuclear power plants that produce little or no radioactive waste.around the world. Accelerators are critical to our efforts to study the structure of matter that builds our visible universe. They also are used to produce medical isotopes and particle beams for diagnosing and eradicating disease. And they offer the potential to power future nuclear power plants that produce little or no radioactive waste.

  6. Superconducting cable

    SciTech Connect

    Benz, H.

    1983-03-22

    A superconducting cable containing a plurality of individual wires which are stranded or plaited to wire bundles and ropes, wherein in order to avoid relative movement and/or deformation between the wire bundles and/or ropes as, for example, may otherwise be caused by high current loading, the individual wire bundles and the ropes are materially joined together at their points of contact, preferably by soldering, to form a mechanically rigid structure, in which the parts between the soldered areas can as well as possible deform elastically, thereby avoiding all disadvantages associated with freely movable wire bundles. In a preferred embodiment, the ropes are made from wire bundles arranged in a lattice.

  7. Cavity magnomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Chang-Ling; Zhang, Xufeng; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Recently, cavity magnonics has attracted much attention for potential applications of coherent information transduction and hybrid quantum devices. The magnon is a collective spin wave excitation in ferromagnetic material. It is magnetically tunability, with long coherence time and non-reciprocical interaction with electro-magnetic fields. We report the coherent coupling between magnon, microwave photon and phonon. First, we demonstrate strong coupling and ultrastrong coupling between the magnon in YIG sphere and microwave photon in three-dimensional cavity. Then, based on the hybridized magnon-photon modes, we observe the triply resonant magnon-mcirowave photon-phonon coupling, where the ultrahigh-Q mechanical vibration of YIG sphere is dispersively coupled with the magnon via magnetostrictive interaction. We observe interesting phenomena, including electromagnetically induced transparency/absorption and parametric amplification. In particular, benefit from the large tunability of the magnon, we demonstrate a tunable microwave amplifier with gain as high as 30 dB. The single crystal YIG also has excellent optical properties, and thus provide a unique platform bridging MHz, GHz and THz information carriers. Finally, we present the latest progress towards coherent magnon to optical photon conversion.

  8. Scientific and engineering services for the LANCE/ER accelerator production of tritium (APT) project

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-05

    The APT project office is conducting a preconceptual design study for an accelerator driven concept to produce tritium. The facility will require new technology in many areas, since the scale of this accelerator is significantly larger then any in operation to date. The facility is composed of four subsystems: accelerator, target & blanket, balance of plant, and tritium purification system (TPS). New physics realms will be entered in order for the concept to be feasible; for example, extremely high energy levels of the entering protons that induce (multiplicative) spallation of the neutrons from the high Z target will occur. These are complex and require advance codes (MCNP) to predict the physics interactions and as well as deleterious material effects in the surrounding structures. Other issues include component cooling and complex thermal-hydraulics effects within the blanket and the beam {open_quotes}window.{close_quotes} In order to support a DOE mandated fast ROD schedule, Los Alamos APT staff will be provided with senior, engineering technical support staff with direct APT technology experience and whom are {open_quotes}on site{close_quotes}. This report contains resumes of the staff.

  9. Cryogenic Test of the Nb-Pb SRF Photoinjector Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    J.K. Sekutowicz, A. Muhs, P. Kneisel, R. Nietubyc

    2009-05-01

    In this contribution, we report progress on the development of a hybrid lead/niobium superconducting RF (SRF) photoinjector. The goal of this effort is to build a Nb injector with the superconducting cathode made of lead, which demonstrated in the past superior quantum efficiency (QE) compared to Nb Three prototype hybrid devices, consisting of an all-niobium cavity with an arc-deposited spot of lead in the cathode region, have been constructed and tested. We present the cold test results of these cavities with and without lead.

  10. Pulsed rf superconductivity program at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, I.E.; Farkas, Z.D.

    1984-08-01

    Recent tests performed at SLAC on superconducting TM/sub 010/ caavities using short rf pulses (less than or equal to 2.5 ..mu..s) have established that at the cavity surface magnetic fields can be reached in the vicinity of the theoretical critical fields without an appreciable increase in average losses. Tests on niobium and lead cavities are reported. The pulse method seems to be best suited to study peak field properties of superconductors in the microwave band, without the limitations imposed by defects. The short pulses also seem to be more effective in decreasing the causes of field emission by rf processing. Applications of the pulsed rf superconductivity to high-gradient linear accelerators are also possible.

  11. High field rf superconductivity: to pulse or not to pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Campisi, I.E.

    1984-10-01

    Experimental data on the behavior of superconductors under the application of rf fields of amplitude comparable to their critical fields are sporadic and not always consistent. In many cases the field level at which breakdown in superconducting rf cavities should be expected has not been clearly established. Tests conducted with very short (approx. 1 ..mu..s) rf pulses indicate that in this mode of operation fields close to the critical values can be consistently reached in superconducting cavities without breakdown. The advantages and disadvantages of the pulsed method are discussed compared to those of the more standard continuous wave (cw) systems. 60 references.

  12. High field superconducting magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  13. Measurements of SCRF cavity dynamic heat load in horizontal test system

    SciTech Connect

    DeGraff, B.D.; Bossert, R.J.; Pei, L.; Soyars, W.M.; /Fermilab

    2009-11-01

    The Horizontal Test System (HTS) at Fermilab is currently testing fully assembled, dressed superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities. These cavities are cooled in a bath of superfluid helium at 1.8K. Dissipated RF power from the cavities is a dynamic heat load on the cryogenic system. The magnitude of heat flux from these cavities into the helium is also an important variable for understanding cavity performance. Methods and hardware used to measure this dynamic heat load are presented. Results are presented from several cavity tests and testing accuracy is discussed.

  14. High performance superconducting radio frequency ingot niobium technology for continuous wave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Pashupati Ciovati, Gianluigi Myneni, Ganapati R.

    2015-12-04

    Future continuous wave (CW) accelerators require the superconducting radio frequency cavities with high quality factor and medium accelerating gradients (≤20 MV/m). Ingot niobium cavities with medium purity fulfill the specifications of both accelerating gradient and high quality factor with simple processing techniques and potential reduction in cost. This contribution reviews the current superconducting radiofrequency research and development and outlines the potential benefits of using ingot niobium technology for CW applications.

  15. PROGRESS ON LEAD PHOTOCATHODES FOR SUPERCONDUCTING INJECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    SMEDLEY, J.; RAO, T.; SEKUTOWICZ, J.; KNEISEL, P.; LANGNER, J.; STRZYZEWSKI, P.; LEFFERTS, R.; LIPSKI, A.

    2005-05-16

    We present the results of our investigation of bulk lead, along with various types of lead films, as suitable photocathode materials for superconducting RF injectors. The quantum efficiency of each sample is presented as a function of the photon energy of the incident light, from 3.9 eV to 6.5 eV. Quantum efficiencies of 0.5% have been obtained. Production of a niobium cavity with a lead-plated cathode is underway.

  16. Progress on lead photocathodes for superconducting injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Smedley, John; Rao, Triveni; Sekutowicz, Jacek; Kneisel, Peter; Langner, J; Strzyzewski, P; Lefferts, Richard; Lipski, Andrzej

    2005-05-16

    We present the results of our investigation of bulk lead, along with various types of lead films, as suitable photocathode materials for superconducting RF injectors. The quantum efficiency of each sample is presented as a function of the photon energy of the incident light, from 3.9 eV to 6.5 eV. Quantum efficiencies of 0.5% have been obtained. Production of a niobium cavity with a lead plated cathode is underway.

  17. Microwave properties of high transition temperature superconducting thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, W. L.

    1991-01-01

    Extensive studies of the interaction of microwaves with YBa2Cu3O(7-delta), Bi-based, and Tl-based superconducting thin films deposited in several microwave substrates were performed. The data were obtained by measuring the microwave power transmitted through the film in the normal and the superconducting state and by resonant cavity techniques. The main motives were to qualify and understand the physical parameters such as the magnetic penetration depth, the complex conductivity, and the surface impedance, of high temperature superconducting (HTS) materials at microwave frequencies. Based on these parameters, the suitability of these HTS thin films is discussed for microwave applications.

  18. Helium refrigeration systems for super-conducting accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ganni, V.

    2015-12-04

    Many of the present day accelerators are based on superconducting technology which requires 4.5-K or 2-K helium refrigeration systems. These systems utilize superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities and/or superconducting magnets which are packaged into vacuum vessels known as cryo-modules (CM’s). Many of the present day accelerators are optimized to operate primarily at around 2-K, requiring specialized helium refrigeration systems which are cost intensive to produce and to operate. Some of the cryogenic refrigeration system design considerations for these challenging applications are discussed.

  19. Transverse Field Perturbation For PIP-II SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Berrutti, Paolo; Khabiboulline, Timergali N.; Lebedev, Valeri; Yakovlev, Vyacheslav P.

    2015-06-01

    Proton Improvement Plan II (PIP-II) consists in a plan for upgrading the Fermilab proton accelerator complex to a beam power capability of at least 1 MW delivered to the neutrino production target. A room temperature section accelerates H⁻ ions to 2.1 MeV and creates the desired bunch structure for injection into the superconducting (SC) linac. Five cavity types, operating at three different frequencies 162.5, 325 and 650 MHz, provide acceleration to 800 MeV. This paper presents the studies on transverse field perturbation on particle dynamic for all the superconducting cavities in the linac. The effects studied include quadrupole defocusing for coaxial resonators, and dipole kick due to couplers for elliptical cavities. A multipole expansion has been performed for each of the cavity designs including effects up to octupole.

