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Sample records for arabidopsis bal variant

  1. Alanine Aminotransferase Variants Conferring Diverse NUE Phenotypes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Chandra H.; Good, Allen G.

    2015-01-01

    Alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT, E.C. 2.6.1.2), is a pyridoxal-5’-phosphate-dependent (PLP) enzyme that catalyzes the reversible transfer of an amino group from alanine to 2-oxoglutarate to produce glutamate and pyruvate, or vice versa. It has been well documented in both greenhouse and field studies that tissue-specific over-expression of AlaAT from barley (Hordeum vulgare, HvAlaAT) results in a significant increase in plant NUE in both canola and rice. While the physical phenotypes associated with over-expression of HvAlaAT have been well characterized, the role this enzyme plays in vivo to create a more N efficient plant remains unknown. Furthermore, the importance of HvAlaAT, in contrast to other AlaAT enzyme homologues in creating this phenotype has not yet been explored. To address the role of AlaAT in NUE, AlaAT variants from diverse sources and different subcellular locations, were expressed in the wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 background and alaat1;2 (alaat1-1;alaat2-1) knockout background in various N environments. The analysis and comparison of both the physical and physiological properties of AlaAT over-expressing transgenic plants demonstrated significant differences between plants expressing the different AlaAT enzymes under different external conditions. This analysis indicates that the over-expression of AlaAT variants other than HvAlaAT in crop plants could further increase the NUE phenotype(s) previously observed. PMID:25830496

  2. Alanine aminotransferase variants conferring diverse NUE phenotypes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chandra H; Good, Allen G

    2015-01-01

    Alanine aminotransferase (AlaAT, E.C. 2.6.1.2), is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent (PLP) enzyme that catalyzes the reversible transfer of an amino group from alanine to 2-oxoglutarate to produce glutamate and pyruvate, or vice versa. It has been well documented in both greenhouse and field studies that tissue-specific over-expression of AlaAT from barley (Hordeum vulgare, HvAlaAT) results in a significant increase in plant NUE in both canola and rice. While the physical phenotypes associated with over-expression of HvAlaAT have been well characterized, the role this enzyme plays in vivo to create a more N efficient plant remains unknown. Furthermore, the importance of HvAlaAT, in contrast to other AlaAT enzyme homologues in creating this phenotype has not yet been explored. To address the role of AlaAT in NUE, AlaAT variants from diverse sources and different subcellular locations, were expressed in the wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 background and alaat1;2 (alaat1-1;alaat2-1) knockout background in various N environments. The analysis and comparison of both the physical and physiological properties of AlaAT over-expressing transgenic plants demonstrated significant differences between plants expressing the different AlaAT enzymes under different external conditions. This analysis indicates that the over-expression of AlaAT variants other than HvAlaAT in crop plants could further increase the NUE phenotype(s) previously observed.

  3. Epigenetic variation in Arabidopsis disease resistance

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Trevor L.; Kunkel, Barbara N.; Richards, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Plant pathogen resistance is mediated by a large repertoire of resistance (R) genes, which are often clustered in the genome and show a high degree of genetic variation. Here, we show that an Arabidopsis thaliana R-gene cluster is also subject to epigenetic variation. We describe a heritable but metastable epigenetic variant bal that overexpresses the R-like gene At4g16890 from a gene cluster on Chromosome 4. The bal variant and Arabidopsis transgenics overexpressing the At4g16890 gene are dwarfed and constitutively activate the salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defense response pathway. Overexpression of a related R-like gene also occurs in the ssi1 (suppressor of SA insensitivity 1) background, suggesting that ssi1 is mechanistically related to bal. PMID:11799061

  4. Genome-Wide Profiling of Histone Modifications and Histone Variants in Arabidopsis thaliana and Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Yelagandula, Ramesh; Osakabe, Akihisa; Axelsson, Elin; Berger, Frederic; Kawashima, Tomokazu

    2017-01-01

    Histone modifications and histone variants barcode the genome and play major roles in epigenetic regulations. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) coupled with next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a well-established method to investigate the landscape of epigenetic marks at a genomic level. Here, we describe procedures for conducting ChIP, subsequent NGS library construction, and data analysis on histone modifications and histone variants in Arabidopsis thaliana. We also describe an optimized nuclear isolation procedure to prepare chromatin for ChIP in the liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha, which is the emerging model plant ideal for evolutionary studies.

  5. Expression of an "Arabidopsis CAX2" variant in potato tubers increases calcium levels with no accumulation of manganese

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previously, we made a chimeric "Arabidopsis thaliana" vacuolar transporter CAX2B [a variant of N-terminus truncated form of CAX2 (sCAX2) containing the "B" domain from CAX1] that has enhanced calcium (Ca[2+]) substrate specificity and lost the manganese (Mn[2+]) transport capability of sCAX2. Here, ...

  6. A genome-wide association study identifies variants underlying the Arabidopsis thaliana shade avoidance response.

    PubMed

    Filiault, Daniele L; Maloof, Julin N

    2012-01-01

    Shade avoidance is an ecologically and molecularly well-understood set of plant developmental responses that occur when the ratio of red to far-red light (R:FR) is reduced as a result of foliar shade. Here, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in Arabidopsis thaliana was used to identify variants underlying one of these responses: increased hypocotyl elongation. Four hypocotyl phenotypes were included in the study, including height in high R:FR conditions (simulated sun), height in low R:FR conditions (simulated shade), and two different indices of the response of height to low R:FR. GWAS results showed that variation in these traits is controlled by many loci of small to moderate effect. A known PHYC variant contributing to hypocotyl height variation was identified and lists of significantly associated genes were enriched in a priori candidates, suggesting that this GWAS was capable of generating meaningful results. Using metadata such as expression data, GO terms, and other annotation, we were also able to identify variants in candidate de novo genes. Patterns of significance among our four phenotypes allowed us to categorize associations into three groups: those that affected hypocotyl height without influencing shade avoidance, those that affected shade avoidance in a height-dependent fashion, and those that exerted specific control over shade avoidance. This grouping allowed for the development of explicit hypotheses about the genetics underlying shade avoidance variation. Additionally, the response to shade did not exhibit any marked geographic distribution, suggesting that variation in low R:FR-induced hypocotyl elongation may represent a response to local conditions.

  7. Through BAL Quasars Brightly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartas, George

    2003-01-01

    We report on an observation of the broad absorption line (BAL) quasar PG 1115+080 performed with the XMM-Newton observatory. Spectral analysis reveals the second case of a relativistic X-ray-absorbing outflow in a BAL quasar. The first case was revealed in a recent observation of APM 08279+5255 with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. As in the case of APM 08279+5255, the observed flux of PG 1115+080 is greatly magnified by gravitational lensing. The relatively high redshift (z=1.72) of the quasar places the redshifted energies of resonant absorption features in a sensitive portion of the XMM- Newton spectral response. The spectrum indicates the presence of complex low-energy absorption in the 0.2-0.6 keV observed energy band and high-energy absorption in the 2-5 keV observed energy band. The high-energy absorption is best modeled by two Gaussian absorption lines with rest-frame energies of 7.4 and 9.5 keV. Assuming that these two lines axe produced by resonant absorption due to Fe XXV, we infer that the X-ray absorbers are outflowing with velocities of approx. 0.10c and approx. 0.34c respectively. We have detected significant variability of the energies and widths of the X-ray BALs in PG 1115+080 and APM 08279+5255 over timescales of 19 and 1.8 weeks (proper time), respectively. The BAL variability observed from APM 08279+5255 supports our earlier conclusion that these absorbers are most likely launched at relatively small radii of less than 10(exp 16)(Mbh/M8)(sup 1/2) cm. A comparison of the ionization properties and column densities of the low-energy and high-energy absorbers indicates that these absorbers are likely distinct; however, higher spectral resolution is needed to confirm this result. Finally, we comment on prospects for constraining the kinematic and ionization properties of these X-ray BALs with the next generation of X-ray observatories.

  8. Nucleolin Is Required for DNA Methylation State and the Expression of rRNA Gene Variants in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Pontvianne, Frédéric; Abou-Ellail, Mohamed; Douet, Julien; Comella, Pascale; Matia, Isabel; Chandrasekhara, Chinmayi; DeBures, Anne; Blevins, Todd; Cooke, Richard; Medina, Francisco J.; Tourmente, Sylvette; Pikaard, Craig S.; Sáez-Vásquez, Julio

    2010-01-01

    In eukaryotes, 45S rRNA genes are arranged in tandem arrays in copy numbers ranging from several hundred to several thousand in plants. Although it is clear that not all copies are transcribed under normal growth conditions, the molecular basis controlling the expression of specific sets of rRNA genes remains unclear. Here, we report four major rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Interestingly, while transcription of one of these rRNA variants is induced, the others are either repressed or remain unaltered in A. thaliana plants with a disrupted nucleolin-like protein gene (Atnuc-L1). Remarkably, the most highly represented rRNA gene variant, which is inactive in WT plants, is reactivated in Atnuc-L1 mutants. We show that accumulated pre–rRNAs originate from RNA Pol I transcription and are processed accurately. Moreover, we show that disruption of the AtNUC-L1 gene induces loss of symmetrical DNA methylation without affecting histone epigenetic marks at rRNA genes. Collectively, these data reveal a novel mechanism for rRNA gene transcriptional regulation in which the nucleolin protein plays a major role in controlling active and repressed rRNA gene variants in Arabidopsis. PMID:21124873

  9. Deciphering the Role of POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX1 Variants in Regulating the Acquisition of Flowering Competence in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Picó, Sara; Ortiz-Marchena, M Isabel; Merini, Wiam; Calonje, Myriam

    2015-08-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins play important roles in regulating developmental phase transitions in plants; however, little is known about the role of the PcG machinery in regulating the transition from juvenile to adult phase. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) B lymphoma Moloney murine leukemia virus insertion region1 homolog (BMI1) POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX1 (PRC1) components participate in the repression of microRNA156 (miR156). Loss of AtBMI1 function leads to the up-regulation of the primary transcript of MIR156A and MIR156C at the time the levels of miR156 should decline, resulting in an extended juvenile phase and delayed flowering. Conversely, the PRC1 component EMBRYONIC FLOWER (EMF1) participates in the regulation of SQUAMOSA PROMOTER-BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE and MIR172 genes. Accordingly, plants impaired in EMF1 function displayed misexpression of these genes early in development, which contributes to a CONSTANS-independent up-regulation of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) leading to the earliest flowering phenotype described in Arabidopsis. Our findings show how the different regulatory roles of two functional PRC1 variants coordinate the acquisition of flowering competence and help to reach the threshold of FT necessary to flower. Furthermore, we show how two central regulatory mechanisms, such as PcG and microRNA, assemble to achieve a developmental outcome.

  10. Deciphering the Role of POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX1 Variants in Regulating the Acquisition of Flowering Competence in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Picó, Sara; Merini, Wiam

    2015-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins play important roles in regulating developmental phase transitions in plants; however, little is known about the role of the PcG machinery in regulating the transition from juvenile to adult phase. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) B lymphoma Moloney murine leukemia virus insertion region1 homolog (BMI1) POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX1 (PRC1) components participate in the repression of microRNA156 (miR156). Loss of AtBMI1 function leads to the up-regulation of the primary transcript of MIR156A and MIR156C at the time the levels of miR156 should decline, resulting in an extended juvenile phase and delayed flowering. Conversely, the PRC1 component EMBRYONIC FLOWER (EMF1) participates in the regulation of SQUAMOSA PROMOTER-BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE and MIR172 genes. Accordingly, plants impaired in EMF1 function displayed misexpression of these genes early in development, which contributes to a CONSTANS-independent up-regulation of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) leading to the earliest flowering phenotype described in Arabidopsis. Our findings show how the different regulatory roles of two functional PRC1 variants coordinate the acquisition of flowering competence and help to reach the threshold of FT necessary to flower. Furthermore, we show how two central regulatory mechanisms, such as PcG and microRNA, assemble to achieve a developmental outcome. PMID:25897002

  11. Induced instability of two Arabidopsis constitutive pathogen-response alleles

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Trevor L.; Richards, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Paramutation is an example of a non-Mendelian-directed allelic interaction that results in the epigenetic alteration of one allele. We describe a paramutation-like interaction between two alleles, bal and cpr1–1 (constitutive expressor of PR genes 1), which map to a complex R-like gene cluster on Arabidopsis chromosome 4. Both alleles cause dwarfing and constitutive defense responses, similar to another dwarf variant, ssi1 (suppressor of SA-insensitivity 1). Previous work has demonstrated that the bal and ssi1 phenotypes are caused by overexpression of an R-like gene from the cluster, which activates an salicylic acid-dependent defense pathway. Here, we show that the cpr1–1 variant does not alter gene expression from the R-like gene cluster. The bal and cpr1–1 alleles did not complement each other in F1 hybrids, but F2 populations that segregated bal and cpr1–1 alleles contained plants with normal morphology at a frequency of 20%. By using molecularly marked bal and cpr1–1 lines, we found that the majority of the normal phenotypes were correlated with inheritance of an altered cpr1–1 allele. Our observation that cpr1–1 is a metastable allele suggests that cpr1–1 is an epigenetic allele. The cpr1–1 allele is the third candidate epigenetic allele originating from this R-like gene cluster, making the region a possible hotspot of epigenetic variation. PMID:12032362

  12. A Specialized Histone H1 Variant Is Required for Adaptive Responses to Complex Abiotic Stress and Related DNA Methylation in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rutowicz, Kinga; Puzio, Marcin; Halibart-Puzio, Joanna; Lirski, Maciej; Kotliński, Maciej; Kroteń, Magdalena A.; Knizewski, Lukasz; Lange, Bartosz; Muszewska, Anna; Śniegowska-Świerk, Katarzyna; Kościelniak, Janusz; Iwanicka-Nowicka, Roksana; Buza, Krisztián; Janowiak, Franciszek; Żmuda, Katarzyna; Jõesaar, Indrek; Laskowska-Kaszub, Katarzyna; Fogtman, Anna; Kollist, Hannes; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Tiuryn, Jerzy; Siedlecki, Paweł; Swiezewski, Szymon; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Koblowska, Marta; Archacki, Rafał; Wilczynski, Bartek; Rapacz, Marcin; Jerzmanowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Linker (H1) histones play critical roles in chromatin compaction in higher eukaryotes. They are also the most variable of the histones, with numerous nonallelic variants cooccurring in the same cell. Plants contain a distinct subclass of minor H1 variants that are induced by drought and abscisic acid and have been implicated in mediating adaptive responses to stress. However, how these variants facilitate adaptation remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the single Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) stress-inducible variant H1.3 occurs in plants in two separate and most likely autonomous pools: a constitutive guard cell-specific pool and a facultative environmentally controlled pool localized in other tissues. Physiological and transcriptomic analyses of h1.3 null mutants demonstrate that H1.3 is required for both proper stomatal functioning under normal growth conditions and adaptive developmental responses to combined light and water deficiency. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis, we show that H1.3 has superfast chromatin dynamics, and in contrast to the main Arabidopsis H1 variants H1.1 and H1.2, it has no stable bound fraction. The results of global occupancy studies demonstrate that, while H1.3 has the same overall binding properties as the main H1 variants, including predominant heterochromatin localization, it differs from them in its preferences for chromatin regions with epigenetic signatures of active and repressed transcription. We also show that H1.3 is required for a substantial part of DNA methylation associated with environmental stress, suggesting that the likely mechanism underlying H1.3 function may be the facilitation of chromatin accessibility by direct competition with the main H1 variants. PMID:26351307

  13. Functional characterization of a constitutively active kinase variant of Arabidopsis phototropin 1.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Jan; Inoue, Shin-Ichiro; Kelly, Sharon M; Sullivan, Stuart; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Christie, John M

    2017-08-18

    Phototropins (phots) are plasma membrane-associated serine/threonine kinases that coordinate a range of processes linked to optimizing photosynthetic efficiency in plants. These photoreceptors contain two light-, oxygen-, or voltage-sensing (LOV) domains within their N terminus, with each binding one molecule of flavin mononucleotide as a UV/blue light-absorbing chromophore. Although phots contain two LOV domains, light-induced activation of the C-terminal kinase domain and subsequent receptor autophosphorylation is controlled primarily by the A'α-LOV2-Jα photosensory module. Mutations that disrupt interactions between the LOV2 core and its flanking helical segments can uncouple this mode of light regulation. However, the impact of these mutations on phot function in Arabidopsis has not been explored. Here we report that histidine substitution of Arg-472 located within the A'α-helix of Arabidopsis phot1 constitutively activates phot1 kinase activity in vitro without affecting LOV2 photochemistry. Expression analysis of phot1 R472H in the phot-deficient mutant confirmed that it is autophosphorylated in darkness in vivo but unable to initiate phot1 signaling in the absence of light. Instead, we found that phot1 R472H is poorly functional under low-light conditions but can restore phototropism, chloroplast accumulation, stomatal opening, and leaf positioning and expansion at higher light intensities. Our findings suggest that Arabidopsis can adapt to the elevated phosphorylation status of the phot1 R472H mutant in part by reducing its stability, whereas the activity of the mutant under high-light conditions can be attributed to additional increases in LOV2-mediated photoreceptor autophosphorylation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Leaf Responses to Mild Drought Stress in Natural Variants of Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Clauw, Pieter; Coppens, Frederik; De Beuf, Kristof; Dhondt, Stijn; Van Daele, Twiggy; Maleux, Katrien; Storme, Veronique; Clement, Lieven; Gonzalez, Nathalie; Inzé, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Although the response of plants exposed to severe drought stress has been studied extensively, little is known about how plants adapt their growth under mild drought stress conditions. Here, we analyzed the leaf and rosette growth response of six Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) accessions originating from different geographic regions when exposed to mild drought stress. The automated phenotyping platform WIWAM was used to impose stress early during leaf development, when the third leaf emerges from the shoot apical meristem. Analysis of growth-related phenotypes showed differences in leaf development between the accessions. In all six accessions, mild drought stress reduced both leaf pavement cell area and number without affecting the stomatal index. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis (using RNA sequencing) of early developing leaf tissue identified 354 genes differentially expressed under mild drought stress in the six accessions. Our results indicate the existence of a robust response over different genetic backgrounds to mild drought stress in developing leaves. The processes involved in the overall mild drought stress response comprised abscisic acid signaling, proline metabolism, and cell wall adjustments. In addition to these known severe drought-related responses, 87 genes were found to be specific for the response of young developing leaves to mild drought stress. PMID:25604532

  15. Multiple loci and genetic interactions involving flowering time genes regulate stem branching among natural variants of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xueqing; Ding, Jia; Effgen, Sigi; Turck, Franziska; Koornneef, Maarten

    2013-08-01

    Shoot branching is a major determinant of plant architecture. Genetic variants for reduced stem branching in the axils of cauline leaves of Arabidopsis were found in some natural accessions and also at low frequency in the progeny of multiparent crosses. Detailed genetic analysis using segregating populations derived from backcrosses with the parental lines and bulked segregant analysis was used to identify the allelic variation controlling reduced stem branching. Eight quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to natural variation for reduced stem branching were identified (REDUCED STEM BRANCHING 1-8 (RSB1-8)). Genetic analysis showed that RSB6 and RSB7, corresponding to flowering time genes FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and FRIGIDA (FRI), epistatically regulate stem branching. Furthermore, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), which corresponds to RSB8 as demonstrated by fine-mapping, transgenic complementation and expression analysis, caused pleiotropic effects not only on flowering time, but, in the specific background of active FRI and FLC alleles, also on the RSB trait. The consequence of allelic variation only expressed in late-flowering genotypes revealed novel and thus far unsuspected roles of several genes well characterized for their roles in flowering time control.

  16. Identification of novel splice variants of the Arabidopsis DCL2 gene.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fei; Peng, Jiejun; Lu, Yuwen; Lin, Lin; Zheng, Hongying; Chen, Hairu; Chen, Jianping; Adams, Michael J

    2009-02-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, Dicer-like protein 2 (DCL2) cleaves double-stranded virus RNA, playing an essential role in the RNA interference pathway. Here, we describe three alternative splicing (AS) forms of AtDCL2: in one, both intron 8 and intron 10 are retained in the mRNA, in second only intron 8 is retained and in the third no intron is retained, but there is a deletion of 56 nucleotides at the end of exon 10. These splicing forms are present in stems and leaves at different development stages. AS was also detected in DCL2 of Brassica rapa, where intron 9, but not intron 8 or intron 10, was retained suggesting that AS may be a common phenomenon in cruciferous plant DCL2s. The retained introns and sequence deletions detected in AtDCL2 changed the reading frame and produced premature terminal codons. The AS forms appeared to be substrates of nonsense-mediated decay of mRNA.

  17. ABCB19-mediated polar auxin transport modulates Arabidopsis hypocotyl elongation and the endoreplication variant of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guosheng; Carville, Jacqueline S; Spalding, Edgar P

    2016-01-01

    Elongation of the Arabidopsis hypocotyl pushes the shoot-producing meristem out of the soil by rapid expansion of cells already present in the embryo. This elongation process is shown here to be impaired by as much as 35% in mutants lacking ABCB19, an ATP-binding cassette membrane protein required for polar auxin transport, during a limited time of fast growth in dim white light beginning 2.5 days after germination. The discovery of high ectopic expression of a cyclin B1;1-based reporter of mitosis throughout abcb19 hypocotyls without an equivalent effect on mitosis prompted investigations of the endoreplication variant of the cell cycle. Flow cytometry performed on nuclei isolated from upper (growing) regions of 3-day-old hypocotyls showed ploidy levels to be lower in abcb19 mutants compared with wild type. CCS52A2 messenger RNA encoding a nuclear protein that promotes a shift from mitosis to endoreplication was lower in abcb19 hypocotyls, and fluorescence microscopy showed the CCS52A2 protein to be lower in the nuclei of abcb19 hypocotyls compared with wild type. Providing abcb19 seedlings with nanomolar auxin rescued their low CCS52A2 levels, endocycle defects, aberrant cyclin B1;1 expression, and growth rate defect. The abcb19-like growth rate of ccs52a2 mutants was not rescued by auxin, placing CCS52A2 after ABCB19-dependent polar auxin transport in a pathway responsible for a component of ploidy-related hypocotyl growth. A ccs52A2 mutation did not affect the level or pattern of cyclin B1;1 expression, indicating that CCS52A2 does not mediate the effect of auxin on cyclin B1;1. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Nonsense-Mediated Decay of Alternative Precursor mRNA Splicing Variants Is a Major Determinant of the Arabidopsis Steady State Transcriptome[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Drechsel, Gabriele; Kahles, André; Kesarwani, Anil K.; Stauffer, Eva; Behr, Jonas; Drewe, Philipp; Rätsch, Gunnar; Wachter, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) surveillance pathway can recognize erroneous transcripts and physiological mRNAs, such as precursor mRNA alternative splicing (AS) variants. Currently, information on the global extent of coupled AS and NMD remains scarce and even absent for any plant species. To address this, we conducted transcriptome-wide splicing studies using Arabidopsis thaliana mutants in the NMD factor homologs UP FRAMESHIFT1 (UPF1) and UPF3 as well as wild-type samples treated with the translation inhibitor cycloheximide. Our analyses revealed that at least 17.4% of all multi-exon, protein-coding genes produce splicing variants that are targeted by NMD. Moreover, we provide evidence that UPF1 and UPF3 act in a translation-independent mRNA decay pathway. Importantly, 92.3% of the NMD-responsive mRNAs exhibit classical NMD-eliciting features, supporting their authenticity as direct targets. Genes generating NMD-sensitive AS variants function in diverse biological processes, including signaling and protein modification, for which NaCl stress–modulated AS-NMD was found. Besides mRNAs, numerous noncoding RNAs and transcripts derived from intergenic regions were shown to be NMD responsive. In summary, we provide evidence for a major function of AS-coupled NMD in shaping the Arabidopsis transcriptome, having fundamental implications in gene regulation and quality control of transcript processing. PMID:24163313

  19. HST and ground-based spectroscopy of quasar outflows: from mini-BALs to BALs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravec, E. A.; Hamann, F.; Capellupo, D. M.; McGraw, S. M.; Shields, J. C.; Rodríguez Hidalgo, P.

    2017-07-01

    Quasar outflows have been posited as a mechanism to couple supermassive black holes to evolution in their host galaxies. We use multi-epoch spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based observatories to study the outflows in seven quasars that have C iv outflow lines ranging from a classic broad absorption line (BAL) to weaker/narrower 'mini-BALs' across rest wavelengths of at least 850-1650 Å. The C iv outflow lines all varied within a time frame of ≤1.9 yr (rest). This includes equal occurrences of strengthening and weakening plus the emergence of a new BAL system at -38 800 km s-1 accompanied by dramatic strengthening in a mini-BAL at -22 800 km s-1. We infer from ˜1:1 doublet ratios in P v and other lines that the BAL system is highly saturated with line-of-sight covering fractions ranging from 0.27 to 0.80 in the highest to lowest column density regions, respectively. Three of the mini-BALs also provide evidence for saturation and partial covering based on ˜1:1 doublet ratios. We speculate that the BALs and mini-BALs form in similar clumpy/filamentary outflows, with mini-BALs identifying smaller or fewer clumps along our lines of sight. If we attribute the line variabilities to clumps crossing our lines of sight at roughly Keplerian speeds, then a typical variability time in our study, ˜1.1 yr, corresponds to a distance ˜2 pc from the central black hole. Combining this with the speed and minimum total column density inferred from the P v BAL, NH ≳ 2.5 × 1022 cm-2, suggests that the BAL outflow kinetic energy is in the range believed to be sufficient for feedback to galaxy evolution.

  20. Elemental concentrations in the seed of mutants and natural variants of Arabidopsis thaliana grown under varying soil conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The concentrations of mineral nutrients in seeds are critical to both the life cycle of plants as well as human nutrition. These concentrations are strongly influenced by soil conditions, as shown here by quantifying the concentration of 14 elements in seeds from Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown un...

  1. A specific variant of the PHR1 binding site is highly enriched in the Arabidopsis phosphate-responsive phospholipase DZ2 coexpression network.

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Hernández, Gustavo; Oropeza-Aburto, Araceli; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2012-08-01

    PLDZ2 is a member of the Arabidopsis phospholipase D gene family that is induced in both shoot and root in response to phosphate (Pi) starvation. Recently, through deletion and gain-of-function analyses of the PLDZ2 promoter, we identified a 65 bp region (denominated enhancer EZ2) capable of conferring tissue-specific and low-Pi responses to a minimal inactive promoter. The EZ2 element contains two P1BS motifs, each of which is the binding site for PHR1 and related transcription factors. This structural organization is evolutionarily conserved in orthologous promoters within the rosid clade. To determine whether EZ2 is significantly over-represented in Arabidopsis genes coexpressed with PLDZ2, we constructed a PLDZ2 coexpression network containing 26 genes, almost half of them encoding enzymes or regulatory proteins involved in Pi recycling. A variant of the P1BS motif was found to be highly enriched in the promoter regions of these coexpressed genes, showing an EZ2-like arrangement in seven of them. No other motifs were significantly enriched. The over-representation of the EZ2 arrangement of P1BS motifs in the promoters of genes coexpressed with PLDZ2, suggests this unit has a particularly important role as a regulatory element in a coexpression network involved in the release of Pi from phospholipids and other molecules under Pi-limiting conditions.

  2. A specific variant of the PHR1 binding site is highly enriched in the Arabidopsis phosphate-responsive phospholipase DZ2 coexpression network

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo-Hernández, Gustavo; Oropeza-Aburto, Araceli; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2012-01-01

    PLDZ2 is a member of the Arabidopsis phospholipase D gene family that is induced in both shoot and root in response to phosphate (Pi) starvation. Recently, through deletion and gain-of-function analyses of the PLDZ2 promoter, we identified a 65 bp region (denominated enhancer EZ2) capable of conferring tissue-specific and low-Pi responses to a minimal inactive promoter. The EZ2 element contains two P1BS motifs, each of which is the binding site for PHR1 and related transcription factors. This structural organization is evolutionarily conserved in orthologous promoters within the rosid clade. To determine whether EZ2 is significantly over-represented in Arabidopsis genes coexpressed with PLDZ2, we constructed a PLDZ2 coexpression network containing 26 genes, almost half of them encoding enzymes or regulatory proteins involved in Pi recycling. A variant of the P1BS motif was found to be highly enriched in the promoter regions of these coexpressed genes, showing an EZ2-like arrangement in seven of them. No other motifs were significantly enriched. The over-representation of the EZ2 arrangement of P1BS motifs in the promoters of genes coexpressed with PLDZ2, suggests this unit has a particularly important role as a regulatory element in a coexpression network involved in the release of Pi from phospholipids and other molecules under Pi-limiting conditions. PMID:22836502

  3. Arabidopsis KINETOCHORE NULL2 Is an Upstream Component for Centromeric Histone H3 Variant cenH3 Deposition at Centromeres[W

    PubMed Central

    Lermontova, Inna; Kuhlmann, Markus; Friedel, Swetlana; Rutten, Twan; Heckmann, Stefan; Sandmann, Michael; Demidov, Dmitri; Schubert, Veit; Schubert, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    The centromeric histone H3 variant cenH3 is an essential centromeric protein required for assembly, maintenance, and proper function of kinetochores during mitosis and meiosis. We identified a KINETOCHORE NULL2 (KNL2) homolog in Arabidopsis thaliana and uncovered features of its role in cenH3 loading at centromeres. We show that Arabidopsis KNL2 colocalizes with cenH3 and is associated with centromeres during all stages of the mitotic cell cycle, except from metaphase to mid-anaphase. KNL2 is regulated by the proteasome degradation pathway. The KNL2 promoter is mainly active in meristematic tissues, similar to the cenH3 promoter. A knockout mutant for KNL2 shows a reduced level of cenH3 expression and reduced amount of cenH3 protein at chromocenters of meristematic nuclei, anaphase bridges during mitosis, micronuclei in pollen tetrads, and 30% seed abortion. Moreover, knl2 mutant plants display reduced expression of suppressor of variegation 3-9 homologs2, 4, and 9 and reduced DNA methylation, suggesting an impact of KNL2 on the epigenetic environment for centromere maintenance. PMID:24014547

  4. Identification of proliferation-induced genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Characterization of a new member of the highly evolutionarily conserved histone H2A.F/Z variant subfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Callard, D; Mazzolini, L

    1997-01-01

    The changes in gene expression associated with the reinitiation of cell division and subsequent progression through the cell cycle in Arabidopsis thaliana cell-suspension cultures were investigated. Partial synchronization of cells was achieved by a technique combining phosphate starvation and a transient treatment with the DNA replication inhibitor aphidicolin. Six cDNAs corresponding to genes highly induced in proliferating cells and showing cell-cycle-regulated expression were obtained by the mRNA differential display technique. Full-length cDNA clones (cH2BAt and cH2AvAt) corresponding to two of the display products were subsequently isolated. The cH2BAt clone codes for a novel histone H2B protein, whereas the cH2AvAt cDNA corresponds to a gene encoding a new member of the highly conserved histone H2A.F/Z subfamily of chromosomal proteins. Further studies indicated that H2AvAt mRNA expression is tightly correlated with cell proliferation in cell-suspension cultures, and that closely related analogs of the encoded protein exist in Arabidopsis. The implications of the conservation of histone H2A.F/Z variants in plants are discussed. PMID:9414552

  5. A role for an alternative splice variant of PIF6 in the control of Arabidopsis primary seed dormancy.

    PubMed

    Penfield, Steven; Josse, Eve-Marie; Halliday, Karen J

    2010-05-01

    Phytochrome interacting factor (PIF) transcription factors have been shown to be important in the regulation of seed dormancy and germination by environmental cues. Many PIF-family transcription factors are expressed in seeds but only PIF1 and SPATULA (SPT) have been tested for a role in germination control. Here we show that PIF6 is expressed strongly during seed development, and that two splice variants exist, one full length (the alpha form), and a second, the beta form, in which a cryptic intron containing the potential DNA binding domain is spliced out, predicted to lead to the generation of a premature stop codon. Loss of PIF6 increases primary seed dormancy, whereas overexpression of the beta form, but not the alpha form, reduce dormancy. Our data show the potential for natural splice variants of PIF transcription factors to be important in the evolution of the control of environmental signalling in plants.

  6. Expression analysis of a heat-inducible, Myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase (MIPS) gene from wheat and the alternatively spliced variants of rice and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Neetika; Chauhan, Harsh; Khurana, Paramjit

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dissection and a deeper analysis of the heat stress response mechanism in wheat have been poorly understood so far. This study delves into the molecular basis of action of TaMIPS, a heat stress-inducible enzyme that was identified through PCR-select subtraction technology, which is named here as TaMIPS2. MIPS (L-Myo-inositol-phosphate synthase) is important for the normal growth and development in plants. Expression profiling showed that TaMIPS2 is expressed during different developing seed stages upon heat stress. Also, the transcript levels increase in unfertilized ovaries and significant amounts are present during the recovery period providing evidence that MIPS is crucial for its role in heat stress recovery and flower development. Alternatively spliced forms from rice and Arabidopsis were also identified and their expression analysis revealed that apart from heat stress, some of the spliced variants were also inducible by drought, NaCl, Cold, ABA, BR, SA and mannitol. In silico promoter analysis revealed various cis-elements that could contribute for the differential regulation of MIPS in different plant systems. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that MIPS are highly conserved among monocots and dicots and TaMIPS2 grouped specifically with monocots. Comparative analyses was undertaken by different experimental approaches, i.e., semi-quantitative RT-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR, Genevestigator as a reference expression tool and motif analysis to predict the possible function of TaMIPS2 in regulating the different aspects of plant development under abiotic stress in wheat.

  7. The Bal Basera Project: The Body as Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Carissa Hope

    2011-01-01

    The author travelled to Jaipur, India, in June 2009 to run a project with a group of 12 young runaways at the Bal Basera Centre, a transitional shelter for boys under the age of 18. The Centre sits within the Jaipur Municipal Police force compound, just a few yards away from the City Railway Station. Bal Basera, or "transit home" in…

  8. Radio characteristics of Broad Absorption Lines (BAL) quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceglowski, Maciej

    2011-07-01

    Broad absorption lines (BALs), seen in a small fraction of both the radio-quiet and radio-loud quasar populations, are probably caused by the outflow of gas with high velocities and are part of the accretion process. The presence of BALs is the geometrical effect and/or it is connected with the quasar evolution. It has been believed that BALQSO occurs only among radio-quiet galaxies. However, in 2000 Becker et al. discovered the representative sample of radio-loud objects which exhibits broad absorption troughs. The radio morphologies of radio-loud BAL quasars provide important additional information about their orientation and the direction of the outflow. Using the final release of FIRST survey combined with a A Catalog of BAL QSOs (SDSS/DR3), we have constructed a new sample of compact radio-loud BAL QSOs, which makes the majority of radio-loud BAL QSOs. The main goal of this project is to study the origin of BALs by analysis the BAL QSOs radio morphology, their orientation and jets evolution, using EVN at 1.6 GHz and VLBA at 5 and 8.4 GHz.

  9. The Bal Basera Project: The Body as Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Carissa Hope

    2011-01-01

    The author travelled to Jaipur, India, in June 2009 to run a project with a group of 12 young runaways at the Bal Basera Centre, a transitional shelter for boys under the age of 18. The Centre sits within the Jaipur Municipal Police force compound, just a few yards away from the City Railway Station. Bal Basera, or "transit home" in…

  10. [Baló's concentric sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Castaigne, P; Escourolle, R; Chain, F; Foncin, J F; Gray, F; Sauron, B; Duyckaerts, C

    1984-01-01

    A clinico-pathological case of concentric sclerosis (Baló type) is reported. A 30-year-old man experienced dizziness, nausea and vomiting. Twelve days later he developed gait disturbances. Neurological examination showed broad based gait, brisk tendon reflexes, bilateral extensor plantar responses, right hemihypoesthesia, cerebellar dysmetria, and a left lateral gaze palsy. CSF examination showed, 520 mg p. 100 ml protein, 7500 red blood cells, 31 lymphocytes and 9 polymorphonuclear leukocytes/mm3, 18 p. 100 gammaglobulin. Three CT scans were performed and showed a round hypodensity in the parieto-occipital white matter with contrast enhancement on one occasion, and several other hypodensities in the contralateral parieto-occipital white matter and in both frontal lobes. 23 days after the onset of the disease, the patient became comatose. A cerebral biopsy was obtained from one of the frontal lesions. He died from aspiration bronchopneumonia 2 months after the first signs. Neuropathological examination showed numerous concentric zones of demyelination which involved the white matter of both hemispheres, brain stem, and cerebellum. On light microscopy sudanophilic myelin breakdown products were numerous in the bands of demyelinisation. Astrocytic proliferation was marked, with frequent Rosenthal fibers. Edema was noted in some lesions. Myelin-axonal dissociation was obvious, but some axonal swelling were observed. Electron microscopy demonstrated the integrity of oligodendrocytes and of blood vessels and confirmed the prominent alterations of the astrocytes. Fifteen similar cases of the literature have been reviewed. The present case seems to be the first one with CT scan examination and electron microscopic study of a brain biopsy. The nosological situation of Baló's disease among the inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the group of MS is discussed.

  11. Histone H1 Variants in Arabidopsis Are Subject to Numerous Post-Translational Modifications, Both Conserved and Previously Unknown in Histones, Suggesting Complex Functions of H1 in Plants.

    PubMed

    Kotliński, Maciej; Rutowicz, Kinga; Kniżewski, Łukasz; Palusiński, Antoni; Olędzki, Jacek; Fogtman, Anna; Rubel, Tymon; Koblowska, Marta; Dadlez, Michał; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Jerzmanowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Linker histones (H1s) are conserved and ubiquitous structural components of eukaryotic chromatin. Multiple non-allelic variants of H1, which differ in their DNA/nucleosome binding properties, co-exist in animal and plant cells and have been implicated in the control of genetic programs during development and differentiation. Studies in mammals and Drosophila have revealed diverse post-translational modifications of H1s, most of which are of unknown function. So far, it is not known how this pattern compares with that of H1s from other major lineages of multicellular Eukaryotes. Here, we show that the two main H1variants of a model flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana are subject to a rich and diverse array of post-translational modifications. The distribution of these modifications in the H1 molecule, especially in its globular domain (GH1), resembles that occurring in mammalian H1s, suggesting that their functional significance is likely to be conserved. While the majority of modifications detected in Arabidopsis H1s, including phosphorylation, acetylation, mono- and dimethylation, formylation, crotonylation and propionylation, have also been reported in H1s of other species, some others have not been previously identified in histones.

  12. Histone H1 Variants in Arabidopsis Are Subject to Numerous Post-Translational Modifications, Both Conserved and Previously Unknown in Histones, Suggesting Complex Functions of H1 in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Kotliński, Maciej; Rutowicz, Kinga; Kniżewski, Łukasz; Palusiński, Antoni; Olędzki, Jacek; Fogtman, Anna; Rubel, Tymon; Koblowska, Marta; Dadlez, Michał; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Jerzmanowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Linker histones (H1s) are conserved and ubiquitous structural components of eukaryotic chromatin. Multiple non-allelic variants of H1, which differ in their DNA/nucleosome binding properties, co-exist in animal and plant cells and have been implicated in the control of genetic programs during development and differentiation. Studies in mammals and Drosophila have revealed diverse post-translational modifications of H1s, most of which are of unknown function. So far, it is not known how this pattern compares with that of H1s from other major lineages of multicellular Eukaryotes. Here, we show that the two main H1variants of a model flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana are subject to a rich and diverse array of post-translational modifications. The distribution of these modifications in the H1 molecule, especially in its globular domain (GH1), resembles that occurring in mammalian H1s, suggesting that their functional significance is likely to be conserved. While the majority of modifications detected in Arabidopsis H1s, including phosphorylation, acetylation, mono- and dimethylation, formylation, crotonylation and propionylation, have also been reported in H1s of other species, some others have not been previously identified in histones. PMID:26820416

  13. Balmer Absorption Lines in FeLoBALs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, K.; Iwata, I.; Ohta, K.; Tamura, N.; Ando, M.; Akiyama, M.; Kiuchi, G.; Nakanishi, K.

    2007-10-01

    We discovered non-stellar Balmer absorption lines in two many-narrow-trough FeLoBALs (mntBALs) by the near-infrared spectroscopy with Subaru/CISCO. Presence of the non-stellar Balmer absorption lines is known to date only in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151; thus our discovery is the first cases for quasars. Since all known active galactic nuclei with Balmer absorption lines share similar characteristics, it is suggested that there is a population of BAL quasars which have unique structures at their nuclei or unique evolutionary phase.

  14. Extreme Bal quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick B. Hall et al.

    2002-10-11

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has discovered a population of broad absorption line quasars with various extreme properties. Many show absorption from metastable states of Fe II with varying excitations; several objects are almost completely absorbed bluewards of Mg II; at least one shows stronger absorption from Fe III than Fe II, indicating temperatures T > 35000 K in the absorbing region; and one object even seems to have broad H{beta} absorption. Many of these extreme BALs are also heavily reddened, though ''normal'' BALs (particularly LoBALs) from SDSS also show evidence for internal reddening.

  15. Toward a Complete Picture of Quasar Outflows: from BALs to mini-BALs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravec, Emily; Hamann, Fred; Capellupo, Daniel M.; McGraw, Sean; Shields, Joseph C.; Rodriguez Hidalgo, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Accretion disk outflows are important for galaxy evolution and an integral part of the quasar phenomenon, but they remain poorly understood. In order to construct a more complete picture of the quasar phenomenon, we need to understand the full range of different types of quasar outflows and how they correlate with one another. We examine seven SDSS quasars with CIV 1548,1551 Å outflow lines that span a range from strong BALs to weak mini-BALs. They have moderate redshifts (1.68 < z < 1.91) to minimize contamination from the Lyα forest while still allowing measurements of CIV from the ground and other important lines like OVI 1031,1038 Å and PV 1118,1128 Å with HST. We use archival SDSS and BOSS spectra in combination with HST COS G230L observations and multi-epoch ground-based spectra obtained at the MDM and Kitt Peak observatories to measure a variety of ions across the rest UV wavelength range. Our preliminary analysis shows OVI is present and stronger than CIV in all seven quasars. In one case, we detect an OVI mini-BAL with no accompanying CIV, requiring a highly-ionized outflow. In the strongest BAL quasar, we detect resolved PV doublet absorption that requires PV optical depths > 3 and in outflow gas with a line-of-sight covering fraction of only 0.27. Thus, the total column density in this outflow component might exceed N_H > 1023 cm-2 which has important consequences for the outflow kinetic energies and feedback. The multi-epoch CIV data reveal CIV outflow variability in all seven quasars; four become weaker, one becomes stronger, and two become both stronger and weaker over the different epochs. This variability happens across time scales of ~1-12 years in the quasar rest frames which is consistent with outflow locations close to the central quasar engines. We use these and other results to constrain the ionization, column density, and location of the absorbers with the broader goals of understanding accretion physics, the integrated structure of

  16. (BAl12)Cs:mA cluster-assembled solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashman, C.; Khanna, S. N.; Liu, Feng; Jena, P.; Kaplan, T.; Mostoller, M.

    1997-06-01

    First-principles calculations on the geometry and stability of AlnBm clusters have been carried out to examine the effect of size, composition, and electronic-shell filling on their relative stability. It is shown that although Al and B are both trivalent, a BAl12 cluster is more stable than an Al13 by 3.4 eV. The enhanced stability is shown to arise due to the relaxation of surface strain in the Al cage when the central Al is replaced by a smaller B atom. Replacement of an additional Al by B to produce B2Al11 results in deformation of the icosahedral BAl12 cage and reduces the stability. The possibility of forming crystals using BAl12 and Cs is examined via total-energy calculations. It is shown that a solid with icosahedral or cuboctahedral BAl12 and Cs and having the CsCl structure is metastable and could be synthesized.

  17. Optical variability properties of mini-BAL and NAL quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Takashi; Misawa, Toru; Morokuma, Tomoki; Koyamada, Suzuka; Takahashi, Kazuma; Wada, Hisashi

    2016-08-01

    While narrow absorption lines (NALs) are relatively stable, broad absorption lines (BALs) and mini-BAL systems usually show violent time variability within a few years via a mechanism that is not yet understood. In this study, we examine the variable ionization state (VIS) scenario as a plausible mechanism, as previously suspected. Over three years, we performed photometric monitoring observations of four mini-BAL and five NAL quasars at zem ˜ 2.0-3.1 using the 105 cm Kiso Schmidt Telescope in u, g, and i bands. We also performed spectroscopic monitoring observation of one of our mini-BAL quasars (HS 1603+3820) using the 188 cm Okayama Telescope over the same period as the photometric observations. Our main results are as follows: (1) Structure function (SF) analysis revealed that the quasar UV flux variability over three years was not large enough to support the VIS scenario, unless the ionization condition of outflow gas is very low. (2) There was no crucial difference between the SFs of mini-BAL and NAL quasars. (3) The variability of the mini-BAL and quasar light curves was weakly synchronized with a small time delay for HS 1603+3820. These results suggest that the VIS scenario may need additional mechanisms such as variable shielding by X-ray warm absorbers.

  18. BAL QSOs and Extreme UFOs: The Eddington Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubovas, Kastytis; King, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    We suggest a common physical origin connecting the fast, highly ionized winds (UFOs) seen in nearby active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and the slower and less ionized winds of broad absorption line (BAL) QSOs. The primary difference is the mass-loss rate in the wind, which is ultimately determined by the rate at which mass is fed toward the central supermassive black hole (SMBH) on large scales. This is below the Eddington accretion rate in most UFOs, and slightly super-Eddington in extreme UFOs such as PG1211+143, but ranges up to ~10-50 times this in BAL QSOs. For UFOs this implies black hole accretion rates and wind mass-loss rates which are at most comparable to Eddington, giving fast, highly ionized winds. In contrast, BAL QSO black holes have mildly super-Eddington accretion rates, and drive winds whose mass-loss rates are significantly super-Eddington, and so are slower and less ionized. This picture correctly predicts the velocities and ionization states of the observed winds, including the recently discovered one in SDSS J1106+1939. We suggest that luminous AGNs may evolve through a sequence from BAL QSO through LoBAL to UFO-producing Seyfert or quasar as their Eddington factors drop during the decay of a bright accretion event. LoBALs correspond to a short-lived stage in which the AGN radiation pressure largely evacuates the ionization cone, but before the large-scale accretion rate has dropped to the Eddington value. We show that sub-Eddington wind rates would produce an M-σ relation lying above that observed. We conclude that significant SMBH mass growth must occur in super-Eddington phases, either as BAL QSOs, extreme UFOs, or obscured from direct observation.

  19. BAL QSOs AND EXTREME UFOs: THE EDDINGTON CONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Zubovas, Kastytis; King, Andrew

    2013-05-20

    We suggest a common physical origin connecting the fast, highly ionized winds (UFOs) seen in nearby active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and the slower and less ionized winds of broad absorption line (BAL) QSOs. The primary difference is the mass-loss rate in the wind, which is ultimately determined by the rate at which mass is fed toward the central supermassive black hole (SMBH) on large scales. This is below the Eddington accretion rate in most UFOs, and slightly super-Eddington in extreme UFOs such as PG1211+143, but ranges up to {approx}10-50 times this in BAL QSOs. For UFOs this implies black hole accretion rates and wind mass-loss rates which are at most comparable to Eddington, giving fast, highly ionized winds. In contrast, BAL QSO black holes have mildly super-Eddington accretion rates, and drive winds whose mass-loss rates are significantly super-Eddington, and so are slower and less ionized. This picture correctly predicts the velocities and ionization states of the observed winds, including the recently discovered one in SDSS J1106+1939. We suggest that luminous AGNs may evolve through a sequence from BAL QSO through LoBAL to UFO-producing Seyfert or quasar as their Eddington factors drop during the decay of a bright accretion event. LoBALs correspond to a short-lived stage in which the AGN radiation pressure largely evacuates the ionization cone, but before the large-scale accretion rate has dropped to the Eddington value. We show that sub-Eddington wind rates would produce an M-{sigma} relation lying above that observed. We conclude that significant SMBH mass growth must occur in super-Eddington phases, either as BAL QSOs, extreme UFOs, or obscured from direct observation.

  20. Changing Transcriptional Initiation Sites and Alternative 5'- and 3'-Splice Site Selection of the First Intron Deploys the Arabidopsis Protein Isoaspartyl Methyltransferase2 Variants to Different Subcellular Compartments

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. possesses two PROTEIN-L-ISOASPARTATE METHYLTRANSFERASE (PIMT), genes encoding an enzyme (EC 2.1.1.77) capable of converting uncoded, L-isoaspartyl residues, arising spontaneously at L-asparaginyl and L-aspartyl sites in proteins, to L-aspartate. PIMT2 produces at lea...

  1. HFE gene variants and iron-induced oxygen radical generation in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Sangiuolo, Federica; Puxeddu, Ermanno; Pezzuto, Gabriella; Cavalli, Francesco; Longo, Giuliana; Comandini, Alessia; Di Pierro, Donato; Pallante, Marco; Sergiacomi, Gianluigi; Simonetti, Giovanni; Zompatori, Maurizio; Orlandi, Augusto; Magrini, Andrea; Amicosante, Massimo; Mariani, Francesca; Losi, Monica; Fraboni, Daniela; Bisetti, Alberto; Saltini, Cesare

    2015-02-01

    In idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), lung accumulation of excessive extracellular iron and macrophage haemosiderin may suggest disordered iron homeostasis leading to recurring microscopic injury and fibrosing damage. The current study population comprised 89 consistent IPF patients and 107 controls. 54 patients and 11 controls underwent bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Haemosiderin was assessed by Perls' stain, BAL fluid malondialdehyde (MDA) by high-performance liquid chromatography, BAL cell iron-dependent oxygen radical generation by fluorimetry and the frequency of hereditary haemochromatosis HFE gene variants by reverse dot blot hybridisation. Macrophage haemosiderin, BAL fluid MDA and BAL cell unstimulated iron-dependent oxygen radical generation were all significantly increased above controls (p<0.05). The frequency of C282Y, S65C and H63D HFE allelic variants was markedly higher in IPF compared with controls (40.4% versus 22.4%, OR 2.35, p=0.008) and was associated with higher iron-dependent oxygen radical generation (HFE variant 107.4±56.0, HFE wild type (wt) 59.4±36.4 and controls 16.7±11.8 fluorescence units per 10(5) BAL cells; p=0.028 HFE variant versus HFE wt, p=0.006 HFE wt versus controls). The data suggest iron dysregulation associated with HFE allelic variants may play an important role in increasing susceptibility to environmental exposures, leading to recurring injury and fibrosis in IPF. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  2. InsP6-sensitive variants of the Gle1 mRNA export factor rescue growth and fertility defects of the ipk1 low-phytic-acid mutation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho-Seok; Lee, Du-Hwa; Cho, Hui Kyung; Kim, Song Hee; Auh, Joong Hyuck; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2015-02-01

    Myo-inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate (InsP(6)), also known as phytic acid, accumulates in large quantities in plant seeds, serving as a phosphorus reservoir, but is an animal antinutrient and an important source of water pollution. Here, we report that Gle1 (GLFG lethal 1) in conjunction with InsP(6) functions as an activator of the ATPase/RNA helicase LOS4 (low expression of osmotically responsive genes 4), which is involved in mRNA export in plants, supporting the Gle1-InsP(6)-Dbp5 (LOS4 homolog) paradigm proposed in yeast. Interestingly, plant Gle1 proteins have modifications in several key residues of the InsP(6) binding pocket, which reduce the basicity of the surface charge. Arabidopsis thaliana Gle1 variants containing mutations that increase the basic charge of the InsP(6) binding surface show increased sensitivity to InsP(6) concentrations for the stimulation of LOS4 ATPase activity in vitro. Expression of the Gle1 variants with enhanced InsP(6) sensitivity rescues the mRNA export defect of the ipk1 (inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate 2-kinase) InsP(6)-deficient mutant and, furthermore, significantly improves vegetative growth, seed yield, and seed performance of the mutant. These results suggest that Gle1 is an important factor responsible for mediating InsP(6) functions in plant growth and reproduction and that Gle1 variants with increased InsP(6) sensitivity may be useful for engineering high-yielding low-phytate crops. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  3. InsP6-Sensitive Variants of the Gle1 mRNA Export Factor Rescue Growth and Fertility Defects of the ipk1 Low-Phytic-Acid Mutation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Seok; Lee, Du-Hwa; Cho, Hui Kyung; Kim, Song Hee; Auh, Joong Hyuck; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2015-01-01

    Myo-inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate (InsP6), also known as phytic acid, accumulates in large quantities in plant seeds, serving as a phosphorus reservoir, but is an animal antinutrient and an important source of water pollution. Here, we report that Gle1 (GLFG lethal 1) in conjunction with InsP6 functions as an activator of the ATPase/RNA helicase LOS4 (low expression of osmotically responsive genes 4), which is involved in mRNA export in plants, supporting the Gle1-InsP6-Dbp5 (LOS4 homolog) paradigm proposed in yeast. Interestingly, plant Gle1 proteins have modifications in several key residues of the InsP6 binding pocket, which reduce the basicity of the surface charge. Arabidopsis thaliana Gle1 variants containing mutations that increase the basic charge of the InsP6 binding surface show increased sensitivity to InsP6 concentrations for the stimulation of LOS4 ATPase activity in vitro. Expression of the Gle1 variants with enhanced InsP6 sensitivity rescues the mRNA export defect of the ipk1 (inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate 2-kinase) InsP6-deficient mutant and, furthermore, significantly improves vegetative growth, seed yield, and seed performance of the mutant. These results suggest that Gle1 is an important factor responsible for mediating InsP6 functions in plant growth and reproduction and that Gle1 variants with increased InsP6 sensitivity may be useful for engineering high-yielding low-phytate crops. PMID:25670768

  4. Measuring the Tensile Strength of B/AL Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Proposed nondestructive technique correlates damping measurements with material strength. Increasing axial damping and decreasing axial tensile strength are observed after 1-hour treatment of B/AL composites containing about 50 percent fiber. Damping was measured in vacuum at frequencies near 2,000 Hz, and tensile strength was normalized by maximum strength observed before thermally induced degradation.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 188 CIV BAL QSOs from SDSS DR7 (He+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Z.-C.; Bian, W.-H.; Ge, X.; Jiang, X.-L.

    2016-07-01

    In the SDSS DR7, it is found that there are 1080 spectra of 480 CIV BAL QSOs with at least two-epoch observations. In order to identify the variable regions in CIV BAL troughs, we select BAL QSOs with SDSS spectral signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) at r band larger than 10, and redshift more than 1.7. It consists of 188 CIV BAL QSOs with 428 SDSS spectra. (2 data files).

  6. In vitro activity of BAL30072 against Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Mima, Takehiko; Kvitko, Brian H.; Rholl, Drew A.; Page, Malcolm G.P.; Desarbre, Eric; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2011-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intrinsically antibiotic-resistant Category B priority pathogen and the aetiological agent of melioidosis. Treatment of B. pseudomallei infection is biphasic and lengthy in order to combat the acute and chronic phases of the disease. Acute-phase treatment preferably involves an intravenous cephalosporin (ceftazidime) or a carbapenem (imipenem or meropenem). In this study, the anti-B. pseudomallei efficacy of a new monosulfactam, BAL30072, was tested against laboratory strains 1026b and 1710b and several isogenic mutant derivatives as well as a collection of clinical and environmental B. pseudomallei strains from Thailand. More than 93% of the isolates had minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) in the range 0.004–0.016 μg/mL. For the laboratory strain 1026b, the MIC of BAL30072 was 0.008 μg/mL, comparable with the MICs of 1.5 μg/mL for ceftazidime, 0.5 μg/mL for imipenem and 1 μg/mL for meropenem. Time–kill curves revealed that BAL30072 was rapidly bactericidal, killing >99% of bacteria in 2 h. BAL30072 activity was not significantly affected by efflux, it was only a marginal substrate of PenA β-lactamase, and activity was independent of malleobactin production and transport and the ability to transport pyochelin. In summary, BAL30072 has superior in vitro activity against B. pseudomallei compared with ceftazidime, meropenem or imipenem and it is rapidly bactericidal. PMID:21596528

  7. In vitro activity of BAL30072 against Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Mima, Takehiko; Kvitko, Brian H; Rholl, Drew A; Page, Malcolm G P; Desarbre, Eric; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2011-08-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is an intrinsically antibiotic-resistant Category B priority pathogen and the aetiological agent of melioidosis. Treatment of B. pseudomallei infection is biphasic and lengthy in order to combat the acute and chronic phases of the disease. Acute-phase treatment preferably involves an intravenous cephalosporin (ceftazidime) or a carbapenem (imipenem or meropenem). In this study, the anti-B. pseudomallei efficacy of a new monosulfactam, BAL30072, was tested against laboratory strains 1026b and 1710b and several isogenic mutant derivatives as well as a collection of clinical and environmental B. pseudomallei strains from Thailand. More than 93% of the isolates had minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) in the range 0.004-0.016 μg/mL. For the laboratory strain 1026b, the MIC of BAL30072 was 0.008 μg/mL, comparable with the MICs of 1.5 μg/mL for ceftazidime, 0.5 μg/mL for imipenem and 1 μg/mL for meropenem. Time-kill curves revealed that BAL30072 was rapidly bactericidal, killing >99% of bacteria in 2 h. BAL30072 activity was not significantly affected by efflux, it was only a marginal substrate of PenA β-lactamase, and activity was independent of malleobactin production and transport and the ability to transport pyochelin. In summary, BAL30072 has superior in vitro activity against B. pseudomallei compared with ceftazidime, meropenem or imipenem and it is rapidly bactericidal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  8. Interface reaction and characterization in B/Al composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, W. H.; Koczak, M. J.; Lawley, A.

    1978-01-01

    Interfacial reactions, strength degradation, and fracture morphology have been characterized in B/Al(1100) and B/Al(6061) composite systems at a volume fraction of 0.55. Reaction was promoted by isothermal exposure at 350 C or 500 C for times up to 860,000 s. Tetragonal AlB12 was identified as the reaction product in the 6061 matrix and hexagonal AlB2 in the 1100 matrix. Interface development is analyzed based on a moving boundary model modified by the addition of ternary elements. While strength decreases in both systems, the time dependence of elevated-temperature exposure is different in the two matrix materials. In the 45 deg fiber orientation, failure occurs primarily by matrix shear, whereas in the 90 deg fiber orientation, fracture morphology is characterized by a mixture of fiber splitting, ductile matrix fracture, and failure at fiber-matrix interfaces.

  9. PP2C-like Promoter and Its Deletion Variants Are Induced by ABA but Not by MeJA and SA in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Bhalothia, Purva; Sangwan, Chetna; Alok, Anshu; Mehrotra, Sandhya; Mehrotra, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression is mediated through interaction between cis regulatory elements and its cognate transcription factors. Cis regulatory elements are defined as non-coding DNA sequences that provide the binding sites for transcription factors and are clustered in the upstream region of genes. ACGT cis regulatory element is one of the important cis regulatory elements found to be involved in diverse biological processes like auxin response, salicylic acid (SA) response, UV light response, ABA response and jasmonic acid (JA) response. We identified through in silico analysis that the upstream region of protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) gene has a distinct genetic architecture of ACGT elements. In the present study, the activation of the full length promoter and its deletion constructs like 900 base pair, 500 base pair, 400 base pair and NRM (Nathji Rajesh Mehrotra) were examined by stable transformation in Arabidopsis thaliana using β-glucuronidase as the reporter gene. Evaluation of deletion constructs of PP2C-like promoter was carried out in the presence of phytohormones like abscisic acid (ABA), SA and JA. Our result indicated that the full length and 900 base pair promoter-reporter constructs of PP2C-like promoter was induced in response to ABA but not to methyl jasmonate and SA.

  10. A SCUBA-2 survey of FeLoBAL QSOs. Are FeLoBALs in a `transition phase' between ULIRGs and QSOs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Violino, Giulio; Coppin, Kristen E. K.; Stevens, Jason A.; Farrah, Duncan; Geach, James E.; Alexander, Dave M.; Hickox, Ryan; Smith, Daniel J. B.; Wardlow, Julie L.

    2016-04-01

    It is thought that a class of broad absorption line (BAL) QSOs, characterized by Fe absorption features in their UV spectra (called `FeLoBALs'), could mark a transition stage between the end of an obscured starburst event and a youthful QSO beginning to shed its dust cocoon, where Fe has been injected into the interstellar medium by the starburst. To test this hypothesis, we have undertaken deep Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array 2 (SCUBA-2) 850 μm observations of a sample of 17 FeLoBAL QSOs with 0.89 ≤ z ≤ 2.78 and -23.31 ≤ MB ≤ -28.50 to directly detect an excess in the thermal emission of the dust which would probe enhanced star formation activity. We find that FeLoBALs are not luminous sources in the sub-mm, none of them are individually detected at 850 μm, nor as a population through stacking (Fs = 1.14 ± 0.58 mJy). Statistical and survival analyses reveal that FeLoBALs have sub-mm properties consistent with BAL and non-BAL QSOs with matched redshifts and magnitudes. An Spectral Energy Distribution fitting analysis shows that the far-infrared emission is dominated by active galactic nuclei activity, and a starburst component is required only in 6/17 sources of our sample; moreover the integrated total luminosity of 16/17 sources is L ≥ 1012 L⊙, high enough to classify FeLoBALs as infrared luminous. In conclusion, we do not find any evidence in support of FeLoBAL QSOs being a transition population between an ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) and an unobscured QSO; in particular, FeLoBALs are not characterized by a cold starburst which would support this hypothesis.

  11. The Level of Ionization and Chemical Composition of QSO BAL Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopko, M., Jr.; Turnshek, D. A.; Espey, B. R.

    1992-05-01

    We present results from our attempts to understand the level of ionization and chemical composition of the Broad Absorption Line (BAL) regions of QSOs. We discuss three aspects of the work: 1) We consider methods used to derive BAL region column densities as a function of outflow velocity from BAL profiles, discussing the problems associated with making assumptions about BAL region cloud sizes, covering factors, and internal kinematics (thermal versus turbulent velocities). 2) We apply these methods to a study of the ionization and chemical composition of QSO BAL regions using Ferland's photoionization code CLOUDY. 3) We present results for several BAL QSOs in our study, taking advantage of the presence of absorption from different ions of the same element to derive photoionization parameters. This allows us to derive more stringent constraints than has been possible in the past.

  12. Dual Analysis for Mycobacteria and Propionibacteria in Sarcoidosis BAL

    PubMed Central

    Oswald-Richter, Kyra A.; Beachboard, Dia C.; Seeley, Erin H.; Abraham, Susamma; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Jenkins, Cathy A.; Culver, Daniel A.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Drake, Wonder P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Sarcoidosis is a non-caseating granulomatous disease for which a role for infectious antigens continues to strengthen. Recent studies have reported molecular evidence of mycobacteria or propionibacteria. We assessed for immune responses against mycobacterial and propionibacterial antigens in sarcoidosis bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) using flow cytometry, and localized signals consistent with microbial antigens with sarcoidosis specimens, using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS). Methods BAL cells from 27 sarcoidosis, 14 PPD- controls, and 9 subjects with nontuberculosis mycobacterial (NTM) infections were analyzed for production of IFN-γ after stimulation with mycobacterial ESAT-6 and Propionibacterium acnes proteins. To complement the immunological data, MALDI-IMS was performed to localize ESAT-6 and Propionibacterium acnes signals within sarcoidosis and control specimens. Results CD4+ immunologic analysis for mycobacteria was positive in 17/27 sarcoidosis subjects, compared to 2/14 PPD-subjects, and 5/9 NTM subjects (p=00.008 and p=00.71 respectively, Fisher's exact test). There was no significant difference for recognition of P. acnes, which occurred only in sarcoidosis subjects that also recognized ESAT-6. Similar results were also observed for the CD8+ immunologic analysis. MALDI-IMS localized signals consistent with ESAT-6 only within sites of granulomatous inflammation, whereas P. acnes signals were distributed throughout the specimen. Conclusions MALDI-IMS localizes signals consistent with ESAT-6 to sarcoidosis granulomas, whereas no specific localization of P. acnes signals is detected. Immune responses against both mycobacterial and P. acnes are present within sarcoidosis BAL, but only mycobacterial signals are distinct from disease controls. These immunologic and molecular investigations support further investigation of the microbial community within sarcoidosis granulomas. PMID:22552860

  13. Drug evaluation: BAL-8557--a novel broad-spectrum triazole antifungal.

    PubMed

    Odds, Frank C

    2006-08-01

    Basilea Pharmaceutica is developing BAL-8557, a water-soluble prodrug of the triazole BAL-4815, for the potential treatment of fungal infections. By August 2005, a phase II study in oral candidiasis was underway. In September 2005, phase III trials were planned for invasive Candida and mold infections, including aspergillus and zygomycetes.

  14. THE NATURE OF LoBAL QSOs. I. SEDs AND MID-INFRARED SPECTRAL PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarova, Mariana S.; Canalizo, Gabriela; Lacy, Mark; Sajina, Anna E-mail: gabriela.canalizo@ucr.edu E-mail: Anna.Sajina@tufts.edu

    2012-08-10

    We have obtained Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectra and MIPS 24, 70, and 160 {mu}m photometry for a volume-limited sample of 22 Sloan Digital Sky Survey selected low-ionization broad absorption line (LoBALs) QSOs at 0.5 < z < 0.6. By comparing their mid-IR spectral properties and far-IR spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with those of a control sample of 35 non-LoBALs matched in M{sub i} , we investigate the differences between the two populations in terms of their infrared emission and star formation (SF) activity. Twenty-five percent of the LoBALs show polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features and 45% have weak 9.7 {mu}m silicate dust emission. We model the SEDs and decouple the active galactic nucleus (AGN) and starburst contributions to the far-infrared luminosity in LoBALs and in non-LoBALs. Their median total, starburst, and AGN infrared luminosities are comparable. Twenty percent (but no more than 60%) of the LoBALs and 26% of the non-LoBALs are ultraluminous infrared galaxies (L{sub IR} > 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }). We estimate star formation rates (SFRs) corrected for the AGN contribution to the FIR flux and find that LoBALs have comparable levels of SF activity to non-LoBALs when considering the entire samples. However, the SFRs of the IR-luminous LoBALs are 80% higher than those of their counterparts in the control sample. The median contribution of SF to the total far-infrared flux in LoBALs and in non-LoBALs is estimated to be 40%-50%, in agreement with previous results for Palomar-Green (PG) QSOs. Overall, our results show that there is no strong evidence from the mid- and far-IR properties that LoBALs are drawn from a different parent population than non-LoBALs.

  15. Microstructure and magnetic properties of mechanically alloyed FeSiBAlNi (Nb) high entropy alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Zheng, Zhou; Xu, Jing; Wang, Yan

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, the effects of milling duration and composition on the microstructure and magnetic properties of equi-atomic FeSiBAlNi and FeSiBAlNiNb high entropy alloys during mechanical alloying have been investigated using X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and alternating gradient magnetometry. The amorphous high entropy alloys have been successfully fabricated using the mechanical alloying method. The results show that the Nb addition prolongs the milling time for the formation of the fully FeSiBAlNi amorphous phase and decreases the glass forming ability. However, FeSiBAlNiNb amorphous high entropy alloy has the higher thermal stability and heat resisting properties. Moreover, the as-milled FeSiBAlNi(Nb) powders are soft-magnetic materials indicated by their low coercivity. The saturation magnetization of the as-milled FeSiBAlNi(Nb) powders decreases with prolonging of the milling time and shows the lowest value when the amorphous high entropy alloys are formed. It suggests that the as-milled products with solid solution phases show the better soft-magnetic properties than those with fully amorphous phases. The Nb addition does not improve the soft-magnetic properties of the FeSiBAlNi high entropy alloys. Rather, both amorphous high entropy alloys have similar soft-magnetic properties after a long milling time.

  16. Clara cell secretory protein. Levels in BAL fluid after smoking cessation.

    PubMed

    Andersson, O; Cassel, T N; Sköld, C M; Eklund, A; Lund, J; Nord, M

    2000-07-01

    The bronchiolar Clara cell is a major target for tobacco smoke exposure. To improve our understanding of the putative regenerative/repair mechanism(s) in the bronchiolar epithelium, we measured the levels of the Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP) in BAL fluid in healthy volunteers following smoking cessation. BAL was performed before smoking cessation, and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 15 months following smoking cessation, in eight healthy volunteers with a previous mean cigarette consumption of 19 pack-years. The levels of CCSP in BAL fluid were assessed in immunoblotting experiments using an antibody against human CCSP. Significantly (p < 0.05) higher levels of CCSP in BAL fluid were observed at 3, 6, and 9 months after smoking cessation, while the levels of CCSP in BAL fluid at 15 months after smoking cessation were the same as those before smoking cessation. Despite the long history of smoking among patients in the present study group, signs of early regeneration in the bronchiolar epithelium were noted, in that the levels of CCSP in BAL fluid were elevated at the indicated time points following smoking cessation. Furthermore, we propose that the insult to the bronchiolar epithelium made by cigarette smoking caused the levels of CCSP in the BAL fluid at 15 months after smoking cessation to return to the levels noted before smoking cessation. The present study suggests a role for CCSP as a marker for nonciliated bronchiolar cell function.

  17. 78 FR 44909 - Regional Reliability Standard BAL-002-WECC-2-Contingency Reserve

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-25

    ... Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) submitted the... pez Esquerra (Technical Information), Office of Electric Reliability, Division of Reliability... regional Reliability Standard BAL-002-WECC-2 (Contingency Reserve). The North American Electric Reliability...

  18. Utility of high-resolution computed tomography and BAL in cryptogenic organizing pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Jara-Palomares, L; Gomez-Izquierdo, L; Gonzalez-Vergara, D; Rodriguez-Becerra, E; Marquez-Martin, E; Barrot-Cortés, E; Martin-Juan, J

    2010-11-01

    Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) is a rare disease, and its diagnosis requires histological confirmation. The objective of our study was to describe the findings of the thoracic high-resolution computed tomography (HR-CT) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in patients with confirmed COP and evaluate the complementary diagnostic use of BAL and thoracic HR-CT. Patients recorded in the registry of interstitial pulmonary diseases between 1991 and 2008 were located and the COP patients selected. We identified 21 patients with histological confirmation of COP. The median age was 58.0 ± 15.9 years, and 61.9% of patients were female. The most frequent thoracic HR-CT profile was patchy infiltrate (71.4%), followed by parenchymatous consolidation (42.9%). The most frequent BAL profile was mixed alveolitis (62%) with lymphocyte predominance, a CD4/CD8 index of 0.4 and foamy macrophages. The effectiveness of transbronchial biopsy was 66.6%. The diagnostic utility of Poletti's BAL criteria gives us a specificity of 88.8%, although the sensitivity obtained was low. The specificity of certain HR-CT profiles is 99%. In addition, we observed a complementary use of the HR-CT and the BAL. The imaging findings and BAL could be useful for patients with appropriate clinical presentation and for those whose transbronchial biopsy is negative or for whom a confirmatory biopsy cannot be performed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cellulase variants

    DOEpatents

    Blazej, Robert; Toriello, Nicholas; Emrich, Charles; Cohen, Richard N.; Koppel, Nitzan

    2015-07-14

    This invention provides novel variant cellulolytic enzymes having improved activity and/or stability. In certain embodiments the variant cellulotyic enzymes comprise a glycoside hydrolase with or comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to one or more of residues F64, A226, and/or E246 in Thermobifida fusca Cel9A enzyme. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a family 9 glycoside hydrolase. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a theme B family 9 glycoside hydrolase.

  20. GEMINI 3D spectroscopy of BAL + IR + FeII QSOs - I. Decoupling the BAL, QSO, starburst, NLR, supergiant bubbles and galactic wind in Mrk 231

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipari, S.; Sanchez, S. F.; Bergmann, M.; Terlevich, R.; Garcia-Lorenzo, B.; Punsly, B.; Mediavilla, E.; Taniguchi, Y.; Ajiki, M.; Zheng, W.; Acosta, J.; Jahnke, K.

