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Sample records for arabidopsis 70mer oligo

  1. The development of an Arabidopsis model system for genome-wide analysis of polyploidy effects

    PubMed Central

    JEFFREY CHEN, Z.; WANG, JIANLIN; TIAN, LU; LEE, HYEON-SE; WANG, JIYUAN J.; CHEN, MENG; LEE, JINSUK J.; JOSEFSSON, CAROLINE; MADLUNG, ANDREAS; WATSON, BRIAN; LIPPMAN, ZACH; VAUGHN, MATT; CHRIS PIRES, J.; COLOT, VINCENT; DOERGE, R. W.; MARTIENSSEN, ROBERT A.; COMAI, LUCA; OSBORN, THOMAS C.

    2007-01-01

    Arabidopsis is a model system not only for studying numerous aspects of plant biology, but also for understanding mechanisms of the rapid evolutionary process associated with genome duplication and polyploidization. Although in animals interspecific hybrids are often sterile and aneuploids are related to disease syndromes, both Arabidopsis autopolyploids and allopolyploids occur in nature and can be readily formed in the laboratory, providing an attractive system for comparing changes in gene expression and genome structure among relatively ‘young’ and ‘established’ or ‘ancient’ polyploids. Powerful reverse and forward genetics in Arabidopsis offer an exceptional means by which regulatory mechanisms of gene and genome duplication may be revealed. Moreover, the Arabidopsis genome is completely sequenced; both coding and non-coding sequences are available. We have developed spotted oligo-gene and chromosome microarrays using the complete Arabidopsis genome sequence. The oligo-gene microarray consists of ~26 000 70-mer oligonucleotides that are designed from all annotated genes in Arabidopsis, and the chromosome microarray contains 1 kb genomic tiling fragments amplified from a chromosomal region or the complete sequence of chromosome 4. We have demonstrated the utility of microarrays for genome-wide analysis of changes in gene expression, genome organization and chromatin structure in Arabidopsis polyploids and related species. PMID:18079994

  2. OligoCalc: an online oligonucleotide properties calculator

    PubMed Central

    Kibbe, Warren A.

    2007-01-01

    We developed OligoCalc as a web-accessible, client-based computational engine for reporting DNA and RNA single-stranded and double-stranded properties, including molecular weight, solution concentration, melting temperature, estimated absorbance coefficients, inter-molecular self-complementarity estimation and intra-molecular hairpin loop formation. OligoCalc has a familiar ‘calculator’ look and feel, making it readily understandable and usable. OligoCalc incorporates three common methods for calculating oligonucleotide-melting temperatures, including a nearest-neighbor thermodynamic model for melting temperature. Since it first came online in 1997, there have been more than 900 000 accesses of OligoCalc from nearly 200 000 distinct hosts, excluding search engines. OligoCalc is available at http://basic.northwestern.edu/biotools/OligoCalc.html, with links to the full source code, usage patterns and statistics at that link as well. PMID:17452344

  3. T-oligo as an anticancer agent in colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wojdyla, Luke; Stone, Amanda L.; Sethakorn, Nan; Uppada, Srijayaprakash B.; Devito, Joseph T.; Bissonnette, Marc; Puri, Neelu

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • T-oligo induces cell cycle arrest, senescence, apoptosis, and differentiation in CRC. • Treatment with T-oligo downregulates telomere-associated proteins. • T-oligo combined with an EGFR-TKI additively inhibits cellular proliferation. • T-oligo has potential as an effective therapeutic agent for CRC. - Abstract: In the United States, there will be an estimated 96,830 new cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) and 50,310 deaths in 2014. CRC is often detected at late stages of the disease, at which point there is no effective chemotherapy. Thus, there is an urgent need for effective novel therapies that have minimal effects on normal cells. T-oligo, an oligonucleotide homologous to the 3′-telomere overhang, induces potent DNA damage responses in multiple malignant cell types, however, its efficacy in CRC has not been studied. This is the first investigation demonstrating T-oligo-induced anticancer effects in two CRC cell lines, HT-29 and LoVo, which are highly resistant to conventional chemotherapies. In this investigation, we show that T-oligo may mediate its DNA damage responses through the p53/p73 pathway, thereby inhibiting cellular proliferation and inducing apoptosis or senescence. Additionally, upregulation of downstream DNA damage response proteins, including E2F1, p53 or p73, was observed. In LoVo cells, T-oligo induced senescence, decreased clonogenicity, and increased expression of senescence associated proteins p21, p27, and p53. In addition, downregulation of POT1 and TRF2, two components of the shelterin protein complex which protects telomeric ends, was observed. Moreover, we studied the antiproliferative effects of T-oligo in combination with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Gefitinib, which resulted in an additive inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation. Collectively, these data provide evidence that T-oligo alone, or in combination with other molecularly targeted therapies, has potential as an anti-cancer agent in CRC.

  4. "Fibonacci's route" to regioregular oligo(3-hexylthiophene)s.

    PubMed

    Koch, Felix P V; Smith, Paul; Heeney, Martin

    2013-09-18

    We describe a new synthetic approach to regioregular monodisperse oligo(3-alkylthiophene)s allowing for simple separation of regioregular material in gram quantities. The number of repeat units follows the Fibonacci numbers up to a length of 21. In a small adaption of this approach, introduction of a protecting group was used to synthesize an oligo(3-hexylthiophene) with 36 repeating units, the longest regioregular 3-hexylthiophene oligomer synthesized to date.

  5. Mango: multiple alignment with N gapped oligos.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zefeng; Lin, Hao; Li, Ming

    2008-06-01

    Multiple sequence alignment is a classical and challenging task. The problem is NP-hard. The full dynamic programming takes too much time. The progressive alignment heuristics adopted by most state-of-the-art works suffer from the "once a gap, always a gap" phenomenon. Is there a radically new way to do multiple sequence alignment? In this paper, we introduce a novel and orthogonal multiple sequence alignment method, using both multiple optimized spaced seeds and new algorithms to handle these seeds efficiently. Our new algorithm processes information of all sequences as a whole and tries to build the alignment vertically, avoiding problems caused by the popular progressive approaches. Because the optimized spaced seeds have proved significantly more sensitive than the consecutive k-mers, the new approach promises to be more accurate and reliable. To validate our new approach, we have implemented MANGO: Multiple Alignment with N Gapped Oligos. Experiments were carried out on large 16S RNA benchmarks, showing that MANGO compares favorably, in both accuracy and speed, against state-of-the-art multiple sequence alignment methods, including ClustalW 1.83, MUSCLE 3.6, MAFFT 5.861, ProbConsRNA 1.11, Dialign 2.2.1, DIALIGN-T 0.2.1, T-Coffee 4.85, POA 2.0, and Kalign 2.0. We have further demonstrated the scalability of MANGO on very large datasets of repeat elements. MANGO can be downloaded at http://www.bioinfo.org.cn/mango/ and is free for academic usage.

  6. Detection, isolation, and characterization of oligo/poly(sialic acid) and oligo/poly(deaminoneuraminic acid) units in glycoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Kitazume, S; Kitajima, K; Inoue, S; Inoue, Y

    1992-04-01

    We have evaluated methods for separation, preparation, and characterization of alpha-2----8-linked oligomers of sialic acids (Neu5Ac and Neu5Gc) and deaminated neuraminic acid (KDN; 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-glycero-D-galacto-nononic acid) recently found as a naturally occurring novel type of sialic acid analogue. (A) We examined preparative anion-exchange chromatography for fractionation and preparation of oligo(Neu5Ac), oligo(Neu5Gc), and oligo(KDN). (B) We also examined the TLC method for separation and differentiation of the partial acid hydrolysates of colominic acid, as well as polysialoglycoproteins (PSGP) and poly(KDN)-glycoproteins (KDN-gp) isolated from rainbow trout eggs, and for discrimination of lower oligomers of Neu5Ac, Neu5Gc, and KDN. (C) We developed the high-performance adsorption-partition chromatographic method for (a) separation of monomers and oligomers of three nonulosonates according to the difference in substituents at C-5 and the presence or absence of 9-O-acetyl groups in oligo(KDN) and (b) separation of three homologous series of lower oligomers according to the degree of polymerization. (D) We examined and compared high-performance anion-exchange chromatographic separation of 3H-labeled oligo(Neu5Ac), oligo(Neu5Gc), and oligo(KDN) alditols by using Mono-Q HR 5/5 resin. (E) We examined a method of selective and quantitative microprecipitation for separation and purification of oligomers and polymers of Neu5Ac by treating them with cetylpyridinium chloride. We also used PSGP and KDN-gp to test both the sensitivity and the selectivity of this method.

  7. Amorphous phase-segregated copoly(ether)esterurethane thermoset networks with oligo(propylene glycol) and oligo[(rac-lactide)-co-glycolide] segments: synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Zotzmann, Jörg; Alteheld, Armin; Behl, Marc; Lendlein, Andreas

    2009-09-01

    Completely amorphous copoly(ether)ester networks based on oligo(propylene glycol) and oligo[(rac-dilactide)-co-glycolide] segments were synthesized by crosslinking star-shaped hydroxyl-telechelic cooligomers using an aliphatic low-molecular weight diisocyanate. Two different network architectures were applied exhibiting differences in the phase-separation behavior. For networks from oligo(propylene glycol)-block-oligo[(rac-lactide)-co-glycolide] triols (G(3)OPG-bl-OLG) only one glass transition was obtained. However, networks from a mixture of oligo(propylene glycol) triols (G(3)OPG) and oligo[(rac-lactide)-co-glycolide] tetrols (P(4)OLG) with a ratio of components in a certain range show two glass transition temperatures (T (g)) being attributed to two segregated amorphous phases. In this way a wide spectrum of mechanical properties can be realized and adjusted to the requirements of a specific application.

  8. Designing oligo libraries taking alternative splicing into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoshan, Avi; Grebinskiy, Vladimir; Magen, Avner; Scolnicov, Ariel; Fink, Eyal; Lehavi, David; Wasserman, Alon

    2001-06-01

    We have designed sequences for DNA microarrays and oligo libraries, taking alternative splicing into account. Alternative splicing is a common phenomenon, occurring in more than 25% of the human genes. In many cases, different splice variants have different functions, are expressed in different tissues or may indicate different stages of disease. When designing sequences for DNA microarrays or oligo libraries, it is very important to take into account the sequence information of all the mRNA transcripts. Therefore, when a gene has more than one transcript (as a result of alternative splicing, alternative promoter sites or alternative poly-adenylation sites), it is very important to take all of them into account in the design. We have used the LEADS transcriptome prediction system to cluster and assemble the human sequences in GenBank and design optimal oligonucleotides for all the human genes with a known mRNA sequence based on the LEADS predictions.

  9. Biosynthesis and Degradation of Mono-, Oligo-, and Polysaccharides: Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Iain B. H.

    Glycomolecules, whether they be mono-, oligo-, or polysaccharides or simple glycosides, are—as any biological molecules—the products of biosynthetic processes; on the other hand, at the end of their lifespan, they are also subject to degradation. The beginning point, biochemically, is the fixation of carbon by photosynthesis; subsequent metabolism in plants and other organisms results in the generation of the various monosaccharides. These must be activated—typically as nucleotide sugars or lipid-phosphosugars—before transfer by glycosyltransferases can take place in order to produce the wide variety of oligo- and polysaccharides seen in Nature; complicated remodelling processes may take place—depending on the pathway—which result in partial trimming of a precursor by glycosidases prior to the addition of further monosaccharide units. Upon completion of the 'life' of a glycoconjugate, glycosidases will degrade the macromolecule finally into monosaccharide units which can be metabolized or salvaged for incorporation into new glycan chains. In modern glycoscience, a wide variety of methods—genetic, biochemical, analytical—are being employed in order to understand these various pathways and to place them within their biological and medical context. In this chapter, these processes and relevant concepts and methods are introduced, prior to elaboration in the subsequent more specialized chapters on biosynthesis and degradation of mono-, oligo-, and polysaccharides.

  10. Novel Insights of Oligometastases and Oligo-Recurrence and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Niibe, Yuzuru; Chang, Joe Y.

    2012-01-01

    Oligometastases and oligo-recurrence are among the most important notions of metastatic and recurrent cancer. The concept of oligometastases is related to the notion that cancer patients with 1–5 metastatic or recurrent lesions that could be treated by local therapy achieve long-term survival or cure, while the concept of oligo-recurrence is related to the notion that cancer patients with 1–5 metastatic or recurrent lesions that could be treated by local therapy have controlled primary lesions. Achievement of long-term survival or cure in patients with oligometastases and oligo-recurrence is cancer and organ specific. These facts rely on the seed and soil theory and multiple steps of cancer progression. Oligo-recurrence is considered to have a better prognosis than oligometastases. In patients with oligometastases and oligo-recurrence, the oligometastases and oligo-recurrence are sometimes cured with only local therapy, which is an example of the abscopal effect, previously described in relation to cure of lesions outside of the field of radiation therapy without systemic therapy. Oligometastases and oligo-recurrence can now be cured by less invasive local treatment methods combined with systemic therapy. The mechanisms of oligometastases and oligo-recurrence, as well as novel insights into these important concepts, are presented in this paper. PMID:22966429

  11. Charge transport in nitro substituted oligo(phenylene-ethynylene) molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabassi, Marco Alberto

    2007-12-01

    This thesis presents research aimed at tackling two issues in the field of molecular electronics. The first issue is the large range of molecular conductance values reported by various research groups for identical molecules. This is addressed by studying the same molecule in dissimilar environments. The second issue is experimental uncertainty---whether the observed effects are inherent to the molecule or due to external causes. This is addressed by performing in-situ spectroscopy of the molecule as part of its electrical characterization. Oligo(phenylene-ethynylene)s are a well studied class of molecules in the field of molecular electronics, and this work focuses on charge transport through nitro substituted oligo(phenylene-ethynylene) molecules. The electrical characterization of these molecules was performed utilizing two testbeds. An electromigrated break-junction testbed was used to probe individual molecules, while a nanowire molecular junction testbed was used to probe self-assembled monolayers of the molecule. Experiments performed on individual molecules revealed a temperature dependent transition in the dominant charge transport mechanism. Above 50K, hopping is the dominant charge transport mechanism, while below 50K direct tunneling is the dominant charge transport mechanism. Experiments performed on self-assembled monolayers did not reveal any temperature dependent transitions. The dominant charge transport mechanism appears to be direct tunneling throughout the temperature range investigated. The results also indicate that molecules embedded in a self-assembled monolayer have significantly lower conductance than individual molecules. This is primarily due to a second charge transport mechanism (hopping) that opens up above 50K that is available only to individual molecules, and secondarily due to better potential screening properties of the self-assembled monolayers. Inelastic electron tunneling spectra obtained for the molecules in a self

  12. Oligo and Poly-thiophene/Zno Hybrid Nanowire Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Briseno, Alejandro L.; Holcombe, Thomas W.; Boukai, Akram I.; Garnett, Erik C.; Shelton, Steve W.; Frechet, Jean J. M.; Yang, Peidong

    2009-11-03

    We demonstrate the basic operation of an organic/inorganic hybrid single nanowire solar cell. End-functionalized oligo- and polythiophenes were grafted onto ZnO nanowires to produce p-n heterojunction nanowires. The hybrid nanostructures were characterized via absorption and electron microscopy to determine the optoelectronic properties and to probe the morphology at the organic/inorganic interface. Individual nanowire solar cell devices exhibited well-resolved characteristics with efficiencies as high as 0.036percent, Jsc = 0.32 mA/cm2, Voc = 0.4 V, and a FF = 0.28 under AM 1.5 illumination with 100 mW/cm2 light intensity. These individual test structures will enable detailed analysis to be carried out in areas that have been difficult to study in bulk heterojunction devices.

  13. Metabolic engineering for amino-, oligo-, and polysugar production in microbes.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Gazi Sakir; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Li, Jianghua; Wang, Miao; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian; Liu, Long

    2016-03-01

    Amino-, oligo-, and polysugars are important for both medicinal and industrial applications. Microbial processes used in production of such sugars are not only carbon-intensive and energy-demanding processes but also have other distinct disadvantages such as low productivity, low yields, and by-product contamination. Therefore, metabolic engineering has emerged as an effective tool for developing engineered strains to deliver production strategies for many valuable sugars, which were previously difficult to manufacture by other means, in necessary amounts to support their applications. In this review, the recent strategies used for metabolic engineering are summarized and future prospects of this technique are discussed. We hope that this review will contribute to the development of functional and high-value sugar production by metabolic engineering strategies.

  14. Oligo-fucoidan prevents renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis by inhibiting the CD44 signal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng-Hsien; Sue, Yuh-Mou; Cheng, Chung-Yi; Chen, Yen-Cheng; Liu, Chung-Te; Hsu, Yung-Ho; Hwang, Pai-An; Huang, Nai-Jen; Chen, Tso-Hsiao

    2017-01-01

    Tubulointerstitial fibrosis is recognized as a key determinant of progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD). Fucoidan, a sulphated polysaccharide extracted from brown seaweed, exerts beneficial effects in some nephropathy models. The present study evaluated the inhibitory effect of oligo-fucoidan (800 Da) on renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis. We established a mouse CKD model by right nephrectomy with transient ischemic injury to the left kidney. Six weeks after the surgery, we fed the CKD mice oligo-fucoidan at 10, 20, and 100 mg/kg/d for 6 weeks and found that the oligo-fucoidan doses less than 100 mg/kg/d improved renal function and reduced renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis in CKD mice. Oligo-fucoidan also inhibited pressure-induced fibrotic responses and the expression of CD44, β-catenin, and TGF-β in rat renal tubular cells (NRK-52E). CD44 knockdown downregulated the expression of β-catenin and TGF-β in pressure-treated cells. Additional ligands for CD44 reduced the anti-fibrotic effect of oligo-fucoidan in NRK-52E cells. These data suggest that oligo-fucoidan at the particular dose prevents renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis in a CKD model. The anti-fibrotic effect of oligo-fucoidan may result from interfering with the interaction between CD44 and its extracellular ligands. PMID:28098144

  15. Oligo-fucoidan prevents renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis by inhibiting the CD44 signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng-Hsien; Sue, Yuh-Mou; Cheng, Chung-Yi; Chen, Yen-Cheng; Liu, Chung-Te; Hsu, Yung-Ho; Hwang, Pai-An; Huang, Nai-Jen; Chen, Tso-Hsiao

    2017-01-18

    Tubulointerstitial fibrosis is recognized as a key determinant of progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD). Fucoidan, a sulphated polysaccharide extracted from brown seaweed, exerts beneficial effects in some nephropathy models. The present study evaluated the inhibitory effect of oligo-fucoidan (800 Da) on renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis. We established a mouse CKD model by right nephrectomy with transient ischemic injury to the left kidney. Six weeks after the surgery, we fed the CKD mice oligo-fucoidan at 10, 20, and 100 mg/kg/d for 6 weeks and found that the oligo-fucoidan doses less than 100 mg/kg/d improved renal function and reduced renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis in CKD mice. Oligo-fucoidan also inhibited pressure-induced fibrotic responses and the expression of CD44, β-catenin, and TGF-β in rat renal tubular cells (NRK-52E). CD44 knockdown downregulated the expression of β-catenin and TGF-β in pressure-treated cells. Additional ligands for CD44 reduced the anti-fibrotic effect of oligo-fucoidan in NRK-52E cells. These data suggest that oligo-fucoidan at the particular dose prevents renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis in a CKD model. The anti-fibrotic effect of oligo-fucoidan may result from interfering with the interaction between CD44 and its extracellular ligands.

  16. Pharmacologic Studies on the In Vitro Bronchodilating Vasoactive Actions of Oligo-PGB.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    also examined the dose response curve to OVA in the presence of pyrilamine (histamine H,-receptor antagonist) alone or in combination with indomethacin... response curve to oligo-PGB will be the best protocol to study this relationship. To exclude the possiblity that the oligo-PGB relaxation could be due...in the presence of indomethacin vv: ich showed a greater degree of relaxation at 10-5M than at 10-6M of oligo-PGB. We suggest that the complete dose

  17. Murine protein which binds preferentially to oligo-C-rich single-stranded nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Goller, M; Funke, B; Gehe-Becker, C; Kröger, B; Lottspeich, F; Horak, I

    1994-01-01

    Two single-stranded nucleic acid binding proteins mCBP and mCTBP were identified by means of their binding to a potential recombination hotspot in LTRs of mouse retro-transposons. Both are nuclear proteins of 35 and 55 kDa respectively. mCBP binds preferentially to oligo dC, mCTBP to oligo dCdT. mCBP was purified and its cDNA was isolated and sequenced. Images PMID:8208614

  18. Achieving targeted and quantifiable alteration of mRNA splicing with Morpholino oligos

    SciTech Connect

    Morcos, Paul A. . E-mail: pmorcos@gene-tools.com

    2007-06-29

    This work represents the first guide for using steric-block antisense oligos as tools for effective and targeted modification of RNA splicing. Comparison of several steric-block oligo types shows the properties of Morpholinos provide significant advantages over other potential splice-blocking oligos. The procedures and complications of designing effective splice-blocking Morpholino oligos are described. The design process requires complete pre-mRNA sequence for defining suitable targets, which usually generate specific predictable messengers. To validate the targeting procedure, the level and nature of transcript alteration is characterized by RT-PCR analysis of splice modification in a {beta}-globin splice model system. An oligo-walking study reveals that while U1 and U2 small nuclear RiboNucleoProtein (snRNP) binding sites are the most effective targets for blocking splicing, inclusion of these sites is not required to achieve effective splice modifications. The most effective targeting strategy employs simultaneously blocking snRNP binding sites and splice-junctions. The work presented here continues to be the basis for most of the successful Morpholino oligos designed for the worldwide research community to block RNA splicing.

  19. Mechanism of T-oligo-induced cell cycle arrest in Mia-PaCa pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Andrew M; Sarkar, Sibaji; Faller, Douglas V

    2012-06-01

    DNA oligonucleotides with sequence homology to human telomeric DNA (T-oligo) induce cell cycle arrest, followed by apoptosis, senescence, or autophagy in a human cancer cell type-specific manner. T-oligo has potential as a new therapeutic strategy in oncology because of its ability to target certain types of tumor cells while sparing normal ones. In the present study, we demonstrate the T-oligo-induced S-phase cell cycle arrest in four pancreatic cancer cell lines. To further contribute to the mechanistic understanding of T-oligo, we also identify cyclin dependent kinase 2 (cdk2) as a functional mediator in the T-oligo-induced cell cycle arrest of pancreatic cancer cells. Ectopic expression of a constitutively active cdk2 mutant abrogates T-oligo-induced cell cycle arrest in these tumor cells while knockdown of cdk2 expression alone recapitulates the T-oligo effect. Finally, we demonstrate the dispensability of T-oligo-induced ATM/ATR-mediated DNA damage response-signaling pathways, which have long been considered functional in the T-oligo signaling mechanism.

  20. Design of smart oligo(ethylene glycol)-based biocompatible hybrid microgels loaded with magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Boularas, Mohamed; Gombart, Emilie; Tranchant, Jean-François; Billon, Laurent; Save, Maud

    2015-01-01

    This article reports a rational strategy for preparing smart oligo(ethylene glycol)-based hybrid microgels loaded with high content of homogeneously distributed preformed magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) (up to 33 wt%). The strategy is based on the synthesis of biocompatible multiresponsive microgels by precipitation copolymerization of di(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate, oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate, methacrylic acid, and oligo(ethylene glycol)diac-rylate. An aqueous dispersion of preformed magnetic NPs is straightforwardly loaded into the microgels. Robust monodisperse thermoresponsive magnetic microgels are produced, exhibiting a constant value of the volume phase transition temperature whatever the NPs content. The homogeneous microstructure of the initial stimuli-responsive biocompatible microgels plays a crucial role for the design of unique well-defined ethylene glycol-based thermoresponsive hybrid microgels.

  1. PROBEmer: a web-based software tool for selecting optimal DNA oligos

    PubMed Central

    Emrich, Scott J.; Lowe, Mary; Delcher, Arthur L.

    2003-01-01

    PROBEmer (http://probemer.cs.loyola.edu) is a web-based software tool that enables a researcher to select optimal oligos for PCR applications and multiplex detection platforms including oligonucleotide microarrays and bead-based arrays. Given two groups of nucleic-acid sequences, a target group and a non-target group, the software identifies oligo sequences that occur in members of the target group, but not in the non-target group. To help predict potential cross hybridization, PROBEmer computes all near neighbors in the non-target group and displays their alignments. The software has been used to obtain genus-specific prokaryotic probes based on the 16S rRNA gene, gene-specific probes for expression analyses and PCR primers. In this paper, we describe how to use PROBEmer, the computational methods it employs, and experimental results for oligos identified by this software tool. PMID:12824409

  2. Combinatorial enzyme technology: Conversion of pectin to oligo species and its effect on microbial growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant cell wall polysaccharides, which consist of polymeric backbones with various types of substitution, were studied using the concept of combinatorial enzyme technology for conversion of agricultural fibers to functional products. Using citrus pectin as the starting substrate, an active oligo spe...

  3. Maillard reaction products of rice protein hydrolysates with mono-, oligo- and polysaccharides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice protein, a byproduct of rice syrup production, is abundant but, its lack of functionality prevents its wide use as a food ingredient. Maillard reaction products of (MRPs) hydrolysates from the limited hydrolysis of rice protein (LHRP) and various mono-, oligo- and polysaccharides were evaluat...

  4. On the hybrid glassy carbon electrode/OligoThiophene/Ag(NP) interface.

    PubMed

    Tassinari, Francesco; Tancini, Erik; Innocenti, Massimo; Schenetti, Luisa; Fontanesi, Claudio

    2012-11-06

    GC/OligoThiophene/Ag(NP) hybrid interfaces are synthesized and characterized: GC is the glassy carbon surface; OligoThiophene stands for both an ultrathin bithiophene grafted film and a 4-Br-Bithiophene grafted polymer; Ag(NP) stands for silver nanoparticles. The hybrid interface preparation involves different steps: first, the electrode surface is functionalized through a combination of electrochemically assisted grafting (under reduction regime) and polymerization (under oxidation regime); then, silver nanoparticles are chemisorbed by dipping. In particular, an ultrathin film of grafted bithiophene can be obtained by applying one cyclic voltammetry reduction cycle (GC/BT surface), while subsequent cyclic voltammetry cycling under oxidation regime yields an immobilized 4Br-Bithiophene polymer (GC/4BrBT surface). AFM and TEM images were recorded to investigate the morphology and chemical composition of the Ag(NP). Fe(II)/Fe(III) cyclic voltammetry, Zn underpotential deposition (UPD), XPS, LA-ICP-MS, and Raman techniques were exploited to characterize both the GC/OligoThiophene and GC/OligoThiophene/Ag(NP) interfaces. Theoretical calculation, at the B3LYP/6-311G** level of the theory, enabled rationalization of the electroreduction mechanism and the Raman results.

  5. Pharmacologic Studies on the In Vitro Bronchodilating Vasoactive Actions of Oligo-PGB (Prostaglandin B)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-06

    of indomethacin which showed a greater de,.,ee of relaxation at 10-5M than at 10 6M of oligo-PGB. We suggest t eit the complete dose - response curve to...to further increase the responses of O-PGB-treated tissues (figure 7). We also examined the dose response curve to OVA in the presence of pyrilamine

  6. Synthesis, electronic properties and self-assembly on Au{111} of thiolated (oligo)phenothiazines

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Adam W; Stoycheva, Svetlana; Himmelhaus, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Summary (Oligo)phenothiazinyl thioacetates, synthesized by a one-pot sequence, are electrochemically oxidizable and highly fluorescent. SAMs can be readily formed from thiols prepared by in situ deprotection of the thioacetates in the presence of a gold-coated silicon wafer. Monolayer formation is confirmed by ellipsometry and the results compared to those obtained by force field and DFT calculations. PMID:20703376

  7. Arabidopsis hybrid speciation processes

    PubMed Central

    Schmickl, Roswitha; Koch, Marcus A.

    2011-01-01

    The genus Arabidopsis provides a unique opportunity to study fundamental biological questions in plant sciences using the diploid model species Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata. However, only a few studies have focused on introgression and hybrid speciation in Arabidopsis, although polyploidy is a common phenomenon within this genus. More recently, there is growing evidence of significant gene flow between the various Arabidopsis species. So far, we know Arabidopsis suecica and Arabidopsis kamchatica as fully stabilized allopolyploid species. Both species evolved during Pleistocene glaciation and deglaciation cycles in Fennoscandinavia and the amphi-Beringian region, respectively. These hybrid studies were conducted either on a phylogeographic scale or reconstructed experimentally in the laboratory. In our study we focus at a regional and population level. Our research area is located in the foothills of the eastern Austrian Alps, where two Arabidopsis species, Arabidopsis arenosa and A. lyrata ssp. petraea, are sympatrically distributed. Our hypothesis of genetic introgression, migration, and adaptation to the changing environment during the Pleistocene has been confirmed: We observed significant, mainly unidirectional gene flow between the two species, which has given rise to the tetraploid A. lyrata. This cytotype was able to escape from the narrow ecological niche occupied by diploid A. lyrata ssp. petraea on limestone outcrops by migrating northward into siliceous areas, leaving behind a trail of genetic differentiation. PMID:21825128

  8. Superexchange contributions to distance dependence of electron transfer/transport: exchange and electronic coupling in oligo(para-phenylene)- and oligo(2,5-thiophene)-bridged donor-bridge-acceptor biradical complexes.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Martin L; Shultz, David A; Stasiw, Daniel E; Lewis, Geoffrey F; Wang, Guangbin; Brannen, Candice L; Sommer, Roger D; Boyle, Paul D

    2013-11-13

    The preparation and characterization of three new donor-bridge-acceptor biradical complexes are described. Using variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility, EPR hyperfine coupling constants, and the results of X-ray crystal structures, we evaluate both exchange and electronic couplings as a function of bridge length for two quintessential molecular bridges: oligo(para-phenylene), β = 0.39 Å(-1) and oligo(2,5-thiophene), β = 0.22 Å(-1). This report represents the first direct comparison of exchange/electronic couplings and distance attenuation parameters (β) for these bridges. The work provides a direct measurement of superexchange contributions to β, with no contribution from incoherent hopping. The different β values determined for oligo(para-phenylene) and oligo(2,5-thiophene) are due primarily to the D-B energy gap, Δ, rather than bridge-bridge electronic couplings, H(BB). This is supported by the fact that the H(BB) values extracted from the experimental data for oligo(para-phenylene) (H(BB) = 11,400 cm(-1)) and oligo(2,5-thiophene) (12,300 cm(-1)) differ by <10%. The results presented here offer unique insight into the intrinsic molecular factors that govern H(DA) and β, which are important for understanding the electronic origin of electron transfer and electron transport mediated by molecular bridges.

  9. Assessing the Sporicidal Activity of Oligo-p-phenylene Ethynylenes and Their Role as Bacillus Germinants.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Harry C; Lovchik, Julie A; Whitten, David G

    2015-04-21

    A wide range of oligo-p-phenylene ethynylenes has been shown to exhibit good biocidal activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. While cell death may occur in the dark, these biocidal compounds are far more effective in the light as a result of their ability to sensitize the production of cell-damaging reactive oxygen species. In these studies, the interactions of a specific cationic oligo-p-phenylene ethynylene with spore-forming Bacillus atrophaeus and Bacillus anthracis Sterne have been investigated. Flow cytometry assays are used to rapidly monitor cell death as well as spore germination. This compound effectively killed Bacillus anthracis Sterne vegetative cells (over 4 log reduction), presumably by severe perturbations of the bacterial cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane, while also acting as an effective spore germinant in the dark. While 2 log reduction of B. anthracis Sterne spores was observed, it is hypothesized that further killing could be achieved through enhanced germination.

  10. Thermosensitivity of bile acid-based oligo(ethylene glycol) stars in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Strandman, Satu; Le Dévédec, Frantz; Zhu, X X

    2011-08-03

    Amphiphilic star-shaped oligo(ethylene glycol)s with a hydrophobic bile acid core and varying number of hydrophilic arms have been made. Their thermal behavior in aqueous solutions depends on the number rather than the length of the arms. The two-armed lithocholate derivative showed the strongest tendency for association and exhibited the lowest cloud point (79 °C) of the oligomers made, as well as another phase separation at a lower temperature (31 °C). The "double thermosensitivity" arising both from the salt-dependent LCST of the oligo(ethylene glycol) segments and the temperature-responsive self-assembly of amphiphilic bile acid derivative provides an interesting path in the design of bile acid-based smart materials.

  11. Expanding The Scope Of Oligo-pyrrolinone-pyrrolidines As Protein-protein Interface Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Raghuraman, Arjun; Xin, Dongyue; Perez, Lisa M.; Burgess, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Oligo-pyrrolinone-pyrrolidines (generic structure 1) have the potential to interfere with protein-protein interactions (PPIs), but to reduce this to practice it is necessary to be able to synthesize these structures with a variety of different side-chains corresponding to genetically encoded proteins. This paper describes expansion of the synthetic scope of 1, the difficulties encountered in this process, particularly issues with epimerization and slow coupling rates, and methods to overcome them. Finally, spectroscopic and physicochemical properties as well as proteolytic stabilities of molecules in this series were measured; these data highlight the suitability of oligo-pyrrolinone-pyrrolidines for the development of pharmacological probes or pharmaceutical leads. PMID:23654284

  12. Exploring Redox States, Doping and Ordering of Electroactive Star-Shaped Oligo(aniline)s.

    PubMed

    Mills, Benjamin M; Fey, Natalie; Marszalek, Tomasz; Pisula, Wojciech; Rannou, Patrice; Faul, Charl F J

    2016-11-14

    We have prepared a simple star-shaped oligo(aniline) (TDPB) and characterised it in detail by MALDI-TOF MS, UV/Vis/NIR spectroscopy, time-dependent DFT, cyclic voltammetry and EPR spectroscopy. TDPB is part of an underdeveloped class of π-conjugated molecules with great potential for organic electronics, display and sensor applications. It is redox active and reacts with acids to form radical cations. Acid-doped TDPB shows behaviour similar to discotic liquid crystals, with X-ray scattering investigations revealing columnar self-assembled arrays. The combination of unpaired electrons and supramolecular stacking suggests that star-shaped oligo(aniline)s like TDPB have the potential to form conducting nanowires and organic magnetic materials.

  13. Exploring Redox States, Doping and Ordering of Electroactive Star‐Shaped Oligo(aniline)s

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Benjamin M.; Fey, Natalie; Marszalek, Tomasz; Pisula, Wojciech; Rannou, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have prepared a simple star‐shaped oligo(aniline) (TDPB) and characterised it in detail by MALDI‐TOF MS, UV/Vis/NIR spectroscopy, time‐dependent DFT, cyclic voltammetry and EPR spectroscopy. TDPB is part of an underdeveloped class of π‐conjugated molecules with great potential for organic electronics, display and sensor applications. It is redox active and reacts with acids to form radical cations. Acid‐doped TDPB shows behaviour similar to discotic liquid crystals, with X‐ray scattering investigations revealing columnar self‐assembled arrays. The combination of unpaired electrons and supramolecular stacking suggests that star‐shaped oligo(aniline)s like TDPB have the potential to form conducting nanowires and organic magnetic materials. PMID:27723154

  14. The Arabidopsis Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    McClung, C. Robertson; Salomé, Patrice A.; Michael, Todd P.

    2002-01-01

    Rhythms with periods of approximately 24 hr are widespread in nature. Those that persist in constant conditions are termed circadian rhythms and reflect the activity of an endogenous biological clock. Plants, including Arabidopsis, are richly rhythmic. Expression analysis, most recently on a genomic scale, indicates that the Arabidopsis circadian clock regulates a number of key metabolic pathways and stress responses. A number of sensitive and high-throughput assays have been developed to monitor the Arabidopsis clock. These assays have facilitated the identification of components of plant circadian systems through genetic and molecular biological studies. Although much remains to be learned, the framework of the Arabidopsis circadian system is coming into focus. Dedication This review is dedicated to the memory of DeLill Nasser, a wonderful mentor and an unwavering advocate of both Arabidopsis and circadian rhythms research. PMID:22303209

  15. Porphyrin-beta-oligo-ethynylenephenylene-[60]fullerene triads: synthesis and electrochemical and photophysical characterization of the new porphyrin-oligo-PPE-[60]fullerene systems.

    PubMed

    Lembo, Angelo; Tagliatesta, Pietro; Guldi, Dirk M; Wielopolski, Mateusz; Nuccetelli, Marzia

    2009-03-05

    The synthesis and electrochemical and photophysical studies of new electron donor-acceptor arrays, bearing porphyrins covalently linked to fullerene, are described. In the reported investigation, phenyleneethynylene subunits were chosen as a linking bridge to guarantee a high conjugation degree between the donor (i.e., porphyrin), the molecular bridge (i.e., oligo-phenyleneethynylenes), and the acceptor (i.e., fullerene). To enhance the electronic interactions through the extended pi-system, the molecular bridge has been directly linked to the beta-pyrrole position of the porphyrin ring, generating a new example of donor-bridge-acceptor systems where, for the first time, the meso-phenyl ring of the macrocycle is not used to hold the "bridge" between porphyrin and fullerene moieties. This modification allows altering the chemical and physical properties of the tetrapyrrole ring. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies together with transient absorption measurements reveal that in nonpolar media (i.e., toluene) transduction of singlet excited-state energy governs the excited-state deactivation, whereas in polar media (i.e., tetrahydrofuran) charge transfer prevails generating a long-lived radical ion pair state. The lifetimes hereof range from 300 to 700 ns. The study also sheds light onto the wirelike behavior of the oligo-phenyleneethynylene bridges, for which a damping factor (beta) of 0.11 +/- 0.05 A(-1) has been determined in the current study.

  16. Seasonal Variability of Meiofaunal Abundance in the Oligo-mesohaline Area of the Gironde Estuary, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, P. J. P.; Castel, J.; Souza-Santos, L. P.

    1996-11-01

    The seasonality of meiofauna abundance was examined at an intertidal mud flat located in the oligo-mesohaline reach of the Gironde Estuary, France. Samples were collected weekly for 1 year at two stations located at the lower and the upper level of the mud flat (Stations L and H, respectively). Clear seasonal variations were evident for the meiofauna at both stations. Multivariate analysis revealed that meiofaunal composition, as well as biomass, was mainly regulated by temperature and salinity. Meiofaunal abundances were dominated by harpacticoid copepods at Station H and by nematodes at Station L, with meiofaunal biomass dominated by harpacticoid copepods at both stations, an unusual situation in estuarine muddy sediments. The meiofaunal community response to salinity occurs both as a chronic effect and as an anticipation to estuarine water salinity changes, thus suggesting that the animals response to this factor in oligo-mesohaline areas can also be an acute response to local heavy rains which can influence the meiofauna due to both variations of interstitial salinity and by erosion. Microphytobenthic resources, as estimated by chlorophyll aand pheopigment concentrations, had no strong influence on either meiofauna composition or biomass. Furthermore, evidence is given that microphytobenthic food supply is not a limiting factor to the benthic fauna in the oligo-mesohaline area of the Gironde Estuary.

  17. Structure-activity relationships of oligo-beta-glucoside elicitors of phytoalexin accumulation in soybean.

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, J J; Birberg, W; Fügedi, P; Pilotti, A; Garegg, P J; Hong, N; Ogawa, T; Hahn, M G

    1991-01-01

    The abilities of a family of chemically synthesized oligo-beta-glucosides, ranging in size from hexamer to decamer, to induce phytoalexin accumulation in soybean cotyledons were investigated to determine which structural elements of the oligoglucosides are important for their biological activity. The results of the biological assays established that the following structural motif is necessary for the oligo-beta-glucosides to have high elicitor activity: [formula; see text] The branched trisaccharide at the nonreducing end of the oligoglucosides was found to be essential for maximum elicitor activity. Substitution of either the nonreducing terminal backbone glucosyl residue or the side-chain glucosyl residue closest to the nonreducing end with glucosaminyl or N-acetylglucosaminyl residues reduced the elicitor activity of the oligoglucosides between 10-fold and 10,000-fold. Elicitor activity was also reduced 1000-fold if the two side-chain glucosyl residues were attached to adjacent backbone glucosyl residues rather than to glucosyl residues separated by an unbranched residue. In contrast, modifications of the reducing terminal glucosyl residue of an elicitor-active hepta-beta-glucoside by conjugation with tyramine and subsequent iodination had no significant effect on the elicitor activity of the hepta-beta-glucoside. These results demonstrate that oligo-beta-glucosides must have a specific structure to trigger the signal transduction pathway, which ultimately leads to the de novo synthesis of phytoalexins in soybean. PMID:1840904

  18. The RNA-binding protein repertoire of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Marondedze, Claudius; Thomas, Ludivine; Serrano, Natalia L.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Gehring, Chris

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have essential roles in determining the fate of RNA from synthesis to decay and have been studied on a protein-by-protein basis, or computationally based on a number of well-characterised RNA-binding domains. Recently, high-throughput methods enabled the capture of mammalian RNA-binding proteomes. To gain insight into the role of Arabidopsis thaliana RBPs at the systems level, we have employed interactome capture techniques using cells from different ecotypes grown in cultures and leaves. In vivo UV-crosslinking of RNA to RBPs, oligo(dT) capture and mass spectrometry yielded 1,145 different proteins including 550 RBPs that either belong to the functional category ‘RNA-binding’, have known RNA-binding domains or have orthologs identified in mammals, C. elegans, or S. cerevisiae in addition to 595 novel candidate RBPs. We noted specific subsets of RBPs in cultured cells and leaves and a comparison of Arabidopsis, mammalian, C. elegans, and S. cerevisiae RBPs reveals a common set of proteins with a role in intermediate metabolism, as well as distinct differences suggesting that RBPs are also species and tissue specific. This study provides a foundation for studies that will advance our understanding of the biological significance of RBPs in plant developmental and stimulus specific responses. PMID:27405932

  19. Specific analogues uncouple transport, signalling, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis in the yeast Gap1 amino acid transceptor.

    PubMed

    Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Rubio-Texeira, Marta; Schothorst, Joep; Thevelein, Johan M

    2014-07-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae amino acid transceptor Gap1 functions as receptor for signalling to the PKA pathway and concomitantly undergoes substrate-induced oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. We have identified specific amino acids and analogues that uncouple to certain extent signalling, transport, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. L-lysine, L-histidine and L-tryptophan are transported by Gap1 but do not trigger signalling. Unlike L-histidine, L-lysine triggers Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination without substantial induction of endocytosis. Two transported, non-metabolizable signalling agonists, β-alanine and D-histidine, are strong and weak inducers of Gap1 endocytosis, respectively, but both causing Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination. The non-signalling agonist, non-transported competitive inhibitor of Gap1 transport, L-Asp-γ-L-Phe, induces oligo-ubiquitination but no discernible endocytosis. The Km of L-citrulline transport is much lower than the threshold concentration for signalling and endocytosis. These results show that molecules can be transported without triggering signalling or substantial endocytosis, and that oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis do not require signalling nor metabolism. Oligo-ubiquitination is required, but apparently not sufficient to trigger endocytosis. In addition, we demonstrate intracellular cross-induction of endocytosis of transport-defective Gap1(Y395C) by ubiquitination- and endocytosis-deficient Gap1(K9R,K16R). Our results support the concept that different substrates bind to partially overlapping binding sites in the same general substrate-binding pocket of Gap1, triggering divergent conformations, resulting in different conformation-induced downstream processes.

  20. Specific analogues uncouple transport, signalling, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis in the yeast Gap1 amino acid transceptor

    PubMed Central

    Van Zeebroeck, Griet; Rubio-Texeira, Marta; Schothorst, Joep; Thevelein, Johan M

    2014-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae amino acid transceptor Gap1 functions as receptor for signalling to the PKA pathway and concomitantly undergoes substrate-induced oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. We have identified specific amino acids and analogues that uncouple to certain extent signalling, transport, oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis. l-lysine, l-histidine and l-tryptophan are transported by Gap1 but do not trigger signalling. Unlike l-histidine, l-lysine triggers Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination without substantial induction of endocytosis. Two transported, non-metabolizable signalling agonists, β-alanine and d-histidine, are strong and weak inducers of Gap1 endocytosis, respectively, but both causing Gap1 oligo-ubiquitination. The non-signalling agonist, non-transported competitive inhibitor of Gap1 transport, l-Asp-γ-l-Phe, induces oligo-ubiquitination but no discernible endocytosis. The Km of l-citrulline transport is much lower than the threshold concentration for signalling and endocytosis. These results show that molecules can be transported without triggering signalling or substantial endocytosis, and that oligo-ubiquitination and endocytosis do not require signalling nor metabolism. Oligo-ubiquitination is required, but apparently not sufficient to trigger endocytosis. In addition, we demonstrate intracellular cross-induction of endocytosis of transport-defective Gap1Y395C by ubiquitination- and endocytosis-deficient Gap1K9R,K16R. Our results support the concept that different substrates bind to partially overlapping binding sites in the same general substrate-binding pocket of Gap1, triggering divergent conformations, resulting in different conformation-induced downstream processes. PMID:24852066

  1. The antimicrobial effects of the alginate oligomer OligoG CF-5/20 are independent of direct bacterial cell membrane disruption

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Manon F.; Powell, Lydia C.; Khan, Saira; Griffiths, Peter C.; Mansour, Omar T.; Schweins, Ralf; Beck, Konrad; Buurma, Niklaas J.; Dempsey, Christopher E.; Wright, Chris J.; Rye, Philip D.; Hill, Katja E.; Thomas, David W.; Ferguson, Elaine L.

    2017-01-01

    Concerns about acquisition of antibiotic resistance have led to increasing demand for new antimicrobial therapies. OligoG CF-5/20 is an alginate oligosaccharide previously shown to have antimicrobial and antibiotic potentiating activity. We investigated the structural modification of the bacterial cell wall by OligoG CF-5/20 and its effect on membrane permeability. Binding of OligoG CF-5/20 to the bacterial cell surface was demonstrated in Gram-negative bacteria. Permeability assays revealed that OligoG CF-5/20 had virtually no membrane-perturbing effects. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) surface charge and aggregation were unaltered in the presence of OligoG CF-5/20. Small angle neutron scattering and circular dichroism spectroscopy showed no substantial change to the structure of LPS in the presence of OligoG CF-5/20, however, isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated a weak calcium-mediated interaction. Metabolomic analysis confirmed no change in cellular metabolic response to a range of osmolytes when treated with OligoG CF-5/20. This data shows that, although weak interactions occur between LPS and OligoG CF-5/20 in the presence of calcium, the antimicrobial effects of OligoG CF-5/20 are not related to the induction of structural alterations in the LPS or cell permeability. These results suggest a novel mechanism of action that may avoid the common route in acquisition of resistance via LPS structural modification. PMID:28361894

  2. Injectable biodegradable hybrid hydrogels based on thiolated collagen and oligo(acryloyl carbonate)-poly(ethylene glycol)-oligo(acryloyl carbonate) copolymer for functional cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guohui; Wang, Xiaolin; Deng, Chao; Teng, Xiaomei; Suuronen, Erik J; Shen, Zhenya; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2015-03-01

    Injectable biodegradable hybrid hydrogels were designed and developed based on thiolated collagen (Col-SH) and multiple acrylate containing oligo(acryloyl carbonate)-b-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-oligo(acryloyl carbonate) (OAC-PEG-OAC) copolymers for functional cardiac regeneration. Hydrogels were readily formed under physiological conditions (37°C and pH 7.4) from Col-SH and OAC-PEG-OAC via a Michael-type addition reaction, with gelation times ranging from 0.4 to 8.1 min and storage moduli from 11.4 to 55.6 kPa, depending on the polymer concentrations, solution pH and degrees of substitution of Col-SH. The collagen component in the hybrid hydrogels retained its enzymatic degradability against collagenase, and the degradation time of the hydrogels increased with increasing polymer concentration. In vitro studies showed that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) exhibited rapid cell spreading and extensive cellular network formation on these hybrid hydrogels. In a rat infarction model, the infarcted left ventricle was injected with PBS, hybrid hydrogels, BMSCs or BMSC-encapsulating hybrid hydrogels. Echocardiography demonstrated that the hybrid hydrogels and BMSC-encapsulating hydrogels could increase the ejection fraction at 28 days compared to the PBS control group, resulting in improved cardiac function. Histology revealed that the injected hybrid hydrogels significantly reduced the infarct size and increased the wall thickness, and these were further improved with the BMSC-encapsulating hybrid hydrogel treatment, probably related to the enhanced engraftment and persistence of the BMSCs when delivered within the hybrid hydrogel. Thus, these injectable hybrid hydrogels combining intrinsic bioactivity of collagen, controlled mechanical properties and enhanced stability provide a versatile platform for functional cardiac regeneration.

  3. Smart poly(oligo(propylene glycol) methacrylate) hydrogel prepared by gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suljovrujic, E.; Micic, M.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of poly(oligo(propylene glycol) methacrylate) (POPGMA) from functionalised oligo(propylene glycol) methacrylate (OPGMA) monomers by gamma radiation-induced radical polymerisation is reported for the first time; POPGMA homopolymeric hydrogel with oligo(propylene glycol) (OPG) pendant chains, as a non-linear PPGMA-analogue, was synthesised from an monomer-solvent (OPGMA375-water/ethanol) mixture at different irradiation doses (5, 10, 25, and 40 kGy). Determination of the gel fraction was conducted after synthesis. The swelling properties of the POPGMA hydrogel were preliminarily investigated over wide pH (2.2-9.0) and temperature (4-70 °C) ranges. Additional characterisation of structure and properties was conducted by UV-vis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy as well as by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In order to evaluate the potential for biomedical applications, biocompatibility (cytocompatibility and haemolytic activity) studies were performed as well. Sol-gel conversion was relatively high for all irradiation doses, indicating radiation-induced synthesis as a good method for fabricating this hydrogel. Thermoresponsiveness and variations in swelling capacity as a result of thermosensitive OPG pendant chains with a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) were mainly observed below room temperature; thus, the volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) of POPGMA homopolymeric hydrogel is about 15 °C. Furthermore, POPGMA has satisfactory biocompatibility. The results indicate that the hydrogels with propylene glycol pendant chains can be easily prepared by gamma radiation and have potential for different applications as smart and biocompatible polymers.

  4. On-Flow Synthesis of Co-Polymerizable Oligo-Microspheres and Application in ssDNA Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Se Hee; Lee, Jae Ha; Lee, Ho Won; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Jeong, Ok Chan; Ahn, Ji-Young

    2016-01-01

    We fabricated droplet-based microfluidic platform for copolymerizable microspheres with acrydite modified DNA probe. The copolymerizable 3-D polyacrylamide microspheres were successfully produced from microcontinuous-flow synthesis with on-channel solidification. DNA copolymerization activity, surface presentation and thermostability were assessed by using fluorescent labeled complementary probe. The binding performance was only visible on the surface area of oligo-microspheres. We show that the resulting oligo-microspheres can be directly integrated into a streamlined microsphere-PCR protocol for amplifying ssDNA. Our microspheres could be utilized as a potential material for ssDNA analysis such as DNA microarray and automatic DNA SELEX process. PMID:27447941

  5. Esters of oligo-(glycerol carbonate-glycerol): New biobased oligomeric surfactants.

    PubMed

    Holmiere, Sébastien; Valentin, Romain; Maréchal, Philippe; Mouloungui, Zéphirin

    2017-02-01

    Glycerol carbonate is one of the most potentially multifunction glycerol-derived compounds. Glycerol is an important by-product of the oleochemical industry. The oligomerization of glycerol carbonate, assisted by the glycerol, results in the production of polyhydroxylated oligomers rich in linear carbonate groups. The polar moieties of these oligomers (Mw<1000Da) were supplied by glycerol and glycerol carbonate rather than ethylene oxide as in most commercial surfactants. The insertion of linear carbonate groups into the glycerol-based skeleton rendered the oligomers amphiphilic, resulting in a decrease in air/water surface tension to 57mN/m. We improved the physical and chemical properties of the oligomers, by altering the type of acylation reaction and the nature of the acyl donor. The polar head is constituted of homo-oligomers and hetero-oligomers. Homo-oligomers are oligoglycerol and/or oligocarbonate, hetero-oligomers are oligo(glycerol-glycerol carbonate). Coprah oligoesters had the best surfactant properties (CMC<1mg/mL, πcmc<30mN/m), outperforming molecules of fossil origin, such as ethylene glycol monododecyl ether, glycol ethers and fatty acid esters of sorbitan polyethoxylates. The self-assembling properties of oligocarbonate esters were highlighted by their ability to stabilize inverse and multiple emulsions. The oligo-(glycerol carbonate-glycerol ether) with relatively low molecular weights showed properties of relatively high-molecular weight molecules, and constitute a viable "green" alternative to ethoxylated surfactants.

  6. Solid support synthesis of all-Rp-oligo(ribonucleoside phosphorothioate)s.

    PubMed Central

    Almer, H; Stawinski, J; Strömberg, R

    1996-01-01

    The first method for solid support synthesis of all-Rp-oligo(ribonucleoside phosphorothioate)s is presented as well as attempts to increase the stereoselectivity of the key step in this approach. The synthetic strategy consists of (i) a solid support synthesis procedure, using 5'-O-(4-methoxytriphenylmethyl)-2'-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-ri bon ucleoside 3'-H- phosphonates, that due to stereoselectivity in the condensation step, gives oligomers with mostly Sp-H-phosphonate diesters (72-89% under standard conditions), (ii) stereospecific sulfurization with S8 in pyridine to produce oligo(ribonucleoside phosphorothioate)s enriched with internucleosidic linkages of Rp configuration, (iii) treatment of the deprotected oligonucleotides with the enzyme Nuclease P1 from Penicillium citrinum, that specifically catalyses cleavage of Sp-phosphorothioate diester linkages, which leaves a mixture of oligomers having all internucleosidic linkages as Rp-phosphorothioates, and finally (iv) isolation and HPLC purification of the full length all-Rp oligomer. Mixed sequences containing the four common nucleosidic residues up to the chain length of a heptamer were synthesized. Change of N-4-protection on the cytidine building block from propionyl to N-methylpyrrolidin-2-ylidene gave a slightly improved diastereoselectivity in H-phosphonate diester formation. Increased selectivity up to 99+% was obtained with the guanosine building block when the amount of pyridine in the coupling step was reduced. PMID:8871563

  7. Synthesis of Hetero-bifunctional, End-Capped Oligo-EDOT Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Spicer, Christopher D; Booth, Marsilea A; Mawad, Damia; Armgarth, Astrid; Nielsen, Christian B; Stevens, Molly M

    2017-01-12

    Conjugated oligomers of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) are attractive materials for tissue engineering applications and as model systems for studying the properties of the widely used polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene). We report here the facile synthesis of a series of keto-acid end-capped oligo-EDOT derivatives (n = 2-7) through a combination of a glyoxylation end-capping strategy and iterative direct arylation chain extension. Importantly, these structures not only represent the longest oligo-EDOTs reported but are also bench stable, in contrast to previous reports on such oligomers. The constructs reported here can undergo subsequent derivatization for integration into higher-order architectures, such as those required for tissue engineering applications. The synthesis of hetero-bifunctional constructs, as well as those containing mixed-monomer units, is also reported, allowing further complexity to be installed in a controlled manner. Finally, we describe the optical and electrochemical properties of these oligomers and demonstrate the importance of the keto-acid in determining their characteristics.

  8. Luminescent oligo(ethylene glycol)-functionalized cyclometalated platinum(II) complexes: cellular characterization and mitochondria-specific localization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhengqing; Tong, Wah-Leung; Chan, Michael C W

    2014-02-18

    A readily tunable series of non-planar oligo(ethylene glycol)-substituted phosphorescent Pt(II) complexes has been investigated as live cell imaging agents; suitable structural modifications can give good cellular uptake, traceable mitochondria-specific localization and potent cytotoxic characteristics towards HeLa cells.

  9. The Oligo Fucoidan Inhibits Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Stimulated Proliferation of Airway Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao-Huei; Tsao, Chiung-Fang; Ko, Wang-Sheng; Chiou, Ya-Ling

    2016-01-09

    In the pathogenesis of asthma, the proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) is a key factor in airway remodeling and causes airway narrowing. In addition, ASMCs are also the effector cells of airway inflammation. Fucoidan extracted from marine brown algae polysaccharides has antiviral, antioxidant, antimicrobial, anticlotting, and anticancer properties; however, its effectiveness for asthma has not been elucidated thus far. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-treated primary ASMCs were cultured with or without oligo-fucoidan (100, 500, or 1000 µg/mL) to evaluate its effects on cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and Akt, ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We found that PDGF (40 ng/mL) increased the proliferation of ASMCs by 2.5-fold after 48 h (p < 0.05). Oligo-fucoidan reduced the proliferation of PDGF-stimulated ASMCs by 75%-99% after 48 h (p < 0.05) and induced G₁/G₀ cell cycle arrest, but did not induce apoptosis. Further, oligo-fucoidan supplementation reduced PDGF-stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), Akt, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB phosphorylation. Taken together, oligo-fucoidan supplementation might reduce proliferation of PDGF-treated ASMCs through the suppression of ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. The results provide basis for future animal experiments and human trials.

  10. The Oligo Fucoidan Inhibits Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-Stimulated Proliferation of Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao-Huei; Tsao, Chiung-Fang; Ko, Wang-Sheng; Chiou, Ya-Ling

    2016-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of asthma, the proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) is a key factor in airway remodeling and causes airway narrowing. In addition, ASMCs are also the effector cells of airway inflammation. Fucoidan extracted from marine brown algae polysaccharides has antiviral, antioxidant, antimicrobial, anticlotting, and anticancer properties; however, its effectiveness for asthma has not been elucidated thus far. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-treated primary ASMCs were cultured with or without oligo-fucoidan (100, 500, or 1000 µg/mL) to evaluate its effects on cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, and Akt, ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We found that PDGF (40 ng/mL) increased the proliferation of ASMCs by 2.5-fold after 48 h (p < 0.05). Oligo-fucoidan reduced the proliferation of PDGF-stimulated ASMCs by 75%–99% after 48 h (p < 0.05) and induced G1/G0 cell cycle arrest, but did not induce apoptosis. Further, oligo-fucoidan supplementation reduced PDGF-stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), Akt, and nuclear factor (NF)-κB phosphorylation. Taken together, oligo-fucoidan supplementation might reduce proliferation of PDGF-treated ASMCs through the suppression of ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. The results provide basis for future animal experiments and human trials. PMID:26761017

  11. OligoG CF-5/20 Disruption of Mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm in a Murine Lung Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhijun; Ciofu, Oana; Onsøyen, Edvar; Rye, Philip D.; Høiby, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm growth is a universal survival strategy for bacteria, providing an effective and resilient approach for survival in an otherwise hostile environment. In the context of an infection, a biofilm provides resistance and tolerance to host immune defenses and antibiotics, allowing the biofilm population to survive and thrive under conditions that would destroy their planktonic counterparts. Therefore, the disruption of the biofilm is a key step in eradicating persistent bacterial infections, as seen in many types of chronic disease. In these studies, we used both in vitro minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) assays and an in vivo model of chronic biofilm infection to demonstrate the biofilm-disrupting effects of an alginate oligomer, OligoG CF-5/20. Biofilm infections were established in mice by tracheal instillation of a mucoid clinical isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa embedded in alginate polymer beads. The disruption of the biofilm by OligoG CF-5/20 was observed in a dose-dependent manner over 24 h, with up to a 2.5-log reduction in CFU in the infected mouse lungs. Furthermore, in vitro assays showed that 5% OligoG CF-5/20 significantly reduced the MBEC for colistin from 512 μg/ml to 4 μg/ml after 8 h. These findings support the potential for OligoG CF-5/20 as a biofilm disruption agent which may have clinical value in reducing the microbial burden in chronic biofilm infections. PMID:26833153

  12. Starch Metabolism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Streb, Sebastian; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2012-01-01

    Starch is the major non-structural carbohydrate in plants. It serves as an important store of carbon that fuels plant metabolism and growth when they are unable to photosynthesise. This storage can be in leaves and other green tissues, where it is degraded during the night, or in heterotrophic tissues such as roots, seeds and tubers, where it is stored over longer time periods. Arabidopsis accumulates starch in many of its tissues, but mostly in its leaves during the day. It has proven to be a powerful genetic system for discovering how starch is synthesised and degraded, and new proteins and processes have been discovered. Such work has major significance for our starch crops, whose yield and quality could be improved by the application of this knowledge. Research into Arabidopsis starch metabolism has begun to reveal how its daily turnover is integrated into the rest of metabolism and adapted to the environmental conditions. Furthermore, Arabidopsis mutant lines deficient in starch metabolism have been employed as tools to study other biological processes ranging from sugar sensing to gravitropism and flowering time control. This review gives a detailed account of the use of Arabidopsis to study starch metabolism. It describes the major discoveries made and presents an overview of our understanding today, together with some as-yet unresolved questions. PMID:23393426

  13. Fluorescence vesicles by self-assembly of oligo(biphenylene vinylene) bolaamphiphiles in n-hexane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, In-Wook; Kim, Yong-Rok

    2013-09-01

    Self-assembly of an oligo(biphenylene vinylene); OBPV bolaamphiphile with two polar coils of significantly long poly(propylene oxide); PPO (n = 21) at each end generated a fluorescent vesicle in apolar n-hexane. The vesicle efficiently produced trans-stilbene-like OBPV excimer emissions, as evidenced by an intense, redshifted, structured fluorescence spectrum with a long decay time of 5.0 ± 0.1 ns. An OBPV chromophore bound at both sides via a polar coil-to-coil interaction in apolar n-hexane was conducive to OBPV excimer emission, as evident from analysis of the spectroscopic data obtained from OBPVs with different PPO coil lengths (n = 13, 21, 34).

  14. Bis(aminoaryl) Carbon-Bridged Oligo(phenylenevinylene)s Expand the Limits of Electronic Couplings.

    PubMed

    Burrezo, Paula Mayorga; Lin, Nai-Ti; Nakabayashi, Koji; Ohkoshi, Shin-Ichi; Calzado, Eva M; Boj, Pedro G; Díaz García, María A; Franco, Carlos; Rovira, Concepciò; Veciana, Jaume; Moos, Michael; Lambert, Christoph; López Navarrete, Juan T; Tsuji, Hayato; Nakamura, Eiichi; Casado, Juan

    2017-03-06

    Carbon-bridged bis(aminoaryl) oligo(para-phenylenevinylene)s have been prepared and their optical, electrochemical, and structural properties analyzed. Their radical cations are class III and class II mixed-valence systems, depending on the molecular size, and they show electronic couplings which are among the largest for the self-exchange reaction of purely organic molecules. In their dication states, the antiferromagnetic coupling is progressively tuned with size from quinoidal closed-shell to open-shell biradicals. The data prove that the electronic coupling in the radical cations and the singlet-triplet gap in the dications show similar small attenuation factors, thus allowing charge/spin transfer over rather large distances.

  15. Diketopyrrolopyrrole-based Conjugated Polymers Bearing Branched Oligo(Ethylene Glycol) Side Chains for Photovoltaic Devices.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xingxing; Zhang, Zijian; Ding, Zicheng; Liu, Jun; Wang, Lixiang

    2016-08-22

    Conjugated polymers are essential for solution-processable organic opto-electronic devices. In contrast to the great efforts on developing new conjugated polymer backbones, research on developing side chains is rare. Herein, we report branched oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) as side chains of conjugated polymers. Compared with typical alkyl side chains, branched OEG side chains endowed the resulting conjugated polymers with a smaller π-π stacking distance, higher hole mobility, smaller optical band gap, higher dielectric constant, and larger surface energy. Moreover, the conjugated polymers with branched OEG side chains exhibited outstanding photovoltaic performance in polymer solar cells. A power conversion efficiency of 5.37 % with near-infrared photoresponse was demonstrated and the device performance could be insensitive to the active layer thickness.

  16. Improved anticoagulation of titanium by sequential immobilization of oligo(ethylene glycol) and 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chang-Jiang; Hou, Yan-Hua; Liu, Heng-Quan; Ding, Hong-Yan; Dong, Yun-Xiao

    2013-12-01

    Titanium and its alloys have been widely used for blood-contacting biomedical devices; however, their blood compatibility needs to be improved. In this study, titanium surface was modified by sequential immobilization of oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) and 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) to improve its anticoagulation. Water contact angle results showed an excellent hydrophilic surface after the immobilization. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) confirmed that OEG and MPC were successfully immobilized on titanium surface. Static platelet adhesion and APTT (activated partial thromboplastin time) experiments suggested that the anticoagulation of titanium was significantly enhanced by the immobilization of OEG and further by subsequent MPC grafting. The approach in the present study opens up a window of promising an effective and efficient method to improve the anticoagulation of blood-contact biomedical devices such as coronary stents.

  17. Novel antifouling oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate particles via surfactant-free emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Buyukserin, Fatih; Camli, Sevket Tolga; Yavuz, Mustafa Selman; Budak, Gurer Guven

    2011-03-01

    The use of particle formulations with antifouling surface properties attracts increasing interest in several biotechnological applications. Majority of these studies utilize a poly(ethylene glycol) coating to render the corresponding surface nonrecognizable to biological macromolecules. Herein, we report a simple way to prepare novel antifouling colloids composed of oligo(ethylene glycol) backbones via surfactant-free emulsion polymerization. Monodisperse cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol) ethyl ether methacrylate particles were characterized by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The effects of monomer, cross-linker and initiator on particle characteristics were investigated. More importantly, a prominent blockage of bovine serum albumin adsorption was obtained for the poly(ethylene glycol)-based sub-micron (~200 nm) particles when compared with similar-sized poly(methyl methacrylate) counterparts.

  18. Oligo(p-phenylene ethynylene)-BODIPY derivatives: synthesis, energy transfer, and quantum-chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shouchun; Leen, Volker; Jackers, Carine; Beljonne, David; Van Averbeke, Bernard; Van der Auweraer, Mark; Boens, Noël; Dehaen, Wim

    2011-11-18

    The synthesis and energy-transfer properties of a series of oligo(p-phenylene ethynylene)-BODIPY (OPEB) cassettes are reported. A series of oligo(p-phenylene ethynylene)s (OPEs) with different conjugated chain lengths as energy donor subunit in the energy-transfer system were capped at both ends with BODIPY chromophores as energy-acceptor subunits. The effect of the conjugated chain of OPEs on energy transfer in the OPEB cassettes was investigated by UV/Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy and modeling. With increasing number n of phenyl acetylene units (n=1-7), the absorption and emission maxima of OPEn are bathochromically shifted. In the OPEBn analogues, the absorption maximum assigned to the BODIPY moieties is independent of the length of the OPE spacer. However, the relative absorption intensity of the BODIPY band decreases when the number of phenyl acetylene units is increased. The emission spectra of OPEBn are dominated by a band peaking at 613 nm, corresponding to emission of the BODIPY moieties, regardless of whether excitation is at 420 or 550 nm. Furthermore, a very small band is observed with a maximum between 450 and 500 nm, and its intensity relative to that of the BODIPY emission increases with increasing n, that is, the excited state of OPE subunits is efficiently quenched in OPEBn by energy transfer to the BODIPY moieties. Energy transfer (ET) from OPEn to BODIPY in OPEBn is very efficient (all Φ(ET) values are greater than 98 %) and only slightly decreases with increasing length of the OPE units. These results are supported by theoretical studies that show very high energy transfer efficiency (Φ(ET) >75 %) from the OPE spacer to the BODIPY end-groups for chains with up to 15-20 units.

  19. Oligo-Miocene peatland ecosystems of the Gippsland Basin and modern analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korasidis, Vera A.; Wallace, Malcolm W.; Wagstaff, Barbara E.; Holdgate, Guy R.

    2017-02-01

    A detailed examination of the brown coal facies preserved in the Latrobe Valley Morwell 1B seam indicates that the type of peat-forming environment and the associated hydrological regime are the main factors influencing the development of lithotypes in brown coal deposits. New palynological data from the Morwell 1B seam suggests that each respective lithotype in the lightening-upwards lithotype cycles was deposited in a particular depositional environment that was characterised by a distinct floral community. The laminated dark lithotype represents a fire-prone emergent marsh that grew on the margins of a coastal lagoon and/or freshwater swamp. This facies grades into the dark lithotype, representing the transition from a meadow marsh to a periodically flooded ombrogenous forested bog. The medium and lighter lithotypes are interpreted as being deposited in an angiosperm-dominated ombrogenous forest bog that was intolerant of fire. These peat-forming environments are interpreted as being largely controlled by moisture and relative depth to water table. Each environment produces distinct lithotypes and lightening-upwards cycles are interpreted as terrestrialization cycles. As the peat grew upwards and above the water table, less moist conditions prevailed and lighter lithotypes were produced. The observed change in colour, from darker to lighter lithotypes, results from the environment evolving from anaerobic/inundated to less anaerobic/less moist settings via terrestrialization. The thin and laterally extensive light and pale lithotypes that top the cycles are interpreted to represent a residual layer of concentrated, oxidation resistant peat-forming elements that result from intense weathering and aerobic degradation of the peats. At a generic level, modern lowland bogs of South Westland in New Zealand have remarkably similar floral/ecological gradients to those of the Oligo-Miocene Morwell 1B brown coal cycles in Australia. This suggests that modern New Zealand

  20. Neutral nickel ethylene oligo- and polymerization catalysts: towards computational catalyst prediction and design.

    PubMed

    Heyndrickx, Wouter; Occhipinti, Giovanni; Jensen, Vidar R

    2014-06-23

    DFT calculations have been used to elucidate the chain termination mechanisms for neutral nickel ethylene oligo- and polymerization catalysts and to rationalize the kind of oligomers and polymers produced by each catalyst. The catalysts studied are the (κ(2)-O,O)-coordinated (1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-acetylacetonato)nickel catalyst I, the (κ(2)-P,O)-coordinated SHOP-type nickel catalyst II, the (κ(2)-N,O)-coordinated anilinotropone and salicylaldiminato nickel catalysts III and IV, respectively, and the (κ(2)-P,N)-coordinated phosphinosulfonamide nickel catalyst V. Numerous termination pathways involving β-H elimination and β-H transfer steps have been investigated, and the most probable routes identified. Despite the complexity and multitude of the possible termination pathways, the information most critical to chain termination is contained in only few transition states. In addition, by consideration of the propagation pathway, we have been able to estimate chain lengths and discriminate between oligo- and polymerization catalysts. In agreement with experiment, we found the Gibbs free energy difference between the overall barrier for the most facile propagation and termination pathways to be close to 0 kcal mol(-1) for the ethylene oligomerization catalysts I and V, whereas values of at least 7 kcal mol(-1) in favor of propagation were determined for the polymerization catalysts III and IV. Because of the shared intermediates between the termination and branching pathways, we have been able to identify the preferred cis/trans regiochemistry of β-H elimination and show that a pronounced difference in σ donation of the two bridgehead atoms of the bidentate ligand can suppress hydride formation and thus branching. The degree of rationalization obtained here from a handful of key intermediates and transition states is promising for the use of computational methods in the screening and prediction of new catalysts of the title class.

  1. A Star-shaped Oligo(phenylenevinylene) Liquid Crystal Host with an Anthracene Guest-A Double Nanosegregating Supermesogen.

    PubMed

    Maier, Philipp; Grüne, Matthias; Lehmann, Matthias

    2017-01-23

    Hexasubstituted C3 -symmetric benzenes with three elongated shape-persistent oligo(phenylenevinylene) arms and three pyridyl hydrogen-bond acceptors have been synthesized. These mesogens assemble in a double-helical columnar liquid crystal (LC) structure, owing to the compensation of free spaces between conjugated arms by dimer formation. The void is filled also by up to three anthracene carboxylic acids as guests forming hydrogen bonded supermesogens assembling in columnar LC and soft-crystal phases. Thin film fluorescence and solid-state NMR spectroscopy imply a transition from a disordered columnar LC to an unexpected double nanosegregated morphology of a filled soft columnar crystal phase. An additional intracolumnar separation of anthracene and oligo(phenylenevinylene) chromophores occurs, separate to the general segregation of aliphatic and aromatic building blocks in LC structures. The new type of supermesogens will enable the rational design of host-guest double cables with a wide range of different conjugated building blocks.

  2. Analysis of 14-3-3 Family Member Function in Xenopus Embryos by Microinjection of Antisense Morpholino Oligos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Jeffrey M. C.; Muslin, Anthony J.

    The 14-3-3 intracellular phosphoserine/threonine-binding proteins are adapter molecules that regulate signal transduction, cell cycle, nutrient sensing, apoptotic, and cytoskeletal pathways. There are seven 14-3-3 family members, encoded by separate genes, in vertebrate organisms. To evaluate the role of individual 14-3-3 proteins in vertebrate embryonic development, we utilized an antisense morpholino oligo microinjection technique in Xenopus laevis embryos. By use of this method, we showed that embryos lacking specific 14-3-3 proteins displayed unique phenotypic abnormalities. Specifically, embryos lacking 14-3-3 τ exhibited gastrulation and axial patterning defects, but embryos lacking 14-3-3 γ exhibited eye defects without other abnormalities, and embryos lacking 14-3-3 ζ appeared completely normal. These and other results demonstrate the power and specificity of the morpholino antisense oligo microinjection technique.

  3. Fluorescent monitoring of copper-occupancy in His-ended catalytic oligo-peptides.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Reina; Kawano, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    Controlled generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is widely beneficial to various medical, environmental, and agricultural studies. As inspired by the functional motifs in natural proteins, our group has been engaged in development of catalytically active oligo-peptides as minimum-sized metalloenzymes for generation of superoxide anion, an active member of ROS. In such candidate molecules, catalytically active metal-binding minimal motif was determined to be X-X-H, where X can be most amino acids followed by His. Based on above knowledge, we have designed a series of minimal copper-binding peptides designated as G n H series peptides, which are composed of oligo-glycyl chains ended with C-terminal His residue such as GGGGGH sequence (G5H). In order to further study the role of copper binding to the peptidic catalysts sharing the X-X-H motif such as G5H-conjugated peptides, we should be able to score the occupancy of the peptide population by copper ion in the reaction mixture. Here, model peptides with Cu-binding affinity which show intrinsic fluorescence due to tyrosyl residue (Y) in the UV region (excitation at ca. 230 and 280 nm, and emission at ca. 320 nm) were synthesized to score the effect of copper occupancy. Synthesized peptides include GFP-derived fluorophore sequence, TFSYGVQ (designated as Gfp), and Gfp sequence fused to C-terminal G5H (Gfp-G5H). In addition, two Y-containing tri-peptides derived from natural GFP fluorophores, namely, TYG and SYG were fused to the G5H (TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H). Conjugation of metal-binding G5H sequence to GFP-fluorophore peptide enhanced the action of Cu(2+) on quenching of intrinsic fluorescence due to Y residue. Two other Y-containing peptides, TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H, also showed intrinsic fluorescence which is sensitive to addition of Cu(2+). There was linear relationship between the loading of Cu(2+) and the quenching of fluorescence in these peptide, suggesting that Cu(2+)-dependent quenching of Y

  4. Oligo-Miocene Deposition Along the Eastern Margin of the Altiplano Plateau, Salla, Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leier, A. L.; Long, S.; McQuarrie, N.

