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Sample records for aquifers case study

  1. Can Remote Sensing Detect Aquifer Characteristics?: A Case Study in the Guarani Aquifer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, A. S.; Thomas, B.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    Global water supply resiliency depends on groundwater, especially regions threatened by population growth and climate change. Aquifer characteristics, even as basic as confined versus unconfined, are necessary to prescribe regulations to sustainably manage groundwater supplies. A significant barrier to sustainable groundwater management exists in the difficulties associated with mapping groundwater resources and characteristics at a large spatial scale. This study addresses this challenge by investigating if remote sensing, including with NASA's Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), can detect and quantify key aquifer parameters and characteristics. We explore this through a case study in the Guarani Aquifer System (GAS) of South America, validating our remote sensing-based findings against the best available regional estimates. The use of remote sensing to advance the understanding of large aquifers is beneficial to sustainable groundwater management, especially in a trans-boundary system, where consistent information exchange can occur within hydrologic boundaries instead of political boundaries.

  2. Geothermal development of the Madison group aquifer: a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    A geothermal well has been drilled at the St. Mary's Hospital in Pierre, South Dakota. The well is 2176 feet deep and artesian flows 375 gpm at 106/sup 0/F. The well is producing fluids from the Mississippian Madison Group, a sequence of carbonate rocks deposited over several western states. The project was funded to demonstrate the goethermal potential of this widespread aquifer. This case study describes the development of the project through geology, drilling, stimulation, and testing.

  3. Monitoring Aquifer Depletion from Space: Case Studies from the Saharan and Arabian Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M.; Sultan, M.; Wahr, J. M.; Yan, E.

    2013-12-01

    Access to potable fresh water resources is a human right and a basic requirement for economic development in any society. In arid and semi-arid areas, the characterization and understanding of the geologic and hydrologic settings of, and the controlling factors affecting, these resources is gaining increasing importance due to the challenges posed by increasing population. In these areas, there is immense natural fossil fresh water resources stored in large extensive aquifers, the transboundary aquifers. Yet, natural phenomena (e.g., rainfall patterns and climate change) together with human-related factors (e.g., population growth, unsustainable over-exploitation, and pollution) are threatening the sustainability of these resources. In this study, we are developing and applying an integrated cost-effective approach to investigate the nature (i.e., natural and anthropogenic) and the controlling factors affecting the hydrologic settings of the Saharan (i.e., Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System [NSAS], Northwest Sahara Aquifer System [NWSA]) and Arabian (i.e., Arabian Peninsula Aquifer System [APAS]) aquifer systems. Analysis of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE)-derived Terrestrial Water Storage (TWS) inter-annual trends over the NSAS and the APAS revealed two areas of significant TWS depletions; the first correlated with the Dakhla Aquifer System (DAS) in the NSAS and second with the Saq Aquifer System (SAS) in the APAS. Annual depletion rates were estimated at 1.3 × 0.66 × 109 m3/yr and 6.95 × 0.68 × 109 m3/yr for DAS and SAS, respectively. Findings include (1) excessive groundwater extraction, not climatic changes, is responsible for the observed TWS depletions ;(2) the DAS could be consumed in 350 years if extraction rates continue to double every 50 years and the APAS available reserves could be consumed within 60-140 years at present extraction (7.08 × 109 m3/yr) and depletion rates; and (3) observed depletions over DAS and SAS and their

  4. Aquifer characterization using geoelectrical modelling, a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Rena; Sauter, Martin; Weller, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Surface geophysical investigations offer inexpensive and complementary information for hydrogeological issues. The quality and feasibility of geophysical models can be improved considerably by incorporating geological and hydrogeological a-priori information. In the presented study, densely spaced surface geoelectrical measurements were performed at the hydrogeological testsite Stegemühle, Göttingen, Germany. Twelve parallel profiles, 100 m long, with an electrode spacing of 0.5 m were measured using the averaged half Wenner configuration. The study area consists of a gravel-sand partially confined aquifer. Thanks to former studies a good hydraulic and geological data base is available. Vertical electrical soundings (VES) as well as 2D and 3D inversions were carried out with the purpose of building a subsurface resistivity model of the aquifer. Commercial software (res2/3Dinv) as well as non-commercial inversion algorithms (VES4, AC2DSIRT) are applied for data analysis. The interpretation of geoelectrical models generally suffers an ambiguity due to the principle of equivalence that hinders the independent determination of layer resistivity and thickness. To overcome this problem, information from certain borehole profiles and conductivity logs were included to calibrate VES and constrain AC2DSIRT modelling. Inversions using AC2DSIRT with an initial model according to the calibrated results of VES generate a 2D resistivity distribution that is significantly more feasible in terms of root mean square and geological data than those without any constraints. Apart from this, a field specific linear relationship between electrical resistivity and hydraulic conductivity is determined at six well locations. This relation is used to extrapolate the hydraulic conductivity distribution over the whole study area. In conclusion, the presented field study shows the importance of integration of a-priori geological and hydrological information to improve the output of

  5. Value of information analysis for groundwater quality monitoring network design Case study: Eocene Aquifer, Palestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khader, A.; McKee, M.

    2010-12-01

    Value of information (VOI) analysis evaluates the benefit of collecting additional information to reduce or eliminate uncertainty in a specific decision-making context. It makes explicit any expected potential losses from errors in decision making due to uncertainty and identifies the “best” information collection strategy as one that leads to the greatest expected net benefit to the decision-maker. This study investigates the willingness to pay for groundwater quality monitoring in the Eocene Aquifer, Palestine, which is an unconfined aquifer located in the northern part of the West Bank. The aquifer is being used by 128,000 Palestinians to fulfill domestic and agricultural demands. The study takes into account the consequences of pollution and the options the decision maker might face. Since nitrate is the major pollutant in the aquifer, the consequences of nitrate pollution were analyzed, which mainly consists of the possibility of methemoglobinemia (blue baby syndrome). In this case, the value of monitoring was compared to the costs of treating for methemoglobinemia or the costs of other options like water treatment, using bottled water or importing water from outside the aquifer. And finally, an optimal monitoring network that takes into account the uncertainties in recharge (climate), aquifer properties (hydraulic conductivity), pollutant chemical reaction (decay factor), and the value of monitoring is designed by utilizing a sparse Bayesian modeling algorithm called a relevance vector machine.

  6. Soil aquifer treatment (SAT) system: a case study.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Samanpreet; Singh, Mandeep

    2002-07-01

    Water scarcity is the major issue in all parts of world. Wastewater reuse is one alternative. SAT proves to efficient, economical and feasible method for wastewater treatment. SAT system achieves an excellent reduction of biochemical oxygen demand, suspended solids, and fecal coliform. About 90% of water applied to SAT site is returned to watershed. A case study has been made by the authors to increase the efficiency of this system.

  7. Smart Grids for Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES): a case study for the Amsterdam Zuidas district

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaxa-Rozen, Marc; Bloemendal, Martin; Rostampour, Vahab

    2017-04-01

    In the context of increasingly strict requirements for building energy efficiency, Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) systems have emerged as an effective means to reduce energy demand for space heating and cooling in larger buildings. In the Netherlands, over 2000 systems are currently active, which has already raised issues with spatial planning in some areas; current planning schemes may lack the flexibility to properly address variations in ATES operation, which are driven by uncertainties across a broad range of time scales - from daily changes in building energy demand, to decadal trends for climate or groundwater conditions. This work is therefore part of a broader research effort on ATES Smart Grids (ATES-SG), which has focused on more adaptive methods for ATES management and control. In particular, improved control schemes which allow for coordination between neighboring ATES systems may offer more robust performance under uncertainty (Rostampour & Keviczky, 2016). The case studies for the ATES-SG project have so far focused on idealized cases, and on a historical simulation of ATES development in the city center of Utrecht. This poster will present an additional case study for the city center of Amsterdam, which poses several geohydrological challenges for ATES: for instance, variable density flow due to salinity gradients in the local aquifer, and varying depths for ATES systems due to the thickness of the aquifer. To study the effect of these conditions, this case uses an existing 15-layer geohydrological model of the Amsterdam region, cropped to an area of 4500m x 2500m around the Amsterdam Zuidas district. This rapidly developing business district is one of the densest areas of ATES use in Amsterdam, with 32 well doublets and 53 monowells currently registered. The geohydrological model is integrated with GIS data to accurately represent ATES spatial planning; simulated well flows are provided by a model predictive control component. This model is

  8. Origins of seawater intrusion in a coastal aquifer - A case study of the Pajaro Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bond, L.D.; Bredehoeft, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Seawater may enter and contaminate stratified coastal aquifers through a number of different pathways. These pathways and their relative contribution are examined in the Pajaro Valley, California, a coastal area with extensive groundwater development. This study considers three pathways of possible intrusion of the primary confined aquifer: (1) onshore leakage from brackish sources, the estuary and sloughs, through the confining layer; (2) near-shore leakage from the ocean through the confining layer; and (3) offshore flow from the ocean through the submarine canyon outcrop of the aquifer. Groundwater flow and seawater intrusion are simulated using an areal, two-dimensional solute-transport computer model. This analysis indicates that leakage through confining layers is the principal mechanism of recharge to the aquifer. Although lateral flow through the offshore outcrop contaminates the aquifer, as a whole, at a higher rate, vertical leakage through the sea floor initially is the main pathway of seawater intrusion to the onshore portion of the aquifer. It is likely that leakage generally is the dominant mechanism of recharge and initial cause of seawater intrusion for poorly-confined, stratified coastal aquifers. This analysis suggests that a significant time interval follows the initial observation of seawater intrusion, during which remedial action can be taken to control lateral flow through the offshore outcrop, which ultimately will be the largest component of future intrusion in these aquifers. ?? 1987.

  9. Intrinsic vulnerability, hazard and risk mapping for karst aquifers: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimi, Ziad A.; Assi, Amjad

    2009-01-01

    SummaryGroundwater from karst aquifers is among the most important resources of drinking water supply of the worldwide population. The European COST action 620 proposed a comprehensive approach to karst groundwater protection, comprising methods of intrinsic and specific vulnerability mapping, hazard and risk mapping. This paper presents the first application of all components of this European approach to the groundwater underlying the Ramallah district, a karst hydrogeology system in Palestine. The vulnerability maps which were developed can assist in the implementation of groundwater management strategies to prevent degradation of groundwater quality. Large areas in the case study area can be classified as low or very low risk area corresponding to the pollution sources due to the absence of hazards and also due to low vulnerabilities. These areas could consequently be interesting for future development as they are preferable in view of ground water protection.

  10. Use of molecular approaches in hydrogeological studies: the case of carbonate aquifers in southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucci, Antonio; Petrella, Emma; Celico, Fulvio; Naclerio, Gino

    2017-06-01

    Waterborne pathogens represent a significant health risk in both developed and developing countries with sensitive sub-populations including children, the elderly, neonates, and immune-compromised people, who are particularly susceptible to enteric infections. Annually, approximately 1.8 billion people utilize a faecally contaminated water source, and waterborne diseases are resulting in up to 2.1 million human mortalities globally. Although groundwater has traditionally been considered less susceptible to contamination by enteric pathogens than surface water due to natural attenuation by overlying strata, the degree of microbial removal attributable to soils and aquifers can vary significantly depending on several factors. Thus, accurate assessment of the variable presence and concentration of microbial contaminants, and the relative importance of potentially causative factors affecting contaminant ingress, is critical in order to develop effective source (well) and resource (aquifer) protection strategies. "Traditional" and molecular microbiological study designs, when coupled with hydrogeological, hydrochemical, isotopic, and geophysical methods, have proven useful for analysis of numerous aspects of subsurface microbial dynamics. Accordingly, this overview paper presents the principal microbial techniques currently being employed (1) to predict and identify sources of faecal contamination in groundwater, (2) to elucidate the dynamics of contaminant migration, and (3) to refine knowledge about the hydrogeological characteristics and behaviours of aquifer systems affected by microbial contamination with an emphasis on carbonate aquifers, which represent an important global water supply. Previous investigations carried out in carbonate aquifers in southern Italy are discussed.

  11. Boise Geothermal Aquifer Study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This report is the final product of a detailed review and quantitative evaluation of existing data for the Boise Front Geothermal Aquifer. Upon review of the many publications, and raw data for the Boise geothermal aquifer, it became clear that adequate data only exists for analysis of current and proposed development within a limited area. This region extends approximately 1.5 miles southeast of the State Capitol to 0.5 mile northwest. Though there are geothermal wells located along the Boise Front outside of this area, the lack of production and water level data preclude any detailed discussions and analysis of their relationship to the central resource. As a result, discussion will concentrate on major users such as the Capitol Mall (CM) Boise Geothermal LTD. (BGL), Veterans Administration (VA) and Boise Warm Springs Water District (BWSWD). The objectives of this study are: Define the inter-relationship of the existing wells and/or portions of the geothermal aquifer; evaluate the effects of current and proposed development on the geothermal aquifer; estimate longevity of the geothermal resource; and make recommendations for an on-going monitoring program. 44 refs., 40 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. Modeling complex aquifer systems: a case study in Baton Rouge, Louisiana (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hai V.; Tsai, Frank T.-C.

    2017-05-01

    This study targets two challenges in groundwater model development: grid generation and model calibration for aquifer systems that are fluvial in origin. Realistic hydrostratigraphy can be developed using a large quantity of well log data to capture the complexity of an aquifer system. However, generating valid groundwater model grids to be consistent with the complex hydrostratigraphy is non-trivial. Model calibration can also become intractable for groundwater models that intend to match the complex hydrostratigraphy. This study uses the Baton Rouge aquifer system, Louisiana (USA), to illustrate a technical need to cope with grid generation and model calibration issues. A grid generation technique is introduced based on indicator kriging to interpolate 583 wireline well logs in the Baton Rouge area to derive a hydrostratigraphic architecture with fine vertical discretization. Then, an upscaling procedure is developed to determine a groundwater model structure with 162 layers that captures facies geometry in the hydrostratigraphic architecture. To handle model calibration for such a large model, this study utilizes a derivative-free optimization method in parallel computing to complete parameter estimation in a few months. The constructed hydrostratigraphy indicates the Baton Rouge aquifer system is fluvial in origin. The calibration result indicates hydraulic conductivity for Miocene sands is higher than that for Pliocene to Holocene sands and indicates the Baton Rouge fault and the Denham Springs-Scotlandville fault to be low-permeability leaky aquifers. The modeling result shows significantly low groundwater level in the "2,000-foot" sand due to heavy pumping, indicating potential groundwater upward flow from the "2,400-foot" sand.

  13. Modeling complex aquifer systems: a case study in Baton Rouge, Louisiana (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hai V.; Tsai, Frank T.-C.

    2017-01-01

    This study targets two challenges in groundwater model development: grid generation and model calibration for aquifer systems that are fluvial in origin. Realistic hydrostratigraphy can be developed using a large quantity of well log data to capture the complexity of an aquifer system. However, generating valid groundwater model grids to be consistent with the complex hydrostratigraphy is non-trivial. Model calibration can also become intractable for groundwater models that intend to match the complex hydrostratigraphy. This study uses the Baton Rouge aquifer system, Louisiana (USA), to illustrate a technical need to cope with grid generation and model calibration issues. A grid generation technique is introduced based on indicator kriging to interpolate 583 wireline well logs in the Baton Rouge area to derive a hydrostratigraphic architecture with fine vertical discretization. Then, an upscaling procedure is developed to determine a groundwater model structure with 162 layers that captures facies geometry in the hydrostratigraphic architecture. To handle model calibration for such a large model, this study utilizes a derivative-free optimization method in parallel computing to complete parameter estimation in a few months. The constructed hydrostratigraphy indicates the Baton Rouge aquifer system is fluvial in origin. The calibration result indicates hydraulic conductivity for Miocene sands is higher than that for Pliocene to Holocene sands and indicates the Baton Rouge fault and the Denham Springs-Scotlandville fault to be low-permeability leaky aquifers. The modeling result shows significantly low groundwater level in the "2,000-foot" sand due to heavy pumping, indicating potential groundwater upward flow from the "2,400-foot" sand.

  14. Evaluation of hydrochemical changes due to intensive aquifer exploitation: case studies from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Esteller, M V; Rodríguez, R; Cardona, A; Padilla-Sánchez, L

    2012-09-01

    The impact of intensive aquifer exploitation has been observed in numerous places around the world. Mexico is a representative example of this problem. In 2010, 101 out of the 653 aquifers recognized in the country, showed negative social, economic, and environmental effects related to intensive exploitation. The environmental effects include, among others, groundwater level decline, subsidence, attenuation, and drying up of springs, decreased river flow, and deterioration of water quality. This study aimed at determining the hydrochemical changes produced by intensive aquifer exploitation and highlighting water quality modifications, taking as example the Valle de Toluca, Salamanca, and San Luis Potosi aquifers in Mexico's highlands. There, elements such as fluoride, arsenic, iron, and manganese have been detected, resulting from the introduction of older groundwater with longer residence times and distinctive chemical composition (regional flows). High concentrations of other elements such as chloride, sulfate, nitrate, and vanadium, as well as pathogens, all related to anthropogenic pollution sources (wastewater infiltration, irrigation return flow, and atmospheric pollutants, among others) were also observed. Some of these elements (nitrate, fluoride, arsenic, iron, and manganese) have shown concentrations above Mexican and World Health Organization drinking water standards.

  15. Hydrodynamic and salinity evolution of groundwaters during artificial recharge within semi-arid coastal aquifers: A case study of El Khairat aquifer system in Enfidha (Tunisian Sahel)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketata, Mouna; Gueddari, Moncef; Bouhlila, Rachida

    2014-09-01

    In common with most coastal aquifers, the El Khairat aquifer suffers the imbalance between recharge and intense exploitation and the extent of agricultural activity. As it is part of the Tunisian Sahel, the Enfidha region has a semiarid climate with very irregular rainfall which makes the groundwater resources quite fragile. This region has major difficulties in managing its water resources which are in decline, especially since, for the last decades, their renewal by rainwater has no longer been sufficient to re-establish the equilibrium. In such a case, the artificial recharge of aquifers by water from dams is a credible alternative to preserve the water resources against marine intrusion and pronounced fall in the piezometric level. The present investigation, based on available data, is aimed to monitoring the piezometry of the El Khairat aquifer during artificial recharge operations (2002-2005) by water from the dam and to identify the impact of the artificial recharge on groundwater quality. The results of this monitoring have shown that the artificial recharge realized between 2002 and 2005, had for effect an increase of the piezometric level of the phreatic aquifer of +0.4 to +2.63 m, especially in the “Ain Garci” zone. The piezometric level of the deep aquifer has also recorded an important increase reaching +3.82 m. After artificial recharge of the aquifer, the spatial distribution of the salinity shows quite low salinity values (lower than 2 g/l) in the western and north-eastern parts of the aquifer, the zone of artificial recharge, whereas the highest ones are found especially in the coastal zones and at the boundaries of the Sebkha where they exceeded 3 g/l. Moreover, we note a slight salinity reduction toward a central zone of the aquifer. Indeed, the zone characterized by salinity lower than 2 g/l and situated near the recharge site becomes more extensive.

  16. Groundwater vulnerability assessment using fuzzy logic: a case study in the Zayandehrood aquifers, Iran.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Farshad; Safavi, Hamid R; Ahmadi, Azadeh

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater is an important source of water, especially in arid and semi-arid regions where surface water is scarce. Groundwater pollution in these regions is consequently a major concern, especially as pollution control and removal in these resources are not only expensive but at times impossible. It is, therefore, essential to prevent their contamination in the first place by properly identifying vulnerable zones. One method most commonly used for evaluating groundwater pollution is the DRASTIC method, in which the Boolean logic is used to rank and classify the parameters involved. Problems arise, however, in the application of the Boolean logic. In this paper, the fuzzy logic has been used to avoid the problems. For this purpose, three critical cases of minimum, maximum, and mean values have been considered for the net recharge parameter. The process has been performed on the Zayandehrood river basin aquifers. The fuzzy-DRASTIC vulnerability map thus obtained indicates that the western areas of the basin generally have the maximum pollution potential followed by the areas located in the east. The central parts of the study area are found to have a low pollution potential. Finally, two sensitivity analyses are performed to show the significance of each value of the net recharge parameter in the calculation of vulnerability index.

  17. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) Applied to Karst Carbonate Aquifers: Case Study from Amdoun, Northwestern Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redhaounia, Belgacem; Ilondo, Batobo Ountsche; Gabtni, Hakim; Sami, Khomsi; Bédir, Mourad

    2016-04-01

    The Amdoun region is characterized by a high degree of karstification due to the climate impact (±1500 mm year-1) and the development of fracture network. Survey using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is deployed to provide a cost-effective characterization of the subsurface karst environments. A total of seven ERT profiles with lengths of 315 m were evaluated at the Béja governorate (NW Tunisia). The area represents a small syncline of Boudabbous limestone rocks (Lower Eocene), which is covered by a thin layer of clay. In this study, an ERT survey was conducted to examine the spatial distribution and shape of underground cavities in the karst area in Jebel Sabah anticline and Aïn Sallem-Zahret Medien syncline. In this study, geological, hydro-geological and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) methods were applied to determine the geometry of the perched aquifer in the Amdoun region (NW Tunisia). The area is characterized by fractured and karstic limestone aquifer of Late Cretaceous (Abiod Fm.) and Lower Eocene (Boudabbous Fm.). The aquifers have a karstic functioning and drain aquifers of economical interest, despite some wells exploiting them. Seven resistivity profiles were conducted along the survey area at three sites. The orientation, extension and the degree of inclination of those profiles are shown in the location map. The correct resistivity data were interpreted using Earth Imager 2D software. The results of the interpreted geo-electrical sections showed that the resistivity of the carbonate aquifer varied between 2.5 to over 5794 Ωm. The thickness of the perched aquifer ranged from 15 to 50 m, while its depth from the surface lies between 10 and 60 m. The ERT not only provided precise near surface information, but was also very useful for establishing the 3D geometry and the position of several potential cavities and karts. The results show the presence of small to large isolated cavities at various depths. The low resistivity of cavities

  18. Methodology of hydrogeological characterization of deep carbonate aquifers as potential reservoirs of groundwater. Case of study: the Jurassic aquifer of El Maestrazgo (Castellón, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejías, M.; Garcia-Orellana, J.; Plata, J. L.; Marina, M.; Garcia-Solsona, E.; Ballesteros, B.; Masqué, P.; López, J.; Fernández-Arrojo, C.

    2008-04-01

    A methodology for the characterization of deep carbonate aquifers has been developed and applied to El Maestrazgo Jurassic aquifer in Castellón, Spain. Characterization of these aquifer formations, located at more than 300 m deep, consisted of a previous phase of compilation, analysis and synthesis of the existing information about the area, followed by a coordinated combination of different speciality studies: geology, stratigraphy, structural analysis, hydrogeology, hydrochemistry, geophysics and remote sensing. Geological studies included geological mapping, definition of stratigraphical units and facies and structural analysis. The aim of the hydrogeology study was to define aquifer formations, recharge area, aquifer points inventory and groundwater flow directions for the establishment of piezometric and water quality observation nets. Special techniques were applied, like thermal infrared aerial images and the evaluation of submarine groundwater discharge by means of natural radium isotopes. Hydrochemical techniques, including majority elements characterization and stable isotopes (18O, 2H and 3H) determination, allowed classifying hydrochemical facies and establishing a renewal pattern for water within the system. Geophysics was useful in determining the aquifer geometry, the features of the basement and the petrophysical characteristics of the geological formations. Preliminary results show an important tectonic complexity and the possibilities for groundwater uses in the area of study.

  19. Identifying functional zones of denitrification in heterogeneous aquifer systems by numerical simulations - a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, E.; Kalbacher, T.; He, W.; Shao, H.; Schueth, C.; Kolditz, O.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate contamination in shallow groundwater is still one of the common problems in many countries. Because of its high solubility and anionic nature, nitrate can easily leach through soil and persist in groundwater for decades. High nitrate concentration has been suggested as a major cause of accelerated eutrophication, methemoglobinemia and gastric cancer. There are several factors influencing the fate of nitrate in groundwater system, which is e.g. distribution of N- sources to soil and groundwater, distribution and amount of reactive substances maintaining denitrification, rate of nitrate degradation and its kinetics, and geological characteristics of the aquifer. Nitrate transport and redox transformation processes are closely linked to complex and spatially distributed physical and chemical interaction, therefore it is difficult to predict and quantify in the field and laboratory experiment. Models can play a key role in elucidation of nitrate reduction pathway in groundwater system and in the design and evaluation of field tests to investigate in situ remediation technologies as well. The goal of the current study is to predict groundwater vulnerability to nitrate, to identify functional zones of denitrification in heterogeneous aquifer systems and to describe the uncertainty of the predictions due to scale effects. For this aim, we developed a kinetic model using multi-component mass transport code OpenGeoSys coupling with IPhreeqc module of the geochemical solver PHREEQC. The developed model included sequential aerobic and nitrate-based respiration, multi-Monod kinetics, multi-species biogeochemical reactions, and geological characteristics of the groundwater aquifer. Moreover water-rock interaction such as secondary mineral precipitation was also included in this model. In this presentation, we focused on the general modelling approach and present the simulation results of nitrate transport simulation in a hypothetical aquifer systems based on data from

  20. Estimating the uncertainty of the impact of climate change on alluvial aquifers. Case study in central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Emanuele; Camici, Stefania; Brocca, Luca; Moramarco, Tommaso; Pica, Federico; Preziosi, Elisabetta

    2014-05-01

    There is evidence that the precipitation pattern in Europe is trending towards more humid conditions in the northern region and drier conditions in the southern and central-eastern regions. However, a great deal of uncertainty concerns how the changes in precipitations will have an impact on water resources, particularly on groundwater, and this uncertainty should be evaluated on the basis of that coming from 1) future climate scenarios of Global Circulation Models (GCMs) and 2) modeling chains including the downscaling technique, the infiltration model and the calibration/validation procedure used to develop the groundwater flow model. With the aim of quantifying the uncertainty of these components, the Valle Umbra porous aquifer (Central Italy) has been considered as a case study. This aquifer, that is exploited for human consumption and irrigation, is mainly fed by the effective infiltration from the ground surface and partly by the inflow from the carbonate aquifers bordering the valley. A numerical groundwater flow model has been developed through the finite difference MODFLOW2005 code and it has been calibrated and validated considering the recharge regime computed through a Thornthwaite-Mather infiltration model under the climate conditions observed in the period 1956-2012. Future scenarios (2010-2070) of temperature and precipitation have been obtained from three different GMCs: ECHAM-5 (Max Planck Institute, Germany), PCM (National Centre Atmospheric Research) and CCSM3 (National Centre Atmospheric Research). Each scenario has been downscaled (DSC) to the data of temperature and precipitation collected in the baseline period 1960-1990 at the stations located in the study area through two different statistical techniques (linear rescaling and quantile mapping). Then, stochastic rainfall and temperature time series are generated through the Neyman-Scott Rectangular Pulses model (NSRP) for precipitation and the Fractionally Differenced ARIMA model (FARIMA

  1. River-aquifer interactions and their relationship to stygofauna assemblages: a case study of the Gwydir River alluvial aquifer (New South Wales, Australia).

    PubMed

    Menció, A; Korbel, K L; Hose, G C

    2014-05-01

    In contrast to surface water ecosystems, groundwater ecosystems are usually considered to have relatively stable conditions and physically inert environments. However, many groundwater ecosystems undergo substantial changes through space and time, related to fluxes in groundwater flow, exchange and nutrient imports. In this study we used hydrochemical data to: 1) determine the different hydrogeological conditions in an alluvial system, the shallow Gwydir River alluvial aquifer (located in Northern New South Wales, Australia); and 2) analyze the relationship between hydrochemical conditions and the composition of stygofauna assemblages in the aquifer. Using hydrochemical modeling and multivariate analyses, four main hydrogeological situations were defined as occurring in the aquifer. Bores were classified as having either a high, low or no influence from or exchange with the river. The latter group was further subdivided into those of low and high salinity. Further analysis combining the biological and hydrochemical data identified two main groups of samples. The first group was composed mainly of samples related to the aquifer groundwater which had higher richness and abundance of fauna compared to samples in the second group which was comprised of samples affected by stream water leakage and samples related to the highest salinities. These results suggest that more stable conditions (mainly related to steadier groundwater head levels) and lower nitrate concentrations promoted a more diverse and abundant stygofauna community.

  2. Hydrogeochemical Modelling for Groundwater in Neyveli Aquifer, Tamil Nadu, India, Using PHREEQC: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Chidambaram, S.; Anandhan, P.; Prasanna, M. V.; Ramanathan, AL.; Srinivasamoorthy, K.; Senthil Kumar, G.

    2012-09-15

    Sophisticated geochemical models have been used to describe and predict the chemical behaviour of complex natural waters and also to protect the groundwater resources from future contamination. One such model is used to study the hydrogeochemical complexity in a mine area. Extraction of groundwater from the coastal aquifer has been in progress for decades to mine lignite in Neyveli. This extraction has developed a cone of depression around the mine site. This cone of depression is well established by the geochemical nature of groundwater in the region. 42 groundwater samples were collected in a definite pattern and they were analysed for major cations, anions and trace elements. The saturation index (SI) of the groundwater for carbonate, sulphate and silica minerals was studied and it has been correlated with the recharge and the discharge regions. The SI of alumino silicates has been used to decipher the stage of weathering. The SI{sub Gibbsite} - SI{sub K-feldspar} has been spatially distributed and the regions of discharge and recharge were identified. Then two flow paths A1 and A2 were identified and inverse modelling using PHREEQC were carried out to delineate the geochemical process that has taken place from recharge to discharge. The initial and final solutions in both the flow paths were correlated with the thermodynamic silicate stability diagrams of groundwater and it was found that the state of thermodynamic stability of the end solutions along the flow path were approaching similar states of equilibrium at the discharge.

  3. Percolation pond as a method of managed aquifer recharge in a coastal saline aquifer: A case study on the criteria for site selection and its impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christy, Raicy Mani; Lakshmanan, Elango

    2017-07-01

    Percolation ponds have become very popular methods of managed aquifer recharge due to their low cost, ease of construction and the participation and assistance of community. The objective of this study is to assess the feasibility of a percolation pond in a saline aquifer, north of Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India, to improve the storage and quality of groundwater. Electrical resistivity and ground penetrating radar methods were used to understand the subsurface conditions of the area. From these investigations, a suitable location was chosen and a percolation pond was constructed. The quality and quantity of groundwater of the nearby area has improved due to the recharge from the pond. This study indicated that a simple excavation without providing support for the slope and paving of the bunds helped to improve the groundwater quality. This method can be easily adoptable by farmers who can have a small pond within their farm to collect and store the rainwater. The cost of water recharged from this pond works out to be about 0.225 Re/l. Cleaning the pond by scrapping the accumulated sediments needs to be done once a year. Due to the small dimension and high saline groundwater, considerable improvement in quality at greater depths could not be achieved. However, ponds of larger size with recharge shafts can directly recharge the aquifer and help to improve the quality of water at greater depths.

  4. Occurrence of minor toxic elements in volcanic-sedimentary aquifers: a case study in central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivona, Raffaella; Preziosi, Elisabetta; Madé, Benoît; Giuliano, Giuseppe

    2007-09-01

    The occurrence of minor toxic elements (arsenic, vanadium and fluoride among others) in the volcanic aquifers of central Italy, with concentrations often above the national standards for drinking waters, has been recognized since the 1970s. However, these groundwaters are still often used for human consumption. With the aim of providing insight into the water-rock interaction processes, as well as into the evolution of arsenic and other elements, water-sampling campaigns where undertaken within a 100 km2 area at the eastern margin of the Viterbo region, where volcanites overlie an alluvial aquifer complex. The samples were analysed and geochemical modelling was applied to characterize the thermodynamic state of the waters. The results indicate the existence of direct relations among arsenic, vanadium and fluoride concentrations and of their inverse relationship with calcium concentration. An evolution scheme of groundwater composition from the upstream volcanic aquifer to the downstream sedimentary aquifer is also discussed. Two hypotheses are proposed which justify the observed decrease of the cited minor element concentrations, i.e. dilution processes and/or precipitation of fluorapatite, which can include in its structure small amounts of these elements. The precipitation hypothesis is supported by modelling results.

  5. Environmental effects of aquifer overexploitation: a case study in the highlands of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Esteller, Maria Vicenta; Diaz-Delgado, Carlos

    2002-02-01

    There are several environmental processes occurring under aquifer overexploitation conditions. These processes include groundwater table decline, subsidence, attenuation and drying of springs, decrease of river flow, and increased pollution vulnerability, among others processes. Some of these effects have been observed on the Upper Basin of the Lerma River. The Lerma River begins in the SE of the Valley of Toluca at 2,600 m asl, in the wetland known as Lagoons of Almoloya del Río. This wetland is made up of a group of lagoons, which are an important aquatic system from an environmental point of view. The water inflow of this wetland is a discharge of springs, which occur between the fractured volcanic material of the mountain range and granular volcanic-continental deposits of the Valley of Toluca aquifer. The intensive exploitation of the Valley of Toluca aquifer to supply urban and industrial water to Mexico City and Toluca began in 1950 and is responsible for a steady decline of piezometric levels of 1-3.5 m/yr. Other effects of this exploitation--the drying of the wetland, the decrease of river flow and the land subsidence--caused serious ecological and social impacts. The authorities declared this aquifer as overexploited in order to reduce the exploitation and preserve the availability of water resources in this important region.

  6. Chemical Source Tracking of Bacterial Contamination Using Micropollutants - A Karst Aquifer Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirlewagen, Johannes; Hillebrand, Olav; Nödler, Karsten; Licha, Tobias; Schiperski, Ferry; Stange, Claudia; Tiehm, Andreas; Scheytt, Traugott

    2015-04-01

    Karst aquifers are important drinking water resources in many parts of the world, though they are well known for their high vulnerability to contamination. Rainfall and snowmelt often trigger temporary contamination of karst water resources. Free-range animal breeding and application of manure on the one hand and sewage leakage or spillage on the other hand are usually regarded as main sources for fecal contamination. But distinction of their respective contributions is difficult. This study investigates the feasibility to track the origin of fecal contamination from the occurrences of indicator bacteria and chemical source indicators in karst spring water. The study site is the 45 km² rural catchment of the perennial karst spring Gallusquelle in SW-Germany (mean discharge: 0.5 m³/s). Overflow events of a stormwater detention basin (combined sewer system) are known to impact water quality at the spring. There is no free-range animal breeding in the catchment but intense application of manure. Following two heavy rainfall events with overflow of the stormwater detention basin, spring water was sampled over several days. Samples were analysed for indicator bacteria (total Coliform, E. coli, Enterococci) and 57 micropollutants, among them cyclamate and metazachlor. For the Gallusquelle catchment the artificial sweetener cyclamate and the herbicide metazachlor have been established as source specific indicators, the former for the sewer system and the latter for cropland. Though recharge in the Gallusquelle catchment is predominantly diffuse, there is a significant portion of direct recharge reflected by distinct breakthrough curves for cyclamate and metazachlor. The breakthrough of indicator bacteria coincides very well with the occurrence of both, cyclamate and metazachlor. However, indicator bacteria cannot be unambiguously tracked back to a specific source.

  7. Salinity mapping of coastal groundwater aquifers using hydrogeochemical and geophysical methods: a case study from north Kelantan, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsudin, A. R.; Haryono, A.; Hamzah, U.; Rafek, A. G.

    2008-10-01

    Integrated hydrogeochemical and geophysical methods were used to study the salinity of groundwater aquifers along the coastal area of north Kelantan. For the hydrogeochemical investigation, analysis of major ion contents of the groundwater was conducted, and other chemical parameters such as pH and total dissolved solids were also determined. For the geophysical study, both geoelectrical resistivity soundings and reflection seismic surveys were conducted to determine the characteristics of the subsurface and groundwater contained within the aquifers. The pH values range from 6.2 to 6.8, indicating that the groundwater in the study area is slightly acidic. Low content of chloride suggests that the groundwater in the first aquifer is fresh, with an average concentration of about 15.8 mg/l and high geoelectrical resistivity (>45 ohm m). On the other hand, the groundwater in the second aquifer is brackish, with chloride concentration ranging from 500 mg/l to 3,600 mg/l and very low geoelectrical resistivity (<45 ohm m) as well as high concentration of total dissolved solids (>1,000 mg/l). The groundwater in the third aquifer is fresh, with chloride concentrations generally ranging from 2 mg/l to 210 mg/l and geoelectrical resistivity of greater than 45 ohm m. Fresh and saltwater interface in the first aquifer is generally located directly in the area of the coast, but, for the second aquifer, both hydrogeochemical and geoelectrical resistivity results indicate that the fresh water and saltwater interface is located as far as 6 km from the beach. The considerable chloride ion content initially suggests that the salinity of the groundwater in the second aquifer is probably caused by the intrusion of seawater. However, continuous monitoring of the chloride content of the second aquifer indicated no significant changes with time, from which it can be inferred that the salinity of the groundwater is not affected by seasonal seawater intrusion. Schoeller diagrams illustrate

  8. Future groundwater extraction scenarios for an aquifer in a semiarid environment: case study of Guadalupe Valley Aquifer, Baja California, Northwest Mexico.

    PubMed

    Campos-Gaytan, Jose Ruben; Kretzschmar, Thomas; Herrera-Oliva, Claudia Soledad

    2014-11-01

    Semiarid northwestern Mexico presents a growing water demand produced by agricultural and domestic requirements during the last two decades. The community of Guadalupe Valley and the city of Ensenada rely on groundwater pumping from the local aquifer as its sole source of water supply. This dependency has resulted in an imbalance between groundwater pumpage and natural recharge. A two-dimensional groundwater flow model was applied to the Guadalupe Valley Aquifer, which was calibrated and validated for the period 1984-2005. The model analysis verified that groundwater levels in the region are subject to steep declines due to decades of intensive groundwater exploitation for agricultural and domestic purposes. The calibrated model was used to assess the effects of different water management scenarios for the period 2007-2025. If the base case (status quo) scenario continues, groundwater levels are in a continuous drawdown trend. Some wells would run dry by August 2017, and water demand may not be met without incurring in an overdraft. The optimistic scenario implies the achievement of the mean groundwater recharge and discharge. Groundwater level depletion could be stopped and restored. The sustainable scenario implies the reduction of current extraction (up to about 50 %), when groundwater level depletion could be stopped. A reduction in current extraction mitigates water stress in the aquifer but cannot solely reverse declining water tables across the region. The combination of reduced current extraction and an implemented alternative solution (such as groundwater artificial recharge), provides the most effective measure to stabilize and reverse declining groundwater levels while meeting water demands in the region.

  9. Future water supply management adaptation measures - case study of Ljubljana field aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čenčur Curk, B.; Zajc Benda, T.; Souvent, P.; Bračič Železnik, B.; Bogardi, I.

    2012-04-01

    The main drinking water supply problems are related to the significant change of groundwater quantity and quality observed in the last decades as an effect of land use practices and very likely also climate change. The latter may affect the ability of drinking water suppliers to provide enough water of sufficient quality to the consumers. These topics were studied in the frame of SEE project CC-WaterS (Climate Change and Impact on Water Supply) with the main goal to develop a water supply management system regarding optimisation of water extraction and land use restrictions under climate change scenarios for water suppliers, since existing management practices are mostly inadequate to reduce impacts of CC on water supply reliability. The main goal was a designation of appropriate measures and risk assessment to adapt water supply to changing climate and land use activities considering socio-economic aspects. This was accomplished by using 'Fuzzy Decimaker', which is a tool for selecting and ranking risk reduction measures or management actions for local waterworks or water authorities under the pressure of climate change. Firstly, management options were selected and ranked. For public water supply of Ljubljana, the capital of Slovenia, several management options were selected. For improvement of water supply and preservation of water resource quantities there is a need for engineering interventions, such as reducing water losses on pipelines. For improving drinking water safety and preserving water resource quality farmers are not allowed to use fertilisers in the first safeguarding zone and they get compensations for income reduction because of lower farming production. Compensations for farming restrictions in the second safeguarding zone were applied as additional management option. On the other hand, drinking water treatment is another management option to be considered. Trends in groundwater level are decreasing, above all recharge areas of waterworks

  10. Modelling as a means to promote water diplomacy in Southern Africa: the Stampriet Transboundary Aquifer System case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Filippis, Giovanna; Carvalho Resende, Tales; Filali-Meknassi, Youssef; Puri, Shaminder; Kenabatho, Piet; Amakali, Maria; Majola, Kwazikwakhe; Rossetto, Rudy

    2017-04-01

    visualization of large spatial datasets; this is demonstrated by running fourteen case studies using the FREEWAT platform. Among these, the STAS is a particularly representative case study aiming at facilitating the link between science based analysis and stakeholder participation aiming at the adoption of sound transboundary management policies. Due to the scarcity of surface water, water-demanding activities in the study area rely only on groundwater. The first version of the model is developed adapting an existing model of the Namibian part of the aquifer: so far, the groundwater body is discretized using rectangular cells about 40 km2 wide and a stack of three aquifers divided respectively by three aquitards with variable thicknesses and heterogeneous hydraulic properties. The model setup is then revised integrating outcomes from the GGRETA project and extended until the groundwater body limits. Also, boundary conditions and hydrologic stresses (i.e., rainfall infiltration and abstraction for irrigation purposes) were re-defined according to maps and datasets available from the GGRETA project. The involvement of the UNESCO-IHP within the FREEWAT Consortium supports the coordination and integration of previous research outcomes (e.g., from the GGRETA project) and the model development to achieve a full characterization of the STAS current and forecast dynamics and possibly highlighting any existing knowledge gaps. This will be

  11. Mathematic modeling of complex aquifer: Evian Natural Mineral Water case study considering lumped and distributed models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriot, abel; Blavoux, bernard; Travi, yves; Lachassagne, patrick; Beon, olivier; Dewandel, benoit; Ladouche, bernard

    2013-04-01

    The Evian Natural Mineral Water (NMW) aquifer is a highly heterogeneous Quaternary glacial deposits complex composed of three main units, from bottom to top: - The "Inferior Complex" mainly composed of basal and impermeable till lying on the Alpine rocks. It outcrops only at the higher altitudes but is known in depth through drilled holes. - The "Gavot Plateau Complex" is an interstratified complex of mainly basal and lateral till up to 400 m thick. It outcrops at heights above approximately 850 m a.m.s.l. and up to 1200 m a.m.s.l. over a 30 km² area. It is the main recharge area known for the hydromineral system. - The "Terminal Complex" from which the Evian NMW is emerging at 410 m a.m.s.l. It is composed of sand and gravel Kame terraces that allow water to flow from the deep "Gavot Plateau Complex" permeable layers to the "Terminal Complex". A thick and impermeable terminal till caps and seals the system. Aquifer is then confined at its downstream area. Because of heterogeneity and complexity of this hydrosystem, distributed modeling tools are difficult to implement at the whole system scale: important hypothesis would have to be made about geometry, hydraulic properties, boundary conditions for example and extrapolation would lead with no doubt to unacceptable errors. Consequently a modeling strategy is being developed and leads also to improve the conceptual model of the hydrosystem. Lumped models mainly based on tritium time series allow the whole hydrosystem to be modeled combining in series: an exponential model (superficial aquifers of the "Gavot Plateau Complex"), a dispersive model (Gavot Plateau interstratified complex) and a piston flow model (sand and gravel from the Kame terraces) respectively 8, 60 and 2.5 years of mean transit time. These models provide insight on the governing parameters for the whole mineral aquifer. They help improving the current conceptual model and are to be improved with other environmental tracers such as CFC, SF6. A

  12. Managed Aquifer Recharge of Surplus Desalinated Seawater: a MARSOL Case Study from Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtzman, Daniel; Ganot, Yonatan; Russak, Ammos; Nitzan, Ido; Bernstein, Anat; Katz, Yoram; Guttman, Yossi

    2015-04-01

    MARSOL is an EU-funded project on demonstrating managed aquifer recharge (MAR) as a solution to water scarcity and drought. Among other activities in MARSOL, 7 demo-sites in Mediterranean countries were chosen for research and demonstration of different types of MAR (e.g. soil aquifer treatment, river infiltration basins etc.). One of these demo sites is the Menashe infiltration basin (Israel) in which MAR of surplus desalinated sea water is demonstrated, monitored and investigated in the last year. Different operational circumstances create periods in which water from the Hadera seawater desalination plant cannot be distributed through the national water carrier to consumers. A solution was set in MAR of this water through sandy infiltration ponds to the Israeli coastal aquifer which is consisted mainly from calcareous sandstone. Hydrological and geochemical aspects are of interest in this MAR operation due to the high discharge rates of low-salinity chlorinated water to the infiltration pond. Monitoring of operational events, laboratory experiments, controlled field-experiments and modelling are carried out aiming at clarifying the following issues: infiltration rates - spatial and temporal variability; recharge and withdrawal operation; disinfection by-products due to infiltration of chlorinated water; changes in hydraulic properties due to dissolution/precipitation processes; and using MAR of desalinated water as a remineralization treatment. We will present some results concerning these aspects concentrating on the last one. Observations show that desalinated water dissolve carbonates relatively fast in the unsaturated zone and shallow groundwater of the infiltration site. This process which increases significantly the water's alkalinity also enriches the water with magnesium which its deficiency in desalinated seawater is an unsolved concern. Further increase in calcium and magnesium concentration requires flow in the aquifer through the calcareous

  13. Case study for delineating a contributing area to a well in a fractured siliciclastic-bedrock aquifer near Lansdale, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barton, Gary J.; Risser, Dennis W.; Galeone, Daniel G.; Goode, Daniel J.

    2003-01-01

    A supply well used by the North Penn Water Authority near Lansdale, Pa., was selected as a case study for delineating a contributing area in a fractured siliciclastic-bedrock aquifer. The study emphasized the importance of refining the understanding of factors that control ground-water movement to the well by conducting (1) geophysical logging and flow measurements, (2) ground-water level monitoring, (3) aquifer testing, and (4) geochemical sampling. This approach could be applicable for other wells in siliciclastic-bedrock terranes, especially those of Triassic age in southeastern Pennsylvania. The principal methods for refining the understanding of hydrology at supply well MG-1125 were aquifer testing, water-level measurements, and geophysical logging. Results of two constant-discharge aquifer tests helped estimate the transmissivity of water-producing units and evaluate the anisotropy caused by dipping beds. Results from slug tests provided estimates of transmissivity that were used to evaluate the results from the constant-discharge aquifer tests. Slug tests also showed the wide distribution of transmissivity, indicating that ground-water velocities must vary considerably in the well field. Water-level monitoring in observation wells allowed maps of the potentiometric surface near the well field to be drawn. The measurements also showed that the hydraulic gradient can change abruptly in response to pumping from nearby supply wells. Water levels measured at a broader regional scale in an earlier study also provided a useful view of the potentiometric surface for purposes of delineating the contributing area. Geophysical logging and measurements of flow within wells showed that about 60 percent of water from supply well MG-1125 probably is contributed from relatively shallow water-producing fractures from 60 to 125 feet below land surface, but measurable amounts of water are contributed by fractures to a depth of 311 feet below land surface. Chemical samples

  14. Assessment of aquifer vulnerability to industrial waste water using resistivity measurements. A case study, along El-Gharbyia main drain, Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemail, Kh. S.; El-Shishtawy, A. M.; El-Alfy, M.; Ghoneim, M. F.; Abd El-Bary, M. H.

    2011-09-01

    1D resistivity sounding and 2D resistivity imaging surveys were integrated with geological and hydrochemical data to assess the aquifer vulnerability and saltwater intrusion in the north of Nile Delta, Egypt. In the present study, the El-Gharbyia main drain was considered as a case study to map the sand bodies within the upper silt and clay aquitard. Twenty Schlumberger soundings and six 2D dipole-dipole profiles were executed along one profile close to the western side of the main drain. In addition, 14 groundwater samples and 4 surface water samples from the main drain were chemically analyzed to obtain the major and trace elements concentrations. The results from the resistivity and hydrochemical data were used to assess the protection of the groundwater aquifer and the potential risk of groundwater pollution. The inverted resistivities and thicknesses of the layers above the aquifer layer were used to estimate the integrated electrical conductivity (IEC) that can be used for quantification of aquifer vulnerability. According to the aquifer vulnerability assessment of an underlying sand aquifer, the southern part of the area is characterized by high vulnerability zone with slightly fresh to brackish groundwater and resistivity values of 11-23 Ω.m below the clay cap. The resistivity sections exhibit some sand bodies within the clay cap that lead to increase the recharging of surface waste water (650 mg/l salinity) and flushing the upper part of underlying saltwater aquifer. The region in the north has saltwater with resistivity less than 6 Ω.m and local vulnerable zones within the clay cap. The inverted 2D dipole-dipole profiles in the vulnerable zones, in combination with drilling information have allowed the identification of subsoil structure around the main drain that is highly affected by waste water.

  15. Tracing Hydraulic Connections of Aquifers By Hydrochemical Comparison To Create A Model For An Improved Groundwater Management: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rips, M.

    As the fast growing metropolitan of Cebu City faces a shortness of freshwater supply within the next 5 to 10 years, an improved groundwater management needs to be im- plemented. To reach this, better understanding of the contributions of the aquifers of three large watersheds in the adjacent mountain range and their impact on the most important coastal aquifer, the Carcar Limestone aquifer; needs to be gained. Due to the complex tectonic structure of Cebu island, standard hydrogeological methods such as tracer or pumping tests would be too costly to be carried out. After identifying the largest continuous aquifers within the watersheds, the contents of major ions and eight different trace metals in the groundwater have been analysed. These were compared to the coastal limestone water. The geologic formations of the mountain range consist primarily of volcanics and volcanogenic sandstones, which influence the hydrochem- ical composition. Especially, the contents of K, Na, Zn, Ni, Mn and V differ from the typical composition of calcareous water. In a second step, groundwater sampling along the contact zone between the Carcar Limestone and the adjoining formations has been carried out. The major ion contents are varying but they do not show a clear signal of dilution of the groundwater by the watersheds. However, the high values of Mn, V and Zn around an east-west striking fault zone in the northern part of the study area indicate an influence of volcanic water within the limestone and thus a hydraulic contact between those two aquifers. More detailed sampling throughout the dry and the rainy season would lead to an estimation of the amount of water contributed by the aquifers and thus allow higher pumping rate of the production wells below that area without the risk of saltwater intrusion from the ocean.

  16. Uncertainty assessment of carbon dioxide storage capacity evaluation in deep saline aquifer:a case study in Songliao Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Yang, X.

    2012-12-01

    Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage techniques (CCS) are one of the effective measures for reduction Carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere to mitigate the global warming. Among the Carbon dioxide geological storage options, deep saline aquifers offer the largest storage potential and are widely distributed throughout the Earth. Implementation of carbon dioxide capture and geological storage to reduce greenhouse gas emissions requires carbon dioxide storage capacity in deep saline aquifers. The storage capacity estimation depends on the storage trapping mechanisms and the availability, resolution and certainty of data. There are five different types of trapping mechanisms in deep saline aquifers namely structural and stratigraphic trapping, residual gas trapping, solubility trapping, mineral trapping and hydrodynamic trapping in which storage capacity by solubility trapping is the largest. The carbon dioxide storage capacities in deep saline aquifer can be evaluated by the method recommended by Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF), which mainly depends on the area of study area, thickness and porosity of sandstone, density and carbon dioxide content (mass fraction) in formation water at initial and saturated state. Hydrogeological parameters in aquifer are uncertainty because of uncertainty of measurement and the spatial variety, which leads evaluation uncertainty of carbon dioxide storage capacity. In this paper, acceptance of evaluated carbon dioxide storage capacity in deep saline aquifer caused by hydrological parameters was discussed based on geostatistical methods and stochastic simulation. The stratum named Yaojialing group in the center depressed area of Songliao Basin was chosen as study area because of the rich data. The porosity of sandstone, thickness ration of sandstone to stratum and the total dissolved solid in formation water were regarded as the main source of the uncertainty of carbon dioxide storage capacity evaluation in deep saline

  17. InSAR detection of aquifer recovery: Case studies of Koehn Lake (central California) and Lone Tree Gold Mine (Basin and Range)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowinski, S.; Greene, F.; Amelung, F.

    2013-12-01

    Anthropogenic intervention in groundwater flow and aquifer storage often results in vertical movements of Earth's surface, which are well detected by InSAR observations. Most anthropogenic intervention occurs due to groundwater extraction for both agriculture and human consumption and results in land subsidence. However in some cases, ending anthropogenic intervention can lead to aquifer recovery and, consequently, surface uplift. In this study we present two such cases of aquifer recovery. The first case is the aquifer beneath Koehn Lake in Central California, which was overused to meet agricultural demands until the 1990's. The second case is the Lone Tree Gold Mine in Nevada that during active mining in the 1991-2006 groundwater pumping disrupted the aquifer and cause subsidence. But after mining ceased, groundwater flow was recovered and resulted in uplift. In both cases we studied the surface uplift using InSAR time series observations. We conduct an ERS and Envisat InSAR survey over Koehn Lake in California and Lone Tree Gold Mine in Nevada between 1992 and 2010. We followed the SBAS algorithm to generate a time-series of ground displacements and average velocities of pixels, which remain coherent through time in the SAR dataset. A total of 100 and 80 combined ERS and Envisat SAR dates are inverted for Koehn Lake and Lone Tree Gold Mine respectively. Results for the Koehn Lake area indicate a rapid uplift of about 3.5 mm/yr between 1992-2000 and a slower uplift rate of 1.6 mm/yr between 2000-2004, suggesting a decrease in the recovery process. The observed uplift correlates well with groundwater level increase in the Koehn Lake area. Results for the Lone Tree Gold Mine show a constant subsidence (~ 1 cm/yr) due to groundwater extraction between 1992-2006, but uplift of ~1 cm/yr since the beginning of 2007. In both case studies, InSAR observations reveal that the aquifer recovery is accompanied by surface uplift. We plan to use the InSAR observations and the

  18. Impacts of future changes on groundwater recharge and flow in highly-connected river-aquifer systems: A case study of the Spokane Valley-Rathdrum Prairie Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. T.; Baxter, H.; Barber, M. E.; Hossain, A.; Orr, C. H.; Adam, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    The Spokane, Washington-Coeur d'Alene, Idaho Corridor is well-known for its Spokane Valley-Rathdrum Prairie (SVRP) Aquifer which is a sole source of drinking water for more than 500,000 people. The aquifer is highly connected to the Spokane River and responds very fast to natural and human perturbations, making it relatively vulnerable to climate and anthropogenic changes in future decades. Recent studies have indicated a decline in minimum daily flow in the Spokane River in the last 100 years, while projecting an increase in cool-season precipitation into the future. We investigated the potential impacts of these projected future climate-driven hydrologic changes on groundwater recharge and flow in the SVRP. A distributed, physically-based hydrological model, the Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS), was coupled with an existing Modular three-dimensional finite-difference ground-water model (MODFLOW) to have better estimates of recharge into the SVRP as well as the interaction of surface water and groundwater. The couple model was calibrated and validated at a daily time-step within the Model-Independent Parameter Estimation (PEST) framework using 16 years of both observed streamflow and observed well data (1990 - 2005). To assess future climate change impacts, statistically downscaled climate projections of temperature and precipitation between 2010 and 2050 from four general circulation models were used. The results from the coupled model provide insight on the interplay between snowmelt, streamflow, groundwater recharge and discharge in such a highly-connected system. Moreover, the relative sensitivities of groundwater recharge and flow with respect to changes in climate and land cover are also examined. These results can be used as good references for long term water resources management and planning in the region.

  19. Delineating groundwater aquifer and subsurface structures by using geoelectrical data: Case study (Dakhla Oasis, Egypt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamaden, Mahmoud Ismail Ismail

    2016-06-01

    Geoelectric technique has been used to detect the subsurface stratigraphy and structures around Dakhla Oasis, Egypt. 1D inversion approach has been applied to interpret the geoelectrical data obtained along 10 vertical electrical soundings (VES) using the well known Schlumberger array of AB/2 with electrode spacing varying from 3 to 400 m in successive steps. A preliminary quantitative interpretation of the vertical electrical sounding curves was achieved firstly by using two-layer standard curves and generalized Cagniard graphs. The final models were obtained in 1D using IPI2 WIN program. The modeling results were used to construct a geoelectrical section. Three geoelectric units were identified: The superficial geoelectrical layer is composed mainly of sand and gravel with relatively high resistivity values (7.61-346 Ω m) and thin thicknesses (0.252-9.19 m), of late Pleistocene to Holocene (Quaternary deposits). The second geoelectrical layer is composed of shale (Dakhla Shale). It is characterized by relatively very low electrical resistivity values (0.3-8.68 Ω m). The maximum depth of this layer ranges from 4.18 to 56.4 m. The Nubian sandstone (upper aquifer) third layer with moderate electrical resistivity values (68.5-1585 Ω m) can be detected at the maximum depth of penetration.

  20. Mapping global vulnerability index in mining sectors: A case study Moulares-Redayef aquifer system, southwestern Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khelif, Nadia; Jmal, Ikram; Bouri, Salem

    2016-09-01

    Contrary to the DRASTIC model grouping together the saturated and unsaturated zones to compute a global intrinsic vulnerability index, the global vulnerability index method incorporates both hydrogeological and hydrochemical data for a comprehensive index mapping for the saturated zones. This concept depends on the behavior and the uses of the groundwater. The main aim of this study is to propose a scientific basis for sustainable land use planning and groundwater management of the Moulares-Reayef aquifer, located in Southwestern Tunisia. The overexploitation of this aquifer causes the threat of groundwater quality by various sources of pollution. The global vulnerability index was applied in the Moulares-Reayef aquifer. The results show that the most favorable zones to pollutant percolation are situated along the wadis (Tabaddit, Zallaz, Berka, …) which are drained by continuous discharges. The global vulnerability values were correlated with nitrates values for validation. It revealed a significant correlation showing that high values of nitrates occurred in highly vulnerable zones with a value of 0.69 for the Pearson coefficient. The global vulnerability evaluation shows that the aquifer is characterized by high vertical vulnerability and high susceptibility.

  1. Determination of hydrogeological conditions in large unconfined aquifer: A case study in central Drava plain (NE Slovenia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keršmanc, Teja; Brenčič, Mihael

    2016-04-01

    In several countries, many unregulated landfills exits which releasing harmful contaminations to the underlying aquifer. The Kidričevo industrial complex is located in southeastern part of Drava plain in NW Slovenia. In the past during the production of alumina and aluminum approximately 11.2 million tons of wastes were deposit directly on the ground on two landfills covering an area of 61 hectares. Hydrogeological studies were intended to better characterized conditions bellow the landfill. Geological and hydrogeological conditions of Quaternary unconfined aquifer were analyzed with lithological characterization of well logs and cutting debris and XRF diffraction of silty sediments on 9 boreholes. Hydrogeological conditions: hydraulic permeability aquifer was determined with hydraulic tests and laboratory grain size analyses where empirical USBR and Hazen methods were applied. Dynamics of groundwater was determined by groundwater contour maps and groundwater level fluctuations. The impact of landfill was among chemical analyses of groundwater characterised by electrical conductivity measurements and XRF spectrometry of sand sediments. The heterogeneous Quaternary aquifer composed mainly of gravel and sand, is between 38 m and 47.5 m thick. Average hydraulic permeability of aquifer is within the decade 10-3 m/s. Average hydraulic permeability estimated on grain size curves is 6.29*10-3 m/s, and for the pumping tests is 4.0*10-3 m/s. General direction of groundwater flow is from west to east. During high water status the groundwater flow slightly changes flow direction to the southwest and when pumping station in Kidričevo (NW of landfill) is active groundwater flows to northeast. Landfills have significant impact on groundwater quality.

  2. PTC simulations, stochastic optimization and safety strategies for groundwater pumping management: case study of the Hersonissos Coastal Aquifer in Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratis, P. N.; Dokou, Z. A.; Karatzas, G. P.; Papadopoulou, E. P.; Saridakis, Y. G.

    2017-09-01

    Recently, the well-known Princeton Transport Code (PTC), a groundwater flow and contaminant transport simulator, has been coupled with the ALgorithm of Pattern EXtraction (ALOPEX), a real-time stochastic optimization method, to provide a freshwater pumping management tool for coastal aquifers, aiming in preventing saltwater intrusion. In our previous work (Proceedings of INASE/CSCC-WHH 2015, Recent Advances in Environmental and Earth Sciences and Economics, pp 329-334, 2015), the PTC-ALOPEX approach was used in studying the saltwater contamination problem for the coastal aquifer at Hersonissos, Crete. Extending these results, in the present study the PTC-ALOPEX approach is equipped with a nodal safety strategy that effectively controls saltwater front's advancement inside the aquifer. In cooperation with an appropriate penalty system, the performance of PTC-ALOPEX algorithm is studied considering several pumping and weather condition scenarios. This study also establishes pumping/well scenarios that ensure the needed volume of fresh water to the local community without risking saltwater contamination.

  3. PTC simulations, stochastic optimization and safety strategies for groundwater pumping management: case study of the Hersonissos Coastal Aquifer in Crete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratis, P. N.; Dokou, Z. A.; Karatzas, G. P.; Papadopoulou, E. P.; Saridakis, Y. G.

    2016-06-01

    Recently, the well-known Princeton Transport Code (PTC), a groundwater flow and contaminant transport simulator, has been coupled with the ALgorithm of Pattern EXtraction (ALOPEX), a real-time stochastic optimization method, to provide a freshwater pumping management tool for coastal aquifers, aiming in preventing saltwater intrusion. In our previous work (Proceedings of INASE/CSCC-WHH 2015, Recent Advances in Environmental and Earth Sciences and Economics, pp 329-334, 2015), the PTC-ALOPEX approach was used in studying the saltwater contamination problem for the coastal aquifer at Hersonissos, Crete. Extending these results, in the present study the PTC-ALOPEX approach is equipped with a nodal safety strategy that effectively controls saltwater front's advancement inside the aquifer. In cooperation with an appropriate penalty system, the performance of PTC-ALOPEX algorithm is studied considering several pumping and weather condition scenarios. This study also establishes pumping/well scenarios that ensure the needed volume of fresh water to the local community without risking saltwater contamination.

  4. Geostatistical analysis to identify hydrogeochemical processes in complex aquifers: a case study (Aguadulce unit, Almeria, SE Spain).

    PubMed

    Daniele, Linda; Pulido Bosch, Antonio; Vallejos, Angela; Molina, Luis

    2008-06-01

    The Aguadulce aquifer unit in southeastern Spain is a complex hydrogeological system because of the varied lithology of the aquifer strata and the variability of the processes that can take place within the unit. Factorial analysis of the data allowed the number of variables to be reduced to 3 factors, which were found to be related to such physico-chemical processes as marine intrusion and leaching of saline deposits. Variographic analysis was applied to these factors, culminating in a study of spatial distribution using ordinary kriging. Mapping of the factors allowed rapid differentiation of some of the processes that affect the waters of the Gador carbonate aquifer within the Aguadulce unit, without the need to recur to purely hydrogeochemical techniques. The results indicate the existence of several factors related to salinity: marine intrusion, paleowaters, and/or leaching of marls and evaporitic deposits. The techniques employed are effective, and the results conform to those obtained using hydrogeochemical methods (vertical records of conductivity and temperature, ion ratios, and others). The findings of this study confirm that the application of such analytical methods can provide a useful assessment of factors affecting groundwater composition.

  5. Hydrogeophysical investigation of groundwater potential and aquifer vulnerability prediction in basement complex terrain - A case study from Akure, Southwestern Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinrinade, Opeyemi J.; Adesina, Rasheed B.

    2016-06-01

    This study provides a model for the prediction of groundwater potential and vulnerability of basement aquifers in parts of Akure, Southwestern Nigeria. Hydrogeophysical surveys involving very-low-frequency electromagnetic (VLF-EM) profiling and electrical resistivity (ER) sounding, as well as evaluation of hydraulic gradient using three-point method, were carried out. Ten VLF-EM reconnaissance survey traverses, with lengths ranging from 55 m to 75 m, at 10 m station separation, and 12 vertical electrical sounding (VES) stations were occupied. Two-dimensional map of the filtered real component reveals areas of high conductivity, indicative of linear features that can serve as a reservoir or conduit for fluid flow. Interpretation of the VES results delineates three to four geoelectric units. Two aquifer zones were identified, with resistivity values in the ranges of 20 Ωm to 310 Ωm and 100 Ωm to 3,000 Ω m, respectively. Transverse resistance, longitudinal conductance, coefficient of anisotropy and hydraulic gradient have values ranging from 318.2 Ωm2 to 1,041.8 Ωm2, 0.11 mhos to 0.39 mhos, 1.04 to 1.74 and 0.017 to 0.05, respectively. The results of this study identified two prospective borehole locations and the optimum position to site the proposed septic system, based on the aquifer's protective capacity and groundwater flow properties.

  6. Development of unconfined conditions in multi-aquifer flow systems: a case study in the Rajshahi Barind, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushton, K. R.; Zaman, M. Asaduz

    2016-08-01

    Identifying flow processes in multi-aquifer flow systems is a considerable challenge, especially if substantial abstraction occurs. The Rajshahi Barind groundwater flow system in Bangladesh provides an example of the manner in which flow processes can change with time. At some locations there has been a decrease with time in groundwater heads and also in the magnitude of the seasonal fluctuations. This report describes the important stages in a detailed field and modelling study at a specific location in this groundwater flow system. To understand more about the changing conditions, piezometers were constructed in 2015 at different depths but the same location; water levels in these piezometers indicate the formation of an additional water table. Conceptual models are described which show how conditions have changed between the years 2000 and 2015. Following the formation of the additional water table, the aquifer system is conceptualised as two units. A pumping test is described with data collected during both the pumping and recovery phases. Pumping test data for the Lower Unit are analysed using a computational model with estimates of the aquifer parameters; the model also provided estimates of the quantity of water moving from the ground surface, through the Upper Unit, to provide an input to the Lower Unit. The reasons for the substantial changes in the groundwater heads are identified; monitoring of the recently formed additional water table provides a means of testing whether over-abstraction is occurring.

  7. Options of sustainable groundwater supply from safe aquifers in areas with elevated arsenic - a case study from Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakariya, M.; Bhattacharya, P.; Bromssen, M. V.

