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Sample records for arabidopsis 70mer oligo

  1. Rapid Oligo-Galacturonide Induced Changes in Protein Phosphorylation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kohorn, Bruce D; Hoon, Divya; Minkoff, Benjamin B; Sussman, Michael R; Kohorn, Susan L

    2016-04-01

    The wall-associated kinases (WAKs)(1)are receptor protein kinases that bind to long polymers of cross-linked pectin in the cell wall. These plasma-membrane-associated protein kinases also bind soluble pectin fragments called oligo-galacturonides (OGs) released from the wall after pathogen attack and damage. WAKs are required for cell expansion during development but bind water soluble OGs generated from walls with a higher affinity than the wall-associated polysaccharides. OGs activate a WAK-dependent, distinct stress-like response pathway to help plants resist pathogen attack. In this report, a quantitative mass-spectrometric-based phosphoproteomic analysis was used to identify Arabidopsis cellular events rapidly induced by OGsin planta Using N(14/)N(15)isotopicin vivometabolic labeling, we screened 1,000 phosphoproteins for rapid OG-induced changes and found 50 proteins with increased phosphorylation, while there were none that decreased significantly. Seven of the phosphosites within these proteins overlap with those altered by another signaling molecule plants use to indicate the presence of pathogens (the bacterial "elicitor" peptide Flg22), indicating distinct but overlapping pathways activated by these two types of chemicals. Genetic analysis of genes encoding 10 OG-specific and two Flg22/OG-induced phosphoproteins reveals that null mutations in eight proteins compromise the OG response. These phosphorylated proteins with genetic evidence supporting their role in the OG response include two cytoplasmic kinases, two membrane-associated scaffold proteins, a phospholipase C, a CDPK, an unknown cadmium response protein, and a motor protein. Null mutants in two proteins, the putative scaffold protein REM1.3, and a cytoplasmic receptor like kinase ROG2, enhance and suppress, respectively, a dominantWAKallele. Altogether, the results of these chemical and genetic experiments reveal the identity of several phosphorylated proteins involved in the kinase

  2. EvoOligo: oligonucleotide probe design with multiobjective evolutionary algorithms.

    PubMed

    Shin, Soo-Yong; Lee, In-Hee; Cho, Young-Min; Yang, Kyung-Ae; Zhang, Byoung-Tak

    2009-12-01

    Probe design is one of the most important tasks in successful deoxyribonucleic acid microarray experiments. We propose a multiobjective evolutionary optimization method for oligonucleotide probe design based on the multiobjective nature of the probe design problem. The proposed multiobjective evolutionary approach has several distinguished features, compared with previous methods. First, the evolutionary approach can find better probe sets than existing simple filtering methods with fixed threshold values. Second, the multiobjective approach can easily incorporate the user's custom criteria or change the existing criteria. Third, our approach tries to optimize the combination of probes for the given set of genes, in contrast to other tools that independently search each gene for qualifying probes. Lastly, the multiobjective optimization method provides various sets of probe combinations, among which the user can choose, depending on the target application. The proposed method is implemented as a platform called EvoOligo and is available for service on the web. We test the performance of EvoOligo by designing probe sets for 19 types of Human Papillomavirus and 52 genes in the Arabidopsis Calmodulin multigene family. The design results from EvoOligo are proven to be superior to those from well-known existing probe design tools, such as OligoArray and OligoWiz.

  3. T-oligo as an anticancer agent in colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wojdyla, Luke; Stone, Amanda L.; Sethakorn, Nan; Uppada, Srijayaprakash B.; Devito, Joseph T.; Bissonnette, Marc; Puri, Neelu

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • T-oligo induces cell cycle arrest, senescence, apoptosis, and differentiation in CRC. • Treatment with T-oligo downregulates telomere-associated proteins. • T-oligo combined with an EGFR-TKI additively inhibits cellular proliferation. • T-oligo has potential as an effective therapeutic agent for CRC. - Abstract: In the United States, there will be an estimated 96,830 new cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) and 50,310 deaths in 2014. CRC is often detected at late stages of the disease, at which point there is no effective chemotherapy. Thus, there is an urgent need for effective novel therapies that have minimal effects on normal cells. T-oligo, an oligonucleotide homologous to the 3′-telomere overhang, induces potent DNA damage responses in multiple malignant cell types, however, its efficacy in CRC has not been studied. This is the first investigation demonstrating T-oligo-induced anticancer effects in two CRC cell lines, HT-29 and LoVo, which are highly resistant to conventional chemotherapies. In this investigation, we show that T-oligo may mediate its DNA damage responses through the p53/p73 pathway, thereby inhibiting cellular proliferation and inducing apoptosis or senescence. Additionally, upregulation of downstream DNA damage response proteins, including E2F1, p53 or p73, was observed. In LoVo cells, T-oligo induced senescence, decreased clonogenicity, and increased expression of senescence associated proteins p21, p27, and p53. In addition, downregulation of POT1 and TRF2, two components of the shelterin protein complex which protects telomeric ends, was observed. Moreover, we studied the antiproliferative effects of T-oligo in combination with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Gefitinib, which resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation. Collectively, these data provide evidence that T-oligo alone, or in combination with other molecularly targeted therapies, has potential as an anti-cancer agent in CRC.

  4. Yeast Oligo-mediated Genome Engineering (YOGE)

    PubMed Central

    DiCarlo, JE; Conley, AJ; Penttilä, M; Jäntti, J; Wang, HH; Church, GM

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency oligonucleotide-directed recombination engineering (recombineering) has enabled rapid modification of several prokaryotic genomes to date. Here, we present a method for oligonucleotide-mediated recombineering in the model eukaryote and industrial production host S. cerevisiae, which we call Yeast Oligo-mediated Genome Engineering (YOGE). Through a combination of overexpression and knockouts of relevant genes and optimization of transformation and oligonucleotide designs, we achieve high gene modification frequencies at levels that only require screening of dozens of cells. We demonstrate the robustness of our approach in three divergent yeast strains, including those involved in industrial production of bio-based chemicals. Furthermore, YOGE can be iteratively executed via cycling to generate genomic libraries up to 105 individuals at each round for diversity generation. YOGE cycling alone, or in combination with phenotypic selections or endonuclease-based negative genotypic selections, can be used to easily generate modified alleles in yeast populations with high frequencies. PMID:24160921

  5. "Fibonacci's route" to regioregular oligo(3-hexylthiophene)s.

    PubMed

    Koch, Felix P V; Smith, Paul; Heeney, Martin

    2013-09-18

    We describe a new synthetic approach to regioregular monodisperse oligo(3-alkylthiophene)s allowing for simple separation of regioregular material in gram quantities. The number of repeat units follows the Fibonacci numbers up to a length of 21. In a small adaption of this approach, introduction of a protecting group was used to synthesize an oligo(3-hexylthiophene) with 36 repeating units, the longest regioregular 3-hexylthiophene oligomer synthesized to date. PMID:23947437

  6. Preparation of graphite intercalation compounds containing oligo and polyethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hanyang; Lerner, Michael M.

    2016-02-01

    Layered host-polymer nanocomposites comprising polymeric guests between inorganic sheets have been prepared with many inorganic hosts, but there is limited evidence for the incorporation of polymeric guests into graphite. Here we report for the first time the preparation, and structural and compositional characterization of graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) containing polyether bilayers. The new GICs are obtained by either (1) reductive intercalation of graphite with an alkali metal in the presence of an oligo or polyether and an electrocatalyst, or (2) co-intercalate exchange of an amine for an oligo or polyether in a donor-type GIC. Structural characterization of products using powder X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and thermal analyses supports the formation of well-ordered, first-stage GICs containing alkali metal cations and oligo or polyether bilayers between reduced graphene sheets.Layered host-polymer nanocomposites comprising polymeric guests between inorganic sheets have been prepared with many inorganic hosts, but there is limited evidence for the incorporation of polymeric guests into graphite. Here we report for the first time the preparation, and structural and compositional characterization of graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) containing polyether bilayers. The new GICs are obtained by either (1) reductive intercalation of graphite with an alkali metal in the presence of an oligo or polyether and an electrocatalyst, or (2) co-intercalate exchange of an amine for an oligo or polyether in a donor-type GIC. Structural characterization of products using powder X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and thermal analyses supports the formation of well-ordered, first-stage GICs containing alkali metal cations and oligo or polyether bilayers between reduced graphene sheets. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Domain size, additional Raman spectra info, compositional calculation, and packing fractions. See DOI: 10.1039/c5

  7. Oligo/Polynucleotide-Based Gene Modification: Strategies and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, R. Geoffrey; Kim, Soya

    2011-01-01

    Oligonucleotide- and polynucleotide-based gene modification strategies were developed as an alternative to transgene-based and classical gene targeting-based gene therapy approaches for treatment of genetic disorders. Unlike the transgene-based strategies, oligo/polynucleotide gene targeting approaches maintain gene integrity and the relationship between the protein coding and gene-specific regulatory sequences. Oligo/polynucleotide-based gene modification also has several advantages over classical vector-based homologous recombination approaches. These include essentially complete homology to the target sequence and the potential to rapidly engineer patient-specific oligo/polynucleotide gene modification reagents. Several oligo/polynucleotide-based approaches have been shown to successfully mediate sequence-specific modification of genomic DNA in mammalian cells. The strategies involve the use of polynucleotide small DNA fragments, triplex-forming oligonucleotides, and single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides to mediate homologous exchange. The primary focus of this review will be on the mechanistic aspects of the small fragment homologous replacement, triplex-forming oligonucleotide-mediated, and single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide-mediated gene modification strategies as it relates to their therapeutic potential. PMID:21417933

  8. Spotting optimization for oligo microarrays on aldehyde-glass.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Erica D; Reppert, Amy E; Rowlen, Kathy L; Kuck, Laura R

    2005-06-15

    Low-density microarrays that utilize short oligos (<100 nt) for capture are highly attractive for use in diagnostic applications, yet these experiments require strict quality control and meticulous reproducibility. However, a survey of current literature indicates vast inconsistencies in the spotting and processing procedures. In this study, spotting and processing protocols were optimized for aldehyde-functionalized glass substrates. Figures of merit were developed for quantitative comparison of spot quality and reproducibility. Experimental variables examined included oligo concentration in the spotting buffer, composition of the spotting buffer, postspotting "curing" conditions, and postspotting wash conditions. Optimized conditions included the use of 3-4 microM oligo in a 3x standard saline citrate/0.05% sodium dodecyl sulfate/0.001% (3-[(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonia]-1-propane sulfonate) spotting buffer, 24-h postspotting reaction at 100% relative humidity, and a four-step wash procedure. Evaluation of six types of aldehyde-functionalized glass substrates indicated that those manufactured by CEL Associates, Inc. yield the highest oligo coverage.

  9. Enzymatic synthesis of oligo- and polysaccharide fatty acid esters.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Lambertus A M; Boeriu, Carmen G

    2013-03-01

    Amphiphilic oligo- and polysaccharides (e.g. polysaccharide alkyl or alkyl-aryl esters) form a new class of polymers with exceptional properties. They function as polymeric surfactants, whilst maintaining most of the properties of the starting polymeric material such as emulsifying, gelling, and film forming properties combined with partial water solubility or permeability. At present carbohydrate fatty acid esters are generally obtained by chemical methods using toxic solvents and organic and inorganic catalysts that leave residual traces in the final products. Enzymatic reactions offer an attractive alternative route for the synthesis of polysaccharide esters. In this review the state of the art of enzymatic synthesis of oligo- and polysaccharides fatty esters has been described.

  10. Designing oligo libraries taking alternative splicing into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoshan, Avi; Grebinskiy, Vladimir; Magen, Avner; Scolnicov, Ariel; Fink, Eyal; Lehavi, David; Wasserman, Alon

    2001-06-01

    We have designed sequences for DNA microarrays and oligo libraries, taking alternative splicing into account. Alternative splicing is a common phenomenon, occurring in more than 25% of the human genes. In many cases, different splice variants have different functions, are expressed in different tissues or may indicate different stages of disease. When designing sequences for DNA microarrays or oligo libraries, it is very important to take into account the sequence information of all the mRNA transcripts. Therefore, when a gene has more than one transcript (as a result of alternative splicing, alternative promoter sites or alternative poly-adenylation sites), it is very important to take all of them into account in the design. We have used the LEADS transcriptome prediction system to cluster and assemble the human sequences in GenBank and design optimal oligonucleotides for all the human genes with a known mRNA sequence based on the LEADS predictions.

  11. Biosynthesis and Degradation of Mono-, Oligo-, and Polysaccharides: Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Iain B. H.

    Glycomolecules, whether they be mono-, oligo-, or polysaccharides or simple glycosides, are—as any biological molecules—the products of biosynthetic processes; on the other hand, at the end of their lifespan, they are also subject to degradation. The beginning point, biochemically, is the fixation of carbon by photosynthesis; subsequent metabolism in plants and other organisms results in the generation of the various monosaccharides. These must be activated—typically as nucleotide sugars or lipid-phosphosugars—before transfer by glycosyltransferases can take place in order to produce the wide variety of oligo- and polysaccharides seen in Nature; complicated remodelling processes may take place—depending on the pathway—which result in partial trimming of a precursor by glycosidases prior to the addition of further monosaccharide units. Upon completion of the 'life' of a glycoconjugate, glycosidases will degrade the macromolecule finally into monosaccharide units which can be metabolized or salvaged for incorporation into new glycan chains. In modern glycoscience, a wide variety of methods—genetic, biochemical, analytical—are being employed in order to understand these various pathways and to place them within their biological and medical context. In this chapter, these processes and relevant concepts and methods are introduced, prior to elaboration in the subsequent more specialized chapters on biosynthesis and degradation of mono-, oligo-, and polysaccharides.

  12. Efficient Serial and Parallel Algorithms for Selection of Unique Oligos in EST Databases

    PubMed Central

    Mata-Montero, Manrique; Shalaby, Nabil; Sheppard, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    Obtaining unique oligos from an EST database is a problem of great importance in bioinformatics, particularly in the discovery of new genes and the mapping of the human genome. Many algorithms have been developed to find unique oligos, many of which are much less time consuming than the traditional brute force approach. An algorithm was presented by Zheng et al. (2004) which finds the solution of the unique oligos search problem efficiently. We implement this algorithm as well as several new algorithms based on some theorems included in this paper. We demonstrate how, with these new algorithms, we can obtain unique oligos much faster than with previous ones. We parallelize these new algorithms to further improve the time of finding unique oligos. All algorithms are run on ESTs obtained from a Barley EST database. PMID:23653640

  13. Atomistic study on dithiolated oligo-phenylenevinylene gated device

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoud, Ahmed Lugli, Paolo

    2014-11-28

    Thanks to their semiconducting behavior, conjugated molecules are considered as an attractive candidate for future electronic devices. Understanding the charge transport characteristics through such molecules for different device applications would accelerate the progress in the field of molecular electronics. In addition, it would become more feasible to introduce/enhance specific properties of molecular devices. This theoretical paper focuses on atomistic simulation and characterization of novel molecular FET employing dithiolated oligo-phenylenevinylene molecules. The simulation is validated by its agreement with the experimental measurements conducted on the same molecules. The employed molecule has oxygen linkers, which are responsible for the strongly nonlinear current characteristics on the molecular device. We perform a thorough atomistic device analysis to illustrate the principles behind the nonlinear current characteristics and the gating effect.

  14. Oligo and Poly-thiophene/Zno Hybrid Nanowire Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Briseno, Alejandro L.; Holcombe, Thomas W.; Boukai, Akram I.; Garnett, Erik C.; Shelton, Steve W.; Frechet, Jean J. M.; Yang, Peidong

    2009-11-03

    We demonstrate the basic operation of an organic/inorganic hybrid single nanowire solar cell. End-functionalized oligo- and polythiophenes were grafted onto ZnO nanowires to produce p-n heterojunction nanowires. The hybrid nanostructures were characterized via absorption and electron microscopy to determine the optoelectronic properties and to probe the morphology at the organic/inorganic interface. Individual nanowire solar cell devices exhibited well-resolved characteristics with efficiencies as high as 0.036percent, Jsc = 0.32 mA/cm2, Voc = 0.4 V, and a FF = 0.28 under AM 1.5 illumination with 100 mW/cm2 light intensity. These individual test structures will enable detailed analysis to be carried out in areas that have been difficult to study in bulk heterojunction devices.

  15. Stereoselective synthesis of P-homochiral oligo(thymidine methanephosphonates).

    PubMed Central

    Lesnikowski, Z J; Jaworska, M; Stec, W J

    1988-01-01

    An approach to the stereoselective synthesis of P-homochiral oligo(thymidine methanephosphonates) is described. Fully protected (Rp)- and (Sp)-diastereomers of MMTrTPMeTAC (3) were prepared in the stereospecific reaction of P-chiral nucleotide component 5'-O-monomethoxytritylthymidine 3'-O-[O-(4-nitrophenyl)methanephosphonate] (1) and 3'-O-acetylthmydine (2) bearing activated 5'-hydroxyl function. Deprotection of the 5'-OH group in 3 and subsequent stepwise reactions of activated 5'-OH oligonucleotide components with (Rp)- or (Sp)- isomers of 1 gave the trinucleotide MMTrTPMeTPMeTAC (4) and, subsequently, the tetranucleotide MMTrTPMeTPMeTPMeTAC (5) possessing all (Rp)- or all (Sp)- configurations at their internucleotide methanephosphonate P-atoms. PMID:3211747

  16. Achieving targeted and quantifiable alteration of mRNA splicing with Morpholino oligos

    SciTech Connect

    Morcos, Paul A. . E-mail: pmorcos@gene-tools.com

    2007-06-29

    This work represents the first guide for using steric-block antisense oligos as tools for effective and targeted modification of RNA splicing. Comparison of several steric-block oligo types shows the properties of Morpholinos provide significant advantages over other potential splice-blocking oligos. The procedures and complications of designing effective splice-blocking Morpholino oligos are described. The design process requires complete pre-mRNA sequence for defining suitable targets, which usually generate specific predictable messengers. To validate the targeting procedure, the level and nature of transcript alteration is characterized by RT-PCR analysis of splice modification in a {beta}-globin splice model system. An oligo-walking study reveals that while U1 and U2 small nuclear RiboNucleoProtein (snRNP) binding sites are the most effective targets for blocking splicing, inclusion of these sites is not required to achieve effective splice modifications. The most effective targeting strategy employs simultaneously blocking snRNP binding sites and splice-junctions. The work presented here continues to be the basis for most of the successful Morpholino oligos designed for the worldwide research community to block RNA splicing.

  17. Proteinase K-catalyzed synthesis of linear and star oligo(L-phenylalanine) conjugates.

    PubMed

    Ageitos, Jose M; Baker, Peter J; Sugahara, Michihiro; Numata, Keiji

    2013-10-14

    Chemoenzymatic synthesis of peptides is a green and clean chemical reaction that offers high yields without using organic synthesis and serves as an alternative to traditional peptide synthesis methods. This report describes the chemoenzymatic synthesis of oligo(L-phenylalanine) mediated by proteinase K from Tritirachium album, which is one of the most widely used proteases in molecular biological studies. The synthesized linear oligo-phenylalanine showed a unique self-assembly in aqueous solutions. To further functionalize linear oligo(L-phenylalanine) as a low-molecular-weight gelator, it was cosynthesized with tris(2-aminoethyl)amine to obtain star-oligo(L-phenylalanine), which was bioconjugated to demonstrate its self-assembly into fluorescent fibers. The self-assembled fibers of star-oligo(L-phenylalanine) formed fibrous networks with various branching ratios, which depended on the molecular weights and molecular aspect ratios of star-oligo(L-phenylalanine). This is the first study to demonstrate that proteinase K is a suitable enzyme for chemoenzymatic cosynthesis of oligopeptides and star-shaped heteropeptides.

  18. Photophysical properties of oligo(2,3-thienyleneethynylene)s.

    PubMed

    Oseki, Yosuke; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Hara, Michihiro; Cai, Xichen; Ie, Yutaka; Aso, Yoshio; Majima, Tetsuro

    2005-06-01

    Photophysical properties of oligo(2,3-thienyleneethynylene)s (nTE, n denotes the number of thiophene rings, n = 2, 3) in benzene were investigated using steady-state, time-resolved fluorescence, and transient absorption spectroscopies. For 2TE, generation of the radiative S2 and nonradiative S1 states was confirmed. Upon excitation, the S2 state was initially generated and deactivated to the S1 state within 10 ps. The S1 state exhibited the transient absorption band at 470 nm, of which the lifetime was estimated to be 5.3 ns. In the case of 3TE, on the other hand, it was revealed that the radiative S1 state with a transient absorption peak at 650 nm was generated upon excitation. The T1 states of nTE were generated from the S1 states. The quantum yields were estimated to be 0.52 and 0.54 for 2TE and 3TE, respectively. Extremely fast reactions in the higher triplet excited state were indicated for both 2TE and 3TE.

  19. Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Strzalka, Wojciech; Aggarwal, Chhavi

    2013-01-01

    The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a key component of the eukaryotic DNA replication machinery. It also plays an important role in DNA repair mechanisms. Despite the intense scientific research on yeast and human PCNA, information describing the function of this protein in plants is still very limited. In the previous study Arabidopsis PCNA2 but not PCNA1 was proposed to be functionally important in DNA polymerase η-dependent postreplication repair. In addition to the above study, PCNA2 but not PCNA1 was also shown to be necessary for Arabidopsis DNA polymerase λ-dependent oxidative DNA damage bypass. Taking into account the reported differences between PCNA1 and PCNA2, we tested the idea of a possible cooperation between PCNA1 and PCNA2 in the plant cell. In a bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay an interaction between PCNA1 and PCNA2 was observed in the nucleus, as well as in the cytoplasm. This finding, together with our previous results, indicates that PCNA1 and PCNA2 may cooperate in planta by forming homo- and heterotrimeric rings. The observed interaction might be relevant when distinct functions for PCNA1 and PCNA2 are considered. PMID:23656863

  20. Oligo-[alpha]-deoxynucleotides covalently linked to an intercalating agent. Double helices with parallel strands are formed with complementary oligo-[beta]-deoxynucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, J S; Asseline, U; Rouzaud, D; Montenay-Garestier, T; Nguyen, T T; Hélène, C

    1987-01-01

    An oligo-[alpha]-deoxynucleotide of sequence (5')d(TCTAAACTC) (3') was synthesized using the alpha-anomers of deoxynucleosides and its 5'-phosphate was covalently linked to a 9-amino acridine derivative via a pentamethylene linker. Two oligo-[beta]-deoxynucleotides containing the complementary sequence in either the 5'----3' or the 3'----5' orientation were synthesized using natural [beta]-deoxynucleosides. Complex formation was investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies. No change in spectroscopic properties was detected with the anti-parallel [beta] sequence. Absorption changes were induced in the visible absorption band of the acridine derivative at 2 degrees C when the acridine-substituted oligo-[alpha]-deoxynucleotide was mixed in equimolecular amounts with the complementary [beta]-sequence in the parallel orientation. Hypochromism was observed in the UV range. The fluorescence of the acridine derivative was quenched by the guanine base present in the second position of the complementary sequence. Cooperative dissociation curves were observed and identical values of melting temperatures were obtained by absorption and fluorescence. An increase in salt concentration stabilized the complex with a delta Tm of 8 degrees C when NaCl concentration increased from 0.1 to 1 M. These results demonstrate that an oligo-[alpha]-deoxynucleotide covalently linked to an intercalating agent is able to form a double helix with an oligo-[beta]-deoxynucleotide. The two strands of this [alpha]-[beta] double helix adopt a parallel 5'----3' orientation. The acridine ring is able to intercalate between the first two base pairs on the 5'-side of the duplex structure. PMID:3627982

  1. Poly(styrene)/oligo(fluorene)-intercalated fluoromica hybrids: synthesis, characterization and self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Porzio, William; Scavia, Guido; Barba, Luisa; Arrighetti, Gianmichele; Ricci, Giovanni; Botta, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Summary We report on the intercalation of a cationic fluorescent oligo(fluorene) in between the 2D interlayer region of a fluoromica type silicate. The formation of intercalated structures with different fluorophore contents is observed in powders by synchrotron radiation XRD. Successively, the hybrids are dispersed in poly(styrene) through in situ polymerization. Such a procedure allows us to synthesize the materials from solution, to achieve solid films, and to characterize them by optical and morphologic techniques. The polymeric films with homogeneous distribution of the hybrids exhibit ultraviolet–blue photoluminescence with a significantly enhanced photostability compared to the bare oligo(fluorene)s. Finally, under specific conditions, the polymer hybrid with higher oligo(fluorene) content spontaneously assembles into highly ordered microporous films. PMID:25671140

  2. Synthesis and binding properties of oligo-2'-deoxyribonucleotides covalently linked to a thiazole orange derivative.

    PubMed

    Privat, E; Asseline, U

    2001-01-01

    Thiazole orange label was coupled to the eighth phosphate of a pentadeca-2'-deoxyriboadenylate via a phosphoramidate linkage using different linkers. The stereoisomers were separated, and their absolute configurations were determined. Finally, the thiazole orange moiety was also linked to the tenth phosphate of icosathymidylates in both the alpha and the beta series via a phosphoramidate linkage. Once again, the thiazole orange-icosathymidylate conjugates were obtained as pure stereoisomers. The binding properties of these oligo-2'-deoxyribonucleotide-thiazole orange conjugates with their complementary sequences were studied by absorption spectroscopy. The covalent attachment of the thiazole orange derivatives to the oligoadenylates stabilizes the complexes formed with both the DNA and RNA targets. On the contrary, when the thiazole orange is tethered to the oligo-alpha-thymidylate or oligo-beta-thymidylate, no significant stabilization of the duplexes formed with poly r(A) can be observed.

  3. Probing the energetics of oligo(dT).poly(dA) by laser cross-linking.

    PubMed Central

    Mesner, L D; Hockensmith, J W

    1992-01-01

    Experimentally determined changes in free energy (delta G(o)) for thymine-thymine interactions occurring in oligo(dT).poly(dA) are dependent on the method used for preparation of the double-stranded template. A rapid laser cross-linking technique was used to examine the equilibrium between oligomers of (dT) bound to either poly(dA) or poly(rA). The single-pulse (4-6 nsec) ultraviolet laser excitation of these polynucleotides causes pyrimidine dimer formation between contiguous oligo(dT) molecules, resulting in a "ligation" of the oligomers. Analysis of the resulting data using standard binding isotherms allowed determination of the degree of cooperativity existing between oligomers. Using the cooperativity, delta G(o), delta H(o), and delta S(o) are calculated, thereby providing thermodynamic parameters for this interaction. The measured cooperativity of oligo(dT) molecule interactions allows direct calculation of the number of 3' ends available as nicked structures or the number of 3' ends associated with gaps for oligo(dT).poly(dA) when used as a substrate for DNA synthesis. Images PMID:1557354

  4. Maillard reaction products of rice protein hydrolysates with mono-, oligo- and polysaccharides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice protein, a byproduct of rice syrup production, is abundant but, its lack of functionality prevents its wide use as a food ingredient. Maillard reaction products of (MRPs) hydrolysates from the limited hydrolysis of rice protein (LHRP) and various mono-, oligo- and polysaccharides were evaluat...

  5. Lung stereotactic radiotherapy for oligometastases: comparison of oligo-recurrence and sync-oligometastases†

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Hideomi; Niibe, Yuzuru; Yamamoto, Takaya; Katsui, Kuniaki; Jingu, Keiichi; Kanazawa, Susumu; Terahara, Atsuro; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Background Oligometastases can be divided into sync-oligometastases and oligo-recurrence. The difference is whether the primary site is uncontrolled or controlled. The goal of this multicenter study was to evaluate treatment outcomes and factors affecting survival after stereotactic body radiotherapy for pulmonary oligometastases. Methods The information after stereotactic body radiotherapy from January 2004 to April 2014 was retrospectively collected. Ninety-six patients (65 males, 31 females) were enrolled. Ten cases (10%) were sync-oligometastases, 79 cases (82%) were oligo-recurrences and 7 (7%) were unclassified oligometastases with <6 months of disease-free interval. The median disease-free interval between initial therapy and stereotactic body radiotherapy was 24 months. The median calculated biological effective dose was 105.6 Gy. Results The median follow-up period was 32 months for survivors. The 3-year overall survival and relapse-free survival rates were 53% and 32%, respectively. No Grade 5 toxicity occurred. The median overall survival was 23.9 months for sync-oligometastases and 66.6 months for oligo-recurrence (P = 0.0029). On multivariate analysis, sync-oligometastases and multiple oligometastatic tumors were significant unfavorable factors for both overall survival and relapse-free survival. Conclusions In stereotactic body radiotherapy for oligometastatic lung tumors, the state of oligo-recurrence has the potential of a significant prognostic factor for survival. PMID:27162324

  6. Synthesis, photonic characteristics, and mesomorphism of an oligo biphenylene vinylene pi-electron system.

    PubMed

    Lincker, Frédéric; Bourgun, Philippe; Masson, Patrick; Didier, Pascal; Guidoni, Luca; Bigot, Jean-Yves; Nicoud, Jean-François; Donnio, Bertrand; Guillon, Daniel

    2005-04-14

    [reaction: see text] The synthesis and photonic and liquid-crystalline properties of a novel oligo biphenylene vinylene (OBV) chromophore with an extended pi-electron system are reported; the compound exhibits high fluorescence, a large two-photon absorption cross-section, and two- and three-dimensional liquid-crystalline mesophases.

  7. Transcriptional profiling of pea ABR17 mediated changes in gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswamy, Sowmya S; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Mohammadi, Mohsen; Rahman, Muhammad H; Deyholos, Michael K; Kav, Nat NV

    2008-01-01

    Background Pathogenesis-related proteins belonging to group 10 (PR10) are elevated in response to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. Previously, we have shown a drastic salinity-induced increase in the levels of ABR17, a member of the PR10 family, in pea. Furthermore, we have also demonstrated that the constitutive expression of pea ABR17 cDNA in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus enhances their germination and early seedling growth under stress. Although it has been reported that several members of the PR10 family including ABR17 possess RNase activity, the exact mechanism by which the aforementioned characteristics are conferred by ABR17 is unknown at this time. We hypothesized that a study of differences in transcriptome between wild type (WT) and ABR17 transgenic A. thaliana may shed light on this process. Results The molecular changes brought about by the expression of pea ABR17 cDNA in A. thaliana in the presence or absence of salt stress were investigated using microarrays consisting of 70-mer oligonucleotide probes representing 23,686 Arabidopsis genes. Statistical analysis identified number of genes which were over represented among up- or down-regulated transcripts in the transgenic line. Our results highlight the important roles of many abscisic acid (ABA) and cytokinin (CK) responsive genes in ABR17 transgenic lines. Although the transcriptional changes followed a general salt response theme in both WT and transgenic seedlings under salt stress, many genes exhibited differential expression patterns when the transgenic and WT lines were compared. These genes include plant defensins, heat shock proteins, other defense related genes, and several transcriptional factors. Our microarray results for selected genes were validated using quantitative real-time PCR. Conclusion Transcriptional analysis in ABR17 transgenic Arabidopsis plants, both under normal and saline conditions, revealed significant changes in abundance of transcripts for many stress

  8. Inhibition of vaccinia mRNA methylation by 2',5'-linked oligo(adenylic acid) triphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, O.K.; Goswami, B.B.

    1981-04-01

    Extracts of interferon-treated cells synthesize unique 2',5'-linked oligo(adenylic acid) 5'-phosphates in the presence of ATP and double-stranded RNA. 2',5'-linked oligo(adenylic acid) 5'-triphosphate inhibits protein synthesis at nanomolar concentrations by activating RNase. We have observed that oligo(adenylic acid) 5'-monophosphate and 5'-triphosphate are potent inhibitors of vaccinia mRNA methylation in vitro. Both the methylation of the 5'-terminal guanine at the 7 position and the 2'-O-ribose methylation of the penultimate nucleoside are inhibited. Such inhibition of mRNA methylation is not due to degradation of the mRNA. Inhibition of the requisite modification of the 5' terminus of mRNA by 2',5'-linked oligo(adenylic acids) may be a mechanism of interferon action against both DNA and RNA viruses in which mRNAs derived from them are capped.

  9. Thermosensitivity of bile acid-based oligo(ethylene glycol) stars in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Strandman, Satu; Le Dévédec, Frantz; Zhu, X X

    2011-08-01

    Amphiphilic star-shaped oligo(ethylene glycol)s with a hydrophobic bile acid core and varying number of hydrophilic arms have been made. Their thermal behavior in aqueous solutions depends on the number rather than the length of the arms. The two-armed lithocholate derivative showed the strongest tendency for association and exhibited the lowest cloud point (79 °C) of the oligomers made, as well as another phase separation at a lower temperature (31 °C). The "double thermosensitivity" arising both from the salt-dependent LCST of the oligo(ethylene glycol) segments and the temperature-responsive self-assembly of amphiphilic bile acid derivative provides an interesting path in the design of bile acid-based smart materials.

  10. Thermosensitivity of bile acid-based oligo(ethylene glycol) stars in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Strandman, Satu; Le Dévédec, Frantz; Zhu, X X

    2011-08-01

    Amphiphilic star-shaped oligo(ethylene glycol)s with a hydrophobic bile acid core and varying number of hydrophilic arms have been made. Their thermal behavior in aqueous solutions depends on the number rather than the length of the arms. The two-armed lithocholate derivative showed the strongest tendency for association and exhibited the lowest cloud point (79 °C) of the oligomers made, as well as another phase separation at a lower temperature (31 °C). The "double thermosensitivity" arising both from the salt-dependent LCST of the oligo(ethylene glycol) segments and the temperature-responsive self-assembly of amphiphilic bile acid derivative provides an interesting path in the design of bile acid-based smart materials. PMID:21661073

  11. Graph of Total Number of Oligos Within Windows of a Sequence

    1995-11-28

    SEQWIN is user-friendly software which graphs the total number of oligos present in a sequence. The sequence is scanned one window at a time; windows can be overlapping. Each bar on the graph represents a single window down the sequence. The user specifies the sequence of interest and a list of oligos as program input. If the sequence is known, locations of specific structure or sequences can be specified and compared with the bars onmore » a graph. The window size, amount of overlap of the windows, number of windows to be considered, and the starting position of the first window used can be adjusted at the user's discretion.« less

  12. Peroxidase induced oligo-tyrosine cross-links during polymerization of α-lactalbumin.

    PubMed

    Dhayal, Surender Kumar; Sforza, Stefano; Wierenga, Peter A; Gruppen, Harry

    2015-12-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) induced cross-linking of proteins has been reported to proceed through formation of di-tyrosine cross-links. In the case of low molar mass phenolic substrates, the enzymatic oxidation is reported to lead to polymerization of the phenols. The aim of this work was to investigate if during oxidative cross-linking of proteins oligo-tyrosine cross-links are formed in addition to dityrosine. To this end, α-lactalbumin (α-LA) was cross-linked using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂). The reaction products were acid hydrolysed, after which the cross-linked amino acids were investigated by LC-MS and MALDI-MS. To test the effect of the size of the substrate, the cross-linking reaction was also performed with L-tyrosine, N-acetyl L-tyrosinamide and angiotensin. These products were analyzed by LC-MS directly, as well as after acid hydrolysis. In the acid hydrolysates of all samples oligo-tyrosine (Yn, n=3-8) was found in addition to di-tyrosine (Y2). Two stages of cross-linking of α-LA were identified: a) 1-2 cross-links were formed per monomer until the monomers were converted into oligomers, and b) subsequent cross-linking of oligomers formed in the first stage to form nanoparticles containing 3-4 cross-links per monomer. The transition from first stage to the second stage coincided with the point where di-tyrosine started to decrease and more oligo-tyrosines were formed. In conclusion, extensive polymerization of α-LA using HRP via oligo-tyrosine cross-links is possible, as is the case for low molar mass tyrosine containing substrates. PMID:26282909

  13. Distributed feedback laser action from polymeric waveguides doped with oligo phenylene vinylene model compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretsch, Kevin P.; Blau, Werner J.; Dumarcher, Vincent; Rocha, Licinio; Fiorini, Celine; Nunzi, Jean-Michel; Pfeiffer, Steffen; Tillmann, Hartwig; Hörhold, Hans-Heinrich

    2000-04-01

    We report lasing studies of poly(styrene) waveguides doped with amino- and cyano-substituted oligo phenylene vinylene (distyryl benzene) model compounds under picosecond excitation. Optical feedback is provided by distributed Bragg gratings formed in the film by interference patterns in the pump beam. We demonstrate broad tunability of laser emission in these materials and simultaneous lasing at two wavelengths separated by 23 nm. Tuning ranges of the model compounds are compared with previous experiments.

  14. The Arabidopsis Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    McClung, C. Robertson; Salomé, Patrice A.; Michael, Todd P.

    2002-01-01

    Rhythms with periods of approximately 24 hr are widespread in nature. Those that persist in constant conditions are termed circadian rhythms and reflect the activity of an endogenous biological clock. Plants, including Arabidopsis, are richly rhythmic. Expression analysis, most recently on a genomic scale, indicates that the Arabidopsis circadian clock regulates a number of key metabolic pathways and stress responses. A number of sensitive and high-throughput assays have been developed to monitor the Arabidopsis clock. These assays have facilitated the identification of components of plant circadian systems through genetic and molecular biological studies. Although much remains to be learned, the framework of the Arabidopsis circadian system is coming into focus. Dedication This review is dedicated to the memory of DeLill Nasser, a wonderful mentor and an unwavering advocate of both Arabidopsis and circadian rhythms research. PMID:22303209

  15. The RNA-binding protein repertoire of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Marondedze, Claudius; Thomas, Ludivine; Serrano, Natalia L.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Gehring, Chris

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have essential roles in determining the fate of RNA from synthesis to decay and have been studied on a protein-by-protein basis, or computationally based on a number of well-characterised RNA-binding domains. Recently, high-throughput methods enabled the capture of mammalian RNA-binding proteomes. To gain insight into the role of Arabidopsis thaliana RBPs at the systems level, we have employed interactome capture techniques using cells from different ecotypes grown in cultures and leaves. In vivo UV-crosslinking of RNA to RBPs, oligo(dT) capture and mass spectrometry yielded 1,145 different proteins including 550 RBPs that either belong to the functional category ‘RNA-binding’, have known RNA-binding domains or have orthologs identified in mammals, C. elegans, or S. cerevisiae in addition to 595 novel candidate RBPs. We noted specific subsets of RBPs in cultured cells and leaves and a comparison of Arabidopsis, mammalian, C. elegans, and S. cerevisiae RBPs reveals a common set of proteins with a role in intermediate metabolism, as well as distinct differences suggesting that RBPs are also species and tissue specific. This study provides a foundation for studies that will advance our understanding of the biological significance of RBPs in plant developmental and stimulus specific responses. PMID:27405932

  16. Specific analogues uncouple transport, signalling, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis in the yeast Gap1 amino acid transceptor.

    PubMed

    Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Rubio-Texeira, Marta; Schothorst, Joep; Thevelein, Johan M

    2014-07-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae amino acid transceptor Gap1 functions as receptor for signalling to the PKA pathway and concomitantly undergoes substrate-induced oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. We have identified specific amino acids and analogues that uncouple to certain extent signalling, transport, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. L-lysine, L-histidine and L-tryptophan are transported by Gap1 but do not trigger signalling. Unlike L-histidine, L-lysine triggers Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination without substantial induction of endocytosis. Two transported, non-metabolizable signalling agonists, β-alanine and D-histidine, are strong and weak inducers of Gap1 endocytosis, respectively, but both causing Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination. The non-signalling agonist, non-transported competitive inhibitor of Gap1 transport, L-Asp-γ-L-Phe, induces oligo-ubiquitination but no discernible endocytosis. The Km of L-citrulline transport is much lower than the threshold concentration for signalling and endocytosis. These results show that molecules can be transported without triggering signalling or substantial endocytosis, and that oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis do not require signalling nor metabolism. Oligo-ubiquitination is required, but apparently not sufficient to trigger endocytosis. In addition, we demonstrate intracellular cross-induction of endocytosis of transport-defective Gap1(Y395C) by ubiquitination- and endocytosis-deficient Gap1(K9R,K16R). Our results support the concept that different substrates bind to partially overlapping binding sites in the same general substrate-binding pocket of Gap1, triggering divergent conformations, resulting in different conformation-induced downstream processes.

  17. Microarray long oligo probe designing for Escherichia coli: an in-silico DNA marker extraction

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Payam; Najafi, Ali; Behzadi, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Urinary tract infections are predominant diseases which may be caused by different pathogenic microorganisms, particularly Escherichia coli (E.coli). DNA microarray technology is an accurate, rapid, sensitive, and specific diagnostic tool which may lead to definite diagnosis and treatment of several infectious diseases. DNA microarray is a multi-process method in which probe designing plays an important. Therefore, the authors of the present study have tried to design a range of effective and proper long oligo microarray probes for detection and identification of different strains of pathogenic E.coli and in particular, uropathogenic E.coli (UPEC). Material and methods E.coli O26 H11 11368 uid41021 was selected as the standard strain for probe designing. This strain encompasses the largest nucleotide sequence and the most number of genes among other pathogenic strains of E.coli. For performing this in silico survey, NCBI database, GReview Server, PanSeq Server, Oligoanalyzer tool, and AlleleID 7.7 were used to design accurate, appropriate, effective, and flexible long oligo microarray probes. Moreover, the genome of E.coli and its closely related microorganisms were compared. Results In this study, 15 long oligo microarray probes were designed for detecting and identifying different strains of E.coli such as UPEC. These probes possessed the best physico-chemical characteristics. The functional and structural properties of the designed probes were recognized by practical tools and softwares. Conclusions The use of reliable advanced technologies and methodologies for probe designing guarentees the high quality of microarray probes and makes DNA microarray technology more flexible and an effective diagnostic technique. PMID:27123336

  18. Structural and electronic properties of oligo- and polythiophenes modified by substituents

    PubMed Central

    Rittmeyer, Simon P

    2012-01-01

    Summary The electronic and structural properties of oligo- and polythiophenes that can be used as building blocks for molecular electronic devices have been studied by using periodic density functional theory calculations. We have in particular focused on the effect of substituents on the electronic structure of thiophenes. Whereas singly bonded substituents, such as methyl, amino or nitro groups, change the electronic properties of thiophene monomers and dimers, they hardly influence the band gap of polythiophene. In contrast, phenyl-substituted polythiophenes as well as vinyl-bridged polythiophene derivatives exhibit drastically modified band gaps. These effects cannot be explained by simple electron removal or addition, as calculations for charged polythiophenes demonstrate. PMID:23365804

  19. Development and validation of a flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) gene expression oligo microarray

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) has been cultivated for around 9,000 years and is therefore one of the oldest cultivated species. Today, flax is still grown for its oil (oil-flax or linseed cultivars) and its cellulose-rich fibres (fibre-flax cultivars) used for high-value linen garments and composite materials. Despite the wide industrial use of flax-derived products, and our actual understanding of the regulation of both wood fibre production and oil biosynthesis more information must be acquired in both domains. Recent advances in genomics are now providing opportunities to improve our fundamental knowledge of these complex processes. In this paper we report the development and validation of a high-density oligo microarray platform dedicated to gene expression analyses in flax. Results Nine different RNA samples obtained from flax inner- and outer-stems, seeds, leaves and roots were used to generate a collection of 1,066,481 ESTs by massive parallel pyrosequencing. Sequences were assembled into 59,626 unigenes and 48,021 sequences were selected for oligo design and high-density microarray (Nimblegen 385K) fabrication with eight, non-overlapping 25-mers oligos per unigene. 18 independent experiments were used to evaluate the hybridization quality, precision, specificity and accuracy and all results confirmed the high technical quality of our microarray platform. Cross-validation of microarray data was carried out using quantitative qRT-PCR. Nine target genes were selected on the basis of microarray results and reflected the whole range of fold change (both up-regulated and down-regulated genes in different samples). A statistically significant positive correlation was obtained comparing expression levels for each target gene across all biological replicates both in qRT-PCR and microarray results. Further experiments illustrated the capacity of our arrays to detect differential gene expression in a variety of flax tissues as well as between two contrasted

  20. 2',5'-linked oligo-3'-deoxyribonucleoside phosphorothioate chimeras: thermal stability and antisense inhibition of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Bhan, P; Bhan, A; Hong, M; Hartwell, J G; Saunders, J M; Hoke, G D

    1997-01-01

    2',5'-Linked oligo-3'-deoxyribonucleotides bind selectively to complementary RNA but not to DNA. These oligonucleotides (ODNs) do not recognize double-stranded DNA by Hoogsteen triplex formation and the complexes formed by these ODNs with RNA are not substrates for Escherichia coli RNase H. Substitution of the 2',5'-phosphodiester backbone by phosphorothioate linkages gives 2',5'-linked oligo-3'-deoxynucleoside phosphorothioate ODNs that exhibit significantly less non-specific binding to cellular proteins or thrombin. Incorporation of a stretch of seven contiguous 3',5'-linked oligo-2'-deoxynucleoside phosphorothioate linkages in the center of 2',5'-linked ODNs (as a putative RNase H recognition site) afford chimeric antisense ODNs that retain the ability to inhibit steroid 5alpha-reductase (5alphaR) expression in cell culture. PMID:9241246

  1. On-Flow Synthesis of Co-Polymerizable Oligo-Microspheres and Application in ssDNA Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Se Hee; Lee, Jae Ha; Lee, Ho Won; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Jeong, Ok Chan; Ahn, Ji-Young

    2016-01-01

    We fabricated droplet-based microfluidic platform for copolymerizable microspheres with acrydite modified DNA probe. The copolymerizable 3-D polyacrylamide microspheres were successfully produced from microcontinuous-flow synthesis with on-channel solidification. DNA copolymerization activity, surface presentation and thermostability were assessed by using fluorescent labeled complementary probe. The binding performance was only visible on the surface area of oligo-microspheres. We show that the resulting oligo-microspheres can be directly integrated into a streamlined microsphere-PCR protocol for amplifying ssDNA. Our microspheres could be utilized as a potential material for ssDNA analysis such as DNA microarray and automatic DNA SELEX process. PMID:27447941

  2. Transcriptome analysis in Brassica rapa under the abiotic stresses using Brassica 24K oligo microarray.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Choon; Lim, Myung-Ho; Kim, Jin A; Lee, Soo-In; Kim, Jung Sun; Jin, Mina; Kwon, Soo-Jin; Mun, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Yeon-Ki; Kim, Hyun Uk; Hur, Yoonkang; Park, Beom-Seok

    2008-12-31

    Genome wide transcription analysis in response to stresses is essential to provide the basis of effective engineering strategies to improve stress tolerance in crop plants. In order to perform transcriptome analysis in Brassica rapa, we constructed a B. rapa oligo microarray, KBGP-24K, using sequence information from approximately 24,000 unigenes and analyzed cold (4 degrees C), salt (250 mM NaCl), and drought (air-dry) treated B. rapa plants. Among the B. rapa unigenes represented on the microarray, 417 (1.7%), 202 (0.8%), and 738 (3.1%) were identified as responsive genes that were differently expressed 5-fold or more at least once during a 48-h treatment with cold, salt, and drought, respectively. These results were confirmed by RT-PCR analysis. In the abiotic stress responsive genes identified, we found 56 transcription factor genes and 60 commonly responsive genes. It suggests that various transcriptional regulatory mechanisms and common signaling pathway are working together under the abiotic stresses in B. rapa. In conclusion, our new developed 24K oligo microarray will be a useful tool for transcriptome profiling and this work will provide valuable insight in the response to abiotic stress in B. rapa.

  3. Improvement of DNA recognition through molecular imprinting: hybrid oligomer imprinted polymeric nanoparticles (oligoMIP NPs).

    PubMed

    Brahmbhatt, H; Poma, A; Pendergraff, H M; Watts, J K; Turner, N W

    2016-02-01

    High affinity and specific binding are cardinal properties of nucleic acids in relation to their biological function and their role in biotechnology. To this end, structural preorganization of oligonucleotides can significantly improve their binding performance, and numerous examples of this can be found in Nature as well as in artificial systems. Here we describe the production and characterization of hybrid DNA-polymer nanoparticles (oligoMIP NPs) as a system in which we have preorganized the oligonucleotide binding by molecular imprinting technology. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are cost-effective "smart" polymeric materials capable of antibody-like detection, but characterized by superior robustness and the ability to work in extreme environmental conditions. Especially in the nanoparticle format, MIPs are dubbed as one of the most suitable alternatives to biological antibodies due to their selective molecular recognition properties, improved binding kinetics as well as size and dispersibility. Nonetheless, there have been very few attempts at DNA imprinting in the past due to structural complexity associated with these templates. By introducing modified thymine bases into the oligonucleotide sequences, which allow establishing covalent bonds between the DNA and the polymer, we demonstrate that such hybrid oligoMIP NPs specifically recognize their target DNA, and that the unique strategy of incorporating the complementary DNA strands as "preorganized selective monomers" improves the recognition properties without affecting the NPs physical properties such as size, shape or dispersibility. PMID:26509192

  4. AB-polymer networks based on oligo(epsilon-caprolactone) segments showing shape-memory properties.

    PubMed

    Lendlein, A; Schmidt, A M; Langer, R

    2001-01-30

    Although shape-memory metal alloys have wide use in medicine and other areas, improved properties, particularly easy shaping, high shape stability, and adjustable transition temperature, are realizable only by polymer systems. In this paper, a polymer system of shape-memory polymer networks based on oligo(epsilon-caprolactone) dimethacrylate as crosslinker and n-butyl acrylate as comonomer was introduced. The influence of two structural parameters, the molecular weight of oligo(epsilon-caprolactone) dimethacrylate and the weight content of n-butyl acrylate, on macroscopic properties of polymer networks such as thermal and mechanical properties has been investigated. Tensile tests above and below melting temperature showed a decrease in the elastic modulus with increasing comonomer weight content. The crystallization behavior of the new materials has been investigated, and key parameters for the programming procedure of the temporary shape have been evaluated. Shape-memory properties have been quantified by thermocyclic experiments. All samples reached uniform deformation properties with recovery rates above 99% after 3 cycles. Whereas strain recovery increased with increasing n-butyl acrylate content, strain fixity decreased, reflecting the decreasing degree of crystallinity of the material. PMID:11158558

  5. AB-polymer networks based on oligo(epsilon-caprolactone) segments showing shape-memory properties.

    PubMed

    Lendlein, A; Schmidt, A M; Langer, R

    2001-01-30

    Although shape-memory metal alloys have wide use in medicine and other areas, improved properties, particularly easy shaping, high shape stability, and adjustable transition temperature, are realizable only by polymer systems. In this paper, a polymer system of shape-memory polymer networks based on oligo(epsilon-caprolactone) dimethacrylate as crosslinker and n-butyl acrylate as comonomer was introduced. The influence of two structural parameters, the molecular weight of oligo(epsilon-caprolactone) dimethacrylate and the weight content of n-butyl acrylate, on macroscopic properties of polymer networks such as thermal and mechanical properties has been investigated. Tensile tests above and below melting temperature showed a decrease in the elastic modulus with increasing comonomer weight content. The crystallization behavior of the new materials has been investigated, and key parameters for the programming procedure of the temporary shape have been evaluated. Shape-memory properties have been quantified by thermocyclic experiments. All samples reached uniform deformation properties with recovery rates above 99% after 3 cycles. Whereas strain recovery increased with increasing n-butyl acrylate content, strain fixity decreased, reflecting the decreasing degree of crystallinity of the material.

  6. Oligo- and polysaccharides exhibit a structure-dependent bioactivity on human keratinocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Deters, Alexandra M; Lengsfeld, Christian; Hensel, Andreas

    2005-12-01

    In traditional medicine, a variety of plants with high carbohydrate contents were used for dermatological therapies. Contemporary investigations confirmed exogenous carbohydrates as biologically active. The recent study describes the characterization of oligo- and polysaccharides from medicinal herbs and evaluation of composite-dependent physiological activity of carbohydrates on human keratinocytes in vitro. Polysaccharide isolation was followed by size- and charge fractionation. Identification of monosaccharide components was performed by GLC/MS. Primary human keratinocytes (NHK) and cells of the cell line HaCaT were used for investigation of carbohydrate action on cellular proliferation (BrdU-uptake), differentiation specific enzymes (involucrin), cell viability (MTT-reduction) and cytotoxicity. Incubation of keratinocytes with a purified beta-glucan from Reed mace seeds resulted in an improved proliferation followed by an increased differentiation after contact inhibition. Fucosylated oligo- and polysaccharides of human milk and Sea weed induced involucrin expression as maker for early differentiation without an increase in proliferation. Cell viability and proliferation of keratinocytes were enhanced by an arabinogalactan of Kaki fruits. Okra fruit rhamnogalacturonans increased cell proliferation. Heart sease pectin-like polysaccharides reduced the proliferation significantly but improved the cell viability. These results led assume that the carbohydrates of traditional used herbs play a part in their efficacy. PMID:16111846

  7. Design and synthesis of dendritic molecular transporter that achieves efficient in vivo delivery of morpholino antisense oligo.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-Fu; Morcos, Paul A

    2008-07-01

    Safe and efficient in vivo delivery of Morpholino antisense oligos was probably the last and most difficult challenge for the broad application of antisense in animal research and therapeutics. Several arginine-rich peptides effective for in vivo delivery of Morpholino antisense oligos require rather complex and expensive procedures for synthesis and conjugation. This work describes the design and synthesis of a dendritic transporter in a most concise manner where the selection of the core scaffold, functional group multiplication, orthogonal protecting group manipulation, solid phase conjugation, and off-resin perguanidinylation of the transporter structure are all orchestrated for efficient assembly. We utilized triazine as a core to provide a site for on-column conjugation to the Morpholino oligo and to anchor functional side arms which, after extension, multiplication, and deprotection, are subsequently converted from primary amines to the eight guanidinium headgroups that serve for transport across cell membranes. Intravenous administration of the delivery-enabled Morpholino into a splice-reporter strain of transgenic living mice results in de novo expression of splice-corrected green fluorescent protein in a broad range of tissues and organs in those treated mice. This rigorously demonstrates that this new dendritic transporter achieves effective delivery of a Morpholino oligo into the cytosol/nuclear compartment of cells systemically in vivo. The practical conjugation process may overcome any availability limitation for routine use by the scientific community, and the efficient delivery ability of this transporter may advance the application of Morpholino antisense technology in animals.

  8. The Oligo Fucoidan Inhibits Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Stimulated Proliferation of Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao-Huei; Tsao, Chiung-Fang; Ko, Wang-Sheng; Chiou, Ya-Ling

    2016-01-09

    In the pathogenesis of asthma, the proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) is a key factor in airway remodeling and causes airway narrowing. In addition, ASMCs are also the effector cells of airway inflammation. Fucoidan extracted from marine brown algae polysaccharides has antiviral, antioxidant, antimicrobial, anticlotting, and anticancer properties; however, its effectiveness for asthma has not been elucidated thus far. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-treated primary ASMCs were cultured with or without oligo-fucoidan (100, 500, or 1000 µg/mL) to evaluate its effects on cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and Akt, ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We found that PDGF (40 ng/mL) increased the proliferation of ASMCs by 2.5-fold after 48 h (p < 0.05). Oligo-fucoidan reduced the proliferation of PDGF-stimulated ASMCs by 75%-99% after 48 h (p < 0.05) and induced G₁/G₀ cell cycle arrest, but did not induce apoptosis. Further, oligo-fucoidan supplementation reduced PDGF-stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), Akt, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB phosphorylation. Taken together, oligo-fucoidan supplementation might reduce proliferation of PDGF-treated ASMCs through the suppression of ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. The results provide basis for future animal experiments and human trials.

  9. Starch Metabolism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Streb, Sebastian; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2012-01-01

    Starch is the major non-structural carbohydrate in plants. It serves as an important store of carbon that fuels plant metabolism and growth when they are unable to photosynthesise. This storage can be in leaves and other green tissues, where it is degraded during the night, or in heterotrophic tissues such as roots, seeds and tubers, where it is stored over longer time periods. Arabidopsis accumulates starch in many of its tissues, but mostly in its leaves during the day. It has proven to be a powerful genetic system for discovering how starch is synthesised and degraded, and new proteins and processes have been discovered. Such work has major significance for our starch crops, whose yield and quality could be improved by the application of this knowledge. Research into Arabidopsis starch metabolism has begun to reveal how its daily turnover is integrated into the rest of metabolism and adapted to the environmental conditions. Furthermore, Arabidopsis mutant lines deficient in starch metabolism have been employed as tools to study other biological processes ranging from sugar sensing to gravitropism and flowering time control. This review gives a detailed account of the use of Arabidopsis to study starch metabolism. It describes the major discoveries made and presents an overview of our understanding today, together with some as-yet unresolved questions. PMID:23393426

  10. Suppressor Screens in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Yuelin

    2016-01-01

    Genetic screens have proven to be a useful tool in the dissection of biological processes in plants. Specifically, suppressor screens have been widely used to study signal transduction pathways. Here we provide a detailed protocol for ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis used in our suppressor screens in Arabidopsis and discuss the basic principles behind suppressor screen design and downstream analyses. PMID:26577776

  11. Diketopyrrolopyrrole-based Conjugated Polymers Bearing Branched Oligo(Ethylene Glycol) Side Chains for Photovoltaic Devices.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xingxing; Zhang, Zijian; Ding, Zicheng; Liu, Jun; Wang, Lixiang

    2016-08-22

    Conjugated polymers are essential for solution-processable organic opto-electronic devices. In contrast to the great efforts on developing new conjugated polymer backbones, research on developing side chains is rare. Herein, we report branched oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) as side chains of conjugated polymers. Compared with typical alkyl side chains, branched OEG side chains endowed the resulting conjugated polymers with a smaller π-π stacking distance, higher hole mobility, smaller optical band gap, higher dielectric constant, and larger surface energy. Moreover, the conjugated polymers with branched OEG side chains exhibited outstanding photovoltaic performance in polymer solar cells. A power conversion efficiency of 5.37 % with near-infrared photoresponse was demonstrated and the device performance could be insensitive to the active layer thickness.

  12. Radiation grafting of oligo(ethylene glycol) ethyl ether methacrylate on polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komasa, Justyna; Miłek, Andrzej; Ulański, Piotr; Rosiak, Janusz M.

    2014-01-01

    Oligo(ethylene glycol) ethyl ether methacrylate (OEGMA) can be grafted onto polypropylene (PP) films by post-irradiation grafting, forming a thermosensitive polymer layer, as indicated by FT-IR and contact angle measurements. In the first step, PP foils are irradiated by electron beam (5.5 kGy/min, up to 300 kGy) in the presence of air. Subsequently, the irradiated foils react with the monomer in oxygen-free solutions in isopropanol (up to 2 M of monomer) at 70 °C. Degree of grafting of OEGMA can be controlled by proper selection of absorbed dose, monomer concentration and reaction time. This work is a part of a broader project on thermosensitive materials facilitating cell growth and detachment for optimizing cell layer engineering techniques in the treatment of burn wounds.

  13. Fluorescence lifetimes and correlated photon statistics from single CdSe/oligo(phenylene vinylene) composite nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Odoi, M Y; Hammer, N I; Early, K T; McCarthy, K D; Tangirala, R; Emrick, T; Barnes, M D

    2007-09-01

    We present measurements of fluorescence intensity trajectories and associated excited-state decay times from individual CdSe/oligo(phenylene vinylene) (CdSe-OPV) quantum dot nanostructures using time-tagged, time-resolved (TTTR) photon counting techniques. We find that fluorescence decay times for the quantum dot emitter in these composite systems are at least an order of magnitude shorter than ZnS-capped CdSe quantum dot systems. We show that both the blinking suppression and associated lifetime/count rate behavior can be described by a modified version of the diffusive reaction coordinate model which couples slow fluctuations in quantum dot electron (1Se, 1Pe) energies to Auger-assisted hole trapping processes, hence modifying both blinking statistics and excited-state decay rates.

  14. Dynamic moisture sorption characteristics of xerogels from water-swellable oligo(oxyethylene) lignin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Passauer, Lars; Struch, Marlene; Schuldt, Stefan; Appelt, Joern; Schneider, Yvonne; Jaros, Doris; Rohm, Harald

    2012-11-01

    Highly swellable lignin derivatives were prepared by cross-linking of oxidatively preactivated spruce organosolv lignin (OSL) with poly(ethylene) glycol diglycidyl ether (PEGDGE). The lignin gels obtained are considered to be an environmentally friendly alternative to synthetic hydrogels and superabsorbents and represent a novel type of lignin based functional materials. For their application, it is not only the absorption of water in terms of hydrogel swelling that plays an important role, but also the adsorption and retention of moisture by the corresponding xerogels. To reveal the mechanisms involved in moistening and reswelling of the lignin gels, the interaction of water vapor with lyophilized xerogels was investigated and compared with sorption characteristics of parent lignin. The chemical structure of PEGDGE-modified lignin was investigated using attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy and selective aminolysis and was related to its sorption and swelling characteristics. Bound and free water in hydrogels was determined by differential scanning calorimetry and by measuring the free swelling capacity of the gels. Moisture sorption of OSL and PEGDGE-modified lignin xerogels was determined using dynamic vapor sorption analysis. In order to determine monolayer and multilayer sorption parameters, sorption data were fitted to the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and the Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer model. Swelling properties of the hydrogels and moisture sorption of the corresponding xerogels were found to be strongly dependent on the degree of chemical modification with PEGDGE: Total and free water content of hydrogels decrease with increasing cross-linking density; on the other hand, water bound in hydrogels and moisture sorption of xerogels at high levels of water activity strongly increase, presumably because of the hydration of hydrophilic oligo(oxyethylene) and oligo(oxyethylene) glycol substituents, which lead to moisture diffusion into

  15. Trichome morphogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, B; Folkers, U; Ilgenfritz, H; Hülskamp, M

    2000-01-01

    Trichomes (plant hairs) in Arabidopsis thaliana are large non-secreting epidermal cells with a characteristic three-dimensional architecture. Because trichomes are easily accessible to a combination of genetic, cell biological and molecular methods they have become an ideal model system to study various aspects of plant cell morphogenesis. In this review we will summarize recent progress in the understanding of trichome morphogenesis. PMID:11128981

  16. LDRD final report on chemical functionalization of oligo(hydrido)silanes, economically attractive routes to new photoresponsive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, G.M.; Loy, D.A.; Curro, J.G.

    1997-05-01

    Metathesis-catalyzed polymerizations of primary silanes were performed to generate polysilanes suitable for functionalization with a variety of side groups. Modeling was employed to predict conformations and estimate electronic properties of candidate functionalized polysilanes. Chemical functionalization of oligo(hydrido)silanes with terminal {alpha}, {omega}-dienes under free radical conditions yielded highly crosslinked, nonporous polysilane networks. Ketone reduction with oligo(hydrido)silanes under free radical conditions led to novel poly(phenylalkoxysilanes). Free radical reduction of terminal alkenyl(alkoxy)silanes forms functionalized polysilanes which can be further transformed into sol-gel matrices with the polysilane functionality intact. These gels may be processed into nonporous xerogels or high surface area aerogels.

  17. Fluorescent monitoring of copper-occupancy in His-ended catalytic oligo-peptides.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Reina; Kawano, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    Controlled generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is widely beneficial to various medical, environmental, and agricultural studies. As inspired by the functional motifs in natural proteins, our group has been engaged in development of catalytically active oligo-peptides as minimum-sized metalloenzymes for generation of superoxide anion, an active member of ROS. In such candidate molecules, catalytically active metal-binding minimal motif was determined to be X-X-H, where X can be most amino acids followed by His. Based on above knowledge, we have designed a series of minimal copper-binding peptides designated as G n H series peptides, which are composed of oligo-glycyl chains ended with C-terminal His residue such as GGGGGH sequence (G5H). In order to further study the role of copper binding to the peptidic catalysts sharing the X-X-H motif such as G5H-conjugated peptides, we should be able to score the occupancy of the peptide population by copper ion in the reaction mixture. Here, model peptides with Cu-binding affinity which show intrinsic fluorescence due to tyrosyl residue (Y) in the UV region (excitation at ca. 230 and 280 nm, and emission at ca. 320 nm) were synthesized to score the effect of copper occupancy. Synthesized peptides include GFP-derived fluorophore sequence, TFSYGVQ (designated as Gfp), and Gfp sequence fused to C-terminal G5H (Gfp-G5H). In addition, two Y-containing tri-peptides derived from natural GFP fluorophores, namely, TYG and SYG were fused to the G5H (TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H). Conjugation of metal-binding G5H sequence to GFP-fluorophore peptide enhanced the action of Cu(2+) on quenching of intrinsic fluorescence due to Y residue. Two other Y-containing peptides, TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H, also showed intrinsic fluorescence which is sensitive to addition of Cu(2+). There was linear relationship between the loading of Cu(2+) and the quenching of fluorescence in these peptide, suggesting that Cu(2+)-dependent quenching of Y

  18. Fluorescent monitoring of copper-occupancy in His-ended catalytic oligo-peptides

    PubMed Central

    Inokuchi, Reina; Kawano, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Controlled generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is widely beneficial to various medical, environmental, and agricultural studies. As inspired by the functional motifs in natural proteins, our group has been engaged in development of catalytically active oligo-peptides as minimum-sized metalloenzymes for generation of superoxide anion, an active member of ROS. In such candidate molecules, catalytically active metal-binding minimal motif was determined to be X-X-H, where X can be most amino acids followed by His. Based on above knowledge, we have designed a series of minimal copper-binding peptides designated as GnH series peptides, which are composed of oligo-glycyl chains ended with C-terminal His residue such as GGGGGH sequence (G5H). In order to further study the role of copper binding to the peptidic catalysts sharing the X-X-H motif such as G5H-conjugated peptides, we should be able to score the occupancy of the peptide population by copper ion in the reaction mixture. Here, model peptides with Cu-binding affinity which show intrinsic fluorescence due to tyrosyl residue (Y) in the UV region (excitation at ca. 230 and 280 nm, and emission at ca. 320 nm) were synthesized to score the effect of copper occupancy. Synthesized peptides include GFP-derived fluorophore sequence, TFSYGVQ (designated as Gfp), and Gfp sequence fused to C-terminal G5H (Gfp-G5H). In addition, two Y-containing tri-peptides derived from natural GFP fluorophores, namely, TYG and SYG were fused to the G5H (TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H). Conjugation of metal-binding G5H sequence to GFP-fluorophore peptide enhanced the action of Cu2+ on quenching of intrinsic fluorescence due to Y residue. Two other Y-containing peptides, TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H, also showed intrinsic fluorescence which is sensitive to addition of Cu2+. There was linear relationship between the loading of Cu2+ and the quenching of fluorescence in these peptide, suggesting that Cu2+-dependent quenching of Y

  19. Engineering oligo(ethylene glycol) based nonfouling surfaces and microstructures for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongwei

    This thesis presents the initial development of oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) based "nonfouling"---protein and cell resistant---coatings that can be applied to a wide range of biomedical applications. The hypothesis underlying this work is that a high density of OEG will eliminate nonspecific protein adsorption thus reduce or eradicate undesired surface phenomena, such as poor biocompatibility, which are direct consequences of the nonspecific protein adsorption. A generalized method for creating functionalized nonfouling surfaces was developed by combining two strategies, namely "Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization of Oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl methacrylate (SI-ATRP of OEGMA)" and "Modular design of initiator", demonstrated on gold (metallic materials), glass and silicon oxide (hydroxylated substrates). SI-ATRP was able to achieve an OEG coating with a density higher than all the pre-existing techniques could achieve. It also provided control over the coating thickness and architecture that are not easily controlled by other techniques. Thickness-density profile of poly(OEGMA) was constructed based on SI-ATRP from mixed SAMs on gold. For the first time, we constructed a map of protein resistance of PEG coated surfaces, which reveals the relationship between the poly(OEGMA) coatings and their protein adsorption. Besides its scientific implications, the practical use (from an engineering point of view) of these results is that the information shall be instructive in designing nonfouling surfaces by providing critical structural parameters. This thesis also demonstrates integration of SI-ATRP with micro and nano scale pattern fabrication, which further expands the applications of this technology. In vitro cell culturing on patterned surfaces confirmed that high-density OEG coatings were exceptionally nonfouling even in physiological milieu, which shows great promise for the in vivo study of OEG coatings. A prototype protein microarray was

  20. Antimicrobial oligo(p-phenylene-ethynylene) film deposited by resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Wangyao; Yu, Qian; López, Gabriel P; Stiff-Roberts, Adrienne D

    2014-04-01

    The antimicrobial oligomer, oligo(p-phenylene-ethynylene) (OPE), was deposited as thin films by resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) on solid substrates and exhibited light-induced biocidal activity. The biocidal activity of OPE thin films deposited by spin-coating and drop-casting was also investigated for comparison. Enhanced bacterial attachment and biocidal efficiency of the film deposited by RIR-MAPLE were observed and attributed to nanoscale surface topography of the thin film.

  1. sigReannot: an oligo-set re-annotation pipeline based on similarities with the Ensembl transcripts and Unigene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Casel, Pierrot; Moreews, François; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Klopp, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Background Microarray is a powerful technology enabling to monitor tens of thousands of genes in a single experiment. Most microarrays are now using oligo-sets. The design of the oligo-nucleotides is time consuming and error prone. Genome wide microarray oligo-sets are designed using as large a set of transcripts as possible in order to monitor as many genes as possible. Depending on the genome sequencing state and on the assembly state the knowledge of the existing transcripts can be very different. This knowledge evolves with the different genome builds and gene builds. Once the design is done the microarrays are often used for several years. The biologists working in EADGENE expressed the need of up-to-dated annotation files for the oligo-sets they share including information about the orthologous genes of model species, the Gene Ontology, the corresponding pathways and the chromosomal location. Results The results of SigReannot on a chicken micro-array used in the EADGENE project compared to the initial annotations show that 23% of the oligo-nucleotide gene annotations were not confirmed, 2% were modified and 1% were added. The interest of this up-to-date annotation procedure is demonstrated through the analysis of real data previously published. Conclusion SigReannot uses the oligo-nucleotide design procedure criteria to validate the probe-gene link and the Ensembl transcripts as reference for annotation. It therefore produces a high quality annotation based on reference gene sets. PMID:19615116

  2. Difference of carboxybetaine and oligo(ethylene glycol) moieties in altering hydrophobic interactions: a molecular simulation study.

    PubMed

    Shao, Qing; White, Andrew D; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2014-01-01

    Polycarboxybetaine and poly(ethylene glycol) materials resist nonspecific protein adsorption but differ in influencing biological functions such as enzymatic activity. To investigate this difference, we studied the influence of carboxybetaine and oligo(ethylene glycol) moieties on hydrophobic interactions using molecular simulations. We employed a model system composed of two non-polar plates and studied the potential of mean force of plate-plate association in carboxybetaine, (ethylene glycol)4, and (ethylene glycol)2 solutions using well-tempered metadynamics simulations. Water, trimethylamine N-oxide, and urea solutions were used as reference systems. We analyzed the variation of the potential of mean force in various solutions to study how carboxybetaine and oligo(ethylene glycol) moieties influence the hydrophobic interactions. To study the origin of their influence, we analyzed the normalized distributions of moieties and water molecules using molecular dynamics simulations. The simulation results showed that oligo(ethylene glycol) moieties repel water molecules away from the non-polar plates and weaken the hydrophobic interactions. Carboxybetaine moieties do not repel water molecules away from the plates and therefore do not influence the hydrophobic interactions.

  3. Effect of Backbone Design on Hybridization Thermodynamics of Oligo-nucleic Acids: A Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Jayaraman, Arthi

    DNA hybridization is the basis of various bio-nano technologies, such as DNA origami and assembly of DNA-functionalized nanoparticles. A hybridized double stranded (ds) DNA is formed when complementary nucleobases on hybridizing strands exhibit specific and directional hydrogen bonds through canonical Watson-Crick base-pairing interactions. In recent years, the need for cheaper alternatives and significant synthetic advances have driven design of DNA mimics with new backbone chemistries. However, a fundamental understanding of how these backbone modifications in the oligo-nucleic acids impact the hybridization and melting behavior of the duplex is still lacking. In this talk, we present our recent findings on impact of varying backbone chemistry on hybridization of oligo-nucleic acid duplexes. We use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to isolate the effect of strand flexibility, electrostatic interactions and nucleobase spacing on the melting curves for duplexes with various strand sequences and concentrations. Since conjugation of oligo-nucleic acids with polymers serve as building blocks for thermo-responsive polymer networks and gels, we also present the effect of such conjugation on hybridization thermodynamics and polymer conformation.

  4. Correlation of length of linear oligo(ethanamino) amides with gene transfer and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Claudia; Kos, Petra; Leclercq, Laurent; Jin, Xiaoyun; Cottet, Hervé; Wagner, Ernst

    2014-09-01

    The optimization of synthetic carriers for gene transfer remains a major challenge. Cationic polymers such as polyethylenimine (PEI) often show increasing gene transfer activity with increasing molecular weight, but this favorable effect is accompanied by an undesired increase in cytotoxicity. Moreover, the polydispersity of polymers prevents accurate determination of optimum size. Herein we describe the step-by-step elongation of precise linear oligo(ethanamino) amides by making use of the artificial amino acid succinoyl-tetraethylene pentamine (Stp) for solid-phase-assisted synthesis. This procedure enabled us to identify the optimal oligomer Stp30-W (8.4 kDa) with a length of 30 Stp units, with which effective gene transfer occurs in the absence of cytotoxicity. The transfection efficiency of Stp30-W exceeded that of standard linear PEI (22 kDa) by sixfold; nevertheless, Stp30-W exhibited tenfold lower cytotoxicity. In addition to the lower molecular weight, the succinate spacer between the oligoamine units may also contribute to the favorable biocompatibility. The cytotoxicity of the cationic polymer PEI is a major concern for use as a carrier for gene delivery, so this comparison between linear PEI and the new Stp oligomers is particularly relevant.

  5. Patients with isolated oligo/hypodontia caused by RUNX2 duplication.

    PubMed

    Molin, Arnaud; Lopez-Cazaux, Serena; Pichon, Olivier; Vincent, Marie; Isidor, Bertrand; Le Caignec, Cédric

    2015-06-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of RUNX2 are responsible for cleidocranial dysplasia, an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by delayed closure of cranial sutures, aplastic or hypoplastic clavicles, moderate short stature and supernumerary teeth. By contrast, an increased gene dosage is expected for duplication of the entire RUNX2 sequence and thus, a phenotype different from cleidocranial dysplasia. To date, two cousins with a duplication including the entire RUNX2 sequence in addition to MIR586, CLIC5 and the 5' half of SUPT3H have been reported. These patients presented with metopic synostosis and hypodontia. Here, we report on a family with an affected mother and three affected children. The four patients carried a 285 kb duplication identified by array comparative genomic hybridization. The duplication includes the entire sequence of RUNX2 and the 5' half of SUPT3H. We confirmed the duplication by real-time quantitative PCR in the four patients. Two children presented with the association of metopic craniosynostosis and oligo/hypodontia previously described, confirming the phenotype caused by RUNX2 duplication. Interestingly, the mother and one child had isolated hypodontia without craniosynostosis, broadening the phenotype observed in patients with such duplications. PMID:25899668

  6. RSC remodeling of oligo-nucleosomes: an atomic force microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Montel, Fabien; Castelnovo, Martin; Menoni, Hervé; Angelov, Dimitar; Dimitrov, Stefan; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine

    2011-04-01

    The 'remodels structure of chromatin' (RSC) complex is an essential chromatin remodeling factor that is required for the control of several processes including transcription, repair and replication. The ability of RSC to relocate centrally positioned mononucleosomes at the end of nucleosomal DNA is firmly established, but the data on RSC action on oligo-nucleosomal templates remains still scarce. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we have quantitatively studied the RSC-induced mobilization of positioned di- and trinucleosomes as well as the directionality of mobilization on mononucleosomal template labeled at one end with streptavidin. AFM imaging showed only a limited set of distinct configurational states for the remodeling products. No stepwise or preferred directionality of the nucleosome motion was observed. Analysis of the corresponding reaction pathways allows deciphering the mechanistic features of RSC-induced nucleosome relocation. The final outcome of RSC remodeling of oligosome templates is the packing of the nucleosomes at the edge of the template, providing large stretches of DNA depleted of nucleosomes. This feature of RSC may be used by the cell to overcome the barrier imposed by the presence of nucleosomes.