  20. Controllable formation of high density SERS-active silver nanoprism layers on hybrid silica-APTES coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipavicius, J.; Kaleinikaite, R.; Pucetaite, M.; Velicka, M.; Kareiva, A.; Beganskiene, A.

    2016-07-01

    In this work sol-gel process for preparation of the uniform hybrid silica-3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) coatings on glass surface is presented from mechanistic point of view. The suggested synthetic approach is straightforward, scalable and provides the means to tune the amount of amino groups on the surface simply by changing concentration of APTES in the initial sol. Deposition rate of different size silver nanoprisms (AgNPRs) on hybrid silica coatings of various amounts of APTES were studied and their performance as SERS materials were probed. The acquired data shows that the deposition rate of AgNPRs can be tuned by changing the amount of APTES. The optimal amount of APTES was found to be crucial for successful AgNPRs assembly and subsequent uniformity of the final SERS substrate-too high APTES content may result in rapid non-stable aggregation and non-uniform assembly process. SERS study revealed that SERS enhancement is the strongest at moderate AgNPRs aggregation level whereas it significantly drops at high aggregation levels.

  1. Superconducting magnet

    DOEpatents

    Satti, John A.

    1980-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  2. Design of Superconducting Parallel Bar Deflecting and Crabbing rf Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jean Delayen, Haipeng Wang

    2009-05-01

    A new concept for a deflecting and crabbing rf structure based on half-wave resonant lines was introduced recently*. It offers significant advantages to existing designs and, because of it compactness, allows low frequency operation. This concept has been further refined and optimized for superconducting implementation. Results of this optimization and application to a 400 MHz crabbing cavity and a 499 MHz deflecting cavity are presented.

  3. The first operation of 56 MHz SRF cavity in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, M.; DeSanto, L.; Goldberg, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; McIntyre, G.; Mernick, K.; Orfin, P.; Seberg, S.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Zaltsman, A.

    2015-05-03

    A 56 MHz superconducting RF cavity has been designed, fabricated and installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The cavity operates at 4.4 K with a “quiet helium source” to isolate the cavity from environmental acoustic noise. The cavity is a beam driven quarter wave resonator. It is detuned and damped during injection and acceleration cycles and is brought to operation only at store energy. For a first test operation, the cavity voltage was stabilized at 300 kV with full beam current. Within both Au + Au and asymmetrical Au + He3 collisions, luminosity improvement was detected from direct measurement, and the hourglass effect was reduced. One higher order mode (HOM) coupler was installed on the cavity. We report in this paper on our measurement of a broadband HOM spectrum excited by the Au beam.

  4. Tunneling study of SRF cavity-grade niobium.

    SciTech Connect

    Proslier, T.; Zasadzinski, J.; Cooley, L.; Pellin, M.; Norem, J.; Elam, J.; Antonine, C. Z.; Rimmer, R.; Kneisel, P.; Illinois Inst. of Tech.; FNL; Thomas Jefferson Lab.; CEA-Saclay

    2009-06-01

    Niobium, with its very high H{sub C1}, has been used in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities for accelerator systems for 40 years with continual improvement. The quality factor of cavities (Q) is governed by the surface impedance R{sub BCS}, which depends on the quasiparticle gap, delta, and the superfluid density. Both of these parameters are seriously affected by surface imperfections (metallic phases, dissolved oxygen, magnetic impurities). Loss mechanism and surface treatments of Nb cavities found to improve the Q factor are still unsolved mysteries. We present here an overview of the capabilities of the point contact tunneling spectroscopy and Atomic layer deposition methods and how they can help understanding the High field Q-drop and the mild baking effect. Tunneling spectroscopy was performed on Nb pieces from the same processed material used to fabricate SRF cavities. Air exposed, electropolished Nb exhibited a surface superconducting gap Delta = 1.55 meV, characteristic of clean, bulk Nb, however the tunneling density of states (DOS) was broadened significantly. Nb pieces treated with the same mild baking used to improve the Q-slope in SRF cavities revealed a much sharper DOS. Good fits to the DOS are obtained using Shiba theory suggesting that magnetic scattering of quasiparticles is the origin of the degraded surface superconductivity and the Q-slope problem of Nb SRF cavities.

  5. Superconductivity: Squash and sandwiches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosatti, Erio

    2008-12-01

    Externally applied pressure induces superconductivity in the layer compound 1T-TaS2. Similarities to, and differences from, other superconducting systems promise exciting future experiments on this old, but suddenly rejuvenated, compound.

  6. Assessment of ischemic penumbra in patients with hyperacute stroke using amide proton transfer (APT) chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI.

    PubMed

    Tietze, Anna; Blicher, Jakob; Mikkelsen, Irene Klaerke; Østergaard, Leif; Strother, Megan K; Smith, Seth A; Donahue, Manus J

    2014-02-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST)-derived, pH-weighted, amide proton transfer (APT) MRI has shown promise in animal studies for the prediction of infarction risk in ischemic tissue. Here, APT MRI was translated to patients with acute stroke (1-24 h post-symptom onset), and assessments of APT contrast, perfusion, diffusion, disability and final infarct volume (23-92 days post-stroke) are reported. Healthy volunteers (n = 5) and patients (n = 10) with acute onset of symptoms (0-4 h, n = 7; uncertain onset <24 h, n = 3) were scanned with diffusion- and perfusion-weighted MRI, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and CEST. Traditional asymmetry and a Lorentzian-based APT index were calculated in the infarct core, at-risk tissue (time-to-peak, TTP; lengthening) and final infarct volume. On average (mean ± standard deviation), control white matter APT values (asymmetry, 0.019 ± 0.005; Lorentzian, 0.045 ± 0.006) were not significantly different (p > 0.05) from APT values in normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) of patients (asymmetry, 0.022 ± 0.003; Lorentzian, 0.048 ± 0.003); however, ischemic regions in patients showed reduced (p = 0.03) APT effects compared with NAWM. Representative cases are presented, whereby the APT contrast is compared quantitatively with contrast from other imaging modalities. The findings vary between patients; in some patients, a trend for a reduction in the APT signal in the final infarct region compared with at-risk tissue was observed, consistent with tissue acidosis. However, in other patients, no relationship was observed in the infarct core and final infarct volume. Larger clinical studies, in combination with focused efforts on sequence development at clinically available field strengths (e.g. 3.0 T), are necessary to fully understand the potential of APT imaging for guiding the hyperacute management of patients. PMID:24288260

  7. Superconducting circuitry for quantum electromechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaHaye, Matthew D.; Rouxinol, Francisco; Hao, Yu; Shim, Seung-Bo; Irish, Elinor K.

    2015-05-01

    Superconducting systems have a long history of use in experiments that push the frontiers of mechanical sensing. This includes both applied and fundamental research, which at present day ranges from quantum computing research and e orts to explore Planck-scale physics to fundamental studies on the nature of motion and the quantum limits on our ability to measure it. In this paper, we first provide a short history of the role of superconducting circuitry and devices in mechanical sensing, focusing primarily on efforts in the last decade to push the study of quantum mechanics to include motion on the scale of human-made structures. This background sets the stage for the remainder of the paper, which focuses on the development of quantum electromechanical systems (QEMS) that incorporate superconducting quantum bits (qubits), superconducting transmission line resonators and flexural nanomechanical elements. In addition to providing the motivation and relevant background on the physical behavior of these systems, we discuss our recent efforts to develop a particular type of QEMS that is based upon the Cooper-pair box (CPB) and superconducting coplanar waveguide (CPW) cavities, a system which has the potential to serve as a testbed for studying the quantum properties of motion in engineered systems.

  8. Simple Superconducting "Permanent" Electromagnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israelson, Ulf E.; Strayer, Donald M.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed short tube of high-temperature-superconducting material like YBa2Cu3O7 acts as strong electromagnet that flows as long as magnetic field remains below critical value and temperature of cylinder maintained sufficiently below superconducting-transition temperature. Design exploits maximally anisotropy of high-temperature-superconducting material.

  9. Nitrogen doping study in ingot niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Dhakal, Pashupati; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter; Myneni, Ganapati Rao; Makita, Junki

    2015-09-01

    Thermal diffusion of nitrogen in niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities at temperature ~800 °C has resulted in the increase in quality factor with a low-field Q-rise extending to Bp > 90 mT. However, the maximum accelerating gradient of these doped cavities often deteriorates below the values achieved by standard treatments prior to doping. Here, we present the results of the measurements on ingot niobium cavities doped with nitrogen at 800 °C. The rf measurements were carried out after the successive electropolishing to remove small amount of material from the inner surface layer. The result showed higher breakdown field with lower quality factor as material removal increases.

  10. Atomic Layer Deposition for SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Proslier, Th.; Ha, Y.; Zasadzinski, J.; Ciovati, G.; Kneissel, P.; Reece, C.; Rimmer, R.; Gurevich, A.; Cooley, L.; Wu, G.; Pellin, M.; /Argonne

    2009-05-01

    We have begun using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) to synthesize a variety of surface coatings on coupons and cavities as part of an effort to produce rf structures with significantly better performance and yield than those obtained from bulk niobium, The ALD process offers the possibility of conformally coating complex cavity shapes with precise layered structures with tightly constrained morphology and chemical properties. Our program looks both at the metallurgy and superconducting properties of these coatings, and also their performance in working structures. Initial results include: (1) results from ALD coated cavities and coupons, (2) new evidence from point contact tunneling (PCT) showing magnetic oxides can be a significant limitation to high gradient operation, (3) a study of high pressure rinsing damage on niobium samples.