    2008-05-01

    Access to safe drinking water is a basic human right. Several millions of people, mainly in developing countries are affected by arsenic in drinking water and the global impact now makes it a top priority water quality issue. A wide gap between the number of exposed people and the pace of mitigation programmes in rural areas of developing countries is the main problem in providing safe drinking water. The main challenge is to develop a sustainable mitigation option that rural and disadvantaged people can adopt and implement themselves to overcome possible public heath hazards. During the recent years, new approaches have emerged in Bangladesh, primarily emerging out of people's own initiative. The local drillers target presumed safe aquifers on the basis of colour and texture of the sediments. A recent study by our research group revealed a distinct correlation between the colour characteristics of the sediments and the groundwater redox conditions. The coupling between the colour of sediments and the redox characteristics of groundwater may thus be used as a tool to assess the risk for As mobilization from the aquifers. The study showed that it is possible to assess the relative risk of high concentrations of As in aquifers if the colour characteristics of the sediments are known and thus, local drillers may target safe aquifers. For validating the sustainability of this mitigation option geological, hydrogeological and microbiological investigations are needed. The sustainability of the aquifers needs to be assessed by combining results from various field and laboratory investigations and by running predictive models. There is also a need to raise the awareness and thereby create a platform for motivating the local drillers to be educated in installing safe tubewells. Awareness raising and community mobilisation are two top priorities for implementing a sustainable safe water project in rural village areas. Significant preparation, attention, and focus must be

  8. Integrating urban recharge uncertainty into standard groundwater modeling practice: A case study on water main break predictions for the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards Aquifer, Austin, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinner, K.; Teasley, R. L.

    2016-12-01

    Groundwater models serve as integral tools for understanding flow processes and informing stakeholders and policy makers in management decisions. Historically, these models tended towards a deterministic nature, relying on historical data to predict and inform future decisions based on model outputs. This research works towards developing a stochastic method of modeling recharge inputs from pipe main break predictions in an existing groundwater model, which subsequently generates desired outputs incorporating future uncertainty rather than deterministic data. The case study for this research is the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards Aquifer near Austin, Texas. Researchers and water resource professionals have modeled the Edwards Aquifer for decades due to its high water quality, fragile ecosystem, and stakeholder interest. The original case study and model that this research is built upon was developed as a co-design problem with regional stakeholders and the model outcomes are generated specifically for communication with policy makers and managers. Recently, research in the Barton Springs segment demonstrated a significant contribution of urban, or anthropogenic, recharge to the aquifer, particularly during dry period, using deterministic data sets. Due to social and ecological importance of urban water loss to recharge, this study develops an evaluation method to help predicted pipe breaks and their related recharge contribution within the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards Aquifer. To benefit groundwater management decision processes, the performance measures captured in the model results, such as springflow, head levels, storage, and others, were determined by previous work in elicitation of problem framing to determine stakeholder interests and concerns. The results of the previous deterministic model and the stochastic model are compared to determine gains to stakeholder knowledge through the additional modeling

  9. Hydrogeochemical processes and geochemical modeling in a coastal aquifer: Case study of the Marathon coastal plain, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papazotos, Panagiotis; Koumantakis, Ioannis; Kallioras, Andreas; Vasileiou, Eleni; Perraki, Maria

    2017-04-01

    Determining the hydrogeochemical processes has always been a challenge for scientists. The aim of this work is the study of the principal hydrogeochemical processes controlling groundwater quality in the Marathon coastal plain, Greece, with emphasis on the origin of the solutes. Various physicochemical parameters and major ions of twenty-five groundwater samples were analyzed. The hydrogeochemical data of groundwater were studied in order to determine the major factors controlling the chemical composition and hydrogeochemical evolution. In the Marathon coastal plain, three different zones of the alluvial granular aquifer system have been detected, considering the geochemical processes and recharge, which affect its hydrochemical characteristics. The alluvial granular aquifer system is divided eastwards into three zones: a) the natural recharge zone, b) the reverse ion exchange zone and c) the diffusion sea water zone. Cl-is the dominant anion and Na+and Ca2+ are the dominant cations, as determined by plotting the analyses on the respective Piper diagram. Near the coastline high concentrations of Na+ and Cl- were observed indicating a zone of seawater intrusion. On the other hand, westward there is increasing concentration of HCO3- with simultaneous decrease of Na+is indication of a recharge zone from karstic aquifers of the study area. Between the aforementioned zones there is an intermediate one, where reverse ion exchange takes place due to high concentrations of dissolved Na+ and Ca2+ adsorption. The saturation indices (SI) were calculated using the geochemical modeling software PHREEQC. Mineral phases of halite, sylvite, gypsum and anhydrite were estimated to be undersaturated in the water samples, suggesting these phases are minor or absent in the host rock. On the other hand, calcite, aragonite and dolomite are close to equilibrium; these minerals are present in the host rocks or in the unsaturated zone, possibly increasing the Ca2+, Mg2+ and HCO3

  10. Groundwater infiltration from alluvial aquifer into karstic aquifer - case study of recharge from river I\\vska to Ižica karstic springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meglič, P.; Brenčič, M.

    2012-04-01

    River I\\vska and Ižica karstic springs are situated in the central part of Slovenia (approximately 20 km south from city Ljubljana) on southern edge of Barje, a tectonic depression field with mostly Holocene and Pleistocene lacustrine and rivers' sediments. Barje is surrounded with hills, which on the southern part consists mostly of Triassic dolomite and Jurassic limestone as well as the basement of Barje in this area. Recharge area of I\\vska River and Ižica karstic springs is covering around 102 km2 of the southern hilly edge of Barje. I\\vska River is a torrent with springs on Blo\\vska planota and flows towards Barje to the north. River formed deep narrow valley that slightly opens at the beginning of I\\vski Vintgar, where flows on a shallow gravel river bed deposited on karstic aquifer. The valley opens on Ljubljansko Barje at village I\\vska vas. Ižica karstic springs are situated on the contact of karst aquifer and Barje intergranular aquifer east of I\\vska valley. After a big flood event on 18th of September 2010 I\\vska River disappeared in the karstic fissures on the river bottom, near bridge in I\\vska village. One day later infiltration point moved 1070 meters upstream. This extreme event caused around 40% higher base flow discharge of Ižica River and total disappearance of I\\vska River for a few days. The analyzed discharge data in the year 2010 of the I\\vska and Ižica River, gave a new understanding of the discharge of I\\vska River and groundwater flow in the area. Before this extreme event discharge of the I\\vska River was measured at different profiles in the channel and reduction of discharge was observed along the course indicating that I\\vska recharges Ižica springs. Analyses presented were performed in the frame of INCOME project and are aimed to improve understanding of hydrogeological conditions in the catchment area of Barje aquifer which is exploited for the public water supply of Ljubljana.

  11. Cross-well slug testing in unconfined aquifers: A case study from the Sleepers River Watershed, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belitz, K.; Dripps, W.

    1999-01-01

    Normally, slug test measurements are limited to the well in which the water level is perturbed. Consequently, it is often difficult to obtain reliable estimates of hydraulic properties, particularly if the aquifer is anisotropic or if there is a wellbore skin. In this investigation, we use partially penetrating stress and observation wells to evaluate specific storage, radial hydraulic conductivity and anisotropy of the aquifer, and the hydraulic conductivity of the borehole skin. The study site is located in the W9 subbasin of the Sleepers River Research Watershed, Vermont. At the site, ~3 m of saturated till are partially penetrated by a stress well located in the center of the unconfined aquifer and six observation wells located above, below, and at the depth of the stress well at radial distances of 1.2 and 2.4 m. The observation wells were shut in with inflatable packers. The semianalytical solution of Butler (1995) was used to conduct a sensitivity analysis and to interpret slug test results. The sensitivity analysis indicates that the response of the stress well is primarily sensitive to radial hydraulic conductivity, less sensitive to anisotropy and the conductivity of the borehole skin, and nearly insensitive to specific storage. In contrast, the responses of the observation wells are sensitive to all four parameters. Interpretation of the field data was facilitated by generating type curves in a manner analogous to the method of Cooper et al. (1967). Because the value of radial hydraulic conductivity is obtained from a match point, the number of unknowns is reduced to three. The estimated values of radial hydraulic conductivity and specific storage are comparable to those derived from the methods of Bouwer and Rice (1976) and Cooper et al. (1967). The values and skin conductivity, however, could not have been obtained without the use of observation wells.Normally, slug test measurements are limited to the well in which the water level is perturbed

  12. Artificial Injection of Fresh Water into a Confined Saline Aquifer: A Case Study at the Nakdong River Delta Area, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, S. Y.; Senapathi, V.; Rajendran, R.; Khakimov, E.

    2015-12-01

    Injection test in a confined saline aquifer was performed to assess the potential of artificial recharge as a means of replacing saline water with fresh water, thereby securing fresh groundwater resources for the Nakdong Delta area of Busan City, Korea. The study area comprises a confined aquifer, in which a 10~21m thick clay layer overlies 31.5~36.5 m thick of sand and a 2.8~11m thick layer of gravel. EC logging of five monitoring wells yielded a value of 7~44 mS/cm, with the transition between saline and fresh water occurring at a depth of 15-38 m. Above 5 m depth, water temperature was 10~15.5°C, whereas between 5 and 50 m depth, the temperature was 15.5~17℃ and pH was 7.15~7.49. The quality of injected fresh water was 388 μS/cm with the temperature of 6.2℃, and pH was 7.70. Approximately 950 m3 of fresh water was injected into the OW-5 injection well at a rate of 370 m3/day for 62 hours, after which the fresh water zone was detected by a CTD Diver installed at a depth of 40 m. The persistence of the fresh water zone was determined via EC and temperature logging at 1 day, 21 days, 62days and 95 days after injection. The contact between fresh and saline water in the injection well was represented by a sharp boundary rather than a transitional boundary. It was concluded that the injected fresh water occupied a specific space and served to maintain the original water quality throughout the observation period. Moreover, we suggest that artificial recharge via long-term injection could help secure a new alternative water resource in this saline coastal aquifer.

  13. Groundwater overexploitation: why is the red flag waved? Case study on the Kairouan plain aquifer (central Tunisia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massuel, Sylvain; Riaux, Jeanne

    2017-09-01

    In many parts of the world, groundwater users regularly face serious resource-depletion threat. At the same time, "groundwater overexploitation" is massively cited when discussing groundwater management problems. A kind of standard definition tends to relegate groundwater overexploitation only as a matter of inputs and outputs. However, a thorough state-of-the-art analysis shows that groundwater overexploitation is not only a matter of hydrogeology but also a qualification of exploitation based on political, social, technical, economic or environmental criteria. Thus, an aquifer with no threat to groundwater storage can rightly be considered as overexploited because of many other prejudicial aspects. So, why is groundwater overexploitation so frequently only associated with resource-depletion threat and so rarely related to other prejudicial aspects? In that case, what really lies behind the use of the overexploitation concept? The case of the Kairouan plain aquifer in central Tunisia was used to analyze the way that the overexploitation message emerges in a given context, how groundwater-use stakeholders (farmers, management agencies and scientists) each qualify the problem in their own way, and how they see themselves with regard to the concept of overexploitation. The analysis shows that focusing messages on overexploitation conceals the problems encountered by the various stakeholders: difficulties accessing water, problems for the authorities in controlling the territory and individual practices, and complications for scientists when qualifying hydrological situations. The solutions put forward to manage overexploitation are at odds with the problems that arise locally, triggering tensions and leading to misunderstandings between the parties involved.

  14. Deduction of groundwater flow regime in a basaltic aquifer using geochemical and isotopic data: The Golan Heights, Israel case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dafny, Elad; Burg, Avi; Gvirtzman, Haim

    2006-11-01

    SummaryGroundwater flow-paths through shallow-perch and deep-regional basaltic aquifers at the Golan Heights, Israel, are reconstructed by using groundwater chemical and isotopic compositions. Groundwater chemical composition, which changes gradually along flow-paths due to mineral dissolution and water-rock interaction, is used to distinguish between shallow-perched and deep-regional aquifers. Groundwater replenishment areas of several springs are identified based on the regional depletion in rainwater δ18O values as a function of elevation (-0.25‰ per 100 m). Tritium concentrations assist in distinguishing between pre-bomb and post-bomb recharged rainwater. It was found that waters emerging through the larger springs are lower in δ18O than surrounding meteoric water and poor in tritium; thus, they are inferred to originate in high-elevation regions up to 20 km away from their discharge points and at least several decades ago. These results verify the numerically simulated groundwater flow field proposed in a previous study, which considered the geological configuration, water mass balance and hydraulic head spatial distribution.

  15. Mapping of groundwater quality in the Turonian aquifer of Oum Er-Rabia Basin, Morocco: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettazarini, Said

    2006-08-01

    This study takes the groundwater of the Moroccan limestone aquifer of Oum Er-Rabia as an example of statistical and cartographical approaches in water resources management. Statistical analyses based on frequency distribution and PCA methods revealed the homogeneity of waters with the existence of abnormal points and have helped to assess correlations between the studied variables. The mapping approach illustrated that waters are influenced by the lithology of the surrounding rocks and are of Ca Mg HCO3, Ca Mg Cl SO4, and mixed types according to the Piper classification. The quality of water is of high to medium, north of the basin, but it is of medium to bad, NE and south, due to excessive contents of chloride, sulfate and nitrate. According to the US Salinity Laboratory classification, water used for irrigation in the eastern and the southern parts of the basin should take into consideration the drainage conditions, the nature of plants and the addition of gypsum doses.

  16. Evaluation of Managed Aquifer Recharge Scenarios using Treated Wastewater: a Case study of the Zarqa River Basin, Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Rawy, Mustafa; Zlotnik, Vitaly; Al-Maktoumi, Ali; Al-Raggad, Marwan; Kacimov, Anvar; Abdalla, Osman

    2016-04-01

    Jordan is an arid country, facing great challenges due to limited water resources. The shortage of water resources constrains economy, especially agriculture that consumes the largest amount of available water (about 53 % of the total demand). According to the Jordan Water Strategy 2008 - 2022, groundwater is twice greater than the recharge rate. Therefore, the government charged the planners to consider treated wastewater (TWW) as a choice in the water resources management and development strategies. In Jordan, there are 31 TWW plants. Among them, As Samra plant serving the two major cities, Amman and Zarqa, is the largest, with projected maximum capacity of 135 Million m3/year. This plant is located upstream of the Zarqa River basin that accepts all TWW discharges. The Zarqa River is considered the most important source of surface water in Jordan and more than 78 % of its current is composed of TWW. The main objectives were to develop a conceptual model for a selected part of the Zarqa River basin, including the As Samrapant, and to provide insights to water resources management in the area using TWW. The groundwater flow model was developed using MODFLOW 2005 and used to assess changes in the aquifer and the Zarqa River under a set of different increments in discharge rates from the As Samra plant and different groundwater pumping rates. The results show that the water table in the study area underwent an average water table decline of 29 m prior to the As Samra plant construction, comparing with the current situation (with annual TWW discharge of 110 Million m3). The analysis of the TWW rate increase to 135 million m3/year (maximum capacity of the As Samra plant) shows that the average groundwater level will rise 0.55 m, compared to the current conditions. We found that the best practices require conjunctive use management of surface- and groundwater. The simulated scenarios highlight the significant role of TWW in augmenting the aquifer storage, improving

  17. Geophysical demonstration of the absence of correlation between lineaments and hydrogeologically usefull fractures: Case study of the Sanon hard rock aquifer (central northern Burkina Faso)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soro, Donissongou Dimitri; Koïta, Mahamadou; Biaou, Chabi Angelbert; Outoumbe, Eli; Vouillamoz, Jean-Michel; Yacouba, Hamma; Guérin, Roger

    2017-05-01

    The conceptualization of hard rock aquifers in terms of their geometry and structure has undergone considerable progress over the last two decades. Despite these advances, hydrogeologists are still divided by the models used to describe two central concepts: (i) the influence of weathering processes on hydraulic conductivity; (ii) the influence of tectonics on the hydraulic conductivity of hard rock aquifers. In order to provide further insight into this debate, the present study proposes a conceptual model for hard rock aquifers, based on an integrated hydrogeological and geophysical approach, using information acquired at different scales. The data and observations used for this case study were derived from the Sanon experimental site, located in Burkina Faso, which is presently exposed to a Sudano-Sahelian climate. The methodological approach consisted firstly in developing a description of the site's weathering profile at the scale of a borehole, based on lithologs and electrical resistivity logs. In a second step, the site's ridge to ridge (longitudinal) weathering profile was established from several 2D resistivity sections crossing a maximum number of lineament structures, which in some prior studies were considered to be the superficial manifestation of tectonic fractures. The results show that at that scale the weathering profile is comprised of three main layers, which from top to bottom are referred to as: the saprolite, the fissured layer and the fresh rock. This weathering profile model is consistent with other models proposed in recent years, suggesting that the hydraulic conductivity of hard rock aquifers is a consequence of weathering processes, rather than tectonic fracturing. Tectonic fractures are not visible on the 2D sections of the ridge to ridge profiles, and the lineaments originally thought to be overground representations of tectonic fractures are likely to have different origins. The lack of a substantial correlation between tectonic

  18. The influence of metamorphic grade on arsenic in metasedimentary bedrock aquifers: a case study from Western New England, USA.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Peter C; West, David P; Hattori, Keiko; Studwell, Sarah; Allen, David N; Kim, Jonathan

    2015-02-01

    Elevated As occurs in many meta-sedimentary bedrock aquifers where elevated bulk-rock As content is one of the primary controls on the concentration of As in groundwater. This study was designed to determine As concentrations in a black shale, black slate and black phyllite sequence that comprises the bedrock aquifer system of the Taconic Mountain region of southwestern Vermont and adjacent New York State. Variability in groundwater As concentrations provides the impetus for this study: 25% of wells in weakly metamorphosed shales and slates (study and previous research indicates that depletion of As from metapelites tends to occur once the rocks reach upper chlorite zone or lower biotite zone, corresponding to metamorphic temperatures of ~250-350 °C. This suggests that, in the absence of subsequent hydrothermal mineralization (e.g. arsenopyrite in late-stage veins), metapelites metamorphosed to upper chlorite zone or higher will be less likely to foster elevated As in groundwater compared to their lower-grade shale and slate counterparts.

  19. Groundwater stress and vulnerability in rural coastal aquifers under competing demands: a case study from Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Jayasekera, Dumindu L; Kaluarachchi, Jagath J; Villholth, Karen G

    2011-05-01

    Rural coastal aquifers are undergoing rapid changes due to increasing population, high water demand with expanding agricultural and domestic uses, and seawater intrusion due to unmanaged water pumping. The combined impact of these activities is the deterioration of groundwater quality, public health concerns, and unsustainable water demands. The Kalpitiya peninsula located northwest of Sri Lanka is one area undergoing such changes. This land area is limited and surrounded almost completely by sea and lagoon. This study consists of groundwater sampling and analysis, and vulnerability assessment using the DRASTIC method. The results reveal that the peninsula is experiencing multiple threats due to population growth, seawater intrusion, land use exploitation for intensive agriculture, groundwater vulnerability from agricultural and domestic uses, and potential public health impacts. Results show that nitrate is a prevalent and serious contaminant occurring in large concentrations (up to 128 mg/l NO(3)-N), while salinity from seawater intrusion produces high chloride content (up to 471 mg/l), affecting freshwater sources. High nitrate levels may have already affected public health based on limited sampling for methemoglobin. The two main sources of nitrogen loadings in the area are fertilizer and human excreta. The major source of nitrogen results from the use of fertilizers and poor management of intense agricultural systems where a maximum application rate of up to 11.21 metric tons N/km(2) per season is typical. These findings suggest that management of coastal aquifers requires an integrated approach to address both the prevalence of agriculture as an economic livelihood, and increasing population growth.

  20. Effect of quality of phreatic aquifer water and water upwelling on constructions. A case study of Ouargla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saggaï, Sofiane; Bachi, Oum Elkheir; Saggaï, Ali

    2016-07-01

    In Ouargla's oasis, which is one of urban conglomerations of Algerian Sahara, the exploitation and/or the overexploitation of the deep aquifers of continental intercalary and of complex terminal that contain waters of mediocre quality (salty and hot), and the rejection of waters of drainage, urban residual waters and non-treated industrial waters are responsible, at the same time, of the degradation of the quality of waters of the groundwater and its upwelling. This situation has led to: (i) the deterioration of the environment and (ii) the deterioration of constructions (houses, roads, etc…). The present paper consists in giving in detail the causes of the water upwelling of phreatic aquifers in our regions, the quality of water of this aquifer and the influence of the quality of phreatic aquifer water on environment and constructions in Ouargla city by analyzing water samples of 10 points of this town.

  1. Groundwater studies: principal aquifer surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burow, Karen R.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    In 1991, the U.S. Congress established the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to develop nationally consistent long-term datasets and provide information about the quality of the Nation’s streams and groundwater. The USGS uses objective and reliable data, water-quality models, and systematic scientific studies to assess current water-quality conditions, to identify changes in water quality over time, and to determine how natural factors and human activities affect the quality of streams and groundwater. NAWQA is the only non-regulatory Federal program to perform these types of studies; participation is voluntary. In the third decade (Cycle 3) of the NAWQA program (2013–2023), the USGS will evaluate the quality and availability of groundwater for drinking supply, improve our understanding of where and why water quality is degraded, and assess how groundwater quality could respond to changes in climate and land use. These goals will be addressed through the implementation of a new monitoring component in Cycle 3: Principal Aquifer Surveys.

  2. Development of a process-oriented vulnerability concept for water travel time in karst aquifers-case study of Tanour and Rasoun springs catchment area.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Ibraheem; Sauter, Martin; Ptak, Thomas; Wiegand, Bettina; Margane, Armin; Toll, Mathias

    2017-04-01

    Key words: Karst aquifer, water travel time, vulnerability assessment, Jordan. The understanding of the groundwater pathways and movement through karst aquifers, and the karst aquifer response to precipitation events especially in the arid to semi-arid areas is fundamental to evaluate pollution risks from point and non-point sources. In spite of the great importance of the karst aquifer for drinking purposes, karst aquifers are highly sensitive to contamination events due to the fast connections between the land-surface and the groundwater (through the karst features) which is makes groundwater quality issues within karst systems very complicated. Within this study, different methods and approaches were developed and applied in order to characterise the karst aquifer system of the Tanour and Rasoun springs (NW-Jordan) and the flow dynamics within the aquifer, and to develop a process-oriented method for vulnerability assessment based on the monitoring of different multi-spatially variable parameters of water travel time in karst aquifer. In general, this study aims to achieve two main objectives: 1. Characterization of the karst aquifer system and flow dynamics. 2. Development of a process-oriented method for vulnerability assessment based on spatially variable parameters of travel time. In order to achieve these aims, different approaches and methods were applied starting from the understanding of the geological and hydrogeological characteristics of the karst aquifer and its vulnerability against pollutants, to using different methods, procedures and monitored parameters in order to determine the water travel time within the aquifer and investigate its response to precipitation event and, finally, with the study of the aquifer response to pollution events. The integrated breakthrough signal obtained from the applied methods and procedures including the using of stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen, the monitoring of multi qualitative and quantitative parameters

  3. Geological exploration for a high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage (HT-ATES) system: a case study from Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterleitner, Gerd; Schütz, Felina; Huenges, Ernst

    2017-04-01

    A collaborative research programme between the German Research Centre for Geoscience, Potsdam (GFZ) and The Research Council of Oman (TRC) is underway, which aims to develop and implement an innovative concept of a sustainable thermally driven cooling system in combination with a HT-ATES in northern Oman. The system will use an absorption chiller for cold supply, which nominally requires water of around 100°C as energy source. Solar collectors will provide this thermal energy and energy surpluses during daytimes will be stored to ensure a continuous operation of the cooling system. An integral part of this project is, therefore, the development of an efficient HT-ATES (100°C), which is based on temporary storage and recovery of thermal energy through hot water injection in subsurface aquifer horizons. Thus, an accurate thermal and fluid flow characterisation of potential reservoir horizons is essential to ensure optimal efficiency of the cooling system. The study area is located in the Al Khwad area, approximately 40 km to the west of Muscat. The area is characterised by a thick Cenozoic mixed carbonate-siliciclastic sedimentary succession, containing at least 3 aquifer horizons. We use a multidisciplinary approach for the initial ATES exploration and development phase, including traditional geological fieldwork dovetailed with virtual outcrop geology, thin-section analyses, geological modelling and reservoir fluid flow forecasting analyses. Our first results indicate two potential storage horizons: (1) a Miocene-aged clastic-dominated alluvial fan system and (2) an Eocene carbonate-dominated sequence. The alluvial fan system is characterised by a more than 300 m thick, coarse-clastic succession of coalesced individual fans. Thermal and hydraulic parameters are favourable for gravel and sandstone intervals but reservoir architecture is complex due to multiple generations of interconnecting fans with highly heterogeneous facies distributions. The Eocene carbonates

  4. The diagnostic plot analysis of artesian aquifers with case studies in Table Mountain Group of South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaobin; Xu, Yongxin; Lin, Lixiang

    2015-05-01

    Parameter estimates of artesian aquifers where piezometric head is above ground level are largely made through free-flowing and recovery tests. The straight-line method proposed by Jacob-Lohman is often used for interpretation of flow rate measured at flowing artesian boreholes. However, the approach fails to interpret the free-flowing test data from two artesian boreholes in the fractured-rock aquifer in Table Mountain Group (TMG) of South Africa. The diagnostic plot method using the reciprocal rate derivative is adapted to evaluate the artesian aquifer properties. The variation of the derivative helps not only identify flow regimes and discern the boundary conditions, but also facilitates conceptualization of the aquifer system and selection of an appropriate model for data interpretation later on. Test data from two free-flowing tests conducted in different sites in TMG are analysed using the diagnostic plot method. Based on the results, conceptual models and appropriate approaches are developed to evaluate the aquifer properties. The advantages and limitations of using the diagnostic plot method on free-flowing test data are discussed.

  5. GPR imaging of a sand dune aquifer: A case study in the niayes ecoregion of Tanma, Senegal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rejiba, F.; Bobée, C.; Maugis, P.; Camerlynck, C.

    2012-06-01

    Local agriculture in Senegal is dependent on truck farming, which is concentrated in the narrow interdunal zone of peat deposits, called "niayes". The viability of the niayes significantly depends on the sand dune aquifer, as a consequence of recent over-pumping. In the present paper, we discuss the ability of GPR to locate the water table, in a highly vegetated interdunal area which includes peat fields, as well as internal dips, which were shown to be complex. Three profiles determined in the interdunal zone have been associated with several boreholes. Analysis of the radargrams clearly shows that 1) the presence of dense vegetation is not a penalising factor; 2) phase inversion in the measured signal could be useful in distinguishing between the presence of a significant water contrast, and that of a strong stratigraphic reflector; 3) in sand dunes, the electromagnetic contrast resulting from a wetting front is likely to be of the same order as that of the water table. The outcome of this study may provide clues to the characterisation and management of water resources in niayes area.

  6. Modeling of nitrate concentration in groundwater using artificial intelligence approach--a case study of Gaza coastal aquifer.

    PubMed

    Alagha, Jawad S; Said, Md Azlin Md; Mogheir, Yunes

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate concentration in groundwater is influenced by complex and interrelated variables, leading to great difficulty during the modeling process. The objectives of this study are (1) to evaluate the performance of two artificial intelligence (AI) techniques, namely artificial neural networks and support vector machine, in modeling groundwater nitrate concentration using scant input data, as well as (2) to assess the effect of data clustering as a pre-modeling technique on the developed models' performance. The AI models were developed using data from 22 municipal wells of the Gaza coastal aquifer in Palestine from 2000 to 2010. Results indicated high simulation performance, with the correlation coefficient and the mean average percentage error of the best model reaching 0.996 and 7 %, respectively. The variables that strongly influenced groundwater nitrate concentration were previous nitrate concentration, groundwater recharge, and on-ground nitrogen load of each land use land cover category in the well's vicinity. The results also demonstrated the merit of performing clustering of input data prior to the application of AI models. With their high performance and simplicity, the developed AI models can be effectively utilized to assess the effects of future management scenarios on groundwater nitrate concentration, leading to more reasonable groundwater resources management and decision-making.

  7. Inferring the interconnections between surface water bodies, tile-drains and an unconfined aquifer-aquitard system: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombani, N.; Di Giuseppe, D.; Faccini, B.; Ferretti, G.; Mastrocicco, M.; Coltorti, M.

    2016-06-01

    Shallow lenses in reclaimed coastal areas are precious sources of freshwater for crop development, but their seasonal behaviour is seldom known in tile-drained fields. In this study, field monitoring and numerical modelling provide a robust conceptual model of these complex environments. Crop and meteorological data are used to implement an unsaturated flow model to reconstruct daily recharge. Groundwater fluxes and salinity, water table elevation, tile-drains' discharge and salinity are used to calibrate a 2D density-dependent numerical model to quantify non-reactive solute transport within the aquifer-aquitard system. Results suggest that lateral fluxes in low hydraulic conductivity sediments are limited, while water table fluctuation is significant. The use of depth-integrated monitoring to calibrate the model results in poor efficiency, while multi-level soil profiles are crucial to define the mixing zone between fresh and brackish groundwater. Measured fluxes and chloride concentrations from tile-drains not fully compare with calculated ones due to preferential flow through cracks.

  8. Mixing of groundwaters with uncertain end-members: case study in the Tepalcingo-Axochiapan aquifer, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Casique, Eric

    2012-05-01

    Groundwater geochemical data from the northern portion of the Tepalcingo-Axochiapan Valley, in the state of Morelos, Mexico, are analyzed to improve the conceptual hydrogeologic model of the region. The geochemical data suggest that the chemical composition of groundwater is the result of a mixing process between two end-members represented by groundwater from an upper aquifer composed of volcanic-sedimentary rocks and groundwater from a lower aquifer composed of carbonate rocks. Analysis of published data demonstrates that the chemical composition of at least one of the end-members varies significantly in time. Mixing ratios are computed, taking into account the uncertainty in identifying end-members and the time variability in their chemical composition, using published methods. Computed mixing ratios suggest there is a significant contribution from the lower aquifer to the water pumped by the wells in the area, which should be taken into account in the conceptual hydrogeologic model of the region.

  9. Numerical evaluation of community-scale aquifer storage, transfer and recovery technology: A case study from coastal Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Jessica L. B.; Hassan, Md. Mahadi; Sultana, Sarmin; Ahmed, Kazi Matin; Robinson, Clare E.

    2016-09-01

    Aquifer storage, transfer and recovery (ASTR) may be an efficient low cost water supply technology for rural coastal communities that experience seasonal freshwater scarcity. The feasibility of ASTR as a water supply alternative is being evaluated in communities in south-western Bangladesh where the shallow aquifers are naturally brackish and severe seasonal freshwater scarcity is compounded by frequent extreme weather events. A numerical variable-density groundwater model, first evaluated against data from an existing community-scale ASTR system, was applied to identify the influence of hydrogeological as well as design and operational parameters on system performance. For community-scale systems, it is a delicate balance to achieve acceptable water quality at the extraction well whilst maintaining a high recovery efficiency (RE) as dispersive mixing can dominate relative to the small size of the injected freshwater plume. For the existing ASTR system configuration used in Bangladesh where the injection head is controlled and the extraction rate is set based on the community water demand, larger aquifer hydraulic conductivity, aquifer depth and injection head improve the water quality (lower total dissolved solids concentration) in the extracted water because of higher injection rates, but the RE is reduced. To support future ASTR system design in similar coastal settings, an improved system configuration was determined and relevant non-dimensional design criteria were identified. Analyses showed that four injection wells distributed around a central single extraction well leads to high RE provided the distance between the injection wells and extraction well is less than half the theoretical radius of the injected freshwater plume. The theoretical plume radius relative to the aquifer dispersivity is also an important design consideration to ensure adequate system performance. The results presented provide valuable insights into the feasibility and design

  10. Evidence of Hydrogeological Connection between the Mountain and Plio-Plistocene Aquifer Systems, Using Pharmaceutical Residual- case study Jericho area/Lower Jordan Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marei, Amer; Schmidt, Natali; Tiehm, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Jericho Oases (-258 m b.s.l) is known through the history for its fertile soil, date trees, and sweet fruits. Groundwater is the only water sources for domestic and agricultural activities, where about 8 MCM/a discharge form three major springs groups, in addition to 20 MCM are taped from 45 shallow boreholes (10-180 m) in the Plio-Plistocene aquifer system. The current and future availability of groundwater of the shallow Plio-Plistocene aquifer system is the key factor for the economical development of agricultural sector, where during the last 10 years around 50 million USD are invested in this sector. Green houses agriculture, and date trees farming become the major groundwater consumers. From the hydrological point view, the study area is part of the eastern Wadi Al Quilt drainage system, where recharge take place along the mountain range in the western part of the catchment area. The shallow aquifer system consists of gravel; sand and silt inter fingering with clay layers. Chalk and chalky limestone formation of Senonian age separate the shallow aquifer from Mountain aquifer which consists of limestone, and dolomite. Both aquifer systems are part from the Eastern Basin where groundwater flows towards the Jordan River-Dead Sea basin. Direct recharge from rainfall to the shallow aquifer system is neglected due to the high evaporation rates, and only about 1 MCM/a of flooding water infiltrate into this aquifer. The hypotheses of this study is an indirect groundwater replenishment take places in certain sites along the N-S-major fault system, and groundwater flow through passages into the Plio-Plistocene aquifer systems. We tried to use pharmaceutical residuals to trace groundwater flow regimes in the Mountain and Plio-Plistocene aquifer system. Twenty eight water samples were collected during the hydrological year 2011 (in March and July) from 19 sampling sites (springs and boreholes). Few samples were collected from Al Bereh waste water treatment plant as well

  11. Can We Mitigate Climate Extremes using Managed Aquifer Recharge: Case Studies California Central Valley and South-Central Arizona, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, B. R.; Reedy, R. C.; Faunt, C. C.; Pool, D. R.; Uhlman, K.

    2015-12-01

    Frequent long-term droughts interspersed with intense floods in the southwestern U.S. underscore the need to store more water to manage these climate extremes. Here we show how managed aquifer recharge can enhance drought resilience in the southwestern U.S. with ~ 70% of California under extreme drought and 75% of Arizona under moderate drought. Data on water sources, transportation, and users were compiled for managed aquifer recharge systems in the Central Valley and south-central Arizona. Groundwater depletion of 115 to 145 km3 in the 1900s created large subsurface reservoirs in thick alluvial basins in these regions. Large canals and aqueducts up to several 100 km long allow water to be imported from reservoirs, mostly in more humid regions. Imported water is either used instead of groundwater or is applied in surface spreading basins primarily during wet periods (≤1.3 km3/yr Central Valley, ≤0.7 km3/yr Arizona) and is extracted during droughts. The dominant water users include irrigators and municipalities both within and outside the managed aquifer recharge systems. Groundwater modeling indicates that recharge basins significantly increase groundwater storage in the Central Valley. Managed aquifer recharge systems significantly enhance drought resilience and increase sustainability of water resources in semiarid regions, complementing surface water reservoirs and conjunctive surface water/groundwater use by providing longer term storage.

  12. Designing a multiscale experimental sampling system for quantification of stream-aquifer water exchanges - the Orgeval basin case study (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouhri, A.; Flipo, N.; Rejiba, F.; Durand, V.; Tallec, G.; Kurtulus, B.

    2011-12-01

    With an area of 104 km2, the Orgeval experimental basin is located 70 km east from Paris. It drains a multi-layer aquifer system, which is composed of two main geological formations: the Oligocene and the Eocene. These two aquifer units are separated by a clayey aquitard. Most of the basin is covered with table-land loess about 2-5m in thickness. These unconsolidated deposits are essentially composed of sand and loam lenses of low permeability. The aim of this work is to understand the water exchanges between the streams and the aquifers at both the basin and the hyporheic zone scales. Some preliminary head observations lead to assume that the downstream part of the river is flowing into the aquifer, contrary to the upstream part where the exchange relationships seem more classical. To investigate this issue, we focus in this presentation on the design of a multiscale experimental sampling system. First of all the basin scale was investigated. The underground structure of the basin was defined using the 1/50 000 geological map coupled with extensive geophysical investigations. Those surveys, which include extensive TDEM (Time Domain ElectroMagnetic) soundings and ERT (Electrical Resistivity Tomography) measurements, have been performed in order to improve the description of the near surface geology associated with likely connections between the stream network and the two different aquifers. The geophysical investigations validate the fact that the land loess are connected to the Oligocene limestones to compose the upper aquifer unit of the basin, so called Oligocene. Based on three snapshot campaigns where piezometric head were measured in around 50 wells distributed in the basin, piezometric head maps representative of low, medium and high water were interpolated. The sensitivity of these maps to the interpolation technique (ANFIS or Kriging using different digital elevation models as an external drift) was also investigated. This step allowed for defining the

  13. Water quality assessment of carbonate aquifers in southern Latium region, Central Italy: a case study for irrigation and drinking purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sappa, Giuseppe; Ergul, Sibel; Ferranti, Flavia

    2014-06-01

    In southern Latium region, Central Italy, groundwater and spring water resources in the carbonate aquifers are the major contributors of drinking and irrigation water supply. The aim of this study was to review hydrochemical processes that control the groundwater chemistry and to determine the suitability of springs and groundwater for irrigation and drinking purposes on the basis of the water quality indices. Physical (pH, electrical conductivity, total dissolved solids) and hydrochemical characteristics (Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, HCO3 -, Cl-, and SO4 -) of springs and groundwater were determined. To assess the water quality, chemical parameters like sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), total hardness, Mg-hazard (MH), sodium percentage (Na %), salinity hazard, permeability index, and Kelly's ratio were calculated based on the analytical results. A Durov diagram plot revealed that the groundwater has been evolved from Ca to HCO3 recharge water, followed by mixing and reverse ion exchange processes, due to the respective dominance of Na-Cl and Ca-Cl water types. According to Gibbs's diagram plots, chemical weathering of rock forming minerals is the major driving force controlling water chemistry in this area. Groundwater and spring samples were grouped into six categories according to irrigation water quality assessment diagram of US Salinity Laboratory classification and most of the water samples distributed in category C2-S1 and C3-S1 highlighting medium to high salinity hazard and low sodium content class. The results of hydrochemical analyses and the calculated water quality parameters suggest that most of the water samples are suitable for irrigation and drinking purposes, except for the samples influenced by seawater and enhanced water-rock interaction. High values of salinity, Na %, SAR, and MH at certain sites, restrict the suitability for agricultural uses.

  14. Effects of reduction in porosity and permeability with depth on storage capacity and injectivity in deep saline aquifers: A case study from the Mount Simon Sandstone aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Medina, C.R.; Rupp, J.A.; Barnes, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Upper Cambrian Mount Simon Sandstone is recognized as a deep saline reservoir that has significant potential for geological sequestration in the Midwestern region of the United States. Porosity and permeability values collected from core analyses in rocks from this formation and its lateral equivalents in Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, and Ohio indicate a predictable relationship with depth owing to a reduction in the pore structure due to the effects of compaction and/or cementation, primarily as quartz overgrowths. The regional trend of decreasing porosity with depth is described by the equation: ??(d)=16.36??e-0.00039*d, where ?? is the porosity and d is the depth in m. The decrease of porosity with depth generally holds true on a basinwide scale. Bearing in mind local variations in lithologic and petrophysical character within the Mount Simon Sandstone, the source data that were used to predict porosity were utilized to estimate the pore volume available within the reservoir that could potentially serve as storage space for injected CO2. The potential storage capacity estimated for the Mount Simon Sandstone in the study area, using efficiency factors of 1%, 5%, 10%, and 15%, is 23,680, 118,418, 236,832, and 355,242 million metric tons of CO2, respectively. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Identification of aquifer potential by using resistivity method: A case study in Kedawung and Sambirejo district, Sragen, Central Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darsono; Legowo, B.; Koesuma, S.

    2016-11-01

    It has been done geophysics survey by using resistivity method with Schlumberger configuration in Sambirejo and Kedawung subdistrict, Sragen regency, Indonesia. This research aims to identification of aquifer potential in those area. Totally there are 22 site surveys where 11 sites located in Sambirejo and 11 sites located in Kedawung subdistrict. Data collection was performed by using Resistvitymeter OYO McOHM-EL with length of current electrode from 1,5 meter up to 350 meter. Data processing was done by using IP2win software, while cross section was processed using Rockwork software. The result shows that in Sambirejo subdistrict, the aquifer layer consist of clayey sand and sand, While in Kedawung subdistrict, The aquifer layers consist of clayey sand, sand, gravel sand, gravel and breccias. Identification of groundwater potential zones as good and very good category was show that the sounding point was have a huge of groundwater source for in Sambirejo subdistrict is TS2, TS5, TS7, TS8, and TS9, while in Kedawung subdistrict is TS13, TS14, T15, TS16,TS17,TS18, TS19, TS20, TS21 dan TS22, respectively.

  16. Analytical Versus Numerical Estimates of Water-Level Declines Caused by Pumping, and a Case Study of the Iao Aquifer, Maui, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oki, Delwyn S.; Meyer, William

    2001-01-01

    Comparisons were made between model-calculated water levels from a one-dimensional analytical model referred to as RAM (Robust Analytical Model) and those from numerical ground-water flow models using a sharp-interface model code. RAM incorporates the horizontal-flow assumption and the Ghyben-Herzberg relation to represent flow in a one-dimensional unconfined aquifer that contains a body of freshwater floating on denser saltwater. RAM does not account for the presence of a low-permeability coastal confining unit (caprock), which impedes the discharge of fresh ground water from the aquifer to the ocean, nor for the spatial distribution of ground-water withdrawals from wells, which is significant because water-level declines are greatest in the vicinity of withdrawal wells. Numerical ground-water flow models can readily account for discharge through a coastal confining unit and for the spatial distribution of ground-water withdrawals from wells. For a given aquifer hydraulic-conductivity value, recharge rate, and withdrawal rate, model-calculated steady-state water-level declines from RAM can be significantly less than those from numerical ground-water flow models. The differences between model-calculated water-level declines from RAM and those from numerical models are partly dependent on the hydraulic properties of the aquifer system and the spatial distribution of ground-water withdrawals from wells. RAM invariably predicts the greatest water-level declines at the inland extent of the aquifer where the freshwater body is thickest and the potential for saltwater intrusion is lowest. For cases in which a low-permeability confining unit overlies the aquifer near the coast, however, water-level declines calculated from numerical models may exceed those from RAM even at the inland extent of the aquifer. Since 1990, RAM has been used by the State of Hawaii Commission on Water Resource Management for establishing sustainable-yield values for the State?s aquifers. Data

  17. Response to Comment by H. Lough, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand, on the Paper " Stream Depletion Predictions using Pumping Test Data from A Heterogeneous Stream-Aquifer System (A Case Study from the Gr

    SciTech Connect

    Kollet, S J; Zlotnik, V A

    2004-12-20

    We thank H. Lough for her interest in our data set and the attempt to re-analyze our results (Kollet and Zlotnik, 2003) using the recent model by Hunt (2003). We welcome others to share our unique data set of the pumping test from the Prairie Creek site, Nebraska, USA. Nevertheless we believe that this particular attempt failed, because H. Lough selected a wrong model of semi-confined aquifer conditions for the interpretation of the pumping test data, which was collected in an unconfined aquifer. H. Lough based her selection on the three distinct drawdown segments observed during the test. It is well known that geologically distinct aquifers can yield a three-segment drawdown response under pumping conditions (e.g., Streltsova, 1988). Examples include unconfined aquifers (e.g., Neuman, 1972; Moench, 1997), aquifers with double porosity or fractures (e.g., Barenblatt et al., 1960; Boulton and Streltsova-Adams, 1978), and (semi-) confined aquifers in contact with aquitards (e.g. Cooley and Case, 1973; Moench, 1985). At the Prairie Creek site the aquifer is unconfined. The interpretation of the pumping test data collected at the site using type curves that are valid for an aquifer-aquitard system is a mistake. In fact, this approach illustrates a typical problem associated with inverse modeling: drastically different models can closely reproduce a system response and yield some parameter estimates, although the models do not represent the real system adequately. Here, the improper model yields some parameter estimates for an aquitard, although the aquitard does not exist at the Prairie Creek test site. We must also unequivocally state that the model by Hunt (2003) is clearly formulated and correct for stream-aquifer-aquitard systems within the stated limitations (pumping wells screened only in the lowest stratigraphic layer, etc.). However, the Hunt (1999) or BZT (Butler et al., 2001) models should be used for interpreting pumping tests near streams in non

  18. Case study for delineating a contributing area to a water-supply well in a fractured crystalline-bedrock aquifer, Stewartstown, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barton, Gary J.; Risser, Dennis W.; Galeone, Daniel G.; Conger, Randall W.

    1999-01-01

    The Trouts Lane well field in Stewartstown, Pa., was selected as a case study for delineating a contributing area in a fractured crystalline-bedrock aquifer. The study emphasized the importance of refining the understanding of boundary conditions and major heterogeneities that affect ground-water movement to the supply well by conducting (1) fracture-trace mapping, (2) borehole logging and flow measurements, (3) ground-water level monitoring, (4) aquifer testing, and (5) geochemical sampling. Methods and approach used in this study could be applicable for other wells in crystalline-bedrock terranes in southeastern Pennsylvania. Methods of primary importance for refining the understanding of hydrology at the Trouts Lane well field were the aquifer tests, water-level measurements, and geophysical logging. Results from the constant-discharge aquifer test helped identify a major north-south trending hydraulic connection between supply well SW6 and a domestic-supply well. Aquifer-test results also indicated fractures that transmit most water to the supply well are hydraulically well-connected to the shallow regolith and highly weathered schist. Results from slug tests provided estimates of transmissivity and the nonuniform distribution of transmissivity throughout the well field, indicating the water-producing fractures are not evenly distributed and ground-water velocities must vary considerably throughout the well field.Water levels, which were easy to measure, provided additional evidence of hydraulic connections among wells. More importantly, they allowed the water-table configuration to be mapped. Borehole geophysics and flow measurements within the well were very useful because results indicated water entered supply well SW6 through bedrock fractures at very shallow depths?less than 60 ft below land surface; therefore, the area providing recharge to the well is probably in the immediate vicinity. Preliminary delineations of the contributing area and the 90-day

  19. Characterizing and Modelling Preferential Flow Path in Fractured Rock Aquifer: A Case Study at Shuangliou Fractured Rock Hydrogeology Research Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Shih-Meng; Ke, Chien-Chung; Lo, Hung-Chieh; Lin, Yen-Tsu; Huang, Chi-Chao

    2016-04-01

    On the basis of a relatively sparse data set, fractured aquifers are difficult to be characterized and modelled. The three-dimensional configuration of transmissive fractures and fracture zones is needed to be understood flow heterogeneity in the aquifer. Innovative technologies for the improved interpretation are necessary to facilitate the development of accurate predictive models of ground-water flow and solute transport or to precisely estimate groundwater potential. To this end, this paper presents a procedure for characterizing and modelling preferential flow path in the fractured rock aquifer carried out at Fractured Rock Hydrogeology Research Site in Shuangliou Forest Recreation Area, Pingtung County, Southern Taiwan. The Shuangliou well field is a 40 by 30-meter area consisting of 6 wells (one geological well, one pumping well and four hydrogeological testing wells). The bedrock at the site is mainly composed of slate and intercalated by meta-sandstone. The overburden consists of about 5.6 m of gravel deposits. Based on results of 100 m geological borehole with borehole televiewer logging, vertical flow logging and full-wave sonic logging, high transmissivity zones in the bedrock underlying the well field were identified. One of transmissivity zone (at the depths of 30~32 m) and its fracture orientation(N56/54) selected for devising a multiple well system with 4 boreholes (borehole depths :45m, 35m, 35m and 25m, respectively), which were utilized to perform cross-borehole flow velocity data under the ambient flow and pumped flow conditions to identify preferential flow paths. Results from the cross-borehole test show the preferential flow pathways are corresponding to the predicted ones. Subsequently, a 3-D discrete fracture network model based on outcrop data was generated by the FracMan code. A validation between observed and simulated data has proved that the present model can accurately predict the hydrogeological properties (e.g., number of fractures

  20. The problem of sustainable groundwater management: the case of La Mancha aquifers, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, Encarna; Albiac, José

    2012-08-01

    Gisser and Sánchez (Water Resour Res 16(4):638-642, 1980) compared two different strategies to manage aquifers: "free market" and policy regulation. They stated that the outcome of both is practically the same, and that policy regulation could not improve social welfare. This study challenges this argument by analyzing the management strategies in two large aquifers located in southern Spain, the Eastern La Mancha and the Western La Mancha aquifers. The appeal of this case stems from the fact that management of the Eastern La Mancha aquifer is almost sustainable. In stark contrast, its neighboring Western La Mancha aquifer is being grossly mismanaged. The results engage two major questions from previous groundwater literature. The first question is whether or not aquifer management requires policy intervention. The answer depends upon the consideration and magnitude of environmental damages in the model. The second question addresses the nature of groundwater policies. The contrast in management outcomes between the Western and the Eastern La Mancha aquifers is related to the different types of policy instruments implemented for each aquifer. The results of these policies underline the importance of nurturing the stakeholders' collective action under the appropriate institutional setting.

  1. Integrated characterization of groundwater contamination in an alluvial system. Case study of Allier alluvial aquifer (Massif Central, France).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Nabaz; Celle-Jeanton, Hélène; Batisson, Isabelle; Bardot, Corinne; Colombet, Jonathan; Huneau, Frédéric; Le Coustumer, Philippe; Clauzet, Marie-Laure; Lavastre, Véronique

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogeology is an intrinsically multi-disciplinary field because of the critical role water plays in both human health and natural ecosystems. The NAA (Nappe Alluviale de l'Allier) project proposes an integrated research (hydrodynamic, hydrochemistry and biology) on the shallow aquifer of the Allier River (one of the main tributaries of the Loire River). This aquifer plays an important role in the regional water supply for it represents more than 60% of the total water abstraction. As an example, the sampling site, located near the city of Clermont-Ferrand (France) constitutes the major source of drinking water supply for more than 100 000 inhabitants and then plays a major role on the local socio-economy. A biweekly following sampling, that concerns hydrodynamical parameters, major ions and isotopes (oxygen-18, deuterium and carbon-13), has been achieved during two years on 2 rivers, 1 pond, 2 springs and 17 boreholes with the aim of defining the functioning of the aquifer in terms of quality and quantity of the water resources and then on the main processes that governs hydrodynamic and hydrochemistry. Preliminary results allowed discriminating different origins of groundwater with a part due to surface waters/groundwater interactions and a secondary origin that implies water circulating from the surrounding hills. A monthly following sampling of pesticides, pharmaceuticals and traces ions provides information on contaminants sources. In parallel, the dynamics of the microbial communities (bacteria, pico-cyanobacteria and pico-eukaryotes) was followed by flow cytometer. The bacterial diversity has been measured through PCR-DGGE analysis in order to evaluate the impact of the occurrence of contaminants.

  2. STUDY OF THE ARBUCKLE-SIMPSON AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study directed by the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and funded by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation will investigate the hydrogeology of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer in south-central Oklahoma. The five year study will involve field investigations including the installation of ne...

  3. Characterization of a karstic aquifer using magnetic resonance sounding and electrical resistivity tomography: a case-study of Estaña Lakes (northern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Bielsa, Cristina; Lambán, Luis J.; Plata, Juan L.; Rubio, Félix M.; Soto, Ruth

    2012-09-01

    The geophysical characterization of a previously unstudied endorheic karstic system is presented. The studied area, known as the Estaña Lakes, is located in the Pyrenean Marginal Sierras, northern Spain. The Estaña Lakes are a set of natural water ponds on a bedrock of Triassic evaporites, lutites and carbonates. This wetland is included in the Natura 2000 European network of nature protection areas as a "Site of Community Importance". Two geophysical techniques were used, magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), to map the subsurface geology and characterize the aquifer layers and the hydraulic links between the aquifers and lakes. The geophysical data were integrated with the surface geology and data from six boreholes. Ten electrical profiles were performed to identify the thickness of the units and lithological changes, whereas the MRS was used to determine the top of the saturated zone. As result, the aquifer in the Estaña Lakes system and surrounding area has been identified as Middle Triassic carbonates, which does not correspond with the regional aquifer in the area (Upper Cretaceous and Eocene). This work shows the power of geophysical methods in poorly understood and tectonically complex areas in addition to the standard aquifer tests to evaluate hydraulic properties.

  4. A new artificial recharge approach using direct push wells for aquifer storage and recovery in near-surface aquifers: A case study in the Lower Republican River basin, Kansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G.; Knobbe, S.; Reboulet, E. C.; Whittemore, D. O.; Händel, F.; Butler, J. J., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is the artificial recharge and temporary storage of water in an aquifer when water is abundant, and recovery of all or a portion of that water when it is needed. In recent years, interest in ASR has increased due to various concerns such as declining groundwater resources, vulnerability of surface water supplies to contamination and reservoir sedimentation, and unfavorable projections of future climate change. In this study, we evaluate a new recharge method for ASR in near-surface unconsolidated aquifers using small-diameter, low-cost wells installed with direct-push (DP) technology. The effectiveness of a DP well for ASR was compared with a surface infiltration basin at a field site in the Lower Republic River basin, north-central Kansas. Initial DP-based characterization of the shallow, unconsolidated subsurface indicates that both the vadose and saturated zones have many low permeability silt and clay layers constraining vertical flow. The performance of the surface basin as a recharge approach was poor at the test site due to the presence of a continuous clay layer at a depth of 1.5 to 3 m, which prevented the downward movement of infiltrated water and significantly reduced the recharge capacity of the basin. The DP well, on the other hand, penetrated through this clay layer and was able to recharge water at a much higher rate without use of a pump (water moved by gravity alone). Most importantly, the costs of the DP well, including both the construction and land costs, were only a small fraction of those for the infiltration basin. The low cost of DP wells can significantly expand the applicability of ASR as a water resources management tool to regions with limited resources, such as many small municipalities and rural communities. Our field results have clearly demonstrated the great potential of DP wells as a new recharge option for ASR projects in near-surface unconsolidated aquifers.

  5. Use of treated wastewater for managed aquifer recharge in highly populated urban centers: a case study in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abiye, Tamiru Alemayehu; Sulieman, Hameed; Ayalew, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Fast population growth and rapid industrialization, on one hand, and lack of sewerage network and poor living condition, on the other, have led to the deterioration of surface and ground water quality in the city of Addis Ababa. The urban wastewater is discharged largely into streams that drain the city. Only less than 3% join the wastewater treatment facilities. Due to sporadic rainfall that causes shortage in groundwater recharge, managed aquifer recharge (MAR) experiment was tested on soil column collected from Akaki Well Field which is located in the southern part of the city using water from the Big Akaki River that crosses the same well field and effluent from Kaliti Wastewater Treatment Plant. Water quality analysis for 17 different parameters was done for both the inflow and outflow water samples and soils were tested for electrical conductivity and cation exchange capacity. The results indicate improved water quality as a result of higher attenuation/filtration capacity of the vadose zone in the well field due to the presence of vertisols. The main geochemical processes that have acted in the soil column could be cation exchange, dissolution, precipitation, oxidation, nitrification, die off etc. that are responsible for the effectiveness of vadose zone for MAR.

  6. Carbonate aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Sukop, Michael; Curran, H. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Only limited hydrogeological research has been conducted using ichnology in carbonate aquifer characterization. Regardless, important applications of ichnology to carbonate aquifer characterization include its use to distinguish and delineate depositional cycles, correlate mappable biogenically altered surfaces, identify zones of preferential groundwater flow and paleogroundwater flow, and better understand the origin of ichnofabric-related karst features. Three case studies, which include Pleistocene carbonate rocks of the Biscayne aquifer in southern Florida and Cretaceous carbonate strata of the Edwards–Trinity aquifer system in central Texas, demonstrate that (1) there can be a strong relation between ichnofabrics and groundwater flow in carbonate aquifers and (2) ichnology can offer a useful methodology for carbonate aquifer characterization. In these examples, zones of extremely permeable, ichnofabric-related macroporosity are mappable stratiform geobodies and as such can be represented in groundwater flow and transport simulations.

  7. Assessment of aquifer vulnerability based on GIS and DRASTIC methods: a case study of the Senirkent-Uluborlu Basin (Isparta, Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sener, Erhan; Sener, Sehnaz; Davraz, Aysen

    2009-12-01

    Aquifer vulnerability has been assessed in the Senirkent-Uluborlu Basin within the Egirdir Lake catchment (Turkey) using the DRASTIC method, based on a geographic information system (GIS). There is widespread agriculture in the basin, and fertilizer (nitrate) and pesticide applications have caused groundwater contamination as a result of leaching. According to hydrogeological data from the study area, surface water and groundwater flow are towards Egirdir Lake. Hence, aquifer vulnerability in the basin should be determined by water quality in Egirdir Lake. DRASTIC layers were prepared using data such as rainfall, groundwater level, aquifer type, and hydraulic conductivity. These data were obtained from hydrogeological investigations and literature. A regional-scale aquifer-vulnerability map of the basin was prepared using overlay analysis with the aid of GIS. A DRASTIC vulnerability map, verified by nitrate in groundwater data, shows that the defined areas are compatible with land-use data. It is concluded that 20.8% of the basin area is highly vulnerable and urgent pollution-preventions measures should be taken for every kind of relevant activity within the whole basin.

  8. A multi-method approach for groundwater resource assessment in coastal carbonate (karst) aquifers: the case study of Sierra Almijara (southern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreo, B.; Barberá, J. A.; Mudarra, M.; Marín, A. I.; García-Orellana, J.; Rodellas, V.; Pérez, I.

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the transference of water resources within hydrogeological systems, particularly in coastal aquifers, in which groundwater discharge may occur through multiple pathways (through springs, into rivers and streams, towards the sea, etc.), is crucial for sustainable groundwater use. This research aims to demonstrate the usefulness of the application of conventional recharge assessment methods coupled to isotopic techniques for accurately quantifying the hydrogeological balance and submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) from coastal carbonate aquifers. Sierra Almijara (Southern Spain), a carbonate aquifer formed of Triassic marbles, is considered as representative of Mediterranean coastal karst formations. The use of a multi-method approach has permitted the computation of a wide range of groundwater infiltration rates (17-60%) by means of direct application of hydrometeorological methods (Thornthwaite and Kessler) and spatially distributed information (modified APLIS method). A spatially weighted recharge rate of 42% results from the most coherent information on physiographic and hydrogeological characteristics of the studied system. Natural aquifer discharge and groundwater abstraction have been volumetrically quantified, based on flow and water-level data, while the relevance of SGD was estimated from the spatial analysis of salinity, 222Rn and the short-lived radium isotope 224Ra in coastal seawater. The total mean aquifer discharge (44.9-45.9 hm3 year-1) is in agreement with the average recharged groundwater (44.7 hm3 year-1), given that the system is volumetrically equilibrated during the study period. Besides the groundwater resources assessment, the methodological aspects of this research may be interesting for groundwater management and protection strategies in coastal areas, particularly karst environments.

  9. Declining water budget in a deep regional aquifer assessed by geostatistical simulations of stable isotopes: Case study of the Saharan "Continental Intercalaire"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalvès, Julio; Vallet-Coulomb, Christine; Petersen, Jade; Hamelin, Bruno; Deschamps, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    The stable isotopes of water were used to improve the determination of the groundwater budget of the deep Saharan "Continental Intercalaire" (CI), a deep confined aquifer. Mixing processes between the CI and shallower aquifers have been described in several regional studies over the last few decades, based on observed isotopic differences between local water masses. Here, we improve the quantitative determination of the discharge flux of this aquifer in one of its main outlet regions, the Djeffara plain in Tunisia, based on geostatistics and a simple mass balance mixing model, applied before and after the beginning of extensive pumping in the 1970s. First, the average values of δ18O and δ2H were precisely documented in the mixing zone between CI water and the local recharge, based on conditional simulations using spatially distributed isotopic data. Together with the available estimate of local recharge and conservative hypotheses on the isotopic end-members, we estimate the discharge flux of the CI in the Djeffara plain at 1.78 ± 1.03 m3 s-1 in 1970, probably near natural steady-state, reduced to 1.02 ± 0.58 m3 s-1 in 2004 under strong anthropogenic pressure, related to the drastic increase in pumping rates in the deep CI aquifer during this period. Considering the general groundwater budget over the entire CI aquifer, we estimate a recharge value of 5.13 m3 s-1, or 6.5 mm yr-1 over the 25,000 km2 of recharge area in the Saharan Atlas. This value is in line with the evaluation of 2.1 mm yr-1 obtained recently from the GRACE satellite gravity data for the overall outcrops considering that recharge occurs mostly in the Atlas region.

  10. Basin-fill Aquifer Modeling with Terrestrial Gravity: Assessing Static Offsets in Bulk Datasets using MATLAB; Case Study of Bridgeport, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlawsky, E. T.; Louie, J. N.; Pohll, G.; Carlson, C. W.; Blakely, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the potential availability of water resources in Eastern California aquifers is of critical importance to making water management policy decisions and determining best-use practices for California, as well as for downstream use in Nevada. Hydrologic well log data can provide valuable information on aquifer capacity, but is often proprietarily inaccessible or economically unfeasible to obtain in sufficient quantity. In the case of basin-fill aquifers, it is possible to make estimates of aquifer geometry and volume using geophysical surveys of gravity, constrained by additional geophysical and geological observations. We use terrestrial gravity data to model depth-to-basement about the Bridgeport, CA basin for application in preserving the Walker Lake biome. In constructing the model, we assess several hundred gravity observations, existing and newly collected. We regard these datasets as "bulk," as the data are compiled from multiple sources. Inconsistencies among datasets can result in "static offsets," or artificial bull's-eye contours, within the gradient. Amending suspect offsets requires the attention of the modeler; picking these offsets by hand can be a time-consuming process when modeling large-scale basin features. We develop a MATLAB script for interpolating the residual Bouguer anomaly about the basin using sparse observation points, and leveling offset points with a user-defined sensitivity. The script is also capable of plotting gravity profiles between any two endpoints within the map extent. The resulting anomaly map provides an efficient means of locating and removing static offsets in the data, while also providing a fast visual representation of a bulk dataset. Additionally, we obtain gridded basin gravity models with an open-source alternative to proprietary modeling tools.

  11. Can we simulate regional groundwater flow in a karst system using equivalent porous media models? Case study, Barton Springs Edwards aquifer, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Bridget R.; Mace, Robert E.; Barrett, Michael E.; Smith, Brian

    2003-05-01

    Various approaches can be used to simulate groundwater flow in karst systems, including equivalent porous media distributed parameter, lumped parameter, and dual porosity approaches, as well as discrete fracture or conduit approaches. The purpose of this study was to evaluate two different equivalent porous media approaches: lumped and distributed parameter, for simulating regional groundwater flow in a karst aquifer and to evaluate the adequacy of these approaches. The models were applied to the Barton Springs Edwards aquifer, Texas. Unique aspects of this study include availability of detailed information on recharge from stream-loss studies and on synoptic water levels, long-term continuous water level monitoring in wells throughout the aquifer, and spring discharge data to compare with simulation results. The MODFLOW code was used for the distributed parameter model. Estimation of hydraulic conductivity distribution was optimized by using a combination of trial and error and automated inverse methods. The lumped parameter model consists of five cells representing each of the watersheds contributing recharge to the aquifer. Transient simulations were conducted using both distributed and lumped parameter models for a 10-yr period (1989-1998). Both distributed and lumped parameter models fairly accurately simulated the temporal variability in spring discharge; therefore, if the objective of the model is to simulate spring discharge, either distributed or lumped parameter approaches can be used. The distributed parameter model generally reproduced the potentiometric surface at different times. The impact of the amount of pumping on a regional scale on spring discharge can be evaluated using a lumped parameter model; however, more detailed evaluation of the effect of pumping on groundwater levels and spring discharge requires a distributed parameter modeling approach. Sensitivity analyses indicated that spring discharge was much more sensitive to variations in

  12. Improved regional groundwater flow modeling using drainage features: a case study of the central northern karst aquifer system of Puerto Rico (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemizadeh, Reza; Yu, Xue; Butscher, Christoph; Padilla, Ingrid Y.; Alshawabkeh, Akram

    2016-09-01

    In northern Puerto Rico (USA), subsurface conduit networks with unknown characteristics, and surface features such as springs, rivers, lagoons and wetlands, drain the coastal karst aquifers. In this study, drain lines connecting sinkholes and springs are used to improve the developed regional model by simulating the drainage effects of conduit networks. Implemented in an equivalent porous media (EPM) approach, the model with drains is able to roughly reproduce the spring discharge hydrographs in response to rainfall. Hydraulic conductivities are found to be scale dependent and significantly increase with higher test radius, indicating scale dependency of the EPM approach. Similar to other karst regions in the world, hydraulic gradients are steeper where the transmissivity is lower approaching the coastline. This study enhances current understanding of the complex flow patterns in karst aquifers and suggests that using a drainage feature improves modeling results where available data on conduit characteristics are minimal.

  13. A new approach for the assessment of groundwater quality and its suitability for irrigation: a case study of the Korba Coastal Aquifer (Tunisia, Africa).

    PubMed

    El Ayni, Foued; Cherif, Semia; Jrad, Amel; Trabelsi-Ayadi, Malika

    2012-08-01

    Groundwater is the main source of water in Mediterranean, water-scarce, semiarid regions of Tunisia, Africa. In this study of the Korba coastal aquifer, 17 water wells were studied to assess their suitability for irrigation and drinking purposes. Assessment parameters include pH, salinity, specific ion toxicity, sodium adsorption ratio, nutrients, trace metals pollutants, and fecal indicators and pathogens. Results indicate that salinity of groundwater varied between 0.36 dS/m and 17.4 dS/m; in addition, its degree of restriction is defined as "none", "slight to moderate", and "severe" for 18, 23, and 59% of the studied wells, respectively. To control salts brought in by irrigation waters, the question arises as to how much water should be used to reach crop and soil requirements. To answer this question, a new approach that calculates the optimum amount of irrigation water considering the electrical conductivity of well water (ECw), field crops, and the semiarid meteorological local conditions for evapotranspiration and rainfall is developed. This is applied to the authors' case study area; barley and lettuce were selected among the commonly grown crops because they are high- and low-salinity tolerant, respectively. Leaching requirements were found to be independent of the crop selected, and depend only on the season, that is, 250 to 260 mm/month in the driest season, with a minimum of 47 mm/month though all seasons. A high bacteriological contamination appears in almost all samples. However, if disinfected and corrected for pH, all the well waters can be used for animal farming (including livestock and poultry), although only 29% could be used for human consumption.

  14. Assessment of the groundwater chemistry of a complex aquifer system in the context of urbanization in Sub-Saharan Africa: case study in semiarid southwest Niger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubakar Hassane, A.; Favreau, G.; Leduc, C.; Ousmane, B.; Soumaila, A.

