Science.gov

Sample records for ar para controle

  1. 40Ar/39Ar ages in deformed potassium feldspar: evidence of microstructural control on Ar isotope systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Steven M.; Potts, Graham J.; Kelley, Simon P.

    2001-05-01

    Detailed field and microstructural studies have been combined with high spatial resolution ultraviolet laser 40Ar/39Ar dating of naturally deformed K-feldspar to investigate the direct relationship between deformation-related microstructure and Ar isotope systematics. The sample studied is a ~1,000 Ma Torridonian arkose from Skye, Scotland, that contains detrital feldspars previously metamorphosed at amphibolite-facies conditions ~1,700 Ma. The sample was subsequently deformed ~430 Ma ago during Caledonian orogenesis. The form and distribution of deformation-induced microstructures within three different feldspar clasts has been mapped using atomic number contrast and orientation contrast imaging, at a range of scales, to identify intragrain variations in composition and lattice orientation. These variations have been related to thin section and regional structural data to provide a well-constrained deformation history for the feldspar clasts. One hundred and forty-three in-situ 40Ar/39Ar analyses measured using ultraviolet laser ablation record a range of apparent ages (317-1030 Ma). The K-feldspar showing the least strain records the greatest range of apparent ages from 420-1,030 Ma, with the oldest apparent ages being found close to the centre of the feldspar away from fractures and the detrital grain boundary. The most deformed K-feldspar yields the youngest apparent ages (317-453 Ma) but there is no spatial relationship between apparent age and the detrital grain boundary. Within this feldspar, the oldest apparent ages are recorded from orientation domain boundaries and fracture surfaces where an excess or trapped 40Ar component resides. Orientation contrast images at a similar scale to the Ar analyses illustrate a significant deformation-related microstructural difference between the feldspars and we conclude that deformation plays a significant role in controlling Ar systematics of feldspars at both the inter- and intragrain scales even at relatively low

  2. Time-resolved rotational spectroscopy of para-difluorobenzene·Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichert, A.; Riehn, C.; Matylitsky, V. V.; Jarzeba, W.; Brutschy, B.

    2002-07-01

    We report on time-resolved rotational spectroscopy experiments of the cluster para-difluorobenzene·Ar ( pDFB·Ar) by picosecond laser pulses in a supersonic expansion. Rotational coherences of pDFB·Ar are generated by resonant electronic excitation and probed by time-resolved fluorescence depletion spectroscopy and time-resolved photoionization ((1+1') PPI) spectroscopy. The former allows the determination of both ground and excited state rotational constants, whereas the latter technique enables the separate study of the excited state with the benefit of mass-selective detection. Since pDFB·Ar represents a near symmetric oblate rotor, persistent J-type transients with tJ≈ n/2( A+ B) could be measured. From their analysis, (A″+B″)=2234.9±2 MHz and (A'+B')=2237.9±2 MHz were obtained. A structural investigation, based on data of the pDFB monomer, is presented resulting in a pDFB·Ar center-of-mass distance of both moieties of R z=3.543±0.017 Å with a change of ΔR z=-0.057±0.009 Å upon electronic excitation. These results are compared to data of former frequency-resolved experiments and ab initio computations.

  3. Comparison of PID and Fuzzy Controller for Position Control of AR.Drone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prayitno, A.; Indrawati, V.; Trusulaw, I. I.

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes the implementation of the PID Controller to control the position of the AR.Drone in the x-y-z. This position control scheme uses three PID controllers to maintain the position of x, y and z using the signal control pitch, roll and vertical rate. PID Controller implemented on AR.Drone 2.0 and then tested in an indoor space. The performance of the controller will be compared with Fuzzy Logic Controller schemes that have been implemented previously. The results show that the PID Controller generate a response with rise time less than 3 seconds at the x and y position with around 25% overshoot. The result for z position give better result without overshoot. The comparison between fuzzy logic and PID Controller indicates that the results of the PID controller is better although there is overshoot.

  4. Spatial control of the βAR system in heart failure: the transverse tubule and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Gorelik, Julia; Wright, Peter T.; Lyon, Alexander R.; Harding, Sian E.

    2013-01-01

    The beta1-adrenoceptors (β1AR) and beta-2 (β2AR) adrenoceptors represent the predominant pathway for sympathetic control of myocardial function. Diverse mechanisms have evolved to translate signalling via these two molecules into differential effects on physiology. In this review, we discuss how the functions of the βAR are organized from the level of secondary messengers to the whole heart to achieve this. Using novel microscopy and bio-imaging methods researchers have uncovered subtle organization of the control of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), the predominant positively inotropic pathway for the βAR. The β2AR in particular is demonstrated to give rise to highly compartmentalized, spatially confined cAMP signals. Organization of β2AR within the T-tubule and caveolae of cardiomyocytes concentrates this receptor with molecules which buffer and shape its cAMP signal to give fine control. This situation is undermined in various forms of heart failure. Human and animal models of heart failure demonstrate disruption of cellular micro-architecture which contributes to the change in response to cardiac βARs. Loss of cellular structure has proved key to the observed loss of confined β2AR signalling. Some pharmacological and genetic treatments have been successful in returning failing cells to a more structured phenotype. Within these cells it has been possible to observe the partial restoration of normal β2AR signalling. At the level of the organ, the expression of the two βAR subtypes varies between regions with the β2AR forming a greater proportion of the βAR population at the apex. This distribution may contribute to regional wall motion abnormalities in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, a syndrome of high sympathetic activity, where the phosphorylated β2AR can signal via Gi protein to produce negatively inotropic effects. PMID:23345264

  5. Acetalated dextran encapsulated AR-12 as a host-directed therapy to control Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Ky V; Borteh, Hassan M; Rajaram, Murugesan V S; Peine, Kevin J; Curry, Heather; Collier, Michael A; Homsy, Michael L; Bachelder, Eric M; Gunn, John S; Schlesinger, Larry S; Ainslie, Kristy M

    2014-12-30

    AR-12 has been evaluated in clinical trials as an anti-cancer agent but also has demonstrated host-directed, broad-spectrum clearance of bacteria. We have previously shown that AR-12 has activity in vitro against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Francisella species by inducing autophagy and other host immune pathways. AR-12 treatment of S. Typhimurium-infected mice resulted in a 10-fold reduction in bacterial load in the liver and spleen and an increased survival time. However, AR-12 treatment did not protect mice from death, likely due poor formulation. In the current study, AR-12 was encapsulated in a microparticulate carrier formulated from the novel degradable biopolymer acetalated dextran (Ace-DEX) and subsequently evaluated for its activity in human monocyte-derived macrophages (hMDMs). Our results show that hMDMs efficiently internalized Ace-DEX microparticles (MPs), and that encapsulation significantly reduced host cell cytotoxicity compared to unencapsulated AR-12. Efficient macrophage internalization of AR-12 loaded MPs (AR-12/MPs) was further demonstrated by autophagosome formation that was comparable to free AR-12 and resulted in enhanced clearance of intracellular Salmonella. Taken together, these studies provide support that Ace-DEX encapsulated AR-12 may be a promising new therapeutic agent to control intracellular bacterial pathogens of macrophages by targeting delivery and reducing drug toxicity.

  6. Acetalated Dextran Encapsulated AR-12 as a Host-directed Therapy to Control Salmonella Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Ky V.; Borteh, Hassan M.; Rajaram, Murugesan V. S.; Peine, Kevin J.; Curry, Heather; Collier, Michael A.; Homsy, Michael L.; Bachelder, Eric M.; Gunn, John S.; Schlesinger, Larry S.; Ainslie, Kristy M.

    2014-01-01

    AR-12 has been evaluated in clinical trials as an anti-cancer agent but also has demonstrated host-directed, broad-spectrum clearance of bacteria. We have previously shown that AR-12 has activity in vitro against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Francisella species by inducing autophagy and other host immune pathways. AR-12 treatment of S. Typhimurium-infected mice resulted in a 10-fold reduction in bacterial load in the liver and spleen and an increased survival time. However, AR-12 treatment did not protect mice from death, likely due poor formulation. In the current study, AR-12 was encapsulated in a microparticulate carrier formulated from the novel degradable biopolymer acetalated dextran (Ace-DEX) and subsequently evaluated for its activity in human monocyte-derived macrophages (hMDMs). Our results show that hMDMs efficiently internalized Ace-DEX microparticles (MPs), and that encapsulation significantly reduced host cell cytotoxicity compared to unencapsulated AR-12. Efficient macrophage internalization of AR-12 loaded MPs (AR-12/MPs) was further demonstrated by autophagosome formation that was comparable to free AR-12 and resulted in enhanced clearance of intracellular Salmonella. Taken together, these studies provide support that Ace-DEX encapsulated AR-12 may be a promising new therapeutic agent to control intracellular bacterial pathogens of macrophages by targeting delivery and reducing drug toxicity. PMID:25447826

  7. Long-lived structural control of Mt. Shasta's plumbing system illuminated by 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, A. T.; Christiansen, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Mt. Shasta is the largest stratovolcano in the Cascade Arc, surpassed in volume only by the large rear-arc Medicine Lake and Newberry composite volcanoes. Including the material in the ~350 ka debris avalanche, it has produced more than 500 km3 of andesite and dacite from several superimposed central vents over its 700-850 kyr history. Earlier, between at least 970 to 1170 ka, the Rainbow Mountain volcano of similar composition and size occupied this latitude of the arc ~20 km further east. This shift of magmatic focus from within the arc axis (as defined by 6 Ma and younger calc-alkaline centers) to the arc front is poorly understood, but the current center's location appears structurally controlled. Most identifiable volcanic vents on Mt. Shasta lie within 1 km of a N-S line through the active summit cone. 40Ar/39Ar ages of map units occupying the vent alignment range from the Holocene (5×1 ka) current summit dome to at least the Middle Pleistocene (464×9 ka McKenzie Butte). The vast majority of eruptions have issued from central vents (Sargents Ridge, 300-135 ka; Misery Hill, 100-15 ka; and Hotlum, <10 ka), each 500 to 1000m north of its predecessor. A central vent for the pre-avalanche edifice is impossible to locate precisely, but was possibly on the same N-S trend and certainly no more than 4 km to the west, likely south of the Sargents Ridge central vent. ~15 of ~25 mapped flank vents lie on the alignment and the other ten lie west of the line. No identified volcanic vents lie east of the line until >12 km from Mt. Shasta (Ash Creek Butte, 227 ka; Basalt of McCloud River, 38 ka; The Whaleback, 102 ka), and monogenetic and polygenetic centers further east and northeast. From these observations we infer that: (1) magmas are localized along a ~20 km, long-lived, N-S trending structure running through the summit; (2) the upper crustal structure appears impermeable to magmas and resistant to dikes on its eastern side; (3) the western half of the area beneath

  8. A study on software-based sensing technology for multiple object control in AR video.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sungmo; Song, Jae-Gu; Hwang, Dae-Joon; Ahn, Jae Young; Kim, Seoksoo

    2010-01-01

    Researches on Augmented Reality (AR) have recently received attention. With these, the Machine-to-Machine (M2M) market has started to be active and there are numerous efforts to apply this to real life in all sectors of society. To date, the M2M market has applied the existing marker-based AR technology in entertainment, business and other industries. With the existing marker-based AR technology, a designated object can only be loaded on the screen from one marker and a marker has to be added to load on the screen the same object again. This situation creates a problem where the relevant marker'should be extracted and printed in screen so that loading of the multiple objects is enabled. However, since the distance between markers will not be measured in the process of detecting and copying markers, the markers can be overlapped and thus the objects would not be augmented. To solve this problem, a circle having the longest radius needs to be created from a focal point of a marker to be copied, so that no object is copied within the confines of the circle. In this paper, software-based sensing technology for multiple object detection and loading using PPHT has been developed and overlapping marker control according to multiple object control has been studied using the Bresenham and Mean Shift algorithms.

  9. Spectral Control of Transmission of Diffuse Irradiation using Piled AR Coated Quartz Glass Filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumano, Tomoyuki; Hanamura, Katsunori

    2004-11-01

    Spectral transmission characteristics of piled quartz glass filters with anti-reflection (AR) coating and without coating were investigated for diffuse irradiation through ray tracing numerical simulation. The spectral transmittance for diffuse irradiation is lower than that for normal irradiation because surface reflection becomes large with increasing incident zenith angle. By using the AR coating, the transmittance for diffuse irradiation becomes much higher than that without coating around a wavelength of 1.1 μm that is specified for the coating thickness design. On the other hand, for the long wavelength region, the transmittance reduced largely due to multiple-surface and absorption. The most striking feature is that difference between transmittances for the specified and the long wavelength region is enhanced using the piled AR coated quartz glass filters. If the refractive index of the coating material were 1.19, which was an ideal value for the design of the coating, the effect is the most remarkable. As a result, it is revealed that this spectral control method is useful for the energy recirculation TPV system using super-adiabatic combustion in porous media.

  10. Simultaneous optimization of dose and focus controls in advanced ArF immersion scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toki, Tsuyoshi; Izikson, Pavel; Kosugi, Junichi; Sakasai, Naruo; Saotome, Keiko; Suzuki, Kazuaki; Kandel, Daniel; Robinson, John C.; Koyanagi, Yuji

    2010-04-01

    We have developed a new scheme of process control combining a CD metrology system and an exposure tool. A new model based on Neural Networks has been created in KLA-Tencor's "KT Analyzer" which calculates the dose and focus errors simultaneously from CD parameters, such as mid CD and height information, measured by a scatterometry (OCD) measurement tool. The accuracy of this new model was confirmed by experiment. Nikon's "CDU master" then calculated the control parameters for dose and focus per each field from the dose and focus error data of a reference wafer provided by KT Analyzer. Using the corrected parameters for dose and focus from CDU master, we exposed wafers on an NSR-S610C (ArF immersion scanner), and measured the CDU on a KLA SCD100 (OCD tool). As a result, we confirmed that CDU in the entire wafer can be improved more than 60% (from 3.36nm (3σ) to 1.28nm (3σ)).

  11. Biological and physical controls on O2/Ar, Ar and pCO2 variability at the Western Antarctic Peninsula and in the Drake Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eveleth, R.; Cassar, N.; Doney, S. C.; Munro, D. R.; Sweeney, C.

    2017-05-01

    Using simultaneous sub-kilometer resolution underway measurements of surface O2/Ar, total O2 and pCO2 from annual austral summer surveys in 2012, 2013 and 2014, we explore the impacts of biological and physical processes on the O2 and pCO2 system spatial and interannual variability at the Western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP). In the WAP, mean O2/Ar supersaturation was (7.6±9.1)% and mean pCO2 supersaturation was (-28±22)%. We see substantial spatial variability in O2 and pCO2 including sub-mesoscale/mesoscale variability with decorrelation length scales of 4.5 km, consistent with the regional Rossby radius. This variability is embedded within onshore-offshore gradients. O2 in the LTER grid region is driven primarily by biological processes as seen by the median ratio of the magnitude of biological oxygen (O2/Ar) to physical oxygen (Ar) supersaturation anomalies (%) relative to atmospheric equilibrium (2.6), however physical processes have a more pronounced influence in the southern onshore region of the grid where we see active sea-ice melting. Total O2 measurements should be interpreted with caution in regions of significant sea-ice formation and melt and glacial meltwater input. pCO2 undersaturation predominantly reflects biological processes in the LTER grid. In contrast we compare these results to the Drake Passage where gas supersaturations vary by smaller magnitudes and decorrelate at length scales of 12 km, in line with latitudinal changes in the regional Rossby radius. Here biological processes induce smaller O2/Ar supersaturations (mean (0.14±1.3)%) and pCO2 undersaturations (mean (-2.8±3.9)%) than in the WAP, and pressure changes, bubble and gas exchange fluxes drive stable Ar supersaturations.

  12. The C5a/C5aR1 axis controls the development of experimental allergic asthma independent of LysM-expressing pulmonary immune cells.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Anna V; Ender, Fanny; Quell, Katharina M; Antoniou, Konstantina; Vollbrandt, Tillman; König, Peter; Köhl, Jörg; Laumonnier, Yves

    2017-01-01

    C5a regulates the development of maladaptive immune responses in allergic asthma mainly through the activation of C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1). Yet, the cell types and the mechanisms underlying this regulation are ill-defined. Recently, we described increased C5aR1 expression in lung tissue eosinophils but decreased expression in airway and pulmonary macrophages as well as in pulmonary CD11b+ conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) and monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) during the allergic effector phase using a floxed green fluorescent protein (GFP)-C5aR1 knock-in mouse. Here, we determined the role of C5aR1 signaling in neutrophils, moDCs and macrophages for the pulmonary recruitment of such cells and the importance of C5aR1-mediated activation of LysM-expressing cells for the development of allergic asthma. We used LysM-C5aR1 KO mice with a specific deletion of C5aR1 in LysMCre-expressing cells and confirmed the specific deletion of C5aR1 in neutrophils, macrophages and moDCs in the airways and/or the lung tissue. We found that alveolar macrophage numbers were significantly increased in LysM-C5aR1 KO mice. Induction of ovalbumin (OVA)-driven experimental allergic asthma in GFP-C5aR1fl/fl and LysM-C5aR1 KO mice resulted in strong but similar airway resistance, mucus production and Th2/Th17 cytokine production. In contrast, the number of airway but not of pulmonary neutrophils was lower in LysM-C5aR1 KO as compared with GFP-C5aR1fl/fl mice. The recruitment of macrophages, cDCs, moDCs, T cells and type 2 innate lymphoid cells was not altered in LysM-C5aR1 KO mice. Our findings demonstrate that C5aR1 is critical for steady state control of alveolar macrophage numbers and the transition of neutrophils from the lung into the airways in OVA-driven allergic asthma. However, C5aR1 activation of LysM-expressing cells plays a surprisingly minor role in the recruitment and activation of such cells and the development of the allergic phenotype in OVA-driven experimental allergic asthma.

  13. The single grain fusion dating approach: Determining the factors that control white mica 40Ar/39Ar age formation during HP metamorphism of the Cycladic Blueschist Unit, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uunk, Bertram; Wijbrans, Jan; Brouwer, Fraukje

    2017-04-01

    White mica 40Ar/39Ar dating is a proven powerful tool for constraining the timing and rate of metamorphism, deformation and exhumation. However, for high-pressure metamorphic rocks dating often results in wide age ranges, which are not in agreement with constraints from other isotopic systems, indicating that geological and chemical processes complicate straightforward 40Ar/39Ar dating. Despite hosting one of the largest geochronological datasets in the world, the Cycladic Blueschist Unit in Greece is presently one of the focal areas in the discussion on the interpretation of metamorphic 40Ar/39Ar ages. Previous phengite multi grain step heating experiments commonly yielded undulating age spectra ranging between 20 - 60 Ma. While some studies attempt to assign geological significance to these ages, others argue the ages are geologically meaningless and the result of the interplay between partial diffusive resetting and continued crystallization. By taking an alternative approach of multiple single grain fusion experiments, this study investigates age heterogeneity between samples of contrasting metamorphic facies, rheology and strain from the Cycladic islands of Syros and Sifnos. Comparing the size and shape of single grain fusion age distributions at the grain, rock, outcrop and island scale allows determination of the scale at which different age-forming processes operate. Resulting ages show a previously unreported consistent variation between different outcrops, moving from the eclogite-blueschist facies (55-45 Ma) to greenschist overprinting (40-30 Ma). This indicates that outcrop scale homogeneous resetting is the dominant processes for age formation in the CBU. Single grain age variation at the sample and outcrop scale is only limited to 10 Ma, indicating a smaller but observable role for local age perturbing processes of incomplete resetting, continued (re)crystallization or infiltration of excess argon. Some of the partially overprinted samples show

  14. ARS racks

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-22

    ISS020-E-041651 (22 Sept. 2009) --- NASA astronaut Michael Barratt works with the Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS) rack in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. Barratt, Canadian Space Agency astronaut Robert Thirsk (out of frame) and European Space Agency astronaut Frank De Winne (out of frame), all Expedition 20 flight engineers, spent several hours with the extensive dual-rack swap/install activity, to move Destiny?s ARS rack to the Kibo laboratory and install in Destiny in its place the newly-delivered ARS rack for Node-3.

  15. ARS racks

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-22

    ISS020-E-041647 (22 Sept. 2009) --- NASA astronaut Michael Barratt works with the Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS) rack in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. Barratt, Canadian Space Agency astronaut Robert Thirsk (out of frame) and European Space Agency astronaut Frank De Winne (out of frame), all Expedition 20 flight engineers, spent several hours with the extensive dual-rack swap/install activity, to move Destiny?s ARS rack to the Kibo laboratory and install in Destiny in its place the newly-delivered ARS rack for Node-3.

  16. Pressure-controlled phase matching to third harmonic in Ar-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Nold, J; Hölzer, P; Joly, N Y; Wong, G K L; Nazarkin, A; Podlipensky, A; Scharrer, M; Russell, P St J

    2010-09-01

    We report tunable third-harmonic generation (THG) in an Ar-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber, pumped by broadband <2 microJ, 30 fs pulses from an amplified Ti:sapphire laser system. The overall dispersion is precisely controlled by balancing the negative dielectric susceptibility of the waveguide against the positive susceptibility of the gas. We demonstrate THG to a higher-order guided mode and show that the phase-matched UV wavelength is tunable by adjusting the gas pressure.

  17. Highly selective and precisely controlled aluminum etching by Ar/HBr/CH3F/O2 gas chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Eiji; Ohtake, Hiroto; Ohsawa, Yusuke; Kumar, Kaushik; Sasaki, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Highly selective and precisely controlled aluminum etching was investigated by using plasma with a new Ar/HBr/CH3F/O2 gas chemistry. Generally, an aluminum surface is oxidized, leading to difficulties in the precise control of nm/min-level aluminum etching with a high selectivity to SiO2 of more than 10. The new gas chemistry enabled precise aluminum etching with a high selectivity to oxide of 10 and a low etching rate of 10 nm/min. In this gas chemistry, the aluminum surface remained oxidized by oxygen during etching and the oxidized surface was reduced by CH3F. The oxidized aluminum surface was etched by radicals from CH3F and the etching rate was decreased by HBr.

  18. Identification of a novel distal control region upstream of the human steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene that participates in SF-1-dependent chromatin architecture.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Tetsuya; Yazawa, Takashi; Ju, Yunfeng; Imamichi, Yoshitaka; Uesaka, Miki; Inaoka, Yoshihiko; Matsuura, Kaoru; Kamiki, Yasue; Oki, Masaya; Umezawa, Akihiro; Miyamoto, Kaoru

    2010-09-03

    StAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein) mediates the transport of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane, the process of which is the rate-limiting step for steroidogenesis. Transcriptional regulation of the proximal promoter of the human StAR gene has been well characterized, whereas analysis of its distal control region has not. Recently, we found that SF-1 (steroidogenic factor 1) induced the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into steroidogenic cells with the concomitant strong induction of StAR expression. Here, we show, using differentiated MSCs, that StAR expression is regulated by a novel distal control region. Using electrophoretic mobility shift (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, we identified novel SF-1 binding sites between 3,000 and 3,400 bp upstream of StAR. A luciferase reporter assay revealed that the region worked as a strong regulator to exert maximal transcription of StAR. ChIP analysis of histone H3 revealed that upon SF-1 expression, nucleosome eviction took place at the SF-1 binding sites, not only in the promoter but also in the distal SF-1 binding sites. Chromosome conformation capture analysis revealed that the region upstream of StAR formed a chromatin loop both in the differentiated MSCs and in KGN cells, a human granulosa cell tumor cell line, where SF-1 is endogenously expressed. Finally, SF-1 knockdown resulted in disrupted formation of this chromatin loop in KGN cells. These results indicate that the novel distal control region participate in StAR activation through SF-1 dependent alterations of chromatin structure, including histone eviction and chromatin loop formation.

  19. Subduction controls on Miocene back-arc lavas from Sierra de Huantraico and La Matancilla and new 40Ar/39Ar dating from the Mendoza Region, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyhr, Charlotte T.; Holm, Paul M.; Llambías, Eduardo J.; Scherstén, Anders

    2013-10-01

    Back-arc volcanism in the western Argentinian provinces of Mendoza and Neuquén has been widespread from the Miocene to historic times. We present a detailed investigation of profiles through two of the major Miocene volcanic areas of the region, the neighboring Huantraico and La Matancilla plateaus, including new 40Ar/39Ar age results of major and trace elements as well as Nd, Sr and Pb isotopic data. Four million years of eruptions from 24.4 ± 0.3 Ma (2σ) of alkali olivine basalts with OIB-type incompatible trace element enrichments at La Matancilla (~ 36.50°S) provide evidence for the presence of back-arc mantle devoid of subduction-related components. In contrast, the lower Huantraico lavas (~ 37.30°S) require an atypical back-arc mantle, almost devoid of arc-like components (e.g. low La/Ta = 15-18 and Ba/La = 12-18), but with a more depleted isotopic signature (e.g. 87Sr/86Sr, 0.7033-0.7037) than observed elsewhere in the Andean back-arc. The Lower to Upper Series development in the Huantraico sequence represents a gradual change from basaltic to trachyandesitic back-arc lavas with a weak but temporally increasing arc geochemical signature (e.g. La/Ta = 15-21; Ba/La = 12-45), which is accompanied by Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions approaching present day values of the Andes arc. The compositional change is accompanied by a gradually decreasing role for garnet in the mantle source, a decreasing degree of melting, but also simultaneously increasing influence from subducted fluids, probably as the slab geometry changes through time. The volcanism at Huantraico ceased when a flat slab was established around 15 Ma.

  20. Controlling VUV photon fluxes in pulsed inductively coupled Ar/Cl2 plasmas and potential applications in plasma etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Peng; Kushner, Mark J.

    2017-02-01

    UV/VUV photon fluxes in plasma materials processing have a variety of effects ranging from producing damage to stimulating synergistic reactions. Although in plasma etching processes, the rate and quality of the feature are typically controlled by the characteristics of the ion flux, to truly optimize these ion and photon driven processes, it is desirable to control the relative fluxes of ions and photons to the wafer. In prior works, it was determined that the ratio of VUV photon to ion fluxes to the substrate in low pressure inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) sustained in rare gases can be controlled by combinations of pressure and pulse power, while the spectrum of these VUV photons can be tuned by adding additional rare gases to the plasma. In this work, VUV photon and ion fluxes are computationally investigated for Ar/Cl2 ICPs as used in etching of silicon. We found that while the overall ratio of VUV photon flux to ion flux are controlled by pressure and pulse power, by varying the fraction of Cl2 in the mixture, both the ratio of VUV to ion fluxes and the spectrum of VUV photons can be tuned. It was also found that the intensity of VUV emission from Cl(3p 44s) can be independently tuned by controlling wall surface conditions. With this ability to control ratios of ion to photon fluxes, photon stimulated processes, as observed in halogen etching of Si, can be tuned to optimize the shape of the etched features.

  1. CAG repeat polymorphism in the androgen receptor (AR) gene of SBMA patients and a control group.

    PubMed

    Sułek, Anna; Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota; Krysa, Wioletta; Szirkowiec, Walentyna; Fidziańska, Elzbieta; Zaremba, Jacek

    2005-01-01

    Spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked form of motor neuron disease characterized by progressive atrophy of the muscles, dysphagia, dysarthria and mild androgen insensitivity. SBMA is caused by CAG repeat expansion in the androgen receptor gene. CAG repeat polymorphism was analysed in a Polish control group (n = 150) and patients suspected of SBMA (n = 60). Normal and abnormal ranges of CAG repeats were established in the control group and in 21 patients whose clinical diagnosis of SBMA was molecularly confirmed. The ranges are similar to those reported for other populations.

  2. DOD AFPMB and USDA ARS team up to develop new insecticides for mosquito control.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mosquito-borne pathogens continue to be one of the leading source of human disease that cause human morbidity and moribundity worldwide. In some cases, vaccines are effective methods of disease reduction; however, in many situations, the reliance is upon insecticides for control, including the use ...

  3. Aerodynamic stability and control characteristics of TBC shuttle booster AR-11981-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, E. R.; Watts, L. L.; Ainsworth, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    A scale model of the Boeing Company space shuttle booster configuration 3 was tested in the MSFC 14-inch trisonic wind tunnel. This test was proposed to fill-in the original test run schedule as well as to investigate the aerodynamic stability and control characteristics of the booster with three wing configurations not previously tested. The configurations tested included: (1) a cylindrical booster body with an axisymmetric nose, (2) clipped delta canards that had variable incidence from 0 deg to -60 deg, (3) different aft body mounted wing configurations, (4) two vertical fin configurations, and (5) a Grumman G-3 orbiter configuration. Tests were conducted over a Mach range from 0.6 to 5.0.

  4. GN/C translation and rotation control parameters for AR/C (category 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, David M.

    1991-01-01

    Detailed analysis of the Automatic Rendezvous and Capture problem indicate a need for three different regions of mathematical description for the GN&C algorithms: (1) multi-vehicle orbital mechanics to the rendezvous interface point, i.e., within 100 n.; (2) relative motion solutions (such as Clohessy-Wiltshire type) from the far-field to the near-field interface, i.e., within 1 nm; and (3) close proximity motion, the nearfield motion where the relative differences in the gravitational and orbit inertial accelerations can be neglected from the equations of motion. This paper defines the reference coordinate frames and control parameters necessary to model the relative motion and attitude of spacecraft in the close proximity of another space system (Region 2 and 3) during the Automatic Rendezvous and Capture phase of an orbit operation.

  5. Diameter control of gold nanoparticles synthesized in gas phase using atmospheric-pressure H2/Ar plasma jet and gold wire as the nanoparticle source: Control by varying the H2/Ar mixture ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Yoshiki

    2017-01-01

    This report describes diameter control of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) during synthesis using an atmospheric-pressure H2/Ar plasma jet drive with pulse-modulated ultrahigh frequency, employing Au wire as the NP source material. During this process, where most of the AuNPs are regarded as formed through condensation from Au vapor derived by the Au wire etching, the mean diameter varied in the approximate range of 2-12 nm with H2 volume ratios up to 3.9%. In plasma diagnostics, results showed that the H2 volume ratio influences the plasma discharge behaviour, which affects the heat flux density flowed into the Au wire, and the atomic hydrogen concentration in the plasma. Both seemed to influence the etching rate of the Au wire per unit area, which is directly related to the concentration of Au vapor in the plasma. The concentration is one factor affecting the particle size evolution because of the collisions among vapor species in reaction field. Therefore, the AuNP size variation with the H2 volume ratio was discussed from the perspective of the etching rate of the Au wire at each H2 volume ratio.

  6. Confinement marries correlation to control time delays in valence-photoemissions of Ar taken hostage in C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Himadri; Dixit, Gopal; Madjet, Mohamed

    2014-05-01

    Effects of confinement and electron correlations on the relative time delay between the 3s and 3p photoemissions of Ar confined endohedrally in C60 are investigated using the time dependent local density approximation - a method that is also found to mostly agree with recent time delay measurements between the 3s and 3p subshells in atomic Ar. The Leeuwen and Baerends exchange-correlation functional to produce accurate asymptotic behavior is employed to calculate the dynamical response of the system to the photon field. At energies in the neighborhood of 3p Cooper minimum, correlations with C60 electrons are found to induce opposite temporal effects in the emission of Ar 3p hybridized symmetrically versus that of Ar 3p hybridized antisymmetrically with C60. A recoil-type interaction model mediated by the confinement is found to best describe the phenomenon. We suggest that future experiments be performed on the time delay in Ar and Ar@C60 over broader photon energy ranges including the 3p Cooper minimum to unravel new physics from confinement and correlations. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  7. The Chromobacterium violaceum ArsR Arsenite Repressor Exerts Tighter Control on Its Cognate Promoter Than the Escherichia coli System

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Letícia M.; Monteiro, Lummy M. O.; Silva-Rocha, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Environmental bacteria are endowed with several regulatory systems that have potential applications in biotechnology. In this report, we characterize the arsenic biosensing features of the ars response system from Chromobacterium violaceum in the heterologous host Escherichia coli. We show that the native Pars/arsR system of C. violaceum outperforms the chromosomal ars copy of E. coli when exposed to micromolar concentrations of arsenite. To understand the molecular basis of this phenomenon, we analyzed the interaction between ArsR regulators and their promoter target sites as well as induction of the system at saturating concentrations of the regulators. In vivo titration experiments indicate that ArsR from C. violaceum has stronger binding affinity for its target promoter than the regulator from E. coli does. Additionally, arsenite induction experiments at saturating regulator concentration demonstrates that although the Pars/arsR system from E. coli displays a gradual response to increasing concentration of the inducer, the system from C. violaceum has a steeper response with a stronger promoter induction after a given arsenite threshold. Taken together, these data demonstrate the characterization of a novel arsenic response element from an environmental bacterium with potentially enhanced performance that could be further explored for the construction of an arsenic biosensor. PMID:27917165

  8. The Chromobacterium violaceum ArsR Arsenite Repressor Exerts Tighter Control on Its Cognate Promoter Than the Escherichia coli System.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Letícia M; Monteiro, Lummy M O; Silva-Rocha, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Environmental bacteria are endowed with several regulatory systems that have potential applications in biotechnology. In this report, we characterize the arsenic biosensing features of the ars response system from Chromobacterium violaceum in the heterologous host Escherichia coli. We show that the native Pars/arsR system of C. violaceum outperforms the chromosomal ars copy of E. coli when exposed to micromolar concentrations of arsenite. To understand the molecular basis of this phenomenon, we analyzed the interaction between ArsR regulators and their promoter target sites as well as induction of the system at saturating concentrations of the regulators. In vivo titration experiments indicate that ArsR from C. violaceum has stronger binding affinity for its target promoter than the regulator from E. coli does. Additionally, arsenite induction experiments at saturating regulator concentration demonstrates that although the Pars/arsR system from E. coli displays a gradual response to increasing concentration of the inducer, the system from C. violaceum has a steeper response with a stronger promoter induction after a given arsenite threshold. Taken together, these data demonstrate the characterization of a novel arsenic response element from an environmental bacterium with potentially enhanced performance that could be further explored for the construction of an arsenic biosensor.

  9. Novel adiponectin-resistin (AR) and insulin resistance (IRAR) indexes are useful integrated diagnostic biomarkers for insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Adiponectin and resistin are adipokines which modulate insulin action, energy, glucose and lipid homeostasis. Meta-analyses showed that hypoadiponectinemia and hyperresistinemia are strongly associated with increased risk of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes (T2DM), metabolic syndrome (MS) and cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to propose a novel adiponectin-resistin (AR) index by taking into account both adiponectin and resistin levels to povide a better indicator of the metabolic homeostasis and metabolic disorders. In addition, a novel insulin resistance (IRAR) index was proposed by integration of the AR index into an existing insulin resistance index to provide an improved diagnostic biomarker of insulin sensitivity. Methods In this case control study, anthropometric clinical and metabolic parameters including fasting serum total adiponectin and resistin levels were determined in 809 Malaysian men (208 controls, 174 MS without T2DM, 171 T2DM without MS, 256 T2DM with MS) whose ages ranged between 40-70 years old. Significant differences in continuous variables among subject groups were confirmed by ANCOVA or MANCOVA test using 1,000 stratified bootstrap samples with bias corrected and accelerated (BCa) 95% CI. Spearman's rho rank correlation test was used to test the correlation between two variables. Results The AR index was formulated as 1+log10(R0)-log10(A0). The AR index was more strongly associated with increased risk of T2DM and MS than hypoadiponectinemia and hyperresistinemia alone. The AR index was more strongly correlated with the insulin resistance indexes and key metabolic endpoints of T2DM and MS than adiponectin and resistin levels alone. The AR index was also correlated with a higher number of MS components than adiponectin and resistin levels alone. The IRAR index was formulated as log10(I0G0)+log10(I0G0)log10(R0/A0). The normal reference range of the IRAR index for insulin sensitive individuals was between 3.265 and

  10. Novel adiponectin-resistin (AR) and insulin resistance (IRAR) indexes are useful integrated diagnostic biomarkers for insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Lau, Cia-Hin; Muniandy, Sekaran

    2011-01-21

    Adiponectin and resistin are adipokines which modulate insulin action, energy, glucose and lipid homeostasis. Meta-analyses showed that hypoadiponectinemia and hyperresistinemia are strongly associated with increased risk of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes (T2DM), metabolic syndrome (MS) and cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to propose a novel adiponectin-resistin (AR) index by taking into account both adiponectin and resistin levels to provide a better indicator of the metabolic homeostasis and metabolic disorders. In addition, a novel insulin resistance (IRAR) index was proposed by integration of the AR index into an existing insulin resistance index to provide an improved diagnostic biomarker of insulin sensitivity. In this case control study, anthropometric clinical and metabolic parameters including fasting serum total adiponectin and resistin levels were determined in 809 Malaysian men (208 controls, 174 MS without T2DM, 171 T2DM without MS, 256 T2DM with MS) whose ages ranged between 40-70 years old. Significant differences in continuous variables among subject groups were confirmed by ANCOVA or MANCOVA test using 1,000 stratified bootstrap samples with bias corrected and accelerated (BCa) 95% CI. Spearman's rho rank correlation test was used to test the correlation between two variables. The AR index was formulated as 1+log10(R0)-log10(A0). The AR index was more strongly associated with increased risk of T2DM and MS than hypoadiponectinemia and hyperresistinemia alone. The AR index was more strongly correlated with the insulin resistance indexes and key metabolic endpoints of T2DM and MS than adiponectin and resistin levels alone. The AR index was also correlated with a higher number of MS components than adiponectin and resistin levels alone. The IRAR index was formulated as log10(I0G0)+log10(I0G0)log10(R0/A0). The normal reference range of the IRAR index for insulin sensitive individuals was between 3.265 and 3.538. The minimum cut

  11. The occurrence and control of pepper mild mottle virus(PMMoV)in the USDA/ARS Capsicum germplasm collection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Four-thousand-four-hundred and three seed inventories of Capsicum spp. obtained from the USDA/ARS Capsicum germplasm collection were tested for the presence of Pepper Mild Mottle Virus (PMMoV). Approximately 32% of these inventories tested positive for PMMoV and the virus distribution was nearly un...

  12. Electronic Spectroscopy of B Atoms and B2 Molecules Isolated in Para-H2, Normal-D2, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe Matrices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    chemical rocket propellants. Thermochemical calculations predict that a fuel consisting of 5 mol % B atoms in solid hydrogen , when combusted with liquid ...oxygen would deliver a t 20 % improvement in specific impulse 32 (Isp) over the state of the art liquid oxygen/ liquid hydrogen propellant system.33 Isp is...K closed-cycle He refrigerator (Ar, Kr, Xe hosts), a liquid helium (lHe) transfer cryostat (nD2, Ne hosts), and a MHe bath cryostat (pH 2, nD2/Ne, Ne

  13. Ar-Ar_Redux: rigorous error propagation of 40Ar/39Ar data, including covariances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, P.

    2015-12-01

    Rigorous data reduction and error propagation algorithms are needed to realise Earthtime's objective to improve the interlaboratory accuracy of 40Ar/39Ar dating to better than 1% and thereby facilitate the comparison and combination of the K-Ar and U-Pb chronometers. Ar-Ar_Redux is a new data reduction protocol and software program for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology which takes into account two previously underappreciated aspects of the method: 1. 40Ar/39Ar measurements are compositional dataIn its simplest form, the 40Ar/39Ar age equation can be written as: t = log(1+J [40Ar/39Ar-298.5636Ar/39Ar])/λ = log(1 + JR)/λ Where λ is the 40K decay constant and J is the irradiation parameter. The age t does not depend on the absolute abundances of the three argon isotopes but only on their relative ratios. Thus, the 36Ar, 39Ar and 40Ar abundances can be normalised to unity and plotted on a ternary diagram or 'simplex'. Argon isotopic data are therefore subject to the peculiar mathematics of 'compositional data', sensu Aitchison (1986, The Statistical Analysis of Compositional Data, Chapman & Hall). 2. Correlated errors are pervasive throughout the 40Ar/39Ar methodCurrent data reduction protocols for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology propagate the age uncertainty as follows: σ2(t) = [J2 σ2(R) + R2 σ2(J)] / [λ2 (1 + R J)], which implies zero covariance between R and J. In reality, however, significant error correlations are found in every step of the 40Ar/39Ar data acquisition and processing, in both single and multi collector instruments, during blank, interference and decay corrections, age calculation etc. Ar-Ar_Redux revisits every aspect of the 40Ar/39Ar method by casting the raw mass spectrometer data into a contingency table of logratios, which automatically keeps track of all covariances in a compositional context. Application of the method to real data reveals strong correlations (r2 of up to 0.9) between age measurements within a single irradiation batch. Propertly taking

  14. Direct Measurement of Recoil Effects on Ar-Ar Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    for FCT and TC sanidines [4] against GA-1550, their K-Ar ages would be 28.06 Ma and 28.41 Ma respectively. For retrospective recalculation purposes, the effective Ar-Ar age of these samples that should yield correct K-Ar ages for unknowns with zero recoil loss would be 28.09 Ma, 28.11 Ma and 28.42 Ma for FCT-3 biotite, FCT-2 sanidine and TCR-2 sanidine respectively. The measured f for FCT-3 appears to explain the R value of it relative to FCT sanidine of 1.0086 found by [8]. From the low T portion of the Ar release spectra of the biotite and amphibole standards, it is clear that the dominant recoil artifact affecting Ar release is the re-implantation mechanism seen in clay samples [1,6,7] and not the loss of 39Ar at the surface of the grain. The geometry of neighboring grains during irradiation and internal defects may predominate in controlling recoil loss. [1] Dong et al., 1995, Science, 267, 355-359. [2] Paine et al., 2006, Geochim.Cosmochim. Acta, 70, 1507-1517. [3] Jourdan et al., 2007, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 71, 2791-2808 [4] Renne et al., 1998, Chem. Geol., 145 117-152. [5] Hall & Farrell, 1995, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 133, 327-338. [6] Hall et al., 1997, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 148, 287-298. [7] Hall et al., 2000, Econ. Geol., 95, 1739-1752. [8] Di Vincenzo & Roman Skála, 2009, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 73, 493-513.

  15. Initial accomplishments of the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) atmosphere revitalization (AR) predevelopment operational system test (POST) for the Space Station Freedom (SSF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Kevin H.; Bulgajewski, Peter J.

    1992-01-01

    Initial results of the integrated AR POST conducted by Boeing at Marshall Space Flight Center in 1992 are presented. The three baselined ECLSS Man Tended Capability AR assemblies were integrated and operated in a closed door chamber in which the internal atmosphere was monitored. The test provides a prerequisite checkout of the AR subsystem in preparation for longer duration tests in which the AR subsystem will be integrated with the Water Recovery Management subsystem. The integrated AR POST will serve as an early test bed to evaluate the integration of the space station ECLSS AR subsystem during design maturation.

  16. ArArCALC—software for 40Ar/ 39Ar age calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, Anthony A. P.

    2002-06-01

    ArArCALC is a Microsoft Excel ® 97-2000-XP application for performing calculations in 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology. It is coded in Visual Basic for Applications and can be used under the Windows ® 95/98/NT/2000/ME/XP operating systems. ArArCALC provides an easy-to-use graphical interface for the calculation of age plateaus, total fusion ages and isochrons following the regression of 40Ar/ 39Ar mass spectrometry data. Results are stored in single Excel workbooks including nine different data tables and four different diagrams. Analytical, internal and external errors are calculated based on error propagation of all input parameters, analytical data and applied corrections. Finally, the age calculation results can be recalibrated with reference to the primary K-Ar standards (e.g. GA-1550, MMhb-1) in order to obtain more consistent absolute40Ar/ 39Ar age determinations. ArArCALC is distributed as freeware.

  17. ACTH Action on StAR Biology

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Barbara J.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) produced by the anterior pituitary stimulates glucocorticoid synthesis by the adrenal cortex. The first step in glucocorticoid synthesis is the delivery of cholesterol to the mitochondrial matrix where the first enzymatic reaction in the steroid hormone biosynthetic pathway occurs. A key response of adrenal cells to ACTH is activation of the cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. PKA activation results in an acute increase in expression and function of the Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory protein (StAR). StAR plays an essential role in steroidogenesis- it controls the hormone-dependent movement of cholesterol across the mitochondrial membranes. Currently StAR's mechanism of action remains a major unanswered question in the field. However, some insight may be gained from understanding the mechanism(s) controlling the PKA-dependent phosphorylation of StAR at S194/195 (mouse/human StAR), a modification that is required for function. This mini-review provides a background on StAR's biology with a focus on StAR phosphorylation. The model for StAR translation and phosphorylation at the outer mitochondrial membrane, the location for StAR function, is presented to highlight a unifying theme emerging from diverse studies. PMID:27999527

  18. ACTH Action on StAR Biology.

    PubMed

    Clark, Barbara J

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) produced by the anterior pituitary stimulates glucocorticoid synthesis by the adrenal cortex. The first step in glucocorticoid synthesis is the delivery of cholesterol to the mitochondrial matrix where the first enzymatic reaction in the steroid hormone biosynthetic pathway occurs. A key response of adrenal cells to ACTH is activation of the cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. PKA activation results in an acute increase in expression and function of the Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory protein (StAR). StAR plays an essential role in steroidogenesis- it controls the hormone-dependent movement of cholesterol across the mitochondrial membranes. Currently StAR's mechanism of action remains a major unanswered question in the field. However, some insight may be gained from understanding the mechanism(s) controlling the PKA-dependent phosphorylation of StAR at S194/195 (mouse/human StAR), a modification that is required for function. This mini-review provides a background on StAR's biology with a focus on StAR phosphorylation. The model for StAR translation and phosphorylation at the outer mitochondrial membrane, the location for StAR function, is presented to highlight a unifying theme emerging from diverse studies.

  19. Control of carrier lifetime of thick n-type 4H-SiC epilayers by high-temperature Ar annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Eiji; Suda, Jun; Kimoto, Tsunenobu

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the carrier lifetime and Z1/2 center density of thick n-type 4H-SiC epilayers, which were oxidized and subsequently annealed in Ar at high temperatures. The Z1/2 center density decreased below the detection limit in the region to, at least, a 130 µm depth by thermal oxidation. After subsequent high-temperature annealing, the Z1/2 center density increased with increasing annealing temperature, while the distribution of the Z1/2 center density was nearly uniform to a 130 µm depth. The carrier lifetime could be controlled from 26 to 2.4 µs by changing the annealing temperature from 1600 to 1800 °C.

  20. Plasma-surface interactions in the control of plasma distribution functions: α-C:H surfaces impacted by Ar/H2 plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, David; Ning, Ning; Fox-Lyon, Nick; Oehrlein, Gottlieb; DOE Plasma Science Center Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of the study is to establish the role of surface processes in influencing and controlling characteristic plasma distributions functions during the erosion of thin α-C:H films. The dominant effect following Ar+ impacts on a α-C:H film is near-surface H depletion, which results in a carbon rich near-surface-region (modified layer). The modified layer thickness increases with increasing ion energy; predicted thickness is in agreement with measurements. Energetic H2+impacts resulted in H insertion and hydrocarbon cluster erosion. Near-surface film structure and composition result from competition between these processes. The effect of H+ impacts and possible synergetic effect of ions, additional neutrals and VUV photons will be discussed. In addition, the species ejected into the plasma following ion and neutral impacts will alter the plasma distribution functions; these effects will be highlighted as well.

  1. Role of the CpxAR two-component signal transduction system in control of fosfomycin resistance and carbon substrate uptake.

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Kumiko; Hirakawa, Yuko; Tanimoto, Koichi; Tomita, Haruyoshi; Hirakawa, Hidetada

    2014-01-01

    Although fosfomycin is an old antibiotic, it has resurfaced with particular interest. The antibiotic is still effective against many pathogens that are resistant to other commonly used antibiotics. We have found that fosfomycin resistance of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is controlled by the bacterial two-component signal transduction system CpxAR. A cpxA mutant lacking its phosphatase activity results in constitutive activation of its cognate response regulator, CpxR, and fosfomycin resistance. We have shown that fosfomycin resistance requires CpxR because deletion of the cpxR gene in the cpxA mutant restores fosfomycin sensitivity. We have also shown that CpxR directly represses the expression of two genes, glpT and uhpT, which encode transporters that cotransport fosfomycin with their native substrates glycerol-3-phosphate and glucose-6-phosphate, and repression of these genes leads to a decrease in fosfomycin transport into the cpxA mutant. However, the cpxA mutant had an impaired growth phenotype when cultured with glycerol-3-phosphate or glucose-6-phosphate as a sole carbon substrate and was outcompeted by the parent strain, even in nutrient-rich medium. This suggests a trade-off between fosfomycin resistance and the biological fitness associated with carbon substrate uptake. We propose a role for the CpxAR system in the reversible control of fosfomycin resistance. This may be a beneficial strategy for bacteria to relieve the fitness burden that results from fosfomycin resistance in the absence of fosfomycin.

  2. Role of the CpxAR Two-Component Signal Transduction System in Control of Fosfomycin Resistance and Carbon Substrate Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Kurabayashi, Kumiko; Hirakawa, Yuko; Tanimoto, Koichi; Tomita, Haruyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Although fosfomycin is an old antibiotic, it has resurfaced with particular interest. The antibiotic is still effective against many pathogens that are resistant to other commonly used antibiotics. We have found that fosfomycin resistance of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is controlled by the bacterial two-component signal transduction system CpxAR. A cpxA mutant lacking its phosphatase activity results in constitutive activation of its cognate response regulator, CpxR, and fosfomycin resistance. We have shown that fosfomycin resistance requires CpxR because deletion of the cpxR gene in the cpxA mutant restores fosfomycin sensitivity. We have also shown that CpxR directly represses the expression of two genes, glpT and uhpT, which encode transporters that cotransport fosfomycin with their native substrates glycerol-3-phosphate and glucose-6-phosphate, and repression of these genes leads to a decrease in fosfomycin transport into the cpxA mutant. However, the cpxA mutant had an impaired growth phenotype when cultured with glycerol-3-phosphate or glucose-6-phosphate as a sole carbon substrate and was outcompeted by the parent strain, even in nutrient-rich medium. This suggests a trade-off between fosfomycin resistance and the biological fitness associated with carbon substrate uptake. We propose a role for the CpxAR system in the reversible control of fosfomycin resistance. This may be a beneficial strategy for bacteria to relieve the fitness burden that results from fosfomycin resistance in the absence of fosfomycin. PMID:24163343

  3. An Astronomically Dated Standard in 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiper, K.; Hilgen, F.; Krijgsman, W.; Wijbrans, J.

    2003-12-01

    The standard geological time scale of Berggren et al. (1995) and Cande and Kent (1995) is calibrated with different absolute dating techniques, i.e. the Plio - Pleistocene relies on astronomical tuning, and older parts of the time scale are based on radio-isotopic (40Ar/39Ar and U/Pb) calibration methods. In the new edition of the standard geological timescale (Lourens et al., to be published in 2004) the entire Neogene will rely on astronomical dating. Therefore, it is of crucial importance that all dating methods produce equivalent absolute ages when the same geological event is dated. The Mediterranean Neogene provides an excellent opportunity to compare different dating methods by isotopic dating (40Ar/39Ar, U/Pb) of volcanic ash layers intercalated in astronomically dated sediments. Here we will show that in spite of potential errors in all methods, we succeeded to intercalibrate the 40Ar/39Ar and astronomical methods, arriving at astronomically calibrated age of 28.24 +/- 0.01 Ma for the in 40Ar/39Ar geochronology commonly used standard FCT sanidine. The advantage of an astronomically calibrated FCT above a K/Ar calibrated standard is a smaller error in the absolute age due to the lack of uncertainties related to 40K and radiogenic 40Ar contents in the primary standard and a decreasing influence of errors in the decay constant (branching ratio is not required). In addition to an astronomically calibrated FCT age we propose to introduce an astronomically dated standard. A direct astronomically dated standard can be regarded as a "primary" standard and does not require intercalibration with other standards, thus reducing analytical (and geological) uncertainties. Ash layers intercalated in sedimentary sequences in the Melilla Basin, Morocco appear to be the most suitable for this purpose. A reliable astronomical time control is available and intercalated ash layers contain sanidine phenocrysts up to 2 mm. Four ash layers are not or barely affected by

  4. Metalloregulatory properties of the ArsD repressor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Rosen, B P

    1997-05-30

    The plasmid-encoded arsenical resistance (ars) operon of plasmid R773 produces resistance to trivalent and pentavalent salts of the metalloids arsenic and antimony in cells of Escherichia coli. The first two genes in the operon, arsR and arsD, were previously shown to encode trans-acting repressor proteins. ArsR controls the basal level of expression of the operon, while ArsD controls maximal expression. Thus, action of the two repressors form a homeostatic regulatory circuit that maintains the level of ars expression within a narrow range. In this study, we demonstrate that ArsD binds to the same site on the ars promoter element as ArsR but with 2 orders of magnitude lower affinity. The results of gel shift assays demonstrate that ArsD is released from the ars DNA promoter by phenylarsine oxide, sodium arsenite, and potassium antimonyl tartrate (in order of effectiveness), the same inducers to which ArsR responds. Using the quenching of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence to measure the affinity of the repressor for inducers, apparent Kd values for Sb(III) and As(III) of 2 and 60 microM, respectively, were obtained. These results demonstrate that the arsR-arsD pair provide a sensitive mechanism for sensing a wide range of environmental heavy metals.

  5. Control of SiO2/Si interface defects generation during thin dielectric film etching using CHxFy/Ar/O2 plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigetoshi, Takushi; Fukasawa, Masanaga; Nagahata, Kazunori; Tatsumi, Tetsuya

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the quantitative control of SiO2/Si interface defects caused by CHxFy/Ar/O2 plasma etching. Both the number and the cause of interface defects generation strongly depended on the residual thicknesses of SiO2. When the residual thickness becomes small, in addition to the VUV/UV irradiation, ion injection caused a remarkable increase in the number of interface defects associated with Si dislocation. Complete recovery from damage was difficult by low-temperature thermal annealing, especially ion-induced damage. Ion-induced damage was suppressed by controlling the residual thickness of SiO2 to be larger than the ion penetration depth. VUV/UV-induces damage could be effectively suppressed by using a light shield layer such as SiN. Moreover, VUV/UV-induces damage under a fine space pattern is expected to be suppressed in comparison with a wide-open pattern. Thus, the process design of a film stack, pattern, etching condition, and thermal annealing condition are important for controlling SiO2/Si interface defect generation during plasma processing.

  6. Tunable Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Topography in O2 or Ar Plasmas for Controlling Surface Wetting Properties and Their Ageing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsougeni, Katerina; Tserepi, Angeliki; Boulousis, George; Constantoudis, Vassilios; Gogolides, Evangelos

    2007-02-01

    A plasma-based methodology to fabricate ultraviolet (UV) curable poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) surfaces with controlled nano-texturing and wettability is described. The surface topography of photo-sensitive PDMS is modified in oxygen and argon plasmas. Plasma treatment of photo-crosslinked PDMS produces spontaneously-formed wavy structures with high nano-scale amplitude and with periodicity of a few 100’s nm. With increasing plasma treatment duration, roughness increased while periodicity decreased, resulting in surfaces of enhanced surface area exploited for the enhancement and control of surface hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity. The mechanisms responsible for the plasma-induced PDMS surface nanotexturing are discussed. The beneficial effect of this nanotopography on retarding ageing of PDMS hydrophilicity is demonstrated. Possible applications in sensors and bio-microsystems are outlined.

  7. Stimulation of StAR expression by cAMP is controlled by inhibition of highly inducible SIK1 via CRTC2, a co-activator of CREB.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinwoo; Tong, Tiegang; Takemori, Hiroshi; Jefcoate, Colin

    2015-06-15

    In mouse steroidogenic cells the activation of cholesterol metabolism is mediated by steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Here, we visualized a coordinated regulation of StAR transcription, splicing and post-transcriptional processing, which are synchronized by salt inducible kinase (SIK1) and CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC2). To detect primary RNA (pRNA), spliced primary RNA (Sp-RNA) and mRNA in single cells, we generated probe sets by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These methods allowed us to address the nature of StAR gene expression and to visualize protein-nucleic acid interactions through direct detection. We show that SIK1 represses StAR expression in Y1 adrenal and MA10 testis cells through inhibition of processing mediated by CRTC2. Digital image analysis matches qPCR analyses of the total cell culture. Evidence is presented for spatially separate accumulation of StAR pRNA and Sp-RNA at the gene loci in the nucleus. These findings establish that cAMP, SIK and CRTC mediate StAR expression through activation of individual StAR gene loci. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Stimulation of StAR expression by cAMP is controlled by inhibition of highly inducible SIK1 via CRTC2, a co-activator of CREB

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jinwoo; Tong, Tiegang; Takemori, Hiroshi; Jefcoate, Colin

    2015-01-01

    In mouse steroidogenic cells the activation of cholesterol metabolism is mediated by steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Here, we visualized a coordinated regulation of StAR transcription, splicing and post-transcriptional processing, which are synchronized by salt inducible kinase (SIK1) and CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC2). To detect primary RNA (pRNA), spliced primary RNA (Sp-RNA) and mRNA in single cells, we generated probe sets by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These methods allowed us to address the nature of StAR gene expression and to visualize protein–nucleic acid interactions through direct detection. We show that SIK1 represses StAR expression in Y1 adrenal and MA10 testis cells through inhibition of processing mediated by CRTC2. Digital image analysis matches qPCR analyses of the total cell culture. Evidence is presented for spatially separate accumulation of StAR pRNA and Sp-RNA at the gene loci in the nucleus. These findings establish that cAMP, SIK and CRTC mediate StAR expression through activation of individual StAR gene loci. PMID:25662274

  9. 75 FR 12161 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Marianna, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Establishment of Class E Airspace; Marianna, AR AGENCY..., Marianna, AR, to accommodate new Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) at Marianna/Lee County... surface for SIAPs operations at Marianna/Lee County Airport-Steve Edwards Field, Marianna, AR. Controlled...

  10. 75 FR 37291 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Osceola, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Osceola, AR AGENCY: Federal... Osceola, AR. Decommissioning of the Osceola non-directional beacon (NDB) at Osceola Municipal Airport has... rulemaking to amend Class E airspace for Osceola, AR, reconfiguring controlled airspace at Osceola Municipal...

  11. 78 FR 41838 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Colt, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Establishment of Class E Airspace; Colt, AR AGENCY: Federal... at Colt, AR. Controlled airspace is necessary to accommodate new Area Navigation (RNAV) Standard... Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to establish Class E airspace for the Colt, AR...

  12. Comparative 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar dating of illite-type clay minerals: A tentative explanation for age identities and differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauer, Norbert; Zwingmann, Horst; Liewig, Nicole; Wendling, Raymond

    2012-10-01

    is not systematic in clay-type material. The finest grain sizes (e.g., < 0.2 μm) are usually least contaminated with detrital components and can be dated by the K-Ar method without special preparation. Alternatively, such fine fractions are most susceptible to 39Ar recoil, and are, therefore, only datable by the 40Ar/39Ar method using an encapsulation technique that still needs to be technically evaluated. In this study, 39Ar recoil during irradiation was quantified by encapsulation; it ranged from about 20% of the total 39Ar for the < 0.2 μm fractions to ca. 10% for the 2-6 μm fractions. Basic interpolation of this 39Ar recoil confirms that grain size increasing minimizes the recoil effect, but how it proceeds has still to be explained. Despite recent developments in 40Ar/39Ar dating, the conventional K-Ar method is still a valuable tool for clay dating due to a convenient and straightforward use supported by a standardized and well-controlled technical approach. The present comparison of the two Ar-dating methods as applied to clay material shows that neither method is presently outdated, and that they are even of reciprocal use. Both methods have distinct application fields in clay geochronology and complementary application fields in clay crystallography.

  13. Role of the blocking capacitor in control of ion energy distributions in pulsed capacitively coupled plasmas sustained in Ar/CF{sub 4}/O{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Sang-Heon; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-03-15

    In plasma etching for microelectronics fabrication, the quality of the process is in large part determined by the ability to control the ion energy distribution (IED) onto the wafer. To achieve this control, dual frequency capacitively coupled plasmas (DF-CCPs) have been developed with the goal of separately controlling the magnitude of the fluxes of ions and radicals with the high frequency (HF) and the shape of the IED with the low frequency (LF). In steady state operation, plasma properties are determined by a real time balance between electron sources and losses. As such, for a given geometry, pressure, and frequency of operation, the latitude for controlling the IED may be limited. Pulsed power is one technique being investigated to provide additional degrees of freedom to control the IED. In one configuration of a DF-CCP, the HF power is applied to the upper electrode and LF power is applied to the lower electrode which is serially connected to a blocking capacitor (BC) which generates a self dc-bias. In the steady state, the value of the dc-bias is, in fact, constant. During pulsed operation, however, there may be time modulation of the dc-bias which provides an additional means to control the IED. In this paper, IEDs to the wafer in pulsed DF-CCPs sustained in Ar/CF{sub 4}/O{sub 2} are discussed with results from a two-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics model. The IED can be manipulated depending on whether the LF or HF power is pulsed. The dynamic range of the control can be tuned by the dc-bias generated on the substrate, whose time variation depends on the size of the BC during pulsed operation. It was found that high energy ions can be preferentially produced when pulsing the HF power and low energy ions are preferentially produced when pulsing the LF power. A smaller BC value which allows the bias to follow the change in charged particle fluxes produces a larger dynamic range with which to control IEDs.

  14. Identification of an AR Mutation-Negative Class of Androgen Insensitivity by Determining Endogenous AR Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ukat, M.; Schweikert, H. U.; Hiort, O.; Werner, R.; Drop, S. L. S.; Cools, M.; Hughes, I. A.; Audi, L.; Ahmed, S. F.; Demiri, J.; Rodens, P.; Worch, L.; Wehner, G.; Kulle, A. E.; Dunstheimer, D.; Müller-Roßberg, E.; Reinehr, T.; Hadidi, A. T.; Eckstein, A. K.; van der Horst, C.; Seif, C.; Siebert, R.; Ammerpohl, O.; Holterhus, P.-M.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Only approximately 85% of patients with a clinical diagnosis complete androgen insensitivity syndrome and less than 30% with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome can be explained by inactivating mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Objective: The objective of the study was to clarify this discrepancy by in vitro determination of AR transcriptional activity in individuals with disorders of sex development (DSD) and male controls. Design: Quantification of DHT-dependent transcriptional induction of the AR target gene apolipoprotein D (APOD) in cultured genital fibroblasts (GFs) (APOD assay) and next-generation sequencing of the complete coding and noncoding AR locus. Setting: The study was conducted at a university hospital endocrine research laboratory. Patients: GFs from 169 individuals were studied encompassing control males (n = 68), molecular defined DSD other than androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS; n = 18), AR mutation-positive AIS (n = 37), and previously undiagnosed DSD including patients with a clinical suspicion of AIS (n = 46). Intervention(s): There were no interventions. Main Outcome Measure(s): DHT-dependent APOD expression in cultured GF and AR mutation status in 169 individuals was measured. Results: The APOD assay clearly separated control individuals (healthy males and molecular defined DSD patients other than AIS) from genetically proven AIS (cutoff < 2.3-fold APOD-induction; 100% sensitivity, 93.3% specificity, P < .0001). Of 46 DSD individuals with no AR mutation, 17 (37%) fell below the cutoff, indicating disrupted androgen signaling. Conclusions: AR mutation-positive AIS can be reliably identified by the APOD assay. Its combination with next-generation sequencing of the AR locus uncovered an AR mutation-negative, new class of androgen resistance, which we propose to name AIS type II. Our data support the existence of cellular components outside the AR affecting androgen signaling during sexual differentiation with high

  15. Identification of an AR Mutation-Negative Class of Androgen Insensitivity by Determining Endogenous AR Activity.

    PubMed

    Hornig, N C; Ukat, M; Schweikert, H U; Hiort, O; Werner, R; Drop, S L S; Cools, M; Hughes, I A; Audi, L; Ahmed, S F; Demiri, J; Rodens, P; Worch, L; Wehner, G; Kulle, A E; Dunstheimer, D; Müller-Roßberg, E; Reinehr, T; Hadidi, A T; Eckstein, A K; van der Horst, C; Seif, C; Siebert, R; Ammerpohl, O; Holterhus, P-M

    2016-11-01

    Only approximately 85% of patients with a clinical diagnosis complete androgen insensitivity syndrome and less than 30% with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome can be explained by inactivating mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The objective of the study was to clarify this discrepancy by in vitro determination of AR transcriptional activity in individuals with disorders of sex development (DSD) and male controls. Quantification of DHT-dependent transcriptional induction of the AR target gene apolipoprotein D (APOD) in cultured genital fibroblasts (GFs) (APOD assay) and next-generation sequencing of the complete coding and noncoding AR locus. The study was conducted at a university hospital endocrine research laboratory. GFs from 169 individuals were studied encompassing control males (n = 68), molecular defined DSD other than androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS; n = 18), AR mutation-positive AIS (n = 37), and previously undiagnosed DSD including patients with a clinical suspicion of AIS (n = 46). There were no interventions. DHT-dependent APOD expression in cultured GF and AR mutation status in 169 individuals was measured. The APOD assay clearly separated control individuals (healthy males and molecular defined DSD patients other than AIS) from genetically proven AIS (cutoff < 2.3-fold APOD-induction; 100% sensitivity, 93.3% specificity, P < .0001). Of 46 DSD individuals with no AR mutation, 17 (37%) fell below the cutoff, indicating disrupted androgen signaling. AR mutation-positive AIS can be reliably identified by the APOD assay. Its combination with next-generation sequencing of the AR locus uncovered an AR mutation-negative, new class of androgen resistance, which we propose to name AIS type II. Our data support the existence of cellular components outside the AR affecting androgen signaling during sexual differentiation with high clinical relevance.

  16. 39Ar- 40Ar ages of martian nakhlites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jisun; Garrison, Daniel H.; Bogard, Donald D.

    2009-04-01

    We report 39Ar- 40Ar ages of whole rock (WR) and plagioclase and pyroxene mineral separates of nakhlites MIL 03346 and Y-000593, and of WR samples of nakhlites NWA 998 and Nakhla. All age spectra are complex and indicate variable degrees of 39Ar recoil and variable amounts of trapped 40Ar in the samples. Thus, we examine possible Ar-Ar ages in several ways. From consideration of both limited plateau ages and isochron ages, we prefer Ar-Ar ages of NWA 998 = 1334 ± 11 Ma, MIL 03346 = 1368 ± 83 Ma (mesostasis) and 1334 ± 54 Ma (pyroxene), Y-000593 = 1367 ± 7 Ma, and Nakhla = 1357 ± 11 Ma, (2 σ errors). For NWA 998 and MIL 03346 the Ar-Ar ages are within uncertainties of preliminary Rb-Sr isochron ages reported in the literature. These Ar-Ar ages for Y-000593 and Nakhla are several Ma older than Sm-Nd ages reported in the literature. We conclude that the major factor in producing Ar-Ar ages slightly too old is the presence of small amounts of trapped martian or terrestrial 40Ar on weathered grain surfaces that was degassed along with the first several percent of 39Ar. A total K- 40Ar isochron for WR and mineral data from five nakhlites analyzed by us, plus Lafayette data in the literature, gives an isochron age of 1325 ± 18 Ma (2 σ). We emphasize the precision of this isochron over the value of the isochron age. Our Ar-Ar data are consistent with a common formation age for nakhlites. The cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) age for NWA 998 of ˜12 Ma is also similar to CRE ages for other nakhlites.

  17. Control of βAR- and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor-Dependent cAMP Dynamics in Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chay, Andrew; Zamparo, Ilaria; Koschinski, Andreas; Zaccolo, Manuela; Blackwell, Kim T.

    2016-01-01

    Norepinephrine, a neuromodulator that activates β-adrenergic receptors (βARs), facilitates learning and memory as well as the induction of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Several forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) at the Schaffer collateral CA1 synapse require stimulation of both βARs and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). To understand the mechanisms mediating the interactions between βAR and NMDAR signaling pathways, we combined FRET imaging of cAMP in hippocampal neuron cultures with spatial mechanistic modeling of signaling pathways in the CA1 pyramidal neuron. Previous work implied that cAMP is synergistically produced in the presence of the βAR agonist isoproterenol and intracellular calcium. In contrast, we show that when application of isoproterenol precedes application of NMDA by several minutes, as is typical of βAR-facilitated LTP experiments, the average amplitude of the cAMP response to NMDA is attenuated compared with the response to NMDA alone. Models simulations suggest that, although the negative feedback loop formed by cAMP, cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), and type 4 phosphodiesterase may be involved in attenuating the cAMP response to NMDA, it is insufficient to explain the range of experimental observations. Instead, attenuation of the cAMP response requires mechanisms upstream of adenylyl cyclase. Our model demonstrates that Gs-to-Gi switching due to PKA phosphorylation of βARs as well as Gi inhibition of type 1 adenylyl cyclase may underlie the experimental observations. This suggests that signaling by β-adrenergic receptors depends on temporal pattern of stimulation, and that switching may represent a novel mechanism for recruiting kinases involved in synaptic plasticity and memory. PMID:26901880

  18. Paleotemperatures at the lunar surfaces from open system behavior of cosmogenic 38Ar and radiogenic 40Ar

    DOE PAGES

    Shuster, David L.; Cassata, William S.

    2015-02-10

    The simultaneous diffusion of both cosmogenic 38Ar and radiogenic 40Ar from solid phases is controlled by the thermal conditions of rocks while residing near planetary surfaces. Combined observations of 38Ar/37Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ratios during stepwise degassing analyses of neutron-irradiated Apollo samples can distinguish between diffusive loss of Ar due to solar heating of the rocks and that associated with elevated temperatures during or following impact events; the data provide quantitative constraints on the durations and temperatures of each process. From sequentially degassed 38Ar/37Ar ratios can be calculated a spectrum of apparent 38Ar exposure ages versus the cumulative release fraction ofmore » 37Ar, which is particularly sensitive to conditions at the lunar surface typically over ~106–108 year timescales. Due to variable proportions of K- and Ca-bearing glass, plagioclase and pyroxene, with variability in the grain sizes of these phases, each sample will have distinct sensitivity to, and therefore different resolving power on, past near-surface thermal conditions. Furthermore, we present the underlying assumptions, and the analytical and numerical methods used to quantify the Ar diffusion kinetics in multi-phase whole-rock analyses that provide these constraints.« less

  19. AR Sco observing campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2016-08-01

    Dr. Thomas Marsh (University of Warwick) and colleagues have requested AAVSO coverage of the intriguing binary AR Sco in support of upcoming Newton-XMM observations scheduled for 2016 September 10 15:41 - September 11 02:26 UT. This fascinating binary system is the subject of an exciting paper in the July 2016 issue of Nature (Marsh et al., 2016Natur.537..374M; pre-print version at arXiv (http://arxiv.org/abs/1607.08265). Marsh writes of their research on AR Sco: "...it was down to [the amateurs [who are co-authors] on the paper that we got onto it in the first place. Coverage immediately before, after and (especially) during [the XMM observations] would be great. The most challenging aspect is the time resolution: ideally one wants a cadence < 29 seconds because of the strong harmonic of the basic 2 minute period, and the faster the better. Observers should use whatever filter (including clear/white light) is needed to allow them to match this constraint. Accurate timing is also essential - the centres of the exposures need to be known to better than ± 2 seconds, and preferably better." A page of materials on AR Sco related to the Nature paper may be found at http://deneb.astro.warwick.ac.uk/phsaap/arsco-info/ . Item #9 on that page is a YouTube video of a fascinating movie Dr. Marsh made of AR Sco from their data (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJGAv2jCF4s&feature=youtu.be). Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (https://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details.

  20. Ar/Ar Dating Independent of Monitor Standard Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell, S.; Hemming, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Because the reported age of an analyzed sample is dependent on the age of the co-irradiated monitor standard(s), Ar/Ar dating is a relative dating technique. There is disagreement at the 1% scale in the age of commonly used monitor standards, and there is a great need to improve the inter-laboratory calibrations. Additionally, new approaches and insights are needed to meet the challenge of bringing the Ar/Ar chronometer to the highest possible precision and accuracy. In this spirit, we present a conceptual framework for Ar/Ar dating that does not depend on the age of monitor standards, but only on the K content of a solid standard. The concept is demonstrated by introducing a re-expressed irradiation parameter (JK) that depends on the ratio of 39ArK to 40Ar* rather than the 40Ar*/39ArK ratio. JK is equivalent to the traditional irradiation parameter J and is defined as JK = (39Ar/40K) • (λ/λe). The ultimate precision and accuracy of the method will depend on how precisely and accurately the 39Ar and 40K can be estimated, and will require isotope dilution measurements of both from the same aliquot. We are testing the workability of our technique at the 1% level by measuring weighed and irradiated hornblende and biotite monitor standards using GLO-1 glauconite to define a calibration curve for argon signals versus abundance.

  1. Fixed-dose combination of AR-13324 and latanoprost: a double-masked, 28-day, randomised, controlled study in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Richard A; Levy, Brian; Ramirez, Nancy; Kopczynski, Casey C; Usner, Dale W; Novack, Gary D

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the ocular hypotensive efficacy of fixed-dose combinations of the Rho kinase inhibitor and norepinephrine transport inhibitor AR-13324 (0.01% and 0.02%) and latanoprost (PG324 Ophthalmic Solution) relative to the active components AR-13324 0.02% and latanoprost 0.005%, used bilaterally at night. This was a double-masked, randomised, parallel comparison study in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. After washout, patients were randomised to one of four treatment arms and treated for 28 days. The primary efficacy variable was mean diurnal intraocular pressure (IOP) at day 29. We randomised 298 patients, of whom 292 (98%) completed the study. Mean unmedicated diurnal IOPs (study eye) was 25.1, 25.1, 26.0 and 25.4 in the PG324 0.01%, PG324 0.02%, latanoprost and AR-13324 0.02% groups, respectively. On day 29, mean diurnal IOP decreased to 17.3, 16.5, 18.4 and 19.1 mm Hg, respectively. For the primary efficacy variable of mean diurnal IOP at day 29, PG324 0.02% met the criterion for statistical superiority relative to both latanoprost and AR-13324 0.02% (p<0.0001), providing additional IOP lowering of 1.9 and 2.6 mm Hg, respectively. PG324 0.01% also met the criterion for superiority. The most frequently reported adverse event was conjunctival hyperaemia with an incidence of 41% (30/73), 40% (29/73), 14% (10/73) and 40% (31/78) in the PG324 0.01%, PG324 0.02%, latanoprost and AR-13324 0.02% groups, respectively. In this short-term study, the fixed-dose combination of AR-13324 0.02% and latanoprost 0.005% in PG324 Ophthalmic Solution provides clinically and statistically superior ocular hypotensive efficacy relative to its individual active components at the same concentrations. The only safety finding of note was transient asymptomatic conjunctival hyperaemia which was typically of mild severity. NCT02207491. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please

  2. 40Ar/39Ar Dating of Volcanic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. E.; Renne, P. R.; Watkins, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    Application of the 40Ar/39Ar method to volcanic glasses has been somewhat stigmatized following several studies demonstrating secondary mobility of K and Ar. Much of the stigma is unwarranted, however, since most studies only impugned the reliability of the K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar techniques when applied to glass shards rather than obsidian clasts with low surface area to volume ratios. We provide further evidence for problematic K loss and/or 39Ar recoil ejection from glass shards in 40Ar/39Ar step heating results for comagmatic feldspars and shards. In an extreme case, the plateau age of the feldspars (0.17 ± 0.03 Ma at 2σ) is significantly younger than the plateau age of the glass (0.85 ± 0.05 Ma at 2σ). If the feldspar age is reasonably interpreted as the eruption age of the ash, it is likely that the glass shards experienced K and/or 39Ar loss. Electron microprobe analyses of the glass shards have low totals (~93%) and no systematic lateral variability (i.e., diffusion gradients) in K, suggesting that the lengthscale of the glass shards is smaller than the lengthscale of K diffusion. Obsidian clasts should not be as susceptible to K loss since any hydrated (K-depleted) volume represents a small fraction of the total material and can often be physically removed prior to analysis. Samples described here are detrital obsidian clasts from the Afar region of Ethiopia. Evidence from Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and previous work by Anovitz (1999), confirm that the scale of water and potassium mobility are often small in comparison to the size of obsidian clasts but large enough to effect the bulk composition of glass shards. This expectation is confirmed in another tuff wherein comagmatic obsidian clasts and sanidine phenocrysts yield indistinguishable 40Ar/39Ar ages of 4.4 Ma High abundances of non-radiogenic 40Ar, and kinetic fractionation of Ar isotopes during quenching and/or laboratory degassing resulting in incomplete equilibration between

  3. Combined K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating of the upper Jaramillo reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillou, Herve; Carracedo, Juan Carlos; Kissel, Catherine; Laj, Carlo; Nomade, Sebastien; Perez Torrado, Francisco Jose; Rodriguez Gonzalez, Alejandro; Wandres, Camille

    2013-04-01

    The Jaramillo subchron was first evidenced in 1966 (Doell and Dalrymple) through the Rhyolotic domes of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico (USA). 40Ar/39Ar studies achieved by Spell et McDougall (1992), Spell et Harrison (1993), Izett and Obradovich (1994) and Singer et al. (1994) defined the base of this subchron at 1053±6 ka, and the ceiling at 986±5 ka. Channell et al. (2009) delimited the age of the Jaramillo subchron by astronomic calibration (base 1071 ka, top 990 ka). To provide additional absolute ages on this geomagnetic period, which is critical to improve our knowledge of the earth magnetic field behaviour, we have carried out a study combining paleomagnetism and isotopic dating of a lava sequence from Tenerife island. This sequence of basaltic lava flows is some 500 m thick. The first 400 m present, based on field magnetometer measurements, normal polarity lavas, with dykes of normal and reverse polarity, passing at the top to reverse polarity lavas. Preliminary K-Ar ages bracketed this sequence between 1018 ± 18 ka and 978 ± 17 ka. Therefore, the upper Jaramillo reversal at least appeared to be potentially recorded in this sequence. A more detailed paleomagnetic study was then carried out to more precisely delimit the reversal itself (see Laj et al., session EMRP3.4). We have undertaken 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating and unspiked K-Ar experiments on groundmass from four transitionally magnetized flows. The first transitional flow is K-Ar dated at 993 ± 18 ka and 40Ar/39Ar dated at 991 ± 13 ka, the second at 981 ± 17 ka (K-Ar) and 1000 ± 13 ka (40Ar/39Ar), the third at 950 ± 17 ka (K-Ar) and 1000 ± 8 ka (40Ar/39Ar) and the fourth at 984 ± 17 ka (K-Ar) and 977 ± 12 (40Ar/39Ar). 40Ar/39Ar ages and K-Ar ages (relative to FCT 28.02 Ma) are indistinguishable at 2σ. The age of the upper boundary of the Jaramillo event calculated combining 40Ar/39Ar ages and K-Ar ages is 992 ± 6 ka, in agreement with previous estimates.

  4. Photoionization of Ar VIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Liang; Jiang, Wen-xian; Zhou, Chao

    2017-01-01

    The photoionization cross section, energy levels and widths of 22 Rydberg series (in the autoionization region) for Na-like Ar VIII were investigated by using of R-matrix method. The relativistic distorted-wave method is used to calculate the radial functions, and QB method of Quigly-Berrington [Quigley et al. 1998] is employed to calculate the resonance levels and widths. We have identified the formant in the figure of the photoionization cross section.

  5. Primordial abundance of 40Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sripada, V. S. Murty

    Primordial abundance of the isotope (40) Ar is still not known accurately. Recent results from Genesis could also not provide (40) Ar/ (36) Ar value of solar wind, due mainly to the overwhelming (40) Ar blank. A major part of (40) Ar is contributed by the radioactive decay of (40) K (half life = 1.25 Ga), even in the nebula, as the nebula grew old. Any attempt to determine this quantity needs a sample that satisfies the following criteria: A primitive mineral/phase that formed very early in the nebula, that can trap a large amount of noble gas (Ar); and a phase that acquires minimum amount (or total absence) of in situ produced components (cosmogenic and radiogenic) of Ar. Carbon phases in the ureilite meteorites and Phase Q from chondrites best fit this criteria. The minimum (40) Ar/ (36) Ar value so far observed in Phase Q is 0.2. Also, the relatively lower value of 1.035±±0.002 for trapped (129) Xe/ (132) Xe in ureilites, as compared to 1.042±±0.002 in Phase Q suggests that trapping of gases in ureilites might have predated that of Phase Q. If this interpretation is valid, ureilites are a better host of most primitive nebular Ar. Earlier attempts on ureilite studies in 1970s have yielded the lowest (40) Ar/ (36) Ar ratio in the meteorite Dayalpur, the major uncertainty for this value mostly coming from blank correction for (40) Ar/ (36) Ar. Recent developments in low blank extraction systems and more sensitive multi-collector noble gas mass spectrometers, as compared to 1970s have prompted us to make a fresh attempt in measuring this important quantity. We have analysed a number of ureilite acid residues by stepwise temperature extraction, using both pyrolysis and combustion techniques, for Ar to ascertain the trapped (40) Ar/ (36) Ar ratio in the solar nebula. These acid residues are mostly made of C rich phases, with only trace amounts of K (radiogenic parent of (40) Ar) and target elements for the production of cosmogenic Ar component. They mostly contain

  6. Controlling Spatial Confinement Effects in La0.3Pr0.4Ca0.3MnO3 Microbridges via Post Ar and Air Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jaechun; Jung, Jan; Chow, Kim H.

    2017-08-01

    We report the effects of post Ar and air annealing of La0.3Pr0.4Ca0.3MnO3 microbridges which do not initially show spatial confinement effects. The removal or addition of oxygen via the post annealing changes the sizes and distribution of the metallic and insulating phase domains within these films and can create spatial confinement effects such as percolation induced resistance jumps and tunneling magnetoresistance.

  7. Control of Photoluminescence of Carbon Nanodots via Surface Functionalization using Para-substituted Anilines

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Woosung; Do, Sungan; Kim, Ji-Hee; Seok Jeong, Mun; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanodots (C-dots) are a kind of fluorescent carbon nanomaterials, composed of polyaromatic carbon domains surrounded by amorphous carbon frames, and have attracted a great deal of attention because of their interesting properties. There are still, however, challenges ahead such as blue-biased photoluminescence, spectral broadness, undefined energy gaps and etc. In this report, we chemically modify the surface of C-dots with a series of para-substituted anilines to control their photoluminescence. Our surface functionalization endows our C-dots with new energy levels, exhibiting long-wavelength (up to 650 nm) photoluminescence of very narrow spectral widths. The roles of para-substituted anilines and their substituents in developing such energy levels are thoroughly studied by using transient absorption spectroscopy. We finally demonstrate light-emitting devices exploiting our C-dots as a phosphor, converting UV light to a variety of colors with internal quantum yields of ca. 20%. PMID:26218869

  8. 40Ar* loss in experimentally deformed muscovite and biotite with implications for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of naturally deformed rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cosca, M.; Stunitz, H.; Bourgeix, A.-L.; Lee, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    of the undeformed muscovite, indicating argon loss of <1% and an average effective grain radius for 40Ar* diffusion ???700??m. The UV laser ablation and IR laser incremental 40Ar/39Ar ages indicating 40Ar* loss of 16% and 35%, respectively, are consistent with an average diffusion radius ???100??m. These results support a hypothesis of grain-scale 40Ar* diffusion distances in undeformed mica and a heterogeneous mechanical reduction in the intragrain effective diffusion length scale for 40Ar* in deformed mica. Reduction in the effective diffusion length scale in naturally deformed samples occurs most probably through production of mesoscopic and submicroscopic defects such as, e.g., stacking faults. A network of interconnected defects, continuously forming and annealing during dynamic deformation likely plays an important role in controlling both 40Ar* retention and intragrain distribution in deformed mica. Intragrain 40Ar/39Ar ages, when combined with estimates of diffusion kinetics and distances, may provide a means of establishing thermochronological histories from individual micas. ?? 2011.

  9. β2AR antagonists and β2AR gene deletion both promote skin wound repair processes.

    PubMed

    Pullar, Christine E; Le Provost, Gabrielle S; O'Leary, Andrew P; Evans, Sian E; Baier, Brian S; Isseroff, R Rivkah

    2012-08-01

    Skin wound healing is a complex process requiring the coordinated, temporal orchestration of numerous cell types and biological processes to regenerate damaged tissue. Previous work has demonstrated that a functional β-adrenergic receptor autocrine/paracrine network exists in skin, but the role of β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) in wound healing is unknown. A range of in vitro (single-cell migration, immunoblotting, ELISA, enzyme immunoassay), ex vivo (rat aortic ring assay), and in vivo (chick chorioallantoic membrane assay, zebrafish, murine wild-type, and β2AR knockout excisional skin wound models) models were used to demonstrate that blockade or loss of β2AR gene deletion promoted wound repair, a finding that is, to our knowledge, previously unreported. Compared with vehicle-only controls, β2AR antagonism increased angiogenesis, dermal fibroblast function, and re-epithelialization, but had no effect on wound inflammation in vivo. Skin wounds in β2AR knockout mice contracted and re-epithelialized faster in the first few days of wound repair in vivo. β2AR antagonism enhanced cell motility through distinct intracellular signalling mechanisms and increased vascular endothelial growth factor secretion from keratinocytes. β2AR antagonism promoted wound repair processes in the early stages of wound repair, revealing a possible new avenue for therapeutic intervention.

  10. Hazard evaluation for 244-AR vault facility

    SciTech Connect

    BRAUN, D.J.

    1999-08-25

    This document presents the results of a hazard identification and evaluation performed on the 244-AR Vault Facility to close a USQ (USQ No.TF-98-0785, Potential Inadequacy in Authorization Basis (PIAB): To Evaluate Miscellaneous Facilities Listed In HNF-2503 And Not Addressed In The TWRS Authorization Basis) that was generated as part of an evaluation of inactive TWRS facilities. A hazard evaluation for the Hanford Site 244-AR Vault Facility was performed. The process and results of the hazard evaluation are provided in this document. A previous hazard evaluation was performed for the 244-AR Vault Facility in 1996 in support of the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, 1998, Revision 1) of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). The results of that evaluation are provided in the BIO. Upon review of those results it was determined that hazardous conditions that could lead to the release of radiological and toxicological material from the 244-AR vaults due to flooding was not addressed in the original hazards evaluation. This supplemental hazard evaluation addresses this oversight of the original hazard evaluation. The results of the hazard evaluation were compared to the current TWRS BIO to identify any hazardous conditions where Authorization Basis (AB) controls may not be sufficient or may not exist. This document is not part of the AB and is not a vehicle for requesting changes to the AB. It is only intended to provide information about hazardous conditions associated with the condition and configuration of the 244-AR vault facility. The AB Control Decision process could be used to determine the applicability and adequacy of existing AB controls as well as any new controls that may be needed for the identified hazardous conditions associated with 244-AR vault flooding. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

  11. Ar-39-Ar-40 ages of four ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    1994-01-01

    Ureilites Novo Urei, Havero, and Kenna show strong evidence of one or more Ar-40 degassing events in the time period of 3.3-4.1 Ga ago. These ages may be compared to current interpretations of ureilite chronology. These include the suggestion of metasomatic activity on the parent body 3.7 Ga ago that reset some Sm-Nd ages and the suggestion that ureilites have experienced terrestrial contamination of several trace elements (including Pb and LREE), which makes suspect ages younger than approximately 4.5 Ga. Because the K-Ar chronometer can be sensitive to metamorphic events, we made Ar-39-Ar-40 determinations on bulk samples (0.12-0.14 g each) of four ureilites. The Ar-39-Ar-40 age spectra and K/Ca ratios as a function of cumulative Ar release from stepwise temperature extractions for the four ureilites analyzed are shown. Because Ar-39-Ar-40 ages shown by low and high temperature extractions may be suspect, we examined the intermediate temperature extractions. Although interpretation of these spectra is obviously uncertain, we believe that the most recent times of Ar degassing can be roughly inferred. These times are approximately 3.3 Ga for Havero, 3.3-3.7 Ga for Novo Urei, and approximately 4.1 Ga for Kenna, for which Ar degassing may not have been complete. The indication of Ar-39-Ar-40 degassing ages of 3.3-4.1 Ga for three ureilites that also contain an enhanced LREE component and (excepting Havero) produce a 3.74 Ga Sm-Nd age, suggests that both chronometers may have responded to the same parent body event. On the other hand, it is also possible that the Ar data reflect one or more separate events that did not strongly affect the Sm-Nd system, a situation that commonly occurs in eucrites. Thus the existence of reset Ar ages does not require similarly reset Sm-Nd ages.

  12. AR Signaling in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rahim, Bilal; O’Regan, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR, a member of the steroid hormone receptor family) status has become increasingly important as both a prognostic marker and potential therapeutic target in breast cancer. AR is expressed in up to 90% of estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer, and to a lesser degree, human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) amplified tumors. In the former, AR signaling has been correlated with a better prognosis given its inhibitory activity in estrogen dependent disease, though conversely has also been shown to increase resistance to anti-estrogen therapies such as tamoxifen. AR blockade can mitigate this resistance, and thus serves as a potential target in ER-positive breast cancer. In HER2 amplified breast cancer, studies are somewhat conflicting, though most show either no effect or are associated with poorer survival. Much of the available data on AR signaling is in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which is an aggressive disease with inferior outcomes comparative to other breast cancer subtypes. At present, there are no approved targeted therapies in TNBC, making study of the AR signaling pathway compelling. Gene expression profiling studies have also identified a luminal androgen receptor (LAR) subtype that is dependent on AR signaling in TNBC. Regardless, there seems to be an association between AR expression and improved outcomes in TNBC. Despite lower pathologic complete response (pCR) rates with neoadjuvant therapy, patients with AR-expressing TNBC have been shown to have a better prognosis than those that are AR-negative. Clinical studies targeting AR have shown somewhat promising results. In this paper we review the literature on the biology of AR in breast cancer and its prognostic and predictive roles. We also present our thoughts on therapeutic strategies. PMID:28245550

  13. AR Signaling in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Bilal; O'Regan, Ruth

    2017-02-24

    Androgen receptor (AR, a member of the steroid hormone receptor family) status has become increasingly important as both a prognostic marker and potential therapeutic target in breast cancer. AR is expressed in up to 90% of estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer, and to a lesser degree, human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) amplified tumors. In the former, AR signaling has been correlated with a better prognosis given its inhibitory activity in estrogen dependent disease, though conversely has also been shown to increase resistance to anti-estrogen therapies such as tamoxifen. AR blockade can mitigate this resistance, and thus serves as a potential target in ER-positive breast cancer. In HER2 amplified breast cancer, studies are somewhat conflicting, though most show either no effect or are associated with poorer survival. Much of the available data on AR signaling is in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which is an aggressive disease with inferior outcomes comparative to other breast cancer subtypes. At present, there are no approved targeted therapies in TNBC, making study of the AR signaling pathway compelling. Gene expression profiling studies have also identified a luminal androgen receptor (LAR) subtype that is dependent on AR signaling in TNBC. Regardless, there seems to be an association between AR expression and improved outcomes in TNBC. Despite lower pathologic complete response (pCR) rates with neoadjuvant therapy, patients with AR-expressing TNBC have been shown to have a better prognosis than those that are AR-negative. Clinical studies targeting AR have shown somewhat promising results. In this paper we review the literature on the biology of AR in breast cancer and its prognostic and predictive roles. We also present our thoughts on therapeutic strategies.

  14. LabVIEW-based control software for para-hydrogen induced polarization instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Agraz, Jose Grunfeld, Alexander; Li, Debiao; Cunningham, Karl; Willey, Cindy; Pozos, Robert; Wagner, Shawn

    2014-04-15

    The elucidation of cell metabolic mechanisms is the modern underpinning of the diagnosis, treatment, and in some cases the prevention of disease. Para-Hydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) enhances magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals over 10 000 fold, allowing for the MRI of cell metabolic mechanisms. This signal enhancement is the result of hyperpolarizing endogenous substances used as contrast agents during imaging. PHIP instrumentation hyperpolarizes Carbon-13 ({sup 13}C) based substances using a process requiring control of a number of factors: chemical reaction timing, gas flow, monitoring of a static magnetic field (B{sub o}), radio frequency (RF) irradiation timing, reaction temperature, and gas pressures. Current PHIP instruments manually control the hyperpolarization process resulting in the lack of the precise control of factors listed above, resulting in non-reproducible results. We discuss the design and implementation of a LabVIEW based computer program that automatically and precisely controls the delivery and manipulation of gases and samples, monitoring gas pressures, environmental temperature, and RF sample irradiation. We show that the automated control over the hyperpolarization process results in the hyperpolarization of hydroxyethylpropionate. The implementation of this software provides the fast prototyping of PHIP instrumentation for the evaluation of a myriad of {sup 13}C based endogenous contrast agents used in molecular imaging.

  15. LabVIEW-based control software for para-hydrogen induced polarization instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Agraz, Jose; Grunfeld, Alexander; Li, Debiao; Cunningham, Karl; Willey, Cindy; Pozos, Robert; Wagner, Shawn

    2014-04-01

    The elucidation of cell metabolic mechanisms is the modern underpinning of the diagnosis, treatment, and in some cases the prevention of disease. Para-Hydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) enhances magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals over 10,000 fold, allowing for the MRI of cell metabolic mechanisms. This signal enhancement is the result of hyperpolarizing endogenous substances used as contrast agents during imaging. PHIP instrumentation hyperpolarizes Carbon-13 ((13)C) based substances using a process requiring control of a number of factors: chemical reaction timing, gas flow, monitoring of a static magnetic field (Bo), radio frequency (RF) irradiation timing, reaction temperature, and gas pressures. Current PHIP instruments manually control the hyperpolarization process resulting in the lack of the precise control of factors listed above, resulting in non-reproducible results. We discuss the design and implementation of a LabVIEW based computer program that automatically and precisely controls the delivery and manipulation of gases and samples, monitoring gas pressures, environmental temperature, and RF sample irradiation. We show that the automated control over the hyperpolarization process results in the hyperpolarization of hydroxyethylpropionate. The implementation of this software provides the fast prototyping of PHIP instrumentation for the evaluation of a myriad of (13)C based endogenous contrast agents used in molecular imaging.

  16. LabVIEW-based control software for para-hydrogen induced polarization instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agraz, Jose; Grunfeld, Alexander; Li, Debiao; Cunningham, Karl; Willey, Cindy; Pozos, Robert; Wagner, Shawn

    2014-04-01

    The elucidation of cell metabolic mechanisms is the modern underpinning of the diagnosis, treatment, and in some cases the prevention of disease. Para-Hydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) enhances magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals over 10 000 fold, allowing for the MRI of cell metabolic mechanisms. This signal enhancement is the result of hyperpolarizing endogenous substances used as contrast agents during imaging. PHIP instrumentation hyperpolarizes Carbon-13 (13C) based substances using a process requiring control of a number of factors: chemical reaction timing, gas flow, monitoring of a static magnetic field (Bo), radio frequency (RF) irradiation timing, reaction temperature, and gas pressures. Current PHIP instruments manually control the hyperpolarization process resulting in the lack of the precise control of factors listed above, resulting in non-reproducible results. We discuss the design and implementation of a LabVIEW based computer program that automatically and precisely controls the delivery and manipulation of gases and samples, monitoring gas pressures, environmental temperature, and RF sample irradiation. We show that the automated control over the hyperpolarization process results in the hyperpolarization of hydroxyethylpropionate. The implementation of this software provides the fast prototyping of PHIP instrumentation for the evaluation of a myriad of 13C based endogenous contrast agents used in molecular imaging.

  17. 75 FR 53876 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Berryville, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ... Airspace; Berryville, AR AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). SUMMARY: This action proposes to establish Class E airspace at Berryville, AR. Controlled... SIAPs operations at Carroll County Airport, Berryville, AR. Controlled airspace is needed for the safety...

  18. 40Ar/39Ar Studies of Antarctic Micrometeorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxton, J. M.; Knott, S. F.; Turner, G.; Maurette, M.

    1992-07-01

    We have used the ^40Ar/^39Ar technique to study eight dust particles, in the size range 50-100 microns, collected by filtering Antarctic blue ice (Maurette et al. 1989). The particles were pressed into aluminium foil and their compositions estimated using SEM/EDX techniques. Six were found to have approximately chondritic Mg/Fe/Si ratios, suggesting an extraterrestrial origin. The remaining two particles appeared to be composed mostly of iron and we are not sure of their origin. The particles were then irradiated with a fast neutron fluence of approximately 6 x 10^18 cm^-2, and the argon in them extracted using a pulsed laser delivering about 100 mJ per pulse. We attempted to step heat most of the particles by initially defocusing the beam to reduce the heating effect. In four cases, a sufficient amount of gas was released for step heating to be profitable. The results for five of the chondritic particles are shown in the figure. One yielded a very small amount of gas and is not plotted. The high temperature step is shown for those particles that were step heated. In this diagram, air plots on the y-axis (^36Ar/^40Ar = 0.00338), a purely radiogenic component plots on the x-axis, and addition of ^36Ar moves a point vertically upwards. Four particles have ^36Ar/^40Ar ratios higher than air. This confirms their extraterrestrial origin. We believe the 36Ar is most probably derived from solar energetic particles; only 10^2-10^3 years exposure at 1 AU would be required to produce the level of ^36Ar we observe (10^-12-10^-13 ccSTP), assuming that no 36Ar is lost during atmospheric passage. This is comfortably less than the time taken for a particle of this size to drift in from 2AU to 1AU due to the Poynting Robertson effect, which is of the order 10^5 years. The concentration ^36Ar content is of the order of 10^-7-10^-6 g^-1, which is comparable to the levels of trapped ^36Ar found in primitive meteorites. This interpretation of the source of the ^36Ar would seem to

  19. AR-39-AR-40 "Age" of Basaltic Shergottite NWA-3171

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Park, Jisun

    2007-01-01

    North-West-Africa 3171 is a 506 g, relatively fresh appearing, basaltic shergottite with similarities to Zagami and Shergotty, but not obviously paired with any of the other known African basaltic shergottites. Its exposure age has the range of 2.5-3.1 Myr , similar to those of Zagami and Shergotty. We made AR-39-AR-40 analyses of a "plagioclase" (now shock-converted to maskelynite) separate and of a glass hand-picked from a vein connected to shock melt pockets.. Plagioclase was separated using its low magnetic susceptibility and then heavy liquid with density of <2.85 g/cm(exp 3). The AR-39-AR-40 age spectrum of NWA-317 1 plag displays a rise in age over 20-100% of the 39Ar release, from 0.24 Gyr to 0.27 Gy.

  20. Plasma AR and abiraterone-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Romanel, Alessandro; Gasi Tandefelt, Delila; Conteduca, Vincenza; Jayaram, Anuradha; Casiraghi, Nicola; Wetterskog, Daniel; Salvi, Samanta; Amadori, Dino; Zafeiriou, Zafeiris; Rescigno, Pasquale; Bianchini, Diletta; Gurioli, Giorgia; Casadio, Valentina; Carreira, Suzanne; Goodall, Jane; Wingate, Anna; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Tunariu, Nina; Flohr, Penny; De Giorgi, Ugo; de Bono, Johann S; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2015-11-04

    Androgen receptor (AR) gene aberrations are rare in prostate cancer before primary hormone treatment but emerge with castration resistance. To determine AR gene status using a minimally invasive assay that could have broad clinical utility, we developed a targeted next-generation sequencing approach amenable to plasma DNA, covering all AR coding bases and genomic regions that are highly informative in prostate cancer. We sequenced 274 plasma samples from 97 castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with abiraterone at two institutions. We controlled for normal DNA in patients' circulation and detected a sufficiently high tumor DNA fraction to quantify AR copy number state in 217 samples (80 patients). Detection of AR copy number gain and point mutations in plasma were inversely correlated, supported further by the enrichment of nonsynonymous versus synonymous mutations in AR copy number normal as opposed to AR gain samples. Whereas AR copy number was unchanged from before treatment to progression and no mutant AR alleles showed signal for acquired gain, we observed emergence of T878A or L702H AR amino acid changes in 13% of tumors at progression on abiraterone. Patients with AR gain or T878A or L702H before abiraterone (45%) were 4.9 and 7.8 times less likely to have a ≥50 or ≥90% decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA), respectively, and had a significantly worse overall [hazard ratio (HR), 7.33; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.51 to 15.34; P = 1.3 × 10(-9)) and progression-free (HR, 3.73; 95% CI, 2.17 to 6.41; P = 5.6 × 10(-7)) survival. Evaluation of plasma AR by next-generation sequencing could identify cancers with primary resistance to abiraterone.

  1. Paleotemperatures at the lunar surfaces from open system behavior of cosmogenic 38Ar and radiogenic 40Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuster, David L.; Cassata, William S.

    2015-04-01

    The simultaneous diffusion of both cosmogenic 38Ar and radiogenic 40Ar from solid phases is controlled by the thermal conditions of rocks while residing near planetary surfaces. Combined observations of 38Ar/37Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ratios during stepwise degassing analyses of neutron-irradiated Apollo samples can distinguish between diffusive loss of Ar due to solar heating of the rocks and that associated with elevated temperatures during or following impact events; the data provide quantitative constraints on the durations and temperatures of each process. From sequentially degassed 38Ar/37Ar ratios can be calculated a spectrum of apparent 38Ar exposure ages versus the cumulative release fraction of 37Ar, which is particularly sensitive to conditions at the lunar surface typically over ∼106-108 year timescales. Due to variable proportions of K- and Ca-bearing glass, plagioclase and pyroxene, with variability in the grain sizes of these phases, each sample will have distinct sensitivity to, and therefore different resolving power on, past near-surface thermal conditions. We present the underlying assumptions, and the analytical and numerical methods used to quantify the Ar diffusion kinetics in multi-phase whole-rock analyses that provide these constraints. For Apollo 15 samples 15016, 15556, and 15596 we find apparent 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages between 3.21 and 3.28 Ga and evidence for diffusive loss of radiogenic 40Ar primarily from K-bearing glass. From 38Ar/37Ar spectra normalized to the apparent Ca/K ratios, we also find evidence of diffusive loss of cosmogenic 38Ar that requires elevated temperatures either during or after surface exposure. Using 39Ar and 37Ar, we construct multiple-phase-multiple diffusion domain (MP-MDD) models to quantify the diffusion kinetics of Ar from a range of macroscopic grain sizes of each phase. While diffusive loss of 40Ar can be explained by brief reheating conditions after crystallization (e.g., during an impact event), we find that

  2. Quantum dynamical simulations for nuclear spin selective laser control of ortho- and para-fulvene.

    PubMed

    Belz, S; Grohmann, T; Leibscher, M

    2009-07-21

    In the present paper we explore the prospects for laser control of the photoinduced nonadiabatic dynamics of para- and ortho-fulvene with the help of quantum dynamical simulations. Previous investigations [Bearpark et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 118, 5253 (1996); Alfalah et al., J. Chem. Phys. 130, 124318 (2009)] show that photoisomerization of fulvene is hindered by ultrafast radiationless decay through a conical intersection at planar configuration. Here, we demonstrate that photoisomerization can nevertheless be initiated by damping unfavorable nuclear vibrations with properly designed laser pulses. Moreover, we show that the resulting intramolecular torsion is nuclear spin selective. The selectivity of the photoexcitation with respect to the nuclear spin isomers can be further enhanced by applying an optimized sequence of two laser pulses.

  3. Efficacy and tolerability of a cream containing AR-GG27® (sorbityl furfural palmitate) in the treatment of mild/moderate childhood atopic dermatitis associated with pityriasis alba. A double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Patrizi, A; Raone, B; Raboni, R; Neri, I

    2012-12-01

    Pityriasis alba (PA) is a skin disorder characterized by finely scaly, hypopigmented patches, typical of childhood, that also represents an atopic dermatitis (AD) minor sign according to Hanifin and Rajka criteria. It may be isolated or associated with AD representing, sometimes an atypical manifestation of AD during the long-term follow-up of the disease. Aim of the study was to evaluate of the efficacy and tolerability of AR-GG27® (sorbityl furfural palmitate) cream in the treatment of childhood mild or moderate AD associated with PA. The trial is a single center, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. The study included patients of both sexes, aged between two months and 15 years, suffering from mild and moderate AD always associated with PA. Xerosis was present in all patients. The treatment with topical steroids or topical calcineurin inhibitors (TIMs) had to be suspended for at least 15 days. Any systemic therapy and phototherapy or sun exposure were withdrawn at least 30 days before. Emollients were stopped at least seven days before. During the trial, no other local or systemic treatments were allowed, as well as sun exposure. Patients affected by AD with viral, bacterial or fungal overinfection or patients with diabetes mellitus, severe systemic diseases or intolerance to one or more components of the product were excluded. The primary endpoint was the evaluation of the average change in the Investigator Global Assessment (IGA) after 15 and 30 days of treatment. The second endpoint was the evaluation of severity of three different clinical signs: erythema, excoriation desquamation, using a subjective five-point scale. Changes in pruritus severity was also considered during the entire period of treatment, through the use of a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). A P<0.05, two tailed was considered as statistically significant. After 15 and 30 days there was a statistically significant difference in the group treated with AR-GG27®, compared to the

  4. Comparison of conventional K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar dating of young mafic volcanic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages have been measured on nine mafic volcanic rocks younger than 1 myr from the Snake River Plain (Idaho), Mount Adams (Washington), and Crater Lake (Oregon). The K-Ar ages were calculated from Ar measurements made by isotope dilution and K2O measurements by flame photometry. The 40Ar/39Ar ages are incremental-heating experiments using a low-blank resistance-heated furnace. The results indicate that high-quality ages can be measured on young, mafic volcanic rocks using either the K-Ar or the 40Ar/39Ar technique. The precision of an 40Ar/39Ar plateau age generally is better than the precision of a K-Ar age because the plateau age is calculated by pooling the ages of several gas increments. The precision of a plateau age generally is better than the precision of an isotope correlation (isochron) age for the same sample. For one sample the intercept of the isochron yielded an 40Ar/36Ar value significantly different from the atmospheric value of 295.5. Recalculation of increment ages using the isochron intercept for the composition of nonradiogenic Ar in the sample resulted in much better agreement of ages for this sample. The results of this study also indicate that, given suitable material and modern equipment, precise K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages can be measured on volcanic rocks as young as the latest Pleistocene, and perhaps even the Holocene.

  5. Ar-40/Ar-39 dating, Ar diffusion properties, and cooling rate determinations of severely shocked chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Hirsch, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    The ages of Ar-40/Ar-39 chondrites were computed to be 4.29 to 1.0 Gyr, with degassing times of 0.5 to 1.0 Gyr. The values of the diffusion parameter for Ar in Arrhenius plots show linear relationships which correspond to the degassing of different mineral phases with distinct K/Ca ratios and different average temperatures for Ar release. The experimental values of the diffusion parameter for the high-temperature phase of severely shocked chondrites are 10 to the -7th to 10 to the -5th/s for the shock-heating temperatures in the 950-1200 C range; the inferred reheating temperatures and the fraction of the Ar-40 loss during the reheating event suggest post-shock cooling rates and burial depths of 0.01-0.0001 C/s and 0.5-2m, respectively.

  6. Ar-40/Ar-39 dating, Ar diffusion properties, and cooling rate determinations of severely shocked chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Hirsch, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    The ages of Ar-40/Ar-39 chondrites were computed to be 4.29 to 1.0 Gyr, with degassing times of 0.5 to 1.0 Gyr. The values of the diffusion parameter for Ar in Arrhenius plots show linear relationships which correspond to the degassing of different mineral phases with distinct K/Ca ratios and different average temperatures for Ar release. The experimental values of the diffusion parameter for the high-temperature phase of severely shocked chondrites are 10 to the -7th to 10 to the -5th/s for the shock-heating temperatures in the 950-1200 C range; the inferred reheating temperatures and the fraction of the Ar-40 loss during the reheating event suggest post-shock cooling rates and burial depths of 0.01-0.0001 C/s and 0.5-2m, respectively.

  7. Modelizacion, control e implementacion de un procesador energetico paralelo para aplicacion en sistemas multisalida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreres Sabater, Agustin

    modelizacion, y aplicacion en convertidores PWM, esta aun por estudiar y valorar. El primer Capitulo consiste en una breve introduccion al problema de la regulacion cruzada y la impedancia cruzada para posteriormente describir las tecnicas de post-regulacion actualmente mas empleadas, con especial atencion al post-regulador con transformador controlado. El Capitulo segundo trata del estudio de las caracteristicas estaticas del postregulador con transformador controlado. Partiendo de los estudios disponibles sobre el postregulador se plantean mejoras en su modo de actuacion y se discuten tres alternativas diferentes para controlar el transformador. Las dos primeras consisten en emplear un convertidor auxiliar Boost en sus dos modos de funcionamiento, continuo y discontinuo. La tercera consiste en controlar el transformador con una tension PWM directamente, sin filtrado. Finalmente se comprueba experimentalmente, para el estado estacionario, el funcionamiento del post-regulador para cada uno de los tres metodos de control. El Capitulo tercero trata de la dinamica de la salida controlada con el post-regulador cuando este emplea un convertidor auxiliar tipo Boost. Mediante la tecnica de promediado de variables de estado se propone el modelo de pequena senal, tanto para el modo continuo como para el modo discontinuo de funcionamiento del convertidor auxiliar. Los resultados mas significativos de esta seccion son las expresiones analiticas de las impedancias cruzadas y de la impedancia de la salida post-regulada. Como complemento al modelo de pequena senal se plantea un modelo de gran senal implementado sobre el simulador Pspice. Con este nuevo modelo se reproducen los resultados obtenidos con el modelo de pequena senal y ademas es posible simular los transitorios en las tensiones de salida ante cambios de carga. La modelizacion del convertidor cuando el transformador se controla con una tension PWM sin filtrar es el objetivo del Capitulo 4. En las secciones siguientes del Capitulo

  8. A case of anti-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase (ARS) antibody-positive polymyositis (PM)/dermatomyositis (DM)-associated interstitial pneumonia (IP) successfully controlled with bosentan therapy.

    PubMed

    Naito, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Yosuke; Hino, Mitsunori; Gemma, Akihiko

    2017-01-01

    A 72-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital and was diagnosed with interstitial pneumonia (IP) associated with amyopathic dermatomyositis (ADM). The patient experienced three acute IP exacerbations in the 7 years that followed, which were each treated and resolved with steroid pulse therapy. The patient was closely examined for respiratory failure with right heart catheterization (RHC), which demonstrated that she had a mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of 34 mmHg. The patient was thus diagnosed as having pulmonary hypertension (PH) associated with anti-synthetase syndrome (ASS) and was started on bosentan therapy, which led to improvements in mPAP as well as in subjective symptoms over time. Indeed, she had had no acute exacerbations with serum markers of IP remaining low over 6 years following initiation of bosentan therapy, suggesting that bosentan may have a role in controlling IP. In addition, she was confirmed to be anti-ARS antibody-positive after 5 years of bosentan therapy, when anti-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase (anti-ARS) antibody testing became available.

  9. ARS-Media for excel instruction manual

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    ARS-Media for Excel Instruction Manual is the instruction manual that explains how to use the Excel spreadsheet ARS-Media for Excel application. ARS-Media for Excel Instruction Manual is provided as a pdf file....

  10. 76 FR 43336 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form AR-11, Extension of an Existing Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form AR-11... Collection under Review: Form AR- 11, Alien's Change of Address Card; OMB Control No. 1615-0007. The... applicable component of the Department of Homeland Security sponsoring this collection: Form AR-11. U.S...

  11. Experimental M1 Transition Rates of Coronal Lines from AR X, AR XIV, and AR XV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Träbert, E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Utter, S. B.; Brown, G. V.; Chen, H.; Harris, C. L.; Neill, P. A.; Savin, D. W.; Smith, A. J.

    2000-09-01

    Transition probabilities of three magnetic dipole (M1) transitions in multiply charged ions of Ar have been measured using the Livermore electron-beam ion trap. Two of the transitions are in the ground configurations of Ar XIV (B-like) and Ar IX (F-like), and are associated with the coronal lines at 4412.4 and 5533.4 Å, respectively. The third is in the excited 2s2p configuration of Be-like Ar XV and produces the coronal line at 5943.73 Å. Our results for the three atomic level lifetimes are 9.32+/-0.12 ms for the Ar X 2s22p5 2Po1/2 level, 9.70+/-0.15 ms for the Ar XIV 2s22p 2Po3/2 level, and 15.0+/-0.8 ms for the Ar XV 2s2p 3Po2 level. These results differ significantly from earlier measurements and are the most accurate ones to date.

  12. AR system in Node 3

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-10-03

    ISS033-E-009199 (3 Oct. 2012) --- NASA astronaut Sunita Williams, Expedition 33 commander, conducts the continuing preventive inspection and cleaning of accessible Atmosphere Revitalization (AR) system bacteria filters in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.

  13. Paleotemperatures at the lunar surfaces from open system behavior of cosmogenic 38Ar and radiogenic 40Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Shuster, David L.; Cassata, William S.

    2015-02-10

    The simultaneous diffusion of both cosmogenic 38Ar and radiogenic 40Ar from solid phases is controlled by the thermal conditions of rocks while residing near planetary surfaces. Combined observations of 38Ar/37Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ratios during stepwise degassing analyses of neutron-irradiated Apollo samples can distinguish between diffusive loss of Ar due to solar heating of the rocks and that associated with elevated temperatures during or following impact events; the data provide quantitative constraints on the durations and temperatures of each process. From sequentially degassed 38Ar/37Ar ratios can be calculated a spectrum of apparent 38Ar exposure ages versus the cumulative release fraction of 37Ar, which is particularly sensitive to conditions at the lunar surface typically over ~106–108 year timescales. Due to variable proportions of K- and Ca-bearing glass, plagioclase and pyroxene, with variability in the grain sizes of these phases, each sample will have distinct sensitivity to, and therefore different resolving power on, past near-surface thermal conditions. Furthermore, we present the underlying assumptions, and the analytical and numerical methods used to quantify the Ar diffusion kinetics in multi-phase whole-rock analyses that provide these constraints.

  14. The B AB AR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bazan, A.; Boucham, A.; Boutigny, D.; De Bonis, I.; Favier, J.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Jeremie, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Le Flour, T.; Lees, J. P.; Lieunard, S.; Petitpas, P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zachariadou, K.; Palano, A.; Chen, G. P.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Reinertsen, P. L.; Stugu, B.; Abbott, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Amerman, L.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Clark, A. R.; Dardin, S.; Day, C.; Dow, S. F.; Fan, Q.; Gaponenko, I.; Gill, M. S.; Goozen, F. R.; Gowdy, S. J.; Gritsan, A.; Groysman, Y.; Hernikl, C.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Jared, R. C.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Karcher, A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kipnis, I.; Kluth, S.; Kral, J. F.; Lafever, R.; LeClerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lewis, S. A.; Lionberger, C.; Liu, T.; Long, M.; Luo, L.; Lynch, G.; Luft, P.; Mandelli, E.; Marino, M.; Marks, K.; Matuk, C.; Meyer, A. B.; Minor, R.; Mokhtarani, A.; Momayezi, M.; Nyman, M.; Oddone, P. J.; Ohnemus, J.; Oshatz, D.; Patton, S.; Pedrali-Noy, M.; Perazzo, A.; Peters, C.; Pope, W.; Pripstein, M.; Quarrie, D. R.; Rasson, J. E.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Stone, R.; Strother, P. D.; Telnov, A. V.; von der Lippe, H.; Weber, T. F.; Wenzel, W. A.; Zizka, G.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Hawkes, C. M.; Kirk, A.; Knowles, D. J.; O'Neale, S. W.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Koch, H.; Krug, J.; Kunze, M.; Lewandowski, B.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Andress, J. C.; Barlow, N. R.; Bhimji, W.; Chevalier, N.; Clark, P. J.; Cottingham, W. N.; De Groot, N.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; Mass, A.; McFall, J. D.; Wallom, D.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Hearty, C.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Camanzi, B.; Harrison, T. J.; McKemey, A. K.; Tinslay, J.; Antohin, E. I.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Bukin, D. A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kolachev, G. M.; Korol, A. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Mikhailov, S. F.; Onuchin, A. P.; Salnikov, A. A.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Telnov, V. I.; Yushkov, A. N.; Booth, J.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Pier, S.; Stoker, D. P.; Zioulas, G.; Ahsan, A.; Arisaka, K.; Buchanan, C.; Chun, S.; Faccini, R.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Prell, S. A.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Raven, G.; Sharma, V.; Burke, S.; Callahan, D.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Hale, D.; Hart, P. A.; Kuznetsova, N.; Kyre, S.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; May, J.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Witherell, M.; Yellin, S.; Beringer, J.; DeWitt, J.; Dorfan, D. E.; Eisner, A. M.; Frey, A.; Grillo, A. A.; Grothe, M.; Heusch, C. A.; Johnson, R. P.; Kroeger, W.; Lockman, W. S.; Pulliam, T.; Rowe, W.; Sadrozinski, H.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E. N.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Wilder, M.; Williams, D. C.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hanson, J. E.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Metzler, S.; Oyang, J.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Weaver, M.; Yang, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Devmal, S.; Geld, T. L.; Jayatilleke, S.; Jayatilleke, S. M.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P.; Broomer, B.; Erdos, E.; Fahey, S.; Ford, W. T.; Gaede, F.; van Hoek, W. C.; Johnson, D. R.; Michael, A. K.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Park, H.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Sen, S.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, D. L.; Blouw, J.; Harton, J. L.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Warner, D. W.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Dahlinger, G.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Eckstein, P.; Futterschneider, H.; Kocian, M. L.; Krause, R.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Behr, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Ferrag, S.; Fouque, G.; Gastaldi, F.; Matricon, P.; Mora de Freitas, P.; Renard, C.; Roussot, E.; T'Jampens, S.; Thiebaux, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Anjomshoaa, A.; Bernet, R.; Di Lodovico, F.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Falbo, M.; Bozzi, C.; Dittongo, S.; Folegani, M.; Piemontese, L.; Ramusino, A. C.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Xie, Y.; Zallo, A.; Bagnasco, S.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Fabbricatore, P.; Farinon, S.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Minutoli, S.; Monge, M. R.; Musenich, R.; Pallavicini, M.; Parodi, R.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Pia, M. G.; Priano, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Bartoldus, R.; Dignan, T.; Hamilton, R.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Fischer, P. A.; Lamsa, J.; McKay, R.; Meyer, W. T.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Albert, J. N.; Beigbeder, C.; Benkebil, M.; Breton, D.; Cizeron, R.; Du, S.; Grosdidier, G.; Hast, C.; Höcker, A.; Lacker, H. M.; LePeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Truong, K.; Valassi, A.; Wormser, G.; Alford, O.; Behne, D.; Bionta, R. M.; Bowman, J.; Brigljević, V.; Brooks, A.; Dacosta, V. A.; Fackler, O.; Fujino, D.; Harper, M.; Lange, D. J.; Mugge, M.; O'Connor, T. G.; Olson, H.; Ott, L.; Parker, E.; Pedrotti, B.; Roeben, M.; Shi, X.; van Bibber, K.; Wenaus, T. J.; Wright, D. M.; Wuest, C. R.; Yamamoto, B.; Carroll, M.; Cooke, P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, M.; Kay, M.; McMahon, S.; Muir, A.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Sutcliffe, P.; Touramanis, C.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Eschrich, I.; Gunawardane, N. J. W.; Martin, R.; Nash, J. A.; Price, D. R.; Sanders, P.; Smith, D.; Azzopardi, D. E.; Back, J. J.; Dixon, P.; Harrison, P. F.; Newman-Coburn, D.; Potter, R. J. L.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Williams, M. I.; Vidal, P. B.; Cowan, G.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McGrath, P.; McMahon, T. R.; Salvatore, F.; Scott, I.; Vaitsas, G.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Li, Y.; Pavlovich, J.; Allison, J.; Barlow, R. J.; Boyd, J. T.; Fullwood, J.; Jackson, F.; Khan, A.; Lafferty, G. D.; Savvas, N.; Simopoulos, E. T.; Thompson, R. J.; Weatherall, J. H.; Bard, R.; Dallapiccola, C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Lillard, V.; Olsen, J.; Roberts, D. A.; Schieck, J. R.; Blaylock, G.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Lin, C. S.; Willocq, S.; Wittlin, J.; Brau, B.; Cowan, R.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Britton, D. I.; Fernholz, R.; Houde, M.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Trischuk, J.; Lanni, F.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Booke, M.; Cremaldi, L.; Kroeger, R.; Reep, M.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Arguin, J. F.; Beaulieu, M.; Martin, J. P.; Nief, J. Y.; Seitz, R.; Taras, P.; Woch, A.; Zacek, V.; Nicholson, H.; Sutton, C. S.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; De Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Cason, N. M.; LoSecco, J. M.; Alsmiller, J. R. G.; Gabriel, T. A.; Handler, T.; Heck, J.; Iwasaki, M.; Sinev, N. B.; Caracciolo, R.; Colecchia, F.; Dal Corso, F.; Galeazzi, F.; Marzolla, M.; Michelon, G.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Santi, S.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Torassa, E.; Voci, C.; Bailly, P.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; De la Vaissière, C.; Del Buono, L.; Genat, J.-F.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Le Diberder, F.; Lebbolo, H.; Lory, J.; Martin, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; Versillé, S.; Zhang, B.; Manfredi, P. F.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Speziali, V.; Frank, E. D.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J. H.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bosi, F.; Carpinelli, M.; Forti, F.; Gaddi, A.; Gagliardi, D.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Mammini, P.; Morganti, M.; Morsani, F.; Neri, N.; Profeti, A.; Paoloni, E.; Raffaelli, F.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Simi, G.; Triggiani, G.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Turnbull, L.; Wagoner, D. E.; Albert, J.; Bula, C.; Kelsey, M. H.; Lu, C.; McDonald, K. T.; Miftakov, V.; Sands, B.; Schaffner, S. F.; Smith, A. J. S.; Tumanov, A.; Varnes, E. W.; Bronzini, F.; Buccheri, A.; Bulfon, C.; Cavoto, G.; del Re, D.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Fratini, K.; Lamanna, E.; Leonardi, E.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Serra, M.; Voena, C.; Waldi, R.; Jacques, P. F.; Kalelkar, M.; Plano, R. J.; Adye, T.; Claxton, B.; Dowdell, J.; Egede, U.; Franek, B.; Galagedera, S.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Kay, J.; Lidbury, J.; Madani, S.; Metcalfe, S.; Metcalfe, S.; Markey, G.; Olley, P.; Watt, M.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Besson, P.; Bourgeois, P.; Convert, P.; De Domenico, G.; de Lesquen, A.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Georgette, Z.; Gosset, L.; Graffin, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Hervé, S.; Karolak, M.; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; London, G. W.; Marques, V.; Mayer, B.; Micout, P.; Mols, J. P.; Mouly, J. P.; Penichot, Y.; Rolquin, J.; Serfass, B.; Toussaint, J. C.; Usseglio, M.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, C.; Zito, M.; Copty, N.; Purohit, M. V.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Adam, I.; Adesanya, A.; Anthony, P. L.; Aston, D.; Bartelt, J.; Becla, J.; Bell, R.; Bloom, E.; Boeheim, C. T.; Boyarski, A. M.; Boyce, R. F.; Briggs, D.; Bulos, F.; Burgess, W.; Byers, B.; Calderini, G.; Chestnut, R.; Claus, R.; Convery, M. R.; Coombes, R.; Cottrell, L.; Coupal, D. P.; Coward, D. H.; Craddock, W. W.; DeBarger, S.; DeStaebler, H.; Dorfan, J.; Doser, M.; Dunwoodie, W.; Dusatko, J. E.; Ecklund, S.; Fieguth, T. H.; Freytag, D. R.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G. L.; Haller, G.; Hanushevsky, A.; Harris, J.; Hasan, A.; Hee, C.; Himel, T.; Huffer, M. E.; Hung, T.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kawahara, H.; Keller, L.; King, M. E.; Klaisner, L.; Krebs, H. J.; Langenegger, U.; Langeveld, W.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Louie, S. K.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; McDonald, J.; Manzin, G.; Marsiske, H.; Mattison, T.; McCulloch, M.; McDougald, M.; McShurley, D.; Menke, S.; Messner, R.; Metcalfe, S.; Morii, M.; Mount, R.; Muller, D. R.; Nelson, D.; Nordby, M.; O'Grady, C. P.; Olavson, L.; Olsen, J.; O'Neill, F. G.; Oxoby, G.; Paolucci, P.; Pavel, T.; Perl, J.; Pertsova, M.; Petrak, S.; Putallaz, G.; Raines, P. E.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reif, R.; Robertson, S. H.; Rochester, L. S.; Roodman, A.; Russel, J. J.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Saxton, O. H.; Schietinger, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Sciolla, G.; Seeman, J. T.; Serbo, V. V.; Shapiro, S.; Skarpass, K., Sr.; Snyder, A.; Soderstrom, E.; Soha, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Stahl, A.; Stiles, P.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Talby, M.; Tanaka, H. A.; Va'vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Wang, R.; Weber, T.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; White, J. L.; Wienands, U.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Young, C. C.; Yu, N.; Burchat, P. R.; Cheng, C. H.; Kirkby, D.; Meyer, T. I.; Roat, C.; Henderson, R.; Khan, N.; Berridge, S.; Bugg, W.; Cohn, H.; Hart, E.; Weidemann, A. W.; Benninger, T.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Turcotte, M.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Daudo, F.; Di Girolamo, B.; Gamba, D.; Grosso, P.; Smol, A.; Trapani, P. P.; Zanin, D.; Bosisio, L.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Pompili, A.; Poropat, P.; Prest, M.; Rashevskaia, I.; Vallazza, E.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Brown, C.; De Silva, A.; Kowalewski, R.; Pitman, D.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Charles, E.; Dasu, S.; Elmer, P.; Johnson, J. R.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Zobernig, H.; Moore, T. B.; Neal, H.

    2002-02-01

    B AB AR, the detector for the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e +e - B Factory operating at the ϒ(4 S) resonance, was designed to allow comprehensive studies of CP-violation in B-meson decays. Charged particle tracks are measured in a multi-layer silicon vertex tracker surrounded by a cylindrical wire drift chamber. Electromagnetic showers from electrons and photons are detected in an array of CsI crystals located just inside the solenoidal coil of a superconducting magnet. Muons and neutral hadrons are identified by arrays of resistive plate chambers inserted into gaps in the steel flux return of the magnet. Charged hadrons are identified by d E/d x measurements in the tracking detectors and by a ring-imaging Cherenkov detector surrounding the drift chamber. The trigger, data acquisition and data-monitoring systems, VME- and network-based, are controlled by custom-designed online software. Details of the layout and performance of the detector components and their associated electronics and software are presented.

  15. ``Smoking From The Same Pipe": Developement of an 40Ar/39Ar Datting Intercalibration PIpette System (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrin, B. D.; Swisher, C. C.; Deino, A.; Hemming, S. R.; Hodges, K.; Renne, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    The precision and accuracy of Ar isotope ratio measurements is one of the main limiting factors in the uncertainties of an 40Ar/39Ar age. Currently, it is relatively common to measure Ar isotopic ratios to a precision of 1-2‰ or better on an intralaboratory basis. This level of analytical precision equates to a comparable level of precision (1-3‰) in the calculated age, depending on the extent of atmospheric Ar contamination, importance of nucleogenic interference corrections, and other factors. However, it has become clear that improving the precision of mass spectrometry is not the only bottleneck towards improving the accuracy and precision of 40Ar/39Ar dating in general. Rather, the most urgent issue is interlaboratory reproducibility. This became obvious in a recent EARTHTIME initiative undertaken to intercalibrate two commonly used 40Ar/39Ar standards [the Fish Canyon sanidine (FCs) and the Alder Creek sanidine (ACs)]. This effort revealed variations amongst laboratories (at the 1-2% level), an order of magnitude greater than the internal analytical precisions. To address these issues, we have proposed (to NSF) to construct two identical pipette systems loaded to identical starting pressures and with identical isotopic compositions. One pipette system will travel between participating 40Ar/39Ar labs and the second system will not travel and serve as the “Master” system to test for any fractionation or undocumented depletion of the traveling pipette system. In order to ensure delivery of uniform amounts of homogenous gas, the pipette system will be computer-controlled with preprogrammed routines and lockouts to prevent compromising the reservoirs. The pipette systems will deliver three gas samples with different isotopic ratios at two different pressures/concentrations. One pipette bulb will be of atmospheric isotopic composition, and the other two pipette bulbs will have 40Ar*/39ArK ratios corresponding to co-irradiated ACs and FCs fixed by their

  16. Controlled Pd(0)/t Bu3P Catalyzed Suzuki Cross-Coupling Polymerization of AB-Type Monomers with ArPd(t Bu3P)X or Pd2(dba)3/t Bu3P/ArX as the Initiator

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Honghai; Xing, Chun-Hui; Hu, Qiao-Sheng; ...

    2015-02-05

    The synthesis of well-defined and functionalized conjugated polymers, which are essential in the development of efficient organic electronics, through Suzuki cross-coupling polymerizations has been a challenging task. We developed controlled Pd(0)/t-Bu3P-catalyzed Suzuki cross-coupling polymerizations of AB-type monomers via the chain-growth mechanism with a series of in situ generated ArPd(t-Bu3P)X (X = I, Br, Cl) complexes as initiators. Among them, the combinations of Pd2(dba)3/t-Bu3P/p-BrC6H4I, Pd2(dba)3/t-Bu3P/p-BrC6H4CH2OH and Pd2(dba)3/t-Bu3P/p-PhCOC6H4Br were identified as highly robust initiator systems, resulting in polymers with predictable molecular weight and narrow polydispersity (PDI~1.13-1.20). In addition, Pd2(dba)3/t-Bu3P/p-BrC6H4CH2OH and Pd2(dba)3/t-Bu3P/p-PhCOC6H4Br initiator systems afforded functional polymers with >95% fidelity. Our results pavedmore » the road to access well-defined conjugated polymers, including conjugated polymers with complex polymer architectures such as block copolymers and branch copolymers.« less

  17. Controlled Pd(0)/t Bu3P Catalyzed Suzuki Cross-Coupling Polymerization of AB-Type Monomers with ArPd(t Bu3P)X or Pd2(dba)3/t Bu3P/ArX as the Initiator

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Honghai; Xing, Chun-Hui; Hu, Qiao-Sheng; Hong, Kunlun

    2015-02-05

    The synthesis of well-defined and functionalized conjugated polymers, which are essential in the development of efficient organic electronics, through Suzuki cross-coupling polymerizations has been a challenging task. We developed controlled Pd(0)/t-Bu3P-catalyzed Suzuki cross-coupling polymerizations of AB-type monomers via the chain-growth mechanism with a series of in situ generated ArPd(t-Bu3P)X (X = I, Br, Cl) complexes as initiators. Among them, the combinations of Pd2(dba)3/t-Bu3P/p-BrC6H4I, Pd2(dba)3/t-Bu3P/p-BrC6H4CH2OH and Pd2(dba)3/t-Bu3P/p-PhCOC6H4Br were identified as highly robust initiator systems, resulting in polymers with predictable molecular weight and narrow polydispersity (PDI~1.13-1.20). In addition, Pd2(dba)3/t-Bu3P/p-BrC6H4CH2OH and Pd2(dba)3/t-Bu3P/p-PhCOC6H4Br initiator systems afforded functional polymers with >95% fidelity. Our results paved the road to access well-defined conjugated polymers, including conjugated polymers with complex polymer architectures such as block copolymers and branch copolymers.

  18. Mosquito and Fly Control Research by the USDA-ARS Center for Medical, Agriculture and Veterinary Entomology (CMAVE) in the Deployed War-Fighter Protection (DWFP) Program

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Despite existing measures to prevent and control arthropod-borne diseases in military units, these diseases continue to be serious threats to deployed troops. Due to a shrinking list of safe, cost-effective pesticides for control of disease vectors, new and improved toxicants and methods for deliver...

  19. Ar-39-Ar-40 Ages of Two Nakhlites, MIL03346 and Y000593: A Detailed Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Jisun; Garrison, Daniel; Bogard, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Radiometric dating of martian nakhlites by several techniques have given similar ages of approx.1.2-1.4 Ga [e.g. 1, 2]. Unlike the case with shergottites, where the presence of martian atmosphere and inherited radiogenic Ar-40 produce apparent Ar-39-Ar-40 ages older than other radiometric ages, Ar-Ar ages of nakhlites are similar to ages derived by other techniques. However, even in some nakhlites the presence of trapped martian Ar produces some uncertainty in the Ar-Ar age. We present here an analysis of such Ar-Ar ages from the MIL03346 and Y000593 nakhlites.

  20. The Potential for Measuring Slow Crustal Evolution using Ar-Ar Dating of Large K-feldspar Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, S. P.; Flude, S.

    2012-12-01

    There has been a great deal of debate concerning Ar/Ar age profiles in K-feldspar, even gem quality K-feldspar which should exhibit simple diffusion behaviour. Here we explore their potential for measuring very slow crustal evolution and cratonization. Several different models have been evoked which if correct would challenge our capability to recover long thermal histories from Ar/Ar data. We have measured 40Ar/39Ar ages in gem quality K-feldspar grains from Itrongay Madagascar of 435 [1] - 477 [2] Ma using UV-laserprobe to produce both depth profiles (0-20 microns) and spot traverses (0-1000 microns) to test the mechanisms that might control Ar diffusion in nature. Micron scale UV laser depth profiling was used to determine Ar diffusion adjacent to the natural crystal surface (presumed to have formed as the sample crystallised). UV laser spot dating was used to measure the age variations on length scales of 10s of microns to mm and even cm. The high potassium content and age of the Itrongay sample made it possible to measure natural argon age profiles at high precision and high spatial resolution, to address some of the issues surrounding Ar diffusion. The analysis reveals the presence of very long age gradients in the Itrongay feldspar spanning more than 50Ma - ages as low as 415.7±3.0 Ma were measured at the grain margin and as high as 473.8±2.2 Ma in the core. As previous work on Itrongay feldspar has tended to be carried out on mm-sized fragments without knowledge of the original crystal boundaries, the variation in radiometric ages in the published literature is likely due to these internal age variations. We interpret the age profiles as the combination of diffusion and 40K decay to 40Ar over the full range of spatial scales from micron to centimetre. Thermal models for the thermal history of Itrongay K-feldspar appear to be in agreement with previous thermochronology in the area and hold out the hope for unravelling very long and slow crustal evolution

  1. Selective AR Modulators that Distinguish Proliferative from Differentiative Gene Promoters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    drugs , resistance arises and AR regains control. An innovative approach to deter resistance is to identify selective AR modulators (SARMs) that...modification would be needed to improve its drug features. Thus rather than perform more screening and characterization of new compounds (Task 2, c...e, of the original SOW), we decided to focus on doxorubicin, which has been well studied and is a FDA approved drug already used in prostate

  2. Regulatory Activities of Four ArsR Proteins in Agrobacterium tumefaciens 5A

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yoon-Suk; Brame, Keenan; Jetter, Jonathan; Bothner, Brian B.; Wang, Gejiao

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT ArsR is a well-studied transcriptional repressor that regulates microbe-arsenic interactions. Most microorganisms have an arsR gene, but in cases where multiple copies exist, the respective roles or potential functional overlap have not been explored. We examined the repressors encoded by arsR1 and arsR2 (ars1 operon) and by arsR3 and arsR4 (ars2 operon) in Agrobacterium tumefaciens 5A. ArsR1 and ArsR4 are very similar in their primary sequences and diverge phylogenetically from ArsR2 and ArsR3, which are also quite similar to one another. Reporter constructs (lacZ) for arsR1, arsR2, and arsR4 were all inducible by As(III), but expression of arsR3 (monitored by reverse transcriptase PCR) was not influenced by As(III) and appeared to be linked transcriptionally to an upstream lysR-type gene. Experiments using a combination of deletion mutations and additional reporter assays illustrated that the encoded repressors (i) are not all autoregulatory as is typically known for ArsR proteins, (ii) exhibit variable control of each other's encoding genes, and (iii) exert variable control of other genes previously shown to be under the control of ArsR1. Furthermore, ArsR2, ArsR3, and ArsR4 appear to have an activator-like function for some genes otherwise repressed by ArsR1, which deviates from the well-studied repressor role of ArsR proteins. The differential regulatory activities suggest a complex regulatory network not previously observed in ArsR studies. The results indicate that fine-scale ArsR sequence deviations of the reiterated regulatory proteins apparently translate to different regulatory roles. IMPORTANCE Given the significance of the ArsR repressor in regulating various aspects of microbe-arsenic interactions, it is important to assess potential regulatory overlap and/or interference when a microorganism carries multiple copies of arsR. This study explores this issue and shows that the four arsR genes in A. tumefaciens 5A, associated with two separate

  3. Ar-39/Ar-40 systematics of Allende inclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzog, G. F.; Bence, A. E.; Bender, J.; Eichhorn, G.; Maluski, H.; Schaeffer, O. A.

    1980-01-01

    A laser microprobe was used to measure the Ar isotopic contents of individual mineral grains in four neutron-irradiated Allende samples: two coarse-grained Ca-Al-rich inclusions; one fine-grained Ca-Al-rich inclusion; and one sample with matrix and miscellaneous chondrules. The following K-Ar ages (G.y.) were obtained after degassing low Ar retentive sites by preheating the samples for one hour at 675 C: matrix, 3.5 + or - 0.2; three miscellaneous chondrules, 4.4 + or - 0.1, 4.0 + or - 0.1, and 4.4 + or - 0.1; and the fine-grained inclusion, 4.5 + or - 0.2. The minerals in the coarse-grained Ca-Al-rich inclusions have ubiquitous chlorine, less than 10 ppm K and apparent ages ranging upwards from 4.6 G.y. to well over 10 G.y. Possible explanations for these apparent ages are atmospheric contamination, the decay of K-40 prior to the formation of the solar system, and the trapping of radiogenic Ar-40 lost by the matrix.

  4. Unveiling Turrialba (Costa Rica) volcano's latest geological evolution through new 40Ar/39Ar, ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Cubillo, P.; Turrin, B. D.; Soto, G. J.; Del Potro, R.; Gagnevin, D.; Gazel, E.; Mora Fernandez, M.; Carr, M. J.; Swisher, C. C.

    2010-12-01

    Step-heating 40Ar/39Ar dating experiments on whole rock matrix were performed on samples from eight key lava flow units from Turrialba, the easternmost volcano of the Central Volcanic Range of Costa Rica. Our results, together with available corrected 14C ages, recent mapping and new geochemical analyses, are part of a study to reconstruct Turrialba’s evolution. The project is being conducted as part of wider studies because of the increase in volcanic activity during the last three years. The geochemical compositions of the lava flow units span the range from basalts to dacites, and commonly have high K2O concentrations, making them good candidates for 40Ar/39Ar radiometric dating. The ages reported here correspond to the Paleo Turrialba (600-250 ka) and Neo Turrialba (< 250 ka) temporal stages. Sample TUR-38 (251 ± 4 ka) belongs to the latest unit of Paleo Turrialba stage, known as Finca Liebres volcano, while the remaining seven samples belong to Neo Turrialba: TUR-30 (99 ± 3 ka), TUR-19 (90 ± 4 ka), TUR-32 (62 ± 2 ka) TUR-33 (61 ± 2 ka), TUR-12 (25 ± 1.9 ka), TUR-36 (10 ± 3 ka) and TUR-08 (3 ± 3 ka). All the obtained ages in this study are in agreement with the local stratigraphy and prior 14C age determinations, adding robustness to our results. According to ages obtained and the areal distribution of the sampled units, the most important construction period of the massif was during the Neo-Turrialba stage which has passed through two important constructing episodes, around 100-60 ka and 10 ka-present. Although our results include some very young ages, all of them meet the established evaluation criteria used for plateau and isochron ages, commonly used for 40Ar/39Ar dating. Furthermore, we used a protocol that closely monitors the mass spectrometer mass discrimination during the measurements to provide additional control. Three of the eight 40Ar/39Ar ages reported here are remarkably young (25 ka or less). Two of those are the samples with the

  5. The ArDM Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, A.; Ardm Collaboration

    2007-08-01

    We describe the Argon Dark Matter (ArDM) experiment. It consists on a one-ton liquid argon detector able to read independently ionization charge and scintillation light. This device has been optimized to perform a direct search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs).

  6. ARS-Media for Excel

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    ARS-Media for Excel is an ion solution calculator that uses Microsoft Excel to generate recipes of salts for complex ion mixtures specified by the user. Generating salt combinations (recipes) that result in pre-specified target ion values is a linear programming problem. Thus, the recipes are genera...

  7. USDA-ARS Quartlerly News

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This quarterly article is an update of research going on at The USDA-ARS Thad Cochran Southern Horticultural Laboratory in Poplarville, MS to be published in the Louisiana Nursery and Landscape Associations (LANLA) quarterly newsletter. This is one of three publications that I am sending out to the ...

  8. The phytochemical 3,3'-diindolylmethane decreases expression of AR-controlled DNA damage repair genes through repressive chromatin modifications and is associated with DNA damage in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Palomera-Sanchez, Zoraya; Watson, Gregory W; Wong, Carmen P; Beaver, Laura M; Williams, David E; Dashwood, Roderick H; Ho, Emily

    2017-09-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a transcription factor involved in normal prostate physiology and prostate cancer (PCa) development. 3,3'-Diindolylmethane (DIM) is a promising phytochemical agent against PCa that affects AR activity and epigenetic regulators in PCa cells. However, whether DIM suppresses PCa via epigenetic regulation of AR target genes is unknown. We assessed epigenetic regulation of AR target genes in LNCaP PCa cells and showed that DIM treatment led to epigenetic suppression of AR target genes involved in DNA repair (PARP1, MRE11, DNA-PK). Decreased expression of these genes was accompanied by an increase in repressive chromatin marks, loss of AR occupancy and EZH2 recruitment to their regulatory regions. Decreased DNA repair gene expression was associated with an increase in DNA damage (γH2Ax) and up-regulation of genomic repeat elements LINE1 and α-satellite. Our results suggest that DIM suppresses AR-dependent gene transcription through epigenetic modulation, leading to DNA damage and genome instability in PCa cells. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. 40Ar/39Ar dating of tourmaline as a tool for high-temperature metamorphism thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, Fred; Thern, Eric

    2014-05-01

    Tourmaline is an ubiquitous mineral, with properties making it ideal for studying metamorphic processes as well as a useful tool for a wide range of applications (e.g, magmatism, metasomatism, ore deposits [1]), mostly because it is not sensitive to chemical or mechanical alteration and is stable over a wide range of pressure-temperature conditions (up to 6 GPa and 850° C [2]). Typical metamorphic tourmaline types include dravite and shorl which, along with elbaite, belong to the alkali group [1]. The alkali group is notable because tourmalines from this group tend to incorporate trace amounts of K2O and therefore, can be dated using the 40Ar/39Ar technique. In order to understand the maximum temperature below which the K/Ar chronometer stays closed to argon loss by thermally activated diffusion, we carried out temperature controlled furnace diffusion experiments on well-behaved 40Ar/39Ar plateau-forming Archean tourmaline of 2935 ± 9 Ma [3]. Each experiment yielded an Arrhenius profile (Do vs. 1/temperature) that shows that the 39Ar data form two linear arrays with two distinct slopes. The first array only includes a few % of the total gas, has a shallow slope and shows very fast diffusivity at low temperature. We interpret these data as indicating very fast release of argon by cracks and defects. The second array of data points includes most of the gas of each experiment and forms a much steeper slope. These data yielded Ea (activation energy) values ranging from 120 to 157 Kcal/mol and D0 (pre-exponential diffusion factor) values ranging from 1.9x106 to 2.5x109 cm2/s for crystals with an average radius of 100 ± 25 μm. Three additional experiments using a laser (resulting in poor temperature control) suggest similar values although the latter experiments are considered semi-quantitative. The furnace experiments suggest that tourmaline has a weighted mean closure temperature of 804 ± 90 ° C (1σ) for a cooling rate of 10° C/Ma. Monte Carlo simulations using

  10. Possibility of controlling the chemical pattern of He and Ar “guided streamers” by means of N{sub 2} or O{sub 2} additives

    SciTech Connect

    Gazeli, K.; Svarnas, P. E-mail: franck.clement@univ-pau.fr; Held, B.; Clément, F. E-mail: franck.clement@univ-pau.fr; Marlin, L.

    2015-03-07

    Plasma chemistry at atmospheric pressure and low temperature has met an increased interest due to the effective production of reactive species (mainly reactive nitrogen species and reactive oxygen species) which are demanded in many applications like in biomedicine. Τhe generation of such emissive reactive species is herein studied. A single parameter, i.e., the gas composition, is tuned and abundant chemical species are obtained in a quite controllable manner. The system refers to a small dielectric barrier discharge based reactor fed with He–N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} or Ar–N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} gases, which provides plasma in the form of “guided streamers.” The plasma is sustained by positive high voltage pulses, and the emissive transitions versus the gas composition is determined by UV-VIS optical emission spectroscopy. The relative intensities of emissive species are recorded in the ambient air where the streamers propagate. The evolution of dominant species as a function of the gas composition is mapped, and optimal conditions in terms of species production are clearly revealed. The results show that additives do not necessarily enhance the density of all species, implying the need for plasma chemistry optimization in respect to every application. The study is extended inside the reactor, supporting the above statements. Finally, the rotational and vibrational distributions of critical probe molecules are recorded, testing the dependence of the gas temperature and energy transfer, respectively, on the gas composition.

  11. Book review: Advances in 40Ar/39Ar dating: From archaeology to planetary sciences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cosca, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    The recently published book Advances in 40Ar/39Ar Dating: From Archaeology to Planetary Sciences is a collection of 24 chapters authored by international scientists on topics ranging from decay constants to 40Ar/39Ar dating of extraterrestrial objects. As stated by the editors in their introduction, these chapters were assembled with the goal of providing technique-specific examples highlighting recent advances in the field of 40Ar/39Ar dating. As this is the first book truly dedicated to 40Ar/39Ar dating since the second edition printing of the argon geochronologist’s handbook Geochronology and Thermochronology by the 40Ar/39Ar Method (McDougall and Harrison 1999), a new collection of chapters highlighting recent advances in 40Ar/39Ar geochronology offers much to the interested reader.

  12. Controlled release of moxifloxacin from intraocular lenses modified by Ar plasma-assisted grafting with AMPS or SBMA: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, A F R; Vieira, A P; Colaço, R; Saramago, B; Gil, M H; Coimbra, P; Alves, P; Bozukova, D; Correia, T R; Correia, I J; Guiomar, A J; Serro, A P

    2017-08-01

    Intraocular lenses (IOLs) present an alternative for extended, local drug delivery in the prevention of post-operative acute endophthalmitis. In the present work, we modified the surface of a hydrophilic acrylic material, used for manufacturing of IOLs, through plasma-assisted grafting copolymerization of 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid (AMPS) or [2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl]dimethyl-(3-sulfopropyl)ammonium hydroxide (SBMA), with the aim of achieving a controlled and effective drug release. The material was loaded with moxifloxacin (MFX), a commonly used antibiotic for endophthalmitis prevention. The characterization of the modified material showed that relevant properties, like swelling capacity, wettability, refractive index and transmittance, were not affected by the surface modification. Concerning the drug release profiles, the most promising result was obtained when AMPS grafting was done in the presence of MFX. This modification led to a higher amount of drug being released for a longer period of time, which is a requirement for the prevention of endophthalmitis. The material was found to be non-cytotoxic for rabbit corneal endothelial cells. In a second step, prototype IOLs were modified with AMPS and loaded with MFX as previously and, after sterilization and storage (30days), they were tested under dynamic conditions, in a microfluidic cell with volume and renovation rate similar to the eye aqueous humour. MFX solutions collected in this assay were tested against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis and the released antibiotic proved to be effective against both bacteria until the 12th day of release. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A 40Ar/ 39Ar study of post-tectonic cooling in the Britt domain of the Grenville Province, Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culshaw, N.; Reynolds, P. H.; Check, G.

    1991-08-01

    We report the results of a 40Ar/ 39Ar study of rocks from the Britt domain, northwestern Grenville Province. Most of the age spectra obtained for micas and amphiboles have well defined age plateaus. Typically, K-feldspars yielded spectra with age gradients and Arrhenius plots with kinks or offsets. Hence, some of the data were interpreted in terms of a multi-diffusion domain-size model. This 40Ar/ 39Ar data base (5 amphiboles, 9 micas, 4 K-feldspar), along with some recently acquired U&z.sbnd;Pb data, provide reasonable constraints on the post-peak metamorphic cooling history which began at depth in the upper amphibolite facies. Comparison of the data with exhumation paths generated by thermal models suggest that cooling, taking place over ˜ 400 Ma, was for the most part due to erosionally controlled exhumation. Although the decompression may have initiated with a short period of rapid (extensional?) uplift, the entire cooling history may have been erosionally controlled. There is an apparent difference in cooling ages between north and south in the 40Ar/ 39Ar mica and K-feldspar data for the Britt domain, which may be due to somewhat higher exhumation rates in the north and/or an elevated geotherm in the south.

  14. Influence of deformation and fluids on Ar retention in white mica: Dating the Dover Fault, Newfoundland Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellett, Dawn A.; Warren, Clare; Larson, Kyle P.; Zwingmann, Horst; van Staal, Cees R.; Rogers, Neil

    2016-06-01

    White mica 40Ar/39Ar analyses may provide useful constraints on the timing of tectonic processes, but complex geological and thermal histories can perturb Ar systematics in a variety of ways. Ductile shear zones represent excellent case studies for exploring the link(s) between dynamic re-/neo-crystallization of white mica and coeval enhanced fluid flow, and their effect on 40Ar/39Ar dates. White mica 40Ar/39Ar dates were collected from compositionally similar granites that record different episodes of deformation with proximity to the Dover Fault, a terrane-bounding strike-slip shear zone in the Appalachian orogen, Newfoundland, Canada. 40Ar/39Ar data were collected in situ by laser ablation and by step heating single crystals. Results were compared to each other and against complementary U-Pb zircon and monazite, and K-Ar fault gouge analysis. Although step-heat 40Ar/39Ar is a widely applied method in orogenic settings, this dataset shows that relatively flat step-heat 40Ar/39Ar spectra are in contradiction with wide spreads in in-situ40Ar/39Ar dates from the same samples, and that plateau dates in some cases yielded mixed dates of equivocal geological significance. This result indicates that the step-wise release of Ar from white mica likely homogenizes and obscures spatially-controlled Ar isotope reservoirs in white mica from sheared rocks. In contrast, in situ laser ablation 40Ar/39Ar analysis preserves the spatial resolution of 40Ar reservoirs that have been variably reset by deformation and fluid interaction. This study therefore suggests that laser ablation is the best method for dating the timing of deformation recorded by white mica. Final interpretation of results should be guided by microstructural analysis, estimation of deformation temperature, chemical characterization of white mica, and complementary chronometers. Overall the dataset shows that granitic protoliths were emplaced between 430 and 422 Ma (U-Pb zircon). High strain deformation along the

  15. Armenian Astronomical Society (ArAS) activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    A review on the activities and achievements of Armenian Astronomical Society (ArAS) and Armenian astronomy in general during the last years is given. ArAS membership, ArAS electronic newsletters (ArASNews), ArAS webpage, Annual Meetings, Annual Prize for Young Astronomers (Yervant Terzian Prize) and other awards, international relations, presence in international organizations, local and international summer schools, science camps, astronomical Olympiads and other events, matters related to astronomical education, astronomical heritage, amateur astronomy, astronomy outreach and ArAS further projects are described and discussed.

  16. Oldest human footprints dated by Ar/Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaillet, Stéphane; Vita-Scaillet, Grazia; Guillou, Hervé

    2008-11-01

    Fossilized human trackways are extremely rare in the geologic record. These bear indirect but invaluable testimony of human/hominid locomotion in open air settings and can provide critical information on biomechanical changes relating to bipedalism evolution throughout the primitive human lineage. Among these, the "Devil's footsteps" represent one of the best preserved human footprints suite recovered so far in a Pleistocene volcanic ash of the Roccamonfina volcano (southern Italy). Until recently, the age of these footprints remained speculative and indirectly correlated with a loosely dated caldera-forming eruption that produced the Brown Leucitic Tuff. Despite extensive hydrothermal alteration of the pyroclastic deposit and variable contamination with excess 40Ar, detailed and selective 40Ar/ 39Ar laser probe analysis of single leucite crystals recovered from the ash deposit shows that the pyroclastic layer and the footprints are 345 ± 6 kyr old (1 σ), confirming for the first time that these are the oldest human trackways ever dated, and that they were presumably left by the modern human predecessor, Homo heidelbergensis, close to Climatic Termination IV.

  17. Efficacy of a text messaging (SMS) based intervention for adults with hypertension: protocol for the StAR (SMS Text-message Adherence suppoRt trial) randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bobrow, Kirsty; Brennan, Thomas; Springer, David; Levitt, Naomi S; Rayner, Brian; Namane, Mosedi; Yu, Ly-Mee; Tarassenko, Lionel; Farmer, Andrew

    2014-01-11

    Interventions to support people with hypertension in attending clinics and taking their medication have potential to improve outcomes, but delivery on a wide scale and at low cost is challenging. Some trials evaluating clinical interventions using short message service (SMS) text-messaging systems have shown important outcomes, although evidence is limited. We have developed a novel SMS system integrated with clinical care for use by people with hypertension in a low-resource setting. We aim to test the efficacy of the system in improving blood pressure control and treatment adherence compared to usual care. The SMS Text-message Adherence suppoRt trial (StAR) is a pragmatic individually randomised three-arm parallel group trial in adults treated for hypertension at a single primary care centre in Cape Town, South Africa. The intervention is a structured programme of clinic appointment, medication pick-up reminders, medication adherence support and hypertension-related education delivered remotely using an automated system with either informational or interactive SMS text-messages. Usual care is supplemented by infrequent non-hypertension related SMS text-messages. Participants are 1:1:1 individually randomised, to usual care or to one of the two active interventions using minimisation to dynamically adjust for gender, age, baseline systolic blood pressure, years with hypertension, and previous clinic attendance. The primary outcome is the change in mean systolic blood pressure at 12-month follow-up from baseline measured with research staff blinded to trial allocation. Secondary outcomes include the proportion of patients with 80% or more of days medication available, proportion of participants achieving a systolic blood pressure less than 140 mmHg and a diastolic blood pressure less than 90 mmHg, hospital admissions, health status, retention in clinical care, satisfaction with treatment and care, and patient related quality of life. Anonymised demographic data

  18. Improving the Precision of the Half Life of 34Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, J. C.; Bencomo, M.; Chen, L.; Horvat, V.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.

    2016-03-01

    Currently, precise ft-values measured for superallowed 0+ -->0+ β transitions provide the most accurate value for Vud, the up-down quark mixing element of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix. This enables the most demanding test of CKM unitarity, one of the pillars of the Standard Model. Further improvements in precision are possible if the ft values for pairs of mirror 0+ -->0+ transitions can be measured with 0.1% precision or better. The decays of 34Ar and 34Cl are members of such a mirror pair, but so far the former is not known with sufficient precision. Since our 2006 publication of the half-life of 34Ar, we have improved significantly our acquisition and analysis techniques, adding refinements that have led to increased accuracy. The 34Cl half-life is about twice that of 34Ar. This obscures the 34Ar contribution to the decay in measurements such as ours, which detected the decay positrons and was thus unable to differentiate between the parent and daughter decays. We report here two experiments aiming to improve the half-life of 34Ar: The first detected positrons as in but with improved controls; the second measured γ rays in coincidence with positrons, thus achieving a clear separation of 34Ar decay from 34Cl.

  19. Commander Truly cleans ARS filters on middeck

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1983-09-05

    STS008-13-336 (5 Sept 1983) --- On middeck, Richard M. Truly, STS-8 commander, uses vacuum cleaner to remove debris from air revitalization system (ARS) filter assembly. Open panel on middeck floor is the ARS access panel.

  20. 39Ar-40Ar chronology of the enstatite chondrite parent bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Jens; Trieloff, Mario; Ott, Uli; Korochantseva, Ekaterina V.; Buykin, Alexey I.

    2014-03-01

    Ar-Ar isochron ages of EL chondrites suggest closure of the K-Ar system at 4.49 ± 0.01 Ga for EL5 and 6 chondrites, and 4.45 ± 0.01 Ga for EL3 MAC 88136. The high-temperature release regimes contain a mixture of radiogenic 40Ar* and trapped primordial argon (solar or Q-type) with 40Ar/36ArTR ~ 0, which does not affect the 40Ar budget. The low-temperature extractions show evidence of an excess 40Ar component. The 40Ar/36Ar is 180-270; it is defined by intercept values of isochron regression. Excess 40Ar is only detectable in petrologic types >4/5. These lost most of their primordial 36Ar from low-temperature phases during metamorphism and retrapped excess 40Ar. The origin of this excess 40Ar component is probably related to metamorphic Ar mobilization, homogenization of primordial and in situ radiogenic Ar, and trapping of Ar by distinct low-temperature phases. Ar-Ar ages of EH chondrites are more variable and show clear evidence of a major impact-induced partial resetting at about 2.2 Ga ago or alternatively, prolonged metamorphic decomposition of major K carrier phases. EH impact melt LAP 02225 displayed the highest Ar-Ar isochron age of 4.53 ± 0.01 Ga. This age sets a limit of about 25-45 Ma for the age bias between the K-Ar and U-Pb decay systems.

  1. arXiv.org and Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramlo, Susan

    2007-01-01

    The website arXiv.org (pronounced "archive") is a free online resource for full-text articles in the fields of physics, mathematics, computer science, nonlinear science, and quantitative biology that has existed for about 15 years. Available directly at http://www.arXiv.org, this e-print archive is searchable. As of Jan. 3, 2007, arXiv had open…

  2. arXiv.org and Physics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramlo, Susan

    2007-01-01

    The website arXiv.org (pronounced "archive") is a free online resource for full-text articles in the fields of physics, mathematics, computer science, nonlinear science, and quantitative biology that has existed for about 15 years. Available directly at http://www.arXiv.org, this e-print archive is searchable. As of Jan. 3, 2007, arXiv had open…

  3. Electronic spectroscopy of the Al +-Ar complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jie; Dagdigian, Paul J.

    1999-05-01

    The laser fluorescence excitation spectrum of the Al +-Ar complex near the Al + ion 3s3p 1P ← 3s 2 1S resonance transition is reported. An excited-state ( v', 0) progression and the (0, 1) hot band were observed. Rotational analysis revealed that these bands involve an electronic transition from the Al +-Ar X 1Σ+ ground state to the 1Σ+ state correlating with the Al +( 1P)+Ar asymptote. Rotational constants and upper-state vibrational constants and the dissociation energy were determined. The spectroscopic constants of the two observed Al +-Ar electronic states are compared with those for neutral AlAr states.

  4. A novel MAs(III)-selective ArsR transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Nadar, Venkadesh Sarkarai; Rosen, Barry P

    2017-09-01

    Microbial expression of genes for resistance to heavy metals and metalloids is usually transcriptionally regulated by the toxic ions themselves. Arsenic is a ubiquitous, naturally occurring toxic metalloid widely distributed in soil and groundwater. Microbes biotransform both arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) into more toxic methylated metabolites methylarsenite (MAs(III)) and dimethylarsenite (DMAs(III)). Environmental arsenic is sensed by members of the ArsR/SmtB family. The arsR gene is autoregulated and is typically part of an operon that contains other ars genes involved in arsenic detoxification. To date every identified ArsR is regulated by inorganic As(III). Here we described a novel ArsR from Shewanella putrefaciens selective for MAs(III). SpArsR orthologs control expression of two MAs(III) resistance genes, arsP that encodes the ArsP MAs(III) efflux permease, and arsH encoding the ArsH MAs(III) oxidase. SpArsR has two conserved cysteine residues, Cys101 and Cys102. Mutation of either resulted in loss of MAs(III) binding, indicating that they form an MAs(III) binding site. SpArsR can be converted into an As(III)-responsive repressor by introduction of an additional cysteine that allows for three-coordinate As(III) binding. Our results indicate that SpArsR evolved selectivity for MAs(III) over As(III) in order to control expression of genes for MAs(III) detoxification. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Controlling the regiospecific oxidation of aromatics via active site engineering of toluene para-monooxygenase of Ralstonia pickettii PKO1.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Ayelet; Tao, Ying; Rui, Lingyun; Wood, Thomas K

    2005-01-07

    A primary goal of protein engineering is to control catalytic activity. Here we show that through mutagenesis of three active site residues, the catalytic activity of a multicomponent monooxygenase is altered so that it hydroxylates all three positions of toluene as well as both positions of naphthalene. Hence, for the first time, an enzyme has been engineered so that its regiospecific oxidation of a substrate can be controlled. Through the A107G mutation in the alpha-subunit of toluene para-monooxygenase, a variant was formed that hydroxylated toluene primarily at the ortho-position while converting naphthalene to 1-naphthol. Conversely, the A107T variant produced >98% p-cresol and p-nitrophenol from toluene and nitrobenzene, respectively, as well as produced 2-naphthol from naphthalene. The mutation I100S/G103S produced a toluene para-monooxygenase variant that formed 75% m-cresol from toluene and 100% m-nitrophenol from nitrobenzene; thus, for the first time a true meta-hydroxylating toluene monooxygenase was created.

  6. FOXA1 acts upstream of GATA2 and AR in hormonal regulation of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jonathan C.; Fong, Ka-Wing; Jin, Hong-Jian; Yang, Yeqing A; Kim, Jung; Yu, Jindan

    2016-01-01

    Hormonal regulation of gene expression by androgen receptor (AR) is tightly controlled by many transcriptional cofactors, including pioneer factors FOXA1 and GATA2, which, however, exhibit distinct expression patterns and functional roles in prostate cancer. Here, we examined how FOXA1, GATA2, and AR crosstalk and regulate hormone-dependent gene expression in prostate cancer cells. ChIP-seq analysis revealed that FOXA1 reprograms both AR and GATA2 cistrome by preferably recruiting them to FKHD-containing genomic sites. By contrast, GATA2 is unable to shift AR or FOXA1 to GATA motifs. Rather, GATA2 co-occupancy enhances AR and FOXA1 binding to nearby ARE and FKHD sites, respectively. Similarly, AR increases, but not re-programs, GATA2 and FOXA1 cistromes. Concordantly, GATA2 and AR strongly enhance the transcriptional program of each other, whereas FOXA1 regulates GATA2- and AR-mediated gene expression in a context-dependent manner due to its reprogramming effects. Taken together, our data delineated for the first time the distinct mechanisms by which GATA2 and FOXA1 regulate AR cistrome and suggest that FOXA1 acts upstream of GATA2 and AR in determining hormone-dependent gene expression in prostate cancer. PMID:26751772

  7. FOXA1 acts upstream of GATA2 and AR in hormonal regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J C; Fong, K-W; Jin, H-J; Yang, Y A; Kim, J; Yu, J

    2016-08-18

    Hormonal regulation of gene expression by androgen receptor (AR) is tightly controlled by many transcriptional cofactors, including pioneer factors FOXA1 and GATA2, which, however, exhibit distinct expression patterns and functional roles in prostate cancer. Here, we examined how FOXA1, GATA2 and AR crosstalk and regulate hormone-dependent gene expression in prostate cancer cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing analysis revealed that FOXA1 reprograms both AR and GATA2 cistrome by preferably recruiting them to FKHD-containing genomic sites. By contrast, GATA2 is unable to shift AR or FOXA1 to GATA motifs. Rather, GATA2 co-occupancy enhances AR and FOXA1 binding to nearby ARE and FKHD sites, respectively. Similarly, AR increases, but not reprograms, GATA2 and FOXA1 cistromes. Concordantly, GATA2 and AR strongly enhance the transcriptional program of each other, whereas FOXA1 regulates GATA2- and AR-mediated gene expression in a context-dependent manner due to its reprogramming effects. Taken together, our data delineated for the first time the distinct mechanisms by which GATA2 and FOXA1 regulate AR cistrome and suggest that FOXA1 acts upstream of GATA2 and AR in determining hormone-dependent gene expression in prostate cancer.

  8. AR-v7 protein expression is regulated by protein kinase and phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinan; Xie, Ning; Gleave, Martin E.; Rennie, Paul S.; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-01-01

    Failure of androgen-targeted therapy and progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are often attributed to sustained expression of the androgen receptor (AR) and its major splice variant, AR-v7. Although the new generation of anti-androgens such as enzalutamide effectively inhibits AR activity, accumulating pre-clinical and clinical evidence indicates that AR-v7 remains constitutively active in driving CRPC progression. However, molecular mechanisms which control AR-v7 protein expression remain unclear. We apply multiple prostate cancer cell models to demonstrate that enzalutamide induces differential activation of protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1) and Akt kinase depending on the gene context of cancer cells. The balance between PP-1 and Akt activation governs AR phosphorylation status and activation of the Mdm2 ubiquitin ligase. Mdm2 recognizes phosphorylated serine 213 of AR-v7, and induces AR-v7 ubiquitination and protein degradation. These findings highlight the decisive roles of PP-1 and Akt for AR-v7 protein expression and activities when AR is functionally blocked. PMID:26378044

  9. AR-v7 protein expression is regulated by protein kinase and phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinan; Xie, Ning; Gleave, Martin E; Rennie, Paul S; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-10-20

    Failure of androgen-targeted therapy and progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are often attributed to sustained expression of the androgen receptor (AR) and its major splice variant, AR-v7. Although the new generation of anti-androgens such as enzalutamide effectively inhibits AR activity, accumulating pre-clinical and clinical evidence indicates that AR-v7 remains constitutively active in driving CRPC progression. However, molecular mechanisms which control AR-v7 protein expression remain unclear. We apply multiple prostate cancer cell models to demonstrate that enzalutamide induces differential activation of protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1) and Akt kinase depending on the gene context of cancer cells. The balance between PP-1 and Akt activation governs AR phosphorylation status and activation of the Mdm2 ubiquitin ligase. Mdm2 recognizes phosphorylated serine 213 of AR-v7, and induces AR-v7 ubiquitination and protein degradation. These findings highlight the decisive roles of PP-1 and Akt for AR-v7 protein expression and activities when AR is functionally blocked.

  10. The USB-based portable data acquisition system for AR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lei; Yan, Dayuan; Dong, Taian; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Guangting; Zheng, Chunliang

    2011-11-01

    Rotary position sensors are widely used in many applications that require precise shaft unlimited rotation: including control systems, robotics and AR (Augmented Reality) systems. However, traditional data acquisition system is often a PC-based (Personal Computer-based) one with complex structures and complicated electrical connections, which means that the system has limited application for its size as well as its poor portability. That is a main drawback, especially for AR system in which the user is supposed to walk freely. In this paper, a novel portable data acquisition system (PDAS) based on USB interface technology with a succinct hardware structure is proposed. Implemented on an 8051-based microcontroller AT89C5131, the proposed system can receive signal from optical encoder, decode the signal and transfer the data to the computer through USB interface. The experimental results show that this system can provide the possibility to realize portable and improve performance of AR, which demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed system.

  11. Age measurements of potassium-bearing sulfide minerals by the 40Ar/39Ar technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czamanske, G.K.; Lanphere, M.A.; Erd, Richard C.; Blake, M.C.

    1978-01-01

    K-Ar ages have been determined for sulfide minerals for the first time. The occurrence of adequate amounts of potassium-bearing sulfides with ideal compositions K3Fe10S14 (???10 wt.% K) and KFe2S3 (???16 wt.% K) in samples from a mafic alkalic diatreme at Coyote Peak, California, prompted an attempt to date these materials. K3Fe10S14, a massive mineral with conchoidal fracture, gives an age of 29.4 ?? 0.5 m.y. (40Ar/39Ar), indistinguishable from the 28.3 ?? 0.4 m.y. (40Ar/39Ar) and 30.2 ?? 1.0 m.y.8 (conventional K-Ar) ages obtained for associated phlogopite (8.7 wt.% K). KFe2S3, a bladed, fibrous sulfide, gives a younger age, 26.5 ?? 0.5 m.y. (40Ar/39Ar), presumably owing to Ar loss. ?? 1978.

  12. Interpretation of discordant 40Ar/39Ar age-spectra of mesozoic tholeiites from antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleck, R.J.; Sutter, J.F.; Elliot, D.H.

    1977-01-01

    Conventional K-Ar ages of tholeiitic basalts of the Ferrar Group in the central Transantarctic Mountains indicate significant loss of radiogenic 40Ar from this unit over much of its outcrop area. Argon loss varies inversely with amount of devitrified matrix in the basalts, which have not been thermally or tectonically disturbed since extrusion. 40Ar/19Ar age-spectra of these tholeiites are generally discordant and indicate significant inhomogeneity in the distribution of radiogenic 40Ar with respect to 39Ar, but are distinctly different from release patterns of thermally disturbed samples. Amounts of argon redistribution vary directly with amounts of devitrification and are reflected in progressive modification of the age spectra. A model of redistribution of radiogenic 40Ar by devitrification of originally glassy matrix is suggested that is consistent with disturbance of the conventional K-Ar systematics as well as the 40Ar/39Ar age-spectra. Samples with substantial redistribution but minor loss of radiogenic argon yield age spectra whose apparent ages decrease from low-temperature to high-temperature steps, similar to those reported for some lunar basalts, breccias, and soils. Modification of all the age spectra is attributed to redistribution of radiogenic 40Ar during progressive devitrification, although 39Ar-recoil effects suggested by Turner and Cadogan (1974) may be a factor in some cases. Where devitrification involves most potassium sites within the basalt, 40Ar/39Ar age-plateaux may be formed that have no geologic significance. ?? 1977.

  13. Metrologically-Calibrated 40Ar Concentrations and Ages of Mineral Standards Used in 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. E.; Davidheiser-Kroll, B.; Kuiper, K.; Wijbrans, J. R.; Mark, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    In geochronology, isotopic ages are determined from the ratio of parent and daughter nuclide concentrations in minerals. For dating of geological material using the K-Ar system, the simultaneous determination of 40Ar and 40K concentrations on the same aliquot is not possible. Therefore, a widely used variant, the 40Ar/39Ar technique, involves the production of 39Ar from 39K by neutron bombardment and the reliance on indirect natural calibrators of the neutron flux, referred to as "mineral standards." Many mineral standards still in use rely on decades-old determinations of 40Ar concentrations; resulting uncertainties, both systematic and analytical, impede the determination of higher accuracy ages using the K-Ar decay system. We present results for the 40Ar concentrations and ages of mineral standards determined based on a modern gas delivery system (Morgan et al. 2011), which delivers metrologically-traceable amounts of 40Ar and thus allows for the sensitivity calibration of noble gas mass spectrometers.

  14. 40Ar/39Ar Ages for the Sentinel-Arlington Volcanic Field, Southwestern Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cave, S. R.; Greeley, R.; Champion, D. E.; Turrin, B. D.

    2007-12-01

    The Sentinel Plains lava field and proximate small (<10 km diameter) shield volcanoes, collectively referred to as the Sentinel-Arlington Volcanic Field (SAVF) are composed of mostly basaltic lava flows with a small percentage of magmatic and phreatomagmatic tephra deposits. SAVF is located ~75 km southwest of Phoenix, Arizona, and covers ~600 km2. SAVF lies on the eastern terminus of the Gila River graben within the Basin and Range physiographic province. A series of northwest-trending normal faults cut across the surrounding terrain, indicating that the loci of the SAVF eruptive centers could be controlled by structural trends. The volcanic centers of SAVF erupted near the Gila River channel, damming and diverting the river at least twice, forming small ephemeral lakes. The relative timing of the SAVF eruptions was determined in order to unravel the SAVF eruptive history as well as the timing of the ancient Gila River interactions that led to the development of the Painted Rock transverse drainage. The absolute timing was determined in order datermine causal relationships with local tectonism. The SAVF basal contact is ~30 m above the Holocene surface where exposed along the current river channel; and the lavas show similar amounts mantling by aeolian dust, development of pedogenic calcium carbonate, and subsequent incision by radial ephemeral drainages. Relative timing of eruptive events was determined by stratigraphic and embayment relationships. Continuity of distal flows exposed in cross-sections to their source vents could be established using field work, and confirmed using geomagnetic secular variation and geochemical analyses. Edifices generally corresponded to discreet geomagnetic inclination, declination, and paleointensity values. Older eruptive events exhibited normal polarity, while stratigraphically younger events exhibited reversed polarity. Most lavas were alkali olivine basalt with a range of unnormalized SiO2 weight percentages ranging from 47

  15. Androgen receptor (AR) in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Lee, Soo Ok; Chang, Eugene; Pang, Haiyan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are still the highest leading cause of death worldwide. Several risk factors have been linked to CVDs, including smoking, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and gender among others. Sex hormones, especially the androgen and its receptor, androgen receptor (AR), have been linked to many diseases with a clear gender difference. Here, we summarize the effects of androgen/AR on CVDs, including hypertension, stroke, atherosclerosis, abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), myocardial hypertrophy, and heart failure, as well as the metabolic syndrome/diabetes and their impacts on CVDs. Androgen/AR signaling exacerbates hypertension, and anti-androgens may suppress hypertension. Androgen/AR signaling plays dual roles in strokes, depending on different kinds of factors; however, generally males have a higher incidence of strokes than females. Androgen and AR differentially modulate atherosclerosis. Androgen deficiency causes elevated lipid accumulation to enhance atherosclerosis; however, targeting AR in selective cells without altering serum androgen levels would suppress atherosclerosis progression. Androgen/AR signaling is crucial in AAA development and progression, and targeting androgen/AR profoundly restricts AAA progression. Men have increased cardiac hypertrophy compared with age-matched women that may be due to androgens. Finally, androgen/AR plays important roles in contributing to obesity and insulin/leptin resistance to increase the metabolic syndrome. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  16. Dating the longevity of ductile shear zones: Insight from 40Ar/39Ar in situ analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Susanne; Hammerschmidt, Konrad; Rosenberg, Claudio L.

    2013-05-01

    We attempt to improve temporal constraints on the longevity and the termination of ductile shear zones by performing texturally-controlled in situ 40Ar/39Ar analyses of pre-kinematic muscovite, biotite and K-feldspars, of syn-kinematic phengite and K-feldspar, and of post-kinematic phengite within the same samples of sinistral shear zones from the western Tauern Window (Eastern Alps). Additionally two samples were dated by the Rb/Sr method (microsampling). Relative sequences of mineral formation based on microstructural, cross-cutting relationships were confirmed by in situ 40Ar/39Ar analyses, showing that syn-kinematic minerals are, in general, younger than pre-kinematic minerals and older or of equal age than the post-kinematic minerals of the same sample. From the rim to the core of the western Tauern Window syn-kinematic phengite and K-feldspar reveal a set of formation ages varying between 33 and 15 Ma for the northernmost and peripheral shear zone (Ahorn Shear Zone), between 24 and 12 Ma for the intermediate shear zone network (Tuxer Shear Zones), and between 20 and 7 Ma for the southernmost and central shear zone (Greiner Shear Zone). The age variation of syn-kinematic phengite and K-feldspar analyses is larger than the analytical error of each age obtained. In addition, isochron calculations of the syn-kinematic minerals reveal atmospheric-like 40Ar/36Ar intercepts. Therefore, the obtained age values of the syn-kinematic minerals are interpreted as formation ages which date increments of a long lasting deformation period. The time range of deformation of each shear zone system is bracketed by the oldest and youngest formation ages of syn-kinematic phengite and K-feldspar. Post-kinematic phengite laths show the youngest formation ages and overlap with the youngest syn-kinematic formation ages. This relationship indicates that post-kinematic growth occurred immediately after syn-kinematic mineral formation at the end of ductile sinistral shear. Hence, the

  17. A critical evaluation of young (near-zero) K-Ar ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaillet, Stéphane; Guillou, Hervé

    2004-04-01

    An evaluation of the precision and resolution of the unspiked K-Ar dating method is presented with particular regard to the statistical significance of ages that are measured near or at the detection limit of the technique. Near-zero (historical) ages can be measured by the unspiked K-Ar technique with a precision that is essentially controlled by the precision with which the 40Ar/ 36Ar of the sample can be resolved from the present-day atmospheric value of 295.5. The best analytical precision on the isotopic ratio is ±0.05% (1σ) by this technique, which currently limits the lower detection limit of unspiked K-Ar ages to samples featuring at least 0.14% of radiogenic 40Ar. The corresponding youngest resolvable K-Ar age depends on the K content and atmospheric contamination of the sample. Total-fusion analysis of high-K refractory minerals like sanidine is not practicable via K-Ar, and the lowest resolvable age for medium-K samples more amenable to complete fusion is around 1.5 ka (on a single-run basis). It is argued that near-zero age measured with a probability density straddling or narrowing the time-origin cannot be handled without accounting for the non-negativity constraint imposed by the physical requirement of a positive age. The pertinent equations are derived both for the single-run case and for the case of independent replicates made on a single sample. We show that pooled K-Ar replicates can theoretically reduce the nominal uncertainty of individual unspiked ages (typically ±1.5 ka, 2σ) to a value that is close to the smallest 40Ar/ 39Ar isochron age uncertainty achievable on sanidine in the 0-2 ka range (±0.2 ka, 2σ). However, this performance is obtained at the cost of prohibitively large-sample statistics ( n≥15) for medium-K feldspars datable via K-Ar. Coupled with the inability of the K-Ar approach to obviate the problems of excess/fractionated 40Ar and/or xenocrystic contamination, this makes the 40Ar/ 39Ar technique the method of choice

  18. 40Ar/39Ar Interlaboratory Calibration into the Holocene.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heizler, M. T.; Jicha, B.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Miggins, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in 40Ar/39Ar analytical precision for very young rocks requires collaborative efforts amongst argon geochronology labs to demonstrate age reproducibility commensurate with high precision. NM Tech (NMT), the University of Wisconsin (UW) and Oregon State University (OSU) have each dated Quaternary flux monitor standard AC-2 sanidine (~1.185 Ma), a blind sanidine described as being 50-100 ka (BS) and sanidine from the Qixiangshan (QIX) flow (~10 ka), Changbaishan volcano, China. The samples were irradiated in a single package with FC-2 sanidine (28.201 Ma) as the flux monitor and the irradiated material was distributed amongst the labs. Heizler was present during analysis at both OSU and UW and Jicha attended OSU during analysis. Physical presence was key towards gaining understanding of individual protocols and prompted valuable discussions. Analyses were carried out on single crystals using total fusion and/or step heating approaches. Age agreement was achieved within 2s uncertainty that ranged between (0.03-0.3%, 0.13-0.37% and 1.8-2.6%) for AC-2, BS and QIX, respectively. Each lab found AC-2 to vary somewhat beyond a normal distribution and to yield an age relative to FC-2 of ~1.185 Ma that is ~1.3% (~5-10 sigma) lower than some published estimates. A key cause of the variation between this study and previous results may be variable gas pressure equilibration times between extraction line and mass spectrometer coupled with variable choices to estimate time zero by other laboratories. The majority of our efforts concentrated on the QIX sanidine where prior data obtained by our labs revealed a factor of two spread in age (~11 and 23 ka) based on experiments carried out by total fusion and bulk incremental heating. By conducting single crystal age spectrum analysis we were able to mitigate effects of melt inclusion hosted excess argon and xenocrystic contamination towards obtaining analytical agreement with apparent ages near 10 ka. However, philosophical

  19. Refractive index and solubility control of para-cymene solutions for index-matched fluid-structure interaction studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fort, Charles; Fu, Christopher D.; Weichselbaum, Noah A.; Bardet, Philippe M.

    2015-12-01

    To deploy optical diagnostics such as particle image velocimetry or planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) in complex geometries, it is beneficial to use index-matched facilities. A binary mixture of para-cymene and cinnamaldehyde provides a viable option for matching the refractive index of acrylic, a common material for scaled models and test sections. This fluid is particularly appropriate for large-scale facilities and when a low-density and low-viscosity fluid is sought, such as in fluid-structure interaction studies. This binary solution has relatively low kinematic viscosity and density; its use enables the experimentalist to select operating temperature and to increase fluorescence signal in PLIF experiments. Measurements of spectral and temperature dependence of refractive index, density, and kinematic viscosity are reported. The effect of the binary mixture on solubility control of Rhodamine 6G is also characterized.

  20. First-principles calibration of 40Ar/39Ar mineral standards and complete extraction of 40Ar* from sanidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. E.; Kuiper, K.; Mark, D.; Postma, O.; Villa, I. M.; Wijbrans, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    40Ar/39Ar geochronology relies on comparing argon isotopic data for unknowns to those for knowns. Mineral standards used as neutron fluence monitors must be dated by the K-Ar method (or at least referenced to a mineral of known K-Ar age). The commonly used age of 28.02 ± 0.28 Ma for the Fish Canyon sanidine (FCs) (Renne et al., 1998) is based upon measurements of radiogenic 40Ar in GA1550 biotite (McDougall and Roksandic, 1974), but underlying full data were not published (these measurements were never intended for use as an international standard), so uncertainties are difficult to assess. Recent developments by Kuiper et al. (2008) and Renne et al. (2010) are limited by their reliance on the accuracy of other systems. Modern technology should allow for more precise and accurate calibration of primary K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar standards. From the ideal gas law, the number of moles of 40Ar in a system can be calculated from measurements of pressure, volume, and temperature. Thus we have designed and are proceeding to build a pipette system to introduce well-determined amounts of 40Ar into noble gas extraction lines and mass spectrometers. This system relies on components with calibrations traceable to SI unit prototypes, including a diaphragm pressure gauge (MKS Instruments), thermocouples, and a “slug” of an accurately determined volume to be inserted into the reservoir for volume determinations of the reservoir and pipette. The system will be renewable, with a lifetime of ca. 1 month for gas in the reservoir, and portable, to permit interlaboratory calibrations. The quantitative extraction of 40Ar* from the mineral standard is of highest importance; for sanidine standards this is complicated by high melt viscosity during heating. Experiments adding basaltic “zero age glass” (ZAG) to decrease melt viscosity are underway. This has previously been explored by McDowell (1983) with a resistance furnace, but has not been quantitatively addressed with laser heating

  1. Ion kinetics in Ar/H2 cold plasmas: the relevance of ArH+

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Redondo, Miguel; Cueto, Maite; Doménech, José Luis; Tanarro, Isabel; Herrero, Víctor J.

    2015-01-01

    The recent discovery of ArH+ in the interstellar medium has awakened the interest in the chemistry of this ion. In this work, the ion-molecule kinetics of cold plasmas of Ar/H2 is investigated in glow discharges spanning the whole range of [H2]/([H2]+[Ar]) proportions for two pressures, 1.5 and 8 Pa. Ion concentrations are determined by mass spectrometry, and electron temperatures and densities, with Langmuir probes. A kinetic model is used for the interpretation of the results. The selection of experimental conditions evinces relevant changes with plasma pressure in the ion distributions dependence with the H2 fraction, particularly for the major ions: Ar+, ArH+ and H3+. At 1.5 Pa, ArH+ prevails for a wide interval of H2 fractions: 0.3<[H2]/([H2]+[Ar])<0.7. Nevertheless, a pronounced displacement of the ArH+ maximum towards the lowest H2 fractions is observed at 8 Pa, in detriment of Ar+, which becomes restricted to very small [H2]/([H2]+[Ar]) ratios, whereas H3+ becomes dominant for all [H2]/([H2]+[Ar]) > 0.1. The analysis of the data with the kinetic model allows the identification of the sources and sinks of the major ions over the whole range of experimental conditions sampled. Two key factors turn out to be responsible for the different ion distributions observed: the electron temperature, which determines the rate of Ar+ formation and thus of ArH+, and the equilibrium ArH+ + H2 ⇄ H3+ + Ar, which can be strongly dependent of the degree of vibrational excitation of H3+. The results are discussed and compared with previously published data on other Ar/H2 plasmas. PMID:26702354

  2. Re-Evaluation of Ar-39 - Ar-40 Ages for Apollo Lunar Rocks 15415 and 60015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Shih, C.-Y.

    2010-01-01

    We re-analyzed 39Ar-40Ar ages of Apollo lunar highland samples 15415 and 60015, two ferroan anorthosites analyzed previously in the 1970 s, with a more detailed approach and with revised decay constants. From these samples we carefully prepared 100-200 mesh mineral separates for analysis at the Noble Gas Laboratory at NASA-Johnson Space Center. The Ar-39-Ar-40 age spectra for 15415 yielded an age of 3851 +/- 38 Ma with 33-99% of Ar39 release, roughly in agreement with previously reported Ar-Ar ages. For 60015, we obtained an age of 3584 +/- 152 Ma in 23-98% of Ar39 release, also in agreement with previously reported Ar-Ar ages of approximately 3.5 Ga. Highland anorthosites like these are believed by many to be the original crust of the moon, formed by plagioclase floatation atop a magma ocean, however the Ar-Ar ages of 15415 and 60015 are considerably younger than lunar crust formation. By contrast, recently recovered lunar anorthosites such as Dhofar 489, Dhofar 908, and Yamato 86032 yield older Ar-Ar ages, up to 4.35 Ga, much closer to time of formation of the lunar crust. It follows that the Ar-Ar ages of the Apollo samples must have been reset by secondary heating, and that this heating affected highland anorthosites at both the Apollo 15 and Apollo 16 landing sites but did not affect lunar highland meteorites. One obvious consideration is that while the Apollo samples were collected from the near side of the moon, these lunar meteorites are thought to have originated from the lunar far side

  3. Variation of illite/muscovite 40Ar/39Ar age spectra during progressive low-grade metamorphism: an example from the US Cordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdel, Charles; van der Pluijm, Ben A.; Niemi, Nathan

    2012-09-01

    40Ar/39Ar step-heating data were collected from micron to submicron grain-sizes of correlative illite- and muscovite-rich Cambrian pelitic rocks from the western United States that range in metamorphic grade from the shallow diagenetic zone (zeolite facies) to the epizone (greenschist facies). With increasing metamorphic grade, maximum ages from 40Ar/39Ar release spectra decrease, as do total gas ages and retention ages. Previous studies have explained similar results as arising dominantly or entirely from the dissolution of detrital muscovite and precipitation/recrystallization of neo-formed illite. While recognizing the importance of these processes in evaluating our results, we suggest that the inverse correlation between apparent age and metamorphic grade is controlled, primarily, by thermally activated volume diffusion, analogous to the decrease in apparent ages with depth observed for many thermochronometers in borehole experiments. Our results suggest that complete resetting of the illite/muscovite Ar thermochronometer occurs between the high anchizone and epizone, or at roughly 300 °C. This empirical result is in agreement with previous calculations based on muscovite diffusion parameters, which indicate that muscovite grains with radii of 0.05-2 μm should have closure temperatures between 250 and 350 °C. At high anchizone conditions, we observe a reversal in the age/grain-size relationship (the finest grain-size produces the oldest apparent age), which may mark the stage in prograde subgreenschist facies metamorphism of pelitic rocks at which neo-formed illite/muscovite crystallites typically surpass the size of detrital muscovite grains. It is also approximately the stage at which neo-formed illite/muscovite crystallites develop sufficient Ar retentivity to produce geologically meaningful 40Ar/39Ar ages. Results from our sampling transect of Cambrian strata establish a framework for interpreting illite/muscovite 40Ar/39Ar age spectra at different

  4. Paralogous Regulators ArsR1 and ArsR2 of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 as a Basis for Arsenic Biosensor Development

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Matilde; Morel, Bertrand; Ramos, Juan L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The remarkable metal resistance of many microorganisms is related to the presence of multiple metal resistance operons. Pseudomonas putida KT2440 can be considered a model for these microorganisms since its arsenic resistance is due to the action of proteins encoded by the two paralogous arsenic resistance operons ARS1 and ARS2. Both operons contain the genes encoding the transcriptional regulators ArsR1 and ArsR2 that control operon expression. We show here that purified ArsR1 and ArsR2 bind the trivalent salt of arsenic (arsenite) with similar affinities (~30 μM), whereas no binding is observed for the pentavalent salt (arsenate). Furthermore, trivalent salts of bismuth and antimony showed binding to both paralogues. The positions of cysteines, found to bind arsenic in other homologues, indicate that ArsR1 and ArsR2 employ different modes of arsenite recognition. Both paralogues are dimeric and possess significant thermal stability. Both proteins were used to construct whole-cell, lacZ-based biosensors. Whereas responses to bismuth were negligible, significant responses were observed for arsenite, arsenate, and antimony. Biosensors based on the P. putida arsB1 arsB2 arsenic efflux pump double mutant were significantly more sensitive than biosensors based on the wild-type strain. This sensitivity enhancement by pump mutation may be a convenient strategy for the construction of other biosensors. A frequent limitation found for other arsenic biosensors was their elevated background signal and interference by inorganic phosphate. The constructed biosensors show no interference by inorganic phosphate, are characterized by a very low background signal, and were found to be suitable to analyze environmental samples. IMPORTANCE Arsenic is at the top of the priority list of hazardous compounds issued by the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease. The reason for the stunning arsenic resistance of many microorganisms is the existence of paralogous arsenic

  5. 244-AR Vault Interim Stabilization Project Plan

    SciTech Connect

    LANEY, T.

    2000-03-24

    The 244-AR Vault Facility, constructed between 1966 and 1968, was designed to provide lag storage and treatment for the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Facility (PUREX) tank farm sludges. Tank farm personnel transferred the waste from the 244-AR Vault Facility to B Plant for recovery of cesium and strontium. B Plant personnel then transferred the treatment residuals back to the tank farms for storage of the sludge and liquids. The last process operations, which transferred waste supporting the cesium/strontium recovery mission, occurred in April 1978. After the final transfer in 1978, the 244-AR facility underwent a cleanout. However, 2,271 L (600 gal) of sludge were left in Tank 004AR from an earlier transfer from Tank 241-AX-104. When the cleanout was completed, the facility was placed in a standby status. The sludge had been transferred to Tank 004AR to support Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL] vitrification work. Documentation of waste transfers suggests that a portion of the sludge may have been moved from Tank 004AR to Tank 002AR in preparation for transfer back to the AX Tank Farm; however, quantities of the sludge that were moved to Tank 002AR from that transfer must be estimated.

  6. USDA/ARS Organic Production Research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    For much of its history, USDA/ARS had little to do with research on organic agriculture, however research in organic systems has made considerable gains at the agency over the past decade. In the 1980's and 1990's, as the organic food industry was taking off, ARS researchers who wanted to serve orga...

  7. Dating fault-generated pseudotachylytes: comparison of 40Ar/39Ar stepwise-heating, laser-ablation and Rb-Sr microsampling analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Wolfgang; Kelley, Simon; Villa, Igor

    2002-07-01

    Three different geochronological techniques (stepwise-heating, laser-ablation 40Ar/39Ar, Rb-Sr microsampling) have been evaluated for dating fault-generated pseudotachylytes sampled along the Periadriatic Fault System (PAF) of the Alps. Because pseudotachylytes are whole-rock systems composed of melt, clast and alteration phases, chemical control from both Ar isotopes (Cl/K, Ca/K ratios) and EMPA analyses is crucial for their discrimination. When applied to stepwise-heating 40Ar/39Ar analyses, this approach yields accurate melt-related ages, even for complex age spectra. The spatial resolution of laser-ablation 40Ar/39Ar analyses is capable of contrasting melt, clast and alteration phases in situ, provided the clasts are not too fine grained, the latter of which results in integrated "mixed" ages without geological information. Elevated Cl/K and Ca/K ratios were found to be an invaluable indicator for the presence of clast admixture or inherited 40Ar. Due to incomplete isotopic resetting during frictional melting, Rb-Sr microsampling dating did not furnish geologically meaningful ages. On the basis of isotopic disequilibria among pseudotachylyte matrix phases, and independent Rb-Sr microsampling dating of cogenetic (ultra)mylonites, the concordant 40Ar/39Ar pseudotachylyte ages are interpreted as formation ages. The investigated pseudotachylytes altogether reveal a Cretaceous to Miocene history for the entire PAF, consistent with independent geological evidence. Individual faults, however, consistently reveal narrower intervals of enhanced activity lasting a few million years. Electronic supplementary material to this paper can be obtained by using the Springer LINK server at http://dx.doi.org/10.1008/s00410-002-0381-6

  8. Revised error propagation of 40Ar/39Ar data, including covariances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, Pieter

    2015-12-01

    The main advantage of the 40Ar/39Ar method over conventional K-Ar dating is that it does not depend on any absolute abundance or concentration measurements, but only uses the relative ratios between five isotopes of the same element -argon- which can be measured with great precision on a noble gas mass spectrometer. The relative abundances of the argon isotopes are subject to a constant sum constraint, which imposes a covariant structure on the data: the relative amount of any of the five isotopes can always be obtained from that of the other four. Thus, the 40Ar/39Ar method is a classic example of a 'compositional data problem'. In addition to the constant sum constraint, covariances are introduced by a host of other processes, including data acquisition, blank correction, detector calibration, mass fractionation, decay correction, interference correction, atmospheric argon correction, interpolation of the irradiation parameter, and age calculation. The myriad of correlated errors arising during the data reduction are best handled by casting the 40Ar/39Ar data reduction protocol in a matrix form. The completely revised workflow presented in this paper is implemented in a new software platform, Ar-Ar_Redux, which takes raw mass spectrometer data as input and generates accurate 40Ar/39Ar ages and their (co-)variances as output. Ar-Ar_Redux accounts for all sources of analytical uncertainty, including those associated with decay constants and the air ratio. Knowing the covariance matrix of the ages removes the need to consider 'internal' and 'external' uncertainties separately when calculating (weighted) mean ages. Ar-Ar_Redux is built on the same principles as its sibling program in the U-Pb community (U-Pb_Redux), thus improving the intercomparability of the two methods with tangible benefits to the accuracy of the geologic time scale. The program can be downloaded free of charge from

  9. 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar data bearing on the metamorphic and tectonic history of western New England.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutter, J.F.; Ratcliffe, N.M.; Mukasa, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar ages of coexisting biotite and hornblende from Proterozoic Y gneisses of the Berkshire and Green Mt massifs, as well as 40Ar/39Ar and K/Ar mineral and whole-rock ages from Palaeozoic metamorphic rocks, suggest that the thermal peaks for the dominant metamorphic recrystallization in western New England occurred 465 + or - 5 m.y. (Taconian). 40Ar/39Ar age data from a poorly-defined terrain along the eastern strip of the area suggests that the area has been retrograded during a metamorphism that peaked at least 376 + or - 5 m.y. (Acadian). Available age and petrological data from western New England indicate the presence of at least three separate metamorphic-structure domains of Taconic age: 1) a small area of relict high-P and low-T metamorphism, 2) a broad area of normal Barrovian metamorphism from chlorite to garnet grade characterized by a gentle metamorphic gradient and, 3) a rather narrow belt of steep-gradient, Barrovian series metamorphic rocks. Areas of maximum metamorphic intensity within the last domain coincide with areas of maximum crustal thickening in the later stage of Taconic orogeny. -L.di H

  10. 40Ar/39Ar geochronological constraints for the Urucum Iron and Manganese-deposits, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piacentini, T.; Vasconcelos, P. M.

    2011-12-01

    40Ar/39Ar geochronology of cryptomelane (KMn8O16.xH2O) interbedded with the Urucum late Proterozoic banded iron-formation (BIF) reveals a minimum deposition age of 587 ± 7 Ma. All cryptomelane samples yield climbing 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating spectra suggestive of partial 40Ar* loss after mineral precipitation, indicating that the samples were heated at the cryptomelane Ar partial retention zone. Inverse isochron calculated for all cryptomelane grains reveals a minimum age of 578 ± 2 Ma, with an initial 40Ar/36Ar ratio of 274.0 ± 1.7. While the age is compatible with the minimum age determined from the incremental heating spectra, the initial 40Ar/36Ar ratio is significantly different from the present value of 298.6 ± 0.3. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology for braunite coexisting with cryptomelane yield complex saddle-shaped age spectra where plateau-like segments are followed by an age increase at the high temperature steps. This degassing pattern may reflect an excess Ar component in braunite, which is aggravated by its low K content and, therefore, intrinsically low radiogenic 40Ar* component. Despite these complexities, the plateau-like segments yield ages varying from 547 ± 8 Ma to 513 ± 8 Ma, which are compatible with the ages estimated for peak metamorphism of the BIF sequence. An inverse isochron for all braunite analyzed yield a well-defined array with an age of 524 ± 3 Ma and an initial 40Ar/36Ar ratio of 271 ± 2, compatible with the initial ratios obtained for the cryptomelane samples. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology for two metamorphic muscovite single crystals from meta-arkoses interbedded with the BIFs yielded reproducible plateau ages of 512 ± 3 Ma and 512 ± 5 Ma, probably recording the timing of peak Brasiliano metamorphism. The incremental heating spectra for the cryptomelane and braunite samples suggest that the Urucum Rapitan-age BIF is at least 587 ± 7 Ma. The initial 40Ar/36Ar ratios for both cryptomelane and braunite suggest a lower atmospheric 40

  11. ¡Cocinar Para Su Salud!: Randomized Controlled Trial of a Culturally Based Dietary Intervention among Hispanic Breast Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Heather; Gaffney, Ann Ogden; Aycinena, A Corina; Koch, Pam; Contento, Isobel; Karmally, Wahida; Richardson, John M; Lim, Emerson; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Crew, Katherine; Maurer, Matthew; Kalinsky, Kevin; Hershman, Dawn L

    2015-05-01

    There is a need for culturally relevant nutrition programs targeted to underserved cancer survivors. Our aim was to examine the effect of a culturally based approach to dietary change on increasing fruit/vegetable (F/V) intake and decreasing fat intake among Hispanic breast cancer survivors. Participants were randomized to Intervention and Control groups. Diet recalls, detailed interviews, fasting blood, and anthropometric measures were collected at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. Hispanic women (n=70) with stage 0 to III breast cancer who completed adjuvant treatment and lived in New York City were randomized between April 2011 and March 2012. The Intervention group (n=34) participated in ¡Cocinar Para Su Salud!, a culturally based nine-session (24 hours over 12 weeks) intervention including nutrition education, cooking classes, and food-shopping field trips. The Control group (n=36) received written dietary recommendations for breast cancer survivors. Change at 6 months in daily F/V servings and percent calories from total fat were the main outcome measures. Linear regression models adjusted for stratification factors and estimated marginal means were used to compare changes in diet from baseline to 3 and 6 months. Baseline characteristics were the following: mean age 56.6 years (standard deviation 9.7 years), mean time since diagnosis 3.4 years (standard deviation 2.7 years), mean body mass index (calculated as kg/m²) 30.9 (standard deviation 6.0), 62.9% with annual household income ≤$15,000, mean daily servings of all F/V was 5.3 (targeted F/V 3.7 servings excluding legumes/juices/starchy vegetables/fried foods), and 27.7% of daily calories from fat. More than 60% in the Intervention group attended seven or more of nine classes, with overall study retention of 87% retention at 6 months. At month 6, the Intervention group compared with Control group reported an increase in mean servings of F/V from baseline (all F/V: +2.0 vs -0.1; P=0.005; targeted F/V: +2

  12. Spatial distribution of Ar-40/Ar-39 ages in lunar breccia 14301.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Megrue, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    The distribution of stable and radioactive argon isotopes in a lunar breccia has been measured in situ by laser probe mass spectrometry. This new technique determines the spatial distribution of Ar-40/Ar-39 ages on less than .1 milligram of material. Calculated Ar-40/Ar-39 ages of clasts within this breccia are 3.7 and 2.9 b.y. Parentless radiogenic Ar-40 exists within the fine-grained matrix and appears to have been trapped simultaneously with solar argon. This 'atmosphere' of ambient gas appears to have been incorporated into the rock by an impact event not more than 3 b.y. ago.

  13. ³⁹Ar/Ar measurements using ultra-low background proportional counters.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jeter; Aalseth, Craig E; Bonicalzi, Ricco M; Brandenberger, Jill M; Day, Anthony R; Humble, Paul H; Mace, Emily K; Panisko, Mark E; Seifert, Allen

    2016-01-01

    Age-dating groundwater and seawater using the (39)Ar/Ar ratio is an important tool to understand water mass-flow rates and mean residence time. Low-background proportional counters developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory use mixtures of argon and methane as counting gas. We demonstrate sensitivity to (39)Ar by comparing geological (ancient) argon recovered from a carbon dioxide gas well and commercial argon. The demonstrated sensitivity to the (39)Ar/Ar ratio is sufficient to date water masses as old as 1000 years.

  14. 40Ar/39Ar ages of lunar impact glasses: Relationships among Ar diffusivity, chemical composition, shape, and size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellner, N. E. B.; Delano, J. W.

    2015-07-01

    Lunar impact glasses, which are quenched melts produced during cratering events on the Moon, have the potential to provide not only compositional information about both the local and regional geology of the Moon but also information about the impact flux over time. We present in this paper the results of 73 new 40Ar/39Ar analyses of well-characterized, inclusion-free lunar impact glasses and demonstrate that size, shape, chemical composition, fraction of radiogenic 40Ar retained, and cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages are important for 40Ar/39Ar investigations of these samples. Specifically, analyses of lunar impact glasses from the Apollo 14, 16, and 17 landing sites indicate that retention of radiogenic 40Ar is a strong function of post-formation thermal history in the lunar regolith, size, and chemical composition. This is because the Ar diffusion coefficient (at a constant temperature) is estimated to decrease by ∼3-4 orders of magnitude with an increasing fraction of non-bridging oxygens, X(NBO), over the compositional range of most lunar impact glasses with compositions from feldspathic to basaltic. Based on these relationships, lunar impact glasses with compositions and sizes sufficient to have retained ∼90% of their radiogenic Ar during 750 Ma of cosmic ray exposure at time-integrated temperatures of up to 290 K have been identified and are likely to have yielded reliable 40Ar/39Ar ages of formation. Additionally, ∼50% of the identified impact glass spheres have formation ages of ⩽500 Ma, while ∼75% of the identified lunar impact glass shards and spheres have ages of formation ⩽2000 Ma. Higher thermal stresses in lunar impact glasses quenched from hyperliquidus temperatures are considered the likely cause of poor survival of impact glass spheres, as well as the decreasing frequency of lunar impact glasses in general with increasing age. The observed age-frequency distribution of lunar impact glasses may reflect two processes: (i) diminished

  15. 40Ar/39Ar Ages of Carbonaceous Xenoliths in 2 HED Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turrin, B.; Lindsay, F. N.; Park, J.; Herzog, G. F.; Delaney, J. S.; Swisher, C. C., III; Johnson, J.; Zolensky, M.

    2016-01-01

    The generally young K/Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages of CM chondrites made us wonder whether carbonaceous xenoliths (CMX) entombed in Howardite–Eucrite–Diogenite (HED) meteorites might retain more radiogenic 40Ar than do ‘free-range’ CM-chondrites. To find out, we selected two HED breccias with carbonaceous inclusions in order to compare the 40Ar/39Ar release patterns and ages of the inclusions with those of nearby HED material. Carbonaceous inclusions (CMXs) in two HED meteorites lost a greater fraction of radiogenic 40Ar than did surrounding host material, but a smaller fraction of it than did free-range CM-chondrites such as Murchison or more heavily altered ones. Importantly, however, the siting of the CMXs in HED matrix did not prevent the 40Ar loss of about 40 percent of the radiogenic 40Ar, even from phases that degas at high laboratory temperatures. We infer that carbonaceous asteroids with perihelia of 1 astronomical unit probably experience losses of at least this size. The usefulness of 40Ar/39Ar dating for samples returned from C-type asteroids may hinge, therefore, on identifying and analyzing separately small quantities of the most retentive phases of carbonaceous chondrites.

  16. Ar-40/Ar-39 laser-probe dating of diamond inclusions from the Premier kimberlite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, D.; Onstott, T. C.; Harris, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    The results of Ar-40/Ar-39 laser-probe analyses of individual eclogitic clinopyroxene inclusions from Premier diamonds are reported which yield a mean age of 1198 + or - 14 Myr. This age agrees well with Sm-Nd and Ar-40/Ar-39 analyses on similar Premier inclusions and is indistinguishable from the inferred time of emplacement of the host kimberlite, which implies that diamond formation was essentially synchronous with kimberlite generation. The extrapolated nonradiogenic Ar-40/Ar-36 ratio of 334 + or - 102 is similar to the present-day atmospheric composition. This value is inconsistent with Sr and Nd isotopic signatures from Premier eclogite inclusions, which suggest a depleted mantle source. Preentrapment equilibration of the inclusions with an Ar-36-rich fluid is the most probable explanation for the low nonradiogenic composition.

  17. 39Ar/Ar measurements using ultra-low background proportional counters

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Jeter C.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bonicalzi, Ricco; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Day, Anthony R.; Humble, Paul H.; Mace, Emily K.; Panisko, Mark E.; Seifert, Allen

    2016-01-08

    Age dating groundwater and seawater using 39Ar/Ar ratios is an important tool to understand water mass flow rates and mean residence time. For modern or contemporary argon, the 39Ar activity is 1.8 mBq per liter of argon. Radiation measurements at these activity levels require ultra low-background detectors. Low-background proportional counters have been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. These detectors use traditional mixtures of argon and methane as counting gas, and the residual 39Ar from commercial argon has become a predominant source of background activity in these detectors. We demonstrated sensitivity to 39Ar by using geological or ancient argon from gas wells in place of commercial argon. The low level counting performance of these proportional counters is then demonstrated for sensitivities to 39Ar/Ar ratios sufficient to date water masses as old as 1000 years.

  18. Needle-Free Delivery of Acetalated Dextran-Encapsulated AR-12 Protects Mice from Francisella tularensis Lethal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Ky V.; Curry, Heather; Collier, Michael A.; Borteh, Hassan; Bachelder, Eric M.; Schlesinger, Larry S.; Gunn, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis causes tularemia and is a potential biothreat. Given the limited antibiotics for treating tularemia and the possible use of antibiotic-resistant strains as a biowarfare agent, new antibacterial agents are needed. AR-12 is an FDA-approved investigational new drug (IND) compound that induces autophagy and has shown host-directed, broad-spectrum activity in vitro against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and F. tularensis. We have shown that AR-12 encapsulated within acetalated dextran (Ace-DEX) microparticles (AR-12/MPs) significantly reduces host cell cytotoxicity compared to that with free AR-12, while retaining the ability to control S. Typhimurium within infected human macrophages. In the present study, the toxicity and efficacy of AR-12/MPs in controlling virulent type A F. tularensis SchuS4 infection were examined in vitro and in vivo. No significant toxicity of blank MPs or AR-12/MPs was observed in lung histology sections when the formulations were given intranasally to uninfected mice. In histology sections from the lungs of intranasally infected mice treated with the formulations, increased macrophage infiltration was observed for AR-12/MPs, with or without suboptimal gentamicin treatment, but not for blank MPs, soluble AR-12, or suboptimal gentamicin alone. AR-12/MPs dramatically reduced the burden of F. tularensis in infected human macrophages, in a manner similar to that of free AR-12. However, in vivo, AR-12/MPs significantly enhanced the survival of F. tularensis SchuS4-infected mice compared to that seen with free AR-12. In combination with suboptimal gentamicin treatment, AR-12/MPs further improved the survival of F. tularensis SchuS4-infected mice. These studies provide support for Ace-DEX-encapsulated AR-12 as a promising new therapeutic agent for tularemia. PMID:26787696

  19. Needle-Free Delivery of Acetalated Dextran-Encapsulated AR-12 Protects Mice from Francisella tularensis Lethal Challenge.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Ky V; Curry, Heather; Collier, Michael A; Borteh, Hassan; Bachelder, Eric M; Schlesinger, Larry S; Gunn, John S; Ainslie, Kristy M

    2016-04-01

    Francisella tularensiscauses tularemia and is a potential biothreat. Given the limited antibiotics for treating tularemia and the possible use of antibiotic-resistant strains as a biowarfare agent, new antibacterial agents are needed. AR-12 is an FDA-approved investigational new drug (IND) compound that induces autophagy and has shown host-directed, broad-spectrum activityin vitroagainstSalmonella entericaserovar Typhimurium andF. tularensis We have shown that AR-12 encapsulated within acetalated dextran (Ace-DEX) microparticles (AR-12/MPs) significantly reduces host cell cytotoxicity compared to that with free AR-12, while retaining the ability to controlS.Typhimurium within infected human macrophages. In the present study, the toxicity and efficacy of AR-12/MPs in controlling virulent type AF. tularensisSchuS4 infection were examinedin vitroandin vivo No significant toxicity of blank MPs or AR-12/MPs was observed in lung histology sections when the formulations were given intranasally to uninfected mice. In histology sections from the lungs of intranasally infected mice treated with the formulations, increased macrophage infiltration was observed for AR-12/MPs, with or without suboptimal gentamicin treatment, but not for blank MPs, soluble AR-12, or suboptimal gentamicin alone. AR-12/MPs dramatically reduced the burden ofF. tularensisin infected human macrophages, in a manner similar to that of free AR-12. However,in vivo, AR-12/MPs significantly enhanced the survival ofF. tularensisSchuS4-infected mice compared to that seen with free AR-12. In combination with suboptimal gentamicin treatment, AR-12/MPs further improved the survival ofF. tularensisSchuS4-infected mice. These studies provide support for Ace-DEX-encapsulated AR-12 as a promising new therapeutic agent for tularemia. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. StAR Enhances Transcription of Genes Encoding the Mitochondrial Proteases Involved in Its Own Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Bahat, Assaf; Perlberg, Shira; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Lauria, Ines; Langer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is essential for steroid hormone synthesis in the adrenal cortex and the gonads. StAR activity facilitates the supply of cholesterol substrate into the inner mitochondrial membranes where conversion of the sterol to a steroid is catalyzed. Mitochondrial import terminates the cholesterol mobilization activity of StAR and leads to mounting accumulation of StAR in the mitochondrial matrix. Our studies suggest that to prevent mitochondrial impairment, StAR proteolysis is executed by at least 2 mitochondrial proteases, ie, the matrix LON protease and the inner membrane complexes of the metalloproteases AFG3L2 and AFG3L2:SPG7/paraplegin. Gonadotropin administration to prepubertal rats stimulated ovarian follicular development associated with increased expression of the mitochondrial protein quality control system. In addition, enrichment of LON and AFG3L2 is evident in StAR-expressing ovarian cells examined by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, reporter studies of the protease promoters examined in the heterologous cell model suggest that StAR expression stimulates up to a 3.5-fold increase in the protease gene transcription. Such effects are StAR-specific, are independent of StAR activity, and failed to occur upon expression of StAR mutants that do not enter the matrix. Taken together, the results of this study suggest the presence of a novel regulatory loop, whereby acute accumulation of an apparent nuisance protein in the matrix provokes a mitochondria to nucleus signaling that, in turn, activates selected transcription of genes encoding the enrichment of mitochondrial proteases relevant for enhanced clearance of StAR. PMID:24422629

  1. StAR enhances transcription of genes encoding the mitochondrial proteases involved in its own degradation.

    PubMed

    Bahat, Assaf; Perlberg, Shira; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Lauria, Ines; Langer, Thomas; Orly, Joseph

    2014-02-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is essential for steroid hormone synthesis in the adrenal cortex and the gonads. StAR activity facilitates the supply of cholesterol substrate into the inner mitochondrial membranes where conversion of the sterol to a steroid is catalyzed. Mitochondrial import terminates the cholesterol mobilization activity of StAR and leads to mounting accumulation of StAR in the mitochondrial matrix. Our studies suggest that to prevent mitochondrial impairment, StAR proteolysis is executed by at least 2 mitochondrial proteases, ie, the matrix LON protease and the inner membrane complexes of the metalloproteases AFG3L2 and AFG3L2:SPG7/paraplegin. Gonadotropin administration to prepubertal rats stimulated ovarian follicular development associated with increased expression of the mitochondrial protein quality control system. In addition, enrichment of LON and AFG3L2 is evident in StAR-expressing ovarian cells examined by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, reporter studies of the protease promoters examined in the heterologous cell model suggest that StAR expression stimulates up to a 3.5-fold increase in the protease gene transcription. Such effects are StAR-specific, are independent of StAR activity, and failed to occur upon expression of StAR mutants that do not enter the matrix. Taken together, the results of this study suggest the presence of a novel regulatory loop, whereby acute accumulation of an apparent nuisance protein in the matrix provokes a mitochondria to nucleus signaling that, in turn, activates selected transcription of genes encoding the enrichment of mitochondrial proteases relevant for enhanced clearance of StAR.

  2. Androgen receptor (AR) coregulators: an overview.

    PubMed

    Heinlein, Cynthia A; Chang, Chawnshang

    2002-04-01

    The biological action of androgens is mediated through the androgen receptor (AR). Androgen-bound AR functions as a transcription factor to regulate genes involved in an array of physiological processes, most notably male sexual differentiation and maturation, and the maintenance of spermatogenesis. The transcriptional activity of AR is affected by coregulators that influence a number of functional properties of AR, including ligand selectivity and DNA binding capacity. As the promoter of target genes, coregulators participate in DNA modification, either directly through modification of histones or indirectly by the recruitment of chromatin-modifying complexes, as well as functioning in the recruitment of the basal transcriptional machinery. Aberrant coregulator activity due to mutation or altered expression levels may be a contributing factor in the progression of diseases related to AR activity, such as prostate cancer. AR demonstrates distinct differences in its interaction with coregulators from other steroid receptors due to differences in the functional interaction between AR domains, possibly resulting in alterations in the dynamic interactions between coregulator complexes.

  3. GRS Measurements of Ar in Mars' Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprague, A. L.; Boynton, W. V.; Kerry, K. E.; Janes, D. M.; Kelly, N. J.; Crombie, M. K.; Hunten, D. M.; Nelli, S. M.; Murphy, J. R.; Reedy, R. C.; Metzger, A. E.

    2005-08-01

    One and one half Mars years of atmospheric argon (Ar) measurements are described in the context of understanding how Ar, a minor constituent of Mars atmosphere that does not condense at Mars temperatures, can be used to study martian circulation and dynamics. There is a repeated factor of 6 enhancement of Ar measured over south polar latitudes. The maximum in Ar abundance occurs near the onset of southern winter. There is no similar strong enhancement of Ar over north-polar regions during northern winter; only modest evidence for an enhancement peak is present. Part of this difference is explained by the global topographic dichotomy and the fact that the duration of northern autumn and winter is shorter than southern autumn and winter. Rapid seasonal fluctuations in Ar abundance may indicate evidence for wave activity at the perimeter of the southern seasonal polar cap. The apparent lack of coincidence of Ar enhancement with the relatively cold, cryptic terrain or relatively warm, bright albedo regions, indirectly supports the conclusion that the low temperatures measured over the south polar region by IRTM are probably caused by the combination of low CO2 abundance over south polar night and low emissivity regions on the surface associated with small grain size.

  4. arXiv.org and Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramlo, Susan

    2007-09-01

    The website arXiv.org (pronounced archive) is a free online resource for full-text articles in the fields of physics, mathematics, computer science, nonlinear science, and quantitative biology that has existed for about 15 years. Available directly at http://www.arXiv.org, this e-print archive is searchable. As of Jan. 3, 2007, arXiv had open access to 401,226 e-prints in the topic areas. Those who sign up for an ID and password can also sign up for daily submission abstract emails for specific subject classes of arXiv, including physics education, physics and society, and history of physics. Founded and developed by Paul Ginsparg when he was at Los Alamos National Laboratory, arXiv's original name was the LANL preprint archive or xxx.lanl.gov. The location and name changed after Ginsparg moved to the physics department at Cornell University. Today, arXiv is hosted and operated by Cornell University library. Mirror sites for arXiv exist worldwide.2

  5. Presence of arylsulfatase A (ARS A) in multiple sulfatase deficiency disorder fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fluharty, A L; Stevens, R L; Davis, L L; Shapiro, L J; Kihara, H

    1978-05-01

    Multiple deficiency disorder fibroblasts cultured in MEM-CO2 showed deficiencies of arylsulfatase A(ARS A) comparable to the deficiency in metachromatic leukodystrophy fibroblasts. However, the MSDD fibroblasts cultured in MEM-HEPES contained near normal levels of ARS A. Moreover, the enzyme from the latter fibroblasts was indistinguishable from ARS A of control fibroblasts on DEAE-cellulose chromatography, ratio of activity with several substrates, thermal inactivation, sensitivity to inhibitors, and precipitation by antiserum to human ARS A. These data support the conclusion that the ARS A genome is intact in MSDD fibroblasts and, by extension, in MSDD patients. Other sulfatases were present at levels ranging from mildly deficient to near normal but never as low as seen in the corresponding specific sulfatase deficient disorders.

  6. Instrumentation development for In Situ 40Ar/39Ar planetary geochronology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, Leah; Munk, Madicken; Davidheiser-Kroll, Brett; Warner, Nicholas H.; Gupta, Sanjeev; Slaybaugh, Rachel; Harkness, Patrick; Mark, Darren

    2017-01-01

    The chronology of the Solar System, particularly the timing of formation of extra-terrestrial bodies and their features, is an outstanding problem in planetary science. Although various chronological methods for in situ geochronology have been proposed (e.g., Rb-Sr, K-Ar), and even applied (K-Ar), the reliability, accuracy, and applicability of the 40Ar/39Ar method makes it by far the most desirable chronometer for dating extra-terrestrial bodies. The method however relies on the neutron irradiation of samples, and thus a neutron source. Herein, we discuss the challenges and feasibility of deploying a passive neutron source to planetary surfaces for the in situ application of the 40Ar/39Ar chronometer. Requirements in generating and shielding neutrons, as well as analysing samples are described, along with an exploration of limitations such as mass, power and cost. Two potential solutions for the in situ extra-terrestrial deployment of the 40Ar/39Ar method are presented. Although this represents a challenging task, developing the technology to apply the 40Ar/39Ar method on planetary surfaces would represent a major advance towards constraining the timescale of solar system formation and evolution.

  7. Ar-40/Ar-39 Studies of Martian Meteorite RBT 04262 and Terrestrial Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Herzog, G. F.; Turrin, B.; Lindsay, F. N.; Delaney, J. S.; Swisher, C. C., III; Nagao, K.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2014-01-01

    Park et al. recently presented an Ar-40/Ar-39 dating study of maskelynite separated from the Martian meteorite RBT 04262. Here we report an additional study of Ar-40/Ar-39 patterns for smaller samples, each consisting of only a few maskelynite grains. Considered as a material for Ar-40/Ar-39 dating, the shock-produced glass maskelynite has both an important strength (relatively high K concentration compared to other mineral phases) and some potentially problematic weaknesses. At Rutgers, we have been analyzing small grains consisting of a single phase to explore local effects that might be averaged and remain hidden in larger samples. Thus, to assess the homogeneity of the RBT maskelynite and for comparison with the results of, we analyzed six approx. 30 microgram samples of the same maskelynite separate they studied. Furthermore, because most Ar-40/Ar-39 are calculated relative to the age of a standard, we present new Ar-40/Ar-39 age data for six standards. Among the most widely used standards are sanidine from Fish Canyon (FCs) and various hornblendes (hb3gr, MMhb-1, NL- 25), which are taken as primary standards because their ages have been determined by independent, direct measurements of K and A-40.

  8. Instrumentation development for planetary in situ 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidheiser-Kroll, B.; Morgan, L. E.; Munk, M.; Warner, N. H.; Gupta, S.; Slaybaugh, R.; Harkness, P.; Mark, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    The chronology of the Solar System, particularly the timing of formation of extraterrestrial bodies and their features, is a major outstanding problem in planetary science. Although various chronological methods for in situ geochronology have been proposed (e.g. Rb-Sr, K-Ar), and even applied (K-Ar, Farley et al., 2014), the reliability, accuracy, and applicability of the 40Ar/39Ar method makes it by far the most desirable chronometer for dating extraterrestrial bodies. The method however relies on the neutron irradiation of samples, and thus a neutron source. We will discuss the challenges and feasibility of deploying a passive neutron source to planetary surfaces for the in situ application of the 40Ar/39Ar chronometer. Requirements in generating and shielding neutrons, as well as analyzing samples are discussed, along with an exploration of limitations such as mass, power, and cost. Two potential solutions for the in situ extraterrestrial deployment of the 40Ar/39Ar method will be presented. Although this represents a challenging task, developing the technology to apply the 40Ar/39Ar method on planetary surfaces would represent a major advance towards constraining the timescale of solar system formation and evolution.

  9. Thermochronology of economic mineral deposits: dating the stages of mineralization at Panasqueira, Portugal, by high-precision 40Ar/ 39Ar age spectrum techniques on muscovite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snee, L.W.; Sutter, J.F.; Kelly, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    This study is an example of a new and powerful application of 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum dating of muscovite. It is now possible to establish time constraints necessary for solving some of the long-standing problems in economic geology. Beyond this, the unique geologic situation of Panasqueira has allowed us to quantify the thermal characteristics of muscovite. Published fluid inclusion data have been used to estimate a muscovite argon closure temperature of ~325??C during rapid cooling or short reheating and a temperature of ~270??C during slow cooling or extended reheating. Argon-loss patterns displayed by all dated muscovites resulted from reheating after original closure; the mechanism for this argon loss appears to have been argon transport by volume diffusion. Thus, 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum dating of muscovite can be used to evaluate thermal conditions controlling argon diffusion as well as age, duration, and number of episodes of mineralization. -from Authors

  10. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, paleomagnetism, and evolution of the Boring volcanic field, Oregon and Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleck, Robert J.; Hagstrum, Jonathan T.; Calvert, Andrew T.; Evarts, Russell C.; Conrey, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    The 40Ar/39Ar investigations of a large suite of fine-grained basaltic rocks of the Boring volcanic field (BVF), Oregon and Washington (USA), yielded two primary results. (1) Using age control from paleomagnetic polarity, stratigraphy, and available plateau ages, 40Ar/39Ar recoil model ages are defined that provide reliable age results in the absence of an age plateau, even in cases of significant Ar redistribution. (2) Grouping of eruptive ages either by period of activity or by composition defines a broadly northward progression of BVF volcanism during latest Pliocene and Pleistocene time that reflects rates consistent with regional plate movements. Based on the frequency distribution of measured ages, periods of greatest volcanic activity within the BVF occurred 2.7–2.2 Ma, 1.7–0.5 Ma, and 350–50 ka. Grouped by eruptive episode, geographic distributions of samples define a series of northeast-southwest–trending strips whose centers migrate from south-southeast to north-northwest at an average rate of 9.3 ± 1.6 mm/yr. Volcanic activity in the western part of the BVF migrated more rapidly than that to the east, causing trends of eruptive episodes to progress in an irregular, clockwise sense. The K2O and CaO values of dated samples exhibit well-defined temporal trends, decreasing and increasing, respectively, with age of eruption. Divided into two groups by K2O, the centers of these two distributions define a northward migration rate similar to that determined from eruptive age groups. This age and compositional migration rate of Boring volcanism is similar to the clockwise rotation rate of the Oregon Coast Range with respect to North America, and might reflect localized extension on the trailing edge of that rotating crustal block.

  11. Abundance and Composition of K and Ca Bearing Minerals in Ordinary Chondrites and Their Application to Ar-Ar Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirich, J. R.; Swindle, T. D.

    2007-03-01

    Compositionally uniform albite accounts for all K in two H chondrites studied. Two K/Ca ratios are observed in individual meteorites in Ar-Ar experiments, however, which must indicate two separate releases of Ar from albite.

  12. Ar-Ar Thermochronlogy of Apollo 12 Impact-Melt Breccia 12033,638-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crow, C. A.; Cassata, W. S.; Jolliff, B. L.; Ziegler, R. A.; Borg, L. E.; Shearer, C. K.

    2017-01-01

    We have undertaken an Ar-Ar thermochronology investigation as part of a coordinated multichronometer analysis of a single Apollo 12 impact- melt breccia to demonstrate the wide range of information that can be obtained for a single complex rock. This has implications for the age of formation, component makeup, and subsequent impact/shock and exposure history of the sample. This study also serves as a capabilities demonstration for the proposed MoonRise Mission [1]. The goal of this investigation is to elucidate the history of this sample through coordinated 40Ar*/39Ar, Sm-Nd, Rb-Sr and zircon 207Pb-206Pb ages along with geochemical and petrographic context on a relatively small (approximately 450 mg) sample. Here, we report preliminary results of the Ar-Ar thermochronology.

  13. Ar-39-Ar-40 Ages of Euerites and the Thermal History of Asteroid 4-Vesta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Garrison, Daniel H.

    2002-01-01

    Eucrite meteorites are igneous rocks that derive from a large asteroid, probably 4 Vesta. Prior studies have shown that after eucrites formed, most were subsequently metamorphosed to temperatures up to equal to or greater than 800 C, and much later many were brecciated and heated by large impacts into the parent body surface. The uncommon basaltic, unbrecciated eucrites also formed near the surface but presumably escaped later brecciation, whereas the cumulate eucrites formed at depth where metamorphism may have persisted for a considerable period. To further understand the complex HED parent body thermal history, we determined new Ar-39-Ar-40 ages for nine eucrites classified as basaltic but unbrecciated, six eucrites classified as cumulate, and several basaltic-brecciated eucrites. Relatively precise Ar-Ar ages of two cumulate eucrites (Moama and EET87520) and four unbrecciated eucrites give a tight cluster at 4.48 +/1 0.01 Gyr. Ar-Ar ages of six additional unbrecciated eucrites are consistent with this age, within their larger age uncertainties. In contrast, available literature data on Pb-Pb isochron ages of four cumulate eucrites and one unbrecciated eucrite vary over 4.4-4.515 Gyr, and Sm-147 - Nd-143 isochron ages of four cumulate and three unbrecciated eucrites vary over 4.41-4.55 Gyr. Similar Ar-Ar ages for cumulate and unbrecciated eucrites imply that cumulate eucrites do not have a younger formation age than basaltic eucrites, as previously proposed. Rather, we suggest that these cumulate and unbrecciated eucrites resided at depth where parent body temperatures were sufficiently high to cause the K-Ar and some other chronometers to remain open diffusion systems. From the strong clustering of Ar-Ar ages at approximately 4.48 Gyr, we propose that these meteorites were excavated from depth in a single large impact event approximately 4.48 Gyr ago, which quickly cooled the samples and started the K-Ar chronometer. A large (approximately 460 km) crater

  14. LASER MICROPROBE **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar DATING OF MINERAL GRAINS IN SITU.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutter, J.F.; Hartung, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    A laser-microprobe attached to a mass spectrometer for **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar age determination of single mineral grains in geological materials has been made operational at the US Geological Survey, Reston, VA. This microanalytical technique involves focusing a pulsed laser beam onto a sample contained in an ultra-high vacuum chamber attached to a rare-gas mass spectrometer. Argon in the neutron-irradiated sample is released by heating with the laser pulse and its isotopic composition is measured to yield an **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar age. Laser probe **4**0Ar/**3**9Ar ages of single mineral grains measured in situ can aid greatly in understanding the chronology of many geological situations where datable minerals are present but are not physically separable in quantities needed for conventional age dating.

  15. ¡Cocinar Para Su Salud!: Randomized Controlled Trial of a Culturally Based Dietary Intervention among Hispanic Breast Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Heather; Gaffney, Ann Ogden; Aycinena, A Corina; Koch, Pam; Contento, Isobel; Karmally, Wahida; Richardson, John M; Lim, Emerson; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Crew, Katherine; Maurer, Matthew; Kalinsky, Kevin; Hershman, Dawn L

    2015-05-01

    There is a need for culturally relevant nutrition programs targeted to underserved cancer survivors. Our aim was to examine the effect of a culturally based approach to dietary change on increasing fruit/vegetable (F/V) intake and decreasing fat intake among Hispanic breast cancer survivors. Participants were randomized to Intervention and Control groups. Diet recalls, detailed interviews, fasting blood, and anthropometric measures were collected at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. Hispanic women (n=70) with stage 0 to III breast cancer who completed adjuvant treatment and lived in New York City were randomized between April 2011 and March 2012. The Intervention group (n=34) participated in ¡Cocinar Para Su Salud!, a culturally based nine-session (24 hours over 12 weeks) intervention including nutrition education, cooking classes, and food-shopping field trips. The Control group (n=36) received written dietary recommendations for breast cancer survivors. Change at 6 months in daily F/V servings and percent calories from total fat were the main outcome measures. Linear regression models adjusted for stratification factors and estimated marginal means were used to compare changes in diet from baseline to 3 and 6 months. Baseline characteristics were the following: mean age 56.6 years (standard deviation 9.7 years), mean time since diagnosis 3.4 years (standard deviation 2.7 years), mean body mass index (calculated as kg/m(2)) 30.9 (standard deviation 6.0), 62.9% with annual household income ≤$15,000, mean daily servings of all F/V was 5.3 (targeted F/V 3.7 servings excluding legumes/juices/starchy vegetables/fried foods), and 27.7% of daily calories from fat. More than 60% in the Intervention group attended seven or more of nine classes, with overall study retention of 87% retention at 6 months. At month 6, the Intervention group compared with Control group reported an increase in mean servings of F/V from baseline (all F/V: +2.0 vs -0.1; P=0.005; targeted F

  16. The ArsD As(III) metallochaperone

    PubMed Central

    Ajees, A. Abdul; Yang, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic, a toxic metalloid widely existing in the environment, causes a variety of health problems. The ars operon encoded by Escherichia coli plasmid R773 has arsD and arsA genes, where ArsA is an ATPase that is the catalytic subunit of the ArsAB As(III) extrusion pump, and ArsD is an arsenic chaperone for ArsA. ArsD transfers As(III) to ArsA and increases the affinity of ArsA for As(III), allowing resistance to environmental concentrations of arsenic. Cys12, Cys13 and Cys18 in ArsD form a three sulfur-coordinated As(III) binding site that is essential for metallochaperone activity. ATP hydrolysis by ArsA is required for transfer of As(III) from ArsD to ArsA, suggesting that transfer occurs with a conformation of ArsA that transiently forms during the catalytic cycle. The 1.4 Å x-ray crystal structure of ArsD shows a core of four β-strands flanked by four α-helices in a thioredoxin fold. Docking of ArsD with ArsA was modeled in silico. Independently ArsD mutants exhibiting either weaker or stronger interaction with ArsA were selected. The locations of the mutations mapped on the surface of ArsD are consistent with the docking model. The results suggest that the interface with ArsA involves one surface of α1 helix and metalloid binding site of ArsD. PMID:21188475

  17. Rapid kimberlite ascent and the significance of Ar-Ar ages in xenolith phlogopites

    PubMed

    Kelley; Wartho

    2000-07-28

    Kimberlite eruptions bring exotic rock fragments and minerals, including diamonds, from deep within the mantle up to the surface. Such fragments are rapidly absorbed into the kimberlite magma so their appearance at the surface implies rapid transport from depth. High spatial resolution Ar-Ar age data on phlogopite grains in xenoliths from Malaita in the Solomon Islands, southwest Pacific, and Elovy Island in the Kola Peninsula, Russia, indicate transport times of hours to days depending upon the magma temperature. In addition, the data show that the phlogopite grains preserve Ar-Ar ages recorded at high temperature in the mantle, 700 degrees C above the conventional closure temperature.

  18. 40Ar/39Ar age of Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary tektites from Haiti

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izett, G.A.; Dalrymple, G.B.; Snee, L.W.

    1991-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar dating of tektites discovered recently in Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary marine sedimentary rocks on Haiti indicates that the K-T boundary and impact event are coeval at 64.5 ?? 0.1 million years ago. Sanidine from a bentonite that lies directly above the K-T boundary in continental, coal-bearing, sedimentary rocks of Montana was also dated and has a 40Ar/39Ar age of 64.6 ?? 0.2 million years ago, which is indistinguishable statistically from the age of the tektites.

  19. 40Ar/39Ar technique of KAr dating: a comparison with the conventional technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brent, Dalrymple G.; Lanphere, M.A.

    1971-01-01

    K-Ar ages have been determined by the 40Ar/39Ar total fusion technique on 19 terrestrial samples whose conventional K-Ar ages range from 3.4 my to nearly 1700 my. Sample materials included biotite, muscovite, sanidine, adularia, plagioclase, hornblende, actinolite, alunite, dacite, and basalt. For 18 samples there are no significant differences at the 95% confidence level between the KAr ages obtained by these two techniques; for one sample the difference is 4.3% and is statistically significant. For the neutron doses used in these experiments (???4 ?? 1018 nvt) it appears that corrections for interfering Ca- and K-derived Ar isotopes can be made without significant loss of precision for samples with K/Ca > 1 as young as about 5 ?? 105 yr, and for samples with K/Ca < 1 as young as about 107 yr. For younger samples the combination of large atmospheric Ar corrections and large corrections for Ca- and K-derived Ar may make the precision of the 40Ar/39Ar technique less than that of the conventional technique unless the irradiation parameters are adjusted to minimize these corrections. ?? 1971.

  20. 40Ar/39Ar ages of the AD 79 eruption of Vesuvius, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, Marvin A.; Champion, Duane E.; Melluso, Leone; Morra, Vincenzo; Perrotta, Annamaria; Scarpati, Claudio; Tedesco, Dario; Calvert, Andrew T.

    2007-01-01

    The Italian volcano, Vesuvius, erupted explosively in AD 79. Sanidine from pumice collected at Casti Amanti in Pompeii and Villa Poppea in Oplontis yielded a weighted-mean 40Ar/39Ar age of 1925±66 years in 2004 (1σ uncertainty) from incremental-heating experiments of eight aliquants of sanidine. This is the calendar age of the eruption. Our results together with the work of Renne et al. (1997) and Renne and Min (1998) demonstrate the validity of the 40Ar/39Ar method to reconstruct the recent eruptive history of young, active volcanoes.

  1. Ar-39-Ar-40 Evidence for Early Impact Events on the LL Parent Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, E. T.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Rubin, A. E.

    2006-01-01

    We determined Ar-39-Ar-40 ages of eight LL chondrites, and one igneous inclusion from an LL chondrite, with the object of understanding the thermal history of the LL-chondrite parent body. The meteorites in this study have a range of petrographic types from LL3.3 to LL6, and shock stages from S1 to S4. These meteorites reveal a range of K-Ar ages from 23.66 to 24.50 Ga, and peak ages from 23.74 to 24.55 Ga. Significantly, three of the eight chondrites (LL4, 5, 6) have K-Ar ages of -4.27 Ga. One of these (MIL99301) preserves an Ar-39-Ar-40 age of 4.23 +/- 0.03 Ga from low-temperature extractions, and an older age of 4.52 +/- 0.08 Ga from the highest temperature extractions. In addition, an igneous-textured impact melt DOM85505,22 has a peak Ar-39-Ar-40 age of >= 4.27 Ga. We interpret these results as evidence for impact events that occurred at about 4.27 Ga on the LL parent body that produced local impact melts, reset the Ar-39-Ar-40 ages of some meteorites, and exhumed (or interred) others, resulting in a range of cooling ages. The somewhat younger peak age of 3.74 Ga from GR095658 (LL3.3) suggests an additional impact event close to timing of impact-reset ages of some other ordinary chondrites between 3.6-3.8 Ga. The results from MIL99301 suggest that some apparently unshocked (Sl) chondrites may have substantially reset Ar-39-Ar-40 ages. A previous petrographic investigation of MIL99301 suggested that reheating to temperatures less than or equal to type 4 petrographic conditions (600C) caused fractures in olivine to anneal, resulting in a low apparent shock stage of S1 (unshocked). The Ar-39-Ar-40 age spectrum of MIL99301 is consistent with this interpretation. Older ages from high-T extractions may date an earlier impact event at 4.52 +/- 0.08 Ga, whereas younger ages from lower-T extractions date a later impact event at 4.23 Ar-39-Ar-40 0.03 Ga that may have caused annealing of feldspar and olivine

  2. Dating samples of lunar soil from the Mare Crisium by the Ar/39/-Ar/40/ technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanin, L. L.; Arakeliants, M. M.; Bogatikov, O. A.; Ivanenko, V. V.; Pupyrev, Iu. G.; Tarasov, L. S.; Frikh-Khar, D. I.

    1981-07-01

    Two samples (dolerite and gabbro fragments) from a depth of 184 cm in the Luna 24 core are dated using the Ar(39)-Ar(40) technique. The values obtained are found to be lower than all published isotopic ages for the Luna 24 samples. An analysis of possible dating errors of the lunar samples, together with the good agreement of the results from the Ar(39)-Ar(40) technique of geochronologic standards and anorthosite from the Korosten pluton with the results from Rb-Sr, U-Pb, and Sm-Nd methods, attests the reliability of the values.

  3. 40Ar/39Ar ages of the AD 79 eruption of Vesuvius, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanphere, Marvin; Champion, Duane; Melluso, Leone; Morra, Vincenzo; Perrotta, Annamaria; Scarpati, Claudio; Tedesco, Dario; Calvert, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The Italian volcano, Vesuvius, erupted explosively in AD 79. Sanidine from pumice collected at Casti Amanti in Pompeii and Villa Poppea in Oplontis yielded a weighted-mean 40Ar/39Ar age of 1925±66 years in 2004 (1σ uncertainty) from incremental-heating experiments of eight aliquants of sanidine. This is the calendar age of the eruption. Our results together with the work of Renne et al. (1997) and Renne and Min (1998) demonstrate the validity of the 40Ar/39Ar method to reconstruct the recent eruptive history of young, active volcanoes.

  4. 39Ar - 40Ar Studies of Lherzolitic Shergottites Yamato 000097 and 984028

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Shih, C.-Y.; Mikouchi, T.; Misawa, K.

    2010-01-01

    Yamato 984028 (Y984028) was discovered by the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE) in 1998 and recently classified as a lherzolitic shergottite with large pyroxene oikocrysts enclosing rounded olivine and chromites. It also contains shock veining and maskelynite. Y984028 is paired with the more recent lherzolitic shergottite finds Y000027/47/97 based on similarities in mineralogy and chemistry, as well as isotopic composition. We present here the studied Ar-39-Ar-40 of Y-984028 whole rock (WR) and pyroxene (Px), in order to gain better understanding of trapped Ar components with a comparison of the possibly-paired Y000097 Ar release.

  5. Comparison of star and linear ArF resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, Drew C.; Wieberger, Florian; Gröschel, Andre; Müller, Axel H. E.; Schmidt, Hans-Werner; Ober, Christopher K.

    2010-04-01

    Linear and star-shaped ArF photoresists were prepared and preliminary lithographic comparison was performed using electron-beam exposure. An oligo-initiator based on saccharose forms the core of the star shaped photoresist from which three standard ArF photoresist monomers, α-gamma butyrolactone methacrylate (GBLMA), methyl adamantyl methacrylate (MAMA) and hydroxyl adamantyl methacrylate (HAMA) were polymerized. Conditions were adjusted to obtain a low polydispersity, 6 kg/mol star polymer with a degree of polymerization of approximately five mers per arm. For comparison, a linear photoresist control was prepared using the same scheme. The star resist architecture was found to improve roughness without reducing sensitivity or resolution.

  6. The bond-forming reactions of atomic dications with neutral molecules: formation of ArNH+ and ArN+ from collisions of Ar2+ with NH3.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Natalie; Kearney, Dominic; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Price, Stephen D

    2004-03-24

    An experimental and computational study has been performed to investigate the bond-forming reactivity between Ar(2+) and NH(3). Experimentally, we detect two previously unobserved bond-forming reactions between Ar(2+) and NH(3) forming ArN(+) and ArNH(+). This is the first experimental observation of a triatomic product ion (ArNH(+)) following a chemical reaction of a rare gas dication with a neutral. The intensity of ArNH(+) was found to decrease with increasing collision energy, with a corresponding increase in the intensity of ArN(+), indicating that ArN(+) is formed by the dissociation of ArNH(+). Key features on the potential energy surface for the reaction were calculated quantum chemically using CASSCF and MRCI methods. The calculated reaction mechanism, which takes place on a singlet surface, involves the initial formation of an Ar-N bond to give Ar-NH(3)(2+). This complexation is followed by proton loss via a transition state, and then loss of the two remaining hydrogen atoms in two subsequent activationless steps to give the products (3)ArN(+) + H(+) + 2H. This calculated pathway supports the sequential formation of ArN(+) from ArNH(+), as suggested by the experimental data. The calculations also indicate that no bond-forming pathway exists on the ground triplet surface for this system.

  7. 40Ar/39Ar systematics and argon diffusion in amber: implications for ancient earth atmospheres

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landis, G.P.; Snee, L.W.

    1991-01-01

    Argon isotope data indicate retained argon in bulk amber (matrix gas) is radiogenic [40Ar/39Ar ???32o] than the much more abundant surface absorbed argon [40Ar/39Ar ???295.5]. Neutron-induced 39Ar is retained in amber during heating experiments to 150?? -250??C, with no evidence of recoiled 39Ar found after irradiation. A maximum permissible volume diffusion coefficient of argon in amber (at ambient temperature) D???1.5 x 10-17 cm2S-1 is calculated from 39Ar retention. 40Ar/39Ar age calculations indicate Dominican Republic amber is ??? 45 Ma and North Dakota amber is ??? 89 Ma, both at least reasonable ages for the amber based upon stratigraphic and paleontological constraints and upon the small amount of radiogenic 40Ar. To date, over 300 gas analyses of ambers and resins of Cretaceous to Recent age that are geographically distributed among fifteen noted world locations identify mixtures of gases in different sites within amber (Berner and Landis, 1988). The presence of multiple mixing trends between compositionally distinct end-members gases within the same sample and evidence for retained radiogenic argon within the amber argue persuasivley against rapid exchange by diffusion of amber-contained gases with moder air. Only gas in primary bubbles entrapped between successive flows of tree resin has been interpreted as original "ancient air", which is an O2-rich end-member gas with air-like N2/Ar ratios. Gas analyses of these primary bubbles indicate atmospheric O2 levels in the Late Cretaceous of ??? 35%, and that atmospheric O2 dropped by early Tertiary time to near a present atmospheric level of 21% O2. A very low argon diffusion coefficient in amber persuasively argues for a gas in primary bubbles trapped in amber being ancient air (possibly modified only by O2 reaction with amber). ?? 1991.

  8. 40Ar/ 39Ar systematics and argon diffusion in amber: implications for ancient earth atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landis, G. P.; Snee, L. W.

    1991-12-01

    Argon isotope data indicate retained argon in bulk amber (matrix gas) is radiogenic [ 40Ar/ 39Ar ≃32o] than the much more abundant surface absorbed argon [ 40Ar/ 39Ar ≃295.5]. Neutron-induced 39Ar is retained in amber during heating experiments to 150° -250°C, with no evidence of recoiled 39Ar found after irradiation. A maximum permissible volume diffusion coefficient of argon in amber (at ambient temperature) D≤1.5 x 10 -17 cm 2S -1 is calculated from 39Ar retention. 40Ar/ 39Ar age calculations indicate Dominican Republic amber is ≃ 45 Ma and North Dakota amber is ≃ 89 Ma, both at least reasonable ages for the amber based upon stratigraphic and paleontological constraints and upon the small amount of radiogenic 40Ar. To date, over 300 gas analyses of ambers and resins of Cretaceous to Recent age that are geographically distributed among fifteen noted world locations identify mixtures of gases in different sites within amber (Berner and Landis, 1988). The presence of multiple mixing trends between compositionally distinct end-members gases within the same sample and evidence for retained radiogenic argon within the amber argue persuasivley against rapid exchange by diffusion of amber-contained gases with moder air. Only gas in primary bubbles entrapped between successive flows of tree resin has been interpreted as original "ancient air", which is an O 2-rich end-member gas with air-like N 2/Ar ratios. Gas analyses of these primary bubbles indicate atmospheric O 2 levels in the Late Cretaceous of ≃ 35%, and that atmospheric O 2 dropped by early Tertiary time to near a present atmospheric level of 21% O 2. A very low argon diffusion coefficient in amber persuasively argues for a gas in primary bubbles trapped in amber being ancient air (possibly modified only by O 2 reaction with amber).

  9. Strain partitioning and preservation of 40Ar/ 39Ar ages during Variscan exhumation of a subducted crust (Malpica-Tui complex, NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, J.; Cosca, M. A.; Gil Ibarguchi, J. I.; Dallmeyer, R. D.

    2003-10-01

    The Malpica-Tui complex (NW Iberian Massif) consists of a Lower Continental Unit of variably deformed and recrystallized granitoids, metasediments and sparse metabasites, overridden by an upper unit with rocks of oceanic affinities. Metamorphic minerals dated by the 40Ar/ 39Ar method record a coherent temporal history of progressive deformation during Variscan metamorphism and exhumation. The earliest stages of deformation (D1) under high-pressure conditions are recorded in phengitic white micas from eclogite-facies rocks at 365-370 Ma. Following this eclogite-facies peak-metamorphism, the continental slab became attached to the overriding plate at deep-crustal levels at ca. 340-350 Ma (D2). Exhumation was accompanied by pervasive deformation (D3) within the continental slab at ca. 330 Ma and major deformation (D4) in the underlying para-autochthon at 315-325 Ma. Final tectonothermal evolution included late folding, localized shearing and granitic intrusions at 280-310 Ma. Dating of high-pressure rocks by the 40Ar/ 39Ar method yields ages that are synchronous with published Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd ages obtained for both the Malpica-Tui complex and its correlative, the Champtoceaux complex in the French Armorican Massif. The results indicate that phengitic white mica retains its radiogenic argon despite been subjected to relatively high temperatures (500-600 °C) for a period of 20-30 My corresponding to the time-span from the static, eclogite-facies M1 peak-metamorphism through D1-M2 eclogite-facies deformation to amphibolite-facies D2-M3. Our study provides additional evidence that under certain geological conditions (i.e., strain partitioning, fluid deficiency) argon isotope mobility is limited at high temperatures, and that 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology can be a reliable method for dating high pressure metamorphism.

  10. ArsP: a methylarsenite efflux permease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Madegowda, Mahendra; Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Rosen, Barry P

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent organoarsenic compounds are far more toxic than either pentavalent organoarsenicals or inorganic arsenite. Many microbes methylate inorganic arsenite (As(III)) to more toxic and carcinogenic methylarsenite (MAs(III)). Additionally, monosodium methylarsenate (MSMA or MAs(V)) has been used widely as an herbicide and is reduced by microbial communities to MAs(III). Roxarsone (3-nitro-4-hydroxybenzenearsonic acid) is a pentavalent aromatic arsenical that is used as antimicrobial growth promoter for poultry and swine, and its active form is the trivalent species Rox(III). A bacterial permease, ArsP, from Campylobacter jejuni, was recently shown to confer resistance to roxarsone. In this study, C. jejuni arsP was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to confer resistance to MAs(III) and Rox(III) but not to inorganic As(III) or pentavalent organoarsenicals. Cells of E. coli expressing arsP did not accumulate trivalent organoarsenicals. Everted membrane vesicles from those cells accumulated MAs(III) > Rox(III) with energy supplied by NADH oxidation, reflecting efflux from cells. The vesicles did not transport As(III), MAs(V) or pentavalent roxarsone. Mutation or modification of the two conserved cysteine residues resulted in loss of transport activity, suggesting that they play a role in ArsP function. Thus, ArsP is the first identified efflux system specific for trivalent organoarsenicals. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. ArsP: a methylarsenite efflux permease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Madegowda, Mahendra; Bhattacharjee, Hiranmoy; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    Trivalent organoarsenic compounds are far more toxic than either pentavalent organoarsenicals or inorganic arsenite. Many microbes methylate inorganic arsenite (As(III)) to more toxic and carcinogenic methylarsenite (MAs(III)). Additionally, monosodium methylarsenate (MSMA or MAs(V)) has been used widely as an herbicide and is reduced by microbial communities to MAs(III). Roxarsone (3-nitro-4-hydroxybenzenearsonic acid) is a pentavalent aromatic arsenical that is used as antimicrobial growth promoter for poultry and swine, and its active form is the trivalent species Rox(III). A bacterial permease, ArsP, from Campylobacter jejuni, was recently shown to confer resistance to roxarsone. In this study C. jejuni arsP was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to confer resistance to MAs(III) and Rox(III) but not to inorganic As(III) or pentavalent organoarsenicals. Cells of E. coli expressing arsP did not accumulate trivalent organoarsenicals. Everted membrane vesicles from those cells accumulated MAs(III)>Rox(III) with energy supplied by NADH oxidation, reflecting efflux from cells. The vesicles did not transport As(III), MAs(V) or pentavalent roxarsone. Mutation or modification of the two conserved cysteine residues resulted in loss of transport activity, suggesting that they play a role in ArsP function. Thus ArsP is the first identified efflux system specific for trivalent organoarsenicals. PMID:26234817

  12. ^40Ar-^39Ar Step Heating of Nördlinger Ries Crater Impact Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, W. H.; Lippolt, H. J.

    2013-09-01

    Ries impact melt samples were analyzed via Ar-Ar step heating technique. All samples contain excess argon increasing the app. ages. Only for one sample a plateau age can be calculated to 14.6 ± 0.2 Ma identical with published age values for Moldavites.

  13. Correlation diagrams in 40 Ar/39Ar dating: is there a correct choice?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalrymple, G.B.; Lanphere, M.A.; Pringle, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Contrary to published assertions, the 2 types of correlation diagrams used in the interpretation of 40Ar/39Ar incremental-heating data yield the same information provided the correct mathematics are used for estimating correlation coefficients and for the least squares fit. The choice is simply between 2 illustrative, graphical displays, neither of which is fundamentally superior to the other. -Authors

  14. Dating transitionally magnetized lavas of the late Matuyama Chron: Toward a new 40Ar/39Ar timescale of reversals and events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Bradley S.; Hoffman, Kenneth A.; Chauvin, Annick; Coe, Robert S.; Pringle, Malcolm S.

    1999-01-01

    The K-Ar based geomagnetic polarity timescale was constructed using data from lavas and tuffs that bracketed, but rarely dated, the transitions between polarity intervals. Subsequent 40Ar/39Ar dating indicated that the ages of some polarity transitions had been underestimated by about 6%. Although the accepted ages of the polarity chron boundaries have increased, their precise temporal definition remained uncertain. We have taken a different approach and used incremental-heating techniques to obtain 18 new 40Ar/39Ar ages from basaltic lavas within flow sequences at Punaruu Valley, Tahiti, and Haleakala volcano, Hawaii. These lavas record transitional paleomagnetic directions corresponding to four mid-Pleistocene polarity reversals or events. Three lavas from Punaruu Valley previously thought to record the Cobb Mountain Normal Polarity Subchron (CMNS) gave a mean age of 1.105+/-0.005Ma, indicating that they were erupted about 76 kyr after the CMNS; this period of transitional field behavior is designated the Punaruu event. In addition, seven new 40Ar/39Ar ages from the Punaruu Valley indicate that the Jaramillo Normal Polarity Subchron (JNS) lasted about 67 kyr, starting at 1.053+/-0.006Ma and ending 0.986+/-0.005Ma. This agrees with astronomical estimates but conflicts with JNS ages proposed by Spell and McDougall [1992] and Izett and Obradovich [1994] on the basis of 40Ar/39Ar dating of rhyolite domes in the Valles Caldera. Indistinguishable 40Ar/39Ar ages of seven lavas, including one from Punaruu Valley and six from Haleakala that record broadly similar intermediate paleodirections, suggest that the Kamikatsura event occurred at 0.886+/-0.003Ma. Moreover, these data indicate that the Kamikatsura event occurred 20-40 kyr after another geomagnetic event, most probably taking place at 0.92 Ma. We designate this earlier field behavior the Santa Rosa event, adopting its name from that of a transitionally magnetized rhyolite dome which happened to figure prominently

  15. Towards establishing high-precision 40Ar/39Ar chronologies for distal tephra archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, D. F.

    2012-12-01

    To develop further understanding of palaeoclimate change in a context of, for example, the expansion of hominin out of Africa and abrupt climate change, correlation between high-resolution terrestrial, marine and ice core archives from around the globe is key. Whereas there can be significant uncertainties in the tuning of palaeoclimate proxy records (i.e., wiggle matching) between regions, direct tephra correlations have essentially zero uncertainty, providing the correlations are robust. Tephrochronology has demonstrated tremendous potential for correlation of records across regions and construction of relative chronological tephra matrices. However absolute dating is often required for: (1) pinning of events to the geological timescale; and (2) to confirm the validity of correlations if geochemical fingerprints do not prove to be definitive. 14C dating can be used for radiocarbon-bearing sediments within which volcanic tephra are intercalated. However, the technique only extends over the last 50 ka and precision suffers dramatically with increasing age. The technique is reliant on the availability of radiocarbon-bearing material within sediments and direct comparison of 14C chronologies from marine and terrestrial settings is problematic owing to marine reservoir offset. OSL dating can also be used to date sediments above and below tephra units but uncertainties are typically too large for development of high-precision chronologies. Volcanic K-bearing distal tephra can theoretically be dated using the 40Ar/39Ar technique thereby placing direct temporal constraints on palaeoclimate records. However, in reality, distal tephra are usually fine-grained and crystal-poor, lacking mineral phases amenable to 40Ar/39Ar dating of young rocks, e.g., sanidine. Although the distal samples contain abundant K-bearing glass shards, they have been shown to provide unreliable 40Ar/39Ar ages likely due to a combination of post eruption K-loss (during glass hydration?) and 37Ar and

  16. 40Ar/39Ar and unspiked 40K-40Ar dating of upper Pleistocene volcanic activity in the Bas-Vivarais (Ardèche, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasco, Romain; Guillou, Hervé; Nomade, Sébastien; Scao, Vincent; Maury, René C.; Kissel, Catherine; Wandres, Camille

    2017-07-01

    Fifteen basanitic and tephritic flows from Bas-Vivarais, the youngest volcanic field in the French Massif Central together with the Chaîne des Puys, were dated by 40Ar/39Ar and 40K-40Ar on separated groundmass, and studied for paleomagnetism. An almost systematic discrepancy between the two types of ages is observed, the 40K-40Ar method providing ages up to 8.5 times the 40Ar/39Ar ones. Microscopic observations and geochemical analyses lead us to conclude that most of the K-Ar ages measured on Bas-Vivarais samples are in error due to extraneous argon originating from contamination by xenocrysts from disintegrated crustal and mantle xenoliths. However, 40Ar/39Ar experiments do not evidence any excess argon, suggesting two possibilities: 1, the extraneous argon contribution was eliminated during the pre-degassing of the samples at 600 °C prior to the step heating experiments, 2 - K-Ar ages may be older because larger quantities of xenocrysts, potential carriers of extraneous argon were involved in the K-Ar experiments than in the 40Ar/39Ar ones. 40Ar/39Ar ages are thus little or not affected by contamination and provide reliable ages for the studied volcanoes. Combined 40Ar/39Ar datings and magnetic directions for each flow point out to three successive stages in the volcanic evolution of Bas-Vivarais. Stage 1, limited to the northern part of the field, has a mean age of 187.3 ± 19.0 ka. In its southern part, Stages 2 and 3 emplaced magmas at 31.1 ± 3.9 ka and 23.9 ± 8.1 ka, respectively. These two last stages are consistent with available 14C dates but not with previous thermoluminescence data.

  17. Photomask cleaning process improvement to minimize ArF haze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Michael; McDonald, Andrew

    2008-04-01

    Growth of "haze" defects on photomasks exposed in ArF lithography is recognized as a serious problem. Haze defects that have grown to detectable sizes can be analysed in situ by techniques such as EDX or Raman, but to analyze at the photomask manufacturing stage requires extraction of residues by solution in DI water. The effect of extraction conditions, including surface area and material, water volume, time, and temperature, has been studied. A standard method to compare residual ion levels is proposed. Various methods for reducing residual ion levels from the photomask cleaning process have been published. These include SPM reduction, oxygen plasma, SC1 dilution, Megasonic agitation, hot rinse, UV exposure, thermal bake, ozone water, ozone gas, and hydrogenated water. Critical parameters for the cleaning process, besides residual ion levels and contamination removal efficiency, include CD shift, AR/chrome damage, scatter bar damage, and on phase shift masks, the change in phase and transmission. An optimized process combining conventional and novel techniques is described. Data is presented to show the importance of controlling all resist strip and clean processes, not just the final clean. It has achieved sulphate levels of 0.2ng/cm2 (well below the critical level for haze growth), as well as improved results for the other critical parameters. This process has been demonstrated to allow ArF exposure of large numbers of wafers without the appearance of haze defects.

  18. Analytic Validation of RNA In Situ Hybridization (RISH) for AR and AR-V7 Expression in Human Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Liana B.; Morais, Carlos L.; Almutairi, Fawaz; Haffner, Michael C.; Zheng, Qizhi; Isaacs, John T.; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Lu, Changxue; Tsai, Harrison; Luo, Jun; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Lotan, Tamara L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose RNA expression of androgen receptor splice variants may be a biomarker of resistance to novel androgen deprivation therapies in castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We analytically validated an RNA in situ hybridization (RISH) assay for total AR and AR-V7 for use in formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) prostate tumors. Experimental Design We used prostate cell lines and xenografts to validate chromogenic RISH to detect RNA containing AR exon 1 (AR-E1, surrogate for total AR RNA species) and cryptic exon 3 (AR-CE3, surrogate for AR-V7 expression). RISH signals were quantified in FFPE primary tumors and CRPC specimens, comparing to known AR and AR-V7 status by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Results The quantified RISH results correlated significantly with total AR and AR-V7 levels by RT-PCR in cell lines, xenografts and autopsy metastases. Both AR-E1 and AR-CE3 RISH signals were localized in nuclear punctae in addition to the expected cytoplasmic speckles. Compared to admixed benign glands, AR-E1 expression was significantly higher in primary tumor cells with a median fold increase of 3.0 and 1.4 in two independent cohorts (p<0.0001 and p=0.04, respectively). While AR-CE3 expression was detectable in primary prostatic tumors, levels were substantially higher in a subset of CRPC metastases and cell lines, and were correlated with AR-E1 expression. Conclusions RISH for AR-E1 and AR-CE3 is an analytically valid method to examine total AR and AR-V7 RNA levels in FFPE tissues. Future clinical validation studies are required to determine whether AR RISH is a prognostic or predictive biomarker in specific clinical contexts. PMID:27166397

  19. Analytic Validation of RNA In Situ Hybridization (RISH) for AR and AR-V7 Expression in Human Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Liana B; Morais, Carlos L; Almutairi, Fawaz; Haffner, Michael C; Zheng, Qizhi; Isaacs, John T; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S; Lu, Changxue; Tsai, Harrison; Luo, Jun; De Marzo, Angelo M; Lotan, Tamara L

    2016-09-15

    RNA expression of androgen receptor splice variants may be a biomarker of resistance to novel androgen deprivation therapies in castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We analytically validated an RNA in situ hybridization (RISH) assay for total AR and AR-V7 for use in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) prostate tumors. We used prostate cell lines and xenografts to validate chromogenic RISH to detect RNA containing AR exon 1 (AR-E1, surrogate for total AR RNA species) and cryptic exon 3 (AR-CE3, surrogate for AR-V7 expression). RISH signals were quantified in FFPE primary tumors and CRPC specimens, comparing to known AR and AR-V7 status by IHC and RT-PCR. The quantified RISH results correlated significantly with total AR and AR-V7 levels by RT-PCR in cell lines, xenografts, and autopsy metastases. Both AR-E1 and AR-CE3 RISH signals were localized in nuclear punctae in addition to the expected cytoplasmic speckles. Compared with admixed benign glands, AR-E1 expression was significantly higher in primary tumor cells with a median fold increase of 3.0 and 1.4 in two independent cohorts (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.04, respectively). While AR-CE3 expression was detectable in primary prostatic tumors, levels were substantially higher in a subset of CRPC metastases and cell lines, and were correlated with AR-E1 expression. RISH for AR-E1 and AR-CE3 is an analytically valid method to examine total AR and AR-V7 RNA levels in FFPE tissues. Future clinical validation studies are required to determine whether AR RISH is a prognostic or predictive biomarker in specific clinical contexts. Clin Cancer Res; 22(18); 4651-63. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. 76 FR 27077 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Form AR-11 and Form AR-11SR, Extension of an Existing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Agency Information Collection Activities: Form AR-11 and Form AR- 11SR, Extension of an Existing Information Collection; Comment Request ACTION: 60-Day Notice of Information Collection under Review: Form AR- 11 and Form AR-11SR, Alien's Change of Address Card...

  1. Ar-Ar and I-Xe Ages and the Thermal History of IAB Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Garrison, Daniel H.; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    Studies of several samples of the large Caddo County IAB iron meteorite reveal andesitic material, enriched in Si, Na, Al and Ca, which is essentially unique among meteorites. This material is believed to have formed from a chondritic source by partial melting and to have further segregated by grain coarsening. Such an origin implies extended metamorphism of the IAB parent body. New Ar-39- Ar-40 ages for silicate from three different Caddo samples are consistent with a common age of 4.50-4.51 Gyr ago. Less well defined Ar-Ar degassing ages for inclusions from two other IABs, EET8333 and Udei Station, are approx.4.32 Gyr, whereas the age for Campo del Cielo varies considerably over approx.3.23-4.56 Gyr. New I-129-Xe-129 ages for Caddo County and EET8333 are 4557.9+/-0.1 Myr and 4557-4560 Myr, respectively, relative to an age of 4562.3 Myr for Shallowater. Considering all reported Ar-Ar degassing ages for IABs and related winonaites, the range is approx.4.32-4.53 Gyr, but several IABs give similar Ar ages of 4.50-4.52 Gyr. We interpret these older Ar ages to represent cooling after the time of last significant metamorphism on the parent body, and the younger ages to represent later 40Ar diffusion loss. The older Ar-Ar ages for IABs are similar to Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isochron ages reported in the literature for Caddo County. Considering the possibility that IAB parent body formation was followed by impact disruption, reassembly, and metamorphism (e.g., Benedix et al. 2000), the Ar-Ar ages and IAB cooling rates deduced from Ni concentration profiles in IAB metal (Herpfer et al., 1994) are consistent if the time of the post-assembly metamorphism was as late as approx.4.53 Gyr ago. However, I-Xe ages reported for some IABs define much older ages of approx.4558-4566 Myr, which cannot easily be reconciled with the much younger Ar-Ar and Sm-Nd ages. An explanation for the difference in radiometric ages of IABs may reside in combinations of the following: a) I-Xe ages have very

  2. 40Ar/39Ar and K/Ar dating of low grade metamorphism: examples on metabasites from Central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, L.; Feraud, G.; Fuentes, F.; Delbar, M.; Morata, D.

    2003-04-01

    Dating low to very low-grade burial metamorphic assemblages is often difficult because of (1) few mineral phases compositionally suitable to apply the 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar methods, and (2) small amount in which these phases are commonly found. K-feldspar adularia, sericitic mica, and celadonite are the best known K-bearing secondary minerals. We present some successful attempts to analyse two distinct secondary phases from a same volcanic formation that allow to test the validity of the measured ages. These ages have been also compared with the crystallisation age of the volcanic rocks in which the secondary phases were lately developed. Adularia and sericite were selected from basic lava flows from a 3 to 13 km thick Cretaceous sequence from the Coastal Range of central Chile, at two different locations: the Bustamante Hill (west from Santiago), and the Cordón de Chacana, c. 80 km further north. Adularia came from a low-variance assemblage with pumpellyite, chlorite and low-albite contained in amygdules whereas sericite was present in milky-white strongly sericitized plagioclase crystals. While small clusters of rare fresh plagioclase grains from lava flows from Bustamante and Chacana displayed concordant plateau ages 119.4 ± 2.4 (2 sigma) and 118.7 ± 0.6 Ma, respectively, the adularia from the same formations gave sensibly younger ages around 94 Ma (high temperature steps), and 96.8 ± 0.2 Ma (plateau age) in Bustamante and Chacana, respectively. Sericite ages were measured in situ into single crystals of strongly transformed plagioclases. The relative proportion of sericite and plagioclase corresponding to each degasing step was monitored by measuring the Ca/K ratio (deduced from 37ArCa/39Ar_K). While intermediate ages were measured on some sericite of both sites (corresponding to a variable but permanent contribution of plagioclase on each step), a plateau age of 97.0 ± 1.6 Ma (concordant with adularia) could be obtained on a strongly sericitized plagioclase

  3. Pneumatically sprayed Cu2ZnSnS4 films under Ar and Ar-H2 atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espindola Rodriguez, M.; Sylla, D.; Sanchez, Y.; López-Marino, S.; Fontané, X.; López-García, J.; Placidi, M.; Pérez-Rodríguez, A.; Vigil-Galán, O.; Saucedo, E.

    2014-06-01

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films have been deposited by pneumatic spray pyrolysis onto soda-lime glass and Mo-coated glass substrates by using a special reactor designed for working under controlled atmospheres. The films were grown using both Ar and Ar-H2 as the carrier gas and atmosphere, aiming to eliminate the oxygen-containing atmosphere from the classical spray pyrolysis configuration that uses air as the carrier gas. Thin films with different compositions were prepared and thermally annealed to investigate its compositional and physical properties and its performance as absorber layers in solar cells. To know the impact of the thermal annealing, two different annealing temperatures were used: 550 and 580 °C, both for 30 min. The last temperature showed a great improvement in the crystallinity and allowed a better incorporation of Sn into the films. The optical band gap of the annealed films was found to be around 1.45 eV. Cu-S and ZnO were found as contaminant phases in the as-grown Ar-sprayed samples, but were effectively transformed after annealing. ZnS was detected in both the as-grown and annealed films as the main secondary phase. Solar cells free of scarce elements were fabricated showing an improved conversion efficiency of 1.4%, evidencing the higher potential of this approach for the synthesis of device-grade films.

  4. The tectonic evolution of Cenozoic extensional basins, northeast Brazil: Geochronological constraints from continental basalt 40Ar/39Ar ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, Zorano Sérgio; Vasconcelos, Paulo Marcos; Knesel, Kurt Michael; da Silveira Dias, Luiz Gustavo; Roesner, Eduardo Henrique; Cordeiro de Farias, Paulo Roberto; de Morais Neto, João Marinho

    2013-12-01

    The Boa Vista and Cubati Basins, Paraíba, Brazil, are NW-SE extension-related intracratonic basins that resulted from tectonic stresses after the opening of the South Atlantic. These basins contain lacustrine fossiliferous sediments, bentonite beds, and basalt flows that preserve Cenozoic continental records. 40Ar/39Ar ages for six whole-rocks from two distinct basaltic flows underlying the sediments in the Boa Vista basin are 27.3 ± 0.8 and 25.4 ± 1.3 Ma, while three grains from a basaltic flow overlying the sediments yield 22.0 ± 0.2 Ma. The sediments at the nearby Cubati Basin are overlain by a basalt flow with ages of ˜25.4 Ma. Three whole-rocks from an NE-SW-trending trachytic dyke cross cutting the sediments at the Boa Vista Basin yield 40Ar/39Ar ages of ˜12.45 ± 0.06, 12.59 ± 0.07, and 12.58 ± 0.07 Ma. Three whole-rocks from a nearby volcanic plug (Chupador) yield an age of 23.4 ± 0.1 Ma. The geochronological results combined with stratigraphic correlations between the two basins allow bracketing the age of the main sedimentary and bentonic units within the Boa Vista and Cubati Basins between 25.5 ± 1.3 and 24.9 ± 0.1 Ma. The ages, combined with field observations reveal that the formation of the Boa Vista and Cubati basins is associated with mantle-derived magmas channelled through reactivated Precambrian shear zones. Our geochronological results suggest that a temporal link with the Fernando de Noronha and Saint Helena hot spots can be excluded as possible sources of the Boa Vista and Cubati magmas. Rather, the extensional tectonics in the 30-20 Ma interval, long after Gondwana break-up, may be associated with the re-activation of continental-scale shear zones that channelled small batches of mantle-derived magmas.

  5. Paleozoic accretionary orogenesis in the eastern Beishan orogen: constraints from zircon U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Songjian; Xiao, Wenjiao; Windley, Brian; Mao, Qigui

    2016-04-01

    The continental growth mechanism of the Altaids in Central Asia is still in controversy between models of continuous subduction-accretion versus punctuated accretion by closure of multiple oceanic basins. The Beishan orogenic belt, located in the southern Altaids, is a natural laboratory to address this controversy. Key questions that are heavily debated are: the closure time and subduction polarity of former oceans, the emplacement time of ophiolites, and the styles of accretion and collision. This paper reports new structural data, zircon ages and Ar-Ar dates from the eastern Beishan Orogen that provide information on the accretion process and tectonic affiliation of various terranes. Our geochronological and structural results show that the younging direction of accretion was northwards and the subduction zone dipped southwards under the northern margin of the Shuangyingshan micro-continent. This long-lived and continuous accretion process formed the Hanshan accretionary prism. Our field investigations show that the emplacement of the Xiaohuangshan ophiolite was controlled by oceanic crust subduction beneath the forearc accretionary prism of the Shuangyingshan-Mazongshan composite arc to the south. Moreover, we address the age and terrane affiliation of lithologies in the eastern Beishan orogen through detrital zircon geochronology of meta-sedimentary rocks. We provide new information on the ages, subduction polarities, and affiliation of constituent structural units, as well as a new model of tectonic evolution of the eastern Beishan orogen. The accretionary processes and crustal growth of Central Asia were the result of multiple sequences of accretion and collision of manifold terranes. Reference: Ao, S.J., Xiao, W., Windley, B.F., Mao, Q., Han, C., Zhang, J.e., Yang, L., Geng, J., Paleozoic accretionary orogenesis in the eastern Beishan orogen: Constraints from zircon U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. Gondwana Research, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j

  6. Non-covalent sp(3) carbon bonding with ArCF3 is analogous to CH-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Bauzá, Antonio; Mooibroek, Tiddo J; Frontera, Antonio

    2014-10-28

    A combined CSD and ab initio study reveals that the interaction between the sp(3) C-atom in para-substituted ArCF3 and electron rich atoms is weak (<5 kcal mol(−1)), somewhat directional, and thus comparable to CH–π interactions.

  7. Epitaxial Ag film formation on NaCl crystals in Knudsen gases of Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, Iwao; Suzuki, Shoetu; Nagashima, Seiichi

    Transportation of Ag atoms onto NaCl substrate in Knudsen Ar gas is studied according to the kinetic theory of gas. The results, as compared with our experiment, are as follows: (1) The temperature of Ar-Ag gas in a deposition chamber is estimated to be ˜900 K. (2) The concentration n( r) in radial flow of Ag atoms oto the substrate is given as n( r) = 4.7 × 10 16r-1 atoms m -3. (3) Estimated deposition rate, 1 nm/s, 9 cm of the Ag source agrees with the experimental value. (4) The number of dimers formed in the Ar sbnd Ag gas is ˜3% of the numbers of Ag atoms reaching the substrate. (5) Epitaxial Ag film formation on the NaCl at room temperature will be controlled by temperature and/or pressure of Ar gas.

  8. Ar-40/Ar-39 Ages of Maskelynite Grains from ALHA 77005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turrin, B.; Park, J.; Herzog, G. F.; Lindsay, F. N.; Delaney, J. S.; Nyquist, L. E.; Swisher, C., III

    2013-01-01

    We present Ar-40/Ar-39 measurements for twelve small (20-60 micro-g) maskelynite samples from the heavily shocked martian meteorite ALHA 77005. The reported modal composition for ALHA 77005 is 50-60% olivine (Fa28), 30-40% pyroxene (Wo5Fs23En72), approx.8% maskelynite (An53), and approx.2% opaques by volume [1]). The meteorite is usually classified as a lherzolite. Previous Studies - Ar-40/Ar-39 results from previous work display disturbed release spectra [2,3]. In study [2], Ar-40/Ar-39 measurements on a 52-mg whole-rock sample produced an extremely disturbed release spec-trum, with all calculated apparent ages > 1 Ga, (Fig. 1). In a subsequent study [3], a light and a dark phase were analyzed. A 2.3-mg sample of the light, relatively low-K phase produced a disturbed release spectrum. For the first 20% of the Ar-39(sub K), most of the apparent ages exceeded >1 Ga; the remaining 80% yielded ages between 0.3-0.5 Ga. The integrated age for this phase is 0.9 Ga.

  9. Moving Beyond the Androgen Receptor (AR): Targeting AR-Interacting Proteins to Treat Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Christopher; Mitsiades, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Medical or surgical castration serve as the backbone of systemic therapy for advanced and metastatic prostate cancer, taking advantage of the importance of androgen signaling in this disease. Unfortunately, resistance to castration emerges almost universally. Despite the development and approval of new and more potent androgen synthesis inhibitors and androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, prostate cancers continue to develop resistance to these therapeutics, while often maintaining their dependence on the AR signaling axis. This highlights the need for innovative therapeutic approaches that aim to continue disrupting AR downstream signaling, but are orthogonal to directly targeting the AR itself. In this review, we discuss the preclinical research that has been done, as well as clinical trials for prostate cancer, on inhibiting several important families of AR interacting proteins, including chaperones (such as HSP90 and FKBP52), pioneer factors (including FOXA1 and GATA-2), and AR transcriptional coregulators such as the p160 steroid receptor coactivators (SRCs) SRC-1, SRC-2, SRC-3, as well as lysine deacetylases (KDACs) and lysine acetyltransferases (KATs). Researching the effect of, and developing new therapeutic agents that target, the AR signaling axis is critical to advancing our understanding of prostate cancer biology, and to continuing to improve treatments for prostate cancer and for overcoming castration-resistance. PMID:26728473

  10. Ar-Ar Impact Heating Ages of Eucrites and Timing of the LHB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald; Garrison, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Eucrites and howardites, more than most meteorite types, show extensive impact resetting of their Ar-39-Ar-40 (K-Ar) ages approximately equal to 3.4-4.1 Ga ago, and many specimens show some disturbance of other radiometry chronometers as well. Bogard (1995) argued that this age resetting occurred on Vesta and was produced by the same general population of objects that produced many of the lunar impact basins. The exact nature of the lunar late heavy bombardment (LHB or 'cataclysm') remains controversial, but the timing is similar to the reset ages of eucrites. Neither the beginning nor ending time of the lunar LHB is well constrained. Comparison of Ar-Ar ages of brecciated eucrites with data for the lunar LHB can resolve both the origin of these impactors and the time period over which they were delivered to the inner solar system. This abstract reports some new Ar-Ar age data for eucrites, obtained since the authors' 1995 and 2003 papers.

  11. Moving Beyond the Androgen Receptor (AR): Targeting AR-Interacting Proteins to Treat Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Foley, Christopher; Mitsiades, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    Medical or surgical castration serves as the backbone of systemic therapy for advanced and metastatic prostate cancer, taking advantage of the importance of androgen signaling in this disease. Unfortunately, resistance to castration emerges almost universally. Despite the development and approval of new and more potent androgen synthesis inhibitors and androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, prostate cancers continue to develop resistance to these therapeutics, while often maintaining their dependence on the AR signaling axis. This highlights the need for innovative therapeutic approaches that aim to continue disrupting AR downstream signaling but are orthogonal to directly targeting the AR itself. In this review, we discuss the preclinical research that has been done, as well as clinical trials for prostate cancer, on inhibiting several important families of AR-interacting proteins, including chaperones (such as heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and FKBP52), pioneer factors (including forkhead box protein A1 (FOXA1) and GATA-2), and AR transcriptional coregulators such as the p160 steroid receptor coactivators (SRCs) SRC-1, SRC-2, SRC-3, as well as lysine deacetylases (KDACs) and lysine acetyltransferases (KATs). Researching the effect of-and developing new therapeutic agents that target-the AR signaling axis is critical to advancing our understanding of prostate cancer biology, to continue to improve treatments for prostate cancer and for overcoming castration resistance.

  12. Investigation of metastable production in a closed-cell dielectric capillary variable pressure He plasma jet with Ar admixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sands, Brian; Ganguly, Biswa

    2011-10-01

    For plasma processing applications of streamer-like atmospheric pressure plasma jets generated in a dielectric capillary, we have demonstrated that an admixture of Ar to the He gas flow greatly increases the lifetime of energetic species in the core flow through enhanced afterglow production of Ar 1s5 metastable species. To study this effect in more detail, we have used a closed-cell plasma jet that allows control over the background gas pressure and composition. We used a 20 ns risetime positive unipolar voltage pulse for excitation. A He flow with a 0-30% Ar admixture was studied using time-resolved emission and tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy of the Ar 1s5 and He 23S metastable states. Nitrogen was used as the background gas. In pure He and pure Ar gases the He and Ar metastables respectively are produced in the first ~100 ns only in the active discharge. With Ar added to the He gas flow, He metastables produced in the active discharge are quickly quenched via Penning ionization of Ar while Ar 1s5 is enhanced over 1-2 μs in the afterglow, increasing the number density as high as 1013/cc and extending the effective lifetime up to 10 μs. This implies that He heavy particle kinetics are a key driver of enhanced afterglow plasma chemistry in plasma jets with rare gas mixtures.

  13. Potassium Isotopic Compositions of NIST Potassium Standards and 40Ar/39Ar Mineral Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Leah; Tappa, Mike; Ellam, Rob; Mark, Darren; Higgins, John; Simon, Justin I.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the isotopic ratios of standards, spikes, and reference materials is fundamental to the accuracy of many geochronological methods. For example, the 238U/235U ratio relevant to U-Pb geochronology was recently re-determined [1] and shown to differ significantly from the previously accepted value employed during age determinations. These underlying values are fundamental to accurate age calculations in many isotopic systems, and uncertainty in these values can represent a significant (and often unrecognized) portion of the uncertainty budget for determined ages. The potassium isotopic composition of mineral standards, or neutron flux monitors, is a critical, but often overlooked component in the calculation of K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages. It is currently assumed that all terrestrial materials have abundances indistinguishable from that of NIST SRM 985 [2]; this is apparently a reasonable assumption at the 0.25per mille level (1s) [3]. The 40Ar/39Ar method further relies on the assumption that standards and samples (including primary and secondary standards) have indistinguishable 40K/39K values. We will present data establishing the potassium isotopic compositions of NIST isotopic K SRM 985, elemental K SRM 999b, and 40Ar/39Ar biotite mineral standard GA1550 (sample MD-2). Stable isotopic compositions (41K/39K) were measured by the peak shoulder method with high resolution MC-ICP-MS (Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus), using the accepted value of NIST isotopic SRM 985 [2] for fractionation [4] corrections [5]. 40K abundances were measured by TIMS (Thermo Scientific TRITON), using 41K/39K values from ICP-MS measurements (or, for SRM 985, values from [2]) for internal fractionation corrections. Collectively these data represent an important step towards a metrologically traceable calibration of 40K concentrations in primary 40Ar/39Ar mineral standards and improve uncertainties by ca. an order of magnitude in the potassium isotopic compositions of standards.

  14. Whole-Rock 40Ar/39Ar Step-heating Analyses, Problems and Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnke, P.; Harrison, M.; Heizler, M. T.; Lovera, O. M.; Warren, P. H.

    2015-12-01

    Whole-rock 40Ar/39Ar step-heating analyses of extra-terrestrial materials are used to constrain the impact history of the inner solar system, the formation age of the Moon, and timing of paleomagnetic fields. Despite the importance of knowing the timing of these important events, the samples we have in hand are usually disturbed through mixing, (multiple?) impact events, and perhaps recoil loss. Extra-terrestrial 40Ar/39Ar data are typically interpreted through the assignment of essentially arbitrary plateau ages rather than through a robust physical model. Although the use of models capable of quantitatively assessing diffusive 40Ar* loss in extra-terrestrial samples has been around for nearly 50 years, this early advance has been widely ignored. Here we present implications of applying a robust, multi-activation energy, multi-diffusion domain model to step-heated 40Ar/39Ar data, with temperature cycling. Our findings show that for even a single heating event, "plateau" ages are unlikely to record meaningful ages. Further, if the sample has experienced multiple heating events or contains inherited clasts, recovering a unique solution may be impossible. Indeed the most readily interpretable portion of the age spectrum is the early heating steps which represents a maximum age estimate of the last re-heating event. Our results challenge the chronologic validity of 40Ar/39Ar "plateau" ages and by extension the hypotheses that are based on this data (e.g., the Late Heavy Bombardment). Future work will require new analytical procedures, interpretative frameworks, and (potentially) the combination of multiple chronometers to derive a robust impact history for the early solar system.

  15. TBLR1 as an AR coactivator selectively activates AR target genes to inhibit prostate cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Garrett; Li, Yirong; Gellert, Lan Lin; Zhou, Albert; Melamed, Jonathan; Wu, Xinyu; Zhang, Xinming; Zhang, David; Meruelo, Daniel; Logan, Susan K.; Basch, Ross; Lee, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Androgen Receptor (AR), a steroid hormone receptor, is critical for prostate cancer growth. However, activation of AR by androgens can also lead to growth suppression and differentiation. Transcriptional cofactors play an important role in this switch between proliferative and anti-proliferative AR target gene programs. TBLR1, a core component of the nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR) complex, shows both co-repressor and co-activator activities on nuclear receptors, but little is known about its effects on AR and prostate cancer. We characterized TBLR1 as a coactivator of AR in prostate cancer cells and the activation is both phosphorylation and 19S proteosome dependent. We showed that TBLR1 physically interacts with AR and directly occupies the androgen response elements of affected AR target genes in an androgen-dependent manner. TBLR1 is primarily localized in the nucleus in benign prostate cells and nuclear expression is significantly reduced in prostate cancer cells in culture. Similarly, in human tumor samples, the expression of TBLR1 in the nucleus is significantly reduced in the malignant glands compared to the surrounding benign prostatic glands (p<0.005). Stable ectopic expression of nuclear TBLR1 leads to androgen-dependent growth suppression of prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo by selective activation of androgen regulated genes associated with differentiation (e.g. KRT18) and growth suppression (e.g. NKX3.1), but not cell proliferation of the prostate. Understanding the molecular switches involved in the transition from AR dependent growth promotion to AR dependent growth suppression will lead to more successful prostate cancer treatments. PMID:24243687

  16. 75 FR 7637 - Arkansas Disaster #AR-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Arkansas Disaster AR-00040 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Arkansas dated 02/10...

  17. 76 FR 42154 - Arkansas Disaster #AR-00050

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Arkansas Disaster AR-00050 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Arkansas (FEMA...

  18. 78 FR 56979 - Arkansas Disaster # AR-00065

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Arkansas Disaster AR-00065 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the...

  19. 76 FR 27140 - Arkansas Disaster # AR-00049

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Arkansas Disaster AR-00049 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the...

  20. 76 FR 42155 - Arkansas Disaster #AR-00051

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Arkansas Disaster AR-00051 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the...

  1. 76 FR 27139 - Arkansas Disaster #AR-00048

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Arkansas Disaster AR-00048 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Arkansas (FEMA...

  2. 78 FR 39821 - Arkansas Disaster #AR-00064

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Arkansas Disaster AR-00064 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the...

  3. 78 FR 9448 - Arkansas Disaster #AR-00061

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Arkansas Disaster AR-00061 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the...

  4. 75 FR 7636 - Arkansas Disaster #AR-00042

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Arkansas Disaster AR-00042 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the...

  5. Experiences from the ARS croplands CEAP program

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The multi-agency Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) within USDA produced a number of lessons that should be applicable to the use of landscape approaches to place bioenergy crops. Results from the ARS Croplands Watersheds CEAP, the NRCS CEAP, and the NIFA CEAP Watershed Assessment Studie...

  6. 75 FR 30872 - Arkansas Disaster # AR-00043

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Arkansas Disaster AR-00043 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Arkansas dated...

  7. Lignocellulosic Biofuels: Bioenergy Research at ARS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The growth and long-term viability of bioenergy production in the Nation are impeded by a number of technical and commercial barriers. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) addresses technical barriers and does so by leveraging its strengths and unique capabilities to (1) pursue technical barriers th...

  8. The ChArMEx database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, Hélène; Belmahfoud, Nizar; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Cloché, Sophie; Descloitres, Jacques; Fleury, Laurence; Focsa, Loredana; Henriot, Nicolas; Mière, Arnaud; Ramage, Karim; Vermeulen, Anne; Boulanger, Damien

    2015-04-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) aims at a scientific assessment of the present and future state of the atmospheric environment in the Mediterranean Basin, and of its impacts on the regional climate, air quality, and marine biogeochemistry. The project includes long term monitoring of environmental parameters , intensive field campaigns, use of satellite data and modelling studies. Therefore ChARMEx scientists produce and need to access a wide diversity of data. In this context, the objective of the database task is to organize data management, distribution system and services, such as facilitating the exchange of information and stimulating the collaboration between researchers within the ChArMEx community, and beyond. The database relies on a strong collaboration between ICARE, IPSL and OMP data centers and has been set up in the framework of the Mediterranean Integrated Studies at Regional And Locals Scales (MISTRALS) program data portal. ChArMEx data, either produced or used by the project, are documented and accessible through the database website: http://mistrals.sedoo.fr/ChArMEx. The website offers the usual but user-friendly functionalities: data catalog, user registration procedure, search tool to select and access data... The metadata (data description) are standardized, and comply with international standards (ISO 19115-19139; INSPIRE European Directive; Global Change Master Directory Thesaurus). A Digital Object Identifier (DOI) assignement procedure allows to automatically register the datasets, in order to make them easier to access, cite, reuse and verify. At present, the ChArMEx database contains about 120 datasets, including more than 80 in situ datasets (2012, 2013 and 2014 summer campaigns, background monitoring station of Ersa...), 25 model output sets (dust model intercomparison, MEDCORDEX scenarios...), a high resolution emission inventory over the Mediterranean... Many in situ datasets

  9. [Inhibition of Bacillus pumilus AR03 on Alternaria alternata and Erysiphe cichoracearum on tobacco].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Tian, Hua; Kong, Fan-yu; Wang, Yi-hong; Zhang, Cheng-sheng; Feng, Chao

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of Bacillus pumilus AR03 against Altenaria alternata and Erysiphe cichoracearum. The antagonistic activities were studied in the way of co-culture on plate, inhibition of pathogen conidia germination on concave slides and LB agar medium. In the investigation, the water suspension of living cells of strain AR03, at 3 x 10(8) cfu . mL-1 had a remarkable inhibition effect on hyphae growth and conidia germination of A. alternata and caused hyphae deformation, shorter and swollen nodes, winding hyphae accumulation, abnormal tubes with tips expanded or deformed. Conidia did not germinate and the tissues of compartment became swollen or formed a round spherical bubble. In addition, the inhibition rate of conidia germination of E. cichoracearum was 91. 3% and 69. 3%, respectively when treated with strain AR03 at 1 x 10(7) cfu . mL-1 and 1.5 x 10(6) cfu . mL-1. Conidia treated by living cells of AR03 became swollen, deformed, the protoplasm of conidia shrinked, disintegrated gradually and separated from the conidia wall. And some conidia were hollow because the protoplasm leaked out from inside. Greenhouse results revealed that the effects of living cells of AR03 with different concentrations were significantly different. Bacterial suspension of AR03 at 3 x 10(8) cfu . mL-1 was strongly antagonistic to E. cichoracearum with the control efficiencies 7 days and 15 days after treatment of two spays being 83.8% and 90.3%, respectively, while the control efficiencies of AR03 at 3 x 10(6) cfu . mL-1 were 70.0% and 73.3%, respectively. Strain AR03 had a long persistence against powdery mildew more than 30 days.

  10. Resolving the early chronology of Mono Craters volcanism with combined 238U-230Th and 40Ar/39Ar dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, J. A.; Calvert, A. T.; Marcaida, M.; Mangan, M.; Lidzbarski, M. I.; Stelten, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    zircon from ash 3 pumice and dome 11 yield indistinguishable U-Th isochron ages of ca. 21 ka, which match the 40Ar/39Ar age for dome 11 sanidine. Sanidine and the rims on allanite and zircon from rhyolite with the oldest hydration rind age (ca. 20 ka) yield a concordant Holocene age of ca. 7 ka, with evidence for significant scavenging of older sanidine immediately prior to eruption. These results reveal that multiple domes in the Mono Craters chain reflect volcanism as old as ca. 25 ka, and that the sources for Wilson Creek tephras older than this are buried by younger rhyolites. The new age and compositional link between ash 3 and dome 11 calibrates the record of late Pleistocene explosive volcanism from Wilson Creek tephras, and provides new age control for the pluvial sediments of the upper portion of the Wilson Creek formation. [1] Vazquez and Lidzbarski, 2012, EPSL 357-358: 54 [2] Zimmerman et al, 2006, EPSL 252: 94.

  11. Anatomy of an Inversion-46Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamick, Larry; Robinson, Shadow; Sharon, Yitzhak

    2011-04-01

    Two different interactions give very close results for properties of most even-even Ar isotopes, but for 46 Ar the results diverge. The interactions in question are a). WBT and b). SPDF-U. For 42 , 44 , 46 Ar the results are as follows : WBT E(21 +) (1 . 29 , 1 . 17 , 1 . 14) MeV E(22 +) (2 . 32 , 1 . 80 , 2 . 10) MeV g(21 +) (- . 095 , - . 022 , + . 100) g(22 +) (. 096 , . 045 , - . 070) SPDF-U E(21 +) (1 . 15 , 1 . 09 , 1 . 59) MeV E(22 +) (2 . 28 , 1 . 78 , 3 . 77) MeV g(21 +) (- . 084 , - . 040 , + . 513) g(22 +) (+ . 075 , + . 346 , + . 514). To understand the big differences for A = 46 we must look to the odd K isotopes. Consider the J = 3 / 2+-- J = 1 / 2+ splitting.(MeV) EXPT/WBT/SPDF-U A = 43 0 . 561 , 1 . 109 , 0 . 672 A = 45 0 . 474 , 0 . 871 , 0 . 345 A = 47 - 0 . 360 , 0 . 507 , - 0 . 320 A = 49 0 . 200 , 0 . 729 , 0 . 078 . We see that there is an inversion in the ``d3/2 -s1/2'' splitting for 47 K. The SPDF-U interaction successfully gives this inversion but WBT does not. Things are a bit different for B(E2, 01 - 21) . The values in e2 fm4 are WBT (338 , 425 , 541) /SPDF-U (351 , 357 , 525). Here the 2 interactions give very similar results. Both interactions yield a larger B(E2) for 46Ar than for 44Ar, as do previous calculations by others. This despite the fact that in single j A = 46 has a closed shell of neutrons. Most experimental measurements had the opposite--larger B(E2) for A = 44 than for A = 46 . But a most recent measurement by Mengone et al. disagrees with all previous measurements and agrees with the current shell model calculations.

  12. Construction of a chimeric ArsA-ArsB protein for overexpression of the oxyanion-translocating ATPase.

    PubMed

    Dou, D; Owolabi, J B; Dey, S; Rosen, B P

    1992-12-25

    Resistance to toxic oxyanions of arsenic and antimony in Escherichia coli is conferred by the conjugative R-factor R773, which encodes an ATP-driven anion extrusion pump. The ars operon is composed of three structural genes, arsA, arsB, and arsC. Although transcribed as a single unit, the three genes are differentially expressed as a result of translational differences, such that the ArsA and ArsC proteins are produced in high amounts relative to the amount of ArsB protein made. Consequently, biochemical characterization of the ArsB protein, which is an integral membrane protein containing the anion-conducting pathway, has been limited, precluding studies of the mechanism of this oxyanion pump. To overexpress the arsB gene, a series of changes were made. First, the second codon, an infrequently used leucine codon, was changed to a more frequently utilized codon. Second, a GC-rich stem-loop (delta G = -17 kcal/mol) between the third and twelfth codons was destabilized by changing several of the bases of the base-paired region. Third, the re-engineered arsB gene was fused 3' in frame to the first 1458 base pairs of the arsA gene to encode a 914-residue chimeric protein (486 residues of the ArsA protein plus 428 residues of the mutated ArsB protein) containing the entire re-engineered ArsB sequence except for the initiating methionine. The ArsA-ArsB chimera has been overexpressed at approximately 15-20% of the total membrane proteins. Cells producing the chimeric ArsA-ArsB protein with an arsA gene in trans excluded 73AsO2- from cells, demonstrating that the chimera can function as a component of the oxyanion-translocating ATPase.

  13. A re-examination of petrogenesis and 40Ar/39Ar systematics in the Chain of Ponds K-feldspar: "diffusion domain" archetype versus polyphase hygrochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chafe, Alex N.; Villa, Igor M.; Hanchar, John M.; Wirth, Richard

    2014-05-01

    K-feldspar (Kfs) from the Chain of Ponds Pluton (CPP) is the archetypal reference material, upon which thermochronological modeling of Ar diffusion in discrete "domains" was founded. We re-examine the CPP Kfs using cathodoluminescence and back-scattered electron imaging, transmission electron microscopy, and electron probe microanalysis. 40Ar/39Ar stepwise heating experiments on different sieve fractions, and on handpicked and unpicked aliquots, are compared. Our results reproduce the staircase-shaped age spectrum and the Arrhenius trajectory of the literature sample, confirming that samples collected from the same locality have an identical Ar isotope record. Even the most pristine-looking Kfs from the CPP contains successive generations of secondary, metasomatic/retrograde mineral replacements that post-date magmatic crystallization. These chemically and chronologically distinct phases are responsible for its staircase-shaped age spectra, which are modified by handpicking. While genuine within-grain diffusion gradients are not ruled out by these data, this study demonstrates that the most important control on staircase-shaped age spectra is the simultaneous presence of heterochemical, diachronous post-magmatic mineral growth. At least five distinct mineral species were identified in the Kfs separate, three of which can be traced to external fluids interacting with the CPP in a chemically open system. Sieve fractions have size-shifted Arrhenius trajectories, negating the existence of the smallest "diffusion domains." Heterochemical phases also play an important role in producing nonlinear trajectories. In vacuo degassing rates recovered from Arrhenius plots are neither related to true Fick's Law diffusion nor to the staircase shape of the age spectra. The CPP Kfs used to define the "diffusion domain" model demonstrates the predominance of metasomatic alteration by hydrothermal fluids and recrystallization in establishing the natural Ar distribution among different

  14. Electron emissions in low energy Ar{sup q+}-Ar collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Vancura, J.; Kostroun, V.O.

    1992-12-31

    The spectra of electrons emitted Ar{sup q+} on Ar (8 {le} q {le} 16) collisions at 2.3 qkeV were measured in the 30 to 400 eV energy range. With the exception of Ar{sup 8+} on Ar, the overall appearance of the electron spectra is quite similar, suggesting that the same mechanism is responsible for the observed features. One possible mechanism is the delocalization of the 3p and 3s target electrons during the collision. The resulting molecular state either deexcites by Auger transitions during the collision, or strands two or more electrons on the projectile in an excited state. This state in turn deexcites by Auger transitions.

  15. Age and origin of carlsbad cavern and related caves from 40Ar/39Ar of alunite

    PubMed

    Polyak; McIntosh; Guven; Provencio

    1998-03-20

    40Ar/39Ar dating of fine-grained alunite that formed during cave genesis provides ages of formation for the Big Room level of Carlsbad Cavern [4.0 to 3.9 million years ago (Ma)], the upper level of Lechuguilla Cave (6.0 to 5.7 Ma), and three other hypogene caves (11.3 to 6.0 Ma) in the Guadalupe Mountains of New Mexico. Alunite ages increase and are strongly correlative with cave elevations, which indicates an 1100-meter decline in the water table, apparently related to tectonic uplift and tilting, from 11.3 Ma to the present. 40Ar/39Ar dating studies of the hypogene caves have the potential to help resolve late Cenozoic climatic, speleologic, and tectonic questions.

  16. Quaternary continental weathering geochronology by laser-heating 40Ar/39Ar analysis of supergene cryptomelane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yuexing; Vasconcelos, Paulo

    2001-07-01

    Incremental laser-heating analyses of supergene cryptomelane clusters extracted from three distinct weathering profiles from the Mary Valley region, southeast Queensland, Australia, yield reproducible and well-defined plateau ages ranging from 346 ± 15 to 291 ± 14 ka (2 σ). Precipitation of supergene cryptomelane in this period implies that relative humid climate prevailed in southeast Queensland from 340 to 290 ka, a result consistent with oxygen isotope analyses of marine sediments from Ocean Drilling Program Site 820 and with regional pollen and spore records. These results, the first report on the precise 40Ar/39Ar dating of Quaternary supergene cryptomelane, indicate that 40Ar/39Ar analysis of pedogenic minerals provides a reliable geochronometer for the study of Quaternary surficial processes useful in the study of soil formation rates, continental paleoclimates, and archaeological sites devoid of datable volcanic minerals.

  17. Ar-Ar Dating of Martian Meteorite, Dhofar 378: An Early Shock Event?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Bogard, D. D.

    2006-01-01

    Martian meteorite, Dhofar 378 (Dho378) is a basaltic shergottite from Oman, weighing 15 g, and possessing a black fusion crust. Chemical similarities between Dho378 and the Los Angeles 001 shergottite suggests that they might have derived from the same Mars locale. The plagioclase in other shergottites has been converted to maskelenite by shock, but Dho378 apparently experienced even more intense shock heating, estimated at 55-75 GPa. Dho378 feldspar (approximately 43 modal %) melted, partially flowed and vesiculated, and then partially recrystallized. Areas of feldspathic glass are appreciably enriched in K, whereas individual plagioclases show a range in the Or/An ratio of approximately 0.18-0.017. Radiometric dating of martian shergottites indicate variable formation times of 160-475 Myr, whereas cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages of shergottites indicate most were ejected from Mars within the past few Myr. Most determined Ar-39-Ar-40 ages of shergottites appear older than other radiometric ages because of the presence of large amounts of martian atmosphere or interior Ar-40. Among all types of meteorites and returned lunar rocks, the impact event that initiated the CRE age very rarely reset the Ar-Ar age. This is because a minimum time and temperature is required to facilitate Ar diffusion loss. It is generally assumed that the shock-texture characteristics in martian meteorites were produced by the impact events that ejected the rocks from Mars, although the time of these shock events (as opposed to CRE ages) are not directly dated. Here we report Ar-39-Ar-40 dating of Dho378 plagioclase. We suggest that the determined age dates the intense shock heating event this meteorite experienced, but that it was not the impact that initiated the CRE age.

  18. Early Pleistocene 40Ar/39Ar ages for Bapang Formation hominins, Central Jawa, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Larick, Roy; Ciochon, Russell L.; Zaim, Yahdi; Sudijono; Suminto; Rizal, Yan; Aziz, Fachroel; Reagan, Mark; Heizler, Matthew

    2001-01-01

    The Sangiran dome is the primary stratigraphic window for the Plio-Pleistocene deposits of the Solo basin of Central Jawa. The dome has yielded nearly 80 Homo erectus fossils, around 50 of which have known findspots. With a hornblende 40Ar/39Ar plateau age of 1.66 ± 0.04 mega-annum (Ma) reportedly associated with two fossils [Swisher, C.C., III, Curtis, G. H., Jacob, T., Getty, A. G., Suprijo, A. & Widiasmoro (1994) Science 263, 1118–1121), the dome offers evidence that early Homo dispersed to East Asia during the earliest Pleistocene. Unfortunately, the hornblende pumice was sampled at Jokotingkir Hill, a central locality with complex lithostratigraphic deformation and dubious specimen provenance. To address the antiquity of Sangiran H. erectus more systematically, we investigate the sedimentary framework and hornblende 40Ar/39Ar age for volcanic deposits in the southeast quadrant of the dome. In this sector, Bapang (Kabuh) sediments have their largest exposure, least deformation, and most complete tephrostratigraphy. At five locations, we identify a sequence of sedimentary cycles in which H. erectus fossils are associated with epiclastic pumice. From sampled pumice, eight hornblende separates produced 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages ranging from 1.51 ± 0.08 Ma at the Bapang/Sangiran Formation contact, to 1.02 ± 0.06 Ma, at a point above the hominin-bearing sequence. The chronological sequence of 40Ar/39Ar ages follows stratigraphic order across the southeast quadrant. An intermediate level yielding four nearly complete crania has an age of about 1.25 Ma. PMID:11309488

  19. 40Ar/39Ar laserprobe study of the Day Nui Con Voi Metamorphic Complex, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Lo, C.; Yeh, M.; Chung, S.; Lee, T.

    2009-12-01

    The garnet bearing gneiss within the Day Nui Con Voi (DNCV) Metamorphic Complex along the Red River Shear Zone (RRSZ) in North Vietnam, recorded a long tectonothermal history since the Indosinian orogeny. In-situ 40Ar/39Ar laserprobe study of biotite inclusions within garnet porphyroblasts and matrix biotites, combining with microstructural and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies, deciphered the timing and duration of thermal events. Biotites from two matrix fabrics from different deformation events show approximately similar 40Ar/39Ar age ranges in 19-24Ma, depending grain size. These matrix biotite ages are best interpreted to record a rapid cooling event associating with the left-lateral shearing event of the RRSZ. Whereas, all biotite inclusions exhibit age zoning patterns with 40Ar/39Ar ages gradually increase from 17 Ma to more than 28 Ma according to their diffusion pathways. These age variations may have resultant from a combination effect of argon retention by garnet shielding, which provides a best recorder to the metamorphic event, and argon diffusion loss along the deformed cracks during the shearing event of the RRSZ. Diffusion modeling of these age zoning indicated that the total duration of argon diffusion loss may have lasted for nearly 9 Myr and argon diffusion may have occurred sometime around 24.5Ma. These results are generally in good agreement with previous interpretation, but provide better resolution of 40Ar/39Ar age data for deciphering the history of thermal event in the DNCV Metamorphic Complex and the left-lateral shearing event of the RRSZ in Vietnam, as well.

  20. 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology by Multi-collector Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosca, M.

    2007-12-01

    The ushering in of a new generation of multi-collector mass spectrometers for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology represents a major technological advance, but what are the true benefits of making routine measurements with such machines versus the practical aspects of additional setup and calibration? Is argon multi-collection the way of the future? Recent experiences with a three collector Nu Instruments Noblesse mass spectrometer will be presented that address these questions. One immediate observation is that electronic stability improves average precision of the isotopic measurements. For example, on any given day 100 consecutive automated air pipette measurements yield 40Ar/36Ar ratios reproducible to 0.1%. One of the great advantages of multi-collection 40Ar/39Ar geochronology is the flexibility and ease of changing detector array configurations, which is useful when measuring irradiation packages with a range of K-content or grain size. For example, in situ UV laser ablation of micas or laser step-heating single grains of amphibole may be run by peak hopping on a single detector, while single grains of muscovite may be run by laser step-heating and analyzed by multi-collection. One of the drawbacks with multi-collection is the effort required with detector calibration and intercalibration. Source and detector discrimination and mass fractionation, however can be accomplished using air pipettes as an argon reference material. A series of experiments using sanidine standards have been performed that demonstrate the reproducibility of single collector and multi-collector measurements, with some as yet unexplained shifts using different detector arrays. Finally, several examples applying multi-collection 40Ar/39Ar data collection will be given that illustrate the utility of multi-collector measurements on a variety of mineral and rock materials.

  1. Ar-Ar Studies of Lherzolitic Shergottites Yamato 000097 and 984028

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.; Shih, C.-Y.; Mikouchi, T.; Misawa, K.

    2010-01-01

    The approx.170 Ma age of the rock(s) is (likely) preserved in minor phases of high K content. Terrestrial Ar appears to have a nearly ubiquitous presence in the gas release, and mixes with Martian Ar in variable proportions. The intermediate temperature release of the plag separate shows an apparently higher approx.270 Ma age, and suggests the presence of terrestrial Ar that "torques" the correlation to a steeper slope than for 170 Ma. The intermediate temperature data of the pyroxene is consistent with a "young" age (either approx.170 to approx.270 Ma) and mostly Martian trapped Ar. The low temperature (needs checking) data also are essentially consistent with the approx.170 Ma age, but an intercept near the terrestrial value is suspicious. Would not have had terrestrial Ar on Mars, so this is more likely a mixing line. Admixtures of terrestrial Ar in the pyroxene extractions seems pervasive, but can t explain the variation in 39/36 along the intermediate temp. "isochron".

  2. Ar-40-Ar-39 microanalysis of single 74220 glass balls and 72435 breccia clasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huneke, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Ar-40-Ar-39 age measurements on single orange glass balls from the Apollo 17 soil 74220 and individual clasts from the Apollo 17 highland breccia 72435 are reported. The measurements required the use of newly established microanalytical techniques to obtain high quality analyses on about 0.5 mg particles with only a few hundred ppm K. An age of 3.60 plus or minus 0.04 b.y. is determined for the orange glass. No corrections for a trapped Ar-40 component were required. The glass forming event occurred at the very end of or after the extrusion of the mare basalts at the Apollo 17 site. An extremely well defined age plateau at 3.86 plus or minus 0.04 b.y. was determined for a 72435 plagioclase clast with attached matrix. A second large plagioclase crystal yielded significantly older ages over the last 60% of Ar release at high temperatures and is a relict clast incompletely degassed at the time of breccia formation. 72435 also contains plagioclase clasts with primitive Sr and a 4.55 AE old dunite clast. The Ar results provide additional evidence for the association of chemically unequilibrated, relict clasts with both primitive Sr and older K/Ar ages.

  3. Ar-40-Ar-39 microanalysis of single 74220 glass balls and 72435 breccia clasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huneke, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Ar-40-Ar-39 age measurements on single orange glass balls from the Apollo 17 soil 74220 and individual clasts from the Apollo 17 highland breccia 72435 are reported. The measurements required the use of newly established microanalytical techniques to obtain high quality analyses on about 0.5 mg particles with only a few hundred ppm K. An age of 3.60 plus or minus 0.04 b.y. is determined for the orange glass. No corrections for a trapped Ar-40 component were required. The glass forming event occurred at the very end of or after the extrusion of the mare basalts at the Apollo 17 site. An extremely well defined age plateau at 3.86 plus or minus 0.04 b.y. was determined for a 72435 plagioclase clast with attached matrix. A second large plagioclase crystal yielded significantly older ages over the last 60% of Ar release at high temperatures and is a relict clast incompletely degassed at the time of breccia formation. 72435 also contains plagioclase clasts with primitive Sr and a 4.55 AE old dunite clast. The Ar results provide additional evidence for the association of chemically unequilibrated, relict clasts with both primitive Sr and older K/Ar ages.

  4. The ChArMEx database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, Hélène; Descloitres, Jacques; Fleury, Laurence; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Focsa, Loredana; Henriot, Nicolas; Mastrorillo, Laurence; Mière, Arnaud; Vermeulen, Anne

    2013-04-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) aims at a scientific assessment of the present and future state of the atmospheric environment in the Mediterranean Basin, and of its impacts on the regional climate, air quality, and marine biogeochemistry. The project includes long term monitoring of environmental parameters, intensive field campaigns, use of satellite data and modelling studies. Therefore ChARMEx scientists produce and need to access a wide diversity of data. In this context, the objective of the database task is to organize data management, distribution system and services such as facilitating the exchange of information and stimulating the collaboration between researchers within the ChArMEx community, and beyond. The database relies on a strong collaboration between OMP and ICARE data centres and falls within the scope of the Mediterranean Integrated Studies at Regional And Locals Scales (MISTRALS) program data portal. All the data produced by or of interest for the ChArMEx community will be documented in the data catalogue and accessible through the database website: http://mistrals.sedoo.fr/ChArMEx. The database website offers different tools: - A registration procedure which enables any scientist to accept the data policy and apply for a user database account. - Forms to document observations or products that will be provided to the database in compliance with metadata international standards (ISO 19115-19139; INSPIRE; Global Change Master Directory Thesaurus). - A search tool to browse the catalogue using thematic, geographic and/or temporal criteria. - Sorted lists of the datasets by thematic keywords, by measured parameters, by instruments or by platform type. - A shopping-cart web interface to order in situ data files. At present datasets from the background monitoring station of Ersa, Cape Corsica and from the 2012 ChArMEx pre-campaign are available. - A user-friendly access to satellite products

  5. Cooperative Dynamics of AR and ER Activity in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, Nicholas C; Gordon, Michael A; Babbs, Beatrice; Spoelstra, Nicole S; Carson Butterfield, Kiel T; Torkko, Kathleen C; Phan, Vernon T; Barton, Valerie N; Rogers, Thomas J; Sartorius, Carol A; Elias, Anthony; Gertz, Jason; Jacobsen, Britta M; Richer, Jennifer K

    2016-11-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is expressed in 90% of estrogen receptor alpha-positive (ER(+)) breast tumors, but its role in tumor growth and progression remains controversial. Use of two anti-androgens that inhibit AR nuclear localization, enzalutamide and MJC13, revealed that AR is required for maximum ER genomic binding. Here, a novel global examination of AR chromatin binding found that estradiol induced AR binding at unique sites compared with dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Estradiol-induced AR-binding sites were enriched for estrogen response elements and had significant overlap with ER-binding sites. Furthermore, AR inhibition reduced baseline and estradiol-mediated proliferation in multiple ER(+)/AR(+) breast cancer cell lines, and synergized with tamoxifen and fulvestrant. In vivo, enzalutamide significantly reduced viability of tamoxifen-resistant MCF7 xenograft tumors and an ER(+)/AR(+) patient-derived model. Enzalutamide also reduced metastatic burden following cardiac injection. Finally, in a comparison of ER(+)/AR(+) primary tumors versus patient-matched local recurrences or distant metastases, AR expression was often maintained even when ER was reduced or absent. These data provide preclinical evidence that anti-androgens that inhibit AR nuclear localization affect both AR and ER, and are effective in combination with current breast cancer therapies. In addition, single-agent efficacy may be possible in tumors resistant to traditional endocrine therapy, as clinical specimens of recurrent disease demonstrate AR expression in tumors with absent or refractory ER. This study suggests that AR plays a previously unrecognized role in supporting E2-mediated ER activity in ER(+)/AR(+) breast cancer cells, and that enzalutamide may be an effective therapeutic in ER(+)/AR(+) breast cancers. Mol Cancer Res; 14(11); 1054-67. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Below 70-nm contact hole pattern with RELACS process on ArF resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terai, Mamoru; Toyoshima, Toshiyuki; Ishibashi, Takeo; Tarutani, Shinji; Takahashi, Kiyohisa; Takano, Yusuke; Tanaka, Hatsuyuki

    2003-06-01

    A chemical shrink technology, RELACS (Resolution Enhancement Lithography Assisted by Chemical Shrink), utilizes the cross linking reaction catalyzed by the acid component existing in a predefined resist pattern. This "RELACS" process is a hole shrinking procedure that includes simple coating, baking, and rinsing applied after conventional photolithography. Our target is realize of sub-70nm hole pattern formation by using new RELACS for ArF resist. At present, RELACS process is introduced to mass production of KrF lithography by using AZ R200 (Product name of Clariant) mainly. Then first of all we reported process performance of conventional RELACS material, AZ R200 with ArF resist. However AZ R200 does not show satisfactory shrinkage on ArF resist. Thereupon, we started on the development of new RELACS corresponding to ArF resist. As the result, we developed new RELACS material including Cross Linking Accelerator (CLA). It was found that CLA is able to improve reactivity of RELACS with ArF-resist. By using this new RELACS, It is Realized sub-70nm hole pattern formation with ArF-Ex lithography and It is able to Control of hole size by mixing bake (MB) temperature and additive ratio of CLA. Moreover this process was realized that thickness of shrunk hole is increased.

  7. Application of the 40Ar/39Ar technique to date the Minoan Tuff, Santorini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijbrans, J. R.; Kuiper, K.; Morgan, L. E.; Klaver, M.; Vroon, P. Z.

    2012-12-01

    The age of the catastrophic eruption of the volcano of Santorini during the Bronze Age is well established from 14C dating at 3344.9 ± 7.5 a1 (uncertainties quoted as 1-σ). Application of the 40Ar/39Ar technique to products from this eruption is used here to (1) investigate the limits of the technique using conventional single collector mass spectrometry on a MAP215-50 instrument, (2) analyse sources of uncertainty to identify major contributing factors for the uncertainty of young 40Ar/39Ar ages, and (3) provide 40Ar/39Ar ages for a sample that has been previously dated via 14C and dendrochronology to further investigate issues with the accuracy of 40Ar/39Ar dating in the late Quaternary. We have separated the plagioclase fraction from the lower Minoan Tuff that immediately overlies the Cape Riva (rp6) tuff in a bay on the west coast of Thira, NW of the town of Oia. Using the calibration of 40Ar/36Ar of Lee et al.2, the decay constant recommended by Min at al.3, and the FCs age of Kuiper et al.4, we calculate an inverse isochron age of 3.7 ± 1.6 ka and a trapped 40Ar/36Ar intercept of 299.8 ± 1.2, slightly higher than the ratio for atmospheric argon of 298.56 ± 0.31, when all steps with ages > 50 ka are included in the regression. Enrichment in radiogenic 40Ar in the steps used for the isochron is extremely low, given the low concentration of K2O in plagioclase and the extremely young age. The stepwise heating approach proved useful because in all 5 replicate experiments unexpectedly high ages showed up at higher step temperatures, suggesting that in each separate some older contaminant was present. The plateaus of each of the replicate experiments had quite reproducible ages, however, and a pooled age was calculated for 23 out of 48 individual steps. The pooled age for the plateau was 17.6 ± 4.1 ka, which is high due to the slight component of excess 40Ar in the non-radiogenic component, as revealed from regression analysis. refs: 1SW Manning et al. (2006

  8. Role of the Helicobacter pylori Sensor Kinase ArsS in Protein Trafficking and Acid Acclimation

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Elizabeth A.; Sachs, George; Wen, Yi; Feng, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori survives and grows at low pHs via acid acclimation mechanisms that enable periplasmic pH homeostasis. Important components include a cytoplasmic urease; a pH-gated urea channel, UreI; and periplasmic α-carbonic anhydrase. To allow the rapid adjustment of periplasmic pH, acid acclimation components are recruited to the inner membrane in acid. The ArsRS two-component system, in an acid-responsive manner, controls the transcription of the urease gene cluster and α-carbonic anhydrase. The aim of this study is to determine the role of ArsS in protein trafficking as a component of acid acclimation. H. pylori wild-type and ΔarsS bacteria were incubated at acidic and neutral pHs. Intact bacteria, purified membranes, and total protein were analyzed by Western blotting and urease activity measurements. The total urease activity level was decreased in the ΔarsS strain, but the acid activation of UreI was unaffected. A 30-min acid exposure increased the level and activity of urease proteins at the membrane in the wild type but not in the ΔarsS strain. The urease levels and activity of the ΔarsS strain after a 90-min acid exposure were similar to those of the wild type. ArsS, in addition to its role in urease gene transcription, is also involved in the recruitment of urease proteins to the inner membrane to augment acid acclimation during acute acid exposure. Urease membrane recruitment following prolonged acid exposure in the absence of ArsS was similar to that of the wild type, suggesting a compensatory mechanism, possibly regulated by FlgS, underscoring the importance of urease membrane recruitment and activation in periplasmic pH homeostasis. PMID:22865848

  9. Beet curly top resistance in germplasm from the USDA-ARS Ft. Collins program, 2014

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ninety-seven sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) germplasm lines from the USDA-ARS Ft. Collins sugar beet program, a resistant control germplasm (1996A008), and three commercial control cultivars [SV2012RR (susceptible), Monohikari (susceptible) and HM PM90 (resistant)] were screened for response to Beet ...

  10. Blood pressure, heart rate and tubuloglomerular feedback in A1AR-deficient mice with different genetic backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Kim, S M; Mizel, D; Qin, Y; Huang, Y; Schnermann, J

    2015-01-01

    Differences in genetic background between control mice and mice with targeted gene mutations have been recognized as a potential cause for phenotypic differences. In this study, we have used A1AR-deficient mice in a C57Bl/6 and SWR/J congenic background to assess the influence of background on the effect of A1AR-deficiency on cardiovascular and renal functional parameters. In A1AR+/+ and A1AR-/- mice in C57Bl/6 and SWR/J congenic backgrounds, we assessed blood pressure and heart rate using radio-telemetry, plasma renin concentrations and tubuloglomerular feedback. We did not detect significant differences in arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rates (HR) between A1AR+/+ and A1AR-/- mice in either C57Bl/6, SWR/J or mixed backgrounds. MAP and HR were significantly higher in SWR/J than in C57Bl/6 mice. A high NaCl intake increased MAP in A1AR-/- mice on C57Bl/6 background while there was less or no salt sensitivity in the SWR/J background. No significant differences in plasma renin concentration were detected between A1AR-/- and A1AR+/+ mice in any of the strains. Tubuloglomerular feedback was found to be absent in A1AR-/- mice with SWR/J genetic background. While this study confirmed important differences between inbred mouse strains, we did not identify phenotypic modifications of A1AR-related effects on blood pressure, heart rate and plasma renin by differences in genetic background. © 2014 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Influence of deformation on Ar retention in white mica: Devonian reactivation of the Silurian Dover fault, Newfoundland Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellett, D.; Warren, C. J.; Larson, K.; Rogers, N.; Van Staal, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    Radiogenic 40Ar stored in white mica may be disturbed or reset by a variety of processes including deformation, recrystallization and diffusion. Ductile shear zone mylonites are ideal for examining the effects of deformation and dynamic re-/neo-crystallization on white mica at temperatures for which thermal diffusion of Ar is inefficient. Here we investigate Ar behaviour in white mica from Late Silurian syn-tectonic granitoids emplaced into the trailing edge of the Ganderian microcontinent, Newfoundland Appalachians. Subsequent regional metamorphism and development of the broad Wing Pond shear zone are interpreted to record Acadian orogenesis, resulting from the docking of Avalonia to Ganderia (composite Laurentian margin) by sinistral-oblique transpressional collision. The suture was later reactivated as a lower temperature, narrow dextral-sense shear zone. The window for sinistral and dextral slip is constrained by emplacement of the syn-tectonic granitoids and a post-tectonic pluton that stitches the Dover fault at 377±4 Ma. In this study we combine in situ 40Ar/39Ar analyses with deformation temperatures from quartz c-axis fabrics to investigate the influence of deformation on Ar retention in white mica for differing structural positions. Zircon U-Pb ages indicate granitoid emplacement ca. 430-425 Ma. Monazite U-Pb ages that span ca. 429 - 403 Ma are interpreted to record recrystallization during high temperature metamorphism and deformation. High spatial-resolution in situ 40Ar/39Ar laser analyses of white mica range from ca. 403 Ma to 390-375 Ma (depending on sample) such that ages reflect the structural field relationships. Relatively low deformation temperatures, single-grain age transects inconsistent with Dodsonian diffusion, and localization of older and younger age domains at thin section scale argue for deformation-induced loss of 40Ar. These data demonstrate the potential of spatially-controlled 40Ar/39Ar age data in elucidating thermal and

  12. A natural laboratory for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology: ICDP cores from Lake Van, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Jonathan; Sudo, Masafumi; Oberhänsli, Roland

    2015-04-01

    Pore water samples from ICDP Paleovan cores indicate a limited pore water exchange within Quaternary lake sediments. The core's volcaniclastic sections bear unaltered K-rich ternary feldspar and fresh to altered glass shards of predominantly rhyolitic composition. Whereas applying the 40Ar/39Ar method on feldspars resulted in ages timing a late-stage crystallization, glass shards had the potential to date the eruption. Volcanic glass is prone to modifications such as hydrous alteration (palagonitization) and devitrification (Cerling et al., 1985). These modifications affect the glass' chemistry and challenge the application of the 40Ar/39Ar method. Gaining precise radiometric ages from two phases has the potential to strengthen a climate-stratigraphic age-model (Stockhecke et al., 2014), and to significantly increase the temporal resolution on the deposition of the lake sediments. Vice versa the core's previous age model has the ability to question the reliability of 40Ar/39Ar eruption ages derived from ternary feldspars and glass shards. Multi- and single-grain total fusion on alkali feldspars from six volcaniclastic deposits resulted in Pleistocene ages that are in good agreement with the predicted age model. Feldspar phenocrysts from three ashes in the core's youngest section yielded consistent isochron ages that are significantly older than the model's prediction. Several distinct stratigraphic and paleomagnetic time markers of similar stratigraphic positions contradict to the older radiometric dates (Stockhecke et al., 2014). Partial resorption features of inherited feldspar domains and the involvement of excess 40Ar indicate incomplete degassing of older domains. To evaluate the magmatic history of the different domains EMPA mappings of trace elements that could be interpreted as Ar diffusion couples are currently conducted. Geochronology on Paleovan cores offers unique opportunities to monitor the effect of alteration on the Ar-systematics of volcanic glass

  13. The new 39Ar/40Ar dating facility of the LSCE, background and performances.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaillet, S.; Nomade, S.; Guillou, H.; Scaillet-Vita, G.

    2007-12-01

    Precise and accurate timescales are increasingly needed in most disciplines of the Earth sciences. To contribute to this challenging task, a new 39Ar/40Ar laboratory, specifically devoted to the dating of very recent (down to 1 ka) volcanic products, has been developed at the LSCE (CEA-IPSL-UVSQ, France). In this contribution, we present the first data obtained from this new facility. The laboratory comprises a VG 5400 mass spectrometer coupled with a high sensitivity and high dynamic range ion counting system. Gas extraction is achieved with a 25 watts C02 laser or a double vacuum furnace depending of the analyzed samples. The full metal vacuum and purification line feature a GP50 and a compact Ti flash getters which permit extremely low blank for all Argon isotopes (e.g. ~ 3.0 10e-19 Moles for 36Ar). Both analytical protocols and hardware were specifically developed and optimized to date extremely young samples. Analytical performances including protocols, flux monitoring as well mass spectrometer discrimination correction method will be presented in the light of data obtained over the last 10 months. All samples were irradiated, under cadmium, in the Β-1 position (~1.0 10e+13 fast n cm-2 s-1) of the 70MWh-1 OSIRIS reactor (Pierre Süe laboratory, CEA-Saclay, France). Irradiation package is composed of home-design Aluminium disks constituting a 4 cm stack (10 to 30 unknowns/irradiation). Analyzed neutrons flux standards indicate less than 1% variation along the 4cm stack and validate the use of this reactor for high-precision 39Ar/40Ar dating. The precision and accuracy of the facility has been checked from cross-comparison of international single grain standards including FCs (28.02Ma), ACR-2 (1.194Ma) and TCR (28.32Ma) using the most recent recommended values for these monitors. A total of 80 grains in two irradiations (10 and 120 minutes) will be presented in details. Results from single-grain analyses agree within errors with those proposed by Renne et al

  14. Contact allergy to sunscreen chemicals in photosensitivity dermatitis/actinic reticuloid syndrome (PD/AR) and polymorphic light eruption (PLE).

    PubMed

    Bilsland, D; Ferguson, J

    1993-08-01

    From 1989-1991, 214 patients (45 PD/AR, 54 PLE, 115 controls) were patch tested to a sunscreen series containing 9 constituents. 16/214 (7.5%) patients reacted to one or more sunscreens, with allergy being significantly more common in PD/AR patients (10/45 versus 2/54 PLE and 4/115 contact dermatitis clinic controls). The benzophenone group of sunscreens (mexenone, oxybenzone) were the most frequent sensitizers, accounting for 8 of the 27 positive patch tests observed. Clinicians should consider contact allergy to sunscreens in PD/AR patients as an explanation for exposed-site dermatitis episodes.

  15. Alpha gas state in 36Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimune, Hidetoshi; Gibelin, Julien; Harakeh, Muhsin; Itoh, Masatoshi; Kawabata, Takahiro; Tamii, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Miki, Kenjiro; Iwamoto, Chiro; Otsu, Hideaki; Oha, Shinsuke; Tanihata, Isao; Muramoto, Tomoyuki; Kadono, Chika; Kalantar, Nasser; Ando, Shun; Leblond, Sylvian; Ayyad, Yassid; Furuno, Tatsuya; Tsynyra, Miho; Baba, Tasuo; Adachi, Satoshi; Freer, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The α cluster structures in light nuclei with N = Z are expected to appear abov the threshold energy of breakup into α particles. After the proposal of an α cluster wave function with α particle condensate type, such condensate states are both theoretically and experimentally discussed extensively. Theoretically, the existence of dilute α cluster state in nuclei with mass region of A > 16, experimentally, is not confirmed for N- α cluster states in nuclei heavier than A = 16. Recently, we measured α inelastic scattering of 36Ar followed by α decay in an inverse kinematics setup. A 50 MeV/u 36Ar beam from RCNP ring cyclotron was used to bombard a 4He gas target. α particles were detected in the magnetic spectrometer LAS which was set at 0 degrees. The α cluster structures in light nuclei with N = Z are expected to appear abov the threshold energy of breakup into α particles. After the proposal of an α cluster wave function with α particle condensate type, such condensate states are both theoretically and experimentally discussed extensively. Theoretically, the existence of dilute α cluster state in nuclei with mass region of A > 16, experimentally, is not confirmed for N- α cluster states in nuclei heavier than A = 16. Recently, we measured α inelastic scattering of 36Ar followed by α decay in an inverse kinematics setup. A 50 MeV/u 36Ar beam from RCNP ring cyclotron was used to bombard a 4He gas target. α particles were detected in the magnetic spectrometer LAS which was set at 0 degrees. Taro Hirao Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research.

  16. Millennial-scale phase relationships between ice-core and Mediterranean marine records: insights from high-precision 40Ar/39Ar dating of the Green Tuff of Pantelleria, Sicily Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaillet, S.; Vita-Scaillet, G.; Rotolo, S. G.

    2013-10-01

    With the advent of annually-resolved polar ice records extending back to 70 ka, marine and continental paleoclimate studies have now matured into a discipline where high-quality age control is essential for putting on an equal pace layer-counted timescale models and Late Quaternary sedimentary records. High-resolution U-Th dating of speleothem records and 40Ar/39Ar dating of globally recorded geomagnetic excursions have recently improved the time calibration of Quaternary archives, reflecting the cross-disciplinary effort made to synchronize the geologic record at the millennial scale. Yet, tie-points with such an absolute age control remain scarce for paleoclimatic time-series extending beyond the radiocarbon timescale, most notably in the marine record. Far-travelled tephra layers recorded both onland and offshore provide an alternative in such instance to synchronize continental and marine archives via high-resolution 40Ar/39Ar dating of the parent volcanic eruption. High-resolution 40Ar/39Ar data are reported herein for one such volcanic marker, the Green Tuff of Pantelleria and its Y-6 tephra equivalent recorded throughout the Central and Eastern Mediterranean. Published radiochronometric and δ18O orbitally-tied ages for this marker horizon scatter widely from about 41 ka up to 56 ka. Our new 40Ar/39Ar age at 45.7 ± 1.0 ka (2σ) reveals that previous estimates are biased by more than their reported errors would suggest, including recent orbital tuning of marine records hosting the tephra bed that are reevaluated in the context of this study. This improved estimate enables potential phase lags and leads to be studied between deep-sea and terrestrial archives with unrivaled (near-millennial) 40Ar/39Ar precision in the marine record.

  17. New HMBA lattice for PF-AR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, N.; Harada, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Nagahashi, S.; Nakamura, N.; Ueda, A.

    2017-07-01

    Photon Factory Advanced Ring (PF-AR) has been operated for users about 30 years from 1987. The lattice and optics are almost not changed from the original one as the TRISTAN booster ring constructed in 1984. The lattice employs FODO structure and the horizontal emittance for the 6.5 GeV user run is about 300 nmrad. In order to improve the performance of PF-AR dramatically, the full replacement of the accelerator to the ESRF type HMBA (Hybrid multi bend achromat) lattice is examined. In order to geometrically fit the new lattice to the present PF-AR tunnel, the new ring consists of 12 cells with four long straight sections. The emittance is improved to about 500 pmrad at 3 GeV. With the present user experimental hall at the northern half of the ring, at least eight undulator beam lines can be constructed. The simulated dynamic aperture is about 1.5 cm at the long straight section with reasonable magnetic errors and COD correction. The Touschek lifetime is about 6 hours. The beam injection with conventional injection system is no problem and the beam lifetime is long enough.

  18. 40Ar retention in the terrestrial planets.

    PubMed

    Watson, E Bruce; Thomas, Jay B; Cherniak, Daniele J

    2007-09-20

    The solid Earth is widely believed to have lost its original gases through a combination of early catastrophic release and regulated output over geologic time. In principle, the abundance of 40Ar in the atmosphere represents the time-integrated loss of gases from the interior, thought to occur through partial melting in the mantle followed by melt ascent to the surface and gas exsolution. Here we present data that reveal two major difficulties with this simple magmatic degassing scenario--argon seems to be compatible in the major phases of the terrestrial planets, and argon diffusion in these phases is slow at upper-mantle conditions. These results challenge the common belief that the upper mantle is nearly degassed of 40Ar, and they call into question the suitability of 40Ar as a monitor of planetary degassing. An alternative to magmatism is needed to release argon to the atmosphere, with one possibility being hydration of oceanic lithosphere consisting of relatively argon-rich olivine and orthopyroxene.

  19. Precise K-Ar, 40Ar/39Ar, Rb-Sr and U/Pb mineral ages from the 27.5 Ma fish canyon tuff reference standard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.; Baadsgaard, H.

    2001-01-01

    The accuracy of ages measured using the 40Ar/39Ar technique is affected by uncertainties in the age of radiation fluence-monitor minerals. At present, there is lack of agreement about the ages of certain minerals used as fluence monitors. The accuracy of the age of a standard may be improved if the age can be measured using different decay schemes. This has been done by measuring ages on minerals from the Oligocene Fish Canyon Tuff (FCT) using the K-Ar, 40Ar/39Ar. Rb-Sr and U/Pb methods. K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar total fusion ages of sanidine, biotite and hornblende yielded a mean age of 27.57 ?? 0.36 Ma. The weighted mean 40Ar/39Ar plateau age of sanidine and biotite is 27.57 ?? 0.18 Ma. A biotite-feldspar Rb-Sr isochron yielded an age of 27.44 ?? 0.16 Ma. The U-Pb data for zircon are complex because of the presence of Precambrian zircons and inheritance of radiogenic Pb. Zircons with 207Pb/235U < 0.4 yielded a discordia line with a lower concordia intercept of 27.52 ?? 0.09 Ma. Evaluation of the combined data suggests that the best age for FCT is 27.51 Ma. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  20. Integration of Mobile AR Technology in Performance Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo-Hung, Chao; Kuo-En, Chang; Chung-Hsien, Lan; Kinshuk; Yao-Ting, Sung

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at exploring how to use augmented reality (AR) technology to enhance the effect of performance assessment (PA). A mobile AR performance assessment system (MARPAS) was developed by integrating AR technology to reduce the limitations in observation and assessment during PA. This system includes three modules: Authentication, AR…

  1. Integration of Mobile AR Technology in Performance Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo-Hung, Chao; Kuo-En, Chang; Chung-Hsien, Lan; Kinshuk; Yao-Ting, Sung

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at exploring how to use augmented reality (AR) technology to enhance the effect of performance assessment (PA). A mobile AR performance assessment system (MARPAS) was developed by integrating AR technology to reduce the limitations in observation and assessment during PA. This system includes three modules: Authentication, AR…

  2. 75 FR 66300 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Searcy, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-28

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Searcy, AR AGENCY: Federal... Searcy, AR. Decommissioning of the Searcy non-directional beacon (NDB) at Searcy Municipal Airport, Searcy, AR, has made this action necessary to enhance the safety and management of Instrument Flight Rule...

  3. 75 FR 29657 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Marianna, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Establishment of Class E Airspace; Marianna, AR AGENCY... airspace for Marianna, AR to accommodate Area Navigation (RNAV) Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) at Marianna/Lee County Airport--Steve Edwards Field, Marianna, AR. The FAA is taking this action...

  4. 75 FR 68416 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Berryville, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Establishment of Class E Airspace; Berryville, AR... Class E airspace for Berryville, AR, to accommodate Area Navigation (RNAV) Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAP) at Carroll County Airport, Berryville, AR. The FAA is taking this action to enhance the...

  5. 75 FR 29654 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Manila, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Manila, AR AGENCY: Federal... Manila, AR. Decommissioning of the Manila non-directional beacon (NDB) at Manila Municipal Airport, Manila, AR has made this action necessary to enhance the safety and management of Instrument Flight Rule...

  6. 75 FR 29655 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Batesville, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Batesville, AR AGENCY... airspace for Batesville, AR. Decommissioning of the Independence County non-directional beacon (NDB) at Batesville Regional Airport, Batesville, AR, has made this action necessary to enhance the safety and...

  7. 75 FR 29656 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Magnolia, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Amendment of Class E Airspace; Magnolia, AR AGENCY: Federal... Magnolia, AR. Decommissioning of the Magnolia non-directional beacon (NDB) at Magnolia Municipal Airport, Magnolia, AR has made this action necessary to enhance the safety and management of Instrument Flight Rule...

  8. 76 FR 73505 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Nashville, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Establishment of Class E Airspace; Nashville, AR... Class E airspace for Nashville, AR, to accommodate new Area Navigation (RNAV) Standard Instrument... Federal Register a notice of proposed rulemaking to amend Class E airspace for Nashville, AR,...

  9. Enhanced β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) signaling by adeno-associated viral (AAV)-mediated gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stacie M; Hiller, F Charles; Jacobi, Sandie E; Foreman, Susan K; Pittman, Laura M; Cornett, Lawrence E

    2003-01-01

    Background β2-Adrenergic receptors (β2AR) play important regulatory roles in a variety of cells and organ systems and are important therapeutic targets in the treatment of airway and cardiovascular disease. Prolonged use of β-agonists results in tolerance secondary to receptor down-regulation resulting in reduced therapeutic efficiency. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the signaling capabilities of the β2AR expressed by a recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector that also included an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene (AAV-β2AR/EGFP). Results By epifluorescence microscopy, ~40% of infected HEK 293 cells demonstrated EGFP expression. β2AR density measured with [3H]dihydroalprenolol ([3H]DHA) increased either 13- or 77-fold in infected cells compared to mock infected controls depending on the culture conditions used. The [3H]DHA binding was to a single receptor population with a dissociation constant of 0.42 nM, as would be expected for wild-type β2AR. Agonist competition assays with [3H]DHA showed the following rank order of potency: isoproterenol>epinephrine> norepinephrine, consistent with β2AR interaction. Isoproterenol-stimulated cyclic AMP levels were 5-fold higher in infected cells compared to controls (314 ± 43 vs. 63.4 ± 9.6 nmol/dish; n = 3). Receptor trafficking demonstrated surface expression of β2AR with vehicle treatment and internalization following isoproterenol treatment. Conclusions We conclude that HEK 293 cells infected with AAV-β2AR/EGFP effectively express β2AR and that increased expression of these receptors results in enhanced β2AR signaling. This method of gene transfer may provide an important means to enhance function in in vivo systems. PMID:14656380

  10. Experimental Constraints on He, Ne, and Ar Solubility in Serpentinite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krantz, J. A.; Parman, S. W.; Kelley, S. P.; Smye, A.; Jackson, C.; Cooper, R. F.

    2015-12-01

    Experiments have been performed to constrain the solubility of He, Ne, and Ar in natural samples of antigorite from three locations. Geochemical analyses of exhumed subduction zone material [1] and well gases [2] indicate that noble gases are recycled from the surface of the earth into the mantle. The mechanism by which uncharged atoms can be bound to a mineral and subsequently recycled remains unclear, but recent experimental work suggests that ring structures in silicate minerals are ideal sites for noble gases [3]. Serpentine contains such ring structures and is abundant in subducting slabs, providing significant potential for control of the recycling of noble gases. Experiments were performed in a cold seal pressure vessel at 350°C using a mix of equal parts He, Ne, and Ar as the pressure media (Brown University, USA). Pressures varied from 0.15 to 1.13 kbar total pressure and durations varied from 20 to 188 hours. Samples were analyzed by UV laser ablation, noble gas mass spectrometry (Open University, UK). He and Ne reached equilibrium during the experiments and both exhibit Henrian behavior. Data from the cleanest sample reduces the error by approximately an order of magnitude over previous work [3] and confirms that He is significantly more soluble (HCHe=6.05x10-10 mol/g/bar) than Ne (HCNe=5.12x10-12 mol/g/bar) in antigorite. Preliminary data from the cleanest sample suggests that Ar is more soluble than both He and Ne (HCAr=1.94x10-10 mol/g/bar). This provides a mechanism for fractionation of noble gases during recycling. 1. Kendrick, M.A., Scambelluri, M., Honda, M., Phillips, D., Nature Geoscience, 4, 807-812, 2011 2. Holland, G., and Ballentine, C.J., Nature, 441, 186-191, 2006 3. Jackson, C.R.M., Parman, S.W., Kelley, S.P., Cooper, R.F., GCA, 159, 1-15, 2015

  11. Potassium isotopic compositions of NIST potassium standards and 40Ar/39Ar mineral standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. E.; Tappa, M.; Ellam, R. M.; Mark, D. F.; Lloyd, N. S.; Higgins, J. A.; Simon, J. I.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of the isotopic ratios of standards, spikes, and reference materials is fundamental to the accuracy of many geochronological methods. For example, the 238U/235U ratio relevant to U-Pb geochronology was recently re-determined [1] and shown to differ significantly from the previously accepted value employed during age determinations. These underlying values are fundamental to accurate age calculations in many isotopic systems, and uncertainty in these values can represent a significant (and often unrecognized) portion of the uncertainty budget for determined ages. The potassium isotopic composition of mineral standards, or neutron flux monitors, is a critical, but often overlooked component in the calculation of K-Ar and 40Ar/39Ar ages. It is currently assumed that all terrestrial materials have abundances indistinguishable from that of NIST SRM 985 [2]; this is apparently a reasonable assumption at the 0.25‰ level (1σ) [3]. The 40Ar/39Ar method further relies on the assumption that standards and samples (including primary and secondary standards) have indistinguishable 40K/39K values. We will present data establishing the potassium isotopic compositions of NIST isotopic K SRM 985, elemental K SRM 999b, and 40Ar/39Ar biotite mineral standard GA1550 (sample MD-2). Stable isotopic compositions (41K/39K) were measured by the peak shoulder method with high resolution MC-ICP-MS (Thermo Scientific NEPTUNE Plus), using the accepted value of NIST isotopic SRM 985 [2] for fractionation [4] corrections [5]. 40K abundances were measured by TIMS (Thermo Scientific TRITON), using 41K/39K values from ICP-MS measurements (or, for SRM 985, values from [2]) for internal fractionation corrections. Collectively these data represent an important step towards a metrologically traceable calibration of 40K concentrations in primary 40Ar/39Ar mineral standards and improve uncertainties by ca. an order of magnitude in the potassium isotopic compositions of standards. [1] Hiess

  12. Ar-39-Ar-40 Age Dating Of Two Angrites and Two Brachinites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, Daniel; Bogard, Donald

    2003-01-01

    Angrites are a rare group (approximately 7 known) of igneous meteorites with basalt-like composition, which probably derive from a relatively small parent body that differs from those of other igneous meteorites. Angrites show evidence for extinct Mn-53, Sm-146, and Pu-244, and precise U-Pb, and Pb-Pb ages of 4.558 Gyr for two angrites define the time of early parent body differentiation. The Sm-147-Nd-143 ages of two angrites range between 4.53 +/- 0.04 and 4.56 +/- 0.04 Gyr, but no Ar-39-Ar-40 or Rb-Sr ages have been reported. Most angrites show no evidence for either shock brecciation or metamorphism. Brachinites are another very rare group' of differentiated meteorites consisting primarily of olivine, with minor augite, chromite, Fe-sulfides, and sometimes plagioclase and opx. Presence of excess Xe-129 and excess Cr53 from decay of Mn-53 in some brachinites indicate that they also formed very early. Brachinite petrogenesis is poorly defined. They may be igneous cumulates or metamorphic products of chondritic-like starting material. If after their formation, angrites and brachinites cooled quickly with minimal subsequent heating, then one might expect them to show uniquely old K-Ar ages, at least in comparison to other differentiated meteorites such as eucrites and mesosiderites. Most angrites and brachinites contain very little, if any K-feldspar, which has deterred measurements of their Ar-Ar ages. We made Ar-39-Ar-40 analyses on two angrites, LEW86010 (metamorphosed) and D'Orbigny, and on two brachinites, EET99402 and Brachina. All are finds. Any feldspar in angrites is highly calcic, with expected K concentrations of <100 ppm. We selected LEW86010 and D'Orbigny because they have been the objects of several other studies and because chemical analyses suggested [K] was approximately 70 ppm in both meteorites. Brachina contains approximately 9.9% plagioclase of higher K-content than angrites, and EET99402 is estimated to contain approximately 5% K

  13. Call for Development of New Mineral Standards for 40Ar/39Ar Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deino, A. L.; Turrin, B. D.; Renne, P. R.; Hemming, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Age determination via the 40Ar/39Ar dating method relies on the intercomparison of measured 40Ar*/39ArK ratios of geological unknowns with those of co-irradiated mineral standards. Good analytical procedure dictates that these ratios (and the evolution of the Ar ion beams underpinning them) be as similar as practical for the greatest accuracy. Unfortunately, throughout several intervals of the geological time scale this 'best practice' cannot be achieved with existing widely used standards. Only two internationally utilized sanidine standards are available for the middle to late Cenozoic: the Alder Creek Rhyolite sanidine (ACs), at ~1.2 Ma (Turrin et al., 1994; Nomade et al., 2005), and the Fish Canyon Tuff sanidine (FCs) at ~28.2 Ma (e.g., Kuiper et al., 2008; Renne et al, 2011). The situation is even worse throughout much of the rest of the Phanerozoic, as the next oldest standard in common use is the Hb3gr hornblende standard with an age of ~1.1 Ga (Turner, 1971; Jourdan et al., 2006). We propose, as a community effort, the development a set of standards covering the entire target range of high-precision 40Ar/39Ar dating, i.e. the Phanerozoic. Their ages would be stepped in a regular fashion with no more than approximately a factor of 3 between standards, such that in the worse case the 40Ar*/39Ar ratios of standards and unknown need differ by no more than a factor of two. While somewhat arbitrary, an approximately 3 X age progression allows the entire time scale to be covered by a manageable number of standards. Anchoring the progression in the widely used ACs, FCs, and Hb3gr (in bold, below) yields the following set of suggested standard ages: 0.4, 1.2, 3.3, 9.4, 28.2, 95, 320, and 1100 Ma. A suitable standard should be highly reproducible in age at the grain-to-grain and sub-grain levels, and highly radiogenic. The mineral should be abundant and easily separated from the host rock. These criteria may be most easily achieved by focusing on sanidine phenocrysts

  14. First 40Ar/39Ar dating of intense Late Palaeogene lateritic weathering in Peninsular India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnet, Nicolas J.; Beauvais, Anicet; Arnaud, Nicolas; Chardon, Dominique; Jayananda, Mudlappa

    2014-01-01

    Lateritic surface processes have shaped large platform and cratons of the tropical belt. Constraining the timing of such processes is crucial to decipher their role in cratonic morphogenesis and their response to long-term climatic change and lithospheric deformation. Weathering histories have been documented for South America, Africa and Australia, but precise time constraints of the lateritic weathering processes in South India are still lacking. We present 40Ar/39Ar ages of supergene cryptomelane (K-Mn oxide) formed in the Sandur Mn ore deposits exposed on the highest lateritic paleolandsurface that once covered the Mysore plateau and the adjacent Deccan Traps. Significant 40Ar/39Ar ages are estimated between ∼36 and ∼26 Ma from well-defined plateaus in step heating 39Ar release spectra and from best-fitted inverse isochrones. These ages constitute firm time constraints that document intense late Eocene-Oligocene lateritic weathering over Peninsular India under the influence of warm and wet climate comparable to that prevailing in tropical humid forests. These results imply that Southern India was weathered between ∼36 and 26 Ma and may have been dissected mostly in the Neogene.

  15. A test of the 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum technique on some terrestrial materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.; Brent, Dalrymple G.

    1971-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar age spectra were determined for 10 terrestrial rock and mineral samples whose geologic history is known from independent evidence. The spectra for six mineral and whole rock samples, including biotite, feldspar, hornblende, muscovite, and granodiorite, that have experienced post-crystallization heating did not reveal the age of crystallization in any obvious way. Minima in the spectra, however, give reasonable maximum ages for reheating and high-temperature maxima can be interpreted as minimum crystallization ages. High-temperature ages of microcline and albite that have not been reheated are approximately 10% younger than the known crystallization age. Apparently there are no domains in these feldspars that have retained radiogenic 40Ar quantitatively. Spectra from two diabase samples that contain significant quantities of excess argon might mistakenly be interpreted as spectra from reheated samples and do not give the age of emplacement. The 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum technique may be a potentially valuable tool for the study of geologic areas with complex histories, but the interpretation of age spectra from terrestrial samples seems to be more difficult than suggested by some previous studies. ?? 1971.

  16. Cosmic Ray Exposure Ages, Ar-Ar Ages, and the Origin and History of Eucrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakefield, Kelli; Bogard, Donald; Garrison, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    HED meteorites likely formed at different depths on the large asteroid 4-Vesta, but passed through Vesta-derived, km-sized intermediary bodies (Vestoids), before arriving at Earth. Most eucrites and diogenites (and all howardites) are brecciated, and impact heating disturbed or reset the K-Ar ages (and some Rb-Sr ages) of most eucrites in the time period of approx. 3.4 - 4.1 Gyr ago. Some basaltic eucrites and most cumulate eucrites, however, are not brecciated. We recently showed that the Ar-39 - Ar-40 ages for several of these eucrites tightly cluster about a value of 4.48 +/- 0.02 Gyr, and we argue that this time likely represents a single large impact event on Vesta, which ejected these objects from depth and quenched their temperatures. A different parent body has been suggested for cumulate eucrites, although the Ar-Ar ages argue for a common parent. Similarities in the cosmic-ray (space) exposure ages for basaltic eucrites and diogenites also have been used to infer a common parent body for some HEDs. Here we present CRE ages of several cumulate and unbrecciated basaltic (UB) eucrites and compare these with CRE ages of other HEDs. This comparison also has some interesting implications for the relative locations of various HED types on Vesta and/or the Vestoids.

  17. Cosmic Ray Exposure Ages, Ar-Ar Ages, and the Origin and History of Eucrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakefield, Kelli; Bogard, Donald; Garrison, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    HED meteorites likely formed at different depths on the large asteroid 4-Vesta, but passed through Vesta-derived, km-sized intermediary bodies (Vestoids), before arriving at Earth. Most eucrites and diogenites (and all howardites) are brecciated, and impact heating disturbed or reset the K-Ar ages (and some Rb-Sr ages) of most eucrites in the time period of approx. 3.4 - 4.1 Gyr ago. Some basaltic eucrites and most cumulate eucrites, however, are not brecciated. We recently showed that the Ar-39 - Ar-40 ages for several of these eucrites tightly cluster about a value of 4.48 +/- 0.02 Gyr, and we argue that this time likely represents a single large impact event on Vesta, which ejected these objects from depth and quenched their temperatures. A different parent body has been suggested for cumulate eucrites, although the Ar-Ar ages argue for a common parent. Similarities in the cosmic-ray (space) exposure ages for basaltic eucrites and diogenites also have been used to infer a common parent body for some HEDs. Here we present CRE ages of several cumulate and unbrecciated basaltic (UB) eucrites and compare these with CRE ages of other HEDs. This comparison also has some interesting implications for the relative locations of various HED types on Vesta and/or the Vestoids.

  18. Direct 40Ar/39Ar age determination of fluid inclusions using in-vacuo¬ stepwise crushing - Example of garnet from the Cycladic Blueschist Unit on Syros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uunk, Bertram; Postma, Onno; Wijbrans, Jan; Brouwer, Fraukje

    2017-04-01

    Metamorphic minerals and veins commonly trap attending hydrous fluids in fluid inclusions, which yield a wealth of information on the history of the hosting metamorphic system. When these fluids are sufficiently saline, the KCl in the inclusions can be used as a K/Ar geochronologic system, potentially dating inclusion incorporation. Whilst primary fluid inclusions (PFIs) can date fluid incorporation during mineral or vein growth, secondary fluid inclusion trails (SFIs) can provide age constraints on later fluid flow events. At VU Amsterdam, a new in-vacuo crushing apparatus has been designed to extract fluid inclusions from minerals for 40Ar/39Ar analysis. Separates are crushed inside a crusher tube connected to a purification line and a quadrupole mass spectrometer. In-vacuo crushing is achieved by lifting and dropping a steel pestle using an externally controlled magnetic field. As the gas can be analyzed between different crushing steps, the setup permits stepwise crushing experiments. Additionally, crushed powder can be heated by inserting the crusher tube in an externally controlled furnace. Dating by 40Ar/39Ar stepwise crushing has the added advantage that, during neutron irradiation to produce 39Ar from 39K, 38Ar and 37Ar are also produced from 38Cl and 40Ca, respectively. Simultaneous analysis of these argon isotopes permits constraining the chemistry of the argon source sampled during the experiment. This allows a distinction between different fluid or crystal lattice sources. Garnet from three samples of the HP metamorphic Cycladic Blueschist Unit on Syros, Greece was stepwise crushed to obtain fluid inclusion ages. Initial steps for all three experiments yield significant components of excess argon, which are interpreted to originate from grain boundary fluids and secondary fluid inclusions trails. During subsequent steps, age results stabilize to a plateau age. One garnet from North Syros yields an unusually old 80 Ma plateau age. However, isochrons

  19. Measuring 36Ar without H35Cl interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxton, John

    2015-04-01

    Noble gas measurements are usually made in static mode, when the mass spectrometer sensitivity is inversely proportional to volume: this makes the building of very large instruments to obtain high mass resolution impracticable. A particularly challenging interference has hitherto been H35Cl, which differs in mass from 36Ar by 1 part in 3937. We have developed a method which makes improved use of the available MRP to remove interferences, and used it to obtain HCl-free 36Ar measurements on a multicollector instrument with MRP of only ~6000 (MRP= mass resolving power = m/dm 5-95% on side of peak). By arranging that the target mass position on a minor isotope (e.g. 36Ar), from which the interference must be removed, coincides with the ~50% point on the side of a major isotope (e.g. 40Ar), it is possible both to set the mass accurately and to verify the mass position and stability during measurements. The peak top of 40Ar is measured in a separate mass step. Two small corrections are necessary. One compensates for the residual HCl tail at the 36Ar position. The other arises because the peak is not totally flat in the region of interest: 40Ar and 36Ar+HCl are measured on the peak top, whilst 36Ar is measured at the extreme edge, with slightly lower efficiency. The required correction parameters can be obtained from a series of air calibrations with different target/interference ratios. With samples containing 4x10-15to 3x10-14moles of 40Ar, 36Ar/40Ar was measured, without HCl interference, to a 1σ precision of 0.5%, only slightly worse than counting statistics. This is potentially useful for 40Ar/39Ar dating, where 36Ar is used to correct for trapped air, and may be particularly significant for smaller or younger samples.

  20. Influence of para substituents in controlling photophysical behavior and different non-covalent weak interactions in zinc complexes of a phenol based "end-off" compartmental ligand.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Prateeti; Adhikary, Jaydeep; Samanta, Sugata; Majumder, Ishani; Massera, Chiara; Escudero, Daniel; Ghosh, Sanjib; Bauza, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio; Das, Debasis

    2015-12-14

    Three dinuclear zinc(II) complexes with "end-off" compartmental ligands, namely 2,6-bis(N-ethylmorpholine-iminomethyl)-4-R-phenol (R = -CH3, Cl, (t)Bu) have been synthesized with the aim of exploring the role of the para substituent present in the ligand backbone in controlling the structural diversity, photophysical properties and different weak interactions of the complexes. All three species, with the general formula {2[Zn2L(CH3COO)2][Zn(NCS)4]}, show the complex anion Zn(NCS)4(2-) as a common structural feature decisive for crystallization. Interestingly, all of them possess several non-covalent weak interactions where the nature of the "R" group plays an essential role as exposed by DFT study. Besides exhibiting fluorescence behavior, the complexes also show para substitution controlled phosphorescence both at room and low temperature. Anisotropy studies suggest the existence of complexes 2 and 3 as dimers in solution. The origins of the unusual room temperature phosphorescence and fluorescence behavior of the complexes have been rationalized in the light of theoretical calculations.

  1. Ar-Ar Ages of L-Melt Rocks: Two Unusual Ages, and Some Insight into the Host of K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirich, J. R.; Isachsen, C.; Kring, D. A.; Swindle, T. D.

    2008-03-01

    Ar-Ar dating of two L-chondrite impact melts produce collisional ages of 4540 and ~50 Ma. Arrhenius plots rule out pyroxene as a second source of K. High temperature behavior of released Ar may be due to a phase change of feldspathic material.

  2. New 40Ar/39Ar Chronostratigraphy for Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania, and Orbital Forcing of Lacustrine Sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deino, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Pleistocene sedimentary and volcanic deposits of Olduvai Gorge, north-central Tanzania, have been a focus of geological, paleontological, paleoanthropological and archaeological investigation since Louis Leakey initiated fossil and artifact excavations there in 1931. Although more than half a century of effort has been applied to radiometric dating of the volcaniclastic strata within this sequence, vexing questions persist regarding details of the chronostratigraphy. Renewed dating efforts have enabled revision of the chronostratigraphy of Bed I, providing a more accurate evaluation of the absolute ages of volcanic events, and the rates of geological processes. The new 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, based primarily on phenocrystic K-feldspar from interbedded marker tuffs, resolves some of the anomalies apparent in earlier Olduvai basin Bed I chronostratigraphies. A new age of 1.88 ± 0.05 for Tuff IA near the base of Bed I, while relatively imprecise, agrees with a projected age 1.91 Ma based on magnetostratigraphy and sedimentation rates toward the base of Bed I. The key marker tuff IB in the upper part of Bed I has a well-determined age of 1.848 ± 0.003 Ma. Comparative dating of early and late erupted phases of this unit yields identical ages, resolving the conundrum of an apparent hiatus of ~80 ka between the crystal-rich fallout base and the body of the Tuff IB ignimbrite in the eastern exposures proposed by Walter et al. (1991, 1992). New ages for tuffs above Tuff IB to the top of Bed I (i.e., Tuff IE 'vitric,' Tuff IE, Ng'eju tuff, and Tuff IF), fall in stratigraphic order and are consistent with the paleomagnetic age constraint of 1.778 Ma imposed by the top of the Olduvai Subchron in overlying Bed II. The new high-precision chronostratigraphy provides age control for a series of wet/dry paleoclimate indicators previously documented in upper Bed I (Hay, 1976; Hay and Kyser, 2001; Sikes and Ashley, 2007). The most prominent event is a major lake expansion

  3. The realities of recoil - Ar-39 recoil out of small grains and anomalous age patterns in Ar-39-Ar-40 dating. [lunar rock ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huneke, J. C.; Smith, S. P.

    1976-01-01

    Excess Ar-39 in olivine from neutron-irradiated mixtures of olivine and K-rich glass was measured to determine the amount of Ar-39 transferred by recoil out of the glass and into the surrounding olivine grains. It was found that a total of 9.0% of the total Ar-39 recoiled out of the 3-micron glass grains and 2.45% out of the 15-micron glass grains. The mean depth of Ar-39 depletion of the surface of the glass grains was 0.1 micron.

  4. Direct dating of weathering phenomena by [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar and K-Ar analysis of supergene K-Mn oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Vasconcelos, P.M.; Brimhall, G.H. ); Renne, P.R.; Becker, T.A. )

    1994-03-01

    Potassium-bearing manganese oxides, cryptomelane, K[sub 1-2](Mn[sup 3+]Mn[sup 4+])[sub 8] O[sub 16] [center dot] xH[sub 2]O, and hollandite, (K,Ba)[sub 1-2](Mn[sup 3+],Mn[sup 4+])[sub 8] O[sub 16] [center dot] xH[sub 2]O, are often authigenically precipitated in weathering profiles. Dating of these phases allows timing of the progression of oxidation fronts during weathering and pedogenic processes. Potential problems in manganese oxide dating, such as Ar and/or K losses, excess argon, [sup 39]Ar loss by recoil during neutron irradiation, etc. are addressed. The K-Ar and [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar analytical results indicate that Ar and/or K losses, excess [sup 40]Ar, and [sup 39]Ar recoil seem not to pose problems in manganese oxide dating. This investigation suggests that the fine scale, laser-probe [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar technique is most appropriate for dating of weathering phenomena because this technique permits identification of contaminating phases and the presence of multiple generations of weathering minerals in the inherently complex mineral assemblage characteristic of weathering profiles. K-Ar and [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar dating of supergene K-bearing manganese oxides formed during lateritization of Archean and Proterozoic bedrocks in the Carajas Region, Amazonia, Brazil, indicates that weathering started before 72 [+-] 6 Ma. Petrographic, electron microscope, and electron microprobe investigation reveal multiple generations of manganese oxide precipitation. Age clusters at 65-69, 51-56, 40-43, 33-35, 20, 24, 12-17 Ma, and zero-age (0.2 [+-] 0.2 Ma) suggest episodic precipitation of K-Mn oxides resulting form changing weathering conditions in the Amazon throughout the Cenozoic. K-Ar and [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar dating of supergene cryptomelane from weathering profiles in eastern Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil, suggests continuous weathering from 10 to 5.6 Ma ago, possibly reflecting local climatic conditions due to the proximity with the Atlantic Ocean.

  5. Dating Impacts: New Constraints from 40Ar-39Ar Analyses of Shocked Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, J.; Falter, M.; Stoffler, D.; Trieloff, M.; Jessberger, E. K.

    1995-09-01

    Since the beginning of crater dating it has been a matter of debate which chronometer should be applied on which kind of impact-metamorphic rock to obtain the true age of a crater. The transition of even a high pressure shock wave in itself appears to be insufficient to fully reset radiometric isotope systems although the K-Ar system suffers partial 40Ar loss and redistribution [1,2]. But rocks that were demonstrably molten in the course of the impact are first choice samples for crater dating. This selection criterion has proven successful to date terrestrial and lunar impact structures by stepwise heating 40Ar-39Ar analysis [e.g. 3-5]. On the other hand, some observations seem to indicate that even totally molten material can retain a significant amount of previously accumulated radiogenic 40Ar [6,7]. In our ongoing effort to contribute to the solution of crater dating problems, we have performed high-resolution 40Ar-39Ar analyses of a suite of highly shocked ordinary chondrites and here report as examples the results of Bluff (L5/S6) and Rose City (H5/S6) The melt samples from Bluff and Rose City yield plateau ages of 0.85 + 0.01 Ga (9 fractions) and 3.62 +/- 0.01 Ga (16 fractions), respectively, for the high temperature release above 1300 degrees C comprising ~65% of the total 39Ar content (Fig. 1). These are the times of the last total degassing of the rocks. Low ages below 1000 degrees C extraction temperature clearly indicate some later disturbances that are more pronounced in the spectra of the host rocks (ages <= 0.5 Ga). The high spectral resolution of the analyses, i.e. the large number of degassing steps, rules out that the plateau ages result from partial degassing of ~4.5 Ga old rock by a thermal or shock-induced overprint as late as ~0.5 Ga. For this reason at least two events affecting the K-Ar systems in these meteorites are needed to explain the 40Ar-39Ar spectra. We associate the plateau ages with the formation of the melts and thus with the time

  6. Ar-40/Ar-39 dating of collisional events in chondrite parent bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Wright, R. J.; Husain, L.

    1976-01-01

    Ar-40/Ar-39 age dating of a number of shocked ordinary chondrites is interpreted in terms of collisional degassing events of meteorite parent bodies, probably in the asteroid belt. Examples of L, H, and at least one LL chondrite show episodic degassing. Degassing ages suggest several distinct events ranging from about 0.03 aeon to 0.7 aeon and probably higher. All specimens of either the H or L chondrites are not consistent with a single age event. A direct correlation exists between the degree of shock heating and the fraction of argon lost during degassing. However, no chondrite yet analyzed shows complete degassing of its high-temperature phase. Consequently, whole rock K-Ar ages are not accurate monitors of the time of the shock event.

  7. Ar-Ar and I-XE Ages and the Thermal History of IAB Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Garrison, Daniel H.; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    Studies of several samples of the large Caddo County IAB iron meteorite reveal andesitic material, enriched in Si, Na, Al and Ca which is essentially unique among meteorites. This material is believed to have formed from a chondritic source by partial melting and to have further segregated by grain coarsening. Such an origin implies extended metamorphism of the IAB parent body. New Ar-39- Ar-40 ages for silicate from three different Caddo samples are consistent with a common age of 4.50- 4.51 Gyr ago. Less well defined Ar-Ar degassing ages for inclusions from two other IABs, EET8333 and Udei Station, are approx. 4.32 Gyr, whereas the age for Campo del Cielo varies considerably over approx. 3.23-4.56 Gyr. New I-129-Xe-129 ges for Caddo County and EET8333 are 4561.9 plus or minus 0.1 Myr and 4560-4563 Myr, respectively, relative to an age of 4566 Myr for Shallowater. Considering all reported Ar-Ar ages for IABs and related winonaites, the range is approx. 4.32-4.53 Gyr, but several IABs give similar Ar ages of 4.50-4.52 Gyr. We interpret these older ages to represent cooling after the time of last significant metamorphism on the parent body, and the younger ages to represent later 40Ar diffusion loss. These older Ar-Ar ages are similar to Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isochron ages reported in the literature for Caddo County. Considering the possibility that IAB parent body formation was followed by impact disruption, reassembly, and metamorphism (e.g., Benedix et al. 2000), the time of the postassembly metamorphism may have been as late as approx. 4.53 Gyr ago. However, precise I-Xe ages reported for some IABs define a range of ages of approx. 4560 to approx. 4576 Myr. The older I-Xe ages exceed the oldest precise radiometric ages of meteorites, appear unrealistic, and suggest a bias in the calibration of all I-Xe ages. But even with such a bias, the I-Xe ages of IABs cannot easily be reconciled with the much younger Ar-Ar and Sm-Nd ages and with cooling rates deduced from Ni

  8. Ar-Ar and I-Xe Ages and the Thermal History of IAB Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Garrison, Daniel H.; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Studies of several samples of the large Caddo County IAB iron meteorite reveal andesitic material, enriched in Si, Nay Al and Ca, which is essentially unique among meteorites. This material is believed to have formed from a chondritic source by partial melting and to have further segregated by grain coarsening. Such an origin implies extended metamorphism of the IAB parent body. New Ar-39-Ar-40 ages for silicate from three different Caddo samples are consistent with a common age of 4.50- 4.51 Gyr ago. Less well defined Ar-Ar degassing ages for inclusions from two other IABs, EET8333 and Udei Station, are approx.4.32 Gyr, whereas the age for Campo del Cielo varies considerably over approx.3.23-4.56 Gyr. New I-129-Xe-129 ages for Caddo County and EET8333 are 4561.9 +/-0.1 Myr and 4560-4563 Myr, respectively, relative to an age of 4566 Myr for Shallowater. Considering all reported Ar-Ar ages for IABs and related winonaites, the range is approx.4.32-4.53 Gyr, but several IABs give similar Ar ages of 4.50-4.52 Gyr. We interpret these older ages to represent cooling after the time of last significant metamorphism on the parent body, and the younger ages to represent later Ar-40 diffusion loss. These older Ar-Ar ages are similar to Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isochron ages reported in the literature for Caddo County. Considering the possibility that IAB parent body formation was followed by impact disruption, reassembly, and metamorphism (e.g., Benedix et al. 2000), the time of the post-assembly metamorphism may have been as late as approx.4.53 Gyr ago. However, precise I-Xe ages reported for some IABs define a range of ages of approx.4560 to approx.4576 My. The older I-Xe ages exceed the oldest precise radiometric ages of meteorites, appear unrealistic, and suggest a bias in the calibration of all I-Xe ages. But even with such a bias, the I-Xe ages of IABs cannot easily be reconciled with the much younger Ar-Ar and Sm-Nd ages and with cooling rates deduced from Ni concentration

  9. Ar-Ar and I-Xe Ages and the Thermal History of IAB Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.; Garrison, Daniel H.; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Studies of several samples of the large Caddo County IAB iron meteorite reveal andesitic material, enriched in Si, Na, Al and Ca, which is essentially unique among meteorites. This material is believed to have formed from a chondritic source by partial melting and to have further segregated by grain coarsening. Such an origin implies extended metamorphism of the IAB parent body. New Ar-39-Ar-40 ages for silicate from three different Caddo samples are consistent with a common age of 4.50-4.51 Gyr ago. Less well defined Ar-Ar degassing ages for inclusions from two other IABs, EET8333 and Udei Station, are approx.4.32 Gyr, whereas the age for Campo del Cielo varies considerably over approx.3.23-4.56 Gyr. New I-129-Xe-129 ages for Caddo County and EET8333 are 4561.9+/-0.1 Myr and 4560- 4563 Myr, respectively, relative to an age of 4566 Myr for Shallowater. Considering all reported Ar-Ar ages for IABs and related winonaites, the range is approx.4.32-4.53 Gyr, but several IABs give similar Ar ages of 4.50-4.52 Gyr. We interpret these older ages to represent cooling after the time of last significant metamorphism on the parent body, and the younger ages to represent later Ar-40 diffusion loss. These older Ar-Ar ages are similar to Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isochron ages reported in the literature for Caddo County. Considering the possibility that IAB parent body formation was followed by impact disruption, reassembly, and metamorphism (e.g., Benedix et al. 2000), the time of the post-assembly metamorphism may have been as late as approx.4.53 Gyr ago. However, precise I-Xe ages reported for some IABs define a range of ages of approx.4560 to approx.4576 Myr. The older I-Xe ages exceed the oldest precise radiometric ages of meteorites, appear unrealistic, and s,uggest a bias in the calibration of all I-Xe ages. But even with such a bias, the I-Xe ages of IABs cannot easily be reconciled with the much younger Ar-Ar and Sm-Nd ages and with cooling rates deduced from Ni concentration

  10. Potential energy surface and bound states of the NH3-Ar and ND3-Ar complexes.

    PubMed

    Loreau, J; Liévin, J; Scribano, Y; van der Avoird, A

    2014-12-14

    A new, four-dimensional potential energy surface for the interaction of NH3 and ND3 with Ar is computed using the coupled-cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations and large basis sets. The umbrella motion of the ammonia molecule is explicitly taken into account. The bound states of both NH3-Ar and ND3-Ar are calculated on this potential for total angular momentum values from J = 0 to 10, with the inclusion of Coriolis interactions. The energies and splittings of the rovibrational levels are in excellent agreement with the extensive high-resolution spectroscopic data accumulated over the years in the infrared and microwave regions for both complexes, which demonstrates the quality of the potential energy surface.

  11. Ar-40/Ar-39 ages of six Apollo 15 impact melt rocks by laser step heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalrymple, G. B.; Ryder, Graham

    1991-01-01

    Fifteen high resolution (21-51 step) Ar-40/Ar-39 age spectra are obtained for six Apollo 15 impact melt rocks of different compositions, using a continuous laser system on submilligram subsamples and on single crystal plagioclase clasts. Four of the six samples gave reproducible age spectra with well-defined intermediate temperature plateaus over 48 percent or more of the Ar-39 released; the plateaus are interpreted as crystallization ages. Samples 15304,7,69, 15294,6,21 and 15314,26,156 gave virtually identical plateau ages whose weighted mean is 3870 + or - 6 Ma. These three melt rocks differ in composition and likely formed in three separate impact events.

  12. 40Ar/39Ar ages of the older eruptive units of Somma-Vesuvius volcano, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanphere, M. A.; Calvert, A. T.; Scarpati, C.; Melluso, L.; Morra, V.; Perrotta, A.; Thornber, C.; Cioni, R.; Champion, D. E.

    2008-12-01

    40Ar/ 39Ar ages have been measured on the older major explosive eruptions of Somma-Vesuvius volcano in Italy. These eruptions all have pumice fall, and pyroclastic surge and flow deposits. The eruptive history of Somma-Vesuvius volcano has previously been based on uncalibrated 14C ages, mostly on carbon from paleosols, reported by Delibrias and others (1979) and Sigurdsson and others (1985). These assigned ages, plus measured 14C ages, calibrated 14C ages (denoted as 14C*) and 40Ar/ 39Ar ages (all in years) are: Mercato Tuff ~8500 years 14C=8263±29, 14C*=9250±49, 40Ar/ 39Ar=9155±461, 9541±460 Verde Tuff ~15000 years 14C=14420±130, 14C*=17200±380, 40Ar/ 39Ar=18456±302 Pomici di Base ~17000 years 14C=17229±398, 14C*=20360±139, 40Ar/ 39Ar=21759±306, 21568±328 The assigned ages are from Delibrias (1979). The 14C ages (Aleisso and others, 1971, 1973, 1974, 1978) use 1σ counting errors reported by laboratories. The uncertainty in calibrated 14C ages (above) are these reported uncertainties plus 1σ uncertainties of the calibration curves in IntCal04 (Reimer and others, 2004). The uncertainties in 40Ar/ 39Ar ages are 1σ errors. Pomici di Base and Mercato samples were analyzed twice. The weighted mean of plateau ages for Pomici di Base fall unit is 21,670 ± 224 years, and the weighted mean of isochron ages is 21,313 ± 408 years. The weighted mean of plateau ages for Mercato Tuff is 9348 ± 326 years, and the weighted mean of isochron ages is 9577 ± 332 years. The period of time from 0-12.4 ka used in calibrating 14C ages is based on dendrochronologically-dated tree ring samples. The calibration older than 12.4 ka is based on marine samples, primarily corals, and the marine calibrations are in dispute. The calibrated 14C ages above are based on IntCal04. Chui and others (2007) have presented another calibration based on fossil corals. In the younger part of their record, less than 30,000 years, the age difference averages less than 100 years. Aleisso and

  13. Incremental Heating 40Ar/39Ar Analyses of Mono Basin Tephra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deino, A.; Hemming, S. R.; Ali, G. A.; Zimmerman, S. R.; Turrin, B. D.

    2012-12-01

    The glacially and volcanically derived sediments of the Wilson Creek Formation (Lajoie, 1968), Mono Basin, eastern California, contain an invaluable archive of hydroclimatic, volcanic, and paleomagnetic events encompassing the past ~85 ka. Accurate radioisotopic dating of this sequence, however, has been stymied by systematic problems encountered in applying C-14, U/Th, and 40Ar/39Ar methods. 40Ar/39Ar dating of the 19-plus locally derived tephra horizons within the formation has been foiled by the presence of excess argon, incorporation of older crystal components and by the difficulty of accurately measuring of the age of late Quaternary materials (Chen et al., 1996; Kent et al., 2002; Cassata et al., 2011). We have acquired detailed laser step-heating 40Ar/39Ar age spectra on individual sanidine crystals of several Wilson Creek ashes using the multiple ion counter capability of the BGC Noblesse noble gas mass spectrometer. This approach represents a breakthrough for young materials, as it allows examination of the internal argon systematics of each grain and identification of steps representing excess Ar components as distinct from primary volcanic ages. Typically, anomalously old ages occur in the first 10-50% of the 39Ar release, followed by an age 'plateau' that is generally consistent from grain to grain. This methodological advance is a result of improvements in extraction-line design and mass spectrometer manufacture (in particular, improved source ionization efficiency, utilization of low-noise ion counters, and fully simultaneous data collection of all relevant isotopes). For example, 15 single-grain step-heating experiments (8-13 steps each) have been performed on sanidine from Ash 12. All crystals yielded apparent-age plateaus in the latter stages of the release, often preceded by anomalously old steps. While the age distribution of the plateau results are unimodal and consistent, with a weighted-mean age of 42.1 ± 0.3 ka (0.7% 1σ error), the

  14. Ar-Ar and Rb-Sr Ages of the Tissint Olivine-phyric Martian Shergottite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J.; Herzog, G. F.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.; Turin, B.; Lindsay, F. N.; Delaney, J. S.; Swisher, C. C., III; Agee, C.

    2013-01-01

    The fifth martian meteorite fall, Tissint, is an olivine-phyric shergottite that contains olivine macrocrysts (approximately 1.5 mm) [1]. [2] reported the Sm-Nd age of Tissint as 596 plus or minus 23 Ma along with Rb-Sr data that defined no isochron. [3] reported Lu-Hf and Sm-Nd ages of 583 plus or minus 86 Ma and 616 plus or minus 67 Ma, respectively. The cosmic-ray exposure ages of Tissint are 1.10 plus or minus 0.15 Ma based on 10Be [4], and 1.0-1.1 Ma, based on 3He, 21Ne, and 38Ar [5,6].We report Ar-Ar ages and Rb-Sr data.

  15. Investigation of the Gardnos Impact Structure: 40Ar/39Ar Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grier, J. A.; Swindle, T. D.; Kring, D. A.; Melosh, H. J.

    1995-09-01

    Introduction: The Gardnos structure (Norway) [1], has recently been identified as an impact crater [2,3], despite being deformed by a series of tectonic processes [2]. The age of the structure is uncertain, although attempts to date the impact event have been made on the basis of stratigraphic relationships [2,3]. Unfortunately, these estimates differ by more than 100 million years. The first study suggested that the impact corresponded roughly with the Cambro-Ordovician boundary, ~500 Ma [2], while a second stratigraphic interpretation suggested a Precambrian age of 650 Ma [3]. To try and resolve this discrepancy, we attempted to determine the age of the structure with radiometric techniques, which typically have an error of < 10 Ma. Method: We examined three samples from the crater, in an attempt to determine the age using the 40Ar/39Ar dating method. The samples (plagioclase feldspar, alkali feldspar, and shards of gray, semi-transparent, glassy-looking material) were obtained from the suevite breccia unit of [2]. This unit should be the most promising for 40Ar/39Ar dating, since it is melt bearing, and no other unit is likely to be less affected by subsequent tectonism and sedimentation. Results: Our experiments yielded complicated age spectra interpreted to reflect a thermal event at 385+/-5 Ma and another possible event at 312+/-5 Ma (Fig. 1). All three samples yielded similar results. If the stratigraphic interpretations are correct, it thus seems clear that the impact event itself was not dated. The 385 Ma age corresponds to the end of the Caledonian Orogeny, which significantly altered this section of Norway [4]. It is suspected that late Caledonian folding occurred during this time [4], and we therefore interpret the 385 Ma age as the thermal metamorphic overprint of the Caledonian Orogeny. Another event clearly occurred afterwards, which is responsible for the 312 Ma signature. The cause of this thermal overprint has not yet been identified, since

  16. Laser /39/Ar-/40/Ar dating of two clasts from consortium breccia 73215

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichhorn, G.; Schaeffer, O. A.; James, O. B.; Mueller, H. W.

    1978-01-01

    A laser Ar-39-Ar-40 study of the components of an ANT-suite anorthositic gabbro and a black aphanite from a consortium breccia is reported. A wide range of K-Ar ages is found for the plagioclase in the anorthositic gabbro; at the centers of the largest grains is material showing the greatest age (older than 4.11 billion years) while the youngest material (3.81-3.88 billion years) is found near the grain margins. Partial outgassing of the clasts upon incorporation into the breccia could account for the age patterns. The black aphanite clast appears to be cogenetic with the aphanite that forms the breccia matrix. The time of crystallization of a lunar granite has also been measured by the laser technique.

  17. K/Ar dating of lunar soils. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, E. C., Jr.; Bates, A.; Coscio, M. R., Jr.; Dragon, J. C.; Murthy, V. R.; Pepin, R. O.; Venkatesan, T. R.

    1976-01-01

    An attempt is made to identify those K/Ar techniques which extract the most reliable chronological information from lunar soils and to define the situations in which the best data are obtainable. Results are presented for determinations of the exposure and K/Ar ages of five lunar soil samples, which were performed by applying correlation techniques for a two-component argon structure to stepwise-heated and neutron-irradiated aliquots of grain-sized separates. It is found that ages deduced from Ar-40/surface-correlated Ar-36 vs K-40/surface-correlated Ar-36 and analogous plots of data from grain-sized separates appear to be the best available K/Ar ages of submature to mature lunar soils, that ages deduced from Ar-40 vs Ar-36 and analogous plots which assume a uniform K content can be significantly in error, and that stepwise-heating (Ar-40)-(Ar-39) experiments yield useful information only for simple immature soils where the K-Ar systematics are dominated by a single component.

  18. MEIS1 functions as a potential AR negative regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Liang; Yang, Yutao; Hang, Xingyi; Cui, Jiajun; Gao, Jiangping

    2014-10-15

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays critical roles in human prostate carcinoma progression and transformation. However, the activation of AR is regulated by co-regulators. MEIS1 protein, the homeodomain transcription factor, exhibited a decreased level in poor-prognosis prostate tumors. In this study, we investigated a potential interaction between MEIS1 and AR. We found that overexpression of MEIS1 inhibited the AR transcriptional activity and reduced the expression of AR target gene. A potential protein–protein interaction between AR and MEIS1 was identified by the immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays. Furthermore, MEIS1 modulated AR cytoplasm/nucleus translocation and the recruitment to androgen response element in prostate specific antigen (PSA) gene promoter sequences. In addition, MEIS1 promoted the recruitment of NCoR and SMRT in the presence of R1881. Finally, MEIS1 inhibited the proliferation and anchor-independent growth of LNCaP cells. Taken together, our data suggests that MEIS1 functions as a novel AR co-repressor. - Highlights: • A potential interaction was identified between MEIS1 and AR signaling. • Overexpression of MEIS1 reduced the expression of AR target gene. • MEIS1 modulated AR cytoplasm/nucleus translocation. • MEIS1 inhibited the proliferation and anchor-independent growth of LNCaP cells.

  19. K/Ar dating of lunar soils. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, E. C., Jr.; Bates, A.; Coscio, M. R., Jr.; Dragon, J. C.; Murthy, V. R.; Pepin, R. O.; Venkatesan, T. R.

    1976-01-01

    An attempt is made to identify those K/Ar techniques which extract the most reliable chronological information from lunar soils and to define the situations in which the best data are obtainable. Results are presented for determinations of the exposure and K/Ar ages of five lunar soil samples, which were performed by applying correlation techniques for a two-component argon structure to stepwise-heated and neutron-irradiated aliquots of grain-sized separates. It is found that ages deduced from Ar-40/surface-correlated Ar-36 vs K-40/surface-correlated Ar-36 and analogous plots of data from grain-sized separates appear to be the best available K/Ar ages of submature to mature lunar soils, that ages deduced from Ar-40 vs Ar-36 and analogous plots which assume a uniform K content can be significantly in error, and that stepwise-heating (Ar-40)-(Ar-39) experiments yield useful information only for simple immature soils where the K-Ar systematics are dominated by a single component.

  20. The 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of the Pelona schist and related rocks, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Carl E.

    1990-01-01

    Seventeen 40Ar/39Ar ages for hornblende, celadonitic muscovite, and biotite from the Pelona, Orocopia, Rand, and Portal Ridge (POR) schists range from 39 to 85 Ma. The 85 Ma is from Portal Ridge, consistent with the proposed correlation of that body with the schist of Sierra de Salinas. Two muscovites and one hornblende from the Rand Schist have ages of 72 to 74 Ma, indistinguishable from the K-Ar age of 74 Ma for hornblende from a posttectonic granodiorite that intrudes the schist, but younger than the 79 Ma U-Pb age of the intrusion. Four muscovite and two hornblende ages for schist and mylonite from the East Fork area of the San Gabriel Mountains range from 55 to 61 Ma, similar to K-Ar ages from nearby upper plate rocks. A third hornblende has an age of 73 Ma but is not well constrained. Concordance of schist and upper plate ages confirms structural and metamorphic evidence that the Vincent thrust in the San Gabriel Mountains has not undergone significant postmetamorphic disruption. Ages from the Orocopia Mountains are 75 Ma for hornblende from nonmylonitic upper plate, 52 Ma for muscovite from structurally high Orocopia Schist that is mylonitic, and 41 Ma for muscovite from nonmylonitic Orocopia Schist. These are consistent with field evidence that the Orocopia "thrust" is a postmetamorphic normal fault. Muscovite and hornblende from the Gavilan Hills have ages of 48 to 50 Ma, younger than ages from the San Gabriel Mountains but similar to schist ages from the Orocopia Mountains. The geochronologic and structural complexities of the Vincent, Chocolate Mountains, Orocopia, and Rand thrusts imply that previously cited northeastward vergence may not relate to prograde metamorphism (subduction) of the POR schists. The 40Ar/39Ar data indicate substantial uplift of the POR schists prior to middle Tertiary detachment faulting, which confirms other geochronologic evidence of uplift in southern California and southern Arizona during the Late Cretaceous-early Tertiary.

  1. The ChArMEx database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferré, Helene; Belmahfoud, Nizar; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Descloitres, Jacques; Fleury, Laurence; Focsa, Loredana; Henriot, Nicolas; Mastrorillo, Laurence; Mière, Arnaud; Vermeulen, Anne

    2014-05-01

    The Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx, http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) aims at a scientific assessment of the present and future state of the atmospheric environment in the Mediterranean Basin, and of its impacts on the regional climate, air quality, and marine biogeochemistry. The project includes long term monitoring of environmental parameters, intensive field campaigns, use of satellite data and modelling studies. Therefore ChARMEx scientists produce and need to access a wide diversity of data. In this context, the objective of the database task is to organize data management, distribution system and services, such as facilitating the exchange of information and stimulating the collaboration between researchers within the ChArMEx community, and beyond. The database relies on a strong collaboration between OMP and ICARE data centres and has been set up in the framework of the Mediterranean Integrated Studies at Regional And Locals Scales (MISTRALS) program data portal. All the data produced by or of interest for the ChArMEx community will be documented in the data catalogue and accessible through the database website: http://mistrals.sedoo.fr/ChArMEx. At present, the ChArMEx database contains about 75 datasets, including 50 in situ datasets (2012 and 2013 campaigns, Ersa background monitoring station), 25 model outputs (dust model intercomparison, MEDCORDEX scenarios), and a high resolution emission inventory over the Mediterranean. Many in situ datasets have been inserted in a relational database, in order to enable more accurate data selection and download of different datasets in a shared format. The database website offers different tools: - A registration procedure which enables any scientist to accept the data policy and apply for a user database account. - A data catalogue that complies with metadata international standards (ISO 19115-19139; INSPIRE European Directive; Global Change Master Directory Thesaurus). - Metadata forms to document

  2. AR-Signaling in Human Malignancies: Prostate Cancer and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Michael T.; Yu, Evan Y.

    2017-01-01

    In the 1940s Charles Huggins reported remarkable palliative benefits following surgical castration in men with advanced prostate cancer, and since then the androgen receptor (AR) has remained the main therapeutic target in this disease. Over the past couple of decades, our understanding of AR-signaling biology has dramatically improved, and it has become apparent that the AR can modulate a number of other well-described oncogenic signaling pathways. Not surprisingly, mounting preclinical and epidemiologic data now supports a role for AR-signaling in promoting the growth and progression of several cancers other than prostate, and early phase clinical trials have documented preliminary signs of efficacy when AR-signaling inhibitors are used in several of these malignancies. In this article, we provide an overview of the evidence supporting the use of AR-directed therapies in prostate as well as other cancers, with an emphasis on the rationale for targeting AR-signaling across tumor types. PMID:28085048

  3. AR-Signaling in Human Malignancies: Prostate Cancer and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Michael T; Yu, Evan Y

    2017-01-11

    In the 1940s Charles Huggins reported remarkable palliative benefits following surgical castration in men with advanced prostate cancer, and since then the androgen receptor (AR) has remained the main therapeutic target in this disease. Over the past couple of decades, our understanding of AR-signaling biology has dramatically improved, and it has become apparent that the AR can modulate a number of other well-described oncogenic signaling pathways. Not surprisingly, mounting preclinical and epidemiologic data now supports a role for AR-signaling in promoting the growth and progression of several cancers other than prostate, and early phase clinical trials have documented preliminary signs of efficacy when AR-signaling inhibitors are used in several of these malignancies. In this article, we provide an overview of the evidence supporting the use of AR-directed therapies in prostate as well as other cancers, with an emphasis on the rationale for targeting AR-signaling across tumor types.

  4. Significance of the cosmogenic argon correction in deciphering the 40Ar/39Ar ages of the Nakhlite (Martian) meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, B. E.; Cassata, W.; Mark, D. F.; Tomkinson, T.; Lee, M. R.; Smith, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    All meteorites contain variable amounts of cosmogenic 38Ar and 36Ar produced during extraterrestrial exposure, and in order to calculate reliable 40Ar/39Ar ages this cosmogenic Ar must be removed from the total Ar budget. The amount of cosmogenic Ar has usually been calculated from the step-wise 38Ar/36Ar, minimum 36Ar/37Ar, or average 38Arcosmogenic/37Ar from the irradiated meteorite fragment. However, if Cl is present in the meteorite, then these values will be disturbed by Ar produced during laboratory neutron irradiation of Cl. Chlorine is likely to be a particular issue for the Nakhlite group of Martian meteorites, which can contain over 1000 ppm Cl [1]. An alternative method for the cosmogenic Ar correction uses the meteorite's exposure age as calculated from an un-irradiated fragment and step-wise production rates based on the measured Ca/K [2]. This calculation is independent of the Cl concentration. We applied this correction method to seven Nakhlites, analyzed in duplicate or triplicate. Selected samples were analyzed at both Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and SUERC to ensure inter-laboratory reproducibility. We find that the cosmogenic argon correction of [2] has a significant influence on the ages calculated for individual steps, particularly for those at lower temperatures (i.e., differences of several tens of million years for some steps). The lower-temperature steps are more influenced by the alternate cosmogenic correction method of [2], as these analyses yielded higher concentrations of Cl-derived 38Ar. As a result, the Nakhlite data corrected using [2] yields step-heating spectra that are flat or nearly so across >70% of the release spectra (in contrast to downward-stepping spectra often reported for Nakhlite samples), allowing for the calculation of precise emplacement ages for these meteorites. [1] Cartwright J. A. et al. (2013) GCA, 105, 255-293. [2] Cassata W. S., and Borg L. E. (2015) 46th LPSC, Abstract #2742.

  5. 40Ar/39Ar and cosmic ray exposure ages of plagioclase-rich lithic fragments from Apollo 17 regolith, 78461

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, J. P.; Baldwin, S. L.; Delano, J. W.

    2016-01-01

    Argon isotopic data is used to assess the potential of low-mass samples collected by sample return missions on planetary objects (e.g., Moon, Mars, asteroids), to reveal planetary surface processes. We report the first 40Ar/39Ar ages and 38Ar cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages, determined for eleven submillimeter-sized (ranging from 0.06 to 1.2 mg) plagioclase-rich lithic fragments from Apollo 17 regolith sample 78461 collected at the base of the Sculptured Hills. Total fusion analysis was used to outgas argon from the lithic fragments. Three different approaches were used to determine 40Ar/39Ar ages and illustrate the sensitivity of age determination to the choice of trapped (40Ar/36Ar)t. 40Ar/39Ar ages range from ~4.0 to 4.4 Ga with one exception (Plag#10). Surface CRE ages, based on 38Ar, range from ~1 to 24 Ma. The relatively young CRE ages suggest recent re-working of the upper few centimeters of the regolith. The CRE ages may result from the effect of downslope movement of materials to the base of the Sculptured Hills from higher elevations. The apparent 40Ar/39Ar age for Plag#10 is >5 Ga and yielded the oldest CRE age (i.e., ~24 Ma). We interpret this data to indicate the presence of parentless 40Ar in Plag#10, originating in the lunar atmosphere and implanted in lunar regolith by solar wind. Based on a chemical mixing model, plagioclase compositions, and 40Ar/39Ar ages, we conclude that lithic fragments originated from Mg-suite of highland rocks, and none were derived from the mare region.

  6. Consortium breccia 73255 - Laser /Ar-39/-/Ar-40/ dating of aphanite samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichhorn, G.; Schaeffer, O. A.; Mcgee, J. J.; James, O. B.

    1979-01-01

    Laser (Ar-39)-(Ar-40) studies of clasts and groundmass in breccia 73255 are presented. They show a variety of ages indicating that some materials lost argon from sites that outgas at low temperature, while other materials have retained argon generated before the breccia-forming event. The estimate for the time of the breccia-forming event from thermal release studies is compared to the upper limit of the event from the laser studies; this work also shows that ages in excess of 4.0 G.y. determined on rocks containing devitrified maskelynite clasts probably have no chronological significance.

  7. Ar-Ar Dating of Martian Chassignites, NWA2737 and Chassigny, and Nakhlite MIL03346

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Garrison, D. H.

    2006-01-01

    Until recently only three nakhlites and one chassignite had been identified among martian meteorites. These four exhibit very similar radiometric ages and cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages, indicating that they may have derived from a common location on Mars and were ejected into space by a single impact. This situation is quite different from that of martian shergottites, which exhibit a range of radiometric ages and CRE ages (1). Recently, several new nakhlites and a new martian dunite (NWA2737) have been recognized. Here we report our results of Ar-39-Ar-40 dating for the MIL03346 nakhlite and the NWA2737 "chassignite", along with new results on Chassigny.

  8. The barents sea magmatic province: Geological-geophysical evidence and new 40Ar/39Ar dates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipilov, E. V.; Karyakin, Yu. V.

    2011-07-01

    Resulting from study of the geological structure of the Franz Josef Land and Svalbard archipelagoes, this work presents new 17 40Ar/39Ar age datings for basalts taken during coastal expeditions in 2006-2010. Radiological age determination for intrusive units (sills) located in the western part of Nordensciold Land (Spitzbergen Island) has been made for the first time. In relation to use of the interpretation results of marine geological-geophysical data, the distribution peculiarities and time ranges for Jurassic-Cretaceous basic magmatism within the studied regions of the Barents Sea continental margin and within the Arctic as a whole are discussed.

  9. 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology of isotopically zoned micas: Insights from the southwestern USA proterozoic orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, K. V.; Bowring, S. A.

    1995-08-01

    We have used three different 40Ar/39Ar laser microprobe methods to explore the distribution of radiogenic 40Ar in 1.0-1.5-mm biotite crystals from the ca. 1680 Ma Horse Mountain monzogranite of central Arizona. Incremental heating of two single crystals with a defocused laser beam produced flat age spectra with near-plateau ages of ˜1190 Ma, showing no indication of intracrystalline 40Ar inhomogeneity. In contrast, total fusion of twenty-five biotite fragments (˜ 100 pm) yielded apparent ages ranging from 1006.7 to 1212.0 Ma. Detailed age mapping in the {001} plane of two crystals, with the laser focused to a minimum spot size, confirms that the age dispersion in the fragment data reflects the existence of 200 m.y. age gradients in single crystals. The two mapped crystals display very different age distribution patterns that suggest radiogenic 40Ar loss through two mechanisms: volume diffusion on a scale comparable to that of the grain radius, and more rapid diffusion along discrete zones of high crystal defect density. Simple inverse modeling of the overall age dispersion in the two mapped crystals and the fragment population is consistent with the development of the observed age gradients by slow cooling at an average rate of ˜0.5 K/m.y. The Horse Mountain results, as well as previously published studies, indicate that conventional, incremental heating of hydrous phases can homogenize intracrystalline gradients in 40Ar, thereby masking important details of the thermal history of analyzed samples. In contrast, detailed isotopic mapping studies offer a wealth of information, and will become more powerful with continued improvement in the spatial resolution of 40Ar/39Ar laser microprobes. Total-fusion studies of crystal fragment populations can be readily automated, making them less labor-intensive than mapping studies. Our preliminary experiment on a limited Horse Mountain fragment population suggests that this procedure has great potential as a reconnaissance

  10. The Spectroscopic study of 33Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adimi, N.; Dominguez-Reyes, R.; Alcorta, M.; Bey, A.; Blank, B.; Borge, M. J. G.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Dossat, C.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Giovinazzo, J.; Knudsen, H. H.; Madurga, M.; Matea, I.; Perea, A.; Sümmerer, K.; Tengblad, O.; Thomas, J. C.

    2011-10-01

    The proton-rich nucleus 33Ar has been produced at the low-energy facility SPIRAL at GANIL. Spectroscopic studies of gamma and p emission of this nucleus were performed with the "Silicon Cube" detection system. The analysis of proton and gamma singles and coincidence spectra allowed us to establish a complete decay scheme of this nucleus. The comparison of the Gamow-Teller strength distribution deduced from our experiment and the theoretical one obtained with the Shell Model permitted the determination of a quenching factor for the Gamow-Teller strength.

  11. Finding Structure in the ArXiv

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemi, Alexander; Chachra, Ricky; Ginsparg, Paul; Sethna, James

    2014-03-01

    We applied machine learning techniques to the full text of the arXiv articles and report a meaningful low-dimensional representation of this big dataset. Using Google's open source implementation of the continuous skip-gram model, word2vec, the vocabulary used in scientific articles is mapped to a Euclidean vector space that preserves semantic and syntactic relationships between words. This allowed us to develop techniques for automatically characterizing articles, finding similar articles and authors, and segmenting articles into their relevant sections, among other applications.

  12. The Spectroscopic study of {sup 33}Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Adimi, N.; Dominguez-Reyes, R.; Alcorta, M.; Borge, M. J. G.; Perea, A.; Tengblad, O.; Bey, A.; Blank, B.; Dossat, C.; Giovinazzo, J.; Matea, I.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Knudsen, H. H.; Suemmerer, K.

    2011-10-28

    The proton-rich nucleus {sup 33}Ar has been produced at the low-energy facility SPIRAL at GANIL. Spectroscopic studies of gamma and p emission of this nucleus were performed with the 'Silicon Cube' detection system. The analysis of proton and gamma singles and coincidence spectra allowed us to establish a complete decay scheme of this nucleus. The comparison of the Gamow-Teller strength distribution deduced from our experiment and the theoretical one obtained with the Shell Model permitted the determination of a quenching factor for the Gamow-Teller strength.

  13. Experimental and theoretical investigations of H2O-Ar.

    PubMed

    Vanfleteren, Thomas; Földes, Tomas; Herman, Michel; Liévin, Jacques; Loreau, Jérôme; Coudert, Laurent H

    2017-07-07

    We have used continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy to record the spectrum of H2O-Ar in the 2OH excitation range of H2O. 24 sub-bands have been observed. Their rotational structure (Trot = 12 K) is analyzed and the lines are fitted separately for ortho and para species together with microwave and far infrared data from the literature, with a unitless standard deviation σ=0.98 and 1.31, respectively. Their vibrational analysis is supported by a theoretical input based on an intramolecular potential energy surface obtained through ab initio calculations and computation of the rotational energy of sub-states of the complex with the water monomer in excited vibrational states up to the first hexad. For the ground and (010) vibrational states, the theoretical results agree well with experimental energies and rotational constants in the literature. For the excited vibrational states of the first hexad, they guided the assignment of the observed sub-bands. The upper state vibrational predissociation lifetime is estimated to be 3 ns from observed spectral linewidths.

  14. Genetic mapping of the interface between the ArsD metallochaperone and the ArsA ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianbo; Ajees, Abdul; Salam, Abdul; Rosen, Barry P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The ArsD metallochaperone delivers trivalent metalloids, As(III) or Sb(III), to the ArsA ATPase, the catalytic subunit of the ArsAB As(III) efflux pump. Transfer of As(III) increases the affinity of ArsA for As(III), allowing resistance to environmental arsenic concentrations. As(III) transfer is channeled from chaperone to ATPase, implying that ArsD and ArsA form an interface at their metal binding sites. A genetic approach was used to test this hypothesis. Thirteen ArsD mutants exhibiting either weaker or stronger interaction with ArsA were selected by either repressed transactivator yeast two-hybrid or reverse yeast two-hybrid assays. Additionally, Lys-37 and Lys-62 were identified as being involved in ArsD function by site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification. Substitution at either position with arginine was tolerated, suggesting participation of a positive charge. By yeast two-hybrid analysis K37A and K62A mutants lost interaction with ArsA. All fifteen mutations were mapped on the surface of the ArsD structure, and their locations are consistent with a structural model generated by in silico docking. Four are close to metalloid binding site residues Cys-12, Cys-13 and Cys18, and seven are on the surface of helix 1. These results suggest that the interface involves one surface of helix 1 and the metalloid binding site. PMID:21299644

  15. High resolution mapping of Dense spike-ar (dsp.ar) to the genetic centromere of barley chromosome 7H.

    PubMed

    Shahinnia, Fahimeh; Druka, Arnis; Franckowiak, Jerome; Morgante, Michele; Waugh, Robbie; Stein, Nils

    2012-02-01

    Spike density in barley is under the control of several major genes, as documented previously by genetic analysis of a number of morphological mutants. One such class of mutants affects the rachis internode length leading to dense or compact spikes and the underlying genes were designated dense spike (dsp). We previously delimited two introgressed genomic segments on chromosome 3H (21 SNP loci, 35.5 cM) and 7H (17 SNP loci, 20.34 cM) in BW265, a BC(7)F(3) nearly isogenic line (NIL) of cv. Bowman as potentially containing the dense spike mutant locus dsp.ar, by genotyping 1,536 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in both BW265 and its recurrent parent. Here, the gene was allocated by high-resolution bi-parental mapping to a 0.37 cM interval between markers SC57808 (Hv_SPL14)-CAPSK06413 residing on the short and long arm at the genetic centromere of chromosome 7H, respectively. This region putatively contains more than 800 genes as deduced by comparison with the collinear regions of barley, rice, sorghum and Brachypodium, Classical map-based isolation of the gene dsp.ar thus will be complicated due to the infavorable relationship of genetic to physical distances at the target locus.

  16. ServAR: An augmented reality tool to guide the serving of food.

    PubMed

    Rollo, Megan E; Bucher, Tamara; Smith, Shamus P; Collins, Clare E

    2017-05-12

    Accurate estimation of food portion size is a difficult task. Visual cues are important mediators of portion size and therefore technology-based aids may assist consumers when serving and estimating food portions. The current study evaluated the usability and impact on estimation error of standard food servings of a novel augmented reality food serving aid, ServAR. Participants were randomised into one of three groups: 1) no information/aid (control); 2) verbal information on standard serving sizes; or 3) ServAR, an aid which overlayed virtual food servings over a plate using a tablet computer. Participants were asked to estimate the standard serving sizes of nine foods (broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, green beans, kidney beans, potato, pasta, rice, and sweetcorn) using validated food replicas. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests compared median served weights of each food to reference standard serving size weights. Percentage error was used to compare the estimation of serving size accuracy between the three groups. All participants also performed a usability test using the ServAR tool to guide the serving of one randomly selected food. Ninety adults (78.9% female; a mean (95%CI) age 25.8 (24.9-26.7) years; BMI 24.2 (23.2-25.2) kg/m(2)) completed the study. The median servings were significantly different to the reference portions for five foods in the ServAR group, compared to eight foods in the information only group and seven foods for the control group. The cumulative proportion of total estimations per group within ±10%, ±25% and ±50% of the reference portion was greater for those using ServAR (30.7, 65.2 and 90.7%; respectively), compared to the information only group (19.6, 47.4 and 77.4%) and control group (10.0, 33.7 and 68.9%). Participants generally found the ServAR tool easy to use and agreed that it showed potential to support optimal portion size selection. However, some refinements to the ServAR tool are required to improve the user experience. Use of the

  17. Beta PIs from the USDA-ARS NPGS evaluated for resistance to Cercospora beticola, 2013

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thirty-one Plant Introductions (PIs) from the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System were evaluated for resistance to Cercospora beticola in an artificially produced epiphytotic at the Saginaw Valley Research and Extension Center near Frankenmuth, Michigan. Internal controls included a susceptibl...

  18. Beta PIs from the USDA-ARS NPGS evaluated for resistance to Cercospora beticola, 2012

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thirty Plant Introductions (PIs) from the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System were evaluated for resistance to Cercospora beticola in an artificially produced epiphytotic at the Saginaw Valley Research and Extension Center near Frankenmuth, MI. Internal controls included a susceptible germplas...

  19. Beta PIs from the USDA-ARS NPGS evaluated for resistance to Cercospora beticola, 2014

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thirty Plant Introductions (PIs) from the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System were evaluated for resistance to Cercospora beticola in an artificially produced epiphytotic at the Saginaw Valley Research and Extension Center near Frankenmuth, Michigan. Internal controls included a susceptible, '...

  20. Beta PIs from the USDA-ARS NPGS evaluated for resistance to Cercospora beticola, 2010

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thirty Plant Introductions (PIs) from the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System were evaluated for resistance to Cercospora beticola in an artificially produced epiphytotic at the Saginaw Valley Research and Extension Center near Frankenmuth, MI. Internal controls included a susceptible commercia...

  1. Beta PIs from the USDA-ARS NPGS evaluated for resistance to Cercospora beticola, 2011

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thirty Plant Introductions (PIs) from the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System were evaluated for resistance to Cercospora beticola in an artificially produced epiphytotic at the Saginaw Valley Research and Extension Center near Frankenmuth, MI. Internal controls included a susceptible commercia...

  2. Beta PIs From the USDA-ARS NPGS Evaluated for Resistance to Cercospora beticola, 2009

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thirty Plant Introductions (PIs) from the USDA-ARS National Plant Germplasm System were evaluated for resistance to Cercospora beticola in an artificially produced epiphytotic at the Saginaw Valley Research Farm near Frankenmuth, MI. Internal controls included a susceptible commercial variety, CE, ...

  3. ECLSS ARS humidifier separator repair onboard Atlantis, OV-104, during STS-44

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    During STS-44, the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Air Revitalization System (ARS) humidifier separator is repaired using a towel and a plastic bag underneath the middeck subfloor of Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104. Problems with the humidifier separator began about midway through the mission.

  4. STS-32 OV-102 air revitalization system (ARS) humidity separator problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    During STS-32, onboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, a leakage problem at environmental control and life support system (ECLSS) air revitalization system (ARS) humidity separator A below the middeck is solved with a plastic bag and a towel. The towel inserted inside a plastic bag absorbed the water that had collected at the separator inlet.

  5. STS-32 OV-102 air revitalization system (ARS) humidity separator problem

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-01-20

    During STS-32, onboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, a leakage problem at environmental control and life support system (ECLSS) air revitalization system (ARS) humidity separator A below the middeck is solved with a plastic bag and a towel. The towel inserted inside a plastic bag absorbed the water that had collected at the separator inlet.

  6. 18. INTERIOR SURFACE OF THE SHORT SOUTH WALL OF AR9, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. INTERIOR SURFACE OF THE SHORT SOUTH WALL OF AR-9, WITH THE MORE RECENT CONCRETE BLOCK CONTROL ROOM AT THE LEFT AND ASSOCIATED CONCRETE PAVING IN THE FOREGROUND. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base, Rammed Earth Aircraft Dispersal Revetments, Western Shore of Rogers Dry Lake, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. Evidence for shock heating and constraints on Martian surface temperatures revealed by 40Ar/ 39Ar thermochronometry of Martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, William S.; Shuster, David L.; Renne, Paul R.; Weiss, Benjamin P.

    2010-12-01

    The thermal histories of Martian meteorite are important for the interpretation of petrologic, geochemical, geochronological, and paleomagnetic constraints that they provide on the evolution of Mars. In this paper, we quantify 40Ar/ 39Ar ages and Ar diffusion kinetics of Martian meteorites Allan Hills (ALH) 84001, Nakhla, and Miller Range (MIL) 03346. We constrain the thermal history of each meteorite and discuss the resulting implications for their petrology, paleomagnetism, and geochronology. Maskelynite in ALH 84001 yields a 40Ar/ 39Ar isochron age of 4163 ± 35 Ma, which is indistinguishable from recent Pb-Pb ( Bouvier et al., 2009a) and Lu-Hf ages ( Lapen et al., 2010). The high precision of this result arises from clear resolution of a reproducible trapped 40Ar/ 36Ar component in maskelynite in ALH 84001 ( 40Ar/ 36Ar = 632 ± 90). The maskelynite 40Ar/ 39Ar age predates the Late Heavy Bombardment and likely represents the time at which the original natural remanent magnetization (NRM) component observed in ALH 84001 was acquired. Nakhla and MIL 03346 yield 40Ar/ 39Ar isochron ages of 1332 ± 24 and 1339 ± 8 Ma, respectively, which we interpret to date crystallization. Multi-phase, multi-domain diffusion models constrained by the observed Ar diffusion kinetics and 40Ar/ 39Ar age spectra suggest that localized regions within both ALH 84001 and Nakhla were intensely heated for brief durations during shock events at 1158 ± 110 and 913 ± 9 Ma, respectively. These ages may date the marginal melting of pyroxene in each rock, mobilization of carbonates and maskelynite in ALH 84001, and NRM overprints observed in ALH 84001. The inferred peak temperatures of the shock heating events (>1400 °C) are sufficient to mobilize Ar, Sr, and Pb in constituent minerals, which may explain some of the dispersion observed in 40Ar/ 39Ar, Rb-Sr, and U-Th-Pb data toward ages younger than ˜4.1 Ga. The data also place conservative upper bounds on the long-duration residence

  8. Ionization in 0.1-1.6 MeV Ar +-Kr and Kr +-Ar collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarcone, M. J.; Lincoln, B. A.; Rapposch, M. H.; Reed, K. J.; Antar, A. A.; Kessel, Q. C.

    1989-04-01

    The final charge states of ions scattered to large angles (1° -18°) in Ar +-Kr and Kr +-Ar collisions have been measured for collision energies from 0.1 to 1.6 MeV. Both sets of data show stepwise increases in ionization beginning for those collisions having distances of closest approach of 0.7 and 0.4 a.u. For the smallest distances of closest approach reached (0.05 a.u.), the average number of electrons lost from the collision complex totals nearly twenty. Comparison with molecular orbital calculations shows possible electron promotions to exist for the 0.7 and 0.4 a.u. distances; however, comparison of the Ar-Kr and Kr-Ar data sets with the calculations shows that a variety of separated-atom states may participate in the promotions. This is in contrast to existing models for deeper-lying shells in which specific separated-atom-united-atom correlations are thought to exist.

  9. 40Ar/39Ar ages for the fossil-bearing Gyeongsang Supergroup in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S. C.; Hemming, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    Since the 1970s, abundant vertebrate fossils have been documented from the Cretaceous Gyeongsang Supergroup in the Gyeongsang Basin and some small nearby basins of the Korean Peninsula, including dinosaurs, pterosaurs, crocodilians, turtles and fish. In addition to body fossils, well-preserved dinosaur, bird and pterosaur tracks have been found from these formations. Well-preserved and extensive vertebrate ichnofaunas from the Gyeongsang Supergroup represent the largest known concentration of Cretaceous vertebrate track sites reported from the Asian continent. Determining the age of the Gyeongsang Supergroup is critical to understanding several fundamental questions related to evolution and paleo-biogeography. However, limited radioisotopic studies for the Gyeongsang Supergroup have been previously reported. Additionally, the large uncertainties of previous data and the incomplete stratigraphic description of the samples limit their value for high-resolution chronostratigraphy. In this study, we aim to establish high-precision 40Ar/39Ar ages for two well-known tuffs from the middle and the upper part of the Gyeongsang Supergroup, and one rhyolite from the uppermost Gyeongsang Supergroup. Our preliminary 40Ar/39Ar data for the Kusandong Tuff indicates that the middle part of the Gyeongsang Supergroup is 78-82 Ma. This is consistent with the hypothesized extension of the Jehol biota into Korea and the preliminary results suggest that refinement of the time scale for these strata is a practical goal. The Gyeongsang Supergroup sample has great potential for substantially increasing our knowledge of Mesozoic terrestrial ecosystems.

  10. Thermal energy charge-transfer reactions of Ar/sup +/ and Ar/sub 2//sup +/

    SciTech Connect

    Shul, R.J.; Upschulte, B.L.; Passarella, R.; Keesee, R.G.; Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1987-05-07

    The rate coefficients for a number of thermal energy charge-transfer reactions are obtained with a recently completed selected ion flow tube (SIFT). The ion-molecule reactions studied involve Ar/sup +/ and Ar/sub 2//sup +/ with a variety of neutral molecules including O/sub 2/, CS/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, SO/sub 2/, H/sub 2/O, H/sub 2/S, NH/sub 3/, NO SF/sub 6/, CH/sub 4/, N/sub 2/O, NO/sub 2/, and CO. The relative magnitudes of the observed rate coefficients are not in accord with an energy resonance model which requires favorable Franck-Condon factors. Furthermore the authors find that the dimer ion reaction rate constant is not always greater than that of the monomer with a specific neutral although there is greater phase space in the case of the dimer where the dissociative channel leads to a three-body final state. However, the proximity of the recombination energy of Ar/sup +/ and Ar/sub 2//sup +/ to a band in the photoelectron spectra of the neutral appear to explain the relative rates of the monomer and the dimer reactions with a specific neutral.

  11. Rb Sr, Sm Nd and Ar Ar isotopic systematics of Martian dunite Chassigny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, K.; Shih, C.-Y.; Reese, Y.; Bogard, D. D.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2006-06-01

    Isotopic analysis of the Martian meteorite Chassigny yields a Rb-Sr age of 1406 ± 14 Ma with an initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio of 0.702251 ± 0.000034, a Sm-Nd age of 1386 ± 28 Ma with an initial ɛ143Nd-value of + 16.9 ± 0.3 and an 39Ar- 40Ar age of 1360 + 40 - 20 Ma. The concordance of these ages and the Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd initial isotopic signatures suggest that Chassigny crystallized from low Rb/Sr, light rare earth element depleted source materials ˜ 1390 Ma ago. The ages and ɛ143Nd-values of Chassigny and the nakhlites Governador Valadares and Lafayette overlap, suggesting that they could have come from very similar mantle sources. Nakhla, Northwest Africa 998 and Yamato 000593 appear to be from similar but distinct sources. Chassigny and all nakhlites so far studied have undergone similar evolution histories. That is, chassignites/nakhlites were derived from a region where volcanism lasted at least 50 Ma and crystallized from different lava flows or subsurface sills. They probably were launched from Mars by a single impact event. The trapped Martian atmospheric 40Ar/ 36Ar ratios in Chassigny, nakhlites and shergottite impact glass are similar and possibly indicate minimal change in this ratio over the past ≥ 600 Ma.

  12. Strong multiple-capture effect in slow Ar^17+-Ar collisions: a quantum mechanical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehzadeh, Arash; Kirchner, Tom

    2012-10-01

    A recent X-ray spectroscopy experiment on 255 keV Ar^17+-Ar collisions [1] provided evidence for strong multiple-electron capture --- a feature that is supported by classical trajectory Monte Carlo calculations for similar collision systems [2]. We have coupled a quantum-mechanical independent-electron model calculation for the Ar^17+-Ar system with (semi-) phenomenological Auger and radiative cascade models to test these findings. The capture calculations are performed using the basis generator method and include single-particle states on the projectile up to the 10th shell. The cross sections obtained for shell-specific multiple capture are fed into a stabilization scheme proposed in Ref. [3] in order to obtain n-specific cross sections for apparent single (and double) capture that in turn are fed into a radiative cascade code [1] to obtain X-ray emission intensities that can be compared with the experimental data. Good agreement is found for the Lyman series from n=3 to n=7 if the multiple-capture contributions are included, whereas calculations that ignore them are in stark conflict with the data. [4pt] [1] M. Trassinelli et al., J. Phys. B 45, 085202 (2012)[0pt] [2] S. Otranto and R. Olson, Phys. Rev. A 83, 032710 (2011)[0pt] [3] R. Ali et al., Phys. Rev A 49, 3586 (1994).

  13. Serotonin (5-HT) 5-HT2A Receptor (5-HT2AR):5-HT2CR Imbalance in Medial Prefrontal Cortex Associates with Motor Impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Anastasio, Noelle C; Stutz, Sonja J; Fink, Latham H L; Swinford-Jackson, Sarah E; Sears, Robert M; DiLeone, Ralph J; Rice, Kenner C; Moeller, F Gerard; Cunningham, Kathryn A

    2015-07-15

    A feature of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders is motor impulsivity. Recent studies have implicated serotonin (5-HT) systems in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in mediating individual differences in motor impulsivity, notably the 5-HT2AR receptor (5-HT2AR) and 5-HT2CR. We investigated the hypothesis that differences in the ratio of 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR protein expression in mPFC would predict the individual level of motor impulsivity and that the engineered loss of the 5-HT2CR would result in high motor impulsivity concomitant with elevated 5-HT2AR expression and pharmacological sensitivity to the selective 5-HT2AR antagonist M100907. High and low impulsive rats were identified in a 1-choice serial reaction time task. Native protein levels of the 5-HT2AR and the 5-HT2CR predicted the intensity of motor impulsivity and the 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR ratio in mPFC positively correlated with levels of premature responses in individual outbred rats. The possibility that the 5-HT2AR and 5-HT2CR act in concert to control motor impulsivity is supported by the observation that high phenotypic motor impulsivity associated with a diminished mPFC synaptosomal 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR protein:protein interaction. Knockdown of mPFC 5-HT2CR resulted in increased motor impulsivity and triggered a functional disruption of the local 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR balance as evidenced by a compensatory upregulation of 5-HT2AR protein expression and a leftward shift in the potency of M100907 to suppress impulsive behavior. We infer that there is an interactive relationship between the mPFC 5-HT2AR and 5-HT2CR, and that a 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR imbalance may be a functionally relevant mechanism underlying motor impulsivity.

  14. Serotonin (5-HT) 5-HT2A Receptor (5-HT2AR):5-HT2CR Imbalance in Medial Prefrontal Cortex Associates with Motor Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Anastasio, Noelle C.; Stutz, Sonja J.; Fink, Latham H. L.; Swinford-Jackson, Sarah E.; Sears, Robert M; DiLeone, Ralph J.; Rice, Kenner C.; Moeller, F. Gerard; Cunningham, Kathryn A.

    2016-01-01

    A feature of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders is motor impulsivity. Recent studies have implicated serotonin (5-HT) systems in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in mediating individual differences in motor impulsivity, notably the 5-HT2AR receptor (5-HT2AR) and 5-HT2CR. We investigated the hypothesis that differences in the ratio of 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR protein expression in mPFC would predict the individual level of motor impulsivity and that the engineered loss of the 5-HT2CR would result in high motor impulsivity concomitant with elevated 5-HT2AR expression and pharmacological sensitivity to the selective 5-HT2AR antagonist M100907. High and low impulsive rats were identified in a 1-choice serial reaction time task. Native protein levels of the 5-HT2AR and the 5-HT2CR predicted the intensity of motor impulsivity and the 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR ratio in mPFC positively correlated with levels of premature responses in individual outbred rats. The possibility that the 5-HT2AR and 5-HT2CR act in concert to control motor impulsivity is supported by the observation that high phenotypic motor impulsivity associated with a diminished mPFC synaptosomal 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR protein:protein interaction. Knockdown of mPFC 5-HT2CR resulted in increased motor impulsivity and triggered a functional disruption of the local 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR balance as evidenced by a compensatory upregulation of 5-HT2AR protein expression and a leftward shift in the potency of M100907 to suppress impulsive behavior. We infer that there is an interactive relationship between the mPFC 5-HT2AR and 5-HT2CR, and that a 5-HT2AR:5-HT2CR imbalance may be a functionally-relevant mechanism underlying motor impulsivity. PMID:26120876

  15. An alternative hypothesis for high-T 40Ar/39Ar age spectrum discordance in polyphase extraterrestrial materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, W. S.; Shuster, D. L.; Renne, P. R.; Weiss, B. P.

    2009-12-01

    A common feature observed in 40Ar/39Ar age spectra of extraterrestrial (ET) rocks is a conspicuous decrease in the ages of high temperature extractions relative to lower temperature steps and a correlated increase in Ca/K, often succeeded by a monotonic increase in ages. This feature is routinely attributed to recoil-implanted 39Ar from a potassium (K)-rich donor phase into a K-poor receptor phase (e.g., 1,2). While 39Ar recoil redistribution is undoubtedly manifested in many terrestrial and ET 40Ar/39Ar whole-rock age spectra, it cannot easily explain the magnitude of high release temperature 40Ar*/39ArK anomalies observed in Martian meteorites ALH 84001 and Nakhla, as well as other course-grained meteorites and lunar rocks. Depending on the aliquot and sample, 50 - 100% of the pyroxene release spectra in ALH 84001 and Nakhla appear strongly perturbed to lower ages. As the mean recoil distance of 39Ar ~0.1 µm, the recoil hypothesis demands that a high-K phase be ubiquitously distributed amongst sub-micron to micron sized pyroxene crystals to account for the observed pyroxene age spectra. However, in both Nakhla and ALH 84001, pyroxene is often completely isolated from high-K phases and individual grains commonly exceed 100 µm in diameter. 40Ar/39Ar analyses of pyroxene-bearing terrestrial basalts, wherein fine-grained pyroxene and plagioclase are intimately adjoined, show that recoil-implanted 39Ar into pyroxene produces much less precipitous anomalies in 40Ar*/39ArK, as predicted by the recoil lengthscale. An alternative hypothesis is that whole-rock age spectra of ET samples with anomalously low ages at high temperatures may reflect diffusive 40Ar distributions within considerably degassed pyroxene grains. Owing to apparent differences in activation energies between glass and/or plagioclase and pyroxene, 40Ar may diffuse more rapidly from pyroxene under certain high-temperature conditions (i.e., above the temperature at which the extrapolated Ar Arrhenius

  16. The 40Ar/39Ar and K/Ar dating of lavas from the Hilo 1-km core hole, Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, W.D.; Turrin, B.D.; Renne, P.R.; Lanphere, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Mauna Kea lava flows cored in the HilIo hole range in age from <200 ka to about 400 ka based on 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating and K-Ar analyses of 16 groundmass samples and one coexisting plagioclase. The lavas, all subaerially deposited, include a lower section consisting only of tholeiitic basalts and an upper section of interbedded alkalic, transitional tholeiitic, and tholeiitic basalts. The lower section has yielded predominantly complex, discordant 40Ar/39Ar age spectra that result from mobility of 40Ar and perhaps K, the presence of excess 40Ar, and redistribution of 39Ar by recoil. Comparison of K-Ar ages with 40Ar/39Ar integrated ages indicates that some of these samples have also lost 39Ar. Nevertheless, two plateau ages of 391 ?? 40 and 400 ?? 26 ka from deep in the hole, combined with data from the upper section, show that the tholeiitic section accumulated at an average rate of about 7 to 8 m/kyr and has an mean recurrence interval of 0.5 kyr/flow unit. Samples from the upper section yield relatively precise 40Ar/39Ar plateau and isotope correlation ages of 326 ?? 23, 241 ?? 5, 232 ?? 4, and 199 ?? 9 ka for depths of -415.7 m to -299.2 m. Within their uncertainty, these ages define a linear relationship with depth, with an average accumulation rate of 0.9 m/kyr and an average recurrence interval of 4.8 kyr/flow unit. The top of the Mauna Kea sequence at -280 m must be older than the plateau age of 132 ?? 32 ka, obtained for the basal Mauna Loa flow in the corehole. The upward decrease in lava accumulation rate is a consequence of the decreasing magma supply available to Mauna Kea as it rode the Pacific plate away from its magma source, the Hawaiian mantle plume. The age-depth relation in the core hole may be used to test and refine models that relate the growth of Mauna Kea to the thermal and compositional structure of the mantle plume.

  17. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of submarine Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jicha, Brian R.; Rhodes, J. Michael; Singer, Brad S.; Garcia, Michael O.

    2012-09-01

    New geochronologic constraints refine the growth history of Mauna Loa volcano and enhance interpretations of the petrologic, geochemical, and isotopic evolution of Hawaiian magmatism. We report results of 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating experiments on low-K, tholeiitic lavas from the 1.6 km high Kahuku landslide scarp cutting Mauna Loa's submarine southwest rift zone, and from lavas in a deeper section of the rift. Obtaining precise40Ar/39Ar ages from young, tholeiitic lavas containing only 0.2-0.3 wt.% K2O is challenging due to their extremely low radiogenic 40Ar contents. Analyses of groundmass from 45 lavas yield 14 new age determinations (31% success rate) with plateau and isochron ages that agree with stratigraphic constraints. Lavas collected from a 1250 m thick section in the landslide scarp headwall were all erupted around 470 ± 10 ka, implying an extraordinary period of accumulation of ˜25 mm/yr, possibly correlating with the peak of the shield-building stage. This rate is three times higher than the estimated vertical lava accumulation rate for shield-building at Mauna Kea (8.6 ± 3.1 mm/yr) based on results from the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project. Between ˜470 and 273 ka, the lava accumulation rate along the southwest rift zone decreased dramatically to ˜1 mm/yr. We propose that the marked reduction in lava accumulation rate does not mark the onset of post-shield volcanism as previously suggested, but rather indicates the upward migration of the magma system as Mauna Loa evolved from a submarine stage of growth to one that is predominantly subaerial, thereby cutting off supply to the distal rift zone. Prior to ˜250 ka, lavas with Loihi-like isotopic signatures were erupted along with lavas having typical Mauna Loa values, implying greater heterogeneity in the plume source earlier in Mauna Loa's growth. In addition to refining accumulation rates and the isotopic evolution of the lavas erupted along the southwest rift zone, our new40Ar/39Ar results

  18. 40Ar/39Ar dating of tuff vents in the Campi Flegrei caldera (southern Italy): Toward a new chronostratigraphic reconstruction of the Holocene volcanic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fedele, L.; Insinga, D.D.; Calvert, A.T.; Morra, V.; Perrotta, A.; Scarpati, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Campi Flegrei hosts numerous monogenetic vents inferred to be younger than the 15 ka Neapolitan Yellow Tuff. Sanidine crystals from the three young Campi Flegrei vents of Fondi di Baia, Bacoli and Nisida were dated using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. These vents, together with several other young edifices, occur roughly along the inner border of the Campi Flegrei caldera, suggesting that the volcanic conduits are controlled by caldera-bounding faults. Plateau ages of ∼9.6 ka (Fondi di Baia), ∼8.6 ka (Bacoli) and ∼3.9 ka (Nisida) indicate eruptive activity during intervals previously interpreted as quiescent. A critical revision, involving calendar age correction of literature 14C data and available 40Ar/39Ar age data, is presented. A new reference chronostratigraphic framework for Holocene Phlegrean activity, which significantly differs from the previously adopted ones, is proposed. This has important implications for understanding the Campi Flegrei eruptive history and, ultimately, for the evaluation of related volcanic risk and hazard, for which the inferred history of its recent activity is generally taken into account.

  19. Paleoclimate change in the Nakuru basin, Kenya, at 119 - 109 ka derived from δ18Odiatom and diatom assemblages and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergner, Andreas; Deino, Alan; Leng, Melanie; Gasse, Francoise

    2016-04-01

    A 4.5m-thick diatomite bed deposited during the cold interval of the penultimate interglacial at ~119 - 109 ka documents a period in which a deep freshwater lake filled the Nakuru basin in the Central Kenya Rift (CKR), East Africa. Palaeohydrological conditions of the basin are reconstructed for the paleolake highstand using δ18Odiatom and characterization of diatom assemblages. The age of the diatomite deposit is established by precise 40Ar/39Ar-dating of intercalated pumice tuffs. The paleolake experienced multiple hydrological fluctuations on sub-orbital (~1,500 to 2,000 years) time scales. The magnitude of the δ18Odiatom change (+/- 3‰) and significant changes in the plankton-littoral ratio of the diatom assemblage (+/- 25%) suggest that the paleolake record can be interpreted in the context of long-term climatic change in East Africa. Using 40Ar/39Ar age control and nominal diatomite-sedimentation rates we establish a simplified age model of paleohydrological vs. climatic change, from which we conclude that more humid conditions prevailed in equatorial East Africa during the late Pleistocene over a relatively long time interval of several thousands years. Then, extreme insolation at eccentricity maximum and weakened zonal air-pressure gradients in the tropics favored intensified ITCZ-like convection over East Africa and deep-freshwater lake conditions.

  20. Daily electronic self-monitoring of subjective and objective symptoms in bipolar disorder—the MONARCA trial protocol (MONitoring, treAtment and pRediCtion of bipolAr disorder episodes): a randomised controlled single-blind trial

    PubMed Central

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria; Vinberg, Maj; Christensen, Ellen Margrethe; Frost, Mads; Bardram, Jakob; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Electronic self-monitoring of affective symptoms using cell phones is suggested as a practical and inexpensive way to monitor illness activity and identify early signs of affective symptoms. It has never been tested in a randomised clinical trial whether electronic self-monitoring improves outcomes in bipolar disorder. We are conducting a trial testing the effect of using a Smartphone for self-monitoring in bipolar disorder. Methods We developed the MONARCA application for Android-based Smartphones, allowing patients suffering from bipolar disorder to do daily self-monitoring—including an interactive feedback loop between patients and clinicians through a web-based interface. The effect of the application was tested in a parallel-group, single-blind randomised controlled trial so far including 78 patients suffering from bipolar disorder in the age group 18–60 years who were given the use of a Smartphone with the MONARCA application (intervention group) or to the use of a cell phone without the application (placebo group) during a 6-month study period. The study was carried out from September 2011. The outcomes were changes in affective symptoms (primary), social functioning, perceived stress, self-rated depressive and manic symptoms, quality of life, adherence to medication, stress and cognitive functioning (secondary and tertiary). Analysis Recruitment is ongoing. Ethics Ethical permission has been obtained. Dissemination Positive, neutral and negative findings of the study will be published. Registration details The trial is approved by the Regional Ethics Committee in The Capital Region of Denmark (H-2-2011-056) and The Danish Data Protection Agency (2013-41-1710). The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT01446406. PMID:23883891

  1. Controlled reshaping of the front surface of the cornea through its full-area ablation outside of the optical zone with a Gaussian ArF excimer laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semchishen, A. V.; Semchishen, V. A.

    2014-01-01

    We studied in vitro the response of the topography of the cornea to its full-area laser ablation (the laser beam spot diameter is commensurable with the size of the interface) outside of the central zone with an excimer laser having a Gaussian fluence distribution across the beam. Subject to investigation were the topographically controlled surface changes of the anterior cornea in 60 porcine eyes with a 5 ± 1.25-diopter artificially induced astigmatism, the changes being caused by laser ablation of the stromal collagen in two 3.5-mm-dia. circular areas along the weaker astigmatism axis. Experimental relationships are presented between the actual astigmatism correction and the expected correction for the intact optical zones 1, 2, 3, and 4 mm in diameter. The data for each zone were approximated by the least-squares method with the function d = a + bx. The coefficient b is given with the root-mean-square error. The statistical processing of the data yielded the following results: d = (0.14 ± 0.037)x for the 1-mm-dia. optical zone, (1.10 ± 0.036)x for the 2-mm-dia. optical zone, (1.04 ± 0.020)x for the 3-mm-dia. optical zone, and (0.55 ± 0.04)x for the 4-mm-dia. optical zone. Full astigmatism correction was achieved with ablation effected outside of the 3-mm-dia. optical zone. The surface changes of the cornea are shown to be due not only to the removal of the corneal tissue, but also to the biomechanical topographic response of the cornea to its strain caused by the formation of a dense pseudomembrane in the ablation area.

  2. A single cell level measurement of StAR expression and activity in adrenal cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinwoo; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Dong, Hui; Jefcoate, Colin

    2017-02-05

    The Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) directs mitochondrial cholesterol uptake through a C-terminal cholesterol binding domain (CBD) and a 62 amino acid N-terminal regulatory domain (NTD) that contains an import sequence and conserved sites for inner membrane metalloproteases. Deletion of the NTD prevents mitochondrial import while maintaining steroidogenesis but with compromised cholesterol homeostasis. The rapid StAR-mediated cholesterol transfer in adrenal cells depends on concerted mRNA translation, p37 StAR phosphorylation and controlled NTD cleavage. The NTD controls this process with two cAMP-inducible modulators of, respectively, transcription and translation SIK1 and TIS11b/Znf36l1. High-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (HR-FISH) of StAR RNA resolves slow RNA splicing at the gene loci in cAMP-induced Y-1 cells and transfer of individual 3.5 kB mRNA molecules to mitochondria. StAR transcription depends on the CREB coactivator CRTC2 and PKA inhibition of the highly inducible suppressor kinase SIK1 and a basal counterpart SIK2. PKA-inducible TIS11b/Znf36l1 binds specifically to highly conserved elements in exon 7 thereby suppressing formation of mRNA and subsequent translation. Co-expression of SIK1, Znf36l1 with 3.5 kB StAR mRNA may limit responses to pulsatile signaling by ACTH while regulating the transition to more prolonged stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hormonal regulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in gonadal tissues of the Atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus).

    PubMed

    Nunez, B Scott; Evans, Andrew N

    2007-02-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), a member of the StAR-related lipid transfer domain (START) family, is critical to regulated steroidogenesis in vertebrates. We have isolated a cDNA encoding StAR from a well-studied model of teleost physiology, the Atlantic croaker Micropogonias undulatus. This cDNA (1204 nucleotides total length) contains an open reading frame of 858 nucleotides encoding a protein of 286 amino acids. Molecular phylogenetic analysis indicates the putative Atlantic croaker StAR protein is more closely related to StAR proteins (62-85% identity) than to the related START protein MLN-64 (28-31% identity). Green monkey kidney cells (COS-1) cotransfected with Atlantic croaker StAR and human cholesterol side chain cleavage (SCC) expression constructs are able to produce significantly more pregnenolone than cells transfected with SCC alone. StAR mRNA is detected in the Atlantic croaker head kidney by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in the kidney and hypothalamus in some individuals. Gonadal StAR gene expression is below the level of detection by RT-PCR in most individuals, but can be detected using fluorescent probes in quantitative RT-PCR. StAR mRNA is not detected in the Atlantic croaker brain. Six hour in vitro treatment of Atlantic croaker ovarian follicles with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is insufficient to significantly alter StAR mRNA levels; however, 24 h hCG treatment induces StAR mRNA levels 17-fold over untreated controls. Neither 6 nor 24 h treatment with hCG significantly alters StAR mRNA levels in Atlantic croaker testicular minces. Likewise, 6h in vitro treatment with estradiol, testosterone or the maturation-inducing steroid 17,20beta,21-trihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one is without effect on gonadal StAR mRNA levels.

  4. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Growth Suppression of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR Prostate Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Eric C.

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) mediates the developmental, physiologic, and pathologic effects of androgens including 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). However, the mechanisms whereby AR regulates growth suppression and differentiation of luminal epithelial cells in the prostate gland and proliferation of malignant versions of these cells are not well understood, though they are central to prostate development, homeostasis, and neoplasia. Here, we identify androgen-responsive genes that restrain cell cycle progression and proliferation of human prostate epithelial cell lines (HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR), and we investigate the mechanisms through which AR regulates their expression. DHT inhibited proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, and cell cycle analysis revealed a prolonged G1 interval. In the cell cycle, the G1/S-phase transition is initiated by the activity of cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) complexes, which relieve growth suppression. In HPr-1AR, cyclin D1/2 and CDK4/6 mRNAs were androgen-repressed, whereas CDK inhibitor, CDKN1A, mRNA was androgen-induced. The regulation of these transcripts was AR-dependent, and involved multiple mechanisms. Similar AR-mediated down-regulation of CDK4/6 mRNAs and up-regulation of CDKN1A mRNA occurred in PC3-Lenti-AR. Further, CDK4/6 overexpression suppressed DHT-inhibited cell cycle progression and proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, whereas CDKN1A overexpression induced cell cycle arrest. We therefore propose that AR-mediated growth suppression of HPr-1AR involves cyclin D1 mRNA decay, transcriptional repression of cyclin D2 and CDK4/6, and transcriptional activation of CDKN1A, which serve to decrease CDK4/6 activity. AR-mediated inhibition of PC3-Lenti-AR proliferation occurs through a similar mechanism, albeit without down-regulation of cyclin D. Our findings provide insight into AR-mediated regulation of prostate epithelial cell proliferation. PMID:26372468

  5. Lin28 Induces Resistance to Anti-Androgens Via Promotion of AR Splice Variant Generation

    PubMed Central

    Tummala, Ramakumar; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Lou, Wei; Evans, Christopher P.; Gao, Allen C.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prostate cancer (PCa) is androgen-dependent initially and progresses to a castration-resistant state after androgen deprivation therapy. Treatment options for castration-resistant PCa include the potent second-generation anti-androgen enzalutamide or CYP17A1 inhibitor abiraterone. Recent clinical observations point to the development of resistance to these therapies which may be mediated by constitutively active alternative splice variants of the androgen receptor (AR). METHODS Sensitivity of LNCaP cells overexpressing Lin28 (LN-Lin28) to enzalutamide, abiraterone, or bicalutamide was compared to that of control LN-neo cells using cell growth assays, proliferation assays using MTT, anchorage-dependent clonogenic ability assays and soft agar assays. Ability of LN-Lin28 cells to maintain AR activation after treatment with enzalutamide, abiraterone, or bicalutamide was tested using immunofluorescence, Western blotting, ChIP assays, and qRT-PCR. Importance of Lin28 in enzalutamide resistance was assessed by the downregulation of Lin28 expression in C4-2B and 22Rv1 cells chronically treated with enzalutamide. Requirement for sustained AR signaling in LN-Lin28 cells was examined by the downregulation of either full length AR or AR-V7 using siRNA. RESULTS We show that Lin28 promotes the development of resistance to currently used targeted therapeutics by enhancing the expression of AR splice variants such as AR-V7. PCa cells overexpressing Lin28 exhibit resistance to treatment with enzalutamide, abiraterone, or bicalutamide. Downregulation of Lin28 resensitizes enzalutamide-resistant PCa cells to enzalutamide treatment. We also show that the upregulation of splicing factors such as hnRNPA1 by Lin28 may mediate the enhanced generation of AR splice variants in Lin28-expressing cells. CONCLUSIONS Our findings suggest that Lin28 plays a key role in the acquisition of resistance to AR-targeted therapies by PCa cells and establish the importance of Lin28 in PCa

  6. Lin28 induces resistance to anti-androgens via promotion of AR splice variant generation.

    PubMed

    Tummala, Ramakumar; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Lou, Wei; Evans, Christopher P; Gao, Allen C

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is androgen-dependent initially and progresses to a castration-resistant state after androgen deprivation therapy. Treatment options for castration-resistant PCa include the potent second-generation anti-androgen enzalutamide or CYP17A1 inhibitor abiraterone. Recent clinical observations point to the development of resistance to these therapies which may be mediated by constitutively active alternative splice variants of the androgen receptor (AR). Sensitivity of LNCaP cells overexpressing Lin28 (LN-Lin28) to enzalutamide, abiraterone, or bicalutamide was compared to that of control LN-neo cells using cell growth assays, proliferation assays using MTT, anchorage-dependent clonogenic ability assays and soft agar assays. Ability of LN-Lin28 cells to maintain AR activation after treatment with enzalutamide, abiraterone, or bicalutamide was tested using immunofluorescence, Western blotting, ChIP assays, and qRT-PCR. Importance of Lin28 in enzalutamide resistance was assessed by the downregulation of Lin28 expression in C4-2B and 22Rv1 cells chronically treated with enzalutamide. Requirement for sustained AR signaling in LN-Lin28 cells was examined by the downregulation of either full length AR or AR-V7 using siRNA. We show that Lin28 promotes the development of resistance to currently used targeted therapeutics by enhancing the expression of AR splice variants such as AR-V7. PCa cells overexpressing Lin28 exhibit resistance to treatment with enzalutamide, abiraterone, or bicalutamide. Downregulation of Lin28 resensitizes enzalutamide-resistant PCa cells to enzalutamide treatment. We also show that the upregulation of splicing factors such as hnRNPA1 by Lin28 may mediate the enhanced generation of AR splice variants in Lin28-expressing cells. Our findings suggest that Lin28 plays a key role in the acquisition of resistance to AR-targeted therapies by PCa cells and establish the importance of Lin28 in PCa progression. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Preparation of water and ice samples for 39Ar dating by atom trap trace analysis (ATTA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwefel, R.; Reichel, T.; Aeschbach-Hertig, W.; Wagenbach, D.

    2012-04-01

    Atom trap trace analysis (ATTA) is a new and promising method to measure very rare noble gas radioisotopes in the environment. The applicability of this method for the dating of very old groundwater with 81Kr has already been demonstrated [1]. Recent developments now show its feasibility also for the analysis of 39Ar [2,3], which is an ideal dating tracer for the age range between 50 and 1000 years. This range is of interest in the fields of hydro(geo)logy, oceanography, and glaciology. We present preparation (gas extraction and Ar separation) methods for groundwater and ice samples for later analysis by the ATTA technique. For groundwater, the sample size is less of a limitation than for applications in oceanography or glaciology. Large samples are furthermore needed to enable a comparison with the classical method of 39Ar detection by low-level counting. Therefore, a system was built that enables gas extraction from several thousand liters of water using membrane contactors. This system provides degassing efficiencies greater than 80 % and has successfully been tested in the field. Gas samples are further processed to separate a pure Ar fraction by a gas-chromatographic method based on Li-LSX zeolite as selective adsorber material at very low temperatures. The gas separation achieved by this system is controlled by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. It has successfully been tested and used on real samples. The separation efficiency was found to be strongly temperature dependent in the range of -118 to -130 °C. Since ATTA should enable the analysis of 39Ar on samples of less than 1 ccSTP of Ar (corresponding to about 100 ml of air, 2.5 l of water or 1 kg of ice), a method to separate Ar from small amounts of gas was developed. Titanium sponge was found to absorb 60 ccSTP of reactive gases per g of the getter material with reasonably high absorption rates at high operating temperatures (~ 800 ° C). Good separation (higher than 92 % Ar content in residual gas) was

  8. One-electron pseudopotential investigation of the RbAr and FrAr van der Waals systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhiflaoui, J.; Berriche, H.

    2012-12-01

    The potential energy curves of the ground state and many excited states of RbAr and FrAr van der Waals systems have been determined using a one-electron pseudopotential approach. The pseudopotential technique is used to replace the effect of the Rb+ and Fr+ cores and the electron-Ar interaction. In addition a core-core interaction is included. This has permitted to reduce the number of active electrons of the RbAr and FrAr systems to only one electron, the valence electron. This has led to use very large basis sets for Rb, Fr and Ar atoms. In this context, the potential energy curves of the ground and many excited states are performed at the SCF level. The core-core interactions for Rb+Ar and Fr+Ar are included using the CCSD(T) accurate potentials of Hickling et al. [H. Hickling, L. Viehland, D. Shepherd, P. Soldan, E. Lee and T. Wright, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 6 (2004) 4233]. In addition, the spectroscopic constants of these states are derived and compared with the available theoretical works. Such comparison for RbAr has shown a very good agreement for the ground and the first excited states. However, the FrAr system was not studied previously and its spectroscopic constants are presented here for the first time.

  9. A method for intercalibration of U-Th-Pb and 40Ar- 39Ar ages in the Phanerozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villeneuve, Mike; Sandeman, Hamish A.; Davis, William J.

    2000-12-01

    The increasing analytical precision of 40Ar- 39Ar geochronological data and its use in studies that combine U-Pb and 40Ar- 39Ar data has necessitated derivation of a means to intercalibrate ages between the two isotopic systems. The primary determinants inhibiting accurate cross calibration are uncertainty in decay constant values and uncertainty in 40Ar∗/ 40K (usually presented as apparent age) for 40Ar- 39Ar standards, notably those derived from the Fish Canyon Tuff. By utilizing a monazite- and biotite bearing Oligocene ash flow tuff (MAC-83) as the primary standard material, precise U-Th-Pb and 40Ar- 39Ar ages can be derived. Because both isotopic systems should reflect closure during the instantaneous eruption event, the 24.21 ± 0.10 Ma 207Pb/ 235U age should match the age resulting from 40Ar- 39Ar biotite analysis. This forced equivalence will partly offset the effects of decay constant uncertainty. Furthermore, by co-irradiating Fish Canyon Tuff sanidine with MAC-83 biotite, the apparent age for Fish Canyon Tuff sanidine is back-calculated to 27.98 ± 0.15 Ma, relative to the MAC-83 207Pb/ 235U age. Hence, intercalibration between the two isotopic systems in a relative sense can be accomplished, allowing for a direct and valid comparison of ages. It is also shown that forcing equivalence of the two isotopic systems minimizes the effect of decay constant uncertainty for samples of Phanerozoic age.

  10. Step heating of 40Ar/ 39Ar standard mineral mixtures: Investigation of a fine-grained bulk sediment provenance tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanLaningham, Sam; Mark, Darren F.

    2011-05-01

    Quantitative techniques that link sediments to their sources are needed to understand a range of tectonic, climate, and anthropogenic driven Earth surface processes. Many provenance techniques exist for sand-sized material but fewer are available for fine-grained sediment archives. In this respect, bulk 40Ar/ 39Ar ages from silt-sized sediment show potential, but many questions remain about the significance of a bulk sediment 40Ar/ 39Ar age. We interrogate bulk sediment 40Ar/ 39Ar ages by step heating mixtures of well-constrained 40Ar/ 39Ar mineral standards crushed to silt-sized. Silt-sized end member components Alder Creek Sanidine, Taylor Creek Sanidine and Heidelberg Biotite all yield plateau ages within uncertainty of their coarse-grained counterparts. High-resolution step heating (as many as 43 steps) of the mineral mixtures shows that biotite degasses first at lower temperatures compared to the two sanidines that degas generally in concert. Concordant age steps develop at both low and high temperatures and the transition from the isotope signal being dominated by one mineral phase to another is clearly observed. We show that age spectra for the mineral standard mixtures can be modeled and predicted for all mixtures by assuming a (simplistic) Gaussian distributed release of Ar, and by using the degassing maxima, variance, K concentration, and 40Ar/ 39Ar age of each monitor mineral. Thus, bulk sediment 40Ar/ 39Ar ages can be robust indicators of the average cooling/crystallization age of all contributing K-bearing minerals to a depositional center. Furthermore, we discuss the potential to deconvolve individual mineral age populations by model inversion. The application of this bulk sediment provenance technique should not be considered a replacement for single grain analyses. It should be applied to environments that do not provide sand-sized sediment archives (e.g., distal terrigenous sedimentary archives) when information about source changes through time

  11. Eurekan deformation on Prins Karls Forland, Svalbard - new insights from Ar40/Ar39 muscovite dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faehnrich, Karol; Schneider, David; Manecki, Maciej; Czerny, Jerzy; Myhre, Per Inge; Majka, Jarosław; Kośmińska, Karolina; Barnes, Christopher; Maraszewska, Maria

    2017-04-01

    Eurekan deformation has been proven to be a complex sequence of tectonic episodes, dominated by compression in the Circum Arctic region. It was associated with early Cenozoic collision of Eurasia, North America and Greenland plates producing fold-thrust belt style of deformation. Timing of this enigmatic event has not yet been extensively resolved by radiometric dating (Piepjohn et al. 2016, Journal of the Geological Society, 173(6), 1007-1024). Reinhardt et al. (2013, Z. Dt. Ges. Geowiss., 164 (1), 131-147) dated syn-tectonic volcanic ashes at c. 60 Ma and 54 Ma on Ellesmere Island, Canada. Tagner et al. (2011, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 303(3), 203-214) interpreted c. 49-47 Ma 40Ar/39Ar ages on trachyte flows in northern Greenland as peak compression during the Eurekan event. On Svalbard, Tessensohn et al. (2001, Geologisches Jahrbuch, B 91, 83-104) reported K/Ar whole rock ages ranging from c. 67 to 49 Ma for the slates from Svartfjella-Eidembukta-Daudmannsodden Lineament. Bentonite layers in the Central Tertiary Basin are as young as c. 56 Ma (Charles et al. 2011, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 12, 1-19), predating latest deformation. Moreover, Barnes et al (2017, in prep.) applied (U-Th)/He thermochronology along the western margin of Svalbard and resolved Early to Middle Eocene heating, likely documenting burial related to thrusting. Here we present new results from 40Ar/39Ar muscovite dating of ductile to brittle shear zone on Prins Karls Forland, Svalbard, indicating Eurekan age of thrusting. Prins Karls Forland is dominated by Neoproterozoic siliciclastic metasediments (comprising Caledonian basement) regionally metamorphosed to greenschist facies conditions. A ˜1 km wide ductile to brittle shear zone (the Bouréefjellet shear zone) separates the amphibolite facies Pinkie Unit from the lower grade upper structural unit, the Grampianfjella Formation (Faehnrich et al. 2016, EGU 2016). The age of the amphibolite facies metamorphism (c. 370-355 Ma

  12. Progress on using deuteron-deuteron fusion generated neutrons for 40Ar/39Ar sample irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutte, Daniel; Renne, Paul R.; Becker, Tim; Waltz, Cory; Ayllon Unzueta, Mauricio; Zimmerman, Susan; Hidy, Alan; Finkel, Robert; Bauer, Joseph D.; Bernstein, Lee; van Bibber, Karl

    2017-04-01

    We present progress on the development and proof of concept of a deuteron-deuteron fusion based neutron generator for 40Ar/39Ar sample irradiation. Irradiation with deuteron-deuteron fusion neutrons is anticipated to reduce Ar recoil and Ar production from interfering reactions. This will allow dating of smaller grains and increase accuracy and precision of the method. The instrument currently achieves neutron fluxes of ˜9×107 cm-2s-1 as determined by irradiation of indium foils and use of the activation reaction 115In(n,n')115mIn. Multiple foils and simulations were used to determine flux gradients in the sample chamber. A first experiment quantifying the loss of 39Ar is underway and will likely be available at the time of the presentation of this abstract. In ancillary experiments via irradiation of K salts and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis we determined the cross-sections of the 39K(n,p)39Ar reaction at ˜2.8 MeV to be 160 ± 35 mb (1σ). This result is in good agreement with bracketing cross-section data of ˜96 mb at ˜2.45 MeV and ˜270 mb at ˜4 MeV [Johnson et al., 1967; Dixon and Aitken, 1961 and Bass et al. 1964]. Our data disfavor a much lower value of ˜45 mb at 2.59 MeV [Lindström & Neuer, 1958]. In another ancillary experiment the cross section for 39K(n,α)36Cl at ˜2.8 MeV was determined as 11.7 ± 0.5 mb (1σ), which is significant for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology due to subsequent decay to 36Ar as well as for the determination of production rates of cosmogenic 36Cl. Additional experiments resolving the cross section functions on 39K between 1.5 and 3.6 MeV are on their way using the LICORNE neutron source of the IPN Orsay tandem accelerator. Results will likely be available at the time of the presentation of this abstract. While the neutron generator is designed for fluxes of ˜109 cm-2s-1, arcing in the sample chamber currently limits the power—straightforwardly correlated to the neutron flux—the generator can safely be run at. Further

  13. Properties of Ar at extreme compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greeff, C. W.

    2017-01-01

    I present results from DFT calculations on the equation of state of Ar. These include static lattice, phonon, and first principles molecular dynamics calculations on solid and liquid phases. The calculations extend beyond the metallization transition, which is thought to occur near a density of 9 g/cm3. The QMD room temperature isotherm agrees well with experiment, while the Hugoniot shows some potentially significant differences. Various measures of the Grüneisen parameter, γ, are compared. It is found that in the solid, γ decreases rapidly under compression, and reaches values less than 1/2 at a densities of 12 g/cm3. The liquid Grüneisen parameter is determined from QMD simulations. It is found to have the anomalously low value of 0.2 above melting at ρ = 11 g/cm3. At this density, it is an increasing function of temperature, in contrast to lower densities.

  14. ARS turns fifteen: la quinceañera bonita.

    PubMed

    Sen, Chandan K

    2013-01-01

    ARS was aimed at advancing the erstwhile niche field of redox biology to a more central position in research. Currently, ARS ranks first (impact factor: 8.456) in the field of redox biology. Of 8336 journals listed in Journal Citation Reports, ARS ranks 205th. The next journal in redox biology ranks 449th. ARS ranks 169th of 8336 in immediacy index. The next journal in redox biology ranks 923rd. Thus, ARS is the primary source of hot papers in redox sciences and healthcare. To grow footprint and overall impact, ARS has nearly doubled the annual publication volume from roughly 200 to 400 in one year. Because the manuscript volume represents the denominator of the impact factor calculation, such a sharp increase in volume would be predicted to a proportionally lower impact factor. Because of the robust current upward momentum, ARS will be affected less than that predicted by simple arithmetic and will maintain its top position even after such aggressive volume expansion. As another year passes, the additional manuscripts will get more time to be cited, and therefore the impact factor is expected to bounce back resulting in a much stronger journal with a substantially enhanced overall presence. ARS currently publishes 36 issues annually as two series: ARS-Discoveries, and ARS-Therapeutics. Redox biology does have the potential of major health impact. ARS-Therapeutics is the first and only forum dedicated to highlight that strength. I am grateful to the global redox village for their unreserved support to raise ARS and this fascinating field of redox research and healthcare. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1-4.

  15. Unmixing 40Ar/39Ar Muscovite Ages Using Powder X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAleer, R. J.; Kunk, M. J.; Valley, P. M.; Walsh, G. J.; Bish, D. L.; Wintsch, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    Whole rock powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments from eight samples collected across a retrograde ductile shear zone in the Devonian Littleton Formation near Claremont, NH, exhibit broad and asymmetric to bimodal muscovite 00l reflections. These composite 00l reflections exhibit a systematic change in shape with increasing retrograde strain. Microtextural relationships, electron microprobe quantitative analyses, and element mapping indicate that the change in peak shape reflects progressive dissolution of metastable Na-rich muscovite and the precipitation of stable Na-poor muscovite. 40Ar/39Ar step heating experiments on muscovite concentrates from these samples show a decrease in total gas age from 274 to 258 Ma as the highest strain zone is approached, and steps within individual spectra range in age by ~20 m.y. The correlation between age and 00l peak shape suggests that the argon isotopic system also tracks the dissolution-precipitation process. Furthermore, the variation in age during step heating indicates that these populations exhibit different in-vacuo degassing behavior. Comparison of whole rock and muscovite concentrate XRD patterns from the same samples shows that the mineral separation process can fractionate these muscovite populations. With this knowledge, four muscovite concentrates were prepared from a single hand sample, analyzed by XRD, and dated. Combining modal estimates from XRD experiments with total gas ages, the four splits narrowly define a mixing line that resolves end-member ages of 250 and 300 Ma for the neocrystallized and earlier high grade populations of muscovite, respectively. These ages are consistent with age data from all other samples. The results show that, in some settings, powder XRD provides a powerful and time effective method to both identify the existence of and establish the proportions of multiple compositional populations of muscovite prior to 40Ar/39Ar analysis. This approach will be especially useful in

  16. Androgen Receptor Variants and Prostate Cancer in Humanized AR Mice

    PubMed Central

    Albertelli, Megan A.; O’Mahony, Orla A.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Androgen, acting via the androgen receptor (AR), is central to male development, differentiation and hormone-dependent diseases such as prostate cancer. AR is actively involved in the initiation of prostate cancer, the transition to androgen independence, and many mechanisms of resistance to therapy. To examine genetic variation of AR in cancer, we created mice by germ-line gene targeting in which human AR sequence replaces that of the mouse. Since shorter length of a polymorphic N-terminal glutamine (Q) tract has been linked to prostate cancer risk, we introduced alleles with 12, 21 or 48 Qs to test this association. The three “humanized” AR mouse strains (h/mAR) are normal physiologically, as well as by cellular and molecular criteria, although slight differences are detected in AR target gene expression, correlating inversely with Q tract length. However, distinct allele-dependent differences in tumorigenesis are evident when these mice are crossed to a transgenic prostate cancer model. Remarkably, Q tract variation also differentially impacts disease progression following androgen depletion. This finding emphasizes the importance of AR function in androgen-independent as well as –dependent disease. These mice provide a novel genetic paradigm in which to dissect opposing functions of AR in tumor suppression vs. oncogenesis. PMID:17936615

  17. Practical reactor production of 41Ar from argon clathrate.

    PubMed

    Mercer, J R; Duke, M J; McQuarrie, S A

    2000-06-01

    The radionuclide 41Ar has many ideal properties as a gas flow tracer. However, the modest cross-section of 40Ar for thermal neutron activation makes preparation of suitable activities of 41Ar technically difficult particularly for low flux reactors. Argon can however be trapped in a molecular complex called a clathrate that can then be irradiated. We prepared argon clathrate and explored its irradiation and stability characteristics. Argon clathrate can be used to provide gigabecquerel quantities of 41Ar even with low power reactors.

  18. A Transferencia do Controle da Educacao da Igreja para o Estado (The Transfer of Educational Control from the Church to the State).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Marcos

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes the principal phases in the historical process of the occidental world that resulted in the transfer of educational control from the church to the state, demonstrating some of the consequences of this historic turn. (BT)

  19. A Transferencia do Controle da Educacao da Igreja para o Estado (The Transfer of Educational Control from the Church to the State).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Marcos

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes the principal phases in the historical process of the occidental world that resulted in the transfer of educational control from the church to the state, demonstrating some of the consequences of this historic turn. (BT)

  20. Water contamination control: Guide for project planning and financing. Technical paper. Control de la contaminacion del agua: Guias para la planificacion y financiamiento de proyectos

    SciTech Connect

    Palange, R.C.; Zavala, A.

    1989-01-01

    This report provides guidelines for administrators, supervisors, and others involved in decision making to satisfy the need for facilities to control water contamination, but who possibly lack specialized training in engineering, economics, financial administration, or other pertinent specialties.

  1. 40Ar/39Ar ages from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California: Age of the Cobb Mountain Normal-Polarity Subchron revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turrin, Brent D.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Carter Hearn, B., Jr.

    1994-03-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California, indicate a 1.186 ±0.006 Ma age for the Cobb Mountain Normal-Polarity Subchron. The new age is statistically older (α = 0.05) than the previously reported K-Ar age (1.12 ±0.02 Ma) and agrees with the age suggested by the astronomical polarity time scale. Incomplete extraction of radiogenic 40Ar (40Ar*) from the sanidine is the most likely reason for the disparity between the 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar ages. Because the Cobb Mountain subchron is a worldwide, short-duration event, and because no widely used interlaboratory 40Ar/39Ar standard younger than 27 Ma exists, we propose that sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek be considered for use as a new Quaternary 40Ar/39Ar mineral standard.

  2. 40Ar/39Ar ages from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California: age of the Cobb Mountain normal-polarity subchron revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turrin, B.D.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Hearn, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek, California, indicate a 1.186 ?? 0.006 Ma age for the Cobb Mountain Normal-Polarity Subchron. The hew age is statistically older (?? = 0.05) than the previously reported K-Ar age (1.12 ?? 0.02 Ma) and agrees with the age suggested by the astronomical polarity time scale. Incomplete extraction of radiogenic 40Ar (40Ar*) from the sanidine is the most likely reason for the disparity between the 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar ages. Because the Cobb Mountain subchron is a worldwide, short-duration event, and because no widely used interlaboratory 40Ar/39Ar standard younger than 27 Ma exists, it is proposed that sanidine from the rhyolite of Alder Creek be considered for use as a new Quaternary 40Ar/39Ar mineral standard. -Authors

  3. (Ar-39)-(Ar-40) dating of mesosiderites - Evidence for major parent body disruption less than 4 Ga ago

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Jordan, J. L.; Garrison, D. H.; Mittlefehldt, D.

    1990-01-01

    The (Ar-39) (Ar-40) chronologies were determined for 14 different mesosiderites representing the full range of classification according to recrystallization, and these chronologies were compared with analogous data for other meteorite types and for lunar highland rocks. Results of Ar-Ar chronologies indicate the history of a degassing of Ar due to a major thermal event that occurred less than 3.9 Ga ago; this event is not the metal-silicate mixing event, which is known to have occurred earlier than 4.4 Ga ago. It is suggested that a major collisional disruption-reassembly event less than 3.9 Ga ago took place, leaving the metal-silicate breccias buried under tens of kilometers of rubble, where they cooled slowly through the Ar closure temperatures.

  4. (Ar-39)-(Ar-40) dating of mesosiderites - Evidence for major parent body disruption less than 4 Ga ago

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Jordan, J. L.; Garrison, D. H.; Mittlefehldt, D.

    1990-01-01

    The (Ar-39) (Ar-40) chronologies were determined for 14 different mesosiderites representing the full range of classification according to recrystallization, and these chronologies were compared with analogous data for other meteorite types and for lunar highland rocks. Results of Ar-Ar chronologies indicate the history of a degassing of Ar due to a major thermal event that occurred less than 3.9 Ga ago; this event is not the metal-silicate mixing event, which is known to have occurred earlier than 4.4 Ga ago. It is suggested that a major collisional disruption-reassembly event less than 3.9 Ga ago took place, leaving the metal-silicate breccias buried under tens of kilometers of rubble, where they cooled slowly through the Ar closure temperatures.

  5. Ar-39 - Ar-40 Evidence for an Approximately 4.26 Ga Impact Heating Event on the LL Parent Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, E. T.; Bogard, D. D.; Rubin, A. E.

    2003-01-01

    Miller Range 99301 is a type 6, unbrecciated LL chondrite. MIL 99301 is of interest because some compositional and petrographic features suggest it experienced rather high shock grades, whereas other features suggest it is relatively unshocked. Inconsistent shock indicators could be explained if MIL 99301 was shocked but then partly annealed by heat produced by impacts on the parent body. The hypothesis that MIL 99301 experienced high temperature metamorphism (type 6) followed by a later shock event that heated, but did not melt, the constituent feldspar can be evaluated using (39)Ar-(40)Ar chronology. This is because (39)Ar-(40)Ar ages of shocked ordinary chondrites are generally <4.2 Ga, whereas (39)Ar-(40)Ar ages of unshocked meteorites are generally older, and between 4.52 - 4.38 Ga.

  6. The RNA-binding protein Sam68 regulates expression and transcription function of the androgen receptor splice variant AR-V7.

    PubMed

    Stockley, Jacqueline; Markert, Elke; Zhou, Yan; Robson, Craig N; Elliott, David J; Lindberg, Johan; Leung, Hing Y; Rajan, Prabhakar

    2015-08-27

    Castration-resistant (CR) prostate cancer (PCa) partly arises due to persistence of androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity in the absence of cognate ligand. An emerging mechanism underlying the CRPCa phenotype and predicting response to therapy is the expression of the constitutively-active AR-V7 splice variant generated by AR cryptic exon 3b inclusion. Here, we explore the role of the RNA-binding protein (RBP) Sam68 (encoded by KHDRBS1), which is over-expressed in clinical PCa, on AR-V7 expression and transcription function. Using a minigene reporter, we show that Sam68 controls expression of exon 3b resulting in an increase in endogenous AR-V7 mRNA and protein expression in RNA-binding-dependent manner. We identify a novel protein-protein interaction between Sam68 and AR-V7 mediated by a common domain shared with full-length AR, and observe these proteins in the cell nucleoplasm. Using a luciferase reporter, we demonstrate that Sam68 co-activates ligand-independent AR-V7 transcriptional activity in an RNA-binding-independent manner, and controls expression of the endogenous AR-V7-specific gene target UBE2C. Our data suggest that Sam68 has separable effects on the regulation of AR-V7 expression and transcriptional activity, through its RNA-binding capacity. Sam68 and other RBPs may control expression of AR-V7 and other splice variants as well as their downstream functions in CRPCa.

  7. The RNA-binding protein Sam68 regulates expression and transcription function of the androgen receptor splice variant AR-V7

    PubMed Central

    Stockley, Jacqueline; Markert, Elke; Zhou, Yan; Robson, Craig N.; Elliott, David J.; Lindberg, Johan; Leung, Hing Y.; Rajan, Prabhakar

    2015-01-01

    Castration-resistant (CR) prostate cancer (PCa) partly arises due to persistence of androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity in the absence of cognate ligand. An emerging mechanism underlying the CRPCa phenotype and predicting response to therapy is the expression of the constitutively-active AR-V7 splice variant generated by AR cryptic exon 3b inclusion. Here, we explore the role of the RNA-binding protein (RBP) Sam68 (encoded by KHDRBS1), which is over-expressed in clinical PCa, on AR-V7 expression and transcription function. Using a minigene reporter, we show that Sam68 controls expression of exon 3b resulting in an increase in endogenous AR-V7 mRNA and protein expression in RNA-binding-dependent manner. We identify a novel protein-protein interaction between Sam68 and AR-V7 mediated by a common domain shared with full-length AR, and observe these proteins in the cell nucleoplasm. Using a luciferase reporter, we demonstrate that Sam68 co-activates ligand-independent AR-V7 transcriptional activity in an RNA-binding-independent manner, and controls expression of the endogenous AR-V7-specific gene target UBE2C. Our data suggest that Sam68 has separable effects on the regulation of AR-V7 expression and transcriptional activity, through its RNA-binding capacity. Sam68 and other RBPs may control expression of AR-V7 and other splice variants as well as their downstream functions in CRPCa. PMID:26310125

  8. Characterization of the ars gene cluster from extremely arsenic-resistant Microbacterium sp. strain A33.

    PubMed

    Achour-Rokbani, Asma; Cordi, Audrey; Poupin, Pascal; Bauda, Pascale; Billard, Patrick

    2010-02-01

    The arsenic resistance gene cluster of Microbacterium sp. A33 contains a novel pair of genes (arsTX) encoding a thioredoxin system that are cotranscribed with an unusual arsRC2 fusion gene, ACR3, and arsC1 in an operon divergent from arsC3. The whole ars gene cluster is required to complement an Escherichia coli ars mutant. ArsRC2 negatively regulates the expression of the pentacistronic operon. ArsC1 and ArsC3 are related to thioredoxin-dependent arsenate reductases; however, ArsC3 lacks the two distal catalytic cysteine residues of this class of enzymes.

  9. Differential unroofing within the central metasedimentary Belt of the Grenville Orogen: constraints from 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosca, Michael A.; Essene, Eric J.; Kunk, Michael J.; Sutter, John F.

    1992-04-01

    An 40Ar/39Ar thermochronological investigation of upper greenschist to granulite facies gneiss, amphibolite and marble was conducted in the Central Metasedimentary Belt (CMB), Ontario, to constrain its cooling history. Incremental 40Ar/39Ar release spectra indicate that substantial differential unroofing occurred in the CMB between ˜ 1000 and ˜ 600 Ma. A consistent pattern of significantly older hornblende and phlogopite 40Ar/3Ar cooling ages on the southeast sides of major northeast striking shear zones is interpreted to reflect late displacement due to extensional deformation. Variations in hornblende 40Ar/39Ar age plateaus exceeding 200 Ma occur over distances less than 50 km with major age discontinuities occurring across the Robertson Lake shear zone and the Sharbot Lake mylonite zone which separate the Sharbot Lake terrane from the Elzevir and Frontenac terranes. Extensional displacements of up to 14 km are inferred between the Frontenac and Elzevir terranes of the CMB. No evidence for significant post argon-closure vertical displacement is indicated in the vicinity of the Perth Road mylonite within the Frontenac terrane. Variations of nearly 100 Ma in phlogopite 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages occur in undeformed marble on either side of the Bancroft Shear Zone. Phlogopites from sheared and mylonitized marble within the shear zone yield 40Ar/39Ar diffusional loss profiles, but have older geologically meaningless ages thought to reflect incorporation of excess argon. By ˜ 900 Ma, southeast directed extension was occurring throughout the CMB, possibly initiated along previous zones of compressional shearing. An easterly migration of active zones of extension is inferred, possibly related to an earlier, overall easterly migration of active zones of regional thrusting and easterly migration of an ancient subduction zone. The duration of extensional shearing is not well constrained, but must have ceased before ˜ 600 Ma as required by the deposition of overlying

  10. Differential unroofing within the central metasedimentary Belt of the Grenville Orogen: constraints from 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cosca, M.A.; Essene, E.J.; Kunk, M.J.; Sutter, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    An 40Ar/39Ar thermochronological investigation of upper greenschist to granulite facies gneiss, amphibolite and marble was conducted in the Central Metasedimentary Belt (CMB), Ontario, to constrain its cooling history. Incremental 40Ar/39Ar release spectra indicate that substantial differential unroofing occurred in the CMB between ??? 1000 and ??? 600 Ma. A consistent pattern of significantly older hornblende and phlogopite 40Ar/3Ar cooling ages on the southeast sides of major northeast striking shear zones is interpreted to reflect late displacement due to extensional deformation. Variations in hornblende 40Ar/39Ar age plateaus exceeding 200 Ma occur over distances less than 50 km with major age discontinuities occurring across the Robertson Lake shear zone and the Sharbot Lake mylonite zone which separate the Sharbot Lake terrane from the Elzevir and Frontenac terranes. Extensional displacements of up to 14 km are inferred between the Frontenac and Elzevir terranes of the CMB. No evidence for significant post argon-closure vertical displacement is indicated in the vicinity of the Perth Road mylonite within the Frontenac terrane. Variations of nearly 100 Ma in phlogopite 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages occur in undeformed marble on either side of the Bancroft Shear Zone. Phlogopites from sheared and mylonitized marble within the shear zone yield 40Ar/39Ar diffusional loss profiles, but have older geologically meaningless ages thought to reflect incorporation of excess argon. By ??? 900 Ma, southeast directed extension was occurring throughout the CMB, possibly initiated along previous zones of compressional shearing. An easterly migration of active zones of extension is inferred, possibly related to an earlier, overall easterly migration of active zones of regional thrusting and easterly migration of an ancient subduction zone. The duration of extensional shearing is not well constrained, but must have ceased before ??? 600 Ma as required by the deposition of overlying

  11. A Whole Blood Assay for AR-V7 and AR(v567es) in Patients with Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xichun; Ledet, Elisa; Li, Dongying; Dotiwala, Ary; Steinberger, Allie; Feibus, Allison; Li, Jianzhuo; Qi, Yanfeng; Silberstein, Jonathan; Lee, Benjamin; Dong, Yan; Sartor, Oliver; Zhang, Haitao

    2016-12-01

    Most prostate cancer mortality can be attributed to metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer, an advanced stage that remains incurable despite recent advances. The AR (androgen receptor) signaling axis remains active in castration resistant prostate cancer. Recent studies suggest that expression of the AR-V (AR splice variant) AR-V7 may underlie resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide. However, controversy exists over the optimal assay. Our objective was to develop a fast and sensitive assay for AR-Vs in patients. Two approaches were assessed in this study. The first approach was based on depletion of leukocytes and the second one used RNA purified directly from whole blood preserved in PAXgene® tubes. Transcript expression was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Through a side-by-side comparison we found that the whole blood approach was suitable to detect AR-Vs. The specificity of the assay was corroborated in a cancer-free cohort. Using the PAXgene assay samples from a cohort of 46 patients with castration resistant prostate cancer were analyzed. Overall, AR-V7 and AR(v567es) were detected in 67.53% and 29.87% of samples, respectively. Statistical analysis revealed a strong association of AR-V positivity with a history of second line hormonal therapies. To our knowledge this is the first study to demonstrate that PAXgene preserved whole blood can be used to obtain clinically relevant information regarding the expression of 2 AR-Vs. These data on a castration resistant prostate cancer cohort support a role for AR-Vs in resistance to therapies targeting the AR ligand-binding domain. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mars’ atmospheric history derived from upper-atmosphere measurements of 38Ar/36Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakosky, B. M.; Slipski, M.; Benna, M.; Mahaffy, P.; Elrod, M.; Yelle, R.; Stone, S.; Alsaeed, N.

    2017-03-01

    The history of Mars’ atmosphere is important for understanding the geological evolution and potential habitability of the planet. We determine the amount of gas lost to space through time using measurements of the upper-atmospheric structure made by the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft. We derive the structure of 38Ar/36Ar between the homopause and exobase altitudes. Fractionation of argon occurs as a result of loss of gas to space by pickup-ion sputtering, which preferentially removes the lighter atom. The measurements require that 66% of the atmospheric argon has been lost to space. Thus, a large fraction of Mars’ atmospheric gas has been lost to space, contributing to the transition in climate from an early, warm, wet environment to today’s cold, dry atmosphere.

  13. Laser probe /Ar-39/-/Ar-40/ dating of materials from consortium breccia 73215

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, H. W.; Schaeffer, O. A.; Plieninger, T.; James, O. B.

    1977-01-01

    The unique capacity of the laser-probe (Ar-39)-(Ar-40) method to determine ages of constituents in a rock sample which are only of the order of 100 microns apart has been applied to measure ages of the different constituents of consortium breccia 73215. Evidence is given that the age of the melt-derived ground mass, 4.01 + or - 0.05 billion years, has no chronological significance. Instead, the best estimate for the age of the breccia-forming event, about 3.90 billion years, comes from the study of two clasts only a few hundred micrometers in size. The interpretation of this age as the age of the breccia-forming event is also supported by the studies of other consortium members and suggests a reinterpretation of the ages of most of the other Apollo 17 highland breccias.

  14. Ar-39 - Ar-40 Dating of Two Angrites and Two Brachnites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, Daniel; Bogard, Donald

    2003-01-01

    Angrites are a rare group (approx.7 known) of igneous meteorites with basalt-like composition, which probably derive from a relatively small parent body that differs from those of other igneous meteorites. Angrites show evidence for extinct Mn-53, Sm-146, and Pu-244, and precise U-Pb, and Pb-Pb ages of 4.558 Gyr for two angrites define the time of early parent body differentiation. The S-147 - Nd-143 ages of two angrites range between 4.53+/-0.04 and 4.56+/-0.04 Gyr, but no Ar-39 - Ar-40 or Rb-Sr ages have been reported. Most angrites show no evidence for either shock brecciation or metamorphism.

  15. Interactions of relativistic 36Ar and 40Ar nuclei in hydrogen: Isotopic production cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, C. N.; Albergo, S.; Caccia, Z.; Chen, C.-X.; Costa, S.; Crawford, H. J.; Cronqvist, M.; Engelage, J.; Greiner, L.; Guzik, T. G.; Insolia, A.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Mitchell, J. W.; Potenza, R.; Russo, G. V.; Soutoul, A.; Testard, O.; Tull, C. E.; Tuvé, C.; Waddington, C. J.; Webber, W. R.; Wefel, J. P.

    1997-07-01

    The interactions of 36Ar projectile nuclei with energies of 361, 546, and 765 MeV/nucleon and 40Ar nuclei with 352 MeV/nucleon, have been studied in a liquid-hydrogen target as part of a program to study interactions of relevance to the problem of cosmic-ray propagation in the interstellar medium. We have measured the cross sections for the production of isotopic fragments of the projectile nuclei in these interactions. The variations of these cross sections with mass, charge, and energy, are examined for insights into any systematic features of this type of fragmentation reaction that might aid predictions of other, unmeasured cross sections. These cross sections are also compared with the values derived from the most commonly used prediction techniques. It is suggested that these techniques could be improved by taking account of the systematic features identified here.

  16. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS): ARS300 operations manual, software version 2.01

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-25

    Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) is a nondestructive evaluation technology developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The ARS technique is a fast, safe, and nonintrusive technique that is particularly useful when a large number of objects need to be tested. Any physical object, whether solid, hollow, or fluid filled, has many modes of vibration. These modes of vibration, commonly referred to as the natural resonant modes or resonant frequencies, are determined by the object`s shape, size, and physical properties, such as elastic moduli, speed of sound, and density. If the object is mechanically excited at frequencies corresponding to its characteristic natural vibrational modes, a resonance effect can be observed when small excitation energies produce large amplitude vibrations in the object. At other excitation frequencies, i.e., vibrational response of the object is minimal.

  17. Ar-39-Ar-40 ages for the Apollo 15 green and yellow volcanic glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangler, R. R.; Warasila, R.; Delano, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    The laser microprobe was used to extend the Ar-39-Ar-40 method to small, low potassium glassy objects in order to determine the ages of Apollo 15 yellow volcanic, green volcanic group A, and green volcanic group D glasses. The apparent solidification ages for these glasses are 3.62 + or -0.07, 3.41 + or -0.12, and 3.35 + or -.18 aeons, respectively. The ages for group A and d green glasses agree well with previously reported ages for aliquots of 'bulk' green glass. No significant difference in the solidification age was found between the A and D groups. The average exposure ages for the yellow and green glasses from 15426 and 15427 were indistinguishable, with ages between 300 and 275 m.y.

  18. 40Ar/39Ar Age of the Lathrop Wells Volcanic Center, Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Turrin, B D; Champion, D; Fleck, R J

    1991-08-09

    Paleomagnetic and (40)Ar/(39)Ar analyses from the Lathrop Wells volcanic center, Nevada, indicate that two eruptive events have occurred there. The ages (136 +/- 8 and 141 +/- 9 thousand years ago) for these two events are analytically indistinguishable. The small angular difference (4.7 degrees ) between the paleomagnetic directions from these two events suggests they differ in age by only about 100 years. These ages are consistent with the chronology of the surficial geological units in the Yucca Mountain area. These results contradict earlier interpretations of the cinder-cone geomorphology and soil-profile data that suggest that at least five temporally discrete eruptive events occurred at Lathrop Wells approximately 20,000 years ago.

  19. 40Ar/39Ar dates from the West Siberian Basin: Siberian flood basalt province doubled.

    PubMed

    Reichow, Marc K; Saunders, Andrew D; White, Rosalind V; Pringle, Malcolm S; Al'Mukhamedov, Alexander I; Medvedev, Alexander I; Kirda, Nikolay P

    2002-06-07

    Widespread basaltic volcanism occurred in the region of the West Siberian Basin in central Russia during Permo-Triassic times. New 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on plagioclase grains from deep boreholes in the basin reveal that the basalts were erupted 249.4 +/- 0.5 million years ago. This is synchronous with the bulk of the Siberian Traps, erupted further east on the Siberian Platform. The age and geochemical data confirm that the West Siberian Basin basalts are part of the Siberian Traps and at least double the confirmed area of the volcanic province as a whole. The larger area of volcanism strengthens the link between the volcanism and the end-Permian mass extinction.

  20. In-situ Ar isotope, 40Ar/39Ar analysis and mineral chemistry of nosean in the phonolite from Olbrück volcano, East Eifel volcanic field, Germany: Implication for the source of excess 40Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, Masafumi; Altenberger, Uwe; Günter, Christina

    2014-05-01

    Since the report by Lippolt et al. (1990), hauyne and nosean phenocrysts in certain phonolites from the northwest in the Quaternary East Eifel volcanic field in Germany were known to contain significant amounts of excess 40Ar, thus, show apparent older ages than the other minerals. However, its petrographic meaning have not been well known. Meanwhile, Sumino et al. (2008) has identified the source of the excess 40Ar in the plagioclase phenocrysts from the historic Unzen dacite lava as the melt inclusions in the zones parallely developed to the plagioclase rim by in-situ laser Ar isotope analysis. In order to obtain eruption ages of very young volcanoes as like Quaternary Eifel volcanic field by the K-Ar system, it is quite essential to know about the location of excess 40Ar in volcanic rocks. We have collected phonolites from the Olbrück volcano in East Eifel and investigated its petrography and mineral chemistry and also performed in-situ Ar isotope analyses of unirradiated rock section sample and also in-situ 40Ar/39Ar analysis of neutron irradiated section sample with the UV pulse laser (wavelength 266 nm) and 40Ar/39Ar analytical system of the University of Potsdam. Petrographically, nosean contained fine melt and/or gas inclusions of less than 5 micrometer, which mostly distribute linearly and are relatively enriched in chlorine than the areas without inclusions. Solid inclusions of similar sizes contain CaO and fluorine. In nosean, typically around 5 wt% of sulfur is contained. The 40Ar/39Ar dating was also performed to leucite, sanidine and groundmass in the same section for comparison of those ages with that of nosean. In each analysis, 200 micrometer of beam size was used for making a pit with depth of up to 300 micrometer by laser ablation. As our 40Ar/39Ar analyses were conducted one and half year after the neutron irradiation, thus, short lived 37Ar derived from Ca had decayed very much, we measured Ca and K contents in nosean by SEM-EDS then applied

  1. The Effects of Androgens on Murine Cortical Bone Do Not Require AR or ERα Signaling in Osteoblasts and Osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Ucer, Serra; Iyer, Srividhya; Bartell, Shoshana M; Martin-Millan, Marta; Han, Li; Kim, Ha-Neui; Weinstein, Robert S; Jilka, Robert L; O'Brien, Charles A; Almeida, Maria; Manolagas, Stavros C

    2015-07-01

    In men, androgens are critical for the acquisition and maintenance of bone mass in both the cortical and cancellous bone compartment. Male mice with targeted deletion of the androgen receptor (AR) in mature osteoblasts or osteocytes have lower cancellous bone mass, but no cortical bone phenotype. We have investigated the possibility that the effects of androgens on the cortical compartment result from AR signaling in osteoprogenitors or cells of the osteoclast lineage; or via estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) signaling in either or both of these two cell types upon conversion of testosterone to estradiol. To this end, we generated mice with targeted deletion of an AR or an ERα allele in the mesenchymal (AR(f/y);Prx1-Cre or ERα(f/f);Osx1-Cre) or myeloid cell lineage (AR(f/y);LysM-Cre or ERα(f/f);LysM-Cre) and their descendants. Male AR(f/y);Prx1-Cre mice exhibited decreased bone volume and trabecular number, and increased osteoclast number in the cancellous compartment. Moreover, they did not undergo the loss of cancellous bone volume and trabecular number caused by orchidectomy (ORX) in their littermate controls. In contrast, AR(f/y);LysM-Cre, ERα(f/f);Osx1-Cre, or ERα(f/f);LysM-Cre mice had no cancellous bone phenotype at baseline and lost the same amount of cancellous bone as their controls following ORX. Most unexpectedly, adult males of all four models had no discernible cortical bone phenotype at baseline, and lost the same amount of cortical bone as their littermate controls after ORX. Recapitulation of the effects of ORX by AR deletion only in the AR(f/y);Prx1-Cre mice indicates that the effects of androgens on cancellous bone result from AR signaling in osteoblasts-not on osteoclasts or via aromatization. The effects of androgens on cortical bone mass, on the other hand, do not require AR or ERα signaling in any cell type across the osteoblast or osteoclast differentiation lineage. Therefore, androgens must exert their effects indirectly by actions on

  2. CHEMILUMINESCENT CHEMI-IONIZATION: Ar* + Ca AND THE CaAr+ EMISSION SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Dennis C.; Winn, John S.

    1980-09-01

    A flowing afterglow chemiluminescence apparatus has been used to analyze visible fluorescence in the Ar* ({sup 3}P{sub 2}{sup o}) + Ca ({sup 1}S{sub 0}) reaction. The rate constants for production of Ca{sup +} ({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}{sup o}) and Ca{sup +} ({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}{sup o}) were measured to be 1.6 x 10{sup -10} cm{sup 3}-molecule{sup -1} sec{sup -1} and 3.2 x 10{sup -11} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} sec{sup -1}, respectively. These results demonstrate a transfer of the total electronic angular momentum polarization in Ar* tothe excited ion levels. The molecular band spectrum of the associative ionization product CaAr{sup +} (A{sup 2}{Pi}) was observed. Molecular fluorescence constituted 14% of the total fluorescence from all ion products. This spectrum was analyzed with a model (exp-Z4) potential, yielding, for the ground state, {Chi}{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}, R{sub e} = 2.8 {angstrom}, {omega}''{sub e} = 87 cm{sup -1}, and D''{sub e} = 1000 cm{sup -1}, and, for the A{sup 2}{Pi} state, R{sub e} = 2.6 {angstrom}, {omega}'{sub e} = 200 cm{sup -1}, and D'{sub e} = 4900 cm{sup -1}. The nascent internal state distribution in CaAr{sup +} is found to consist of a fairly narrow range of high vibrational levels. The analysis of spectra from chemiluminescent reaction is a well established technique for elucidating the product state distributions of elementary processes. In this paper, they use the analysis of the chemiluminescent chemi-ionization reactions between metastable argon atoms and calcium atoms to expose the dynamics of associative ionization (AI) and to measure the branching ratios for chemi-ionization into more than one product channel.

  3. Refining lunar impact chronology through high spatial resolution 40Ar/39Ar dating of impact melts

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Cameron M.; Young, Kelsey E.; Weirich, John R.; Hodges, Kip V.; Jolliff, Bradley L.; Wartho, Jo-Anne; van Soest, Matthijs C.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative constraints on the ages of melt-forming impact events on the Moon are based primarily on isotope geochronology of returned samples. However, interpreting the results of such studies can often be difficult because the provenance region of any sample returned from the lunar surface may have experienced multiple impact events over the course of billions of years of bombardment. We illustrate this problem with new laser microprobe 40Ar/39Ar data for two Apollo 17 impact melt breccias. Whereas one sample yields a straightforward result, indicating a single melt-forming event at ca. 3.83 Ga, data from the other sample document multiple impact melt–forming events between ca. 3.81 Ga and at least as young as ca. 3.27 Ga. Notably, published zircon U/Pb data indicate the existence of even older melt products in the same sample. The revelation of multiple impact events through 40Ar/39Ar geochronology is likely not to have been possible using standard incremental heating methods alone, demonstrating the complementarity of the laser microprobe technique. Evidence for 3.83 Ga to 3.81 Ga melt components in these samples reinforces emerging interpretations that Apollo 17 impact breccia samples include a significant component of ejecta from the Imbrium basin impact. Collectively, our results underscore the need to quantitatively resolve the ages of different melt generations from multiple samples to improve our current understanding of the lunar impact record, and to establish the absolute ages of important impact structures encountered during future exploration missions in the inner Solar System. PMID:26601128

  4. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and paleomagnetism of Independence volcano, Absaroka volcanic supergroup, Beartooth mountains, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harlan, S.S.; Snee, L.W.; Geissman, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    Independence volcano is a major volcanic complex in the lower part of the Absaroka Volcanic Supergroup (AVS) of Montana and Wyoming. Recently reported Rb-Sr mineral dates from the complex give apparent ages of 91 and 84 Ma, whereas field relationships and the physical and compositional similarity of the rocks with other dated parts of the AVS indicate an Early to Middle Eocene age for eruption and deposition. To resolve the conflict between age assignments based on stratigraphic correlations and Rb-Sr dates, we report new paleomagnetic data and 40Ar/39Ar dates for Independence volcano. Paleomagnetic data for the stock and an and andesite plug that cuts the stock are well grouped, of reverse polarity, and yield a virtual geomagnetic pole that is essentially identical to Late Cretaceous and Tertiary reference poles. The reverse polarity indicates that the magnetization of these rocks is probably younger than the Cretaceous normal superchron, or less than about 83.5 Ma. Hornblende from a volcanic breccia near the base of the volcanic pile gives a 40Ar/39Ar age of 51.57 Ma, whereas biotites from a dacite sill and a granodiorite stock that forms the core of the volcano give dates that range from 49.96 to 48.50 Ma. These dates record the age of eruption and intrusion of these rocks and clearly show that the age of Independence volcano is Early to Middle Eocene, consistent with stratigraphic relations. We suggest that the Rb-Sr mineral dates from the Independence stock and related intrusions are unreliable.

  5. 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology of mesoproterozoic metamorphism in the Colorado Front Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, C.A.; Snee, L.W.; Selverstone, J.; Reed, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    A low-pressure metamorphic episode in the Colorado Front Range has been identified by the presence of staurolite, andalusite, cordierite, and garnet porphyroblasts overprinting earlier assemblages. The overprinting assemblages and reaction textures are most consistent with porphyroblast growth on a prograde metamorphic path with peak temperatures exceeding ~525??C. Twenty-eight 40Ar/39Ar dates on hornblende, muscovite, biotite, and microcline were used to infer the age and thermal conditions of metamorphism. Muscovite and biotite 40Ar/39Ar ages fall mainly in the interval 1400-1340 Ma, consistent with cooling through the closure temperature interval of micas (~400??-300??C) after about 1400 Ma. In contrast, hornblende apparent ages (T(c)~500??-550??C) between 1600 and 1390 Ma reflect variable retention of radiogenic argon. Forward modeling of argon diffusion shows that the distribution of hornblende and mica ages is consistent with the partial resetting of argon systematics ca. 1400 Ma by a thermal pulse reaching maximum temperatures around 550??C and decaying within <20 m.yr. These temperatures match the conditions inferred from the overprinting assemblage; thus, muscovite and biotite ages are interpreted to date the cooling phase of this metamorphic event. This late metamorphism is broadly coeval with the intrusion of ca. 1400-Ma granitic plutons in the study area and throughout the southwestern United States. However, thermal effects are observed far from pluton margins, suggesting pervasive, regional crustal heating rather than restricted contact metamorphism. Our results suggest that ca. 1400-Ma metamorphism and plutonism are manifestations of a regional thermal episode that both partially melted the lower crust and pervasively metamorphosed middle crustal rocks.

  6. A Deuteron-Deuteron Neutron Generator for 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, P. R.; Leung, K.; Becker, T.; Cassata, W. S.; Chen, A. X.; Jones, G.

    2010-12-01

    Neutron irradiation of samples for 40Ar/39Ar dating conventionally uses 235U fission reactors whose broad neutron energy spectra engender recoil phenomena, interfering reactions and radiological issues. An alternative source of neutrons with a nearly monoenergetic energy distribution can be obtained via the deuteron-deuteron (D-D) fusion process by which 2 deuterium (D) atoms are fused to create 3He and a neutron with 2.45 MeV energy. Existing neutron generators of this type have produced as much as ~109 n/s, insufficient to provide an alternative to fission reactors. We are building a novel D-D neutron generator aimed at achieving 1012-1013 n/s, featuring a toroidal deuterium plasma ion source that extracts radially inward focused D+ ion beams at 120 kV. The high energy D+ ion beam continuously loads a cylindrical titanium target to form TiD2 at the surface. Subsequent D+ ions then interact with the deuterated titanium to produce the forward biased neutrons that irradiate samples located concentrically inside the cylindrical target. The main limitation on neutron flux is posed by the challenge of cooling the target to prevent outgassing of deuterium from the titanium surface, hence a fluid-cooled Cu-backing is employed. The D-D neutrons to be produced will (1) dramatically reduce the energy (hence displacement) spectrum of recoiling activated 39Ar and 37Ar nuclides, (2) virtually eliminate unwanted interfering reactions on Ca, K, and Cl, and (3) significantly ameliorate radiological concerns due to e.g. collateral activation of Al in sample vessels and samples themselves. Reduction of recoil distances enables fine-grained materials such as clay minerals to be dated more reliably, and the reduction of interfering reactions will reduce the accuracy penalties for over- or under-irradiating samples as well as extending the viability shelf-life of irradiated samples.This project is supported by NSF.

  7. Geochemistry and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of the ophiolite in Northern Xinjiang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qinqin, Xu; Jianqing, Ji

    2010-05-01

    As the remnant of ancient oceanic crust, ophiolite is extremely important to reconstruct the framework of ancient ocean and continent. There are several ophiolite belts in Northern Xinjiang, assuming planar distribution, and they are generally related to different faults since Paleozoic in the outcrops. This paper presents a systematic study of geochemistry and geochronology of the gabbro, diabase and basalt of ophiolite collected from different regions in Northern Xinjiang. The intermediate and basic rocks in ophiolite show similar patterns in primitive mantle-normalized REE and trace elements diagrams with MORB and different from IAT, indicating that the ophiolite may be formed in mid-ocean ridge. Their Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions also show that they have mid-ocean ridge environment affinity. Additionally, their Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic ratios are similar respectively, suggesting the same source area, and they also have positive epsilon Nd values(4.40 ~ 8.04), which indicates they likely originate from the depleted mantle. The previous and the author's researches show that the forming time of ophiolite in Northern Xinjiang is early Paleozoic, but 40Ar/39Ar ages of gabbro, diabase and basalt are in the range of 396 ~ 226Ma (mainly from 350 to 250Ma), and no ages of early Paleozoic are gained. Moreover, this time coincides with the timing of late Paleozoic post-collisional plutonism, indicating the ophiolite in Northern Xinjiang was reworked by the late thermal events. The ophiolite widely exposed in Northern Xinjiang have similar characteristics of occurrence, lithologic association and isotopes in spite of diverse special features, which indicates that a relatively uniform and integrated source region has existed in Northern Xinjiang since Paleozoic. It is likely to infer that this source region is related with the long lasting remnant oceanic basin and the related lithosphere since Paleozoic in North Xinjiang. Key Words: Ophiolite, 40Ar/39Ar age

  8. The Berkeley Instrumental Neutron Generator (BINGE) for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, P. R.; Becker, T. A.; Bernstein, L.; Firestone, R. B.; Kirsch, L.; Leung, K. N.; Rogers, A.; Van Bibber, K.; Waltz, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Berkeley Instrumental Neutron Generator (BINGE) facility is the product of a consortium involving the Berkeley Geochronology Center (BGC), the U.C. Berkeley Nuclear Engineering Dept. (UCB/NE), and Lawrence Berkeley (LBNL) and Lawrence Livermore (LLNL) National Labs. BINGE was initially designed (and funded by NSF) for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. BINGE uses a plasma-based deuteron ion source and a self-loading Ti-surfaced target to induce deuteron-deuterium (DD) fusion via the reaction 2H(d,n)3He, producing 2.45 MeV neutrons. The limited neutron energy spectrum is aimed at reducing recoil effects, interfering nuclear reactions, and unwanted radioactive byproducts, all of which are undesirable consequences of conventional irradiation with 235U fission spectrum neutrons. Minimization of interfering reactions such as 40Ca(n,na)36Ar greatly reduces penalties for over-irradiation, enabling improved signal/background measurement of e.g. 39Ar. BINGE will also be used for a variety of nuclear physics and engineering experiments that require a high flux of monoenergetic neutrons. Neutron energies lower than 2.45 MeV can be obtained via irradiation ports within and external to polyethylene shielding. Initial commissioning produced a neutron flux of 108 n/sec/cm2 at 1 mA source current and 100 kV anode voltage, as expected. When scaled up to the 1 A source current as planned, this indicates that BINGE will achieve the design objective neutron flux of 1011 n/sec/cm2. Further progress towards this goal will be reported. Supported by NSF (grant #EAR-0960138), BGC, UCB/NE, University of California Office of the President, and DOE through LLNL under contract #DE-AC52-07NA27344 and LBNL under contract #DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  9. Refining lunar impact chronology through high spatial resolution (40)Ar/(39)Ar dating of impact melts.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Cameron M; Young, Kelsey E; Weirich, John R; Hodges, Kip V; Jolliff, Bradley L; Wartho, Jo-Anne; van Soest, Matthijs C

    2015-02-01

    Quantitative constraints on the ages of melt-forming impact events on the Moon are based primarily on isotope geochronology of returned samples. However, interpreting the results of such studies can often be difficult because the provenance region of any sample returned from the lunar surface may have experienced multiple impact events over the course of billions of years of bombardment. We illustrate this problem with new laser microprobe (40)Ar/(39)Ar data for two Apollo 17 impact melt breccias. Whereas one sample yields a straightforward result, indicating a single melt-forming event at ca. 3.83 Ga, data from the other sample document multiple impact melt-forming events between ca. 3.81 Ga and at least as young as ca. 3.27 Ga. Notably, published zircon U/Pb data indicate the existence of even older melt products in the same sample. The revelation of multiple impact events through (40)Ar/(39)Ar geochronology is likely not to have been possible using standard incremental heating methods alone, demonstrating the complementarity of the laser microprobe technique. Evidence for 3.83 Ga to 3.81 Ga melt components in these samples reinforces emerging interpretations that Apollo 17 impact breccia samples include a significant component of ejecta from the Imbrium basin impact. Collectively, our results underscore the need to quantitatively resolve the ages of different melt generations from multiple samples to improve our current understanding of the lunar impact record, and to establish the absolute ages of important impact structures encountered during future exploration missions in the inner Solar System.

  10. Ar-40/Ar-39 Age of Hornblende-bearing R Chondrite LAP 04840

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Cosca, M.

    2014-01-01

    Chondrites have a complex chronology due to several variables affecting and operating on chondritic parent bodies such as radiogenic heating, pressure and temperature variation with depth, aqueous alteration, and shock or impact heating [1]. Unbrecciated chondrites can record ages from 4.56 to 4.4 Ga that represent cooling in small parent bodies. Some brecciated chondrites exhibit younger ages (<<4 to 4.4 Ga) that may reflect the age of brecciation, disturbance, or shock and impact events (<< 4 Ga). A unique R chondrite was recently found in the LaPaz Icefield of Antarctica - LAP 04840 [2]. This chondrite contains approx.15% hornblende and trace amounts of biotite, making it the first of its kind. Studies have revealed an equigranular texture, mineral equilibria yielding equilibration near 650-700 C and 250-500 bars, hornblende that is dominantly OH-bearing (very little Cl or F), and high D/H ratios [8,9,10]. To help gain a better understanding of the origin of this unique sample, we have measured the Ar-40/Ar-39 age. Age of 4.290 +/- 0.030 Ga is younger than one would expect for a sample that has cooled within a small body [4], and one might instead attribute the age to a younger shock event, On the other hand, there is no evidence for extensive shock in this meteorite (shock stage S2; [3]), so this sample may have been reannealed after the shock event. This age is similar to Ar-Ar ages determined for some other R chondrites

  11. Results of 40Ar/39Ar dating of phlogopites from kelyphitic rims around garnet grains (Udachnaya-Vostochnaya kimberlite pipe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, D. S.; Tomilenko, A. A.; Alifirova, T. A.; Travin, A. V.; Murzintsev, N. G.; Pokhilenko, N. P.

    2016-07-01

    40Ar/39Ar dating of phlogopite from kelyphitic rims around garnet grains from the Udachnaya-Vostochnaya kimberlite pipe in the Sakha (Yakutia) Republic (Russia) revealed that when this mineral has contact with a kimberlite melt its age corresponds (within error limits) to that of the formation of the kimberlite pipe, thus indicating that the method may be used for dating kimberlites and related rocks. In mantle xenoliths, kelyphitic phlogopites rimming garnet grains partially lose radiogenic Ar, which results in a complex age spectrum. Rejuvenation of the K/Ar system in them is determined by the thermal impact of the kimberlite melt on captured rocks.

  12. AR-601 anthropomorphic robot modeling and virtualization toolset for research and education purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirazetdinov, R.; Kamalov, A.; Nikitina, D.; Katsevman, E.

    2016-06-01

    A program toolset for modeling and visualization of anthropomorphic robot AR-601 produced by “NPO Androidnaya technika” was implemented, allowing one to test the components of the control system and to debug control algorithms on a virtual model of the robot. The toolset might be used for both scientific and educational purposes. The work is performed according to the Russian Government Program of Competitive Growth of the Kazan Federal University (KFU).

  13. Long-term Diet and Biomarker Changes after a Short-term Intervention among Hispanic Breast Cancer Survivors: The ¡Cocinar Para Su Salud! Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Heather; Ogden Gaffney, Ann; Aycinena, A Corina; Koch, Pam; Contento, Isobel; Karmally, Wahida; Richardson, John M; Shi, Zaixing; Lim, Emerson; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Santella, Regina M; Blaner, William S; Clugston, Robin D; Cremers, Serge; Pollak, Susan; Sirosh, Iryna; Crew, Katherine D; Maurer, Matthew; Kalinsky, Kevin; Hershman, Dawn L

    2016-11-01

    Among Hispanic breast cancer survivors, we examined the long-term effects of a short-term culturally based dietary intervention on increasing fruits/vegetables (F/V), decreasing fat, and changing biomarkers associated with breast cancer recurrence risk. Spanish-speaking women (n = 70) with a history of stage 0-III breast cancer who completed treatment were randomized to ¡Cocinar Para Su Salud! (n = 34), a culturally based 9-session program (24 hours over 12 weeks, including nutrition education, cooking classes, and food-shopping field trips), or a control group (n = 36, written dietary recommendations for breast cancer survivors). Diet recalls, fasting blood, and anthropometric measures were collected at baseline, 6, and 12 months. We report changes between groups at 12 months in dietary intake and biomarkers using 2-sample Wilcoxon t tests and generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. At 12 months, the intervention group compared with the control group reported higher increases in mean daily F/V servings (total: +2.0 vs. -0.4; P < 0.01), and nonsignificant decreases in the percentage of calories from fat (-2.2% vs. -1.1%; P = 0.69) and weight (-2.6 kg vs. -1.5 kg; P = 0.56). Compared with controls, participants in the intervention group had higher increases in plasma lutein (+20.4% vs. -11.5%; P < 0.01), and borderline significant increases in global DNA methylation (+0.8% vs. -0.5%; P = 0.06). The short-term ¡Cocinar Para Su Salud! program was effective at increasing long-term F/V intake in Hispanic breast cancer survivors and changed biomarkers associated with breast cancer recurrence risk. It is possible for short-term behavioral interventions to have long-term effects on behaviors and biomarkers in minority cancer patient populations. Results can inform future study designs. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(11); 1491-502. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Significant association of poor glycemic control with increased resistance in efferent arterioles--study of inulin and para-aminohippuric acid clearance in humans.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, A; Ishimura, E; Ohno, Y; Ichii, M; Nakatani, S; Mori, K; Fukumoto, S; Emoto, M; Inaba, M

    2014-05-01

    To examine whether glomerular hemodynamic parameters in humans are associated with glycemic control indices, by simultaneously measuring clearance of inulin (Cin) and para-aminohippuric acid (CPHA). Thirty-one subjects (age 55.4±14.7 years; 15 men and 16 women; 21 diabetics and 10 non-diabetics) were enrolled. Cin and CPAH were measured simultaneously. Afferent arteriolar resistance (Ra), efferent arteriolar resistance (Re), glomerular hydrostatic pressure (Pglo) and glomerular filtration fraction (FF) were calculated according to Gomez' formula. FF correlated significantly and positively with fasting plasma glucose (FPG), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and glycated albumin (GA) (r=0.396, p=0.0303; r=0.587, p=0.0007; r=0.525, p=0.0070, respectively). Pglo correlated significantly and positively with FPG, HbA1c and GA (r=0.572, p=0.0008; r=0.535, p=0.0019; r=0.540, p=0.0053, respectively). Although there was no significant correlation between Ra and glycemic control indices, Re correlated significantly and positively with HbA1c and GA (r=0.499, p=0.0043; r=0.592, p=0.0018, respectively). FF, Pglo and Re were associated significantly with HbA1c and GA after adjustment for age. These results demonstrate, in humans, that poor glycemic control is associated with increased Re, but not Ra. It is suggested that increased Re causes increased Pglo, leading to increased FF. Thus, hemodynamic abnormalities with poor glycemic control may be related to glomerular hypertension in humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Un modelo para el control de calidad academica de los textos de instruccion a distancia (A Model for Controlling the Academic Quality of Distance Education Texts).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolanos-Mora, Guiselle; And Others

    1992-01-01

    In response to the need for a system of control over the academic quality of distance education texts, this article proposes a methodological model based on criteria that evaluate written materials based on their instructional quality, design, and production. A discussion and figures evaluate educational aspects of content, communication,…

  16. Un modelo para el control de calidad academica de los textos de instruccion a distancia (A Model for Controlling the Academic Quality of Distance Education Texts).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolanos-Mora, Guiselle; And Others

    1992-01-01

    In response to the need for a system of control over the academic quality of distance education texts, this article proposes a methodological model based on criteria that evaluate written materials based on their instructional quality, design, and production. A discussion and figures evaluate educational aspects of content, communication,…

  17. Detection of AR-V7 mRNA in whole blood may not predict the effectiveness of novel endocrine drugs for castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Takumi; Okuno, Yumiko; Hattori-Kato, Mami; Zaitsu, Masayoshi; Mikami, Koji

    2016-01-01

    A splice variant of androgen receptor (AR), AR-V7, lacks in androgen-binding portion and leads to aggressive cancer characteristics. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) and subsequent nested PCRs for the amplification of AR-V7 and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) transcripts were done for whole blood of patients with prostate cancer and male controls. With primary reverse transcription PCRs, AR-V7 and PSA were detected in 4.5% and 4.7% of prostate cancer, respectively. With nested PCRs, AR-V7 messenger RNA (mRNA) was positive in 43.8% of castration-sensitive prostate cancer and 48.1% of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), while PSA mRNA was positive in 6.3% of castration-sensitive prostate cancer and 18.5% of CRPC. Whole-blood samples of controls showed AR-V7 mRNA expression by nested PCR. Based on multivariate analysis, expression of AR-V7 mRNA in whole blood was not significantly correlated with clinical parameters and PSA mRNA in blood, while univariate analysis showed a correlation between AR-V7 mRNA and metastasis at initial diagnosis. Detection of AR-V7 mRNA did not predict the reduction of serum PSA in patients with CRPC following abiraterone and enzalutamide administration. In conclusion, AR-V7 mRNA expression in normal hematopoietic cells may have annihilated the manifestation of aggressiveness of prostate cancer and the prediction of the effectiveness of abiraterone and enzalutamide by the assessment of AR-V7 mRNA in blood.

  18. A Framework for Designing Collaborative Learning Environments Using Mobile AR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Thomas; Narayan, Vickel; Antonczak, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Smartphones provide a powerful platform for augmented reality (AR). Using a smartphone's camera together with the built in GPS, compass, gyroscope, and touch screen enables the real world environment to be overlaid with contextual digital information. The creation of mobile AR environments is relatively simple, with the development of mobile AR…

  19. 75 FR 12163 - Class E Airspace; Mountain View, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Class E Airspace; Mountain View, AR AGENCY: Federal... proposes to amend Class E airspace at Mountain View, AR. Decommissioning of the Wilcox non-directional beacon (NDB) at Mountain View Wilcox Memorial Field Airport has made this action necessary for the safety...

  20. A Framework for Designing Collaborative Learning Environments Using Mobile AR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Thomas; Narayan, Vickel; Antonczak, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Smartphones provide a powerful platform for augmented reality (AR). Using a smartphone's camera together with the built in GPS, compass, gyroscope, and touch screen enables the real world environment to be overlaid with contextual digital information. The creation of mobile AR environments is relatively simple, with the development of mobile AR…

  1. 75 FR 12162 - Class E Airspace; Manila, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Class E Airspace; Manila, AR AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Class E airspace at Manila, AR. Decommissioning of the Manila non-directional beacon (NDB) at Manila... amending Class E airspace extending upward from 700 feet above the surface for standard instrument...

  2. 75 FR 12165 - Class E Airspace; Batesville, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Class E Airspace; Batesville, AR AGENCY: Federal... proposes to amend Class E airspace at Batesville, AR. Decommissioning of the Independence County non... Regulations (14 CFR), part 71 by amending Class E airspace extending upward from 700 feet above the...

  3. 40Ar/39Ar and (U-Th)/He model age signatures of elusive Mercurian and Venusian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, Fred; Eroglu, Ela

    2017-05-01

    No meteorites from Mercury and Venus have been conclusively identified so far. In this study, we develop an original approach based on extensive Monte Carlo simulations and diffusion models to explore the radiogenic argon (40Ar*) and helium (4He*) loss behavior and the range of 40Ar/39Ar and (U-Th)/He age signatures expected for a range of crystals if meteorites from these planets were ever to be found. We show that we can accurately date the crystallization age of a meteorite from both Mercury and Venus using the 40Ar/39Ar technique on clinopyroxene (± orthopyroxene) and that its 40Ar/39Ar age should match the Pb-Pb age. At the surface of Mercury, phases like albite and anorthite will exhibit a complete range of 40Ar* loss ranging from 0% to 100%, whereas merrillite and apatite will show 100% 4He* loss. By measuring the crystal size and diffusion parameters of a series of plagioclase crystals, one can inverse the 40Ar* loss value to estimate the maximum temperature experienced by a rock, and narrow down the possible pre-ejection location of the meteorite at the surface of Mercury. At the surface of Venus, plagioclase and phosphate phases will only record the age of ejection. The (U-Th)/He systematics of merrillite and apatite will be, respectively, moderately and strongly affected by 4He* loss during the transit of the meteorite from its host planet to Earth. Finally, meteorites from Mercury or Venus will each have their own 40Ar/39Ar and (U-Th)/He isotopic age and 38Arc cosmic ray exposure age signatures over a series of different crystal types, allowing to unambiguously recognize a meteorite for any of these two planets using radiogenic and cosmogenic noble gases.

  4. 40Ar-39Ar age of Northwest Africa 091: More evidence for a link between L chondrites and fossil meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weirich, J. R.; Swindle, T. D.; Isachsen, C. E.

    2012-08-01

    Most 40Ar-39Ar ages of L chondrites record an event at approximately 500 Ma, indicating a large collisional impact at that time. However, there is a spread in ages from 400 to 600 Ma in these meteorites that is greater than the analytical uncertainty. Identification of, and correction for, trapped Ar in a few L chondrites has given an age of 470 ± 6 Ma. This age coincides with Ordivician fossil meteorites that fell to Earth at 467 ± 2 Ma. As these fossil meteorites were originally L chondrites, the apparent conclusion is that a large impact sent a flood of L chondrite material to Earth, while material that remained on the L chondrite parent body was strongly heated and reset. We have reduced 40Ar-39Ar data for Northwest Africa 091 using various techniques that appear in the literature, including identification and subtraction of trapped Ar. These techniques give a range of ages from 455 to 520 Ma, and show the importance of making accurate corrections. By using the most straightforward technique to identify and remove a trapped Ar component (which is neither terrestrial nor primordial), an 40Ar-39Ar age of 475 ± 6 Ma is found for Northwest Africa 091, showing a temporal link to fossil meteorites. In addition, high temperature releases of Northwest Africa 091 contain evidence for a second trapped component, and subtraction of this component indicates a possible second collisional impact at approximately 800 Ma. This earlier age coincides with 40Ar-39Ar ages of some H and L chondrites, and lunar samples.

  5. New palynology-based astronomical and revised 40Ar/39Ar ages for the Eocene maar lake of Messel (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, Olaf K.; Wilde, Volker; Mertz, Dieter F.; Riegel, Walter

    2015-04-01

    The annually laminated oil shale from the Eocene maar lake at Messel (Federal State of Hessen, Germany) provides unique paleoenvironmental data for a time interval of ~640 ka during the Paleogene greenhouse phase. As a consequence of orbitally controlled changes in the vegetation in the vicinity of the lake, the lacustrine laminites can now be astronomically tuned. Dating is based on the short eccentricity amplitude modulations of the regional pollen rain and their correlation to the astronomical La2010a/La2010d solutions in combination with a revised 40Ar/39Ar age of a basalt fragment from a lapilli tuff section below the first lacustrine sediments. Depending on different newly suggested ages for the Fish Canyon sanidine used as monitor for neutron irradiation, the age for the eruption at Messel is between 48.27 ± 0.22 and 48.11 ± 0.22 Ma. This allows for the first time the exact correlation of a Paleogene lacustrine sequence to the marine record in Central Europe. The Messel oil shale becomes now slightly older than previously assumed and includes the Ypresian/Lutetian boundary that moves the base of the European Land Mammal Age Geiseltalian (MP 11) into the Lower Eocene. This opens a window for establishing an independent chronostratigraphic framework for Paleogene terrestrial records and their correlation to the marine realm. Furthermore, the study reveals that higher amounts of pollen from "wet" and thermophilous plants indicate less seasonal and more balanced precipitation and slightly higher temperatures during a well-expressed eccentricity minimum.

  6. Effect of surface derived hydrocarbon impurities on Ar plasma properties

    SciTech Connect

    Fox-Lyon, Nick; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.; Godyak, Valery

    2014-05-15

    The authors report on Langmuir probe measurements that show that hydrocarbon surfaces in contact with Ar plasma cause changes of electron energy distribution functions due to the flux of hydrogen and carbon atoms released by the surfaces. The authors compare the impact on plasma properties of hydrocarbon species gasified from an etching hydrocarbon surface with injection of gaseous hydrocarbons into Ar plasma. They find that both kinds of hydrocarbon injections decrease electron density and slightly increase electron temperatures of low pressure Ar plasma. For low percentages of impurities (∼1% impurity in Ar plasma explored here), surface-derived hydrocarbon species and gas phase injected hydrocarbon molecules cause similar changes of plasma properties for the same number of hydrocarbon molecules injected into Ar with a decrease in electron density of ∼4%.

  7. Eruption age of an approximately 100,000-year-old basalt from Ar-40/Ar-39 analysis of partially degassed xenoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, A. R.; Huneke, J. C.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    Eleven samples from five partially degassed Mesozoic granitic xenoliths and two late Pleistocene host basalt samples from Sawmill Canyon in Sierra Nevada, California, have been analyzed using stepwise Ar-40/Ar-39 dating techniques. The petrography and analytic techniques are described and the results are presented. Isotopic compositions of Ar released from the xenoliths in several extraction steps at temperatures below about 900 C were colinear in Ar-36/Ar-40 versus Ar-39/Ar-40 diagrams and defined isochrons, giving a mean age of degassing of 119,000 + or - 7000 yr. Ar-40 extracted at higher temperatures included ancient radiogenic Ar-40 that never diffused from the xenoliths during immersion in the magma. This Ar-40 caused an increase in the apparent age for the high-temperature extractions. The high precision of the eruption age determined by this method is comparable to that obtained elsewhere by conventional K/Ar dating of sanidine.

  8. AR Sco: A Precessing White Dwarf Synchronar?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, J. I.

    2017-02-01

    The emission of the white dwarf–M dwarf binary AR Sco is driven by the rapid synchronization of its white dwarf, rather than by accretion. Synchronization requires a magnetic field ∼100 Gauss at the M dwarf and ∼ {10}8 Gauss at the white dwarf, larger than the fields of most intermediate polars but within the range of fields of known magnetic white dwarfs. The spindown power is dissipated in the atmosphere of the M dwarf, within the near zone of the rotating white dwarf’s field, by magnetic reconnection, accelerating particles that produce the observed synchrotron radiation. The displacement of the optical maximum from conjunction may be explained either by dissipation in a bow wave as the white dwarf’s magnetic field sweeps past the M dwarf or by a misaligned white dwarf rotation axis and oblique magnetic moment. In the latter case the rotation axis precesses with a period of decades, predicting a drift in the orbital phase of the optical maximum. Binaries whose emission is powered by synchronization may be termed synchronars, in analogy to magnetars.

  9. Search for cosmogenic Ar-42 in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cini Castagnoli, G.; Cane, D.; Taricco, C.; Bhandari, N.

    2003-04-01

    We have evidence for decreasing galactic cosmic ray (GCR) flux in the past 3 centuries by a factor about two [1]. The measurements of the activity of cosmogenic 44Ti (T1/2 = 59.2 y) produced by GCR in stony meteorites that fell during the last two centuries are in good agreement with the calculated values and validate the decreasing trend of GCR flux. The measurements were obtained by an hyperpure (372 cm3) Ge-NaI(Tl) spectrometer operating in the Monte dei Cappuccini laboratory in Torino[2]. To further improve upon statistical precision of 44Ti data and also to be able to measure the 42Ar (T1/2 = 33 y) which is produced in even smaller amounts by GCR in meteorites, we have set up in the same laboratory a larger (581 cm3) hyperpure Ge detector operating in coincidence with a 100 kg NaI(Tl) crystal assembly. This should enable us to confirm the above results about GCR variations. We wish to acknowledge our deep gratitude to professor Bonino, deceased on September 29, 2002, to whom the assemblage of the new equipment is due. [1] G. Bonino, G. Cini Castagnoli, D. Cane, C. Taricco and N. Bhandari,Proc. XXVII Intern. Cosmic Ray Conf. (Hamburg, 2001) 3769-3772. [2] Bonino G., Cini Castagnoli G., Cane D., Taricco C., Bhandari N, textit {34th COSPAR Sci. Ass. Houston 2002 (Adv. Space Res.)}, in press

  10. Hard x ray highlights of AR 5395

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. A.; Dennis, Brian R.

    1989-01-01

    Active Region 5395 produced an exceptional series of hard x ray bursts notable for their frequency, intensity, and impulsivity. Over the two weeks from March 6 to 19, 447 hard x ray flares were observed by the Hard X Ray Burst Spectrometer on Solar Maximum Mission (HXRBS/SMM), a rate of approx. 35 per day which exceeded the previous high by more than 50 percent. During one 5 day stretch, more than 250 flares were detected, also a new high. The three largest GOES X-flares were observed by HXRBS and had hard x ray rates over 100,000 s(exp -1) compared with only ten flares above 100,000(exp -1) during the previous nine years of the mission. An ongoing effort for the HXRBS group has been the correlated analysis of hard x ray data with flare data at other wavelengths with the most recent emphasis on those measurements with spatial information. During a series of bursts from AR 5395 at 1644 to 1648 UT on 12 March 1989, simultaneous observations were made by HXRBS and UVSP (Ultra Violet Spectrometer Polarimeter) on SMM, the two-element Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) interferometric array, and R. Canfield's H-alpha Echelle spectrograph at the National Solar Observatory at Sacramento Peak. The data show strong correlations in the hard x ray, microwave, and UV lightcurves. This event will be the subject of a combined analysis.

  11. A compilation of K-Ar-ages for southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Fred K.; Morton, Douglas M.; Morton, Janet L.; Miller, David M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to make available a large body of conventional K-Ar ages for granitic, volcanic, and metamorphic rocks collected in southern California. Although one interpretive map is included, the report consists primarily of a systematic listing, without discussion or interpretation, of published and unpublished ages that may be of value in future regional and other geologic studies. From 1973 to 1979, 468 rock samples from southern California were collected for conventional K-Ar dating under a regional geologic mapping project of Southern California (predecessor of the Southern California Areal Mapping Project). Most samples were collected and dated between 1974 and 1977. For 61 samples (13 percent of those collected), either they were discarded for varying reasons, or the original collection data were lost. For the remaining samples, 518 conventional K-Ar ages are reported here; coexisting mineral pairs were dated from many samples. Of these K-Ar ages, 225 are previously unpublished, and identified as such in table 1. All K-Ar ages are by conventional K-Ar analysis; no 40Ar/39Ar dating was done. Subsequent to the rock samples collected in the 1970s and reported here, 33 samples were collected and 38 conventional K-Ar ages determined under projects directed at (1) characterization of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic igneous rocks in and on both sides of the Transverse Ranges and (2) clarifying the Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonics of the eastern Mojave Desert. Although previously published (Beckerman et al., 1982), another eight samples and 11 conventional K-Ar ages are included here, because they augment those completed under the previous two projects.

  12. Paleomagnetic and 40Ar/39Ar geochronologic data from late Proterozoic mafic dikes and sills, Montana and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harlan, Stephen S.; Geissman, John William; Snee, Lawrence W.

    1997-01-01

    Paleomagnetic and 40Ar/39Ar results from mafic dikes and sills in northwestern Wyoming and western Montana yield similar virtual geomagnetic poles and isotopic dates. In combination with paleomagnetic and geochronologic data from elsewhere in the western Cordillera, these data provide evidence for a regional mafic magnetic event at 780 to 770 Ma that affected a large area of western North America.

  13. On Full Disclosure and Transparent Data Flow from 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology Measurements to Data Reduction to Online Repositories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A. A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Arguably 40Ar/39Ar geochronology is one of the most versatile techniques available to Earth scientists today for the dating of rocks and minerals and determining the rates of geological processes on Earth and in our solar system. Over the last four decades large quantities of high (and lower) quality 40Ar/39Ar data have been produced using many different generations of mass spectrometry instrumentation. This wealth of data is only as useful as its description and availability of metadata allows. Many online data sets or compilations available in the science literature only carry the resulting product, an age and a related uncertainty in millions of years, for example. These data points are far from desirable as these don't allow recalculation against modern-day age standards, decay constants and other parameters essential in 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. Over time these data will become less useful to the research community and eventually these will be put by the wayside. In this presentation I will emphasize the need for full disclosure of all data and metadata involved in 40Ar/39Ar geochronology. I will give examples of how a complex data flow can be kept transparent from sample preparation to measurement to data reduction and eventually the uploading into online data repositories. Without the full disclosure of our data and a transparent data flow, it is evident that we cannot live up to one of the governing doctrines in the sciences, namely reproducibility of our scientific experiments and findings.

  14. 40Ar-39Ar Studies of the Shocked L6 Chondrites Allan Hills 78003, Yamato 74445, and Yamato 791384

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Isachsen, C. E.; Weirich, J. R.; Kimura, M.

    2011-03-01

    Three heavily shocked L6 chondrites clearly record resetting of their K-Ar systems in the last ~1000 Ma. However, their Ar systematics are complicated enough that it is not obvious whether they were involved in the 475 Ma L-chondrite event.

  15. Ar-40/Ar-39 and U-Th-Pb dating of separated clasts from the Abee E4 chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Unruh, D. M.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1983-01-01

    Ar-40/Ar-39 and U-Th-Pb are investigated for three clasts from the Abee (E4) enstatite chondrite, yielding Ar-40/Ar-39 plateau ages (and/or maximum ages) of 4.5 Gy, while two of the clasts give average ages of 4.4 Gy. The 4.4-4.5 Gy range does not resolve possible age differences among the clasts. The U-Th-Pb data are consistent with the interpretation that initial clast formation occurred 4.58 Gy ago, and that the clasts have since remained closed systems which have been contaminated with terrestrial Pb. The thermal history of Abee deduced from Ar data seems consistent with that deduced from magnetic data, suggesting that various Abee components experienced separate histories until brecciation no later than 4.4 Gy ago, experiencing no significant subsequent heating.

  16. Ar-40/Ar-39 and U-Th-Pb dating of separated clasts from the Abee E4 chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Unruh, D. M.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1983-01-01

    Ar-40/Ar-39 and U-Th-Pb are investigated for three clasts from the Abee (E4) enstatite chondrite, yielding Ar-40/Ar-39 plateau ages (and/or maximum ages) of 4.5 Gy, while two of the clasts give average ages of 4.4 Gy. The 4.4-4.5 Gy range does not resolve possible age differences among the clasts. The U-Th-Pb data are consistent with the interpretation that initial clast formation occurred 4.58 Gy ago, and that the clasts have since remained closed systems which have been contaminated with terrestrial Pb. The thermal history of Abee deduced from Ar data seems consistent with that deduced from magnetic data, suggesting that various Abee components experienced separate histories until brecciation no later than 4.4 Gy ago, experiencing no significant subsequent heating.

  17. Evaluation of the IPCC Models (AR4 and AR5) in the Precipitation Simulation in the Northeast of Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, José; Vasconcelos Junior, Francisco; Chaves, Rosane; Silva, Emerson; Servain, Jacques; Costa, Alexandre; Sombra, Sérgio; Barbosa, Augusto; Dos Santos, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    With the simulations of the models used in the latest reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), comparative studies are necessary between observations and the so-called historical run (C20) and future projections of the AR4 (A2) and AR5 (RCP8.5) experiments, in order to assess whether the AR5 models had a better performance in the representation of physical processes. This article compares the sensitivity of IPCC models (AR4 and AR5) in representing the anuall average and seasonal rainfall variation (summer and autumn) in three regions of the Northeast of Brazil between 1979 and 2000, using the CMAP - CPC (Merged Analysis of Precipitation) data as reference. The projections made by these models for the period 2040-2070 were also analyzed.

  18. Factors affecting the in vivo lactone stability and systemic clearance of the lipophilic camptothecin analogue AR-67.

    PubMed

    Adane, Eyob D; Liu, Zhiwei; Xiang, Tian-Xiang; Anderson, Bradley D; Leggas, Markos

    2010-07-01

    The narrow efficacy-toxicity window of anticancer agents necessitates understanding of factors contributing to their disposition. This is especially true for camptothecins as they exist in the lactone and carboxylate forms with each moiety differentially interacting with efflux or uptake transporters. Here we determined the disposition of the lactone and carboxylate forms of AR-67, a 3(rd) generation camptothecin analogue. Pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in rats given intravenous boluses of AR-67 lactone or carboxylate with or without pharmacologic inhibitor pretreatment (GF120918 or rifampin). Pharmacokinetic modeling was used to estimate clearances, while simulations assessed the impact of clearance changes on overall AR-67 exposure. Our modeling showed that carboxylate clearance was 3.5-fold higher than that of the lactone. GF120918 decreased lactone clearance only, but rifampin decreased both lactone and carboxylate clearances. Simulations showed that decreasing carboxylate clearance, which controls the overall drug disposition, leads to significant increase in AR-67 exposure. The apparent in vivo blood stability of AR-67 is partly dependent on the increased carboxylate clearance. This may have clinical implications for populations with single nucleotide polymorphisms that impair the function of uptake transporter genes (e.g., SLCO1B1), which are potentially responsible for AR-67 carboxylate clearance.

  19. BRCA1 inhibits AR-mediated proliferation of breast cancer cells through the activation of SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwen; Luo, Jiayan; Yang, Fang; Wang, Yucai; Yin, Yongmei; Strom, Anders; Gustafsson, Jan Åke; Guan, Xiaoxiang

    2016-02-23

    Breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) is a tumor suppressor protein that functions to maintain genomic stability through critical roles in DNA repair, cell-cycle arrest, and transcriptional control. The androgen receptor (AR) is expressed in more than 70% of breast cancers and has been implicated in breast cancer pathogenesis. However, little is known about the role of BRCA1 in AR-mediated cell proliferation in human breast cancer. Here, we report that a high expression of AR in breast cancer patients was associated with shorter overall survival (OS) using a tissue microarray with 149 non-metastatic breast cancer patient samples. We reveal that overexpression of BRCA1 significantly inhibited expression of AR through activation of SIRT1 in breast cancer cells. Meanwhile, SIRT1 induction or treatment with a SIRT1 agonist, resveratrol, inhibits AR-stimulated proliferation. Importantly, this mechanism is manifested in breast cancer patient samples and TCGA database, which showed that low SIRT1 gene expression in tumor tissues compared with normal adjacent tissues predicts poor prognosis in patients with breast cancer. Taken together, our findings suggest that BRCA1 attenuates AR-stimulated proliferation of breast cancer cells via SIRT1 mediated pathway.

  20. Estimation of (41)Ar activity concentration and release rate from the TRIGA Mark-II research reactor.

    PubMed

    Hoq, M Ajijul; Soner, M A Malek; Rahman, A; Salam, M A; Islam, S M A

    2016-03-01

    The BAEC TRIGA research reactor (BTRR) is the only nuclear reactor in Bangladesh. Bangladesh Atomic Energy Regulatory Authority (BAERA) regulations require that nuclear reactor licensees undertake all reasonable precautions to protect the environment and the health and safety of persons, including identifying, controlling and monitoring the release of nuclear substances to the environment. The primary activation product of interest in terms of airborne release from the reactor is (41)Ar. (41)Ar is a noble gas readily released from the reactor stacks and most has not decayed by the time it moves offsite with normal wind speed. Initially (41)Ar is produced from irradiation of dissolved air in the primary water which eventually transfers into the air in the reactor bay. In this study, the airborne radioisotope (41)Ar generation concentration, ground level concentration and release rate from the BTRR bay region are evaluated theoretically during the normal reactor operation condition by several governing equations. This theoretical calculation eventually minimizes the doubt about radiological safety to determine the radiation level for (41)Ar activity whether it is below the permissible limit or not. Results show that the estimated activity for (41)Ar is well below the maximum permissible concentration limit set by the regulatory body, which is an assurance for the reactor operating personnel and general public. Thus the analysis performed within this paper is so much effective in the sense of ensuring radiological safety for working personnel and the environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Toward a high-resolution 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of the Tatun Volcano Group, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesko, G. T.; Song, S.; Chang, S.; Hemming, S. R.; Turrin, B. D.

    2010-12-01

    The Tatun Volcano Group [TVG] consists of five volcanic subgroups of which ~30 edifices have been identified, all in close proximity to the densely populated Taipei Basin to its south (Song et al., 2000, Journal of the Geological Society of China, in Chinese). Evidence of eruptions is in the form of mostly lava flows, with pyroclastic flows, and ash deposition (Tsai et al., 2010, TAO), consistent with vulcanian and plinian eruptions that are only minimally preserved because of the region’s high weathering rate (Belousov et al., 2010, Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research). The TVG is made up of calc-alkaline andesite, with few interspersed basaltic lava flows that bear geochemical signatures consistent with subduction volcanism, yet due to tectonic location Teng (1996, Geology) describes it as Ryukyu back-arc basin volcanism, and still others attribute volcanism here to post-collisional collapse of the Taiwan orogen (Wang et al., 1999, Tectonophysics and 2004, Journal of Petrology). Various TVG samples were previously K-Ar dated by Juang and Chen (1989, Bulletin of Central Geological Survey, in Chinese), Tsao (1994, Bulletin of Central Geological Survey, in Chinese), and 40Ar/39Ar whole rock analyses by Lee (1996, masters thesis, National Taiwan University) to suggest volcanism from 2.8-2.5Ma and then from 1.5-.22Ma after which volcanic events ceased. In contrast, radiocarbon dates obtained from charcoal in related sediment by Chen et al. (2010, TAO) and Belousov et al. (2010, Journal of Volcanology Geothermal Research) suggest volcanic activity was present at 20ka and 6ka respectively. The andesite samples are microcrystalline; therefore hand picked aliquots of groundmass from the hand magnetic fraction were subjected to several iterations of sonic rinse in glycine-based soap, then 4N HNO3, then quartz-distilled water in a preparation modified from Nicolaysen et al. (2000, EPSL). Samples were co-irradiated at the USGS facility in Denver using Alder

  2. Unique Thermal Histories from Whole-Rock 40Ar/39Ar Step-heating Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnke, P.; Harrison, M.; Heizler, M. T.; Lovera, O. M.; Warren, P. H.

    2014-12-01

    Step-heating 40Ar/39Ar analysis can reveal spatial distributions of 40Ar* at the micron scale imparted by post- crystallization heating events through complex, multi-diffusion domain models. These efforts have largely focused on single-phase, terrestrial samples with only scant attention paid to multi-phase or extra-terrestrial materials. Generalizing these models to incorporate the multiple activation energies (E) expected from bulk rock samples introduces significant interpretational ambiguity. This is because the thermal crossovers explicit in multi-E cases make the age spectrum a function of the lab heating schedule in thermally disturbed samples. A further difficulty is that unique interpretation of the associated Arrhenius plot is no longer possible and a range of E's can be fitted with equal goodness of fit. In order to address these challenges, we developed a new computational approach that simultaneously inverts the Arrhenius spectra and release pattern using a variant of the Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization (APSO) algorithm for a square-pulse heating event. Our version uses a Levy Flight to break the swarm out of a local minima rather than randomly modifying a single dimension as in the original APSO. Further we explored issues of Pareto efficiency arising from fitting two fitness functions (i.e., the fit to the age spectra and to the Arrhenius plot) and found an adequate resolution to the classic inability to have a single best fit. By utilizing multiple-E samples, we are able to obtain unique thermal history solutions. Application of these methods to high resolution age spectra of the Jilin chondrite and Apollo 16 samples (North Ray Crater) and found fits of sufficiently high fidelity to constrain the absolute temperature of the thermal episode to better than ±10%.

  3. 40Ar/39Ar constraints on the temporal evolution of Graciosa Island, Azores (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrea, Patricia; Wijbrans, Jan R.; Galé, Carlos; Ubide, Teresa; Lago, Marceliano; França, Zilda; Widom, Elisabeth

    2014-02-01

    Lava flows spanning the eruptive record of Graciosa Island (Azores archipelago) and a gabbro xenolith were dated by 40Ar/39Ar in order to constrain the Pleistocene and Holocene volcanic evolution of the island. The results range from 1.05 Ma to 3.9 ka, whereas prior published K-Ar and 14C ages range from 620 to 2 ka. The formation of the Serra das Fontes shield volcano started at minimum 1.05 Ma, and the magmatic system was active for ca. 600 ky, as suggested by the formation of the gabbro xenolith by magmatic differentiation. Evolved magmas making up the Serra das Fontes-Serra Branca composite volcano were generated at ca. 450 ka. After a period of ca. 110 ky of volcanic inactivity and erosion of volcanic edifices, volcanism was reactivated with the formation of the Vitória Unit NW platform. Later, the development of the Vulcão Central Unit started with the formation of monogenetic cones located to the south of the Serra das Fontes-Serra Branca-Vitória Unit. This volcanism became progressively more evolved and was concentrated in a main eruptive center, forming the Vulcão Central stratovolcano with an age older than 50 ka. The caldera related to this stratovolcano is older than 47 ka and was followed by effusion of basaltic magmas into the caldera, resulting in the formation of a lava lake, which ultimately spilled over the caldera rim at ca. 11 ka. The most recent eruptions on Graciosa formed two small pyroclastic cones within the caldera and the Pico do Timão cone within the Vitória Unit at ca 3.9 ka.

  4. A new approach to cosmogenic corrections in 40Ar/39Ar chronometry: Implications for the ages of Martian meteorites

    DOE PAGES

    Cassata, W. S.; Borg, L. E.

    2016-05-04

    Anomalously old 40Ar/39Ar ages are commonly obtained from Shergottites and are generally attributed to uncertainties regarding the isotopic composition of the trapped component and/or the presence of excess 40Ar. Old ages can also be obtained if inaccurate corrections for cosmogenic 36Ar are applied. Current methods for making the cosmogenic correction require simplifying assumptions regarding the spatial homogeneity of target elements for cosmogenic production and the distribution of cosmogenic nuclides relative to trapped and reactor-derived Ar isotopes. To mitigate uncertainties arising from these assumptions, a new cosmogenic correction approach utilizing the exposure age determined on an un-irradiated aliquot and step-wise productionmore » rate estimates that account for spatial variations in Ca and K is described. Data obtained from NWA 4468 and an unofficial pairing of NWA 2975, which yield anomalously old ages when corrected for cosmogenic 36Ar using conventional techniques, are used to illustrate the efficacy of this new approach. For these samples, anomalous age determinations are rectified solely by the improved cosmogenic correction technique described herein. Ages of 188 ± 17 and 184 ± 17 Ma are obtained for NWA 4468 and NWA 2975, respectively, both of which are indistinguishable from ages obtained by other radioisotopic systems. For other Shergottites that have multiple trapped components, have experienced diffusive loss of Ar, or contain excess Ar, more accurate cosmogenic corrections may aid in the interpretation of anomalous ages. In conclusion, the trapped 40Ar/36Ar ratios inferred from inverse isochron diagrams obtained from NWA 4468 and NWA 2975 are significantly lower than the Martian atmospheric value, and may represent upper mantle or crustal components.« less

  5. Ar Ar dating of authigenic K-feldspar: Quantitative modelling of radiogenic argon-loss through subgrain boundary networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, D. F.; Kelley, S. P.; Lee, M. R.; Parnell, J.; Sherlock, S. C.; Brown, D. J.

    2008-06-01

    We have analysed two distinct generations of authigenic K-feldspar in Fucoid Bed sandstones from An-t-Sron and Skiag Bridge, NW Highlands, Scotland, which have experienced post-growth heating to levels in excess of the predicted Ar-closure temperature. Authigenic K-feldspars show microtextural similarities to patch perthites; that is subgrains separated by dislocation-rich boundary networks that potentially act as fast diffusion pathways for radiogenic argon. The two generations of authigenic K-feldspar in the Fucoid Bed sandstones can be distinguished by different microtextural zones, bulk mineral compositions, fluid-inclusion populations, and inferred temperatures and chemistries of parent fluids. Ar-Ar age data obtained using high-resolution ultraviolet laser ablation, show that the first cementing generation is Ordovician and the second cementing generation is Silurian. Modelling of Ar diffusion using subgrain size as the effective diffusion dimension and a simplified tectono-thermal thrust model assuming transient heating of the Fucoid Beds is inconsistent with observed data. Removal of heat from the thrust zone through rapid flushing of heated fluids rather than transient heating can be invoked to explain the observed Ar-Ar ages for both generations of cement. Alternatively, Ar-diffusion modelling using overgrowth thickness as the effective diffusion dimension instead of subgrain size also yields models that are consistent with both the Fucoid Bed palaeothermal maxima and determined Ar-Ar age ages for the two generations of K-feldspar cement. Based on this alternate explanation, we propose a theoretical microtextural model that highlights fundamental differences between the microtextures of deuterically formed patch perthites and authigenic K-feldspars, explaining the apparent robustness of authigenic K-feldspar with respect to Ar-retention.

  6. A new approach to cosmogenic corrections in 40Ar/39Ar chronometry: Implications for the ages of Martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassata, W. S.; Borg, L. E.

    2016-08-01

    Anomalously old 40Ar/39Ar ages are commonly obtained from Shergottites and are generally attributed to uncertainties regarding the isotopic composition of the trapped component and/or the presence of excess 40Ar. Old ages can also be obtained if inaccurate corrections for cosmogenic 36Ar are applied. Current methods for making the cosmogenic correction require simplifying assumptions regarding the spatial homogeneity of target elements for cosmogenic production and the distribution of cosmogenic nuclides relative to trapped and reactor-derived Ar isotopes. To mitigate uncertainties arising from these assumptions, a new cosmogenic correction approach utilizing the exposure age determined on an un-irradiated aliquot and step-wise production rate estimates that account for spatial variations in Ca and K is described. Data obtained from NWA 4468 and an unofficial pairing of NWA 2975, which yield anomalously old ages when corrected for cosmogenic 36Ar using conventional techniques, are used to illustrate the efficacy of this new approach. For these samples, anomalous age determinations are rectified solely by the improved cosmogenic correction technique described herein. Ages of 188 ± 17 and 184 ± 17 Ma are obtained for NWA 4468 and NWA 2975, respectively, both of which are indistinguishable from ages obtained by other radioisotopic systems. For other Shergottites that have multiple trapped components, have experienced diffusive loss of Ar, or contain excess Ar, more accurate cosmogenic corrections may aid in the interpretation of anomalous ages. The trapped 40Ar/36Ar ratios inferred from inverse isochron diagrams obtained from NWA 4468 and NWA 2975 are significantly lower than the Martian atmospheric value, and may represent upper mantle or crustal components.

  7. New 40Ar/39Ar Ages From Southwest Bolivia Refine the Timing of APVC Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salisbury, M.; de Silva, S. L.; Jicha, B.; Singer, B.; Jiménez, N.; Ort, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex (APVC) of the Central Andes has produced prodigious silicic volcanism (at least 11,000 km3 of magma) over the last 10 Ma including some of the largest known ignimbrites on Earth. Despite excellent exposure, little previous work had been conducted on the timing and distribution of ignimbrite volcanism in the Lípez region of southwestern Bolivia, the heart of the APVC. To address this deficiency we have performed ~612 single crystal laser-fusion 40Ar/39Ar analyses from 39 pumice and bulk matrix samples collected from the main ignimbrite units within the Lípez region. Geochemistry of pumice and mineral samples, and paleomagnetic data are also being used to correlate individual ignimbrite units. Our new 40Ar/39Ar results establish new or refined eruption ages (with 2σ error) from the Vilama caldera at 8.41±0.02 Ma, Pastos Grandes caldera at 5.45±0.02 and 2.94±0.01 Ma, and Guacha caldera at 5.65±0.01, and 3.57±0.02 Ma. New ages were also determined for eruptions from the Panizos ignimbrite shield (6.86±0.03 Ma), Juvina ignimbrite shield (5.23±0.01 Ma), and the Laguna Colorado ignimbrite shield (2.21±0.05 and 1.95±0.03 Ma). The oldest ignimbrite we have found in the area is 10.33±0.64 Ma, a local unit beneath the Vilama ignimbrite. The youngest units have been identified west of the Guacha caldera with eruption ages of 1.70±0.6 Ma and 0.70±0.01 Ma. These results demonstrate that ignimbrite-producing eruptions in the Lípez region span the age of APVC volcanism previously established, with the largest eruptions occurring from long-lived, cyclic supervolcano caldera systems like Guacha and Pastos Grandes. The aggregate data from the APVC support the hypothesis that the APVC developed predominantly during distinct pulses of massive ignimbrite eruptions at ~8, 6, and 4 Ma and attest to episodic behavior of the magmatic system. Ignimbrites of <1 Ma, the cyclical nature of activity, and the continued geothermal presence and

  8. High-precision 40Ar/39Ar age for the Jehol Biota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S.; Zhang, H.; Renne, P. R.; Fang, Y.

    2008-12-01

    Abundant fossils of the terrestrial Jehol Biota, including plants, insects, dinosaurs, birds, mammals and freshwater invertebrates, were discovered from the Yixian Formation and the overlying Jiufotang Formation in Inner Mongolia, Hebei Province and Liaoning Province, northeastern China. Because of the exceptional preservation of fossils, the Jehol Biota is one of the most important Mesozoic fossil outcrops and referred to as a "Mesozoic Pompeii". The Jehol Biota has provided a rare opportunity to address questions about the origin of birds, the evolution of feathers and flight, the early diversification of angiosperms and the timing of the radiation of placental mammals. The Tuchengzi Formation, which lies unconformably just below the Yixian Formation and consists mainly of variegated sandstones, is less fossiliferous than the two overlying formations. However, dinosaur tracks, silicified wood and compressed plants are found in this formation. A systematic 40Ar/39Ar dating of the Yixian and the Jiufotang formations was undertaken to provide a framework for understanding the timing and duration of the Jehol Biota and evolutionary events represented within it. Furthermore, determining the absolute age of the Tuchengzi Formation provides information to interpret abundant dinosaur tracks within and provide better age constrains for the beginning of the Jehol Biota. Here we present robust high-precision 40Ar/39Ar data for six tuff samples and two basalt samples collected from the Tuchengzi, the Yixian and the Jiufotang formations near the classic outcrops in western Liaoning, NE China. We obtain an age of 139.5 ± 1.0 Ma for the uppermost Tuchengzi Formation, an age of 129.7 ± 0.5 Ma for a basaltic lava from the bottom of the Yixian Formation and an age of 122.1 ± 0.3 Ma for a tuff from the base of the overlying Jiufotang Formation. Our data indicate that the Yixian Formation was deposited during the Early Cretaceous, the Barremian to early Aptian, within a time span

  9. 40Ar/(39)Ar dating of the Kapthurin Formation, Baringo, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Deino, Alan L; McBrearty, Sally

    2002-01-01

    The(40)Ar/(39)Ar radiometric dating technique has been applied to tuffs and lavas of the Kapthurin Formation in the Tugen Hills, Kenya Rift Valley. Two variants of the(40)Ar/(39)Ar technique, single-crystal total fusion (SCTF) and laser incremental heating (LIH) have been employed to date five marker horizons within the formation: near the base, the Kasurein Basalt at 0.61+/-0.04 Ma; the Pumice Tuff at 0.543+/-0.004 Ma; the Upper Kasurein Basalt at 0.552+/-0.015 Ma; the Grey Tuff at 0.509+/-0.009 Ma; and within the upper part of the formation, the Bedded Tuff at 0.284+/-0.012 Ma. The new, precise radiometric age determination for the Pumice Tuff also provides an age for the widespread Lake Baringo Trachyte, since the Pumice Tuff is the early pyroclastic phase of this voluminous trachyte eruption. These results establish the age of fossil hominids KNM-BK 63-67 and KNM-BK 8518 at approximately 0.510-0.512 Ma, a significant finding given that few Middle Pleistocene hominids are radiometrically dated. The Kapthurin hominids are thus the near contemporaries of those from Bodo, Ethiopia and Tanzania. A flake and core industry from lacustrine sediments in the lower part of the formation is constrained by new dates of 0.55-0.52 Ma, a period during which the Acheulian industry, characterized by handaxes, is known throughout East Africa. Points, typical of the Middle Stone Age (MSA), are found in Kapthurin Formation sediments now shown to date to between 0.509+/-0.009 Ma and 0.284+/-0.012 Ma. This date exceeds previous estimates for the age of the MSA elsewhere in East Africa by 49 ka, and establishes the age of Acheulian to MSA transition for the region. Evidence of the use of the Levallois technique for the manufacture of both small flakes and biface preforms, the systematic production of blades, and the use and processing of red ochre also occurs in this interval. The presence of blades and red ochre at this depth is important as blades signify a high degree of technical

  10. Ar-40/Ar-39 age determinations for the Rotoiti eruption, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flude, S.; Storey, M.

    2013-12-01

    The contemporaneous Rotoiti and Earthquake Flat ignimbrites, erupted from the Taupo Volcanic zone, New Zealand, form a distinctive tephrostratigraphic horizon in the Southern Pacific. Radioisotopic dating results for these eruptions remain controversial, with published ages ranging from 35.1 × 2.8 ka [1] to 71 × 6 ka [2], with 61.0 × 1.5 ka [3] often being cited as the most widely accepted age. These eruptions are difficult to date as their age is near the limit for various radiometric dating techniques, which are complicated by a large proportion of inherited material (xenocrysts) and a lack of phases suitable for dating. Glass-bearing plutonic blocks erupted with the Rotoiti and Earthquake Flat ignimbrites have previously been interpreted as deriving from a slowly cooled and incompletely solidified magma body that was sampled by the eruptions. They contain large vugs lined with euhedral quartz, sanidine and biotite crystals, indicating that these crystals grew in a gas or aqueous fluid rich environment and are interpreted to have formed shortly before or during eruption. Here we will present Ar-40/Ar-39 ages for sanidines and biotites extracted from vugs in lithic blocks erupted as part of the Earthquake Flat ignimbrite. We show that, even for vug-lining material, inherited ages remain a problem and are the likely source of the wide variation in published radiometric ages. Nevertheless, many of the Ar-40/Ar-39 ages are much younger than the 61 ka age [3] and are more consistent with the recent stratigraphic, C-14 and U-238/Th-230+(U-Th)/He ages that have been suggested (e.g. [4,5]). 1. Whitehead, N. & Ditchburn, R. New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics 37, 381-383 (1994). 2. Ota, Y., Omura, A. & Iwata, H. New Zealand Journal of Geology and Geophysics 32, 327-331 (1989). 3. Wilson, C. J. N. et al. Quaternary Science Reviews 26, 1861-1870 (2007). 4. Molloy, C., Shane, P. & Augustinus, P. Geological Society of America Bulletin 121, 1666-1677 (2009). 5

  11. Implications of new 40Ar/39Ar data for the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, P. R.; Deino, A.; Hilgen, F.; Kuiper, K.; Mark, D. F.; Mitchell, W. S.; Morgan, L. E.; Smit, J.

    2012-12-01

    The cause of the mass extinctions across the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary (KPB) is still controversial. Previous geochronological data [1-3] appear to preclude the Chicxulub impact as a causal mechanism as they indicate that the KPB predated the impact by 181 ± 71 ka (1σ here and throughout). New 40Ar/39Ar data, determined blind in the BGC and SUERC labs, for the terrestrial KPB (IrZ-coal bentonite) from the Hell Creek area of northeastern Montana yield an age of 66.044 ± 0.011/0.045 Ma (without/with systematic uncertainties, calibrated per [4]). New 40Ar/39Ar data for Haitian tektites, combined with previous work [2,3], yield an age of 66.038 ± 0.025/0.049 Ma thereby establishing synchrony between the terrestrial KPB and the Chicxulub bolide impact to within 33 ka. The absolute boundary age of 66.044 Ma ± 0.045 [4] or 65.837 ± 0.061 Ma [5] allows clear discrimination between Earth's 405 ka orbital eccentricity cycles and both calibrations favor the orbital tuning chronology of [5] for the KPB at Zumaia, Spain. The former calibration is corroborated by U/Pb data [6]. In contrast, a recent orbital chronology proposed for the Zumaia section [7] infers an age of 65.2 Ma for the KPB, suggesting that the tuning missed two 405 ka eccentricity cycles. New data for tuffs above the KPB indicate a dramatic reduction in the post-KPB timescale of faunal recovery during the Puercan1 NALMA substage, and for the restoration of pre-KPB atmospheric δ13C values, to several tens of ka at most. Our new data clearly implicate a significant role for the Chicxulub impact in the KPB extinctions, but this cannot explain the significant pre-KPB climate instability or precursory faunal turnover [8]. The Chicxulub impact likely delivered the final blow to stressed ecosystems rather than being the sole cause of the KPB extinctions. The role of roughly synchronous phenomena such as eruption of the multiphased Deccan Traps [9] remains to be tested via high-precision geochronology. Refs

  12. Androgen Receptor Variant AR-V9 Is Coexpressed with AR-V7 in Prostate Cancer Metastases and Predicts Abiraterone Resistance.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Manish; Ho, Yeung; Hillman, David W; Van Etten, Jamie L; Henzler, Christine; Yang, Rendong; Sperger, Jamie M; Li, Yingming; Tseng, Elizabeth; Hon, Ting; Clark, Tyson; Tan, Winston; Carlson, Rachel E; Wang, Liguo; Sicotte, Hugues; Thai, Ho; Jimenez, Rafael; Huang, Haojie; Vedell, Peter T; Eckloff, Bruce W; Quevedo, Jorge F; Pitot, Henry C; Costello, Brian A; Jen, Jin; Wieben, Eric D; Silverstein, Kevin A T; Lang, Joshua M; Wang, Liewei; Dehm, Scott M

    2017-08-15

    Purpose: Androgen receptor (AR) variant AR-V7 is a ligand-independent transcription factor that promotes prostate cancer resistance to AR-targeted therapies. Accordingly, efforts are under way to develop strategies for monitoring and inhibiting AR-V7 in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The purpose of this study was to understand whether other AR variants may be coexpressed with AR-V7 and promote resistance to AR-targeted therapies.Experimental Design: We utilized complementary short- and long-read sequencing of intact AR mRNA isoforms to characterize AR expression in CRPC models. Coexpression of AR-V7 and AR-V9 mRNA in CRPC metastases and circulating tumor cells was assessed by RNA-seq and RT-PCR, respectively. Expression of AR-V9 protein in CRPC models was evaluated with polyclonal antisera. Multivariate analysis was performed to test whether AR variant mRNA expression in metastatic tissues was associated with a 12-week progression-free survival endpoint in a prospective clinical trial of 78 CRPC-stage patients initiating therapy with the androgen synthesis inhibitor, abiraterone acetate.Results: AR-V9 was frequently coexpressed with AR-V7. Both AR variant species were found to share a common 3' terminal cryptic exon, which rendered AR-V9 susceptible to experimental manipulations that were previously thought to target AR-V7 uniquely. AR-V9 promoted ligand-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. High AR-V9 mRNA expression in CRPC metastases was predictive of primary resistance to abiraterone acetate (HR = 4.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.31-12.2; P = 0.02).Conclusions: AR-V9 may be an important component of therapeutic resistance in CRPC. Clin Cancer Res; 23(16); 4704-15. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Spatially Resolved, Correlated Variations in Apparent 40Ar/39Ar Ages and Ca/K Ratios in Apollo 17 Impact Melt Breccia 77135

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercer, C. M.; Hodges, K. V.; Jolliff, B. L.; van Soest, M. C.; Wartho, J.-A.; Weirich, J. R.

    2015-07-01

    Although the Apollo 17 impact melt breccia 77135 has experienced partial Ar loss, we found that the high spatial-resolution afforded by the laser microprobe 40Ar/39Ar method allowed us to avoid materials that preferentially experienced Ar loss.

  14. The development of AR book for computer learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadung, Muneeroh; Wani, Najela; Tongmnee, Nur-aiynee

    2017-08-01

    Educators need to provide the alternative educational tools to foster learning outcomes of students. By using AR technology to create exciting edutainment experiences, this paper presents how augmented reality (AR) can be applied in the education. This study aims to develop the AR book for tenth grade students (age 15-16) and evaluate its quality. The AR book was developed based on ADDIE framework processes to provide computer learning on software computer knowledge. The content was accorded with the current Thai education curriculum. The AR book had 10 pages in three topics (the first was "Introduction," the second was "System Software" and the third was "Application Software"). Each page contained markers that placed virtual objects (2D animation and video clip). The obtained data were analyzed in terms of average and standard deviation. The validity of multimedia design of the AR book was assessed by three experts in multimedia design. A five-point Likert scale was used and the values were X¯ =4 .84 , S.D. = 1.27 which referred to very high. Moreover, three content experts, who specialize in computer teaching, evaluated the AR book's validity. The values determined by the experts were X¯ =4 .69 , S.D. = 0.29 which referred to very high. Implications for future study and education are discussed.

  15. ARS-12G inertial angular vibration sensor provides nanoradian measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughlin, Darren R.; Smith, Dennis

    2001-08-01

    Applied Technology Associates' ARS-12 is the most sensitive inertial angular vibration sensor available in the market today. The sensing mechanism is based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) principles. This sensor has a bandwidth from 1-1000 Hz and a noise-equivalent angle of less than 35 nanoradians from 2-1000 Hz. The ARS-12 can measure inertial angular motions of less than 10 nanoradians at discrete frequencies. Their solid state design makes these sensors smaller and more rugged than any previous angular vibration sensor. In addition, the ARS-12 is essentially impervious to linear acceleration and angular cross-axis sensitivity is limited to incorrect physical alignment. The ARS-12 has recently undergone several design changes in order to survive the space environment. This new model, the ARS-12G, also has increased reliability and tighter performance specifications. The ARS-12G design, testing, and performance will be reviewed in this paper. Several ARS-12G sensor packages are currently being tested and space-qualified for Boeing(HSC) and Japan's space agency, NASDA.

  16. ELF5-Mediated AR Activation Regulates Prostate Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kai; Guo, Yongmin; Yang, Xiong; Zhang, Zhihong; Zhang, Changwen; Xu, Yong

    2017-01-01

    The transcription factor E74-like factor 5 (ELF5) is a potent antioncogene that can prevent epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis in prostate cancer (PCa). However, little is known how it suppress the tumor growth and if it can interact with androgen receptor (AR). In this study, we find that the ELF5 is frequently expressed in AR activated PCa cells, where it binds to AR acting as a physiological partner and negatively regulates its transcriptional activity. In addition, the interaction between ELF5 and AR is androgen-dependent. Downregulation of ELF5 by shRNA increases the expression of AR-response genes and the progression of PCa. Moreover, ELF5 is a AR-dependent gene that its expression can be induced by androgen and suppressed by antiandrogen treatment. Notably, forced reduction of ELF5 in LNCaP cells facilitates the binding of AR to ARE in ELF5 gene and enabling its transcription, so that low level ELF5 can turn up its own expression by the negative feedback loop. PMID:28287091

  17. ELF5-Mediated AR Activation Regulates Prostate Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Guo, Yongmin; Yang, Xiong; Zhang, Zhihong; Zhang, Changwen; Xu, Yong

    2017-03-13

    The transcription factor E74-like factor 5 (ELF5) is a potent antioncogene that can prevent epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis in prostate cancer (PCa). However, little is known how it suppress the tumor growth and if it can interact with androgen receptor (AR). In this study, we find that the ELF5 is frequently expressed in AR activated PCa cells, where it binds to AR acting as a physiological partner and negatively regulates its transcriptional activity. In addition, the interaction between ELF5 and AR is androgen-dependent. Downregulation of ELF5 by shRNA increases the expression of AR-response genes and the progression of PCa. Moreover, ELF5 is a AR-dependent gene that its expression can be induced by androgen and suppressed by antiandrogen treatment. Notably, forced reduction of ELF5 in LNCaP cells facilitates the binding of AR to ARE in ELF5 gene and enabling its transcription, so that low level ELF5 can turn up its own expression by the negative feedback loop.

  18. Molecular modeling of the effects of 40Ar recoil in illite particles on their K-Ar isotope dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczerba, Marek; Derkowski, Arkadiusz; Kalinichev, Andrey G.; Środoń, Jan

    2015-06-01

    The radioactive decay of 40K to 40Ar is the basis of isotope age determination of micaceous clay minerals formed during diagenesis. The difference in K-Ar ages between fine and coarse grained illite particles has been interpreted using detrital-authigenic components system, its crystallization history or post-crystallization diffusion. Yet another mechanism should also be considered: natural 40Ar recoil. Whether this recoil mechanism can result in a significant enough loss of 40Ar to provide observable decrease of K-Ar age of the finest illite crystallites at diagenetic temperatures - is the primary objective of this study which is based on molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. All the simulations were performed for the same kinetic energy (initial velocity) of the 40Ar atom, but for varying recoil angles that cover the entire range of their possible values. The results show that 40Ar recoil can lead to various deformations of the illite structure, often accompanied by the displacement of OH groups or breaking of the Si-O bonds. Depending on the recoil angle, there are four possible final positions of the 40Ar atom with respect to the 2:1 layer at the end of the simulation: it can remain in the interlayer space or end up in the closest tetrahedral, octahedral or the opposite tetrahedral sheet. No simulation angles were found for which the 40Ar atom after recoil passes completely through the 2:1 layer. The energy barrier for 40Ar passing through the hexagonal cavity from the tetrahedral sheet into the interlayer was calculated to be 17 kcal/mol. This reaction is strongly exothermic, therefore there is almost no possibility for 40Ar to remain in the tetrahedral sheet of the 2:1 layer over geological time periods. It will either leave the crystal, if close enough to the edge, or return to the interlayer space. On the other hand, if 40Ar ends up in the octahedral sheet after recoil, a substantially higher energy barrier of 55 kcal/mol prevents it from leaving

  19. Management of plant species for controlling pests, by peasant farmers at Lagoa Seca, Paraíba state, Brazil: an ethnoecological approach

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Andréia de Souza; Mourão, José da Silva

    2006-01-01

    Ethnoecological knowledge may be understood as spontaneous knowledge, culturally referenced of any society's members, learned and transmitted through social interactions and that are targeted at resolution of daily routine situations. The traditional knowledge in small scale economy societies as well as the non-academic knowledge in urban-industrial societies might be included in this concept. An ethnoecological approach study was performed here on people living at the communities of Alvinho, Almeida, Chã do Marinho, Floriano, and Chã de Oiti, all located in the municipality of Lagoa Seca, Paraíba state, Northeast Brazil. The general objective pursued here was to study the knowledge that peasant farmers have on management of plant species utilized for pest control. For this, the methodological instruments employed here to investigate the ethnoecological knowledge were: direct observation, structured and semi-structured interviews, and tours conducted by local peasant farmers. We analyzed the data obtained under an emic/etic view and also by comparing the local knowledge with those obtained from the literature. The results showed that people in those communities utilize management alternatives for controlling pests, which are mainly: (i) fallowing; (ii) crop rotation; (iii) destruction of crop remains and fruits attacked by pests; (iv) alternations of crops with repellent plants; and/or (v) mixed cropping; (vi) insect's larvae covered with soil; (vii) crops irrigated abundantly; and (viii) soil preparation. The recovery and comprehension we get about this knowledge as well as the farmers' savoir faire, are extremely important to the revival of ancient agricultural practices, which have been forgotten due to advances in modern agriculture. The data obtained here showed that a huge body of knowledge the farmers have on many forms or strategies of management are generally compatible with scientific knowledge. PMID:17026748

  20. Metabolic pathways of the camptothecin analog AR-67.

    PubMed

    Horn, Jamie; Milewska, Marta; Arnold, Susanne M; Leggas, Markos

    2011-04-01

    7-tert-Butyldimethylsilyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (AR-67; also known as DB-67) is a novel lipophilic camptothecin analog in early-phase anticancer clinical trials. In support of these studies, we evaluated the metabolism of AR-67 in vitro and identified potential metabolites in patient samples. The lactone form of AR-67 was found to be preferentially metabolized over AR-67 carboxylate in human microsomes. Subsequently, the lactone form was tested as a substrate in a panel of CYP450 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes known to metabolize the majority of clinically approved molecules. AR-67 was metabolized by CYP3A5, CYP3A4, CYP1A1, and CYP1A2, in order of activity. Extrahepatic UGT1A8 and UGT1A7 possessed at least 6-fold higher metabolizing activity than UGT1A1 and other UGT enzymes tested. CYP1A1 and UGT1A7 displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, whereas CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and UGT1A8 displayed kinetics consistent with substrate inhibition. Chromatographic analysis of representative patient plasma and urine samples demonstrated the presence of AR-67 glucuronides and oxidized products in the urine but only in very minimal amounts. We conclude that limited in vivo metabolism of AR-67 by UGT1A1 may partly explain the absence of AR-67 glucuronides in plasma and hypothesize that UGT1A8- and CYP3A-mediated biotransformation within the gastrointestinal epithelium may provide protective mechanisms against AR-67 gastrointestinal toxicity.

  1. Metabolic Pathways of the Camptothecin Analog AR-67

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Jamie; Milewska, Marta; Arnold, Susanne M.

    2011-01-01

    7-tert-Butyldimethylsilyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (AR-67; also known as DB-67) is a novel lipophilic camptothecin analog in early-phase anticancer clinical trials. In support of these studies, we evaluated the metabolism of AR-67 in vitro and identified potential metabolites in patient samples. The lactone form of AR-67 was found to be preferentially metabolized over AR-67 carboxylate in human microsomes. Subsequently, the lactone form was tested as a substrate in a panel of CYP450 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes known to metabolize the majority of clinically approved molecules. AR-67 was metabolized by CYP3A5, CYP3A4, CYP1A1, and CYP1A2, in order of activity. Extrahepatic UGT1A8 and UGT1A7 possessed at least 6-fold higher metabolizing activity than UGT1A1 and other UGT enzymes tested. CYP1A1 and UGT1A7 displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, whereas CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and UGT1A8 displayed kinetics consistent with substrate inhibition. Chromatographic analysis of representative patient plasma and urine samples demonstrated the presence of AR-67 glucuronides and oxidized products in the urine but only in very minimal amounts. We conclude that limited in vivo metabolism of AR-67 by UGT1A1 may partly explain the absence of AR-67 glucuronides in plasma and hypothesize that UGT1A8- and CYP3A-mediated biotransformation within the gastrointestinal epithelium may provide protective mechanisms against AR-67 gastrointestinal toxicity. PMID:21189330

  2. Cooling and inferred uplift/erosion history of the Grenville Orogen, Ontario: Constraints from 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosca, Michael A.; Sutter, John F.; Essene, Eric J.

    1991-10-01

    Stepwise 40Ar/39Ar degassing experiments of 57 mineral separates of hornblende, muscovite, biotite, and perthitic microcline have been used in conjunction with petrologic observations to place regional constraints on the postmetamorphic cooling and the inferred uplift and erosion history of the Grenville Orogen in Ontario. The 40Ar/39Ar data support an interpretation of slow, nearly uniform cooling (1°-4°C/m.y.) from temperatures of ˜500°C to below ˜150°C. In the Central Gneiss Belt (CGB) hornblendes cooled through Ar closure between 930 and 1025 Ma, whereas in the Central Metasedimentary Belt (CMB) hornblendes record the following range in 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages: 1104 Ma in the Frontenac terrane, 1007-1067 Ma in the Sharbot Lake terrane, 919-1026 Ma in the Elzevir terrane, and 972 Ma in the Central Metasedimentary Belt Boundary Zone. Regional uplift/erosion rates of 0.03-0.14 km/m.y. have been estimated for the Grenville Orogen in Ontario based on the 40Ar/39Ar data, a model retrograde P-T path for rocks of the CGB, and an upper time constraint provided by flat, overlying Cambrian and Ordovician sediments. These erosion rates are consistent with rates estimated for other Proterozoic or Archean granulite terranes but are an order of magnitude slower than active orogens such as the Alps and Himalayas. A regular variation in hornblende 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages is observed in rocks that traverse highly strained often mylonitic shear zones that separate the four major terranes of the CMB. The pattern of 40Ar/39Ar ages is interpreted to reflect late-tectonic extension, consistent with field observations in the Central Metasedimentary Belt Boundary Zone and elsewhere in the CMB. Up to 13 km of vertical displacement is inferred for some rocks in the CMB between the time they cooled below closure to argon diffusion in hornblende (˜500°C) and their exposure at the surface (˜25°C).

  3. Regulation of StAR by the N-terminal Domain and Coinduction of SIK1 and TIS11b/Znf36l1 in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinwoo; Tong, Tiegang; Duan, Haichuan; Foong, Yee Hoon; Musaitif, Ibrahim; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Jefcoate, Colin

    2016-01-01

    The cholesterol transfer function of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is uniquely integrated into adrenal cells, with mRNA translation and protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation occurring at the mitochondrial outer membrane (OMM). The StAR C-terminal cholesterol-binding domain (CBD) initiates mitochondrial intermembrane contacts to rapidly direct cholesterol to Cyp11a1 in the inner membrane (IMM). The conserved StAR N-terminal regulatory domain (NTD) includes a leader sequence targeting the CBD to OMM complexes that initiate cholesterol transfer. Here, we show how the NTD functions to enhance CBD activity delivers more efficiently from StAR mRNA in adrenal cells, and then how two factors hormonally restrain this process. NTD processing at two conserved sequence sites is selectively affected by StAR PKA phosphorylation. The CBD functions as a receptor to stimulate the OMM/IMM contacts that mediate transfer. The NTD controls the transit time that integrates extramitochondrial StAR effects on cholesterol homeostasis with other mitochondrial functions, including ATP generation, inter-organelle fusion, and the major permeability transition pore in partnership with other OMM proteins. PKA also rapidly induces two additional StAR modulators: salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) and Znf36l1/Tis11b. Induced SIK1 attenuates the activity of CRTC2, a key mediator of StAR transcription and splicing, but only as cAMP levels decline. TIS11b inhibits translation and directs the endonuclease-mediated removal of the 3.5-kb StAR mRNA. Removal of either of these functions individually enhances cAMP-mediated induction of StAR. High-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (HR-FISH) of StAR RNA reveals asymmetric transcription at the gene locus and slow RNA splicing that delays mRNA formation, potentially to synchronize with cholesterol import. Adrenal cells may retain slow transcription to integrate with intermembrane NTD activation. HR-FISH resolves individual 3.5-kb StAR

  4. Regulation of StAR by the N-terminal Domain and Coinduction of SIK1 and TIS11b/Znf36l1 in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jinwoo; Tong, Tiegang; Duan, Haichuan; Foong, Yee Hoon; Musaitif, Ibrahim; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Jefcoate, Colin

    2016-01-01

    The cholesterol transfer function of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is uniquely integrated into adrenal cells, with mRNA translation and protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation occurring at the mitochondrial outer membrane (OMM). The StAR C-terminal cholesterol-binding domain (CBD) initiates mitochondrial intermembrane contacts to rapidly direct cholesterol to Cyp11a1 in the inner membrane (IMM). The conserved StAR N-terminal regulatory domain (NTD) includes a leader sequence targeting the CBD to OMM complexes that initiate cholesterol transfer. Here, we show how the NTD functions to enhance CBD activity delivers more efficiently from StAR mRNA in adrenal cells, and then how two factors hormonally restrain this process. NTD processing at two conserved sequence sites is selectively affected by StAR PKA phosphorylation. The CBD functions as a receptor to stimulate the OMM/IMM contacts that mediate transfer. The NTD controls the transit time that integrates extramitochondrial StAR effects on cholesterol homeostasis with other mitochondrial functions, including ATP generation, inter-organelle fusion, and the major permeability transition pore in partnership with other OMM proteins. PKA also rapidly induces two additional StAR modulators: salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) and Znf36l1/Tis11b. Induced SIK1 attenuates the activity of CRTC2, a key mediator of StAR transcription and splicing, but only as cAMP levels decline. TIS11b inhibits translation and directs the endonuclease-mediated removal of the 3.5-kb StAR mRNA. Removal of either of these functions individually enhances cAMP-mediated induction of StAR. High-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization (HR-FISH) of StAR RNA reveals asymmetric transcription at the gene locus and slow RNA splicing that delays mRNA formation, potentially to synchronize with cholesterol import. Adrenal cells may retain slow transcription to integrate with intermembrane NTD activation. HR-FISH resolves individual 3.5-kb StAR

  5. Electronic structure modification of the KTaO3 single-crystal surface by Ar+ bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadehra, Neha; Tomar, Ruchi; Halder, Soumyadip; Sharma, Minaxi; Singh, Inderjit; Jena, Nityasagar; Prakash, Bhanu; De Sarkar, Abir; Bera, Chandan; Venkatesan, Ananth; Chakraverty, S.

    2017-09-01

    Oxygen vacancies play an important role in controlling the physical properties of a perovskite oxide. We report alterations in the electronic properties of a cubic perovskite oxide, namely, KTaO3, as a function of oxygen vacancies. The conducting surface of the KTaO3 single-crystal substrate has been realized via Ar+ irradiation. The band gap changes as a function of conductivity which is controlled by irradiation time, indicating the formation of defect states. Kelvin probe force microscopy suggests a sharp increase in the work function upon Ar+ irradiation for a short period of time followed by a monotonic decrease, as we increase the irradiation time. Our experimental findings along with theoretical simulations suggest a significant surface dipole contribution and an unusual change in the electronic band line-up of KTaO3 due to oxygen vacancies.

  6. Jurassic cooling ages in Paleozoic to early Mesozoic granitoids of northeastern Patagonia: 40Ar/39Ar, 40K-40Ar mica and U-Pb zircon evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Dopico, Carmen I.; Tohver, Eric; López de Luchi, Mónica G.; Wemmer, Klaus; Rapalini, Augusto E.; Cawood, Peter A.

    2016-12-01

    U-Pb SHRIMP zircon crystallization ages and Ar-Ar and K-Ar mica cooling ages for basement rocks of the Yaminué and Nahuel Niyeu areas in northeastern Patagonia are presented. Granitoids that cover the time span from Ordovician to Early Triassic constitute the main outcrops of the western sector of the Yaminué block. The southern Yaminué Metaigneous Complex comprises highly deformed Ordovician and Permian granitoids crosscut by undeformed leucogranite dikes (U-Pb SHRIMP zircon age of 254 ± 2 Ma). Mica separates from highly deformed granitoids from the southern sector yielded an Ar-Ar muscovite age of 182 ± 3 Ma and a K-Ar biotite age of 186 ± 2 Ma. Moderately to highly deformed Permian to Early Triassic granitoids made up the northern Yaminué Complex. The Late Permian to Early Triassic (U-Pb SHRIMP zircon age of 252 ± 6 Ma) Cabeza de Vaca Granite of the Yaminué block yielded Jurassic mica K-Ar cooling ages (198 ± 2, 191 ± 1, and 190 ± 2 Ma). At the boundary between the Yaminué and Nahuel Niyeu blocks, K-Ar muscovite ages of 188 ± 3 and 193 ± 5 Ma were calculated for the Flores Granite, whereas the Early Permian Navarrete granodiorite, located in the Nahuel Niyeu block, yielded a K-Ar biotite age of 274 ± 4 Ma. The Jurassic thermal history is not regionally uniform. In the supracrustal exposures of the Nahuel Niyeu block, the Early Permian granitoids of its western sector as well as other Permian plutons and Ordovician leucogranites located further east show no evidence of cooling age reset since mica ages suggest cooling in the wake of crystallization of these intrusive rocks. In contrast, deeper crustal levels are inferred for Permian-Early Triassic granitoids in the Yaminué block since cooling ages for these rocks are of Jurassic age (198-182 Ma). Jurassic resetting is contemporaneous with the massive Lower Jurassic Flores Granite, and the Marifil and Chon Aike volcanic provinces. This intraplate deformational pulse that affected northeastern

  7. A generic interface element for COMET-AR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccleary, Susan L.; Aminpour, Mohammad A.

    1995-01-01

    The implementation of an interface element capability within the COMET-AR software system is described. The report is intended for use by both users of currently implemented interface elements and developers of new interface element formulations. Guidance on the use of COMET-AR is given. A glossary is provided as an Appendix to this report for readers unfamiliar with the jargon of COMET-AR. A summary of the currently implemented interface element formulation is presented in Section 7.3 of this report.

  8. Application of periodogram and AR spectral analysis to EEG signals.

    PubMed

    Akin, M; Kiymik, M K

    2000-08-01

    In this study, in order to analyze the EEG signal, the conventional and modern spectral methods were investigated. Interpretation and performance of these methods were detected for clinical applications. For this purpose EEG data obtained from different persons were processed by PC computer using periodogram and AR model algorithms. Periodogram and AR modeling approaches were compared for their resolution and interpretation performance. It was determined that the AR approach is better for the use in clinical and research areas, because of the clear spectra that are obtained by it.

  9. Fluorocarbon assisted atomic layer etching of SiO2 and Si using cyclic Ar/C4F8 and Ar/CHF3 plasma

    DOE PAGES

    Metzler, Dominik; Li, Chen; Engelmann, Sebastian; ...

    2015-11-11

    The need for atomic layer etching (ALE) is steadily increasing as smaller critical dimensions and pitches are required in device patterning. A flux-control based cyclic Ar/C4F8 ALE based on steady-state Ar plasma in conjunction with periodic, precise C4F8 injection and synchronized plasma-based low energy Ar+ ion bombardment has been established for SiO2.1 In this work, the cyclic process is further characterized and extended to ALE of silicon under similar process conditions. The use of CHF3 as a precursor is examined and compared to C4F8. CHF3 is shown to enable selective SiO2/Si etching using a fluorocarbon (FC) film build up. Othermore » critical process parameters investigated are the FC film thickness deposited per cycle, the ion energy, and the etch step length. Etching behavior and mechanisms are studied using in situ real time ellipsometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Silicon ALE shows less self-limitation than silicon oxide due to higher physical sputtering rates for the maximum ion energies used in this work, ranged from 20 to 30 eV. The surface chemistry is found to contain fluorinated silicon oxide during the etching of silicon. As a result, plasma parameters during ALE are studied using a Langmuir probe and establish the impact of precursor addition on plasma properties.« less

  10. Mass Spectrometric and Langmuir Probe Measurements in Inductively Coupled Plasmas in Ar, CHF3/Ar and CHF3/Ar/O2 Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J. S.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Cappelli, M. A.; Sharma, S. P.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Absolute fluxes and energy distributions of ions in inductively coupled plasmas of Ar, CHF3/Ar, and CHF3/Ar/O2 have been measured. These plasmas were generated in a Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) cell modified for inductive coupling at pressures 10-50 mTorr and 100-300 W of 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) power in various feedgas mixtures. In pure Ar plasmas, the Ar(+) flux increases linearly with pressure as well as RF-power. Total ion flux in CHF3 mixtures decreases with increase in pressure and also CHF3 concentration. Relative ion fluxes observed in the present studies are analyzed with the help of available cross sections for electron impact ionization and charge-exchange ion-molecule reactions. Measurements of plasma potential, electron and ion number densities, electron energy distribution function, and mean electron energy have also been made in the center of the plasma with a RF compensated Langmuir probe. Plasma potential values are compared with the mean ion energies determined from the measured ion energy distributions and are consistent. Electron temperature, plasma potential, and mean ion energy vary inversely with pressure, but increase with CHF3 content in the mixture.

  11. Structural rejuvenation of the eastern Arabian Shield during continental collision: 40Ar/ 39Ar evidence from the Ar Ridayniyah ophiolitic mélange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saleh, A. M.; Boyle, A. P.

    2001-07-01

    The Ar Ridayniyah ophiolitic mélange is one of a number of such complexes found within or at the peripheries of the Neoproterozoic Al-Amar Suture of the eastern Arabian Shield. This suture is sandwiched between the Ar Rayn island-arc terrane on the east and the much larger Afif continental block to the west, and is thought to represent the site of a 695—680 Ma back-arc basin that separated the two terranes. A thick and monotonous unit of metagraywacke (Abt Schist) underlies most of the suture along with scattered outcrops of metavolcanics and ophiolitic mélange. One of these bodies is the Ar Ridayniyah mélange, which occurs as a longitudinal belt of sheared ultramafic schists enclosing abundant blocks of oceanic serpentinites, as well as subordinate gabbros and basalts. The western boundary of this mélange is defined by the Ar Ridayniyah thrust fault. The 610—600 Ma ages obtained from the metagabbros of this complex are considered to record the reactivation of the Ar Ridayniyah Fault during continental collision, 60 Ma after ophiolite emplacement.

  12. /Ar-40/-/Ar-39/ dating of Apollo 16 and 17 rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, D.; Kahl, S. B.; Reynolds, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The reported study is a continuation of an investigation begun by Alexander and Kahl (1974), with primary emphasis on (Ar-40)-(Ar-39) dating of lunar breccias. A primary objective of the study was related to the resolution of small plateau-age differences between Apollo 16 and 17 samples which have been irradiated in the same irradiation. This objective was not realized because (1) neither of the considered Apollo 16 samples has a well-defined plateau, and (2) the release patterns of the two Apollo 17 samples with plateaux (73235 and 77017) are sufficiently complex to suggest caution in interpretation of fine-scale differences among apparent ages. The plateau age of 73235 agrees well with plateau ages measured for a nearby boulder at the South Massif. The plateau age of 77017, on the other hand, agrees well with plateau ages measured in an nearby boulder at the base of the North Massif. These rock and boulder ages are tightly clustered about 3.99 b.y., and this clustering suggests that the North and South Massifs were made in the same basin-forming event, presumably Serenitatis.

  13. Duration of sedimentation of Creede Formation from 40Ar/39Ar ages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, Marvin A.

    2000-01-01

    The Oligocene Creede Formation was deposited in the moat of the Creede caldera, which formed as a result of eruption of ythe Snowshoe Mountains Tuff. The Creede Formation in the two moat drill holes contains ash layers that are considered fallout tuffs derived from Fisher Dacite volcanoes that were erupting during accumulation of the Creede Formation. The duration of sedimentation of the Creede Formation could hnot be determinted directly by measuring the ages of the ash layers because 40Ar/39Ar ages of biotite from the asj layers do not stack in the correct stratigraphic order, indicating that the ash layers have been contaminated by biotite from older units. The duration of sedimentation is constrained by the ages of volcanic unites that stratigraphically bracket the Creede Formation. Pooling all ages for the underlyinh Snowshoe Mountain Tuff yields an age of 26.92 ± 0.07 Ma for the unit. The age of the stratigraphically highest lavas of Fisher Dacite, which overlie the Creede Formation, is 26.26 ± 0.04 Ma. The two limits give a maximum duration for sedimentation of the Creede Formation of 0.66 m.y. Using the ages of older Fisher Dacite lavas, on which some beds of the Creede Formation were deposited, a more realistic maximum duration of 0.34 m.y. for sedimentation of the Creede Formation can be determined.

  14. (40)Ar/(39)Ar Age of Hornblende-Bearing R Chondrite LAP 04840

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Cosca, M.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrites have a complex chronology due to several variables affecting and operating on chondritic parent bodies such as radiogenic heating, pressure and temperature variation with depth, aqueous alteration, and shock or impact heating. Unbrecciated chondrites can record ages from 4.56 to 4.4 Ga that represent cooling in small parent bodies. Some brecciated chondrites exhibit younger ages (much less than 4 to 4.4 Ga) that may reflect the age of brecciation, disturbance, or shock and impact events (much less than 4 Ga). A unique R chondrite was recently found in the LaPaz Icefield of Antarctica - LAP 04840. This chondrite contains approximately 15% hornblende and trace amounts of biotite, making it the first of its kind. Studies have revealed an equigranular texture, mineral equilibria yielding equilibration near 650-700 C and 250-500 bars, hornblende that is dominantly OH-bearing (very little Cl or F), and high D/H ratios. To help gain a better understanding of the origin of this unique sample, we have measured the (40)Ar/(39)Ar age (LAP 04840 split 39).

  15. 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of Late Permian evaporites, southeastern New Mexico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, Paul R.; Sharp, Warren D.; Montañez, Isabel P.; Becker, Tim A.; Zierenberg, Robert A.

    2001-12-01

    40Ar/ 39Ar dating of the potassium-magnesium sulfate mineral langbeinite from Permian evaporites of the Salado formation near Carlsbad, New Mexico, provides quantitative evidence that some salts in these deposits have not recrystallized for 251 Myr since deposition. Survival of Permian salts supports the possibility that Bacillus bacteria recovered from nearby halite was isolated in a closed system and represents a sample of uncontaminated Permian life. Local recrystallization of langbeinite and other nearby minerals is also indicated by the dating, suggesting both the need and the opportunity to document closed system behavior more rigorously. The shoaling and desiccation event recorded by the Salado formation began at least 1 Myr before the Permian-Triassic boundary. Temporal correlation of the Salado with the Zechstein evaporites of north-central Europe supports previously inferred regression models for the origin of these deposits. Significant paleoenvironmental change at the Permian-Triassic boundary thus occurred on a time scale more protracted than that implied by geologically instantaneous events such as bolide impacts.

  16. 40Ar-39Ar ages of H-chondrite impact melt breccias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindle, T. D.; Isachsen, C. E.; Weirich, J. R.; Kring, D. A.

    2009-07-01

    40Ar-39Ar analyses of a total of 26 samples from eight shock-darkened impact melt breccias of H-chondrite affinity (Gao-Guenie, LAP 02240, LAP 03922, LAP 031125, LAP 031173, LAP 031308, NWA 2058, and Ourique) are reported. These appear to record impacts ranging in time from 303 ± 56 Ma (Gao-Guenie) to 4360 ± 120 Ma (Ourique) ago. Three record impacts 300-400 Ma ago, while two others record impacts 3900-4000 Ma ago. Combining these with other impact ages from H chondrites in the literature, it appears that H chondrites record impacts in the first 100 Ma of solar system history, during the era of the “lunar cataclysm” and shortly thereafter (3500-4000 Ma ago), one or more impacts ˜300 Ma ago, and perhaps an impact ˜500 Ma ago (near the time of the L chondrite parent body disruption). Records of impacts on the H chondrite parent body are rare or absent between the era of planetary accretion and the “lunar cataclysm” (4400-4050 Ma), during the long stretch between heavy bombardment and recent breakup events (3500-1000 Ma), or at the time of final breakup into meteorite-sized bodies (<50 Ma).

  17. 40Ar/ 39Ar dating of the emplacement of the Muslim Bagh ophiolite, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Khalid; Boudier, Françoise; Gnos, Edwin; Monié, Patrick; Nicolas, Adolphe

    1995-11-01

    The obduction-related basal part of the Muslim Bagh ophiolite (Baluchistan, Pakistan) and the underlying metamorphic sequence were studied structurally which demonstrated a WSW-ENE-trending thrusting sequence for the initial obduction. 40Ar/ 39Ar measurements on amphiboles and plagioclase from the subophiolitic metamorphic rocks, and on plastically deformed and recrystallized dolerite samples from the base of the sheeted dyke complex give apparent ages between 70.7 ± 5.0 and 65.1 ± 4.1 Ma interpreted as cooling ages dating approximately the formation of the plastic deformation and obduction. The results indicate that the Muslim Bagh ophiolite represents a segment of ocean floor from the small and slow-spreading ocean branch of the Neo-Tethys located between the Indo-Pakistani and the Afro-Arabian plates. The WSW-ENE-oriented obduction of the Muslim Bagh ophiolite onto the Indo-Pakistani continental margin occurred with the convergence of the Neo-Tethys branch during the Late Cretaceous and before the Tertiary collision of the Indo-Pakistani plate with the Eurasian plate.

  18. Cloning and expression of StAR during gonadal cycle and hCG-induced oocyte maturation of air-breathing catfish, Clarias gariepinus.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasulu, G; Sridevi, P; Sahoo, P K; Swapna, I; Ge, W; Kirubagaran, R; Dutta-Gupta, A; Senthilkumaran, B

    2009-09-01

    Complementary DNAs encoding steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) have been isolated from different fish species, yet the relevance of StAR during gonadal cycle and more importantly in final oocyte maturation has not been assessed so far. A cDNA encoding StAR was isolated from the ovarian follicles of air-breathing catfish, Clarias gariepinus. Catfish StAR exhibited 55 to 72% identity at nucleotide level with other vertebrate orthologs. RT-PCR analysis of tissue distribution pattern demonstrated the presence of StAR mRNA in various tissues including gonads, kidney, liver, brain and intestine of catfish. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed high expression of StAR mRNA in the pre-spawning phase of ovary while it was low in preparatory, spawning and regressed phases. In testis, maximum expression was noticed during the preparatory phase. During human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-induced oocyte maturation, both in vitro and in vivo, StAR mRNA levels were augmented by 2 h and then declined gradually to reach basal levels by 12 h as that of saline-treated controls. Taken together, high level of expression during hCG-induced oocyte maturation vis-à-vis in spawning suggests a role for StAR, in addition to the steroidogenic enzyme genes in final oocyte maturation.

  19. High-resolution 40Ar/ 39Ar chronostratigraphy of the post-caldera (<20 ka) volcanic activity at Pantelleria, Sicily Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaillet, Stéphane; Rotolo, Silvio G.; La Felice, Sonia; Vita-Scaillet, Grazia

    2011-09-01

    The island of Pantelleria (Sicily Strait), the type locality for pantellerite, has been the locus of major caldera-forming eruptions that culminated, ca. 50 ka ago, in the formation of the Cinque Denti caldera produced by the Green Tuff eruption. The post-caldera silicic activity since that time has been mostly confined inside the caldera and consists of smaller-energy eruptions represented by more than twenty coalescing pantelleritic centers structurally controlled by resurgence and trapdoor faulting of the caldera floor. A high-resolution 40Ar/ 39Ar study was conducted on key units spanning the recent (post-20 ka) intracaldera activity to better characterize the present-day status (and forecast the short-term behavior of) the system based on the temporal evolution of the latest eruptions. The new 40Ar/ 39Ar data capture a long-term (> 15 ka) decline in eruption frequency with a shift in eruptive pace from 3.5 ka -1 to 0.8 ka -1 associated with a prominent paleosol horizon marking the only recognizable volcanic stasis around 12-14 ka. This shift in extraction frequency occurs without major changes in eruptive style, and is paralleled by a subtle trend of decreasing melt differentiation index. We speculate that this decline probably occurred (i) without short-term variations in melt production/differentiation rate in a steady-state compositionally-zoned silicic reservoir progressively tapped deeper through the sequence, and (ii) that it was possibly modulated by outboard eustatic forcing due to the 140 m sea level rise over the past 21 ka. The intracaldera system is experiencing a protracted stasis since 7 ka. Coupled with recent geodetic evidence of deflation and subsidence of the caldera floor, the system appears today to be on a wane with no temporal evidence for a short-term silicic eruption.

  20. 40Ar/39Ar dating of Pleistocene tuffs: an accurate age for the Matuyama-Brunhes geomagnetic reversal (MBGR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, D. F.; Renne, P. R.; Morgan, L. E.; Deino, A.; Smith, V. C.; Ellis, B. S.; Pearce, N. J.

    2012-12-01

    Recent recalibrations of the 40Ar/39Ar system [1,2] reveal inconsistencies with some previous ages inferred for the MBGR. An Ar/Ar age [3] for the Bishop Tuff (BT) (which post-dates the MBGR by at least 15.3 ± 2.2 ka [3]) recalculated [2] yields an age of 778.0 ± 3.8 ka (1σ, full systematic uncertainty). The age is c. 10 ka older than the BT zircon ID-TIMS U-Pb age [4] and places the MBGR at c. 793 ka, c. 13 and 20 ka older than astronomical ages for the MBGR of 780 ka [5] and 773 ka [6], respectively. To determine an accurate age for the MBGR, we have made a series of 40Ar/39Ar age determinations for Pleistocene tuffs from both Indonesia and North America that have direct relationships to the MBGR. Blind analyses were conducted at SUERC and BGC. We observed excellent inter-laboratory agreement and no systematic offset in data. Ar/Ar ages are reported relative to [2] (1σ, full systematic uncertainty). Drill cores from ODP Site 758 show the precise location of the MBGR. Below the MBGR are two distal tephra horizons that we have identified as products of two temporally distinct Old Toba Tuff (OTT) eruptions (layer d OTT1 and layer D OTT2). Continuous sedimentation between OTT1 (802.8 ± 0.7 ka, n = 100, MSWD 1.2) and OTT2 (796.2 ± 0.8 ka, n = 62, MSWD 1.3) allows for calculation of an accurate sedimentation rate and for extrapolation of an age from OTT2 to the MBGR. Data define an age for the MBGR of 795.2 ± 0.9 ka. Using tephra above the MBGR boundary, the Middle Toba Tuff (layer C) and Young Toba Tuff (layer A), extrapolation down core supports a MBGR age of c. 795 ka. Recent age data for BT sanidine reported relative to FCs at 28.172 Ma (767.4 ± 1.1 Ma) [7] oddly yielded an Ar/Ar age that was indistinguishable from the BT zircon U-Pb age [4], which is consistent with previous 40Ar/39Ar age measurements made relative to FCs at 28.02 Ma [3]. Thus we made a series of 40Ar/39Ar measurements on the exact same sample as used by Rivera et al. [7] and observed

  1. High Precision Ar/Ar Ages of Coso Volcanic Field Rhyolites: A Requirement for Constraining Eruption and Subvolcanic Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, J. I.; Renne, P. R.; Vazquez, J.

    2006-12-01

    Study of the extended volcanic history and petrology at Coso Volcanic Field, CA has led to fundamental ideas related to silicic magma evolution and eruption prediction. Unfortunately, tests of these and related models for the time scales of subvolcanic processes at Coso are limited because relatively few modern geochronological constraints have been published. For example, tighter age constraints are needed to test the veracity of the volume-age "time-prediction" model of Bacon (1982) wherein the next eruption can be predicted reasonably well from a long-term eruption rate that simply considers the total volume of Coso rhyolites over an appropriate time span. At Coso, reported eruption events are mean ages comprising K-Ar ± hydration rind glass ages grouped by rock chemical similarities. Here we present new Ar/Ar ages for seven Pleistocene domes from groups 4, 6, and 7. Sanidine and anorthoclase were separated from nearly aphyric obsidian and pumiceous glasses. Total fusion and step-heating feldspar and glass analyses were performed. Ar/Ar spectra derived from laser step-heating of samples from previously dated domes show that excess 40Ar contamination likely biased some K-Ar results. Modern Ar/Ar analyses of the studied rhyolites with disturbed model (i.e., assuming atmospheric initial Ar) ages, but well-defined Ar isochrons still provide accurate eruption ages. In detail, a 229 ±6 ka (2 se) age is determined for the most northern dome, which is ~60 ka older than one reported K-Ar date and the nominal age for Group 4 rhyolites and ~150-370 ka younger than four other reported K-Ar dates. Based on pre-eruption zircon ages from other magma centers, the inaccuracies and magnitude of these age shifts could produce apparent magma residence times from ≥500 ka to meaningless futuristic storage times. New ages for the southern domes are older than the reported mean Group 6 age of ~90 ka. It is probable that the anomalously young K-Ar dates reflect incomplete extraction

  2. STS-32 OV-102 air revitalization system (ARS) humidity separator problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    During STS-32, onboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, a leakage problem at environmental control and life support system (ECLSS) air revitalization system (ARS) humidity separator A below the middeck is documented in this closeup view. Note the many bubbles around the separator. The crew cleared out stowage bags, lithium hydroxide (LiOH) cannisters and other materials to get at the problem. It was eventually repaired.

  3. The role of mitochondrial fusion and StAR phosphorylation in the regulation of StAR activity and steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana F; Orlando, Ulises; Helfenberger, Katia E; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2015-06-15

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein regulates the rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis, i.e. the delivery of cholesterol from the outer (OMM) to the inner (IMM) mitochondrial membrane. StAR is a 37-kDa protein with an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence that is cleaved off during mitochondrial import to yield 30-kDa intramitochondrial StAR. StAR acts exclusively on the OMM and its activity is proportional to how long it remains on the OMM. However, the precise fashion and the molecular mechanism in which StAR remains on the OMM have not been elucidated yet. In this work we will discuss the role of mitochondrial fusion and StAR phosphorylation by the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) as part of the mechanism that regulates StAR retention on the OMM and activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Single-crystal sup 40 Ar/ sup 39 Ar dating of the Olorgesailie Formation, southern Kenya rift

    SciTech Connect

    Deino, A. ); Potts, R. )

    1990-06-10

    Single-crystal laser fusion {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar analyses and several conventional bulk fusion {sup 40}K- {sup 40}Ar dates have been used to determine the age of volcaniclastic strata within the Olorgesailie Formation and of associated volcanic and sedimentary units of the southern Kenya rift. In the principal exposures along the southern edge of the Legemunge Plain, the formation spans the interval from approximately 500 to 1,000 ka. Deposition continued to the east along the Ol Keju Nyiro river where a tuff near the top of the formation has been dated at 215 ka. In these exposures, the formation is unconformably overlain by sediments dated at 49 ka. A possible source for the Olorgesailie tephra, the Ol Doinyo Nyokie volcanic complex, contains as ash flow dated at {approximately} 1 Ma, extending the known age range of this complex to encompass that of virtually the entire Olorgesailie Formation in the Legemunge Plain. These geologic examples illustrate the importance of the single-crystal {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar dating technique whereby contaminant, altered, or otherwise aberrant grains can be identified and eliminated from the determination of eruptive ages for reworked or altered pyroclastic deposits. The authors have presented a computer-modeling procedure based on an inverse-isochron analysis that promotes a more objective approach to trimming {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar isotope data sets of this type.

  5. 40Ar/39Ar and U-Th-Pb dating of separated clasts from the Abee E4 chondrite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bogard, D.D.; Unruh, D.M.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1983-01-01

    Determinations of 40Ar/39Ar and U-Th-Pb are reported for three clasts from the Abee (E4) enstatite chondrite, which has been the object of extensive consortium investigations. The clasts give 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages and/or maximum ages of 4.5 Gy, whereas two of the clasts give average ages of 4.4 Gy. Within the range of 4.4-4.5 Gy these data do not resolve any possible age differences among the three clasts. 206Pb measured in these clasts is only ???1.5-2.5% radiogenic, which leads to relatively large uncertainties in the Pb isochron age and in the 207Pb/206Pb model ages. The Pb data indicate that the initial 207Pb/206Pb was no more than 0.08??0.07% higher than this ratio in Can??on Diablo troilite. The U-Th-Pb data are consistent with the interpretation that initial formation of these clasts occurred 4.58 Gy ago and that the clasts have since remained closed systems, but are contaminated with terrestrial Pb. The 40