    2009-02-01

    In this paper we present the first results of a study of BAL QSOs (at low and high redshift), based on very deep Gemini GMOS integral field spectroscopy. In particular, the results obtained for the nearest BAL IR-QSO Mrk 231 are presented. For the nuclear region of Mrk 231, the QSO and host galaxy components were modelled, using a new technique of decoupling 3D spectra. From this study, the following main results were found: (i) in the pure host galaxy spectrum an extreme nuclear starburst component was clearly observed, as a very strong increase in the flux, at the blue wavelengths; (ii) the BAL system I is observed in the spectrum of the host galaxy; (iii) in the clean/pure QSO emission spectrum, only broad lines were detected. 3D GMOS individual spectra (specially in the near-infrared CaII triplet) and maps confirm the presence of an extreme and young nuclear starburst (8 < age < 15 Myr), which was detected in a ring or toroid with a radius r = 0.3arcsec ~ 200 pc, around the core of the nucleus. The extreme continuum blue component was detected only to the south of the core of the nucleus. This area is coincident with the region where we previously suggested that the galactic wind is cleaning the nuclear dust. Very deep 3D spectra and maps clearly show that the BAL systems I and II - in the strong `absorption lines' NaIDλ5889-95 and CaII Kλ3933 - are extended (reaching ~1.4-1.6 arcsec ~ 1.2-1.3 kpc, from the nucleus) and clearly elongated at the position angle (PA) close to the radio jet PA, which suggest that the BAL systems I and II are `both' associated with the radio jet. The physical properties of the four expanding nuclear bubbles were analysed, using the GMOS 3D spectra and maps. In particular, we found strong multiple LINER/OF emission-line systems and Wolf-Rayet features in the main knots of the more external super bubble S1 (r = 3.0 kpc). The kinematics of these knots - and the internal bubbles - suggest that they are associated with an area of

  1. Infrared SEDs And Star Formation Rates Of LoBAL QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarova, Mariana S.; Canalizo, G.; Lacy, M.

    2010-01-01

    Low-ionization Broad Absorption Line QSOs (LoBALs) are a rare class of objects, accounting only for 1-3% of the general population of QSOs.  Their defining characteristic is the presence of high velocity (>2000 km/s) mass outflows of low- and high-ionization ions, which are evident in the very broad blue-shifted absorption troughs in their rest-UV spectra.  There is some observational evidence that LoBALs at low redshifts might exclusively reside in Ultra Luminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs) with disturbed morphologies and young stellar populations as a result of a recent galaxy merger.  Those studies and the currently sparked interest in AGN feedback as a possible mechanism for regulating galaxy evolution have highlighted the importance of testing previous ideas proposing that BALs represent a short-lived outflow phase early in the life of QSOs.  Herein we present the first results from a multiwavelength, systematic study of a complete sample of 22 LoBALs drawn from the SDSS DR3 within 0.5 < z < 0.6.  We model their infrared SEDs and measure the total IR luminosities from 24, 70, and 160 micron Spitzer/MIPS observations.  Also, we estimate the star formation rates from their IR luminosities and the PAH features in their Spitzer/IRS spectra.

  2. BAL31-NGS approach for identification of telomeres de novo in large genomes.

    PubMed

    Peška, Vratislav; Sitová, Zdeňka; Fajkus, Petr; Fajkus, Jiří

    2017-02-01

    This article describes a novel method to identify as yet undiscovered telomere sequences, which combines next generation sequencing (NGS) with BAL31 digestion of high molecular weight DNA. The method was applied to two groups of plants: i) dicots, genus Cestrum, and ii) monocots, Allium species (e.g. A. ursinum and A. cepa). Both groups consist of species with large genomes (tens of Gb) and a low number of chromosomes (2n=14-16), full of repeat elements. Both genera lack typical telomeric repeats and multiple studies have attempted to characterize alternative telomeric sequences. However, despite interesting hypotheses and suggestions of alternative candidate telomeres (retrotransposons, rDNA, satellite repeats) these studies have not resolved the question. In a novel approach based on the two most general features of eukaryotic telomeres, their repetitive character and sensitivity to BAL31 nuclease digestion, we have taken advantage of the capacity and current affordability of NGS in combination with the robustness of classical BAL31 nuclease digestion of chromosomal termini. While representative samples of most repeat elements were ensured by low-coverage (less than 5%) genomic shot-gun NGS, candidate telomeres were identified as under-represented sequences in BAL31-treated samples.

  3. Bismuth Dimercaptopropanol (BisBAL) Inhibits the Expression of Extracellular Polysaccharides and Proteins by Brevundimonas diminuta: Implications for Membrane Microfiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Badireddy, Appala R.; Chellam, Shankararaman; Yanina, Svetlana; Gassman, Paul L.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2008-02-15

    A 2:1 molar ratio preparation of bismuth with a lipophilic dithiol (3-dimercapto-1-propanol, BAL)significantly reduced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) expression by Brevundimonas diminuta in suspended cultures at levels just below the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Total polysaccharides and proteins secreted by B. diminuta decreased by approximately 95% over a 5-day period when exposed to the bismuth-BAL chelate (BisBAL) at near MIC (12 μM). Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) suggested that a possible mechanism of biofilm disruption by BisBAL is the inhibition of carbohydrate Oacetylation. FTIR also revealed extensive homology between EPS samples with and without BisBAL treatment, with proteins, polysaccharides, and peptides varying predominantly only in the amount expressed. EPS secretion decreased following BisBAL treatment as verified by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Without BisBAL treatment, a slime-like EPS matrix secreted by B. diminuta resulted in biofouling and inefficient hydrodynamic backwashing of microfiltration membranes.

  4. The novel microtubule targeting agent BAL101553 in combination with radiotherapy in treatment-refractory tumor models.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashish; Broggini-Tenzer, Angela; Vuong, Van; Messikommer, Alessandra; Nytko, Katarzyna J; Guckenberger, Matthias; Bachmann, Felix; Lane, Heidi A; Pruschy, Martin

    2017-09-01

    Resistance to microtubule targeting agents (MTA) represents a major drawback in successful cancer therapy with MTAs. Here we investigated the combined treatment modality of the novel MTA BAL101553 in combination with radiotherapy in paclitaxel and epothilone-resistant tumor models. Multiple regimens of BAL101553, or its active moiety BAL27862 for in vitro experiments, were probed in combination with radiotherapy in P-glycoprotein-overexpressing, human colon adenocarcinoma cells (SW480) and in tubulin-mutated human NSCLC cells (A549EpoB40) and tumors thereof. BAL27862 reduced the proliferative activity of SW480 and A549EpoB40 tumor cells with similar potency as in A549 wildtype cells. Combined treatment of BAL27862 with ionizing radiation in vitro resulted in an additive reduction of clonogenicity. Moreover, treatment of paclitaxel- and epothilone-resistant tumors with fractionated irradiation and different regimens of BAL101553 (a single i.v. bolus vs. oral daily) suppressed tumor growth and resulted in an extended additive tumor growth delay with strong reduction of tumor proliferation and mean tumor vessel density. BAL101553 is a promising alternative in taxane- and epothilone-refractory tumors as part of a combined treatment modality with ionizing radiation. Its potent antitumor effect is not only tumor cell-directed but also targets the tumor microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. XMM-Newton Observation of Fe K(alpha) Emission from a BAL QSO: Mrk 231

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; Kraemer, S. B.

    2003-01-01

    We present results from a 20 ksec XMM-Newton observation of Mrk 231. EPIC spectral data reveal strong line emission due to Fe K alpha, which has rarely been detected in this class, as BAL QSOs are very faint in the X-ray band. The line energy is consistent with an origin in neutral Fe. The width of the line is equivalent to a velocity dispersion approximately 18,000 kilometers per second and thus the line may be attributed to transmission and/or reflection from a distribution of emitting clouds. If, instead, the line originates in the accretion disk then the line strength and flat X-ray continuum support some contribution from a reflected component, although the data disfavor a model where the hard X-ray band is purely reflected X-rays. The line parameters are similar to those obtained for the Fe Ka line detected in another BAL QSO, H1413 + 117.

  6. BAL: A library for the brute-force analysis of dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linaro, Daniele; Storace, Marco

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the functionality and usage of BAL, a C/C++ library with a Python front-end for the brute-force analysis of continuous-time dynamical systems described by ordinary differential equations (ODEs). BAL provides an easy-to-use wrapper for the efficient numerical integration of ODEs and, by detecting intersections of the trajectory with appropriate Poincaré sections, allows to classify the asymptotic trajectory of a dynamical system for bifurcation analysis. Some examples of application are discussed, concerning two-dimensional bifurcation diagrams, Lyapunov exponents and finite-time Lyapunov exponents, basins of attraction, simulation of switching ODE systems, and integration with AUTO, a software package for continuation analysis.

  7. Lahar Hazards at Casita and San Cristóbal Volcanoes, Nicaragua

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallance, J.W.; Schilling, S.P.; Devoli, G.; Reid, M.E.; Howell, M.M.; Brien, D.L.

    2004-01-01

    Casita and San Cristóbal volcanoes are part of a volcano complex situated at the eastern end of the Cordillera de los Maribios. Other centers of volcanism in the complex include El Chonco, Cerro Moyotepe, and La Pelona. At 1745 m, San Cristóbal is the highest and only historically active volcano of the complex. The volcano’s crater is 500 to 600 m across and elongate east to west; its western rim is more than 100 m higher than its eastern rim. The conical volcano is both steep and symmetrical. El Chonco, which lies west of San Cristóbal, is crudely conical but has been deeply dissected by streams. Cerro Moyotepe to the northeast of San Cristóbal is even more deeply incised by erosion than El Chonco, and its crater is breached by erosion. Casita volcano, about 5 km east of San Cristóbal volcano, comprises a broad ridge like form, elongate along an eastwest axis, that is deeply dissected. Nested along the ridge are two craters. The younger one, La Ollada crater, truncates an older smaller crater to the east near Casita’s summit (1430 m). La Ollada crater is about 1 km across and 100 m deep. Numerous small fumarole fields occur near the summit of Casita and on nearby slopes outside of the craters. Casita volcano overlaps the 3-km-wide crater of La Pelona to the east. Stream erosion has deeply incised the slopes of La Pelona, and it is likely the oldest center of the Casita-San Cristóbal volcano complex. In late October and early November 1998, torrential rains of Hurricane Mitch caused numerous slope failures in Central America. The most catastrophic occurred at Casita volcano, on October 30, 1998. At Casita, five days of heavy rain triggered a 1.6-million-cubic-meter rock and debris avalanche that generated an 2- to 4- million-cubic-meter debris flow that swept down the steep slopes of the volcano. The debris flow spread out across the volcano’s apron, destroyed two towns, and killed more than 2500 people. In prehistoric time, Casita erupted explosively

  8. Factors influencing the thermally-induced strength degradation of B/Al composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Literature data related to the thermally-induced strength degradation of B/Al composites were examined in the light of fracture theories based on reaction-controlled fiber weakening. Under the assumption of a parabolic time-dependent growth for the interfacial reaction product, a Griffith-type fracture model was found to yield simple equations whose predictions were in good agreement with data for boron fiber average strength and for B/Al axial fracture strain. The only variables in these equations were the time and temperature of the thermal exposure and an empirical factor related to fiber surface smoothness prior to composite consolidation. Such variables as fiber diameter and aluminum alloy composition were found to have little influence. The basic and practical implications of the fracture model equations are discussed.

  9. Increased levels of interleukin-8 in BAL fluid from smokers susceptible to pulmonary emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Tanino, M; Betsuyaku, T; Takeyabu, K; Tanino, Y; Yamaguchi, E; Miyamoto, K; Nishimura, M

    2002-01-01

    Background: It has previously been shown that smokers with computed tomographic (CT) evidence of subclinical emphysema have signs of neutrophil activation, despite having no appreciable increase in the number of neutrophils in their bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Methods: The levels of the following chemoattractants in BAL fluid from 61 community based older volunteers classified into four groups according to current smoking status and the presence or absence of emphysema were determined: interleukin 8 (IL-8), epithelial neutrophil activating protein 78 (ENA-78) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) which are primarily chemotactic for neutrophils; monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) which are predominantly chemotactic for mononuclear leucocytes. Results: Of the five chemoattractants studied, only the level of IL-8 in BAL fluid clearly distinguished between subjects with and without emphysema among current smokers (median values 34.7 and 12.2 pg/ml, respectively, p<0.01). In addition, the levels of IL-8 and neutrophil elastase-α1 protease inhibitor complex in BAL fluid were significantly correlated (r=0.65, p<0.01). There was no difference in either the release of IL-8 from cultured alveolar macrophages at 24 hours or the expression of IL-8 messenger RNA of alveolar macrophages in the two groups of current smokers with and without emphysema. Conclusion: An accelerated response of IL-8 to chronic smoking is a factor that characterises those smokers who are susceptible to pulmonary emphysema, although the cellular source of IL-8 remains to be determined. PMID:11978916

  10. Modification of a Common BAL Technique to Enhance Sample Diagnostic Value

    PubMed Central

    Singletary, Morgan L; Phillippi-Falkenstein, Kathrine M; Scanlon, Elizabeth; Bohm, Rudolf P; Veazey, Ronald S; Gill, Amy F

    2008-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) by means of bronchoscopy is a diagnostic tool frequently used for clinical and research purposes in nonhuman primates. Although many institutions use this procedure, the technique is not standardized. One technical aspect that can vary is the method by which fluid is recovered. The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences between 2 different BAL aspiration techniques. Bronchoscopy and BAL fluid collection were performed on 20 rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Data collected for comparison included heart rate, oxygen saturation levels, rectal temperature, volume of fluid collected, total cell count, cell viability, differential cell count, and flow cytometry. Results showed no significant differences in the heart rate, oxygen saturation, or body temperature between the 2 groups. Likewise, differential cell counts and cell viability studies of the retrieved fluid did not differ between methods. Compared with the conventional technique, the modified aspiration technique led to an 8.3% increase in overall fluid yield and a higher concentration of cells recovered. These differences are statistically significant and likely will be clinically relevant in the context of diagnosis. PMID:18947171

  11. Random Plant Viral Variants Attain Temporal Advantages During Systemic Infections and in Turn Resist other Variants of the Same Virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Guo, Jiangbo; Zhang, Xiuchun; Meulia, Tea; Paul, Pierce; Madden, Laurence V; Li, Dawei; Qu, Feng

    2015-10-20

    Infection of plants with viruses containing multiple variants frequently leads to dominance by a few random variants in the systemically infected leaves (SLs), for which a plausible explanation is lacking. We show here that SL dominance by a given viral variant is adequately explained by its fortuitous lead in systemic spread, coupled with its resistance to superinfection by other variants. We analyzed the fate of a multi-variant turnip crinkle virus (TCV) population in Arabidopsis and N. benthamiana plants. Both wild-type and RNA silencing-defective plants displayed a similar pattern of random dominance by a few variant genotypes, thus discounting a prominent role for RNA silencing. When introduced to plants sequentially as two subpopulations, a twelve-hour head-start was sufficient for the first set to dominate. Finally, SLs of TCV-infected plants became highly resistant to secondary invasions of another TCV variant. We propose that random distribution of variant foci on inoculated leaves allows different variants to lead systemic movement in different plants. The leading variants then colonize large areas of SLs, and resist the superinfection of lagging variants in the same areas. In conclusion, superinfection resistance is the primary driver of random enrichment of viral variants in systemically infected plants.

  12. Random Plant Viral Variants Attain Temporal Advantages During Systemic Infections and in Turn Resist other Variants of the Same Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Guo, Jiangbo; Zhang, Xiuchun; Meulia, Tea; Paul, Pierce; Madden, Laurence V.; Li, Dawei; Qu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Infection of plants with viruses containing multiple variants frequently leads to dominance by a few random variants in the systemically infected leaves (SLs), for which a plausible explanation is lacking. We show here that SL dominance by a given viral variant is adequately explained by its fortuitous lead in systemic spread, coupled with its resistance to superinfection by other variants. We analyzed the fate of a multi-variant turnip crinkle virus (TCV) population in Arabidopsis and N. benthamiana plants. Both wild-type and RNA silencing-defective plants displayed a similar pattern of random dominance by a few variant genotypes, thus discounting a prominent role for RNA silencing. When introduced to plants sequentially as two subpopulations, a twelve-hour head-start was sufficient for the first set to dominate. Finally, SLs of TCV-infected plants became highly resistant to secondary invasions of another TCV variant. We propose that random distribution of variant foci on inoculated leaves allows different variants to lead systemic movement in different plants. The leading variants then colonize large areas of SLs, and resist the superinfection of lagging variants in the same areas. In conclusion, superinfection resistance is the primary driver of random enrichment of viral variants in systemically infected plants. PMID:26481091

  13. Discovery of a z = 0.65 post-starburst BAL quasar in the DES supernova fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudd, Dale; Martini, Paul; Tie, Suk Sien; Lidman, Chris; McMahon, Richard; Banerji, Manda; Davis, Tamara; Peterson, Bradley; Sharp, Rob; Seymour, Nicholas; Childress, Michael; Lewis, Geraint; Tucker, Brad; Yuan, Fang; Abbot, Tim; Abdalla, Filipe; Allam, Sahar; Benoit-Lévy, Aurélien; Bertin, Emmanuel; Brooks, David; Camero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, Matias; Carretero, Jorge; da Costa, Luiz N.; Desai, Shantanu; Diehl, Thomas; Eifler, Tim; Finley, David; Flaugher, Brenna; Glazebrook, Karl; Gruen, Daniel; Gruendl, Robert; Gutierrez, Gaston; Hinton, Samuel; Honscheid, Klaus; James, David; Kuehn, Kyler; Kuropatkin, Nikolav; Macaulay, Edward; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Miquel, Ramon; Ogando, Ricardo; Plazas, Andres; Riel, Kevin; Sanchez, Eusebio; Santiago, Basillio; Schubnell, Michael; Sevilla-Noarbe, Ignacio; Smith, Robert C.; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Sobreira, Flavia; Suchyta, Eric; Swanson, Molly; Tarle, Gregory; Thomas, Daniel; Uddin, Syed; Walker, Alistair; Zhang, Bonnie

    2017-07-01

    We present the discovery of a z = 0.65 low-ionization broad absorption line (LoBAL) quasar in a post-starburst galaxy in data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and spectroscopy from the Australian Dark Energy Survey (OzDES). LoBAL quasars are a minority of all BALs, and rarer still is that this object also exhibits broad Fe II (an FeLoBAL) and Balmer absorption. This is the first BAL quasar that has signatures of recently truncated star formation, which we estimate ended about 40 Myr ago. The characteristic signatures of an FeLoBAL require high column densities, which could be explained by the emergence of a young quasar from an early, dust-enshrouded phase, or by clouds compressed by a blast wave. The age of the starburst component is comparable to estimates of the lifetime of quasars, so if we assume the quasar activity is related to the truncation of the star formation, this object is better explained by the blast wave scenario.

  14. Discovery of a z = 0.65 post-starburst BAL quasar in the DES supernova fields

    DOE PAGES

    Mudd, Dale; Martini, Paul; Tie, Suk Sien; ...

    2017-03-23

    In this paper, we present the discovery of a z = 0.65 low-ionization broad absorption line (LoBAL) quasar in a post-starburst galaxy in data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and spectroscopy from the Australian Dark Energy Survey (OzDES). LoBAL quasars are a minority of all BALs, and rarer still is that this object also exhibits broad Fe ii (an FeLoBAL) and Balmer absorption. This is the first BAL quasar that has signatures of recently truncated star formation, which we estimate ended about 40 Myr ago. The characteristic signatures of an FeLoBAL require high column densities, which could be explainedmore » by the emergence of a young quasar from an early, dust-enshrouded phase, or by clouds compressed by a blast wave. Finally, the age of the starburst component is comparable to estimates of the lifetime of quasars, so if we assume the quasar activity is related to the truncation of the star formation, this object is better explained by the blast wave scenario.« less

  15. Discovery of a z=0.65 Post-Starburst BAL Quasar in the DES Supernova Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mudd, Dale; et al.

    2016-06-08

    We present the discovery of a z=0.65 low-ionization broad absorption line (LoBAL) quasar in a post-starburst galaxy in data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and spectroscopy from the Australian Dark Energy Survey (OzDES). LoBAL quasars are a minority of all BALs, and rarer still is that this object also exhibits broad FeII (an FeLoBAL) and Balmer absorption. This is the first BAL quasar that has signatures of recently truncated star formation, which we estimate ended about 40 Myr ago. The characteristic signatures of an FeLoBAL require high column densities, which could be explained by the emergence of a young quasar from an early, dust-enshrouded phase, or by clouds compressed by a blast wave. The age of the starburst component is comparable to estimates of the lifetime of quasars, so if we assume the quasar activity is related to the truncation of the star formation, this object is better explained by the blast wave scenario.

  16. Arabidopsis hybrid speciation processes

    PubMed Central

    Schmickl, Roswitha; Koch, Marcus A.

    2011-01-01

    The genus Arabidopsis provides a unique opportunity to study fundamental biological questions in plant sciences using the diploid model species Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata. However, only a few studies have focused on introgression and hybrid speciation in Arabidopsis, although polyploidy is a common phenomenon within this genus. More recently, there is growing evidence of significant gene flow between the various Arabidopsis species. So far, we know Arabidopsis suecica and Arabidopsis kamchatica as fully stabilized allopolyploid species. Both species evolved during Pleistocene glaciation and deglaciation cycles in Fennoscandinavia and the amphi-Beringian region, respectively. These hybrid studies were conducted either on a phylogeographic scale or reconstructed experimentally in the laboratory. In our study we focus at a regional and population level. Our research area is located in the foothills of the eastern Austrian Alps, where two Arabidopsis species, Arabidopsis arenosa and A. lyrata ssp. petraea, are sympatrically distributed. Our hypothesis of genetic introgression, migration, and adaptation to the changing environment during the Pleistocene has been confirmed: We observed significant, mainly unidirectional gene flow between the two species, which has given rise to the tetraploid A. lyrata. This cytotype was able to escape from the narrow ecological niche occupied by diploid A. lyrata ssp. petraea on limestone outcrops by migrating northward into siliceous areas, leaving behind a trail of genetic differentiation. PMID:21825128

  17. The novel microtubule-destabilizing drug BAL27862 binds to the colchicine site of tubulin with distinct effects on microtubule organization.

    PubMed

    Prota, Andrea E; Danel, Franck; Bachmann, Felix; Bargsten, Katja; Buey, Rubén M; Pohlmann, Jens; Reinelt, Stefan; Lane, Heidi; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2014-04-17

    Microtubule-targeting agents are widely used for the treatment of cancer and as tool compounds to study the microtubule cytoskeleton. BAL27862 is a novel microtubule-destabilizing drug that is currently undergoing phase I clinical evaluation as the prodrug BAL101553. The drug is a potent inhibitor of tumor cell growth and shows a promising activity profile in a panel of human cancer models resistant to clinically relevant microtubule-targeting agents. Here, we evaluated the molecular mechanism of the tubulin-BAL27862 interaction using a combination of cell biology, biochemistry and structural biology methods. Tubulin-binding assays revealed that BAL27862 potently inhibited tubulin assembly at 37 °C with an IC50 of 1.4 μM and bound to unassembled tubulin with a stoichiometry of 1 mol/mol tubulin and a dissociation constant of 244±30 nM. BAL27862 bound to tubulin independently of vinblastine, without the formation of tubulin oligomers. The kinetics of BAL27862 binding to tubulin were distinct from those of colchicine, with evidence of competition between BAL27862 and colchicine for binding. Determination of the tubulin-BAL27862 structure by X-ray crystallography demonstrated that BAL27862 binds to the same site as colchicine at the intradimer interface. Comparison of crystal structures of tubulin-BAL27862 and tubulin-colchicine complexes shows that the binding mode of BAL27862 to tubulin is similar to that of colchicine. However, comparative analyses of the effects of BAL27862 and colchicine on the microtubule mitotic spindle and in tubulin protease-protection experiments suggest different outcomes of tubulin binding. Taken together, our data define BAL27862 as a potent, colchicine site-binding, microtubule-destabilizing agent with distinct effects on microtubule organization.

  18. The Arabidopsis Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    McClung, C. Robertson; Salomé, Patrice A.; Michael, Todd P.

    2002-01-01

    Rhythms with periods of approximately 24 hr are widespread in nature. Those that persist in constant conditions are termed circadian rhythms and reflect the activity of an endogenous biological clock. Plants, including Arabidopsis, are richly rhythmic. Expression analysis, most recently on a genomic scale, indicates that the Arabidopsis circadian clock regulates a number of key metabolic pathways and stress responses. A number of sensitive and high-throughput assays have been developed to monitor the Arabidopsis clock. These assays have facilitated the identification of components of plant circadian systems through genetic and molecular biological studies. Although much remains to be learned, the framework of the Arabidopsis circadian system is coming into focus. Dedication This review is dedicated to the memory of DeLill Nasser, a wonderful mentor and an unwavering advocate of both Arabidopsis and circadian rhythms research. PMID:22303209

  19. Variable X-Ray Absorption in the Mini-BAL QSO PG 1126-041

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giustini, M.; Cappi, M.; Chartas, G.; Dadina, M.; Eracleous, M.; Ponti, G.; Proga, D.; Tombesi, F.; Vignali, C.; Palumbo, G. G. C.

    2011-01-01

    Context. X-ray studies of AGN with powerful nuclear winds are important to constrain the physics of the inner accretion/ejection flow around SMBH, and to understand the impact of such winds on the AGN environment. Aims. Our main scientific goal is to constrain the properties of a variable outflowing absorber that is thought to be launched near the SMBH of the mini-BAL QSO PG 1126-041 using a multi-epoch observational campaign performed with XMM-Newton. Methods. We performed temporally resolved X-ray spectroscopy and simultaneous UV and X-ray photometry on the most complete set of observations and on the deepest X-ray exposure of a mini-BAL QSO to date. Results. We found complex X-ray spectral variability on time scales of both months and hours, best reproduced by means of variable massive ionized absorbers along the line of sight. As a consequence, the observed optical-to-X-ray spectral index is found to be variable with time. In the highest signal-to-noise observation we detected highly ionized X-ray absorbing material outflowing much faster (u(sub X) approx. 16 500 km/s) than the UV absorbing one (u(sub uv) approx. 5,000 km/s). This highly ionized absorber is found to be variable on very short (a few kiloseconds) time scales. Conclusions. Our findings are qualitatively consistent with line driven accretion disk winds scenarios. Our observations have opened the time-resolved X-ray spectral analysis field for mini-BAL QSOs; only with future deep studies will we be able to map the dynamics of the inner flow and understand the physics of AGN winds and their impact on the environment.

  20. Clarithromycin Decreases IL-6 Concentration in Serum and BAL Fluid in Patients with Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Radzikowska, Elżbieta; Roży, Adriana; Jagus, Paulina; Polubiec-Kownacka, Małgorzata; Wiatr, Elżbieta; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna; Roszkowski-Śliż, Kazimierz

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are involved in the development of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP). It has been shown that macrolides inhibit cytokine production in the alveolar macrophages of COP patients. The aim of the study was to assess the concentrations of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) in serum and in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL-f) in COP patients treated with clarithromycin (CAM). The study involved 26 patients (18 women and 8 men, mean age 56.46 ± 8.83 years) with biopsy-proven COP. After being treated with CAM, a complete recovery was achieved in 22 patients, while four patients did not respond to the treatment. The ELISA method was used to measure the serum and BAL-f concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TGF-β. Before treatment, the serum IL-1β1, IL-6, IL-8 and TGF-β1 concentrations were similar in responders and non-responders. Significant decreases in serum concentrations of IL-6 (8.98 ± 13.26 pg/mL vs. 3.1 ± 6.95 pg/mL; p = 0.005), IL-8 (20.14 ± 25.72 pg/mL vs. 10.14 ± 6.8 pg/mL; p = 0.007) and TGF-β1 (37.89 ± 12.49 ng/mL vs. 26.49 ± 12.45 ng/mL; p = 0.001) were found after treatment, as well as a significant decrease in the BAL-f concentration of IL-6 (30.56 ± 56.78 pg/mL vs. 4.53 ± 5.84 pg/mL; p = 0.036). Clarithromycin treatment resulted in a significantly lower mean value of serum IL-6 responders than non-responders. In COP patients, response to clarithromycin treatment was associated with decreases in serum concentrations of IL-6, IL-8 and TGF-β, and of rations, and of the BAL-f concentration of IL-6.

  1. Monitoring of a Dramatically Variable C IV Mini-BAL in the Quasar HS1603+3820

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Toru; Eracleous, M.; Charlton, J. C.; Kashikawa, N.

    2006-12-01

    We present eight high-resolution spectra of an optically bright quasar, HS1603+3820 (z_em=2.542), taken over an interval of 4.2 years (1.2 years in the quasar rest frame) with Subaru Telescope and Hobby-Eberly Telescope, for the purpose of monitoring absorption lines that are physically associated to the quasar. Among eight C IV absorption systems in this quasar spectrum, only one mini-BAL system at z_abs 2.43, which was already identified as an intrinsic system based on partial coverage analysis (Misawa et al. 2003,2005), showed dramatic time variability. We fitted Voigt profiles to the mini-BAL, and found that there were no clear correlations between the fit parameters such as the column density, Doppler parameter, and coverage fraction. This result suggests that the mini-BAL absorber has an inhomogeneous internal structure. Another important observational clue is that all absorption components in the system varied in concert, which suggests the observed time variability was due to a change of the ionization conditions (not due to the gas motion) in the mini-BAL absorber. Because such rapid UV continuum variability is not expected in luminous quasars such as our target, we suggest that a variable screen of material between the quasar continuum source and the absorber is the cause of the changes in the ionization state of the mini-BAL system. We acknowledge support from NASA grant NAG5-10817.

  2. ORIGIN OF THE COMPLEX RADIO STRUCTURE IN BAL QSO 1045+352

    SciTech Connect

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, Magdalena; Gawronski, Marcin P.; Janiuk, Agnieszka; Siemiginowska, Aneta

    2010-08-01

    We present new, more sensitive, high-resolution radio observations of a compact broad absorption line (BAL) quasar, 1045+352, made with the EVN+MERLIN at 5 GHz. These observations allowed us to trace the connection between the arcsecond structure and the radio core of the quasar. The radio morphology of 1045+352 is dominated by a knotty jet showing several bends. We discuss possible scenarios that could explain such a complex morphology: galaxy merger, accretion disk instability, precession of the jet, and jet-cloud interactions. It is possible that we are witnessing an ongoing jet precession in this source due to internal instabilities within the jet flow; however, a dense environment detected in the submillimeter band and an outflowing material suggested by the X-ray absorption could strongly interact with the jet. It is difficult to establish the orientation between the jet axis and the observer in 1045+352 because of the complex structure. Nevertheless, taking into account the most recent inner radio structure, we conclude that the radio jet is oriented close to the line of sight, which can mean that the opening angle of the accretion disk wind can be large in this source. We also suggest that there is no direct correlation between the jet-observer orientation and the possibility of observing BALs.

  3. Origin of the Complex Radio Structure in BAL QSO 1045+352

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert-Bajraszewska, Magdalena; Janiuk, Agnieszka; Gawroński, Marcin P.; Siemiginowska, Aneta

    2010-08-01

    We present new, more sensitive, high-resolution radio observations of a compact broad absorption line (BAL) quasar, 1045+352, made with the EVN+MERLIN at 5 GHz. These observations allowed us to trace the connection between the arcsecond structure and the radio core of the quasar. The radio morphology of 1045+352 is dominated by a knotty jet showing several bends. We discuss possible scenarios that could explain such a complex morphology: galaxy merger, accretion disk instability, precession of the jet, and jet-cloud interactions. It is possible that we are witnessing an ongoing jet precession in this source due to internal instabilities within the jet flow; however, a dense environment detected in the submillimeter band and an outflowing material suggested by the X-ray absorption could strongly interact with the jet. It is difficult to establish the orientation between the jet axis and the observer in 1045+352 because of the complex structure. Nevertheless, taking into account the most recent inner radio structure, we conclude that the radio jet is oriented close to the line of sight, which can mean that the opening angle of the accretion disk wind can be large in this source. We also suggest that there is no direct correlation between the jet-observer orientation and the possibility of observing BALs.

  4. BAL OUTFLOW CONTRIBUTION TO AGN FEEDBACK: FREQUENCY OF S IV OUTFLOWS IN THE SDSS

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, Jay P.; Arav, Nahum; Laughlin, Courtney; Edmonds, Doug; Aoki, Kentaro; Wilkins, Ashlee; Bautista, Manuel E-mail: arav@vt.edu E-mail: kentaro.aoki@hawaiiantel.net E-mail: manuel.bautista@wmich.edu

    2012-05-10

    We present a study of broad absorption line (BAL) quasar outflows that show S IV {lambda}1063 and S IV* {lambda}1073 troughs. The fractional abundances of S IV and C IV peak at similar value of the ionization parameter, implying that they arise from the same physical component of the outflow. Detection of the S IV* troughs will allow us to determine the distance to this gas with higher resolution and higher signal-to-noise spectra, therefore providing the distance and energetics of the ubiquitous C IV BAL outflows. In our bright sample of 156 SDSS quasars, 14% show C IV and 1.9% S IV troughs, which are consistent with a fainter magnitude sample with twice as many objects. One object in the fainter sample shows evidence of a broad S IV trough without any significant trough present from the excited state line, which implies that this outflow could be at a distance of several kpc. Given the fractions of C IV and S IV, we establish firm limits on the global covering factor on S IV that ranges from 2.8% to 21% (allowing for the k-correction). Comparison of the expected optical depth for these ions with their detected percentage suggests that these species arise from common outflows with a covering factor closer to the latter.

  5. Balance Assessment in Subacute Stroke Patients Using the Balance Control Trainer (BalPro).

    PubMed

    Song, Jin Won; Kim, Jong Min; Cheong, Youn Soo; Lee, Yang-Soo; Chun, Seong Min; Min, Yu-Sun; Jung, Tae-Du

    2017-04-01

    To demonstrate the efficacy of the balance control trainer (BCT), developed for training patients with balance problems, as a balance assessment tool in subacute stroke patients. A prospective cross-sectional study was carried out on 38 subacute stroke patients in their first episode of a stroke, and having the ability to maintain a standing position without aid for at least 5 minutes. Patients were assessed using the BCT (BalPro) 43.7±35.7 days after stroke. The balance was assessed using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the Timed Up and Go Test (TUG), a 10-meter walking test (10mWT), a 6-minute walking test (6MWT), and the Korean version of the Modified Barthel Index. The correlation and validity between the BCT and various balance assessments were analyzed. Statistically significant linear correlations were observed between the BCT score and the BBS (r=0.698, p<0.001). A moderate to excellent correlation was seen between the BCT score and 11 of the 14 BBS items. The BCT scores and other secondary outcome parameters (6MWT r=0.392, p=0.048; TUG r=-0.471, p=0.006; 10mWT r=-0.437, p=0.012) had a moderate correlation. Balance control training using the BCT (BalPro) showed significant statistical correlation with the BBS, and could therefore be a useful additional balance assessment tool in subacute stroke patients.

  6. Assay to evaluate BAL Fluid regulation of Fibroblast α-SMA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Larson-Casey, Jennifer L.; Carter, A. Brent

    2016-01-01

    Because transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β1) induces differentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, we developed a protocol to evaluate alveolar macrophage-derived TGF-β1 regulation of lung fibroblast differentiation (Larson-Casey et al., 2016). The protocol allows evaluating the ability of mouse bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid to alter fibroblast differentiation. Fibroblast differentiation was measured by the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Background Alveolar macrophages play an integral role in pulmonary fibrosis development by increasing the expression of TGF-β1 (He et al., 2011). Our prior data demonstrate that alveolar macrophages are a critical source of TGF-β1 as mice harboring a conditional deletion of TGF-β1 in macrophages were protected from pulmonary fibrosis (Larson-Casey et al., 2016). The expression of α-SMA is a defining feature of myofibroblasts, and TGF-β1 is a well-characterized pro-fibrotic mediator that induces transformation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts both in vitro (Desmoulière et al., 1993) and in vivo (Sime et al., 1997). Prior studies exposed fibroblasts to recombinant TGF-β1 to show its effect on differentiation and function (Horowitz et al., 2007). Here we have developed a protocol for determining the ability of mouse BAL fluid to alter the differentiation of human lung fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, the cells that produce extracellular matrix proteins. PMID:28239621

  7. Diabetes prevalence and awareness in adults in the Balçova district in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Selçuk, Kevser Tari; Sözmen, Melih Kaan; Toğrul, Belgin Unal

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and awareness of diabetes and to evaluate associated factors in a population aged 30 and over in the Balçova district of Izmir, Turkey. In this cross-sectional study data from 12,915 people who participated in Balçova's Heart Project were evaluated. Diabetes was defined using fasting blood glucose levels according to ADA criteria. Diabetes prevalence was 13.0% and 87.7% of the patients were aware of the condition. Diabetes prevalence was 1.32 times higher in males, 1.31 times higher in individuals with primary school or lower level of education, 1.37 times higher in individuals who perceived their economic status as bad, 1.20 times higher in those who had quit smoking, 2.84 times higher in individuals who had chronic disease, 1.78 times higher in overweight or obese individuals, and 1.65 times higher in individuals with high blood pressure. Diabetes awareness was 1.78 times higher in women, 1.94 times higher in individuals with social security, 2.62 times higher in individuals with a chronic disease, and 3.55 times higher in individuals who perceived their economic level as poor. Diabetes prevention policies and programs that aim for early diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of complications in patients should be developed and implemented for the public.

  8. Local evolution of seed flotation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Saez-Aguayo, Susana; Rondeau-Mouro, Corinne; Macquet, Audrey; Kronholm, Ilkka; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Berger, Adeline; Sallé, Christine; Poulain, Damien; Granier, Fabienne; Botran, Lucy; Loudet, Olivier; de Meaux, Juliette; Marion-Poll, Annie; North, Helen M

    2014-03-01

    Arabidopsis seeds rapidly release hydrophilic polysaccharides from the seed coat on imbibition. These form a heavy mucilage layer around the seed that makes it sink in water. Fourteen natural Arabidopsis variants from central Asia and Scandinavia were identified with seeds that have modified mucilage release and float. Four of these have a novel mucilage phenotype with almost none of the released mucilage adhering to the seed and the absence of cellulose microfibrils. Mucilage release was modified in the variants by ten independent causal mutations in four different loci. Seven distinct mutations affected one locus, coding the MUM2 β-D-galactosidase, and represent a striking example of allelic heterogeneity. The modification of mucilage release has thus evolved a number of times independently in two restricted geographical zones. All the natural mutants identified still accumulated mucilage polysaccharides in seed coat epidermal cells. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry their production and retention was shown to reduce water mobility into internal seed tissues during imbibition, which would help to maintain seed buoyancy. Surprisingly, despite released mucilage being an excellent hydrogel it did not increase the rate of water uptake by internal seed tissues and is more likely to play a role in retaining water around the seed.

  9. Local Evolution of Seed Flotation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Saez-Aguayo, Susana; Rondeau-Mouro, Corinne; Macquet, Audrey; Kronholm, Ilkka; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Berger, Adeline; Sallé, Christine; Poulain, Damien; Granier, Fabienne; Botran, Lucy; Loudet, Olivier; de Meaux, Juliette; Marion-Poll, Annie; North, Helen M.

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis seeds rapidly release hydrophilic polysaccharides from the seed coat on imbibition. These form a heavy mucilage layer around the seed that makes it sink in water. Fourteen natural Arabidopsis variants from central Asia and Scandinavia were identified with seeds that have modified mucilage release and float. Four of these have a novel mucilage phenotype with almost none of the released mucilage adhering to the seed and the absence of cellulose microfibrils. Mucilage release was modified in the variants by ten independent causal mutations in four different loci. Seven distinct mutations affected one locus, coding the MUM2 β-D-galactosidase, and represent a striking example of allelic heterogeneity. The modification of mucilage release has thus evolved a number of times independently in two restricted geographical zones. All the natural mutants identified still accumulated mucilage polysaccharides in seed coat epidermal cells. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry their production and retention was shown to reduce water mobility into internal seed tissues during imbibition, which would help to maintain seed buoyancy. Surprisingly, despite released mucilage being an excellent hydrogel it did not increase the rate of water uptake by internal seed tissues and is more likely to play a role in retaining water around the seed. PMID:24625826

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS/BOSS/TDSS CIV BAL quasars (Grier+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grier, C. J.; Brandt, W. N.; Hall, P. B.; Trump, J. R.; Filiz, Ak N.; Anderson, S. F.; Green, P. J.; Schneider, D. P.; Sun, M.; Vivek, M.; Beatty, T. G.; Brownstein, J. R.; Roman-Lopes, A.

    2016-08-01

    We began with the 2005 targets from the BAL catalog of Gibson et al. (2009, J/ApJ/692/758), which were observed by SDSS and targeted for additional observations with Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS; Eisenstein et al. 2011AJ....142...72E; Dawson et al. 2013AJ....145...10D) and Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS; Morganson et al. 2015ApJ...806..244M). We then searched for BOSS and TDSS observations of these targets as of 2015 June 30, identifying 172 targets that were observed by all three surveys. We restricted the redshift range of our sample to 1.5

  11. The integumentary ultrastructure of Cryptocellus bordoni Dumitresco and Jurvara-Bals, 1976 (Arachnida, Ricinulei).

    PubMed

    Salvatierra, Lidianne; Tourinho, Ana Lúcia

    2016-02-01

    Ricinulei is an order of Arachnida composed of rare and little known species. The species of Ricinulei possess a rich variety of fine integumentary structures that have been poorly investigated in a few species. Besides, several structures are still undescribed and their function not yet addressed. In this paper we provide a detailed study of the integumentary morphology of Cryptocellus bordoni Dumitresco and Jurvara-Bals, 1976 using Light and Scanning Electron Microscopy. We describe and present photos of the new and already known fine integumentary structures. We compare the new structures to those previously described for other Ricinulei species and discuss their taxonomic implications and the placement of C. bordoni in the genus Cryptocellus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. CCD Astrometric Measurements of Double Stars BAL 746, BPM 342, KU 92, and STF 897

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Schuyler

    2017-07-01

    Double stars WDS 06589-0106 (BAL 746), WDS 06579+1430 (BPM 342), WDS 07006+0921 (KU 92), and WDS 06224+2640 (STF 897) were measured as part of a science fair project for the 2016 Greater San Diego Science and Engineering Fair. The goal was to measure the separation and position angles of stars by using a telescope with a charge-coupled device (CCD) on the iTelescope network. Five images were taken of each of the stars. These images were plate solved with Visual PinPoint and measured using Aladin Sky Atlas. Measurements for all five doubles compare well to the more recent values in the Washington Double Star Catalog.

  13. Solid-phase synthesis of lidocaine and procainamide analogues using backbone amide linker (BAL) anchoring.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Simon K; Peacock, Mandy J; Kates, Steven A; Barany, George

    2003-01-01

    New solid-phase strategies have been developed for the synthesis of lidocaine (1) and procainamide (2) analogues, using backbone amide linker (BAL) anchoring. Both sets were prepared starting from a common resin-bound intermediate, followed by four general steps: (i) attachment of a primary aliphatic or aromatic amine to the solid support via reductive amination (as monitored by a novel test involving reaction of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine with residual aldehyde groups); (ii) acylation of the resultant secondary amine; (iii) displacement of halide with an amine; and (iv) trifluoroacetic acid-mediated release from the support. A manual parallel strategy was followed to provide 60 novel compounds, of which two dozen have not been previously described. In most cases, initial crude purities were >80%, and overall isolated yields were in the 40-88% range.

  14. Investigation of optical and spectroscopic properties of Sm3+ ions in CaBAl glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, D. R. N.; Queiroz, M. N.; Barboza, M. J.; Steimacher, A.; Pedrochi, F.

    2017-02-01

    Samples of CaBAl glass with composition of (25-x)CaO-50B2O3-15Al2O3-10CaF2-xSm2O3, with Sm2O3 concentration varying from 0.5 to 7 wt%, were prepared by using melt-quenching method in air atmosphere. The samples were prepared with different concentrations of Sm2O3, aiming to understand how the dopant changes the optical and spectroscopic properties of the glass. The doped CaBAl glasses were studied by means of volumetric density measurements, refractive index, optical absorption, luminescence at room temperature, luminescence as function of the temperature and radiative lifetime. All results were discussed in function of Sm2O3 concentration. The measured volumetric density and polarizability showed an increase with Sm2O3 doping. The refractive index showed a small increase due to RE doping, although within the errors. The absorption bands were attributed to Sm3+ transitions from the ground state 6H5/2 to the various excited states. The luminescence spectra present emission bands assigned to the appropriate electronic f-f transitions of Sm3+ ions; there are four emission bands at 565, 602, 649 and 710 nm. The luminescence quenching was observed up to 2 wt% of Sm2O3. The O/R ratio as function of the Sm2O3 concentration showed changes in the symmetry site with addition of Sm2O3. The CIE 1931 diagram presented a reddish-orange shift color with Sm2O3 doping. The luminescence intensity presents a decrease with temperature increase for all studied samples. The experimental lifetime decreases with the increase of Sm2O3, mainly due to ion-ion interaction.

  15. Vesicle formation and follicular root sheath separation in mice homozygous for deleterious alleles at the balding (bal) locus.

    PubMed

    Montagutelli, X; Lalouette, A; Boulouis, H J; Guénet, J L; Sundberg, J P

    1997-09-01

    The balding (bal) mutation of the mouse is an autosomal recessive mutation that causes alopecia and immunologic anomalies. A new allele was identified by allelism testing after using an interspecific backcross to localize the mutation to the centromeric end of mouse chromosome 18. We investigated the skin and hair histologic lesions of two alleles (bal(J) and bal(Pas)) at this locus and analyzed the expression of several keratinocyte markers and the production of autoantibodies by immunofluorescence on frozen skin sections. The lesions observed included separation of the inner and outer root sheath in anagen follicles resulting in the hair fiber being very easily plucked from the follicle. Vesicles on the ventral tongue, mucocutaneous junction of the eyelid, foot pads, and rarely in skin were also evident. Separation occurred between the basal and suprabasilar cells forming an empty cleft, resembling that observed in human pemphigus vulgaris. Immunofluorescence studies did not reveal the presence of tissue-bound or circulating autoantibodies. Expression of keratinocyte markers in hair follicles was normal. Keratin 6-positive cells were found on either side of the follicular separation suggesting a molecular defect in adhesion molecules between the inner layer of the outer root sheath cells to layers on either sides. This hypothesis has been confirmed by another group who demonstrated that the bal(J) mutation is due to the insertion of a thymidine in the desmoglein 3 gene, resulting in a premature stop codon.

  16. Fluorescein-labeled dextran concentration is increased in BAL fluid after ANTU-induced edema in rats.

    PubMed

    Guery, B P; Nelson, S; Viget, N; Fialdes, P; Summer, W R; Dobard, E; Beaucaire, G; Mason, C M

    1998-09-01

    Several methodologies have been developed to assess alveolocapillary membrane permeability in acute lung injury. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of FITC-dextran compared with radioactive tracers to assess lung permeability alterations. After intraperitoneal administration of alpha-naphthylthiourea (ANTU, 50 mg/kg) or DMSO-ANTU vehicle, the animals were euthanized and their lungs were studied in an isolated-lung preparation. FITC-dextran or radiolabeled tracers were added to the perfusate. At 2 h the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from the ANTU group showed a significantly greater amount of fluorescence in the supernatant after centrifugation of BAL fluid compared with the DMSO group. Consistent results were observed with the radioactive tracers: there was an increase in extravascular albumin space and extravascular lung water compared with the control group. No cleavage of the FITC from the dextran molecule was evident by chromatography comparing samples recovered from the BAL fluid to the pure FITC-dextran molecule. In conclusion, measurement of FITC-dextran in the supernatant of BAL fluid after intravascular administration is a reliable method of assessing lung permeability changes in vivo and ex vivo.

  17. Petrogenesis of the post-collisional Oligo-Miocene Volcanism in NW Anatolia (Turkey): Balıkesir Volcanites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünal, Alp; Altunkaynak, Şafak; Benowitz, Jeff A.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we present whole-rock chemical and Sr-Nd-Pb-O isotopic compositions as well as 40Ar/39Ar ages of Balıkesir volcanites to evaluate the nature, genesis and timing of the post-collisional Oligo-Miocene magmatism in NW Anatolia. Three main volcano-stratigraphic groups distinguished in the Balıkesir volcanites on the basis of field observations and petrographical investigations; 1) andesitic lavas and related pyroclastic units representing the lower part of the volcanic sequence; 2) Trachyandesite- basaltic trachyandesite lavas and 3) dacitic lavas and associated pyroclastic units corresponding to the upper part of the volcanic sequence. Both andesitic and dacitic pyroclastic units are represented with ash fall, ash block flow and flow breccia units. Geochemically, Balıkesir volcanites are ranging in composition from basaltic trachy-andesite to dacite. They are sub-alkaline in character and show enrichment in large ion lithophile elements (LILE) and light rare earth elements (LREE) relative to the high field strength elements (HFSE). Balıkesir volcanites display depletion in P, Ta, Nb and Ti. All these trace element characteristics and inter-element ratios suggest that magma forming the Balıkesir volcanites show similar patterns to those of subduction-related arc magmas and/or post collisional lavas. They have high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.707109-0.708620), low 143Nd/144Nd (0.512322- 0.512493). 206Pb/204Pb and 207Pb/204Pb values vary from 18.703 to 18.867 and 15.681 to 15.714, respectively and ɛNd values range between -5.61 and -2.27. 18O isotopic ratios range between 8.3 and 11.8. All these isotopic characteristics and major-trace element compositions of Balıkesir volcanites suggest that the lavas are co-genetic and originated from a hybrid magma derived from enriched mantle (EM II) source. 40Ar/39Ar dating yielded isochron ages of 22.9±0.2 - 21.0±0.2 which is consistent with other volcanic and plutonic associations of western Anatolia (eg

  18. Genomic Rearrangements in Arabidopsis Considered as Quantitative Traits

    PubMed Central

    Imprialou, Martha; Kahles, André; Steffen, Joshua G.; Osborne, Edward J.; Gan, Xiangchao; Lempe, Janne; Bhomra, Amarjit; Belfield, Eric; Visscher, Anne; Greenhalgh, Robert; Harberd, Nicholas P; Goram, Richard; Hein, Jotun; Robert-Seilaniantz, Alexandre; Jones, Jonathan; Stegle, Oliver; Kover, Paula; Tsiantis, Miltos; Nordborg, Magnus; Rätsch, Gunnar; Clark, Richard M.; Mott, Richard

    2017-01-01

    To understand the population genetics of structural variants and their effects on phenotypes, we developed an approach to mapping structural variants that segregate in a population sequenced at low coverage. We avoid calling structural variants directly. Instead, the evidence for a potential structural variant at a locus is indicated by variation in the counts of short-reads that map anomalously to that locus. These structural variant traits are treated as quantitative traits and mapped genetically, analogously to a gene expression study. Association between a structural variant trait at one locus, and genotypes at a distant locus indicate the origin and target of a transposition. Using ultra-low-coverage (0.3×) population sequence data from 488 recombinant inbred Arabidopsis thaliana genomes, we identified 6502 segregating structural variants. Remarkably, 25% of these were transpositions. While many structural variants cannot be delineated precisely, we validated 83% of 44 predicted transposition breakpoints by polymerase chain reaction. We show that specific structural variants may be causative for quantitative trait loci for germination and resistance to infection by the fungus Albugo laibachii, isolate Nc14. Further we show that the phenotypic heritability attributable to read-mapping anomalies differs from, and, in the case of time to germination and bolting, exceeds that due to standard genetic variation. Genes within structural variants are also more likely to be silenced or dysregulated. This approach complements the prevalent strategy of structural variant discovery in fewer individuals sequenced at high coverage. It is generally applicable to large populations sequenced at low-coverage, and is particularly suited to mapping transpositions. PMID:28179367

  19. Genomic Rearrangements in Arabidopsis Considered as Quantitative Traits.

    PubMed

    Imprialou, Martha; Kahles, André; Steffen, Joshua G; Osborne, Edward J; Gan, Xiangchao; Lempe, Janne; Bhomra, Amarjit; Belfield, Eric; Visscher, Anne; Greenhalgh, Robert; Harberd, Nicholas P; Goram, Richard; Hein, Jotun; Robert-Seilaniantz, Alexandre; Jones, Jonathan; Stegle, Oliver; Kover, Paula; Tsiantis, Miltos; Nordborg, Magnus; Rätsch, Gunnar; Clark, Richard M; Mott, Richard

    2017-04-01

    To understand the population genetics of structural variants and their effects on phenotypes, we developed an approach to mapping structural variants that segregate in a population sequenced at low coverage. We avoid calling structural variants directly. Instead, the evidence for a potential structural variant at a locus is indicated by variation in the counts of short-reads that map anomalously to that locus. These structural variant traits are treated as quantitative traits and mapped genetically, analogously to a gene expression study. Association between a structural variant trait at one locus, and genotypes at a distant locus indicate the origin and target of a transposition. Using ultra-low-coverage (0.3×) population sequence data from 488 recombinant inbred Arabidopsis thaliana genomes, we identified 6502 segregating structural variants. Remarkably, 25% of these were transpositions. While many structural variants cannot be delineated precisely, we validated 83% of 44 predicted transposition breakpoints by polymerase chain reaction. We show that specific structural variants may be causative for quantitative trait loci for germination and resistance to infection by the fungus Albugo laibachii, isolate Nc14. Further we show that the phenotypic heritability attributable to read-mapping anomalies differs from, and, in the case of time to germination and bolting, exceeds that due to standard genetic variation. Genes within structural variants are also more likely to be silenced or dysregulated. This approach complements the prevalent strategy of structural variant discovery in fewer individuals sequenced at high coverage. It is generally applicable to large populations sequenced at low-coverage, and is particularly suited to mapping transpositions.

  20. Vascular development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zheng-Hua; Freshour, Glenn; Hahn, Michael G; Burk, David H; Zhong, Ruiqin

    2002-01-01

    Vascular tissues, xylem and phloem, form a continuous network throughout the plant body for transport of water, minerals, and food. Characterization of Arabidopsis mutants defective in various aspects of vascular formation has demonstrated that Arabidopsis is an ideal system for investigating the molecular mechanisms controlling vascular development. The processes affected in these mutants include initiation or division of procambium or vascular cambium, formation of continuous vascular cell files, differentiation of procambium or vascular cambium into vascular tissues, cell elongation, patterned secondary wall thickening, and biosynthesis of secondary walls. Identification of the genes affected by some of these mutations has revealed essential roles in vascular development for a cytokinin receptor and several factors mediating auxin transport or signaling. Mutational studies have also identified a number of Arabidopsis mutants defective in leaf venation pattern or vascular tissue organization in stems. Genetic evidence suggests that the vascular tissue organization is regulated by the same positional information that determines organ polarity.

  1. Arabidopsis brassinosteroid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Belkhadir, Youssef; Wang, Xuelu; Chory, Joanne

    2006-12-05

    Plants control their size through the action of several phytohormones. One class of growth-promoting hormones is the brassinosteroids (BRs), the polyhydroxylated steroid hormones of plants. Here, we present the Arabidopsis-specific proteins that are the founding members of key BR signaling pathway components found in all plants. The genetic studies that identified these components are unique to Arabidopsis owing to its rapid generation time, sophisticated genetics, and facile transformation protocols, thereby highlighting the importance of a reference plant for understanding fundamental processes in all land plants.

  2. Dopamine D{sub 3} receptor gene: Organization transcript variants, and polymorphism associated with schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Griffon, N.; Pilon, C.; Martres, M.P.

    1996-02-16

    DNA fragments from a genomic library were used to establish the partial structure of the human dopamine D{sub 3} receptor gene (DRD3). Its coding sequence contains 6 exons and stretches over 40,000 base pairs. The complete DRD3 transcript and three shorter variants, in which the second and/or third exon are deleted, were detected in similar proportions in brains from four controls and three psychiatric patients. The Msp I polymorphism was localized in the fifth intron of the gene, 40,000 base pairs downstream the Bal I polymorphism and a PCR-based method was developed for genotyping this polymorphism. The distributions of the Msp I and Bal I genotypes were not independent in 297 individuals ({chi}{sup 2} = 10.5, df = 4, P = 0.03), but only a weak association was found between allele 1 of the Bal I polymorphism and allele 2 of the Msp I polymorphism ({chi}{sup 2} = 3.99, df = 1, P = 0.04). The previously reported association between homozygosity at both alleles of the Bal I polymorphism and schizophrenia was presently maintained in an extended sample, comprising 119 DSM-III-R chronic schizophrenics and 85 controls ({chi}{sup 2}= 5.3, df = 1, P = 0.02) and found more important in males than in females. The presence of the Bal I allele 2 is associated with an early age at onset, particularly in males (df = 35, t value = 2.6, P = 0.014). In the same sample, allelic frequencies, genotype counts, and proportion of homozygotes for the Msp I polymorphism did not differ between schizophrenics and controls ({chi}{sup 2}= 0.06, df = 1, P = 0.80, {chi}{sup 2} = 0.22, df = 1, P = 0.90 and {chi}{sup 2} = 0.16, df = 1, P = 0.69, respectively). The large distance of the Msp I polymorphism from the Bal I polymorphism and its localization in the 3{prime} part of the gene may explain the discrepant results obtained with the two polymorphisms. 36 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Starch Metabolism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Streb, Sebastian; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2012-01-01

    Starch is the major non-structural carbohydrate in plants. It serves as an important store of carbon that fuels plant metabolism and growth when they are unable to photosynthesise. This storage can be in leaves and other green tissues, where it is degraded during the night, or in heterotrophic tissues such as roots, seeds and tubers, where it is stored over longer time periods. Arabidopsis accumulates starch in many of its tissues, but mostly in its leaves during the day. It has proven to be a powerful genetic system for discovering how starch is synthesised and degraded, and new proteins and processes have been discovered. Such work has major significance for our starch crops, whose yield and quality could be improved by the application of this knowledge. Research into Arabidopsis starch metabolism has begun to reveal how its daily turnover is integrated into the rest of metabolism and adapted to the environmental conditions. Furthermore, Arabidopsis mutant lines deficient in starch metabolism have been employed as tools to study other biological processes ranging from sugar sensing to gravitropism and flowering time control. This review gives a detailed account of the use of Arabidopsis to study starch metabolism. It describes the major discoveries made and presents an overview of our understanding today, together with some as-yet unresolved questions. PMID:23393426

  4. Optical and spectroscopic properties of Eu2O3 doped CaBAl glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, G. H. A.; Dias, J. D. M.; Lodi, T. A.; Barboza, M. J.; Pedrochi, F.; Steimacher, A.

    2016-04-01

    Eu2O3 doped CaBAL glasses (x Eu2O3) - (25-x) CaO - (50) B2O3 - (15) Al2O3 - (10) CaF2 (x = 0, 5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10 wt%) were prepared by using conventional melt-quenching and studied by means of density measurements, refractive index, optical absorption, luminescence and radiative lifetime. The results are discussed in terms of Eu2O3 content. The incorporation of Eu2O3 leads to an increase in the electronic polarizability and the refractive index. A linear increase with Eu2O3 content was observed in the optical absorption coefficient at 394 nm. The luminescence spectra present typical Eu3+ emission and do not present quenching up to 10 wt%. The luminescence ratio R/O I(5D0 → 7F2)/I(5D0 → 7F1) presents an increase with Eu2O3 doping; it indicates a reduction in local symmetry around the Eu3+ ions. The CIE 1931 diagram presents a red shift and an increase of color purity with Eu2O3 addition. The luminescence as a function of temperature shows an increase of 25% in the luminescence intensity for the Eu0.5 sample, at 592 nm. The radiative lifetime at 614 nm shows an exponential decay due to the reduction of the interionic distance Eu3+ - Eu3+ and the increase of the ion-ion interaction.

  5. Heterogeneity in Lipid Composition of the Outer Membrane and Cytoplasmic Membrane of Pseudomonas BAL-31

    PubMed Central

    Diedrich, D. L.; Cota-Robles, E. H.

    1974-01-01

    The outer membranes and cytoplasmic membranes of the marine bacterium Pseudomonas BAL-31 were separated by washing the cells three times in 0.5 M NaCl and twice in 0.5 M sucrose. Electron microscopy during the removal of membranes revealed that the outer membranes fragmented in a regular manner to give rise to fairly uniform vesicles measuring approximately 140 nm in diameter. Isolated outer membranes had a buoyant density in sucrose of 1.230 g per cm3, whereas the cytoplasmic membranes had a density of 1.194 g per cm3. The removal of the outer membrane during the application of this procedure was monitored by measuring the release of 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid and phospholipid. The cells lost 85.5% of their 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid and 47.3% of their phospholipid during this treatment. Complete recovery of outer membrane material could be achieved. The removal of 25.5% of the 2-keto-3-deoxyoctulosonic acid and 0.9% of the phospholipid rendered the cells sensitive to lysis with Triton X-100. The phospholipid composition of the outer membrane was calculated to be 78.9% phosphatidylethanolamine and 16.1% phosphatidylglycerol. The phospholipid composition of the cytoplasmic membrane proved to be 71.5% phosphatidylethanolamine and 23.5% phosphatidylglycerol. The fatty acid composition was also found to be quantitatively heterogeneous between the two membranes. Images PMID:4852262

  6. Magnetic properties of Nd-Ga-Fe{sub bal}-Nb-B alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyunkyu; Sung Kim, Chul; Yong An, Sung; Ryong Choi, Kang; Choi, Moonhee

    2014-05-07

    Here, we have synthesized Nd-Ga-Fe{sub bal}-Nb-B alloy by strip casting method. The crystalline and magnetic properties of sample were investigated with x-ray diffractometer (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and Mössbauer spectrometer. The XRD pattern was analyzed with the Rietveld refinement method, indicating a tetragonal structure and the space group of P4{sub 2}/mnm. The temperature dependence of zero-field cooled (ZFC) magnetization curve was measured under applied field at temperature ranging from 4.2 to 740 K. From the ZFC curve, Curie temperature and spin reorientation temperature are determined to be 615 K and 130 K, respectively. Also, Mössbauer spectra were measured at various temperatures ranging from 4.2 to 620 K. Each spectrum was fitted with 6-sextets for Fe site (8j{sub 1}, 8j{sub 2}, 16k{sub 1}, 16k{sub 2}, 4c, and 4e), and magnetic hyperfine field, Isomer shift, electric quadrupole shift, and area ratio values were obtained from the fit. We observed the change in slope of magnetic hyperfine field and electric quadrupole shift at 130 K while the Curie temperature was determined to be 615 K from the measurement of zero velocity counter, agreeing with the values obtained from VSM measurements.

  7. Site specificity of psoralen-DNA interstrand cross-linking determined by nuclease Bal31 digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, W.; Buchardt, O.; Nielsen, H.; Nielsen, P.E.

    1986-10-21

    A novel method for determination of psoralen photo-cross-linking sites in double-stranded DNA is described, which is based on a pronounced inhibition of Bal31 exonuclease activity by psoralen-DNA interstrand cross-links. The results using a 51 base pair fragment of plasmid pUC19 and a 346 base pair fragment of pBR322 show that 5'-TA sequences are preferred cross-linking sites compared to 3'-TA sequences. They also indicate that sequences flanking the 5'-TA site influence the cross-linking efficiency at the site. The DNA photo-cross-linking by 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen and 8-methoxypsoralen was analyzed, and these two psoralens showed identical site specificity. The 5'-TA preference is rationalized on the basis of the local DNA structure in terms of ..pi..-..pi.. electronic interaction between the thymines and the intercalated psoralens, as well as on the base tilt angles of the DNA.

  8. SimBAL: A Spectral Synthesis Approach to Analyzing Broad Absorption Line Quasar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terndrup, Donald M.; Leighly, Karen; Gallagher, Sarah; Richards, Gordon T.

    2017-01-01

    Broad Absorption Line quasars (BALQSOs) show blueshifted absorption lines in their rest-UV spectra, indicating powerful winds emerging from the central engine. These winds are essential part of quasars: they can carry away angular momentum and thus facilitate accretion through a disk, they can distribute chemically-enriched gas through the intergalactic medium, and they may inject kinetic energy to the host galaxy, influencing its evolution. The traditional method of analyzing BALQSO spectra involves measuring myriad absorption lines, computing the inferred ionic column densities in each feature, and comparing with the output of photonionization models. This method is inefficient and does not handle line blending well. We introduce SimBAL, a spectral synthesis fitting method for BALQSOs, which compares synthetic spectra created from photoionization model results with continuum-normalized observed spectra using Bayesian model calibration. We find that we can obtain an excellent fit to the UV to near-IR spectrum of the low-redshift BALQSO SDSS J0850+4451, including lines from diverse ionization states such as PV, CIII*, SIII, Lyalpha, NV, SiIV, CIV, MgII, and HeI*.

  9. Quasar Ton 34 with steepest far-UV break known has entered new bal QSO phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binette, Luc

    2011-10-01

    Using HST-COS/G140L and HST-STIS with G230L and G430L, we request 4 orbits to observe the QSO Ton34 {z=1.928}. Among archive HST/FOS spectra, Ton34 shows an unusually steep FUV drop, equivalent to a powerlaw of index -5. At shorter wavelengths, only an extremely noisy IUE spectra exists. The FUV observations would provide us with a unique window to test whether Ton34 remains EUV deficient at shorter wavelengths or shows instead the onset of a second peak in the extreme {E}UV, explaining how photoionization can still account for its high excitation emission lines of CIV, OVIA? With the STIS MAMA-NUV spectrum, we will also study and confirm whether low excitation EUV BLR lines such as the permitted lines of OII + OIII {835A?} or NIII {686A?} are present and as strong as reported from an earlier but noisy IUE spectrum {this would possibly favor shock excitation}. Using archive optical spectra near the CIV region {from years 1988 and 2006}, we recently showed that Ton34 is currently undergoing a strong BalQSO phase, the first case reported among bright quasars. A priority of the proposed STIS NUV observations will be to look for the presence of blueshifted absorption troughs near Ly-alpha or OIV {as well as any change in the continuum's sharp break} using the STIS/G430L spectrum.

  10. The Relationship Between Vitamin E Plasma and BAL Concentrations, SOD Activity and Ventilatory Support Measures in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ziaie, Shadi; Jamaati, Hamidreza; Hajimahmoodi, Mannan; Hashemian, Seyyed Mohammadreza; Fahimi, Fanak; Farzanegan, Behrooz; Moghaddam, Ghazaleh; Radmand, Golnar; Vahdani, Behzad; Nadji, Seyed Alireza; Mousavi, Sarah; Hamishehkar, Hadi; Mojtahedzadeh, Mojtaba

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin E is a potent reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM) scavenger. It is a lipid-soluble vitamin and its main function is to protect polyunsaturated fatty acids against oxidative stress. Twenty-five mechanically ventilated Intensive Care Unit (ICU) adult patients participated in a prospective randomized clinical trial receiving either placebo (10 patients) or 3 IM doses (1000 IU each) of vitamin E (15 patients). We determined plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid concentrations of vitamin E and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Among these 25 patients, there were 14 men and 11 women, aged 63.16 ±15.48 years (mean ± SD; range = 33 to 87 years). Vitamin E supplementation resulted in significant differences in plasma and BAL vitamin E concentrations between the two groups (p-value = 0.01, 0.01), decrease in SOD activities (not differ significantly in plasma (p-value = 0.23)), but with significant differences in BAL (p-value = 0.016) and progressive reduction in Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) (p-value = 0.52) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) (p-value = 0.008) score in vitamin E group. From the results of this study, it seems that supplementation of vitamin E as a potent antioxidant, along with other supportive measures, can be beneficial in decreasing SOD total activity, ROM production and risk of organ failure in critically ill patients. PMID:24250434

  11. The Physical Constraints on a New LoBAL QSO at z = 4.82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Weimin; Green, Richard; Bai, Jin-Ming; Wang, Tinggui; Grier, Catherine J.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Brandt, William N.; Zuo, Wenwen; Yang, Jinyi; Wang, Feige; Yang, Chenwei; Wu, Xue-Bing; Zhou, Hongyan; Fan, Xiaohui; Jiang, Linhua; Yang, Qian; Varricatt, Watson; Kerr, Tom; Milne, Peter; Benigni, Sam; Wang, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Jujia; Wang, Fang; Wang, Chuan-Jun; Xin, Yu-Xin; Fan, Yu-Feng; Chang, Liang; Zhang, Xiliang; Lun, Bao-Li

    2017-04-01

    Very few low-ionization broad absorption line (LoBAL) QSOs have been found at high redshifts, to date. One high-redshift LoBAL QSO, J0122+1216, was recently discovered by the Lijiang 2.4 m Telescope, with an initial redshift determination of 4.76. Aiming to investigate its physical properties, we carried out follow-up observations in the optical and near-IR spectroscopy. Near-IR spectra from UKIRT and P200 confirm that it is a LoBAL, with a new redshift determination of 4.82 ± 0.01 based on the Mg ii emission-line. The new Mg ii redshift determination reveals strong blueshifts and asymmetry of the high-ionization emission lines. We estimate a black hole mass of ∼2.3 × 109 M ⊙ and Eddington ratio of ∼1.0 according to the empirical Mg ii-based single-epoch relation and bolometric correction factor. It is possible that strong outflows are the result of an extreme quasar environment driven by the high Eddington ratio. A lower limit on the outflowing kinetic power (>0.9% L Edd) is derived from both emission and absorption lines, indicating that these outflows play a significant role in the feedback process that regulates the growth of its black hole, as well as host galaxy evolution.

  12. Multidimensional fluorescence microscopy of multiple organelles in Arabidopsis seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Naohiro; Reynolds, Dexter; Brown, Matthew L; Boisdore, Marietta; Fujikawa, Yukichi; Morales, Andrea; Meisel, Lee A

    2008-01-01

    Background The isolation of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the development of spectral variants over the past decade have begun to reveal the dynamic nature of protein trafficking and organelle motility. In planta analyses of this dynamic process have typically been limited to only two organelles or proteins at a time in only a few cell types. Results We generated a transgenic Arabidopsis plant that contains four spectrally different fluorescent proteins. Nuclei, plastids, mitochondria and plasma membranes were genetically tagged with cyan, red, yellow and green fluorescent proteins, respectively. In addition, methods to track nuclei, mitochondria and chloroplasts and quantify the interaction between these organelles at a submicron resolution were developed. These analyzes revealed that N-ethylmaleimide disrupts nuclear-mitochondrial but not nuclear-plastids interactions in root epidermal cells of live Arabidopsis seedlings. Conclusion We developed a tool and associated methods for analyzing the complex dynamic of organelle-organelle interactions in real time in planta. Homozygous transgenic Arabidopsis (Kaleidocell) is available through Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center. PMID:18489765

  13. Relationship between airway reactivity induced by methacholine or ultrasonically nebulized distilled cold water and BAL fluid cellular constituents in patients with sulfur mustard gas-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Emad, Ali; Emad, Yasaman

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this article was to evaluate the relationship between the bronchial reactivity to methacholine and distilled cold water and inflammatory bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL) cells in mustard gas-induced asthma. This was a randomized, crossover clinical study set in a university hospital. The patients were 17 veterans with mustard gas-induced asthma and 17 normal veterans as a control group. Inhalation challenges with ultrasonically nebulized distilled water and methacholine and BAL via bronchoscopy and were performed in all patients and subjects. All patients did sustain a 20% fall in FEV(1) after methacholine, whereas two of them did not with distilled cold water. The patients were sensitive to distilled cold water with a median PD20 of 8.44 +/- 6.55 mL and sensitive to methacholine with the median PC20 of 4.88 +/- 4.22 mg/mL. Significant correlation was found between PC20 of methacholine and PD20 of distilled cold water (r = -0.74, p = 0.005). The proportion of BAL macrophages was significantly lower in patients with asthma than in the control group (p = 0.001). The proportions of lymphocytes and neutrophils were similar in the two groups. The percentage of eosinophils was higher in BAL fluid from the asthmatics compared with that in BAL fluid from the control group (p < 0.001). The percentage of the BAL eosinophils significantly correlated with both PC20 of methacholine (r = - 0.58, p = 0.01) and PD20 of distilled cold water (r = -0.81, p = 0.002). No relationship between PC20 of methacholine or PD20 of distilled cold water was found for other inflammatory BAL cells. This study showed that in patients with mustard gas-induced asthma, the degree of airway responsiveness to both methacholine and distilled water was associated with the percentage of BAL eosinophils.