    2010-12-01

    The groundwater chemistry in the local vicinity of the city of Niamey was investigated in order to identify the origin of the groundwater mineralization and, in particular, to elucidate the impact of urbanization on the groundwater resources. Sources of pollution of concern in the urban area are solid waste and material deposited on the ground and latrines. Contaminants from these sources are mobilized and transported by recharge and lixiviation from rising groundwater levels. Piezometric data monitoring at 70 sites was conducted monthly from March 2004 to February 2005 to evaluate the seasonal variability of groundwater levels. Groundwater samples for chemical data were collected from the major aquifers in 74 dug wells, 14 boreholes and 1 spring for 2 years (232 samples in 4 campaigns). Data were also compiled from previous studies on groundwater, rain water, surface waters, latrines and soils. Geochemical data (major ions) are used to define groundwater groups, to map their distribution in the study area, and to evaluate their origin. We combined multivariate statistical methods, scatter diagrams, ionic ratios, and Piper diagrams to decipher the processes affecting the water chemistry at large (Niamey) and local (wells) scale. The piezometric time series revealed seasonal variability in all wells indicating that the study area is a recharge zone, which enhances the transfer of contaminants from the surface. The geochemical monitoring revealed high spatial and temporal variability in chemical parameters. Processes controlling the groundwater chemistry at large scales in the aquifers include atmospheric inputs (rainfall and dust) in the poorly mineralized formations, evapotranspiration in the soil layers, and alteration of silicates. Processes specific to individual wells are production of weak acids (H2CO3) and bases (HCO3-) in soil layers near pollutant sources, leaching of ions (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+, NH4+, NO3-, Cl-, HCO3-, SO42-) from pollutants, ion exchange

  15. Geophysical and hydrochemical study of the seawater intrusion in Mediterranean semi arid zones. Case of the Korba coastal aquifer (Cap-Bon, Tunisia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouzana, Lamia; Benassi, Ramdhane; Ben mammou, Abdallah; Sfar felfoul, Mennoubi

    2010-09-01

    Coastal aquifers serve as major sources for freshwater supply in many countries around the world, especially in arid and semi arid zones. The fact that coastal zones contain some of the densely populated areas in the world makes the need for freshwater even more acute. The intensive extraction of groundwater from coastal aquifers reduces freshwater outflow to the sea and creates local water aquifer depression, causing seawater migration inland and rising toward the wells. This phenomenon, called seawater intrusion, has become one of the major constraints imposed on groundwater utilization. As seawater intrusion progresses, existing pumping wells become saline and have to be abandoned. In this paper, we have the results of the seawater intrusion study of the Korba aquifer by the geophysical and hydrochemical methods. In order to locate the zones affected by saltwater intrusion, 38 Vertical electrical sounding (VES) were distributed over the coastal area between Korba and Oued Lebna. The interpretation of these electric soundings using Winsev software, based on mechanical boreholes, carry out iso-resistivity and iso-depth maps of seawater intrusion. The maps of apparent iso-resistivity having different lengths of line and the pseudosections differentiate dry grounds, grounds saturated with fresh water and those saturated with brackish water and saltwater. Mapping of the boundaries between freshwater and saltwater is an ideal application for resistivity surveys because of the high electrical conductivity of the saltwater and its contrast with that of fresh water. The correlation of the different electric surveys allowed realizing geo-electric sections showing the vertical configuration of seawater intrusion. It comes out from this study that saltwater intrusion reached approximately a distance of 3 km inland. The high groundwater salinity anomaly observed in Diar El Hajjej, Garaet Sassi and Takelsa-Korba zones was explained by the presence of seawater intrusion in

  16. Geochemical evolution of groundwater in a basaltic aquifer based on chemical and stable isotopic data: Case study from the Northeastern portion of Serra Geral Aquifer, São Paulo state (Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastmans, Didier; Hutcheon, Ian; Menegário, Amauri Antônio; Chang, Hung Kiang

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater from the fractured basalt Serra Geral Aquifer (SGA) represents an important source for water supply in Northeastern São Paulo state (Brazil). Groundwater flow conditions in fractured aquifers hosted in basaltic rocks are difficult to define because flow occurs through rock discontinuities. The evaluation of hydrodynamic information associated with hydrochemical data has identified geochemical processes related to groundwater evolution, observed in regional flowpaths. SGA groundwaters are characterized by low TDS with pH varying from neutral to alkaline. Two main hydrochemical facies are recognized: Ca-Mg-HCO3, and Na-HCO3 types. Primarily, the geochemical evolution of SGA groundwater occurs under CO2 open conditions, and the continuous uptake of CO2 is responsible for mineral dissolution, producing bicarbonate as the main anion, and calcium and magnesium in groundwater. Ion exchange between smectites (Na and Ca-beidelites) seems to be responsible for the occurrence of Na-HCO3 groundwater. Toward the Rio Grande, in the northern portion of the study area, there is mixing between SGA groundwater and water from the sandstones of the Guarani Aquifer System, as evidenced by the chemical and isotopic composition of the groundwater. Inverse mass balance modeling performed using NETPATH XL produces results in agreement with the dissolution of minerals in basalt (feldspars and pyroxenes) associated with the uptake of atmospheric CO2, as well as the dissolution of clay minerals present in the soil. Kaolinite precipitation occurs due to the incongruent dissolution of feldspars, while Si remains almost constant due to the precipitation of silica. The continuous uptake of CO2 under open conditions leads to calcite precipitation, which in addition to ion exchange are responsible by Ca removal from groundwater and an increase in Na concentrations. Down the flow gradientCO2 is subject to closed conditions where the basalts are covered by the sediments of Bauru Group or

  17. Assessment of hydrochemical processes and groundwater hydrodynamics in a multilayer aquifer system under long-term irrigation condition: A case study of Nefzaoua basin, southern Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Tarki, M; Ben Hammadi, M; El Mejri, H; Dassi, L

    2016-04-01

    The hydrochemical and isotopic investigation of the Nefzaoua aquifer system demonstrates that groundwater mineralization in is controlled by natural and anthropogenic processes including water-rock interaction and irrigation return flow. It identifies all of the water bodies that flow within the aquifer system and their circulation patterns. The isotopically depleted paleowaters, identified within the deep and intermediate aquifers, undergo significant enrichment by evaporation during irrigation and recharged the shallow aquifer by return flow. Subsequently, they infiltrate to the intermediate aquifer which receives also rainfall modern recharge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of CO2 concentration on autotrophic metabolisms and carbon fate in saline aquifers - A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupraz, Sebastien; Fabbri, Antonin; Joulian, Catherine; Dictor, Marie-Christine; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne; Ménez, Bénédicte; Crouzet, Catherine; Henry, Benoît; Garrido, Francis

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and quantify the fate and speciation of carbon that can occur in mixtures of geological media (crushed rock) and autotrophic microbial communities. A sulfate reducing bacterium (Desulfotomaculum geothermicum) and a methanogenic archaeon (Methanothermococcus thermolithotrophicus) were both tested separately and together, with and without crushed sedimentary rock (carbonaceous sandstone) for different CO2 partial pressures (0.22, 0.88, 3.52, and 8 bar) at 54 °C in saline artificial groundwater. In order to quantify the respective metabolic activities, the inorganic gases of interest (H2, CH4, H2S and CO2) were measured and the speciation of carbon was assessed by measuring volatile, non-purgeable, total and dissolved organic carbon as well as total and dissolved inorganic carbon. Despite a protective effect of the mineral matrix, the results showed a high sensitivity of autotrophic microorganisms to the stress induced by pressures of CO2 superior to one bar and revealed that a part of this stress was due to direct toxic effects. M. thermolithotrophicus demonstrated a better tolerance to CO2 and was dominating the consortia. This ascendancy was interpreted as resulting from equilibrium displacement due to transport effects of methane between the liquid and gas phases. Abiotic dissolution was observed but some biomineralization processes of carbonates were also identified for D. geothermicum. Both strains displayed very different patterns in their conversion of inorganic carbon: while M. thermolithotrophicus was mainly producing methane, D. geothermicum induced the formation of biomass. The availability of crushed rock increased the proportion of sessile biofilms. All these results were analyzed in correlation with a successful PHREEQC simulation and demonstrate the strong influence of the microbial activities and diversity on the carbon fate in the immediate surroundings of geological CCS storage zones.

  19. Effects of management policies, including artificial recharge, on salinization in a sloping aquifer: The Israeli Coastal Aquifer case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, S.; Shavit, U.

    2004-04-01

    Overexploitation of aquifers may impair groundwater quality and cause salinization, as occurs in the sloping Coastal Aquifer in Israel. The current management policy risks the future of the aquifer as the country's most important water reservoir. The paper examines a variety of policies and studies their impact on the salinization of the aquifer. Two quantitative approaches were applied: (1) a balance approach which was used to calculate the mean salinity of the aquifer water and (2) a 2-D numerical solution of the flow and transport equations in a 10 × 15 km cell representing a portion of the aquifer. The policy alternatives include desalination of imported freshwater (180-250 ppm Cl-), desalination of treated wastewater, and injection of the desalinated water. An increased pumping from the aquifer compensates for the injection of these waters. The results show that desalination of imported freshwater or wastewater with no injection would reduce the salinization rate of the aquifer only slightly, and that the effect would be noticeable only after a period corresponding to the retention time of the vadose zone. The alternatives that involve injection of desalinated water would stop the salinization process; the aquifer mean salinity would stabilize around the level that prevailed at the time of implementation of the injection policy. The numerical solution confirmed the conclusions of the balance approach while including the complex effect of the high-salinity boundary condition on the east and the role of thickness variations in a sloping aquifer. This approach addressed the influence of the spatial densities of pumping and of injection and showed that as the density increases, the numerical and balance solutions converge. It is shown that the numerical simulation should be used for future planning of the injection and pumping layout. Finally, calculations based on our results show that the alternatives involving injection of desalinated freshwater provide the

  20. Feasibility studies of aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, S. H.

    1993-01-01

    Determining the feasibility of using aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) for a particular heating or cooling application is an interdisciplinary effort, requiring (at a minimum) expertise in engineering and hydrology. The feasibility study should proceed in two distinct stages. The first stage, which is limited in scope and detail, is intended to show if an ATES system is technically and economically suited to the application. Focus of this preliminary investigation is on revealing the existence of factors that might weigh heavily against the use of ATES methods, and, in the absence of such factors, on choosing a suitable scale for the ATES plant and well field. The results of the preliminary investigation are used to determine if more detailed investigation--including field studies--are justified, and to facilitate comparing the advantages of ATES to those of other means of providing heating or cooling. The second stage of the feasibility study focuses on detailed aquifer characterization, refinement of engineering design and cost estimates, and economic and environmental risk analysis. The results of this investigation, if favorable, will be used to justify the expense of constructing the ATES system.

  1. Modelling the impact of forest cover on groundwater resources: A case study of the Sherwood Sandstone aquifer in the East Midlands, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Hiscock, K. M.

    2010-10-01

    SummaryLand-use change from arable agriculture to forestry has become a focus in many European countries to control leaching of non-point agricultural pollutants such as nitrate to aquifers. However, a reduction in groundwater recharge beneath forest areas could potentially exacerbate water supply shortages. No direct study has previously been undertaken in the UK to assess the effect of increasing woodland cover on the quantity of groundwater resources. To address this knowledge gap, this study applied a groundwater flow model (MODFLOW) with a soil moisture balance recharge model to predict the effect of land-use change to forestry on groundwater recharge and levels by 2025 at two public supply borehole sites on the unconfined Sherwood Sandstone aquifer in Nottinghamshire. Four land-use change scenarios focusing on borehole capture zones were developed. The recharge calculations revealed a reduction of up to 45% in annual recharge as a result of an increase in woodland cover in the borehole capture zones, with the reduction more marked in winter than in summer at both borehole locations. However, the associated decrease in groundwater levels was limited owing to the high storage capacity of the sandstone aquifer. Even with an increase in woodland cover over the entire target zone, the simulated decrease in groundwater levels was less than 0.3 m. It is concluded that a quantitative analysis using a modelling approach can assist in the better targeting of pollution control strategies that include land-use change to woodland, helping decision-makers balance the expected improvements to groundwater quality while concurrently managing groundwater resources.

  2. Numerical simulation of groundwater artificial recharge in a semiarid-climate basin of northwest Mexico, case study the Guadalupe Valley Aquifer, Baja California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Gaytan, J. R.; Herrera-Oliva, C. S.

    2013-05-01

    In this study was analyzed through a regional groundwater flow model the effects on groundwater levels caused by the application of different future groundwater management scenarios (2007-2025) at the Guadalupe Valley, in Baja California, Mexico. Among these studied alternatives are those scenarios designed in order to evaluate the possible effects generated for the groundwater artificial recharge in order to satisfy a future water demand with an extraction volume considered as sustainable. The State of Baja California has been subject to an increment of the agricultural, urban and industrials activities, implicating a growing water-demand. However, the State is characterized by its semiarid-climate with low surface water availability; therefore, has resulted in an extensive use of groundwater in local aquifer. Water level measurements indicate there has been a decline in water levels in the Guadalupe Valley for the past 30 years. The Guadalupe Valley aquifer represents one the major sources of water supply in Ensenada region. It supplies about 25% of the water distributed by the public water supplier at the city of Ensenada and in addition constitutes the main water resource for the local wine industries. Artificially recharging the groundwater system is one water resource option available to the study zone, in response to increasing water demand. The existing water supply system for the Guadalupe Valley and the city of Ensenada is limited since water use demand periods in 5 to 10 years or less will require the construction of additional facilities. To prepare for this short-term demand, one option available to water managers is to bring up to approximately 3.0 Mm3/year of treated water of the city of Ensenada into the valley during the low-demand winter months, artificially recharge the groundwater system, and withdraw the water to meet the summer demands. A 2- Dimensional groundwater flow was used to evaluate the effects of the groundwater artificial recharge

  3. The impact of freshwater and wastewater irrigation on the chemistry of shallow groundwater: a case study from the Israeli Coastal Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kass, A.; Gavrieli, I.; Yechieli, Y.; Vengosh, A.; Starinsky, A.

    2005-01-01

    Differences in the impact of irrigation with freshwater versus wastewater on the underlying shallow groundwater quality were investigated in the Coastal Aquifer of Israel. Seven research boreholes were drilled to the top-most 3-5 m of the saturated zone (the water table region-WTR) in the agricultural fields. The unsaturated zone and the WTR below the irrigated fields consist mainly of clayey sands, while the main aquifer comprises mainly of calcareous sandstones and sands. We show that the salinity and composition of the groundwater at the WTR are highly variable over a distance of less than 1 km and are controlled by the irrigating water and the processes in the overlying unsaturated zone. Tritium data in this groundwater (4.6 tritium units (TU)) support that these water are modern recharge. The water at the WTR is more saline and has a different chemical composition relative to the overlying irrigation water. High SAR values (sodium adsorption ratio) in wastewater irrigation lead to absorption of Na + onto the clay and release of Ca 2+ into the recharging water, resulting in low Na/Cl (0.4 compared to 1.2 in the wastewater) and high Ca/Cl ratios. In contrast, in the freshwater-irrigated field the irrigation water pumped from the aquifer (Na/Cl=0.9; SAR=0.6) is modified into Na-rich groundwater (Na/Cl=2.0) due to reverse base-exchange reactions. The high NO 3 concentration (>100 mg/l) in the WTR below both fields is derived from the agricultural activities. In the freshwater field, the source of NO 3 is fertilizer leachates, whereas in the wastewater field, where less fertilizers are applied, nitrate is probably derived from nitrification of the NH 4 in the wastewater. Some of the original inorganic nitrogen in the wastewater is consumed by the agricultural plants, resulting in a lower inorganic-N/Cl ratio in the WTR as compared to that in the wastewater. This study demonstrates the important role of the composition of irrigation water, combined with lithology

  4. Assessing Uncertainty and Repeatability in Time-Lapse VSP Monitoring of CO2 Injection in a Brine Aquifer, Frio Formation, Texas (A Case Study)

    SciTech Connect

    Nazari, Siamak; Daley, Thomas M.

    2013-02-07

    This study was done to assess the repeatability and uncertainty of time-lapse VSP response to CO2 injection in the Frio formation near Houston Texas. A work flow was built to assess the effect of time-lapse injected CO2 into two Frio brine reservoir intervals, the ‘C’ sand (Frio1) and the ‘Blue sand’ (Frio2). The time-lapse seismic amplitude variations with sensor depth for both reservoirs Frio1 and Frio2 were computed by subtracting the seismic response of the base survey from each of the two monitor seismic surveys. Source site 1 has been considered as one of the best sites for evaluating the time-lapse response after injection. For site 1, the computed timelapse NRMS levels after processing had been compared to the estimated time-lapse NRMS level before processing for different control reflectors, and for brine aquifers Frio1, and Frio2 to quantify detectability of amplitude difference. As the main interest is to analyze the time-lapse amplitude variations, different scenarios have been considered. Three different survey scenarios were considered: the base survey which was performed before injection, monitor1 performed after the first injection operation, and monitor2 which was after the second injection. The first scenario was base-monitor1, the second was basemonitor2, and the third was monitor1-monitor2. We considered three ‘control’ reflections above the Frio to assist removal of overburden changes, and concluded that third control reflector (CR3) is the most favorable for the first scenario in terms of NRMS response, and first control reflector (CR1) is the most favorable for the second and third scenarios in terms of NRMS response. The NRMS parameter is shown to be a useful measure to assess the effect of processing on time-lapse data. The overall NRMS for the Frio VSP data set was found to be in the range of 30% to 80% following basic processing. This could be considered as an estimated baseline in assessing the utility

  5. Classifying zones of suitability for manual drilling using textural and hydraulic parameters of shallow aquifers: a case study in northwestern Senegal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fussi, F. Fabio; Fumagalli, Letizia; Fava, Francesco; Di Mauro, Biagio; Kane, Cheik Hamidou; Niang, Magatte; Wade, Souleye; Hamidou, Barry; Colombo, Roberto; Bonomi, Tullia

    2017-08-01

    A method is proposed that uses analysis of borehole stratigraphic logs for the characterization of shallow aquifers and for the assessment of areas suitable for manual drilling. The model is based on available borehole-log parameters: depth to hard rock, depth to water, thickness of laterite and hydraulic transmissivity of the shallow aquifer. The model is applied to a study area in northwestern Senegal. A dataset of boreholes logs has been processed using a software package (TANGAFRIC) developed during the research. After a manual procedure to assign a standard category describing the lithological characteristics, the next step is the automated extraction of different textural parameters and the estimation of hydraulic conductivity using reference values available in the literature. The hydraulic conductivity values estimated from stratigraphic data have been partially validated, by comparing them with measured values from a series of pumping tests carried out in large-diameter wells. The results show that this method is able to produce a reliable interpretation of the shallow hydrogeological context using information generally available in the region. The research contributes to improving the identification of areas where conditions are suitable for manual drilling. This is achieved by applying the described method, based on a structured and semi-quantitative approach, to classify the zones of suitability for given manual drilling techniques using data available in most African countries. Ultimately, this work will support proposed international programs aimed at promoting low-cost water supply in Africa and enhancing access to safe drinking water for the population.

  6. Salinization in a stratified aquifer induced by heat transfer from well casings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lopik, Jan H.; Hartog, Niels; Zaadnoordijk, Willem Jan; Cirkel, D. Gijsbert; Raoof, Amir

    2015-12-01

    The temperature inside wells used for gas, oil and geothermal energy production, as well as steam injection, is in general significantly higher than the groundwater temperature at shallower depths. While heat loss from these hot wells is known to occur, the extent to which this heat loss may result in density-driven flow and in mixing of surrounding groundwater has not been assessed so far. However, based on the heat and solute effects on density of this arrangement, the induced temperature contrasts in the aquifer due to heat transfer are expected to destabilize the system and result in convection, while existing salt concentration contrasts in an aquifer would act to stabilize the system. To evaluate the degree of impact that may occur under field conditions, free convection in a 50-m-thick aquifer driven by the heat loss from penetrating hot wells was simulated using a 2D axisymmetric SEAWAT model. In particular, the salinization potential of fresh groundwater due to the upward movement of brackish or saline water in a stratified aquifer is studied. To account for a large variety of well applications and configurations, as well as different penetrated aquifer systems, a wide range of well temperatures, from 40 to 100 °C, together with a range of salt concentration (1-35 kg/m3) contrasts were considered. This large temperature difference with the native groundwater (15 °C) required implementation of a non-linear density equation of state in SEAWAT. We show that density-driven groundwater flow results in a considerable salt mass transport (up to 166,000 kg) to the top of the aquifer in the vicinity of the well (radial distance up to 91 m) over a period of 30 years. Sensitivity analysis showed that density-driven groundwater flow and the upward salt transport was particularly enhanced by the increased heat transport from the well into the aquifer by thermal conduction due to increased well casing temperature, thermal conductivity of the soil, as well as decreased

  7. Comparison of surface and groundwater balance approaches in the evaluation of managed aquifer recharge structures: Case of a percolation tank in a crystalline aquifer in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisson, A.; Baïsset, M.; Alazard, M.; Perrin, J.; Villesseche, D.; Dewandel, B.; Kloppmann, W.; Chandra, S.; Picot-Colbeaux, G.; Sarah, S.; Ahmed, S.; Maréchal, J. C.

    2014-11-01

    To face the problem of groundwater depletion, the Indian Government relies on large projects of Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR). Numerous recharge structures such as percolation tanks exist but the impact of these structures on groundwater resources remains poorly understood. Although the evaporation/infiltration ratio of percolation tanks was determined in several studies in semi-arid contexts using surface water balance methods, few studies evaluated the impact on the aquifer recharge. However, knowledge on recharge dynamics over time and space is essential for (1) the quantitative evaluation of stored water volumes, (2) the identification of beneficiaries (farmers) and (3) the estimation of percolation tanks recharge zone to the extent that is required to define proper management regulations at basin scale. These three points are of prime importance in the case of semi-arid regions where a limited number of rain events determine the water stored over the entire year. Assessment of the stored groundwater is even more difficult in crystalline aquifers due to the heterogeneous structure of flow paths. To date no methodological guidelines exist for local assessment of percolation tanks in crystalline aquifers. In this paper, we develop a method for calculating a local groundwater budget and we compare it with a computed surface balance. The method is applied to a case study in semi-arid crystalline context. From the groundwater balance we draw conclusions on (1) the limited amount of stored water in the aquifer, (2) the delayed recharge of the aquifer highlighting temporary storage/slow groundwater movement in the unsaturated zone and (3) the limited number of beneficiaries in years of medium monsoon rainfall. These results complement the understanding of the hydrodynamic functioning of percolation tanks, and their impact on the local groundwater balance.

  8. Assessing different airborne EM systems for delivering information on aquifer geometry and character: A case study from the Musgrave Province South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munday, T. J.; Ley-Cooper, A. Y.

    2012-12-01

    When developing their pre-competitive data bases in support of the minerals industry, State and Federal Government agencies in Australia are now looking at the conjunctive use of airborne geophysics. This is particularly so for AEM data sets, which are now being acquired to promote exploration. This reflects a recognition that in the arid regions of Australia development of a given mineral deposit will, in part, be determined by the availability of water to support mining and mineral processing. An emerging trend, linked to the availability of new data processing procedures, sees AEM data now being actively employed for a combination of applications linked to minerals exploration including geological mapping, aquifer characterization and groundwater assessment. New surveys are being commissioned with attention being given as to whether AEM systems are capable of resolving the complexity of aquifer systems. In addition to new surveys, historical AEM data sets acquired to target potential mineralization are being re-processed for groundwater related applications. As part of the South Australian Goyder FLOWS project, regional and local scale AEM data sets are being examined to develop hydrogeological conceptual models in the remote Musgrave Province in the States north. The work has required the re-processing of historical data, including those acquired by TEMPEST, HoisTEM and VTEM. More recently, the project also acquired co-incident data from several new AEM systems, including the new SkyTEM508 (a helicopter TDEM system) and the SPECTREM2000 (a fixed wing TDEM system). Their acquisition aims to inform State agencies about options for acquiring further pre-competitive AEM data to support mineral exploration whilst also addressing groundwater resource requirements for the region. In this paper we examine the results from a comparative study of these systems for defining the variability of aquifers that are expected to provide the main source of groundwater for any

  9. Detecting a Defective Casing Seal at the Top of a Bedrock Aquifer.

    PubMed

    Richard, Sandra K; Chesnaux, Romain; Rouleau, Alain

    2016-03-01

    An improperly sealed casing can produce a direct hydraulic connection between two or more originally isolated aquifers with important consequences regarding groundwater quantity and quality. A recent study by Richard et al. (2014) investigated a monitoring well installed in a fractured rock aquifer with a defective casing seal at the soil-bedrock interface. A hydraulic short circuit was detected that produced some leakage between the rock and the overlying deposits. A falling-head permeability test performed in this well showed that the usual method of data interpretation is not valid in this particular case due to the presence of a piezometric error. This error is the direct result of the preferential flow originating from the hydraulic short circuit and the subsequent re-equilibration of the piezometric levels of both aquifers in the vicinity of the inlet and the outlet of the defective seal. Numerical simulations of groundwater circulation around the well support the observed impact of the hydraulic short circuit on the results of the falling-head permeability test. These observations demonstrate that a properly designed falling-head permeability test may be useful in the detection of defective casing seals.

  10. Contamination of fluoride in groundwater and its effect on human health: a case study in hard rock aquifers of Siddipet, Telangana State, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narsimha, A.; Sudarshan, V.

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogeochemical investigation has been carried out in the granitic terrain of Siddipet area, Medak district, Telangana State, India with an aim to understand the distribution of fluoride in the groundwater and to understand the relationship of fluoride with other major ions, and also to identify the high fluoride-bearing groundwater zones. 104 groundwater samples were analyzed in the study area for fluoride and other major ions like calcium, magnesium, chloride, carbonate, bicarbonate, sodium, potassium, sulfate, and nitrate in addition to pH and electrical conductivity. The studies revealed that the concentration of fluoride in groundwater is ranging from 0.2 to 2.2 mg L-1 with a mean of 1.1 mg L-1. Nearly 22 % of groundwater has more than the permissible limit of fluoride (1.5 mg L-1), which is responsible for the endemic dental fluorosis in the area concerned. Geochemical classification of groundwater shows that Na-HCO3, Ca-Cl, and Ca-HCO3-Na are the dominant hydrochemical facies. Gibbs diagram shows rock-water interaction dominance and evaporation dominance, which are responsible for the change in the quality of water in the hard rock aquifer of the study area. The groundwater in villages and its environs are affected by fluoride contamination, and consequently majority of the population living in these villages suffer from dental fluorosis. Hence, they are advised to consume drinking water which has less than 1.5 mg L-1 fluoride to avoid further fluorosis risks.

  11. Contamination of fluoride in groundwater and its effect on human health: a case study in hard rock aquifers of Siddipet, Telangana State, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narsimha, A.; Sudarshan, V.

    2017-09-01

    Hydrogeochemical investigation has been carried out in the granitic terrain of Siddipet area, Medak district, Telangana State, India with an aim to understand the distribution of fluoride in the groundwater and to understand the relationship of fluoride with other major ions, and also to identify the high fluoride-bearing groundwater zones. 104 groundwater samples were analyzed in the study area for fluoride and other major ions like calcium, magnesium, chloride, carbonate, bicarbonate, sodium, potassium, sulfate, and nitrate in addition to pH and electrical conductivity. The studies revealed that the concentration of fluoride in groundwater is ranging from 0.2 to 2.2 mg L-1 with a mean of 1.1 mg L-1. Nearly 22 % of groundwater has more than the permissible limit of fluoride (1.5 mg L-1), which is responsible for the endemic dental fluorosis in the area concerned. Geochemical classification of groundwater shows that Na-HCO3, Ca-Cl, and Ca-HCO3-Na are the dominant hydrochemical facies. Gibbs diagram shows rock-water interaction dominance and evaporation dominance, which are responsible for the change in the quality of water in the hard rock aquifer of the study area. The groundwater in villages and its environs are affected by fluoride contamination, and consequently majority of the population living in these villages suffer from dental fluorosis. Hence, they are advised to consume drinking water which has less than 1.5 mg L-1 fluoride to avoid further fluorosis risks.

  12. Managed aquifer recharge by a check dam to improve the quality of fluoride-rich groundwater: a case study from southern India.

    PubMed

    Gowrisankar, G; Jagadeshan, G; Elango, L

    2017-04-01

    In many regions around the globe, including India, degradation in the quality of groundwater is of great concern. The objective of this investigation is to determine the effect of recharge from a check dam on quality of groundwater in a region of Krishnagiri District of Tamil Nadu State, India. For this study, water samples from 15 wells were periodically obtained and analysed for major ions and fluoride concentrations. The amount of major ions present in groundwater was compared with the drinking water guideline values of the Bureau of Indian Standards. With respect to the sodium and fluoride concentrations, 38% of groundwater samples collected was not suitable for direct use as drinking water. Suitability of water for agricultural use was determined considering the electrical conductivity, sodium adsorption ratio, sodium percentage, permeability index, Wilcox and United States Salinity Laboratory diagrams. The influence of freshwater recharge from the dam is evident as the groundwater in wells nearer to the check dam was suitable for both irrigation and domestic purposes. However, the groundwater away from the dam had a high ionic composition. This study demonstrated that in other fluoride-affected areas, the concentration can be reduced by dilution with the construction of check dams as a measure of managed aquifer recharge.

  13. Effects of aquifer thermal energy storage on groundwater quality and the consequences for drinking water production: a case study from The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Bonte, M; Stuyfzand, P J; van den Berg, G A; Hijnen, W A M

    2011-01-01

    We used data from an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system located 570 m from a public water supply well field in the south of The Netherlands to investigate the relation between production of renewable energy with an ATES system and the production of drinking water. The data show that the groundwater circulation by the ATES system can impact chemical groundwater quality by introducing shallow groundwater with a different chemical composition at greater depth. However, the observed concentration changes are sufficiently small to keep groundwater suitable for drinking water production. Microbiological results showed that the ATES system introduced faecal bacteria in the groundwater and stimulated the growth of heterotrophic micro-organisms. At the studied site this forms no hygienic risk because of the long distance between the ATES wells and the public supply well field A further degradation of either chemical or microbiological groundwater quality however may necessitate additional water treatment which raises the energy requirements. The additional energy requirements for drinking water treatment may be up the same order of magnitude as the harvested energy by the ATES system.

  14. On the use of multiple-point statistics to improve groundwater flow modeling in karst aquifers: A case study from the Hydrogeological Experimental Site of Poitiers, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Coz, Mathieu; Bodin, Jacques; Renard, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    Limestone aquifers often exhibit complex groundwater flow behaviors resulting from depositional heterogeneities and post-lithification fracturing and karstification. In this study, multiple-point statistics (MPS) was applied to reproduce karst features and to improve groundwater flow modeling. For this purpose, MPS realizations were used in a numerical flow model to simulate the responses to pumping test experiments observed at the Hydrogeological Experimental Site of Poitiers, France. The main flow behaviors evident in the field data were simulated, particularly (i) the early-time inflection of the drawdown signal at certain observation wells and (ii) the convex behavior of the drawdown curves at intermediate times. In addition, it was shown that the spatial structure of the karst features at various scales is critical with regard to the propagation of the depletion wave induced by pumping. Indeed, (i) the spatial shape of the cone of depression is significantly affected by the karst proportion in the vicinity of the pumping well, and (ii) early-time inflection of the drawdown signal occurs only at observation wells crossing locally well-developed karst features.

  15. Isotopic and hydrogeochemical characterization of high-altitude karst aquifers in complex geological settings. The Ordesa and Monte Perdido National Park (Northern Spain) case study.

    PubMed

    Lambán, L J; Jódar, J; Custodio, E; Soler, A; Sapriza, G; Soto, R

    2015-02-15

    The Ordesa and Monte Perdido National Park, located in the Southern Pyrenees, constitutes the highest karst system in Western Europe. No previous studies regarding its geochemical and isotopic groundwater characterization are available in this area. This work presents the results of field and sampling campaigns carried out between July 2007 and September 2013. The groundwater presents high calcium bicarbonate contents due to the occurrence of upper Cretaceous and lower Paleocene-Eocene carbonate materials in the studied area. Other relevant processes include dissolution of anhydrite and/or gypsum and incongruent dissolution of Mg-limestone and dolomite. The water stable isotopes (δ(18)O, δ(2)H) show that the oceanic fronts from the Atlantic Ocean are responsible for the high levels of precipitation. In autumn, winter, and spring, a deuterium excess is found in the recharge water, which could be related to local atmospheric transport of low-altitude snow sublimation vapour and its later condensation on the snow surface at higher altitude, where recharge is mostly produced. The recharge zones are mainly between 2500m and 3200ma.s.l. The tritium content of the water suggests short groundwater transit times. The isotopic composition of dissolved sulphate points to the existence of regional fluxes mixed with local discharge in some of the springs. This work highlights the major role played by the altitude difference between the recharge and discharge zones in controlling the chemistry and the vertical variability of the isotopic composition in high-altitude karst aquifers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Soil-water content characterisation in a modified Jarvis-Stewart model: A case study of a conifer forest on a shallow unconfined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyot, Adrien; Fan, Junliang; Oestergaard, Kasper T.; Whitley, Rhys; Gibbes, Badin; Arsac, Margaux; Lockington, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Groundwater-vegetation-atmosphere fluxes were monitored for a subtropical coastal conifer forest in South-East Queensland, Australia. Observations were used to quantify seasonal changes in transpiration rates with respect to temporal fluctuations of the local water table depth. The applicability of a Modified Jarvis-Stewart transpiration model (MJS), which requires soil-water content data, was assessed for this system. The influence of single depth values compared to use of vertically averaged soil-water content data on MJS-modelled transpiration was assessed over both a wet and a dry season, where the water table depth varied from the surface to a depth of 1.4 m below the surface. Data for tree transpiration rates relative to water table depth showed that trees transpire when the water table was above a threshold depth of 0.8 m below the ground surface (water availability is non-limiting). When the water table reached the ground surface (i.e., surface flooding) transpiration was found to be limited. When the water table is below this threshold depth, a linear relationship between water table depth and the transpiration rate was observed. MJS modelling results show that the influence of different choices for soil-water content on transpiration predictions was insignificant in the wet season. However, during the dry season, inclusion of deeper soil-water content data improved the model performance (except for days after isolated rainfall events, here a shallower soil-water representation was better). This study demonstrated that, to improve MJS simulation results, appropriate selection of soil water measurement depths based on the dynamic behaviour of soil water profiles through the root zone was required in a shallow unconfined aquifer system.

  17. InSAR Observation of Ground Surface Deformations Associated to Aquifer Storage and Recovery: A Case study for Future CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normand, J.; Heggy, E.; Bonneville, A.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage in subsurface has been suggested as a potential method to reduce the steep increase of exogenic CO2 in the atmosphere resulting from man-made industrial activities. Our site of Pendleton, OR is used as an analog to understand reservoirs' dynamic response for future CO2 sequestration. The CO2 sequestration simulation is carried out by injecting drainage water in the permeable basalt confined aquifer during winter and recovering it in summer. However, an extensive monitoring is necessary to measure the potential dilatation and subsidence of the ground during the injection and recovery. Two Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) techniques; Differential inSAR associated with the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) Time Series approach and Permanent Scatterer inSAR (PSinSAR), are performed herein to assess the potential ground deformation associated to these injections and recoveries. The two inSAR techniques are applied on three different radar frequencies; ALOS PALSAR L-Band, Radarsat-2 C-Band and TerraSAR-X X-Band, which allow us to select the most adequate inSAR technique and Radar frequency for monitoring urban and semi-vegetated areas. The potential for sub-wavelength deformations in such type of terrains due to fluid recovery and injections, is explored through this study. Our discontinuous four-years of Line Of Sight (LOS) displacement observations, in areas with low decorrelation near the injection points, suggest that surface deformation associated with water injection and recovery follows an uplift and subsidence cycle with an amplitude of ~4 mm. While observed displacements are geographically correlated to injections and recoveries, they are temporally out-phased with these events due to the subsurface hydraulic conductivity. The sub-centimetric LOS displacements observed with Radar inSAR techniques in Pendleton after water injection in this basaltic confined aquifer suggest that the potential for CO2 sequestration is

  18. Dissolved arsenic in the shallow alluvial aquifers in North Brahmaputra Plain, India: a case study in and around lower Jia Bharali River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khound, Nayan J.; Phukon, Parag; Bhattacharyya, Krishna G.

    2017-08-01

    This study was carried out to investigate Arsenic (As) contamination in the alluvial aquifers of the lower Jia Bharali catchment and adjoining areas in Sonitpur district of Assam. Samples were collected twice a year (July and February) for three consecutive years from 50 monitoring wells spread into both older and younger alluvium between the Brahmaputra River towards south and Arunachal foothills towards north. The analytical results show that dissolved As content [both As(III) and As(V)] varies from below detection level (BDL) to 7.39 µg/L with a mean value of 1.92 µg/L and standard deviation of 1.37 µg/L during wet season (July). Thus, it remains within the WHO (2004) prescribed limit (10 µg/L) in the study area in the wet season. During the dry season, the range of variation is higher, from BDL to as much as 13.8 µg/L with a mean value of 2.57 µg/Land standard deviation of 2.23 µg/L. About 78% of the wells show a concentration between 1 and 10 µg/L in both the seasons. However, only one of the wells present in foothills of Arunachal Himalaya was found to have As content higher than the WHO limit in the dry season. Along with total As, examination of concentration levels of other key parameters, viz., Fe, Mn, Ca, Na, K, and Mg with pH and SO4 2- was also carried out. Most of the wells ( 92%) showed Fe concentration much higher than the WHO (2004) permissible limit of (0.3 mg/L) particularly during the dry season and it is likely that high Fe concentration was responsible for keeping total As concentration at comparatively low levels. 34% of the samples in the wet seasons and 86% of the samples in the dry seasons have Mn above the permissible limit of 0.1 mg/L.

  19. Pumping tests in nonuniform aquifers - The radially symmetric case

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Traditionally, pumping-test-analysis methodology has been limited to applications involving aquifers whose properties are assumed uniform in space. This work attempts to assess the applicability of analytical methodology to a broader class of units with spatially varying properties. An examination of flow behavior in a simple configuration consisting of pumping from the center of a circular disk embedded in a matrix of differing properties is the basis for this investigation. A solution describing flow in this configuration is obtained through Laplace-transform techniques using analytical and numerical inversion schemes. Approaches for the calculation of flow properties in conditions that can be roughly represented by this simple configuration are proposed. Possible applications include a wide variety of geologic structures, as well as the case of a well skin resulting from drilling or development. Of more importance than the specifics of these techniques for analysis of water-level responses is the insight into flow behavior during a pumping test that is provided by the large-time form of the derived solution. The solution reveals that drawdown during a pumping test can be considered to consist of two components that are dependent and independent of near-well properties, respectively. Such an interpretation of pumping-test drawdown allows some general conclusions to be drawn concerning the relationship between parameters calculated using analytical approaches based on curve-matching and those calculated using approaches based on the slope of a semilog straight line plot. The infinite-series truncation that underlies the semilog analytical approaches is shown to remove further contributions of near-well material to total drawdown. In addition, the semilog distance-drawdown approach is shown to yield an expression that is equivalent to the Thiem equation. These results allow some general recommendations to be made concerning observation-well placement for pumping

  20. Isotope evolution and contribution to geochemical investigations in aquifer storage and recovery: a case study using reclaimed water at Bolivar, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gal La Salle, C.; Vanderzalm, J.; Hutson, J.; Dillon, P.; Pavelic, P.; Martin, R.

    2005-11-01

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is an important resource management tool whereby water from an available source is stored in a suitable aquifer for later use in periods of higher demand. Important issues in ASR include maintaining the injection rate and recovering water of suitable quality. Both of these depend on subsurface biogeochemical processes. This paper investigates the use of deuterium, 18O, 13C, 14C and 34S in understanding the reactions induced by reclaimed water injection in a carbonate aquifer at Bolivar, South Australia. Additionally, the injection scheme provides a natural laboratory to observe the process of carbon isotope exchange. The injectant deuterium (-6.4 +/- 2.9 versus Vienna standard mean ocean water (V-SMOW)) and 18O (-0.9 +/- 0.5 V-SMOW) signature is more enriched and variable than the native groundwater signature of -26 +/- 1 and -4.4 +/- 0.1 respectively. The variability of the injectant signature is maintained with injectant migration and is useful in constraining the portion of the injected end-member reaching observation wells. Effluent treatment results in total dissolved inorganic carbon (TDIC) enriched in 13C (-3.3 +/- 2.5 versus Pee Dee belemnite) and modern carbon (100 +/- 7 per cent modern carbon (pmC)), which is distinct from the native groundwater comparatively depleted in 13C (-11 +/- 1) and 14C (5.6 +/- 2.1 pmC). The carbon isotopic signature in groundwater 4 m from the ASR well is dominated by the injectant signature modified by some organic matter oxidation and calcite dissolution. However, with further migration to the 50 m radius, both 13C and 14C signatures are dominated by isotopic exchange with the matrix surface (initially in equilibrium with the ambient groundwater) and little overall dissolution. During storage, biogeochemical processes, including sulphate reduction and methanogenesis, are dominant near the ASR well. These are indicated by a sulphate decline of up to 1.5 mmol l-1

  1. Determination of aquifer roof extending under the sea from variable-density flow modelling of groundwater response to tidal loading: case study of the Jahe River Basin, Shandong Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jianmei; Chen, Chongxi; Ji, Menrui

    The main task of studies on salt-water intrusion into coastal confined aquifers is to predict the position of the fresh- salt-water interface, which can be determined from the length of the aquifer roof extending under the sea. Records of groundwater level affected by tides can be used to infer hydrological conditions and determine hydraulic parameters of an aquifer extending under the sea. In this paper, a three-dimensional, variable-density groundwater flow model has been developed to determine the equivalent roof length of an aquifer extending under the sea from the tidal-effected data of groundwater level in the Jahe River Basin, Shandong Province, China. The seaward boundary is obtained by converging hydraulic head fluctuations observed in drill holes with calculated values, and the aquifer parameters in the extending zone are estimated. The impacts of aquifer roof length and aquifer parameters on the fluctuation of tidal groundwater are studied. It is concluded that the length of the aquifer roof extending under the sea should correspond with certain aquifer parameters in the extrapolation zone. Therefore, the seaward boundary determined from tidal-effect information is the equivalent boundary in hydrodynamic characteristics rather than the true boundary of the confined aquifer Les sujets principaux des études d'instrusion saline dans les aquifères confinés en zone côtière sont la prédiction de la position de l'interface entre l'eau salée et l'eau fraîche, qui peut être déterminée à partir de l'extention du toit de l'aquifère sous la mer. Les enregistrements des niveaux des eaux souterraines influencés par les marées peuvent être utilisés pour préciser les conditions hydrologiques et déterminer les paramètres hydrauliques d'un aquifère possédant une extension sous la mer. Dans cet article, un modèle tridimensionnel comprenant des eaux souterraines de densité variable a été développé pour déterminer la longueur équivalente du toit

  2. A study of deep aquifers underlying coastal Orange County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moreland, Joe A.; Singer, John A.

    1969-01-01

    zone, the depth to the base of aquifers containing fresh water ranges from 1,000 to 2,500 feet below mean sea level. The aquifers are composed of fine to medium sand with locally occurring beds of coarse sand and gravel. Permeability generally ranges from less than 50 gallons per day per square foot to 300 gallons per day per square foot. Pressure head increases with depth of the aquifer to as much as 40 feet above land surface near the base of fresh water. The water is of the sodium bicarbonate type, increasing in salinity with depth. Organic material imparts an amber color to the water, which becomes more distinct with depth. A test well, drilled to 926 feet and perforated from 784 to 884 feet, yielded 1,950 gallons per minute with about 90 feet of drawdown. The water is of the sodium bicarbonate type with dissolved solids of 225 mg/1. Additional studies are needed to evaluate the possibilities of subsidence due to pumping from the deep aquifers, to determine the vertical and horizontal permeabilities of confining beds, and to monitor the changes in water quality and water level.

  3. Poor understanding of the hydrogeological structure is a main cause of hand-dug wells failure in developing countries: A case study of a Precambrian basement aquifer in Bugesera region (Burundi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakundukize, Charles; Mtoni, Yohana; Martens, Kristine; Van Camp, Marc; Walraevens, Kristine

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates a Precambrian basement aquifer in Bugesera region, a typical African rural area in northeastern Burundi. Domestic water supply relies on groundwater which is tapped through hand-dug wells. Despite several attempts to increase the number of water points in the area, the water demand is still far from being met as a result of the high rate of well failure. This paper seeks to understand whether the hydrogeological structure and the spatial distribution of hydraulic parameters can explain the low productivity and the high failure rate of hand-dug wells. The hydrogeological structure inferred from the interpretation of a large number of vertical electrical soundings (VES) reveals a typical sequence of geoelectrical layers, which is characterized by an overall upwards fining from the fresh basement, over the fractured/weathered basement, to the overburden or saprolite with a clay-rich layer on top. Whereas the overall aquifer potential mainly depends on the thickness of the weathered overburden, the aquifer potential for shallow hand-dug wells is determined by the hydraulic conductivity of the upper few meters of the saturated zone. This upper zone was investigated in the pumping tests. The spatial distribution of the specific capacity reveals a wide variation of hydraulic parameters, depending on the well's position in the depth profile of the aquifer's hydraulic conductivity. The thickness of the potential aquifer is highest in the central part of the study area (pegmatitic and granitic intrusions) which has the highest overall aquifer potential compared to the surrounding metasedimentary formations. However, a thick weathered overburden will increase the groundwater potential of an aquifer for deep boreholes, whereas for hand-dug wells, the productivity can only be high if the thickness of the weathered overburden is small enough, or the water table is deep enough, to allow to tap the coarse part at the base of the overburden and/or part of

  4. Long-term pumping test to study the impact of an open-loop geothermal system on seawater intrusion in a coastal aquifer: the case study of Bari (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementina Caputo, Maria; Masciale, Rita; Masciopinto, Costantino; De Carlo, Lorenzo

    2016-04-01

    The high cost and scarcity of fossil fuels have promoted the increased use of natural heat for a number of direct applications. Just as for fossil fuels, the exploitation of geothermal energy should consider its environmental impact and sustainability. Particular attention deserves the so-called open loop geothermal groundwater heat pump (GWHP) system, which uses groundwater as geothermal fluid. From an economic point of view, the implementation of this kind of geothermal system is particularly attractive in coastal areas, which have generally shallow aquifers. Anyway the potential problem of seawater intrusion has led to laws that restrict the use of groundwater. The scarcity of freshwater could be a major impediment for the utilization of geothermal resources. In this study a new methodology has been proposed. It was based on an experimental approach to characterize a coastal area in order to exploit the low-enthalpy geothermal resource. The coastal karst and fractured aquifer near Bari, in Southern Italy, was selected for this purpose. For the purpose of investigating the influence of an open-loop GWHP system on the seawater intrusion, a long-term pumping test was performed. The test simulated the effects of a prolonged withdrawal on the chemical-physical groundwater characteristics of the studied aquifer portion. The duration of the test was programmed in 16 days, and it was performed with a constant pumping flowrate of 50 m3/h. The extracted water was outflowed into an adjacent artificial channel, by means of a piping system. Water depth, temperature and electrical conductivity of the pumped water were monitored for 37 days, including also some days before and after the pumping duration. The monitored parameters, collected in the pumping and in five observation wells placed 160 m down-gradient with respect to the groundwater flow direction, have been used to estimate different scenarios of the impact of the GWHP system on the seawater intrusion by mean of a

  5. Occurrence and risk assessment of antibiotics in surface water and groundwater from different depths of aquifers: A case study at Jianghan Plain, central China.

    PubMed

    Yao, Linlin; Wang, Yanxin; Tong, Lei; Deng, Yamin; Li, Yonggang; Gan, Yiqun; Guo, Wei; Dong, Chuangju; Duan, Yanhua; Zhao, Ke

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of 14 antibiotics (fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, macrolides and sulfonamides) in groundwater and surface water at Jianghan Plain was investigated during three seasons. The total concentrations of target compounds in the water samples were higher in spring than those in summer and winter. Erythromycin was the predominant antibiotic in surface water samples with an average value of 1.60μg/L, 0.772μg/L and 0.546μg/L respectively in spring, summer and winter. In groundwater samples, fluoroquinolones and tetracyclines accounted for the dominant proportion of total antibiotic residues. The vertical distributions of total antibiotics in groundwater samples from three different depths boreholes (10m, 25m, and 50m) exhibited irregular fluctuations. Consistently decreasing of antibiotic residues with increasing of depth was observed in four (G01, G02, G03 and G05) groundwater sampling sites over three seasons. However, at the sampling sites G07 and G08, the pronounced high concentrations of total antibiotic residues were detected in water samples from 50m deep boreholes instead of those at upper aquifer in winter sampling campaign, with the total concentrations of 0.201μg/L and 0.100μg/L respectively. The environmental risks posed by the 14 antibiotics were assessed by using the methods of risk quotient and mixture risk quotient for algae, daphnids and fish in surface water and groundwater. The results suggested that algae might be the aquatic organism most sensitive to the antibiotics, with the highest risk levels posed by erythromycin in surface water and by ciprofloxacin in groundwater among the 14 antibiotics. In addition, the comparison between detected antibiotics in groundwater samples and the reported effective concentrations of antibiotics on denitrification by denitrifying bacteria, indicating this biogeochemical process driven by microorganisms won't be inhibitory influenced by the antibiotic residues in groundwater. Copyright © 2016

  6. Digital spatial data for predicted nitrate and arsenic concentrations in basin-fill aquifers of the Southwest Principal Aquifers study area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKinney, Tim S.; Anning, David W.

    2012-01-01

    This product "Digital spatial data for predicted nitrate and arsenic concentrations in basin-fill aquifers of the Southwest Principal Aquifers study area" is a 1:250,000-scale vector spatial dataset developed as part of a regional Southwest Principal Aquifers (SWPA) study (Anning and others, 2012). The study examined the vulnerability of basin-fill aquifers in the southwestern United States to nitrate contamination and arsenic enrichment. Statistical models were developed by using the random forest classifier algorithm to predict concentrations of nitrate and arsenic across a model grid that represents local- and basin-scale measures of source, aquifer susceptibility, and geochemical conditions.

  7. Simulation of the transfer of hydrocarbons in unconfined aquifer in tropical zone: the case of benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnès Kouamé, Amenan; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Derron, Marc-Henri; Kouamé, Kan Jean

    2016-04-01

    Groundwater is the largest global reserves of continental freshwater (Bosca, 2002) and also an important source of drinking water in many parts of the world (Brassington. 2007). However, this resource is today threatened by pollution such as inadequate supply of drinking water services, inaccessibility and / or dilapidated sanitation facilities and excessive use fertilizers, and industrial wastewater and solid waste pesticides (Boubacar, 2010) and the rapid urbanization in great cities (Foster, 2001). Abidjan, the largest city in Côte d'Ivoire is also facing pollution problems such as illegal dumping of waste, waste oil spilled garages, land application of domestic and industrial wastewater, automotive workshops, overexploitation of sand in the Ebrié lagoon, open waste dump of Akouédo and the spill of about 400,000 liters of toxic waste from the ship "Probo Koala" in August 2006. The Abidjan aquifer or the Continental terminal aquifer is the main source of supply drinking water. It is mainly composed of sandy and it is an unconfined aquifer as a whole (Jourda, 1987). According to Gilli and al., (2012), the recharge of unconfined aquifers comes mostly from the infiltration of surface water including rainwater. These waters on their transport in the basement could carry certain pollutants into groundwater. Kouamé (2007) reports a potential groundwater pollution of the "Continental terminal" aquifer in Abidjan. In addition to the cases cited pollution, there has been a proliferation of service stations in the district of Abidjan and this can cause possible pollution. We deemed it necessary to conduct a study on the groundwater pollution of Abidjan by oil in general. We chose benzene to simulate organic pollution in case of accident. To observe the likely evolution of such contaminants in the subsurface, we developed hydrogeological models that couple groundwater flow and benzene transport with FEFLOW software in steady and transient states. The models are composed

  8. Earth Tide Analysis Specifics in Case of Unstable Aquifer Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, Evgeny; Gorbunova, Ella; Besedina, Alina; Kabychenko, Nikolay

    2017-06-01

    We consider the main factors that affect underground water flow including aquifer supply, collector state, and distant earthquakes seismic waves' passage. In geodynamically stable conditions underground inflow change can significantly distort hydrogeological response to Earth tides, which leads to the incorrect estimation of phase shift between tidal harmonics of ground displacement and water level variations in a wellbore. Besides an original approach to phase shift estimation that allows us to get one value per day for the semidiurnal M2 wave, we offer the empirical method of excluding periods of time that are strongly affected by high inflow. In spite of rather strong ground motion during earthquake waves' passage, we did not observe corresponding phase shift change against the background on significant recurrent variations due to fluctuating inflow influence. Though inflow variations do not look like the only important parameter that must be taken into consideration while performing phase shift analysis, permeability estimation is not adequate without correction based on background alternations of aquifer parameters due to natural and anthropogenic reasons.

  9. AQUIFER TESTING AND REBOUND STUDY IN SUPPORT OF THE 100-H DEEP CHROMIUM INVESTIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    SMOOT JL

    2010-11-05

    The 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) second Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) 5-year review (DOEIRL-2006-20, The Second CERCLA Five-Year Review Report for the Hanford Site) set a milestone to conduct an investigation of deep hexavalent chromium contamination in the sediments of the Ringold upper mud (RUM) unit, which underlies the unconfined aquifer in the 100-H Area. The 5-year review noted that groundwater samples from one deep well extending below the aquitard (i.e., RUM) exceeded both the groundwater standard of 48 parts per billion (ppb) (Ecology Publication 94-06, Model Toxics Control Act Cleanup Statute and Regulation) and the federal drinking water standard of 100 {mu}g/L for hexavalent chromium. The extent of hexavalent chromium contamination in this zone is not well understood. Action 12-1 from the 5-year review is to perform additional characterization of the aquifer below the initial aquitard. Field characterization and aquifer testing were performed in the Hanford Site's 100-H Area to address this milestone. The aquifer tests were conducted to gather data to answer several fundamental questions regarding the presence of the hexavalent chromium in the deep sediments of the RUM and to determine the extent and magnitude of deeper contamination. The pumping tests were performed in accordance with the Description of Work for Aquifer Testing in Support of the 100-H Deep Chromium Investigation (SGW-41302). The specific objectives for the series of tests were as follows: (1) Evaluate the sustainable production of the subject wells using step-drawdown and constant-rate pumping tests. (2) Collect water-level data to evaluate the degree of hydraulic connection between the RUM and the unconfined (upper) aquifer (natural or induced along the well casing). (3) Evaluate the hydraulic properties of a confined permeable layer within the RUM.; (4) Collect time-series groundwater samples during testing to

  10. Analysis of multicomopnent groundwater flow in karst aquifer by CFC, tritium, tracer test and modelling, case study at Skaistkalnes vicinity, Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikshe, Janis; Babre, Alise; Delina, Aija; Popovs, Konrads

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater in karst environments tends to have difficulties to distinguish multiple flows if several sources of water are present. Skaistkalne vicinity faces with such situation where old groundwater, fresh groundwater and inflow from river Iecava occurs. Attempts were made to distinguish groundwater residence time of multiple components of water applying CFC and tritium dating techniques supplied by tracer test and numerical model of study area. Study area covers territory between two rivers Iecava and Memele with water level difference of 7 meters and horizontal distance of 2.2 kilometres between both. Study area consists of karst affected Devonian gypsum and carbonaceous rocks covered by Quaternary low to high permeable deposits. Confined groundwater at depth of 10-25 meters where analysed by CFC's and tritium. At this depth groundwater exhibits anoxic reducing environment that has caused degradation of CFC's at similar degree in all samples. Taking it into account, mean residence time based on CFC piston flow model is 22 - 42 years and 28 - 34 years based on binary mixing model. Tritium results show signs of incensement of groundwater residence time towards discharge area. CFC combined with tritium proved increased vertical velocity in middle part between the rivers likely caused by hydrogeological window in Quaternary deposits created by karst processes. Numerical model (Delina et al. 2012) was applied and calculations yielded groundwater flow velocity rate at 0.3 - 1 m/day in area between the rivers. Investigation of CFC data resulted in possible groundwater flow rate of at a minimum of 0.2 m/day although it's not applicable to all sampled wells due to specific hydrogeological conditions. Tracer test was made between the rivers in order to distinguish main water flow paths and flow velocity. Results showed that very high permeable conduits connect rivers and karst lakes with velocity rates of 800 - 1300 m/day. Complex investigation leads to conclude that

  11. Effectiveness of a physical barrier for contaminant control in an unconfined coastal plain aquifer: the case study of the former industrial site of Bagnoli (Naples, southern Italy).

    PubMed

    Arienzo, Michele; Allocca, Vincenzo; Manna, Ferdinando; Trifuoggi, Marco; Ferrara, Luciano

    2015-12-01

    A vertical engineered barrier (VEB) coupled with a water treatment plant was surveyed in the framework of a vast remedial action at the brownfield site of the former ILVA of Bagnoli steel making facility located in western Naples, Italy. The VEB was put in place to minimize contaminant migration from the brownfield site toward the sea at the shorelines sites of Bagnoli and Coroglio. The efficiency of the VEB was monitored through 12 piezometers, 8 at the Bagnoli shoreline and 4 at the Coroglio shoreline. Concentrations of inorganic and organic pollutants were examined in upstream and downstream groundwater relative to the VEB. The mean levels of Al, As, Fe, and Mn largely exceeded the legal limits, 10-15-fold, whereas that of Hg was up to 3-fold the rules. The VEB decreased the outlet concentrations only at certain specific location of the barrier, four times for Al, 6-fold for Hg, and by 20% for Mn with means largely exceeding the rules. At the other sites, the downstream water showed marked increases of the pollutants up to 3-fold. Outstanding levels of the hydrocarbons > 12 were detected in the inlet water with means of some hundred times the limits at both sites. Likewise most of screened inorganic pollutants, the downstream water showed marked increases of the hydrocarbons up to ~113%. The treatment plant was very effective, with removal efficiencies >80% for As, Al, Fe, and Mn. The study evidenced the need to put alternative groundwater remedial actions.

  12. Using stable isotopes and multi-spatial variable parameters in characterising the karstic aquifer of the Ajloun area, NW-Jordan - A case study of the Tanour and Rasoun springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Ibraheem; Wiegand, Bettina; Ptak, Thomas; Licha, Tobias; Toll, Mathias; Margane, Armin; Sauter, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Key words: Karst systems, Groundwater vulnerability, Stable isotopes, Jordan. Water resources are extremely scarce in Jordan, which is considered as one of the poorest countries in the world with respect to water resources availability (UNDP 2014), with more than 90% of the country receiving less than 200 mm/year of rainfall (Al Kharadsheh et al. 2012). The most important aquifer for drinking-water purposes in Jordan is the upper Cretaceous limestone aquifer. The karstic springs of Tanour and Rasoun, located in the Ajloun governorate around 75 kilometres northwest of the capital of Amman, have been selected for this study. These springs are the main source for the local domestic water supply, with an average discharge between the years 2000 and 2012 of 200 m3/h and 60 m3/h, respectively (MWI, 2013). During the past few years, the water supply from these two springs had to be discontinued due to high contamination of the groundwater either by microbiological contaminants or by wastewater from local olive oil presses. This wastewater is locally called 'Zeebar'. Understanding of the karst aquifer system, the pathways and movement within the epikarst, and estimation of the travel and residence time within the aquifer is important for managing and evaluating the pollution risk, which affects the usability of groundwater for drinking purposes. For a better understanding of the karstic system and its behaviour, different methods are applied: 1. Analysis of the stable isotope composition of δ2H and δ18O during the winter season for both (a) Tanour and Rasoun groundwater, and (b) rainfall samples collected from several locations at different elevations within the catchment. 2. Analysis of major ion concentrations in groundwater of the Tanour and Rasoun springs. 3. Long-term measurements of different physico-chemical parameters from the Tanour and Rasoun springs (temperature, conductivity, turbidity, TOC, etc.) using multiparameter probes with telemetric data transfer. 4

  13. Validation of hydraulic tomography in an unconfined aquifer: A controlled sandbox study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhanfeng; Illman, Walter A.; Yeh, Tian-Chyi J.; Berg, Steven J.; Mao, Deqiang

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the effectiveness of hydraulic tomography (HT) that considers variably saturated flow processes in mapping the heterogeneity of both the saturated and unsaturated zones in a laboratory unconfined aquifer. The successive linear estimator (SLE) developed by Mao et al. (2013c) for interpreting HT in unconfined aquifers is utilized to obtain tomograms of hydraulic conductivity (K), specific storage (Ss), and the unsaturated zone parameters (pore size parameter (α) and saturated water content (θs)) for the Gardner-Russo's model. The estimated tomograms are first evaluated by visually comparing them with stratigraphy visible in the sandbox. Results reveal that the HT analysis is able to accurately capture the location and extent of heterogeneity including high and low K layers within the saturated and unsaturated zones, as well as reasonable distribution patterns of α and θs for the Gardner-Russo's model. We then validate the estimated tomograms through predictions of drawdown responses of pumping tests not used during the inverse modeling effort. The strong agreement between simulated and observed drawdown curves obtained by pressure transducers and tensiometers demonstrates the robust performance of HT that considers variably saturated flow processes in unconfined aquifers and the unsaturated zone above it. In addition, compared to the case using the homogeneous assumption, HT results, as expected, yield significantly better predictions of drawdowns in both the saturated and unsaturated zones. This comparison further substantiates the unbiased and minimal variance of HT analysis with the SLE algorithm.

  14. Pumping tests in heterogeneous aquifers: An analytical study of what can be obtained from their interpretation using Jacob's Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SáNchez-Vila, Xavier; Meier, Peter M.; Carrera, Jesús

    1999-04-01

    Interpretation of pumping tests to estimate hydraulic parameter values is typically based on the assumption of aquifer homogeneity. The applicability of the traditional methods of interpretation in real aquifers can be questioned, since the evaluation of the drawdown curves observed at different locations in a single test may not result in one consistent set of hydraulic parameters. Thus most hydrogeologists tend to look at estimated transmissivities (T) as some average property of the medium, while estimated storativities (S) are disregarded in some cases, particularly when they are obtained from data measured at the pumping well. An analytical study of drawdown under radially convergent flow toward a single point in heterogeneous aquifers shows that large time drawdown values form a straight line on a drawdown versus log time plot. Jacob's method consists of obtaining estimates for T and S from the slope and intercept of this line. We find that even in a heterogeneous field, these estimates provide valuable information about the aquifer. Estimated T values for different observation points tend to converge to a single value, which corresponds to the effective T derived under parallel flow conditions. Estimated storativities, however, display higher variability, but the geometric mean of the Sest values can be used as an unbiased estimator of the actual S. Thus it appears that although Jacob's method was originally derived for homogeneous media, it can provide valuable information in real aquifers.

  15. Paleoclimatical signals from large aquifers: comparative study of North China Plain, North America and Great Artesian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.

    2016-12-01

    Major aquifers worldwide, under favorable conditions, can retain low temporal resolution information on climatic conditions at the time of recharge. Generally, this geochemical information can be used to better constrain reaction of the aquifer to climatic changes or even to assess long term groundwater sustainability. Understanding whether major aquifers at similar latitude world-wide share similar climatic responses and records is one of the objectives of the G@GPS (Groundwater@Global Palaeoclimatic Signals) network. Several flag basins were selected and many activities were carried out since 2011, when G@GPS was accepted as one IFG within TERPRO of INQUA. The presentation will cover the objectives, major actities and achievements in the past 5 years, with a focus on the case studies in North China Plain (NCP), Great Artesian Basin (GAB) in Australia, and North America. 81Kr and 85Kr by using ATTA (atom trap trace analysis) to derive paleoclimate signals from deep aquifer was introduced in the workshop and training course in Zhanjiang, Guangdong Province on Dec. 8-13, 2014, and some results are to be presented, combined with those from 14C. Paleoclimatic signals in the last 30-40 ka were reconstructed using stable isotopes and dated groundwater in three areas indicate climatic changes and several recharge events. The signal in NCP was compared and verified by the high resolution data series from two caves in China. The signals from the large aquifers could provide a reasonable regional and global record of paleoclimatic change.

  16. Aquifer thermal energy storage - a feasibility study for large scale demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, W.V.; Supkow, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    An aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) feasibility study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using a portion of the Magothy Aquifer underlying the Stony Brook University Campus on Long Island, New York, for storing water that is chilled during the winter and then recovering this water during the following summer months for air conditioning purposes.

  17. Initial study of thermal energy storage in unconfined aquifers. [UCATES

    SciTech Connect

    Haitjema, H.M.; Strack, O.D.L.

    1986-04-01

    Convective heat transport in unconfined aquifers is modeled in a semi-analytic way. The transient groundwater flow is modeled by superposition of analytic functions, whereby changes in the aquifer storage are represented by a network of triangles, each with a linearly varying sink distribution. This analytic formulation incorporates the nonlinearity of the differential equation for unconfined flow and eliminates numerical dispersion in modeling heat convection. The thermal losses through the aquifer base and vadose zone are modeled rather crudely. Only vertical heat conduction is considered in these boundaries, whereby a linearly varying temperature is assumed at all times. The latter assumption appears reasonable for thin aquifer boundaries. However, assuming such thin aquifer boundaries may lead to an overestimation of the thermal losses when the aquifer base is regarded as infinitely thick in reality. The approach is implemented in the computer program UCATES, which serves as a first step toward the development of a comprehensive screening tool for ATES systems in unconfined aquifers. In its present form, the program is capable of predicting the relative effects of regional flow on the efficiency of ATES systems. However, only after a more realistic heatloss mechanism is incorporated in UCATES will reliable predictions of absolute ATES efficiencies be possible.

  18. Aquifer thermal energy storage - A feasibility study for large scale demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, W. V.; Supkow, D. J.

    Engineering procedures necessary for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES), based on studies of the Magothy Aquifer on Long Island, NY, are presented, with chilled winter water pumped into the aquifer and reclaimed in summer months for air conditioning. The choice of aquifer involves necessary volume, flow rate, efficiency of thermal recovery, and avoidance of conflict with other users; utilization depends on choice of appropriate piping, heat exchangers, and well construction to prevent degradation of the aquifer. The methods employed to probe the Magothy for suitability are described, including drilling an asymmetric well cluster for observation, and 48 hr pumping and 8 hr recovery. Transmissivity was found to vary from 8,000 to 29,000 sq ft/day. A doublet well was then drilled and water withdrawn, chilled, and returned. Later withdrawal indicated a 46% thermal recovery, with computer models projecting 80% with additional cycling. The study verified the feasibility of ATES, which can be expanded with additional demand.

  19. Plan of study for the northern Midwest regional aquifer-system analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinhilber, W.L.; Young, H.L.