  11. STS-47 MS Davis and MS Apt view GAS Bridge installation in OV-105's PLB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Mission Specialist (MS) N. Jan Davis (left) and MS Jerome Apt, wearing clean suits, examine Endeavour's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105's, aft payload bay (PLB) wall and the get away special (GAS) Bridge Assembly installation during a sharp-edge inspection at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). OV-105 was in KSC's Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) high bay at the time of the inspection. Spacelab Japan (SLJ) end cone is barely visible at the bottom right. View provided by KSC with alternate KSC number KSC-92PC-1640.

  12. "Fine grain Nb tube for SRF cavities"

    SciTech Connect

    Robert E. Barber

    2012-07-08

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities used in charged particle linear accelerators, are currently fabricated by deep drawing niobium sheets and welding the drawn dishes together. The Nb sheet has a non-uniform microstructure, which leads to unpredictable cavity shape and surface roughness, and inconsistent "spring-back" during forming. In addition, weld zones cause hot spots during cavity operation. These factors limit linear accelerator performance and increase cavity manufacturing cost. Equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) can be used to refine and homogenize the microstructure of Nb tube for subsequent hydroforming into SRF cavities. Careful selection of deformation and heat treatment conditions during the processing steps can give a uniform and consistent microstructure in the tube, leading to improved deformability and lower manufacturing costs. Favorable microstructures were achieved in short test samples of RRR Nb tube, which may be particularly suitable for hydroforming into SRF cavity strings. The approach demonstrated could be applicable to microstructure engineering of other tube materials including tantalum, titanium, and zirconium.

  13. Facile one-pot preparation, surface functionalization, and toxicity assay of APTS-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Mingwu; Cai, Hongdong; Wang, Xifu; Cao, Xueyan; Li, Kangan; Wang, Su He; Guo, Rui; Zheng, Linfeng; Zhang, Guixiang; Shi, Xiangyang

    2012-03-01

    We report a facile approach to synthesizing 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTS)-coated magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4@APTS) nanoparticles (NPs) with tunable surface functional groups for potential biomedical applications. The Fe3O4 NPs with a mean diameter of 6.5 nm were synthesized by a hydrothermal route in the presence of APTS. The formed amine-surfaced Fe3O4@APTS NPs were further chemically modified with acetic anhydride and succinic anhydride to generate neutral (Fe3O4@APTSṡAc) and negatively charged (Fe3O4@APTSṡSAH) NPs. These differently functionalized NPs were extensively characterized by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetry analysis, zeta potential measurements, and T2 relaxometry. The cytotoxicity of the particles was evaluated by in vitro 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric viability assay of cells along with microscopic observation of cell morphology. The hemocompatibility of the particles was assessed by in vitro hemolysis assay. We show that the hydrothermal approach enables an efficient modification of APTS onto the Fe3O4 NP surfaces and the formed NPs with different surface charge polarities are water-dispersible and colloidally stable. The acetylated Fe3O4@APTSṡAc NPs displayed good biocompatibility and hemocompatibility in the concentration range of 0-100 µg ml-1, while the pristine Fe3O4@APTS and Fe3O4@APTSṡSAH particles started to display slight cytotoxicity at a concentration of 10 µg ml-1. The findings from this study suggest that the Fe3O4@APTS NPs synthesized by the one-pot hydrothermal route can be surface modified for various potential biomedical applications.

  14. Critical Magnetic Field Determination of Superconducting Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Canabal, A.; Tajima, T.; Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Yamamoto, T.; /Tsukuba, Natl. Res. Lab. Metrol.

    2011-11-04

    Superconducting RF technology is becoming more and more important. With some recent cavity test results showing close to or even higher than the critical magnetic field of 170-180 mT that had been considered a limit, it is very important to develop a way to correctly measure the critical magnetic field (H{sup RF}{sub c}) of superconductors in the RF regime. Using a 11.4 GHz, 50-MW, <1 {mu}s, pulsed power source and a TE013-like mode copper cavity, we have been measuring critical magnetic fields of superconductors for accelerator cavity applications. This device can eliminate both thermal and field emission effects due to a short pulse and no electric field at the sample surface. A model of the system is presented in this paper along with a discussion of preliminary experimental data.

  15. Research and development for electropolishing of Nb for ILC accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, Michael J.

    2009-09-21

    The objectives of this project are to 1, Expand the scientific and technological understanding of the effect of post-treatment (electropolish, buffered chemical polish, low-temperature baking) on the surface of niobium; 2, Relate the knowledge to the performance of niobium superconducting radiofrequency accelerator cavities; and, 3, Thereby design and demonstrate an electropolish process that can be applied to complete cavities.

  16. Superconductivity fact vs. fancy

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, K.

    1988-05-01

    The author says great advances have been made in superconductivity. However, the rush to secure recognition combined with public confusion over superconductivity has tainted the field with misconceptions. Some people are saying little progress towards practical use of the ceramics has been made over the last year and many researchers have left what they were doing to study superconductivity. All the hype surrounding the new found ceramic superconductors could give way to a period of disillusionment and frustration. This article discusses recent work in the field of superconductivity. IEEE Spectrum has adopted an attitude of ''just the facts'' in reporting superconductivity news.

  17. Progress in the Development of Superconducting RF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinello, Martina

    2016-03-01

    The R &D of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities is focused on lowering the power dissipation, i.e. increasing the Q factor, during their operation in accelerators. Nitrogen doping is the innovative high Q SRF technology currently implemented in the LCLS-II cavity production. Of crucial importance is the understanding on how high Q factors can be maintained from the cavity vertical test to the cryomodule operation. One of the major issue of SRF cavity operation is the remnant magnetic field which will always be present during the cool down through the critical temperature, jeopardizing the cavity performance. Research is ongoing both to reduce the remnant field levels and to avoid magnetic field trapping during the SC transition. In addition, fundamental studies allowed us to define the best nitrogen doping treatment needed to lower the sensitivity to trapped flux. Recent developments on the preparation of Nb3Sn coatings for SRF cavities will be also presented. This alternative technology has been demonstrated to allow high Q operation even at 4.2 K. In addition, the maximum field limit of Nb3Sn is predicted to be twice that of niobium, potentially providing a significant decrease in the required length of an accelerator to reach a given energy.

  18. Protective link for superconducting coil

    DOEpatents

    Umans, Stephen D.

    2009-12-08

    A superconducting coil system includes a superconducting coil and a protective link of superconducting material coupled to the superconducting coil. A rotating machine includes first and second coils and a protective link of superconducting material. The second coil is operable to rotate with respect to the first coil. One of the first and second coils is a superconducting coil. The protective link is coupled to the superconducting coil.

  19. Study of medium beta elliptical cavities for CADS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Liangjian; Zhang, Shenghu; Li, Yongming; Wang, Ruoxu; Guo, Hao; Zhang, Cong; Jia, Huan; Jiang, Tiancai; Li, Chunlong; He, Yuan

    2016-02-01

    The China Accelerator-Driven Sub-critical System (CADS) is a high intensity proton facility to dispose of nuclear waste and generate electric power. CADS is based on a 1.5 GeV, 10 mA CW superconducting (SC) linac as a driver. The high energy section of the linac is composed of two families of SC elliptical cavities which are designed with geometrical beta 0.63 and 0.82. In this paper, the 650 MHz β=0.63 SC elliptical cavity is studied, including cavity optimization, multipacting, high order modes (HOMs) and generator RF power calculation. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (91426303)

  20. Beam Dynamics Studies of Parallel-Bar Deflecting Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ahmed, G. Krafft, K. Detrick, S. Silva, J. Delayen, M. Spata ,M. Tiefenback, A. Hofler ,K. Beard

    2011-03-01

    We have performed three-dimensional simulations of beam dynamics for parallel-bar transverse electromagnetic mode (TEM) type RF separators: normal- and super-conducting. The compact size of these cavities as compared to conventional TM$_{110}$ type structures is more attractive particularly at low frequency. Highly concentrated electromagnetic fields between the parallel bars provide strong electrical stability to the beam for any mechanical disturbance. An array of six 2-cell normal conducting cavities or a one- or two-cell superconducting structure are enough to produce the required vertical displacement at the Lambertson magnet. Both the normal and super-conducting structures show very small emittance dilution due to the vertical kick of the beam.

  1. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified.

  2. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified. PMID:25666075

  3. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E.V.; Schipper, J.F.

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a T configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  4. Dual frequency optical cavity

    DOEpatents

    George, E. Victor; Schipper, John F.

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for generating two distinct laser frequencies in an optical cavity, using a "T" configuration laser cavity and means for intermittently increasing or decreasing the index of refraction n of an associated transmission medium in one arm of the optical cavity to enhance laser action in one arm or the second arm of the cavity.

  5. APT a next generation QM-based reactive force field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappé, A. K.; Bormann-Rochotte, L. M.; Wiser, D. C.; Hart, J. R.; Pietsch, M. A.; Casewit, C. J.; Skiff, W. M.