    2006-12-01

    The Eastern Cordillera of the Bolivian Andes forms the eastern boundary of the Altiplano plateau, an internally- drained hinterland basin that occupies an area of 150,000 km2 and has an average elevation of 4 km. Almost all tectonic models of the region indicate an important causal relationship existed between early Tertiary deformation in the Eastern Cordillera and initial development of the Altiplano plateau. We examined Oligo- Miocene strata deposited along the eastern margin of the Altiplano plateau and within the Eastern Cordillera near the village of Salla (100 km south of La Paz) to constrain the depositional and deformational history of the region. Stratigraphic units in the study area consist of the Oligocene Luribay Conglomerate and the overlying Oligo-Miocene Salla Beds. The Luribay Conglomerate comprises up to 500 m of pebble- to boulder- conglomerate with interbedded coarse-grained sandstone. Clast-compositions, thicknesses, facies, and paleocurrent directions vary considerably between outcrop exposures. Conglomerate beds were deposited by gravity flows in alluvial fan settings and by traction transport in fluvial systems. Growth strata within the Luribay Conglomerate record syn-deformational deposition. The overlying Salla Beds consist of roughly 500 m of clay- and siltstone, with minor amounts of sandstone and rare conglomerate lenses. Extensive evidence of pedogenesis within the succession suggests the region was characterized by well-drained interfluve environments during Late Oligocene-Early Miocene time. Although the Salla Beds are folded and faulted, they are generally less deformed than the underlying Luribay Conglomerate. Deposition near Salla commenced during Oligocene time in a number of discrete basins separated from one another by topographic highs, which were produced by upper crustal folding and faulting in the west verging portion of the Andean fold-thrust belt. Sediments within these basins were derived from local sources and deposited

  5. Fluorescent monitoring of copper-occupancy in His-ended catalytic oligo-peptides

    PubMed Central

    Inokuchi, Reina; Kawano, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Controlled generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is widely beneficial to various medical, environmental, and agricultural studies. As inspired by the functional motifs in natural proteins, our group has been engaged in development of catalytically active oligo-peptides as minimum-sized metalloenzymes for generation of superoxide anion, an active member of ROS. In such candidate molecules, catalytically active metal-binding minimal motif was determined to be X-X-H, where X can be most amino acids followed by His. Based on above knowledge, we have designed a series of minimal copper-binding peptides designated as GnH series peptides, which are composed of oligo-glycyl chains ended with C-terminal His residue such as GGGGGH sequence (G5H). In order to further study the role of copper binding to the peptidic catalysts sharing the X-X-H motif such as G5H-conjugated peptides, we should be able to score the occupancy of the peptide population by copper ion in the reaction mixture. Here, model peptides with Cu-binding affinity which show intrinsic fluorescence due to tyrosyl residue (Y) in the UV region (excitation at ca. 230 and 280 nm, and emission at ca. 320 nm) were synthesized to score the effect of copper occupancy. Synthesized peptides include GFP-derived fluorophore sequence, TFSYGVQ (designated as Gfp), and Gfp sequence fused to C-terminal G5H (Gfp-G5H). In addition, two Y-containing tri-peptides derived from natural GFP fluorophores, namely, TYG and SYG were fused to the G5H (TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H). Conjugation of metal-binding G5H sequence to GFP-fluorophore peptide enhanced the action of Cu2+ on quenching of intrinsic fluorescence due to Y residue. Two other Y-containing peptides, TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H, also showed intrinsic fluorescence which is sensitive to addition of Cu2+. There was linear relationship between the loading of Cu2+ and the quenching of fluorescence in these peptide, suggesting that Cu2+-dependent quenching of Y

  6. Postdiffusion of oligo-peptide within exponential growth multilayer films for localized peptide delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuefei; Ji, Jian

    2009-10-06

    The multilayers of poly(L-lysine) (PLL) and hyaluronic acid (HA) were constructed by alternating deposition of PLL at high pH and HA at low pH. The exponential growth of the multilayer was proved to be amplified by increasing the pH difference between the two deposition solutions. The exponential growth multilayers of PLL/HA assembled at different pH were utilized as reservoirs for loading a trans-activating transcriptional factor (TAT) peptide. The confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) results indicated that the FITC-labeled TAT could diffuse throughout the exponentially growing PLL/HA film. The amount of peptide embedded within multilayer could be adjusted by both multilayer assembly pH and the TAT loading pH. Compared with (PLL/HA 6.5/6.5)5 multilayer (PLL/HA a/b means that the multilayer film was constructed by using PLL at pH a and HA at pH b), the (PLL/HA 9.5/2.9)5 film can be loaded with more TAT peptide at the same loading pH 6.5. The excess of positively charged TAT peptide within (PLL/HA 9.5/2.9)5 film could not only be ascribed to its extraordinary thickness but also be attributed to its uncompensated negative charge density enhanced by the pH difference between film buildup and peptide loading process. Increasing of the TAT loading pH from 6.5 to 9.5, which increases the pH difference between multilayer assembly and peptide loading process, enhances the uncompensated charge density within (PLL/HA 9.5/2.9)5 film and elevates the peptide density from 13.8 to 25.0 microg/cm2. Compared with direct layer-by-layer assembly of TAT and HA, the postdiffusion of TAT into (PLL/HA 9.5/2.9)5 film was loaded much more peptide. The postdiffusion of peptide into a rapid growth multilayer can be more favorable to load and sustainedly release functional oligo-peptide. The cell culture results indicated that the TAT embedded within the film maintained the ability to traverse across the Hep G2 cell membrane. The functionalized (PLL/HA 9.5/2.9)5 TAT 9.5 film was more

  7. Engineering oligo(ethylene glycol) based nonfouling surfaces and microstructures for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongwei

    This thesis presents the initial development of oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) based "nonfouling"---protein and cell resistant---coatings that can be applied to a wide range of biomedical applications. The hypothesis underlying this work is that a high density of OEG will eliminate nonspecific protein adsorption thus reduce or eradicate undesired surface phenomena, such as poor biocompatibility, which are direct consequences of the nonspecific protein adsorption. A generalized method for creating functionalized nonfouling surfaces was developed by combining two strategies, namely "Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization of Oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl methacrylate (SI-ATRP of OEGMA)" and "Modular design of initiator", demonstrated on gold (metallic materials), glass and silicon oxide (hydroxylated substrates). SI-ATRP was able to achieve an OEG coating with a density higher than all the pre-existing techniques could achieve. It also provided control over the coating thickness and architecture that are not easily controlled by other techniques. Thickness-density profile of poly(OEGMA) was constructed based on SI-ATRP from mixed SAMs on gold. For the first time, we constructed a map of protein resistance of PEG coated surfaces, which reveals the relationship between the poly(OEGMA) coatings and their protein adsorption. Besides its scientific implications, the practical use (from an engineering point of view) of these results is that the information shall be instructive in designing nonfouling surfaces by providing critical structural parameters. This thesis also demonstrates integration of SI-ATRP with micro and nano scale pattern fabrication, which further expands the applications of this technology. In vitro cell culturing on patterned surfaces confirmed that high-density OEG coatings were exceptionally nonfouling even in physiological milieu, which shows great promise for the in vivo study of OEG coatings. A prototype protein microarray was

  8. Preparation of Reactive Oligo(p-Phenylene Vinylene) Materials for Spatial Profiling of the Chemical Reactivity of Intracellular Compartments.

    PubMed

    Nie, Chenyao; Li, Shengliang; Wang, Bing; Liu, Libing; Hu, Rong; Chen, Hui; Lv, Fengting; Dai, Zhihui; Wang, Shu

    2016-05-01

    An oligo(p-phenylene vinylene) derivative (OPV-pfp) functionalized with pentafluorophenol active ester is designed and synthesized. The high reactivity of OPV-pfp with biological small molecules or macromolecules containing amino groups under physiological conditions leads to spectral changes of OPV-pfp; thus, spatial reactivity discrimination for different subcellular structures inside cells is realized by triggering and imaging the fluorescence signal change of the OPV-pfp.

  9. sigReannot: an oligo-set re-annotation pipeline based on similarities with the Ensembl transcripts and Unigene clusters

    PubMed Central

    Casel, Pierrot; Moreews, François; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Klopp, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Background Microarray is a powerful technology enabling to monitor tens of thousands of genes in a single experiment. Most microarrays are now using oligo-sets. The design of the oligo-nucleotides is time consuming and error prone. Genome wide microarray oligo-sets are designed using as large a set of transcripts as possible in order to monitor as many genes as possible. Depending on the genome sequencing state and on the assembly state the knowledge of the existing transcripts can be very different. This knowledge evolves with the different genome builds and gene builds. Once the design is done the microarrays are often used for several years. The biologists working in EADGENE expressed the need of up-to-dated annotation files for the oligo-sets they share including information about the orthologous genes of model species, the Gene Ontology, the corresponding pathways and the chromosomal location. Results The results of SigReannot on a chicken micro-array used in the EADGENE project compared to the initial annotations show that 23% of the oligo-nucleotide gene annotations were not confirmed, 2% were modified and 1% were added. The interest of this up-to-date annotation procedure is demonstrated through the analysis of real data previously published. Conclusion SigReannot uses the oligo-nucleotide design procedure criteria to validate the probe-gene link and the Ensembl transcripts as reference for annotation. It therefore produces a high quality annotation based on reference gene sets. PMID:19615116

  10. Effect of Backbone Design on Hybridization Thermodynamics of Oligo-nucleic Acids: A Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Jayaraman, Arthi

    DNA hybridization is the basis of various bio-nano technologies, such as DNA origami and assembly of DNA-functionalized nanoparticles. A hybridized double stranded (ds) DNA is formed when complementary nucleobases on hybridizing strands exhibit specific and directional hydrogen bonds through canonical Watson-Crick base-pairing interactions. In recent years, the need for cheaper alternatives and significant synthetic advances have driven design of DNA mimics with new backbone chemistries. However, a fundamental understanding of how these backbone modifications in the oligo-nucleic acids impact the hybridization and melting behavior of the duplex is still lacking. In this talk, we present our recent findings on impact of varying backbone chemistry on hybridization of oligo-nucleic acid duplexes. We use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to isolate the effect of strand flexibility, electrostatic interactions and nucleobase spacing on the melting curves for duplexes with various strand sequences and concentrations. Since conjugation of oligo-nucleic acids with polymers serve as building blocks for thermo-responsive polymer networks and gels, we also present the effect of such conjugation on hybridization thermodynamics and polymer conformation.

  11. Preparation, composition analysis and antioxidant activities of konjac oligo-glucomannan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianhua; Xu, Qiuhong; Zhang, Jingjing; Zhou, Xuxia; Lyu, Fei; Zhao, Peicheng; Ding, Yuting

    2015-10-05

    Konjac oligo-glucomannan (KOG) was prepared by degradation of konjac glucomannan (KG) using β-mannanase. The hydrolysis process was monitored by the viscosity of the enzymatic hydrolysates. Factors affecting the enzymatic hydrolysis of KG were investigated, and the optimum hydrolysis conditions were as follows: time 2h; temperature 50°C; pH 6.0; and enzymatic concentration 150 U/g. Under these optimized conditions, minimum viscosity (31.9 mPa·s) of the hydrolasate was obtained. The average degree of polymerization (DP) of the resulting KOG was approximately equal to 5.2. The results of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of KG and KOG indicated that KG was successfully degraded. In addition, their antioxidant activities were evaluated by determination of hydroxyl radical (•OH) and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhrazyl radical (•DPPH) scavenging activity, and determination of reducing power. The results showed that KOG exhibited significant antioxidant activities. Taken together, this study suggested that KOG could potentially be used as a natural antioxidant.

  12. Correlation of length of linear oligo(ethanamino) amides with gene transfer and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Claudia; Kos, Petra; Leclercq, Laurent; Jin, Xiaoyun; Cottet, Hervé; Wagner, Ernst

    2014-09-01

    The optimization of synthetic carriers for gene transfer remains a major challenge. Cationic polymers such as polyethylenimine (PEI) often show increasing gene transfer activity with increasing molecular weight, but this favorable effect is accompanied by an undesired increase in cytotoxicity. Moreover, the polydispersity of polymers prevents accurate determination of optimum size. Herein we describe the step-by-step elongation of precise linear oligo(ethanamino) amides by making use of the artificial amino acid succinoyl-tetraethylene pentamine (Stp) for solid-phase-assisted synthesis. This procedure enabled us to identify the optimal oligomer Stp30-W (8.4 kDa) with a length of 30 Stp units, with which effective gene transfer occurs in the absence of cytotoxicity. The transfection efficiency of Stp30-W exceeded that of standard linear PEI (22 kDa) by sixfold; nevertheless, Stp30-W exhibited tenfold lower cytotoxicity. In addition to the lower molecular weight, the succinate spacer between the oligoamine units may also contribute to the favorable biocompatibility. The cytotoxicity of the cationic polymer PEI is a major concern for use as a carrier for gene delivery, so this comparison between linear PEI and the new Stp oligomers is particularly relevant.

  13. Ladder Oligo(m-aniline)s: Derivatives of Azaacenes with Cross-Conjugated [pi]-Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rajca, Andrzej; Boraty; #324; ski, Przemys; #322; aw J.; Olankitwanit, Arnon; Shiraishi, Kouichi; Pink, Maren; Rajca, Suchada

    2012-04-30

    We describe the synthesis and electronic properties of ladder oligomers of poly(m-aniline) that may be considered as derivatives of azaacenes with cross-conjugated {pi}-systems. Syntheses of ladder oligo(m-aniline)s with 9 and 13 collinearly fused six-membered rings employed Pd-catalyzed aminations and Friedel-Crafts-based ring closures. Structures were confirmed by either X-ray crystallography or correlations between DFT-computed and experimental spectroscopic data such as {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N NMR chemical shifts and electronic absorption spectra. All compounds have planar 'azaacene' moieties. The experimental band gaps E{sub g} {approx} 3.5-3.65 eV, determined by the UV-vis absorption onsets, were in agreement with the TD-DFT-computed vertical excitation energies to the S{sub 1} state. Fluorescence quantum yields of up to 20% were found. Electrochemically estimated HOMO energies of -4.8 eV suggested propensity for a facile one-electron oxidation and just sufficient environmental stability toward oxygen (O{sub 2}). For two oligomers with 'tetraazanonacene' moieties, potentials of E{sup 4+/3+} {approx} 1.6-1.7 V vs SCE were determined for four-electron oxidation to the corresponding tetraradical tetracations.

  14. RSC remodeling of oligo-nucleosomes: an atomic force microscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Montel, Fabien; Castelnovo, Martin; Menoni, Hervé; Angelov, Dimitar; Dimitrov, Stefan; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine

    2011-01-01

    The ‘remodels structure of chromatin’ (RSC) complex is an essential chromatin remodeling factor that is required for the control of several processes including transcription, repair and replication. The ability of RSC to relocate centrally positioned mononucleosomes at the end of nucleosomal DNA is firmly established, but the data on RSC action on oligo-nucleosomal templates remains still scarce. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we have quantitatively studied the RSC-induced mobilization of positioned di- and trinucleosomes as well as the directionality of mobilization on mononucleosomal template labeled at one end with streptavidin. AFM imaging showed only a limited set of distinct configurational states for the remodeling products. No stepwise or preferred directionality of the nucleosome motion was observed. Analysis of the corresponding reaction pathways allows deciphering the mechanistic features of RSC-induced nucleosome relocation. The final outcome of RSC remodeling of oligosome templates is the packing of the nucleosomes at the edge of the template, providing large stretches of DNA depleted of nucleosomes. This feature of RSC may be used by the cell to overcome the barrier imposed by the presence of nucleosomes. PMID:21138962

  15. Toward Multiple Conductance Pathways with Heterocycle-Based Oligo(phenyleneethynylene) Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Delia; Álvarez de Cienfuegos, Luis; Martín-Lasanta, Ana; Morcillo, Sara P; Zotti, Linda A; Leary, Edmund; Bürkle, Marius; Asai, Yoshihiro; Jurado, Rocío; Cárdenas, Diego J; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Agraït, Nicolás; Cuerva, Juan M; González, M Teresa

    2015-11-04

    In this paper, we have systematically studied how the replacement of a benzene ring by a heterocyclic compound in oligo(phenyleneethynylene) (OPE) derivatives affects the conductance of a molecular wire using the scanning tunneling microscope-based break junction technique. We describe for the first time how OPE derivatives with a central pyrimidine ring can efficiently link to the gold electrode by two pathways presenting two different conductance G values. We have demonstrated that this effect is associated with the presence of two efficient conductive pathways of different length: the conventional end-to-end configuration, and another with one of the electrodes linked directly to the central ring. This represents one of the few examples in which two defined conductive states can be set up in a single molecule without the aid of an external stimulus. Moreover, we have observed that the conductance through the full length of the heterocycle-based OPEs is basically unaffected by the presence of the heterocycle. All these results and the simplicity of the proposed molecules push forward the development of compounds with multiple conductance pathways, which would be a breakthrough in the field of molecular electronics.

  16. The Oligo-Miocene of Eil (NE Somalia): a prograding coral- Lepidocyclina system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosellini, A.; Russo, A.; Arush, M. A.; Cabdulqadir, M. M.

    The Oligo-Miocene succession of Eil is the product of a depositional regression and constitutes a 120-150 m thick depositional sequence that prograded seaward for at least 20-25 km. Its time-transgressive stratigraphy is documented physically by well exposed tangential clinoforms (previously considered as evidence of a tectonic coastal flexure) and biostratigraphically by the occurrence of calcareous nannoplankton, planktonic and benthonic foraminifera, and a rich coral fauna. The upper boundary of the sequence is indicated by a reefal toplap, which constitutes the flat surface of the Nogal Plateau. Age (Chattian to Burdigalian) and toplap relationships of the sequence indicate clearly that progradation took place after the Late Oligocene flooding which followed the strong fall of sea-level during the Chattian. Because of the horizontal geometry of the entire sedimentary system, it has been possible to make a clear environmental reconstruction and a facies model with original water depths. A worldwide Tertiary facies—the Lepidocyclina beds— was confined to the front of the reef, at depths ranging from 35-40 to 120-130 m.

  17. The role of varicocele sclerotherapy in men with severe oligo-astheno-teratozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Mazen A; Safan, Manal A; Ghanem, Ashraf A; Dohle, Gert R

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the role of antegrade scrotal sclerotherapy for the treatment of varicoceles in infertile men with severe oligo-astheno-teratozoospermia (OAT). The 59 patients with severe OAT in this study underwent antegrade scrotal sclerotherapy for the treatment of varicoceles. The outcome was assessed in terms of improvement in semen parameters and spontaneous conception rate. Semen parameters and reproductive hormones were evaluated before antegrade sclerotherapy (AS) and 6 months after AS. After an average follow-up time of 34.8±3.2 months, significant improvement was noted in the mean sperm concentration, motility and morphology in 36 patients (61%). Spontaneous pregnancy occurred in nine couples (15%). Six months after treatment, inhibin B levels were significantly higher (P<0.04), whereas follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were significantly lower (P<0.001) than before treatment. Antegrade internal spermatic vein sclerotherapy can significantly improve seminal parameters and hormonal parameters in men with severe OAT and may even result in spontaneous pregnancy in couples who would otherwise be candidates for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI).

  18. Antibacterial Properties of an Oligo-Acyl-Lysyl Hexamer Targeting Gram-Negative Species

    PubMed Central

    Zaknoon, Fadia; Goldberg, Keren; Sarig, Hadar; Epand, Raquel F.; Epand, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Toward developing new tools for fighting resistance to antibiotics, we investigated the antibacterial properties of a new decanoyl-based oligo-acyl-lysyl (OAK) hexamer, aminododecanoyl-lysyl-[aminodecanoyl-lysyl]5 (α12-5α10). The OAK exhibited preferential activity against Gram-negative bacteria (GNB), as determined using 36 strains, including diverse species, with an MIC90 of 6.2 μM. The OAK's bactericidal mode of action was associated with rapid membrane depolarization and cell permeabilization, suggesting that the inner membrane was the primary target, whereas the observed binding affinity to lipoteichoic acid suggested that inefficacy against Gram-positive species resulted from a cell wall interaction preventing α12-5α10 from reaching internal targets. Interestingly, perturbation of the inner membrane structure and function was preserved at sub-MIC values. This prompted us to assess the OAK's effect on the proton motive force-dependent efflux pump AcrAB-TolC, implicated in the low sensitivity of GNB to various antibiotics, including erythromycin. We found that under sub-MIC conditions, wild-type Escherichia coli was significantly more sensitive to erythromycin (the MIC dropped by >10-fold), unlike its acr-deletion mutant. Collectively, the data suggest a useful approach for treating GNB infections through overcoming antibiotic efflux. PMID:22751534

  19. The role of varicocele sclerotherapy in men with severe oligo-astheno-teratozoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Mazen A; Safan, Manal A; Ghanem, Ashraf A; Dohle, Gert R

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the role of antegrade scrotal sclerotherapy for the treatment of varicoceles in infertile men with severe oligo-astheno-teratozoospermia (OAT). The 59 patients with severe OAT in this study underwent antegrade scrotal sclerotherapy for the treatment of varicoceles. The outcome was assessed in terms of improvement in semen parameters and spontaneous conception rate. Semen parameters and reproductive hormones were evaluated before antegrade sclerotherapy (AS) and 6 months after AS. After an average follow-up time of 34.8±3.2 months, significant improvement was noted in the mean sperm concentration, motility and morphology in 36 patients (61%). Spontaneous pregnancy occurred in nine couples (15%). Six months after treatment, inhibin B levels were significantly higher (P<0.04), whereas follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were significantly lower (P<0.001) than before treatment. Antegrade internal spermatic vein sclerotherapy can significantly improve seminal parameters and hormonal parameters in men with severe OAT and may even result in spontaneous pregnancy in couples who would otherwise be candidates for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). PMID:21785440

  20. Masking autoprocessing of Clostridium difficile toxin A by the C-terminus combined repetitive oligo peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongrong; Hamza, Therwa; Gao, Si; Feng, Hanping

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile toxin A and B (TcdA and TcdB) are the major virulence factors of the bacterium, both of which consist of two enzymatic domains: an effector glucosyltransferase domain (GTD) and a cysteine protease domain (CPD) responsible for autocleavage and release of GTD. Although the CPDs from both toxins share a similar structure and mechanism of hexakisphosphate (InsP6) -induced activation, TcdA is substantially less sensitive to the autocleavage as compared with TcdB. In this study, we provided evidence of inter-domain regulation of CPD activity of TcdA and its autoprocessing. The C-terminus combined repetitive oligo peptides (CROPs) of TcdA reduced the accessibility of TcdB CPD to its substrate in a chimeric toxin TxB-Ar, consequently blocking autoprocessing. Moreover, interference of antibodies with the CROPs of full-length TcdA efficiently enhanced its GTD release. In conclusion, by utilizing chimeric toxins and specific antibodies, we identified that the CROPs of TcdA plays a crucial role in controlling the InsP6-mediated activation of CPD and autocleavage of GTD. Our data provides insights on the molecular mode of action of the C. difficile toxins. PMID:25725153

  1. Oligo(phenylenevinylene) hybrids and self-assemblies: versatile materials for excitation energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Praveen, Vakayil K; Ranjith, Choorikkat; Bandini, Elisa; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai; Armaroli, Nicola

    2014-06-21

    Oligo(phenylenevinylene)s (OPVs) are extensively investigated π-conjugated molecules that exhibit absorption and fluorescence in the UV-Vis spectral region, which can be widely tuned by chemical functionalisation and external control (e.g. solvent, temperature, pH). Further modulation of the optoelectronic properties of OPVs is possible by supramolecular aggregation, primarily driven by hydrogen bonding or π-stacking interactions. In recent years, extensive research work has been accomplished in exploiting the unique combination of the structural and electronic properties of OPVs, most of which has been targeted at the preparation of molecules and materials featuring photoinduced energy transfer. This review intends to offer an overview of the multicomponent arrays and self-assembled materials based on OPV which have been designed to undergo energy transfer by means of a thorough choice of excitation donor-acceptor partners. We present a few selected examples of photoactive dyads and triads containing organic moieties (e.g. fullerene, phenanthroline) as well as coordination compounds (Cu(I) complexes). We then focus more extensively on self-assembled materials containing suitably functionalised OPVs that lead to hydrogen bonded aggregates, helical structures, gels, nanoparticles, vesicles, mesostructured organic-inorganic hybrid films, functionalised nanoparticles and quantum dots. In most cases, these materials exhibit luminescence whose colour and intensity is related to the efficiency and direction of the energy transfer processes.

  2. Patients with isolated oligo/hypodontia caused by RUNX2 duplication.

    PubMed

    Molin, Arnaud; Lopez-Cazaux, Serena; Pichon, Olivier; Vincent, Marie; Isidor, Bertrand; Le Caignec, Cédric

    2015-06-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of RUNX2 are responsible for cleidocranial dysplasia, an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by delayed closure of cranial sutures, aplastic or hypoplastic clavicles, moderate short stature and supernumerary teeth. By contrast, an increased gene dosage is expected for duplication of the entire RUNX2 sequence and thus, a phenotype different from cleidocranial dysplasia. To date, two cousins with a duplication including the entire RUNX2 sequence in addition to MIR586, CLIC5 and the 5' half of SUPT3H have been reported. These patients presented with metopic synostosis and hypodontia. Here, we report on a family with an affected mother and three affected children. The four patients carried a 285 kb duplication identified by array comparative genomic hybridization. The duplication includes the entire sequence of RUNX2 and the 5' half of SUPT3H. We confirmed the duplication by real-time quantitative PCR in the four patients. Two children presented with the association of metopic craniosynostosis and oligo/hypodontia previously described, confirming the phenotype caused by RUNX2 duplication. Interestingly, the mother and one child had isolated hypodontia without craniosynostosis, broadening the phenotype observed in patients with such duplications.

  3. Distributional patterns of decapod crustaceans in the circum-Mediterranean area during the Oligo-Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyžný, Matúš

    2015-04-01

    . 80, 83-103. Harzhauser M., Kroh A., Mandic O., Piller W.E., Göhlich U., Reuter M. & Berning B. 2007: Biogeographic responses to geodynamics: a key study all around the Oligo-Miocene Tethyan Seaway. Zool. Anz. 246, 241-256. Harzhauser M., Mandic O. & Zuschin M. 2003: Changes in Paratethyan marine molluscs at the Early/Middle Miocene transition: diversity, palaeogeography and palaeoclimate. Acta Geol. Pol. 53, 323-339. Harzhauser M., Piller W.E. & Steininger F.F. 2002: Circum-Mediterranean Oligo/Miocene Biogeographic Evolution - the Gastropods' Point of View. Palaeogeogr., Palaeoclimatol., Palaeoecol. 183, 103-133. Müller P. 1979: The Indo-West-Pacific character of the Badenian decapod crustaceans of the Paratethys. In: VII International Congress on Mediterranean Neogene. Athens, September 27-October 2. Ann. Géol. Pays Hellén., Tome hors série 2, 865-869. Schweitzer C.E. 2001: Paleobiogeography of Cretaceous and Tertiary decapod crustaceans of the North Pacific Ocean. J. Paleontol. 75, 808-826. Studencka B., Gontsharova I.A. & Popov S.V. 1998: The bivalve faunas as a basis for reconstruction of the Middle Miocene history of the Paratethys. Acta Geol. Pol. 48, 285-342.

  4. Crystalline oligo(ethylene sulfide) domains define highly stable supramolecular block copolymer assemblies.

    SciTech Connect

    Brubaker, Carrie E.; Velluto, Diana; Demurtas, Davide; Phelps, Edward A.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-07-01

    With proper control over copolymer design and solvation conditions, self-assembled materials display impressive morphological variety that encompasses nanoscale colloids as well as bulk three-dimensional architectures. Here we take advantage of both hydrophobicity and crystallinity to mediate supra-molecular self-assembly of spherical micellar, linear fibrillar, or hydrogel structures by a family of highly asymmetric poly(ethylene glycol)-b-oligo(ethylene sulfide) (PEG-OES) copolymers. Assembly structural polymorphism was achieved with modification of PEG-OES topology (linear versus multiarm) and with precise, monomer-by-monomer control of OES length. Notably, all three morphologies were accessed utilizing OES oligomers with degrees of polymerization as short as three. These exceptionally small assembly forming blocks represent the first application of ethylene sulfide oligomers in supramolecular materials. While the assemblies demonstrated robust aqueous stability over time, oxidation by hydrogen peroxide progressively converted ethylene sulfide residues to increasingly hydrophilic and amorphous sulfoxides and sulfones, causing morphological changes and permanent disassembly. We utilized complementary microscopic and spectroscopic techniques to confirm this chemical stimulus-responsive behavior in self-assembled PEG-OES colloidal dispersions and physical gels. In addition to inherent stimulus-responsive behavior, fibrillar assemblies demonstrated biologically relevant molecular delivery, as confirmed by the dose-dependent activation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells following fibril-mediated delivery of the immunological adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A. In physical gels composed of either linear or multiarm PEG-OES precursors, rheologic analysis also identified mechanical stimulus-responsive shear thinning behavior. Thanks to the facile preparation, user-defined morphology, aqueous stability, carrier functionality, and stimuli-responsive behaviors of

  5. Tectonics and sedimentation of Oligo-Miocene Vasquez Formation, Soledad basin, southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrix, E.D.

    1987-05-01

    The nonmarine Oligo-Miocene Vasquez Formation represents the earliest sedimentation within the Soledad basin. Basin analysis of this unit provides important clues to the tectonic regimen during the convergent/transform-margin transition in southern California during the mid-Tertiary. The Vasquez crops out in three separate subbasins or depocenters; from south to north, these are the Vasquez Rocks, Texas Canyon, and Charlie Canyon subbasins. Basaltic-andesitic volcanism and rapid subsidence punctuated the initial rifting event which generated the Vasquez Rocks half-graben and Texas Canyon graben. Small, thick alluvial fans were shed into these two subbasins, with sediment derived via erosion of local plutonic, metamorphic, and volcanic source terranes. A minimum of four discrete uplift events generated development of 250 to 600-m thick, upward-fining alluvial megacycles in both the Vasquez Rocks and Texas Canyon depocenters. In the absence of biostratigraphic control, these allocyclic megasequences provide a tangible means of lithostratigraphic correlation between these separate subbasins. A major uplift and drainage basin reorganization event subsequently modified the Vasquez depositional system, facilitating physical interconnection of the two southern subbasins. The northernmost subbasin, Charlie Canyon, is characterized by a single, thick, upward-coarsening alluvial fan sequence. There are no megacycles or clast suites to suggest interconnection with or evolutionary similarities to the other two depocenters. This sedimentologic uniqueness may support a mid-Tertiary palinspastic reconstruction which places the Charlie Canyon region 80-100 km northwest of its current location. Soledad basin rifting and Vasquez sedimentation are consistent with a tectonic model involving lithospheric extension north of the unstable Mendocino triple junction.

  6. Dispersion of Vesicles Composed of Industrially Produced Alkyl (Oligo) Glucoside Using Diol-Boron Complexation.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Tatsuo; Asano, Yuuka; Kondo, Takeshi; Yuasa, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    Alkyl (oligo)glucosides (AOG) are known to be environmentally compatible amphiphiles whose commercial applicability should be broadened. The present paper describes the preparation of molecular assemblies of industrially produced AOG, which is a mixture composed of different length of alkyl chains (C9-C12) with oligoglucoside moiety with a few (1-3) of glucose units. It was also described that regulation of the dispersibility of the molecular assemblies prepared by diol-boron complexation between the sugar moiety on AOG and boric acid in a dispersion medium. The molecular assembly of AOG was successfully formed by mixing AOG and cholesterols (CH). When using a suitable amount of CH (20-40 mol% with respect to AOG), the molecular assembly formed a vesicle structure. The dispersion ability of the resulting vesicle was dependent on both the boric acid concentration and pH of the dispersion medium. The light-scattering and ζ-potential measurements revealed that high concentrations (≥10 mM) of boric acid improved dispersibility the vesicles. In contrast, the vesicle agglomerated at low concentrations of boric acid (1-7.5 mM). In the absence of boric acid in dispersion medium, the vesicles were completely agglomerated. The optimum pH range for vesicle dispersion was found to be from neutral to basic (7.4-10.1). The (11)B NMR study revealed that borate ester formation occurred between boric acid and the diol of the sugar moiety on AOG vesicle. The present data suggest that borate ester formation that occurred on the surface of the vesicle provided negative charge to the vesicles, contributing to their dispersion via repulsive forces.

  7. Production of multi-, oligo- and single-pore membranes using a continuous ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, P. Yu.; Ivanov, O. M.; Lizunov, N. E.; Mamonova, T. I.; Nechaev, A. N.; Olejniczak, K.; Vacik, J.; Dmitriev, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Ion track membranes (ITM) have attracted significant interest over the past two decades due to their numerous applications in physical, biological, chemical, biochemical and medical experimental works. A particular feature of ITM technology is the possibility to fabricate samples with a predetermined number of pores, including single-pore membranes. The present report describes a procedure that allowed for the production of multi-, oligo- and single-pore membranes using a continuous ion beam from an IC-100 cyclotron. The beam was scanned over a set of small diaphragms, from 17 to ∼1000 μm in diameter. Ions passed through the apertures and impinged two sandwiched polymer foils, with the total thickness close to the ion range in the polymer. The foils were pulled across the ion beam at a constant speed. The ratio between the transport speed and the scanning frequency determined the distance between irradiation spots. The beam intensity and the aperture diameters were adjusted such that either several, one or no ions passed through the diaphragms during one half-period of scanning. After irradiation, the lower foil was separated from the upper foil and was etched to obtain pores 6-8 μm in diameter. The pores were found using a color chemical reaction between two reagents placed on opposite sides of the foil. The located pores were further confirmed using SEM and optical microscopy. The numbers of tracks in the irradiation spots were consistent with the Poisson statistics. Samples with single or few tracks obtained in this way were employed to study fine phenomena in ion track nanopores.

  8. Oligo(ethylene glycol)-functionalized disiloxanes as electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengcheng; Dong, Jian; West, Robert; Amine, Khalil

    Functionalized disiloxane compounds were synthesized by attaching oligo(ethylene glycol) chains, -(CH 2CH 2O)- n, n = 2-7, via hydrosilation, dehydrocoupling, and nucleophilic substitution reactions and were examined as non-aqueous electrolyte solvents in lithium-ion cells. The compounds were fully characterized by 1H, 13C, and 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Upon doping with lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB) or LiPF 6, the disiloxane electrolytes showed conductivities up to 6.2 × 10 -4 S cm -1 at room temperature. The thermal behavior of the electrolytes was studied by differential scanning calorimetry, which revealed very low glass transition temperatures before and after LiBOB doping and much higher thermal stability compared to organic carbonate electrolytes. Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed that disiloxane-based electrolytes with 0.8 M LiBOB salt concentration are stable to 4.7 V. The LiBOB/disiloxane combinations were found to be good electrolytes for lithium-ion cells; unlike LiPF 6, LiBOB can provide a good passivation film on the graphite anode. The LiPF 6/disiloxane electrolyte was enabled in lithium-ion cells by adding 1 wt% vinyl ethylene carbonate (VEC). Full cell performance tests with LiNi 0.80Co 0.15Al 0.05O 2 as the cathode and mesocarbon microbead (MCMB) graphite as the anode show stable cyclability. The results demonstrate that disiloxane-based electrolytes have considerable potential as electrolytes for use in lithium-ion batteries.

  9. Crystalline Oligo(ethylene sulfide) Domains Define Highly Stable Supramolecular Block Copolymer Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Brubaker, Carrie E; Velluto, Diana; Demurtas, Davide; Phelps, Edward A; Hubbell, Jeffrey A

    2015-07-28

    With proper control over copolymer design and solvation conditions, self-assembled materials display impressive morphological variety that encompasses nanoscale colloids as well as bulk three-dimensional architectures. Here we take advantage of both hydrophobicity and crystallinity to mediate supramolecular self-assembly of spherical micellar, linear fibrillar, or hydrogel structures by a family of highly asymmetric poly(ethylene glycol)-b-oligo(ethylene sulfide) (PEG-OES) copolymers. Assembly structural polymorphism was achieved with modification of PEG-OES topology (linear versus multiarm) and with precise, monomer-by-monomer control of OES length. Notably, all three morphologies were accessed utilizing OES oligomers with degrees of polymerization as short as three. These exceptionally small assembly forming blocks represent the first application of ethylene sulfide oligomers in supramolecular materials. While the assemblies demonstrated robust aqueous stability over time, oxidation by hydrogen peroxide progressively converted ethylene sulfide residues to increasingly hydrophilic and amorphous sulfoxides and sulfones, causing morphological changes and permanent disassembly. We utilized complementary microscopic and spectroscopic techniques to confirm this chemical stimulus-responsive behavior in self-assembled PEG-OES colloidal dispersions and physical gels. In addition to inherent stimulus-responsive behavior, fibrillar assemblies demonstrated biologically relevant molecular delivery, as confirmed by the dose-dependent activation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells following fibril-mediated delivery of the immunological adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A. In physical gels composed of either linear or multiarm PEG-OES precursors, rheologic analysis also identified mechanical stimulus-responsive shear thinning behavior. Thanks to the facile preparation, user-defined morphology, aqueous stability, carrier functionality, and stimuli-responsive behaviors of

  10. High-throughput marker discovery in melon using a self-designed oligo microarray

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Genetic maps constitute the basis of breeding programs for many agricultural organisms. The creation of these maps is dependent on marker discovery. Melon, among other crops, is still lagging in genomic resources, limiting the ability to discover new markers in a high-throughput fashion. One of the methods used to search for molecular markers is DNA hybridization to microarrays. Microarray hybridization of DNA from different accessions can reveal differences between them--single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs). These SFPs can be used as markers for breeding purposes, or they can be converted to conventional markers by sequencing. This method has been utilized in a few different plants to discover genetic variation, using Affymetrix arrays that exist for only a few organisms. We applied this approach with some modifications for marker discovery in melon. Results Using a custom-designed oligonucleotide microarray based on a partial EST collection of melon, we discovered 6184 putative SFPs between the parents of our mapping population. Validation by sequencing of 245 SFPs from the two parents showed a sensitivity of around 79%. Most SFPs (81%) contained single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Testing the SFPs on another mapping population of melon confirmed that many of them are conserved. Conclusion Thousands of new SFPs that can be used for genetic mapping and molecular-assisted breeding in melon were discovered using a custom-designed oligo microarray. A portion of these SFPs are conserved and can be used in different breeding populations. Although improvement of the discovery rate is still needed, this approach is applicable to many agricultural systems with limited genomic resources. PMID:20426811

  11. Foamed oligo(poly(ethylene glycol)fumarate) hydrogels as versatile prefabricated scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Henke, Matthias; Baumer, Julia; Blunk, Torsten; Tessmar, Joerg

    2014-03-01

    Radically cross-linked hydrogels are frequently used as cell carriers due to their excellent biocompatibility and their tissue-like mechanical properties. Through frequent investigation, PEG-based polymers such as oligo(poly(ethylene glycol)fumarate [OPF] have proven to be especially suitable as cell carriers by encapsulating cells during hydrogel formation. In some cases, NaCl or biodegradable gelatin microparticles were added prior to cross-linking in order to provide space for the proliferating cells, which would otherwise stay embedded in the hydrogel matrix. However, all of these immediate cross-linking procedures involve time consuming sample preparation and sterilization directly before cell culture and often show notable swelling after their preparation. In this study, ready to use OPF-hydrogel scaffolds were prepared by gas foaming, freeze drying, individual packing into bags and subsequent γ-sterilization. The scaffolds could be stored and used "off-the-shelf" without any need for further processing prior to cell culture. Thus the handling was simplified and the sterility of the cell carrier was assured. Further improvement of the gel system was achieved using a two component injectable system, which may be used for homogenous injection molding in order to create individually shaped three dimensional scaffolds. In order to evaluate the suitability of the scaffolds for tissue engineering, constructs were seeded with juvenile bovine chondrocytes and cultured for 28 days. Cross-sections of the respective constructs showed an intense and homogenous red staining of GAG with safranin O, indicating a homogenous cell distribution within the scaffolds and the production of substantial amounts of GAG-rich matrix.

  12. Temperature-dependent control of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms and virulence by thermoresponsive oligo(N-vinylcaprolactam).

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Yong-Guy; Lee, Kayeon; Kim, Seong-Cheol; Lee, Jintae

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial biofilms are associated with persistent infections because they are highly tolerant of antimicrobial agents, and in the case of Staphylococcus aureus, which is a leading cause of nosocomial infections because of its resistance to diverse antibiotics, biofilm formation is a known mechanism of drug resistance. In the present study, we investigated the ability of thermoresponsive oligo (N-vinylcaprolactam) (OVCL) to control biofilm formation by and the virulence of S. aureus. One synthetic and four commercial OVCLs (MW ≤ 240,000) at 50 µg/mL were found to increase S. aureus biofilm formation 7-fold at 25 °C, but to markedly inhibit S. aureus biofilm formation at 37 °C. Confocal and scanning electron microscopy confirmed the temperature-dependent effect of OVCL on S. aureus biofilms. It was found that the addition of OVCL to S. aureus culture caused cells to become dramatically more hydrophilic at 37 °C, which partially supports the biofilm reduction. Also, transcriptional analysis showed that OVCL temperature-dependently regulated biofilm-related genes (aur, agrA, and icaA) in S. aureus. In addition, it was found surface coatings containing OVCL effectively controlled S. aureus biofilm formation on solid glass surfaces. Furthermore, OVCL inhibited the hemolysis of human red blood cells by S. aureus at 37 °C and attenuated S. aureus virulence in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. These results suggest that OVCL has potential use for controlling bacterial biofilm formation and virulence.

  13. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  14. Rapid Synthesis of a Long Double-Stranded Oligonucleotide from a Single-Stranded Nucleotide Using Magnetic Beads and an Oligo Library

    PubMed Central

    Pengpumkiat, Sumate; Koesdjojo, Myra; Rowley, Erik R.; Mockler, Todd C.; Remcho, Vincent T.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical synthesis of oligonucleotides is a widely used tool in the field of biochemistry. Several methods for gene synthesis have been introduced in the growing area of genomics. In this paper, a novel method of constructing dsDNA is proposed. Short (28-mer) oligo fragments from a library were assembled through successive annealing and ligation processes, followed by PCR. First, two oligo fragments annealed to form a dsDNA molecule. The double-stranded oligo was immobilized onto magnetic beads (solid support) via streptavidin-biotin binding. Next, single-stranded oligo fragments were added successively through ligation to form the complete DNA molecule. The synthesized DNA was amplified through PCR and gel electrophoresis was used to characterize the product. Sanger sequencing showed that more than 97% of the nucleotides matched the expected sequence. Extending the length of the DNA molecule by adding single-stranded oligonucleotides from a basis set (library) via ligation enables a more convenient and rapid mechanism for the design and synthesis of oligonucleotides on the go. Coupled with an automated dispensing system and libraries of short oligo fragments, this novel DNA synthesis method would offer an efficient and cost-effective method for producing dsDNA. PMID:26930667

  15. Immobilization of Antibody on a Cyclic Olefin Copolymer Surface with Functionalizable, Non-Biofouling Poly[Oligo(Ethylene Glycol) Methacrylate].

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung Pyo; Kang, Sung Min; Hong, Daewha; Lee, Hee-Yoon; Choi, Insung S; Ko, Sangwon; Lee, Jungkyu K

    2015-02-01

    We report a perfluoroaryl azide-based photoreaction for synthesizing functionalizable and nonbiofouling poly[oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate] (pOEGMA) films on a chemically inert COC substrate, and an estimation of a surface coverage of the antibody immobilized onto the surface with the immuno-gold nanoparticles. The processes were confirmed by water contact angle measurement, FT-IR spectroscopy, and FE-SEM. The strategy demonstrated in this work could be applied to functionalizations of other polymeric materials and determination of the binding capacity of analytes in biosensors and microfluidic devices.

  16. OligoPrep PVA support for oligonucleotide synthesis in columns on a scale up to 10 micromol.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Sheena; Anderson, Emma

    2007-01-01

    OligoPrep is a macroporous polyvinylacetate (PVA) biodegradable support that has been designed for cost-effective automated synthesis of oligonucleotides using standard phosphoramidite chemistry. Originally developed for large-scale oligonucleotide synthesis in beds and reactors, we present here its utility for medium-scale work of 1-10 micromol in column syntheses on standard DNA synthesizers. We show how an increase in scale, and, therefore, yield, can be achieved without significant increase in reagent quantity. Additional deblock and oxidation cycles can provide high coupling yields, and the use of concentrated ammonia in aqueous methylamine (AMA) for oligonucleotide cleavage and deprotection results in excellent recovery.

  17. Gene expression profiling in common cormorant liver with an oligo array: assessing the potential toxic effects of environmental contaminants.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Kei; Iwata, Hisato; Kim, Eun-Young; Tashiro, Kosuke; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2006-02-01

    To establish a monitoring system for gene expression profiles related to chemical contamination in wild common cormorants (Phalacrocorax carbo), the present study constructed an oligo array designed from expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences of the cormorant liver, where 1061 unique oligonucleotides were spotted. Common cormorants were collected from Lake Biwa, Japan in May 2001 and 2002. With the use of this oligo array, gene expression profiles in the liver of individual specimens were evaluated. To determine the expression patterns of genes altered by environmental contaminants, relationships between concentrations of persistent organochlorines including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, furans, polychlorinated biphenyls, 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane and its metabolites (DDTs), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs), chlordane compounds (CHLs), butyltins, and bisphenol A (BPA) and expression levels of each gene in the cormorant liver were examined using stepwise multiple regression analysis. The reliability of data obtained by the oligo array was further confirmed by quantifying the expression levels of certain genes using real-time RT-PCR. The 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin toxic equivalent (TEQ) level was positively correlated with both cytochrome P4501A4 and 1A5 gene expression. In addition, the mRNA level of an antioxidant enzyme, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, was negatively correlated with hepatic total TEQ. Other antioxidant enzymes, glutathione peroxidase 3 and glutathione S-transferase class mu, were negatively correlated with HCHs and BPA levels, respectively. The mRNA expression level of a nonenzymatic antioxidant, haptoglobin, was negatively but not significantly correlated with CHLs. These results led to a hypothesis that wild cormorant population may suffer from oxidative stress due to chemically induced formation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent reduction of antioxidant resistance. Thus, the cormorant oligo array may be

  18. Optimization of Aqueous SI-ATRP Grafting of Poly(Oligo(Ethylene Glycol) Methacrylate) Brushes from Benzyl Chloride Macroinitiator Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rodda, Andrew E; Ercole, Francesca; Nisbet, David R; Forsythe, John S; Meagher, Laurence

    2015-06-01

    Poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) (pOEGMA) brushes were grafted via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) from a poly(styrene-co-vinylbenzyl chloride) macroinitiator. While bromoisobutyryl initiator groups are most commonly used for this purpose, benzyl chloride initiators may be advantageous for some applications due to superior stability. Water-only graft solutions produced thicker brush coatings with superior low fouling properties (low protein adsorption and cell adhesion) versus mixed water/alcohol solutions. Coatings produced using 475 Da OEGMA (methyl ether terminated) further reduced non-specific interactions compared to 360 Da OEGMA (hydroxyl terminated). Initiator density had minimal effect on low fouling properties.

  19. Spherical Oligo-Silicic Acid SOSA Disclosed as Possible Endogenous Digitalis-Like Factor

    PubMed Central

    Kerek, Franz; Voicu, Victor A.

    2015-01-01

    The Na+/K+-ATPase is a membrane ion-transporter protein, specifically inhibited by digitalis glycosides used in cardiac therapy. The existence in mammals of some endogenous digitalis-like factors (EDLFs) as presumed ATPase ligands is generally accepted. But the chemical structure of these factors remained elusive because no weighable amounts of pure EDLFs have been isolated. Recent high-resolution crystal structure data of Na+/K+-ATPase have located the hydrophobic binding pocket of the steroid glycoside ouabain. It remained uncertain if the EDLF are targeting this steroid-receptor or another specific binding site(s). Our recently disclosed spherical oligo-silicic acids (SOSA) fulfill the main criteria to be identified with the presumed EDL factors. SOSA was found as a very potent inhibitor of the Na+/K+-ATPase, Ca2+-ATPase, H+/K+-ATPase, and of K-dp-ATPase, with IC50 values between 0.2 and 0.5 μg/mL. These findings are even more astonishing while so far, neither monosilicic acid nor its poly-condensed forms have been remarked biologically active. With the diameter ϕ between 1 and 3 nm, SOSA still belong to molecular species definitely smaller than silica nano-particles with ϕ > 5 nm. In SOSA molecules, almost all Si-OH bonds are displayed on the external shell, which facilitates the binding to hydrophilic ATPase domains. SOSA is stable for long term in solution but is sensitive to freeze-drying, which could explain the failure of countless attempts to isolate pure EDLF. There is a strong resemblance between SOSA and vanadates, the previously known general inhibitors of P-type ATPases. SOSA may be generated endogenously by spherical oligomerization of the ubiquitously present monosilicic acid in animal fluids. The structure of SOSA is sensitive to the concentration of Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, and other ions suggesting a presumably archaic mechanism for the regulation of the ATPase pumps. PMID:25667581

  20. Spherical Oligo-Silicic Acid SOSA Disclosed as Possible Endogenous Digitalis-Like Factor.

    PubMed

    Kerek, Franz; Voicu, Victor A

    2014-01-01

    The Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is a membrane ion-transporter protein, specifically inhibited by digitalis glycosides used in cardiac therapy. The existence in mammals of some endogenous digitalis-like factors (EDLFs) as presumed ATPase ligands is generally accepted. But the chemical structure of these factors remained elusive because no weighable amounts of pure EDLFs have been isolated. Recent high-resolution crystal structure data of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase have located the hydrophobic binding pocket of the steroid glycoside ouabain. It remained uncertain if the EDLF are targeting this steroid-receptor or another specific binding site(s). Our recently disclosed spherical oligo-silicic acids (SOSA) fulfill the main criteria to be identified with the presumed EDL factors. SOSA was found as a very potent inhibitor of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, Ca(2+)-ATPase, H(+)/K(+)-ATPase, and of K-dp-ATPase, with IC50 values between 0.2 and 0.5 μg/mL. These findings are even more astonishing while so far, neither monosilicic acid nor its poly-condensed forms have been remarked biologically active. With the diameter ϕ between 1 and 3 nm, SOSA still belong to molecular species definitely smaller than silica nano-particles with ϕ > 5 nm. In SOSA molecules, almost all Si-OH bonds are displayed on the external shell, which facilitates the binding to hydrophilic ATPase domains. SOSA is stable for long term in solution but is sensitive to freeze-drying, which could explain the failure of countless attempts to isolate pure EDLF. There is a strong resemblance between SOSA and vanadates, the previously known general inhibitors of P-type ATPases. SOSA may be generated endogenously by spherical oligomerization of the ubiquitously present monosilicic acid in animal fluids. The structure of SOSA is sensitive to the concentration of Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and other ions suggesting a presumably archaic mechanism for the regulation of the ATPase pumps.

  1. Mixed DNA/Oligo(ethylene glycol) Functionalized Gold Surface Improve DNA Hybridization in Complex Media

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,C.; Gamble, L.; Grainger, D.; Castner, D.

    2006-01-01

    Reliable, direct 'sample-to-answer' capture of nucleic acid targets from complex media would greatly improve existing capabilities of DNA microarrays and biosensors. This goal has proven elusive for many current nucleic acid detection technologies attempting to produce assay results directly from complex real-world samples, including food, tissue, and environmental materials. In this study, we have investigated mixed self-assembled thiolated single-strand DNA (ssDNA) monolayers containing a short thiolated oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) surface diluent on gold surfaces to improve the specific capture of DNA targets from complex media. Both surface composition and orientation of these mixed DNA monolayers were characterized with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). XPS results from sequentially adsorbed ssDNA/OEG monolayers on gold indicate that thiolated OEG diluent molecules first incorporate into the thiolated ssDNA monolayer and, upon longer OEG exposures, competitively displace adsorbed ssDNA molecules from the gold surface. NEXAFS polarization dependence results (followed by monitoring the N 1s{yields}{pi}* transition) indicate that adsorbed thiolated ssDNA nucleotide base-ring structures in the mixed ssDNA monolayers are oriented more parallel to the gold surface compared to DNA bases in pure ssDNA monolayers. This supports ssDNA oligomer reorientation towards a more upright position upon OEG mixed adlayer incorporation. DNA target hybridization on mixed ssDNA probe/OEG monolayers was monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Improvements in specific target capture for these ssDNA probe surfaces due to incorporation of the OEG diluent were demonstrated using two model biosensing assays, DNA target capture from complete bovine serum and from salmon genomic DNA mixtures. SPR results demonstrate that OEG incorporation into the ssDNA adlayer improves surface resistance to both nonspecific DNA and protein

  2. Genetic and biochemical characterization of an oligo-α-1,6-glucosidase from Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Susana; Flórez, Ana Belén; Guadamuro, Lucía; Mayo, Baltasar

    2017-04-04

    Although encoded in the genome of many Lactobacillus spp. strains, α-glucosidases have received little attention compared to other glycosyl hydrolases. In this study, a putative oligosaccharide(oligo)-α-1,6-glucosidase-encoding gene (malL) was identified in the genome of Lactobacillus plantarum LL441. malL coded for 572 amino acid residues with a calculated total molecular mass of 66.31kDa. No predicted signal peptide was observed, suggesting this enzyme to be localized within the cytoplasm of the cell. Homology studies of the deduced amino acid sequence in the area of its active sites classified the enzyme as a member of the α-amylase (AmyAC) superfamily of glycosyl hydrolases (GH), family 13 (GH13), subfamily 31 (GH13_31). malL was cloned in Escherichia coli and the coded enzyme overexpressed as a histidine-tagged protein (MalLHis). It was then purified and characterized. MalLHis protein showed strong hydrolytic activity towards 4-nitrophenyl-α-d-glucopyranoside (pNP-α-Glu) but not to other pNP-α-d- or pNP-β-d-derivatives. When using pNP-α-Glu as a substrate, MalLHis showed similar specific activities between pH5.0 and 6.0, and between 20 and 42°C (optimum 30°C). Among the natural carbohydrates assayed, MalLHis showed specificity towards isomaltose (Vmax and Km values of 40.64μmolmin(-1)mg(-1) and 6.22mM) and much less to isomaltulose (Vmax and Km values of 168.86μmolmin(-1)mg(-1) and 244.52mM). However, under the conditions of the assay, the enzyme showed no transglycosylation activity. Characterization of the entire complement of glycosidases in L. plantarum might reveal how strains of this species could be used in new biotechnological applications or in the development of functional foods.

  3. Local Electronic and Chemical Structure of Oligo-acetylene Derivatives Formed Through Radical Cyclizations at a Surface

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Semiconducting π-conjugated polymers have attracted significant interest for applications in light-emitting diodes, field-effect transistors, photovoltaics, and nonlinear optoelectronic devices. Central to the success of these functional organic materials is the facile tunability of their electrical, optical, and magnetic properties along with easy processability and the outstanding mechanical properties associated with polymeric structures. In this work we characterize the chemical and electronic structure of individual chains of oligo-(E)-1,1′-bi(indenylidene), a polyacetylene derivative that we have obtained through cooperative C1–C5 thermal enediyne cyclizations on Au(111) surfaces followed by a step-growth polymerization of the (E)-1,1′-bi(indenylidene) diradical intermediates. We have determined the combined structural and electronic properties of this class of oligomers by characterizing the atomically precise chemical structure of individual monomer building blocks and oligomer chains (via noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM)), as well as by imaging their localized and extended molecular orbitals (via scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS)). Our combined structural and electronic measurements reveal that the energy associated with extended π-conjugated states in these oligomers is significantly lower than the energy of the corresponding localized monomer orbitals, consistent with theoretical predictions. PMID:24387223

  4. Performance of the HSV OligoGen kit for the diagnosis of herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Parra-Sánchez, Manuel; Marcuello López, Ana; García-Rey, Silvia; Zakariya-Yousef Breval, Ismail; Bernal Martínez, Samuel; Pueyo Rodríguez, Isabel; Martín-Mazuelos, Estrella; Palomares Folía, José Carlos

    2016-07-01

    PCR methods are nowadays between the most rapid and sensitive methods for screening and diagnosing herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 and 2. The aim of this study was to analyze the reliability, accuracy, and usefulness of the new assay HSV OligoGen kit in comparison with the Roche LightCycler HSV ½ Qual Kit assay for the detection of HSV in clinical samples. For this analysis, a prospective study was designed for detection of HSV-1 and HSV-2 including 110 ulcer specimens, 48 urine, 48 endocervical, 43 cerebral spinal fluids, 4 urethral and 3 pharyngeal swabs that were sent from a regional STI clinic or an Intensive Clinical Unit, both in Seville, Spain. In comparison to the Roche LightCycler HSV ½ Qual Kit assay, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predicative values, and kappa value for HSV detection using the HSV OligoGen kit were 96.2%, 100%, 100%, 98.3%, and 0.97 for HSV-1, respectively. For HSV-2, the corresponding values were 98.3%, 100%, 100%, 99.5%, and 0.98, respectively. Statistical data obtained in this study confirms the usefulness and reliable results of this new assay.

  5. Adapting biodegradable oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) hydrogels for pigment epithelial cell encapsulation and lens regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mimi W; Park, Hansoo; Guo, Xuan; Nakamura, Kenta; Raphael, Robert M; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G; Tsonis, Panagiotis A

    2010-04-01

    This study investigated the encapsulation of newt iris pigment epithelial cells (PECs), which have the ability to regenerate a lens by trans-differentiation in vivo, within a biodegradable hydrogel of oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) crosslinked with poly(ethylene glycol)-diacrylate. Hydrogel beads of initial diameter of 1 mm were fabricated by a molding technique. The swelling ratio and degradation rate of the hydrogel beads decreased with increasing crosslinking ratios. Confocal microscopy confirmed the cytocompatibility of crosslinking hydrogel formulations as evidenced by the viability of an encapsulated model cell line within a crosslinked hydrogel bead. Hydrogel beads encapsulating iris PECs were also implanted into lentectomized newts in vivo; histological evaluation of explants after 30 days revealed a regenerated lens, thus demonstrating that the presence of degrading hydrogel did not adversely affect lens regeneration. The results of this study suggest the potential of a method for lens regeneration involving oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) hydrogels for iris PEC encapsulation and transplantation.

  6. Fluorosilane compounds with oligo(ethylene oxide) substituent as safe electrolyte solvents for high-voltage lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinglun; Mai, Yongjin; Luo, Hao; Yan, Xiaodan; Zhang, Lingzhi

    2016-12-01

    Two fluorosilanes with oligo(ethylene oxide) unites were synthesized through hydrosilylation of chlorosilane with allyl substituted oligo(ethylene oxide) ether followed by fluorination with potassium fluoride. The synthesized fluorosilane compounds exhibited lower viscosity, higher dielectric constant and higher oxidation potential, compared with their non-fluorination counterparts. Difluoro(3-(2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethoxy)propyl)methylsilane (DFSM2), one of the two compounds, was evaluated as high-voltage and thermal stable electrolyte co-solvent with the conventional carbonate-based electrolytes. Using an optimized electrolyte of 1M LiPF6 in EC/DFSM2/EMC (2/3/5 in vol.) with addition of 5 wt% fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC), high-voltage LiCoO2(LCO)/graphite full cell displayed outstanding cycling stability of 92.5% capacity retention after 135 cycles at 4.4 V upper cutoff voltage. Characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis, the DFSM2-based electrolyte demonstrated higher thermal stability with lithiated graphite anode and delithiated LCO cathode, thus better safety feature compared with the conventional electrolyte.

  7. A predicted interactome for Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Geisler-Lee, Jane; O'Toole, Nicholas; Ammar, Ron; Provart, Nicholas J; Millar, A Harvey; Geisler, Matt

    2007-10-01

    The complex cellular functions of an organism frequently rely on physical interactions between proteins. A map of all protein-protein interactions, an interactome, is thus an invaluable tool. We present an interactome for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) predicted from interacting orthologs in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), nematode worm (Caenorhabditis elegans), fruitfly (Drosophila melanogaster), and human (Homo sapiens). As an internal quality control, a confidence value was generated based on the amount of supporting evidence for each interaction. A total of 1,159 high confidence, 5,913 medium confidence, and 12,907 low confidence interactions were identified for 3,617 conserved Arabidopsis proteins. There was significant coexpression of genes whose proteins were predicted to interact, even among low confidence interactions. Interacting proteins were also significantly more likely to be found within the same subcellular location, and significantly less likely to be found in conflicting localizations than randomly paired proteins. A notable exception was that proteins located in the Golgi were more likely to interact with Golgi, vacuolar, or endoplasmic reticulum sorted proteins, indicating possible docking or trafficking interactions. These predictions can aid researchers by extending known complexes and pathways with candidate proteins. In addition we have predicted interactions for many previously unknown proteins in known pathways and complexes. We present this interactome, and an online Web interface the Arabidopsis Interactions Viewer, as a first step toward understanding global signaling in Arabidopsis, and to whet the appetite for those who are awaiting results from high-throughput experimental approaches.

  8. Arabidopsis thaliana—Aphid Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Joe; Singh, Vijay; Shah, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Aphids are important pests of plants that use their stylets to tap into the sieve elements to consume phloem sap. Besides the removal of photosynthates, aphid infestation also alters source-sink patterns. Most aphids also vector viral diseases. In this chapter, we will summarize on recent significant findings in plant-aphid interaction, and how studies involving Arabidopsis thaliana and Myzus persicae (Sülzer), more commonly known as the green peach aphid (GPA), are beginning to provide important insights into the molecular basis of plant defense and susceptibility to aphids. The recent demonstration that expression of dsRNA in Arabidopsis can be used to silence expression of genes in GPA has further expanded the utility of Arabidopsis for evaluating the contribution of the aphid genome-encoded proteins to this interaction. PMID:22666177

  9. Synthesis of oligo(chloroorganoxy) chlorophosphazenes and investigation of these materials as combustion inhibitors in fiberglass-reinforced plastics based on epoxy and polyster resins

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, S.G.; Gol`din, G.S.; Nikitina, G.S.

    1992-03-10

    The authors have carried out the synthesis of linear oligo(chloroorganoxy)chlorophosphazenes (OCOCPs) by the interaction of linear oligochlorophosphazenes (LCPs) with ethylene oxide and a number of other expoxy compounds. Also, the authors have investigated the fire-retardant efficiency of the OCOCPs that the authors synthesized. 7 refs., 5 tabs.

  10. T Oligo-Primed Polymerase Chain Reaction (TOP-PCR): A Robust Method for the Amplification of Minute DNA Fragments in Body Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Nai, Yu-Shin; Chen, Tzu-Han; Huang, Yu-Feng; Midha, Mohit K.; Shiau, Hsin-Chieh; Shen, Chen-Yang; Chen, Chien-Jen; Yu, Alice L.; Chiu, Kuo Ping

    2017-01-01

    Body fluid DNA sequencing is a powerful noninvasive approach for the diagnosis of genetic defects, infectious agents and diseases. The success relies on the quantity and quality of the DNA samples. However, numerous clinical samples are either at low quantity or of poor quality due to various reasons. To overcome these problems, we have developed T oligo-primed polymerase chain reaction (TOP-PCR) for full-length nonselective amplification of minute quantity of DNA fragments. TOP-PCR adopts homogeneous “half adaptor” (HA), generated by annealing P oligo (carrying a phosphate group at the 5′ end) and T oligo (carrying a T-tail at the 3′ end), for efficient ligation to target DNA and subsequent PCR amplification primed by the T oligo alone. Using DNA samples from body fluids, we demonstrate that TOP-PCR recovers minute DNA fragments and maintains the DNA size profile, while enhancing the major molecular populations. Our results also showed that TOP-PCR is a superior method for detecting apoptosis and outperforms the method adopted by Illumina for DNA amplification. PMID:28094343

  11. T Oligo-Primed Polymerase Chain Reaction (TOP-PCR): A Robust Method for the Amplification of Minute DNA Fragments in Body Fluids.

    PubMed

    Nai, Yu-Shin; Chen, Tzu-Han; Huang, Yu-Feng; Midha, Mohit K; Shiau, Hsin-Chieh; Shen, Chen-Yang; Chen, Chien-Jen; Yu, Alice L; Chiu, Kuo Ping

    2017-01-17

    Body fluid DNA sequencing is a powerful noninvasive approach for the diagnosis of genetic defects, infectious agents and diseases. The success relies on the quantity and quality of the DNA samples. However, numerous clinical samples are either at low quantity or of poor quality due to various reasons. To overcome these problems, we have developed T oligo-primed polymerase chain reaction (TOP-PCR) for full-length nonselective amplification of minute quantity of DNA fragments. TOP-PCR adopts homogeneous "half adaptor" (HA), generated by annealing P oligo (carrying a phosphate group at the 5' end) and T oligo (carrying a T-tail at the 3' end), for efficient ligation to target DNA and subsequent PCR amplification primed by the T oligo alone. Using DNA samples from body fluids, we demonstrate that TOP-PCR recovers minute DNA fragments and maintains the DNA size profile, while enhancing the major molecular populations. Our results also showed that TOP-PCR is a superior method for detecting apoptosis and outperforms the method adopted by Illumina for DNA amplification.

  12. Calcium ion binding of three different types of oligo/polysialic acids as studied by equilibrium dialysis and circular dichroic methods.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Y; Kitajima, K; Inoue, S; Inoue, Y

    1994-02-08

    Ca2+ binding properties of three different types of oligo/polysialic acid chains, i.e., oligo/poly(Neu5Ac), oligo/poly(Neu5Gc), and oligo/poly(KDN), were studied by equilibrium dialysis and circular dichroism. Colominic acid, high molecular weight polysialoglycoprotein (H-PSGP), low molecular weight polysialoglycoprotein (L-PSGP), and 3-deoxy-D-glycero-D-galacto-2-nonulosonic acid (KDN) glycoprotein were found to bind calcium ions with about 8-100 times the affinity of sialic acid monomer. Analysis by equilibrium dialysis of the binding of Ca2+ to colominic acid was biphasic, and the high-affinity interaction was shown to change with the degree of polymerization. Specific binding of Ca2+ to polysialic acid (polySia) caused characteristic effects in the circular dichroism spectrum. A pronounced decrease in the circular dichroism of polySia at 205 nm was observed upon addition of calcium. H-PSGP was found to bind calcium ions with 3-fold higher affinity than L-PSGP.

  13. The salty tale of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sanders, D

    2000-06-29

    High concentrations of sodium chloride are toxic to most plant species. New insights into the mechanisms by which plants tolerate salt have emerged from the identification of genes in Arabidopsis thaliana that play a critical part in physiological resistance to salt.

  14. Araport: the Arabidopsis Information Portal

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, Vivek; Hanlon, Matthew R.; Contrino, Sergio; Ferlanti, Erik S.; Karamycheva, Svetlana; Kim, Maria; Rosen, Benjamin D.; Cheng, Chia-Yi; Moreira, Walter; Mock, Stephen A.; Stubbs, Joseph; Sullivan, Julie M.; Krampis, Konstantinos; Miller, Jason R.; Micklem, Gos; Vaughn, Matthew; Town, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis Information Portal (https://www.araport.org) is a new online resource for plant biology research. It houses the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence and associated annotation. It was conceived as a framework that allows the research community to develop and release ‘modules’ that integrate, analyze and visualize Arabidopsis data that may reside at remote sites. The current implementation provides an indexed database of core genomic information. These data are made available through feature-rich web applications that provide search, data mining, and genome browser functionality, and also by bulk download and web services. Araport uses software from the InterMine and JBrowse projects to expose curated data from TAIR, GO, BAR, EBI, UniProt, PubMed and EPIC CoGe. The site also hosts ‘science apps,’ developed as prototypes for community modules that use dynamic web pages to present data obtained on-demand from third-party servers via RESTful web services. Designed for sustainability, the Arabidopsis Information Portal strategy exploits existing scientific computing infrastructure, adopts a practical mixture of data integration technologies and encourages collaborative enhancement of the resource by its user community. PMID:25414324

  15. [Malabsorption of fermentable oligo-, di-, or monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAP) as a common cause of unclear abdominal discomfort].

    PubMed

    Goebel-Stengel, M; Mönnikes, H

    2014-06-01

    Carbohydrate malabsorption is a frequent but underestimated cause of unexplained gastrointestinal symptoms like meteorism, flatulence, pain and diarrhea. By means of hydrogen and/or methane breath test after ingestion of the respective carbohydrate it can be identified and diagnosed easily, fast and reliably by successful nutritional therapy. Besides the well known complaints caused by lactose and fructose malabsorption, other fermentable oligo-, di-, or monosaccharides and polyols (akronym: FODMAP) can cause abdominal discomfort and IBS-like symptoms. In addition to lactose (dairy products) and fructose (apples, pears, mango, watermelon), FODMAPs comprise galactans (legumes), fructans (wheat, onions, garlic, artichoke) and the artificial sweeteners sorbitol, mannitol, maltitol and xylitol (sugar free candy, light products). A general restriction of all FODMAP components can be beneficial in relieving symptoms and improving quality of life in patients with functional gastrointestinal complaints.

  16. HTP-OligoDesigner: An Online Primer Design Tool for High-Throughput Gene Cloning and Site-Directed Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Camilo, Cesar M; Lima, Gustavo M A; Maluf, Fernando V; Guido, Rafael V C; Polikarpov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Following burgeoning genomic and transcriptomic sequencing data, biochemical and molecular biology groups worldwide are implementing high-throughput cloning and mutagenesis facilities in order to obtain a large number of soluble proteins for structural and functional characterization. Since manual primer design can be a time-consuming and error-generating step, particularly when working with hundreds of targets, the automation of primer design process becomes highly desirable. HTP-OligoDesigner was created to provide the scientific community with a simple and intuitive online primer design tool for both laboratory-scale and high-throughput projects of sequence-independent gene cloning and site-directed mutagenesis and a Tm calculator for quick queries.

  17. Oligo(p-phenylene ethynylene) with Cyanoacrylate Terminal Groups and Graphene Composite as Fluorescent Chemical Sensor for Cysteine.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Naoya; Yoshinari, Mariko; Suzuki, Eri; Okada, Mari

    2017-04-08

    A chemical sensor for cysteine (Cys) was fabricated based on a fluorescent oligo(p-phenylene ethynylene)s (OPEs) and OPE-graphene oxide (GO) composite. OPE with cyanoacrylate terminal groups were synthesized by a Pd-catalyzed Sonogashira coupling reaction and Knoevenagel condensation for use as a chemical sensor for Cys. The optical properties and Cys sensing capability of the cyanoacrylate modified OPE and OPE-GO composite were investigated. In addition of Cys, the fluorescence of OPE was blue-shifted and decreased (fluorescence turn-off), while the fluorescence of the OPE-GO composite was enhanced (fluorescence turn-on). Thus, OPE with cyanoacrylate terminal groups and OPE-GO composite acts a highly sensitive fluorescent chemical sensor for Cys.

  18. Energy-transfer efficiency in stacked oligo(p-phenylene vinylene)s: pronounced effects of order.

    PubMed

    Hoeben, Freek J M; Schenning, Albertus P H J; Meijer, E W

    2005-11-11

    The supramolecular structure of two types of oligo(p-phenylene vinylene) (OPV) building blocks in dodecane solution is studied. Monofunctional chromophores (MOPV) form well-defined helical assemblies, whereas bifunctional molecules (BOPV) aggregate into so-called frustrated stacks, lacking any higher helical order. This difference in organization has a major influence on the transfer of excitation energy through the assemblies. Energy transfer to supramolecularly incorporated guests (MOPV with lower bandgap) is used to probe the intrinsic differences in exciton mobility in these two types of mixed aggregates. From the observed donor fluorescence quenching, it can be concluded that the helically ordered nature of the MOPV stacks facilitates the transfer of excitation energy, yielding evidence for higher exciton mobility in the well-ordered assemblies than in the frustrated stacks. Finally, the concept of energy transfer in supramolecular assemblies is extended to the solid state by the successful implementation in a light-emitting diode (LED).

  19. Asparagine Metabolic Pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gaufichon, Laure; Rothstein, Steven J; Suzuki, Akira

    2016-04-01

    Inorganic nitrogen in the form of ammonium is assimilated into asparagine via multiple steps involving glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate synthase (GOGAT), aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT) and asparagine synthetase (AS) in Arabidopsis. The asparagine amide group is liberated by the reaction catalyzed by asparaginase (ASPG) and also the amino group of asparagine is released by asparagine aminotransferase (AsnAT) for use in the biosynthesis of amino acids. Asparagine plays a primary role in nitrogen recycling, storage and transport in developing and germinating seeds, as well as in vegetative and senescence organs. A small multigene family encodes isoenzymes of each step of asparagine metabolism in Arabidopsis, except for asparagine aminotransferase encoded by a single gene. The aim of this study is to highlight the structure of the genes and encoded enzyme proteins involved in asparagine metabolic pathways; the regulation and role of different isogenes; and kinetic and physiological properties of encoded enzymes in different tissues and developmental stages.

  20. Identification, characterization, and developmental expression of a novel alpha 2-->8-KDN-transferase which terminates elongation of alpha 2-->8-linked oligo-polysialic acid chain synthesis in trout egg polysialoglycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Angata, T; Kitazume, S; Terada, T; Kitajima, K; Inoue, S; Troy, F A; Inoue, Y

    1994-10-01

    A novel glycosyltransferase which catalyses transfer of deaminated neuraminic acid, KDN (2-keto-3-deoxy-D-glycero-D-galacto-nononic acid) from CMP-KDN to the non-reducing termini of oligo-polysialyl chains of polysialoglycoprotein (PSGP), was discovered in the ovary of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The KDN-transferase activity was optimal at neutral pH, and stimulated 2 to 2.5-fold by 2-5 mM Mg2+ or Mn2+. Expression of KDN-transferase was developmentally regulated in parallel with expression of the alpha 2-->8-polysialyltransferase, which catalyses synthesis of the oligo-polysialyl chains in PSGP. Incorporation of the KDN residues into the oligo-polysialyl chains prevented their further elongation, resulting in 'capping' of the oligo-polysialyl chains. This is the first example of a glycosyltransferase that catalyses termination of alpha 2-->8-polysialylation in glycoproteins.

  1. An International Bioinformatics Infrastructure to Underpin the Arabidopsis Community

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The future bioinformatics needs of the Arabidopsis community as well as those of other scientific communities that depend on Arabidopsis resources were discussed at a pair of recent meetings held by the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Committee (MASC) and the North American Arabidopsis Steering C...

  2. Using "Arabidopsis" Genetic Sequences to Teach Bioinformatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xiaorong

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a new approach to teaching bioinformatics using "Arabidopsis" genetic sequences. Several open-ended and inquiry-based laboratory exercises have been designed to help students grasp key concepts and gain practical skills in bioinformatics, using "Arabidopsis" leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR…

  3. New deuterated oligo(ethylene glycol) building blocks and their use in the preparation of surface active lipids possessing labeled hydrophilic tethers.

    PubMed

    Faragher, Robert J; Schwan, Adrian L

    2008-02-15

    For the introduction of additional analysis protocols of tethered molecules, a method is presented to prepare functionalized, deuterated oligo(ethylene glycols) from ethylene glycol-d4. Partial oligomerization of ethylene glycol-d4 and conversion to ditosylates is accompanied by coupling reactions to prepare doubly benzyl protected oligo(ethylene glycols) with two to five repeating units. The tetramer bearing 16 deuteria was elaborated at both ends to eventually prepare 2,3-di-O-phytanyl-sn-glycerol-1-tetraethylene glycol-d,l-alpha-lipoic acid ester (DPTL), which bears a fully deuterated tetra(ethylene glycol) spacer group. Through linking of functionalized components, an analogue of DPTL possessing an octa(ethylene glycol) spacer group was prepared, both in deuterated and unlabeled form.

  4. Extended monolayer of cyano-ended oligo(para-phenylenes) at the air/HOPG interface investigated by high-resolution AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hourani, W.; Lamare, S.; Makoudi, Y.; Palmino, F.; Cherioux, F.

    2016-10-01

    The formation of functional networks on surfaces is one of the main challenges in the field of nanotechnologies. In this paper, we shall propose a very simple process which can be used to achieve the formation of extended monolayer of functional oligo(para-phenylenes) molecules at the air/graphite interface. By developing a convergent strategy, we successfully achieved the synthesis of oligo(para-phenylenes) molecules with a tuneable length. The photophysical properties of these new oligomers were characterized by UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Deposition of these molecules by a simple spin-coating process on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface leads to the formation of extended monolayered 2D networks. These networks were characterized by atomic force microscopy experiments under ambient conditions with submolecular resolution thus providing the adsorption model of these molecules on an HOPG surface.

  5. BODIPY-based fluorescent thermometer as a lysosome-targetable probe: how the oligo(ethylene glycols) compete photoinduced electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Wu, Yongquan; Shi, Yanlin; Tao, Pan; Fan, Xing; Su, Xinyan; Kuang, Gui-Chao

    2015-02-16

    A novel BODIPY-based fluorescent thermometer, which shows a lysosome-targeting property, was successfully prepared. Due to the electron-donating ability of the oligo(ethylene glycols), the photoinduced electron-transfer pathway from morpholine to BODIPY dye is blocked. The fluorescence of the thermometer quenched by intramolecular rotation at room temperature was progressively enhanced during heating due to the increased microviscosity around the fluorophore.

  6. Oligo(ethylene glycol)-incorporated hybrid linear alkyl side chains for n-channel polymer semiconductors and their effect on the thin-film crystalline structure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ran; Kang, Boseok; Sin, Dong Hun; Choi, Hyun Ho; Kwon, Soon-Ki; Kim, Yun-Hi; Cho, Kilwon

    2015-01-28

    Oligo(ethylene glycol)-incorporated hybrid linear alkyl side chains, serving as solubilizing groups, are designed and introduced into naphthalene-diimide-based n-channel copolymers. The synthesized polymers exhibit unipolar n-type operation with an electron mobility of up to 1.64 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), which demonstrates the usefulness of the hybrid side chains in polymer electronics applications.