  14. Epigenetic regulation of gene responsiveness in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    To, Taiko K.; Kim, Jong Myong

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of chromatin structure is inevitable for proper transcriptional response in eukaryotes. Recent reports in Arabidopsis have suggested that gene responsiveness is modulated by particular chromatin status. One such feature is H2A.Z, a histone variant conserved among eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, H2A.Z is enriched within gene bodies of transcriptionally variable genes, which is in contrast to genic DNA methylation found within constitutive genes. In the absence of H2A.Z, the genes normally harboring H2A.Z within gene bodies are transcriptionally misregulated, while DNA methylation is unaffected. Therefore, H2A.Z may promote variability of gene expression without affecting genic DNA methylation. Another epigenetic information that could be important for gene responsiveness is trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me3). The level of H3K4me3 increases when stress responsive genes are transcriptionally activated, and it decreases after recovery from the stress. Even after the recovery, however, H3K4me3 is kept at some atypical levels, suggesting possible role of H3K4me3 for a stress memory. In this review, we summarize and discuss the growing evidences connecting chromatin features and gene responsiveness. PMID:24432027

  15. Histone variants and chromatin assembly in plant abiotic stress responses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Dong, Aiwu; Shen, Wen-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Genome organization into nucleosomes and higher-order chromatin structures has profound implications for the regulation of gene expression, DNA replication and repair. The structure of chromatin can be remodeled by several mechanisms; among others, nucleosome assembly/disassembly and replacement of canonical histones with histone variants constitute important ones. In this review, we provide a brief description on the current knowledge about histone chaperones involved in nucleosome assembly/disassembly and histone variants in Arabidopsis thaliana. We discuss recent advances in revealing crucial functions of histone chaperones, nucleosome assembly/disassembly and histone variants in plant response to abiotic stresses. It appears that chromatin structure remodeling may provide a flexible, global and stable means for the regulation of gene transcription to help plants more effectively cope with environmental stresses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Histone chaperones and chromatin assembly.

  16. Histone Variants and Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Henikoff, Steven; Smith, M. Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Histones package and compact DNA by assembling into nucleosome core particles. Most histones are synthesized at S phase for rapid deposition behind replication forks. In addition, the replacement of histones deposited during S phase by variants that can be deposited independently of replication provide the most fundamental level of chromatin differentiation. Alternative mechanisms for depositing different variants can potentially establish and maintain epigenetic states. Variants have also evolved crucial roles in chromosome segregation, transcriptional regulation, DNA repair, and other processes. Investigations into the evolution, structure, and metabolism of histone variants provide a foundation for understanding the participation of chromatin in important cellular processes and in epigenetic memory. PMID:25561719

  17. Arabidopsis assay for mutagenicity.

    PubMed

    Gichner, T; Badayev, S A; Demchenko, S I; Relichová, J; Sandhu, S S; Usmanov, P D; Usmanova, O; Velemínský, J

    1994-10-16

    Four laboratories, two in the Czech Republic (Brno and Prague) and two in the CIS (Moscow and Duschanbe), participated in the International Programme on Chemical Safety's (IPCS) collaborative study to evaluate the utility of the most commonly used plant test systems, including the Arabidopsis thaliana assay, for assessing the mutagenic potential of environmental agents. Out of the five compounds evaluated in the Arabidopsis assay, three compounds, i.e., ethyl methanesulfonate, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, and azidoglycerol, were reported to be mutagenic by all four participating laboratories. Sodium azide (NaN3) demonstrated a negative response in all four laboratories, whereas maleic hydrazide was reported to be weakly mutagenic by one laboratory and nonmutagenic by the other three laboratories.

  18. Telomeric localization of the Arabidopsis-type heptamer repeat, (TTTAGGG)n , at the chromosome ends in Saccharina japonica (Phaeophyta).

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi-Fan; Liu, Li; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Zhi-Gang

    2017-02-01

    Telomeres generally consist of short repeats of minisatellite DNA sequences and are useful in chromosome identification and karyotype analysis. To date, telomeres have not been characterized in the economically important brown seaweed Saccharina japonica, thus its full cytogenetic research and genetic breeding potential has not been realized. Herein, the tentative sequence of telomeres in S. japonica was identified by PCR amplification with primers designed based on the Arabidopsis-type telomere sequence (TTTAGGG)n , which was chosen out of three possible telomeric repeat DNA sequences typically present in plants and algae. After PCR optimization and cloning, sequence analysis of the amplified products from S. japonica genomic DNA showed that they were composed of repeat units, (TTTAGGG)n , in which the repeat number ranged from 15 to 63 (n = 46). This type of repeat sequence was verified by a Southern blot assay with the Arabidopsis-type telomere sequence as a probe. The digestion of S. japonica genomic DNA with the exonuclease Bal31 illustrated that the target sequence corresponding to the Arabidopsis-type telomere sequence was susceptible to Bal31 digestion, suggesting that the repeat sequence was likely located at the outermost ends of the kelp chromosomes. Fluorescence in situ hybridizations with the aforementioned probe provided the initial cytogenetic evidence that the hybridization signals were principally localized at both ends of S. japonica chromosomes. This study indicates that the telomeric repeat of the kelp chromosomes is (TTTAGGG)n which differs from the previously reported (TTAGGG)n sequence in Ectocarpus siliculosus through genome sequencing, thereby suggesting distinct telomeres in brown seaweeds.

  19. Urinary Concentrations and Antibacterial Activity of BAL30072, a Novel Siderophore Monosulfactam, against Uropathogens after Intravenous Administration in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Straubinger, Marion; Blenk, Holger; Wagenlehner, Florian M. E.

    2016-01-01

    This annex study to a phase 1 study aimed to correlate urinary concentrations and bactericidal titers (UBTs) of BAL30072, a novel siderophore monosulfactam, in healthy subjects in order to evaluate which dosage of BAL30072 should be investigated in a clinical study on complicated urinary tract infection (UTI). Three cohorts of a total of 19 healthy male subjects were included in the add-on study and received the following BAL30072 dosages. The 1st cohort received 1 g once a day (q.d.) intravenously (i.v.) (1 h) on day 1 and 1 g thrice daily (t.i.d.) on day 2, the 2nd cohort received 2 g q.d. i.v. (1 h) on day 1 and 2 g t.i.d. on day 2, and the 3rd cohort received 1 g q.d. i.v. (4-h infusion) on day 8. Urine was collected up to 24 h after drug administration. UBTs were determined for seven Escherichia coli isolates (three wild type [WT], CTX-M-15, TEM-3, TEM-5, NDM-1), two Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates (WT, KPC), one Proteus mirabilis isolate (WT), and two Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates (WT, VIM-1 plus AmpC). Urine drug concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The median urinary excretions of BAL30072 ranged between 38% and 46% (3 cohorts). The median UBTs after i.v. administration of 1 or 2 g q.d. and after 1 or 2 g t.i.d. showed positive UBTs for 24 h after the lowest dosage (1 g q.d.) for 5 of 7 of the Enterobacteriaceae strains and after the higher dosage of 2 g administered i.v. t.i.d. for all strains tested. After i.v. infusion of 1 g over 4 h, positive UBTs were demonstrated for three E. coli strains for up to 12 h, for the K. pneumoniae (KPC) strain for up to 8 h, and for the P. aeruginosa (VIM-1 plus AmpC) strain for up to only 4 h. The minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of the E. coli (NDM-1) strain and the K. pneumoniae (WT) strain correlated well between broth and urine but did not correlate well for the two P. aeruginosa strains. BAL30072 exhibits positive UBTs for 24 h even after a dosage of 1

  20. Utility of Urinary Biomarkers in Predicting Loss of Residual Renal Function: The balANZ Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yeoungjee; Johnson, David W.; Vesey, David A.; Hawley, Carmel M.; Clarke, Margaret; Topley, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    ♦ Background: The ability of urinary biomarkers to predict residual renal function (RRF) decline in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients has not been defined. The present study aimed to explore the utility of established biomarkers from kidney injury models for predicting loss of RRF in incident PD patients, and to evaluate the impact on RRF of using neutral-pH PD solution low in glucose degradation products. ♦ Methods: The study included 50 randomly selected participants from the balANZ trial who had completed 24 months of follow-up. A change in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was used as the primary clinical outcome measure. In a mixed-effects general linear model, baseline measurements of 18 novel urinary biomarkers and albumin were used to predict GFR change. The model was further used to evaluate the impact of biocompatible PD solution on RRF, adjusted for each biomarker. ♦ Results: Baseline albuminuria was not a useful predictor of change in RRF in PD patients (p = 0.84). Only clusterin was a significant predictor of GFR decline in the whole population (p = 0.04, adjusted for baseline GFR and albuminuria). However, the relationship was no longer apparent when albuminuria was removed from the model (p = 0.31). When the effect of the administered PD solutions was examined using a model adjusted for PD solution type, baseline albuminuria, and GFR, higher baseline urinary concentrations of trefoil factor 3 (TFF3, p = 0.02), kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1, p = 0.04), and interferon γ-induced protein 10 (IP-10, p = 0.03) were associated with more rapid decline of RRF in patients receiving conventional PD solution compared with biocompatible PD solution. ♦ Conclusions: Higher urinary levels of kidney injury biomarkers (TFF3, KIM-1, IP-10) at baseline predicted significantly slower RRF decline in patients receiving biocompatible PD solutions. Findings from the present investigation should help to guide future studies to validate the utility of urinary

  1. Assessment of Wound Healing Activity of the Aqueous Extracts of Colutea cilicica Boiss. & Bal. Fruits and Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Peşin Süntar, Ipek; Koca, Ufuk; Küpeli Akkol, Esra; Yılmazer, Demet; Alper, Murat

    2011-01-01

    The fruiting branches of Colutea cilicica Boiss. & Bal., along with leaves and fruits, have been used to heal inflammatory wounds at traditional medicine in various parts of Turkey. In order to evaluate the wound healing activity of the plant, aqueous extracts were prepared from the flowering parts and fruits of Colutea cilicica Boiss. & Bal. by using 40°C distilled water. Incision wound healing models by using tensiometer on rats and excision wound healing models on mice were employed to assess the activity. Significant wound healing activity was observed when ointment formulation of the aqueous extract at 1% concentration was applied on the mentioned models. The fruit extract treated the groups of animals, showing a 78.1% contraction in wounds, which was close to the contraction value of the reference drug Madecassol (100%). On the other hand, the same extract used on the incision wound model demonstrated a significant increase (42%) in wound tensile strength, compared to the flowering aerial parts. Histopathological examination also supported the results shown in both the incision and excision wound models. The wound healing effect was evaluated and compared with the reference ointment Madecassol. Moreover, zinc and vitamin C levels in the fruit (9480 ± 0 mcg g−1; 389 mg g−1) and flowering aerial part (6609 ± 1 mcg g−1; 404 mg g−1) extracts, which might have contributed to the wound healing process, were determined. The experimental data confirmed the traditional usage of C. cilicica Boiss. & Bal. PMID:19946024

  2. The determination of normative data for a cost-effective Bal Ex ABEVR: Preliminary data - Case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zainun Z, Z.; Mohamed Zain, K. A.; Abdullah Zawawi, Sn N.; El Saboni, L.; Manaf, A. Abd

    2017-07-01

    Bal Ex Automated balance Evaluator and vestibular rehabilitation (ABEVR) method is used for balance assessment and considered as a fundamental test for vestibular disordered patients. Apart from evaluating the functions of vestibular organs, the test has also been used for rehabilitation. However, if compared to conventional vestibular tests, this test is simple structure configuration. This system was integrated between 4 accelerometer sensors (ADXL335) and microcontroller PSoC. The data were logged in portable computer and analyzed. This system showed consistent output voltage between range 1.2-4.0V for each sensor output for normal patient testing.

  3. MiR-185/AKT and miR-29a/Collagen 1a pathways are activated in IPF BAL cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsitoura, Eliza; Wells, Athol U.; Karagiannis, Kostantinos; Lasithiotaki, Ismini; Vasarmidi, Eirini; Bibaki, Eleni; Koutoulaki, Chara; Sato, Hiroe; Spandidos, Demetrios A.; Siafakas, Nikolaos M.; Sourvinos, George; Antoniou, Katerina M.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA signatures of BAL cells and alveolar macrophages are currently lacking in IPF. Here we sought to investigate the expression of fibrosis-related microRNAs in the cellular component of the BAL in IPF. We thus focused on microRNAs previously associated with fibrosis (miR-29a, miR-29b, miR-29c, let-7d, and miR-21) and rapid IPF progression (miR-185, miR-210, miR-302c-3p miR-376c and miR-423-5p). Among the tested microRNAs miR-29a and miR-185 were found significantly downregulated in IPF while miR-302c-3p and miR-376c were not expressed by BAL cells. Importantly, the downregulation of miR-29a inversely correlated with the significantly increased levels of COL1A1 mRNA in IPF BAL cells. Collagen 1 a was found mainly overexpressed in alveolar macrophages and not other cell types of the BAL by immunofluorescence. In view of the downregulation of miR-185, we tested the response of THP-1 macrophages to profibrotic cytokine TGFb and observed the downregulation of miR-185. Conversely, proinflammatory stimulation lead to miR-185 upregulation. Upon examination of the mRNA levels of known miR-185 targets AKT1, DNMT1 and HMGA2, no significant correlations were observed in the BAL cells. However, increased levels of total AKT and AKTser473 phosphorylation were observed in the IPF BAL cells. Furthermore, miR-185 inhibition in THP-1 macrophages resulted in significant increase of AKTser473 phosphorylation. Our study highlights the importance of BAL microRNA signatures in IPF and identifies significant differences in miR-185/AKT and miR-29a/collagen axes in the BAL cells of IPF patients. PMID:27769060

  4. Iron-rich low-cost superalloys. [Cr(15)-Mn(15)-Mo(2)-C(1. 5)-Si(1. 0)-Nb(1. 0)-Fe(bal. ) and Cr(20)-Mn(10)-C(3. 4)-Fe(bal. )

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne, S.F.

    1985-01-01

    An iron-rich low-cost superalloy has been developed in conjunction with United Technologies Research Center under the NASA program, Conservation of Strategic Aerospace Materials. The alloy, when processed by conventional chill casting, has physical and mechanical properties that compare favorably with existing nickel - and cobalt-based superalloys while containing significantly lower amounts of strategic elements. The composition of the alloy is Cr(15)-Mn(15)-Mo(2)-C(1.5)-Si(1.0)-Nb(1.0)-Fe(bal.), and it can be produced with chromite ore deposits located within the United States. Studies were also made on the properties of Cr(20)-Mn(10)-C(3.4)-Fe(bal.), a eutectic alloy processed by chill casting and directional solidification (D.S.) which produced an aligned microstructure consisting of M/sub 7/C/sub 3/ fibers in an ..gamma..-Fe matrix. This good alignment vanishes when molybdenum or aluminum is added in higher concentrations. Thermal expansion of the M/sub 7/C/sub 3/ (M = Fe, Cr, Mn) carbide lattice was measured up to 800/sup 0/C and found to be highly anisotropic, with the a-axis being the predominant mode of expansion. Repetitive impact-sliding wear experiments performed with the Fe-rich eutectic alloy showed that the directionally solidified microstructure greatly improved the alloy's wear resistance as compared to the chill-cast microstructure and conventional nickel-base superalloys.

  5. Genome-Wide Assessment of Efficiency and Specificity in CRISPR/Cas9 Mediated Multiple Site Targeting in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Brenda A.; Haak, David C.; Nishimura, Marc T.; Teixeira, Paulo J. P. L.; James, Sean R.; Dangl, Jeffery L.; Nimchuk, Zachary L.

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous multiplex mutation of large gene families using Cas9 has the potential to revolutionize agriculture and plant sciences. The targeting of multiple genomic sites at once raises concerns about the efficiency and specificity in targeting. The model Arabidopsis thaliana is widely used in basic plant research. Previous work has suggested that the Cas9 off-target rate in Arabidopsis is undetectable. Here we use deep sequencing on pooled plants simultaneously targeting 14 distinct genomic loci to demonstrate that multiplex targeting in Arabidopsis is highly specific to on-target sites with no detectable off-target events. In addition, chromosomal translocations are extremely rare. The high specificity of Cas9 in Arabidopsis makes this a reliable method for clean mutant generation with no need to enhance specificity or adopt alternate Cas9 variants. PMID:27622539

  6. Mucopolysaccharidosis: A New Variant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primrose, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    Described is a possibly new variant of mucopolysaccharidosis characterized by progressive mental and motor deficiency, bone abnormalities, a generalized skin lesion, and abnormal mucopolysaccharides in the urine as seen in a 20-year-old female. (DB)

  7. Crystal structure and composition of BAlN thin films: Effect of boron concentration in the gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuo; Li, Xiaohang; Fischer, Alec M.; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Dupuis, Russell D.; Ponce, Fernando A.

    2017-10-01

    We have investigated the microstructure of BxAl1-xN films grown by flow-modulated epitaxy at 1010 °C, with B/(B + Al) gas-flow ratios ranging from 0.06 to 0.18. The boron content obtained from X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns ranges from x = 0.02 to 0.09. On the other hand, boron content deduced from the aluminum signal in the Rutherford backscattering spectra (RBS) ranges from x = 0.06 to 0.16, closely following the gas-flow ratios. Transmission electron microscopy indicates the sole presence of a wurtzite crystal structure in the BAlN films, and a tendency towards columnar growth for B/(B + Al) gas-flow ratios below 0.12. For higher ratios, the BAlN films exhibit a tendency towards twin formation and finer microstructure. Electron energy loss spectroscopy has been used to profile spatial variations in the composition of the films. The RBS data suggest that the incorporation of B is highly efficient for our growth method, while the XRD data indicate that the epitaxial growth may be limited by a solubility limit in the crystal phase at about 9%, for the range of B/(B + Al) gas-flow ratios that we have studied, which is significantly higher than previously thought.

  8. Effects of annealing on the microstructure and magnetic property of the mechanically alloyed FeSiBAlNiM (M=Co, Cu, Ag) amorphous high entropy alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoxia; Zhou, Xuan; Yu, Shuaishuai; Wei, Congcong; Xu, Jing; Wang, Yan

    2017-05-01

    The effects of annealing treatment on the microstructure, thermal stability, and magnetic properties of the mechanical alloyed FeSiBAlNiM (M=Co, Cu, Ag) amorphous high entropy alloys (HEAs) have been investigated in this project. The simple crystallization products in FeSiBAlNi amorphous HEAs with Co and Ag addition reveal the high phase stability during heating process. At high annealing treatment, the crystallized HEAs possess the good semi-hard magnetic property. It can conclude that crystallization products containing proper FeSi-rich and FeB-rich phases are beneficial to improve the magnetic property. Annealing near the exothermic peak temperature presents the best enhancing effect on the semi-hard magnetic property of FeSiBAlNiCo. It performs both large saturated magnetization and remanence ratio of 13.0 emu/g and near 45%, which exhibit 465% and 105% enhancement compared with as-milled state, respectively.

  9. HIV-1 gp120Bal down-regulates phosphorylated NMDA receptor subunit 1 in cortical neurons via activation of glutamate and chemokine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ru, Wenjuan; Tang, Shao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 (gp120) is a major virulence protein implicated in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Although gp120 has been suggested to cause synaptic and neuronal injuries by disrupting NMDA receptor (NMDAR) function, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we show that gp120Bal down-regulates the phosphorylation of the NMDAR subunit 1 NR1 (at Ser896 and Ser897), which is essential for NMDAR function. This effect of gp120Bal is blocked by specific antagonists of both NMDA and AMPA receptors, indicating a critical role of synaptic activation. Furthermore, AMD3100 and maraviroc, antagonists of CCR5 and CXCR4 chemokine receptors, respectively, inhibit the effect of gp120Bal on NR1, suggesting that CXCR4 and CCR5 activation are involved. These findings may provide mechanistic insights into the synaptopathogenesis caused by HIV-1 infection. PMID:26582091

  10. Hubble Space Telescope observations of BALQSO Ton 34 reveal a connection between the broad-line region and the BAL outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krongold, Y.; Binette, L.; Bohlin, R.; Bianchi, L.; Longinotti, A. L.; Mathur, S.; Nicastro, F.; Gupta, A.; Negrete, C. A.; Hernandez-Ibarra, F.

    2017-07-01

    Ton 34 recently transitioned from non-absorbing quasar into a broad absorption line quasi-stellar object. Here, we report new HST-STIS observations of this quasar. Along with C iv absorption, we also detect absorption by NV+Lyα and possibly O vi+Lyβ. We follow the evolution of the C iv BAL, and find that, for the slower outflowing material, the absorption trough varies little (if at all) on a rest-frame time-scale of ˜2 yr. However, we detect a strong deepening of the absorption in the gas moving at larger velocities (-20 000 to -23 000 km s-1). The data is consistent with a multistreaming flow crossing our line of sight to the source. The transverse velocity of the flow should be ˜ few thousand km s-1, similar to the rotation velocity of the BLR gas (≈2 600 km s-1). By simply assuming Keplerian motion, these two components must have similar locations, pointing to a common outflow forming the BLR and the BAL. We speculate that BALs, mini-BALs and NALs are part of a common, ubiquitous, accretion-disc outflow in AGN, but become observable depending on the viewing angle towards the flow. The absorption troughs suggest a wind covering only ˜20 per cent of the emitting source, implying a maximum size of 10-3 pc for the clouds forming the BAL/BLR medium. This is consistent with constraints of the BLR clouds from X-ray occultations. Finally, we suggest that the low excitation broad emission lines detected in the spectra of this source lie beyond the wind, and this gas is probably excited by the shock of the BAL wind with the surrounding medium.

  11. Features of Arabidopsis genes and genome discovered using full-length cDNAs.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Nickolai N; Troukhan, Maxim E; Brover, Vyacheslav V; Tatarinova, Tatiana; Flavell, Richard B; Feldmann, Kenneth A

    2006-01-01

    Arabidopsis is currently the reference genome for higher plants. A new, more detailed statistical analysis of Arabidopsis gene structure is presented including intron and exon lengths, intergenic distances, features of promoters, and variant 5'-ends of mRNAs transcribed from the same transcription unit. We also provide a statistical characterization of Arabidopsis transcripts in terms of their size, UTR lengths, 3'-end cleavage sites, splicing variants, and coding potential. These analyses were facilitated by scrutiny of our collection of sequenced full-length cDNAs and much larger collection of 5'-ESTs, together with another set of full-length cDNAs from Salk/Stanford/Plant Gene Expression Center/RIKEN. Examples of alternative splicing are observed for transcripts from 7% of the genes and many of these genes display multiple spliced isoforms. Most splicing variants lie in non-coding regions of the transcripts. Non-canonical splice sites constitute less than 1% of all splice sites. Genes with fewer than four introns display reduced average mRNA levels. Putative alternative transcription start sites were observed in 30% of highly expressed genes and in more than 50% of the genes with low expression. Transcription start sites correlate remarkably well with a CG skew peak in the DNA sequences. The intergenic distances vary considerably, those where genes are transcribed towards one another being significantly shorter. New transcripts, missing in the current TIGR genome annotation and ESTs that are non-coding, including those antisense to known genes, are derived and cataloged in the Supplementary Material. They identify 148 new loci in the Arabidopsis genome. The conclusions drawn provide a better understanding of the Arabidopsis genome and how the gene transcripts are processed. The results also allow better predictions to be made for, as yet, poorly defined genes and provide a reference for comparisons with other plant genomes whose complete sequences are currently

  12. Formation of the Arabidopsis pentatricopeptide repeat family.

    PubMed

    Rivals, Eric; Bruyère, Clémence; Toffano-Nioche, Claire; Lecharny, Alain

    2006-07-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) the 466 pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are putative RNA-binding proteins with essential roles in organelles. Roughly half of the PPR proteins form the plant combinatorial and modular protein (PCMP) subfamily, which is land-plant specific. PCMPs exhibit a large and variable tandem repeat of a standard pattern of three PPR variant motifs. The association or not of this repeat with three non-PPR motifs at their C terminus defines four distinct classes of PCMPs. The highly structured arrangement of these motifs and the similar repartition of these arrangements in the four classes suggest precise relationships between motif organization and substrate specificity. This study is an attempt to reconstruct an evolutionary scenario of the PCMP family. We developed an innovative approach based on comparisons of the proteins at two levels: namely the succession of motifs along the protein and the amino acid sequence of the motifs. It enabled us to infer evolutionary relationships between proteins as well as between the inter- and intraprotein repeats. First, we observed a polarized elongation of the repeat from the C terminus toward the N-terminal region, suggesting local recombinations of motifs. Second, the most N-terminal PPR triple motif proved to evolve under different constraints than the remaining repeat. Altogether, the evidence indicates different evolution for the PPR region and the C-terminal one in PCMPs, which points to distinct functions for these regions. Moreover, local sequence homogeneity observed across PCMP classes may be due to interclass shuffling of motifs, or to deletions/insertions of non-PPR motifs at the C terminus.

  13. Histone methyltransferases regulating rRNA gene dose and dosage control in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pontvianne, Frédéric; Blevins, Todd; Chandrasekhara, Chinmayi; Feng, Wei; Stroud, Hume; Jacobsen, Steven E.; Michaels, Scott D.; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotes have hundreds of nearly identical 45S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, each encoding the 18S, 5.8S, and 25S catalytic rRNAs. Because cellular demands for ribosomes and protein synthesis vary during development, the number of active rRNA genes is subject to dosage control. In genetic hybrids, one manifestation of dosage control is nucleolar dominance, an epigenetic phenomenon in which the rRNA genes of one progenitor are repressed. For instance, in Arabidopsis suecica, the allotetraploid hybrid of Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis arenosa, the A. thaliana-derived rRNA genes are selectively silenced. An analogous phenomenon occurs in nonhybrid A. thaliana, in which specific classes of rRNA gene variants are inactivated. An RNA-mediated knockdown screen identified SUVR4 {SUPPRESSOR OF VARIEGATION 3-9 [SU(VAR)3-9]-RELATED 4} as a histone H3 Lys 9 (H3K9) methyltransferase required for nucleolar dominance in A. suecica. H3K9 methyltransferases are also required for variant-specific silencing in A. thaliana, but SUVH5 [SU(VAR)3-9 HOMOLOG 5] and SUVH6, rather than SUVR4, are the key activities in this genomic context. Mutations disrupting the H3K27 methyltransferases ATXR5 or ATXR6 affect which rRNA gene variants are expressed or silenced, and in atxr5 atxr6 double mutants, dominance relationships among variants are reversed relative to wild type. Interestingly, these changes in gene expression are accompanied by changes in the relative abundance of the rRNA gene variants at the DNA level, including overreplication of the normally silenced class and decreased abundance of the normally dominant class. Collectively, our results indicate that histone methylation can affect both the doses of different variants and their differential silencing through the choice mechanisms that achieve dosage control. PMID:22549957

  14. TAF13 interacts with PRC2 members and is essential for Arabidopsis seed development.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Matias; Simonini, Sara; Kooiker, Maarten; Gagliardini, Valeria; Somssich, Marc; Hohenstatt, Mareike; Simon, Rüdiger; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Kater, Martin M

    2013-07-01

    TBP-Associated Factors (TAFs) are components of complexes like TFIID, TFTC, SAGA/STAGA and SMAT that are important for the activation of transcription, either by establishing the basic transcription machinery or by facilitating histone acetylation. However, in Drosophila embryos several TAFs were shown to be associated with the Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1), even though the role of this interaction remains unclear. Here we show that in Arabidopsis TAF13 interacts with MEDEA and SWINGER, both members of a plant variant of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2). PRC2 variants play important roles during the plant life cycle, including seed development. The taf13 mutation causes seed defects, showing embryo arrest at the 8-16 cell stage and over-proliferation of the endosperm in the chalazal region, which is typical for Arabidopsis PRC2 mutants. Our data suggest that TAF13 functions together with PRC2 in transcriptional regulation during seed development.

  15. Involvement of Fe Uptake Systems and AmpC β-Lactamase in Susceptibility to the Siderophore Monosulfactam BAL30072 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    van Delden, Christian; Page, Malcolm G. P.

    2013-01-01

    BAL30072 is a monosulfactam conjugated with an iron-chelating dihydroxypyridone moiety. It is active against Gram-negative bacteria, including multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We selected mutants with decreased susceptibilities to BAL30072 in P. aeruginosa PAO1 under a variety of conditions. Under iron-deficient conditions, mutants with overexpression of AmpC β-lactamase predominated. These mutants were cross-resistant to aztreonam and ceftazidime. Similar mutants were obtained after selection at >16× the MIC in iron-sufficient conditions. At 4× to 8× the MIC, mutants with elevated MIC for BAL30072 but unchanged MICs for aztreonam or ciprofloxacin were selected. The expression of ampC and the major efflux pump genes were also unchanged. These BAL30072-specific mutants were characterized by transcriptome analysis, which revealed upregulation of the Fe-dicitrate operon, FecIRA. Whole-genome sequencing showed that this resulted from a single nucleotide change in the Fur-box of the fecI promoter. Overexpression of either the FecI ECF sigma factor or the FecA receptor increased BAL30072 MICs 8- to 16-fold. A fecI mutant and a fecA mutant of PAO1 were hypersusceptible to BAL30072 (MICs < 0.06 μg/ml). The most downregulated gene belonged to the pyochelin synthesis operon, although mutants in pyochelin receptor or synthesis genes had unchanged MICs. The piuC gene, coding for a Fe(II)-dependent dioxygenase located next to the piuA iron receptor gene, was also downregulated. The MICs of BAL30072 for piuC and piuA transposon mutants were increased 8- and 16-fold, respectively. We conclude that the upregulation of the Fe-dicitrate system impacts the expression of other TonB-dependent iron transporters and that PiuA and PiuC contribute to the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to BAL30072. PMID:23422914

  16. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  17. Brassinosteroids in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, S; Noguchi, T; Yokota, T; Takatsuto, S; Yoshida, S

    1998-06-01

    From the seeds and siliques of Arabidopsis thaliana, six brassinosteroids, brassinolide, castasterone, typhasterol, 6-deoxocastasterone, 6-deoxotyphasterol and 6-deoxoteasterone, were identified by GC-mass spectrometry or GC-selected ion monitoring. As the occurrence of castasterone, typhasterol, 6-deoxocastasterone and 6-deoxotyphasterol in the shoots of A. thaliana has already been reported, this study provides evidence for the occurrence of the above four brassinosteroids in different organs, seeds and siliques, and the first evidence for the occurrence of brassinolide and 6-deoxoteasterone in A. thaliana. All brassinosteroids identified in this study belong to important components of both the early and late C-6 oxidation pathways, which were established in the cultured cells of Catharanthus roseus. This suggests that both pathways are operating in A. thaliana to produce the most biologically active brassinosteroid, brassinolide, which is responsible for growth and development of the plant.

  18. Volatile contents of mafic-to-intermediate magmas at San Cristóbal volcano in Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robidoux, P.; Aiuppa, A.; Rotolo, S. G.; Rizzo, A. L.; Hauri, E. H.; Frezzotti, M. L.

    2017-02-01

    San Cristóbal volcano in northwest Nicaragua is one of the most active basaltic-andesitic stratovolcanoes of the Central American Volcanic Arc (CAVA). Here we provide novel constraints on the volcano's magmatic plumbing system, by presenting the first direct measurements of major volatile contents in mafic-to-intermediate glass inclusions from Holocene and historic-present volcanic activity. Olivine-hosted (forsterite [Fo] < 80; Fo< 80) glass inclusions from Holocene tephra layers contain moderate amounts of H2O (0.1-3.3 wt%) and S and Cl up to 2500 μg/g, and define the mafic (basaltic) endmember component. Historic-present scoriae and tephra layers exhibit more-evolved olivines (Fo69-72) that contain distinctly lower volatile contents (0.1-2.2 wt% H2O, 760-1675 μg/g S, and 1021-1970 μg/g Cl), and represent a more-evolved basaltic-andesitic magma. All glass inclusions are relatively poor in CO2, with contents reaching 527 μg/g (as measured by nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry), suggesting pre- to postentrapment CO2 loss to a magmatic vapor. We use results of Raman spectroscopy obtained in a population of small (< 50 μm) inclusions with CO2-bearing shrinkage bubbles (3-12 μm) to correct for postentrapment CO2 loss to bubbles, and to estimate the original minimum CO2 content in San Cristóbal parental melts at 1889 μg/g, which is consistent with the less-CO2-degassed melt inclusions (MI) (> 1500 μg/g) found in Nicaragua at Cerro Negro, Nejapa, and Granada. Models of H2O and CO2 solubilities constrain the degassing pathway of magmas up to 425 MPa ( 16 km depth), which includes a deep CO2 degassing step (only partially preserved in the MI record), followed by coupled degassing of H2O and S plus crystal fractionation at magma volatile saturation pressures from ∼ 195 to < 10 MPa. The variation in volatile contents from San Cristóbal MI is interpreted to reflect (1) Holocene eruptive cycles characterized by the rapid emplacement of basaltic magma

  19. Chapter 4: Variant descriptions

    Treesearch

    Duncan C. Lutes; Donald C. E. Robinson

    2003-01-01

    The Fire and Fuels Extension (FFE) to the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) simulates fuel dynamics and potential fire behavior over time, in the context of stand development and management. This report documents differences between geographic variants of the FFE. It is a companion document to the FFE "Model Description" and "User's Guide."...

  20. A predicted interactome for Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Geisler-Lee, Jane; O'Toole, Nicholas; Ammar, Ron; Provart, Nicholas J; Millar, A Harvey; Geisler, Matt

    2007-10-01

    The complex cellular functions of an organism frequently rely on physical interactions between proteins. A map of all protein-protein interactions, an interactome, is thus an invaluable tool. We present an interactome for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) predicted from interacting orthologs in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), nematode worm (Caenorhabditis elegans), fruitfly (Drosophila melanogaster), and human (Homo sapiens). As an internal quality control, a confidence value was generated based on the amount of supporting evidence for each interaction. A total of 1,159 high confidence, 5,913 medium confidence, and 12,907 low confidence interactions were identified for 3,617 conserved Arabidopsis proteins. There was significant coexpression of genes whose proteins were predicted to interact, even among low confidence interactions. Interacting proteins were also significantly more likely to be found within the same subcellular location, and significantly less likely to be found in conflicting localizations than randomly paired proteins. A notable exception was that proteins located in the Golgi were more likely to interact with Golgi, vacuolar, or endoplasmic reticulum sorted proteins, indicating possible docking or trafficking interactions. These predictions can aid researchers by extending known complexes and pathways with candidate proteins. In addition we have predicted interactions for many previously unknown proteins in known pathways and complexes. We present this interactome, and an online Web interface the Arabidopsis Interactions Viewer, as a first step toward understanding global signaling in Arabidopsis, and to whet the appetite for those who are awaiting results from high-throughput experimental approaches.

  1. The ultraviolet spectrum of the gravitational lens candidate UM 425 = QSO 1120+019: Evidence for broad absorption line (BAL) structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelitsianos, A. G.; Oliversen, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    The UV line profile structure of high-ionization resonance lines found with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) in the brightest of four multiply imaged sources (images-A) in the candidate gravitational lens UM 425 = QSO 1120+019 indicates broad absorption line (BAL) structure. The deep-broad trough associated with the O IV line extends to velocities approiximately -12,000 km/s, and contains disrete features that suggest multicomponent velocity structure. This structure may include contributions from C IV absorption from the early-type galaxy that is believed to lens UM 425. A strong absorption feature in the blue wing of the Lyman-alpha lambda 1216 emission line may be a Lyman alpha absorption system at a Z(sub Ly alpha) = 1.437 +/- 0.003, or it may be formed by the superposition of the broad N V lambda lambda 1238, 1242 absorption trough on the extended blue emission wing of the QSO Lyman-alpha line. We obtained a redshift of Z(sub QSO) = 1.471 +/- 0.003 from Lyman-alpha lambda 1215, consistent with the redshift found by Meylan and Djorgovski in the optical. The Lyman-alpha line appears unusally weak due to the presence of N V lambda 1240 BAL absorption. A Lyman-limit absorption system at lambda 912 was not observed in the QSO rest frame. The detection of BAL structure in the other weaker ground-state resonance lines of N II (l) and S IV (l) was not found, suggesting these lines are formed in a region that is distinct from the BAL component. Detection of BAL structure in the other fainter images in this system with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) instrumentation, similar to structure observed here in image A, could provide evidence that UM 425 is a gravitational lens.

  2. Alternative and effective proteomic analysis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Espagne, Christelle; Martinez, Aude; Valot, Benoît; Meinnel, Thierry; Giglione, Carmela

    2007-10-01

    Various functional genomics platforms are required to define the phenotype associated with a mutant. Global protein analyses may be included in any study. We describe here a rapid method of protein sample preparation and analysis, suitable for all laboratories and using Arabidopsis plantlets as the starting material. This reliable and reproducible method for high yield protein extraction from small amounts of material can be used on even the most recalcitrant tissues. The proteins extracted are suitable for many types of protein analysis, including nondenaturing investigations. This method was validated by a rigorous 2-DE approach, coupled with unambiguous LC-MS/MS identifications featuring strong sequence coverage (average of 26% with eight different peptides/spot protein). The reproducibility of the method was demonstrated by multiple protein identifications from identical series of spots. An interactive map (http://www.isv.cnrsgif.fr/gel2d/), including 435 protein variants showed that (i) 38% of the proteins were yet unreported, (ii) reduced subfractionation, (iii) had frequent protein modifications (average of two spots/protein entry), and (iv) underwent no major proteolytic events other than leader peptide cleavage. Finally, a simple mobility shift method for the large subunit of RuBisCo (LS) in the first dimension made it possible to characterize previously masked protein spots.

  3. Arabidopsis thaliana—Aphid Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Joe; Singh, Vijay; Shah, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Aphids are important pests of plants that use their stylets to tap into the sieve elements to consume phloem sap. Besides the removal of photosynthates, aphid infestation also alters source-sink patterns. Most aphids also vector viral diseases. In this chapter, we will summarize on recent significant findings in plant-aphid interaction, and how studies involving Arabidopsis thaliana and Myzus persicae (Sülzer), more commonly known as the green peach aphid (GPA), are beginning to provide important insights into the molecular basis of plant defense and susceptibility to aphids. The recent demonstration that expression of dsRNA in Arabidopsis can be used to silence expression of genes in GPA has further expanded the utility of Arabidopsis for evaluating the contribution of the aphid genome-encoded proteins to this interaction. PMID:22666177

  4. Variants of Uncertainty

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-15

    Variants of Uncertainty Daniel Kahneman University of British Columbia Amos Tversky Stanford University DTI-C &%E-IECTE ~JUNO 1i 19 8 1j May 15, 1981... Dennett , 1979) in which different parts have ac- cess to different data, assign then different weights and hold different views of the situation...2robable and t..h1 provable. Oxford- Claredor Press, 1977. Dennett , D.C. Brainstorms. Hassocks: Harvester, 1979. Donchin, E., Ritter, W. & McCallum, W.C

  5. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    DOEpatents

    Teter, Sarah; Ward, Connie; Cherry, Joel; Jones, Aubrey; Harris, Paul; Yi, Jung

    2017-07-11

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  6. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    DOEpatents

    Teter, Sarah; Ward, Connie; Cherry, Joel; Jones, Aubrey; Harris, Paul; Yi, Jung

    2013-02-26

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  7. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    DOEpatents

    Teter, Sarah [Davis, CA; Ward, Connie [Hamilton, MT; Cherry, Joel [Davis, CA; Jones, Aubrey [Davis, CA; Harris, Paul [Carnation, WA; Yi, Jung [Sacramento, CA

    2011-04-26

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  8. Enhanced variants of IDE algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujok, Petr

    2017-07-01

    The performance of a new mechanism applied on a differential evolution algorithm with an individual-dependent mechanism (IDE) is studied experimentally. Three new IDE variants are proposed and compared with the original IDE variant. The performance of all studied algorithms was compared on each problem of CEC 2015 test suite. The newly proposed IDE variants mostly outperformed the original IDE variant significantly. The results show that the best results are for the newly proposed IDE variant with an enhanced mutation scheme and IDE with the control of the population diversity.

  9. Composite volcanoes in the south-eastern part of İzmir-Balıkesir Transfer Zone, Western Anatolia, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seghedi, Ioan; Helvacı, Cahit; Pécskay, Zoltan

    2015-01-01

    During the Early-Middle Miocene (Western Anatolia) several volcanic fields occur along a NE-SW-trending shear zone, known as İzmir-Balıkesir Transfer Zone. This is a deformed crustal-scale sinistral strike-slip fault zone crossing the Bornova flysch and extending along the NW-boundary of the Menderes Massif by accommodating the differential deformation between the Cycladic and Menderes core complexes within the Aegean extensional system. Here we discuss the volcanic activity in Yamanlar and Yuntdağı fields that is closely related to the extensional tectonics of the İzmir-Balıkesir Transfer Zone and in the same time with the episodic core complex denudation of the Menderes Massif. This study documents two composite volcanoes (Yamanlar and Yuntdağı), whose present vent area is strongly eroded and cut by a variety of strike-slip and normal fault systems, the transcurrent NW-SE being the dominant one. The erosional remnants of the vent areas, resembling a shallow crater intrusive complex, illustrate the presence of numerous dykes or variably sized neck-like intrusions and lava flows, typically associated with hydrothermal alteration processes (propylitic and argillic). Such vent areas were observed in both the examined volcanic fields, having ~ 6 km in diameter and being much more eroded toward the south, along the NW-SE fault system. Lava flows and lava domes are sometimes associated with proximal block and ash flow deposits. In the cone-building association part, besides lava flows and remnants of lava domes, rare block and ash and pumice-rich pyroclastic flow deposits, as well as a series of debris-flow deposits, have been observed. The rocks display a porphyritic texture and contain various proportions of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, amphibole, rare biotite and corroded quartz. The examined rocks fall at the limit between calc-alkaline to alkaline field, and plot predominantly in high-K andesite and dacite fields and one is rhyolite. The trace

  10. Araport: the Arabidopsis information portal.

    PubMed

    Krishnakumar, Vivek; Hanlon, Matthew R; Contrino, Sergio; Ferlanti, Erik S; Karamycheva, Svetlana; Kim, Maria; Rosen, Benjamin D; Cheng, Chia-Yi; Moreira, Walter; Mock, Stephen A; Stubbs, Joseph; Sullivan, Julie M; Krampis, Konstantinos; Miller, Jason R; Micklem, Gos; Vaughn, Matthew; Town, Christopher D

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis Information Portal (https://www.araport.org) is a new online resource for plant biology research. It houses the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence and associated annotation. It was conceived as a framework that allows the research community to develop and release 'modules' that integrate, analyze and visualize Arabidopsis data that may reside at remote sites. The current implementation provides an indexed database of core genomic information. These data are made available through feature-rich web applications that provide search, data mining, and genome browser functionality, and also by bulk download and web services. Araport uses software from the InterMine and JBrowse projects to expose curated data from TAIR, GO, BAR, EBI, UniProt, PubMed and EPIC CoGe. The site also hosts 'science apps,' developed as prototypes for community modules that use dynamic web pages to present data obtained on-demand from third-party servers via RESTful web services. Designed for sustainability, the Arabidopsis Information Portal strategy exploits existing scientific computing infrastructure, adopts a practical mixture of data integration technologies and encourages collaborative enhancement of the resource by its user community. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Araport: the Arabidopsis Information Portal

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, Vivek; Hanlon, Matthew R.; Contrino, Sergio; Ferlanti, Erik S.; Karamycheva, Svetlana; Kim, Maria; Rosen, Benjamin D.; Cheng, Chia-Yi; Moreira, Walter; Mock, Stephen A.; Stubbs, Joseph; Sullivan, Julie M.; Krampis, Konstantinos; Miller, Jason R.; Micklem, Gos; Vaughn, Matthew; Town, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis Information Portal (https://www.araport.org) is a new online resource for plant biology research. It houses the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence and associated annotation. It was conceived as a framework that allows the research community to develop and release ‘modules’ that integrate, analyze and visualize Arabidopsis data that may reside at remote sites. The current implementation provides an indexed database of core genomic information. These data are made available through feature-rich web applications that provide search, data mining, and genome browser functionality, and also by bulk download and web services. Araport uses software from the InterMine and JBrowse projects to expose curated data from TAIR, GO, BAR, EBI, UniProt, PubMed and EPIC CoGe. The site also hosts ‘science apps,’ developed as prototypes for community modules that use dynamic web pages to present data obtained on-demand from third-party servers via RESTful web services. Designed for sustainability, the Arabidopsis Information Portal strategy exploits existing scientific computing infrastructure, adopts a practical mixture of data integration technologies and encourages collaborative enhancement of the resource by its user community. PMID:25414324

  12. Systemic endopolyploidy in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Galbraith, D.W.; Harkins, K.R. ); Knapp, S. )

    1991-07-01

    Microfluorometric analysis of the nuclear DNA contents of the somatic tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana has revealed extensive endoreduplication, resulting in tissues that comprise mixtures of polypoloid cells. Endoreduplication was found in all tissues except those of the inflorescences and was developmentally regulated according to the age of the tissues and their position within the plant.

  13. The salty tale of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sanders, D

    2000-06-29

    High concentrations of sodium chloride are toxic to most plant species. New insights into the mechanisms by which plants tolerate salt have emerged from the identification of genes in Arabidopsis thaliana that play a critical part in physiological resistance to salt.

  14. The Phenylpropanoid Pathway in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Christopher M.; Chapple, Clint

    2011-01-01

    The phenylpropanoid pathway serves as a rich source of metabolites in plants, being required for the biosynthesis of lignin, and serving as a starting point for the production of many other important compounds, such as the flavonoids, coumarins, and lignans. In spite of the fact that the phenylpropanoids and their derivatives are sometimes classified as secondary metabolites, their relevance to plant survival has been made clear via the study of Arabidopsis and other plant species. As a model system, Arabidopsis has helped to elucidate many details of the phenylpropanoid pathway, its enzymes and intermediates, and the interconnectedness of the pathway with plant metabolism as a whole. These advances in our understanding have been made possible in large part by the relative ease with which mutations can be generated, identified, and studied in Arabidopsis. Herein, we provide an overview of the research progress that has been made in recent years, emphasizing both the genes (and gene families) associated with the phenylpropanoid pathway in Arabidopsis, and the end products that have contributed to the identification of many mutants deficient in the phenylpropanoid metabolism: the sinapate esters. PMID:22303276

  15. Expression of aberrant forms of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR8 stimulates parthenocarpy in Arabidopsis and tomato.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Marc; Hooper, Lauren C; Johnson, Susan D; Rodrigues, Julio Carlyle Macedo; Vivian-Smith, Adam; Koltunow, Anna M

    2007-10-01

    Fruit initiation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is generally repressed until fertilization occurs. However, mutations in AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR8 (ARF8) uncouple fruit initiation from fertilization, resulting in the formation of seedless, parthenocarpic fruit. Here we induced parthenocarpy in wild-type Arabidopsis by introducing either the mutant genomic (g) Atarf8-4 sequence or gAtARF8:beta-glucuronidase translational fusion constructs by plant transformation. Silencing of endogenous AtARF8 transcription was not observed, indicating that the introduced, aberrant ARF8 transcripts were compromising the function of endogenous ARF8 and/or associated factors involved in suppressing fruit initiation. To analyze the role of ARF8 in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) we initially emasculated 23 tomato cultivars to test for background parthenocarpy. Surprisingly, all had a predisposition to initiate fertilization-independent fruit growth. Expression of gAtarf8-4 in transgenic tomato ('Monalbo') resulted in a significant increase in the number and size of parthenocarpic fruit. Isolation of tomato ARF8 cDNA indicated significant sequence conservation with AtARF8. SlARF8 may therefore control tomato fruit initiation in a similar manner as AtARF8 does in Arabidopsis. Two SlARF8 cDNAs differing in size by 5 bp were found, both arising from the same gene. The smaller cDNA is a splice variant and is also present in Arabidopsis. We propose that low endogenous levels of the splice variant products might interfere with efficient formation/function of a complex repressing fruit initiation, thereby providing an explanation for the observed ovary expansion in tomato and also Arabidopsis after emasculation. Increasing the levels of aberrant Atarf8-4 transcripts may further destabilize formation/function of the complex in a dosage-dependent manner enhancing tomato parthenocarpic fruit initiation frequency and size and mimicking the parthenocarpic dehiscent silique phenotype found in

  16. Physiological Genomics of Response to Soil Drying in Diverse Arabidopsis Accessions[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Des Marais, David L.; McKay, John K.; Richards, James H.; Sen, Saunak; Wayne, Tierney; Juenger, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana, like many species, is characterized by abundant genetic variation. This variation is rapidly being cataloged at the sequence level, but careful dissection of genetic variation in whole-organism responses to stresses encountered in the natural environment are lacking; this functional variation can be exploited as a natural mutant screen to determine gene function. Here, we document physiological and transcriptomic response to soil drying in 17 natural accessions of Arabidopsis. By imposing ecologically realistic stress conditions, we found that acclimation in Arabidopsis involved a strong signature of increased investment in photosynthesis, carbohydrate turnover, and root growth. Our results extend previous work in the Columbia accession suggesting that abscisic acid signaling pathways play an important role in drought stress response. We also identified several mechanisms, including an increase in leaf nitrogen concentration and upregulation of two-component signaling relays, that were common to most natural accessions but had not been identified in studies using only the Columbia accession. Principal component analysis reveals strong correlations between suites of genes and specific physiological responses to stress. The functional variants we identified may represent adaptive mutations in natural habitats and useful variants for agronomic improvement of crop species. PMID:22408074

  17. BAL PHOSPHORUS ABUNDANCE AND EVIDENCE FOR IMMENSE IONIC COLUMN DENSITIES IN QUASAR OUTFLOWS: VLT/X-SHOOTER OBSERVATIONS OF QUASAR SDSS J1512+1119

    SciTech Connect

    Borguet, Benoit C. J.; Edmonds, Doug; Arav, Nahum; Chamberlain, Carter; Benn, Chris

    2012-10-10

    We present spectroscopic analysis of the broad absorption line (BAL) outflow in quasar SDSS J1512+1119. In particular, we focus our attention on a kinematic component in which we identify P V and S IV/S IV* absorption troughs. The shape of the unblended phosphorus doublet troughs and the three S IV/S IV* troughs allow us to obtain reliable column density measurements for these two ions. Photoionization modeling using these column densities and those of He I* constrain the abundance of phosphorus to the range of 0.5-4 times the solar value. The total column density, ionization parameter, and metallicity inferred from the P V and S IV column densities lead to large optical depth values for the common transition observed in BAL outflows. We show that the true C IV optical depth is {approx}1000 times greater in the core of the absorption profile than the value deduced from its apparent optical depth.

  18. Bond ionicities in CuBC2 chalcogenides (B=Al, Ga, In; C=S, Se, Te)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, J. M.; Díaz, R.; León, M.

    2000-04-01

    The bond ionicities, fi,Cu-C and fi,BC of several CuBC2 (B=Al, Ga, In, and C=S, Se, Te) chalcopyrite compounds are estimated by means of the Phillips-Van Vechten dielectric theory for binary tetrahedral compounds and Levine's extension to multibond crystals in the same way as Neumann [Crystal Res. Technol. 18, 1299 (1983)]. The influence of Cu 3d electrons has been taken into account considering Jaffe-Zunger [Phys. Rev. B 29, 1882 (1984)] band-structure calculations in chalcopyrite compounds, and performing a simple extrapolation for Te compounds. The Cu-C bond susceptibilities have been estimated from the static dielectric constant values obtained by Márquez and Rincón [Phys. Status Solidi B 191, 115 (1995)], and a set of Cu-C bond susceptibilities is proposed. The evaluated fi,Cu-C bond ionicities were found to increase with the atomic fractional coordinate of the C atom, x[anion], indicating that the anion position is a good estimation of the Cu-C bond ionicity.

  19. Aflatoxin levels in chronic hepatitis B patients with cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma in Balıkesir, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aydın, M; Aydın, S; Bacanlı, M; Başaran, N

    2015-11-01

    Aflatoxins, the secondary metabolites produced by species of naturally occurring Aspergilli, are commonly found in food such as cereals, dried fruits and juice, wine, beer and spices. They are hepatotoxic and are well known human carcinogens based on evidence from human studies. Aflatoxins are an environmental risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Chronic hepatitis B-infected patients are at increased risk of cirrhosis, hepatic failure and liver cancer. This study was designed to determine the serum aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 ), aflatoxin B2 (AFB2 ), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1 ) and aflatoxin G2 (AFG2 ) concentrations using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) in hepatitis B-infected patients with or without cirrhosis and liver cancer, alongside healthy controls in Balıkesir, Turkey. The mean AFB1 and total AF levels in patients without liver cancer and cirrhosis were significantly higher than healthy controls. The mean AFB1 and total AF levels in patients with chronic hepatitis B and HCC were significantly higher than infected patients with or without cirrhosis. These results suggest that patients with chronic hepatitis B who are exposed to AFs are at increased risk for developing HCC, which might be prevented by reducing consumption of contaminated foods.

  20. Adaptation to climate across the Arabidopsis thaliana genome.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Angela M; Brachi, Benjamin; Faure, Nathalie; Horton, Matthew W; Jarymowycz, Lucien B; Sperone, F Gianluca; Toomajian, Chris; Roux, Fabrice; Bergelson, Joy

    2011-10-07

    Understanding the genetic bases and modes of adaptation to current climatic conditions is essential to accurately predict responses to future environmental change. We conducted a genome-wide scan to identify climate-adaptive genetic loci and pathways in the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Amino acid-changing variants were significantly enriched among the loci strongly correlated with climate, suggesting that our scan effectively detects adaptive alleles. Moreover, from our results, we successfully predicted relative fitness among a set of geographically diverse A. thaliana accessions when grown together in a common environment. Our results provide a set of candidates for dissecting the molecular bases of climate adaptations, as well as insights about the prevalence of selective sweeps, which has implications for predicting the rate of adaptation.

  1. Microstructure, thermal properties, and corrosion behaviors of FeSiBAlNi alloy fabricated by mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-lei; Gao, Tai-xiu; Niu, Jia-zheng; Shi, Pei-jian; Xu, Jing; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    An equiatomic FeSiBAlNi amorphous high-entropy alloy (HEA) was fabricated by mechanical alloying (MA). A fully amorphous phase was obtained in the FeSiBAlNi HEA after 240 h of MA. The bulk FeSiBAlNi samples were sintered by spark plasma sintering (SPS) at 520 and 1080°C under a pressure of 80 MPa. The sample sintered at 520°C exhibited an amorphous composite structure comprising solid-solution phases (body-centered cubic (bcc) and face-centered cubic (fcc) phases). When the as-milled amorphous HEA was consolidated at 1080°C, another fcc phase appeared and the amorphous phase disappeared. The sample sintered by SPS at 1080°C exhibited a slightly higher melting temperature compared with those of the as-milled alloy and the bulk sample sintered at 520°C. The corrosion behaviors of the as-sintered samples were investigated by potentiodynamic polarization measurements and immersion tests in seawater solution. The results showed that the HEA obtained by SPS at 1080°C exhibited better corrosion resistance than that obtained by SPS at 520°C.

  2. Integron-associated mobile gene cassettes code for folded proteins: the structure of Bal32a, a new member of the adaptable alpha+beta barrel family.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Andrew; Wu, Peter S-C; Harrop, Stephen J; Schaeffer, Patrick M; Dosztányi, Zsuzsanna; Gillings, Michael R; Holmes, Andrew J; Nevalainen, K M Helena; Stokes, H W; Otting, Gottfried; Dixon, Nicholas E; Curmi, Paul M G; Mabbutt, Bridget C

    2005-03-11

    The wide-ranging physiology and large genetic variability observed for prokaryotes is largely attributed, not to the prokaryotic genome itself, but rather to mechanisms of lateral gene transfer. Cassette PCR has been used to sample the integron/gene cassette metagenome from different natural environments without laboratory cultivation of the host organism, and without prior knowledge of any target protein sequence. Since over 90% of cassette genes are unrelated to any sequence in the current databases, it is not clear whether these genes code for folded functional proteins. We have selected a sample of eight cassette-encoded genes with no known homologs; five have been isolated as soluble protein products and shown by biophysical techniques to be folded. In solution, at least three of these proteins organise as stable oligomeric assemblies. The tertiary structure of one of these, Bal32a derived from a contaminated soil site, has been solved by X-ray crystallography to 1.8 A resolution. From the three-dimensional structure, Bal32a is found to be a member of the highly adaptable alpha+beta barrel family of transport proteins and enzymes. In Bal32a, the barrel cavity is unusually deep and inaccessible to solvent. Polar side-chains in its interior are reminiscent of catalytic sites of limonene-1,2-epoxide hydrolase and nogalonic acid methyl ester cyclase. These studies demonstrate the viability of direct sampling of mobile DNA as a route for the discovery of novel proteins.

  3. Extensive Natural Variation in Arabidopsis Seed Mucilage Structure

    PubMed Central

    Voiniciuc, Cătălin; Zimmermann, Eva; Schmidt, Maximilian Heinrich-Wilhelm; Günl, Markus; Fu, Lanbao; North, Helen M.; Usadel, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Hydrated Arabidopsis thaliana seeds are coated by a gelatinous layer called mucilage, which is mainly composed of cell wall polysaccharides. Since mucilage is rich in pectin, its architecture can be visualized with the ruthenium red (RR) dye. We screened the seeds of around 280 Arabidopsis natural accessions for variation in mucilage structure, and identified a large number of novel variants that differed from the Col-0 wild-type. Most of the accessions released smaller RR-stained capsules compared to the Col-0 reference. By biochemically characterizing the phenotypes of 25 of these accessions in greater detail, we discovered that distinct changes in polysaccharide structure resulted in gelatinous coatings with a deceptively similar appearance. Monosaccharide composition analysis of total mucilage extracts revealed a remarkable variation (from 50 to 200% of Col-0 levels) in the content of galactose and mannose, which are important subunits of heteromannan. In addition, most of the natural variants had altered Pontamine Fast Scarlet 4B staining of cellulose and significantly reduced birefringence of crystalline structures. This indicates that the production or organization of cellulose may be affected by the presence of different amounts of hemicellulose. Although, the accessions described in this study were primarily collected from Western Europe, they form five different phenotypic classes based on the combined results of our experiments. This suggests that polymorphisms at multiple loci are likely responsible for the observed mucilage structure. The transcription of MUCILAGE-RELATED10 (MUCI10), which encodes a key enzyme for galactoglucomannan synthesis, was severely reduced in multiple variants that phenocopied the muci10-1 insertion mutant. Although, we could not pinpoint any causal polymorphisms in this gene, constitutive expression of fluorescently-tagged MUCI10 proteins complemented the mucilage defects of a muci10-like accession. This leads us to

  4. Group B streptococcal opacity variants.

    PubMed Central

    Pincus, S H; Cole, R L; Wessels, M R; Corwin, M D; Kamanga-Sollo, E; Hayes, S F; Cieplak, W; Swanson, J

    1992-01-01

    Colony opacity variants were detected for type III group B streptococci (GBS). Transparent colonies predominate in the parent GBS, with occasional colonies having opaque portions. Two stable opaque variants (1.1 and 1.5) were compared with three transparent clones (1.2, 1.3, and 1.4). All grew well on blood agar and on GC medium, but variant 1.1 failed to grow on Todd-Hewitt medium. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that colony opacity correlated with bacterial aggregation status, with opaque variants forming longer and more organized chains. Opaque-transparent switches were observed in both directions for most variants, with transparent to opaque noted most frequently, but 1.5 did not switch at all. Switching of the opacity phenotype was observed both in vitro and in neonatal mice. Relationships between colony opacity and several cell surface phenomena were explored. (i) Opaque variant 1.1 had two surface proteins (46 and 75 kDa) that were either unique or greatly overexpressed. (ii) Variant 1.1 was deficient in type III polysaccharide, while 1.5 lacked group B antigen. Diminished capsular polysaccharide of variant 1.1 was reflected in reduced negative electrophoretic mobility and in increased buoyant density. (iii) Transparent variant colonies growing closest to a penicillin disk were opaque, but colonial variants did not differ in their sensitivity to penicillin. These data indicate that GBS can exist in both opaque and transparent forms, with opaque appearance occurring by multiple routes. Opaque variants grow poorly on Todd-Hewitt medium generally used for isolation of GBS, so any possible relationships between opacity variation and pathogenesis of GBS infection are unknown. Images PMID:1592825

  5. Variants of windmill nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kwang-Dong; Shin, Hae Kyung; Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Sung-Hee; Choi, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Zee, David S

    2016-07-01

    Windmill nystagmus is characterized by a clock-like rotation of the beating direction of a jerk nystagmus suggesting separate horizontal and vertical oscillators, usually 90° out of phase. We report oculographic characteristics in three patients with variants of windmill nystagmus in whom the common denominator was profound visual loss due to retinal diseases. Two patients showed a clock-like pattern, while in the third, the nystagmus was largely diagonal (in phase or 180° out of phase) but also periodically changed direction by 180°. We hypothesize that windmill nystagmus is a unique manifestation of "eye movements of the blind." It emerges when the central structures, including the cerebellum, that normally keep eye movements calibrated and gaze steady can no longer perform their task, because they are deprived of the retinal image motion that signals a need for adaptive recalibration.

  6. Zinc triggers a complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the metal homeostasis gene FRD3 in Arabidopsis relatives

    PubMed Central

    Charlier, Jean-Benoit; Polese, Catherine; Nouet, Cécile; Carnol, Monique; Bosman, Bernard; Krämer, Ute; Motte, Patrick; Hanikenne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, FRD3 (FERRIC CHELATE REDUCTASE DEFECTIVE 3) plays a central role in metal homeostasis. FRD3 is among a set of metal homeostasis genes that are constitutively highly expressed in roots and shoots of Arabidopsis halleri, a zinc hyperaccumulating and hypertolerant species. Here, we examined the regulation of FRD3 by zinc in both species to shed light on the evolutionary processes underlying the evolution of hyperaccumulation in A. halleri. We combined gene expression studies with the use of β-glucuronidase and green fluorescent protein reporter constructs to compare the expression profile and transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of FRD3 in both species. The AtFRD3 and AhFRD3 genes displayed a conserved expression profile. In A. thaliana, alternative transcription initiation sites from two promoters determined transcript variants that were differentially regulated by zinc supply in roots and shoots to favour the most highly translated variant under zinc-excess conditions. In A. halleri, a single transcript variant with higher transcript stability and enhanced translation has been maintained. The FRD3 gene thus undergoes complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis relatives. Our study reveals that a diverse set of mechanisms underlie increased gene dosage in the A. halleri lineage and illustrates how an environmental challenge can alter gene regulation. PMID:25900619

  7. Zinc triggers a complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the metal homeostasis gene FRD3 in Arabidopsis relatives.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Jean-Benoit; Polese, Catherine; Nouet, Cécile; Carnol, Monique; Bosman, Bernard; Krämer, Ute; Motte, Patrick; Hanikenne, Marc

    2015-07-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, FRD3 (FERRIC CHELATE REDUCTASE DEFECTIVE 3) plays a central role in metal homeostasis. FRD3 is among a set of metal homeostasis genes that are constitutively highly expressed in roots and shoots of Arabidopsis halleri, a zinc hyperaccumulating and hypertolerant species. Here, we examined the regulation of FRD3 by zinc in both species to shed light on the evolutionary processes underlying the evolution of hyperaccumulation in A. halleri. We combined gene expression studies with the use of β-glucuronidase and green fluorescent protein reporter constructs to compare the expression profile and transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of FRD3 in both species. The AtFRD3 and AhFRD3 genes displayed a conserved expression profile. In A. thaliana, alternative transcription initiation sites from two promoters determined transcript variants that were differentially regulated by zinc supply in roots and shoots to favour the most highly translated variant under zinc-excess conditions. In A. halleri, a single transcript variant with higher transcript stability and enhanced translation has been maintained. The FRD3 gene thus undergoes complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis relatives. Our study reveals that a diverse set of mechanisms underlie increased gene dosage in the A. halleri lineage and illustrates how an environmental challenge can alter gene regulation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  8. Investigating Magmatic Processes on San Cristóbal, Galápagos Through Analysis and Modeling of Newly Acquired Gravity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Z.; Harpp, K. S.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Bercovici, H.; Mahr, J.; Pimentel, R.; Córdova Aguilar, M. D.

    2016-12-01

    San Cristóbal, in the eastern Galápagos, is one of the oldest islands formed by the same magmatic system currently responsible for volcanic activity in the western archipelago. Unlike the younger western islands, San Cristóbal lacks any morphological evidence of a caldera, which is a characteristic feature of the western Galápagos shield volcanoes. Instead, San Cristóbal consists of two shield complexes dominated by eruptive cones aligned along presumed fissure systems. The island thus provides an opportunity to investigate whether the dichotomy between the morphology of the western and eastern Galápagos volcanoes is a result of evolving magmatic systems or a fundamentally different set of formation processes. We are reporting the results of a recent gravitational survey on San Cristóbal's southwestern shield, which consists of 186 measurements at 500 m spacing along all passable roads. Our results indicate that the Bouguer Anomaly (BA) on the southwest shield of San Cristóbal has a range of 8 mGals. The BA has a relative low along the western part of the shield complex and a relative high in the central and eastern sections. Within the central complex, there is a prominent BA low, which corresponds to a large cone. These results contrast with previous studies performed on the western volcanoes of Fernandina and Sierra Negra (Case et al., 1974; Vigouroux et al., 2008), which exhibit a 30 mGal BA high centered over each caldera. On these volcanoes, the BA high was interpreted as a dense plug of cumulates in the magmatic system beneath the volcano's caldera. Though our results differ from those obtained in the western Galápagos, a study by Schwartz et al.(2014) on the eastern island of Santa Cruz also fails to identify a prominent gravity high. Schwartz et al. concluded that a low magma supply to older islands cannot support the caldera formation process that characterizes the western islands, which are believed to form by evacuation of shallow magma sills

  9. Assessing Gravitropic Responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Barker, Richard; Cox, Benjamin; Silber, Logan; Sangari, Arash; Assadi, Amir; Masson, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana was the first higher organism to have its genome sequenced and is now widely regarded as the model dicot. Like all plants, Arabidopsis develops distinct growth patterns in response to different environmental stimuli. This can be seen in the gravitropic response of roots. Methods to investigate this particular tropism are presented here. First, we describe a high-throughput time-lapse photographic analysis of root growth and curvature response to gravistimulation allowing the quantification of gravitropic kinetics and growth rate at high temporal resolution. Second, we present a protocol that allows a quantitative evaluation of gravitropic sensitivity using a homemade 2D clinostat. Together, these approaches allow an initial comparative analysis of the key phenomena associated with root gravitropism between different genotypes and/or accessions.

  10. Asparagine Metabolic Pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gaufichon, Laure; Rothstein, Steven J; Suzuki, Akira

    2016-04-01

    Inorganic nitrogen in the form of ammonium is assimilated into asparagine via multiple steps involving glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate synthase (GOGAT), aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT) and asparagine synthetase (AS) in Arabidopsis. The asparagine amide group is liberated by the reaction catalyzed by asparaginase (ASPG) and also the amino group of asparagine is released by asparagine aminotransferase (AsnAT) for use in the biosynthesis of amino acids. Asparagine plays a primary role in nitrogen recycling, storage and transport in developing and germinating seeds, as well as in vegetative and senescence organs. A small multigene family encodes isoenzymes of each step of asparagine metabolism in Arabidopsis, except for asparagine aminotransferase encoded by a single gene. The aim of this study is to highlight the structure of the genes and encoded enzyme proteins involved in asparagine metabolic pathways; the regulation and role of different isogenes; and kinetic and physiological properties of encoded enzymes in different tissues and developmental stages.

  11. Election 2016: Voting on Variants.

    PubMed

    Cho, Raymond J; Collisson, Eric A

    2016-07-01

    Genome sequencing studies increasingly identify variants of unknown significance in provocative genes. Kim and colleagues present a system with which to functionally annotate such variants in a high-throughput, biologically relevant series of assays. Cancer Discov; 6(7); 694-6. ©2016 AACRSee related article by Kim et al., p. 714.

  12. Cold tolerance in Arabidopsis kamchatica.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Jessica J; Takebayashi, Naoki; Sformo, Todd; Wolf, Diana E

    2015-03-01

    • Cold tolerance is a critically important factor determining how plants will be influenced by climate change, including changes in snowcover and extreme weather events. Although a great deal is known about cold tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana, it is not highly cold tolerant. This study examined cold tolerance and its genetic diversity in an herbaceous subarctic relative, Arabidopsis kamchatica, which generally occurs in much colder climates.• Thermal analysis and electrolyte leakage were used to estimate supercooling points and lethal temperatures (LT50) in cold-acclimated and nonacclimated families from three populations of A. kamchatica.• Arabidopsis kamchatica was highly cold tolerant, with a mean LT50 of -10.8°C when actively growing, and -21.8°C when cold acclimated. It also was able to supercool to very low temperatures. Surprisingly, actively growing plants supercooled more than acclimated plants (-14.7 vs. -12.7°C). There was significant genetic variation for cold tolerance both within and among populations. However, both cold tolerance and genetic diversity were highest in the midlatitude population rather than in the far north, indicating that adaptations to climate change are most likely to arise in the center of the species range rather than at the edges.• Arabidopsis kamchatica is highly cold tolerant throughout its range. It is far more freeze tolerant than A. thaliana, and supercooled to lower temperatures, suggesting that A. kamchatica provides a valuable complement to A. thaliana for cold tolerance research. © 2015 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  13. Moving from Survival to Healthy Survival through Child Health Screening and Early Intervention Services Under Rashtriya Bal Swasthya Karyakram (RBSK).

    PubMed

    Singh, Arun K; Kumar, Rakesh; Mishra, C K; Khera, Ajay; Srivastava, Anubhav

    2015-11-01

    For negating the impact of early adversities on the development and ensuring a healthy, dynamic future for all children, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare in 2013 launched a programme for child health screening and early intervention services as Rashtriya Bal Swasthya Karyakram (RBSK) which aims to improve the quality of life with special focus on improving cognition and survival outcomes for "at risk" children. It has a systemic approach of prevention, early identification and management of 30 health conditions distributed under 4Ds: Defects at birth, Diseases, Deficiencies and Developmental delays including Disabilities spread over birth to 18 y of age in a holistic manner. There is a dedicated 4 member Mobile Health team for community screening and a dedicated 14 member team at District Early Intervention Center (DEIC) for comprehensive management. Existing health infrastructure and personnel are also integrated and utilized in this endeavor. Defects at birth are screened at Delivery points, home visits by accredited social health activist (ASHA), Anganwadi centers and at schools. Developmental delays are evaluated at DEIC through a multidisciplinary team with interdisciplinary approach. Five thousand four hundred eighteen dedicated Mobile Health teams have screened a total of 12.19 crore children till Dec.14. From April to Dec. 2014, 4.20 crore children were screened, of which birth to 6-y-old children were 2.13 crore while 2.07 crore were from 6 to 18 y. 17.7 lakh children were referred to tertiary centers and 6.2 lakh availed tertiary care. 50.7 lakhs were found positive for 4Ds; 1.35 lakhs were birth defects. RBSK is a step towards universal health care for free assured services.

  14. [Spanish wines in the Liber de arte medendi (1564) by Cristóbal de Vega (1510-1573)].