    Modelling reactivity at the nanoscale is a major computational challenge. Both reactive force field and combined QM-MM methodologies have been and are being developed to study reactivity at this boundary between molecules and the solid state. There have been more than 1500 publications since the mid-1990s, on combined QM-MM methodologies. Limitations in current models include the distortional characteristics of force field potential terms, the smooth transit from one potential surface to another, rather than surface hopping, and the blending of electrostatics between QM and MM portions of a QM-MM model. Functional forms, potential surface coupling terms, and parameterization strategies for the Approximate Pair Theory (APT), a next generation reactive force field model, are described. The APT model has been developed to correct a number of limitations in current reactive force field models as well as providing a foundation for a next generation QM-MM model. Chemical bonding concepts are used to develop fully dissociative bond stretch, bend, torsion, and inversion valence terms. Quantum mechanics also provides functional forms for potential surface coupling terms that permit a general description of reactivity from hydrogen bonding, through non-classical carbocations and cracking, to olefin polymerization, oxidation, and metathesis. Van der Waals, electrostatic, and metallic bonding models also derive from quantum mechanical resonance. Finally, Pauli Principle-based orthogonality provides a way to electrostatically couple the QM and MM portions of a QM-MM model that will support arbitrarily large basis sets.

  6. LLNL review of the 1994 accelerator production of tritium (APT) concept

    SciTech Connect

    Alesso, H.P.; Barnard, J.J.; Booth, R.

    1995-03-08

    LLNL was asked in September 1994 to review the accelerator production of tritium (APT) concept as it had evolved up to the fall of 1994. The purpose was not to compare it to other sources of tritium, but to identify possible technical flaws in the concept and to assess feasibility. The APT concept reviewed was based on a 1.0 GeV normal conducting proton linac operating CW at currents up to 200 mA with a target of tungsten and blanket of {sup 3}He and lead. The LLNL review group concurs with the conclusions of four previous reviews (1989 to 1994) that this concept can meet the tritium requirements of a reduced stockpile of approximately 3,500 {+-} 1,500 warheads. The authors believe that the predicted tritium production rate is based on sound nuclear and transport models and that the schedules for technology demonstrations, design, and construction are realistic. They conclude that the technical risk of the concept is low and can be managed within the risk reduction program. The risk reduction program should focus on risk to the schedule and on cost reduction.

  7. RAMI modeling of selected balance of plant systems for the proposed Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project

    SciTech Connect

    Radder, J.A.; Cramer, D.S.

    1997-06-01

    In order to meet Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Program requirements for tritium in the 2005-2007 time frame, new production capability must be made available. The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Plant is being considered as an alternative to nuclear reactor production of tritium, which has been the preferred method in the past. The proposed APT plant will use a high-power proton accelerator to generate thermal neutrons that will be captured in {sup 3}He to produce tritium (3H). It is expected that the APT Plant will be built and operated at the DOE`s Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina. Discussion is focused on Reliability, Availability, Maintainability, and Inspectability (RAMI) modeling of recent conceptual designs for balance of plant (BOP) systems in the proposed APT Plant. In the conceptual designs for balance of plant (BOP) systems in the proposed APT Plant. In the conceptual design phase, system RAMI estimates are necessary to identify the best possible system alternative and to provide a valid picture of the cost effectiveness of the proposed system for comparison with other system alternatives. RAMI estimates in the phase must necessarily be based on generic data. The objective of the RAMI analyses at the conceptual design stage is to assist the designers in achieving an optimum design which balances the reliability and maintainability requirements among the subsystems and components.

  8. Biomedical applications of SPION@APTES@PEG-folic acid@carboxylated quercetin nanodrug on various cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akal, Z. Ü.; Alpsoy, L.; Baykal, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, carboxylated quercetin (CQ) was conjugated to superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) which were modified by (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTES), Folic acid (FA) and carboxylated Polyethylene glycol (PEG); (SPION@APTES@FA-PEG@CQ), nanodrug has been synthesized via polyol and accompanying by various chemical synthesis routes. The characterization of the final product was done via X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), Transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM) and Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Its cytotoxic and apoptotic activities on over expressed folic acid receptor (FR +) (MCF-7, HeLa) and none expressed folic acid receptor (FR-) (A549) cancer cell lines were determined by using MTT assay, Real-Time Cell Analysis, TUNEL assay, Annexin assay and RT-PCR analysis for Caspase3/7 respectively. SPION@APTES@FA-PEG@CQ nanodrug showed higher cytotoxicity against HeLa and MCF-7 cell lines as compared with A549 cell line. Moreover, SPION@APTES@FA-PEG@CQ nanodrug also caused higher apoptotic and necrotic effects in 100 μg/mL HeLa and MCF-7 cells than A549 cells. The findings showed that SPION@APTES@FA-PEG@CQ nanodrug has cytotoxic, apoptotic and necrotic effects on HeLa and MCF-7 which are FR over expressed cell lines and can be potentially used for the delivery of quercetin to cervical and breast cancer cells.

  9. Physics and Accelerator Applications of RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    H. Padamsee; K. W. Shepard; Ron Sundelin

    1993-12-01

    A key component of any particle accelerator is the device that imparts energy gain to the charged particle. This is usually an electromagnetic cavity resonating at a microwave frequency, chosen between 100 and 3000 MHz. Serious attempts to utilize superconductors for accelerating cavities were initiated more than 25 years ago with the acceleration of electrons in a lead-plated resonator at Stanford University (1). The first full-scale accelerator, the Stanford SCA, was completed in 1978 at the High Energy Physics Laboratory (HEPL) (2). Over the intervening one and a half decades, superconducting cavities have become increasingly important to particle accelerators for nuclear physics and high energy physics. For continuous operation, as is required for many applications, the power dissipation in the walls of a copper structure is quite substantial, for example, 0.1 megawatts per meter of structure operating at an accelerating field of 1 million volts/meter (MV/m). since losses increase as the square of the accelerating field, copper cavities become severely uneconomical as demand for higher fields grows with the higher energies called for by experimenters to probe ever deeper into the structure of matter. Rf superconductivity has become an important technology for particle accelerators. Practical structures with attractive performance levels have been developed for a variety of applications, installed in the targeted accelerators, and operated over significant lengths of time. Substantial progress has been made in understanding field and Q limitations and in inventing cures to advance performance. The technical and economical potential of rf superconductivity makes it an important candidate for future advanced accelerators for free electron lasers, for nuclear physics, and for high energy physics, at the luminosity as well as at the energy frontiers.

  10. Plasma Treatment of Single-Cell Niobium SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    J. Upadhyay, M. Nikolić, S. Popović, L. Vušković, H.L. Phillips, A-M. Valente-Feliciano

    2011-03-01

    Superconducting radio frequency cavities of bulk Niobium are integral components of particle accelerators based on superconducting technology. Wet chemical processing is the commonly used procedure for impurities and surface defects removal and surface roughness improvement , both required to improve the RF performance of the cavity. We are studying plasma etching as an alternate technique to process these cavities. The uniformity of the plasma sheath at the inner wall of the cavity is one prerequisite for its uniform etching. We are developing electro-optic diagnostic techniques to assess the plasma uniformity. Multiple electro-optical probes are placed at different locations of the single cell cavity to diagnose the electrical and optical properties of the plasma. The electrical parameters are required to understand the kinetic nature of the plasma and the optical emission spectroscopy provides the spatial distribution of radicals in the plasma. The spatial variation of the plasma parameters inside the cavity and their effect on the etching of niobium samples placed at different locations in the cavity will be presented.

  11. SRF cavity and HOM damper tests at TRIUMF for ARIEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Philipp; Laxdal, Robert; Zvyagintsev, Vladimir

    2012-10-01

    The eLINAC for ARIELfootnotetextAdvanced Rare Isotope Experiment Laboratory consists of 5 superconducting nine cell cavities operating at 1.3 GHz, each cavity with a accelerating voltage of 10 MV. The design requires a quality factor of 1 .10^10 or higher at the operating temperature of 2 K for 10 W dissipated power in the cavity walls. Latest SRFfootnotetextSuperconducting Radio Frequency tests of a 1.3 GHz niobium single cell cavity will show that procedures at TRIUMF are capable of exceeding the RF requirements of ARIEL. Future upgrade plans for the eLINAC include a recirculating arc to either increase the energy of the 10 mA electron beam or drive an FELfootnotetextFree Electron Laser in ERLfootnotetextEnergy Recovery LINAC mode. BBUfootnotetextBeam Break-Up is a limitation in recirculating LINACs. Its strength depends on a number of parameters including the shunt impedance RSh of HOM,footnotetextHigher Order Modes especially dipole modes, of the SRF cavity. Using beam line absorbers made out of a low electric conductive material reduces the QL of the cavity and therefore reduces the RSh. Qualification of such a material is essential and measurements of the electrical conductivity of a candidate material will be presented in addition to the cavity tests.

  12. First high power pulsed tests of a dressed 325 MHz superconducting single spoke resonator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Madrak, R.; Branlard, J.; Chase, B.; Darve, C.; Joireman, P.; Khabiboulline, T.; Mukherjee, A.; Nicol, T.; Peoples-Evans, E.; Peterson, D.; Pischalnikov, Y.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    In the recently commissioned superconducting RF cavity test facility at Fermilab (SCTF), a 325 MHz, {beta} = 0.22 superconducting single-spoke resonator (SSR1) has been tested for the first time with its input power coupler. Previously, this cavity had been tested CW with a low power, high Q{sub ext} test coupler; first as a bare cavity in the Fermilab Vertical Test Stand and then fully dressed in the SCTF. For the tests described here, the design input coupler with Q{sub ext} {approx} 10{sup 6} was used. Pulsed power was provided by a Toshiba E3740A 2.5 MW klystron.

  13. Coherent controlization using superconducting qubits.

    PubMed

    Friis, Nicolai; Melnikov, Alexey A; Kirchmair, Gerhard; Briegel, Hans J

    2015-01-01

    Coherent controlization, i.e., coherent conditioning of arbitrary single- or multi-qubit operations on the state of one or more control qubits, is an important ingredient for the flexible implementation of many algorithms in quantum computation. This is of particular significance when certain subroutines are changing over time or when they are frequently modified, such as in decision-making algorithms for learning agents. We propose a scheme to realize coherent controlization for any number of superconducting qubits coupled to a microwave resonator. For two and three qubits, we present an explicit construction that is of high relevance for quantum learning agents. We demonstrate the feasibility of our proposal, taking into account loss, dephasing, and the cavity self-Kerr effect.