  7. Conformation-controlled electron transport in single-molecule junctions containing oligo(phenylene ethynylene) derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Le-Jia; Yong, Ai; Zhou, Kai-Ge; Tan, Lin; Ye, Jian; Wu, Guo-Ping; Xu, Zhu-Guo; Zhang, Hao-Li

    2013-08-01

    Understanding the relationships between the molecular structure and electronic transport characteristics of single-molecule junctions is of fundamental and technological importance for future molecular electronics. Herein, we report a combined experimental and theoretical study on the single-molecule conductance of a series of oligo(phenylene ethynylene) (OPE) molecular wires, which consist of two phenyl-ethynyl-phenyl π units with different dihedral angles. The molecular conductance was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM)-based break-junction techniques under different conditions, including variable temperature and bias potential, which suggested that a coherent tunneling mechanism takes place in the OPE molecular wires with a length of 2.5 nm. The conductance of OPE molecular junctions are strongly affected by the coupling strength between the two π systems, which can be tuned by controlling their intramolecular conformation. A cos(2)θ dependence was revealed between the molecular conductance and dihedral angles between the two conjugated units. Theoretical investigations on the basis of density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's functions (NEGF) gave consistent results with the experimental observations and provided insights into the conformation-dominated molecular conductance.

  8. Oligo-Glycine Synthesis in an Aqueous Solution of Glycine Under Oxidative Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagata, Yukio; Yamashita, Atsunori; Inomata, Katsuhiko

    1980-03-01

    Di-and tri-glycine were synthesized in 1M aqueous solution of glycine by bubbling for 90 hr with oxygen discharged in the path from an oxygen cylinder. The peptides were also produced by an incubation at 37°C of 2M glycine solution prepared with 75% hydrogen peroxide, and the yields were traced for 200 days. The final yields were about 0.25% and 0.01% for di-and tri-glycine, respectively. The solution at 166 days of incubation was applied to a Sephadex G 10 column, and the fractions around the top of the chromatogram were found to increase the intensity of ninhydrin color about 4˜5 times after hydrolysis, indicating an existence of oligo-glycine. The solutions of 1M glycine and 0.5M diglycine prepared with 30% hydrogen peroxide were incubated at 37°C for 38 days, and di-and tetra-glycine were detected in the yields of 0.12% and 0.33%, respectively.

  9. Temperature-responsive self-assembled monolayers of oligo(ethylene glycol): control of biomolecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Zareie, Hadi M; Boyer, Cyrille; Bulmus, Volga; Nateghi, Ebrahim; Davis, Thomas P

    2008-04-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG)-tethered molecules on gold are important for various biorelevant applications ranging from biomaterials to bioanalytical devices, where surface resistance to nonspecific protein adsorption is needed. Incorporation of a stimuli-responsive character to the OEG SAMs enables the creation of nonfouling surfaces with switchable functionality. Here we present an OEG-derived structure that is highly responsive to temperature changes in the vicinity of the physiological temperature, 37 degrees C. The temperature-responsive solution behavior of this new compound was demonstrated by UV-vis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Its chemisorption onto gold(111), and the retention of responsive behavior after chemisorption have been demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy. The OEG-derived SAMs have been shown to reversibly switch the wettability of the surface, as determined by contact angle measurements. More importantly, SPR and AFM studies showed that the OEG SAMs can be utilized to control the affinity binding of streptavidin to the biotin-tethered surface in a temperature-dependent manner while still offering the nonspecific protein-resistance to the surface.

  10. Linear dipole behavior in single CdSe-oligo(phenylene vinylene) nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Early, K T; McCarthy, K D; Odoi, M Y; Sudeep, P K; Emrick, T; Barnes, M D

    2009-02-24

    We report on linearly polarized absorption and emission from individual (4.3 nm) CdSe quantum dots whose surfaces are coordinated with monodisperse oligo-phenylene vinylene ligands. Shown previously to suppress quantum dot blinking, we demonstrate here that the electronic interaction of photoexcited ligands with the quantum dot core is manifested as a strong polarization anisotropy in absorption (M = 0.5), as well as distinct linear dipole emission patterns from the quantum dot core. Further, there is a correlation between the quantum dot emission moment and polarization orientation corresponding to the absorption maxima that is manifested as fluctuations in emission moment orientation in the X-Y plane. The observed polarization effects can be switched off by tuning the excitation away from the ligand absorption band. We propose a mechanism based on exciton dissociation from the photoexcited ligand, followed by the pinning of electrons at the quantum dot surface. The resulting Stark interaction is sufficiently strong to break the 2D degeneracy of the emission moment within the dot, and may therefore account for the linear dipole emission character.

  11. Development of Electrically Conductive Oligo(polyethylene Glycol) Fumarate-Polypyrrole Hydrogels for Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Runge, M. Brett; Dadsetan, Mahrokh; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Ruesink, Terry; Lu, Lichun; Windebank, Anthony J.; Yaszemski, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Electrically conductive hydrogel composites consisting of oligo(polyethylene glycol) fumarate (OPF) and polypyrrole (PPy) were developed for applications in nerve regeneration. OPF-PPy scaffolds were synthesized using three different anions: naphthalene-2-sulfonic acid sodium salt (NSA), dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid sodium salt (DBSA), and dioctyl sulfosuccinate sodium salt (DOSS). Scaffolds were characterized by ATR-FTIR, XPS, AFM, dynamic mechanical analysis, electrical resistivity measurements, and swelling experiments. OPF-PPy scaffolds were shown to consist of up to 25 mol% polypyrrole with a compressive modulus ranging from 265 to 323 kPa and a sheet resistance ranging from 6 to 30 × 103 Ohms/square. In vitro studies using PC12 cells showed OPF-PPy materials had no cytotoxicity and PC12 cells showed distinctly better cell attachment and an increase in the percent of neurite bearing cells on OPF-PPy materials compared to OPF. The neurite lengths of PC12 cells were significantly higher on OPF-PPyNSA and OPF-PPyDBSA. These results show that electrically conductive OPF-PPy hydrogels are promising candidates for future applications in nerve regeneration. PMID:20942380

  12. Masking autoprocessing of Clostridium difficile toxin A by the C-terminus combined repetitive oligo peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongrong; Hamza, Therwa; Gao, Si; Feng, Hanping

    2015-04-01

    Clostridium difficile toxin A and B (TcdA and TcdB) are the major virulence factors of the bacterium, both of which consist of two enzymatic domains: an effector glucosyltransferase domain (GTD) and a cysteine protease domain (CPD) responsible for autocleavage and release of GTD. Although the CPDs from both toxins share a similar structure and mechanism of hexakisphosphate (InsP6)-induced activation, TcdA is substantially less sensitive to the autocleavage as compared with TcdB. In this study, we provided evidence of inter-domain regulation of CPD activity of TcdA and its autoprocessing. The C-terminus combined repetitive oligo peptides (CROPs) of TcdA reduced the accessibility of TcdB CPD to its substrate in a chimeric toxin TxB-Ar, consequently blocking autoprocessing. Moreover, interference of antibodies with the CROPs of full-length TcdA efficiently enhanced its GTD release. In conclusion, by utilizing chimeric toxins and specific antibodies, we identified that the CROPs of TcdA plays a crucial role in controlling the InsP6-mediated activation of CPD and autocleavage of GTD. Our data provides insights on the molecular mode of action of the C. difficile toxins.

  13. Synthesis of dithienogermole-containing oligo- and polysilsesquioxanes as luminescent materials.

    PubMed

    Ohshita, Joji; Nakamura, Masashi; Yamamoto, Kazuki; Watase, Seiji; Matsukawa, Kimihiro

    2015-05-01

    Dithienogermole (DTG)-containing oligo- and polysilsesquioxanes were prepared by hydrolysis/condensation of DTGs bearing one () or two trialkoxysilyl group(s) (). The reaction of gave a cage-type octasilsesquioxane with eight DTG groups at the edges () as a viscous oil, whereas the reaction of yielded a network polymer () as a self-standing film. showed a photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (Φ) of 56% in THF. This value was as high as that of (Φ = 58%), in spite of the accumulation of DTG units in the molecule, as characteristics of the POSS structure. The PL of in THF was suppressed by contact with nitrobenzene, showing the potential of for sensing nitroaromatic explosives. Polymer exhibited a relatively low Φ of 2% as a film, but Φ was improved to 38% by copolymerization with trimethoxymethylsilane. was also copolymerized with a trimethoxysilyl-substituted carbazole derivative () to provide polysilsesquioxanes with DTG and carbazole units, which showed efficient photo-energy transfer from carbazole to DTG in the films. Similar copolymerization of with in the presence of poly(9-vinylcarbazole) provided a composite material with hole-transporting electroluminescence properties, applicable in multi-layered organic light emitting diodes.

  14. Synthesis, self-assembly, and photophysical properties of cationic oligo(p-phenyleneethynylene)s.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yanli; Hill, Eric H; Zhou, Zhijun; Evans, Deborah G; Schanze, Kirk S; Whitten, David G

    2011-04-19

    Three series of cationic oligo p-phenyleneethynylenes (OPEs) have been synthesized to study their structure-property relationships and gain insights into the transition from molecular to macromolecular properties. The absorbance maxima and molar extinction coefficients in all three sets increase with increasing number of repeat units; however, the increase in λ(max) between the oligomers having 2 and 3 repeat units is very small, and the oligomer having 3 repeat units shows virtually the same spectra as a p-phenyleneethynylene polymer having 49 repeat units. A computational study of the oligomers using density functional theory calculations indicates that while the simplest oligomers (OPE-1) are fully conjugated, the larger oligomers are nonplanar and the limiting "segment chromophore" may be confined to a near-planar segment extending over three or four phenyl rings. Several of the OPEs self-assemble on anionic "scaffolds", with pronounced changes in absorption and fluorescence. Both experimental and computational results suggest that the planarization of discrete conjugated segments along the phenylene-ethynylene backbone is predominantly responsible for the photophysical characteristics of the assemblies formed from the larger oligomers. The striking differences in fluorescence between methanol and water are attributed to reversible nucleophilic attack of structured interfacial water on the excited singlet state.

  15. Ladder Oligo(m-aniline)s: Derivatives of Azaacenes with Cross-Conjugated [pi]-Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rajca, Andrzej; Boraty; #324; ski, Przemys; #322; aw J.; Olankitwanit, Arnon; Shiraishi, Kouichi; Pink, Maren; Rajca, Suchada

    2012-04-30

    We describe the synthesis and electronic properties of ladder oligomers of poly(m-aniline) that may be considered as derivatives of azaacenes with cross-conjugated {pi}-systems. Syntheses of ladder oligo(m-aniline)s with 9 and 13 collinearly fused six-membered rings employed Pd-catalyzed aminations and Friedel-Crafts-based ring closures. Structures were confirmed by either X-ray crystallography or correlations between DFT-computed and experimental spectroscopic data such as {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N NMR chemical shifts and electronic absorption spectra. All compounds have planar 'azaacene' moieties. The experimental band gaps E{sub g} {approx} 3.5-3.65 eV, determined by the UV-vis absorption onsets, were in agreement with the TD-DFT-computed vertical excitation energies to the S{sub 1} state. Fluorescence quantum yields of up to 20% were found. Electrochemically estimated HOMO energies of -4.8 eV suggested propensity for a facile one-electron oxidation and just sufficient environmental stability toward oxygen (O{sub 2}). For two oligomers with 'tetraazanonacene' moieties, potentials of E{sup 4+/3+} {approx} 1.6-1.7 V vs SCE were determined for four-electron oxidation to the corresponding tetraradical tetracations.

  16. Toward Multiple Conductance Pathways with Heterocycle-Based Oligo(phenyleneethynylene) Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Delia; Álvarez de Cienfuegos, Luis; Martín-Lasanta, Ana; Morcillo, Sara P; Zotti, Linda A; Leary, Edmund; Bürkle, Marius; Asai, Yoshihiro; Jurado, Rocío; Cárdenas, Diego J; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Agraït, Nicolás; Cuerva, Juan M; González, M Teresa

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we have systematically studied how the replacement of a benzene ring by a heterocyclic compound in oligo(phenyleneethynylene) (OPE) derivatives affects the conductance of a molecular wire using the scanning tunneling microscope-based break junction technique. We describe for the first time how OPE derivatives with a central pyrimidine ring can efficiently link to the gold electrode by two pathways presenting two different conductance G values. We have demonstrated that this effect is associated with the presence of two efficient conductive pathways of different length: the conventional end-to-end configuration, and another with one of the electrodes linked directly to the central ring. This represents one of the few examples in which two defined conductive states can be set up in a single molecule without the aid of an external stimulus. Moreover, we have observed that the conductance through the full length of the heterocycle-based OPEs is basically unaffected by the presence of the heterocycle. All these results and the simplicity of the proposed molecules push forward the development of compounds with multiple conductance pathways, which would be a breakthrough in the field of molecular electronics. PMID:26452050

  17. Distributional patterns of decapod crustaceans in the circum-Mediterranean area during the Oligo-Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyžný, Matúš

    2015-04-01

    . 80, 83-103. Harzhauser M., Kroh A., Mandic O., Piller W.E., Göhlich U., Reuter M. & Berning B. 2007: Biogeographic responses to geodynamics: a key study all around the Oligo-Miocene Tethyan Seaway. Zool. Anz. 246, 241-256. Harzhauser M., Mandic O. & Zuschin M. 2003: Changes in Paratethyan marine molluscs at the Early/Middle Miocene transition: diversity, palaeogeography and palaeoclimate. Acta Geol. Pol. 53, 323-339. Harzhauser M., Piller W.E. & Steininger F.F. 2002: Circum-Mediterranean Oligo/Miocene Biogeographic Evolution - the Gastropods' Point of View. Palaeogeogr., Palaeoclimatol., Palaeoecol. 183, 103-133. Müller P. 1979: The Indo-West-Pacific character of the Badenian decapod crustaceans of the Paratethys. In: VII International Congress on Mediterranean Neogene. Athens, September 27-October 2. Ann. Géol. Pays Hellén., Tome hors série 2, 865-869. Schweitzer C.E. 2001: Paleobiogeography of Cretaceous and Tertiary decapod crustaceans of the North Pacific Ocean. J. Paleontol. 75, 808-826. Studencka B., Gontsharova I.A. & Popov S.V. 1998: The bivalve faunas as a basis for reconstruction of the Middle Miocene history of the Paratethys. Acta Geol. Pol. 48, 285-342.

  18. Dispersion of Vesicles Composed of Industrially Produced Alkyl (Oligo) Glucoside Using Diol-Boron Complexation.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Tatsuo; Asano, Yuuka; Kondo, Takeshi; Yuasa, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    Alkyl (oligo)glucosides (AOG) are known to be environmentally compatible amphiphiles whose commercial applicability should be broadened. The present paper describes the preparation of molecular assemblies of industrially produced AOG, which is a mixture composed of different length of alkyl chains (C9-C12) with oligoglucoside moiety with a few (1-3) of glucose units. It was also described that regulation of the dispersibility of the molecular assemblies prepared by diol-boron complexation between the sugar moiety on AOG and boric acid in a dispersion medium. The molecular assembly of AOG was successfully formed by mixing AOG and cholesterols (CH). When using a suitable amount of CH (20-40 mol% with respect to AOG), the molecular assembly formed a vesicle structure. The dispersion ability of the resulting vesicle was dependent on both the boric acid concentration and pH of the dispersion medium. The light-scattering and ζ-potential measurements revealed that high concentrations (≥10 mM) of boric acid improved dispersibility the vesicles. In contrast, the vesicle agglomerated at low concentrations of boric acid (1-7.5 mM). In the absence of boric acid in dispersion medium, the vesicles were completely agglomerated. The optimum pH range for vesicle dispersion was found to be from neutral to basic (7.4-10.1). The (11)B NMR study revealed that borate ester formation occurred between boric acid and the diol of the sugar moiety on AOG vesicle. The present data suggest that borate ester formation that occurred on the surface of the vesicle provided negative charge to the vesicles, contributing to their dispersion via repulsive forces. PMID:27321117

  19. 6-O-Branched Oligo-β-glucan-Based Antifungal Glycoconjugate Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Liao, Guochao; Zhou, Zhifang; Liao, Jun; Zu, Luning; Wu, Qiuye; Guo, Zhongwu

    2016-02-12

    With the rapid growth in fungal infections and drug-resistant fungal strains, antifungal vaccines have become an especially attractive strategy to tackle this important health problem. β-Glucans, a class of extracellular carbohydrate antigens abundantly and consistently expressed on fungal cell surfaces, are intriguing epitopes for antifungal vaccine development. β-Glucans have a conserved β-1,3-glucan backbone with sporadic β-1,3- or β-1,6-linked short glucans as branches at the 6-O-positions, and the branches may play a critical role in their immunologic functions. To study the immunologic properties of branched β-glucans and develop β-glucan-based antifungal vaccines, three branched β-glucan oligosaccharides with 6-O-linked β-1,6-tetraglucose, β-1,3-diglucose, and β-1,3-tetraglucose branches on a β-1,3-nonaglucan backbone, which mimic the structural epitopes of natural β-glucans, were synthesized and coupled with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) to form novel synthetic conjugate vaccines. These glycoconjugates were proved to elicit strong IgG antibody responses in mice. It was also discovered that the number, size, and structure of branches linked to the β-glucan backbone had a significant impact on the immunologic property. Moreover, antibodies induced by the synthetic oligosaccharide-KLH conjugates were able to recognize and bind to natural β-glucans and fungal cells. Most importantly, these conjugates elicited effective protection against systemic Candida albicans infection in mice. Thus, branched oligo-β-glucans were identified as functional epitopes for antifungal vaccine design and the corresponding protein conjugates as promising antifungal vaccine candidates. PMID:27624963

  20. Conformation and Phase Separation of Oligo (ethylene glycol) Grafted Polystyrene in Dilute Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Gang; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Wignall, George D; Hua, Fengjun; Hong, Kunlun; Mays, Jimmy

    2007-01-01

    Temperature induced conformational changes of poly(p-oligo(ethylene glycol) styrene) (POEGS) in aqueous solutions were investigated by small angle neutron scattering (SANS), neutron transmission and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The molecular weight of the polymer studied was 9400 g/mol with a polydispersity index of 1.18 and each repeat unit of the polymer had four ethylene glycol monomer segments. The polymer was water soluble due to the hydrophilicity of the OEG side chains and these solutions showed lower critical solution temperature (LCST) depending on the concentration of the polymer. Measurements of solution behavior were made as a function of temperature in the range of 25-55 C for three polymer concentrations (0.1 wt%, 0.3 wt%, and 1.8 wt%). Neutron transmission measurements were used to monitor the amount of polymer which precipitated or remained in solution above the cloud point temperature (T{sub CP}). DLS revealed the presence of large clusters in all solutions both below and above T{sub CP} while SANS provided information on the structure and interactions between individual chains. It was found that in the homogeneous region below T{sub CP} the shape of individual polymers in solution was close to ellipsoidal with the dimensions R{sub a} = 37 Angstroms and R{sub b} = 14 Angstroms and was virtually independent of temperature. The SANS data taken for the most concentrated solution studied (1.8 wt%) were fit to the ellipsoidal model with attractive interactions which were approximated by the Ornstein-Zernike function with a temperature-dependent correlation length in the range of 24-49 Angstroms. The collapse of individual polymers to spherical globules with the radius of 15 Angstroms above TCP was observed.

  1. The demise of the Oligo-Miocene fluvial system of the Levant and its geodynamic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachtman, Dina; Mart, Yossi

    2015-04-01

    The Levant rift system is a linear assemblage of axial rifts and their mountainous flanks that comprises two structurally distinct sections. The southern segment is built of series of secondary axial grabens, which trend northwards and are separated from each other by poorly rifted threshold zones, which is the northern extension of the Red Sea continental break-up. The northern section comprises the SW-trending Karasu - Hatay rifts, from which the Ghab graben branches southwards, which is tectonically attributed to the westward migration of Anatolia. A system of large rivers transected the southern section of the Levant from central Arabia in the east to the Mediterranean Sea in the west during the Oligo-Miocene, leaving behind 5 km thick series of clastic deposits at sea, and sandstones and conglomerates of variable thickness on land. The demise of that fluvial system was gradual, stretching from the late Miocene to the early Pleistocene, where coastal rivers were truncated from their sources due to the growth of segmented rift. The geodynamic process that constrains the development of the rifts of the southern Levant and their elevated flanks is oblique rifting, where several small rifts start the evolution along a weakness zone concurrently, separated by wide and inactive threshold zones. Gradually the rifts grow along their long axes to interconnect, shrinking the threshold zone to their disappearence. Such geodynamic history best accounts for the observations of relicts of late Miocene fluvial deposits on mountaintops, large river beds dated to the late Miocene-early Pliocene, and large marine fan deposits of early Pliocene age, where rivers continued to flow in the threshold zones, but truncated by the emerging rifts.

  2. The effect of oligo(trimethylene carbonate) addition on the stiffness of acrylic bone cement

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Cecilia; López, Alejandro; Fathali, Hoda; Hoess, Andreas; Rojas, Ramiro; Ott, Marjam Karlsson; Hilborn, Jöns; Engqvist, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract With the increasing elderly population an increase in the number of bony fractures associated to age-related diseases such as osteoporosis also follows. The relatively high stiffness of the acrylic bone cements used in these patients has been suggested to give raise to a suboptimal load distribution surrounding the cement in vivo, and hence contribute to clinical complications, such as additional fractures. The aim of this study was to develop a low-modulus bone cement, based on currently used, commercially available poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) cements for vertebroplasty. To this end, acrylate end-functionalized oligo(trimethylene carbonate) (oTMC) was incorporated into the cements, and the resulting compressive mechanical properties were evaluated, as well as the cytotoxic and handling properties of selected formulations. Sixteen wt%oTMC was needed in the vertebroplastic cement Osteopal V to achieve an elastic modulus of 1063 MPa (SD 74), which gave a corresponding compressive strength of 46.1 MPa (SD 1.9). Cement extracts taken at 1 and 12 hours gave a reduced MG-63 cell viability in most cases, while extracts taken at 24 hours had no significant effect on cell behavior. The modification also gave an increase in setting time, from 14.7 min (SD 1.7) to 18.0 min (SD 0.9), and a decrease in maximum polymerization temperature, from 41.5°C (SD 3.4) to 30.7°C (SD 1.4). While further evaluation of other relevant properties, such as injectability and in vivo biocompatibility, remains to be done, the results presented herein are promising in terms of approaching clinically applicable bone cements with a lower stiffness. PMID:26727581

  3. Oligo(ethylene glycol)-functionalized disiloxanes as electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengcheng; Dong, Jian; West, Robert; Amine, Khalil

    Functionalized disiloxane compounds were synthesized by attaching oligo(ethylene glycol) chains, -(CH 2CH 2O)- n, n = 2-7, via hydrosilation, dehydrocoupling, and nucleophilic substitution reactions and were examined as non-aqueous electrolyte solvents in lithium-ion cells. The compounds were fully characterized by 1H, 13C, and 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Upon doping with lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB) or LiPF 6, the disiloxane electrolytes showed conductivities up to 6.2 × 10 -4 S cm -1 at room temperature. The thermal behavior of the electrolytes was studied by differential scanning calorimetry, which revealed very low glass transition temperatures before and after LiBOB doping and much higher thermal stability compared to organic carbonate electrolytes. Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed that disiloxane-based electrolytes with 0.8 M LiBOB salt concentration are stable to 4.7 V. The LiBOB/disiloxane combinations were found to be good electrolytes for lithium-ion cells; unlike LiPF 6, LiBOB can provide a good passivation film on the graphite anode. The LiPF 6/disiloxane electrolyte was enabled in lithium-ion cells by adding 1 wt% vinyl ethylene carbonate (VEC). Full cell performance tests with LiNi 0.80Co 0.15Al 0.05O 2 as the cathode and mesocarbon microbead (MCMB) graphite as the anode show stable cyclability. The results demonstrate that disiloxane-based electrolytes have considerable potential as electrolytes for use in lithium-ion batteries.

  4. Tectonics and sedimentation of Oligo-Miocene Vasquez Formation, Soledad basin, southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrix, E.D.

    1987-05-01

    The nonmarine Oligo-Miocene Vasquez Formation represents the earliest sedimentation within the Soledad basin. Basin analysis of this unit provides important clues to the tectonic regimen during the convergent/transform-margin transition in southern California during the mid-Tertiary. The Vasquez crops out in three separate subbasins or depocenters; from south to north, these are the Vasquez Rocks, Texas Canyon, and Charlie Canyon subbasins. Basaltic-andesitic volcanism and rapid subsidence punctuated the initial rifting event which generated the Vasquez Rocks half-graben and Texas Canyon graben. Small, thick alluvial fans were shed into these two subbasins, with sediment derived via erosion of local plutonic, metamorphic, and volcanic source terranes. A minimum of four discrete uplift events generated development of 250 to 600-m thick, upward-fining alluvial megacycles in both the Vasquez Rocks and Texas Canyon depocenters. In the absence of biostratigraphic control, these allocyclic megasequences provide a tangible means of lithostratigraphic correlation between these separate subbasins. A major uplift and drainage basin reorganization event subsequently modified the Vasquez depositional system, facilitating physical interconnection of the two southern subbasins. The northernmost subbasin, Charlie Canyon, is characterized by a single, thick, upward-coarsening alluvial fan sequence. There are no megacycles or clast suites to suggest interconnection with or evolutionary similarities to the other two depocenters. This sedimentologic uniqueness may support a mid-Tertiary palinspastic reconstruction which places the Charlie Canyon region 80-100 km northwest of its current location. Soledad basin rifting and Vasquez sedimentation are consistent with a tectonic model involving lithospheric extension north of the unstable Mendocino triple junction.

  5. Protein patterning by UV-induced photodegradation of poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) brushes.

    PubMed

    Alang Ahmad, Shahrul; Hucknall, Angus; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Leggett, Graham J

    2010-06-15

    The UV photodegradation of protein-resistant poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) (POEGMA) bottle-brush films, grown on silicon oxide by surface-initiated atom radical transfer polymerization, was studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Exposure to light with a wavelength of 244 nm caused a loss of polyether units from the brush structure and the creation of aldehyde groups that could be derivatized with amines. An increase was measured in the coefficient of friction of the photodegraded polymer brush compared to the native brush, attributed to the creation of a heterogeneous surface film, leading to increased energy dissipation through film deformation and the creation of new polar functional groups at the surface. Exposure of the films through a photomask yielded sharp, well-defined patterns. Analysis of topographical images showed that physical removal of material occurred during exposure, at a rate of 1.35 nm J(-1) cm(2). Using fluorescence microscopy, the adsorption of labeled proteins onto the exposed surfaces was studied. It was found that protein strongly adsorbed to exposed areas, while the masked regions retained their protein resistance. Exposure of the film to UV light from a scanning near-field optical microscope yielded submicrometer-scale patterns. These data indicate that a simple, rapid, one-step photoconversion of the poly(OEGMA) brush occurs that transforms it from a highly protein-resistant material to one that adsorbs protein and can covalently bind amine-containing molecules and that this photoconversion can be spatially addressed with high spatial resolution.

  6. Production of multi-, oligo- and single-pore membranes using a continuous ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, P. Yu.; Ivanov, O. M.; Lizunov, N. E.; Mamonova, T. I.; Nechaev, A. N.; Olejniczak, K.; Vacik, J.; Dmitriev, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Ion track membranes (ITM) have attracted significant interest over the past two decades due to their numerous applications in physical, biological, chemical, biochemical and medical experimental works. A particular feature of ITM technology is the possibility to fabricate samples with a predetermined number of pores, including single-pore membranes. The present report describes a procedure that allowed for the production of multi-, oligo- and single-pore membranes using a continuous ion beam from an IC-100 cyclotron. The beam was scanned over a set of small diaphragms, from 17 to ∼1000 μm in diameter. Ions passed through the apertures and impinged two sandwiched polymer foils, with the total thickness close to the ion range in the polymer. The foils were pulled across the ion beam at a constant speed. The ratio between the transport speed and the scanning frequency determined the distance between irradiation spots. The beam intensity and the aperture diameters were adjusted such that either several, one or no ions passed through the diaphragms during one half-period of scanning. After irradiation, the lower foil was separated from the upper foil and was etched to obtain pores 6-8 μm in diameter. The pores were found using a color chemical reaction between two reagents placed on opposite sides of the foil. The located pores were further confirmed using SEM and optical microscopy. The numbers of tracks in the irradiation spots were consistent with the Poisson statistics. Samples with single or few tracks obtained in this way were employed to study fine phenomena in ion track nanopores.

  7. Crystalline Oligo(ethylene sulfide) Domains Define Highly Stable Supramolecular Block Copolymer Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Brubaker, Carrie E; Velluto, Diana; Demurtas, Davide; Phelps, Edward A; Hubbell, Jeffrey A

    2015-07-28

    With proper control over copolymer design and solvation conditions, self-assembled materials display impressive morphological variety that encompasses nanoscale colloids as well as bulk three-dimensional architectures. Here we take advantage of both hydrophobicity and crystallinity to mediate supramolecular self-assembly of spherical micellar, linear fibrillar, or hydrogel structures by a family of highly asymmetric poly(ethylene glycol)-b-oligo(ethylene sulfide) (PEG-OES) copolymers. Assembly structural polymorphism was achieved with modification of PEG-OES topology (linear versus multiarm) and with precise, monomer-by-monomer control of OES length. Notably, all three morphologies were accessed utilizing OES oligomers with degrees of polymerization as short as three. These exceptionally small assembly forming blocks represent the first application of ethylene sulfide oligomers in supramolecular materials. While the assemblies demonstrated robust aqueous stability over time, oxidation by hydrogen peroxide progressively converted ethylene sulfide residues to increasingly hydrophilic and amorphous sulfoxides and sulfones, causing morphological changes and permanent disassembly. We utilized complementary microscopic and spectroscopic techniques to confirm this chemical stimulus-responsive behavior in self-assembled PEG-OES colloidal dispersions and physical gels. In addition to inherent stimulus-responsive behavior, fibrillar assemblies demonstrated biologically relevant molecular delivery, as confirmed by the dose-dependent activation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells following fibril-mediated delivery of the immunological adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A. In physical gels composed of either linear or multiarm PEG-OES precursors, rheologic analysis also identified mechanical stimulus-responsive shear thinning behavior. Thanks to the facile preparation, user-defined morphology, aqueous stability, carrier functionality, and stimuli-responsive behaviors of

  8. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  9. Rapid Synthesis of a Long Double-Stranded Oligonucleotide from a Single-Stranded Nucleotide Using Magnetic Beads and an Oligo Library.

    PubMed

    Pengpumkiat, Sumate; Koesdjojo, Myra; Rowley, Erik R; Mockler, Todd C; Remcho, Vincent T

    2016-01-01

    Chemical synthesis of oligonucleotides is a widely used tool in the field of biochemistry. Several methods for gene synthesis have been introduced in the growing area of genomics. In this paper, a novel method of constructing dsDNA is proposed. Short (28-mer) oligo fragments from a library were assembled through successive annealing and ligation processes, followed by PCR. First, two oligo fragments annealed to form a dsDNA molecule. The double-stranded oligo was immobilized onto magnetic beads (solid support) via streptavidin-biotin binding. Next, single-stranded oligo fragments were added successively through ligation to form the complete DNA molecule. The synthesized DNA was amplified through PCR and gel electrophoresis was used to characterize the product. Sanger sequencing showed that more than 97% of the nucleotides matched the expected sequence. Extending the length of the DNA molecule by adding single-stranded oligonucleotides from a basis set (library) via ligation enables a more convenient and rapid mechanism for the design and synthesis of oligonucleotides on the go. Coupled with an automated dispensing system and libraries of short oligo fragments, this novel DNA synthesis method would offer an efficient and cost-effective method for producing dsDNA. PMID:26930667

  10. Rapid Synthesis of a Long Double-Stranded Oligonucleotide from a Single-Stranded Nucleotide Using Magnetic Beads and an Oligo Library

    PubMed Central

    Pengpumkiat, Sumate; Koesdjojo, Myra; Rowley, Erik R.; Mockler, Todd C.; Remcho, Vincent T.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical synthesis of oligonucleotides is a widely used tool in the field of biochemistry. Several methods for gene synthesis have been introduced in the growing area of genomics. In this paper, a novel method of constructing dsDNA is proposed. Short (28-mer) oligo fragments from a library were assembled through successive annealing and ligation processes, followed by PCR. First, two oligo fragments annealed to form a dsDNA molecule. The double-stranded oligo was immobilized onto magnetic beads (solid support) via streptavidin-biotin binding. Next, single-stranded oligo fragments were added successively through ligation to form the complete DNA molecule. The synthesized DNA was amplified through PCR and gel electrophoresis was used to characterize the product. Sanger sequencing showed that more than 97% of the nucleotides matched the expected sequence. Extending the length of the DNA molecule by adding single-stranded oligonucleotides from a basis set (library) via ligation enables a more convenient and rapid mechanism for the design and synthesis of oligonucleotides on the go. Coupled with an automated dispensing system and libraries of short oligo fragments, this novel DNA synthesis method would offer an efficient and cost-effective method for producing dsDNA. PMID:26930667

  11. Helix stability of oligoglycine, oligoalanine, and oligo-β-alanine dodecamers reflected by hydrogen-bond persistence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengyu; Ponder, Jay W; Marshall, Garland R

    2014-11-01

    Helices are important structural/recognition elements in proteins and peptides. Stability and conformational differences between helices composed of α- and β-amino acids as scaffolds for mimicry of helix recognition has become a theme in medicinal chemistry. Furthermore, helices formed by β-amino acids are experimentally more stable than those formed by α-amino acids. This is paradoxical because the larger sizes of the hydrogen-bonding rings required by the extra methylene groups should lead to entropic destabilization. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations using the second-generation force field, AMOEBA (Ponder, J.W., et al., Current status of the AMOEBA polarizable force field. J Phys Chem B, 2010. 114(8): p. 2549-64.) explored the stability and hydrogen-bonding patterns of capped oligo-β-alanine, oligoalanine, and oligoglycine dodecamers in water. The MD simulations showed that oligo-β-alanine has strong acceptor+2 hydrogen bonds, but surprisingly did not contain a large content of 3(12) -helical structures, possibly due to the sparse distribution of the 3(12) -helical structure and other structures with acceptor+2 hydrogen bonds. On the other hand, despite its backbone flexibility, the β-alanine dodecamer had more stable and persistent <3.0 Å hydrogen bonds. Its structure was dominated more by multicentered hydrogen bonds than either oligoglycine or oligoalanine helices. The 3(1) (PII) helical structure, prevalent in oligoglycine and oligoalanine, does not appear to be stable in oligo-β-alanine indicating its competition with other structures (stacking structure as indicated by MD analyses). These differences are among the factors that shape helical structural preferences and the relative stabilities of these three oligopeptides.

  12. Dissolved organic matter dynamics in the oligo/meso-haline zone of wetland-influenced coastal rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maie, Nagamitsu; Sekiguchi, Satoshi; Watanabe, Akira; Tsutsuki, Kiyoshi; Yamashita, Youhei; Melling, Lulie; Cawley, Kaelin M.; Shima, Eikichi; Jaffé, Rudolf

    2014-08-01

    Wetlands are key components in the global carbon cycle and export significant amounts of terrestrial carbon to the coastal oceans in the form of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Conservative behavior along the salinity gradient of DOC and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) has often been observed in estuaries from their freshwater end-member (salinity = 0) to the ocean (salinity = 35). While the oligo/meso-haline (salinity < 10) tidal zone of upper estuaries has been suggested to be more complex and locally influenced by geomorphological and hydrological features, the environmental dynamics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and the environmental drivers controlling its source, transport, and fate have scarcely been evaluated. Here, we investigated the distribution patterns of DOC and CDOM optical properties determined by UV absorbance at 254 nm (A254) and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence coupled with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) along the lower salinity range (salinity < 10) of the oligo/meso-haline zone for three distinct wetland-influenced rivers; namely the Bekanbeushi River, a cool-temperate river with estuarine lake in Hokkaido, Japan, the Harney River, a subtropical river with tidally-submerged mangrove fringe in Florida, USA, and the Judan River, a small, acidic, tropical rainforest river in Borneo, Malaysia. For the first two rivers, a clear decoupling between DOC and A254 was observed, while these parameters showed similar conservative behavior for the third. Three distinct EEM-PARAFAC models established for each of the rivers provided similar spectroscopic characteristics except for some unique fluorescence features observed for the Judan River. The distribution patterns of PARAFAC components suggested that the inputs from plankton and/or submerged aquatic vegetation can be important in the Bekanbeushi River. Further, DOM photo-products formed in the estuarine lake were also found to be transported upstream. In the Harney River

  13. Immobilization of Antibody on a Cyclic Olefin Copolymer Surface with Functionalizable, Non-Biofouling Poly[Oligo(Ethylene Glycol) Methacrylate].

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung Pyo; Kang, Sung Min; Hong, Daewha; Lee, Hee-Yoon; Choi, Insung S; Ko, Sangwon; Lee, Jungkyu K

    2015-02-01

    We report a perfluoroaryl azide-based photoreaction for synthesizing functionalizable and nonbiofouling poly[oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate] (pOEGMA) films on a chemically inert COC substrate, and an estimation of a surface coverage of the antibody immobilized onto the surface with the immuno-gold nanoparticles. The processes were confirmed by water contact angle measurement, FT-IR spectroscopy, and FE-SEM. The strategy demonstrated in this work could be applied to functionalizations of other polymeric materials and determination of the binding capacity of analytes in biosensors and microfluidic devices.

  14. Antimicrobial oligo(p-phenylene-ethynylene) film deposited by resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Wangyao; Yu, Qian; López, Gabriel P; Stiff-Roberts, Adrienne D

    2014-04-01

    The antimicrobial oligomer, oligo(p-phenylene-ethynylene) (OPE), was deposited as thin films by resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) on solid substrates and exhibited light-induced biocidal activity. The biocidal activity of OPE thin films deposited by spin-coating and drop-casting was also investigated for comparison. Enhanced bacterial attachment and biocidal efficiency of the film deposited by RIR-MAPLE were observed and attributed to nanoscale surface topography of the thin film. PMID:24581926

  15. Clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy for patients with lung tumors in the state of oligo-recurrence.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tetsuya; Katoh, Norio; Onimaru, Rikiya; Shirato, Hiroki

    2012-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the clinical outcomes of patients with oligometastatic lung tumors who underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Twenty-two patients with one or two oligometastatic lung tumors were treated with SBRT at our institution between 1999 and 2009. With a median follow-up period of 25 months from the date of SBRT to the detection of oligometastatic lung tumors, the patients' 3- and 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 72% and 54%, respectively. The median disease-free interval (DFI) between the treatment of the primary site and SBRT to oligometastatic lung tumors was 41 months. The OS of patients with a DFI ≥ 36 months was significantly longer than that of the patients with a DFI < 36 months by the log-rank test (P = 0.02). For patients with a DFI ≥ 36 months, the 3- and 5-year OS rates were both 88%, compared to 50% for the patients with a DFI < 36 months. The primary tumor of all patients was locally controlled when SBRT to oligometastatic lung tumors was performed, and thus they were in the state of "oligo-recurrence." Patients with oligometastatic lung lesions treated by SBRT had good prognoses. This was especially true of the patients with a long DFI and in the state of "oligo-recurrence."

  16. Oligo(p-phenylenevinylene)-peptide conjugates: synthesis and self-assembly in solution and at the solid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Matmour, Rachid; De Cat, Inge; George, Subi J; Adriaens, Wencke; Leclère, Philippe; Bomans, Paul H H; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M; Gielen, Jeroen C; Christianen, Peter C M; Heldens, Jeroen T; van Hest, Jan C M; Löwik, Dennis W P M; De Feyter, Steven; Meijer, E W; Schenning, Albertus P H J

    2008-11-01

    Two oligo(p-phenylenevinylene)-peptide hybrid amphiphiles have been synthesized using solid- and liquid-phase strategies. The amphiliphiles are composed of a pi-conjugated oligo(p-phenylenevinylene) trimer (OPV) which is coupled at either a glycinyl-alanyl-glycinyl-alanyl-glycine (GAGAG) silk-inspired beta-sheet or a glycinyl-alanyl-asparagyl-prolyl-asparagy-alanyl-alanyl-glycine (GANPNAAG) beta-turn forming oligopeptide sequence. The solid-phase strategy enables one to use longer peptides if strong acidic conditions are avoided, whereas the solution-phase coupling gives better yields. The study of the two-dimensional (2D) self-assembly of OPV-GAGAG by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at the submolecular level demonstrated the formation of bilayers in which the molecules are lying antiparallel in a beta-sheet conformation. In the case of OPV-GANPNAAG self-assembled monolayers could not be observed. Absorption, fluorescence, and circular dichroism studies showed that OPV-GAGAG and OPV-GANPNAAG are aggregated in a variety of organic solvents. In water cryogenic temperature transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), light scattering, and optical studies reveal that self-assembled nanofibers are formed in which the helical organization of the OPV segments is dictated by the peptide sequence. PMID:18847199

  17. A new look towards BAC-based array CGH through a comprehensive comparison with oligo-based array CGH

    PubMed Central

    Wicker, Nicolas; Carles, Annaïck; Mills, Ian G; Wolf, Maija; Veerakumarasivam, Abhi; Edgren, Henrik; Boileau, Fabrice; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Schalken, Jack A; Neal, David E; Kallioniemi, Olli; Poch, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Background Currently, two main technologies are used for screening of DNA copy number; the BAC (Bacterial Artificial Chromosome) and the recently developed oligonucleotide-based CGH (Chromosomal Comparative Genomic Hybridization) arrays which are capable of detecting small genomic regions with amplification or deletion. The correlation as well as the discriminative power of these platforms has never been compared statistically on a significant set of human patient samples. Results In this paper, we present an exhaustive comparison between the two CGH platforms, undertaken at two independent sites using the same batch of DNA from 19 advanced prostate cancers. The comparison was performed directly on the raw data and a significant correlation was found between the two platforms. The correlation was greatly improved when the data were averaged over large chromosomic regions using a segmentation algorithm. In addition, this analysis has enabled the development of a statistical model to discriminate BAC outliers that might indicate microevents. These microevents were validated by the oligo platform results. Conclusion This article presents a genome-wide statistical validation of the oligo array platform on a large set of patient samples and demonstrates statistically its superiority over the BAC platform for the Identification of chromosomic events. Taking advantage of a large set of human samples treated by the two technologies, a statistical model has been developed to show that the BAC platform could also detect microevents. PMID:17394638

  18. Stomatal Development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pillitteri, Lynn Jo; Dong, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Stomata consist of two guard cells that function as turgor-operated valves that regulate gas exchange in plants. In Arabidopsis, a dedicated cell lineage is initiated and undergoes a series of cell divisions and cell-state transitions to produce a stoma. A set of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors regulates the transition and differentiation events through the lineage, while the placement of stomata relative to each other is controlled by intercellular signaling via peptide ligands, transmembrane receptors, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) modules. Some genes involved in regulating stomatal differentiation or density are also involved in hormonal and environmental stress responses, which may provide a link between modulation of stomatal development or function in response to changes in the environment. Premitotic polarlylocalized proteins provide an added layer of regulation, which can be addressed more thoroughly with the identification of additional proteins in this pathway. Linking the networks that control stomatal development promises to bring advances to our understanding of signal transduction, cell polarity, and cell-fate specification in plants. PMID:23864836

  19. Arabidopsis thaliana—Aphid Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Joe; Singh, Vijay; Shah, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Aphids are important pests of plants that use their stylets to tap into the sieve elements to consume phloem sap. Besides the removal of photosynthates, aphid infestation also alters source-sink patterns. Most aphids also vector viral diseases. In this chapter, we will summarize on recent significant findings in plant-aphid interaction, and how studies involving Arabidopsis thaliana and Myzus persicae (Sülzer), more commonly known as the green peach aphid (GPA), are beginning to provide important insights into the molecular basis of plant defense and susceptibility to aphids. The recent demonstration that expression of dsRNA in Arabidopsis can be used to silence expression of genes in GPA has further expanded the utility of Arabidopsis for evaluating the contribution of the aphid genome-encoded proteins to this interaction. PMID:22666177

  20. Oligo-monoclonal immunoglobulins frequently develop during concurrent cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infections in patients after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Drouet, E; Chapuis-Cellier, C; Bosshard, S; Verniol, C; Niveleau, A; Touraine, J L; Garnier, J L

    1999-12-01

    In the present study we report that the appearance of oligo-monoclonal immunoglobulins (oligoM-Igs) in the sera of transplanted individuals is concurrent with the detection of coincident active CMV infection and EBV replication. Eighty-four renal allograft patients were monitored with respect to CMV isolation, to CMV conventional serology and humoral response against the EBV trans-activator ZEBRA (an immediate-early antigen also called BZLF1). Titration of anti-ZEBRA antibodies (IgG and IgM) and amount of EBV DNA in serum were evaluated. Using the combination of four techniques (agarose gel electrophoresis, analytical isoelectric focusing, high resolution immunoelectrophoresis, immunofixation electrophoresis), oligoM-Igs were found in 25% of patients after allografting and significantly associated with rejection episodes (P < 0.001). Twenty out of 23 (86%) concurrent CMV/EBV infections were associated with serum oligoM-Igs (P < 0.001). One can thus reasonably assume that a sustained EBV replication following iatrogenic immunosuppression can promote the immunoglobulin heavy chain expression in EBV-infected B lymphocytes. The proliferation of immunoglobulin-secreting clones might occur after active CMV infection, through a transient over-immunosuppression or via immune subversion.

  1. Synthesis of oligo(chloroorganoxy) chlorophosphazenes and investigation of these materials as combustion inhibitors in fiberglass-reinforced plastics based on epoxy and polyster resins

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, S.G.; Gol`din, G.S.; Nikitina, G.S.

    1992-03-10

    The authors have carried out the synthesis of linear oligo(chloroorganoxy)chlorophosphazenes (OCOCPs) by the interaction of linear oligochlorophosphazenes (LCPs) with ethylene oxide and a number of other expoxy compounds. Also, the authors have investigated the fire-retardant efficiency of the OCOCPs that the authors synthesized. 7 refs., 5 tabs.

  2. Coplanar Oligo(p-phenylenedisilenylene)s as Si═Si Analogues of Oligo(p-phenylenevinylene)s: Evidence for Extended π-Conjugation through the Carbon and Silicon π-Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangchun; Matsuo, Tsukasa; Hashizume, Daisuke; Fueno, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kazuyoshi; Tamao, Kohei

    2015-12-01

    A series of oligo(p-phenylenedisilenylene)s (Si-OPVs 1-4), silicon analogues of oligo(p-phenylenevinylene)s, up to the tetramer have been synthesized and isolated by the introduction of a newly developed protecting group [(HexO)MEind] for improving their solubility. The experimental and theoretical studies of the Si-OPVs 1-4 demonstrate the fully extended π-conjugation of the Si-OPV main chains. Single crystal X-ray analyses of the monomer 1 and the dimer 2 revealed the highly coplanar Si-OPV backbones facilitating the effective extension of the π-conjugation, which has further been validated by the significant increases in the absorption maxima from 465 nm for the monomer 1 to 610 nm for the tetramer 4. The absorption maxima exhibit an excellent fit to Meier's equation, leading to the estimation of an effective conjugation length (ECL) of 9 repeat units (nECL = 9) and the absorption maximum of 635 nm for the infinite chain (λ∞ = 635 nm). In sharp contrast to other nonemissive disilenes, the Si-OPVs 2-4 show an intense fluorescence from 613 to 668 nm at room temperature with the quantum yields up to 0.48. All the data presented here provide the first evidence for the efficient extended π-conjugation between the Si═Si double bonds and the carbon π-electron systems over the entire Si-OPV skeleton. This study reveals the possibility for developing the conjugated disilene π-systems, in which the Si═Si double bonds would be promising building blocks, significantly optimizing the intrinsic photophysical and electrochemical properties of the carbon-based π-conjugated materials.

  3. Purification of an oligo(dG).oligo(dC)-binding sea urchin nuclear protein, suGF1: a family of G-string factors involved in gene regulation during development.

    PubMed

    Hapgood, J; Patterton, D

    1994-02-01

    Contiguous deoxyguanosine residues (G strings) have been implicated in regulation of gene expression in several organisms via the binding of G-string factors. Regulation of expression of the chicken adult beta-globin gene may involve the interplay between binding of an erythrocyte-specific G-string factor, BGP1, and the stability of a positioned nucleosome (C. D. Lewis, S. P. Clark, G. Felsenfeld, and H. Gould, Genes Dev. 2:863-873, 1988). We have purified a 59.5-kDa nuclear protein (suGF1) from sea urchin embryos by DNA affinity chromatography. suGF1 has high binding affinity and specificity for oligo(dG).oligo(dC). The identity of the purified protein was confirmed by renaturation of sequence-specific DNA-binding activity from a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel slice and by Southwestern (DNA-protein) blotting. suGF1 binds in vitro to a G11 string present in the H1-H4 intergenic region of a sea urchin early histone gene battery. This suGF1 DNA recognition site occurs within a homopurine-homopyrimidine stretch previously shown to be incorporated into a positioned nucleosome core in vitro. DNase I footprinting shows that suGF1 protects the same base pairs on the promoter of the chicken beta A-globin gene as does BGP1. We show that a G-string cis-regulatory element of a sea urchin cell lineage-specific gene LpS1 (M. Xiang, S.-Y. Lu, M. Musso, G. Karsenty, and W. H. Klein, Development 113:1345-1355, 1991) also represents a high-affinity recognition site for suGF1. suGF1 may be a member of a family of G-string factors involved in the regulation of expression of unrelated genes during development of a number of different organisms.

  4. Araport: the Arabidopsis Information Portal

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, Vivek; Hanlon, Matthew R.; Contrino, Sergio; Ferlanti, Erik S.; Karamycheva, Svetlana; Kim, Maria; Rosen, Benjamin D.; Cheng, Chia-Yi; Moreira, Walter; Mock, Stephen A.; Stubbs, Joseph; Sullivan, Julie M.; Krampis, Konstantinos; Miller, Jason R.; Micklem, Gos; Vaughn, Matthew; Town, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis Information Portal (https://www.araport.org) is a new online resource for plant biology research. It houses the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence and associated annotation. It was conceived as a framework that allows the research community to develop and release ‘modules’ that integrate, analyze and visualize Arabidopsis data that may reside at remote sites. The current implementation provides an indexed database of core genomic information. These data are made available through feature-rich web applications that provide search, data mining, and genome browser functionality, and also by bulk download and web services. Araport uses software from the InterMine and JBrowse projects to expose curated data from TAIR, GO, BAR, EBI, UniProt, PubMed and EPIC CoGe. The site also hosts ‘science apps,’ developed as prototypes for community modules that use dynamic web pages to present data obtained on-demand from third-party servers via RESTful web services. Designed for sustainability, the Arabidopsis Information Portal strategy exploits existing scientific computing infrastructure, adopts a practical mixture of data integration technologies and encourages collaborative enhancement of the resource by its user community. PMID:25414324

  5. [Malabsorption of fermentable oligo-, di-, or monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAP) as a common cause of unclear abdominal discomfort].

    PubMed

    Goebel-Stengel, M; Mönnikes, H

    2014-06-01

    Carbohydrate malabsorption is a frequent but underestimated cause of unexplained gastrointestinal symptoms like meteorism, flatulence, pain and diarrhea. By means of hydrogen and/or methane breath test after ingestion of the respective carbohydrate it can be identified and diagnosed easily, fast and reliably by successful nutritional therapy. Besides the well known complaints caused by lactose and fructose malabsorption, other fermentable oligo-, di-, or monosaccharides and polyols (akronym: FODMAP) can cause abdominal discomfort and IBS-like symptoms. In addition to lactose (dairy products) and fructose (apples, pears, mango, watermelon), FODMAPs comprise galactans (legumes), fructans (wheat, onions, garlic, artichoke) and the artificial sweeteners sorbitol, mannitol, maltitol and xylitol (sugar free candy, light products). A general restriction of all FODMAP components can be beneficial in relieving symptoms and improving quality of life in patients with functional gastrointestinal complaints. PMID:24892470

  6. A Thermo- and Mechanoresponsive Cyano-Substituted Oligo(p-phenylene vinylene) Derivative with Five Emissive States.

    PubMed

    Sagara, Yoshimitsu; Lavrenova, Anna; Crochet, Aurélien; Simon, Yoan C; Fromm, Katharina M; Weder, Christoph

    2016-03-18

    Multiresponsive materials that display predefined photoluminescence color changes upon exposure to different stimuli are attractive candidates for advanced sensing schemes. Herein, we report a cyano-substituted oligo(p-phenylene vinylene) (cyano-OPV) derivative that forms five different solvent-free solid-state molecular assemblies, luminescence properties of which change upon thermal and mechanical stimulation. Single-crystal X-ray structural analysis suggested that tolyl groups introduced at the termini of solubilizing side-chains of the cyano-OPV play a pivotal role in its solid-state arrangement. Viewed more broadly, this report shows that the introduction of competing intermolecular interactions into excimer-forming chromophores is a promising design strategy for multicolored thermo- and mechanoresponsive luminescent materials.

  7. Oligo- and Polymetastatic Progression in Lung Metastasis(es) Patients Is Associated with Specific MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Lussier, Yves A.; Ganai, Sabha; Khan, Sajid A.; Gnerlich, Jennifer; Darga, Thomas E.; Fan, Hanli; Karpenko, Oleksiy; Paty, Philip B.; Posner, Mitchell C.; Chmura, Steven J.; Hellman, Samuel; Ferguson, Mark K.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Strategies to stage and treat cancer rely on a presumption of either localized or widespread metastatic disease. An intermediate state of metastasis termed oligometastasis(es) characterized by limited progression has been proposed. Oligometastases are amenable to treatment by surgical resection or radiotherapy. Methods We analyzed microRNA expression patterns from lung metastasis samples of patients with ≤5 initial metastases resected with curative intent. Results Patients were stratified into subgroups based on their rate of metastatic progression. We prioritized microRNAs between patients with the highest and lowest rates of recurrence. We designated these as high rate of progression (HRP) and low rate of progression (LRP); the latter group included patients with no recurrences. The prioritized microRNAs distinguished HRP from LRP and were associated with rate of metastatic progression and survival in an independent validation dataset. Conclusion Oligo- and poly- metastasis are distinct entities at the clinical and molecular level. PMID:23251360

  8. Energy-transfer efficiency in stacked oligo(p-phenylene vinylene)s: pronounced effects of order.

    PubMed

    Hoeben, Freek J M; Schenning, Albertus P H J; Meijer, E W

    2005-11-11

    The supramolecular structure of two types of oligo(p-phenylene vinylene) (OPV) building blocks in dodecane solution is studied. Monofunctional chromophores (MOPV) form well-defined helical assemblies, whereas bifunctional molecules (BOPV) aggregate into so-called frustrated stacks, lacking any higher helical order. This difference in organization has a major influence on the transfer of excitation energy through the assemblies. Energy transfer to supramolecularly incorporated guests (MOPV with lower bandgap) is used to probe the intrinsic differences in exciton mobility in these two types of mixed aggregates. From the observed donor fluorescence quenching, it can be concluded that the helically ordered nature of the MOPV stacks facilitates the transfer of excitation energy, yielding evidence for higher exciton mobility in the well-ordered assemblies than in the frustrated stacks. Finally, the concept of energy transfer in supramolecular assemblies is extended to the solid state by the successful implementation in a light-emitting diode (LED).

  9. BODIPY-based oligo(ethylene glycol) dendrons as fluorescence thermometers: when thermoresponsiveness meets intramolecular electron/charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Wu, Yongquan; Tao, Pan; Fan, Xing; Kuang, Gui-Chao

    2014-12-01

    The temperature-dependent photophysical properties of a series of 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (BODIPY) derivatives with different oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) dendrons were investigated. Weak fluorescence emission was observed for these BODIPY derivatives in dilute solution with low viscosity. BDP-G0 and BDP-G1-TEG exhibit a high quantum yield in viscous glycerol solutions, contrary to the moderate and little fluorescence enhancement for BDP-G1 and BDP-G2 under the same conditions. The photoinduced electron transfer (PET) may have quenched the fluorescence, as supported by calculation. Interestingly, the thermoresponsive BODIPY derivatives show heat-induced luminescence enhancement with a high signal-to-noise ratio and their emission maxima are dependent on the structures of branched tri(ethylene glycol) moieties. Finally, preliminary studies on the BODIPY derivatives as intracellular fluorescence indicators in living HeLa cells were carried out.

  10. [Malabsorption of fermentable oligo-, di-, or monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAP) as a common cause of unclear abdominal discomfort].

    PubMed

    Goebel-Stengel, M; Mönnikes, H

    2014-06-01

    Carbohydrate malabsorption is a frequent but underestimated cause of unexplained gastrointestinal symptoms like meteorism, flatulence, pain and diarrhea. By means of hydrogen and/or methane breath test after ingestion of the respective carbohydrate it can be identified and diagnosed easily, fast and reliably by successful nutritional therapy. Besides the well known complaints caused by lactose and fructose malabsorption, other fermentable oligo-, di-, or monosaccharides and polyols (akronym: FODMAP) can cause abdominal discomfort and IBS-like symptoms. In addition to lactose (dairy products) and fructose (apples, pears, mango, watermelon), FODMAPs comprise galactans (legumes), fructans (wheat, onions, garlic, artichoke) and the artificial sweeteners sorbitol, mannitol, maltitol and xylitol (sugar free candy, light products). A general restriction of all FODMAP components can be beneficial in relieving symptoms and improving quality of life in patients with functional gastrointestinal complaints.

  11. Oligo-Miocene reservoir sequence characterization and structuring in the Sisseb El Alem-Kalaa Kebira regions (Northeastern Tunisia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houatmia, Faten; Khomsi, Sami; Bédir, Mourad

    2015-11-01

    The Sisseb El Alem-Enfidha basin is located in the northeastern Tunisia, It is borded by Nadhour - Saouaf syncline to the north, Kairouan plain to the south, the Mediterranean Sea to the east and Tunisian Atlassic "dorsale" to the west. Oligocene and Miocene deltaic deposits present the main potential deep aquifers in this basin with high porosity (25%-30%). The interpretation of twenty seismic reflection profiles, calibrated by wire line logging data of twelve oil wells, hydraulic wells and geologic field sections highlighted the impact of tectonics on the structuring geometry of Oligo-Miocene sandstones reservoirs and their distribution in raised structures and subsurface depressions. Miocene seismostratigraphy analysis from Ain Ghrab Formation (Langhian) to the Segui Formation (Quaternary) showed five third-order seismic sequence deposits and nine extended lenticular sandy bodies reservoirs limited by toplap and downlap surfaces unconformities, Oligocene deposits presented also five third- order seismic sequences with five extended lenticular sandy bodies reservoirs. The Depth and the thickness maps of these sequence reservoir packages exhibited the structuring of this basin in sub-basins characterized by important lateral and vertical geometric and thichness variations. Petroleum wells wire line logging correlation with clay volume calculation showed an heterogeneous multilayer reservoirs of Oligocene and Miocene formed by the arrangement of fourteen sandstone bodies being able to be good reservoirs, separated by impermeable clay packages and affected by faults. Reservoirs levels correspond mainly to the lower system tract (LST) of sequences. Intensive fracturing by deep seated faults bounding the different sub-basins play a great role for water surface recharge and inter-layer circulations between affected reservoirs. The total pore volume of the Oligo-Miocene reservoir sandy bodies in the study area, is estimated to about 4 × 1012 m3 and equivalent to 4

  12. Assessing Gravitropic Responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Barker, Richard; Cox, Benjamin; Silber, Logan; Sangari, Arash; Assadi, Amir; Masson, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana was the first higher organism to have its genome sequenced and is now widely regarded as the model dicot. Like all plants, Arabidopsis develops distinct growth patterns in response to different environmental stimuli. This can be seen in the gravitropic response of roots. Methods to investigate this particular tropism are presented here. First, we describe a high-throughput time-lapse photographic analysis of root growth and curvature response to gravistimulation allowing the quantification of gravitropic kinetics and growth rate at high temporal resolution. Second, we present a protocol that allows a quantitative evaluation of gravitropic sensitivity using a homemade 2D clinostat. Together, these approaches allow an initial comparative analysis of the key phenomena associated with root gravitropism between different genotypes and/or accessions. PMID:26867611

  13. Asparagine Metabolic Pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gaufichon, Laure; Rothstein, Steven J; Suzuki, Akira

    2016-04-01

    Inorganic nitrogen in the form of ammonium is assimilated into asparagine via multiple steps involving glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate synthase (GOGAT), aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT) and asparagine synthetase (AS) in Arabidopsis. The asparagine amide group is liberated by the reaction catalyzed by asparaginase (ASPG) and also the amino group of asparagine is released by asparagine aminotransferase (AsnAT) for use in the biosynthesis of amino acids. Asparagine plays a primary role in nitrogen recycling, storage and transport in developing and germinating seeds, as well as in vegetative and senescence organs. A small multigene family encodes isoenzymes of each step of asparagine metabolism in Arabidopsis, except for asparagine aminotransferase encoded by a single gene. The aim of this study is to highlight the structure of the genes and encoded enzyme proteins involved in asparagine metabolic pathways; the regulation and role of different isogenes; and kinetic and physiological properties of encoded enzymes in different tissues and developmental stages. PMID:26628609

  14. Extended monolayer of cyano-ended oligo(para-phenylenes) at the air/HOPG interface investigated by high-resolution AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hourani, W.; Lamare, S.; Makoudi, Y.; Palmino, F.; Cherioux, F.

    2016-10-01

    The formation of functional networks on surfaces is one of the main challenges in the field of nanotechnologies. In this paper, we shall propose a very simple process which can be used to achieve the formation of extended monolayer of functional oligo(para-phenylenes) molecules at the air/graphite interface. By developing a convergent strategy, we successfully achieved the synthesis of oligo(para-phenylenes) molecules with a tuneable length. The photophysical properties of these new oligomers were characterized by UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Deposition of these molecules by a simple spin-coating process on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface leads to the formation of extended monolayered 2D networks. These networks were characterized by atomic force microscopy experiments under ambient conditions with submolecular resolution thus providing the adsorption model of these molecules on an HOPG surface.

  15. Extended monolayer of cyano-ended oligo(para-phenylenes) at the air/HOPG interface investigated by high-resolution AFM.

    PubMed

    Hourani, W; Lamare, S; Makoudi, Y; Palmino, F; Cherioux, F

    2016-10-21

    The formation of functional networks on surfaces is one of the main challenges in the field of nanotechnologies. In this paper, we shall propose a very simple process which can be used to achieve the formation of extended monolayer of functional oligo(para-phenylenes) molecules at the air/graphite interface. By developing a convergent strategy, we successfully achieved the synthesis of oligo(para-phenylenes) molecules with a tuneable length. The photophysical properties of these new oligomers were characterized by UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Deposition of these molecules by a simple spin-coating process on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface leads to the formation of extended monolayered 2D networks. These networks were characterized by atomic force microscopy experiments under ambient conditions with submolecular resolution thus providing the adsorption model of these molecules on an HOPG surface.

  16. BODIPY-based fluorescent thermometer as a lysosome-targetable probe: how the oligo(ethylene glycols) compete photoinduced electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Wu, Yongquan; Shi, Yanlin; Tao, Pan; Fan, Xing; Su, Xinyan; Kuang, Gui-Chao

    2015-02-16

    A novel BODIPY-based fluorescent thermometer, which shows a lysosome-targeting property, was successfully prepared. Due to the electron-donating ability of the oligo(ethylene glycols), the photoinduced electron-transfer pathway from morpholine to BODIPY dye is blocked. The fluorescence of the thermometer quenched by intramolecular rotation at room temperature was progressively enhanced during heating due to the increased microviscosity around the fluorophore.

  17. Subtractive cDNA cloning using oligo(dT)30-latex and PCR: isolation of cDNA clones specific to undifferentiated human embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hara, E; Kato, T; Nakada, S; Sekiya, S; Oda, K

    1991-01-01

    The human embryonal carcinoma cell line NEC14 can be induced to differentiate by the addition of 10(-2)M N,N'-hexamethylene-bis-acetamide (HMBA). A subtractive cDNA library specific to undifferentiated NEC14 cells was constructed using oligo(dT)30-Latex and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The method was designed to improve the efficiency of subtraction and the enrichment of cDNA clones corresponding to low abundance mRNAs. The single strand of cDNA was made from mRNA prepared from the HMBA-treated NEC14 cells using an oligo(dT)30 primer covalently linked to Latex particles. After removal of the mRNA template by heat-denaturation and centrifugation, the subtractive hybridization was carried out between the cDNA-oligo(dT)30-Latex and mRNA from untreated NEC14 cells. Unhybridized mRNA collected by centrifugation was hybridized repeatedly to the cDNA-oligo(dT)30-Latex and subtractive mRNA was converted to cDNA. The subtractive cDNA was then amplified by PCR and cloned into pBluescript II KS-. The cDNA library thus constructed consisted of approximately 10,000 independent clones with cDNA inserts of 1.7 Kb on average. Differential hybridization of these transformants indicated that approximately 3% of them contained cDNA inserts specific to the undifferentiated EC cells, some of which were derived from low abundance mRNAs. Images PMID:1766870

  18. Using "Arabidopsis" Genetic Sequences to Teach Bioinformatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xiaorong

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a new approach to teaching bioinformatics using "Arabidopsis" genetic sequences. Several open-ended and inquiry-based laboratory exercises have been designed to help students grasp key concepts and gain practical skills in bioinformatics, using "Arabidopsis" leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR RLK) genetic…

  19. An International Bioinformatics Infrastructure to Underpin the Arabidopsis Community

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The future bioinformatics needs of the Arabidopsis community as well as those of other scientific communities that depend on Arabidopsis resources were discussed at a pair of recent meetings held by the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Committee (MASC) and the North American Arabidopsis Steering C...

  20. Carbon-bridged oligo(phenylenevinylene)s: stable π-systems with high responsiveness to doping and excitation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaozhang; Tsuji, Hayato; Navarrete, Juan T López; Casado, Juan; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2012-11-21

    The high responsiveness of π-conjugated materials to external stimuli, such as electrons and photons, accounts for both their utility in optoelectronic applications and their chemical instability. Extensive studies on heteroatom-stabilized π-conjugated systems notwithstanding, it is still difficult to combine high performance and stability. We report here that carbon-bridged oligo(p-phenylenevinylene)s (COPV-n) are not only more responsive to doping and photoexcitation but also more stable than the conventional p-phenylenevinylenes and poly(3-hexylthiophene), surviving photolysis very well in air, suggesting that they could serve as building blocks for optoelectronic applications. Activation of the ground state by installation of bond angle strain toward the doped or photoexcited state and the flat, rigid, and hindered structure endows COPVs with stimuli-responsiveness and stability without recourse to heteroatoms. For example, COPV-6 can be doped with an extremely small reorganization energy and form a bipolaron delocalized over the entire π-conjugated system. Applications to bulk and molecular optoelectronic devices are foreseen. PMID:23106224

  1. Langmuir-Blodgett films incorporating molecular wire candidates of ester-substituted oligo(phenylene-ethynylene) derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villares, Ana; Lydon, Donocadh P.; Robinson, Benjamin J.; Ashwell, Geoffrey J.; Royo, Félix M.; Low, Paul J.; Cea, Pilar

    2008-12-01

    Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of two "wire-like" oligo(phenylene-ethynylene) methyl ester derivatives, namely methyl-4-[(4″-(nonyloxyphenylethynyl)-4'-(phenylethynyl)]-benzoate and methyl-4-[(4″-hexadecyloxyphenylethynyl)-4'-(phenylethynyl]-benzoate (abbreviated as C9BPEB and C16BPEB), have been prepared and characterized. Surface pressure isotherms for both materials have been obtained, with C9BPEB showing more expanded monolayers. An analysis of the reflection spectra of monolayer films at the air-water interface suggests the formation of H-aggregates, and supports an organizational model in which tilt angles of C16BPEB and C9BPEB molecules with respect to the water surface are approximately 70° and 60°, respectively. The sequential transfer of monolayers of these BPEB ester derivatives onto solid substrates results in a Z-type deposition in the case of C9BPEB and Y-type for C16BPEB. The current-voltage ( I- V) characteristics of LB monolayers are relatively symmetrical for both films, with the asymmetric contacts more evident in the I- V C16BPEB characteristics.

  2. Comparison between intracytoplasmic sperm injection and intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection in oligo-astheno-teratozoospermia patients

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hye Jin; Jang, Jung Mi; Oh, Hwa Soon; Lee, Yong Jun; Lee, Won Don; Yoon, San Hyun; Lim, Jin Ho

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of the intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection (IMSI) technique compared with conventional ICSI and previous ICSI attempts in oligo-astheno-teratozoospermia (OAT) patients. Methods The sperms were selected under high magnification (6,600×) and used to induce fertilization in previous ICSI patients by IMSI. These results were compared with previous conventional ICSI cycles in patients with OAT infertility. Results These results demonstrated no significant difference in the fertilization rate between IMSI and previous ICSI cycles (67.7% vs. 65.0%). However, the pregnancy and implantation rates with IMSI were significantly higher than those of the ICSI cycles (33.3% vs. 12.5% and 14.6% vs. 5.4%, respectively; p<0.05). The miscarriage rate among pregnant patients (18.2% vs. 37.5%) showed no statistically significant difference between groups. Conclusion Compared to conventional ICSI, this study found that IMSI increased the IVF-ET success rates in patients with OAT. PMID:24693492

  3. Block and Random Copolymers Bearing Cholic Acid and Oligo(ethylene glycol) Pendant Groups: Aggregation, Thermosensitivity, and Drug Loading

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of block and random copolymers consisting of oligo(ethylene glycol) and cholic acid pendant groups were synthesized via ring-opening metathesis polymerization of their norbornene derivatives. These block and random copolymers were designed to have similar molecular weights and comonomer ratios; both types of copolymers showed thermosensitivity in aqueous solutions with similar cloud points. The copolymers self-assembled into micelles in water as shown by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The hydrodynamic diameter of the micelles formed by the block copolymer is much larger and exhibited a broad and gradual shrinkage from 20 to 54 °C below its cloud point, while the micelles formed by the random copolymers are smaller in size but exhibited some swelling in the same temperature range. Based on in vitro drug release studies, 78% and 24% paclitaxel (PTX) were released in 24 h from micelles self-assembled by the block and random copolymers, respectively. PTX-loaded micelles formed by the block and random copolymers exhibited apparent antitumor efficacy toward the ovarian cancer cells with a particularly low half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 27.4 and 40.2 ng/mL, respectively. Cholic acid-based micelles show promise as a versatile and potent platform for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:24725005

  4. Block and random copolymers bearing cholic acid and oligo(ethylene glycol) pendant groups: aggregation, thermosensitivity, and drug loading.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yu; Jia, Yong-Guang; Shi, Changying; Luo, Juntao; Zhu, X X

    2014-05-12

    A series of block and random copolymers consisting of oligo(ethylene glycol) and cholic acid pendant groups were synthesized via ring-opening metathesis polymerization of their norbornene derivatives. These block and random copolymers were designed to have similar molecular weights and comonomer ratios; both types of copolymers showed thermosensitivity in aqueous solutions with similar cloud points. The copolymers self-assembled into micelles in water as shown by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The hydrodynamic diameter of the micelles formed by the block copolymer is much larger and exhibited a broad and gradual shrinkage from 20 to 54 °C below its cloud point, while the micelles formed by the random copolymers are smaller in size but exhibited some swelling in the same temperature range. Based on in vitro drug release studies, 78% and 24% paclitaxel (PTX) were released in 24 h from micelles self-assembled by the block and random copolymers, respectively. PTX-loaded micelles formed by the block and random copolymers exhibited apparent antitumor efficacy toward the ovarian cancer cells with a particularly low half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 27.4 and 40.2 ng/mL, respectively. Cholic acid-based micelles show promise as a versatile and potent platform for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:24725005

  5. Structure and dynamics of water near the interface with oligo(ethylene oxide) self-assembled monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Ahmed E.; Grest, Gary S.; Stevens, Mark J.

    2007-03-01

    Oligo(ethylene oxide) self-assembled monolayers (OEO SAM's) deposited on Au are the prototypical materials used to study protein resistance. Recently, protein resistance has been shown to vary as a function of surface coverage and to be maximal at about two-thirds coverage, not complete coverage. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the nature of the interface between water and the OEO SAM for a range of SAM coverages. As SAM coverage decreases, the amount of water within the OEO monolayer increases monotonically; however, the penetration depth of the water shows a maximum near the experimentally-found maximal coverage. As the water content increases, the SAM-water mixture becomes harder to distinguish from bulk water. Since the oxygen atoms of OEO are hydrogen bond acceptors, a hydrogen bond network forms within the SAM-water mixture. The water molecules diffuse freely within the monolayer and exchange with the bulk water. Because the monolayer becomes increasingly like bulk water as the coverage decreases, proteins stay in their bulk soluble conformation and do not adsorb. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Synthesis and self-assembly of perylenetetracarboxylic diimide derivatives with helical oligo(L-lactic acid)n segments.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Xue, Lin; Shi, Yan; Li, Xiyou; Xue, Qingbin; Wang, Shuangqing

    2012-10-01

    Three perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PDI) derivatives consisting of a short oligo(L-lactic acid)(n) (O-LLA) segment at one imide nitrogen were synthesized. The polymers were characterized by (1)H NMR and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Their properties were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electronic absorption, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The self-assembly behavior of these PDIs in molten state as well as in solvent was examined. It was found that the structure and the morphology of the self-assembly of these polymers depend on the relative length of the O-LLA segment. The PDIs with longer O-LLA chains present liquid crystal properties with an obvious phase transition from disordered phase to an ordered (α) phase, which cannot be found for the PDIs with short O-LLA segments. The long O-LLA segments also caused a left-handed helicity for the aggregates of the PDIs from solution. This research demonstrated that one can control the order, aggregation mode, and morphology of the molecular aggregates by changing the length of the O-LLA chains. This information can be useful in the design of new organic materials that exhibit molecular aggregation.

  7. Electrochemical Investigation of Li-Al Anodes in Oligo (ethylene glycol) Dimethyl ether/LiPF6

    SciTech Connect

    Y Zhou; X Wang; H Lee; K Nam; X Yang; O Haas

    2011-12-31

    LiPF{sub 6} dissolved in oligo(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether with a molecular weight 5 g mol{sup -1} was investigated as a new electrolyte (OEGDME5, 1 M LiPF{sub 6}) for metal deposition and battery applications. At 25 C a conductivity of .48 x 1{sup -3} S cm{sup -1} was obtained and at 85 C, 3.78 x 1{sup -3} S cm{sup -1}. The apparent activation barrier for ionic transport was evaluated to be 3.7 kJ mol{sup -1}. OEGDME5, 1 M LiPF{sub 6} allows operating temperature above 1 C with very attractive conductivity. The electrolyte shows excellent performance at negative and positive potentials. With this investigation, we report experimental results obtained with aluminum electrodes using this electrolyte. At low current densities lithium ion reduction and re-oxidation can be achieved on aluminum electrodes at potentials about 28 mV more positive than on lithium electrodes. In situ X-ray diffraction measurements collected during electrochemical lithium deposition on aluminum electrodes show that the shift to positive potentials is due to the negative Gibbs free energy change of the Li-Al alloy formation reaction.

  8. Electrochemical Investigation of Li–Al Anodes in Oligo(ethylene glycol) Dimethyl Ether/LiPF6

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Y.N.; Yang, X.; Wang, X.J.; Lee, H.S.; Nam, K.W.; Haas, O.

    2010-11-01

    1 M LiPF{sub 6} dissolved in oligo(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether with a molecular weight 500 g mol{sup -1} was investigated as a new electrolyte (OEGDME500, 1 M LiPF{sub 6}) for metal deposition and battery applications. At 25 C a conductivity of 0.48 x 10{sup -3} S cm{sup -1} was obtained and at 85 C, 3.78 x 10{sup -3} S cm{sup -1}. The apparent activation barrier for ionic transport was evaluated to be 30.7 kJ mol{sup -1}. OEGDME500, 1 M LiPF{sub 6} allows operating temperature above 100 C with very attractive conductivity. The electrolyte shows excellent performance at negative and positive potentials. With this investigation, we report experimental results obtained with aluminum electrodes using this electrolyte. At low current densities lithium ion reduction and re-oxidation can be achieved on aluminum electrodes at potentials about 280 mV more positive than on lithium electrodes. In situ X-ray diffraction measurements collected during electrochemical lithium deposition on aluminum electrodes show that the shift to positive potentials is due to the negative Gibbs free energy change of the Li-Al alloy formation reaction.