    1979-01-01

    Sedimentary rocks of Cambrian and Ordovician age form a major aquifer system in most of Wisconsin and Iowa, northern Illinois, northwestern Indiana, southeastern Minnesota, and northern Missouri. Many metropolitan areas depend on the aquifer for all or part of their water supplies. Declines in potentiometric head have been large in the most heavily pumped areas, most notably Chicago, Milwaukee-Waukesha, Minneapolis-St. Paul, and Des Moines. A thorough understanding of the aquifer system is needed for sound management decisions. Thus, a 4-year study of the aquifer, beginning in October 1978, is included in the U.S. Geological Survey 's program of Regional Aquifer-System Analysis. The study will evaluate the aquifer 's water-supply potential, describe its water quality, and, through computer models of the ground-water flow system, provide the means to evaluate regional aquifer response to different patterns of ground-water development. This report describes the objectives, work plan, and organization of this study. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. Geochemical and isotopic study of the aquifers of the littoral plain of Benin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odeloui, Diane; Celle-Jeanton, Hélène; Huneau, Frédéric; Alasanne, Abdoukarim; Boukari, Moussa; Mama, Daouda; Lavastre, Véronique

    2013-04-01

    The study area is located in the Southern part of the coastal sedimentary basin of Benin. This basin contains four aquifers among which the aquifers of the Quaternary and of the Continental Terminal which are concerned by the present study. These aquifers are intensely used for the drinking water supply of about two million inhabitants in the cities of Cotonou, Porto Novo, Ouidah and their surroundings. At present, a degradation of the quality of groundwaters coming from the aquifers of the Quaternary and of Continental Terminal is observed that is connected to ground occupation and to the intensive pumping, having for consequence the progression of the marine intrusion in these aquifers. The present work aims at studying the hydrogeochemical and isotopic behaviour of these two aquifers. The methodological approach consists in the measurements of the physico-chemical parameters, as well as the stable isotope signature of the groundwater in order to appreciate groundwater quality and origin. Results show that groundwaters of the aquifers of the Quaternary and of the Continental Terminal are highly mineralized and show Na-Cl or Ca-HCO3 water types. The main processes affecting the mineralization of waters are, among others, the mixture with salty and brackish waters from the Atlantic Ocean or from the littoral lagoons, dissolution of carbonate minerals and cationic exchanges. The isotopic study indicates that groundwater is recharged by local rainfalls; some samples of the Quaternary aquifer show a mixture with the sea water, which is in good agreement with the geochemical results. Both aquifers tend to show the same isotopic signature suggesting a relatively good hydraulic continuity within the reservoir and confirming geological investigations made through drillings.

  1. Nitrate pollution study in the aquifer of Dakar (Senegal).

    PubMed

    Tandia, A A; Diop, E S; Gaye, C B; Travi, Y

    2000-01-01

    Dakar is a peninsula inhabited by a population of about 2 million people in 1996. In some dug wells and piezometers, the nitrate content (NO3.) in the groundwater is above the World Health Organization (WHO) limit of 50 mg/l. In the unconfined part of the aquifer of the peninsula, all the samples from wells are contaminated by high nitrate contents which increased over time from 100 mg/l in 1987 to more than 250 mg/l in 1996. Only a limited area is affected by nitrate pollution in the confined layer. The results indicate anthropogenic pollution, a fact which indicates the increasing risk of pollution of drinking-water resources. Studies in the unsaturated zone and familiarity with the sanitation practices in the area indicate that the horizontal and vertical flux are linked mainly to defective septic tanks and direct organic waste elimination into the soil by more than 40% of the inhabitants. The correlation between tritium values (3H) and nitrate shows that the source of nitrate is recent. The relation of oxygen 18 (18O) to deuterium (2H) in water with high nitrate levels indicates that the concentrations of nitrate have been identified in evaporated points.

  2. Calibrated models as management tools for stream-aquifer systems: the case of central Kansas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sophocleous, Marios; Perkins, Samuel P.

    1993-12-01

    We address the problem of declining streamflows in interconnected stream-aquifer systems and explore possible management options to address the problem for two areas of central Kansas: the Arkansas River valley from Kinsley to Great Bend and the lower Rattlesnake Creek-Quivira National Wildlife Refuge area. The approach we followed implements, calibrates, and partially validates for the study areas a stream-aquifer numerical model combined with a parameter estimation package and sensitivity analysis. Hydrologic budgets for both predevelopment and developed conditions indicate significant differences in the hydrologic components of the study areas resulting from development. The predevelopment water budgets give an estimate of natural ground-water recharge, whereas the budgets for developed conditions give an estimate of induced recharge, indicating that major ground-water development changes the recharge-discharge regime of the model areas with time. Such stream-aquifer models serve to link proposed actions to hydrologic effects, as is clearly demonstrated by the effects of various management alternatives on the streamflows of the Arkansas River and Rattlesnake Creek. Thus we show that a possible means of restoring specified streamflows in the area is to implement protective stream corridors with restricted ground-water extraction.

  3. Calibrated models as management tools for stream-aquifer systems: the case of central Kansas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sophocleous, M.; Perkins, S.P.

    1993-01-01

    We address the problem of declining streamflows in interconnected stream-aquifer systems and explore possible management options to address the problem for two areas of central Kansas: the Arkansas River valley from Kinsley to Great Bend and the lower Rattlesnake Creek-Quivira National Wildlife Refuge area. The approach we followed implements, calibrates, and partially validates for the study areas a stream-aquifer numerical model combined with a parameter estimation package and sensitivity analysis. Hydrologic budgets for both predevelopment and developed conditions indicate significant differences in the hydrologic components of the study areas resulting from development. The predevelopment water budgets give an estimate of natural ground-water recharge, whereas the budgets for developed conditions give an estimate of induced recharge, indicating that major ground-water development changes the recharge-discharge regime of the model areas with time. Such stream-aquifer models serve to link proposed actions to hydrologic effects, as is clearly demonstrated by the effects of various management alternatives on the streamflows of the Arkansas River and Rattlesnake Creek. Thus we show that a possible means of restoring specified streamflows in the area is to implement protective stream corridors with restricted ground-water extraction. ?? 1993.

  4. MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF NITROGEN, OXYGEN AND SULFUR HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS UNDER ANAEROBIC CONDITIONS: STUDIES WITH AQUIFER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential for anaerobic biodegradation of 12 heterocyclic model compounds was studied. Nine of the model compounds were biotransformed in aquifer slurries under sulfate-reducing or methanogenic conditions. The nitrogen and oxygen heterocyclic compounds were more susceptible t...

  5. MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF NITROGEN, OXYGEN AND SULFUR HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS UNDER ANAEROBIC CONDITIONS: STUDIES WITH AQUIFER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential for anaerobic biodegradation of 12 heterocyclic model compounds was studied. Nine of the model compounds were biotransformed in aquifer slurries under sulfate-reducing or methanogenic conditions. The nitrogen and oxygen heterocyclic compounds were more susceptible t...

  6. A Study of Finding Safer Aquifer in the Arsenic Contaminated Holocene Deposit; South-Western Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M.; Mano, A.; Udo, K.; Ishibashi, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The depositional pattern, geochemistry and mineralogy of the Arsenic (As) contaminated sediments along with the chemistry of groundwaters extracted from the Holocene deposit of an As hotspot, Kalaroa, Southwestern Bangladesh have been investigated in this study. These were done to elucidate a unified view that could explain the accumulation and distribution of As on the sediment surface and its subsequent release into the groundwater. Such view of As distribution mainly helped to find out eventually the possible existence of any safer aquifer that could provide adequate potable water to that targeted community. Two key geochemical parameters, the reaction rate Kr and the partition coefficient, Kd were found to be very promising in explaining the As release mechanism. Showing the realistic natural biotite dissolution process, the in-situ Kr that was derived by applying inverse mass balance model (2.72 × 10-16 /sec), was found to be slower by only three orders of magnitude than that was determined with the laboratory study (3.19×10-13 /sec). A parametric predictor equation, that can calculate the partition coefficient Kd based on the aquifer sediment’s minerals such as Fe and Al contents along with pore-water pH was developed in this study. Another Kd model based on the diffuse double layer surface complexation theory has also been developed to compare the appropriateness of the parametric Kd model. These two models were compared with the in-situ based field Kd data and were found in a good agreement. Integrating those two essential geochemical parameters (Kd and Kr), a 1D-Finite Difference numerical model was applied to observe and evaluate the As pollution scenario for the studied Holocene aquifer. The simulation showed very promising results introducing the idea that the deeper aquifer’s groundwaters would be remained safe against being contaminated with high As in future, due to the presence of a number of encouraging factors. The most significant among

  7. Geochemical controls on fluoriferous groundwaters of the Pliocene and the more recent aquifers: the case of Aigion region, Greece.

    PubMed

    Katsanou, K; Siavalas, G; Lambrakis, N

    2013-12-01

    High fluoride concentrations (>8 mg/L) in the groundwater of the Plio-Pleistocene sediments are rare; however, this is the case around Aigion town, where teeth fluorosis has been detected since the 80s. Aiming to investigate the origin and the mobility mechanism of fluorine in groundwater and sediments a hydrogeological and geochemical research has been conducted. The hydrogeological research revealed that the Na-HCO3 water type of boreholes aligned along a fault and hosted in the confined aquifers display the higher fluoride content. The unconfined aquifer is mostly dominated by Na-Ca-Mg-HCO3-SO4 water, which displays much lower fluoride concentrations. The most permeable sectors of this aquifer host fresh water of Ca-HCO3 type. The geochemical research revealed significant amount of fluorine in the base of a lignite sequence hosted in the Plio-Pleistocene sediments. The Na-HCO3 water type represents a deep water circulation, proved by its elevated temperature and isotopic composition, carrying a significant load of fluorine and trace elements. During its uprise through faults and the Plio-Pleistocene sediments, part of its load is being deposited on the base of the lignite beds. Leaching experiments and mineralogical determinations in lignite samples revealed enrichment in fluorine at the bottom of the studied lignite sequence, where silicate minerals are dominant. This is due to either, the presence of F-bearing minerals or the presence of organic matter which can also absorb/adsorb fluorine. At the upper part of the sequence, where carbonates prevail, calcite is the major phase indicating the circulation of Ca-ΗCO3-rich fresh water. The Na-Ca-Mg-HCO3-SO4 water type could be considered as mixed water spending longer time in sediments of relatively low permeability and thus, dissolving fluorine and trace elements from clay minerals and organic matter.

  8. An integrated approach for aquifer vulnerability mapping using GIS and rough sets: study from an alluvial aquifer in North India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Arina; Khan, Haris Hasan; Umar, Rashid; Khan, Muneeb Hasan

    2014-06-01

    A modified DRASTIC model in a geographic information system (GIS) environment coupled with an information-analytic technique called `rough sets' is used to understand the aquifer vulnerability characteristics of a segment of the lower Kali watershed in western Uttar Pradesh, India. Since the region is a flat plain, topography (T) is removed as a potential control. Other parameters are the same as in DRASTIC, hence the new model is termed as DRASIC. The rough set technique is employed to provide insight into the relative vulnerabilities of different administrative units (blocks) within the study area. Using rough sets, three important factors are computed: strength, certainty and coverage. Strength indicates how the vulnerability characteristics vary in the entire area, certainty gives the relative fractions of low, medium and high vulnerability regions within a particular block, and coverage computes the percentage of a particular vulnerability state in each block. The purpose of the work is to demonstrate the utility of this integrated approach in classifying different administrative blocks in the study area according to their aquifer vulnerability characteristics. This approach is particularly useful for block-level planning and decision making for sustainable management of groundwater resources.

  9. Digital Surfaces and Thicknesses of Selected Hydrogeologic Units within the Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study (MERAS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Rheannon M.; Clark, Brian R.; Bolyard, Susan E.

    2008-01-01

    Digital surfaces of selected Tertiary and younger age hydrogeologic units within the Mississippi embayment aquifer system were created using more than 2,600 geophysical logs for an area that covers approximately 70,000 square miles and encompasses parts of eight states. The digital surfaces were developed to define and display the hydrogeologic framework for the Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study (MERAS). The digital surfaces also provide a foundation of the selected hydrogeologic units for development of a steady-state and transient regional ground-water flow model of the Mississippi embayment aquifer system from the top of the Midway confining unit upwards to land surface. The ground-water flow model is under development as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Ground-Water Resources Program. Using a Geographic Information System, nine digital surfaces of the tops of selected hydrogeologic units were created using the Australian National University Digital Elevation Model method as an interpolation scheme. Thickness maps also were constructed using the Geographic Information System by calculating the difference between the altitude of the interpreted base of an overlying unit and the altitude of the interpreted top of an underlying unit. In general, the highest hydrogeologic unit altitudes are located along the eastern edge of the study area in the outcrop, and the lowest altitudes, in general, are located along the southern edge of the study area along the axis of the embayment. The Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer and the lower Claiborne aquifer are the thinnest aquifers of importance in the study area; the thickest aquifer of importance is the middle Claiborne aquifer.

  10. Glacial aquifer systems in the northeastern United States; a plan for study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyford, F.P.; Dysart, J.E.; Randall, A.D.; Kontis, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey project designed to study the availability and quality of water in glacial aquifers in the States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Ohio is scheduled for completion in 1986. It will focus on general principles that define aquifer geometry, hydraulic properties of sediments, recharge, discharge, physical-chemical properties of water, rock and water-rock interactions, and mechanisms for mixing of water from multiple sources. Planned project activities include compilation and analysis of available data for a regionwide analysis of glacial-aquifer systems, studies of selected system components such as recharge and chemical processes, classification of aquifers with regard to water-supply potential, and construction of generalized ground-water models to predict responses of types of aquifer systems to pumping and climatic stress. This report describes the general characteristics of glacial aquifer systems in the Northeastern United States and of planned work elements of the study. (USGS)

  11. Modeling radium distribution in coastal aquifers during sea level changes: The Dead Sea case

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiro, Yael; Yechieli, Yoseph; Voss, Clifford I.; Starinsky, Abraham; Weinstein, Yishai

    2012-01-01

    We present a new approach to studying the behavior of radium isotopes in a coastal aquifer. In order to simulate radium isotope distributions in the dynamic flow field of the Dead Sea aquifer, a multi-species density dependent flow model (SUTRA-MS) was used. Field data show that the activity of 226Ra decreases from 140 to 60 dpm/L upon entering the aquifer from the Dead Sea, and then further decreases linearly due to mixing with Ra-poor fresh water. On the other hand, an increase is observed in the activity of the shorter-lived isotopes (up to 52 dpm/L 224Ra and 31 dpm/L 223Ra), which are relatively low in Dead Sea water (up to 2.5 dpm/L 224Ra and 0.5 dpm/L 223Ra). The activities of the short lived radium isotopes also decrease with decreasing salinity, which is due to the effect of salinity on the adsorption of radium. The relationship between 224Ra and salinity suggests that the adsorption partition coefficient (K) is linearly related to salinity. Simulations of the steady-state conditions, show that the distance where equilibrium activity is attained for each radium isotope is affected by the isotope half-life, K and the groundwater velocity, resulting in a longer distance for the long-lived radium isotopes. K affects the radium distribution in transient conditions, especially that of the long-lived radium isotopes. The transient conditions in the Dead Sea system, with a 1 m/yr lake level drop, together with the radium field data, constrains K to be relatively low (226Ra cannot be explained by adsorption, and it is better explained by removal via coprecipitation, probably with barite or celestine.

  12. Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Lois A., Ed.; Sue, Valerie M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents two case studies using online surveys for evaluation. The authors begin with an example of a needs assessment survey designed to measure the amount of help new students at a university require in their first year. They then discuss the follow-up survey conducted by the same university to measure the effectiveness of the…

  13. Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritter, Lois A., Ed.; Sue, Valerie M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents two case studies using online surveys for evaluation. The authors begin with an example of a needs assessment survey designed to measure the amount of help new students at a university require in their first year. They then discuss the follow-up survey conducted by the same university to measure the effectiveness of the…

  14. Sanitary protection zoning based on time-dependent vulnerability assessment model - case examples at two different type of aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Živanović, Vladimir; Jemcov, Igor; Dragišić, Veselin; Atanacković, Nebojša

    2017-04-01

    Delineation of sanitary protection zones of groundwater source is a comprehensive and multidisciplinary task. Uniform methodology for protection zoning for various type of aquifers is not established. Currently applied methods mostly rely on horizontal groundwater travel time toward the tapping structure. On the other hand, groundwater vulnerability assessment methods evaluate the protective function of unsaturated zone as an important part of groundwater source protection. In some particular cases surface flow might also be important, because of rapid transfer of contaminants toward the zones with intense infiltration. For delineation of sanitary protection zones three major components should be analysed: vertical travel time through unsaturated zone, horizontal travel time through saturated zone and surface water travel time toward intense infiltration zones. Integrating the aforementioned components into one time-dependent model represents a basis of presented method for delineation of groundwater source protection zones in rocks and sediments of different porosity. The proposed model comprises of travel time components of surface water, as well as groundwater (horizontal and vertical component). The results obtained using the model, represent the groundwater vulnerability as the sum of the surface and groundwater travel time and corresponds to the travel time of potential contaminants from the ground surface to the tapping structure. This vulnerability assessment approach do not consider contaminant properties (intrinsic vulnerability) although it can be easily improved for evaluating the specific groundwater vulnerability. This concept of the sanitary protection zones was applied at two different type of aquifers: karstic aquifer of catchment area of Blederija springs and "Beli Timok" source of intergranular shallow aquifer. The first one represents a typical karst hydrogeological system with part of the catchment with allogenic recharge, and the second one

  15. Trace elements geochemistry of fractured basement aquifer in southern Malawi: A case of Blantyre rural

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mapoma, Harold Wilson Tumwitike; Xie, Xianjun; Nyirenda, Mathews Tananga; Zhang, Liping; Kaonga, Chikumbusko Chiziwa; Mbewe, Rex

    2017-07-01

    In this study, twenty one (21) trace elements in the basement complex groundwater of Blantyre district, Malawi were analyzed. The majority of the analyzed trace elements in the water were within the standards set by World Health Organization (WHO) and Malawi Standards Board (MSB). But, iron (Fe) (BH16 and 21), manganese (Mn) (BH01) and selenium (Se) (BH02, 13, 18, 19 and 20) were higher than the WHO and MSB standards. Factor analysis (FA) revealed up to five significant factors which accounted for 87.4% of the variance. Factor 1, 2 and 3 suggest evaporite dissolution and silicate weathering processes while the fourth factor may explain carbonate dissolution and pH influence on trace element geochemistry of the studied groundwater samples. According to PHREEQC computed saturation indices, dissolution, precipitation and rock-water-interaction control the levels of trace elements in this aquifer. Elevated concentrations of Fe, Mn and Se in certain boreholes are due to the geology of the aquifer and probable redox status of groundwater. From PHREEQC speciation results, variations in trace element species were observed. Based on this study, boreholes need constant monitoring and assessment for human consumption to avoid health related issues.

  16. Plan of study for the Ohio-Indiana carbonate-bedrock and glacial- aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bugliosi, E.F.

    1990-01-01

    The major aquifers of 35,000 sq mi area in western Ohio and eastern Indiana consist of Silurian and Devonian carbonate bedrock and Quaternary glacial deposits. These bedrock units and glacial deposits have been designated for study as part of the U.S. Geological Survey 's Regional Aquifer System Analysis program, a nationwide program to assess the regional hydrology, geology and water quality of the Nation 's most important aquifers. The purpose of the study is to define the hydrology, geochemistry, and geologic framework of the aquifer system within the Silurian and Devonian rocks and glacial deposits, with emphasis on describing the groundwater flow patterns and characterizing the water quality. The study, which began in 1988 , is expected to be completed in 1993. In 1980, the aquifers in the study area supplied more than 280 million gallons of water/day to industry, agriculture, and a population of more than 6.3 million people. With a projected future population growth to 7.1 million in 1990, and with intensified agricultural and industrial uses, water withdrawals from these bedrock and glacial aquifers are expected to be increased. The most significant groundwater problems in the study area result from the pronounced areal differences in availability and quality of the groundwater. These differences are related to the lateral discontinuity of many of the glacial deposits and to variations in secondary permeability of the bedrock aquifers associated with patterns of fracturing. Planned activities of the study include compilation of available geohydrologic and water quality data, such as groundwater levels, geohydrologic properties of aquifers, chemical analyses, land use and water use data, and ancillary data such as digital satellite images. Additional geohydrologic and water quality data may be collected from existing wells or wells that may be drilled for this study. A computerized, geographic information system will be used as a data base management tool and

  17. Geochemical controls on fluoriferous groundwaters of the Pliocene and the more recent aquifers: The case of Aigion region, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsanou, K.; Siavalas, G.; Lambrakis, N.

    2013-12-01

    High fluoride concentrations (> 8 mg/L) in the groundwater of the Plio-Pleistocene sediments are rare; however, this is the case around Aigion town, where teeth fluorosis has been detected since the 80s. Aiming to investigate the origin and the mobility mechanism of fluorine in groundwater and sediments a hydrogeological and geochemical research has been conducted. The hydrogeological research revealed that the Na-HCO3 water type of boreholes aligned along a fault and hosted in the confined aquifers display the higher fluoride content. The unconfined aquifer is mostly dominated by Na-Ca-Mg-HCO3-SO4 water, which displays much lower fluoride concentrations. The most permeable sectors of this aquifer host fresh water of Ca-HCO3 type. The geochemical research revealed significant amount of fluorine in the base of a lignite sequence hosted in the Plio-Pleistocene sediments.

  18. Plan of study for the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain Regional Aquifer System Analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meisler, Harold

    1980-01-01

    Sediments of Cretaceous to Holocene age compose the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain aquifer system in an area of 50,000 square miles in parts of New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina. The aquifer system is a major source of water supply in the area. About 1.4 billion gallons is withdrawn from its aquifers each day. Increasing withdrawal of ground water has created or intensified several problems such as declining water levels, development of large cones of depression, saltwater intrusion, spreading of ground-water contamination, and land subsidence. The U.S. Geological Survey has begun a comprehensive study that will define the geology, hydrology, and geochemistry of the aquifer system. The effects of future utilization of the aquifer system will be determined and alternative plans for water withdrawal will be evaluated through computer simulation modeling. This report describes the objectives, organization, and work plans of the study, and describes the work to be accomplished in each U.S. Geological Survey District of the study area.

  19. Non-aqueous-phase fluids in heterogeneous aquifers -- experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Illangasekare, T.H.; Yates, D.N.; Armbruster, E.J. III.

    1995-08-01

    Understanding of flow and entrapment of non-aqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) in aquifers contaminated with organic chemicals is important in the effective design of recovery and remediation schemes. Soil heterogeneities play a significant role in the physical behavior of these chemicals. An experimental facility consisting of a large soil tank (lysimeter) and a dual-gamma spectroscopy system for fluid saturation measurements was developed to simulate and monitor plume migration in water-table aquifers after chemical spills. Experimental techniques and results form a preliminary set of experiments conducted in unsaturated and saturated soils under homogeneous and heterogeneous conditions are presented. the effects of the layered homogeneities were pronounced in modifying the migration pattern and velocity of the plume. Pockets of coarse sand placed across the path of the plume resulted in the soil acting as a light NAPL trap. A fine-sand pocket acted as a barrier. Qualitative and quantitative data generated in the type of experiments presented in this paper can be used to validate multiphase flow models.

  20. Study to define points of entry for potential contaminants in limestone aquifers. [in Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, F. L.

    1973-01-01

    Visual examinations of both prints and transparencies from ERTS 1 and U-2 aircraft imagery provided a method for discovering possible points of entry of potential contaminants into the limestone aquifer in Madison County, Alabama. Knowledge of the locations at which contaminants could enter the aquifer is an important consideration in water quality management, particularly for regions that depend, at least partially, on ground water for their water supply. ERTS 1 imagery recorded on December 28, 1972 in the Multispectral Scanner-5 (MSS-5) and MSS-7 bands, and a false-color composite of the MSS-4 (green), MSS-5 (red), and MSS-7 (near infrared) bands were the principal materials used, along with thermography recorded by an RS-7 infrared scanner onboard a U-2 aircraft. The results of the study are discussed in detail, providing information on prominent lineations and major fracture trends which are related to aquifer contamination. Maps depicting the observations are also presented.

  1. A multiscale modeling study for the convective mass transfer in a subsurface aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Jahrul M.

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative and realistic computer simulations of mass transfer associated with disposal in subsurface aquifers is a challenging endeavor. This article has proposed a novel and efficient multiscale modeling framework, and has examined its potential to study the penetrative mass transfer in a plume that migrates in an aquifer. Numerical simulations indicate that the migration of the injected enhances the vorticity generation, and the dissolution of has a strong effect on the natural convection mass transfer. The vorticity decays with the increase of the porosity. The time scale of the vertical migration of a plume is strongly dependent on the rate of dissolution. Comparisons confirm the near optimal performance of the proposed multiscale model. These primary results with an idealized computational model of the migration in an aquifer brings the potential of the proposed multiscale model to the field of heat and mass transfer in the geoscience.

  2. Preliminary study of the aquifers of the lower Mesilla Valley in Texas and New Mexico by model simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gates, J.S.; White, D.E.; Leggat, E.R.

    1984-01-01

    Because the salinity of water in all three aquifers south of Canutillo is greater than elsewhere in the study area, there is potential for movement of this water northward toward the Canutillo well field if the cone of depression reaches that part of the aquifer system. This potential should be evaluated in future geohydrologic studies of the lower Mesilla Valley.

  3. Enumeration and Biomass Estimation of Bacteria in Aquifer Microcosm Studies by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    DeLeo, P. C.; Baveye, P.

    1996-01-01

    Flow cytometry was used to enumerate and characterize bacteria from a sand column microcosm simulating aquifer conditions. Pure cultures of a species of Bacillus isolated from subsurface sediments or Bacillus megaterium were first evaluated to identify these organisms' characteristic histograms. Counting was then carried out with samples from the aquifer microcosms. Enumeration by flow cytometry was compared with more-traditional acridine orange direct counting. These two techniques gave statistically similar results. However, counting by flow cytometry, in this case, surveyed a sample size 700 times greater than did acridine orange direct counting (25 (mu)l versus 0.034 (mu)l) and required 1/10 the time (2 h versus 20 h). Flow cytometry was able to distinguish the same species of bacteria grown under different nutrient conditions, and it could distinguish changes in cell growth patterns, specifically single cell growth versus chained cell growth in different regions of an aquifer microcosm. A biomass estimate was calculated by calibrating the total fluorescence of a sample from a pure culture with the dry weight of a freeze-dried volume from the original pure culture. Growth conditions significantly affected histograms and biomass estimates, so the calibration was carried out with cells grown under conditions similar to those in the aquifer microcosm. Costs associated with using flow cytometry were minimal compared with the amount of time saved in counting cells and estimating biomass. PMID:16535470

  4. LABORATORY STUDIES ON THE STABILITY AND TRANSPORT OF INORGANIC COLLOIDS THROUGH NATURAL AQUIFER MATERIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The stability and transport of radio-labeled Fe2O3 particles were studied using laboratory batch and column techniques. Core material collected from shallow sand and gravel aquifer was used as the immobile column matrix material. Variables in the study included flow rate, pH, i...

  5. LABORATORY STUDIES ON THE STABILITY AND TRANSPORT OF INORGANIC COLLOIDS THROUGH NATURAL AQUIFER MATERIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The stability and transport of radio-labeled Fe2O3 particles were studied using laboratory batch and column techniques. Core material collected from shallow sand and gravel aquifer was used as the immobile column matrix material. Variables in the study included flow rate, pH, i...

  6. A General Solution for Groundwater Flow in Estuarine Leaky Aquifer System with Considering Aquifer Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Chia; Chuang, Mo-Hsiung; Tan, Yih-Chi

    2014-05-01

    In recent years the urban and industrial developments near the coastal area are rapid and therefore the associated population grows dramatically. More and more water demand for human activities, agriculture irrigation, and aquaculture relies on heavy pumping in coastal area. The decline of groundwater table may result in the problems of seawater intrusion and/or land subsidence. Since the 1950s, numerous studies focused on the effect of tidal fluctuation on the groundwater flow in the coastal area. Many studies concentrated on the developments of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) analytical solutions describing the tide-induced head fluctuations. For example, Jacob (1950) derived an analytical solution of 1D groundwater flow in a confined aquifer with a boundary condition subject to sinusoidal oscillation. Jiao and Tang (1999) derived a 1D analytical solution of a leaky confined aquifer by considered a constant groundwater head in the overlying unconfined aquifer. Jeng et al. (2002) studied the tidal propagation in a coupled unconfined and confined costal aquifer system. Sun (1997) presented a 2D solution for groundwater response to tidal loading in an estuary. Tang and Jiao (2001) derived a 2D analytical solution in a leaky confined aquifer system near open tidal water. This study aims at developing a general analytical solution describing the head fluctuations in a 2D estuarine aquifer system consisted of an unconfined aquifer, a confined aquifer, and an aquitard between them. Both the confined and unconfined aquifers are considered to be anisotropic. The predicted head fluctuations from this solution will compare with the simulation results from the MODFLOW program. In addition, the solutions mentioned above will be shown to be special cases of the present solution. Some hypothetical cases regarding the head fluctuation in costal aquifers will be made to investigate the dynamic effects of water table fluctuation, hydrogeological conditions, and

  7. Estimating the hydrogeological parameters of an unconfined aquifer with the time-lapse resistivity-imaging method during pumping tests: Case studies at the Pengtsuo and Dajou sites, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ping-Yu; Chang, Lian-Cheng; Hsu, Shao-Yiu; Tsai, Jui-Pin; Chen, Wen-Fu

    2017-09-01

    We conducted time-lapse resistivity imaging during pumping tests at the Pengtsuo and Dajou test sites in Taiwan in order to examine the feasibility of estimating hydrogeological parameters with resistivity variations. Core logs reveal that the subsurface consists mainly of at least 100-m-thick gravel and sand at the two test sites. The resistivity differences between the pumping stages and pre-pumping background are well correlated to water level changes that are due to the dewatering of pumping activity. Therefore, it is possible to use the geometry of resistivity anomalies to estimate the hydraulic conductivity of the unconfined aquifer using the distance-drawdown equation for pumping tests in unsaturated aquifers. For each site, we used the contours of resistivity variations and recorded water levels in the pumping well to depict the bottom of the drawdown cone. The estimated hydraulic conductivity and specific yield, respectively, are 1.33 × 10- 4 m/s and 0.12 at the Pengtsuo site, and are 2.50 × 10- 4 m/s and 0.22 at the Dajou site. These values are consistent with the parameters that engineers from Taiwan Sugar Company calculated previously regarding groundwater-level variations in multiple wells (9.65 × 10- 5 m/s and 0.13 at Pengtsuo, and 1.00 × 10- 3 m/s and 0.19 at Dajou). This consistency suggests that resistivity imaging can perhaps serve as an alternative way to yield information about hydrogeological parameters.

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS INFLUENCING METHANOGENESIS IN A SHALLOW ANOXIC AQUIFER: A FIELD AND LABORATORY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental factors influencing methanogenesis in a shallow anoxic aquifer were probed in a combined field and laboratory study. Field data collected over a year revealed that in situ rates of methane production were depressed in winter and elevated in summer. Over the same...

  9. Influence of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) on groundwater chemistry: an overview of several cases in Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Possemiers, Mathias; Huysmans, Marijke; Batelaan, Okke

    2013-04-01

    Environmental concerns and an increasing pressure on fossil fuels cause a rapidly growing interest in renewable energy. An interesting provider of such renewable energy is Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES), where groundwater in the aquifer is used as storage medium for summer heat and winter cold. The number of ATES systems has been continually increasing over the last years and will continue to increase in the future. Because ATES is often applied in aquifers also used for the production of drinking water, drinking water companies and environmental agencies are concerned about the impact of all these ATES systems on the groundwater quality in the long term. Because most ATES systems operate at relatively small temperature differences, ranging to several °C above and below the natural groundwater temperature, several studies show that the temperature influence on the groundwater quality is negligible. Mixing of the water column, on the other hand, possibly affects groundwater quality. The water is often extracted over a large portion of the aquifer in order to come to the desired flow rates. The composition of the groundwater on this interval may, however, differ from the top to the bottom by interaction with the surrounding aquifer material. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence that Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage may have on the groundwater quality. Therefore the groundwater chemistry around seven ATES installations in the north of Belgium (Flanders) is evaluated. The selected ATES systems are located in several aquifers, which have major groundwater resources. The warm and cold wells of the different ATES installations were sampled and analyzed for the main chemical constituents during 4 to 7 years. The time series of the different chemical compounds are investigated per ATES well and compared with time series of several monitoring wells in the exploited aquifer. Results confirm that the temperatures occurring in the ATES systems do not affect

  10. Colloid Mobilization in Two Atlantic Coastal Plain Aquifers: Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Joseph N.; Gschwend, Philip M.

    1990-02-01

    The geochemical mechanisms leading to the mobilization of colloids in groundwater were investigated in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey and in rural central Delaware by sampling pairs of wells screened in oxic and anoxic groundwaters in the same geologic formations. Samples were carefully taken at very low flow rates (˜100 mL min-1) to avoid suspending immobilized particles. The colloidal matter was characterized by light-scattering photometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X ray analysis, microelectrophoresis, and Fe, Al, Si, and organic carbon analyses. The colloids, composed primarily of clays, were observed at high concentrations (up to 60 mg colloids/L) in the anoxic groundwaters, while the oxic groundwaters exhibited ≤1 mg colloids/L. Colloidal organic carbon was present in all groundwaters; but under anoxic conditions, one-third to one-half of the total organic carbon was associated with the inorganic colloids. The field evidence indicates that anoxic conditions cause the mobilization of soil colloids by dissolving the ferric oxyhydroxide coatings cementing the clay particles to the aquifer solids. The depletion of oxidized iron on the surfaces of immobile particles and the addition of organic carbon coatings on the soil particles and colloids apparently stabilizes the colloidal suspension in the anoxic groundwaters.

  11. Biofilm resilience to desiccation in groundwater aquifers: a laboratory and field study.

    PubMed

    Weaver, L; Webber, J B; Hickson, A C; Abraham, P M; Close, M E

    2015-05-01

    Groundwater is used as a precious resource for drinking water worldwide. Increasing anthropogenic activity is putting increasing pressure on groundwater resources. One impact of increased groundwater abstraction coupled with increasing dry weather events is the lowering of groundwater levels within aquifers. Biofilms within groundwater aquifers offer protection to the groundwater by removing contaminants entering the aquifer systems from land use activities. The study presented investigated the impact of desiccation events on the biofilms present in groundwater aquifers using field and laboratory experiments. In both field and laboratory experiments a reduction in enzyme activity (glucosidase, esterase and phosphatase) was seen during desiccation compared to wet controls. However, comparing all the data together no significant differences were seen between either wet or desiccated samples or between the start and end of the experiments. In both field and laboratory experiments enzyme activity recovered to start levels after return to wet conditions. The study shows that biofilms within groundwater systems are resilient and can withstand periods of desiccation (4 months). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Interlaboratory study of a method for determining nonvolatile organic carbon in aquifer materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caughey, M.E.; Barcelona, M.J.; Powell, R.M.; Cahill, R.A.; Gron, C.; Lawrenz, D.; Meschi, P.L.

    1995-01-01

    The organic carbon fraction in aquifer materials exerts a major influence on the subsurface mobilities of organic and organic-associated contaminants. The spatial distribution of total organic carbon (TOC) in aquifer materials must be determined before the transport of hydrophobic organic pollutants in aquifers can be modeled accurately. Previous interlaboratory studies showed that it is difficult to measure TOC concentrations 1%. We have tested a new analytical method designed to improve the accuracy and precision of nonvolatile TOC quantitation in geologic materials that also contain carbonate minerals. Four authentic aquifer materials and one NIST standard reference material were selected as test materials for a blind collaborative study. Nonvolatile TOC in these materials ranged from 0.05 to 1.4%, while TIC ranged from 0.46 to 12.6%. Sample replicates were digested with sulfurous acid, dried at 40??C, and then combusted at 950??C using LECO or UIC instruments. For the three test materials that contained >2% TIC, incomplete acidification resulted in a systematic positive bias of TOC values reported by five of the six laboratories that used the test method. Participants did not have enough time to become proficient with the new method before they analyzed the test materials. A seventh laboratory successfully used an alternative method that analyzed separate liquid and solid fractions of the acidified sample residues. ?? 1995 Springer-Verlag.

  13. Comparative study of microbial dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes in an aquifer and a clayey aquitard.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Mio; Kawabe, Yoshishige; Watanabe, Eiji; Oiwa, Toshio; Takahashi, Manabu; Nanba, Kenji; Kamagata, Yoichi; Hanada, Satoshi; Ohko, Yoshihisa; Komai, Takeshi

    2011-06-01

    In order to determine whether natural attenuation of chlorinated ethenes by microbial activity occurs in aquitards, sediments at a site contaminated with tetrachloroethene were vertically studied by drilling. The distribution of microbes (Dehalococcoides group and anaerobic hydrogen producers) and the ability of the sediments to sustain microbial dechlorination were determined in an aquitard as well as in an aquifer. Close-spaced sampling revealed the existence of large populations of Dehalococcoides and H(2)-producing bacteria, especially in the organic-rich clayey aquitard rather than in the aquifer. The vinyl chloride reductase gene was also detected in the clay layer. Furthermore, incubation experiments indicated that the clay sediment could sustain transformations of tetrachloroethene at least to vinyl chloride. In contrast, no significant transformation was observed in the aquifer sand. Our results indicate that dechlorination of tetrachloroethene by bacteria can take place in an organic-rich clayey aquitard, and that organic-rich clay may also be important in the natural attenuation in an adjacent aquifer, possibly supplying a carbon source or an electron donor.

  14. Study of sensitivity of hydraulic properties of unconfined aquifer with oscillatory pumping test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulain, A.; Goderniaux, P.

    2016-12-01

    Oscillatory pumping tests provide several advantages compared to classical hydraulic tests. The frequency of the induced stresses is known, and the aquifer response can be isolated quite easily from any possible noise, so that the accuracy of the results is improved. Another advantage relates to the fact that there is no net extraction or injection of groundwater over the total duration of the test. In contaminated sites, the possible plume of pollutant is potentially less affected and there is no cost related to water treatment. Recently, several studies have shown that multi-frequency sinusoidal pumping tests may be able to characterize the aquifer properties and their spatial distribution. However, most of the performed oscillatory tests have being conducted and studied in confined aquifers. The idea of this work is to investigate the use the sinusoidal pumping tests in unconfined aquifers, to performed a sensitivity analysis of the method, and to applied it in the field. Generic sinusoidal pumping tests have been numerically simulated. A sensitivity analysis was performed using a coupling between Modflow and Ucode_2005. The amplitude and the phase shift of the groundwater head fluctuation around the solicited well were considered relatively to the flow hydraulic parameters. Periodic pumping tests have been carried out in two different unconfined aquifers, composed of (1) fractured chalk and (2) fractured and slightly karstified limestone. In both experimental sites, pumping/injection cycles have been imposed to the water table with different frequencies. Groundwater heads were monitored in the well and in an adjacent observation piezometer. Measured data were automatically calibrated, to estimate the hydraulic parameters. Results were compared for different sets of observations. The calibrated hydraulic conductivity is generally quite similar to values calculated with classical pumping tests. The specified yield values are however lower.

  15. Reductive dissolution of Mn oxides in river-recharged aquifers: a laboratory column study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrunic, B. M.; MacQuarrie, K. T. B.; Al, T. A.

    2005-01-01

    River-recharged aquifers are developed for drinking water supplies in many parts of the world. Often, however, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) present in the infiltrating river water causes biogeochemical reactions to occur in the adjacent aquifer that create elevated Mn and Fe. Mn concentrations in groundwater from some of the production wells installed in the aquifer at Fredericton, New Brunswick exceed the Canadian Drinking Water Guideline of 9.1×10 -4 mmol/l by up to 5.5×10 -2 mmol/l. It has previously been hypothesized that the influx of DOC from the Saint John River is causing bacterially mediated reductive dissolution of Mn oxides in the aquifer system, leading to elevated aqueous Mn concentrations. Previous work was limited to the collection of water samples from production wells and several observation wells installed in the glacial outwash aquifer. The objective of this study was to investigate the biogeochemical controls on Mn concentrations using sand-filled columns. One column was inoculated with bacteria while a second column was treated with ethanol in order to decrease the microbial population initially present in the system. Both columns received the same influent solution that contained acetate as a source of DOC. The results of the experiments suggested that the two main controls on Mn concentrations in the columns were microbially mediated reductive dissolution of Mn oxides and cation exchange. The conceptual model that was developed based on the experimental data was supported by the results obtained using a one-dimensional reactive-transport model. The reductive dissolution of Mn oxides in the aquifer sands could be adequately simulated using dual-Monod kinetics. Similar trends are observed in the experimental data and field data collected from Production Well 5, located in the Fredericton Aquifer. From the experiments, it is evident that cation-exchange reactions may be an important geochemical control on Mn concentrations during the initial

  16. Studying the flow dynamics of a karst aquifer system with an equivalent porous medium model.

    PubMed

    Abusaada, Muath; Sauter, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The modeling of groundwater flow in karst aquifers is a challenge due to the extreme heterogeneity of its hydraulic parameters and the duality in their discharge behavior, that is, rapid response of highly conductive karst conduits and delayed drainage of the low-permeability fractured matrix after recharge events. There are a number of different modeling approaches for the simulation of the karst groundwater dynamics, applicable to different aquifer as well as modeling problem types, ranging from continuum models to double continuum models to discrete and hybrid models. This study presents the application of an equivalent porous model approach (EPM, single continuum model) to construct a steady-state numerical flow model for an important karst aquifer, that is, the Western Mountain Aquifer Basin (WMAB), shared by Israel and the West-Bank, using MODFLOW2000. The WMAB was used as a catchment since it is a well-constrained catchment with well-defined recharge and discharge components and therefore allows a control on the modeling approach, a very rare opportunity for karst aquifer modeling. The model demonstrates the applicability of equivalent porous medium models for the simulation of karst systems, despite their large contrast in hydraulic conductivities. As long as the simulated saturated volume is large enough to average out the local influence of karst conduits and as long as transport velocities are not an issue, EPM models excellently simulate the observed head distribution. The model serves as a starting basis that will be used as a reference for developing a long-term dynamic model for the WMAB, starting from the pre-development period (i.e., 1940s) up to date. © 2012, The Author(s). GroundWater © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  17. Regional flow in the Dakota aquifer; a study of the role of confining layers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bredehoeft, John D.; Neuzil, C.E.; Milly, P.C.

    1983-01-01

    The Dakota Sandstone in South Dakota is one of the classic artesian aquifers; it was first studied by N. H. Darton at the turn of the century. Since then, hydrogeologists have debated the source of the large quantities of water which have been discharged by artesian flow from the Dakota. Among suggestions for the source of this water are (1) recharge of the aquifer at outcrops in the Black Hills, (2) compaction and compressive storage within the aquifer, (3)leakage through confining layers, and (4) upward flow from the underlying Madison Group limestones. A series of increasingly refined models of the aquifer system in South Dakota have been developed and used for numerical simulations of the ground-water flow. The simulations have provided estimates of leakage through the confining layers. The results indicate that, before development, most of the flow into and out of the Dakota Sandstone occurred as leakage through confining layers and, since development, most of the water released from storage has come from the confining layers. In situ and laboratory hydraulic conductivity measurements have been made for the Cretaceous shale confining layer which overlies the Dakota. These data indicate hydraulic conductivities which are one to three orders of magnitude lower than the conductivities indicated by the numerical analyses; this suggests that the leakage through the confining layer is largely through fractures. The fractures apparently did not influence the laboratory and in situ measurements. To test the conception of flow in the aquifer-confining layer system derived from our analyses, the transport of sulfate in the system was simulated. Simulations using a numerical ground-water transport model were reasonably successful in explaining the present distribution of sulfate in the system. This result increases confidence in the flow system implied by the flow simulations in which leakage through confining layers is dominant.

  18. Study of quaternary aquifers in Ganga Plain, India: focus on groundwater salinity, fluoride and fluorosis.

    PubMed

    Misra, Anil Kumar; Mishra, Ajai

    2007-06-01

    In marginal and central alluvial plains (Ganga Plain) of India, the inland salinity is continuously increasing, canal network and arid to semi-arid climatic conditions that led to excessive evapotranspiration concentrates the salt in soil and thereby escalating the groundwater salinity. In Mat Tahsil, Mathura district (Ganga Plain) study on shallow and deep aquifer salinity and fluoride was carried out in August 2001 and 2004. Groundwater salinity in some parts is more then 4000 microOmega(-1)/cm. This region is severely affected by endemic fluorosis due to consumption of fluoride-contaminated water. Analysis of F(-), Na(+), K(+), Cl(-) and HCO(3)(-) was carried out at 30 sites of dugwells and borewells. Result shows that there is a variation and continuous escalation in the groundwater salinity and fluoride concentration in deep and shallow aquifers on the basis of analysis. Classification of salinity levels was carried out in 2001 and 2004. The deep aquifers (borewells) are found more saline as compare to the shallow aquifers (dugwells) while F(-), Na(+), K(+), Cl(-) and HCO(3)(-) shows high concentration in shallow aquifers. The fluoride concentration in the groundwater of these villages showed values from 0.1 to 2.5mg/l, severe enough to cause dental and skeletal fluorosis among the inhabitants, especially children of these villages. One of the major effects of inland salinity in this region is from saline groundwater, which is reaching the land surface and causing soil salinisations and water logging in the NE and SE parts of Mat block.

  19. Case Study: Testing with Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2015-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses using case studies to test for knowledge or lessons learned.

  20. Case Study: Testing with Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2015-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses using case studies to test for knowledge or lessons learned.

  1. Geophysical characterization of saltwater intrusion in a coastal aquifer: The case of Martil-Alila plain (North Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himi, Mahjoub; Tapias, Josefiina; Benabdelouahab, Sara; Salhi, Adil; Rivero, Luis; Elgettafi, Mohamed; El Mandour, Abdenabi; Stitou, Jamal; Casas, Albert

    2017-02-01

    Several factors can affect the quantity and the quality of groundwater resources, but in coastal aquifers seawater intrusion is often the most significant issue regarding freshwater supply. Further, saltwater intrusion is a worldwide issue because about seventy percent of the world's population lives in coastal regions. Generally, fresh groundwater not affected by saltwater intrusion is characterized by low salinity and therefore low electrical conductivity (EC) values. Consequently, high values of EC in groundwater along the coastline are usually associated to seawater intrusion. This effect is amplified if the coastal aquifer is overexploited with a subsequent gradual displacement of the freshwater-saltwater interface towards the continent. Delineation of marine intrusion in coastal aquifers has traditionally relied upon observation wells and collection of water samples. This approach may miss important hydrologic features related to saltwater intrusion in areas where access is difficult and where wells are widely spaced. Consequently, the scarcity of sampling points and sometimes their total absence makes the number of data available limited and most of the time not representative for mapping the spatial and temporal variability of groundwater salinity. In this study, we use a series of geophysical methods for characterizing the aquifer geometry and the extension of saltwater intrusion in the Martil-Alila coastal region (Morocco) as a complement to geological and hydrogeochemical data. For this reason, we carried out three geophysical surveys: Gravity, Electrical Resistivity and Frequency Domain Electromagnetic. The geometry of the basin has been determined from the interpretation of a detailed gravity survey. Electrical resistivity models derived from vertical electrical soundings allowed to characterize the vertical and the lateral extensions of aquifer formations. Finally, frequency domain electromagnetic methods allowed delineating the extension of the

  2. Investigating the Hydro-geochemical Impact of Fugitive Methane on Groundwater: The Borden Aquifer Controlled Release Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, A. G.; Parker, B. L.; Cherry, J. A.; Mayer, K. U.; Mayer, B.; Ryan, C.

    2014-12-01

    Shale gas development by hydraulic fracturing is believed by many to have the potential to transform the world's energy economy. The propensity of this technique to cause significant environmental impact is strongly contested and lacks evidence. Fugitive methane (CH4), potentially mobilized during well drilling, the complex extraction process and/or leaking well seals over time is arguably the greatest concern. Advanced understanding of CH4 mobility and fate in the subsurface is needed in order to assess risks, design suitable monitoring systems and gain public trust. Currently knowledge on subsurface CH4 mobilization and migration at scales relevant to shale gas development is lacking. Consequently a shallow aquifer controlled CH4 release experiment is being conducted at the Borden aquifer research facility (an unconfined, unconsolidated silicate sand aquifer) in Ontario, Canada. During the experiment, 100 m3 of gas phase CH4 was injected into the saturated zone over approximately 60 days through 2 inclined sparging wells (4.5 and 9 m depth) at rates relevant to natural gas well casing vent flows. The gas mobility and fate is being comprehensively monitored temporally and spatially in both the saturated and unsaturated zones considering; aqueous chemistry (including stable isotopes), soil gas characterization, surface efflux, geophysics (GPR and ERT), real time sensors (total dissolved gas pressure, soil moisture content, CH4 and CO2), mineralogical and microbiological characterization before, during and after injection. An overview of this unique study will be given including experimental design, monitoring system configuration and preliminary results. This multidisciplinary study will provide important insights regarding the mechanisms and rates for shallow CH4 migration, attenuation and water quality impacts that will inform baseline groundwater monitoring programs and retrospective forensic studies.

  3. Investigating the Hydro-geochemical Impact of Fugitive Methane on Groundwater: The Borden Aquifer Controlled Release Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, A. G.; Parker, B. L.; Cherry, J. A.; Mayer, K. U.; Mayer, B.; Ryan, C.

    2015-12-01

    Shale gas development by hydraulic fracturing is believed by many to have the potential to transform the world's energy economy. The propensity of this technique to cause significant environmental impact is strongly contested and lacks evidence. Fugitive methane (CH4), potentially mobilized during well drilling, the complex extraction process and/or leaking well seals over time is arguably the greatest concern. Advanced understanding of CH4 mobility and fate in the subsurface is needed in order to assess risks, design suitable monitoring systems and gain public trust. Currently knowledge on subsurface CH4 mobilization and migration at scales relevant to shale gas development is lacking. Consequently a shallow aquifer controlled CH4 release experiment is being conducted at the Borden aquifer research facility (an unconfined, unconsolidated silicate sand aquifer) in Ontario, Canada. During the experiment, 100 m3 of gas phase CH4 was injected into the saturated zone over approximately 60 days through 2 inclined sparging wells (4.5 and 9 m depth) at rates relevant to natural gas well casing vent flows. The gas mobility and fate is being comprehensively monitored temporally and spatially in both the saturated and unsaturated zones considering; aqueous chemistry (including stable isotopes), soil gas characterization, surface efflux, geophysics (GPR and ERT), real time sensors (total dissolved gas pressure, soil moisture content, CH4 and CO2), mineralogical and microbiological characterization before, during and after injection. An overview of this unique study will be given including experimental design, monitoring system configuration and preliminary results. This multidisciplinary study will provide important insights regarding the mechanisms and rates for shallow CH4 migration, attenuation and water quality impacts that will inform baseline groundwater monitoring programs and retrospective forensic studies.

  4. Fault Zone Hydrogeology of Crystalline and Sedimentary Aquifers in Arid Regions: The Case Sinai Peninsula, Egypt.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M.; Mohamed, L.; Sultan, M.; Farag, A. Z. A.

    2015-12-01

    Structural control on the groundwater flow in arid regions is still poorly understood. Understanding the distribution of structural discontinuities (i.e. faults, joints and shear zones), their cross cutting relationships, and their relation with the regional hydraulic gradient are critical for deciphering the complexity of water resources distribution in the highly fractured crystalline and sedimentary aquifers in Sinai. In order to achieve that, we conducted an integrated approach using remote sensing, geophysical and hydrogeological datasets: (1) identification of the spatial and temporal rainfall events using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data; (2) delineation of major faults and shear zones using Landsat 8 and ASTER image ratioing, geological datasets and field investigation; (3) generation of a normalized difference ratio image using Envisat radar images before and after the rain events to identify preferential water-channeling discontinuities in the crystalline terrain; (4) validation of the water-channeling discontinuities using Very Low Frequency (VLF) method; (5) generation of regional groundwater flow and isotopic (18O and 2H ) distribution maps for the sedimentary aquifer and an approximation flow map for the crystalline aquifer; (6) developing a conceptual model for the groundwater flow in the fractured crystalline and sedimentary aquifers; (7) testing the model accuracy using Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) method in seven locations. Our findings include: (1) in the crystalline aquifer, discontinuities that are sub-parallel to groundwater flow direction act as preferred pathways for groundwater flow, whereas those that intersect groundwater flow directions at high angles act as barriers causing considerable groundwater accumulations at the upstream side; (2) in the sedimentary aquifer, high angle E-W discontinuities (i.e. Themed shear zone and Sinai Hinge Belt) cause a considerable groundwater elevation, redirection of the groundwater

  5. Estimation of intrinsic aquifer vulnerability with index-overlay and statistical methods: the case of eastern Kopaida, central Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziritis, E.; Lombardo, L.

    2017-09-01

    The intrinsic vulnerability of a karstic aquifer system in central Greece was jointly assessed with the use of a statistical approach and PI method, as a function of topography, protective cover effectiveness and the degree to which this cover is bypassed due to flow conditions. The input data for the index-overlay PI method were derived from field works and 71 boreholes of the area; the information was obtained, subsequently its critical factors were compiled which included lithology, fissuring and karstification of bedrock, soil characteristics, hydrology, hydrogeology, topography and vegetation. The aforementioned parameters were processed jointly with the aid of a GIS and yielded the final estimation of intrinsic aquifer vulnerability to contamination. Results were compared with an equivalent spatially distributed probability map obtained through a stochastic approach. The calibration and test phase of the latter relied on morphometric conditions derived by terrain analyses of a digital elevation model as well as on geology and land use from thematic maps. This procedure allowed taking into account the topographic influences with respect to a deep system such as the local karstic aquifer of eastern Kopaida basin. Finally, results were validated with ground truth nitrate values obtained from 41 groundwater samples, highlighted the spatial delineation of susceptible areas to contamination in both cases and provided a robust tool for regional planning actions and water resources management schemes.

  6. Estimation of intrinsic aquifer vulnerability with index-overlay and statistical methods: the case of eastern Kopaida, central Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziritis, E.; Lombardo, L.

    2016-03-01

    The intrinsic vulnerability of a karstic aquifer system in central Greece was jointly assessed with the use of a statistical approach and PI method, as a function of topography, protective cover effectiveness and the degree to which this cover is bypassed due to flow conditions. The input data for the index-overlay PI method were derived from field works and 71 boreholes of the area; the information was obtained, subsequently its critical factors were compiled which included lithology, fissuring and karstification of bedrock, soil characteristics, hydrology, hydrogeology, topography and vegetation. The aforementioned parameters were processed jointly with the aid of a GIS and yielded the final estimation of intrinsic aquifer vulnerability to contamination. Results were compared with an equivalent spatially distributed probability map obtained through a stochastic approach. The calibration and test phase of the latter relied on morphometric conditions derived by terrain analyses of a digital elevation model as well as on geology and land use from thematic maps. This procedure allowed taking into account the topographic influences with respect to a deep system such as the local karstic aquifer of eastern Kopaida basin. Finally, results were validated with ground truth nitrate values obtained from 41 groundwater samples, highlighted the spatial delineation of susceptible areas to contamination in both cases and provided a robust tool for regional planning actions and water resources management schemes.

  7. Plan of study for the regional aquifer systems analysis of the Michigan Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mandle, Richard J.

    1986-01-01

    Quaternary glacial deposits and Pennsylvanian and Mississippian sandstones, -the Saginaw Formation and Marshall Sandstone- are the major aquifers in the Michigan basin. These aquifers supply approximately 188 million gal/day to municipalities in the 29 ,000 sq mi study area. The most significant problems related to groundwater supplies are the identification of potable sources of groundwater in large quantities and the migration of saline groundwater toward pumping centers. Saline water underlies the entire lower Peninsula of Michigan at indeterminate depth in the deeper parts of the Saginaw Formation and Marshall Sandstone in the center of the Michigan basin. In places, saline water is present in glacial deposits. Overdraft has resulted in severe drawdown in the Lansing area and the abandonment of wells near Flint because of saline water encroachment. Increased demand on the groundwater resources of the study area are expected to cause further problems. In 1985, the U.S. Geological Survey began a 5-yr study to define the geohydrologic framework, describe the geochemistry of groundwater in the glacial and bedrock aquifers, and analyze regional groundwater flow patterns. The scope, plan of study, organization and work elements are described in this report.

  8. Gravimetry contributions to the study of the complex western Haouz aquifer (Morocco): Structural and hydrogeological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouikri, Ibtissam; el Mandour, Abdennabi; Jaffal, Mohammed; Baudron, Paul; García-Aróstegui, José-Luis; Manar, Ahmed; Casas, Albert

    2016-03-01

    This study provides new elements that illustrate the benefits of combining gravity, structural, stratigraphic and piezometric data for hydrogeological purposes. A combined methodology was applied to the western Haouz aquifer (Morocco), one of the main sources of water for irrigation and human consumption in the Marrakech region. First, a residual anomaly map was calculated from the Bouguer anomaly data. The computed map provided information on the ground density variation, revealing a strong control by a regional gradient. We then used various filtering techniques to delineate the major geological structures such as faults and basins: vertical and horizontal derivatives and upward continuation. This technique highlighted news structures and provided information on their dip. The gravity anomalies perfectly delineated the basement uplifts and the sedimentary thickening in depressions and grabens. The interpretation of gravimetric filtering, geological and hydrogeological data then highlighted two types of groundwater reservoirs, an unconfined aquifer hosted in conglomeratic mio-pliocene and quaternary rocks, covering the entire western Haouz and a deep confined aquifer contained in cenomanian-turonian limestone and eocene dolomitic formations in the south. Combining piezometric and residual anomaly maps revealed that groundwater flow and storage was in perfect agreement with the structures showing a negative anomaly, while structures with positive anomalies corresponded to groundwater divides. The study of gravity gradient zones by contact analysis enhanced the existing structural pattern of the study area and highlighted new structures, mainly oriented N70 and N130. The results of this study present a common framework and provide a notable step forward in the knowledge of the geometry and the groundwater flow pattern of the western Haouz aquifer, and will serve as a solid basis for a better water resource management.

  9. Numerical simulation of a steam-injection pilot study for a PCP-contaminated aquifer.

    PubMed

    Tse, Ken K C; Liou, Tai-Sheng; Lo, Shang-Lien

    2006-07-01

    The following study was focused on the simulation of a steam-injection field pilottest conducted in our past research. The scope of research contained two main subjects: heat transfer and contaminant transport when steam was injected into a pentachlorophenol (PCP)-contaminated aquifer. Numerical simulation of the heat transfer during the field test showed that vertical permeability is more influential to the distribution of water temperature than the horizontal permeability. If the vertical permeability is relatively high, the steam in the aquifer has a higher tendency to migrate upward and cause the aquifer temperature to rise faster. The simulation results also showed that heat convection is very sensitive to the soil permeability. Therefore, high permeability media makes the effect of heat convection more important on applying the steam-injection method. Heat conduction dominates the heat transfer within the hot aqueous zone. However, the hot aqueous zone is relatively smaller than the steam zone when steam is injected into the aquifer. Therefore, heat conduction is not as important as heat convection within the steam zone, which is the same result observed in the field test. Specific heat of soil media is also a sensitive factor. A numerical simulator, T2VOC, was utilized to simulate the PCP transport in the aquifer when steam was injected into the aquifer. The results showed that the shape of PCP distribution was identical to that of steam. It illustrated thatthe steam carried PCP upward and laterally. The high vertical soil permeability causes the steam to migrate upward with PCP easily. A low partitioning coefficient allows PCP to be desorbed easier, also an important factor. A majority of the PCP in the soil was transferred to the aqueous phase as the water temperature increased, showing similar results to those observed in the field test. According to the sensitivity analysis, PCP transport is more sensitive to the vertical permeability than the

  10. Digital spatial data for observed, predicted, and misclassification errors for observations in the training dataset for nitrate and arsenic concentrations in basin-fill aquifers in the Southwest Principal Aquifers study area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKinney, Tim S.; Anning, David W.

    2012-01-01

    This product "Digital spatial data for observed, predicted, and misclassification errors for observations in the training dataset for nitrate and arsenic concentrations in basin-fill aquifers in the Southwest Principal Aquifers study area" is a 1:250,000-scale point spatial dataset developed as part of a regional Southwest Principal Aquifers (SWPA) study (Anning and others, 2012). The study examined the vulnerability of basin-fill aquifers in the southwestern United States to nitrate contamination and arsenic enrichment. Statistical models were developed by using the random forest classifier algorithm to predict concentrations of nitrate and arsenic across a model grid that represents local- and basin-scale measures of source, aquifer susceptibility, and geochemical conditions.

  11. CO2 storage in heterogeneous aquifer: A study on the effect of temperature and mineral precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, A.; Gholami, R.; Rezaee, R.; Bing, C. H.; Nagarajan, R.; Hamid, M. A.

    2017-06-01

    CO2 storage in suitable geologic media has been recognized as a major strategy taken to have a carbon free environment. This practice can be done in depleted reservoirs as well as brine aquifers where sufficient storage capacity is available to hold carbon dioxide for thousands of years. Storage in an aquifer is often achieved through four trapping mechanisms, among which capillary trapping is a rapid and effective phenomenon. Although, there have been studies pointing out the relationships of different storage related factors with capillary trapping, more studies are still required to recognize other parameters linked to this effective trapping mechanism. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the effect of temperature and mineral precipitation on trapping mechanisms of heterogeneous aquifer. A dynamic numerical simulation was run by the commercial reservoir simulator Eclipse300 to simulate 30 years of CO2 injection. A synthetic but realistic model of a geologic formation was considered to evaluate the efficiency of trapping mechanisms under different temperature and mineral precipitation conditions. The results obtained indicated that trapping mechanisms are affected by both temperature and mineral precipitation in a short and long terms - temperature is indirectly affecting the trapping ability regardless of the precipitation effect. However, precipitation have a severe impact on injectivity as well as trapping mechanisms in the long term. Although some practical conclusions were drawn, the results obtained and presented in this study may need experimental verification before taking into serious consideration.

  12. Provenance of buried esker groundwater: the case of Vars-Winchester esker aquifer, Eastern Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauriol, Jacques

    2016-02-01

    An innovative mode of groundwater recharge to a buried esker aquifer is considered. The current conceptual model affords a natural safeguard to underlying aquifers from the overlying muds. A hypothesis of groundwater recharge to a buried esker aquifer via preferential pathways across its overlying muds is tested here by heuristic numerical one-dimensional and two-dimensional modeling simulations. The hypothesis has been tested against two other conventionally accepted scenarios involving: (1) distal esker outcrop areas and (2) remote shallow-bedrock recharge areas. The main evidence comes from documented recharge pressure pulses in the overlying mud aquitard and in the underlying esker hydraulic-head time series for the Vars-Winchester esker aquifer in Eastern Ontario, Canada. These perturbations to the potentiometric surface are believed to be the aquifer response to recharge events. The migration rate of these pressure pulses is directly related to the hydraulic diffusivity of the formation. The measured response time and response amplitude between singular radar precipitation events and well hydrographs constituted the heuristic model calibration targets. The main evidence also includes mud-layering deformation (water escape features) which was observed in seismic surveys of the over-esker muds. These disturbed stratigraphic elements provide a realistic mechanism for migrating water to transit through the muds. The effective hydraulic conductivities of these preferential pathways in the muds were estimated to be between 2 × 10-6 and 7 × 10-6 m/s. The implications of these findings relate to the alleged natural safeguard of these overlying muds.

  13. Geochemical studies of backfill aggregates, lake sediment cores and the Hueco Bolson Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapalia, Anita

    This dissertation comprises of three different researches that focuses on the application of geochemistry from aggregates, lake sediment cores and Hueco Bolson Aquifer. Each study is independent and presented in the publication format. The first chapter is already published and the second chapter is in revision phase. Overall, three studies measure the large scale (field) as well as bench scale (lab) water-rock interactions influenced by the climatic and anthropogenic factors spans from the field of environmental geology to civil engineering. The first chapter of this dissertation addresses the chemical evaluation of coarse aggregates from six different quarries in Texas. The goal of this work is to find out the best geochemical methods for assessing the corrosion potential of coarse aggregates prior to their use in mechanically stabilized earth walls. Electrochemical parameters help to define the corrosion potential of aggregates following two different leaching protocols. Testing the coarse and fine aggregates demonstrate the chemical difference due to size-related kinetic leaching effects. Field fines also show different chemistry than the bulk rock indicating the weathering impact on carbonate rocks. The second chapter investigates zinc (Zn) isotopic signatures from eight lake sediment cores collected both from pristine lakes and those impacted by urban anthropogenic contamination. Zinc from the natural weathering of rocks and anthropogenic atmospheric pollutants are transported to these lakes and the signatures are recorded in the sediments. Isotopic analysis of core samples provides the signature of anthropogenic contamination sources. Dated sediment core and isotopic analysis can identify Zn inputs that are correlated to the landuse and population change of the watersheds. Comparison of isotopic data from both pristine and urban lake sediment core also serves as an analog in other lake sediment cores in the world. The third chapter studies on Hueco Bolson

  14. Study of stable isotopes for highly deformed aquifers in the Hsinchu-Miaoli area, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hsueh-Yu; Peng, Tsung-Ren; Liu, Tsung-Kwei; Wang, Chung-Ho; Huang, Chih-Chao

    2006-08-01

    This study was based on the analysis of isotopic compositions of hydrogen and oxygen in samples from precipitation, groundwater and stream water. In addition, parts of groundwater samples were dated by carbon-14 and tritium. These data are integrated to provide other views of the hydrologic cycle in the Hsinchu-Miaoli groundwater district. The groundwater district is principally composed of Pleistocene and Holocene aquifers. The Pleistocene aquifers are highly deformed by folding and faults into small sub-districts with areas of only tens of square kilometers. These aquifers are exclusively recharged by local precipitation. The Holocene aquifers cover narrow creek valleys, only tens of meters in thickness. The local meteoric water line (LMWL), constructed from rainfall samples in the Hsinchu Science Park, is described by the equation δD=8.02δ18O+10.16, which agrees with the global meteoric water line. In addition, the precipitation isotopic compositions can be categorized into two distinct end members: typhoon type and monsoon type. The groundwater isotopic compositions are perfectly located on an LMWL and can be considered a mixture of precipitations. Based on the mass balance of isotopic compositions of oxygen and hydrogen, infiltration is more active in the rainy season with depleted isotopic compositions. The amount of infiltration during May-September is roughly estimated to comprise at least 55% of the whole year’s recharge. The isotopic compositions of stream water are expressed by a regression equation: δD=7.61δ18O+9.62, which is similar to the LMWL. Although precipitation isotopic compositions are depleted during summer time, the isotopic compositions contrarily show an enriched trend in the upstream area. This is explained by the opposite altitude effect on isotopic compositions for typhoon-related precipitations.