  14. Coherent controlization using superconducting qubits

    PubMed Central

    Friis, Nicolai; Melnikov, Alexey A.; Kirchmair, Gerhard; Briegel, Hans J.

    2015-01-01

    Coherent controlization, i.e., coherent conditioning of arbitrary single- or multi-qubit operations on the state of one or more control qubits, is an important ingredient for the flexible implementation of many algorithms in quantum computation. This is of particular significance when certain subroutines are changing over time or when they are frequently modified, such as in decision-making algorithms for learning agents. We propose a scheme to realize coherent controlization for any number of superconducting qubits coupled to a microwave resonator. For two and three qubits, we present an explicit construction that is of high relevance for quantum learning agents. We demonstrate the feasibility of our proposal, taking into account loss, dephasing, and the cavity self-Kerr effect. PMID:26667893

  15. Results of Cavity Series Fabrication at Jefferson Laboratory for the Cryomodule “R100”

    SciTech Connect

    F. Marhauser, W.A. Clemens, M.A. Drury, D. Forehand, J. Henry, S. Manning, R.B. Overton, R.S. Williams

    2011-09-01

    A series production of eight superconducting RF cavities for the cryomodule R100 was conducted at JLab in 2010. The cavities underwent chemical post-processing prior to vertical high power testing and routinely exceeded the envisaged performance specifications. After cryomodule assembly, cavities were successfully high power acceptance tested. In this paper, we present the achievements paving the way for the first demonstration of 100 MV (and beyond) in a single cryomodule to be operated at CEBAF.

  16. RF tests of the beta - 0.5 five cell TRASCO cavities

    SciTech Connect

    A. Bosotti; Carlo Pagani; P. Pierini; J.P. Charrier; B. Visentin; Gianluigi Ciovati; Peter Kneisel

    2004-07-01

    Two complete 5 cell superconducting cavities at {beta} = 0.5 have been fabricated in the TRASCO INFN program. The cavities have been designed to minimize peak electric and magnetic fields, with a goal of 8.5 MV/m of accelerating gradient, at a Q > 5 10{sup 9}. The cavities have been tested in vertical cryostats at TJNAF and Saclay and the results are summarized here.

  17. Theory and Practice of Cavity RF Test Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Powers

    2006-08-28

    Over the years Jefferson Lab staff members have performed about 2500 cold cavity tests on about 500 different superconducting cavities. Most of these cavities were later installed in 73 different cryomodules, which were used in three different accelerators. All of the cavities were tested in our vertical test area. About 25% of the cryomodules were tested in our cryomodule test facility and later commissioned in an accelerator. The remainder of the cryomodules were tested and commissioned after they were installed in their respective accelerator. This paper is an overview which should provide a practical background in the RF systems used to test the cavities as well as provide the mathematics necessary to convert the raw pulsed or continuous wave RF signals into useful information such as gradient, quality factor, RF-heat loads and loaded Q?s. Additionally, I will provide the equations necessary for determining the measurement error associated with these values.

  18. Superharmonic resonances in a strongly coupled cavity-atom system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buks, Eyal; Deng, Chunqing; Orgazzi, Jean-Luc F. X.; Otto, Martin; Lupascu, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    We study a system consisting of a superconducting flux qubit strongly coupled to a microwave cavity. The fundamental cavity mode is externally driven and the response is investigated in the weak nonlinear regime. We find that near the crossing point, at which the resonance frequencies of the cavity mode and qubit coincide, the sign of the Kerr coefficient changes, and consequently the type of nonlinear response changes from softening to hardening. Furthermore, the cavity response exhibits superharmonic resonances (SHR) when the ratio between the qubit frequency and the cavity fundamental mode frequency is tuned close to an integer value. The nonlinear response is characterized by the method of intermodulation and both signal and idler gains are measured. The experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions and good qualitative agreement is obtained. The SHRs have potential for applications in quantum amplification and generation of entangled states of light.

  19. Use of simple x-ray measurement in the performance analysis of cryogenic RF accelerator cavities

    SciTech Connect

    D. Dotson; M. Drury; R. May; C. Reece

    1996-10-01

    X-ray emission by radiofrequency (RF) resonant cavities has long been known to accelerator health physicists as a potentially serious source of radiation exposure. The authors points out the danger of klystrons and microwave cavities by stating that the radiation source term is erratic and may be unpredictable depending on microscopic surface conditions which change with time. He also states the x-ray output is a rapidly increasing function of RF input power. At Jefferson Lab, the RF cavities used to accelerate the electron beam employ superconducting technology. X-rays are emitted at high cavity gradients, and measurements of cavity x-rays are valuable for health physics purposes and provide a useful diagnostic tool for assessing cavity performance. The quality factor (Q) for superconducting RF resonant cavities used at Jefferson Lab, is typically 5 x 10{sup 9} for the nominal design gradient of 5 MVm{sup {minus}1}. This large value for Q follows from the small resistive loss in superconducting technology. The operating frequency is 1,497 MHz. In the absence of beam, the input power for a cavity is typically 750 W and the corresponding dissipated power is 2.6 W. At 5 MWm{sup {minus}1}, the input power is 3 kW fully beam loaded. At higher gradients, performance degradation tends to occur due to the onset of electron field emission from defects in the cavity.

  20. Superconducting resonator used as a beam phase detector.

    SciTech Connect

    Sharamentov, S. I.; Pardo, R. C.; Ostroumov, P. N.; Clifft, B. E.; Zinkann, G. P.; Physics

    2003-05-01

    Beam-bunch arrival time has been measured for the first time by operating superconducting cavities, normally part of the linac accelerator array, in a bunch-detecting mode. The very high Q of the superconducting cavities provides high sensitivity and allows for phase-detecting low-current beams. In detecting mode, the resonator is operated at a very low field level comparable to the field induced by the bunched beam. Because of this, the rf field in the cavity is a superposition of a 'pure' (or reference) rf and the beam-induced signal. A new method of circular phase rotation (CPR), allowing extraction of the beam phase information from the composite rf field was developed. Arrival time phase determination with CPR is better than 1{sup o} (at 48 MHz) for a beam current of 100 nA. The electronics design is described and experimental data are presented.

  1. Novel Approach to Linear Accelerator Superconducting Magnet System

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2011-11-28

    Superconducting Linear Accelerators include a superconducting magnet system for particle beam transportation that provides the beam focusing and steering. This system consists of a large number of quadrupole magnets and dipole correctors mounted inside or between cryomodules with SCRF cavities. Each magnet has current leads and powered from its own power supply. The paper proposes a novel approach to magnet powering based on using superconducting persistent current switches. A group of magnets is powered from the same power supply through the common, for the group of cryomodules, electrical bus and pair of current leads. Superconducting switches direct the current to the chosen magnet and close the circuit providing the magnet operation in a persistent current mode. Two persistent current switches were fabricated and tested. In the paper also presented the results of magnetic field simulations, decay time constants analysis, and a way of improving quadrupole magnetic center stability. Such approach substantially reduces the magnet system cost and increases the reliability.

  2. The apt/6-Methylpurine Counterselection System and Its Applications in Genetic Studies of the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Hongkai; Whitaker, Rachel J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sulfolobus islandicus serves as a model for studying archaeal biology as well as linking novel biology to evolutionary ecology using functional population genomics. In the present study, we developed a new counterselectable genetic marker in S. islandicus to expand the genetic toolbox for this species. We show that resistance to the purine analog 6-methylpurine (6-MP) in S. islandicus M.16.4 is due to the inactivation of a putative adenine phosphoribosyltransferase encoded by M164_0158 (apt). The application of the apt gene as a novel counterselectable marker was first illustrated by constructing an unmarked α-amylase deletion mutant. Furthermore, the 6-MP counterselection feature was employed in a forward (loss-of-function) mutation assay to reveal the profile of spontaneous mutations in S. islandicus M.16.4 at the apt locus. Moreover, the general conservation of apt genes in the crenarchaea suggests that the same strategy can be broadly applied to other crenarchaeal model organisms. These results demonstrate that the apt locus represents a new tool for genetic manipulation and sequence analysis of the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon S. islandicus. IMPORTANCE Currently, the pyrEF/5-fluoroorotic acid (5-FOA) counterselection system remains the sole counterselection marker in crenarchaeal genetics. Since most Sulfolobus mutants constructed by the research community were derived from genetic hosts lacking the pyrEF genes, the pyrEF/5-FOA system is no longer available for use in forward mutation assays. Demonstration of the apt/6-MP counterselection system for the Sulfolobus model renders it possible to again study the mutation profiles in mutants that have already been constructed by the use of strains with a pyrEF-deficient background. Furthermore, additional counterselectable markers will allow us to conduct more sophisticated genetic studies, i.e., investigate mechanisms of chromosomal DNA transfer and quantify recombination frequencies among S

  3. APTS and rGO co-functionalized pyrenated fluorescent nanonets for representative vapor phase nitroaromatic explosive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Linjuan; Zu, Baiyi; Yang, Zheng; Cao, Hongyu; Zheng, Xuefang; Dou, Xincun