    PubMed

    Hernández González, J P

    2005-01-01

    The Liber de arte medendi (Lyon, 1564) is the most relevant book of Prima Professor of The Faculty of Medicine of Universidad de Alcalá, doctor Cristóbal de Vega (1510-1573). It is a treatise--674 pages in folio--of theoretical and practical medicine. This doctrinal expose, scholar and bookisk, changes its tone in the second of the three parts, the liber II, that deals with "no natural things" of galenism, which necessarily affect the organism and that, depending on how they are used, they may strengthen or weaken its health: air, physical activity, foods and drinks, sleep, evacuations and passions of the soul. Within the section dedicated to foods and drinks, we have studied the interesting chapter about wines, where the author makes a hygienic assessment about wine. The chapter on spanish wines consigned at the Liber de arte medendi and some other references about the therapeutic capabilities of some of the wines described by the author. He we undertaken a critical analysis of that chapter, glossing the most significant texts about spanish wines mentioned by the author. In this chapter vega praises the class and hygienic applications of white Alcarrian wines from Yepes, Lillo and Santorcaz, of the Galician from Rivadavia, from Cantalapiedra in the Salamanca region, and the Andalusians from Jerez, Cazalla and Alanís. He also extols the smooth reds from Santorcaz; though the best in this category would be, for the adaptation of its temperament to the human nature, the Illana wine. at Liber de arte medendi, wines from Cantalapiedra (Ded Castille), Rivadavia (Galicia), Jerez, Ca- zalla and Alanís (Andalusia), Santorcaz, Corpa, Yepes, San Martín de Valdeiglesias, Villalbilla, Illana and Lillo (New Castille) are mentioned.

  15. On the covering fraction variability in an EUV mini-BAL outflow from PG 1206+459

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzahid, S.; Srianand, R.; Charlton, J.; Eracleous, M.

    2016-04-01

    We report on the first detection of extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) absorption variability in the Ne VIII λλ770, 780 mini-broad absorption line (mini-BAL) in the spectrum of the quasar (QSO) PG 1206+459. The observed equivalent width (EW) of the Ne VIII doublet shows a ˜4σ variation over a time-scale of 2.8 months in the QSO's rest frame. Both members of the Ne VIII doublet exhibit non-black saturation, indicating partial coverage of the continuum source. An increase in the Ne VIII covering fraction from fc = 0.59 ± 0.05 to 0.72 ± 0.03 is observed over the same period. The Ne VIII profiles are too highly saturated to be susceptible to changes in the ionization state of the absorbing gas. In fact, we do not observe any significant variation in the EW and/or column density after correcting the spectra for partial coverage. We, thus, propose transverse motions of the absorbing gas as the cause of the observed variability. Using a simple model of a transiting cloud we estimate a transverse speed of ˜1800 km s-1. For Keplerian motion, this corresponds to a distance between the absorber and the central engine of ˜1.3 pc, which places the absorber just outside the broad-line region. We further estimate a density of ˜5 × 106 cm-3 and a kinetic luminosity of ˜1043-1044 erg s-1. Such large kinetic powers suggest that outflows detected via EUV lines are potentially major contributors to active galactic nuclei feedback.

  16. An International Bioinformatics Infrastructure to Underpin the Arabidopsis Community

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The future bioinformatics needs of the Arabidopsis community as well as those of other scientific communities that depend on Arabidopsis resources were discussed at a pair of recent meetings held by the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Committee (MASC) and the North American Arabidopsis Steering C...

  17. Using "Arabidopsis" Genetic Sequences to Teach Bioinformatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xiaorong

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a new approach to teaching bioinformatics using "Arabidopsis" genetic sequences. Several open-ended and inquiry-based laboratory exercises have been designed to help students grasp key concepts and gain practical skills in bioinformatics, using "Arabidopsis" leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR…

  18. Using "Arabidopsis" Genetic Sequences to Teach Bioinformatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xiaorong

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a new approach to teaching bioinformatics using "Arabidopsis" genetic sequences. Several open-ended and inquiry-based laboratory exercises have been designed to help students grasp key concepts and gain practical skills in bioinformatics, using "Arabidopsis" leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR…

  19. Variant (Swine Origin) Influenza Viruses in Humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Other Variant Influenza Viruses: Background and CDC Risk Assessment and Reporting Language: ... Background CDC Assessment Reporting Background On Variant Influenza Viruses Swine flu viruses do not normally infect humans. ...

  20. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Wogulis, Mark

    2013-09-24

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase II. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the variants.

  1. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Wogulis, Mark

    2014-10-14

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase II. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the variants.

  2. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Wogulis, Mark

    2014-09-09

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the cellobiohydrolase variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the cellobiohydrolase variants.

  3. Effector-Triggered Immune Response in Arabidopsis thaliana Is a Quantitative Trait

    PubMed Central

    Iakovidis, Michail; Teixeira, Paulo J. P. L.; Exposito-Alonso, Moises; Cowper, Matthew G.; Law, Theresa F.; Liu, Qingli; Vu, Minh Chau; Dang, Troy Minh; Corwin, Jason A.; Weigel, Detlef; Dangl, Jeffery L.; Grant, Sarah R.

    2016-01-01

    We identified loci responsible for natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) responses to a bacterial pathogen virulence factor, HopAM1. HopAM1 is a type III effector protein secreted by the virulent Pseudomonas syringae strain Pto DC3000. Delivery of HopAM1 from disarmed Pseudomonas strains leads to local cell death, meristem chlorosis, or both, with varying intensities in different Arabidopsis accessions. These phenotypes are not associated with differences in bacterial growth restriction. We treated the two phenotypes as quantitative traits to identify host loci controlling responses to HopAM1. Genome-wide association (GWA) of 64 Arabidopsis accessions identified independent variants highly correlated with response to each phenotype. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping in a recombinant inbred population between Bur-0 and Col-0 accessions revealed genetic linkage to regions distinct from the top GWA hits. Two major QTL associated with HopAM1-induced cell death were also associated with HopAM1-induced chlorosis. HopAM1-induced changes in Arabidopsis gene expression showed that rapid HopAM1-dependent cell death in Bur-0 is correlated with effector-triggered immune responses. Studies of the effect of mutations in known plant immune system genes showed, surprisingly, that both cell death and chlorosis phenotypes are enhanced by loss of EDS1, a regulatory hub in the plant immune-signaling network. Our results reveal complex genetic architecture for response to this particular type III virulence effector, in contrast to the typical monogenic control of cell death and disease resistance triggered by most type III effectors. PMID:27412712

  4. Heteromorphic variants of chromosome 9

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Heterochromatic variants of pericentromere of chromosome 9 are reported and discussed since decades concerning their detailed structure and clinical meaning. However, detailed studies are scarce. Thus, here we provide the largest ever done molecular cytogenetic research based on >300 chromosome 9 heteromorphism carriers. Results In this study, 334 carriers of heterochromatic variants of chromosome 9 were included, being 192 patients from Western Europe and the remainder from Easter-European origin. A 3-color-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probe-set directed against for 9p12 to 9q13~21.1 (9het-mix) and 8 different locus-specific probes were applied for their characterization. The 9het-mix enables the characterization of 21 of the yet known 24 chromosome 9 heteromorphic patterns. In this study, 17 different variants were detected including five yet unreported; the most frequent were pericentric inversions (49.4%) followed by 9qh-variants (23.9%), variants of 9ph (11.4%), cenh (8.2%), and dicentric- (3.8%) and duplication-variants (3.3%). For reasons of simplicity, a new short nomenclature for the yet reported 24 heteromorphic patterns of chromosome 9 is suggested. Six breakpoints involved in four of the 24 variants could be narrowed down using locus-specific probes. Conclusions Based on this largest study ever done in carriers of chromosome 9 heteromorphisms, three of the 24 detailed variants were more frequently observed in Western than in Eastern Europe. Besides, there is no clear evidence that infertility is linked to any of the 24 chromosome 9 heteromorphic variants. PMID:23547710

  5. Variants of beta-glucosidase

    DOEpatents

    Fidantsef, Ana; Lamsa, Michael; Gorre-Clancy, Brian

    2009-12-29

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent beta-glucosidase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 703 of amino acids 1 to 842 of SEQ ID NO: 2 or corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 705 of amino acids 1 to 844 of SEQ ID NO: 70, wherein the variant has beta-glucosidase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant beta-glucosidases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  6. Variants of beta-glucosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Fidantsef, Ana; Lamsa, Michael; Gorre-Clancy, Brian

    2015-07-14

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent beta-glucosidase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 703 of amino acids 1 to 842 of SEQ ID NO: 2 or corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 705 of amino acids 1 to 844 of SEQ ID NO: 70, wherein the variant has beta-glucosidase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant beta-glucosidases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  7. Variants of beta-glucosidases

    SciTech Connect

    Fidantsef, Ana; Lamsa, Michael; Gorre-Clancy, Brian

    2014-10-07

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent beta-glucosidase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 703 of amino acids 1 to 842 of SEQ ID NO: 2 or corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 705 of amino acids 1 to 844 of SEQ ID NO: 70, wherein the variant has beta-glucosidase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant beta-glucosidases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  8. Variants of beta-glucosidases

    DOEpatents

    Fidantsef, Ana; Lamsa, Michael; Clancy, Brian Gorre

    2008-08-19

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent beta-glucosidase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 703 of amino acids 1 to 842 of SEQ ID NO: 2 or corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 705 of amino acids 1 to 844 of SEQ ID NO: 70, wherein the variant has beta-glucosidase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant beta-glucosidases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  9. Ultrastructure of the root cap of Arabidopsis Thaliana L. Heynh under spaceflight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Peculiarities of the ultrastructural organization of Arabidopsis root cap cells grown from the stage of two cotyledonous leaves in the Svetoblok-1 apparatus aboard the Salyut 6 research orbital station and in the laboratory are assessed. It is established that under conditions of real space flight vacuolization of the root cap cells increses considerably compared to the control variant. Changes in the topography and ulstrastructure of amyloplasts as well as lysis of cell walls are observed in the material under study. An assumption is advanced on analogous cell responses observed at the ultrastructural level to weightlessness and clinostatic conditions.

  10. Functional characterization of 5-enopyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase from Alkaliphilus metalliredigens in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xiao-Juan; Tian, Yong-Sheng; Peng, Ri-He; Xu, Jing; Zhao, Wei; Yao, Quan-Hong; Sun, Sheng

    2014-10-01

    Although a large number of AroA enzymes (EPSPS: 5-enopyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase) have been identified, cloned, and tested for glyphosate resistance, only two AroA variants, derived from Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain CP4 and Zea mays, have been utilized to produce the commercial glyphosate-resistant crops. Here, we have used a PCR-based twostep DNA synthesis method to synthesize an aroA gene (aroAA. metalliredigens) from Alkaliphilus metalliredigens, encoding a new EPSPS. Furthermore, transgenic Arabidopsis with the new aroAA. metalliredigens gene was obtained to confirm the potential of the novel aroA gene in developing glyphosate-resistant crops.

  11. Photo-sensitive degron variants for tuning protein stability by light.

    PubMed

    Usherenko, Svetlana; Stibbe, Hilke; Muscò, Massimiliano; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Kostina, Ekaterina A; Taxis, Christof

    2014-11-18

    Regulated proteolysis by the proteasome is one of the fundamental mechanisms used in eukaryotic cells to control cellular behavior. Efficient tools to regulate protein stability offer synthetic influence on molecular level on a selected biological process. Optogenetic control of protein stability has been achieved with the photo-sensitive degron (psd) module. This engineered tool consists of the photoreceptor domain light oxygen voltage 2 (LOV2) from Arabidopsis thaliana phototropin1 fused to a sequence that induces direct proteasomal degradation, which was derived from the carboxy-terminal degron of murine ornithine decarboxylase. The abundance of target proteins tagged with the psd module can be regulated by blue light if the degradation tag is exposed to the cytoplasm or the nucleus. We used the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae to generate psd module variants with increased and decreased stabilities in darkness or when exposed to blue light using site-specific and random mutagenesis. The variants were characterized as fusions to fluorescent reporter proteins and showed half-lives between 6 and 75 minutes in cells exposed to blue light and 14 to 187 minutes in darkness. In blue light, ten variants showed accelerated degradation and four variants increased stability compared to the original psd module. Measuring the dark/light ratio of selected constructs in yeast cells showed that two variants were obtained with ratios twice as high as in the wild type psd module. In silico modeling of photoreceptor variant characteristics suggested that for most cases alterations in behavior were induced by changes in the light-response of the LOV2 domain. In total, the mutational analysis resulted in psd module variants, which provide tuning of protein stability over a broad range by blue light. Two variants showed characteristics that are profoundly improved compared to the original construct. The modular usage of the LOV2 domain in optogenetic tools allows the usage of

  12. Perforin down-regulation and adhesion molecules activation in pulmonary sarcoidosis: an induced sputum and BAL study.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Katerina M; Tsiligianni, Ioanna; Kyriakou, Despina; Tzanakis, Nikolaos; Tzouvelekis, Argyris; Siafakas, Nikolaos M; Bouros, Demosthenes

    2006-06-01

    Sarcoidosis is thought to be a T-helper type 1 cytokine-mediated disorder. Sputum induction has been proposed as a useful noninvasive method mainly for the assessment of airway diseases. However, it is unknown whether the balance of T-cytotoxic (Tc1) type 1 and Tc2 cells is altered in sarcoidosis. The primary aim of this study was to characterize the CD8+ T lymphocyte subpopulations in induced sputum from sarcoidosis patients, and to compare these subpopulations to those found in BAL fluid (BALF) from sarcoidosis patients. To further investigate the mechanism of the cytotoxic activity of CD8+ lymphocytes, we measured their perforin expression. Additionally, two adhesion molecules (CD62 and CD71), which are expressed on CD8+ T cells and may serve as novel immunologic markers, were detected. Department of Thoracic Medicine, University of Crete, and Department of Pneumonology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, Greece. We prospectively studied 22 patients with sarcoidosis (median age, 48 years; age range, 25 to 65 years) and 10 healthy subjects (5 female and 5 male; median age, 39 years; age range, 26 to 60 years). The stimulation of lymphocytes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate was followed by the use of double immunocytochemical methods to identify CD8+ interferon (IFN)-gamma producing cells (ie, Tc1) and CD8+ interleukin-4 producing cells (ie, Tc2). We found a significant decrease in the prestimulation percentage of IFN-gamma-positive CD8+ T cells in the BALF (p = 0.001) and induced sputum (p = 0.001) of sarcoidosis patients compared to the number in samples from healthy control subjects. However, no significant difference was documented between lymphocyte subsets poststimulation. Decreased levels of perforin expression were found in BALF (p = 0.001) and induced sputum (p < 0.001) of sarcoidosis patients compared to those in control subjects. The adhesion molecules were significantly increased in both the BALF and induced sputum of the sarcoid

  13. Investigation of chemical composition and crystal structure in sintered Ce{sub 15}Nd{sub 15}Fe{sub bal}B{sub 1} magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shu-lin; Feng, Hai-bo; Zhu, Ming-gang; Li, An-hua; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yue

    2014-10-15

    The substitution of cerium, a more abundant rare-earth element, for sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets has drawn intense interest. In the present work, nominal composition of Ce{sub 15}Nd{sub 15}Fe{sub bal}B{sub 1} (wt. %), with cerium constitutes increased to 50% of the total rare-earth content, was used. And Ce-free Nd{sub 30}Fe{sub bal}B{sub 1} (wt. %) was prepared by the same preparation process as comparison. The microstructure of the sintered magnets has been investigated by means of X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope. The results show that there are three kinds of RE-rich phases in the same magnet, i.e., fcc-(Ce,Nd)O{sub x} (a=0.547nm), hcp-(Ce,Nd){sub 2}O{sub 3} (a=0.386nm, c=0.604nm) and bcc-(Ce,Nd){sub 2}O{sub 3} (a=1.113nm). Ors of (140)(Ce,Nd){sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B// (1-21)bcc-(Ce,Nd){sub 2}O{sub 3}(∼3°), [001](Ce,Nd){sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B// [-214]bcc-(Ce,Nd){sub 2}O{sub 3}; (01-1)(Ce,Nd){sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B// (101)fcc- (Ce,Nd)O{sub x}(∼2°), [101](Ce,Nd){sub 2}Fe14B// [12-1]fcc-(Ce,Nd)O{sub x} were found through selected area electron diffraction (SAED) analysis. According to the analysis, it can be concluded that cerium has partly substituted for neodymium by occupying the corresponding atom sites in the Ce{sub 15}Nd{sub 15}Fe{sub bal}B{sub 1} magnet, without changing the crystal configuration.

  14. Determination of impact of urbanization on agricultural land and wetland land use in Balçovas' delta by remote sensing and GIS technique.

    PubMed

    Bolca, Mustafa; Turkyilmaz, Bahar; Kurucu, Yusuf; Altinbas, Unal; Esetlili, M Tolga; Gulgun, Bahriye

    2007-08-01

    Because of their intense vegetation and the fact that they include areas of coastline, deltas situated in the vicinity of big cities are areas of greet attraction for people who wish to get away from in a crowded city. However, deltas, with their fertile soil and unique flora and fauna, need to be protected. In order for the use of such areas to be planned in a sustainable way by local authorities, there is a need for detailed data about these regions. In this study, the changes in land use of the Balçova Delta, which is to the immediate west of Turkey's third largest city Izmir, from 1957 up to the present day, were investigated. In the study, using aerial photographs taken in 1957, 1976 and 1995 and an IKONOS satellite image from the year 2005, the natural and cultural characteristics of the region and changes in the coastline were determined spatially. Through this study, which aimed to reveal the characteristics of the areas of land already lost as well as the types of land use in the Balçova delta and to determine geographically the remaining areas in need of protection, local authorities were provided with the required data support. Balçova consists of flat and fertile wetland with mainly citrus-fruit orchards and flower-producing green houses. The marsh and lagoon system situated in the coastal areas of the delta provides a habitat for wild life, in particular birds. In the Balçova Delta, which provides feeding and resting for migratory birds, freshwater sources are of vital importance for fauna and flora. The settlement area, which in 1957 was 182 ha, increased 11-fold up to the year 2005 when it reached 2,141 ha. On the other hand, great losses were determined in farming land, olive groves, forest and in the marsh and lagoon system. This unsystematic and rapid urbanization occurring in the study region is not only causing the loss of important agricultural land and wetland, but also lasting water and soil pollution.

  15. Developing a DNA variant database.

    PubMed

    Fung, David C Y

    2008-01-01

    Disease- and locus-specific variant databases have been a valuable resource to clinical and research geneticists. With the recent rapid developments in technologies, the number of DNA variants detected in a typical molecular genetics laboratory easily exceeds 1,000. To keep track of the growing inventory of DNA variants, many laboratories employ information technology to store the data as well as distributing the data and its associated information to clinicians and researchers via the Web. While it is a valuable resource, the hosting of a web-accessible database requires collaboration between bioinformaticians and biologists and careful planning to ensure its usability and availability. In this chapter, a series of tutorials on building a local DNA variant database out of a sample dataset will be provided. However, this tutorial will not include programming details on building a web interface and on constructing the web application necessary for web hosting. Instead, an introduction to the two commonly used methods for hosting web-accessible variant databases will be described. Apart from the tutorials, this chapter will also consider the resources and planning required for making a variant database project successful.

  16. Elucidation of the in vitro metabolic profile of stable isotope labeled BAL19403 by accurate mass capillary liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and isotope exchange.

    PubMed

    Wind, Mathias; Gebhardt, Klaus; Grunwald, Helge; Spickermann, Jochen; Donzelli, Massimiliano; Kellenberger, Laurenz; Muller, Marc; Fullhardt, Pascal; Schmitt-Hoffmann, Anne; Schleimer, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The in vitro metabolic pattern of BAL19403, a novel macrolide antibiotic, was investigated by capillary liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/QTOF-MS) in incubations with human microsomes. For the elucidation of the metabolic pathway, BAL19403 labeled with four deuterium atoms (D4) was used, and detection of metabolites performed using mixtures of the unlabeled (H4) BAL19403 and its D4 analogue (1:1) as substrate. All metabolites appeared with similar chromatographic behavior. MS/MS spectra of BAL19403 and its metabolites are dominated by non-informative fragment ions. Therefore, the structure of the metabolites was elucidated mainly by accurate mass measurements with subsequent proposals of elemental compositions. Main biotransformations were N-demethylation, lactone ring hydrolysis, and oxidation. Additionally, N-dealkylation of the aromatic moiety was identified. This dealkylation results not only in formation of an aldehyde, according to the classical pathway, but also in formation of the corresponding alcohol and carboxylic acid. Final elucidation of their structures was possible, since this dealkylation takes place vicinal to the deuterium-labeled part of BAL19403 and interferes with D/H exchange. The degree of D/H exchange, determined by analysis of the metabolite isotopic pattern, was used to elucidate the adjacent functional group. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Taxonomy and Phylogeny of Arabidopsis (Brassicaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shehbaz, Ihsan A.; O'Kane, Steve L.

    2002-01-01

    Detailed taxonomic, cytological, and phylogenetic accounts of Arabidopsis are presented. As currently delimited, the genus consists of nine species all of which are indigenous to Europe, with the ranges of two species extending into northern and eastern Asia and North American into central United States. A survey of chromosome numbers in the genus is presented, and the country of origin for each count is given. Detailed descriptions of all species and subspecies and keys to all taxa are provided. Generic assignments are updated for the 50 species previously included in Arabidopsis. A cladogram of the species of Arabidopsis based on molecular phylogenetic studies by the authors is given. PMID:22303187

  18. Sulfenome mining in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Waszczak, Cezary; Akter, Salma; Eeckhout, Dominique; Persiau, Geert; Wahni, Khadija; Bodra, Nandita; Van Molle, Inge; De Smet, Barbara; Vertommen, Didier; Gevaert, Kris; De Jaeger, Geert; Van Montagu, Marc; Messens, Joris; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to be potent signaling molecules. Today, oxidation of cysteine residues is a well-recognized posttranslational protein modification, but the signaling processes steered by such oxidations are poorly understood. To gain insight into the cysteine thiol-dependent ROS signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent sulfenome: that is, proteins with at least one cysteine thiol oxidized to a sulfenic acid. By means of a genetic construct consisting of a fusion between the C-terminal domain of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) AP-1–like (YAP1) transcription factor and a tandem affinity purification tag, we detected ∼100 sulfenylated proteins in Arabidopsis cell suspensions exposed to H2O2 stress. The in vivo YAP1-based trapping of sulfenylated proteins was validated by a targeted in vitro analysis of DEHYDROASCORBATE REDUCTASE2 (DHAR2). In DHAR2, the active site nucleophilic cysteine is regulated through a sulfenic acid-dependent switch, leading to S-glutathionylation, a protein modification that protects the protein against oxidative damage. PMID:25049418

  19. Arabidopsis thaliana life without phytochromes

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Bárbara; Sánchez-Lamas, Maximiliano; Yanovsky, Marcelo J.; Casal, Jorge J.; Cerdán, Pablo D.

    2010-01-01

    Plants use light as a source of energy for photosynthesis and as a source of environmental information perceived by photoreceptors. Testing whether plants can complete their cycle if light provides energy but no information about the environment requires a plant devoid of phytochromes because all photosynthetically active wavelengths activate phytochromes. Producing such a quintuple mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana has been challenging, but we were able to obtain it in the flowering locus T (ft) mutant background. The quintuple phytochrome mutant does not germinate in the FT background, but it germinates to some extent in the ft background. If germination problems are bypassed by the addition of gibberellins, the seedlings of the quintuple phytochrome mutant exposed to red light produce chlorophyll, indicating that phytochromes are not the sole red-light photoreceptors, but they become developmentally arrested shortly after the cotyledon stage. Blue light bypasses this blockage, rejecting the long-standing idea that the blue-light receptors cryptochromes cannot operate without phytochromes. After growth under white light, returning the quintuple phytochrome mutant to red light resulted in rapid senescence of already expanded leaves and severely impaired expansion of new leaves. We conclude that Arabidopsis development is stalled at several points in the presence of light suitable for photosynthesis but providing no photomorphogenic signal. PMID:20176939

  20. Toxicity induced by Hg2+ on choline acetyltransferase activity from E. electricus (L.) electrocytes: the protective effect of 2,3 dimercapto-propanol (BAL).

    PubMed

    Nunes-Tavares, Nilson; Valverde, Rafael Hospodar Felippe; Araújo, Glauce Maria Nunes; Hassón-Voloch, Aida

    2005-04-01

    The effect of mercury (Hg(2+)) on the activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) from electrocytes of Electrophorus electricus (L.) was studied due to the importance of this enzyme and acetylcholine in many neurochemical functions such as arousal, learning, and memory. Mercury, which has affinity to thiol groups, acted as a potent inhibitor of ChAT, which was obtained by differential centrifugation and ammonium sulfate precipitation, at 80%, from the main electric organ homogenate. Mercury inhibition presents different kinetic behaviors for both enzyme substrates: noncompetitive to choline and of mixed type to AcCoA, with inhibition constants on the order of 0.5 to 1.0 microM. The enzyme activity was recovered using 2,3 dimercapto-propanol (BAL), a well-known chelate for sulphydryl groups and metals, which acted as a protecting agent and was able to revert the Hg(2+) inhibition at a concentration of 10 (-6) M. After treatment with this metal and in the presence of 2,3 dimercapto-propanol, 70% of the enzyme activity was recovered for AcCoA and 80% for choline. The observed inhibition is likely due to direct protein interaction, because the addition of BAL reversed the effects of HgCl(2) on ChAT activity. The results cast new light on the mechanisms of mercurial neurotoxicity.

  1. Effect of C and Ce addition on the microstructure and magnetic property of the mechanically alloyed FeSiBAlNi high entropy alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Axinte, Eugen; Zhao, Zhengfeng; Wang, Yan

    2016-09-01

    The effects of elemental addition, C and Ce, on the microstructure, thermal property and magnetic property of mechanically alloyed FeSiBAlNi (based-W5) high entropy alloys (HEAs) have been investigated in depth in the present work. The amorphous HEAs have been successfully fabricated by mechanical alloying. The results reveal that Ce addition obviously shortens the formation time of fully amorphous phase, therefore leading to the enhanced glass forming ability (GFA) of the based-W5. The final products of as-milled FeSiBAlNiC alloy consist of the main amorphous phase and a small amount of Si nanocrystals. In addition, C and Ce addition are both beneficial to enhance the thermal stability. The coercivity force (Hc) of the tested samples lies in the range of 50-378 Oe, suggesting the semi-hard magnetic property. The saturation magnetization (Ms) becomes decreased with increasing the milling time. C addition effectively increases Ms exhibiting the good magnetic property, however, Ce addition presents the negative effect. It should be noted that the amorphous phase tends to be formed when the radius ratio (Rr) is larger than 1, and the GFA is enhanced with increasing Rr and valence electron concentration.

  2. Electronic structures and optical properties of wurtzite type LiBSe{sub 2} (B=Al, Ga, In): A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Li Longhua; Li Junqian; Wu Liming

    2008-09-15

    The electronic structures of three wurtzite type isostructural compounds LiBSe{sub 2} (B=Al, Ga, In) are studied by the density functional theory (DFT). The results reveal that the presence of Li cations has direct influence on neither the band gaps (Eg) nor the bonding levels, but plays an important role in the stabilization of the structures. The band structures and densities of states (DOS) are analyzed in detail, and the band gaps of LiBSe{sub 2} adhere to the following trend Eg{sub (LiAlSe2)}>Eg{sub (LiGaSe2)}>Eg{sub (LiInSe2)}, which is in agreement with the decrease of the bond energy of the corresponding Se 4p-B s antibonding orbitals. The role of the active s electrons of B element on the band gaps is also discussed. Finally, the optical properties are predicted, and the results would be a guide to understand the experiments. - Graphical abstract: The electronic structures and optical properties of wurtzite type LiBSe{sub 2} (B=Al, Ga, In) have been studied by the DFT calculations. And the correlation of the electronegative of B element and the band gap decrease-trend are discussed. The comparison between different calculation methods and the experimental results is presented.

  3. Influence of Arabidopsis thaliana accessions on rhizobacterial communities and natural variation in root exudates

    PubMed Central

    Micallef, Shirley A.; Shiaris, Michael P.; Colón-Carmona, Adán

    2009-01-01

    Plant species is considered to be one of the most important factors in shaping rhizobacterial communities, but specific plant–microbe interactions in the rhizosphere are still not fully understood. Arabidopsis thaliana, for which a large number of naturally occurring ecotype accessions exist, lacks mycorrhizal associations and is hence an ideal model for rhizobacterial studies. Eight Arabidopsis accessions were found to exert a marked selective influence on bacteria associated with their roots, as determined by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA). Community differences in species composition and relative abundance were both significant (P <0.001). The eight distinct and reproducible accession-dependent community profiles also differed from control bulk soil. Root exudates of these variants were analysed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to try to establish whether the unique rhizobacterial assemblages among accessions could be attributed to plant-regulated chemical changes in the rhizosphere. Natural variation in root exudation patterns was clearly exhibited, suggesting that differences in exudation patterns among accessions could be influencing bacterial assemblages. Other factors such as root system architecture are also probably involved. Finally, to investigate the Arabidopsis rhizosphere further, the phylogenetic diversity of rhizobacteria from accession Cvi-0 is described. PMID:19342429

  4. Plant U13 orthologues and orphan snoRNAs identified by RNomics of RNA from Arabidopsis nucleoli

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Hyon; Spensley, Mark; Choi, Seung Kook; Calixto, Cristiane P. G.; Pendle, Ali F.; Koroleva, Olga; Shaw, Peter J.; Brown, John W. S.

    2010-01-01

    Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and small Cajal body-specific RNAs (scaRNAs) are non-coding RNAs whose main function in eukaryotes is to guide the modification of nucleotides in ribosomal and spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs, respectively. Full-length sequences of Arabidopsis snoRNAs and scaRNAs have been obtained from cDNA libraries of capped and uncapped small RNAs using RNA from isolated nucleoli from Arabidopsis cell cultures. We have identified 31 novel snoRNA genes (9 box C/D and 22 box H/ACA) and 15 new variants of previously described snoRNAs. Three related capped snoRNAs with a distinct gene organization and structure were identified as orthologues of animal U13snoRNAs. In addition, eight of the novel genes had no complementarity to rRNAs or snRNAs and are therefore putative orphan snoRNAs potentially reflecting wider functions for these RNAs. The nucleolar localization of a number of the snoRNAs and the localization to nuclear bodies of two putative scaRNAs was confirmed by in situ hybridization. The majority of the novel snoRNA genes were found in new gene clusters or as part of previously described clusters. These results expand the repertoire of Arabidopsis snoRNAs to 188 snoRNA genes with 294 gene variants. PMID:20081206

  5. PAIR: the predicted Arabidopsis interactome resource.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mingzhi; Shen, Xueling; Chen, Xin

    2011-01-01

    The predicted Arabidopsis interactome resource (PAIR, http://www.cls.zju.edu.cn/pair/), comprised of 5990 experimentally reported molecular interactions in Arabidopsis thaliana together with 145,494 predicted interactions, is currently the most comprehensive data set of the Arabidopsis interactome with high reliability. PAIR predicts interactions by a fine-tuned support vector machine model that integrates indirect evidences for interaction, such as gene co-expressions, domain interactions, shared GO annotations, co-localizations, phylogenetic profile similarities and homologous interactions in other organisms (interologs). These predictions were expected to cover 24% of the entire Arabidopsis interactome, and their reliability was estimated to be 44%. Two independent example data sets were used to rigorously validate the prediction accuracy. PAIR features a user-friendly query interface, providing rich annotation on the relationships between two proteins. A graphical interaction network browser has also been integrated into the PAIR web interface to facilitate mining of specific pathways.

  6. The fifth international conference on Arabidopsis research

    SciTech Connect

    Hangarter, R.; Scholl, R.; Davis, K.; Feldmann, K.

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains abstracts of oral and poster presentations made in conjunction with the Fifth International Conference on Arabidopsis Research held August 19--22, 1993 at the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

  7. The mitochondrial monothiol glutaredoxin S15 is essential for iron-sulfur protein maturation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Moseler, Anna; Aller, Isabel; Wagner, Stephan; Nietzel, Thomas; Przybyla-Toscano, Jonathan; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich; Lill, Roland; Berndt, Carsten; Rouhier, Nicolas; Schwarzländer, Markus; Meyer, Andreas J.

    2015-01-01

    The iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) is an ancient and essential cofactor of many proteins involved in electron transfer and metabolic reactions. In Arabidopsis, three pathways exist for the maturation of iron-sulfur proteins in the cytosol, plastids, and mitochondria. We functionally characterized the role of mitochondrial glutaredoxin S15 (GRXS15) in biogenesis of ISC containing aconitase through a combination of genetic, physiological, and biochemical approaches. Two Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutants were identified as null mutants with early embryonic lethal phenotypes that could be rescued by GRXS15. Furthermore, we showed that recombinant GRXS15 is able to coordinate and transfer an ISC and that this coordination depends on reduced glutathione (GSH). We found the Arabidopsis GRXS15 able to complement growth defects based on disturbed ISC protein assembly of a yeast Δgrx5 mutant. Modeling of GRXS15 onto the crystal structures of related nonplant proteins highlighted amino acid residues that after mutation diminished GSH and subsequently ISC coordination, as well as the ability to rescue the yeast mutant. When used for plant complementation, one of these mutant variants, GRXS15K83/A, led to severe developmental delay and a pronounced decrease in aconitase activity by approximately 65%. These results indicate that mitochondrial GRXS15 is an essential protein in Arabidopsis, required for full activity of iron-sulfur proteins. PMID:26483494

  8. Natural variations in expression of regulatory and detoxification related genes under limiting phosphate and arsenate stress in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Tapsi; Kumar, Smita; Khare, Ria; Tripathi, Rudra D.; Trivedi, Prabodh K.

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic stress including nutrient deficiency and heavy metal toxicity severely affects plant growth, development, and productivity. Genetic variations within and in between species are one of the important factors in establishing interactions and responses of plants with the environment. In the recent past, natural variations in Arabidopsis thaliana have been used to understand plant development and response toward different stresses at genetic level. Phosphorus deficiency negatively affects plant growth and metabolism and modulates expression of the genes involved in Pi homeostasis. Arsenate, As(V), a chemical analog of Pi, is taken up by the plants via phosphate transport system. Studies suggest that during Pi deficiency, enhanced As(V) uptake leads to increased toxicity in plants. Here, the natural variations in Arabidopsis have been utilized to study the As(V) stress response under limiting Pi condition. The primary root length was compared to identify differential response of three Arabidopsis accessions (Col-0, Sij-1, and Slavi-1) under limiting Pi and As(V) stress. To study the molecular mechanisms responsible for the differential response, comprehensive expression profiling of the genes involved in uptake, detoxification, and regulatory mechanisms was carried out. Analysis suggests genetic variation-dependent regulatory mechanisms may affect differential response of Arabidopsis natural variants toward As(V) stress under limiting Pi condition. Therefore, it is hypothesized that detailed analysis of the natural variations under multiple stress conditions might help in the better understanding of the biological processes involved in stress tolerance and adaptation. PMID:26557133

  9. Analysis of a Panel of 48 Cytokines in BAL Fluids Specifically Identifies IL-8 Levels as the Only Cytokine that Distinguishes Controlled Asthma from Uncontrolled Asthma, and Correlates Inversely with FEV1

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Huibin; Kurosky, Alexander; Jennings, Kristofer; Sun, Qian; Boldogh, Istvan; Sur, Sanjiv

    2015-01-01

    We sought to identify cells and cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids that distinguish asthma from healthy control subjects and those that distinguish controlled asthma from uncontrolled asthma. Following informed consent, 36 human subjects were recruited for this study. These included 11 healthy control subjects, 15 subjects with controlled asthma with FEV1≥80% predicted and 10 subjects with uncontrolled asthma with FEV1 <80% predicted. BAL fluid was obtained from all subjects. The numbers of different cell types and the levels of 48 cytokines were measured in these fluids. Compared to healthy control subjects, patients with asthma had significantly more percentages of eosinophils and neutrophils, IL-1RA, IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2Rα, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, G-CSF, GROα (CXCL1), MIP-1β (CCL4), MIG (CXCL9), RANTES (CCL5) and TRAIL in their BAL fluids. The only inflammatory markers that distinguished controlled asthma from uncontrolled asthma were neutrophil percentage and IL-8 levels, and both were inversely correlated with FEV1. We examined whether grouping asthma subjects on the basis of BAL eosinophil % or neutrophil % could identify specific cytokine profiles. The only differences between neutrophil-normal asthma (neutrophil≤2.4%) and neutrophil-high asthma (neutrophils%>2.4%) were a higher BAL fluid IL-8 levels, and a lower FEV1 in the latter group. By contrast, compared to eosinophil-normal asthma (eosinophils≤0.3%), eosinophil-high asthma (eosinophils>0.3%) had higher levels of IL-5, IL-13, IL-16, and PDGF-bb, but same neutrophil percentage, IL-8, and FEV1. Our results identify neutrophils and IL-8 are the only inflammatory components in BAL fluids that distinguish controlled asthma from uncontrolled asthma, and both correlate inversely with FEV1. PMID:26011707

  10. Analysis of a Panel of 48 Cytokines in BAL Fluids Specifically Identifies IL-8 Levels as the Only Cytokine that Distinguishes Controlled Asthma from Uncontrolled Asthma, and Correlates Inversely with FEV1.

    PubMed

    Hosoki, Koa; Ying, Sun; Corrigan, Christopher; Qi, Huibin; Kurosky, Alexander; Jennings, Kristofer; Sun, Qian; Boldogh, Istvan; Sur, Sanjiv

    2015-01-01

    We sought to identify cells and cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids that distinguish asthma from healthy control subjects and those that distinguish controlled asthma from uncontrolled asthma. Following informed consent, 36 human subjects were recruited for this study. These included 11 healthy control subjects, 15 subjects with controlled asthma with FEV1≥80% predicted and 10 subjects with uncontrolled asthma with FEV1 <80% predicted. BAL fluid was obtained from all subjects. The numbers of different cell types and the levels of 48 cytokines were measured in these fluids. Compared to healthy control subjects, patients with asthma had significantly more percentages of eosinophils and neutrophils, IL-1RA, IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2Rα, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, G-CSF, GROα (CXCL1), MIP-1β (CCL4), MIG (CXCL9), RANTES (CCL5) and TRAIL in their BAL fluids. The only inflammatory markers that distinguished controlled asthma from uncontrolled asthma were neutrophil percentage and IL-8 levels, and both were inversely correlated with FEV1. We examined whether grouping asthma subjects on the basis of BAL eosinophil % or neutrophil % could identify specific cytokine profiles. The only differences between neutrophil-normal asthma (neutrophil≤2.4%) and neutrophil-high asthma (neutrophils%>2.4%) were a higher BAL fluid IL-8 levels, and a lower FEV1 in the latter group. By contrast, compared to eosinophil-normal asthma (eosinophils≤0.3%), eosinophil-high asthma (eosinophils>0.3%) had higher levels of IL-5, IL-13, IL-16, and PDGF-bb, but same neutrophil percentage, IL-8, and FEV1. Our results identify neutrophils and IL-8 are the only inflammatory components in BAL fluids that distinguish controlled asthma from uncontrolled asthma, and both correlate inversely with FEV1.

  11. Arabidopsis Fused kinase TWO-IN-ONE dominantly inhibits male meiotic cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sung Aeong; Bourdon, Valérie; Dickinson, Hugh G; Twell, David; Park, Soon Ki

    2014-03-01

    Arabidopsis Fused kinase TWO-IN-ONE (TIO) controls phragmoplast expansion through its interaction with the Kinesin-12 subfamily proteins that anchor the plus ends of interdigitating microtubules in the phragmoplast midzone. Previous analyses of loss-of-function mutants and RNA interference lines revealed that TIO positively controls both somatic and gametophytic cell cytokinesis; however, knowledge of the full spectrum of TIO functions during plant development remains incomplete. To characterize TIO functions further, we expressed TIO and a range of TIO variants under control of the TIO promoter in wild-type Arabidopsis plants. We discovered that TIO-overexpressing transgenic lines produce enlarged pollen grains, arising from incomplete cytokinesis during male meiosis, and show sporophytic abnormalities indicative of polyploidy. These phenotypes arose independently in TIO variants in which either gametophytic function or the ability of TIO to interact with Kinesin-12 subfamily proteins was abolished. Interaction assays in yeast showed TIO to bind to the AtNACK2/TETRASPORE, and plants doubly homozygous for kinesin-12a and kinesin-12b knockout mutations to produce enlarged pollen grains. Our results show TIO to dominantly inhibit male meiotic cytokinesis in a dosage-dependent manner that may involve direct binding to a component of the canonical NACK-PQR cytokinesis signaling pathway.

  12. Cell Polarity Signaling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhenbiao

    2009-01-01

    Cell polarization is intimately linked to plant development, growth, and responses to the environment. Major advances have been made in our understanding of the signaling pathways and networks that regulate cell polarity in plants owing to recent studies on several model systems, e.g., tip growth in pollen tubes, cell morphogenesis in the leaf epidermis, and polar localization of PINs. From these studies we have learned that plant cells use conserved mechanisms such as Rho family GTPases to integrate both plant-specific and conserved polarity cues and to coordinate the cytoskeketon dynamics/reorganization and vesicular trafficking required for polarity establishment and maintenance. This review focuses upon signaling mechanisms for cell polarity formation in Arabidopsis, with an emphasis on Rho GTPase signaling in polarized cell growth and how these mechanisms compare with those for cell polarity signaling in yeast and animal systems. PMID:18837672

  13. Apoplastic Diffusion Barriers in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus Benni; Geldner, Niko; Reina-Pinto, José J.; Kunst, Ljerka

    2013-01-01

    During the development of Arabidopsis and other land plants, diffusion barriers are formed in the apoplast of specialized tissues within a variety of plant organs. While the cuticle of the epidermis is the primary diffusion barrier in the shoot, the Casparian strips and suberin lamellae of the endodermis and the periderm represent the diffusion barriers in the root. Different classes of molecules contribute to the formation of extracellular diffusion barriers in an organ- and tissue-specific manner. Cutin and wax are the major components of the cuticle, lignin forms the early Casparian strip, and suberin is deposited in the stage II endodermis and the periderm. The current status of our understanding of the relationships between the chemical structure, ultrastructure and physiological functions of plant diffusion barriers is discussed. Specific aspects of the synthesis of diffusion barrier components and protocols that can be used for the assessment of barrier function and important barrier properties are also presented. PMID:24465172

  14. Tetrapyrrole Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Ryouichi; Kobayashi, Koichi; Masuda, Tatsuru

    2011-01-01

    Higher plants produce four classes of tetrapyrroles, namely, chlorophyll (Chl), heme, siroheme, and phytochromobilin. In plants, tetrapyrroles play essential roles in a wide range of biological activities including photosynthesis, respiration and the assimilation of nitrogen/sulfur. All four classes of tetrapyrroles are derived from a common biosynthetic pathway that resides in the plastid. In this article, we present an overview of tetrapyrrole metabolism in Arabidopsis and other higher plants, and we describe all identified enzymatic steps involved in this metabolism. We also summarize recent findings on Chl biosynthesis and Chl breakdown. Recent advances in this field, in particular those on the genetic and biochemical analyses of novel enzymes, prompted us to redraw the tetrapyrrole metabolic pathways. In addition, we also summarize our current understanding on the regulatory mechanisms governing tetrapyrrole metabolism. The interactions of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and other cellular processes including the plastid-to-nucleus signal transduction are discussed. PMID:22303270

  15. Analysis of Arabidopsis Accessions Hypersensitive to a Loss of Chloroplast Translation.

    PubMed

    Parker, Nicole; Wang, Yixing; Meinke, David

    2016-11-01

    Natural accessions of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) differ in their ability to tolerate a loss of chloroplast translation. These differences can be attributed in part to variation in a duplicated nuclear gene (ACC2) that targets homomeric acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) to plastids. This functional redundancy allows limited fatty acid biosynthesis to occur in the absence of heteromeric ACCase, which is encoded in part by the plastid genome. In the presence of functional ACC2, tolerant alleles of several nuclear genes, not yet identified, enhance the growth of seedlings and embryos disrupted in chloroplast translation. ACC2 knockout mutants, by contrast, are hypersensitive. Here we describe an expanded search for hypersensitive accessions of Arabidopsis, evaluate whether all of these accessions are defective in ACC2, and characterize genotype-to-phenotype relationships for homomeric ACCase variants identified among 855 accessions with sequenced genomes. Null alleles with ACC2 nonsense mutations, frameshift mutations, small deletions, genomic rearrangements, and defects in RNA splicing are included among the most sensitive accessions examined. By contrast, most missense mutations affecting highly conserved residues failed to eliminate ACC2 function. Several accessions were identified where sensitivity could not be attributed to a defect in either ACC2 or Tic20-IV, the chloroplast membrane channel required for ACC2 uptake. Overall, these results underscore the central role of ACC2 in mediating Arabidopsis response to a loss of chloroplast translation, highlight future applications of this system to analyzing chloroplast protein import, and provide valuable insights into the mutational landscape of an important metabolic enzyme that is highly conserved throughout eukaryotes.

  16. Analysis of Arabidopsis Accessions Hypersensitive to a Loss of Chloroplast Translation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Nicole; Wang, Yixing; Meinke, David

    2016-01-01

    Natural accessions of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) differ in their ability to tolerate a loss of chloroplast translation. These differences can be attributed in part to variation in a duplicated nuclear gene (ACC2) that targets homomeric acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) to plastids. This functional redundancy allows limited fatty acid biosynthesis to occur in the absence of heteromeric ACCase, which is encoded in part by the plastid genome. In the presence of functional ACC2, tolerant alleles of several nuclear genes, not yet identified, enhance the growth of seedlings and embryos disrupted in chloroplast translation. ACC2 knockout mutants, by contrast, are hypersensitive. Here we describe an expanded search for hypersensitive accessions of Arabidopsis, evaluate whether all of these accessions are defective in ACC2, and characterize genotype-to-phenotype relationships for homomeric ACCase variants identified among 855 accessions with sequenced genomes. Null alleles with ACC2 nonsense mutations, frameshift mutations, small deletions, genomic rearrangements, and defects in RNA splicing are included among the most sensitive accessions examined. By contrast, most missense mutations affecting highly conserved residues failed to eliminate ACC2 function. Several accessions were identified where sensitivity could not be attributed to a defect in either ACC2 or Tic20-IV, the chloroplast membrane channel required for ACC2 uptake. Overall, these results underscore the central role of ACC2 in mediating Arabidopsis response to a loss of chloroplast translation, highlight future applications of this system to analyzing chloroplast protein import, and provide valuable insights into the mutational landscape of an important metabolic enzyme that is highly conserved throughout eukaryotes. PMID:27707889

  17. Alternative splicing and gene duplication differentially shaped the regulation of isochorismate synthase in Populus and Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yinan; Chung, Jeng-Der; Fu, Xueyan; Johnson, Virgil E.; Ranjan, Priya; Booth, Sarah L.; Harding, Scott A.; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2009-01-01

    Isochorismate synthase (ICS) converts chorismate to isochorismate for the biosynthesis of phylloquinone, an essential cofactor for photosynthetic electron transport. ICS is also required for salicylic acid (SA) synthesis during Arabidopsis defense. In several other species, including Populus, SA is derived primarily from the phenylpropanoid pathway. We therefore sought to investigate ICS regulation in Populus to learn the extent of ICS involvement in SA synthesis and defense. Arabidopsis harbors duplicated AtICS genes that differ in their exon-intron structure, basal expression, and stress inducibility. In contrast, we found a single ICS gene in Populus and six other sequenced plant genomes, pointing to the AtICS duplication as a lineage-specific event. The Populus ICS encodes a functional plastidic enzyme, and was not responsive to stresses that stimulated phenylpropanoid accumulation. Populus ICS underwent extensive alternative splicing that was rare for the duplicated AtICSs. Sequencing of 184 RT-PCR Populus clones revealed 37 alternative splice variants, with normal transcripts representing ≈50% of the population. When expressed in Arabidopsis, Populus ICS again underwent alternative splicing, but did not produce normal transcripts to complement AtICS1 function. The splice-site sequences of Populus ICS are unusual, suggesting a causal link between junction sequence, alternative splicing, and ICS function. We propose that gene duplication and alternative splicing of ICS evolved independently in Arabidopsis and Populus in accordance with their distinct defense strategies. AtICS1 represents a divergent isoform for inducible SA synthesis during defense. Populus ICS primarily functions in phylloquinone biosynthesis, a process that can be sustained at low ICS transcript levels. PMID:19996170

  18. A Single Amino Acid Substitution in an ORANGE Protein Promotes Carotenoid Overaccumulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hui; Owsiany, Katherine; Sheeja, T E; Zhou, Xiangjun; Rodriguez, Caroline; Li, Yongxi; Welsch, Ralf; Chayut, Noam; Yang, Yong; Thannhauser, Theodore W; Parthasarathy, Mandayam V; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiuxin; Fei, Zhangjun; Schaffer, Ari; Katzir, Nurit; Burger, Joseph; Tadmor, Yaakov; Li, Li

    2015-09-01

    Carotenoids are crucial for plant growth and human health. The finding of ORANGE (OR) protein as a pivotal regulator of carotenogenesis offers a unique opportunity to comprehensively understand the regulatory mechanisms of carotenoid accumulation and develop crops with enhanced nutritional quality. Here, we demonstrated that alteration of a single amino acid in a wild-type OR greatly enhanced its ability to promote carotenoid accumulation. Whereas overexpression of OR from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; AtOR) or from the agronomically important crop sorghum (Sorghum bicolor; SbOR) increased carotenoid levels up to 2-fold, expression of AtOR(His) (R90H) or SbOR(His) (R104H) variants dramatically enhanced carotenoid accumulation by up to 7-fold in the Arabidopsis calli. Moreover, we found that AtOR(Ala) (R90A) functioned similarly to AtOR(His) to promote carotenoid overproduction. Neither AtOR nor AtOR(His) greatly affected carotenogenic gene expression. AtOR(His) exhibited similar interactions with phytoene synthase (PSY) as AtOR in posttranscriptionally regulating PSY protein abundance. AtOR(His) triggered biogenesis of membranous chromoplasts in the Arabidopsis calli, which shared structures similar to chromoplasts found in the curd of the orange cauliflower (Brassica oleracea) mutant. By contrast, AtOR did not cause plastid-type changes in comparison with the controls, but produced plastids containing larger and electron-dense plastoglobuli. The unique ability of AtOR(His) in mediating chromoplast biogenesis is responsible for its induced carotenoid overproduction. Our study demonstrates OR(His/Ala) as powerful tools for carotenoid enrichment in plants, and provides insights into the mechanisms underlying OR(His)-regulated carotenoid accumulation.

  19. A Single Amino Acid Substitution in an ORANGE Protein Promotes Carotenoid Overaccumulation in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hui; Owsiany, Katherine; Sheeja, T.E.; Zhou, Xiangjun; Rodriguez, Caroline; Li, Yongxi; Welsch, Ralf; Chayut, Noam; Yang, Yong; Thannhauser, Theodore W.; Parthasarathy, Mandayam V.; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiuxin; Fei, Zhangjun; Schaffer, Ari; Katzir, Nurit; Burger, Joseph; Tadmor, Yaakov; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are crucial for plant growth and human health. The finding of ORANGE (OR) protein as a pivotal regulator of carotenogenesis offers a unique opportunity to comprehensively understand the regulatory mechanisms of carotenoid accumulation and develop crops with enhanced nutritional quality. Here, we demonstrated that alteration of a single amino acid in a wild-type OR greatly enhanced its ability to promote carotenoid accumulation. Whereas overexpression of OR from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; AtOR) or from the agronomically important crop sorghum (Sorghum bicolor; SbOR) increased carotenoid levels up to 2-fold, expression of AtORHis (R90H) or SbORHis (R104H) variants dramatically enhanced carotenoid accumulation by up to 7-fold in the Arabidopsis calli. Moreover, we found that AtORAla (R90A) functioned similarly to AtORHis to promote carotenoid overproduction. Neither AtOR nor AtORHis greatly affected carotenogenic gene expression. AtORHis exhibited similar interactions with phytoene synthase (PSY) as AtOR in posttranscriptionally regulating PSY protein abundance. AtORHis triggered biogenesis of membranous chromoplasts in the Arabidopsis calli, which shared structures similar to chromoplasts found in the curd of the orange cauliflower (Brassica oleracea) mutant. By contrast, AtOR did not cause plastid-type changes in comparison with the controls, but produced plastids containing larger and electron-dense plastoglobuli. The unique ability of AtORHis in mediating chromoplast biogenesis is responsible for its induced carotenoid overproduction. Our study demonstrates ORHis/Ala as powerful tools for carotenoid enrichment in plants, and provides insights into the mechanisms underlying ORHis-regulated carotenoid accumulation. PMID:26224804

  20. The Arabidopsis sickle Mutant Exhibits Altered Circadian Clock Responses to Cool Temperatures and Temperature-Dependent Alternative Splicing.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Carine M; Tartaglio, Virginia; Duarte, Maritza; Harmon, Frank G

    2016-10-01

    The circadian clock allows plants to anticipate and respond to daily changes in ambient temperature. Mechanisms establishing the timing of circadian rhythms in Arabidopsis thaliana through temperature entrainment remain unclear. Also incompletely understood is the temperature compensation mechanism that maintains consistent period length within a range of ambient temperatures. A genetic screen for Arabidopsis mutants affecting temperature regulation of the PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR7 promoter yielded a novel allele of the SICKLE (SIC) gene. This mutant, sic-3, and the existing sic-1 mutant both exhibit low-amplitude or arrhythmic expression of core circadian clock genes under cool ambient temperature cycles, but not under light-dark entrainment. sic mutants also lengthen free running period in a manner consistent with impaired temperature compensation. sic mutant alleles accumulate LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) and CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) splice variants, among other alternatively spliced transcripts, which is exacerbated by cool temperatures. The cca1-1 lhy-20 double mutant is epistatic to sic-3, indicating the LHY and CCA1 splice variants are needed for sic-3 circadian clock phenotypes. It is not expected that SIC is directly involved in the circadian clock mechanism; instead, SIC likely contributes to pre-mRNA metabolism, and the splice variants that accumulate in sic mutants likely affect the circadian clock response to cool ambient temperature. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  1. The Arabidopsis sickle Mutant Exhibits Altered Circadian Clock Responses to Cool Temperatures and Temperature-Dependent Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglio, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock allows plants to anticipate and respond to daily changes in ambient temperature. Mechanisms establishing the timing of circadian rhythms in Arabidopsis thaliana through temperature entrainment remain unclear. Also incompletely understood is the temperature compensation mechanism that maintains consistent period length within a range of ambient temperatures. A genetic screen for Arabidopsis mutants affecting temperature regulation of the PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR7 promoter yielded a novel allele of the SICKLE (SIC) gene. This mutant, sic-3, and the existing sic-1 mutant both exhibit low-amplitude or arrhythmic expression of core circadian clock genes under cool ambient temperature cycles, but not under light-dark entrainment. sic mutants also lengthen free running period in a manner consistent with impaired temperature compensation. sic mutant alleles accumulate LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) and CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) splice variants, among other alternatively spliced transcripts, which is exacerbated by cool temperatures. The cca1-1 lhy-20 double mutant is epistatic to sic-3, indicating the LHY and CCA1 splice variants are needed for sic-3 circadian clock phenotypes. It is not expected that SIC is directly involved in the circadian clock mechanism; instead, SIC likely contributes to pre-mRNA metabolism, and the splice variants that accumulate in sic mutants likely affect the circadian clock response to cool ambient temperature. PMID:27624757

  2. Phonological variant recognition: representations and rules.

    PubMed

    Pinnow, Eleni; Connine, Cynthia M

    2014-03-01

    The current research explores the role of lexical representations and processing in the recognition of phonological variants. Two alternative approaches for variant recognition are considered: a representational approach that posits frequency-graded lexical representations for variant forms and inferential processes that mediate between the spoken variant and the lexical representation. In a lexical decision task (Experiment 1) and in a phoneme identification task (Experiment 2) using real words, low-frequency variants, but not high-frequency variants, show improved recognition rates following additional experience with the variants. This knowledge generalized to novel variant forms. Experiment 3 replicated these results using an artificial lexicon and showed that recognition of low-frequency variants was influenced by similarity to a high-frequency variant form. Similarity to a high-frequency variant alone, however, was insufficient to explain recognition of the infrequent variants (Experiments 4 and 5). The results support a hybrid account of variant recognition that relies on both multiple frequency-graded representations and inference processes.

  3. RHD variants in Flanders, Belgium.

    PubMed

    Van Sandt, Vicky S T; Gassner, Christoph; Emonds, Marie-Paule; Legler, Tobias J; Mahieu, Sarah; Körmöczi, Günther F

    2015-06-01

    D antigen variants may be grouped into partial D, weak D, and DEL types. Cumulative phenotype frequencies of these D variants may approach 1% in certain European regions. Unambiguous and quick identification of D variants is of immediate clinical relevance, with implications for transfusion strategy. A total of 628 samples with ambiguous serologic results from different immunohematology laboratories throughout the Flanders region, Belgium, were genotyped using a commercially available weak D typing approach. After exclusion of detectable weak D types, molecular RHD exon scanning was performed for the remaining samples, and RHD sequencing was performed in two particular cases. Of all samples investigated, 424 (67.5%) were positive for weak D Type 1, 2, or 3, and 22 cases (3.5%) typed weak D Type 4.0/4.1/4.3, 4.2, 5, 11, 15, or 17. Another 49 (7.8%) samples were partial D variants, with a major proportion being category DVI types (n = 27). One RHD(S103P) sample was identified as high-grade partial D, with DIII-like phenotype and anti-D and anti-C immunization. Additionally, a novel DVI Type 3 (A399T) variant was found. Of the remaining 133 samples mainly tested because of ambiguous serologic D typing results due to recent transfusion, 32 (5.1%) were negative for RHD, and 101 (16.1%) were indistinguishable from wild-type RHD and not investigated further. Despite the enormous diversity of RHD alleles, first-line weak D genotyping was remarkably informative, allowing for rapid classification of most samples with conspicuous RhD phenotype in Flanders. The clinical implications are discussed. © 2014 AABB.

  4. Chemical composition of the essential oil of Phlomis linearis Boiss. & Bal., and biological effects on the CAM-assay: a safety evaluation.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Betül; Dadandi, Mehmet Y; Paper, Dietrich H; Franz, Gerhard; Başer, Kemal Hüsnü Can

    2003-01-01

    Phlomis linearis Boiss. & Bal. of the Lamiaceae family growing in central, east and southeast Anatolia is an endemic species for Turkey. The essential oil obtained from the aerial parts by hydro distillation was subsequently analyzed by GC/MS. The main components of the oil were found as beta-caryophyllene (24.2%), germacrene D (22.3%) and caryophyllene oxide (9.2%), among 49 identified compounds, representing 94.5% of the total essential oil. The overall biological activity of the essential oil (100 microg/pellet) was tested on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of the fertilized hen's egg in order to examine the anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory activity. None of the tests showed pronounced activity, toxicity or irritation at the tested concentration.

  5. Binding of BAL 31 RNA polymerase to PM2 DNA as determined by electron microscopy and protection against restriction endonuclease cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Bull, P; Susaeta, M; González, B; Yudelevich, A

    1988-01-01

    Specific binding sites of BAL 31 RNA polymerase on PM2 DNA have been mapped by protection against HincII and HindIII cleavage and by observation of enzyme-DNA complexes by electron microscopy. Nine specific binding sites were observed at map units 0.19, 0.20, 0.28, 0.54, 0.63, 0.65, 0.71, 0.72, and 0.75 by the first method. All these sites were confirmed by electron microscopy which, in addition, revealed another site at 0.05 map unit. Published nucleotide sequences of the region surrounding sites at 0.71 and 0.75 map units show the presence of consensus sequences for procaryotic promoters. Images PMID:2843687

  6. Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Viruses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Variant Other Information on Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Virus Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook ... disease of pigs caused by type A influenza viruses that regularly cause outbreaks of influenza in pigs. ...

  7. Biodistribution of radiomercury in rabbits and efficacy of dimercaptopropanesulfonic acid (DMPS) and dimercaprol (BAL) to reduce tracer-level kidney (kid) burden of radiomercury in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Coveney, J.R.; Robbins, M.S.

    1986-03-01

    There is clinical interest in /sup 195m/Hg//sup 195m/Au generators for radionuclide angiocardiography. Generators are /sup 195m/Hg-impregnated columns through which S/sub 2/O/sub 3//sup 2 -//NO/sub 3//sup -/ eluant is passed to recover /sup 195m/Au daughter (t/sub 1/2p/ approx. 30s) permitting repeated patient study at short intervals, but co-elution of some /sup 195m/Hg (t/sub 1/2p approx. 40h) limits per-study dose: eluate was injected i.v. to male and female New Zealand White rabbits (1.4-2.4 kg, 12 ml eluate ea.); approx. 40% of injected dose (ID) of /sup 195m/Hg was in kids by 3d and approx. 20% ID remained after 14d; only 37% ID was excreted (2/3 in feces) at 7d. To evaluate DMPS action upon kid /sup 195m/Hg burden, male Sprague-Dawley rats (187-240 g) were injected i.v. with 2ml eluate containing 0.02 mg DMPS/ml or eluate alone. DMPS slightly reduced % ID /sup 195m/Hg in kids 22h later: 12.2 +/- 0.3 to 8.5 +/- 0.3 (mean +/- s.e.m., n = 4). Additional rats were given 5 mg BAL/kg, i.p., or 2ml propylene glycol vehicle/kg 3-4' before 2ml eluate, i.v.; % ID of Hg was again only slightly reduced (14.4 +/- 0.2 to 10.7 +/- 0.1). Neither BAL nor DMPS, useful in repeat-dose regimens in heavy metal poisoning, are suitable in single doses for reducing absorbed radiation dose in /sup 195m/Au angiocardiography.

  8. Trends in Soil Moisture Reflect More Than Slope Position: Soils on San Cristóbal Island, Galápagos as a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, M.; Singha, K.; Benninger, L. K.; Riveros-Iregui, D. A.; Mirus, B. B.

    2015-12-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of soil moisture in tropical critical zones depends upon a number of variables including topographic position, soil texture, overlying vegetation, and local microclimates. We investigate the influences on soil moisture on a tropical basaltic island (San Cristóbal, Galápagos) across a variety of microclimates during the transition from the wetter to the drier season. We used multiple approaches to characterize spatial and temporal patterns in soil moisture at four sites across microclimates ranging from arid to very humid. The microclimates on San Cristóbal vary with elevation, so our monitoring includes two sites in the transitional zone at lower elevations, one in the humid zone at moderate elevations, and one in the very humid zone in higher elevations. We made over 250 near-surface point measurements per site using a Hydrosense II probe, and estimated the lateral variability in soil moisture across each site with an EM-31 electrical conductivity meter. We also monitored continuous time-series of in-situ soil moisture dynamics using three nested TDR probes collocated with meteorological stations at each of the sites. Preliminary analysis indicates that soils in the very humid zone have lower electrical conductivities across all the hillslopes as compared to the humid and transitional zones, which suggests that additional factors beyond climate and slope position are important. While soil texture across the very humid site is fairly uniform, variations in vegetation have a strong control on soil moisture patterns. At the remaining sites the vegetation patterns also have a very strong local influence on soil moisture, but correlation between the depth to clay layers and soil moisture patterns suggests that mineralogy is also important. Our findings suggest that the microclimatic setting is a crucial consideration for understanding relations between vegetation, soil texture, and soil-moisture dynamics in tropical critical

  9. Tracing the outflow of a z = 0.334 FeLoBAL: New constraints from low-ionization absorbers in FBQS J1151+3822

    SciTech Connect

    Lucy, Adrian B.; Leighly, Karen M.; Terndrup, Donald M.; Dietrich, Matthias; Gallagher, Sarah C.

    2014-03-01

    We show for the first time that FBQS J1151+3822 is an iron low-ionization broad absorption line quasar (FeLoBAL QSO), the second-brightest and second-closest known example of this class. He I* and Fe II together act as an effective analytical tool, allowing us to obtain useful kinematic constraints from photoionization models of the outflow without needing to assume any particular acceleration model. The main outflow's log ionization parameter is –1.5, the log hydrogen density (cm{sup –3}) 5.5-8, the log hydrogen column density (cm{sup –2}) 21.7-21.9, the absorption radius 7.2-127 pc, and the kinetic luminosity is 0.16%-4.5% of the bolometric luminosity. We obtain line-of-sight covering fractions of ∼0.25 for strong Fe II, ∼0.5 for He I*, and ∼0.6 for Mg II. Narrower and shallower absorption lines from weaker Fe II and Mn II with an outflow velocity of ∼3400 km s{sup –1} have appeared between 2005 and 2011, suggesting that dense cores may have condensed inside the main outflow. Consideration of the literature might suggest that the FBQS J1151+3822 outflow is a member of a rare and distinct subclass of FeLoBALs with high densities and correspondingly small absorption radii. We find, however, that such outflows are not necessarily a distinct subclass, and that their apparent rarity could be a symptom of selection bias in studies using density-sensitive lines.

  10. Identification, biochemical characterization, and subcellular localization of allantoate amidohydrolases from Arabidopsis and soybean.

    PubMed

    Werner, Andrea K; Sparkes, Imogen A; Romeis, Tina; Witte, Claus-Peter

    2008-02-01

    Allantoate amidohydrolases (AAHs) hydrolize the ureide allantoate to ureidoglycolate, CO(2), and two molecules of ammonium. Allantoate degradation is required to recycle purine-ring nitrogen in all plants. Tropical legumes additionally transport fixed nitrogen via allantoin and allantoate into the shoot, where it serves as a general nitrogen source. AAHs from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; AtAAH) and from soybean (Glycine max; GmAAH) were cloned, expressed in planta as StrepII-tagged variants, and highly purified from leaf extracts. Both proteins form homodimers and release 2 mol ammonium/mol allantoate. Therefore, they can truly be classified as AAHs. The kinetic constants determined and the half-maximal activation by 2 to 3 microm manganese are consistent with allantoate being the in vivo substrate of manganese-loaded AAHs. The enzymes were strongly inhibited by micromolar concentrations of fluoride as well as by borate, and by millimolar concentrations of L-asparagine and L-aspartate but not D-asparagine. L-Asparagine likely functions as competitive inhibitor. An Ataah T-DNA mutant, unable to grow on allantoin as sole nitrogen source, is rescued by the expression of StrepII-tagged variants of AtAAH and GmAAH, demonstrating that both proteins are functional in vivo. Similarly, an allantoinase (aln) mutant is rescued by a tagged AtAln variant. Fluorescent fusion proteins of allantoinase and both AAHs localize to the endoplasmic reticulum after transient expression and in transgenic plants. These findings demonstrate that after the generation of allantoin in the peroxisome, plant purine degradation continues in the endoplasmic reticulum.

  11. Identification, Biochemical Characterization, and Subcellular Localization of Allantoate Amidohydrolases from Arabidopsis and Soybean1[W

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Andrea K.; Sparkes, Imogen A.; Romeis, Tina; Witte, Claus-Peter

    2008-01-01

    Allantoate amidohydrolases (AAHs) hydrolize the ureide allantoate to ureidoglycolate, CO2, and two molecules of ammonium. Allantoate degradation is required to recycle purine-ring nitrogen in all plants. Tropical legumes additionally transport fixed nitrogen via allantoin and allantoate into the shoot, where it serves as a general nitrogen source. AAHs from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; AtAAH) and from soybean (Glycine max; GmAAH) were cloned, expressed in planta as StrepII-tagged variants, and highly purified from leaf extracts. Both proteins form homodimers and release 2 mol ammonium/mol allantoate. Therefore, they can truly be classified as AAHs. The kinetic constants determined and the half-maximal activation by 2 to 3 μm manganese are consistent with allantoate being the in vivo substrate of manganese-loaded AAHs. The enzymes were strongly inhibited by micromolar concentrations of fluoride as well as by borate, and by millimolar concentrations of l-asparagine and l-aspartate but not d-asparagine. l-Asparagine likely functions as competitive inhibitor. An Ataah T-DNA mutant, unable to grow on allantoin as sole nitrogen source, is rescued by the expression of StrepII-tagged variants of AtAAH and GmAAH, demonstrating that both proteins are functional in vivo. Similarly, an allantoinase (aln) mutant is rescued by a tagged AtAln variant. Fluorescent fusion proteins of allantoinase and both AAHs localize to the endoplasmic reticulum after transient expression and in transgenic plants. These findings demonstrate that after the generation of allantoin in the peroxisome, plant purine degradation continues in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:18065556

  12. Engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Paul A

    2012-07-01

    Many plants accumulate crystals of calcium oxalate. Just how these crystals form remains unknown. To gain insight into the mechanisms regulating calcium oxalate crystal formation, a crystal engineering approach was initiated utilizing the non-crystal-accumulating plant, Arabidopsis. The success of this approach hinged on the ability to transform Arabidopsis genetically into a calcium oxalate crystal-accumulating plant. To accomplish this transformation, two oxalic acid biosynthetic genes, obcA and obcB, from the oxalate-secreting phytopathogen, Burkholderia glumae were inserted into the Arabidopsis genome. The co-expression of these two bacterial genes in Arabidopsis conferred the ability not only to produce a measurable amount of oxalate but also to form crystals of calcium oxalate. Biochemical and cellular studies of crystal accumulation in Arabidopsis revealed features that are similar to those observed in the cells of crystal-forming plants. Thus, it appears that at least some of the basic components that comprise the calcium oxalate crystal formation machinery are conserved even in non-crystal-accumulating plants.

  13. Terpene Specialized Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tholl, Dorothea; Lee, Sungbeom

    2011-01-01

    Terpenes constitute the largest class of plant secondary (or specialized) metabolites, which are compounds of ecological function in plant defense or the attraction of beneficial organisms. Using biochemical and genetic approaches, nearly all Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) enzymes of the core biosynthetic pathways producing the 5-carbon building blocks of terpenes have been characterized and closer insight has been gained into the transcriptional and posttranscriptional/translational mechanisms regulating these pathways. The biochemical function of most prenyltransferases, the downstream enzymes that condense the C5-precursors into central 10-, 15-, and 20-carbon prenyldiphosphate intermediates, has been described, although the function of several isoforms of C20-prenyltranferases is not well understood. Prenyl diphosphates are converted to a variety of C10-, C15-, and C20-terpene products by enzymes of the terpene synthase (TPS) family. Genomic organization of the 32 Arabidopsis TPS genes indicates a species-specific divergence of terpene synthases with tissue- and cell-type specific expression profiles that may have emerged under selection pressures by different organisms. Pseudogenization, differential expression, and subcellular segregation of TPS genes and enzymes contribute to the natural variation of terpene biosynthesis among Arabidopsis accessions (ecotypes) and species. Arabidopsis will remain an important model to investigate the metabolic organization and molecular regulatory networks of terpene specialized metabolism in relation to the biological activities of terpenes. PMID:22303268

  14. Nitric oxide reduces seed dormancy in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bethke, Paul C; Libourel, Igor G L; Jones, Russell L

    2006-01-01

    Dormancy is a property of many mature seeds, and experimentation over the past century has identified numerous chemical treatments that will reduce seed dormancy. Nitrogen-containing compounds including nitrate, nitrite, and cyanide break seed dormancy in a range of species. Experiments are described here that were carried out to further our understanding of the mechanism whereby these and other compounds, such as the nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP), bring about a reduction in seed dormancy of Arabidopsis thaliana. A simple method was devised for applying the products of SNP photolysis through the gas phase. Using this approach it was shown that SNP, as well as potassium ferricyanide (Fe(III)CN) and potassium ferrocyanide (Fe(II)CN), reduced dormancy of Arabidopsis seeds by generating cyanide (CN). The effects of potassium cyanide (KCN) on dormant seeds were tested and it was confirmed that cyanide vapours were sufficient to break Arabidopsis seed dormancy. Nitrate and nitrite also reduced Arabidopsis seed dormancy and resulted in substantial rates of germination. The effects of CN, nitrite, and nitrate on dormancy were prevented by the NO scavenger c-PTIO. It was confirmed that NO plays a role in reducing seed dormancy by using purified NO gas, and a model to explain how nitrogen-containing compounds may break dormancy in Arabidopsis is presented.