  15. A comparative study of artificial neural networks and support vector machines for predicting groundwater levels in a coastal aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Heesung; Jun, Seong-Chun; Hyun, Yunjung; Bae, Gwang-Ok; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2011-01-01

    SummaryWe have developed two nonlinear time-series models for predicting groundwater level (GWL) fluctuations using artificial neural networks (ANNs) and support vector machines (SVMs). The models were applied to GWL prediction of two wells at a coastal aquifer in Korea. Among the possible variables (past GWL, precipitation, and tide level) for an input structure, the past GWL was the most effective input variable for this study site. Tide level was more frequently selected as an input variable than precipitation. The results of the model performance show that root mean squared error (RMSE) values of ANN models are lower than those of SVM in model training and testing stages. However, the overall model performance criteria of the SVM are similar to or even better than those of the ANN in model prediction stage. The generalization ability of a SVM model is superior to an ANN model for input structures and lead times. The uncertainty analysis for model parameters detects an equifinality of model parameter sets and higher uncertainty for ANN model than SVM in this case. These results imply that the model-building process should be carefully conducted, especially when using ANN models for GWL forecasting in a coastal aquifer.

  16. Natural Attenuation Of Creosote Contamination In A Tidally Forced Anaerobic Aquifer: A Tracer Study Using C14-naphthalene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchin, M.; Lesser, L.; Smith, L.; Barker, J. F.; Butler, B.; Aravena, R.; Beckie, R.

    Historic practices at a wood-preserving facility along a major river in the lower main- land of British Columbia have contaminated the underlying tidally forced anaerobic aquifer. Creosote from the source zone, found mostly as an immobile separate phase, is dissolving and forming an aqueous-phase plume, which is discharging from the aquifer at the river bottom. Previous studies could only explain the plume shape by invoking an attenuation process such as degradation or sorption. A careful study of the on-shore portion of the aquifer using in-situ and laboratory microcosms could not detect any measurable degradation. Similarly, sorption could not explain the plume shape. Here we present the results of a tracer study conducted in the off-shore portion of the aquifer. C14-labeled naphthalene, bromide and deuterated water were intro- duced into the portion of the aquifer beneath the river. Water samples were collected and analyzed for bromide, C-14 naphthalene and C14-labeled CO2, a likely degra- dation product. While C-14 CO2 has been detected, the levels are low, suggesting a very slow degradation process. The study is unique in several respects, including the methodologies used to sample the aquifer beneath the river and the use of a radio- labeled tracer in the field.

  17. Review of the general geology and solid-phase geochemical studies in the vicinity of the Central Oklahoma aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosier, Elwin L.; Bullock, John H.

    1988-01-01

    The Central Oklahoma aquifer is the principal source of ground water for municipal, industrial, and rural use in central Oklahoma. Ground water in the aquifer is contained in consolidated sedimentary rocks consisting of the Admire, Council Grove, and Chase Groups, Wellington Formation, and Garber Sandstone and in the unconsolidated Quaternary alluvium and terrace deposits that occur along the major stream systems in the study area. The Garber Sandstone and the Wellington Formation comprise the main flow system and, as such, the aquifer is often referred to as the 'Garber-Wellington aquifer.' The consolidated sedimentary rocks consist of interbedded lenticular sandstone, shale, and siltstone beds deposited in similar deltaic environments in early Permian time. Arsenic, chromium, and selenium are found in the ground water of the Central Oklahoma aquifer in concentrations that, in places, exceed the primary drinking-water standards of the Environmental Protection Agency. Gross-alpha concentrations also exceed the primary standards in some wells, and uranium concentrations are uncommonly high in places. As a prerequisite to a surface and subsurface solid-phase geochemical study, this report summarizes the general geology of the Central Oklahoma study area. Summaries of results from certain previously reported solid-phase geochemical studies that relate to the vicinity of the Central Oklahoma aquifer are also given; including a summary of the analytical results and distribution plots for arsenic, selenium, chromium, thorium, uranium, copper, and barium from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program.

  18. Stable groundwater quality in deep aquifers of Southern Bangladesh: the case against sustainable abstraction.

    PubMed

    Ravenscroft, P; McArthur, J M; Hoque, M A

    2013-06-01

    In forty six wells >150 m deep, from across the arsenic-polluted area of south-central Bangladesh, groundwater composition remained unchanged between 1998 and 2011. No evidence of deteriorating water quality was found in terms of arsenic, iron, manganese, boron, barium or salinity over this period of 13 years. These deep tubewells have achieved operating lives of more than 20 years with minimal institutional support. These findings confirm that tubewells tapping the deep aquifers in the Bengal Basin provide a safe, popular, and economic, means of arsenic mitigation and are likely to do so for decades to come. Nevertheless, concerns remain about the sustainability of a resource that could serve as a source of As-safe water to mitigate As-pollution in shallower aquifers in an area where tens of millions of people are exposed to dangerous levels of arsenic in well water. The conjunction of the stable composition in deep groundwater and the severe adverse health effects of arsenic in shallow groundwater lead us to challenge the notion that strong sustainability principles should be applied to the management of deep aquifer abstraction in Bangladesh is, the notion that the deep groundwater resource should be preserved for future generations by protecting it from adverse impacts, probably of a minor nature, that could occur after a long time and might not happen at all. Instead, we advocate an ethical approach to development of the deep aquifer, based on adaptive abstraction management, which allows possibly unsustainable exploitation now in order to alleviate crippling disease and death from arsenic today while also benefiting future generations by improving the health, education and economy of living children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Unprotected karst resources in western Iran: the environmental impacts of intensive agricultural pumping on the covered karstic aquifer, a case in Kermanshah province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Kamal; Taheri, Milad; Parise, Mario

    2015-04-01

    Bare and covered karst areas, with developed karstic aquifers, cover 35 percent of the Kermanshah province in western Iran. These aquifers are the vital sources for drinking and agricultural water supplies. Over the past decade, intensive groundwater use (exploitation) for irrigation imposed a significant impact on the carbonate environments. The huge amount of groundwater over-exploitations has been carried out and still goes on by local farmers in the absence of appropriate governance monitoring control. Increasing in water demands, for more intense crop production, is an important driving force toward groundwater depletion in alluvial aquifers. Progressive groundwater over-exploitations from underlying carbonate rocks have led to dramatic drawdown in alluvial aquifers and deep karst water tables. Detecting new sources of groundwater extractions and prohibiting the karst water utilization for agricultural use could be the most effective strategy to manage the sustainability of covered karst aquifers. Anthropogenic pressures on covered karst aquifers have magnified the drought impacts and caused dryness of most of the karst springs and deep wells. In this study, the combination of geophysical and geological studies was used to estimate the most intensively exploited agricultural zones of Islam Abad plain in the southwestern Kermanshah province using GIS. The results show that in the past decade a great number of deep wells were drilled through the overburden alluvial aquifer and reached the deep karst water resources. However, the difficulties involved in monitoring deep wells in covered karst aquifer were the main cause of karst water depletion. Overexploitation from both alluvial and karst aquifers is the main reason for drying out the Arkawazi, Sharafshah, Gawrawani karst springs, and the karst drinking water wells 1, 3 and 5 of Islam Abad city. Karst spring landscape destructions, fresh water supply deficit for inhabitants, decreasing of tourism and

  20. Comparison of aquifer characterization approaches through steady state groundwater model validation: A controlled laboratory sandbox study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Illman, W.A.; Zhu, J.; Craig, A.J.; Yin, D.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater modeling has become a vital component to water supply and contaminant transport investigations. An important component of groundwater modeling under steady state conditions is selecting a representative hydraulic conductivity (K) estimate or set of estimates which defines the K field of the studied region. Currently, there are a number of characterization approaches to obtain K at various scales and in varying degrees of detail, but there is a paucity of information in terms of which characterization approach best predicts flow through aquifers or drawdowns caused by some drawdown inducing events. The main objective of this paper is to assess K estimates obtained by various approaches by predicting drawdowns from independent cross-hole pumping tests and total flow rates through a synthetic heterogeneous aquifer from flow-through tests. Specifically, we (1) characterize a synthetic heterogeneous aquifer built in the sandbox through various techniques (permeameter analyses of core samples, single-hole, cross-hole, and flow-through testing), (2) obtain mean K fields through traditional analysis of test data by treating the medium to be homogeneous, (3) obtain heterogeneous K fields through kriging and steady state hydraulic tomography, and (4) conduct forward simulations of 16 independent pumping tests and six flowthrough tests using these homogeneous and heterogeneous K fields and comparing them to actual data. Results show that the mean K and heterogeneous K fields estimated through kriging of small-scale K data (core and single-hole tests) yield biased predictions of drawdowns and flow rates in this synthetic heterogeneous aquifer. In contrast, the heterogeneous K distribution or ?K tomogram? estimated via steady state hydraulic tomography yields excellent predictions of drawdowns of pumping tests not used in the construction of the tomogram and very good estimates of total flow rates from the flowthrough tests. These results suggest that steady state

  1. CASE STUDY CRITIQUE; UPPER CLINCH CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Case study critique: Upper Clinch case study (from Research on Methods for Integrating Ecological Economics and Ecological Risk Assessment: A Trade-off Weighted Index Approach to Integrating Economics and Ecological Risk Assessment). This critique answers the questions: 1) does ...

  2. Hydrogeochemical study of shallow carbonate aquifers, Rameswaram Island, India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S Krishna; Chandrasekar, N; Seralathan, P; Godson, Prince S; Magesh, N S

    2012-07-01

    Groundwater quality assessment has been carried out based on physicochemical parameters (pH, EC, TDS, CO(3), HCO(3), Cl, SO(4), PO(4), NO(2), Ca(+2), Mg(+2), Na(+) and K(+)) and metal concentration in the Rameswaram Island from 25 bore wells. The Langelier Saturation Index of the groundwater shows positive values (63% samples) with a tendency to deposit the CaCO(3) in the majority of water samples. Scatter plot (Ca + Mg/HCO(3)) suggests carbonate weathering process, which is the main contributor of Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and HCO(3) ions to the water. Gibbs diagram suggests rock-water interaction dominance and evaporation dominance which are responsible for the change in the quality of water in the study area. NaCl and mixed CaNaHCO(3) facies are two main hydrogeochemical facies of groundwater. Mathematical calculations and graphical plots of geochemical data reveal that the groundwater of Rameswaram Island is influenced by natural weathering of rocks, anthropogenic activities and seawater intrusion due to over exploitation. Weathering and dissolution of carbonate and gypsum minerals also control the concentration of major ions (Ca(+2), Mg(+2), Na(+) and K(+)) in the groundwater. The nutrient concentration of groundwater is controlled to a large extent by the fertilizers used in agricultural lands and aquaforms. Comparison of geochemical data shows that majority of the groundwater samples are suitable for drinking water and irrigation purposes.

  3. Case Study: Writing a Journal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prud'homme-Genereux, Annie

    2016-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue describes incorporating a journal article into the classroom by first converting it into a case study.

  4. Case Study: Writing a Journal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prud'homme-Genereux, Annie

    2016-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue describes incorporating a journal article into the classroom by first converting it into a case study.

  5. The use of MRS in the determination of hydraulic transmissivity: The case of alluvial aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plata, Juan L.; Rubio, Félix M.

    2008-12-01

    Magnetic Resonance Sounding (MRS) is nowadays accepted as a new geophysical method that can be used for a reliable determination of the ground water content distribution in the top 150 m. A great effort has also been made in MRS development to deduce the hydraulic transmissivity, based on empiric relationships of the permeability with a factor F which is calculated with NMR parameters measured at laboratory scale. To use this relationship under field conditions a calibration coefficient CT = Tpt / F has to be previously established, which demands the knowledge of the transmissivity Tpt evaluated in the pumping test. The transmissivity can then be calculated at any other site of the same aquifer using the relation Tmrs = C TF . The CT values reported suggest a certain relationship with the lithology, but with a great dispersion and contradictory results. MRS surveys carried out in alluvial aquifers in Spain have shown that the value of CT evaluated at one site may not be valid at another place of the same aquifer, because of the great heterogeneity of this kind of geological environment. The demand of a pumping test at each site where a MRS is measured invalidates the method actually used for MRS transmissivity evaluation. More than 50 MRS have been used to propose a new methodology. The aquifers visited cover a great range of transmissivities (from 2 × 10 - 6 to 9 × 10 - 3 m 2/s). The MRS signal amplitude varies between 20 and 1400 nV, the signal/noise ratio is in the range from 0.6 to 42, and the value of the decay time constant varies from 200 to 800 ms. It has been demonstrated that when the transmissivity increases, the value of F decreases, and CT increases, except for certain groups of MRS taken at the same aquifer or part of one aquifer, for which F increases with Tpt, keeping CT constant. A function CT( F) of the type CT = mF- n has been obtained that allows the transmissivity evaluation without the need of Tpt. Considering that both values of

  6. Geochemical modelling of worst-case leakage scenarios at potential CO2-storage sites - CO2 and saline water contamination of drinking water aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, Zsuzsanna; Edit Gál, Nóra; Kun, Éva; Szőcs, Teodóra; Falus, György

    2017-04-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage is a transitional technology to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to mitigate climate change. Following the implementation and enforcement of the 2009/31/EC Directive in the Hungarian legislation, the Geological and Geophysical Institute of Hungary is required to evaluate the potential CO2 geological storage structures of the country. Basic assessment of these saline water formations has been already performed and the present goal is to extend the studies to the whole of the storage complex and consider the protection of fresh water aquifers of the neighbouring area even in unlikely scenarios when CO2 injection has a much more regional effect than planned. In this work, worst-case scenarios are modelled to understand the effects of CO2 or saline water leaks into drinking water aquifers. The dissolution of CO2 may significantly change the pH of fresh water which induces mineral dissolution and precipitation in the aquifer and therefore, changes in solution composition and even rock porosity. Mobilization of heavy metals may also be of concern. Brine migration from CO2 reservoir and replacement of fresh water in the shallower aquifer may happen due to pressure increase as a consequence of CO2 injection. The saline water causes changes in solution composition which may also induce mineral reactions. The modelling of the above scenarios has happened at several methodological levels such as equilibrium batch, kinetic batch and kinetic reactive transport simulations. All of these have been performed by PHREEQC using the PHREEQC.DAT thermodynamic database. Kinetic models use equations and kinetic rate parameters from the USGS report of Palandri and Kharaka (2004). Reactive transport modelling also considers estimated fluid flow and dispersivity of the studied formation. Further input parameters are the rock and the original ground water compositions of the aquifers and a range of gas-phase CO2 or brine replacement ratios. Worst-case scenarios

  7. Groundwater Mounding in Non-uniform Aquifers with Implications for Managed Aquifer Recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnik, V. A.; Noel, P.; Kacimov, A. R.; Al Maktoumi, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Many areas of the world (e.g. the Middle East and North Africa countries) are deficient in observation networks and hydrogeological data needed for Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) design. Therefore, diagnostic analytical approaches are appropriate for feasibility studies of MAR. It was found that the common assumption of aquifer thickness uniformity often does not hold, especially in mountainous watersheds. However, the only practical result available for non-uniform aquifers was developed for well hydraulics applications (point sinks or sources) by Hantush (1962), while the recharge zones may cover large areas on the scale of kilometers, such as temporarily filled impoundments (natural and engineered reservoirs in wadis, depressions, trenches, etc.) or perennial streams accepting massive treated wastewater discharge. To address these important, but overlooked MAR problems in sloping aquifers, a set of new closed-form analytical solutions for water table elevations were obtained. Interestingly, the 2D groundwater flow equation acquires the advection-dispersion equation form in these cases. The quadratures in closed-form solutions obtained by the Green's function method converge rapidly. These models account for both shapes and orientations of sources with respect to the direction of the aquifer base gradient. Qualitatively, solutions in sloping aquifers have an important trait: the mounding is limited in time and space, unlike in aquifers with a horizontal base. Aquifers with the greater slopes have the lesser potential of waterlogging from the rising water table and different storage characteristics (height and volume of locally stored water). Computational aspects of these solutions for MAR analyses are illustrated by example utilizing regional aquifer properties near Az Zarqa River, Jordan. (This study was supported by a grant from USAID-FABRI, project contract: AID-OAA-TO-11-00049, Subcontract: 1001624 -12S-19745).

  8. Potentiometric surface of the upper Floridan Aquifer, west-central Florida, May 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metz, Patricia A.; Stelman, K.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Floridan aquifer system consists of the Upper and Lower Floridan aquifers separated by a middle confining unit. The middle confining unit and the Lower Floridan aquifer generally contain highly mineralized water. In most reports on the hydrology of southwest Florida, the term "Floridan aquifer" has been applied to the water-bearing rocks, herin referred to as the Upper Floridan aquifer. The Upper Floridan aquifer is a productive aquifer and supplies more than 10 times the amount of water pumped from either the surfical aquifer system of the intermediate aquifer system in most of the study area (Duerr and other, 1988). This map report depicts the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer in May 1995. The potentipmetric surface represents to the level to which water will rise in tightly cased wells that tap a confined aquifer system. The surface is mapped by determining the altitude of water levels in a network of wells and is represented on maps by contours that connect point of equal altitude. This map represents water-level conditions near the end of the dry season when ground-water withdrawals for agricultural use are usually high. The cumulative rainfall for the study area was 2.98 inches above average for the period from June 1994 through May 1995 (Southwest Florida Water Management District, 1995)

  9. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Pi, Kunfu; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu

    2015-09-15

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an aquifer iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technology, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main water source for drinking. The in situ arsenic removal technology was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions. The effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The arsenic removal mechanism by the coated iron oxide/hydroxide was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Aquifer iron coating method was developed via a 4-step alternating injection of oxidant, iron salt and oxygen-free water. A continuous injection of 5.0 mmol/L FeSO4 and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 h can form a uniform goethite coating on the surface of quartz sand without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 7.2 mL/min of the injection reagents, arsenic (as Na2HAsO4) and tracer fluorescein sodium to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column were approximately at 126 and 7 column pore volumes, respectively. The retardation factor of arsenic was 23.0, and the adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As(V) and Fe(II) reagents. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation with fine goethite particles by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Therefore, the study results indicate that the high arsenic removal efficiency of the in situ aquifer iron coating technology likely resulted from the expanded specific surface area of the small goethite particles, which enhanced arsenic sorption capability and/or from co-precipitation of arsenic on the surface of goethite particles.

  10. Influence of tidal fluctuations in the water table and methods applied in the calculation of hydrogeological parameters. The case of Motril-Salobreña coastal aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez Úbeda, Juan Pedro; Calvache Quesada, María Luisa; Duque Calvache, Carlos; López Chicano, Manuel; Martín Rosales, Wenceslao

    2013-04-01

    The hydraulic properties of coastal aquifer are essential for any estimation of groundwater flow with simple calculations or modelling techniques. Usually the application of slug test or tracers test are the techniques selected for solving the uncertainties. Other methods are based on the information associated to the changes induced by tidal fluctuation in coastal zones. The Tidal Response Method is a simple technique based in two different factors, tidal efficiency factor and time lag of the tidal oscillation regarding to hydraulic head oscillation caused into the aquifer. This method was described for a homogeneous and isotropic confined aquifer; however, it's applicable to unconfined aquifers when the ratio of maximum water table fluctuation and the saturated aquifer thickness is less than 0.02. Moreover, the tidal equations assume that the tidal signal follows a sinusoidal wave, but actually, the tidal wave is a set of simple harmonic components. Due to this, another methods based in the Fourier series have been applied in earlier studies trying to describe the tidal wave. Nevertheless, the Tidal Response Method represents an acceptable and useful technique in the Motril-Salobreña coastal aquifer. From recently hydraulic head data sets at discharge zone of the Motril-Salobreña aquifer have been calculated transmissivity values using different methods based in the tidal fluctuations and its effects on the hydraulic head. The effects of the tidal oscillation are detected in two boreholes of 132 m and 38 m depth located 300 m to the coastline. The main difficulties for the application of the method were the consideration of a confined aquifer and the variation of the effect at different depths (that is not included into the tidal equations), but these troubles were solved. In one hand, the assumption that the storage coefficient (S) in this unconfined aquifer is close to confined aquifers values due to the hydrogeological conditions at high depth and without

  11. A multi-tracer study in the Hutton Sandstone aquifer, Australia: How "wrong ages" give us deeper insights into aquifer structure and effective deep recharge to a double porosity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suckow, Axel; Taylor, Andrew; Davies, Phil; Leaney, Fred

    2017-04-01

    Depressurisation of coal seams in the Walloon Coal Measures in Queensland, Australia, may influence aquifers both over- and underlying the formation. The Gubberamunda Sandstone aquifer, which overlies the Walloon Coal Measures, is the starting point of the Great Artesian Basin (GAB) flow system and has been the focus of numerous recharge studies. In comparison, the Hutton Sandstone aquifer, which underlies the Walloon Coal Measures, has received much less attention. This aquifer however, is the main supply of stock water for the beef industry in the area. A multi-environmental tracer study of the Hutton Sandstone aquifer was undertaken at the Mimosa Syncline and was complemented by a few samples taken from the underlying Precipice Sandstone aquifer. This multi-tracer study (comprising 18O, 2H, 3H, CFCs, SF6, 14C, 36Cl, and 4He) demonstrated that the Hutton Sandstone aquifer behaves as a double porosity system. At the regional scale, the system features a relatively small fraction of conductive rock within a fairly large fraction of low permeability rock. Tracer migration therefore occurs mainly by advection in the conductive fraction and mainly by diffusion in the low-permeability fraction of the aquifer. Groundwater flow velocities, derived from exponential decrease of 14C and 36Cl concentrations with distance, differ by a factor of ten and therefore do not indicate the real groundwater flow velocity. However, accounting for a double porosity interpretation of the tracer data leads to a single groundwater flow velocity that is consistent with all observed data. Advective velocity in this double porosity model differs from face value flow velocities derived from 14C and 36Cl by a factor of 4 and 40 respectively. As a consequence of this interpretation, the deeper groundwater flow system of the Hutton Sandstone aquifer is estimated to receive only 3% of the recharge previously estimated using the Chloride Mass Balance approach at the intake beds. The other 97% is

  12. Case Study Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes the history of case study teaching, types of cases, and experimental data supporting their effectiveness. It also describes a model for comparing the efficacy of the various case study methods. (Contains 1 figure.)

  13. Case Study Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes the history of case study teaching, types of cases, and experimental data supporting their effectiveness. It also describes a model for comparing the efficacy of the various case study methods. (Contains 1 figure.)

  14. Hydrogeochemical and isotope study of perched aquifers in the Cuvelai-Etosha Basin, Namibia.

    PubMed

    Hamutoko, Josefina T; Wanke, Heike; Koeniger, Paul; Beyer, Matthias; Gaj, Marcel

    2017-08-01

    A hydrogeochemical and stable isotope study ((2)H and (18)O) was carried out in the Cuvelai-Etosha Basin in order to characterize available groundwater and to identify possible recharge mechanisms for the perched aquifers. Data were collected during seven field campaigns between 2013 and 2015 from a total of 24 shallow and deep groundwater hand-dug wells. In the investigated groundwaters, hydrogencarbonate is the dominating anion in both well types, whereas cations vary between calcium and magnesium in deep wells, and sodium and potassium in shallow wells. Groundwater chemistry is controlled by dissolution of carbonate minerals, silicate weathering and ion exchange. Stable isotopic composition suggests that deep groundwater is recharged by high-intensity/large rainfall events, whereas the shallow wells can even be recharged by less-intense/small rainfall events. Water in deep wells reflect a mixture of water influenced by evaporation during or before infiltration and water that infiltrated through fast preferential pathways, whereas shallow wells are strongly influenced by evaporation. The findings of this research contribute to improve the understanding of hydrogeochemistry, recharge paths and temporal variations of perched aquifers.

  15. The study of buried drift aquifers in Minnesota by seismic geophysical methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodward, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Buried-drift aquifers are stratified sand and (or) gravel aquifers in glacial deposits that cannot be seen or inferred at the land surface. During the Pleistocene Epoch, four continental glaciations advanced and retreated across Minnesota, blanketing the bedrock surface with drift as much as 700 feet thick (fig. 1). Most of the drift consists of till, an unsorted, un-stratified mixture of clay silt, sand, and gravel that usually is not considered to be an aquifer. Permeable, stratified sand and gravel, deposited as outwash, alluvium, and (or) ice-contact deposits usually during an earlier glacial episode and subsequently covered (buried) with till, form the buried-drift aquifers.

  16. Aquifer systems in the Great Basin region of Nevada, Utah, and adjacent states: A study plan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrill, James R.; Welch, Alan H.; Prudic, David E.; Thomas, James M.; Carman, Rita L.; Plume, Russell W.; Gates, Joseph S.; Mason, James L.

    1983-01-01

    The Great Basin Regional Aquifer Study includes about 140,000 square miles in parts of Nevada, Utah, California, Idaho, Oregon, and Arizona. Within that area, 240 hydrographic areas occupy structural depressions formed primarily by basin-and-range faulting. The principal aquifers are in basin- fill deposits; however, permeable carbonate rocks underlie valleys in much of eastern Nevada and western Utah and are significant regional aquifers. Anticipated future water needs require a better understanding of the resource so that wise management will be possible. In October 1980, the U.S Geological Survey started a 4-year study to (1) describe the ground-water systems as they existed under natural conditions and as they exist today, (2) analyze the changes that have led to the systems' present condition, (3) tie the results of this and previous studies together in a regional analysis, and (4) provide means by which effects of future ground-water development can be estimated.A plan of work is presented that describes the general approach to be taken in this study. It defines (1) the major task necessary to meet objectives and (2) constraints on the scope of work. The approach has been strongly influenced by the diverse nature of ground-water flow systems and the large number of basins. A detailed appraisal of 240 individual areas would require more resources than are available. Consequently, the general approach is to study selected "typical" areas and key hydrologic processes. Effort during the first 3 years will be directed toward describing the regional hydrology, conducting detailed studies of "type" areas, and studying selected hydrologic processes. Effort during the final year will be directed toward developing a regional analyses of results.Special studies that will address hydrologic processes, key components of the ground-water system, and improved use of technology include evaluations of regional geochemistry, regional hydrogeology, recharge, ground

  17. Understanding steady-state Deep Submarine Groundwater Discharge: a case study in Northern Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paldor, Anner; Aharonov, Einat; Katz, Oded

    2017-04-01

    Deep Submarine Groundwater Discharge (DSGD) is a ubiquitous and highly significant phenomenon, yet it remains poorly understood. Here we use numerical modeling (FEFLOW) to investigate a case study of DSGD offshore northern Israel, aiming to unravel the main features and mechanics of steady-state DSGD: the hydrology that enables its formation, the controls on rates and salinity of seepage, and the residence time of fluid underground. In addition, we investigate the geometry of the fresh-salt water interface within the seeping offshore aquifer. The first part of this work constructs a large scale (70 km) geologic cross-section of our case-study region. The mapping suggests outcropping of confined aquifer strata (Upper Cenomanian Judea Group) on the continental shelf break, 5-15 km offshore. The second part consists of hydrological simulations of DSGD from a confined aquifer similar to the case-study aquifer. The main findings are thus: steady-state DSGD from a confined aquifer occurs far offshore even under moderate heads. It is accompanied by a circulation cell that forms around an intrinsic freshwater-seawater interface. Circulation consists of seawater entering the confined aquifer at the exposed section offshore, mixing with terrestrial groundwater within the aquifer, and seeping saline water out the upper part of the exposed section. In addition, the simulated confined aquifer displays a very flat fresh-salt water interface extending far offshore, as observed in natural offshore aquifers. Preliminary results of a hydrographic survey in the area of study suggest a low-salinity anomaly close to the seafloor, implying seepage of brines in that area, as expected from the model. These new insights have potentially important implications for coastal hydrology, seawater chemistry, biogeochemistry, and submarine slope instability.

  18. Review: Groundwater flow and transport modeling of karst aquifers, with particular reference to the North Coast Limestone aquifer system of Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemizadeh, Reza; Hellweger, Ferdinand; Butscher, Christoph; Padilla, Ingrid; Vesper, Dorothy; Field, Malcolm; Alshawabkeh, Akram

    2013-01-01

    Karst systems have a high degree of heterogeneity and anisotropy, which makes them behave very differently from other aquifers. Slow seepage through the rock matrix and fast flow through conduits and fractures result in a high variation in spring response to precipitation events. Contaminant storage occurs in the rock matrix and epikarst, but contaminant transport occurs mostly along preferential pathways that are typically inaccessible locations, which makes modeling of karst systems challenging. Computer models for understanding and predicting hydraulics and contaminant transport in aquifers make assumptions about the distribution and hydraulic properties of geologic features that may not always apply to karst aquifers. This paper reviews the basic concepts, mathematical descriptions, and modeling approaches for karst systems. The North Coast Limestone aquifer system of Puerto Rico (USA) is introduced as a case study to illustrate and discuss the application of groundwater models in karst aquifer systems to evaluate aquifer contamination. PMID:23645996

  19. Review: Groundwater flow and transport modeling of karst aquifers, with particular reference to the North Coast Limestone aquifer system of Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Ghasemizadeh, Reza; Hellweger, Ferdinand; Butscher, Christoph; Padilla, Ingrid; Vesper, Dorothy; Field, Malcolm; Alshawabkeh, Akram

    2012-12-01

    Karst systems have a high degree of heterogeneity and anisotropy, which makes them behave very differently from other aquifers. Slow seepage through the rock matrix and fast flow through conduits and fractures result in a high variation in spring response to precipitation events. Contaminant storage occurs in the rock matrix and epikarst, but contaminant transport occurs mostly along preferential pathways that are typically inaccessible locations, which makes modeling of karst systems challenging. Computer models for understanding and predicting hydraulics and contaminant transport in aquifers make assumptions about the distribution and hydraulic properties of geologic features that may not always apply to karst aquifers. This paper reviews the basic concepts, mathematical descriptions, and modeling approaches for karst systems. The North Coast Limestone aquifer system of Puerto Rico (USA) is introduced as a case study to illustrate and discuss the application of groundwater models in karst aquifer systems to evaluate aquifer contamination.

  20. Proposed 10-year plan for continuation of hydrologic studies of the Edwards Aquifer, San Antonio area, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Land, Larry F.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the topics identified for special study include: (1) The potential of saline water entering the freshwater zone from the downdip boundary; (2) the possibility of water leaking into the aquifer from an overlying aquifer; (3) the effects of urbanization on ground-water quality in local areas; (4) the movement and dissipation of a recharge water plume; (5) the influx of water from the Glen Rose Formation; (6) the effects of the fault barriers, regional dense bed, and irregular geologic framework on ground-water flow patterns; (7) natural recharge-discharge relationships; (8) the aquifer stage-storage relationship; (9) natural water-quality evolution; and (10) a refinement of the hydrogeologic framework in a local area. 

  1. Contribution of hydrochemistry to the characterization and assessment of groundwater resources: the case of Tebessa alluvial aquifer (Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedrati, N.; Djabri, L.

    2014-09-01

    Assessment of groundwater resources requires the knowledge of geometric and hydrodynamic features. In the Mio-Plio-Quaternary aquifer of the plain of Tebessa (Algeria), the groundwater quality is deteriorating. Different methods using geochemistry (ions Na+, Cl-, SO42-, NO3-) and conductivity are compared with the hydrogeological information to identify the main processes involved in the increase in pollution. The evaluation for water contamination is based on the method proposed by Tolga et al. (2009) for irrigation waters, and on that proposed by Neubert et al. (2008), for those intended for drinking water supply. This method is a new technique of indexation of water sensitivity to pollution. It combines data from water chemistry and the results obtained by applying the DRASTIC model to the area of study. The obtained maps of sensitivity reveal zones that coincide almost perfectly with those of strong anthropogenic activities. Suitable water management policies are needed to save this unconfined aquifer and provide the data necessary to define the area at increased risk from these phenomena.

  2. Analysis of the separation of aquifers and potential shale gas source rocks: a national-scale screening study from the UK.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, John; Ward, Rob; Garcia-Bajo, Marieta; Hart, Alwyn

    2014-05-01

    A number of potential pathways can be identified for the migration of methane and contaminants associated with the shale gas extraction process to aquifers. These include the possible movement of contaminants from shale gas reservoirs that have been hydraulically fractured to overlying aquifers. The risk of contamination of an overlying aquifer is a function of i.) the separation of the potential shale gas source rock and the aquifer, ii.) the hydraulic characteristics (e.g. hydraulic conductivity, storage and hydrogeochemistry) of the rocks in the intervening interval, and iii.) regional and local physio-chemical gradients. Here we report on a national-scale study from the UK to assess the former, i.e. the vertical separation between potential shale gas source rocks and major aquifers, as a contribution to more informed management of the risks associated with shale gas development if and when it takes place in the UK. Eleven aquifers are considered in the study. These are aquifers that have been designated by the environment agencies of England (Environment Agency) and Wales (Natural Resources Wales) under the EU Water Framework Directive as being nationally important (Principal Aquifers). The shale gas source rocks have been defined on best publically available evidence for potential gas productivity and include both shales and clay formations. Based on a national geological fence diagram consisting of ~80 geological sections, totalling ~12,000km in length, down to >5km in depth, and with a typical spacing of 30km, the lower surfaces of each aquifer unit and upper surfaces of each shale/clay unit have been estimated at a spatial resolution of 3x3km. These surfaces have then been used to estimate vertical separations between pairs of shale/clay and aquifer units. The modelling process will be described and the aquifer, shale and separation maps presented and discussed. The aquifers are defined by geological units and since these geological units may be found at

  3. A hydrogeological study of the confined aquifers below the Boom Clay in NE-Belgium: combining a piezometric analysis with groundwater modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandersteen, Katrijn; Gedeon, Matej

    2013-04-01

    For more than 35 years, SCKCEN has been investigating the possibility of high-level and/or long-lived radioactive waste disposal in the Boom Clay in north-eastern Belgium. This research, defined in the long term management programme for high-level and/or long-lived waste of ONDRAF/NIRAS, includes studying the regional hydrogeology of the aquifer systems surrounding the Boom Clay. In this context, a hydrogeological study of the confined aquifers below the Boom Clay was performed. To properly address the conceptual uncertainties related to the poorly characterized domain featuring large uncertainty in the forcing data, a combination of a piezometric data analysis and hydrogeological modelling was used. The study area represents the confined part of the groundwater system located stratigraphically below the Boom Clay in NE-Belgium. This so-called deep aquifer system includes, with increasing depth, parts of the Oligocene aquifer, the Bartoon aquitard system and the Ledo-Paniselian-Brusselian aquifer. Due to the considerable pumping from these aquifers in combination with a limited recharge to the deep aquifer system, a gradual decrease in groundwater levels has been observed in more than 30-year piezometric records. The analysis of the piezometry of the confined deep aquifer system allowed gaining more insight on the system response to the intensive pumping. Since the Oligocene aquifer has a significantly lower permeability compared to the Ledo-Paniselian-Brusselian aquifer, the Oligocene pumping triggers only local effects on groundwater levels. Hence, the regional effects (constant decrease of groundwater levels) in the Oligocene aquifer are presumably caused by pumping in the Ledo-Paniselian-Brusselian aquifer, whereby the hydraulically isolating Maldegem Formation (Bartoon aquitard) dampens these effects. The amount of this dampening is given by the spatial distribution of the hydraulic properties of the Maldegem Formation and/or its variable thickness. For the

  4. Impact of global change on ground subsidence related to aquifer exploitation. The case of the Vega de Granada aquifer (SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido-Velazquez, David; María Mateos, Rosa; Rueda, Ramon; Pegalajar-Cuellar, Manuel; Ezquerro, Pablo; Béjar, Marta; Herrera, Gerardo; Collados-Lara, Antonio-Juan

    2017-04-01

    In this research, we intend to develop a methodology to assess the impact of potential global change scenarios on land subsidence. Subsidence rates in wide areas could be estimated by using remote sensing techniques, such as DInSAR and specifically the new radar information obtained by the Sentinel set of satellites from the European Space Agency (ESA). A symbolic regression method will be developed to obtain an explicit quantitative relationship between subsidence, hydraulic head changes and other physical variables (e.g. percentage of clay and silt in the ground, load of buildings and constructions, fill-in works etc.). Different ensemble and downscaling techniques will be used to define potential future global change scenarios for the test-regions based on the data coming from simulations with different Regional Circulation Models (RCMs). Future drawdowns can be estimated from these global change scenarios under different management options. The regression approach will be employed to simulate the impacts of these drawdowns, in terms of land-subsidence, taking into account the estimated hydraulic head changes. It will allow to assess sustainable management of detrital aquifers taking into account subsidence issues. Classic regression analysis attempts to postulate a hypothesis function f, and the regression is reduced to the problem of finding the optimal parameters w of the hypothesis y=f(x, w), to explain a set of dependent variables y from the values of independent variables x, where x and y are known input/output data. Symbolic regression generalizes this process by assuming that f is also unknown in advance, so that the problem is formulated as finding the optimal analytical expression and its parameters that best approximate the data y considering the data in x. To achieve that purpose, in this work Straight Line Programs (SLP) will be used to represent analytical expressions, and a genetic programming approach will be used to find an optimal SLP that

  5. A 10-year plan to study the aquifer system of Indian Wells Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipinski, Paul; Knochenmus, Darwin D.

    1981-01-01

    Water needs of the population of Indian Wells Valley, Calif., must be met through further development of ground-water resources. Studies show that annual ground-water pumpage there has increased since 1945 and has exceeded mean annual recharge since 1966. Continued and increased stress on the aquifer system of the valley is expected because population in the valley is predicted to double by 1998 and triple by 2020, based on 1977 population figures. The U.S. Geological Survey proposes a 10-year program to develop a data base to aid in evaluation of future water-management alternatives. A study plan has been developed that describes present and potential problems and objectives of the program, and outlines work items to be undertaken in the study area. (USGS)

  6. Microcosm experiments to control anaerobic redox conditions when studying the fate of organic micropollutants in aquifer material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, Manuela; Carrera, Jesús; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Ayora, Carlos; Cama, Jordi; Köck-Schulmeyer, Marianne; López de Alda, Miren; Barceló, Damià; Tobella Brunet, Joana; Hernández García, Marta

    2011-11-01

    The natural processes occurring in subsurface environments have proven to effectively remove a number of organic pollutants from water. The predominant redox conditions revealed to be one of the controlling factors. However, in the case of organic micropollutants the knowledge on this potential redox-dependent behavior is still limited. Motivated by managed aquifer recharge practices microcosm experiments involving aquifer material, settings potentially feasible in field applications, and organic micropollutants at environmental concentrations were carried out. Different anaerobic redox conditions were promoted and sustained in each set of microcosms by adding adequate quantities of electron donors and acceptors. Whereas denitrification and sulfate-reducing conditions are easily achieved and maintained, Fe- and Mn-reduction are strongly constrained by the slower dissolution of the solid phases commonly present in aquifers. The thorough description and numerical modeling of the evolution of the experiments, including major and trace solutes and dissolution/precipitation of solid phases, have been proven necessary to the understanding of the processes and closing the mass balance. As an example of micropollutant results, the ubiquitous beta-blocker atenolol is completely removed in the experiments, the removal occurring faster under more advanced redox conditions. This suggests that aquifers constitute a potentially efficient alternative water treatment for atenolol, especially if adequate redox conditions are promoted during recharge and long enough residence times are ensured.

  7. Applications of universal kriging to an aquifer study in New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pucci, A.A.; Murashige, J.A.E.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the use of kriging for optimizing data collection and utility in a regional groundwater investigation of the Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system in central New Jersey, Kriging was used to 1) estimate the altitude of an aquifer surface, 2) estimate hydraulic conductivities from point data, and 3) estimate the associated kriged errors. -from Authors

  8. Numerical Study on Tide-Driven Submarine Groundwater Discharge and Seawater Recirculation in Heterogeneous Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Hu, B. X.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical modeling was performed to quantitatively study the influences of various factors on submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) in a coastal aquifer. Tide and terrestrial hydraulic gradient are the important forces driving fresh and salt water movement in a coastal aquifer. Unlike steady-state flow, dynamic fresh and salt water mixing at near-shore seafloor could form an intertidal mixing zone (IMZ) near the surface. Based on the construction of a general SGD model, the effects of various model components such as boundary conditions, model geometry and hydraulic parameters on SGD were systematically studied. Several important findings were obtained from the study results. (1) Previous studies indicated that a freshwater discharge tube could be formed between classic transition zone and IMZ. However, this phenomenon might become unclear with the increase of heterogeneity and anisotropy of the medium's conductivity field. (2) SGD and IMZ were both more sensitive to the vertical anisotropy ratio of hydraulic conductivity (Kx/Kz) than to the horizontal anisotropy ratio of hydraulic conductivity (Kx/ Ky). (3) Heterogeneity of effective porosity significant affected SGD and IMZ. (4) Increase of storage coefficient decreased fresh water discharge while increased mixing salt water discharge and total SGD increases. The increase would also change the shape of the IMZ. (5) Variation of dispersivities had little influence on SGD, but would significantly change the distributions of the IMZ and the whole mixing zone. These findings will be helpful to the field study of SGD on sampling design and the application of dynamic SGD model to field sites for model development and calibration.

  9. Geophysical Log Database for the Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study (MERAS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Rheannon M.; Clark, Brian R.

    2008-01-01

    The Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study (MERAS) is an investigation of ground-water availability and sustainability within the Mississippi embayment as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Ground-Water Resources Program. The MERAS area consists of approximately 70,000 square miles and encompasses parts of eight states including Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee. More than 2,600 geophysical logs of test holes and wells within the MERAS area were compiled into a database and were used to develop a digital hydrogeologic framework from land surface to the top of the Midway Group of upper Paleocene age. The purpose of this report is to document, present, and summarize the geophysical log database, as well as to preserve the geophysical logs in a digital image format for online access.

  10. Acoustic and optical borehole-wall imaging for fractured-rock aquifer studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, J.H.; Johnson, C.D.

    2004-01-01

    Imaging with acoustic and optical televiewers results in continuous and oriented 360?? views of the borehole wall from which the character, relation, and orientation of lithologic and structural planar features can be defined for studies of fractured-rock aquifers. Fractures are more clearly defined under a wider range of conditions on acoustic images than on optical images including dark-colored rocks, cloudy borehole water, and coated borehole walls. However, optical images allow for the direct viewing of the character of and relation between lithology, fractures, foliation, and bedding. The most powerful approach is the combined application of acoustic and optical imaging with integrated interpretation. Imaging of the borehole wall provides information useful for the collection and interpretation of flowmeter and other geophysical logs, core samples, and hydraulic and water-quality data from packer testing and monitoring. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Studying the impact of climate change on coastal aquifers and adjacent wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stigter, Tibor; Ribeiro, Luís.; Oliveira, Rodrigo; Samper, Javier; Fakir, Younes; Fonseca, Luís.; Monteiro, José Paulo; Nunes, João. Pedro; Pisani, Bruno

    2010-05-01

    negligible, groundwater recharge is determined by evapotranspiration methods. WP3 involves the monitoring and modeling of groundwater. Water level, electrical conductivity (EC) and temperature measurements are made on a regular basis. At the Portuguese study site, continuous recording of these parameters is performed in the estuary and adjacent aquifer, studying the effect of tidal fluctuations and seasonal variations in recharge and abstractions. Groundwater flow and transport models are created or further developed, integrating the climate scenarios and recharge calculations of WP2, in order to simulate the impact on aquifer hydrodynamics and the movement of the fresh/salt water interface. In WP4 the response of coastal ecosystems to changes in groundwater inputs is assessed with the aid of ecological diversity indices and by using particular taxonomic groups of invertebrates as bioindicators. Mesofauna groups are also characterized in groundwater and their potential as indicators of changes in water composition is assessed. Preliminary results at the Portuguese study site allow understanding that low salinity is apparently relevant for the colonization of the macroinvertebrate species in the groundwater receiving wetland, as the typically estuarine species, which tolerate low salinity, are abundant.

  12. The nitrogen cycle in highly urbanized tropical regions and the effect of river-aquifer interactions: The case of Jakarta and the Ciliwung River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Diogo; Burlando, Paolo; Priadi, Cindy; Shie-Yui, Liong

    2016-09-01

    Groundwater is extensively used in Jakarta to compensate for the limited public water supply network. Recent observations show a rise in nitrate (NO3-) levels in the shallow aquifer, thus pointing at a potential risk for public health. The detected levels are still below national and international regulatory limits for drinking water but a strategy is necessary to contain the growing problem. We combine 3 years of available data in the Ciliwung River, the major river flowing through Jakarta, with a distributed river-aquifer interaction model to characterise the impact of urbanisation on the N-cycle of both surface and groundwater systems. Results show that the N-cycle in the river-aquifer system is heterogeneous in space, seasonal dependent (i.e. flow regime) and strongly affected by urban pollution. Results suggest also that although the main sources of N related groundwater pollution are leaking septic tanks, the aquifer interaction with the Ciliwung River may locally have a strong effect on the concentrations. In the general context of pollution control in urban areas, this study demonstrates how advanced process-based models can be efficiently used in combination with field measurements to bring new insights into complex contamination problems. These are essential for more effective and integrated management of water quality in river-aquifer systems.

  13. A Study of the Connection Among Basin-Fill Aquifers, Carbonate-Rock Aquifers, and Surface-Water Resources in Southern Snake Valley, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The Secretary of the Interior through the Southern Nevada Public Lands Management Act approved funding for research to improve understanding of hydrologic systems that sustain numerous water-dependent ecosystems on Federal lands in Snake Valley, Nevada. Some of the streams and spring-discharge areas in and adjacent to Great Basin National Park have been identified as susceptible to ground-water withdrawals (Elliott and others, 2006) and research has shown a high potential for ground-water flow from southern Spring Valley into southern Snake Valley through carbonate rocks that outcrop along a low topographic divide known as the Limestone Hills (Welch and others, 2007). Comprehensive geologic, hydrologic, and chemical information will be collected and analyzed to assess the hydraulic connection between basin-fill aquifers and surface-water resources, water-dependent ecological features, and the regional carbonate-rock aquifer, the known source of many high-discharge springs. Understanding these connections is important because proposed projects to pump and export ground water from Spring and Snake Valleys in Nevada may result in unintended capture of water currently supplying springs, streams, wetlands, limestone caves, and other biologically sensitive areas (fig. 1). The methods that will be used in this study may be transferable to other areas in the Great Basin. The National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and U.S. Forest Service submitted the proposal for funding this research to facilitate science-based land management. Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources and Geologic Disciplines, and the University of Nevada, Reno, will accomplish four research elements through comprehensive data collection and analysis that are concentrated in two distinct areas on the eastern and southern flanks of the Snake Range (fig. 2). The projected time line for this research is from July 2008 through September 2011.

  14. Stochastic Optimization for an Analytical Model of Saltwater Intrusion in Coastal Aquifers

    PubMed Central

    Stratis, Paris N.; Karatzas, George P.; Papadopoulou, Elena P.; Zakynthinaki, Maria S.; Saridakis, Yiannis G.

    2016-01-01

    The present study implements a stochastic optimization technique to optimally manage freshwater pumping from coastal aquifers. Our simulations utilize the well-known sharp interface model for saltwater intrusion in coastal aquifers together with its known analytical solution. The objective is to maximize the total volume of freshwater pumped by the wells from the aquifer while, at the same time, protecting the aquifer from saltwater intrusion. In the direction of dealing with this problem in real time, the ALOPEX stochastic optimization method is used, to optimize the pumping rates of the wells, coupled with a penalty-based strategy that keeps the saltwater front at a safe distance from the wells. Several numerical optimization results, that simulate a known real aquifer case, are presented. The results explore the computational performance of the chosen stochastic optimization method as well as its abilities to manage freshwater pumping in real aquifer environments. PMID:27689362

  15. Case Studies Behavior Modification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wark, David M.

    The case histories of five students enrolled in a university course in how to study are reported. The students ranged in age from 18 to 35, included two males and three females, and varied in school experience from no college in one case and some college in two cases to college degrees in two cases. Students were initially taught to chart their…

  16. A study of chlorinated solvent contamination of the aquifers of an industrial area in central Italy: a possibility of bioremediation

    PubMed Central

    Matteucci, Federica; Ercole, Claudia; del Gallo, Maddalena

    2015-01-01

    Perchloroethene, trichloroethene, and other chlorinated solvents are widespread groundwater pollutants. They form dense non-aqueous phase liquids that sink through permeable groundwater aquifers until non-permeable zone is reached. In Italy, there are many situations of serious contamination of groundwater that might compromise their use in industry, agriculture, private, as the critical case of a Central Italy valley located in the province of Teramo (“Val Vibrata”), characterized by a significant chlorinated solvents contamination. Data from the various monitoring campaigns that have taken place over time were collected, and new samplings were carried out, resulting in a complete database. The data matrix was processed with a multivariate statistic analysis (in particular principal component analysis, PCA) and was then imported into geographic information system (GIS), to obtain a model of the contamination. A microcosm anaerobic study was utilized to assess the potential for in situ natural or enhanced bioremediation. Most of the microcosms were positive for dechlorination, particularly those inoculated with a mineral medium. This indicate the presence of an active native dechlorinating population in the subsurface, probably inhibited by co-contaminants in the groundwater, or more likely by the absence or lack of nutritional factors. Among the tested electron donors (i.e., yeast extract, lactate, and butyrate) lactate and butyrate enhanced dechlorination of chlorinated compounds. PCA and GIS studies allowed delimiting the contamination; the microcosm study helped to identify the conditions to promote the bioremediation of the area. PMID:26388862

  17. Integrating borehole logs and aquifer tests in aquifer characterization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Reese, R.S.

    2000-01-01

    Integration of lithologic logs, geophysical logs, and hydraulic tests is critical in characterizing heterogeneous aquifers. Typically only a limited number of aquifer tests can be performed, and these need to be designed to provide hydraulic properties for the principle aquifers in the system. This study describes the integration of logs and aquifer tests in the development of a hydrostratigraphic model for the surficial aquifer system in and around Big Cypress National Preserve in eastern Collier County, Florida. Borehole flowmeter tests provide qualitative permeability profiles in most of 26 boreholes drilled in the Study area. Flow logs indicate the depth of transmissive units, which are correlated across the study area. Comparison to published studies in adjacent areas indicates that the main limestone aquifer of the 000000Tamiami Formation in the study area corresponds with the gray limestone aquifer in western Dade County and the water table and lower Tamiami Aquifer in western Collier County. Four strategically located, multiwell aquifer tests are used to quantify the qualitative permeability profiles provided by the flowmeter log analysis. The hydrostratigraphic model based on these results defines the main aquifer in the central part of the study area as unconfined to semiconfined with a transmissivity as high as 30,000 m2/day. The aquifer decreases in transmissivity to less than 10,000 m2/day in some parts of western Collier County, and becomes confined to the east and northeast of the study area, where transmissivity decreases to below 5000 m2/day.Integration of lithologic logs, geophysical logs, and hydraulic tests is critical in characterizing heterogeneous aquifers. Typically only a limited number of aquifer tests can be performed, and these need to be designed to provide hydraulic properties for the principle aquifers in the system. This study describes the integration of logs and aquifer tests in the development of a hydrostratigraphic model for the

  18. Case study research.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Ruth; Thomas-Gregory, Annette

    2015-06-10

    This article describes case study research for nursing and healthcare practice. Case study research offers the researcher an approach by which a phenomenon can be investigated from multiple perspectives within a bounded context, allowing the researcher to provide a 'thick' description of the phenomenon. Although case study research is a flexible approach for the investigation of complex nursing and healthcare issues, it has methodological challenges, often associated with the multiple methods used in individual studies. These are explored through examples of case study research carried out in practice and education settings. An overview of what constitutes 'good' case study research is proposed.

  19. Accuracy of numerical simulations of contaminant transport in heterogeneous aquifers: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radu, F. A.; Suciu, N.; Hoffmann, J.; Vogel, A.; Kolditz, O.; Park, C.-H.; Attinger, S.

    2011-01-01

    This work deals with a comparison of different numerical schemes for the simulation of contaminant transport in heterogeneous porous media. The numerical methods under consideration are Galerkin finite element (GFE), finite volume (FV), and mixed hybrid finite element (MHFE). Concerning the GFE we use linear and quadratic finite elements with and without upwind stabilization. Besides the classical MHFE a new and an upwind scheme are tested. We consider higher order finite volume schemes as well as two time discretization methods: backward Euler (BE) and the second order backward differentiation formula BDF (2). It is well known that numerical (or artificial) diffusion may cause large errors. Moreover, when the Péclet number is large, a numerical code without some stabilising techniques produces oscillating solutions. Upwind schemes increase the stability but show more numerical diffusion. In this paper we quantify the numerical diffusion for the different discretization schemes and its dependency on the Péclet number. We consider an academic example and a realistic simulation of solute transport in heterogeneous aquifer. In the latter case, the stochastic estimates used as reference were obtained with global random walk (GRW) simulations, free of numerical diffusion. The results presented can be used by researchers to test their numerical schemes and stabilization techniques for simulation of contaminant transport in groundwater.

  20. A BENCH SCALE STUDY ON BIODEGRADATION AND VOLATILIZATION OF ETHYLBENZOATE IN AQUIFERS. (R825549C039)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the fate of ethylbenzoate and soil microorganisms in shallow aquifers. Biodegradation and volatilization have been identified as the major mechanisms in attenuating ethylbenzoate in contaminated soils. The rate of volatilization was ex...

  1. The unusual and large drawdown response of buried-valley aquifers to pumping.

    PubMed

    van der Kamp, Garth; Maathuis, Harm

    2012-01-01

    The buried-valley aquifers that are common in the glacial deposits of the northern hemisphere are a typical case of the strip aquifers that occur in many parts of the world. Pumping from a narrow strip aquifer leads to much greater drawdown and much more distant drawdown effects then would occur in a sheet aquifer with a similar transmissivity and storage coefficient. Widely used theories for radial flow to wells, such as the Theis equation, are not appropriate for narrow strip aquifers. Previously published theory for flow to wells in semiconfined strip aquifers is reviewed and a practical format of the type curves for pumping-test analysis is described. The drawdown response of strip aquifers to pumping tests is distinctive, especially for observation wells near the pumped well. A case study is presented, based on extensive pumping test experience for the Estevan Valley Aquifer in southern Saskatchewan, Canada. Evaluation of groundwater resources in such buried-valley aquifers needs to take into account the unusually large drawdowns in response to pumping.

  2. Experimental and numerical study for seawater intrusion remediation in heterogeneous coastal aquifer.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Abdelkader T

    2017-08-01

    The contamination of fresh groundwater by saltwater intrusion (SWI) becomes a worldwide alarming problem, which threatens all countries depending on groundwater abstraction from coastal areas. Various control and treatment strategies have been suggested to prevent SWI. The construction of subsurface physical barriers is one of the most practical implementation methods to prevent SWI. In this work, the use of subsurface dam as a remediation and protection tool was investigated in a heterogeneous aquifer via lab scale experiments and numerical simulation. The experiments depended on a novel automated imaged analysis method for SWI measurements. Glass beads of different grain sizes were used in sandbox experiments. The simulation works adopted the SEAWAT code for validation of the experimental results and making numerical sensitivity analyses for affecting parameters. Results proved the significant impact of using sub water dams with heterogonous aquifers. The remediation impacts of the dam was captured clearly in preventing and backwashing of the existed SWI. The results revealed also that the heterogeneous aquifers with high permeability in the bottom boundary behave closer to the homogenous aquifers in SWI than those having low hydraulic conductivity in the bottom. Sensitivity analyses results showed that the closer dam to seawater boundary led to the quicker and more effective backwashing process. Results exhibited also that the dam height with 50% of the aquifer dam has the ability to hold the seawater so long as the hydraulic gradient is high and dams with 67% of aquifer height prevent the saltwater intrusion completely. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of Carbonate Hydrostratigraphy Using Ambient Seismic Noise: A Pilot Study in the Floridan Aquifer System, Ocala, FL, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, S.; Screaton, E.; Russo, R. M.; Panning, M. P.; Bremner, P. M.; Stanciu, A. C.; Torpey, M. E.; Hongsresawat, S.; Farrell, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Defining zones of high and low hydraulic conductivity within aquifers is vital to hydrogeologic research and groundwater management. Carbonate aquifers are particularly difficult to characterize due to dissolution and dolomitization. We investigated a new imaging technique for aquifer characterization that uses cross-correlation of ambient seismic noise to determine seismic velocity structure. Differences in densities between confining units and high permeability flow zones can produce distinct seismic velocities in the correlated signals. We deployed an array of 9 short period geophones from 11/2013 to 3/2014 in Indian Lake State Forest, Florida, to determine if the high frequency diffusive seismic wavefield can be used for imaging hydrostratigraphy. Here, a thin surficial layer of siliciclastic deposits overlie a ~ 0.6 km sequence of Cenozoic limestone and dolomite units that comprise the Floridan Aquifer System (FAS). A low permeability dolomite unit vertically divides the FAS throughout most of Florida. Deep boreholes surrounding the site constrain hydrostratigraphy, however the horizontal continuity of the middle dolomite unit as well as its effectiveness as a confining unit in the study area are not well known. The stations were spaced at distances ranging from 0.18 to 2.6 km, and yielded 72 cross-correlation Green's functions for Rayleigh wave propagation at frequencies between 0.2 and 40 Hz, with dominant peaks around 0.8 Hz, 3 Hz and 13 Hz. Local vehicle traffic did interfere to a degree with the correlation of the diffuse waves, but was minimized by using only nighttime data. At the lowest frequencies (greatest depths) investigated, velocities increase with depth; however, correlations become less coherent at higher frequencies, perhaps due to shallow complex scattering. Comparison of cross-correlations for all station pairs also indicates spatial variations in velocity. Thus, the method shows promise for characterization of the heterogeneity of the

  4. Improving emerging organic compound degradation through chaotic advection in a Managed Aquifer Recharge: the case of benzotriazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Escales, P.; Drechsel, J.; Fernandez-Garcia, D.; Sanchez-Vila, X.

    2016-12-01

    Improving emerging compound degradation in groundwater is still a challenge. The coupling of Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) with soil aquifer remediation (SAR) through a reactive layer placed at the bottom of the infiltration pond is a promising technology to improve the quality of both recharged water and groundwater. As the reactive layer is made up of organic matter, all the redox processes are enhanced, improving the degradation of emerging pollutants. The success of coupling the MAR-SAR is based on the assumption that recharged water and groundwater are well mixed. Nevertheless, it is well known that mixing is not an instantaneous process in porous media. One strategy to improve it is the enhancement of chaotic advection through extraction-injection engineering (EIE). The EIE enhances mixing and, thus, all the reactions of the system. Although the emerging pollutant degradation is not well understood, it is known that some compounds are preferably degraded either in oxic or in reduced conditions. For example, in the case of benzotriazoles different redox conditions are required depending on each compound. Promoting different redox conditions in a system will result in an enhancement in the actual degree of degradation expected for any given compound. Considering all of this, our work is aimed to evaluate how caothic advection can improve mixing during MAR-SAR, and thus, be capable of enhancing the spreading of redox conditions with the final aim of improving benzotriazoles degradation. To achieve this, we have developed a reactive transport model that describes how recharged water (rich in organic matter coming from a reactive layer) is mixed with groundwater, and how this organic matter is oxidized by different electron acceptors. We have included the degradation rates of each benzotriazole compound in function of its reactivity with redox condition. The model has been tested in different scenarios of recharge and injection-extraction sequences, both in

  5. ANALYTICAL ELEMENT MODELING OF COASTAL AQUIFERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four topics were studied concerning the modeling of groundwater flow in coastal aquifers with analytic elements: (1) practical experience was obtained by constructing a groundwater model of the shallow aquifers below the Delmarva Peninsula USA using the commercial program MVAEM; ...

  6. ANALYTICAL ELEMENT MODELING OF COASTAL AQUIFERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four topics were studied concerning the modeling of groundwater flow in coastal aquifers with analytic elements: (1) practical experience was obtained by constructing a groundwater model of the shallow aquifers below the Delmarva Peninsula USA using the commercial program MVAEM; ...

  7. A reconnaissance study of the effect of irrigated agriculture on water quality in the Ogallala Formation, Central High Plains Aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, Peter B.

    2000-01-01

    In 1998, the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program began a regional study of water quality in the High Plains aquifer. The High Plains aquifer underlies an area of about 174,000 square miles in parts of eight States. Because of its large size, the High Plains aquifer has been divided into three regions: the Southern High Plains, Central High Plains, and Northern High Plains. Although an assessment of water quality in each of the three regions is planned, the initial focus will be the Central High Plains aquifer. Anyone who has flown over the Central High Plains in the summer and has seen the large green circles associated with center pivot sprinklers knows that irrigated agriculture is a widespread land use. Pesticides and fertilizers applied on those irrigated fields will not degrade ground-water quality if they remain in or above the root zone. However, if those chemicals move downward through the unsaturated zone to the water table, they may degrade the quality of the ground water. Water is the principal agent for transporting chemicals from land surface to the water table, and in the semiarid Central High Plains, irrigation often represents the most abundant source of water during the growing season. One objective of NAWQA's High Plains Regional Ground-Water study is to evaluate the effect of irrigated agriculture on the quality of recently recharged water in the Ogallala Formation of the Central High Plains aquifer. The Ogallala Formation is the principal geologic unit in the Central High Plains aquifer, and it consists of poorly sorted clay, silt, sand, and gravel that generally is unconsolidated (Gutentag and others, 1984). Approximately 23 percent of the cropland overlying the Ogallala Formation is irrigated (U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1999). The NAWQA Program generally defines recently recharged ground water to be water recharged in the last 50 years. The water table in the Ogallala Formation is separated from

  8. A combined radio- and stable-isotopic study of a California coastal aquifer system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, Peter W.; Baskaran, Mark; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Edwards, Brian D.; Land, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Stable and radioactive tracers were utilized in concert to characterize geochemical processes in a complex coastal groundwater system and to provide constraints on the kinetics of rock/water interactions. Groundwater samples from wells within the Dominguez Gap region of Los Angeles County, California were analyzed for a suite of major cations (Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+) and anions (Cl−, SO42−), silica, alkalinity, select trace elements (Ba, B, Sr), dissolved oxygen, stable isotopes of hydrogen (δD), oxygen (δ18O), dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC), and radioactive isotopes (3H, 222Rn and 223,224,226,228Ra). In the study area, groundwater may consist of a complex mixture of native groundwater, intruded seawater, non-native injected water, and oil-field brine water. In some wells, Cl− concentrations attained seawater-like values and in conjunction with isotopically heavier δ18O values, these tracers provide information on the extent of seawater intrusion and/or mixing with oil-field brines. Groundwater 3H above 1 tritium unit (TU) was observed only in a few select wells close to the Dominguez Gap area and most other well groundwater was aged pre-1952. Based on an initial 14C value for the study site of 90 percent modern carbon (pmc), groundwater age estimates likely extend beyond 20 kyr before present and confirm deep circulation of some native groundwater through multiple aquifers. Enriched values of groundwater δ13CDIC in the absence of SO42− imply enhanced anaerobic microbial methanogenesis. While secular equilibrium was observed for 234U/238U (activity ratios ~1) in host matrices, strong isotopic fractionation in these groundwater samples can be used to obtain information of adsorption/desorption kinetics. Calculated Ra residence times are short, and the associated desorption rate constant is about three orders of magnitude slower than that of the adsorption rate constant. Combined stable- and radio-isotopic results provide unique insights into aquifer

  9. A plan to study the aquifer system of the Central Valley of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bertoldi, Gilbert L.

    1979-01-01

    Unconsolidated Quaternary alluvial deposits comprise a large complex aquifer system in the Central Valley of California. Millions of acre-feet of water is pumped from the system annually to support a large and expanding agribusiness industry. Since the 1950's, water levels have been steadily declining in many areas of the valley and concern has been expressed about the ability of the entire ground-water system to support agribusiness at current levels, not to mention its ability to function at projected expansion levels. At current levels of ground-water use, an estimated 1.5 to 2 million acre-feet is withdrawn from storage each year; that is, 1.5 to 2 million acre-feet of water is pumped annually in excess of annual replenishment. The U.S. Geological Survey has initiated a 4-year study to develop geologic, hydrologic, and hydraulic information and to establish a valleywide ground-water data base that will be used to build computer models of the ground-water flow system. Subsequently, these models may be used to evaluate the system response to various ground-water management alternatives. This report describes current problems, objectives of the study, and outlines the general work to be accomplished in the study area. A bibliography of about 600 references is included. (Kosco-USGS)

  10. On continuity case studies.

    PubMed

    Lindstedt, David; Lombardo, Timothy

    This article is divided into three sections. The first section provides a taxonomy of case studies within the field of business continuity along with a brief commentary. The second section discusses the proper use of case studies in general pedagogy and provides research-based recommendations for their employment. The third section provides suggestions and examples of how business continuity case studies might be utilised specifically for instruction in the discipline of business continuity planning.

  11. An analytical study on artesian flow conditions in unconfined-aquifer drainage basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Zhi; Jiang, Xiao-Wei; Wan, Li; Wörman, Anders; Wang, Heng; Wang, Xu-Sheng; Li, Hailong

    2015-10-01

    Although it has been reported that flowing artesian wells could be topographically controlled, there is no quantitative research on artesian flow conditions in unconfined aquifers. In this study, the water table, which has a lower amplitude than the land surface, is damped from the topography and used as the boundary condition to obtain the analytical solution of hydraulic head of a unit basin with a single flow system. The term artesian head is defined to characterize the condition of flowing artesian wells. The zone with positive artesian head is called artesian zone while with negative artesian head is nonartesian zone. The maximum artesian head and the size of artesian zones are found to increase with the damping factor and the anisotropy ratio, and decrease with the ratio of basin width to depth and the depth-decay exponent of hydraulic conductivity. Moreover, the artesian head increases with depth nearby the valley and decreases with depth near by the divide, and the variation rates are influenced by the decay exponent and the anisotropy ratio. Finally, the distribution of flowing artesian wells and the artesian head measurements in different depths of a borehole in a small catchment in the Ordos Plateau, Northwestern China is used to illustrate the theoretical findings. The change in artesian head with depth was used to estimate the anisotropy ratio and the decay exponent. This study opens up a new door to analyze basin-scale groundwater flow.

  12. A geophysical and hydrogeological study of aquifers contamination by a landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senos Matias, M.; Marques da Silva, M.; Ferreira, P.; Ramalho, E.

    1994-08-01

    Landfills are the classical solution for waste disposal. During the last years there has been a growing concern about the effect of landfills in public health, because leaching water can contaminate nearby aquifers. Hydrogeological studies are very important to investigate and remedy these contamination problems but an integrated use of both geophysical and hydrological methods can be even more effective. In this paper, the groundwater contamination by a landfill, located on very porous and permeable formations, is assessed by both geophysical and hydrogeological techniques. Bearing in mind the geological and hydrogeological characteristics of the area, electrical methods were chosen to carry out the geophysical survey. At first, electromagnetic methods were used and a ground conductivity survey was carried out to determine the contamination plume. Then several resistivity soundings were proposed and two resistivity pseudo-sections obtained so that a more detailed study of the contamination was accomplished. From the geophysical data interpretation, strategically located boreholes were drilled, water samples obtained and chemical analysis carried out. Finally, the overall results are integrated and discussed as well as the merits and disadvantages of the techniques that have been employed.

  13. A reconnaissance study of saltwater contamination in the El Dorado aquifer, Union County, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broom, Matthew E.; Kraemer, T.F.; Bush, William V.