  9. Biodegradable pH/temperature-sensitive oligo(β-amino ester urethane) hydrogels for controlled release of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Cong Truc; Nguyen, Minh Khanh; Lee, Doo Sung

    2011-08-01

    An injectable biodegradable pH/temperature-sensitive oligo(β-amino ester urethane) (OAEU) was synthesized. The OAEU was synthesized by addition polymerization between the isocyanate groups of 1,6-diisocyanato hexamethylene and the hydroxyl groups of a synthesized monomer piperazine dihydroxyl amino ester (monomer PDE) in chloroform in the presence of dibutyltin dilaurate as a catalyst. The synthesized OAEU was characterized by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatography. The aqueous solutions of OAEU showed a sol-to-gel-to-sol phase transition as a function of temperature and pH. The gel window covered the physiological conditions (37°C, pH 7.4) and could be controlled by changing the OAEU concentration. After a subcutaneous injection of the OAEU solution into Sprague-Dawley rats, a gel formed rapidly in situ and remained in the body for more than 2 weeks. The in vitro cytotoxicity test and in vitro degradation showed that the OAEU hydrogel was non-cytotoxic and biodegradable. The in vitro release of doxorubicin from this OAEU hydrogel was sustained for more than 10 days. This injectable biodegradable pH/temperature-sensitive OAEU hydrogel is a potential candidate as a drug/protein carrier and in biomedical applications. PMID:21601018

  10. Electronic transport in oligo-para-phenylene junctions attached to carbon nanotube electrodes: Transition-voltage spectroscopy and chirality

    SciTech Connect

    Brito Silva, C. A. Jr.; Silva, S. J. S. da; Leal, J. F. P.; Pinheiro, F. A.; Del Nero, J.

    2011-06-15

    We have investigated, by means of a nonequilibrium Green's function method coupled to density functional theory, the electronic transport properties of molecular junctions composed of oligo-para-phenylene (with two, three, four, and five phenyl rings) covalently bridging the gap between metallic carbon nanotubes electrodes. We have found that the current is strongly correlated to a purely geometrical chiral parameter, both on-resonance and off-resonance. The Fowler-Nordheim plot exhibits minima, V{sub min}, that occur whenever the tail of a resonant transmission peak enters in the bias window. This result corroborates the scenario in which the coherent transport model gives the correct interpretation to transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS). We have shown that V{sub min} corresponds to voltages where a negative differential resistance (NDR) occurs. The finding that V{sub min} corresponds to voltages that exhibit NDR, which can be explained only in single-molecule junctions within the coherent transport model, further confirms the applicability of such models to adequately interpret TVS. The fact that the electrodes are organic is at the origin of differences in the behavior of V{sub min} if compared to the case of molecular junctions with nonorganic contacts treated so far.

  11. Synthesis, characterization, conformation and self-assembly behavior of polypeptide-based brush with oligo (ethylene glycol) side chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yugang; Luo, Weiang; Ye, Guodong

    2015-02-01

    A new polypeptide-based copolymer brush composed of poly (γ-propargyl-L-glutamate)-block-poly (propylene oxide)-block-poly (γ-propargyl-L-glutamate) backbone (PPLG-b-PPO-b-PPLG) and oligo (ethylene glycol) (PEG) side-chain was synthesized by combination of N-carboxyanhydride ring-opening polymerization and click chemistry. Nearly 100% grafting efficiency was achieved by copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (CuAAc) reaction. The α-helical conformation adopted by the grafted polypeptide blocks in water was relatively stable and showed a reversible change in a heating-cooling circle from 5 to 70 °C. It displayed weak stability against elevated temperature but still reversible changes in the presence of 0.47 M NaCl. The brushes were amphiphilic and could self-assemble into thermo-sensitive micelles in water. Big micelles could break into small micelles upon heating due to the improved solubility.

  12. Carbon-bridged oligo(p-phenylenevinylene)s for photostable and broadly tunable, solution-processable thin film organic lasers

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Vidal, Marta; Boj, Pedro G.; Villalvilla, José M.; Quintana, José A.; Yan, Qifan; Lin, Nai-Ti; Zhu, Xiaozhang; Ruangsupapichat, Nopporn; Casado, Juan; Tsuji, Hayato; Nakamura, Eiichi; Díaz-García, María A.

    2015-01-01

    Thin film organic lasers represent a new generation of inexpensive, mechanically flexible devices for spectroscopy, optical communications and sensing. For this purpose, it is desired to develop highly efficient, stable, wavelength-tunable and solution-processable organic laser materials. Here we report that carbon-bridged oligo(p-phenylenevinylene)s serve as optimal materials combining all these properties simultaneously at the level required for applications by demonstrating amplified spontaneous emission and distributed feedback laser devices. A series of six compounds, with the repeating unit from 1 to 6, doped into polystyrene films undergo amplified spontaneous emission from 385 to 585 nm with remarkably low threshold and high net gain coefficients, as well as high photostability. The fabricated lasers show narrow linewidth (<0.13 nm) single mode emission at very low thresholds (0.7 kW cm−2), long operational lifetimes (>105 pump pulses for oligomers with three to six repeating units) and wavelength tunability across the visible spectrum (408–591 nm). PMID:26416643

  13. QTAIM study of the closed-shell interactions in peptide secondary structures: A cluster treatment of oligo- and polyalanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vener, M. V.; Egorova, A. N.; Fomin, D. P.; Tsirelson, V. G.

    2007-06-01

    The closed-shell interactions in oligo- and polyalanines are studied by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) using electron densities derived from the B3LYP/6-31+G ∗∗ ground-state electronic wave-functions. The QTAIM enabled us to identify a large number of the intraturn closed-shell stabilizing interactions in the β-turns, which were presented by several conformers of the tetrapeptide model compound. We found that only β-turn type IVa exhibits a 10-member pseudocycle. The intrachain H-bonds between the adjacent N-H and C dbnd O groups in the antiparallel β-sheet conformation of polyalanine have not been found. At the same time, these interactions do exist in the parallel conformation and are even stronger than the interchain N-H…O bonds. A weak interaction between the C dbnd O group at the position i and the side-chain C-H group at the position i + 3 was detected in the α-helical conformation of polyalanine.

  14. Synthesis and application of monodisperse oligo(oxyethylene)-grafted polystyrene resins for solid-phase organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lumpi, Daniel; Braunshier, Christian; Horkel, Ernst; Hametner, Christian; Fröhlich, Johannes

    2014-07-14

    In a preliminary investigation by our group, we found that poly(styrene-oxyethylene) graft copolymers (PS-PEG), for example, TentaGel resins, are advantageous for gel-phase (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Because of the solution-like environment provided by the PS-PEG resins, good spectral quality of the attached moiety can be achieved, which is useful for nondestructive on-resin analysis. The general drawbacks of such resins are low loading capacities and the intense signal in the spectra resulting from the PEG linker (>50 units). Here, we describe the characterization of solvent-dependent swelling and reaction kinetics on a new type of resin for solid-phase organic synthesis (SPOS) that allows an accurate monitoring by gel-phase NMR without the above disadvantages. A series of polystyrene-oligo(oxyethylene) graft copolymers containing monodisperse PEG units (n = 2-12) was synthesized. A strong correlation between the linker (PEG) length and the line widths in the (13)C gel-phase spectra was observed, with a grafted PEG chain of 8 units giving similar results in terms of reactivity and gel-phase NMR monitoring to TentaGel resin. Multistep on-resin reaction sequences were performed to prove the applicability of the resins in solid-phase organic synthesis. PMID:24941069

  15. Synthesis and application of monodisperse oligo(oxyethylene)-grafted polystyrene resins for solid-phase organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lumpi, Daniel; Braunshier, Christian; Horkel, Ernst; Hametner, Christian; Fröhlich, Johannes

    2014-07-14

    In a preliminary investigation by our group, we found that poly(styrene-oxyethylene) graft copolymers (PS-PEG), for example, TentaGel resins, are advantageous for gel-phase (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Because of the solution-like environment provided by the PS-PEG resins, good spectral quality of the attached moiety can be achieved, which is useful for nondestructive on-resin analysis. The general drawbacks of such resins are low loading capacities and the intense signal in the spectra resulting from the PEG linker (>50 units). Here, we describe the characterization of solvent-dependent swelling and reaction kinetics on a new type of resin for solid-phase organic synthesis (SPOS) that allows an accurate monitoring by gel-phase NMR without the above disadvantages. A series of polystyrene-oligo(oxyethylene) graft copolymers containing monodisperse PEG units (n = 2-12) was synthesized. A strong correlation between the linker (PEG) length and the line widths in the (13)C gel-phase spectra was observed, with a grafted PEG chain of 8 units giving similar results in terms of reactivity and gel-phase NMR monitoring to TentaGel resin. Multistep on-resin reaction sequences were performed to prove the applicability of the resins in solid-phase organic synthesis.

  16. Knockdown of gene expression by antisense morpholino oligos in preimplantation mouse embryos cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuki; Sato, Shiori; Kikuchi, Takahiro; Nonaka, Asumi; Kumagai, Yuki; Sasaki, Akira; Kobayashi, Masayuki

    2016-09-15

    Knockdown of gene expression by antisense morpholino oligos (MOs) is a simple and effective method for analyzing the roles of genes in mammalian cells. Here, we demonstrate the efficient delivery of MOs by Endo-Porter (EP), a special transfection reagent for MOs, into preimplantation mouse embryos cultured in vitro. A fluorescein-labeled control MO was applied for monitoring the incorporation of MOs into developing 2-cell embryos in the presence of varying amounts of EP and bovine serum albumin. In optimized conditions, fluorescence was detected in 2-cell embryos within a 3-h incubation period. In order to analyze the validity of the optimized conditions, an antisense Oct4 MO was applied for knockdown of the synthesis of OCT4 protein in developing embryos from the 2-cell stage. In blastocysts, the antisense Oct4 MO induced a decrease in the amount in OCT4 protein to less than half. An almost complete absence of OCT4-positive cells and nearly complete disappearance of the inner cell mass in the outgrowths of blastocysts were also noted. These phenotypes corresponded with those of Oct4-deficient mouse embryos. Overall, we suggest that the delivery of MOs using EP is useful for the knockdown of gene expression in preimplantation mouse embryos cultured in vitro. PMID:27381842

  17. Chain-length-dependent conformational transformation and melting behaviour of alkyl/oligo(oxyethylene)/alkyl triblock compounds: alpha-octyl-omega-octyloxyoligo(oxyethylene)s.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Koichi; Mizawa, Takahiro; Inoue, Tomohiro; Kumamoto, Hirotaka; Terai, Yoshihide; Matsuura, Hiroatsu; Viras, Kyriakos

    2005-04-01

    The chain-length-dependent conformational transformation and the melting behaviour of triblock compounds alpha-octyl-omega-octyloxyoligo(oxyethylene)s, H(CH2)8(OCH2CH2)mO(CH2)8H (abbreviated as C8EmC8) (m = 1-8), have been studied by infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The compounds with m = 1-5 assume the all-trans planar form (gamma-form) in the solid state, while those with m = 7 and 8 assume the planar/ helical/planar form with conformational defects in the alkyl chain (beta'-form). Conformational polymorphism was observed for C8E6C8: the gamma-form for the annealed solid and the planar/helical/planar form without conformational defects (beta-form) for the unannealed solid. The conformational transformation from the planar form into the planar/helical/planar form takes place at a length of the oligo(oxyethylene) chain m = 6. This result for C8EmC8 and a similar conformational transformation for C6EmC6 at m = 5 (previous work) demonstrate that the conformation of the CnEmCn triblock compounds in the solid state is determined by intramolecular conformational restoring force in the central oligo(oxyethylene) block, intermolecular dipole-dipole interaction of the C-O bonds and intermolecular packing force in the end alkyl blocks. The melting points of the gamma-form solid of C8EmC8 are much lower than the melting points of n-alkanes with similar molecular masses. The observed thermodynamic quantities show that the planar structure of the oligo(oxyethylene) chain is stabilized by the force of the magnitude that maintains the rotator phase of n-alkanes. For the beta'-form solid of C8EmC8, the alkyl blocks, which are partially noncrystalline, and the oligo(oxyethylene) block melt together at the melting point, unlike the beta-form solid of C6EmC6, for which the melting of the alkyl blocks takes place before the melting of the oligo(oxyethylene) block. The beta-form solid of C8E6C8 (unannealed) melts via the gamma-form solid.

  18. Reconciling structural and thermodynamic predictions using all-atom and coarse-grain force fields: the case of charged oligo-arginine translocation into DMPC bilayers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuan; Sinha, Sudipta Kumar; Patel, Sandeep

    2014-10-16

    Using the translocation of short, charged cationic oligo-arginine peptides (mono-, di-, and triarginine) from bulk aqueous solution into model DMPC bilayers, we explore the question of the similarity of thermodynamic and structural predictions obtained from molecular dynamics simulations using all-atom and Martini coarse-grain force fields. Specifically, we estimate potentials of mean force associated with translocation using standard all-atom (CHARMM36 lipid) and polarizable and nonpolarizable Martini force fields, as well as a series of modified Martini-based parameter sets. We find that we are able to reproduce qualitative features of potentials of mean force of single amino acid side chain analogues into model bilayers. In particular, modifications of peptide-water and peptide-membrane interactions allow prediction of free energy minima at the bilayer-water interface as obtained with all-atom force fields. In the case of oligo-arginine peptides, the modified parameter sets predict interfacial free energy minima as well as free energy barriers in almost quantitative agreement with all-atom force field based simulations. Interfacial free energy minima predicted by a modified coarse-grained parameter set are -2.51, -4.28, and -5.42 for mono-, di-, and triarginine; corresponding values from all-atom simulations are -0.83, -3.33, and -3.29, respectively, all in units of kcal/mol. We found that a stronger interaction between oligo-arginine and the membrane components and a weaker interaction between oligo-arginine and water are crucial for producing such minima in PMFs using the polarizable CG model. The difference between bulk aqueous and bilayer center states predicted by the modified coarse-grain force field are 11.71, 14.14, and 16.53 kcal/mol, and those by the all-atom model are 6.94, 8.64, and 12.80 kcal/mol; those are of almost the same order of magnitude. Our simulations also demonstrate a remarkable similarity in the structural aspects of the ensemble of

  19. Taxonomy and Phylogeny of Arabidopsis (Brassicaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shehbaz, Ihsan A.; O'Kane, Steve L.

    2002-01-01

    Detailed taxonomic, cytological, and phylogenetic accounts of Arabidopsis are presented. As currently delimited, the genus consists of nine species all of which are indigenous to Europe, with the ranges of two species extending into northern and eastern Asia and North American into central United States. A survey of chromosome numbers in the genus is presented, and the country of origin for each count is given. Detailed descriptions of all species and subspecies and keys to all taxa are provided. Generic assignments are updated for the 50 species previously included in Arabidopsis. A cladogram of the species of Arabidopsis based on molecular phylogenetic studies by the authors is given. PMID:22303187

  20. Sulfenome mining in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Waszczak, Cezary; Akter, Salma; Eeckhout, Dominique; Persiau, Geert; Wahni, Khadija; Bodra, Nandita; Van Molle, Inge; De Smet, Barbara; Vertommen, Didier; Gevaert, Kris; De Jaeger, Geert; Van Montagu, Marc; Messens, Joris; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to be potent signaling molecules. Today, oxidation of cysteine residues is a well-recognized posttranslational protein modification, but the signaling processes steered by such oxidations are poorly understood. To gain insight into the cysteine thiol-dependent ROS signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent sulfenome: that is, proteins with at least one cysteine thiol oxidized to a sulfenic acid. By means of a genetic construct consisting of a fusion between the C-terminal domain of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) AP-1–like (YAP1) transcription factor and a tandem affinity purification tag, we detected ∼100 sulfenylated proteins in Arabidopsis cell suspensions exposed to H2O2 stress. The in vivo YAP1-based trapping of sulfenylated proteins was validated by a targeted in vitro analysis of DEHYDROASCORBATE REDUCTASE2 (DHAR2). In DHAR2, the active site nucleophilic cysteine is regulated through a sulfenic acid-dependent switch, leading to S-glutathionylation, a protein modification that protects the protein against oxidative damage. PMID:25049418

  1. Polyploidy in the Arabidopsis genus.

    PubMed

    Bomblies, Kirsten; Madlung, Andreas

    2014-06-01

    Whole genome duplication (WGD), which gives rise to polyploids, is a unique type of mutation that duplicates all the genetic material in a genome. WGD provides an evolutionary opportunity by generating abundant genetic "raw material," and has been implicated in diversification, speciation, adaptive radiation, and invasiveness, and has also played an important role in crop breeding. However, WGD at least initially challenges basic biological functions by increasing cell size, altering relationships between cell volume and DNA content, and doubling the number of homologous chromosome copies that must be sorted during cell division. Newly polyploid lineages often have extensive changes in gene regulation, genome structure, and may suffer meiotic or mitotic chromosome mis-segregation. The abundance of species that persist in nature as polyploids shows that these problems are surmountable and/or that advantages of WGD might outweigh drawbacks. The molecularly especially tractable Arabidopsis genus has several ancient polyploidy events in its history and contains several independent more recent polyploids. This genus can thus provide important insights into molecular aspects of polyploid formation, establishment, and genome evolution. The ability to integrate ecological and evolutionary questions with molecular and genetic understanding makes comparative analyses in this genus particularly attractive and holds promise for advancing our general understanding of polyploid biology. Here, we highlight some of the findings from Arabidopsis that have given us insights into the origin and evolution of polyploids. PMID:24788061

  2. Selective Ablation of Ppp1cc Gene in Testicular Germ Cells Causes Oligo-Teratozoospermia and Infertility in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Nilam; Puri, Pawan; Nairn, Angus C.; Vijayaraghavan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The four isoforms of serine/threonine phosphoprotein phosphatase 1 (PP1), derived from three genes, are among the most conserved proteins known. The Ppp1cc gene encodes two alternatively spliced variants, PP1 gamma1 (PPP1CC1) and PP1 gamma2 (PPP1CC2). Global deletion of the Ppp1cc gene, which causes loss of both isoforms, results in male infertility due to impaired spermatogenesis. This phenotype was assumed to be due to the loss of PPP1CC2, which is abundant in testis. While PPP1CC2 is predominant, other PP1 isoforms are also expressed in testis. Given the significant homology between the four PP1 isoforms, the lack of compensation by the other PP1 isoforms for loss of one, only in testis, is surprising. Here we document, for the first time, expression patterns of the PP1 isoforms in postnatal developing and adult mouse testis. The timing and sites of testis expression of PPP1CC1 and PPP1CC2 in testis are nonoverlapping. PPP1CC2 is the only one of the four PP1 isoforms not detected in sertoli cells and spermatogonia. Conversely, PPP1CC2 may be the only PP1 isoform expressed in postmeiotic germ cells. Deletion of the Ppp1cc gene in germ cells at the differentiated spermatogonia stage of development and beyond in Stra8 promoter-driven Cre transgenic mice results in oligo-terato-asthenozoospermia and male infertility, thus phenocopying global Ppp1cc null (−/−) mice. Taken together, these results confirm that spermatogenic defects observed in the global Ppp1cc knockout mice and in mice expressing low levels of PPP1CC2 in testis are due to compromised functions of PPP1CC2 in meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells. PMID:24089200

  3. Evaluation of the Speed-oligo Direct Mycobacterium tuberculosis Assay for Molecular Detection of Mycobacteria in Clinical Respiratory Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Oya, Ana; Mendoza-Lopez, Pablo; Rodriguez-Granger, Javier; Fernández-Sánchez, Ana María; Bermúdez-Ruiz, María Pilar; Toro-Peinado, Inmaculada; Palop-Borrás, Begoña; Navarro-Marí, Jose María

    2013-01-01

    We present the first evaluation of a novel molecular assay, the Speed-oligo Direct Mycobacterium tuberculosis (SO-DMT) assay, which is based on PCR combined with a dipstick for the detection of mycobacteria and the specific identification of M. tuberculosis complex (MTC) in respiratory specimens. A blind evaluation was carried out in two stages: first, under experimental conditions on convenience samples comprising 20 negative specimens, 44 smear- and culture-positive respiratory specimens, and 11 sputa inoculated with various mycobacterium-related organisms; and second, in the routine workflow of 566 fresh respiratory specimens (4.9% acid-fast bacillus [AFB] smear positives, 7.6% MTC positives, and 1.8% nontuberculous mycobacteria [NTM] culture positives) from two Mycobacterium laboratories. SO-DMT assay showed no reactivity in any of the mycobacterium-free specimens or in those with mycobacterium-related organisms. Compared to culture, the sensitivity in the selected smear-positive specimens was 0.91 (0.92 for MTC and 0.90 for NTM), and there was no molecular detection of NTM in a tuberculosis case or vice versa. With respect to culture and clinical data, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for the SO-DMT system in routine specimens were 0.76 (0.93 in smear positives [1.0 for MTC and 0.5 for NTM] and 0.56 in smear negatives [0.68 for MTC and 0.16 for NTM]), 0.99, 0.85 (1.00 in smear positives and 0.68 in smear negatives), and 0.97, respectively. Molecular misidentification of NTM cases occurred when testing 2 gastric aspirates from two children with clinically but not microbiologically confirmed lung tuberculosis. The SO-DMT assay appears to be a fast and easy alternative for detecting mycobacteria and differentiating MTC from NTM in smear-positive respiratory specimens. PMID:23100355

  4. Oligo-Miocene thinning of the Beni Bousera peridotites and their Variscan crustal host rocks, Internal Rif, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueydan, Frédéric; Pitra, Pavel; Afiri, Abdelkhaleq; Poujol, Marc; Essaifi, Abderrahim; Paquette, Jean-Louis

    2015-06-01

    Deciphering Variscan versus Alpine history in the Internal Rif system is a key to constrain the tectonic evolution of the Alboran domain and hence the geodynamics of the western Mediterranean system during the Cenozoic. This study focuses on the evolution of the metamorphic envelope of the Beni Bousera massif and its relation to the underlying peridotites. Combining structural geology, metamorphic petrology, and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry U-Th-Pb dating of monazite, this study contributes to the understanding of the tectonic history of the western Internal Rif. The regional foliation (S2) is characterized by low pressure-high temperature (LP-HT) mineral assemblages and obliterates a former foliation (S1) developed along a Barrovian (medium pressure-medium temperature, MP-MT) metamorphic gradient. The dating of some metamorphic monazite grains from a micaschist and a migmatitic gneiss demonstrates that the crustal envelope of the peridotite recorded two distinct tectonometamorphic episodes. Data from monazite inclusions in S1 garnet suggest that the first event, D1, is older than 250-170 Ma and likely related to the Variscan collision, in agreement with the Barrovian type of the metamorphic gradient. The second event, D2, is Alpine in age (at circa 21 Ma) and corresponds to a strong lithosphere thinning allowing subsequent subcontinental mantle exhumation. Such a tectonic context provides an explanation for the LP-HT metamorphic gradient that is recorded in the regional foliation of the western Betic-Rif system. This extension is probably related to a subduction slab rollback in the western end of the Mediterranean realm during the Oligo-Miocene times. No evidence for a Tertiary high pressure/low temperature metamorphism has been identified in the studied area.

  5. The fifth international conference on Arabidopsis research

    SciTech Connect

    Hangarter, R.; Scholl, R.; Davis, K.; Feldmann, K.

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains abstracts of oral and poster presentations made in conjunction with the Fifth International Conference on Arabidopsis Research held August 19--22, 1993 at the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

  6. Cytological analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana meiotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Susan J; Sanchez-Moran, Eugenio; Franklin, F Chris H

    2009-01-01

    Advances in molecular biology and in the genetics of Arabidopsis thaliana have led to this organism becoming an important model for the analysis of meiosis in plants. Cytogenetic investigations are pivotal to meiotic studies and a number of technological improvements for Arabidopsis cytology have provided a range of tools to investigate chromosome behaviour during meiosis. This chapter includes protocols on basic cytology, FISH analysis, immunocytology, a procedure for a meiotic time course and electron microscopy.

  7. Oligo-Miocene foraminiferal record (Miogypsinidae, Lepidocyclinidae and Nummulitidae) from the Western Taurides (SW Turkey): Biometry and implications for the regional geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özcan, Ercan; Less, György; Báldi-Beke, Mária; Kollányi, Katalin; Acar, Ferhat

    2009-05-01

    The marine Oligo-Miocene units of western Taurides, deposited under different tectonic regimes (in Bey Dağları platform in foreland and coeval sequences in hinterland), were studied to establish a high-resolution biostratigraphic framework. Biometric study of the full spectrum of larger foraminifera in a regional scale allowed us correlating them with the shallow benthic zonation (SBZ) system introduced by [Cahuzac, B., Poignant, A., 1997. Essai de biozonation de l'Oligo-Miocène dans les bassins européens à l'aide des grands foraminifères néritiques. Bulletin de la Société géologique de France 168, 155-169], and to determine the ages of these sites on zonal precision for the first time. In correlating these assemblages to standard shallow benthic zones, planktonic data were also used whenever possible. Taxa, classified under the genera Nummulites, Miogypsina, Miolepidocyclina, Nephrolepidina, Eulepidina, Heterostegina, Operculina and Cycloclypeus (?) and their assemblages, closely resemble to the fauna described from European basins. These groups characterize the SBZ 22B to 25 zones referring to a time interval from early Chattian to Burdigalian. However, a main gap in late Chattian (SBZ 23) and in early part of the Aquitanian (SBZ 24) is also recorded in the platform succession. In the meantime, rare Eulepidina in the Burdigalian levels suggest a clear Indo-Pacific influence. Based on the discovery of early Chattian (SBZ 22B) deposits (previously mapped under Eocene/Miocene units), the Oligo-Miocene stratigraphy of the Bey Dağları platform is also revised. A more precise chronology for regional Miocene transgression is presented based on the miogypsinid evolutionary scale.

  8. Ring-opening metathesis polymerization with the second generation Hoveyda-Grubbs catalyst: an efficient approach toward high-purity functionalized macrocyclic oligo(cyclooctene)s.

    PubMed

    Blencowe, Anton; Qiao, Greg G

    2013-04-17

    Herein, we present a facile and general strategy to prepare functionalized macrocyclic oligo(cyclooctene)s (cOCOEs) in high purity and high yield by exploiting the ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) intramolecular backbiting process with the commercially available second generation Hoveyda-Grubbs (HG2) catalyst. In the first instance, ROMP of 5-acetyloxycyclooct-1-ene (ACOE) followed by efficient quenching and removal of the catalyst using an isocyanide derivative afforded macrocyclic oligo(5-acetyloxycyclooct-1-ene) (cOACOE) in high yield (95%), with a weight-average molecular weight (Mw) of 1.6 kDa and polydispersity index (PDI) of 1.6, as determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The structure and purity of the macrocycles were confirmed by NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis, which indicated the complete absence of end-groups. This was further supported by GPC-matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (GPC-MALDI ToF MS), which revealed the exclusive formation of macrocyclic derivatives composed of up to 45 repeat units. Complete removal of residual ruthenium from the macrocycles was confirmed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The same methodology was subsequently extended to the ROMP of 5-bromocyclooct-1-ene and 1,5-cyclooctadiene to prepare their macrocyclic derivatives, which were further derivatized to produce a library of functionalized macrocyclic oligo(cyclooctene)s. A comparative study using the second and third generation Grubbs catalysts in place of the HG2 catalyst for the polymerization of ACOE provided macrocycles contaminated with linear species, thus indicating that the bidendate benzylidene ligand of the Hoveyda-Grubbs catalyst plays an important role in the observed product distributions.

  9. Apoplastic diffusion barriers in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Nawrath, Christiane; Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus Benni; Geldner, Niko; Reina-Pinto, José J; Kunst, Ljerka

    2013-12-27

    During the development of Arabidopsis and other land plants, diffusion barriers are formed in the apoplast of specialized tissues within a variety of plant organs. While the cuticle of the epidermis is the primary diffusion barrier in the shoot, the Casparian strips and suberin lamellae of the endodermis and the periderm represent the diffusion barriers in the root. Different classes of molecules contribute to the formation of extracellular diffusion barriers in an organ- and tissue-specific manner. Cutin and wax are the major components of the cuticle, lignin forms the early Casparian strip, and suberin is deposited in the stage II endodermis and the periderm. The current status of our understanding of the relationships between the chemical structure, ultrastructure and physiological functions of plant diffusion barriers is discussed. Specific aspects of the synthesis of diffusion barrier components and protocols that can be used for the assessment of barrier function and important barrier properties are also presented.

  10. Apoplastic Diffusion Barriers in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus Benni; Geldner, Niko; Reina-Pinto, José J.; Kunst, Ljerka

    2013-01-01

    During the development of Arabidopsis and other land plants, diffusion barriers are formed in the apoplast of specialized tissues within a variety of plant organs. While the cuticle of the epidermis is the primary diffusion barrier in the shoot, the Casparian strips and suberin lamellae of the endodermis and the periderm represent the diffusion barriers in the root. Different classes of molecules contribute to the formation of extracellular diffusion barriers in an organ- and tissue-specific manner. Cutin and wax are the major components of the cuticle, lignin forms the early Casparian strip, and suberin is deposited in the stage II endodermis and the periderm. The current status of our understanding of the relationships between the chemical structure, ultrastructure and physiological functions of plant diffusion barriers is discussed. Specific aspects of the synthesis of diffusion barrier components and protocols that can be used for the assessment of barrier function and important barrier properties are also presented. PMID:24465172

  11. Identification of Arabidopsis rat Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanmin; Nam, Jaesung; Humara, Jaime M.; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Lee, Lan-Ying; Cao, Hongbin; Valentine, Lisa; Li, Jingling; Kaiser, Anthony D.; Kopecky, Andrea L.; Hwang, Hau-Hsuan; Bhattacharjee, Saikat; Rao, Praveen K.; Tzfira, Tzvi; Rajagopal, Jyothi; Yi, HoChul; Veena; Yadav, Badam S.; Crane, Yan M.; Lin, Kui; Larcher, Yves; Gelvin, Matthew J.K.; Knue, Marnie; Ramos, Cynthia; Zhao, Xiaowen; Davis, Susan J.; Kim, Sang-Ic; Ranjith-Kumar, C.T.; Choi, Yoo-Jin; Hallan, Vipin K.; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Sui, Xiangzhen; Ziemienowicz, Alicja; Matthysse, Ann G.; Citovsky, Vitaly; Hohn, Barbara; Gelvin, Stanton B.

    2003-01-01

    Limited knowledge currently exists regarding the roles of plant genes and proteins in the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation process. To understand the host contribution to transformation, we carried out root-based transformation assays to identify Arabidopsis mutants that are resistant to Agrobacterium transformation (rat mutants). To date, we have identified 126 rat mutants by screening libraries of T-DNA insertion mutants and by using various “reverse genetic” approaches. These mutants disrupt expression of genes of numerous categories, including chromatin structural and remodeling genes, and genes encoding proteins implicated in nuclear targeting, cell wall structure and metabolism, cytoskeleton structure and function, and signal transduction. Here, we present an update on the identification and characterization of these rat mutants. PMID:12805582

  12. The Arabidopsis metacaspase9 degradome.

    PubMed

    Tsiatsiani, Liana; Timmerman, Evy; De Bock, Pieter-Jan; Vercammen, Dominique; Stael, Simon; van de Cotte, Brigitte; Staes, An; Goethals, Marc; Beunens, Tine; Van Damme, Petra; Gevaert, Kris; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2013-08-01

    Metacaspases are distant relatives of the metazoan caspases, found in plants, fungi, and protists. However, in contrast with caspases, information about the physiological substrates of metacaspases is still scarce. By means of N-terminal combined fractional diagonal chromatography, the physiological substrates of metacaspase9 (MC9; AT5G04200) were identified in young seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana on the proteome-wide level, providing additional insight into MC9 cleavage specificity and revealing a previously unknown preference for acidic residues at the substrate prime site position P1'. The functionalities of the identified MC9 substrates hinted at metacaspase functions other than those related to cell death. These results allowed us to resolve the substrate specificity of MC9 in more detail and indicated that the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (AT4G37870), a key enzyme in gluconeogenesis, is enhanced upon MC9-dependent proteolysis.

  13. Tetrapyrrole Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Ryouichi; Kobayashi, Koichi; Masuda, Tatsuru

    2011-01-01

    Higher plants produce four classes of tetrapyrroles, namely, chlorophyll (Chl), heme, siroheme, and phytochromobilin. In plants, tetrapyrroles play essential roles in a wide range of biological activities including photosynthesis, respiration and the assimilation of nitrogen/sulfur. All four classes of tetrapyrroles are derived from a common biosynthetic pathway that resides in the plastid. In this article, we present an overview of tetrapyrrole metabolism in Arabidopsis and other higher plants, and we describe all identified enzymatic steps involved in this metabolism. We also summarize recent findings on Chl biosynthesis and Chl breakdown. Recent advances in this field, in particular those on the genetic and biochemical analyses of novel enzymes, prompted us to redraw the tetrapyrrole metabolic pathways. In addition, we also summarize our current understanding on the regulatory mechanisms governing tetrapyrrole metabolism. The interactions of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and other cellular processes including the plastid-to-nucleus signal transduction are discussed. PMID:22303270

  14. Dating the West-Central Pyrenean deformation Front with magnetostratigraphy of its Oligo-Miocene syntectonic deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva-Urcia, Belén; Beamud, Elisabet; Garcés, Miguel; Soto, Ruth; Pueyo, Emilio; Arenas, Concha

    2014-05-01

    Well-dated foreland basin deposits are crucial to correctly decipher the tectonic evolution of the orogen associated to the foreland basin. A magnetostratigraphic section of ca. 3.200 m in length has been done in the Northern margin of the Ebro foreland Basin, to the South of the frontal thrust (SFT). In this area, the frontal thrust produces the detachment of the Santo Domingo anticline, located in the External Sierras of the West-Central Pyrenees. The main goal of our study is to constrain the age of the upper part of the syntectonic Campodarbe Fm. (Oligo-Miocene) which is at present under discussion and which represents an utterly change in the paleogeography of the depositional systems represented by the replacement of the Campodarbe Fm with the Uncastillo Fm (i.e., general change from overall W-NW-flowing to S-flowing paleocurrents), linked to the late tectonic activity of the SFT with the final tightening of the Santo Domingo anticlinal (Chattian-Aquitanian). Prior to this final tectonic activity and tightening of the anticlinal, overall fluvial paleocurrents (Campodarbe Fm.) were from the S-SE; in contrast, during and after such deformation period, overall southward-flowing alluvial systems occurred. Integration of our new data with previous magnetostratigraphic data of the Uncastillo Fm. and with the careful notation of the dip of layers provides information about the timing of thrusts development and allows reconstructing the kinematics of the Santo Domingo anticline at the western termination of the External Sierrras. The new results indicate that the syn-tectonic deposits of the upper Campodarbe Fm. span over 6.5 Myr and that the upper part of the Campodarbe Fm. is younger than previously considered (reaching chron 7r, in contrast to previous correlations to C10r). On one hand, the new data constrain the cause of the cartographic scale unconformity within the Campodarbe Fm. and sets the time-span of the San Felices thrust sheet activity, part of the

  15. Petrogenesis of the post-collisional Oligo-Miocene Volcanism in NW Anatolia (Turkey): Balıkesir Volcanites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünal, Alp; Altunkaynak, Şafak; Benowitz, Jeff A.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we present whole-rock chemical and Sr-Nd-Pb-O isotopic compositions as well as 40Ar/39Ar ages of Balıkesir volcanites to evaluate the nature, genesis and timing of the post-collisional Oligo-Miocene magmatism in NW Anatolia. Three main volcano-stratigraphic groups distinguished in the Balıkesir volcanites on the basis of field observations and petrographical investigations; 1) andesitic lavas and related pyroclastic units representing the lower part of the volcanic sequence; 2) Trachyandesite- basaltic trachyandesite lavas and 3) dacitic lavas and associated pyroclastic units corresponding to the upper part of the volcanic sequence. Both andesitic and dacitic pyroclastic units are represented with ash fall, ash block flow and flow breccia units. Geochemically, Balıkesir volcanites are ranging in composition from basaltic trachy-andesite to dacite. They are sub-alkaline in character and show enrichment in large ion lithophile elements (LILE) and light rare earth elements (LREE) relative to the high field strength elements (HFSE). Balıkesir volcanites display depletion in P, Ta, Nb and Ti. All these trace element characteristics and inter-element ratios suggest that magma forming the Balıkesir volcanites show similar patterns to those of subduction-related arc magmas and/or post collisional lavas. They have high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.707109-0.708620), low 143Nd/144Nd (0.512322- 0.512493). 206Pb/204Pb and 207Pb/204Pb values vary from 18.703 to 18.867 and 15.681 to 15.714, respectively and ɛNd values range between -5.61 and -2.27. 18O isotopic ratios range between 8.3 and 11.8. All these isotopic characteristics and major-trace element compositions of Balıkesir volcanites suggest that the lavas are co-genetic and originated from a hybrid magma derived from enriched mantle (EM II) source. 40Ar/39Ar dating yielded isochron ages of 22.9±0.2 - 21.0±0.2 which is consistent with other volcanic and plutonic associations of western Anatolia (eg

  16. Application of Critical-Taper Theory to Oligo-Miocene Extension and Core-Complex Exhumation in Western Arizona, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, J. E.

    2006-12-01

    Restoration of 93 km of Oligo-Miocene extension in the area around the Harcuvar metamorphic core complex in western Arizona reveals three east-southeast-trending belts. From southwest to northeast these are: (1) a basin occupied by the Upper Jurassic to Upper Cretaceous McCoy Mountains Formation and its Jurassic volcanic substrate, (2) the generally southwest-vergent, Late Cretaceous Maria fold-and-thrust belt, and (3) the restored position of the Harcuvar metamorphic core complex in the middle crust beneath Proterozoic bedrock adjacent to the Colorado Plateau. Large-magnitude extension that exhumed the core-complex mylonites began along a narrow, southeast-trending belt that crossed the Maria fold-and-thrust belt at an angle of about ten degrees. Extension in the northwestern part of the area where the two belts crossed was unusual because mylonitic mid-crustal rocks were exhumed with almost no extension of overlying rocks (Buckskin, Rawhide, and Artillery Mountains). This is equivalent to stable sliding of an extensional wedge. In contrast, approximately 100 km to the southeast in the Vulture Mountains area, extension produced a highly distended array of tilted fault blocks with no exhumation of mylonitic mid-crustal rock. This is equivalent to highly unstable sliding of an extensional wedge. Almost every other area in Arizona that is both highly extended and at least moderately well exposed is intermediate in structural style of extension. Juxtaposition of end-member structural styles in western Arizona can be explained by application of critical taper theory to restored paleotopography characterized by a mountain range along the axis of the Maria fold-and-thrust belt. When extension began, the Buckskin-Rawhide detachment fault dipped to the northeast beneath a northeast-sloping surface on the northeast flank of the mountain range, resulting in stable sliding of the hanging-wall rocks. Along strike to the southeast the detachment fault dipped northeast beneath

  17. Body Composition, Hemodynamic and Biochemical Parameters in Young Female Normal-Weight Oligo-amenorrheic and Eumenorrheic Athletes and Non-athletes

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Vibha; de Lourdes Eguiguren, Maria; Eysenbach, Lindsey; Clarke, Hannah; Slattery, Meghan; Eddy, Kamryn; Ackerman, Kathryn E.; Misra, Madhusmita

    2014-01-01

    Aims Low-weight hypogonadal conditions such as anorexia nervosa are associated with marked changes in body composition, hemodynamic and hematological parameters, and liver enzymes. The impact of athletic activity in normal-weight adolescents with/without amenorrhea on these parameters has not been assessed. Our aim was to examine these parameters in normal-weight athletes and non-athletes and determine any associations of body composition, oligo-amenorrhea and exercise intensity. Methods We assessed vital signs, complete blood counts, liver enzymes, and regional body composition in 43 oligo-amenorrheic athletes (OAA), 24 eumenorrheic athletes (EA) and 23 non-athletes 14-21 years of age. Results BMI was lower in OAA than EA. Systolic and pulse pressure, and temperature were lowest in OAA. Blood counts did not differ among groups. AST was higher in both groups of athletes, while ALT was higher in OAA than EA and non-athletes. Total and regional fat was lower in OAA than other groups, positively associated with heart rate and inversely with liver enzymes. Conclusions Athletic activity is associated with higher AST, whereas menstrual dysfunction is associated with lower total and regional fat and higher ALT. Higher liver enzymes are associated with reductions in total and regional fat. PMID:25376841

  18. An oligo-based microarray offers novel transcriptomic approaches for the analysis of pathogen resistance and fruit quality traits in melon (Cucumis melo L.)

    PubMed Central

    Mascarell-Creus, Albert; Cañizares, Joaquin; Vilarrasa-Blasi, Josep; Mora-García, Santiago; Blanca, José; Gonzalez-Ibeas, Daniel; Saladié, Montserrat; Roig, Cristina; Deleu, Wim; Picó-Silvent, Belén; López-Bigas, Nuria; Aranda, Miguel A; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Nuez, Fernando; Puigdomènech, Pere; Caño-Delgado, Ana I

    2009-01-01

    Background Melon (Cucumis melo) is a horticultural specie of significant nutritional value, which belongs to the Cucurbitaceae family, whose economic importance is second only to the Solanaceae. Its small genome of approx. 450 Mb coupled to the high genetic diversity has prompted the development of genetic tools in the last decade. However, the unprecedented existence of a transcriptomic approaches in melon, highlight the importance of designing new tools for high-throughput analysis of gene expression. Results We report the construction of an oligo-based microarray using a total of 17,510 unigenes derived from 33,418 high-quality melon ESTs. This chip is particularly enriched with genes that are expressed in fruit and during interaction with pathogens. Hybridizations for three independent experiments allowed the characterization of global gene expression profiles during fruit ripening, as well as in response to viral and fungal infections in plant cotyledons and roots, respectively. Microarray construction, statistical analyses and validation together with functional-enrichment analysis are presented in this study. Conclusion The platform validation and enrichment analyses shown in our study indicate that this oligo-based microarray is amenable for future genetic and functional genomic studies of a wide range of experimental conditions in melon. PMID:19821986

  19. Terpene Specialized Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tholl, Dorothea; Lee, Sungbeom

    2011-01-01

    Terpenes constitute the largest class of plant secondary (or specialized) metabolites, which are compounds of ecological function in plant defense or the attraction of beneficial organisms. Using biochemical and genetic approaches, nearly all Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) enzymes of the core biosynthetic pathways producing the 5-carbon building blocks of terpenes have been characterized and closer insight has been gained into the transcriptional and posttranscriptional/translational mechanisms regulating these pathways. The biochemical function of most prenyltransferases, the downstream enzymes that condense the C5-precursors into central 10-, 15-, and 20-carbon prenyldiphosphate intermediates, has been described, although the function of several isoforms of C20-prenyltranferases is not well understood. Prenyl diphosphates are converted to a variety of C10-, C15-, and C20-terpene products by enzymes of the terpene synthase (TPS) family. Genomic organization of the 32 Arabidopsis TPS genes indicates a species-specific divergence of terpene synthases with tissue- and cell-type specific expression profiles that may have emerged under selection pressures by different organisms. Pseudogenization, differential expression, and subcellular segregation of TPS genes and enzymes contribute to the natural variation of terpene biosynthesis among Arabidopsis accessions (ecotypes) and species. Arabidopsis will remain an important model to investigate the metabolic organization and molecular regulatory networks of terpene specialized metabolism in relation to the biological activities of terpenes. PMID:22303268

  20. BRX promotes Arabidopsis shoot growth.

    PubMed

    Beuchat, Julien; Scacchi, Emanuele; Tarkowska, Danuse; Ragni, Laura; Strnad, Miroslav; Hardtke, Christian S

    2010-10-01

    • BREVIS RADIX (BRX) has been identified through a loss-of-function allele in the Umkirch-1 accession in a natural variation screen for Arabidopsis root growth vigor. Physiological and gene expression analyses have suggested that BRX is rate limiting for auxin-responsive gene expression by mediating cross-talk with the brassinosteroid pathway, as impaired root growth and reduced auxin perception of brx can be (partially) rescued by external brassinosteroid application. • Using genetic tools, we show that brx mutants also display significantly reduced cotyledon and leaf growth. • Similar to the root, the amplitude and penetrance of this phenotype depends on genetic background and shares the physiological features, reduced auxin perception and brassinosteroid rescue. Furthermore, reciprocal grafting experiments between mutant and complemented brx shoot scions and root stocks suggest that the shoot phenotypes are not an indirect consequence of the root phenotype. Finally, BRX gain-of-function lines display epinastic leaf growth and, in the case of dominant negative interference, increased epidermal cell size. Consistent with an impact of BRX on brassinosteroid biosynthesis, this phenotype is accompanied by increased brassinosteroid levels. • In summary, our results demonstrate a ubiquitous, although quantitatively variable role of BRX in modulating the growth rate in both the root and shoot.

  1. Arabidopsis Chitinases: a Genomic Survey

    PubMed Central

    Passarinho, Paul A.; de Vries, Sacco C.

    2002-01-01

    Plant chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14) belong to relatively large gene families subdivided in classes that suggest class-specific functions. They are commonly induced upon the attack of pathogens and by various sources of stress, which led to associating them with plant defense in general. However, it is becoming apparent that most of them display several functions during the plant life cycle, including taking part in developmental processes such as pollination and embryo development. The number of chitinases combined with their multiple functions has been an obstacle to a better understanding of their role in plants. It is therefore important to identify and inventory all chitinase genes of a plant species to be able to dissect their function and understand the relations between the different classes. Complete sequencing of the Arabidopsis genome has made this task feasible and we present here a survey of all putative chitinase-encoding genes accompanied by a detailed analysis of their sequence. Based on their characteristics and on studies on other plant chitinases, we propose an overview of their possible functions as well as modified annotations for some of them. PMID:22303199

  2. Early flower development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, D R; Bowman, J L; Meyerowitz, E M

    1990-01-01

    The early development of the flower of Arabidopsis thaliana is described from initiation until the opening of the bud. The morphogenesis, growth rate, and surface structure of floral organs were recorded in detail using scanning electron microscopy. Flower development has been divided into 12 stages using a series of landmark events. Stage 1 begins with the initiation of a floral buttress on the flank of the apical meristem. Stage 2 commences when the flower primordium becomes separate from the meristem. Sepal primordia then arise (stage 3) and grow to overlie the primordium (stage 4). Petal and stamen primordia appear next (stage 5) and are soon enclosed by the sepals (stage 6). During stage 6, petal primordia grow slowly, whereas stamen primordia enlarge more rapidly. Stage 7 begins when the medial stamens become stalked. These soon develop locules (stage 8). A long stage 9 then commences with the petal primordia becoming stalked. During this stage all organs lengthen rapidly. This includes the gynoecium, which commences growth as an open-ended tube during stage 6. When the petals reach the length of the lateral stamens, stage 10 begins. Stigmatic papillae appear soon after (stage 11), and the petals rapidly reach the height of the medial stamens (stage 12). This final stage ends when the 1-millimeter-long bud opens. Under our growing conditions 1.9 buds were initiated per day on average, and they took 13.25 days to progress through the 12 stages from initiation until opening. PMID:2152125

  3. Proteins are polyisoprenylated in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Gutkowska, Malgorzata; Bieńkowski, Tomasz; Hung, Vo Si; Wanke, Malgorzata; Hertel, Jozefina; Danikiewicz, Witold; Swiezewska, Ewa

    2004-09-24

    Isoprenoid lipids were found to be covalently linked to proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana. Their identity (polyprenols: Prenol-9-11 with Pren-10 dominating and dolichols: Dol-15-17 with Dol-16 dominating) was confirmed by means of HPLC/ESI-MS with application of the multiple reaction monitoring technique as well as metabolic labeling of Arabidopsis plants with [(3)H]mevalonate and other precursors. The occurrence of typical farnesol-, geranylgeraniol-, and phytol-modified proteins was also noted. Radioisotopic labeling allowed detection of several proteins that were covalently bound to mevalonate-derived isoprenoid alcohols. A significant portion of polyisoprenylated proteins was recovered in the cytosolic/light vesicular fraction of Arabidopsis cells upon subfractionation. Taken together our data prove that a subset of plant proteins is polyisoprenylated.

  4. Regional Fat Depots and their Relationship to Bone Density and Microarchitecture in Young Oligo-amenorrheic Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Vibha; Maffazioli, Giovana D.N.; Sokoloff, Natalia Cano; Ackerman, Kathryn E.; Lee, Hang; Gupta, Nupur; Clarke, Hannah; Slattery, Meghan; Bredella, Miriam A.; Misra, Madhusmita

    2015-01-01

    Context Various fat depots have differential effects on bone. Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) is deleterious to bone, whereas subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) has positive effects. Also, marrow adipose tissue (MAT), a relatively newly recognized fat depot is inversely associated with bone mineral density (BMD). Bone mass in athletes depends on many factors including gonadal steroids and muscle mass. Exercise increases muscle mass and BMD, whereas, estrogen deficiency decreases BMD. Thus, the beneficial effects of weight-bearing exercise on areal and volumetric BMD (aBMD and vBMD) in regularly menstruating (eumenorrheic) athletes (EA) are attenuated in oligo-amenorrheic athletes (OA). Of note, data regarding VAT, SAT, MAT and regional muscle mass in OA compared with EA and non-athletes (C), and their impact on bone are lacking. Methods We used (i) MRI to assess VAT and SAT at the L4 vertebra level, and cross-sectional muscle area (CSA) of the mid-thigh, (ii) 1H-MRS to assess MAT at L4, the proximal femoral metaphysis and mid-diaphysis, (iii) DXA to assess spine and hip aBMD, and (iv) HRpQCT to assess vBMD at the distal radius (non-weight-bearing bone) and tibia (weight-bearing bone) in 41 young women (20 OA, 10 EA and 11 C 18-25 years). All athletes engaged in weight-bearing sports for ≥4 hours/week or ran ≥20 miles/week. Main Outcome Measures VAT, SAT and MAT at L4; CSA of the mid thigh; MAT at the proximal femoral metaphysis and mid-diaphysis; aBMD, vBMD and bone microarchitecture. Results Groups had comparable age, menarchal age, BMI, VAT, VAT/SAT and spine BMD Z-scores. EA had higher femoral neck BMD Z-scores than OA and C. Fat mass was lowest in OA. SAT was lowest in OA (p= 0.048); L4 MAT was higher in OA than EA (p=0.03). We found inverse associations of (i) VAT/SAT with spine BMD Z-scores (r=-0.42, p=0.01), (ii) L4 MAT with spine and hip BMD Z-scores (r=-0.44, p=0.01;r=-0.36, p=0.02), and vBMD of the radius and tibia (r=-0.49, p=0.002; r= -0.41, p=0

  5. Gibberellins control fruit patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Arnaud, Nicolas; Girin, Thomas; Sorefan, Karim; Fuentes, Sara; Wood, Thomas A.; Lawrenson, Tom; Sablowski, Robert; Østergaard, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The Arabidopsis basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) proteins INDEHISCENT (IND) and ALCATRAZ (ALC) specify tissues required for fruit opening that have major roles in seed dispersal and plant domestication. Here, we show that synthesis of the phytohormone gibberellin is a direct and necessary target of IND, and that ALC interacts directly with DELLA repressors, which antagonize ALC function but are destabilized by gibberellin. Thus, the gibberellin/DELLA pathway has a key role in patterning the Arabidopsis fruit, and the interaction between DELLA and bHLH proteins, previously shown to connect gibberellin and light responses, is a versatile regulatory module also used in tissue patterning. PMID:20889713

  6. Gibberellins control fruit patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Nicolas; Girin, Thomas; Sorefan, Karim; Fuentes, Sara; Wood, Thomas A; Lawrenson, Tom; Sablowski, Robert; Østergaard, Lars

    2010-10-01

    The Arabidopsis basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins INDEHISCENT (IND) and ALCATRAZ (ALC) specify tissues required for fruit opening that have major roles in seed dispersal and plant domestication. Here, we show that synthesis of the phytohormone gibberellin is a direct and necessary target of IND, and that ALC interacts directly with DELLA repressors, which antagonize ALC function but are destabilized by gibberellin. Thus, the gibberellin/DELLA pathway has a key role in patterning the Arabidopsis fruit, and the interaction between DELLA and bHLH proteins, previously shown to connect gibberellin and light responses, is a versatile regulatory module also used in tissue patterning. PMID:20889713

  7. Oligo-DNA Custom Macroarray for Monitoring Major Pathogenic and Non-Pathogenic Fungi and Bacteria in the Phyllosphere of Apple Trees

    PubMed Central

    He, Ying-Hong; Isono, Sayaka; Shibuya, Makoto; Tsuji, Masaharu; Adkar Purushothama, Charith-Raj; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Sano, Teruo

    2012-01-01

    Background To monitor the richness in microbial inhabitants in the phyllosphere of apple trees cultivated under various cultural and environmental conditions, we developed an oligo-DNA macroarray for major pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi and bacteria inhabiting the phyllosphere of apple trees. Methods and Findings First, we isolated culturable fungi and bacteria from apple orchards by an agar-plate culture method, and detected 32 fungal and 34 bacterial species. Alternaria, Aureobasidium, Cladosporium, Rhodotorula, Cystofilobasidium, and Epicoccum genera were predominant among the fungi, and Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, Methylobacterium, and Pantoea genera were predominant among the bacteria. Based on the data, we selected 29 major non-pathogenic and 12 phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria as the targets of macroarray. Forty-one species-specific 40-base pair long oligo-DNA sequences were selected from the nucleotide sequences of rDNA-internal transcribed spacer region for fungi and 16S rDNA for bacteria. The oligo-DNAs were fixed on nylon membrane and hybridized with digoxigenin-labeled cRNA probes prepared for each species. All arrays except those for Alternaria, Bacillus, and their related species, were specifically hybridized. The array was sensitive enough to detect 103 CFU for Aureobasidium pullulans and Bacillus cereus. Nucleotide sequencing of 100 each of independent fungal rDNA-ITS and bacterial 16S-rDNA sequences from apple tree was in agreement with the macroarray data obtained using the same sample. Finally, we analyzed the richness in the microbial inhabitants in the samples collected from apple trees in four orchards. Major apple pathogens that cause scab, Alternaria blotch, and Marssonina blotch were detected along with several non-phytopathogenic fungal and bacterial inhabitants. Conclusions The macroarray technique presented here is a strong tool to monitor the major microbial species and the community structures in the phyllosphere of

  8. Oligo-β-(1 → 3)-glucans: impact of thio-bridges on immunostimulating activities and the development of cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sylla, Balla; Legentil, Laurent; Saraswat-Ohri, Sujata; Vashishta, Aruna; Daniellou, Richard; Wang, Hsei-Wei; Vetvicka, Vaclav; Ferrières, Vincent

    2014-10-23

    Recent developments of innovative anticancer therapies are based on compounds likely to stimulate the immune defense of the patients. β-(1 → 3)-Glucans are natural polysaccharides well-known for their immunostimulating properties. We report here on the synthesis of small oligo-β-(1 → 3)-glucans characterized by thioglycosidic linkages. The presence of sulfur atom(s) was not only crucial to prolong in vivo immunoactive activities in time, compared to native polysaccharides, but sulfur atoms also had a direct impact on the development of colorectal cancer stem cells. As a result, a short, pure, and structurally well-defined trisaccharidic thioglucan demonstrated similar activities compared to those of natural laminarin.

  9. Presence of Potential Toxin-Producing Cyanobacteria in an Oligo-Mesotrophic Lake in Baltic Lake District, Germany: An Ecological, Genetic and Toxicological Survey

    PubMed Central

    Dadheech, Pawan K.; Selmeczy, Géza B.; Vasas, Gábor; Padisák, Judit; Arp, Wolfgang; Tapolczai, Kálmán; Casper, Peter; Krienitz, Lothar

    2014-01-01

    Massive developments of potentially toxic cyanobacteria in Lake Stechlin, an oligo-mesotrophic lake in the Baltic Lake District of Germany raised concerns about toxic contamination of these important ecosystems. Field samples in the phase of mass developments of cyanobacteria were used for genetic and toxicological analyses. Microcystins and microcystin genes were detected in field samples of the lake for the first time. However, the toxins were not produced by the dominant taxa (Dolichospermum circinale and Aphanizomenon flos-aquae) but by taxa, which were present only in low biomass in the samples (Microcystis cf. aeruginosa and Planktothrix rubescens). The phytoplankton successions during the study period revealed an increase of cyanobacterial populations. The findings contribute to the changes that have been investigated in Lake Stechlin since the mid-1990s. The possible reasons behind these developments may be climate change, special weather conditions and an increased nutrient pool. PMID:25268981

  10. The combination of oligo- and polysaccharides and reticulated protein for the control of symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome: Results of a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel group, multicentre clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Alexea, Octavian; Bacarea, Vlad

    2015-01-01

    Background A medical device containing the film-forming agent reticulated protein and a prebiotic mixture of vegetable oligo- and polysaccharides has been developed, recently receiving European approval as MED class III for the treatment of chronic/functional or recidivant diarrhoea due to different causes including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In the present paper, we evaluate a protein preparation containing these components in comparison with placebo in adult patients with diarrhoea-predominant IBS. Methods In a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel group, multicentre clinical trial, patients were randomly assigned to receive the combination of oligo- and polysaccharides and reticulated protein and placebo (four oral tablets/day for 56 days). Demographic, clinical and quality of life characteristics and presence and intensity of abdominal pain and flatulence (seven-point Likert scale) were assessed at three study visits (baseline and at 28 and 56 days). Stool emissions were recorded on the diary card using the seven-point Bristol Stool Scale. Results A total of 128 patients were randomised to receive either tablets containing the combination (n = 63) or placebo (n = 65). Treatment with oligo- and polysaccharides and reticulated protein was safe and well tolerated. A significant improvement in symptoms across the study was observed in patients treated with oligo- and polysaccharides and reticulated protein between visit 2 and visit 3 in abdominal pain (p = 0.0167) and flatulence (p = 0.0373). We also detected a statistically significant increase in the quality of life of patients receiving the active treatment from baseline to visit 3 (p < 0.0001). Conclusions Treatment with oligo- and polysaccharides and reticulated protein is safe, improving IBS symptoms and quality of life of patients with diarrhoea-predominant IBS. PMID:27403313

  11. Shotgun Proteomic Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two shotgun tandem mass spectrometry proteomics approaches, Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) and 1D-Gel-LC-MS/MS, were used to identify Arabidopsis thaliana leaf proteins. These methods utilize different protein/peptide separation strategies. Detergents not compatible wit...

  12. Biosynthetic Pathways of Brassinolide in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Takahiro; Fujioka, Shozo; Choe, Sunghwa; Takatsuto, Suguru; Tax, Frans E.; Yoshida, Shigeo; Feldmann, Kenneth A.

    2000-01-01

    Our previous studies on the endogenous brassinosteroids (BRs) in Arabidopsis have provided suggestive evidence for the operation of the early C6-oxidation and the late C6-oxidation pathways, leading to brassinolide (BL) in Arabidopsis. However, to date the in vivo operation of these pathways has not been fully confirmed in this species. This paper describes metabolic studies using deuterium-labeled BRs in wild-type and BR-insensitive mutant (bri1) seedlings to establish the intermediates of the biosynthetic pathway of BL in Arabidopsis. The first evidence for the conversion of campestanol to 6-deoxocathasterone and the conversion of 6-deoxocathasterone to 6-deoxoteasterone is provided. The later biosynthetic steps (6-deoxoteasterone → 3-dehydro-6-deoxoteasterone → 6-deoxotyphasterol → 6-deoxocastasterone → 6α-hydroxycastasterone → castasterone → BL) were demonstrated by stepwise metabolic experiments. Therefore, these studies complete the documentation of the late C6-oxidation pathway. The biosynthetic sequence involved in the early C6-oxidation pathway (teasterone → 3-dehydroteasterone → typhasterol → castasterone → BL) was also demonstrated. These results show that both the early and late C6-oxidation pathways are functional in Arabidopsis. In addition we report two new observations: the presence of a new branch in the pathway, C6 oxidation of 6-deoxotyphasterol to typhasterol, and increased metabolic flow in BR-insensitive mutants. PMID:10982435

  13. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  14. Engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many plants accumulate crystals of calcium oxalate. Just how these crystals form remains unknown. To gain insight into the mechanisms regulating calcium oxalate crystal formation, a crystal engineering approach was initiated utilizing the non-crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis. The success of t...

  15. Prognostic Value of MR Imaging Texture Analysis in Brain Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Oligo-Metastases Undergoing Stereotactic Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Tini, Paolo; Biondi, Michelangelo; Sebaste, Lucio; Vanzi, Eleonora; De Otto, Gianmarco; Rubino, Giovanni; Carfagno, Tommaso; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Pastina, Pierpaolo; Cerase, Alfonso; Mazzoni, Lorenzo Nicola; Banci Buonamici, Fabrizio; Pirtoli, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Background  Stereotactic irradiation is widely used in brain oligo-metastases treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prognostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) texture analysis (TA) of brain metastases (BM) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and methods  This study included thirty-eight consecutive patients undergoing stereotactic irradiation, that is, stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SRT) or radiosurgery (SRS), from January 2011 to December 2014 for 1-2 brain BM from NSCLC. Whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) was not delivered. The diagnostic MRI DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) images were collected and analyzed with a homemade ImageJ macro, and typical TA parameters (mean, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis, entropy, and uniformity) were evaluated for: brain progression-free survival; modality of brain metastatic progression (local progression or/and new metastases); and overall survival, after SRT/SRS. Results After SRT/SRS 14 patients (36.8%) experienced recurrence in the brain, with a recurrence in the irradiated site (five patients, 13.2%), new metastases (11 patients, 28.9%), local recurrence and new metastases (two patients, 5.25%). Nineteen patients (50%) died of tumor progression or other causes. Entropy and uniformity were significantly associated with local progression, whereas kurtosis was significantly associated with both local progression and new brain metastases. Conclusions  These results appear promising, since the knowledge of factors correlated with the modality of brain progression after stereotactic irradiation of brain oligo-metastatic foci of NSCLC might help in driving the best treatment in these patients (association of SRT/SRS with WBRT? Increase of SRT/SRS dose?). Our preliminary data needs confirmation in large patient series. PMID:27226944

  16. Provenance of Oligo-Miocene Strata from the Adriatic Foredeep of the Alps-Apennines System Determined through Detrital-Zircon U-Pb Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dafov, L. N.; Anfinson, O. A.; Malusa', M. G.; Stockli, D. F.

    2014-12-01

    U-Pb geochronology of detrital zircon is an effective method for evaluating exhumation history, provenance, and depositional age constraints of sedimentary deposits. Over 1400 grains evaluated from thirteen samples collected from distal and proximal Oligo-Miocene strata of Adriatic turbidites are consistent with modern characterization of the proposed source region. Studies indicate that the principal source area of Oligo-Miocene strata from Adriatic deposits is the Lepontine Dome of the Central Alps. Our data reveals a significant shift in detrital zircon U-Pb age populations during the Oligocene-Miocene boundary which, when compared with data from modern sands, closely correlates to the westward shift of the erosional foci within the Lepontine Dome, from the Ticino to the Toce subdome, due to progressive indentation of Adria. This is coeval with progressive unroofing of Periadriatic magmatic rocks of Tertiary age along the Insubric Fault. The lowermost Upper Oligocene proximal samples collected from the Como and Villa Olmo Conglomerates are dominated by Caledonian and Cadomian detrital zircon U-Pb age populations. The uppermost Oligocene and lower Miocene proximal samples collected from the Como Conglomerate are dominated instead by Periadriatic detrital zircon. Distal samples collected from the Lower Oligocene Aveto Formation have a dominant Periadriatic age peak with lesser amounts of late Cretaceous, Variscan, Caledonian and Cadomian detrital zircon. The lowermost Upper Oligocene distal samples collected from the Macigno Formation contain populations of Periadriatic, Variscan, Caledonian, and Cadomian detrital zircon, with major shifts in relative abundance from the lower to upper strata. The most dramatic shift in provenance in the distal units is between two samples located relatively proximally to one another in the Modino unit: Upper Oligocene marls contains primarily Variscan and Caledonian zircon grains with no individuals yielding Periadriatic ages

  17. 17th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research

    SciTech Connect

    Judith Bender

    2006-07-01

    The 17th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research was held at the University of Madison, Wisconsin from June 27- July 2, 2006. ICAR-2006 included approximately 625 scientists from across the world. The scientific program was of excellent quality featuring 73 talks, including 30 from invited speakers. There were also 6 community-organized workshops (facilitated by conference staff) featuring additional talks on topics including ‘Submitting data to long-term repositories,’ ‘TAIR introductory workshop,’ ‘Web services and demonstration,’ ‘Public engagement: broadening the impact of your research,’ ‘Systems biology approaches to analysis of metabolic and regulatory networks of Arabidopsis,’ and ‘Mechanotransduction in Arabidopsis.’ Approximately 440 posters were presented in general topic areas including, among others, Development, Modeling/Other Systems, Energy, Environment, and Genetic/Epigenetic mechanisms. Graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, junior faculty, and underrepresented minorities made up a significant portion of the oral presentations thereby promoting the training of young scientists and facilitating important career development opportunities for speakers. Several poster sessions provided an opportunity for younger participants to freely meet with more established scientists. The North American Arabidopsis Steering Committee (NAASC) continued its outreach effort and again sponsored two special luncheons to encourage personal and professional development of young scientists and also underrepresented minorities. The ‘Emerging Scientists Luncheon’ featured 10 graduate students selected on the basis of scientific excellence of their submitted research abstracts. The ‘Minority Funding Luncheon,’ featured 8 awardees selected by the NAASC through a widely-publicized application process. This luncheon was established specifically to provide an opportunity for underrepresented minorities, and/or scientists from

  18. Evolutionary Divergence of Arabidopsis thaliana Classical Peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Kupriyanova, E V; Mamoshina, P O; Ezhova, T A

    2015-10-01

    Polymorphisms of 62 peroxidase genes derived from Arabidopsis thaliana were investigated to evaluate evolutionary dynamics and divergence of peroxidase proteins. By comparing divergence of duplicated genes AtPrx53-AtPrx54 and AtPrx36-AtPrx72 and their products, nucleotide and amino acid substitutions were identified that were apparently targets of positive selection. These substitutions were detected among paralogs of 461 ecotypes from Arabidopsis thaliana. Some of these substitutions are conservative and matched paralogous peroxidases in other Brassicaceae species. These results suggest that after duplication, peroxidase genes evolved under the pressure of positive selection, and amino acid substitutions identified during our study provided divergence of properties and physiological functions in peroxidases. Our predictions regarding functional significance for amino acid residues identified in variable sites of peroxidases may allow further experimental assessment of evolution of peroxidases after gene duplication.

  19. Root gravitropism in maize and Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Michael L.

    1993-01-01

    Research during the period 1 March 1992 to 30 November 1993 focused on improvements in a video digitizer system designed to automate the recording of surface extension in plants responding to gravistimulation. The improvements included modification of software to allow detailed analysis of localized extension patterns in roots of Arabidopsis. We used the system to analyze the role of the postmitotic isodiametric growth zone (a region between the meristem and the elongation zone) in the response of maize roots to auxin, calcium, touch and gravity. We also used the system to analyze short-term auxin and gravitropic responses in mutants of Arabidopsis with reduced auxin sensitivity. In a related project, we studied the relationship between growth rate and surface electrical currents in roots by examining the effects of gravity and thigmostimulation on surface potentials in maize roots.

  20. Unraveling the circadian clock in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Ma, Ligeng

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous timing system responsible for coordinating an organism’s biological processes with its environment. Interlocked transcriptional feedback loops constitute the fundamental architecture of the circadian clock. In Arabidopsis, three feedback loops, the core loop, morning loop and evening loop, comprise a network that is the basis of the circadian clock. The components of these three loops are regulated in distinct ways, including transcriptional, post-transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms. The discovery of the DNA-binding and repressive activities of TOC1 has overturned our initial concept of its function in the circadian clock. The alternative splicing of circadian clock-related genes plays an essential role in normal functioning of the clock and enables organisms to sense environmental changes. In this review, we describe the regulatory mechanisms of the circadian clock that have been identified in Arabidopsis. PMID:23221775

  1. DYn-2 Based Identification of Arabidopsis Sulfenomes*

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Salma; Huang, Jingjing; Bodra, Nandita; De Smet, Barbara; Wahni, Khadija; Rombaut, Debbie; Pauwels, Jarne; Gevaert, Kris; Carroll, Kate; Van Breusegem, Frank; Messens, Joris

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the sulfenylation state of stressed cells is emerging as a strategic approach for the detection of key reactive oxygen species signaling proteins. Here, we optimized an in vivo trapping method for cysteine sulfenic acids in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) stressed plant cells using a dimedone based DYn-2 probe. We demonstrated that DYn-2 specifically detects sulfenylation events in an H2O2 dose- and time-dependent way. With mass spectrometry, we identified 226 sulfenylated proteins after H2O2 treatment of Arabidopsis cells, residing in the cytoplasm (123); plastid (68); mitochondria (14); nucleus (10); endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi and plasma membrane (7) and peroxisomes (4). Of these, 123 sulfenylated proteins have never been reported before to undergo cysteine oxidative post-translational modifications in plants. All in all, with this DYn-2 approach, we have identified new sulfenylated proteins, and gave a first glance on the locations of the sulfenomes of Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:25693797

  2. From genome to function: the Arabidopsis aquaporins

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, Francoise; Rosenberg, Joshua M; Shachar-Hill, Yair; Bohnert, Hans J

    2002-01-01

    Background In the post-genomic era newly sequenced genomes can be used to deduce organismal functions from our knowledge of other systems. Here we apply this approach to analyzing the aquaporin gene family in Arabidopsis thaliana. The aquaporins are intrinsic membrane proteins that have been characterized as facilitators of water flux. Originally termed major intrinsic proteins (MIPs), they are now also known as water channels, glycerol facilitators and aqua-glyceroporins, yet recent data suggest that they facilitate the movement of other low-molecular-weight metabolites as well. Results The Arabidopsis genome contains 38 sequences with homology to aquaporin in four subfamilies, termed PIP, TIP, NIP and SIP. We have analyzed aquaporin family structure and expression using the A. thaliana genome sequence, and introduce a new NMR approach for the purpose of analyzing water movement in plant roots in vivo. Conclusions Our preliminary data indicate a strongly transcellular component for the flux of water in roots. PMID:11806824

  3. Meiosis in autopolyploid and allopolyploid Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Andrew; Bomblies, Kirsten

    2016-04-01

    All newly formed polyploids face a challenge in meiotic chromosome segregation due to the presence of an additional set of chromosomes. Nevertheless, naturally occurring auto and allopolyploids are common and generally show high fertility, showing that evolution can find solutions. Exactly how meiosis is adapted in these cases, however, remains a mystery. The rise of Arabidopsis as a model genus for polyploid and meiosis research has seen several new studies begin to shed light on this long standing question.

  4. Analyzing Synthetic Promoters Using Arabidopsis Protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Stracke, Ralf; Thiedig, Katharina; Kuhlmann, Melanie; Weisshaar, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes a transient protoplast co-transfection method that can be used to quantitatively study in vivo the activity and function of promoters and promoter elements (reporters), and their induction or repression by transcription factors (effectors), stresses, hormones, or metabolites. A detailed protocol for carrying out transient co-transfection assays with Arabidopsis At7 protoplasts and calculating the promoter activity is provided. PMID:27557761

  5. Flavonoid-specific staining of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sheahan, J J; Rechnitz, G A

    1992-12-01

    Crop yields may be threatened by increases in UV-B radiation resulting from depletion of the ozone layer. In higher plants, the presence of flavonols provides a protective mechanism, and we report a novel staining procedure for the visualization of such protectants in plant tissue. It is shown that the proposed technique provides sensitive and specific fluorescence of flavonoids in chlorophyll-bleached tissue of Arabidopsis thaliana.

  6. Fluorescence-Activated Nucleolus Sorting in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pontvianne, Frédéric; Boyer-Clavel, Myriam; Sáez-Vásquez, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Nucleolar isolation allows exhaustive characterization of the nucleolar content. Centrifugation-based protocols are not adapted to isolation of nucleoli directly from a plant tissue because of copurification of cellular debris. We describe here a method that allows the purification of nucleoli using fluorescent-activated cell sorting from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. This approach requires the expression of a specific nucleolar protein such as fibrillarin fused to green fluorescent protein in planta. PMID:27576720

  7. Analysis of the Arabidopsis Mitochondrial Proteome1

    PubMed Central

    Millar, A. Harvey; Sweetlove, Lee J.; Giegé, Philippe; Leaver, Christopher J.

    2001-01-01

    The complete set of nuclear genes that encode proteins targeted to mitochondria in plants is currently undefined and thus the full range of mitochondrial functions in plants is unknown. Analysis of two-dimensional gel separations of Arabidopsis cell culture mitochondrial protein revealed approximately 100 abundant proteins and 250 low-abundance proteins. Comparison of subfractions of mitochondrial protein on two-dimensional gels provided information on the soluble, membrane, or integral membrane locations of this protein set. A total of 170 protein spots were excised, trypsin-digested, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight mass spectrometry spectra obtained. Using this dataset, 91 of the proteins were identified by searching translated Arabidopsis genomic databases. Of this set, 81 have defined functions based on sequence comparison. These functions include respiratory electron transport, tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism, amino acid metabolism, protein import, processing, and assembly, transcription, membrane transport, and antioxidant defense. A total of 10 spectra were matched to Arabidopsis putative open reading frames for which no specific function has been determined. A total of 64 spectra did not match to an identified open reading frame. Analysis of full-length putative protein sequences using bioinformatic tools to predict subcellular targeting (TargetP, Psort, and MitoProt) revealed significant variation in predictions, and also a lack of mitochondrial targeting prediction for several characterized mitochondrial proteins. PMID:11743115

  8. Regulatory Proteolysis in Arabidopsis-Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pogány, Miklós; Dankó, Tamás; Kámán-Tóth, Evelin; Schwarczinger, Ildikó; Bozsó, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Approximately two and a half percent of protein coding genes in Arabidopsis encode enzymes with known or putative proteolytic activity. Proteases possess not only common housekeeping functions by recycling nonfunctional proteins. By irreversibly cleaving other proteins, they regulate crucial developmental processes and control responses to environmental changes. Regulatory proteolysis is also indispensable in interactions between plants and their microbial pathogens. Proteolytic cleavage is simultaneously used both by plant cells, to recognize and inactivate invading pathogens, and by microbes, to overcome the immune system of the plant and successfully colonize host cells. In this review, we present available results on the group of proteases in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana whose functions in microbial pathogenesis were confirmed. Pathogen-derived proteolytic factors are also discussed when they are involved in the cleavage of host metabolites. Considering the wealth of review papers available in the field of the ubiquitin-26S proteasome system results on the ubiquitin cascade are not presented. Arabidopsis and its pathogens are conferred with abundant sets of proteases. This review compiles a list of those that are apparently involved in an interaction between the plant and its pathogens, also presenting their molecular partners when available. PMID:26404238

  9. Transcriptional profiling of the Arabidopsis embryo.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Matthew W B; Casson, Stuart A; Lindsey, Keith

    2007-02-01

    We have used laser-capture microdissection to isolate RNA from discrete tissues of globular, heart, and torpedo stage embryos of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). This was amplified and analyzed by DNA microarray using the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip, representing approximately 22,800 Arabidopsis genes. Cluster analysis showed that spatial differences in gene expression were less significant than temporal differences. Time course analysis reveals the dynamics and complexity of gene expression in both apical and basal domains of the developing embryo, with several classes of synexpressed genes identifiable. The transition from globular to heart stage is associated in particular with an up-regulation of genes involved in cell cycle control, transcriptional regulation, and energetics and metabolism. The transition from heart to torpedo stage is associated with a repression of cell cycle genes and an up-regulation of genes encoding storage proteins, and pathways of cell growth, energy, and metabolism. The torpedo stage embryo shows strong functional differentiation in the root and cotyledon, as inferred from the classes of genes expressed in these tissues. The time course of expression of the essential EMBRYO-DEFECTIVE genes shows that most are expressed at unchanging levels across all stages of embryogenesis. We show how identified genes can be used to generate cell type-specific markers and promoter activities for future application in cell biology.

  10. Phosphorylation of plastoglobular proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lohscheider, Jens N.; Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2016-01-01

    Plastoglobules (PGs) are plastid lipid–protein particles with a small specialized proteome and metabolome. Among the 30 core PG proteins are six proteins of the ancient ABC1 atypical kinase (ABC1K) family and their locations in an Arabidopsis mRNA-based co-expression network suggested central regulatory roles. To identify candidate ABC1K targets and a possible ABC1K hierarchical phosphorylation network within the chloroplast PG proteome, we searched Arabidopsis phosphoproteomics data from publicly available sources. Evaluation of underlying spectra and/or associated information was challenging for a variety of reasons, but supported pSer sites and a few pThr sites in nine PG proteins, including five FIBRILLINS. PG phosphorylation motifs are discussed in the context of possible responsible kinases. The challenges of collection and evaluation of published Arabidopsis phosphorylation data are discussed, illustrating the importance of deposition of all mass spectrometry data in well-organized repositories such as PRIDE and ProteomeXchange. This study provides a starting point for experimental testing of phosho-sites in PG proteins and also suggests that phosphoproteomics studies specifically designed toward the PG proteome and its ABC1K are needed to understand phosphorylation networks in these specialized particles. PMID:26962209

  11. Computational identification of 69 retroposons in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yujun; Wu, Yongrui; Liu, Yilei; Han, Bin

    2005-06-01

    Retroposition is a shot-gun strategy of the genome to achieve evolutionary diversities by mixing and matching coding sequences with novel regulatory elements. We have identified 69 retroposons in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome by a computational approach. Most of them were derivatives of mature mRNAs, and 20 genes contained relics of the reverse transcription process, such as truncations, deletions, and extra sequence additions. Of them, 22 are processed pseudogenes, and 52 genes are likely to be actively transcribed, especially in tissues from apical meristems (roots and flowers). Functional compositions of these retroposon parental genes imply that not the mRNA itself but its expression in gamete cells defines a suitable template for retroposition. The presence/absence patterns of retroposons can be used as cladistic markers for biogeographic research. Effects of human and the Mediterranean Pleistocene refugia in Arabidopsis biogeographic distributions were revealed based on two recent retroposons (At1g61410 and At5g52090). An evolutionary rate of new gene creation by retroposition was calculated as 0.6 genes per million years. Retroposons can also be used as molecular fossils of the parental gene expressions in ancient time. Extensions of 3' untranslated regions for those expressed parental genes are revealed as a possible trend of plant transcriptome evolution. In addition, we reported the first plant functional chimeric gene that adapts to intercompartmental transport by capturing two additional exons after retroposition. PMID:15923328

  12. Gene expression profile analysis of Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) hemocytes after a Vibrio alginolyticus challenge using an immune-enriched oligo-microarray

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) is a cultured bivalve with worldwide commercial importance, and diseases cause high economic losses. For this reason, interest in the immune genes in this species has recently increased. The present work describes the construction of the first R. philippinarum microarray containing immune-related hemocyte sequences and its application to study the gene transcription profiles of hemocytes from clams infected with V. alginolyticus through a time course. Results The complete set of sequences from R. philippinarum available in the public databases and the hemocyte sequences enriched in immune transcripts were assembled successfully. A total of 12,156 annotated sequences were used to construct the 8 ×15 k oligo-microarray. The microarray experiments yielded a total of 579 differentially expressed transcripts. Using the gene expression results, the associated Gene Ontology terms and the enrichment analysis, we found different response mechanisms throughout the experiment. Genes related to signaling, transcription and apoptosis, such as IL-17D, NF-κB or calmodulin, were typically expressed as early as 3 hours post-challenge (hpc), while characteristic immune genes, such as PGRPs, FREPs and defense proteins appeared later at 8 hpc. This immune-triggering response could have affected a high number of processes that seemed to be activated 24 hpc to overcome the Vibrio challenge, including the expression of many cytoskeleton molecules, which is indicative of the active movement of hemocytes. In fact functional studies showed an increment in apoptosis, necrosis or cell migration after the infection. Finally, 72 hpc, activity returned to normal levels, and more than 50% of the genes were downregulated in a negative feedback of all of the previously active processes. Conclusions Using a new version of the R. philippinarum oligo-microarray, a putative timing for the response against a Vibrio infection was established. The key

  13. The Arabidopsis TAC Position Viewer: a high-resolution map of transformation-competent artificial chromosome (TAC) clones aligned with the Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia-0 genome.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Yoshitsugu; Suda, Kunihiro; Liu, Yao-Guang; Sato, Shusei; Nakamura, Yukino; Yokoyama, Koji; Yamamoto, Naoki; Hanano, Shigeru; Takita, Eiji; Sakurai, Nozomu; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Kaneko, Takakazu; Yano, Kentaro; Tabata, Satoshi; Shibata, Daisuke

    2015-09-01

    We present a high-resolution map of genomic transformation-competent artificial chromosome (TAC) clones extending over all Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) chromosomes. The Arabidopsis genomic TAC clones have been valuable genetic tools. Previously, we constructed an Arabidopsis genomic TAC library consisting of more than 10,000 TAC clones harboring large genomic DNA fragments extending over the whole Arabidopsis genome. Here, we determined 13,577 end sequences from 6987 Arabidopsis TAC clones and mapped 5937 TAC clones to precise locations, covering approximately 90% of the Arabidopsis chromosomes. We present the large-scale data set of TAC clones with high-resolution mapping information as a Java application tool, the Arabidopsis TAC Position Viewer, which provides ready-to-go transformable genomic DNA clones corresponding to certain loci on Arabidopsis chromosomes. The TAC clone resources will accelerate genomic DNA cloning, positional walking, complementation of mutants and DNA transformation for heterologous gene expression. PMID:26227242

  14. Synthesis of Well-Defined Oligo(2,5-dialkoxy-1,4-phenylene vinylene)s with Chiral End Groups: Unique Helical Aggregations Induced by the Chiral Chain Ends.

    PubMed

    Yorsaeng, Sakkawet; Kato, Yuka; Tsutsumi, Ken; Inagaki, Akiko; Kitiyanan, Boonyarach; Fujiki, Michiya; Nomura, Kotohiro

    2015-11-16

    Oligo(2,5-dialkoxy-1,4-phenylenevinylene)s containing three different chiral alkoxy substituents on the phenyl end groups with structurally regular (all trans) controlled repeat units have been prepared; these compounds showed highly enhanced aggregation-induced circular dichroism (AICD; formation of supramolecular polymers), and an inversion of the CD signal was observed even with the same end groups under certain conditions. PMID:26441371

  15. Oligo-dT anchored cDNA-SCoT: a novel differential display method for analyzing differential gene expression in response to several stress treatments in mango (Mangifera indica L.).

    PubMed

    Luo, Cong; He, Xin-Hua; Hu, Ying; Yu, Hai-xia; Ou, Shi-Jin; Fang, Zhong-Bin

    2014-09-15

    Differential display is a powerful technique for analyzing differences in gene expression. Oligo-dT cDNAstart codon targeted marker (cDNA-SCoT) technique is a novel, simple, cheap, rapid, and efficient method for differential gene expression research. In the present study, the oligo-dT anchored cDNA-SCoT technique was exploited to identify differentially expressed genes during several stress treatments in mango. A total of 37 primers combined with oligo-dT anchor primers 3side amplified approximately 150 fragments of 150 bp to 1500 bp in length. Up to 100 fragments were differentially expressed among the stress treatments and control samples, among which 92 were obtained and sequenced. Out of the 92 transcript derived fragments (TDFs), 70% were highly homologous to known genes, and 30% encoded unclassified proteins with unknown functions. The expression pattern of nine genes with known functions involved in several abiotic stresses in other species was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) under cold (4 °C), salinity (NaCl), polyethylene glycol (PEG, MW 6000), and heavy metal treatments in leaves and stems at different time points (0, 24, 48, and 72 h). The expression patterns of the genes (TDF4, TDF7, TDF23, TDF45, TDF49, TDF50, TDF57, TDF91 and TDF92) that had direct or indirect relationships with cold, salinity, drought and heavy metal stress response were analyzed through qRT-PCR. The possible roles of these genes are discussed. This study suggests that the oligo-dT anchored cDNA-SCoT differential display method is a useful tool to serve as an initial step for characterizing transcriptional changes induced by abiotic stresses and provide gene information for further study and application in genetic improvement and breeding in mango.

  16. Comparative genomics of Arabidopsis and maize: prospects and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Brendel, Volker; Kurtz, Stefan; Walbot, Virginia

    2002-01-01

    The completed Arabidopsis genome seems to be of limited value as a model for maize genomics. In addition to the expansion of repetitive sequences in maize and the lack of genomic micro-colinearity, maize-specific or highly-diverged proteins contribute to a predicted maize proteome of about 50,000 proteins, twice the size of that of Arabidopsis. PMID:11897028

  17. How to grow transgenic Arabidopsis in the field.

    PubMed

    Jänkänpää, Hanna Johansson; Jansson, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis is naturally adapted to habitats in which both biotic variables (e.g., light, wind, and humidity) and abiotic variables (e.g., competition, herbivory, and pathogen densities) strongly fluctuate. Hence, conditions in controlled growth chambers (in which Arabidopsis is typically grown for scientific experiments) differ substantially from those in natural environments. In order to mimic more closely natural conditions, we grow Arabidopsis outdoors under "semi-natural" field conditions. Performing experiments on transgenic Arabidopsis grown in the field that are sufficiently reliable for publication is challenging. In this chapter, we present some of our experiences based on 10 years of field experimentation, which may be of use to researchers seeking to perform field experiments using transgenic Arabidopsis.

  18. P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance phenotype of L1210/VCR cells is associated with decreases of oligo- and/or polysaccharide contents.

    PubMed

    Fiala, R; Sulová, Z; El-Saggan, A H; Uhrík, B; Liptaj, T; Dovinová, I; Hanusovská, E; Drobná, Z; Barancík, M; Breier, A

    2003-11-20

    Multidrug resistance of murine leukaemic cell line L1210/VCR (obtained by adaptation of parental drug-sensitive L1210 cells to vincristine) is associated with overexpression of mdr1 gene product P-glycoprotein (Pgp)-the ATP-dependent drug efflux pump. 31P-NMR spectra of L1210 and L1210/VCR cells (the latter in the presence of vincristine) revealed, besides the decrease of ATP level, a considerable lower level of UDP-saccharides in L1210/VCR cells. Histochemical staining of negatively charged cell surface binding sites (mostly sialic acid) by ruthenium red (RR) revealed a compact layer of RR bound to the external coat of sensitive cells. In resistant cells cultivated in the absence or presence of vincristine, the RR layer is either reduced or absent. Consistently, resistant cells were found to be less sensitive to Concanavalin A (ConA). Moreover, differences in the amount and spectrum of glycoproteins interacting with ConA-Sepharose were demonstrated between sensitive and resistant cells. Finally, the content of glycogen in resistant cells is lower than in sensitive cells. All the above facts indicate that multidrug resistance of L1210/VCR cells mediated predominantly by drug efflux activity of Pgp is accompanied by a considerable depression of oligo- and/or polysaccharides biosynthesis.

  19. Identification of novel pro-alpha2(IX) collagen gene mutations in two families with distinctive oligo-epiphyseal forms of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Holden, P; Canty, E G; Mortier, G R; Zabel, B; Spranger, J; Carr, A; Grant, M E; Loughlin, J A; Briggs, M D

    1999-01-01

    Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder with marked clinical and radiographic variability. Traditionally, the mild "Ribbing" and severe "Fairbank" types have been used to define a broad phenotypic spectrum. Mutations in the gene encoding cartilage oligomeric-matrix protein have been shown to result in several types of MED, whereas mutations in the gene encoding the alpha2 chain of type IX collagen (COL9A2) have so far been found only in two families with the Fairbank type of MED. Type IX collagen is a heterotrimer of pro-alpha chains derived from three distinct genes-COL9A1, COL9A2, and COL9A3. In this article, we describe two families with distinctive oligo-epiphyseal forms of MED, which are heterozygous for different mutations in the COL9A2 exon 3/intron 3 splice-donor site. Both of these mutations result in the skipping of exon 3 from COL9A2 mRNA, but the position of the mutation in the splice-donor site determines the stability of the mRNA produced from the mutant COL9A2 allele. PMID:10364514

  20. Cationic Oligo(thiophene ethynylene) with Broad-Spectrum and High Antibacterial Efficiency under White Light and Specific Biocidal Activity against S. aureus in Dark.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qi; Li, Junting; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Li, Zhengping; Tang, Yanli

    2016-01-13

    We designed and synthesized a novel oligo(thiophene ethynylene) (OTE) to investigate the antibacterial activities against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis) and Gram-negative (Ralstonia solanacearum and Escherichia coli) bacteria in vitro by photodynamic therapy (PDT). Notably, OTE presents broad-spectrum and greatly high antibacterial activities after white light irradiation at nanogram per milliliter concentrations. The half inhibitory concentrations (IC50) values obtained for S. aureus, S. epidermidis, E. coli, and R. solanacearum are 8, 13, 24, and 52 ng/mL after illumination for 30 min, respectively, which are lower than that of other PDT agents. Interestingly, OTE shows the specific and very strong dark killing capability against S. aureus at the concentration of 180 ng/mL for 30 min, which is the highest efficiency biocide against S. aureus without the need of irradiation to date. The antibacterial mechanism investigated demonstrated that reactive oxygen species or singlet-oxygen generated by OTE kills bacteria irreversibly upon white light irradiation, and OTE as a v-type oligomer exerts its toxicity directly on destroying bacterial cytoplasmic membrane in the dark. Importantly, the OTE shows no cell cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility. The results indicate that it is potential to provide versatile applications in the efficient control of pathogenic organisms and specific application for killing S. aureus. PMID:26671682

  1. Bimetallic ruthenium complexes bridged by divinylphenylene bearing oligo(ethylene glycol)methylether: synthesis, (spectro)electrochemistry and the lithium cation effect.

    PubMed

    Tian, Li Yan; Liu, Yuan Mei; Tian, Guang-Xuan; Wu, Xiang Hua; Li, Zhen; Kou, Jun-Feng; Ou, Ya-Ping; Liu, Sheng Hua; Fu, Wen-Fu

    2014-03-14

    A series of 1,4-disubstituted ruthenium-vinyl complexes, (E,E)-[{(PMe3)3(CO)ClRu}2(μ-HC=CH-Ar-CH=CH)], in which the 1,4-diethenylphenylene bridge bears two oligo(ethylene glycol)methyl ether side chains at different positions (2,5- and 2,3-positions), were prepared. The respective products were characterized by elemental analyses and NMR spectroscopy. The structures of complexes 1b and 1e were established by X-ray crystallography. The electronic properties of the complexes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, and IR and UV-vis/NIR spectroscopies. Electrochemical studies showed that the 2,5-substituents better stabilized the mixed-valence states; the electrochemical behavior was greatly affected by lithium cations, especially complex 1g with 2,3-substituents, which was further supported by IR and UV-vis/NIR spectra changes. Spectroelectrochemical studies showed that the redox chemistry was dominated by the non-innocent character of the bridging fragment. PMID:24457499

  2. Oligo(FcDC-co-CholDEA) with ferrocene in the main chain and cholesterol as a pendant group-preparation and unusual properties.

    PubMed

    Yan, Junlin; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yuanhui; Jing, Ping; He, Panli; Gao, Di; Fang, Yu

    2010-10-21

    With ever-increasing need for thin, flexible, and functional materials in electrochemical systems, various techniques have been explored for creating materials used in fuel cells, batteries, electrochromic devices, solar cells, and sensors. In the present study, a novel ferrocene (Fc) and cholesterol (Chol)-containing oligomer, oligo(FcDC-co-CholDEA), was specially designed and prepared by putting Fc in the main chain and Chol as a side group. MALDI-TOF MS and freezing point depression measurements revealed that in average each oligomer contains three Fc units and three Chol units. Cyclic voltammetric measurements revealed that the oligomer displays superior electrochemical stability if compared with other Fc derivatives containing only one Fc unit and one or two Chol unit and with poly(ferrocenylsilane) with Fc in the main chain. In particular, the Fc-containing oligomer possesses an unusual oxidation center, of which the oxidation potential could be as high as 1.81 V. The oligomer is also superior in self-assembly, as demonstrated by forming an LB film of layered structures. Furthermore, supramolecular films with high mechanical strength in the wet state can be prepared by employing a simple solution casting method. This finding demonstrates that self-assembly is a simple but effective way to create films of potential uses in real-life applications provided proper building blocks are designed and employed. PMID:20857991

  3. Micro- and nanostructured poly[oligo(ethylene glycol)methacrylate] brushes grown from photopatterned halogen initiators by atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shah Alang; Leggett, Graham J; Hucknall, Angus; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2011-03-01

    Photolithographic techniques have been used to fabricate polymer brush micro- and nanostructures. On exposure to UV light with a wavelength of 244 nm, halogens were selectively removed from films of chloromethylphenyltrichlorosilane and 3-(2-bromoisobutyramido)propyl-triethoxysilane on silicon dioxide. Patterning was achieved at the micrometer scale, by using a mask in conjunction with the incident laser beam, and at the nanometer scale, by utilizing interferometric lithography (IL). Friction force microscopy images of patterned surfaces exhibited frictional contrast due to removal of the halogen but no topographical contrast. In both cases the halogenated surface was used as an initiator for surface atom-transfer radical polymerization. Patterning of the surface by UV lithography enabled the definition of patterns of initiator from which micro- and nanostructured poly[oligo(ethylene glycol)methacrylate] bottle brushes were grown. Micropatterned brushes formed on both surfaces exhibited excellent resistance to protein adsorption, enabling the formation of protein patterns. Using IL, brush structures were formed that covered macroscopic areas (approximately 0.5 cm²) but exhibited a full width at half maximum height as small as 78 nm, with a period of 225 nm. Spatially selective photolytic removal of halogens that are immobilized on a surface thus appears to be a simple, rapid, and versatile method for the formation of micro- and nanostructured polymer brushes and for the control of protein adsorption.

  4. The genus Perissocytheridea Stephenson, 1938 (Crustacea: Ostracoda) and evidence of brackish water facies along the Oligo-Miocene, Pirabas Formation, eastern Amazonia, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelista Nogueira, Anna Andressa; Ramos, Maria Inês Feijó

    2016-01-01

    Perissocytheridea Stephenson is characteristic of brackish water facies. In 57 samples from the Upper Oligocene to Lower Miocene, from five localities, Pirabas Formation, Pará State, Brazil eleven species have been identified. Among these species, four are new reports: Perissocytheridea punctoreticulata n. sp., Perissocytheridea largulateralis n. sp., Perissocytheridea colini n. sp. and Perissocytheridea pirabensis n. sp.; five species in open nomenclature: Perissocytheridea sp. 1, P. sp. 2, P. sp. 3, P. sp. 4, and P. sp. 5 and two species left in "aff." abbreviation: Perissocytheridea aff. Perissocytheridea pumila and Perissocytheridea aff. Perissocytheridea brachyforma subsp. excavata. The distributional pattern of the Perissocytheridea combined with the occurrence of foraminifera Elphidium and Ammonia in the studied sections supports the presence of the brackish water facies to the respective layers. Their quantitative variation through the studied sections indicate more than one phase of salinity reduction (about >5 and <30 ppm) and/or the decrease of the sea level, forming lagoon along the Pirabas Formation. This genus has a wide paleobiogeographical occurrence and stratigraphic distribution ranging from the Cretaceous to Recent, and already been recorded in the northern of South America, especially in the Neogene of Solimões Basin, but this is the first report of a neotropical genus to the Oligo-Miocene deposits of Pirabas Formation, northern Brazilian Coast, Pará State.

  5. Bimetallic ruthenium complexes bridged by divinylphenylene bearing oligo(ethylene glycol)methylether: synthesis, (spectro)electrochemistry and the lithium cation effect.

    PubMed

    Tian, Li Yan; Liu, Yuan Mei; Tian, Guang-Xuan; Wu, Xiang Hua; Li, Zhen; Kou, Jun-Feng; Ou, Ya-Ping; Liu, Sheng Hua; Fu, Wen-Fu

    2014-03-14

    A series of 1,4-disubstituted ruthenium-vinyl complexes, (E,E)-[{(PMe3)3(CO)ClRu}2(μ-HC=CH-Ar-CH=CH)], in which the 1,4-diethenylphenylene bridge bears two oligo(ethylene glycol)methyl ether side chains at different positions (2,5- and 2,3-positions), were prepared. The respective products were characterized by elemental analyses and NMR spectroscopy. The structures of complexes 1b and 1e were established by X-ray crystallography. The electronic properties of the complexes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, and IR and UV-vis/NIR spectroscopies. Electrochemical studies showed that the 2,5-substituents better stabilized the mixed-valence states; the electrochemical behavior was greatly affected by lithium cations, especially complex 1g with 2,3-substituents, which was further supported by IR and UV-vis/NIR spectra changes. Spectroelectrochemical studies showed that the redox chemistry was dominated by the non-innocent character of the bridging fragment.

  6. Highly Efficient Multiphoton-Pumped Frequency-Upconversion Stimulated Blue Emission with Ultralow Threshold from Highly Extended Ladder-Type Oligo(p-phenylene)s.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Li, King Fai; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Cheah, Kok Wai; Wong, Man Shing

    2016-08-26

    A series of highly extended π-conjugated ladder-type oligo(p-phenylene)s containing up to 10 phenyl rings with (L)-Ph(n)-NPh (n=7-10) or without diphenylamino endcaps (L)-Ph(n) (n=7 and 8) were synthesized and investigated for their multiphoton absorption properties for frequency upconverted blue ASE/lasing. Extremely large two-photon absorption (2PA) cross-sections and highly efficient 2PA ASE/lasing with ultralow threshold were achieved. (L)-Ph(10)-NPh exhibits the highest intrinsic 2PA cross-section of 3643 GM for a blue emissive organic fluorophore reported so far. The record-high 2PA pumped ASE/lasing efficiency of 2.06 % was obtained by un-endcapped oligomer, (L)-Ph(8) rather than that with larger σ2 , suggesting that a molecule with larger σ2 is not guaranteed to exhibit higher η2 . All of these oligomers exhibit exceptionally ultralow 2PA pumped ASE/lasing thresholds, among which the lowest 2PA pumped threshold of circa 0.26 μJ was achieved by (L)-Ph(10)-NPh. PMID:27485210

  7. Fluorescent oligo(p-phenyleneethynylene) contained amphiphiles-encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles for targeted magnetic resonance and two-photon optical imaging in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Chao; Hong, Binbin; Gong, Zhaocui; Zhao, Hui; Hu, Wenbo; Lu, Xiaomei; Li, Jie; Li, Xiang; Yang, Zhen; Fan, Quli; Yao, Yuyu; Huang, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Folate receptor-targeted multifunctional fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMNPs) composed of cores containing iron oxide nanocrystals and amphiphilic oligo(p-phenyleneethynylene) shells with multimodal imaging capability were successfully prepared through a convenient hydrophobic encapsulation approach. The iron oxide nanoparticles in the core provided T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), whereas the amphiphilic oligomers on the surface of the nanoparticles introduced good water-solubility, biocompatibility, excellent fluorescent properties and cancer-targeting. These nanoparticles exhibited superparamagnetic properties with saturation magnetization (Ms) of 23 emu g-1 and a transverse relaxivity rate of 140.89 mM-1 s-1. In vitro studies indicated that the dual-modal FMNPs can serve as an effective two-photon fluorescent and a magnetic probe to achieve the targeted imaging of Hela cells without obvious cytotoxicity. In vivo two-photon fluorescence and MRI results demonstrated that the FMNPs were able to preferentially accumulate in tumor tissues to allow dual-modal detection of tumors in a living body. These studies provided insight in developing novel multifunctional probes for multimodal imaging, which would play an important role for theranostics in biomedical science.

  8. Electrochemical Investigation of Al–Li/LixFePO4 Cells in Oligo(ethylene glycol) Dimethyl Ether/LiPF6

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.J.; Zhou, Y.N.; Lee, H.S.; Nam, K.W.; Yang, X.Q.; Haas, O.

    2011-02-01

    1 M LiPF{sub 6} dissolved in oligo(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether with a molecular weight, 500 g mol{sup -1} (OEGDME500, 1 M LiPF{sub 6}), was investigated as an electrolyte in experimental Al-Li/LiFePO{sub 4} cells. More than 60 cycles were achieved using this electrolyte in a Li-ion cell with an Al-Li alloy as an anode sandwiched between two Li x FePO{sub 4} electrodes (cathodes). Charging efficiencies of 96-100% and energy efficiencies of 86-89% were maintained during 60 cycles at low current densities. A theoretical investigation revealed that the specific energy can be increased up to 15% if conventional LiC{sub 6} anodes are replaced by Al-Li alloy electrodes. The specific energy and the energy density were calculated as a function of the active mass per electrode surface (charge density). The results reveal that for a charge density of 4 mAh cm{sup -2} about 160 mWh g{sup -1} can be reached with Al-Li/LiFePO{sub 4} batteries. Power limiting diffusion processes are discussed, and the power capability of Al-Li/LiFePO{sub 4} cells was experimentally evaluated using conventional electrolytes.

  9. Selection of conformational states in self-assembled surface structures formed from an oligo(naphthylene-ethynylene) 3-bit binary switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Y.; Cramer, J. R.; Nuermaimaiti, A.; Svane, K.; Yu, M.; Lægsgaard, E.; Besenbacher, F.; Xue, Q.-K.; Ma, X.; Hammer, B.; Gothelf, K. V.; Linderoth, T. R.

    2015-03-01

    Supra-molecular self-assembly on surfaces often involves molecular conformational flexibility which may act to enrich the variation and complexity of the structures formed. However, systematic and explicit investigations of how molecular conformational states are selected in surface self-assembly processes are relatively scarce. Here, we use a combination of high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy and Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations to investigate self-assembly for a custom-designed molecule capable of assuming eight distinct surface conformations (four enantiomeric pairs). The conformations result from binary positions of n = 3 naphtalene units on a linear oligo(naphthylene-ethynylene) backbone. On Au(111), inter-molecular interactions involving carboxyl and bulky tert-butyl-phenyl functional groups induce the molecules to form two ordered phases with brick-wall and lamella structure, respectively. These structures each involve molecules in two conformational states, and there is a clear separation between the conformers involved in the two types of structures. On Cu(111), individual molecules isolated by carboxylate-substrate binding show a distribution involving all possible conformational states. Together these observations imply selection and adaptation of conformational states upon molecular self-assembly. From DFT modeling and statistical analysis of the molecular conformations, the observed selection of conformational states is attributed to steric interaction between the naphthalene units. The present study enhances our understanding of how ordering and selection of molecular conformations is controlled by intermolecular interactions in a complex situation with many distinct conformational states for the participating molecules.

  10. Copolymer Networks From Oligo(ε-caprolactone) and n-Butyl Acrylate Enable a Reversible Bidirectional Shape-Memory Effect at Human Body Temperature.

    PubMed

    Saatchi, Mersa; Behl, Marc; Nöchel, Ulrich; Lendlein, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Exploiting the tremendous potential of the recently discovered reversible bidirectional shape-memory effect (rbSME) for biomedical applications requires switching temperatures in the physiological range. The recent strategy is based on the reduction of the melting temperature range (ΔT m ) of the actuating oligo(ε-caprolactone) (OCL) domains in copolymer networks from OCL and n-butyl acrylate (BA), where the reversible effect can be adjusted to the human body temperature. In addition, it is investigated whether an rbSME in the temperature range close or even above Tm,offset (end of the melting transition) can be obtained. Two series of networks having mixtures of OCLs reveal broad ΔTm s from 2 °C to 50 °C and from -10 °C to 37 °C, respectively. In cyclic, thermomechanical experiments the rbSME can be tailored to display pronounced actuation in a temperature interval between 20 °C and 37 °C. In this way, the application spectrum of the rbSME can be extended to biomedical applications.

  11. Positively Charged Oligo[Poly(Ethylene Glycol) Fumarate] Scaffold Implantation Results in a Permissive Lesion Environment after Spinal Cord Injury in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Jeffrey S.; Esmaeili Rad, Melika; Grahn, Peter J.; Chen, Bingkun K.; Knight, Andrew M.; Schmeichel, Ann M.; Isaq, Nasro A.; Dadsetan, Mahrokh; Yaszemski, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Positively charged oligo[poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate] (OPF+) scaffolds loaded with Schwann cells bridge spinal cord injury (SCI) lesions and support axonal regeneration in rat. The regeneration achieved is not sufficient for inducing functional recovery. Attempts to increase regeneration would benefit from understanding the effects of the scaffold and transplanted cells on lesion environment. We conducted morphometric and stereological analysis of lesions in rats implanted with OPF+ scaffolds with or without loaded Schwann cells 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 weeks after thoracic spinal cord transection. No differences were found in collagen scarring, cyst formation, astrocyte reactivity, myelin debris, or chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) accumulation. However, when scaffold-implanted animals were compared with animals with transection injuries only, these barriers to regeneration were significantly reduced, accompanied by increased activated macrophages/microglia. This distinctive and regeneration permissive tissue reaction to scaffold implantation was independent of Schwann cell transplantation. Although the tissue reaction was beneficial in the short term, we observed a chronic fibrotic host response, resulting in scaffolds surrounded by collagen at 8 weeks. This study demonstrates that an appropriate biomaterial scaffold improves the environment for regeneration. Future targeting of the host fibrotic response may allow increased axonal regeneration and functional recovery. PMID:25891264

  12. Antimicrobial Contact-Active Oligo(2-oxazoline)s-Grafted Surfaces for Fast Water Disinfection at the Point-of-Use.

    PubMed

    Correia, Vanessa G; Ferraria, Ana M; Pinho, Mariana G; Aguiar-Ricardo, Ana

    2015-12-14

    Water is one of the most valuable resources today and its purity is crucial to health and society well-being. The access to safe drinking water is decreasing in the world, which can have a huge socio-economic impact especially in developing countries, more prone to water-associated diseases. The goal of this work was to develop an innovative, fast, and cost-effective 3D material capable of decontaminating water. We have used an eco-friendly strategy, combining plasma surface activation and supercritical fluid technology to produce, for the first time, a 2-oxazoline-grafted 3D surface with broad-spectrum contact-active antimicrobial properties. Oligo(2-methyl-2-oxazoline) quaternized with N,N-dimethyldodecylamine and grafted to a chitosan (CHT) scaffold (CHT-OMetOx-DDA) efficiently and quickly (<3 min) killed >99.999% of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli cells upon direct contact and avoided bacterial adhesion to the materials surface, which is important for the prevention of biofilm formation. As a proof of concept, CHT-OMetOx-DDA scaffold was demonstrated to be suitable for water purification efficiently killing the microorganisms present in different water samples within minutes of contact and without leaching to the water. Additionally, we report for the first time a new method to clearly distinguish two mechanisms of action of bioactive surfaces: contact-active and releasing systems.

  13. HYPER RECOMBINATION1 of the THO/TREX complex plays a role in controlling transcription of the REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 gene in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Congyao; Zhou, Xin; Wen, Chi-Kuang

    2015-02-01

    Arabidopsis REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 (RTE1) represses ethylene hormone responses by promoting ethylene receptor ETHYLENE RESPONSE1 (ETR1) signaling, which negatively regulates ethylene responses. To investigate the regulation of RTE1, we performed a genetic screening for mutations that suppress ethylene insensitivity conferred by RTE1 overexpression in Arabidopsis. We isolated HYPER RECOMBINATION1 (HPR1), which is required for RTE1 overexpressor (RTE1ox) ethylene insensitivity at the seedling but not adult stage. HPR1 is a component of the THO complex, which, with other proteins, forms the TRanscription EXport (TREX) complex. In yeast, Drosophila, and humans, the THO/TREX complex is involved in transcription elongation and nucleocytoplasmic RNA export, but its role in plants is to be fully determined. We investigated how HPR1 is involved in RTE1ox ethylene insensitivity in Arabidopsis. The hpr1-5 mutation may affect nucleocytoplasmic mRNA export, as revealed by in vivo hybridization of fluorescein-labeled oligo(dT)45 with unidentified mRNA in the nucleus. The hpr1-5 mutation reduced the total and nuclear RTE1 transcript levels to a similar extent, and RTE1 transcript reduction rate was not affected by hpr1-5 with cordycepin treatment, which prematurely terminates transcription. The defect in the THO-interacting TEX1 protein of TREX but not the mRNA export factor SAC3B also reduced the total and nuclear RTE1 levels. SERINE-ARGININE-RICH (SR) proteins are involved mRNA splicing, and we found that SR protein SR33 co-localized with HPR1 in nuclear speckles, which agreed with the association of human TREX with the splicing machinery. We reveal a role for HPR1 in RTE1 expression during transcription elongation and less likely during export. Gene expression involved in ethylene signaling suppression was not reduced by the hpr1-5 mutation, which indicates selectivity of HPR1 for RTE1 expression affecting the consequent ethylene response. Thus, components of the

  14. Generation and identification of Arabidopsis EMS mutants.

    PubMed

    Qu, Li-Jia; Qin, Genji

    2014-01-01

    EMS mutant analysis is a routine experiment to identify new players in a specific biological process or signaling pathway using forward genetics. It begins with the generation of mutants by treating Arabidopsis seeds with EMS. A mutant with a phenotype of interest (mpi) is obtained by screening plants of the M2 generation under a specific condition. Once the phenotype of the mpi is confirmed in the next generation, map-based cloning is performed to locate the mpi mutation. During the map-based cloning, mpi plants (Arabidopsis Columbia-0 (Col-0) ecotype background) are first crossed with Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta (Ler) ecotype, and the presence or absence of the phenotype in the F1 hybrids indicates whether the mpi is recessive or dominant. F2 plants with phenotypes similar to the mpi, if the mpi is recessive, or those without the phenotype, if the mpi is dominant, are used as the mapping population. As few as 24 such plants are selected for rough mapping. After finding one marker (MA) linked to the mpi locus or mutant phenotype, more markers near MA are tested to identify recombinants. The recombinants indicate the interval in which the mpi is located. Additional recombinants and molecular markers are then required to narrow down the interval. This is an iterative process of narrowing down the mapping interval until no further recombinants or molecular markers are available. The genes in the mapping interval are then sequenced to look for the mutation. In the last step, the wild-type or mutated gene is cloned to generate binary constructs. Complementation or recapitulation provides the most convincing evidence in determining the mutation that causes the phenotype of the mpi. Here, we describe the procedures for generating mutants with EMS and analyzing EMS mutations by map-based cloning.

  15. Functional Analysis of Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2009-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate the expression of genes at the transcriptional level. Modification of TF activity dynamically alters the transcriptome, which leads to metabolic and phenotypic changes. Thus, functional analysis of TFs using ‘omics-based’ methodologies is one of the most important areas of the post-genome era. In this mini-review, we present an overview of Arabidopsis TFs and introduce strategies for the functional analysis of plant TFs, which include both traditional and recently developed technologies. These strategies can be assigned to five categories: bioinformatic analysis; analysis of molecular function; expression analysis; phenotype analysis; and network analysis for the description of entire transcriptional regulatory networks. PMID:19478073

  16. Bacterial RNAs activate innate immunity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Boyoung; Park, Yong-Soon; Lee, Soohyun; Song, Geun Cheol; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2016-01-01

    The common molecular patterns of microbes play a critical role in the regulation of plant innate immunity. However, little is known about the role of nucleic acids in this process in plants. We pre-infiltrated Arabidopsis leaves with total RNAs from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pto DC3000) and subsequently inoculated these plants with the same bacterial cells. Total Pto DC3000 RNAs pre-infiltrated into Arabidopsis leaves elicited plant immune responses against Pto DC3000. However, sheared RNAs and RNase A application failed to induce immunity, suggesting that intact bacterial RNAs function in plant innate immunity. This notion was supported by the positive regulation of superoxide anion levels, callose deposition, two mitogen-activated protein kinases and defense-related genes observed in bacterial RNA-pre-treated leaves. Intriguingly, the Pto DC3000 population was not compromised in known pattern recognition receptor mutants for chitin, flagellin and elongation factor-Tu (EF-Tu). Plant defense-related mutant analyses further revealed that bacterial RNA-elicited innate immunity was normally required for salicylic and jasmonic acid signaling. Notably, among total RNAs, the abundant bacterial RNA species 16S and 23S ribosomal RNAs were the major determinants of this response. Our findings provide evidence that bacterial RNA serves as a microbe-associated molecular pattern in plants. PMID:26499893

  17. Stress promotes Arabidopsis - Piriformospora indica interaction.

    PubMed

    Vahabi, Khabat; Dorcheh, Sedigheh Karimi; Monajembashi, Shamci; Westermann, Martin; Reichelt, Michael; Falkenberg, Daniela; Hemmerich, Peter; Sherameti, Irena; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2016-05-01

    The endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica colonizes Arabidopsis thaliana roots and promotes plant performance, growth and resistance/tolerance against abiotic and biotic stress. Here we demonstrate that the benefits for the plant increase when the two partners are co-cultivated under stress (limited access to nutrient, exposure to heavy metals and salt, light and osmotic stress, pathogen infection). Moreover, physical contact between P. indica and Arabidopsis roots is necessary for optimal growth promotion, and chemical communication cannot replace the physical contact. Lower nutrient availability down-regulates and higher nutrient availability up-regulates the plant defense system including the expression of pathogenesis-related genes in roots. High light, osmotic and salt stresses support the beneficial interaction between the plant and the fungus. P. indica reduces stomata closure and H2O2 production after Alternaria brassicae infection in leaves and suppresses the defense-related accumulation of the phytohormone jasmonic acid. Thus, shifting the growth conditions toward a stress promotes the mutualistic interaction, while optimal supply with nutrients or low stress diminishes the benefits for the plant in the symbiosis. PMID:27167761

  18. MTHFD1 controls DNA methylation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Groth, Martin; Moissiard, Guillaume; Wirtz, Markus; Wang, Haifeng; Garcia-Salinas, Carolina; Ramos-Parra, Perla A; Bischof, Sylvain; Feng, Suhua; Cokus, Shawn J; John, Amala; Smith, Danielle C; Zhai, Jixian; Hale, Christopher J; Long, Jeff A; Hell, Ruediger; Díaz de la Garza, Rocío I; Jacobsen, Steven E

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that has important functions in transcriptional silencing and is associated with repressive histone methylation (H3K9me). To further investigate silencing mechanisms, we screened a mutagenized Arabidopsis thaliana population for expression of SDCpro-GFP, redundantly controlled by DNA methyltransferases DRM2 and CMT3. Here, we identify the hypomorphic mutant mthfd1-1, carrying a mutation (R175Q) in the cytoplasmic bifunctional methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase/methenyltetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase (MTHFD1). Decreased levels of oxidized tetrahydrofolates in mthfd1-1 and lethality of loss-of-function demonstrate the essential enzymatic role of MTHFD1 in Arabidopsis. Accumulation of homocysteine and S-adenosylhomocysteine, genome-wide DNA hypomethylation, loss of H3K9me and transposon derepression indicate that S-adenosylmethionine-dependent transmethylation is inhibited in mthfd1-1. Comparative analysis of DNA methylation revealed that the CMT3 and CMT2 pathways involving positive feedback with H3K9me are mostly affected. Our work highlights the sensitivity of epigenetic networks to one-carbon metabolism due to their common S-adenosylmethionine-dependent transmethylation and has implications for human MTHFD1-associated diseases. PMID:27291711

  19. Photoperiodic flowering regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Golembeski, Greg S.; Kinmonth-Schultz, Hannah A.; Song, Young Hun; Imaizumi, Takato

    2015-01-01

    Photoperiod, or the duration of light in a given day, is a critical cue that flowering plants utilize to effectively assess seasonal information and coordinate their reproductive development in synchrony with the external environment. The use of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, has greatly improved our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that determine how plants process and utilize photoperiodic information to coordinate a flowering response. This mechanism is typified by the transcriptional activation of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene by the transcription factor CONSTANS (CO) under inductive long-day conditions in Arabidopsis. FT protein then moves from the leaves to the shoot apex, where floral meristem development can be initiated. As a point of integration from a variety of environmental factors in the context of a larger system of regulatory pathways that affect flowering, the importance of photoreceptors and the circadian clock in CO regulation throughout the day has been a key feature of the photoperiodic flowering pathway. In addition to these established mechanisms, the recent discovery of a photosynthate derivative trehalose-6-phosphate as an activator of FT in leaves has interesting implications for the involvement of photosynthesis in the photoperiodic flowering response that were suggested from previous physiological experiments in flowering induction. PMID:25684830

  20. MTHFD1 controls DNA methylation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Groth, Martin; Moissiard, Guillaume; Wirtz, Markus; Wang, Haifeng; Garcia-Salinas, Carolina; Ramos-Parra, Perla A.; Bischof, Sylvain; Feng, Suhua; Cokus, Shawn J.; John, Amala; Smith, Danielle C.; Zhai, Jixian; Hale, Christopher J.; Long, Jeff A.; Hell, Ruediger; Díaz de la Garza, Rocío I.; Jacobsen, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that has important functions in transcriptional silencing and is associated with repressive histone methylation (H3K9me). To further investigate silencing mechanisms, we screened a mutagenized Arabidopsis thaliana population for expression of SDCpro-GFP, redundantly controlled by DNA methyltransferases DRM2 and CMT3. Here, we identify the hypomorphic mutant mthfd1-1, carrying a mutation (R175Q) in the cytoplasmic bifunctional methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase/methenyltetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase (MTHFD1). Decreased levels of oxidized tetrahydrofolates in mthfd1-1 and lethality of loss-of-function demonstrate the essential enzymatic role of MTHFD1 in Arabidopsis. Accumulation of homocysteine and S-adenosylhomocysteine, genome-wide DNA hypomethylation, loss of H3K9me and transposon derepression indicate that S-adenosylmethionine-dependent transmethylation is inhibited in mthfd1-1. Comparative analysis of DNA methylation revealed that the CMT3 and CMT2 pathways involving positive feedback with H3K9me are mostly affected. Our work highlights the sensitivity of epigenetic networks to one-carbon metabolism due to their common S-adenosylmethionine-dependent transmethylation and has implications for human MTHFD1-associated diseases. PMID:27291711

  1. Local evolution of seed flotation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Saez-Aguayo, Susana; Rondeau-Mouro, Corinne; Macquet, Audrey; Kronholm, Ilkka; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Berger, Adeline; Sallé, Christine; Poulain, Damien; Granier, Fabienne; Botran, Lucy; Loudet, Olivier; de Meaux, Juliette; Marion-Poll, Annie; North, Helen M

    2014-03-01

    Arabidopsis seeds rapidly release hydrophilic polysaccharides from the seed coat on imbibition. These form a heavy mucilage layer around the seed that makes it sink in water. Fourteen natural Arabidopsis variants from central Asia and Scandinavia were identified with seeds that have modified mucilage release and float. Four of these have a novel mucilage phenotype with almost none of the released mucilage adhering to the seed and the absence of cellulose microfibrils. Mucilage release was modified in the variants by ten independent causal mutations in four different loci. Seven distinct mutations affected one locus, coding the MUM2 β-D-galactosidase, and represent a striking example of allelic heterogeneity. The modification of mucilage release has thus evolved a number of times independently in two restricted geographical zones. All the natural mutants identified still accumulated mucilage polysaccharides in seed coat epidermal cells. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry their production and retention was shown to reduce water mobility into internal seed tissues during imbibition, which would help to maintain seed buoyancy. Surprisingly, despite released mucilage being an excellent hydrogel it did not increase the rate of water uptake by internal seed tissues and is more likely to play a role in retaining water around the seed. PMID:24625826

  2. Local Evolution of Seed Flotation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Saez-Aguayo, Susana; Rondeau-Mouro, Corinne; Macquet, Audrey; Kronholm, Ilkka; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Berger, Adeline; Sallé, Christine; Poulain, Damien; Granier, Fabienne; Botran, Lucy; Loudet, Olivier; de Meaux, Juliette; Marion-Poll, Annie; North, Helen M.

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis seeds rapidly release hydrophilic polysaccharides from the seed coat on imbibition. These form a heavy mucilage layer around the seed that makes it sink in water. Fourteen natural Arabidopsis variants from central Asia and Scandinavia were identified with seeds that have modified mucilage release and float. Four of these have a novel mucilage phenotype with almost none of the released mucilage adhering to the seed and the absence of cellulose microfibrils. Mucilage release was modified in the variants by ten independent causal mutations in four different loci. Seven distinct mutations affected one locus, coding the MUM2 β-D-galactosidase, and represent a striking example of allelic heterogeneity. The modification of mucilage release has thus evolved a number of times independently in two restricted geographical zones. All the natural mutants identified still accumulated mucilage polysaccharides in seed coat epidermal cells. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry their production and retention was shown to reduce water mobility into internal seed tissues during imbibition, which would help to maintain seed buoyancy. Surprisingly, despite released mucilage being an excellent hydrogel it did not increase the rate of water uptake by internal seed tissues and is more likely to play a role in retaining water around the seed. PMID:24625826

  3. Epigenetic Natural Variation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongmei; Carrasquillo, Robert; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Dedhia, Neilay; McCombie, W. Richard; Agier, Nicolas; Bulski, Agnès; Colot, Vincent; Doerge, R.W; Martienssen, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Cytosine methylation of repetitive sequences is widespread in plant genomes, occurring in both symmetric (CpG and CpNpG) as well as asymmetric sequence contexts. We used the methylation-dependent restriction enzyme McrBC to profile methylated DNA using tiling microarrays of Arabidopsis Chromosome 4 in two distinct ecotypes, Columbia and Landsberg erecta. We also used comparative genome hybridization to profile copy number polymorphisms. Repeated sequences and transposable elements (TEs), especially long terminal repeat retrotransposons, are densely methylated, but one third of genes also have low but detectable methylation in their transcribed regions. While TEs are almost always methylated, genic methylation is highly polymorphic, with half of all methylated genes being methylated in only one of the two ecotypes. A survey of loci in 96 Arabidopsis accessions revealed a similar degree of methylation polymorphism. Within-gene methylation is heritable, but is lost at a high frequency in segregating F2 families. Promoter methylation is rare, and gene expression is not generally affected by differences in DNA methylation. Small interfering RNA are preferentially associated with methylated TEs, but not with methylated genes, indicating that most genic methylation is not guided by small interfering RNA. This may account for the instability of gene methylation, if occasional failure of maintenance methylation cannot be restored by other means. PMID:17579518

  4. Diuretics Prime Plant Immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Noutoshi, Yoshiteru; Ikeda, Mika; Shirasu, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Plant activators are agrochemicals that activate the plant immune system, thereby enhancing disease resistance. Due to their prophylactic and durable effects on a wide spectrum of diseases, plant activators can provide synergistic crop protection when used in combination with traditional pest controls. Although plant activators have achieved great success in wet-rice farming practices in Asia, their use is still limited. To isolate novel plant activators applicable to other crops, we screened a chemical library using a method that can selectively identify immune-priming compounds. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of three diuretics, bumetanide, bendroflumethiazide and clopamide, as immune-priming compounds. These drugs upregulate the immunity-related cell death of Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells induced with an avirulent strain of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in a concentration-dependent manner. The application of these compounds to Arabidopsis plants confers disease resistance to not only the avirulent but also a virulent strain of the pathogen. Unlike salicylic acid, an endogenous phytohormone that governs disease resistance in response to biotrophic pathogens, the three diuretic compounds analyzed here do not induce PR1 or inhibit plant growth, showing potential as lead compounds in a practical application. PMID:23144763

  5. Brassinosteroids promote Arabidopsis pollen germination and growth.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Frank; Schmalzl, Christina; Englhart, Maria; Bircheneder, Martin; Sprunck, Stefanie

    2014-09-01

    Pollen tubes are among the fastest tip-growing plant cells and represent an excellent experimental system for studying the dynamics and spatiotemporal control of polarized cell growth. However, investigating pollen tube tip growth in the model plant Arabidopsis remains difficult because in vitro pollen germination and pollen tube growth rates are highly variable and largely different from those observed in pistils, most likely due to growth-promoting properties of the female reproductive tract. We found that in vitro grown Arabidopsis pollen respond to brassinosteroid (BR) in a dose-dependent manner. Pollen germination and pollen tube growth increased nine- and fivefold, respectively, when media were supplemented with 10 µM epibrassinolide (epiBL), resulting in growth kinetics more similar to growth in vivo. Expression analyses show that the promoter of one of the key enzymes in BR biosynthesis, CYP90A1/CPD, is highly active in the cells of the reproductive tract that form the pathway for pollen tubes from the stigma to the ovules. Pollen tubes grew significantly shorter through the reproductive tract of a cyp90a1 mutant compared to the wild type, or to a BR perception mutant. Our results show that epiBL promotes pollen germination and tube growth in vitro and suggest that the cells of the reproductive tract provide BR compounds to stimulate pollen tube growth.

  6. Dicopper(II) metallacyclophanes with oligo(p-phenylene-ethynylene) spacers: experimental foundations and theoretical predictions on potential molecular magnetic wires.

    PubMed

    Castellano, María; Fortea-Pérez, Francisco R; Bentama, Abdeslem; Stiriba, Salah-Eddine; Julve, Miguel; Lloret, Francesc; De Munno, Giovanni; Armentano, Donatella; Li, Yangling; Ruiz-García, Rafael; Cano, Joan

    2013-07-01

    absorption spectra of 1 and 2 [λ1 = 308 (1) and 316 nm (2)]. In the series of orthogonal model complexes 1-5 with linear oligo(p-phenylene-ethynylene) (OPE) spacers, -C6H4(C≡CC6H4)n- (n = 1-5), a linear increase of the IL π-π* transition energy with the reciprocal of the intermetallic distance is theoretically predicted [νmax = 1.99 × 10(4) + 2.15 × 10(5) (1/r) (S = 0) or ν = 2.01 × 10(4) + 2.18 × 10(5) (1/r) (S = 1)], which clearly indicates that the effective π-conjugation length increases with the number of phenylethyne repeating units. This is accompanied by an exponential decay of the antiferromagnetic coupling with the intermetallic distance [-J = 1.08 × 10(3) exp(-0.31r)], which supports the ability of the extended π-conjugated OPEs to mediate the exchange interaction between the unpaired electrons of the two Cu(II) centers with intermetallic distances in the range of 1.5-4.3 nm. Further developments may be then envisaged for this new family of oxamato-based dicopper(II) oligo-p-phenylethynophanes on the basis of the unique ligand capacity to act as a molecular antiferromagnetic wire.

  7. In vitro inhibition of promyelocytic leukemia/retinoic acid receptor-alpha (PML/RARalpha) expression and leukemogenic activity by DNA/LNA chimeric antisense oligos.

    PubMed

    Caprodossi, Sara; Galluzzi, Luca; Biagetti, Simona; Della Chiara, Giulia; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Magnani, Mauro; Fanelli, Mirco

    2005-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of myeloid leukemia characterized by the chromosomal translocation t(15:17) that leads to the expression of promyelocytic leukemia/retinoic acid receptor-alpha (PML/ RARalpha) oncofusion protein. The block of differentiation at the promyelocytic stage of the blasts and their increased survival induced by PML/RARalpha are the principal biological features of the disease. Therapies based on pharmacological doses of retinoic acid (RA, 10(-6) M) are able to restore APL cell differentiation in most cases, but not to achieve complete hematological remission because retinoic acid resistance occurs in many patients. In order to elaborate alternative therapeutic approaches, we focused our attention on the use of antisense oligonucleotides as gene-specific drug directed to PML/RARalpha mRNA target. We used antisense molecules containing multiple locked nucleic acid (LNA) modifications. The LNAs are nucleotide analogues that are able to form duplexes with complementary DNA or RNA sequences with highly increased thermal stability and are resistant to 3'-exonuclease degradation in vitro. The DNA/LNA chimeric molecules were designed on the fusion sequence of PML and RARalpha genes to specifically target the oncofusion protein. Cell-free and in vitro experiments using U937-PR9-inducible cell line showed that DNA/LNA oligonucleotides were able to interfere with PML/RARalpha expression more efficiently than the corresponding unmodified DNA oligo. Moreover, the treatment of U937-PR9 cells with these chimeric antisense molecules was able to abrogate the block of differentiation induced by PML/RARalpha oncoprotein. These data suggest a possible application of oligonucleotides containing LNA in an antisense therapeutic strategy for APL.

  8. Reducible Poly(Oligo-D-Arginine) as an Efficient Carrier of the Thymidine Kinase Gene in the Intracranial Glioblastoma Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ah; Lee, Hyun-Lin; Choi, Eunji; Kim, Yong-Hee; Lee, Minhyung

    2015-11-01

    Gene therapy has been considered as an alternative treatment for glioblastoma therapy. In this study, a glioblastoma-specific suicide gene, pEpo-NI2-SV-TK, was delivered into the intracranial glioblastoma model using reducible poly(oligo-d-arginines) (rPOA). pEpo-NI2-SV-TK has the erythropoietin (Epo) enhancer and the nestin intron 2 (NI2) for glioblastoma specific gene expression. The in vitro studies showed that the rPOA formed stable complexes with pEpo-NI2-SV-TK. In the MTT and TUNEL assays, rPOA showed lower cytotoxicity than polyethylenimine (25 kDa, PEI25k). In addition, the rPOA/pEpo-NI2-SV-TK complex induced higher glioblastoma cell death under hypoxic condition than normoxic condition, suggesting that pEpo-NI2-SV-TK induced gene expression in the hypoxic tumor tissue. For in vivo therapeutic efficacy evaluation, the rPOA/pEpo-NI2-SV-TK complex was injected into the brains of an intracranial glioblastoma rat model. The rPOA/pEpo-NI2-SV-TK injected group had a significantly reduced tumor size, compared with the control and the PEI25k/pEpo-NI2-SV-TK injected group. The TUNEL assay showed that the rPOA-pEpo-NI2-SV-TK complex had more apoptotic cells than the control and PEI25k/pEpo-NI2-SV-TK injected groups. These results suggest that the rPOA is an efficient carrier for pEpo-NI2-SV-TK and increased the therapeutic efficacy in the intracranial glioblastoma models. Therefore, the rPOA/pEpo-NI2-SV-TK complex may be useful for glioblastoma specific gene therapy.

  9. Reconstruction of pre-rift Pyrenean relief in the Oligo-Quitanian Camargue Basin (Gulf of Lion passive margin, SE France): Implications on thermal history of basins

    SciTech Connect

    Benedicto, A.; Labaume, P.; Seranne, M.

    1995-08-01

    Fault reconstruction techniques commonly assume horizontal pre-rift level datum to calculate fault geometry from hanging-wall geometry or viceversa. Example from Camargue basin shows that neglecting pre-rift relief may lead to important errors in calculating the fault and hanging-wall geometries, and the total extension. These errors have direct implications on reconstruction of the thermal history of basins. The Camargue basin results front NW-SE extension and rifting of the Gulf of Lion passive margin. More than 4000m of Oligo-Aquitanian syn-rift series unconformably overlie a crust previously thickened during Pyrenean orogeny. The half-graben basin is controlled by the SE-dipping listric Nimes basement fault which generated a typical roll-over. As both fault and hanging-wall geometries are constrained, the pre-rift surface topography can be restored, using three reconstruction techniques. Either the constant-bed-length and constant-heave techniques produce a depression in the axis of the basin and a relief (1500m and 12(X)m respectively) atop the roll-over. The simple-shear (a=60{degrees}) technique generates a 1500m topography atop the roll-over, more coherent with regional data. Testing the hypothesis of a pre-rift horizontal datum leads to a roll-over 1400m too deep. Pre-rift surface elevation corresponds to the residual topography herited from the Pyrenean orogeny. Consequently, there has been some 1000m subsidence more than predicted by the syn-rift sedimentary record.

  10. Small Angle Neutron Scattering Study of Conformation of Oligo(ethylene glycol) Grafted Polystyrene in Dilute Solutions: Effect of the Backbone Length

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Gang; Hong, Kunlun; Hua, Fengjun; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Wignall, George D; Mays, Jimmy

    2008-01-01

    The conformation and clusterization of comb like polymers of polystyrene densely grafted with oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) side chains in 1.0 wt% solutions of D2O, toluene-d8 and methanol-d4 was investigated as a function of the degree of polymerization (DP) of the backbone by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Each side chain had four EG repeat units and the DP of the polystyrene backbone was varied from 8 to 85. The global conformation of the polymers in toluene and methanol was shown to assume ellipsoidal, cylindrical or worm-like chain morphologies with increasing DP of the polystyrene backbone. At the same time, in D2O, the polymer conformation was described by the form factor of rigid cylinders. The second viral coefficient was measured for the polymer with a DP of 85 in all three solvents and the solvent quality of toluene, methanol and D2O was identified as good, marginal and poor for this polymer. Due to a poor solvent quality, the PS backbone (DP = 85) is partially collapsed in D2O whereas it is moderately expanded in toluene and methanol. Polymers with the DP of 8 were found to aggregate into clusters in all three solvents, with the characteristic size between 100 and 200 ?and a fractal dimension of 2. With increase of the DP, the clusters diminished in D2O and completely disappeared in toluene and methanol. This observation suggests that the clusterization of these short side-chain polymers is caused by end group and hydrogen bonding interactions between different chains.

  11. Rotational motion of rhodamine 6G tethered to actin through oligo(ethylene glycol) linkers studied by frequency-domain fluorescence anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Wazawa, Tetsuichi; Morimoto, Nobuyuki; Nagai, Takeharu; Suzuki, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of the rotational motion of a fluorescent probe tethered to a protein helps to elucidate the local properties of the solvent and protein near the conjugation site of the probe. In this study, we have developed an instrument for frequency-domain fluorescence (FDF) anisotropy measurements, and studied how the local properties around a protein, actin, can be elucidated from the rotational motion of a dye tethered to actin. Rhodamine 6G (R6G) was attached to Cys-374 using newly-synthesized R6G-maleimide with three different oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) linker lengths. The time-resolved anisotropy decay of R6G tethered to G-actin was revealed to be a combination of the two modes of the wobbling motion of R6G and the tumbling motion of G-actin. The rotational diffusion coefficient (RDC) of R6G wobbling was ~0.1 ns(-1) at 20°C and increased with OEG linker length. The use of the three R6G-actin conjugates of different linker lengths was useful to not only figure out the linker length dependence of the rotational motion of R6G but also validate the analyses. In the presence of a cosolvent of glycerol, although the tumbling motion of G-actin was retarded in response to the bulk viscosity, the wobbling motion of R6G tethered to actin exhibited an increase of RDC as glycerol concentration increased. This finding suggests an intricate relationship between the fluid properties of the bulk solvent and the local environment around actin.

  12. Estimating In Situ Zooplankton Non-Predation Mortality in an Oligo-Mesotrophic Lake from Sediment Trap Data: Caveats and Reality Check

    PubMed Central

    Dubovskaya, Olga P.; Tang, Kam W.; Gladyshev, Michail I.; Kirillin, Georgiy; Buseva, Zhanna; Kasprzak, Peter; Tolomeev, Aleksandr P.; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Mortality is a main driver in zooplankton population biology but it is poorly constrained in models that describe zooplankton population dynamics, food web interactions and nutrient dynamics. Mortality due to non-predation factors is often ignored even though anecdotal evidence of non-predation mass mortality of zooplankton has been reported repeatedly. One way to estimate non-predation mortality rate is to measure the removal rate of carcasses, for which sinking is the primary removal mechanism especially in quiescent shallow water bodies. Objectives and Results We used sediment traps to quantify in situ carcass sinking velocity and non-predation mortality rate on eight consecutive days in 2013 for the cladoceran Bosmina longirostris in the oligo-mesotrophic Lake Stechlin; the outcomes were compared against estimates derived from in vitro carcass sinking velocity measurements and an empirical model correcting in vitro sinking velocity for turbulence resuspension and microbial decomposition of carcasses. Our results show that the latter two approaches produced unrealistically high mortality rates of 0.58-1.04 d-1, whereas the sediment trap approach, when used properly, yielded a mortality rate estimate of 0.015 d-1, which is more consistent with concurrent population abundance data and comparable to physiological death rate from the literature. Ecological implications Zooplankton carcasses may be exposed to water column microbes for days before entering the benthos; therefore, non-predation mortality affects not only zooplankton population dynamics but also microbial and benthic food webs. This would be particularly important for carbon and nitrogen cycles in systems where recurring mid-summer decline of zooplankton population due to non-predation mortality is observed. PMID:26146995

  13. Rotational motion of rhodamine 6G tethered to actin through oligo(ethylene glycol) linkers studied by frequency-domain fluorescence anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Wazawa, Tetsuichi; Morimoto, Nobuyuki; Nagai, Takeharu; Suzuki, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of the rotational motion of a fluorescent probe tethered to a protein helps to elucidate the local properties of the solvent and protein near the conjugation site of the probe. In this study, we have developed an instrument for frequency-domain fluorescence (FDF) anisotropy measurements, and studied how the local properties around a protein, actin, can be elucidated from the rotational motion of a dye tethered to actin. Rhodamine 6G (R6G) was attached to Cys-374 using newly-synthesized R6G-maleimide with three different oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) linker lengths. The time-resolved anisotropy decay of R6G tethered to G-actin was revealed to be a combination of the two modes of the wobbling motion of R6G and the tumbling motion of G-actin. The rotational diffusion coefficient (RDC) of R6G wobbling was ~0.1 ns−1 at 20°C and increased with OEG linker length. The use of the three R6G-actin conjugates of different linker lengths was useful to not only figure out the linker length dependence of the rotational motion of R6G but also validate the analyses. In the presence of a cosolvent of glycerol, although the tumbling motion of G-actin was retarded in response to the bulk viscosity, the wobbling motion of R6G tethered to actin exhibited an increase of RDC as glycerol concentration increased. This finding suggests an intricate relationship between the fluid properties of the bulk solvent and the local environment around actin. PMID:27493858

  14. Light responses in Photoperiodism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony R. Cashmore

    2006-08-01

    ADO1: An Arabidopsis blue light photoreceptor We have reported the characterization of an Arabidopsis gene encoding the ADAGIO 1 (ADO1) protein (Jarillo et al., 2001a). ADO1 contains a LOV domain, similar to WHITE COLLAR 1 (WC1), a photoreceptor for entrainment of Neurospora circadian rhythms (Froehlich et al., 2002), as well as PHOT1 and PHOT2, the blue light photoreceptors for phototropism (Briggs et al., 2001; Christie et al., 1998; Jarillo et al., 2001b; Kinoshita et al., 2001). Loss of function ado1 mutants show an unusually long periodicity for their free running circadian rhythm (Jarillo et al., 2001a). This observation holds for plants grown under white light as well as blue light and surprisingly, plants grown under red light also show altered circadian properties. The similarity of the LOV domain of ADO1 to those of PHOT1, PHOT2 and WC1 (known flavoprotein photoreceptors) as well as the genetic and molecular properties of ADO1, indicate that ADO1 is likely a new class of blue light photoreceptor. Indeed, the LOV domain of the related FKF1/ADO3 has been shown to bind FMN, and exhibit the in vitro photochemistry characteristic of PHOT1 (Imaizumi et al., 2003). Furthermore, ZTL/ADO1 has been shown to participate in the circadian and proteasome mediated degradation of the Arabidopsis clock protein, TOC1 (Mas et al., 2003). We also showed that the ado1 mutation selectively confers hypersensitivity to red light — when grown under red light (but not blue light) the ado1 mutant possesses an unusually short hypocotyl. This red light hypersensivity is even more severe in a triple ado1 ado2 ado3 mutant — ADO2 and ADO3 being the two other members of this ADAGIO gene family. This finding of a mutant phenotype under red light is somewhat unexpected for a protein thought to function as a photoreceptor for blue light. We have pursued our studies of ADO1 by preparing a mutant gene for which we have altered the codon for the cysteine residue conserved in all LOV

  15. Protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana after chronic clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piastuch, William C.; Brown, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    Soluble protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heynh.) leaf and stem tissue was examined after chronic clinorotation. Seeds of Arabidopsis were germinated and plants grown to maturity on horizontal or vertical slow-rotating clinostats (1 rpm) or in stationary vertical control units. Total soluble proteins and in vivo-labeled soluble proteins isolated from these plants were analyzed by two-dimensional sodium doedocyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE) and subsequent fluorography. Visual and computer analysis of the resulting protein patterns showed no significant differences in either total protein expression or in active protein synthesis between horizontal clinorotation and vertical controls in the Arabidopsis leaf and stem tissue. These results show chronic clinorotation does not cause gross changes in protein expression in Arabidopsis.

  16. VIZARD: analysis of Affymetrix Arabidopsis GeneChip data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseyko, Nick; Feldman, Lewis J.

    2002-01-01

    SUMMARY: The Affymetrix GeneChip Arabidopsis genome array has proved to be a very powerful tool for the analysis of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, the most commonly studied plant model organism. VIZARD is a Java program created at the University of California, Berkeley, to facilitate analysis of Arabidopsis GeneChip data. It includes several integrated tools for filtering, sorting, clustering and visualization of gene expression data as well as tools for the discovery of regulatory motifs in upstream sequences. VIZARD also includes annotation and upstream sequence databases for the majority of genes represented on the Affymetrix Arabidopsis GeneChip array. AVAILABILITY: VIZARD is available free of charge for educational, research, and not-for-profit purposes, and can be downloaded at http://www.anm.f2s.com/research/vizard/ CONTACT: moseyko@uclink4.berkeley.edu.

  17. 3D Gel Map of Arabidopsis Complex I

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Katrin; Belt, Katharina; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Complex I has a unique structure in plants and includes extra subunits. Here, we present a novel study to define its protein constituents. Mitochondria were isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures, leaves, and roots. Subunits of complex I were resolved by 3D blue-native (BN)/SDS/SDS-PAGE and identified by mass spectrometry. Overall, 55 distinct proteins were found, seven of which occur in pairs of isoforms. We present evidence that Arabidopsis complex I consists of 49 distinct types of subunits, 40 of which represent homologs of bovine complex I. The nine other subunits represent special proteins absent in the animal linage of eukaryotes, most prominently a group of subunits related to bacterial gamma-type carbonic anhydrases. A GelMap http://www.gelmap.de/arabidopsis-3d-complex-i/ is presented for promoting future complex I research in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:23761796

  18. Growing weed, producing knowledge: an epistemic history of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Leonelli, Sabina

    2007-01-01

    Arabidopsis is currently the most popular and well-researched model organism in plant biology. This paper documents this plant's rise to scientific fame by focusing on two interrelated aspects of Arabidopsis research. One is the extent to which the material features of the plant have constrained research directions and enabled scientific achievements. The other is the crucial role played by the international community of Arabidopsis researchers in making it possible to grow, distribute and use plant specimen that embody these material features. I argue that at least part of the explosive development of this research community is due to its successful standardisation and to the subsequent use of Arabidopsis specimen as material models of plants. I conclude that model organisms have a double identity as both samples of nature and artifacts representing nature. It is the resulting ambivalence in their representational value that makes them attractive research tools for biologists.

  19. Protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana after chronic clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piastuch, W. C.; Brown, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Soluble protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heynh.) leaf and stem tissue was examined after chronic clinorotation. Seeds of Arabidopsis were germinated and plants grown to maturity on horizontal or vertical slow-rotating clinostats (1 rpm) or in stationary vertical control units. Total soluble proteins and in vivo-labeled soluble proteins isolated from these plants were analyzed by two-dimensional SDS PAGE and subsequent fluorography. Visual and computer analysis of the resulting protein patterns showed no significant differences in either total protein expression or in active protein synthesis between horizontal clinorotation and vertical controls in the Arabidopsis leaf and stem tissue. These results show chronic clinorotation does not cause gross changes in protein expression in Arabidopsis.

  20. Overexpression of Arabidopsis AnnAt8 Alleviates Abiotic Stress in Transgenic Arabidopsis and Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Deepanker; Ahmed, Israr; Shukla, Pawan; Boyidi, Prasanna; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stress results in massive loss of crop productivity throughout the world. Because of our limited knowledge of the plant defense mechanisms, it is very difficult to exploit the plant genetic resources for manipulation of traits that could benefit multiple stress tolerance in plants. To achieve this, we need a deeper understanding of the plant gene regulatory mechanisms involved in stress responses. Understanding the roles of different members of plant gene families involved in different stress responses, would be a step in this direction. Arabidopsis, which served as a model system for the plant research, is also the most suitable system for the functional characterization of plant gene families. Annexin family in Arabidopsis also is one gene family which has not been fully explored. Eight annexin genes have been reported in the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression studies of different Arabidopsis annexins revealed their differential regulation under various abiotic stress conditions. AnnAt8 (At5g12380), a member of this family has been shown to exhibit ~433 and ~175 fold increase in transcript levels under NaCl and dehydration stress respectively. To characterize Annexin8 (AnnAt8) further, we have generated transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants constitutively expressing AnnAt8, which were evaluated under different abiotic stress conditions. AnnAt8 overexpressing transgenic plants exhibited higher seed germination rates, better plant growth, and higher chlorophyll retention when compared to wild type plants under abiotic stress treatments. Under stress conditions transgenic plants showed comparatively higher levels of proline and lower levels of malondialdehyde compared to the wild-type plants. Real-Time PCR analyses revealed that the expression of several stress-regulated genes was altered in AnnAt8 over-expressing transgenic tobacco plants, and the enhanced tolerance exhibited by the transgenic plants can be correlated with altered expressions of

  1. Using Arabidopsis to study shoot branching in biomass willow.

    PubMed

    Ward, Sally P; Salmon, Jemma; Hanley, Steven J; Karp, Angela; Leyser, Ottoline

    2013-06-01

    The success of the short-rotation coppice system in biomass willow (Salix spp.) relies on the activity of the shoot-producing meristems found on the coppice stool. However, the regulation of the activity of these meristems is poorly understood. In contrast, our knowledge of the mechanisms behind axillary meristem regulation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has grown rapidly in the past few years through the exploitation of integrated physiological, genetic, and molecular assays. Here, we demonstrate that these assays can be directly transferred to study the control of bud activation in biomass willow and to assess similarities with the known hormone regulatory system in Arabidopsis. Bud hormone response was found to be qualitatively remarkably similar in Salix spp. and Arabidopsis. These similarities led us to test whether Arabidopsis hormone mutants could be used to assess allelic variation in the cognate Salix spp. hormone genes. Allelic differences in Salix spp. strigolactone genes were observed using this approach. These results demonstrate that both knowledge and assays from Arabidopsis axillary meristem biology can be successfully applied to Salix spp. and can increase our understanding of a fundamental aspect of short-rotation coppice biomass production, allowing more targeted breeding.

  2. Auxin Signaling in Arabidopsis Leaf Vascular Development1

    PubMed Central

    Mattsson, Jim; Ckurshumova, Wenzislava; Berleth, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    A number of observations have implicated auxin in the formation of vascular tissues in plant organs. These include vascular strand formation in response to local auxin application, the effects of impaired auxin transport on vascular patterns and suggestive phenotypes of Arabidopsis auxin response mutants. In this study, we have used molecular markers to visualize auxin response patterns in developing Arabidopsis leaves as well as Arabidopsis mutants and transgenic plants to trace pathways of auxin signal transduction controlling the expression of early procambial genes. We show that in young Arabidopsis leaf primordia, molecular auxin response patterns presage sites of procambial differentiation. This is the case not only in normal development but also upon experimental manipulation of auxin transport suggesting that local auxin signals are instrumental in patterning Arabidopsis leaf vasculature. We further found that the activity of the Arabidopsis gene MONOPTEROS, which is required for proper vascular differentiation, is also essential in a spectrum of auxin responses, which include the regulation of rapidly auxin-inducible AUX/IAA genes, and discovered the tissue-specific vascular expression profile of the class I homeodomain-leucine zipper gene, AtHB20. Interestingly, MONOPTEROS activity is a limiting factor in the expression of AtHB8 and AtHB20, two genes encoding transcriptional regulators expressed early in procambial development. Our observations connect general auxin signaling with early controls of vascular differentiation and suggest molecular mechanisms for auxin signaling in patterned cell differentiation. PMID:12644682

  3. N-Glycopeptide Profiling in Arabidopsis Inflorescence.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shou-Ling; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Burlingame, Alma L; Chalkley, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    This study presents the first large-scale analysis of plant intact glycopeptides. Using wheat germ agglutinin lectin weak affinity chromatography to enrich modified peptides, followed by electron transfer dissociation (ETD)(1) fragmentation tandem mass spectrometry, glycan compositions on over 1100 glycopeptides from 270 proteins found in Arabidopsis inflorescence tissue were characterized. While some sites were only detected with a single glycan attached, others displayed up to 16 different glycoforms. Among the identified glycopeptides were four modified in nonconsensus glycosylation motifs. While most of the modified proteins are secreted, membrane, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), or Golgi-localized proteins, surprisingly, N-linked sugars were detected on a protein predicted to be cytosolic or nuclear. PMID:27067053

  4. The ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The simple gas ethylene influences a diverse array of plant growth and developmental processes including germination, senescence, cell elongation, and fruit ripening. This review focuses on recent molecular genetic studies, principally in Arabidopsis, in which components of the ethylene response pathway have been identified. The isolation and characterization of two of these genes has revealed that ethylene sensing involves a protein kinase cascade. One of these genes encodes a protein with similarity to the ubiquitous Raf family of Ser/Thr protein kinases. A second gene shows similarity to the prokaryotic two-component histidine kinases and most likely encodes an ethylene receptor. Additional elements involved in ethylene signaling have only been identified genetically. The characterization of these genes and mutants will be discussed.

  5. Metabolic fingerprinting of Arabidopsis thaliana accessions

    PubMed Central

    Sotelo-Silveira, Mariana; Chauvin, Anne-Laure; Marsch-Martínez, Nayelli; Winkler, Robert; de Folter, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In the post-genomic era much effort has been put on the discovery of gene function using functional genomics. Despite the advances achieved by these technologies in the understanding of gene function at the genomic and proteomic level, there is still a big genotype-phenotype gap. Metabolic profiling has been used to analyze organisms that have already been characterized genetically. However, there is a small number of studies comparing the metabolic profile of different tissues of distinct accessions. Here, we report the detection of over 14,000 and 17,000 features in inflorescences and leaves, respectively, in two widely used Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. A predictive Random Forest Model was developed, which was able to reliably classify tissue type and accession of samples based on LC-MS profile. Thereby we demonstrate that the morphological differences among A. thaliana accessions are reflected also as distinct metabolic phenotypes within leaves and inflorescences. PMID:26074932

  6. The ethylene signal transduction pathway in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The gaseous hormone ethylene is an important regulator of plant growth and development. Using a simple response of etiolated seedlings to ethylene as a genetic screen, genes involved in ethylene signal transduction have been identified in Arabidopsis. Analysis of two of these genes that have been cloned reveals that ethylene signalling involves a combination of a protein (ETR1) with similarity to bacterial histidine kinases and a protein (CTR1) with similarity to Raf-1, a protein kinase involved in multiple signalling cascades in eukaryotic cells. Several lines of investigation provide compelling evidence that ETR1 encodes an ethylene receptor. For the first time there is a glimpse of the molecular circuitry underlying the signal transduction pathway for a plant hormone.

  7. ELF3 controls thermoresponsive growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Box, Mathew S; Huang, B Emma; Domijan, Mirela; Jaeger, Katja E; Khattak, Asif Khan; Yoo, Seong Jeon; Sedivy, Emma L; Jones, D Marc; Hearn, Timothy J; Webb, Alex A R; Grant, Alastair; Locke, James C W; Wigge, Philip A

    2015-01-19

    Plant development is highly responsive to ambient temperature, and this trait has been linked to the ability of plants to adapt to climate change. The mechanisms by which natural populations modulate their thermoresponsiveness are not known. To address this, we surveyed Arabidopsis accessions for variation in thermal responsiveness of elongation growth and mapped the corresponding loci. We find that the transcriptional regulator EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3) controls elongation growth in response to temperature. Through a combination of modeling and experiments, we show that high temperature relieves the gating of growth at night, highlighting the importance of temperature-dependent repressors of growth. ELF3 gating of transcriptional targets responds rapidly and reversibly to changes in temperature. We show that the binding of ELF3 to target promoters is temperature dependent, suggesting a mechanism where temperature directly controls ELF3 activity.

  8. Crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana cytokinin dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Bitto, Eduard; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2008-08-13

    Since first discovered in Zea mays, cytokinin dehydrogenase (CKX) genes have been identified in many plants including rice and Arabidopsis thaliana, which possesses CKX homologues (AtCKX1-AtCKX7). So far, the three-dimensional structure of only Z. mays CKX (ZmCKX1) has been determined. The crystal structures of ZmCKX1 have been solved in the native state and in complex with reaction products and a slowly reacting substrate. The structures revealed four glycosylated asparagine residues and a histidine residue covalently linked to FAD. Combined with the structural information, recent biochemical analyses of ZmCKX1 concluded that the final products of the reaction, adenine and a side chain aldehyde, are formed by nonenzymatic hydrolytic cleavage of cytokinin imine products resulting directly from CKX catalysis. Here, we report the crystal structure of AtCKX7 (gene locus At5g21482.1, UniProt code Q9FUJ1).

  9. Metabolic fingerprinting of Arabidopsis thaliana accessions.

    PubMed

    Sotelo-Silveira, Mariana; Chauvin, Anne-Laure; Marsch-Martínez, Nayelli; Winkler, Robert; de Folter, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In the post-genomic era much effort has been put on the discovery of gene function using functional genomics. Despite the advances achieved by these technologies in the understanding of gene function at the genomic and proteomic level, there is still a big genotype-phenotype gap. Metabolic profiling has been used to analyze organisms that have already been characterized genetically. However, there is a small number of studies comparing the metabolic profile of different tissues of distinct accessions. Here, we report the detection of over 14,000 and 17,000 features in inflorescences and leaves, respectively, in two widely used Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. A predictive Random Forest Model was developed, which was able to reliably classify tissue type and accession of samples based on LC-MS profile. Thereby we demonstrate that the morphological differences among A. thaliana accessions are reflected also as distinct metabolic phenotypes within leaves and inflorescences. PMID:26074932

  10. A Space Flight Cultivation Protocol for Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, H. G.

    2008-06-01

    A tube-based method is presented for the cultivation and manipulation of Arabidopsis thaliana during space flight experimentation. Seeds were germinated on rock-wool plugs and subsequently transferred into modified polypropylene conical tubes (cut to 5 cm lengths) at 7 days after planting. Each tube contained four side-situated slits through which capillary mat strips were woven. An additional capillary mat wick extended from below the tube up through the bottom to the mid-interior portion. The incorporation of Fibrous Ion Exchange Resin Substrate provided nutrients. The tubes were transferred to plant compartments containing a horticulture foam matrix that received water inputs. Vigorous seedling development through to seed production was achieved. Dispersed seeds frequently germinated on top of the foam substrate, yielding a 2nd generation of seedlings. The methods used herein could be applied to other plant species to be flown in space.

  11. Powerful Partners: Arabidopsis and Chemical Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Stéphanie; Raikhel, Natasha V.; Hicks, Glenn R.

    2009-01-01

    Chemical genomics (i.e. genomics scale chemical genetics) approaches capitalize on the ability of low molecular mass molecules to modify biological processes. Such molecules are used to modify the activity of a protein or a pathway in a manner that it is tunable and reversible. Bioactive chemicals resulting from forward or reverse chemical screens can be useful in understanding and dissecting complex biological processes due to the essentially limitless variation in structure and activities inherent in chemical space. A major advantage of this approach as a powerful addition to conventional plant genetics is the fact that chemical genomics can address loss-of-function lethality and redundancy. Furthermore, the ability of chemicals to be added at will and to act quickly can permit the study of processes that are highly dynamic such as endomembrane trafficking. An important aspect of utilizing small molecules effectively is to characterize bioactive chemicals in detail including an understanding of structure-activity relationships and the identification of active and inactive analogs. Bioactive chemicals can be useful as reagents to probe biological pathways directly. However, the identification of cognate targets and their pathways is also informative and can be achieved by screens for genetic resistance or hypersensitivity in Arabidopsis thaliana or other organisms from which the results can be translated to plants. In addition, there are approaches utilizing “tagged” chemical libraries that possess reactive moieties permitting the immobilization of active compounds. This opens the possibility for biochemical purification of putative cognate targets. We will review approaches to screen for bioactive chemicals that affect biological processes in Arabidopsis and provide several examples of the power and challenges inherent in this new approach in plant biology. PMID:22303245

  12. Photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. A. M.; Klein, W. H.

    1971-01-01

    Arabidopsis seeds were germinated on sterile mineral agar supplemented with 1% glucose and cultured under continuous light regimes. With 4-hour incandescent plus 20-hour monochromatic illumination in the region from 400 to 485 nanometers there was effective floral induction at an intensity of 100 microwatts per square centimeter. Exclusion of far red wave lengths from the 4-hour incandescent period sharply reduced the effectiveness of subsequent monochromatic blue light in promoting floral induction. Delayed floral induction occurred under continuous incandescent light lacking far red and was attributable to the blue wave lengths. Continuous 485 nanometer (100 microwatts per square centimeter) exposure without any white light treatment during the postgermination growth period was ineffective in floral induction and meristem development. Light at 730 nanometers under the same conditions was partially effective, whereas energy between 500 and 700 nanometers was completely ineffective. When continuous monochromatic light at a 3-fold higher energy level was administered, all photomorphogenic responses were accomplished with 485 nanometer light, including germination and 100% floral induction without any white light treatment at any time during the experiment. Almost equal quantum effectiveness was calculated when equivalent quantum flux densities in the region from 710 to 740 nanometers or at 485 nanometers were used. It is postulated that floral induction in Arabidopsis may be the result of a continuous excitation of a stable form of far red-absorbing phytochrome localized in or on a membrane, and that excitation can be either by direct absorption of energy by far red-absorbing phytochrome or by transfer from an accessory pigment. Images PMID:16657629

  13. Comparative genomics in salt tolerance between Arabidopsis and aRabidopsis-related halophyte salt cress using Arabidopsis microarray.

    PubMed

    Taji, Teruaki; Seki, Motoaki; Satou, Masakazu; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Ishiyama, Kanako; Narusaka, Yoshihiro; Narusaka, Mari; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2004-07-01

    Salt cress (Thellungiella halophila), a halophyte, is a genetic model system with a small plant size, short life cycle, copious seed production, small genome size, and an efficient transformation. Its genes have a high sequence identity (90%-95% at cDNA level) to genes of its close relative, Arabidopsis. These qualities are advantageous not only in genetics but also in genomics, such as gene expression profiling using Arabidopsis cDNA microarrays. Although salt cress plants are salt tolerant and can grow in 500 mm NaCl medium, they do not have salt glands or other morphological alterations either before or after salt adaptation. This suggests that the salt tolerance in salt cress results from mechanisms that are similar to those operating in glycophytes. To elucidate the differences in the regulation of salt tolerance between salt cress and Arabidopsis, we analyzed the gene expression profiles in salt cress by using a full-length Arabidopsis cDNA microarray. In salt cress, only a few genes were induced by 250 mm NaCl stress in contrast to Arabidopsis. Notably a large number of known abiotic- and biotic-stress inducible genes, including Fe-SOD, P5CS, PDF1.2, AtNCED, P-protein, beta-glucosidase, and SOS1, were expressed in salt cress at high levels even in the absence of stress. Under normal growing conditions, salt cress accumulated Pro at much higher levels than did Arabidopsis, and this corresponded to a higher expression of AtP5CS in salt cress, a key enzyme of Pro biosynthesis. Furthermore, salt cress was more tolerant to oxidative stress than Arabidopsis. Stress tolerance of salt cress may be due to constitutive overexpression of many genes that function in stress tolerance and that are stress inducible in Arabidopsis. PMID:15247402

  14. Efficient Cellular Knockdown Mediated by siRNA Nanovectors of Gemini Cationic Lipids Having Delocalizable Headgroups and Oligo-Oxyethylene Spacers.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Negro, María; Kumar, Krishan; Barrán-Berdón, Ana L; Datta, Sougata; Kondaiah, Paturu; Junquera, Elena; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Aicart, Emilio

    2016-08-31

    The use of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to silence specific genes is one of the most promising approaches in gene therapy, but it requires efficient nanovectors for successful cellular delivery. Recently, we reported liposomal gene carriers derived from a gemini cationic lipid (GCL) of the 1,2-bis(hexadecyl dimethyl imidazolium) oligo-oxyethylene series ((C16Im)2(C2H4O)nC2H4 with n = 1, 2, or 3) and 1,2-dioleyol phosphatidylethanolamine as highly efficient cytofectins for pDNA. On the basis of the satisfactory outcomes of the previous study, the present work focuses on the utility of coliposomes of these gemini lipids with the biocompatible neutral lipid mono oleoyl glycerol (MOG) as highly potent vectors for siRNA cellular transport in the presence of serum. The (C16Im)2(C2H4O)nC2H4/MOG-siRNA lipoplexes were characterized through (i) a physicochemical study (zeta potential, cryo-transmission electron microscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering, and fluorescence anisotropy) to establish the relationship between size, structure, fluidity, and the interaction between siRNA and the GCL/MOG gene vectors and (ii) a biological analysis (flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, and cell viability) to report the anti-GFP siRNA transfections in HEK 293T, HeLa, and H1299 cancer cell lines. The in vitro biological analysis confirms the cellular uptake and indicates that a short spacer, a very low molar fraction of GCL in the mixed lipid, and a moderate effective charge ratio of the lipoplex yielded maximum silencing efficacy. At these experimental conditions, the siRNA used in this work is compacted by the GCL/MOG nanovectors by forming two cubic structures (Ia3d and Pm3n) that are correlated with excellent silencing activity. These liposomal nanocarriers possess high silencing activity with a negligible cytotoxicity, which strongly supports their practical use for in vivo knockdown studies. PMID:27508330

  15. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  16. MicroRNA Gene Evolution in Arabidopsis lyrata and Arabidopsis thaliana[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Fahlgren, Noah; Jogdeo, Sanjuro; Kasschau, Kristin D.; Sullivan, Christopher M.; Chapman, Elisabeth J.; Laubinger, Sascha; Smith, Lisa M.; Dasenko, Mark; Givan, Scott A.; Weigel, Detlef; Carrington, James C.

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short regulatory RNAs processed from partially self-complementary foldbacks within longer MIRNA primary transcripts. Several MIRNA families are conserved deeply through land plants, but many are present only in closely related species or are species specific. The finding of numerous evolutionarily young MIRNA, many with low expression and few if any targets, supports a rapid birth-death model for MIRNA evolution. A systematic analysis of MIRNA genes and families in the close relatives, Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata, was conducted using both whole-genome comparisons and high-throughput sequencing of small RNAs. Orthologs of 143 A. thaliana MIRNA genes were identified in A. lyrata, with nine having significant sequence or processing changes that likely alter function. In addition, at least 13% of MIRNA genes in each species are unique, despite their relatively recent speciation (∼10 million years ago). Alignment of MIRNA foldbacks to the Arabidopsis genomes revealed evidence for recent origins of 32 families by inverted or direct duplication of mostly protein-coding gene sequences, but less than half of these yield miRNA that are predicted to target transcripts from the originating gene family. miRNA nucleotide divergence between A. lyrata and A. thaliana orthologs was higher for young MIRNA genes, consistent with reduced purifying selection compared with deeply conserved MIRNA genes. Additionally, target sites of younger miRNA were lost more frequently than for deeply conserved families. In summary, our systematic analyses emphasize the dynamic nature of the MIRNA complement of plant genomes. PMID:20407027

  17. Synthesis and molecular recognition of novel oligo(ethylenediamino) bridged bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s and their copper(II) complexes: enhanced molecular binding ability and selectivity by multiple recognition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; You, C C; Li, B

    2001-03-16

    Four bridged bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s tethered by different lengths of oligo(ethylenediamine)s have been synthesized and their inclusion complexation behavior with selected substrates elucidated by circular dichroism spectroscopy and fluorescence decay. In order to study their binding ability quantitatively, inclusion complexation stability constants with four dye guests, that is, brilliant green (BG), methyl orange (MO), ammonium 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS), and sodium 6-(p-toluidino)-2-naphthalenesulfonate (TNS), have been determined in aqueous solution at 25 degrees C with spectrophotometric, spectropolarimetric, or spectrofluorometric titrations. The results obtained indicate that the two tethered cyclodextrin units might cooperatively bind to a guest, and the molecular binding ability toward model substrates, especially linear guests such as TNS and MO, could be extended. The tether length plays a crucial role in the molecular recognition, the binding constants for ANS and TNS decrease linearly with an increase in the tether length of dimeric cyclodextrin. The Gibbs free energy changes (-deltaGo) for the unit increment per ethylene are 0.99 kJ mol(-1) for ANS and 0.44 kJmol(-1) for TNS, respectively. On the other hand, the presence of a copper(II) ion in metallobis(beta-cyclodextrin)s oligo(ethylenediamino) tethers enhances not only the original binding ability, but also the molecular selectivity through triple or multiple recognition, as compared with the parent bis(beta-cyclodextrin)s.

  18. Signal sequence and keyword trap in silico for selection of full-length human cDNAs encoding secretion or membrane proteins from oligo-capped cDNA libraries.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Tetsuji; Ota, Toshio; Nishikawa, Tetsuo; Hayashi, Koji; Suzuki, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Jun-ichi; Wakamatsu, Ai; Kimura, Kouichi; Sakamoto, Katsuhiko; Hatano, Naoto; Kawai, Yuri; Ishii, Shizuko; Saito, Kaoru; Kojima, Shin-ichi; Sugiyama, Tomoyasu; Ono, Tetsuyoshi; Okano, Kazunori; Yoshikawa, Yoko; Aotsuka, Satoshi; Sasaki, Naokazu; Hattori, Atsushi; Okumura, Koji; Nagai, Keiichi; Sugano, Sumio; Isogai, Takao

    2005-01-01

    We have developed an in silico method of selection of human full-length cDNAs encoding secretion or membrane proteins from oligo-capped cDNA libraries. Fullness rates were increased to about 80% by combination of the oligo-capping method and ATGpr, software for prediction of translation start point and the coding potential. Then, using 5'-end single-pass sequences, cDNAs having the signal sequence were selected by PSORT ('signal sequence trap'). We also applied 'secretion or membrane protein-related keyword trap' based on the result of BLAST search against the SWISS-PROT database for the cDNAs which could not be selected by PSORT. Using the above procedures, 789 cDNAs were primarily selected and subjected to full-length sequencing, and 334 of these cDNAs were finally selected as novel. Most of the cDNAs (295 cDNAs: 88.3%) were predicted to encode secretion or membrane proteins. In particular, 165(80.5%) of the 205 cDNAs selected by PSORT were predicted to have signal sequences, while 70 (54.2%) of the 129 cDNAs selected by 'keyword trap' preserved the secretion or membrane protein-related keywords. Many important cDNAs were obtained, including transporters, receptors, and ligands, involved in significant cellular functions. Thus, an efficient method of selecting secretion or membrane protein-encoding cDNAs was developed by combining the above four procedures.

  19. Prevalence of alternative splicing choices in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Around 14% of protein-coding genes of Arabidopsis thaliana genes from the TAIR9 genome release are annotated as producing multiple transcript variants through alternative splicing. However, for most alternatively spliced genes in Arabidopsis, the relative expression level of individual splicing variants is unknown. Results We investigated prevalence of alternative splicing (AS) events in Arabidopsis thaliana using ESTs. We found that for most AS events with ample EST coverage, the majority of overlapping ESTs strongly supported one major splicing choice, with less than 10% of ESTs supporting the minor form. Analysis of ESTs also revealed a small but noteworthy subset of genes for which alternative choices appeared with about equal prevalence, suggesting that for these genes the variant splicing forms co-occur in the same cell types. Of the AS events in which both forms were about equally prevalent, more than 80% affected untranslated regions or involved small changes to the encoded protein sequence. Conclusions Currently available evidence from ESTs indicates that alternative splicing in Arabidopsis occurs and affects many genes, but for most genes with documented alternative splicing, one AS choice predominates. To aid investigation of the role AS may play in modulating function of Arabidopsis genes, we provide an on-line resource (ArabiTag) that supports searching AS events by gene, by EST library keyword search, and by relative prevalence of minor and major forms. PMID:20525311

  20. Ethylene signaling in rice and Arabidopsis: conserved and diverged aspects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Lu, Xiang; Ma, Biao; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2015-04-01

    Ethylene as a gas phytohormone plays significant roles in the whole life cycle of plants, ranging from growth and development to stress responses. A linear ethylene signaling pathway has been established in the dicotyledonous model plant Arabidopsis. However, the ethylene signaling mechanism in monocotyledonous plants such as rice is largely unclear. In this review, we compare the ethylene response phenotypes of dark-grown seedlings of Arabidopsis, rice, and other monocotyledonous plants (maize, wheat, sorghum, and Brachypodium distachyon) and pinpoint that rice has a distinct phenotype of root inhibition but coleoptile promotion in etiolated seedlings upon ethylene treatment. We further summarize the homologous genes of Arabidopsis ethylene signaling components in these monocotyledonous plants and discuss recent progress. Although conserved in most aspects, ethylene signaling in rice has evolved new features compared with that in Arabidopsis. These analyses provide novel insights into the understanding of ethylene signaling in the dicotyledonous Arabidopsis and monocotyledonous plants, particularly rice. Further characterization of rice ethylene-responsive mutants and their corresponding genes will help us better understand the whole picture of ethylene signaling mechanisms in plants.

  1. Arsenic uptake and speciation in Arabidopsis thaliana under hydroponic conditions.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hee; Han, Young-Soo; Seong, Hye Jin; Ahn, Joo Sung; Nam, In-Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Arsenic (As) uptake and species in Arabidopsis thaliana were evaluated under hydroponic conditions. Plant nutrient solutions were treated with arsenite [As(III)] or arsenate [As(V)], and aqueous As speciation was conducted using a solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge. Arabidopsis reduced As(V) to As(III) in the nutrient solution, possibly due to root exudates such as organic acids or the efflux of As(III) from plant roots after in vivo reduction of As(V) to As(III). Arsenic uptake by Arabidopsis was associated with increased levels of Ca and Fe, and decreased levels of K in plant tissues. Arsenic in Arabidopsis mainly occurred as As(III), which was coordinated with oxygen and sulfur based on XANES and EXAFS results. The existence of As(III)O and As(III)S in EXAFS indicates partial biotransformation of As(III)O to a sulfur-coordinated form because of limited amount of glutathione in plants. Further understanding the mechanism of As biotransformation in Arabidopsis may help to develop measures that can mitigate As toxicity via genetic engineering.

  2. Arsenic uptake and speciation in Arabidopsis thaliana under hydroponic conditions.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hee; Han, Young-Soo; Seong, Hye Jin; Ahn, Joo Sung; Nam, In-Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Arsenic (As) uptake and species in Arabidopsis thaliana were evaluated under hydroponic conditions. Plant nutrient solutions were treated with arsenite [As(III)] or arsenate [As(V)], and aqueous As speciation was conducted using a solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge. Arabidopsis reduced As(V) to As(III) in the nutrient solution, possibly due to root exudates such as organic acids or the efflux of As(III) from plant roots after in vivo reduction of As(V) to As(III). Arsenic uptake by Arabidopsis was associated with increased levels of Ca and Fe, and decreased levels of K in plant tissues. Arsenic in Arabidopsis mainly occurred as As(III), which was coordinated with oxygen and sulfur based on XANES and EXAFS results. The existence of As(III)O and As(III)S in EXAFS indicates partial biotransformation of As(III)O to a sulfur-coordinated form because of limited amount of glutathione in plants. Further understanding the mechanism of As biotransformation in Arabidopsis may help to develop measures that can mitigate As toxicity via genetic engineering. PMID:27058920

  3. 50 years of Arabidopsis research: highlights and future directions.

    PubMed

    Provart, Nicholas J; Alonso, Jose; Assmann, Sarah M; Bergmann, Dominique; Brady, Siobhan M; Brkljacic, Jelena; Browse, John; Chapple, Clint; Colot, Vincent; Cutler, Sean; Dangl, Jeff; Ehrhardt, David; Friesner, Joanna D; Frommer, Wolf B; Grotewold, Erich; Meyerowitz, Elliot; Nemhauser, Jennifer; Nordborg, Magnus; Pikaard, Craig; Shanklin, John; Somerville, Chris; Stitt, Mark; Torii, Keiko U; Waese, Jamie; Wagner, Doris; McCourt, Peter

    2016-02-01

    922 I. 922 II. 922 III. 925 IV. 925 V. 926 VI. 927 VII. 928 VIII. 929 IX. 930 X. 931 XI. 932 XII. 933 XIII. Natural variation and genome-wide association studies 934 XIV. 934 XV. 935 XVI. 936 XVII. 937 937 References 937 SUMMARY: The year 2014 marked the 25(th) International Conference on Arabidopsis Research. In the 50 yr since the first International Conference on Arabidopsis Research, held in 1965 in Göttingen, Germany, > 54 000 papers that mention Arabidopsis thaliana in the title, abstract or keywords have been published. We present herein a citational network analysis of these papers, and touch on some of the important discoveries in plant biology that have been made in this powerful model system, and highlight how these discoveries have then had an impact in crop species. We also look to the future, highlighting some outstanding questions that can be readily addressed in Arabidopsis. Topics that are discussed include Arabidopsis reverse genetic resources, stock centers, databases and online tools, cell biology, development, hormones, plant immunity, signaling in response to abiotic stress, transporters, biosynthesis of cells walls and macromolecules such as starch and lipids, epigenetics and epigenomics, genome-wide association studies and natural variation, gene regulatory networks, modeling and systems biology, and synthetic biology. PMID:26465351

  4. Arabidopsis Hormone Database: a comprehensive genetic and phenotypic information database for plant hormone research in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhi-yu; Zhou, Xin; Li, Linchuan; Yu, Xiangchun; Li, Hongjiang; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Cao, Guangyu; Bai, Mingyi; Wang, Xingchun; Jiang, Caifu; Lu, Haibin; Hou, Xianhui; Qu, Lijia; Wang, Zhiyong; Zuo, Jianru; Fu, Xiangdong; Su, Zhen; Li, Songgang; Guo, Hongwei

    2009-01-01

    Plant hormones are small organic molecules that influence almost every aspect of plant growth and development. Genetic and molecular studies have revealed a large number of genes that are involved in responses to numerous plant hormones, including auxin, gibberellin, cytokinin, abscisic acid, ethylene, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, and brassinosteroid. Here, we develop an Arabidopsis hormone database, which aims to provide a systematic and comprehensive view of genes participating in plant hormonal regulation, as well as morphological phenotypes controlled by plant hormones. Based on data from mutant studies, transgenic analysis and gene ontology (GO) annotation, we have identified a total of 1026 genes in the Arabidopsis genome that participate in plant hormone functions. Meanwhile, a phenotype ontology is developed to precisely describe myriad hormone-regulated morphological processes with standardized vocabularies. A web interface (http://ahd.cbi.pku.edu.cn) would allow users to quickly get access to information about these hormone-related genes, including sequences, functional category, mutant information, phenotypic description, microarray data and linked publications. Several applications of this database in studying plant hormonal regulation and hormone cross-talk will be presented and discussed.

  5. Arabidopsis Hormone Database: a comprehensive genetic and phenotypic information database for plant hormone research in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhi-yu; Zhou, Xin; Li, Linchuan; Yu, Xiangchun; Li, Hongjiang; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Cao, Guangyu; Bai, Mingyi; Wang, Xingchun; Jiang, Caifu; Lu, Haibin; Hou, Xianhui; Qu, Lijia; Wang, Zhiyong; Zuo, Jianru; Fu, Xiangdong; Su, Zhen; Li, Songgang; Guo, Hongwei

    2009-01-01

    Plant hormones are small organic molecules that influence almost every aspect of plant growth and development. Genetic and molecular studies have revealed a large number of genes that are involved in responses to numerous plant hormones, including auxin, gibberellin, cytokinin, abscisic acid, ethylene, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, and brassinosteroid. Here, we develop an Arabidopsis hormone database, which aims to provide a systematic and comprehensive view of genes participating in plant hormonal regulation, as well as morphological phenotypes controlled by plant hormones. Based on data from mutant studies, transgenic analysis and gene ontology (GO) annotation, we have identified a total of 1026 genes in the Arabidopsis genome that participate in plant hormone functions. Meanwhile, a phenotype ontology is developed to precisely describe myriad hormone-regulated morphological processes with standardized vocabularies. A web interface (http://ahd.cbi.pku.edu.cn) would allow users to quickly get access to information about these hormone-related genes, including sequences, functional category, mutant information, phenotypic description, microarray data and linked publications. Several applications of this database in studying plant hormonal regulation and hormone cross-talk will be presented and discussed. PMID:19015126

  6. Inflorescence abnormalities occur with overexpression of Arabidopsis lyrata FT in the fwa mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kawanabe, Takahiro; Fujimoto, Ryo

    2011-10-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is a quantitative long-day plant with the timing of the floral transition being regulated by both endogenous signals and multiple environmental factors. fwa is a late-flowering mutant, and this phenotype is due to ectopic FWA expression caused by hypomethylation at the FWA locus. The floral transition results in the activation of the floral development process, the key regulators being the floral meristem identity genes, AP1 (APETALA1) and LFY (LEAFY). In this study, we describe inflorescence abnormalities in plants overexpressing the Arabidopsis lyrata FT (AlFT) and A. thaliana FWA (AtFWA) genes simultaneously. The inflorescence abnormality phenotype was present in only a proportion of plants. All plants overexpressing both AlFT and AtFWA flowered earlier than fwa, suggesting that the inflorescence abnormality and earlier flowering time are caused independently. The inflorescence abnormality phenotype was similar to that of the double mutant of ap1 and lfy, and AP1 and LFY genes were down-regulated in the abnormal inflorescences. From these results, we suggest that not only does ectopic AtFWA expression inhibit AtFT/AlFT function to delay flowering but that overexpression of AtFWA and AlFT together inhibits AP1 and LFY function to produce abnormal inflorescences.

  7. Arabidopsis cpSRP54 regulates carotenoid accumulation in Arabidopsis and Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Margaret Y.; Hannoufa, Abdelali

    2012-01-01

    An Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, cbd (carotenoid biosynthesis deficient), was recovered from a mutant population based on its yellow cotyledons, yellow-first true leaves, and stunted growth. Seven-day-old seedlings and mature seeds of this mutant had lower chlorophyll and total carotenoids than the wild type (WT). Genetic and molecular characterization revealed that cbd was a recessive mutant caused by a T-DNA insertion in the gene cpSRP54 encoding the 54kDa subunit of the chloroplast signal recognition particle. Transcript levels of most of the main carotenoid biosynthetic genes in cbd were unchanged relative to WT, but expression increased in carotenoid and abscisic acid catabolic genes. The chloroplasts of cbd also had developmental defects that contributed to decreased carotenoid and chlorophyll contents. Transcription of AtGLK1 (Golden 2-like 1), AtGLK2, and GUN4 appeared to be disrupted in the cbd mutant suggesting that the plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signal may be affected, regulating the changes in chloroplast functional and developmental states and carotenoid content flux. Transformation of A. thaliana and Brassica napus with a gDNA encoding the Arabidopsis cpSRP54 showed the utility of this gene in enhancing levels of seed carotenoids without affecting growth or seed yield. PMID:22791829

  8. Gamete formation without meiosis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Maruthachalam; Marimuthu, Mohan P A; Siddiqi, Imran

    2008-02-28

    Apomixis, the formation of asexual seeds in plants, leads to populations that are genetically uniform maternal clones. The transfer of apomixis to crop plants holds great promise in plant breeding for fixation of heterozygosity and hybrid vigour because it would allow the propagation of hybrids over successive generations. Apomixis involves the production of unreduced (diploid) female gametes that retain the genotype of the parent plant (apomeiosis), followed by parthenogenetic development of the egg cell into an embryo and the formation of functional endosperm. The molecular mechanisms underlying apomixis are unknown. Here we show that mutation of the Arabidopsis gene DYAD/SWITCH1 (SWI1), a regulator of meiotic chromosome organization, leads to apomeiosis. We found that most fertile ovules in dyad plants form seeds that are triploid and that arise from the fertilization of an unreduced female gamete by a haploid male gamete. The unreduced female gametes fully retain parental heterozygosity across the genome, which is characteristic of apomeiosis. Our results show that the alteration of a single gene in a sexual plant can bring about functional apomeiosis, a major component of apomixis.

  9. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pigliucci, Massimo

    2002-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is now widely used as a model system in molecular and developmental biology, as well as in physiology and cell biology. However, ecologists and evolutionary biologists have turned their attention to the mouse ear cress only much more recently and almost reluctantly. The reason for this is the perception that A. thaliana is not particularly interesting ecologically and that it represents an oddity from an evolutionary standpoint. While there is some truth in both these attitudes, similar criticisms apply to other model systems such as the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, which has been extensively studied from an organismal perspective. Furthermore, the shortcomings of A. thaliana in terms of its restricted ecological niche are counterbalanced by the wealth of information on the molecular and developmental biology of this species, which makes possible to address evolutionary questions that can rarely be pursued in other species. This chapter reviews the history of the use of A. thaliana in organismal biology and discusses some of the recent work and future perspectives of research on a variety of field including life history evolution, phenotypic plasticity, natural selection and quantitative genetics. I suggest that the future of both molecular and especially organismal biology lies into expanding our knowledge from limited and idiosyncratic model systems to their phylogenetic neighborhood, which is bound to be more varied and biologically interesting. PMID:22303188

  10. Arabidopsis mutants with increased sensitivity to aluminum.

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, P B; Tai, C Y; Kochian, L V; Howell, S H

    1996-01-01

    Al-sensitive (als) mutants of Arabidopsis were isolated and characterized with the aim of defining mechanisms of Al toxicity and resistance. Most als mutants selected on the basis of root growth sensitivity to Al were recessive, and together the mutants constituted eight complementation groups. Also, in most als mutants, Al sensitivity appeared to be specific for Al relative to La (another trivalent cation), except als2, which was more sensitive to La than wild type. The tendency of roots on mutant seedlings to accumulate Al was examined by staining with morin and hematoxylin, dyes used to indicate the presence of Al. A significant increase in morin staining was observed in als5, consistent with its increased sensitivity to Al. Unexpectedly, als7 and als4 showed less morin staining, suggesting that the roots on these mutants accumulate less Al than wild type seedlings after exposure to Al-containing solutions. Roots of wild-type seedlings produce callose in response to AlCl3 concentrations that inhibit root growth. Only als5 accumulated more callose than wild type in response to low levels (25 mu M) of AICI3 However, als4 and als7 did not accumulate callose at this AlCl3 concentration even though root growth was significantly inhibited. The lack of callose accumulation in als4 and als7 suggests that there is not an obligatory relationship between callose deposition and Al-induced inhibition of root growth. PMID:8819866

  11. G2 Checkpoint Responses in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Britt, Anne

    2013-03-18

    This project focused on the mechanism and biological significance of the G2 arrest response to replication stress in plants. We employed both forward and reverse genetic approaches to identify genes required for this response. A total of 3 different postdocs, 5 undergraduates, and 2 graduate students participated in the project. We identified several genes required for damage response in plants, including homologs of genes previously identified in animals (ATM and ATR), novel, a plant-specific genes (SOG1) and a gene known in animals but previously thought to be missing from the Arabidopsis genome (ATRIP). We characterized the transcriptome of gamma-irradiated plants, and found that plants, unlike animals, express a robust transcriptional response to damage, involving genes that regulate the cell cycle and DNA metabolism. This response requires both ATM and the transcription factor SOG1. We found that both ATM and ATR play a role in meiosis in plants. We also found that plants have a cell-type-specific programmed cell death response to ionizing radiation and UV light, and that this response requires ATR, ATM, and SOG1. These results were published in a series of 5 papers.

  12. Chromatin associations in Arabidopsis interphase nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Veit; Rudnik, Radoslaw; Schubert, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    The arrangement of chromatin within interphase nuclei seems to be caused by topological constraints and related to gene expression depending on tissue and developmental stage. In yeast and animals it was found that homologous and heterologous chromatin association are required to realize faithful expression and DNA repair. To test whether such associations are present in plants we analyzed Arabidopsis thaliana interphase nuclei by FISH using probes from different chromosomes. We found that chromatin fiber movement and variable associations, although in general relatively seldom, may occur between euchromatin segments along chromosomes, sometimes even over large distances. The combination of euchromatin segments bearing high or low co-expressing genes did not reveal different association frequencies probably due to adjacent genes of deviating expression patterns. Based on previous data and on FISH analyses presented here, we conclude that the global interphase chromatin organization in A. thaliana is relatively stable, due to the location of its 10 centromeres at the nuclear periphery and of the telomeres mainly at the centrally localized nucleolus. Nevertheless, chromatin movement enables a flexible spatial genome arrangement in plant nuclei. PMID:25431580

  13. Spiralizations and tropisms in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Migliaccio, F; Piconese, S

    2001-12-01

    When Arabidopsis seedlings are grown on a hard-agar plate, their primary roots show characteristic spiralling movements, apparent as waves, coils and torsions, together with a slanting toward the right-hand side. All these movements are believed to be the result of three different processes acting on the roots: circumnutation, positive gravitropism and negative thigmotropism. The basic movement of the roots is described as that of a growing right-handed helix, which, because of the root tip hitting the agar plate, is continuously switched from the right-hand to the left-hand of the growth direction, and vice versa. This movement also produces a slanting root-growth direction toward the right-hand because of the incomplete waves made by the right-handed root to the left-hand. By contrast, the torsions seen in the coils and waves are interpreted as artefacts that form as an adaptation of the three-dimensional root helix to the flat two-dimensional agar surface.

  14. Interactions between axillary branches of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ongaro, Veronica; Bainbridge, Katherine; Williamson, Lisa; Leyser, Ottoline

    2008-03-01

    Studies of apical dominance have benefited greatly from two-branch assays in pea and bean, in which the shoot system is trimmed back to leave only two active cotyledonary axillary branches. In these two-branch shoots, a large body of evidence shows that one actively growing branch is able to inhibit the growth of the other, prompting studies on the nature of the inhibitory signals, which are still poorly understood. Here, we describe the establishment of two-branch assays in Arabidopsis, using consecutive branches on the bolting stem. As with the classical studies in pea and bean, these consecutive branches are able to inhibit one another's growth. Not only can the upper branch inhibit the lower branch, but also the lower branch can inhibit the upper branch, illustrating the bi-directional action of the inhibitory signals. Using mutants, we show that the inhibition is partially dependent on the MAX pathway and that while the inhibition is clearly transmitted across the stem from the active to the inhibited branch, the vascular connectivity of the two branches is weak, and the MAX pathway is capable of acting unilaterally in the stem. PMID:19825548

  15. Functional Analysis of Arabidopsis Sucrose Transporters

    SciTech Connect

    John M. Ward

    2009-03-31

    Sucrose is the main photosynthetic product that is transported in the vasculature of plants. The long-distance transport of carbohydrates is required to support the growth and development of net-importing (sink) tissues such as fruit, seeds and roots. This project is focused on understanding the transport mechanism sucrose transporters (SUTs). These are proton-coupled sucrose uptake transporters (membrane proteins) that are required for transport of sucrose in the vasculature and uptake into sink tissues. The accomplishments of this project included: 1) the first analysis of substrate specificity for any SUT. This was accomplished using electrophysiology to analyze AtSUC2, a sucrose transporter from companion cells in Arabidopsis. 2) the first analysis of the transport activity for a monocot SUT. The transport kinetics and substrate specificity of HvSUT1 from barley were studied. 3) the first analysis of a sucrose transporter from sugarcane. and 4) the first analysis of transport activity of a sugar alcohol transporter homolog from plants, AtPLT5. During this period four primary research papers, funded directly by the project, were published in refereed journals. The characterization of several sucrose transporters was essential for the current effort in the analysis of structure/function for this gene family. In particular, the demonstration of strong differences in substrate specificity between type I and II SUTs was important to identify targets for site-directed mutagenesis.

  16. Momilactone sensitive proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Kitajima, Shinya

    2015-05-01

    The labdane-related diterpenoid, momilactone B has potent growth inhibitory activity and was demonstrated to play a particularly critical role in the allelopathy of rice (Oryza sativa L.). However, there is limited information available about the mode of action of momilactone B on the growth inhibition. The present research describes the effects of momilactone B on protein expression in the early development of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling, which was determined by two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOFMS. Momilactone B inhibited the accumulation of subtilisin-like serine protease, amyrin synthase LUP2, β-glucosidase and malate synthase at 1 h after the momilactone application. Those proteins are involved in the metabolic turnover and the production of intermediates needed for cell structures resulting in plant growth and development. Momilactone B also inhibited the breakdown of cruciferin 2, which is essential for seed germination and seedling growth to construct cell structures. Momilactone B induced the accumulation of translationally controlled tumor protein, glutathione S-transferase and 1-cysteine peroxiredoxin 1. These proteins are involved in stress responses and increased stress tolerance. In addition, glutathione S-transferase has the activity of herbicide detoxification and 1-cysteine peroxiredoxin 1 has inhibitory activity for seed germination under unfavorable conditions. The present research suggests that momilactone B may inhibit the seedling growth by the inhibition of the metabolic turnover and the production of intermediates for cell structures. In addition, momilactone induced proteins associated with plant defense responses. PMID:26058145

  17. Metabolic profiling of Arabidopsis thaliana epidermal cells

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Berit; Zöller, Daniela; Erban, Alexander; Fehrle, Ines; Hartmann, Jürgen; Niehl, Annette; Kopka, Joachim; Fisahn, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic phenotyping at cellular resolution may be considered one of the challenges in current plant physiology. A method is described which enables the cell type-specific metabolic analysis of epidermal cell types in Arabidopsis thaliana pavement, basal, and trichome cells. To achieve the required high spatial resolution, single cell sampling using microcapillaries was combined with routine gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS) based metabolite profiling. The identification and relative quantification of 117 mostly primary metabolites has been demonstrated. The majority, namely 90 compounds, were accessible without analytical background correction. Analyses were performed using cell type-specific pools of 200 microsampled individual cells. Moreover, among these identified metabolites, 38 exhibited differential pool sizes in trichomes, basal or pavement cells. The application of an independent component analysis confirmed the cell type-specific metabolic phenotypes. Significant pool size changes between individual cells were detectable within several classes of metabolites, namely amino acids, fatty acids and alcohols, alkanes, lipids, N-compounds, organic acids and polyhydroxy acids, polyols, sugars, sugar conjugates and phenylpropanoids. It is demonstrated here that the combination of microsampling and GC-MS based metabolite profiling provides a method to investigate the cellular metabolism of fully differentiated plant cell types in vivo. PMID:20150518

  18. Polarized cytokinesis in vacuolate cells of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Sean R.; Ehrhardt, David W.

    2002-01-01

    The view of plant-cell cytokinesis commonly depicted in textbooks is of a symmetrical process, with the phragmoplast initiating in the center of the cell and growing outward to the parental cell membrane. In contrast to this picture, we observe that cell-plate development in Arabidopsis shoot cells is highly polarized along the plane of division. Three-dimensional live-cell imaging reveals that the mitotic spindle and phragmoplast are laterally displaced, and that the growing cell plate anchors on one side of the cell at an early stage of cytokinesis. Growth of phragmoplast across the cell creates a new partition in its wake, giving the visual effect of a curtain being pulled across the cell. Throughout this process, the advancing front of the phragmoplast is in intimate contact with the parental wall, suggesting that short-range interactions between the phragmoplast and plasma membrane may play important roles in guiding the cell plate throughout much of its development. Polarized cytokinesis was observed in a wide variety of vacuolate shoot cells and in some small root cells, implying that it is not solely a function of cell size. This mode of cytokinesis may provide a mechanically robust mechanism for cell-plate formation in large cells and suggests a simple explanation for the occurrence of cell wall stubs observed upon drug treatment or in cytokinetic mutants. PMID:11880633

  19. A Superfamily of Arabidopsis Thaliana Retrotransposons

    PubMed Central

    Konieczny, A.; Voytas, D. F.; Cummings, M. P.; Ausubel, F. M.

    1991-01-01

    We describe a superfamily of Arabidopsis thaliana retrotransposable elements that consists of at least ten related families designated Ta1-Ta10. The Ta1 family has been described previously. Two genomic clones representing the Ta2 and Ta3 elements were isolated from an A. thaliana (race Landsberg erecta) λ library using sequences derived from the reverse transcriptase region of Ta1 as hybridization probes. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the Ta1, Ta2 and Ta3 families share >75% amino acid identity in pairwise comparisons of their reverse transcriptase and RNase H genes. In addition to Ta1, Ta2 and Ta3, we identified seven other related retrotransposon families in Landsberg erecta, Ta4-Ta10, using degenerate primers and the polymerase chain reaction to amplify a highly conserved region of retrotransposon-encoded reverse transcriptase. One to two copies of elements Ta2-Ta10 are present in the genomes of the A. thaliana races Landsberg erecta and Columbia indicating that the superfamily comprises at least 0.1% of the A. thaliana genome. The nucleotide sequences of the reverse transcriptase regions of the ten element families place them in the category of copia-like retrotransposons and phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequences suggests that horizontal transfer may have played a role in their evolution. PMID:1709409

  20. Microgravity effects on Arabidopsis thaliana energy pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrota, C.; Piso, M. I.; Banciu, H.; Keul, A.

    The flexibility of plant bioenergetics helps plants to acclimate to environmental stresses Our work is focused on standard free energy changes for PPi and ATP hydrolysis in order to assess the relative importance of PPi versus ATP as an energy donor in the plant cytosol of Arabidopsis plants exposed to microgravity The results indicated that PPi would be particularly favored as a phosphoryl donor relative to ATP under cytosolic conditions known to accompany stresses Recent researches showed that besides its functions inside the cell ATP may be released to the extracellular milieu where it functions as the primary signaling molecule of a diverse range of physiological processes It seems that extracellular ATP is essential for maintaining plant cell viability We intend to study how the production and the release of ATP is influenced by the microgravity References begin enumerate item Chivasaa S Bongani K Ndimbab W Simonc J Lindseyc K and Slabasc A 2005 Extracellular ATP Functions as an Endogenous External Metabolite Regulating Plant Cell Viability The Plant Cell 17 3019-3034 item Palma D A Blumwald E and Plaxton W C 2000 Upregulation of vacuolar H -translocating pyrophosphatase by phosphate starvation of Brassica napus rapeseed suspension cell cultures FEBS Letters 486 155-158 item Plaxton W C 2004 Plant response to stress Biochemical adaptations to phosphate deficiency In R Goodman ed Encyclopedia of Plant and Crop Science Marcel Dekker Inc N Y end enumerate

  1. Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with altered phototropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, J. P.; Poff, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty five strains of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. have been identified with altered phototropic responses to 450-nm light. Four of these mutants have been more thoroughly characterized. Strain JK224 shows normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. However, while the amplitude for "first positive" phototropism is the same as that in the wild-type, the threshold and fluence for the maximum response in "first positive" phototropism are shifted to higher fluence by a factor of 20-30. This mutant may represent an alteration in the photoreceptor pigment for phototropism. Strain JK218 exhibits no curvature to light at any fluence from 1 micromole m-2 to 2700 micromoles m-2, but shows normal gravitropism. Strain JK345 shows no "first positive" phototropism, and reduced gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Strain JK229 shows no measurable "first positive" phototropism, but normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Based on these data, it is suggested that: 1. gravitropism and phototropism contain at least one common element; 2. "first positive" and "second positive" phototropism contain at least one common element; and 3. "first positive" phototropism can be substantially altered without any apparent alteration of "second positive" phototropism.

  2. Ecology and evolutionary biology of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pigliucci, Massimo

    2002-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is now widely used as a model system in molecular and developmental biology, as well as in physiology and cell biology. However, ecologists and evolutionary biologists have turned their attention to the mouse ear cress only much more recently and almost reluctantly. The reason for this is the perception that A. thaliana is not particularly interesting ecologically and that it represents an oddity from an evolutionary standpoint. While there is some truth in both these attitudes, similar criticisms apply to other model systems such as the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, which has been extensively studied from an organismal perspective. Furthermore, the shortcomings of A. thaliana in terms of its restricted ecological niche are counterbalanced by the wealth of information on the molecular and developmental biology of this species, which makes possible to address evolutionary questions that can rarely be pursued in other species. This chapter reviews the history of the use of A. thaliana in organismal biology and discusses some of the recent work and future perspectives of research on a variety of field including life history evolution, phenotypic plasticity, natural selection and quantitative genetics. I suggest that the future of both molecular and especially organismal biology lies into expanding our knowledge from limited and idiosyncratic model systems to their phylogenetic neighborhood, which is bound to be more varied and biologically interesting. PMID:22303188

  3. Next-generation mapping of Arabidopsis genes.

    PubMed

    Austin, Ryan S; Vidaurre, Danielle; Stamatiou, George; Breit, Robert; Provart, Nicholas J; Bonetta, Dario; Zhang, Jianfeng; Fung, Pauline; Gong, Yunchen; Wang, Pauline W; McCourt, Peter; Guttman, David S

    2011-08-01

    Next-generation genomic sequencing technologies have made it possible to directly map mutations responsible for phenotypes of interest via direct sequencing. However, most mapping strategies proposed to date require some prior genetic analysis, which can be very time-consuming even in genetically tractable organisms. Here we present a de novo method for rapidly and robustly mapping the physical location of EMS mutations by sequencing a small pooled F₂ population. This method, called Next Generation Mapping (NGM), uses a chastity statistic to quantify the relative contribution of the parental mutant and mapping lines to each SNP in the pooled F₂ population. It then uses this information to objectively localize the candidate mutation based on its exclusive segregation with the mutant parental line. A user-friendly, web-based tool for performing NGM analysis is available at http://bar.utoronto.ca/NGM. We used NGM to identify three genes involved in cell-wall biology in Arabidopsis thaliana, and, in a power analysis, demonstrate success in test mappings using as few as ten F₂ lines and a single channel of Illumina Genome Analyzer data. This strategy can easily be applied to other model organisms, and we expect that it will also have utility in crops and any other eukaryote with a completed genome sequence.

  4. Birth, death and subfunctionalization in the Arabidopsis genome.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Matthew T; Cross, Katilyn V; Van Woert, Patrick A

    2012-04-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is now a model system, not just for plant biology but also for comparative genomics. The completion of the sequences of two closely related species, Arabidopsis lyrata and Brassica rapa, is complemented by genomic comparisons among A. thaliana accessions and mutation accumulation lines. Together these genomic data document the birth of new genes via gene duplication, transposon exaptation and de novo formation of new genes from noncoding sequence. Most novel loci exhibit low expression, and are undergoing pseudogenization or subfunctionalization. Comparatively, A. thaliana has lost large amounts of sequence through deletion, particularly of transposable elements. Intraspecific genomic variation indicates high rates of deletion mutations and deletion polymorphisms across accessions, shedding light on the history of Arabidopsis genome architecture.

  5. Building an efficient curation workflow for the Arabidopsis literature corpus.

    PubMed

    Li, Donghui; Berardini, Tanya Z; Muller, Robert J; Huala, Eva

    2012-01-01

    TAIR (The Arabidopsis Information Resource) is the model organism database (MOD) for Arabidopsis thaliana, a model plant with a literature corpus of about 39 000 articles in PubMed, with over 4300 new articles added in 2011. We have developed a literature curation workflow incorporating both automated and manual elements to cope with this flood of new research articles. The current workflow can be divided into two phases: article selection and curation. Structured controlled vocabularies, such as the Gene Ontology and Plant Ontology are used to capture free text information in the literature as succinct ontology-based annotations suitable for the application of computational analysis methods. We also describe our curation platform and the use of text mining tools in our workflow. Database URL: www.arabidopsis.org PMID:23221298

  6. Abiotic stresses induce different localizations of anthocyanins in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kovinich, Nik; Kayanja, Gilbert; Chanoca, Alexandra; Otegui, Marisa S; Grotewold, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Anthocyanins are induced in plants in response to abiotic stresses such as drought, high salinity, excess light, and cold, where they often correlate with enhanced stress tolerance. Numerous roles have been proposed for anthocyanins induced during abiotic stresses including functioning as ROS scavengers, photoprotectants, and stress signals. We have recently found different profiles of anthocyanins in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants exposed to different abiotic stresses, suggesting that not all anthocyanins have the same function. Here, we discuss these findings in the context of other studies and show that anthocyanins induced in Arabidopsis in response to various abiotic stresses have different localizations at the organ and tissue levels. These studies provide a basis to clarify the role of particular anthocyanin species during abiotic stress. PMID:26179363

  7. pATsi: Paralogs and Singleton Genes from Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosino, Luca; Bostan, Hamed; di Salle, Pasquale; Sangiovanni, Mara; Vigilante, Alessandra; Chiusano, Maria L.

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is widely accepted as a model species in plant biology. Its genome, due to its small size and diploidy, was the first to be sequenced among plants, making this species also a reference for plant comparative genomics. Nevertheless, the evolutionary mechanisms that shaped the Arabidopsis genome are still controversial. Indeed, duplications, translocations, inversions, and gene loss events that contributed to the current organization are difficult to be traced. A reliable identification of paralogs and single-copy genes is essential to understand these mechanisms. Therefore, we implemented a dedicated pipeline to identify paralog genes and classify single-copy genes into opportune categories. PATsi, a web-accessible database, was organized to allow the straightforward access to the paralogs organized into networks and to the classification of single-copy genes. This permits to efficiently explore the gene collection of Arabidopsis for evolutionary investigations and comparative genomics. PMID:26792975

  8. pATsi: Paralogs and Singleton Genes from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ambrosino, Luca; Bostan, Hamed; di Salle, Pasquale; Sangiovanni, Mara; Vigilante, Alessandra; Chiusano, Maria L

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is widely accepted as a model species in plant biology. Its genome, due to its small size and diploidy, was the first to be sequenced among plants, making this species also a reference for plant comparative genomics. Nevertheless, the evolutionary mechanisms that shaped the Arabidopsis genome are still controversial. Indeed, duplications, translocations, inversions, and gene loss events that contributed to the current organization are difficult to be traced. A reliable identification of paralogs and single-copy genes is essential to understand these mechanisms. Therefore, we implemented a dedicated pipeline to identify paralog genes and classify single-copy genes into opportune categories. PATsi, a web-accessible database, was organized to allow the straightforward access to the paralogs organized into networks and to the classification of single-copy genes. This permits to efficiently explore the gene collection of Arabidopsis for evolutionary investigations and comparative genomics.

  9. Chromosomal rearrangement in autotetraploid plants of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Weiss, H; Maluszynska, J

    2000-01-01

    Recent development of cytogenetic techniques has facilitated significant progress in Arabidopsis thaliana karyotype studies. Double-target FISH with rRNA genes provides makers that allow individual chromosome in the genome to be distinguished. Those studies have revealed that the number and position of rDNA loci is ecotype-specific. Arabidopsis is believed to be a true diploid (x = 5) with numerous ecotypes (accessions) and only a very few natural polyploid populations reported. Few studies were undertaken to induce polyploidy in Arabidopsis, however none of those gave the cytogenetic characteristics of polyploid plants. Our analysis of chromosome pairing of colchicine-induced autotetraploid Arabidopsis (Wilna ecotype) revealed preferential bivalent pairing in PMCs (pollen mother cells). In order to attempt to explain this phenomenon, first of all more detailed cytogenetic studies of autopolyploid plants have been undertaken. The localization of 45S and 5S rDNA loci in the diploid and autotetraploid plants revealed that Wilna ecotypes belongs to the group of Arabidopsis accessions with only two 5S rDNA loci present in a genome. Furthermore, the rearrangement of 45S rDNA locus in autopolyploid, when compared to the diploid plants of the same ecotype, was revealed. These results are interesting also in the context of the recently emphasised role of polyploidy in plant evolution and speciation. Arabidopsis, despite having small chromosomes, is a good system to study chromosome behaviour in relation to diploidization of autopolyploids and to evaluate the degree of chromosomal rearrangements during this process. PMID:11433970

  10. An Arabidopsis thaliana methyltransferase Capable of Methylating Farnesoic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Yang,Y.; Yuan, J.; Ross, J.; Noel, J.; Pichersky, E.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported the identification of a new family of plant methyltransferases (MTs), named the SABATH family, that use S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) to methylate a carboxyl moiety or a nitrogen-containing functional group on a diverse array of plant compounds. The Arabidopsis genome alone contains 24 distinct SABATH genes. To identify the catalytic specificities of members of this protein family in Arabidopsis, we screened recombinantly expressed and purified enzymes with a large number of potential substrates. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis thaliana gene At3g44860 encodes a protein with high catalytic specificity towards farnesoic acid (FA). Under steady-state conditions, this farnesoic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (FAMT) exhibits K{sub M} values of 41 and 71 {mu}M for FA and SAM, respectively. A three-dimensional model of FAMT constructed based upon similarity to the experimentally determined structure of Clarkia breweri salicylic acid methyltransferase (SAMT) suggests a reasonable model for FA recognition in the FAMT active site. In plants, the mRNA levels of At3g44860 increase in response to the exogenous addition of several compounds previously shown to induce plant defense responses at the transcriptional level. Although methyl farnesoate (MeFA) has not yet been detected in Arabidopsis, the presence of a FA-specific carboxyl methyltransferase in Arabidopsis capable of producing MeFA, an insect juvenile hormone made by some plants as a presumed defense against insect herbivory, suggests that MeFA or chemically similar compounds are likely to serve as new specialized metabolites in Arabidopsis.

  11. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns are altered during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Popp, Michael P.; Gurley, William B.; Guy, Charles; Norwood, Kelly L.; Ferl, Robert J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments results in differential gene expression. A 5-day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β-Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on gene expression patterns initially by using the Adh/GUS transgene to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response (Paul, A.L., Daugherty, C.J., Bihn, E.A., Chapman, D.K., Norwood, K.L., Ferl, R.J., 2001. Transgene expression patterns indicate that spaceflight affects stress signal perception and transduction in arabidopsis, Plant Physiol. 126, 613-621). As a follow-on to the reporter gene analysis, we report here the evaluation of genome-wide patterns of native gene expression within Arabidopsis shoots utilizing the Agilent DNA array of 21,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - Taqman®). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays probed with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to RNA isolated from ground control plants revealed 182 genes that were differentially expressed in response to the spaceflight mission by more than 4-fold, and of those only 50 genes were expressed at levels chosen to support a conservative change call. None of the genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were induced to this level. However, genes related to heat shock were dramatically induced - but in a pattern and under growth conditions that are not easily explained by elevated temperatures. These gene expression data are discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment and with regard to potential future spaceflight experiment

  12. Immunolocalization of meiotic proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana: method 2.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Susan; Osman, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the molecular biology and genetics of Arabidopsis thaliana have led to it becoming an important model for the analysis of meiosis in plants. Cytogenetic investigations are pivotal to meiotic studies and a number of technological improvements for Arabidopsis cytology have provided a range of tools to investigate chromosome behavior during meiosis (Jones et al. Chromosome Res 11:205-215, 2003). This chapter contains a detailed description of an immunological technique currently used in our lab for the preparation of meiotic chromosomes for immunolocalization.

  13. Expression profiles of differentially regulated genes during the early stages of apple flower infection with Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Sarowar, Sujon; Zhao, Youfu; Soria-Guerra, Ruth Elena; Ali, Shahjahan; Zheng, Danman; Wang, Dongping; Korban, Schuyler S

    2011-10-01

    To identify genes involved in the response to the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora in apple (Malus×domestica), expression profiles were investigated using an apple oligo (70-mer) array representing 40, 000 genes. Blossoms of a fire blight-susceptible apple cultivar Gala were collected from trees growing in the orchard, placed on a tray in the laboratory, and spray-inoculated with a suspension of E. amylovora at a concentration of 10(8) cfu ml(-1). Uninoculated detached flowers served as controls at each time point. Expression profiles were captured at three different time points post-inoculation at 2, 8, and 24 h, together with those at 0 h (uninoculated). A total of about 3500 genes were found to be significantly modulated in response to at least one of the three time points. Among those, a total of 770, 855, and 1002 genes were up-regulated, by 2-fold, at 2, 8, and 24 h following inoculation, respectively; while, 748, 1024, and 1455 genes were down-regulated, by 2-fold, at 2, 8, and 24 h following inoculation, respectively. Over the three time points post-inoculation, 365 genes were commonly up-regulated and 374 genes were commonly down-regulated. Both sets of genes were classified based on their functional categories. The majority of up-regulated genes were involved in metabolism, signal transduction, signalling, transport, and stress response. A number of transcripts encoding proteins/enzymes known to be up-regulated under particular biotic and abiotic stress were also up-regulated following E. amylovora treatment. Those up- or down-regulated genes encode transcription factors, signaling components, defense-related, transporter, and metabolism, all of which have been associated with disease responses in Arabidopsis and rice, suggesting similar response pathways are involved in apple blossoms.

  14. Tethering Complexes in the Arabidopsis Endomembrane System

    PubMed Central

    Vukašinović, Nemanja; Žárský, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Targeting of endomembrane transport containers is of the utmost importance for proper land plant growth and development. Given the immobility of plant cells, localized membrane vesicle secretion and recycling are amongst the main processes guiding proper cell, tissue and whole plant morphogenesis. Cell wall biogenesis and modification are dependent on vectorial membrane traffic, not only during normal development, but also in stress responses and in plant defense against pathogens and/or symbiosis. It is surprising how little we know about these processes in plants, from small GTPase regulation to the tethering complexes that act as their effectors. Tethering factors are single proteins or protein complexes mediating first contact between the target membrane and arriving membrane vesicles. In this review we focus on the tethering complexes of the best-studied plant model—Arabidopsis thaliana. Genome-based predictions indicate the presence of all major tethering complexes in plants that are known from a hypothetical last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). The evolutionary multiplication of paralogs of plant tethering complex subunits has produced the massively expanded EXO70 family, indicating a subfunctionalization of the terminal exocytosis machinery in land plants. Interpretation of loss of function (LOF) mutant phenotypes has to consider that related, yet clearly functionally-specific complexes often share some common core subunits. It is therefore impossible to conclude with clarity which version of the complex is responsible for the phenotypic deviations observed. Experimental interest in the analysis of plant tethering complexes is growing and we hope to contribute with this review by attracting even more attention to this fascinating field of plant cell biology. PMID:27243010

  15. Ethylene Modulates Sphingolipid Synthesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian-xin; Wu, Jia-li; Yin, Jian; Zheng, Ping; Yao, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids have essential structural and bioactive functions in membranes and in signaling. However, how plants regulate sphingolipid biosynthesis in the response to stress remains unclear. Here, we reveal that the plant hormone ethylene can modulate sphingolipid synthesis. The fungal toxin Fumonisin B1 (FB1) inhibits the activity of ceramide synthases, perturbing sphingolipid homeostasis, and thus inducing cell death. We used FB1 to test the role of ethylene signaling in sphingolipid synthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. The etr1-1 and ein2 mutants, which have disrupted ethylene signaling, exhibited hypersensitivity to FB1; by contrast, the eto1-1 and ctr1-1 mutants, which have enhanced ethylene signaling, exhibited increased tolerance to FB1. Gene expression analysis showed that during FB1 treatment, transcripts of genes involved in de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis were down-regulated in ctr1-1 mutants but up-regulated in ein2 mutants. Strikingly, under normal conditions, ctr1-1 mutants contained less ceramides and hydroxyceramides, compared with wild type. After FB1 treatment, ctr1-1 and ein2 mutants showed a significant improvement in sphingolipid contents, except the ctr1-1 mutants showed little change in hydroxyceramide levels. Treatment of wild-type seedlings with the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid down-regulated genes involved in the sphingolipid de novo biosynthesis pathway, thus reducing sphingolipid contents and partially rescuing FB1-induced cell death. Taking these results together, we propose that ethylene modulates sphingolipids by regulating the expression of genes related to the de novo biosynthesis of sphingolipids. PMID:26734030

  16. Tethering Complexes in the Arabidopsis Endomembrane System.

    PubMed

    Vukašinović, Nemanja; Žárský, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Targeting of endomembrane transport containers is of the utmost importance for proper land plant growth and development. Given the immobility of plant cells, localized membrane vesicle secretion and recycling are amongst the main processes guiding proper cell, tissue and whole plant morphogenesis. Cell wall biogenesis and modification are dependent on vectorial membrane traffic, not only during normal development, but also in stress responses and in plant defense against pathogens and/or symbiosis. It is surprising how little we know about these processes in plants, from small GTPase regulation to the tethering complexes that act as their effectors. Tethering factors are single proteins or protein complexes mediating first contact between the target membrane and arriving membrane vesicles. In this review we focus on the tethering complexes of the best-studied plant model-Arabidopsis thaliana. Genome-based predictions indicate the presence of all major tethering complexes in plants that are known from a hypothetical last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). The evolutionary multiplication of paralogs of plant tethering complex subunits has produced the massively expanded EXO70 family, indicating a subfunctionalization of the terminal exocytosis machinery in land plants. Interpretation of loss of function (LOF) mutant phenotypes has to consider that related, yet clearly functionally-specific complexes often share some common core subunits. It is therefore impossible to conclude with clarity which version of the complex is responsible for the phenotypic deviations observed. Experimental interest in the analysis of plant tethering complexes is growing and we hope to contribute with this review by attracting even more attention to this fascinating field of plant cell biology. PMID:27243010

  17. Hybrid mimics and hybrid vigor in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Greaves, Ian K.; Groszmann, Michael; Wu, Li Min; Dennis, Elizabeth S.; Peacock, W. James

    2015-01-01

    F1 hybrids can outperform their parents in yield and vegetative biomass, features of hybrid vigor that form the basis of the hybrid seed industry. The yield advantage of the F1 is lost in the F2 and subsequent generations. In Arabidopsis, from F2 plants that have a F1-like phenotype, we have by recurrent selection produced pure breeding F5/F6 lines, hybrid mimics, in which the characteristics of the F1 hybrid are stabilized. These hybrid mimic lines, like the F1 hybrid, have larger leaves than the parent plant, and the leaves have increased photosynthetic cell numbers, and in some lines, increased size of cells, suggesting an increased supply of photosynthate. A comparison of the differentially expressed genes in the F1 hybrid with those of eight hybrid mimic lines identified metabolic pathways altered in both; these pathways include down-regulation of defense response pathways and altered abiotic response pathways. F6 hybrid mimic lines are mostly homozygous at each locus in the genome and yet retain the large F1-like phenotype. Many alleles in the F6 plants, when they are homozygous, have expression levels different to the level in the parent. We consider this altered expression to be a consequence of transregulation of genes from one parent by genes from the other parent. Transregulation could also arise from epigenetic modifications in the F1. The pure breeding hybrid mimics have been valuable in probing the mechanisms of hybrid vigor and may also prove to be useful hybrid vigor equivalents in agriculture. PMID:26283378

  18. Amyloplast movement and gravityperception in Arabidopsis endoderm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaka, M.; Saito, T.; Morita, M. T.

    Gravitropism of higher plant is a growth response regulating the orientation of organs elongation, which includes four sequential steps, the perception of gravistimulus, transduction of the physical stimulus to chemical signal, transmission of the signal, and differential cell elongation depending on the signal. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of these steps, we have isolated a number of Arabidopsis mutants with abnormal shoot gravitropic response. zig (zigzag)/sgr4(shoot gravitropism 4) shows little gravitropism in their shoots. Besides, their inflorescence stems elongate in a zigzag-fashion to bend at each node. ZIG encodes a SNARE, AtVTI11. sgr3 with reduced gravitropic response in inflorescence stems had a missense mutation in other SNARE, AtVAM3. These two SNAREs make a complex in the shoot endoderm cells that are gravity-sensing cells, suggesting that the vesicle transport from trans-Golgi network (TGN) to prevacuolar compartment (PVC) and/or vacuole is involved in gravitropism. Abnormal vesicular/vacuolar structures were observed in several tissues of both mutants. Moreover, SGR2 encodes phospholipase A1-like protein that resides in the vacuolar membrane. Endodermis-specific expression of these genes could complement gravitropism in each mutant. In addition, amyloplasts thought to be statoliths localized abnormally in their endoderm cells. These results strongly suggest that formation and function of vacuole in the endoderm cells are important for amyloplasts sedimentation, which is involved in the early process of shoot gravitropism. To reveal this, we constructed vertical stage microscope system to visualize the behavior of amyloplasts and vacuolar membrane in living endodermal cells. We hope to discuss the mechanism of gravity perception after showing their movements.

  19. The Arabidopsis Nuclear Pore and Nuclear Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Iris; Brkljacic, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear envelope is a double membrane structure that separates the eukaryotic cytoplasm from the nucleoplasm. The nuclear pores embedded in the nuclear envelope are the sole gateways for macromolecular trafficking in and out of the nucleus. The nuclear pore complexes assembled at the nuclear pores are large protein conglomerates composed of multiple units of about 30 different nucleoporins. Proteins and RNAs traffic through the nuclear pore complexes, enabled by the interacting activities of nuclear transport receptors, nucleoporins, and elements of the Ran GTPase cycle. In addition to directional and possibly selective protein and RNA nuclear import and export, the nuclear pore gains increasing prominence as a spatial organizer of cellular processes, such as sumoylation and desumoylation. Individual nucleoporins and whole nuclear pore subcomplexes traffic to specific mitotic locations and have mitotic functions, for example at the kinetochores, in spindle assembly, and in conjunction with the checkpoints. Mutants of nucleoporin genes and genes of nuclear transport components lead to a wide array of defects from human diseases to compromised plant defense responses. The nuclear envelope acts as a repository of calcium, and its inner membrane is populated by functionally unique proteins connected to both chromatin and—through the nuclear envelope lumen—the cytoplasmic cytoskeleton. Plant nuclear pore and nuclear envelope research—predominantly focusing on Arabidopsis as a model—is discovering both similarities and surprisingly unique aspects compared to the more mature model systems. This chapter gives an overview of our current knowledge in the field and of exciting areas awaiting further exploration. PMID:22303264

  20. Silica nanoparticle phytotoxicity to Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Slomberg, Danielle L; Schoenfisch, Mark H

    2012-09-18

    The phytotoxicity of silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) was evaluated as a function of particle size (14, 50, and 200 nm), concentration (250 and 1000 mg L(-1)), and surface composition toward Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown hydroponically for 3 and 6 weeks. Reduced development and chlorosis were observed for plants exposed to highly negative SiNPs (-20.3 and -31.9 mV for the 50 and 200 nm SiNPs, respectively) regardless of particle concentration when not controlling pH of the hydroponic medium, which resulted in increased alkalinity (~pH 8). Particles were no longer toxic to the plants at either concentration upon calcination or removal of surface silanols from the SiNP surface, or adjusting the pH of the growth medium to pH 5.8. The phytotoxic effects observed for the negatively charged 50 and 200 nm SiNPs were attributed to pH effects and the adsorption of macro- and micro-nutrients to the silica surface. Size-dependent uptake of the nanoparticles by the plants was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) with plant roots containing 32.0, 1.85, and 7.00 × 10(-3) mg Si·kg tissue(-1)/nm(3) (normalized for SiNP volume) for the 14, 50, and 200 nm SiNPs respectively, after 6 weeks exposure at 1000 ppm (pH 5.8). This study demonstrates that the silica scaffolds are not phytotoxic up to 1000 ppm despite significant uptake of the SiNPs (14, 50, and 200 nm) into the root system of A. thaliana. PMID:22889047

  1. Mapping gene activity of Arabidopsis root hairs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Quantitative information on gene activity at single cell-type resolution is essential for the understanding of how cells work and interact. Root hairs, or trichoblasts, tubular-shaped outgrowths of specialized cells in the epidermis, represent an ideal model for cell fate acquisition and differentiation in plants. Results Here, we provide an atlas of gene and protein expression in Arabidopsis root hair cells, generated by paired-end RNA sequencing and LC/MS-MS analysis of protoplasts from plants containing a pEXP7-GFP reporter construct. In total, transcripts of 23,034 genes were detected in root hairs. High-resolution proteome analysis led to the reliable identification of 2,447 proteins, 129 of which were differentially expressed between root hairs and non-root hair tissue. Dissection of pre-mRNA splicing patterns showed that all types of alternative splicing were cell type-dependent, and less complex in EXP7-expressing cells when compared to non-root hair cells. Intron retention was repressed in several transcripts functionally related to root hair morphogenesis, indicative of a cell type-specific control of gene expression by alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. Concordance between mRNA and protein expression was generally high, but in many cases mRNA expression was not predictive for protein abundance. Conclusions The integrated analysis shows that gene activity in root hairs is dictated by orchestrated, multilayered regulatory mechanisms that allow for a cell type-specific composition of functional components. PMID:23800126

  2. Dissecting Arabidopsis G beta signal transduction on the protein surface

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The heterotrimeric G protein complex provides signal amplification and target specificity. The Arabidopsis Gbeta subunit of this complex (AGB1) interacts with and modulates the activity of target cytoplasmic proteins. This specificity resides in the structure of the interface between AGB1 and its ta...

  3. Computational tools for Brassica-Arabidopsis comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Paul; Bancroft, Ian; Trick, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances, such as the availability of extensive genome survey sequence (GSS) data and draft physical maps, are radically transforming the means by which we can dissect Brassica genome structure and systematically relate it to the Arabidopsis model. Hitherto, our view of the co-linearities between these closely related genomes had been largely inferred from comparative RFLP data, necessitating substantial interpolation and expert interpretation. Sequencing of the Brassica rapa genome by the Multinational Brassica Genome Project will, however, enable an entirely computational approach to this problem. Meanwhile we have been developing databases and bioinformatics tools to support our work in Brassica comparative genomics, including a recently completed draft physical map of B. rapa integrated with anchor probes derived from the Arabidopsis genome sequence. We are also exploring new ways to display the emerging Brassica-Arabidopsis sequence homology data. We have mapped all publicly available Brassica sequences in silico to the Arabidopsis TIGR v5 genome sequence and published this in the ATIDB database that uses Generic Genome Browser (GBrowse). This in silico approach potentially identifies all paralogous sequences and so we colour-code the significance of the mappings and offer an integrated, real-time multiple alignment tool to partition them into paralogous groups. The MySQL database driving GBrowse can also be directly interrogated, using the powerful API offered by the Perl BioColon, two colonsDBColon, two colonsGFF methods, facilitating a wide range of data-mining possibilities.

  4. TNT phytotransformation pathway characteristics in Arabidopsis: role of aromatic hydroxylamines.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Murali; Oliver, David J; Shanks, Jacqueline V

    2006-01-01

    Basic knowledge of the plant transformation pathways of TNT will aid phytoremediation design and assessment. While TNT transformation by plant metabolism has been demonstrated in previous studies, the presence and role of hydroxylamines in the transformation pathway has not been sufficiently understood. Hydroxylamines are unequivocally shown to be formed by plant transformation of TNT by two axenic plant systems (Arabidopsis thaliana and Catharanthusroseus). In addition, confirmation was obtained for conversion of these hydroxylamines to previously identified conjugates. Further characteristics of TNT transformation in Arabidopsis, an increasingly popular model system for genetic and biochemical studies of TNT transformation, were elucidated by [U-14C]TNT mass balance studies and metabolite feeding studies. These studies showed the rapid conversion of TNT to unextractable bound compounds by Arabidopsis seedlings in agreement with the green-liver model. Arabidopsis seedlings formed and transformed 4-substituted metabolites more efficiently than the 2-substituted metabolites. A qualitative kinetic rate analysis of the pathway was performed to propose rate-limiting steps in the pathway and theoretical schemes for improved rates are suggested.

  5. Glutamate functions in stomatal closure in Arabidopsis and fava bean.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Riichiro; Mori, Izumi C; Kamizono, Nobuto; Shichiri, Yudai; Shimatani, Tetsuo; Miyata, Fumika; Honda, Kenji; Iwai, Sumio

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells are indispensable for higher plants because they control gas exchange and water balance to maintain photosynthetic activity. The signaling processes that govern their movement are controlled by several factors, such as abscisic acid (ABA), blue light, pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and carbon dioxide. Herein, we demonstrated that the amino acid glutamate (Glu), a well-known mammalian neurotransmitter, functions as a novel signaling molecule in stomatal closure in both Arabidopsis and fava bean (Vicia faba L.). Pharmacological and electrophysiological analyses provided important clues for the participation of Glu-receptors, Ca(2+), and protein phosphorylation during the signaling process. Genetic analyses using Arabidopsis ABA-deficient (aba2-1) and ABA-insensitive (abi1-1 and abi2-1) mutants showed that ABA is not required for Glu signaling. However, loss-of-function of the Arabidopsis gene encoding Slow Anion Channel-Associated 1 (SLAC1) and Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 6 (CPK6) impaired the Glu response. Moreover, T-DNA knockout mutations of the Arabidopsis Glu receptor-like gene (GLR), GLR3.5, lost their sensitivity to Glu-dependent stomatal closure. Our results strongly support functional Glu-signaling in stomatal closure and the crucial roles of GLRs in this signaling process.

  6. Dated molecular phylogenies indicate a Miocene origin for Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Beilstein, Mark A; Nagalingum, Nathalie S; Clements, Mark D; Manchester, Steven R; Mathews, Sarah

    2010-10-26

    Dated molecular phylogenies are the basis for understanding species diversity and for linking changes in rates of diversification with historical events such as restructuring in developmental pathways, genome doubling, or dispersal onto a new continent. Valid fossil calibration points are essential to the accurate estimation of divergence dates, but for many groups of flowering plants fossil evidence is unavailable or limited. Arabidopsis thaliana, the primary genetic model in plant biology and the first plant to have its entire genome sequenced, belongs to one such group, the plant family Brassicaceae. Thus, the timing of A. thaliana evolution and the history of its genome have been controversial. We bring previously overlooked fossil evidence to bear on these questions and find the split between A. thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata occurred about 13 Mya, and that the split between Arabidopsis and the Brassica complex (broccoli, cabbage, canola) occurred about 43 Mya. These estimates, which are two- to threefold older than previous estimates, indicate that gene, genomic, and developmental evolution occurred much more slowly than previously hypothesized and that Arabidopsis evolved during a period of warming rather than of cooling. We detected a 2- to 10-fold shift in species diversification rates on the branch uniting Brassicaceae with its sister families. The timing of this shift suggests a possible impact of the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction on their radiation and that Brassicales codiversified with pierid butterflies that specialize on mustard-oil-producing plants.

  7. Multiplex micro-respiratory measurements of Arabidopsis tissues.

    PubMed

    Sew, Yun Shin; Ströher, Elke; Holzmann, Cristián; Huang, Shaobai; Taylor, Nicolas L; Jordana, Xavier; Millar, A Harvey

    2013-11-01

    Researchers often want to study the respiratory properties of individual parts of plants in response to a range of treatments. Arabidopsis is an obvious model for this work; however, because of its size, it represents a challenge for gas exchange measurements of respiration. The combination of micro-respiratory technologies with multiplex assays has the potential to bridge this gap, and make measurements possible in this model plant species. We show the adaptation of the commercial technology used for mammalian cell respiration analysis to study three critical tissues of interest: leaf sections, root tips and seeds. The measurement of respiration in single leaf discs has allowed the age dependence of the respiration rate in Arabidopsis leaves across the rosette to be observed. The oxygen consumption of single root tips from plate-grown seedlings shows the enhanced respiration of root tips and their time-dependent susceptibility to salinity. The monitoring of single Arabidopsis seeds shows the kinetics of respiration over 48 h post-imbibition, and the effect of the phytohormones gibberellic acid (GA3 ) and abscisic acid (ABA) on respiration during seed germination. These studies highlight the potential for multiplexed micro-respiratory assays to study oxygen consumption in Arabidopsis tissues, and open up new possibilities to screen and study mutants and to identify differences in ecotypes or populations of different plant species. PMID:23834713

  8. EC and US agencies fund large-scale Arabidopsis sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, V.

    1996-06-01

    Together, USA agencies and the European Commission have been funding specific genetic mapping projects. As a result, sequencing of the Arabidopsis genome is nearing completion. The commercialization of such information is predictable, with genes that regulate lipid unsaturation being among the first cloned and sequenced.

  9. Structure of "Arabidopsis" chloroplastic monothiol glutaredoxin AtGRXcp

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monothiol glutaredoxins (Grxs) play important roles in maintaining redox homeostasis in living cells and are conserved across species. "Arabidopsis thaliana" monothiol glutaredoxin AtGRXcp, is critical for protection from oxidative stress in chloroplasts. The crystal structure of AtGRXcp has been de...

  10. Arabidopsis transcriptional responses differentiate between O3 and herbicides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using published data based on Affymetrix ATH1 Gene-Chips we characterized the transcriptional response of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia to O3 and a few other major environmental stresses including oxidative stress . A set of 101 markers could be extracted which provided a compo...

  11. Gene expression in arabidopsis shoot tips after liquid nitrogen exposure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arabidopsis thaliana shoot tips can be successfully cryopreserved using either Plant Vitrification Solution 2 (PVS2) or Plant Vitrification Solution 3 (PVS3) as the cryoprotectant. We used this model system to identify suites of genes that were either upregulated or downregulated as shoot tips recov...

  12. Arabidopsis: an adequate model for dicot root systems?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the search for answers to pressing root developmental genetic issues, plant science has turned to a small genome dicot plant (Arabidopsis) to be used as a model to study and use to develop hypotheses for testing other species. Through out the published research only three classes of root are des...

  13. Glutamate functions in stomatal closure in Arabidopsis and fava bean.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Riichiro; Mori, Izumi C; Kamizono, Nobuto; Shichiri, Yudai; Shimatani, Tetsuo; Miyata, Fumika; Honda, Kenji; Iwai, Sumio

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells are indispensable for higher plants because they control gas exchange and water balance to maintain photosynthetic activity. The signaling processes that govern their movement are controlled by several factors, such as abscisic acid (ABA), blue light, pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and carbon dioxide. Herein, we demonstrated that the amino acid glutamate (Glu), a well-known mammalian neurotransmitter, functions as a novel signaling molecule in stomatal closure in both Arabidopsis and fava bean (Vicia faba L.). Pharmacological and electrophysiological analyses provided important clues for the participation of Glu-receptors, Ca(2+), and protein phosphorylation during the signaling process. Genetic analyses using Arabidopsis ABA-deficient (aba2-1) and ABA-insensitive (abi1-1 and abi2-1) mutants showed that ABA is not required for Glu signaling. However, loss-of-function of the Arabidopsis gene encoding Slow Anion Channel-Associated 1 (SLAC1) and Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 6 (CPK6) impaired the Glu response. Moreover, T-DNA knockout mutations of the Arabidopsis Glu receptor-like gene (GLR), GLR3.5, lost their sensitivity to Glu-dependent stomatal closure. Our results strongly support functional Glu-signaling in stomatal closure and the crucial roles of GLRs in this signaling process. PMID:26586261

  14. Quantitative trait loci for inflorescence development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Ungerer, Mark C; Halldorsdottir, Solveig S; Modliszewski, Jennifer L; Mackay, Trudy F C; Purugganan, Michael D

    2002-01-01

    Variation in inflorescence development patterns is a central factor in the evolutionary ecology of plants. The genetic architectures of 13 traits associated with inflorescence developmental timing, architecture, rosette morphology, and fitness were investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana, a model plant system. There is substantial naturally occurring genetic variation for inflorescence development traits, with broad sense heritabilities computed from 21 Arabidopsis ecotypes ranging from 0.134 to 0.772. Genetic correlations are significant for most (64/78) pairs of traits, suggesting either pleiotropy or tight linkage among loci. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping indicates 47 and 63 QTL for inflorescence developmental traits in Ler x Col and Cvi x Ler recombinant inbred mapping populations, respectively. Several QTL associated with different developmental traits map to the same Arabidopsis chromosomal regions, in agreement with the strong genetic correlations observed. Epistasis among QTL was observed only in the Cvi x Ler population, and only between regions on chromosomes 1 and 5. Examination of the completed Arabidopsis genome sequence in three QTL regions revealed between 375 and 783 genes per region. Previously identified flowering time, inflorescence architecture, floral meristem identity, and hormone signaling genes represent some of the many candidate genes in these regions. PMID:11901129

  15. Dated molecular phylogenies indicate a Miocene origin for Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Beilstein, Mark A; Nagalingum, Nathalie S; Clements, Mark D; Manchester, Steven R; Mathews, Sarah

    2010-10-26

    Dated molecular phylogenies are the basis for understanding species diversity and for linking changes in rates of diversification with historical events such as restructuring in developmental pathways, genome doubling, or dispersal onto a new continent. Valid fossil calibration points are essential to the accurate estimation of divergence dates, but for many groups of flowering plants fossil evidence is unavailable or limited. Arabidopsis thaliana, the primary genetic model in plant biology and the first plant to have its entire genome sequenced, belongs to one such group, the plant family Brassicaceae. Thus, the timing of A. thaliana evolution and the history of its genome have been controversial. We bring previously overlooked fossil evidence to bear on these questions and find the split between A. thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata occurred about 13 Mya, and that the split between Arabidopsis and the Brassica complex (broccoli, cabbage, canola) occurred about 43 Mya. These estimates, which are two- to threefold older than previous estimates, indicate that gene, genomic, and developmental evolution occurred much more slowly than previously hypothesized and that Arabidopsis evolved during a period of warming rather than of cooling. We detected a 2- to 10-fold shift in species diversification rates on the branch uniting Brassicaceae with its sister families. The timing of this shift suggests a possible impact of the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction on their radiation and that Brassicales codiversified with pierid butterflies that specialize on mustard-oil-producing plants. PMID:20921408

  16. Mining the plant-herbivore interface with a leafmining Drosophila of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Whiteman, Noah K.; Groen, Simon C.; Chevasco, Daniela; Bear, Ashley; Beckwith, Noor; Gregory, T. Ryan; Denoux, Carine; Mammarella, Nicole; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Pierce, Naomi E.

    2010-01-01

    Experimental infections of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) with genomically characterized plant pathogens such as Pseudomonas syringae have facilitated dissection of canonical eukaryotic defense pathways and parasite virulence factors. Plants are also attacked by herbivorous insects, and the development of an ecologically relevant genetic model herbivore that feeds on Arabidopsis will enable the parallel dissection of host defense and reciprocal resistance pathways such as those involved in xenobiotic metabolism. An ideal candidate is Scaptomyza flava, a drosophilid fly whose leafmining larvae are true herbivores that can be found in nature feeding on Arabidopsis and other crucifers. Here we describe the eukaryotic life cycle of S. flava on Arabidopsis, and use multiple approaches to characterize the response of Arabidopsis to S. flava attack. Oviposition choice tests and growth performance assays on different Arabidopsis ecotypes, defense-related mutants, and hormone and chitin-treated plants revealed significant differences in host preference and variation in larval performance across Arabidopsis accessions. The jasmonate (JA) and glucosinolate pathways in Arabidopsis are important in mediating quantitative resistance against S. flava, and priming with JA or chitin resulted in increased resistance. Expression of xenobiotic detoxification genes was reduced in S. flava larvae reared on Arabidopsis JA signaling mutants, and increased in plants pre-treated with chitin. These results and future research directions are discussed in the context of developing a genetic model system to analyze insect/plant interactions. PMID:21073583

  17. Structural Characterization of Arabidopsis Leaf Arabinogalactan Polysaccharides1[W

    PubMed Central

    Tryfona, Theodora; Liang, Hui-Chung; Kotake, Toshihisa; Tsumuraya, Yoichi; Stephens, Elaine; Dupree, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Proteins decorated with arabinogalactan (AG) have important roles in cell wall structure and plant development, yet the structure and biosynthesis of this polysaccharide are poorly understood. To facilitate the analysis of biosynthetic mutants, water-extractable arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) were isolated from the leaves of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants and the structure of the AG carbohydrate component was studied. Enzymes able to hydrolyze specifically AG were utilized to release AG oligosaccharides. The released oligosaccharides were characterized by high-energy matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometry and polysaccharide analysis by carbohydrate gel electrophoresis. The Arabidopsis AG is composed of a β-(1→3)-galactan backbone with β-(1→6)-d-galactan side chains. The β-(1→6)-galactan side chains vary in length from one to over 20 galactosyl residues, and they are partly substituted with single α-(1→3)-l-arabinofuranosyl residues. Additionally, a substantial proportion of the β-(1→6)-galactan side chain oligosaccharides are substituted at the nonreducing termini with single 4-O-methyl-glucuronosyl residues via β-(1→6)-linkages. The β-(1→6)-galactan side chains are occasionally substituted with α-l-fucosyl. In the fucose-deficient murus1 mutant, AGPs lack these fucose modifications. This work demonstrates that Arabidopsis mutants in AGP structure can be identified and characterized. The detailed structural elucidation of the AG polysaccharides from the leaves of Arabidopsis is essential for insights into the structure-function relationships of these molecules and will assist studies on their biosynthesis. PMID:22891237

  18. Metabolomic Characterization of Knockout Mutants in Arabidopsis: Development of a Metabolite Profiling Database for Knockout Mutants in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Atsushi; Kusano, Miyako; Mejia, Ramon Francisco; Iwasa, Mami; Kobayashi, Makoto; Hayashi, Naomi; Watanabe-Takahashi, Akiko; Narisawa, Tomoko; Tohge, Takayuki; Hur, Manhoi; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin; Nikolau, Basil J; Saito, Kazuki

    2014-05-14

    Despite recent intensive research efforts in functional genomics, the functions of only a limited number of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genes have been determined experimentally, and improving gene annotation remains a major challenge in plant science. As metabolite profiling can characterize the metabolomic phenotype of a genetic perturbation in the plant metabolism, it provides clues to the function(s) of genes of interest. We chose 50 Arabidopsis mutants, including a set of characterized and uncharacterized mutants, that resemble wild-type plants. We performed metabolite profiling of the plants using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. To make the data set available as an efficient public functional genomics tool for hypothesis generation, we developed the Metabolite Profiling Database for Knock-Out Mutants in Arabidopsis (MeKO). It allows the evaluation of whether a mutation affects metabolism during normal plant growth and contains images of mutants, data on differences in metabolite accumulation, and interactive analysis tools. Nonprocessed data, including chromatograms, mass spectra, and experimental metadata, follow the guidelines set by the Metabolomics Standards Initiative and are freely downloadable. Proof-of-concept analysis suggests that MeKO is highly useful for the generation of hypotheses for genes of interest and for improving gene annotation. MeKO is publicly available at http://prime.psc.riken.jp/meko/.

  19. Selected Reaction Monitoring to Determine Protein Abundance in Arabidopsis Using the Arabidopsis Proteotypic Predictor1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Nicolas L.; Fenske, Ricarda; Castleden, Ian; Tomaz, Tiago; Nelson, Clark J.; Millar, A. Harvey

    2014-01-01

    In reverse genetic knockout (KO) studies that aim to assign function to specific genes, confirming the reduction in abundance of the encoded protein will often aid the link between genotype and phenotype. However, measuring specific protein abundance is particularly difficult in plant research, where only a limited number of antibodies are available. This problem is enhanced when studying gene families or different proteins derived from the same gene (isoforms), as many antibodies cross react with more than one protein. We show that utilizing selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry allows researchers to confirm protein abundance in mutant lines, even when discrimination between very similar proteins is needed. Selecting the best peptides for SRM analysis to ensure that protein- or gene-specific information can be obtained requires a series of steps, aids, and interpretation. To enable this process in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we have built a Web-based tool, the Arabidopsis Proteotypic Predictor, to select candidate SRM transitions when no previous mass spectrometry evidence exists. We also provide an in-depth analysis of the theoretical Arabidopsis proteome and its use in selecting candidate SRM peptides to establish assays for use in determining protein abundance. To test the effectiveness of SRM mass spectrometry in determining protein abundance in mutant lines, we selected two enzymes with multiple isoforms, aconitase and malate dehydrogenase. Selected peptides were quantified to estimate the abundance of each of the two mitochondrial isoforms in wild-type, KO, double KO, and complemented plant lines. We show that SRM protein analysis is a sensitive and rapid approach to quantify protein abundance differences in Arabidopsis for specific and highly related enzyme isoforms. PMID:24296071

  20. Synteny conservation between the Prunus genome and both the present and ancestral Arabidopsis genomes

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sook; Main, Dorrie; Staton, Margaret; Cho, Ilhyung; Zhebentyayeva, Tatyana; Arús, Pere; Abbott, Albert

    2006-01-01

    Background Due to the lack of availability of large genomic sequences for peach or other Prunus species, the degree of synteny conservation between the Prunus species and Arabidopsis has not been systematically assessed. Using the recently available peach EST sequences that are anchored to Prunus genetic maps and to peach physical map, we analyzed the extent of conserved synteny between the Prunus and the Arabidopsis genomes. The reconstructed pseudo-ancestral Arabidopsis genome, existed prior to the proposed recent polyploidy event, was also utilized in our analysis to further elucidate the evolutionary relationship. Results We analyzed the synteny conservation between the Prunus and the Arabidopsis genomes by comparing 475 peach ESTs that are anchored to Prunus genetic maps and their Arabidopsis homologs detected by sequence similarity. Microsyntenic regions were detected between all five Arabidopsis chromosomes and seven of the eight linkage groups of the Prunus reference map. An additional 1097 peach ESTs that are anchored to 431 BAC contigs of the peach physical map and their Arabidopsis homologs were also analyzed. Microsyntenic regions were detected in 77 BAC contigs. The syntenic regions from both data sets were short and contained only a couple of conserved gene pairs. The synteny between peach and Arabidopsis was fragmentary; all the Prunus linkage groups containing syntenic regions matched to more than two different Arabidopsis chromosomes, and most BAC contigs with multiple conserved syntenic regions corresponded to multiple Arabidopsis chromosomes. Using the same peach EST datasets and their Arabidopsis homologs, we also detected conserved syntenic regions in the pseudo-ancestral Arabidopsis genome. In many cases, the gene order and content of peach regions was more conserved in the ancestral genome than in the present Arabidopsis region. Statistical significance of each syntenic group was calculated using simulated Arabidopsis genome. Conclusion We

  1. Genetic Control of Root Hair Development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Schiefelbein, JW; Somerville, C

    1990-01-01

    Visual examination of roots from 12,000 mutagenized Arabidopsis seedlings has led to the identification of more than 40 mutants impaired in root hair morphogenesis. Mutants from four phenotypic classes have been characterized in detail, and genetic tests show that these result from single nuclear recessive mutations in four different genes designated RHD1, RHD2, RHD3, and RHD4. The phenotypic analysis of the mutants and homozygous double mutants has led to a proposed model for root hair development and the stages at which the genes are normally required. The RHD1 gene product appears to be necessary for proper initiation of root hairs, whereas the RHD2, RHD3, and RHD4 gene products are required for normal hair elongation. These results demonstrate that root hair development in Arabidopsis is amenable to genetic dissection and should prove to be a useful model system to study the molecular mechanisms governing cell differentiation in plants. PMID:12354956

  2. A reference map of the Arabidopsis thaliana mature pollen proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Noir, Sandra; Braeutigam, Anne; Colby, Thomas; Schmidt, Juergen; Panstruga, Ralph . E-mail: panstrug@mpiz-koeln.mpg.de

    2005-12-02

    The male gametophyte (or pollen) plays an obligatory role during sexual reproduction of higher plants. The extremely reduced complexity of this organ renders pollen a valuable experimental system for studying fundamental aspects of plant biology such as cell fate determination, cell-cell interactions, cell polarity, and tip-growth. Here, we present the first reference map of the mature pollen proteome of the dicotyledonous model plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana. Based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight, and electrospray quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we reproducibly identified 121 different proteins in 145 individual spots. The presence, subcellular localization, and functional classification of the identified proteins are discussed in relation to the pollen transcriptome and the full protein complement encoded by the nuclear Arabidopsis genome.

  3. Genetic control of polar cell expansion in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Schiefelbein, J.; Ford, S. ); Somerville, C. )

    1990-05-01

    Certain plant cells, like root hairs and pollen tubes, exhibit polar cell growth, with expansion limited to the tip of the growing cell. In order to understand the mechanisms regulating polar cell expansion, we are studying the process of root hair elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana. By visually screening roots from 12,000 mutagenized Arabidopsis seedlings on Petri dishes, more than 40 root hair mutants have been identified. We have focused our attention on mutants that possess nuclear recessive mutations in three genes (RHD2, RHD3, and RDH4) that appear to be involved in controlling polar cell growth in root hairs. We are currently using cellular, genetic, and molecular approaches to understand these genes' normal roles in root hair elongation.

  4. Composition and function of P bodies in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado-Bonilla, Luis D.

    2014-01-01

    mRNA accumulation is tightly regulated by diverse molecular pathways. The identification and characterization of enzymes and regulatory proteins involved in controlling the fate of mRNA offers the possibility to broaden our understanding of posttranscriptional gene regulation. Processing bodies (P bodies, PB) are cytoplasmic protein complexes involved in degradation and translational arrest of mRNA. Composition and dynamics of these subcellular structures have been studied in animal systems, yeasts and in the model plant Arabidopsis. Their assembly implies the aggregation of specific factors related to decapping, deadenylation, and exoribonucleases that operate synchronously to regulate certain mRNA targets during development and adaptation to stress. Although the general function of PB along with the flow of genetic information is understood, several questions still remain open. This review summarizes data on the composition, potential molecular roles, and biological significance of PB and potentially related proteins in Arabidopsis. PMID:24860588

  5. Arabidopsis YAK1 regulates abscisic acid response and drought resistance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongjin; Ntui, Valentine Otang; Xiong, Liming

    2016-07-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone that controls several plant processes such as seed germination, seedling growth, and abiotic stress response. Here, we report that AtYak1 plays an important role in ABA signaling and postgermination growth in Arabidopsis. AtYak1 knockout mutant plants were hyposensitive to ABA inhibition of seed germination, cotyledon greening, seedling growth, and stomatal movement. atyak1-1 mutant plants display reduced drought stress resistance, as evidenced by water loss rate and survival rate. Molecular genetic analysis revealed that AtYak1 deficiency led to elevated expression of stomatal-related gene, MYB60, and down-regulation of several stress-responsive genes. Altogether, these results indicate that AtYak1 plays a role as a positive regulator in ABA-mediated drought response in Arabidopsis. PMID:27264339

  6. The Arabidopsis Cytosolic Ribosomal Proteome: From form to Function

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Adam J.

    2013-01-01

    The cytosolic ribosomal proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana has been studied intensively by a range of proteomics approaches and is now one of the most well characterized eukaryotic ribosomal proteomes. Plant cytosolic ribosomes are distinguished from other eukaryotic ribosomes by unique proteins, unique post-translational modifications and an abundance of ribosomal proteins for which multiple divergent paralogs are expressed and incorporated. Study of the A. thaliana ribosome has now progressed well beyond a simple cataloging of protein parts and is focused strongly on elucidating the functions of specific ribosomal proteins, their paralogous isoforms and covalent modifications. This review summarises current knowledge concerning the Arabidopsis cytosolic ribosomal proteome and highlights potentially fruitful areas of future research in this fast moving and important area. PMID:23459595

  7. Lil3 dimerization and chlorophyll binding in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Mork-Jansson, Astrid Elisabeth; Gargano, Daniela; Kmiec, Karol; Furnes, Clemens; Shevela, Dmitriy; Eichacker, Lutz Andreas

    2015-10-01

    The two-helix light harvesting like (Lil) protein Lil3 belongs to the family of chlorophyll binding light harvesting proteins of photosynthetic membranes. A function in tetrapyrrol synthesis and stabilization of geranylgeraniol reductase has been shown. Lil proteins contain the chlorophyll a/b-binding motif; however, binding of chlorophyll has not been demonstrated. We find that Lil3.2 from Arabidopsis thaliana forms heterodimers with Lil3.1 and binds chlorophyll. Lil3.2 heterodimerization (25±7.8 nM) is favored relative to homodimerization (431±59 nM). Interaction of Lil3.2 with chlorophyll a (231±49 nM) suggests that heterodimerization precedes binding of chlorophyll in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  8. The Arabidopsis nectary is an ABC-independent floral structure.

    PubMed

    Baum, S F; Eshed, Y; Bowman, J L

    2001-11-01

    In contrast to the conservation of floral organ order in angiosperm flowers, nectary glands can be found in various floral and extrafloral positions. Since in Arabidopsis, the nectary develops only at the base of stamens, its specification was assayed with regard to the floral homeotic ABC selector genes. We show that the nectary can form independently of any floral organ identity gene but is restricted to the 'third whorl' domain in the flower. This domain is, in part, specified redundantly by LEAFY and UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS. Even though nectary glands arise from cells previously expressing the B class genes, their proper development requires the down-regulation of B class gene activity. While CRABS CLAW is essential for nectary gland formation, its ectopic expression is not sufficient to induce ectopic nectary formation. We show that in Arabidopsis multiple factors act to restrict the nectary to the flower, and surprisingly, some of these factors are LEAFY and UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS. PMID:11714690

  9. Genetic analysis of photoreceptor action pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The specific strategies and long-term goals of this proposal remain intact relative to the original proposal. We continue to isolate and characterize photomorphogenic mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. The molecular and biochemical characterization of one of these mutants, det1, has led to one publication of original data and to one Society for Experimental Biology Symposium paper (see below). The phenotype of a second mutant, det2, has also been studied during this funding period. In addition, we have continued work on a general strategy to isolate mutations in trans-acting regulatory factors that mediate light-regulated gene expression, and have identified several potentially interesting regulatory mutants. In the third funding period, we will concentrate on the genetical, biochemical, and molecular characterization of these new mutants. Construction of double mutants between the new mutants and the previously characterized morphological mutants should allow us to construct a pathway for light-regulated seedling development in Arabidopsis.

  10. Whole genome duplications in plants: an overview from Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    del Pozo, Juan Carlos; Ramirez-Parra, Elena

    2015-12-01

    Polyploidy is a common event in plants that involves the acquisition of more than two complete sets of chromosomes. Allopolyploidy originates from interspecies hybrids while autopolyploidy originates from intraspecies whole genome duplication (WGD) events. In spite of inconveniences derived from chromosomic rearrangement during polyploidization, natural plant polyploids species often exhibit improved growth vigour and adaptation to adverse environments, conferring evolutionary advantages. These advantages have also been incorporated into crop breeding programmes. Many tetraploid crops show increased stress tolerance, although the molecular mechanisms underlying these different adaptation abilities are poorly known. Understanding the physiological, cellular, and molecular mechanisms coupled to WGD, in both allo- and autopolyploidy, is a major challenge. Over the last few years, several studies, many of them in Arabidopsis, are shedding light on the basis of genetic, genomic, and epigenomic changes linked to WGD. In this review we summarize and discuss the latest advances made in Arabidopsis polyploidy, but also in other agronomic plant species.

  11. Arabidopsis TTR1 causes LRR-dependent lethal systemic necrosis, rather than systemic acquired resistance, to Tobacco ringspot virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most Arabidopsis ecotypes display tolerance to the Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV), but a subset of Arabidopsis ecotypes, including Estland (Est), develop lethal systemic necrosis (LSN), which differs from the localized hypersensitive responses (HRs) or systemic acquired resistance (SAR) characteristi...

  12. Function of polar glycerolipids in flower development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuki

    2015-10-01

    The flower lipidome is an unexplored frontier of plant lipid research as compared with the major advances in photosynthetic or storage organs. However, ample evidence from recent molecular biological studies suggests that lipids play crucial roles in coordinating flower development rather than being an inert end product of metabolism. This review summarizes the current understanding of the function of glycerolipids in flower development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  13. Looking for Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidases involved in lignin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Joaquín; Esteban-Carrasco, Alberto; Zapata, José Miguel

    2013-06-01

    Monolignol polymerization into lignin is catalyzed by peroxidases or laccases. Recently, a Zinnia elegans peroxidase (ZePrx) that is considered responsible for monolignol polymerization in this plant has been molecularly and functionally characterized. Nevertheless, Arabidopsis thaliana has become an alternative model plant for studies of lignification, filling the gaps that may occur with Z. elegans. The arabidopsis genome offers the possibility of performing bioinformatic analyses and data mining that are not yet feasible with other plant species, in order to obtain preliminary evidence on the role of genes and proteins. In our search for arabidopsis homologs to the ZePrx, we performed an exhaustive in silico characterization of everything from the protein to the transcript of Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidases (AtPrxs) homologous to ZePrx, with the aim of identifying one or more peroxidases that may be involved in monolignol polymerization. Nine peroxidases (AtPrx 4, 5, 52, 68, 67, 36, 14, 49 and 72) with an E-value greater than 1e-80 with ZePrx were selected for this study. The results demonstrate that a high level of 1D, 2D and 3D homology between these AtPrxs and ZePrx are not always accompanied by the presence of the same electrostatic and mRNA properties that indicate a peroxidase is involved in lignin biosynthesis. In summary, we can confirm that the peroxidases involved in lignification are among AtPrx 4, 52, 49 and 72. Their structural and mRNA features indicate that exert their action in the cell wall similar to ZePrx.

  14. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyuha; Reinhard, Carsten; Serra, Heïdi; Ziolkowski, Piotr A; Underwood, Charles J; Zhao, Xiaohui; Hardcastle, Thomas J; Yelina, Nataliya E; Griffin, Catherine; Jackson, Matthew; Mézard, Christine; McVean, Gil; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Henderson, Ian R

    2016-07-01

    Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1) R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity.

  15. Gravity-regulated gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sederoff, Heike; Brown, Christopher S.; Heber, Steffen; Kajla, Jyoti D.; Kumar, Sandeep; Lomax, Terri L.; Wheeler, Benjamin; Yalamanchili, Roopa

    Plant growth and development is regulated by changes in environmental signals. Plants sense environmental changes and respond to them by modifying gene expression programs to ad-just cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. Functional expression of genes comprises many different processes including transcription, translation, post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications, as well as the degradation of RNA and proteins. Recently, it was discovered that small RNAs (sRNA, 18-24 nucleotides long), which are heritable and systemic, are key elements in regulating gene expression in response to biotic and abiotic changes. Sev-eral different classes of sRNAs have been identified that are part of a non-cell autonomous and phloem-mobile network of regulators affecting transcript stability, translational kinetics, and DNA methylation patterns responsible for heritable transcriptional silencing (epigenetics). Our research has focused on gene expression changes in response to gravistimulation of Arabidopsis roots. Using high-throughput technologies including microarrays and 454 sequencing, we iden-tified rapid changes in transcript abundance of genes as well as differential expression of small RNA in Arabidopsis root apices after minutes of reorientation. Some of the differentially regu-lated transcripts are encoded by genes that are important for the bending response. Functional mutants of those genes respond faster to reorientation than the respective wild type plants, indicating that these proteins are repressors of differential cell elongation. We compared the gravity responsive sRNAs to the changes in transcript abundances of their putative targets and identified several potential miRNA: target pairs. Currently, we are using mutant and transgenic Arabidopsis plants to characterize the function of those miRNAs and their putative targets in gravitropic and phototropic responses in Arabidopsis.

  16. Multi-Element Bioimaging of Arabidopsis thaliana Roots1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Salt, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Better understanding of root function is central for the development of plants with more efficient nutrient uptake and translocation. We here present a method for multielement bioimaging at the cellular level in roots of the genetic model system Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using conventional protocols for microscopy, we observed that diffusible ions such as potassium and sodium were lost during sample dehydration. Thus, we developed a protocol that preserves ions in their native, cellular environment. Briefly, fresh roots are encapsulated in paraffin, cryo-sectioned, and freeze dried. Samples are finally analyzed by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, utilizing a specially designed internal standard procedure. The method can be further developed to maintain the native composition of proteins, enzymes, RNA, and DNA, making it attractive in combination with other omics techniques. To demonstrate the potential of the method, we analyzed a mutant of Arabidopsis unable to synthesize the metal chelator nicotianamine. The mutant accumulated substantially more zinc and manganese than the wild type in the tissues surrounding the vascular cylinder. For iron, the images looked completely different, with iron bound mainly in the epidermis of the wild-type plants but confined to the cortical cell walls of the mutant. The method offers the power of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to be fully employed, thereby providing a basis for detailed studies of ion transport in roots. Being applicable to Arabidopsis, the molecular and genetic approaches available in this system can now be fully exploited in order to gain a better mechanistic understanding of these processes. PMID:27566167

  17. Brassinosteroid-induced exaggerated growth in hydroponically grown Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Arteca, Jeannette M.; Arteca, Richard N.

    2001-05-01

    The effects of root application of brassinolide (BL) on the growth and development of Arabidopsis plants (Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia [L.] Heynh) were evaluated. Initially, all leaves were evaluated on plants 18, 22, 26 and 29 days old. The younger leaves were found to exhibit maximal petiole elongation and upward leaf bending in response to BL treatment. Therefore, based on these results leaves 6, 7 and 8 on 22-24-day-old plants were selected for all subsequent studies. Elongation along the length of the petiole in response to BL treatment was uniform with the exception of an approximately 4 mm region next to the leaf where upward curvature was observed. Both BL and 24-epibrassinolide (24-epiBL) were evaluated, with BL being more effective at lower concentrations than 24-epiBL. The exaggerated growth induced by 0.1 µM BL was not observed in plants treated with 1 000-fold higher concentrations of GA3, IAA, NAA or 2,4-D (100 µM). In addition, no exaggerated growth effects were observed when plants were treated with 200 ppm ethylene or 1 mM ACC. All treatments with BL, NAA, 2,4-D, IAA or ACC promoted ethylene and ACC production in wild type Arabidopsis plants, but only BL triggered exaggerated plant growth. BL also promoted exaggerated growth and elevated levels of ACC and ethylene in the ethylene insensitive mutant etr1-3, showing that the effect of BR on growth is independent of ethylene. This work provides evidence that BR-induced exaggerated growth of Arabidopsis plants is independent of gibberellins, auxins and ethylene.

  18. The Arabidopsis CDPK-SnRK superfamily of protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Hrabak, Estelle M; Chan, Catherine W M; Gribskov, Michael; Harper, Jeffrey F; Choi, Jung H; Halford, Nigel; Kudla, Jorg; Luan, Sheng; Nimmo, Hugh G; Sussman, Michael R; Thomas, Martine; Walker-Simmons, Kay; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Harmon, Alice C

    2003-06-01

    The CDPK-SnRK superfamily consists of seven types of serine-threonine protein kinases: calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPKs), CDPK-related kinases (CRKs), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase kinases (PPCKs), PEP carboxylase kinase-related kinases (PEPRKs), calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMKs), calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CCaMKs), and SnRKs. Within this superfamily, individual isoforms and subfamilies contain distinct regulatory domains, subcellular targeting information, and substrate specificities. Our analysis of the Arabidopsis genome identified 34 CDPKs, eight CRKs, two PPCKs, two PEPRKs, and 38 SnRKs. No definitive examples were found for a CCaMK similar to those previously identified in lily (Lilium longiflorum) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) or for a CaMK similar to those in animals or yeast. CDPKs are present in plants and a specific subgroup of protists, but CRKs, PPCKs, PEPRKs, and two of the SnRK subgroups have been found only in plants. CDPKs and at least one SnRK have been implicated in decoding calcium signals in Arabidopsis. Analysis of intron placements supports the hypothesis that CDPKs, CRKs, PPCKs and PEPRKs have a common evolutionary origin; however there are no conserved intron positions between these kinases and the SnRK subgroup. CDPKs and SnRKs are found on all five Arabidopsis chromosomes. The presence of closely related kinases in regions of the genome known to have arisen by genome duplication indicates that these kinases probably arose by divergence from common ancestors. The PlantsP database provides a resource of continuously updated information on protein kinases from Arabidopsis and other plants.

  19. Rhizobacterial volatiles affect the growth of fungi and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Vespermann, Anja; Kai, Marco; Piechulla, Birgit

    2007-09-01

    Volatiles of Stenotrophomonas, Serratia, and Bacillus species inhibited mycelial growth of many fungi and Arabidopsis thaliana (40 to 98%), and volatiles of Pseudomonas species and Burkholderia cepacia retarded the growth to lesser extents. Aspergillus niger and Fusarium species were resistant, and B. cepacia and Staphylococcus epidermidis promoted the growth of Rhizoctonia solani and A. thaliana. Bacterial volatiles provide a new source of compounds with antibiotic and growth-promoting features.

  20. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Heïdi; Ziolkowski, Piotr A.; Yelina, Nataliya E.; Jackson, Matthew; Mézard, Christine; McVean, Gil; Henderson, Ian R.

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1) R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity. PMID:27415776

  1. Genetic Architecture of Natural Variation in Thermal Responses of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Bermejo, Eduardo; Zhu, Wangsheng; Tasset, Celine; Eimer, Hannes; Sureshkumar, Sridevi; Singh, Rupali; Sundaramoorthi, Vignesh; Colling, Luana; Balasubramanian, Sureshkumar

    2015-09-01

    Wild strains of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) exhibit extensive natural variation in a wide variety of traits, including response to environmental changes. Ambient temperature is one of the major external factors that modulates plant growth and development. Here, we analyze the genetic architecture of natural variation in thermal responses of Arabidopsis. Exploiting wild accessions and recombinant inbred lines, we reveal extensive phenotypic variation in response to ambient temperature in distinct developmental traits such as hypocotyl elongation, root elongation, and flowering time. We show that variation in thermal response differs between traits, suggesting that the individual phenotypes do not capture all the variation associated with thermal response. Genome-wide association studies and quantitative trait locus analyses reveal that multiple rare alleles contribute to the genetic architecture of variation in thermal response. We identify at least 20 genomic regions that are associated with variation in thermal response. Further characterizations of temperature sensitivity quantitative trait loci that are shared between traits reveal a role for the blue-light receptor CRYPTOCHROME2 (CRY2) in thermosensory growth responses. We show the accession Cape Verde Islands is less sensitive to changes in ambient temperature, and through transgenic analysis, we demonstrate that allelic variation at CRY2 underlies this temperature insensitivity across several traits. Transgenic analyses suggest that the allelic effects of CRY2 on thermal response are dependent on genetic background suggestive of the presence of modifiers. In addition, our results indicate that complex light and temperature interactions, in a background-dependent manner, govern growth responses in Arabidopsis. PMID:26195568

  2. Transcriptomic and lipidomic profiles of glycerolipids during Arabidopsis flower development.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuki; Teo, Norman Z W; Shui, Guanghou; Chua, Christine H L; Cheong, Wei-Fun; Parameswaran, Sriram; Koizumi, Ryota; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Wenk, Markus R; Ito, Toshiro

    2014-07-01

    Flower glycerolipids are the yet-to-be discovered frontier of the lipidome. Although ample evidence suggests important roles for glycerolipids in flower development, stage-specific lipid profiling in tiny Arabidopsis flowers is challenging. Here, we utilized a transgenic system to synchronize flower development in Arabidopsis. The transgenic plant PAP1::AP1-GR ap1-1 cal-5 showed synchronized flower development upon dexamethasone treatment, which enabled massive harvesting of floral samples of homogenous developmental stages for glycerolipid profiling. Glycerolipid profiling revealed a decrease in concentrations of phospholipids involved in signaling during the early development stages, such as phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol, and a marked increase in concentrations of nonphosphorous galactolipids during the late stage. Moreover, in the midstage, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate concentration was increased transiently, which suggests the stimulation of the phosphoinositide metabolism. Accompanying transcriptomic profiling of relevant glycerolipid metabolic genes revealed simultaneous induction of multiple phosphoinositide biosynthetic genes associated with the increased phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate concentration, with a high degree of differential expression patterns for genes encoding other glycerolipid-metabolic genes. The phosphatidic acid phosphatase mutant pah1 pah2 showed flower developmental defect, suggesting a role for phosphatidic acid in flower development. Our concurrent profiling of glycerolipids and relevant metabolic gene expression revealed distinct metabolic pathways stimulated at different stages of flower development in Arabidopsis.

  3. [Orthologs of arabidopsis CLAVATA 1 gene in cultivated Brassicaceae plants].

    PubMed

    Martynov, V V; Tsvetkov, I L; Khavkin, E E

    2004-01-01

    In arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the CLAVATA1 (CLV1) gene is involved in maintaining the balance between the stem cells in the central zone of the stem apical meristem and the determined cells at its periphery. However, CLV1 has not been previously characterized in other Brassicaceae. Using the direct amplification of genomic DNA, we obtained a full-length CLV1 ortholog from canola plants (Brassica napus), and also three CLV1 fragments from rape (B. rapa), canola (B. napus), and false flax (Camelina sativa), which corresponded to the transmembrane domain and a part of the kinase domain of the CLAVATA1 protein. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the full-size CLV1 ortholog from B. napus were similar by 81 and 87% to the prototype gene from arabidopsis; in the case of shorter gene fragments, the similarity was as high as 91-93 and 98%, respectively. By their primary structure, the CLV1 genes in the Brassicaceae considerably differ from its putative structural homologs beyond this family.

  4. Small Glycosylated Lignin Oligomers Are Stored in Arabidopsis Leaf Vacuoles

    PubMed Central

    Dima, Oana; Morreel, Kris; Vanholme, Bartel; Kim, Hoon; Ralph, John; Boerjan, Wout

    2015-01-01

    Lignin is an aromatic polymer derived from the combinatorial coupling of monolignol radicals in the cell wall. Recently, various glycosylated lignin oligomers have been revealed in Arabidopsis thaliana. Given that monolignol oxidation and monolignol radical coupling are known to occur in the apoplast, and glycosylation in the cytoplasm, it raises questions about the subcellular localization of glycosylated lignin oligomer biosynthesis and their storage. By metabolite profiling of Arabidopsis leaf vacuoles, we show that the leaf vacuole stores a large number of these small glycosylated lignin oligomers. Their structural variety and the incorporation of alternative monomers, as observed in Arabidopsis mutants with altered monolignol biosynthesis, indicate that they are all formed by combinatorial radical coupling. In contrast to the common believe that combinatorial coupling is restricted to the apoplast, we hypothesized that the aglycones of these compounds are made within the cell. To investigate this, leaf protoplast cultures were cofed with 13C6-labeled coniferyl alcohol and a 13C4-labeled dimer of coniferyl alcohol. Metabolite profiling of the cofed protoplasts provided strong support for the occurrence of intracellular monolignol coupling. We therefore propose a metabolic pathway involving intracellular combinatorial coupling of monolignol radicals, followed by oligomer glycosylation and vacuolar import, which shares characteristics with both lignin and lignan biosynthesis. PMID:25700483

  5. Genetic analysis of growth-regulator-induced parthenocarpy in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Vivian-Smith, A; Koltunow, A M

    1999-10-01

    In Arabidopsis, seedless silique development or parthenocarpy can be induced by the application of various plant growth regulators (PGRs) to unfertilized pistils. Ecotype-specific responses were observed in the Arabidopsis ecotypes Columbia and Landsberg relative to the type of PGR and level applied. The parthenocarpic response was greatest in ecotype Landsberg, and comparisons of fruit growth and morphology were studied primarily in this ecotype. Gibberellic acid application (10 micromol pistil(-1)) caused development similar to that in pollinated pistils, while benzyladenine (1 micromol pistil(-1)) and naphthylacetic acid (10 micromol pistil(-1)) treatment produced shorter siliques. Naphthylacetic acid primarily modified mesocarp cell expansion. Arabidopsis mutants were employed to examine potential dependencies on gibberellin biosynthesis (ga1-3, ga4-1, and ga5-1) and perception (spy-4 and gai) during parthenocarpic silique development. Emasculated spy-4 pistils were neither obviously parthenocarpic nor deficient in PGR perception. By contrast, emasculated gai mutants did not produce parthenocarpic siliques following gibberellic acid application, but silique development occurred following pollination or application of auxin and cytokinin. Pollinated gai siliques had decreased cell numbers and morphologically resembled auxin-induced parthenocarpic siliques. This shows that a number of independent and possibly redundant pathways can direct hormone-induced parthenocarpy, and that endogenous gibberellins play a role in regulating cell expansion and promoting cell division in carpels. PMID:10517835

  6. Abscisic acid (ABA) regulation of Arabidopsis SR protein gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Tiago M D; Carvalho, Raquel F; Richardson, Dale N; Duque, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are major modulators of alternative splicing, a key generator of proteomic diversity and flexible means of regulating gene expression likely to be crucial in plant environmental responses. Indeed, mounting evidence implicates splicing factors in signal transduction of the abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone, which plays pivotal roles in the response to various abiotic stresses. Using real-time RT-qPCR, we analyzed total steady-state transcript levels of the 18 SR and two SR-like genes from Arabidopsis thaliana in seedlings treated with ABA and in genetic backgrounds with altered expression of the ABA-biosynthesis ABA2 and the ABA-signaling ABI1 and ABI4 genes. We also searched for ABA-responsive cis elements in the upstream regions of the 20 genes. We found that members of the plant-specific SC35-Like (SCL) Arabidopsis SR protein subfamily are distinctively responsive to exogenous ABA, while the expression of seven SR and SR-related genes is affected by alterations in key components of the ABA pathway. Finally, despite pervasiveness of established ABA-responsive promoter elements in Arabidopsis SR and SR-like genes, their expression is likely governed by additional, yet unidentified cis-acting elements. Overall, this study pinpoints SR34, SR34b, SCL30a, SCL28, SCL33, RS40, SR45 and SR45a as promising candidates for involvement in ABA-mediated stress responses. PMID:25268622

  7. Immunolocalization of integrin-like proteins in Arabidopsis and Chara

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katembe, W. J.; Swatzell, L. J.; Makaroff, C. A.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1997-01-01

    Integrins are a large family of integral plasma membrane proteins that link the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton in animal cells. As a first step in determining if integrin-like proteins are involved in gravitropic signal transduction pathways, we have used a polyclonal antibody against the chicken beta1 integrin subunit in western blot analyses and immunofluorescence microscopy to gain information on the size and location of these proteins in plants. Several different polypeptides are recognized by the anti-integrin antibody in roots and shoots of Arabidopsis and in the internodal cells and rhizoids of Chara. These cross-reactive polypeptides are associated with cellular membranes, a feature which is consistent with the known location of integrins in animal systems. In immunofluorescence studies of Arabidopsis roots, a strong signal was obtained from labeling integrin-like proteins in root cap cells, and there was little or no immunolabel in other regions of the root tip. While the antibody stained throughout Chara rhizoids, the highest density of immunolabel was at the tip. Thus, in both Arabidopsis roots and Chara rhizoids, the sites of gravity perception/transduction appear to be enriched in integrin-like molecules.

  8. Strigolactones suppress adventitious rooting in Arabidopsis and pea.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Amanda; Mason, Michael Glenn; De Cuyper, Carolien; Brewer, Philip B; Herold, Silvia; Agusti, Javier; Geelen, Danny; Greb, Thomas; Goormachtig, Sofie; Beeckman, Tom; Beveridge, Christine Anne

    2012-04-01

    Adventitious root formation is essential for the propagation of many commercially important plant species and involves the formation of roots from nonroot tissues such as stems or leaves. Here, we demonstrate that the plant hormone strigolactone suppresses adventitious root formation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and pea (Pisum sativum). Strigolactone-deficient and response mutants of both species have enhanced adventitious rooting. CYCLIN B1 expression, an early marker for the initiation of adventitious root primordia in Arabidopsis, is enhanced in more axillary growth2 (max2), a strigolactone response mutant, suggesting that strigolactones restrain the number of adventitious roots by inhibiting the very first formative divisions of the founder cells. Strigolactones and cytokinins appear to act independently to suppress adventitious rooting, as cytokinin mutants are strigolactone responsive and strigolactone mutants are cytokinin responsive. In contrast, the interaction between the strigolactone and auxin signaling pathways in regulating adventitious rooting appears to be more complex. Strigolactone can at least partially revert the stimulatory effect of auxin on adventitious rooting, and auxin can further increase the number of adventitious roots in max mutants. We present a model depicting the interaction of strigolactones, cytokinins, and auxin in regulating adventitious root formation. PMID:22323776

  9. Rapid endocytosis is triggered upon imbibition in Arabidopsis seeds

    PubMed Central

    Pagnussat, Luciana; Burbach, Christian; Baluška, František; de la Canal, Laura

    2012-01-01

    During seed imbibition and embryo activation, rapid change from a metabolically resting state to the activation of diverse extracellular and/or membrane bound molecules is essential and, hence, endocytosis could be activated too. In fact, we have documented endocytic internalization of the membrane impermeable endocytic tracer FM4–64 already upon 30 min of imbibition of Arabidopsis seeds. This finding suggest that endocytosis is activated early during seed imbibition in Arabidopsis. Immunolocalization of rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) complexed with boron showed that whereas this pectin is localized only in the cell walls of dry seed embryos, it starts to be intracellular once the imbibition started. Brefeldin A (BFA) exposure resulted in recruitment of the intracellular RG-II pectin complexes into the endocytic BFA-induced compartments, confirming the endocytic origin of the RG-II signal detected intracellularly. Finally, germination was significantly delayed when Arabidopsis seeds were germinated in the presence of inhibitors of endocytic pathways, suggesting that trafficking of extracellular molecules might play an important role in the overcome of germination. This work constitutes the first demonstration of endocytic processes during germination and opens new perspectives about the role of the extracellular matrix and membrane components in seed germination. PMID:22476454

  10. A Polyamine Metabolon Involving Aminopropyl Transferase Complexes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Panicot, Mireia; Minguet, Eugenio G.; Ferrando, Alejandro; Alcázar, Rubén; Blázquez, Miguel A.; Carbonell, Juan; Altabella, Teresa; Koncz, Csaba; Tiburcio, Antonio F.

    2002-01-01

    The conversion of putrescine to spermidine in the biosynthetic pathway of plant polyamines is catalyzed by two closely related spermidine synthases, SPDS1 and SPDS2, in Arabidopsis. In the yeast two-hybrid system, SPDS2 was found to interact with SPDS1 and a novel protein, SPMS (spermine synthase), which is homologous with SPDS2 and SPDS1. SPMS interacts with both SPDS1 and SPDS2 in yeast and in vitro. Unlike SPDS1 and SPDS2, SPMS failed to suppress the speΔ3 deficiency of spermidine synthase in yeast. However, SPMS was able to complement the speΔ4 spermine deficiency in yeast, indicating that SPMS is a novel spermine synthase. The SPDS and SPMS proteins showed no homodimerization but formed heterodimers in vitro. Pairwise coexpression of hemagglutinin- and c-Myc epitope–labeled proteins in Arabidopsis cells confirmed the existence of coimmunoprecipitating SPDS1-SPDS2 and SDPS2-SPMS heterodimers in vivo. The epitope-labeled SPDS and SPMS proteins copurified with protein complexes ranging in size from 650 to 750 kD. Our data demonstrate the existence of a metabolon involving at least the last two steps of polyamine biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:12368503

  11. A polyamine metabolon involving aminopropyl transferase complexes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Panicot, Mireia; Minguet, Eugenio G; Ferrando, Alejandro; Alcázar, Rubén; Blázquez, Miguel A; Carbonell, Juan; Altabella, Teresa; Koncz, Csaba; Tiburcio, Antonio F

    2002-10-01

    The conversion of putrescine to spermidine in the biosynthetic pathway of plant polyamines is catalyzed by two closely related spermidine synthases, SPDS1 and SPDS2, in Arabidopsis. In the yeast two-hybrid system, SPDS2 was found to interact with SPDS1 and a novel protein, SPMS (spermine synthase), which is homologous with SPDS2 and SPDS1. SPMS interacts with both SPDS1 and SPDS2 in yeast and in vitro. Unlike SPDS1 and SPDS2, SPMS failed to suppress the speDelta3 deficiency of spermidine synthase in yeast. However, SPMS was able to complement the speDelta4 spermine deficiency in yeast, indicating that SPMS is a novel spermine synthase. The SPDS and SPMS proteins showed no homodimerization but formed heterodimers in vitro. Pairwise coexpression of hemagglutinin- and c-Myc epitope-labeled proteins in Arabidopsis cells confirmed the existence of coimmunoprecipitating SPDS1-SPDS2 and SDPS2-SPMS heterodimers in vivo. The epitope-labeled SPDS and SPMS proteins copurified with protein complexes ranging in size from 650 to 750 kD. Our data demonstrate the existence of a metabolon involving at least the last two steps of polyamine biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

  12. The Significance of Hydrogen Sulfide for Arabidopsis Seed Germination

    PubMed Central

    Baudouin, Emmanuel; Poilevey, Aurélie; Hewage, Nishodi Indiketi; Cochet, Françoise; Puyaubert, Juliette; Bailly, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) recently emerged as an important gaseous signaling molecule in plants. In this study, we investigated the possible functions of H2S in regulating Arabidopsis seed germination. NaHS treatments delayed seed germination in a dose-dependent manner and were ineffective in releasing seed dormancy. Interestingly, endogenous H2S content was enhanced in germinating seeds. This increase was correlated with higher activity of three enzymes (L-cysteine desulfhydrase, D-cysteine desulfhydrase, and β-cyanoalanine synthase) known as sources of H2S in plants. The H2S scavenger hypotaurine and the D/L cysteine desulfhydrase inhibitor propargylglycine significantly delayed seed germination. We analyzed the germinative capacity of des1 seeds mutated in Arabidopsis cytosolic L-cysteine desulfhydrase. Although the mutant seeds do not exhibit germination-evoked H2S formation, they retained similar germination capacity as the wild-type seeds. In addition, des1 seeds responded similarly to temperature and were as sensitive to ABA as wild type seeds. Taken together, these data suggest that, although its metabolism is stimulated upon seed imbibition, H2S plays, if any, a marginal role in regulating Arabidopsis seed germination under standard conditions. PMID:27446159

  13. The Significance of Hydrogen Sulfide for Arabidopsis Seed Germination.

    PubMed

    Baudouin, Emmanuel; Poilevey, Aurélie; Hewage, Nishodi Indiketi; Cochet, Françoise; Puyaubert, Juliette; Bailly, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) recently emerged as an important gaseous signaling molecule in plants. In this study, we investigated the possible functions of H2S in regulating Arabidopsis seed germination. NaHS treatments delayed seed germination in a dose-dependent manner and were ineffective in releasing seed dormancy. Interestingly, endogenous H2S content was enhanced in germinating seeds. This increase was correlated with higher activity of three enzymes (L-cysteine desulfhydrase, D-cysteine desulfhydrase, and β-cyanoalanine synthase) known as sources of H2S in plants. The H2S scavenger hypotaurine and the D/L cysteine desulfhydrase inhibitor propargylglycine significantly delayed seed germination. We analyzed the germinative capacity of des1 seeds mutated in Arabidopsis cytosolic L-cysteine desulfhydrase. Although the mutant seeds do not exhibit germination-evoked H2S formation, they retained similar germination capacity as the wild-type seeds. In addition, des1 seeds responded similarly to temperature and were as sensitive to ABA as wild type seeds. Taken together, these data suggest that, although its metabolism is stimulated upon seed imbibition, H2S plays, if any, a marginal role in regulating Arabidopsis seed germination under standard conditions.

  14. The Role of Gravity on the Reproduction of Arabidopsis Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoshizaki, T.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of gravity as a necessary environmental factor for higher plants to complete their life cycle was examined. Arabidopsis thalliana (L.) Heynh. Columbia strain plants were grown continuously for three generations in a simulated micro-g environment as induced by horizontal clinostats. Growth, development and reproduction were followed. The Arabidopsis plants were selected for three generations on clinostats because: (1) a short life cycle of around 35 days; (2) the cells of third generation plants would in theory be free of gravity imprint; and (3) a third generation plant would therefore more than likely grow and respond like a plant growing in a micro-g environment. It is found that gravity is not a required environmental factor for higher plants to complete their life cycle, at least as tested by a horizontal clinostat. Clinostatting does not prevent the completion of the plant life cycle. However, clinostatting does appear to slow down the reproductive process of Arabidopsis plants. Whether higher plants can continue to reproduce for many generations in a true micro-g environment of space can only be determined by long duration experiments in space.

  15. Biosynthesis and Metabolic Engineering of Anthocyanins in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ming-Zhu; Xie, De-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is the first model plant, the genome of which has been sequenced. In general, intensive studies on this model plant over the past nearly 30 years have led to many new revolutionary understandings in every single aspect of plant biology. Here, we review the current understanding of anthocyanin biosynthesis in this model plant. Although the investigation of anthocyanin structures in this model plant was not performed until 2002, numerous studies over the past three decades have been conducted to understand the biosynthesis of anthocyanins. To date, it appears that all pathway genes of anthocyanins have been molecularly, genetically and biochemically characterized in this plant. These fundamental accomplishments have made Arabidopsis an ideal model to understand the regulatory mechanisms of anthocyanin pathway. Several studies have revealed that the biosynthesis of anthocyanins is controlled by WD40-bHLH-MYB (WBM) transcription factor complexes under lighting conditions. However, how different regulatory complexes coordinately and specifically regulate the pathway genes of anthocyanins remains unclear. In this review, we discuss current progresses and findings including structural diversity, regulatory properties and metabolic engineering of anthocyanins in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:24354533

  16. Developmentally distinct MYB genes encode functionally equivalent proteins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, M M; Schiefelbein, J

    2001-05-01

    The duplication and divergence of developmental control genes is thought to have driven morphological diversification during the evolution of multicellular organisms. To examine the molecular basis of this process, we analyzed the functional relationship between two paralogous MYB transcription factor genes, WEREWOLF (WER) and GLABROUS1 (GL1), in Arabidopsis. The WER and GL1 genes specify distinct cell types and exhibit non-overlapping expression patterns during Arabidopsis development. Nevertheless, reciprocal complementation experiments with a series of gene fusions showed that WER and GL1 encode functionally equivalent proteins, and their unique roles in plant development are entirely due to differences in their cis-regulatory sequences. Similar experiments with a distantly related MYB gene (MYB2) showed that its product cannot functionally substitute for WER or GL1. Furthermore, an analysis of the WER and GL1 proteins shows that conserved sequences correspond to specific functional domains. These results provide new insights into the evolution of the MYB gene family in Arabidopsis, and, more generally, they demonstrate that novel developmental gene function may arise solely by the modification of cis-regulatory sequences.

  17. Abscisic Acid (ABA) Regulation of Arabidopsis SR Protein Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Tiago M. D.; Carvalho, Raquel F.; Richardson, Dale N.; Duque, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are major modulators of alternative splicing, a key generator of proteomic diversity and flexible means of regulating gene expression likely to be crucial in plant environmental responses. Indeed, mounting evidence implicates splicing factors in signal transduction of the abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone, which plays pivotal roles in the response to various abiotic stresses. Using real-time RT-qPCR, we analyzed total steady-state transcript levels of the 18 SR and two SR-like genes from Arabidopsis thaliana in seedlings treated with ABA and in genetic backgrounds with altered expression of the ABA-biosynthesis ABA2 and the ABA-signaling ABI1 and ABI4 genes. We also searched for ABA-responsive cis elements in the upstream regions of the 20 genes. We found that members of the plant-specific SC35-Like (SCL) Arabidopsis SR protein subfamily are distinctively responsive to exogenous ABA, while the expression of seven SR and SR-related genes is affected by alterations in key components of the ABA pathway. Finally, despite pervasiveness of established ABA-responsive promoter elements in Arabidopsis SR and SR-like genes, their expression is likely governed by additional, yet unidentified cis-acting elements. Overall, this study pinpoints SR34, SR34b, SCL30a, SCL28, SCL33, RS40, SR45 and SR45a as promising candidates for involvement in ABA-mediated stress responses. PMID:25268622

  18. Regulation of the stability of poly(I)xpoly(C)-induced human fibroblast interferon mRNA: selective inactivation of interferon mRNA and lack of involvement of 2',5'-oligo(A) synthetase activation during the shutoff of interferon production.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, P B; Gupta, S L

    1980-06-01

    The inactivation of interferon mRNA during the shutoff phase of interferon production in poly(I)xpoly(C)-induced human fibroblast cultures is selective. We have determined that the shutoff of interferon production, which takes place from 3 to 8 hr after the beginning of induction, is not associated with an appreciable declined in the rate of bulk cellular protein synthesis or of cellular protein secretion. While the amount of translatable interferon mRNA declined markedly during the shutoff phase, the level of translatable bulk cellular mRNA and the stability of [3H]uridine-labeled mRNA were unaffected. Superinduction with actinomycin D selectively stabilized interferon mRNA with no apparent effect on the stability of bulk cellular mRNA. Furthermore, an activation of the 2',5'-oligo(A) synthetase/endonuclease system does not appear to be involved in the shutoff phenomenon. Uninduced FS-4 cells contained a low basal level of 2'5'-oligo(A) synthetase activity, which was unchanged in poly(I)xpoly(C)-induced cells during the shutoff phase. Treatment of FS-4 cells with interferon for 16-18 hr prior to induction increased the enzyme activity by approximately 200-fold. However, this did not inhibit interferon production after induction with poly(I)xpoly(C) alone or after superinduction with cycloheximide or actinomycin D or both. Furthermore, the rates of decay of interferon production were comparable in cells with either a basal or an increased level of 2',5'-oligo(A) synthetase. Thus a 200-fold increase in 2',5'-oligo(A) synthetase level did not affect either the stability of interferon mRNA or the efficacy of interferon superinduction by metabolic inhibitors.

  19. Arabidopsis genotypes resistant and susceptible to diamondback moth (Lepidoptera: Putellidea): No net effects on insect growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plutella xylostella (L.), diamondback moth (DBM) is a destructive pest of the Brassicaceae including Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynhold. Ecotypes of Arabidopsis vary in the amounts of leaf area consumed when fed on by DBM, which has been used as a measure of resistance to DBM. Recombinant inbred lin...

  20. The role of CAX1 and CAX3 in elemental distribution and abundance in Arabidopsis seed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to alter nutrient partitioning within plant cells is poorly understood. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a family of endomembrane cation exchangers (CAXs) transports Ca(2+) and other cations. However, experiments have not focused on how the distribution and partitioning of calcium ...

  1. Reducing isozyme competition increases target fatty acid accumulation in seed triacylglycerols of transgenic Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One goal of green chemistry is the production of industrially useful fatty acids (FAs) in crop plants. We focus on the engineering of industrial FAs, specifically hydroxy fatty acids (HFA) and conjugated polyenoic fatty acids (a-eleostearic acid, ESA), using Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) as a m...

  2. AIM: A comprehensive Arabidopsis Interactome Module database and related interologs in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Systems biology analysis of protein modules is important for understanding the functional relationships between proteins in the interactome. Here, we present a comprehensive database named AIM for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) interactome modules. The database contains almost 250,000 modules th...

  3. Comparative proteomics of salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana and Thellungiella halophila.

    PubMed

    Pang, Qiuying; Chen, Sixue; Dai, Shaojun; Chen, Yazhou; Wang, Yang; Yan, Xiufeng

    2010-05-01

    Salinity is a major abiotic stress affecting plant cultivation and productivity. Thellungiella halophila is a halophyte and has been used as a model for studying plant salt tolerance. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of salinity tolerance will facilitate the generation of salt tolerant crops. Here we report comparative leaf proteomics of Arabidopsis, a glycophyte, and its close relative Thellungiella, a halophyte, under different salt stress conditions. Proteins from control and NaCl treated Arabidopsis and Thellungiella leaf samples were extracted and separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. A total of 88 protein spots from Arabidopsis gels and 37 protein spots from Thellungiella gels showed significant changes. Out of these spots, a total of 79 and 32 proteins were identified by mass spectrometry in Arabidopsis and Thellungiella, respectively. Most of the identified proteins were involved in photosynthesis, energy metabolism, and stress response in Arabidopsis and Thellungiella. As a complementary approach, isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) LC-MS was used to identify crude microsomal proteins. A total of 31 and 32 differentially expressed proteins were identified in Arabidopsis and Thellungiella under salt treatment, respectively. Overall, there were more proteins changed in abundance in Arabidopsis than in Thellungiella. Distinct patterns of protein changes in the two species were observed. Collectively, this work represents the most extensive proteomic description of salinity responses of Arabidopsis and Thellungiella and has improved our knowledge of salt tolerance in glycophytes and halophytes. PMID:20377188

  4. Arabidopsis GPAT9 contributes to synthesis of intracellular glycerolipids but not surface lipids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GLYCEROL-3-PHOSPHATE ACYLTRANSFERASE (GPAT) genes encode enzymes involved in glycerolipid biosynthesis in plants. Ten GPAT homologues have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). GPATs 4-8 have been shown to be involved in the production of extracellular lipid barrier polyesters. Rece...

  5. Root development under metal stress in Arabidopsis thaliana requires the H(+)/cation antiporter CAX4

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Arabidopsis vacuolar CAtion eXchangers (CAXs) play a key role in mediating cation influx into the vacuole. In Arabidopsis, there are six CAX genes. However, some members are yet to be characterized fully. In this study, we show that CAX4 is expressed in the root apex and lateral root primordia, ...

  6. Geology and petrology of the Simav Magmatic Complex (NW Anatolia) and its comparison with the Oligo-Miocene granitoids in NW Anatolia: implications on Tertiary tectonic evolution of the region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akay, Erhan

    2009-10-01

    The Oligo-Miocene granitic plutons and their related volcanic-subvolcanic successions form a NW-SE trending magmatic belt along the northern border of the Menderes Massif. This belt evolved within a nappe package consisting of the Menderes metamorphics, Sakarya Continent, Afyon Zone and Tavşanlı Zone and also intruded this nappe package. The Ezine, Evciler, Eybek, Kozak, Alaçam, Koyunoba, Eğrigöz and the Baklan plutons emplaced along this belt and show similarities in their internal structures, emplacement mechanisms, and petrological characteristics. These different granitic plutons cut and stitch various combinations of the nappe package of the above-mentioned tectonic belts, and evolved during and following the Alpine collision. They all show characteristic map patterns of shallow-seated plutons and range from granite to monzogranite. The granitic plutons display calc-alkaline, I-type and post-collisional geochemical characteristics. The Eğrigöz, Koyunoba plutons and their subvolcanic-volcanic phases (Simav Magmatic Complex) were studied in detail. The geochemical characteristics and field occurences of the Simav Magmatic Complex were compared to the other magmatic associations in western Anatolia and it was determined that it is of collisional origin and not related to an extensional tectonic regime as suggested in some recent studies.

  7. Disparate Metabolic Responses in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet Supplemented with Maize-Derived Non-Digestible Feruloylated Oligo- and Polysaccharides Are Linked to Changes in the Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junyi; Bindels, Laure B.; Segura Munoz, Rafael R.; Martínez, Inés; Walter, Jens; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E.; Rose, Devin J.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have suggested links between colonic fermentation of dietary fibers and improved metabolic health. The objectives of this study were to determine if non-digestible feruloylated oligo- and polysaccharides (FOPS), a maize-derived dietary fiber, could counteract the deleterious effects of high-fat (HF) feeding in mice and explore if metabolic benefits were linked to the gut microbiota. C57BL/6J mice (n = 8/group) were fed a low-fat (LF; 10 kcal% fat), HF (62 kcal% fat), or HF diet supplemented with FOPS (5%, w/w). Pronounced differences in FOPS responsiveness were observed: four mice experienced cecal enlargement and enhanced short chain fatty acid production, indicating increased cecal fermentation (F-FOPS). Only these mice displayed improvements in glucose metabolism compared with HF-fed mice. Blooms in the gut microbial genera Blautia and Akkermansia were observed in three of the F-FOPS mice; these shifts were associated with reductions in body and adipose tissue weights compared with the HF-fed control mice. No improvements in metabolic markers or weights were detected in the four mice whose gut microbiota did not respond to FOPS. These findings demonstrate that FOPS-induced improvements in weight gain and metabolic health in mice depended on the ability of an individual’s microbiota to ferment FOPS. PMID:26731528

  8. Significant improvement in crow's feet after treatment with Jet-M and a mixed solution of copper-GHK, oligo-hyaluronic acid, rhodiolar extract, tranexamic acid, and β-glucan (GHR formulation).

    PubMed

    Byun, Sang-Young; Chae, Je-Byeong; Na, Jung-Im; Park, Kyoung-Chan

    2016-10-01

    Jet-M (Tav-Tech Ltd., Israel) is an instrument for skin resurfacing. When it sprays microdroplets of solution or shoots air on the skin, exfoliation and stretching of superficial layers can occur. Thus, it will increase percutaneous absorption of vitamins and other cosmetic agents. A cosmetic preparation containing copper-glycyl-L-histidyl-L-lysine, oligo-hyaluronic acid, rhodiolar extract, tranexamic acid, and β-glucan was used with Jet-M in one patient. Anesthesia was not administered and there was no pain during the treatment. A male aged 59 years was treated once a week for 12 weeks. In the clinical photographs, wrinkles around the treated eye were greatly decreased. Skin biopsies were taken from treated and untreated areas. Hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome staining showed increased collagen production in the upper dermis. On the other hand, collagen IV production was slightly increased. Fibrillin-1 and procollagen type 1 were greatly increased and tropoelastin was also increased. There was no adverse effect during and after treatment.

  9. Molecular genetics of root gravitropism and waving in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedbrook, J.; Boonsirichai, K.; Chen, R.; Hilson, P.; Pearlman, R.; Rosen, E.; Rutherford, R.; Batiza, A.; Carroll, K.; Schulz, T.; Masson, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    When Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grow embedded in an agar-based medium, their roots grow vertically downward. This reflects their ability to sense the gravity vector and to position their tip parallel to it (gravitropism). We have isolated a number of mutations affecting root gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana. One of these mutations, named arg1, affects root and hypocotyl gravitropism without promoting defects in starch content or in the ability of seedlings' organs to respond to plant hormones. The ARG1 gene was cloned and shown to code for a protein with a J domain at its amino terminus and a second sequence motif found in several cytoskeleton binding proteins. Mutations in the AGR1 locus promote a strong defect in root gravitropism. Some alleles also confer an increased root resistance to exogenous ethylene and an increased sensitivity to auxin. AGR1 was cloned and found to encode a putative transmembrane protein which might be involved in polar auxin transport, or in regulating the differential growth response to gravistimulation. When Arabidopsis seedlings grow on the surface of agar-based media tilted backward, their roots wave. That wavy pattern of root growth derives from a combined response to gravity, touch and other surface-derived stimuli. It is accompanied by a reversible rotation of the root tip about its axis. A number of mutations affect the presence or the shape of root waves on tilted agar-based surfaces. One of them, wvc1, promotes the formation of compressed root waves under these conditions. The physiological and molecular analyses of this mutant suggest that a tryptophan-derived molecule other than IAA might be an important regulator of the curvature responsible for root waving.

  10. Increased Ac excision (iae): Arabidopsis thaliana mutations affecting Ac transposition.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, P; Belzile, F; Page, T; Dean, C

    1997-05-01

    The maize transposable element Ac is highly active in the heterologous hosts tobacco and tomato, but shows very much reduced levels of activity in Arabidopsis. A mutagenesis experiment was undertaken with the aim of identifying Arabidopsis host factors responsible for the observed low levels of Ac activity. Seed from a line carrying a single copy of the Ac element inserted into the streptomycin phosphotransferase (SPT) reporter fusion, and which displayed typically low levels of Ac activity, were mutagenized using gamma rays. Nineteen mutants displaying high levels of somatic Ac activity, as judged by their highly variegated phenotypes, were isolated after screening the M2 generation on streptomycin-containing medium. The mutations fall into two complementation groups, iae1 and iae2, are unlinked to the SPT::Ac locus and segregate in a Mendelian fashion. The iae1 mutation is recessive and the iae2 mutation is semi-dominant. The iae1 and iae2 mutants show 550- and 70-fold increases, respectively, in the average number of Ac excision sectors per cotyledon. The IAE1 locus maps to chromosome 2, whereas the SPT::Ac reporter maps to chromosome 3. A molecular study of Ac activity in the iae1 mutant confirmed the very high levels of Ac excision predicted using the phenotypic assay, but revealed only low levels of Ac re-insertion. Analyses of germinal transposition in the iae1 mutant demonstrated an average germinal excision frequency of 3% and a frequency of independent Ac re-insertions following germinal excision of 22%. The iae mutants represents a possible means of improving the efficiency of Ac/Ds transposon tagging systems in Arabidopsis, and will enable the dissection of host involvement in Ac transposition and the mechanisms employed for controlling transposable element activity.

  11. Arabidopsis MSI1 functions in photoperiodic flowering time control

    PubMed Central

    Steinbach, Yvonne; Hennig, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate timing of flowering is crucial for crop yield and the reproductive success of plants. Flowering can be induced by a number of molecular pathways that respond to internal and external signals such as photoperiod, vernalization or light quality, ambient temperature and biotic as well as abiotic stresses. The key florigenic signal FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) is regulated by several flowering activators, such as CONSTANS (CO), and repressors, such as FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Chromatin modifications are essential for regulated gene expression, which often involves the well conserved MULTICOPY SUPRESSOR OF IRA 1 (MSI1)-like protein family. MSI1-like proteins are ubiquitous partners of various complexes, such as POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX2 or CHROMATIN ASSEMBLY FACTOR 1. In Arabidopsis, one of the functions of MSI1 is to control the switch to flowering. Arabidopsis MSI1 is needed for the correct expression of the floral integrator gene SUPPRESSOR OF CO 1 (SOC1). Here, we show that the histone-binding protein MSI1 acts in the photoperiod pathway to regulate normal expression of CO in long day (LD) photoperiods. Reduced expression of CO in msi1-mutants leads to failure of FT and SOC1 activation and to delayed flowering. MSI1 is needed for normal sensitivity of Arabidopsis to photoperiod, because msi1-mutants responded less than wild type to an intermittent LD treatment of plants grown in short days. Finally, genetic analysis demonstrated that MSI1 acts upstream of the CO-FT pathway to enable an efficient photoperiodic response and to induce flowering. PMID:24639681

  12. Arabidopsis RGL1 encodes a negative regulator of gibberellin responses.

    PubMed

    Wen, Chi-Kuang; Chang, Caren

    2002-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, the DELLA subfamily of GRAS regulatory genes consists of GAI, RGA, RGA-LIKE1 (RGL1), RGL2, and RGL3. GAI and RGA are known to be negative regulators of gibberellin (GA) responses. We found that RGL1 is a similar repressor of GA responses, as revealed by RGL1 gain-of-function and loss-of-function phenotypes. Repression of GA responses in Arabidopsis was conferred by a dominant 35S-rgl1 transgene carrying a DELLA domain deletion analogous to the GA-insensitive gai-1 mutation. As in GA-deficient Arabidopsis, the transgenic plants were dark green dwarfs with underdeveloped trichomes and flowers. Expression levels of GA4, a feedback-regulated GA biosynthetic gene, were increased correspondingly. Conversely, a loss-of-function rgl1 line had reduced GA4 expression and exhibited GA-independent activation of seed germination, leaf expansion, flowering, stem elongation, and floral development, as detected by resistance to the GA biosynthesis inhibitor paclobutrazol. RGL1 plays a greater role in seed germination than do GAI and RGA. The expression profile of RGL1 differed from those of the four other DELLA homologs. RGL1 message levels were predominant in flowers, with transcripts detected in developing ovules and anthers. As with RGA, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged RGL1 protein was localized to the nucleus, but unlike GFP-RGA, there was no degradation after GA treatment. These findings indicate that RGL1 is a partially redundant, but distinct, negative regulator of GA responses and suggest that all DELLA subfamily members might possess separate as well as overlapping roles in GA signaling. PMID:11826301

  13. Danger-associated peptide signaling in Arabidopsis requires clathrin.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Morea, Fausto Andres; Savatin, Daniel V; Dejonghe, Wim; Kumar, Rahul; Luo, Yu; Adamowski, Maciej; Van den Begin, Jos; Dressano, Keini; Pereira de Oliveira, Guilherme; Zhao, Xiuyang; Lu, Qing; Madder, Annemieke; Friml, Jiří; Scherer de Moura, Daniel; Russinova, Eugenia

    2016-09-27

    The Arabidopsis thaliana endogenous elicitor peptides (AtPeps) are released into the apoplast after cellular damage caused by pathogens or wounding to induce innate immunity by direct binding to the membrane-localized leucine-rich repeat receptor kinases, PEP RECEPTOR1 (PEPR1) and PEPR2. Although the PEPR-mediated signaling components and responses have been studied extensively, the contributions of the subcellular localization and dynamics of the active PEPRs remain largely unknown. We used live-cell imaging of the fluorescently labeled and bioactive pep1 to visualize the intracellular behavior of the PEPRs in the Arabidopsis root meristem. We found that AtPep1 decorated the plasma membrane (PM) in a receptor-dependent manner and cointernalized with PEPRs. Trafficking of the AtPep1-PEPR1 complexes to the vacuole required neither the trans-Golgi network/early endosome (TGN/EE)-localized vacuolar H(+)-ATPase activity nor the function of the brefeldin A-sensitive ADP-ribosylation factor-guanine exchange factors (ARF-GEFs). In addition, AtPep1 and different TGN/EE markers colocalized only rarely, implying that the intracellular route of this receptor-ligand pair is largely independent of the TGN/EE. Inducible overexpression of the Arabidopsis clathrin coat disassembly factor, Auxilin2, which inhibits clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), impaired the AtPep1-PEPR1 internalization and compromised AtPep1-mediated responses. Our results show that clathrin function at the PM is required to induce plant defense responses, likely through CME of cell surface-located signaling components.

  14. Higher order chromatin structures in maize and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, A L; Ferl, R J

    1998-01-01

    We are investigating the nature of plant genome domain organization by using DNase I- and topoisomerase II-mediated cleavage to produce domains reflecting higher order chromatin structures. Limited digestion of nuclei with DNase I results in the conversion of the >800 kb genomic DNA to an accumulation of fragments that represents a collection of individual domains of the genome created by preferential cleavage at super-hypersensitive regions. The median size of these fragments is approximately 45 kb in maize and approximately 25 kb in Arabidopsis. Hybridization analyses with specific gene probes revealed that individual genes occupy discrete domains within the distribution created by DNase I. The maize alcohol dehydrogenase Adh1 gene occupies a domain of 90 kb, and the maize general regulatory factor GRF1 gene occupies a domain of 100 kb in length. Arabidopsis Adh was found within two distinct domains of 8.3 and 6.1 kb, whereas an Arabidopsis GRF gene occupies a single domain of 27 kb. The domains created by topoisomerase II-mediated cleavage are identical in size to those created by DNase I. These results imply that the genome is not packaged by means of a random gathering of the genome into domains of indiscriminate length but rather that the genome is gathered into specific domains and that a gene consistently occupies a discrete physical section of the genome. Our proposed model is that these large organizational domains represent the fundamental structural loop domains created by attachment of chromatin to the nuclear matrix at loop basements. These loop domains may be distinct from the domains created by the matrix attachment regions that typically flank smaller, often functionally distinct sections of the genome. PMID:9707534

  15. Kinome profiling of Arabidopsis using arrays of kinase consensus substrates

    PubMed Central

    Ritsema, Tita; Joore, Jos; van Workum, Wilbert; Pieterse, Corné MJ

    2007-01-01

    Background Kinome profiling aims at the parallel analysis of kinase activities in a cell. Novel developed arrays containing consensus substrates for kinases are used to assess those kinase activities. The arrays described in this paper were already used to determine kinase activities in mammalian systems, but since substrates from many organisms are present we decided to test these arrays for the determination of kinase activities in the model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Kinome profiling using Arabidopsis cell extracts resulted in the labelling of many consensus peptides by kinases from the plant, indicating the usefulness of this kinome profiling tool for plants. Method development showed that fresh and frozen plant material could be used to make cell lysates containing active kinases. Dilution of the plant extract increased the signal to noise ratio and non-radioactive ATP enhances full development of spot intensities. Upon infection of Arabidopsis with an avirulent strain of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, we could detect differential kinase activities by measuring phosphorylation of consensus peptides. Conclusion We show that kinome profiling on arrays with consensus substrates can be used to monitor kinase activities in plants. In a case study we show that upon infection with avirulent P. syringae differential kinase activities can be found. The PepChip can for example be used to purify (unknown) kinases that play a role in P. syringae infection. This paper shows that kinome profiling using arrays of consensus peptides is a valuable new tool to study signal-transduction in plants. It complements the available methods for genomics and proteomics research. PMID:17295910

  16. Molecular genetics of root gravitropism and waving in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sedbrook, J; Boonsirichai, K; Chen, R; Hilson, P; Pearlman, R; Rosen, E; Rutherford, R; Batiza, A; Carroll, K; Schulz, T; Masson, P H

    1998-05-01

    When Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grow embedded in an agar-based medium, their roots grow vertically downward. This reflects their ability to sense the gravity vector and to position their tip parallel to it (gravitropism). We have isolated a number of mutations affecting root gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana. One of these mutations, named arg1, affects root and hypocotyl gravitropism without promoting defects in starch content or in the ability of seedlings' organs to respond to plant hormones. The ARG1 gene was cloned and shown to code for a protein with a J domain at its amino terminus and a second sequence motif found in several cytoskeleton binding proteins. Mutations in the AGR1 locus promote a strong defect in root gravitropism. Some alleles also confer an increased root resistance to exogenous ethylene and an increased sensitivity to auxin. AGR1 was cloned and found to encode a putative transmembrane protein which might be involved in polar auxin transport, or in regulating the differential growth response to gravistimulation. When Arabidopsis seedlings grow on the surface of agar-based media tilted backward, their roots wave. That wavy pattern of root growth derives from a combined response to gravity, touch and other surface-derived stimuli. It is accompanied by a reversible rotation of the root tip about its axis. A number of mutations affect the presence or the shape of root waves on tilted agar-based surfaces. One of them, wvc1, promotes the formation of compressed root waves under these conditions. The physiological and molecular analyses of this mutant suggest that a tryptophan-derived molecule other than IAA might be an important regulator of the curvature responsible for root waving.

  17. Environmental Regulation of Heterosis in the Allopolyploid Arabidopsis suecica.

    PubMed

    Solhaug, Erik M; Ihinger, Jacie; Jost, Maria; Gamboa, Veronica; Marchant, Blaine; Bradford, Denise; Doerge, R W; Tyagi, Anand; Replogle, Amy; Madlung, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Allopolyploids are organisms possessing more than two complete sets of chromosomes from two or more species and are frequently more vigorous than their progenitors. To address the question why allopolyploids display hybrid vigor, we compared the natural allopolyploid Arabidopsis suecica to its progenitor species Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis arenosa. We measured chlorophyll content, CO2 assimilation, and carbohydrate production under varying light conditions and found that the allopolyploid assimilates more CO2 per unit chlorophyll than either of the two progenitor species in high intensity light. The increased carbon assimilation corresponds with greater starch accumulation, but only in strong light, suggesting that the strength of hybrid vigor is dependent on environmental conditions. In weaker light A. suecica tends to produce as much primary metabolites as the better progenitor. We found that gene expression of LIMIT DEXTRINASE1, a debranching enzyme that cleaves branch points within starch molecules, is at the same level in the allopolyploid as in the maternal progenitor A. thaliana and significantly more expressed than in the paternal progenitor A. arenosa. However, expression differences of β-amylases and GLUCAN-WATER DIKINASE1 were not statistically significantly elevated in the allopolyploid over progenitor expression levels. In contrast to allopolyploids, autopolyploid A. thaliana showed the same photosynthetic rate as diploids, indicating that polyploidization alone is likely not the reason for enhanced vigor in the allopolyploid. Taken together, our data suggest that the magnitude of heterosis in A. suecica is environmentally regulated, arises from more efficient photosynthesis, and, under specific conditions, leads to greater starch accumulation than in its progenitor species. PMID:26896394

  18. Arabidopsis myosin XI: a motor rules the tracks.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chao; Henty-Ridilla, Jessica L; Szymanski, Daniel B; Staiger, Christopher J

    2014-11-01

    Plant cell expansion relies on intracellular trafficking of vesicles and macromolecules, which requires myosin motors and a dynamic actin network. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) myosin XI powers the motility of diverse cellular organelles, including endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, endomembrane vesicles, peroxisomes, and mitochondria. Several recent studies show that there are changes in actin organization and dynamics in myosin xi mutants, indicating that motors influence the molecular tracks they use for transport. However, the mechanism by which actin organization and dynamics are regulated by myosin XI awaits further detailed investigation. Here, using high spatiotemporal imaging of living cells, we quantitatively assessed the architecture and dynamic behavior of cortical actin arrays in a mutant with three Myosin XI (XI-1, XI-2, and XI-K) genes knocked out (xi3KO). In addition to apparent reduction of organ and cell size, the mutant showed less dense and more bundled actin filament arrays in epidermal cells. Furthermore, the overall actin dynamicity was significantly inhibited in the xi3KO mutant. Because cytoskeletal remodeling is contributed mainly by filament assembly/disassembly and translocation/buckling, we also examined the dynamic behavior of individual actin filaments. We found that the xi3KO mutant had significantly decreased actin turnover, with a 2-fold reduction in filament severing frequency. Moreover, quantitative analysis of filament shape change over time revealed that myosin XI generates the force for buckling and straightening of both single actin filaments and actin bundles. Thus, our data provide genetic evidence that three Arabidopsis class XI myosins contribute to actin remodeling by stimulating turnover and generating the force for filament shape change. PMID:25237128

  19. Abundant protein phosphorylation potentially regulates Arabidopsis anther development

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Juanying; Zhang, Zaibao; You, Chenjiang; Zhang, Xumin; Lu, Jianan; Ma, Hong

    2016-01-01

    As the male reproductive organ of flowering plants, the stamen consists of the anther and filament. Previous studies on stamen development mainly focused on single gene functions by genetic methods or gene expression changes using comparative transcriptomic approaches, especially in model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana. However, studies on Arabidopsis anther protein expression and post-translational modifications are still lacking. Here we report proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies on developing Arabidopsis anthers at stages 4–7 and 8–12. We identified 3908 high-confidence phosphorylation sites corresponding to 1637 phosphoproteins. Among the 1637 phosphoproteins, 493 were newly identified, with 952 phosphorylation sites. Phosphopeptide enrichment prior to LC-MS analysis facilitated the identification of low-abundance proteins and regulatory proteins, thereby increasing the coverage of proteomic analysis, and facilitated the analysis of more regulatory proteins. Thirty-nine serine and six threonine phosphorylation motifs were uncovered from the anther phosphoproteome and further analysis supports that phosphorylation of casein kinase II, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and 14-3-3 proteins is a key regulatory mechanism in anther development. Phosphorylated residues were preferentially located in variable protein regions among family members, but they were they were conserved across angiosperms in general. Moreover, phosphorylation might reduce activity of reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes and hamper brassinosteroid signaling in early anther development. Most of the novel phosphoproteins showed tissue-specific expression in the anther according to previous microarray data. This study provides a community resource with information on the abundance and phosphorylation status of thousands of proteins in developing anthers, contributing to understanding post-translational regulatory mechanisms during anther development. PMID:27531888

  20. Identification of gravitropic response indicator genes in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Moritaka; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo Terao

    2014-01-01

    Differential organ growth during gravitropic response is caused by differential accumulation of auxin, that is, relative higher auxin concentration in lower flanks than in upper flanks of responding organs. Auxin responsive reporter systems such as DR5::GUS and DR5::GFP have usually been used as indicators of gravitropic response in roots and hypocotyls of Arabidopsis. However, in the inflorescence stems, the reporter systems don't work well to monitor gravitropic response. Here, we aim to certify appropriate gravitropic response indicators (GRIs) in inflorescence stems. We performed microarray analysis comparing gene expression profiles between upper and lower flanks of Arabidopsis inflorescence stems after gravistimulation. Thirty genes showed > 2-fold differentially increased expression in lower flanks at 30 min, of which 19 were auxin response genes. We focused on IAA5 and IAA2 and verified whether they are appropriate GRIs by real-time qRT-PCR analyses. Transcript levels of IAA5 and IAA2 were remarkably higher in lower flanks than in upper flanks after gravistimulation. The biased IAA5 or IAA2 expression is disappeared in sgr2-1 mutant which is defective in gravity perception, indicating that gravity perception process is essential for formation of the biased gene expression during gravitropism. IAA5 expression was remarkably increased in lower flanks at 30 min after gravistimulation, whereas IAA2 expression was gradually decreased in upper flanks in a time-dependent manner. Therefore, we conclude that IAA5 is a sensitive GRI to monitor asymmetric auxin signaling caused by gravistimulation in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems.

  1. Autophagy contributes to nighttime energy availability for growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masanori; Hidema, Jun; Makino, Amane; Ishida, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular process leading to the vacuolar degradation of cytoplasmic components. Autophagic degradation of chloroplasts is particularly activated in leaves under conditions of low sugar availability. Here, we investigated the importance of autophagy in the energy availability and growth of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). autophagy-deficient (atg) mutants showed reduced growth under short-day conditions. This growth inhibition was largely relieved under continuous light or under short-day conditions combined with feeding of exogenous sucrose, suggesting that autophagy is involved in energy production at night for growth. Arabidopsis accumulates starch during the day and degrades it for respiration at night. Nighttime energy availability is perturbed in starchless mutants, in which a lack of starch accumulation causes a transient sugar deficit at night. We generated starchless and atg double mutants and grew them under different photoperiods. The double mutants showed more severe phenotypes than did atg or starchless single mutants: reduced growth and early cell death in leaves were observed when plants were grown under 10-h photoperiods. Transcript analysis of dark-inducible genes revealed that the sugar starvation symptoms observed in starchless mutants became more severe in starchless atg double mutants. The contents of free amino acids (AAs) increased, and transcript levels of several genes involved in AA catabolism were elevated in starchless mutant leaves. The increases in branched-chain AA and aromatic AA contents were partially compromised in starchless atg double mutants. We conclude that autophagy can contribute to energy availability at night by providing a supply of alternative energy sources such as AAs.

  2. Plantacyanin plays a role in reproduction in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Juan; Kim, Sun Tae; Lord, Elizabeth M

    2005-06-01

    Plantacyanins belong to the phytocyanin family of blue copper proteins. In the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome, only one gene encodes plantacyanin. The T-DNA-tagged mutant is a knockdown mutant that shows no visible phenotype. We used both promoter-beta-glucuronidase transgenic plants and immunolocalization to show that Arabidopsis plantacyanin is expressed most highly in the inflorescence and, specifically, in the transmitting tract of the pistil. Protein levels show a steep gradient in expression from the stigma into the style and ovary. Overexpression plants were generated using cauliflower mosaic virus 35S, and protein levels in the pistil were examined as well as the pollination process. Seed set in these plants is highly reduced mainly due to a lack of anther dehiscence, which is caused by degeneration of the endothecium. Callose deposits occur on the pollen walls in plants that overexpress plantacyanin, and a small percentage of these pollen grains germinate in the closed anthers. When wild-type pollen was used on the overexpression stigma, seed set was still decreased compared to the control pollinations. We detected an increase in plantacyanin levels in the overexpression pistil, including the transmitting tract. Guidance of the wild-type pollen tube on the overexpression stigma is disrupted as evidenced by the growth behavior of pollen tubes after they penetrate the papillar cell. Normally, pollen tubes travel down the papilla cell and into the style. Wild-type pollen tubes on the overexpression stigma made numerous turns around the papilla cell before growing toward the style. In some rare cases, pollen tubes circled up the papilla cell away from the style and were arrested there. We propose that when plantacyanin levels in the stigma are increased, pollen tube guidance into the style is disrupted.

  3. Arabidopsis thaliana as Bioindicator of Fungal VOCs in Indoor Air

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Richard; Yin, Guohua; Klich, Maren A.; Grimm, Casey; Bennett, Joan W.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the ability of Arabidopsis thaliana to detect different mixtures of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by the common indoor fungus, Aspergillus versicolor, and demonstrate the potential usage of the plant as a bioindicator to monitor fungal VOCs in indoor air. We evaluated the volatile production of Aspergillus versicolor strains SRRC 108 (NRRL 3449) and SRRC 2559 (ATCC 32662) grown on nutrient rich fungal medium, and grown under conditions to mimic the substrate encountered in the built environment where fungi would typically grow indoors (moist wallboard and ceiling tiles). Using headspace solid phase microextraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, we analyzed VOC profiles of the two strains. The most abundant compound produced by both strains on all three media was 1-octen-3-ol. Strain SRRC 2559 made several terpenes not detected from strain SRRC 108. Using a split-plate bioassay, we grew Arabidopsis thaliana in a shared atmosphere with VOCs from the two strains of Aspergillus versicolor grown on yeast extract sucrose medium. The VOCs emitted by SRRC 2559 had an adverse impact on seed germination and plant growth. Chemical standards of individual VOCs from the Aspergillus versicolor mixture (2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-octen-3-ol, limonene, and β-farnesene), and β-caryophyllene were tested one by one in seed germination and vegetative plant growth assays. The most inhibitory compound to both seed germination and plant growth was 1-octen-3-ol. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis is a useful model for monitoring indoor air quality as it is sensitive to naturally emitted fungal volatile mixtures as well as to chemical standards of individual compounds, and it exhibits relatively quick concentration- and duration-dependent responses. PMID:27790067

  4. Danger-associated peptide signaling in Arabidopsis requires clathrin.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Morea, Fausto Andres; Savatin, Daniel V; Dejonghe, Wim; Kumar, Rahul; Luo, Yu; Adamowski, Maciej; Van den Begin, Jos; Dressano, Keini; Pereira de Oliveira, Guilherme; Zhao, Xiuyang; Lu, Qing; Madder, Annemieke; Friml, Jiří; Scherer de Moura, Daniel; Russinova, Eugenia

    2016-09-27

    The Arabidopsis thaliana endogenous elicitor peptides (AtPeps) are released into the apoplast after cellular damage caused by pathogens or wounding to induce innate immunity by direct binding to the membrane-localized leucine-rich repeat receptor kinases, PEP RECEPTOR1 (PEPR1) and PEPR2. Although the PEPR-mediated signaling components and responses have been studied extensively, the contributions of the subcellular localization and dynamics of the active PEPRs remain largely unknown. We used live-cell imaging of the fluorescently labeled and bioactive pep1 to visualize the intracellular behavior of the PEPRs in the Arabidopsis root meristem. We found that AtPep1 decorated the plasma membrane (PM) in a receptor-dependent manner and cointernalized with PEPRs. Trafficking of the AtPep1-PEPR1 complexes to the vacuole required neither the trans-Golgi network/early endosome (TGN/EE)-localized vacuolar H(+)-ATPase activity nor the function of the brefeldin A-sensitive ADP-ribosylation factor-guanine exchange factors (ARF-GEFs). In addition, AtPep1 and different TGN/EE markers colocalized only rarely, implying that the intracellular route of this receptor-ligand pair is largely independent of the TGN/EE. Inducible overexpression of the Arabidopsis clathrin coat disassembly factor, Auxilin2, which inhibits clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), impaired the AtPep1-PEPR1 internalization and compromised AtPep1-mediated responses. Our results show that clathrin function at the PM is required to induce plant defense responses, likely through CME of cell surface-located signaling components. PMID:27651494

  5. Starch synthesis in Arabidopsis. Granule synthesis, composition, and structure.

    PubMed

    Zeeman, Samuel C; Tiessen, Axel; Pilling, Emma; Kato, K Lisa; Donald, Athene M; Smith, Alison M

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize starch synthesis, composition, and granule structure in Arabidopsis leaves. First, the potential role of starch-degrading enzymes during starch accumulation was investigated. To discover whether simultaneous synthesis and degradation of starch occurred during net accumulation, starch was labeled by supplying (14)CO(2) to intact, photosynthesizing plants. Release of this label from starch was monitored during a chase period in air, using different light intensities to vary the net rate of starch synthesis. No release of label was detected unless there was net degradation of starch during the chase. Similar experiments were performed on a mutant line (dbe1) that accumulates the soluble polysaccharide, phytoglycogen. Label was not released from phytoglycogen during the chase indicating that, even when in a soluble form, glucan is not appreciably degraded during accumulation. Second, the effect on starch composition of growth conditions and mutations causing starch accumulation was studied. An increase in starch content correlated with an increased amylose content of the starch and with an increase in the ratio of granule-bound starch synthase to soluble starch synthase activity. Third, the structural organization and morphology of Arabidopsis starch granules was studied. The starch granules were birefringent, indicating a radial organization of the polymers, and x-ray scatter analyses revealed that granules contained alternating crystalline and amorphous lamellae with a periodicity of 9 nm. Granules from the wild type and the high-starch mutant sex1 were flattened and discoid, whereas those of the high-starch mutant sex4 were larger and more rounded. These larger granules contained "growth rings" with a periodicity of 200 to 300 nm. We conclude that leaf starch is synthesized without appreciable turnover and comprises similar polymers and contains similar levels of molecular organization to storage starches, making Arabidopsis

  6. Genetic Architecture of NaCl Tolerance in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Quesada, Víctor; García-Martínez, Santiago; Piqueras, Pedro; Ponce, María Rosa; Micol, José Luis

    2002-01-01

    The little success of breeding approaches toward the improvement of salt tolerance in crop species is thought to be attributable to the quantitative nature of most, if not all the processes implicated. Hence, the identification of some of the quantitative trait loci (QTL) that contribute to natural variation in salt tolerance should be instrumental in eventually manipulating the perception of salinity and the corresponding responses. A good choice to reach this goal is the plant model system Arabidopsis, whose complete genome sequence is now available. Aiming to analyze natural variability in salt tolerance, we have compared the ability of 102 wild-type races (named ecotypes or accessions) of Arabidopsis to germinate on 250 mm NaCl, finding a wide range of variation among them. Accessions displaying extremely different responses to NaCl were intercrossed, and the phenotypes found in their F2 progenies suggested that natural variation in NaCl tolerance during germination was under polygenic controls. Genetic distances calculated on the basis of variations in repeat number at 22 microsatellites, were analyzed in a group of either extremely salt-tolerant or extremely salt-sensitive accessions. We found that most but not all accessions with similar responses to NaCl are phylogenetically related. NaCl tolerance was also studied in 100 recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross between the Columbia-4 and Landsberg erecta accessions. We detected 11 QTL harboring naturally occurring alleles that contribute to natural variation in NaCl tolerance in Arabidopsis, six at the germination and five at the vegetative growth stages, respectively. At least five of these QTL are likely to represent loci not yet described by their relationship with salt stress. PMID:12376659

  7. Abundant protein phosphorylation potentially regulates Arabidopsis anther development.

    PubMed

    Ye, Juanying; Zhang, Zaibao; You, Chenjiang; Zhang, Xumin; Lu, Jianan; Ma, Hong

    2016-09-01

    As the male reproductive organ of flowering plants, the stamen consists of the anther and filament. Previous studies on stamen development mainly focused on single gene functions by genetic methods or gene expression changes using comparative transcriptomic approaches, especially in model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana However, studies on Arabidopsis anther protein expression and post-translational modifications are still lacking. Here we report proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies on developing Arabidopsis anthers at stages 4-7 and 8-12. We identified 3908 high-confidence phosphorylation sites corresponding to 1637 phosphoproteins. Among the 1637 phosphoproteins, 493 were newly identified, with 952 phosphorylation sites. Phosphopeptide enrichment prior to LC-MS analysis facilitated the identification of low-abundance proteins and regulatory proteins, thereby increasing the coverage of proteomic analysis, and facilitated the analysis of more regulatory proteins. Thirty-nine serine and six threonine phosphorylation motifs were uncovered from the anther phosphoproteome and further analysis supports that phosphorylation of casein kinase II, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and 14-3-3 proteins is a key regulatory mechanism in anther development. Phosphorylated residues were preferentially located in variable protein regions among family members, but they were they were conserved across angiosperms in general. Moreover, phosphorylation might reduce activity of reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes and hamper brassinosteroid signaling in early anther development. Most of the novel phosphoproteins showed tissue-specific expression in the anther according to previous microarray data. This study provides a community resource with information on the abundance and phosphorylation status of thousands of proteins in developing anthers, contributing to understanding post-translational regulatory mechanisms during anther development. PMID:27531888

  8. Long-distance phloem transport of glucosinolates in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Petersen, B L; Olsen, C E; Schulz, A; Halkier, B A

    2001-09-01

    Glucosinolates are a large group of plant secondary metabolites found mainly in the order Capparales, which includes a large number of economically important Brassica crops and the model plant Arabidopsis. In the present study, several lines of evidence are provided for phloem transport of glucosinolates in Arabidopsis. When radiolabeled p-hydroxybenzylglucosinolate (p-OHBG) and sucrose were co-applied to the tip of detached leaves, both tracers were collected in the phloem exudates at the petioles. Long-distance transport of [(14)C]p-OHBG was investigated in wild-type and transgenic 35S::CYP79A1 plants, synthesizing high amounts of p-OHBG, which is not a natural constituent of wild-type Arabidopsis. In both wild-type and 35S::CYP79A1 plants, radiolabeled p-OHBG was rapidly transported from the application site into the whole plant and intact p-OHBG was recovered from different tissues. The pattern of distribution of the radioactivity corresponded to that expected for transport of photoassimilates such as sucrose, and was consistent with translocation in phloem following the source-sink relationship. Radiolabeled p-OHBG was shown to accumulate in the seeds of wild-type and 35S::CYP79A1 plants, where p-OHBG had been either exogenously applied or endogenously synthesized from Tyr in the leaves. p-OHBG was found in phloem exudates collected from cut petioles of leaves from both wild-type and 35S::CYP79A1 plants. Phloem exudates were shown to contain intact glucosinolates, and not desulphoglucosinolates, as the transport form. It is concluded that intact glucosinolates are readily loaded into and transported by the phloem. PMID:11553747

  9. Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Affect Biomass Accumulation and Photosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoping; Yang, Xiyu; Chen, Siyu; Li, Qianqian; Wang, Wei; Hou, Chunjiang; Gao, Xiao; Wang, Li; Wang, Shucai

    2015-01-01

    Dramatic increase in the use of nanoparticles (NPs) in a variety of applications greatly increased the likelihood of the release of NPs into the environment. Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are among the most commonly used NPs, and it has been shown that ZnO NPs were harmful to several different plants. We report here the effects of ZnO NPs exposure on biomass accumulation and photosynthesis in Arabidopsis. We found that 200 and 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treatments reduced Arabidopsis growth by ∼20 and 80%, respectively, in comparison to the control. Pigments measurement showed that Chlorophyll a and b contents were reduced more than 50%, whereas carotenoid contents remain largely unaffected in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated Arabidopsis plants. Consistent with this, net rate of photosynthesis, leaf stomatal conductance, intercellular CO2 concentration and transpiration rate were all reduced more than 50% in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated plants. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that expression levels of chlorophyll synthesis genes including CHLOROPHYLL A OXYGENASE (CAO), CHLOROPHYLL SYNTHASE (CHLG), COPPER RESPONSE DEFECT 1 (CRD1), MAGNESIUM-PROTOPORPHYRIN IX METHYLTRANSFERASE (CHLM) and MG-CHELATASE SUBUNIT D (CHLD), and photosystem structure gene PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT D-2 (PSAD2), PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT E-2 (PSAE2), PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT K (PSAK) and PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT K (PSAN) were reduced about five folds in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated plants. On the other hand, elevated expression, though to different degrees, of several carotenoids synthesis genes including GERANYLGERANYL PYROPHOSPHATE SYNTHASE 6 (GGPS6), PHYTOENE SYNTHASE (PSY) PHYTOENE DESATURASE (PDS), and ZETA-CAROTENE DESATURASE (ZDS) were observed in ZnO NPs treated plants. Taken together, these results suggest that toxicity effects of ZnO NPs observed in Arabidopsis was likely due to the inhibition of the expression of chlorophyll synthesis genes and photosystem structure genes, which results in the inhibition of

  10. Arabidopsis small RNAs and their targets during cyst nematode parasitism.

    PubMed

    Hewezi, Tarek; Howe, Peter; Maier, Tom R; Baum, Thomas J

    2008-12-01

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes induce the formation of specialized feeding cells in infected roots, which involves plant developmental processes that have been shown to be influenced by microRNAs (miRNAs) and other small RNAs. This observation provided the foundation to investigate the potential involvement of small RNAs in plant-cyst nematode interactions. First, we examined the susceptibilities of Arabidopsis DICER-like (dcl) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (rdr) mutants to the sugar beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii. The examined mutants exhibited a trend of decreased susceptibility, suggesting a role of small RNAs mediating gene regulation processes during the plant-nematode interaction. Second, we generated two small RNA libraries from aseptic Arabidopsis roots harvested at 4 and 7 days after infection with surface-sterilized H. schachtii. Sequences of known miRNAs as well as novel small interfering (si)RNAs were identified. Following this discovery, we used real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to quantify a total of 15 Arabidopsis transcripts that are known targets of six of the different miRNA families found in our study (miR160, miR164, miR167, miR171, miR396, and miR398) in inoculated and noninoculated Arabidopsis roots. Our analyses showed mostly negative correlations between miRNA accumulation and target gene mRNA abundance, suggesting regulatory roles of these miRNAs during parasitism. Also, we identified a total of 125 non-miRNA siRNAs. Some of these siRNAs perfectly complement protein-coding mRNAs or match transposon or retrotransposon sequences in sense or antisense orientations. We further quantified a group of siRNAs in H. schachtii-inoculated roots. The examined siRNAs exhibited distinct expression patterns in infected and noninfected roots, providing additional evidence for the implication of small RNAs in cyst nematode parasitism. These data lay the foundation for detailed analyses of the functions of small RNAs

  11. Mutants of Arabidopsis as tools for physiology and molecular biology

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, C.R.; Artus, N.; Browse, J.; Caspar, T.; Estelle, M.; Haughn, G.; Kunst, L.; Martinez, J.; McCourt, P.; Moffatt, B.

    1986-04-01

    The authors discuss the importance of developing a facile system for genetic analysis in higher plants which can be used to approach problems specific to plant biology in much the same way that molecular genetic approaches have been used in other classes of organisms such as yeast and Drosophila. Toward this end, they have developed methods for the isolation and analysis of mutants of Arabidopsis with specific alterations in photosynthesis, photorespiration, starch metabolism, lipid metabolism, purine metabolism, amino acid metabolism and phytohormone responses. The utility of this collection of mutants for studying problems in physiology and biochemistry is illustrated with selected examples.

  12. Regulation of floral stem cell termination in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bo; Ito, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, floral stem cells are maintained only at the initial stages of flower development, and they are terminated at a specific time to ensure proper development of the reproductive organs. Floral stem cell termination is a dynamic and multi-step process involving many transcription factors, chromatin remodeling factors and signaling pathways. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms involved in floral stem cell maintenance and termination, highlighting the interplay between transcriptional regulation and epigenetic machinery in the control of specific floral developmental genes. In addition, we discuss additional factors involved in floral stem cell regulation, with the goal of untangling the complexity of the floral stem cell regulatory network. PMID:25699061

  13. Mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana with altered shoot gravitropism

    SciTech Connect

    Bullen, B.L.; Poff, K.L.

    1987-04-01

    A procedure has been developed and used to screen 40,000 m-2 seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana for strains with altered shoot gravitropism. Several strains have been identified for which shoot gravitropism is considerably more random than that of their wild-type parent (based on frequency distribution histograms of the gravitropic response to a 1 g stimulus). One such strain exhibits normal hypocotyl phototropism and normal root gravitropism. Thus, the gravitropism pathway in the shoot contains at least one mutable element which is not required for root gravitropism.

  14. Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Affect Biomass Accumulation and Photosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoping; Yang, Xiyu; Chen, Siyu; Li, Qianqian; Wang, Wei; Hou, Chunjiang; Gao, Xiao; Wang, Li; Wang, Shucai

    2016-01-01

    Dramatic increase in the use of nanoparticles (NPs) in a variety of applications greatly increased the likelihood of the release of NPs into the environment. Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are among the most commonly used NPs, and it has been shown that ZnO NPs were harmful to several different plants. We report here the effects of ZnO NPs exposure on biomass accumulation and photosynthesis in Arabidopsis. We found that 200 and 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treatments reduced Arabidopsis growth by ∼20 and 80%, respectively, in comparison to the control. Pigments measurement showed that Chlorophyll a and b contents were reduced more than 50%, whereas carotenoid contents remain largely unaffected in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated Arabidopsis plants. Consistent with this, net rate of photosynthesis, leaf stomatal conductance, intercellular CO2 concentration and transpiration rate were all reduced more than 50% in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated plants. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that expression levels of chlorophyll synthesis genes including CHLOROPHYLL A OXYGENASE (CAO), CHLOROPHYLL SYNTHASE (CHLG), COPPER RESPONSE DEFECT 1 (CRD1), MAGNESIUM-PROTOPORPHYRIN IX METHYLTRANSFERASE (CHLM) and MG-CHELATASE SUBUNIT D (CHLD), and photosystem structure gene PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT D-2 (PSAD2), PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT E-2 (PSAE2), PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT K (PSAK) and PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT K (PSAN) were reduced about five folds in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated plants. On the other hand, elevated expression, though to different degrees, of several carotenoids synthesis genes including GERANYLGERANYL PYROPHOSPHATE SYNTHASE 6 (GGPS6), PHYTOENE SYNTHASE (PSY) PHYTOENE DESATURASE (PDS), and ZETA-CAROTENE DESATURASE (ZDS) were observed in ZnO NPs treated plants. Taken together, these results suggest that toxicity effects of ZnO NPs observed in Arabidopsis was likely due to the inhibition of the expression of chlorophyll synthesis genes and photosystem structure genes, which results in the inhibition of

  15. In vivo localization in Arabidopsis protoplasts and root tissue.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myoung Hui; Lee, Yongjik; Hwang, Inhwan

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, a large number of proteins are transported to their final destination after translation by a process called intracellular trafficking. Transient gene expression, either in plant protoplasts or in specific plant tissues, is a fast, flexible, and reproducible approach to study the cellular function of proteins, protein subcellular localizations, and protein-protein interactions. Here we describe the general method of protoplast isolation, polyethylene glycol-mediated protoplast transformation and immunostaining of protoplast or intact root tissues for studying the localization of protein in Arabidopsis.

  16. JMJ24 targets CHROMOMETHYLASE3 for proteasomal degradation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shulin; Jang, In-Cheol; Su, Linlin; Xu, Jun; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2016-01-01

    H3K9 methylation is usually associated with DNA methylation, and together they symbolize transcriptionally silenced heterochromatin. A number of proteins involved in epigenetic processes have been characterized. However, how the stability of these proteins is regulated at the post-translational level is largely unknown. Here, we show that an Arabidopsis JmjC domain protein, JMJ24, possesses ubiquitin E3 ligase activity. JMJ24 directly targets a DNA methyltransferase, CHROMOMETHYLASE 3 (CMT3), for proteasomal degradation to initiate destabilization of the heterochromatic state of endogenous silenced loci. Our results uncover an additional connection between two conserved epigenetic modifications: histone modification and DNA methylation. PMID:26798133

  17. Populus: Arabidopsis for Forestry. Do We Need a Model Tree?

    PubMed Central

    TAYLOR, GAIL

    2002-01-01

    Trees are used to produce a variety of wood‐based products including timber, pulp and paper. More recently, their use as a source of renewable energy has also been highlighted, as has their value for carbon mitigation within the Kyoto Protocol. Relative to food crops, the domestication of trees has only just begun; the long generation time and complex nature of juvenile and mature growth forms are contributory factors. To accelerate domestication, and to understand further some of the unique processes that occur in woody plants such as dormancy and secondary wood formation, a ‘model’ tree is needed. Here it is argued that Populus is rapidly becoming accepted as the ‘model’ woody plant and that such a ‘model’ tree is necessary to complement the genetic resource being developed in arabidopsis. The genus Populus (poplars, cottonwoods and aspens) contains approx. 30 species of woody plant, all found in the Northern hemisphere and exhibiting some of the fastest growth rates observed in temperate trees. Populus is fulfilling the ‘model’ role for a number of reasons. First, and most important, is the very recent commitment to sequence the Populus genome, a project initiated in February 2002. This will be the first woody plant to be sequenced. Other reasons include the relatively small genome size (450–550 Mbp) of Populus, the large number of molecular genetic maps and the ease of genetic transformation. Populus may also be propagated vegetatively, making mapping populations immortal and facilitating the production of large amounts of clonal material for experimentation. Hybridization occurs routinely and, in these respects, Populus has many similarities to arabidopsis. However, Populus also differs from arabidopsis in many respects, including being dioecious, which makes selfing and back‐cross manipulations impossible. The long time‐to‐flower is also a limitation, whilst physiological and biochemical experiments are more readily conducted in

  18. Strong Magnetic Field Induced Changes of Gene Expression in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.; Klingenberg, B.; Brooks, J. S.; Morgan, A. N.; Yowtak, J.; Meisel, M. W.

    2005-07-01

    We review our studies of the biological impact of magnetic field strengths of up to 30 T on transgenic arabidopsis plants engineered with a stress response gene consisting of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene reporter. Field strengths in excess of 15 T induce expression of the Adh/GUS transgene in the roots and leaves. Microarray analyses indicate that such field strengths have a far reaching effect on the genome. Wide spread induction of stress-related genes and transcription factors, and a depression of genes associated with cell wall metabolism are prominent examples.

  19. Populus: arabidopsis for forestry. Do we need a model tree?

    PubMed

    Taylor, Gail

    2002-12-01

    Trees are used to produce a variety of wood-based products including timber, pulp and paper. More recently, their use as a source of renewable energy has also been highlighted, as has their value for carbon mitigation within the Kyoto Protocol. Relative to food crops, the domestication of trees has only just begun; the long generation time and complex nature of juvenile and mature growth forms are contributory factors. To accelerate domestication, and to understand further some of the unique processes that occur in woody plants such as dormancy and secondary wood formation, a 'model' tree is needed. Here it is argued that Populus is rapidly becoming accepted as the 'model' woody plant and that such a 'model' tree is necessary to complement the genetic resource being developed in arabidopsis. The genus Populus (poplars, cottonwoods and aspens) contains approx. 30 species of woody plant, all found in the Northern hemisphere and exhibiting some of the fastest growth rates observed in temperate trees. Populus is fulfilling the 'model' role for a number of reasons. First, and most important, is the very recent commitment to sequence the Populus genome, a project initiated in February 2002. This will be the first woody plant to be sequenced. Other reasons include the relatively small genome size (450-550 Mbp) of Populus, the large number of molecular genetic maps and the ease of genetic transformation. Populus may also be propagated vegetatively, making mapping populations immortal and facilitating the production of large amounts of clonal material for experimentation. Hybridization occurs routinely and, in these respects, Populus has many similarities to arabidopsis. However, Populus also differs from arabidopsis in many respects, including being dioecious, which makes selfing and back-cross manipulations impossible. The long time-to-flower is also a limitation, whilst physiological and biochemical experiments are more readily conducted in Populus compared with the

  20. Cytological and molecular characterization of non-host resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana against wheat stripe rust.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yulin; Zhang, Hongchang; Yao, Juanni; Han, Qingmei; Wang, Xiaojie; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2013-01-01

    Wheat stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is one of the most destructive diseases of wheat worldwide. We report the use of the non-host plant Arabidopsis thaliana to identify the basis of resistance to Pst at the cytological and molecular levels. No visible symptoms were observed on Arabidopsis leaves inoculated with Pst. Microscopic observations showed that significantly reduced numbers of Pst urediospores had successfully achieved penetration in Arabidopsis compared with those in wheat. There were significant differences in the frequency of stomatal penetration but not in fungal growth among different Pst races in Arabidopsis. The fungus failed to successfully form haustoria in Arabidopsis and attempted infection induced an active response including accumulation of phenolic compounds and callose deposition in plant cells. A set of defence-related genes were also up regulated during the Pst infection. Compared with wild type plants, increased fungal growth was observed in an npr1-1 mutant and in NahG transformed plants, which both are insensitive to salicylic acid. However, treatment of Arabidopsis plants with cytochalasin B, an inhibitor of actin microfilament polymerization, did not increase susceptibility to Pst. Our results demonstrate that Arabidopsis can be used to study mechanisms of non-host resistance to wheat stripe rust, and highlight the significance of participation of salicylic acid in non-host resistance to rust fungi.

  1. Arabidopsis Rab Geranylgeranyltransferases Demonstrate Redundancy and Broad Substrate Specificity in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wan; Zeng, Qin; Kunkel, Barbara N; Running, Mark P

    2016-01-15

    Posttranslational lipid modifications mediate the membrane attachment of Rab GTPases, facilitating their function in regulating intracellular vesicular trafficking. In Arabidopsis, most Rab GTPases have two C-terminal cysteines and potentially can be double-geranylgeranylated by heterodimeric Rab geranylgeranyltransferases (Rab-GGTs). Genes encoding two putative α subunits and two putative β subunits of Rab-GGTs have been annotated in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, but little is known about Rab-GGT activity in Arabidopsis. In this study, we demonstrate that four different heterodimers can be formed between putative Arabidopsis Rab-GGT α subunits RGTA1/RGTA2 and β subunits RGTB1/RGTB2, but only RGTA1·RGTB1 and RGTA1·RGTB2 exhibit bona fide Rab-GGT activity, and they are biochemically redundant in vitro. We hypothesize that RGTA2 function might be disrupted by a 12-amino acid insertion in a conserved motif. We present evidence that Arabidopsis Rab-GGTs may have preference for prenylation of C-terminal cysteines in particular positions. We also demonstrate that Arabidopsis Rab-GGTs can not only prenylate a great variety of Rab GTPases in the presence of Rab escort protein but, unlike Rab-GGT in yeast and mammals, can also prenylate certain non-Rab GTPases independently of Rab escort protein. Our findings may help to explain some of the phenotypes of Arabidopsis protein prenyltransferase mutants. PMID:26589801

  2. Genomic analysis and expression investigation of caleosin gene family in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yue; Xie, Jun; Liu, Rui-Dan; Ni, Xue-Feng; Wang, Xue-Hao; Li, Zhi-Xi; Zhang, Meng

    2014-06-13

    Caleosin is a common lipid-droplet surface protein, which has the ability to bind calcium. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is considered a model organism in plant researches. Although there are growing researches about caleosin in the past few years, a systemic analysis of caleosins in Arabidopsis is still scarce. In this study, a comprehensive investigation of caleosins in Arabidopsis was performed by bioinformatics methods. Firstly, eight caleosins in Arabidopsis are divided into two types, L-caleosin and H-caleosin, according to their molecular weights, and these two types of caleosin have many differences in characteristics. Secondly, phylogenetic tree result indicates that L-caleosin may evolve from H-caleosin. Thirdly, duplication pattern analysis shows that segmental and tandem duplication are main reasons for Arabidopsis caleosin expansion with the equal part. Fourthly, the expression profiles of caleosins are also investigated in silico in different organs and under various stresses and hormones. In addition, based on promoter analysis, caleosin may be involved in calcium signal transduction and lipid accumulation. Thus, the classification and expression analysis of caleosin genes in Arabidopsis provide facilities to the research of phylogeny and functions in this gene family. PMID:24796675

  3. Proteomics and transcriptomics analyses of Arabidopsis floral buds uncover important functions of ARABIDOPSIS SKP1-LIKE1

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Dihong; Ni, Weimin; Stanley, Bruce A.; Ma, Hong

    2016-03-03

    The ARABIDOPSIS SKP1-LIKE1 (ASK1) protein functions as a subunit of SKP1-CUL1-F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligases. Previous genetic studies showed that ASK1 plays important roles in Arabidopsis flower development and male meiosis. However, the molecular impact of ASK1-containing SCF E3 ubiquitin ligases (ASK1-E3s) on the floral proteome and transcriptome is unknown. Here we identified proteins that are potentially regulated by ASK1-E3s by comparing floral bud proteomes of wild-type and the ask1 mutant plants. More than 200 proteins were detected in the ask1 mutant but not in wild-type and >300 were detected at higher levels in the ask1 mutant than in wild-type,more » but their RNA levels were not significantly different between wild-type and ask1 floral buds as shown by transcriptomics analysis, suggesting that they are likely regulated at the protein level by ASK1-E3s. Integrated analyses of floral proteomics and transcriptomics of ask1 and wild-type uncovered several potential aspects of ASK1-E3 functions, including regulation of transcription regulators, kinases, peptidases, and ribosomal proteins, with implications on possible mechanisms of ASK1-E3 functions in floral development. In conclusion, our results suggested that ASK1-E3s play important roles in Arabidopsis protein degradation during flower development. This study opens up new possibilities for further functional studies of these candidate E3 substrates.« less

  4. Copia-, Gypsy- and Line-like Retrotransposon Fragments in the Mitochondrial Genome of Arabidopsis Thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Knoop, V.; Unseld, M.; Marienfeld, J.; Brandt, P.; Sunkel, S.; Ullrich, H.; Brennicke, A.

    1996-01-01

    Several retrotransposon fragments are integrated in the mitochondrial genome of Arabidopsis thaliana. These insertions are derived from all three classes of nuclear retrotransposons, the Ty1/copia-, Ty3/gypsy- and non-LTR/LINE-families. Members of the Ty3/gypsy group of elements have not yet been identified in the nuclear genome of Arabidopsis. The varying degrees of similarity with nuclear elements and the dispersed locations of the sequences in the mitochondrial genome suggest numerous independent transfer-insertion events in the evolutionary history of this plant mitochondrial genome. Overall, we estimate remnants of retrotransposons to cover >/=5% of the mitochondrial genome in Arabidopsis. PMID:8852855

  5. Methylation of Gibberellins by Arabidopsis GAMT1 and GAMT2

    SciTech Connect

    Varbanova,M.; Yamaguchi, S.; Yang, Y.; McKelvey, K.; Hanada, A.; Borochov, R.; Yu, F.; Jikumaru, Y.; Ross, J.; et al

    2007-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana GAMT1 and GAMT2 encode enzymes that catalyze formation of the methyl esters of gibberellins (GAs). Ectopic expression of GAMT1 or GAMT2 in Arabidopsis, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), and petunia (Petunia hybrida) resulted in plants with GA deficiency and typical GA deficiency phenotypes, such as dwarfism and reduced fertility. GAMT1 and GAMT2 are both expressed mainly in whole siliques (including seeds), with peak transcript levels from the middle until the end of silique development. Within whole siliques, GAMT2 was previously shown to be expressed mostly in developing seeds, and we show here that GAMT1 expression is also localized mostly to seed, suggesting a role in seed development. Siliques of null single GAMT1 and GAMT2 mutants accumulated high levels of various GAs, with particularly high levels of GA1 in the double mutant. Methylated GAs were not detected in wild-type siliques, suggesting that methylation of GAs by GAMT1 and GAMT2 serves to deactivate GAs and initiate their degradation as the seeds mature. Seeds of homozygous GAMT1 and GAMT2 null mutants showed reduced inhibition of germination, compared with the wild type, when placed on plates containing the GA biosynthesis inhibitor ancymidol, with the double mutant showing the least inhibition. These results suggest that the mature mutant seeds contained higher levels of active GAs than wild-type seeds.

  6. Spaceflight Induces Specific Alterations in the Proteomes of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Jin; Denison, Fiona; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Life in spaceflight demonstrates remarkable acclimation processes within the specialized habitats of vehicles subjected to the myriad of unique environmental issues associated with orbital trajectories. To examine the response processes that occur in plants in space, leaves and roots from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings from three GFP reporter lines that were grown from seed for 12 days on the International Space Station and preserved on orbit in RNAlater were returned to Earth and analyzed by using iTRAQ broad-scale proteomics procedures. Using stringent criteria, we identified over 1500 proteins, which included 1167 leaf proteins and 1150 root proteins we were able to accurately quantify. Quantification revealed 256 leaf proteins and 358 root proteins that showed statistically significant differential abundance in the spaceflight samples compared to ground controls, with few proteins differentially regulated in common between leaves and roots. This indicates that there are measurable proteomics responses to spaceflight and that the responses are organ-specific. These proteomics data were compared with transcriptome data from similar spaceflight samples, showing that there is a positive but limited relationship between transcriptome and proteome regulation of the overall spaceflight responses of plants. These results are discussed in terms of emergence understanding of plant responses to spaceflight particularly with regard to cell wall remodeling, as well as in the context of deriving multiple omics data sets from a single on-orbit preservation and operations approach. Key Words: Space biology—Proteomics—Gene expression—ISS. Astrobiology 15, 32–56. PMID:25517942

  7. Spaceflight induces specific alterations in the proteomes of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ferl, Robert J; Koh, Jin; Denison, Fiona; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Life in spaceflight demonstrates remarkable acclimation processes within the specialized habitats of vehicles subjected to the myriad of unique environmental issues associated with orbital trajectories. To examine the response processes that occur in plants in space, leaves and roots from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings from three GFP reporter lines that were grown from seed for 12 days on the International Space Station and preserved on orbit in RNAlater were returned to Earth and analyzed by using iTRAQ broad-scale proteomics procedures. Using stringent criteria, we identified over 1500 proteins, which included 1167 leaf proteins and 1150 root proteins we were able to accurately quantify. Quantification revealed 256 leaf proteins and 358 root proteins that showed statistically significant differential abundance in the spaceflight samples compared to ground controls, with few proteins differentially regulated in common between leaves and roots. This indicates that there are measurable proteomics responses to spaceflight and that the responses are organ-specific. These proteomics data were compared with transcriptome data from similar spaceflight samples, showing that there is a positive but limited relationship between transcriptome and proteome regulation of the overall spaceflight responses of plants. These results are discussed in terms of emergence understanding of plant responses to spaceflight particularly with regard to cell wall remodeling, as well as in the context of deriving multiple omics data sets from a single on-orbit preservation and operations approach.

  8. Differential petiole growth in Arabidopsis thaliana: photocontrol and hormonal regulation.

    PubMed

    Millenaar, Frank F; van Zanten, Martijn; Cox, Marjolein C H; Pierik, Ronald; Voesenek, Laurentius A C J; Peeters, Anton J M

    2009-01-01

    Environmental challenges such as low light intensity induce differential growth-driven upward leaf movement (hyponastic growth) in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, little is known about the physiological regulation of this response. Here, we studied how low light intensity is perceived and translated into a differential growth response in Arabidopsis. We used mutants defective in light, ethylene and auxin signaling, and in polar auxin transport, as well as chemical inhibitors, to analyze the mechanisms of low light intensity-induced differential growth. Our data indicate that photosynthesis-derived signals and blue light wavelengths affect petiole movements and that rapid induction of hyponasty by low light intensity involves functional cryptochromes 1 and 2, phytochrome-A and phytochrome-B photoreceptor proteins. The response is independent of ethylene signaling. Auxin and polar auxin transport, by contrast, play a role in low light intensity-induced differential petiole growth. We conclude that low light intensity-induced differential petiole growth requires blue light, auxin signaling and polar auxin transport and is, at least in part, genetically separate from well-characterized ethylene-induced differential growth.

  9. Genetic architecture of regulatory variation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Cal, Andrew J; Borevitz, Justin O

    2011-05-01

    Studying the genetic regulation of expression variation is a key method to dissect complex phenotypic traits. To examine the genetic architecture of regulatory variation in Arabidopsis thaliana, we performed genome-wide association (GWA) mapping of gene expression in an F(1) hybrid diversity panel. At a genome-wide false discovery rate (FDR) of 0.2, an associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) explains >38% of trait variation. In comparison with SNPs that are distant from the genes to which they were associated, locally associated SNPs are preferentially found in regions with extended linkage disequilibrium (LD) and have distinct population frequencies of the derived alleles (where Arabidopsis lyrata has the ancestral allele), suggesting that different selective forces are acting. Locally associated SNPs tend to have additive inheritance, whereas distantly associated SNPs are primarily dominant. In contrast to results from mapping of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) in linkage studies, we observe extensive allelic heterogeneity for local regulatory loci in our diversity panel. By association mapping of allele-specific expression (ASE), we detect a significant enrichment for cis-acting variation in local regulatory variation. In addition to gene expression variation, association mapping of splicing variation reveals both local and distant genetic regulation for intron and exon level traits. Finally, we identify candidate genes for 59 diverse phenotypic traits that were mapped to eQTL. PMID:21467266

  10. A novel system for xylem cell differentiation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yuki; Fujita, Takashi; Sugiyama, Munetaka; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2015-04-01

    During vascular development, procambial and cambial cells give rise to xylem and phloem cells. Because the vascular tissue is deeply embedded, it has been difficult to analyze the processes of vascular development in detail. Here, we establish a novel in vitro experimental system in which vascular development is induced in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf-disk cultures using bikinin, an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase 3 proteins. Transcriptome analysis reveals that mesophyll cells in leaf disks synchronously turn into procambial cells and then differentiate into tracheary elements. Leaf-disk cultures from plants expressing the procambial cell markers TDR(pro):GUS and TDR(pro):YFP can be used for spatiotemporal visualization of procambial cell formation. Further analysis with the tdr mutant and TDIF (tracheary element differentiation inhibitory factor) indicates that the key signaling TDIF-TDR-GSK3s regulates xylem differentiation in leaf-disk cultures. This new culture system can be combined with analysis using the rich material resources for Arabidopsis including cell-marker lines and mutants, thus offering a powerful tool for analyzing xylem cell differentiation.

  11. Functional divergence in tandemly duplicated Arabidopsis thaliana trypsin inhibitor genes.

    PubMed Central

    Clauss, M J; Mitchell-Olds, T

    2004-01-01

    In multigene families, variation among loci and alleles can contribute to trait evolution. We explored patterns of functional and genetic variation in six duplicated Arabidopsis thaliana trypsin inhibitor (ATTI) loci. We demonstrate significant variation in constitutive and herbivore-induced transcription among ATTI loci that show, on average, 65% sequence divergence. Significant variation in ATTI expression was also found between two molecularly defined haplotype classes. Population genetic analyses for 17 accessions of A. thaliana showed that six ATTI loci arranged in tandem within 10 kb varied 10-fold in nucleotide diversity, from 0.0009 to 0.0110, and identified a minimum of six recombination events throughout the tandem array. We observed a significant peak in nucleotide and indel polymorphism spanning ATTI loci in the interior of the array, due primarily to divergence between the two haplotype classes. Significant deviation from the neutral equilibrium model for individual genes was interpreted within the context of intergene linkage disequilibrium and correlated patterns of functional differentiation. In contrast to the outcrosser Arabidopsis lyrata for which recombination is observed even within ATTI loci, our data suggest that response to selection was slowed in the inbreeding, annual A. thaliana because of interference among functionally divergent ATTI loci. PMID:15082560

  12. Caesium-affected gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sahr, Tobias; Voigt, Gabriele; Paretzke, Herwig G; Schramel, Peter; Ernst, Dieter

    2005-03-01

    * Excessive caesium can be toxic to plants. Here we investigated Cs uptake and caesium-induced gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana. * Accumulation was measured in plants grown for 5 wk on agar supplemented with nontoxic and up to toxic levels of Cs. Caesium-induced gene expression was studied by suppression-subtractive hybridization (SSH) and RT-PCR. * Caesium accumulated in leaf rosettes dependent upon the external concentration in the growth media, whereas the potassium concentration decreased in rosettes. At a concentration of 850 microM, Cs plants showed reduced development, and withered with an increase in concentration to 1 mM Cs. SSH resulted in the isolation of 73 clones that were differentially expressed at a Cs concentration of 150 microM. Most of the genes identified belong to groups of genes encoding proteins in stress defence, detoxification, transport, homeostasis and general metabolism, and proteins controlling transcription and translation. * The present study identified a number of marker genes for Cs in Arabidopsis grown under nontoxic Cs concentrations, indicating that Cs acts as an abiotic stress factor.

  13. Posttranslational modifications of FERREDOXIN-NADP+ OXIDOREDUCTASE in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Lehtimäki, Nina; Koskela, Minna M; Dahlström, Käthe M; Pakula, Eveliina; Lintala, Minna; Scholz, Martin; Hippler, Michael; Hanke, Guy T; Rokka, Anne; Battchikova, Natalia; Salminen, Tiina A; Mulo, Paula

    2014-12-01

    Rapid responses of chloroplast metabolism and adjustments to photosynthetic machinery are of utmost importance for plants' survival in a fluctuating environment. These changes may be achieved through posttranslational modifications of proteins, which are known to affect the activity, interactions, and localization of proteins. Recent studies have accumulated evidence about the crucial role of a multitude of modifications, including acetylation, methylation, and glycosylation, in the regulation of chloroplast proteins. Both of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf-type FERREDOXIN-NADP(+) OXIDOREDUCTASE (FNR) isoforms, the key enzymes linking the light reactions of photosynthesis to carbon assimilation, exist as two distinct forms with different isoelectric points. We show that both AtFNR isoforms contain multiple alternative amino termini and undergo light-responsive addition of an acetyl group to the α-amino group of the amino-terminal amino acid of proteins, which causes the change in isoelectric point. Both isoforms were also found to contain acetylation of a conserved lysine residue near the active site, while no evidence for in vivo phosphorylation or glycosylation was detected. The dynamic, multilayer regulation of AtFNR exemplifies the complex regulatory network systems controlling chloroplast proteins by a range of posttranslational modifications, which continues to emerge as a novel area within photosynthesis research.

  14. Brassinosteroids Are Master Regulators of Gibberellin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Unterholzner, Simon J; Rozhon, Wilfried; Papacek, Michael; Ciomas, Jennifer; Lange, Theo; Kugler, Karl G; Mayer, Klaus F; Sieberer, Tobias; Poppenberger, Brigitte

    2015-08-01

    Plant growth and development are highly regulated processes that are coordinated by hormones including the brassinosteroids (BRs), a group of steroids with structural similarity to steroid hormones of mammals. Although it is well understood how BRs are produced and how their signals are transduced, BR targets, which directly confer the hormone's growth-promoting effects, have remained largely elusive. Here, we show that BRs regulate the biosynthesis of gibberellins (GAs), another class of growth-promoting hormones, in Arabidopsis thaliana. We reveal that Arabidopsis mutants deficient in BR signaling are severely impaired in the production of bioactive GA, which is correlated with defective GA biosynthetic gene expression. Expression of the key GA biosynthesis gene GA20ox1 in the BR signaling mutant bri1-301 rescues many of its developmental defects. We provide evidence that supports a model in which the BR-regulated transcription factor BES1 binds to a regulatory element in promoters of GA biosynthesis genes in a BR-induced manner to control their expression. In summary, our study underscores a role of BRs as master regulators of GA biosynthesis and shows that this function is of major relevance for the growth and development of vascular plants.

  15. A role for the TOC complex in Arabidopsis root gravitropism.

    PubMed

    Stanga, John P; Boonsirichai, Kanokporn; Sedbrook, John C; Otegui, Marisa S; Masson, Patrick H

    2009-04-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots perceive gravity and reorient their growth accordingly. Starch-dense amyloplasts within the columella cells of the root cap are important for gravitropism, and starchless mutants such as pgm1 display an attenuated response to gravistimulation. The altered response to gravity1 (arg1) mutant is known to be involved with the early phases of gravity signal transduction. arg1 responds slowly to gravistimulation and is in a genetically distinct pathway from pgm1, as pgm1 mutants enhance the gravitropic defect of arg1. arg1 seeds were mutagenized with ethylmethane sulfonate to identify new mutants that enhance the gravitropic defect of arg1. Two modifier of arg1 mutants (mar1 and mar2) grow in random directions only when arg1 is present, do not affect phototropism, and respond like the wild type to application of phytohormones. Both have mutations affecting different components of the Translocon of Outer Membrane of Chloroplasts (TOC) complex. mar1 possesses a mutation in the TOC75-III gene; mar2 possesses a mutation in the TOC132 gene. Overexpression of TOC132 rescues the random growth phenotype of mar2 arg1 roots. Root cap amyloplasts in mar2 arg1 appear ultrastructurally normal. They saltate like the wild type and sediment at wild-type rates upon gravistimulation. These data point to a role for the plastidic TOC complex in gravity signal transduction within the statocytes.

  16. Piriformospora indica Stimulates Root Metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Strehmel, Nadine; Mönchgesang, Susann; Herklotz, Siska; Krüger, Sylvia; Ziegler, Jörg; Scheel, Dierk

    2016-01-01

    Piriformospora indica is a root-colonizing fungus, which interacts with a variety of plants including Arabidopsis thaliana. This interaction has been considered as mutualistic leading to growth promotion of the host. So far, only indolic glucosinolates and phytohormones have been identified as key players. In a comprehensive non-targeted metabolite profiling study, we analyzed Arabidopsis thaliana's roots, root exudates, and leaves of inoculated and non-inoculated plants by ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/(ESI)-QTOFMS) and gas chromatography/electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC/EI-QMS), and identified further biomarkers. Among them, the concentration of nucleosides, dipeptides, oligolignols, and glucosinolate degradation products was affected in the exudates. In the root profiles, nearly all metabolite levels increased upon co-cultivation, like carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, glucosinolates, oligolignols, and flavonoids. In the leaf profiles, we detected by far less significant changes. We only observed an increased concentration of organic acids, carbohydrates, ascorbate, glucosinolates and hydroxycinnamic acids, and a decreased concentration of nitrogen-rich amino acids in inoculated plants. These findings contribute to the understanding of symbiotic interactions between plant roots and fungi of the order of Sebacinales and are a valid source for follow-up mechanistic studies, because these symbioses are particular and clearly different from interactions of roots with mycorrhizal fungi or dark septate endophytes. PMID:27399695

  17. Widespread translational control contributes to the regulation of Arabidopsis photomorphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Jung; Wu, Szu-Hsien; Chen, Ho-Ming; Wu, Shu-Hsing

    2012-01-01

    Environmental ‘light' has a vital role in regulating plant growth and development. Transcriptomic profiling has been widely used to examine how light regulates mRNA levels on a genome-wide scale, but the global role of translational regulation in the response to light is unknown. Through a transcriptomic comparison of steady-state and polysome-bound mRNAs, we reveal a clear impact of translational control on thousands of genes, in addition to transcriptomic changes, during photomorphogenesis. Genes encoding ribosomal protein are preferentially regulated at the translational level, which possibly contributes to the enhanced translation efficiency. We also reveal that mRNAs regulated at the translational level share characteristics of longer half-lives and shorter cDNA length, and that transcripts with a cis-element, TAGGGTTT, in their 5′ untranslated region have higher translatability. We report a previously neglected aspect of gene expression regulation during Arabidopsis photomorphogenesis. The identities and molecular signatures associated with mRNAs regulated at the translational level also offer new directions for mechanistic studies of light-triggered translational enhancement in Arabidopsis. PMID:22252389

  18. LEAFY, a Homeotic Gene That Regulates Inflorescence Development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, EA; Haughn, GW

    1991-01-01

    Variation in plant shoot structure may be described as occurring through changes within a basic unit, the metamer. Using this terminology, the apical meristem of Arabidopsis produces three metameric types sequentially: type 1, rosette; type 2, coflorescence-bearing with bract; and type 3, flower-bearing without bract. We describe a mutant of Arabidopsis, Leafy, homozygous for a recessive allele of a nuclear gene LEAFY (LFY), that has an inflorescence composed only of type 2-like metamers. These data suggest that the LFY gene is required for the development of type 3 metamers and that the transition from type 2 to type 3 metamers is a developmental step distinct from that between vegetative and reproductive growth (type 1 to type 2 metamers). Results from double mutant analysis, showing that lfy-1 is epistatic to the floral organ homeotic gene ap2-6, are consistent with the hypothesis that a functional LFY gene is necessary for the expression of downstream genes controlling floral organ identity. PMID:12324613

  19. Mutants of Arabidopsis with altered regulation of starch degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Caspar, T.; Lin, Tsanpiao; Kakefuda, G.; Benbow, L.; Preiss, J.; Somerville, C. )

    1991-04-01

    Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. with altered regulation of starch degradation were identified by screening for plants that retained high levels of leaf starch after a period of extended darkness. The mutant phenotype was also expressed in seeds, flowers, and roots, indicating that the same pathway of starch degradation is used in these tissues. In many respects, the physiological consequences of the mutations were equivalent to the effects observed in previously characterized mutants of Arabidopsis that are unable to synthesize starch. One mutant line, which was characterized in detail, had normal levels of activity of the starch degradative enzymes {alpha}-amylase, {beta}-amylase, phosphorylase, D-enzyme, and debranching enzyme. Thus, it was not possible to establish a biochemical basis for the phenotype, which was due to a recessive mutant at a locus designated sex 1 at position 12.2 on chromosome 1. This raises the possibility that hitherto unidentified factors, altered by the mutation, play a key role in regulating or catalyzing starch degradation.

  20. RNA editing of nuclear transcripts in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background RNA editing is a transcript-based layer of gene regulation. To date, no systemic study on RNA editing of plant nuclear genes has been reported. Here, a transcriptome-wide search for editing sites in nuclear transcripts of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) was performed. Results MPSS (massively parallel signature sequencing) and PARE (parallel analysis of RNA ends) data retrieved from public databases were utilized, focusing on one-base-conversion editing. Besides cytidine (C)-to-uridine (U) editing in mitochondrial transcripts, many nuclear transcripts were found to be diversely edited. Interestingly, a sizable portion of these nuclear genes are involved in chloroplast- or mitochondrion-related functions, and many editing events are tissue-specific. Some editing sites, such as adenosine (A)-to-U editing loci, were found to be surrounded by peculiar elements. The editing events of some nuclear transcripts are highly enriched surrounding the borders between coding sequences (CDSs) and 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs), suggesting site-specific editing. Furthermore, RNA editing is potentially implicated in new start or stop codon generation, and may affect alternative splicing of certain protein-coding transcripts. RNA editing in the precursor microRNAs (pre-miRNAs) of ath-miR854 family, resulting in secondary structure transformation, implies its potential role in microRNA (miRNA) maturation. Conclusions To our knowledge, the results provide the first global view of RNA editing in plant nuclear transcripts. PMID:21143795

  1. Constitutively active UVR8 photoreceptor variant in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Heijde, Marc; Binkert, Melanie; Yin, Ruohe; Ares-Orpel, Florence; Rizzini, Luca; Van De Slijke, Eveline; Persiau, Geert; Nolf, Jonah; Gevaert, Kris; De Jaeger, Geert; Ulm, Roman

    2013-12-10

    Arabidopsis thaliana UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) is a UV-B photoreceptor that initiates photomorphogenic responses underlying acclimation and UV-B tolerance in plants. UVR8 is a homodimer in its ground state, and UV-B exposure results in its instantaneous monomerization followed by interaction with CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1), a major factor in UV-B signaling. UV-B photoreception by UVR8 is based on intrinsic tryptophan aromatic amino acid residues, with tryptophan-285 as the main chromophore. We generated transgenic plants expressing UVR8 with a single amino acid change of tryptophan-285 to alanine. UVR8(W285A) appears monomeric and shows UV-B-independent interaction with COP1. Phenotypically, the plants expressing UVR8(W285A) exhibit constitutive photomorphogenesis associated with constitutive activation of target genes, elevated levels of anthocyanins, and enhanced, acclimation-independent UV-B tolerance. Moreover, we have identified COP1, REPRESSOR OF UV-B PHOTOMORPHOGENESIS 1 and 2 (RUP1 and RUP2), and the SUPPRESSOR OF PHYA-105 (SPA) family as proteins copurifying with UVR8(W285A). Whereas COP1, RUP1, and RUP2 are known to directly interact with UVR8, we show that SPA1 interacts with UVR8 indirectly through COP1. We conclude that UVR8(W285A) is a constitutively active UVR8 photoreceptor variant in Arabidopsis, as is consistent with the crucial importance of monomer formation and COP1 binding for UVR8 activity.

  2. Determination of Arabidopsis thaliana telomere length by PCR

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero-Sedas, María I.; Vega-Palas, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    In humans, telomere length studies have acquired great relevance because the length of telomeres has been related to natural processes like disease, aging and cancer. However, very little is known about the influence of telomere length on the biology of wild type plants. The length of plant telomeres has been usually studied by Terminal Restriction Fragment (TRF) analyses. This technique requires high amounts of tissue, including multiple cell types, which might be the reason why very little is known about the influence of telomere length on plant natural processes. In contrast, many of the human telomere length studies have focused on homogenous cell populations. Most of these studies have been performed by PCR, using telomeric degenerated primers, which allow the determination of telomere length from small amounts of human cells. Here, we have adapted the human PCR procedure to analyze the length of Arabidopsis thaliana telomeres. This PCR approach will facilitate the analysis of telomere length from low amounts of tissue. We have used it to determine that CG and non CG DNA methylation positively regulates Arabidopsis telomere length. PMID:24986269

  3. Acetylsalicylic acid induces programmed cell death in Arabidopsis cell cultures.

    PubMed

    García-Heredia, José M; Hervás, Manuel; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Navarro, José A

    2008-06-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), a derivative from the plant hormone salicylic acid (SA), is a commonly used drug that has a dual role in animal organisms as an anti-inflammatory and anticancer agent. It acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenases (COXs), which catalyze prostaglandins production. It is known that ASA serves as an apoptotic agent on cancer cells through the inhibition of the COX-2 enzyme. Here, we provide evidences that ASA also behaves as an agent inducing programmed cell death (PCD) in cell cultures of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, in a similar way than the well-established PCD-inducing agent H(2)O(2), although the induction of PCD by ASA requires much lower inducer concentrations. Moreover, ASA is herein shown to be a more efficient PCD-inducing agent than salicylic acid. ASA treatment of Arabidopsis cells induces typical PCD-linked morphological and biochemical changes, namely cell shrinkage, nuclear DNA degradation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from mitochondria and induction of caspase-like activity. However, the ASA effect can be partially reverted by jasmonic acid. Taking together, these results reveal the existence of common features in ASA-induced animal apoptosis and plant PCD, and also suggest that there are similarities between the pathways of synthesis and function of prostanoid-like lipid mediators in animal and plant organisms.

  4. Genetic architecture of regulatory variation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Cal, Andrew J; Borevitz, Justin O

    2011-05-01

    Studying the genetic regulation of expression variation is a key method to dissect complex phenotypic traits. To examine the genetic architecture of regulatory variation in Arabidopsis thaliana, we performed genome-wide association (GWA) mapping of gene expression in an F(1) hybrid diversity panel. At a genome-wide false discovery rate (FDR) of 0.2, an associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) explains >38% of trait variation. In comparison with SNPs that are distant from the genes to which they were associated, locally associated SNPs are preferentially found in regions with extended linkage disequilibrium (LD) and have distinct population frequencies of the derived alleles (where Arabidopsis lyrata has the ancestral allele), suggesting that different selective forces are acting. Locally associated SNPs tend to have additive inheritance, whereas distantly associated SNPs are primarily dominant. In contrast to results from mapping of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) in linkage studies, we observe extensive allelic heterogeneity for local regulatory loci in our diversity panel. By association mapping of allele-specific expression (ASE), we detect a significant enrichment for cis-acting variation in local regulatory variation. In addition to gene expression variation, association mapping of splicing variation reveals both local and distant genetic regulation for intron and exon level traits. Finally, we identify candidate genes for 59 diverse phenotypic traits that were mapped to eQTL.

  5. Aluminum Induces Oxidative Stress Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana1

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Keith D.; Schott, Eric J.; Sharma, Yogesh K.; Davis, Keith R.; Gardner, Richard C.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in gene expression induced by toxic levels of Al were characterized to investigate the nature of Al stress. A cDNA library was constructed from Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings treated with Al for 2 h. We identified five cDNA clones that showed a transient induction of their mRNA levels, four cDNA clones that showed a longer induction period, and two down-regulated genes. Expression of the four long-term-induced genes remained at elevated levels for at least 48 h. The genes encoded peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, blue copper-binding protein, and a protein homologous to the reticuline:oxygen oxidoreductase enzyme. Three of these genes are known to be induced by oxidative stresses and the fourth is induced by pathogen treatment. Another oxidative stress gene, superoxide dismutase, and a gene for Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor were also induced by Al in A. thaliana. These results suggested that Al treatment of Arabidopsis induces oxidative stress. In confirmation of this hypothesis, three of four genes induced by Al stress in A. thaliana were also shown to be induced by ozone. Our results demonstrate that oxidative stress is an important component of the plant's reaction to toxic levels of Al. PMID:9449849

  6. The Arabidopsis NPF3 protein is a GA transporter

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Iris; Zhang, Yi; Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Pisanty, Odelia; Barbosa, Inês C. R.; Zourelidou, Melina; Regnault, Thomas; Crocoll, Christoph; Erik Olsen, Carl; Weinstain, Roy; Schwechheimer, Claus; Halkier, Barbara Ann; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Estelle, Mark; Shani, Eilon

    2016-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are plant hormones that promote a wide range of developmental processes. While GA signalling is well understood, little is known about how GA is transported or how GA distribution is regulated. Here we utilize fluorescently labelled GAs (GA-Fl) to screen for Arabidopsis mutants deficient in GA transport. We show that the NPF3 transporter efficiently transports GA across cell membranes in vitro and GA-Fl in vivo. NPF3 is expressed in root endodermis and repressed by GA. NPF3 is targeted to the plasma membrane and subject to rapid BFA-dependent recycling. We show that abscisic acid (ABA), an antagonist of GA, is also transported by NPF3 in vitro. ABA promotes NPF3 expression and GA-Fl uptake in plants. On the basis of these results, we propose that GA distribution and activity in Arabidopsis is partly regulated by NPF3 acting as an influx carrier and that GA–ABA interaction may occur at the level of transport. PMID:27139299

  7. The protein kinase TOUSLED facilitates RNAi in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Mohammad Nazim; Dunoyer, Patrice; Schott, Gregory; Akhter, Salina; Shi, Chunlin; Lucas, William J.; Voinnet, Olivier; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2014-01-01

    RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism triggered by double-stranded RNA that is processed into 21- to 24-nt small interfering (si)RNA or micro (mi)RNA by RNaseIII-like enzymes called Dicers. Gene regulations by RNA silencing have fundamental implications in a large number of biological processes that include antiviral defense, maintenance of genome integrity and the orchestration of cell fates. Although most generic or core components of the various plant small RNA pathways have been likely identified over the past 15 years, factors involved in RNAi regulation through post-translational modifications are just starting to emerge, mostly through forward genetic studies. A genetic screen designed to identify factors required for RNAi in Arabidopsis identified the serine/threonine protein kinase, TOUSLED (TSL). Mutations in TSL affect exogenous and virus-derived siRNA activity in a manner dependent upon its kinase activity. By contrast, despite their pleiotropic developmental phenotype, tsl mutants show no defect in biogenesis or activity of miRNA or endogenous trans-acting siRNA. These data suggest a possible role for TSL phosphorylation in the specific regulation of exogenous and antiviral RNA silencing in Arabidopsis and identify TSL as an intrinsic regulator of RNA interference. PMID:24920830

  8. Thiamin confers enhanced tolerance to oxidative stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Miller, Gad; Song, Luhua; Kim, James; Sodek, Ahmet; Koussevitzky, Shai; Misra, Amarendra Narayan; Mittler, Ron; Shintani, David

    2009-09-01

    Thiamin and thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) are well known for their important roles in human nutrition and enzyme catalysis. In this work, we present new evidence for an additional role of these compounds in the protection of cells against oxidative damage. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants subjected to abiotic stress conditions, such as high light, cold, osmotic, salinity, and oxidative treatments, accumulated thiamin and TPP. Moreover, the accumulation of these compounds in plants subjected to oxidative stress was accompanied by enhanced expression of transcripts encoding thiamin biosynthetic enzymes. When supplemented with exogenous thiamin, wild-type plants displayed enhanced tolerance to oxidative stress induced by paraquat. Thiamin application was also found to protect the reactive oxygen species-sensitive ascorbate peroxidase1 mutant from oxidative stress. Thiamin-induced tolerance to oxidative stress was accompanied by decreased production of reactive oxygen species in plants, as evidenced from decreased protein carbonylation and hydrogen peroxide accumulation. Because thiamin could protect the salicylic acid induction-deficient1 mutant against oxidative stress, thiamin-induced oxidative protection is likely independent of salicylic acid signaling or accumulation. Taken together, our studies suggest that thiamin and TPP function as important stress-response molecules that alleviate oxidative stress during different abiotic stress conditions.

  9. [Regulation pattern of the FRUITFULL (FUL) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana].

    PubMed

    Chu, Tingting; Xie, Hua; Xu, Yong; Ma, Rongcai

    2010-11-01

    FRUITFULL (FUL) is an MADS box gene that functions early in controlling flowering time, meristem identity and cauline leaf morphology and later in carpel and fruit development in Arabidopsis thaliana. In order to clarify the regulation of FUL expression the upstream regulatory region, -2148 bp - +96 bp and the first intron of the FUL gene were cloned, and vectors with a series of deletion of FUL promoter, and the ones fused with the first intron were constructed. Vectors harboring the fusion of cis-acting elements with the constitutive promoters of TUBULIN and ACTIN were also constructed. Beta-Glucuronidase activity assays of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants showed that two cis-elements were involved in the repression of FUL expression, with one of the two being probably the binding site of the transcriptional factor AP1. And the two CArG boxes played a important role in FUL initiation particularly. Furthermore, the first intron of FUL was shown to participate in the development of carpel and stamen as an enhancer.

  10. Re-Evaluation of Reportedly Metal Tolerant Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Guzman, Macarena; Addo-Quaye, Charles; Dilkes, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    Santa Clara, Limeport, and Berkeley are Arabidopsis thaliana accessions previously identified as diversely metal resistant. Yet these same accessions were determined to be genetically indistinguishable from the metal sensitive Col-0. We robustly tested tolerance for Zn, Ni and Cu, and genetic relatedness by growing these accessions under a range of Ni, Zn and Cu concentrations for three durations in multiple replicates. Neither metal resistance nor variance in growth were detected between them and Col-0. We re-sequenced the genomes of these accessions and all stocks available for each accession. In all cases they were nearly indistinguishable from the standard laboratory accession Col-0. As Santa Clara was allegedly collected from the Jasper Ridge serpentine outcrop in California, USA we investigated the possibility of extant A. thaliana populations adapted to serpentine soils. Botanically vouchered Arabidopsis accessions in the Jepson database were overlaid with soil maps of California. This provided no evidence of A. thaliana collections from serpentine sites in California. Thus, our work demonstrates that the Santa Clara, Berkeley and Limeport accessions are not metal tolerant, not genetically distinct from Col-0, and that there are no known serpentine adapted populations or accessions of A. thaliana. PMID:27467746

  11. Flavonoid accumulation patterns of transparent testa mutants of arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peer, W. A.; Brown, D. E.; Tague, B. W.; Muday, G. K.; Taiz, L.; Murphy, A. S.

    2001-01-01

    Flavonoids have been implicated in the regulation of auxin movements in Arabidopsis. To understand when and where flavonoids may be acting to control auxin movement, the flavonoid accumulation pattern was examined in young seedlings and mature tissues of wild-type Arabidopsis. Using a variety of biochemical and visualization techniques, flavonoid accumulation in mature plants was localized in cauline leaves, pollen, stigmata, and floral primordia, and in the stems of young, actively growing inflorescences. In young Landsberg erecta seedlings, aglycone flavonols accumulated developmentally in three regions, the cotyledonary node, the hypocotyl-root transition zone, and the root tip. Aglycone flavonols accumulated at the hypocotyl-root transition zone in a developmental and tissue-specific manner with kaempferol in the epidermis and quercetin in the cortex. Quercetin localized subcellularly in the nuclear region, plasma membrane, and endomembrane system, whereas kaempferol localized in the nuclear region and plasma membrane. The flavonoid accumulation pattern was also examined in transparent testa mutants blocked at different steps in the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway. The transparent testa mutants were shown to have precursor accumulation patterns similar to those of end product flavonoids in wild-type Landsberg erecta, suggesting that synthesis and end product accumulation occur in the same cells.

  12. Arabidopsis chloroplast chaperonin 10 is a calmodulin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse cellular activities in plants through the action of calmodulin (CaM). By using (35)S-labeled CaM to screen an Arabidopsis seedling cDNA expression library, a cDNA designated as AtCh-CPN10 (Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast chaperonin 10) was cloned. Chloroplast CPN10, a nuclear-encoded protein, is a functional homolog of E. coli GroES. It is believed that CPN60 and CPN10 are involved in the assembly of Rubisco, a key enzyme involved in the photosynthetic pathway. Northern analysis revealed that AtCh-CPN10 is highly expressed in green tissues. The recombinant AtCh-CPN10 binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion mutants revealed that there is only one CaM-binding site in the last 31 amino acids of the AtCh-CPN10 at the C-terminal end. The CaM-binding region in AtCh-CPN10 has higher homology to other chloroplast CPN10s in comparison to GroES and mitochondrial CPN10s, suggesting that CaM may only bind to chloroplast CPN10s. Furthermore, the results also suggest that the calcium/CaM messenger system is involved in regulating Rubisco assembly in the chloroplast, thereby influencing photosynthesis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  13. Transposon tagging and the study of root development in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsugeki, R.; Olson, M. L.; Fedoroff, N. V.

    1998-01-01

    The maize Ac-Ds transposable element family has been used as the basis of transposon mutagenesis systems that function in a variety of plants, including Arabidopsis. We have developed modified transposons and methods which simplify the detection, cloning and analysis of insertion mutations. We have identified and are analyzing two plant lines in which genes expressed either in the root cap cells or in the quiescent cells, cortex/endodermal initial cells and columella cells of the root cap have been tagged with a transposon carrying a reporter gene. A gene expressed in root cap cells tagged with an enhancer-trap Ds was isolated and its corresponding EST cDNA was identified. Nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the gene show no significant similarity to other genes in the database. Genetic ablation experiments have been done by fusing a root cap-specific promoter to the diphtheria toxin A-chain gene and introducing the fusion construct into Arabidopsis plants. We find that in addition to eliminating gravitropism, root cap ablation inhibits elongation of roots by lowering root meristematic activities.

  14. Viral Strain-Specific Differential Alterations in Arabidopsis Developmental Patterns.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Flora; Manrique, Pilar; Mansilla, Carmen; Lunello, Pablo; Wang, Xiaowu; Rodrigo, Guillermo; López-González, Silvia; Jenner, Carol; González-Melendi, Pablo; Elena, Santiago F; Walsh, John; Ponz, Fernando

    2015-12-01

    Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) infections affect many Arabidopsis developmental traits. This paper analyzes, at different levels, the development-related differential alterations induced by different strains of TuMV, represented by isolates UK 1 and JPN 1. The genomic sequence of JPN 1 TuMV isolate revealed highest divergence in the P1 and P3 viral cistrons, upon comparison with the UK 1 sequence. Infectious viral chimeras covering the whole viral genome uncovered the P3 cistron as a major viral determinant of development alterations, excluding the involvement of the PIPO open reading frame. However, constitutive transgenic expression of P3 in Arabidopsis did not induce developmental alterations nor modulate the strong effects induced by the transgenic RNA silencing suppressor HC-Pro from either strain. This highlights the importance of studying viral determinants within the context of actual viral infections. Transcriptomic and interactomic analyses at different stages of plant development revealed large differences in the number of genes affected by the different infections at medium infection times but no significant differences at very early times. Biological functions affected by UK 1 (the most severe strain) included mainly stress response and transport. Most cellular components affected cell-wall transport or metabolism. Hubs in the interactome were affected upon infection. PMID:26646245

  15. Determination of Arabidopsis thaliana telomere length by PCR.

    PubMed

    Vaquero-Sedas, María I; Vega-Palas, Miguel A

    2014-07-02

    In humans, telomere length studies have acquired great relevance because the length of telomeres has been related to natural processes like disease, aging and cancer. However, very little is known about the influence of telomere length on the biology of wild type plants. The length of plant telomeres has been usually studied by Terminal Restriction Fragment (TRF) analyses. This technique requires high amounts of tissue, including multiple cell types, which might be the reason why very little is known about the influence of telomere length on plant natural processes. In contrast, many of the human telomere length studies have focused on homogenous cell populations. Most of these studies have been performed by PCR, using telomeric degenerated primers, which allow the determination of telomere length from small amounts of human cells. Here, we have adapted the human PCR procedure to analyze the length of Arabidopsis thaliana telomeres. This PCR approach will facilitate the analysis of telomere length from low amounts of tissue. We have used it to determine that CG and non CG DNA methylation positively regulates Arabidopsis telomere length.

  16. CRYPTOCHROME2 in Vascular Bundles Regulates Flowering in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Motomu; Mochizuki, Nobuyoshi; Suzuki, Tomomi; Nagatani, Akira

    2007-01-01

    Plants make full use of light signals to determine the timing of flowering. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a blue/UV-A photoreceptor, CRYPTOCHROME 2 (cry2), and a red/far-red photoreceptor, PHYTOCHROME B (phyB), are two major photoreceptors that control flowering. The light stimuli for the regulation of flowering are perceived by leaves. We have recently shown that phyB expression in mesophyll but not in vascular bundles suppresses the expression of a key flowering regulator, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), in vascular bundles. In this study, we asked where in the leaf cry2 perceives light stimuli to regulate flowering. To answer this question, we established transgenic Arabidopsis lines in which the cry2–green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion was expressed under the control of organ/tissue-specific promoters in a cry2-deficient mutant background. Analysis of these lines revealed that expression of cry2-GFP in vascular bundles, but not in epidermis or mesophyll, rescued the late flowering phenotype. We further confirmed that cry2-GFP expressed in vascular bundles increased FT expression only in vascular bundles. Hence, in striking contrast with phyB, cry2 most likely regulates FT expression in a cell-autonomous manner. PMID:17259260

  17. Quantitative genetic analysis of salicylic acid perception in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dobón, Albor; Canet, Juan Vicente; Perales, Lorena; Tornero, Pablo

    2011-10-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a phytohormone required for a full resistance against some pathogens in Arabidopsis, and NPR1 (Non-Expressor of Pathogenesis Related Genes 1) is the only gene with a strong effect on resistance induced by SA which has been described. There can be additional components of SA perception that escape the traditional approach of mutagenesis. An alternative to that approach is searching in the natural variation of Arabidopsis. Different methods of analyzing the variation between ecotypes have been tried and it has been found that measuring the growth of a virulent isolate of Pseudomonas syringae after the exogenous application of SA is the most effective one. Two ecotypes, Edi-0 and Stw-0, have been crossed, and their F2 has been studied. There are two significant quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in this population, and there is one QTL in each one of the existing mapping populations Col-4 × Laer-0 and Laer-0 × No-0. They have different characteristics: while one QTL is only detectable at low concentrations of SA, the other acts after the point of crosstalk with methyl jasmonate signalling. Three of the QTLs have candidates described in SA perception as NPR1, its interactors, and a calmodulin binding protein.

  18. A role for seed storage proteins in Arabidopsis seed longevity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thu-Phuong; Cueff, Gwendal; Hegedus, Dwayne D; Rajjou, Loïc; Bentsink, Leónie

    2015-10-01

    Proteomics approaches have been a useful tool for determining the biological roles and functions of individual proteins and identifying the molecular mechanisms that govern seed germination, vigour and viability in response to ageing. In this work the dry seed proteome of four Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes, that carry introgression fragments at the position of seed longevity quantitative trait loci and as a result display different levels of seed longevity, was investigated. Seeds at two physiological states, after-ripened seeds that had the full germination ability and aged (stored) seeds of which the germination ability was severely reduced, were compared. Aged dry seed proteomes were markedly different from the after-ripened and reflected the seed longevity level of the four genotypes, despite the fact that dry seeds are metabolically quiescent. Results confirmed the role of antioxidant systems, notably vitamin E, and indicated that protection and maintenance of the translation machinery and energy pathways are essential for seed longevity. Moreover, a new role for seed storage proteins (SSPs) was identified in dry seeds during ageing. Cruciferins (CRUs) are the most abundant SSPs in Arabidopsis and seeds of a triple mutant for three CRU isoforms (crua crub cruc) were more sensitive to artificial ageing and their seed proteins were highly oxidized compared with wild-type seeds. These results confirm that oxidation is involved in seed deterioration and that SSPs buffer the seed from oxidative stress, thus protecting important proteins required for seed germination and seedling formation.

  19. Eskimo1 mutants of Arabidopsis are constitutively freezing-tolerant.

    PubMed

    Xin, Z; Browse, J

    1998-06-23

    Temperate plants develop a greater ability to withstand freezing in response to a period of low but nonfreezing temperatures through a complex, adaptive process of cold acclimation. Very little is known about the signaling processes by which plants perceive the low temperature stimulus and transduce it into the nucleus to activate genes needed for increased freezing tolerance. To help understand the signaling processes, we have isolated mutants of Arabidopsis that are constitutively freezing-tolerant in the absence of cold acclimation. Freezing tolerance of wild-type Arabidopsis was increased from -5.5 degreesC to -12.6 degreesC by cold acclimation whereas the freezing tolerance of 26 mutant lines ranged from -6.8 degreesC to -10.6 degreesC in the absence of acclimation. Plants with mutations at the eskimo1 (esk1) locus accumulated high levels of proline, a compatible osmolyte, but did not exhibit constitutively increased expression of several cold-regulated genes involved in freezing tolerance. RNA gel blot analysis suggested that proline accumulation in esk1 plants was mediated by regulation of transcript levels of genes involved in proline synthesis and degradation. The characterization of esk1 mutants and results from other mutants suggest that distinct signaling pathways activate different aspects of cold acclimation and that activation of one pathway can result in considerable freezing tolerance without activation of other pathways.

  20. Interspecific and interploidal gene flow in Central European Arabidopsis (Brassicaceae)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Effects of polyploidisation on gene flow between natural populations are little known. Central European diploid and tetraploid populations of Arabidopsis arenosa and A. lyrata are here used to study interspecific and interploidal gene flow, using a combination of nuclear and plastid markers. Results Ploidal levels were confirmed by flow cytometry. Network analyses clearly separated diploids according to species. Tetraploids and diploids were highly intermingled within species, and some tetraploids intermingled with the other species, as well. Isolation with migration analyses suggested interspecific introgression from tetraploid A. arenosa to tetraploid A. lyrata and vice versa, and some interploidal gene flow, which was unidirectional from diploid to tetraploid in A. arenosa and bidirectional in A. lyrata. Conclusions Interspecific genetic isolation at diploid level combined with introgression at tetraploid level indicates that polyploidy may buffer against negative consequences of interspecific hybridisation. The role of introgression in polyploid systems may, however, differ between plant species, and even within the small genus Arabidopsis, we find very different evolutionary fates when it comes to introgression. PMID:22126410

  1. Brassinosteroids Are Master Regulators of Gibberellin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Unterholzner, Simon J.; Rozhon, Wilfried; Papacek, Michael; Ciomas, Jennifer; Lange, Theo; Kugler, Karl G.; Mayer, Klaus F.; Sieberer, Tobias; Poppenberger, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Plant growth and development are highly regulated processes that are coordinated by hormones including the brassinosteroids (BRs), a group of steroids with structural similarity to steroid hormones of mammals. Although it is well understood how BRs are produced and how their signals are transduced, BR targets, which directly confer the hormone’s growth-promoting effects, have remained largely elusive. Here, we show that BRs regulate the biosynthesis of gibberellins (GAs), another class of growth-promoting hormones, in Arabidopsis thaliana. We reveal that Arabidopsis mutants deficient in BR signaling are severely impaired in the production of bioactive GA, which is correlated with defective GA biosynthetic gene expression. Expression of the key GA biosynthesis gene GA20ox1 in the BR signaling mutant bri1-301 rescues many of its developmental defects. We provide evidence that supports a model in which the BR-regulated transcription factor BES1 binds to a regulatory element in promoters of GA biosynthesis genes in a BR-induced manner to control their expression. In summary, our study underscores a role of BRs as master regulators of GA biosynthesis and shows that this function is of major relevance for the growth and development of vascular plants. PMID:26243314

  2. Highly oxidized peroxisomes are selectively degraded via autophagy in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Michitaro; Oikawa, Kazusato; Yoshimoto, Kohki; Kondo, Maki; Mano, Shoji; Yamada, Kenji; Hayashi, Makoto; Sakamoto, Wataru; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Nishimura, Mikio

    2013-12-01

    The positioning of peroxisomes in a cell is a regulated process that is closely associated with their functions. Using this feature of the peroxisomal positioning as a criterion, we identified three Arabidopsis thaliana mutants (peroxisome unusual positioning1 [peup1], peup2, and peup4) that contain aggregated peroxisomes. We found that the PEUP1, PEUP2, and PEUP4 were identical to Autophagy-related2 (ATG2), ATG18a, and ATG7, respectively, which are involved in the autophagic system. The number of peroxisomes was increased and the peroxisomal proteins were highly accumulated in the peup1 mutant, suggesting that peroxisome degradation by autophagy (pexophagy) is deficient in the peup1 mutant. These aggregated peroxisomes contained high levels of inactive catalase and were more oxidative than those of the wild type, indicating that peroxisome aggregates comprise damaged peroxisomes. In addition, peroxisome aggregation was induced in wild-type plants by exogenous application of hydrogen peroxide. The cat2 mutant also contained peroxisome aggregates. These findings demonstrate that hydrogen peroxide as a result of catalase inactivation is the inducer of peroxisome aggregation. Furthermore, an autophagosome marker, ATG8, frequently colocalized with peroxisome aggregates, indicating that peroxisomes damaged by hydrogen peroxide are selectively degraded by autophagy in the wild type. Our data provide evidence that autophagy is crucial for quality control mechanisms for peroxisomes in Arabidopsis.

  3. Arabidopsis thaliana root growth kinetics and lunisolar tidal acceleration.

    PubMed

    Fisahn, Joachim; Yazdanbakhsh, Nima; Klingele, Emile; Barlow, Peter

    2012-07-01

    • All living organisms on Earth are continually exposed to diurnal variations in the gravitational tidal force due to the Sun and Moon. • Elongation of primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings maintained at a constant temperature was monitored for periods of up to 14 d using high temporal- and spatial-resolution video imaging. The time-course of the half-hourly elongation rates exhibited an oscillation which was maintained when the roots were placed in the free-running condition of continuous illumination. • Correlation between the root growth kinetics collected from seedlings initially raised under several light protocols but whose roots were subsequently in the free-running condition and the lunisolar tidal profiles enabled us to identify that the latter is the probable exogenous determinant of the rhythmic variation in root elongation rate. Similar observations and correlations using roots of Arabidopsis starch mutants suggest a central function of starch metabolism in the response to the lunisolar tide. The periodicity of the lunisolar tidal signal and the concomitant adjustments in root growth rate indicate that an exogenous timer exists for the modulation of root growth and development. • We propose that, in addition to the sensitivity to Earthly 1G gravity, which is inherent to all animals and plants, there is another type of responsiveness which is attuned to the natural diurnal variations of the lunisolar tidal force. PMID:22583121

  4. Abscisic acid inhibits root growth in Arabidopsis through ethylene biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xingju; Chen, Zhizhong; Gao, Junping; Gong, Zhizhong

    2014-07-01

    When first discovered in 1963, abscisic acid (ABA) was called abscisin II because it promotes abscission. Later, researchers found that ABA accelerates abscission via ethylene. In Arabidopsis, previous studies have shown that high concentrations of ABA inhibit root growth through ethylene signaling but not ethylene production. In the present study in Arabidopsis, we found that ABA inhibits root growth by promoting ethylene biosynthesis. The ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor L-α-(2-aminoethoxyvinyl)-glycine reduces ABA inhibition of root growth, and multiple mutants of ACS (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase) are more resistant to ABA in terms of root growth than the wild-type is. Two ABA-activated calcium-dependent protein kinases, CPK4 and CPK11, phosphorylate the C-terminus of ACS6 and increase the stability of ACS6 in ethylene biosynthesis. Plants expressing an ACS6 mutant that mimics the phosphorylated form of ACS6 produce more ethylene than the wild-type. Our results reveal an important mechanism by which ABA promotes ethylene production. This mechanism may be highly conserved among higher plants.

  5. Arabidopsis DREB2C modulates ABA biosynthesis during germination.

    PubMed

    Je, Jihyun; Chen, Huan; Song, Chieun; Lim, Chae Oh

    2014-09-12

    Plant dehydration-responsive element binding factors (DREBs) are transcriptional regulators of the APETELA2/Ethylene Responsive element-binding Factor (AP2/ERF) family that control expression of abiotic stress-related genes. We show here that under conditions of mild heat stress, constitutive overexpression seeds of transgenic DREB2C overexpression Arabidopsis exhibit delayed germination and increased abscisic acid (ABA) content compared to untransformed wild-type (WT). Treatment with fluridone, an inhibitor of the ABA biosynthesis abrogated these effects. Expression of an ABA biosynthesis-related gene, 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 9 (NCED9) was up-regulated in the DREB2C overexpression lines compared to WT. DREB2C was able to trans-activate expression of NCED9 in Arabidopsis leaf protoplasts in vitro. Direct and specific binding of DREB2C to a complete DRE on the NCED9 promoter was observed in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Exogenous ABA treatment induced DREB2C expression in germinating seeds of WT. Vegetative growth of transgenic DREB2C overexpression lines was more strongly inhibited by exogenous ABA compared to WT. These results suggest that DREB2C is a stress- and ABA-inducible gene that acts as a positive regulator of ABA biosynthesis in germinating seeds through activating NCED9 expression.

  6. Gibberellin biosynthesis and response during Arabidopsis seed germination.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Mikihiro; Hanada, Atsushi; Yamauchi, Yukika; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Kamiya, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro

    2003-07-01

    The hormone-mediated control of plant growth and development involves both synthesis and response. Previous studies have shown that gibberellin (GA) plays an essential role in Arabidopsis seed germination. To learn how GA stimulates seed germination, we performed comprehensive analyses of GA biosynthesis and response using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and oligonucleotide-based DNA microarray analysis. In addition, spatial correlations between GA biosynthesis and response were assessed by in situ hybridization. We identified a number of transcripts, the abundance of which is modulated upon exposure to exogenous GA. A subset of these GA-regulated genes was expressed in accordance with an increase in endogenous active GA levels, which occurs just before radicle emergence. The GA-responsive genes identified include those responsible for synthesis, transport, and signaling of other hormones, suggesting the presence of uncharacterized crosstalk between GA and other hormones. In situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that the expression of GA-responsive genes is not restricted to the predicted site of GA biosynthesis, suggesting that GA itself, or GA signals, is transmitted across different cell types during Arabidopsis seed germination.

  7. Flavonoid Accumulation Patterns of Transparent Testa Mutants of Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Peer, Wendy Ann; Brown, Dana E.; Tague, Brian W.; Muday, Gloria K.; Taiz, Lincoln; Murphy, Angus S.

    2001-01-01

    Flavonoids have been implicated in the regulation of auxin movements in Arabidopsis. To understand when and where flavonoids may be acting to control auxin movement, the flavonoid accumulation pattern was examined in young seedlings and mature tissues of wild-type Arabidopsis. Using a variety of biochemical and visualization techniques, flavonoid accumulation in mature plants was localized in cauline leaves, pollen, stigmata, and floral primordia, and in the stems of young, actively growing inflorescences. In young Landsberg erecta seedlings, aglycone flavonols accumulated developmentally in three regions, the cotyledonary node, the hypocotyl-root transition zone, and the root tip. Aglycone flavonols accumulated at the hypocotyl-root transition zone in a developmental and tissue-specific manner with kaempferol in the epidermis and quercetin in the cortex. Quercetin localized subcellularly in the nuclear region, plasma membrane, and endomembrane system, whereas kaempferol localized in the nuclear region and plasma membrane. The flavonoid accumulation pattern was also examined in transparent testa mutants blocked at different steps in the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway. The transparent testa mutants were shown to have precursor accumulation patterns similar to those of end product flavonoids in wild-type Landsberg erecta, suggesting that synthesis and end product accumulation occur in the same cells. PMID:11402185

  8. Metabolic footprint of epiphytic bacteria on Arabidopsis thaliana leaves.

    PubMed

    Ryffel, Florian; Helfrich, Eric J N; Kiefer, Patrick; Peyriga, Lindsay; Portais, Jean-Charles; Piel, Jörn; Vorholt, Julia A

    2016-03-01

    The phyllosphere, which is defined as the parts of terrestrial plants above the ground, is a large habitat for different microorganisms that show a high extent of adaption to their environment. A number of hypotheses were generated by culture-independent functional genomics studies to explain the competitiveness of specialized bacteria in the phyllosphere. In contrast, in situ data at the metabolome level as a function of bacterial colonization are lacking. Here, we aimed to obtain new insights into the metabolic interplay between host and epiphytes upon colonization of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves in a controlled laboratory setting using environmental metabolomics approaches. Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and imaging high-resolution mass spectrometry (IMS) methods were used to identify Arabidopsis leaf surface compounds and their possible involvement in the epiphytic lifestyle by relative changes in compound pools. The dominant carbohydrates on the leaf surfaces were sucrose, fructose and glucose. These sugars were significantly and specifically altered after epiphytic leaf colonization by the organoheterotroph Sphingomonas melonis or the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, but only to a minor extent by the methylotroph Methylobacterium extorquens. In addition to carbohydrates, IMS revealed surprising alterations in arginine metabolism and phytoalexin biosynthesis that were dependent on the presence of bacteria, which might reflect the consequences of bacterial activity and the recognition of not only pathogens but also commensals by the plant. These results highlight the power of environmental metabolomics to aid in elucidating the molecular basis underlying plant-epiphyte interactions in situ. PMID:26305156

  9. Ethylene Inhibits Cell Proliferation of the Arabidopsis Root Meristem.

    PubMed

    Street, Ian H; Aman, Sitwat; Zubo, Yan; Ramzan, Aleena; Wang, Xiaomin; Shakeel, Samina N; Kieber, Joseph J; Schaller, G Eric

    2015-09-01

    The root system of plants plays a critical role in plant growth and survival, with root growth being dependent on both cell proliferation and cell elongation. Multiple phytohormones interact to control root growth, including ethylene, which is primarily known for its role in controlling root cell elongation. We find that ethylene also negatively regulates cell proliferation at the root meristem of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Genetic analysis indicates that the inhibition of cell proliferation involves two pathways operating downstream of the ethylene receptors. The major pathway is the canonical ethylene signal transduction pathway that incorporates CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1, ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2, and the ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 family of transcription factors. The secondary pathway is a phosphorelay based on genetic analysis of receptor histidine kinase activity and mutants involving the type B response regulators. Analysis of ethylene-dependent gene expression and genetic analysis supports SHORT HYPOCOTYL2, a repressor of auxin signaling, as one mediator of the ethylene response and furthermore, indicates that SHORT HYPOCOTYL2 is a point of convergence for both ethylene and cytokinin in negatively regulating cell proliferation. Additional analysis indicates that ethylene signaling contributes but is not required for cytokinin to inhibit activity of the root meristem. These results identify key elements, along with points of cross talk with cytokinin and auxin, by which ethylene negatively regulates cell proliferation at the root apical meristem.

  10. Piriformospora indica Stimulates Root Metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Strehmel, Nadine; Mönchgesang, Susann; Herklotz, Siska; Krüger, Sylvia; Ziegler, Jörg; Scheel, Dierk

    2016-01-01

    Piriformospora indica is a root-colonizing fungus, which interacts with a variety of plants including Arabidopsis thaliana. This interaction has been considered as mutualistic leading to growth promotion of the host. So far, only indolic glucosinolates and phytohormones have been identified as key players. In a comprehensive non-targeted metabolite profiling study, we analyzed Arabidopsis thaliana’s roots, root exudates, and leaves of inoculated and non-inoculated plants by ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/(ESI)-QTOFMS) and gas chromatography/electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC/EI-QMS), and identified further biomarkers. Among them, the concentration of nucleosides, dipeptides, oligolignols, and glucosinolate degradation products was affected in the exudates. In the root profiles, nearly all metabolite levels increased upon co-cultivation, like carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, glucosinolates, oligolignols, and flavonoids. In the leaf profiles, we detected by far less significant changes. We only observed an increased concentration of organic acids, carbohydrates, ascorbate, glucosinolates and hydroxycinnamic acids, and a decreased concentration of nitrogen-rich amino acids in inoculated plants. These findings contribute to the understanding of symbiotic interactions between plant roots and fungi of the order of Sebacinales and are a valid source for follow-up mechanistic studies, because these symbioses are particular and clearly different from interactions of roots with mycorrhizal fungi or dark septate endophytes PMID:27399695

  11. Telomere Rapid Deletion Regulates Telomere Length in Arabidopsis thaliana▿

    PubMed Central

    Watson, J. Matthew; Shippen, Dorothy E.

    2007-01-01

    Telomere length is maintained in species-specific equilibrium primarily through a competition between telomerase-mediated elongation and the loss of terminal DNA through the end-replication problem. Recombinational activities are also capable of both lengthening and shortening telomeres. Here we demonstrate that elongated telomeres in Arabidopsis Ku70 mutants reach a new length set point after three generations. Restoration of wild-type Ku70 in these mutants leads to discrete telomere-shortening events consistent with telomere rapid deletion (TRD). These findings imply that the longer telomere length set point is achieved through competition between overactive telomerase and TRD. Surprisingly, in the absence of telomerase, a subset of elongated telomeres was further lengthened, suggesting that in this background a mechanism of telomerase-independent lengthening of telomeres operates. Unexpectedly, we also found that plants possessing wild-type-length telomeres exhibit TRD when telomerase is inactivated. TRD is stochastic, and all chromosome ends appear to be equally susceptible. The frequency of TRD decreases as telomeres shorten; telomeres less than 2 kb in length are rarely subject to TRD. We conclude that TRD functions as a potent force to regulate telomere length in Arabidopsis. PMID:17189431

  12. A novel system for xylem cell differentiation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yuki; Fujita, Takashi; Sugiyama, Munetaka; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2015-04-01

    During vascular development, procambial and cambial cells give rise to xylem and phloem cells. Because the vascular tissue is deeply embedded, it has been difficult to analyze the processes of vascular development in detail. Here, we establish a novel in vitro experimental system in which vascular development is induced in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf-disk cultures using bikinin, an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase 3 proteins. Transcriptome analysis reveals that mesophyll cells in leaf disks synchronously turn into procambial cells and then differentiate into tracheary elements. Leaf-disk cultures from plants expressing the procambial cell markers TDR(pro):GUS and TDR(pro):YFP can be used for spatiotemporal visualization of procambial cell formation. Further analysis with the tdr mutant and TDIF (tracheary element differentiation inhibitory factor) indicates that the key signaling TDIF-TDR-GSK3s regulates xylem differentiation in leaf-disk cultures. This new culture system can be combined with analysis using the rich material resources for Arabidopsis including cell-marker lines and mutants, thus offering a powerful tool for analyzing xylem cell differentiation. PMID:25624147

  13. Re-Evaluation of Reportedly Metal Tolerant Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions.

    PubMed

    Silva-Guzman, Macarena; Addo-Quaye, Charles; Dilkes, Brian P

    2016-01-01

    Santa Clara, Limeport, and Berkeley are Arabidopsis thaliana accessions previously identified as diversely metal resistant. Yet these same accessions were determined to be genetically indistinguishable from the metal sensitive Col-0. We robustly tested tolerance for Zn, Ni and Cu, and genetic relatedness by growing these accessions under a range of Ni, Zn and Cu concentrations for three durations in multiple replicates. Neither metal resistance nor variance in growth were detected between them and Col-0. We re-sequenced the genomes of these accessions and all stocks available for each accession. In all cases they were nearly indistinguishable from the standard laboratory accession Col-0. As Santa Clara was allegedly collected from the Jasper Ridge serpentine outcrop in California, USA we investigated the possibility of extant A. thaliana populations adapted to serpentine soils. Botanically vouchered Arabidopsis accessions in the Jepson database were overlaid with soil maps of California. This provided no evidence of A. thaliana collections from serpentine sites in California. Thus, our work demonstrates that the Santa Clara, Berkeley and Limeport accessions are not metal tolerant, not genetically distinct from Col-0, and that there are no known serpentine adapted populations or accessions of A. thaliana. PMID:27467746

  14. In Silico Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Peroxisomal 6-Phosphogluconate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Fernández, Álvaro D.; Corpas, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    NADPH, whose regeneration is critical for reductive biosynthesis and detoxification pathways, is an essential component in cell redox homeostasis. Peroxisomes are subcellular organelles with a complex biochemical machinery involved in signaling and stress processes by molecules such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO). NADPH is required by several peroxisomal enzymes involved in β-oxidation, NO, and glutathione (GSH) generation. Plants have various NADPH-generating dehydrogenases, one of which is 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGDH). Arabidopsis contains three 6PGDH genes that probably are encoded for cytosolic, chloroplastic/mitochondrial, and peroxisomal isozymes, although their specific functions remain largely unknown. This study focuses on the in silico analysis of the biochemical characteristics and gene expression of peroxisomal 6PGDH (p6PGDH) with the aim of understanding its potential function in the peroxisomal NADPH-recycling system. The data show that a group of plant 6PGDHs contains an archetypal type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS), while in silico gene expression analysis using affymetrix microarray data suggests that Arabidopsis p6PGDH appears to be mainly involved in xenobiotic response, growth, and developmental processes. PMID:27034898

  15. Opposite stereoselectivities of dirigent proteins in Arabidopsis and schizandra species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kye-Won; Moinuddin, Syed G A; Atwell, Kathleen M; Costa, Michael A; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2012-10-01

    How stereoselective monolignol-derived phenoxy radical-radical coupling reactions are differentially biochemically orchestrated in planta, whereby for example they afford (+)- and (-)-pinoresinols, respectively, is both a fascinating mechanistic and evolutionary question. In earlier work, biochemical control of (+)-pinoresinol formation had been established to be engendered by a (+)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein in Forsythia intermedia, whereas the presence of a (-)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein was indirectly deduced based on the enantiospecificity of downstream pinoresinol reductases (AtPrRs) in Arabidopsis thaliana root tissue. In this study of 16 putative dirigent protein homologs in Arabidopsis, AtDIR6, AtDIR10, and AtDIR13 were established to be root-specific using a β-glucuronidase reporter gene strategy. Of these three, in vitro analyses established that only recombinant AtDIR6 was a (-)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein, whose physiological role was further confirmed using overexpression and RNAi strategies in vivo. Interestingly, its closest homolog, AtDIR5, was also established to be a (-)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein based on in vitro biochemical analyses. Both of these were compared in terms of properties with a (+)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein from Schizandra chinensis. In this context, sequence analyses, site-directed mutagenesis, and region swapping resulted in identification of putative substrate binding sites/regions and candidate residues controlling distinct stereoselectivities of coupling modes.

  16. Endosperm turgor pressure decreases during early Arabidopsis seed development.

    PubMed

    Beauzamy, Léna; Fourquin, Chloé; Dubrulle, Nelly; Boursiac, Yann; Boudaoud, Arezki; Ingram, Gwyneth

    2016-09-15

    In Arabidopsis, rapid expansion of the coenocytic endosperm after fertilisation has been proposed to drive early seed growth, which is in turn constrained by the seed coat. This hypothesis implies physical heterogeneity between the endosperm and seed coat compartments during early seed development, which to date has not been demonstrated. Here, we combine tissue indentation with modelling to show that the physical properties of the developing seed are consistent with the hypothesis that elevated endosperm-derived turgor pressure drives early seed expansion. We provide evidence that whole-seed turgor is generated by the endosperm at early developmental stages. Furthermore, we show that endosperm cellularisation and seed growth arrest are associated with a drop in endosperm turgor pressure. Finally, we demonstrate that this decrease is perturbed when the function of POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX 2 is lost, suggesting that turgor pressure changes could be a target of genomic imprinting. Our results indicate a developmental role for changes in endosperm turgor pressure in the Arabidopsis seed.

  17. The Arabidopsis NPF3 protein is a GA transporter.

    PubMed

    Tal, Iris; Zhang, Yi; Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Pisanty, Odelia; Barbosa, Inês C R; Zourelidou, Melina; Regnault, Thomas; Crocoll, Christoph; Olsen, Carl Erik; Weinstain, Roy; Schwechheimer, Claus; Halkier, Barbara Ann; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Estelle, Mark; Shani, Eilon

    2016-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are plant hormones that promote a wide range of developmental processes. While GA signalling is well understood, little is known about how GA is transported or how GA distribution is regulated. Here we utilize fluorescently labelled GAs (GA-Fl) to screen for Arabidopsis mutants deficient in GA transport. We show that the NPF3 transporter efficiently transports GA across cell membranes in vitro and GA-Fl in vivo. NPF3 is expressed in root endodermis and repressed by GA. NPF3 is targeted to the plasma membrane and subject to rapid BFA-dependent recycling. We show that abscisic acid (ABA), an antagonist of GA, is also transported by NPF3 in vitro. ABA promotes NPF3 expression and GA-Fl uptake in plants. On the basis of these results, we propose that GA distribution and activity in Arabidopsis is partly regulated by NPF3 acting as an influx carrier and that GA-ABA interaction may occur at the level of transport. PMID:27139299

  18. Identification of Arabidopsis mutants with altered freezing tolerance.

    PubMed

    Perea-Resa, Carlos; Salinas, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Low temperature is an important determinant in the configuration of natural plant communities and defines the range of distribution and growth of important crops. Some plants, including Arabidopsis, have evolved sophisticated adaptive mechanisms to tolerate low and freezing temperatures. Central to this adaptation is the process of cold acclimation. By means of this process, many plants from temperate regions are able to develop or increase their freezing tolerance in response to low, nonfreezing temperatures. The identification and characterization of factors involved in freezing tolerance are crucial to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the cold acclimation response and have a potential interest to improve crop tolerance to freezing temperatures. Many genes implicated in cold acclimation have been identified in numerous plant species by using molecular approaches followed by reverse genetic analysis. Remarkably, however, direct genetic analyses have not been conveniently exploited in their capacity for identifying genes with pivotal roles in that adaptive response. In this chapter, we describe a protocol for evaluating the freezing tolerance of both non-acclimated and cold-acclimated Arabidopsis plants. This protocol allows the accurate and simple screening of mutant collections for the identification of novel factors involved in freezing tolerance and cold acclimation.

  19. Determination of Arabidopsis thaliana telomere length by PCR.

    PubMed

    Vaquero-Sedas, María I; Vega-Palas, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    In humans, telomere length studies have acquired great relevance because the length of telomeres has been related to natural processes like disease, aging and cancer. However, very little is known about the influence of telomere length on the biology of wild type plants. The length of plant telomeres has been usually studied by Terminal Restriction Fragment (TRF) analyses. This technique requires high amounts of tissue, including multiple cell types, which might be the reason why very little is known about the influence of telomere length on plant natural processes. In contrast, many of the human telomere length studies have focused on homogenous cell populations. Most of these studies have been performed by PCR, using telomeric degenerated primers, which allow the determination of telomere length from small amounts of human cells. Here, we have adapted the human PCR procedure to analyze the length of Arabidopsis thaliana telomeres. This PCR approach will facilitate the analysis of telomere length from low amounts of tissue. We have used it to determine that CG and non CG DNA methylation positively regulates Arabidopsis telomere length. PMID:24986269

  20. Coronatine Facilitates Pseudomonas syringae Infection of Arabidopsis Leaves at Night.

    PubMed

    Panchal, Shweta; Roy, Debanjana; Chitrakar, Reejana; Price, Lenore; Breitbach, Zachary S; Armstrong, Daniel W; Melotto, Maeli

    2016-01-01

    In many land plants, the stomatal pore opens during the day and closes during the night. Thus, periods of darkness could be effective in decreasing pathogen penetration into leaves through stomata, the primary sites for infection by many pathogens. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 produces coronatine (COR) and opens stomata, raising an intriguing question as to whether this is a virulence strategy to facilitate bacterial infection at night. In fact, we found that (a) biological concentration of COR is effective in opening dark-closed stomata of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves, (b) the COR defective mutant Pst DC3118 is less effective in infecting Arabidopsis in the dark than under light and this difference in infection is reduced with the wild type bacterium Pst DC3000, and (c) cma, a COR biosynthesis gene, is induced only when the bacterium is in contact with the leaf surface independent of the light conditions. These findings suggest that Pst DC3000 activates virulence factors at the pre-invasive phase of its life cycle to infect plants even when environmental conditions (such as darkness) favor stomatal immunity. This functional attribute of COR may provide epidemiological advantages for COR-producing bacteria on the leaf surface. PMID:27446113

  1. Arabidopsis thaliana root growth kinetics and lunisolar tidal acceleration.

    PubMed

    Fisahn, Joachim; Yazdanbakhsh, Nima; Klingele, Emile; Barlow, Peter

    2012-07-01

    • All living organisms on Earth are continually exposed to diurnal variations in the gravitational tidal force due to the Sun and Moon. • Elongation of primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings maintained at a constant temperature was monitored for periods of up to 14 d using high temporal- and spatial-resolution video imaging. The time-course of the half-hourly elongation rates exhibited an oscillation which was maintained when the roots were placed in the free-running condition of continuous illumination. • Correlation between the root growth kinetics collected from seedlings initially raised under several light protocols but whose roots were subsequently in the free-running condition and the lunisolar tidal profiles enabled us to identify that the latter is the probable exogenous determinant of the rhythmic variation in root elongation rate. Similar observations and correlations using roots of Arabidopsis starch mutants suggest a central function of starch metabolism in the response to the lunisolar tide. The periodicity of the lunisolar tidal signal and the concomitant adjustments in root growth rate indicate that an exogenous timer exists for the modulation of root growth and development. • We propose that, in addition to the sensitivity to Earthly 1G gravity, which is inherent to all animals and plants, there is another type of responsiveness which is attuned to the natural diurnal variations of the lunisolar tidal force.

  2. Coronatine Facilitates Pseudomonas syringae Infection of Arabidopsis Leaves at Night

    PubMed Central

    Panchal, Shweta; Roy, Debanjana; Chitrakar, Reejana; Price, Lenore; Breitbach, Zachary S.; Armstrong, Daniel W.; Melotto, Maeli

    2016-01-01

    In many land plants, the stomatal pore opens during the day and closes during the night. Thus, periods of darkness could be effective in decreasing pathogen penetration into leaves through stomata, the primary sites for infection by many pathogens. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 produces coronatine (COR) and opens stomata, raising an intriguing question as to whether this is a virulence strategy to facilitate bacterial infection at night. In fact, we found that (a) biological concentration of COR is effective in opening dark-closed stomata of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves, (b) the COR defective mutant Pst DC3118 is less effective in infecting Arabidopsis in the dark than under light and this difference in infection is reduced with the wild type bacterium Pst DC3000, and (c) cma, a COR biosynthesis gene, is induced only when the bacterium is in contact with the leaf surface independent of the light conditions. These findings suggest that Pst DC3000 activates virulence factors at the pre-invasive phase of its life cycle to infect plants even when environmental conditions (such as darkness) favor stomatal immunity. This functional attribute of COR may provide epidemiological advantages for COR-producing bacteria on the leaf surface. PMID:27446113

  3. Suppression and Restoration of Lesion Formation in Arabidopsis lsd Mutants.

    PubMed

    Weymann, K.; Hunt, M.; Uknes, S.; Neuenschwander, U.; Lawton, K.; Steiner, H. Y.; Ryals, J.

    1995-12-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a broad-spectrum, systemic defense response that is activated in many plant species after pathogen infection. We have previously described Arabidopsis mutants that constitutively express SAR and concomitantly develop lesions simulating disease (lsd). Here, we describe two new mutants, lsd6 and lsd7, that develop spontaneous necrotic lesions and possess elevated levels of salicylic acid (SA) as well as heightened disease resistance, similar to the previously characterized lsd and accelerated cell death (acd2) mutants. Genetic analysis of lsd6 and lsd7 showed that the mutant phenotypes segregated as simple dominant traits. When crossed with transgenic Arabidopsis plants containing the SA-degrading enzyme salicylate hydroxylase, the F1 progeny showed suppression of both SAR gene expression and resistance. In addition, salicylate hydroxylase suppressed lesion formation in the F1 progeny, suggesting that SA or some SA-dependent process may have a role in pathogen-associated cell death. Surprisingly, lesions were restored in the lsd6 F1 progeny after the application of either 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid or SA. Lesions were not restored by treatment with either compound in the lsd7 F1 plants. Our findings demonstrate that steps early in the signal transduction pathway leading to SAR and disease resistance are potentiated by later events, suggesting feedback control of lesion formation.

  4. Exploring the influence of the poly(4-vinyl pyridine) segment on the solution properties and thermal phase behaviours of oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate-based block copolymers: the different aggregation processes with various morphologies.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yalan; Wu, Peiyi

    2016-08-01

    The assembly properties, thermal phase behavior and microdynamics of well-defined P(MEO2MA-co-OEGMA)-b-P4VP, (poly(2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethylmethacrylate)-co-poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate))-b-poly(4-vinyl pyridine), in aqueous solution during heating are investigated in detail by dynamic light scattering (DLS), turbidity measurements, temperature-variable (1)H NMR and FTIR spectroscopy in combination with two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2Dcos) and the perturbation correlation moving window (PCMW) technique. It is observed that the chain length of the relatively hydrophobic P4VP segment strongly affects the temperature-induced phase transition behavior of the block copolymers: the copolymers with shorter P4VP7/10 segments exhibit an abrupt phase transition process, while the copolymer with longer P4VP19 blocks presents a relatively gradual transition behavior. Moreover, the two systems with different P4VP segment lengths have different morphologies in aqueous solution: a single-chain globule for shorter P4VP7/10 systems and a core-shell micelle consisting of a relatively hydrophobic P4VP core and a hydrophilic POEGMA-based shell for the longer P4VP19 system. Analysis of spectral results clearly illustrates that the dehydration of the C[double bond, length as m-dash]O groups at the linkages between backbones and pendant chains predominates the sharp phase transition of P(MEO2MA-co-OEGMA)-b-P4VP10, while the dehydration of hydrophobic C-H groups on the side chains in P(MEO2MA-co-OEGMA)-b-P4VP19 leads to the continuous increase of the hydrodynamic diameter (Dh) upon heating. PMID:27425657

  5. The primary function of RNA binding by the influenza A virus NS1 protein in infected cells: Inhibiting the 2'-5' oligo (A) synthetase/RNase L pathway.

    PubMed

    Min, Ji-Young; Krug, Robert M

    2006-05-01

    The NS1 protein of influenza A virus (NS1A protein) is a multifunctional protein that counters cellular antiviral activities and is a virulence factor. Its N-terminal RNA-binding domain binds dsRNA. The only amino acid absolutely required for dsRNA binding is the R at position 38. To identify the role of this dsRNA-binding activity during influenza A virus infection, we generated a recombinant influenza A/Udorn/72 virus expressing an NS1A protein containing an RNA-binding domain in which R38 is mutated to A. This R38A mutant virus is highly attenuated, and the mutant NS1A protein, like the WT protein, is localized in the nucleus. Using the R38A mutant virus, we establish that dsRNA binding by the NS1A protein does not inhibit production of IFN-beta mRNA. Rather, we demonstrate that the primary role of this dsRNA-binding activity is to protect the virus against the antiviral state induced by IFN-beta. Pretreatment of A549 cells with IFN-beta for 6 h did not inhibit replication of WT Udorn virus, whereas replication of R38A mutant virus was inhibited 1,000-fold. Using both RNA interference in A549 cells and mouse knockout cells, we show that this enhanced sensitivity to IFN-beta-induced antiviral activity is due predominantly to the activation of RNase L. Because activation of RNase L is totally dependent on dsRNA activation of 2'-5' oligo (A) synthetase (OAS), it is likely that the primary role of dsRNA binding by the NS1A protein in virus-infected cells is to sequester dsRNA away from 2'-5' OAS.

  6. Infection and RNA recombination of Brome mosaic virus in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Dzianott, Aleksandra; Bujarski, Jozef J

    2004-01-20

    Ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana supported the replication and systemic spread of Brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNAs. Infection was induced either by manual inoculation with viral RNA or by BMV virions, demonstrating that virus disassembly did not prevent infection. When in vitro-transcribed BMV RNAs 1-3 were used, production of subgenomic RNA4 was observed, showing that BMV RNA replication and transcription had occurred. Furthermore, inoculations of the transgenic Arabidopsis line that expressed a suppressor of RNA interference (RNAi) pathway markedly increased the BMV RNA concentrations. Inoculations with designed BMV RNA3 recombination vectors generated both homologous and nonhomologous BMV RNA-RNA recombinants. Thus, all cellular factors essential for BMV RNA replication, transcription, and RNA recombination were shown to be present in Arabidopsis. The current scope of understanding of the model Arabidopsis plant system should facilitate the identification of these factors governing the BMV life cycle.

  7. Common virulence factors for Pseudomonas tolaasii pathogenesis in Agaricus and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chung, In-Young; Kim, Young-Kee; Cho, You-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Brown blotch of cultivatable mushrooms is a disease caused by the small peptide toxin (tolaasin) secreted by Pseudomonas tolaasii. Here we found that the wild type tolassin-producing P. tolaasii stain 6264 was capable of infection in Arabidopsis thaliana cotyledons, causing chlorotic symptoms and growth arrest as a result of bacterial proliferation. Seven virulence-attenuated mutants of P. tolaasii were isolated from the Agaricus bisporus screen using 2512 mariner-based transposon insertion mutants, and all of them displayed reduced virulence and bacterial proliferation in Arabidopsis infection as well. The transposon was inserted within the genes for tolassin biosynthesis and amino acid biosynthesis, and within an intergenic region between the genes of unknown function. The finding that some virulence factors are commonly required for both Agaricus and Arabidopsis infections suggests that Arabidopsis could be exploited to study the host-pathogen interaction involving P. tolaasii.

  8. Rain-, wind-, and touch-induced expression of calmodulin and calmodulin-related genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Braam, J; Davis, R W

    1990-02-01

    In response to water spray, subirrigation, wind, touch, wounding, or darkness, Arabidopsis regulates the expression of at least four touch-induced (TCH) genes. Ten to thirty minutes after stimulation, mRNA levels increase up to 100-fold. Arabidopsis plants stimulated by touch develop shorter petioles and bolts. This developmental response is known as thigmomorphogenesis. TCH 1 cDNA encodes the putative Arabidopsis calmodulin differing in one amino acid from wheat calmodulin. Sequenced regions of TCH 2 and TCH 3 contain 44% and 70% amino acid identities to calmodulin, respectively. The regulation of this calmodulin-related gene family in Arabidopsis suggests that calcium ions and calmodulin are involved in transduction of signals from the environment, enabling plants to sense and respond to environmental changes.

  9. Arabidopsis transcriptional responses differentiating closely related chemicals (herbicides) and cross-species extrapolation to Brassica

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using whole genome Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChips we characterized the transcriptional response of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia 24 hours after treatment with five different herbicides. Four of them (chloransulam, imazapyr, primisulfuron, sulfometuron) inhibit acetolactate synthase (A...

  10. Natural Genetic Variation of Freezing Tolerance in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hannah, Matthew A.; Wiese, Dana; Freund, Susanne; Fiehn, Oliver; Heyer, Arnd G.; Hincha, Dirk K.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature is a primary determinant of plant growth and survival. Using accessions of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) originating from Scandinavia to the Cape Verde Islands, we show that freezing tolerance of natural accessions correlates with habitat winter temperatures, identifying low temperature as an important selective pressure for Arabidopsis. Combined metabolite and transcript profiling show that during cold exposure, global changes of transcripts, but not of metabolites, correlate with the ability of Arabidopsis to cold acclimate. There are, however, metabolites and transcripts, including several transcription factors, that correlate with freezing tolerance, indicating regulatory pathways that may be of primary importance for this trait. These data identify that enhanced freezing tolerance is associated with the down-regulation of photosynthesis and hormonal responses and the induction of flavonoid metabolism, provide evidence for naturally increased nonacclimated freezing tolerance due to the constitutive activation of the C-repeat binding factors pathway, and identify candidate transcriptional regulators that correlate with freezing tolerance. PMID:16844837

  11. AtHSPR may function in salt-induced cell death and ER stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Chongying

    2016-07-01

    Salt stress is a harmful and global abiotic stress to plants and has an adverse effect on all physiological processes of plants. Recently, we cloned and identified a novel AtHSPR (Arabidopsis thaliana Heat Shock Protein Related), which encodes a nuclear-localized protein with ATPase activity, participates in salt and drought tolerance in Arabidopsis. Transcript profiling analysis revealed a differential expression of genes involved in accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), abscisic acid (ABA) signaling, stress response and photosynthesis between athspr mutant and WT under salt stress. Here, we provide further analysis of the data showing the regulation of salt-induced cell death and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in Arabidopsis and propose a hypothetical model for the role of AtHSPR in the regulation of the salt tolerance in Arabidopsis. PMID:27302034

  12. Arabidopsis PCNAs form complexes with selected D-type cyclins

    PubMed Central

    Strzalka, Wojciech K.; Aggarwal, Chhavi; Krzeszowiec, Weronika; Jakubowska, Agata; Sztatelman, Olga; Banas, Agnieszka K.

    2015-01-01

    Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) is a key nuclear protein of eukaryotic cells. It has been shown to form complexes with cyclin dependent kinases, cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors and the D-type cyclins which are involved in the cell cycle control. In Arabidopsis two genes coding for PCNA1 and PCNA2 proteins have been identified. In this study by analyzing Arabidopsis PCNA/CycD complexes we tested the possible functional differentiation of PCNA1/2 proteins in cell cycle control. Most out of the 10 cyclins investigated showed only nuclear localization except CycD2;1, CycD4;1, and CycD4;2 which were observed both in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Using the Y2H, BiFC and FLIM-FRET techniques we identified D-type cyclins which formed complexes with either PCNA1 or PCNA2. Among the candidates tested only CycD1;1, CycD3;1, and CycD3;3 were not detected in a complex with the PCNA proteins. Moreover, our results indicate that the formation of CycD3;2/PCNA and CycD4;1/PCNA complexes can be regulated by other as yet unidentified factor(s). Additionally, FLIM-FRET analyses suggested that in planta the distance between PCNA1/CycD4;1, PCNA1/CycD6;1, PCNA1/CycD7;1, and PCNA2/CycD4;2 proteins was shorter than that between PCNA2/CycD4;1, PCNA2/CycD6;1, PCNA2/CycD7;1, and PCNA1/CycD4;2 pairs. These data indicate that the nine amino acid differences between PCNA1 and PCNA2 have an impact on the architecture of Arabidopsis CycD/PCNA complexes. PMID:26379676

  13. Gene Expression in Plant Lipid Metabolism in Arabidopsis Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, An-Shan; Haslam, Richard P.; Michaelson, Louise V.; Liao, Pan; Napier, Johnathan A.; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-01-01

    Events in plant lipid metabolism are important during seedling establishment. As it has not been experimentally verified whether lipid metabolism in 2- and 5-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings is diurnally-controlled, quantitative real-time PCR analysis was used to investigate the expression of target genes in acyl-lipid transfer, β-oxidation and triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis and hydrolysis in wild-type Arabidopsis WS and Col-0. In both WS and Col-0, ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN3 (ACBP3), DIACYLGLYCEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE1 (DGAT1) and DGAT3 showed diurnal control in 2- and 5-day-old seedlings. Also, COMATOSE (CTS) was diurnally regulated in 2-day-old seedlings and LONG-CHAIN ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE6 (LACS6) in 5-day-old seedlings in both WS and Col-0. Subsequently, the effect of CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) and LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) from the core clock system was examined using the cca1lhy mutant and CCA1-overexpressing (CCA1-OX) lines versus wild-type WS and Col-0, respectively. Results revealed differential gene expression in lipid metabolism between 2- and 5-day-old mutant and wild-type WS seedlings, as well as between CCA1-OX and wild-type Col-0. Of the ACBPs, ACBP3 displayed the most significant changes between cca1lhy and WS and between CCA1-OX and Col-0, consistent with previous reports that ACBP3 is greatly affected by light/dark cycling. Evidence of oil body retention in 4- and 5-day-old seedlings of the cca1lhy mutant in comparison to WS indicated the effect of cca1lhy on storage lipid reserve mobilization. Lipid profiling revealed differences in primary lipid metabolism, namely in TAG, fatty acid methyl ester and acyl-CoA contents amongst cca1lhy, CCA1-OX, and wild-type seedlings. Taken together, this study demonstrates that lipid metabolism is subject to diurnal regulation in the early stages of seedling development in Arabidopsis. PMID:25264899

  14. Potential role of Arabidopsis PHP as an accessory subunit of the PAF1 transcriptional cofactor.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunchung; Ek-Ramos, Maria Julissa; Oh, Sookyung; van Nocker, Steven

    2011-08-01

    Paf1C is a transcriptional cofactor that has been implicated in various transcription-associated mechanisms spanning initiation, elongation and RNA processing, and is important for multiple aspects of development in Arabidopsis. Our recent studies suggest Arabidopsis Paf1C is crucial for proper regulation of genes within H3K27me3-enriched chromatin, and that a protein named PHP may act as an accessory subunit of Paf1C that promotes this function.

  15. Peculiarities in formation of Arabidopsis Thaliana (L.) Heynh, generative organs under space flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kordyum, Y. L.; Chernyayeva, I. I.

    1983-01-01

    Peculiarities in the formation of the andrecium and gynecium elements are described for Arabidopsis plants grown from the stages of two cotyledonous leaves in the Svitoblok-1 device on board the Salyut 6 orbital research station and in the laboratory. It is established that flower buds and flowers, normally formed in habitus, contain sterile elements of andrecium and gynecium whose degeneration occurs at different developmental stages of the Arabidopsis plants in the experiment under conditions of weightlessness.

  16. Brassinosteroids regulate plant growth through distinct signaling pathways in Selaginella and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Jinyeong; Fujioka, Shozo; Dilkes, Brian P; Choe, Sunghwa

    2013-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are growth-promoting steroid hormones that regulate diverse physiological processes in plants. Most BR biosynthetic enzymes belong to the cytochrome P450 (CYP) family. The gene encoding the ultimate step of BR biosynthesis in Arabidopsis likely evolved by gene duplication followed by functional specialization in a dicotyledonous plant-specific manner. To gain insight into the evolution of BRs, we performed a genomic reconstitution of Arabidopsis BR biosynthetic genes in an ancestral vascular plant, the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii. Selaginella contains four members of the CYP90 family that cluster together in the CYP85 clan. Similar to known BR biosynthetic genes, the Selaginella CYP90s exhibit eight or ten exons and Selaginella produces a putative BR biosynthetic intermediate. Therefore, we hypothesized that Selaginella CYP90 genes encode BR biosynthetic enzymes. In contrast to typical CYPs in Arabidopsis, Selaginella CYP90E2 and CYP90F1 do not possess amino-terminal signal peptides, suggesting that they do not localize to the endoplasmic reticulum. In addition, one of the three putative CYP reductases (CPRs) that is required for CYP enzyme function co-localized with CYP90E2 and CYP90F1. Treatments with a BR biosynthetic inhibitor, propiconazole, and epi-brassinolide resulted in greatly retarded and increased growth, respectively. This suggests that BRs promote growth in Selaginella, as they do in Arabidopsis. However, BR signaling occurs through different pathways than in Arabidopsis. A sequence homologous to the Arabidopsis BR receptor BRI1 was absent in Selaginella, but downstream components, including BIN2, BSU1, and BZR1, were present. Thus, the mechanism that initiates BR signaling in Selaginella seems to differ from that in Arabidopsis. Our findings suggest that the basic physiological roles of BRs as growth-promoting hormones are conserved in both lycophytes and Arabidopsis; however, different BR molecules and BRI1-based

  17. A Novel Family of Cys-Rich Membrane Proteins Mediates Cadmium Resistance in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Song, Won-Yong; Martinoia, Enrico; Lee, Joohyun; Kim, Dongwoo; Kim, Do-Young; Vogt, Esther; Shim, Donghwan; Choi, Kwan Sam; Hwang, Inhwan; Lee, Youngsook

    2004-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a widespread pollutant that is toxic to plant growth. However, only a few genes that contribute to Cd resistance in plants have been identified. To identify additional Cd(II) resistance genes, we screened an Arabidopsis cDNA library using a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) expression system employing the Cd(II)-sensitive yeast mutant ycf1. This screening process yielded a small Cys-rich membrane protein (Arabidopsis plant cadmium resistance, AtPcrs). Database searches revealed that there are nine close homologs in Arabidopsis. Homologs were also found in other plants. Four of the five homologs that were tested also increased resistance to Cd(II) when expressed in ycf1. AtPcr1 localizes at the plasma membrane in both yeast and Arabidopsis. Arabidopsis plants overexpressing AtPcr1 exhibited increased Cd(II) resistance, whereas antisense plants that showed reduced AtPcr1 expression were more sensitive to Cd(II). AtPcr1 overexpression reduced Cd uptake by yeast cells and also reduced the Cd contents of both yeast and Arabidopsis protoplasts treated with Cd. Thus, it appears that the Pcr family members may play an important role in the Cd resistance of plants. PMID:15181212

  18. Auxin polar transport in arabidopsis under simulated microgravity conditions - relevance to growth and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, K.; Oka, M.; Yamamoto, R.; Masuda, Y.; Hoson, T.; Kamisaka, S.; Ueda, J.

    1999-01-01

    Activity of auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes of Arabidopsis thaliana grown under simulated microgravity conditions was studied in relation to the growth and development. Seeds were germinated and allowed to grow on an agar medium in test tubes on a horizontal clinostat. Horizontal clinostat rotation substantially reduced the growth of inflorescence axes and the productivity of seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana (ecotypes Landsberg erecta and Columbia), although it little affected seed germination, development of rosette leaves and flowering. The activity of auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes decreased when Arabidopsis plants were grown on a horizontal clinostat from germination stage, being ca. 60% of 1 g control. On the other hand, the auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes of Arabidopsis grown in 1 g conditions was not affected when the segments were exposed to various gravistimuli, including 3-dimensional clinorotation, during transport experiments. Pin-formed mutant of Arabidopsis, having a unique structure of the inflorescence axis with no flower and extremely low levels of the activity of auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes and endogenous auxin, did not continue its vegetative growth under clinostat rotation. These facts suggest that the development of the system of auxin polar transport in Arabidopsis is affected by microgravity, resulting in the inhibition of growth and development, especially during reproductive growth.

  19. Handling Arabidopsis plants: growth, preservation of seeds, transformation, and genetic crosses.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Luz; Scholl, Randy; Holomuzki, Nicholas; Crist, Deborah; Grotewold, Erich; Brkljacic, Jelena

    2014-01-01

    Growing healthy plants is essential for the advancement of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) research. Over the last 20 years, the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (ABRC) has collected and developed a series of best-practice protocols, some of which are presented in this chapter. Arabidopsis can be grown in a variety of locations, growth media, and environmental conditions. Most laboratory accessions and their mutant or transgenic derivatives flower after 4-5 weeks and set seeds after 7-8 weeks, under standard growth conditions (soil, long day, 23 ºC). Some mutant genotypes, natural accessions, and Arabidopsis relatives require strict control of growth conditions best provided by growth rooms, chambers, or incubators. Other lines can be grown in less-controlled greenhouse settings. Although the majority of lines can be grown in soil, certain experimental purposes require utilization of sterile solid or liquid growth media. These include the selection of primary transformants, identification of homozygous lethal individuals in a segregating population, or bulking of a large amount of plant material. The importance of controlling, observing, and recording growth conditions is emphasized and appropriate equipment required to perform monitoring of these conditions is listed. Proper conditions for seed harvesting and preservation, as well as seed quality control, are also described. Plant transformation and genetic crosses, two of the methods that revolutionized Arabidopsis genetics, are introduced as well.

  20. Suppression of Arabidopsis flowering by near-null magnetic field is affected by light.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunxiao; Li, Yue; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Yuxia; Wei, Shufeng

    2015-09-01

    We previously reported that a near-null magnetic field suppressed Arabidopsis flowering in white light, which might be related to the function modification of cryptochrome (CRY). To further demonstrate that the effect of near-null magnetic field on Arabidopsis flowering is associated with CRY, Arabidopsis wild type and CRY mutant plants were grown in the near-null magnetic field under blue or red light with different light cycle and photosynthetic photon flux density. We found that Arabidopsis flowering was significantly suppressed by near-null magnetic field in blue light with lower intensity (10 µmol/m(2) /s) and shorter cycle (12 h period: 6 h light/6 h dark). However, flowering time of CRY1/CRY2 mutants did not show any difference between plants grown in near-null magnetic field and in local geomagnetic field under detected light conditions. In red light, no significant difference was shown in Arabidopsis flowering between plants in near-null magnetic field and local geomagnetic field under detected light cycles and intensities. These results suggest that changes of blue light cycle and intensity alter the effect of near-null magnetic field on Arabidopsis flowering, which is mediated by CRY.

  1. Use of Arabidopsis thaliana defense-related mutants to dissect the plant response to pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Ausubel, F M; Katagiri, F; Mindrinos, M; Glazebrook, J

    1995-01-01

    The plant defense response to microbial pathogens had been studied primarily by using biochemical and physiological techniques. Recently, several laboratories have developed a variety of pathosystems utilizing Arabidopsis thaliana as a model host so that genetic analysis could also be used to study plant defense responses. Utilizing a pathosystem that involves the infection of Arabidopsis with pathogenic pseudomonads, we have cloned the Arabidopsis disease-resistance gene RPS2, which corresponds to the avirulence gene avrRpt2 in a gene-for-gene relationship. RPS2 encodes a 105-kDa protein containing a leucine zipper, a nucleotide binding site, and 14 imperfect leucine-rich repeats. The RPS2 protein is remarkably similar to the product of the tobacco N gene, which confers resistance to tobacco mosaic virus. We have also isolated a series of Arabidopsis mutants that synthesize decreased levels of an Arabidopsis phytoalexin called camalexin. Analysis of these mutants indicated that camalexin does not play a significant role in limiting growth of avirulent Pseudomonas syringae strains during the hypersensitive defense response but that it may play a role in limiting the growth of virulent strains. More generally, we have shown that we can utilize Arabidopsis to systematically dissect the defense response by isolation and characterization of appropriate defense-related mutants. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7753782

  2. An Egg Apparatus-Specific Enhancer of Arabidopsis, Identified by Enhancer Detection1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Jefferson, Richard A.; Huttner, Eric; Moore, James M.; Gagliano, Wendy B.; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2005-01-01

    Despite a central role in angiosperm reproduction, few gametophyte-specific genes and promoters have been isolated, particularly for the inaccessible female gametophyte (embryo sac). Using the Ds-based enhancer-detector line ET253, we have cloned an egg apparatus-specific enhancer (EASE) from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The genomic region flanking the Ds insertion site was further analyzed by examining its capability to control gusA and GFP reporter gene expression in the embryo sac in a transgenic context. Through analysis of a 5′ and 3′ deletion series in transgenic Arabidopsis, the sequence responsible for egg apparatus-specific expression was delineated to 77 bp. Our data showed that this enhancer is unique in the Arabidopsis genome, is conserved among different accessions, and shows an unusual pattern of sequence variation. This EASE works independently of position and orientation in Arabidopsis but is probably not associated with any nearby gene, suggesting either that it acts over a large distance or that a cryptic element was detected. Embryo-specific ablation in Arabidopsis was achieved by transactivation of a diphtheria toxin gene under the control of the EASE. The potential application of the EASE element and similar control elements as part of an open-source biotechnology toolkit for apomixis is discussed. PMID:16258010

  3. Functional analysis of the Hikeshi-like protein and its interaction with HSP70 in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, Shinya; Ohama, Naohiko; Mizoi, Junya; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • HKL, a Hikeshi homologous gene is identified in Arabidopsis. • HKL interacts with two HSP70 isoforms and regulates the subcellular localization of HSC70-1. • The two HSP70 translocate into nucleus in response to heat stress. • Overexpression of HKL confers thermotolerance in transgenic plants. - Abstract: Heat shock proteins (HSPs) refold damaged proteins and are an essential component of the heat shock response. Previously, the 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) has been reported to translocate into the nucleus in a heat-dependent manner in many organisms. In humans, the heat-induced translocation of HSP70 requires the nuclear carrier protein Hikeshi. In the Arabidopsis genome, only one gene encodes a protein with high homology to Hikeshi, and we named this homolog Hikeshi-like (HKL) protein. In this study, we show that two Arabidopsis HSP70 isoforms accumulate in the nucleus in response to heat shock and that HKL interacts with these HSP70s. Our histochemical analysis revealed that HKL is predominantly expressed in meristematic tissues, suggesting the potential importance of HKL during cell division in Arabidopsis. In addition, we show that HKL regulates HSP70 localization, and HKL overexpression conferred thermotolerance to transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Our results suggest that HKL plays a positive role in the thermotolerance of Arabidopsis plants and cooperatively interacts with HSP70.

  4. Evolution of NIN-like proteins in Arabidopsis, rice, and Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Schauser, Leif; Wieloch, Wioletta; Stougaard, Jens

    2005-02-01

    Genetic studies in Lotus japonicus and pea have identified Nin as a core symbiotic gene required for establishing symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen fixing bacteria collectively called Rhizobium. Sequencing of additional Lotus cDNAs combined with analysis of genome sequences from Arabidopsis and rice reveals that Nin homologues in all three species constitute small gene families. In total, the Arabidopsis and rice genomes encode nine and three NIN-like proteins (NLPs), respectively. We present here a bioinformatics analysis and prediction of NLP evolution. On a genome scale we show that in Arabidopsis, this family has evolved through segmental duplication rather than through tandem amplification. Alignment of all predicted NLP protein sequences shows a composition with six conserved modules. In addition, Lotus and pea NLPs contain segments that might characterize NIN proteins of legumes and be of importance for their function in symbiosis. The most conserved region in NLPs, the RWP-RK domain, has secondary structure predictions consistent with DNA binding properties. This motif is shared by several other small proteins in both Arabidopsis and rice. In rice, the RWP-RK domain sequences have diversified significantly more than in Arabidopsis. Database searches reveal that, apart from its presence in Arabidopsis and rice, the motif is also found in the algae Chlamydomonas and in the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Thus, the origin of this putative DNA binding region seems to predate the fungus-plant divide. PMID:15785851

  5. Séquence de chevauchements et de sédimentation syntectonique dans un bassin transporté (piggy-back) : le bassin oligo-aquitanien de Mula Pliego (Zone interne bétique, Sud-Est de l'Espagne)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Martín, Manuel; Martín-Algarra, Agustín.

    The Oligo-Aquitanian deposits of the Mula-Pliego basin consist of a marine carbonate platform assemblage (bottom), transitioning into a turbidite wedge (top). This evolution was controlled by tectonics in a piggy-back basin by means of three main mechanisms: first, a flexural tectonic event created the basin; later on, blind-fault-propagation folds deformed it progressively from south to north; finally a tectonic event destroyed the basin. To cite this article: M. Martı´n-Martı´n, A. Martı´n-Algarra, C. R. Geoscience 334 (2002) 363-370.

  6. Thermospermine suppresses auxin-inducible xylem differentiation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Kaori; Noutoshi, Yoshiteru; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Shirasu, Ken; Takahashi, Taku; Motose, Hiroyasu

    2012-08-01

    Thermospermine, a structural isomer of spermine, is synthesized by a thermospermine synthase designated ACAULIS5 (ACL5). Thermospermine-deficient acl5 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana shows severe dwarfism and excessive xylem differentiation. By screening for compounds that affect xylem differentiation in the acl5 mutant, we identified auxin analogs that remarkably enhanced xylem vessel differentiation in the acl5 mutant but not in the wild type. The xylem-inducing effect of auxin analogs was clearly suppressed by thermospermine, indicating that auxin-inducible xylem differentiation is normally limited by thermospermine. Here, we further characterized xylem-inducing effect of auxin analogs in various organs. Auxin analogs promoted protoxylem differentiation in roots and cotyledons in the acl5 mutant. Our results indicate that the opposite action between thermospermine and auxin in xylem differentiation is common in different organs and also suggest that thermospermine might be required for the suppression of protoxylem differentiation.

  7. Physiological characterization of Mg deficiency in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Christian; Verbruggen, Nathalie

    2005-08-01

    Although the symptoms of magnesium deficiency are well documented in plants, the primary physiological effects of low Mg availability remain largely unknown. This paper describes the physiological responses of Mg starvation in Arabidopsis thaliana. Growth characteristics, Mg and sugar concentration, and photochemical performance were measured at regular intervals during the induction of Mg deficiency. These data show that Mg deficiency increased the sugar concentration and altered sucrose export from young source leaves before any noticeable effect on photosynthetic activity was seen. The decline in photosynthetic activity might be elicited by increased leaf sugar concentrations. Transcript levels of Cab2 (encoding a chlorophyll a/b protein) were lower in Mg-deficient plants before any obvious decrease in the chlorophyll concentration. These transcriptional data suggest that the reduction of chlorophyll is a response to sugar levels, rather than a lack of Mg atoms for chelating chlorophyll. PMID:15983014

  8. Growth Distribution during Phototropism of Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings.

    PubMed Central

    Orbovic, V.; Poff, K. L.

    1993-01-01

    The elongation rates of two opposite sides of hypocotyls of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings were measured during phototropism by using an infrared imaging system. In first positive phototropism, second positive phototropism, and red light-enhanced first positive phototropism, curvature toward the light source was the result of an increase in the rate of elongation of the shaded side and a decrease in the rate of elongation of the lighted side of the seedlings. The phase of straightening that followed maximum curvature resulted from a decrease in the elongation rate of the shaded side and an increase in the elongation rate of the lighted side. These data for the three types of blue light-induced phototropism tested in this study and for the phase of straightening are all clearly consistent with the growth rate changes predicted by the Cholodny-Went theory. PMID:12231922

  9. Red-light-induced positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruppel, N. J.; Hangarter, R. P.; Kiss, J. Z.

    2001-01-01

    The interaction between light and gravity is critical in determining the final form of a plant. For example, the competing activities of gravitropism and phototropism can determine the final orientation of a stem or root. The results reported here indicate that, in addition to the previously described blue-light-dependent negative phototropic response in roots, roots of Arahidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. display a previously unknown red-light-dependent positive phototropic response. Both phototropic responses in roots are considerably weaker than the graviresponse, which often masks phototropic curvature. However, through the use of mutant strains with impaired gravitropism, we were able to identify a red-light-dependent positive phototropic response in Arabidopsis roots. The red-induced positive phototropic response is considerably weaker than the blue-light response and is barely detectable in plants with a normal gravitropic response.

  10. Phototropism and gravitropism in lateral roots of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, John Z.; Miller, Kelley M.; Ogden, Lisa A.; Roth, Kelly K.

    2002-01-01

    Gravitropism and, to a lesser extent, phototropism have been characterized in primary roots, but little is known about structural/functional aspects of these tropisms in lateral roots. Therefore, in this study, we report on tropistic responses in lateral roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Lateral roots initially are plagiogravitropic, but when they reach a length of approximately 10 mm, these roots grow downward and exhibit positive orthogravitropism. Light and electron microscopic studies demonstrate a correlation between positive gravitropism and development of columella cells with large, sedimented amyloplasts in wild-type plants. Lateral roots display negative phototropism in response to white and blue light and positive phototropism in response to red light. As is the case with primary roots, the photoresponse is weak relative to the graviresponse, but phototropism is readily apparent in starchless mutant plants, which are impaired in gravitropism. To our knowledge, this is the first report of phototropism of lateral roots in any plant species.

  11. Screening Stress Tolerance Traits in Arabidopsis Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Salamó, Imma; Boros, Bogáta; Szabados, László

    2016-01-01

    Screening for tolerance traits in plant cell cultures can combine the efficiency of microbial selection and plant genetics. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation can efficiently introduce cDNA library to cell suspension cultures generating population of randomly transformed microcolonies. Transformed cultures can subsequently be screened for tolerance to different stress conditions such as salinity, high osmotic, or oxidative stress conditions. cDNA inserts in tolerant cell lines can be easily identified by PCR amplification and homology search of the determined nucleotide sequences. The described methods have been tested and used to identify regulatory genes controlling salt tolerance in Arabidopsis. As cDNA libraries can be prepared from any plants, natural diversity can be explored by using extremophile plants as gene source. PMID:26867628

  12. Proteomic Insight into the Response of Arabidopsis Chloroplasts to Darkness

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Yu, Qingbo; Xiong, Haibo; Wang, Jun; Chen, Sixue; Yang, Zhongnan; Dai, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast function in photosynthesis is essential for plant growth and development. It is well-known that chloroplasts respond to various light conditions. However, it remains poorly understood about how chloroplasts respond to darkness. In this study, we found 81 darkness-responsive proteins in Arabidopsis chloroplasts under 8 h darkness treatment. Most of the proteins are nucleus-encoded, indicating that chloroplast darkness response is closely regulated by the nucleus. Among them, 17 ribosome proteins were obviously reduced after darkness treatment. The protein expressional patterns and physiological changes revealed the mechanisms in chloroplasts in response to darkness, e.g., (1) inhibition of photosystem II resulted in preferential cyclic electron flow around PSI; (2) promotion of starch degradation; (3) inhibition of chloroplastic translation; and (4) regulation by redox and jasmonate signaling. The results have improved our understanding of molecular regulatory mechanisms in chloroplasts under darkness. PMID:27137770

  13. A two-step process for epigenetic inheritance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Blevins, Todd; Pontvianne, Frédéric; Cocklin, Ross; Podicheti, Ram; Chandrasekhara, Chinmayi; Yerneni, Satwica; Braun, Chris; Lee, Brandon; Rusch, Doug; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Tang, Haixu; Pikaard, Craig S

    2014-04-10

    In Arabidopsis, multisubunit RNA polymerases IV and V orchestrate RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) and transcriptional silencing, but what identifies the loci to be silenced is unclear. We show that heritable silent locus identity at a specific subset of RdDM targets requires HISTONE DEACETYLASE 6 (HDA6) acting upstream of Pol IV recruitment and siRNA biogenesis. At these loci, epigenetic memory conferring silent locus identity is erased in hda6 mutants such that restoration of HDA6 activity cannot restore siRNA biogenesis or silencing. Silent locus identity is similarly lost in mutants for the cytosine maintenance methyltransferase, MET1. By contrast, pol IV or pol V mutants disrupt silencing without erasing silent locus identity, allowing restoration of Pol IV or Pol V function to restore silencing. Collectively, these observations indicate that silent locus specification and silencing are separable steps that together account for epigenetic inheritance of the silenced state.

  14. Mild ammonium stress increases chlorophyll content in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Zabala, Joseba; González-Murua, Carmen; Marino, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) and ammonium (NH4(+)) are the main forms of nitrogen available in the soil for plants. Excessive NH4(+) accumulation in tissues is toxic for plants and exclusive NH4(+)-based nutrition enhances this effect. Ammonium toxicity syndrome commonly includes growth impairment, ion imbalance and chlorosis among others. In this work, we observed high intraspecific variability in chlorophyll content in 47 Arabidopsis thaliana natural accessions grown under 1 mM NH4(+) or 1 mM NO3(-) as N-source. Interestingly, chlorophyll content increased in every accession upon ammonium nutrition. Moreover, this increase was independent of ammonium tolerance capacity. Thus, chlorosis seems to be an exclusive effect of severe ammonium toxicity while mild ammonium stress induces chlorophyll accumulation.

  15. Phototropism in Arabidopsis roots is mediated by two sensory systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, John Z.; Ruppel, Nicholas J.; Hangarter, Roger P.

    Phototropism has been well-characterized in stems and stem-like organs, but there have been relatively few studies of root phototropism. Our experiments suggest that there are two photosensory systems that elicit phototropic responses in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana: a previously identified blue-light photoreceptor system mediated by phototropin (= NPH1 protein) and a novel red-light-based mechanism. The phototropic responses in roots are much weaker than the graviresponse, which competes with and often masks the phototropic response. It was through the use of mutant plants with a weakened graviresponse that we were able to identify the activity of the red-light-dependent phototropic system. In addition, the red-light-based photoresponse in roots is even weaker compared to the blue-light response. Our results also suggest that phytochrome may be involved in mediating positive phototropism in roots.

  16. Beyond the thale: comparative genomics and genetics of Arabidopsis relatives.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Daniel; Weigel, Detlef

    2015-05-01

    For decades a small number of model species have rightly occupied a privileged position in laboratory experiments, but it is becoming increasingly clear that our knowledge of biology is greatly improved when informed by a broader diversity of species and evolutionary context. Arabidopsis thaliana has been the primary model organism for plants, benefiting from a high-quality reference genome sequence and resources for reverse genetics. However, recent studies have made a group of species also in the Brassicaceae family and closely related to A. thaliana a focal point for comparative molecular, genomic, phenotypic and evolutionary studies. In this Review, we emphasize how such studies complement continued study of the model plant itself, provide an evolutionary perspective and summarize our current understanding of genetic and phenotypic diversity in plants.

  17. Purification of SUMO Conjugates from Arabidopsis for Mass Spectrometry Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rytz, Thérèse C; Miller, Marcus J; Vierstra, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    The posttranslational modification of proteins with small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) is a rapid, robust, and reversible mechanism that impacts a host of eukaryotic processes important to both normal cellular functions and survival during various abiotic and biotic challenges. Essential to defining the breadth of events impacted by SUMOylation is the development of full catalogues of protein targets. Here, we describe a stringent affinity method to purify native SUMO conjugates from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana based on the expression of modified SUMOs bearing epitope tags. When combined with standard and quantitative mass spectrometric methods, deep datasets of SUMOylated proteins can be acquired. Functional analysis of these lists links SUMO to numerous regulatory events, with an emphasis on those associated with transcription, DNA replication and repair, and chromatin assembly/accessibility. PMID:27631811

  18. Variable expansin expression in Arabidopsis leads to different growth responses.

    PubMed

    Goh, Hoe-Han; Sloan, Jennifer; Malinowski, Robert; Fleming, Andrew

    2014-02-15

    Expansins have long been implicated in the control of cell wall extensibility. However, despite ample evidence supporting a role for these proteins in the endogenous mechanism of plant growth, there are also examples in the literature where the outcome of altered expansin gene expression is difficult to reconcile with a simplistic causal linkage to growth promotion. To investigate this problem, we report on the analysis of transgenic Arabidopsis plants in which a heterologous cucumber expansin can be inducibly overexpressed. Our results indicate that the effects of expansin expression on growth depend on the degree of induction of expansin expression and the developmental pattern of organ growth. They support the role of expansin in directional cell expansion. They are also consistent with the idea that excess expansin might itself impede normal activities of cell wall modifications, culminating in both growth promotion and repression depending on the degree of expression.

  19. Epigenomic Diversity in a Global Collection of Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions.

    PubMed

    Kawakatsu, Taiji; Huang, Shao-Shan Carol; Jupe, Florian; Sasaki, Eriko; Schmitz, Robert J; Urich, Mark A; Castanon, Rosa; Nery, Joseph R; Barragan, Cesar; He, Yupeng; Chen, Huaming; Dubin, Manu; Lee, Cheng-Ruei; Wang, Congmao; Bemm, Felix; Becker, Claude; O'Neil, Ryan; O'Malley, Ronan C; Quarless, Danjuma X; Schork, Nicholas J; Weigel, Detlef; Nordborg, Magnus; Ecker, Joseph R

    2016-07-14

    The epigenome orchestrates genome accessibility, functionality, and three-dimensional structure. Because epigenetic variation can impact transcription and thus phenotypes, it may contribute to adaptation. Here, we report 1,107 high-quality single-base resolution methylomes and 1,203 transcriptomes from the 1001 Genomes collection of Arabidopsis thaliana. Although the genetic basis of methylation variation is highly complex, geographic origin is a major predictor of genome-wide DNA methylation levels and of altered gene expression caused by epialleles. Comparison to cistrome and epicistrome datasets identifies associations between transcription factor binding sites, methylation, nucleotide variation, and co-expression modules. Physical maps for nine of the most diverse genomes reveal how transposons and other structural variants shape the epigenome, with dramatic effects on immunity genes. The 1001 Epigenomes Project provides a comprehensive resource for understanding how variation in DNA methylation contributes to molecular and non-molecular phenotypes in natural populations of the most studied model plant.

  20. The Arabidopsis METACASPASE9 Degradome[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Tsiatsiani, Liana; Timmerman, Evy; De Bock, Pieter-Jan; Vercammen, Dominique; Stael, Simon; van de Cotte, Brigitte; Staes, An; Goethals, Marc; Beunens, Tine; Van Damme, Petra; Gevaert, Kris; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Metacaspases are distant relatives of the metazoan caspases, found in plants, fungi, and protists. However, in contrast with caspases, information about the physiological substrates of metacaspases is still scarce. By means of N-terminal combined fractional diagonal chromatography, the physiological substrates of METACASPASE9 (MC9; AT5G04200) were identified in young seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana on the proteome-wide level, providing additional insight into MC9 cleavage specificity and revealing a previously unknown preference for acidic residues at the substrate prime site position P1′. The functionalities of the identified MC9 substrates hinted at metacaspase functions other than those related to cell death. These results allowed us to resolve the substrate specificity of MC9 in more detail and indicated that the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (AT4G37870), a key enzyme in gluconeogenesis, is enhanced upon MC9-dependent proteolysis. PMID:23964026