  15. A new dominant Arabidopsis transparent testa mutant, sk21-D, and modulation of seed flavonoid biosynthesis by KAN4.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Li, Xiang; Cui, Dejun; Wu, Limin; Parkin, Isobel; Gruber, Margaret Y

    2010-12-01

    Flavonoids are widely distributed in plants and play important roles in human and animal health and nutrition. Model plants with discernible flavonoid phenotypes, such as Arabidopsis seed patterning lines, are valuable tools that can provide avenues for understanding flavonoid and proanthocyanidin accumulation patterns in crops. Here, we characterize the GARP family gene, KAN4, which earlier was known for its role in defining the boundary of the seed integument layers in Arabidopsis. In this report, KAN4 is shown to broadly control the flavonoid pathway in Arabidopsis seed. Loss-of-function T-DNA mutants show reduced transcript abundance for most flavonoid and proanthocyanidin genes in young siliques and decreased flavonols and variable proanthocyanidin content in mature seed. KAN4 was localized to the nucleus and could specifically bind with promoters of early and late flavonoid biosynthetic genes and PA regulatory genes. Activated over-expression of KAN4 led to the discovery of the first novel dominant Arabidopsis transparent testa mutant, sk21-D. Two KAN4 transcript splice variants with identical MYB-like B-motifs were highly expressed in sk21-D and equivalently designed activation atk4-OE lines. This extreme dual expression resulted in large, light- and dark-coloured patches on seed coats of sk21-D and atk4-OE lines, but not in non-activated over-expression lines. Flavonoid and proanthocyanidin contents and transcript amounts for genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis also were reduced in KAN4 activation lines. These results confirm that KAN4 is a regulatory protein which modulates the content of flavonols and PA in Arabidopsis seeds. © 2010 Crown in the right of Canada. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2010 Society for Experimental Biology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Endogenous Arabidopsis messenger RNAs transported to distant tissues.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Christoph J; Rojas-Triana, Monica; Stecyk, Ewelina; Schudoma, Christian; Zhang, Wenna; Yang, Lei; Miñambres, Miguel; Walther, Dirk; Schulze, Waltraud X; Paz-Ares, Javier; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Kragler, Friedrich

    2015-03-23

    The concept that proteins and small RNAs can move to and function in distant body parts is well established. However, non-cell-autonomy of small RNA molecules raises the question: To what extent are protein-coding messenger RNAs (mRNAs) exchanged between tissues in plants? Here we report the comprehensive identification of 2,006 genes producing mobile RNAs in Arabidopsis thaliana. The analysis of variant ecotype transcripts that were present in heterografted plants allowed the identification of mRNAs moving between various organs under normal or nutrient-limiting conditions. Most of these mobile transcripts seem to follow the phloem-dependent allocation pathway transporting sugars from photosynthetic tissues to roots via the vasculature. Notably, a high number of transcripts also move in the opposite, root-to-shoot direction and are transported to specific tissues including flowers. Proteomic data on grafted plants indicate the presence of proteins from mobile RNAs, allowing the possibility that they may be translated at their destination site. The mobility of a high number of mRNAs suggests that a postulated tissue-specific gene expression profile might not be predictive for the actual plant body part in which a transcript exerts its function.

  17. Genetic Regulation of Transcriptional Variation in Natural Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions

    PubMed Central

    Zan, Yanjun; Shen, Xia; Forsberg, Simon K. G.; Carlborg, Örjan

    2016-01-01

    An increased knowledge of the genetic regulation of expression in Arabidopsis thaliana is likely to provide important insights about the basis of the plant’s extensive phenotypic variation. Here, we reanalyzed two publicly available datasets with genome-wide data on genetic and transcript variation in large collections of natural A. thaliana accessions. Transcripts from more than half of all genes were detected in the leaves of all accessions, and from nearly all annotated genes in at least one accession. Thousands of genes had high transcript levels in some accessions, but no transcripts at all in others, and this pattern was correlated with the genome-wide genotype. In total, 2669 eQTL were mapped in the largest population, and 717 of them were replicated in the other population. A total of 646 cis-eQTL-regulated genes that lacked detectable transcripts in some accessions was found, and for 159 of these we identified one, or several, common structural variants in the populations that were shown to be likely contributors to the lack of detectable RNA transcripts for these genes. This study thus provides new insights into the overall genetic regulation of global gene expression diversity in the leaf of natural A. thaliana accessions. Further, it also shows that strong cis-acting polymorphisms, many of which are likely to be structural variations, make important contributions to the transcriptional variation in the worldwide A. thaliana population. PMID:27226169

  18. Characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana telomeres isolated in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, E J; Chao, S; Vongs, A; Yang, J

    1992-01-01

    In an effort to learn more about the genomic organization of chromosomal termini in plants we employed a functional complementation strategy to isolate Arabidopsis thaliana telomeres in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Eight yeast episomes carrying A. thaliana telomeric sequences were obtained. The plant sequences carried on two episomes, YpAtT1 and YpAtT7, were characterized in detail. The telomeric origins of YpAtT1 and YpAtT7 insert DNAs were confirmed by demonstrating that corresponding genomic sequences are preferentially degraded during exonucleolytic digestion. The isolated telomeric restriction fragments contain G-rich repeat arrays characteristic of A. thaliana telomeres, as well as subterminal telomere-associated sequences (TASs). DNA sequence analysis revealed the presence of variant telomeric repeats at the centromere-proximal border of the terminal block of telomere repeats. The TAS flanking the telomeric G-rich repeat in YpAtT7 corresponds to a repetitive element present at other A. thaliana telomeres, while more proximal sequences are unique to one telomere. The YpAtT1 TAS is unique in the Landsberg strain of A. thaliana from which the clone originated; however, the Landsberg TAS cross-hybridizes weakly to a second telomere in the strain Columbia. Restriction analysis with cytosine methylation-sensitive endonucleases indicated that both TASs are highly methylated in the genome. Images PMID:1508688

  19. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Gualfetti, Peter [San Francisco, CA; Mitchinson, Colin [Half Moon Bay, CA; Larenas, Edmund [Moss Beach, CA

    2008-12-02

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  20. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Gualfetti, Peter [San Francisco, CA; Mitchinson, Colin [Half Moon Bay, CA; Larenas, Edmund [Moss Beach, CA

    2011-05-31

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  1. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Gualfetti, Peter [San Francisco, CA; Mitchinson, Colin [Half Moon Bay, CA; Larenas, Edmund [Moss Beach, CA

    2011-08-16

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  2. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Gualfetti, Peter [San Francisco, CA; Mitchinson, Colin [Half Moon Bay, CA; Larenas, Edmund [Moss Beach, CA

    2012-08-07

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  3. Variant humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Edmund, Larenas

    2014-09-09

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  4. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegeburr, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2013-02-19

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  5. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2014-03-18

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  6. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2017-05-09

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea CeI7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  7. DHAD variants and methods of screening

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Kristen J.; Ye, Rick W.

    2017-02-28

    Methods of screening for dihydroxy-acid dehydratase (DHAD) variants that display increased DHAD activity are disclosed, along with DHAD variants identified by these methods. Such enzymes can result in increased production of compounds from DHAD requiring biosynthetic pathways. Also disclosed are isolated nucleic acids encoding the DHAD variants, recombinant host cells comprising the isolated nucleic acid molecules, and methods of producing butanol.

  8. A variant of Brugada syndrome.

    PubMed

    Switzer, Maryna Popp; Teleb, Mohamed; Agunanne, Enoch; Abbas, Aamer

    2017-01-01

    Brugada syndrome is an inherited disorder that can present with syncope, cardiac arrest, or sudden cardiac death. Multiple genetic mutations have been described that cause this disease. We present a 56-year-old man who sustained an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, was resuscitated, and was found to have typical features of the Brugada criteria on the electrocardiogram. Genetic testing was positive for a heterozygous mutation in the sodium voltage-gated channel alpha subunit 5 (SCN5A) gene with a p. Leu227Pro (L227P) variant located on exon 6. To our knowledge, this is the first described case with this variant causing malignant arrhythmia with a cardiac arrest.

  9. A variant of Brugada syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Switzer, Maryna Popp; Agunanne, Enoch; Abbas, Aamer

    2017-01-01

    Brugada syndrome is an inherited disorder that can present with syncope, cardiac arrest, or sudden cardiac death. Multiple genetic mutations have been described that cause this disease. We present a 56-year-old man who sustained an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, was resuscitated, and was found to have typical features of the Brugada criteria on the electrocardiogram. Genetic testing was positive for a heterozygous mutation in the sodium voltage-gated channel alpha subunit 5 (SCN5A) gene with a p. Leu227Pro (L227P) variant located on exon 6. To our knowledge, this is the first described case with this variant causing malignant arrhythmia with a cardiac arrest. PMID:28127136

  10. Clinicopathologic Variants of Mycosis Fungoides.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-González, H; Molina-Ruiz, A M; Requena, L

    2017-04-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The clinical course of the disease is typically characterized by progression from a nonspecific phase of erythematous macules to the appearance of plaques and ultimately, in some patients, tumors. However, numerous clinical and histopathologic variants of MF with specific therapeutic and prognostic implications have been described in recent decades. Clarification of the differential diagnosis can be frustrated by the wide range of clinical manifestations and histopathologic patterns of cutaneous infiltration, particularly in the early phases of the disease. In this paper, we review the main clinical, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical characteristics of the variants of MF described in the literature in order to facilitate early diagnosis of the disease.

  11. Oncotator: cancer variant annotation tool.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alex H; Lichtenstein, Lee; Gupta, Manaswi; Lawrence, Michael S; Pugh, Trevor J; Saksena, Gordon; Meyerson, Matthew; Getz, Gad

    2015-04-01

    Oncotator is a tool for annotating genomic point mutations and short nucleotide insertions/deletions (indels) with variant- and gene-centric information relevant to cancer researchers. This information is drawn from 14 different publicly available resources that have been pooled and indexed, and we provide an extensible framework to add additional data sources. Annotations linked to variants range from basic information, such as gene names and functional classification (e.g. missense), to cancer-specific data from resources such as the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC), the Cancer Gene Census, and The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). For local use, Oncotator is freely available as a python module hosted on Github (https://github.com/broadinstitute/oncotator). Furthermore, Oncotator is also available as a web service and web application at http://www.broadinstitute.org/oncotator/.

  12. Pigmented Porokeratosis. A Further Variant?

    PubMed

    Tan, Tracy S P; Tallon, Ben

    2016-03-01

    Porokeratosis is a clonal disorder of keratinization characterized by the presence of the cornoid lamella. A number of variants of porokeratosis have been described, based on the clinical features and histologic features of the lesions. The authors present a case of porokeratosis with prominent melanocytic hyperplasia, which was biopsied to clinically exclude melanoma. The authors retrospectively studied cases of porokeratosis to look for the presence of melanocytic hyperplasia. Melanocytic hyperplasia was identified in 8 of 31 cases (25.8%). All of the cases except the index case were clinically nonpigmented but arose in solar damaged skin. This case represents a distinct variant of porokeratosis, and the authors propose the designation pigmented porokeratosis. Melanocytic hyperplasia is a benign condition, and it is important that this is not histologically confused with melanoma in situ, particularly in a context of clinically pigmented lesion. Increased recognition of pigmented porokeratosis is essential to avoid an erroneous diagnosis of melanoma in situ.

  13. Unusual variant of Cantrell's pentalogy?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Basant; Sharma, S. B.; Kandpal, Deepak K.; Agrawal, L. D.

    2008-01-01

    A 12-hour-old male infant presented with prolapsed abdominal content through a defect on left side of chest wall with respiratory distress. A thorough clinical examination suggested absence of ectopia cordis, abdominal wall defect, and any bony anomaly. The child expired after 6 hours of admission because of respiratory distress and electrolyte imbalance. Is congenital defect of chest wall associated with diaphragmatic hernia without ectopia cordis and omphalocele, an unusual variant of Cantrell's pentalogy? PMID:19561890

  14. Assessing the 5S ribosomal RNA heterogeneity in Arabidopsis thaliana using short RNA next generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, Maciej; Karlowski, Wojciech M

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, ribosomal 5S rRNAs are products of multigene families organized within clusters of tandemly repeated units. Accumulation of genomic data obtained from a variety of organisms demonstrated that the potential 5S rRNA coding sequences show a large number of variants, often incompatible with folding into a correct secondary structure. Here, we present results of an analysis of a large set of short RNA sequences generated by the next generation sequencing techniques, to address the problem of heterogeneity of the 5S rRNA transcripts in Arabidopsis and identification of potentially functional rRNA-derived fragments.

  15. Identifying essential genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Meinke, David; Muralla, Rosanna; Sweeney, Colleen; Dickerman, Allan

    2008-09-01

    Eight years after publication of the Arabidopsis genome sequence and two years before completing the first phase of an international effort to characterize the function of every Arabidopsis gene, plant biologists remain unable to provide a definitive answer to the following basic question: what is the minimal gene set required for normal growth and development? The purpose of this review is to summarize different strategies employed to identify essential genes in Arabidopsis, an important component of the minimal gene set in plants, to present an overview of the datasets and specific genes identified to date, and to discuss the prospects for future saturation of this important class of genes. The long-term goal of this collaborative effort is to facilitate basic research in plant biology and complement ongoing research with other model organisms.

  16. Differentiation of programmed Arabidopsis cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, De-Yu; Shi, Ming-Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Plants express genes that encode enzymes that catalyse reactions to form plant secondary metabolites in specific cell types. However, the mechanisms of how plants decide their cellular metabolic fate and how cells diversify and specialise their specific secondary metabolites remains largely unknown. Additionally, whether and how an established metabolic program impacts genome-wide reprogramming of plant gene expression is unclear. We recently isolated PAP1-programmed anthocyanin-producing (red) and -free (white) cells from Arabidopsis thaliana; our previous studies have indicated that the PAP1 expression level is similar between these two different cell types. Transcriptional analysis showed that the red cells contain the TTG1-GL3/TT8-PAP1 regulatory complex, which controls anthocyanin biosynthesis; in contrast, the white cells and the wild-type cells lack this entire complex. These data indicate that different regulatory programming underlies the different metabolic states of these cells. In addition, our previous transcriptomic comparison indicated that there is a clear difference in the gene expression profiles of the red and wild-type cells, which is probably a consequence of cell-specific reprogramming. Based on these observations, in this report we discuss the potential mechanisms that underlie the programming and reprogramming of gene expression involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis. PMID:22126737

  17. Variant-specific prion interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Jaya; Liebman, Susan W

    2013-01-01

    Prions are protein conformations that “self-seed” the misfolding of their non-prion iso-forms into prion, often amyloid, conformations. The most famous prion is the mammalian PrP protein that in its prion form causes transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. Curiously there can be distinct conformational differences even between prions of the same protein propagated in the same host species. These are called prion strains or variants. For example, different PrP variants are faithfully transmitted during self-seeding and are associated with distinct disease characteristics. Variant-specific PrP prion differences include the length of the incubation period before the disease appears and the deposition of prion aggregates in distinct regions of the brain.1 Other more common neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, type 2 diabetes and ALS) are likewise caused by the misfolding of a normal protein into a self-seeding aggregate.2-4 One of the most important unanswered questions is how the first prion-like seed arises de novo, resulting in the pathological cascade. PMID:24475372

  18. Dorsal variant blister aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Couldwell, William T; Chamoun, Roukoz

    2012-01-01

    Dorsal variant proximal carotid blister aneurysms are treacherous lesions to manage. It is important to recognize this variant on preoperative angiographic imaging, in anticipation of surgical strategies for their treatment. Strategies include trapping the involved segment and revascularization if necessary. Other options include repair of the aneurysm rupture site directly. Given that these are not true berry aneurysms, repair of the rupture site involves wrapping or clip-grafting techniques. The case presented here was a young woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dorsal variant blister aneurysm. The technique used is demonstrated in the video and is a modified clip-wrap technique using woven polyester graft material. The patient was given aspirin preoperatively as preparation for the clip-wrap technique. It is the authors' current protocol to attempt a direct repair with clip-wrapping and leaving artery sacrifice with or without bypass as a salvage therapy if direct repair is not possible. Assessment of vessel patency after repair is performed by intraoperative Doppler and indocyanine green angiography. Intraoperative somatosensory and motor evoked potential monitoring is performed in all cases. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/crUreWGQdGo.

  19. Analysis of Unfolded Protein Response in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yani; Brandizzi, Federica

    2014-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is fundamental for development and adaption in eukaryotic cells. Arabidopsis has become one of the best model systems to uncover conserved mechanisms of the UPR in multicellular eukaryotes as well as organism-specific regulation of the UPR in plants. Monitoring the UPR in planta is an elemental approach to identifying regulatory components and to revealing molecular mechanisms of the plant UPR. In this chapter, we provide protocols for the induction and analyses of plant UPR at a molecular level in Arabidopsis. Three kinds of ER stress treatment methods and quantitation of the plant UPR activation are described here. PMID:23913037

  20. Variant Calling From Next Generation Sequence Data.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Nancy F

    2016-01-01

    The use of next generation nucleotide sequencing to discover and genotype small sequence variants has led to numerous insights into the molecular causes of various diseases. This chapter describes the use of freely available software to align next generation sequencing reads to a reference and then to use the resulting alignments to call, annotate, view, and filter small sequence variants. The suggested variant calling workflow includes read alignment with novoalign, the removal of polymerase chain reaction duplicate sequences with samtools or bamUtils, and the detection of variants with Freebayes or bam2mpg software. ANNOVAR is then used to annotate the predicted variants using gene models, population frequencies, and predicted mutation severity, producing variant files which can be viewed and filtered with the variant display tool VarSifter.

  1. Segregation of Virulent Influenza A(H1N1) Variants in the Lower Respiratory Tract of Critically Ill Patients during the 2010–2011 Seasonal Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Piralla, Antonio; Pariani, Elena; Rovida, Francesca; Campanini, Giulia; Muzzi, Alba; Emmi, Vincenzo; Iotti, Giorgio A.; Pesenti, Antonio; Conaldi, Pier Giulio; Zanetti, Alessandro; Baldanti, Fausto

    2011-01-01

    Background Since its appearance in 2009, the pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus circulated worldwide causing several severe infections. Methods Respiratory samples from patients with 2009 influenza A(H1N1) and acute respiratory distress attending 24 intensive care units (ICUs) as well as from patients with lower respiratory tract infections not requiring ICU admission and community upper respiratory tract infections in the Lombardy region (10 million inhabitants) of Italy during the 2010–2011 winter-spring season, were analyzed. Results In patients with severe ILI, the viral load was higher in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) with respect to nasal swab (NS), (p<0.001) suggesting a higher virus replication in the lower respiratory tract. Four distinct virus clusters (referred to as cluster A to D) circulated simultaneously. Most (72.7%, n = 48) of the 66 patients infected with viruses belonging to cluster A had a severe (n = 26) or moderate ILI (n = 22). Amino acid mutations (V26I, I116M, A186T, D187Y, D222G/N, M257I, S263F, I286L/M, and N473D) were observed only in patients with severe ILI. D222G/N variants were detected exclusively in BAL samples. Conclusions Multiple virus clusters co-circulated during the 2010–2011 winter-spring season. Severe or moderate ILI were associated with specific 2009 influenza A(H1N1) variants, which replicated preferentially in the lower respiratory tract. PMID:22194826

  2. Novel glyoxalases from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kyu; Choi, Dongwook; Hyun, Jae Kyung; Jung, Hyun Suk; Baek, Kwanghee; Park, Chankyu

    2013-07-01

    We examined six Arabidopsis thaliana genes from the DJ-1/PfpI superfamily for similarity to the recently characterized bacterial and animal glyoxalases. Based on their sequence similarities, the six genes were classified into two sub-groups consisting of homologs of the human DJ-1 gene and the PH1704 gene of Pyrococcus horikoshii. Unlike the homologs from other species, all the A. thaliana genes have two tandem domains, which may have been created by gene duplication. The six AtDJ-1 proteins (a-f) were expressed in Escherichia coli for enzymatic assays with glyoxals. The DJ-1d protein, which belongs to the PH1704 sub-group, exhibits the highest activity against methylglyoxal and glyoxal, and K(m) values of 0.10 and 0.27 mm were measured for these two substrates, respectively, while the corresponding k(cat) values were 1700 and 2200 min(-1), respectively. The DJ-1a and DJ-1b glyoxalases exhibited higher specificity towards glyoxal. The other three proteins have either no or extremely low activity for glyoxals. For the DJ-1d enzyme, the residues, Cys120/313 and Glu19/212 at the active site and His121/314 and Glu94/287 at the oligomeric interface were mutated to alanines. As in other enzymes characterized to date, mutation of either the Cys or the Glu residues of the active site completely abolished enzyme activity, whereas mutation of the interface residues produced a variable decrease in activity. DJ-1d differs from its animal and bacterial homologs with respect to the configuration of its catalytic residues and the oligomeric property of the enzyme. When the wild-type DJ-1d enzyme was expressed in E. coli, the bacteria became resistant to glyoxals. © 2013 FEBS.

  3. Orthology Analysis and In Vivo Complementation Studies to Elucidate the Role of DIR1 during Systemic Acquired Resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana and Cucumis sativus.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, Marisa; Carella, Philip; Faubert, Jennifer; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Cameron, Robin K

    2016-01-01

    AtDIR1 (Defective in Induced Resistance1) is an acidic lipid transfer protein essential for systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Upon SAR induction, DIR1 moves from locally infected to distant uninfected leaves to activate defense priming; however, a molecular function for DIR1 has not been elucidated. Bioinformatic analysis and in silico homology modeling identified putative AtDIR1 orthologs in crop species, revealing conserved protein motifs within and outside of DIR1's central hydrophobic cavity. In vitro assays to compare the capacity of recombinant AtDIR1 and targeted AtDIR1-variant proteins to bind the lipophilic probe TNS (6,P-toluidinylnaphthalene-2-sulfonate) provided evidence that conserved leucine 43 and aspartic acid 39 contribute to the size of the DIR1 hydrophobic cavity and possibly hydrophobic ligand binding. An Arabidopsis-cucumber SAR model was developed to investigate the conservation of DIR1 function in cucumber (Cucumis sativus), and we demonstrated that phloem exudates from SAR-induced cucumber rescued the SAR defect in the Arabidopsis dir1-1 mutant. Additionally, an AtDIR1 antibody detected a protein of the same size as AtDIR1 in SAR-induced cucumber phloem exudates, providing evidence that DIR1 function during SAR is conserved in Arabidopsis and cucumber. In vitro TNS displacement assays demonstrated that recombinant AtDIR1 did not bind the SAR signals azelaic acid (AzA), glycerol-3-phosphate or pipecolic acid. However, recombinant CsDIR1 and CsDIR2 interacted weakly with AzA and pipecolic acid. Bioinformatic and functional analyses using the Arabidopsis-cucumber SAR model provide evidence that DIR1 orthologs exist in tobacco, tomato, cucumber, and soybean, and that DIR1-mediated SAR signaling is conserved in Arabidopsis and cucumber.

  4. Variant Interpretation: Functional Assays to the Rescue.

    PubMed

    Starita, Lea M; Ahituv, Nadav; Dunham, Maitreya J; Kitzman, Jacob O; Roth, Frederick P; Seelig, Georg; Shendure, Jay; Fowler, Douglas M

    2017-09-07

    Classical genetic approaches for interpreting variants, such as case-control or co-segregation studies, require finding many individuals with each variant. Because the overwhelming majority of variants are present in only a few living humans, this strategy has clear limits. Fully realizing the clinical potential of genetics requires that we accurately infer pathogenicity even for rare or private variation. Many computational approaches to predicting variant effects have been developed, but they can identify only a small fraction of pathogenic variants with the high confidence that is required in the clinic. Experimentally measuring a variant's functional consequences can provide clearer guidance, but individual assays performed only after the discovery of the variant are both time and resource intensive. Here, we discuss how multiplex assays of variant effect (MAVEs) can be used to measure the functional consequences of all possible variants in disease-relevant loci for a variety of molecular and cellular phenotypes. The resulting large-scale functional data can be combined with machine learning and clinical knowledge for the development of "lookup tables" of accurate pathogenicity predictions. A coordinated effort to produce, analyze, and disseminate large-scale functional data generated by multiplex assays could be essential to addressing the variant-interpretation crisis. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. An International Bioinformatics Infrastructure to Underpin the Arabidopsis Community

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The future bioinformatics needs of the Arabidopsis community as well as those of other scientific communities that depend on Arabidopsis resources were discussed at a pair of recent meetings held by the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Committee and the North American Arabidopsis Steering Committee. There are extensive tools and resources for information storage, curation, and retrieval of Arabidopsis data that have been developed over recent years primarily through the activities of The Arabidopsis Information Resource, the Nottingham Arabidopsis Stock Centre, and the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center, among others. However, the rapid expansion in many data types, the international basis of the Arabidopsis community, and changing priorities of the funding agencies all suggest the need for changes in the way informatics infrastructure is developed and maintained. We propose that there is a need for a single core resource that is integrated into a larger international consortium of investigators. We envision this to consist of a distributed system of data, tools, and resources, accessed via a single information portal and funded by a variety of sources, under shared international management of an International Arabidopsis Informatics Consortium (IAIC). This article outlines the proposal for the development, management, operations, and continued funding for the IAIC. PMID:20807877

  6. Engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in Arabidopsis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many plants accumulate crystals of calcium oxalate. Just how these crystals form remains unknown. To gain insight into the mechanisms regulating calcium oxalate crystal formation, a crystal engineering approach was initiated utilizing the non-crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis. The success of t...

  7. Shotgun Proteomic Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two shotgun tandem mass spectrometry proteomics approaches, Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) and 1D-Gel-LC-MS/MS, were used to identify Arabidopsis thaliana leaf proteins. These methods utilize different protein/peptide separation strategies. Detergents not compatible wit...

  8. Biosynthetic Pathways of Brassinolide in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Takahiro; Fujioka, Shozo; Choe, Sunghwa; Takatsuto, Suguru; Tax, Frans E.; Yoshida, Shigeo; Feldmann, Kenneth A.

    2000-01-01

    Our previous studies on the endogenous brassinosteroids (BRs) in Arabidopsis have provided suggestive evidence for the operation of the early C6-oxidation and the late C6-oxidation pathways, leading to brassinolide (BL) in Arabidopsis. However, to date the in vivo operation of these pathways has not been fully confirmed in this species. This paper describes metabolic studies using deuterium-labeled BRs in wild-type and BR-insensitive mutant (bri1) seedlings to establish the intermediates of the biosynthetic pathway of BL in Arabidopsis. The first evidence for the conversion of campestanol to 6-deoxocathasterone and the conversion of 6-deoxocathasterone to 6-deoxoteasterone is provided. The later biosynthetic steps (6-deoxoteasterone → 3-dehydro-6-deoxoteasterone → 6-deoxotyphasterol → 6-deoxocastasterone → 6α-hydroxycastasterone → castasterone → BL) were demonstrated by stepwise metabolic experiments. Therefore, these studies complete the documentation of the late C6-oxidation pathway. The biosynthetic sequence involved in the early C6-oxidation pathway (teasterone → 3-dehydroteasterone → typhasterol → castasterone → BL) was also demonstrated. These results show that both the early and late C6-oxidation pathways are functional in Arabidopsis. In addition we report two new observations: the presence of a new branch in the pathway, C6 oxidation of 6-deoxotyphasterol to typhasterol, and increased metabolic flow in BR-insensitive mutants. PMID:10982435

  9. Biosynthetic pathways of brassinolide in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, T; Fujioka, S; Choe, S; Takatsuto, S; Tax, F E; Yoshida, S; Feldmann, K A

    2000-09-01

    Our previous studies on the endogenous brassinosteroids (BRs) in Arabidopsis have provided suggestive evidence for the operation of the early C6-oxidation and the late C6-oxidation pathways, leading to brassinolide (BL) in Arabidopsis. However, to date the in vivo operation of these pathways has not been fully confirmed in this species. This paper describes metabolic studies using deuterium-labeled BRs in wild-type and BR-insensitive mutant (bri1) seedlings to establish the intermediates of the biosynthetic pathway of BL in Arabidopsis. The first evidence for the conversion of campestanol to 6-deoxocathasterone and the conversion of 6-deoxocathasterone to 6-deoxoteasterone is provided. The later biosynthetic steps (6-deoxoteasterone --> 3-dehydro-6-deoxoteasterone --> 6-deoxotyphasterol --> 6-deoxocastasterone --> 6alpha-hydroxycastasterone --> castasterone --> BL) were demonstrated by stepwise metabolic experiments. Therefore, these studies complete the documentation of the late C6-oxidation pathway. The biosynthetic sequence involved in the early C6-oxidation pathway (teasterone --> 3-dehydroteasterone --> typhasterol --> castasterone --> BL) was also demonstrated. These results show that both the early and late C6-oxidation pathways are functional in Arabidopsis. In addition we report two new observations: the presence of a new branch in the pathway, C6 oxidation of 6-deoxotyphasterol to typhasterol, and increased metabolic flow in BR-insensitive mutants.

  10. Arabidopsis, the Rosetta stone of flowering time?

    PubMed

    Simpson, Gordon G; Dean, Caroline

    2002-04-12

    Multiple environmental and endogenous inputs regulate when plants flower. The molecular genetic dissection of flowering time control in Arabidopsis has identified an integrated network of pathways that quantitatively control the timing of this developmental switch. This framework provides the basis to understand the evolution of different reproductive strategies and how floral pathways interact through seasonal progression.

  11. Imaging lipid droplets in Arabidopsis mutants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy was adapted for the imaging of neutral lipids in plant leaves with defects in normal lipid metabolism using two different fluorescent dyes. Disruptions in a gene locus, At4g24160, yielded Arabidopsis thaliana plants with a preponderance of oil bodies in their leaves ...

  12. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  13. Clinical variants of pityriasis rosea

    PubMed Central

    Urbina, Francisco; Das, Anupam; Sudy, Emilio

    2017-01-01

    Pityriasis rosea (PR) is a common erythemato-squamous dermatosis which almost always, is easily diagnosed. Mostly the disease presents in its classical form. However, clinical dermatology is all about variations and PR is not an exception. Variants of the disease in some cases may be troublesome to diagnose and confuse clinicians. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of the condition becomes necessary to avoid unnecessary investigations. We hereby review and illustrate atypical presentations of the disease, including diverse forms of location and morphology of the lesions, the course of the eruption, and its differential diagnoses. PMID:28685133

  14. Source parameters of the 2005-2008 Balâ-Sırapınar (central Turkey) earthquakes: Implications for the internal deformation of the Anatolian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çubuk, Yeşim; Yolsal-Çevikbilen, Seda; Taymaz, Tuncay

    2014-11-01

    Active tectonics of central Anatolia is mainly governed by the collision of the African, Arabian and Anatolian plates, which causes westward escape of Anatolia along the North and East Anatolian Fault zones, and the counterclockwise rotation of the Kırşehir block with insignificant internal deformation. The formation of the present-day tectonic processes in this region can be deduced from geophysical prospecting and seismological data. Although the seismicity in central Anatolia is distinctively lower than that in the northern and eastern parts of the Anatolian plate, small and moderate earthquakes (2.5 ≤ Mw ≤ 6.0) mostly occurred in the region in the past decades or so. For example, intense earthquake activity was observed in the Balâ-Afşar-Sırapınar (Ankara, central Anatolia) region in the period of 2005 to 2008 with destructive earthquakes of July 30, 2005 (Mw = 5.2); December 20, 2007 (Mw = 5.7) and December 26, 2007 (Mw = 5.6). Therefore, these earthquakes are crucial to analyze the shallow crustal deformation in the central Anatolian block. In the present study, we obtained source parameters of 2005-2008 earthquake sequence using the regional moment tensor (RMT) inversion method. We analyzed complete broad-band waveforms recorded at near-field distances (0.45° ≤ Δ ≤ 3.6°). Our results reveal NW-SE directed right-lateral strike-slip faulting and NE-SW directed left-lateral strike-slip faulting mechanisms, which are clearly correlated with the conjugate fault systems in the Balâ-Afşar-Sırapınar region. However, some earthquakes also have E-W directed normal faulting components. We suggest that the major characteristics of 2005-2006 and 2007-2008 earthquake activity could have been dominantly associated with left-lateral and right-lateral strike-slip faulting mechanisms, respectively. The seismogenic depth is found to be about 8-10 km. This result implies that earthquakes in the study region occurred mostly in the upper crust, which

  15. The effect of low glucose degradation product, neutral pH versus standard peritoneal dialysis solutions on peritoneal membrane function: the balANZ trial

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, David W.; Brown, Fiona G.; Clarke, Margaret; Boudville, Neil; Elias, Tony J.; Foo, Marjorie W.Y.; Jones, Bernard; Kulkarni, Hemant; Langham, Robyn; Ranganathan, Dwarakanathan; Schollum, John; Suranyi, Michael G.; Tan, Seng H.; Voss, David

    2012-01-01

    Background The balANZ trial recently reported that neutral pH, low glucose degradation product (biocompatible) peritoneal dialysis (PD) solutions significantly delayed anuria and reduced peritonitis rates compared with conventional solutions. This article reports a secondary outcome analysis of the balANZ trial with respect to peritoneal membrane function. Methods Adult, incident PD patients with residual renal function were randomized to receive either biocompatible or conventional (control) PD solutions for 2 years. Peritoneal equilibration tests were performed at 1, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. Peritoneal small solute clearances and ultra-filtration (UF) were measured at 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months. Results Of the 185 patients recruited into the trial, 85 patients in the Balance group and 82 patients in the control group had peritoneal membrane function evaluated. Mean 4-h dialysate:plasma creatinine ratios (D:P Cr 4h) at 1 month were significantly higher in the Balance group compared with controls (0.67 ± 0.10 versus 0.62 ± 0.10, P = 0.002). Over the 2-year study period, mean D:P Cr 4 h measurements remained stable in the Balance group but increased significantly in controls [difference −0.004 per month, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) −0.005 to −0.002, P < 0.001]. Similar results were obtained for dialysate glucose ratios (D/D0 glucose). Peritoneal UF was significantly lower in the Balance group than in controls at 3 and 6 months. Over the 2-year study period, peritoneal UF increased significantly in the Balance group but remained stable in controls (difference 24 mL/day/month, 95% CI 9–39, P = 0.002). No differences in peritoneal small solute clearances, prescribed dialysate fill volumes or peritoneal glucose exposure were observed between the two groups. Conclusions Biocompatible and conventional PD solutions exert differential effects on peritoneal small solute transport rate and UF over time. Adequately powered trials assessing the impact of these

  16. The Effects of Biocompatible Compared with Standard Peritoneal Dialysis Solutions on Peritonitis Microbiology, Treatment, and Outcomes: the balANZ Trial

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, David W.; Brown, Fiona G.; Clarke, Margaret; Boudville, Neil; Elias, Tony J.; Foo, Marjorie W.Y.; Jones, Bernard; Kulkarni, Hemant; Langham, Robyn; Ranganathan, Dwarakanathan; Schollum, John; Suranyi, Michael G.; Tan, Seng H.; Voss, David

    2012-01-01

    ♦ Background: A multicenter, multi-country randomized controlled trial (the balANZ study) recently reported that peritonitis rates significantly improved with the use of neutral-pH peritoneal dialysis (PD) solutions low in glucose degradation products (“biocompatible”) compared with standard solutions. The present paper reports a secondary outcome analysis of the balANZ trial with respect to peritonitis microbiology, treatment, and outcomes. ♦ Methods: Adult incident PD patients with residual renal function were randomized to receive either biocompatible or conventional (control) PD solutions for 2 years. ♦ Results: The safety population analysis for peritonitis included 91 patients in each group. The unadjusted geometric mean peritonitis rates in those groups were 0.30 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.22 to 0.41] episodes per patient-year for the biocompatible group and 0.49 (95% CI: 0.39 to 0.62) episodes per patient-year for the control group [incidence rate ratio (IRR): 0.61; 95% CI: 0.41 to 0.90; p = 0.01]. When specific causative organisms were examined, the rates of culture-negative, gram-positive, gram-negative, and polymicrobial peritonitis episodes were not significantly different between the biocompatible and control groups, although the biocompatible group did experience a significantly lower rate of non-pseudomonal gram-negative peritonitis (IRR: 0.41; 95% CI: 0.18 to 0.92; p = 0.03). Initial empiric antibiotic regimens were comparable between the groups. Biocompatible fluid use did not significantly reduce the risk of peritonitis-associated hospitalization (adjusted odds ratio: 0.80; 95% CI: 0.48 to 1.34), but did result in a shorter median duration of peritonitis-associated hospitalization (6 days vs 11 days, p = 0.05). Peritonitis severity was more likely to be rated as mild in the biocompatible group (37% vs 10%, p = 0.001). Overall peritonitis-associated technique failures and peritonitis-related deaths were comparable in the two groups

  17. Economic evaluation of neutral-pH, low-glucose degradation product peritoneal dialysis solutions compared with standard solutions: a secondary analysis of the balANZ Trial.

    PubMed

    Howard, Kirsten; Hayes, Alison; Cho, Yeoungjee; Cass, Alan; Clarke, Margaret; Johnson, David W

    2015-05-01

    Biocompatible solutions may lower peritonitis rates, but are more costly than conventional solutions. The aim of the present study was to assess the additional costs and health outcomes of biocompatible over conventional solutions in incident peritoneal dialysis patients to guide practice decisions. Secondary economic evaluation of a randomized controlled trial. 185 participants in the balANZ trial. Cost-effectiveness of biocompatible compared to standard solution over the 2 years using an Australian health care funder perspective. Intervention group received biocompatible solutions and control group received standard solutions over 2 years. Costs included dialysis charges, costs of treating peritonitis, non-peritonitis-related hospital stays, and medication. Peritonitis was the health outcome of interest; incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were reported in terms of the additional cost per additional patient avoiding peritonitis at 2 years. Mean total per-patient costs were A$57,451 and A$53,930 for the biocompatible and standard-solution groups, respectively. The base-case analysis indicated an incremental cost of A$17,804 per additional patient avoiding peritonitis at 2 years for biocompatible compared to standard solution. In a sensitivity analysis excluding extreme outliers for non-peritonitis-related hospitalizations, mean per-patient costs were A$49,159 and A$52,009 for the biocompatible and standard-solution groups, respectively. Consequently, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio also was reduced significantly: biocompatible solution became both less costly and more effective than standard solution and, in economic terms, was dominant over standard solution. Peritonitis was a secondary outcome of the balANZ trial. Health outcomes measured only in terms of patients avoiding peritonitis over 2 years may underestimate the longer term benefits (eg, prolonged technique survival). Biocompatible dialysis solutions may offer a cost-effective alternative to

  18. Proteome analysis of peroxisomes from etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings identifies a peroxisomal protease involved in β-oxidation and development.

    PubMed

    Quan, Sheng; Yang, Pingfang; Cassin-Ross, Gaëlle; Kaur, Navneet; Switzenberg, Robert; Aung, Kyaw; Li, Jiying; Hu, Jianping

    2013-12-01

    Plant peroxisomes are highly dynamic organelles that mediate a suite of metabolic processes crucial to development. Peroxisomes in seeds/dark-grown seedlings and in photosynthetic tissues constitute two major subtypes of plant peroxisomes, which had been postulated to contain distinct primary biochemical properties. Multiple in-depth proteomic analyses had been performed on leaf peroxisomes, yet the major makeup of peroxisomes in seeds or dark-grown seedlings remained unclear. To compare the metabolic pathways of the two dominant plant peroxisomal subtypes and discover new peroxisomal proteins that function specifically during seed germination, we performed proteomic analysis of peroxisomes from etiolated Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings. The detection of 77 peroxisomal proteins allowed us to perform comparative analysis with the peroxisomal proteome of green leaves, which revealed a large overlap between these two primary peroxisomal variants. Subcellular targeting analysis by fluorescence microscopy validated around 10 new peroxisomal proteins in Arabidopsis. Mutant analysis suggested the role of the cysteine protease RESPONSE TO DROUGHT21A-LIKE1 in β-oxidation, seed germination, and growth. This work provides a much-needed road map of a major type of plant peroxisome and has established a basis for future investigations of peroxisomal proteolytic processes to understand their roles in development and in plant interaction with the environment.

  19. Histone variants: emerging players in cancer biology

    PubMed Central

    Vardabasso, Chiara; Hasson, Dan; Ratnakumar, Kajan; Chung, Chi-Yeh; Duarte, Luis F.

    2014-01-01

    Histone variants are key players in shaping chromatin structure, and, thus, in regulating fundamental cellular processes such as chromosome segregation and gene expression. Emerging evidence points towards a role for histone variants in contributing to tumor progression, and, recently, the first cancer-associated mutation in a histone variant-encoding gene was reported. In addition, genetic alterations of the histone chaperones that specifically regulate chromatin incorporation of histone variants are rapidly being uncovered in numerous cancers. Collectively, these findings implicate histone variants as potential drivers of cancer initiation and/or progression, and, therefore, targeting histone deposition or the chromatin remodeling machinery may be of therapeutic value. Here, we review the mammalian histone variants of the H2A and H3 families in their respective cellular functions, and their involvement in tumor biology. PMID:23652611

  20. Reliably Detecting Clinically Important Variants Requires Both Combined Variant Calls and Optimized Filtering Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Field, Matthew A.; Cho, Vicky

    2015-01-01

    A diversity of tools is available for identification of variants from genome sequence data. Given the current complexity of incorporating external software into a genome analysis infrastructure, a tendency exists to rely on the results from a single tool alone. The quality of the output variant calls is highly variable however, depending on factors such as sequence library quality as well as the choice of short-read aligner, variant caller, and variant caller filtering strategy. Here we present a two-part study first using the high quality ‘genome in a bottle’ reference set to demonstrate the significant impact the choice of aligner, variant caller, and variant caller filtering strategy has on overall variant call quality and further how certain variant callers outperform others with increased sample contamination, an important consideration when analyzing sequenced cancer samples. This analysis confirms previous work showing that combining variant calls of multiple tools results in the best quality resultant variant set, for either specificity or sensitivity, depending on whether the intersection or union, of all variant calls is used respectively. Second, we analyze a melanoma cell line derived from a control lymphocyte sample to determine whether software choices affect the detection of clinically important melanoma risk-factor variants finding that only one of the three such variants is unanimously detected under all conditions. Finally, we describe a cogent strategy for implementing a clinical variant detection pipeline; a strategy that requires careful software selection, variant caller filtering optimizing, and combined variant calls in order to effectively minimize false negative variants. While implementing such features represents an increase in complexity and computation the results offer indisputable improvements in data quality. PMID:26600436

  1. Transcriptional Consequence and Impaired Gametogenesis with High-Grade Aneuploidy in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Chen, I-Ju; Liu, Yu-Chen; Chung, Mei-Chu; Lo, Wan-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Aneuploidy features a numerical chromosome variant that the number of chromosomes in the nucleus of a cell is not an exact multiple of the haploid number, which may have an impact on morphology and gene expression. Here we report a tertiary trisomy uncovered by characterizing a T-DNA insertion mutant (aur2-1/+) in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) AURORA2 locus. Whole-genome analysis with DNA tiling arrays revealed a chromosomal translocation linked to the aur2-1 allele, which collectively accounted for a tertiary trisomy 2. Morphologic, cytogenetic and genetic analyses of aur2-1 progeny showed impaired male and female gametogenesis to various degrees and a tight association of the aur2-1 allele with the tertiary trisomy that was preferentially inherited. Transcriptome analysis showed overlapping and distinct gene expression profiles between primary and tertiary trisomy 2 plants, particularly genes involved in response to stress and various types of external and internal stimuli. Additionally, transcriptome and gene ontology analyses revealed an overrepresentation of nuclear-encoded organelle-related genes functionally involved in plastids, mitochondria and peroxisomes that were differentially expressed in at least three if not all Arabidopsis trisomics. These observations support a previous hypothesis that aneuploid cells have higher energy requirement to overcome the detrimental effects of an unbalanced genome. Moreover, our findings extend the knowledge of the complex nature of the T-DNA insertion event influencing plant genomic integrity by creating high-grade trisomy. Finally, gene expression profiling results provide useful information for future research to compare primary and tertiary trisomics for the effects of aneuploidy on plant cell physiology. PMID:25514186

  2. A bifunctional locus (BIO3-BIO1) required for biotin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Muralla, Rosanna; Chen, Elve; Sweeney, Colleen; Gray, Jennifer A; Dickerman, Allan; Nikolau, Basil J; Meinke, David

    2008-01-01

    We identify here the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) gene encoding the third enzyme in the biotin biosynthetic pathway, dethiobiotin synthetase (BIO3; At5g57600). This gene is positioned immediately upstream of BIO1, which is known to be associated with the second reaction in the pathway. Reverse genetic analysis demonstrates that bio3 insertion mutants have a similar phenotype to the bio1 and bio2 auxotrophs identified using forward genetic screens for arrested embryos rescued on enriched nutrient medium. Unexpectedly, bio3 and bio1 mutants define a single genetic complementation group. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrates that separate BIO3 and BIO1 transcripts and two different types of chimeric BIO3-BIO1 transcripts are produced. Consistent with genetic data, one of the fused transcripts is monocistronic and encodes a bifunctional fusion protein. A splice variant is bicistronic, with distinct but overlapping reading frames. The dual functionality of the monocistronic transcript was confirmed by complementing the orthologous auxotrophs of Escherichia coli (bioD and bioA). BIO3-BIO1 transcripts from other plants provide further evidence for differential splicing, existence of a fusion protein, and localization of both enzymatic reactions to mitochondria. In contrast to most biosynthetic enzymes in eukaryotes, which are encoded by genes dispersed throughout the genome, biotin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis provides an intriguing example of a bifunctional locus that catalyzes two sequential reactions in the same metabolic pathway. This complex locus exhibits several unusual features that distinguish it from biotin operons in bacteria and from other genes known to encode bifunctional enzymes in plants.

  3. Ligand-induced endocytosis of the pattern recognition receptor FLS2 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Robatzek, Silke; Chinchilla, Delphine; Boller, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) trigger innate immune responses in animals and plants. One such PRR is the flagellin receptor FLS2 in Arabidopsis. Here, we demonstrate that a functional fusion of FLS2 to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) resides in cell membranes of most tissues. Stimulation with the flagellin epitope flg22 induces its transfer into intracellular mobile vesicles, followed by degradation. FLS2 internalization depends on cytoskeleton and proteasome functions, and receptor activation. A variant FLS2 mutated in Thr 867, a potential phosphorylation site, binds flg22 normally, but is impaired in flg22 responses and FLS2 endocytosis. We propose that plant cells regulate pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-mediated PRR activities by subcellular compartmentalization. PMID:16510871

  4. STRUBBELIG defines a receptor kinase-mediated signaling pathway regulating organ development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, David; Batoux, Martine; Fulton, Lynette; Pfister, Karen; Yadav, Ram Kishor; Schellenberg, Maja; Schneitz, Kay

    2005-01-01

    An open question remains as to what coordinates cell behavior during organogenesis, permitting organs to reach their appropriate size and shape. The Arabidopsis gene STRUBBELIG (SUB) defines a receptor-mediated signaling pathway in plants. SUB encodes a putative leucine-rich repeat transmembrane receptor-like kinase. The mutant sub phenotype suggests that SUB affects the formation and shape of several organs by influencing cell morphogenesis, the orientation of the division plane, and cell proliferation. Mutational analysis suggests that the kinase domain is important for SUB function. Biochemical assays using bacterially expressed fusion proteins indicate that the SUB kinase domain lacks enzymatic phosphotransfer activity. Furthermore, transgenes encoding WT and different mutant variants of SUB were tested for their ability to rescue the mutant sub phenotype. These genetic data also indicate that SUB carries a catalytically inactive kinase domain. The SUB receptor-like kinase may therefore signal in an atypical fashion. PMID:15951420

  5. DNA fingerprinting and new tools for fine-scale discrimination of Arabidopsis thaliana accessions.

    PubMed

    Simon, Matthieu; Simon, Adeline; Martins, Fréderic; Botran, Lucy; Tisné, Sébastien; Granier, Fabienne; Loudet, Olivier; Camilleri, Christine

    2012-03-01

    One of the main strengths of Arabidopsis thaliana as a model species is the impressive number of public resources available to the scientific community. Exploring species genetic diversity--and therefore adaptation--relies on collections of individuals from natural populations taken from diverse environments. Nevertheless, due to a few mislabeling events or genotype mixtures, some variants available in stock centers have been misidentified, causing inconsistencies and limiting the potential of genetic analyses. To improve the identification of natural accessions, we genotyped 1311 seed stocks from our Versailles Arabidopsis Stock Center and from other collections to determine their molecular profiles at 341 single nucleotide polymorphism markers. These profiles were used to compare genotypes at both the intra- and inter-accession levels. We confirmed previously described inconsistencies and revealed new ones, and suggest likely identities for accessions whose lineage had been lost. We also developed two new tools: a minimal fingerprint computation to quickly verify the identity of an accession, and an optimized marker set to assist in the identification of unknown or mixed accessions. These tools are available on a dedicated web interface called ANATool (https://www.versailles.inra.fr/ijpb/crb/anatool) that provides a simple and efficient means to verify or determine the identity of A. thaliana accessions in any laboratory, without the need for any specific or expensive technology. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Arabidopsis ABCG34 contributes to defense against necrotrophic pathogens by mediating the secretion of camalexin.

    PubMed

    Khare, Deepa; Choi, Hyunju; Huh, Sung Un; Bassin, Barbara; Kim, Jeongsik; Martinoia, Enrico; Sohn, Kee Hoon; Paek, Kyung-Hee; Lee, Youngsook

    2017-07-11

    Plant pathogens cause huge yield losses. Plant defense often depends on toxic secondary metabolites that inhibit pathogen growth. Because most secondary metabolites are also toxic to the plant, specific transporters are needed to deliver them to the pathogens. To identify the transporters that function in plant defense, we screened Arabidopsis thaliana mutants of full-size ABCG transporters for hypersensitivity to sclareol, an antifungal compound. We found that atabcg34 mutants were hypersensitive to sclareol and to the necrotrophic fungi Alternaria brassicicola and Botrytis cinereaAtABCG34 expression was induced by Abrassicicola inoculation as well as by methyl-jasmonate, a defense-related phytohormone, and AtABCG34 was polarly localized at the external face of the plasma membrane of epidermal cells of leaves and roots. atabcg34 mutants secreted less camalexin, a major phytoalexin in Athaliana, whereas plants overexpressing AtABCG34 secreted more camalexin to the leaf surface and were more resistant to the pathogen. When treated with exogenous camalexin, atabcg34 mutants exhibited hypersensitivity, whereas BY2 cells expressing AtABCG34 exhibited improved resistance. Analyses of natural Arabidopsis accessions revealed that AtABCG34 contributes to the disease resistance in naturally occurring genetic variants, albeit to a small extent. Together, our data suggest that AtABCG34 mediates camalexin secretion to the leaf surface and thereby prevents Abrassicicola infection.

  7. Natural diversity in flowering responses of Arabidopsis thaliana caused by variation in a tandem gene array.

    PubMed

    Rosloski, Sarah Marie; Jali, Sathya Sheela; Balasubramanian, Sureshkumar; Weigel, Detlef; Grbic, Vojislava

    2010-09-01

    Tandemly arrayed genes that belong to gene families characterize genomes of many organisms. Gene duplication and subsequent relaxation of selection can lead to the establishment of paralogous cluster members that may evolve along different trajectories. Here, we report on the structural variation in MADS AFFECTING FLOWERING 2 (MAF2) gene, one member of the tandemly duplicated cluster of MADS-box-containing transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana. The altered gene structure at the MAF2 locus is present as a moderate-frequency polymorphism in Arabidopsis and leads to the extensive diversity in transcript patterns due to alternative splicing. Rearrangements at the MAF2 locus are associated with an early flowering phenotype in BC(5) lines. The lack of suppression of flowering time in a MAF2-insertion line expressing the MAF2-specific artificial miRNA suggests that these MAF2 variants are behaving as loss-of-function alleles. The variation in gene architecture is also associated with segregation distortion, which may have facilitated the spread and the establishment of the corresponding alleles throughout the Eurasian range of the A. thaliana population.

  8. Distinct Signaling Mechanisms in Multiple Developmental Pathways by the SCRAMBLED Receptor of Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Su-Hwan; Woo, Sooah; Lee, Myeong Min; Schiefelbein, John

    2014-01-01

    SCRAMBLED (SCM), a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), is required for positional signaling in the root epidermis and for tissue/organ development in the shoot. To further understand SCM action, we generated a series of kinase domain variants and analyzed their ability to complement scm mutant defects. We found that the SCM kinase domain, but not kinase activity, is required for its role in root epidermal patterning, supporting the view that SCM is an atypical receptor kinase. We also describe a previously uncharacterized role for SCM in fruit dehiscence, because mature siliques from scm mutants fail to open properly. Interestingly, the kinase domain of SCM appears to be dispensable for this developmental process. Furthermore, we found that most of the SCM kinase domain mutations dramatically inhibit inflorescence development. Because this process is not affected in scm null mutants, it is likely that SCM acts redundantly to regulate inflorescence size. The importance of distinct kinase residues for these three developmental processes provides an explanation for the maintenance of the conserved kinase domain in the SCM protein, and it may generally explain its conservation in other atypical kinases. Furthermore, these results indicate that individual leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases may participate in multiple pathways using distinct signaling mechanisms to mediate diverse cellular communication events. PMID:25136062

  9. Suppression of Dwarf and irregular xylem Phenotypes Generates Low-Acetylated Biomass Lines in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bensussan, Matthieu; Lefebvre, Valérie; Ducamp, Aloïse; Trouverie, Jacques; Gineau, Emilie; Fortabat, Marie-Noëlle; Guillebaux, Alexia; Baldy, Aurélie; Naquin, Delphine; Herbette, Stéphane; Lapierre, Catherine; Mouille, Gregory; Horlow, Christine; Durand-Tardif, Mylène

    2015-06-01

    eskimo1-5 (esk1-5) is a dwarf Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant that has a constitutive drought syndrome and collapsed xylem vessels, along with low acetylation levels in xylan and mannan. ESK1 has xylan O-acetyltransferase activity in vitro. We used a suppressor strategy on esk1-5 to screen for variants with wild-type growth and low acetylation levels, a favorable combination for ethanol production. We found a recessive mutation in the KAKTUS (KAK) gene that suppressed dwarfism and the collapsed xylem character, the cause of decreased hydraulic conductivity in the esk1-5 mutant. Backcrosses between esk1-5 and two independent knockout kak mutants confirmed suppression of the esk1-5 effect. kak single mutants showed larger stem diameters than the wild type. The KAK promoter fused with a reporter gene showed activity in the vascular cambium, phloem, and primary xylem in the stem and hypocotyl. However, suppression of the collapsed xylem phenotype in esk1 kak double mutants was not associated with the recovery of cell wall O-acetylation or any major cell wall modifications. Therefore, our results indicate that, in addition to its described activity as a repressor of endoreduplication, KAK may play a role in vascular development. Furthermore, orthologous esk1 kak double mutants may hold promise for ethanol production in crop plants. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Distinct signaling mechanisms in multiple developmental pathways by the SCRAMBLED receptor of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Su-Hwan; Woo, Sooah; Lee, Myeong Min; Schiefelbein, John

    2014-10-01

    SCRAMBLED (SCM), a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), is required for positional signaling in the root epidermis and for tissue/organ development in the shoot. To further understand SCM action, we generated a series of kinase domain variants and analyzed their ability to complement scm mutant defects. We found that the SCM kinase domain, but not kinase activity, is required for its role in root epidermal patterning, supporting the view that SCM is an atypical receptor kinase. We also describe a previously uncharacterized role for SCM in fruit dehiscence, because mature siliques from scm mutants fail to open properly. Interestingly, the kinase domain of SCM appears to be dispensable for this developmental process. Furthermore, we found that most of the SCM kinase domain mutations dramatically inhibit inflorescence development. Because this process is not affected in scm null mutants, it is likely that SCM acts redundantly to regulate inflorescence size. The importance of distinct kinase residues for these three developmental processes provides an explanation for the maintenance of the conserved kinase domain in the SCM protein, and it may generally explain its conservation in other atypical kinases. Furthermore, these results indicate that individual leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases may participate in multiple pathways using distinct signaling mechanisms to mediate diverse cellular communication events.

  11. Purification and characterization of carbonic anhydrase from Ağrı Balık Lake trout gill (Salmo trutta labrax) and effects of sulfonamides on enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Demirdag, Ramazan; Comakli, Veysal; Kuzu, Muslum; Yerlikaya, Emrah; Şentürk, Murat

    2015-03-01

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA) was purified from Ağrı Balık Lake trout gill (fCA) by affinity chromatography on a sepharose 4B-tyrosine-sulfanilamide column. The fCA enzyme was purified with about a 303.9 purification factor, a specific activity 4130.4 EU (mg-protein)(-1), and a yield of 79.3 by using sepharose-4B-L tyrosine-sulfanilamide affinity gel chromatography. The molecular weight determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was found to be about 29.9 kDa. The kinetic parameters, K(M) and V(max) were determined for the 4-nitrophenyl acetate hydrolysis reaction. Some sulfonamides were tested as inhibitors against the purified CA enzymes. The Ki constants for mafenide (1), p-toluenesulfonamide (2), 2-bromo-benzene sulfonamide (3), 4-chlorobenzene sulfonamide (4), 4-amino-6-chloro-1-3 benzenedisulfonamide (5), sulfamethazine (6), sulfaguanidine (7), sulfadiazine (8), and acetozazolamide (9) were in the range of 7.5-108.75 μM. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Microstructure and magnetic properties of Sm(Co balFe xCu 0.128Zr 0.02) 7.0 magnets with Fe substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, W.; Zhang, Y.; Hadjipanayis, G. C.

    2000-11-01

    The effect of Fe substitution on the microstructure and magnetic properties of Sm(Co balFe xCu 0.128Zr 0.02) 7.0 magnets was systematically studied. With increasing Fe content ( x=0-0.25), the cellular structure changes from a fine inhomogeneous (the average cell size is 25 nm.) to a larger but uniform cell size (120 nm), and finally to coarse and inhomogeneous (180 nm). The coercivity gradually increases reaching an optimal value of 30 kOe with x=0.2, and then drops sharply with further Fe increase. These results suggest that Fe mainly goes into the 2 : 17R structure and stabilizes the phase. The addition of a certain amount of Fe is necessary to develop a uniform cellular with a larger cell size and thus a high coercivity. The excessive addition of Fe hinders the transformation of 2 : 17R to 2 : 17H structure during a solid solution and leads to the disappearance of the cellular microstructure and deterioration of coercivity.

  13. Populational parameters of Spalangia endius Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) on Pupae of Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae) treated with two strains of Beauveria bassiana (Bals.) Vuil. (Deuteromycetes).

    PubMed

    Lecuona, Roberto; Crespo, Diana; La Rossa, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    The parasitoid Spalangia endius Walker is an efficient controller of Dipteran pupae, such as Musca domestica L. The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (Bals.) Vuil. is a regulator of insect populations, including these synanthropic pests. The aim of this work was to explore the possibilities of utilizing both agents in a combined form for the biocontrol of the domestic fly. Recently formed M. domestica pupae were inoculated by immersion in conidia suspension (10(8) conidia/ml) with two strains of B. bassiana (Bb6 and Bb10). The inoculated pupae were offered to the female parasitoid. In one bioassay they were offered pupae inoculated a single day and in other, pupae inoculated the following day as well. In both bioassays non inoculated (control) pupae were offered to the parasitoids until their death. Thirty females of S. endius were used for each strain and bioassay. From the study of the parasitoid offspring, life tables were built and the reproduction net rate (R(0)) and intrinsic natural increase (r(m)) were obtained among other demographic parameters; the parasitism percentages and sex ratios were also analyzed. B. bassiana did not affect significantly the biodemography of the parasitoid when pupae were inoculated a single time. On the other hand the R0 and the rm were smaller than that of the control without the fungus when pupae were inoculated twice, although sporulation was not observed in the cadavers of S. endius.

  14. Hydrogeological settings of a volcanic island (San Cristóbal, Galapagos) from joint interpretation of airborne electromagnetics and geomorphological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryet, A.; d'Ozouville, N.; Violette, S.; Deffontaines, B.; Auken, E.

    2012-08-01

    Many volcanic islands face freshwater stress and the situation may worsen with climate change and sea level rise. In this context, an optimum management of freshwater resources becomes crucial, but is often impeded by the lack of data. With the aim of investigating the hydrogeological settings of Southern San Cristóbal Island (Galapagos), we conducted an helicopter-borne, transient electromagnetic survey with the SkyTEM system. It provided unprecedented insights in the 3-D resistivity structure of this extinct basaltic shield. Combined with remote sensing and fieldwork, it allowed the definition of the first hydrogeological conceptual model of the island. Springs are fed by a series of perched aquifers overlying a regional basal aquifer subject to seawater intrusion. Dykes, evidenced by alignments of eruptive cones at the surface, correspond to sharp sub-vertical contrasts in resistivity in the subsurface, and impound groundwater in a summit channel. Combined with geomorphological observations, airborne electromagnetics is shown to be a useful tool for hydrogeological exploratory studies in complex, poorly known environments. It allows optimal development of land-based geophysical surveys and drilling campaigns.

  15. Hydrogeological settings of a volcanic island (San Cristóbal, Galapagos) from joint interpretation of airborne electromagnetics and geomorphological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryet, A.; d'Ozouville, N.; Violette, S.; Deffontaines, B.; Auken, E.

    2012-12-01

    Many volcanic islands face freshwater stress and the situation may worsen with climate change and sea level rise. In this context, an optimum management of freshwater resources becomes crucial, but is often impeded by the lack of data. With the aim of investigating the hydrogeological settings of southern San Cristóbal Island (Galapagos), we conducted a helicopter-borne, transient electromagnetic survey with the SkyTEM system. It provided unprecedented insights into the 3-D resistivity structure of this extinct basaltic shield. Combined with remote sensing and fieldwork, it allowed the definition of the first hydrogeological conceptual model of the island. Springs are fed by a series of perched aquifers overlying a regional basal aquifer subject to seawater intrusion. Dykes, evidenced by alignments of eruptive cones at the surface, correspond to sharp sub-vertical contrasts in resistivity in the subsurface, and impound groundwater in a summit channel. Combined with geomorphological observations, airborne electromagnetics are shown to be a useful for hydrogeological exploratory studies in complex, poorly known environments. They allow optimal development of land-based geophysical surveys and drilling campaigns.

  16. Health Status of Galápagos Sea Lions (Zalophus wollebaeki) on San Cristóbal Island Rookeries Determined by Hematology, Biochemistry, Blood Gases, and Physical Examination.

    PubMed

    Páez-Rosas, Diego; Hirschfeld, Maximilian; Deresienski, Diane; Lewbart, Gregory A

    2016-01-01

    The Galápagos sea lion, Zalophus wollebaeki, is an endemic and endangered species subject to population decline associated with environmental variability, such as El Niño events, constant feeding stress, and exposure to diseases through contact with introduced species. Reference blood parameter intervals have been published for some pinniped species, but baseline biochemical and blood gas values are lacking from Z. wollebaeki. We analyzed blood samples from 30 juvenile Galápagos sea lions (19 females, 11 males) captured in two rookeries on San Cristóbal Island. A portable blood analyzer (iSTAT) was used to obtain near-immediate field results for pH, partial pressure of O2, partial pressure of CO2, bicarbonate (HCO3(-)), hematocrit (Hct), hemoglobin, Na, K, ionized Ca, and glucose, and blood lactate was measured using a portable Lactate Plus(TM) analyzer. Average heart rate, biochemistry, and hematology parameters were comparable with healthy individuals of other pinniped species. Hemoglobin was significantly correlated with body condition of juvenile Galápagos sea lions. When compared with available blood values of clinically healthy California sea lions, Galápagos sea lions had higher total protein and Hct and lower Ca and K levels. Our results provide baseline data that may be useful in comparisons among populations and in detecting changes in health status among Galápagos sea lions.

  17. 17th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, Judith

    2006-07-02

    The 17th International Conference on Arabidopsis Research was held at the University of Madison, Wisconsin from June 27- July 2, 2006. ICAR-2006 included approximately 625 scientists from across the world. The scientific program was of excellent quality featuring 73 talks, including 30 from invited speakers. There were also 6 community-organized workshops (facilitated by conference staff) featuring additional talks on topics including ‘Submitting data to long-term repositories,’ ‘TAIR introductory workshop,’ ‘Web services and demonstration,’ ‘Public engagement: broadening the impact of your research,’ ‘Systems biology approaches to analysis of metabolic and regulatory networks of Arabidopsis,’ and ‘Mechanotransduction in Arabidopsis.’ Approximately 440 posters were presented in general topic areas including, among others, Development, Modeling/Other Systems, Energy, Environment, and Genetic/Epigenetic mechanisms. Graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, junior faculty, and underrepresented minorities made up a significant portion of the oral presentations thereby promoting the training of young scientists and facilitating important career development opportunities for speakers. Several poster sessions provided an opportunity for younger participants to freely meet with more established scientists. The North American Arabidopsis Steering Committee (NAASC) continued its outreach effort and again sponsored two special luncheons to encourage personal and professional development of young scientists and also underrepresented minorities. The ‘Emerging Scientists Luncheon’ featured 10 graduate students selected on the basis of scientific excellence of their submitted research abstracts. The ‘Minority Funding Luncheon,’ featured 8 awardees selected by the NAASC through a widely-publicized application process. This luncheon was established specifically to provide an opportunity for underrepresented minorities, and/or scientists from

  18. [Normokalemic variant of paroxysmal myoplegia].

    PubMed

    Il'ina, N A; Aver'ianov, Iu N; Antipova, R I; Sokolina, N A; Maksimenko, I M

    1977-01-01

    For the first time in Soviet literature the authors describe a family where patients from 2 generations suffered from normokalemic periodical paralysis. The patients had undergone several examinations which confirmed this diagnosis. This report confirms the existence of a normopotassemic variant of periodical paralysis. The authors demonstrate the absence of a direct relation between the development of myoplegic attacks in these patients and disorders of the electrolyte balance. The histological studies of the muscular biopsy during the attacks detected a vacuolization of muscular fiberes. Histochemical studies of some metabolities of the carbohydrate metabolism did not detect any significant changes. The achieved results point only to an increase of the glyconeogenesis process and aerobie glycolisis.¿

  19. Turner syndrome and its variants.

    PubMed

    Bharath, R; Unnikrishnan, A G; Thampy, M V; Anilkumar, Alka; Nisha, B; Praveen, V P; Nair, Vasantha; Jayakumar, R V; Kumar, Harish

    2010-02-01

    Case records of female patients with karyotype proven turner syndrome were analyzed. 11 patients had classic Turner karyotype (Group 1) and 13 patients had karyotype suggestive of one of the variants of Turner syndrome (Group 2). There was a median difference of 3 years between the age of presentation and the age of diagnosis in Group 2. Out of the thirteen patients in Group 2, 4 had no clinical stigmata of Turner Syndrome; the rest (n=9) had one or more of the typical clinical stigmata of Turner Syndrome. One patient with a complex mosaic karyotype also had an intracranial medulloblastoma. One patient in each group had coarctation of the aorta. 5 patients in Group 1 and 3 patients in Group 2 had primary hypothyroidism and received levothyroxine. The median Thyroid Stimulating Hormone levels were significantly higher among patients in group 1 than in group 2.

  20. Primary pleural liposarcoma, pleomorphic variant.

    PubMed

    Carrillo B, Jorge Alberto; Navarrete, Constanza; López Arias, María Alejandra; Peláez, Mauricio

    2014-09-01

    Primary pleural liposarcoma (PPL) is a rare tumor derived from primitive mesenchymal tissue. We report a case of a 49-year-old female patient complaining of thoracic pain and dyspnea for 3 months. The chest X-ray showed a left basal opacity of lobulated contours and the thoracic computer tomography (CT) scan revealed a left pleural collection/mass, of 18 HU density and passive pulmonary atelectasis. The patient was taken to surgery and the cytologic examination of the gelatinous mass found in the procedure confirmed the diagnosis of a pleomorphic variant of pleural liposarcoma. We emphasise in the importance of careful inspection of the origin of the tumor in the diagnostic images to allow accurate diagnosis.

  1. Natural variation of potato allene oxide synthase 2 causes differential levels of jasmonates and pathogen resistance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pajerowska-Mukhtar, Karolina M.; Mukhtar, M. Shahid; Guex, Nicolas; Halim, Vincentius A.; Rosahl, Sabine; Somssich, Imre E.

    2008-01-01

    Natural variation of plant pathogen resistance is often quantitative. This type of resistance can be genetically dissected in quantitative resistance loci (QRL). To unravel the molecular basis of QRL in potato (Solanum tuberosum), we employed the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana for functional analysis of natural variants of potato allene oxide synthase 2 (StAOS2). StAOS2 is a candidate gene for QRL on potato chromosome XI against the oömycete Phytophthora infestans causing late blight, and the bacterium Erwinia carotovora ssp. atroseptica causing stem black leg and tuber soft rot, both devastating diseases in potato cultivation. StAOS2 encodes a cytochrome P450 enzyme that is essential for biosynthesis of the defense signaling molecule jasmonic acid. Allele non-specific dsRNAi-mediated silencing of StAOS2 in potato drastically reduced jasmonic acid production and compromised quantitative late blight resistance. Five natural StAOS2 alleles were expressed in the null Arabidopsis aos mutant under control of the Arabidopsis AOS promoter and tested for differential complementation phenotypes. The aos mutant phenotypes evaluated were lack of jasmonates, male sterility and susceptibility to Erwinia carotovora ssp. carotovora. StAOS2 alleles that were associated with increased disease resistance in potato complemented all aos mutant phenotypes better than StAOS2 alleles associated with increased susceptibility. First structure models of ‘quantitative resistant’ versus ‘quantitative susceptible’ StAOS2 alleles suggested potential mechanisms for their differential activity. Our results demonstrate how a candidate gene approach in combination with using the homologous Arabidopsis mutant as functional reporter can help to dissect the molecular basis of complex traits in non model crop plants. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00425-008-0737-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  2. Congenital pancreatic anomalies, variants, and conditions.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Lauren F

    2012-05-01

    Understanding pancreatic development and the congenital anomalies and variants that result from alterations in normal development allows for better recognition of these anomalies at diagnostic imaging. This article reviews normal pancreatic embryology and anatomy, and the appearance of the more common developmental anomalies and ductal variants, with emphasis on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Common mimics of masses are also covered.

  3. Semantic prioritization of novel causative genomic variants

    PubMed Central

    Boudellioua, Imane; Schoenmakers, Nadia; Gkoutos, Georgios V.; Schofield, Paul N.

    2017-01-01

    Discriminating the causative disease variant(s) for individuals with inherited or de novo mutations presents one of the main challenges faced by the clinical genetics community today. Computational approaches for variant prioritization include machine learning methods utilizing a large number of features, including molecular information, interaction networks, or phenotypes. Here, we demonstrate the PhenomeNET Variant Predictor (PVP) system that exploits semantic technologies and automated reasoning over genotype-phenotype relations to filter and prioritize variants in whole exome and whole genome sequencing datasets. We demonstrate the performance of PVP in identifying causative variants on a large number of synthetic whole exome and whole genome sequences, covering a wide range of diseases and syndromes. In a retrospective study, we further illustrate the application of PVP for the interpretation of whole exome sequencing data in patients suffering from congenital hypothyroidism. We find that PVP accurately identifies causative variants in whole exome and whole genome sequencing datasets and provides a powerful resource for the discovery of causal variants. PMID:28414800

  4. Beta-glucosidase I variants with improved properties

    SciTech Connect

    Bott, Richard R.; Kaper, Thijs; Kelemen, Bradley; Goedegebuur, Frits; Hommes, Ronaldus Wilhelmus; Kralj, Slavko; Kruithof, Paulien; Nikolaev, Igor; Van Der Kley, Wilhelmus Antonious Hendricus; Van Lieshout, Johannes Franciscus Thomas; Van Stigt Thans, Sander

    2016-09-20

    The present disclosure is generally directed to enzymes and in particular beta-glucosidase variants. Also described are nucleic acids encoding beta-glucosidase variants, compositions comprising beta-glucosidase variants, methods of using beta-glucosidase variants, and methods of identifying additional useful beta-glucosidase variants.

  5. Extraction of total protein from Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Rob

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTIONThe functions of most Arabidopsis genes cannot be understood simply by studying the expression patterns of their mRNAs. The level of a protein may not be closely correlated with the level of the corresponding mRNA, or a protein may need to be modified to be active. Furthermore, the function of proteins often depends on specific subcellular localization, so knowledge of this can exclude some hypotheses about possible function. The simplest way to analyze proteins is in unfractionated extracts. However, it is often desirable to fractionate proteins, e.g, by size. This procedure extracts total protein from Arabidopsis samples. Typical yields are ~2-3 mg/ml (using rosette leaves) or 6-8 mg/ml (using young seedlings).

  6. Physiological Analysis of Phototropic Responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zeidler, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Plants utilize light as sole energy source. To maximize light capture they are able to detect the light direction and orient themselves towards the light source. This phototropic response is mediated by the plant blue light photoreceptors phototropin1 and 2 (phot1 and phot2). Although fully differentiated plants also exhibit this response it can be best observed in etiolated seedlings. Differences in light between the illuminated and shaded site of a seedling stem lead to changes in the auxin-distribution, resulting in cell elongation on the shaded site. Since phototropism connects light perception, signaling, and auxin transport, it is of great interest to analyze this response with a fast and simple method.Here we describe a method to analyze the phototropic response of Arabidopsis seedlings. With numerous mutants available, its fast germination and its small size Arabidopsis is well suited for this analysis. Different genotypes can be simultaneously probed in less than a week.

  7. Evolutionary Divergence of Arabidopsis thaliana Classical Peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Kupriyanova, E V; Mamoshina, P O; Ezhova, T A

    2015-10-01

    Polymorphisms of 62 peroxidase genes derived from Arabidopsis thaliana were investigated to evaluate evolutionary dynamics and divergence of peroxidase proteins. By comparing divergence of duplicated genes AtPrx53-AtPrx54 and AtPrx36-AtPrx72 and their products, nucleotide and amino acid substitutions were identified that were apparently targets of positive selection. These substitutions were detected among paralogs of 461 ecotypes from Arabidopsis thaliana. Some of these substitutions are conservative and matched paralogous peroxidases in other Brassicaceae species. These results suggest that after duplication, peroxidase genes evolved under the pressure of positive selection, and amino acid substitutions identified during our study provided divergence of properties and physiological functions in peroxidases. Our predictions regarding functional significance for amino acid residues identified in variable sites of peroxidases may allow further experimental assessment of evolution of peroxidases after gene duplication.

  8. Arabidopsis thaliana telomeres exhibit euchromatic features

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero-Sedas, María I.; Gámez-Arjona, Francisco M.; Vega-Palas, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Telomere function is influenced by chromatin structure and organization, which usually involves epigenetic modifications. We describe here the chromatin structure of Arabidopsis thaliana telomeres. Based on the study of six different epigenetic marks we show that Arabidopsis telomeres exhibit euchromatic features. In contrast, subtelomeric regions and telomeric sequences present at interstitial chromosomal loci are heterochromatic. Histone methyltransferases and the chromatin remodeling protein DDM1 control subtelomeric heterochromatin formation. Whereas histone methyltransferases are required for histone H3K92Me and non-CpG DNA methylation, DDM1 directs CpG methylation but not H3K92Me or non-CpG methylation. These results argue that both kinds of proteins participate in different pathways to reinforce subtelomeric heterochromatin formation. PMID:21071395

  9. Root gravitropism in maize and Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Michael L.

    1993-01-01

    Research during the period 1 March 1992 to 30 November 1993 focused on improvements in a video digitizer system designed to automate the recording of surface extension in plants responding to gravistimulation. The improvements included modification of software to allow detailed analysis of localized extension patterns in roots of Arabidopsis. We used the system to analyze the role of the postmitotic isodiametric growth zone (a region between the meristem and the elongation zone) in the response of maize roots to auxin, calcium, touch and gravity. We also used the system to analyze short-term auxin and gravitropic responses in mutants of Arabidopsis with reduced auxin sensitivity. In a related project, we studied the relationship between growth rate and surface electrical currents in roots by examining the effects of gravity and thigmostimulation on surface potentials in maize roots.

  10. DYn-2 Based Identification of Arabidopsis Sulfenomes*

    PubMed Central

    Akter, Salma; Huang, Jingjing; Bodra, Nandita; De Smet, Barbara; Wahni, Khadija; Rombaut, Debbie; Pauwels, Jarne; Gevaert, Kris; Carroll, Kate; Van Breusegem, Frank; Messens, Joris

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the sulfenylation state of stressed cells is emerging as a strategic approach for the detection of key reactive oxygen species signaling proteins. Here, we optimized an in vivo trapping method for cysteine sulfenic acids in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) stressed plant cells using a dimedone based DYn-2 probe. We demonstrated that DYn-2 specifically detects sulfenylation events in an H2O2 dose- and time-dependent way. With mass spectrometry, we identified 226 sulfenylated proteins after H2O2 treatment of Arabidopsis cells, residing in the cytoplasm (123); plastid (68); mitochondria (14); nucleus (10); endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi and plasma membrane (7) and peroxisomes (4). Of these, 123 sulfenylated proteins have never been reported before to undergo cysteine oxidative post-translational modifications in plants. All in all, with this DYn-2 approach, we have identified new sulfenylated proteins, and gave a first glance on the locations of the sulfenomes of Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:25693797

  11. High-throughput TILLING for Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Till, Bradley J; Colbert, Trenton; Codomo, Christine; Enns, Linda; Johnson, Jessica; Reynolds, Steven H; Henikoff, Jorja G; Greene, Elizabeth A; Steine, Michael N; Comai, Luca; Henikoff, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Targeting induced local lesions in genomes (TILLING) is a general strategy for identifying induced point mutations that can be applied to almost any organism. In this chapter, we describe the basic methodology for high-throughput TILLING. Gene segments are amplified using fluorescently tagged primers, and products are denatured and reannealed to form heteroduplexes between the mutated sequence and its wild-type counterpart. These heteroduplexes are substrates for cleavage by the endonuclease CEL I. Following cleavage, products are analyzed on denaturing polyacrylamide gels using the LI-COR DNA analyzer system. High-throughput TILLING has been adopted by the Arabidopsis TILLING Project (ATP) to provide allelic series of point mutations for the general Arabidopsis community.

  12. Hypermethylated SUPERMAN epigenetic alleles in arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, S E; Meyerowitz, E M

    1997-08-22

    Mutations in the SUPERMAN gene affect flower development in Arabidopsis. Seven heritable but unstable sup epi-alleles (the clark kent alleles) are associated with nearly identical patterns of excess cytosine methylation within the SUP gene and a decreased level of SUP RNA. Revertants of these alleles are largely demethylated at the SUP locus and have restored levels of SUP RNA. A transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying an antisense methyltransferase gene, which shows an overall decrease in genomic cytosine methylation, also contains a hypermethylated sup allele. Thus, disruption of methylation systems may yield more complex outcomes than expected and can result in methylation defects at known genes. The clark kent alleles differ from the antisense line because they do not show a general decrease in genomic methylation.

  13. Unraveling the circadian clock in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Ma, Ligeng

    2013-02-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous timing system responsible for coordinating an organism's biological processes with its environment. Interlocked transcriptional feedback loops constitute the fundamental architecture of the circadian clock. In Arabidopsis, three feedback loops, the core loop, morning loop and evening loop, comprise a network that is the basis of the circadian clock. The components of these three loops are regulated in distinct ways, including transcriptional, post-transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms. The discovery of the DNA-binding and repressive activities of TOC1 has overturned our initial concept of its function in the circadian clock. The alternative splicing of circadian clock-related genes plays an essential role in normal functioning of the clock and enables organisms to sense environmental changes. In this review, we describe the regulatory mechanisms of the circadian clock that have been identified in Arabidopsis.

  14. Histones in functional diversification. Core histone variants.

    PubMed

    Pusarla, Rama-Haritha; Bhargava, Purnima

    2005-10-01

    Recent research suggests that minor changes in the primary sequence of the conserved histones may become major determinants for the chromatin structure regulating gene expression and other DNA-related processes. An analysis of the involvement of different core histone variants in different nuclear processes and the structure of different variant nucleosome cores shows that this may indeed be so. Histone variants may also be involved in demarcating functional regions of the chromatin. We discuss in this review why two of the four core histones show higher variation. A comparison of the status of variants in yeast with those from higher eukaryotes suggests that histone variants have evolved in synchrony with functional requirement of the cell.

  15. Visualizing the geography of genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Joseph H; Novembre, John

    2016-10-14

    One of the key characteristics of any genetic variant is its geographic distribution. The geographic distribution can shed light on where an allele first arose, what populations it has spread to, and in turn on how migration, genetic drift, and natural selection have acted. The geographic distribution of a genetic variant can also be of great utility for medical/clinical geneticists and collectively many genetic variants can reveal population structure. Here we develop an interactive visualization tool for rapidly displaying the geographic distribution of genetic variants. Through a REST API and dynamic front-end, the Geography of Genetic Variants (GGV) browser (http://popgen.uchicago.edu/ggv/) provides maps of allele frequencies in populations distributed across the globe.

  16. Linear Time-Variant Space-Variant Filters and the WKB Approximation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    AD-AJ34 886 LINEAR TIME-VARIANT SPACE -VARIANT FILTERS AND THE WKB APPROXIMATIOHTU) NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA L J ZIOMEK OCT 83 NPS-62-83...1220 - T- LL , lUIH _’ U __ 1.4 MICROCOPY RESOUTION TEST CHART PK "S-62-83-058 NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California LINEAR TIM-VARIANT SPACE ...COV401o Linear Time-Variant Space -Variant Filters and Interim The WKB Approximation October 1982 - October 1983 a. P"UPOWNHO OmO. "Cpo.T mueSam 7UO). CTAT

  17. Deposition of Histone Variant H2A.Z within Gene Bodies Regulates Responsive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Coleman-Derr, Devin; Zilberman, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of eukaryotic chromatin relies on interactions between many epigenetic factors, including histone modifications, DNA methylation, and the incorporation of histone variants. H2A.Z, one of the most conserved but enigmatic histone variants that is enriched at the transcriptional start sites of genes, has been implicated in a variety of chromosomal processes. Recently, we reported a genome-wide anticorrelation between H2A.Z and DNA methylation, an epigenetic hallmark of heterochromatin that has also been found in the bodies of active genes in plants and animals. Here, we investigate the basis of this anticorrelation using a novel h2a.z loss-of-function line in Arabidopsis thaliana. Through genome-wide bisulfite sequencing, we demonstrate that loss of H2A.Z in Arabidopsis has only a minor effect on the level or profile of DNA methylation in genes, and we propose that the global anticorrelation between DNA methylation and H2A.Z is primarily caused by the exclusion of H2A.Z from methylated DNA. RNA sequencing and genomic mapping of H2A.Z show that H2A.Z enrichment across gene bodies, rather than at the TSS, is correlated with lower transcription levels and higher measures of gene responsiveness. Loss of H2A.Z causes misregulation of many genes that are disproportionately associated with response to environmental and developmental stimuli. We propose that H2A.Z deposition in gene bodies promotes variability in levels and patterns of gene expression, and that a major function of genic DNA methylation is to exclude H2A.Z from constitutively expressed genes. PMID:23071449

  18. Comparative transcriptomics of Arabidopsis sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Borges, Filipe; Gomes, Gabriela; Gardner, Rui; Moreno, Nuno; McCormick, Sheila; Feijó, José A; Becker, Jörg D

    2008-10-01

    In flowering plants, the two sperm cells are embedded within the cytoplasm of the growing pollen tube and as such are passively transported to the embryo sac, wherein double fertilization occurs upon their release. Understanding the mechanisms and conditions by which male gametes mature and take part in fertilization are crucial goals in the study of plant reproduction. Studies of gene expression in male gametes of maize (Zea mays) and Plumbago and in lily (Lilium longiflorum) generative cells already showed that the previously held view of transcriptionally inert male gametes was not true, but genome-wide studies were lacking. Analyses in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) were hindered, because no method to isolate sperm cells was available. Here, we used fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate sperm cells from Arabidopsis, allowing GeneChip analysis of their transcriptome at a genome-wide level. Comparative analysis of the sperm cell transcriptome with those of representative sporophytic tissues and of pollen showed that sperm has a distinct and diverse transcriptional profile. Functional classifications of genes with enriched expression in sperm cells showed that DNA repair, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, and cell cycle progression are overrepresented Gene Ontology categories. Moreover, analysis of the small RNA and DNA methylation pathways suggests that distinct mechanisms might be involved in regulating the epigenetic state of the paternal genome. We identified numerous candidate genes whose involvement in sperm cell development and fertilization can now be directly tested in Arabidopsis. These results provide a roadmap to decipher the role of sperm-expressed proteins.

  19. Disease variants in genomes of 44 centenarians

    PubMed Central

    Freudenberg-Hua, Yun; Freudenberg, Jan; Vacic, Vladimir; Abhyankar, Avinash; Emde, Anne-Katrin; Ben-Avraham, Danny; Barzilai, Nir; Oschwald, Dayna; Christen, Erika; Koppel, Jeremy; Greenwald, Blaine; Darnell, Robert B; Germer, Soren; Atzmon, Gil; Davies, Peter

    2014-01-01

    To identify previously reported disease mutations that are compatible with extraordinary longevity, we screened the coding regions of the genomes of 44 Ashkenazi Jewish centenarians. Individual genome sequences were generated with 30× coverage on the Illumina HiSeq 2000 and single-nucleotide variants were called with the genome analysis toolkit (GATK). We identified 130 coding variants that were annotated as “pathogenic” or “likely pathogenic” based on the ClinVar database and that are infrequent in the general population. These variants were previously reported to cause a wide range of degenerative, neoplastic, and cardiac diseases with autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked inheritance. Several of these variants are located in genes that harbor actionable incidental findings, according to the recommendations of the American College of Medical Genetics. In addition, we found risk variants for late-onset neurodegenerative diseases, such as the APOE ε4 allele that was even present in a homozygous state in one centenarian who did not develop Alzheimer's disease. Our data demonstrate that the incidental finding of certain reported disease variants in an individual genome may not preclude an extraordinarily long life. When the observed variants are encountered in the context of clinical sequencing, it is thus important to exercise caution in justifying clinical decisions. In genome sequences of 44 Ashkenazi centenarians, we identified many coding variants that were annotated as “pathogenic” or “likely pathogenic” based on the ClinVar database. Our data demonstrate that the incidental finding of certain reported disease variants in an individual genome may not preclude an extraordinarily long life. When the observed variants are encountered in the context of clinical sequencing, it is thus important to exercise caution in justifying clinical decisions. PMID:25333069

  20. Regulatory Proteolysis in Arabidopsis-Pathogen Interactions.

    PubMed

    Pogány, Miklós; Dankó, Tamás; Kámán-Tóth, Evelin; Schwarczinger, Ildikó; Bozsó, Zoltán

    2015-09-24

    Approximately two and a half percent of protein coding genes in Arabidopsis encode enzymes with known or putative proteolytic activity. Proteases possess not only common housekeeping functions by recycling nonfunctional proteins. By irreversibly cleaving other proteins, they regulate crucial developmental processes and control responses to environmental changes. Regulatory proteolysis is also indispensable in interactions between plants and their microbial pathogens. Proteolytic cleavage is simultaneously used both by plant cells, to recognize and inactivate invading pathogens, and by microbes, to overcome the immune system of the plant and successfully colonize host cells. In this review, we present available results on the group of proteases in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana whose functions in microbial pathogenesis were confirmed. Pathogen-derived proteolytic factors are also discussed when they are involved in the cleavage of host metabolites. Considering the wealth of review papers available in the field of the ubiquitin-26S proteasome system results on the ubiquitin cascade are not presented. Arabidopsis and its pathogens are conferred with abundant sets of proteases. This review compiles a list of those that are apparently involved in an interaction between the plant and its pathogens, also presenting their molecular partners when available.

  1. Phosphorylation of plastoglobular proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lohscheider, Jens N.; Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2016-01-01

    Plastoglobules (PGs) are plastid lipid–protein particles with a small specialized proteome and metabolome. Among the 30 core PG proteins are six proteins of the ancient ABC1 atypical kinase (ABC1K) family and their locations in an Arabidopsis mRNA-based co-expression network suggested central regulatory roles. To identify candidate ABC1K targets and a possible ABC1K hierarchical phosphorylation network within the chloroplast PG proteome, we searched Arabidopsis phosphoproteomics data from publicly available sources. Evaluation of underlying spectra and/or associated information was challenging for a variety of reasons, but supported pSer sites and a few pThr sites in nine PG proteins, including five FIBRILLINS. PG phosphorylation motifs are discussed in the context of possible responsible kinases. The challenges of collection and evaluation of published Arabidopsis phosphorylation data are discussed, illustrating the importance of deposition of all mass spectrometry data in well-organized repositories such as PRIDE and ProteomeXchange. This study provides a starting point for experimental testing of phosho-sites in PG proteins and also suggests that phosphoproteomics studies specifically designed toward the PG proteome and its ABC1K are needed to understand phosphorylation networks in these specialized particles. PMID:26962209

  2. Analysis of the Arabidopsis Mitochondrial Proteome1

    PubMed Central

    Millar, A. Harvey; Sweetlove, Lee J.; Giegé, Philippe; Leaver, Christopher J.

    2001-01-01

    The complete set of nuclear genes that encode proteins targeted to mitochondria in plants is currently undefined and thus the full range of mitochondrial functions in plants is unknown. Analysis of two-dimensional gel separations of Arabidopsis cell culture mitochondrial protein revealed approximately 100 abundant proteins and 250 low-abundance proteins. Comparison of subfractions of mitochondrial protein on two-dimensional gels provided information on the soluble, membrane, or integral membrane locations of this protein set. A total of 170 protein spots were excised, trypsin-digested, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time of flight mass spectrometry spectra obtained. Using this dataset, 91 of the proteins were identified by searching translated Arabidopsis genomic databases. Of this set, 81 have defined functions based on sequence comparison. These functions include respiratory electron transport, tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism, amino acid metabolism, protein import, processing, and assembly, transcription, membrane transport, and antioxidant defense. A total of 10 spectra were matched to Arabidopsis putative open reading frames for which no specific function has been determined. A total of 64 spectra did not match to an identified open reading frame. Analysis of full-length putative protein sequences using bioinformatic tools to predict subcellular targeting (TargetP, Psort, and MitoProt) revealed significant variation in predictions, and also a lack of mitochondrial targeting prediction for several characterized mitochondrial proteins. PMID:11743115

  3. Arabidopsis alternative oxidase sustains Escherichia coli respiration.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, A M; Söll, D

    1992-01-01

    Glutamyl-tRNA reductase, encoded by the hemA gene, is the first enzyme in porphyrin biosynthesis in many organisms. Hemes, important porphyrin derivatives, are essential components of redox enzymes, such as cytochromes. Thus a hemA Escherichia coli strain (SASX41B) is deficient in cytochrome-mediated aerobic respiration. Upon complementation of this strain with an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library, we isolated a clone which permitted the SASX41B strain to grow aerobically. The clone encodes the gene for Arabidopsis alternative oxidase, whose deduced amino acid sequence was found to have 71% identity with that of the enzyme from the voodoo lily, Sauromatum guttatum. The Arabidopsis protein is expressed as a 31-kDa protein in E. coli and confers on this organism cyanide-resistant growth, which in turn is sensitive to salicylhydroxamate. This implies that a single polypeptide is sufficient for alternative oxidase activity. Based on these observations we propose that a cyanide-insensitive respiratory pathway operates in the transformed E. coli hemA strain. Introduction of this pathway now opens the way to genetic/molecular biological investigations of alternative oxidase and its cofactor. Images PMID:1438286

  4. [Imprinting genes and it's expression in Arabidopsis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Yu; Xu, Pei-Zhou; Yang, Hua; Wu, Xian-Jun

    2010-07-01

    Genomic imprinting refers to the phenomenon that the expression of a gene copy depends on its parent of origin. The Arabidopsis imprinted FIS (Fertilisation-independent seed) genes, mea, fis2, and fie, play essential roles in the repression of central cell and the regulation of early endosperm development. fis mutants display two phenotypes: autonomous diploid endosperm development when fertilization is absent and un-cellularised endosperm formation when fertilization occurs. The FIS Polycomb protein complex including the above three FIS proteins catalyzes histone H3 K27 tri-methylation on target loci. DME (DEMETER), a DNA glycosylase, and AtMET1 (Methyltransferase1), a DNA methyltransferase, are involved in the regulation of imprinted expression of both mea and fis2. This review summarizes the studies on the Arabidopsis imprinted FIS genes and other related genes. Recent works have shown that the insertion of transposons may affect nearby gene expression, which may be the main driving force behind the evolution of genomic imprinting. This summary covers the achievements on Arabidopsis imprinted genes will provide important information for studies on genomic imprinting in the important crops such as rice and maize.

  5. A Method for Characterizing Embryogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jinlin; Ma, Ligeng

    2017-08-04

    Given the highly predictable nature of their development, Arabidopsis embryos have been used as a model for studies of morphogenesis in plants. However, early stage plant embryos are small and contain few cells, making them difficult to observe and analyze. A method is described here for characterizing pattern formation in plant embryos under a microscope using the model organism Arabidopsis. Following the clearance of fresh ovules using Hoyer's solution, the cell number in and morphology of embryos could be observed, and their developmental stage could be determined by differential interference contrast microscopy using a 100X oil immersion lens. In addition, the expression of specific marker proteins tagged with Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was monitored to annotate cell identity specification during embryo patterning by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Thus, this method can be used to observe pattern formation in wild-type plant embryos at the cellular and molecular levels, and to characterize the role of specific genes in embryo patterning by comparing pattern formation in embryos from wild-type plants and embryo-lethal mutants. Therefore, the method can be used to characterize embryogenesis in Arabidopsis.

  6. Phytochrome regulation of branching in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Finlayson, Scott A; Krishnareddy, Srirama R; Kebrom, Tesfamichael H; Casal, Jorge J

    2010-04-01

    The red light:far-red light ratio perceived by phytochromes controls plastic traits of plant architecture, including branching. Despite the significance of branching for plant fitness and productivity, there is little quantitative and mechanistic information concerning phytochrome control of branching responses in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here, we show that in Arabidopsis, the negative effects of the phytochrome B mutation and of low red light:far-red light ratio on branching were largely due to reduced bud outgrowth capacity and an increased degree of correlative inhibition acting on the buds rather than due to a reduced number of leaves and buds available for branching. Phytochrome effects on the degree of correlative inhibition required functional BRANCHED1 (BRC1), BRC2, AXR1, MORE AXILLARY GROWTH2 (MAX2), and MAX4. The analysis of gene expression in selected buds indicated that BRC1 and BRC2 are part of different gene networks. The BRC1 network is linked to the growth capacity of specific buds, while the BRC2 network is associated with coordination of growth among branches. We conclude that the branching integrators BRC1 and BRC2 are necessary for responses to phytochrome, but they contribute differentially to these responses, likely acting through divergent pathways.

  7. Sodium Influx and Accumulation in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Essah, Pauline A.; Davenport, Romola; Tester, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Arabidopsis is frequently used as a genetic model in plant salt tolerance studies, however, its physiological responses to salinity remain poorly characterized. This study presents a characterization of initial Na+ entry and the effects of Ca2+ on plant growth and net Na+ accumulation in saline conditions. Unidirectional Na+ influx was measured carefully using very short influx times in roots of 12-d-old seedlings. Influx showed three components with distinct sensitivities to Ca2+, diethylpyrocarbonate, and osmotic pretreatment. Pharmacological agents and known mutants were used to test the contribution of different transport pathways to Na+ uptake. Influx was stimulated by 4-aminobutyric acid and glutamic acid; was inhibited by flufenamate, quinine, and cGMP; and was insensitive to modulators of K+ and Ca2+ channels. Influx did not differ from wild type in akt1 and hkt1 insertional mutants. These data suggested that influx was mediated by several different types of nonselective cation channels. Na+ accumulation in plants grown in 50 mm NaCl was strongly reduced by increasing Ca2+ activity (from 0.05-3.0 mm), and plant survival was improved. However, plant biomass was not affected by shoot Na+ concentration, suggesting that in Arabidopsis Na+ toxicity is not dependent on shoot Na+ accumulation. These data suggest that Arabidopsis is a good model for investigation of Na+ transport, but may be of limited utility as a model for the study of Na+ toxicity. PMID:12970496

  8. Regulatory Single-Nucleotide Variant Predictor Increases Predictive Performance of Functional Regulatory Variants.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Thomas A; Mort, Matthew; Cooper, David N; Radivojac, Predrag; Kann, Maricel G; Mooney, Sean D

    2016-11-01

    In silico methods for detecting functionally relevant genetic variants are important for identifying genetic markers of human inherited disease. Much research has focused on protein-coding variants since coding regions have well-defined physicochemical and functional properties. However, many bioinformatics tools are not applicable to variants outside coding regions. Here, we increase the classification performance of our regulatory single-nucleotide variant predictor (RSVP) for variants that cause regulatory abnormalities from an AUC of 0.90-0.97 by incorporating genomic regions identified by the ENCODE project into RSVP. RSVP is comparable to a recently published tool, Genome-Wide Annotation of Variants (GWAVA); both RSVP and GWAVA perform better on regulatory variants than a traditional variant predictor, combined annotation-dependent depletion (CADD). However, our method outperforms GWAVA on variants located at similar distances to the transcription start site as the positive set (AUC: 0.96) as compared with GWAVA (AUC: 0.71). Much of this disparity is due to RSVP's incorporation of features pertaining to the nearest gene (expression, GO terms, etc.), which are not included in GWAVA. Our findings hold out the promise of a framework for the assessment of all functional regulatory variants, providing a means to predict which rare or de novo variants are of pathogenic significance. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  9. The Arabidopsis TAC Position Viewer: a high-resolution map of transformation-competent artificial chromosome (TAC) clones aligned with the Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia-0 genome.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Yoshitsugu; Suda, Kunihiro; Liu, Yao-Guang; Sato, Shusei; Nakamura, Yukino; Yokoyama, Koji; Yamamoto, Naoki; Hanano, Shigeru; Takita, Eiji; Sakurai, Nozomu; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Kaneko, Takakazu; Yano, Kentaro; Tabata, Satoshi; Shibata, Daisuke

    2015-09-01

    We present a high-resolution map of genomic transformation-competent artificial chromosome (TAC) clones extending over all Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) chromosomes. The Arabidopsis genomic TAC clones have been valuable genetic tools. Previously, we constructed an Arabidopsis genomic TAC library consisting of more than 10,000 TAC clones harboring large genomic DNA fragments extending over the whole Arabidopsis genome. Here, we determined 13,577 end sequences from 6987 Arabidopsis TAC clones and mapped 5937 TAC clones to precise locations, covering approximately 90% of the Arabidopsis chromosomes. We present the large-scale data set of TAC clones with high-resolution mapping information as a Java application tool, the Arabidopsis TAC Position Viewer, which provides ready-to-go transformable genomic DNA clones corresponding to certain loci on Arabidopsis chromosomes. The TAC clone resources will accelerate genomic DNA cloning, positional walking, complementation of mutants and DNA transformation for heterologous gene expression.

  10. Analysis of Functions of VIP1 and Its Close Homologs in Osmosensory Responses of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tsugama, Daisuke; Liu, Shenkui; Takano, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    VIP1 is a bZIP protein in Arabidopsis thaliana. VIP1 accumulates in the nucleus under hypo-osmotic conditions and interacts with the promoters of hypo-osmolarity-responsive genes, CYP707A1 and CYP707A3 (CYP707A1/3), but neither overexpression of VIP1 nor truncation of its DNA-binding region affects the expression of CYP707A3 in vivo, raising the possibility that VIP and other proteins are functionally redundant. Here we show further analyses on VIP1 and its close homologs, namely, Arabidopsis group I bZIP proteins. The patterns of the signals of the GFP-fused group I bZIP proteins were similar in onion and Arabidopsis cells, suggesting that they have similar subcellular localization. In a yeast one-hybrid assay, the group I bZIP proteins caused reporter gene activation in the yeast reporter strain. VIP1 and other group I bZIP proteins showed positive results in a yeast two-hybrid assay and a bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay, suggesting that they physically interact. These results support the idea that they have somewhat similar functions. By gel shift assays, VIP1-binding sequences in the CYP707A1/3 promoters were confirmed to be AGCTGT/G. Their presence in the promoters of the genes that respond to hypo-osmotic conditions was evaluated using previously published microarray data. Interestingly, a significantly higher proportion of the promoters of the genes that were up-regulated by rehydration treatment and/or submergence treatment (treatment by a hypotonic solution) and a significantly lower proportion of the promoters of the genes that were down-regulated by such treatment shared AGCTGT/G. To further assess the physiological role of VIP1, constitutively nuclear-localized variants of VIP1 were generated. When overexpressed in Arabidopsis, some of them as well as VIP1 caused growth retardation under a mannitol-stressed condition, where VIP1 is localized mainly in the cytoplasm. This raises the possibility that the expression of VIP1 itself rather

  11. Feeding Habits of Introduced Black Rats, Rattus rattus, in Nesting Colonies of Galapagos Petrel on San Cristóbal Island, Galapagos

    PubMed Central

    Riofrío-Lazo, Marjorie; Páez-Rosas, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Introduced rodents are responsible for ecosystem changes in islands around the world. In the Galapagos archipelago, their effects on the native flora and fauna are adverse, including the extinction of endemic rodents in some islands and the reduction in the reproductive success of the Galapagos petrel (Pterodroma phaeopygia) in its nesting zones. Understanding the feeding behavior of introduced rodents and their trophic interactions with native and non-native species on islands, can assist in the design of management strategies and conservation plans of invasive and endemic species respectively. Four petrel nesting colonies were monitored during June 2013 on San Cristóbal Island (El Plátano, El Junco, San Joaquín, and La Comuna). The feeding habits of black rats were evaluated by analyzing stomach contents and stable isotopes in hair. Three species of introduced rodents were captured. R. rattus was the most abundant at all sites (n=43, capture success (CS) = 55.8%), followed by the house mouse, Mus musculus (n = 17, CS = 37.8%), and the Norwegian rat, R. norvegicus (n = 4, CS = 4.5%), captured only at La Comuna. The omnivorous black rat ate mostly plants (98%) and arthropods (2%). Intact seeds of Miconia robinsoniana were the main food at all sites (relative abundance=72.1%, present in 95% of the analyzed stomachs), showing the black rats’ possible role in the archipelago as endemic seed dispersers. There was no evidence of petrel’s intake; however, its possible consumption is not discarded at all. The δ15N and δ13C analysis corroborated the primarily herbivorous diet of black rats. The isotopic signatures of the three rodent species reflect the inter- and intra-specific differential use of food resources. Black rat showed a wider diet in La Comuna, which was related to a lower availability of its primary prey and its ability to adapt to the available resources in its habitat. PMID:25984724

  12. Spectral, electron microscopic and chemical investigations of gamma-induced purple color zonings in amethyst crystals from the Dursunbey-Balıkesir region of Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatipoğlu, Murat; Kibar, Rana; Çetin, Ahmet; Can, Nurdoğan; Helvacı, Cahit; Derin, H.

    2011-07-01

    Amethyst crystals on matrix specimens from the Dursunbey-Balıkesir region in Turkey have five representative purple color zonings: dark purple, light purple, lilac, orchid, and violet. The purple color zonings have been analyzed with optical absorption spectra in the visible wavelength region, chemical full trace element analyses (inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy), and scanning electron microscopic images with high magnification. It can be proposed that the production of the purple color in amethyst crystals is due to three dominant absorption bands centered at 375, 530, and 675 nm, respectively. In addition, the purple color zonings are also due to four minor absorption bands centered at 435, 480, 620, and 760 nm. X-ray diffraction graphics of the investigated amethyst crystals indicate that these crystals are composed of a nearly pure alpha-quartz phase and do not include any moganite silica phase and/or other mineral implications. Trace element analyses of the amethyst crystals show five representative purple color zonings, suggesting that the absorption bands can be mainly attributed to extrinsic defects (chemical impurities). However, another important factor that influences all structural defects in amethyst is likely to be the gamma irradiation that exists during amethyst crystallization and its inclusion in host materials. This gamma irradiation originates from the large underlying intrusive granitoid body in the region of amethyst formation. Irradiation modifies the valence values of the impurity elements in the amethyst crystals. It is observed that the violet-colored amethyst crystals have the most stable and the least reversible coloration when exposed to strong light sources. This situation can be related to the higher impurity content of Fe (2.50 ppm), Co (3.1 ppm), Ni (38 ppm), Cu (17.9 ppm), Zn (10 ppm), Zr (3.9 ppm), and Mo (21.8 ppm).

  13. Isavuconazole (BAL4815) pharmacodynamic target determination in an in vivo murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis against wild-type and cyp51 mutant isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Lepak, Alexander J; Marchillo, Karen; Vanhecker, Jamie; Andes, David R

    2013-12-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) continues to rise in concert with increasing numbers of immune suppression techniques to treat other medical conditions and transplantation. Despite these advances, morbidity and mortality rates remain unacceptably high. One strategy used to optimize outcomes is antifungal pharmacodynamic (PD) examination. We explored the pharmacodynamics of a new triazole in development, isavuconazole, in a murine neutropenic IPA model. Ten A. fumigatus isolates were used, including four wild-type isolates and six cyp51 mutants. The MIC range was 0.125 to 8 mg/liter. Following infection, groups of mice were treated orally with the prodrug (BAL8557) at 40 to 640 mg/kg/12 h for 7 days. Efficacy was determined by quantitative PCR of lung homogenates. At the start of therapy, mice had 4.97 log10 conidial equivalents (CE)/ml of lung homogenate, and this increased to 6.82 log10 CE/ml of lung homogenate in untreated animals. The infection model was uniformly lethal in untreated control mice. The PD target endpoints examined included the static-dose AUC/MIC ratio and the 1-log10 killing AUC/MIC ratio. A stasis endpoint was achieved for all isolates with an MIC of ≤1 mg/liter and 1-log10 killing in all isolates with an MIC of ≤0.5 mg/liter, regardless of the presence or absence of the cyp51 mutation. The static-dose range was 65 to 617 mg/kg/12 h. The corresponding median free-drug AUC/MIC ratio was near 5. The 1-log10 killing dose range was 147 to 455 mg/kg/12 h, and the corresponding median free-drug AUC/MIC ratio was 11.1. These values are similar to those previously reported for other triazoles.

  14. The X-ray spectrum and spectral energy distribution of FIRST J155633.8+351758: a LoBAL quasar with a probable polar outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrington, Robert C.; Brotherton, Michael S.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Ganguly, Rajib; Shang, Zhaohui; DiPompeo, Michael; Chatterjee, Ritaban; Lacy, Mark; Gregg, Michael D.; Hall, Patrick B.; Laurent-Muehleisen, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    We report the results of a new 60 ks Chandra X-ray Observatory Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer S-array (ACIS-S) observation of the reddened, radio-selected, highly polarized `FeLoBAL' quasar FIRST J1556+3517. We investigated a number of models of varied sophistication to fit the 531-photon spectrum. These models ranged from simple power laws to power laws absorbed by hydrogen gas in differing ionization states and degrees of partial covering. Preferred fits indicate that the intrinsic X-ray flux is consistent with that expected for quasars of similarly high luminosity, i.e. an intrinsic, dereddened and unabsorbed optical to X-ray spectral index of -1.7. We cannot tightly constrain the intrinsic X-ray power-law slope, but find indications that it is flat (photon index Γ = 1.7 or flatter at a >99 per cent confidence for a neutral hydrogen absorber model). Absorption is present, with a column density a few times 1023 cm-2, with both partially ionized models and partially covering neutral hydrogen models providing good fits. We present several lines of argument that suggest the fraction of X-ray emissions associated with the radio jet is not large. We combine our Chandra data with observations from the literature to construct the spectral energy distribution of FIRST J1556+3517 from radio to X-ray energies. We make corrections for Doppler beaming for the pole-on radio jet, optical dust reddening and X-ray absorption, in order to recover a probable intrinsic spectrum. The quasar FIRST J1556+3517 seems to be an intrinsically normal radio-quiet quasar with a reddened optical/UV spectrum, a Doppler-boosted but intrinsically weak radio jet and an X-ray absorber not dissimilar from that of other broad absorption line quasars.

  15. Feeding Habits of Introduced Black Rats, Rattus rattus, in Nesting Colonies of Galapagos Petrel on San Cristóbal Island, Galapagos.

    PubMed

    Riofrío-Lazo, Marjorie; Páez-Rosas, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Introduced rodents are responsible for ecosystem changes in islands around the world. In the Galapagos archipelago, their effects on the native flora and fauna are adverse, including the extinction of endemic rodents in some islands and the reduction in the reproductive success of the Galapagos petrel (Pterodroma phaeopygia) in its nesting zones. Understanding the feeding behavior of introduced rodents and their trophic interactions with native and non-native species on islands, can assist in the design of management strategies and conservation plans of invasive and endemic species respectively. Four petrel nesting colonies were monitored during June 2013 on San Cristóbal Island (El Plátano, El Junco, San Joaquín, and La Comuna). The feeding habits of black rats were evaluated by analyzing stomach contents and stable isotopes in hair. Three species of introduced rodents were captured. R. rattus was the most abundant at all sites (n=43, capture success (CS) = 55.8%), followed by the house mouse, Mus musculus (n = 17, CS = 37.8%), and the Norwegian rat, R. norvegicus (n = 4, CS = 4.5%), captured only at La Comuna. The omnivorous black rat ate mostly plants (98%) and arthropods (2%). Intact seeds of Miconia robinsoniana were the main food at all sites (relative abundance=72.1%, present in 95% of the analyzed stomachs), showing the black rats' possible role in the archipelago as endemic seed dispersers. There was no evidence of petrel's intake; however, its possible consumption is not discarded at all. The δ15N and δ13C analysis corroborated the primarily herbivorous diet of black rats. The isotopic signatures of the three rodent species reflect the inter- and intra-specific differential use of food resources. Black rat showed a wider diet in La Comuna, which was related to a lower availability of its primary prey and its ability to adapt to the available resources in its habitat.

  16. The impact of Arabidopsis on human health: diversifying our portfolio.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alan M; Chory, Joanne; Dangl, Jeffery L; Estelle, Mark; Jacobsen, Steven E; Meyerowitz, Elliot M; Nordborg, Magnus; Weigel, Detlef

    2008-06-13

    Studies of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana may seem to have little impact on advances in medical research, yet a survey of the scientific literature shows that this is a misconception. Many discoveries with direct relevance to human health and disease have been elaborated using Arabidopsis, and several processes important to human biology are more easily studied in this versatile model plant.

  17. The 4 January, 2009, landslide at "Los Chorros" village, San Cristóbal Verapaz, Guatemala: context and a preliminary assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepeda, J.; Hungr, O.; Luna, B. Quan; Flores Beltetón, O. G.; Barillas, M.; Mota Chavarría, M. A.; Girón Mazariego, J. R.; Devoli, G.; Lauritzen, S. E.; Christen, M.

    2009-04-01

    On 4 January, 2009, more than 5 million cubic metres of limestone and calcareous breccias detached from the "Los Chorros" hill and travelled along a tributary ravine of the Chixoy river in the municipality of San Cristóbal Verapaz, department of Alta Verapaz, Guatemala. At the time of this landslide, several persons were crossing roads and foot trails downstream of the release area. As of 14 January, authorities had reported 38 casualties, 50 missing and 5 injured persons. Along the landslide path, a 1.2 km segment of the 7W National Highway was destroyed, cutting the sole access route between San Cristóbal Verapaz and the western department of Quiché where numerous inhabitants of Alta Verapaz commute to work, especially during the coffee harvest season from October to March (with its peak on January). In response to this disaster, the Guatemalan government established four priorities: search and rescue activities, relief aid to victims and their families, evacuation of villages at risk and selection and construction of a temporary access route and a permanent road. In an attempt to provide additional elements to decision-makers of the Guatemalan authorities, this report is aimed to characterise the context of this landslide from a geosciences perspective. Preliminary assessments of the 4 January event and of other potentially unstable zones identified in the surrounding areas are also performed. The first accounts of ground instabilities in this area date back to 1590 when a 4.0 MS earthquake was associated with the collapse of a karst cave. In 1881, a Guatemalan newspaper reported that the San Cristóbal (Chichoj) lagoon was created after a ground subsidence was triggered by an earthquake. In 1983, after less than one year of operations, a ~50 m segment of the 26-km long pressure tunnel in the Chixoy hydro electrical project was damaged due to an anhydrite karst produced during tunnel operations. In response to this event, repair and strengthening works were

  18. MDM4 (MDMX) and its Transcript Variants

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, F; Conza, G. Di; Moretti, F

    2009-01-01

    MDM family proteins are crucial regulators of the oncosuppressor p53. Alterations of their gene status, mainly amplification events, have been frequently observed in human tumors. MDM4 is one of the two members of the MDM family. The human gene is located on chromosome 1 at q32-33 and codes for a protein of 490aa. In analogy to MDM2, besides the full-length mRNA several transcript variants of MDM4 have been identified. Almost all variants thus far described derive from a splicing process, both through canonical and aberrant splicing events. Some of these variants are expressed in normal tissues, others have been observed only in tumor samples. The presence of these variants may be considered a fine tuning of the function of the full-length protein, especially in normal cells. In tumor cells, some variants show oncogenic properties. This review summarizes all the different MDM4 splicing forms thus far described and their role in the regulation of the wild type protein function in normal and tumor cells. In addition, a description of the full-length protein structure with all known interacting proteins thus far identified and a comparison of the MDM4 variant structure with that of full-length protein are presented. Finally, a parallel between MDM4 and MDM2 variants is discussed. PMID:19721810

  19. Prioritizing Rare Variants with Conditional Likelihood Ratios

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weili; Dobbins, Sara; Tomlinson, Ian; Houlston, Richard; Pal, Deb K.; Strug, Lisa J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Prioritizing individual rare variants within associated genes or regions often consists of an ad hoc combination of statistical and biological considerations. From the statistical perspective, rare variants are often ranked using Fisher’s exact p values, which can lead to different rankings of the same set of variants depending on whether 1- or 2-sided p values are used. Results We propose a likelihood ratio-based measure, maxLRc, for the statistical component of ranking rare variants under a case-control study design that avoids the hypothesis-testing paradigm. We prove analytically that the maxLRc is always well-defined, even when the data has zero cell counts in the 2×2 disease-variant table. Via simulation, we show that the maxLRc outperforms Fisher’s exact p values in most practical scenarios considered. Using next-generation sequence data from 27 rolandic epilepsy cases and 200 controls in a region previously shown to be linked to and associated with rolandic epilepsy, we demonstrate that rankings assigned by the maxLRc and exact p values can differ substantially. Conclusion The maxLRc provides reliable statistical prioritization of rare variants using only the observed data, avoiding the need to specify parameters associated with hypothesis testing that can result in ranking discrepancies across p value procedures; and it is applicable to common variant prioritization. PMID:25659987

  20. Chemokine gene variants in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Dasdemir, Selcuk; Kucukali, Cem Ismail; Bireller, Elif Sinem; Tuzun, Erdem; Cakmakoglu, Bedia

    2016-08-01

    Background Chemokines are known to play a major role in driving inflammation and immune responses in several neuroinflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Inflammation has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Aim We aimed to investigate a potential link between chemokines and schizophrenia and analyze the role of MCP-1-A2518G, SDF-1-3'A, CCR5-delta32, CCR5-A55029G, CXCR4-C138T and CCR2-V64I gene polymorphisms in the Turkish population. Methods Genotyping was conducted by PCR-RFLP based on 140 patients and 123 unrelated healthy controls to show the relation between chemokine gene variants and schizophrenia risk. Results Frequencies of CCR5-A55029G A genotypes and CCR5-A55029G AG genotypes were found higher in patients than the controls and even also CCR2-V64I WT: CCR5-A55029G A and CCR2-V64I 64I: CCR5-A55029G A haplotypes significantly associated according to Bonferroni correction. However, no significant association was found for any of the other polymorphisms with the risk of schizophrenia. Conclusions Our findings suggest that CCR5-A55029G polymorphisms and CCR2-V64I WT: CCR5-A55029G A and CCR2-V64I 64I: CCR5-A55029G A haplotypes might have association with schizophrenia pathogenesis.

  1. A survey of dominant mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Meinke, David W

    2013-02-01

    Following the recent publication of a comprehensive dataset of 2400 genes with a loss-of-function mutant phenotype in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), questions remain concerning the diversity of dominant mutations in Arabidopsis. Most of these dominant phenotypes are expected to result from inappropriate gene expression, novel protein function, or disrupted protein complexes. This review highlights the major classes of dominant mutations observed in model organisms and presents a collection of 200 Arabidopsis genes associated with a dominant or semidominant phenotype. Emphasis is placed on mutants identified through forward genetic screens of mutagenized or activation-tagged populations. These datasets illustrate the variety of genetic changes and protein functions that underlie dominance in Arabidopsis and may ultimately contribute to phenotypic variation in flowering plants.

  2. Expression pattern and subcellular localization of Arabidopsis purple acid phosphatase AtPAP9.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Katayoun; Lohrasebi, Tahmineh; Sabet, Mohammad S; Malboobi, Mohammad A; Mousavi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Purple acid phosphatase (PAP; EC 3.1.3.2) enzymes are metallophosphoesterases that hydrolysis phosphate ester bonds in a wide range of substrates. Twenty-nine PAP-encoding loci have been identified in the Arabidopsis genome, many of which have multiple transcript variants expressed in response to diverse environmental conditions. Having analyzed T-DNA insertion mutants, we have provided strong pieces of evidence that AtPAP9 locus encodes at least two types of transcripts, designated as AtPAP9-1 and AtPAP9-2. These transcript variants expressed distinctly during the course of growth in medium containing sufficient phosphate or none. Further histochemical analysis by the use of AtPAP9-1 promoter fused to β-glucuronidase reporter gene indicated the expression of this gene is regulated in a tissue-specific manner. AtPAP9-1 was highly expressed in stipule and vascular tissue, particularly in response to fungal infection. Subcellular localization of AtPAP9-1:green fluorescent fusion protein showed that it must be involved in plasma membrane and cell wall adhesion. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Histological variants of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, Wayne; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2008-01-01

    This review provides a comprehensive overview of the broad clinicopathologic spectrum of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma (KS) lesions. Variants discussed include: usual KS lesions associated with disease progression (i.e. patch, plaque and nodular stage); morphologic subtypes alluded to in the older literature such as anaplastic and telangiectatic KS, as well as several lymphedematous variants; and numerous recently described variants including hyperkeratotic, keloidal, micronodular, pyogenic granuloma-like, ecchymotic, and intravascular KS. Involuting lesions as a result of treatment related regression are also presented. PMID:18655700

  4. The variant call format and VCFtools.

    PubMed

    Danecek, Petr; Auton, Adam; Abecasis, Goncalo; Albers, Cornelis A; Banks, Eric; DePristo, Mark A; Handsaker, Robert E; Lunter, Gerton; Marth, Gabor T; Sherry, Stephen T; McVean, Gilean; Durbin, Richard

    2011-08-01

    The variant call format (VCF) is a generic format for storing DNA polymorphism data such as SNPs, insertions, deletions and structural variants, together with rich annotations. VCF is usually stored in a compressed manner and can be indexed for fast data retrieval of variants from a range of positions on the reference genome. The format was developed for the 1000 Genomes Project, and has also been adopted by other projects such as UK10K, dbSNP and the NHLBI Exome Project. VCFtools is a software suite that implements various utilities for processing VCF files, including validation, merging, comparing and also provides a general Perl API. http://vcftools.sourceforge.net

  5. Ultrasonographic imaging of papillary thyroid carcinoma variants

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is routinely used to evaluate thyroid nodules. The US features of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), the most common thyroid malignancy, include hypoechogenicity, spiculated/microlobulated margins, microcalcifications, and a nonparallel orientation. However, many PTC variants have been identified, some of which differ from the classic type of PTC in terms of biological behavior and clinical outcomes. This review describes the US features and clinical implications of the variants of PTC. With the introduction of active surveillance replacing immediate biopsy or surgical treatment of indolent, small PTCs, an understanding of the US characteristics of PTC variants will facilitate the individualized management of patients with PTC. PMID:28222584

  6. Ultrasonographic imaging of papillary thyroid carcinoma variants.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jung Hee

    2017-04-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is routinely used to evaluate thyroid nodules. The US features of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), the most common thyroid malignancy, include hypoechogenicity, spiculated/microlobulated margins, microcalcifications, and a nonparallel orientation. However, many PTC variants have been identified, some of which differ from the classic type of PTC in terms of biological behavior and clinical outcomes. This review describes the US features and clinical implications of the variants of PTC. With the introduction of active surveillance replacing immediate biopsy or surgical treatment of indolent, small PTCs, an understanding of the US characteristics of PTC variants will facilitate the individualized management of patients with PTC.

  7. FTO variant associated with malformation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rohena, Luis; Lawson, Michelle; Guzman, Edwin; Ganapathi, Mythily; Cho, Megan T; Haverfield, Eden; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame

    2016-04-01

    Common FTO variants are associated with obesity. However, it has recently been shown that homozygous FTO c.947G>A variant, which predicts p.R316Q, and c.956C>T, which predicts p.S319F, are associated with a malformation syndrome inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. We present a similar homozygous FTO c.965G>A variant that predicts p.R322Q, associated with a lethal malformation syndrome in a consanguineous Yemeni family. Functional studies showed that the p.R316Q, p.S219F, and p.R322Q variants render the FTO protein inactive. We further expand on the phenotype of homozygous FTO loss-of-function mutations to include eye abnormalities, gingival overgrowth, craniosynostosis, and cutaneous photosensitivity.

  8. Gonococcal pilin variants in experimental gonorrhea.

    PubMed

    Swanson, J; Robbins, K; Barrera, O; Corwin, D; Boslego, J; Ciak, J; Blake, M; Koomey, J M

    1987-05-01

    When pilus+ Gc were introduced into a male subject's urethra, they gave rise to pilus+ variants whose pilin mRNAs differed from that of input Gc. The differences stemmed from the Gc genome's single complete pilin gene having undergone gene conversion by different partial pilin genes' sequences and by different length stretches of a single partial pilin gene. In some instances, the variant's pilin mRNA appeared to reflect two independent gene-conversion events that used sequences from two different partial pilin genes. The resulting variants' pilins exhibited antigenic differences compared with the pilin polypeptide of input Gc; these differences were discernible by immunoblotting with mAbs. Amino acid and antigenic changes occurred in a segment of the variants' pilin polypeptides that previously was thought to be conserved or constant in sequence.

  9. Genetic variants of ghrelin in metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Ukkola, Olavi

    2011-11-01

    An increasing understanding of the role of genes in the development of obesity may reveal genetic variants that, in combination with conventional risk factors, may help to predict an individual's risk for developing metabolic disorders. Accumulating evidence indicates that ghrelin plays a role in regulating food intake and energy homeostasis and it is a reasonable candidate gene for obesity-related co-morbidities. In cross-sectional studies low total ghrelin concentrations and some genetic polymorphisms of ghrelin have been associated with obesity-associated diseases. The present review highlights many of the important problems in association studies of genetic variants and complex diseases. It is known that population-specific differences in reported associations exist. We therefore conclude that more studies on variants of ghrelin gene are needed to perform in different populations to get deeper understanding on the relationship of ghrelin gene and its variants to obesity.

  10. A rare hemoglobin variant, Hb Belliard

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, Raul

    2017-01-01

    There are many documented variants of hemoglobin; however, other than a limited number (such as sickle cell disease), very few are known to have any clinical significance. As advances in detection and identification continue through gel electrophoresis, capillary electrophoresis, and DNA sequencing, more rare variants are identified. Without case reporting, the significance of these variants will remain unknown or continue to be thought of as insignificant. Here we report a rare hemoglobin variant, Hb Belliard, which was detected in a 68-year-old Indian immigrant to the United States. He presented with elevated hemoglobin and was found to have a unique peak on capillary electrophoresis. The specimen was sent for sequencing and was subsequently found to have Hb Belliard. Currently, Hb Belliard is thought to be insignificant.

  11. Histone variants in plant transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Danhua; Berger, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin based organization of eukaryotic genome plays a profound role in regulating gene transcription. Nucleosomes form the basic subunits of chromatin by packaging DNA with histone proteins, impeding the access of DNA to transcription factors and RNA polymerases. Exchange of histone variants in nucleosomes alters the properties of nucleosomes and thus modulates DNA exposure during transcriptional regulation. Growing evidence indicates the important function of histone variants in programming transcription during developmental transitions and stress response. Here we review how histone variants and their deposition machineries regulate the nucleosome stability and dynamics, and discuss the link between histone variants and transcriptional regulation in plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Gene Regulatory Mechanisms and Networks, edited by Dr. Erich Grotewold and Dr. Nathan Springer.

  12. Laryngeal Dysplasia, Squamous Cell Carcinoma, and Variants.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lester D R

    2017-03-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a malignant epithelial tumor showing evidence of squamous differentiation. It is the most common malignancy of the larynx, with several variants (verrucous, exophytic or papillary, spindle-cell, basaloid, acantholytic, adenosquamous) recognized, with well-established precursor lesions. Dysplasia is now separated into only low-grade and high-grade categories. Each SCC variant has unique cytomorphologic features and histologic differential diagnoses that are important to consider, as management and outcomes are different.

  13. Rare variant association test with multiple phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Selyeong; Won, Sungho; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Yongkang; Kim, Bong-Jo; Park, Taesung

    2017-04-01

    Although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have now discovered thousands of genetic variants associated with common traits, such variants cannot explain the large degree of "missing heritability," likely due to rare variants. The advent of next generation sequencing technology has allowed rare variant detection and association with common traits, often by investigating specific genomic regions for rare variant effects on a trait. Although multiple correlated phenotypes are often concurrently observed in GWAS, most studies analyze only single phenotypes, which may lessen statistical power. To increase power, multivariate analyses, which consider correlations between multiple phenotypes, can be used. However, few existing multivariant analyses can identify rare variants for assessing multiple phenotypes. Here, we propose Multivariate Association Analysis using Score Statistics (MAAUSS), to identify rare variants associated with multiple phenotypes, based on the widely used sequence kernel association test (SKAT) for a single phenotype. We applied MAAUSS to whole exome sequencing (WES) data from a Korean population of 1,058 subjects to discover genes associated with multiple traits of liver function. We then assessed validation of those genes by a replication study, using an independent dataset of 3,445 individuals. Notably, we detected the gene ZNF620 among five significant genes. We then performed a simulation study to compare MAAUSS's performance with existing methods. Overall, MAAUSS successfully conserved type 1 error rates and in many cases had a higher power than the existing methods. This study illustrates a feasible and straightforward approach for identifying rare variants correlated with multiple phenotypes, with likely relevance to missing heritability.

  14. Variant profiling of evolving prokaryotic populations

    PubMed Central

    Zojer, Markus; Schuster, Lisa N.; Schulz, Frederik; Pfundner, Alexander; Horn, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Genomic heterogeneity of bacterial species is observed and studied in experimental evolution experiments and clinical diagnostics, and occurs as micro-diversity of natural habitats. The challenge for genome research is to accurately capture this heterogeneity with the currently used short sequencing reads. Recent advances in NGS technologies improved the speed and coverage and thus allowed for deep sequencing of bacterial populations. This facilitates the quantitative assessment of genomic heterogeneity, including low frequency alleles or haplotypes. However, false positive variant predictions due to sequencing errors and mapping artifacts of short reads need to be prevented. We therefore created VarCap, a workflow for the reliable prediction of different types of variants even at low frequencies. In order to predict SNPs, InDels and structural variations, we evaluated the sensitivity and accuracy of different software tools using synthetic read data. The results suggested that the best sensitivity could be reached by a union of different tools, however at the price of increased false positives. We identified possible reasons for false predictions and used this knowledge to improve the accuracy by post-filtering the predicted variants according to properties such as frequency, coverage, genomic environment/localization and co-localization with other variants. We observed that best precision was achieved by using an intersection of at least two tools per variant. This resulted in the reliable prediction of variants above a minimum relative abundance of 2%. VarCap is designed for being routinely used within experimental evolution experiments or for clinical diagnostics. The detected variants are reported as frequencies within a VCF file and as a graphical overview of the distribution of the different variant/allele/haplotype frequencies. The source code of VarCap is available at https://github.com/ma2o/VarCap. In order to provide this workflow to a broad community

  15. Bisalbuminemia. A new molecular variant, albumin Vancouver.

    PubMed

    Frohlich, J; Kozier, J; Campbell, D J; Curnow, J V; Tárnoky, A L

    1978-11-01

    Of 18 members of a Fiji Indian family investigated, eight of the 12 males and two of the six females had an electrophoretically slow-type bisalbuminemia (alloalbuminemia). The albumin was characterized by the hiterto unique ratio of the two bands (Al A 35%: variant 65%), and by dye-binding studies and electrophoretic mobility in different media. The data suggest that this is a new variant, which we propose to call albumin Vancouver (Al Va).

  16. Variant profiling of evolving prokaryotic populations.

    PubMed

    Zojer, Markus; Schuster, Lisa N; Schulz, Frederik; Pfundner, Alexander; Horn, Matthias; Rattei, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Genomic heterogeneity of bacterial species is observed and studied in experimental evolution experiments and clinical diagnostics, and occurs as micro-diversity of natural habitats. The challenge for genome research is to accurately capture this heterogeneity with the currently used short sequencing reads. Recent advances in NGS technologies improved the speed and coverage and thus allowed for deep sequencing of bacterial populations. This facilitates the quantitative assessment of genomic heterogeneity, including low frequency alleles or haplotypes. However, false positive variant predictions due to sequencing errors and mapping artifacts of short reads need to be prevented. We therefore created VarCap, a workflow for the reliable prediction of different types of variants even at low frequencies. In order to predict SNPs, InDels and structural variations, we evaluated the sensitivity and accuracy of different software tools using synthetic read data. The results suggested that the best sensitivity could be reached by a union of different tools, however at the price of increased false positives. We identified possible reasons for false predictions and used this knowledge to improve the accuracy by post-filtering the predicted variants according to properties such as frequency, coverage, genomic environment/localization and co-localization with other variants. We observed that best precision was achieved by using an intersection of at least two tools per variant. This resulted in the reliable prediction of variants above a minimum relative abundance of 2%. VarCap is designed for being routinely used within experimental evolution experiments or for clinical diagnostics. The detected variants are reported as frequencies within a VCF file and as a graphical overview of the distribution of the different variant/allele/haplotype frequencies. The source code of VarCap is available at https://github.com/ma2o/VarCap. In order to provide this workflow to a broad community

  17. Discovery of rare variants for complex phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Kosmicki, Jack A; Churchhouse, Claire L; Rivas, Manuel A; Neale, Benjamin M

    2016-06-01

    With the rise of sequencing technologies, it is now feasible to assess the role rare variants play in the genetic contribution to complex trait variation. While some of the earlier targeted sequencing studies successfully identified rare variants of large effect, unbiased gene discovery using exome sequencing has experienced limited success for complex traits. Nevertheless, rare variant association studies have demonstrated that rare variants do contribute to phenotypic variability, but sample sizes will likely have to be even larger than those of common variant association studies to be powered for the detection of genes and loci. Large-scale sequencing efforts of tens of thousands of individuals, such as the UK10K Project and aggregation efforts such as the Exome Aggregation Consortium, have made great strides in advancing our knowledge of the landscape of rare variation, but there remain many considerations when studying rare variation in the context of complex traits. We discuss these considerations in this review, presenting a broad range of topics at a high level as an introduction to rare variant analysis in complex traits including the issues of power, study design, sample ascertainment, de novo variation, and statistical testing approaches. Ultimately, as sequencing costs continue to decline, larger sequencing studies will yield clearer insights into the biological consequence of rare mutations and may reveal which genes play a role in the etiology of complex traits.

  18. Hemoglobin Variant Profiles among Brazilian Quilombola Communities.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Rayra P; Oliveira, Rodrigo M; Soares, Leonardo F; Figueiredo, Camylla V B; Silva, Denise Oliveira; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ana F; Fiuza, Luciana M; Guarda, Caroline C; Adorno, Elisângela V; Barbosa, Cynara G; Gonçalves, Marilda S

    2017-03-01

    Brazilian Quilombolas are communities composed of African-derived populations that have their territories guaranteed by the Brazilian Constitution. The present study investigated the hemoglobin (Hb) variants among these population groups. This study was conducted in a total of 2843 individuals of Brazilian Quilombola communities of the Bahia, Pará, and Piauí states. All the participants had their Hb profiles evaluated. The Hb S (HBB: c.20A>T) variant was described in all the studied localities. However, the individuals in Bahia State had the highest frequency of the Hb C (HBB: c.19G>A) variant; individuals from Piauí State had a higher frequency of the Hb D-Punjab (HBB: c.364G>C) variant compared to the other states, and individuals from Pará State only carried the Hb S variant. The present study revealed a specific distribution of Hb variants that could represent different waves of African influence in these Brazilian populations.

  19. Histone variants: key players of chromatin.

    PubMed

    Biterge, Burcu; Schneider, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Histones are fundamental structural components of chromatin. Eukaryotic DNA is wound around an octamer of the core histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. Binding of linker histone H1 promotes higher order chromatin organization. In addition to their structural role, histones impact chromatin function and dynamics by, e.g., post-translational histone modifications or the presence of specific histone variants. Histone variants exhibit differential expression timings (DNA replication-independent) and mRNA characteristics compared to canonical histones. Replacement of canonical histones with histone variants can affect nucleosome stability and help to create functionally distinct chromatin domains. In line with this, several histone variants have been implicated in the regulation of cellular processes such as DNA repair and transcriptional activity. In this review, we focus on recent progress in the study of core histone variants H2A.X, H2A.Z, macroH2A, H3.3, and CENP-A, as well as linker histone H1 variants, their functions and their links to development and disease.

  20. Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Adenoma Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Abulí, Anna; Castells, Antoni; Bujanda, Luis; Lozano, Juan José; Bessa, Xavier; Hernández, Cristina; Álvarez-Urturi, Cristina; Pellisé, Maria; Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Hijona, Elizabeth; Burón, Andrea; Macià, Francesc; Grau, Jaume; Guayta, Rafael; Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Andreu, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Common low-penetrance genetic variants have been consistently associated with colorectal cancer risk. To determine if these genetic variants are associated also with adenoma susceptibility and may improve selection of patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity (≥ 3 adenomas). We selected 1,326 patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity and 1,252 controls with normal colonoscopy from population-based colorectal cancer screening programs. We conducted a case-control association study analyzing 30 colorectal cancer susceptibility variants in order to investigate the contribution of these variants to the development of subsequent advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity. We found that 14 of the analyzed genetic variants showed a statistically significant association with advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity: the probability of developing these lesions increased with the number of risk alleles reaching a 2.3-fold risk increment in individuals with ≥ 17 risk alleles. Nearly half of the genetic variants associated with colorectal cancer risk are also related to advanced adenoma and/or multiplicity predisposition. Assessing the number of risk alleles in individuals within colorectal cancer screening programs may help to identify better a subgroup with increased risk for advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity in the general population.

  1. The IBO germination quantitative trait locus encodes a phosphatase 2C-related variant with a nonsynonymous amino acid change that interferes with abscisic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Amiguet-Vercher, Amélia; Santuari, Luca; Gonzalez-Guzman, Miguel; Depuydt, Stephen; Rodriguez, Pedro L; Hardtke, Christian S

    2015-02-01

    Natural genetic variation is crucial for adaptability of plants to different environments. Seed dormancy prevents precocious germination in unsuitable conditions and is an adaptation to a major macro-environmental parameter, the seasonal variation in temperature and day length. Here we report the isolation of IBO, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) that governs c. 30% of germination rate variance in an Arabidopsis recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from the parental accessions Eilenburg-0 (Eil-0) and Loch Ness-0 (Lc-0). IBO encodes an uncharacterized phosphatase 2C-related protein, but neither the Eil-0 nor the Lc-0 variant, which differ in a single amino acid, have any appreciable phosphatase activity in in vitro assays. However, we found that the amino acid change in the Lc-0 variant of the IBO protein confers reduced germination rate. Moreover, unlike the Eil-0 variant of the protein, the Lc-0 variant can interfere with the activity of the phosphatase 2C ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE 1 in vitro. This suggests that the Lc-0 variant possibly interferes with abscisic acid signaling, a notion that is supported by physiological assays. Thus, we isolated an example of a QTL allele with a nonsynonymous amino acid change that might mediate local adaptation of seed germination timing. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Ecotype dependent expression and alternative splicing of epithiospecifier protein (ESP) in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kissen, R; Hyldbakk, E; Wang, C-W V; Sørmo, C G; Rossiter, J T; Bones, A M

    2012-03-01

    Epithiospecifier protein (ESP) is responsible for diverting glucosinolate hydrolysis from the generation of isothiocyanates to that of epithionitriles or nitriles, and thereby negatively affects the ability of the plant to defend itself against certain insects. Despite this important role of ESP, little is known about its expression in plant tissues and the regulation thereof. We therefore investigated ESP expression by qPCR and Western blot in different organs during the growth cycle of the two Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes Col-0 and Mt-0. Besides the fact that ESP transcript and protein levels were revealed to be much higher in Mt-0 than in Col-0 in all cases, our qPCR results also indicated that ESP expression is regulated differently in the two A. thaliana ecotypes. No ESP protein was detected by Western blot in any organ or developmental stage for Col-0. During the assays an alternative splice variant of ESP was identified in Col-0, but not Mt-0, leading to a mis-spliced transcript which could explain the low expression levels of ESP in the former ecotype. Analysis of genomic sequences containing the ESP splice sites, of ESP protein level and ESP activity from seven A. thaliana ecotypes showed a positive correlation between the presence of a non-canonical 5' splice site for ESP and the absence of detectable ESP protein levels and ESP activity. When analysing the expression of both transcript variants in Col-0 after treatment with methyl jasmonate, a condition known to "induce ESP", it was indeed the alternative splice variant that was preferentially induced.

  3. Meiosis-Specific Loading of the Centromere-Specific Histone CENH3 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Maruthachalam; Shibata, Fukashi; Ramahi, Joseph S.; Nagaki, Kiyotaka; Chen, Changbin; Murata, Minoru; Chan, Simon W. L.

    2011-01-01

    Centromere behavior is specialized in meiosis I, so that sister chromatids of homologous chromosomes are pulled toward the same side of the spindle (through kinetochore mono-orientation) and chromosome number is reduced. Factors required for mono-orientation have been identified in yeast. However, comparatively little is known about how meiotic centromere behavior is specialized in animals and plants that typically have large tandem repeat centromeres. Kinetochores are nucleated by the centromere-specific histone CENH3. Unlike conventional histone H3s, CENH3 is rapidly evolving, particularly in its N-terminal tail domain. Here we describe chimeric variants of CENH3 with alterations in the N-terminal tail that are specifically defective in meiosis. Arabidopsis thaliana cenh3 mutants expressing a GFP-tagged chimeric protein containing the H3 N-terminal tail and the CENH3 C-terminus (termed GFP-tailswap) are sterile because of random meiotic chromosome segregation. These defects result from the specific depletion of GFP-tailswap protein from meiotic kinetochores, which contrasts with its normal localization in mitotic cells. Loss of the GFP-tailswap CENH3 variant in meiosis affects recruitment of the essential kinetochore protein MIS12. Our findings suggest that CENH3 loading dynamics might be regulated differently in mitosis and meiosis. As further support for our hypothesis, we show that GFP-tailswap protein is recruited back to centromeres in a subset of pollen grains in GFP-tailswap once they resume haploid mitosis. Meiotic recruitment of the GFP-tailswap CENH3 variant is not restored by removal of the meiosis-specific cohesin subunit REC8. Our results reveal the existence of a specialized loading pathway for CENH3 during meiosis that is likely to involve the hypervariable N-terminal tail. Meiosis-specific CENH3 dynamics may play a role in modulating meiotic centromere behavior. PMID:21695238

  4. Experimental determination of the effect of the ratio of B/Al on glass dissolution along the nepheline (NaAlSiO 4)-malinkoite (NaBSiO 4) join

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, E. M.; Reed, L. R.; Shaw, W. J.; McGrail, B. P.; Icenhower, J. P.; Windisch, C. F.; Cordova, E. A.; Broady, J.

    2010-05-01

    The dissolution kinetics of five glasses along the NaAlSiO 4-NaBSiO 4 join were used to evaluate how the structural variations associated with boron-aluminum substitution affect the rate of dissolution. The composition of each glass varied inversely in mol% of Al 2O 3 (5-25 mol%) and B 2O 3 (20-0 mol%) with Na 2O (25 mol%) and SiO 2 (50 mol%) making up the remaining amount, in every case Na/(Al + B) = 1.0. Single-pass flow-through experiments (SPFT) were conducted under dilute conditions as a function of solution pH (from 7.0 to 12.0) and temperature (from 23 to 90 °C). Analysis of unreacted glass samples by 27Al and 29Si MAS-NMR suggests Al (˜98% [4]Al) and Si-atoms (˜100% [4]Si) occupy a tetrahedral coordination whereas, B-atoms occupy both tetrahedral ( [4]B) and trigonal ( [3]B) coordination. The distribution of [3]B fractionated between [3]B(ring) and [3]B(non-ring) moieties, with the [3]B(ring)/ [3]B(non-ring) ratio increases with an increase in the B/Al ratio. The MAS-NMR results also indicated an increase in the fraction of [4]B with an increase in the B/Al ratio. The 27Al peak maxima shift to lesser values with an increase in the B/Al ratio which suggests mixing between the [4]Al and [3]B sites, assuming avoidance between tetrahedral trivalent cations ( [4]Al-O- [4]B avoidance). Unlike the 27Al and 11B spectra, the 29Si spectra illustrate a subtle shift to more negative chemical shift (chemical shift range between -88 and -84 ppm) and increases in the spectral widths as the B/Al ratio increases. Raman spectroscopy of unreacted glass samples was also used to cross-check the results collected from MAS-NMR and suggested that NeB4 (the glass sample with the highest B content) may consist of B-Na enriched and Al-Si enriched micro-domains, which affected the measured dissolution rates. Results from SPFT experiments suggest a forward rate of reaction and pH power-law coefficients, η, that are independent of B/Al under these neutral to alkaline test conditions

  5. RNA in situ hybridization in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Miin-Feng; Wagner, Doris

    2012-01-01

    RNA in situ hybridization using digoxigenin-labeled riboprobes on tissue sections is a powerful technique for revealing microscopic spatial gene expression. Here, we describe an in situ hybridization method commonly practiced in Arabidopsis research labs. The highly stringent hybridization condition eliminates the usage of Ribonlucease A and gives highly specific signals. This also allows the use of longer probes which enhance signal strength without cross hybridization to closely related genes. In addition, using spin columns in template and riboprobe purification greatly reduces background signals.

  6. Effects of vertical rotation on Arabidopsis development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. H.; Chapman, D. K.; Dahl, A. O.

    1975-01-01

    Various gross morphological end points of Arabidopsis development are examined in an attempt to separate the effects of growth on the horizontal clinostat into a component caused by rotation alone and another component caused by the altered position with respect to the direction of the g-vector. In a series of tests which involved comparisons between vertical stationary plants, vertical rotated plants, and plants rotated on clinostats, certain characters were consistently influenced by vertical rotation alone. The characters for which this effect was statistically significant were petiole length and leaf blade width.

  7. Carotenoid Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis: A Colorful Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Sola, M. Águila; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Plant carotenoids are a family of pigments that participate in light harvesting and are essential for photoprotection against excess light. Furthermore, they act as precursors for the production of apocarotenoid hormones such as abscisic acid and strigolactones. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the genes and enzymes of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway (which is now almost completely elucidated) and on the regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. We also discuss the relevance of Arabidopsis as a model system for the study of carotenogenesis and how metabolic engineering approaches in this plant have taught important lessons for carotenoid biotechnology. PMID:22582030

  8. Molecular mechanisms underlying the Arabidopsis circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Norihito

    2011-10-01

    A wide range of biological processes exhibit circadian rhythm, enabling plants to adapt to the environmental day-night cycle. This rhythm is generated by the so-called 'circadian clock'. Although a number of genetic approaches have identified >25 clock-associated genes involved in the Arabidopsis clock mechanism, the molecular functions of a large part of these genes are not known. Recent comprehensive studies have revealed the molecular functions of several key clock-associated proteins. This progress has provided mechanistic insights into how key clock-associated proteins are integrated, and may help in understanding the essence of the clock's molecular mechanisms.

  9. The defense response in Arabidopsis thaliana against Fusarium sporotrichioides

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Certain graminaceous plants such as Zea mays and Triticum aestivum serve as hosts for Fusarium sporotrichioides; however, molecular interactions between the host plants and F. sporotrichioides remain unknown. It is also not known whether any interaction between Arabidopsis thaliana and F. sporotrichioides can occur. To understand these interactions, we performed proteomic analysis. Results Arabidopsis leaves and flowers were inoculated with F. sporotrichioides. Accumulation of PLANT DEFENSIN1.2 (PDF1.2) and PATHOGENESIS RELATED1 (PR1) mRNA in Arabidopsis were increased by inoculation of F. sporotrichioides. Furthermore, mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 (MPK3) and mitogen-activated protein kinase 6 (MPK6), which represent MAP kinases in Arabidopsis, were activated by inoculation of F. sporotrichioides. Proteomic analysis revealed that some defense-related proteins were upregulated, while the expression of photosynthesis- and metabolism-related proteins was down regulated, by inoculation with F. sporotrichioides. We carried out the proteomic analysis about upregulated proteins by inoculation with Fusarium graminearum. The glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), such as GSTF4 and GSTF7 were upregulated, by inoculation with F. graminearum-infected Arabidopsis leaves. On the other hand, GSTF3 and GSTF9 were uniquely upregulated, by inoculation with F. sporotrichioides. Conclusions These results indicate that Arabidopsis is a host plant for F. sporotrichioides. We revealed that defense response of Arabidopsis is initiated by infection with F. sporotrichioides. PMID:23110430

  10. Linkage maps for Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata and Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. petraea combining anonymous and Arabidopsis thaliana-derived markers.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Julien; Jean, Martine; Belzile, François

    2007-02-01

    Arabidopsis lyrata, a close relative of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, is 1 of a few plant species for which the genome is to be entirely sequenced, which promises to yield important insights into genome evolution. Only 2 sparse linkage maps have been published, and these were based solely on markers derived from the A. thaliana genome. Because the genome of A. lyrata is practically twice as large as that of A. thaliana, the extent of map coverage of the A. lyrata genome remains uncertain. In this study, a 2-way pseudo-testcross strategy was used to construct genetic linkage maps of A. lyrata subsp. petraea and A. lyrata subsp. lyrata, using simple sequence repeat (SSR) and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) markers from the A. thaliana genome, and anonymous amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers that could potentially uncover regions unique to the A. lyrata genome. The SSR and CAPS markers largely confirmed the relationships between linkage groups in A. lyrata and A. thaliana. AFLP markers slightly increased the coverage of the A. lyrata maps, but mostly increased marker density on the linkage groups. We noted a much lower level of polymorphism and a greater segregation distortion in A. lyrata subsp. lyrata markers. The implications of these findings for the sequencing of the A. lyrata genome are discussed.

  11. Monitoring heavy metal pollution in foraminifera from the Gulf of Edremit (northeastern Aegean Sea) between Izmir, Balıkesir and Çanakkale (Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yümün, Zeki Ünal; Önce, Melike

    2017-06-01

    In this study, the populations and abnormal shell structures of Quaternary foraminifers in the sediments of the North-eastern Aegean Sea were examined. For this purpose, offshore drilling was carried out at three locations, and core samples were collected from 13 locations at Küçükkuyu (Çanakkale), Güre (Edremit-Balıkesir) and Dikili (İzmir). At these points, drilling reached depths ranging from 3.00 to 22.00 m beneath the seafloor; recent sediments were observed, but the bedrock was not reached. Examination of the faunal and sedimentological properties of the samples showed that the Gulf of Edremit is completely influenced by the sea and has rich foraminifers and ostracod populations. The abnormalities observed in the foraminifer shells, as well as the yellow- and/or black-coloured shells seen in both the foraminifer and ostracod populations, are due to natural and anthropogenic ecological pollution. The vertical (chronological) and horizontal (spatial) distributions of heavy metal concentrations in both the core and drill core samples were investigated to determine the causes of the morphological abnormalities observed in the foraminifers. In the present study, pollution index (PI) values were calculated to assess the degree of heavy metal pollution (Yümün 2017). The current land use status of the coastal areas corresponding to the measured PI values was investigated to identify the sources of the pollution. Especially in the Güre region, a large number of genera and species of benthic foraminifers showed overgrowth in the shell sizes of individuals, and the coloration of the shells is noteworthy. These changes in the shells are a result of thermal sources and agricultural activities in the region. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to perform an elemental analysis of the surfaces of dark yellow-orange foraminifers (Ammonia compacta and Elphidium crispum). The S, Fe and Mn concentrations in the shells were found to be high, based on the SEM

  12. Neogene-Quaternary evolution of the Manisa Basin: Evidence for variation in the stress pattern of the İzmir-Balıkesir Transfer Zone, western Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özkaymak, Çağlar; Sözbilir, Hasan; Uzel, Bora

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we aim to identify the Neogene-Quaternary evolution of the Manisa Basin located in the İzmir-Balıkesir Transfer Zone (İBTZ) which lies between the normal-fault-dominated West Anatolian Extensional Province (WAEP) and the strike-slip-dominated North Aegean Region (NAR). The Manisa Basin, which forms a connection with the Gediz Graben, underwent two-stage basin evolution, distinguished by an ancient and modern graben-fill. The ancient basin-fill is made up of a folded and normal-to-reverse faulted and strike-slip-faulted Miocene volcano-sedimentary sequence. The younger modern basin-fill is represented by the Quaternary Bahadır Formation comprising fluvial terrace deposits, early-middle Pleistocene continental clastics of the Turgutlu Formation, alluvial/colluvial sediments of late Pleistocene-early Holocene Emlakdere Formation, and Holocene alluvium. Structural and stratigraphical data reveal that the basin was initially formed as a lacustrine basin bounded by a volcanic ridge from the west; it was subsequently uplifted and deformed probably as a result of Pliocene wrench-dominated strike-slip tectonics, which is characterised by NNW-SSE horizontal σ3 and vertical σ2. Post-Miocene strike-slip faulting along the İBTZ occurred along a right-lateral shear zone in the Manisa Basin. This suggests that some branches of the right-lateral movement of the North Anatolian Fault Zone may continue into the WAEP. The youngest stage shows an extension-dominated transtension with a NE-SW trending σ3 and a vertical σ1. These results are consistent with progressive deformation developed during late Pliocene and onwards wherein the axis of minimum horizontal stress remained in the horizontal plane but the intermediate and maximum horizontal stress axes switched position in the vertical plane. In addition, available palaeostress data for the Gediz Graben are consistent with the pure extension in the eastern and middle part of the graben and with the wrench

  13. A multi-epoch spectroscopic study of the BAL quasar APM 08279+5255. II. Emission- and absorption-line variability time lags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saturni, F. G.; Trevese, D.; Vagnetti, F.; Perna, M.; Dadina, M.

    2016-03-01

    Context. The study of high-redshift bright quasars is crucial to gather information about the history of galaxy assembly and evolution. Variability analyses can provide useful data on the physics of quasar processes and their relation with the host galaxy. Aims: In this study, we aim to measure the black hole mass of the bright lensed BAL QSO APM 08279+5255 at z = 3.911 through reverberation mapping, and to update and extend the monitoring of its C IV absorption line variability. Methods: We perform the first reverberation mapping of the Si IV and C IV emission lines for a high-luminosity quasar at high redshift with the use of 138 R-band photometric data and 30 spectra available over 16 years of observations. We also cross-correlate the C IV absorption equivalent width variations with the continuum light curve to estimate the recombination time lags of the various absorbers and infer the physical conditions of the ionised gas. Results: We find a reverberation-mapping time lag of ~900 rest-frame days for both Si IV and C IV emission lines. This is consistent with an extension of the BLR size-to-luminosity relation for active galactic nuclei up to a luminosity of ~1048 erg s-1, and implies a black hole mass of 1010 M⊙. Additionally, we measure a recombination time lag of ~160 days in the rest frame for the C IV narrow absorption system, which implies an electron density of the absorbing gas of ~2.5 × 104 cm-3. Conclusions: The measured black hole mass of APM 08279+5255 indicates that the quasar resides in an under-massive host-galaxy bulge with Mbulge ~ 7.5MBH, and that the lens magnification is lower than ~8. Finally, the inferred electron density of the narrow-line absorber implies a distance of the order of 10 kpc of the absorbing gas from the quasar, placing it within the host galaxy.

  14. Arabidopsis transcription factors: genome-wide comparative analysis among eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Riechmann, J L; Heard, J; Martin, G; Reuber, L; Jiang, C; Keddie, J; Adam, L; Pineda, O; Ratcliffe, O J; Samaha, R R; Creelman, R; Pilgrim, M; Broun, P; Zhang, J Z; Ghandehari, D; Sherman, B K; Yu, G

    2000-12-15

    The completion of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence allows a comparative analysis of transcriptional regulators across the three eukaryotic kingdoms. Arabidopsis dedicates over 5% of its genome to code for more than 1500 transcription factors, about 45% of which are from families specific to plants. Arabidopsis transcription factors that belong to families common to all eukaryotes do not share significant similarity with those of the other kingdoms beyond the conserved DNA binding domains, many of which have been arranged in combinations specific to each lineage. The genome-wide comparison reveals the evolutionary generation of diversity in the regulation of transcription.

  15. Diuretics prime plant immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Noutoshi, Yoshiteru; Ikeda, Mika; Shirasu, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Plant activators are agrochemicals that activate the plant immune system, thereby enhancing disease resistance. Due to their prophylactic and durable effects on a wide spectrum of diseases, plant activators can provide synergistic crop protection when used in combination with traditional pest controls. Although plant activators have achieved great success in wet-rice farming practices in Asia, their use is still limited. To isolate novel plant activators applicable to other crops, we screened a chemical library using a method that can selectively identify immune-priming compounds. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of three diuretics, bumetanide, bendroflumethiazide and clopamide, as immune-priming compounds. These drugs upregulate the immunity-related cell death of Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells induced with an avirulent strain of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in a concentration-dependent manner. The application of these compounds to Arabidopsis plants confers disease resistance to not only the avirulent but also a virulent strain of the pathogen. Unlike salicylic acid, an endogenous phytohormone that governs disease resistance in response to biotrophic pathogens, the three diuretic compounds analyzed here do not induce PR1 or inhibit plant growth, showing potential as lead compounds in a practical application.

  16. Arabidopsis MET1 cytosine methyltransferase mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Kankel, Mark W; Ramsey, Douglas E; Stokes, Trevor L; Flowers, Susan K; Haag, Jeremy R; Jeddeloh, Jeffrey A; Riddle, Nicole C; Verbsky, Michelle L; Richards, Eric J

    2003-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of two missense mutations in the cytosine-DNA-methyltransferase gene, MET1, from the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Both missense mutations, which affect the catalytic domain of the protein, led to a global reduction of cytosine methylation throughout the genome. Surprisingly, the met1-2 allele, with the weaker DNA hypomethylation phenotype, alters a well-conserved residue in methyltransferase signature motif I. The stronger met1-1 allele caused late flowering and a heterochronic delay in the juvenile-to-adult rosette leaf transition. The distribution of late-flowering phenotypes in a mapping population segregating met1-1 indicates that the flowering-time phenotype is caused by the accumulation of inherited defects at loci unlinked to the met1 mutation. The delay in flowering time is due in part to the formation and inheritance of hypomethylated fwa epialleles, but inherited defects at other loci are likely to contribute as well. Centromeric repeat arrays hypomethylated in met1-1 mutants are partially remethylated when introduced into a wild-type background, in contrast to genomic sequences hypomethylated in ddm1 mutants. ddm1 met1 double mutants were constructed to further our understanding of the mechanism of DDM1 action and the interaction between two major genetic loci affecting global cytosine methylation levels in Arabidopsis. PMID:12663548

  17. The mitochondrial lysine acetylome of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    König, Ann-Christine; Hartl, Markus; Boersema, Paul J; Mann, Matthias; Finkemeier, Iris

    2014-11-01

    Posttranslational modifications are essential regulators of protein functions as they can modify enzyme activities or protein-molecule interactions by changing the charge state or chemical properties of their target amino acid. The acetyl moiety of the central energy metabolite acetyl-CoA can be transferred to the ε-amino group of lysine, a process known as lysine acetylation which is implicated in the regulation of key metabolic enzymes in various organisms. Since plant mitochondria are of great importance for plant growth and development and as they house key enzymes of oxidative phosphorylation and photorespiration, it is essential to investigate the occurrence of lysine acetylation in this organelle. Here we characterised the plant mitochondrial acetylome of Arabidopsis mitochondria by LC-MS/MS analysis. In total 120 lysine-acetylated mitochondrial proteins containing 243 acetylated sites were identified. These proteins were mapped into functional categories showing that many proteins with essential functions from the tricaboxylic cycle and the respiratory chain are lysine-acetylated, as well as proteins involved in photorespiration, amino acid and protein metabolism, and redox regulation. Immuno-detection of mitochondrial proteins revealed that many lysine-acetylated proteins reside in native protein complexes. Furthermore, in vitro experiments demonstrated that lysine acetylation can occur non-enzymatically in Arabidopsis mitochondria at physiological matrix pH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Diuretics Prime Plant Immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Noutoshi, Yoshiteru; Ikeda, Mika; Shirasu, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Plant activators are agrochemicals that activate the plant immune system, thereby enhancing disease resistance. Due to their prophylactic and durable effects on a wide spectrum of diseases, plant activators can provide synergistic crop protection when used in combination with traditional pest controls. Although plant activators have achieved great success in wet-rice farming practices in Asia, their use is still limited. To isolate novel plant activators applicable to other crops, we screened a chemical library using a method that can selectively identify immune-priming compounds. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of three diuretics, bumetanide, bendroflumethiazide and clopamide, as immune-priming compounds. These drugs upregulate the immunity-related cell death of Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells induced with an avirulent strain of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in a concentration-dependent manner. The application of these compounds to Arabidopsis plants confers disease resistance to not only the avirulent but also a virulent strain of the pathogen. Unlike salicylic acid, an endogenous phytohormone that governs disease resistance in response to biotrophic pathogens, the three diuretic compounds analyzed here do not induce PR1 or inhibit plant growth, showing potential as lead compounds in a practical application. PMID:23144763

  19. Stress promotes Arabidopsis - Piriformospora indica interaction

    PubMed Central

    Vahabi, Khabat; Dorcheh, Sedigheh Karimi; Monajembashi, Shamci; Westermann, Martin; Reichelt, Michael; Falkenberg, Daniela; Hemmerich, Peter; Sherameti, Irena; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica colonizes Arabidopsis thaliana roots and promotes plant performance, growth and resistance/tolerance against abiotic and biotic stress. Here we demonstrate that the benefits for the plant increase when the two partners are co-cultivated under stress (limited access to nutrient, exposure to heavy metals and salt, light and osmotic stress, pathogen infection). Moreover, physical contact between P. indica and Arabidopsis roots is necessary for optimal growth promotion, and chemical communication cannot replace the physical contact. Lower nutrient availability down-regulates and higher nutrient availability up-regulates the plant defense system including the expression of pathogenesis-related genes in roots. High light, osmotic and salt stresses support the beneficial interaction between the plant and the fungus. P. indica reduces stomata closure and H2O2 production after Alternaria brassicae infection in leaves and suppresses the defense-related accumulation of the phytohormone jasmonic acid. Thus, shifting the growth conditions toward a stress promotes the mutualistic interaction, while optimal supply with nutrients or low stress diminishes the benefits for the plant in the symbiosis. PMID:27167761

  20. Stress promotes Arabidopsis - Piriformospora indica interaction.

    PubMed

    Vahabi, Khabat; Dorcheh, Sedigheh Karimi; Monajembashi, Shamci; Westermann, Martin; Reichelt, Michael; Falkenberg, Daniela; Hemmerich, Peter; Sherameti, Irena; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2016-05-03

    The endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica colonizes Arabidopsis thaliana roots and promotes plant performance, growth and resistance/tolerance against abiotic and biotic stress. Here we demonstrate that the benefits for the plant increase when the two partners are co-cultivated under stress (limited access to nutrient, exposure to heavy metals and salt, light and osmotic stress, pathogen infection). Moreover, physical contact between P. indica and Arabidopsis roots is necessary for optimal growth promotion, and chemical communication cannot replace the physical contact. Lower nutrient availability down-regulates and higher nutrient availability up-regulates the plant defense system including the expression of pathogenesis-related genes in roots. High light, osmotic and salt stresses support the beneficial interaction between the plant and the fungus. P. indica reduces stomata closure and H2O2 production after Alternaria brassicae infection in leaves and suppresses the defense-related accumulation of the phytohormone jasmonic acid. Thus, shifting the growth conditions toward a stress promotes the mutualistic interaction, while optimal supply with nutrients or low stress diminishes the benefits for the plant in the symbiosis.

  1. Brassinosteroid functions in Arabidopsis seed development

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wen-Bo; Lin, Wen-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Seed development of flowering plant is a complicated process controlled by a signal network. Double fertilization generates 2 zygotic products (embryo and endosperm). Embryo gives rise to a daughter plant while endosperm provides nutrients for embryo during embryogenesis and germination. Seed coat differentiates from maternally derived integument and encloses embryo and endosperm. Seed size/mass and number comprise final seed yield, and seed shape also contributes to seed development and weight. Seed size is coordinated by communication among endosperm, embryo, and integument. Seed number determination is more complex to investigate and shows differencies between monocot and eudicot. Total seed number depends on sillique number and seed number per sillique in Arabidopsis. Seed comes from fertilized ovule, hence the ovule number per flower determines the maximal seed number per sillique. Early studies reported that engineering BR levels increased the yield of ovule and seed; however the molecular mechanism of BR regulation in seed development still remained unclear. Our recent studies demonstrated that BR regulated seed size, shape, and number by transcriptionally modulating specific seed developmental pathways. This review summarizes roles of BR in Arabidopsis seed development and gives clues for future application of BR in agricultural production. PMID:24270689

  2. Defining the core Arabidopsis thaliana root microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, Jase; Malfatti, Stephanie; Tremblay, Julien; Engelbrektson, Anna; Kunin, Victor; del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Edgar, Robert C.; Eickhorst, Thilo; Ley, Ruth E.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Tringe, Susannah Green; Dangl, Jeffery L.

    2014-01-01

    Land plants associate with a root microbiota distinct from the complex microbial community present in surrounding soil. The microbiota colonizing therhizosphere(immediately surroundingthe root) and the endophytic compartment (within the root) contribute to plant growth, productivity, carbon sequestration and phytoremediation1-3. Colonization of the root occurs despite a sophisticated plant immune system4,5, suggesting finely tuned discrimination of mutualists and commensals from pathogens. Genetic principles governing the derivation of host-specific endophyte communities from soil communities are poorly understood. Here we report the pyrosequencing of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene of more than 600 Arabidopsis thaliana plants to test the hypotheses that the root rhizosphere and endophytic compartment microbiota of plants grown under controlled conditions in natural soils are sufficiently dependent on the host to remain consistent across different soil types and developmental stages, and sufficiently dependent on host genotype to vary between inbred Arabidopsis accessions. We describe different bacterial communities in two geochemically distinct bulk soils and in rhizosphere and endophytic compartments prepared from roots grown in these soils. The communities in each compartment are strongly influenced by soil type. Endophytic compartments from both soils feature overlapping, low-complexity communities that are markedly enriched in Actinobacteria and specific families from other phyla, notably Proteobacteria. Some bacteria vary quantitatively between plants of different developmental stage and genotype. Our rigorous definition of an endophytic compartment microbiome should facilitate controlled dissection of plantmicrobe interactions derived from complex soil communities. PMID:22859206

  3. Polyploidization increases meiotic recombination frequency in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Polyploidization is the multiplication of the whole chromosome complement and has occurred frequently in vascular plants. Maintenance of stable polyploid state over generations requires special mechanisms to control pairing and distribution of more than two homologous chromosomes during meiosis. Since a minimal number of crossover events is essential for correct chromosome segregation, we investigated whether polyploidy has an influence on the frequency of meiotic recombination. Results Using two genetically linked transgenes providing seed-specific fluorescence, we compared a high number of progeny from diploid and tetraploid Arabidopsis plants. We show that rates of meiotic recombination in reciprocal crosses of genetically identical diploid and autotetraploid Arabidopsis plants were significantly higher in tetraploids compared to diploids. Although male and female gametogenesis differ substantially in meiotic recombination frequency, both rates were equally increased in tetraploids. To investigate whether multivalent formation in autotetraploids was responsible for the increased recombination rates, we also performed corresponding experiments with allotetraploid plants showing strict bivalent pairing. We found similarly increased rates in auto- and allotetraploids, suggesting that the ploidy effect is independent of chromosome pairing configurations. Conclusions The evolutionary success of polyploid plants in nature and under domestication has been attributed to buffering of mutations and sub- and neo-functionalization of duplicated genes. Should the data described here be representative for polyploid plants, enhanced meiotic recombination, and the resulting rapid creation of genetic diversity, could have also contributed to their prevalence. PMID:21510849

  4. Epigenetic natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Matthew W; Tanurdzić, Milos; Lippman, Zachary; Jiang, Hongmei; Carrasquillo, Robert; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Dedhia, Neilay; McCombie, W Richard; Agier, Nicolas; Bulski, Agnès; Colot, Vincent; Doerge, R W; Martienssen, Robert A

    2007-07-01

    Cytosine methylation of repetitive sequences is widespread in plant genomes, occurring in both symmetric (CpG and CpNpG) as well as asymmetric sequence contexts. We used the methylation-dependent restriction enzyme McrBC to profile methylated DNA using tiling microarrays of Arabidopsis Chromosome 4 in two distinct ecotypes, Columbia and Landsberg erecta. We also used comparative genome hybridization to profile copy number polymorphisms. Repeated sequences and transposable elements (TEs), especially long terminal repeat retrotransposons, are densely methylated, but one third of genes also have low but detectable methylation in their transcribed regions. While TEs are almost always methylated, genic methylation is highly polymorphic, with half of all methylated genes being methylated in only one of the two ecotypes. A survey of loci in 96 Arabidopsis accessions revealed a similar degree of methylation polymorphism. Within-gene methylation is heritable, but is lost at a high frequency in segregating F(2) families. Promoter methylation is rare, and gene expression is not generally affected by differences in DNA methylation. Small interfering RNA are preferentially associated with methylated TEs, but not with methylated genes, indicating that most genic methylation is not guided by small interfering RNA. This may account for the instability of gene methylation, if occasional failure of maintenance methylation cannot be restored by other means.

  5. Epigenetic Natural Variation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongmei; Carrasquillo, Robert; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Dedhia, Neilay; McCombie, W. Richard; Agier, Nicolas; Bulski, Agnès; Colot, Vincent; Doerge, R.W; Martienssen, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Cytosine methylation of repetitive sequences is widespread in plant genomes, occurring in both symmetric (CpG and CpNpG) as well as asymmetric sequence contexts. We used the methylation-dependent restriction enzyme McrBC to profile methylated DNA using tiling microarrays of Arabidopsis Chromosome 4 in two distinct ecotypes, Columbia and Landsberg erecta. We also used comparative genome hybridization to profile copy number polymorphisms. Repeated sequences and transposable elements (TEs), especially long terminal repeat retrotransposons, are densely methylated, but one third of genes also have low but detectable methylation in their transcribed regions. While TEs are almost always methylated, genic methylation is highly polymorphic, with half of all methylated genes being methylated in only one of the two ecotypes. A survey of loci in 96 Arabidopsis accessions revealed a similar degree of methylation polymorphism. Within-gene methylation is heritable, but is lost at a high frequency in segregating F 2 families. Promoter methylation is rare, and gene expression is not generally affected by differences in DNA methylation. Small interfering RNA are preferentially associated with methylated TEs, but not with methylated genes, indicating that most genic methylation is not guided by small interfering RNA. This may account for the instability of gene methylation, if occasional failure of maintenance methylation cannot be restored by other means. PMID:17579518

  6. Brassinosteroids promote Arabidopsis pollen germination and growth.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Frank; Schmalzl, Christina; Englhart, Maria; Bircheneder, Martin; Sprunck, Stefanie

    2014-09-01

    Pollen tubes are among the fastest tip-growing plant cells and represent an excellent experimental system for studying the dynamics and spatiotemporal control of polarized cell growth. However, investigating pollen tube tip growth in the model plant Arabidopsis remains difficult because in vitro pollen germination and pollen tube growth rates are highly variable and largely different from those observed in pistils, most likely due to growth-promoting properties of the female reproductive tract. We found that in vitro grown Arabidopsis pollen respond to brassinosteroid (BR) in a dose-dependent manner. Pollen germination and pollen tube growth increased nine- and fivefold, respectively, when media were supplemented with 10 µM epibrassinolide (epiBL), resulting in growth kinetics more similar to growth in vivo. Expression analyses show that the promoter of one of the key enzymes in BR biosynthesis, CYP90A1/CPD, is highly active in the cells of the reproductive tract that form the pathway for pollen tubes from the stigma to the ovules. Pollen tubes grew significantly shorter through the reproductive tract of a cyp90a1 mutant compared to the wild type, or to a BR perception mutant. Our results show that epiBL promotes pollen germination and tube growth in vitro and suggest that the cells of the reproductive tract provide BR compounds to stimulate pollen tube growth.

  7. FPF1 promotes flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Kania, T; Russenberger, D; Peng, S; Apel, K; Melzer, S

    1997-01-01

    We have characterized the gene flowering promoting factor1 (FPF1), which is expressed in apical meristems immediately after the photoperiodic induction of flowering in the long-day plants mustard and Arabidopsis. In early transition stages, expression is only detectable in the peripheral zone of apical meristems; however, later on, it can also be found in floral meristems and in axillary meristems that form secondary inflorescences. The FPF1 gene encodes a 12.6-kD protein that has no homology to any previously identified protein of known function. Constitutive expression of the gene in Arabidopsis under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter resulted in a dominant heritable trait of early flowering under both short- and long-day conditions. Treatments with gibberellin (GA) and paclobutrazol, a GA biosynthesis inhibitor, as well as crosses with GA-deficient mutants indicate that FPF1 is involved in a GA-dependent signaling pathway and modulates a GA response in apical meristems during the transition to flowering. PMID:9286110

  8. MTHFD1 controls DNA methylation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Groth, Martin; Moissiard, Guillaume; Wirtz, Markus; Wang, Haifeng; Garcia-Salinas, Carolina; Ramos-Parra, Perla A.; Bischof, Sylvain; Feng, Suhua; Cokus, Shawn J.; John, Amala; Smith, Danielle C.; Zhai, Jixian; Hale, Christopher J.; Long, Jeff A.; Hell, Ruediger; Díaz de la Garza, Rocío I.; Jacobsen, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that has important functions in transcriptional silencing and is associated with repressive histone methylation (H3K9me). To further investigate silencing mechanisms, we screened a mutagenized Arabidopsis thaliana population for expression of SDCpro-GFP, redundantly controlled by DNA methyltransferases DRM2 and CMT3. Here, we identify the hypomorphic mutant mthfd1-1, carrying a mutation (R175Q) in the cytoplasmic bifunctional methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase/methenyltetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase (MTHFD1). Decreased levels of oxidized tetrahydrofolates in mthfd1-1 and lethality of loss-of-function demonstrate the essential enzymatic role of MTHFD1 in Arabidopsis. Accumulation of homocysteine and S-adenosylhomocysteine, genome-wide DNA hypomethylation, loss of H3K9me and transposon derepression indicate that S-adenosylmethionine-dependent transmethylation is inhibited in mthfd1-1. Comparative analysis of DNA methylation revealed that the CMT3 and CMT2 pathways involving positive feedback with H3K9me are mostly affected. Our work highlights the sensitivity of epigenetic networks to one-carbon metabolism due to their common S-adenosylmethionine-dependent transmethylation and has implications for human MTHFD1-associated diseases. PMID:27291711

  9. Metallochaperone-like genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Tehseen, Muhammad; Cairns, Narelle; Sherson, Sarah; Cobbett, Christopher S

    2010-08-01

    A complete inventory of metallochaperone-like proteins containing a predicted HMA domain in Arabidopsis revealed a large family of 67 proteins. 45 proteins, the HIPPs, have a predicted isoprenylation site while 22 proteins, the HPPs, do not. Sequence comparisons divided the proteins into seven major clusters (I-VII). Cluster IV is notable for the presence of a conserved Asp residue before the CysXXCys, metal binding motif, analogous to the Zn binding motif in E. coli ZntA. HIPP20, HIPP21, HIPP22, HIPP26 and HIPP27 in Cluster IV were studied in more detail. All but HIPP21 could rescue the Cd-sensitive, ycf1 yeast mutant but failed to rescue the growth of zrt1zrt2, zrc1cot1 and atx1 mutants. In Arabidopsis, single and double mutants did not show a phenotype but the hipp20/21/22 triple mutant was more sensitive to Cd and accumulated less Cd than the wild-type suggesting the HIPPs can have a role in Cd-detoxification, possibly by binding Cd. Promoter-GUS reporter expression studies indicated variable expression of these HIPPs. For example, in roots, HIPP22 and HIPP26 are only expressed in lateral root tips while HIPP20 and HIPP25 show strong expression in the root vasculature.

  10. Photoperiodic flowering regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Golembeski, Greg S.; Kinmonth-Schultz, Hannah A.; Song, Young Hun; Imaizumi, Takato

    2015-01-01

    Photoperiod, or the duration of light in a given day, is a critical cue that flowering plants utilize to effectively assess seasonal information and coordinate their reproductive development in synchrony with the external environment. The use of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, has greatly improved our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that determine how plants process and utilize photoperiodic information to coordinate a flowering response. This mechanism is typified by the transcriptional activation of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) gene by the transcription factor CONSTANS (CO) under inductive long-day conditions in Arabidopsis. FT protein then moves from the leaves to the shoot apex, where floral meristem development can be initiated. As a point of integration from a variety of environmental factors in the context of a larger system of regulatory pathways that affect flowering, the importance of photoreceptors and the circadian clock in CO regulation throughout the day has been a key feature of the photoperiodic flowering pathway. In addition to these established mechanisms, the recent discovery of a photosynthate derivative trehalose-6-phosphate as an activator of FT in leaves has interesting implications for the involvement of photosynthesis in the photoperiodic flowering response that were suggested from previous physiological experiments in flowering induction. PMID:25684830

  11. Frequency of thermostability variants: estimation of total rare variant frequency in human populations

    SciTech Connect

    Mohrenweiser, H.W.; Neel, J.V.

    1981-09-01

    Eight erythrocyte enzymes were examine for thermostability in an unselected sample of 100 newborn infants. Three thermolabile variants, one each of lactate dehydrogenase, glucosephosphate isomerase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, were identified, none of which was detectable as a variant by standard electrophoretic techniques. All were inherited. This frequency of 3.8 heritable thermostability variants per 1000 determinations is to be compared with a frequency of electrophoretically detectable variants of 1.1 per 1000 determinations, a frequency of 2.4 enzyme-deficiency variants per 1000 determinations, and a frequency of individuals with rare enzyme deficiency or electrophoretic or thermostability (or both) variants at these loci is 8.4 per 1000 determinations. A similar distribution and frequency is seen when the comparison is limited to the seven loci studied by all techniques. it is clear that not all of the electrophoretic and thermostability variants present in the population are detected by the techniques used in this study. Accordingly, it is estimated that the true frequency of carriers of a rare variant for each of these enzyme-coding loci averages greater than 10/1000. Some implications of these frequencies for human disease are discussed.

  12. Splice variants of MDM2 in oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Melissa; Okoro, Danielle E; Bargonetti, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Many types of human cancers overexpress MDM2 protein. A common characteristic among these cancers is an associated increase in mdm2 splice variants. Provided here is a comprehensive list, based on a literature review, of over 70 mdm2 variants. These variants are grouped according to in-frame versus out-of-frame status and their potential (or ability) to be translated into isoform proteins. We describe the putative functions for these mdm2 splice variant mRNAs, as well as the mechanistic drivers associated with increased mdm2 transcription and splicing. The paradoxical signal transduction functions of the most commonly studied variants mdm2-a,-b and -c are addressed for their outcomes in the presence and absence of wild-type p53. These outcomes vary from tumor promotion to growth arrest. Finally, we present issues in the detection of endogenous MDM2 protein and how many of the antibodies commonly used to detect MDM2 do not present a full picture of the cellular representation of the isoform proteins. This review provides a focusing lens for individuals interested in learning about the complexities of mdm2 mRNAs and their protein isoforms as well as the roles MDM2 isoforms may play in cancer progression.

  13. VariantAnnotation: a Bioconductor package for exploration and annotation of genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Obenchain, Valerie; Lawrence, Michael; Carey, Vincent; Gogarten, Stephanie; Shannon, Paul; Morgan, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Summary: VariantAnnotation is an R / Bioconductor package for the exploration and annotation of genetic variants. Capabilities exist for reading, writing and filtering variant call format (VCF) files. VariantAnnotation allows ready access to additional R / Bioconductor facilities for advanced statistical analysis, data transformation, visualization and integration with diverse genomic resources. Availability and implementation: This package is implemented in R and available for download at the Bioconductor Web site (http://bioconductor.org/packages/2.13/bioc/html/VariantAnnotation.html). The package contains extensive help pages for individual functions and a ‘vignette’ outlining typical work flows; it is made available under the open source ‘Artistic-2.0’ license. Version 1.9.38 was used in this article. Contact: vobencha@fhcrc.org PMID:24681907

  14. Proteome Analysis of Peroxisomes from Etiolated Arabidopsis Seedlings Identifies a Peroxisomal Protease Involved in β-Oxidation and Development1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Sheng; Yang, Pingfang; Cassin-Ross, Gaëlle; Kaur, Navneet; Switzenberg, Robert; Aung, Kyaw; Li, Jiying; Hu, Jianping

    2013-01-01

    Plant peroxisomes are highly dynamic organelles that mediate a suite of metabolic processes crucial to development. Peroxisomes in seeds/dark-grown seedlings and in photosynthetic tissues constitute two major subtypes of plant peroxisomes, which had been postulated to contain distinct primary biochemical properties. Multiple in-depth proteomic analyses had been performed on leaf peroxisomes, yet the major makeup of peroxisomes in seeds or dark-grown seedlings remained unclear. To compare the metabolic pathways of the two dominant plant peroxisomal subtypes and discover new peroxisomal proteins that function specifically during seed germination, we performed proteomic analysis of peroxisomes from etiolated Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings. The detection of 77 peroxisomal proteins allowed us to perform comparative analysis with the peroxisomal proteome of green leaves, which revealed a large overlap between these two primary peroxisomal variants. Subcellular targeting analysis by fluorescence microscopy validated around 10 new peroxisomal proteins in Arabidopsis. Mutant analysis suggested the role of the cysteine protease RESPONSE TO DROUGHT21A-LIKE1 in β-oxidation, seed germination, and growth. This work provides a much-needed road map of a major type of plant peroxisome and has established a basis for future investigations of peroxisomal proteolytic processes to understand their roles in development and in plant interaction with the environment. PMID:24130194

  15. Functional analysis of the rice rubisco activase promoter in transgenic Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhipan; Lu, Qingtao; Wen, Xiaogang; Chen, Fan; Lu, Congming

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rice rubisco activase promoter was analyzed in transgenic Arabidopsis system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Region conferring tissue specific and light inducible expression of Rca was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer -58 to +43 bp region mediates tissue-specific expression of rice Rca. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Light inducible expression of rice Rca is mediated by -297 to -58 bp region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rice nuclear proteins bind specifically with the light inducible region. -- Abstract: To gain a better understanding of the regulatory mechanism of the rice rubisco activase (Rca) gene, variants of the Rca gene promoter (one full-length and four deletion mutants) fused to the coding region of the bacterial reporter gene {beta}-glucuronidase (GUS) were introduced into Arabidopsis via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Our results show that a 340 bp fragment spanning from -297 to +43 bp relative to the transcription initiation site is enough to promote tissue-specific and light-inducible expression of the rice Rca gene as done by the full-length promoter (-1428 to +43 bp). Further deletion analysis indicated that the region conferring tissue-specificity of Rca expression is localized within a 105 bp fragment from -58 to +43 bp, while light-inducible expression of Rca is mediated by the region from -297 to -58 bp. Gel shift assays and competition experiments demonstrated that rice nuclear proteins bind specifically with the fragment conferring light responsiveness at more than one binding site. This implies that multiple cis-elements may be involved in light-induced expression of the rice Rca gene. These works provide a useful reference for understanding transcriptional regulation mechanism of the rice Rca gene, and lay a strong foundation for further detection of related cis-elements and trans-factors.

  16. Protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana after chronic clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piastuch, William C.; Brown, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    Soluble protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heynh.) leaf and stem tissue was examined after chronic clinorotation. Seeds of Arabidopsis were germinated and plants grown to maturity on horizontal or vertical slow-rotating clinostats (1 rpm) or in stationary vertical control units. Total soluble proteins and in vivo-labeled soluble proteins isolated from these plants were analyzed by two-dimensional sodium doedocyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE) and subsequent fluorography. Visual and computer analysis of the resulting protein patterns showed no significant differences in either total protein expression or in active protein synthesis between horizontal clinorotation and vertical controls in the Arabidopsis leaf and stem tissue. These results show chronic clinorotation does not cause gross changes in protein expression in Arabidopsis.

  17. Protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana after chronic clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piastuch, W. C.; Brown, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Soluble protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heynh.) leaf and stem tissue was examined after chronic clinorotation. Seeds of Arabidopsis were germinated and plants grown to maturity on horizontal or vertical slow-rotating clinostats (1 rpm) or in stationary vertical control units. Total soluble proteins and in vivo-labeled soluble proteins isolated from these plants were analyzed by two-dimensional SDS PAGE and subsequent fluorography. Visual and computer analysis of the resulting protein patterns showed no significant differences in either total protein expression or in active protein synthesis between horizontal clinorotation and vertical controls in the Arabidopsis leaf and stem tissue. These results show chronic clinorotation does not cause gross changes in protein expression in Arabidopsis.

  18. The development of Arabidopsis as a model plant.

    PubMed

    Koornneef, Maarten; Meinke, David

    2010-03-01

    Twenty-five years ago, Arabidopsis thaliana emerged as the model organism of choice for research in plant biology. A consensus was reached about the need to focus on a single organism to integrate the classical disciplines of plant science with the expanding fields of genetics and molecular biology. Ten years after publication of its genome sequence, Arabidopsis remains the standard reference plant for all of biology. We reflect here on the major advances and shared resources that led to the extraordinary growth of the Arabidopsis research community. We also underscore the importance of continuing to expand and refine our detailed knowledge of Arabidopsis while seeking to appreciate the remarkable diversity that characterizes the plant kingdom.

  19. VIZARD: analysis of Affymetrix Arabidopsis GeneChip data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseyko, Nick; Feldman, Lewis J.

    2002-01-01

    SUMMARY: The Affymetrix GeneChip Arabidopsis genome array has proved to be a very powerful tool for the analysis of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, the most commonly studied plant model organism. VIZARD is a Java program created at the University of California, Berkeley, to facilitate analysis of Arabidopsis GeneChip data. It includes several integrated tools for filtering, sorting, clustering and visualization of gene expression data as well as tools for the discovery of regulatory motifs in upstream sequences. VIZARD also includes annotation and upstream sequence databases for the majority of genes represented on the Affymetrix Arabidopsis GeneChip array. AVAILABILITY: VIZARD is available free of charge for educational, research, and not-for-profit purposes, and can be downloaded at http://www.anm.f2s.com/research/vizard/ CONTACT: moseyko@uclink4.berkeley.edu.

  20. Protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana after chronic clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piastuch, W. C.; Brown, C. S.

    1995-01-01

    Soluble protein expression in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heynh.) leaf and stem tissue was examined after chronic clinorotation. Seeds of Arabidopsis were germinated and plants grown to maturity on horizontal or vertical slow-rotating clinostats (1 rpm) or in stationary vertical control units. Total soluble proteins and in vivo-labeled soluble proteins isolated from these plants were analyzed by two-dimensional SDS PAGE and subsequent fluorography. Visual and computer analysis of the resulting protein patterns showed no significant differences in either total protein expression or in active protein synthesis between horizontal clinorotation and vertical controls in the Arabidopsis leaf and stem tissue. These results show chronic clinorotation does not cause gross changes in protein expression in Arabidopsis.

  1. VIZARD: analysis of Affymetrix Arabidopsis GeneChip data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseyko, Nick; Feldman, Lewis J.

    2002-01-01

    SUMMARY: The Affymetrix GeneChip Arabidopsis genome array has proved to be a very powerful tool for the analysis of gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, the most commonly studied plant model organism. VIZARD is a Java program created at the University of California, Berkeley, to facilitate analysis of Arabidopsis GeneChip data. It includes several integrated tools for filtering, sorting, clustering and visualization of gene expression data as well as tools for the discovery of regulatory motifs in upstream sequences. VIZARD also includes annotation and upstream sequence databases for the majority of genes represented on the Affymetrix Arabidopsis GeneChip array. AVAILABILITY: VIZARD is available free of charge for educational, research, and not-for-profit purposes, and can be downloaded at http://www.anm.f2s.com/research/vizard/ CONTACT: moseyko@uclink4.berkeley.edu.

  2. Nespoli works with Arabidopsis Seeds in the Columbus Module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-02-17

    ISS026-E-027966 (17 Feb. 2011) --- European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli, Expedition 26 flight engineer, works with hardware containing Arabidopsis seeds in the Columbus laboratory of the International Space Station.

  3. 3D Gel Map of Arabidopsis Complex I

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Katrin; Belt, Katharina; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Complex I has a unique structure in plants and includes extra subunits. Here, we present a novel study to define its protein constituents. Mitochondria were isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures, leaves, and roots. Subunits of complex I were resolved by 3D blue-native (BN)/SDS/SDS-PAGE and identified by mass spectrometry. Overall, 55 distinct proteins were found, seven of which occur in pairs of isoforms. We present evidence that Arabidopsis complex I consists of 49 distinct types of subunits, 40 of which represent homologs of bovine complex I. The nine other subunits represent special proteins absent in the animal linage of eukaryotes, most prominently a group of subunits related to bacterial gamma-type carbonic anhydrases. A GelMap http://www.gelmap.de/arabidopsis-3d-complex-i/ is presented for promoting future complex I research in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:23761796

  4. EBS7 is a plant-specific component of a highly conserved endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation system in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yidan; Zhang, Congcong; Wang, Dinghe; Su, Wei; Liu, Linchuan; Wang, Muyang; Li, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) is an essential part of an ER-localized protein quality-control system for eliminating terminally misfolded proteins. Recent studies have demonstrated that the ERAD machinery is conserved among yeast, animals, and plants; however, it remains unknown if the plant ERAD system involves plant-specific components. Here we report that the Arabidopsis ethyl methanesulfonate-mutagenized brassinosteroid-insensitive 1 suppressor 7 (EBS7) gene encodes an ER membrane-localized ERAD component that is highly conserved in land plants. Loss-of-function ebs7 mutations prevent ERAD of brassinosteroid insensitive 1-9 (bri1-9) and bri1-5, two ER-retained mutant variants of the cell-surface receptor for brassinosteroids (BRs). As a result, the two mutant receptors accumulate in the ER and consequently leak to the plasma membrane, resulting in the restoration of BR sensitivity and phenotypic suppression of the bri1-9 and bri1-5 mutants. EBS7 accumulates under ER stress, and its mutations lead to hypersensitivity to ER and salt stresses. EBS7 interacts with the ER membrane-anchored ubiquitin ligase Arabidopsis thaliana HMG-CoA reductase degradation 1a (AtHrd1a), one of the central components of the Arabidopsis ERAD machinery, and an ebs7 mutation destabilizes AtHrd1a to reduce polyubiquitination of bri1-9. Taken together, our results uncover a plant-specific component of a plant ERAD pathway and also suggest its likely biochemical function. PMID:26371323

  5. A Bifunctional Locus (BIO3-BIO1) Required for Biotin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Muralla, Rosanna; Chen, Elve; Sweeney, Colleen; Gray, Jennifer A.; Dickerman, Allan; Nikolau, Basil J.; Meinke, David

    2008-01-01

    We identify here the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) gene encoding the third enzyme in the biotin biosynthetic pathway, dethiobiotin synthetase (BIO3; At5g57600). This gene is positioned immediately upstream of BIO1, which is known to be associated with the second reaction in the pathway. Reverse genetic analysis demonstrates that bio3 insertion mutants have a similar phenotype to the bio1 and bio2 auxotrophs identified using forward genetic screens for arrested embryos rescued on enriched nutrient medium. Unexpectedly, bio3 and bio1 mutants define a single genetic complementation group. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrates that separate BIO3 and BIO1 transcripts and two different types of chimeric BIO3-BIO1 transcripts are produced. Consistent with genetic data, one of the fused transcripts is monocistronic and encodes a bifunctional fusion protein. A splice variant is bicistronic, with distinct but overlapping reading frames. The dual functionality of the monocistronic transcript was confirmed by complementing the orthologous auxotrophs of Escherichia coli (bioD and bioA). BIO3-BIO1 transcripts from other plants provide further evidence for differential splicing, existence of a fusion protein, and localization of both enzymatic reactions to mitochondria. In contrast to most biosynthetic enzymes in eukaryotes, which are encoded by genes dispersed throughout the genome, biotin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis provides an intriguing example of a bifunctional locus that catalyzes two sequential reactions in the same metabolic pathway. This complex locus exhibits several unusual features that distinguish it from biotin operons in bacteria and from other genes known to encode bifunctional enzymes in plants. PMID:17993549

  6. Iron-induced turnover of the Arabidopsis IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER1 metal transporter requires lysine residues.

    PubMed

    Kerkeb, Loubna; Mukherjee, Indrani; Chatterjee, Iera; Lahner, Brett; Salt, David E; Connolly, Erin L

    2008-04-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient but is toxic if accumulated at high levels. Thus, iron uptake and distribution in plants are controlled by precise regulatory mechanisms. IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER1 (IRT1) is the major high affinity iron transporter responsible for iron uptake from the soil in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Previously, we showed that IRT1 is subject to posttranscriptional regulation; when expressed from the constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, IRT1 protein accumulates only in iron-deficient roots. IRT1 contains an intracellular loop that may be critical for posttranslational regulation by metals. Of particular interest are a histidine (His) motif (HGHGHGH) that might bind metals and two lysine residues that could serve as attachment sites for ubiquitin. We constructed a set of mutant IRT1 alleles: IRT1H154Q, IRT1H156Q, IRT1H158Q, IRT1H160Q, IRT14HQ (quadruple His mutant), IRT1K146R, IRT1K171R, and a double mutant (IRT1K146R,K171R). Mutation of the His or lysine residues did not eliminate the ability of IRT1 to transport iron or zinc. Expression of each of the IRT1 variants and an IRT1intact construct in plants from the 35S promoter revealed that either K146 or K171 is required for iron-induced protein turnover, and 35S-IRT1K146R,K171R plants contain higher levels of iron as compared to 35S-IRT1 and wild type. Furthermore, accumulation of metals in 35S-IRT1K146R,K171R plants was not associated with an increase in ferric chelate reductase activity; this result indicates that, at least under conditions when iron is abundant, reduction of ferric iron may not be the rate-limiting step in iron uptake by strategy I plants such as Arabidopsis.

  7. In silico comparative characterization of pharmacogenomic missense variants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Missense pharmacogenomic (PGx) variants refer to amino acid substitutions that potentially affect the pharmacokinetic (PK) or pharmacodynamic (PD) response to drug therapies. The PGx variants, as compared to disease-associated variants, have not been investigated as deeply. The ability to computationally predict future PGx variants is desirable; however, it is not clear what data sets should be used or what features are beneficial to this end. Hence we carried out a comparative characterization of PGx variants with annotated neutral and disease variants from UniProt, to test the predictive power of sequence conservation and structural information in discriminating these three groups. Results 126 PGx variants of high quality from PharmGKB were selected and two data sets were created: one set contained 416 variants with structural and sequence information, and, the other set contained 1,265 variants with sequence information only. In terms of sequence conservation, PGx variants are more conserved than neutral variants and much less conserved than disease variants. A weighted random forest was used to strike a more balanced classification for PGx variants. Generally structural features are helpful in discriminating PGx variant from the other two groups, but still classification of PGx from neutral polymorphisms is much less effective than between disease and neutral variants. Conclusions We found that PGx variants are much more similar to neutral variants than to disease variants in the feature space consisting of residue conservation, neighboring residue conservation, number of neighbors, and protein solvent accessibility. Such similarity poses great difficulty in the classification of PGx variants and polymorphisms. PMID:25057096

  8. Variants of Monteggia Type Injury: Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Firdouse, M; Han, CS; M Yusof, A

    2015-01-01

    Background Monteggia fracture-dislocation is rare in children. Various reports attest to its rarity, while recording the many variant of this injury. It is, therefore, easy to miss the diagnosis in the absence of proper clinical examination and radiographs. Case Report This report highlights two rare variants of Monteggia fracture-dislocation seen in children. The first case was a 12-year old girl alleged to have fallen from a 15- feet tall tree and sustaining a combined type III Monteggia injury with ipsilateral Type II Salter-Harris injury of distal end radius with a metaphyseal fracture of the distal third of the ulna. The second case was a 13-year old who had sustained a closed fracture of atypical Type I Monteggia hybrid lesion, in a road traffic accident. Conclusion This report highlights the rare variants of Monteggia fracture dislocation which could have been missed without proper clinical examinations and radiographs. PMID:28435591

  9. Hemoglobin Variants: Biochemical Properties and Clinical Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Thom, Christopher S.; Dickson, Claire F.; Gell, David A.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2013-01-01

    Diseases affecting hemoglobin synthesis and function are extremely common worldwide. More than 1000 naturally occurring human hemoglobin variants with single amino acid substitutions throughout the molecule have been discovered, mainly through their clinical and/or laboratory manifestations. These variants alter hemoglobin structure and biochemical properties with physiological effects ranging from insignificant to severe. Studies of these mutations in patients and in the laboratory have produced a wealth of information on hemoglobin biochemistry and biology with significant implications for hematology practice. More generally, landmark studies of hemoglobin performed over the past 60 years have established important paradigms for the disciplines of structural biology, genetics, biochemistry, and medicine. Here we review the major classes of hemoglobin variants, emphasizing general concepts and illustrative examples. PMID:23388674

  10. A phonetic explanation of pronunciation variant effects.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Meghan

    2013-07-01

    Effects of word-level phonetic variation on the recognition of words with different pronunciation variants (e.g., center produced with/(out) [t]) are investigated via the semantic- and pseudoword-priming paradigms. A bias favoring clearly articulated words with canonical variants ([nt]) is found. By reducing the bias, words with different variants show robust and equivalent lexical activation. The equivalence of different word forms highlights a snag for frequency-based theories of lexical access: How are words and word productions with vastly different frequencies recognized equally well by listeners? A process-based account is proposed, suggesting that careful speech induces bottom-up processing and casual speech induces top-down processing.

  11. Novel Human Butyrylcholinesterase Variants: Toward Organophosphonate Detoxication

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human butyrylcholinesterase (hBChE) is currently being developed as a detoxication enzyme for stoichiometric binding and/or catalytic hydrolysis of organophosphates. Herein, we describe the use of a molecular evolution method to develop novel hBChE variants with increased resistance to stereochemically defined nerve agent model compounds of soman, sarin, and cyclosarin. Novel hBChE variants (Y332S, D340H, and Y332S/D340H) were identified with an increased resistance to nerve agent model compounds that retained robust intrinsic catalytic efficiency. Molecular dynamics simulations of these variants revealed insights into the mechanism by which these structural changes conferred nerve agent model compound resistance. PMID:24902043

  12. Porokeratosis ptychotropica: a rare variant of porokeratosis.

    PubMed

    D'souza, Paschal; Dhali, Tapan Kumar; Arora, Shikha; Gupta, Himanshu; Khanna, Urmi

    2014-06-15

    Porokeratosis, a well recognized disorder of keratinization, is known to have several clinical variants. This report describes a rare variant characterized by verrucous plaques. An adult male presented with a slowly progressive verrucous plaque on the gluteal region that was resistant to conventional therapy. Careful inspection revealed a keratotic ridge at the plaque border leading to the diagnosis. Histopathology showed the presence of multiple cornoid lamellae confirming the diagnosis of porokeratosis ptychotropica. Porokeratosis ptychotropica is a rare variant of porokeratosis with fewer than 25 cases described in the literature. This report is to highlight the importance of considering this particular entity in the diagnosis of genitogluteal plaques, especially those not responding to conventional modalities.

  13. Analysis of rRNA gene methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana by CHEF-Conventional 2D gel electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Mohannath, Gireesha; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Contour-clamped homogenous electric field (CHEF) gel electrophoresis, a variant of Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), is a powerful technique for resolving large fragments of DNA (10 kb to 9 Mb). CHEF has many applications including the physical mapping of chromosomes, artificial chromosomes and sub-chromosomal DNA fragments, etc. Here we describe the use of CHEF and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to analyze rRNA gene methylation patterns within the two ~ 4 million base pair nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) of Arabidopsis thaliana. The method involves CHEF gel electrophoresis of agarose-embedded DNA following restriction endonuclease digestion to cut the NORs into large but resolvable segments, followed by digestion with methylation-sensitive restriction endonucleases and conventional (or CHEF) gel electrophoresis, in a second dimension. Resulting products are then detected by Southern blotting or PCR analyses capable of discriminating rRNA gene subtypes. PMID:27576719

  14. Analysis of rRNA Gene Methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana by CHEF-Conventional 2D Gel Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Mohannath, Gireesha; Pikaard, Craig S

    2016-01-01

    Contour-clamped homogenous electric field (CHEF) gel electrophoresis, a variant of Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), is a powerful technique for resolving large fragments of DNA (10 kb-9 Mb). CHEF has many applications including the physical mapping of chromosomes, artificial chromosomes, and sub-chromosomal DNA fragments, etc. Here, we describe the use of CHEF and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to analyze rRNA gene methylation patterns within the two ~4 million base pair nucleolus organizer regions (NORs) of Arabidopsis thaliana. The method involves CHEF gel electrophoresis of agarose-embedded DNA following restriction endonuclease digestion to cut the NORs into large but resolvable segments, followed by digestion with methylation-sensitive restriction endonucleases and conventional (or CHEF) gel electrophoresis, in a second dimension. Resulting products are then detected by Southern blotting or PCR analyses capable of discriminating rRNA gene subtypes.

  15. Light responses in Photoperiodism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony R. Cashmore

    2006-08-01

    ADO1: An Arabidopsis blue light photoreceptor We have reported the characterization of an Arabidopsis gene encoding the ADAGIO 1 (ADO1) protein (Jarillo et al., 2001a). ADO1 contains a LOV domain, similar to WHITE COLLAR 1 (WC1), a photoreceptor for entrainment of Neurospora circadian rhythms (Froehlich et al., 2002), as well as PHOT1 and PHOT2, the blue light photoreceptors for phototropism (Briggs et al., 2001; Christie et al., 1998; Jarillo et al., 2001b; Kinoshita et al., 2001). Loss of function ado1 mutants show an unusually long periodicity for their free running circadian rhythm (Jarillo et al., 2001a). This observation holds for plants grown under white light as well as blue light and surprisingly, plants grown under red light also show altered circadian properties. The similarity of the LOV domain of ADO1 to those of PHOT1, PHOT2 and WC1 (known flavoprotein photoreceptors) as well as the genetic and molecular properties of ADO1, indicate that ADO1 is likely a new class of blue light photoreceptor. Indeed, the LOV domain of the related FKF1/ADO3 has been shown to bind FMN, and exhibit the in vitro photochemistry characteristic of PHOT1 (Imaizumi et al., 2003). Furthermore, ZTL/ADO1 has been shown to participate in the circadian and proteasome mediated degradation of the Arabidopsis clock protein, TOC1 (Mas et al., 2003). We also showed that the ado1 mutation selectively confers hypersensitivity to red light — when grown under red light (but not blue light) the ado1 mutant possesses an unusually short hypocotyl. This red light hypersensivity is even more severe in a triple ado1 ado2 ado3 mutant — ADO2 and ADO3 being the two other members of this ADAGIO gene family. This finding of a mutant phenotype under red light is somewhat unexpected for a protein thought to function as a photoreceptor for blue light. We have pursued our studies of ADO1 by preparing a mutant gene for which we have altered the codon for the cysteine residue conserved in all LOV

  16. Charge variants in IgG1

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Sirj; Hutchinson, Ryan; Kwong, Zephania W; Yang, Jihong; Wang, Xiangdan; Yao, Zhenling; Sreedhara, Alavattam; Cano, Tony; Tesar, Devin; Nijem, Ihsan; Allison, David E; Wong, Pin Yee; Kao, Yung-Hsiang; Quan, Cynthia; Joshi, Amita; Harris, Reed J; Motchnik, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Antibody charge variants have gained considerable attention in the biotechnology industry due to their potential influence on stability and biological activity. Subtle differences in the relative proportions of charge variants are often observed during routine biomanufacture or process changes and pose a challenge to demonstrating product comparability. To gain further insights into the impact on biological activity and pharmacokinetics (PK) of monoclonal antibody (mAb) charge heterogeneity, we isolated the major charge forms of a recombinant humanized IgG1 and compared their in vitro properties and in vivo PK. The mAb starting material had a pI range of 8.7–9.1 and was composed of about 20% acidic variants, 12% basic variants and 68% main peak. Cation exchange displacement chromatography was used to isolate the acidic, basic and main peak fractions for animal studies. Detailed analyses were performed on the isolated fractions to identify specific chemical modification contributing to the charge differences and were also characterized for purity and in vitro potency prior to being administered either subcutaneously (SC) or intravenously (IV) in rats. All isolated materials had similar potency and rat FcRn binding relative to the starting material. Following IV or SC administration (10 mg/kg) in rats, no difference in serum PK was observed, indicating that physiochemical modifications and pI differences among charge variants were not sufficient to result in PK changes. Thus, these results provided meaningful information for the comparative evaluation of charge-related heterogeneity of mAbs and suggested that charge variants of IgGs do not affect the in vitro potency, FcRn binding affinity or the PK properties in rats. PMID:20818176

  17. PHOSPHATIDIC ACID PHOSPHOHYDROLASE1 and 2 Regulate Phospholipid Synthesis at the Endoplasmic Reticulum in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Eastmond, Peter J.; Quettier, Anne-Laure; Kroon, Johan T.M.; Craddock, Christian; Adams, Nicolette; Slabas, Antoni R.

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipid biosynthesis is essential for the construction of most eukaryotic cell membranes, but how this process is regulated in plants remains poorly understood. Here, we show that in Arabidopsis thaliana, two Mg2+-dependent phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolases called PAH1 and PAH2 act redundantly to repress phospholipid biosynthesis at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Leaves from pah1 pah2 double mutants contain ~1.8-fold more phospholipid than the wild type and exhibit gross changes in ER morphology, which are consistent with massive membrane overexpansion. The net rate of incorporation of [methyl-14C]choline into phosphatidylcholine (PC) is ~1.8-fold greater in the double mutant, and the transcript abundance of several key genes that encode enzymes involved in phospholipid synthesis is increased. In particular, we show that PHOSPHORYLETHANOLAMINE N-METHYLTRANSFERASE1 (PEAMT1) is upregulated at the level of transcription in pah1 pah2 leaves. PEAMT catalyzes the first committed step of choline synthesis in Arabidopsis and defines a variant pathway for PC synthesis not found in yeasts or mammals. Our data suggest that PAH1/2 play a regulatory role in phospholipid synthesis that is analogous to that described in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the target enzymes differ, and key components of the signal transduction pathway do not appear to be conserved. PMID:20699392

  18. Suppression of Dwarf and irregular xylem Phenotypes Generates Low-Acetylated Biomass Lines in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Valérie; Ducamp, Aloïse; Trouverie, Jacques; Fortabat, Marie-Noëlle; Guillebaux, Alexia; Baldy, Aurélie; Naquin, Delphine; Lapierre, Catherine; Mouille, Gregory; Horlow, Christine; Durand-Tardif, Mylène

    2015-01-01

    eskimo1-5 (esk1-5) is a dwarf Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant that has a constitutive drought syndrome and collapsed xylem vessels, along with low acetylation levels in xylan and mannan. ESK1 has xylan O-acetyltransferase activity in vitro. We used a suppressor strategy on esk1-5 to screen for variants with wild-type growth and low acetylation levels, a favorable combination for ethanol production. We found a recessive mutation in the KAKTUS (KAK) gene that suppressed dwarfism and the collapsed xylem character, the cause of decreased hydraulic conductivity in the esk1-5 mutant. Backcrosses between esk1-5 and two independent knockout kak mutants confirmed suppression of the esk1-5 effect. kak single mutants showed larger stem diameters than the wild type. The KAK promoter fused with a reporter gene showed activity in the vascular cambium, phloem, and primary xylem in the stem and hypocotyl. However, suppression of the collapsed xylem phenotype in esk1 kak double mutants was not associated with the recovery of cell wall O-acetylation or any major cell wall modifications. Therefore, our results indicate that, in addition to its described activity as a repressor of endoreduplication, KAK may play a role in vascular development. Furthermore, orthologous esk1 kak double mutants may hold promise for ethanol production in crop plants. PMID:25888614

  19. Epigenetic modification of centromeric chromatin: hypomethylation of DNA sequences in the CENH3-associated chromatin in Arabidopsis thaliana and maize.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenli; Lee, Hye-Ran; Koo, Dal-Hoe; Jiang, Jiming

    2008-01-01

    The centromere in eukaryotes is defined by the presence of a special histone H3 variant, CENH3. Centromeric chromatin consists of blocks of CENH3-containing nucleosomes interspersed with blocks of canonical H3-containing nucleosomes. However, it is not known how CENH3 is precisely deposited in the centromeres. It has been suggested that epigenetic modifications of the centromeric chromatin may play a role in centromere identity. The centromeres of Arabidopsis thaliana are composed of megabase-sized arrays of a 178-bp satellite repeat. Here, we report that the 178-bp repeats associated with the CENH3-containing chromatin (CEN chromatin) are hypomethylated compared with the same repeats located in the flanking pericentromeric regions. A similar hypomethylation of DNA in CEN chromatin was also revealed in maize (Zea mays). Hypomethylation of the DNA in CEN chromatin is correlated with a significantly reduced level of H3K9me2 in Arabidopsis. We demonstrate that the 178-bp repeats from CEN chromatin display a distinct distribution pattern of the CG and CNG sites, which may provide a foundation for the differential methylation of these repeats. Our results suggest that DNA methylation plays an important role in epigenetic demarcation of the CEN chromatin.

  20. The Arabidopsis Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) Components AtBMI1A, B, and C Impact Gene Networks throughout All Stages of Plant Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yue

    2017-01-01

    Polycomb Group regulation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is required to maintain cell differentiation and allow developmental phase transitions. This is achieved by the activity of three PcG repressive complex 2s (PRC2s) and the participation of a yet poorly defined PRC1. Previous results showed that apparent PRC1 components perform discrete roles during plant development, suggesting the existence of PRC1 variants; however, it is not clear in how many processes these components participate. We show that AtBMI1 proteins are required to promote all developmental phase transitions and to control cell proliferation during organ growth and development, expanding their proposed range of action. While AtBMI1 function during germination is closely linked to B3 domain transcription factors VAL1/2 possibly in combination with GT-box binding factors, other AtBMI1 regulatory networks require participation of different factor combinations. Conversely, EMF1 and LHP1 bind many H3K27me3 positive genes up-regulated in atbmi1a/b/c mutants; however, loss of their function affects expression of a different subset, suggesting that even if EMF1, LHP1, and AtBMI1 exist in a common PRC1 variant, their role in repression depends on the functional context. PMID:27837089

  1. Rare and Common Variants: Twenty arguments

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have greatly improved our understanding of the genetic basis of disease risk. The fact that they tend not to identify more than a fraction of the specific causal loci has led to divergence of opinion over whether most of the variance is hidden as numerous rare variants of large effect, or common variants of very small effect. Here I review 20 arguments for and against each of these models of the genetic basis of complex traits, and conclude that both classes of effect can be reconciled readily. PMID:22251874

  2. Using Arabidopsis to study shoot branching in biomass willow.

    PubMed

    Ward, Sally P; Salmon, Jemma; Hanley, Steven J; Karp, Angela; Leyser, Ottoline

    2013-06-01

    The success of the short-rotation coppice system in biomass willow (Salix spp.) relies on the activity of the shoot-producing meristems found on the coppice stool. However, the regulation of the activity of these meristems is poorly understood. In contrast, our knowledge of the mechanisms behind axillary meristem regulation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has grown rapidly in the past few years through the exploitation of integrated physiological, genetic, and molecular assays. Here, we demonstrate that these assays can be directly transferred to study the control of bud activation in biomass willow and to assess similarities with the known hormone regulatory system in Arabidopsis. Bud hormone response was found to be qualitatively remarkably similar in Salix spp. and Arabidopsis. These similarities led us to test whether Arabidopsis hormone mutants could be used to assess allelic variation in the cognate Salix spp. hormone genes. Allelic differences in Salix spp. strigolactone genes were observed using this approach. These results demonstrate that both knowledge and assays from Arabidopsis axillary meristem biology can be successfully applied to Salix spp. and can increase our understanding of a fundamental aspect of short-rotation coppice biomass production, allowing more targeted breeding.

  3. Increased Calcium Levels and Prolonged Shelf Life in Tomatoes Expressing Arabidopsis H+/Ca2+ Transporters1

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sunghun; Cheng, Ning Hui; Pittman, Jon K.; Yoo, Kil Sun; Park, Jungeun; Smith, Roberta H.; Hirschi, Kendal D.

    2005-01-01

    Here we demonstrate that fruit from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants expressing Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) H+/cation exchangers (CAX) have more calcium (Ca2+) and prolonged shelf life when compared to controls. Previously, using the prototypical CAX1, it has been demonstrated that, in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells, CAX transporters are activated when the N-terminal autoinhibitory region is deleted, to give an N-terminally truncated CAX (sCAX), or altered through specific manipulations. To continue to understand the diversity of CAX function, we used yeast assays to characterize the putative transport properties of CAX4 and N-terminal variants of CAX4. CAX4 variants can suppress the Ca2+ hypersensitive yeast phenotypes and also appear to be more specific Ca2+ transporters than sCAX1. We then compared the phenotypes of sCAX1- and CAX4-expressing tomato lines. The sCAX1-expressing tomato lines demonstrate increased vacuolar H+/Ca2+ transport, when measured in root tissue, elevated fruit Ca2+ level, and prolonged shelf life but have severe alterations in plant development and morphology, including increased incidence of blossom-end rot. The CAX4-expressing plants demonstrate more modest increases in Ca2+ levels and shelf life but no deleterious effects on plant growth. These findings suggest that CAX expression may fortify plants with Ca2+ and may serve as an alternative to the application of CaCl2 used to extend the shelf life of numerous agriculturally important commodities. However, judicious regulation of CAX transport is required to assure optimal plant growth. PMID:16244156

  4. Arabidopsis phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase 2 contains a functional nuclear localization sequence and interacts with alpha-importins.

    PubMed

    Gerth, Katharina; Lin, Feng; Daamen, Franziska; Menzel, Wilhelm; Heinrich, Franziska; Heilmann, Mareike

    2017-09-26

    The Arabidopsis phosphoinositide kinase PIP5K2 has been implicated in the control of membrane trafficking and is important for development and growth. In addition to cytosolic functions of phosphoinositides, a nuclear phosphoinositide system has been proposed, but evidence for nuclear phosphoinositides in plants is limited. Fluorescence-tagged variants of PIP5K2 reside in the nucleus of Arabidopsis root meristem cells, in addition to reported plasma membrane localization. Here we report on the interaction of PIP5K2 with alpha-importins and characterize its nuclear localization sequences (NLSs). The PIP5K2 sequence contains four putative NLSs (NLSa-d) and only a PIP5K2 fragment containing NLSs is imported into nuclei of onion epidermis cells upon transient expression. PIP5K2 interacts physically with alpha-importin isoforms in cytosolic split-ubiquitin-based yeast-two-hybrid tests, in dot blot experiments, and in immuno-pull-downs. A 27-amino acid-fragment of PIP5K2 containing NLSc is necessary and sufficient to mediate the nuclear import of a large cargo fusion consisting of two mCherry markers fused to RubisCO large subunit. Substitution of basic residues in NLSc results in reduced import of PIP5K2 or other cargoes into plant nuclei. The data suggest that PIP5K2 is subject to active, alpha-importin-mediated nuclear import, consistent with a nuclear role for PIP5K2 in addition to its reported cytosolic functions. The detection of both substrate and product of PIP5K2 in plant nuclei according to reporter fluorescence and immunofluorescence further supports the notion of a nuclear phosphoinositide system in plants. Variants of PIP5K2 with reduced nuclear residence might serve as tools for the future functional study of plant nuclear phosphoinositides. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Overexpression of Arabidopsis AnnAt8 Alleviates Abiotic Stress in Transgenic Arabidopsis and Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Deepanker; Ahmed, Israr; Shukla, Pawan; Boyidi, Prasanna; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stress results in massive loss of crop productivity throughout the world. Because of our limited knowledge of the plant defense mechanisms, it is very difficult to exploit the plant genetic resources for manipulation of traits that could benefit multiple stress tolerance in plants. To achieve this, we need a deeper understanding of the plant gene regulatory mechanisms involved in stress responses. Understanding the roles of different members of plant gene families involved in different stress responses, would be a step in this direction. Arabidopsis, which served as a model system for the plant research, is also the most suitable system for the functional characterization of plant gene families. Annexin family in Arabidopsis also is one gene family which has not been fully explored. Eight annexin genes have been reported in the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression studies of different Arabidopsis annexins revealed their differential regulation under various abiotic stress conditions. AnnAt8 (At5g12380), a member of this family has been shown to exhibit ~433 and ~175 fold increase in transcript levels under NaCl and dehydration stress respectively. To characterize Annexin8 (AnnAt8) further, we have generated transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants constitutively expressing AnnAt8, which were evaluated under different abiotic stress conditions. AnnAt8 overexpressing transgenic plants exhibited higher seed germination rates, better plant growth, and higher chlorophyll retention when compared to wild type plants under abiotic stress treatments. Under stress conditions transgenic plants showed comparatively higher levels of proline and lower levels of malondialdehyde compared to the wild-type plants. Real-Time PCR analyses revealed that the expression of several stress-regulated genes was altered in AnnAt8 over-expressing transgenic tobacco plants, and the enhanced tolerance exhibited by the transgenic plants can be correlated with altered expressions of

  6. The Curation of Genetic Variants: Difficulties and Possible Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kapil Raj; Maden, Narendra; Poudel, Barsha; Pradhananga, Sailendra; Sharma, Amit Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The curation of genetic variants from biomedical articles is required for various clinical and research purposes. Nowadays, establishment of variant databases that include overall information about variants is becoming quite popular. These databases have immense utility, serving as a user-friendly information storehouse of variants for information seekers. While manual curation is the gold standard method for curation of variants, it can turn out to be time-consuming on a large scale thus necessitating the need for automation. Curation of variants described in biomedical literature may not be straightforward mainly due to various nomenclature and expression issues. Though current trends in paper writing on variants is inclined to the standard nomenclature such that variants can easily be retrieved, we have a massive store of variants in the literature that are present as non-standard names and the online search engines that are predominantly used may not be capable of finding them. For effective curation of variants, knowledge about the overall process of curation, nature and types of difficulties in curation, and ways to tackle the difficulties during the task are crucial. Only by effective curation, can variants be correctly interpreted. This paper presents the process and difficulties of curation of genetic variants with possible solutions and suggestions from our work experience in the field including literature support. The paper also highlights aspects of interpretation of genetic variants and the importance of writing papers on variants following standard and retrievable methods. PMID:23317699

  7. The curation of genetic variants: difficulties and possible solutions.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Kapil Raj; Maden, Narendra; Poudel, Barsha; Pradhananga, Sailendra; Sharma, Amit Kumar

    2012-12-01

    The curation of genetic variants from biomedical articles is required for various clinical and research purposes. Nowadays, establishment of variant databases that include overall information about variants is becoming quite popular. These databases have immense utility, serving as a user-friendly information storehouse of variants for information seekers. While manual curation is the gold standard method for curation of variants, it can turn out to be time-consuming on a large scale thus necessitating the need for automation. Curation of variants described in biomedical literature may not be straightforward mainly due to various nomenclature and expression issues. Though current trends in paper writing on variants is inclined to the standard nomenclature such that variants can easily be retrieved, we have a massive store of variants in the literature that are present as non-standard names and the online search engines that are predominantly used may not be capable of finding them. For effective curation of variants, knowledge about the overall process of curation, nature and types of difficulties in curation, and ways to tackle the difficulties during the task are crucial. Only by effective curation, can variants be correctly interpreted. This paper presents the process and difficulties of curation of genetic variants with possible solutions and suggestions from our work experience in the field including literature support. The paper also highlights aspects of interpretation of genetic variants and the importance of writing papers on variants following standard and retrievable methods. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Overexpression of Rad51C splice variants in colorectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Kalvala, Arjun; Gao, Li; Aguila, Brittany; Reese, Tyler; Otterson, Gregory A; Villalona-Calero, Miguel A; Duan, Wenrui

    2015-04-20

    Functional alterations in Rad51C are the cause of the Fanconi anemia complementation group O (FANCO) gene disorder. We have identified novel splice variants of Rad51C mRNA in colorectal tumors and cells. The alternatively spliced transcript variants are formed either without exon-7 (variant 1), without exon 6 and 7 (variant 2) or without exon 7 and 8 (variant 3). Real time PCR analysis of nine pair-matched colorectal tumors and non-tumors showed that variant 1 was overexpressed in tumors compared to matched non-tumors. Among 38 colorectal tumor RNA samples analyzed, 18 contained variant 1, 12 contained variant 2, 14 contained variant 3, and eight expressed full length Rad51C exclusively. Bisulfite DNA sequencing showed promoter methylation of Rad51C in tumor cells. 5-azacytidine treatment of LS-174T cells caused a 14 fold increase in variant 1, a 4.8 fold increase for variant 3 and 3.4 fold for variant 2 compared to 2.5 fold increase in WT. Expression of Rad51C variants is associated with FANCD2 foci positive colorectal tumors and is associated with microsatellite stability in those tumors. Further investigation is needed to elucidate differential function of the Rad51C variants to evaluate potential effects in drug resistance and DNA repair.