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, flexible PVP/pyrene/APTS/rGO fluorescent nanonets were designed and synthesized via a one-step electrospinning method to detect representative subsaturated nitroaromatic explosive vapor. The functional fluorescent nanonets, which were highly stable in air, showed an 81% quenching efficiency towards TNT vapor (~10 ppb) with an exposure time of 540 s at room temperature. The nice performance of the nanonets was ascribed to the synergistic effects induced by the specific adsorption properties of APTS, the fast charge transfer properties and the effective π-π interaction with pyrene and TNT of rGO. Compared to the analogues of TNT, the PVP/pyrene/APTS/rGO nanonets showed notable selectivity towards TNT and DNT vapors. The explored functionalization method opens up brand new insight into sensitive and selective detection of vapor phase nitroaromatic explosives.For the first time, flexible PVP/pyrene/APTS/rGO fluorescent nanonets were designed and synthesized via a one-step electrospinning method to detect representative subsaturated nitroaromatic explosive vapor. The functional fluorescent nanonets, which were highly stable in air, showed an 81% quenching efficiency towards TNT vapor (~10 ppb) with an exposure time of 540 s at room temperature. The nice performance of the nanonets was ascribed to the synergistic effects induced by the specific adsorption properties of APTS, the fast charge transfer properties and the effective π-π interaction with pyrene and TNT of rGO. Compared to the analogues of TNT, the PVP/pyrene/APTS/rGO nanonets showed notable selectivity towards TNT and DNT vapors. The explored functionalization method opens up brand new insight into sensitive and selective detection of vapor phase nitroaromatic explosives. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Vapor pressure of TNT and its analogues, fluorescence quenching kinetics, fluorescence quenching efficiencies and additional SEM images. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr04960d

  4. HOMs of the SRF Electron Gun Cavity in the BNL ERL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, H.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Belomestnykh, S.; Hammons, L.; Litvinenko, V.; Than, Y. R.; Todd, R.; Weiss, D.; Xu, Wencan

    The Brookhaven Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is operated as an R&D test bed for high-current, low emittance electron beams. It comprises a superconducting five-cell cavity and a half-cell superconducting RF photo-injector electron gun. The ERL is undergoing commissioning with focus on the performance of the electron gun, not the least on the cavity Higher Order Modes (HOM). Among the various alternative solutions, a beam tube damper based on a layer of ferrite tiles was adopted for the five-cell accelerator cavity. For the gun, a ceramic-ferrite damper consisting of a lossless ceramic cylinder surrounded by damping ferrite tiles has been investigated. This design is innovative in its damper approach and combines a variety of goals including broadband HOM damping and protection of the superconducting cavity vacuum from potential damage by the separately cooled absorber. In this paper the empirical performance of an installed ceramic-ferrite damper is described by the Q reduction of a few selected gun cavity resonances. The theoretical coupling impedance presented to a traversing beam is numerically analyzed in terms of radial waveguide modes in the damper section. Strong damping of the gun cavity HOMs by the fundamental power coupler (FPC) is found and discussed. Finally, the measured Q-values of the operational gun cavity without the ceramic-ferrite damper at superconducting temperatures are presented

  5. Superconducting levitating bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, Francis C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A superconducting bearing assembly includes a coil field source that may be superconducting and a superconducting structure. The coil field source assembly and superconducting structure are positioned so as to enable relative rotary movement therebetween. The structure and coil field source are brought to a supercooled temperature before a power supply induces a current in the coil field source. A Meissner-like effect is thereby obtained and little or no penetration of the field lines is seen in the superconducting structure. Also, the field that can be obtained from the superconducting coil is 2-8 times higher than that of permanent magnets. Since the magnetic pressure is proportioned to the square of the field, magnetic pressures from 4 to 64 times higher are achieved.

  6. ADMX Microwave Cavity R&D Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Ian; ADMX Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX), a direct-detection axion search, has begun taking data with a redesigned system. Earlier phases conducted axion searches in the mass range of 1.9-3.5 μeV (460-850 MHz) setting upper limits below the theoretical KSVZ coupling strength of the axion to two photons. The current upgrades will allow ADMX to detect axions with even the most pessimistic (DFSZ) couplings in this frequency range. In order to expand the mass reach of the detector, ADMX is conducting extensive research and development of microwave cavities. Prototype development programs include photonic band-gaps, multi-vane cavities, partitioned cavities, in-phase coupled cavities, and superconducting hybrid cavities. Additional studies include techniques for mode detection and mode-crossing suppression, and strategic planning. The various projects are in different phases of analysis, fabrication, and/or testing. The current status and near term objectives will be presented. Supported by DOE Grants DE-SC0010280, DE-FG02-96ER40956, DE- AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC03-76SF00098, NSF Grant 1067242, and the Livermore LDRD program.

  7. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    A general review on high-temperature superconductivity was made. After prehistoric view and the process of discovery were stated, the special features of high-temperature superconductors were explained from the materials side and the physical properties side. The present status on applications of high-temperature superconductors were explained on superconducting tapes, electric power cables, magnets for maglev trains, electric motors, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and single flux quantum (SFQ) devices and circuits.

  8. Superconducting energy recovery linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan

    2016-10-01

    High-average-power and high-brightness electron beams from a combination of laser photocathode electron guns and a superconducting energy recovery linac (ERL) is an emerging accelerator science with applications in ERL light sources, high repetition rate free electron lasers , electron cooling, electron ion colliders and more. This paper reviews the accelerator physics issues of superconducting ERLs, discusses major subsystems and provides a few examples of superconducting ERLs.

  9. High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 149 NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (Web, free access)   The NIST High Temperature Superconducting Materials Database (WebHTS) provides evaluated thermal, mechanical, and superconducting property data for oxides and other nonconventional superconductors.

  10. Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Overton, Jr., William C.; van Hulsteyn, David B.; Flynn, Edward R.

    1991-01-01

    An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  11. Superconducting imaging surface magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Overton, W.C. Jr.; van Hulsteyn, D.B.; Flynn, E.R.

    1991-04-16

    This patent describes an improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. Another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

  12. Development of a raster electronics system for expanding the APT proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Chapelle, S.; Hubbard, E.L.; Smith, T.L.; Schulze, M.E.; Shafer, R.E.

    1998-12-31

    A 1700 MeV, 100 mA proton linear accelerator is being designed for Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT). A beam expansion system is required to uniformly irradiate a 19 x 190 cm tritium production target. This paper describes a beam expansion system consisting of eight ferrite dipole magnets to raster the beam in the x- and y-planes and also describes the salient features of the design of the electronics that are unique to the expander. Eight Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT)-based modulators drive the raster magnets with triangular current waveforms that are synchronized using phase-locked loops (PLLs) and voltage controlled crystal oscillators (VCXOs). Fault detection circuitry shuts down the beam before the target can be damaged by a failure of the raster system. Test data are presented for the prototype system.

  13. Mesoscopic cavity quantum electrodynamics with quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Childress, L.; Soerensen, A.S.; Lukin, M.D.

    2004-04-01

    We describe an electrodynamic mechanism for coherent, quantum-mechanical coupling between spatially separated quantum dots on a microchip. The technique is based on capacitive interactions between the electron charge and a superconducting transmission line resonator, and is closely related to atomic cavity quantum electrodynamics. We investigate several potential applications of this technique which have varying degrees of complexity. In particular, we demonstrate that this mechanism allows design and investigation of an on-chip double-dot microscopic maser. Moreover, the interaction may be extended to couple spatially separated electron-spin states while only virtually populating fast-decaying superpositions of charge states. This represents an effective, controllable long-range interaction, which may facilitate implementation of quantum information processing with electron-spin qubits and potentially allow coupling to other quantum systems such as atomic or superconducting qubits.

  14. Radiation shielding for the Fermilab Vertical Cavity Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, Camille; Rakhno, Igor; /Fermilab

    2010-03-01

    The results of radiation shielding studies for the vertical test cryostat VTS1 at Fermilab performed with the codes FISHPACT and MARS15 are presented and discussed. The analysis is focused on operations with two RF cavities in the cryostat. The vertical cavity test facility (VCTF) for superconducting RF cavities in Industrial Building 1 at Fermilab has been in operation since 2007. The facility currently consists of a single vertical test cryostat VTS1. Radiation shielding for VTS1 was designed for operations with single 9-cell 1.3 GHz cavities, and the shielding calculations were performed using a simplified model of field emission as the radiation source. The operations are proposed to be extended in such a way that two RF cavities will be in VTS1 at a time, one above the other, with tests for each cavity performed sequentially. In such a case the radiation emitted during the tests from the lower cavity can, in part, bypass the initially designed shielding which can lead to a higher dose in the building. Space for additional shielding, either internal or external to VTS1, is limited. Therefore, a re-evaluation of the radiation shielding was performed. An essential part of the present analysis is in using realistic models for cavity geometry and spatial, angular and energy distributions of field-emitted electrons inside the cavities. The calculations were performed with the computer codes FISHPACT and MARS15.

  15. 805 MHz and 201 MHz RF cavity development for MUCOOL

    SciTech Connect

    DLi@lbl.gov

    2002-10-10

    A muon cooling channel calls for very high acceleratinggradient RF structures to restore the energy lost by muons in theabsorbers. The RF structures have to be operated in a strong magneticfield and thus the use of superconducting RF cavities is excluded. Toachieve a high shunt impedance while maintaining a large enough apertureto accommodate a large transverse emittance muon beam, the cavity designadopted is a pillbox-like geometry with thin Be foils to terminate theelectromagnetic field at the cavity iris. The possibility of using gridsof thin-walled metallic tubes for the termination is also being explored.Many of the RF-related issues for muon cooling channels are being studiedboth theoretically and experimentally using an 805 MHz cavity that has apillbox-like geometry with thin Be windows to terminate the cavityaperture. The design and performance of this cavity are reported here.High-power RF tests of the 805 MHz cavity are in progress at Lab G inFermilab. The cavity has exceeded its design gradient of 30 MV/m,reaching 34 MV/m without external magnetic field. No surface damage wasobserved at this gradient. The cavity is currently under conditioning atLab G with an external magnetic field of 2.5 T. We also present here a201 MHz cavity design for muoncooling channels. The proposed cavitydesign is also suitable for use in a proof-of-principle Muon IonizationCooling Experiment (MICE).