    1984-01-01

    Since 1960 chloride concentrations in the El Dorado aquifer have increased near El Dorado, Arkansas. The aquifer is a major source for municipal and industrial water supply in Union County. Greatest withdrawal occurs near El Dorado. Because of this withdrawal, the potentiometric surface at El Dorado has been lowered more than 300 feet. Geologic, hydrologic, and chemical data indicate that water from a graben south and east of El Dorado is the source of contamination from salt within the El Dorado aquifer. The data indicates that surface brines and deeper aquifers are not the sources of chloride contamination. Lowering the potentiometric surface near El Dorado has caused water to move out of the graben toward El Dorado. Estimates based on interpretation of electric logs for two wells in the graben indicate chloride equivalents may be as high as 2,500 milligrams per liter in the aquifer. Concentrations outside the graben range from 130 to 650 milligrams per liter at the west end of the graben and from 25 to 150 milligrams per liter farther west and north. (USGS)

  14. Transport and Attenuation of Particles of Different Density and Surface Charge: A Karst Aquifer Field Study.

    PubMed

    Schiperski, Ferry; Zirlewagen, Johannes; Scheytt, Traugott

    2016-08-02

    Although karst aquifers are far more susceptible to contamination than porous aquifers, with the transport of particulate matter being an important factor, little is known about the attenuation of solutes within karst aquifers and even less about the attenuation of particulate matter. These in situ investigations have therefore aimed to systematically identify the processes that influence the transport and attenuation of particles within a karst aquifer through multitracer testing, using four different types of 1 μm fluorescent particles and the fluorescent dye uranine. Each of the types of particles used were detected at the observed spring, which drains the investigated aquifer. However, the transport behavior varied significantly between the various particles and the uranine dye, with the breakthrough of particles occurring slightly earlier than that of uranine. Attenuation was determined from the tracer recovery and attributed to filtration processes. These processes were affected by the hydrophobicity and surface charge of the particles. Carboxylated polystyrene particles with a density and surface charge comparable to pathogenic microorganisms were found to be mobile in groundwater over a distance of about 3 km. No attenuation was observed for plain silica particles. Particles with these characteristics thus pose a major threat to karst spring water as they might occur as contaminants themselves or facilitate the transport of other contaminants.

  15. Identification of TCE and PCE sorption and biodegradation parameters in a sandy aquifer for fate and transport modelling: batch and column studies.

    PubMed

    Kret, E; Kiecak, A; Malina, G; Nijenhuis, I; Postawa, A

    2015-07-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine the sorption and biodegradation parameters of trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE) as input data required for their fate and transport modelling in a Quaternary sandy aquifer. Sorption was determined based on batch and column experiments, while biodegradation was investigated using the compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA). The aquifer materials medium (soil 1) to fine (soil 2) sands and groundwater samples came from the representative profile of the contaminated site (south-east Poland). The sorption isotherms were approximately linear (TCE, soil 1, K d = 0.0016; PCE, soil 1, K d = 0.0051; PCE, soil 2, K d = 0.0069) except for one case in which the best fitting was for the Langmuir isotherm (TCE, soil 2, K f = 0.6493 and S max = 0.0145). The results indicate low retardation coefficients (R) of TCE and PCE; however, somewhat lower values were obtained in batch compared to column experiments. In the column experiments with the presence of both contaminants, TCE influenced sorption of PCE, so that the R values for both compounds were almost two times higher. Non-significant differences in isotope compositions of TCE and PCE measured in the observation points (δ(13)C values within the range of -23.6 ÷ -24.3‰ and -26.3 ÷-27.7‰, respectively) indicate that biodegradation apparently is not an important process contributing to the natural attenuation of these contaminants in the studied sandy aquifer.

  16. Estimating harvested rainwater at greenhouses in south Portugal aquifer Campina de Faro for potential infiltration in Managed Aquifer Recharge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Luís; Monteiro, José Paulo; Leitão, Teresa; Lobo-Ferreira, João Paulo; Oliveira, Manuel; Martins de Carvalho, José; Martins de Carvalho, Tiago; Agostinho, Rui

    2015-04-01

    value is a good indication of the total amount of the harvested rainfall that could be considered for future MAR solutions. Given the estimates on the greenhouse harvested rainwater and the infiltration capacity of the infiltration basins and large diameter wells, it is intended to develop groundwater flow models in order to assess the nitrate washing rate in the CF aquifer. This work is being developed under the scope of MARSOL Project (MARSOL-GA-2013-619120), in which Campina de Faro aquifer system is one of the several case studies. This project aims to demonstrate that MAR is a sound, safe and sustainable strategy that can be applied with great confidence in finding solutions to water scarcity in Southern Europe.

  17. Aquifer stability investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.

    1981-09-01

    The study of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in porous rock reservoirs is carried out within the Reservoir Stability Studies Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The goal of the study is to establish criteria for long-term stability of aquifer CAES reservoirs. These criteria are intended to be guidelines and check lists that utilities and architect-engineering firms may use to evaluate reservoir stability at candidate CAES sites. These criteria will be quantitative where possible, qualitative where necessary, and will provide a focal point for CAES relevant geotechnical knowledge, whether developed within this study or available from petroleum, mining or other geotechnical practices using rock materials. The Reservoir Stability Studies Program had four major activities: a state-of-the-art survey to establish preliminary stability criteria and identify areas requiring research and development; numerical modeling; laboratory testing to provide data for use in numerical models and to investigate fundamental rock mechanics, thermal, fluid, and geochemical response of aquifer materials; and field studies to verify the feasibility of air injection and recovery under CAES conditions in an aquifer, to validate and refine the stability criteria, and to evaluate the accuracy and adequacy of the numerical and experimental methodologies developed in previous work. Three phases of study, including preliminary criteria formulation, numerical model development, and experimental assessment of CAES reservoir materials have been completed. Present activity consists of construction and operation of the aquifer field test, and associated numerical and experimental work in support of that activity. Work is presently planned to be complete by 1983 at the end of the field test. At that time the final stability criteria for aquifers will be issued. Attached here also are preliminary criteria for aquifers.

  18. AQUIFER TRANSMISSIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of groundwater resources requires the knowledge of the capacity of aquifers to store and transmit ground water. This requires estimates of key hydraulic parameters, such as the transmissivity, among others. The transmissivity T (m2/sec) is a hydrauli...

  19. AQUIFER TRANSMISSIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of groundwater resources requires the knowledge of the capacity of aquifers to store and transmit ground water. This requires estimates of key hydraulic parameters, such as the transmissivity, among others. The transmissivity T (m2/sec) is a hydrauli...

  20. Analysis of radial movement of an unconfined leaky aquifer due to well pumping and injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiang

    2007-09-01

    Radial movement of an unconfined leaky aquifer was studied with respect to hydraulic forces that are induced by well recharge and discharge. New analytic solutions in the velocity and displacement fields were found and applied to describe transient movement in an unconfined leaky aquifer. Linear momentum and mass balance of saturated porous sediments, the Darcy-Gersevanov law, and the analytic solution of hydraulic drawdown for unsteady flow within the unconfined leaky aquifer were introduced to find the new solutions. Analytic results indicate that the nonlinear relation between the initial hydraulic head (h0) and the well function has an insignificant effect on the aquifer transient movement when the drawdown s<0.02 h 0. When the well function is simplified with different assumptions and pumping conditions, the new solutions correspondingly reduce to cases that are similar to the Hantush-Jacob, Muskat, and Theis transient movement of a confined leaky aquifer. It was found that large leakance is important in slowing radial movement and reducing aquifer deformation. Flow velocity in the aquifer is more responsive to leakance than to cumulative displacement within the aquifer. The zones and boundary with tensile stress can be located using the same approach applied to a confined aquifer for risk assessment of earth fissuring.

  1. Human enteric viruses in groundwater from a confined bedrock aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borchardt, M. A.; Bradbury, K.R.; Gotkowitz, M.B.; Cherry, J.A.; Parker, B.L.

    2007-01-01

    Confined aquifers are overlain by low-permeability aquitards that are commonly assumed to protect underlying aquifers from microbial contaminants. However, empirical data on microbial contamination beneath aquitards is limited. This study determined the occurrence of human pathogenic viruses in well water from a deep sandstone aquifer confined by a regionally extensive shale aquitard. Three public water-supply wells were each sampled 10 times over 15 months. Samples were analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for several virus groups and by cell culture for infectious enteroviruses. Seven of 30 samples were positive by RT-PCR for enteroviruses; one of these was positive for infectious echovirus 18. The virus-positive samples were collected from two wells cased through the aquitard, indicating the viruses were present in the confined aquifer. Samples from the same wells showed atmospheric tritium, indicating water recharged within the past few decades. Hydrogeologic conditions support rapid porous media transport of viruses through the upper sandstone aquifer to the top of the aquitard 61 m below ground surface. Natural fractures in the shale aquitard are one possible virus transport pathway through the aquitard; however, windows, cross-connecting well bores, or imperfect grout seals along well casings also may be involved. Deep confined aquifers can be more vulnerable to contamination by human viruses than commonly believed. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  2. [Case and studies].

    PubMed

    Schubert, András

    2015-11-15

    Case studies and case reports form an important and ever growing part of scientific and scholarly literature. The paper deals with the share and citation rate of these publication types on different fields of research. In general, evidence seems to support the opinion that an excessive number of such publications may negatively influence the impact factor of the journal. In the literature of scientometrics, case studies (at least the presence of the term "case study" in the titles of the papers) have a moderate share, but their citation rate is practically equal to that of other publication types.

  3. A field, laboratory and modeling study of reactive transport of groundwater arsenic in a coastal aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hun Bok; Charette, Matthew A.; Zheng, Yan

    2009-01-01

    A field, laboratory, and modeling study of As in groundwater discharging to Waquoit Bay, MA, shed light on coupled control of chemistry and hydrology on reactive transport of As in a coastal aquifer. Dissolved Fe(II) and As(III) in a reducing groundwater plume bracketed by an upper and a lower redox interface are oxidized as water flows towards the bay. This results in precipitation of Fe(III) oxides, along with oxidation and adsorption of As to sediment at the redox interfaces where concentrations of sedimentary HCl-leachable Fe (80~90% Fe(III)) are 734±232 mg kg-1, sedimentary phosphate extractable As (90~100% As(V)) are 316±111 μg kg-1, and are linearly correlated. Batch adsorption of As(III) onto orange, brown and gray sediments follows Langmuir isotherms, and can be fitted by a surface complexation model (SCM) assuming a diffuse layer for ferrihydrite. The sorption capacity and distribution coefficient for As increase with decreasing sediment Fe(II)/Fe. To allow accumulation of the amount of sediment As, similar hydrogeochemical conditions would have been operating for thousands of years at Waquoit Bay. The SCM simulated the observed dissolved As concentration better than a parametric approach based on Kd. Site specific isotherms should be established for Kd or SCM based models. PMID:19708362

  4. Infiltration of organic pollutants into groundwater: Field studies in the alluvial aquifer of the Sava River

    SciTech Connect

    Ahel, M. )

    1991-10-01

    Groundwater represents one of the most important sources of potable water for many public water supplies in the world. The benefits of these valuable water reservoirs are being reduced however, due to the increasing infiltration of both inorganic and organic pollutants from different sources such as wastewaters, polluted freshwaters, contaminated soils, sanitary landfills, and industrial dumping sites. Therefore, investigations of pollutant migration and persistence in groundwaters are of great significance for groundwater protection strategies. The study of organic pollutants is perhaps the most complex issue in groundwater pollution chemistry. The extremely high number of possible organic pollutants as well as the severe ecotoxicological effects of specific organic compounds make the assessment of water quality and long term pollution trends in the aquifer very difficult. The application of the computer-assisted high-resolution gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy in the last decade has extended our knowledge about the occurrence of specific organic pollutants in groundwaters and processes that determine their transport and transformation.

  5. 241Am migration in a sandy aquifer studied by long-term column experiments.

    PubMed

    Artinger, Robert; Schuessler, Wolfram; Scherbaum, Franz; Schild, Dieter; Kim, Jae-Il

    2002-11-15

    The migration behavior of 241Am(III) in a sandy aquifer was studied under near-natural conditions by long-term column experiments of more than 1 year duration. Columns with 50 cm length and 5 cm in diameter were packed with aeolian quartz sand and equilibrated with two different groundwaters having an original dissolved organic carbon concentration (DOC) of 1.1 and 7.2 mg x dm(-3), respectively,from the Gorleben site (Lower Saxony, Germany). In each experiment, 1 cm3 of Am-spiked groundwater ([Am] = 0.2 to 2 micromol x dm(-3)) was injected into the column. The flow rate of the groundwater was adjusted to 0.28 m x d(-1). A small colloid-borne Am fraction was found to elute together with tritiated water. After 414 and 559 days, respectively, the experiments were terminated. Whereas the nonsorbing tracer of tritiated water would have covered a distance of about 350 m in that time period, the maximum of the Am activity was detected between 32 and 40 mm column length. Applying selective dissolution analysis to the sand surface, Am was found to be preferentially bound to iron hydroxide/oxide sites. From this Am distribution, a retardation factor R of about 10(4) was determined and compared to static batch experiments. The Am breakthrough was calculated forthe conditions of the column experiment

  6. A Combined Field and Modelling Study of Interactions Between Evaporation and Oceanic Forcing in Coastal Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, X.; Boufadel, M.; Jackson, N.

    2016-12-01

    In coastal environments, evaporation is an important driver of subsurface salinity gradients in marsh systems. However, its interaction with oceanic forcing (e.g., tides and waves) has not been fully addressed in the coastal beaches. Here, we used field data on an estuarine beach foreshore with numerical simulations to show that evaporation caused upper intertidal zone pore-water salinity to be double that of seawater. We found the increase in pore-water salinity mainly depended on air temperature and relative humidity, and tide and wave actions diluted a fraction of the high salinity plume, resulting in a complex process. This is in contrast to previous studies that considered seawater as the most saline source to a coastal aquifer system, thereby concluding that seawater infiltration always increased pore-water salinity by seawater-groundwater mixing dynamics. It is also found that evaporation provided important forcing mechanisms, which not only facilitated pore water to flow upwards, but also intensification of the horizontal pore water flow due to the interaction with the tide. Our results demonstrated the combined effects of evaporation and tide and waves on subsurface salinity distribution on a beach face.

  7. Groundwater flow in a transboundary fault-dominated aquifer and the importance of regional modeling: the case of the city of Querétaro, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera-Hernández, J. J.; Carreón-Freyre, D.; Cerca-Martínez, M.; Levresse, G.

    2016-03-01

    The city of Querétaro, located near the political boundary of the Mexican states of Querétaro and Guanajuato, relies on groundwater as it sole water supply. Groundwater extraction in the city increased from 21 × 106 m3/yr in 1970 to 104 × 106 m3/yr in 2010, with an associated drawdown of 100 m in some parts of the aquifer. A three-dimensional numerical groundwater-flow model has been developed that represents the historical evolution of the aquifer's potentiometric levels and is used to simulate the effect of two scenarios: (1) a 40 % reduction in the extraction rate from public water supply wells in early 2011 (thus reducing the extraction to 62 × 106 m3/yr), and (2) a further reduction in 2021 to 1 × 106 m3/yr. The modeling results project a temporary recovery of the potentiometric levels after the 40 % reduction of early 2011, but a return to 2010 levels by 2020. If scenario 2 is implemented in 2021, the aquifer will take nearly 30 years to recover to the simulated levels of 1995. The model also shows that the wells located in the city of Querétaro started to extract water from part of the aquifer beneath the State of Guanajuato in the late 1970s, thus showing that the administrative boundaries used in Mexico to study and develop water resources are inappropriate, and consideration should be given to physical boundaries instead. A regional approach to studying aquifers is needed in order to adequately understand groundwater flow dynamics.

  8. An analytical solution of groundwater level fluctuation in a U-shaped leaky coastal aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fu-Kuo; Chuang, Mo-Hsiung; Wang, Shu-chuan

    2017-04-01

    Tide-induced groundwater level fluctuations in coastal aquifers have attracted much attention in past years, especially for the issues associated with the impact of the coastline shape, multi-layered leaky aquifer system, and anisotropy of aquifers. In this study, a homogeneous but anisotropic multi-layered leaky aquifer system with U-shaped coastline is considered, where the subsurface system consisting of an unconfined aquifer, a leaky confined aquifer, and a semi-permeable layer between them. The analytical solution of the model obtained herein may be considered as an extended work of two solutions; one was developed by Huang et al. (Huang et al. Tide-induced groundwater level fluctuation in a U-shaped coastal aquifer, J. Hydrol. 2015; 530: 291-305) for two-dimensional interacting tidal waves bounded by three water-land boundaries while the other was by Li and Jiao (Li and Jiao. Tidal groundwater level fluctuations in L-shaped leaky coastal aquifer system, J. Hydrol. 2002; 268: 234-243) for two-dimensional interacting tidal waves of leaky coastal aquifer system adjacent to a cross-shore estuary. In this research, the effects of leakage and storativity of the semi-permeable layer on the amplitude and phase shift of the tidal head fluctuation, and the influence of anisotropy of the aquifer are all examined for the U-shaped leaky coastal aquifer. Some existing solutions in literatures can be regarded as the special cases of the present solution if the aquifer system is isotropic and non-leaky. The results obtained will be beneficial to coastal development and management for water resources.

  9. SETDA Case Studies 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Educational Technology Directors Association, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The State Educational Technology Directors Association (SETDA) published a series of case studies from 28 states to showcase examples of how ARRA EETT ("American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Enhancing Education Through Technology") grant funds have impacted teaching and learning. SETDA collected data for the case studies through…

  10. Case Study: Challenging Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Steven K.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses a case study involving organizational change and its effect on employees. Presents three responses to the case study: "Paradox of Ordering Change: I Insist That We Work as a Team" (Paaige K. Turner); "Managing Change Is Managing Meaning" (Greg Hearn and Abraham Ninan); and "The Psychodynamics of an Organizational Change Initiative"…

  11. Work Sharing Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Maureen E.; And Others

    Designed to provide private sector employers with the practical information necessary to select and then to design and implement work sharing arrangements, this book presents case studies of some 36 work sharing programs. Topics covered in the case studies include the circumstances leading to adoption of the program, details of compensation and…

  12. Case Study: Challenging Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Steven K.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses a case study involving organizational change and its effect on employees. Presents three responses to the case study: "Paradox of Ordering Change: I Insist That We Work as a Team" (Paaige K. Turner); "Managing Change Is Managing Meaning" (Greg Hearn and Abraham Ninan); and "The Psychodynamics of an Organizational Change Initiative"…

  13. Plan of study for the High Plains regional aquifer-system analysis in parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weeks, John B.

    1978-01-01

    The Ogallala Formation and associated Tertiary and Quarternary deposits from the principal aquifers supporting irrigation in the High Plains of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. The volume of water in storage within the aquifers is declining in most of the High Plains because water is being withdrawn in excess of the rate of replenishment. The U.S. Geological Survey has initiated a 5-year study of the High Plains aquifer system to develop the geohydrologic data base and computer models of the ground-water flow system needed to evaluate the response of the aquifer system to ground-water management alternatives. This report describes the objectives, plan, and organization of the study and outlines the work to be accomplished in each State in the study area. (Woodard-USGS)

  14. Simulation of the transfer of organochlorine pollutants in an alluvial aquifer in an alpine valley: the case of tetrachloroethene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouamé, A. A.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Tacher, L.; Derron, M.-H.

    2012-04-01

    During a series of environmental analysis carried out in soil and groundwater in the Alpine Valley (Rhone valley Western Switzerland), were identified high levels of chlorinated solvents, particularly the tetrachloroethene. The leakage of this pollutant originates from industry. The geological substratum in this part of the valley is mainly composed of alluvial deposits and the deposit of a large rock avalanche. The sediments are composed of sandy silt, sandy clay, sand and gravel. The rock avalanche deposit which is the wall of the alluvial aquifer consists of fine materials, stones and large debris mainly of limestone. The investigations developed in this area have shown the presence of a contaminant plume of 60 m long and 35 m wide approximately. Thus the technique of venting / sparging was proposed as remediation measure. Despite the effectiveness of this technique, it turns out that there are still some pockets of contamination of groundwater in the area. In order to assess the potential pollution, a numerical modeling was developed by using the Visual Modflow software. The stages of this modeling are: • Selecting the parameters of the models; • Developing conceptual and numerical models; • Calibration and validation of the model; • Reproducing the observed concentrations; • Sensitivity analysis; • Making a parametric study to see at different stages the tetrachloroethene plume. The first results of the simulation show a slow leakage of the pollutant forming a pocket in the water flow direction.

  15. Harmonizing water management and social needs: a necessary condition for sustainable development. The case of Israel's coastal aquifer.

    PubMed

    Melloul, Abraham J; Collin, Martin L

    2003-04-01

    This study focuses on the problem of most efficiently fulfilling the water requirements of society for sustainable water resources management. The goal is to coordinate effectively the social needs of the resident population with operational water resources management planning.The proposed approach consists of a pyramidal hierarchy of water resource management needs, similar to that suggested by psychologist Abraham Maslow for human social needs. The two pyramidal hierarchies can be simultaneously employed to delineate guidelines to synchronize planning for sustainable water resources development with the concerns and expectations of the resident population. In both hierarchies, higher level needs remain irrelevant and difficult to attain until lower level needs of the resident population have been fulfilled. Management planning measures employed with regard to Israel's coastal aquifer have been used to illustrate this approach. Observation of Israel's experience indicates markedly reduced effectiveness where such measures have failed to be properly synchronised with societal needs. Conversely, where hydrological management measures were successfully synchronized with societal concerns, increased efficiency towards attaining sustainable groundwater management was evident.

  16. Plan of study for the regional aquifer-system analysis of the San Juan structural basin, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welder, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    The San Juan structural basin is an 18,000 sq mi area that contains several extensive aquifers. The basin includes three surface drainage basins and parts of New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and Utah. Surface water in the area is fully appropriated, and the steadily increasing demand for groundwater has resulted in water supply concerns. Competition is great between mining and electric power companies, municipalities, and Indian communities for the limited groundwater supplies. This report outlines a 4-year plan for a study of the regional aquifer system in the San Juan structural basin. The purposes of the study are to define and understand the aquifer system; to assess the effects of groundwater use on the aquifers and streams; and to determine the availability and quality of groundwater in the basin. (Author 's abstract)

  17. The effect of heterogeneity identifying the leakage of carbon dioxide in a shallow aquifer: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, S. W.; Lee, S. H.; Jeon, W. T.; Joo, Y. J.; Lee, K. K.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) leakage into the shallow aquifer is one of the main concerns at a CO2 sequestration site. Various hydrogeochemical parameters have been suggested to determine the leakage (i.e., pH, EC, Alkalinity, Ca and δ13C). For the practical point of view, direct and continuous measurement of the dissolved CO2 concentration at the proper location can be the most useful strategy for the CO2 leakage detection in a shallow aquifer. In order to enhance possibility of identifying leaked CO2, monitoring location should be determined with regard to the shallow aquifer heterogeneity. In this study, a series of experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of heterogeneity on the dissolved CO2 concentrations. A 2-D sand tank of homogeneous medium sands including a single heterogeneity layer was designed. Two NDIR CO2 sensors, modified for continuous measuring in aquatic system, were installed above and below the single heterogeneous layer (clay, fine and medium sand lenses). Also, temperature and water contents were measured continuously at a same position. Bromocresol purple which is one of the acid-base indicator was used to visualize CO2 migration. During the gas phase CO2 injection at the bottom of the sand tank, dissolved CO2 in the water is continuously measured. In the results, significant differences of concentrations were observed due to the presence of heterogeneity layer, even the locations were close. These results suggested that monitoring location should be determined considering vertical heterogeneity of shallow aquifer at a CO2 leakage site.

  18. Comparative Study of Effects of CO 2 Concentration and pH on Microbial Communities from a Saline Aquifer, a Depleted Oil Reservoir, and a Freshwater Aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Gulliver, Djuna M.; Lowry, Gregory V.; Gregory, Kelvin B.

    2016-10-01

    Injected CO2 from geologic carbon storage is expected to impact the microbial communities of proposed storage sites, such as depleted oil reservoirs and deep saline aquifers, as well as overlying freshwater aquifers at risk of receiving leaking CO2. Microbial community change in these subsurface sites may affect injectivity of CO2, permanence of stored CO2, and shallow subsurface water quality. The effect of CO2 concentration on the microbial communities in fluid collected from a depleted oil reservoir and a freshwater aquifer was examined at subsurface pressures and temperatures. The community was exposed to 0%, 1%, 10%, and 100% pCO2 for 56 days. Bacterial community structure was analyzed through 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, and total bacterial abundance was estimated through quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Changes in the microbial community observed in the depleted oil reservoir samples and freshwater samples were compared to previous results from CO2-exposed deep saline aquifer fluids. Overall, results suggest that CO2 exposure to microbial communities will result in pH-dependent population change, and the CO2-selected microbial communities will vary among sites. This is the first study to compare the response of multiple subsurface microbial communities at conditions expected during geologic carbon storage, increasing the understanding of environmental drivers for microbial community changes in CO2-exposed environments.

  19. Field, Experimental, and Modeling Study of Arsenic Partitioning across a Redox Transition in a Bangladesh Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hun Bok; Bostick, Benjamin C.; Zheng, Yan

    2012-01-01

    To understand the redox-dependent arsenic partitioning, we performed batch sorption and desorption experiments using aquifer sands subjected to chemical and mineralogical characterization. Sands collected from the redox transition zone between reducing groundwater and oxic river water at the Meghna riverbank with HCl extractable Fe(III)/Fe ratio ranging from 0.32 to 0.74, are representative of the redox conditions of aquifers common in nature. One brown suboxic sediment displayed a partitioning coefficient (Kd) of 7∼8 L kg−1 at equilibrium with 100 μg L−1 As(III), while two gray reducing sediments showed Kd of 1∼2 L kg−1. Lactate amendment to aquifer sands containing 91 mg kg−1 P-extractable As resulted in the reduction of As and Fe with sediment Fe(III)/Fe decreasing from 0.54 to 0.44, and mobilized an equivalent of 64 mg kg−1 As over a month. Desorption of As from non-lactate-amended sediment was negligible with little change in sediment Fe(III)/Fe. This release of As is consistent with microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxyhydroxides and the resulting decrease in the number of surface sites on Fe(III) oxyhydroxides. Arsenic partitioning (Kd) in iron-rich, sulfur-poor aquifers with circumneutral pH is redox-dependent and can be estimated by HCL leachable sediment Fe(III)/Fe ratio with typical Fe concentrations. PMID:22201284

  20. Experimental study of the storage of thermal energy in confined aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molz, F. J.; Parr, A. D.; Andersen, P. F.

    1980-05-01

    A two cycle experiment was performed in which heated water was stored in a confined aquifer and then recovered. During the first cycle, 54,784 cubic meters of water were pumped from a shallow supply aquifer, heated to an average temperature of 55 C, and injected into a deeper confined aquifer where the ambient temperature was 20 C. After a storage period of 51 days, 55, 345 cubic meters of water were produced from the confined aquifer. Throughout the first cycle, which lasted approximately six months, ground water temperatures were recorded at six depths in each of ten observation wells, and hydraulic heads were recorded in five observation wells. During the 41 day production period, the temperature of the produced water varied from 55 C to 33 C, and 66 percent of the injected thermal energy was recovered. The second cycle injection began on 9/23/78 and continued until 11/25/78 when 58,010 cubic meters of water had been recovered. The major problem experienced during the first cycle, a clogging injection well, was reduced by regular backwashing.

  1. Tectonic setting of the San Diego formation aquifer,considered for conjunctive use storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, B.; Ward, A.

    2001-10-01

    A number of alluvial aquifers in coastal southern California are either in current use or are being considered for aquifer storage and recovery (ASR). This conjunctive-use strategy involves artificial recharge with local or imported potable water or recycled water during low-use periods and extraction during high-use periods. Most of the aquifers are alluvial fill of eroded stream channels or are alluvial fill of actively subsiding tectonic basins in the Transverse Ranges geomorphic province. In both cases, the aquifer material is relatively tectonically undisturbed since deposition, and in many cases, individual aquifer units have considerable areal extent. The San Diego Formation aquifer, which spans the international border between Alta California and Baja California, is an exception. It was deposited in a pull-apart basin in the strike-slip regime of the Rose Canyon fault zone and parallel faults, which form the boundary between the Peninsular Ranges and Continental Borderlands geomorphic provinces. The formation has been faulted, internally fractured, and locally chemically altered. The lack of continuity of individual aquifer units that is observed in aquifer studies may be associated with localized patterns of syntectonic deposition.

  2. Pumping tests in non-uniform aquifers - the linear strip case

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, J.J.; Liu, W.Z.

    1991-01-01

    Many pumping tests are performed in geologic settings that can be conceptualized as a linear infinite strip of one material embedded in a matrix of differing flow properties. A semi-analytical solution is presented to aid the analysis of drawdown data obtained from pumping tests performed in settings that can be represented by such a conceptual model. Integral transform techniques are employed to obtain a solution in transform space that can be numerically inverted to real space. Examination of the numerically transformed solution reveals several interesting features of flow in this configuration. If the transmissivity of the strip is much higher than that of the matrix, linear and bilinear flow are the primary flow regimes during a pumping test. If the contrast between matrix and strip properties is not as extreme, then radial flow should be the primary flow mechanism. Sensitivity analysis is employed to develop insight into the controls on drawdown in this conceptual model and to demonstrate the importance of temporal and spatial placement of observations. Changes in drawdown are sensitive to the transmissivity of the strip for a limited time duration. After that time, only the total drawdown remains a function of strip transmissivity. In the case of storativity, both the total drawdown and changes in drawdown are sensitive to the storativity of the strip for a time of quite limited duration. After that time, essentially no information can be gained about the storage properties of the strip from drawdown data. An example analysis is performed using data previously presented in the literature to demonstrate the viability of the semi-analytical solution and to illustrate a general procedure for analysis of drawdown data in complex geologic settings. This example reinforces the importance of observation well placement and the time of data collection in constraining parameter correlation, a major source of the uncertainty that arises in the parameter estimation

  3. ALOPEX stochastic optimization for pumping management in fresh water coastal aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratis, P. N.; Saridakis, Y. G.; Zakynthinaki, M. S.; Papadopoulou, E. P.

    2014-03-01

    Saltwater intrusion in freshwater aquifers is a problem of increasing significance in areas nearby the coastline. Apart from natural disastrous phenomena, such as earthquakes or floods, intense pumping human activities over the aquifer areas may change the chemical composition of the freshwater aquifer. Working towards the direction of real time management of freshwater pumping from coastal aquifers, we have considered the deployment of the stochastic optimization Algorithm of Pattern Extraction (ALOPEX), coupled with several penalty strategies that produce convenient management policies. The present study, which further extents recently derived results, considers the analytical solution of a classical model for underground flow and the ALOPEX stochastic optimization technique to produce an efficient approach for pumping management over coastal aquifers. Numerical experimentation also includes a case study at Vathi area on the Greek island of Kalymnos, to compare with known results in the literature as well as to demonstrate different management strategies.

  4. Electric analog studies of flow to wells in the Punjab aquifer of West Pakistan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mundorff, Maurice John; Bennett, G.D.; Ahmad, Masood

    1972-01-01

    A series of experiments was performed with a steady-state electric analog simulating a cylindrical segment of the aquifer underlying the plains of the Punjab region of West Pakistan. In most of the experiments recharge was assumed to be from the surface, within a specified radius of influence, and distributed uniformly over the area within this radius. Experiments were made with different anisotropies (ratios of lateral to vertical resistance) so that various possible combinations of aquifer thickness and effective radius or radius of influence and combinations .of lateral and vertical permeability could be included in the models. Flow nets were constructed to show distribution of potential in the vertical section and intersections of stream surfaces with the vertical plane. The series of experiments in which the screened interval is in the upper part of the aquifer shows that flow decreases and stream tubes shift progressively toward the upper part of the aquifer as anisotropy increases. Another series illustrates that total yield increases and yield per foot of screen decreases as screen length increases. The experiments indicate that, under conditions prevalent in the Punjab, the Distance-drawdown method for determining permeability gives results with an error of 10 percent or less provided that at least one piezometer or observation well is within a few feet of the pumped well and that no observation well or piezometer used is more than 100 feet from the pumped well. Relative traveltime for each of 10 stream tubes is given for three models. Relative traveltimes for one-fourth and one-half the effective radius are given for selected stream tubes. By substituting values for the aquifer parameters, actual traveltimes are computed from the relative-traveltime data.

  5. Septic Systems Case Studies

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A collection of septic systems case studies to help community planners, elected officials, health department staff, state officials, and interested citizens explore alternatives for managing their decentralized wastewater treatment systems.

  6. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  7. MULTIPLE CONTAMINANTS CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information taken from the arsenic demonstration program projects that have treatment systems removing multiply contaminants from drinking water. The case studies sited in the presentation consist of projects that have arsenic along with either nitrate, ...

  8. MULTIPLE CONTAMINANTS CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides information taken from the arsenic demonstration program projects that have treatment systems removing multiply contaminants from drinking water. The case studies sited in the presentation consist of projects that have arsenic along with either nitrate, ...

  9. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  10. [Qualitative case study].

    PubMed

    Debout, Christophe

    2016-06-01

    The qualitative case study is a research method which enables a complex phenomenon to be explored through the identification of different factors interacting with each other. The case observed is a real situation. In the field of nursing science, it may be a clinical decision-making process. The study thereby enables the patient or health professional experience to be conceptualised. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. Monitoring a shallow geothermal experiment in a sandy aquifer using electrical resistivity tomography: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermans, Thomas; Vandenbohede, Alexander; Nguyen, Frederic; Lebbe, Luc

    2010-05-01

    The use of low-enthalpy geothermal ressources is increasingly growing in Europe and around the world. This domain constitutes an essential field of research and development in the diversification of energy ressources to hinder global warming. The advantages of very low temperature systems are, first, that they are much more available than the geothermal high temperature, since the underground often contains important shallow aquifers (e.g. alluvial plains), and second, that their exploitation involve relatively low costs of implementation. Very low energy systems exhibit underground fluid with a temperature ranging from 5 to 30 ° C, which may be used for cooling or heating. The two main modes of exploitation of geothermal energy rely on the extraction of the hydrothermal fluid in the aquifer from wells and on the circulation of a heat transfer fluid in a closed and buried geothermal circuit. Underground heat exchange and overall exploitation system design may be undertaken in an optimized and sustainable fashion if the parameters governing the coupled heat transport and flow equations are know to a certain degree. As for many underground reservoir problems, sufficient knowledge on the distribution of the parameters of interests (e.g. thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, thermomechanic dispersitivity, effective porosity) must be obtained to perform reliable predictions. Designing novel experiments to estimate those parameters in-situ is therefore essential. In this framework, we examine the feasibility of a thermal tracer experiment similar to the ones performed in hydrogeology or hydrogeophysics. The test consists in following the evolution of a heat plume through the underground as it is injected in one well and pumped to another one. The thermal tracer evolution is followed by gathering electrical resistivity (ERT) images in a time-lapse framework over 10 days. In this contribution, we examine the potential of ERT to image such thermal plume and its

  12. A participatory approach to integrated aquifer management: The case of Guanajuato State, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, Ricardo

    Guanajuato State, located in central Mexico, with less than 2% of the country's area, has almost 17,000 deep water wells, from which nearly 4,000 cubic hectometers (hm3) per year are being extracted, more than 1,000 hm3 over the estimated renewable yield. Since, in Mexico, water is administered under federal jurisdiction by the National Water Commission (CNA, for its Spanish acronym), the state government faces the challenge of ensuring its population's economic development without formal means of intervention. Being thus limited to apply mandatory policies and measures, the state water program has focused on the implementation of a two-sided strategy. First, basic hydrogeological studies and mathematical groundwater hydrodynamic models were developed upon a comprehensive survey of existing wells and a general revision of the state's geological framework. Second, a structure for water user's participation in water management actions was promoted (from the dissemination of information to the implementation of pilot efficient water use projects) with financial, technical and political support from the state. Simultaneously, a coordinated effort towards the completion of the water user's registry was performed with the federal authority along with other supporting measures such as training and monitoring programs. In this paper, a general overview of the project's achievements and challenges is presented. L'État de Guanajuato, situé dans la partie centrale du Mexique, avec moins de 2% de la surface du pays, a près de 17 000 puits profonds, d'où sont extraits près de 4 000 hm3 par an, soit plus de 1 000 hm3 de plus que le débit renouvelable estimé. Comme au Mexique l'eau est administrée dans le cadre d'une juridiction fédérale, le gouvernement de l'État fait tout son possible pour assurer le développement de sa population sans moyens formels d'intervention. Étant ainsi limité à appliquer des politiques et des mesures de recommandations, le programme Eau

  13. Enhancements to the Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study (MERAS) groundwater-flow model and simulations of sustainable water-level scenarios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Brian R.; Westerman, Drew A.; Fugitt, D. Todd

    2013-01-01

    Arkansas continues to be one of the largest users of groundwater in the Nation. As such, long-term planning and management are essential to ensure continued availability of groundwater and surface water for years to come. The Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study (MERAS) model was developed previously as a tool to evaluate groundwater availability within the Mississippi embayment, which encompasses much of eastern Arkansas where the majority of groundwater is used. The Arkansas Water Plan is being updated for the first time since 1990 and serves as the State’s primary, comprehensive water-resources planning and guidance document. The MERAS model was selected as the best available tool for evaluation of specific water-use pumping scenarios that are currently being considered by the State of Arkansas. The model, developed as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Groundwater Resources Program’s assessment of the Nation’s groundwater availability, is proving to be invaluable to the State as it works toward development of a sustained yield pumping strategy. One aspect of this investigation was to evaluate multiple methods to improve the match of observed to simulated groundwater levels within the Mississippi River Valley alluvial and middle Claiborne (Sparta) aquifers in the MERAS model. Five primary methods were evaluated: (1) explicit simulation of evapotranspiration (ET), (2) upgrade of the Multi-Node Well (MNW2) Package, (3) geometry improvement within the Streamflow Routing (SFR) Package, (4) parameter estimation of select aquifer properties with pilot points, and (5) modification of water-use estimates. For the planning purposes of the Arkansas Water Plan, three scenarios were developed to evaluate potential future conditions: (1) simulation of previously optimized pumping values within the Mississippi River Valley alluvial and the middle Claiborne aquifers, (2) simulated prolonged effects of pumping at average recent (2000–5) rates, and (3) simulation

  14. Valuing the subsurface pathogen treatment barrier in water recycling via aquifers for drinking supplies.

    PubMed

    Page, Declan; Dillon, Peter; Toze, Simon; Bixio, Davide; Genthe, Bettina; Jiménez Cisneros, Blanca Elena; Wintgens, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    A quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) was performed at four managed aquifer recharge (MAR) sites (Australia, South Africa, Belgium, Mexico) where reclaimed wastewater and stormwater is recycled via aquifers for drinking water supplies, using the same risk-based approach that is used for public water supplies. For each of the sites, the aquifer treatment barrier was assessed for its log(10) removal capacity much like for other water treatment technologies. This information was then integrated into a broader risk assessment to determine the human health burden from the four MAR sites. For the Australian and South African cases, managing the aquifer treatment barrier was found to be critical for the schemes to have low risk. For the Belgian case study, the large treatment trains both in terms of pre- and post-aquifer recharge ensures that the risk is always low. In the Mexico case study, the risk was high due to the lack of pre-treatment and the low residence times of the recharge water in the aquifer. A further sensitivity analysis demonstrated that human health risk can be managed if aquifers are integrated into a treatment train to attenuate pathogens. However, reduction in human health disease burden (as measured in disability adjusted life years, DALYs) varied depending upon the number of pathogens in the recharge source water. The beta-Poisson dose response curve used for translating rotavirus and Cryptosporidium numbers into DALYs coupled with their slow environmental decay rates means poor quality injectant leads to aquifers having reduced value to reduce DALYs. For these systems, like the Mexican case study, longer residence times are required to meet their DALYs guideline for drinking water. Nevertheless the results showed that the risks from pathogens can still be reduced and recharging via an aquifer is safer than discharging directly into surface water bodies.

  15. The dynamics of stream-aquifer connectivity: an observational study in northern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Velez, J. D.; Crossey, L. J.; Wilson, J. L.; Sherson, L. R.; Dahm, C.

    2015-12-01

    The bidirectional feedback between streams and aquifers changes over several spatio- temporal scales, requiring a complex, multi-variable observational network that captures the dominant processes taking place and the response to changes in hydrologic forcing. The importance of stream-aquifer connectivity is evidenced by its influence in the hydrologic response and in the fate and transport of solutes at the watershed scale. To better understand the dynamics of stream-aquifer connectivity and the effects that intra-annual weather variability has on physical and chemical processes, a monitoring network was installed at a meander bend of the East Fork of the Jemez River in the Valles Caldera National Preserve (VCNP), a snow-dominated watershed in northern New Mexico. This work summarizes four years of observations of groundwater-surface water interaction. Spatio-temporal patterns of water level, temperature, and electrical conductivity were measured in meander-bend wells and vertical fluxes to/from the stream were estimated using in-stream piezometers, subsurface thermal records, and distributed temperature sensing in the channel. A three-dimensional numerical model was used to synthesize data and draw general conclusions. The observational network has been collecting data since the summer of 2010 to present, overlapping the Las Conchas fire in the VCNP (largest wildfire on record in New Mexico's history), and therefore representing a valuable data set to evaluate the hydrological and biogeochemical implications of wildfire events.

  16. Distance Learning Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Bruce O.

    The Office of Technology Assessment authorized a series of case studies in 1989 to investigate how technologies, services, and programs are implemented in distance education projects. The studies were also intended to look at the role of local, state, and federal agencies, and other public and private entities in providing educational services to…

  17. Transboundary study of the Milk River aquifer (Canada, USA): geological, conceptual and numerical models for the sound management of the regional groundwater resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pétré, Marie-Amélie; Rivera, Alfonso; Lefebvre, René

    2016-04-01

    The Milk River transboundary aquifer straddles southern Alberta (Canada) and northern Montana (United States), a semi-arid and water-short region. The extensive use of this regional sandstone aquifer over the 20th century has led to a major drop in water levels locally, and concerns about the durability of the resources have been raised since the mid-1950. Even though the Milk River Aquifer (MRA) has been studied for decades, most of the previous studies were limited by the international border, preventing a sound understanding of the aquifer dynamics. Yet, a complete portrait of the aquifer is required for proper management of this shared resource. The transboundary study of the MRA aims to overcome transboundary limitations by providing a comprehensive characterization of the groundwater resource at the aquifer scale, following a three-stage approach: 1) The development of a 3D unified geological model of the MRA (50,000 km2). The stratigraphic framework on both sides of the border was harmonized and various sources of geological data were unified to build the transboundary geological model. The delineation of the aquifer and the geometry and thicknesses of the geological units were defined continuously across the border. 2) Elaboration of a conceptual hydrogeological model by linking hydrogeological and geochemical data with the 3D unified geological model. This stage is based on a thorough literature review and focused complementary field work on both sides of the border. The conceptual model includes the determination of the groundwater flow pattern, the spatial distribution of hydraulic properties, a groundwater budget and the definition of the groundwater types. Isotopes (3H, 14C, 36Cl) were used to delineate the recharge area as well as the active and low-flow areas. 3) The building of a 3D numerical groundwater flow model of the MRA (26,000 km2). This model is a transposition of the geological and hydrogeological conceptual models. A pre

  18. Numerical Simulation of Borehole Flow in Deep Monitor Wells, Pearl Harbor Aquifer, Oahu, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotzoll, K.; Oki, D. S.; El-Kadi, A. I.

    2010-12-01

    Salinity profiles collected from uncased deep monitor wells are commonly used to monitor freshwater-lens thickness in coastal aquifers. However, vertical flow in these wells can cause the measured salinity to differ from salinity in the adjacent aquifer. Substantial borehole flow has been observed in uncased wells in the Pearl Harbor aquifer, Oahu, Hawaii. A numerical modeling approach, incorporating aquifer hydraulic characteristics and recharge rates representative of the Pearl Harbor aquifer, was used to evaluate the effects of borehole flow on measured salinity profiles from deep monitor wells. Borehole flow caused by vertical hydraulic gradients associated with the natural regional groundwater-flow system and local groundwater withdrawals was simulated. Model results were used to estimate differences between vertical salinity profiles in deep monitor wells and the adjacent aquifer in areas of downward, horizontal, and upward flow within the regional flow system—for cases with and without nearby pumped wells. Aquifer heterogeneity, represented in the model as layers of contrasting permeability, was incorporated in model scenarios. Results from this study provide insight into the magnitude of the differences between vertical salinity profiles from deep monitor wells and the salinity distributions in the aquifers. These insights are relevant and are critically needed for management and predictive modeling purposes.

  19. Use of GIS and Data Visualization Tools for Modeling Aquifer Architecture and Generating Aquifer Vulnerability Maps at a Regional Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scibek, J.; Allen, D. M.; Bishop, T. W.; Wei, M.

    2003-12-01

    The Grand Forks aquifer aquifer is one of the first aquifers in the province of British Columbia to undergo a full hydrogeologic characterization because of its importance as a water supply. It is also being used as a case study area for modelling the impact of climate change on groundwater. The aquifer consists of a layered sequence of glacial and alluvial sediments overlying bedrock, which from the top down are comprised of gravel, sand, silt and clay. Aquifer hydrostratigraphy was defined based on some over 300 water well records contained from in the BC Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection Water WellWELL Database. Lithology data were first standardized to correct errors in syntax, grammar and spelling, recognize equivalent terms, and classify the materials into dominant types so that calculations involving the database could be more easily undertaken. Standardized data have beenwere then used to construct an aquifer architecture model that can be used as input to a numerical groundwater flow model and to construct a vulnerability map. The three-dimensional aquifer architecture model was developed in the data visualization software (GMS) by first constructing cross-sections, and later, generating a solid model that represents the layering and spatial heterogeneity of the aquifer. The bedrock surface was modeled using geostatistical techniques to produce a bedrock digital elevation model (DEM) that better constrains the lower bound of the model. Layers were imported into the numerical groundwater flow code, Visual MODFLOW, and are being used to model current climate conditions and climate change scenarios for the Grand Forks region. A GIS was also used to capture the spatial variability in the input parameters that are used to construct vulnerability maps. Using the DRASTIC approach, indices were assigned to each of seven hydrogeologic parameters. A rastor map was generated for each. A digitized soils map was used to assign soil material and soil topography

  20. Experimental study and steady-state simulation of biogeochemical processes in laboratory columns with aquifer material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirbahman, Aria; Schönenberger, René; Furrer, Gerhard; Zobrist, Jürg

    2003-07-01

    Packed bed laboratory column experiments were performed to simulate the biogeochemical processes resulting from microbially catalyzed oxidation of organic matter. These included aerobic respiration, denitrification, and Mn(IV), Fe(III) and SO 4 reduction processes. The effects of these reactions on the aqueous- and solid-phase geochemistry of the aquifer material were closely examined. The data were used to model the development of alkalinity and pH along the column. To study the independent development of Fe(III)- and SO 4-reducing environments, two columns were used. One of the columns (column 1) contained small enough concentrations of SO 4 in the influent to render the reduction of this species unimportant to the geochemical processes in the column. The rate of microbially catalyzed reduction of Mn(IV) changed with time as evidenced by the variations in the initial rate of Mn(II) production at the head of the column. The concentration of Mn in both columns was controlled by the solubility of rhodochrosite (MnCO 3(S)). In the column where significant SO 4 reduction took place (column 2), the concentration of dissolved Fe(II) was controlled by the solubility of FeS. In column 1, where SO 4 reduction was not important, maximum dissolved Fe(II) concentrations were controlled by the solubility of siderite (FeCO 3(S)). Comparison of solid-phase and aqueous-phase data suggests that nearly 20% of the produced Fe(II) precipitates as siderite in column 1. The solid-phase analysis also indicates that during the course of experiment, approximately 20% of the total Fe(III) hydroxides and more than 70% of the amorphous Fe(III) hydroxides were reduced by dissimilatory iron reduction. The most important sink for dissolved S(-II) produced by the enzymatic reduction of SO 4 was its direct reaction with solid-phase Fe(III) hydroxides leading initially to the formation of FeS. Compared to this pathway, precipitation as FeS did not constitute an important sink for S(-II) in column

  1. Part 1: Vadose-zone column studies of toluene (enhanced bioremediation) in a shallow unconfined aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tindall, J.A.; Friedel, M.J.; Szmajter, R.J.; Cuffin, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of the laboratory study described in this paper were (1) to determine the effectiveness of four nutrient solutions and a control in stimulating the microbial degradation of toluene in the unsaturated zone as an alternative to bioremediation methodologies such as air sparging, in situ vitrification, or others (Part I), and (2) to compare the effectiveness of the addition of the most effective nutrient solution from Part I (modified Hoagland type, nitrate-rich) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on microbial degradation of toluene for repeated, simulated spills in the unsaturated zone (Part II). For Part 1, fifteen columns (30-cm diameter by 150-cm height), packed with air-dried, 0.25-mm, medium-fine sand, were prepared to simulate shallow unconfined aquifer conditions. Toluene (10 mL) was added to the surface of each column, and soil solution and soil gas samples were collected from the columns every third day for 21 days. On day 21, a second application of toluene (10 mL) was made, and the experiment was run for another 21 days. Solution 4 was the most effective for microbial degradation in Part I. For Part II, three columns were designated nutrient-rich 3-day toluene columns and received toluene injections every 3 days; three columns were designated as nutrient-rich 7-day columns and received toluene injections every 7 days; and two columns were used as controls to which no nutrient was added. As measured by CO2 respiration, the initial benefits for aerobic organisms from the O2 enhancement were sustained by the bacteria for only a short period of time (about 8 days). Degradation benefits from the nutrient solution were sustained throughout the experiment. The O2 and nutrient-enhanced columns degraded significantly more toluene than the control columns when simulating repeated spills onto the unsaturated zone, and demonstrated a potentially effective in situ bioremediation technology when used immediately or within days after a spill. The combined usage

  2. Determination of heterogeneities in the hydraulic properties of a phreatic aquifer from tidal level fluctuations: a case in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carol, Eleonora S.; Kruse, Eduardo E.; Pousa, Jorge L.; Roig, Alejandro R.

    2009-11-01

    A well-known analytical solution of Jacob (1950) for groundwater flow due to tidal-wave propagation, together with field measurements along a complete tidal cycle and geological data, were used to evaluate the heterogeneities in the hydraulic properties of a phreatic aquifer located next to the River Ajo in the coastal plain environment of the southern sector of the Samborombon Bay wetland, Argentina. From the analysis of water-table fluctuations in a set of monitoring wells located along a riverbank-normal transect, it was possible to quantify the piecewise spatial variations of the hydraulic diffusivity of the phreatic aquifer. The results show the strong lateral variations of the sedimentary environment due to the influence of the different transport and deposition agents that characterize the coastal plain. The known thickness of the phreatic aquifer and the estimated range of the specific yield allowed the hydraulic conductivity to be identified as the most influential factor. [Jacob CE (1950) Flow of ground water. In: Rouse H (ed) Engineering Hydraulics. Wiley, New York

  3. An evaluation of aquifer intercommunication between the unconfined and Rattlesnake Ridge aquifers on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, E.J.

    1987-10-01

    During 1986, Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a study of a portion of the Rattlesnake Ridge aquifer (confined aquifer) that lies beneath the B Pond - Gable Mountain Pond area of the Hanford Site. The purpose was to determine the extent of intercommunication between the unconfined aquifer and the uppermost regionally extensive confined aquifer, referred to as the Rattlesnake Ridge aquifer. Hydraulic head data and chemical data were collected from the ground water in the study area during December 1986. The hydraulic head data were used to determine the effects caused by water discharged to the ground from B Pond on both the water table of the unconfined aquifer and the potentiometric surface of the confined aquifer. The chemical data were collected to determine the extent of chemical constituents migrating from the unconfined aquifer to the confined aquifer. Analysis of chemical constituents in the Rattlesnake Ridge aquifer demonstrated that communication between the unconfined and confined aquifers had occurred. However, the levels of contaminants found in the Rattlesnake Ridge aquifer during this study were below the DOE Derived Concentration Guides.

  4. Batch and column studies on BTEX biodegradation by aquifer microorganisms under denitrifying conditions. Final report, April 1990-February 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, S.R.; Rhodes, D.E.; Moolenaar, S.W.

    1994-08-01

    The objective of these laboratory experiments was to determine the role nitrate plays in enhancing the biodegradation of fuel contaminated groundwater. Column studies were conducted to simulate the nitrate field demonstration project carried out earlier at Traverse City, MI so as to quantify the benefits of nitrate addition on BTEX removal. Columns were operated under limited oxygen, limited oxygen with nitrate, or nitrate alone conditions. Batch microcosms were conducted to evaluate BTEX biodegradation with either air (aerobic), nitrate (denitrifying), nitrous oxide (denitrifying), or no added electron acceptor. Results suggest a mixed oxygen/nitrate system could be used for biodegradation of fuel contaminated aquifers.

  5. Geothermal Case Studies

    DOE Data Explorer

    Young, Katherine

    2014-09-30

    database.) In fiscal year 2015, NREL is working with universities to populate additional case studies on OpenEI. The goal is to provide a large enough dataset to start conducting analyses of exploration programs to identify correlations between successful exploration plans for areas with similar geologic occurrence models.

  6. Case Studies in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeakes, Samuel J.

    1989-01-01

    A case study writing exercise used in a course on parasitology was found to be a powerful learning experience for students because it involved discipline-based technical writing and terminology, brought the students in as evaluators, applied current learning, caused interaction among all students, and simulated real professional activities. (MSE)

  7. River bank filtration as a dynamic biogeochemical and hydrogeological system: a three-year study of the spatial evolution with time of reduced zones in the Capdenac-Gare alluvial aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourg, A. C.; Kedziorek, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Alluvial aquifers are abundantly solicited for obtaining drinking water because of easy access to groundwater (shallow depth of the water table) and significant recharge by the nearby river. Transit of river water through the "alluvial system" (river bank and aquifer alluvium) to the pumping wells is expected to filter undesirable constituents coming from the river (organic matter, bacteria and viruses, heavy metals, organic pollutants…). This porous system is not only a physical and geochemical filter but also a biogeochemical reactor. The degradation of organic matter brought by infiltrating river water "fuels" the biogeochemical engine that drives redox reactions in the reactor and can induce local and temporary reducing conditions. This can be either beneficial (denitrification) or detrimental (dissolution of Mn and Fe) to the quality of the water pumped. A well field in the alluvial plain of the Lot River (France) was studied for 3 years. The origin of the water sampled in wells and piezometers (river versus aquifer was identified using chloride as a natural tracer. In many wells located close to the river bank, the water chemistry varies seasonally, with high summer temperature and low summer dissolved oxygen and nitrate. Even though dissolved manganese tends to show high summer concentrations different trends are observed , the peak manganese concentration increasing or decreasing with the years depending on the well location. The bacterial activity and its degradation of infiltrated dissolved organic carbon creates the seasonal reduced zone (best indicated by the dissolution of manganese, the third electron acceptor after dissolved oxygen and nitrate). At mid-survey, due to the deterioration of the water quality (increasing manganese concentrations) in some pumped wells, two of them were abandoned and three new ones drilled. The pumping pattern changed significantly and new groundwater flow lines were established. The amplitude of the reduction of

  8. Contributions to a shallow aquifer study by reprocessed seismic sections from petroleum exploration surveys, eastern Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodward, D.

    1994-01-01

    The US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Drilling Company of Abu Dhabi, is conducting a 4-year study of the fresh and slightly saline groundwater resources of the eastern Abu Dhabi Emirate. Most of this water occurs in a shallow aquifer, generally less than 150 m deep, in the Al Ain area. A critical part of the Al Ain area coincides with a former petroleum concession area where about 2780 km of vibroseis data were collected along 94 seismic lines during 1981-1983. Field methods, acquistion parameters, and section processing were originally designed to enhance reflections expected at depths ranging from 5000 to 6000 m, and subsurface features directly associated with the shallow aquifer system were deleted from the original seismic sections. The original field tapes from the vibroseis survey were reprocessed in an attempt to extract shallow subsurface information (depths less than 550 m) for investigating the shallow aquifer. A unique sequence of reproccessing parameters was established after reviewing the results from many experimental tests. Many enhancements to the resolution of shallow seismic reflections resulted from: (1) application of a 20-Hz, low-cut filter; (2) recomputation of static corrections to a datum nearer the land surface; (3) intensive velocity analyses; and (4) near-trace muting analyses. The number, resolution, and lateral continuity of shallow reflections were greatly enhanced on the reprocessed sections, as was the delineation of shallow, major faults. Reflections on a synthetic seismogram, created from a borehole drilled to a depth of 786 m on seismic line IQS-11, matcheddprecisely with shallow reflections on the reprocessed section. The 33 reprocessed sections were instrumental in preparing a map showing the major structural features that affect the shallow aquifer system. Analysis of the map provides a better understanding of the effect of these shallow features on the regional occurrence, movement, and quality of

  9. Big Data Processing for a Central Texas Groundwater Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantu, A.; Rivera, O.; Martínez, A.; Lewis, D. H.; Gentle, J. N., Jr.; Fuentes, G.; Pierce, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    As computational methods improve, scientists are able to expand the level and scale of experimental simulation and testing that is completed for case studies. This study presents a comparative analysis of multiple models for the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer. Several numerical simulations using state-mandated MODFLOW models ran on Stampede, a High Performance Computing system housed at the Texas Advanced Computing Center, were performed for multiple scenario testing. One goal of this multidisciplinary project aims to visualize and compare the output data of the groundwater model using the statistical programming language R to find revealing data patterns produced by different pumping scenarios. Presenting data in a friendly post-processing format is covered in this paper. Visualization of the data and creating workflows applicable to the management of the data are tasks performed after data extraction. Resulting analyses provide an example of how supercomputing can be used to accelerate evaluation of scientific uncertainty and geological knowledge in relation to policy and management decisions. Understanding the aquifer behavior helps policy makers avoid negative impact on the endangered species, environmental services and aids in maximizing the aquifer yield.

  10. A field tracer study of attenuation of atrazine, hexazinone and procymidone in a pumice sand aquifer.

    PubMed

    Pang, L; Close, M E

    2001-12-01

    A field tracer experiment, simulating point source contamination, was conducted to investigate attenuation and transport of atrazine, hexazinone and procymidone in a volcanic pumice sand aquifer. Preliminary laboratory incubation tests were also carried out to determine degradation rates. Field transport of the pesticides was observed to the significant under non-equilibrium conditions. Therefore, a two-region/two-site non-equilibrium transport model, N3DADE, was used for analysis of the field data. A lump reduction rate constant was used in this paper to encompass all the irreversible reduction processes (e.g. degradation, irreversible adsorption, complexation and filtration for the pesticides adsorbed into particles and colloids) which are assumed to follow a first-order rate law. Results from the field experiment suggest that (a) hexazinone was the most mobile (retardation factor R = 1.4) and underwent least mass reduction; (b) procymidone was the least mobile (R = 9.26) and underwent the greatest mass reduction; (c) the mobility of atrazine (R = 4.45) was similar to that of rhodamine WT (R = 4.10). Hence, rhodamine WT can be used to delimit the appearance of atrazine in pumice sand groundwater. Results from the incubation tests suggest that (a) hexazinone was degraded only in the mixture of groundwater and aquifer material (degradation rate constant = 4.36 x 10(-3) day-1); (b) procymidone was degraded not only in the mixture of groundwater and aquifer material (rate constant = 1.12 x 10(-2) day-1) but also in the groundwater alone (rate constant = 2.79 x 10(-2) and-1); (c) atrazine was not degraded over 57 days incubation in either the mixture of aquifer material and groundwater or the groundwater alone. Degradation rates measured in the batch tests were much lower than the total reduction rates. This suggests that not only degradation but also other irreversible processes are important in attenuating pesticides under field conditions. Hence, the use of

  11. Modeling the impact of solute recycling on groundwater salinization under irrigated lands: A study of the Alto Piura aquifer, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakirevich, A.; Weisbrod, N.; Kuznetsov, M.; Rivera Villarreyes, C. A.; Benavent, I.; Chavez, A. M.; Ferrando, D.

    2013-03-01

    SummaryStudies of groundwater quality in arid and semi-arid lands show that irrigation return flow is one of major factors contributing to aquifer salinization. Existing mathematical models do not account explicitly for solute recycling during irrigation on a daily scale, which is considered as an important salinization input. The main objective of this research was to develop a mathematical numerical model that can simulate impact of irrigation return flow by coupling water and solute fluxes at the soil surface with quality of water pumped from the aquifer. This was obtained with a Quasi-3D model representing flow in the vadose zone - aquifer system by series of 1D Richards' equations in a variably-saturated zone and by a 3D flow equation in groundwater. The 3D advection-dispersion equation is solved in the entire domain. Concentration of irrigation water is calculated at each time step as a function of concentration of both surface water and groundwater extracted at specific locations. The model was applied to simulate the impact of irrigation on groundwater salinization of Alto Piura aquifer (Northern Peru) over thirty years. Three scenarios were considered: (i) use of flood irrigation and groundwater extraction (the present situation); (ii) increase of groundwater pumping by 50% compared to the first scenario; and (iii) transition from flood irrigation to drip irrigation, thus decreasing irrigation volume by around 60% compared to the first scenario. Results indicate that in different irrigation areas, the simulated increase rates of total dissolved solids in groundwater vary from 3-5 to 15-17 mg/L/year, depending on hydrogeological and hydrochemical conditions, volumes of water extracted, and proportion between surface water and groundwater applied. The transition from flood irrigation to drip irrigation decreases the negative impact of return flow on groundwater quality; however drip irrigation causes faster soil salinization compared to flood irrigation

  12. Assessment of Drywells as Effective Tools for Stormwater Management and Aquifer Recharge: Results of a Two-Year Field and Numerical Modeling Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, E.; Washburn, B.; Harter, T.; Fogg, G. E.; Nelson, C.; Lock, B.; Li, X.

    2016-12-01

    Drywells are gravity-fed, excavated pits with perforated casings used to facilitate stormwater infiltration and groundwater recharge in areas with low permeability soils or cover. Stormwater runoff that would otherwise be routed to streams or drains in urban areas can be used as a source of aquifer recharge, potentially mitigating the effects of drought and harm to natural water bodies. However, the potential for groundwater contamination caused by urban runoff bypassing surface soil and near surface sediment attenuation processes has prevented more widespread use of drywells as a recharge mechanism. A field study was conducted in Elk Grove, CA, to determine the effects of drywell-induced stormwater infiltration on the local hydrogeologic system. Two drywells 13.5 meters in depth were constructed for the project: one in a preexisting drainage basin fed by residential lots, and one at an industrial site. Both sites were outfitted with vegetated pretreatments, and upgradient and downgradient groundwater monitoring wells. Site stormwater and groundwater were sampled between November, 2014, and May, 2016, and analyzed for contaminants. Results of water quality sampling have been statistically analyzed for trends and used to determine the contaminants of interest and the concentrations of these contaminants in influent stormwater. The fate and transport of these contaminants have been simulated using a 1D variably saturated flow and transport model and site specific parameters to predict long-term effects of stormwater infiltration on the surrounding hydrogeologic system. The potential for remobilization of geogenic heavy metals from changes in subsurface hydrochemistry caused by drywell infiltration have also been assessed. The results of the field study and numerical modeling assessment indicate that the study's drywells do not pose a long-term threat to groundwater quality and may be an effective source of aquifer recharge and tool for urban stormwater management.

  13. On the interpretation of coastal aquifer water level trends and water balances: A precautionary note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Leanne K.; Werner, Adrian D.; Simmons, Craig T.

    2012-11-01

    SummaryThe changes in seawater volumes caused by seawater intrusion are often neglected in coastal aquifer management studies. The conditions under which this can result in significant water balance errors are not well understood. Interface movements also influence temporal trends in coastal aquifer water levels, but there is little guidance on this effect. In this study, we use steady-state, sharp-interface, analytic modelling to generate idealised relationships between seawater volume, freshwater volume and water levels. The approach assumes quasi-equilibrium conditions, which are evaluated using a selection of transient, dispersive simulations. The results demonstrate that seawater volume changes can influence significantly coastal aquifer water level trends, relative to the corresponding non-coastal aquifer situation, particularly within deep aquifers with high hydraulic conductivity and low net recharge. It is also shown that seawater volume changes can be a significant component of coastal aquifer water balances, e.g., relative to freshwater discharge to the sea, especially within deep aquifers characterised by low hydraulic conductivity and low freshwater discharge. Transient simulations show that steady-state conditions are a reasonable approximation for a range of transient seawater intrusion situations, including two of the three cases considered in this analysis. We conclude that changes in seawater volumes should be included routinely in coastal aquifer water balances. Also, temporal trends in coastal aquifer water levels may not provide an adequate measure of freshwater storage trends. It follows that the assessment of coastal aquifer condition should consider groundwater levels relative to the hydraulic head imposed by the ocean, accounting for density effects.

  14. In Brief: Assessing carbonate aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-07-01

    An assessment of water quality in 12 carbonate aquifers, mostly in the eastern and central United States, found that while water quality in the aquifers was highly variable, most of the samples met drinking water standards. The study, “Factors affecting water quality in selected carbonate aquifers in the United States, 1993-2005,” was released by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) on 26 June. According to the study, carbonate aquifers provide about 20% of the groundwater used as drinking water in the United States. The study, which included sample results for 151 chemical constituents or physical properties in 1042 wells and springs across 20 states, found that contaminants “were most often detected at concentrations less than human-health benchmarks except for nitrate.” The study also indicated that “the occurrence of anthropogenic contaminants was related to contaminant sources but also was affected by degree of aquifer confinement, ground-water age, and redox status. Areas with higher amounts of agricultural or urban land in unconfined aquifers were the most likely to have elevated concentrations of anthropogenic contaminants.”

  15. Plan of study for the Regional Aquifer-System Analysis, Columbia Plateau, Washington, northern Oregon, and northwestern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vaccaro, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey began a 4-year study of the regional aquifer system underlying the Columbia Plateau, in central and eastern Washington, northern Oregon, and northwestern Idaho in October 1983, as part of the Regional Aquifer System Analysis program. The study will describe the geohydrology, geochemistry, and quality of water in the Columbia River Basalt Group, the Miocene rocks that underlie 70,000 square miles in three States. Water from the basalts is used for municipal and industrial purposes, and most importantly, for agriculture. As more land is brought under cultivation and surface water becomes totally allocated, the groundwater is an increasingly important supply for agriculture and related activities. In addition, the basalts are being considered as a repository site for high-level nuclear wastes. For management agencies to make the best decisions regarding the future development of this area, the regional groundwater flow system, its relation to the surfacewater system , and the quality of the water need to be quantified. This report describes the geohydrologic setting, hydrologic problems, objectives, and approach for the region. (USGS)

  16. Groundwater recharge dynamics in unsaturated fractured chalk: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherubini, Claudia; Pastore, Nicola; Giasi, Concetta I.; Allegretti, Nicolaetta M.

    2016-04-01

    The heterogeneity of the unsaturated zone controls its hydraulic response to rainfall and the extent to which pollutants are delayed or attenuated before reaching groundwater. It plays therefore a very important role in the recharge of aquifers and the transfer of pollutants because of the presence of temporary storage zones and preferential flows. A better knowledge of the physical processes in the unsaturated zone would allow an improved assessment of the natural recharge in a heterogeneous aquifer and of its vulnerability to surface-applied pollution. The case study regards the role of the thick unsaturated zone of the Cretaceous chalk aquifer in Picardy (North of France) that controls the hydraulic response to rainfall. In the North Paris Basin, much of the recharge must pass through a regional chalk bed that is composed of a porous matrix with embedded fractures. Different types of conceptual models have been formulated to explain infiltration and recharge processes in the unsaturated fractured rock. The present study analyses the episodic recharge in fractured Chalk aquifer using the kinematic diffusion theory to predict water table fluctuation in response to rainfall. From an analysis of the data, there is the evidence of 1) a seasonal behavior characterized by a constant increase in the water level during the winter/spring period and a recession period, 2) a series of episodic behaviors during the summer/autumn. Kinematic diffusion models are useful for predict preferential fluxes and dynamic conditions. The presented approach conceptualizes the unsaturated flow as a combination of 1) diffusive flow refers to the idealized portion of the pore space of the medium within the flow rate is driven essentially by local gradient of potential; 2) preferential flow by which water moves across macroscopic distances through conduits of macropore length.

  17. In-Situ Study of Denitrification in the Elk Valley Aquifer, North Dakota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korom, S. F.; Kammer, A. E.; Schlag, A. J.; Skubinna, P. A.

    2001-05-01

    Our hypothesis was that pyrite in the Elk Valley Aquifer (EVA) is a significant electron donor for denitrification. To test our hypothesis two large (1.5 m long by 0.4 m in diameter) stainless steel chambers were installed below the water table in the EVA. The isolated aquifer sediments formed in-situ mesocosms (ISMs). Groundwater was pumped from the "control" ISM, amended with bromide, and pumped back. Groundwater was pumped from the "nitrate" ISM, amended with bromide and nitrate such that the ionic strengths of the chemicals added to both ISMs were the same, and pumped back. After 272 days the nitrate decreased below detection and sulfate concentrations increased from 0.67 mmol/L to 2.37 mmol/L in the nitrate ISM. No increase in sulfate was observed in the control. During the experiment the delta 15N values in the remaining nitrate was concentrated from 2.4 per mil to 43.5 per mil. Using bromide to determine dilution rates in the nitrate chamber and assuming that denitrification explained any loss of nitrate above dilution, the denitrification rate was up to 0.015 mmol/L/day. As much as 61% of the denitrification could be explained by the oxidation of pyrite. The tracer test described above was repeated two times. Results indicated that denitrification rates decreased and the amount of denitrification attributable to pyrite oxidation also decreased.

  18. Categorical Indicator Kriging for assessing the risk of groundwater nitrate pollution: the case of Vega de Granada aquifer (SE Spain).

    PubMed

    Chica-Olmo, Mario; Luque-Espinar, Juan Antonio; Rodriguez-Galiano, Victor; Pardo-Igúzquiza, Eulogio; Chica-Rivas, Lucía

    2014-02-01

    Groundwater nitrate pollution associated with agricultural activity is an important environmental problem in the management of this natural resource, as acknowledged by the European Water Framework Directive. Therefore, specific measures aimed to control the risk of water pollution by nitrates must be implemented to minimise its impact on the environment and potential risk to human health. The spatial probability distribution of nitrate contents exceeding a threshold or limit value, established within the quality standard, will be helpful to managers and decision-makers. A methodology based on non-parametric and non-linear methods of Indicator Kriging was used in the elaboration of a nitrate pollution categorical map for the aquifer of Vega de Granada (SE Spain). The map has been obtained from the local estimation of the probability that a nitrate content in an unsampled location belongs to one of the three categories established by the European Water Framework Directive: CL. 1 good quality [Min - 37.5 ppm], CL. 2 intermediate quality [37.5-50 ppm] and CL. 3 poor quality [50 ppm - Max]. The obtained results show that the areas exceeding nitrate concentrations of 50 ppm, poor quality waters, occupy more than 50% of the aquifer area. A great proportion of the area's municipalities are located in these poor quality water areas. The intermediate quality and good quality areas correspond to 21% and 28%, respectively, but with the highest population density. These results are coherent with the experimental data, which show an average nitrate concentration value of 72 ppm, significantly higher than the quality standard limit of 50 ppm. Consequently, the results suggest the importance of planning actions in order to control and monitor aquifer nitrate pollution. © 2013.

  19. Qualitative Case Study Guidelines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    methods in public relations and marketing communications. New York, Routledge 166-185 13. Denzin , N. K. (1978) The Research Act: A Theoretical...Introduction to Sociological Methods. 2nd ed. New York, McGraw-Hill 14. Denzin , N. K. and Lincoln, Y. S. (2011) The SAGE Handbook of Qualitative...The Art of Science. In: Denzin , N. K. and Lincoln, Y. S. (eds.) Handbook of Qualitative Research. Thousand Oaks, Sage 19. GAO (1990) Case Study

  20. Remediation case studies: Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide case studies of site cleanup projects utilizing bioremediation. This volume contains reports on nine projects that include bioventing and land treatment technologies, as well as a unique, large-scale slurry-phase project. In these projects, petroleum hydrocarbons are the most frequent contaminants of concern. Two land treatment projects in this volume represent completed cleanups at creosote sites.

  1. Post-injection feasibility study with the reflectivity method for the Ketzin pilot site, Germany (CO2 storage in a saline aquifer)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Alexandra; Kempka, Thomas; Huang, Fei; Diersch [Gil], Magdalena; Lüth, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    3D time-lapse seismic surveys (4D seismic) have proven to be a suitable technique for monitoring of injected CO2, because when CO2 replaces brine as a free gas it considerably affects elastic properties of porous media. Forward modeling of a 4D seismic response to the CO2-fluid substitution in a storage reservoir is an inevitable step in such studies. At the Ketzin pilot site (CO2 storage) 67 kilotons of CO2 were injected into a saline aquifer between 2008 and 2013. In order to track migration of CO2 at Ketzin, 3D time-lapse seismic data were acquired by means of a baseline pre-injection survey in 2005 and 3 monitor surveys: in 2009, 2012 and in 2015 (the 1st post-injection survey). Results of the 4D seismic forward modeling with the reflectivity method suggest that effects of the injected CO2 on the 4D seismic data at Ketzin are significant regarding both seismic amplitudes and time delays. These results prove the corresponding observations in the real 4D seismic data at the Ketzin pilot site. But reservoir heterogeneity and seismic resolution, as well as random and coherent seismic noise are negative factors to be considered in this interpretation. Results of the 4D seismic forward modeling with the reflectivity method support the conclusion that even small amounts of injected CO2 can be monitored in such post-injected saline aquifer as the CO2 storage reservoir at the Ketzin pilot site both qualitatively and quantitatively with considerable uncertainties (Lüth et al., 2015). Reference: Lueth, S., Ivanova, A., Kempka, T. (2015): Conformity assessment of monitoring and simulation of CO2 storage: A case study from the Ketzin pilot site. - International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, 42, p. 329-339.

  2. Groundwater-quality data in the Monterey–Salinas shallow aquifer study unit, 2013: Results from the California GAMA Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldrath, Dara A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Davis, Tracy A.

    2016-09-01

    Groundwater quality in the 3,016-square-mile Monterey–Salinas Shallow Aquifer study unit was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from October 2012 to May 2013 as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program’s Priority Basin Project. The GAMA Monterey–Salinas Shallow Aquifer study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated-groundwater quality in the shallow-aquifer systems in parts of Monterey and San Luis Obispo Counties and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of untreated-groundwater quality throughout California. The shallow-aquifer system in the Monterey–Salinas Shallow Aquifer study unit was defined as those parts of the aquifer system shallower than the perforated depth intervals of public-supply wells, which generally corresponds to the part of the aquifer system used by domestic wells. Groundwater quality in the shallow aquifers can differ from the quality in the deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater can be more vulnerable to surficial contamination.Samples were collected from 170 sites that were selected by using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method. The study unit was divided into 4 study areas, each study area was divided into grid cells, and 1 well was sampled in each of the 100 grid cells (grid wells). The grid wells were domestic wells or wells with screen depths similar to those in nearby domestic wells. A greater spatial density of data was achieved in 2 of the study areas by dividing grid cells in those study areas into subcells, and in 70 subcells, samples were collected from exterior faucets at sites where there were domestic wells or wells with screen depths similar to those in nearby domestic wells (shallow-well tap sites).Field water-quality indicators (dissolved oxygen, water temperature, pH, and specific conductance) were measured, and samples for analysis of inorganic

  3. Conceptual understanding and groundwater quality of selected basin-fill aquifers in the Southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thiros, Susan A.; Bexfield, Laura M.; Anning, David W.; Huntington, Jena M.

    2010-01-01

    The National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey has been conducting a regional analysis of water quality in the principal aquifer systems in the southwestern United States (hereinafter, “Southwest”) since 2005. Part of the NAWQA Program, the objective of the Southwest Principal Aquifers (SWPA) study is to develop a better understanding of water quality in basin-fill aquifers in the region by synthesizing information from case studies of 15 basins into a common set of important natural and human-related factors found to affect groundwater quality.The synthesis consists of three major components:1. Summary of current knowledge about the groundwater systems, and the status of, changes in, and influential factors affecting quality of groundwater in basin-fill aquifers in 15 basins previously studied by NAWQA (this report).2. Development of a conceptual model of the primary natural and human-related factors commonly affecting groundwater quality, thereby building a regional understanding of the susceptibility and vulnerability of basin-fill aquifers to contaminants.3. Development of statistical models that relate the concentration or occurrence of specific chemical constituents in groundwater to natural and human-related factors linked to the susceptibility and vulnerability of basin-fill aquifers to contamination.Basin-fill aquifers occur in about 200,000 mi2 of the 410,000 mi2 SWPA study area and are the primary source of groundwater supply for cities and agricultural communities. Four of the principal aquifers or aquifer systems of the United States are included in the basin-fill aquifers of the study area: (1) the Basin and Range basin-fill aquifers in California, Nevada, Utah, and Arizona; (2) the Rio Grande aquifer system in New Mexico and Colorado; (3) the California Coastal Basin aquifers; and (4) the Central Valley aquifer system in California. Because of the generally limited availability of surface-water supplies in

  4. A simulation/optimization study to assess seawater intrusion management strategies for the Gaza Strip coastal aquifer (Palestine)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentoni, Marta; Deidda, Roberto; Paniconi, Claudio; Qahman, Khalid; Lecca, Giuditta

    2015-03-01

    Seawater intrusion is one of the major threats to freshwater resources in coastal areas, often exacerbated by groundwater overexploitation. Mitigation measures are needed to properly manage aquifers, and to restore groundwater quality. This study integrates three computational tools into a unified framework to investigate seawater intrusion in coastal areas and to assess strategies for managing groundwater resources under natural and human-induced stresses. The three components are a three-dimensional hydrogeological model for density-dependent variably saturated flow and miscible salt transport, an automatic calibration procedure that uses state variable outputs from the model to estimate selected model parameters, and an optimization module that couples a genetic algorithm with the simulation model. The computational system is used to rank alternative strategies for mitigation of seawater intrusion, taking into account conflicting objectives and problem constraints. It is applied to the Gaza Strip (Palestine) coastal aquifer to identify a feasible groundwater management strategy for the period 2011-2020. The optimized solution is able to: (1) keep overall future abstraction from municipal groundwater wells close to the user-defined maximum level, (2) increase the average groundwater heads, and (3) lower both the total mass of salt extracted and the extent of the areas affected by seawater intrusion.

  5. Numerical study on the responses of groundwater and strata to pumping and recharge in a deep confined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang-Qing; Wang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Jin-Jian; Li, Ming-Guang

    2017-05-01

    Groundwater drawdown and strata settlements induced by dewatering in confined aquifers can be relieved by artificial recharge. In this study, numerical simulations of a field multi-well pumping-recharge test in a deep confined aquifer are conducted to analyze the responses of groundwater and strata to pumping and recharge. A three-dimensional numerical model is developed in a finite-difference software, which considers the fluid-mechanical interaction using the Biot consolidation theory. The predicted groundwater drawdown and ground settlements are compared to the measured data to confirm the validation of the numerical analysis of the pumping and recharge. Both numerical results and measured data indicate that the effect of recharge on controlling the groundwater drawdown and strata settlements correlates with the injection rate and well arrangements. Since the groundwater drawdown induced by pumping can be controlled by artificial recharge, soil compression can be relieved by reducing the changes of effective stress of the soils. Consequently, strata settlement induced by pumping can be relieved by artificial recharge and ground settlements can be eliminated if an appropriate injection rate and well arrangement are being determined. Moreover, the changes of the pore pressure and seepage force induced by pumping and recharge will also result in significant horizontal deformations in the strata near the recharge wells.

  6. A comparative study of shallow groundwater level simulation with three time series models in a coastal aquifer of South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Delgado, J.

    2017-05-01

    Accurate and reliable groundwater level forecasting models can help ensure the sustainable use of a watershed's aquifers for urban and rural water supply. In this paper, three time series analysis methods, Holt-Winters (HW), integrated time series (ITS), and seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA), are explored to simulate the groundwater level in a coastal aquifer, China. The monthly groundwater table depth data collected in a long time series from 2000 to 2011 are simulated and compared with those three time series models. The error criteria are estimated using coefficient of determination ( R 2), Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient ( E), and root-mean-squared error. The results indicate that three models are all accurate in reproducing the historical time series of groundwater levels. The comparisons of three models show that HW model is more accurate in predicting the groundwater levels than SARIMA and ITS models. It is recommended that additional studies explore this proposed method, which can be used in turn to facilitate the development and implementation of more effective and sustainable groundwater management strategies.

  7. Ni adsorption and Ni-Al LDH precipitation in a sandy aquifer: an experimental and mechanistic modeling study.

    PubMed

    Regelink, Inge C; Temminghoff, Erwin J M

    2011-03-01

    Mining activities and industries have created nickel (Ni) contaminations in many parts of the world. The objective of this study is to increase our understanding of Ni adsorption and Nickel-Aluminium Layered Double Hydroxide (Ni-Al LDH) precipitation to reduce Ni mobility in a sandy soil aquifer. At pH ≥ 7.2 both adsorption and Ni-Al LDH precipitation occurred. In batch experiments with the sandy soil up to 70% of oxalate-extractable Al was taken up in LDH formation during 56 days. In a long term column experiment 99% of influent Ni was retained at pH 7.5 due to Ni adsorption (≈ 34%) and Ni-Al LDH precipitation (≈ 66%) based on mechanistic reactive transport modeling. The subsequent leaching at pH 6.5 could be largely attributed to desorption. Our results show that even in sandy aquifers with relatively low Al content, Ni-Al LDH precipitation is a promising mechanism to immobilize Ni.

  8. Exploration case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Jimmy M.

    1989-04-01

    NASA's Office of Exploration has undertaken four case studies for prospective expansion of manned space activities beyond earth orbit. The subjects of these studies are (1) an expedition to the Martian moon Phobos; (2) a three-mission expedition to Mars; (3) the construction of a man-tended lunar observatory; and (4) the construction of a lunar outpost to serve as the basis for construction of a Martian outpost. The fourth alternative would follow the recommendation of the National Commission on Space for the creation of a 'bridge between worlds' in which explorers would develop ways in which to 'live off the land' in a space environment.

  9. Transient solutions to groundwater mounding in bounded and unbounded aquifers.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Serdar

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the well-known Hantush solution procedure for groundwater mounding under infinitely long infiltration strips is extended to finite and semi-infinite aquifer cases. Initially, the solution for infinite aquifers is presented and compared to those available in literature and to the numerical results of MODFLOW. For the finite aquifer case, the method of images, which is commonly used in well hydraulics, is used to be able to represent the constant-head boundaries at both sides. It is shown that a finite number of images is enough to obtain the results and sustain the steady state. The effect of parameters on the growth of the mound and on the time required to reach the steady state is investigated. The semi-infinite aquifer case is emphasized because the growth of the mound is not symmetric. As the constant-head boundary limits the growth, the unbounded side grows continuously. For this reason, the groundwater divide shifts toward the unbounded side. An iterative solution procedure is proposed. To perform the necessary computations a code was written in Visual Basic of which the algorithm is presented. The proposed methodology has a wide range of applicability and this is demonstrated using two practical examples. The first one is mounding under a stormwater dispersion trench in an infinite aquifer and the other is infiltration from a flood control channel into a semi-infinite aquifer. Results fit very well with those of MODFLOW. © 2012, The Author(s). Groundwater © 2012, National Ground Water Association.

  10. Quality assessment of an aquifer recharged with wastewater for its potential use as drinking source: "El Mezquital Valley" case.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, B; Chávez, A

    2004-01-01

    Mexico City, with a population of 18 million, has been sending its wastewater for more than 100 years to the Tula Valley where it is used to irrigate 90,000 ha. Due to the large wastewater volume (60 m3/s) sent through unlined channels, combined with the use of very high irrigation rates, artificial recharge of the local aquifer has been occurring. This recharge is estimated in more than 25 m3/s. As a consequence, the water table has raised and several springs have appeared in the last decades with flows between 100 to 600 L/s. These springs and several wells are the water sources in the region. An evaluation of the Tula Valley aquifer quality was performed to analyze the use of such water as source of drinking water for Mexico City. The work is divided into 5 individual projects: (a) drinking water quality in the Tula Valley; (b) water availability in the Tula Valley; (c) wastewater treatment due to its use for irrigation, (d) use of membrane processes to treat groundwater; and (d) biota developed in the new surface water reservoirs. Results show that it is feasible to use this reclaimed water as drinking source.

  11. Diagnostic analysis of pumping tests using derivative of dlgs/dlgt with case study.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Liang; Xu, Yongxin

    2014-09-01

    Diagnostic derivative interpretation of drawdown data from pumping tests is discussed in this paper. An emphasis is placed on the conceptualization of derivative term of dlgs/dlgt. Use of a combined plot of dlgs/dlgt and ds/dlgt is made to identify various flow patterns from variable discharge tests with infinite conditions, constant rate tests in bounded aquifers, and tests involving double porosity, which can be used to further characterize the aquifer. Compared with the standard derivative method (ds/dlgt), the combined derivative analysis of dlgs/dlgt and ds/dlgt of drawdown behaviours possesses certain advantages identified as follows: (1) the plot of dlgs/dlgt is strikingly sensitive for use in unveiling differences between pumping and recovery periods in a variable discharge test; (2) storativity (S) of pumped aquifers can be accurately evaluated by the combined plot; and (3) a quantitative assessment of double porosity behaviour can also be achieved. Based on applied case studies, Lagrange Interpolation Regression (LIR) is recommended for numerical derivative calculation. Advantages and disadvantages of LIR and traditional methods are demonstrated via a selected case study. The result of the case study confirms that LIR is a preferred method for numerical derivative calculation as it can be used to effectively minimise noisy effect during derivative processes. The proposed derivative approach provides the hydrologists with an additional tool for characterizing pumped aquifers.

  12. Sustainable yields from large diameter wells in shallow weathered aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushton, K. R.; de Silva, C. S.

    2016-08-01

    Large diameter wells in shallow weathered aquifers provide a valuable source of water for domestic and agricultural purposes in many locations including the Indian subcontinent. However, when used for irrigation, these wells often fail towards the end of the dry season. By considering two case studies in the dry and intermediate rainfall zones of Sri Lanka, reasons for the limited yield of these wells are identified. The first case study is concerned with a sloping catchment; a significant proportion of the precipitation during the rainy season either becomes runoff or passes down-gradient through the aquifer and is discharged at the ground surface. Furthermore, during the dry season, groundwater discharge continues. In the second case study the topography is generally flat but, even though the aquifer fills most years during the rainy season, there is often only sufficient water to irrigate about half of each farmer's holding. These investigations are based on field information and the development of conceptual and computational models. Of critical importance in assessing the long term yield of a well is the formation of a seepage face on the side of the well, with the water table a significant distance above the pumping water level. Consequently the water table may only be lowered to about half the depth of the well. The paper concludes with recommendations for the exploitation of groundwater from shallow weathered aquifers to minimise the risk of failure during the dry season.

  13. Plan of study to quantify the hydrologic relations between the Rio Grande and the Santa Fe Group aquifer system near Albuquerque, central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAda, D.P.

    1996-01-01

    The Albuquerque Basin in central New Mexico covers an area of about 3,060 square miles. Ground water from the Santa Fe Group aquifer system of the Albuquerque Basin is the principal source of water for municipal, domestic, commercial, and industrial uses in the Albuquerque area, an area of about 410 square miles. Ground- water withdrawal in the basin has increased from about 97,000 acre-feet in 1970 to about 171,000 acre-feet in 1994. About 92 percent of the 1994 total was withdrawn in the Albuquerque area. Management of ground water in the Albuquerque Basin is related to the surface water in the Rio Grande. Because the aquifer system is hydraulically connected to the Rio Grande and water in the river is fully appropriated, the ability to reliably estimate the effects of ground-water withdrawals on flow in the river is important. This report describes the components of the Rio Grande/Santa Fe Group aquifer system in the Albuquerque area and the data availability and data and interpretation needs relating to those components, and presents a plan of study to quantify the hydrologic relations between the Rio Grande and the Santa Fe Group aquifer system. The information needs related to the components of the river/aquifer system are prioritized. Information that is necessary to improve the understanding or quantification of a component in the river/aquifer system is prioritized as essential. Information that could add additional understanding of the system, but would not be necessary to improve the quantification of the system, is prioritized as useful. The study elements are prioritized in the same manner as the information needs; study elements designed to provide information considered necessary to improve the quantification of the system are prioritized as essential, and those designed to provide information that would add additional understanding of the system, but would not be necessary to improve the quantification of the system, are prioritized as useful.

  14. Portrayal of fuzzy recharge areas for water balance modelling - a case study in northern Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerner, A.; Schütze, N.; Schmitz, G. H.

    2012-06-01

    The research project IWAS Oman aims at implementing integrated water resources management (IWRM) to a pilot area in Al Batinah, Oman. This requires - amongst others - a realistic assessment of groundwater recharge to the alluvial aquifer which obviously has to be based upon the extension of recharge areas. In this context, the subsequent investigation focuses on the role of vagueness as regards the portrayal of the areas that provide water for particular aquifers. For that purpose, concepts of fuzziness in spatial analysis are applied to describe possible extents of recharge areas. In general, any water assessment is based on clearly delineated boundaries. However, in many cases, aquifer recharge areas are not clearly defined due to the nature of the study area. Hence, surfaces indicating a gradual membership to the recharge area of a particular aquifer are used in this investigation. These surfaces, which are based on available qualitative information, visualise a potential range of spatial extension. With regard to water balance calculations, functional relationships in tabular form are derived as well. Based on a regionalisation approach providing spatially distributed recharge rates, the corresponding recharge volume is calculated. Hence, this methodology provides fuzzy input data for water balance calculations. Beyond the portrayal of one singular aquifer recharge area, this approach also supports the complementary consideration of adjacent areas.

  15. Study of the Santa Catarina aquifer system (Mexico Basin) using magnetotelluric soundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouteau, Michel; Krivochieva, Stefka; Castillo, Ramiro Rodriguez; Moran, Tomas Gonzalez; Jouanne, Virginie

    1994-02-01

    A tensor magnetotelluric test survey was carried out in the region of Santa Catarina, located in the Chalco sub-basin of the Mexico Basin. The objective was to define the stratification at depth with an emphasis on the geometry of the main aquifer of that region which is partially known from DC resistivity soundings and drilling. High-quality magnetotelluric soundings could be recorded in the immediate vicinity of large urban zones because the sub-surface is very conductive. Interpretation shows that the solid bedrock is located at a depth of at least 800 m to the south and 1300 m to the north; it could, however, be much deeper. Using complementary DC resistivity sounding and well-logging data, three main layers have been defined overlying the bedrock. These layers are, from surface to bottom, an unsaturated zone of sand, volcanic ash and clay about 10 m thick, followed by a very conductive (1.5 ohm·m) 200 m thick layer of sand and ash with intercalated clay, saturated with highly mineralized water, and finally a zone with resistivity increasing gradually to 60 ohm·m. The investigated deep aquifer constitutes most of this third layer. It consists of a sequence of sand, gravel, pyroclastites and mainly fractured basalts. MT resistivity soundings and magnetic transfer functions also indicate that a shallow resistive structure is dipping, from the northwest, into the lacustrine deposits of the basin. This geologic feature is likely to be highly permeable fractured basaltic flows, which provide a channel by which water contaminated by the Santa Catarina landfill may leak into the basin.

  16. Recent climatic events controlling the hydrological and the aquifer dynamics at arid areas: The case of Huasco River watershed, northern Chile.

    PubMed

    Salas, I; Herrera, C; Luque, J A; Delgado, J; Urrutia, J; Jordan, T

    2016-11-15

    The investigation assesses the influence of recent climatic events in the water resources and the aquifer dynamics in the Huasco watershed by means of the analysis of precipitation, streamflow and piezometric levels during the last 50years. These hydrological and hydrogeological parameters were evaluated by an exploratory geostatistical analysis (semivariogram) and a spectral analysis (periodogram). Specifically, the hydrological and hydrogeological data analyses are organized according to three sub-basins, the Del Carmen River (Section I), the El Tránsito River (Section II), and the Huasco River (Section III). Data ranges for rainfall are from 1961 to 2015, for streamflow from 1964 to 2015, and for groundwater levels from 1969 to 2014, available from Water Authority of Chile. The analyses allowed the identification of cycles in the hydrological and hydrogeological records. The study area is located in a transient climatic fringe where the convergence of several climatic systems can be identified in the hydrological and hydrogeological records. Results indicate that the nival areas and the small glaciers are especially important to the recharge processes in the Huasco watershed during the spring-summer snowmelting. Water reservoirs in the main aquifer (Section III) and in the Santa Juana dam are highly sensitive to ENSO oscillation climatic patterns. The main climatic events that control this record are the El Niño and La Niña events. In addition, the climatic influence of the westerlies and the SE extratropical moisture were also identified. Spectral analysis identified the presence of a 22.9-yearcycle in piezometric levels of the alluvial aquifer of the Huasco River. This cycle is consistent with the 22-year Hale solar cycle, suggesting the existence of a solar forcing controlling the ENSO oscillations. Moreover, semivariogram and spectral analysis identified a 10.65-yearcycle and a 9.2-yearcycle in groundwater, respectively, which were attributed to the

  17. The Sparta aquifer system in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newcome, Roy

    1976-01-01

    A large amount of information is available on the aquifers of Mississippi.  Reports resulting from various areal studies have described the ground-water resources of the areas concerned, but no reports dealing specifically with the entire Mississippi occurrence of individual aquifer systems have previously been prepared.  A series of "aquifer atlases" was deemed the most effective way to describe the character, the potential, and the extent of development of the aquifers and thereby provide water managers with data needed for efficient utilization of available resources.  This report on the Sparta aquifer system is the third in the series.  Information on the aquifers was obtained in the cooperative programs of the U.S. Geological Survey with the Mississippi Board of Water Commissioners and other State and Federal agencies.

  18. Low velocity non-Darcian flow to a well fully penetrating a confined aquifer in the first kind of leaky aquifer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xianmeng; Shao, Junyu; Yin, Maosheng; Liu, Dengfeng; Xue, Xianwu

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we use a finite difference method to solve low velocity non-Darcian flow to a well in the first kind of leaky aquifer system. Flow in the confined aquifer is assumed to be Darcian and horizontal, whereas flow in the aquitard is assumed to be non-Darcian and vertical. The threshold hydraulic gradient existence of non-Darcian flow in low permeability porous media is employed to describe the non-Darcian flow in the aquitard. A numerical solution has been obtained by using a finite difference method. This solution is compared with the previous solution for Darcian flow case in leaky aquifer system. The error has been analyzed. The comparison of this study and Darcian flow case (Hantush and Jacob, 1955) in leaky aquifer system indicates that the error is very small and can be neglected. However, the hydrogeological parameter calculation of leaky aquifer system is remarkably influenced by low velocity non-Darcian flow in aquitard. For the inflection point method (Hantush, 1956), the absolute values of estimated errors for coefficient of transmissibility of confined aquifer and vertical hydraulic conductivity of aquitard show negative relationship with the pumping rate. For the type curve-fitting method (Walton, 1962), the estimated errors for coefficient of transmissibility and elastic drainable porosity of confined aquifer are very small under small pumping rate. In general, the estimated errors for coefficient of transmissibility and elastic drainable porosity of confined aquifer can be controlled under certain level through adjusting pumping rate. The estimated error of vertical hydraulic conductivity of aquitard is quite large no matter which method is used, even up to nearly 300%.

  19. Field evidence of hydraulic connections between bedrock aquifers and overlying granular aquifers: examples from the Grenville Province of the Canadian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Sandra K.; Chesnaux, Romain; Rouleau, Alain; Morin, Roger; Walter, Julien; Rafini, Silvain

    2014-12-01

    Field evidence of hydraulic connections between a bedrock aquifer and an overlying granular aquifer in the Canadian Shield (Grenville Province) is presented. This issue is rarely considered and investigated despite its important hydraulic and chemical consequences and its widespread occurrence worldwide. The methodology employed is based on complementary field tests conducted at specific experimental sites instrumented both in the rock and in the overlying deposits. One of the bedrock sites revealed a natural hydraulic connection with the overlying granular aquifer caused by the weathered surface of the uppermost bedrock. Another site revealed an artificial hydraulic connection between the bedrock and the granular aquifer created by an improperly sealed casing. A regional study showed that hydraulic connections yield an erroneous interpretation of the true hydraulic properties of the tested aquifer. The detection of hydraulic connections is therefore essential to properly define well-capture areas and contamination conditions. It is recommended to practitioners that pumping tests be performed as well as hydrochemical comparisons of each existing aquifer unit. Falling-head permeability tests are also helpful in verifying the quality of the seal at the bedrock-casing contact. More effective procedural controls and better well-construction practices are necessary to reduce the risks of cross-contamination induced by defective seals.

  20. Conducting and Reporting Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtman, Merilyn; Taylor, Satomi Izumi

    Issues and elements of case study research are explored and illustrated with the example of a case study of a kindergarten in a suburb of Tokyo (Japan). Case study research is a type of qualitative research that concentrates on a single unit or entity, with boundaries established by the researcher. The case is an example drawn from a larger class,…

  1. PREDICT : A CASE STUDY.

    SciTech Connect

    Kerscher, W. J. III; Booker, J. M.; Meyer, Mary A.

    2001-01-01

    Delphi Automotive Systems and the Los Alamos National Laboratory worked together to develop PREDICT, a new methodology to characterize the reliability of a new product during its development program. Rather than conducting testing after hardware has been built, and developing statistical confidence bands around the results, this updating approach starts with an early reliability estimate characterized by large uncertainty, and then proceeds to reduce the uncertainty by folding in fresh information in a Bayesian framework. A considerable amount of knowledge is available at the beginning of a program in the form of expert judgment which helps to provide the initial estimate. This estimate is then continually updated as substantial and varied information becomes available during the course of the development program. This paper presents a case study of the application of PREDICT, with the objective of further describing the methodology. PREDICT has been honored with an R&D 100 Award presented by R&D Magazine.

  2. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Pi, Kunfu; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu

    2015-09-15

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technique, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main source of drinking water. The in situ arsenic removal technique was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions., Its effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The mechanism of arsenic removal by the iron coating was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, an electron microprobe, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. A 4-step alternative cycle aquifer iron coating method was developed. A continuous injection of 5 mmol/L FeSO4 and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 hours can create a uniform coating of crystalline goethite on the surface of quartz sand in the columns without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 0.45 cm/min of the injection reagents (vi), the time for arsenic (as Na2HAsO4) to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column was approximately 35 hours, which was much longer than that for tracer fluorescein sodium (approximately 2 hours). The retardation factor of arsenic was 23, and its adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe, leading to an excellent arsenic removal. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As (V) and Fe (II) reagents. When the arsenic content in the groundwater was 233 μg/L, the aqueous phase arsenic was completely removed with an arsenic adsorption of 0.05 mol As per mol Fe. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation, in which arsenic and iron likely formed the arsenic-bearing iron mineral phases with poor crystallinity by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Thus, the high arsenic removal efficiency of the technique likely resulted from the

  3. A pragmatic approach to study the groundwater quality suitability for domestic and agricultural usage, Saq aquifer, northwest of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Nazzal, Yousef; Ahmed, Izrar; Al-Arifi, Nassir S N; Ghrefat, Habes; Zaidi, Faisal K; El-Waheidi, Mahmud M; Batayneh, Awni; Zumlot, Taisser

    2014-08-01

    The present study deals with detailed hydrochemical assessment of groundwater within the Saq aquifer. The Saq aquifer which extends through the NW part of Saudi Arabia is one of the major sources of groundwater supply. Groundwater samples were collected from about 295 groundwater wells and analyzed for various physico-chemical parameters such as electrical conductivity (EC), pH, temperature, total dissolved solids (TDS), Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), CO3 (-), HCO3 (-), Cl(-), SO4 (2-), and NO3 (-). Groundwater in the area is slightly alkaline and hard in nature. Electrical conductivity (EC) varies between 284 and 9,902 μS/cm with an average value of 1,599.4 μS/cm. The groundwater is highly mineralized with approximately 30 % of the samples having major ion concentrations above the WHO permissible limits. The NO3 (-) concentration varies between 0.4 and 318.2 mg/l. The depth distribution of NO3 (-) concentration shows higher concentration at shallow depths with a gradual decrease at deeper depths. As far as drinking water quality criteria are concerned, study shows that about 33 % of samples are unfit for use. A detailed assessment of groundwater quality in relation to agriculture use reveals that 21 % samples are unsuitable for irrigation. Using Piper's classification, groundwater was classified into five different groups. Majority of the samples show Mix-Cl-SO4- and Na-Cl-types water. The abundances of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) over alkalis infer mixed type of groundwater facies and reverse exchange reactions. The groundwater has acquired unique chemical characteristics through prolonged rock-water interactions, percolation of irrigation return water, and reactions at vadose zone.

  4. Gulf Coast regional aquifer-system analysis; a Mississippi perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grubb, H.F.

    1986-01-01

    The Gulf Coast Regional Aquifer-System Analysis is a study of regional aquifers in sediments of mostly Cenozoic age in an area of about 230,000 sq mi in the Central Plain of Alabama, Arkansas , Florida, Illinois, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Tennessee, and Texas, and an additional 60,000 sq mi offshore. Three aquifer systems have been identified: the Mississippi embayment aquifer system, the Texas coastal uplands aquifer system, and the coastal lowlands aquifer system. These aquifer systems thicken from < 100 ft near their updip limit to thousands of ft gulfward toward their downdip limits. The Mississippi embayment aquifer system exceeds 5,000 ft in thickness in central Louisiana and in southwestern Mississippi. The thickest area in southwestern Mississippi underlies most of the six Mississippi counties, centered around Jefferson County. The greatest thickness of the coastal lowlands aquifer system in Mississippi occurs in southern Hancock County where the system is composed of several individual aquifers and confining units. There are seven aquifers and three confining units in the Mississippi embayment aquifer system, five aquifers and two confining units in the Texas coastal uplands aquifer system, and five aquifers and two confining units in the coastal lowlands aquifer system. Most of the thicker parts of each aquifer system contain moderately saline to very saline water. Water in the Mississippi embayment aquifer system is moderately saline to very saline in most of a seven county area in southwestern Mississippi. About 9,600 million gal/day (gpd) of ground water was pumped from the aquifers in the study area during 1980. About 15% of that pumpage (or about 1,400 million gpd was in Mississippi, mostly from the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer of the Mississippi embayment aquifer system. About 10% of the Mississippi pumpage, or 140 million gpd, was from the coastal lowlands aquifer system. Preliminary results from simulation of

  5. Hydrostratigraphy and hydrogeology of the western part of Maira area, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan: a case study by using electrical resistivity.

    PubMed

    Farid, Asam; Jadoon, Khanzaib; Akhter, Gulraiz; Iqbal, Muhammad Asim

    2013-03-01

    Hydrostratigraphy and hydrogeology of the Maira vicinity is important for the characterization of aquifer system and developing numerical groundwater flow models to predict the future availability of the water resource. Conventionally, the aquifer parameters are obtained by the analysis of pumping tests data which provide limited spatial information and turn out to be costly and time consuming. Vertical electrical soundings and pump testing of boreholes were conducted to delineate the aquifer system at the western part of the Maira area, Khyber Pakhtun Khwa, Pakistan. Aquifer lithology in the eastern part of the study area is dominated by coarse sand and gravel whereas the western part is characterized by fine sand. An attempt has been made to estimate the hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer system by establishing a relationship between the pumping test results and vertical electrical soundings by using regression technique. The relationship is applied to the area along the resistivity profiles where boreholes are not drilled. Our findings show a good match between pumped hydraulic conductivity and estimated hydraulic conductivity. In case of sparse borehole data, regression technique is useful in estimating hydraulic properties for aquifers with varying lithology.

  6. Modeling seawater intrusion and the associated reactive solute transport in fractured coastal aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nick, Hamid M.; Regnier, Pierre; Thullner, Martin

    2013-04-01

    In coastal aquifers seawater and terrestrial water get into contact and the reactive mixing between these water bodies controls the water quality of submarine groundwater discharge. The rates of such mixing controlled reactions are depending not only on the properties of the reactive species but also on the density driven flow dynamics and the resulting transport patterns. A prediction of these flow and transport processes and thus of the fate of reactive species is specifically challenged in fracture aquifers as it depends on the focusing of the flow and the local balance of viscous and gravitational forces. To study the influence of fractures on mixing and reactive transport in coastal aquifers we present a reactive discrete fracture and matrix (DFM) model using unstructured spatially adaptively refined finite-element meshes. This model is developed by coupling the Complex System Modelling Platform (CSMP++) utilizing a hybrid FEFV scheme, and a Biogeochemical Reaction Network Simulator (BRNS) capable of solving for kinetically and thermodynamically constrained biogeochemical reactions [1]. The model is applied to simulate the reactive transport in fracture networks embedded in a permeable rock matrix. For virtual coastal aquifers, different fracture data sets are employed to study the effect of fractures and their characteristics on the reactive mixing between fresh water and seawater in coastal aquifers. Obtained results show that the presence of fractures enhances reactive mixing for most cases due to the combined effect of fracture induced flow channeling and dispersion. The magnitude of this effect depends highly on fracture density, spacing and orientation. Furthermore the results indicate that reactive mixing in fractured aquifers is not well described using an effective parameterization of a homogeneous aquifer setup. This suggests that structural information on the fracture network is needed for a sufficient description of reactive transport processes in

  7. Project Summary. ANALYTICAL ELEMENT MODELING OF COASTAL AQUIFERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four topics were studied concerning the modeling of groundwater flow in coastal aquifers with analytic elements: (1) practical experience was obtained by constructing a groundwater model of the shallow aquifers below the Delmarva Peninsula USA using the commercial program MVAEM; ...

  8. Project Summary. ANALYTICAL ELEMENT MODELING OF COASTAL AQUIFERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four topics were studied concerning the modeling of groundwater flow in coastal aquifers with analytic elements: (1) practical experience was obtained by constructing a groundwater model of the shallow aquifers below the Delmarva Peninsula USA using the commercial program MVAEM; ...

  9. Characterising aquifer treatment for pathogens in managed aquifer recharge.

    PubMed

    Page, D; Dillon, P; Toze, S; Sidhu, J P S

    2010-01-01

    In this study the value of subsurface treatment of urban stormwater during Aquifer Storage Transfer Recovery (ASTR) is characterised using quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) methodology. The ASTR project utilizes a multi-barrier treatment train to treat urban stormwater but to date the role of the aquifer has not been quantified. In this study it was estimated that the aquifer barrier provided 1.4, 2.6, >6.0 log(10) removals for rotavirus, Cryptosporidium and Campylobacter respectively based on pathogen diffusion chamber results. The aquifer treatment barrier was found to vary in importance vis-à-vis the pre-treatment via a constructed wetland and potential post-treatment options of UV-disinfection and chlorination for the reference pathogens. The risk assessment demonstrated that the human health risk associated with potable reuse of stormwater can be mitigated (disability adjusted life years, DALYs <1 × 10(-6)) if the aquifer is integrated with suitable post treatment options into a treatment train to attenuate pathogens and protect human health.

  10. Aquifer test at well SMW-1 near Moenkopi, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carruth, Rob; Bills, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    The Hopi villages of Lower Moencopi and Upper Moenkopi are on the Hopi Indian Reservation south of Tuba City in northern Arizona. These adjacent Hopi villages, located west and north of the confluence of Pasture Canyon Wash and Moenkopi Wash, are dependent on groundwater withdrawals from three wells that penetrate the N aquifer and from two springs that discharge from the N aquifer. The N aquifer is the principal aquifer in this region of northern Arizona and is composed of thick beds of sandstone between less permeable layers of siltstone and mudstone. The fine-grained character of the N aquifer inhibits rapid movement of water and large yields to wells; however, the aquifer is moderately productive at yields generally less than 25 gallons per minute in the study area. In recent years, the water level has declined in the three public-supply wells and the flow from the springs has decreased, causing concern that the current water supply will not be able to accommodate peak demand and allow for residential and economic growth. In addition to the challenge imposed by declining groundwater levels, the water-supply wells and springs are located about 2 miles downgradient from the Tuba City Landfill site where studies are ongoing to determine if uranium and other metals in groundwater beneath the landfill are higher than regional concentrations in the N aquifer. In August 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Hopi Tribe, conducted an aquifer test on well SMW-1, designed to help the Hopi Tribe determine the potential yield and water quality of the N aquifer south of Moenkopi Wash as a possible source of additional water supply. Well SMW-1 was drilled south of Moenkopi Wash to a depth of 760 feet below land surface before being backfilled and cased to about 300 feet. The well penetrates, in descending order, the Navajo Sandstone and the Kayenta Formation, both units of the N aquifer. The pre-test water level in the well was 99.15 feet below land

  11. Experimental study on the vertical deformation of aquifer soils under conditions of withdrawing and recharging of groundwater in Tongchuan region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ya-ni; Fan, Wen; Cao, Yanbo

    2017-03-01

    Land subsidence due to aquifer-system compaction accompanying groundwater extraction is a global hazard. Rising urban construction and groundwater demand necessitate increased awareness and better understanding of the geological problem. Motivated by the lack of laboratory-scale studies on this issue, an experimental investigation on the newly developed Tongchuan region, China, is presented. The study addresses the deformation behaviors of three soil samples, with the lithology of silty clay, silt, and fine sand, under the conditions of groundwater withdrawal and recharge using the GDS Consolidation Testing System. Results indicate that all three samples were characterized by elastic-plastic deformation under the conditions of withdrawing and recharging. The vertical deformation of the silty clay in the aquitard above the first confined aquifer was larger than those of the other two samples, and its deformation is a gradual and long process; thus, considerable attention should be paid to deformation in this aquitard due to the apparent creep effect and tiny rebound deformation. However, the settlement of the fine sand in the second confined aquifer cannot be ignored due to the great thickness of the aquifer. For the same soil, as the pore-water pressure declined, the unit rate of vertical deformation decreased gradually, whereas the creep effect of deformation in the later declining stage of pore-water pressure was more apparent than that in the former declining stage. These observations are highly important to the local government, which is developing measures to prevent and control subsidence.

  12. Experimental study on the vertical deformation of aquifer soils under conditions of withdrawing and recharging of groundwater in Tongchuan region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ya-ni; Fan, Wen; Cao, Yanbo

    2016-11-01

    Land subsidence due to aquifer-system compaction accompanying groundwater extraction is a global hazard. Rising urban construction and groundwater demand necessitate increased awareness and better understanding of the geological problem. Motivated by the lack of laboratory-scale studies on this issue, an experimental investigation on the newly developed Tongchuan region, China, is presented. The study addresses the deformation behaviors of three soil samples, with the lithology of silty clay, silt, and fine sand, under the conditions of groundwater withdrawal and recharge using the GDS Consolidation Testing System. Results indicate that all three samples were characterized by elastic-plastic deformation under the conditions of withdrawing and recharging. The vertical deformation of the silty clay in the aquitard above the first confined aquifer was larger than those of the other two samples, and its deformation is a gradual and long process; thus, considerable attention should be paid to deformation in this aquitard due to the apparent creep effect and tiny rebound deformation. However, the settlement of the fine sand in the second confined aquifer cannot be ignored due to the great thickness of the aquifer. For the same soil, as the pore-water pressure declined, the unit rate of vertical deformation decreased gradually, whereas the creep effect of deformation in the later declining stage of pore-water pressure was more apparent than that in the former declining stage. These observations are highly important to the local government, which is developing measures to prevent and control subsidence.

  13. Quantification of the reactions in heat storage systems in the Malm aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueckert, Martina; Baumann, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Combined heat and power plants (CHP) are efficient and environmentally friendly because excess heat produced during power generation is used for heating purposes. While the power demand remains rather constant throughout the year, the heat demand shows seasonal variations. In a worst-case scenario, the heat production in winter is not sufficient, and the power production in summer has to be ramped down because the excess heat cannot be released to the environment. Therefore, storage of excess heat of CHP is highly beneficial from an economic and an ecological point of view. Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) is considered as a promising technology for energy storage. In a typical setting, water from an aquifer is produced, heated up by excess heat from the CHP and injected through a second borehole back into the aquifer. The carbonate rocks of the upper Jurrasic in the Molasse Basin seem to be promising sites for aquifer heat storage because of their high transmissivity combined with a typical geological setting with tight caprock. However, reactions in the aquifer cannot be neglected and may become the limiting process of the whole operation. While there have been several studies performed in clastic aquifers and for temperatures below 100°C, the knowledge about high injection temperatures and storage into a carbonatic aquifer matrix is still limited. Within a research project funded by the Bavarian State Ministry for Economic Affairs and the BMW Group, the storage and recuperation of excess heat energy into the Bavarian Malm aquifer with flow rates of 15 L/s and temperatures of up to 110°C was investigated. The addition of {CO_2} was used to prevent precipitations. Data from the field site was backed up by autoclave experiments and used to verify a conceptional hydrogeochemical model with PhreeqC for the heat storage operation. The model allows to parametrize the operation and to predict possible reactions in the aquifer.

  14. Quality of groundwater at and near an aquifer storage and recovery site, Bexar, Atascosa, and Wilson Counties, Texas, June 2004-August 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otero, Cassi L.; Petri, Brian L.

    2010-01-01

    recovery wells likely indicate some degree of mixing of the two waters occurred rather than continued decay of radium-226 in the injected water. Geochemical and isotope data measured in samples collected in May 2005 from two Carrizo aquifer monitoring wells and in July 2008 from the three ASR production-only wells in the northern section of the ASR site indicate that injected Edwards aquifer water had not migrated to these five sites. Geochemical and isotope data measured in samples collected from Carrizo aquifer wells in 2004, 2005, and 2008 were graphically analyzed to determine if changes in chemistry could be detected. Major-ion, trace element, and isotope chemistry varied spatially in the samples collected from the Carrizo aquifer. With the exception of a few samples, major-ion concentrations measured in samples collected in Carrizo aquifer wells in 2004, 2005, and 2008 were similar. A slightly larger sulfate con-centration and a slightly smaller bicarbonate concentration were measured in samples collected in 2005 and 2008 from well NC1 compared to samples collected at well NC1 in 2004. Larger sodium concentrations and smaller calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, and sulfate concentrations were measured in samples collected in 2008 from well WC1 than in samples collected at this well in 2004 and 2005. Larger calcium and magnesium concentrations and a smaller sodium concentration were measured in the samples collected in 2008 at well EC2 compared to samples collected at this well in 2004 and 2005. While in some cases the computed percent differences (compared to concentrations from June 2004) in dissolved iron and dissolved manganese concentrations in 11 wells sampled in the Carrizo aquifer in 2005 and 2008 were quite large, no trends that might have been caused by migration of injected Edwards aquifer water were observed. Because of the natural variation in geochemical data in the Carrizo aquifer and the small data set collected for this study, differences in major

  15. Termination: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Ahron L

    2015-12-01

    In this article I posit and examine certain criteria and qualities for ending an analysis. The case study describes the end phase of a four-year psychoanalysis in which the patient's decision to move to another area forced the end of his analysis. We continued to explore and work through his core neurotic conflicts that included issues of competitive rivalry, dominance and submission, control, and anxiety about birth and death. A shift in the transference from me as a negative father to me as a supportive but competitive older brother was also examined in the context of ending treatment as well as other aspects of the transference. In addition, we analyzed the meaning of his ending treatment based on an extra-analytic circumstance. In discussing this phase of treatment, the definition and history of the term "termination" and its connotations are reviewed. Various criteria for completing an analysis are examined, and technical observations about this phase of treatment are investigated. It was found that while a significant shift in the transference occurred in this phase of the patient's analysis, conflicts related to the transference were not "resolved" in the classical sense. Terminating treatment was considered as a practical matter in which the patient's autonomy and sense of choice were respected and analyzed.

  16. Dioxin: a case study.

    PubMed

    Bond, G G

    1993-01-01

    The need to notify individuals of a possible health risk from their past exposure to potentially hazardous agents frequently extends beyond workers to include community groups. The issues to consider in community notification are frequently similar to those that are important for worker notification but may include some that are unique. This case study traces the evolution of one company's strategy for communicating with the public about possible dioxin contamination associated with its operations. Early communications tended to emphasize the technical aspects of the issues in the fashion of scientists talking to other scientists. This was interpreted by some to be symptomatic of an arrogant and uncaring attitude. Beginning in the early 1980s, the company's management recognized the need to reach out to a variety of audiences on multiple levels, and shifted to a more comprehensive communications strategy. A similar shift is now occurring throughout the chemical manufacturing industry as top managers realize that, if they expect to continue to operate, they must become more accountable and responsive to the public.

  17. Water quality decline in coastal aquifers under anthropic pressure: the case of a suburban area of Dakar (Senegal).

    PubMed

    Re, Viviana; Cissé Faye, Seynabou; Faye, Abdoulaye; Faye, Serigne; Gaye, Cheikh Becaye; Sacchi, Elisa; Zuppi, Gian Maria

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the unregulated increase of the population in coastal areas of developing countries has become source of concern for both water supply and quality control. In the region of Dakar (Senegal), approximately 80% of water resources come from groundwater reservoirs, which are increasingly affected by anthropogenic pressures. The identification of the main sources of pollution, and thus the aquifer vulnerability, is essential to provide a sound basis for the implementation of long-term geochemically based water management plans in this sub-Saharan area. With this aim, a hydrochemical and isotopic survey on 26 wells was performed in the so-called Peninsula of Cap-Vert. Results show that seawater intrusion represents the main process affecting groundwater chemical characteristics. Nitrates often exceed the World Health Organization drinking water limits: stable isotopes of dissolved nitrate (δ¹⁵N and δ¹⁸O) indicate urban sewage and fertilizers as a major source of contamination. Results depict a complex situation in which groundwater is affected by direct and indirect infiltration of effluents, mixing with seawater and freshening processes from below. Besides the relevance of the investigation at a regional level, it represents a basis for decision-making processes in an integrated water resources management and in the planning of similar monitoring strategies for other urban coastal regions.

  18. Natural Learning Case Study Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Natural Learning Case Study Archives (NLCSA) is a research facility for those interested in using case study analysis to deepen their understanding of common sense knowledge and natural learning (how the mind interacts with everyday experiences to develop common sense knowledge). The database comprises three case study corpora based on experiences…

  19. Natural Learning Case Study Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawler, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Natural Learning Case Study Archives (NLCSA) is a research facility for those interested in using case study analysis to deepen their understanding of common sense knowledge and natural learning (how the mind interacts with everyday experiences to develop common sense knowledge). The database comprises three case study corpora based on experiences…

  20. The Paradox of Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Helen

    1996-01-01

    Examines the paradox of case studies' abilities to understand the complexity in particular contexts while not being generalizable. Argues that the pressure for quantification and multisite case study design in policy research has weakened the original utility of the case study method for understanding complex educational phenomena. (DSK)

  1. Geoelectric resistivity sounding of riverside alluvial aquifer in an agricultural area at Buyeo, Geum River watershed, Korea: an application to groundwater contamination study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yong-Hee; Doh, Seong-Jae; Yun, Seong-Taek

    2007-12-01

    Twenty profiles of vertical electric soundings (VES) were obtained in a riverside alluvium at the Buyeo area, South Korea, to examine the variations of subsurface geology and associated groundwater chemistry. The combination of the VES data with the borehole data provided useful information on subsurface hydrogeologic conditions. The vestige of an ancient river channel (e.g. oxbow lake) was identified on the resistivity profiles by the lateral continuation of a near-surface perched aquifer parallel to the river. Such a perched aquifer is typically developed in the area with a clay-rich silty surface alluvium which prohibits the infiltration of oxygen. Therefore, groundwater below the oxbow lake shows a very low nitrate concentration and Eh values under the strong anoxic condition. The distribution of water resistivity is correlated with that of measured total dissolved solids concentration in groundwater, while the earth resistivity of the aquifer shows a significant spatial variation. It is interpreted that the earth resistivity of the aquifer is mainly controlled by the soil type rather than by the water chemistry in the study area.

  2. Arsenic and Humic Substances in Alluvial Aquifers of Bangladesh and Taiwan: A Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reza, A.; Jean, J.; Lee, M.

    2007-12-01

    Humic substances in groundwater samples from the arsenicosis area in Bangladesh, northern Taiwan and the Blackfoot disease (BFD) area in southwestern Taiwan were characterized by Fluorescence Spectroscopy (FS), and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses. As, Mn, Fe, Sr, Se levels in these groundwaters were measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Major ions and selected water parameters including pH, electrical conductivity (EC), oxidation reduction potential (ORP), and dissolved oxygen (DO) were also determined. Groundwater As concentration ranges from 1.4 to 140 μg/L in the alluvial aquifers located in the Chapai-Nawabganj district of Bangladesh. As levels in groundwater ranges from 0.5 to 560 μg/L in the Ilan Plain of northern Taiwan. Geothermal waters in the Beitou hot springs contain high concentrations of inorganic As (up to 3,975 μg/L); geothermal activity is likely responsible for the significant discharge of arsenic to the downstream Kwandu Plain. As levels in the BFD area of southwestern Taiwan ranges from 25 μg/L to 967 μg/L. Interestingly, groundwater arsenic in the BFD area of southwestern Taiwan correlates positively with strong fluorescence (maximum relative fluorescence intensity upto 495) and the content of humic substances. In contrast, As-rich groundwaters from Chapai-Nawabganj district of Bangladesh and northern part of Taiwan generally have relatively low content of humic substances with weak fluorescence (maximum relative fluorescence intensity upto 65 and 121, respectively). Moreover, results of FTIR analysis show that humic substances extracted from water samples of the Taiwan BFD area contain phenolic and amines groups of humic substances, which tend to form organo-metal complexes with As and other trace elements. High levels of As and humic substances probably play a critical role in causing the Black foot disease in Chia-Nan plain of southwestern Taiwan.

  3. Surface Spills at Unconventional Oil and Gas Sites: a Contaminant Transport Modeling Study for the South Platte Alluvial Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCray, J. E.; Kanno, C.; McLaughlin, M.; Blotevogel, J.; Borch, T.

    2016-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has revolutionized the U.S.'s energy portfolio by making shale reservoirs productive and commercially viable. However, the public is concerned that the chemical constituents in hydraulic fracturing fluid, produced water, or natural gas itself could potentially impact groundwater. Here, we present fate and transport simulations of aqueous fluid surface spills. Surface spills are the most likely contamination pathway to occur during oil and gas production operations. We have three primary goals: 1) evaluate whether or not these spills pose risks to groundwater quality in the South Platte aquifer system, 2) develop a screening level methodology that could be applied at other sites and for various pollutants, and 3) demonstrate the potential importance of co-contaminant interactions using selected chemicals. We considered two types of fluid that can be accidentally released at oil and gas sites: produced water and hydraulic fracturing fluid. Benzene was taken to be a representative contaminant of interest for produced water. Glutaraldehyde, polyethylene glycol, and polyacrylamide were the chemical additives considered for spills of hydraulic fracturing fluid. We focused on the South Platte Alluvial Aquifer, which is located in the greater Denver metro area and overlaps a zone of high-density oil and gas development. Risk of groundwater pollution was based on predicted concentration at the groundwater table. In general, results showed groundwater contamination due to produced water and hydraulic fracturing fluid spills is low in most areas of the South Platte system for the contaminants and spill conditions investigated. Substantial risk may exist in certain areas where the groundwater table is shallow (less than 10 ft below ground surface) and when large spills and large post-spill storms occur. Co-chemical interactions are an important consideration in certain cases when modeling hydraulic fracturing fluid spills. By helping to identify locations

  4. Rapid Recharge of Parts of the High Plains Aquifer Indicated by a Reconnaissance Study in Oklahoma, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, William J.; Osborn, Noel I.; Luckey, Richard R.

    2000-01-01

    The High Plains aquifer underlies about 174,000 square miles in parts of eight states, including about 7,100 square miles in northwestern Oklahoma (fig. 1). This aquifer consists of the saturated part of the Ogallala Formation and saturated materials of Quaternary Age that are hydraulically connected to the Ogallala. The High Plains aquifer in northwestern Oklahoma is the primary source of water to an important agricultural region. Most water is withdrawn from the aquifer for irrigating wheat and other grain crops, with the remainder used for livestock (primarily cattle and swine), municipal, and domestic needs. Historically, water from precipitation was thought to take hundreds or thousands of years to reach the water table because the depth of the water table is greater than 100 feet over most of the aquifer and the low-permeability beds in the Ogallala would impede downward flow. It also was thought that land uses would take a similar period of time to affect water quality in the aquifer.

  5. Experimental studies in stream-aquifer interaction along the Arkansas River in Central Kansas - Field testing and analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sophocleous, M.; Townsend, M.A.; Vogler, L.D.; McClain, T.J.; Marks, E.T.; Coble, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    During the last several years, streamflows of a number of Kansas streams have been reduced as a result of groundwater declines. In order to better understand and quantify stream-aquifer interrelationships, an eight-day comprehensive stream-aquifer pumping test, followed by recovery monitoring, was conducted along the Arkansas River near Great Bend, Kansas. In addition to water level monitoring in numerous observation wells, streamflow data, streambed hydraulic gradients, neutron probe-based water content of dewatered sediments, water chemistry and other data were collected. The alluvial aquifer is shown to be highly transmissive (T = 1803 m2d-1) with the pumping stress (9538 m3d-1) having a radius of influence larger than 1.77 km, impacting both the aquifer levels and the streamflow in the nearby Arkansas River. Drawdown and recharge boundary effects were observed in all observation wells, including those on the opposite side of the river. The alluvial aquifer did not exhibit a water table behavior and responded as a leaky confined aquifer. A semiconfining clay layer less than 3 m thick and an additional recharge source from a nearby stream-alluvial system were the probable causes of the observed phenomena. Actual streamflow depletion is shown to be appreciably less than the computed depletion based on analytical solutions. ?? 1988.

  6. Hydrology of the Claiborne aquifer and interconnection with the Upper Floridan aquifer in southwest Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, Debbie W.; Gonthier, Gerard

    2017-04-24

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study, in cooperation with the Georgia Environmental Protection Division, to define the hydrologic properties of the Claiborne aquifer and evaluate its connection with the Upper Floridan aquifer in southwest Georgia. The effort involved collecting and compiling hydrologic data from the aquifer in subarea 4 of southwestern Georgia. Data collected for this study include borehole geophysical logs in 7 wells, and two 72-hour aquifer tests to determine aquifer properties.The top of the Claiborne aquifer extends from an altitude of about 200 feet above the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88) in Terrell County to 402 feet below NAVD 88 in Decatur County, Georgia. The base of the aquifer extends from an altitude of about 60 feet above NAVD 88 in eastern Sumter County to about 750 feet below NAVD 88 in Decatur County. Aquifer thickness ranges from about 70 feet in eastern Early County to 400 feet in Decatur County.The transmissivity of the Claiborne aquifer, determined from two 72-hour aquifer tests, was estimated to be 1,500 and 700 feet squared per day in Mitchell and Early Counties, respectively. The storage coefficient was estimated to be 0.0006 and 0.0004 for the same sites, respectively. Aquifer test data from Mitchell County indicate a small amount of leakage occurred during the test. Groundwater-flow models suggest that the source of the leakage was the underlying Clayton aquifer, which produced about 2.5 feet of drawdown in response to pumping in the Claiborne aquifer. The vertical hydraulic conductivity of the confining unit between the Claiborne and Clayton aquifers was simulated to be about 0.02 foot per day.Results from the 72-hour aquifer tests run for this study indicated no interconnection between the Claiborne and overlying Upper Floridan aquifers at the two test sites. Additional data are needed to monitor the effects that increased withdrawals from the Claiborne aquifer may have on future water resources.

  7. Aquifer characterization proposed SRC-I facility, Newman, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Dames and Moore conducted a two-phase groundwater supply and aquifer characterization study on a portion of the proposed Solvent-Refined Coal (SRC-I) Demonstration Plant site at Newman, Kentucky. The objectives were to assess the transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, and storability of the aquifer in the vicinity of the test well, and to determine the aquifer characteristics beneath the proposed facility.

  8. Origin of the groundwater salinity and geochemical processes in detrital and carbonate aquifers: Case of Chougafiya basin (Central Tunisia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farid, Intissar; Zouari, Kamel; Rigane, Adel; Beji, Ridha

    2015-11-01

    Comprehensive investigations of groundwaters were performed in the detrital and carbonate aquifers of the Chougafiya basin, central Tunisia. In the present review, hydrochemistry and isotopic tools were combined to get an insight into the processes controlling mineralization, recharge conditions, flow pattern of groundwater and C chemistry in the investigated hydrological system. Analysis of the dissolved constituents revealed that several processes controlled the observed chemical composition: (i) the dissolution of evaporitic minerals, (ii) cation exchange reactions, (iii) sulfate reduction under anaerobic conditions, (iv) incongruent dissolution of carbonate minerals (calcite, dolomite) coupled with gypsum dissolution and calcite precipitation, and (v) silicates weathering. Data inferred from 18O and deuterium isotopes in groundwater samples indicated recharge with modern rainfall. Water characterized by lower δ18O and δ2H values is interpreted as recharged by non-evaporated rainfall originating from Mediterranean and Atlantic air masses. However, water with relatively enriched δ18O and δ2H contents is thought to reflect the occurrence of an evaporation process related to the long term practice of flood irrigation. The radiogenic (3H) isotope data provided insight into the presence of two recharge periods in the investigated groundwaters. Waters with 3H contents of <1 TU indicated a pre-nuclear recharge. Waters with 3H contents of >1 TU clearly suggested the occurrence of a contemporaneous recharge probably during the last two decades. Carbon isotopes provided some insights into the timescales of groundwater flow, but mainly revealed that main sources of C are active in the system. These are likely: dissolved biogenic CO2, carbonate dissolution and incongruent reaction of the carbonate matrix. Mean residence times were determined after correction of the initial activities for dead C from the rock matrix and suggest ages ranging from the present day to the

  9. Global assessment of coastal aquifer state and its vulnerability respect to Sea Water Intrusion. Application to several Mediterranean Coastal Aquifers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baena, Leticia; Pulido-Velazquez, David; Renau-Pruñonosa, Arianna; Morell, Ignacio

    2017-04-01

    In this research we propose a method for a global assessment of coastal aquifer state and its vulnerability to Sea Water Intrusion (SWI). It is based on two indices, the MART index, which summarize the global significance of the SWI phenomenon, and the L_GALDIT for a lumped assessment of the vulnerability to SWI. Both of them can be useful as a tool to assess coastal groundwater bodies in risk of not achieving good status in accordance with the Water Framework Directive (WFD, 2000) and to identify possible management alternative to reduce existing impacts. They can be obtained even from a reduced number of data (in the MART case only depend on the geometry and available aquifer state data) with simple calculations, which have been implemented in a general GIS tool that can be easily applied to other case studies. The MART index in an aquifer is related with the total mass of chloride in the aquifer due to sea water intrusion and can be obtained by simple linear operations of volume and concentrations that can be deduced from a schematic conceptual cross-section approach (orthogonal to the shore line) defined to summarize the intrusion volume in the aquifer. At a certain historical time, this representative aquifer cross-section can be defined in a systhematic way from the aquifer geometry, the specific yield, and the hydraulic head and chloride concentration fields that can be deduced from the available information by using appropriate interpolation methods. Following the proposed procedure we will finally obtain a summary of the historical significance of the SWI in an aquifer at different spatial resolution: 3D salinity concentration maps, 2D representative conceptual cross-section of intrusion and the MART lumped significance index. The historical evolution of the MART can be employed to perform a global assessment of the resilience and trends of global significance of the SWI in an aquifer. It can be useful to compare the significance of intrusion problems in

  10. Teaching Pharmacology by Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Sue

    1997-01-01

    Using pharmacology case studies with nursing students encourages theory-practice links and infuses real-life content. Cases provide rich qualitative data for evaluating curriculum. However, they are not a substitute for evidence-based practice. (SK)

  11. Case study--leprosy.

    PubMed

    Wood, A M; Wood, C M; Bakker-Dyos, J

    2010-01-01

    We present the case of a 26 year old Indian base worker who attended the Role 2 enhanced hospital in Iraq with a case of leprosy. The patient presented four times over a 12 month period with non-specific pain in the right hand and forearm combined with a large lesion of dry skin and reduced sensation in the forearm. A clinical diagnosis of leprosy was made, which was subsequently confirmed as paucibacillary leprosy by skin smears sent to the UK. It was not possible to treat the patient locally and a recommendation made to the patient's employer that the patient return to India to commence treatment.

  12. Investigating controls on denitrification rates during managed aquifer recharge: Field studies of infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beganskas, S.; Gorski, G.; Fisher, A. T.; Weir, W. B.; Schmidt, C. M.; Saltikov, C.; Stoneburner, B.; Hernandez, J.; Harmon, R. E.; Weathers, T. S.

    2016-12-01

    We have designed field experiments to observe and quantify water quality improvement during infiltration in the shallow subsurface, as part of managed aquifer recharge (MAR). We are exploring how microbial diversity and denitrification rate respond to different infiltration rates and the presence or absence of carbon-rich reactive materials (woodchips or biochar). In 2015, we conducted a series of two-week-long field infiltration tests, and in 2016 we are running tests at a new site. For each test, nitrate-rich water (20-25 ppm NO3-N) was continuously applied to 1-m square plots instrumented to measure infiltration rates and sample subsurface water at multiple depths. Soil samples were collected before and after each test to assess microbial diversity. In 2015, we observed infiltration rates of 4-18 m/d, consistent with very sandy soils at our field site. All water samples had >20 ppm DOC, indicating that denitrification was unlikely carbon-limited. There was a net increase in DOC in fluids sampled below woodchips, but no change in DOC in samples from un-amended native soil. Up to 20% of NO3- was removed below woodchips on days with infiltration rates below 15 m/d. Nitrate removal was not observed in native soil, even though infiltration rates were considerably lower, 4 m/d. Isotopic analyses indicate that denitrification is likely the mechanism for nitrate removal. Genomic sequencing of soil microbes shows that microbial populations' relative abundance shifted significantly due to infiltration; further analyses are underway. Our results suggest that rapid infiltration can lead to oxic conditions unfavorable for denitrification, and that a carbon-rich reactive material (woodchips) may stimulate microbially-mediated denitrification. Our experimental design is a novel way to examine factors that impact water quality during infiltration. Nitrate, a pervasive groundwater contaminant, can be removed via denitrification during MAR under some conditions, depending on

  13. Case studies in wellhead protection area delineation and monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.A.

    1993-04-01

    Ground-water monitoring is one of many management options for Wellhead Protection Program implementation. Ground-water parameters are monitored (1) to assess source-control measures, (2) to monitor compliance with drinking water standards at sites other than the wellhead, and (3) to provide advance warning of contaminants in ground water. Five case studies are included in the document to exemplify the monitoring methodology for different hydrogeologic and contaminant source settings. The five case study research sites include Stevens Point, Wisconsin; Littleton, MA; Sioux Falls, South Dakota; Dover, New Hampshire; and Springfield, Missouri. The document emphasizes a multi-disciplinary approach for hydrogeologic characterization, wellhead protection area delineation, and flowpath assessment. Hydrogeologic characterization techniques include: well installation, water quality sampling and assessment, geologic and structural-control mapping, aquifer testing, dye tracing, borehole geophysics, analytical solutions, and ground-water flow modeling.

  14. Modelling the salinization of a coastal lagoon-aquifer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombani, N.; Mastrocicco, M.

    2017-08-01

    In this study, a coastal area constituted by alternations of saline-brackish lagoons and freshwater bodies was studied and modelled to understand the hydrological processes occurring between the lagoons, the groundwater system of the Po River Delta (Italy) and the Adriatic Sea. The contribution of both evaporation and anthropogenic factors on groundwater salinization was assessed by means of soil, groundwater and surface water monitoring. Highresolution multi-level samplers were used to capture salinity gradients within the aquifer and surface water bodies. Data were employed to calibrate a density-dependent numerical transport model implemented with SEAWAT code along a transect perpendicular to the coast line. The results show that the lagoon is hydraulically well connected with the aquifer, which provides the major source of salinity because of the upcoming of paleo-seawater from the aquitard laying at the base of the unconfined aquifer. On the contrary, the seawater (diluted by the freshwater river outflow) creates only a limited saltwater wedge. The increase in groundwater salinity could be of serious concern, especially for the pinewood located in the dune near the coast, sensitive to salinity increases. This case study represents an interesting paradigm for other similar environmental setting, where the assumption of classical aquifer salinization from a saltwater wedge intruding from the sea is often not representative of the actual aquifer’s salinization mechanisms.

  15. Geohydrology of the Cerro Prieto geothermal aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez R, J.; de la Pena L, A.

    1981-01-01

    The most recent information on the Cerro Prieto geothermal aquifer is summarized, with special emphasis on the initial production zone where the wells completed in the Alpha aquifer are located. These wells produce steam for power plant units 1 and 2. Brief comments also are made on the Beta aquifer, which underlies the Alpha aquifer in the Cerro Prieto I area and which extends to the east to what is known as the Cerro Prieto II and Cerro Prieto III areas. The location of the area studied is shown. The Alpha and Beta aquifers differ in their mineralogy and cementing mineral composition, temperatures, and piezometric levels. The difference in piezometric levels indicates that there is no local communication between the two aquifers. This situation has been verified by a well interference test, using well E-1 as a producer in the Beta aquifer and well M-46 as the observation well in the Alpha aquifer. No interference between them was observed. Information on the geology, geohydrology, and geochemistry of Cerro Prieto is presented.

  16. Geochemistry of the Arbuckle-Simpson Aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christenson, Scott; Hunt, Andrew G.; Parkhurst, David L.; Osborn, Noel I.

    2009-01-01

    The Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in south-central Oklahoma provides water for public supply, farms, mining, wildlife conservation, recreation, and the scenic beauty of springs, streams, and waterfalls. A new understanding of the aquifer flow system was developed as part of the Arbuckle-Simpson Hydrology Study, done in 2003 through 2008 as a collaborative research project between the State of Oklahoma and the Federal government. The U.S. Geological Survey collected 36 water samples from 32 wells and springs in the Arbuckle-Simpson aquifer in 2004 through 2006 for geochemical analyses of major ions, trace elements, isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen, dissolved gases, and dating tracers. The geochemical analyses were used to characterize the water quality in the aquifer, to describe the origin and movement of ground water from recharge areas to discharge at wells and springs, and to determine the age of water in the aquifer.

  17. The recharge process in alluvial strip aquifers in arid Namibia and implication for artificial recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, Diganta; Xu, Yongxin

    2016-10-01

    Alluvial strip aquifers associated with ephemeral rivers are important groundwater supply sources that sustain numerous settlements and ecological systems in arid Namibia. More than 70 % of the population in the nation's western and southern regions depend on alluvial aquifers associated with ephemeral rivers. Under natural conditions, recharge occurs through infiltration during flood events. Due to the characteristic spatial and temporal variability of rainfall in arid regions, recharge is irregular making the aquifers challenging to manage sustainably and they are often overexploited. This condition is likely to become more acute with increasing water demand and climate change, and artificial recharge has been projected as the apparent means of increasing reliability of supply. The article explores, through a case study and numerical simulation, the processes controlling infiltration, significance of surface water and groundwater losses, and possible artificial recharge options. It is concluded that recharge processes in arid alluvial aquifers differ significantly from those processes in subhumid systems and viability of artificial recharge requires assessment through an understanding of the natural recharge process and losses from the aquifer. It is also established that in arid-region catchments, infiltration through the streambed occurs at rates dependent on factors such as antecedent conditions, flow rate, flow duration, channel morphology, and sediment texture and composition. The study provides an important reference for sustainable management of alluvial aquifer systems in similar regions.

  18. Emotion, Engagement, and Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Terry, David R.; Lemons, Paula; Armstrong, Norris; Brickman, Peggy; Ribbens, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Three college faculty taught large general biology classes using case studies and personal response systems (clickers). Each instructor taught the same eight cases in two different sections, except the questions within the cases differed. In one section the questions were lower order (LO) factual inquiries, and in the other they were largely…

  19. Emotion, Engagement, and Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Terry, David R.; Lemons, Paula; Armstrong, Norris; Brickman, Peggy; Ribbens, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Three college faculty taught large general biology classes using case studies and personal response systems (clickers). Each instructor taught the same eight cases in two different sections, except the questions within the cases differed. In one section the questions were lower order (LO) factual inquiries, and in the other they were largely…

  20. Aquifer Heterogeneity and Solute-Transport Modeling in the Floridan Aquifer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, W.; Maliva, R. G.; Missimer, T. M.

    2008-05-01

    The Floridan Aquifer System (FAS) is one of the most prolific aquifers in the world and is widely used for public and irrigation water supply. The FAS is also increasingly being used as a storage zone for aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) systems, including a 333-well system that is planned as part of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP). The FAS is highly heterogeneous with respect to hydraulic conductivity, with meter- scale inter-bed variation exceeding seven orders of magnitude in some cases, even in South Florida where mega-karst is not well developed. Aquifer heterogeneity can have a major impact on ASR system performance because of its affects on the movement and mixing of stored water. Aquifer heterogeneity poses challenges for accurate modeling of the FAS, including solute transport modeling of ASR systems and variable density flow modeling of the freshwater/saltwater interface along coastal areas. Dispersivity is an important parameter in solute transport modeling, which is associated with aquifer heterogeneity. Commonly the values of dispersivity used in solute-transport modeling are derived from literature review and adjusted during model calibration process. Artificially large dispersivity values are often used in solute-transport models of ASR systems as a "fudge factor" to simulate the apparent greater mixing caused by inter-bed heterogeneity. This approach is problematic because the use of artificial hydraulic parameters for calibration opens the results of predictive simulations to question. The use of large dispersivity values to simulate aquifer heterogeneity also does not incorporate other impacts of aquifer heterogeneity, such as differential flow rates and migration distances between beds. The technical challenge is to incorporate aquifer heterogeneity into groundwater models at a scale that is sufficient to adequately simulate its effect on ASR system performance and coastal groundwater flow, while maintaining acceptable

  1. Effects of natural and human factors on groundwater quality of basin-fill aquifers in the southwestern United States-conceptual models for selected contaminants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bexfield, Laura M.; Thiros, Susan A.; Anning, David W.; Huntington, Jena M.; McKinney, Tim S.

    2011-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program, the Southwest Principal Aquifers (SWPA) study is building a better understanding of the factors that affect water quality in basin-fill aquifers in the Southwestern United States. The SWPA study area includes four principal aquifers of the United States: the Basin and Range basin-fill aquifers in California, Nevada, Utah, and Arizona; the Rio Grande aquifer system in New Mexico and Colorado; and the California Coastal Basin and Central Valley aquifer systems in California. Similarities in the hydrogeology, land- and water-use practices, and water-quality issues for alluvial basins within the study area allow for regional analysis through synthesis of the baseline knowledge of groundwater-quality conditions in basins previously studied by the NAWQA Program. Resulting improvements in the understanding of the sources, movement, and fate of contaminants are assisting in the development of tools used to assess aquifer susceptibility and vulnerability.This report synthesizes previously published information about the groundwater systems and water quality of 15 information-rich basin-fill aquifers (SWPA case-study basins) into conceptual models of the primary natural and human factors commonly affecting groundwater quality with respect to selected contaminants, thereby helping to build a regional understanding of the susceptibility and vulnerability of basin-fill aquifers to those contaminants. Four relatively common contaminants (dissolved solids, nitrate, arsenic, and uranium) and two contaminant classes (volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and pesticide compounds) were investigated for sources and controls affecting their occurrence and distribution above specified levels of concern in groundwater of the case-study basins. Conceptual models of factors that are important to aquifer vulnerability with respect to those contaminants and contaminant classes were subsequently formed. The

  2. Variable-density modelling of multiple-cycle aquifer storage and recovery (ASR): Importance of anisotropy and layered heterogeneity in brackish aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, James D.; Simmons, Craig T.; Dillon, Peter J.

    2008-07-01

    SummaryAquifer storage and recovery (ASR) involves injection of freshwater into an aquifer for later removal and use. If the aquifer initially contains brackish or saline water, then the density difference between fluids can cause the injected plume to "float" towards the top of the aquifer. This causes saltwater to intrude the well at the bottom, meaning freshwater recovery must be terminated prematurely. This study examined the density-induced flow phenomena in hypothetical "layer-cake" aquifers (i.e. horizontal layers of alternating low and high permeability). Despite low ambient TDS concentration (2857 mg L-1), density-dependent simulations resulted in lower recovery efficiencies than density-invariant simulations. However, results showed that greater permeability ratios (between high and low permeability layers) led to suppression of the vertical buoyancy flow and therefore higher recovery efficiencies. Each stratified heterogeneous aquifer was "simplified" to an equivalent homogeneous, anisotropic medium using the arithmetic mean for horizontal hydraulic conductivity and harmonic mean for vertical hydraulic conductivity. The results showed a very similar effect of suppressing vertical flow as was noted in the heterogeneous models. The simulated recovery efficiencies in the homogeneous cases were in excellent agreement with the explicit heterogeneous cases, with higher anisotropy ratios resulting in higher recovery efficiencies. The important conclusion is that the recovery efficiency of a simulated ASR operation is sensitive to whether or not the model considers density-induced flow and whether the aquifer is considered to be isotropic or not, but relatively insensitive to the representation of heterogeneity as either an explicit heterogeneous medium or an equivalent homogeneous (anisotropic) medium.

  3. A GIS-based methodology to delineate potential areas for groundwater development: a case study from Kathmandu Valley, Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Vishnu P.; Shrestha, Sangam; Kazama, Futaba

    2013-06-01

    For an effective planning of activities aimed at recovering aquifer depletion and maintaining health of groundwater ecosystem, estimates of spatial distribution in groundwater storage volume would be useful. The estimated volume, if analyzed together with other hydrogeologic characteristics, may help delineate potential areas for groundwater development. This study proposes a GIS-based ARC model to delineate potential areas for groundwater development; where `A' stands for groundwater availability, `R' for groundwater release potential of soil matrix, and `C' for cost for groundwater development. The model is illustrated with a case of the Kathmandu Valley in Central Nepal, where active discussions are going on to develop and implement groundwater management strategies. The study results show that shallow aquifers have high groundwater storage potential (compared to the deep) and favorable areas for groundwater development are concentrated at some particular areas in shallow and deep aquifers. The distribution of groundwater storage and potential areas for groundwater development are then mapped using GIS.

  4. Case Study: Case Studies and the Flipped Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Schiller, Nancy A.

    2013-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses the positive and negative aspects of the "flipped classroom." In the flipped classroom model, what is normally done in class and what is normally done as…

  5. Case Study: Case Studies and the Flipped Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Schiller, Nancy A.

    2013-01-01

    This column provides original articles on innovations in case study teaching, assessment of the method, as well as case studies with teaching notes. This month's issue discusses the positive and negative aspects of the "flipped classroom." In the flipped classroom model, what is normally done in class and what is normally done as…

  6. Retardation of arsenic transport by oxidized Holocene aquifer sediments of West Bengal, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Sudipta; Nath, Bibhash; Chatterjee, Debashis; Charlet, Laurent

    2014-10-01

    The transport of arsenic (As) in groundwater is known to be considerably controlled by the adsorption behavior of aquifer sediments and changes in subsurface redox conditions. Here we report wet chemical analyses of As(III) adsorption onto oxidized, low As containing Holocene aquifer sediments from West Bengal, India. Batch experiments in an open laboratory atmosphere show that the slow removal of As(III) from aqueous solution is a resulting effect of adsorption and oxidation which is not significantly influenced by the changes in pH (6.0-9.1). The isotherm data were fitted with Freundlich and Langmuir equations and maximum adsorption density (Γmax ≈ 0.40 mmol kg-1) obtained is lower than that for As(V) at pH 7.5 (0.95 mmol kg-1). The estimated distribution coefficient maxima (Kdmax) values are within the ranges of Kd values previously reported in case of Holocene aquifer sediments of West Bengal, India and Bangladesh. The low adsorption capacity of oxidized Holocene aquifer sediments in this study compared to oxidized Pleistocene sediments of Bangladesh is attributed to coarser grain sizes and low abundance of Fe-oxyhydroxides and micas which act as a potential sink of As. This study has important implications for As(III) attenuation and transport in the shallow aquifers (especially around the zone of 'maximum' water table fluctuations, i.e., 10-20 m depth below ground surface) when oxygen-depleted (anoxic) Holocene aquifers get in contact with oxygen (e.g., by irrigation/groundwater drawdown) and also for predicting possible future risk associated with its transport from shallow aquifers to present day "low-As" containing deeper aquifers of West Bengal, India.

  7. Arsenic, microbes and contaminated aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Stolz, John F.

    2005-01-01

    The health of tens of millions of people world-wide is at risk from drinking arsenic-contaminated well water. In most cases this arsenic occurs naturally within the sub-surface aquifers, rather than being derived from identifiable point sources of pollution. The mobilization of arsenic into the aqueous phase is the first crucial step in a process that eventually leads to human arsenicosis. Increasing evidence suggests that this is a microbiological phenomenon.

  8. Investigation of Climate Change Impacts to the Coastal Aquifer of North Germany: A 3D Modelling Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptak, T.; Yang, J.; Graf, T.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change is expected to induce sea level rise in the German Bight, which is part of the North Sea, Germany. Climate change may also modify discharge of the river Weser flowing into the German Bight, which will alter both water levels and salinity distributions along the coast. To study the long-term effects of sea level rise and discharge variations to the salinity distribution, a 3D seawater intrusion model was designed using the fully coupled surface-subsurface numerical model HydroGeoSphere. The model simulates the coastal aquifer as an integral system considering complexities such as variable-density groundwater flow, surface-subsurface interaction, irregular land topography and anthropogenic structures (e.g. dykes, drainage canals, water gates). Using PEST, steady state groundwater flow of year 2009 is calibrated. In addition, 3 climate change scenarios are simulated based on the calibrated model: (i) sea level rise of 1 m, (ii) the salinity of the seaside boundary increased by 25 %, and (iii) the salinity of the seaside boundary decreased by 70 %. Results demonstrate the changes of fresh groundwater resources, surface water depths and salinity distribution. The obtained results are useful for coastal engineering practices, drinking water resources management and for the development of climate change adaptation strategies.

  9. Two-dimensional NMR relaxometry study of pore space characteristics of carbonate rocks from a Permian aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenfelder, Wiete; Gläser, Hans-Reinhard; Mitreiter, Ivonne; Stallmach, Frank

    2008-06-01

    Limestones and karstified limestones (dolostones) from a Permian aquifer in Central Germany were studied by 1H 2D NMR relaxometry and PFG NMR diffusometry, aiming at a non-destructive characterization of the pore space. Information concerning pore size distribution and water diffusion were in accord for different samples of each type of rock, but differed fundamentally between limestones and dolostones. The results of the 2D relaxometry measurements revealed a ratio of surface relaxation times Ts1/ Ts2 of about 2 for the limestones and about 4.5 for the dolostones, mirroring the different content of iron and manganese in the solid pore walls. In consideration of thin section interpretation, the corresponding fraction in the T1- T2 relaxation time distributions was attributed to interparticle porosity. Porosity of large vugs is clearly displayed by relaxation times longer than 1 s in the dolostones only. A third fraction of the total water-saturated pore space in the dolostones, which is clearly displayed in the 2D relaxation time distributions at the smallest relaxation times and a Ts1/ Ts2 ratio of about 12, is attributed to intrafossil porosity. The porosity classification, basing on non-destructive NMR experiments, is verified by mercury intrusion porosimetry and thin section interpretation.

  10. Determining Aquifer Storage Properties Using Borehole Geophysical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wempe, W.; Clayton, N.; Coulibaly, K.

    2006-12-01

    Specific yield and specific storage are essential parameters for groundwater management planning. These storage properties can be determined using a number of methods, however they are typically interpreted from multi-well aquifer pump tests. The interpretation of storage properties using pump tests can be strongly influenced and biased by small-scale hydrostratigraphic heterogeneities and boundary effects. We investigate using high resolution geophysical data collected in boreholes to provide depth-continuous logs of storage properties within heterogeneous aquifers. The advantage of using borehole geophysical data to interpret storage properties is that the estimates are unaffected by boundary conditions and that small-scale heterogeneities around the borehole can be resolved and then incorporated in more advanced interpretations of pump tests, which sample away from the borehole wall. This improved interpretation of storage properties ultimately leads to improved groundwater management planning and optimal well design, thus reducing economic risks associated with high cost production or aquifer storage and recovery wells. Our interpretations of specific yield are based on measurements of effective porosity that are made using borehole nuclear magnetic resonance tools and our interpretations of specific storage are based on measurements of aquifer compressibility that are made using borehole dipole shear sonic tools. With several case studies, we demonstrate how to interpret storage properties from these types of borehole geophysical data and show the benefits of incorporating the heterogeneity of storage properties in groundwater management planning.

  11. Method for isolating two aquifers in a single borehole

    DOEpatents

    Burklund, P.W.

    1984-01-20

    A method for isolating and individually instrumenting separate aquifers within a single borehole is disclosed. A borehole is first drilled from the ground surface, through an upper aquifer, and into a separating confining bed. A casing, having upper and lower sections separated by a coupling collar, is lowered into the borehole. The borehole is grouted in the vicinity of the lower section of the casing. A borehole is then drilled through the grout plug and into a lower aquifer. After the lower aquifer is instrumented, the borehole is grouted back into the lower portion of the casing. Then the upper section of the casing is unscrewed via the coupling collar and removed from the borehole. Finally, instrumentation is added to the upper aquifer and the borehole is appropriately grouted. The coupling collar is designed to have upper right-hand screw threads and lower left-hand screw thread, whereby the sections of the casing can be readily separated.

  12. Method for isolating two aquifers in a single borehole

    DOEpatents

    Burklund, Patrick W.

    1985-10-22

    A method for isolating and individually instrumenting separate aquifers within a single borehole. A borehole is first drilled from the ground surface, through an upper aquifer, and into a separating confining bed. A casing, having upper and lower sections separated by a coupling collar, is lowered into the borehole. The borehole is grouted in the vicinity of the lower section of the casing. A borehole is then drilled through the grout plug and into a lower aquifer. After the lower aquifer is instrumented, the borehole is grouted back into the lower portion of the casing. Then the upper section of the casing is unscrewed via the coupling collar and removed from the borehole. Finally, instrumentation is added to the upper aquifer and the borehole is appropriately grouted. The coupling collar is designed to have upper right-hand screw threads and lower left-hand screw thread, whereby the sections of the casing can be readily separated.

  13. Aquifer response to stream-stage and recharge variations. II. Convolution method and applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlow, P.M.; DeSimone, L.A.; Moench, A.F.

    2000-01-01

    In this second of two papers, analytical step-response functions, developed in the companion paper for several cases of transient hydraulic interaction between a fully penetrating stream and a confined, leaky, or water-table aquifer, are used in the convolution integral to calculate aquifer heads, streambank seepage rates, and bank storage that occur in response to streamstage fluctuations and basinwide recharge or evapotranspiration. Two computer programs developed on the basis of these step-response functions and the convolution integral are applied to the analysis of hydraulic interaction of two alluvial stream-aquifer systems in the northeastern and central United States. These applications demonstrate the utility of the analytical functions and computer programs for estimating aquifer and streambank hydraulic properties, recharge rates, streambank seepage rates, and bank storage. Analysis of the water-table aquifer adjacent to the Blackstone River in Massachusetts suggests that the very shallow depth of water table and associated thin unsaturated zone at the site cause the aquifer to behave like a confined aquifer (negligible specific yield). This finding is consistent with previous studies that have shown that the effective specific yield of an unconfined aquifer approaches zero when the capillary fringe, where sediment pores are saturated by tension, extends to land surface. Under this condition, the aquifer's response is determined by elastic storage only. Estimates of horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivity, specific yield, specific storage, and recharge for a water-table aquifer adjacent to the Cedar River in eastern Iowa, determined by the use of analytical methods, are in close agreement with those estimated by use of a more complex, multilayer numerical model of the aquifer. Streambank leakance of the semipervious streambank materials also was estimated for the site. The streambank-leakance parameter may be considered to be a general (or lumped

  14. Effect of a contaminated site (the San Giuliano landfill, Venice, Italy) on the interaction between water bodies in a coastal aquifer system.

    PubMed

    Critto, Andrea; Zuppi, Giovanni Maria; Carlon, Claudio; Marcomini, Antonio

    2004-04-01

    A complex multiple aquifer system affected by a contaminated site and exposed to tidal effects was investigated to develop the hydrogeological conceptual model of the study case. Two water bodies were identified, from top to down: a surface aquifer unaffected by tidal events, and a semiconfined aquifer partly communicating with the brackish lagoon waters. By using the Cl(-)/SO4(2-) ratio and the DOC (Dissolved Organic Carbon) concentration, as well as by applying the kriking to the piezometric levels results, the groundwater flow directions and the hydraulic gradients within the investigated aquifers were also identified. Based on the overall results, a schematic of the conceptual model for the whole aquifer system was provided which allows to visualize the communication between the different water bodies.

  15. Reconsideration at Field Scale of the Relationship between Hydraulic Conductivity and Porosity: The Case of a Sandy Aquifer in South Italy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To describe flow or transport phenomena in porous media, relations between aquifer hydraulic conductivity and effective porosity can prove useful, avoiding the need to perform expensive and time consuming measurements. The practical applications generally require the determination of this parameter at field scale, while most of the empirical and semiempirical formulas, based on grain size analysis and allowing determination of the hydraulic conductivity from the porosity, are related to the laboratory scale and thus are not representative of the aquifer volumes to which one refers. Therefore, following the grain size distribution methodology, a new experimental relation between hydraulic conductivity and effective porosity, representative of aquifer volumes at field scale, is given for a confined aquifer. The experimental values used to determine this law were obtained for both parameters using only field measurements methods. The experimental results found, also if in the strict sense valid only for the investigated aquifer, can give useful suggestions for other alluvial aquifers with analogous characteristics of grain-size distribution. Limited to the investigated range, a useful comparison with the best known empirical formulas based on grain size analysis was carried out. The experimental data allowed also investigation of the existence of a scaling behaviour for both parameters considered. PMID:25180202

  16. Reconsideration at field scale of the relationship between hydraulic conductivity and porosity: the case of a sandy aquifer in South Italy.

    PubMed

    Fallico, Carmine

    2014-01-01

    To describe flow or transport phenomena in porous media, relations between aquifer hydraulic conductivity and effective porosity can prove useful, avoiding the need to perform expensive and time consuming measurements. The practical applications generally require the determination of this parameter at field scale, while most of the empirical and semiempirical formulas, based on grain size analysis and allowing determination of the hydraulic conductivity from the porosity, are related to the laboratory scale and thus are not representative of the aquifer volumes to which one refers. Therefore, following the grain size distribution methodology, a new experimental relation between hydraulic conductivity and effective porosity, representative of aquifer volumes at field scale, is given for a confined aquifer. The experimental values used to determine this law were obtained for both parameters using only field measurements methods. The experimental results found, also if in the strict sense valid only for the investigated aquifer, can give useful suggestions for other alluvial aquifers with analogous characteristics of grain-size distribution. Limited to the investigated range, a useful comparison with the best known empirical formulas based on grain size analysis was carried out. The experimental data allowed also investigation of the existence of a scaling behaviour for both parameters considered.

  17. Groundwater-quality data in the Tulare Shallow Aquifer Study Unit, 2014-2015: Results from the California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, George L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Johnson, Tyler

    2017-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected groundwater samples from 95 domestic wells in Tulare and Kings Counties, California in 2014-2015. The wells were sampled for the Tulare Shallow Aquifer Study Unit of the California State Water Resources Control Board Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program Priority Basin Project’s assessment of the quality of groundwater resources used for domestic drinking water supply. Domestic wells commonly are screened at shallower depths than are public-supply wells. The Tulare Shallow Aquifer Study Unit includes the Kaweah, Tule, and Tulare Lake subbasins of the San Joaquin Valley groundwater basin and adjacent areas of the Sierra Nevada. The study unit was divided into equal area grid cells and one domestic well was sampled in each cell. Groundwater samples were analyzed for field water-quality parameters, volatile organic compounds, pesticides and pesticide degradates, nutrients, major ions and trace elements, gross alpha and gross beta particle activities, noble gases, tritium, carbon-14 in dissolved inorganic carbon, stable isotopic ratios of water and dissolved nitrate, and microbial indicators.These data support the following publication:Fram, M.S., 2017, Groundwater Quality in the Shallow Aquifers of the Tulare, Kaweah, and Tule Groundwater Basins and Adjacent Highlands areas, Southern San Joaquin Valley, California: U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet 2017–3001, 4 p., http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/fs20173001.

  18. The use of groundwater tracers, including {sup 36}Cl, {delta}{sup 18}O, and {delta}{sup 2}JH, in the study fo the Magothy aquifer, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, C.A.; Mignerey, A.C.; Helz, G.R.

    1995-12-01

    The recent conclusion of a study of groundwater from the Magothy Formation, Maryland allows for an examination of processes occurring in this aquifer system. Water samples were gathered from a wide area along flow paths estimated from hydrological parameters and analyzed for the major cations and anions, nutrients, and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios, in addition to {sup 36}Cl, {delta}{sup 18}O, and {delta}{sup 2}H. Also, three samples that contained anomalously high {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios were analyzed for {sup 3}H in an attempt to determine possible sources for those readings. A comparison of the results of this study to those of a previous study conducted by this group of the overlying Aquia Aquifer will also be given. The potential of inter-aquifer mixing between the two systems in some areas and of matching {sup 36}Cl and Cl{sup -} values to sea level rise and fall will be discussed.

  19. Factors controlling elevated lead concentrations in water samples from aquifer systems in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, B.G.; Bullen, M.P.; Bullen, T.D.; Hansard, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Concentrations of total lead (Pb) and dissolved Pb exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency action level of 15 micrograms per liter (mg/L) in approximately 19 percent and 1.3 percent, respectively, of ground-water samples collected during 1991-96 from a statewide network of monitoring wells designed to delineate background water quality of Florida's major aquifer systems. Differences in total Pb concentrations among aquifer systems reflect the combined influence of anthropogenic sources and chemical conditions in each system. A highly significant (p<0.001) difference in median total Pb concentrations was found for water samples from wells with water-level recording devices that contain Pb-counterweights (14 mg/L) compared to non-recorder wells (2 mg/L). Differences between total Pb concentrations for recorder and non-recorder wells are even more pronounced when compared for each aquifer system. The largest differences for recorder status are found for the surficial aquifer system, where median total Pb concentrations are 44 and 2.4 mg/L for recorder wells and non-recorder wells, respectively. Leaching of Pb from metal casing materials is another potential source of Pb in ground water samples. Median total Pb concentrations in water samples from the surficial, intermediate, and Floridan aquifer systems are higher from recorder wells cased with black iron than for recorder wells with steel and PVC casing material. Stable isotopes of Pb were used in this study to distinguish between anthropogenic and natural sources of Pb in ground water, as Pb retains the isotopic signature of the source from which it is derived. Based on similarities between slopes and intercepts of trend lines for various sample types (plots of 206Pb/204Pb versus 208Pb/204Pb and 207Pb/204Pb versus 208Pb/204Pb) the predominant source of total Pb in water samples from the surficial aquifer system is corrosion of Pb counterweights. It is likely that only ground-water samples, not the aquifer

  20. Online Collaborative Case Study Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    Case study learning was integrated into a course designed to improve students' potential for academic success and increase student retention. Case studies related to self-regulation of behavior, motivation, and cognition for academic tasks were used to prompt students' critical thinking and facilitate deep learning of self-regulation topics,…

  1. Instructional Computing: Ten Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargan, Carol; Hunter, Beverly

    These case studies are written for educational institutions that wish to plan, extend, or improve their use of computers for learning and teaching. Each case study includes a brief description of each of the following: profile of the institution, history of the development of instructional computing, organization and management, student access to…

  2. Case Studies Reveal Camper Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannan, Steve; Fullerton, Ann

    1999-01-01

    Case studies in the National Camp Evaluation Project and National Inclusive Camp Practices project used interviews with counselors and parents about camper's growth to yield qualitative data for camp program evaluation. The importance, methods, and benefits of case studies are described. Sidebars give examples of comments on perceived camper…

  3. Fuzzy-Set Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikkelsen, Kim Sass

    2017-01-01

    Contemporary case studies rely on verbal arguments and set theory to build or evaluate theoretical claims. While existing procedures excel in the use of qualitative information (information about kind), they ignore quantitative information (information about degree) at central points of the analysis. Effectively, contemporary case studies rely on…

  4. Three Community College Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojtysiak, Joseph; Sutton, William J., II; Wright, Tommy; Brantley, Linda

    2011-01-01

    This article presents three case studies that focus on specific projects that are underway or have been completed. In the first case study, Joseph Wojtysiak and William J. Sutton, II discuss the Green Center of Central Pennsylvania, which is designed to serve as the state's preeminent source for education, training and public information about…

  5. The Big Read: Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Endowment for the Arts, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Big Read evaluation included a series of 35 case studies designed to gather more in-depth information on the program's implementation and impact. The case studies gave readers a valuable first-hand look at The Big Read in context. Both formal and informal interviews, focus groups, attendance at a wide range of events--all showed how…

  6. The genesis of the amethyst geodes at Artigas (Uruguay) and the paleohydrology of the Guaraní aquifer: structural, geochemical, oxygen, carbon, strontium isotope and fluid inclusion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morteani, Giulio; Kostitsyn, Y.; Preinfalk, C.; Gilg, H. A.

    2010-06-01

    The amethyst-bearing geodes found in the flood basalts of the Arapey formation at Artigas (Uruguay) were formed as protogeodes by bubbles of CO2-rich basalt-derived fluids. The formation of the celadonite rim and the lining of the geodes by agate followed by quartz and amethyst were driven by the artesian water of the Guaraní aquifer percolating the basalts from below. The temperature of the amethyst formation is estimated from fluid inclusion data to be between 50° and 120°C. Oxygen stable isotope data suggest a crystallization temperature of calcite of about only 24°C. The actual wellhead temperature of the water produced from the Guaraní aquifer in the study area is around 29°C.

  7. Potentiometric map of the Cockfield Aquifer in Mississippi, fall 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darden, Daphne

    1986-01-01

    This map, the second in a series for the Cockfield aquifer in Mississippi, follows a map that delineated the 1980 potentiometric surface of the aquifer. This water level map is based on water level measurements made in about 80 wells in the Cockfield aquifer in the fall of 1984. The contours show altitudes at which water levels would have stood in tightly cased unpumped wells in fall 1984. (Lantz-PTT)

  8. Pilot-scale study on the treatment of basal aquifer water using ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis and evaporation/crystallization to achieve zero-liquid discharge.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Kavithaa; Chelme-Ayala, Pamela; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Basal aquifer water is deep groundwater found at the bottom of geological formations, underlying bitumen-saturated sands. Some of the concerns associated with basal aquifer water at the Athabasca oil sands are the high concentrations of hardness-causing compounds, alkalinity, and total dissolved solids. The objective of this pilot-scale study was to treat basal aquifer water to a quality suitable for its reuse in the production of synthetic oil. To achieve zero-liquid discharge (ZLD) conditions, the treatment train included chemical oxidation, polymeric ultrafiltration (UF), reverse osmosis (RO), and evaporation-crystallization technologies. The results indicated that the UF unit was effective in removing solids, with UF filtrate turbidity averaging 2.0 NTU and silt density index averaging 0.9. Membrane autopsies indicated that iron was the primary foulant on the UF and RO membranes. Laboratory and pilot-scale tests on RO reject were conducted to determine the feasibility of ZLD crystallization. Due to the high amounts of calcium, magnesium, and bicarbonate in the RO reject, softening of the feed was required to avoid scaling in the evaporator. Crystals produced throughout the testing were mainly sodium chloride. The results of this study indicated that the ZLD approach was effective in both producing freshwater and minimizing brine discharges. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Results of a hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical study of a semi-arid karst aquifer in Tezbent plateau, Tebessa region, northeast of Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belfar, Dalila; Fehdi, Chemseddine; Baali, Fethi; Salameh, Elias

    2017-06-01

    The Hammamet Plain, situated in the northwest of the Tezbent mountain range, northeast of Algeria, drains carbonate aquifers through some important karst springs. The physical and chemical characteristics of spring and well water samples were studied for 2 years to assess the origin of groundwater and determine the factors driving the geochemical composition. The ionic speciation and mineral dissolution/precipitation was calculated. Water wells, characterizing groundwater circulation at shallow depths, are moderate to high mineralized waters of Na-HCO3 type. In contrast to the shallow environment, the CO2-rich, deeper waters are of the Ca-HCO3-SO4 type and undergo significant changes in the baseline chemistry along flow lines with increasing residence time. The main factors controlling the groundwater composition and its seasonal variations are the geology, because of the presence of carbonate formations, the elevation and the rate of karst development. In both groups, the carbonate chemistry is diagnostic of the effect of karst development. The supersaturation with respect to calcite indicates CO2 degassing, occurring either inside the aquifer in open conduits, or at the outlet in reservoirs. The undersaturation with respect to calcite shows the existence of fast flow and short residence time conditions inside the aquifer. Interaction between groundwater and surrounding host rocks is believed to be the main process responsible for the observed chemical characteristics of groundwater in the study area.

  10. How multiple partially penetrating wells improve the freshwater recovery of coastal aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) systems: A field and modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuurbier, Koen G.; Zaadnoordijk, Willem Jan; Stuyfzand, Pieter J.

    2014-02-01

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) of freshwater in brackish or saline aquifers can be an efficient technique to bridge freshwater shortages in coastal areas. However, buoyancy effects may cause salinization at the bottom of the ASR well during recovery, making a part of the freshwater irrecoverable. This study shows how such freshwater losses can be reduced applying deep injection and shallow recovery by independently operated multiple partially penetrating wells (MPPW) in a single borehole. A small-scale ASR system with such an MPPW was installed in January 2012 and its operation was extensively monitored until October 2012. A SEAWAT model was built and calibrated on the field measurements of this first ASR cycle. The model was used to compare the MPPW with a conventional fully and partially penetrating well. The freshwater recovery of those wells was 15% and 30% of the injected water, respectively, which is significantly less than the 40% recovered by the MPPW. In subsequent cycles, no more than 60% could be recovered by the MPPW, as mixing in the lower half of the aquifer remained a source of freshwater losses. However, this recovery is significantly higher than the recovery of the conventional well types. This study therefore shows that for less ideal ASR conditions, a viable system can still be realized using MPPW.

  11. Results of a hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical study of a semi-arid karst aquifer in Tezbent plateau, Tebessa region, northeast of Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belfar, Dalila; Fehdi, Chemseddine; Baali, Fethi; Salameh, Elias

    2015-10-01

    The Hammamet Plain, situated in the northwest of the Tezbent mountain range, northeast of Algeria, drains carbonate aquifers through some important karst springs. The physical and chemical characteristics of spring and well water samples were studied for 2 years to assess the origin of groundwater and determine the factors driving the geochemical composition. The ionic speciation and mineral dissolution/precipitation was calculated. Water wells, characterizing groundwater circulation at shallow depths, are moderate to high mineralized waters of Na-HCO3 type. In contrast to the shallow environment, the CO2-rich, deeper waters are of the Ca-HCO3-SO4 type and undergo significant changes in the baseline chemistry along flow lines with increasing residence time. The main factors controlling the groundwater composition and its seasonal variations are the geology, because of the presence of carbonate formations, the elevation and the rate of karst development. In both groups, the carbonate chemistry is diagnostic of the effect of karst development. The supersaturation with respect to calcite indicates CO2 degassing, occurring either inside the aquifer in open conduits, or at the outlet in reservoirs. The undersaturation with respect to calcite shows the existence of fast flow and short residence time conditions inside the aquifer. Interaction between groundwater and surrounding host rocks is believed to be the main process responsible for the observed chemical characteristics of groundwater in the study area.

  12. Southern Appalachian Case Study

    Treesearch

    Charles C. van Sickle

    1999-01-01

    The Southern Appalachian study covers a region of 37.4 million acres. Its mountains, foothills, and valleys stretch from northern Virginia and northern West Virginia to northern Georgia and Alabama. When Native Americans came to the region, forests dominated the landscape and they still do, covering 70% of the land (Figure 32.1). Terrain characteristics are...

  13. Mercury mobilization and speciation linked to bacterial iron oxide and sulfate reduction: A column study to mimic reactive transfer in an anoxic aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellal, Jennifer; Guédron, Stéphane; Huguet, Lucie; Schäfer, Jörg; Laperche, Valérie; Joulian, Catherine; Lanceleur, Laurent; Burnol, André; Ghestem, Jean-Philippe; Garrido, Francis; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne

    2015-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) mobility and speciation in subsurface aquifers is directly linked to its surrounding geochemical and microbial environment. The role of bacteria on Hg speciation (i.e., methylation, demethylation and reduction) is well documented, however little data is available on their impact on Hg mobility. The aim of this study was to test if (i) Hg mobility is due to either direct iron oxide reduction by iron reducing bacteria (IRB) or indirect iron reduction by sulfide produced by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), and (ii) to investigate its subsequent fate and speciation. Experiments were carried out in an original column setup combining geochemical and microbiological approaches that mimic an aquifer including an interface of iron-rich and iron depleted zones. Two identical glass columns containing iron oxides spiked with Hg(II) were submitted to (i) direct iron reduction by IRB and (ii) to indirect iron reduction by sulfides produced by SRB. Results show that in both columns Hg was leached and methylated during the height of bacterial activity. In the column where IRB are dominant, Hg methylation and leaching from the column was directly correlated to bacterial iron reduction (i.e., FeII release). In opposition, when SRB are dominant, produced sulfide induced indirect iron oxide reduction and rapid adsorption of leached Hg (or produced methylmercury) on neoformed iron sulfides (e.g., Mackinawite) or its precipitation as HgS. At the end of the SRB column experiment, when iron-oxide reduction was complete, filtered Hg and Fe concentrations increased at the outlet suggesting a leaching of Hg bound to FeS colloids that may be a dominant mechanism of Hg transport in aquifer environments. These experimental results highlight different biogeochemical mechanisms that can occur in stratified sub-surface aquifers where bacterial activities play a major role on Hg mobility and changes in speciation.

  14. Mercury mobilization and speciation linked to bacterial iron oxide and sulfate reduction: A column study to mimic reactive transfer in an anoxic aquifer.

    PubMed

    Hellal, Jennifer; Guédron, Stéphane; Huguet, Lucie; Schäfer, Jörg; Laperche, Valérie; Joulian, Catherine; Lanceleur, Laurent; Burnol, André; Ghestem, Jean-Philippe; Garrido, Francis; Battaglia-Brunet, Fabienne

    2015-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) mobility and speciation in subsurface aquifers is directly linked to its surrounding geochemical and microbial environment. The role of bacteria on Hg speciation (i.e., methylation, demethylation and reduction) is well documented, however little data is available on their impact on Hg mobility. The aim of this study was to test if (i) Hg mobility is due to either direct iron oxide reduction by iron reducing bacteria (IRB) or indirect iron reduction by sulfide produced by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB), and (ii) to investigate its subsequent fate and speciation. Experiments were carried out in an original column setup combining geochemical and microbiological approaches that mimic an aquifer including an interface of iron-rich and iron depleted zones. Two identical glass columns containing iron oxides spiked with Hg(II) were submitted to (i) direct iron reduction by IRB and (ii) to indirect iron reduction by sulfides produced by SRB. Results show that in both columns Hg was leached and methylated during the height of bacterial activity. In the column where IRB are dominant, Hg methylation and leaching from the column was directly correlated to bacterial iron reduction (i.e., Fe(II) release). In opposition, when SRB are dominant, produced sulfide induced indirect iron oxide reduction and rapid adsorption of leached Hg (or produced methylmercury) on neoformed iron sulfides (e.g., Mackinawite) or its precipitation as HgS. At the end of the SRB column experiment, when iron-oxide reduction was complete, filtered Hg and Fe concentrations increased at the outlet suggesting a leaching of Hg bound to FeS colloids that may be a dominant mechanism of Hg transport in aquifer environments. These experimental results highlight different biogeochemical mechanisms that can occur in stratified sub-surface aquifers where bacterial activities play a major role on Hg mobility and changes in speciation.

  15. Aquifer-nomenclature guidelines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laney, R.L.; Davidson, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    Guidelines and recommendations for naming aquifers are presented to assist authors of geohydrological reports in the United States Geological Survey, Water Resources Division. The hierarchy of terms that is used for water- yielding rocks from largest to smallest is aquifer system, aquifer, and zone. If aquifers are named, the names should be derived from lithologic terms, rock-stratigraphic units, or geographic names. The following items are not recommended as sources of aquifer names: time-stratigraphic names, relative position, alphanumeric designations, depositional environment, depth of occurrence, acronyms, and hydrologic conditions. Confining units should not be named unless doing so clearly promotes understanding of a particular aquifer system. Sources of names for confining units are similar to those for aquifer names, i.e. lithologic terms, rock-stratigraphic units or geographic names. Examples of comparison charts and tables that are used to define the geohydrologic framework are included. Aquifers are defined in 11 hypothetical examples that characterize geohydrologic settings throughout the country. (Author 's abstract)

  16. Hydrogeophysical approach for the study of groundwater resources and hydrogeological features of an carbonate aquifer (Muro Lucano Mounts, Basilicata, Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaldi, Salvatore; Summa, Gianpietro; Leone, Domenico; Rizzo, Enzo

    2010-05-01

    The proposed work is about the geophysical survey applied on a carbonate aquifer to improve the hydrogeological knowledge. The optimal characterization of a groundwater resource is the conditions necessary to achieve the best location of a exploitable pumping hole. In order to characterize an exploitable aquifer, it is necessary to define the best hydrogeological model which necessarily must be supported by a lot of geological and hydrogeological data. Therefore, the integration between detailed geological data and indirect information is one of the best way to improve the groundwater model of an aquifer. This work summarizes the hydrogeological knowledge of the area of Muro Lucano village (Basilicata region). This area is characterized by the presence of an interesting karst aquifer which is made up by a carbonate ridge (Castelgrande - Muro Lucano) that tectonically dips southward and is widely covered by Pliocene deposits (sands and conglomerates), by the Argille Varicolori formation and by debris slope and landslide deposits. Besides the assessment of the complex hydrogeological framework of the area, also a balance of the groundwater resources has been carried out and, by the use of an innovative geophysical technique, a zone which is potentially suitable for the exploitation of the groundwater has been localized.

  17. COMBINED LABORATORY/FIELD STUDY ON THE USE OF NITRATE FOR IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF A FUEL-CONTAMINATED AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot demonstration project was conducted at Eglin Air Force Base, FL, to compare the extent of bioremediation of a fuel-contaminated aquifer using sprinkler application with and without nitrate addition on two adjacent 30 m x 30 m cells. Target compound groups included both B...

  18. Isotopic evolution of groundwater in a telogenetic karst aquifer: A method to study recharge and contaminant transport

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There exists a limited understanding of hydrogeologic flow and contaminant transport within karst aquifers, particularly in the epikarst zone, which are highly susceptible to natural and anthropogenic contamination, such as agricultural runoff, due to the interconnected nature of the surface and sub...

  19. COMBINED LABORATORY/FIELD STUDY ON THE USE OF NITRATE FOR IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF A FUEL-CONTAMINATED AQUIFER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot demonstration project was conducted at Eglin Air Force Base, FL, to compare the extent of bioremediation of a fuel-contaminated aquifer using sprinkler application with and without nitrate addition on two adjacent 30 m x 30 m cells. Target compound groups included both B...

  20. Geostatistical case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Matheron, G.; Armstrong, M.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this volume of contributed chapters is to present a series of applications of geostatistics. These range from a careful variographic analysis on uranium data, through detailed studies on geologically complex deposits, right up to the latest nonlinear methods applied to deposits with highly skewed data contributions. Applications of new techniques such as the external drift method for combining well data with seismic information have also been included. The volume emphasizes geostatistics in practice. Notation has been kept to a minimum and mathematical details have been relegated to annexes.

  1. Geohydrology and water quality of the Roubidoux Aquifer, northeastern Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christenson, S.C.; Parkhurst, D.L.; Fairchild, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    ) Contamination by mine water, (2) large concentrations of sodium and chloride, and (3) large radium-226 concentrations. Many wells in the mining area have been affected by mine-water contamination. At present (1990), all instances of ground-water contamination by mine water can be explained by faulty seals or leaky casings in wells that pass through the zone of mine workings and down to the Roubidoux aquifer. None of the data available to date demonstrate that mine water has migrated from the Boone Formation through the pores and fractures of the intervening geologic units to the Roubidoux aquifer. Ground water with large concentrations of sodium and chloride occurs at some depth throughout the study unit. In the eastern part of the study unit, chloride concentrations greater than 250 milligrams per liter are found at depths greater than approximately 1,200 to 1,500 feet. Data are too few to determine the depth to ground water with large concentrations of sodium and chloride in the southern and southwestern parts of the study unit. Large concentrations of gross-alpha radioactivity in ground water occur near the western edge of the transition zone. Generally, ground water with large concentrations of gross-alpha radioactivity was found to exceed the maximum contaminant level for radium-226. (available as photostat copy only)

  2. Case Studies in Science Ethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Karen

    2010-03-01

    Everyone in science should have ethics education training. I have seen graduate students taken advantage of by their mentors. Many of us have seen misconduct...but what should we do about it? Young scientists are often unaware of the rules in science and make mistakes because of their ignorance of the rules in that particular field of study. Then there are an increasing number of cases in the news of overt cases of misrepresentation in science. All are welcome to attend this discussion of case studies. A case study on topics such as: how to treat data properly, how our values in science affect our work, who gets authorship on scientific papers, who is first author on a paper, what you should do if you uncover misconduct or plagiarism in your university, and we will discuss the scientist's role in society. This will be a painless, non-confrontational small group, then large group discussion of each case

  3. Analysis of aquifer mineralization by paleodrainage channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, H.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    2003-01-01

    Mineralization of groundwater resources is a problem in south-central Kansas, due to the penetration of saline water from Permian bedrock formations into the overlying alluvial aquifer. One of the mechanisms involved in the mineralization involves small bedrock features of high permeability located in places occupied by streams and rivers in past geological eras. These geological features are termed 'paleodrainage channels'. The permeability of the overlying aquifer can be significantly smaller than that of the channel fill material. The comparatively fast migration of saline water through these channels of high permeability is associated with the transfer of minerals into the overlying freshwater aquifer. This study applies a set of boundary layer approaches to quantify the process of mineral transfer from the channels into the aquifer. The methods used in the present study provide quick estimation and evaluation of the dilution of the channel flow, as well as mineral concentration profile changes in the mineralized zone created in the overlying aquifer. More generally, the method can also be useful for the analysis and evaluation of various types of groundwater contamination in heterogeneous aquifers. The application of the method is exemplified by a complete set of calculations characterizing the possible mineralization process at a specific channel in south central Kansas. Sensitivity analyses are performed and provide information about the importance of the various parameters that affect the mineralization process. Some possible scenarios for the aquifer mineralization phenomena are described and evaluated. It is shown that the channel mineralization may create either several stream tubes of the aquifer with high mineral concentration, or many stream tubes mineralized to a lesser extent. Characteristics of these two patterns of aquifer mineralization are quantified and discussed. ?? 2003 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  4. Case study: a patient's survival.

    PubMed

    Nauer, K A; Kramer, L; Lockard, K L

    2000-05-01

    Presentation of a case study involving a female patient, in her 20s, undergoing routine surgery for removal of atrial myxoma leading to a heart transplant. This case study will show the progression from postcardiotomy failure, the emergent use of the extracorporeal membrane oxygenator device, the insertion of the HeartMate device, and the final return to the operating room for a heart transplant. The case study will examine the physiologic demands on the patient, as well as the psychological effects from the various life-saving devices.

  5. The problems of overexploitation of aquifers in semi-arid areas: the Murcia Region and the Segura Basin (South-east Spain) case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Estrella, T.

    2012-05-01

    A general analysis of the problems arising from aquifer exploitation in semi-arid areas such as the Autonomous Region of Murcia, which belongs to the Segura Basin is presented, with particular reference to the Ascoy-Sopalmo aquifer, which is the most overexploited aquifer in Spain. It has suffered intense overabstraction over the last forty years, given renewable water resources of 2 Mm3 yr-1 and abstractions amounting to as much as 55 Mm3 yr-1. This has resulted in the drying of springs, continuous drawdown of water levels (5 m yr-1); piezometric drops (over 30 m in one year, as a consequence of it being a karstic aquifer); increase in pumping costs (elevating water from more than 320 m depth); abandoning of wells (45 reduced to 20), diminishing groundwater reserves, and deteriorating water quality (progressing from a mixed sodium bicarbonate-chloride facies to a sodium chloride one). This is a prime example of poor management with disastrous consequences. In this sense, a series of internal measures is proposed to alleviate the overexploitation of this aquifer and of the Segura Basin, with the aim of contributing to a sustainable future.

  6. Aquifer properties determined from two analytical solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Ayers, J.F.

    1998-09-01

    Many ground water flow and contaminant transport studies involve unconfined aquifers. Determination of reliable hydraulic properties of unconfined aquifers is therefore important. In the analysis of pumping test data, the quality of the determined aquifer parameters can be greatly improved by using a proper model of the aquifer system. Moench (1995) provided an analytical solution for flow to a well partially penetrating an unconfined aquifer. His solution, in contrast to the Neuman solution (1974), accounts for the noninstantaneous decline of the water table (delayed yield). Consequently, the calculated drawdown in these two solutions is different under certain circumstances, and this difference may therefore affect the computation of aquifer properties from pumping test data. This paper uses an inverse computational method to calculate four aquifer parameters as well as a delayed yield parameter, {alpha}{sub 1}, from pumping test data using both the Neuman (1974) and Moench (1995) solutions. Time-drawdown data sets from a pumping test in an unconfined alluvial aquifer near Grand Island, Nebraska, were analyzed. In single-well analyses, horizontal hydraulic conductivity values derived from the Moench solution are lower, but vertical hydraulic conductivity values are higher than those calculated from the Neuman solution. However, the hydraulic conductivity values in composite-well analyses from both solutions become very close. Furthermore, the Neuman solution produces similar hydraulic conductivity values in the single-well and composite-well analyses, but the Moench solution does not. While variable {alpha}{sub 1} seems to play a role in affecting the computation of aquifer parameters in the single-well analysis, a much smaller effect was observed in the composite-well analysis.

  7. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (DENVER PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  8. Hydrogeologic Case Studies (Seattle, WA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  9. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (CHICAGO, IL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  10. Case studies of uncommon headaches.

    PubMed

    Evans, Randolph W

    2006-05-01

    The following interesting and uncommon headache disorders are presented through case studies: exploding head syndrome, hypnic headache, neck-tongue syndrome, "Alice in Wonderland" syndrome, nummular headache, red ear syndrome, burning mouth syndrome, spontaneous intracranial hypotension syndrome, and cardiac cephalalgia.

  11. Teaching astronomy with case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Timothy F.

    2015-11-01

    Breaking the students into small, collaborative learning groups to solve a meaningful task together is one of the most successful and fully evaluated teaching techniques implemented over the last century. Although there are many ways to accomplish small group learning, a long-standing and consistently successful collaborative class activity is to use the case study teaching strategy. The use of case studies is common in medical schools and law schools, but not so common in the teaching of astronomy. Case studies create meaningful conversations among students and with the professor by focusing on life-like dilemmas to be solved. Case study tasks ask audience members to synthesize several ideas or evaluate scenarios that have not been explicitly presented to them in the lecture or in available readings.

  12. Nasopharyngeal Case-Control Study

    Cancer.gov

    A case-control study conducted in Taiwan between 1991-1994 among approximately 1,000 individuals to examine the role of viral, environmental, and genetic factors associated with the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

  13. Case Study: del Amo Bioventing

    EPA Science Inventory

    The attached presentation discusses the fundamentals of bioventing in the vadose zone. The basics of bioventing are presented. The experience to date with the del Amo Superfund Site is presented as a case study.

  14. Case Study: del Amo Bioventing

    EPA Science Inventory

    The attached presentation discusses the fundamentals of bioventing in the vadose zone. The basics of bioventing are presented. The experience to date with the del Amo Superfund Site is presented as a case study.

  15. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (CHICAGO, IL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  16. HYDROGEOLOGIC CASE STUDIES (DENVER PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  17. Hydrogeologic Case Studies (Seattle, WA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeology is the foundation of subsurface site characterization for evaluations of monitored natural attenuation (MNA). Three case studies are presented. Examples of the potentially detrimental effects of drilling additives on ground-water samples from monitoring wells are d...

  18. Application of multivariate statistical analysis and hydrochemical and isotopic investigations for evaluation of groundwater quality and its suitability for drinking and agriculture purposes: case of Oum Ali-Thelepte aquifer, central Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Hassen, Imen; Hamzaoui-Azaza, Fadoua; Bouhlila, Rachida

    2016-03-01

    Groundwater plays a dominant role in arid regions; it is among the most available water resources in Tunisia. Located in northwestern Tunisia, Oum Ali-Thelepte is a deep Miocene sedimentary aquifer, where groundwater is the most important source of water supply. The aim of the study is to investigate the hydrochemical processes leading to mineralization and to assess water quality with respect to agriculture and drinking for a better management of groundwater resources. To achieve such objectives, water analysis was carried out on 16 groundwater samples collected during January-February 2014. Stable isotopes and 26 hydrochemical parameters were examined. The interpretation of these analytical data showed that the concentrations of major and trace elements were within the permissible level for human use. The distribution of mineral processes in this aquifer was identified using conventional classification techniques, suggesting that the water facies gradually changes from Ca-HCO3 to Mg-SO4 type and are controlled by water-rock interaction. These results were endorsed using multivariate statistical methods such as principal component analysis and cluster analysis. The sustainability of groundwater for drinking and irrigation was assessed based on the water quality index (WQI) and on Wilcox and Richards's diagrams. This aquifer has been classified as "excellent water" serving good irrigation in the area. As for the stable isotope, the measurements showed that groundwater samples lay between global meteoric water line (GMWL) and LMWL; hence, this arrangement signifies that the recharge of the Oum Ali-Thelepte aquifer is ensured by rainwater infiltration through mountains in the border of the aquifer without evaporation effects.

  19. Hydrogeological analysis of the upper Dupi Tila Aquifer, towards the implementation of a managed aquifer-recharge project in Dhaka City, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Mohammad Azizur; Wiegand, Bettina A.; Badruzzaman, A. B. M.; Ptak, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    A preliminary feasibility assessment of managed aquifer-recharge (MAR) techniques was undertaken for Dhaka City, Bangladesh. Considering the top impermeable-layer (TIL) thickness and the land-use classification, four primary MAR techniques have been suggested: (1) soil-aquifer treatment (SAT) for TIL thickness 0-8 m, (2) cascade-type recharge trenches/pits for TIL thickness 9-30 m, (3) aquifer storage, transfer and recovery (ASR/ASTR) for TIL thickness 31-52 m, and (4) use of natural wetlands to recharge water collected from open spaces. The study suggests that recharge trenches and pits will be the most appropriate MAR techniques, which can be implemented in most parts of the recharge area (ca. 277 km2). In case of a recharge trench, the lower parts (15-20 m) that are in direct contact with the aquifer can be backfilled with biosand filters with a reactive layer containing metallic iron (Fe0) to offer pre-treatment of the infiltrated water. In addition to the suggested four techniques, the regional groundwater flow direction, from the northwest and northeast towards Dhaka City, may allow use of the aquifer as a natural treatment and transport medium for groundwater, if spreading basins are installed in the greater Dhaka area.

  20. Science for informed decision: A 3D unified conceptual model of the Milk River Transboundary Aquifer (Alberta-Montana)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, A.; Pétré, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Milk River transboundary aquifer straddles southern Alberta (Canada) and northern Montana (United States), in a semi-arid region considered water short. This confined sandstone aquifer is a source for municipal supply and agricultural uses on the Canadian side, as well as for secondary oil recovery on the US-side of the border. The extensive use of this resource since the mid 1950's has led to a dramatic drop in the water level in some places and concerns about the durability of the resource have risen. The Milk River aquifer has been the object of many studies during the 20th century; however most of them were limited by the USCanada border, preventing a sound understanding of the global dynamics of the aquifer. The objectives of this transboundary study are to better understand the dynamics of the Milk River aquifer, following its natural limits, in order to make recommendations for a sustainable management and its good governance by the two international jurisdictions, as recommended in the UNGA resolution 63/124 on the Law of Transboundary Aquifers. Since 2009, the Milk River transboundary aquifer is part of the inventory of UNESCO ISARM-Americas initiative, which encourages riparian states to work cooperatively toward mutually beneficial and sustainable aquifer development However, the use of this shared resource is not ruled by any international agreement or convention between the USA and the Canada. Stakeholders from the two countries have been involved, at various levels of jurisdictions (municipal, provincial, state, federal) to establish a strong cooperation. In these contexts, models can constitute useful tools for informed decisions. In the case of the Milk River aquifer, models could support scientists and managers from both countries in avoiding potential tensions linked to the water shortage context in this region. Models can determine the conditions of overexploitation and provide an assessment of a sustainable yield. A unified conceptual model

  1. A conceptual sedimentological-geostatistical model of aquifer heterogeneity based on outcrop studies

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Three outcrop studies were conducted in deposits of different depositional environments. At each site, permeability measurements were obtained with an air-minipermeameter developed as part of this study. In addition, the geological units were mapped with either surveying, photographs, or both. Geostatistical analysis of the permeability data was performed to estimate the characteristics of the probability distribution function and the spatial correlation structure. The information obtained from the geological mapping was then compared with the results of the geostatistical analysis for any relationships that may exist. The main field site was located in the Albuquerque Basin of central New Mexico at an outcrop of the Pliocene-Pleistocene Sierra Ladrones Formation. The second study was conducted on the walls of waste pits in alluvial fan deposits at the Nevada Test Site. The third study was conducted on an outcrop of an eolian deposit (miocene) south of Socorro, New Mexico. The results of the three studies were then used to construct a conceptual model relating depositional environment to geostatistical models of heterogeneity. The model presented is largely qualitative but provides a basis for further hypothesis formulation and testing.

  2. A Black Hills-Madison Aquifer origin for Dakota Aquifer groundwater in northeastern Nebraska.

    PubMed

    Stotler, Randy; Harvey, F Edwin; Gosselin, David C

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies of the Dakota Aquifer in South Dakota attributed elevated groundwater sulfate concentrations to Madison Aquifer recharge in the Black Hills with subsequent chemical evolution prior to upward migration into the Dakota Aquifer. This study examines the plausibility of a Madison Aquifer origin for groundwater in northeastern Nebraska. Dakota Aquifer water samples were collected for major ion chemistry and isotopic analysis ((18)O, (2)H, (3)H, (14)C, (13)C, (34)S, (18)O-SO(4), (87)Sr, (37)Cl). Results show that groundwater beneath the eastern, unconfined portion of the study area is distinctly different from groundwater sampled beneath the western, confined portion. In the east, groundwater is calcium-bicarbonate type, with delta(18)O values (-9.6 per thousand to -12.4 per thousand) similar to local, modern precipitation (-7.4 per thousand to -10 per thousand), and tritium values reflecting modern recharge. In the west, groundwater is calcium-sulfate type, having depleted delta(18)O values (-16 per thousand to -18 per thousand) relative to local, modern precipitation, and (14)C ages 32,000 to more than 47,000 years before present. Sulfate, delta(18)O, delta(2)H, delta(34)S, and delta(18)O-SO(4) concentrations are similar to those found in Madison Aquifer groundwater in South Dakota. Thus, it is proposed that Madison Aquifer source water is also present within the Dakota Aquifer beneath northeastern Nebraska. A simple Darcy equation estimate of groundwater velocities and travel times using reported physical parameters from the Madison and Dakota Aquifers suggests such a migration is plausible. However, discrepancies between (14)C and Darcy age estimates indicate that (14)C ages may not accurately reflect aquifer residence time, due to mixtures of varying aged water.

  3. BATCH AND COLUMN STUDIES ON BTEX BIODEGRADATION BY AQUIFER MICROORGANISMS UNDER DENITRIFYING CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of these laboratory experiments was to determine the role nitrate plays in enhancing the biodegradation of fuel contaminated groundwater. Column studies were conducted to simulate the nitrate field demonstration project carried out earlier at Traverse City, MI so a...

  4. Biscayne aquifer, southeast Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, Howard; Hull, John E.

    1978-01-01

    Peak daily pumpage from the highly permeable, unconfined Biscayne aquifer for public water-supply systems in southeast Florida in 1975 was about 500 million gallons. Another 165 million gallons was withdrawn daily for irrigation. Recharge to the aquifer is primarily by local rainfall. Discharge is by evapotranspiration, canal drainage, coastal seepage, and pumping. Pollutants can enter the aquifer by direct infiltration from land surface or controlled canals, septic-tank and other drainfields, drainage wells, and solid-waste dumps. Most of the pollutants are concentrated in the upper 20 to 30 feet of the aquifer; public supply wells generally range in depth from about 75 to 150 feet. Dilution, dispersion, and adsorption tend to reduce the concentrations. Seasonal heavy rainfall and canal discharge accelerate ground-water circulation, thereby tending to dilute and flush upper zones of the aquifer. The ultimate fate of pollutants in the aquifer is the ocean, although some may be adsorbed by the aquifer materials en route to the ocean, and some are diverted to pumping wells. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Boundary condition effects on maximum groundwater withdrawal in coastal aquifers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chunhui; Chen, Yiming; Luo, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Prevention of sea water intrusion in coastal aquifers subject to groundwater withdrawal requires optimization of well pumping rates to maximize the water supply while avoiding sea water intrusion. Boundary conditions and the aquifer domain size have significant influences on simulating flow and concentration fields and estimating maximum pumping rates. In this study, an analytical solution is derived based on the potential-flow theory for evaluating maximum groundwater pumping rates in a domain with a constant hydraulic head landward boundary. An empirical correction factor, which was introduced by Pool and Carrera (2011) to account for mixing in the case with a constant recharge rate boundary condition, is found also applicable for the case with a constant hydraulic head boundary condition, and therefore greatly improves the usefulness of the sharp-interface analytical solution. Comparing with the solution for a constant recharge rate boundary, we find that a constant hydraulic head boundary often yields larger estimations of the maximum pumping rate and when the domain size is five times greater than the distance between the well and the coastline, the effect of setting different landward boundary conditions becomes insignificant with a relative difference between two solutions less than 2.5%. These findings can serve as a preliminary guidance for conducting numerical simulations and designing tank-scale laboratory experiments for studying groundwater withdrawal problems in coastal aquifers with minimized boundary condition effects. © 2011, The Author(s). Ground Water © 2011, National Ground Water Association.

  6. Remediation of trichloroethylene in an artificial aquifer with trees: A controlled field study

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, L.A.; Wang, X.; Muiznieks, I.A.

    1999-07-01

    Poplar trees have been evaluated in the field for the control of contaminated groundwater movement, but to date, the fate of the contaminants has not been demonstrated. In the present study, the authors tested a hybrid poplar for the uptake and degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE). Plants were exposed to TCE-contaminated groundwater under field conditions in lined cells for three years. During the growing seasons, the trees were able to remove over 99% of the added TCE. Less than 9% of the TCE was transpired to the atmosphere during the second and third years, and examination of the tissue showed expected metabolites, but at low levels. Chloride did not significantly accumulate in the plant tissues, but chloride ion increased in the soil in amounts that approximately corresponded to TCE loss. These results demonstrate that treatment of TCE-contaminated groundwater with this poplar clone can result in efficient destruction of TCE.

  7. Denitrification in the karstic Floridan Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fork, M.; Albertin, A. R.; Heffernan, J. B.; Katz, B. G.; Cohen, M. J.

    2010-12-01

    Nitrate concentrations in the karstic Floridan Aquifer have increased dramatically over the past 50 years, owing to agricultural intensification and urbanization. Due to low concentrations of organic matter and moderately oxic conditions in the Floridan Aquifer, groundwater denitrification has been assumed to be negligible. In this study, we evaluate that assumption using both exi