  9. Stomatal Density Influences Leaf Water and Leaf Wax D/H Values in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H.; Feakins, S. J.; Sternberg, L. O.

    2014-12-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition (δD) of plant leaf wax is a powerful tool to study the hydrology of past and present environments. The δD value of leaf waxes is known to primarily reflect the δD value of source water, modified by biological fractionations commonly summarized as the 'net or apparent' fractionation. It remains a challenge, however, to quantitatively relate the isotopic composition of the end product (wax) back to that of the precursor (water) because multiple isotope effects contributing to the net fractionation are not yet well understood. Transgenic variants have heretofore unexplored potential to isolate individual isotope effects. Here we report the first hydrogen isotopic measurements from transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants with calculations of leaf water enrichment, net and biosynthetic fractionation values from measured δD of plant waters and leaf wax n-alkanes. We employed transgenic Arabidopsis leaves, engineered to have different stomatal density, by differential expression of the stomatal growth hormone stomagen. Comparison of variants and wild types allow us to isolate the effects of stomatal density on leaf water and the net fractionation expressed by leaf wax biomarkers. Results show that transgenic leaves with denser pores have more enriched leaf water and leaf wax δD values than wild type and even more so than transgenic leaves with sparse stomata (difference of 10 ‰). Our findings that stomatal density controls leaf water and leaf wax δD values adds insights into the cause of variations in net fractionations between species, as well as suggesting that geological variations in stomatal density may modulate the sedimentary leaf wax δD record. In nature, stomatal density varies between species and environments, and all other factors being equal, this will contribute to variations in fractionations observed. Over geological history, lower stomatal densities occur at times of elevated pCO2; our findings predict reduced leaf

  10. Carotenogenesis Is Regulated by 5'UTR-Mediated Translation of Phytoene Synthase Splice Variants.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Daniel; Voß, Björn; Maass, Dirk; Wüst, Florian; Schaub, Patrick; Beyer, Peter; Welsch, Ralf

    2016-12-01

    Phytoene synthase (PSY) catalyzes the highly regulated, frequently rate-limiting synthesis of the first biosynthetically formed carotene. While PSY constitutes a small gene family in most plant taxa, the Brassicaceae, including Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), predominantly possess a single PSY gene. This monogenic situation is compensated by the differential expression of two alternative splice variants (ASV), which differ in length and in the exon/intron retention of their 5'UTRs. ASV1 contains a long 5'UTR (untranslated region) and is involved in developmentally regulated carotenoid formation, such as during deetiolation. ASV2 contains a short 5'UTR and is preferentially induced when an immediate increase in the carotenoid pathway flux is required, such as under salt stress or upon sudden light intensity changes. We show that the long 5'UTR of ASV1 is capable of attenuating the translational activity in response to high carotenoid pathway fluxes. This function resides in a defined 5'UTR stretch with two predicted interconvertible RNA conformations, as known from riboswitches, which might act as a flux sensor. The translation-inhibitory structure is absent from the short 5'UTR of ASV2 allowing to bypass translational inhibition under conditions requiring rapidly increased pathway fluxes. The mechanism is not found in the rice (Oryza sativa) PSY1 5'UTR, consistent with the prevalence of transcriptional control mechanisms in taxa with multiple PSY genes. The translational control mechanism identified is interpreted in terms of flux adjustments needed in response to retrograde signals stemming from intermediates of the plastid-localized carotenoid biosynthesis pathway. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Negative feedback control of jasmonate signaling by an alternative splice variant of JAZ10.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Javier E; Shyu, Christine; Campos, Marcelo L; Patel, Lalita C; Chung, Hoo Sun; Yao, Jian; He, Sheng Yang; Howe, Gregg A

    2013-06-01

    The plant hormone jasmonate (JA) activates gene expression by promoting ubiquitin-dependent degradation of jasmonate ZIM domain (JAZ) transcriptional repressor proteins. A key feature of all JAZ proteins is the highly conserved Jas motif, which mediates both JAZ degradation and JAZ binding to the transcription factor MYC2. Rapid expression of JAZ genes in response to JA is thought to attenuate JA responses, but little is known about the mechanisms by which newly synthesized JAZ proteins exert repression in the presence of the hormone. Here, we show in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that desensitization to JA is mediated by an alternative splice variant (JAZ10.4) of JAZ10 that lacks the Jas motif. Unbiased protein-protein interaction screens identified three related basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors (MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4) and the corepressor NINJA as JAZ10.4-binding partners. We show that the amino-terminal region of JAZ10.4 contains a cryptic MYC2-binding site that resembles the Jas motif and that the ZIM motif of JAZ10.4 functions as a transferable repressor domain whose activity is associated with the recruitment of NINJA. Functional studies showed that the expression of JAZ10.4 from the native JAZ10 promoter complemented the JA-hypersensitive phenotype of a jaz10 mutant. Moreover, treatment of these complemented lines with JA resulted in the rapid accumulation of JAZ10.4 protein. Our results provide an explanation for how the unique domain architecture of JAZ10.4 links transcription factors to a corepressor complex and suggest how JA-induced transcription and alternative splicing of JAZ10 premessenger RNA creates a regulatory circuit to attenuate JA responses.

  12. N-Glycopeptide Profiling in Arabidopsis Inflorescence.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shou-Ling; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Burlingame, Alma L; Chalkley, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    This study presents the first large-scale analysis of plant intact glycopeptides. Using wheat germ agglutinin lectin weak affinity chromatography to enrich modified peptides, followed by electron transfer dissociation (ETD)(1) fragmentation tandem mass spectrometry, glycan compositions on over 1100 glycopeptides from 270 proteins found in Arabidopsis inflorescence tissue were characterized. While some sites were only detected with a single glycan attached, others displayed up to 16 different glycoforms. Among the identified glycopeptides were four modified in nonconsensus glycosylation motifs. While most of the modified proteins are secreted, membrane, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), or Golgi-localized proteins, surprisingly, N-linked sugars were detected on a protein predicted to be cytosolic or nuclear. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. The ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The simple gas ethylene influences a diverse array of plant growth and developmental processes including germination, senescence, cell elongation, and fruit ripening. This review focuses on recent molecular genetic studies, principally in Arabidopsis, in which components of the ethylene response pathway have been identified. The isolation and characterization of two of these genes has revealed that ethylene sensing involves a protein kinase cascade. One of these genes encodes a protein with similarity to the ubiquitous Raf family of Ser/Thr protein kinases. A second gene shows similarity to the prokaryotic two-component histidine kinases and most likely encodes an ethylene receptor. Additional elements involved in ethylene signaling have only been identified genetically. The characterization of these genes and mutants will be discussed.

  14. Molecular genetic analysis of phototropism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Tatsuya; Haga, Ken

    2012-09-01

    Plant life is strongly dependent on the environment, and plants regulate their growth and development in response to many different environmental stimuli. One of the regulatory mechanisms involved in these responses is phototropism, which allows plants to change their growth direction in response to the location of the light source. Since the study of phototropism by Darwin, many physiological studies of this phenomenon have been published. Recently, molecular genetic analyses of Arabidopsis have begun to shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying this response system, including phototropin blue light photoreceptors, phototropin signaling components, auxin transporters, auxin action mechanisms and others. This review highlights some of the recent progress that has been made in further elucidating the phototropic response, with particular emphasis on mutant phenotypes.

  15. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Phototropism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Tatsuya; Haga, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Plant life is strongly dependent on the environment, and plants regulate their growth and development in response to many different environmental stimuli. One of the regulatory mechanisms involved in these responses is phototropism, which allows plants to change their growth direction in response to the location of the light source. Since the study of phototropism by Darwin, many physiological studies of this phenomenon have been published. Recently, molecular genetic analyses of Arabidopsis have begun to shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying this response system, including phototropin blue light photoreceptors, phototropin signaling components, auxin transporters, auxin action mechanisms and others. This review highlights some of the recent progress that has been made in further elucidating the phototropic response, with particular emphasis on mutant phenotypes. PMID:22864452

  16. Regulation of the Arabidopsis defense transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Eulgem, Thomas

    2005-02-01

    Transcriptional re-programming is a key step of plant defense in response to pathogen recognition. Microarray analyses combined with genetic and biochemical approaches are now enabling us to study basic principles and details of regulatory mechanisms controlling the defense transcriptome in Arabidopsis. Recent results show that signaling pathways used by different defense systems converge and target overlapping gene sets. Furthermore, a quantitative mechanism common to multiple defense systems modulates transcript levels of these defense-associated genes. Most importantly, some transcription factors have been proven to play a pivotal role in disease resistance. Regulatory circuits linking signaling and gene regulation are emerging, suggesting that a complex interplay of transcriptional activators and repressors fine-tunes expression of the defense transcriptome.

  17. The Arabidopsis Cyclophilin Gene Family1

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Patrick G.N.; Horton, Peter; Gray, Julie E.

    2004-01-01

    Database searching has allowed the identification of a number of previously unreported single and multidomain isoform members of the Arabidopsis cyclophilin gene family. In addition to the cyclophilin-like peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase domain, the latter contain a variety of other domains with characterized functions. Transcriptional analysis showed they are expressed throughout the plant, and different isoforms are present in all parts of the cell including the cytosol, nucleus, mitochondria, secretory pathway, and chloroplast. The abundance and diversity of cyclophilin isoforms suggests that, like their animal counterparts, plant cyclophilins are likely to be important proteins involved in a wide variety of cellular processes. As well as fulfilling the basic role of protein folding, they may also play important roles in mRNA processing, protein degradation, and signal transduction and thus may be crucial during both development and stress responsiveness. PMID:15051864

  18. A Space Flight Cultivation Protocol for Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, H. G.

    2008-06-01

    A tube-based method is presented for the cultivation and manipulation of Arabidopsis thaliana during space flight experimentation. Seeds were germinated on rock-wool plugs and subsequently transferred into modified polypropylene conical tubes (cut to 5 cm lengths) at 7 days after planting. Each tube contained four side-situated slits through which capillary mat strips were woven. An additional capillary mat wick extended from below the tube up through the bottom to the mid-interior portion. The incorporation of Fibrous Ion Exchange Resin Substrate provided nutrients. The tubes were transferred to plant compartments containing a horticulture foam matrix that received water inputs. Vigorous seedling development through to seed production was achieved. Dispersed seeds frequently germinated on top of the foam substrate, yielding a 2nd generation of seedlings. The methods used herein could be applied to other plant species to be flown in space.

  19. Radiation-sensitive mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, M.E.; Harlow, G.R.; Liu, Z.

    1995-06-01

    Five Arabidopsis mutants have been isolated on the basis of hypersensitivity of leaf tissue to UV light. For each mutant, the UV-hypersensitive phenotype (uvh) was inherited as a single recessive Mendelian trait. In addition, each uvh mutant represented a separate complementation group. Three of the mutations producing the UV hypersensitive phenotype have been mapped relative to either genetic markers or physical microsatellite polymorphisms. Locus UVH1 is linked to nga76 on chromosome 5, UVH3 to GL1 on chromosome three, and UVH6 to nga59 on chromosome 1. Each uvh mutant has a characteristic pattern of sensitivity based on UV sensitivity of leaf tissue, UV sensitivity of root tissue, and ionizing radiation sensitivity of seeds. On the basis of these patterns, possible molecular defects in these mutants are discussed. 30 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. The ethylene signal transduction pathway in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The gaseous hormone ethylene is an important regulator of plant growth and development. Using a simple response of etiolated seedlings to ethylene as a genetic screen, genes involved in ethylene signal transduction have been identified in Arabidopsis. Analysis of two of these genes that have been cloned reveals that ethylene signalling involves a combination of a protein (ETR1) with similarity to bacterial histidine kinases and a protein (CTR1) with similarity to Raf-1, a protein kinase involved in multiple signalling cascades in eukaryotic cells. Several lines of investigation provide compelling evidence that ETR1 encodes an ethylene receptor. For the first time there is a glimpse of the molecular circuitry underlying the signal transduction pathway for a plant hormone.

  1. ELF3 controls thermoresponsive growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Box, Mathew S; Huang, B Emma; Domijan, Mirela; Jaeger, Katja E; Khattak, Asif Khan; Yoo, Seong Jeon; Sedivy, Emma L; Jones, D Marc; Hearn, Timothy J; Webb, Alex A R; Grant, Alastair; Locke, James C W; Wigge, Philip A

    2015-01-19

    Plant development is highly responsive to ambient temperature, and this trait has been linked to the ability of plants to adapt to climate change. The mechanisms by which natural populations modulate their thermoresponsiveness are not known. To address this, we surveyed Arabidopsis accessions for variation in thermal responsiveness of elongation growth and mapped the corresponding loci. We find that the transcriptional regulator EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3) controls elongation growth in response to temperature. Through a combination of modeling and experiments, we show that high temperature relieves the gating of growth at night, highlighting the importance of temperature-dependent repressors of growth. ELF3 gating of transcriptional targets responds rapidly and reversibly to changes in temperature. We show that the binding of ELF3 to target promoters is temperature dependent, suggesting a mechanism where temperature directly controls ELF3 activity.

  2. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response in Arabidopsis Roots

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yueh; Kanehara, Kazue

    2017-01-01

    Roots are the frontier of plant body to perceive underground environmental change. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response represents circumvention of cellular stress caused by various environmental changes; however, a limited number of studies are available on the ER stress responses in roots. Here, we report the tunicamycin (TM) -induced ER stress response in Arabidopsis roots by monitoring expression patterns of immunoglobulin-binding protein 3 (BiP3), a representative marker for the response. Roots promptly responded to the TM-induced ER stress through the induction of similar sets of ER stress-responsive genes. However, not all cells responded uniformly to the TM-induced ER stress in roots, as BiP3 was highly expressed in root tips, an outer layer in elongation zone, and an inner layer in mature zone of roots. We suggest that ER stress response in roots has tissue specificity. PMID:28298914

  3. Live confocal imaging of Arabidopsis flower buds.

    PubMed

    Prunet, Nathanaël; Jack, Thomas P; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2016-11-01

    Recent advances in confocal microscopy, coupled with the development of numerous fluorescent reporters, provide us with a powerful tool to study the development of plants. Live confocal imaging has been used extensively to further our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the formation of roots, shoots and leaves. However, it has not been widely applied to flowers, partly because of specific challenges associated with the imaging of flower buds. Here, we describe how to prepare and grow shoot apices of Arabidopsis in vitro, to perform both single-point and time-lapse imaging of live, developing flower buds with either an upright or an inverted confocal microscope. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. RNA structure, binding, and coordination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Foley, Shawn W; Kramer, Marianne C; Gregory, Brian D

    2017-09-01

    From the moment of transcription, up through degradation, each RNA transcript is bound by an ever-changing cohort of RNA binding proteins. The binding of these proteins is regulated by both the primary RNA sequence, as well as the intramolecular RNA folding, or secondary structure, of the transcript. Thus, RNA secondary structure regulates many post-transcriptional processes. With the advent of next generation sequencing, several techniques have been developed to generate global landscapes of both RNA-protein interactions and RNA secondary structure. In this review, we describe the current state of the field detailing techniques to globally interrogate RNA secondary structure and/or RNA-protein interaction sites, as well as our current understanding of these features in the transcriptome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. WIREs RNA 2017, 8:e1426. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1426 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Cation channels in the Arabidopsis plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Véry, Anne Aliénor; Sentenac, Hervé

    2002-04-01

    In vivo analyses have identified different functional types of ion channels in various plant tissues and cells. The Arabidopsis genome contains approximately 70 genes for ion channels, of which 57 might be cation-selective channels (K(+), Ca(2+) or poorly discriminating channels). Here, we describe the different families of (putative) cation channels: the Shakers, the two-P-domain and Kir K(+) channels (encoded by the KCO genes), the cyclic-nucleotide-gated channels, the glutamate receptors, and the Ca(2+) channel TPC1. We also compare molecular data with the data obtained in planta, which should lead to a better understanding of the identity of these channels and provide clues about their roles in plant nutrition and cell signalling.

  6. The ethylene signal transduction pathway in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The gaseous hormone ethylene is an important regulator of plant growth and development. Using a simple response of etiolated seedlings to ethylene as a genetic screen, genes involved in ethylene signal transduction have been identified in Arabidopsis. Analysis of two of these genes that have been cloned reveals that ethylene signalling involves a combination of a protein (ETR1) with similarity to bacterial histidine kinases and a protein (CTR1) with similarity to Raf-1, a protein kinase involved in multiple signalling cascades in eukaryotic cells. Several lines of investigation provide compelling evidence that ETR1 encodes an ethylene receptor. For the first time there is a glimpse of the molecular circuitry underlying the signal transduction pathway for a plant hormone.

  7. Crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana cytokinin dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Bitto, Eduard; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2008-08-13

    Since first discovered in Zea mays, cytokinin dehydrogenase (CKX) genes have been identified in many plants including rice and Arabidopsis thaliana, which possesses CKX homologues (AtCKX1-AtCKX7). So far, the three-dimensional structure of only Z. mays CKX (ZmCKX1) has been determined. The crystal structures of ZmCKX1 have been solved in the native state and in complex with reaction products and a slowly reacting substrate. The structures revealed four glycosylated asparagine residues and a histidine residue covalently linked to FAD. Combined with the structural information, recent biochemical analyses of ZmCKX1 concluded that the final products of the reaction, adenine and a side chain aldehyde, are formed by nonenzymatic hydrolytic cleavage of cytokinin imine products resulting directly from CKX catalysis. Here, we report the crystal structure of AtCKX7 (gene locus At5g21482.1, UniProt code Q9FUJ1).

  8. The ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The simple gas ethylene influences a diverse array of plant growth and developmental processes including germination, senescence, cell elongation, and fruit ripening. This review focuses on recent molecular genetic studies, principally in Arabidopsis, in which components of the ethylene response pathway have been identified. The isolation and characterization of two of these genes has revealed that ethylene sensing involves a protein kinase cascade. One of these genes encodes a protein with similarity to the ubiquitous Raf family of Ser/Thr protein kinases. A second gene shows similarity to the prokaryotic two-component histidine kinases and most likely encodes an ethylene receptor. Additional elements involved in ethylene signaling have only been identified genetically. The characterization of these genes and mutants will be discussed.

  9. Metabolic fingerprinting of Arabidopsis thaliana accessions

    PubMed Central

    Sotelo-Silveira, Mariana; Chauvin, Anne-Laure; Marsch-Martínez, Nayelli; Winkler, Robert; de Folter, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In the post-genomic era much effort has been put on the discovery of gene function using functional genomics. Despite the advances achieved by these technologies in the understanding of gene function at the genomic and proteomic level, there is still a big genotype-phenotype gap. Metabolic profiling has been used to analyze organisms that have already been characterized genetically. However, there is a small number of studies comparing the metabolic profile of different tissues of distinct accessions. Here, we report the detection of over 14,000 and 17,000 features in inflorescences and leaves, respectively, in two widely used Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. A predictive Random Forest Model was developed, which was able to reliably classify tissue type and accession of samples based on LC-MS profile. Thereby we demonstrate that the morphological differences among A. thaliana accessions are reflected also as distinct metabolic phenotypes within leaves and inflorescences. PMID:26074932

  10. Catabolism of Glutathione Conjugates in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Brazier-Hicks, Melissa; Evans, Kathryn M.; Cunningham, Oliver D.; Hodgson, David R. W.; Steel, Patrick G.; Edwards, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The safener fenclorim (4,6-dichloro-2-phenylpyrimidine) increases tolerance to chloroacetanilide herbicides in rice by enhancing the expression of detoxifying glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). Fenclorim also enhances GSTs in Arabidopsis thaliana, and while investigating the functional significance of this induction in suspension cultures, we determined that these enzymes glutathionylated the safener. The resulting S-(fenclorim)-glutathione conjugate was sequentially processed to S-(fenclorim)-γ-glutamyl-cysteine and S-(fenclorim)-cysteine (FC), the latter accumulating in both the cells and the medium. FC was then either catabolized to 4-chloro-6-(methylthio)-phenylpyrimidine (CMTP) or N-acylated with malonic acid. These cysteine derivatives had distinct fates, with the enzymes responsible for their formation being induced by fenclorim and FC. Fenclorim-N-malonylcysteine was formed from FC by the action of a malonyl-CoA-dependent N-malonyltransferase. A small proportion of the fenclorim-N-malonylcysteine then underwent decarboxylation to yield a putative S-fenclorim-N-acetylcysteine intermediate, which underwent a second round of GST-mediated S-glutathionylation and subsequent proteolytic processing. The formation of CMTP was catalyzed by the concerted action of a cysteine conjugate β-lyase and an S-methyltransferase, with the two activities being coordinately regulated. Although the fenclorim conjugates tested showed little GST-inducing activity in Arabidopsis, the formation of CMTP resulted in metabolic reactivation, with the product showing good enhancing activity. In addition, CMTP induced GSTs and herbicide-safening activity in rice. The bioactivated CMTP was in turn glutathione-conjugated and processed to a malonyl cysteine derivative. These results reveal the surprisingly complex set of competing catabolic reactions acting on xenobiotics entering the S-glutathionylation pathway in plants, which can result in both detoxification and bioactivation. PMID

  11. Powerful Partners: Arabidopsis and Chemical Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Stéphanie; Raikhel, Natasha V.; Hicks, Glenn R.

    2009-01-01

    Chemical genomics (i.e. genomics scale chemical genetics) approaches capitalize on the ability of low molecular mass molecules to modify biological processes. Such molecules are used to modify the activity of a protein or a pathway in a manner that it is tunable and reversible. Bioactive chemicals resulting from forward or reverse chemical screens can be useful in understanding and dissecting complex biological processes due to the essentially limitless variation in structure and activities inherent in chemical space. A major advantage of this approach as a powerful addition to conventional plant genetics is the fact that chemical genomics can address loss-of-function lethality and redundancy. Furthermore, the ability of chemicals to be added at will and to act quickly can permit the study of processes that are highly dynamic such as endomembrane trafficking. An important aspect of utilizing small molecules effectively is to characterize bioactive chemicals in detail including an understanding of structure-activity relationships and the identification of active and inactive analogs. Bioactive chemicals can be useful as reagents to probe biological pathways directly. However, the identification of cognate targets and their pathways is also informative and can be achieved by screens for genetic resistance or hypersensitivity in Arabidopsis thaliana or other organisms from which the results can be translated to plants. In addition, there are approaches utilizing “tagged” chemical libraries that possess reactive moieties permitting the immobilization of active compounds. This opens the possibility for biochemical purification of putative cognate targets. We will review approaches to screen for bioactive chemicals that affect biological processes in Arabidopsis and provide several examples of the power and challenges inherent in this new approach in plant biology. PMID:22303245

  12. Photomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. A. M.; Klein, W. H.

    1971-01-01

    Arabidopsis seeds were germinated on sterile mineral agar supplemented with 1% glucose and cultured under continuous light regimes. With 4-hour incandescent plus 20-hour monochromatic illumination in the region from 400 to 485 nanometers there was effective floral induction at an intensity of 100 microwatts per square centimeter. Exclusion of far red wave lengths from the 4-hour incandescent period sharply reduced the effectiveness of subsequent monochromatic blue light in promoting floral induction. Delayed floral induction occurred under continuous incandescent light lacking far red and was attributable to the blue wave lengths. Continuous 485 nanometer (100 microwatts per square centimeter) exposure without any white light treatment during the postgermination growth period was ineffective in floral induction and meristem development. Light at 730 nanometers under the same conditions was partially effective, whereas energy between 500 and 700 nanometers was completely ineffective. When continuous monochromatic light at a 3-fold higher energy level was administered, all photomorphogenic responses were accomplished with 485 nanometer light, including germination and 100% floral induction without any white light treatment at any time during the experiment. Almost equal quantum effectiveness was calculated when equivalent quantum flux densities in the region from 710 to 740 nanometers or at 485 nanometers were used. It is postulated that floral induction in Arabidopsis may be the result of a continuous excitation of a stable form of far red-absorbing phytochrome localized in or on a membrane, and that excitation can be either by direct absorption of energy by far red-absorbing phytochrome or by transfer from an accessory pigment. Images PMID:16657629

  13. The current state of clinical interpretation of sequence variants.

    PubMed

    Hoskinson, Derick C; Dubuc, Adrian M; Mason-Suares, Heather

    2017-01-31

    Accurate and consistent variant classification is required for Precision Medicine. But clinical variant classification remains in its infancy. While recent guidelines put forth jointly by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) and Association of Molecular Pathology (AMP) for the classification of Mendelian variants has advanced the field, the degree of subjectivity allowed by these guidelines can still lead to inconsistent classification across clinical molecular genetic laboratories. In addition, there are currently no such guidelines for somatic cancer variants, only published institutional practices. Additional variant classification guidelines, including disease- or gene-specific criteria, along with inter-laboratory data sharing is critical for accurate and consistent variant interpretation.

  14. Guidelines for investigating causality of sequence variants in human disease

    PubMed Central

    MacArthur, D. G.; Manolio, T. A.; Dimmock, D. P.; Rehm, H. L.; Shendure, J.; Abecasis, G. R.; Adams, D. R.; Altman, R. B.; Antonarakis, S. E.; Ashley, E. A.; Barrett, J. C.; Biesecker, L. G.; Conrad, D. F.; Cooper, G. M.; Cox, N. J.; Daly, M. J.; Gerstein, M. B.; Goldstein, D. B.; Hirschhorn, J. N.; Leal, S. M.; Pennacchio, L. A.; Stamatoyannopoulos, J. A.; Sunyaev, S. R.; Valle, D.; Voight, B. F.; Winckler, W.; Gunter, C.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of rare genetic variants is accelerating, and clear guidelines for distinguishing disease-causing sequence variants from the many potentially functional variants present in any human genome are urgently needed. Without rigorous standards we risk an acceleration of false-positive reports of causality, which would impede the translation of genomic research findings into the clinical diagnostic setting and hinder biological understanding of disease. Here we discuss the key challenges of assessing sequence variants in human disease, integrating both gene-level and variant-level support for causality. We propose guidelines for summarizing confidence in variant pathogenicity and highlight several areas that require further resource development. PMID:24759409

  15. Orthology Analysis and In Vivo Complementation Studies to Elucidate the Role of DIR1 during Systemic Acquired Resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana and Cucumis sativus

    PubMed Central

    Isaacs, Marisa; Carella, Philip; Faubert, Jennifer; Rose, Jocelyn K. C.; Cameron, Robin K.

    2016-01-01

    AtDIR1 (Defective in Induced Resistance1) is an acidic lipid transfer protein essential for systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Upon SAR induction, DIR1 moves from locally infected to distant uninfected leaves to activate defense priming; however, a molecular function for DIR1 has not been elucidated. Bioinformatic analysis and in silico homology modeling identified putative AtDIR1 orthologs in crop species, revealing conserved protein motifs within and outside of DIR1’s central hydrophobic cavity. In vitro assays to compare the capacity of recombinant AtDIR1 and targeted AtDIR1-variant proteins to bind the lipophilic probe TNS (6,P-toluidinylnaphthalene-2-sulfonate) provided evidence that conserved leucine 43 and aspartic acid 39 contribute to the size of the DIR1 hydrophobic cavity and possibly hydrophobic ligand binding. An Arabidopsis–cucumber SAR model was developed to investigate the conservation of DIR1 function in cucumber (Cucumis sativus), and we demonstrated that phloem exudates from SAR-induced cucumber rescued the SAR defect in the Arabidopsis dir1-1 mutant. Additionally, an AtDIR1 antibody detected a protein of the same size as AtDIR1 in SAR-induced cucumber phloem exudates, providing evidence that DIR1 function during SAR is conserved in Arabidopsis and cucumber. In vitro TNS displacement assays demonstrated that recombinant AtDIR1 did not bind the SAR signals azelaic acid (AzA), glycerol-3-phosphate or pipecolic acid. However, recombinant CsDIR1 and CsDIR2 interacted weakly with AzA and pipecolic acid. Bioinformatic and functional analyses using the Arabidopsis–cucumber SAR model provide evidence that DIR1 orthologs exist in tobacco, tomato, cucumber, and soybean, and that DIR1-mediated SAR signaling is conserved in Arabidopsis and cucumber. PMID:27200039

  16. Variation in sulfur and selenium accumulation is controlled by naturally occurring isoforms of the key sulfur assimilation enzyme ADENOSINE 5'-PHOSPHOSULFATE REDUCTASE2 across the Arabidopsis species range.

    PubMed

    Chao, Dai-Yin; Baraniecka, Patrycja; Danku, John; Koprivova, Anna; Lahner, Brett; Luo, Hongbing; Yakubova, Elena; Dilkes, Brian; Kopriva, Stanislav; Salt, David E

    2014-11-01

    Natural variation allows the investigation of both the fundamental functions of genes and their role in local adaptation. As one of the essential macronutrients, sulfur is vital for plant growth and development and also for crop yield and quality. Selenium and sulfur are assimilated by the same process, and although plants do not require selenium, plant-based selenium is an important source of this essential element for animals. Here, we report the use of linkage mapping in synthetic F2 populations and complementation to investigate the genetic architecture of variation in total leaf sulfur and selenium concentrations in a diverse set of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) accessions. We identify in accessions collected from Sweden and the Czech Republic two variants of the enzyme ADENOSINE 5'-PHOSPHOSULFATE REDUCTASE2 (APR2) with strongly diminished catalytic capacity. APR2 is a key enzyme in both sulfate and selenate reduction, and its reduced activity in the loss-of-function allele apr2-1 and the two Arabidopsis accessions Hodonín and Shahdara leads to a lowering of sulfur flux from sulfate into the reduced sulfur compounds, cysteine and glutathione, and into proteins, concomitant with an increase in the accumulation of sulfate in leaves. We conclude from our observation, and the previously identified weak allele of APR2 from the Shahdara accession collected in Tadjikistan, that the catalytic capacity of APR2 varies by 4 orders of magnitude across the Arabidopsis species range, driving significant differences in sulfur and selenium metabolism. The selective benefit, if any, of this large variation remains to be explored.

  17. Gene expression in response to cryoprotectant and liquid nitrogen exposure in Arabidopsis shoot tips

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Arabidopsis thaliana serves as an ideal model system to study cryopreservation at the molecular level. We have developed reliable cryopreservation methods for Arabidopsis shoot tips using Plant Vitrification Solution 2, Plant Vitrification Solution 3 and polyethylene glycol-glucose-dimethylsulfoxid...

  18. Comprehensive analysis of CLE polypeptide signaling gene expression and overexpression activity in Arabidopsis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Technical Abstract: Intercellular signaling is essential for the coordination of growth and development in higher plants. Although hundreds of putative receptors have been identified in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), only a few families of extracellular signaling molecules have been discovered...

  19. New genetic variants associated with prostate cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have newly identified 23 common genetic variants -- one-letter changes in DNA known as single-nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs -- that are associated with risk of prostate cancer. These results come from an analysis of more than 10 million SNP

  20. Cellobiohydrolase I gene and improved variants

    DOEpatents

    Adney, William S.; Decker, Stephen R.; Mc Carter, Suzanne; Baker, John O.; Nieves, Raphael; Himmel, Michael E.; Vinzant, Todd B.

    2008-05-20

    The disclosure provides a method for preparing an active exoglucanase in a heterologous host of eukaryotic origin. The method includes mutagenesis to reduce glycosylation of the exoglucanase when expressed in a heterologous host. It is further disclosed a method to produce variant cellobiohydrolase that is stable at high temperature through mutagenesis.

  1. A Novel Variant of Bartter's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Punatar, Sachin B; Divyashree, S; Jogi, Vishal M

    2015-07-01

    Bartter's syndrome, a rare disorder affecting the renal tubular potassium handling, is characterized by metabolic alkalosis, hypokalemia and renal salt wasting. Here we describe a patient with Bartter's syndrome with hitherto undescribed clinical features and also discuss the various possibilities leading to such variant of Bartter's syndrome.

  2. Progress in methods for rare variant association.

    PubMed

    Santorico, Stephanie A; Hendricks, Audrey E

    2016-02-03

    Empirical studies and evolutionary theory support a role for rare variants in the etiology of complex traits. Given this motivation and increasing affordability of whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing, methods for rare variant association have been an active area of research for the past decade. Here, we provide a survey of the current literature and developments from the Genetics Analysis Workshop 19 (GAW19) Collapsing Rare Variants working group. In particular, we present the generalized linear regression framework and associated score statistic for the 2 major types of methods: burden and variance components methods. We further show that by simply modifying weights within these frameworks we arrive at many of the popular existing methods, for example, the cohort allelic sums test and sequence kernel association test. Meta-analysis techniques are also described. Next, we describe the 6 contributions from the GAW19 Collapsing Rare Variants working group. These included development of new methods, such as a retrospective likelihood for family data, a method using genomic structure to compare cases and controls, a haplotype-based meta-analysis, and a permutation-based method for combining different statistical tests. In addition, one contribution compared a mega-analysis of family-based and population-based data to meta-analysis. Finally, the power of existing family-based methods for binary traits was compared. We conclude with suggestions for open research questions.

  3. Regional Phonological Variants in Louisiana Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubrecht, August Weston

    Based on tape recorded conversations of 28 informants in 18 Louisiana communities, this study investigated regional phonological variants in Louisiana speech. On the basis of settlement history and previous dialect studies, four regions are defined: northern Louisiana, the Florida Parishes, French Louisiana, and New Orleans. The informants are all…

  4. Novel variant of tickborne encephalitis virus, Russia.

    PubMed

    Ternovoi, Vladimir A; Protopopova, Elena V; Chausov, Eugene V; Novikov, Dmitry V; Leonova, Galina N; Netesov, Sergey V; Loktev, Valery B

    2007-10-01

    We isolated a novel strain of tickborne encephalitis virus (TBEV), Glubinnoe/2004, from a patient with a fatal case in Russia. We sequenced the strain, whose landmark features included 57 amino acid substitutions and 5 modified cleavage sites. Phylogenetically, Glubinnoe/2004 is a novel variant that belongs to the Eastern type of TBEV.

  5. Truncated variants of apolipoprotein B cause hypobetalipoproteinaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, D R; Knott, T J; Pease, R J; Powell, L M; Wallis, S C; Robertson, S; Pullinger, C R; Milne, R W; Marcel, Y L; Humphries, S E

    1988-01-01

    Familial hypobetalipoproteinaemia is a rare autosomal dominant disorder in which levels of apo-B-containing plasma lipoproteins are approximately half-normal in heterozygotes and virtually absent in homozygotes. Here we describe mutations of the apo-B gene that cause two different truncated variants of apo-B in unrelated individuals with hypobetalipoproteinaemia. One variant, apo-B(His1795----Met-Trp-Leu-Val-Thr-Term) is predicted to be 1799 amino acids long and arises from deletion of a single nucleotide (G) from leucine codon 1794. This protein was found at low levels in very low density and low density lipoprotein fractions in the blood. The second, shorter variant, apo-B(Arg1306----Term), is caused by mutation of a CpG dinucleotide in arginine codon 1306 converting it to a stop codon and predicting a protein of 1305 residues. The product of this allele could not be detected in the circulation. The differences in size and behaviour of these two variants compared to apo-B100 or apo-B48 point to domains that may be important for the assembly, secretion or stability of apo-B-containing lipoproteins. Images PMID:2843815

  6. Regional Phonological Variants in Louisiana Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubrecht, August Weston

    Based on tape recorded conversations of 28 informants in 18 Louisiana communities, this study investigated regional phonological variants in Louisiana speech. On the basis of settlement history and previous dialect studies, four regions are defined: northern Louisiana, the Florida Parishes, French Louisiana, and New Orleans. The informants are all…

  7. [Basal cell carcinoma and rare form variants].

    PubMed

    Liersch, J; Schaller, J

    2014-09-01

    Basal cell carcinomas are the most common primary cutaneous malignant neoplasms. The diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma represents a common and routine task for pathologists and dermatopathologists. The aim of this review is the clinical and histopathological presentation of the most common subtypes of basal cell carcinoma. Furthermore, the rare variants of basal cell carcinoma and their differential diagnoses are also discussed.

  8. Guillain-Barré Syndrome and Variants

    PubMed Central

    Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is characterized by rapidly evolving ascending weakness, mild sensory loss and hypo- or areflexia, progressing to a nadir over up to four weeks. Cerebrospinal fluid evaluation demonstrates albuminocytologic dissociation in 90% of cases. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) was the first to be recognized over a century ago and is the most common form of GBS. In AIDP, the immune attack is directed at peripheral nerve myelin with secondary by-stander axon loss. Axonal motor and sensorimotor variants have been described in the last 3 decades and are mediated by molecular mimicry targeting peripheral nerve motor axons. Besides the Miller-Fisher syndrome (MFS) and descending weakness, other rare phenotypic variants have been recently described with pure sensory variant, restricted autonomic manifestations and the pharyngeal-cervical-brachial pattern. It is important to recognize GBS and its variants due to the availability of equally effective therapies in the form of plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulins. PMID:23642721

  9. Truncated variants of apolipoprotein B cause hypobetalipoproteinaemia

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, D.R.; Knott, T.J.; Pease, R.J.; Powell, L.M.; Wallis, S.C.; Robertson, S.; Pullinger, C.R.; Lloyd, K.; Miller, N.E.; Muller, D.; Scott, J. ); Humphries, S.E.; Talmud, P.J. ); Milne, R.W.; Marcel, Y.L. )

    1988-09-12

    Familial hypobetalipoproteinaemia is a rare autosomal dominant disorder in which levels of apo-B-containing plasma lipoproteins are approximately half-normal in heterozygotes and virtually absent in homozygotes. Here the authors describe mutations of the apo-B gene that cause two different truncated variants of apo-B in unrelated individuals with hypobetalipoproteinaemia. One variant is predicted to be 1,799 amino acids long and arises from deletion of a single nucleotide (G) from leucine codon 1,794. This protein was found at low levels in very low density and low density lipoprotein fractions in the blood. The second, shorter variant is caused by mutation of a CpG dinucleotide in arginine codon 1,306 converting it to a stop codon and predicting a protein of 1,305 residues. The differences in size and behavior of these two variants compared to apo-B100 or apo-B48 point to domains that may be important for the assembly, secretion or stability of apo-B-containing lipoproteins.

  10. Variant Spellings in Modern American Dictionaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emery, Donald W.

    A record of how present-day desk dictionaries are recognizing the existence of variant or secondary spellings for many common English words, this reference list can be used by teachers of English and authors of spelling lists. Originally published in 1958, this revised edition uses two dictionaries not in existence then and the revised editions of…

  11. Neuroendocrine factors distinguish juvenile psychopathy variants.

    PubMed

    Kimonis, Eva R; Goulter, Natalie; Hawes, David J; Wilbur, Rhonda R; Groer, Maureen W

    2017-03-01

    The characteristic pattern of emotional hypo-reactivity observed in primary psychopathy is not evident in secondary psychopathy, which is thought to originate from childhood adversity and co-occurring anxiety. The main aim of this study was to test whether salivary afternoon cortisol, Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and cortisol-to-DHEA concentrations, which at high levels indicate risk for chronic stress and poor mental health, distinguished secondary from primary variants of callous-unemotional (CU) traits-the affective component of psychopathy. This aim was achieved by first identifying psychopathy variants using latent profile analysis of CU, anxiety, and aggression scores among 232 incarcerated adolescent boys (M age = 16.75). Based on a subset with neuroendocrine data (n = 201), aggressive secondary CU variants had lower afternoon DHEA concentrations and higher cortisol-to-DHEA ratios and comorbid psychopathology compared with all other groups. In contrast, two primary CU variants (aggressive and non-aggressive types) emerged with profiles characterized by low to average psychopathology and high DHEA levels. Findings contribute to a growing literature base suggesting that biomarkers may distinguish youth on separable developmental pathways to psychopathy.

  12. Variant Spellings in Modern American Dictionaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emery, Donald W.

    A record of how present-day desk dictionaries are recognizing the existence of variant or secondary spellings for many common English words, this reference list can be used by teachers of English and authors of spelling lists. Originally published in 1958, this revised edition uses two dictionaries not in existence then and the revised editions of…

  13. Gene variants as risk factors for gastroschisis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Schultz, Kathleen; Tom, Lauren; Lin, Bin; Carmichael, Suzan L.; Lammer, Edward J.; Shaw, Gary M.

    2016-01-01

    In a population‐based case‐control study in California of 228 infants, we investigated 75 genetic variants in 20 genes and risk of gastroschisis with regard to maternal age, race/ethnicity, vitamin use, and smoking exposure. We hypothesized that genes related to vascular compromise may interact with environmental factors to affect the risk of gastroschisis. Haplotypes were constructed for 75 gene variants using the HaploView program. Risk for gastroschisis associated with each gene variant was calculated for both the homozygotes and the heterozygotes, with the homozygous wildtypes as the referent. Risks were estimated as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by logistic regression. We found 11 gene variants with increased risk and four variants with decreased risk of gastroschisis for heterozygous (ORh) or homozygous variants (ORv) genotypes. These included NOS3 (rs1036145) ORh = 0.4 (95% CI: 0.2–0.7); NOS3 (rs10277237) ORv = 2.7 (95% CI: 1.3–6.0); ADD1 (rs12503220) ORh = 2.9 (95% CI: 1.6–5.4), GNB3 (rs5443) ORh = 0.2 (95% CI: 0.1–0.5), ORv = 0.4 (95% CI: 0.2–0.9); ICAM1 (rs281428) ORv = 6.9 (95% CI: 2.1–22.9), ICAM1 (rs3093030) ORv = 2.6 (95% CI: 1.2–5.6); ICAM4 (rs281438) ORv = 4.9 (95% CI: 1.4–16.6), ICAM5 (rs281417) ORh = 2.1 (95% CI: 1.1–4.1), ORv = 4.8 (95% CI: 1.7–13.6); ICAM5 (rs281440) ORh = 23.7 (95% CI: 5.5–102.5), ORv = 20.6 (95% CI: 3.4–124.3); ICAM5 (rs2075741) ORv = 2.2 (95% CI: 1.1–4.4); NAT1 ORv = 0.3 (95% CI: 0.1–0.9). There were additional associations between several gene variants and gastroschisis among women aged 20–24 and among mothers with and without vitamin use. NOS3, ADD1, ICAM1, ICAM4, and ICAM5 warrant further investigation in additional populations and with the interaction of additional environmental exposures. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27616475

  14. Employing in vitro directed molecular evolution for the selection of α-amylase variant inhibitors with activity toward cotton boll weevil enzyme.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Maria Cristina Mattar; Del Sarto, Rafael Perseghini; Lucena, Wagner Alexandre; Rigden, Daniel John; Teixeira, Fabíola Rodrigues; Bezerra, Caroline de Andrade; Albuquerque, Erika Valéria Saliba; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria Fatima

    2013-09-20

    Numerous species of insect pests attack cotton plants, out of which the cotton boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis) is the main insect in Brazil and must be controlled to avert large economic losses. Like other insect pests, A. grandis secretes a high level of α-amylases in the midgut lumen, which are required for digestion of carbohydrates. Thus, α-amylase inhibitors (α-AIs) represent a powerful tool to apply in the control of insect pests. Here, we applied DNA shuffling and phage display techniques and obtained a combinatorial library containing 10⁸ α-AI variant forms. From this library, variants were selected exhibiting in vitro affinity for cotton boll weevil α-amylases. Twenty-six variant sequences were cloned into plant expression vectors and expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana. Transformed plant extracts were assayed in vitro to select specific and potent α-amylase inhibitors against boll weevil amylases. While the wild type inhibitors, used to create the shuffled library, did not inhibit the A. grandis α-amylases, three α-AI mutants, named α-AIC3, α-AIA11 and α-AIG4 revealed high inhibitory activities against A. grandis α-amylases in an in vitro assay. In summary, data reported here shown the potential biotechnology of new α-AI variant genes for cotton boll weevil control.

  15. Dynamic Bayesian Testing of Sets of Variants in Complex Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Ghosh, Soumitra; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2014-01-01

    Rare genetic variants have recently been studied for genome-wide associations with human complex diseases. Existing rare variant methods are based on the hypothesis-testing framework that predefined variant sets need to be tested separately. The power of those methods is contingent upon accurate selection of variants for testing, and frequently, common variants are left out for separate testing. In this article, we present a novel Bayesian method for simultaneous testing of all genome-wide variants across the whole frequency range. The method allows for much more flexible grouping of variants and dynamically combines them for joint testing. The method accounts for correlation among variant sets, such that only direct associations with the disease are reported, whereas indirect associations due to linkage disequilibrium are not. Consequently, the method can obtain much improved power and flexibility and simultaneously pinpoint multiple disease variants with high resolution. Additional covariates of categorical, discrete, and continuous values can also be added. We compared our method with seven existing categories of approaches for rare variant mapping. We demonstrate that our method achieves similar power to the best methods available to date when testing very rare variants in small SNP sets. When moderately rare or common variants are included, or when testing a large collection of variants, however, our method significantly outperforms all existing methods evaluated in this study. We further demonstrate the power and the usage of our method in a whole-genome resequencing study of type 1 diabetes. PMID:25217050

  16. Dynamic Bayesian testing of sets of variants in complex diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Ghosh, Soumitra; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2014-11-01

    Rare genetic variants have recently been studied for genome-wide associations with human complex diseases. Existing rare variant methods are based on the hypothesis-testing framework that predefined variant sets need to be tested separately. The power of those methods is contingent upon accurate selection of variants for testing, and frequently, common variants are left out for separate testing. In this article, we present a novel Bayesian method for simultaneous testing of all genome-wide variants across the whole frequency range. The method allows for much more flexible grouping of variants and dynamically combines them for joint testing. The method accounts for correlation among variant sets, such that only direct associations with the disease are reported, whereas indirect associations due to linkage disequilibrium are not. Consequently, the method can obtain much improved power and flexibility and simultaneously pinpoint multiple disease variants with high resolution. Additional covariates of categorical, discrete, and continuous values can also be added. We compared our method with seven existing categories of approaches for rare variant mapping. We demonstrate that our method achieves similar power to the best methods available to date when testing very rare variants in small SNP sets. When moderately rare or common variants are included, or when testing a large collection of variants, however, our method significantly outperforms all existing methods evaluated in this study. We further demonstrate the power and the usage of our method in a whole-genome resequencing study of type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  17. Mouse p63 variants and chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Junxia; Lu, Yaojuan; Qiao, Longwei; Ran, Deyuan; Li, Na; Cao, Hong; Gao, Yan; Zheng, Qiping

    2013-01-01

    As a critical member of the p53 family of transcription factors, p63 has been implicated a role in development than in tumor formation, because p63 is seldom mutated in human cancers, while p63 null mice exhibit severe developmental abnormalities without increasing cancer susceptibility. Notably, besides the major epithelial and cardiac defect, p63 deficient mice show severe limb and craniofacial abnormalities. In addition, humans with p63 mutations also show severe limb and digit defects, suggesting a putative role of p63 in skeletal development. There are eight p63 variants which encode for the TAp63 and ΔNp63 isoforms by alternative promoters. How these isoforms function during skeletal development is currently largely unknown. Our recent transgenic studies suggest a role of TAP63α, but not ΔNP63α, during embryonic long bone development. However, the moderate skeletal phenotypes in the TAP63α transgenic mice suggest requirement of additional p63 isoform(s) for the limb defects in p63 null mice. Here, we report analysis of mouse p63 variants in MCT and ATDC5 cells, two cell models undergo hypertrophic differentiation and mimic the process of endochondral bone formation upon growth arrest or induction. We detected increased level of p63 variants in hypertrophic MCT cells by regular RT-PCR analysis. Further analysis by qRT-PCR, we detected significantly upregulated level of γ variant (p<0.05), but not α or β variant (p>0.05), in hypertrophic MCT cells than in proliferative MCT cells. Moreover, we detected upregulated TAP63γ in ATDC5 cells undergoing hypertrophic differentiation. Our results suggest that TAp63γ plays a positive role during endochondral bone formation. PMID:24294373

  18. Are secondary variants of juvenile psychopathy more reactively violent and less psychosocially mature than primary variants?

    PubMed

    Kimonis, Eva R; Skeem, Jennifer L; Cauffman, Elizabeth; Dmitrieva, Julia

    2011-10-01

    There is growing support for the disaggregation of psychopathy into primary and secondary variants. This study examines whether variants of psychopathy can be identified in a subsample (n = 116) of juvenile offenders with high scores on the Youth Version of the Psychopathy Checklist (PCL:YV). Model-based cluster analysis of offenders' scores on the PCL:YV and a measure of anxiety suggested a two-group solution. The derived clusters manifested expected differences across theoretically relevant constructs of abuse history, hostility, and psychiatric symptoms. Compared with low-anxious primary variants, high-anxious secondary variants manifested more institutional violence, greater psychosocial immaturity, and more instability in institutional violence over a 2-year period, but similar stability in PCL:YV scores.

  19. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  20. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  1. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vaka S; Ali, Gul S; Reddy, Anireddy S N

    2002-03-22

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  2. AtCCX3 is an Arabidopsis endomembrane H(+)-dependent K(+) transporter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Arabidopsis ("Arabidopsis thaliana") cation calcium exchangers (CCXs) were recently identified as a subfamily of cation transporters; however, no plant "CCXs" have been functionally characterized. Here, we show that Arabidopsis AtCCX3 (At3g14070) and AtCCX4 (At1g54115) can suppress yeast mutants...

  3. Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-21

    Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks Paulo Shakarian1*, J. Kenneth Wickiser2 1 Paulo Shakarian...pathogens on host protein networks for humans and Arabidopsis - noting striking similarities. Specifically, we preform k-shell decomposition analysis on...significantly attacked. Citation: Shakarian P, Wickiser JK (2012) Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks

  4. Comparative analysis of MAMP-induced calcium influx in Arabidopsis seedlings and protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Maintz, Jens; Cavdar, Meltem; Tamborski, Janina; Kwaaitaal, Mark; Huisman, Rik; Meesters, Christian; Kombrink, Erich; Panstruga, Ralph

    2014-10-01

    Rapid transient elevation of cytoplasmic calcium (Ca(2+)) levels in plant cells is an early signaling event triggered by many environmental cues including abiotic and biotic stresses. Cellular Ca(2+) levels and their alterations can be monitored by genetically encoded reporter systems such as the bioluminescent protein, aequorin. Employment of proteinaceous Ca(2+) sensors is usually performed in transgenic lines that constitutively express the reporter construct. Such settings limit the usage of these Ca(2+) biosensors to particular reporter variants and plant genetic backgrounds, which can be a severe constraint in genetic pathway analysis. Here we systematically explored the potential of Arabidopsis thaliana leaf mesophyll protoplasts, either derived from a transgenic apoaequorin-expressing line or transfected with apoaequorin reporter constructs, as a complementary biological resource to monitor cytoplasmic changes of Ca(2+) levels in response to various biotic stress elicitors. We tested a range of endogenous and pathogen-derived elicitors in seedlings and protoplasts of the corresponding apoaequorin-expressing reporter line. We found that the protoplast system largely reflects the Ca(2+) signatures seen in intact transgenic seedlings. Results of inhibitor experiments including the calculation of IC50 values indicated that the protoplast system is also suitable for pharmacological studies. Moreover, analyses of Ca(2+)signatures in mutant backgrounds, genetic complementation of the mutant phenotypes and expression of sensor variants targeted to different subcellular localizations can be readily performed. Thus, in addition to the prevalent use of seedlings, the leaf mesophyll protoplast setup represents a versatile and convenient tool for the analysis of Ca(2+) signaling pathways in plant cells. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email

  5. Photoactivated UVR8-COP1 Module Determines Photomorphogenic UV-B Signaling Output in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Xinhao; Chen, Liangbi; Deng, Xing Wang

    2014-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, ultraviolet (UV)-B-induced photomorphogenesis is initiated by a unique photoreceptor UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) which utilizes its tryptophan residues as internal chromophore to sense UV-B. As a result of UV-B light perception, the UVR8 homodimer shaped by its arginine residues undergoes a conformational switch of monomerization. Then UVR8 associates with the CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1-SUPPRESSOR OF PHYA (COP1-SPA) core complex(es) that is released from the CULLIN 4-DAMAGED DNA BINDING PROTEIN 1 (CUL4-DDB1) E3 apparatus. This association, in turn, causes COP1 to convert from a repressor to a promoter of photomorphogenesis. It is not fully understood, however, regarding the biological significance of light-absorbing and dimer-stabilizing residues for UVR8 activity in photomorphogenic UV-B signaling. Here, we take advantage of transgenic UVR8 variants to demonstrate that two light-absorbing tryptophans, W233 and W285, and two dimer-stabilizing arginines, R286 and R338, play pivotal roles in UV-B-induced photomorphogenesis. Mutation of each residue results in alterations in UV-B light perception, UVR8 monomerization and UVR8-COP1 association in response to photomorphogenic UV-B. We also identify and functionally characterize two constitutively active UVR8 variants, UVR8W285A and UVR8R338A, whose photobiological activities are enhanced by the repression of CUL4, a negative regulator in this pathway. Based on our molecular and biochemical evidence, we propose that the UVR8-COP1 affinity in plants critically determines the photomorphogenic UV-B signal transduction coupling with UVR8-mediated UV-B light perception. PMID:24651064

  6. The antifungal plant defensin AtPDF2.3 from Arabidopsis thaliana blocks potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Vriens, Kim; Peigneur, Steve; De Coninck, Barbara; Tytgat, Jan; Cammue, Bruno P. A.; Thevissen, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Scorpion toxins that block potassium channels and antimicrobial plant defensins share a common structural CSαβ-motif. These toxins contain a toxin signature (K-C4-X-N) in their amino acid sequence, and based on in silico analysis of 18 plant defensin sequences, we noted the presence of a toxin signature (K-C5-R-G) in the amino acid sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana defensin AtPDF2.3. We found that recombinant (r)AtPDF2.3 blocks Kv1.2 and Kv1.6 potassium channels, akin to the interaction between scorpion toxins and potassium channels. Moreover, rAtPDF2.3[G36N], a variant with a KCXN toxin signature (K-C5-R-N), is more potent in blocking Kv1.2 and Kv1.6 channels than rAtPDF2.3, whereas rAtPDF2.3[K33A], devoid of the toxin signature, is characterized by reduced Kv channel blocking activity. These findings highlight the importance of the KCXN scorpion toxin signature in the plant defensin sequence for blocking potassium channels. In addition, we found that rAtPDF2.3 inhibits the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and that pathways regulating potassium transport and/or homeostasis confer tolerance of this yeast to rAtPDF2.3, indicating a role for potassium homeostasis in the fungal defence response towards rAtPDF2.3. Nevertheless, no differences in antifungal potency were observed between the rAtPDF2.3 variants, suggesting that antifungal activity and Kv channel inhibitory function are not linked. PMID:27573545

  7. Influenza A (H3N2) Variant Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Avian Swine Variant Other Influenza A (H3N2) Variant Virus Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Influenza viruses that normally circulate in pigs are called “ ...

  8. Gene Variant from Africa Linked to Black Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Gene Variant From Africa Linked to Black Obesity Study sees first biological pathway to weight gain ... identified an Africa-specific gene variant associated with obesity. The team found that about 1 percent of ...

  9. Arabidopsis cell-free extract, ACE, a new in vitro translation system derived from Arabidopsis callus cultures.

    PubMed

    Murota, Katsunori; Hagiwara-Komoda, Yuka; Komoda, Keisuke; Onouchi, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Masayuki; Naito, Satoshi

    2011-08-01

    The analysis of post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in plants has benefited greatly from the use of cell-free extract systems. Arabidopsis as a model system provides extensive genetic resources; however, to date a suitable cell-free translation system from Arabidopsis has not been available. In this study, we devised an Arabidopsis cell-free extract (ACE) to be used for in vitro translation studies. Protoplasts were prepared from callus cultures derived from Arabidopsis seedlings, and cell-free extracts were prepared after evacuolation of the protoplasts by Percoll gradient centrifugation. The new ACE system exhibits translation activity comparable with that of the wheat germ extract system. We demonstrated that ACE prepared from the 5'-3' exoribonuclease-deficient mutant of Arabidopsis, xrn4-5, exhibited increased stability of an uncapped mRNA as compared with that from wild-type Arabidopsis. We applied the ACE system to study post-transcriptional regulation of AtCGS1. AtCGS1 codes for cystathionine γ-synthase (CGS) that catalyzes the first committed step of methionine and S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet) biosynthesis in plants, and is feedback regulated by mRNA degradation coupled with translation elongation arrest. The ACE system was capable of reproducing translation elongation arrest and subsequent AtCGS1 mRNA degradation that are induced by AdoMet. The ACE system described here can be prepared in a month after seed sowing and will make it possible to study post-transcriptional regulation of plant genes while taking advantage of the genetics of Arabidopsis.

  10. Processing of No-Release Variants in Connected Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoCasto, Paul C.; Connine, Cynthia M.

    2011-01-01

    The cross modal repetition priming paradigm was used to investigate how potential lexically ambiguous no-release variants are processed. In particular we focus on segmental regularities that affect the variant's frequency of occurrence (voicing of the critical segment) and phonological context in which the variant occurs (status of the following…

  11. Strategies to choose from millions of imputed sequence variants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Millions of sequence variants are known, but subsets are needed for routine genomic predictions or to include on genotyping arrays. Variant selection and imputation strategies were tested using 26 984 simulated reference bulls, of which 1 000 had 30 million sequence variants, 773 had 600 000 markers...

  12. Stomatal development in Arabidopsis and grasses: differences and commonalities.

    PubMed

    Serna, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Stomata, found on the epidermis of all terrestrial plants, consist of two specialized cells called guard cells, which surround a tiny pore. Major advances have been made in our understanding of the genetic control of stomatal development in Arabidopsis and grasses. In Arabidopsis, three basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH) genes control the successive steps that lead to stomatal formation. SPEECHLESS (SPCH) drives the cell division that initiates the stomatal cell lineage, MUTE induces the formation of the immediate stomatal precursor cell, and FAMA causes the stomatal precursor cell to divide into the two guard cells. Recent results demonstrate that these genes share functions with their grass homologs, and that MUTE is expressed later in development than its grass counterparts. Other differences in stomatal development between these two plant groups are exemplified by the PANGLOSS1 (PAN1) gene of maize. PAN1, which encodes a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase with an inactive kinase domain, promotes polarization of the subsidiary mother cell and orients its cell division plane. Because such events do not exist in Arabidopsis, it is likely that the PAN1-like genes of Arabidopsis and PAN1 are paralogs. Together, these results indicate that distinctions in the regulation of gene expression and protein function are both responsible for the divergence of stomatal development between Arabidopsis and grasses.

  13. Arsenic uptake and speciation in Arabidopsis thaliana under hydroponic conditions.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hee; Han, Young-Soo; Seong, Hye Jin; Ahn, Joo Sung; Nam, In-Hyun

    2016-07-01

    Arsenic (As) uptake and species in Arabidopsis thaliana were evaluated under hydroponic conditions. Plant nutrient solutions were treated with arsenite [As(III)] or arsenate [As(V)], and aqueous As speciation was conducted using a solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge. Arabidopsis reduced As(V) to As(III) in the nutrient solution, possibly due to root exudates such as organic acids or the efflux of As(III) from plant roots after in vivo reduction of As(V) to As(III). Arsenic uptake by Arabidopsis was associated with increased levels of Ca and Fe, and decreased levels of K in plant tissues. Arsenic in Arabidopsis mainly occurred as As(III), which was coordinated with oxygen and sulfur based on XANES and EXAFS results. The existence of As(III)O and As(III)S in EXAFS indicates partial biotransformation of As(III)O to a sulfur-coordinated form because of limited amount of glutathione in plants. Further understanding the mechanism of As biotransformation in Arabidopsis may help to develop measures that can mitigate As toxicity via genetic engineering.

  14. 50 years of Arabidopsis research: highlights and future directions.

    PubMed

    Provart, Nicholas J; Alonso, Jose; Assmann, Sarah M; Bergmann, Dominique; Brady, Siobhan M; Brkljacic, Jelena; Browse, John; Chapple, Clint; Colot, Vincent; Cutler, Sean; Dangl, Jeff; Ehrhardt, David; Friesner, Joanna D; Frommer, Wolf B; Grotewold, Erich; Meyerowitz, Elliot; Nemhauser, Jennifer; Nordborg, Magnus; Pikaard, Craig; Shanklin, John; Somerville, Chris; Stitt, Mark; Torii, Keiko U; Waese, Jamie; Wagner, Doris; McCourt, Peter

    2016-02-01

    922 I. 922 II. 922 III. 925 IV. 925 V. 926 VI. 927 VII. 928 VIII. 929 IX. 930 X. 931 XI. 932 XII. 933 XIII. Natural variation and genome-wide association studies 934 XIV. 934 XV. 935 XVI. 936 XVII. 937 937 References 937 SUMMARY: The year 2014 marked the 25(th) International Conference on Arabidopsis Research. In the 50 yr since the first International Conference on Arabidopsis Research, held in 1965 in Göttingen, Germany, > 54 000 papers that mention Arabidopsis thaliana in the title, abstract or keywords have been published. We present herein a citational network analysis of these papers, and touch on some of the important discoveries in plant biology that have been made in this powerful model system, and highlight how these discoveries have then had an impact in crop species. We also look to the future, highlighting some outstanding questions that can be readily addressed in Arabidopsis. Topics that are discussed include Arabidopsis reverse genetic resources, stock centers, databases and online tools, cell biology, development, hormones, plant immunity, signaling in response to abiotic stress, transporters, biosynthesis of cells walls and macromolecules such as starch and lipids, epigenetics and epigenomics, genome-wide association studies and natural variation, gene regulatory networks, modeling and systems biology, and synthetic biology.

  15. Ethylene signaling in rice and Arabidopsis: conserved and diverged aspects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Lu, Xiang; Ma, Biao; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2015-04-01

    Ethylene as a gas phytohormone plays significant roles in the whole life cycle of plants, ranging from growth and development to stress responses. A linear ethylene signaling pathway has been established in the dicotyledonous model plant Arabidopsis. However, the ethylene signaling mechanism in monocotyledonous plants such as rice is largely unclear. In this review, we compare the ethylene response phenotypes of dark-grown seedlings of Arabidopsis, rice, and other monocotyledonous plants (maize, wheat, sorghum, and Brachypodium distachyon) and pinpoint that rice has a distinct phenotype of root inhibition but coleoptile promotion in etiolated seedlings upon ethylene treatment. We further summarize the homologous genes of Arabidopsis ethylene signaling components in these monocotyledonous plants and discuss recent progress. Although conserved in most aspects, ethylene signaling in rice has evolved new features compared with that in Arabidopsis. These analyses provide novel insights into the understanding of ethylene signaling in the dicotyledonous Arabidopsis and monocotyledonous plants, particularly rice. Further characterization of rice ethylene-responsive mutants and their corresponding genes will help us better understand the whole picture of ethylene signaling mechanisms in plants.

  16. Expression of an "Arabidopsis" Ca(2+)/H(+) antiporter CAX1 variant in petunia enhances cadmium tolerance and accumulation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phytoremediation is a cost-effective and minimally invasive technology to cleanse soils contaminated with heavy metals. However, few plant species are suitable for phytoremediation of metals such as cadmium (Cd). Genetic engineering offers a powerful tool to generate plants that can hyperaccumulate ...

  17. The Alphabet of Galactolipids in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Amina; Schütz, Anna-Lena; Galano, Jean-Marie; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Feussner, Kirstin; Durand, Thierry; Brodhun, Florian; Feussner, Ivo

    2011-01-01

    Galactolipids constitute the major lipid class in plants. In recent years oxygenated derivatives of galactolipids have been detected. They are discussed as signal molecules during leaf damage, since they accumulate in wounded leaves in high levels. Using different analytical methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance, infra-red spectroscopy, and high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) earlier reports focused on the analysis of either oxidized or non-oxidized species and needed high levels of analytes. Here, we report on the analysis of the galactolipid subfraction of the Arabidopsis leaf lipidome by an improved HPLC/MS2-based method that is fast, robust, and comparatively simple in its performance. Due to a combination of phase partitioning, solid phase fractionation, liquid chromatography, and MS2 experiments this method has high detection sensitivity and requires only low amounts of plant material. With this method 167 galactolipid species were detected in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. Out of these 79 being newly described species. From all species the head group and acyl side chains were identified via MS2 experiments. Moreover, the structural identification was supported by HPLC/time-of-flight (TOF)-MS and gas chromatography (GC)/MS analysis. The quantification of different galactolipid species that accumulated 30 min after a mechanical wounding in A. thaliana leaves showed that the oxidized acyl side chains in galactolipids are divided into 65% cyclopentenones, 27% methyl-branched ketols, 3.8% hydroperoxides/straight-chain ketols, 2.0% hydroxides, and 2.6% phytoprostanes. In comparison to the free cyclopentenone derivatives, the esterified forms occur in a 149-fold excess supporting the hypothesis that galactolipids might function as storage compounds for cyclopentenones. Additional analysis of the ratio of non-oxidized to oxidized galactolipid species in leaves of wounded plants was performed resulting in a ratio of 2.0 in case

  18. Immunization of chickens with VP2 protein of infectious bursal disease virus expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wu, H; Singh, Narendra K; Locy, Robert D; Scissum-Gunn, K; Giambrone, Joseph J

    2004-09-01

    Transgenic plants represent a safe, effective, and inexpensive way to produce vaccines. The immunogenicity of VP2 protein of an infectious bursal disease (IBD) virus variant E isolate expressed in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana was compared with a commercial vaccine in specific-pathogen-free broiler chickens. The VP2 coding sequence was isolated and integrated into A. thaliana genome by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Soluble VP2 expressed in transgenic plants was used to immunize chickens. Chickens receiving oral immunization with plant-derived VP2 at 1 and 3 wk of age had an antibody response using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and 80% protection against challenge infection at 4 wk. Chickens primed with a commercial vaccine at 1 wk followed by an oral booster with VP2 expressed in plants at 3 wk of age showed 90% protection. Chickens immunized with a commercial vaccine at 1 and 3 wk showed 78% protection. Results supported the efficacy of plant-produced VP2 as a vaccine against IBD.

  19. DNA methylation in Arabidopsis has a genetic basis and shows evidence of local adaptation.

    PubMed

    Dubin, Manu J; Zhang, Pei; Meng, Dazhe; Remigereau, Marie-Stanislas; Osborne, Edward J; Paolo Casale, Francesco; Drewe, Philipp; Kahles, André; Jean, Geraldine; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni; Jagoda, Joanna; Irez, Selen; Voronin, Viktor; Song, Qiang; Long, Quan; Rätsch, Gunnar; Stegle, Oliver; Clark, Richard M; Nordborg, Magnus

    2015-05-05

    Epigenome modulation potentially provides a mechanism for organisms to adapt, within and between generations. However, neither the extent to which this occurs, nor the mechanisms involved are known. Here we investigate DNA methylation variation in Swedish Arabidopsis thaliana accessions grown at two different temperatures. Environmental effects were limited to transposons, where CHH methylation was found to increase with temperature. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) revealed that the extensive CHH methylation variation was strongly associated with genetic variants in both cis and trans, including a major trans-association close to the DNA methyltransferase CMT2. Unlike CHH methylation, CpG gene body methylation (GBM) was not affected by growth temperature, but was instead correlated with the latitude of origin. Accessions from colder regions had higher levels of GBM for a significant fraction of the genome, and this was associated with increased transcription for the genes affected. GWAS revealed that this effect was largely due to trans-acting loci, many of which showed evidence of local adaptation.

  20. ERECTA signaling controls Arabidopsis inflorescence architecture through chromatin-mediated activation of PRE1 expression.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hanyang; Zhao, Lihua; Wang, Lulu; Zhang, Man; Su, Zhenxia; Cheng, Yan; Zhao, Heming; Qin, Yuan

    2017-03-13

    Flowering plants display a remarkable diversity in inflorescence architecture, and pedicel length is one of the key contributors to this diversity. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the receptor-like kinase ERECTA (ER) mediated signaling pathway plays important roles in regulating inflorescence architecture by promoting cell proliferation. However, the regulating mechanism remains elusive in the pedicel. Genetic interactions between ERECTA signaling and the chromatin remodeling complex SWR1 in the control of inflorescence architecture were studied. Comparative transcriptome analysis was applied to identify downstream components. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and nucleosome occupancy was further investigated. The results indicated that the chromatin remodeler SWR1 coordinates with ERECTA signaling in regulating inflorescence architecture by activating the expression of PRE1 family genes and promoting pedicel elongation. It was found that SWR1 is required for the incorporation of the H2A.Z histone variant into nucleosomes of the whole PRE1 gene family and the ERECTA controlled expression of PRE1 gene family through regulating nucleosome dynamics. We propose that utilization of a chromatin remodeling complex to regulate gene expression is a common theme in developmental control across kingdoms. These findings shed light on the mechanisms through which chromatin remodelers orchestrate complex transcriptional regulation of gene expression in coordination with a developmental cue.