  16. Power coupler kick of the TRIUMF ICM capture cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fang; E. Laxdal, R.; Zvyagintsev, V.; Yu., Chao; C., Gong; Koscielniak, S.

    2011-06-01

    The TRIUMF Injector CryoModule (ICM) adapted two superconducting single cavities as the capture section for the low injecting energy of 100 keV electrons. Coupler kick induced beam deflection and projected emittance growth are one of the prime concerns of the beam stability, especially at low energies. In low energy applications, the electron velocity changes rapidly inside the cavity, which makes the numerical analysis much more complicated. The commonly used theoretical formulas of the direct integral or the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem is not suitable for the kick calculation of β < 1 electrons. Despite that, the above mentioned kick calculation method doesn't consider injecting electron energy, the beam offset due to the coupler kick may not be negligible because of the low injection energy even if the kick is optimized. Thus the beam dynamics code TRACK is used here for the simulation of the power coupler kick perturbation. The coupler kick can be compensated for by a judicious choice of the coupler position in successive cavities from upstream to downstream. The simulation shows that because of the adiabatic damping by the following superconducting 9-cell cavity, even for the worst orbit distortion case after two capture cavities, the kick is still acceptable at the exit of the ICM after reaching 10 MeV. This paper presents the analysis of the transverse kick and the projected emittance growth induced by the coupler for β < 1 electrons. The simulated results of the TRIUMF ICM capture cavities are described and presented.

  17. Progress in cavity and cryomodule design for the Project X linac

    SciTech Connect

    Champion, M.; Barbanotti, S.; Foley, M.; Ginsburg, S.; Gonin, I; Grimm, C.; Kerby, J.; Nagaitsev, S.; Nicol, T.; Peterson, T.; Ristori, L.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The continuous wave 3 GeV Project X Linac requires the development of two families of cavities and cryomodules at 325 and 650 MHz. The baseline design calls for three types of superconducting single-spoke resonators at 325 MHz having betas of 0.11, 0.22, and 0.42 and two types of superconducting five-cell elliptical cavities having betas of 0.61 and 0.9. These cavities shall accelerate a 1 mA H- beam initially and must support eventual operation at 4 mA. The electromagnetic and mechanical designs of the cavities are in progress and acquisition of prototypes is planned. The heat load to the cryogenic system is up to 25 W per cavity in the 650 MHz section, thus segmentation of the cryogenic system is a major issue in the cryomodule design. Designs for the two families of cryomodules are underway.

  18. Testing of HOM coupler designs on a single cell niobium cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Kneisel; Gianluigi Ciovati; ganapati rao myneni; Genfa Wu; Jacek Sekutowicz

    2005-05-01

    Coaxial higher order mode (HOM) couplers were developed initially for HERA cavities and subsequently for TESLA cavities. They were adopted later for SNS and Jlab upgrade cavities. The principle of operation is the rejection of the fundamental mode by the tunable filter and the transmission of the HOMs. It has been recognized recently that for continuous wave or high duty factor applications of the TESLA coupler the output pick-up probe must stay superconducting in order to avoid its heating by the fundamental mode residual magnetic field leading to deterioration of the cavity quality factor. In addition, the thermal conduction of existing rf feedthrough designs is only marginally sufficient to keep even the niobium probe tip superconducting in cw operation. We have equipped a single-cell niobium cavity with the modified HOM couplers and tested the new designs by measuring Q vs Eacc behavior at 2 K for different feedthroughs and probe tip materials.

  19. Pump down rate for SRF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Knobloch, J.

    1992-02-01

    This note is about calculations aimed at quantifying adequate pumping speeds of evacuation of normally humid clean-room air from typical Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) cavities. The subject is of high relevance to the semiconductor industry, where the yield of VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) chip production is affected by micron size particles which may cause fatal defects to their micron and sub-micron features. The recent availability of particle counters capable of operating in vacuum has stimulated measurements at reduced pressures in this subject.

  20. The impact of aminopyrene trisulfonate (APTS) label in acceptor glycan substrates for profiling plant pectin β-galactosyltransferase activities.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Stephan; Rejzek, Martin; Nepogodiev, Sergey A; Field, Robert A

    2016-10-01

    Aminopyrene trisulfonate (APTS)-labelled disaccharides are demonstrated to serve as readily accessible acceptor substrates for galactosyltransferase activities present in Arabidopsis microsome preparations. The reductive amination procedure used to install the fluorophore results in loss of the ring structure of the reducing terminal sugar unit, such that a single intact sugar ring is present, attached via an alditol tether to the aminopyrene fluorophore. The configuration of the alditol portion of the labelled acceptor, as well as the position of alditol galactosylation, substantially influence the ability of compounds to serve as Arabidopsis galactosyltransferase acceptor substrates. The APTS label exhibits an unexpected reaction-promoting effect that is not evident for structurally similar sulfonated aromatic fluorophores ANDS and ANTS. When APTS-labelled β-(1 → 4)-Gal3 was employed as an acceptor substrate with Arabidopsis microsomes, glycan extension generated β-(1 → 4)-galactan chains running to beyond 60 galactose residues. These studies demonstrate the potential of even very short glycan-APTS probes for assessing plant galactosyltransferase activities and the suitability CE-LIF for CAZyme profiling. PMID:27479753

  1. Highly Stable Nanocontainer of APTES-Anchored Layered Titanate Nanosheet for Reliable Protection/Recovery of Nucleic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, In Young; Park, Dae-Hwan; Choy, Jin-Ho; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2016-02-01

    A universal technology for the encapsulative protection of unstable anionic species by highly stable layered metal oxide has been developed via the surface modification of a metal oxide nanosheet. The surface anchoring of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) on exfoliated titanate nanosheet yields a novel cationic metal oxide nanosheet, which can be universally used for the hybridization with various biological and inorganic anions. The encapsulation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in the cationic APTES-anchored titanate lattice makes possible the reliable long-term protection of DNA against enzymatic, chemical, and UV‑vis light corrosions. The encapsulated DNA can be easily released from the titanate lattice via sonication, underscoring the functionality of the cationic APTES-anchored titanate nanosheet as a stable nanocontainer for DNA. The APTES-anchored titanate nanosheet can be also used as an efficient CO2 adsorbent and a versatile host material for various inorganic anions like polyoxometalates, leading to the synthesis of novel intercalative nanohybrids with unexplored properties and useful functionalities.

  2. Highly Stable Nanocontainer of APTES-Anchored Layered Titanate Nanosheet for Reliable Protection/Recovery of Nucleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, In Young; Park, Dae-Hwan; Choy, Jin-Ho; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2016-01-01

    A universal technology for the encapsulative protection of unstable anionic species by highly stable layered metal oxide has been developed via the surface modification of a metal oxide nanosheet. The surface anchoring of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) on exfoliated titanate nanosheet yields a novel cationic metal oxide nanosheet, which can be universally used for the hybridization with various biological and inorganic anions. The encapsulation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in the cationic APTES-anchored titanate lattice makes possible the reliable long-term protection of DNA against enzymatic, chemical, and UV−vis light corrosions. The encapsulated DNA can be easily released from the titanate lattice via sonication, underscoring the functionality of the cationic APTES-anchored titanate nanosheet as a stable nanocontainer for DNA. The APTES-anchored titanate nanosheet can be also used as an efficient CO2 adsorbent and a versatile host material for various inorganic anions like polyoxometalates, leading to the synthesis of novel intercalative nanohybrids with unexplored properties and useful functionalities. PMID:26906340

  3. Highly Stable Nanocontainer of APTES-Anchored Layered Titanate Nanosheet for Reliable Protection/Recovery of Nucleic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, In Young; Park, Dae-Hwan; Choy, Jin-Ho; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2016-02-01

    A universal technology for the encapsulative protection of unstable anionic species by highly stable layered metal oxide has been developed via the surface modification of a metal oxide nanosheet. The surface anchoring of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) on exfoliated titanate nanosheet yields a novel cationic metal oxide nanosheet, which can be universally used for the hybridization with various biological and inorganic anions. The encapsulation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in the cationic APTES-anchored titanate lattice makes possible the reliable long-term protection of DNA against enzymatic, chemical, and UV-vis light corrosions. The encapsulated DNA can be easily released from the titanate lattice via sonication, underscoring the functionality of the cationic APTES-anchored titanate nanosheet as a stable nanocontainer for DNA. The APTES-anchored titanate nanosheet can be also used as an efficient CO2 adsorbent and a versatile host material for various inorganic anions like polyoxometalates, leading to the synthesis of novel intercalative nanohybrids with unexplored properties and useful functionalities.

  4. Superconductivity in bad metals

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    It is argued that many synthetic metals, including high temperature superconductors are ``bad metals`` with such a poor conductivity that the usual mean-field theory of superconductivity breaks down because of anomalously large classical and quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. Some consequences for high temperature superconductors are described.