  7. Synthesis of amphiphilic alternating polyesters with oligo(ethylene glycol) side chains and potential use for sustained release drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Ding, Jianxun; Xiao, Chunsheng; Tang, Zhaohui; Li, Di; Chen, Jie; Zhuang, Xiuli; Chen, Xuesi

    2011-07-11

    Novel amphiphilic alternating polyesters, poly((N-phthaloyl-l-glutamic anhydride)-co-(2-(2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethoxy)methyl)oxirane) (P(PGA-co-ME(2)MO)), were synthesized by alternating copolymerization of PGA and ME(2)MO. The structures of the synthesized polyesters were characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, FT-IR, and GPC analyses. Because of the presence of oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) side chains, the polyesters could self-assemble into thermosensitive micelles. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that these micelles underwent thermoinduced size decrease without intermicellar aggregation. In vitro methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay demonstrated that the polyesters were biocompatible to Henrietta Lacks (HeLa) cells, rendering their potential for drug delivery applications. Two hydrophobic drugs, rifampin and doxorubicin (DOX), were loaded into the polyester micelles and observed to be released in a zero-order sustained manner. The sustained release could be accelerated in lower pH or in the presence of proteinase K, due to the degradation of the polyester under these conditions. Remarkably, in vitro cell experiments showed that the polyester micelles accomplished fast release of DOX inside cells and higher anticancer efficacy as compared with the free DOX. With enhanced stability during circulation condition and accelerated drug release at the target sites (e.g., low pH or enzyme presence), these novel polyesters with amphiphilic structures are promising to be used in sustained release drug delivery systems.

  8. Charge separation in a covalently-linked phthalocyanine-oligo(p-phenylenevinylene)-C60 system. Influence of the solvent polarity.

    PubMed

    Cid, Juan-José; Kahnt, Axel; Vázquez, Purificación; Guldi, Dirk M; Torres, Tomás

    2012-03-01

    A photo- and redoxactive system ZnPc-oPPV-C(60)2, in which the photoexcited state electron donor - zinc phthalocyanine - and the ground state electron acceptor - C(60) - are connected by a oligo(p-phenylenevinylene) (oPPV) spacer, has been synthesized in a multi-step synthesis by means of two consecutive Wadsworth-Horner-Emmons and a dipolar 1,3-cycloaddition reactions as key steps. The simpler system ZnPc-C(60)1 has also been prepared as a reference model for photophysical studies. In this regards, the photophysical investigations by means of fluorescence, flash photolysis, and transient-absorption spectroscopy have manifested a clear dependence between charge transfer kinetics and spatial arrangement. In both systems, intramolecular charge separation evolves from the photoexcited ZnPc and yields the ZnPc(·+)/C(60)(·-) radical ion pairs. Interestingly, the ZnPc(·+)/C(60)(·-) radical ion pair lifetimes and quantum yields are strongly impacted by the solvent polarity and the distance. To this end, maximum radical ion pair lifetimes of 2900 and 5530 ps were found in anisol for 1 and 2, respectively.

  9. The Human OligoGenome Resource: a database of oligonucleotide capture probes for resequencing target regions across the human genome.

    PubMed

    Newburger, Daniel E; Natsoulis, Georges; Grimes, Sue; Bell, John M; Davis, Ronald W; Batzoglou, Serafim; Ji, Hanlee P

    2012-01-01

    Recent exponential growth in the throughput of next-generation DNA sequencing platforms has dramatically spurred the use of accessible and scalable targeted resequencing approaches. This includes candidate region diagnostic resequencing and novel variant validation from whole genome or exome sequencing analysis. We have previously demonstrated that selective genomic circularization is a robust in-solution approach for capturing and resequencing thousands of target human genome loci such as exons and regulatory sequences. To facilitate the design and production of customized capture assays for any given region in the human genome, we developed the Human OligoGenome Resource (http://oligogenome.stanford.edu/). This online database contains over 21 million capture oligonucleotide sequences. It enables one to create customized and highly multiplexed resequencing assays of target regions across the human genome and is not restricted to coding regions. In total, this resource provides 92.1% in silico coverage of the human genome. The online server allows researchers to download a complete repository of oligonucleotide probes and design customized capture assays to target multiple regions throughout the human genome. The website has query tools for selecting and evaluating capture oligonucleotides from specified genomic regions.

  10. Poorly differentiated and anaplastic thyroid carcinomas: chromosomal and oligo-array profile of five new cell lines.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, R F; Roque, L; Krug, T; Leite, V

    2007-04-23

    Information on gene alterations associated to poorly differentiated (PDTC) and anaplastic thyroid carcinomas (ATC) is scarce. Using human cancer cell lines as a tool for gene discovery, we performed a cytogenetic and oligo-array analysis in five new cell lines derived from two PDTC and three ATC. In PDTC we evidenced, as important, the involvement of the MAPK/ERK kinase pathway, and downregulation of a group of suppressor genes that include E-cadherin. In ATC, downregulation of a specific group of oncosuppressor genes was also observed. Our ATC cell lines presented chromosomal markers of gene amplification, and we were able to identify for the first time the nature of the involved amplicon target genes. We found that the main molecular differences between the two cell line types were related to signal transduction pathways, cell adhesion and motility process. TaqMan experiments performed for five amplicon target genes and for two genes, which allowed a clear distinction between ATC and PDTC: CDH13 and PLAU corroborated array results, not only in the cell lines, but also in an additional set of primary 14 PDTC and three ATC. We suggest that our findings may represent new tools for the development of more effective therapies to the hitherto untreatable ATC.

  11. Biodegradable pH/temperature-sensitive oligo(β-amino ester urethane) hydrogels for controlled release of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Cong Truc; Nguyen, Minh Khanh; Lee, Doo Sung

    2011-08-01

    An injectable biodegradable pH/temperature-sensitive oligo(β-amino ester urethane) (OAEU) was synthesized. The OAEU was synthesized by addition polymerization between the isocyanate groups of 1,6-diisocyanato hexamethylene and the hydroxyl groups of a synthesized monomer piperazine dihydroxyl amino ester (monomer PDE) in chloroform in the presence of dibutyltin dilaurate as a catalyst. The synthesized OAEU was characterized by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatography. The aqueous solutions of OAEU showed a sol-to-gel-to-sol phase transition as a function of temperature and pH. The gel window covered the physiological conditions (37°C, pH 7.4) and could be controlled by changing the OAEU concentration. After a subcutaneous injection of the OAEU solution into Sprague-Dawley rats, a gel formed rapidly in situ and remained in the body for more than 2 weeks. The in vitro cytotoxicity test and in vitro degradation showed that the OAEU hydrogel was non-cytotoxic and biodegradable. The in vitro release of doxorubicin from this OAEU hydrogel was sustained for more than 10 days. This injectable biodegradable pH/temperature-sensitive OAEU hydrogel is a potential candidate as a drug/protein carrier and in biomedical applications.

  12. Suicide gene therapy using reducible poly (oligo-D-arginine) for the treatment of spinal cord tumors.

    PubMed

    Won, Young-Wook; Kim, Kyung-Min; An, Sung Su; Lee, Minhyung; Ha, Yoon; Kim, Yong-Hee

    2011-12-01

    Suicide gene therapy based on a combination of herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) and ganciclovir (GCV) has obstacles to achieving a success in clinical use for the treatment of cancer due to inadequate thymidine kinase (TK) expression. The primary concern for improving anticancer efficacy of the suicide gene therapy is to develop an appropriate carrier that highly expresses TK in vivo. Despite great advances in the development of non-viral vectors, none has been used in cancer suicide gene therapy, not even in experimental challenge. Reducible poly (oligo-D-arginine) (rPOA), one of the effective non-viral carriers working in vivo, was chosen to deliver HSV-tk to spinal cord tumors which are appropriate targets for suicide gene therapy. Since the system exerts toxicity only in dividing cells, cells in the central nervous system, which are non-proliferative, are not sensitive to the toxic metabolites. In the present study, we demonstrated that the locomotor function of the model rat was maintained through the tumor suppression resulting from the tumor-selective suicide activity by co-administration of rPOA/HSV-tk and GCV. Thus, rPOA plays a crucial role in suicide gene therapy for cancer, and an rPOA/HSV-tk and GCV system could help promote in vivo trials of suicide gene therapy.

  13. Synthesis, characterization, conformation and self-assembly behavior of polypeptide-based brush with oligo (ethylene glycol) side chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yugang; Luo, Weiang; Ye, Guodong

    2015-02-01

    A new polypeptide-based copolymer brush composed of poly (γ-propargyl-L-glutamate)-block-poly (propylene oxide)-block-poly (γ-propargyl-L-glutamate) backbone (PPLG-b-PPO-b-PPLG) and oligo (ethylene glycol) (PEG) side-chain was synthesized by combination of N-carboxyanhydride ring-opening polymerization and click chemistry. Nearly 100% grafting efficiency was achieved by copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (CuAAc) reaction. The α-helical conformation adopted by the grafted polypeptide blocks in water was relatively stable and showed a reversible change in a heating-cooling circle from 5 to 70 °C. It displayed weak stability against elevated temperature but still reversible changes in the presence of 0.47 M NaCl. The brushes were amphiphilic and could self-assemble into thermo-sensitive micelles in water. Big micelles could break into small micelles upon heating due to the improved solubility.

  14. Protein-resistant polyurethane via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhilin; Feng, Wei; Zhu, Shiping; Sheardown, Heather; Brash, John L

    2009-12-15

    Protein-resistant polyurethane (PU) surfaces were prepared by surface-initiated simultaneous normal and reverse atom transfer radical polymerization (s-ATRP) of poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) (poly (OEGMA)). Oxygen plasma treatment was employed for initial activation of the PU surface. The grafted polymer chain length was adjusted by varying the molar ratio of monomer to sacrificial initiator in solution from 5:1 to 200:1. The modified PU surfaces were characterized by water contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Protein adsorption experiments from tris-buffered saline (TBS) and plasma were carried out to evaluate the protein-resistance of the surfaces. Adsorption from single and binary protein solutions as well as from plasma was significantly reduced after modification. Adsorption decreased with increasing poly(OEGMA) chain length. Fibrinogen (Fg) adsorption on the 200:1 monomer/initiator surface was in the range of 3-33 ng/cm(2) representing 96-99% reduction compared with the unmodified PU. Fg adsorption from 0.01-10% plasma was as low as 1-5 ng/cm(2). Moreover, binary protein adsorption experiments using Fg and lysozyme (Lys) showed that protein size is a factor in the protein resistance of these surfaces.

  15. Carbon-bridged oligo(p-phenylenevinylene)s for photostable and broadly tunable, solution-processable thin film organic lasers

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Vidal, Marta; Boj, Pedro G.; Villalvilla, José M.; Quintana, José A.; Yan, Qifan; Lin, Nai-Ti; Zhu, Xiaozhang; Ruangsupapichat, Nopporn; Casado, Juan; Tsuji, Hayato; Nakamura, Eiichi; Díaz-García, María A.

    2015-01-01

    Thin film organic lasers represent a new generation of inexpensive, mechanically flexible devices for spectroscopy, optical communications and sensing. For this purpose, it is desired to develop highly efficient, stable, wavelength-tunable and solution-processable organic laser materials. Here we report that carbon-bridged oligo(p-phenylenevinylene)s serve as optimal materials combining all these properties simultaneously at the level required for applications by demonstrating amplified spontaneous emission and distributed feedback laser devices. A series of six compounds, with the repeating unit from 1 to 6, doped into polystyrene films undergo amplified spontaneous emission from 385 to 585 nm with remarkably low threshold and high net gain coefficients, as well as high photostability. The fabricated lasers show narrow linewidth (<0.13 nm) single mode emission at very low thresholds (0.7 kW cm−2), long operational lifetimes (>105 pump pulses for oligomers with three to six repeating units) and wavelength tunability across the visible spectrum (408–591 nm). PMID:26416643

  16. Carbon-bridged oligo(p-phenylenevinylene)s for photostable and broadly tunable, solution-processable thin film organic lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Vidal, Marta; Boj, Pedro G.; Villalvilla, José M.; Quintana, José A.; Yan, Qifan; Lin, Nai-Ti; Zhu, Xiaozhang; Ruangsupapichat, Nopporn; Casado, Juan; Tsuji, Hayato; Nakamura, Eiichi; Díaz-García, María A.

    2015-09-01

    Thin film organic lasers represent a new generation of inexpensive, mechanically flexible devices for spectroscopy, optical communications and sensing. For this purpose, it is desired to develop highly efficient, stable, wavelength-tunable and solution-processable organic laser materials. Here we report that carbon-bridged oligo(p-phenylenevinylene)s serve as optimal materials combining all these properties simultaneously at the level required for applications by demonstrating amplified spontaneous emission and distributed feedback laser devices. A series of six compounds, with the repeating unit from 1 to 6, doped into polystyrene films undergo amplified spontaneous emission from 385 to 585 nm with remarkably low threshold and high net gain coefficients, as well as high photostability. The fabricated lasers show narrow linewidth (<0.13 nm) single mode emission at very low thresholds (0.7 kW cm-2), long operational lifetimes (>105 pump pulses for oligomers with three to six repeating units) and wavelength tunability across the visible spectrum (408-591 nm).

  17. Efficient synthesis of diverse heterobifunctionalized clickable oligo(ethylene glycol) linkers: potential applications in bioconjugation and targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Lalit N; Houston, Zachary H; Sarma, Saurav J; Jalisatgi, Satish S; Hawthorne, M Frederick

    2013-02-21

    Herein we describe the sequential synthesis of a variety of azide-alkyne click chemistry-compatible heterobifunctional oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) linkers for bioconjugation chemistry applications. Synthesis of these bioorthogonal linkers was accomplished through desymmetrization of OEGs by conversion of one of the hydroxyl groups to either an alkyne or azido functionality. The remaining distal hydroxyl group on the OEGs was activated by either a 4-nitrophenyl carbonate or a mesylate (-OMs) group. The -OMs functional group served as a useful precursor to form a variety of heterobifunctionalized OEG linkers containing different highly reactive end groups, e.g., iodo, -NH(2), -SH and maleimido, that were orthogonal to the alkyne or azido functional group. Also, the alkyne- and azide-terminated OEGs are useful for generating larger discrete poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) linkers (e.g., PEG(16) and PEG(24)) by employing a Cu(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition click reaction. The utility of these clickable heterobifunctional OEGs in bioconjugation chemistry was demonstrated by attachment of the integrin (α(v)β(3)) receptor targeting peptide, cyclo-(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Lys) (cRGfKD) and to the fluorescent probe sulfo-rhodamine B. The synthetic methodology presented herein is suitable for the large scale production of several novel heterobifunctionalized OEGs from readily available and inexpensive starting materials.

  18. Synthesis and application of monodisperse oligo(oxyethylene)-grafted polystyrene resins for solid-phase organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Lumpi, Daniel; Braunshier, Christian; Horkel, Ernst; Hametner, Christian; Fröhlich, Johannes

    2014-07-14

    In a preliminary investigation by our group, we found that poly(styrene-oxyethylene) graft copolymers (PS-PEG), for example, TentaGel resins, are advantageous for gel-phase (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Because of the solution-like environment provided by the PS-PEG resins, good spectral quality of the attached moiety can be achieved, which is useful for nondestructive on-resin analysis. The general drawbacks of such resins are low loading capacities and the intense signal in the spectra resulting from the PEG linker (>50 units). Here, we describe the characterization of solvent-dependent swelling and reaction kinetics on a new type of resin for solid-phase organic synthesis (SPOS) that allows an accurate monitoring by gel-phase NMR without the above disadvantages. A series of polystyrene-oligo(oxyethylene) graft copolymers containing monodisperse PEG units (n = 2-12) was synthesized. A strong correlation between the linker (PEG) length and the line widths in the (13)C gel-phase spectra was observed, with a grafted PEG chain of 8 units giving similar results in terms of reactivity and gel-phase NMR monitoring to TentaGel resin. Multistep on-resin reaction sequences were performed to prove the applicability of the resins in solid-phase organic synthesis.

  19. Modification of fluorous substrates with oligo(ethylene glycol) via "click" chemistry for long-term resistance of cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Caceres, Rafael; Santos, Catherine M; Li, Siheng; Kumar, Amit; Zhu, Zhiling; Kolar, Satya S; Casado-Rodriguez, Miguel A; Huang, Yongkai; McDermott, Alison; Lopez-Romero, Juan Manuel; Cai, Chengzhi

    2015-11-15

    In this work perfluorinated substrates fabricated from SiO2 glass slides are modified with oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) units for long-term resistance of cell adhesion purposes, based on fluorous interactions and click chemistry. Specifically, fluorous substrates, prepared by treatment of glass slides with 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorodecyltrimethoxysilane (FAS17), were coated with ethynyl-OEG-C8F17, followed by covalent attachment of an azido-OEG via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) "click" reaction. We demonstrate that the resultant surface avoid fibrinogen adsorption and resisted cell adhesion for over 14days. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) analysis and contact angle goniometry measurements confirm the presence of the OEG molecules on the fluorous substrates. Bright field optical images show total absence of 3T3 fibroblast cells on the OEG modified fluorinated substrate for 1 and 5days, and a remarkably decrease of cell adhesion at 14days.

  20. Incorporation of phosphate group modulates bone cell attachment and differentiation on oligo(polyethylene glycol) fumarate hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Dadsetan, Mahrokh; Giuliani, Melissa; Wanivenhaus, Florian; Runge, M. Brett; Charlesworth, Jon E.; Yaszemski, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we have investigated the development of a synthetic hydrogel that contains a negatively charged phosphate group for use as a substrate for bone cell attachment and differentiation in culture. The photoreactive, phosphate-containing molecule, bis(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl)phosphate (BP), was incorporated into oligo(polyethylene glycol) fumarate hydrogel and the mechanical, rheological and thermal properties of the resulting hydrogels were characterized. Our results showed changes in hydrogel compression and storage moduli with incorporation of BP. The modification also resulted in decreased crystallinity as recorded by differential scanning calorimetry. Our data revealed that incorporation of BP improved attachment and differentiation of human fetal osteoblast (hFOB) cells in a dose-dependent manner. A change in surface chemistry and mineralization of the phosphate-containing surfaces verified by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis was found to be important for hFOB cell attachment and differentiation. We also demonstrated that phosphate-containing hydrogels support attachment and differentiation of primary bone marrow stromal cells. These findings suggest that BP-modified hydrogels are capable of sustaining attachment and differentiation of both bone marrow stromal cells and osteoblasts that are critical for bone regeneration. PMID:22277774

  1. Coexistence of macroprolactinaemia and hyperprolactinaemia in women with oligo-/amenorrhoea is associated with high risk of pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Krzysztof C; Gasior-Perczak, Danuta; Kowalska, Aldona; Lewinski, Andrzej

    2014-05-01

    Macroprolactin may cause elevation of prolactin (PRL) concentrations measured by standard assays. In our study, we assessed the prevalence of pituitary lesions in women with macroprolactinaemia and either oligomenorrhoea or secondary amenorrhoea. Pituitary MRI scans were performed in 61 women aged 31.0  ±  6.7 years (mean  ±  SD), with raised PRL concentrations due to macroprolactinaemia, detected by 25% polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation method (PRL recovery <40%). After PEG precipitation of macroprolactin, free PRL concentrations were still raised in 36 (59%) women. Microadenomas were detected in 10 patients out of 61 (16.4%), with raised free PRL in 9 of these cases, while macroadenomas were detected in 4 out of 61 (6.6%) women, all of whom also had raised free PRL. In case of coexistence of macroprolactinaemia and raised free PRL after PEG precipitation of macroprolactin, the chance of finding of either a micro- or a macroadenoma was 36% (13 cases out of 36). We conclude that hyperprolactinaemia and macroprolactinaemia may coexist in the same patient. Furthermore, if free PRL is raised after PEG precipitation of macroprolactin, then the chance of finding either a pituitary micro- or macroadenoma in women with oligo-/amenorrhoea is over 30%. Therefore pituitary magnetic resonance imaging is mandatory in all such cases.

  2. Sugar-coated proteins: the importance of degree of polymerisation of oligo-galacturonic acid on protein binding and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Amy Y; Melton, Laurence D; Ryan, Timothy M; Mata, Jitendra P; Jameson, Geoffrey B; Rekas, Agata; Williams, Martin A K; McGillivray, Duncan J

    2017-04-05

    We have simplified the structural heterogeneity of protein-polysaccharide binding by investigating protein binding to oligosaccharides. The interactions between bovine beta-lactoglobulin A (βLgA) and oligo-galacturonic acids (OGAs) with various numbers of sugar residues have been investigated with a range of biophysical techniques. We show that the βLgA-OGA interaction is critically dependent on the length of the oligosaccharide. Isothermal titration calorimetry results suggest that a minimum length of 7 or 8 sugar residues is required in order to exhibit appreciable exothermic interactions with βLgA - shorter oligosaccharides show no enthalpic interactions at any concentration ratio. When titrating βLgA into OGAs with more than 7-8 sugar residues the sample solution also became turbid with increasing amounts of βLgA, indicating the formation of macroscopic assemblies. Circular dichroism, thioflavin T fluorescence and small angle X-ray/neutron scattering experiments revealed two structural regimes during the titration. When OGAs were in excess, βLgA formed discrete assemblies upon OGA binding, and no subsequent aggregation was observed. However, when βLgA was present in excess, multi-scale structures were formed and this eventually led to the separation of the solution into two liquid-phases.

  3. Electronic transport in oligo-para-phenylene junctions attached to carbon nanotube electrodes: Transition-voltage spectroscopy and chirality

    SciTech Connect

    Brito Silva, C. A. Jr.; Silva, S. J. S. da; Leal, J. F. P.; Pinheiro, F. A.; Del Nero, J.

    2011-06-15

    We have investigated, by means of a nonequilibrium Green's function method coupled to density functional theory, the electronic transport properties of molecular junctions composed of oligo-para-phenylene (with two, three, four, and five phenyl rings) covalently bridging the gap between metallic carbon nanotubes electrodes. We have found that the current is strongly correlated to a purely geometrical chiral parameter, both on-resonance and off-resonance. The Fowler-Nordheim plot exhibits minima, V{sub min}, that occur whenever the tail of a resonant transmission peak enters in the bias window. This result corroborates the scenario in which the coherent transport model gives the correct interpretation to transition voltage spectroscopy (TVS). We have shown that V{sub min} corresponds to voltages where a negative differential resistance (NDR) occurs. The finding that V{sub min} corresponds to voltages that exhibit NDR, which can be explained only in single-molecule junctions within the coherent transport model, further confirms the applicability of such models to adequately interpret TVS. The fact that the electrodes are organic is at the origin of differences in the behavior of V{sub min} if compared to the case of molecular junctions with nonorganic contacts treated so far.

  4. Ehealth monitoring in irritable bowel syndrome patients treated with low fermentable oligo-, di-, mono-saccharides and polyols diet.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Natalia; Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Burisch, Johan; Jensen, Lisbeth; Ankersen, Dorit Vedel; Felding, Maria; Andersen, Nynne Nyboe; Munkholm, Pia

    2014-06-07

    In the present study we report on changes in irritable bowel syndrome-severity scoring system (IBS-SSS) and irritable bowel syndrome-quality of life (IBS-QoL) in 19 IBS patients, aged 18 to 74 years (F/M: 14/5), during 12 wk registering their symptoms on the web-application (www.ibs.constant-care.dk). During a control period of the first 6-wk patients were asked to register their IBS-SSS and IBS-QoL on the web-application weekly without receiving any intervention. Thereafter, low fermentable oligo-, di-, mono-saccharides and polyols (FODMAP) diet (LFD) was introduced for the next 6 wk while continuing the registration. Though a small sample size a significant improvement in disease activity (IBS-SSS) was observed during both the control period, median: 278 (range: 122-377), P = 0.02, and subsequently during the LFD period, median: 151 (range: 29-334), P < 0.01. The IBS-QoL solely changed significantly during the LFD period, median: 67 (37-120), P < 0.01. The significant reduction in disease activity during the control period shows a positive effect of the web-application on IBS symptoms when presented as a "traffic light". However adding the diet reduced IBS-SSS to < 150, inactive to mild symptoms. In the future results from larger scale trials are awaited.

  5. Functional studies of cochleate assemblies of an oligo-acyl-lysyl with lipid mixtures for combating bacterial multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Sarig, Hadar; Ohana, Dafna; Epand, Raquel F; Mor, Amram; Epand, Richard M

    2011-10-01

    The cationic antimicrobial oligo-acyl-lysyls (OAKs) interact with lipid mixtures mimicking the composition of bacterial cytoplasmic membranes. We have reported the ability of one such OAK, C(12)K-7α(8), to cluster anionic lipids and to promote a structural change with lipid bilayers to form rolled cylindrical structures or cochleates, without requiring divalent cations for their assembly. These assemblies can be exploited for drug delivery, permitting their synergistic use with antibiotics in systemic therapy to increase efficacy and reduce toxicity. Our previous studies of the biophysical properties of these systems led us to select mixtures with the goal of optimizing their potential for enhancing effectiveness in combating bacterial multidrug resistance. Here, we further investigate the properties of such mixtures that result in enhanced in vivo activity. The role of erythromycin in the assembly of cochleates with OAK in the gel and the liquid crystalline states were assessed, as well as the encapsulation efficiency of the systems chosen. In addition, we found that erythromycin did not undermine the ability of OAKs to induce fusion of vesicles, fusion being an essential component of cochleate formation. The in vivo activity of the new assemblies tested resulted in higher survival rates of animals infected with multidrug resistant bacteria.

  6. Poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) Brushes on High-κ Metal Oxide Dielectric Surfaces for Bioelectrical Environments.

    PubMed

    Joh, Daniel Y; McGuire, Felicia; Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Andrews, Joseph B; Achar, Rohan K; Zimmers, Zackary; Mozhdehi, Darush; Blair, Rebecca; Albarghouthi, Faris; Oles, William; Richter, Jacob; Fontes, Cassio M; Hucknall, Angus M; Yellen, Benjamin B; Franklin, Aaron D; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2017-02-15

    Advances in electronics and life sciences have generated interest in "lab-on-a-chip" systems utilizing complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry for low-power, portable, and cost-effective biosensing platforms. Here, we present a simple and reliable approach for coating "high-κ" metal oxide dielectric materials with "non-fouling" (protein- and cell-resistant) poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (POEGMA) polymer brushes as biointerfacial coatings to improve their relevance for biosensing applications utilizing advanced electronic components. By using a surface-initiated "grafting from" strategy, POEGMA films were reliably grown on each material, as confirmed by ellipsometric measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The electrical behavior of these POEGMA films was also studied to determine the potential impact on surrounding electronic devices, yielding information on relative permittivity and breakdown field for POEGMA in both dry and hydrated states. We show that the incorporation of POEGMA coatings significantly reduced levels of nonspecific protein adsorption compared to uncoated high-κ dielectric oxide surfaces as shown by protein resistance assays. These attributes, combined with the robust dielectric properties of POEGMA brushes on high-κ surfaces open the way to incorporate this protein and cell resistant polymer interface into CMOS devices for biomolecular detection in a complex liquid milieu.

  7. OligoHeatMap (OHM): an online tool to estimate and display hybridizations of oligonucleotides onto DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Croce, Olivier; Chevenet, François; Christen, Richard

    2008-07-01

    The efficiency of molecular methods involving DNA/DNA hybridizations depends on the accurate prediction of the melting temperature (T(m)) of the duplex. Many softwares are available for T(m) calculations, but difficulties arise when one wishes to check if a given oligomer (PCR primer or probe) hybridizes well or not on more than a single sequence. Moreover, the presence of mismatches within the duplex is not sufficient to estimate specificity as it does not always significantly decrease the T(m). OHM (OligoHeatMap) is an online tool able to provide estimates of T(m) for a set of oligomers and a set of aligned sequences, not only as text files of complete results but also in a graphical way: T(m) values are translated into colors and displayed as a heat map image, either stand alone or to be used by softwares such as TreeDyn to be included in a phylogenetic tree. OHM is freely available at http://bioinfo.unice.fr/ohm/, with links to the full source code and online help.

  8. Photochemistry of "end-only" oligo-p-phenylene ethynylenes: complexation with sodium dodecyl sulfate reduces solvent accessibility.

    PubMed

    Hill, Eric H; Evans, Deborah G; Whitten, David G

    2013-08-06

    Cationic oligo-p-phenylene ethynylenes are very effective light-activated biocides and biosensors but degrade upon exposure to light. In this study, we explore the photochemistry of a class of "end-only" compounds from this series, which have cationic moieties on the ends of the backbone. Product characterization by mass spectrometry reveals that the photoreactivity of these molecules is higher than that of a previously studied oligomer and that the primary products of photolysis result from the addition of water or oxygen across the triple bond. In addition, a product suggesting the addition of peroxide or other reactive oxygen species across the triple bond was observed. To explore avenues by which the photodegradation of these compounds can be mitigated, the effects of complexation with sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles on their photochemistry was explored. Classical molecular dynamics simulations revealed that compounds that were protected from photolysis by SDS buried their phenylene ethynylene backbones into the interior of the micelle, protecting it from contact with water. This work has revealed a molecular basis for the protection of a novel class of light-activated biocides from irradiation that is consistent with the proposed photochemistry of these compounds. This information can be useful for developing photodegradation-resistant biocidal materials and applications for current compounds and leads to new molecular design.

  9. Dynamique des faciès détritiques oligo-miocènes de Tunisie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaich, C.

    1992-07-01

    The Oligo-Miocene outcrops spread over a large part of Central and Northern Tunisia; from South to North, one can find: 1) the deltaic complex of Fortuna Formation: It consists of a deltaic complex which is basically formed by clayey sandstones with some marine intercalations. This complex progrades from W and S-W to N-E. Vertically it appears as a regressive megasequence which is divided in two large regressive sequences each one having its own deltaic system, the upper one shows a clear progression of the fluvial channels on the sediments of the deltaic plain, all of which progrades on the prodeltaic beds; 2) the Numidian flysch: occurring as a relatively regressive megasequence, the Numidian flysch shows in most of surveyed sections the superposition of a proximal material (inner fan) with undersea channels, grain flow, slumps, flux and proximal turbidites (Ta-e) on a relatively deeper and lobed material with distal turbidites (middle fan). The drifts go to N150-N200 and have a tendency to move from the North southwards; 3) The micaceous sandstones and marly limestones of Galite Island: on this island, the sedimentary series shows a fine sandstone, sometimes coarse with quartz pebbles, very rich in muscovite and feldspath, intercalated within a clayey and carbonate series. From the dynamic point of view it consists of a proximal part of deep sea fan (Inner fan) joined by gritty and carbonate proximal turbidites almost exclusively slump of very changeable sizes.

  10. Radiation-grafting of 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate and oligo (ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate onto polypropylene films by one step method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Jiménez, Alejandro; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Concheiro, Angel; Bucio, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    Polypropylene films were modified with 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) and oligo (ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (OEGMA) using the pre-irradiation method with gamma-rays (one step method). The effect of absorbed dose from 10 to 100 kGy, temperature (50, 60, and 70 °C), monomer concentration between 12.5% and 62.5%, monomers ratio from 10% to 90% and reaction time from 5 to 50 h; on the degree of grafting was determined. The grafted samples were analyzed by FTIR-ATR, TGA, DSC, swelling, and contact angle. Grafts onto polymeric films between 3% and 109% were obtained at doses from 10 to 100 kGy and a dose rate around 7.4 kGy/h. The graft percent increased with the content in HEMA in the HEMA:OEGMA feed mixture, which indicates a lower reactivity of OEGMA compared to HEMA. The hydrogel layer grafted on the polypropylene substrate increases the hydrophilicity of the surface and also provides certain temperature-responsiveness, which may be of interest for biomedical applications.

  11. Reconciling structural and thermodynamic predictions using all-atom and coarse-grain force fields: the case of charged oligo-arginine translocation into DMPC bilayers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuan; Sinha, Sudipta Kumar; Patel, Sandeep

    2014-10-16

    Using the translocation of short, charged cationic oligo-arginine peptides (mono-, di-, and triarginine) from bulk aqueous solution into model DMPC bilayers, we explore the question of the similarity of thermodynamic and structural predictions obtained from molecular dynamics simulations using all-atom and Martini coarse-grain force fields. Specifically, we estimate potentials of mean force associated with translocation using standard all-atom (CHARMM36 lipid) and polarizable and nonpolarizable Martini force fields, as well as a series of modified Martini-based parameter sets. We find that we are able to reproduce qualitative features of potentials of mean force of single amino acid side chain analogues into model bilayers. In particular, modifications of peptide-water and peptide-membrane interactions allow prediction of free energy minima at the bilayer-water interface as obtained with all-atom force fields. In the case of oligo-arginine peptides, the modified parameter sets predict interfacial free energy minima as well as free energy barriers in almost quantitative agreement with all-atom force field based simulations. Interfacial free energy minima predicted by a modified coarse-grained parameter set are -2.51, -4.28, and -5.42 for mono-, di-, and triarginine; corresponding values from all-atom simulations are -0.83, -3.33, and -3.29, respectively, all in units of kcal/mol. We found that a stronger interaction between oligo-arginine and the membrane components and a weaker interaction between oligo-arginine and water are crucial for producing such minima in PMFs using the polarizable CG model. The difference between bulk aqueous and bilayer center states predicted by the modified coarse-grain force field are 11.71, 14.14, and 16.53 kcal/mol, and those by the all-atom model are 6.94, 8.64, and 12.80 kcal/mol; those are of almost the same order of magnitude. Our simulations also demonstrate a remarkable similarity in the structural aspects of the ensemble of

  12. Reconciling Structural and Thermodynamic Predictions Using All-Atom and Coarse-Grain Force Fields: The Case of Charged Oligo-Arginine Translocation into DMPC Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Using the translocation of short, charged cationic oligo-arginine peptides (mono-, di-, and triarginine) from bulk aqueous solution into model DMPC bilayers, we explore the question of the similarity of thermodynamic and structural predictions obtained from molecular dynamics simulations using all-atom and Martini coarse-grain force fields. Specifically, we estimate potentials of mean force associated with translocation using standard all-atom (CHARMM36 lipid) and polarizable and nonpolarizable Martini force fields, as well as a series of modified Martini-based parameter sets. We find that we are able to reproduce qualitative features of potentials of mean force of single amino acid side chain analogues into model bilayers. In particular, modifications of peptide–water and peptide–membrane interactions allow prediction of free energy minima at the bilayer–water interface as obtained with all-atom force fields. In the case of oligo-arginine peptides, the modified parameter sets predict interfacial free energy minima as well as free energy barriers in almost quantitative agreement with all-atom force field based simulations. Interfacial free energy minima predicted by a modified coarse-grained parameter set are −2.51, −4.28, and −5.42 for mono-, di-, and triarginine; corresponding values from all-atom simulations are −0.83, −3.33, and −3.29, respectively, all in units of kcal/mol. We found that a stronger interaction between oligo-arginine and the membrane components and a weaker interaction between oligo-arginine and water are crucial for producing such minima in PMFs using the polarizable CG model. The difference between bulk aqueous and bilayer center states predicted by the modified coarse-grain force field are 11.71, 14.14, and 16.53 kcal/mol, and those by the all-atom model are 6.94, 8.64, and 12.80 kcal/mol; those are of almost the same order of magnitude. Our simulations also demonstrate a remarkable similarity in the structural aspects of

  13. Efficient use of artificial micro-RNA to downregulate the expression of genes at the post-transcriptional level in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ud-Din, A; Rauf, M; Ghafoor, S; Khattak, M N K; Hameed, M W; Shah, H; Jan, S; Muhammad, K; Rehman, A; Inamullah

    2016-04-07

    Micro-RNAs are cellular components regulating gene expression at the post-transcription level. In the present study, artificial micro-RNAs were used to decrease the transcript level of two genes, AtExpA8 (encoding an expansin) and AHL25 (encoding an AT-hook motif nuclear localized protein) in Arabidopsis thaliana. The backbone of the Arabidopsis endogenous MIR319a micro-RNA was used in a site-directed mutagenesis approach for the generation of artificial micro-RNAs targeting two genes. The recombinant cassettes were expressed under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter in individual A. thaliana plants. Transgenic lines of the third generation were tested by isolating total RNA and by subsequent cDNA synthesis using oligo-dT18 primers and mRNAs as templates. The expression of the two target genes was checked through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction to confirm reduced transcript levels for AtExpA8 and AHL25. Downregulation of AtExpA8 resulted in the formation of short hypocotyls compared with those of the wild-type control in response to low pH and high salt concentration. This technology could be used to prevent the expression of exogenous and invading genes posing a threat to the normal cellular physiology of the host plant.

  14. Taxonomy and Phylogeny of Arabidopsis (Brassicaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shehbaz, Ihsan A.; O'Kane, Steve L.

    2002-01-01

    Detailed taxonomic, cytological, and phylogenetic accounts of Arabidopsis are presented. As currently delimited, the genus consists of nine species all of which are indigenous to Europe, with the ranges of two species extending into northern and eastern Asia and North American into central United States. A survey of chromosome numbers in the genus is presented, and the country of origin for each count is given. Detailed descriptions of all species and subspecies and keys to all taxa are provided. Generic assignments are updated for the 50 species previously included in Arabidopsis. A cladogram of the species of Arabidopsis based on molecular phylogenetic studies by the authors is given. PMID:22303187

  15. Arabidopsis thaliana life without phytochromes

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Bárbara; Sánchez-Lamas, Maximiliano; Yanovsky, Marcelo J.; Casal, Jorge J.; Cerdán, Pablo D.

    2010-01-01

    Plants use light as a source of energy for photosynthesis and as a source of environmental information perceived by photoreceptors. Testing whether plants can complete their cycle if light provides energy but no information about the environment requires a plant devoid of phytochromes because all photosynthetically active wavelengths activate phytochromes. Producing such a quintuple mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana has been challenging, but we were able to obtain it in the flowering locus T (ft) mutant background. The quintuple phytochrome mutant does not germinate in the FT background, but it germinates to some extent in the ft background. If germination problems are bypassed by the addition of gibberellins, the seedlings of the quintuple phytochrome mutant exposed to red light produce chlorophyll, indicating that phytochromes are not the sole red-light photoreceptors, but they become developmentally arrested shortly after the cotyledon stage. Blue light bypasses this blockage, rejecting the long-standing idea that the blue-light receptors cryptochromes cannot operate without phytochromes. After growth under white light, returning the quintuple phytochrome mutant to red light resulted in rapid senescence of already expanded leaves and severely impaired expansion of new leaves. We conclude that Arabidopsis development is stalled at several points in the presence of light suitable for photosynthesis but providing no photomorphogenic signal. PMID:20176939

  16. Sulfenome mining in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Waszczak, Cezary; Akter, Salma; Eeckhout, Dominique; Persiau, Geert; Wahni, Khadija; Bodra, Nandita; Van Molle, Inge; De Smet, Barbara; Vertommen, Didier; Gevaert, Kris; De Jaeger, Geert; Van Montagu, Marc; Messens, Joris; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to be potent signaling molecules. Today, oxidation of cysteine residues is a well-recognized posttranslational protein modification, but the signaling processes steered by such oxidations are poorly understood. To gain insight into the cysteine thiol-dependent ROS signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent sulfenome: that is, proteins with at least one cysteine thiol oxidized to a sulfenic acid. By means of a genetic construct consisting of a fusion between the C-terminal domain of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) AP-1–like (YAP1) transcription factor and a tandem affinity purification tag, we detected ∼100 sulfenylated proteins in Arabidopsis cell suspensions exposed to H2O2 stress. The in vivo YAP1-based trapping of sulfenylated proteins was validated by a targeted in vitro analysis of DEHYDROASCORBATE REDUCTASE2 (DHAR2). In DHAR2, the active site nucleophilic cysteine is regulated through a sulfenic acid-dependent switch, leading to S-glutathionylation, a protein modification that protects the protein against oxidative damage. PMID:25049418

  17. Oligo-carrageenans enhance growth and contents of cellulose, essential oils and polyphenolic compounds in Eucalyptus globulus trees.

    PubMed

    González, Alberto; Contreras, Rodrigo A; Moenne, Alejandra

    2013-07-24

    Eucalyptus globulus (Myrtaceae) originated in Australia and has been introduced in countries with temperate weather in order to obtain wood for cellulose extraction and building purposes. In this work, we analyzed the potential stimulation of growth in height and trunk diameter as well as the content of holo-cellulose, α-cellulose (long cellulose chains), essential oils and polyphenolic compounds (PPCs) in E. globulus trees treated with oligo-carrageenans (OCs) kappa, lambda and iota, at 1 mg mL⁻¹, once a week, four times in total and then cultivated for three additional years without further treatment. Eucalyptus treated with OCs kappa, lambda and iota showed an increase in height, mainly with OCs kappa and iota by 58% and 47%, respectively, and in trunk diameter by 44% and 40%, respectively. In addition, OCs induced an increase in the contents of holo-cellulose and α-cellulose, mainly OCs kappa and iota which increased holo-cellulose by 8% and 5%, respectively, and α-cellulose by 16 and 13%, respectively. Moreover, OCs increased the content of essential oils, mainly OCs kappa and iota by 67% and 39%, respectively. Furthermore, OCs decreased the concentration of total phenolic compounds but differentially changed the concentration of several PPCs such as genistein, rutin, ellagic acid, morin, luteolin and quercetin with potential antimicrobial activities. Thus, marine algae OCs kappa, lambda and iota stimulate growth of E. globulus trees by enhancing height and trunk diameter as well as the content of α-cellulose, total essential oils, and some PPCs with potential antimicrobial activities.

  18. Evaluation of the Speed-oligo Direct Mycobacterium tuberculosis Assay for Molecular Detection of Mycobacteria in Clinical Respiratory Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Oya, Ana; Mendoza-Lopez, Pablo; Rodriguez-Granger, Javier; Fernández-Sánchez, Ana María; Bermúdez-Ruiz, María Pilar; Toro-Peinado, Inmaculada; Palop-Borrás, Begoña; Navarro-Marí, Jose María

    2013-01-01

    We present the first evaluation of a novel molecular assay, the Speed-oligo Direct Mycobacterium tuberculosis (SO-DMT) assay, which is based on PCR combined with a dipstick for the detection of mycobacteria and the specific identification of M. tuberculosis complex (MTC) in respiratory specimens. A blind evaluation was carried out in two stages: first, under experimental conditions on convenience samples comprising 20 negative specimens, 44 smear- and culture-positive respiratory specimens, and 11 sputa inoculated with various mycobacterium-related organisms; and second, in the routine workflow of 566 fresh respiratory specimens (4.9% acid-fast bacillus [AFB] smear positives, 7.6% MTC positives, and 1.8% nontuberculous mycobacteria [NTM] culture positives) from two Mycobacterium laboratories. SO-DMT assay showed no reactivity in any of the mycobacterium-free specimens or in those with mycobacterium-related organisms. Compared to culture, the sensitivity in the selected smear-positive specimens was 0.91 (0.92 for MTC and 0.90 for NTM), and there was no molecular detection of NTM in a tuberculosis case or vice versa. With respect to culture and clinical data, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for the SO-DMT system in routine specimens were 0.76 (0.93 in smear positives [1.0 for MTC and 0.5 for NTM] and 0.56 in smear negatives [0.68 for MTC and 0.16 for NTM]), 0.99, 0.85 (1.00 in smear positives and 0.68 in smear negatives), and 0.97, respectively. Molecular misidentification of NTM cases occurred when testing 2 gastric aspirates from two children with clinically but not microbiologically confirmed lung tuberculosis. The SO-DMT assay appears to be a fast and easy alternative for detecting mycobacteria and differentiating MTC from NTM in smear-positive respiratory specimens. PMID:23100355

  19. In vivo release of plasmid DNA from composites of oligo(poly(ethylene glycol)fumarate) and cationized gelatin microspheres.

    PubMed

    Kasper, F Kurtis; Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Kimura, Yu; Mikos, Antonios G; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2005-10-20

    Composites of cationized gelatin microspheres (CGMS), crosslinked with either 3 mM or 6 mM glutaraldehyde solution, and a novel hydrogel material, oligo(poly(ethylene glycol)fumarate) (OPF) were fabricated and investigated toward prolonging the release of plasmid DNA in vivo relative to the constituent materials. The composites and constituent materials were investigated in a subcutaneous murine model to assess the release of 125I-labeled plasmid DNA and 125I-labeled cationized gelatin in vivo. The time profiles of the radioactivity remaining were employed to compare the profiles of DNA release and cationized gelatin degradation. Both composite formulations (incorporating either 3 mM or 6 mM CGMS) prolonged the bioavailability of plasmid DNA relative to both injected plasmid DNA solution and the respective non-embedded cationized gelatin microspheres. Injected plasmid DNA solution persisted in the subject for only 7-10 days, whereas the persistence of DNA from composites of OPF and either 3 mM or 6 mM CGMS extended to at least day 42. The 3 mM and 6 mM CGMS each increased the persistence of DNA slightly, relative to injection of DNA solution, to between 28 and 35 days. Interestingly, the release profile of plasmid DNA from composites was not significantly different from the release of DNA from OPF alone. The release of plasmid DNA from the composites was in accord with the degradation of the microspheres within the OPF. These results show that composites of OPF and cationized gelatin microspheres are able to prolong the availability of plasmid DNA in vivo relative to cationized gelatin microspheres alone and provide a promising candidate material for the sustained, controlled release of plasmid DNA.

  20. Hexactinellid sponges reported from shallow waters in the Oligo-Miocene Pirabas Formation (N Brazil) are in fact cheilostome bryozoans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muricy, Guilherme; Domingos, Celso; Távora, Vladimir A.; Ramalho, Laís V.; Pisera, Andrzej; Taylor, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Although hexactinellid sponges occur exclusively in deep and/or cold waters, three species of hexactinellids have been reported from shallow and warm waters in Oligo-Miocene deposits of the Pirabas Formation in northern Brazil: Aphrocallistes estevoui, A. lobata and Manzonia aprutina. Here we re-examine these fossils and show that they are not hexactinellid sponges but instead comprise three species of cheilostome bryozoans of the genus Celleporaria (Family Lepraliellidae). Two of these are new to science, viz., Celleporaria pirabasensis sp. nov. and Celleporaria triangulavicularis sp. nov., and the third could not be identified to species level due to poor preservation. Colonies of all three species are massive and multilaminar, with irregular layers of zooids produced by frontal budding. Autozooids have marginal areolar pores and a rounded, asinuate primary orifice. All colonies also have suboral adventitious avicularia and interzooidal avicularia, although of different shapes and sizes. Celleporaria triangulavicularis sp. nov. has distinctive triangular interzooidal avicularia. The underside of the frontal shield was seen only in Celleporaria pirabasensis sp. nov. and Celleporaria sp., in which it is umbonuloid. Ovicells were only seen in Celleporaria pirabasensis sp. nov. and are cap-shaped. The three species differ among themselves mainly in the shape and position of the adventitious and interzooidal avicularia. The presence of several typical bryozoan traits and the absence of spicule traces or any other sponge features clearly demonstrate that these fossils are bryozoans, not sponges. The change in the classification of these fossils from hexactinellids to bryozoans of the genus Celleporaria eliminates the incongruence of the occurrence of deep-water species in the warm shallow water depositional environment of the Pirabas Formation.

  1. In vivo bone and soft tissue response to injectable, biodegradable oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Shin, Heungsoo; Quinten Ruhé, P; Mikos, Antonios G; Jansen, John A

    2003-08-01

    This study was designed to assess in vivo bone and soft tissue behavior of novel oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) (OPF) hydrogels using a rabbit model. In vitro degradation of the OPF hydrogels was also investigated in order to compare with in vivo characteristics. Four groups of OPF hydrogel implants were synthesized by alternation of crosslinking density, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) block length of OPF, and cell-binding peptide content. The in vitro degradation rate of OPF hydrogels increased with decreasing crosslinking density of hydrogels, which was characterized by measuring weight loss and swelling ratio of hydrogels and medium pH change. Examination of histological sections of the subcutaneous and cranial implants showed that an uniform thin circumferential fibrous capsule was formed around the OPF hydrogel implants. Quantitative evaluation of the tissue response revealed that no statistical difference existed in capsule quality or thickness between implant groups, implantation sites or implantation times. At 4 weeks, there was a very limited number of inflammatory and multinuclear cells at the implant-fibrous capsule interface for all implants. However, at 12 weeks, OPF hydrogels with PEG block length of number average molecular weight 6090+/-90 showed extensive surface erosion and superficial fragmentation that was surrounded by a number of inflammatory cells, while OPF hydrogels with PEG block length of number average molecular weight 930+/-10 elicited minimal degradation. Constant fibrous capsule layers and number of inflammatory cells were observed regardless of the incorporation of cell-binding peptide and crosslinking density of OPF hydrogels with PEG block length of number average molecular weight 930+/-90. These results confirm that the degradation of implants can be controlled by tailoring the macromolecular structure of OPF hydrogels. Additionally, histological evaluation of implants proved that the OPF hydrogel is a promising material for

  2. The fifth international conference on Arabidopsis research

    SciTech Connect

    Hangarter, R.; Scholl, R.; Davis, K.; Feldmann, K.

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains abstracts of oral and poster presentations made in conjunction with the Fifth International Conference on Arabidopsis Research held August 19--22, 1993 at the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

  3. PAIR: the predicted Arabidopsis interactome resource.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mingzhi; Shen, Xueling; Chen, Xin

    2011-01-01

    The predicted Arabidopsis interactome resource (PAIR, http://www.cls.zju.edu.cn/pair/), comprised of 5990 experimentally reported molecular interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana together with 145,494 predicted interactions, is currently the most comprehensive data set of the Arabidopsis interactome with high reliability. PAIR predicts interactions by a fine-tuned support vector machine model that integrates indirect evidences for interaction, such as gene co-expressions, domain interactions, shared GO annotations, co-localizations, phylogenetic profile similarities and homologous interactions in other organisms (interologs). These predictions were expected to cover 24% of the entire Arabidopsis interactome, and their reliability was estimated to be 44%. Two independent example data sets were used to rigorously validate the prediction accuracy. PAIR features a user-friendly query interface, providing rich annotation on the relationships between two proteins. A graphical interaction network browser has also been integrated into the PAIR web interface to facilitate mining of specific pathways.

  4. Separation of oligo/polymers of 5-N-acetylneuraminic acid, 5-N-glycolylneuraminic acid, and 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-glycero-D-galacto-nononic acid by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detector.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Inoue, Y; Inoue, S; Lee, Y C

    1997-08-01

    A sensitive and efficient method to analyze oligo/ poly-sialic acids containing alpha2-8-linked 5-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), 5-N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc), and deaminated neuraminic acid (KDN) using high-performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC) with a pulsed amperometric detector (PAD-2) has been developed. Using a CarboPac PA-100 column and sodium nitrate as the pushing agent, polymers in colominic acid with degree of polymerization (DP) up to 80 were separated in 68 min. A similar DP-based resolution was also obtained on a CarboPac PA-1 column. The elution ladders of the Neu5Ac, Neu5Gc, and KDN series were sufficiently different to be used as diagnostic indices. This technique was applied to identification of the sialic acid components in a polysialoglycoprotein (PSGP) sample as well as monitoring the oligo/poly-KDN-containing fractions during the purification of KDN-containing glycoprotein (KDN-gp). The maximum DPs of oligo-Neu5Gc and oligo-KDN that can be detected in PSGP and KDN-gp hydrolysates were 11 and 8, respectively. The high sensitivity of this method was demonstrated by the quantification of Neu5Ac oligomers. Distributions of the monomer and oligo/polymers in the acid and enzymatic hydrolysates of colominic acid and PSGP under different conditions were also studied.

  5. Viral agents causing lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized children: evaluation of the Speed-Oligo® RSV assay for the detection of respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Yebra, W; Ávila-Carrillo, J A; Giménez-Sánchez, F; Reyes-Bertos, A; Sánchez-Forte, M; Morales-Torres, M; Rojas, A; Mendoza, J

    2012-03-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the viral agent which is more frequently involved in lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in infants under 1 year of age in developed countries. A new oligochromatographic assay, Speed-Oligo® RSV, was designed and optimized for the specific detection and identification of RSV subtypes A and B. The test was evaluated in 289 clinical samples from 169 hospitalized children using an immunochromatography (IC) test, virus isolation by culture, and an in-house real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Other viruses causing LRTIs were investigated by cell culture or PCR-based tests. Sixty-two patients were infected by RSV (36.7%). In addition, adenovirus, influenza B, parainfluenza 2, and human metapneumovirus were detected in rates ranging from 5 to 8%. A proportion of 10.1% of the patients had mixed infections. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were, respectively, 94.9, 99.4, 98.9, and 97.4% for Speed-Oligo® RSV, 92.9, 96.3, 92.9, and 96.3% for RT-PCR/RSV, and 58.4, 98.1, 93.3, and 82.6% for IC. Our rates of viral detection and co-infection were similar to those of previously reported series. Finally, we find that Speed-Oligo® RSV is a rapid and easy-to-perform technique for the detection of RSV and the identification of subtypes A and B.

  6. Oligo-Miocene foraminiferal record (Miogypsinidae, Lepidocyclinidae and Nummulitidae) from the Western Taurides (SW Turkey): Biometry and implications for the regional geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özcan, Ercan; Less, György; Báldi-Beke, Mária; Kollányi, Katalin; Acar, Ferhat

    2009-05-01

    The marine Oligo-Miocene units of western Taurides, deposited under different tectonic regimes (in Bey Dağları platform in foreland and coeval sequences in hinterland), were studied to establish a high-resolution biostratigraphic framework. Biometric study of the full spectrum of larger foraminifera in a regional scale allowed us correlating them with the shallow benthic zonation (SBZ) system introduced by [Cahuzac, B., Poignant, A., 1997. Essai de biozonation de l'Oligo-Miocène dans les bassins européens à l'aide des grands foraminifères néritiques. Bulletin de la Société géologique de France 168, 155-169], and to determine the ages of these sites on zonal precision for the first time. In correlating these assemblages to standard shallow benthic zones, planktonic data were also used whenever possible. Taxa, classified under the genera Nummulites, Miogypsina, Miolepidocyclina, Nephrolepidina, Eulepidina, Heterostegina, Operculina and Cycloclypeus (?) and their assemblages, closely resemble to the fauna described from European basins. These groups characterize the SBZ 22B to 25 zones referring to a time interval from early Chattian to Burdigalian. However, a main gap in late Chattian (SBZ 23) and in early part of the Aquitanian (SBZ 24) is also recorded in the platform succession. In the meantime, rare Eulepidina in the Burdigalian levels suggest a clear Indo-Pacific influence. Based on the discovery of early Chattian (SBZ 22B) deposits (previously mapped under Eocene/Miocene units), the Oligo-Miocene stratigraphy of the Bey Dağları platform is also revised. A more precise chronology for regional Miocene transgression is presented based on the miogypsinid evolutionary scale.

  7. Cell Polarity Signaling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhenbiao

    2009-01-01

    Cell polarization is intimately linked to plant development, growth, and responses to the environment. Major advances have been made in our understanding of the signaling pathways and networks that regulate cell polarity in plants owing to recent studies on several model systems, e.g., tip growth in pollen tubes, cell morphogenesis in the leaf epidermis, and polar localization of PINs. From these studies we have learned that plant cells use conserved mechanisms such as Rho family GTPases to integrate both plant-specific and conserved polarity cues and to coordinate the cytoskeketon dynamics/reorganization and vesicular trafficking required for polarity establishment and maintenance. This review focuses upon signaling mechanisms for cell polarity formation in Arabidopsis, with an emphasis on Rho GTPase signaling in polarized cell growth and how these mechanisms compare with those for cell polarity signaling in yeast and animal systems. PMID:18837672

  8. Apoplastic Diffusion Barriers in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus Benni; Geldner, Niko; Reina-Pinto, José J.; Kunst, Ljerka

    2013-01-01

    During the development of Arabidopsis and other land plants, diffusion barriers are formed in the apoplast of specialized tissues within a variety of plant organs. While the cuticle of the epidermis is the primary diffusion barrier in the shoot, the Casparian strips and suberin lamellae of the endodermis and the periderm represent the diffusion barriers in the root. Different classes of molecules contribute to the formation of extracellular diffusion barriers in an organ- and tissue-specific manner. Cutin and wax are the major components of the cuticle, lignin forms the early Casparian strip, and suberin is deposited in the stage II endodermis and the periderm. The current status of our understanding of the relationships between the chemical structure, ultrastructure and physiological functions of plant diffusion barriers is discussed. Specific aspects of the synthesis of diffusion barrier components and protocols that can be used for the assessment of barrier function and important barrier properties are also presented. PMID:24465172

  9. Protein resistant surfaces: comparison of acrylate graft polymers bearing oligo-ethylene oxide and phosphorylcholine side chains.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Zhu, Shiping; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Brash, John L

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this work was to compare poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and phosphorylcholine (PC) moieties as surface modifiers with respect to their ability to inhibit protein adsorption. Surfaces were prepared by graft polymerization of the methacrylate monomers oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (OEGMA, MW 300, PEG side chains of length n=4.5) and 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC, MW 295). The grafted polymers thus contained short PEG chains and PC, respectively, as side groups. Grafting on silicon was carried out using surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Graft density was controlled via the surface density of the ATRP initiator, and chain length of the grafts was controlled via the ratio of monomer to sacrificial initiator. The grafted surfaces were characterized by water contact angle, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The effect of graft density and chain length on fibrinogen adsorption from buffer was investigated using radio labeling methods. Adsorption to both MPC- and OEGMA-grafted surfaces was found to decrease with increasing graft density and chain length. Adsorption on the MPC and OEGMA surfaces for a given chain length and density was essentially the same. Very low adsorption levels of the order of 7 ngcm(2) were seen on the most resistant surfaces. The effect of protein size on resistance to adsorption was studied using binary solutions of lysozyme (MW 14 600) and fibrinogen (MW 340 000). Adsorption levels in these experiments were also greatly reduced on the grafted surfaces compared to the control surfaces. It was concluded that at the lowest graft density, both proteins had unrestricted access to the substrate, and the relative affinities of the proteins for the substrate (higher affinity of fibrinogen) determined the composition of the layer. At the highest graft density also, where the adsorption of both proteins was very low, no preference for one or the other

  10. Petrogenesis of the post-collisional Oligo-Miocene Volcanism in NW Anatolia (Turkey): Balıkesir Volcanites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünal, Alp; Altunkaynak, Şafak; Benowitz, Jeff A.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we present whole-rock chemical and Sr-Nd-Pb-O isotopic compositions as well as 40Ar/39Ar ages of Balıkesir volcanites to evaluate the nature, genesis and timing of the post-collisional Oligo-Miocene magmatism in NW Anatolia. Three main volcano-stratigraphic groups distinguished in the Balıkesir volcanites on the basis of field observations and petrographical investigations; 1) andesitic lavas and related pyroclastic units representing the lower part of the volcanic sequence; 2) Trachyandesite- basaltic trachyandesite lavas and 3) dacitic lavas and associated pyroclastic units corresponding to the upper part of the volcanic sequence. Both andesitic and dacitic pyroclastic units are represented with ash fall, ash block flow and flow breccia units. Geochemically, Balıkesir volcanites are ranging in composition from basaltic trachy-andesite to dacite. They are sub-alkaline in character and show enrichment in large ion lithophile elements (LILE) and light rare earth elements (LREE) relative to the high field strength elements (HFSE). Balıkesir volcanites display depletion in P, Ta, Nb and Ti. All these trace element characteristics and inter-element ratios suggest that magma forming the Balıkesir volcanites show similar patterns to those of subduction-related arc magmas and/or post collisional lavas. They have high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.707109-0.708620), low 143Nd/144Nd (0.512322- 0.512493). 206Pb/204Pb and 207Pb/204Pb values vary from 18.703 to 18.867 and 15.681 to 15.714, respectively and ɛNd values range between -5.61 and -2.27. 18O isotopic ratios range between 8.3 and 11.8. All these isotopic characteristics and major-trace element compositions of Balıkesir volcanites suggest that the lavas are co-genetic and originated from a hybrid magma derived from enriched mantle (EM II) source. 40Ar/39Ar dating yielded isochron ages of 22.9±0.2 - 21.0±0.2 which is consistent with other volcanic and plutonic associations of western Anatolia (eg

  11. RoboOligo: software for mass spectrometry data to support manual and de novo sequencing of post-transcriptionally modified ribonucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Sample, Paul J; Gaston, Kirk W; Alfonzo, Juan D; Limbach, Patrick A

    2015-05-26

    Ribosomal ribonucleic acid (RNA), transfer RNA and other biological or synthetic RNA polymers can contain nucleotides that have been modified by the addition of chemical groups. Traditional Sanger sequencing methods cannot establish the chemical nature and sequence of these modified-nucleotide containing oligomers. Mass spectrometry (MS) has become the conventional approach for determining the nucleotide composition, modification status and sequence of modified RNAs. Modified RNAs are analyzed by MS using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (CID MS/MS), which produces a complex dataset of oligomeric fragments that must be interpreted to identify and place modified nucleosides within the RNA sequence. Here we report the development of RoboOligo, an interactive software program for the robust analysis of data generated by CID MS/MS of RNA oligomers. There are three main functions of RoboOligo: (i) automated de novo sequencing via the local search paradigm. (ii) Manual sequencing with real-time spectrum labeling and cumulative intensity scoring. (iii) A hybrid approach, coined 'variable sequencing', which combines the user intuition of manual sequencing with the high-throughput sampling of automated de novo sequencing.

  12. Purification of compounds from Lignum Dalbergia Odorifera using two-dimensional preparative chromatography with Click oligo (ethylene glycol) and C18 column.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jiatao; Xiao, Yuansheng; Guo, Zhimou; Yu, Danhua; Jin, Yu; Liang, Xinmiao

    2011-02-01

    Purification of compounds from traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) is an important task for understanding the chemical composition of TCMs. However, it is difficult to obtain compounds with high enough purity for identification by NMR due to the complexity of TCMs in chemical composition. In this study, a two-dimensional purification method based on a Click oligo (ethylene glycol) column and a C18 column was developed to realize an orthogonal separation in preparative level for purifying compounds efficiently. The first dimensional preparation was performed on a Click oligo (ethylene glycol) column to simplify the sample into the fractions with good separation repeatability. On the first dimension, 7.2 g sample was separated into 11 fractions with a recovery of 86% within 6 h. A C18 column was taken as the second dimension to realize the high-performance separation and rapid preparation from the fractions collected from the first dimension. Eight compounds in fraction 6 and 2 compounds in fraction 8 were isolated and identified after optimizing the separation and collection parameters. This method is a high-efficient and orthogonal preparation method to improve the separation of a complex sample and increase the purity of the compounds, which benefits from the application of novel materials in the preparation and purification.

  13. Body Composition, Hemodynamic and Biochemical Parameters in Young Female Normal-Weight Oligo-amenorrheic and Eumenorrheic Athletes and Non-athletes

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Vibha; de Lourdes Eguiguren, Maria; Eysenbach, Lindsey; Clarke, Hannah; Slattery, Meghan; Eddy, Kamryn; Ackerman, Kathryn E.; Misra, Madhusmita

    2014-01-01

    Aims Low-weight hypogonadal conditions such as anorexia nervosa are associated with marked changes in body composition, hemodynamic and hematological parameters, and liver enzymes. The impact of athletic activity in normal-weight adolescents with/without amenorrhea on these parameters has not been assessed. Our aim was to examine these parameters in normal-weight athletes and non-athletes and determine any associations of body composition, oligo-amenorrhea and exercise intensity. Methods We assessed vital signs, complete blood counts, liver enzymes, and regional body composition in 43 oligo-amenorrheic athletes (OAA), 24 eumenorrheic athletes (EA) and 23 non-athletes 14-21 years of age. Results BMI was lower in OAA than EA. Systolic and pulse pressure, and temperature were lowest in OAA. Blood counts did not differ among groups. AST was higher in both groups of athletes, while ALT was higher in OAA than EA and non-athletes. Total and regional fat was lower in OAA than other groups, positively associated with heart rate and inversely with liver enzymes. Conclusions Athletic activity is associated with higher AST, whereas menstrual dysfunction is associated with lower total and regional fat and higher ALT. Higher liver enzymes are associated with reductions in total and regional fat. PMID:25376841

  14. An oligo-based microarray offers novel transcriptomic approaches for the analysis of pathogen resistance and fruit quality traits in melon (Cucumis melo L.)

    PubMed Central

    Mascarell-Creus, Albert; Cañizares, Joaquin; Vilarrasa-Blasi, Josep; Mora-García, Santiago; Blanca, José; Gonzalez-Ibeas, Daniel; Saladié, Montserrat; Roig, Cristina; Deleu, Wim; Picó-Silvent, Belén; López-Bigas, Nuria; Aranda, Miguel A; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Nuez, Fernando; Puigdomènech, Pere; Caño-Delgado, Ana I

    2009-01-01

    Background Melon (Cucumis melo) is a horticultural specie of significant nutritional value, which belongs to the Cucurbitaceae family, whose economic importance is second only to the Solanaceae. Its small genome of approx. 450 Mb coupled to the high genetic diversity has prompted the development of genetic tools in the last decade. However, the unprecedented existence of a transcriptomic approaches in melon, highlight the importance of designing new tools for high-throughput analysis of gene expression. Results We report the construction of an oligo-based microarray using a total of 17,510 unigenes derived from 33,418 high-quality melon ESTs. This chip is particularly enriched with genes that are expressed in fruit and during interaction with pathogens. Hybridizations for three independent experiments allowed the characterization of global gene expression profiles during fruit ripening, as well as in response to viral and fungal infections in plant cotyledons and roots, respectively. Microarray construction, statistical analyses and validation together with functional-enrichment analysis are presented in this study. Conclusion The platform validation and enrichment analyses shown in our study indicate that this oligo-based microarray is amenable for future genetic and functional genomic studies of a wide range of experimental conditions in melon. PMID:19821986

  15. Identifying essential genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Meinke, David; Muralla, Rosanna; Sweeney, Colleen; Dickerman, Allan

    2008-09-01

    Eight years after publication of the Arabidopsis genome sequence and two years before completing the first phase of an international effort to characterize the function of every Arabidopsis gene, plant biologists remain unable to provide a definitive answer to the following basic question: what is the minimal gene set required for normal growth and development? The purpose of this review is to summarize different strategies employed to identify essential genes in Arabidopsis, an important component of the minimal gene set in plants, to present an overview of the datasets and specific genes identified to date, and to discuss the prospects for future saturation of this important class of genes. The long-term goal of this collaborative effort is to facilitate basic research in plant biology and complement ongoing research with other model organisms.

  16. Differentiation of programmed Arabidopsis cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, De-Yu; Shi, Ming-Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Plants express genes that encode enzymes that catalyse reactions to form plant secondary metabolites in specific cell types. However, the mechanisms of how plants decide their cellular metabolic fate and how cells diversify and specialise their specific secondary metabolites remains largely unknown. Additionally, whether and how an established metabolic program impacts genome-wide reprogramming of plant gene expression is unclear. We recently isolated PAP1-programmed anthocyanin-producing (red) and -free (white) cells from Arabidopsis thaliana; our previous studies have indicated that the PAP1 expression level is similar between these two different cell types. Transcriptional analysis showed that the red cells contain the TTG1-GL3/TT8-PAP1 regulatory complex, which controls anthocyanin biosynthesis; in contrast, the white cells and the wild-type cells lack this entire complex. These data indicate that different regulatory programming underlies the different metabolic states of these cells. In addition, our previous transcriptomic comparison indicated that there is a clear difference in the gene expression profiles of the red and wild-type cells, which is probably a consequence of cell-specific reprogramming. Based on these observations, in this report we discuss the potential mechanisms that underlie the programming and reprogramming of gene expression involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis. PMID:22126737

  17. Analysis of Unfolded Protein Response in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yani; Brandizzi, Federica

    2014-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is fundamental for development and adaption in eukaryotic cells. Arabidopsis has become one of the best model systems to uncover conserved mechanisms of the UPR in multicellular eukaryotes as well as organism-specific regulation of the UPR in plants. Monitoring the UPR in planta is an elemental approach to identifying regulatory components and to revealing molecular mechanisms of the plant UPR. In this chapter, we provide protocols for the induction and analyses of plant UPR at a molecular level in Arabidopsis. Three kinds of ER stress treatment methods and quantitation of the plant UPR activation are described here. PMID:23913037

  18. Mineral chemistry, crystallization conditions and geodynamic implications of the Oligo-Miocene granitoids in the Biga Peninsula, Northwest Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aysal, Namık

    2015-06-01

    6.79% (mean = 4.15%). Meanwhile, the biotites, which display consistent oxygen fugacity values (-10.65 to -13.22), suggest their reliability with the typical values of calc-alkaline magma crystallization. These values suggest a relatively higher oxidation state during crystallization and are related to arc magmatism. All of the calculated values indicate that all of the plutons were emplaced at shallow crustal levels. It can be inferred that the Oligo-Miocene magmatism in NW Turkey may be linked to crustal thinning that resulted from slab roll-back and a back-arc extensional regime after the collision between the Sakarya Zone and Anatolide-Tauride Platform.

  19. Oligo-DNA Custom Macroarray for Monitoring Major Pathogenic and Non-Pathogenic Fungi and Bacteria in the Phyllosphere of Apple Trees

    PubMed Central

    He, Ying-Hong; Isono, Sayaka; Shibuya, Makoto; Tsuji, Masaharu; Adkar Purushothama, Charith-Raj; Tanaka, Kazuaki; Sano, Teruo

    2012-01-01

    Background To monitor the richness in microbial inhabitants in the phyllosphere of apple trees cultivated under various cultural and environmental conditions, we developed an oligo-DNA macroarray for major pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi and bacteria inhabiting the phyllosphere of apple trees. Methods and Findings First, we isolated culturable fungi and bacteria from apple orchards by an agar-plate culture method, and detected 32 fungal and 34 bacterial species. Alternaria, Aureobasidium, Cladosporium, Rhodotorula, Cystofilobasidium, and Epicoccum genera were predominant among the fungi, and Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, Methylobacterium, and Pantoea genera were predominant among the bacteria. Based on the data, we selected 29 major non-pathogenic and 12 phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria as the targets of macroarray. Forty-one species-specific 40-base pair long oligo-DNA sequences were selected from the nucleotide sequences of rDNA-internal transcribed spacer region for fungi and 16S rDNA for bacteria. The oligo-DNAs were fixed on nylon membrane and hybridized with digoxigenin-labeled cRNA probes prepared for each species. All arrays except those for Alternaria, Bacillus, and their related species, were specifically hybridized. The array was sensitive enough to detect 103 CFU for Aureobasidium pullulans and Bacillus cereus. Nucleotide sequencing of 100 each of independent fungal rDNA-ITS and bacterial 16S-rDNA sequences from apple tree was in agreement with the macroarray data obtained using the same sample. Finally, we analyzed the richness in the microbial inhabitants in the samples collected from apple trees in four orchards. Major apple pathogens that cause scab, Alternaria blotch, and Marssonina blotch were detected along with several non-phytopathogenic fungal and bacterial inhabitants. Conclusions The macroarray technique presented here is a strong tool to monitor the major microbial species and the community structures in the phyllosphere of

  20. Imaging lipid droplets in Arabidopsis mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy was adapted for the imaging of neutral lipids in plant leaves with defects in normal lipid metabolism using two different fluorescent dyes. Disruptions in a gene locus, At4g24160, yielded Arabidopsis thaliana plants with a preponderance of oil bodies in their leaves ...

  1. Engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many plants accumulate crystals of calcium oxalate. Just how these crystals form remains unknown. To gain insight into the mechanisms regulating calcium oxalate crystal formation, a crystal engineering approach was initiated utilizing the non-crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis. The success of t...

  2. Arabidopsis, the Rosetta stone of flowering time?

    PubMed

    Simpson, Gordon G; Dean, Caroline

    2002-04-12

    Multiple environmental and endogenous inputs regulate when plants flower. The molecular genetic dissection of flowering time control in Arabidopsis has identified an integrated network of pathways that quantitatively control the timing of this developmental switch. This framework provides the basis to understand the evolution of different reproductive strategies and how floral pathways interact through seasonal progression.

  3. Shotgun Proteomic Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two shotgun tandem mass spectrometry proteomics approaches, Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) and 1D-Gel-LC-MS/MS, were used to identify Arabidopsis thaliana leaf proteins. These methods utilize different protein/peptide separation strategies. Detergents not compatible wit...

  4. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  5. The combination of oligo- and polysaccharides and reticulated protein for the control of symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome: Results of a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel group, multicentre clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Alexea, Octavian; Bacarea, Vlad

    2015-01-01

    Background A medical device containing the film-forming agent reticulated protein and a prebiotic mixture of vegetable oligo- and polysaccharides has been developed, recently receiving European approval as MED class III for the treatment of chronic/functional or recidivant diarrhoea due to different causes including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In the present paper, we evaluate a protein preparation containing these components in comparison with placebo in adult patients with diarrhoea-predominant IBS. Methods In a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel group, multicentre clinical trial, patients were randomly assigned to receive the combination of oligo- and polysaccharides and reticulated protein and placebo (four oral tablets/day for 56 days). Demographic, clinical and quality of life characteristics and presence and intensity of abdominal pain and flatulence (seven-point Likert scale) were assessed at three study visits (baseline and at 28 and 56 days). Stool emissions were recorded on the diary card using the seven-point Bristol Stool Scale. Results A total of 128 patients were randomised to receive either tablets containing the combination (n = 63) or placebo (n = 65). Treatment with oligo- and polysaccharides and reticulated protein was safe and well tolerated. A significant improvement in symptoms across the study was observed in patients treated with oligo- and polysaccharides and reticulated protein between visit 2 and visit 3 in abdominal pain (p = 0.0167) and flatulence (p = 0.0373). We also detected a statistically significant increase in the quality of life of patients receiving the active treatment from baseline to visit 3 (p < 0.0001). Conclusions Treatment with oligo- and polysaccharides and reticulated protein is safe, improving IBS symptoms and quality of life of patients with diarrhoea-predominant IBS. PMID:27403313

  6. Presence of Potential Toxin-Producing Cyanobacteria in an Oligo-Mesotrophic Lake in Baltic Lake District, Germany: An Ecological, Genetic and Toxicological Survey

    PubMed Central

    Dadheech, Pawan K.; Selmeczy, Géza B.; Vasas, Gábor; Padisák, Judit; Arp, Wolfgang; Tapolczai, Kálmán; Casper, Peter; Krienitz, Lothar

    2014-01-01

    Massive developments of potentially toxic cyanobacteria in Lake Stechlin, an oligo-mesotrophic lake in the Baltic Lake District of Germany raised concerns about toxic contamination of these important ecosystems. Field samples in the phase of mass developments of cyanobacteria were used for genetic and toxicological analyses. Microcystins and microcystin genes were detected in field samples of the lake for the first time. However, the toxins were not produced by the dominant taxa (Dolichospermum circinale and Aphanizomenon flos-aquae) but by taxa, which were present only in low biomass in the samples (Microcystis cf. aeruginosa and Planktothrix rubescens). The phytoplankton successions during the study period revealed an increase of cyanobacterial populations. The findings contribute to the changes that have been investigated in Lake Stechlin since the mid-1990s. The possible reasons behind these developments may be climate change, special weather conditions and an increased nutrient pool. PMID:25268981

  7. Presence of potential toxin-producing cyanobacteria in an oligo-mesotrophic lake in Baltic Lake District, Germany: an ecological, genetic and toxicological survey.

    PubMed

    Dadheech, Pawan K; Selmeczy, Géza B; Vasas, Gábor; Padisák, Judit; Arp, Wolfgang; Tapolczai, Kálmán; Casper, Peter; Krienitz, Lothar

    2014-09-29

    Massive developments of potentially toxic cyanobacteria in Lake Stechlin, an oligo-mesotrophic lake in the Baltic Lake District of Germany raised concerns about toxic contamination of these important ecosystems. Field samples in the phase of mass developments of cyanobacteria were used for genetic and toxicological analyses. Microcystins and microcystin genes were detected in field samples of the lake for the first time. However, the toxins were not produced by the dominant taxa (Dolichospermum circinale and Aphanizomenon flos-aquae) but by taxa, which were present only in low biomass in the samples (Microcystis cf. aeruginosa and Planktothrix rubescens). The phytoplankton successions during the study period revealed an increase of cyanobacterial populations. The findings contribute to the changes that have been investigated in Lake Stechlin since the mid-1990s. The possible reasons behind these developments may be climate change, special weather conditions and an increased nutrient pool.

  8. Prevailing Photocurrent Generation of D-π-A Type Oligo(phenyleneethynylene) in Contact with Gold over Dexter-Type Energy-Transfer Quenching.

    PubMed

    Uji, Hirotaka; Ito, Taichi; Matsumoto, Mitsuaki; Kimura, Shunsaku

    2016-03-03

    Photocurrent generation is observed with D-π-A type oligo(phenyleneethynylene) (OPE) physically contacting gold substrate. The OPE is conjugated with helical peptides, which helps the OPE moiety orient vertically on gold surface. This configuration makes the Dexter energy transfer difficult to occur even though one end of the D-π-A type OPE physically contacts gold. The anodic photocurrent continuously increases with increment of applying bias voltage from -0.3 to 0.5 V. The first principle calculations reveal that the increase in photocurrent generation is attributed partly to the change in the electron distributions of HOMO and LUMO of the D-π-A type OPE to be more localized with applying the positive potential.

  9. A broader role for AmyR in Aspergillus niger: regulation of the utilisation of D-glucose or D-galactose containing oligo- and polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    vanKuyk, Patricia A; Benen, Jaques A E; Wösten, Han A B; Visser, Jaap; de Vries, Ronald P

    2012-01-01

    AmyR is commonly considered a regulator of starch degradation whose activity is induced by the presence of maltose, the disaccharide building block of starch. In this study, we demonstrate that the role of AmyR extends beyond starch degradation. Enzyme activity assays, genes expression analysis and growth profiling on D-glucose- and D-galactose-containing oligo- and polysaccharides showed that AmyR regulates the expression of some of the Aspergillus niger genes encoding α- and β-glucosidases, α- and β- galactosidases, as well as genes encoding α-amlyases and glucoamylases. In addition, we provide evidence that D-glucose or a metabolic product thereof may be the inducer of the AmyR system in A. niger and not maltose, as is commonly assumed.

  10. Oligo-aspartic acid conjugates with benzo[c][2,6]naphthyridine-8-carboxylic acid scaffold as picomolar inhibitors of CK2.

    PubMed

    Vahter, Jürgen; Viht, Kaido; Uri, Asko; Enkvist, Erki

    2017-02-28

    Structurally diverse inhibitors of the protein kinase CK2 are required for regulation of this ubiquitous protein to establish biological roles of the enzyme which catalyzes the phosphorylation of a vast number of substrate proteins. In this article we disclose a series of new bisubstrate inhibitors of CK2 that are structurally represented by the oligo(l-Asp) peptide conjugates of benzo[c][2,6]naphthyridine-8-carboxylic acid. This fragment originated from CX-4945, the first in class inhibitor taken to clinical trials. The most potent conjugates possessed two-digit picomolar affinity and clear selectivity for CK2α in a panel of 140 protein kinases. Labeling of the inhibitors with a fluorescent dye yielded probes for a fluorescence anisotropy-based binding/displacement assay which can be used for analysis of CK2 and precise determination of affinity of the highly potent (tight-binding) CK2-targeting inhibitors.

  11. Prognostic Value of MR Imaging Texture Analysis in Brain Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Oligo-Metastases Undergoing Stereotactic Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Tini, Paolo; Biondi, Michelangelo; Sebaste, Lucio; Vanzi, Eleonora; De Otto, Gianmarco; Rubino, Giovanni; Carfagno, Tommaso; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Pastina, Pierpaolo; Cerase, Alfonso; Mazzoni, Lorenzo Nicola; Banci Buonamici, Fabrizio; Pirtoli, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Background  Stereotactic irradiation is widely used in brain oligo-metastases treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prognostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) texture analysis (TA) of brain metastases (BM) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and methods  This study included thirty-eight consecutive patients undergoing stereotactic irradiation, that is, stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SRT) or radiosurgery (SRS), from January 2011 to December 2014 for 1-2 brain BM from NSCLC. Whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) was not delivered. The diagnostic MRI DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) images were collected and analyzed with a homemade ImageJ macro, and typical TA parameters (mean, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis, entropy, and uniformity) were evaluated for: brain progression-free survival; modality of brain metastatic progression (local progression or/and new metastases); and overall survival, after SRT/SRS. Results After SRT/SRS 14 patients (36.8%) experienced recurrence in the brain, with a recurrence in the irradiated site (five patients, 13.2%), new metastases (11 patients, 28.9%), local recurrence and new metastases (two patients, 5.25%). Nineteen patients (50%) died of tumor progression or other causes. Entropy and uniformity were significantly associated with local progression, whereas kurtosis was significantly associated with both local progression and new brain metastases. Conclusions  These results appear promising, since the knowledge of factors correlated with the modality of brain progression after stereotactic irradiation of brain oligo-metastatic foci of NSCLC might help in driving the best treatment in these patients (association of SRT/SRS with WBRT? Increase of SRT/SRS dose?). Our preliminary data needs confirmation in large patient series. PMID:27226944

  12. Characterization of Recombinant UDP- and ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylases and Glycogen Synthase To Elucidate Glucose-1-Phosphate Partitioning into Oligo- and Polysaccharides in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Asención Diez, Matías D.; Peirú, Salvador; Demonte, Ana M.; Gramajo, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor exhibits a major secondary metabolism, deriving important amounts of glucose to synthesize pigmented antibiotics. Understanding the pathways occurring in the bacterium with respect to synthesis of oligo- and polysaccharides is of relevance to determine a plausible scenario for the partitioning of glucose-1-phosphate into different metabolic fates. We report the molecular cloning of the genes coding for UDP- and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases as well as for glycogen synthase from genomic DNA of S. coelicolor A3(2). Each gene was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli cells to produce and purify to electrophoretic homogeneity the respective enzymes. UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UDP-Glc PPase) was characterized as a dimer exhibiting a relatively high Vmax in catalyzing UDP-glucose synthesis (270 units/mg) and with respect to dTDP-glucose (94 units/mg). ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (ADP-Glc PPase) was found to be tetrameric in structure and specific in utilizing ATP as a substrate, reaching similar activities in the directions of ADP-glucose synthesis or pyrophosphorolysis (Vmax of 0.15 and 0.27 units/mg, respectively). Glycogen synthase was arranged as a dimer and exhibited specificity in the use of ADP-glucose to elongate α-1,4-glucan chains in the polysaccharide. ADP-Glc PPase was the only of the three enzymes exhibiting sensitivity to allosteric regulation by different metabolites. Mannose-6-phosphate, phosphoenolpyruvate, fructose-6-phosphate, and glucose-6-phosphate behaved as major activators, whereas NADPH was a main inhibitor of ADP-Glc PPase. The results support a metabolic picture where glycogen synthesis occurs via ADP-glucose in S. coelicolor, with the pathway being strictly regulated in connection with other routes involved with oligo- and polysaccharides, as well as with antibiotic synthesis in the bacterium. PMID:22210767

  13. 17th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, Judith

    2006-07-02

    The 17th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research was held at the University of Madison, Wisconsin from June 27- July 2, 2006. ICAR-2006 included approximately 625 scientists from across the world. The scientific program was of excellent quality featuring 73 talks, including 30 from invited speakers. There were also 6 community-organized workshops (facilitated by conference staff) featuring additional talks on topics including ‘Submitting data to long-term repositories,’ ‘TAIR introductory workshop,’ ‘Web services and demonstration,’ ‘Public engagement: broadening the impact of your research,’ ‘Systems biology approaches to analysis of metabolic and regulatory networks of Arabidopsis,’ and ‘Mechanotransduction in Arabidopsis.’ Approximately 440 posters were presented in general topic areas including, among others, Development, Modeling/Other Systems, Energy, Environment, and Genetic/Epigenetic mechanisms. Graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, junior faculty, and underrepresented minorities made up a significant portion of the oral presentations thereby promoting the training of young scientists and facilitating important career development opportunities for speakers. Several poster sessions provided an opportunity for younger participants to freely meet with more established scientists. The North American Arabidopsis Steering Committee (NAASC) continued its outreach effort and again sponsored two special luncheons to encourage personal and professional development of young scientists and also underrepresented minorities. The ‘Emerging Scientists Luncheon’ featured 10 graduate students selected on the basis of scientific excellence of their submitted research abstracts. The ‘Minority Funding Luncheon,’ featured 8 awardees selected by the NAASC through a widely-publicized application process. This luncheon was established specifically to provide an opportunity for underrepresented minorities, and/or scientists from

  14. Evolutionary Divergence of Arabidopsis thaliana Classical Peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Kupriyanova, E V; Mamoshina, P O; Ezhova, T A

    2015-10-01

    Polymorphisms of 62 peroxidase genes derived from Arabidopsis thaliana were investigated to evaluate evolutionary dynamics and divergence of peroxidase proteins. By comparing divergence of duplicated genes AtPrx53-AtPrx54 and AtPrx36-AtPrx72 and their products, nucleotide and amino acid substitutions were identified that were apparently targets of positive selection. These substitutions were detected among paralogs of 461 ecotypes from Arabidopsis thaliana. Some of these substitutions are conservative and matched paralogous peroxidases in other Brassicaceae species. These results suggest that after duplication, peroxidase genes evolved under the pressure of positive selection, and amino acid substitutions identified during our study provided divergence of properties and physiological functions in peroxidases. Our predictions regarding functional significance for amino acid residues identified in variable sites of peroxidases may allow further experimental assessment of evolution of peroxidases after gene duplication.

  15. Root gravitropism in maize and Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Michael L.

    1993-01-01

    Research during the period 1 March 1992 to 30 November 1993 focused on improvements in a video digitizer system designed to automate the recording of surface extension in plants responding to gravistimulation. The improvements included modification of software to allow detailed analysis of localized extension patterns in roots of Arabidopsis. We used the system to analyze the role of the postmitotic isodiametric growth zone (a region between the meristem and the elongation zone) in the response of maize roots to auxin, calcium, touch and gravity. We also used the system to analyze short-term auxin and gravitropic responses in mutants of Arabidopsis with reduced auxin sensitivity. In a related project, we studied the relationship between growth rate and surface electrical currents in roots by examining the effects of gravity and thigmostimulation on surface potentials in maize roots.

  16. DYn-2 Based Identification of Arabidopsis Sulfenomes*

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Salma; Huang, Jingjing; Bodra, Nandita; De Smet, Barbara; Wahni, Khadija; Rombaut, Debbie; Pauwels, Jarne; Gevaert, Kris; Carroll, Kate; Van Breusegem, Frank; Messens, Joris

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the sulfenylation state of stressed cells is emerging as a strategic approach for the detection of key reactive oxygen species signaling proteins. Here, we optimized an in vivo trapping method for cysteine sulfenic acids in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) stressed plant cells using a dimedone based DYn-2 probe. We demonstrated that DYn-2 specifically detects sulfenylation events in an H2O2 dose- and time-dependent way. With mass spectrometry, we identified 226 sulfenylated proteins after H2O2 treatment of Arabidopsis cells, residing in the cytoplasm (123); plastid (68); mitochondria (14); nucleus (10); endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi and plasma membrane (7) and peroxisomes (4). Of these, 123 sulfenylated proteins have never been reported before to undergo cysteine oxidative post-translational modifications in plants. All in all, with this DYn-2 approach, we have identified new sulfenylated proteins, and gave a first glance on the locations of the sulfenomes of Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:25693797

  17. High-throughput TILLING for Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Till, Bradley J; Colbert, Trenton; Codomo, Christine; Enns, Linda; Johnson, Jessica; Reynolds, Steven H; Henikoff, Jorja G; Greene, Elizabeth A; Steine, Michael N; Comai, Luca; Henikoff, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Targeting induced local lesions in genomes (TILLING) is a general strategy for identifying induced point mutations that can be applied to almost any organism. In this chapter, we describe the basic methodology for high-throughput TILLING. Gene segments are amplified using fluorescently tagged primers, and products are denatured and reannealed to form heteroduplexes between the mutated sequence and its wild-type counterpart. These heteroduplexes are substrates for cleavage by the endonuclease CEL I. Following cleavage, products are analyzed on denaturing polyacrylamide gels using the LI-COR DNA analyzer system. High-throughput TILLING has been adopted by the Arabidopsis TILLING Project (ATP) to provide allelic series of point mutations for the general Arabidopsis community.

  18. Comparative transcriptomics of Arabidopsis sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Borges, Filipe; Gomes, Gabriela; Gardner, Rui; Moreno, Nuno; McCormick, Sheila; Feijó, José A; Becker, Jörg D

    2008-10-01

    In flowering plants, the two sperm cells are embedded within the cytoplasm of the growing pollen tube and as such are passively transported to the embryo sac, wherein double fertilization occurs upon their release. Understanding the mechanisms and conditions by which male gametes mature and take part in fertilization are crucial goals in the study of plant reproduction. Studies of gene expression in male gametes of maize (Zea mays) and Plumbago and in lily (Lilium longiflorum) generative cells already showed that the previously held view of transcriptionally inert male gametes was not true, but genome-wide studies were lacking. Analyses in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) were hindered, because no method to isolate sperm cells was available. Here, we used fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate sperm cells from Arabidopsis, allowing GeneChip analysis of their transcriptome at a genome-wide level. Comparative analysis of the sperm cell transcriptome with those of representative sporophytic tissues and of pollen showed that sperm has a distinct and diverse transcriptional profile. Functional classifications of genes with enriched expression in sperm cells showed that DNA repair, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, and cell cycle progression are overrepresented Gene Ontology categories. Moreover, analysis of the small RNA and DNA methylation pathways suggests that distinct mechanisms might be involved in regulating the epigenetic state of the paternal genome. We identified numerous candidate genes whose involvement in sperm cell development and fertilization can now be directly tested in Arabidopsis. These results provide a roadmap to decipher the role of sperm-expressed proteins.

  19. Regulatory Proteolysis in Arabidopsis-Pathogen Interactions.

    PubMed

    Pogány, Miklós; Dankó, Tamás; Kámán-Tóth, Evelin; Schwarczinger, Ildikó; Bozsó, Zoltán

    2015-09-24

    Approximately two and a half percent of protein coding genes in Arabidopsis encode enzymes with known or putative proteolytic activity. Proteases possess not only common housekeeping functions by recycling nonfunctional proteins. By irreversibly cleaving other proteins, they regulate crucial developmental processes and control responses to environmental changes. Regulatory proteolysis is also indispensable in interactions between plants and their microbial pathogens. Proteolytic cleavage is simultaneously used both by plant cells, to recognize and inactivate invading pathogens, and by microbes, to overcome the immune system of the plant and successfully colonize host cells. In this review, we present available results on the group of proteases in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana whose functions in microbial pathogenesis were confirmed. Pathogen-derived proteolytic factors are also discussed when they are involved in the cleavage of host metabolites. Considering the wealth of review papers available in the field of the ubiquitin-26S proteasome system results on the ubiquitin cascade are not presented. Arabidopsis and its pathogens are conferred with abundant sets of proteases. This review compiles a list of those that are apparently involved in an interaction between the plant and its pathogens, also presenting their molecular partners when available.

  20. Analysis of the Arabidopsis Mitochondrial Proteome1

    PubMed Central

    Millar, A. Harvey; Sweetlove, Lee J.; Giegé, Philippe; Leaver, Christopher J.

    2001-01-01

    The complete set of nuclear genes that encode proteins targeted to mitochondria in plants is currently undefined and thus the full range of mitochondrial functions in plants is unknown. Analysis of two-dimensional gel separations of Arabidopsis cell culture mitochondrial protein revealed approximately 100 abundant proteins and 250 low-abundance proteins. Comparison of subfractions of mitochondrial protein on two-dimensional gels provided information on the soluble, membrane, or integral membrane locations of this protein set. A total of 170 protein spots were excised, trypsin-digested, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight mass spectrometry spectra obtained. Using this dataset, 91 of the proteins were identified by searching translated Arabidopsis genomic databases. Of this set, 81 have defined functions based on sequence comparison. These functions include respiratory electron transport, tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism, amino acid metabolism, protein import, processing, and assembly, transcription, membrane transport, and antioxidant defense. A total of 10 spectra were matched to Arabidopsis putative open reading frames for which no specific function has been determined. A total of 64 spectra did not match to an identified open reading frame. Analysis of full-length putative protein sequences using bioinformatic tools to predict subcellular targeting (TargetP, Psort, and MitoProt) revealed significant variation in predictions, and also a lack of mitochondrial targeting prediction for several characterized mitochondrial proteins. PMID:11743115

  1. Arabidopsis alternative oxidase sustains Escherichia coli respiration.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, A M; Söll, D

    1992-01-01

    Glutamyl-tRNA reductase, encoded by the hemA gene, is the first enzyme in porphyrin biosynthesis in many organisms. Hemes, important porphyrin derivatives, are essential components of redox enzymes, such as cytochromes. Thus a hemA Escherichia coli strain (SASX41B) is deficient in cytochrome-mediated aerobic respiration. Upon complementation of this strain with an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library, we isolated a clone which permitted the SASX41B strain to grow aerobically. The clone encodes the gene for Arabidopsis alternative oxidase, whose deduced amino acid sequence was found to have 71% identity with that of the enzyme from the voodoo lily, Sauromatum guttatum. The Arabidopsis protein is expressed as a 31-kDa protein in E. coli and confers on this organism cyanide-resistant growth, which in turn is sensitive to salicylhydroxamate. This implies that a single polypeptide is sufficient for alternative oxidase activity. Based on these observations we propose that a cyanide-insensitive respiratory pathway operates in the transformed E. coli hemA strain. Introduction of this pathway now opens the way to genetic/molecular biological investigations of alternative oxidase and its cofactor. Images PMID:1438286

  2. Phosphorylation of plastoglobular proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lohscheider, Jens N.; Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2016-01-01

    Plastoglobules (PGs) are plastid lipid–protein particles with a small specialized proteome and metabolome. Among the 30 core PG proteins are six proteins of the ancient ABC1 atypical kinase (ABC1K) family and their locations in an Arabidopsis mRNA-based co-expression network suggested central regulatory roles. To identify candidate ABC1K targets and a possible ABC1K hierarchical phosphorylation network within the chloroplast PG proteome, we searched Arabidopsis phosphoproteomics data from publicly available sources. Evaluation of underlying spectra and/or associated information was challenging for a variety of reasons, but supported pSer sites and a few pThr sites in nine PG proteins, including five FIBRILLINS. PG phosphorylation motifs are discussed in the context of possible responsible kinases. The challenges of collection and evaluation of published Arabidopsis phosphorylation data are discussed, illustrating the importance of deposition of all mass spectrometry data in well-organized repositories such as PRIDE and ProteomeXchange. This study provides a starting point for experimental testing of phosho-sites in PG proteins and also suggests that phosphoproteomics studies specifically designed toward the PG proteome and its ABC1K are needed to understand phosphorylation networks in these specialized particles. PMID:26962209

  3. [Imprinting genes and it's expression in Arabidopsis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Yu; Xu, Pei-Zhou; Yang, Hua; Wu, Xian-Jun

    2010-07-01

    Genomic imprinting refers to the phenomenon that the expression of a gene copy depends on its parent of origin. The Arabidopsis imprinted FIS (Fertilisation-independent seed) genes, mea, fis2, and fie, play essential roles in the repression of central cell and the regulation of early endosperm development. fis mutants display two phenotypes: autonomous diploid endosperm development when fertilization is absent and un-cellularised endosperm formation when fertilization occurs. The FIS Polycomb protein complex including the above three FIS proteins catalyzes histone H3 K27 tri-methylation on target loci. DME (DEMETER), a DNA glycosylase, and AtMET1 (Methyltransferase1), a DNA methyltransferase, are involved in the regulation of imprinted expression of both mea and fis2. This review summarizes the studies on the Arabidopsis imprinted FIS genes and other related genes. Recent works have shown that the insertion of transposons may affect nearby gene expression, which may be the main driving force behind the evolution of genomic imprinting. This summary covers the achievements on Arabidopsis imprinted genes will provide important information for studies on genomic imprinting in the important crops such as rice and maize.

  4. TBP-associated factors in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lago, Clara; Clerici, Elena; Mizzi, Luca; Colombo, Lucia; Kater, Martin M

    2004-11-24

    Initiation of transcription mediated by RNA polymerase II requires a number of transcription factors among which TFIID is the major core promoter recognition factor. TFIID is composed of highly conserved factors which include the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and about 14 TBP-associated factors (TAFs). Since TAFs play important roles in transcription they have been extensively studied in organisms like yeast, Drosophila and human. Surprisingly, TAFs have been poorly characterized in plants. With the completion of the Arabidopsis genome sequence, it is possible to search for TAFs, since many of them have conserved amino acid sequences. Mining the genome of Arabidopsis for TAFs resulted in the identification of 18 putative Arabidopsis TAFs (AtTAFs). We have analyzed their protein structure and their genomic localisation. Expression profiling by RT-PCR showed that these TAFs are expressed in all parts of the plant which is in agreement with their general role in transcription. These analyses in combination with their evolutionary conservation with TAFs of other organisms are discussed.

  5. Phytochrome regulation of branching in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Finlayson, Scott A; Krishnareddy, Srirama R; Kebrom, Tesfamichael H; Casal, Jorge J

    2010-04-01

    The red light:far-red light ratio perceived by phytochromes controls plastic traits of plant architecture, including branching. Despite the significance of branching for plant fitness and productivity, there is little quantitative and mechanistic information concerning phytochrome control of branching responses in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here, we show that in Arabidopsis, the negative effects of the phytochrome B mutation and of low red light:far-red light ratio on branching were largely due to reduced bud outgrowth capacity and an increased degree of correlative inhibition acting on the buds rather than due to a reduced number of leaves and buds available for branching. Phytochrome effects on the degree of correlative inhibition required functional BRANCHED1 (BRC1), BRC2, AXR1, MORE AXILLARY GROWTH2 (MAX2), and MAX4. The analysis of gene expression in selected buds indicated that BRC1 and BRC2 are part of different gene networks. The BRC1 network is linked to the growth capacity of specific buds, while the BRC2 network is associated with coordination of growth among branches. We conclude that the branching integrators BRC1 and BRC2 are necessary for responses to phytochrome, but they contribute differentially to these responses, likely acting through divergent pathways.

  6. Sodium Influx and Accumulation in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Essah, Pauline A.; Davenport, Romola; Tester, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Arabidopsis is frequently used as a genetic model in plant salt tolerance studies, however, its physiological responses to salinity remain poorly characterized. This study presents a characterization of initial Na+ entry and the effects of Ca2+ on plant growth and net Na+ accumulation in saline conditions. Unidirectional Na+ influx was measured carefully using very short influx times in roots of 12-d-old seedlings. Influx showed three components with distinct sensitivities to Ca2+, diethylpyrocarbonate, and osmotic pretreatment. Pharmacological agents and known mutants were used to test the contribution of different transport pathways to Na+ uptake. Influx was stimulated by 4-aminobutyric acid and glutamic acid; was inhibited by flufenamate, quinine, and cGMP; and was insensitive to modulators of K+ and Ca2+ channels. Influx did not differ from wild type in akt1 and hkt1 insertional mutants. These data suggested that influx was mediated by several different types of nonselective cation channels. Na+ accumulation in plants grown in 50 mm NaCl was strongly reduced by increasing Ca2+ activity (from 0.05-3.0 mm), and plant survival was improved. However, plant biomass was not affected by shoot Na+ concentration, suggesting that in Arabidopsis Na+ toxicity is not dependent on shoot Na+ accumulation. These data suggest that Arabidopsis is a good model for investigation of Na+ transport, but may be of limited utility as a model for the study of Na+ toxicity. PMID:12970496

  7. The Arabidopsis TAC Position Viewer: a high-resolution map of transformation-competent artificial chromosome (TAC) clones aligned with the Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia-0 genome.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Yoshitsugu; Suda, Kunihiro; Liu, Yao-Guang; Sato, Shusei; Nakamura, Yukino; Yokoyama, Koji; Yamamoto, Naoki; Hanano, Shigeru; Takita, Eiji; Sakurai, Nozomu; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Kaneko, Takakazu; Yano, Kentaro; Tabata, Satoshi; Shibata, Daisuke

    2015-09-01

    We present a high-resolution map of genomic transformation-competent artificial chromosome (TAC) clones extending over all Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) chromosomes. The Arabidopsis genomic TAC clones have been valuable genetic tools. Previously, we constructed an Arabidopsis genomic TAC library consisting of more than 10,000 TAC clones harboring large genomic DNA fragments extending over the whole Arabidopsis genome. Here, we determined 13,577 end sequences from 6987 Arabidopsis TAC clones and mapped 5937 TAC clones to precise locations, covering approximately 90% of the Arabidopsis chromosomes. We present the large-scale data set of TAC clones with high-resolution mapping information as a Java application tool, the Arabidopsis TAC Position Viewer, which provides ready-to-go transformable genomic DNA clones corresponding to certain loci on Arabidopsis chromosomes. The TAC clone resources will accelerate genomic DNA cloning, positional walking, complementation of mutants and DNA transformation for heterologous gene expression.

  8. Integrated analysis of transcriptome and metabolome of Arabidopsis albino or pale green mutants with disrupted nuclear-encoded chloroplast proteins.

    PubMed

    Satou, Masakazu; Enoki, Harumi; Oikawa, Akira; Ohta, Daisaku; Saito, Kazunori; Hachiya, Takushi; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kusano, Miyako; Fukushima, Atsushi; Saito, Kazuki; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Nagata, Noriko; Myouga, Fumiyoshi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Motohashi, Reiko

    2014-07-01

    We used four mutants having albino or pale green phenotypes with disrupted nuclear-encoded chloroplast proteins to analyze the regulatory system of metabolites in chloroplast. We performed an integrated analyses of transcriptomes and metabolomes of the four mutants. Transcriptome analysis was carried out using the Agilent Arabidopsis 2 Oligo Microarray, and metabolome analysis with two mass spectrometers; a direct-infusion Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR/MS) and a gas chromatograph-time of flight mass spectrometer. Among approximately 200 known metabolites detected by the FT-ICR/MS, 71 metabolites showed significant changes in the mutants when compared with controls (Ds donor plants). Significant accumulation of several amino acids (glutamine, glutamate and asparagine) was observed in the albino and pale green mutants. Transcriptome analysis revealed altered expressions of genes in several metabolic pathways. For example, genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and the de novo purine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway were up-regulated. These results suggest that nitrogen assimilation is constitutively promoted in the albino and pale green mutants. The accumulation of ammonium ions in the albino and pale green mutants was consistently higher than in Ds donor lines. Furthermore, genes related to pyridoxin accumulation and the de novo purine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway were up-regulated, which may have occurred as a result of the accumulation of glutamine in the albino and pale green mutants. The difference in metabolic profiles seems to be correlated with the disruption of chloroplast internal membrane structures in the mutants. In albino mutants, the alteration of metabolites accumulation and genes expression is stronger than pale green mutants.

  9. Gene expression profile analysis of Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) hemocytes after a Vibrio alginolyticus challenge using an immune-enriched oligo-microarray

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) is a cultured bivalve with worldwide commercial importance, and diseases cause high economic losses. For this reason, interest in the immune genes in this species has recently increased. The present work describes the construction of the first R. philippinarum microarray containing immune-related hemocyte sequences and its application to study the gene transcription profiles of hemocytes from clams infected with V. alginolyticus through a time course. Results The complete set of sequences from R. philippinarum available in the public databases and the hemocyte sequences enriched in immune transcripts were assembled successfully. A total of 12,156 annotated sequences were used to construct the 8 ×15 k oligo-microarray. The microarray experiments yielded a total of 579 differentially expressed transcripts. Using the gene expression results, the associated Gene Ontology terms and the enrichment analysis, we found different response mechanisms throughout the experiment. Genes related to signaling, transcription and apoptosis, such as IL-17D, NF-κB or calmodulin, were typically expressed as early as 3 hours post-challenge (hpc), while characteristic immune genes, such as PGRPs, FREPs and defense proteins appeared later at 8 hpc. This immune-triggering response could have affected a high number of processes that seemed to be activated 24 hpc to overcome the Vibrio challenge, including the expression of many cytoskeleton molecules, which is indicative of the active movement of hemocytes. In fact functional studies showed an increment in apoptosis, necrosis or cell migration after the infection. Finally, 72 hpc, activity returned to normal levels, and more than 50% of the genes were downregulated in a negative feedback of all of the previously active processes. Conclusions Using a new version of the R. philippinarum oligo-microarray, a putative timing for the response against a Vibrio infection was established. The key

  10. Construction of an Ostrea edulis database from genomic and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) obtained from Bonamia ostreae infected haemocytes: Development of an immune-enriched oligo-microarray.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Belén G; Álvarez-Dios, José Antonio; Cao, Asunción; Ramilo, Andrea; Gómez-Tato, Antonio; Planas, Josep V; Villalba, Antonio; Martínez, Paulino

    2016-12-01

    The flat oyster, Ostrea edulis, is one of the main farmed oysters, not only in Europe but also in the United States and Canada. Bonamiosis due to the parasite Bonamia ostreae has been associated with high mortality episodes in this species. This parasite is an intracellular protozoan that infects haemocytes, the main cells involved in oyster defence. Due to the economical and ecological importance of flat oyster, genomic data are badly needed for genetic improvement of the species, but they are still very scarce. The objective of this study is to develop a sequence database, OedulisDB, with new genomic and transcriptomic resources, providing new data and convenient tools to improve our knowledge of the oyster's immune mechanisms. Transcriptomic and genomic sequences were obtained using 454 pyrosequencing and compiled into an O. edulis database, OedulisDB, consisting of two sets of 10,318 and 7159 unique sequences that represent the oyster's genome (WG) and de novo haemocyte transcriptome (HT), respectively. The flat oyster transcriptome was obtained from two strains (naïve and tolerant) challenged with B. ostreae, and from their corresponding non-challenged controls. Approximately 78.5% of 5619 HT unique sequences were successfully annotated by Blast search using public databases. A total of 984 sequences were identified as being related to immune response and several key immune genes were identified for the first time in flat oyster. Additionally, transcriptome information was used to design and validate the first oligo-microarray in flat oyster enriched with immune sequences from haemocytes. Our transcriptomic and genomic sequencing and subsequent annotation have largely increased the scarce resources available for this economically important species and have enabled us to develop an OedulisDB database and accompanying tools for gene expression analysis. This study represents the first attempt to characterize in depth the O. edulis haemocyte transcriptome in

  11. Oligo-dT anchored cDNA-SCoT: a novel differential display method for analyzing differential gene expression in response to several stress treatments in mango (Mangifera indica L.).

    PubMed

    Luo, Cong; He, Xin-Hua; Hu, Ying; Yu, Hai-xia; Ou, Shi-Jin; Fang, Zhong-Bin

    2014-09-15

    Differential display is a powerful technique for analyzing differences in gene expression. Oligo-dT cDNAstart codon targeted marker (cDNA-SCoT) technique is a novel, simple, cheap, rapid, and efficient method for differential gene expression research. In the present study, the oligo-dT anchored cDNA-SCoT technique was exploited to identify differentially expressed genes during several stress treatments in mango. A total of 37 primers combined with oligo-dT anchor primers 3side amplified approximately 150 fragments of 150 bp to 1500 bp in length. Up to 100 fragments were differentially expressed among the stress treatments and control samples, among which 92 were obtained and sequenced. Out of the 92 transcript derived fragments (TDFs), 70% were highly homologous to known genes, and 30% encoded unclassified proteins with unknown functions. The expression pattern of nine genes with known functions involved in several abiotic stresses in other species was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) under cold (4 °C), salinity (NaCl), polyethylene glycol (PEG, MW 6000), and heavy metal treatments in leaves and stems at different time points (0, 24, 48, and 72 h). The expression patterns of the genes (TDF4, TDF7, TDF23, TDF45, TDF49, TDF50, TDF57, TDF91 and TDF92) that had direct or indirect relationships with cold, salinity, drought and heavy metal stress response were analyzed through qRT-PCR. The possible roles of these genes are discussed. This study suggests that the oligo-dT anchored cDNA-SCoT differential display method is a useful tool to serve as an initial step for characterizing transcriptional changes induced by abiotic stresses and provide gene information for further study and application in genetic improvement and breeding in mango.

  12. A survey of dominant mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Meinke, David W

    2013-02-01

    Following the recent publication of a comprehensive dataset of 2400 genes with a loss-of-function mutant phenotype in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), questions remain concerning the diversity of dominant mutations in Arabidopsis. Most of these dominant phenotypes are expected to result from inappropriate gene expression, novel protein function, or disrupted protein complexes. This review highlights the major classes of dominant mutations observed in model organisms and presents a collection of 200 Arabidopsis genes associated with a dominant or semidominant phenotype. Emphasis is placed on mutants identified through forward genetic screens of mutagenized or activation-tagged populations. These datasets illustrate the variety of genetic changes and protein functions that underlie dominance in Arabidopsis and may ultimately contribute to phenotypic variation in flowering plants.

  13. Copolymer Networks From Oligo(ε-caprolactone) and n-Butyl Acrylate Enable a Reversible Bidirectional Shape-Memory Effect at Human Body Temperature.

    PubMed

    Saatchi, Mersa; Behl, Marc; Nöchel, Ulrich; Lendlein, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Exploiting the tremendous potential of the recently discovered reversible bidirectional shape-memory effect (rbSME) for biomedical applications requires switching temperatures in the physiological range. The recent strategy is based on the reduction of the melting temperature range (ΔT m ) of the actuating oligo(ε-caprolactone) (OCL) domains in copolymer networks from OCL and n-butyl acrylate (BA), where the reversible effect can be adjusted to the human body temperature. In addition, it is investigated whether an rbSME in the temperature range close or even above Tm,offset (end of the melting transition) can be obtained. Two series of networks having mixtures of OCLs reveal broad ΔTm s from 2 °C to 50 °C and from -10 °C to 37 °C, respectively. In cyclic, thermomechanical experiments the rbSME can be tailored to display pronounced actuation in a temperature interval between 20 °C and 37 °C. In this way, the application spectrum of the rbSME can be extended to biomedical applications.

  14. Fluorescent oligo(p-phenyleneethynylene) contained amphiphiles-encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles for targeted magnetic resonance and two-photon optical imaging in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Chao; Hong, Binbin; Gong, Zhaocui; Zhao, Hui; Hu, Wenbo; Lu, Xiaomei; Li, Jie; Li, Xiang; Yang, Zhen; Fan, Quli; Yao, Yuyu; Huang, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Folate receptor-targeted multifunctional fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMNPs) composed of cores containing iron oxide nanocrystals and amphiphilic oligo(p-phenyleneethynylene) shells with multimodal imaging capability were successfully prepared through a convenient hydrophobic encapsulation approach. The iron oxide nanoparticles in the core provided T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), whereas the amphiphilic oligomers on the surface of the nanoparticles introduced good water-solubility, biocompatibility, excellent fluorescent properties and cancer-targeting. These nanoparticles exhibited superparamagnetic properties with saturation magnetization (Ms) of 23 emu g-1 and a transverse relaxivity rate of 140.89 mM-1 s-1. In vitro studies indicated that the dual-modal FMNPs can serve as an effective two-photon fluorescent and a magnetic probe to achieve the targeted imaging of Hela cells without obvious cytotoxicity. In vivo two-photon fluorescence and MRI results demonstrated that the FMNPs were able to preferentially accumulate in tumor tissues to allow dual-modal detection of tumors in a living body. These studies provided insight in developing novel multifunctional probes for multimodal imaging, which would play an important role for theranostics in biomedical science.

  15. Fluorescent oligo(p-phenyleneethynylene) contained amphiphiles-encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles for targeted magnetic resonance and two-photon optical imaging in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chao; Hong, Binbin; Gong, Zhaocui; Zhao, Hui; Hu, Wenbo; Lu, Xiaomei; Li, Jie; Li, Xiang; Yang, Zhen; Fan, Quli; Yao, Yuyu; Huang, Wei

    2015-05-21

    Folate receptor-targeted multifunctional fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMNPs) composed of cores containing iron oxide nanocrystals and amphiphilic oligo(p-phenyleneethynylene) shells with multimodal imaging capability were successfully prepared through a convenient hydrophobic encapsulation approach. The iron oxide nanoparticles in the core provided T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), whereas the amphiphilic oligomers on the surface of the nanoparticles introduced good water-solubility, biocompatibility, excellent fluorescent properties and cancer-targeting. These nanoparticles exhibited superparamagnetic properties with saturation magnetization (Ms) of 23 emu g(-1) and a transverse relaxivity rate of 140.89 mM(-1) s(-1). In vitro studies indicated that the dual-modal FMNPs can serve as an effective two-photon fluorescent and a magnetic probe to achieve the targeted imaging of Hela cells without obvious cytotoxicity. In vivo two-photon fluorescence and MRI results demonstrated that the FMNPs were able to preferentially accumulate in tumor tissues to allow dual-modal detection of tumors in a living body. These studies provided insight in developing novel multifunctional probes for multimodal imaging, which would play an important role for theranostics in biomedical science.

  16. Interferon-induced inhibition of parainfluenza virus type 5; the roles of MxA, PKR and oligo A synthetase/RNase L.

    PubMed

    Carlos, T S; Young, D; Stertz, S; Kochs, G; Randall, R E

    2007-06-20

    We have previously reported that the addition of interferon (IFN) to the culture medium of Vero cells (which cannot produce IFN) that were infected with the CPI- strain of parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5, formally known as SV5), that fails to block IFN signaling, rapidly induces alterations in the relative levels of virus mRNA and protein synthesis. In addition, IFN treatment also caused a rapid redistribution of virus proteins and enhanced the formation of cytoplasmic viral inclusion bodies. The most studied IFN-induced genes with known anti-viral activity are MxA, PKR and the Oligo A synthetase/RNase L system. We therefore examined the effects of these proteins on the replication cycle of PIV5. These studies revealed that while these proteins had some anti-viral activity against PIV5 they were not primarily responsible for the very rapid alteration in virus protein synthesis observed following IFN treatment, nor for the IFN-induced formation of virus inclusion bodies, in CPI- infected cells.

  17. Preparation of highly pure daidzin on oligo-β-cyclodextrin-Sepharose HP and investigation of chromatographic behavior of isoflavones by molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Li, Cong; Yuan, Tianhu; Tan, Tianwei; Zhang, Liqun

    2011-06-15

    A novel method using column chromatography on oligo-β-cyclodextrin-Sepharose HP for the preparation of high purity daidzin from crude soybean samples was proposed in this work. The isoflavone of daidzin in sample A and B was purified under the optimum mobile phase composed of methanol/acetic acid/water=20.0/8.0/72.0 (v/v/v) at a flow-rate of 1.0 mL/min in one-step operation with a purity of 97.2% and 98.1%, a recovery of 95.3% and 96.3% respectively. The target products in isolated fraction were detected and characterized by HPLC analysis and ESI-MS spectrum. Preparative separation with sample-load of up to 2.42 mg/mL medium gave satisfactory results for daidzin with the purities over 97% and recoveries approximately 90%. Molecular docking simulations were utilized to help demonstrate the inclusion complexation between β-cyclodextrin and the isoflavones in samples through inclusion geometries and calculations of the binding energies. The prediction of the elution orders with AUTODOCK and SURFLEX-DOCK were validated by the chromatographic results.

  18. 4'-Thio-oligo-beta-D-ribonucleotides: synthesis of beta-4'-thio-oligouridylates, nuclease resistance, base pairing properties, and interaction with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Bellon, L; Barascut, J L; Maury, G; Divita, G; Goody, R; Imbach, J L

    1993-01-01

    We present the synthesis and the study of properties of a new series of modified oligonucleotides, namely 4'-thio-oligo-beta-D-ribonucleotides (4'-S-RNA). Homo-oligonucleotides of this class (4'-SU6 and 4'-SU12) were prepared from the previously known thionucleosides using the phosphoramidite methodology. The comparison of the substrate properties of 4'-SU6 and its natural analog U6 with respect to four nucleases indicates that the former is much more resistant than the latter. Such resistance to nucleases in addition to relatively high Tm values for 4'-SU12 hybridized with Poly(A) show that these new 4'-S-RNA are good candidates for potential antisense effects. The oligonucleotides 4'-SU6 and 4'-SU12 have been also evaluated as non sequence specific inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. All available evidences, based primarily on fluorescence measurements, are consistent with the binding of 4'-SU6 and 4'-SU12 to RT at a site which is different from the polymerase site of the enzyme. PMID:7683133

  19. Trimodal Control of Ion-Transport Activity on Cyclo-oligo-(1→6)-β-D-glucosamine-Based Artificial Ion-Transport Systems.

    PubMed

    Roy, Arundhati; Saha, Tanmoy; Gening, Marina L; Titov, Denis V; Gerbst, Alexey G; Tsvetkov, Yury E; Nifantiev, Nikolay E; Talukdar, Pinaki

    2015-11-23

    Cyclo-oligo-(1→6)-β-D-glucosamines functionalized with hydrophobic tails are reported as a new class of transmembrane ion-transport system. These macrocycles with hydrophilic cavities were introduced as an alternative to cyclodextrins, which are supramolecular systems with hydrophobic cavities. The transport activities of these glycoconjugates were manipulated by altering the oligomericity of the macrocycles, as well as the length and number of attached tails. Hydrophobic tails of 3 different sizes were synthesized and coupled with each glucosamine scaffold through the amide linkage to obtain 18 derivatives. The ion-transport activity increased from di- to tetrameric glucosamine macrocycles, but decreased further when flexible pentameric glucosamine was introduced. The ion-transport activity also increased with increasing length of attached linkers. For a fixed length of linkers, the transport activity decreased when the number of such tails was reduced. All glycoconjugates displayed a uniform anion-selectivity sequence: Cl(-) >Br(-) >I(-) . From theoretical studies, hydrogen bonding between the macrocycle backbone and the anion bridged through water molecules was observed.

  20. Push-Pull Type Oligo(N-annulated perylene)quinodimethanes: Chain Length and Solvent-Dependent Ground States and Physical Properties.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zebing; Lee, Sangsu; Son, Minjung; Fukuda, Kotaro; Burrezo, Paula Mayorga; Zhu, Xiaojian; Qi, Qingbiao; Li, Run-Wei; Navarrete, Juan T López; Ding, Jun; Casado, Juan; Nakano, Masayoshi; Kim, Dongho; Wu, Jishan

    2015-07-08

    Research on stable open-shell singlet diradicaloids recently became a hot topic because of their unique optical, electronic, and magnetic properties and promising applications in materials science. So far, most reported singlet diradicaloid molecules have a symmetric structure, while asymmetric diradicaloids with an additional contribution of a dipolar zwitterionic form to the ground state were rarely studied. In this Article, a series of new push-pull type oligo(N-annulated perylene)quinodimethanes were synthesized. Their chain length and solvent-dependent ground states and physical properties were systematically investigated by various experimental methods such as steady-state and transient absorption, two-photon absorption, X-ray crystallographic analysis, electron spin resonance, superconducting quantum interference device, Raman spectroscopy, and electrochemistry. It was found that with extension of the chain length, the diradical character increases while the contribution of the zwitterionic form to the ground state becomes smaller. Because of the intramolecular charge transfer character, the physical properties of this push-pull system showed solvent dependence. In addition, density functional theory calculations on the diradical character and Hirshfeld charge were conducted to understand the chain length and solvent dependence of both symmetric and asymmetric systems. Our studies provided a comprehensive understanding on the fundamental structure- and environment-property relationships in the new asymmetric diradicaloid systems.

  1. Development of a sensitive surface plasmon resonance immunosensor for detection of 2,4-dinitrotoluene with a novel oligo (ethylene glycol)-based sensor surface.

    PubMed

    Nagatomo, Kazutaka; Kawaguchi, Toshikazu; Miura, Norio; Toko, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi

    2009-09-15

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunosensor for detection of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT), which is a signature compound of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene-related explosives, was developed by using a novel oligo (ethylene glycol) (OEG)-based sensor surface. A rabbit polyclonal antibody against 2,4-DNT (anti-DNPh-KLH-400 antibody) was prepared, and the avidity for 2,4-DNT and recognition capability were investigated by indirect competitive ELISA. The sensor surface was fabricated by immobilizing a 2,4-DNT analog onto an OEG-based self-assembled monolayer formed on a gold surface via an OEG linker. The fabricated surface was characterized by Fourier-transform infrared-refractive absorption spectrometry (FTIR-RAS). The immunosensing of 2,4-DNT is based on the indirect competitive principle, in which the immunoreaction between the anti-DNPh-KLH-400 antibody and 2,4-DNT on the sensor surface was inhibited in the presence of free 2,4-DNT in solution. The limit of detection for the immunosensor, calculated as three times the standard deviation of a blank value, was 20 pg mL(-1), and the linear dynamic range was found to be between 1 and 100 ng mL(-1). Additionally, the fabricated OEG-based surface effectively prevented non-specific adsorption of proteins, and the specific response to anti-DNPh-KLH-400 antibody was maintained for more than 30 measurement cycles.

  2. Rapid grafting of azido-labeled oligo(ethylene glycol)s onto an alkynyl-terminated monolayer on nonoxidized silicon via microwave-assisted "click" reaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wang, Jun; Cai, Chengzhi

    2011-03-15

    Microwave (MW) irradiation was used for the grafting of azido-labeled oligo(ethylene oxide) (OEG) on alkynyl-terminated nonoxidized silicon substrates via copper-catalyzed "click" reaction. The "clickable" monolayers were prepared by photografting of an α,ω-alkynene, where the alkynyl terminus was protected by a trimethylgermanyl (TMG) group, onto hydrogen-terminated Si(111) surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was primarily employed to characterize the monolayers, and the data obtained were utilized to calculate the surface density of the TMG-alkynyl-functionalized substrate. MW-assisted one-pot deprotection/click reaction was optimized on the surfaces using azido-tagged OEG derivatives. Using MW instead of conventional heating led to a substantial improvement in the rate of the reaction while suppressing the oxidation of the silicon interface and OEG degradation. The antifouling property of the resulting substrates was evaluated using fibrinogen as a model protein. Results show that the OEG-modification reduced the protein adsorption by >90%.

  3. Effect of oligochitosan and oligo-β-glucan supplementation on growth, innate immunity, and disease resistance of striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus).

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ngoc Duy; Van Dang, Phu; Le, Anh Quoc; Nguyen, Thi Kim Lan; Pham, Duy Hai; Van Nguyen, Nguyen; Nguyen, Quoc Hien

    2016-06-01

    Oligochitosan (COS) and oligo-β-glucan (βOG) were prepared by gamma Co-60 irradiation of chitosan/H2 O2 and β-glucan/H2 O2 solutions. The striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) was fed diets containing 0-200 mg COS, βOG, and a mixture of COS/βOG per kg feed for 45 days, and then challenged with Edwardsiella ictaluri bacterium. The effects of supplemented COS, βOG, and a mixture of COS/βOG on immune stimulation and growth performance in striped catfish were investigated. The results indicated that when striped catfish fed with 100-200 mg COS or βOG/kg feed the growth performance was significantly improved and the mortality was considerably decreased. Furthermore, striped catfish fed with supplementation of 50 mg COS + 50 mg βOG/kg feed was the best for increasing weight gain (∼26%) and for decreasing mortality (∼38%) compared with the control group. Moreover, phagocytic activity and lysozyme activity of fish were enhanced by feeding diet-supplemented COS and/or βOG. Thus, COS and/or βOG can be potentially utilized as the immunostimulants and growth promoters for aquaculture.

  4. Protein-resistant polyurethane by sequential grafting of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) and poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) via surface-initiated ATRP.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhilin; Feng, Wei; Zhu, Shiping; Sheardown, Heather; Brash, John L

    2010-12-15

    Protein-resistant polyurethane (PU) surfaces were prepared by sequentially grafting poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (poly(HEMA)) and poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) (poly(OEGMA)) via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (s-ATRP). The chain lengths of poly(HEMA) and poly(OEGMA) were regulated via the ratio of monomer to sacrificial initiator in solution. The surfaces were characterized by water contact angle and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The protein resistant properties of the surfaces were assessed by single and binary adsorption experiments with fibrinogen (Fg), lysozyme (Lys), and lactalbumin (Lac). The adsorption of all three proteins on the sequentially grafted poly(HEMA)-poly(OEGMA) surfaces (PU/PH/PO) was greatly reduced compared with the unmodified PU. Adsorption decreased with increasing poly(OEGMA) chain length. On the PU/PH/PO surface with longest poly(OEGMA) chain length (∼100), the decrease in Lys adsorption was in the range of 95-98% and the decrease in Fg and Lac adsorption was >99% compared with the unmodified PU. Adsorption from binary protein solutions showed that the PU/PH/PO surfaces resisted these proteins more or less equally, that is, independent of protein size.

  5. Positively Charged Oligo[Poly(Ethylene Glycol) Fumarate] Scaffold Implantation Results in a Permissive Lesion Environment after Spinal Cord Injury in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Jeffrey S.; Esmaeili Rad, Melika; Grahn, Peter J.; Chen, Bingkun K.; Knight, Andrew M.; Schmeichel, Ann M.; Isaq, Nasro A.; Dadsetan, Mahrokh; Yaszemski, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Positively charged oligo[poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate] (OPF+) scaffolds loaded with Schwann cells bridge spinal cord injury (SCI) lesions and support axonal regeneration in rat. The regeneration achieved is not sufficient for inducing functional recovery. Attempts to increase regeneration would benefit from understanding the effects of the scaffold and transplanted cells on lesion environment. We conducted morphometric and stereological analysis of lesions in rats implanted with OPF+ scaffolds with or without loaded Schwann cells 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 weeks after thoracic spinal cord transection. No differences were found in collagen scarring, cyst formation, astrocyte reactivity, myelin debris, or chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) accumulation. However, when scaffold-implanted animals were compared with animals with transection injuries only, these barriers to regeneration were significantly reduced, accompanied by increased activated macrophages/microglia. This distinctive and regeneration permissive tissue reaction to scaffold implantation was independent of Schwann cell transplantation. Although the tissue reaction was beneficial in the short term, we observed a chronic fibrotic host response, resulting in scaffolds surrounded by collagen at 8 weeks. This study demonstrates that an appropriate biomaterial scaffold improves the environment for regeneration. Future targeting of the host fibrotic response may allow increased axonal regeneration and functional recovery. PMID:25891264

  6. Cationic Oligo(thiophene ethynylene) with Broad-Spectrum and High Antibacterial Efficiency under White Light and Specific Biocidal Activity against S. aureus in Dark.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qi; Li, Junting; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Li, Zhengping; Tang, Yanli

    2016-01-13

    We designed and synthesized a novel oligo(thiophene ethynylene) (OTE) to investigate the antibacterial activities against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis) and Gram-negative (Ralstonia solanacearum and Escherichia coli) bacteria in vitro by photodynamic therapy (PDT). Notably, OTE presents broad-spectrum and greatly high antibacterial activities after white light irradiation at nanogram per milliliter concentrations. The half inhibitory concentrations (IC50) values obtained for S. aureus, S. epidermidis, E. coli, and R. solanacearum are 8, 13, 24, and 52 ng/mL after illumination for 30 min, respectively, which are lower than that of other PDT agents. Interestingly, OTE shows the specific and very strong dark killing capability against S. aureus at the concentration of 180 ng/mL for 30 min, which is the highest efficiency biocide against S. aureus without the need of irradiation to date. The antibacterial mechanism investigated demonstrated that reactive oxygen species or singlet-oxygen generated by OTE kills bacteria irreversibly upon white light irradiation, and OTE as a v-type oligomer exerts its toxicity directly on destroying bacterial cytoplasmic membrane in the dark. Importantly, the OTE shows no cell cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility. The results indicate that it is potential to provide versatile applications in the efficient control of pathogenic organisms and specific application for killing S. aureus.

  7. Oligo(FcDC-co-CholDEA) with ferrocene in the main chain and cholesterol as a pendant group-preparation and unusual properties.

    PubMed

    Yan, Junlin; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yuanhui; Jing, Ping; He, Panli; Gao, Di; Fang, Yu

    2010-10-21

    With ever-increasing need for thin, flexible, and functional materials in electrochemical systems, various techniques have been explored for creating materials used in fuel cells, batteries, electrochromic devices, solar cells, and sensors. In the present study, a novel ferrocene (Fc) and cholesterol (Chol)-containing oligomer, oligo(FcDC-co-CholDEA), was specially designed and prepared by putting Fc in the main chain and Chol as a side group. MALDI-TOF MS and freezing point depression measurements revealed that in average each oligomer contains three Fc units and three Chol units. Cyclic voltammetric measurements revealed that the oligomer displays superior electrochemical stability if compared with other Fc derivatives containing only one Fc unit and one or two Chol unit and with poly(ferrocenylsilane) with Fc in the main chain. In particular, the Fc-containing oligomer possesses an unusual oxidation center, of which the oxidation potential could be as high as 1.81 V. The oligomer is also superior in self-assembly, as demonstrated by forming an LB film of layered structures. Furthermore, supramolecular films with high mechanical strength in the wet state can be prepared by employing a simple solution casting method. This finding demonstrates that self-assembly is a simple but effective way to create films of potential uses in real-life applications provided proper building blocks are designed and employed.

  8. Antimicrobial Contact-Active Oligo(2-oxazoline)s-Grafted Surfaces for Fast Water Disinfection at the Point-of-Use.

    PubMed

    Correia, Vanessa G; Ferraria, Ana M; Pinho, Mariana G; Aguiar-Ricardo, Ana

    2015-12-14

    Water is one of the most valuable resources today and its purity is crucial to health and society well-being. The access to safe drinking water is decreasing in the world, which can have a huge socio-economic impact especially in developing countries, more prone to water-associated diseases. The goal of this work was to develop an innovative, fast, and cost-effective 3D material capable of decontaminating water. We have used an eco-friendly strategy, combining plasma surface activation and supercritical fluid technology to produce, for the first time, a 2-oxazoline-grafted 3D surface with broad-spectrum contact-active antimicrobial properties. Oligo(2-methyl-2-oxazoline) quaternized with N,N-dimethyldodecylamine and grafted to a chitosan (CHT) scaffold (CHT-OMetOx-DDA) efficiently and quickly (<3 min) killed >99.999% of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli cells upon direct contact and avoided bacterial adhesion to the materials surface, which is important for the prevention of biofilm formation. As a proof of concept, CHT-OMetOx-DDA scaffold was demonstrated to be suitable for water purification efficiently killing the microorganisms present in different water samples within minutes of contact and without leaching to the water. Additionally, we report for the first time a new method to clearly distinguish two mechanisms of action of bioactive surfaces: contact-active and releasing systems.

  9. Live confocal imaging of Arabidopsis flower buds.

    PubMed

    Prunet, Nathanaël; Jack, Thomas P; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2016-11-01

    Recent advances in confocal microscopy, coupled with the development of numerous fluorescent reporters, provide us with a powerful tool to study the development of plants. Live confocal imaging has been used extensively to further our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the formation of roots, shoots and leaves. However, it has not been widely applied to flowers, partly because of specific challenges associated with the imaging of flower buds. Here, we describe how to prepare and grow shoot apices of Arabidopsis in vitro, to perform both single-point and time-lapse imaging of live, developing flower buds with either an upright or an inverted confocal microscope.

  10. RNA in situ hybridization in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Miin-Feng; Wagner, Doris

    2012-01-01

    RNA in situ hybridization using digoxigenin-labeled riboprobes on tissue sections is a powerful technique for revealing microscopic spatial gene expression. Here, we describe an in situ hybridization method commonly practiced in Arabidopsis research labs. The highly stringent hybridization condition eliminates the usage of Ribonlucease A and gives highly specific signals. This also allows the use of longer probes which enhance signal strength without cross hybridization to closely related genes. In addition, using spin columns in template and riboprobe purification greatly reduces background signals.

  11. Effects of vertical rotation on Arabidopsis development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. H.; Chapman, D. K.; Dahl, A. O.

    1975-01-01

    Various gross morphological end points of Arabidopsis development are examined in an attempt to separate the effects of growth on the horizontal clinostat into a component caused by rotation alone and another component caused by the altered position with respect to the direction of the g-vector. In a series of tests which involved comparisons between vertical stationary plants, vertical rotated plants, and plants rotated on clinostats, certain characters were consistently influenced by vertical rotation alone. The characters for which this effect was statistically significant were petiole length and leaf blade width.

  12. Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis: A Colorful Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Sola, M. Águila; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Plant carotenoids are a family of pigments that participate in light harvesting and are essential for photoprotection against excess light. Furthermore, they act as precursors for the production of apocarotenoid hormones such as abscisic acid and strigolactones. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the genes and enzymes of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway (which is now almost completely elucidated) and on the regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. We also discuss the relevance of Arabidopsis as a model system for the study of carotenogenesis and how metabolic engineering approaches in this plant have taught important lessons for carotenoid biotechnology. PMID:22582030

  13. Linkage maps for Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata and Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. petraea combining anonymous and Arabidopsis thaliana-derived markers.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Julien; Jean, Martine; Belzile, François

    2007-02-01

    Arabidopsis lyrata, a close relative of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, is 1 of a few plant species for which the genome is to be entirely sequenced, which promises to yield important insights into genome evolution. Only 2 sparse linkage maps have been published, and these were based solely on markers derived from the A. thaliana genome. Because the genome of A. lyrata is practically twice as large as that of A. thaliana, the extent of map coverage of the A. lyrata genome remains uncertain. In this study, a 2-way pseudo-testcross strategy was used to construct genetic linkage maps of A. lyrata subsp. petraea and A. lyrata subsp. lyrata, using simple sequence repeat (SSR) and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) markers from the A. thaliana genome, and anonymous amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers that could potentially uncover regions unique to the A. lyrata genome. The SSR and CAPS markers largely confirmed the relationships between linkage groups in A. lyrata and A. thaliana. AFLP markers slightly increased the coverage of the A. lyrata maps, but mostly increased marker density on the linkage groups. We noted a much lower level of polymorphism and a greater segregation distortion in A. lyrata subsp. lyrata markers. The implications of these findings for the sequencing of the A. lyrata genome are discussed.

  14. Arabidopsis transcription factors: genome-wide comparative analysis among eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Riechmann, J L; Heard, J; Martin, G; Reuber, L; Jiang, C; Keddie, J; Adam, L; Pineda, O; Ratcliffe, O J; Samaha, R R; Creelman, R; Pilgrim, M; Broun, P; Zhang, J Z; Ghandehari, D; Sherman, B K; Yu, G

    2000-12-15

    The completion of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence allows a comparative analysis of transcriptional regulators across the three eukaryotic kingdoms. Arabidopsis dedicates over 5% of its genome to code for more than 1500 transcription factors, about 45% of which are from families specific to plants. Arabidopsis transcription factors that belong to families common to all eukaryotes do not share significant similarity with those of the other kingdoms beyond the conserved DNA binding domains, many of which have been arranged in combinations specific to each lineage. The genome-wide comparison reveals the evolutionary generation of diversity in the regulation of transcription.

  15. Arabidopsis MET1 cytosine methyltransferase mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Kankel, Mark W; Ramsey, Douglas E; Stokes, Trevor L; Flowers, Susan K; Haag, Jeremy R; Jeddeloh, Jeffrey A; Riddle, Nicole C; Verbsky, Michelle L; Richards, Eric J

    2003-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of two missense mutations in the cytosine-DNA-methyltransferase gene, MET1, from the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Both missense mutations, which affect the catalytic domain of the protein, led to a global reduction of cytosine methylation throughout the genome. Surprisingly, the met1-2 allele, with the weaker DNA hypomethylation phenotype, alters a well-conserved residue in methyltransferase signature motif I. The stronger met1-1 allele caused late flowering and a heterochronic delay in the juvenile-to-adult rosette leaf transition. The distribution of late-flowering phenotypes in a mapping population segregating met1-1 indicates that the flowering-time phenotype is caused by the accumulation of inherited defects at loci unlinked to the met1 mutation. The delay in flowering time is due in part to the formation and inheritance of hypomethylated fwa epialleles, but inherited defects at other loci are likely to contribute as well. Centromeric repeat arrays hypomethylated in met1-1 mutants are partially remethylated when introduced into a wild-type background, in contrast to genomic sequences hypomethylated in ddm1 mutants. ddm1 met1 double mutants were constructed to further our understanding of the mechanism of DDM1 action and the interaction between two major genetic loci affecting global cytosine methylation levels in Arabidopsis. PMID:12663548

  16. Diuretics prime plant immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Noutoshi, Yoshiteru; Ikeda, Mika; Shirasu, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Plant activators are agrochemicals that activate the plant immune system, thereby enhancing disease resistance. Due to their prophylactic and durable effects on a wide spectrum of diseases, plant activators can provide synergistic crop protection when used in combination with traditional pest controls. Although plant activators have achieved great success in wet-rice farming practices in Asia, their use is still limited. To isolate novel plant activators applicable to other crops, we screened a chemical library using a method that can selectively identify immune-priming compounds. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of three diuretics, bumetanide, bendroflumethiazide and clopamide, as immune-priming compounds. These drugs upregulate the immunity-related cell death of Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells induced with an avirulent strain of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in a concentration-dependent manner. The application of these compounds to Arabidopsis plants confers disease resistance to not only the avirulent but also a virulent strain of the pathogen. Unlike salicylic acid, an endogenous phytohormone that governs disease resistance in response to biotrophic pathogens, the three diuretic compounds analyzed here do not induce PR1 or inhibit plant growth, showing potential as lead compounds in a practical application.

  17. Epigenetic natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Matthew W; Tanurdzić, Milos; Lippman, Zachary; Jiang, Hongmei; Carrasquillo, Robert; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Dedhia, Neilay; McCombie, W Richard; Agier, Nicolas; Bulski, Agnès; Colot, Vincent; Doerge, R W; Martienssen, Robert A

    2007-07-01

    Cytosine methylation of repetitive sequences is widespread in plant genomes, occurring in both symmetric (CpG and CpNpG) as well as asymmetric sequence contexts. We used the methylation-dependent restriction enzyme McrBC to profile methylated DNA using tiling microarrays of Arabidopsis Chromosome 4 in two distinct ecotypes, Columbia and Landsberg erecta. We also used comparative genome hybridization to profile copy number polymorphisms. Repeated sequences and transposable elements (TEs), especially long terminal repeat retrotransposons, are densely methylated, but one third of genes also have low but detectable methylation in their transcribed regions. While TEs are almost always methylated, genic methylation is highly polymorphic, with half of all methylated genes being methylated in only one of the two ecotypes. A survey of loci in 96 Arabidopsis accessions revealed a similar degree of methylation polymorphism. Within-gene methylation is heritable, but is lost at a high frequency in segregating F(2) families. Promoter methylation is rare, and gene expression is not generally affected by differences in DNA methylation. Small interfering RNA are preferentially associated with methylated TEs, but not with methylated genes, indicating that most genic methylation is not guided by small interfering RNA. This may account for the instability of gene methylation, if occasional failure of maintenance methylation cannot be restored by other means.

  18. Epigenetic Natural Variation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongmei; Carrasquillo, Robert; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Dedhia, Neilay; McCombie, W. Richard; Agier, Nicolas; Bulski, Agnès; Colot, Vincent; Doerge, R.W; Martienssen, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Cytosine methylation of repetitive sequences is widespread in plant genomes, occurring in both symmetric (CpG and CpNpG) as well as asymmetric sequence contexts. We used the methylation-dependent restriction enzyme McrBC to profile methylated DNA using tiling microarrays of Arabidopsis Chromosome 4 in two distinct ecotypes, Columbia and Landsberg erecta. We also used comparative genome hybridization to profile copy number polymorphisms. Repeated sequences and transposable elements (TEs), especially long terminal repeat retrotransposons, are densely methylated, but one third of genes also have low but detectable methylation in their transcribed regions. While TEs are almost always methylated, genic methylation is highly polymorphic, with half of all methylated genes being methylated in only one of the two ecotypes. A survey of loci in 96 Arabidopsis accessions revealed a similar degree of methylation polymorphism. Within-gene methylation is heritable, but is lost at a high frequency in segregating F 2 families. Promoter methylation is rare, and gene expression is not generally affected by differences in DNA methylation. Small interfering RNA are preferentially associated with methylated TEs, but not with methylated genes, indicating that most genic methylation is not guided by small interfering RNA. This may account for the instability of gene methylation, if occasional failure of maintenance methylation cannot be restored by other means. PMID:17579518

  19. Epigenetic regulation of gene responsiveness in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    To, Taiko K.; Kim, Jong Myong

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of chromatin structure is inevitable for proper transcriptional response in eukaryotes. Recent reports in Arabidopsis have suggested that gene responsiveness is modulated by particular chromatin status. One such feature is H2A.Z, a histone variant conserved among eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, H2A.Z is enriched within gene bodies of transcriptionally variable genes, which is in contrast to genic DNA methylation found within constitutive genes. In the absence of H2A.Z, the genes normally harboring H2A.Z within gene bodies are transcriptionally misregulated, while DNA methylation is unaffected. Therefore, H2A.Z may promote variability of gene expression without affecting genic DNA methylation. Another epigenetic information that could be important for gene responsiveness is trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me3). The level of H3K4me3 increases when stress responsive genes are transcriptionally activated, and it decreases after recovery from the stress. Even after the recovery, however, H3K4me3 is kept at some atypical levels, suggesting possible role of H3K4me3 for a stress memory. In this review, we summarize and discuss the growing evidences connecting chromatin features and gene responsiveness. PMID:24432027

  20. MTHFD1 controls DNA methylation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Groth, Martin; Moissiard, Guillaume; Wirtz, Markus; Wang, Haifeng; Garcia-Salinas, Carolina; Ramos-Parra, Perla A.; Bischof, Sylvain; Feng, Suhua; Cokus, Shawn J.; John, Amala; Smith, Danielle C.; Zhai, Jixian; Hale, Christopher J.; Long, Jeff A.; Hell, Ruediger; Díaz de la Garza, Rocío I.; Jacobsen, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that has important functions in transcriptional silencing and is associated with repressive histone methylation (H3K9me). To further investigate silencing mechanisms, we screened a mutagenized Arabidopsis thaliana population for expression of SDCpro-GFP, redundantly controlled by DNA methyltransferases DRM2 and CMT3. Here, we identify the hypomorphic mutant mthfd1-1, carrying a mutation (R175Q) in the cytoplasmic bifunctional methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase/methenyltetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase (MTHFD1). Decreased levels of oxidized tetrahydrofolates in mthfd1-1 and lethality of loss-of-function demonstrate the essential enzymatic role of MTHFD1 in Arabidopsis. Accumulation of homocysteine and S-adenosylhomocysteine, genome-wide DNA hypomethylation, loss of H3K9me and transposon derepression indicate that S-adenosylmethionine-dependent transmethylation is inhibited in mthfd1-1. Comparative analysis of DNA methylation revealed that the CMT3 and CMT2 pathways involving positive feedback with H3K9me are mostly affected. Our work highlights the sensitivity of epigenetic networks to one-carbon metabolism due to their common S-adenosylmethionine-dependent transmethylation and has implications for human MTHFD1-associated diseases. PMID:27291711

  1. Local Evolution of Seed Flotation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Saez-Aguayo, Susana; Rondeau-Mouro, Corinne; Macquet, Audrey; Kronholm, Ilkka; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Berger, Adeline; Sallé, Christine; Poulain, Damien; Granier, Fabienne; Botran, Lucy; Loudet, Olivier; de Meaux, Juliette; Marion-Poll, Annie; North, Helen M.

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis seeds rapidly release hydrophilic polysaccharides from the seed coat on imbibition. These form a heavy mucilage layer around the seed that makes it sink in water. Fourteen natural Arabidopsis variants from central Asia and Scandinavia were identified with seeds that have modified mucilage release and float. Four of these have a novel mucilage phenotype with almost none of the released mucilage adhering to the seed and the absence of cellulose microfibrils. Mucilage release was modified in the variants by ten independent causal mutations in four different loci. Seven distinct mutations affected one locus, coding the MUM2 β-D-galactosidase, and represent a striking example of allelic heterogeneity. The modification of mucilage release has thus evolved a number of times independently in two restricted geographical zones. All the natural mutants identified still accumulated mucilage polysaccharides in seed coat epidermal cells. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry their production and retention was shown to reduce water mobility into internal seed tissues during imbibition, which would help to maintain seed buoyancy. Surprisingly, despite released mucilage being an excellent hydrogel it did not increase the rate of water uptake by internal seed tissues and is more likely to play a role in retaining water around the seed. PMID:24625826

  2. Brassinosteroid functions in Arabidopsis seed development

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wen-Bo; Lin, Wen-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Seed development of flowering plant is a complicated process controlled by a signal network. Double fertilization generates 2 zygotic products (embryo and endosperm). Embryo gives rise to a daughter plant while endosperm provides nutrients for embryo during embryogenesis and germination. Seed coat differentiates from maternally derived integument and encloses embryo and endosperm. Seed size/mass and number comprise final seed yield, and seed shape also contributes to seed development and weight. Seed size is coordinated by communication among endosperm, embryo, and integument. Seed number determination is more complex to investigate and shows differencies between monocot and eudicot. Total seed number depends on sillique number and seed number per sillique in Arabidopsis. Seed comes from fertilized ovule, hence the ovule number per flower determines the maximal seed number per sillique. Early studies reported that engineering BR levels increased the yield of ovule and seed; however the molecular mechanism of BR regulation in seed development still remained unclear. Our recent studies demonstrated that BR regulated seed size, shape, and number by transcriptionally modulating specific seed developmental pathways. This review summarizes roles of BR in Arabidopsis seed development and gives clues for future application of BR in agricultural production. PMID:24270689

  3. Local evolution of seed flotation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Saez-Aguayo, Susana; Rondeau-Mouro, Corinne; Macquet, Audrey; Kronholm, Ilkka; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Berger, Adeline; Sallé, Christine; Poulain, Damien; Granier, Fabienne; Botran, Lucy; Loudet, Olivier; de Meaux, Juliette; Marion-Poll, Annie; North, Helen M

    2014-03-01

    Arabidopsis seeds rapidly release hydrophilic polysaccharides from the seed coat on imbibition. These form a heavy mucilage layer around the seed that makes it sink in water. Fourteen natural Arabidopsis variants from central Asia and Scandinavia were identified with seeds that have modified mucilage release and float. Four of these have a novel mucilage phenotype with almost none of the released mucilage adhering to the seed and the absence of cellulose microfibrils. Mucilage release was modified in the variants by ten independent causal mutations in four different loci. Seven distinct mutations affected one locus, coding the MUM2 β-D-galactosidase, and represent a striking example of allelic heterogeneity. The modification of mucilage release has thus evolved a number of times independently in two restricted geographical zones. All the natural mutants identified still accumulated mucilage polysaccharides in seed coat epidermal cells. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry their production and retention was shown to reduce water mobility into internal seed tissues during imbibition, which would help to maintain seed buoyancy. Surprisingly, despite released mucilage being an excellent hydrogel it did not increase the rate of water uptake by internal seed tissues and is more likely to play a role in retaining water around the seed.

  4. Polyploidization increases meiotic recombination frequency in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Polyploidization is the multiplication of the whole chromosome complement and has occurred frequently in vascular plants. Maintenance of stable polyploid state over generations requires special mechanisms to control pairing and distribution of more than two homologous chromosomes during meiosis. Since a minimal number of crossover events is essential for correct chromosome segregation, we investigated whether polyploidy has an influence on the frequency of meiotic recombination. Results Using two genetically linked transgenes providing seed-specific fluorescence, we compared a high number of progeny from diploid and tetraploid Arabidopsis plants. We show that rates of meiotic recombination in reciprocal crosses of genetically identical diploid and autotetraploid Arabidopsis plants were significantly higher in tetraploids compared to diploids. Although male and female gametogenesis differ substantially in meiotic recombination frequency, both rates were equally increased in tetraploids. To investigate whether multivalent formation in autotetraploids was responsible for the increased recombination rates, we also performed corresponding experiments with allotetraploid plants showing strict bivalent pairing. We found similarly increased rates in auto- and allotetraploids, suggesting that the ploidy effect is independent of chromosome pairing configurations. Conclusions The evolutionary success of polyploid plants in nature and under domestication has been attributed to buffering of mutations and sub- and neo-functionalization of duplicated genes. Should the data described here be representative for polyploid plants, enhanced meiotic recombination, and the resulting rapid creation of genetic diversity, could have also contributed to their prevalence. PMID:21510849

  5. Defining the core Arabidopsis thaliana root microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, Jase; Malfatti, Stephanie; Tremblay, Julien; Engelbrektson, Anna; Kunin, Victor; del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Edgar, Robert C.; Eickhorst, Thilo; Ley, Ruth E.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Tringe, Susannah Green; Dangl, Jeffery L.

    2014-01-01

    Land plants associate with a root microbiota distinct from the complex microbial community present in surrounding soil. The microbiota colonizing therhizosphere(immediately surroundingthe root) and the endophytic compartment (within the root) contribute to plant growth, productivity, carbon sequestration and phytoremediation1-3. Colonization of the root occurs despite a sophisticated plant immune system4,5, suggesting finely tuned discrimination of mutualists and commensals from pathogens. Genetic principles governing the derivation of host-specific endophyte communities from soil communities are poorly understood. Here we report the pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene of more than 600 Arabidopsis thaliana plants to test the hypotheses that the root rhizosphere and endophytic compartment microbiota of plants grown under controlled conditions in natural soils are sufficiently dependent on the host to remain consistent across different soil types and developmental stages, and sufficiently dependent on host genotype to vary between inbred Arabidopsis accessions. We describe different bacterial communities in two geochemically distinct bulk soils and in rhizosphere and endophytic compartments prepared from roots grown in these soils. The communities in each compartment are strongly influenced by soil type. Endophytic compartments from both soils feature overlapping, low-complexity communities that are markedly enriched in Actinobacteria and specific families from other phyla, notably Proteobacteria. Some bacteria vary quantitatively between plants of different developmental stage and genotype. Our rigorous definition of an endophytic compartment microbiome should facilitate controlled dissection of plantmicrobe interactions derived from complex soil communities. PMID:22859206

  6. Photoperiodic flowering regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Golembeski, Greg S.; Kinmonth-Schultz, Hannah A.; Song, Young Hun; Imaizumi, Takato

    2015-01-01

    Photoperiod, or the duration of light in a given day, is a critical cue that flowering plants utilize to effectively assess seasonal information and coordinate their reproductive development in synchrony with the external environment. The use of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, has greatly improved our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that determine how plants process and utilize photoperiodic information to coordinate a flowering response. This mechanism is typified by the transcriptional activation of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene by the transcription factor CONSTANS (CO) under inductive long-day conditions in Arabidopsis. FT protein then moves from the leaves to the shoot apex, where floral meristem development can be initiated. As a point of integration from a variety of environmental factors in the context of a larger system of regulatory pathways that affect flowering, the importance of photoreceptors and the circadian clock in CO regulation throughout the day has been a key feature of the photoperiodic flowering pathway. In addition to these established mechanisms, the recent discovery of a photosynthate derivative trehalose-6-phosphate as an activator of FT in leaves has interesting implications for the involvement of photosynthesis in the photoperiodic flowering response that were suggested from previous physiological experiments in flowering induction. PMID:25684830

  7. The Oligo-Acyl Lysyl Antimicrobial Peptide C12K-2β12 Exhibits a Dual Mechanism of Action and Demonstrates Strong In Vivo Efficacy against Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Makobongo, Morris O.; Gancz, Hanan; Carpenter, Beth M.; McDaniel, Dennis P.

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has developed antimicrobial resistance to virtually all current antibiotics. Thus, there is a pressing need to develop new anti-H. pylori therapies. We recently described a novel oligo-acyl-lysyl (OAK) antimicrobial peptidomimetic, C12K-2β12, that shows potent in vitro bactericidal activity against H. pylori. Herein, we define the mechanism of action and evaluate the in vivo efficacy of C12K-2β12 against H. pylori after experimental infection of Mongolian gerbils. We demonstrate using a 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (fluorescent probe) uptake assay and electron microscopy that C12K-2β12 rapidly permeabilizes the bacterial membrane and creates pores that cause bacterial cell lysis. Furthermore, using nucleic acid binding assays, Western blots, and confocal microscopy, we show that C12K-2β12 can cross the bacterial membranes into the cytoplasm and tightly bind to bacterial DNA, RNA, and proteins, a property that may result in inhibition of enzymatic activities and macromolecule synthesis. To define the in vivo efficacy of C12K-2β12, H. pylori-infected gerbils were orogastrically treated with increasing doses and concentrations of C12K-2β12 1 day or 1 week postinfection. The efficacy of C12K-2β12 was strongest in animals that received the largest number of doses at the highest concentration, indicating dose-dependent activity of the peptide (P < 0.001 by analysis of variance [ANOVA]) regardless of the timing of the treatment with C12K-2β12. Overall, our results demonstrate a dual mode of action of C12K-2β12 against the H. pylori membrane and cytoplasmic components. Moreover, and consistent with the previously reported in vitro efficacy, C12K-2β12 shows significant in vivo efficacy against H. pylori when used as monotherapy. Therefore, OAK peptides may be a valuable resource for therapeutic treatment of H. pylori infection. PMID:22064541

  8. A factorial analysis of the combined effects of hydrogel fabrication parameters on the in vitro swelling and degradation of oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Lam, Johnny; Kim, Kyobum; Lu, Steven; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Scott, David W; Mikos, Antonios G; Kasper, F Kurtis

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a full factorial approach was used to investigate the effects of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) molecular weight (MW; 10,000 vs. 35,000 nominal MW), crosslinker-to-macromer carbon-carbon double bond ratio (DBR; 40 vs. 60), crosslinker type (PEG-diacrylate (PEGDA) vs. N,N'-methylene bisacrylamide (MB)), crosslinking extent of incorporated gelatin microparticles (low vs. high), and incubation medium composition (with or without collagenase) on the swelling and degradation characteristics of oligo[(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate)] (OPF) hydrogel composites as indicated by the swelling ratio and the percentage of mass remaining, respectively. Each factor consisted of two levels, which were selected based on previous in vitro and in vivo studies utilizing these hydrogels for various tissue engineering applications. Fractional factorial analyses of the main effects indicated that the mean swelling ratio and the mean percentage of mass remaining of OPF composite hydrogels were significantly affected by every factor. In particular, increasing the PEG chain MW of OPF macromers significantly increased the mean swelling ratio and decreased the mean percentage of mass remaining by 5.7 ± 0.3 and 17.2 ± 0.6%, respectively. However, changing the crosslinker from MB to PEGDA reduced the mean swelling ratio and increased the mean percentage of mass remaining of OPF composite hydrogels by 4.9 ± 0.2 and 9.4 ± 0.9%, respectively. Additionally, it was found that the swelling characteristics of hydrogels fabricated with higher PEG chain MW or with MB were more sensitive to increases in DBR. Collectively, the main and cross effects observed between factors enables informed tuning of the swelling and degradation properties of OPF-based hydrogels for various tissue engineering applications. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 102A: 3477-3487, 2014.

  9. Reconstruction of pre-rift Pyrenean relief in the Oligo-Quitanian Camargue Basin (Gulf of Lion passive margin, SE France): Implications on thermal history of basins

    SciTech Connect

    Benedicto, A.; Labaume, P.; Seranne, M.

    1995-08-01

    Fault reconstruction techniques commonly assume horizontal pre-rift level datum to calculate fault geometry from hanging-wall geometry or viceversa. Example from Camargue basin shows that neglecting pre-rift relief may lead to important errors in calculating the fault and hanging-wall geometries, and the total extension. These errors have direct implications on reconstruction of the thermal history of basins. The Camargue basin results front NW-SE extension and rifting of the Gulf of Lion passive margin. More than 4000m of Oligo-Aquitanian syn-rift series unconformably overlie a crust previously thickened during Pyrenean orogeny. The half-graben basin is controlled by the SE-dipping listric Nimes basement fault which generated a typical roll-over. As both fault and hanging-wall geometries are constrained, the pre-rift surface topography can be restored, using three reconstruction techniques. Either the constant-bed-length and constant-heave techniques produce a depression in the axis of the basin and a relief (1500m and 12(X)m respectively) atop the roll-over. The simple-shear (a=60{degrees}) technique generates a 1500m topography atop the roll-over, more coherent with regional data. Testing the hypothesis of a pre-rift horizontal datum leads to a roll-over 1400m too deep. Pre-rift surface elevation corresponds to the residual topography herited from the Pyrenean orogeny. Consequently, there has been some 1000m subsidence more than predicted by the syn-rift sedimentary record.

  10. Dynamic in vitro hemocompatibility testing of poly(ether imide) membranes functionalized with linear, methylated oligoglycerol and oligo(ethylene glycol).

    PubMed

    Braune, Steffen; von Ruesten-Lange, Maik; Mrowietz, Christof; Lützow, Karola; Roch, Toralf; Neffe, Axel T; Lendlein, Andreas; Jung, Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    Linear, side-chain methylated oligoglycerols (OGMe) were recently reported as potential surface passivating molecules for improving the protein resistance of cardiovascular application relevant poly(ether imide) (PEI) membranes. A previously reported in vitro screening under static test conditions allowed an end-point evaluation of the adhesion and activation of adherent thrombocytes performed on the material surfaces and revealed similar levels of thrombogenicity on PEI membranes, functionalized with OGMe and oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) of similar molecular weight (Mn = 1,300 g·mol-1 - 1,800 g·mol-1). In the present study, we investigated the hemocompatibility of these materials in a dynamic closed loop system, in order to study time-dependent thrombocyte material interactions also of the circulating thrombocytes by mimicking in vivo relevant flow conditions in a dynamic test system with multiple material contacts. Activation and aggregation of circulating thrombocytes as well as complement activation and plasmatic coagulation were evaluated after 40 circulations of thrombocyte rich plasma in the closed loop system. The results of the dynamic tests revealed no differences between the OGMe and OEG functionalized PEI membranes. Furthermore, no differences were observed between the latter and a PEI membrane treated under the conditions of functionalization at pH 11 (PEI-pH11) without an oligoether being present. Blood plasma protein adsorption, as well as activation, and adherence of circulating thrombocytes occurred in a comparable, but minor manner on all investigated PEI membranes. From this we conclude that the OGMe and OEG surface functionalization did not lead to an improvement of the already good hemocompatibility of the PEI-pH11 membrane.

  11. Rotational motion of rhodamine 6G tethered to actin through oligo(ethylene glycol) linkers studied by frequency-domain fluorescence anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Wazawa, Tetsuichi; Morimoto, Nobuyuki; Nagai, Takeharu; Suzuki, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of the rotational motion of a fluorescent probe tethered to a protein helps to elucidate the local properties of the solvent and protein near the conjugation site of the probe. In this study, we have developed an instrument for frequency-domain fluorescence (FDF) anisotropy measurements, and studied how the local properties around a protein, actin, can be elucidated from the rotational motion of a dye tethered to actin. Rhodamine 6G (R6G) was attached to Cys-374 using newly-synthesized R6G-maleimide with three different oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) linker lengths. The time-resolved anisotropy decay of R6G tethered to G-actin was revealed to be a combination of the two modes of the wobbling motion of R6G and the tumbling motion of G-actin. The rotational diffusion coefficient (RDC) of R6G wobbling was ~0.1 ns−1 at 20°C and increased with OEG linker length. The use of the three R6G-actin conjugates of different linker lengths was useful to not only figure out the linker length dependence of the rotational motion of R6G but also validate the analyses. In the presence of a cosolvent of glycerol, although the tumbling motion of G-actin was retarded in response to the bulk viscosity, the wobbling motion of R6G tethered to actin exhibited an increase of RDC as glycerol concentration increased. This finding suggests an intricate relationship between the fluid properties of the bulk solvent and the local environment around actin. PMID:27493858

  12. Reducible Poly(Oligo-D-Arginine) as an Efficient Carrier of the Thymidine Kinase Gene in the Intracranial Glioblastoma Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ah; Lee, Hyun-Lin; Choi, Eunji; Kim, Yong-Hee; Lee, Minhyung

    2015-11-01

    Gene therapy has been considered as an alternative treatment for glioblastoma therapy. In this study, a glioblastoma-specific suicide gene, pEpo-NI2-SV-TK, was delivered into the intracranial glioblastoma model using reducible poly(oligo-d-arginines) (rPOA). pEpo-NI2-SV-TK has the erythropoietin (Epo) enhancer and the nestin intron 2 (NI2) for glioblastoma specific gene expression. The in vitro studies showed that the rPOA formed stable complexes with pEpo-NI2-SV-TK. In the MTT and TUNEL assays, rPOA showed lower cytotoxicity than polyethylenimine (25 kDa, PEI25k). In addition, the rPOA/pEpo-NI2-SV-TK complex induced higher glioblastoma cell death under hypoxic condition than normoxic condition, suggesting that pEpo-NI2-SV-TK induced gene expression in the hypoxic tumor tissue. For in vivo therapeutic efficacy evaluation, the rPOA/pEpo-NI2-SV-TK complex was injected into the brains of an intracranial glioblastoma rat model. The rPOA/pEpo-NI2-SV-TK injected group had a significantly reduced tumor size, compared with the control and the PEI25k/pEpo-NI2-SV-TK injected group. The TUNEL assay showed that the rPOA-pEpo-NI2-SV-TK complex had more apoptotic cells than the control and PEI25k/pEpo-NI2-SV-TK injected groups. These results suggest that the rPOA is an efficient carrier for pEpo-NI2-SV-TK and increased the therapeutic efficacy in the intracranial glioblastoma models. Therefore, the rPOA/pEpo-NI2-SV-TK complex may be useful for glioblastoma specific gene therapy.

  13. Gene expression in breast muscle associated with feed efficiency in a single male broiler line using a chicken 44K oligo microarray. I. Top differentially expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Kong, B-W; Song, J J; Lee, J Y; Hargis, B M; Wing, T; Lassiter, K; Bottje, W

    2011-11-01

    Global RNA expression in breast muscle obtained from a male broiler line phenotyped for high or low feed efficiency (FE) was investigated. Pooled RNA samples (n = 6/phenotype) labeled with cyanine 3 or cyanine 5 fluorescent dyes to generate cRNA probes were hybridized on a 4 × 44K chicken oligo microarray. Local polynomial regression normalization was applied to background-corrected red and green intensities with a moderated t-statistic. Corresponding P-values were computed and adjusted for multiple testing by false discovery rate to identify differentially expressed genes. Microarray validation was carried out by comparing findings with quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. A 1.3-fold difference in gene expression was set as a cutoff value, which encompassed 20% (782 of 4,011) of the total number of genes that were differentially expressed between FE phenotypes. Using an online software program (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis), the top 10 upregulated genes identified by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis in the high-FE group were generally associated with anabolic processes. In contrast, 7 of the top 10 downregulated genes in the high-FE phenotype (upregulated in the low-FE phenotype) were associated with muscle fiber development, muscle function, and cytoskeletal organization, with the remaining 3 genes associated with self-recognition or stress-responding genes. The results from this study focusing on only the top differentially expressed genes suggest that the high-FE broiler phenotype is derived from the upregulation of genes associated with anabolic processes as well as a downregulation of genes associated with muscle fiber development, muscle function, cytoskeletal organization, and stress response.

  14. Radiation-induced synthesis and swelling properties of p(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate/itaconic acid/oligo (ethylene glycol) acrylate) terpolymeric hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micic, M.; Stamenic, D.; Suljovrujic, E.

    2012-09-01

    Since it is presumed that by incorporation of pH-responsive (IA) and temperature-responsive (OEGA) co-monomers, it is possible to prepare P(HEMA/IA/OEGA) hydrogels with dual (pH and thermo) responsiveness, the main purpose of our study is to investigate the influence of different mole fractions of IA and especially OEGA on the diversity of the swelling properties of the obtained hydrogels. For that reason, a series of terpolymeric hydrogels with different mole ratios of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), itaconic acid (IA) and oligo(ethylene glycol) acrylates (OEGA) was synthesised by gamma radiation. The obtained hydrogels were characterised by swelling studies in the wide pH (2.2-9.0) and temperature range (20-70 °C), confirming dual (pH and thermo) responsiveness and a large variation in the swelling capability. It was observed that the equilibrium swelling of P(HEMA/IA/OEGA) hydrogels, for a constant amount of IA, increased progressively with an increase in OEGA share. On the other hand, the dissociation of carboxyl groups from IA occurs at pH>4; therefore, small mole fractions of IA render good pH sensitivity and a large increase in the swelling capacity of these hydrogels at higher pH values. Additional characterisation of structure and properties was conducted by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and mechanical measurements, confirming that the inherent properties of P(HEMA/IA/OEGA) hydrogels can be significantly tuned by variation in their composition. According to all presented, it seems that the obtained hydrogels can be a beneficial synergetic combination for controlled delivery of bioactive molecules such as drugs, peptides, proteins, etc.

  15. Modulation of marrow stromal osteoblast adhesion on biomimetic oligo[poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate] hydrogels modified with Arg-Gly-Asp peptides and a poly(ethyleneglycol) spacer.

    PubMed

    Shin, Heungsoo; Jo, Seongbong; Mikos, Antonios G

    2002-08-01

    Novel oligo[poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate] (OPF) hydrogels functionalized with cell adhesion peptides were prepared, and the effects of incorporated peptide density and macromolecular structure of hydrogels on attachment and morphology of marrow stromal cells (MSCs) were evaluated. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG; number average molecular weight of 930, 2860, and 6090) was used to synthesize OPF. A model peptide, Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp (GRGD), was incorporated into OPF hydrogels after being coupled to acrylated PEG of molecular weight 3400. The increase of incorporated peptide concentration enhanced MSC attachment to OPF hydrogels of PEG of molecular weight of 930 and 2860. However, the number of attached MSCs to OPF hydrogels of PEG (molecular weight 6090) remained constant regardless of the peptide density. The length of PEG in OPF also influenced cell attachment. When 1 micromole peptide/g hydrogel was incorporated into the OPF hydrogels, the degree of cell attachment at 12 h relative to the initial seeding density was 93.9 +/- 5.9%, 64.7 +/- 8.2%, and 9.3 +/- 6.6% for OPF hydrogels prepared with PEG of molecular weights of 930, 2860, and 6090, respectively. However, the crosslinking density of hydrogels did not significantly affect cell attachment. The interaction was sequence specific, in that MSC attachment to GRGD-modified hydrogels was competitively inhibited when cells were incubated in the presence of 0.5 mM soluble GRGD before cell seeding. These results suggest that we can modulate MSC attachment to OPF hydrogels by altering the peptide density and the molecular structure of OPF hydrogels.

  16. Effect of poly(ethylene glycol) molecular weight on tensile and swelling properties of oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Temenoff, Johnna S; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A; LeBaron, Richard G; Mikos, Antonios G

    2002-03-05

    This study was designed to determine the effect of changes in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) molecular weight on swelling and mechanical properties of hydrogels made from a novel polymer, oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) (OPF), recently developed in our laboratory. Properties of hydrogels made from OPF with initial PEG molecular weights of 860, 3900, and 9300 were examined. The PEG 3900 formulation had a tensile modulus of 23.1 +/- 12.4 kPa and percent elongation at fracture of 53.2 +/- 13.7%; the PEG 9300 formulation had similar tensile properties (modulus: 16.5 +/- 4.6 kPa, elongation: 76.0 +/- 26.4%). However, the PEG 860 gels had a significantly higher modulus (89.5 +/- 50.7 kPa) and a significantly smaller percent elongation at fracture (30.1 +/- 6.4%), when compared with other formulations. Additionally, there were significant differences in percent swelling between each of the formulations. Molecular weight between crosslinks (M(c)) and mesh size were calculated for each OPF formulation. M(c) increased from 2010 +/- 116 g/mol with PEG 860 to 6250 +/- 280 g/mol with PEG 9300. Mesh size calculations showed a similar trend (76 +/- 2 A for PEG 860 to 160 +/- 6 A for PEG 9300). It was also found that these hydrogels could be laminated if a second layer was added before the first had completely crosslinked. Mechanical testing of these laminated gels revealed that the presence of an interfacial area did not significantly alter their tensile properties. These results suggest that the material properties of OPF-based hydrogels can be altered by changing the molecular weight of PEG used in synthesis and that multilayered OPF hydrogel constructs can be produced, with each layer having distinct mechanical properties.

  17. Long-term protection against tobacco mosaic virus induced by the marine alga oligo-sulphated-galactan Poly-Ga in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Vera, Jeannette; Castro, Jorge; González, Alberto; Barrientos, Herna; Matsuhiro, Betty; Arce, Patricio; Zuñiga, Gustavo; Moenne, Alejandra

    2011-06-01

    In order to study the antiviral effect of the oligo-sulphated galactan Poly-Ga, the leaves of tobacco plants Xhanti(NN) were sprayed with water (control), with increasing concentrations of Poly-Ga, for increasing numbers of treatments or cultivated for increasing times after treatment. Control and treated plants were infected with tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and the numbers of necrotic lesions were measured in infected leaves. The number of necrotic lesions decreased with increasing concentrations of Poly-Ga, with increasing numbers of treatments and with increasing time after treatment, indicating a long-term protection against TMV that mimicks vaccination. In addition, control Xhanti(nn) plants and plants treated with Poly-Ga and cultivated for increasing times after treatment were infected with TMV in the middle part of the plant, and the levels of TMV-capsid protein (CP) transcripts were measured in apical leaves. TMV-CP transcripts decreased in distant leaves, indicating that Poly-Ga induces systemic protection against TMV. The activities of the defence enzymes phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and lipoxygenase (LOX) and the amounts of several phenylpropanoid compounds (PPCs) were measured in control and treated plants without infection. A progressive increase in PAL activity was observed with increasing time after treatment, together with the accumulation of free and conjugated PPCs. In contrast, LOX activity remained unchanged. Interestingly, the increase in PAL activity showed a linear correlation with the decrease in necrotic lesions and the decrease in TMV-CP transcript level. Thus, Poly-Ga induced systemic and long-term protection against TMV in tobacco plants that is determined, at least in part, by a sustained activation of PAL and the accumulation of PPCs with potential antiviral activity.

  18. Synthesis and antitumor activity of new amphiphilic alkylglycerolipids substituted with a polar head group, 2-(2-trimethylammonioethoxy)ethyl or a congeneric oligo(ethyleneoxy)ethyl group.

    PubMed

    Ukawa, K; Imamiya, E; Yamamoto, H; Aono, T; Kozai, Y; Okutani, T; Nomura, H; Honma, Y; Hozumi, M; Kudo, I

    1989-12-01

    A new series of amphiphilic 1-octadecyl glycerolipids (eleven compounds, 1a-k) were designed and synthesized, in which the 3-phosphocholine portion of platelet-activating factor (1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, PAF) was replaced by the 2-(2-trimethylammonioethoxy)ethyl group and congeneric groups having oligo(ethyleneoxy)ethyl bridges of various lengths at position 3, together with modification at position 2 (lower alkyl, acetonyl, acetoacetyl, carboxymethyl and pyrimidin-2-yl groups). These ether lipids, characterized by a nonphosphorus lysoglycerolipid structure, showed potent antitumor activity in vitro (human promyelocytic leukemia cells, HL-60, and human epidermoid carcinoma cells, KB) and in vivo (mouse sarcoma S180 and mouse mammary carcinoma MM46). Maximal in vitro potency was obtained with 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-(2-pyrimidinyl)-3-O-[2-(2-trimethylammonioethoxy )ethyl] glycerol (1g; IC50 values for both HL-60 and KB were 0.32 microgram/ml, indicating a higher activity than alkyl-lysophospholipid, ET18-OMe). Several appropriately 2-substituted 1-octadecylglycerolipids with the 3-[2-(2-trimethylammonioethoxy)ethyl] group (e.g., methyl, 1b; butyl, 1f; 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl, 1j; and acetonyl, 1k) showed a potent life-span-prolonging effect on mice with ascites sarcoma S180 and on those with mammary carcinoma MM46, when administered intraperitoneally at 16.5 and 12.5 mg/kg/d, respectively. Compounds 1b and 1k showed definite tumor growth inhibition against solid sarcoma S180 in mice, whether given p.o. or i.v. at 16.5 mg/kg/d. Studies on the structure-activity relationships indicate that the metabolic stability to phospholipase C or related enzymes is at least partly responsible for the potent antitumor activity of this series of ether lipids.

  19. Estimating In Situ Zooplankton Non-Predation Mortality in an Oligo-Mesotrophic Lake from Sediment Trap Data: Caveats and Reality Check

    PubMed Central

    Dubovskaya, Olga P.; Tang, Kam W.; Gladyshev, Michail I.; Kirillin, Georgiy; Buseva, Zhanna; Kasprzak, Peter; Tolomeev, Aleksandr P.; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Mortality is a main driver in zooplankton population biology but it is poorly constrained in models that describe zooplankton population dynamics, food web interactions and nutrient dynamics. Mortality due to non-predation factors is often ignored even though anecdotal evidence of non-predation mass mortality of zooplankton has been reported repeatedly. One way to estimate non-predation mortality rate is to measure the removal rate of carcasses, for which sinking is the primary removal mechanism especially in quiescent shallow water bodies. Objectives and Results We used sediment traps to quantify in situ carcass sinking velocity and non-predation mortality rate on eight consecutive days in 2013 for the cladoceran Bosmina longirostris in the oligo-mesotrophic Lake Stechlin; the outcomes were compared against estimates derived from in vitro carcass sinking velocity measurements and an empirical model correcting in vitro sinking velocity for turbulence resuspension and microbial decomposition of carcasses. Our results show that the latter two approaches produced unrealistically high mortality rates of 0.58-1.04 d-1, whereas the sediment trap approach, when used properly, yielded a mortality rate estimate of 0.015 d-1, which is more consistent with concurrent population abundance data and comparable to physiological death rate from the literature. Ecological implications Zooplankton carcasses may be exposed to water column microbes for days before entering the benthos; therefore, non-predation mortality affects not only zooplankton population dynamics but also microbial and benthic food webs. This would be particularly important for carbon and nitrogen cycles in systems where recurring mid-summer decline of zooplankton population due to non-predation mortality is observed. PMID:26146995

  20. Small Angle Neutron Scattering Study of Conformation of Oligo(ethylene glycol) Grafted Polystyrene in Dilute Solutions: Effect of the Backbone Length

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Gang; Hong, Kunlun; Hua, Fengjun; Melnichenko, Yuri B; Wignall, George D; Mays, Jimmy

    2008-01-01

    The conformation and clusterization of comb like polymers of polystyrene densely grafted with oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) side chains in 1.0 wt% solutions of D2O, toluene-d8 and methanol-d4 was investigated as a function of the degree of polymerization (DP) of the backbone by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). Each side chain had four EG repeat units and the DP of the polystyrene backbone was varied from 8 to 85. The global conformation of the polymers in toluene and methanol was shown to assume ellipsoidal, cylindrical or worm-like chain morphologies with increasing DP of the polystyrene backbone. At the same time, in D2O, the polymer conformation was described by the form factor of rigid cylinders. The second viral coefficient was measured for the polymer with a DP of 85 in all three solvents and the solvent quality of toluene, methanol and D2O was identified as good, marginal and poor for this polymer. Due to a poor solvent quality, the PS backbone (DP = 85) is partially collapsed in D2O whereas it is moderately expanded in toluene and methanol. Polymers with the DP of 8 were found to aggregate into clusters in all three solvents, with the characteristic size between 100 and 200 ?and a fractal dimension of 2. With increase of the DP, the clusters diminished in D2O and completely disappeared in toluene and methanol. This observation suggests that the clusterization of these short side-chain polymers is caused by end group and hydrogen bonding interactions between different chains.

  1. Protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana after chronic clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piastuch, William C.; Brown, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    Soluble protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heynh.) leaf and stem tissue was examined after chronic clinorotation. Seeds of Arabidopsis were germinated and plants grown to maturity on horizontal or vertical slow-rotating clinostats (1 rpm) or in stationary vertical control units. Total soluble proteins and in vivo-labeled soluble proteins isolated from these plants were analyzed by two-dimensional sodium doedocyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE) and subsequent fluorography. Visual and computer analysis of the resulting protein patterns showed no significant differences in either total protein expression or in active protein synthesis between horizontal clinorotation and vertical controls in the Arabidopsis leaf and stem tissue. These results show chronic clinorotation does not cause gross changes in protein expression in Arabidopsis.

  2. 3D Gel Map of Arabidopsis Complex I

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Katrin; Belt, Katharina; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Complex I has a unique structure in plants and includes extra subunits. Here, we present a novel study to define its protein constituents. Mitochondria were isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures, leaves, and roots. Subunits of complex I were resolved by 3D blue-native (BN)/SDS/SDS-PAGE and identified by mass spectrometry. Overall, 55 distinct proteins were found, seven of which occur in pairs of isoforms. We present evidence that Arabidopsis complex I consists of 49 distinct types of subunits, 40 of which represent homologs of bovine complex I. The nine other subunits represent special proteins absent in the animal linage of eukaryotes, most prominently a group of subunits related to bacterial gamma-type carbonic anhydrases. A GelMap http://www.gelmap.de/arabidopsis-3d-complex-i/ is presented for promoting future complex I research in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:23761796

  3. Protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana after chronic clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piastuch, W. C.; Brown, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Soluble protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heynh.) leaf and stem tissue was examined after chronic clinorotation. Seeds of Arabidopsis were germinated and plants grown to maturity on horizontal or vertical slow-rotating clinostats (1 rpm) or in stationary vertical control units. Total soluble proteins and in vivo-labeled soluble proteins isolated from these plants were analyzed by two-dimensional SDS PAGE and subsequent fluorography. Visual and computer analysis of the resulting protein patterns showed no significant differences in either total protein expression or in active protein synthesis between horizontal clinorotation and vertical controls in the Arabidopsis leaf and stem tissue. These results show chronic clinorotation does not cause gross changes in protein expression in Arabidopsis.

  4. VIZARD: analysis of Affymetrix Arabidopsis GeneChip data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseyko, Nick; Feldman, Lewis J.

    2002-01-01

    SUMMARY: The Affymetrix GeneChip Arabidopsis genome array has proved to be a very powerful tool for the analysis of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, the most commonly studied plant model organism. VIZARD is a Java program created at the University of California, Berkeley, to facilitate analysis of Arabidopsis GeneChip data. It includes several integrated tools for filtering, sorting, clustering and visualization of gene expression data as well as tools for the discovery of regulatory motifs in upstream sequences. VIZARD also includes annotation and upstream sequence databases for the majority of genes represented on the Affymetrix Arabidopsis GeneChip array. AVAILABILITY: VIZARD is available free of charge for educational, research, and not-for-profit purposes, and can be downloaded at http://www.anm.f2s.com/research/vizard/ CONTACT: moseyko@uclink4.berkeley.edu.

  5. The development of Arabidopsis as a model plant.

    PubMed

    Koornneef, Maarten; Meinke, David

    2010-03-01

    Twenty-five years ago, Arabidopsis thaliana emerged as the model organism of choice for research in plant biology. A consensus was reached about the need to focus on a single organism to integrate the classical disciplines of plant science with the expanding fields of genetics and molecular biology. Ten years after publication of its genome sequence, Arabidopsis remains the standard reference plant for all of biology. We reflect here on the major advances and shared resources that led to the extraordinary growth of the Arabidopsis research community. We also underscore the importance of continuing to expand and refine our detailed knowledge of Arabidopsis while seeking to appreciate the remarkable diversity that characterizes the plant kingdom.

  6. Light responses in Photoperiodism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony R. Cashmore

    2006-08-01

    ADO1: An Arabidopsis blue light photoreceptor We have reported the characterization of an Arabidopsis gene encoding the ADAGIO 1 (ADO1) protein (Jarillo et al., 2001a). ADO1 contains a LOV domain, similar to WHITE COLLAR 1 (WC1), a photoreceptor for entrainment of Neurospora circadian rhythms (Froehlich et al., 2002), as well as PHOT1 and PHOT2, the blue light photoreceptors for phototropism (Briggs et al., 2001; Christie et al., 1998; Jarillo et al., 2001b; Kinoshita et al., 2001). Loss of function ado1 mutants show an unusually long periodicity for their free running circadian rhythm (Jarillo et al., 2001a). This observation holds for plants grown under white light as well as blue light and surprisingly, plants grown under red light also show altered circadian properties. The similarity of the LOV domain of ADO1 to those of PHOT1, PHOT2 and WC1 (known flavoprotein photoreceptors) as well as the genetic and molecular properties of ADO1, indicate that ADO1 is likely a new class of blue light photoreceptor. Indeed, the LOV domain of the related FKF1/ADO3 has been shown to bind FMN, and exhibit the in vitro photochemistry characteristic of PHOT1 (Imaizumi et al., 2003). Furthermore, ZTL/ADO1 has been shown to participate in the circadian and proteasome mediated degradation of the Arabidopsis clock protein, TOC1 (Mas et al., 2003). We also showed that the ado1 mutation selectively confers hypersensitivity to red light — when grown under red light (but not blue light) the ado1 mutant possesses an unusually short hypocotyl. This red light hypersensivity is even more severe in a triple ado1 ado2 ado3 mutant — ADO2 and ADO3 being the two other members of this ADAGIO gene family. This finding of a mutant phenotype under red light is somewhat unexpected for a protein thought to function as a photoreceptor for blue light. We have pursued our studies of ADO1 by preparing a mutant gene for which we have altered the codon for the cysteine residue conserved in all LOV

  7. Using Arabidopsis to study shoot branching in biomass willow.

    PubMed

    Ward, Sally P; Salmon, Jemma; Hanley, Steven J; Karp, Angela; Leyser, Ottoline

    2013-06-01

    The success of the short-rotation coppice system in biomass willow (Salix spp.) relies on the activity of the shoot-producing meristems found on the coppice stool. However, the regulation of the activity of these meristems is poorly understood. In contrast, our knowledge of the mechanisms behind axillary meristem regulation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has grown rapidly in the past few years through the exploitation of integrated physiological, genetic, and molecular assays. Here, we demonstrate that these assays can be directly transferred to study the control of bud activation in biomass willow and to assess similarities with the known hormone regulatory system in Arabidopsis. Bud hormone response was found to be qualitatively remarkably similar in Salix spp. and Arabidopsis. These similarities led us to test whether Arabidopsis hormone mutants could be used to assess allelic variation in the cognate Salix spp. hormone genes. Allelic differences in Salix spp. strigolactone genes were observed using this approach. These results demonstrate that both knowledge and assays from Arabidopsis axillary meristem biology can be successfully applied to Salix spp. and can increase our understanding of a fundamental aspect of short-rotation coppice biomass production, allowing more targeted breeding.

  8. Bacillus thermoamyloliquefaciens KP1071 alpha-glucosidase II is a thermostable M(r) 540,000 homohexameric alpha-glucosidase with both exo-alpha-1,4-glucosidase and oligo-1,6-glucosidase activities.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Y; Nobiki, M; Matsuda, M; Sawai, T

    1997-04-01

    alpha-Glucosidase II of the facultative thermophile Bacillus thermoamyloliquefaciens KP1071 (FERM-P8477; growth over 30-66 degrees C) was purified to a homogeneous state. Its M(r) was estimated as 90000 by SDS/PAGE. However, the enzyme behaved as an active Mr 540000 protein on gel filtration with each of two gels of different matrices as well as on gel electrophoresis under native conditions. The enzyme was not glycosylated. Its isoelectric point was estimated as 5.7. The N-terminal sequence of 20 residues was determined asAla1-Ile-Gln-Pro-Glu-Gln-Asp-Asp-Lys-Thr-Gln-Glu-Asp-Gly- Tyr-Ile-Asp-Ile-Gly-Asn20. The sequence did not resemble those of procaryotic and eucaryotic proteins hitherto reported including the monomeric exo-alpha-1,4-glucosidase and the monomeric oligo-1,6-glucosidase from the same microorganism. The alpha-glucosidase II had no antigenic group shared with the latter two enzymes. Analysis of substrate specificity showed that the alpha-glucosidase II has dual activity towards oligo-1,6-glucosidases and exo-alpha-1,4-glucosidases, but its preference is for non-reducing terminal alpha-1,4 glucosidic bonds in substrates. Kinetic studies proved that both activities are attributed to the same catalytic site. The enzyme was most active at 81 degrees C and pH 7.0. Its half-life at pH 6.8 was 10 min at 81 degrees C, and 5 h at 55 degrees C in 6.4 M urea, 26% ethanol or 2.5% SDS. We suggest that the alpha-glucosidase II is a thermostable, homohexameric enzyme of origin distinct from the exo-alpha-1,4-glucosidase and the oligo-1,6-glucosidase present in the same strain.

  9. The ethylene signal transduction pathway in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The gaseous hormone ethylene is an important regulator of plant growth and development. Using a simple response of etiolated seedlings to ethylene as a genetic screen, genes involved in ethylene signal transduction have been identified in Arabidopsis. Analysis of two of these genes that have been cloned reveals that ethylene signalling involves a combination of a protein (ETR1) with similarity to bacterial histidine kinases and a protein (CTR1) with similarity to Raf-1, a protein kinase involved in multiple signalling cascades in eukaryotic cells. Several lines of investigation provide compelling evidence that ETR1 encodes an ethylene receptor. For the first time there is a glimpse of the molecular circuitry underlying the signal transduction pathway for a plant hormone.

  10. ELF3 controls thermoresponsive growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Box, Mathew S; Huang, B Emma; Domijan, Mirela; Jaeger, Katja E; Khattak, Asif Khan; Yoo, Seong Jeon; Sedivy, Emma L; Jones, D Marc; Hearn, Timothy J; Webb, Alex A R; Grant, Alastair; Locke, James C W; Wigge, Philip A

    2015-01-19

    Plant development is highly responsive to ambient temperature, and this trait has been linked to the ability of plants to adapt to climate change. The mechanisms by which natural populations modulate their thermoresponsiveness are not known. To address this, we surveyed Arabidopsis accessions for variation in thermal responsiveness of elongation growth and mapped the corresponding loci. We find that the transcriptional regulator EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3) controls elongation growth in response to temperature. Through a combination of modeling and experiments, we show that high temperature relieves the gating of growth at night, highlighting the importance of temperature-dependent repressors of growth. ELF3 gating of transcriptional targets responds rapidly and reversibly to changes in temperature. We show that the binding of ELF3 to target promoters is temperature dependent, suggesting a mechanism where temperature directly controls ELF3 activity.

  11. Cation channels in the Arabidopsis plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Véry, Anne Aliénor; Sentenac, Hervé

    2002-04-01

    In vivo analyses have identified different functional types of ion channels in various plant tissues and cells. The Arabidopsis genome contains approximately 70 genes for ion channels, of which 57 might be cation-selective channels (K(+), Ca(2+) or poorly discriminating channels). Here, we describe the different families of (putative) cation channels: the Shakers, the two-P-domain and Kir K(+) channels (encoded by the KCO genes), the cyclic-nucleotide-gated channels, the glutamate receptors, and the Ca(2+) channel TPC1. We also compare molecular data with the data obtained in planta, which should lead to a better understanding of the identity of these channels and provide clues about their roles in plant nutrition and cell signalling.

  12. Crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana cytokinin dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Bitto, Eduard; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2008-08-13

    Since first discovered in Zea mays, cytokinin dehydrogenase (CKX) genes have been identified in many plants including rice and Arabidopsis thaliana, which possesses CKX homologues (AtCKX1-AtCKX7). So far, the three-dimensional structure of only Z. mays CKX (ZmCKX1) has been determined. The crystal structures of ZmCKX1 have been solved in the native state and in complex with reaction products and a slowly reacting substrate. The structures revealed four glycosylated asparagine residues and a histidine residue covalently linked to FAD. Combined with the structural information, recent biochemical analyses of ZmCKX1 concluded that the final products of the reaction, adenine and a side chain aldehyde, are formed by nonenzymatic hydrolytic cleavage of cytokinin imine products resulting directly from CKX catalysis. Here, we report the crystal structure of AtCKX7 (gene locus At5g21482.1, UniProt code Q9FUJ1).

  13. The Arabidopsis Cyclophilin Gene Family1

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Patrick G.N.; Horton, Peter; Gray, Julie E.

    2004-01-01

    Database searching has allowed the identification of a number of previously unreported single and multidomain isoform members of the Arabidopsis cyclophilin gene family. In addition to the cyclophilin-like peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase domain, the latter contain a variety of other domains with characterized functions. Transcriptional analysis showed they are expressed throughout the plant, and different isoforms are present in all parts of the cell including the cytosol, nucleus, mitochondria, secretory pathway, and chloroplast. The abundance and diversity of cyclophilin isoforms suggests that, like their animal counterparts, plant cyclophilins are likely to be important proteins involved in a wide variety of cellular processes. As well as fulfilling the basic role of protein folding, they may also play important roles in mRNA processing, protein degradation, and signal transduction and thus may be crucial during both development and stress responsiveness. PMID:15051864

  14. A Space Flight Cultivation Protocol for Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, H. G.

    2008-06-01

    A tube-based method is presented for the cultivation and manipulation of Arabidopsis thaliana during space flight experimentation. Seeds were germinated on rock-wool plugs and subsequently transferred into modified polypropylene conical tubes (cut to 5 cm lengths) at 7 days after planting. Each tube contained four side-situated slits through which capillary mat strips were woven. An additional capillary mat wick extended from below the tube up through the bottom to the mid-interior portion. The incorporation of Fibrous Ion Exchange Resin Substrate provided nutrients. The tubes were transferred to plant compartments containing a horticulture foam matrix that received water inputs. Vigorous seedling development through to seed production was achieved. Dispersed seeds frequently germinated on top of the foam substrate, yielding a 2nd generation of seedlings. The methods used herein could be applied to other plant species to be flown in space.

  15. Metabolic fingerprinting of Arabidopsis thaliana accessions

    PubMed Central

    Sotelo-Silveira, Mariana; Chauvin, Anne-Laure; Marsch-Martínez, Nayelli; Winkler, Robert; de Folter, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In the post-genomic era much effort has been put on the discovery of gene function using functional genomics. Despite the advances achieved by these technologies in the understanding of gene function at the genomic and proteomic level, there is still a big genotype-phenotype gap. Metabolic profiling has been used to analyze organisms that have already been characterized genetically. However, there is a small number of studies comparing the metabolic profile of different tissues of distinct accessions. Here, we report the detection of over 14,000 and 17,000 features in inflorescences and leaves, respectively, in two widely used Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. A predictive Random Forest Model was developed, which was able to reliably classify tissue type and accession of samples based on LC-MS profile. Thereby we demonstrate that the morphological differences among A. thaliana accessions are reflected also as distinct metabolic phenotypes within leaves and inflorescences. PMID:26074932

  16. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response in Arabidopsis Roots

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yueh; Kanehara, Kazue

    2017-01-01

    Roots are the frontier of plant body to perceive underground environmental change. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response represents circumvention of cellular stress caused by various environmental changes; however, a limited number of studies are available on the ER stress responses in roots. Here, we report the tunicamycin (TM) -induced ER stress response in Arabidopsis roots by monitoring expression patterns of immunoglobulin-binding protein 3 (BiP3), a representative marker for the response. Roots promptly responded to the TM-induced ER stress through the induction of similar sets of ER stress-responsive genes. However, not all cells responded uniformly to the TM-induced ER stress in roots, as BiP3 was highly expressed in root tips, an outer layer in elongation zone, and an inner layer in mature zone of roots. We suggest that ER stress response in roots has tissue specificity. PMID:28298914

  17. Regulation of the Arabidopsis defense transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Eulgem, Thomas

    2005-02-01

    Transcriptional re-programming is a key step of plant defense in response to pathogen recognition. Microarray analyses combined with genetic and biochemical approaches are now enabling us to study basic principles and details of regulatory mechanisms controlling the defense transcriptome in Arabidopsis. Recent results show that signaling pathways used by different defense systems converge and target overlapping gene sets. Furthermore, a quantitative mechanism common to multiple defense systems modulates transcript levels of these defense-associated genes. Most importantly, some transcription factors have been proven to play a pivotal role in disease resistance. Regulatory circuits linking signaling and gene regulation are emerging, suggesting that a complex interplay of transcriptional activators and repressors fine-tunes expression of the defense transcriptome.

  18. The ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The simple gas ethylene influences a diverse array of plant growth and developmental processes including germination, senescence, cell elongation, and fruit ripening. This review focuses on recent molecular genetic studies, principally in Arabidopsis, in which components of the ethylene response pathway have been identified. The isolation and characterization of two of these genes has revealed that ethylene sensing involves a protein kinase cascade. One of these genes encodes a protein with similarity to the ubiquitous Raf family of Ser/Thr protein kinases. A second gene shows similarity to the prokaryotic two-component histidine kinases and most likely encodes an ethylene receptor. Additional elements involved in ethylene signaling have only been identified genetically. The characterization of these genes and mutants will be discussed.

  19. Photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. A. M.; Klein, W. H.

    1971-01-01

    Arabidopsis seeds were germinated on sterile mineral agar supplemented with 1% glucose and cultured under continuous light regimes. With 4-hour incandescent plus 20-hour monochromatic illumination in the region from 400 to 485 nanometers there was effective floral induction at an intensity of 100 microwatts per square centimeter. Exclusion of far red wave lengths from the 4-hour incandescent period sharply reduced the effectiveness of subsequent monochromatic blue light in promoting floral induction. Delayed floral induction occurred under continuous incandescent light lacking far red and was attributable to the blue wave lengths. Continuous 485 nanometer (100 microwatts per square centimeter) exposure without any white light treatment during the postgermination growth period was ineffective in floral induction and meristem development. Light at 730 nanometers under the same conditions was partially effective, whereas energy between 500 and 700 nanometers was completely ineffective. When continuous monochromatic light at a 3-fold higher energy level was administered, all photomorphogenic responses were accomplished with 485 nanometer light, including germination and 100% floral induction without any white light treatment at any time during the experiment. Almost equal quantum effectiveness was calculated when equivalent quantum flux densities in the region from 710 to 740 nanometers or at 485 nanometers were used. It is postulated that floral induction in Arabidopsis may be the result of a continuous excitation of a stable form of far red-absorbing phytochrome localized in or on a membrane, and that excitation can be either by direct absorption of energy by far red-absorbing phytochrome or by transfer from an accessory pigment. Images PMID:16657629

  20. Formation of the Arabidopsis pentatricopeptide repeat family.

    PubMed

    Rivals, Eric; Bruyère, Clémence; Toffano-Nioche, Claire; Lecharny, Alain

    2006-07-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) the 466 pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are putative RNA-binding proteins with essential roles in organelles. Roughly half of the PPR proteins form the plant combinatorial and modular protein (PCMP) subfamily, which is land-plant specific. PCMPs exhibit a large and variable tandem repeat of a standard pattern of three PPR variant motifs. The association or not of this repeat with three non-PPR motifs at their C terminus defines four distinct classes of PCMPs. The highly structured arrangement of these motifs and the similar repartition of these arrangements in the four classes suggest precise relationships between motif organization and substrate specificity. This study is an attempt to reconstruct an evolutionary scenario of the PCMP family. We developed an innovative approach based on comparisons of the proteins at two levels: namely the succession of motifs along the protein and the amino acid sequence of the motifs. It enabled us to infer evolutionary relationships between proteins as well as between the inter- and intraprotein repeats. First, we observed a polarized elongation of the repeat from the C terminus toward the N-terminal region, suggesting local recombinations of motifs. Second, the most N-terminal PPR triple motif proved to evolve under different constraints than the remaining repeat. Altogether, the evidence indicates different evolution for the PPR region and the C-terminal one in PCMPs, which points to distinct functions for these regions. Moreover, local sequence homogeneity observed across PCMP classes may be due to interclass shuffling of motifs, or to deletions/insertions of non-PPR motifs at the C terminus.

  1. Catabolism of Glutathione Conjugates in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Brazier-Hicks, Melissa; Evans, Kathryn M.; Cunningham, Oliver D.; Hodgson, David R. W.; Steel, Patrick G.; Edwards, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The safener fenclorim (4,6-dichloro-2-phenylpyrimidine) increases tolerance to chloroacetanilide herbicides in rice by enhancing the expression of detoxifying glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). Fenclorim also enhances GSTs in Arabidopsis thaliana, and while investigating the functional significance of this induction in suspension cultures, we determined that these enzymes glutathionylated the safener. The resulting S-(fenclorim)-glutathione conjugate was sequentially processed to S-(fenclorim)-γ-glutamyl-cysteine and S-(fenclorim)-cysteine (FC), the latter accumulating in both the cells and the medium. FC was then either catabolized to 4-chloro-6-(methylthio)-phenylpyrimidine (CMTP) or N-acylated with malonic acid. These cysteine derivatives had distinct fates, with the enzymes responsible for their formation being induced by fenclorim and FC. Fenclorim-N-malonylcysteine was formed from FC by the action of a malonyl-CoA-dependent N-malonyltransferase. A small proportion of the fenclorim-N-malonylcysteine then underwent decarboxylation to yield a putative S-fenclorim-N-acetylcysteine intermediate, which underwent a second round of GST-mediated S-glutathionylation and subsequent proteolytic processing. The formation of CMTP was catalyzed by the concerted action of a cysteine conjugate β-lyase and an S-methyltransferase, with the two activities being coordinately regulated. Although the fenclorim conjugates tested showed little GST-inducing activity in Arabidopsis, the formation of CMTP resulted in metabolic reactivation, with the product showing good enhancing activity. In addition, CMTP induced GSTs and herbicide-safening activity in rice. The bioactivated CMTP was in turn glutathione-conjugated and processed to a malonyl cysteine derivative. These results reveal the surprisingly complex set of competing catabolic reactions acting on xenobiotics entering the S-glutathionylation pathway in plants, which can result in both detoxification and bioactivation. PMID

  2. Double helix formation of poly(m-phenylene)s bearing achiral oligo(ethylene oxide) pendants and transformation into an excess of one-handed single helix through cholate binding in water.

    PubMed

    Ben, Teng; Furusho, Yoshio; Goto, Hidetoshi; Miwa, Kazuhiro; Yashima, Eiji

    2009-06-21

    A water-soluble poly(m-phenylene) bearing an achiral oligo(ethylene oxide) chain at the 5-position was synthesized by the Ni(0)-mediated homo-coupling polycondensation of a 3,5-dibromophenol monomer. The poly(m-phenylene) adopted a single helical conformation in protic media and self-assembled into a double helix in water through aromatic interaction, while it took a random-coil conformation in chloroform. Upon the addition of sodium cholate in water, the double helical poly(m-phenylene) was transformed into single strands, which bound the cholate molecules to form an excess of one-handed single helix.

  3. Efficient Cellular Knockdown Mediated by siRNA Nanovectors of Gemini Cationic Lipids Having Delocalizable Headgroups and Oligo-Oxyethylene Spacers.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Negro, María; Kumar, Krishan; Barrán-Berdón, Ana L; Datta, Sougata; Kondaiah, Paturu; Junquera, Elena; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Aicart, Emilio

    2016-08-31

    The use of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to silence specific genes is one of the most promising approaches in gene therapy, but it requires efficient nanovectors for successful cellular delivery. Recently, we reported liposomal gene carriers derived from a gemini cationic lipid (GCL) of the 1,2-bis(hexadecyl dimethyl imidazolium) oligo-oxyethylene series ((C16Im)2(C2H4O)nC2H4 with n = 1, 2, or 3) and 1,2-dioleyol phosphatidylethanolamine as highly efficient cytofectins for pDNA. On the basis of the satisfactory outcomes of the previous study, the present work focuses on the utility of coliposomes of these gemini lipids with the biocompatible neutral lipid mono oleoyl glycerol (MOG) as highly potent vectors for siRNA cellular transport in the presence of serum. The (C16Im)2(C2H4O)nC2H4/MOG-siRNA lipoplexes were characterized through (i) a physicochemical study (zeta potential, cryo-transmission electron microscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering, and fluorescence anisotropy) to establish the relationship between size, structure, fluidity, and the interaction between siRNA and the GCL/MOG gene vectors and (ii) a biological analysis (flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, and cell viability) to report the anti-GFP siRNA transfections in HEK 293T, HeLa, and H1299 cancer cell lines. The in vitro biological analysis confirms the cellular uptake and indicates that a short spacer, a very low molar fraction of GCL in the mixed lipid, and a moderate effective charge ratio of the lipoplex yielded maximum silencing efficacy. At these experimental conditions, the siRNA used in this work is compacted by the GCL/MOG nanovectors by forming two cubic structures (Ia3d and Pm3n) that are correlated with excellent silencing activity. These liposomal nanocarriers possess high silencing activity with a negligible cytotoxicity, which strongly supports their practical use for in vivo knockdown studies.

  4. A High Fiber and Vegetable Protein Diet is Associated with Low Lumbar Bone Mineral Density in Young Oligo-amenorrheic Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Elizabeth; Sokoloff, Natalia Cano; Maffazioli, Giovana D. N.; Ackerman, Kathryn E.; Woolley, Ryan; Holmes, Tara M.; Anderson, Ellen J.; Misra, Madhusmita

    2015-01-01

    Background Associations of bone mineral density (BMD) with specific food components, including dietary fiber and isoflavones (that have a negative association with serum estrogen), are unclear and need to be determined, particularly in a population more likely to consume large amounts of these nutrients (such as young athletes). Objective To determine dietary intake of specific food components in oligo-amenorrheic athletes (OA) compared to eumenorrheic athletes (EA) and non-athletes (NA), and associations of the dietary intake of these nutrients with lumbar spine BMD. Design and Subjects This cross-sectional study evaluated 68 OA, 24 EA, and 26 NA 14–23 years old. Measurements included four-day food records (assessed using Nutrient Data System for Research software), a DXA scan evaluating lumbar spine BMD and body composition, and hormone levels. Multivariate analysis was used to estimate associations of nutrients with lumbar spine BMD. Results Compared with EA and NA, OA had higher intake of fiber, phytic acid, and vegetable protein (p<0.0001 for all). Intake of isoflavones, genistein and daidzein, was higher in OA than NA (p=0.003 and 0.0002 respectively). OA had lower consumption of energy from saturated fatty acids (%SFA) than NA (p=0.002). After controlling for confounders such as body weight, menstrual status (indicative of estrogen status), calcium intake, and serum vitamin D (known BMD determinants), lumbar spine BMD Z-scores were inversely associated with dietary fiber [β coefficient (β)= −0.30; p=0.01], vegetable protein (β = −0.28, p=0.02), phytic acid (β = −0.27, p=0.02), genistein (β = −0.25, p=0.01), and daidzein (β = −0.24, p=0.01), and positively with %SFA (β =0.32, p=0.0006)]. Conclusions Compared to EA and NA, OA had a higher dietary intake of fiber, vegetable protein and phytic acid, which were inversely associated with lumbar spine BMD Z-scores. Further studies are needed to assess dietary recommendations for OA to optimize

  5. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 release from oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) hydrogels in conditions that model the cartilage wound healing environment.

    PubMed

    Holland, Theresa A; Tessmar, Joerg K V; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Mikos, Antonios G

    2004-01-08

    This research demonstrates that controlled material degradation and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) release can be achieved by encapsulation of TGF-beta1-loaded gelatin microparticles within the biodegradable polymer oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) (OPF), so that these microparticles function as both a digestible porogen and a delivery vehicle. Release studies performed with non-encapsulated microparticles confirmed that at normal physiological pH, TGF-beta1 complexes with acidic gelatin, resulting in slow release rates. At pH 4.0, this complexation no longer persists, and TGF-beta1 release is enhanced. However, by encapsulating TGF-beta1-loaded microparticles in a network of OPF, release at either pH can be diffusionally controlled. For instance, after 28 days of incubation at pH 4.0, final cumulative release from non-encapsulated microparticles crosslinked in 10 and 40 mM glutaraldehyde (GA) was 75.4+/-1.6% and 76.6+/-1.1%, respectively. However, when either microparticle formulation was encapsulated in an OPF hydrogel (noted as OPF-10 mM and OPF-40 mM, respectively), these values were reduced to 44.7+/-14.6% and 47.4+/-4.7%. More interestingly, release studies, in conditions that model the expected collagenase concentration of injured cartilage, demonstrated that by altering the microparticle crosslinking extent and loading within OPF hydrogels, TGF-beta1 release, composite swelling, and polymer loss could be systematically altered. Composites encapsulating less crosslinked microparticles (OPF-10 mM) exhibited 100% release after only 18 days and were completely degraded by day 24 in collagenase-containing phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Hydrogels encapsulating 40 mM GA microparticles did not exhibit 100% release or polymer loss until day 28. Hydrogels with no microparticle component demonstrated only 79.3+/-9.2% release and 89.2+/-3.4% polymer loss after 28 days in enzyme-containing PBS. Accordingly, these studies confirm that the rate of TGF

  6. Effect of drying history on swelling properties and cell attachment to oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) hydrogels for guided tissue regeneration applications.

    PubMed

    Temenoff, Johnna S; Steinbis, Emily S; Mikos, Antonios G

    2003-01-01

    In these experiments, the effects of the drying history of hydrogels made from a novel polymer, oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) (OPF) with two different poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) molecular weights (approximately 920 (1K) and 9110 (10K) g/mol), were investigated. The hydrogels were either formed, dried and then swelled, representing what may occur in the case of a pre-formed membrane for guided tissue regeneration, or were formed and swelled immediately, as may occur with an injectable material for such applications. Subsequently, swelling properties, sol fraction and polymer network structure (as indicated by differential scanning calorimetry), as well as attachment of human dermal fibroblasts to these hydrogels at 4 and 24 h was examined. It was found that drying before swelling caused a significant reduction in final fold swelling of OPF hydrogels, regardless of OPF formulation or method of drying (air-dried or vacuum-dried) (e.g. PEG 10K swollen first: 13.94 +/- 0.35 vs. vacuum first: 6.53 +/- 0.12; PEG 1K swollen first: 8.99 +/- 0.47 vs. vacuum first: 2.26 +/- 0.08). This decreased swelling correlated to significantly higher cell attachment (% seeded) to these hydrogels at 24 h (PEG 10K vacuum first: 21.1 +/- 4.7% vs. swollen first: 7.1 +/- 5.5%; PEG 1K vacuum first: 58.2 +/- 2% vs. swollen first: 7.4 +/- 2.2%). LIVE/DEAD staining followed by microscopic analysis revealed attached cells were viable, yet rounded, and that, in the case of the PEG 1K dried-first samples, undulations in the surface visible in the hydrated state may have affected cell adhesion. Regardless of treatment, all hydrogels showed significantly less cell attachment than the tissue culture polystyrene control after 24 h (104.9 +/- 4.4%). These results suggest that, by altering the PEG molecular weight used in synthesis, OPF hydrogels may be tailored to produce desired swelling properties and reduce non-specific cell adhesion for either injectable or pre-formed applications, thus

  7. Cononsolvency-induced micellization of pyrene end-labeled diblock copolymers of N-isopropylacrylamide and oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate.

    PubMed

    Rao, Jingyi; Xu, Jian; Luo, Shizhong; Liu, Shiyong

    2007-11-06

    Pyrene end-labeled double hydrophilic diblock copolymers, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-b-poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (Py-PNIPAM-b-POEGMA), were synthesized via consecutive reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization using a pyrene-containing dithioester as the chain transfer agent. These diblock copolymers molecularly dissolve in pure methanol and water, but form well-defined and nearly monodisperse PNIPAM-core micelles in an appropriate mixture of them due to the cononsolvency of PNIPAM block. 1H NMR, laser light scattering, fluorescence spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were employed to characterize the cononsolvency-induced PNIPAM-core micelles. When the volume fraction of water, phi water, in the methanol/water mixture is in the range of 0.5-0.8, the sizes of micelles are in the range of 20-30 nm in radius for Py-PNIPAM50-b- POEGMA18. At phi water = 0.5, the formed micelles possess the highest overall micelle density and the largest molar mass. The effects of varying the block lengths of Py-PNIPAM-b-POEGMA diblock copolymers on the structural parameters of PNIPAM-core micelles have also been explored. Although we can observe the immediate appearance of bluish tinge upon mixing the diblock copolymer solution in methanol with equal volume of water (phi water = 0.5), which is characteristic of the formation of micellar aggregates, the whole micellization process apparently takes a relatively long time to complete, as revealed by monitoring the time dependence of fluorescence emission spectra. The excimer/monomer fluorescence intensity ratios, IE/IM, continuously decrease with time and then reach a plateau value after approximately 20 min. The decrease of IE/IM after the initial formation of pseudo-equilibrium micelles should be ascribed to the structural rearrangement and further packing of PNIPAM segments within the micelle core, restricting the mobility of pyrene end groups and decreasing the

  8. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  9. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vaka S; Ali, Gul S; Reddy, Anireddy S N

    2002-03-22

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  10. AtCCX3 is an Arabidopsis endomembrane H(+)-dependent K(+) transporter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Arabidopsis ("Arabidopsis thaliana") cation calcium exchangers (CCXs) were recently identified as a subfamily of cation transporters; however, no plant "CCXs" have been functionally characterized. Here, we show that Arabidopsis AtCCX3 (At3g14070) and AtCCX4 (At1g54115) can suppress yeast mutants...

  11. Arabidopsis cell-free extract, ACE, a new in vitro translation system derived from Arabidopsis callus cultures.

    PubMed

    Murota, Katsunori; Hagiwara-Komoda, Yuka; Komoda, Keisuke; Onouchi, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Masayuki; Naito, Satoshi

    2011-08-01

    The analysis of post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in plants has benefited greatly from the use of cell-free extract systems. Arabidopsis as a model system provides extensive genetic resources; however, to date a suitable cell-free translation system from Arabidopsis has not been available. In this study, we devised an Arabidopsis cell-free extract (ACE) to be used for in vitro translation studies. Protoplasts were prepared from callus cultures derived from Arabidopsis seedlings, and cell-free extracts were prepared after evacuolation of the protoplasts by Percoll gradient centrifugation. The new ACE system exhibits translation activity comparable with that of the wheat germ extract system. We demonstrated that ACE prepared from the 5'-3' exoribonuclease-deficient mutant of Arabidopsis, xrn4-5, exhibited increased stability of an uncapped mRNA as compared with that from wild-type Arabidopsis. We applied the ACE system to study post-transcriptional regulation of AtCGS1. AtCGS1 codes for cystathionine γ-synthase (CGS) that catalyzes the first committed step of methionine and S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) biosynthesis in plants, and is feedback regulated by mRNA degradation coupled with translation elongation arrest. The ACE system was capable of reproducing translation elongation arrest and subsequent AtCGS1 mRNA degradation that are induced by AdoMet. The ACE system described here can be prepared in a month after seed sowing and will make it possible to study post-transcriptional regulation of plant genes while taking advantage of the genetics of Arabidopsis.

  12. 50 years of Arabidopsis research: highlights and future directions.

    PubMed

    Provart, Nicholas J; Alonso, Jose; Assmann, Sarah M; Bergmann, Dominique; Brady, Siobhan M; Brkljacic, Jelena; Browse, John; Chapple, Clint; Colot, Vincent; Cutler, Sean; Dangl, Jeff; Ehrhardt, David; Friesner, Joanna D; Frommer, Wolf B; Grotewold, Erich; Meyerowitz, Elliot; Nemhauser, Jennifer; Nordborg, Magnus; Pikaard, Craig; Shanklin, John; Somerville, Chris; Stitt, Mark; Torii, Keiko U; Waese, Jamie; Wagner, Doris; McCourt, Peter

    2016-02-01

    922 I. 922 II. 922 III. 925 IV. 925 V. 926 VI. 927 VII. 928 VIII. 929 IX. 930 X. 931 XI. 932 XII. 933 XIII. Natural variation and genome-wide association studies 934 XIV. 934 XV. 935 XVI. 936 XVII. 937 937 References 937 SUMMARY: The year 2014 marked the 25(th) International Conference on Arabidopsis Research. In the 50 yr since the first International Conference on Arabidopsis Research, held in 1965 in Göttingen, Germany, > 54 000 papers that mention Arabidopsis thaliana in the title, abstract or keywords have been published. We present herein a citational network analysis of these papers, and touch on some of the important discoveries in plant biology that have been made in this powerful model system, and highlight how these discoveries have then had an impact in crop species. We also look to the future, highlighting some outstanding questions that can be readily addressed in Arabidopsis. Topics that are discussed include Arabidopsis reverse genetic resources, stock centers, databases and online tools, cell biology, development, hormones, plant immunity, signaling in response to abiotic stress, transporters, biosynthesis of cells walls and macromolecules such as starch and lipids, epigenetics and epigenomics, genome-wide association studies and natural variation, gene regulatory networks, modeling and systems biology, and synthetic biology.

  13. Arsenic uptake and speciation in Arabidopsis thaliana under hydroponic conditions.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hee; Han, Young-Soo; Seong, Hye Jin; Ahn, Joo Sung; Nam, In-Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Arsenic (As) uptake and species in Arabidopsis thaliana were evaluated under hydroponic conditions. Plant nutrient solutions were treated with arsenite [As(III)] or arsenate [As(V)], and aqueous As speciation was conducted using a solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge. Arabidopsis reduced As(V) to As(III) in the nutrient solution, possibly due to root exudates such as organic acids or the efflux of As(III) from plant roots after in vivo reduction of As(V) to As(III). Arsenic uptake by Arabidopsis was associated with increased levels of Ca and Fe, and decreased levels of K in plant tissues. Arsenic in Arabidopsis mainly occurred as As(III), which was coordinated with oxygen and sulfur based on XANES and EXAFS results. The existence of As(III)O and As(III)S in EXAFS indicates partial biotransformation of As(III)O to a sulfur-coordinated form because of limited amount of glutathione in plants. Further understanding the mechanism of As biotransformation in Arabidopsis may help to develop measures that can mitigate As toxicity via genetic engineering.

  14. Stomatal development in Arabidopsis and grasses: differences and commonalities.

    PubMed

    Serna, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Stomata, found on the epidermis of all terrestrial plants, consist of two specialized cells called guard cells, which surround a tiny pore. Major advances have been made in our understanding of the genetic control of stomatal development in Arabidopsis and grasses. In Arabidopsis, three basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) genes control the successive steps that lead to stomatal formation. SPEECHLESS (SPCH) drives the cell division that initiates the stomatal cell lineage, MUTE induces the formation of the immediate stomatal precursor cell, and FAMA causes the stomatal precursor cell to divide into the two guard cells. Recent results demonstrate that these genes share functions with their grass homologs, and that MUTE is expressed later in development than its grass counterparts. Other differences in stomatal development between these two plant groups are exemplified by the PANGLOSS1 (PAN1) gene of maize. PAN1, which encodes a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase with an inactive kinase domain, promotes polarization of the subsidiary mother cell and orients its cell division plane. Because such events do not exist in Arabidopsis, it is likely that the PAN1-like genes of Arabidopsis and PAN1 are paralogs. Together, these results indicate that distinctions in the regulation of gene expression and protein function are both responsible for the divergence of stomatal development between Arabidopsis and grasses.

  15. Ethylene signaling in rice and Arabidopsis: conserved and diverged aspects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Lu, Xiang; Ma, Biao; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2015-04-01

    Ethylene as a gas phytohormone plays significant roles in the whole life cycle of plants, ranging from growth and development to stress responses. A linear ethylene signaling pathway has been established in the dicotyledonous model plant Arabidopsis. However, the ethylene signaling mechanism in monocotyledonous plants such as rice is largely unclear. In this review, we compare the ethylene response phenotypes of dark-grown seedlings of Arabidopsis, rice, and other monocotyledonous plants (maize, wheat, sorghum, and Brachypodium distachyon) and pinpoint that rice has a distinct phenotype of root inhibition but coleoptile promotion in etiolated seedlings upon ethylene treatment. We further summarize the homologous genes of Arabidopsis ethylene signaling components in these monocotyledonous plants and discuss recent progress. Although conserved in most aspects, ethylene signaling in rice has evolved new features compared with that in Arabidopsis. These analyses provide novel insights into the understanding of ethylene signaling in the dicotyledonous Arabidopsis and monocotyledonous plants, particularly rice. Further characterization of rice ethylene-responsive mutants and their corresponding genes will help us better understand the whole picture of ethylene signaling mechanisms in plants.

  16. Identification of Pseudomonas syringae pathogens of Arabidopsis and a bacterial locus determining avirulence on both Arabidopsis and soybean.

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, M C; Innes, R W; Bent, A F; Staskawicz, B J

    1991-01-01

    To develop a model system for molecular genetic analysis of plant-pathogen interactions, we studied the interaction between Arabidopsis thaliana and the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst). Pst strains were found to be virulent or avirulent on specific Arabidopsis ecotypes, and single ecotypes were resistant to some Pst strains and susceptible to others. In many plant-pathogen interactions, disease resistance is controlled by the simultaneous presence of single plant resistance genes and single pathogen avirulence genes. Therefore, we tested whether avirulence genes in Pst controlled induction of resistance in Arabidopsis. Cosmids that determine avirulence were isolated from Pst genomic libraries, and the Pst avirulence locus avrRpt2 was defined. This allowed us to construct pathogens that differed only by the presence or absence of a single putative avirulence gene. We found that Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0 was susceptible to Pst strain DC3000 but resistant to the same strain carrying avrRpt2, suggesting that a single locus in Col-0 determines resistance. As a first step toward genetically mapping the postulated resistance locus, an ecotype susceptible to infection by DC3000 carrying avrRpt2 was identified. The avrRpt2 locus from Pst was also moved into virulent strains of the soybean pathogen P. syringae pv glycinea to test whether this locus could determine avirulence on soybean. The resulting strains induced a resistant response in a cultivar-specific manner, suggesting that similar resistance mechanisms may function in Arabidopsis and soybean. PMID:1824334

  17. Transformation of beta-lycopene cyclase genes from Salicornia europaea and Arabidopsis conferred salt tolerance in Arabidopsis and tobacco.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianyang; Han, Heping; Jiang, Ping; Nie, Lingling; Bao, Hexigeduleng; Fan, Pengxiang; Lv, Sulian; Feng, Juanjuan; Li, Yinxin

    2011-05-01

    Inhibition of lycopene cyclization decreased the salt tolerance of the euhalophyte Salicornia europaea L. We isolated a β-lycopene cyclase gene SeLCY from S. europaea and transformed it into Arabidopsis with stable expression. Transgenic Arabidopsis on post-germination exhibited enhanced tolerance to oxidative and salt stress. After 8 and 21 d recovery from 200 mM NaCl treatment, transgenic lines had a higher survival ratio than wild-type (WT) plants. Three-week-old transgenic plants treated with 200 mM NaCl showed better growth than the WT with higher photosystem activity and less H(2)O(2) accumulation. Determination of endogenous pigments of Arabidopsis treated with 200 mM NaCl for 0, 2 or 4 d demonstrated that the transgenic plants retained higher contents of carotenoids than the WT. Furthermore, to compare the difference between SeLCY and AtLCY from Arabidopsis, we used viral vector mediating ectopic expression of SeLCY and AtLCY in Nicotiana benthamiana. Although LCY genes transformation increased the salt tolerance in tobacco, there is no significant difference between SeLCY- and AtLCY-transformed plants. These findings indicate that SeLCY transgenic Arabidopsis improved salt tolerance by increasing synthesis of carotenoids, which impairs reactive oxygen species and protects the photosynthesis system under salt stress, and as a single gene, SeLCY functionally showed no advantage for salt tolerance improvement compared with AtLCY.

  18. Arabidopsis Hormone Database: a comprehensive genetic and phenotypic information database for plant hormone research in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhi-yu; Zhou, Xin; Li, Linchuan; Yu, Xiangchun; Li, Hongjiang; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Cao, Guangyu; Bai, Mingyi; Wang, Xingchun; Jiang, Caifu; Lu, Haibin; Hou, Xianhui; Qu, Lijia; Wang, Zhiyong; Zuo, Jianru; Fu, Xiangdong; Su, Zhen; Li, Songgang; Guo, Hongwei

    2009-01-01

    Plant hormones are small organic molecules that influence almost every aspect of plant growth and development. Genetic and molecular studies have revealed a large number of genes that are involved in responses to numerous plant hormones, including auxin, gibberellin, cytokinin, abscisic acid, ethylene, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, and brassinosteroid. Here, we develop an Arabidopsis hormone database, which aims to provide a systematic and comprehensive view of genes participating in plant hormonal regulation, as well as morphological phenotypes controlled by plant hormones. Based on data from mutant studies, transgenic analysis and gene ontology (GO) annotation, we have identified a total of 1026 genes in the Arabidopsis genome that participate in plant hormone functions. Meanwhile, a phenotype ontology is developed to precisely describe myriad hormone-regulated morphological processes with standardized vocabularies. A web interface (http://ahd.cbi.pku.edu.cn) would allow users to quickly get access to information about these hormone-related genes, including sequences, functional category, mutant information, phenotypic description, microarray data and linked publications. Several applications of this database in studying plant hormonal regulation and hormone cross-talk will be presented and discussed.

  19. Inflorescence abnormalities occur with overexpression of Arabidopsis lyrata FT in the fwa mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kawanabe, Takahiro; Fujimoto, Ryo

    2011-10-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is a quantitative long-day plant with the timing of the floral transition being regulated by both endogenous signals and multiple environmental factors. fwa is a late-flowering mutant, and this phenotype is due to ectopic FWA expression caused by hypomethylation at the FWA locus. The floral transition results in the activation of the floral development process, the key regulators being the floral meristem identity genes, AP1 (APETALA1) and LFY (LEAFY). In this study, we describe inflorescence abnormalities in plants overexpressing the Arabidopsis lyrata FT (AlFT) and A. thaliana FWA (AtFWA) genes simultaneously. The inflorescence abnormality phenotype was present in only a proportion of plants. All plants overexpressing both AlFT and AtFWA flowered earlier than fwa, suggesting that the inflorescence abnormality and earlier flowering time are caused independently. The inflorescence abnormality phenotype was similar to that of the double mutant of ap1 and lfy, and AP1 and LFY genes were down-regulated in the abnormal inflorescences. From these results, we suggest that not only does ectopic AtFWA expression inhibit AtFT/AlFT function to delay flowering but that overexpression of AtFWA and AlFT together inhibits AP1 and LFY function to produce abnormal inflorescences.

  20. Building an efficient curation workflow for the Arabidopsis literature corpus.

    PubMed

    Li, Donghui; Berardini, Tanya Z; Muller, Robert J; Huala, Eva

    2012-01-01

    TAIR (The Arabidopsis Information Resource) is the model organism database (MOD) for Arabidopsis thaliana, a model plant with a literature corpus of about 39 000 articles in PubMed, with over 4300 new articles added in 2011. We have developed a literature curation workflow incorporating both automated and manual elements to cope with this flood of new research articles. The current workflow can be divided into two phases: article selection and curation. Structured controlled vocabularies, such as the Gene Ontology and Plant Ontology are used to capture free text information in the literature as succinct ontology-based annotations suitable for the application of computational analysis methods. We also describe our curation platform and the use of text mining tools in our workflow. Database URL: www.arabidopsis.org

  1. A petal breakstrength meter for Arabidopsis abscission studies

    PubMed Central

    Lease, Kevin A; Cho, Sung Ki; Walker, John C

    2006-01-01

    Background Abscission is the regulated dropping of plant organs, such as leaves or flower petals. This process involves a break down of the cell wall between layers of cells in the abscission zone, causing the organ to become detached. The model plant Arabidopsis thaliana undergoes floral organ abscission. Various experimental methods have been used to study Arabidopsis floral organ abscission, including measuring the petal breakstrength, or the amount of force required to pull a petal from the receptacle. Petal breakstrength provides a quantitative insight into the physical integrity of the petal abscission zone. Results We developed a petal breakstrength meter that allows rapid data acquisition on a personal computer. We present the design of the device and show its utility in measuring Arabidopsis petal breakstrength for abscission studies. Conclusion This petal breakstrength meter should enable researchers to perform the petal breakstrength assay as a routine part of the characterization of environmental and genetic factors affecting abscission. PMID:16483376

  2. Lateral root development in Arabidopsis: fifty shades of auxin.

    PubMed

    Lavenus, Julien; Goh, Tatsuaki; Roberts, Ianto; Guyomarc'h, Soazig; Lucas, Mikaël; De Smet, Ive; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Beeckman, Tom; Bennett, Malcolm; Laplaze, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    The developmental plasticity of the root system represents a key adaptive trait enabling plants to cope with abiotic stresses such as drought and is therefore important in the current context of global changes. Root branching through lateral root formation is an important component of the adaptability of the root system to its environment. Our understanding of the mechanisms controlling lateral root development has progressed tremendously in recent years through research in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). These studies have revealed that the phytohormone auxin acts as a common integrator to many endogenous and environmental signals regulating lateral root formation. Here, we review what has been learnt about the myriad roles of auxin during lateral root formation in Arabidopsis.

  3. Abiotic stresses induce different localizations of anthocyanins in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kovinich, Nik; Kayanja, Gilbert; Chanoca, Alexandra; Otegui, Marisa S; Grotewold, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Anthocyanins are induced in plants in response to abiotic stresses such as drought, high salinity, excess light, and cold, where they often correlate with enhanced stress tolerance. Numerous roles have been proposed for anthocyanins induced during abiotic stresses including functioning as ROS scavengers, photoprotectants, and stress signals. We have recently found different profiles of anthocyanins in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants exposed to different abiotic stresses, suggesting that not all anthocyanins have the same function. Here, we discuss these findings in the context of other studies and show that anthocyanins induced in Arabidopsis in response to various abiotic stresses have different localizations at the organ and tissue levels. These studies provide a basis to clarify the role of particular anthocyanin species during abiotic stress. PMID:26179363

  4. Altered selectivity in an Arabidopsis metal transporter.

    PubMed

    Rogers, E E; Eide, D J; Guerinot, M L

    2000-10-24

    Plants require metals for essential functions ranging from respiration to photosynthesis. These metals also contribute to the nutritional value of plants for both humans and livestock. Additionally, plants have the ability to accumulate nonessential metals such as cadmium and lead, and this ability could be harnessed to remove pollutant metals from the environment. Designing a transporter that specifically accumulates certain cations while excluding others has exciting applications in all of these areas. The Arabidopsis root membrane protein IRT1 is likely to be responsible for uptake of iron from the soil. Like other Fe(II) transporters identified to date, IRT1 transports a variety of other cations, including the essential metals zinc and manganese as well as the toxic metal cadmium. By heterologous expression in yeast, we show here that the replacement of a glutamic acid residue at position 103 in wild-type IRT1 with alanine increases the substrate specificity of the transporter by selectively eliminating its ability to transport zinc. Two other mutations, replacing the aspartic acid residues at either positions 100 or 136 with alanine, also increase IRT1 metal selectivity by eliminating transport of both iron and manganese. A number of other conserved residues in or near transmembrane domains appear to be essential for all transport function. Therefore, this study identifies at least some of the residues important for substrate selection and transport in a protein belonging to the ZIP gene family, a large transporter family found in a wide variety of organisms.

  5. Phenotypic consequences of aneuploidy in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Henry, Isabelle M; Dilkes, Brian P; Miller, Eric S; Burkart-Waco, Diana; Comai, Luca

    2010-12-01

    Aneuploid cells are characterized by incomplete chromosome sets. The resulting imbalance in gene dosage has phenotypic consequences that are specific to each karyotype. Even in the case of Down syndrome, the most viable and studied form of human aneuploidy, the mechanisms underlying the connected phenotypes remain mostly unclear. Because of their tolerance to aneuploidy, plants provide a powerful system for a genome-wide investigation of aneuploid syndromes, an approach that is not feasible in animal systems. Indeed, in many plant species, populations of aneuploid individuals can be easily obtained from triploid individuals. We phenotyped a population of Arabidopsis thaliana aneuploid individuals containing 25 different karyotypes. Even in this highly heterogeneous population, we demonstrate that certain traits are strongly associated with the dosage of specific chromosome types and that chromosomal effects can be additive. Further, we identified subtle developmental phenotypes expressed in the diploid progeny of aneuploid parent(s) but not in euploid controls from diploid lineages. These results indicate long-term phenotypic consequences of aneuploidy that can persist after chromosomal balance has been restored. We verified the diploid nature of these individuals by whole-genome sequencing and discuss the possibility that trans-generational phenotypic effects stem from epigenetic modifications passed from aneuploid parents to their diploid progeny.

  6. The peri-cell-cycle in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Beeckman, T; Burssens, S; Inzé, D

    2001-03-01

    The root systems of plants proliferate via de novo formed meristems originating from differentiated pericycle cells. The identity of putative signals responsible for triggering some of the pericycle cells to re-enter the cell cycle remains unknown. Here, the cell cycle regulation in the pericycle of seedling roots of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) HEYNH: is studied shortly after germination using various strategies. Based on the detailed analysis of the promoter-beta-glucuronidase activity of four key cell cycle regulatory genes, combined with cell length measurements, microdensitometry of DNA content, and experiments with a cell cycle-blocking agent, a model is proposed for cell cycle regulation in the pericycle at the onset of lateral root initiation. The results clearly show that before the first lateral root is initiated, the pericycle consists of dissimilar cell files in respect of their cell division history. Depending on the distance behind the root tip and on position in relation to the vascular tissue, particular pericycle cells remain in the G(2) phase of the cell cycle and are apparently more susceptible to lateral root initiation than others.

  7. Isolation and Suborganellar Fractionation of Arabidopsis Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Flores-Pérez, Úrsula; Jarvis, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Chloroplasts are structurally complex organelles containing ~2000-3000 proteins. They are delimited by a double membrane system or envelope, have an inner aqueous compartment called the stroma, and possess a second internal membrane system called the thylakoids. Thus, determining the suborganellar location of a chloroplast protein is vital to understanding or verifying its function. One way in which protein localization can be addressed is through fractionation. Here we present two rapid and simple methods that may be applied sequentially on the same day: (a) The isolation of intact chloroplasts from Arabidopsis thaliana plants that may be used directly (e.g., for functional studies such as protein import analysis), or for further processing as follows; (b) separation of isolated chloroplasts into three suborganellar fractions (envelope membranes, a soluble fraction containing stromal proteins, and the thylakoids). These methods are routinely used in our laboratory, and they provide a good yield of isolated chloroplasts and suborganellar fractions that can be used for various downstream applications.

  8. Microgravity effects on Arabidopsis thaliana energy pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrota, C.; Piso, M. I.; Banciu, H.; Keul, A.

    The flexibility of plant bioenergetics helps plants to acclimate to environmental stresses Our work is focused on standard free energy changes for PPi and ATP hydrolysis in order to assess the relative importance of PPi versus ATP as an energy donor in the plant cytosol of Arabidopsis plants exposed to microgravity The results indicated that PPi would be particularly favored as a phosphoryl donor relative to ATP under cytosolic conditions known to accompany stresses Recent researches showed that besides its functions inside the cell ATP may be released to the extracellular milieu where it functions as the primary signaling molecule of a diverse range of physiological processes It seems that extracellular ATP is essential for maintaining plant cell viability We intend to study how the production and the release of ATP is influenced by the microgravity References begin enumerate item Chivasaa S Bongani K Ndimbab W Simonc J Lindseyc K and Slabasc A 2005 Extracellular ATP Functions as an Endogenous External Metabolite Regulating Plant Cell Viability The Plant Cell 17 3019-3034 item Palma D A Blumwald E and Plaxton W C 2000 Upregulation of vacuolar H -translocating pyrophosphatase by phosphate starvation of Brassica napus rapeseed suspension cell cultures FEBS Letters 486 155-158 item Plaxton W C 2004 Plant response to stress Biochemical adaptations to phosphate deficiency In R Goodman ed Encyclopedia of Plant and Crop Science Marcel Dekker Inc N Y end enumerate

  9. Epigenetic Regulation of Intronic Transgenes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Osabe, Kenji; Harukawa, Yoshiko; Miura, Saori; Saze, Hidetoshi

    2017-01-01

    Defense mechanisms of plant genomes can epigenetically inactivate repetitive sequences and exogenous transgenes. Loss of mutant phenotypes in intronic T-DNA insertion lines by interaction with another T-DNA locus, termed T-DNA suppression, has been observed in Arabidopsis thaliana, although the molecular basis of establishment and maintenance of T-DNA suppression is poorly understood. Here we show that maintenance of T-DNA suppression requires heterochromatinisation of T-DNA sequences and the nuclear proteins, INCREASED IN BONSAI METHYLATION 2 (IBM2) and ENHANCED DOWNY MILDEW 2 (EDM2), which prevent ectopic 3′ end processing of mRNA in atypically long introns containing T-DNA sequences. Initiation of T-DNA suppression is mediated by the canonical RdDM pathway after hybridisation of two T-DNA strains, accompanied by DNA hypermethylation of T-DNA sequences in the F1 generation. Our results reveal the presence of a genome surveillance mechanism through genome hybridisation that masks repetitive DNAs intruding into transcription units. PMID:28338020

  10. Metabolic fluxes in an illuminated Arabidopsis rosette.

    PubMed

    Szecowka, Marek; Heise, Robert; Tohge, Takayuki; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Vosloh, Daniel; Huege, Jan; Feil, Regina; Lunn, John; Nikoloski, Zoran; Stitt, Mark; Fernie, Alisdair R; Arrivault, Stéphanie

    2013-02-01

    Photosynthesis is the basis for life, and its optimization is a key biotechnological aim given the problems of population explosion and environmental deterioration. We describe a method to resolve intracellular fluxes in intact Arabidopsis thaliana rosettes based on time-dependent labeling patterns in the metabolome. Plants photosynthesizing under limiting irradiance and ambient CO2 in a custom-built chamber were transferred into a (13)CO2-enriched environment. The isotope labeling patterns of 40 metabolites were obtained using liquid or gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Labeling kinetics revealed striking differences between metabolites. At a qualitative level, they matched expectations in terms of pathway topology and stoichiometry, but some unexpected features point to the complexity of subcellular and cellular compartmentation. To achieve quantitative insights, the data set was used for estimating fluxes in the framework of kinetic flux profiling. We benchmarked flux estimates to four classically determined flux signatures of photosynthesis and assessed the robustness of the estimates with respect to different features of the underlying metabolic model and the time-resolved data set.

  11. RNA-directed DNA methylation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Aufsatz, Werner; Mette, M. Florian; van der Winden, Johannes; Matzke, Antonius J. M.; Matzke, Marjori

    2002-01-01

    In plants, double-stranded RNA that is processed to short RNAs ≈21–24 nt in length can trigger two types of epigenetic gene silencing. Posttranscriptional gene silencing, which is related to RNA interference in animals and quelling in fungi, involves targeted elimination of homologous mRNA in the cytoplasm. RNA-directed DNA methylation involves de novo methylation of almost all cytosine residues within a region of RNA–DNA sequence identity. RNA-directed DNA methylation is presumed to be responsible for the methylation observed in protein coding regions of posttranscriptionally silenced genes. Moreover, a type of transcriptional gene silencing and de novo methylation of homologous promoters in trans can occur if a double-stranded RNA contains promoter sequences. Although RNA-directed DNA methylation has been described so far only in plants, there is increasing evidence that RNA can also target genome modifications in other organisms. To understand how RNA directs methylation to identical DNA sequences and how changes in chromatin configuration contribute to initiating or maintaining DNA methylation induced by RNA, a promoter double-stranded RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing system has been established in Arabidopsis. A genetic analysis of this system is helping to unravel the relationships among RNA signals, DNA methylation, and chromatin structure. PMID:12169664

  12. Functional Analysis of Arabidopsis Sucrose Transporters

    SciTech Connect

    John M. Ward

    2009-03-31

    Sucrose is the main photosynthetic product that is transported in the vasculature of plants. The long-distance transport of carbohydrates is required to support the growth and development of net-importing (sink) tissues such as fruit, seeds and roots. This project is focused on understanding the transport mechanism sucrose transporters (SUTs). These are proton-coupled sucrose uptake transporters (membrane proteins) that are required for transport of sucrose in the vasculature and uptake into sink tissues. The accomplishments of this project included: 1) the first analysis of substrate specificity for any SUT. This was accomplished using electrophysiology to analyze AtSUC2, a sucrose transporter from companion cells in Arabidopsis. 2) the first analysis of the transport activity for a monocot SUT. The transport kinetics and substrate specificity of HvSUT1 from barley were studied. 3) the first analysis of a sucrose transporter from sugarcane. and 4) the first analysis of transport activity of a sugar alcohol transporter homolog from plants, AtPLT5. During this period four primary research papers, funded directly by the project, were published in refereed journals. The characterization of several sucrose transporters was essential for the current effort in the analysis of structure/function for this gene family. In particular, the demonstration of strong differences in substrate specificity between type I and II SUTs was important to identify targets for site-directed mutagenesis.

  13. Chromatin associations in Arabidopsis interphase nuclei.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Veit; Rudnik, Radoslaw; Schubert, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    The arrangement of chromatin within interphase nuclei seems to be caused by topological constraints and related to gene expression depending on tissue and developmental stage. In yeast and animals it was found that homologous and heterologous chromatin association are required to realize faithful expression and DNA repair. To test whether such associations are present in plants we analyzed Arabidopsis thaliana interphase nuclei by FISH using probes from different chromosomes. We found that chromatin fiber movement and variable associations, although in general relatively seldom, may occur between euchromatin segments along chromosomes, sometimes even over large distances. The combination of euchromatin segments bearing high or low co-expressing genes did not reveal different association frequencies probably due to adjacent genes of deviating expression patterns. Based on previous data and on FISH analyses presented here, we conclude that the global interphase chromatin organization in A. thaliana is relatively stable, due to the location of its 10 centromeres at the nuclear periphery and of the telomeres mainly at the centrally localized nucleolus. Nevertheless, chromatin movement enables a flexible spatial genome arrangement in plant nuclei.

  14. G2 Checkpoint Responses in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Britt, Anne

    2013-03-18

    This project focused on the mechanism and biological significance of the G2 arrest response to replication stress in plants. We employed both forward and reverse genetic approaches to identify genes required for this response. A total of 3 different postdocs, 5 undergraduates, and 2 graduate students participated in the project. We identified several genes required for damage response in plants, including homologs of genes previously identified in animals (ATM and ATR), novel, a plant-specific genes (SOG1) and a gene known in animals but previously thought to be missing from the Arabidopsis genome (ATRIP). We characterized the transcriptome of gamma-irradiated plants, and found that plants, unlike animals, express a robust transcriptional response to damage, involving genes that regulate the cell cycle and DNA metabolism. This response requires both ATM and the transcription factor SOG1. We found that both ATM and ATR play a role in meiosis in plants. We also found that plants have a cell-type-specific programmed cell death response to ionizing radiation and UV light, and that this response requires ATR, ATM, and SOG1. These results were published in a series of 5 papers.

  15. Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with altered phototropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khurana, J. P.; Poff, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty five strains of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. have been identified with altered phototropic responses to 450-nm light. Four of these mutants have been more thoroughly characterized. Strain JK224 shows normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. However, while the amplitude for "first positive" phototropism is the same as that in the wild-type, the threshold and fluence for the maximum response in "first positive" phototropism are shifted to higher fluence by a factor of 20-30. This mutant may represent an alteration in the photoreceptor pigment for phototropism. Strain JK218 exhibits no curvature to light at any fluence from 1 micromole m-2 to 2700 micromoles m-2, but shows normal gravitropism. Strain JK345 shows no "first positive" phototropism, and reduced gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Strain JK229 shows no measurable "first positive" phototropism, but normal gravitropism and "second positive" phototropism. Based on these data, it is suggested that: 1. gravitropism and phototropism contain at least one common element; 2. "first positive" and "second positive" phototropism contain at least one common element; and 3. "first positive" phototropism can be substantially altered without any apparent alteration of "second positive" phototropism.

  16. ArabidopsisChitinases: a Genomic Survey.

    PubMed

    Passarinho, Paul A; de Vries, Sacco C

    2002-01-01

    Plant chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14) belong to relatively large gene families subdivided in classes that suggest class-specific functions. They are commonly induced upon the attack of pathogens and by various sources of stress, which led to associating them with plant defense in general. However, it is becoming apparent that most of them display several functions during the plant life cycle, including taking part in developmental processes such as pollination and embryo development. The number of chitinases combined with their multiple functions has been an obstacle to a better understanding of their role in plants. It is therefore important to identify and inventory all chitinase genes of a plant species to be able to dissect their function and understand the relations between the different classes. Complete sequencing of the Arabidopsis genome has made this task feasible and we present here a survey of all putative chitinase-encoding genes accompanied by a detailed analysis of their sequence. Based on their characteristics and on studies on other plant chitinases, we propose an overview of their possible functions as well as modified annotations for some of them.

  17. NFXL2 modifies cuticle properties in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lisso, Janina; Schröder, Florian; Schippers, Jos H M; Müssig, Carsten

    2012-05-01

    Loss of the Arabidopsis NFX1-LIKE2 (NFXL2) gene (At5g05660) results in elevated ABA levels, elevated hydrogen peroxide levels, reduced stomatal aperture, and enhanced drought stress tolerance. Introduction of the NFXL2-78 isoform into the nfxl2-1 mutant is largely sufficient for complementation of the phenotype. We show here that cuticular properties are altered in the nfxl2-1 mutant. The NFXL2-78 protein binds to the SHINE1 (SHN1), SHN2, SHN3, and BODYGUARD1 (BDG1) promoters and mediates weaker expression of these genes. The SHN AP2 domain transcription factors influence cuticle properties. Stronger SHN1, SHN2, and SHN3 expression in the nfxl2-1 mutant may cause altered cuticle properties including reduced stomatal density, and partly explain the enhanced drought stress tolerance. The BDG1 protein also controls cuticle development and is essential for osmotic stress regulation of ABA biosynthesis. Stronger BDG1 expression in nfxl2-1 plants may allow elevated ABA accumulation under drought stress. We conclude that the NFXL2-78 protein is part of a regulatory network that integrates the biosynthesis and action of ABA, ROS, and cuticle components.

  18. Light inputs shape the Arabidopsis circadian system.

    PubMed

    Wenden, Bénédicte; Kozma-Bognár, László; Edwards, Kieron D; Hall, Anthony J W; Locke, James C W; Millar, Andrew J

    2011-05-01

    The circadian clock is a fundamental feature of eukaryotic gene regulation that is emerging as an exemplar genetic sub-network for systems biology. The circadian system in Arabidopsis plants is complex, in part due to its phototransduction pathways, which are themselves under circadian control. We therefore analysed two simpler experimental systems. Etiolated seedlings entrained by temperature cycles showed circadian rhythms in the expression of genes that are important for the clock mechanism, but only a restricted set of downstream target genes were rhythmic in microarray assays. Clock control of phototransduction pathways remained robust across a range of light inputs, despite the arrhythmic transcription of light-signalling genes. Circadian interactions with light signalling were then analysed using a single active photoreceptor. Phytochrome A (phyA) is expected to be the only active photoreceptor that can mediate far-red (FR) light input to the circadian clock. Surprisingly, rhythmic gene expression was profoundly altered under constant FR light, in a phyA-dependent manner, resulting in high expression of evening genes and low expression of morning genes. Dark intervals were required to allow high-amplitude rhythms across the transcriptome. Clock genes involved in this response were identified by mutant analysis, showing that the EARLY FLOWERING 4 gene is a likely target and mediator of the FR effects. Both experimental systems illustrate how profoundly the light input pathways affect the plant circadian clock, and provide strong experimental manipulations to understand critical steps in the plant clock mechanism.

  19. An Arabidopsis thaliana methyltransferase Capable of Methylating Farnesoic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Yang,Y.; Yuan, J.; Ross, J.; Noel, J.; Pichersky, E.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported the identification of a new family of plant methyltransferases (MTs), named the SABATH family, that use S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) to methylate a carboxyl moiety or a nitrogen-containing functional group on a diverse array of plant compounds. The Arabidopsis genome alone contains 24 distinct SABATH genes. To identify the catalytic specificities of members of this protein family in Arabidopsis, we screened recombinantly expressed and purified enzymes with a large number of potential substrates. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis thaliana gene At3g44860 encodes a protein with high catalytic specificity towards farnesoic acid (FA). Under steady-state conditions, this farnesoic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (FAMT) exhibits K{sub M} values of 41 and 71 {mu}M for FA and SAM, respectively. A three-dimensional model of FAMT constructed based upon similarity to the experimentally determined structure of Clarkia breweri salicylic acid methyltransferase (SAMT) suggests a reasonable model for FA recognition in the FAMT active site. In plants, the mRNA levels of At3g44860 increase in response to the exogenous addition of several compounds previously shown to induce plant defense responses at the transcriptional level. Although methyl farnesoate (MeFA) has not yet been detected in Arabidopsis, the presence of a FA-specific carboxyl methyltransferase in Arabidopsis capable of producing MeFA, an insect juvenile hormone made by some plants as a presumed defense against insect herbivory, suggests that MeFA or chemically similar compounds are likely to serve as new specialized metabolites in Arabidopsis.

  20. Molecular foundations of reproductive lethality in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Muralla, Rosanna; Lloyd, Johnny; Meinke, David

    2011-01-01

    The SeedGenes database (www.seedgenes.org) contains information on more than 400 genes required for embryo development in Arabidopsis. Many of these EMBRYO-DEFECTIVE (EMB) genes encode proteins with an essential function required throughout the life cycle. This raises a fundamental question. Why does elimination of an essential gene in Arabidopsis often result in embryo lethality rather than gametophyte lethality? In other words, how do mutant (emb) gametophytes survive and participate in fertilization when an essential cellular function is disrupted? Furthermore, why do some mutant embryos proceed further in development than others? To address these questions, we first established a curated dataset of genes required for gametophyte development in Arabidopsis based on information extracted from the literature. This provided a basis for comparison with EMB genes obtained from the SeedGenes dataset. We also identified genes that exhibited both embryo and gametophyte defects when disrupted by a loss-of-function mutation. We then evaluated the relationship between mutant phenotype, gene redundancy, mutant allele strength, gene expression pattern, protein function, and intracellular protein localization to determine what factors influence the phenotypes of lethal mutants in Arabidopsis. After removing cases where continued development potentially resulted from gene redundancy or residual function of a weak mutant allele, we identified numerous examples of viable mutant (emb) gametophytes that required further explanation. We propose that the presence of gene products derived from transcription in diploid (heterozygous) sporocytes often enables mutant gametophytes to survive the loss of an essential gene in Arabidopsis. Whether gene disruption results in embryo or gametophyte lethality therefore depends in part on the ability of residual, parental gene products to support gametophyte development. We also highlight here 70 preglobular embryo mutants with a zygotic pattern

  1. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns are altered during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Popp, Michael P.; Gurley, William B.; Guy, Charles; Norwood, Kelly L.; Ferl, Robert J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments results in differential gene expression. A 5-day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β-Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on gene expression patterns initially by using the Adh/GUS transgene to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response (Paul, A.L., Daugherty, C.J., Bihn, E.A., Chapman, D.K., Norwood, K.L., Ferl, R.J., 2001. Transgene expression patterns indicate that spaceflight affects stress signal perception and transduction in arabidopsis, Plant Physiol. 126, 613-621). As a follow-on to the reporter gene analysis, we report here the evaluation of genome-wide patterns of native gene expression within Arabidopsis shoots utilizing the Agilent DNA array of 21,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - Taqman®). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays probed with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to RNA isolated from ground control plants revealed 182 genes that were differentially expressed in response to the spaceflight mission by more than 4-fold, and of those only 50 genes were expressed at levels chosen to support a conservative change call. None of the genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were induced to this level. However, genes related to heat shock were dramatically induced - but in a pattern and under growth conditions that are not easily explained by elevated temperatures. These gene expression data are discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment and with regard to potential future spaceflight experiment

  2. Weeding out the genes: the Arabidopsis genome project.

    PubMed

    Martienssen, R A

    2000-05-01

    The Arabidopsis genome sequence is scheduled for completion at the end of this year (December 2000). It will be the first higher plant genome to be sequenced, and will allow a detailed comparison with bacterial, yeast and animal genomes. Already, two of the five chromosomes have been sequenced, and we have had our first glimpse of higher eukaryotic centromeres, and the structure of heterochromatin. The implications for understanding plant gene function, genome structure and genome organization are profound. In this review, the lessons learned for future genome projects are reviewed as well as a summary of the initial findings in Arabidopsis.

  3. Structure, Wettability, and Thermal Stability of Organic Thin-Films on Gold Generated from the Molecular Self-Assembly of Unsymmetrical Oligo(ethylene glycol) Spiroalkanedithiols.

    PubMed

    Chinwangso, Pawilai; Lee, Han Ju; Jamison, Andrew C; Marquez, Maria D; Park, Chul Soon; Lee, T Randall

    2017-02-28

    Organic thin-films on gold were prepared from a set of new, custom-designed bidentate alkanethiols possessing a mixture of normal alkane and methoxy-terminated tri(ethylene glycol) chains. The new unsymmetrical spiroalkanedithiol adsorbates were of the form [CH3O(CH2CH2O)3(CH2)5]-[CH3(CH2)n+1]C[CH2SH]2 where n = 3 and 14; designated EG3C7-C7 and EG3C7-C18, respectively. Their corresponding self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold were characterized and compared with monothiol SAMs derived from an analogous normal alkanethiol (C18SH) and an alkanethiol terminated with an oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) moiety (i.e., EG3C7SH). Ellipsometric data revealed reduced film thicknesses for the double-chained dithiolate SAMs, which perhaps arose from the phase-incompatible merger of a hydrocarbon chain with an OEG moiety, contributing to disorder in the films and/or an increase in chain tilt. The comparable wettabilities of the SAMs derived from EG3C7SH and EG3C7-C7, using water as the contacting liquid, are consistent with exposure of the OEG moieties at both interfaces, whereas the lower wettability of the SAM derived from EG3C7-C18 is consistent with exposure of hydrocarbon chains at the interface. The data collected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the formation of the new OEG-terminated dithiolate SAMs, and also revealed them as less densely packed monolayers due in part to the large molecular cross section of the OEG moieties and to their double-chained structure with dual surface bonds. Mixed SAMs formed from pairs of monothiols having chain compositions analogous to those of the chains of the new dithiols showed that an EG3C7SH/heptanethiol-mixed SAM and the EG3C7-C7 SAM produced almost identical characterization data, revealing the favorable film formation dynamics for adsorbate structures where the alkyl chains can assemble beneath the phase-incompatible OEG termini. For the mixed SAM formed from EG3C7SH/C18SH, the data indicate that the EG3C7SH component

  4. Tethering Complexes in the Arabidopsis Endomembrane System

    PubMed Central

    Vukašinović, Nemanja; Žárský, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Targeting of endomembrane transport containers is of the utmost importance for proper land plant growth and development. Given the immobility of plant cells, localized membrane vesicle secretion and recycling are amongst the main processes guiding proper cell, tissue and whole plant morphogenesis. Cell wall biogenesis and modification are dependent on vectorial membrane traffic, not only during normal development, but also in stress responses and in plant defense against pathogens and/or symbiosis. It is surprising how little we know about these processes in plants, from small GTPase regulation to the tethering complexes that act as their effectors. Tethering factors are single proteins or protein complexes mediating first contact between the target membrane and arriving membrane vesicles. In this review we focus on the tethering complexes of the best-studied plant model—Arabidopsis thaliana. Genome-based predictions indicate the presence of all major tethering complexes in plants that are known from a hypothetical last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). The evolutionary multiplication of paralogs of plant tethering complex subunits has produced the massively expanded EXO70 family, indicating a subfunctionalization of the terminal exocytosis machinery in land plants. Interpretation of loss of function (LOF) mutant phenotypes has to consider that related, yet clearly functionally-specific complexes often share some common core subunits. It is therefore impossible to conclude with clarity which version of the complex is responsible for the phenotypic deviations observed. Experimental interest in the analysis of plant tethering complexes is growing and we hope to contribute with this review by attracting even more attention to this fascinating field of plant cell biology. PMID:27243010

  5. Systemic low temperature signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gorsuch, Peter A; Sargeant, Alexander W; Penfield, Steven D; Quick, W Paul; Atkin, Owen K

    2010-09-01

    When leaves are exposed to low temperature, sugars accumulate and transcription factors in the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) family are expressed, which, together with CBF-independent pathways, are known to contribute to the cold acclimation process and an increase in freezing tolerance. What is not known, however, is whether expression of these cold-regulated genes can be induced systemically in response to a localized cold treatment. To address this, pre-existing, mature leaves of warm-grown Arabidopsis thaliana were exposed to a localized cold treatment (near 10 °C) whilst conjoined newly developing leaves continued only to experience warmer temperatures. In initial experiments on wild-type A. thaliana (Col-0) using real-time reverse transcription--PCR (RT-PCR) we observed that some genes--including CBF genes, certain downstream cold-responsive (COR) targets and CBF-independent transcription factors--respond to a direct 9 °C treatment of whole plants. In subsequent experiments, we found that the treatment of expanded leaves with temperatures near 10 °C can induce cold-associated genes in conjoined warm-maintained tissues. CBF1 showed a particularly strong systemic response, although CBF-independent transcription factors also responded. Moreover, the localized cold treatment of A. thaliana (C24) plants with a luciferase reporter fused to the promoter region of KIN2 indicated that in warm-maintained leaves, KIN2 might respond to a systemic signal from remote, directly cold-treated leaves. Collectively, our study provides strong evidence that the processes involved in cold acclimation are partially mediated by a signal that acts systemically. This has the potential to act as an early-warning system to enable developing leaves to cope better with the cold environment in which they are growing.

  6. Stomagen positively regulates stomatal density in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Shigeo S; Shimada, Tomoo; Imai, Yu; Okawa, Katsuya; Tamai, Atsushi; Mori, Masashi; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2010-01-14

    Stomata in the epidermal tissues of leaves are valves through which passes CO(2), and as such they influence the global carbon cycle. The two-dimensional pattern and density of stomata in the leaf epidermis are genetically and environmentally regulated to optimize gas exchange. Two putative intercellular signalling factors, EPF1 and EPF2, function as negative regulators of stomatal development in Arabidopsis, possibly by interacting with the receptor-like protein TMM. One or more positive intercellular signalling factors are assumed to be involved in stomatal development, but their identities are unknown. Here we show that a novel secretory peptide, which we designate as stomagen, is a positive intercellular signalling factor that is conserved among vascular plants. Stomagen is a 45-amino-rich peptide that is generated from a 102-amino-acid precursor protein designated as STOMAGEN. Both an in planta analysis and a semi-in-vitro analysis with recombinant and chemically synthesized stomagen peptides showed that stomagen has stomata-inducing activity in a dose-dependent manner. A genetic analysis showed that TMM is epistatic to STOMAGEN (At4g12970), suggesting that stomatal development is finely regulated by competitive binding of positive and negative regulators to the same receptor. Notably, STOMAGEN is expressed in inner tissues (the mesophyll) of immature leaves but not in the epidermal tissues where stomata develop. This study provides evidence of a mesophyll-derived positive regulator of stomatal density. Our findings provide a conceptual advancement in understanding stomatal development: inner photosynthetic tissues optimize their function by regulating stomatal density in the epidermis for efficient uptake of CO(2).

  7. Hybrid mimics and hybrid vigor in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Greaves, Ian K; Groszmann, Michael; Wu, Li Min; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Peacock, W James

    2015-09-01

    F1 hybrids can outperform their parents in yield and vegetative biomass, features of hybrid vigor that form the basis of the hybrid seed industry. The yield advantage of the F1 is lost in the F2 and subsequent generations. In Arabidopsis, from F2 plants that have a F1-like phenotype, we have by recurrent selection produced pure breeding F5/F6 lines, hybrid mimics, in which the characteristics of the F1 hybrid are stabilized. These hybrid mimic lines, like the F1 hybrid, have larger leaves than the parent plant, and the leaves have increased photosynthetic cell numbers, and in some lines, increased size of cells, suggesting an increased supply of photosynthate. A comparison of the differentially expressed genes in the F1 hybrid with those of eight hybrid mimic lines identified metabolic pathways altered in both; these pathways include down-regulation of defense response pathways and altered abiotic response pathways. F6 hybrid mimic lines are mostly homozygous at each locus in the genome and yet retain the large F1-like phenotype. Many alleles in the F6 plants, when they are homozygous, have expression levels different to the level in the parent. We consider this altered expression to be a consequence of transregulation of genes from one parent by genes from the other parent. Transregulation could also arise from epigenetic modifications in the F1. The pure breeding hybrid mimics have been valuable in probing the mechanisms of hybrid vigor and may also prove to be useful hybrid vigor equivalents in agriculture.

  8. Amyloplast movement and gravityperception in Arabidopsis endoderm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaka, M.; Saito, T.; Morita, M. T.

    Gravitropism of higher plant is a growth response regulating the orientation of organs elongation, which includes four sequential steps, the perception of gravistimulus, transduction of the physical stimulus to chemical signal, transmission of the signal, and differential cell elongation depending on the signal. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of these steps, we have isolated a number of Arabidopsis mutants with abnormal shoot gravitropic response. zig (zigzag)/sgr4(shoot gravitropism 4) shows little gravitropism in their shoots. Besides, their inflorescence stems elongate in a zigzag-fashion to bend at each node. ZIG encodes a SNARE, AtVTI11. sgr3 with reduced gravitropic response in inflorescence stems had a missense mutation in other SNARE, AtVAM3. These two SNAREs make a complex in the shoot endoderm cells that are gravity-sensing cells, suggesting that the vesicle transport from trans-Golgi network (TGN) to prevacuolar compartment (PVC) and/or vacuole is involved in gravitropism. Abnormal vesicular/vacuolar structures were observed in several tissues of both mutants. Moreover, SGR2 encodes phospholipase A1-like protein that resides in the vacuolar membrane. Endodermis-specific expression of these genes could complement gravitropism in each mutant. In addition, amyloplasts thought to be statoliths localized abnormally in their endoderm cells. These results strongly suggest that formation and function of vacuole in the endoderm cells are important for amyloplasts sedimentation, which is involved in the early process of shoot gravitropism. To reveal this, we constructed vertical stage microscope system to visualize the behavior of amyloplasts and vacuolar membrane in living endodermal cells. We hope to discuss the mechanism of gravity perception after showing their movements.

  9. Gene Regulation by Cytokinin in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Wolfram G.; Ramireddy, Eswar; Heyl, Alexander; Schmülling, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The plant hormone cytokinin realizes at least part of its signaling output through the regulation of gene expression. A great part of the early transcriptional regulation is mediated by type-B response regulators, which are transcription factors of the MYB family. Other transcription factors, such as the cytokinin response factors of the AP2/ERF family, have also been shown to be involved in this process. Additional transcription factors mediate distinct parts of the cytokinin response through tissue- and cell-specific downstream transcriptional cascades. In Arabidopsis, only a single cytokinin response element, to which type-B response regulators bind, has been clearly proven so far, which has 5′-GAT(T/C)-3′ as a core sequence. This motif has served to construct a synthetic cytokinin-sensitive two-component system response element, which is useful for monitoring the cellular cytokinin status. Insight into the extent of transcriptional regulation has been gained by genome-wide gene expression analyses following cytokinin treatment and from plants having an altered cytokinin content or signaling. This review presents a meta analysis of such microarray data resulting in a core list of cytokinin response genes. Genes encoding type-A response regulators displayed the most stable response to cytokinin, but a number of cytokinin metabolism genes (CKX4, CKX5, CYP735A2, UGT76C2) also belong to them, indicating homeostatic mechanisms operating at the transcriptional level. The cytokinin core response genes are also the target of other hormones as well as biotic and abiotic stresses, documenting crosstalk of the cytokinin system with other hormonal and environmental signaling pathways. The multiple links of cytokinin to diverse functions, ranging from control of meristem activity, hormonal crosstalk, nutrient acquisition, and various stress responses, are also corroborated by a compilation of genes that have been repeatedly found by independent gene expression profiling

  10. Mining the plant-herbivore interface with a leafmining Drosophila of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Whiteman, Noah K.; Groen, Simon C.; Chevasco, Daniela; Bear, Ashley; Beckwith, Noor; Gregory, T. Ryan; Denoux, Carine; Mammarella, Nicole; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Pierce, Naomi E.

    2010-01-01

    Experimental infections of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) with genomically characterized plant pathogens such as Pseudomonas syringae have facilitated dissection of canonical eukaryotic defense pathways and parasite virulence factors. Plants are also attacked by herbivorous insects, and the development of an ecologically relevant genetic model herbivore that feeds on Arabidopsis will enable the parallel dissection of host defense and reciprocal resistance pathways such as those involved in xenobiotic metabolism. An ideal candidate is Scaptomyza flava, a drosophilid fly whose leafmining larvae are true herbivores that can be found in nature feeding on Arabidopsis and other crucifers. Here we describe the eukaryotic life cycle of S. flava on Arabidopsis, and use multiple approaches to characterize the response of Arabidopsis to S. flava attack. Oviposition choice tests and growth performance assays on different Arabidopsis ecotypes, defense-related mutants, and hormone and chitin-treated plants revealed significant differences in host preference and variation in larval performance across Arabidopsis accessions. The jasmonate (JA) and glucosinolate pathways in Arabidopsis are important in mediating quantitative resistance against S. flava, and priming with JA or chitin resulted in increased resistance. Expression of xenobiotic detoxification genes was reduced in S. flava larvae reared on Arabidopsis JA signaling mutants, and increased in plants pre-treated with chitin. These results and future research directions are discussed in the context of developing a genetic model system to analyze insect/plant interactions. PMID:21073583

  11. Relationships between Arabidopsis thaliana and soil bacterial communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizosphere microbial communities are impacted by resident plant species and have reciprocal effects on their host plants. In this study, we collected resident soil from five wild populations of Arabidopsis in the United States and Europe in an effort to characterize the soil microbiome that co-exis...

  12. Quantitative trait loci for inflorescence development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Ungerer, Mark C; Halldorsdottir, Solveig S; Modliszewski, Jennifer L; Mackay, Trudy F C; Purugganan, Michael D

    2002-01-01

    Variation in inflorescence development patterns is a central factor in the evolutionary ecology of plants. The genetic architectures of 13 traits associated with inflorescence developmental timing, architecture, rosette morphology, and fitness were investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana, a model plant system. There is substantial naturally occurring genetic variation for inflorescence development traits, with broad sense heritabilities computed from 21 Arabidopsis ecotypes ranging from 0.134 to 0.772. Genetic correlations are significant for most (64/78) pairs of traits, suggesting either pleiotropy or tight linkage among loci. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping indicates 47 and 63 QTL for inflorescence developmental traits in Ler x Col and Cvi x Ler recombinant inbred mapping populations, respectively. Several QTL associated with different developmental traits map to the same Arabidopsis chromosomal regions, in agreement with the strong genetic correlations observed. Epistasis among QTL was observed only in the Cvi x Ler population, and only between regions on chromosomes 1 and 5. Examination of the completed Arabidopsis genome sequence in three QTL regions revealed between 375 and 783 genes per region. Previously identified flowering time, inflorescence architecture, floral meristem identity, and hormone signaling genes represent some of the many candidate genes in these regions. PMID:11901129

  13. Descendants of primed Arabidopsis plants exhibit resistance to biotic stress.

    PubMed

    Slaughter, Ana; Daniel, Xavier; Flors, Victor; Luna, Estrella; Hohn, Barbara; Mauch-Mani, Brigitte

    2012-02-01

    An attack of plants by pathogens or treatment with certain resistance-inducing compounds can lead to the establishment of a unique primed state of defense. Primed plants show enhanced defense reactions upon further challenge with biotic or abiotic stress. Here, we report that the primed state in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is still functional in the next generation without additional treatment. We compared the reactions of Arabidopsis plants that had been either primed with β-amino-butyric acid (BABA) or with an avirulent isolate of the bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (PstavrRpt2). The descendants of primed plants showed a faster and higher accumulation of transcripts of defense-related genes in the salicylic acid signaling pathway and enhanced disease resistance upon challenge inoculation with a virulent isolate of P. syringae. In addition, the progeny of primed plants was also more resistant against the oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. When transgenerationally primed plants were subjected to an additional priming treatment, their descendants displayed an even stronger primed phenotype, suggesting that plants can inherit a sensitization for the priming phenomenon. Interestingly, this primed to be primed phenotype was much reduced in the Arabidopsis β-amino-butyric acid priming mutant ibs1 (induced BABA sterility1). Our results demonstrate that the primed state of plants is transferred to their progeny and confers improved protection from pathogen attack as compared to the descendants of unprimed plants.

  14. An Arabidopsis thaliana embryo arrest mutant exhibiting germination potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to initiate radicle elongation, or germination potential, occurs in developing embryos before the completion of seed maturation. Green embryos after walking-stick stage in developing Arabidopsis thaliana seeds germinate when excised from seeds and incubated in MS media containing 1 % suc...

  15. Dissecting Arabidopsis G beta signal transduction on the protein surface

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The heterotrimeric G protein complex provides signal amplification and target specificity. The Arabidopsis Gbeta subunit of this complex (AGB1) interacts with and modulates the activity of target cytoplasmic proteins. This specificity resides in the structure of the interface between AGB1 and its ta...

  16. Multidimensional fluorescence microscopy of multiple organelles in Arabidopsis seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Naohiro; Reynolds, Dexter; Brown, Matthew L; Boisdore, Marietta; Fujikawa, Yukichi; Morales, Andrea; Meisel, Lee A

    2008-01-01

    Background The isolation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the development of spectral variants over the past decade have begun to reveal the dynamic nature of protein trafficking and organelle motility. In planta analyses of this dynamic process have typically been limited to only two organelles or proteins at a time in only a few cell types. Results We generated a transgenic Arabidopsis plant that contains four spectrally different fluorescent proteins. Nuclei, plastids, mitochondria and plasma membranes were genetically tagged with cyan, red, yellow and green fluorescent proteins, respectively. In addition, methods to track nuclei, mitochondria and chloroplasts and quantify the interaction between these organelles at a submicron resolution were developed. These analyzes revealed that N-ethylmaleimide disrupts nuclear-mitochondrial but not nuclear-plastids interactions in root epidermal cells of live Arabidopsis seedlings. Conclusion We developed a tool and associated methods for analyzing the complex dynamic of organelle-organelle interactions in real time in planta. Homozygous transgenic Arabidopsis (Kaleidocell) is available through Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center. PMID:18489765

  17. Dated molecular phylogenies indicate a Miocene origin for Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Beilstein, Mark A.; Nagalingum, Nathalie S.; Clements, Mark D.; Manchester, Steven R.; Mathews, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Dated molecular phylogenies are the basis for understanding species diversity and for linking changes in rates of diversification with historical events such as restructuring in developmental pathways, genome doubling, or dispersal onto a new continent. Valid fossil calibration points are essential to the accurate estimation of divergence dates, but for many groups of flowering plants fossil evidence is unavailable or limited. Arabidopsis thaliana, the primary genetic model in plant biology and the first plant to have its entire genome sequenced, belongs to one such group, the plant family Brassicaceae. Thus, the timing of A. thaliana evolution and the history of its genome have been controversial. We bring previously overlooked fossil evidence to bear on these questions and find the split between A. thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata occurred about 13 Mya, and that the split between Arabidopsis and the Brassica complex (broccoli, cabbage, canola) occurred about 43 Mya. These estimates, which are two- to threefold older than previous estimates, indicate that gene, genomic, and developmental evolution occurred much more slowly than previously hypothesized and that Arabidopsis evolved during a period of warming rather than of cooling. We detected a 2- to 10-fold shift in species diversification rates on the branch uniting Brassicaceae with its sister families. The timing of this shift suggests a possible impact of the Cretaceous–Paleogene mass extinction on their radiation and that Brassicales codiversified with pierid butterflies that specialize on mustard-oil–producing plants. PMID:20921408

  18. Thermoinhibition uncovers a role for strigolactones in Arabidopsis seed germination.

    PubMed

    Toh, Shigeo; Kamiya, Yuji; Kawakami, Naoto; Nambara, Eiji; McCourt, Peter; Tsuchiya, Yuichiro

    2012-01-01

    Strigolactones are host factors that stimulate seed germination of parasitic plant species such as Striga and Orobanche. This hormone is also important in shoot branching architecture and photomorphogenic development. Strigolactone biosynthetic and signaling mutants in model systems, unlike parasitic plants, only show seed germination phenotypes under limited growth condition. To understand the roles of strigolactones in seed germination, it is necessary to develop a tractable experimental system using model plants such as Arabidopsis. Here, we report that thermoinhibition, which involves exposing seeds to high temperatures, uncovers a clear role for strigolactones in promoting Arabidopsis seed germination. Both strigolactone biosynthetic and signaling mutants showed increased sensitivity to seed thermoinhibition. The synthetic strigolactone GR24 rescued germination of thermoinbibited biosynthetic mutant seeds but not a signaling mutant. Hormone analysis revealed that strigolactones alleviate thermoinhibition by modulating levels of the two plant hormones, GA and ABA. We also showed that GR24 was able to counteract secondary dormancy in Arabidopsis ecotype Columbia (Col) and Cape Verde island (Cvi). Systematic hormone analysis of germinating Striga helmonthica seeds suggested a common mechanism between the parasitic and non-parasitic seeds with respect to how hormones regulate germination. Thus, our simple assay system using Arabidopsis thermoinhibition allows comparisons to determine similarities and differences between parasitic plants and model experimental systems for the use of strigolactones.

  19. Glutamate functions in stomatal closure in Arabidopsis and fava bean.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Riichiro; Mori, Izumi C; Kamizono, Nobuto; Shichiri, Yudai; Shimatani, Tetsuo; Miyata, Fumika; Honda, Kenji; Iwai, Sumio

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells are indispensable for higher plants because they control gas exchange and water balance to maintain photosynthetic activity. The signaling processes that govern their movement are controlled by several factors, such as abscisic acid (ABA), blue light, pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and carbon dioxide. Herein, we demonstrated that the amino acid glutamate (Glu), a well-known mammalian neurotransmitter, functions as a novel signaling molecule in stomatal closure in both Arabidopsis and fava bean (Vicia faba L.). Pharmacological and electrophysiological analyses provided important clues for the participation of Glu-receptors, Ca(2+), and protein phosphorylation during the signaling process. Genetic analyses using Arabidopsis ABA-deficient (aba2-1) and ABA-insensitive (abi1-1 and abi2-1) mutants showed that ABA is not required for Glu signaling. However, loss-of-function of the Arabidopsis gene encoding Slow Anion Channel-Associated 1 (SLAC1) and Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 6 (CPK6) impaired the Glu response. Moreover, T-DNA knockout mutations of the Arabidopsis Glu receptor-like gene (GLR), GLR3.5, lost their sensitivity to Glu-dependent stomatal closure. Our results strongly support functional Glu-signaling in stomatal closure and the crucial roles of GLRs in this signaling process.

  20. Proteomic Responses in Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings Treated with Ethylene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethylene (ET) is a volatile plant growth hormone that most famously modulates fruit ripening, but it also controls plant growth, development and stress responses. In Arabidopsis thaliana, ET is perceived by receptors in the endoplasmic reticulum, and a signal is transduced through a protein kinase,...

  1. Arabidopsis: an adequate model for dicot root systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the search for answers to pressing root developmental genetic issues, plant science has turned to a small genome dicot plant (Arabidopsis) to be used as a model to study and use to develop hypotheses for testing other species. Through out the published research only three classes of root are des...

  2. Gene expression in arabidopsis shoot tips after liquid nitrogen exposure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arabidopsis thaliana shoot tips can be successfully cryopreserved using either Plant Vitrification Solution 2 (PVS2) or Plant Vitrification Solution 3 (PVS3) as the cryoprotectant. We used this model system to identify suites of genes that were either upregulated or downregulated as shoot tips recov...

  3. Conservation of floral homeotic gene function between Arabidopsis and antirrhinum.

    PubMed Central

    Irish, V F; Yamamoto, Y T

    1995-01-01

    Several homeotic genes controlling floral development have been isolated in both Antirrhinum and Arabidopsis. Based on the similarities in sequence and in the phenotypes elicited by mutations in some of these genes, it has been proposed that the regulatory hierarchy controlling floral development is comparable in these two species. We have performed a direct experimental test of this hypothesis by introducing a chimeric Antirrhinum Deficiens (DefA)/Arabidopsis APETALA3 (AP3) gene, under the control of the Arabidopsis AP3 promoter, into Arabidopsis. We demonstrated that this transgene is sufficient to partially complement severe mutations at the AP3 locus. In combination with a weak ap3 mutation, this transgene is capable of completely rescuing the mutant phenotype to a fully functional wild-type flower. These observations indicate that despite differences in DNA sequence and expression, DefA coding sequences can compensate for the loss of AP3 gene function. We discuss the implications of these results for the evolution of homeotic gene function in flowering plants. PMID:7580255

  4. Structure of "Arabidopsis" chloroplastic monothiol glutaredoxin AtGRXcp

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monothiol glutaredoxins (Grxs) play important roles in maintaining redox homeostasis in living cells and are conserved across species. "Arabidopsis thaliana" monothiol glutaredoxin AtGRXcp, is critical for protection from oxidative stress in chloroplasts. The crystal structure of AtGRXcp has been de...

  5. Phytochrome A-specific signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kircher, Stefan; Terecskei, Kata; Wolf, Iris; Sipos, Mark; Adam, Eva

    2011-11-01

    Among the five phytochromes in Arabidopsis thaliana, phytochrome A (phyA) plays a major role in seedling de-etiolation. Until now more then ten positive and some negative components acting downstream of phyA have been identified. However, their site of action and hierarchical relationships are not completely understood yet.

  6. Arabidopsis transcriptional responses differentiate between O3 and herbicides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using published data based on Affymetrix ATH1 Gene-Chips we characterized the transcriptional response of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia to O3 and a few other major environmental stresses including oxidative stress . A set of 101 markers could be extracted which provided a compo...

  7. Plant chip for high-throughput phenotyping of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huawei; Xu, Zhen; Aluru, Maneesha R; Dong, Liang

    2014-04-07

    We report on the development of a vertical and transparent microfluidic chip for high-throughput phenotyping of Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Multiple Arabidopsis seeds can be germinated and grown hydroponically over more than two weeks in the chip, thus enabling large-scale and quantitative monitoring of plant phenotypes. The novel vertical arrangement of this microfluidic device not only allows for normal gravitropic growth of the plants but also, more importantly, makes it convenient to continuously monitor phenotypic changes in plants at the whole organismal level, including seed germination and root and shoot growth (hypocotyls, cotyledons, and leaves), as well as at the cellular level. We also developed a hydrodynamic trapping method to automatically place single seeds into seed holding sites of the device and to avoid potential damage to seeds that might occur during manual loading. We demonstrated general utility of this microfluidic device by showing clear visible phenotypes of the immutans mutant of Arabidopsis, and we also showed changes occurring during plant-pathogen interactions at different developmental stages. Arabidopsis plants grown in the device maintained normal morphological and physiological behaviour, and distinct phenotypic variations consistent with a priori data were observed via high-resolution images taken in real time. Moreover, the timeline for different developmental stages for plants grown in this device was highly comparable to growth using a conventional agar plate method. This prototype plant chip technology is expected to lead to the establishment of a powerful experimental and cost-effective framework for high-throughput and precise plant phenotyping.

  8. Multiplex micro-respiratory measurements of Arabidopsis tissues.

    PubMed

    Sew, Yun Shin; Ströher, Elke; Holzmann, Cristián; Huang, Shaobai; Taylor, Nicolas L; Jordana, Xavier; Millar, A Harvey

    2013-11-01

    Researchers often want to study the respiratory properties of individual parts of plants in response to a range of treatments. Arabidopsis is an obvious model for this work; however, because of its size, it represents a challenge for gas exchange measurements of respiration. The combination of micro-respiratory technologies with multiplex assays has the potential to bridge this gap, and make measurements possible in this model plant species. We show the adaptation of the commercial technology used for mammalian cell respiration analysis to study three critical tissues of interest: leaf sections, root tips and seeds. The measurement of respiration in single leaf discs has allowed the age dependence of the respiration rate in Arabidopsis leaves across the rosette to be observed. The oxygen consumption of single root tips from plate-grown seedlings shows the enhanced respiration of root tips and their time-dependent susceptibility to salinity. The monitoring of single Arabidopsis seeds shows the kinetics of respiration over 48 h post-imbibition, and the effect of the phytohormones gibberellic acid (GA3 ) and abscisic acid (ABA) on respiration during seed germination. These studies highlight the potential for multiplexed micro-respiratory assays to study oxygen consumption in Arabidopsis tissues, and open up new possibilities to screen and study mutants and to identify differences in ecotypes or populations of different plant species.

  9. Expression of Arabidopsis LINEs from two promoters.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yoshizu; Noma, Kenichi; Tsuchimoto, Suguru; Ohtsubo, Eiichi; Ohtsubo, Hisako

    2002-12-01

    Most Arabidopsis long interspersed elements (LINEs, called ATLNs) have two open reading frames, orf1 and orf2. In the 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) located upstream of orf1, the most proximal segments of tens of base pairs long are not homologous even in two ATLN members with almost identical sequences. In this study, we first show that RT-PCR products from ATLN39, a member of ATLN, can be detected only in total RNA from the hypomethylation mutant ddm1 or from suspension-cultured cells treated with a DNA methylation inhibitor 5-azacytidine, indicating that the expression of ATLN39 is negatively regulated by DNA methylation. We then show that orf1 fused in frame with the luciferase (luc) gene is expressed in suspension-cultured cells of A. thaliana when the 5' UTR is present in the region upstream of orf1. Analysis of deletion in the 5' UTR revealed that the 5' UTR has two promoters, designated here as P1 and P2. Analysis of transcripts by 5' RACE showed that their 5' ends were located at sites immediately upstream of the P1 region or at sites downstream of the P2 region. This observation and the fact that the P1 region contains no TATA sequence indicate that P1 is an internal promoter that initiates transcription from sites upstream of the promoter. A sequence containing GGCGA with a CpG methylatable site is conserved in the P1 regions in members closely related to ATLN39. The P2 region, however, contains the TATA sequence as well as another sequence with a CpG site. The TATA sequence is conserved in members closely related to ATLN39 but not in the other ATLN members, suggesting that P2 is the promoter uniquely present in the ATLN39-related members. Transcripts from promoter P1 can be used as templates to give new copies proficient in retroposition, but those from promoter P2 cannot because of the lack of the proximal half region of the 5' UTR sequence. Transcripts from promoter P2, as well as those from promoter P1 can, however, be used for the production of a

  10. Arabidopsis TTR1 causes LRR-dependent lethal systemic necrosis, rather than systemic acquired resistance, to Tobacco ringspot virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most Arabidopsis ecotypes display tolerance to the Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV), but a subset of Arabidopsis ecotypes, including Estland (Est), develop lethal systemic necrosis (LSN), which differs from the localized hypersensitive responses (HRs) or systemic acquired resistance (SAR) characteristi...

  11. Organic triplet excited states of gold(I) complexes with oligo(o- or m-phenyleneethynylene) ligands: conjunction of steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic studies on exciton delocalization and emission pathways.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Kwok, Wai-Ming; Ma, Chensheng; Chan, Chris Tsz-Leung; Zhu, Ming-Xin; Che, Chi-Ming

    2011-09-07

    A series of mononuclear and binuclear gold(I) complexes containing oligo(o- or m-phenyleneethynylene) (PE) ligands, namely [PhC≡C(C(6)H(4)-1,2-C≡C)(n-1)Au(PCy(3))] (n = 2-4, 4a-c), [μ-{C≡C-(1,2-C(6)H(4)C≡C)(n)}{Au(PCy(3))}(2)] (n = 1-6, 8, 5a-g), [PhC≡C(C(6)H(4)-1,3-C≡C)(n-1)Au(PCy(3))] (n = 2-4, 6a-c), and [μ-{C≡C-(1,3-C(6)H(4)C≡C)(n)}{Au(PCy(3))}(2)] (n = 1, 2, 7a,b), were synthesized and structurally characterized. Extensive spectroscopic measurements have been performed by applying combined methods of femtosecond transient absorption (fs-TA), fs time-resolved fluorescence (fs-TRF), and nanosecond time-resolved emission (ns-TRE) coupled with steady-state absorption and emission spectroscopy at both ambient and low (77 K) temperatures to directly probe the temporal evolution of the excited states and to determine the dynamics and spectral signatures for the involved singlet (S(1)) and triplet (T(1)) excited states. The results reveal that S(1) and T(1) both feature ligand-centered electronic transitions with ππ* character associated with the phenyl and acetylene moieties. The (3)ππ* emission of the PE ligands is switched on by the attachment of [Au(PCy(3))](+) fragment(s) due to the heavy-atom effect. T(1)((3)ππ*) was found to form with nearly unity efficiency through intersystem crossing (ISC) from S(1)((1)ππ*). The ISC time constants were determined to be ∼50, 35, and 40 ps for 4b and 6a,b, respectively. Dual emission composed of fluorescence from S(1) and phosphorescence from T(1) were observed for most of the complexes except 5a and 7a, where only phosphorescence was found. The fluorescence at ambient temperature is accounted for by both the short-lived prompt fluorescence (PF) and long-lived delayed fluorescence (DF, lifetime on microsecond time scale). Explicit evidence was presented for a triplet-triplet annihilation mechanism for the generation of DF. Ligand length and substitution-dependent dynamics of T(1) are the key factors

  12. Variation in Arabidopsis flooding responses identifies numerous putative "tolerance genes".

    PubMed

    Vashisht, Divya; van Veen, Hans; Akman, Melis; Sasidharan, Rashmi

    2016-11-01

    Plant survival in flooded environments requires a combinatory response to multiple stress conditions such as limited light availability, reduced gas exchange and nutrient uptake. The ability to fine-tune the molecular response at the transcriptional and/or post-transcriptional level that can eventually lead to metabolic and anatomical adjustments are the underlying requirements to confer tolerance. Previously, we compared the transcriptomic adjustment of submergence tolerant, intolerant accessions and identified a core conserved and genotype-specific response to flooding stress, identifying numerous 'putative' tolerance genes. Here, we performed genome wide association analyses on 81 natural Arabidopsis accessions that identified 30 additional SNP markers associated with flooding tolerance. We argue that, given the many genes associated with flooding tolerance in Arabidopsis, improving resistance to submergence requires numerous genetic changes.

  13. Lil3 dimerization and chlorophyll binding in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Mork-Jansson, Astrid Elisabeth; Gargano, Daniela; Kmiec, Karol; Furnes, Clemens; Shevela, Dmitriy; Eichacker, Lutz Andreas

    2015-10-07

    The two-helix light harvesting like (Lil) protein Lil3 belongs to the family of chlorophyll binding light harvesting proteins of photosynthetic membranes. A function in tetrapyrrol synthesis and stabilization of geranylgeraniol reductase has been shown. Lil proteins contain the chlorophyll a/b-binding motif; however, binding of chlorophyll has not been demonstrated. We find that Lil3.2 from Arabidopsis thaliana forms heterodimers with Lil3.1 and binds chlorophyll. Lil3.2 heterodimerization (25±7.8 nM) is favored relative to homodimerization (431±59 nM). Interaction of Lil3.2 with chlorophyll a (231±49 nM) suggests that heterodimerization precedes binding of chlorophyll in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  14. Genetic analysis of photoreceptor action pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The specific strategies and long-term goals of this proposal remain intact relative to the original proposal. We continue to isolate and characterize photomorphogenic mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. The molecular and biochemical characterization of one of these mutants, det1, has led to one publication of original data and to one Society for Experimental Biology Symposium paper (see below). The phenotype of a second mutant, det2, has also been studied during this funding period. In addition, we have continued work on a general strategy to isolate mutations in trans-acting regulatory factors that mediate light-regulated gene expression, and have identified several potentially interesting regulatory mutants. In the third funding period, we will concentrate on the genetical, biochemical, and molecular characterization of these new mutants. Construction of double mutants between the new mutants and the previously characterized morphological mutants should allow us to construct a pathway for light-regulated seedling development in Arabidopsis.

  15. Improving the Arabidopsis genome annotation using maximal transcript alignment assemblies.

    PubMed

    Haas, Brian J; Delcher, Arthur L; Mount, Stephen M; Wortman, Jennifer R; Smith, Roger K; Hannick, Linda I; Maiti, Rama; Ronning, Catherine M; Rusch, Douglas B; Town, Christopher D; Salzberg, Steven L; White, Owen

    2003-10-01

    The spliced alignment of expressed sequence data to genomic sequence has proven a key tool in the comprehensive annotation of genes in eukaryotic genomes. A novel algorithm was developed to assemble clusters of overlapping transcript alignments (ESTs and full-length cDNAs) into maximal alignment assemblies, thereby comprehensively incorporating all available transcript data and capturing subtle splicing variations. Complete and partial gene structures identified by this method were used to improve The Institute for Genomic Research Arabidopsis genome annotation (TIGR release v.4.0). The alignment assemblies permitted the automated modeling of several novel genes and >1000 alternative splicing variations as well as updates (including UTR annotations) to nearly half of the approximately 27 000 annotated protein coding genes. The algorithm of the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA) tool is described, as well as the results of automated updates to Arabidopsis gene annotations.

  16. The roles of anion channels in Arabidopsis immunity

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Wang, Chengcheng; Zuo, Zhangli; Qiu, Jin-Long

    2014-01-01

    Anion efflux is one of the most immediate responses of plant cells to pathogen attacks, suggesting that anion channels may play a role in plant defense. Recently we reported that the chloride channel AtCLCd negatively regulates Arabidopsis pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity (PTI), probably by affecting trafficking of the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Since AtCLCd is localized to the trans-Golgi network, it is not likely to be directly involved in anion flux across the plasma membrane. Here, we used a pharmacological approach to explore further the function of plasma membrane-localized R-type and S-type anion channels in plant immunity. We found that the R-type and S-type anion channels play opposite roles in Arabidopsis innate immunity. Inhibition of the R-type anion channels enhances, whereas inhibition of the S-type channels inhibits PTI and effector-triggered immunity (ETI). PMID:25763497

  17. MYB76 Inhibits Seed Fatty Acid Accumulation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Shaowei; Jin, Changyu; Li, Dong; Gao, Chenhao; Qi, Shuanghui; Liu, Kaige; Hai, Jiangbo; Ma, Haoli; Chen, Mingxun

    2017-01-01

    The MYB family of transcription factors is important in regulatory networks controlling development, metabolism and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis. However, their role in regulating fatty acid accumulation in seeds is still largely unclear. Here, we found that MYB76, localized in the nucleus, was predominantly expressed in developing seeds during maturation. The myb76 mutation caused a significant increase in the amounts of total fatty acids and several major fatty acid compositions in mature seeds, suggesting that MYB76 functioned as an important repressor during seed oil biosynthesis. RNA sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed remarkable alteration of numerous genes involved in photosynthesis, fatty acid biosynthesis, modification, and degradation, and oil body formation in myb76 seeds at 12 days after pollination. These results help us to understand the novel function of MYB76 and provide new insights into the regulatory network of MYB transcriptional factors controlling seed oil accumulation in Arabidopsis. PMID:28270825

  18. Functional overlap of the Arabidopsis leaf and root microbiota.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Müller, Daniel B; Srinivas, Girish; Garrido-Oter, Ruben; Potthoff, Eva; Rott, Matthias; Dombrowski, Nina; Münch, Philipp C; Spaepen, Stijn; Remus-Emsermann, Mitja; Hüttel, Bruno; McHardy, Alice C; Vorholt, Julia A; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2015-12-17

    Roots and leaves of healthy plants host taxonomically structured bacterial assemblies, and members of these communities contribute to plant growth and health. We established Arabidopsis leaf- and root-derived microbiota culture collections representing the majority of bacterial species that are reproducibly detectable by culture-independent community sequencing. We found an extensive taxonomic overlap between the leaf and root microbiota. Genome drafts of 400 isolates revealed a large overlap of genome-encoded functional capabilities between leaf- and root-derived bacteria with few significant differences at the level of individual functional categories. Using defined bacterial communities and a gnotobiotic Arabidopsis plant system we show that the isolates form assemblies resembling natural microbiota on their cognate host organs, but are also capable of ectopic leaf or root colonization. While this raises the possibility of reciprocal relocation between root and leaf microbiota members, genome information and recolonization experiments also provide evidence for microbiota specialization to their respective niche.

  19. A reference map of the Arabidopsis thaliana mature pollen proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Noir, Sandra; Braeutigam, Anne; Colby, Thomas; Schmidt, Juergen; Panstruga, Ralph . E-mail: panstrug@mpiz-koeln.mpg.de

    2005-12-02

    The male gametophyte (or pollen) plays an obligatory role during sexual reproduction of higher plants. The extremely reduced complexity of this organ renders pollen a valuable experimental system for studying fundamental aspects of plant biology such as cell fate determination, cell-cell interactions, cell polarity, and tip-growth. Here, we present the first reference map of the mature pollen proteome of the dicotyledonous model plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana. Based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight, and electrospray quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we reproducibly identified 121 different proteins in 145 individual spots. The presence, subcellular localization, and functional classification of the identified proteins are discussed in relation to the pollen transcriptome and the full protein complement encoded by the nuclear Arabidopsis genome.

  20. A novel group of transcriptional repressors in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Miho; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2009-05-01

    We showed previously that the ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif is a plant-specific repression domain that contains the conserved amino acid sequence LXLXL. In this report, we describe the identification of a novel repression domain, L/VR/KLFGVXM/V/L, which is different from known EAR motifs, in B3 DNA-binding domain transcription factors in Arabidopsis. Database analysis revealed that 29 Arabidopsis transcription factors, which included members of the RAV, ARF, Hsf and MYB families, contain the R/KLFGV conserved motif found in the novel repression domain. We demonstrated that factors that contain the R/KLFGV motif, namely, RAV1, RAV2, HsfB1 and HsfB2b, exhibited the repressive activity.

  1. Herbivore-induced resistance against microbial pathogens in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    De Vos, Martin; Van Zaanen, Wendy; Koornneef, Annemart; Korzelius, Jerôme P; Dicke, Marcel; Van Loon, L C; Pieterse, Corné M J

    2006-09-01

    Caterpillars of the herbivore Pieris rapae stimulate the production of jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and trigger a defense response that affects insect performance on systemic tissues. To investigate the spectrum of effectiveness of P. rapae-induced resistance, we examined the level of resistance against different pathogens. Although the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola is sensitive to JA-dependent defenses, herbivore-induced resistance was not effective against this pathogen. By contrast, caterpillar feeding significantly reduced disease caused by the bacterial pathogens Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato and Xanthomonas campestris pv armoraciae. However, this effect was apparent only locally in caterpillar-damaged tissue. Arabidopsis mutants jar1, coi1, ein2, sid2, eds5, and npr1 showed wild-type levels of P. rapae-induced protection against P. syringae pv tomato, suggesting that this local, herbivore-induced defense response does not depend exclusively on either JA, ET, or salicylic acid (SA). Resistance against the biotroph Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) requires SA, but not JA and ET. Nevertheless, herbivore feeding strongly affected TCV multiplication and TCV lesion formation, also in systemic tissues. Wounding alone was not effective, but application of P. rapae regurgitate onto the wounds induced a similar level of protection. Analysis of SA-induced PATHOGENESIS RELATED-1 (PR-1) expression revealed that P. rapae grazing primed Arabidopsis leaves for augmented expression of SA-dependent defenses. Pharmacological experiments showed that ET acts synergistically on SA-induced PR-1, suggesting that the increased production of ET upon herbivore feeding sensitizes the tissue to respond faster to SA, thereby contributing to an enhanced defensive capacity toward pathogens, such as TCV, that trigger SA-dependent defenses upon infection.

  2. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyuha; Reinhard, Carsten; Serra, Heïdi; Ziolkowski, Piotr A; Underwood, Charles J; Zhao, Xiaohui; Hardcastle, Thomas J; Yelina, Nataliya E; Griffin, Catherine; Jackson, Matthew; Mézard, Christine; McVean, Gil; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Henderson, Ian R

    2016-07-01

    Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1) R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity.

  3. Polyploids exhibit higher potassium uptake and salinity tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chao, Dai-Yin; Dilkes, Brian; Luo, Hongbing; Douglas, Alex; Yakubova, Elena; Lahner, Brett; Salt, David E

    2013-08-09

    Genome duplication (or polyploidization) has occurred throughout plant evolutionary history and is thought to have driven the adaptive radiation of plants. We found that the cytotype of the root, and not the genotype, determined the majority of heritable natural variation in leaf potassium (K) concentration in Arabidopsis thaliana. Autopolyploidy also provided resistance to salinity and may represent an adaptive outcome of the enhanced K accumulation of plants with higher ploidy.

  4. Gravity-regulated gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sederoff, Heike; Brown, Christopher S.; Heber, Steffen; Kajla, Jyoti D.; Kumar, Sandeep; Lomax, Terri L.; Wheeler, Benjamin; Yalamanchili, Roopa

    Plant growth and development is regulated by changes in environmental signals. Plants sense environmental changes and respond to them by modifying gene expression programs to ad-just cell growth, differentiation, and metabolism. Functional expression of genes comprises many different processes including transcription, translation, post-transcriptional and post-translational modifications, as well as the degradation of RNA and proteins. Recently, it was discovered that small RNAs (sRNA, 18-24 nucleotides long), which are heritable and systemic, are key elements in regulating gene expression in response to biotic and abiotic changes. Sev-eral different classes of sRNAs have been identified that are part of a non-cell autonomous and phloem-mobile network of regulators affecting transcript stability, translational kinetics, and DNA methylation patterns responsible for heritable transcriptional silencing (epigenetics). Our research has focused on gene expression changes in response to gravistimulation of Arabidopsis roots. Using high-throughput technologies including microarrays and 454 sequencing, we iden-tified rapid changes in transcript abundance of genes as well as differential expression of small RNA in Arabidopsis root apices after minutes of reorientation. Some of the differentially regu-lated transcripts are encoded by genes that are important for the bending response. Functional mutants of those genes respond faster to reorientation than the respective wild type plants, indicating that these proteins are repressors of differential cell elongation. We compared the gravity responsive sRNAs to the changes in transcript abundances of their putative targets and identified several potential miRNA: target pairs. Currently, we are using mutant and transgenic Arabidopsis plants to characterize the function of those miRNAs and their putative targets in gravitropic and phototropic responses in Arabidopsis.

  5. Looking for Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidases involved in lignin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Joaquín; Esteban-Carrasco, Alberto; Zapata, José Miguel

    2013-06-01

    Monolignol polymerization into lignin is catalyzed by peroxidases or laccases. Recently, a Zinnia elegans peroxidase (ZePrx) that is considered responsible for monolignol polymerization in this plant has been molecularly and functionally characterized. Nevertheless, Arabidopsis thaliana has become an alternative model plant for studies of lignification, filling the gaps that may occur with Z. elegans. The arabidopsis genome offers the possibility of performing bioinformatic analyses and data mining that are not yet feasible with other plant species, in order to obtain preliminary evidence on the role of genes and proteins. In our search for arabidopsis homologs to the ZePrx, we performed an exhaustive in silico characterization of everything from the protein to the transcript of Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidases (AtPrxs) homologous to ZePrx, with the aim of identifying one or more peroxidases that may be involved in monolignol polymerization. Nine peroxidases (AtPrx 4, 5, 52, 68, 67, 36, 14, 49 and 72) with an E-value greater than 1e-80 with ZePrx were selected for this study. The results demonstrate that a high level of 1D, 2D and 3D homology between these AtPrxs and ZePrx are not always accompanied by the presence of the same electrostatic and mRNA properties that indicate a peroxidase is involved in lignin biosynthesis. In summary, we can confirm that the peroxidases involved in lignification are among AtPrx 4, 52, 49 and 72. Their structural and mRNA features indicate that exert their action in the cell wall similar to ZePrx.

  6. Multi-Element Bioimaging of Arabidopsis thaliana Roots1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Salt, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Better understanding of root function is central for the development of plants with more efficient nutrient uptake and translocation. We here present a method for multielement bioimaging at the cellular level in roots of the genetic model system Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using conventional protocols for microscopy, we observed that diffusible ions such as potassium and sodium were lost during sample dehydration. Thus, we developed a protocol that preserves ions in their native, cellular environment. Briefly, fresh roots are encapsulated in paraffin, cryo-sectioned, and freeze dried. Samples are finally analyzed by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, utilizing a specially designed internal standard procedure. The method can be further developed to maintain the native composition of proteins, enzymes, RNA, and DNA, making it attractive in combination with other omics techniques. To demonstrate the potential of the method, we analyzed a mutant of Arabidopsis unable to synthesize the metal chelator nicotianamine. The mutant accumulated substantially more zinc and manganese than the wild type in the tissues surrounding the vascular cylinder. For iron, the images looked completely different, with iron bound mainly in the epidermis of the wild-type plants but confined to the cortical cell walls of the mutant. The method offers the power of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to be fully employed, thereby providing a basis for detailed studies of ion transport in roots. Being applicable to Arabidopsis, the molecular and genetic approaches available in this system can now be fully exploited in order to gain a better mechanistic understanding of these processes. PMID:27566167

  7. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Heïdi; Ziolkowski, Piotr A.; Yelina, Nataliya E.; Jackson, Matthew; Mézard, Christine; McVean, Gil; Henderson, Ian R.

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr) effectors by resistance (R) genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1) R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity. PMID:27415776

  8. Interactions between selenium and sulphur nutrition in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    White, P J; Bowen, H C; Parmaguru, P; Fritz, M; Spracklen, W P; Spiby, R E; Meacham, M C; Mead, A; Harriman, M; Trueman, L J; Smith, B M; Thomas, B; Broadley, M R

    2004-08-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential plant micronutrient, but is toxic at high tissue concentrations. It is chemically similar to sulphur (S), an essential plant macronutrient. The interactions between Se and S nutrition were investigated in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. Arabidopsis plants were grown on agar containing a complete mineral complement and various concentrations of selenate and sulphate. The Se/S concentration ratio in the shoot ([Se](shoot)/[S](shoot)) showed a complex dependence on the ratio of selenate to sulphate concentration in the agar ([Se](agar)/[S](agar)). Increasing [S](agar) increased shoot fresh weight (FW) and [S](shoot), but decreased [Se](shoot). Increasing [Se](agar) increased both [Se](shoot) and [S](shoot), but reduced shoot FW. The reduction in shoot FW in the presence of Se was linearly related to the shoot Se/S concentration ratio. These data suggest (i) that Se and S enter Arabidopsis through multiple transport pathways with contrasting sulphate/selenate selectivities, whose activities vary between plants of contrasting nutritional status, (ii) that rhizosphere sulphate inhibits selenate uptake, (iii) that rhizosphere selenate promotes sulphate uptake, possibly by preventing the reduction in the abundance and/or activity of sulphate transporters by sulphate and/or its metabolites, and (iv) that Se toxicity occurs because Se and S compete for a biochemical process, such as assimilation into amino acids of essential proteins.

  9. Dissecting iron deficiency-induced proton extrusion in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Santi, Simonetta; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Here, we have analysed the H(+)-ATPase-mediated extrusion of protons across the plasma membrane (PM) of rhizodermic cells, a process that is inducible by iron (Fe) deficiency and thought to serve in the mobilization of sparingly soluble Fe sources. The induction and function of Fe-responsive PM H(+)-ATPases in Arabidopsis roots was investigated by gene expression analysis and by using mutants defective in the expression or function of one of the isogenes. In addition, the expression of the most responsive isogenes was investigated in natural Arabidopsis accessions that have been selected for their in vivo proton extrusion activity. Our data suggest that the rhizosphere acidification in response to Fe deficiency is chiefly mediated by AHA2, while AHA1 functions as a housekeeping isoform. The aha7 knock-out mutant plants showed a reduced frequency of root hairs, suggesting an involvement of AHA7 in the differentiation of rhizodermic cells. Acidification capacity varied among Arabidopsis accessions and was associated with a high induction of AHA2 and IRT1, a high relative growth rate and a shoot-root ratio that was unaffected by the external Fe supply. An effective regulation of the Fe-responsive genes and a stable shoot-root ratio may represent important characteristics for the Fe uptake efficiency.

  10. Transcriptomic and lipidomic profiles of glycerolipids during Arabidopsis flower development.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuki; Teo, Norman Z W; Shui, Guanghou; Chua, Christine H L; Cheong, Wei-Fun; Parameswaran, Sriram; Koizumi, Ryota; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Wenk, Markus R; Ito, Toshiro

    2014-07-01

    Flower glycerolipids are the yet-to-be discovered frontier of the lipidome. Although ample evidence suggests important roles for glycerolipids in flower development, stage-specific lipid profiling in tiny Arabidopsis flowers is challenging. Here, we utilized a transgenic system to synchronize flower development in Arabidopsis. The transgenic plant PAP1::AP1-GR ap1-1 cal-5 showed synchronized flower development upon dexamethasone treatment, which enabled massive harvesting of floral samples of homogenous developmental stages for glycerolipid profiling. Glycerolipid profiling revealed a decrease in concentrations of phospholipids involved in signaling during the early development stages, such as phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol, and a marked increase in concentrations of nonphosphorous galactolipids during the late stage. Moreover, in the midstage, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate concentration was increased transiently, which suggests the stimulation of the phosphoinositide metabolism. Accompanying transcriptomic profiling of relevant glycerolipid metabolic genes revealed simultaneous induction of multiple phosphoinositide biosynthetic genes associated with the increased phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate concentration, with a high degree of differential expression patterns for genes encoding other glycerolipid-metabolic genes. The phosphatidic acid phosphatase mutant pah1 pah2 showed flower developmental defect, suggesting a role for phosphatidic acid in flower development. Our concurrent profiling of glycerolipids and relevant metabolic gene expression revealed distinct metabolic pathways stimulated at different stages of flower development in Arabidopsis.

  11. The Significance of Hydrogen Sulfide for Arabidopsis Seed Germination

    PubMed Central

    Baudouin, Emmanuel; Poilevey, Aurélie; Hewage, Nishodi Indiketi; Cochet, Françoise; Puyaubert, Juliette; Bailly, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) recently emerged as an important gaseous signaling molecule in plants. In this study, we investigated the possible functions of H2S in regulating Arabidopsis seed germination. NaHS treatments delayed seed germination in a dose-dependent manner and were ineffective in releasing seed dormancy. Interestingly, endogenous H2S content was enhanced in germinating seeds. This increase was correlated with higher activity of three enzymes (L-cysteine desulfhydrase, D-cysteine desulfhydrase, and β-cyanoalanine synthase) known as sources of H2S in plants. The H2S scavenger hypotaurine and the D/L cysteine desulfhydrase inhibitor propargylglycine significantly delayed seed germination. We analyzed the germinative capacity of des1 seeds mutated in Arabidopsis cytosolic L-cysteine desulfhydrase. Although the mutant seeds do not exhibit germination-evoked H2S formation, they retained similar germination capacity as the wild-type seeds. In addition, des1 seeds responded similarly to temperature and were as sensitive to ABA as wild type seeds. Taken together, these data suggest that, although its metabolism is stimulated upon seed imbibition, H2S plays, if any, a marginal role in regulating Arabidopsis seed germination under standard conditions. PMID:27446159

  12. Phytochrome a overexpression inhibits hypocotyl elongation in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, M T; Quail, P H

    1991-01-01

    To develop a model plant system for efficient functional analysis of mutagenized phytochrome polypeptides, we have overexpressed oat phytochrome A in Arabidopsis thaliana. R1 seedlings from selfed primary transformants segregated for hypocotyl length, when grown in the light, with a ratio of 3 short to 1 of normal length. When homozygous lines were established from these two size classes, accumulation of immunologically detectable oat phytochrome cosegregated with the short-hypocotyl trait. The short-hypocotyl seedlings contained substantially more spectrally active phytochrome than their normal-sized siblings, indicating that the introduced oat protein was photoreversible. The short-hypocotyl phenotype was strictly light-dependent, since no morphological effects of phytochrome overexpression could be seen in etiolated seedlings. Overexpression of only the chromophore-bearing, N-terminal domain of phytochrome A did not induce short hypocotyls in light-grown seedlings, indicating that additional sequence is essential for photoreceptor function. Similarly, overexpression of a full-length sequence mutated at the chromophore attachment site had no effect on phenotype, indicating the absence of any detectable dominant negative effect of the chromophoreless polypeptide on the activity of endogenous Arabidopsis phytochrome. Thus, the readily scorable short-hypocotyl phenotype of Arabidopsis seedlings overexpressing phytochrome A provides a simple visual assay for rapidly monitoring the biological activity of mutagenized phytochrome A polypeptides. Images PMID:11607244

  13. Thermal energy dissipation and xanthophyll cycles beyond the Arabidopsis model.

    PubMed

    García-Plazaola, José Ignacio; Esteban, Raquel; Fernández-Marín, Beatriz; Kranner, Ilse; Porcar-Castell, Albert

    2012-09-01

    Thermal dissipation of excitation energy is a fundamental photoprotection mechanism in plants. Thermal energy dissipation is frequently estimated using the quenching of the chlorophyll fluorescence signal, termed non-photochemical quenching. Over the last two decades, great progress has been made in the understanding of the mechanism of thermal energy dissipation through the use of a few model plants, mainly Arabidopsis. Nonetheless, an emerging number of studies suggest that this model represents only one strategy among several different solutions for the environmental adjustment of thermal energy dissipation that have evolved among photosynthetic organisms in the course of evolution. In this review, a detailed analysis of three examples highlights the need to use models other than Arabidopsis: first, overwintering evergreens that develop a sustained form of thermal energy dissipation; second, desiccation tolerant plants that induce rapid thermal energy dissipation; and third, understorey plants in which a complementary lutein epoxide cycle modulates thermal energy dissipation. The three examples have in common a shift from a photosynthetically efficient state to a dissipative conformation, a strategy widely distributed among stress-tolerant evergreen perennials. Likewise, they show a distinct operation of the xanthophyll cycle. Expanding the list of model species beyond Arabidopsis will enhance our knowledge of these mechanisms and increase the synergy of the current studies now dispersed over a wide number of species.

  14. Immunolocalization of integrin-like proteins in Arabidopsis and Chara

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katembe, W. J.; Swatzell, L. J.; Makaroff, C. A.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1997-01-01

    Integrins are a large family of integral plasma membrane proteins that link the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton in animal cells. As a first step in determining if integrin-like proteins are involved in gravitropic signal transduction pathways, we have used a polyclonal antibody against the chicken beta1 integrin subunit in western blot analyses and immunofluorescence microscopy to gain information on the size and location of these proteins in plants. Several different polypeptides are recognized by the anti-integrin antibody in roots and shoots of Arabidopsis and in the internodal cells and rhizoids of Chara. These cross-reactive polypeptides are associated with cellular membranes, a feature which is consistent with the known location of integrins in animal systems. In immunofluorescence studies of Arabidopsis roots, a strong signal was obtained from labeling integrin-like proteins in root cap cells, and there was little or no immunolabel in other regions of the root tip. While the antibody stained throughout Chara rhizoids, the highest density of immunolabel was at the tip. Thus, in both Arabidopsis roots and Chara rhizoids, the sites of gravity perception/transduction appear to be enriched in integrin-like molecules.

  15. Strigolactones suppress adventitious rooting in Arabidopsis and pea.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Amanda; Mason, Michael Glenn; De Cuyper, Carolien; Brewer, Philip B; Herold, Silvia; Agusti, Javier; Geelen, Danny; Greb, Thomas; Goormachtig, Sofie; Beeckman, Tom; Beveridge, Christine Anne

    2012-04-01

    Adventitious root formation is essential for the propagation of many commercially important plant species and involves the formation of roots from nonroot tissues such as stems or leaves. Here, we demonstrate that the plant hormone strigolactone suppresses adventitious root formation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and pea (Pisum sativum). Strigolactone-deficient and response mutants of both species have enhanced adventitious rooting. CYCLIN B1 expression, an early marker for the initiation of adventitious root primordia in Arabidopsis, is enhanced in more axillary growth2 (max2), a strigolactone response mutant, suggesting that strigolactones restrain the number of adventitious roots by inhibiting the very first formative divisions of the founder cells. Strigolactones and cytokinins appear to act independently to suppress adventitious rooting, as cytokinin mutants are strigolactone responsive and strigolactone mutants are cytokinin responsive. In contrast, the interaction between the strigolactone and auxin signaling pathways in regulating adventitious rooting appears to be more complex. Strigolactone can at least partially revert the stimulatory effect of auxin on adventitious rooting, and auxin can further increase the number of adventitious roots in max mutants. We present a model depicting the interaction of strigolactones, cytokinins, and auxin in regulating adventitious root formation.

  16. Comparative transcriptomics of early meiosis in Arabidopsis and maize.

    PubMed

    Dukowic-Schulze, Stefanie; Harris, Anthony; Li, Junhua; Sundararajan, Anitha; Mudge, Joann; Retzel, Ernest F; Pawlowski, Wojciech P; Chen, Changbin

    2014-03-20

    Though sexually reproductive plants share the same principle and most processes in meiosis, there are distinct features detectable. To address the similarities and differences of early meiosis transcriptomes from the dicot model system Arabidopsis and monocot model system maize, we performed comparative analyses of RNA-seq data of isolated meiocytes, anthers and seedlings from both species separately and via orthologous genes. Overall gene expression showed similarities, such as an increased number of reads mapping to unannotated features, and differences, such as the amount of differentially expressed genes. We detected major similarities and differences in functional annotations of genes up-regulated in meiocytes, which point to conserved features as well as unique features. Transcriptional regulation seems to be quite similar in Arabidopsis and maize, and we could reveal known and novel transcription factors and cis-regulatory elements acting in early meiosis. Taken together, meiosis between Arabidopsis and maize is conserved in many ways, but displays key distinctions that lie in the patterns of gene expression.

  17. Proteomics investigation of endogenous S-nitrosylation in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Fares, Abasse; Rossignol, Michel; Peltier, Jean-Benoit

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification and quantification of nitrosothiols. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A first dataset of endogenously nitrosylated cysteines in Arabidopsis cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrosothiols display apolar motifs not located in close vicinity of cysteines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salt stress alters the endogenous nitrosylation of specific cysteines in Arabidopsis. -- Abstract: S-Nitrosylation emerges as an important protein modification in many processes. However, most data were obtained at the protein level after addition of a NO donor, particularly in plants where information about the cysteines nitrosylated in these proteins is scarce. An adapted work-flow, combining the classical biotin switch method and labeling with isotope-coded affinity tags (ICAT), is proposed. Without addition of NO donor, a total of 53 endogenous nitrosocysteines was identified in Arabidopsis cells, in proteins belonging to all cell territories, including membranes, and covering a large panel of functions. This first repertoire of nitrosothiols in plants enabled also preliminary structural description. Three apolar motifs, not located in close vicinity of cysteines and accounting for half the dataset, were detected and are proposed to complement nitrosylation prediction algorithms, poorly trained with plant data to date. Analysis of changes induced by a brief salt stress showed that NaCl modified the nitrosylation level of a small proportion of endogenously nitrosylated proteins and did not concern all nitrosothiols in these proteins. The possible role of some NO targets in the response to salt stress was discussed.

  18. Oviposition by pierid butterflies triggers defense responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Little, Dawn; Gouhier-Darimont, Caroline; Bruessow, Friederike; Reymond, Philippe

    2007-02-01

    Insect eggs represent a threat for the plant as hatching larvae rapidly start with their feeding activity. Using a whole-genome microarray, we studied the expression profile of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves after oviposition by two pierid butterflies. For Pieris brassicae, the deposition of egg batches changed the expression of hundreds of genes over a period of 3 d after oviposition. The transcript signature was similar to that observed during a hypersensitive response or in lesion-mimic mutants, including the induction of defense and stress-related genes and the repression of genes involved in growth and photosynthesis. Deposition of single eggs by Pieris rapae caused a similar although much weaker transcriptional response. Analysis of the jasmonic acid and salicylic acid mutants coi1-1 and sid2-1 indicated that the response to egg deposition is mostly independent of these signaling pathways. Histochemical analyses showed that egg deposition is causing a localized cell death, accompanied by the accumulation of callose, and the production of reactive oxygen species. In addition, activation of the pathogenesis-related1::beta-glucuronidase reporter gene correlated precisely with the site of egg deposition and was also triggered by crude egg extract. This study provides molecular evidence for the detection of egg deposition by Arabidopsis plants and suggests that oviposition causes a localized response with strong similarity to a hypersensitive response.

  19. Cadmium interferes with maintenance of auxin homeostasis in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yan Feng; Zhou, Guoying; Na, Xiao Fan; Yang, Lijing; Nan, Wen Bin; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Yong Qiang; Li, Jiao Long; Bi, Yu Rong

    2013-07-15

    Auxin and its homeostasis play key roles in many aspects of plant growth and development. Cadmium (Cd) is a phytotoxic heavy metal and its inhibitory effects on plant growth and development have been extensively studied. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of the effects of Cd stress on auxin homeostasis is still unclear. In the present study, we found that the root elongation, shoot weight, hypocotyl length and chlorophyll content in wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis seedlings were significantly reduced after exposure to Cd stress. However, the lateral root (LR) formation was markedly promoted by Cd stress. The level and distribution of auxin were both greatly altered in primary root tips and cotyledons of Cd-treated plants. The results also showed that after Cd treatment, the IAA content was significantly decreased, which was accompanied by increases in the activity of the IAA oxidase and alteration in the expression of several putative auxin biosynthetic and catabolic genes. Application of the auxin transport inhibitor, 1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and 1-naphthoxyacetic acid (1-NOA), reversed the effects of Cd on LR formation. Additionally, there was less promotion of LR formation by Cd treatment in aux1-7 and pin2 mutants than that in the WT. Meanwhile, Cd stress also altered the expression of PINs and AUX1 in Arabidopsis roots, implying that the auxin transport pathway is required for Cd-modulated LR development. Taken together, these findings suggest that Cd stress disturbs auxin homeostasis through affecting auxin level, distribution, metabolism, and transport in Arabidopsis seedling.

  20. PAUSED Encodes the Arabidopsis Exportin-t Ortholog1

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Christine A.; Aukerman, Milo J.; Sun, Hui; Fokina, Maria; Poethig, R. Scott

    2003-01-01

    Los1p/exportin-t (XPOT) mediates the nuclear export of tRNAs in yeast and mammals. The requirements for this transport pathway are unclear, however, because los1 mutations do not affect yeast growth, and the phenotype of XPOT mutations in mammals is unknown. Here, we show that PAUSED (PSD) is the Arabidopsis ortholog of LOS1/XPOT and is capable of rescuing the tRNA export defect of los1 in Brewer's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), suggesting that its function has been conserved. Putative null alleles of PSD disrupt the initiation of the shoot apical meristem and delay leaf initiation after germination, the emergence of the radicle and lateral roots, and the transition to flowering. Plants doubly mutant for psd and hasty, the Arabidopsis ortholog of exportin 5, are viable but have a more severe phenotype than either single mutant. These results suggest that PSD plays a role in tRNA export in Arabidopsis, but that at least one—and perhaps several—additional tRNA export pathways also exist. The PSD transcript is broadly expressed during development and is alternatively spliced in the 3′-untranslated region. No temporal or spatial difference in the abundance of different splice forms was observed. We propose that the mutant phenotype of psd reflects defects in developmental events and cell/tissue types that require elevated levels of protein synthesis and are therefore acutely sensitive to a reduction in tRNA export. PMID:12913168

  1. PAUSED encodes the Arabidopsis exportin-t ortholog.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Christine A; Aukerman, Milo J; Sun, Hui; Fokina, Maria; Poethig, R Scott

    2003-08-01

    Los1p/exportin-t (XPOT) mediates the nuclear export of tRNAs in yeast and mammals. The requirements for this transport pathway are unclear, however, because los1 mutations do not affect yeast growth, and the phenotype of XPOT mutations in mammals is unknown. Here, we show that PAUSED (PSD) is the Arabidopsis ortholog of LOS1/XPOT and is capable of rescuing the tRNA export defect of los1 in Brewer's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), suggesting that its function has been conserved. Putative null alleles of PSD disrupt the initiation of the shoot apical meristem and delay leaf initiation after germination, the emergence of the radicle and lateral roots, and the transition to flowering. Plants doubly mutant for psd and hasty, the Arabidopsis ortholog of exportin 5, are viable but have a more severe phenotype than either single mutant. These results suggest that PSD plays a role in tRNA export in Arabidopsis, but that at least one-and perhaps several-additional tRNA export pathways also exist. The PSD transcript is broadly expressed during development and is alternatively spliced in the 3'-untranslated region. No temporal or spatial difference in the abundance of different splice forms was observed. We propose that the mutant phenotype of psd reflects defects in developmental events and cell/tissue types that require elevated levels of protein synthesis and are therefore acutely sensitive to a reduction in tRNA export.

  2. A Polyamine Metabolon Involving Aminopropyl Transferase Complexes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Panicot, Mireia; Minguet, Eugenio G.; Ferrando, Alejandro; Alcázar, Rubén; Blázquez, Miguel A.; Carbonell, Juan; Altabella, Teresa; Koncz, Csaba; Tiburcio, Antonio F.

    2002-01-01

    The conversion of putrescine to spermidine in the biosynthetic pathway of plant polyamines is catalyzed by two closely related spermidine synthases, SPDS1 and SPDS2, in Arabidopsis. In the yeast two-hybrid system, SPDS2 was found to interact with SPDS1 and a novel protein, SPMS (spermine synthase), which is homologous with SPDS2 and SPDS1. SPMS interacts with both SPDS1 and SPDS2 in yeast and in vitro. Unlike SPDS1 and SPDS2, SPMS failed to suppress the speΔ3 deficiency of spermidine synthase in yeast. However, SPMS was able to complement the speΔ4 spermine deficiency in yeast, indicating that SPMS is a novel spermine synthase. The SPDS and SPMS proteins showed no homodimerization but formed heterodimers in vitro. Pairwise coexpression of hemagglutinin- and c-Myc epitope–labeled proteins in Arabidopsis cells confirmed the existence of coimmunoprecipitating SPDS1-SPDS2 and SDPS2-SPMS heterodimers in vivo. The epitope-labeled SPDS and SPMS proteins copurified with protein complexes ranging in size from 650 to 750 kD. Our data demonstrate the existence of a metabolon involving at least the last two steps of polyamine biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:12368503

  3. The Role of Gravity on the Reproduction of Arabidopsis Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoshizaki, T.

    1985-01-01

    The presence of gravity as a necessary environmental factor for higher plants to complete their life cycle was examined. Arabidopsis thalliana (L.) Heynh. Columbia strain plants were grown continuously for three generations in a simulated micro-g environment as induced by horizontal clinostats. Growth, development and reproduction were followed. The Arabidopsis plants were selected for three generations on clinostats because: (1) a short life cycle of around 35 days; (2) the cells of third generation plants would in theory be free of gravity imprint; and (3) a third generation plant would therefore more than likely grow and respond like a plant growing in a micro-g environment. It is found that gravity is not a required environmental factor for higher plants to complete their life cycle, at least as tested by a horizontal clinostat. Clinostatting does not prevent the completion of the plant life cycle. However, clinostatting does appear to slow down the reproductive process of Arabidopsis plants. Whether higher plants can continue to reproduce for many generations in a true micro-g environment of space can only be determined by long duration experiments in space.

  4. Effective extraction of Arabidopsis adherent seed mucilage by ultrasonic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xianhai; Qiao, Lijun; Wu, Ai-Min

    2017-01-01

    The Arabidopsis seed coat is composed of two layers of mucilage, a water-soluble non-adherent outer layer and an adherent inner layer. The non-adherent mucilage can easily be extracted by gentle shaking. However, adherent mucilage is extremely difficult to dissociate from the seed coat. Despite various treatments to extract the adherent mucilage, including EDTA, ammonium oxalate, dilute alkali or acid washes, most of it remains on the seed coat. Here, we show for the first time the extraction of almost all of the adherent mucilage from the Arabidopsis seed coat. Our results demonstrate that ultrasonic treatment was able to extract the adherent mucilage effectively within 20 seconds. Adherent mucilage, like non-adherent mucilage, is mainly composed of rhamnogalacturonan I (RG I). The crystalline cellulose content in adherent mucilage was measured as 3.7 mg g−1 of dry seed. Compared with non-adherent mucilage, the adherent mucilage exhibits relatively stable levels of sugar under various environmental conditions. In all cases, adherent mucilage showed higher levels of sugar than non-adherent mucilage. The cell wall remnant could associate with the adherent mucilage, which could prevent the extraction of the adherent mucilage. Our results show that ultrasonic treatment is an effective method for the quick extraction of Arabidopsis adherent mucilage with little effort. PMID:28091592

  5. A hydroxycinnamoyltransferase responsible for synthesizing suberin aromatics in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gou, Jin-Ying; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2009-01-01

    Suberin, a polyester polymer in the cell wall of terrestrial plants, controls the transport of water and nutrients and protects plant from pathogenic infections and environmental stresses. Structurally, suberin consists of aliphatic and aromatic domains; p-hydroxycinnamates, such as ferulate, p-coumarate, and/or sinapate, are the major phenolic constituents of the latter. By analyzing the “wall-bound” phenolics of mutant lines of Arabidopsis deficient in a family of acyl-CoA dependent acyltransferase (BAHD) genes, we discovered that the formation of aromatic suberin in Arabidopsis, primarily in seed and root tissues, depends on a member of the BAHD superfamily of enzymes encoded by At5g41040. This enzyme exhibits an ω-hydroxyacid hydroxycinnamoyltransferase activity with an in vitro kinetic preference for feruloyl-CoA and 16-hydroxypalmitic acid. Knocking down or knocking out the At5g41040 gene in Arabidopsis reduces specifically the quantity of ferulate in suberin, but does not affect the accumulation of p-coumarate or sinapate. The loss of the suberin phenolic differentially affects the aliphatic monomer loads and alters the permeability and sensitivity of seeds and roots to salt stress. This highlights the importance of suberin aromatics in the polymer's function. PMID:19846769

  6. Characterization of AtALMT1 expression in aluminum inducible malate release and its role for rhizotoxic stress in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Malate transporters play a critical role in aluminum (Al) tolerance responses for some plant species, such as Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here we further characterize AtALMT1, an Arabidopsis malate transporter, to clarify its specific role in malate release and Al stress responses. Malate ex...

  7. In vitro Arabidopsis pollen germination and characterization of the inward potassium currents in Arabidopsis pollen grain protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Fan, L M; Wang, Y F; Wang, H; Wu, W H

    2001-08-01

    The focus of this study is to investigate the regulatory role of K(+) influx in Arabidopsis pollen germination and pollen tube growth. Using agar-containing media, in vitro methods for Arabidopsis pollen germination have been successfully established for the first time. The pollen germination percentage was nearly 75% and the average pollen tube length reached 135 microm after a 6 h incubation. A decrease in external K(+) concentration from 1 mM to 35 microM resulted in 30% inhibition of pollen germination and 40% inhibition of pollen tube growth. An increase in external K(+) concentration from 1 mM to 30 mM stimulated pollen tube growth but inhibited pollen germination. To study how K(+) influx is associated with pollen germination and tube growth, regulation of the inward K(+) channels in the pollen plasma membrane was investigated by conducting patch-clamp whole-cell recording with pollen protoplasts. K(+) currents were first identified in Arabidopsis pollen protoplasts. The inward K(+) currents were insensitive to changes in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) but were inhibited by a high concentration of external Ca(2+). A decrease of external Ca(2+) concentration from 10 mM (control) to 1 mM had no significant effect on the inward K(+) currents, while an increase of external Ca(2+) concentration from 10 mM to 50 mM inhibited the inward K(+) currents by 46%. Changes in external pH significantly affected the magnitude, conductance, voltage-independent maximal conductance, and activation kinetics of the inward K(+) currents. The physiological importance of potassium influx mediated by the inward K(+)-channels during Arabidopsis pollen germination and tube growth is discussed.

  8. Proteomics and transcriptomics analyses of Arabidopsis floral buds uncover important functions of ARABIDOPSIS SKP1-LIKE1

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Dihong; Ni, Weimin; Stanley, Bruce A.; Ma, Hong

    2016-03-03

    The ARABIDOPSIS SKP1-LIKE1 (ASK1) protein functions as a subunit of SKP1-CUL1-F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligases. Previous genetic studies showed that ASK1 plays important roles in Arabidopsis flower development and male meiosis. However, the molecular impact of ASK1-containing SCF E3 ubiquitin ligases (ASK1-E3s) on the floral proteome and transcriptome is unknown. Here we identified proteins that are potentially regulated by ASK1-E3s by comparing floral bud proteomes of wild-type and the ask1 mutant plants. More than 200 proteins were detected in the ask1 mutant but not in wild-type and >300 were detected at higher levels in the ask1 mutant than in wild-type, but their RNA levels were not significantly different between wild-type and ask1 floral buds as shown by transcriptomics analysis, suggesting that they are likely regulated at the protein level by ASK1-E3s. Integrated analyses of floral proteomics and transcriptomics of ask1 and wild-type uncovered several potential aspects of ASK1-E3 functions, including regulation of transcription regulators, kinases, peptidases, and ribosomal proteins, with implications on possible mechanisms of ASK1-E3 functions in floral development. In conclusion, our results suggested that ASK1-E3s play important roles in Arabidopsis protein degradation during flower development. This study opens up new possibilities for further functional studies of these candidate E3 substrates.

  9. The isolation and characterization of resident yeasts from the phylloplane of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Sipilä, Timo P.; Overmyer, Kirk

    2016-01-01

    The genetic model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (arabidopsis) has been instrumental to recent advances in our understanding of the molecular function of the plant immune system. However, this work has not yet included plant associated and phytopathogenic yeasts largely due to a lack of yeast species known to interact with arabidopsis. The plant phylloplane is a significant habitat for neutral-residents, plant-growth and health-promoting species, and latent-pathogenic species. However, yeast phylloplane residents of arabidopsis remain underexplored. To address this, resident yeasts from the phyllosphere of wild arabidopsis collected in field conditions have been isolated and characterized. A total of 95 yeast strains representing 23 species in 9 genera were discovered, including potentially psychrophilic and pathogenic strains. Physiological characterization revealed thermotolerance profiles, sensitivity to the arabidopsis phytoalexin camalexin, the production of indolic compounds, and the ability to activate auxin responses in planta. These results indicate a rich diversity of yeasts present in the arabidopsis phylloplane and have created culture resources and information useful in the development of model systems for arabidopsis-yeast interactions. PMID:28004784

  10. The role of CAX1 and CAX3 in elemental distribution and abundance in Arabidopsis seed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to alter nutrient partitioning within plant cells is poorly understood. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a family of endomembrane cation exchangers (CAXs) transports Ca(2+) and other cations. However, experiments have not focused on how the distribution and partitioning of calcium ...

  11. Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-21

    transduction components between organelle such as the nucleus and mitochondria as the cell strives to maintain homeostasis. Many of these communication... Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks Paulo Shakarian1*, J. Kenneth Wickiser2 1 Paulo Shakarian...pathogens on host protein networks for humans and Arabidopsis - noting striking similarities . Specifically, we preform k-shell decomposition analysis on

  12. Arabidopsis GPAT9 contributes to synthesis of intracellular glycerolipids but not surface lipids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GLYCEROL-3-PHOSPHATE ACYLTRANSFERASE (GPAT) genes encode enzymes involved in glycerolipid biosynthesis in plants. Ten GPAT homologues have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). GPATs 4-8 have been shown to be involved in the production of extracellular lipid barrier polyesters. Rece...

  13. Arabidopsis genotypes resistant and susceptible to diamondback moth (Lepidoptera: Putellidea): No net effects on insect growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plutella xylostella (L.), diamondback moth (DBM) is a destructive pest of the Brassicaceae including Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynhold. Ecotypes of Arabidopsis vary in the amounts of leaf area consumed when fed on by DBM, which has been used as a measure of resistance to DBM. Recombinant inbred lin...

  14. Reducing isozyme competition increases target fatty acid accumulation in seed triacylglycerols of transgenic Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One goal of green chemistry is the production of industrially useful fatty acids (FAs) in crop plants. We focus on the engineering of industrial FAs, specifically hydroxy fatty acids (HFA) and conjugated polyenoic fatty acids (a-eleostearic acid, ESA), using Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) as a m...

  15. Root development under metal stress in Arabidopsis thaliana requires the H(+)/cation antiporter CAX4

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Arabidopsis vacuolar CAtion eXchangers (CAXs) play a key role in mediating cation influx into the vacuole. In Arabidopsis, there are six CAX genes. However, some members are yet to be characterized fully. In this study, we show that CAX4 is expressed in the root apex and lateral root primordia, ...

  16. The Arabidopsis receptor kinase FLS2 binds flg22 and determines the specificity of flagellin perception.

    PubMed

    Chinchilla, Delphine; Bauer, Zsuzsa; Regenass, Martin; Boller, Thomas; Felix, Georg

    2006-02-01

    Flagellin, the main building block of the bacterial flagellum, acts as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern triggering the innate immune response in animals and plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the Leu-rich repeat transmembrane receptor kinase FLAGELLIN SENSITIVE2 (FLS2) is essential for flagellin perception. Here, we demonstrate the specific interaction of the elicitor-active epitope flg22 with the FLS2 protein by chemical cross-linking and immunoprecipitation. The functionality of this receptor was further tested by heterologous expression of the Arabidopsis FLS2 gene in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) cells. The perception of flg22 in tomato differs characteristically from that in Arabidopsis. Expression of Arabidopsis FLS2 conferred an additional flg22-perception system on the cells of tomato, which showed all of the properties characteristic of the perception of this elicitor in Arabidopsis. In summary, these results show that FLS2 constitutes the pattern-recognition receptor that determines the specificity of flagellin perception.

  17. Morphological, physiological and molecular genetic characterization ofArabidopsis himalaica, with reference toA. thaliana.

    PubMed

    Tsukaya, H; Yokoyama, J; Ikeda, H; Kuroiwa, H; Kuroiwa, T; Iwatsuki, K

    1997-03-01

    Arabidopsis himalaica (Edgeworth) O.E. Schulz, a poorly characterized species typical of HimalayanArabidopsis, was analyzed in terms of its morphology, physiology, chromosome number and molecular genetics, in comparison withA. thaliana which is the standard species in the genusArabidopsis. From view point of developmental genetics, several features which are specific toA. himalaica seem not to be derived by single-gene mutations inA. thaliana. Phylogenetic analyses based onrbcL sequences suggested that genusArabidopsis is not monophyletic. The detailed characterization ofA. himalaica should provide clues to understand the trait of evolution of particular features of Himalayan species ofArabidopsis and their genetic basis.

  18. Disparate Metabolic Responses in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet Supplemented with Maize-Derived Non-Digestible Feruloylated Oligo- and Polysaccharides Are Linked to Changes in the Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junyi; Bindels, Laure B.; Segura Munoz, Rafael R.; Martínez, Inés; Walter, Jens; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E.; Rose, Devin J.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have suggested links between colonic fermentation of dietary fibers and improved metabolic health. The objectives of this study were to determine if non-digestible feruloylated oligo- and polysaccharides (FOPS), a maize-derived dietary fiber, could counteract the deleterious effects of high-fat (HF) feeding in mice and explore if metabolic benefits were linked to the gut microbiota. C57BL/6J mice (n = 8/group) were fed a low-fat (LF; 10 kcal% fat), HF (62 kcal% fat), or HF diet supplemented with FOPS (5%, w/w). Pronounced differences in FOPS responsiveness were observed: four mice experienced cecal enlargement and enhanced short chain fatty acid production, indicating increased cecal fermentation (F-FOPS). Only these mice displayed improvements in glucose metabolism compared with HF-fed mice. Blooms in the gut microbial genera Blautia and Akkermansia were observed in three of the F-FOPS mice; these shifts were associated with reductions in body and adipose tissue weights compared with the HF-fed control mice. No improvements in metabolic markers or weights were detected in the four mice whose gut microbiota did not respond to FOPS. These findings demonstrate that FOPS-induced improvements in weight gain and metabolic health in mice depended on the ability of an individual’s microbiota to ferment FOPS. PMID:26731528

  19. Characterization of tailor-made copolymers of oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate and N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate as nonviral gene transfer agents: influence of macromolecular structure on gene vector particle properties and transfection efficiency.

    PubMed

    Uzgün, Senta; Akdemir, Ozgür; Hasenpusch, Günther; Maucksch, Christof; Golas, Monika M; Sander, Bjoern; Stark, Holger; Imker, Rabea; Lutz, Jean-François; Rudolph, Carsten

    2010-01-11

    Oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylates (OEGMA) of various chain lengths (i.e., 9, 23, or 45 EG units) and N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) were copolymerized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), yielding well-defined P(DMAEMA-co-OEGMA) copolymers with increasing OEGMA molar fractions (F(OEGMA)) but a comparable degree of polymerization (DP approximately 120). Increase of both F(OEGMA) and OEGMA chain lengths correlated inversely with gene vector size, morphology, and zeta potential. P(DMAEMA-co-OEGMA) copolymers prevented gene vector aggregation at high plasmid DNA (pDNA) concentrations in isotonic solution and did not induce cytotoxicity even at high concentrations. Transfection efficiency of the most efficient P(DMAEMA-co-OEGMA) copolymers was found to be >10-fold lower compared with branched polyethylenimine (PEI) 25 kDa. Although OEGMA copolymerization largely reduced gene vector binding with the cell surface, cellular internalization of the bound complexes was less affected. These observations suggest that inefficient endolysosomal escape limits transfection efficiency of P(DMAEMA-co-OEGMA) copolymer gene vectors. Despite this observation, optimized p(DMAEMA-co-OEGMA) gene vectors remained stable under conditions for in vivo application leading to 7-fold greater gene expression in the lungs compared with PEI. Tailor-made P(DMAEMA-co-OEGMA) copolymers are promising nonviral gene transfer agents that fulfill the requirements for successful in vivo gene delivery.

  20. Molecular genetics of root gravitropism and waving in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sedbrook, J; Boonsirichai, K; Chen, R; Hilson, P; Pearlman, R; Rosen, E; Rutherford, R; Batiza, A; Carroll, K; Schulz, T; Masson, P H

    1998-05-01

    When Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grow embedded in an agar-based medium, their roots grow vertically downward. This reflects their ability to sense the gravity vector and to position their tip parallel to it (gravitropism). We have isolated a number of mutations affecting root gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana. One of these mutations, named arg1, affects root and hypocotyl gravitropism without promoting defects in starch content or in the ability of seedlings' organs to respond to plant hormones. The ARG1 gene was cloned and shown to code for a protein with a J domain at its amino terminus and a second sequence motif found in several cytoskeleton binding proteins. Mutations in the AGR1 locus promote a strong defect in root gravitropism. Some alleles also confer an increased root resistance to exogenous ethylene and an increased sensitivity to auxin. AGR1 was cloned and found to encode a putative transmembrane protein which might be involved in polar auxin transport, or in regulating the differential growth response to gravistimulation. When Arabidopsis seedlings grow on the surface of agar-based media tilted backward, their roots wave. That wavy pattern of root growth derives from a combined response to gravity, touch and other surface-derived stimuli. It is accompanied by a reversible rotation of the root tip about its axis. A number of mutations affect the presence or the shape of root waves on tilted agar-based surfaces. One of them, wvc1, promotes the formation of compressed root waves under these conditions. The physiological and molecular analyses of this mutant suggest that a tryptophan-derived molecule other than IAA might be an important regulator of the curvature responsible for root waving.

  1. Genome Sequencing Reveals the Origin of the Allotetraploid Arabidopsis suecica.

    PubMed

    Novikova, Polina Yu; Tsuchimatsu, Takashi; Simon, Samson; Nizhynska, Viktoria; Voronin, Viktor; Burns, Robin; Fedorenko, Olga M; Holm, Svante; Säll, Torbjörn; Prat, Elisa; Marande, William; Castric, Vincent; Nordborg, Magnus

    2017-04-01

    Polyploidy is an example of instantaneous speciation when it involves the formation of a new cytotype that is incompatible with the parental species. Because new polyploid individuals are likely to be rare, establishment of a new species is unlikely unless polyploids are able to reproduce through self-fertilization (selfing), or asexually. Conversely, selfing (or asexuality) makes it possible for polyploid species to originate from a single individual-a bona fide speciation event. The extent to which this happens is not known. Here, we consider the origin of Arabidopsis suecica, a selfing allopolyploid between Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis arenosa, which has hitherto been considered to be an example of a unique origin. Based on whole-genome re-sequencing of 15 natural A. suecica accessions, we identify ubiquitous shared polymorphism with the parental species, and hence conclusively reject a unique origin in favor of multiple founding individuals. We further estimate that the species originated after the last glacial maximum in Eastern Europe or central Eurasia (rather than Sweden, as the name might suggest). Finally, annotation of the self-incompatibility loci in A. suecica revealed that both loci carry non-functional alleles. The locus inherited from the selfing A. thaliana is fixed for an ancestral non-functional allele, whereas the locus inherited from the outcrossing A. arenosa is fixed for a novel loss-of-function allele. Furthermore, the allele inherited from A. thaliana is predicted to transcriptionally silence the allele inherited from A. arenosa, suggesting that loss of self-incompatibility may have been instantaneous.

  2. Arabidopsis MSI1 functions in photoperiodic flowering time control.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Yvonne; Hennig, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate timing of flowering is crucial for crop yield and the reproductive success of plants. Flowering can be induced by a number of molecular pathways that respond to internal and external signals such as photoperiod, vernalization or light quality, ambient temperature and biotic as well as abiotic stresses. The key florigenic signal FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) is regulated by several flowering activators, such as CONSTANS (CO), and repressors, such as FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Chromatin modifications are essential for regulated gene expression, which often involves the well conserved MULTICOPY SUPRESSOR OF IRA 1 (MSI1)-like protein family. MSI1-like proteins are ubiquitous partners of various complexes, such as POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX2 or CHROMATIN ASSEMBLY FACTOR 1. In Arabidopsis, one of the functions of MSI1 is to control the switch to flowering. Arabidopsis MSI1 is needed for the correct expression of the floral integrator gene SUPPRESSOR OF CO 1 (SOC1). Here, we show that the histone-binding protein MSI1 acts in the photoperiod pathway to regulate normal expression of CO in long day (LD) photoperiods. Reduced expression of CO in msi1-mutants leads to failure of FT and SOC1 activation and to delayed flowering. MSI1 is needed for normal sensitivity of Arabidopsis to photoperiod, because msi1-mutants responded less than wild type to an intermittent LD treatment of plants grown in short days. Finally, genetic analysis demonstrated that MSI1 acts upstream of the CO-FT pathway to enable an efficient photoperiodic response and to induce flowering.

  3. Arabidopsis thaliana as Bioindicator of Fungal VOCs in Indoor Air

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Richard; Yin, Guohua; Klich, Maren A.; Grimm, Casey; Bennett, Joan W.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the ability of Arabidopsis thaliana to detect different mixtures of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by the common indoor fungus, Aspergillus versicolor, and demonstrate the potential usage of the plant as a bioindicator to monitor fungal VOCs in indoor air. We evaluated the volatile production of Aspergillus versicolor strains SRRC 108 (NRRL 3449) and SRRC 2559 (ATCC 32662) grown on nutrient rich fungal medium, and grown under conditions to mimic the substrate encountered in the built environment where fungi would typically grow indoors (moist wallboard and ceiling tiles). Using headspace solid phase microextraction/gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, we analyzed VOC profiles of the two strains. The most abundant compound produced by both strains on all three media was 1-octen-3-ol. Strain SRRC 2559 made several terpenes not detected from strain SRRC 108. Using a split-plate bioassay, we grew Arabidopsis thaliana in a shared atmosphere with VOCs from the two strains of Aspergillus versicolor grown on yeast extract sucrose medium. The VOCs emitted by SRRC 2559 had an adverse impact on seed germination and plant growth. Chemical standards of individual VOCs from the Aspergillus versicolor mixture (2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-octen-3-ol, limonene, and β-farnesene), and β-caryophyllene were tested one by one in seed germination and vegetative plant growth assays. The most inhibitory compound to both seed germination and plant growth was 1-octen-3-ol. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis is a useful model for monitoring indoor air quality as it is sensitive to naturally emitted fungal volatile mixtures as well as to chemical standards of individual compounds, and it exhibits relatively quick concentration- and duration-dependent responses. PMID:27790067

  4. Aspartate oxidase plays an important role in Arabidopsis stomatal immunity.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Boutrot, Freddy; Rathjen, John P; Zipfel, Cyril

    2012-08-01

    Perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as bacterial flagellin (or the peptide flg22), by surface-localized receptors activates defense responses and subsequent immunity. In a previous forward-genetic screen aimed at the identification of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) flagellin-insensitive (fin) mutants, we isolated fin4, which is severely affected in flg22-triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) bursts. Here, we report that FIN4 encodes the chloroplastic enzyme ASPARTATE OXIDASE (AO), which catalyzes the first irreversible step in the de novo biosynthesis of NAD. Genetic studies on the role of NAD have been hindered so far by the lethality of null mutants in NAD biosynthetic enzymes. Using newly identified knockdown fin alleles, we found that AO is required for the ROS burst mediated by the NADPH oxidase RBOHD triggered by the perception of several unrelated PAMPs. AO is also required for RBOHD-dependent stomatal closure. However, full AO activity is not required for flg22-induced responses that are RBOHD independent. Interestingly, although the fin4 mutation dramatically affects RBOHD function, it does not affect functions carried out by other members of the RBOH family, such as RBOHC and RBOHF. Finally, we determined that AO is required for stomatal immunity against the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae. Altogether, our work reveals a novel specific requirement for AO activity in PAMP-triggered RBOHD-dependent ROS burst and stomatal immunity. In addition, the availability of viable mutants for the chloroplastic enzyme AO will enable future detailed studies on the role of NAD metabolism in different cellular processes, including immunity, in Arabidopsis.

  5. Identification of gravitropic response indicator genes in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Moritaka; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo Terao

    2014-01-01

    Differential organ growth during gravitropic response is caused by differential accumulation of auxin, that is, relative higher auxin concentration in lower flanks than in upper flanks of responding organs. Auxin responsive reporter systems such as DR5::GUS and DR5::GFP have usually been used as indicators of gravitropic response in roots and hypocotyls of Arabidopsis. However, in the inflorescence stems, the reporter systems don't work well to monitor gravitropic response. Here, we aim to certify appropriate gravitropic response indicators (GRIs) in inflorescence stems. We performed microarray analysis comparing gene expression profiles between upper and lower flanks of Arabidopsis inflorescence stems after gravistimulation. Thirty genes showed > 2-fold differentially increased expression in lower flanks at 30 min, of which 19 were auxin response genes. We focused on IAA5 and IAA2 and verified whether they are appropriate GRIs by real-time qRT-PCR analyses. Transcript levels of IAA5 and IAA2 were remarkably higher in lower flanks than in upper flanks after gravistimulation. The biased IAA5 or IAA2 expression is disappeared in sgr2-1 mutant which is defective in gravity perception, indicating that gravity perception process is essential for formation of the biased gene expression during gravitropism. IAA5 expression was remarkably increased in lower flanks at 30 min after gravistimulation, whereas IAA2 expression was gradually decreased in upper flanks in a time-dependent manner. Therefore, we conclude that IAA5 is a sensitive GRI to monitor asymmetric auxin signaling caused by gravistimulation in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems.

  6. Molecular genetics of root gravitropism and waving in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedbrook, J.; Boonsirichai, K.; Chen, R.; Hilson, P.; Pearlman, R.; Rosen, E.; Rutherford, R.; Batiza, A.; Carroll, K.; Schulz, T.; Masson, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    When Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grow embedded in an agar-based medium, their roots grow vertically downward. This reflects their ability to sense the gravity vector and to position their tip parallel to it (gravitropism). We have isolated a number of mutations affecting root gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana. One of these mutations, named arg1, affects root and hypocotyl gravitropism without promoting defects in starch content or in the ability of seedlings' organs to respond to plant hormones. The ARG1 gene was cloned and shown to code for a protein with a J domain at its amino terminus and a second sequence motif found in several cytoskeleton binding proteins. Mutations in the AGR1 locus promote a strong defect in root gravitropism. Some alleles also confer an increased root resistance to exogenous ethylene and an increased sensitivity to auxin. AGR1 was cloned and found to encode a putative transmembrane protein which might be involved in polar auxin transport, or in regulating the differential growth response to gravistimulation. When Arabidopsis seedlings grow on the surface of agar-based media tilted backward, their roots wave. That wavy pattern of root growth derives from a combined response to gravity, touch and other surface-derived stimuli. It is accompanied by a reversible rotation of the root tip about its axis. A number of mutations affect the presence or the shape of root waves on tilted agar-based surfaces. One of them, wvc1, promotes the formation of compressed root waves under these conditions. The physiological and molecular analyses of this mutant suggest that a tryptophan-derived molecule other than IAA might be an important regulator of the curvature responsible for root waving.

  7. Contribution of transcriptional regulation to natural variations in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenqiong J; Chang, Sherman H; Hudson, Matthew E; Kwan, Wai-King; Li, Jingqiu; Estes, Bram; Knoll, Daniel; Shi, Liang; Zhu, Tong

    2005-01-01

    Background Genetic control of gene transcription is a key component in genome evolution. To understand the transcriptional basis of natural variation, we have studied genome-wide variations in transcription and characterized the genetic variations in regulatory elements among Arabidopsis accessions. Results Among five accessions (Col-0, C24, Ler, WS-2, and NO-0) 7,508 probe sets with no detectable genomic sequence variations were identified on the basis of the comparative genomic hybridization to the Arabidopsis GeneChip microarray, and used for accession-specific transcriptome analysis. Two-way ANOVA analysis has identified 60 genes whose mRNA levels differed in different accession backgrounds in an organ-dependent manner. Most of these genes were involved in stress responses and late stages of plant development, such as seed development. Correlation analysis of expression patterns of these 7,508 genes between pairs of accessions identified a group of 65 highly plastic genes with distinct expression patterns in each accession. Conclusion Genes that show substantial genetic variation in mRNA level are those with functions in signal transduction, transcription and stress response, suggesting the existence of variations in the regulatory mechanisms for these genes among different accessions. This is in contrast to those genes with significant polymorphisms in the coding regions identified by genomic hybridization, which include genes encoding transposon-related proteins, kinases and disease-resistance proteins. While relatively fewer sequence variations were detected on average in the coding regions of these genes, a number of differences were identified from the upstream regions, several of which alter potential cis-regulatory elements. Our results suggest that nucleotide polymorphisms in regulatory elements of genes encoding controlling factors could be primary targets of natural selection and a driving force behind the evolution of Arabidopsis accessions. PMID

  8. Starch synthesis in Arabidopsis. Granule synthesis, composition, and structure.

    PubMed

    Zeeman, Samuel C; Tiessen, Axel; Pilling, Emma; Kato, K Lisa; Donald, Athene M; Smith, Alison M

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize starch synthesis, composition, and granule structure in Arabidopsis leaves. First, the potential role of starch-degrading enzymes during starch accumulation was investigated. To discover whether simultaneous synthesis and degradation of starch occurred during net accumulation, starch was labeled by supplying (14)CO(2) to intact, photosynthesizing plants. Release of this label from starch was monitored during a chase period in air, using different light intensities to vary the net rate of starch synthesis. No release of label was detected unless there was net degradation of starch during the chase. Similar experiments were performed on a mutant line (dbe1) that accumulates the soluble polysaccharide, phytoglycogen. Label was not released from phytoglycogen during the chase indicating that, even when in a soluble form, glucan is not appreciably degraded during accumulation. Second, the effect on starch composition of growth conditions and mutations causing starch accumulation was studied. An increase in starch content correlated with an increased amylose content of the starch and with an increase in the ratio of granule-bound starch synthase to soluble starch synthase activity. Third, the structural organization and morphology of Arabidopsis starch granules was studied. The starch granules were birefringent, indicating a radial organization of the polymers, and x-ray scatter analyses revealed that granules contained alternating crystalline and amorphous lamellae with a periodicity of 9 nm. Granules from the wild type and the high-starch mutant sex1 were flattened and discoid, whereas those of the high-starch mutant sex4 were larger and more rounded. These larger granules contained "growth rings" with a periodicity of 200 to 300 nm. We conclude that leaf starch is synthesized without appreciable turnover and comprises similar polymers and contains similar levels of molecular organization to storage starches, making Arabidopsis

  9. Long-Distance Phloem Transport of Glucosinolates in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sixue; Petersen, Bent Larsen; Olsen, Carl Erik; Schulz, Alexander; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2001-01-01

    Glucosinolates are a large group of plant secondary metabolites found mainly in the order Capparales, which includes a large number of economically important Brassica crops and the model plant Arabidopsis. In the present study, several lines of evidence are provided for phloem transport of glucosinolates in Arabidopsis. When radiolabeled p-hydroxybenzylglucosinolate (p-OHBG) and sucrose were co-applied to the tip of detached leaves, both tracers were collected in the phloem exudates at the petioles. Long-distance transport of [14C]p-OHBG was investigated in wild-type and transgenic 35S::CYP79A1 plants, synthesizing high amounts of p-OHBG, which is not a natural constituent of wild-type Arabidopsis. In both wild-type and 35S::CYP79A1 plants, radiolabeled p-OHBG was rapidly transported from the application site into the whole plant and intact p-OHBG was recovered from different tissues. The pattern of distribution of the radioactivity corresponded to that expected for transport of photoassimilates such as sucrose, and was consistent with translocation in phloem following the source-sink relationship. Radiolabeled p-OHBG was shown to accumulate in the seeds of wild-type and 35S::CYP79A1 plants, where p-OHBG had been either exogenously applied or endogenously synthesized from Tyr in the leaves. p-OHBG was found in phloem exudates collected from cut petioles of leaves from both wild-type and 35S::CYP79A1 plants. Phloem exudates were shown to contain intact glucosinolates, and not desulphoglucosinolates, as the transport form. It is concluded that intact glucosinolates are readily loaded into and transported by the phloem. PMID:11553747

  10. Abundant protein phosphorylation potentially regulates Arabidopsis anther development

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Juanying; Zhang, Zaibao; You, Chenjiang; Zhang, Xumin; Lu, Jianan; Ma, Hong

    2016-01-01

    As the male reproductive organ of flowering plants, the stamen consists of the anther and filament. Previous studies on stamen development mainly focused on single gene functions by genetic methods or gene expression changes using comparative transcriptomic approaches, especially in model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana. However, studies on Arabidopsis anther protein expression and post-translational modifications are still lacking. Here we report proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies on developing Arabidopsis anthers at stages 4–7 and 8–12. We identified 3908 high-confidence phosphorylation sites corresponding to 1637 phosphoproteins. Among the 1637 phosphoproteins, 493 were newly identified, with 952 phosphorylation sites. Phosphopeptide enrichment prior to LC-MS analysis facilitated the identification of low-abundance proteins and regulatory proteins, thereby increasing the coverage of proteomic analysis, and facilitated the analysis of more regulatory proteins. Thirty-nine serine and six threonine phosphorylation motifs were uncovered from the anther phosphoproteome and further analysis supports that phosphorylation of casein kinase II, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and 14-3-3 proteins is a key regulatory mechanism in anther development. Phosphorylated residues were preferentially located in variable protein regions among family members, but they were they were conserved across angiosperms in general. Moreover, phosphorylation might reduce activity of reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes and hamper brassinosteroid signaling in early anther development. Most of the novel phosphoproteins showed tissue-specific expression in the anther according to previous microarray data. This study provides a community resource with information on the abundance and phosphorylation status of thousands of proteins in developing anthers, contributing to understanding post-translational regulatory mechanisms during anther development. PMID:27531888

  11. Glucosinolate Breakdown in Arabidopsis: Mechanism, Regulation and Biological Significance

    PubMed Central

    Wittstock, Ute; Burow, Meike

    2010-01-01

    Glucosinolates are a group of thioglucosides in plants of the Brassicales order. Together with their hydrolytic enzymes, the myrosinases, they constitute the ‘mustard oil bomb’ involved in plant defense. Here we summarize recent studies in Arabidopsis that have provided molecular evidence that the glucosinolate-myrosinase system is much more than a ‘two-component defense system,’ and started to unravel the roles of different glucosinolate breakdown pathways in the context of plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. PMID:22303260

  12. Mutants of Arabidopsis as tools for physiology and molecular biology

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, C.R.; Artus, N.; Browse, J.; Caspar, T.; Estelle, M.; Haughn, G.; Kunst, L.; Martinez, J.; McCourt, P.; Moffatt, B.

    1986-04-01

    The authors discuss the importance of developing a facile system for genetic analysis in higher plants which can be used to approach problems specific to plant biology in much the same way that molecular genetic approaches have been used in other classes of organisms such as yeast and Drosophila. Toward this end, they have developed methods for the isolation and analysis of mutants of Arabidopsis with specific alterations in photosynthesis, photorespiration, starch metabolism, lipid metabolism, purine metabolism, amino acid metabolism and phytohormone responses. The utility of this collection of mutants for studying problems in physiology and biochemistry is illustrated with selected examples.

  13. In vivo localization in Arabidopsis protoplasts and root tissue.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myoung Hui; Lee, Yongjik; Hwang, Inhwan

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, a large number of proteins are transported to their final destination after translation by a process called intracellular trafficking. Transient gene expression, either in plant protoplasts or in specific plant tissues, is a fast, flexible, and reproducible approach to study the cellular function of proteins, protein subcellular localizations, and protein-protein interactions. Here we describe the general method of protoplast isolation, polyethylene glycol-mediated protoplast transformation and immunostaining of protoplast or intact root tissues for studying the localization of protein in Arabidopsis.

  14. A Chemical Genetic Screening Procedure for Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Bjornson, Marta; Song, Xingshun; Dandekar, Abhaya; Franz, Annaliese; Drakakaki, Georgia; Dehesh, Katayoon

    2016-01-01

    Unbiased screening approaches are powerful tools enabling identification of novel players in biological processes. Chemical genetic screening refers to the technique of using a reporter response, such as expression of luciferase driven by a promoter of interest, to discover small molecules that affect a given process when applied to plants. These chemicals then act as tools for identification of regulatory components that could not otherwise be detected by forward genetic screens due to gene family redundancy or mutant lethality. This protocol describes a chemical genetic screen using Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings, which has led to recognition of novel players in the plant general stress response. PMID:27446980

  15. Strong Magnetic Field Induced Changes of Gene Expression in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.; Klingenberg, B.; Brooks, J. S.; Morgan, A. N.; Yowtak, J.; Meisel, M. W.

    2005-07-01

    We review our studies of the biological impact of magnetic field strengths of up to 30 T on transgenic arabidopsis plants engineered with a stress response gene consisting of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene reporter. Field strengths in excess of 15 T induce expression of the Adh/GUS transgene in the roots and leaves. Microarray analyses indicate that such field strengths have a far reaching effect on the genome. Wide spread induction of stress-related genes and transcription factors, and a depression of genes associated with cell wall metabolism are prominent examples.

  16. Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Affect Biomass Accumulation and Photosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoping; Yang, Xiyu; Chen, Siyu; Li, Qianqian; Wang, Wei; Hou, Chunjiang; Gao, Xiao; Wang, Li; Wang, Shucai

    2016-01-01

    Dramatic increase in the use of nanoparticles (NPs) in a variety of applications greatly increased the likelihood of the release of NPs into the environment. Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are among the most commonly used NPs, and it has been shown that ZnO NPs were harmful to several different plants. We report here the effects of ZnO NPs exposure on biomass accumulation and photosynthesis in Arabidopsis. We found that 200 and 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treatments reduced Arabidopsis growth by ∼20 and 80%, respectively, in comparison to the control. Pigments measurement showed that Chlorophyll a and b contents were reduced more than 50%, whereas carotenoid contents remain largely unaffected in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated Arabidopsis plants. Consistent with this, net rate of photosynthesis, leaf stomatal conductance, intercellular CO2 concentration and transpiration rate were all reduced more than 50% in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated plants. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that expression levels of chlorophyll synthesis genes including CHLOROPHYLL A OXYGENASE (CAO), CHLOROPHYLL SYNTHASE (CHLG), COPPER RESPONSE DEFECT 1 (CRD1), MAGNESIUM-PROTOPORPHYRIN IX METHYLTRANSFERASE (CHLM) and MG-CHELATASE SUBUNIT D (CHLD), and photosystem structure gene PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT D-2 (PSAD2), PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT E-2 (PSAE2), PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT K (PSAK) and PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT K (PSAN) were reduced about five folds in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated plants. On the other hand, elevated expression, though to different degrees, of several carotenoids synthesis genes including GERANYLGERANYL PYROPHOSPHATE SYNTHASE 6 (GGPS6), PHYTOENE SYNTHASE (PSY) PHYTOENE DESATURASE (PDS), and ZETA-CAROTENE DESATURASE (ZDS) were observed in ZnO NPs treated plants. Taken together, these results suggest that toxicity effects of ZnO NPs observed in Arabidopsis was likely due to the inhibition of the expression of chlorophyll synthesis genes and photosystem structure genes, which results in the inhibition of

  17. Arabidopsis thaliana has the enzymatic machinery for replicating representative viroid species of the family Pospiviroidae.

    PubMed

    Daròs, José-Antonio; Flores, Ricardo

    2004-04-27

    Viroids, subviral noncoding RNAs, replicate, move, and incite diseases in plants. Viroids replicate through a rolling-circle mechanism in which oligomeric RNAs of one or both polarities are cleaved and ligated into the circular monomers. Attempts to transmit viroids to Arabidopsis have failed for unknown reasons. To tackle this question, Arabidopsis was transformed with cDNAs expressing dimeric (+) transcripts of representative species of the families Pospiviroidae and Avsunviroidae, which replicate in the nucleus and the chloroplast, respectively. Correct processing to the circular (+) monomers was always observed, demonstrating that Arabidopsis has the appropriate RNase and RNA ligase. Northern blot hybridization also revealed the multimeric (-) RNAs of Citrus exocortis viroid and Hop stunt viroid (HSVd) of the family Pospiviroidae, but not of Avocado sunblotch viroid of the family Avsunviroidae, showing that the first RNA-RNA transcription of the rolling-circle mechanism occurs in Arabidopsis for the two nuclear viroids and that their multimeric (-) RNAs remain unprocessed as in typical hosts. Moreover, transgenic Arabidopsis expressing HSVd dimeric (-) transcripts accumulated the circular (+) monomers, although at low levels, together with the unprocessed primary transcript that served as the template for the second RNA-RNA transcription. Agroinoculation of Arabidopsis with the dimeric (+) Citrus exocortis viroid, HSVd, and Coleus blumei viroid 1 cDNAs showed that these viroids could not move to distal plant parts, in contrast with the situation observed in their experimental hosts. Therefore, deficiencies in movement or low replication appear to be the factors limiting infectivity of some viroids in Arabidopsis.

  18. Proteomics and transcriptomics analyses of Arabidopsis floral buds uncover important functions of ARABIDOPSIS SKP1-LIKE1

    DOE PAGES

    Lu, Dihong; Ni, Weimin; Stanley, Bruce A.; ...

    2016-03-03

    The ARABIDOPSIS SKP1-LIKE1 (ASK1) protein functions as a subunit of SKP1-CUL1-F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligases. Previous genetic studies showed that ASK1 plays important roles in Arabidopsis flower development and male meiosis. However, the molecular impact of ASK1-containing SCF E3 ubiquitin ligases (ASK1-E3s) on the floral proteome and transcriptome is unknown. Here we identified proteins that are potentially regulated by ASK1-E3s by comparing floral bud proteomes of wild-type and the ask1 mutant plants. More than 200 proteins were detected in the ask1 mutant but not in wild-type and >300 were detected at higher levels in the ask1 mutant than in wild-type,more » but their RNA levels were not significantly different between wild-type and ask1 floral buds as shown by transcriptomics analysis, suggesting that they are likely regulated at the protein level by ASK1-E3s. Integrated analyses of floral proteomics and transcriptomics of ask1 and wild-type uncovered several potential aspects of ASK1-E3 functions, including regulation of transcription regulators, kinases, peptidases, and ribosomal proteins, with implications on possible mechanisms of ASK1-E3 functions in floral development. In conclusion, our results suggested that ASK1-E3s play important roles in Arabidopsis protein degradation during flower development. This study opens up new possibilities for further functional studies of these candidate E3 substrates.« less

  19. Cross-talk between gibberellins and salicylic acid in early stress responses in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Ramírez, Ana; Rodríguez, Dolores; Reyes, David; Jiménez, Jesús Angel; Nicolás, Gregorio; López-Climent, María; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2009-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a plant hormone mainly associated with the induction of defense mechanism in plants, although in the last years there is increasing evidence on the role of SA in plant responses to abiotic stress. We recently reported that an increase in endogenous SA levels are able to counteract the inhibitory effects of several abiotic stress conditions during germination and seedling establishment of Arabidopsis thaliana and that this effect is modulated by gibberellins (GAs) probably through a member of the GASA (Giberellic Acid Stimulated in Arabidopsis) gene family, clearly showing the existence of a cross talk between these two plant hormones in Arabidopsis. PMID:19820299

  20. Re-Evaluation of Reportedly Metal Tolerant Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Guzman, Macarena; Addo-Quaye, Charles; Dilkes, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    Santa Clara, Limeport, and Berkeley are Arabidopsis thaliana accessions previously identified as diversely metal resistant. Yet these same accessions were determined to be genetically indistinguishable from the metal sensitive Col-0. We robustly tested tolerance for Zn, Ni and Cu, and genetic relatedness by growing these accessions under a range of Ni, Zn and Cu concentrations for three durations in multiple replicates. Neither metal resistance nor variance in growth were detected between them and Col-0. We re-sequenced the genomes of these accessions and all stocks available for each accession. In all cases they were nearly indistinguishable from the standard laboratory accession Col-0. As Santa Clara was allegedly collected from the Jasper Ridge serpentine outcrop in California, USA we investigated the possibility of extant A. thaliana populations adapted to serpentine soils. Botanically vouchered Arabidopsis accessions in the Jepson database were overlaid with soil maps of California. This provided no evidence of A. thaliana collections from serpentine sites in California. Thus, our work demonstrates that the Santa Clara, Berkeley and Limeport accessions are not metal tolerant, not genetically distinct from Col-0, and that there are no known serpentine adapted populations or accessions of A. thaliana. PMID:27467746

  1. Linkage disequilibrium mapping of Arabidopsis CRY2 flowering time alleles.

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Kenneth M; Halldorsdottir, Solveig S; Stinchcombe, John R; Weinig, Cynthia; Schmitt, Johanna; Purugganan, Michael D

    2004-01-01

    The selfing plant Arabidopsis thaliana has been proposed to be well suited for linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping as a means of identifying genes underlying natural trait variation. Here we apply LD mapping to examine haplotype variation in the genomic region of the photoperiod receptor CRYPTOCHROME2 and associated flowering time variation. CRY2 DNA sequences reveal strong LD and the existence of two highly differentiated haplogroups (A and B) across the gene; in addition, a haplotype possessing a radical glutamine-to-serine replacement (AS) occurs within the more common haplogroup. Growth chamber and field experiments using an unstratified population of 95 ecotypes indicate that under short-day photoperiod, the AS and B haplogroups are both highly significantly associated with early flowering. Data from six genes flanking CRY2 indicate that these haplogroups are limited to an approximately 65-kb genomic region around CRY2. Whereas the B haplogroup cannot be delimited to <16 kb around CRY2, the AS haplogroup is characterized almost exclusively by the nucleotide polymorphisms directly associated with the serine replacement in CRY2; this finding strongly suggests that the serine substitution is directly responsible for the AS early flowering phenotype. This study demonstrates the utility of LD mapping for elucidating the genetic basis of natural, ecologically relevant variation in Arabidopsis. PMID:15280248

  2. Linkage disequilibrium mapping of Arabidopsis CRY2 flowering time alleles.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Kenneth M; Halldorsdottir, Solveig S; Stinchcombe, John R; Weinig, Cynthia; Schmitt, Johanna; Purugganan, Michael D

    2004-07-01

    The selfing plant Arabidopsis thaliana has been proposed to be well suited for linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping as a means of identifying genes underlying natural trait variation. Here we apply LD mapping to examine haplotype variation in the genomic region of the photoperiod receptor CRYPTOCHROME2 and associated flowering time variation. CRY2 DNA sequences reveal strong LD and the existence of two highly differentiated haplogroups (A and B) across the gene; in addition, a haplotype possessing a radical glutamine-to-serine replacement (AS) occurs within the more common haplogroup. Growth chamber and field experiments using an unstratified population of 95 ecotypes indicate that under short-day photoperiod, the AS and B haplogroups are both highly significantly associated with early flowering. Data from six genes flanking CRY2 indicate that these haplogroups are limited to an approximately 65-kb genomic region around CRY2. Whereas the B haplogroup cannot be delimited to <16 kb around CRY2, the AS haplogroup is characterized almost exclusively by the nucleotide polymorphisms directly associated with the serine replacement in CRY2; this finding strongly suggests that the serine substitution is directly responsible for the AS early flowering phenotype. This study demonstrates the utility of LD mapping for elucidating the genetic basis of natural, ecologically relevant variation in Arabidopsis.

  3. Coronatine Facilitates Pseudomonas syringae Infection of Arabidopsis Leaves at Night

    PubMed Central

    Panchal, Shweta; Roy, Debanjana; Chitrakar, Reejana; Price, Lenore; Breitbach, Zachary S.; Armstrong, Daniel W.; Melotto, Maeli

    2016-01-01

    In many land plants, the stomatal pore opens during the day and closes during the night. Thus, periods of darkness could be effective in decreasing pathogen penetration into leaves through stomata, the primary sites for infection by many pathogens. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 produces coronatine (COR) and opens stomata, raising an intriguing question as to whether this is a virulence strategy to facilitate bacterial infection at night. In fact, we found that (a) biological concentration of COR is effective in opening dark-closed stomata of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves, (b) the COR defective mutant Pst DC3118 is less effective in infecting Arabidopsis in the dark than under light and this difference in infection is reduced with the wild type bacterium Pst DC3000, and (c) cma, a COR biosynthesis gene, is induced only when the bacterium is in contact with the leaf surface independent of the light conditions. These findings suggest that Pst DC3000 activates virulence factors at the pre-invasive phase of its life cycle to infect plants even when environmental conditions (such as darkness) favor stomatal immunity. This functional attribute of COR may provide epidemiological advantages for COR-producing bacteria on the leaf surface. PMID:27446113

  4. Variability and Constancy in Cellular Growth of Arabidopsis Sepals.

    PubMed

    Tauriello, Gerardo; Meyer, Heather M; Smith, Richard S; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Roeder, Adrienne H K

    2015-12-01

    Growth of tissues is highly reproducible; yet, growth of individual cells in a tissue is highly variable, and neighboring cells can grow at different rates. We analyzed the growth of epidermal cell lineages in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) sepal to determine how the growth curves of individual cell lineages relate to one another in a developing tissue. To identify underlying growth trends, we developed a continuous displacement field to predict spatially averaged growth rates. We showed that this displacement field accurately describes the growth of sepal cell lineages and reveals underlying trends within the variability of in vivo cellular growth. We found that the tissue, individual cell lineages, and cell walls all exhibit growth rates that are initially low, accelerate to a maximum, and decrease again. Accordingly, these growth curves can be represented by sigmoid functions. We examined the relationships among the cell lineage growth curves and surprisingly found that all lineages reach the same maximum growth rate relative to their size. However, the cell lineages are not synchronized; each cell lineage reaches this same maximum relative growth rate but at different times. The heterogeneity in observed growth results from shifting the same underlying sigmoid curve in time and scaling by size. Thus, despite the variability in growth observed in our study and others, individual cell lineages in the developing sepal follow similarly shaped growth curves.

  5. Caesium-affected gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sahr, Tobias; Voigt, Gabriele; Paretzke, Herwig G; Schramel, Peter; Ernst, Dieter

    2005-03-01

    * Excessive caesium can be toxic to plants. Here we investigated Cs uptake and caesium-induced gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana. * Accumulation was measured in plants grown for 5 wk on agar supplemented with nontoxic and up to toxic levels of Cs. Caesium-induced gene expression was studied by suppression-subtractive hybridization (SSH) and RT-PCR. * Caesium accumulated in leaf rosettes dependent upon the external concentration in the growth media, whereas the potassium concentration decreased in rosettes. At a concentration of 850 microM, Cs plants showed reduced development, and withered with an increase in concentration to 1 mM Cs. SSH resulted in the isolation of 73 clones that were differentially expressed at a Cs concentration of 150 microM. Most of the genes identified belong to groups of genes encoding proteins in stress defence, detoxification, transport, homeostasis and general metabolism, and proteins controlling transcription and translation. * The present study identified a number of marker genes for Cs in Arabidopsis grown under nontoxic Cs concentrations, indicating that Cs acts as an abiotic stress factor.

  6. MYB46 modulates disease susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Vicente; Agorio, Astrid; Coego, Alberto; García-Andrade, Javier; Hernández, M José; Balaguer, Begoña; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B F; Zarra, Ignacio; Vera, Pablo

    2011-04-01

    In this study, we show that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transcription factor MYB46, previously described to regulate secondary cell wall biosynthesis in the vascular tissue of the stem, is pivotal for mediating disease susceptibility to the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. We identified MYB46 by its ability to bind to a new cis-element located in the 5' promoter region of the pathogen-induced Ep5C gene, which encodes a type III cell wall-bound peroxidase. We present genetic and molecular evidence indicating that MYB46 modulates the magnitude of Ep5C gene induction following pathogenic insults. Moreover, we demonstrate that different myb46 knockdown mutant plants exhibit increased disease resistance to B. cinerea, a phenotype that is accompanied by selective transcriptional reprogramming of a set of genes encoding cell wall proteins and enzymes, of which extracellular type III peroxidases are conspicuous. In essence, our results substantiate that defense-related signaling pathways and cell wall integrity are interconnected and that MYB46 likely functions as a disease susceptibility modulator to B. cinerea through the integration of cell wall remodeling and downstream activation of secondary lines of defense.

  7. A role for the TOC complex in Arabidopsis root gravitropism.

    PubMed

    Stanga, John P; Boonsirichai, Kanokporn; Sedbrook, John C; Otegui, Marisa S; Masson, Patrick H

    2009-04-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots perceive gravity and reorient their growth accordingly. Starch-dense amyloplasts within the columella cells of the root cap are important for gravitropism, and starchless mutants such as pgm1 display an attenuated response to gravistimulation. The altered response to gravity1 (arg1) mutant is known to be involved with the early phases of gravity signal transduction. arg1 responds slowly to gravistimulation and is in a genetically distinct pathway from pgm1, as pgm1 mutants enhance the gravitropic defect of arg1. arg1 seeds were mutagenized with ethylmethane sulfonate to identify new mutants that enhance the gravitropic defect of arg1. Two modifier of arg1 mutants (mar1 and mar2) grow in random directions only when arg1 is present, do not affect phototropism, and respond like the wild type to application of phytohormones. Both have mutations affecting different components of the Translocon of Outer Membrane of Chloroplasts (TOC) complex. mar1 possesses a mutation in the TOC75-III gene; mar2 possesses a mutation in the TOC132 gene. Overexpression of TOC132 rescues the random growth phenotype of mar2 arg1 roots. Root cap amyloplasts in mar2 arg1 appear ultrastructurally normal. They saltate like the wild type and sediment at wild-type rates upon gravistimulation. These data point to a role for the plastidic TOC complex in gravity signal transduction within the statocytes.

  8. Monoterpene-induced molecular responses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Godard, Kimberley-Ann; White, Richard; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2008-06-01

    Terpenoid volatiles mediate various forms of chemical communications of plants with other organisms. In this paper we demonstrate that exposure of intact Arabidopsis thaliana plants to monoterpene volatiles results in substantial changes of the plant transcriptome and induction of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) accumulation. We used a heterologous pinII::GUS reporter system to test monoterpenes for their potential to induce a response in A. thaliana. Plants showed increased pinII-promoter activity upon exposure to different monoterpene volatiles, similar to the response induced by MeJA, mechanical wounding, or insect feeding. Microarray gene expression profiling indicated induced changes in the abundance of several hundred transcripts in wild-type plants upon either exposure to myrcene volatiles or exposure to a blend of ocimene volatiles consisting of (E)-beta-ocimene, (Z)-beta-ocimene, and allo-ocimene. Many of the monoterpene-induced transcripts are annotated as either transcription factors or as stress or defense genes including several steps in the octadecanoid pathway. Metabolite analysis showed that exposure of Arabidopsis for 2h to myrcene or ocimene induced increased tissue levels of MeJA. Octadecanoid biosynthesis (aoc) and signaling (coi1) mutants showed some reduced ocimene-induction of gene expression.

  9. Reference genes for normalizing transcription in diploid and tetraploid Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibin; Wang, Jingjing; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei; Guan, Zhiyong; Liao, Yuan; Chen, Fadi

    2014-10-27

    Published transcription data from a set of 19 diploid Arabidopsis thaliana and 5 tetraploid (3 allo- and 2 auto- tetraploid) Arabidopsis accessions were re-analysed to identify reliable reference genes for normalization purposes. Five conventional and 16 novel reference genes previously derived from microarray data covering a wide range of abundance in absolute expression levels in diploid A. thaliana Col-0 were employed. Transcript abundance was well conserved for all 21 potential reference genes in the diploid A. thaliana accessions, with geNorm and NormFinder analysis indicating that AT5G46630, AT1G13320, AT4G26410, AT5G60390 and AT5G08290 were the most stable. However, conservation was less good among the tetraploid accessions, with the transcription of seven of the 21 genes being undetectable in all allotetraploids. The most stable gene was AT5G46630, while AT1G13440 was the unstable one. Hence, the choice of reference gene(s) for A. thaliana is quite wide, but with respect to the analysis of transcriptomic data derived from the tetraploids, it is probably necessary to select more than one reference gene.

  10. The Arabidopsis NPF3 protein is a GA transporter

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Iris; Zhang, Yi; Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Pisanty, Odelia; Barbosa, Inês C. R.; Zourelidou, Melina; Regnault, Thomas; Crocoll, Christoph; Erik Olsen, Carl; Weinstain, Roy; Schwechheimer, Claus; Halkier, Barbara Ann; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Estelle, Mark; Shani, Eilon

    2016-01-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) are plant hormones that promote a wide range of developmental processes. While GA signalling is well understood, little is known about how GA is transported or how GA distribution is regulated. Here we utilize fluorescently labelled GAs (GA-Fl) to screen for Arabidopsis mutants deficient in GA transport. We show that the NPF3 transporter efficiently transports GA across cell membranes in vitro and GA-Fl in vivo. NPF3 is expressed in root endodermis and repressed by GA. NPF3 is targeted to the plasma membrane and subject to rapid BFA-dependent recycling. We show that abscisic acid (ABA), an antagonist of GA, is also transported by NPF3 in vitro. ABA promotes NPF3 expression and GA-Fl uptake in plants. On the basis of these results, we propose that GA distribution and activity in Arabidopsis is partly regulated by NPF3 acting as an influx carrier and that GA–ABA interaction may occur at the level of transport. PMID:27139299

  11. Novel Disease Susceptibility Factors for Fungal Necrotrophic Pathogens in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    García-Andrade, Javier; Angulo, Carlos; Neumetzler, Lutz; Persson, Staffan; Vera, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Host cells use an intricate signaling system to respond to invasions by pathogenic microorganisms. Although several signaling components of disease resistance against necrotrophic fungal pathogens have been identified, our understanding for how molecular components and host processes contribute to plant disease susceptibility is rather sparse. Here, we identified four transcription factors (TFs) from Arabidopsis that limit pathogen spread. Arabidopsis mutants defective in any of these TFs displayed increased disease susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea and Plectosphaerella cucumerina, and a general activation of non-immune host processes that contribute to plant disease susceptibility. Transcriptome analyses revealed that the mutants share a common transcriptional signature of 77 up-regulated genes. We characterized several of the up-regulated genes that encode peptides with a secretion signal, which we named PROVIR (for provirulence) factors. Forward and reverse genetic analyses revealed that many of the PROVIRs are important for disease susceptibility of the host to fungal necrotrophs. The TFs and PROVIRs identified in our work thus represent novel genetic determinants for plant disease susceptibility to necrotrophic fungal pathogens. PMID:25830627

  12. [Expression of Arabidopsis thaliana thioesterase gene in Pichia pastoris].

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhaocheng; Wang, Tengfei; Li, Zhongkui; Hao, Zikai; Dai, Kun; Wang, Ruiming

    2015-01-01

    Thioesterase catalyzes the hydrolysis of acyl-ACP and saturated fatty acyl chain. It plays a key role in the accumulation of medium chain fatty acids in vivo. In this study, to construct an engineering strain to produce MCFAs, the Arabidopsis acyl-ACP thioesterase gene AtFatA was amplified by PCR from cDNA of arabidopsis and double digested by EcoR I/Xba I, then linked to the plasmid digested with same enzymes to get the recombinant plasmid pPICZaA-AtFatA. We transformed the gene into Pichia pastoris GS115 by electroporation and screened positive colonies by YPD medium with Zeocin. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) results showed that the recombinant enzyme had a molecular of 45 kDa band which was consistent with the predicted molecular mass and we constructed the expression system of gene AtFatA in fungus for the first time. Under shake-flask conditions, Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer-computer results indicated that recombinant strain produced 51% more extracellular free MCFAs than the wild and its yield reached 28.7% of all extracellular fatty acids. This figure is 10% higher than the control group. The result provides a new way to produce MCFAs.

  13. Pathogen stress increases somatic recombination frequency in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lucht, Jan M; Mauch-Mani, Brigitte; Steiner, Henry-York; Metraux, Jean-Pierre; Ryals, John; Hohn, Barbara

    2002-03-01

    Evolution is based on genetic variability and subsequent phenotypic selection. Mechanisms that modulate the rate of mutation according to environmental cues, and thus control the balance between genetic stability and flexibility, might provide a distinct evolutionary advantage. Stress-induced mutations stimulated by unfavorable environments, and possible mechanisms for their induction, have been described for several organisms, but research in this area has mainly focused on microorganisms. We have analyzed the influence of adverse environmental conditions on the genetic stability of the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we show that a biotic stress factor-attack by the oomycete pathogen Peronospora parasitica-can stimulate somatic recombination in Arabidopsis. The same effect was observed when plant pathogen-defense mechanisms were activated by the chemicals 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (INA) or benzothiadiazole (BTH), or by a mutation (cim3). Together with previous studies of recombination induced by abiotic factors, these findings suggest that increased somatic recombination is a general stress response in plants. The increased genetic flexibility might facilitate evolutionary adaptation of plant populations to stressful environments.

  14. Brassinosteroids Are Master Regulators of Gibberellin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Unterholzner, Simon J.; Rozhon, Wilfried; Papacek, Michael; Ciomas, Jennifer; Lange, Theo; Kugler, Karl G.; Mayer, Klaus F.; Sieberer, Tobias; Poppenberger, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Plant growth and development are highly regulated processes that are coordinated by hormones including the brassinosteroids (BRs), a group of steroids with structural similarity to steroid hormones of mammals. Although it is well understood how BRs are produced and how their signals are transduced, BR targets, which directly confer the hormone’s growth-promoting effects, have remained largely elusive. Here, we show that BRs regulate the biosynthesis of gibberellins (GAs), another class of growth-promoting hormones, in Arabidopsis thaliana. We reveal that Arabidopsis mutants deficient in BR signaling are severely impaired in the production of bioactive GA, which is correlated with defective GA biosynthetic gene expression. Expression of the key GA biosynthesis gene GA20ox1 in the BR signaling mutant bri1-301 rescues many of its developmental defects. We provide evidence that supports a model in which the BR-regulated transcription factor BES1 binds to a regulatory element in promoters of GA biosynthesis genes in a BR-induced manner to control their expression. In summary, our study underscores a role of BRs as master regulators of GA biosynthesis and shows that this function is of major relevance for the growth and development of vascular plants. PMID:26243314

  15. An illustrated gardener's guide to transgenic Arabidopsis field experiments.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Martin; Jänkänpää, Hanna Johansson; Moen, Jon; Jansson, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Field studies with transgenic Arabidopsis lines have been performed over 8 yr, to better understand the influence that certain genes have on plant performance. Many (if not most) plant phenotypes cannot be observed under the near constant, low-stress conditions in growth chambers, making field experiments necessary. However, there are challenges in performing such experiments: permission must be obtained and regulations obeyed, the profound influence of uncontrollable biotic and abiotic factors has to be considered, and experimental design has to be strictly controlled. The aim here is to provide inspiration and guidelines for researchers who are not used to setting up such experiments, allowing others to learn from our mistakes. This is believed to be the first example of a 'manual' for field experiments with transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Many of the challenges encountered are common for all field experiments, and many researchers from ecological backgrounds are skilled in such methods. There is huge potential in combining the detailed mechanistic understanding of molecular biologists with ecologists' expertise in examining plant performance under field conditions, and it is suggested that more interdisciplinary collaborations will open up new scientific avenues to aid analyses of the roles of genetic and physiological variation in natural systems.

  16. Protein Degradation Rate in Arabidopsis thaliana Leaf Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Nelson, Clark J; Trösch, Josua; Castleden, Ian; Huang, Shaobai; Millar, A Harvey

    2017-02-01

    We applied (15)N labeling approaches to leaves of the Arabidopsis thaliana rosette to characterize their protein degradation rate and understand its determinants. The progressive labeling of new peptides with (15)N and measuring the decrease in the abundance of >60,000 existing peptides over time allowed us to define the degradation rate of 1228 proteins in vivo. We show that Arabidopsis protein half-lives vary from several hours to several months based on the exponential constant of the decay rate for each protein. This rate was calculated from the relative isotope abundance of each peptide and the fold change in protein abundance during growth. Protein complex membership and specific protein domains were found to be strong predictors of degradation rate, while N-end amino acid, hydrophobicity, or aggregation propensity of proteins were not. We discovered rapidly degrading subunits in a variety of protein complexes in plastids and identified the set of plant proteins whose degradation rate changed in different leaves of the rosette and correlated with leaf growth rate. From this information, we have calculated the protein turnover energy costs in different leaves and their key determinants within the proteome.

  17. Shade avoidance and the regulation of leaf inclination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Jack L; Weinig, Cynthia; Hangarter, Roger P

    2006-06-01

    As a rosette plant, Arabidopsis thaliana forms leaves near to the ground, which causes the plant to be vulnerable to shading by neighbours. One mechanism to avoid such shading is the regulation of leaf inclination, such that leaves can be raised to more vertical orientations to prevent neighbouring leaves from overtopping them. Throughout Arabidopsis rosette development, rosette leaves move to more vertical orientations when shaded by neighbouring leaves, exposed to low light levels or placed in the dark. After dark-induced reorientation of leaves, returning them to white light causes the leaves to reorient to more horizontal inclinations. These light-dependent leaf movements are more robust than, and distinct from, the diurnal movements of rosette leaves. However, the movements are gated by the circadian clock. The light-dependent leaf orientation response is mediated primarily through phytochromes A, B and E, with the orientation varying with the ratio of red light to far-red light, consistent with other shade-avoidance responses. However, even plants lacking these phytochromes were able to alter leaf inclination in response to white light, suggesting a role for other photoreceptors. In particular, we found significant changes in leaf inclination for plants exposed to green light. This green light response may be caused, in part, by light-dependent regulation of abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis.

  18. The Arabidopsis NPF3 protein is a GA transporter.

    PubMed

    Tal, Iris; Zhang, Yi; Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Pisanty, Odelia; Barbosa, Inês C R; Zourelidou, Melina; Regnault, Thomas; Crocoll, Christoph; Olsen, Carl Erik; Weinstain, Roy; Schwechheimer, Claus; Halkier, Barbara Ann; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; Estelle, Mark; Shani, Eilon

    2016-05-03

    Gibberellins (GAs) are plant hormones that promote a wide range of developmental processes. While GA signalling is well understood, little is known about how GA is transported or how GA distribution is regulated. Here we utilize fluorescently labelled GAs (GA-Fl) to screen for Arabidopsis mutants deficient in GA transport. We show that the NPF3 transporter efficiently transports GA across cell membranes in vitro and GA-Fl in vivo. NPF3 is expressed in root endodermis and repressed by GA. NPF3 is targeted to the plasma membrane and subject to rapid BFA-dependent recycling. We show that abscisic acid (ABA), an antagonist of GA, is also transported by NPF3 in vitro. ABA promotes NPF3 expression and GA-Fl uptake in plants. On the basis of these results, we propose that GA distribution and activity in Arabidopsis is partly regulated by NPF3 acting as an influx carrier and that GA-ABA interaction may occur at the level of transport.

  19. Functional divergence in tandemly duplicated Arabidopsis thaliana trypsin inhibitor genes.

    PubMed Central

    Clauss, M J; Mitchell-Olds, T

    2004-01-01

    In multigene families, variation among loci and alleles can contribute to trait evolution. We explored patterns of functional and genetic variation in six duplicated Arabidopsis thaliana trypsin inhibitor (ATTI) loci. We demonstrate significant variation in constitutive and herbivore-induced transcription among ATTI loci that show, on average, 65% sequence divergence. Significant variation in ATTI expression was also found between two molecularly defined haplotype classes. Population genetic analyses for 17 accessions of A. thaliana showed that six ATTI loci arranged in tandem within 10 kb varied 10-fold in nucleotide diversity, from 0.0009 to 0.0110, and identified a minimum of six recombination events throughout the tandem array. We observed a significant peak in nucleotide and indel polymorphism spanning ATTI loci in the interior of the array, due primarily to divergence between the two haplotype classes. Significant deviation from the neutral equilibrium model for individual genes was interpreted within the context of intergene linkage disequilibrium and correlated patterns of functional differentiation. In contrast to the outcrosser Arabidopsis lyrata for which recombination is observed even within ATTI loci, our data suggest that response to selection was slowed in the inbreeding, annual A. thaliana because of interference among functionally divergent ATTI loci. PMID:15082560

  20. A role for seed storage proteins in Arabidopsis seed longevity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thu-Phuong; Cueff, Gwendal; Hegedus, Dwayne D; Rajjou, Loïc; Bentsink, Leónie

    2015-10-01

    Proteomics approaches have been a useful tool for determining the biological roles and functions of individual proteins and identifying the molecular mechanisms that govern seed germination, vigour and viability in response to ageing. In this work the dry seed proteome of four Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes, that carry introgression fragments at the position of seed longevity quantitative trait loci and as a result display different levels of seed longevity, was investigated. Seeds at two physiological states, after-ripened seeds that had the full germination ability and aged (stored) seeds of which the germination ability was severely reduced, were compared. Aged dry seed proteomes were markedly different from the after-ripened and reflected the seed longevity level of the four genotypes, despite the fact that dry seeds are metabolically quiescent. Results confirmed the role of antioxidant systems, notably vitamin E, and indicated that protection and maintenance of the translation machinery and energy pathways are essential for seed longevity. Moreover, a new role for seed storage proteins (SSPs) was identified in dry seeds during ageing. Cruciferins (CRUs) are the most abundant SSPs in Arabidopsis and seeds of a triple mutant for three CRU isoforms (crua crub cruc) were more sensitive to artificial ageing and their seed proteins were highly oxidized compared with wild-type seeds. These results confirm that oxidation is involved in seed deterioration and that SSPs buffer the seed from oxidative stress, thus protecting important proteins required for seed germination and seedling formation.

  1. Aluminum Induces Oxidative Stress Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana1

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Keith D.; Schott, Eric J.; Sharma, Yogesh K.; Davis, Keith R.; Gardner, Richard C.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in gene expression induced by toxic levels of Al were characterized to investigate the nature of Al stress. A cDNA library was constructed from Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings treated with Al for 2 h. We identified five cDNA clones that showed a transient induction of their mRNA levels, four cDNA clones that showed a longer induction period, and two down-regulated genes. Expression of the four long-term-induced genes remained at elevated levels for at least 48 h. The genes encoded peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, blue copper-binding protein, and a protein homologous to the reticuline:oxygen oxidoreductase enzyme. Three of these genes are known to be induced by oxidative stresses and the fourth is induced by pathogen treatment. Another oxidative stress gene, superoxide dismutase, and a gene for Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor were also induced by Al in A. thaliana. These results suggested that Al treatment of Arabidopsis induces oxidative stress. In confirmation of this hypothesis, three of four genes induced by Al stress in A. thaliana were also shown to be induced by ozone. Our results demonstrate that oxidative stress is an important component of the plant's reaction to toxic levels of Al. PMID:9449849

  2. A novel system for xylem cell differentiation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yuki; Fujita, Takashi; Sugiyama, Munetaka; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2015-04-01

    During vascular development, procambial and cambial cells give rise to xylem and phloem cells. Because the vascular tissue is deeply embedded, it has been difficult to analyze the processes of vascular development in detail. Here, we establish a novel in vitro experimental system in which vascular development is induced in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf-disk cultures using bikinin, an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase 3 proteins. Transcriptome analysis reveals that mesophyll cells in leaf disks synchronously turn into procambial cells and then differentiate into tracheary elements. Leaf-disk cultures from plants expressing the procambial cell markers TDR(pro):GUS and TDR(pro):YFP can be used for spatiotemporal visualization of procambial cell formation. Further analysis with the tdr mutant and TDIF (tracheary element differentiation inhibitory factor) indicates that the key signaling TDIF-TDR-GSK3s regulates xylem differentiation in leaf-disk cultures. This new culture system can be combined with analysis using the rich material resources for Arabidopsis including cell-marker lines and mutants, thus offering a powerful tool for analyzing xylem cell differentiation.

  3. A role for seed storage proteins in Arabidopsis seed longevity

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thu-Phuong; Cueff, Gwendal; Hegedus, Dwayne D; Rajjou, Loïc; Bentsink, Leónie

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics approaches have been a useful tool for determining the biological roles and functions of individual proteins and identifying the molecular mechanisms that govern seed germination, vigour and viability in response to ageing. In this work the dry seed proteome of four Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes, that carry introgression fragments at the position of seed longevity quantitative trait loci and as a result display different levels of seed longevity, was investigated. Seeds at two physiological states, after-ripened seeds that had the full germination ability and aged (stored) seeds of which the germination ability was severely reduced, were compared. Aged dry seed proteomes were markedly different from the after-ripened and reflected the seed longevity level of the four genotypes, despite the fact that dry seeds are metabolically quiescent. Results confirmed the role of antioxidant systems, notably vitamin E, and indicated that protection and maintenance of the translation machinery and energy pathways are essential for seed longevity. Moreover, a new role for seed storage proteins (SSPs) was identified in dry seeds during ageing. Cruciferins (CRUs) are the most abundant SSPs in Arabidopsis and seeds of a triple mutant for three CRU isoforms (crua crub cruc) were more sensitive to artificial ageing and their seed proteins were highly oxidized compared with wild-type seeds. These results confirm that oxidation is involved in seed deterioration and that SSPs buffer the seed from oxidative stress, thus protecting important proteins required for seed germination and seedling formation. PMID:26184996

  4. Regulation by Polycomb and Trithorax Group Proteins in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Venegas, Raúl

    2010-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) and trithorax group (trxG) proteins are key regulators of homeotic genes and have crucial roles in cell proliferation, growth and development. PcG and trxG proteins form higher order protein complexes that contain SET domain proteins, with a histone methyltransferase (HMTase) activity, responsible for the different types of lysine methylation at the N-terminal tails of the core histone proteins. In recent years, genetic studies along with biochemical and cell biological analyses in Arabidopsis have enabled researchers to begin to understand how PcG and trxG proteins are recruited to chromatin and how they regulate their target genes and to elucidate their functions. This review focuses on the advances in our understanding of the biological roles of PcG and trxG proteins, their molecular mechanisms of action and further examines the role of histone marks in PcG and trxG regulation in Arabidopsis. PMID:22303254

  5. Piriformospora indica Stimulates Root Metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Strehmel, Nadine; Mönchgesang, Susann; Herklotz, Siska; Krüger, Sylvia; Ziegler, Jörg; Scheel, Dierk

    2016-01-01

    Piriformospora indica is a root-colonizing fungus, which interacts with a variety of plants including Arabidopsis thaliana. This interaction has been considered as mutualistic leading to growth promotion of the host. So far, only indolic glucosinolates and phytohormones have been identified as key players. In a comprehensive non-targeted metabolite profiling study, we analyzed Arabidopsis thaliana’s roots, root exudates, and leaves of inoculated and non-inoculated plants by ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/(ESI)-QTOFMS) and gas chromatography/electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC/EI-QMS), and identified further biomarkers. Among them, the concentration of nucleosides, dipeptides, oligolignols, and glucosinolate degradation products was affected in the exudates. In the root profiles, nearly all metabolite levels increased upon co-cultivation, like carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, glucosinolates, oligolignols, and flavonoids. In the leaf profiles, we detected by far less significant changes. We only observed an increased concentration of organic acids, carbohydrates, ascorbate, glucosinolates and hydroxycinnamic acids, and a decreased concentration of nitrogen-rich amino acids in inoculated plants. These findings contribute to the understanding of symbiotic interactions between plant roots and fungi of the order of Sebacinales and are a valid source for follow-up mechanistic studies, because these symbioses are particular and clearly different from interactions of roots with mycorrhizal fungi or dark septate endophytes PMID:27399695

  6. Bicarbonate Induced Redox Proteome Changes in Arabidopsis Suspension Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zepeng; Balmant, Kelly; Geng, Sisi; Zhu, Ning; Zhang, Tong; Dufresne, Craig; Dai, Shaojun; Chen, Sixue

    2017-01-01

    Climate change as a result of increasing atmospheric CO2 affects plant growth and productivity. CO2 is not only a carbon donor for photosynthesis but also an environmental signal that can perturb cellular redox homeostasis and lead to modifications of redox-sensitive proteins. Although redox regulation of protein functions has emerged as an important mechanism in several biological processes, protein redox modifications and how they function in plant CO2 response remain unclear. Here a new iodoTMTRAQ proteomics technology was employed to analyze changes in protein redox modifications in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells in response to bicarbonate (mimic of elevated CO2) in a time-course study. A total of 47 potential redox-regulated proteins were identified with functions in carbohydrate and energy metabolism, transport, ROS scavenging, cell structure modulation and protein turnover. This inventory of previously unknown redox responsive proteins in Arabidopsis bicarbonate responses lays a foundation for future research toward understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying plant CO2 responses. PMID:28184230

  7. Nuclear phytochrome A signaling promotes phototropism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kami, Chitose; Hersch, Micha; Trevisan, Martine; Genoud, Thierry; Hiltbrunner, Andreas; Bergmann, Sven; Fankhauser, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Phototropin photoreceptors (phot1 and phot2 in Arabidopsis thaliana) enable responses to directional light cues (e.g., positive phototropism in the hypocotyl). In Arabidopsis, phot1 is essential for phototropism in response to low light, a response that is also modulated by phytochrome A (phyA), representing a classical example of photoreceptor coaction. The molecular mechanisms underlying promotion of phototropism by phyA remain unclear. Most phyA responses require nuclear accumulation of the photoreceptor, but interestingly, it has been proposed that cytosolic phyA promotes phototropism. By comparing the kinetics of phototropism in seedlings with different subcellular localizations of phyA, we show that nuclear phyA accelerates the phototropic response, whereas in the fhy1 fhl mutant, in which phyA remains in the cytosol, phototropic bending is slower than in the wild type. Consistent with this data, we find that transcription factors needed for full phyA responses are needed for normal phototropism. Moreover, we show that phyA is the primary photoreceptor promoting the expression of phototropism regulators in low light (e.g., PHYTOCHROME KINASE SUBSTRATE1 [PKS1] and ROOT PHOTO TROPISM2 [RPT2]). Although phyA remains cytosolic in fhy1 fhl, induction of PKS1 and RPT2 expression still occurs in fhy1 fhl, indicating that a low level of nuclear phyA signaling is still present in fhy1 fhl.

  8. Analysis of Phosphate Acquisition Efficiency in Different Arabidopsis Accessions

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Ram A.; Bruene, Asja; Altmann, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    The morphological and physiological characteristics of Arabidopsis accessions differing in their phosphate acquisition efficiencies (PAEs) when grown on a sparingly soluble phosphate source (hydroxylapatite) were analyzed. A set of 36 accessions was subjected to an initial PAE evaluation following cultivation on synthetic, agarose-solidified media containing potassium phosphate (soluble) or hydroxylapatite (sparingly soluble). From the five most divergent accessions identified in this way, C24, Co, and Cal exhibited high PAEs, whereas Col-0 and Te exhibited low PAEs. These five accessions were analyzed in detail. Significant differences were found in root morphology, phosphate uptake kinetics, organic acid release, rhizosphere acidification, and the ability of roots to penetrate substrates. Long root hairs at high densities, high uptake per unit root length, and high substrate penetration ability in the efficient accessions C24 and Co mediate their high PAEs. The third accession with high PAE, Cal, exhibits a high shoot-to-root ratio, long roots with long root hairs, and rhizosphere acidification. These results are consistent with previous observations and highlight the suitability of using Arabidopsis accessions to identify and isolate genes determining the PAE in plants. PMID:11115894

  9. Diclofenac in Arabidopsis cells: Rapid formation of conjugates.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiuguo; Ye, Qingfu; Zhang, Jianbo; Richards, Jaben; Borchardt, Dan; Gan, Jay

    2017-03-01

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) are continuously introduced into the soil-plant system, through practices such as agronomic use of reclaimed water and biosolids containing these trace contaminants. Plants may accumulate PPCPs from soil, serving as a conduit for human exposure. Metabolism likely controls the final accumulation of PPCPs in plants, but is in general poorly understood for emerging contaminants. In this study, we used diclofenac as a model compound, and employed (14)C tracing, and time-of-flight (TOF) and triple quadruple (QqQ) mass spectrometers to unravel its metabolism pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana cells. We further validated the primary metabolites in Arabidopsis seedlings. Diclofenac was quickly taken up into A. thaliana cells. Phase I metabolism involved hydroxylation and successive oxidation and cyclization reactions. However, Phase I metabolites did not accumulate appreciably; they were instead rapidly conjugated with sulfate, glucose, and glutamic acid through Phase II metabolism. In particular, diclofenac parent was directly conjugated with glutamic acid, with acyl-glutamatyl-diclofenac accounting for >70% of the extractable metabolites after 120-h incubation. In addition, at the end of incubation, >40% of the spiked diclofenac was in the non-extractable form, suggesting extensive sequestration into cell matter. The rapid formation of non-extractable residue and dominance of diclofenac-glutamate conjugate uncover previously unknown metabolism pathways for diclofenac. In particular, the rapid conjugation of parent highlights the need to consider conjugates of emerging contaminants in higher plants, and their biological activity and human health implications.

  10. The fate of retrotransposed processed genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Abdelkarim, Basma T M; Maranda, Vincent; Drouin, Guy

    2017-04-20

    Processed genes are functional genes that have arisen as a result of the retrotransposition of mRNA molecules. We found 6 genes that generated processed genes in the common ancestor of five Brassicaceae species (Arabidopsis thaliana, Arabidopsis lyrata, Capsella rubella, Brassica rapa and Thellungiella parvula). These processed genes have therefore been kept for at least 30millionyears. Analyses of the Ka/Ks ratio of these genes, and of those having given rise to them, show that they evolve relatively slowly and suggest that the processed genes maintained the same function as that of their parental gene. There is a significant negative correlation between the number of ESTs and transcripts produced and the Ka/Ks ratios of the parental genes but not of the processed genes. This suggests that selection has not yet adapted the selective pressure the processed genes experience to their expression level. However, the A. thaliana processed genes tend to be expressed in the same tissues as that of their parental genes. Furthermore, most have a CAATT-box, a TATA-box and are located about 1kb from another protein-coding gene. Altogether, our results suggest that the processed genes found in the A. thaliana genome have been kept to produce more of the same product, and in the same tissues, as that encoded by their parental gene.

  11. Characterization of chromosomal architecture in Arabidopsis by chromosome conformation capture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The packaging of long chromatin fibers in the nucleus poses a major challenge, as it must fulfill both physical and functional requirements. Until recently, insights into the chromosomal architecture of plants were mainly provided by cytogenetic studies. Complementary to these analyses, chromosome conformation capture technologies promise to refine and improve our view on chromosomal architecture and to provide a more generalized description of nuclear organization. Results Employing circular chromosome conformation capture, this study describes chromosomal architecture in Arabidopsis nuclei from a genome-wide perspective. Surprisingly, the linear organization of chromosomes is reflected in the genome-wide interactome. In addition, we study the interplay of the interactome and epigenetic marks and report that the heterochromatic knob on the short arm of chromosome 4 maintains a pericentromere-like interaction profile and interactome despite its euchromatic surrounding. Conclusion Despite the extreme condensation that is necessary to pack the chromosomes into the nucleus, the Arabidopsis genome appears to be packed in a predictive manner, according to the following criteria: heterochromatin and euchromatin represent two distinct interactomes; interactions between chromosomes correlate with the linear position on the chromosome arm; and distal chromosome regions have a higher potential to interact with other chromosomes. PMID:24267747

  12. Mechanisms guiding Polycomb activities during gene silencing in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    He, Chongsheng; Huang, Hai; Xu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins act in an evolutionarily conserved epigenetic pathway that regulates chromatin structures in plants and animals, repressing many developmentally important genes by modifying histones. PcG proteins can form at least two multiprotein complexes: Polycomb Repressive Complexes 1 and 2 (PRC1 and PRC2, respectively). The functions of Arabidopsis thaliana PRCs have been characterized in multiple stages of development and have diverse roles in response to environmental stimuli. Recently, the mechanism that precisely regulates Arabidopsis PcG activity was extensively studied. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries in the regulations of PcG at the three different layers: the recruitment of PRCs to specific target loci, the polyubiquitination and degradation of PRC2, and the antagonism of PRC2 activity by the Trithorax group proteins. Current knowledge indicates that the powerful activity of the PcG pathway is strictly controlled for specific silencing of target genes during plant development and in response to environmental stimuli. PMID:24312106

  13. Opposite Stereoselectivities of Dirigent Proteins in Arabidopsis and Schizandra Species*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kye-Won; Moinuddin, Syed G. A.; Atwell, Kathleen M.; Costa, Michael A.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2012-01-01

    How stereoselective monolignol-derived phenoxy radical-radical coupling reactions are differentially biochemically orchestrated in planta, whereby for example they afford (+)- and (−)-pinoresinols, respectively, is both a fascinating mechanistic and evolutionary question. In earlier work, biochemical control of (+)-pinoresinol formation had been established to be engendered by a (+)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein in Forsythia intermedia, whereas the presence of a (−)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein was indirectly deduced based on the enantiospecificity of downstream pinoresinol reductases (AtPrRs) in Arabidopsis thaliana root tissue. In this study of 16 putative dirigent protein homologs in Arabidopsis, AtDIR6, AtDIR10, and AtDIR13 were established to be root-specific using a β-glucuronidase reporter gene strategy. Of these three, in vitro analyses established that only recombinant AtDIR6 was a (−)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein, whose physiological role was further confirmed using overexpression and RNAi strategies in vivo. Interestingly, its closest homolog, AtDIR5, was also established to be a (−)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein based on in vitro biochemical analyses. Both of these were compared in terms of properties with a (+)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein from Schizandra chinensis. In this context, sequence analyses, site-directed mutagenesis, and region swapping resulted in identification of putative substrate binding sites/regions and candidate residues controlling distinct stereoselectivities of coupling modes. PMID:22854967

  14. Plasticity of the Arabidopsis root system under nutrient deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Benjamin D; Giehl, Ricardo F H; Friedel, Swetlana; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2013-09-01

    Plant roots show a particularly high variation in their morphological response to different nutrient deficiencies. Although such changes often determine the nutrient efficiency or stress tolerance of plants, it is surprising that a comprehensive and comparative analysis of root morphological responses to different nutrient deficiencies has not yet been conducted. Since one reason for this is an inherent difficulty in obtaining nutrient-deficient conditions in agar culture, we first identified conditions appropriate for producing nutrient-deficient plants on agar plates. Based on a careful selection of agar specifically for each nutrient being considered, we grew Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants at four levels of deficiency for 12 nutrients and quantified seven root traits. In combination with measurements of biomass and elemental concentrations, we observed that the nutritional status and type of nutrient determined the extent and type of changes in root system architecture (RSA). The independent regulation of individual root traits further pointed to a differential sensitivity of root tissues to nutrient limitations. To capture the variation in RSA under different nutrient supplies, we used principal component analysis and developed a root plasticity chart representing the overall modulations in RSA under a given treatment. This systematic comparison of RSA responses to nutrient deficiencies provides a comprehensive view of the overall changes in root plasticity induced by the deficiency of single nutrients and provides a solid basis for the identification of nutrient-sensitive steps in the root developmental program.

  15. Soluble and filamentous proteins in Arabidopsis sieve elements.

    PubMed

    Batailler, Brigitte; Lemaître, Thomas; Vilaine, Françoise; Sanchez, Christian; Renard, Denis; Cayla, Thibaud; Beneteau, Julie; Dinant, Sylvie

    2012-07-01

    Phloem sieve elements are highly differentiated cells involved in the long-distance transport of photoassimilates. These cells contain both aggregated phloem-proteins (P-proteins) and soluble proteins, which are also translocated by mass flow. We used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to carry out a proteomic survey of the phloem exudate of Arabidopsis thaliana, collected by the ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-facilitated method. We identified 287 proteins, a large proportion of which were enzymes involved in the metabolic precursor generation and amino acid synthesis, suggesting that sieve tubes display high levels of metabolic activity. RNA-binding proteins, defence proteins and lectins were also found. No putative P-proteins were detected in the EDTA-exudate fraction, indicating a lack of long-distance translocation of such proteins in Arabidopsis. In parallel, we investigated the organization of P-proteins, by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and the localization of the phloem lectin PP2, a putative P-protein component, by immunolocalization with antibodies against PP2-A1. Transmission electron microscopy observations of P-proteins revealed bundles of filaments resembling strings of beads. PP2-A1 was found weakly associated with these structures in the sieve elements and bound to plastids. These observations suggest that PP2-A1 is anchored to P-proteins and organelles rather than being a structural component of P-proteins.

  16. Engineering vitamin E content: from Arabidopsis mutant to soy oil.

    PubMed

    Van Eenennaam, Alison L; Lincoln, Kim; Durrett, Timothy P; Valentin, Henry E; Shewmaker, Christine K; Thorne, Greg M; Jiang, Jian; Baszis, Susan R; Levering, Charlene K; Aasen, Eric D; Hao, Ming; Stein, Joshua C; Norris, Susan R; Last, Robert L

    2003-12-01

    We report the identification and biotechnological utility of a plant gene encoding the tocopherol (vitamin E) biosynthetic enzyme 2-methyl-6-phytylbenzoquinol methyltransferase. This gene was identified by map-based cloning of the Arabidopsis mutation vitamin E pathway gene3-1 (vte3-1), which causes increased accumulation of delta-tocopherol and decreased gamma-tocopherol in the seed. Enzyme assays of recombinant protein supported the hypothesis that At-VTE3 encodes a 2-methyl-6-phytylbenzoquinol methyltransferase. Seed-specific expression of At-VTE3 in transgenic soybean reduced seed delta-tocopherol from 20 to 2%. These results confirm that At-VTE3 protein catalyzes the methylation of 2-methyl-6-phytylbenzoquinol in planta and show the utility of this gene in altering soybean tocopherol composition. When At-VTE3 was coexpressed with At-VTE4 (gamma-tocopherol methyltransferase) in soybean, the seed accumulated to >95% alpha-tocopherol, a dramatic change from the normal 10%, resulting in a greater than eightfold increase of alpha-tocopherol and an up to fivefold increase in seed vitamin E activity. These findings demonstrate the utility of a gene identified in Arabidopsis to alter the tocopherol composition of commercial seed oils, a result with both nutritional and food quality implications.

  17. Determination of Arabidopsis floral meristem identity by AGAMOUS.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Y; Ma, H

    1997-03-01

    Determinate growth of floral meristems in Arabidopsis requires the function of the floral regulatory gene AGAMOUS (AG). Expression of AG mRNA in the central region of floral meristems relies on the partially overlapping functions of the LEAFY (LFY) and APETALA1 (AP1) genes, which promote initial floral meristem identity. Here, we provide evidence that AG function is required for the final definition of floral meristem identity and that constitutive AG function can promote, independent of LFY and AP1 functions, the determinate floral state in the center of reproductive meristems. Loss-of-function analysis showed that the indeterminate central region of the ag mutant floral meristem undergoes conversion to an inflorescence meristem when long-day-dependent flowering stimulus is removed. Furthermore, gain-of-function analysis demonstrated that ectopic AG function results in precocious flowering and the formation of terminal flowers at apices of both the primary inflorescence and axillary branches of transgenic Arabidopsis plants in which AG expression is under the control of the 35S promoter from cauliflower mosaic virus. Similar phenotypes were also observed in lfy ap1 double mutants carrying a 35S-AG transgene. Together, these results indicate that AG is a principal developmental switch that controls the transition of meristem activity from indeterminate to determinate.

  18. Arabidopsis thaliana root growth kinetics and lunisolar tidal acceleration.

    PubMed

    Fisahn, Joachim; Yazdanbakhsh, Nima; Klingele, Emile; Barlow, Peter

    2012-07-01

    • All living organisms on Earth are continually exposed to diurnal variations in the gravitational tidal force due to the Sun and Moon. • Elongation of primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings maintained at a constant temperature was monitored for periods of up to 14 d using high temporal- and spatial-resolution video imaging. The time-course of the half-hourly elongation rates exhibited an oscillation which was maintained when the roots were placed in the free-running condition of continuous illumination. • Correlation between the root growth kinetics collected from seedlings initially raised under several light protocols but whose roots were subsequently in the free-running condition and the lunisolar tidal profiles enabled us to identify that the latter is the probable exogenous determinant of the rhythmic variation in root elongation rate. Similar observations and correlations using roots of Arabidopsis starch mutants suggest a central function of starch metabolism in the response to the lunisolar tide. The periodicity of the lunisolar tidal signal and the concomitant adjustments in root growth rate indicate that an exogenous timer exists for the modulation of root growth and development. • We propose that, in addition to the sensitivity to Earthly 1G gravity, which is inherent to all animals and plants, there is another type of responsiveness which is attuned to the natural diurnal variations of the lunisolar tidal force.

  19. Flavonoid accumulation patterns of transparent testa mutants of arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peer, W. A.; Brown, D. E.; Tague, B. W.; Muday, G. K.; Taiz, L.; Murphy, A. S.

    2001-01-01

    Flavonoids have been implicated in the regulation of auxin movements in Arabidopsis. To understand when and where flavonoids may be acting to control auxin movement, the flavonoid accumulation pattern was examined in young seedlings and mature tissues of wild-type Arabidopsis. Using a variety of biochemical and visualization techniques, flavonoid accumulation in mature plants was localized in cauline leaves, pollen, stigmata, and floral primordia, and in the stems of young, actively growing inflorescences. In young Landsberg erecta seedlings, aglycone flavonols accumulated developmentally in three regions, the cotyledonary node, the hypocotyl-root transition zone, and the root tip. Aglycone flavonols accumulated at the hypocotyl-root transition zone in a developmental and tissue-specific manner with kaempferol in the epidermis and quercetin in the cortex. Quercetin localized subcellularly in the nuclear region, plasma membrane, and endomembrane system, whereas kaempferol localized in the nuclear region and plasma membrane. The flavonoid accumulation pattern was also examined in transparent testa mutants blocked at different steps in the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway. The transparent testa mutants were shown to have precursor accumulation patterns similar to those of end product flavonoids in wild-type Landsberg erecta, suggesting that synthesis and end product accumulation occur in the same cells.

  20. Chemically inducible expression of the PHB biosynthetic pathway in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kourtz, Lauralynn; Dillon, Kevin; Daughtry, Sean; Peoples, Oliver P; Snell, Kristi D

    2007-12-01

    Arabidopsis plants were transformed with a multi-gene construct for expression of the polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) biosynthetic pathway containing a gene switch that can be activated by commercially available non-steroidal ecdysone analogs approved for use on some crops as pesticides. T(1) progeny of transgenic Arabidopsis plants were isolated and screened for PHB production in the presence of ecdysone analogs. T(2) progeny derived from selected T(1) lines were subjected to further analysis by comparing PHB production levels prior to treatment with inducing agent and 21 days after initiation of induction. Significant PHB production was delayed in many of the engineered plants until after induction. PHB levels of up to 14.3% PHB per unit dry weight were observed in young leaves harvested from engineered T(2) plants after applications of the commercial ecdysone analog Mimic. PHB in older leaves reached levels of up to 7% PHB per unit dry weight. This study represents a first step towards engineering a chemically inducible gene switch for PHB production in plants using inducing agents that are approved for field use.

  1. Mutants of Arabidopsis with altered regulation of starch degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Caspar, T.; Lin, Tsanpiao; Kakefuda, G.; Benbow, L.; Preiss, J.; Somerville, C. )

    1991-04-01

    Mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. with altered regulation of starch degradation were identified by screening for plants that retained high levels of leaf starch after a period of extended darkness. The mutant phenotype was also expressed in seeds, flowers, and roots, indicating that the same pathway of starch degradation is used in these tissues. In many respects, the physiological consequences of the mutations were equivalent to the effects observed in previously characterized mutants of Arabidopsis that are unable to synthesize starch. One mutant line, which was characterized in detail, had normal levels of activity of the starch degradative enzymes {alpha}-amylase, {beta}-amylase, phosphorylase, D-enzyme, and debranching enzyme. Thus, it was not possible to establish a biochemical basis for the phenotype, which was due to a recessive mutant at a locus designated sex 1 at position 12.2 on chromosome 1. This raises the possibility that hitherto unidentified factors, altered by the mutation, play a key role in regulating or catalyzing starch degradation.

  2. Natural variation in herbivore-induced volatiles in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Snoeren, Tjeerd A. L.; Broekgaarden, Colette; Mumm, Roland; Dicke, Marcel; Bouwmeester, Harro J.

    2010-01-01

    To study whether natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana could be used to dissect the genetic basis of responses to herbivory in terms of induced volatile emissions, nine accessions were characterized upon herbivory by biting-chewing Pieris rapae caterpillars or after treatment with the phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA). Analysis of 73 compounds in the headspace showed quantitative differences in the emission rates of several individual compounds among the accessions. Moreover, variation in the emission of volatile compounds after JA treatment was reflected in the behaviour of the parasitoid Diadegma semiclausum when they were offered the headspace volatiles of several combinations of accessions in two-choice experiments. Accessions also differ in transcript levels of genes that are associated with the emission of plant volatiles. The genes BSMT1 and Cyp72A13 could be connected to the emission of methyl salicylate and (E,E)-4,8,12-trimethyltrideca-1,3,7,11-tetraene (TMTT), respectively. Overall, Arabidopsis showed interesting phenotypic variations with respect to the volatile blend emitted in response to herbivory that can be exploited to identify genes and alleles that underlie this important plant trait. PMID:20488836

  3. Methylation of Gibberellins by Arabidopsis GAMT1 and GAMT2

    SciTech Connect

    Varbanova,M.; Yamaguchi, S.; Yang, Y.; McKelvey, K.; Hanada, A.; Borochov, R.; Yu, F.; Jikumaru, Y.; Ross, J.; et al

    2007-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana GAMT1 and GAMT2 encode enzymes that catalyze formation of the methyl esters of gibberellins (GAs). Ectopic expression of GAMT1 or GAMT2 in Arabidopsis, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), and petunia (Petunia hybrida) resulted in plants with GA deficiency and typical GA deficiency phenotypes, such as dwarfism and reduced fertility. GAMT1 and GAMT2 are both expressed mainly in whole siliques (including seeds), with peak transcript levels from the middle until the end of silique development. Within whole siliques, GAMT2 was previously shown to be expressed mostly in developing seeds, and we show here that GAMT1 expression is also localized mostly to seed, suggesting a role in seed development. Siliques of null single GAMT1 and GAMT2 mutants accumulated high levels of various GAs, with particularly high levels of GA1 in the double mutant. Methylated GAs were not detected in wild-type siliques, suggesting that methylation of GAs by GAMT1 and GAMT2 serves to deactivate GAs and initiate their degradation as the seeds mature. Seeds of homozygous GAMT1 and GAMT2 null mutants showed reduced inhibition of germination, compared with the wild type, when placed on plates containing the GA biosynthesis inhibitor ancymidol, with the double mutant showing the least inhibition. These results suggest that the mature mutant seeds contained higher levels of active GAs than wild-type seeds.

  4. Transposon tagging and the study of root development in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsugeki, R.; Olson, M. L.; Fedoroff, N. V.

    1998-01-01

    The maize Ac-Ds transposable element family has been used as the basis of transposon mutagenesis systems that function in a variety of plants, including Arabidopsis. We have developed modified transposons and methods which simplify the detection, cloning and analysis of insertion mutations. We have identified and are analyzing two plant lines in which genes expressed either in the root cap cells or in the quiescent cells, cortex/endodermal initial cells and columella cells of the root cap have been tagged with a transposon carrying a reporter gene. A gene expressed in root cap cells tagged with an enhancer-trap Ds was isolated and its corresponding EST cDNA was identified. Nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the gene show no significant similarity to other genes in the database. Genetic ablation experiments have been done by fusing a root cap-specific promoter to the diphtheria toxin A-chain gene and introducing the fusion construct into Arabidopsis plants. We find that in addition to eliminating gravitropism, root cap ablation inhibits elongation of roots by lowering root meristematic activities.

  5. Genetic architecture of plastic methyl jasmonate responses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Kliebenstein, Daniel J; Figuth, Antje; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    The ability of a single genotype to generate different phenotypes in disparate environments is termed phenotypic plasticity, which reflects the interaction of genotype and environment on developmental processes. However, there is controversy over the definition of plasticity genes. The gene regulation model states that plasticity loci influence trait changes between environments without altering the means within a given environment. Alternatively, the allelic sensitivity model argues that plasticity evolves due to selection of phenotypic values expressed within particular environments; hence plasticity must be controlled by loci expressed within these environments. To identify genetic loci controlling phenotypic plasticity and address this controversy, we analyzed the plasticity of glucosinolate accumulation under methyl jasmonate (MeJa) treatment in Arabidopsis thaliana. We found genetic variation influencing multiple MeJa signal transduction pathways. Analysis of MeJa responses in the Landsberg erecta x Columbia recombinant inbred lines identified a number of quantitative trait loci (QTL) that regulate plastic MeJa responses. All significant plasticity QTL also impacted the mean trait value in at least one of the two "control" or "MeJa" environments, supporting the allelic sensitivity model. Additionally, we present an analysis of MeJa and salicylic acid cross-talk in glucosinolate regulation and describe the implications for glucosinolate physiology and functional understanding of Arabidopsis MeJa signal transduction. PMID:12196411

  6. Piriformospora indica Stimulates Root Metabolism of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Strehmel, Nadine; Mönchgesang, Susann; Herklotz, Siska; Krüger, Sylvia; Ziegler, Jörg; Scheel, Dierk

    2016-07-08

    Piriformospora indica is a root-colonizing fungus, which interacts with a variety of plants including Arabidopsis thaliana. This interaction has been considered as mutualistic leading to growth promotion of the host. So far, only indolic glucosinolates and phytohormones have been identified as key players. In a comprehensive non-targeted metabolite profiling study, we analyzed Arabidopsis thaliana's roots, root exudates, and leaves of inoculated and non-inoculated plants by ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/(ESI)-QTOFMS) and gas chromatography/electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC/EI-QMS), and identified further biomarkers. Among them, the concentration of nucleosides, dipeptides, oligolignols, and glucosinolate degradation products was affected in the exudates. In the root profiles, nearly all metabolite levels increased upon co-cultivation, like carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, glucosinolates, oligolignols, and flavonoids. In the leaf profiles, we detected by far less significant changes. We only observed an increased concentration of organic acids, carbohydrates, ascorbate, glucosinolates and hydroxycinnamic acids, and a decreased concentration of nitrogen-rich amino acids in inoculated plants. These findings contribute to the understanding of symbiotic interactions between plant roots and fungi of the order of Sebacinales and are a valid source for follow-up mechanistic studies, because these symbioses are particular and clearly different from interactions of roots with mycorrhizal fungi or dark septate endophytes.

  7. Insertions/Deletions-Associated Nucleotide Polymorphism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Changjiang; Du, Jianchang; Wang, Long; Yang, Sihai; Mauricio, Rodney; Tian, Dacheng; Gu, Tingting

    2016-01-01

    Although high levels of within-species variation are commonly observed, a general mechanism for the origin of such variation is still lacking. Insertions and deletions (indels) are a widespread feature of genomes and we hypothesize that there might be an association between indels and patterns of nucleotide polymorphism. Here, we investigate flanking sequences around 18 indels (>100 bp) among a large number of accessions of the plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. We found two distinct haplotypes, i.e., a nucleotide dimorphism, present around each of these indels and dimorphic haplotypes always corresponded to the indel-present/-absent patterns. In addition, the peaks of nucleotide diversity between the two divergent alleles were closely associated with these indels. Thus, there exists a close association between indels and dimorphisms. Further analysis suggests that indel-associated substitutions could be an important component of genetic variation shaping nucleotide polymorphism in Arabidopsis. Finally, we suggest a mechanism by which indels might generate these highly divergent haplotypes. This study provides evidence that nucleotide dimorphisms, which are frequently regarded as evidence of frequency-dependent selection, could be explained simply by structural variation in the genome. PMID:27965694

  8. SHUGOSHINs and PATRONUS protect meiotic centromere cohesion in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zamariola, Linda; De Storme, Nico; Vannerum, Katrijn; Vandepoele, Klaas; Armstrong, Susan J; Franklin, F Christopher H; Geelen, Danny

    2014-03-01

    In meiosis, chromosome cohesion is maintained by the cohesin complex, which is released in a two-step manner. At meiosis I, the meiosis-specific cohesin subunit Rec8 is cleaved by the protease Separase along chromosome arms, allowing homologous chromosome segregation. Next, in meiosis II, cleavage of the remaining centromere cohesin results in separation of the sister chromatids. In eukaryotes, protection of centromeric cohesion in meiosis I is mediated by SHUGOSHINs (SGOs). The Arabidopsis genome contains two SGO homologs. Here we demonstrate that Atsgo1 mutants show a premature loss of cohesion of sister chromatid centromeres at anaphase I and that AtSGO2 partially rescues this loss of cohesion. In addition to SGOs, we characterize PATRONUS which is specifically required for the maintenance of cohesion of sister chromatid centromeres in meiosis II. In contrast to the Atsgo1 Atsgo2 double mutant, patronus T-DNA insertion mutants only display loss of sister chromatid cohesion after meiosis I, and additionally show disorganized spindles, resulting in defects in chromosome segregation in meiosis. This leads to reduced fertility and aneuploid offspring. Furthermore, we detect aneuploidy in sporophytic tissue, indicating a role for PATRONUS in chromosome segregation in somatic cells. Thus, ploidy stability is preserved in Arabidopsis by PATRONUS during both meiosis and mitosis.

  9. Arabidopsis chloroplast chaperonin 10 is a calmodulin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse cellular activities in plants through the action of calmodulin (CaM). By using (35)S-labeled CaM to screen an Arabidopsis seedling cDNA expression library, a cDNA designated as AtCh-CPN10 (Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast chaperonin 10) was cloned. Chloroplast CPN10, a nuclear-encoded protein, is a functional homolog of E. coli GroES. It is believed that CPN60 and CPN10 are involved in the assembly of Rubisco, a key enzyme involved in the photosynthetic pathway. Northern analysis revealed that AtCh-CPN10 is highly expressed in green tissues. The recombinant AtCh-CPN10 binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion mutants revealed that there is only one CaM-binding site in the last 31 amino acids of the AtCh-CPN10 at the C-terminal end. The CaM-binding region in AtCh-CPN10 has higher homology to other chloroplast CPN10s in comparison to GroES and mitochondrial CPN10s, suggesting that CaM may only bind to chloroplast CPN10s. Furthermore, the results also suggest that the calcium/CaM messenger system is involved in regulating Rubisco assembly in the chloroplast, thereby influencing photosynthesis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  10. Ethylene Inhibits Cell Proliferation of the Arabidopsis Root Meristem.

    PubMed

    Street, Ian H; Aman, Sitwat; Zubo, Yan; Ramzan, Aleena; Wang, Xiaomin; Shakeel, Samina N; Kieber, Joseph J; Schaller, G Eric

    2015-09-01

    The root system of plants plays a critical role in plant growth and survival, with root growth being dependent on both cell proliferation and cell elongation. Multiple phytohormones interact to control root growth, including ethylene, which is primarily known for its role in controlling root cell elongation. We find that ethylene also negatively regulates cell proliferation at the root meristem of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Genetic analysis indicates that the inhibition of cell proliferation involves two pathways operating downstream of the ethylene receptors. The major pathway is the canonical ethylene signal transduction pathway that incorporates CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1, ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE2, and the ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 family of transcription factors. The secondary pathway is a phosphorelay based on genetic analysis of receptor histidine kinase activity and mutants involving the type B response regulators. Analysis of ethylene-dependent gene expression and genetic analysis supports SHORT HYPOCOTYL2, a repressor of auxin signaling, as one mediator of the ethylene response and furthermore, indicates that SHORT HYPOCOTYL2 is a point of convergence for both ethylene and cytokinin in negatively regulating cell proliferation. Additional analysis indicates that ethylene signaling contributes but is not required for cytokinin to inhibit activity of the root meristem. These results identify key elements, along with points of cross talk with cytokinin and auxin, by which ethylene negatively regulates cell proliferation at the root apical meristem.

  11. Spaceflight Induces Specific Alterations in the Proteomes of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Jin; Denison, Fiona; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Life in spaceflight demonstrates remarkable acclimation processes within the specialized habitats of vehicles subjected to the myriad of unique environmental issues associated with orbital trajectories. To examine the response processes that occur in plants in space, leaves and roots from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings from three GFP reporter lines that were grown from seed for 12 days on the International Space Station and preserved on orbit in RNAlater were returned to Earth and analyzed by using iTRAQ broad-scale proteomics procedures. Using stringent criteria, we identified over 1500 proteins, which included 1167 leaf proteins and 1150 root proteins we were able to accurately quantify. Quantification revealed 256 leaf proteins and 358 root proteins that showed statistically significant differential abundance in the spaceflight samples compared to ground controls, with few proteins differentially regulated in common between leaves and roots. This indicates that there are measurable proteomics responses to spaceflight and that the responses are organ-specific. These proteomics data were compared with transcriptome data from similar spaceflight samples, showing that there is a positive but limited relationship between transcriptome and proteome regulation of the overall spaceflight responses of plants. These results are discussed in terms of emergence understanding of plant responses to spaceflight particularly with regard to cell wall remodeling, as well as in the context of deriving multiple omics data sets from a single on-orbit preservation and operations approach. Key Words: Space biology—Proteomics—Gene expression—ISS. Astrobiology 15, 32–56. PMID:25517942

  12. Free-flow electrophoresis for fractionation of Arabidopsis thaliana membranes.

    PubMed

    Bardy, N; Carrasco, A; Galaud, J P; Pont-Lezica, R; Canut, H

    1998-06-01

    Highly purified tonoplast and plasma membrane vesicles were isolated from microsomes of Arabidopsis thaliana by preparative free-flow electrophoresis. The most electronegative fractions were identified as tonoplast using nitrate-inhibited Mg2+-ATPase as enzyme marker. The least electronegative fractions were identified as plasma membrane using glucan-synthase II, UDPG: sterol-glucosyl-transferase, and vanadate-inhibited Mg2+-ATPase as enzyme markers. Other membrane markers, latent inosine-5'-diphosphatase (Golgi), NADPH-cytochrome-c reductase (endoplasmic reticulum) and cytochrome-c oxidase (mitochondria) were recovered in the fractions intermediate between tonoplast and plasma membrane. Immunoblot analysis of membrane fractions by antibodies directed against tonoplast and plasma membrane proteins confirmed the nature and the purity of the isolated membranes. The cytoskeletal protein actin, which was also identified by immunoblotting, was found to be specifically attached to the plasma membrane vesicles. The structural and functional integrity of the isolated membranes from Arabidopsis thaliana is discussed in the light of results obtained for the location of receptors and enzymes, or for the determination of ligand binding activity.

  13. Acclimation responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to sustained phosphite treatments

    PubMed Central

    Berkowitz, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Phosphite () induces a range of physiological and developmental responses in plants by disturbing the homeostasis of the macronutrient phosphate. Because of its close structural resemblance to phosphate, phosphite impairs the sensing, membrane transport, and subcellular compartmentation of phosphate. In addition, phosphite induces plant defence responses by an as yet unknown mode of action. In this study, the acclimation of Arabidopsis thaliana plants to a sustained phosphite supply in the growth medium was investigated and compared with plants growing under varying phosphate supplies. Unlike phosphate, phosphite did not suppress the formation of lateral roots in several Arabidopsis accessions. In addition, the expression of well-documented phosphate-starvation-induced genes, such as miRNA399d and At4, was not repressed by phosphite accumulation, whilst the induction of PHT1;1 and PAP1 was accentuated. Thus, a mimicking of phosphate by phosphite was not observed for these classical phosphate-starvation responses. Metabolomic analysis of phosphite-treated plants showed changes in several metabolite pools, most prominently those of aspartate, asparagine, glutamate, and serine. These alterations in amino acid pools provide novel insights for the understanding of phosphite-induced pathogen resistance. PMID:23404904

  14. BODYGUARD is required for the biosynthesis of cutin in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jakobson, Liina; Lindgren, Leif Ove; Verdier, Gaëtan; Laanemets, Kristiina; Brosché, Mikael; Beisson, Fred; Kollist, Hannes

    2016-07-01

    The cuticle plays a critical role in plant survival during extreme drought conditions. There are, however, surprisingly, many gaps in our understanding of cuticle biosynthesis. An Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA mutant library was screened for mutants with enhanced transpiration using a simple condensation spot method. Five mutants, named cool breath (cb), were isolated. The cb5 mutant was found to be allelic to bodyguard (bdg), which is affected in an α/β-hydrolase fold protein important for cuticle structure. The analysis of cuticle components in cb5 (renamed as bdg-6) and another T-DNA mutant allele (bdg-7) revealed no impairment in wax synthesis, but a strong decrease in total cutin monomer load in young leaves and flowers. Root suberin content was also reduced. Overexpression of BDG increased total leaf cutin monomer content nearly four times by affecting preferentially C18 polyunsaturated ω-OH fatty acids and dicarboxylic acids. Whole-plant gas exchange analysis showed that bdg-6 had higher cuticular conductance and rate of transpiration; however, plant lines overexpressing BDG resembled the wild-type with regard to these characteristics. This study identifies BDG as an important component of the cutin biosynthesis machinery in Arabidopsis. We also show that, using BDG, cutin can be greatly modified without altering the cuticular water barrier properties and transpiration.

  15. Cononsolvency-induced micellization kinetics of pyrene end-labeled diblock copolymer of N-isopropylacrylamide and oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate studied by stopped-flow light-scattering and fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Rao, Jingyi; Zhang, Jingyan; Xu, Jian; Liu, Shiyong

    2008-12-01

    Cononsolvency-induced micellization kinetics of a pyrene end-labeled diblock copolymer of N-isopropylacrylamide and oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate, Py-PNIPAM-b-POEGMA, was investigated in detail via a combination of stopped-flow light-scattering and fluorescence techniques. Upon a stopped-flow jump from pure methanol to proper methanol/water mixtures, scattered light intensity exhibited an initial increase and then stabilized out; whereas the time-dependence of monomer to excimer fluorescence intensity ratios (I E/I M) revealed an abrupt increase followed by a gradual decrease to plateau values. The dynamic traces of scattered intensity can be well fitted by double exponential functions, the obtained tau 1, scat and tau 2, scat can be ascribed to processes of forming quasi-equilibrium micelles and their relaxation into final equilibrium states, respectively. On the other hand, a triple exponential function was needed to fit the dynamic traces of I E/I M, leading to three characteristic relaxation times (tau 1, fluo, tau 2, fluo, and tau 3, fluo). It was found that the time scales of tau 1, scat and tau 2, scat obtained from stopped-flow light scattering were in general agreement with tau 2, fluo and tau 3, fluo obtained from stopped-flow fluorescence. Considering that excimer fluorescence is extremely sensitive to small aggregates, the newly detected fast process (tau 1, fluo) approximately 10 ms) by stopped-flow fluorescence should be ascribed to the early stage of micellization, i.e., the burst formation of small transient micelles, in which light scattering detection was still not sensitive enough. These small transient micelles fused and grew into quasi-equilibrium micelles, which then slowly relaxed into the final equilibrium state.

  16. Skew in CG content near the transcription start site in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Tatarinova, Tatiana; Brover, Vyacheslav; Troukhan, Maxim; Alexandrov, Nickolai

    2003-01-01

    We have discovered a novel statistical feature of Arabidopsis thaliana genome that remarkably correlates with a position of transcription start site--CG skew peak. We hypothesize that the phenomenon can be explained by the higher mutability of unprotected cytosines.

  17. Start of Arabidopsis research in Japan: a personal memoir of the seedling stage 1985-2000.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kiyotaka

    2010-05-01

    The author received the research award from the Botanical Society of Japan in September 2009 under the title Development of Plant Molecular Biology using Arabidopsis. Here, the author summarizes the motivations and efforts of researchers at the start and subsequent expansion of Arabidopsis research in Japan. Pioneering study that focused on Arabidopsis characteristics started in the 1960s but it did not expand until the mid-1980s when several research groups started their studies with the new and clear objectives of examining the characteristics and capacity of multi-cellular plants by use of a molecular genetics approach. Together, members of these research groups helped to promote the novel research field, and established a nationwide system encouraging students and young researchers to join in Arabidopsis research, and supporting them scientifically and financially.

  18. Arabidopsis transcriptional responses differentiating closely related chemicals (herbicides) and cross-species extrapolation to Brassica

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using whole genome Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChips we characterized the transcriptional response of Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia 24 hours after treatment with five different herbicides. Four of them (chloransulam, imazapyr, primisulfuron, sulfometuron) inhibit acetolactate synthase (A...

  19. Molecular and physiological responses to titanium dioxide and cerium oxide nanoparticles in arabidopsis

    EPA Science Inventory

    - Changes in tissue transcriptomes and productivity of Arabidopsis thaliana were investigated during exposure of plants to two widely-used engineered metal oxide nanoparticles, titanium dioxide (nano-titanium) and cerium dioxide (nano-cerium). Microarray analyses confirmed that e...

  20. Natural Genetic Variation of Freezing Tolerance in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hannah, Matthew A.; Wiese, Dana; Freund, Susanne; Fiehn, Oliver; Heyer, Arnd G.; Hincha, Dirk K.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature is a primary determinant of plant growth and survival. Using accessions of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) originating from Scandinavia to the Cape Verde Islands, we show that freezing tolerance of natural accessions correlates with habitat winter temperatures, identifying low temperature as an important selective pressure for Arabidopsis. Combined metabolite and transcript profiling show that during cold exposure, global changes of transcripts, but not of metabolites, correlate with the ability of Arabidopsis to cold acclimate. There are, however, metabolites and transcripts, including several transcription factors, that correlate with freezing tolerance, indicating regulatory pathways that may be of primary importance for this trait. These data identify that enhanced freezing tolerance is associated with the down-regulation of photosynthesis and hormonal responses and the induction of flavonoid metabolism, provide evidence for naturally increased nonacclimated freezing tolerance due to the constitutive activation of the C-repeat binding factors pathway, and identify candidate transcriptional regulators that correlate with freezing tolerance. PMID:16844837

  1. Brassinosteroids Regulate Plant Growth through Distinct Signaling Pathways in Selaginella and Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Jinyeong; Fujioka, Shozo; Dilkes, Brian P.; Choe, Sunghwa

    2013-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are growth-promoting steroid hormones that regulate diverse physiological processes in plants. Most BR biosynthetic enzymes belong to the cytochrome P450 (CYP) family. The gene encoding the ultimate step of BR biosynthesis in Arabidopsis likely evolved by gene duplication followed by functional specialization in a dicotyledonous plant-specific manner. To gain insight into the evolution of BRs, we performed a genomic reconstitution of Arabidopsis BR biosynthetic genes in an ancestral vascular plant, the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii. Selaginella contains four members of the CYP90 family that cluster together in the CYP85 clan. Similar to known BR biosynthetic genes, the Selaginella CYP90s exhibit eight or ten exons and Selaginella produces a putative BR biosynthetic intermediate. Therefore, we hypothesized that Selaginella CYP90 genes encode BR biosynthetic enzymes. In contrast to typical CYPs in Arabidopsis, Selaginella CYP90E2 and CYP90F1 do not possess amino-terminal signal peptides, suggesting that they do not localize to the endoplasmic reticulum. In addition, one of the three putative CYP reductases (CPRs) that is required for CYP enzyme function co-localized with CYP90E2 and CYP90F1. Treatments with a BR biosynthetic inhibitor, propiconazole, and epi-brassinolide resulted in greatly retarded and increased growth, respectively. This suggests that BRs promote growth in Selaginella, as they do in Arabidopsis. However, BR signaling occurs through different pathways than in Arabidopsis. A sequence homologous to the Arabidopsis BR receptor BRI1 was absent in Selaginella, but downstream components, including BIN2, BSU1, and BZR1, were present. Thus, the mechanism that initiates BR signaling in Selaginella seems to differ from that in Arabidopsis. Our findings suggest that the basic physiological roles of BRs as growth-promoting hormones are conserved in both lycophytes and Arabidopsis; however, different BR molecules and BRI1-based

  2. Brassinosteroids regulate plant growth through distinct signaling pathways in Selaginella and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Jinyeong; Fujioka, Shozo; Dilkes, Brian P; Choe, Sunghwa

    2013-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are growth-promoting steroid hormones that regulate diverse physiological processes in plants. Most BR biosynthetic enzymes belong to the cytochrome P450 (CYP) family. The gene encoding the ultimate step of BR biosynthesis in Arabidopsis likely evolved by gene duplication followed by functional specialization in a dicotyledonous plant-specific manner. To gain insight into the evolution of BRs, we performed a genomic reconstitution of Arabidopsis BR biosynthetic genes in an ancestral vascular plant, the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii. Selaginella contains four members of the CYP90 family that cluster together in the CYP85 clan. Similar to known BR biosynthetic genes, the Selaginella CYP90s exhibit eight or ten exons and Selaginella produces a putative BR biosynthetic intermediate. Therefore, we hypothesized that Selaginella CYP90 genes encode BR biosynthetic enzymes. In contrast to typical CYPs in Arabidopsis, Selaginella CYP90E2 and CYP90F1 do not possess amino-terminal signal peptides, suggesting that they do not localize to the endoplasmic reticulum. In addition, one of the three putative CYP reductases (CPRs) that is required for CYP enzyme function co-localized with CYP90E2 and CYP90F1. Treatments with a BR biosynthetic inhibitor, propiconazole, and epi-brassinolide resulted in greatly retarded and increased growth, respectively. This suggests that BRs promote growth in Selaginella, as they do in Arabidopsis. However, BR signaling occurs through different pathways than in Arabidopsis. A sequence homologous to the Arabidopsis BR receptor BRI1 was absent in Selaginella, but downstream components, including BIN2, BSU1, and BZR1, were present. Thus, the mechanism that initiates BR signaling in Selaginella seems to differ from that in Arabidopsis. Our findings suggest that the basic physiological roles of BRs as growth-promoting hormones are conserved in both lycophytes and Arabidopsis; however, different BR molecules and BRI1-based

  3. Potential role of Arabidopsis PHP as an accessory subunit of the PAF1 transcriptional cofactor.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunchung; Ek-Ramos, Maria Julissa; Oh, Sookyung; van Nocker, Steven

    2011-08-01

    Paf1C is a transcriptional cofactor that has been implicated in various transcription-associated mechanisms spanning initiation, elongation and RNA processing, and is important for multiple aspects of development in Arabidopsis. Our recent studies suggest Arabidopsis Paf1C is crucial for proper regulation of genes within H3K27me3-enriched chromatin, and that a protein named PHP may act as an accessory subunit of Paf1C that promotes this function.

  4. Partial Purification and Characterization of RNase P from Arabidopsis Thaliana Tissue.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    Sequence homology is indicated by 9 Source Subcellular Density Nuclease RNA Protienase Locale CsCI (g/ml/ Sensitive Subunit Sensitive Spinach chloroplasts...PARTIAL PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF RNASE P FROM ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA TISSUE A Thesis Presented in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirement...ptRNA) molecules to give mature 5’ ends has been isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana tissue. The RNase P activity was isolated by ammonium sulfate

  5. Peculiarities in formation of Arabidopsis Thaliana (L.) Heynh, generative organs under space flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kordyum, Y. L.; Chernyayeva, I. I.

    1983-01-01

    Peculiarities in the formation of the andrecium and gynecium elements are described for Arabidopsis plants grown from the stages of two cotyledonous leaves in the Svitoblok-1 device on board the Salyut 6 orbital research station and in the laboratory. It is established that flower buds and flowers, normally formed in habitus, contain sterile elements of andrecium and gynecium whose degeneration occurs at different developmental stages of the Arabidopsis plants in the experiment under conditions of weightlessness.

  6. Arabidopsis PCNAs form complexes with selected D-type cyclins

    PubMed Central

    Strzalka, Wojciech K.; Aggarwal, Chhavi; Krzeszowiec, Weronika; Jakubowska, Agata; Sztatelman, Olga; Banas, Agnieszka K.

    2015-01-01

    Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) is a key nuclear protein of eukaryotic cells. It has been shown to form complexes with cyclin dependent kinases, cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors and the D-type cyclins which are involved in the cell cycle control. In Arabidopsis two genes coding for PCNA1 and PCNA2 proteins have been identified. In this study by analyzing Arabidopsis PCNA/CycD complexes we tested the possible functional differentiation of PCNA1/2 proteins in cell cycle control. Most out of the 10 cyclins investigated showed only nuclear localization except CycD2;1, CycD4;1, and CycD4;2 which were observed both in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Using the Y2H, BiFC and FLIM-FRET techniques we identified D-type cyclins which formed complexes with either PCNA1 or PCNA2. Among the candidates tested only CycD1;1, CycD3;1, and CycD3;3 were not detected in a complex with the PCNA proteins. Moreover, our results indicate that the formation of CycD3;2/PCNA and CycD4;1/PCNA complexes can be regulated by other as yet unidentified factor(s). Additionally, FLIM-FRET analyses suggested that in planta the distance between PCNA1/CycD4;1, PCNA1/CycD6;1, PCNA1/CycD7;1, and PCNA2/CycD4;2 proteins was shorter than that between PCNA2/CycD4;1, PCNA2/CycD6;1, PCNA2/CycD7;1, and PCNA1/CycD4;2 pairs. These data indicate that the nine amino acid differences between PCNA1 and PCNA2 have an impact on the architecture of Arabidopsis CycD/PCNA complexes. PMID:26379676

  7. Expression and Protein Interaction Analyses Reveal Combinatorial Interactions of LBD Transcription Factors During Arabidopsis Pollen Development.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mirim; Kim, Min-Jung; Pandey, Shashank; Kim, Jungmook

    2016-11-01

    LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD) transcription factor gene family members play key roles in diverse aspects of plant development. LBD10 and LBD27 have been shown to be essential for pollen development in Arabidopsis thaliana. From the previous RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) data set of Arabidopsis pollen, we identified the mRNAs of LBD22, LBD25 and LBD36 in addition to LBD10 and LBD27 in Arabidopsis pollen. Here we conducted expression and cellular analysis using GFP:GUS (green fluorescent protein:β-glucuronidase) reporter gene and subcellular localization assays using LBD:GFP fusion proteins expressed under the control of their own promoters in Arabidopsis. We found that these LBD proteins display spatially and temporally distinct and overlapping expression patterns during pollen development. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and GST (glutathione S-transferase) pull-down assays demonstrated that protein-protein interactions occur among the LBDs exhibiting overlapping expression during pollen development. We further showed that LBD10, LBD22, LBD25, LBD27 and LBD36 interact with each other to form heterodimers, which are localized to the nucleus in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Taken together, these results suggest that combinatorial interactions among LBD proteins may be important for their function in pollen development in Arabidopsis.

  8. Suppression of Arabidopsis flowering by near-null magnetic field is affected by light.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunxiao; Li, Yue; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Yuxia; Wei, Shufeng

    2015-09-01

    We previously reported that a near-null magnetic field suppressed Arabidopsis flowering in white light, which might be related to the function modification of cryptochrome (CRY). To further demonstrate that the effect of near-null magnetic field on Arabidopsis flowering is associated with CRY, Arabidopsis wild type and CRY mutant plants were grown in the near-null magnetic field under blue or red light with different light cycle and photosynthetic photon flux density. We found that Arabidopsis flowering was significantly suppressed by near-null magnetic field in blue light with lower intensity (10 µmol/m(2) /s) and shorter cycle (12 h period: 6 h light/6 h dark). However, flowering time of CRY1/CRY2 mutants did not show any difference between plants grown in near-null magnetic field and in local geomagnetic field under detected light conditions. In red light, no significant difference was shown in Arabidopsis flowering between plants in near-null magnetic field and local geomagnetic field under detected light cycles and intensities. These results suggest that changes of blue light cycle and intensity alter the effect of near-null magnetic field on Arabidopsis flowering, which is mediated by CRY.

  9. Auxin polar transport in arabidopsis under simulated microgravity conditions - relevance to growth and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, K.; Oka, M.; Yamamoto, R.; Masuda, Y.; Hoson, T.; Kamisaka, S.; Ueda, J.

    1999-01-01

    Activity of auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes of Arabidopsis thaliana grown under simulated microgravity conditions was studied in relation to the growth and development. Seeds were germinated and allowed to grow on an agar medium in test tubes on a horizontal clinostat. Horizontal clinostat rotation substantially reduced the growth of inflorescence axes and the productivity of seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana (ecotypes Landsberg erecta and Columbia), although it little affected seed germination, development of rosette leaves and flowering. The activity of auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes decreased when Arabidopsis plants were grown on a horizontal clinostat from germination stage, being ca. 60% of 1 g control. On the other hand, the auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes of Arabidopsis grown in 1 g conditions was not affected when the segments were exposed to various gravistimuli, including 3-dimensional clinorotation, during transport experiments. Pin-formed mutant of Arabidopsis, having a unique structure of the inflorescence axis with no flower and extremely low levels of the activity of auxin polar transport in inflorescence axes and endogenous auxin, did not continue its vegetative growth under clinostat rotation. These facts suggest that the development of the system of auxin polar transport in Arabidopsis is affected by microgravity, resulting in the inhibition of growth and development, especially during reproductive growth.

  10. Functional analysis of the Hikeshi-like protein and its interaction with HSP70 in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, Shinya; Ohama, Naohiko; Mizoi, Junya; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • HKL, a Hikeshi homologous gene is identified in Arabidopsis. • HKL interacts with two HSP70 isoforms and regulates the subcellular localization of HSC70-1. • The two HSP70 translocate into nucleus in response to heat stress. • Overexpression of HKL confers thermotolerance in transgenic plants. - Abstract: Heat shock proteins (HSPs) refold damaged proteins and are an essential component of the heat shock response. Previously, the 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) has been reported to translocate into the nucleus in a heat-dependent manner in many organisms. In humans, the heat-induced translocation of HSP70 requires the nuclear carrier protein Hikeshi. In the Arabidopsis genome, only one gene encodes a protein with high homology to Hikeshi, and we named this homolog Hikeshi-like (HKL) protein. In this study, we show that two Arabidopsis HSP70 isoforms accumulate in the nucleus in response to heat shock and that HKL interacts with these HSP70s. Our histochemical analysis revealed that HKL is predominantly expressed in meristematic tissues, suggesting the potential importance of HKL during cell division in Arabidopsis. In addition, we show that HKL regulates HSP70 localization, and HKL overexpression conferred thermotolerance to transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Our results suggest that HKL plays a positive role in the thermotolerance of Arabidopsis plants and cooperatively interacts with HSP70.

  11. Handling Arabidopsis plants: growth, preservation of seeds, transformation, and genetic crosses.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Luz; Scholl, Randy; Holomuzki, Nicholas; Crist, Deborah; Grotewold, Erich; Brkljacic, Jelena

    2014-01-01

    Growing healthy plants is essential for the advancement of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) research. Over the last 20 years, the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (ABRC) has collected and developed a series of best-practice protocols, some of which are presented in this chapter. Arabidopsis can be grown in a variety of locations, growth media, and environmental conditions. Most laboratory accessions and their mutant or transgenic derivatives flower after 4-5 weeks and set seeds after 7-8 weeks, under standard growth conditions (soil, long day, 23 ºC). Some mutant genotypes, natural accessions, and Arabidopsis relatives require strict control of growth conditions best provided by growth rooms, chambers, or incubators. Other lines can be grown in less-controlled greenhouse settings. Although the majority of lines can be grown in soil, certain experimental purposes require utilization of sterile solid or liquid growth media. These include the selection of primary transformants, identification of homozygous lethal individuals in a segregating population, or bulking of a large amount of plant material. The importance of controlling, observing, and recording growth conditions is emphasized and appropriate equipment required to perform monitoring of these conditions is listed. Proper conditions for seed harvesting and preservation, as well as seed quality control, are also described. Plant transformation and genetic crosses, two of the methods that revolutionized Arabidopsis genetics, are introduced as well.

  12. P-proteins in Arabidopsis are heteromeric structures involved in rapid sieve tube sealing.

    PubMed

    Jekat, Stephan B; Ernst, Antonia M; von Bohl, Andreas; Zielonka, Sascia; Twyman, Richard M; Noll, Gundula A; Prüfer, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Structural phloem proteins (P-proteins) are characteristic components of the sieve elements in all dicotyledonous and many monocotyledonous angiosperms. Tobacco P-proteins were recently confirmed to be encoded by the widespread sieve element occlusion (SEO) gene family, and tobacco SEO proteins were shown to be directly involved in sieve tube sealing thus preventing the loss of photosynthate. Analysis of the two Arabidopsis SEO proteins (AtSEOa and AtSEOb) indicated that the corresponding P-protein subunits do not act in a redundant manner. However, there are still pending questions regarding the interaction properties and specific functions of AtSEOa and AtSEOb as well as the general function of structural P-proteins in Arabidopsis. In this study, we characterized the Arabidopsis P-proteins in more detail. We used in planta bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays to confirm the predicted heteromeric interactions between AtSEOa and AtSEOb. Arabidopsis mutants depleted for one or both AtSEO proteins lacked the typical P-protein structures normally found in sieve elements, underlining the identity of AtSEO proteins as P-proteins and furthermore providing the means to determine the role of Arabidopsis P-proteins in sieve tube sealing. We therefore developed an assay based on phloem exudation. Mutants with reduced AtSEO expression levels lost twice as much photosynthate following injury as comparable wild-type plants, confirming that Arabidopsis P-proteins are indeed involved in sieve tube sealing.

  13. Molecular cloning of cryptochrome 1 from apple and its functional characterization in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Yuan; Mao, Ke; Zhao, Cheng; Zhang, Rui-Fen; Zhao, Xian-Yan; Zhang, Hua-Lei; Shu, Huai-Rui; Zhao, Yu-Jin

    2013-06-01

    Cryptochromes are blue-light photoreceptors involved in regulating many aspects of plant growth and development. Investigations of cryptochromes in plants have largely focused on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), rice (Oryza sativa) and pea (Pisum sativum). Here, we isolated the cryptochrome 1 gene from apple (Malus domestica) (MdCRY1) and analyzed its function in transgenic Arabidopsis. The predicted MdCRY1 protein was most closely homologous to strawberry CRY1. In terms of transcript levels, MdCRY1 expression was up-regulated by light. The function of MdCRY1 was analyzed through heterologous expression in Arabidopsis. Overexpression of MdCRY1 in Arabidopsis is able to rescue the cry1 mutant phenotype, inhibit hypocotyl elongation, promote root growth, and enhance anthocyanin accumulation in wild-type seedlings under blue light. These data provide functional evidence for a role of MdCRY1 in controlling photomorphogenesis under blue light and indicate that CRY1 function is conserved between Arabidopsis and apple. Furthermore, we found that MdCRY1 interacts with AtCOP1 in both yeast and onion cells. This interaction may represent an important regulatory mechanism in blue-light signaling pathway in apple.

  14. Using Arabidopsis to Study Shoot Branching in Biomass Willow1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Sally P.; Salmon, Jemma; Hanley, Steven J.; Karp, Angela; Leyser, Ottoline

    2013-01-01

    The success of the short-rotation coppice system in biomass willow (Salix spp.) relies on the activity of the shoot-producing meristems found on the coppice stool. However, the regulation of the activity of these meristems is poorly understood. In contrast, our knowledge of the mechanisms behind axillary meristem regulation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has grown rapidly in the past few years through the exploitation of integrated physiological, genetic, and molecular assays. Here, we demonstrate that these assays can be directly transferred to study the control of bud activation in biomass willow and to assess similarities with the known hormone regulatory system in Arabidopsis. Bud hormone response was found to be qualitatively remarkably similar in Salix spp. and Arabidopsis. These similarities led us to test whether Arabidopsis hormone mutants could be used to assess allelic variation in the cognate Salix spp. hormone genes. Allelic differences in Salix spp. strigolactone genes were observed using this approach. These results demonstrate that both knowledge and assays from Arabidopsis axillary meristem biology can be successfully applied to Salix spp. and can increase our understanding of a fundamental aspect of short-rotation coppice biomass production, allowing more targeted breeding. PMID:23610219

  15. Generation of VHH antibodies against the Arabidopsis thaliana seed storage proteins.

    PubMed

    De Meyer, Thomas; Eeckhout, Dominique; De Rycke, Riet; De Buck, Sylvie; Muyldermans, Serge; Depicker, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies and antibody derived fragments are excellent tools for the detection and purification of proteins. However, only few antibodies targeting Arabidopsis seed proteins are currently available. Here, we evaluate the process to make antibody libraries against crude protein extracts and more particularly to generate a VHH phage library against native Arabidopsis thaliana seed proteins. After immunising a dromedary with a crude Arabidopsis seed extract, we cloned the single-domain antigen-binding fragments from their heavy-chain only antibodies in a phage display vector and selected nanobodies (VHHs) against native Arabidopsis seed proteins. For 16 VHHs, the corresponding antigens were identified by affinity purification and MS/MS analysis. They were shown to bind the major Arabidopsis seed storage proteins albumin and globulin (14 to albumin and 2 to globulin). All 16 VHHs were suitable primary reagents for the detection of the Arabidopsis seed storage proteins by ELISA. Furthermore, several of the anti-albumin VHHs were used successfully for storage protein localisation via electron microscopy. The easy cloning, selection and production, together with the demonstrated functionality and applicability, strongly suggest that the VHH antibody format will play a more prominent role in future protein research, in particular for the study of native proteins.

  16. Inducible Expression of Arabidopsis Response Regulator 22 (ARR22), a Type-C ARR, in Transgenic Arabidopsis Enhances Drought and Freezing Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jungmook

    2013-01-01

    The Arabidopsis two-component signaling system, which is comprised of sensor histidine kinases, histidine phosphotransfer proteins, and response regulators, mediates cytokinin response as well as various other plant responses including abiotic stress responses. Arabidopsis response regulators (ARRs) are classified into type-A, -B, and -C. Although the roles of type-A and -B ARRs are well established in Arabidopsis plant signaling, roles of type-C ARRs, ARR22 and ARR24, remain elusive. ARR22, a preferentially cytosolic protein, interacts with certain Arabidopsis histidine phosphotransfer proteins (AHPs) and displays phosphatase activity on AHP5. ARR22 is induced by cold and dehydration. Here, we show that inducible overexpression of ARR22 in Arabidopsis enhanced dehydration, drought, and cold tolerance in a dexamethasone-dependent manner, whereas mutation of the putative phospho-accepting Asp to Asn in ARR22 (ARR22D74N) abolished these tolerance phenotypes. Overexpression of ARR22 decreased electrolyte leakage in dehydration-, drought-, or cold-stressed transgenic Arabidopsis plants compared with that of ARR22D74N or compared with wild-type plants. Transpiration rates and stomatal apertures were not affected by ARR22 overexpression. No significant difference in both dehydration and freezing tolerance was observed between wild-type and arr22 mutants with or without cytokinin preincubation, consistent with the lack of phenotypes of arr22 mutants in their vegetative development. Meta-profile analyses of the microarray data on ARR22-responsive genes indicate that ARR22 modulates expression of a variety of abiotic stress-responsive genes, which might contribute to increasing drought and freezing tolerance. Taken together, these results suggest that ARR22 plays a positive role in the stress tolerance response in part via enhancing cell membrane integrity and that phospho-histidine phosphatase activity of ARR22 may be required for this function. PMID:24244460

  17. Common and divergent physiological, hormonal and metabolic responses of Arabidopsis thaliana and Thellungiella halophila to water and salt stress.

    PubMed

    Arbona, Vicent; Argamasilla, Rosa; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2010-11-01

    To explain the higher tolerance of Thellungiella to abiotic stress in comparison to Arabidopsis, several studies have focused on differences in ion absorption and gene expression. However, little is known about hormone regulation and metabolic responses. In this work, plants of both species were subjected to desiccation and salt stress to compare common and divergent responses. In control conditions, the number of significantly upregulated mass features as well as proline levels was higher in Tellungiella than in Arabidopsis. When subjected to desiccation, both species exhibited similar rates of water loss but proline over accumulation only occurred in Thellungiella; both species accumulated ABA and JA with a similar trend although Arabidopsis showed higher concentrations of both hormones which indicated a stronger impact of desiccation on Arabidopsis. However, Arabidopsis showed a higher number of significantly altered mass features than Thellungiella. Under salt stress, Thellungiella plants accumulated lower amounts of Cl(-) ions than Arabidopsis but exhibited a similar proline response. Under these conditions, ABA and JA levels increased in Arabidopsis whereas minimal changes in both hormone concentrations were recorded in Thellungiella. Contrastingly, the impact of salt stress on metabolite profiles was higher in Thellungiella than in Arabidopsis. Overall, data indicated that physiological responses in Arabidopsis are induced after stress imposition through hormonal regulation whereas Thellungiella has a basal metabolic configuration, better prepared to endure environmental cues.

  18. The involvement of ethylene in regulation of Arabidopsis gravitropism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Zhu, Lin

    Plant gravitropism is a directional response to gravity stimulus. This response involves a com-plex signaling network. Ethylene, a major plant hormone, has been found to modulate grav-itropism. The biosynthesis of ethylene is induced by the gravi-stimulus and the requirement for ethylene during gravitropism is tissue-dependent. While ethylene plays a modulating role in inflorescence stems, the light-grown hypocotyls of Arabidopsis requires ethylene to achieve a maximum gravicurvature. Because both inhibitory and stimulatory effects of ethylene on gravitropism have been overwhelmingly documented, there is a need to postulate a new theory to consolidate the apparently contradictory results. A dual-and-opposing effects (DOE) theory is therefore hypothesized to address how ethylene is involved in regulation of Arabidopsis grav-itropism, in which it is suggested that both stimulatory and inhibitory effects act on the same organ of a plant and co-exist at the same time in a mutually opposing manner. The final out-come of gravitropic response is determined by the dynamic display between the two opposing effects. A prolonged pretreatment of ethylene promotes the gravitropism in both inflorescence and light-grown hypocotyls, while a short ethylene pretreatment inhibits gravitropism. Gener-ally speaking, the inhibitory effect of ethylene is dominant over the expression of the stimula-tory effect in light-grown hypocotyls, whereas the stimulatory effect is dominant in inflorescence stem. Each effect is also positively correlated with concentrations of ethylene and in a time-dependent manner. The stimulatory effect occurs slowly but continues to react after the removal of ethylene, whereas the inhibitory effect takes place abruptly and diminishes shortly after its removal. Forward genetic screening based on the DOE phenotype of ethylene-treated Arabidop-sis has revealed a novel component in gravity signaling pathway: EGY1 (ethylene-dependent gravitropism-deficient and yellow

  19. Light regulation of cadmium-induced cell death in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sarah J; Wang, Yun; Slabas, Antoni R; Chivasa, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium is an environmental pollutant with deleterious effects on both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. In plants, the effects of cadmium toxicity are concentration dependent; lower doses destabilize many physiological processes and inhibit cell growth and multiplication, while higher doses evoke a more severe response that triggers activation of cell death. We recently investigated the effects of light on cadmium toxicity in Arabidopsis using a cell suspension culture system. Although not affecting the inhibitory effects on cell multiplication, we found that light is a powerful regulator of Cd-induced cell death. A very specific proteomic response, which was clearly controlled by light, preceded cell death. Here we discuss the implications of these findings and highlight similarities between the regulation of cell death triggered by Cd and fumonisin B1. We consider how both compounds could be useful tools in dissecting plant cell death signaling. PMID:24398567

  20. Structure of the Arabidopsis thaliana TOP2 oligopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruiying; Rajagopalan, Krithika; Sadre-Bazzaz, Kianoush; Moreau, Magali; Klessig, Daniel F.; Tong, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Thimet oligopeptidase (TOP) is a zinc-dependent metallopeptidase. Recent studies suggest that Arabidopsis thaliana TOP1 and TOP2 are targets for salicylic acid (SA) binding and participate in SA-mediated plant innate immunity. The crystal structure of A. thaliana TOP2 has been determined at 3.0 Å resolution. Comparisons to the structure of human TOP revealed good overall structural conservation, especially in the active-site region, despite their weak sequence conservation. The protein sample was incubated with the photo-activated SA analog 4-azido-SA and exposed to UV irradiation before crystallization. However, there was no conclusive evidence for the binding of SA based on the X-ray diffraction data. Further studies are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanism of how SA regulates the activity of A. thaliana TOP1 and TOP2. PMID:24817709