  5. Superconducting properties of protactinium.

    PubMed

    Smith, J L; Spirlet, J C; Müller, W

    1979-07-13

    The superconducting transition temperature and upper critical magnetic field of protactinium were measured by alternating-current susceptibility techniques. Since the superconducting behavior of protactinium is affected by its 5f electron character, it is clear now that protactinium is a true actinide element.

  6. Graphene: Carbon's superconducting footprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafek, Oskar

    2012-02-01

    Graphene exhibits many extraordinary properties, but superconductivity isn't one of them. Two theoretical studies suggest that by decorating the surface of graphene with the right species of dopant atoms, or by using ionic liquid gating, superconductivity could yet be induced.

  7. Superconducting properties of protactinium.

    PubMed

    Smith, J L; Spirlet, J C; Müller, W

    1979-07-13

    The superconducting transition temperature and upper critical magnetic field of protactinium were measured by alternating-current susceptibility techniques. Since the superconducting behavior of protactinium is affected by its 5f electron character, it is clear now that protactinium is a true actinide element. PMID:17750320

  8. Superconductivity of magnesium diboride

    SciTech Connect

    Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-15

    Over the past 14 years MgB2 has gone from a startling discovery to a promising, applied superconductor. In our article we present a brief overview of the synthesis and the basic superconducting properties of this remarkable compound. Specifically, the effect of pressure, substitutions and neutron irradiation on superconducting properties are discussed.

  9. Superconductivity of magnesium diboride

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bud’ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2015-07-15

    Over the past 14 years MgB2 has gone from a startling discovery to a promising, applied superconductor. In our article we present a brief overview of the synthesis and the basic superconducting properties of this remarkable compound. Specifically, the effect of pressure, substitutions and neutron irradiation on superconducting properties are discussed.

  10. Superconducting gyroscope research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, J. B.; Karr, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    Four basic areas of research and development of superconducting gyroscopes are studied. Chapter 1 studies the analysis of a SQUID readout for a superconducting gyroscope. Chapter 2 studies the dependence of spin-up torque on channel and gas properties. Chapter 3 studies the theory of super fluid plug operation. And chapter 4 studies the gyro rotor and housing manufacture.

  11. Rapid cycling superconducting magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbricatore, P.; Farinon, S.; Gambardella, U.; Greco, M.; Volpini, G.

    2006-04-01

    The paper deals with the general problematic related to the development of fast cycled superconducting magnets for application in particle accelerator machines. Starting from the requirements of SIS300 synchrotron under design at GSI and an envisaged future Super-SPS injector at CERN, it is shown which developments are mandatory in the superconducting wire technology and in the magnet design field.

  12. Superconductivity: Finding a direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Liang

    2016-09-01

    The experimental observation of superconductivity that breaks spin-rotation symmetry in copper-doped Bi2Se3 provides a qualitatively distinct kind of unconventional superconducting behaviour -- one that brings the importance of the spin-orbit interaction to the fore.

  13. Cavity quantum electrodynamics with mesoscopic topological superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmytruk, Olesia; Trif, Mircea; Simon, Pascal

    2015-12-01

    We study one-dimensional p -wave superconductors capacitively coupled to a microwave stripline cavity. By probing the light exiting from the cavity, one can reveal the electronic susceptibility of the p -wave superconductor. We analyze two superconducting systems: the prototypical Kitaev chain and a topological semiconducting wire. For both systems, we show that the photonic measurements, via the electronic susceptibility, allow us to determine the topological phase-transition point, the emergence of the Majorana fermions, and the parity of their ground state. We show that all of these effects, which are absent in effective theories that take into account the coupling of light to Majorana fermions only, are due to the interplay between the Majorana fermions and the bulk states of the superconductors.

  14. Atomic Layer Deposition for SRF Cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J; Pellin, M J; Antoine, C Z; Ciovati, G; Kneisel, P; Reece, C E; Rimmer, R A; Cooley, L; Gurevich, A V; Ha, Y; Proslier, Th; Zasadzinski, J

    2009-05-01

    We have begun using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) to synthesize a variety of surface coatings on coupons and cavities as part of an effort to produce rf structures with significantly better performance and yield than those obtained from bulk niobium, The ALD process offers the possibility of conformally coating complex cavity shapes with precise layered structures with tightly constrained morphology and chemical properties. Our program looks both at the metallurgy and superconducting properties of these coatings, and also their performance in working structures. Initial results include: 1) evidence from point contact tunneling showing magnetic oxides can be a significant limitation to high gradient operation, 2) experimental results showing the production sharp niobium/oxide interfaces from a high temperature bake of ALD coated Al2O3 on niobium surfaces, 3) results from ALD coated structures.

  15. Size-controllable APTS stabilized ruthenium(0) nanoparticles catalyst for the dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Zahmakıran, Mehmet; Philippot, Karine; Özkar, Saim; Chaudret, Bruno

    2012-01-14

    Dimethylamine-borane, (CH(3))(2)NHBH(3), has been considered as one of the attractive materials for the efficient storage of hydrogen, which is still one of the key issues in the "Hydrogen Economy". In a recent communication we have reported the synthesis and characterization of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane stabilized ruthenium(0) nanoparticles with the preliminary results for their catalytic performance in the dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane at room temperature. Herein, we report a complete work including (i) effect of initial [APTS]/[Ru] molar ratio on both the size and the catalytic activity of ruthenium(0) nanoparticles, (ii) collection of extensive kinetic data under non-MTL conditions depending on the substrate and catalyst concentrations to define the rate law of Ru(0)/APTS-catalyzed dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane at room temperature, (iii) determination of activation parameters (E(a), ΔH(#) and ΔS(#)) for Ru(0)/APTS-catalyzed dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane; (iv) demonstration of the catalytic lifetime of Ru(0)/APTS nanoparticles in the dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane at room temperature, (v) testing the bottlability and reusability of Ru(0)/APTS nanocatalyst in the room-temperature dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane, (vi) quantitative carbon disulfide (CS(2)) poisoning experiments to find a corrected TTO and TOF values on a per-active-ruthenium-atom basis, (vii) a summary of extensive literature review for the catalysts tested in the catalytic dehydrogenation of dimethylamine-borane as part of the results and discussions. PMID:22052298

  16. Superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlugon, Katarzyna

    The purpose of this thesis is to explain the phenomenon of superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. In the introductory chapter, there is a description of superconductivity and how it occurs at critical temperature (Tc) that is characteristic and different to every superconducting material. The discovery of superconductivity in mercury in 1911 by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes is also mentioned. Different types of superconductors, type I and type II, low and high temperatures superconductors, as well as the BCS theory that was developed in 1957 by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer, are also described in detail. The BCS theory explains how Cooper's pairs are formed and how they are responsible for the superconducting properties of many materials. The following chapters explain superconductivity in doped fullerenes, graphene and carbon nanotubes, respectively. There is a thorough explanation followed by many examples of different types of carbon nanomaterials in which small changes in chemical structure cause significant changes in superconducting properties. The goal of this research was not only to take into consideration well known carbon based superconductors but also to search for the newest available materials such as the fullerene nanowhiskers discovered quite recently. There is also a presentation of fairly new ideas about inducing superconductivity in a monolayer of graphene which is more challenging than inducing superconductivity in graphite by simply intercalating metal atoms between its graphene sheets. An effort has been taken to look for any available information about carbon nanomaterials that have the potential to superconduct at room temperature, mainly because discovery of such materials would be a real revolution in the modern world, although no such materials have been discovered yet.

  17. Advanced Beamline Design for Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Prokop, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab is a new electron accelerator currently in the commissioning stage. In addition to testing superconducting accelerating cavities for future accelerators, it is foreseen to support a variety of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments. Producing the required electron bunches with the expected flexibility is challenging. The goal of this dissertation is to explore via numerical simulations new accelerator beamlines that can enable the advanced manipulation of electron bunches. The work especially includes the design of a low-energy bunch compressor and a study of transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchangers.

  18. Superconducting quantum node for entanglement and storage of microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Flurin, E; Roch, N; Pillet, J D; Mallet, F; Huard, B

    2015-03-01

    Superconducting circuits and microwave signals are good candidates to realize quantum networks, which are the backbone of quantum computers. We have realized a quantum node based on a 3D microwave superconducting cavity parametrically coupled to a transmission line by a Josephson ring modulator. We first demonstrate the time-controlled capture, storage, and retrieval of an optimally shaped propagating microwave field, with an efficiency as high as 80%. We then demonstrate a second essential ability, which is the time-controlled generation of an entangled state distributed between the node and a microwave channel. PMID:25793790

  19. Superconducting quantum node for entanglement and storage of microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Flurin, E; Roch, N; Pillet, J D; Mallet, F; Huard, B

    2015-03-01

    Superconducting circuits and microwave signals are good candidates to realize quantum networks, which are the backbone of quantum computers. We have realized a quantum node based on a 3D microwave superconducting cavity parametrically coupled to a transmission line by a Josephson ring modulator. We first demonstrate the time-controlled capture, storage, and retrieval of an optimally shaped propagating microwave field, with an efficiency as high as 80%. We then demonstrate a second essential ability, which is the time-controlled generation of an entangled state distributed between the node and a microwave channel.

  20. Advanced beamline design for Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokop, Christopher R.

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab is a new electron accelerator currently in the commissioning stage. In addition to testing superconducting accelerating cavities for future accelerators, it is foreseen to support a variety of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments. Producing the required electron bunches with the expected flexibility is challenging. The goal of this dissertation is to explore via numerical simulations new accelerator beamlines that can enable the advanced manipulation of electron bunches. The work especially includes the design of a low-energy bunch compressor and a study of transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchangers.