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Sample records for arabidopsis cold shock

  1. Cold shock domain protein 3 regulates freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Sasaki, Kentaro; Imai, Ryozo

    2009-08-28

    In response to cold, Escherichia coli produces cold shock proteins (CSPs) that have essential roles in cold adaptation as RNA chaperones. Here, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis cold shock domain protein 3 (AtCSP3), which shares a cold shock domain with bacterial CSPs, is involved in the acquisition of freezing tolerance in plants. AtCSP3 complemented a cold-sensitive phenotype of the E. coli CSP quadruple mutant and displayed nucleic acid duplex melting activity, suggesting that AtCSP3 also functions as an RNA chaperone. Promoter-GUS transgenic plants revealed tissue-specific expression of AtCSP3 in shoot and root apical regions. When exposed to low temperature, GUS activity was extensively induced in a broader region of the roots. In transgenic plants expressing an AtCSP3-GFP fusion, GFP signals were detected in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. An AtCSP3 knock-out mutant (atcsp3-2) was sensitive to freezing compared with wild-type plants under non-acclimated and cold-acclimated conditions, whereas expression of C-repeat-binding factors and their downstream genes during cold acclimation was not altered in the atcsp3-2 mutant. Overexpression of AtCSP3 in transgenic plants conferred enhanced freezing tolerance over wild-type plants. Together, the data demonstrated an essential role of RNA chaperones for cold adaptation in higher plants.

  2. Cold shock protein 1 chaperones mRNAs during translation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Juntawong, Piyada; Sorenson, Reed; Bailey-Serres, Julia

    2013-06-01

    RNA binding proteins (RBPs) function post-transcriptionally to fine-tune gene regulation. Arabidopsis thaliana has four Gly-rich, zinc finger-containing RBPs called cold shock proteins 1-4 (CSP1-CSP4), that possess an evolutionary conserved cold shock domain. Here, we determined that CSP1 associates with polyribosomes (polysomes) via an RNA-mediated interaction. Both the abundance and polysomal co-fractionation of CSP1 was enhanced in the cold (4°C), but did not influence global levels of polysomes, which were minimally perturbed by above freezing cold temperatures. Using a polyclonal antiserum, CSP1 was co-immunopurified with several hundred transcripts from rosettes of plants cultivated at 23°C or transferred to 4°C for 12 h. CSP1-associated mRNAs were characterized by G+C-rich 5' untranslated regions and gene ontologies related to cellular respiration, mRNA binding and translation. The majority of the CSP1-associated mRNAs were constitutively expressed and stable in the cold. CSP1 abundance was correlated with improved translation of ribosomal protein mRNAs during cold stress and improved maintenance of homeostasis and translation of mRNAs under water-deficit stress. In summary, CSP1 selectively chaperones mRNAs, providing translational enhancement during stress.

  3. Arabidopsis COLD SHOCK DOMAIN PROTEIN2 is a RNA chaperone that is regulated by cold and developmental signals

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Kentaro; Kim, Myung-Hee; Imai, Ryozo

    2007-12-21

    Bacterial cold shock proteins (CSPs) are RNA chaperones that unwind RNA secondary structures. Arabidopsis COLD SHOCK DOMAIN PROTEIN2 (AtCSP2) contains a domain that is shared with bacterial CSPs. Here we showed that AtCSP2 binds to RNA and unwinds nucleic acid duplex. Heterologous expression of AtCSP2 complemented cold sensitivity of an Escherichia coli csp quadruple mutant, indicating that AtCSP2 function as a RNA chaperone in E. coli. AtCSP2 mRNA and protein levels increased during cold acclimation, but the protein accumulation was most prominent after 10 days of cold treatment. AtCSP2 promoter::GUS transgenic plants revealed that AtCSP2 is expressed only in root and shoot apical regions during vegetative growth but is expressed in reproductive organs such as pollens, ovules and embryos. These data indicated that AtCSP2 is involved in developmental processes as well as cold adaptation. Localization of AtCSP2::GFP in nucleolus and cytoplasm suggested different nuclear and cytosolic RNA targets.

  4. Arabidopsis cold shock domain protein 2 influences ABA accumulation in seed and negatively regulates germination.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kentaro; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kanno, Yuri; Seo, Mitsunori; Kamiya, Yuji; Imai, Ryozo

    2015-01-02

    The cold shock domain (CSD) is the most conserved nucleic acid binding domain and is distributed from bacteria to animals and plants. CSD proteins are RNA chaperones that destabilize RNA secondary structures to regulate stress tolerance and development. AtCSP2 is one of the four CSD proteins in Arabidopsis and is up-regulated in response to cold. Since AtCSP2 negatively regulates freezing tolerance, it was proposed to be a modulator of freezing tolerance during cold acclimation. Here, we examined the function of AtCSP2 in seed germination. We found that AtCSP2-overexpressing lines demonstrated retarded germination as compared with the wild type, with or without stress treatments. The ABA levels in AtCSP2-overexpressing seeds were higher than those in the wild type. In addition, overexpression of AtCSP2 reduced the expression of an ABA catabolic gene (CYP707A2) and gibberellin biosynthesis genes (GA20ox and GA3ox). These results suggest that AtCSP2 negatively regulates seed germination by controlling ABA and GA levels.

  5. Overexpression of Arabidopsis NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (AtNTRC) confers freezing and cold shock tolerance to plants

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Jeong Chan; Lee, Sangmin; Shin, Su Young; Chae, Ho Byoung; Jung, Young Jun; Jung, Hyun Suk; Lee, Kyun Oh; Lee, Jung Ro; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2015-08-07

    Overexpression of AtNTRC (AtNTRC{sup OE}) in Arabidopsis thaliana led to a freezing and cold stress tolerance, whereas a knockout mutant (atntrc) showed a stress-sensitive phenotype. Biochemical analyses showed that the recombinant AtNTRC proteins exhibited a cryoprotective activity for malate dehydrogenase and lactic dehydrogenase. Furthermore, conclusive evidence of its interaction with nucleic acids in vitro is provided here on the basis of gel shift and electron microscopy analysis. Recombinant AtNTRC efficiently protected RNA and DNA from RNase A and metal catalyzed oxidation damage, respectively. The C-terminal thioredoxin domain is required for the nucleic acid–protein complex formation. From these results, it can be hypothesized that AtNTRC, which is known to be an electron donor of peroxiredoxin, contributes the stability of macromolecules under cold stress. - Highlights: • AtNTRC has a cryoprotective activity in vitro. • Overexpression of AtNTRC increases tolerance to freezing and cold shock stresses. • Thioredoxin domain of AtNTRC protects nucleic acids in vitro. • AtNTRC inhibits protein aggregation under freezing stress in vitro.

  6. Effects of mutations in the Arabidopsis Cold Shock Domain Protein 3 (AtCSP3) gene on leaf cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongil; Karlson, Dale

    2012-01-01

    The cold shock domain is among the most evolutionarily conserved nucleic acid binding domains from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes, including plants. Although eukaryotic cold shock domain proteins have been extensively studied as transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulators during various developmental processes, their functional roles in plants remains poorly understood. In this study, AtCSP3 (At2g17870), which is one of four Arabidopsis thaliana c old s hock domain proteins (AtCSPs), was functionally characterized. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed high expression of AtCSP3 in reproductive and meristematic tissues. A homozygous atcsp3 loss-of-function mutant exhibits an overall reduced seedling size, stunted and orbicular rosette leaves, reduced petiole length, and curled leaf blades. Palisade mesophyll cells are smaller and more circular in atcsp3 leaves. Cell size analysis indicated that the reduced size of the circular mesophyll cells appears to be generated by a reduction of cell length along the leaf-length axis, resulting in an orbicular leaf shape. It was also determined that leaf cell expansion is impaired for lateral leaf development in the atcsp3 loss-of-function mutant, but leaf cell proliferation is not affected. AtCSP3 loss-of-function resulted in a dramatic reduction of LNG1 transcript, a gene that is involved in two-dimensional leaf polarity regulation. Transient subcellular localization of AtCSP3 in onion epidermal cells confirmed a nucleocytoplasmic localization pattern. Collectively, these data suggest that AtCSP3 is functionally linked to the regulation of leaf length by affecting LNG1 transcript accumulation during leaf development. A putative function of AtCSP3 as an RNA binding protein is also discussed in relation to leaf development. PMID:22888122

  7. Effects of mutations in the Arabidopsis Cold Shock Domain Protein 3 (AtCSP3) gene on leaf cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongil; Karlson, Dale

    2012-08-01

    The cold shock domain is among the most evolutionarily conserved nucleic acid binding domains from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes, including plants. Although eukaryotic cold shock domain proteins have been extensively studied as transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulators during various developmental processes, their functional roles in plants remains poorly understood. In this study, AtCSP3 (At2g17870), which is one of four Arabidopsis thaliana c old s hock domain proteins (AtCSPs), was functionally characterized. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed high expression of AtCSP3 in reproductive and meristematic tissues. A homozygous atcsp3 loss-of-function mutant exhibits an overall reduced seedling size, stunted and orbicular rosette leaves, reduced petiole length, and curled leaf blades. Palisade mesophyll cells are smaller and more circular in atcsp3 leaves. Cell size analysis indicated that the reduced size of the circular mesophyll cells appears to be generated by a reduction of cell length along the leaf-length axis, resulting in an orbicular leaf shape. It was also determined that leaf cell expansion is impaired for lateral leaf development in the atcsp3 loss-of-function mutant, but leaf cell proliferation is not affected. AtCSP3 loss-of-function resulted in a dramatic reduction of LNG1 transcript, a gene that is involved in two-dimensional leaf polarity regulation. Transient subcellular localization of AtCSP3 in onion epidermal cells confirmed a nucleocytoplasmic localization pattern. Collectively, these data suggest that AtCSP3 is functionally linked to the regulation of leaf length by affecting LNG1 transcript accumulation during leaf development. A putative function of AtCSP3 as an RNA binding protein is also discussed in relation to leaf development.

  8. Cold tolerance in Arabidopsis kamchatica.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Jessica J; Takebayashi, Naoki; Sformo, Todd; Wolf, Diana E

    2015-03-01

    Cold tolerance is a critically important factor determining how plants will be influenced by climate change, including changes in snowcover and extreme weather events. Although a great deal is known about cold tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana, it is not highly cold tolerant. This study examined cold tolerance and its genetic diversity in an herbaceous subarctic relative, Arabidopsis kamchatica, which generally occurs in much colder climates.• Thermal analysis and electrolyte leakage were used to estimate supercooling points and lethal temperatures (LT50) in cold-acclimated and nonacclimated families from three populations of A. kamchatica.• Arabidopsis kamchatica was highly cold tolerant, with a mean LT50 of -10.8°C when actively growing, and -21.8°C when cold acclimated. It also was able to supercool to very low temperatures. Surprisingly, actively growing plants supercooled more than acclimated plants (-14.7 vs. -12.7°C). There was significant genetic variation for cold tolerance both within and among populations. However, both cold tolerance and genetic diversity were highest in the midlatitude population rather than in the far north, indicating that adaptations to climate change are most likely to arise in the center of the species range rather than at the edges.• Arabidopsis kamchatica is highly cold tolerant throughout its range. It is far more freeze tolerant than A. thaliana, and supercooled to lower temperatures, suggesting that A. kamchatica provides a valuable complement to A. thaliana for cold tolerance research. © 2015 Botanical Society of America, Inc.

  9. Cold Osmotic Shock in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Patching, J. W.; Rose, A. H.

    1971-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCYC 366 is susceptible to cold osmotic shock. Exponentially growing cells from batch cultures grown in defined medium at 30 C, after being suspended in 0.8 m mannitol containing 10 mm ethylenedia-minetetraacetic acid and then resuspended in ice-cold 0.5 mm MgCl2, accumulated the nonmetabolizable solutes d-glucosamine-hydrochloride and 2-aminoisobutyrate at slower rates than unshocked cells; shocked cells retained their viability. Storage of unshocked batch-grown cells in buffer at 10 C led to an increase in ability to accumulate glucosamine, and further experiments were confined to cells grown in a chemostat under conditions of glucose limitation, thereby obviating the need for storing cells before use. A study was made of the effect of the different stages in the cold osmotic shock procedure, including the osmotic stress, the chelating agent, and the cold Mg2+-containing diluent, on viability and solute-accumulating ability. Growth of shocked cells in defined medium resembled that of unshocked cells; however, in malt extract-yeast extract-glucose-peptone medium, the shocked cells had a longer lag phase of growth and initially grew at a slower rate. Cold osmotic shock caused the release of low-molecular-weight compounds and about 6 to 8% of the cell protein. Neither the cell envelope enzymes, invertase, acid phosphatase and l-leucine-β-naphthylamidase, nor the cytoplasmic enzyme, alkaline phosphatase, were released when yeast cells were subjected to cold osmotic shock. PMID:5001201

  10. Cold Shock Induction of Thermal Sensitivity in Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Arthur J.; Bayles, Darrell O.; Eblen, B. Shawn

    2000-01-01

    Cold shock at 0 to 15°C for 1 to 3 h increased the thermal sensitivity of Listeria monocytogenes. In a model broth system, thermal death time at 60°C was reduced by up to 45% after L. monocytogenes Scott A was cold shocked for 3 h. The duration of the cold shock affected thermal tolerance more than did the magnitude of the temperature downshift. The Z values were 8.8°C for controls and 7.7°C for cold-shocked cells. The D values of cold-shocked cells did not return to control levels after incubation for 3 h at 28°C followed by heating at 60°C. Nine L. monocytogenes strains that were cold shocked for 3 h exhibited D60 values that were reduced by 13 to 37%. The D-value reduction was greatest in cold-shocked stationary-phase cells compared to cells from cultures in either the lag or exponential phases of growth. In addition, cold-shocked cells were more likely to be inactivated by a given heat treatment than nonshocked cells, which were more likely to experience sublethal injury. The D values of chloramphenicol-treated control cells and chloramphenicol-treated cold-shocked cells were no different from those of untreated cold-shocked cells, suggesting that cold shock suppresses synthesis of proteins responsible for heat protection. In related experiments, the D values of L. monocytogenes Scott A were decreased 25% on frankfurter skins and 15% in ultra-high temperature milk if the inoculated products were first cold shocked. Induction of increased thermal sensitivity in L. monocytogenes by thermal flux shows potential to become a practical and efficacious preventative control method. PMID:11010880

  11. Relationship of Extreme Cold Weather and Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Shocks.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Justin M; Liu, Shuangbo; Hiebert, Brett; Tam, James W; Seifer, Colette M

    2017-09-15

    Cold weather to 0°C has been implicated as a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shocks. The effect of more extreme cold weather on the risk of ventricular arrhythmias and ICD shocks is unknown. We sought to describe the relationship between extreme cold weather and the risk of ICD shocks. We retrospectively identified patients seen at the Pacemaker and Defibrillator Clinic at St. Boniface Hospital in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada between 2010 and 2015 with an ICD shock. We excluded multiple shocks occurring on the same day in a single patient. We collected weather data, and evaluated the relationship between ICD shocks and weather on the same day as the shock using Negative Binomial regression. Three hundred and sixty patients experienced a total of 1,355 shocks. When excluding multiple shocks occurring in a single patient on the same day, there were 756 unique shocks. The daily high (DH) was the strongest predictor of receiving an ICD shock. Compared with the warmest days (DH above 10°C), shocks were 25% more common on the coldest days (DH below -10°C), and 8% more common on cold days (DH between -10°C and 10°C). This linear trend was statistically significant, with a p-value of 0.04. In conclusion, we found an association between extreme cold weather and ICD shocks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fitness benefits and costs of cold acclimation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Ying; Dhakal, Preeti; Ungerer, Mark C

    2011-07-01

    Abstract When resources are limited, there is a trade-off between growth/reproduction and stress defense in plants. Most temperate plant species, including Arabidopsis thaliana, can enhance freezing tolerance through cold acclimation at low but nonfreezing temperatures. Induction of the cold acclimation pathway should be beneficial in environments where plants frequently encounter freezing stress, but it might represent a cost in environments where freezing events are rare. In A. thaliana, induction of the cold acclimation pathway critically involves a small subfamily of genes known as the CBFs. Here we test for a cost of cold acclimation by utilizing (1) natural accessions of A. thaliana that originate from different regions of the species' native range and that have experienced different patterns of historical selection on their CBF genes and (2) transgenic CBF overexpression and T-DNA insertion (knockdown/knockout) lines. While benefits of cold acclimation in the presence of freezing stress were confirmed, no cost of cold acclimation was detected in the absence of freezing stress. These findings suggest that cold acclimation is unlikely to be selected against in warmer environments and that naturally occurring mutations disrupting CBF function in the southern part of the species range are likely to be selectively neutral. An unanticipated finding was that cold acclimation in the absence of a subsequent freezing stress resulted in increased fruit production, that is, fitness.

  13. Temporal heterogeneity of cold acclimation phenotypes in Arabidopsis leaves.

    PubMed

    Gorsuch, Peter A; Pandey, Subedar; Atkin, Owen K

    2010-02-01

    To predict the effects of temperature changes on plant growth and performance, it is crucial to understand the impact of thermal history on leaf morphology, anatomy and physiology. Here, we document a comprehensive range of leaf phenotypes in 25/20 degrees C-grown Arabidopsis thaliana plants that were shifted to 5 degrees C for up to 2 months. When warm-grown, pre-existing (PE) leaves were exposed to cold, leaf thickness increased due to an increase in mesophyll cell size. Leaves that were entirely cold-developed (CD) were twice as thick (eight cell layers) as their warm-developed (WD) counterparts (six layers), and also had higher epidermal and stomatal cell densities. After 4 d of cold, PE leaves accumulated high levels of total non-structural carbohydrates (TNC). However, glucose and starch levels declined thereafter, and after 45 d in the cold, PE leaves exhibited similar TNC to CD leaves. A similar phenomenon was observed in delta(13)C and a range of photosynthetic parameters. In cold-treated PE leaves, an increase in respiration (R(dark)) with cold exposure time was evident when measured at 25 degrees C but not 5 degrees C. Cold acclimation was associated with a large increase in the ratio of leaf R(dark) to photosynthesis. The data highlight the importance of understanding developmental thermal history in determining individual phenotypic traits.

  14. High power cold shock phenomena in Loop Heat Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitkin, Michael N.; Bienert, Walter B.

    2001-02-01

    DCI's most recent experiments with a wide range of the LHP configurations (from kilowatt systems with parallel condensers for deployable radiators to miniature few-watts-LHPs for cooling electronics) have discovered a new, interesting phenomenon that we called the ``cold shock.'' Initially, the cold shock behavior was discovered during routine acceptance tests of large LHPs with large-volume condensers. Traditional power-up steps appeared to lead to unexplainable temperature instabilities and significant temperature overshoots when the condenser was initially very cold. After the occurrence of these anomalies we performed hundreds of experiments on dozens of typical LHPs, trying to understand the overshoots and find ways to avoid them. .

  15. A Cold-Inducible DEAD-Box RNA Helicase from Arabidopsis thaliana Regulates Plant Growth and Development under Low Temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuelin; Tabata, Daisuke; Imai, Ryozo

    2016-01-01

    DEAD-box RNA helicases comprise a large family and are involved in a range of RNA processing events. Here, we identified one of the Arabidopsis thaliana DEAD-box RNA helicases, AtRH7, as an interactor of Arabidopsis COLD SHOCK DOMAIN PROTEIN 3 (AtCSP3), which is an RNA chaperone involved in cold adaptation. Promoter:GUS transgenic plants revealed that AtRH7 is expressed ubiquitously and that its levels of the expression are higher in rapidly growing tissues. Knockout mutant lines displayed several morphological alterations such as disturbed vein pattern, pointed first true leaves, and short roots, which resemble ribosome-related mutants of Arabidopsis. In addition, aberrant floral development was also observed in rh7 mutants. When the mutants were germinated at low temperature (12°C), both radicle and first leaf emergence were severely delayed; after exposure of seedlings to a long period of cold, the mutants developed aberrant, fewer, and smaller leaves. RNA blots and circular RT-PCR revealed that 35S and 18S rRNA precursors accumulated to higher levels in the mutants than in WT under both normal and cold conditions, suggesting the mutants are partially impaired in pre-rRNA processing. Taken together, the results suggest that AtRH7 affects rRNA biogenesis and plays an important role in plant growth under cold.

  16. A Cold-Inducible DEAD-Box RNA Helicase from Arabidopsis thaliana Regulates Plant Growth and Development under Low Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuelin; Tabata, Daisuke; Imai, Ryozo

    2016-01-01

    DEAD-box RNA helicases comprise a large family and are involved in a range of RNA processing events. Here, we identified one of the Arabidopsis thaliana DEAD-box RNA helicases, AtRH7, as an interactor of Arabidopsis COLD SHOCK DOMAIN PROTEIN 3 (AtCSP3), which is an RNA chaperone involved in cold adaptation. Promoter:GUS transgenic plants revealed that AtRH7 is expressed ubiquitously and that its levels of the expression are higher in rapidly growing tissues. Knockout mutant lines displayed several morphological alterations such as disturbed vein pattern, pointed first true leaves, and short roots, which resemble ribosome-related mutants of Arabidopsis. In addition, aberrant floral development was also observed in rh7 mutants. When the mutants were germinated at low temperature (12°C), both radicle and first leaf emergence were severely delayed; after exposure of seedlings to a long period of cold, the mutants developed aberrant, fewer, and smaller leaves. RNA blots and circular RT-PCR revealed that 35S and 18S rRNA precursors accumulated to higher levels in the mutants than in WT under both normal and cold conditions, suggesting the mutants are partially impaired in pre-rRNA processing. Taken together, the results suggest that AtRH7 affects rRNA biogenesis and plays an important role in plant growth under cold. PMID:27116354

  17. Characterization of Two Dinoflagellate Cold Shock Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Beauchemin, Mathieu; Roy, Sougata; Pelletier, Sarah; Averback, Alexandra; Lanthier, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Roughly two-thirds of the proteins annotated as transcription factors in dinoflagellate transcriptomes are cold shock domain-containing proteins (CSPs), an uncommon condition in eukaryotic organisms. However, no functional analysis has ever been reported for a dinoflagellate CSP, and so it is not known if they do in fact act as transcription factors. We describe here some of the properties of two CSPs from the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum, LpCSP1 and LpCSP2, which contain a glycine-rich C-terminal domain and an N-terminal cold shock domain phylogenetically related to those in bacteria. However, neither of the two LpCSPs act like the bacterial CSP, since they do not functionally complement the Escherichia coli quadruple cold shock domain protein mutant BX04, and cold shock does not induce LpCSP1 and LpCSP2 to detectable levels, based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Both CSPs bind to RNA and single-stranded DNA in a nonspecific manner in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, and both proteins also bind double-stranded DNA nonspecifically, albeit more weakly. These CSPs are thus unlikely to act alone as sequence-specific transcription factors. IMPORTANCE Dinoflagellate transcriptomes contain cold shock domain proteins as the major component of the proteins annotated as transcription factors. We show here that the major family of cold shock domain proteins in the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium do not bind specific sequences, suggesting that transcriptional control is not a predominant mechanism for regulating gene expression in this group of protists. PMID:27303711

  18. Sucrose helps regulate cold acclimation of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Rekarte-Cowie, Iona; Ebshish, Omar S.; Mohamed, Khalifa S.; Pearce, Roger S.

    2008-01-01

    A test was carried out to see if sucrose could regulate cold-acclimation-associated gene expression in Arabidopsis. In plants and excised leaves, sucrose caused an increase in GUS activity, as a reporter for the activity of the cold-responsive COR78 promoter. This increase was transient at 21 °C but lasted for at least 4 d at 4 °C in continuous darkness. However, at 4 °C with a 16 h photoperiod, GUS activity was similarly high with solutions lacking sucrose or with different concentrations of sucrose. In peeled lower epidermis in the cold dark environment, 40 mM sucrose increased COR78 transcript abundance to substantially above that in the controls, but sorbitol had no effect. Similarly to the cold and dark conditions, sucrose increased COR78 transcript abundance in the epidermis in the warm light and warm dark environments, but not in a cold light environment. Sucrose had much less effect on COR78 transcript abundance in leaves without the lower epidermis. Thus sucrose regulates expression of COR78, possibly mainly in the epidermis, at the level of transcription. Furthermore, 40 mM sucrose at 4 °C for 24 h in constant darkness was sufficient to give the same GUS activity as in fully acclimated plants of the same age in a 16 h photoperiod, although by 48 h, GUS activity had become intermediate between control and fully cold-acclimated plants. Thus sucrose has a regulatory role in the acclimation of whole plants to cold and this may be important during diurnal dark periods. PMID:18980951

  19. Ca(2+)-activated anion channels and membrane depolarizations induced by blue light and cold in Arabidopsis seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. D.; Karlin-Neumann, G.; Davis, R. W.; Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The activation of an anion channel in the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls by blue light (BL) is believed to be a signal-transducing event leading to growth inhibition. Here we report that the open probability of this particular anion channel depends on cytoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt) within the concentration range of 1 to 10 microM, raising the possibility that BL activates the anion channel by increasing [Ca2+]cyt. Arabidopsis seedlings cytoplasmically expressing aequorin were generated to test this possibility. Aequorin luminescence did not increase during or after BL, providing evidence that Ca2+ does not play a second-messenger role in the activation of anion channels. However, cold shock simultaneously triggered a large increase in [Ca2+]cyt and a 110-mV transient depolarization of the plasma membrane. A blocker of the anion channel, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid, blocked 61% of the cold-induced depolarization without affecting the increase in [Ca2+]cyt. These data led us to propose that cold shock opens Ca2+ channels at the plasma membrane, allowing an inward, depolarizing Ca2+ current. The resulting large increase in [Ca2+]cyt activates the anion channel, which further depolarizes the membrane. Although an increase in [Ca2+]cyt may activate anion channels in response to cold, it appears that BL does so via a Ca(2+)-independent pathway.

  20. Ca(2+)-activated anion channels and membrane depolarizations induced by blue light and cold in Arabidopsis seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. D.; Karlin-Neumann, G.; Davis, R. W.; Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    The activation of an anion channel in the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls by blue light (BL) is believed to be a signal-transducing event leading to growth inhibition. Here we report that the open probability of this particular anion channel depends on cytoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt) within the concentration range of 1 to 10 microM, raising the possibility that BL activates the anion channel by increasing [Ca2+]cyt. Arabidopsis seedlings cytoplasmically expressing aequorin were generated to test this possibility. Aequorin luminescence did not increase during or after BL, providing evidence that Ca2+ does not play a second-messenger role in the activation of anion channels. However, cold shock simultaneously triggered a large increase in [Ca2+]cyt and a 110-mV transient depolarization of the plasma membrane. A blocker of the anion channel, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid, blocked 61% of the cold-induced depolarization without affecting the increase in [Ca2+]cyt. These data led us to propose that cold shock opens Ca2+ channels at the plasma membrane, allowing an inward, depolarizing Ca2+ current. The resulting large increase in [Ca2+]cyt activates the anion channel, which further depolarizes the membrane. Although an increase in [Ca2+]cyt may activate anion channels in response to cold, it appears that BL does so via a Ca(2+)-independent pathway.

  1. Cold induction of Arabidopsis CBF genes involves multiple ICE (inducer of CBF expression) promoter elements and a cold-regulatory circuit that is desensitized by low temperature.

    PubMed

    Zarka, Daniel G; Vogel, Jonathan T; Cook, Daniel; Thomashow, Michael F

    2003-10-01

    The Arabidopsis CBF1, 2, and 3 genes (also known as DREB1b, c, and a, respectively) encode transcriptional activators that have a central role in cold tolerance. CBF1-3 are rapidly induced upon exposing plants to low temperature, followed by expression of CBF-targeted genes, the CBF regulon, resulting in an increase in plant freezing tolerance. At present, little is known about the cold-sensing mechanism that controls CBF expression. Results presented here indicate that this mechanism does not require a cold shock to bring about the accumulation of CBF transcripts, but instead, absolute temperature is monitored with a greater degree of input, i.e. lower temperature, resulting in a greater output, i.e. higher levels of CBF transcripts. Temperature-shift experiments also indicate that the cold-sensing mechanism becomes desensitized to a given low temperature, such as 4 degrees C, and that resensitization to that temperature requires between 8 and 24 h at warm temperature. Gene fusion experiments identified a 125-bp section of the CBF2 promoter that is sufficient to impart cold-responsive gene expression. Mutational analysis of this cold-responsive region identified two promoter segments that work in concert to impart robust cold-regulated gene expression. These sequences, designated ICEr1 and ICEr2 (induction of CBF expression region 1 or 2), were also shown to stimulate transcription in response to mechanical agitation and the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide.

  2. Cold shock and cold acclimation proteins in the psychrotrophic bacterium Arthrobacter globiformis SI55.

    PubMed Central

    Berger, F; Morellet, N; Menu, F; Potier, P

    1996-01-01

    The psychrotrophic bacterium Arthrobacter globiformis SI55 was grown at 4 and 25 degrees C, and the cell protein contents were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Cells subjected to cold shocks of increasing magnitude were also analyzed. Correspondence analysis of protein appearance distinguished four groups of physiological significance. Group I contained cold shock proteins (Csps) overexpressed only after a large temperature downshift. Group II contained Csps with optimal expression after mild shocks. Group III contained proteins overexpressed after all cold shocks. These last proteins were also overexpressed in cells growing at 4 degrees C and were considered to be early cold acclimation proteins (Caps). Group IV contained proteins which were present at high concentrations only in 4 degrees C steady-state cells and appeared to be late Caps. A portion of a gene very similar to the Escherichia coli cspA gene (encoding protein CS7.4) was identified. A synthetic peptide was used to produce an antibody which detected a CS7.4-like protein (A9) by immunoblotting two-dimensional electrophoresis gels of A. globiformis SI55 total proteins. Unlike mesophilic microorganisms, this CS7.4-like protein was still produced during prolonged growth at low temperature, and it might have a particular adaptive function needed for balanced growth under harsh conditions. However, A9 was induced at high temperature by chloramphenicol, suggesting that CS7.4-like proteins have a more general role than their sole implication in cold acclimation processes. PMID:8655472

  3. Solution structure of the cold-shock-like protein from Rickettsia rickettsii.

    PubMed

    Gerarden, Kyle P; Fuchs, Andrew M; Koch, Jonathan M; Mueller, Melissa M; Graupner, David R; O'Rorke, Justin T; Frost, Caleb D; Heinen, Heather A; Lackner, Emily R; Schoeller, Scott J; House, Paul G; Peterson, Francis C; Veldkamp, Christopher T

    2012-11-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by Rickettsia rickettsii infection. R. rickettsii can be transmitted to mammals, including humans, through the bite of an infected hard-bodied tick of the family Ixodidae. Since the R. rickettsii genome contains only one cold-shock-like protein and given the essential nature of cold-shock proteins in other bacteria, the structure of the cold-shock-like protein from R. rickettsii was investigated. With the exception of a short α-helix found between β-strands 3 and 4, the solution structure of the R. rickettsii cold-shock-like protein has the typical Greek-key five-stranded β-barrel structure found in most cold-shock domains. Additionally, the R. rickettsii cold-shock-like protein, with a ΔG of unfolding of 18.4 kJ mol(-1), has a similar stability when compared with other bacterial cold-shock proteins.

  4. Formation of shock waves in a cold dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, G. C.; Choudhury, Balen; Bora, M. P.

    2012-04-01

    In this brief report, we present our calculations leading to formation of coherent structures through shock waves, which is studied with the help of the Burger wave equation, in certain space plasmas contaminated by the massive cold dust grains. Burger equation, in an ideal Maxwellian complex plasma, is derived and results are reported, which could be relevant in case of different space and astrophysical plasmas including Saturn's spokes, F-ring, planetary nebulae, etc.

  5. Metabolite Profiling of adh1 Mutant Response to Cold Stress in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yuan; Liu, Lijun; Wei, Yunzhu; Li, Gaopeng; Yue, Xiule; An, Lizhe

    2017-01-01

    As a result of global warming, vegetation suffers from repeated freeze-thaw cycles caused by more frequent short-term low temperatures induced by hail, snow, or night frost. Therefore, short-term freezing stress of plants should be investigated particularly in light of the current climatic conditions. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) plays a central role in the metabolism of alcohols and aldehydes and it is a key enzyme in anaerobic fermentation. ADH1 responds to plant growth and environmental stress; however, the function of ADH1 in the response to short-term freezing stress remains unknown. Using real-time quantitative fluorescence PCR, the expression level of ADH1 was analyzed at low temperature (4°C). The lethal temperature was calculated based on the electrolyte leakage tests for both ADH1 deletion mutants (adh1) and wild type (WT) plants. To further investigate the relationship between ADH1 and cold tolerance in plants, low-Mr polar metabolite analyses of Arabidopsis adh1 and WT were performed at cold temperatures using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This investigation focused on freezing treatments (cold acclimation group: −6°C for 2 h with prior 4°C for 7 d, cold shock group: −6°C for 2 h without cold acclimation) and recovery (23°C for 24 h) with respect to seedling growth at optimum temperature. The experimental results revealed a significant increase in ADH1 expression during low temperature treatment (4°C) and at a higher lethal temperature in adh1 compared to that in the WT. Retention time indices and specific mass fragments were used to monitor 263 variables and annotate 78 identified metabolites. From these analyses, differences in the degree of metabolite accumulation between adh1 and WT were detected, including soluble sugars (e.g., sucrose) and amino acids (e.g., asparagine). In addition, the correlation-based network analysis highlighted some metabolites, e.g., melibiose, fumaric acid, succinic acid, glycolic acid, and xylose, which

  6. Metabolite Profiling of adh1 Mutant Response to Cold Stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuan; Liu, Lijun; Wei, Yunzhu; Li, Gaopeng; Yue, Xiule; An, Lizhe

    2016-01-01

    As a result of global warming, vegetation suffers from repeated freeze-thaw cycles caused by more frequent short-term low temperatures induced by hail, snow, or night frost. Therefore, short-term freezing stress of plants should be investigated particularly in light of the current climatic conditions. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) plays a central role in the metabolism of alcohols and aldehydes and it is a key enzyme in anaerobic fermentation. ADH1 responds to plant growth and environmental stress; however, the function of ADH1 in the response to short-term freezing stress remains unknown. Using real-time quantitative fluorescence PCR, the expression level of ADH1 was analyzed at low temperature (4°C). The lethal temperature was calculated based on the electrolyte leakage tests for both ADH1 deletion mutants (adh1) and wild type (WT) plants. To further investigate the relationship between ADH1 and cold tolerance in plants, low-Mr polar metabolite analyses of Arabidopsis adh1 and WT were performed at cold temperatures using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This investigation focused on freezing treatments (cold acclimation group: -6°C for 2 h with prior 4°C for 7 d, cold shock group: -6°C for 2 h without cold acclimation) and recovery (23°C for 24 h) with respect to seedling growth at optimum temperature. The experimental results revealed a significant increase in ADH1 expression during low temperature treatment (4°C) and at a higher lethal temperature in adh1 compared to that in the WT. Retention time indices and specific mass fragments were used to monitor 263 variables and annotate 78 identified metabolites. From these analyses, differences in the degree of metabolite accumulation between adh1 and WT were detected, including soluble sugars (e.g., sucrose) and amino acids (e.g., asparagine). In addition, the correlation-based network analysis highlighted some metabolites, e.g., melibiose, fumaric acid, succinic acid, glycolic acid, and xylose, which

  7. Cold shock induction of recombinant Arctic environmental genes.

    PubMed

    Bjerga, Gro Elin Kjæreng; Williamson, Adele Kim

    2015-08-19

    Heterologous expression of psychrophilic enzymes in E. coli is particularly challenging due to their intrinsic instability. The low stability is regarded as a consequence of adaptation that allow them to function at low temperatures. Recombinant production presents a significant barrier to their exploitation for commercial applications in industry. As part of an enzyme discovery project we have investigated the utility of a cold-shock inducible promoter for low-temperature expression of five diverse genes derived from the metagenomes of marine Arctic sediments. After evaluation of their production, we further optimized for soluble production by building a vector suite from which the environmental genes could be expressed as fusions with solubility tags. We found that the low-temperature optimized system produced high expression levels for all putatively cold-active proteins, as well as reducing host toxicity for several candidates. As a proof of concept, activity assays with one of the candidates, a putative chitinase, showed that functional protein was obtained using the low-temperature optimized vector suite. We conclude that a cold-shock inducible system is advantageous for the heterologous expression of psychrophilic proteins, and may also be useful for expression of toxic mesophilic and thermophilic proteins where properties of the proteins are deleterious to the host cell growth.

  8. Pleiotropic roles of cold shock domain proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kentaro; Imai, Ryozo

    2011-01-01

    The cold shock domain (CSD) is a nucleic acid binding domain that is widely conserved from bacteria to higher plants and animals. In Escherichia coli, cold shock proteins (CSPs) are composed solely of a CSD and function as RNA chaperones that destabilize RNA secondary structures. Cellular RNAs tend to be folded into unfavorable structures under low temperature conditions, and RNA chaperones resolve these structures, recovering functionality of the RNAs. CSP functions are associated mainly with cold adaptation, but they are also involved in other biological processes under normal growth conditions. Eukaryotic CSD proteins contain auxiliary domains in addition to the CSD and regulate many biological processes such as development and stress tolerance. In plants, it has been demonstrated that CSD proteins play essential roles in acquiring freezing tolerance. In addition, it has been suggested that some plant CSD proteins regulate embryo development, flowering time, and fruit development. In this review, we summarize the pleiotropic biological functions of CSP proteins in plants and discuss possible mechanisms by which plant CSD proteins regulate the functions of RNA molecules.

  9. Synchronized turbo apoptosis induced by cold-shock

    PubMed Central

    Fransen, J. H.; Dieker, J. W.; Hilbrands, L. B.; Berden, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    In our research on the role of apoptosis in the pathogenesis of the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we aim to evaluate the effects of early and late apoptotic cells and blebs on antigen presenting cells. This requires the in vitro generation of sufficiently large and homogeneous populations of early and late apoptotic cells. Here, we present a quick method encountered by serendipity that results in highly reproducible synchronized homogeneous apoptotic cell populations. In brief, granulocytic 32Dcl3 cells are incubated on ice for 2 h and subsequently rewarmed at 37°C. After 30–90 min at 37°C more than 80–90% of the cells become early apoptotic (Annexin V positive/propidium iodide negative). After 24 h of rewarming at 37°C 98% of the cells were late apoptotic (secondary necrotic; Annexin V positive/propidium iodide positive). Cells already formed apoptotic blebs at their cell surface after approximately 20 min at 37°C. Inter-nucleosomal chromatin cleavage and caspase activation were other characteristics of this cold-shock-induced process of apoptosis. Consequently, apoptosis could be inhibited by a caspase inhibitor. Finally, SLE-derived anti-chromatin autoantibodies showed a high affinity for apoptotic blebs generated by cold-shock. Overall, cold-shock induced apoptosis is achieved without the addition of toxic compounds or antibodies, and quickly leads to synchronized homogeneous apoptotic cell populations, which can be applied for various research questions addressing apoptosis. PMID:20972831

  10. Galaxy bimodality due to cold flows and shock heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekel, Avishai; Birnboim, Yuval

    2006-05-01

    We address the origin of the robust bimodality observed in galaxy properties about a characteristic stellar mass ~3 × 1010Msolar. Less massive galaxies tend to be ungrouped blue star forming discs, while more massive galaxies are typically grouped red old-star spheroids. Colour-magnitude data show a gap between the red and blue sequences, extremely red luminous galaxies already at z~ 1, a truncation of today's blue sequence above L*, and massive starbursts at z~ 2-4. We propose that these features are driven by the thermal properties of the inflowing gas and their interplay with the clustering and feedback processes, all functions of the dark matter halo mass and associated with a similar characteristic scale. In haloes below a critical shock-heating mass Mshock<~ 1012Msolar, discs are built by cold streams, not heated by a virial shock, yielding efficient early star formation. It is regulated by supernova feedback into a long sequence of bursts in blue galaxies constrained to a `fundamental line'. Cold streams penetrating through hot media in M>=Mshock haloes preferentially at z>= 2 lead to massive starbursts in L > L* galaxies. At z < 2, in M > Mshock haloes hosting groups, the gas is heated by a virial shock, and being dilute it becomes vulnerable to feedback from energetic sources such as active galactic nuclei. This shuts off gas supply and prevents further star formation, leading by passive evolution to `red-and-dead' massive spheroids starting at z~ 1. A minimum in feedback efficiency near Mshock explains the observed minimum in M/L and the qualitative features of the star formation history. The cold flows provide a hint for solving the angular momentum problem. When these processes are incorporated in simulations they recover the main bimodality features and solve other open puzzles.

  11. Arabidopsis Response Regulator1 and Arabidopsis Histidine Phosphotransfer Protein2 (AHP2), AHP3, and AHP5 Function in Cold Signaling1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jin; Kim, Jungmook

    2013-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) two-component signaling system, which is composed of sensor histidine kinases, histidine phosphotransfer proteins, and response regulators, mediates the cytokinin response and various other plant responses. We have previously shown that ARABIDOPSIS HISTIDINE KINASE2 (AHK2), AHK3, and cold-inducible type A ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATORS (ARRs) play roles in cold signaling. However, the roles of type B ARRs and ARABIDOPSIS HISTIDINE PHOSPHOTRANSFER PROTEINS (AHPs) have not been investigated in cold signaling. Here, we show that ARR1 and AHP2, AHP3, and AHP5 play positive roles in the cold-inducible expression of type A ARRs. arr1 mutants showed greatly reduced cold-responsive expression of type A ARRs compared with the wild type, whereas ARR1-overexpressing Arabidopsis exhibited the hypersensitive cold response of type A ARRs as well as enhanced freezing tolerance with cytokinin, suggesting that ARR1 functions as a positive factor of cold signaling. Transgenic Arabidopsis expressing ARR1ΔDDK:GR lacking the amino-terminal receiver domain showed wild-type expression levels of type A ARRs in response to cold, indicating that the signal receiver domain of ARR1 might be important for cold-responsive expression of type A ARRs. ahp2 ahp3 ahp5 triple mutations greatly reduced type A ARR expression in response to cold, whereas the single or double ahp mutants displayed wild-type levels of ARR expression, suggesting that AHP2, AHP3, and AHP5 are redundantly involved in cold signaling. Taken together, these results suggest that ARR1 mediates cold signal via AHP2, AHP3, or AHP5 from AHK2 and AHK3 to express type A ARRs. We further identified a cold transcriptome affected by ahk2 ahk3 mutations by microarray analysis, revealing a new cold-responsive gene network regulated downstream of AHK2 and AHK3. PMID:23124324

  12. Expression of major cold shock proteins and genes by Yersinia enterocolitica in synthetic medium and foods.

    PubMed

    Annamalai, Thirunavukkarasu; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2005-11-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a psychrotrophic foodborne pathogen that has been implicated in outbreaks of foodborne illness involving cold-stored foods, especially milk and pork. A major mechanism bacteria use to adapt to cold is expression of cold shock proteins. The objective of this research was to study the expression of major cold shock proteins of Y. enterocolitica in Luria-Bertani (LB) broth, milk, and pork following a temperature downshift from 30 to 4 degrees C. Y. enterocolitica was inoculated into 10 ml of LB broth, sterile skim milk, or pork, and the samples were stored at 4 degrees C (cold shock) or 30 degrees C (control) for 0, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h. At each sampling time, total protein and total RNA were extracted from Y. enterocolitica harvested from LB broth, milk, and pork and subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and dot blot analysis. Two major cold shock proteins (CspA1 and CspA2) of approximately 7 kDa and their genes were expressed by Y. enterocolitica following cold shock. However, the CspA1 and CspA2 proteins were not expressed by Y. enterocolitica at 30 degrees C. Y. enterocolitica CspA1 and CspA2 were observed as early as 2 h of cold shock in cultures from LB broth and milk and at 8 h of cold shock in cultures from pork.

  13. Tissue Culture as a Source of Replicates in Nonmodel Plants: Variation in Cold Response in Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea.

    PubMed

    Kenta, Tanaka; Edwards, Jessica E M; Butlin, Roger K; Burke, Terry; Quick, W Paul; Urwin, Peter; Davey, Matthew P

    2016-12-07

    While genotype-environment interaction is increasingly receiving attention by ecologists and evolutionary biologists, such studies need genetically homogeneous replicates-a challenging hurdle in outcrossing plants. This could be potentially overcome by using tissue culture techniques. However, plants regenerated from tissue culture may show aberrant phenotypes and "somaclonal" variation. Here, we examined somaclonal variation due to tissue culturing using the response to cold treatment of photosynthetic efficiency (chlorophyll fluorescence measurements for Fv/Fm, Fv'/Fm', and ΦPSII, representing maximum efficiency of photosynthesis for dark- and light-adapted leaves, and the actual electron transport operating efficiency, respectively, which are reliable indicators of photoinhibition and damage to the photosynthetic electron transport system). We compared this to variation among half-sibling seedlings from three different families of Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea Somaclonal variation was limited, and we could detect within-family variation in change in chlorophyll fluorescence due to cold shock successfully with the help of tissue-culture derived replicates. Icelandic and Norwegian families exhibited higher chlorophyll fluorescence, suggesting higher performance after cold shock, than a Swedish family. Although the main effect of tissue culture on Fv/Fm, Fv'/Fm', and ΦPSII was small, there were significant interactions between tissue culture and family, suggesting that the effect of tissue culture is genotype-specific. Tissue-cultured plantlets were less affected by cold treatment than seedlings, but to a different extent in each family. These interactive effects, however, were comparable to, or much smaller than the single effect of family. These results suggest that tissue culture is a useful method for obtaining genetically homogenous replicates for studying genotype-environment interaction related to adaptively-relevant phenotypes, such as cold response, in

  14. Tissue Culture as a Source of Replicates in Nonmodel Plants: Variation in Cold Response in Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea

    PubMed Central

    Kenta, Tanaka; Edwards, Jessica E. M.; Butlin, Roger K.; Burke, Terry; Quick, W. Paul; Urwin, Peter; Davey, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    While genotype–environment interaction is increasingly receiving attention by ecologists and evolutionary biologists, such studies need genetically homogeneous replicates—a challenging hurdle in outcrossing plants. This could be potentially overcome by using tissue culture techniques. However, plants regenerated from tissue culture may show aberrant phenotypes and “somaclonal” variation. Here, we examined somaclonal variation due to tissue culturing using the response to cold treatment of photosynthetic efficiency (chlorophyll fluorescence measurements for Fv/Fm, Fv′/Fm′, and ΦPSII, representing maximum efficiency of photosynthesis for dark- and light-adapted leaves, and the actual electron transport operating efficiency, respectively, which are reliable indicators of photoinhibition and damage to the photosynthetic electron transport system). We compared this to variation among half-sibling seedlings from three different families of Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea. Somaclonal variation was limited, and we could detect within-family variation in change in chlorophyll fluorescence due to cold shock successfully with the help of tissue-culture derived replicates. Icelandic and Norwegian families exhibited higher chlorophyll fluorescence, suggesting higher performance after cold shock, than a Swedish family. Although the main effect of tissue culture on Fv/Fm, Fv′/Fm′, and ΦPSII was small, there were significant interactions between tissue culture and family, suggesting that the effect of tissue culture is genotype-specific. Tissue-cultured plantlets were less affected by cold treatment than seedlings, but to a different extent in each family. These interactive effects, however, were comparable to, or much smaller than the single effect of family. These results suggest that tissue culture is a useful method for obtaining genetically homogenous replicates for studying genotype–environment interaction related to adaptively-relevant phenotypes, such

  15. Solution structure of the cold-shock-like protein from Rickettsia rickettsii

    PubMed Central

    Gerarden, Kyle P.; Fuchs, Andrew M.; Koch, Jonathan M.; Mueller, Melissa M.; Graupner, David R.; O’Rorke, Justin T.; Frost, Caleb D.; Heinen, Heather A.; Lackner, Emily R.; Schoeller, Scott J.; House, Paul G.; Peterson, Francis C.; Veldkamp, Christopher T.

    2012-01-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by Rickettsia rickettsii infection. R. rickettsii can be transmitted to mammals, including humans, through the bite of an infected hard-bodied tick of the family Ixodidae. Since the R. rickettsii genome contains only one cold-shock-like protein and given the essential nature of cold-shock proteins in other bacteria, the structure of the cold-shock-like protein from R. rickettsii was investigated. With the exception of a short α-helix found between β-strands 3 and 4, the solution structure of the R. rickettsii cold-shock-like protein has the typical Greek-key five-stranded β-barrel structure found in most cold-shock domains. Additionally, the R. rickettsii cold-shock-like protein, with a ΔG of unfolding of 18.4 kJ mol−1, has a similar stability when compared with other bacterial cold-shock proteins. PMID:23143233

  16. Coping with the cold: the cold shock response in the Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Michael H W; Marahiel, Mohamed A

    2002-01-01

    All organisms examined to date, respond to a sudden change in environmental temperature with a specific cascade of adaptation reactions that, in some cases, have been identified and monitored at the molecular level. According to the type of temperature change, this response has been termed heat shock response (HSR) or cold shock response (CSR). During the HSR, a specialized sigma factor has been shown to play a central regulatory role in controlling expression of genes predominantly required to cope with heat-induced alteration of protein conformation. In contrast, after cold shock, nucleic acid structure and proteins interacting with the biological information molecules DNA and RNA appear to play a major cellular role. Currently, no cold-specific sigma factor has been identified. Therefore, unlike the HSR, the CSR appears to be organized as a complex stimulon rather than resembling a regulon. This review has been designed to draw a refined picture of our current understanding of the CSR in Bacillus subtilis. Important processes such as temperature sensing, membrane adaptation, modification of the translation apparatus, as well as nucleoid reorganization and some metabolic aspects, are discussed in brief. Special emphasis is placed on recent findings concerning the nucleic acid binding cold shock proteins, which play a fundamental role, not only during cold shock adaptation but also under optimal growth conditions. PMID:12171653

  17. CIPK7 is involved in cold response by interacting with CBL1 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Huang, Conglin; Ding, Shuo; Zhang, Hua; Du, Hang; An, Lizhe

    2011-07-01

    The family of calcineurin B-like (CBL) proteins is a unique group of Ca(2+) sensors in plants. CBLs relay the calcium signal by interacting with and regulating the family of CBL-interacting protein kinases (CIPKs). Extensive studies have demonstrated that the CBL-CIPK complexes mediate plant responses to a variety of external stresses. However, there are few reports on the CBL-CIPK involved in cold stress responses. In this study, we analyzed expression of CIPK7 and CBL1 in Arabidopsis during cold treatments. Expression of CIPK7 was induced by cold, and CIPK7 interacted with CBL1 in vitro. Moreover, affinity chromatography purification of CIPK7 from Arabidopsis plants using CBL1 suggested that CIPK7 may associate with CBL1 in vivo. Expression of CBL1 was cold inducible, and CBL1 had a role in regulating cold response. By comparing expression patterns of CIPK7 between wild-type and cbl1 mutant plants, we found the induction of CIPK7 by cold stress was influenced by CBL1. This is the first report to demonstrate that CIPK7 may play a role in cold response via its interaction with CBL1.

  18. Ectopic expression of Arabidopsis RCI2A gene contributes to cold tolerance in tomato.

    PubMed

    Sivankalyani, Velu; Geetha, Mahalingam; Subramanyam, Kondeti; Girija, Shanmugam

    2015-04-01

    Cold is a major stress that limits the quality and productivity of economically important crops such as tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). Generating a cold-stress-tolerant tomato by expressing cold-inducible genes would increase agricultural strategies. Rare cold-inducible 2a (RCI2A) is expressed in Arabidopsis, but its molecular function during cold stress is not fully understood. Here we ectopically expressed Arabidopsis RCI2A in transgenic tomato to evaluate tolerance to cold stress without altering agronomic traits. Biochemical and physiological study demonstrated that expression of RCI2A in transgenic tomato enhanced the activity of peroxidase and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and reduced the accumulation of H2O2, alleviated lipid peroxidation, increased the accumulation of chlorophyll, reduced chilling-induced membrane damage, retained relative water content and enhanced cold tolerance. A motif search revealed that the motifs of photosystem II (PSII) phosphoproteins PsbJ and PsbH and reaction-center proteins PsbL and PsbK were common to cold-inducible RCI2A and peroxidase proteins RCI3A, tomato peroxidase (TPX1), TPX2, tomato ascorbate peroxidase (APX1), and horseradish peroxidase (HRP-c). In addition to membrane protection, RCI2A may cross talk with PSII-associated proteins or peroxidase family enzymes in response to cold stress. Our findings may strengthen the understanding of the molecular function of RCI2A in cold-stress tolerance. RCI2A could be used to improve abiotic stress tolerance in agronomic crops.

  19. Rescue of a cold-sensitive mutant at low temperatures by cold shock proteins from Polaribacter irgensii KOPRI 22228.

    PubMed

    Uh, Ji-hyun; Jung, Youn Hong; Lee, Yoo Kyung; Lee, Hong Kum; Im, Hana

    2010-12-01

    Exposure to low temperatures induces the biosynthesis of specific sets of proteins, including cold shock proteins (Csps). Since many of the specific functions of pychrophilic Csps are unknown, the roles of Csps from an Arctic bacterium, Polaribacter irgensii KOPRI 22228, were examined. The genes encoding CspA and CspC of P. irgensii were cloned in this study. Sequence analysis showed that these proteins have cold shock domains containing two RNA-binding motifs, RNP1 and RNP2. Both proteins bound oligo(dT)-cellulose resins, suggesting single-stranded nucleic acid-binding activity. When the P. irgensii Csps were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, the cold-resistance of the host was increased by more than five-fold. The P. irgensii Csps also rescued a cold-sensitive E. coli csp-quadruple deletion strain, BX04, at low temperatures. These results suggest that Csps from P. irgensii play a role in survival in polar environments.

  20. Mechanism by Which Cold Shock Evokes Exocytosis of Symbiotic Algae in Marine Cnidarians

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-30

    cold shock evokes exocytosis of symbiotic algae in marine cnidarians . RPORTING PERIOD: 30 September 1989 - 30 May 1993 D TIC ELECTE AWARD PERIOD: 30... cnidarians (sea anemones and corals). 2. To identify host factor in symbiotic cnidarians . OBJECTIVE 1: Marine cnidarians were subjected ta cold shock, heat...and L. Muscatine (1992) Temperature stress causes host cell detachment in symbiotic cnidarians : Implications for coral bleaching. Biol. Bull. 182: 324

  1. [Effects of cold-shock on tomato seedlings under high temperature stress].

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-Li; Xia, Ya-Zhen; Liu, Jin; Shi, Xiao-Dan; Sun, Zhi-Qiang

    2014-10-01

    High temperature stress (HTS) is one of the major limiting factors that affect the quality of intensively cultured seedlings in protected facilitates during hot season. Increasing the cross adaptive response of plant induced by temperature stress is an effective way to improve plant stress resistance. In order to explore the alleviating effect of cold-shock intensity on tomato seedlings under HTS, tomato seedlings were subjected to cold-shock treatments every day with 5 °C, 10 °C, and 15 °C for 10 min, 20 min, and 30 min, respectively, in an artificial climate chamber. The effect of single appropriate cold-shock on the gene expression of small heat shock proteins LeHSP 23.8 and CaHSP18 was investigated. The results showed that hypocotyl elongation and plant height of tomato seedlings were restrained by cold-shock treatment before HTS was met. The alleviating effect of tomato seedlings under HTS by cold-shock varied greatly with levels and durations of temperature. The membrane lipids in the leaf of tomato seedlings were subjected to peroxidation injury in the cold-shock treatment at 5 °C, in which the penetration of cell membrane was increased and the activities of antioxidant enzyme was inhibited. The alleviating effect to HTS by cold-shock was decreased with the increasing cold-shock duration at 10 °C, however, a reverse change was found at 15 °C. The results indicated that cross adaptive response of tomato seedling could be induced with a moderate cold-shock temperature for a proper duration before HTS was met. The optimum cold-shock treatment was at 10 °C for 10 min per day, under which, the dry mass, healthy index, activities of protective enzymes (including SOD, POD and CAT) in leaves of tomato seedlings were significantly increased, the contents of proline and soluble protein were enhanced, relative conductivity and malondialdehyde concentration were significantly decreased, and the expression levels of Le-HSP23.8 and CaHSP18 were increased compared

  2. A non-cold-inducible cold shock protein homolog mainly contributes to translational control under optimal growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshiko; Mega, Ryosuke; Kim, Kwang; Shinkai, Akeo; Masui, Ryoji; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Nakagawa, Noriko

    2012-03-01

    Cold shock proteins (Csps) include both cold-induced and non-cold-induced proteins, contrary to their name. Cold-induced Csps are well studied; they function in cold acclimation by controlling transcription and translation. Some Csps have been reported to contribute to other cellular processes. However, the functions of non-cold-induced Csps under optimal growth conditions remain unknown. To elucidate these functions, we used transcriptome and proteome analyses as comprehensive approaches and have compared the outputs of wild-type and non-cold-induced Csp-deletion mutant cells. As a model organism, we selected Thermus thermophilus HB8 because it has only two csp genes (ttcsp1 and ttcsp2); ttCsp1 is the only non-cold-induced Csp. Surprisingly, the amount of transcripts and proteins upon deletion of the ttcsp1 gene was quite different. DNA microarray analysis revealed that the deletion of ttcsp1 did not affect the amount of transcripts, although the ttcsp1 gene was constantly expressed in the wild-type cell. Nonetheless, proteomic analysis revealed that the expression levels of many proteins were significantly altered when ttcsp1 was deleted. These results suggest that ttCsp1 functions in translation independent of transcription. Furthermore, ttCsp1 is involved in both the stimulation and inhibition of translation of specific proteins. Here, we have determined the crystal structure of ttCsp1 at 1.65 Å. This is the first report to present the structure of a non-cold-inducible cold shock protein. We also report the nucleotide binding affinity of ttCsp1. Finally, we discuss the functions of non-cold-induced Csps and propose how they modulate the levels of specific proteins to suit the prevailing environmental conditions.

  3. Transcriptional profiling of Arabidopsis heat shock proteins and transcription factors reveals extensive overlap between heat and non-heat stress response pathways

    PubMed Central

    Swindell, William R; Huebner, Marianne; Weber, Andreas P

    2007-01-01

    Background The heat shock response of Arabidopsis thaliana is dependent upon a complex regulatory network involving twenty-one known transcription factors and four heat shock protein families. It is known that heat shock proteins (Hsps) and transcription factors (Hsfs) are involved in cellular response to various forms of stress besides heat. However, the role of Hsps and Hsfs under cold and non-thermal stress conditions is not well understood, and it is unclear which types of stress interact least and most strongly with Hsp and Hsf response pathways. To address this issue, we have analyzed transcriptional response profiles of Arabidopsis Hsfs and Hsps to a range of abiotic and biotic stress treatments (heat, cold, osmotic stress, salt, drought, genotoxic stress, ultraviolet light, oxidative stress, wounding, and pathogen infection) in both above and below-ground plant tissues. Results All stress treatments interact with Hsf and Hsp response pathways to varying extents, suggesting considerable cross-talk between heat and non-heat stress regulatory networks. In general, Hsf and Hsp expression was strongly induced by heat, cold, salt, and osmotic stress, while other types of stress exhibited family or tissue-specific response patterns. With respect to the Hsp20 protein family, for instance, large expression responses occurred under all types of stress, with striking similarity among expression response profiles. Several genes belonging to the Hsp20, Hsp70 and Hsp100 families were specifically upregulated twelve hours after wounding in root tissue, and exhibited a parallel expression response pattern during recovery from heat stress. Among all Hsf and Hsp families, large expression responses occurred under ultraviolet-B light stress in aerial tissue (shoots) but not subterranean tissue (roots). Conclusion Our findings show that Hsf and Hsp family member genes represent an interaction point between multiple stress response pathways, and therefore warrant functional

  4. Mutational Evidence for the Critical Role of CBF Transcription Factors in Cold Acclimation in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhengjing; Li, Yuanya

    2016-01-01

    The three tandemly arranged CBF genes, CBF1, CBF2, and CBF3, are involved in cold acclimation. Due to the lack of stable loss-of-function Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants deficient in all three CBF genes, it is still unclear whether the CBF genes are essential for freezing tolerance and whether they may have other functions besides cold acclimation. In this study, we used the CRISPR/Cas9 system to generate cbf single, double, and triple mutants. Compared to the wild type, the cbf triple mutants are extremely sensitive to freezing after cold acclimation, demonstrating that the three CBF genes are essential for cold acclimation. Our results show that the three CBF genes also contribute to basal freezing tolerance. Unexpectedly, we found that the cbf triple mutants are defective in seedling development and salt stress tolerance. Transcript profiling revealed that the CBF genes regulate 414 cold-responsive (COR) genes, of which 346 are CBF-activated genes and 68 are CBF-repressed genes. The analysis suggested that CBF proteins are extensively involved in the regulation of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, cell wall modification, and gene transcription. Interestingly, like the triple mutants, cbf2 cbf3 double mutants are more sensitive to freezing after cold acclimation compared to the wild type, but cbf1 cbf3 double mutants are more resistant, suggesting that CBF2 is more important than CBF1 and CBF3 in cold acclimation-dependent freezing tolerance. Our results not only demonstrate that the three CBF genes together are required for cold acclimation and freezing tolerance, but also reveal that they are important for salt tolerance and seedling development. PMID:27252305

  5. Natural Variation of Cold Deacclimation Correlates with Variation of Cold-Acclimation of the Plastid Antioxidant System in Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions

    PubMed Central

    Juszczak, Ilona; Cvetkovic, Jelena; Zuther, Ellen; Hincha, Dirk K.; Baier, Margarete

    2016-01-01

    Temperature variations impact on the balance between photosynthetic electron transport and electron-consuming assimilation reactions and transiently increase generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previous studies demonstrated that the expression of C-repeat binding factors (CBFs), which activate cold acclimation reactions, respond to chloroplast ROS signals and that cold deacclimation is partly halted for days after the transfer of acclimated plants to optimal growth conditions in four Arabidopsis accessions from cold-continental habitats. We hypothesized that these accessions differ from others in the regulation of the plastid antioxidant system (PAS). In the present study, we compared the expression intensity of the 12 most prominent PAS genes for peroxidases, superoxide dismutase and low molecular weight antioxidant regenerating enzymes in 10 Arabidopsis accessions with regulation of CBF and COR (cold regulated genes) transcript levels and cold-regulated metabolite levels prior to cold, after 2 week long cold acclimation and during the first 3 days of deacclimation. In the accessions with prolonged activation of cold responses, by trend, weaker induction of various cold-inducible PAS genes and stronger decreases in the expression of negatively cold-regulated PAS genes were observed. Low PAS gene expression delayed the post-cold decrease in H2O2 levels after transfer of the plants from cold to optimal growth conditions. We conclude that weaker expression of various PAS genes in the cold is an adapted strategy of the Arabidopsis accessions N14, N13, Ms-0, and Kas-1 to avoid full inactivation of cold-responses in the first days after the end of the cold period. PMID:27014325

  6. Natural Variation of Cold Deacclimation Correlates with Variation of Cold-Acclimation of the Plastid Antioxidant System in Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions.

    PubMed

    Juszczak, Ilona; Cvetkovic, Jelena; Zuther, Ellen; Hincha, Dirk K; Baier, Margarete

    2016-01-01

    Temperature variations impact on the balance between photosynthetic electron transport and electron-consuming assimilation reactions and transiently increase generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previous studies demonstrated that the expression of C-repeat binding factors (CBFs), which activate cold acclimation reactions, respond to chloroplast ROS signals and that cold deacclimation is partly halted for days after the transfer of acclimated plants to optimal growth conditions in four Arabidopsis accessions from cold-continental habitats. We hypothesized that these accessions differ from others in the regulation of the plastid antioxidant system (PAS). In the present study, we compared the expression intensity of the 12 most prominent PAS genes for peroxidases, superoxide dismutase and low molecular weight antioxidant regenerating enzymes in 10 Arabidopsis accessions with regulation of CBF and COR (cold regulated genes) transcript levels and cold-regulated metabolite levels prior to cold, after 2 week long cold acclimation and during the first 3 days of deacclimation. In the accessions with prolonged activation of cold responses, by trend, weaker induction of various cold-inducible PAS genes and stronger decreases in the expression of negatively cold-regulated PAS genes were observed. Low PAS gene expression delayed the post-cold decrease in H2O2 levels after transfer of the plants from cold to optimal growth conditions. We conclude that weaker expression of various PAS genes in the cold is an adapted strategy of the Arabidopsis accessions N14, N13, Ms-0, and Kas-1 to avoid full inactivation of cold-responses in the first days after the end of the cold period.

  7. Cold/menthol TRPM8 receptors initiate the cold-shock response and protect germ cells from cold-shock–induced oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Borowiec, Anne-Sophie; Sion, Benoit; Chalmel, Frédéric; D. Rolland, Antoine; Lemonnier, Loïc; De Clerck, Tatiana; Bokhobza, Alexandre; Derouiche, Sandra; Dewailly, Etienne; Slomianny, Christian; Mauduit, Claire; Benahmed, Mohamed; Roudbaraki, Morad; Jégou, Bernard; Prevarskaya, Natalia; Bidaux, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Testes of most male mammals present the particularity of being externalized from the body and are consequently slightly cooler than core body temperature (4–8°C below). Although, hypothermia of the testis is known to increase germ cells apoptosis, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms, including cold sensors, transduction pathways, and apoptosis triggers. In this study, using a functional knockout mouse model of the cold and menthol receptors, dubbed transient receptor potential melastatine 8 (TRPM8) channels, we found that TRPM8 initiated the cold-shock response by differentially modulating cold- and heat-shock proteins. Besides, apoptosis of germ cells increased in proportion to the cooling level in control mice but was independent of temperature in knockout mice. We also observed that the rate of germ cell death correlated positively with the reactive oxygen species level and negatively with the expression of the detoxifying enzymes. This result suggests that the TRPM8 sensor is a key determinant of germ cell fate under hypothermic stimulation.—Borowiec, A.-S., Sion, B., Chalmel, F., Rolland, A. D., Lemonnier, L., De Clerck, T., Bokhobza, A., Derouiche, S., Dewailly, E., Slomianny, C., Mauduit, C., Benahmed, M., Roudbaraki, M., Jégou, B., Prevarskaya, N., Bidaux, G. Cold/menthol TRPM8 receptors initiate the cold-shock response and protect germ cells from cold-shock–induced oxidation. PMID:27317670

  8. A developmentally regulated membrane protein gene in Dictyostelium discoideum is also induced by heat shock and cold shock.

    PubMed Central

    Maniak, M; Nellen, W

    1988-01-01

    We have analyzed the expression of the Dictyostelium gene P8A7 which had been isolated as a cDNA clone from an early developmentally regulated gene. The single genomic copy generated two mRNAs which were subject to different control mechanisms: while one mRNA (P8A7S) was regulated like the cell-type-nonspecific late genes, the other one (P8A7L) was induced during development, when cells were allowed to attach to a substrate, and when cells were subjected to stress, such as heat shock and cadmium. Interestingly the same induction was also observed with cold shock. RNA processing was inhibited by heat and cold shock, leading to nuclear accumulation of a precursor. The translated region of the cDNA was common to both mRNAs and encoded an unusually hydrophobic peptide with the characteristics of a membrane protein. Images PMID:3336356

  9. Mass spectrometric approach for identifying putative plasma membrane proteins of Arabidopsis leaves associated with cold acclimation.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Yukio; Uemura, Matsuo

    2003-10-01

    Although enhancement of freezing tolerance in plants during cold acclimation is closely associated with an increase in the cryostability of plasma membrane, the molecular mechanism for the increased cryostability of plasma membrane is still to be elucidated. In Arabidopsis, enhanced freezing tolerance was detectable after cold acclimation at 2 degrees C for as short as 1 day, and maximum freezing tolerance was attained after 1 week. To identify the plasma membrane proteins that change in quantity in response to cold acclimation, a highly purified plasma membrane fraction was isolated from leaves before and during cold acclimation, and the proteins in the fraction were separated with gel electrophoresis. We found that there were substantial changes in the protein profiles after as short as 1 day of cold acclimation. Subsequently, using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), we identified 38 proteins that changed in quantity during cold acclimation. The proteins that changed in quantity during the first day of cold acclimation include those that are associated with membrane repair by membrane fusion, protection of the membrane against osmotic stress, enhancement of CO2 fixation, and proteolysis.

  10. Electrostatic stabilization of a thermophilic cold shock protein.

    PubMed

    Perl, D; Schmid, F X

    2001-10-19

    The cold shock protein Bc-Csp from the thermophile Bacillus caldolyticus differs from its mesophilic homolog Bs-CspB from Bacillus subtilis by 15.8 kJ mol(-1) in the Gibbs free energy of denaturation (DeltaG(D)). The two proteins vary in sequence at 12 positions but only two of them, Arg3 and Leu66 of Bc-Csp, which replace Glu3 and Glu66 of Bs-CspB, are responsible for the additional stability of Bc-Csp. These two positions are near the ends of the protein chain, but close to each other in the three-dimensional structure. The Glu3Arg exchange alone changed the stability by more than 11 kJ mol(-1). Here, we elucidated the molecular origins of the stability difference between the two proteins by a mutational analysis. Electrostatic contributions to stability were characterized by measuring the thermodynamic stabilities of many variants as a function of salt concentration. Double and triple mutant analyses indicate that the stabilization by the Glu3Arg exchange originates from three sources. Improved hydrophobic interactions of the aliphatic moiety of Arg3 contribute about 4 kJ mol(-1). Another 4 kJ mol(-1) is gained from the relief of a pairwise electrostatic repulsion between Glu3 and Glu66, as in the mesophilic protein, and 3 kJ mol(-1) originate from a general electrostatic stabilization by the positive charge of Arg3, which is not caused by a pairwise interaction. Mutations of all potential partners for an ion pair within a radius of 10 A around Arg3 had only marginal effects on stability. The Glu3-->Arg3 charge reversal thus optimizes ionic interactions at the protein surface by both local and global effects. However, it cannot convert the coulombic repulsion with another Glu residue into a corresponding attraction. Avoidance of unfavorable coulombic repulsions is probably a much simpler route to thermostability than the creation of stabilizing surface ion pairs, which can form only at the expense of conformational entropy. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  11. Transcriptomic analysis of (group I) Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502 cold shock response.

    PubMed

    Dahlsten, Elias; Isokallio, Marita; Somervuo, Panu; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Profound understanding of the mechanisms foodborne pathogenic bacteria utilize in adaptation to the environmental stress they encounter during food processing and storage is of paramount importance in design of control measures. Chill temperature is a central control measure applied in minimally processed foods; however, data on the mechanisms the foodborne pathogen Clostridium botulinum activates upon cold stress are scarce. Transcriptomic analysis on the C. botulinum ATCC 3502 strain upon temperature downshift from 37°C to 15°C was performed to identify the cold-responsive gene set of this organism. Significant up- or down-regulation of 16 and 11 genes, respectively, was observed 1 h after the cold shock. At 5 h after the temperature downshift, 199 and 210 genes were up- or down-regulated, respectively. Thus, the relatively small gene set affected initially indicated a targeted acute response to cold shock, whereas extensive metabolic remodeling appeared to take place after prolonged exposure to cold. Genes related to fatty acid biosynthesis, oxidative stress response, and iron uptake and storage were induced, in addition to mechanisms previously characterized as cold-tolerance related in bacteria. Furthermore, several uncharacterized DNA-binding transcriptional regulator-encoding genes were induced, suggesting involvement of novel regulatory mechanisms in the cold shock response of C. botulinum. The role of such regulators, CBO0477 and CBO0558A, in cold tolerance of C. botulinum ATCC 3502 was demonstrated by deteriorated growth of related mutants at 17°C.

  12. Genome-scale cold stress response regulatory networks in ten Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Low temperature leads to major crop losses every year. Although several studies have been conducted focusing on diversity of cold tolerance level in multiple phenotypically divergent Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) ecotypes, genome-scale molecular understanding is still lacking. Results In this study, we report genome-scale transcript response diversity of 10 A. thaliana ecotypes originating from different geographical locations to non-freezing cold stress (10°C). To analyze the transcriptional response diversity, we initially compared transcriptome changes in all 10 ecotypes using Arabidopsis NimbleGen ATH6 microarrays. In total 6061 transcripts were significantly cold regulated (p < 0.01) in 10 ecotypes, including 498 transcription factors and 315 transposable elements. The majority of the transcripts (75%) showed ecotype specific expression pattern. By using sequence data available from Arabidopsis thaliana 1001 genome project, we further investigated sequence polymorphisms in the core cold stress regulon genes. Significant numbers of non-synonymous amino acid changes were observed in the coding region of the CBF regulon genes. Considering the limited knowledge about regulatory interactions between transcription factors and their target genes in the model plant A. thaliana, we have adopted a powerful systems genetics approach- Network Component Analysis (NCA) to construct an in-silico transcriptional regulatory network model during response to cold stress. The resulting regulatory network contained 1,275 nodes and 7,720 connections, with 178 transcription factors and 1,331 target genes. Conclusions A. thaliana ecotypes exhibit considerable variation in transcriptome level responses to non-freezing cold stress treatment. Ecotype specific transcripts and related gene ontology (GO) categories were identified to delineate natural variation of cold stress regulated differential gene expression in the model plant A. thaliana. The predicted

  13. Involvement of the Sieve Element Cytoskeleton in Electrical Responses to Cold Shocks1[W

    PubMed Central

    Hafke, Jens B.; Ehlers, Katrin; Föller, Jens; Höll, Sabina-Roxana; Becker, Stefanie; van Bel, Aart J.E.

    2013-01-01

    This study dealt with the visualization of the sieve element (SE) cytoskeleton and its involvement in electrical responses to local cold shocks, exemplifying the role of the cytoskeleton in Ca2+-triggered signal cascades in SEs. High-affinity fluorescent phalloidin as well as immunocytochemistry using anti-actin antibodies demonstrated a fully developed parietal actin meshwork in SEs. The involvement of the cytoskeleton in electrical responses and forisome conformation changes as indicators of Ca2+ influx was investigated by the application of cold shocks in the presence of diverse actin disruptors (latrunculin A and cytochalasin D). Under control conditions, cold shocks elicited a graded initial voltage transient, ΔV1, reduced by external La3+ in keeping with the involvement of Ca2+ channels, and a second voltage transient, ΔV2. Cytochalasin D had no effect on ΔV1, while ΔV1 was significantly reduced with 500 nm latrunculin A. Forisome dispersion was triggered by cold shocks of 4°C or greater, which was indicative of an all-or-none behavior. Forisome dispersion was suppressed by incubation with latrunculin A. In conclusion, the cytoskeleton controls cold shock-induced Ca2+ influx into SEs, leading to forisome dispersion and sieve plate occlusion in fava bean (Vicia faba). PMID:23624858

  14. Involvement of the sieve element cytoskeleton in electrical responses to cold shocks.

    PubMed

    Hafke, Jens B; Ehlers, Katrin; Föller, Jens; Höll, Sabina-Roxana; Becker, Stefanie; van Bel, Aart J E

    2013-06-01

    This study dealt with the visualization of the sieve element (SE) cytoskeleton and its involvement in electrical responses to local cold shocks, exemplifying the role of the cytoskeleton in Ca(2+)-triggered signal cascades in SEs. High-affinity fluorescent phalloidin as well as immunocytochemistry using anti-actin antibodies demonstrated a fully developed parietal actin meshwork in SEs. The involvement of the cytoskeleton in electrical responses and forisome conformation changes as indicators of Ca(2+) influx was investigated by the application of cold shocks in the presence of diverse actin disruptors (latrunculin A and cytochalasin D). Under control conditions, cold shocks elicited a graded initial voltage transient, ΔV1, reduced by external La(3+) in keeping with the involvement of Ca(2+) channels, and a second voltage transient, ΔV2. Cytochalasin D had no effect on ΔV1, while ΔV1 was significantly reduced with 500 nm latrunculin A. Forisome dispersion was triggered by cold shocks of 4°C or greater, which was indicative of an all-or-none behavior. Forisome dispersion was suppressed by incubation with latrunculin A. In conclusion, the cytoskeleton controls cold shock-induced Ca(2+) influx into SEs, leading to forisome dispersion and sieve plate occlusion in fava bean (Vicia faba).

  15. A Subset of Cytokinin Two-component Signaling System Plays a Role in Cold Temperature Stress Response in Arabidopsis*

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jin; Kim, Nan Young; Kim, Sunmi; Kang, Na Young; Novák, Ondrej; Ku, Su-Jin; Cho, Chuloh; Lee, Dong Ju; Lee, Eun-Jung; Strnad, Miroslav; Kim, Jungmook

    2010-01-01

    A multistep two-component signaling system is established as a key element of cytokinin signaling in Arabidopsis. Here, we provide evidence for a function of the two-component signaling system in cold stress response in Arabidopsis. Cold significantly induced the expression of a subset of A-type ARR genes and of GUS in ProARR7:GUS transgenic Arabidopsis. AHK2 and AHK3 were found to be primarily involved in mediating cold to express A-type ARRs despite cytokinin deficiency. Cold neither significantly induced AHK2 and AHK3 expression nor altered the cytokinin contents of wild type within the 4 h during which the A-type ARR genes exhibited peak expression in response to cold, indicating that cold might induce ARR expression via the AHK2 and AHK3 proteins without alterations in cytokinin levels. The ahk2 ahk3 and ahk3 ahk4 mutants exhibited enhanced freezing tolerance compared with wild type. These ahk double mutants acclimated as efficiently to cold as did wild type. The overexpression of the cold-inducible ARR7 in Arabidopsis resulted in a hypersensitivity response to freezing temperatures under cold-acclimated conditions. The expression of C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element target genes was not affected by ARR7 overexpression as well as in ahk double mutants. By contrast, the arr7 mutants showed increased freezing tolerance. The ahk2 ahk3 and arr7 mutants showed hypersensitive response to abscisic acid (ABA) for germination, whereas ARR7 overexpression lines exhibited insensitive response to ABA. These results suggest that AHK2 and AHK3 and the cold-inducible A-type ARRs play a negative regulatory role in cold stress signaling via inhibition of ABA response, occurring independently of the cold acclimation pathway. PMID:20463025

  16. Role of cold shock proteins in Xylella fastidiosa virulence

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Xylella fastidiosa (Xf), causal agent of Pierce’s Disease (PD) of grapevine, is mainly prevalent in warmer climates. Subjecting Xf-infected grapevines to cold temperatures can, in many cases, effectively eliminate the bacterial population, a phenomenon known as cold curing. However, very little is k...

  17. The importance of cold shock proteins in Xylella fastidiosa virulence

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Xylella fastidiosa (Xf), causal agent of Pierce’s Disease (PD) of grapevine, is mainly prevalent in warmer climates. Subjecting Xf-infected grapevines to cold temperatures can, in many cases, effectively eliminate the bacterial population, a phenomenon known as cold curing. However, very little is k...

  18. Cold acclimation is accompanied by complex responses of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Kawamura, Yukio; Uemura, Matsuo

    2016-01-01

    Cold acclimation results in changes of the plasma membrane (PM) composition. The PM is considered to contain specific lipid/protein-enriched microdomains which can be extracted as detergent-resistant plasma membrane (DRM). Previous studies in animal cells have demonstrated that glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) can be targeted to microdomains and/or the apoplast. However, the functional significance of GPI-APs during cold acclimation in plants is not yet fully understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the responsiveness of GPI-APs to cold acclimation treatment in Arabidopsis. We isolated the PM, DRM, and apoplast fractions separately and, in addition, GPI-AP-enriched fractions were prepared from the PM preparation. Label-free quantitative shotgun proteomics identified a number of GPI-APs (163 proteins). Among them, some GPI-APs such as fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins and glycerophosphoryldiester phosphodiesterase-like proteins predominantly increased in PM- and GPI-AP-enriched fractions while the changes of GPI-APs in the DRM and apoplast fractions during cold acclimation were considerably different from those of other fractions. These proteins are thought to be associated with cell wall structure and properties. Therefore, this study demonstrated that each GPI-AP responded to cold acclimation in a different manner, suggesting that these changes during cold acclimation are involved in rearrangement of the extracellular matrix including the cell wall towards acquisition of freezing tolerance. PMID:27471282

  19. Male gametophyte-specific WRKY34 transcription factor mediates cold sensitivity of mature pollen in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Changsong; Jiang, Wenbo; Yu, Diqiu

    2010-01-01

    Mature pollen is very sensitive to cold stress in chilling-sensitive plants. Plant WRKY DNA-binding transcription factors are key regulators in plant responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Previous studies have suggested that WRKY34 (At4g26440) gene might be involved in pollen viability, although the mechanism involved is unclear. In this study, it is shown that cold treatment increased WRKY34 expression in the wild type, and promoter-GUS analysis revealed that WRKY34 expression is pollen-specific. Enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged WRKY34 was localized in the nuclei. Pollen harbouring the wrky34 allele showed higher viability than pollen with the WRKY34 allele after cold treatment. Further functional analysis indicated that the WRKY34 transcription factor was involved in pollen development regulated by the pollen-specific MIKC* class of MADS-domain transcription factors under cold stress, and cold-insensitivity of mature wrky34 pollen might be partly attributable to the enhanced expression of transcriptional activator CBFs in the mutants. Thus, the WRKY34 transcription factor negatively mediated cold sensitivity of mature Arabidopsis pollen and might be involved in the CBF signal cascade in mature pollen. PMID:20643804

  20. Genome-Wide Survey of Cold Stress Regulated Alternative Splicing in Arabidopsis thaliana with Tiling Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Leviatan, Noam; Alkan, Noam; Leshkowitz, Dena; Fluhr, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a major role in expanding the potential informational content of eukaryotic genomes. It is an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism that can increase protein diversity and affect mRNA stability. Alternative splicing is often regulated in a tissue-specific and stress-responsive manner. Cold stress, which adversely affects plant growth and development, regulates the transcription and splicing of plant splicing factors. This can affect the pre-mRNA processing of many genes. To identify cold regulated alternative splicing we applied Affymetrix Arabidopsis tiling arrays to survey the transcriptome under cold treatment conditions. A novel algorithm was used for detection of statistically relevant changes in intron expression within a transcript between control and cold growth conditions. A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of a number of randomly selected genes confirmed the changes in splicing patterns under cold stress predicted by tiling array. Our analysis revealed new types of cold responsive genes. While their expression level remains relatively unchanged under cold stress their splicing pattern shows detectable changes in the relative abundance of isoforms. The majority of cold regulated alternative splicing introduced a premature termination codon (PTC) into the transcripts creating potential targets for degradation by the nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD) process. A number of these genes were analyzed in NMD-defective mutants by RT-PCR and shown to evade NMD. This may result in new and truncated proteins with altered functions or dominant negative effects. The results indicate that cold affects both quantitative and qualitative aspects of gene expression. PMID:23776682

  1. Genome-wide survey of cold stress regulated alternative splicing in Arabidopsis thaliana with tiling microarray.

    PubMed

    Leviatan, Noam; Alkan, Noam; Leshkowitz, Dena; Fluhr, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a major role in expanding the potential informational content of eukaryotic genomes. It is an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism that can increase protein diversity and affect mRNA stability. Alternative splicing is often regulated in a tissue-specific and stress-responsive manner. Cold stress, which adversely affects plant growth and development, regulates the transcription and splicing of plant splicing factors. This can affect the pre-mRNA processing of many genes. To identify cold regulated alternative splicing we applied Affymetrix Arabidopsis tiling arrays to survey the transcriptome under cold treatment conditions. A novel algorithm was used for detection of statistically relevant changes in intron expression within a transcript between control and cold growth conditions. A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of a number of randomly selected genes confirmed the changes in splicing patterns under cold stress predicted by tiling array. Our analysis revealed new types of cold responsive genes. While their expression level remains relatively unchanged under cold stress their splicing pattern shows detectable changes in the relative abundance of isoforms. The majority of cold regulated alternative splicing introduced a premature termination codon (PTC) into the transcripts creating potential targets for degradation by the nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD) process. A number of these genes were analyzed in NMD-defective mutants by RT-PCR and shown to evade NMD. This may result in new and truncated proteins with altered functions or dominant negative effects. The results indicate that cold affects both quantitative and qualitative aspects of gene expression.

  2. Efficient protein production method for NMR using soluble protein tags with cold shock expression vector.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kokoro; Kojima, Chojiro

    2010-11-01

    The E. coli protein expression system is one of the most useful methods employed for NMR sample preparation. However, the production of some recombinant proteins in E. coli is often hampered by difficulties such as low expression level and low solubility. To address these problems, a modified cold-shock expression system containing a glutathione S-transferase (GST) tag, the pCold-GST system, was investigated. The pCold-GST system successfully expressed 9 out of 10 proteins that otherwise could not be expressed using a conventional E. coli expression system. Here, we applied the pCold-GST system to 84 proteins and 78 proteins were successfully expressed in the soluble fraction. Three other cold-shock expression systems containing a maltose binding protein tag (pCold-MBP), protein G B1 domain tag (pCold-GB1) or thioredoxin tag (pCold-Trx) were also developed to improve the yield. Additionally, we show that a C-terminal proline tag, which is invisible in ¹H-¹⁵N HSQC spectra, inhibits protein degradation and increases the final yield of unstable proteins. The purified proteins were amenable to NMR analyses. These data suggest that pCold expression systems combined with soluble protein tags can be utilized to improve the expression and purification of various proteins for NMR analysis.

  3. Cold ions at the Martian bow shock - PHOBOS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, E.; Lundin, R.; Koskinen, H.; Norberg, O.

    1993-04-01

    Measurements carried out by the plasma spectrometer ASPERA aboard the Phobos 2 spacecraft show that the Martian bow shock is characterized by a sudden increase of ionization of the neutral corona. It acts as a source of new ions that can strongly modify the process of ion heating behind the shock front. The loss of momentum of solar wind protons due to their interaction with exospheric ions may lead to an increase in the effective scale of the obstacle.

  4. Expression, purification and characterization of cold shock protein A of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lindae, Antje; Eberle, Raphael J; Caruso, Icaro P; Coronado, Monika A; de Moraes, Fabio R; Azevedo, Vasco; Arni, Raghuvir K

    2015-08-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis is the causative agent of different diseases that cause dramatically reduced yields of wool and milk, and results in weight loss, carcass condemnation and also death mainly in sheep, equids, cattle and goats and therefore globally results in considerable economical loss. Cold shock proteins are conserved in many bacteria and eukaryotic cells and they help to restore normal cell functions after cold shock in which some appear to have specific functions at normal growth temperature as well. Cold shock protein A from C. pseudotuberculosis was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The thermal unfolding/refolding process characterized by circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy techniques indicated that the refolding process was almost completely reversible.

  5. Flavonoids are determinants of freezing tolerance and cold acclimation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Elisa; Tohge, Takayuki; Zuther, Ellen; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Hincha, Dirk K.

    2016-01-01

    In plants from temperate climates such as Arabidopsis thaliana low, non-freezing temperatures lead to increased freezing tolerance in a process termed cold acclimation. This process is accompanied by massive changes in gene expression and in the content of primary metabolites and lipids. In addition, most flavonols and anthocyanins accumulate upon cold exposure, along with most transcripts encoding transcription factors and enzymes of the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. However, no evidence for a functional role of flavonoids in plant freezing tolerance has been shown. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis using qRT-PCR for transcript, LC-MS for flavonoid and GC-MS for primary metabolite measurements, and an electrolyte leakage assay to determine freezing tolerance of 20 mutant lines in two Arabidopsis accessions that are affected in different steps of the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. This analysis provides evidence for a functional role of flavonoids in plant cold acclimation. The accumulation of flavonoids in the activation tagging mutant line pap1-D improved, while reduced flavonoid content in different knock-out mutants impaired leaf freezing tolerance. Analysis of the different knock-out mutants suggests redundancy of flavonoid structures, as the lack of flavonols or anthocyanins could be compensated by other compound classes. PMID:27658445

  6. Differential remodeling of the lipidome during cold acclimation in natural accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Degenkolbe, Thomas; Giavalisco, Patrick; Zuther, Ellen; Seiwert, Bettina; Hincha, Dirk K; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2012-12-01

    Freezing injury is a major factor limiting the geographical distribution of plant species and the growth and yield of crop plants. Plants from temperate climates are able to increase their freezing tolerance during exposure to low but non-freezing temperatures in a process termed cold acclimation. Damage to cellular membranes is the major cause of freezing injury in plants, and membrane lipid composition is strongly modified during cold acclimation. Forward and reverse genetic approaches have been used to probe the role of specific lipid-modifying enzymes in the freezing tolerance of plants. In the present paper we describe an alternative ecological genomics approach that relies on the natural genetic variation within a species. Arabidopsis thaliana has a wide geographical range throughout the Northern Hemisphere with significant natural variation in freezing tolerance that was used for a comparative analysis of the lipidomes of 15 Arabidopsis accessions using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to Fourier-transform mass spectrometry, allowing the detection of 180 lipid species. After 14 days of cold acclimation at 4°C the plants from most accessions had accumulated massive amounts of storage lipids, with most of the changes in long-chain unsaturated triacylglycerides, while the total amount of membrane lipids was only slightly changed. Nevertheless, major changes in the relative amounts of different membrane lipids were also evident. The relative abundance of several lipid species was highly correlated with the freezing tolerance of the accessions, allowing the identification of possible marker lipids for plant freezing tolerance.

  7. Egg Viability, Mating Frequency and Male Mating Ability Evolve in Populations of Drosophila melanogaster Selected for Resistance to Cold Shock

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Karan; Kochar, Ekta; Prasad, N. G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ability to resist temperature shock is an important component of fitness of insects and other ectotherms. Increased resistance to temperature shock is known to affect life-history traits. Temperature shock is also known to affect reproductive traits such as mating ability and viability of gametes. Therefore selection for increased temperature shock resistance can affect the evolution of reproductive traits. Methods We selected replicate populations of Drosophila melanogaster for resistance to cold shock. We then investigated the evolution of reproductive behavior along with other components of fitness- larval survivorship, adult mortality, fecundity, egg viability in these populations. Results We found that larval survivorship, adult mortality and fecundity post cold shock were not significantly different between selected and control populations. However, compared to the control populations, the selected populations laid significantly higher percentage of fertile eggs (egg viability) 24 hours post cold shock. The selected populations had higher mating frequency both with and without cold shock. After being subjected to cold shock, males from the selected populations successfully mated with significantly more non-virgin females and sired significantly more progeny compared to control males. Conclusions A number of studies have reported the evolution of survivorship in response to selection for temperature shock resistance. Our results clearly indicate that adaptation to cold shock can involve changes in components of reproductive fitness. Our results have important implications for our understanding of how reproductive behavior can evolve in response to thermal stress. PMID:26065704

  8. σB-Dependent and σB-Independent Mechanisms Contribute to Transcription of Listeria monocytogenes Cold Stress Genes during Cold Shock and Cold Growth▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yvonne C.; Boor, Kathryn J.; Wiedmann, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The role of the stress response regulator σB (encoded by sigB) in directing the expression of selected putative and confirmed cold response genes was evaluated using Listeria monocytogenes 10403S and an isogenic ΔsigB mutant, which were either cold shocked at 4°C in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth for up to 30 min or grown at 4°C in BHI for 12 days. Transcript levels of the housekeeping genes rpoB and gap, the σB-dependent genes opuCA and bsh, and the cold stress genes ltrC, oppA, and fri were measured using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Transcriptional start sites for ltrC, oppA, and fri were determined using rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR. Centrifugation was found to rapidly induce σB-dependent transcription, which necessitated the use of centrifugation-independent protocols to evaluate the contributions of σB to transcription during cold shock. Our data confirmed that transcription of the cold stress genes ltrC and fri is at least partially σB dependent and experimentally identified a σB-dependent ltrC promoter. In addition, our data indicate that (i) while σB activity is induced during 30 min of cold shock, this cold shock does not induce the transcription of σB-dependent or -independent cold shock genes; (ii) σB is not required for L. monocytogenes growth at 4°C in BHI; and (iii) transcription of the putative cold stress genes opuCA, fri, and oppA is σB independent during growth at 4°C, while both bsh and ltrC show growth phase and σB-dependent transcription during growth at 4°C. We conclude that σB-dependent and σB-independent mechanisms contribute to the ability of L. monocytogenes to survive and grow at low temperatures. PMID:17675428

  9. SigmaB-dependent and sigmaB-independent mechanisms contribute to transcription of Listeria monocytogenes cold stress genes during cold shock and cold growth.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yvonne C; Boor, Kathryn J; Wiedmann, Martin

    2007-10-01

    The role of the stress response regulator sigma(B) (encoded by sigB) in directing the expression of selected putative and confirmed cold response genes was evaluated using Listeria monocytogenes 10403S and an isogenic DeltasigB mutant, which were either cold shocked at 4 degrees C in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth for up to 30 min or grown at 4 degrees C in BHI for 12 days. Transcript levels of the housekeeping genes rpoB and gap, the sigma(B)-dependent genes opuCA and bsh, and the cold stress genes ltrC, oppA, and fri were measured using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Transcriptional start sites for ltrC, oppA, and fri were determined using rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR. Centrifugation was found to rapidly induce sigma(B)-dependent transcription, which necessitated the use of centrifugation-independent protocols to evaluate the contributions of sigma(B) to transcription during cold shock. Our data confirmed that transcription of the cold stress genes ltrC and fri is at least partially sigma(B) dependent and experimentally identified a sigma(B)-dependent ltrC promoter. In addition, our data indicate that (i) while sigma(B) activity is induced during 30 min of cold shock, this cold shock does not induce the transcription of sigma(B)-dependent or -independent cold shock genes; (ii) sigma(B) is not required for L. monocytogenes growth at 4 degrees C in BHI; and (iii) transcription of the putative cold stress genes opuCA, fri, and oppA is sigma(B) independent during growth at 4 degrees C, while both bsh and ltrC show growth phase and sigma(B)-dependent transcription during growth at 4 degrees C. We conclude that sigma(B)-dependent and sigma(B)-independent mechanisms contribute to the ability of L. monocytogenes to survive and grow at low temperatures.

  10. Changes in nuclear phenotype frequencies following sequential cold shocks in Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera, Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Campos, Silvana G P; Rodrigues, Vera Lúcia C C; Mello, Maria Luiza S

    2002-09-01

    The nuclear phenotypes of Malpighian tubule cells in fifth instar nymphs of Triatoma infestans, one of the most important vectors of Chagas disease, were studied following sequential shocks at 0 degrees C, separated by intervals of 8 h and 24 h at 30 degrees C, under conditions of moderate fasting and full nourishment. The insects pertained to colonies reared in the laboratory and originated from domestic specimens collected in the Brazilian states of São Paulo (north) and Minas Gerais (south). Since nuclear phenotypes in this species are affected by single cold shocks, it was expected that these phenotypes could also be changed by sequential shocks. Nuclear phenotypes indicative of mechanisms of cell survival (nuclear fusion and heterochromatin decondensation) and cell death (apoptosis and necrosis) were observed concomitantly in all the conditions tested. Nuclear fusion and heterochromatin decondensation were not found relevant for the presumed acquisition of the cold-hardening response in T. infestans. The decreased frequency of apoptosis and necrosis following sequential cold shocks including under fasting conditions, indicated that tolerance to sequential cold shocks occurred in T. infestans of the mentioned origin.

  11. Regulatory Networks Controlling Plant Cold Acclimation or Low Temperature Regulatory Networks Controlling Cold Acclimation in Arabidopsis (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Thomashow, Mike

    2016-07-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Mike Thomashow of Michigan State University gives a presentation on on "Low Temperature Regulatory Networks Controlling Cold Acclimation in Arabidopsis" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011. «

  12. Transcriptional regulation of LUX by CBF1 mediates cold input to the circadian clock in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chow, Brenda Y; Sanchez, Sabrina E; Breton, Ghislain; Pruneda-Paz, Jose L; Krogan, Naden T; Kay, Steve A

    2014-07-07

    Circadian clocks allow organisms to anticipate daily changes in the environment to enhance overall fitness. Transcription factors (TFs) play a prominent role in the molecular mechanism but are incompletely described possibly due to functional redundancy, gene family proliferation, and/or lack of context-specific assays. To overcome these, we performed a high-throughput yeast one-hybrid screen using the LUX ARRYHTHMO (LUX) gene promoter as bait against an Arabidopsis TF library. LUX is a unique gene because its mutation causes severe clock defects and transcript maintains high-amplitude cycling in the cold. We report the well-characterized cold-inducible C-repeat (CRT)/drought-responsive element (DRE) binding factor CBF1/DREB1b is a transcriptional regulator of LUX. We show that CBF1 binds the CRT in the LUX promoter, and both genes overlap in temporal and spatial expression. CBF1 overexpression causes upregulation of LUX and also alters other clock gene transcripts. LUX promoter regions including the CRT and Evening Element (EE) are sufficient for high-amplitude transcriptional cycling in the cold, and cold-acclimated lux seedlings are sensitive to freezing stress. Our data show cold signaling is integrated into the clock by CBF-mediated regulation of LUX expression, thereby defining a new transcriptional mechanism for temperature input to the circadian clock.

  13. Nuclear-mitochondrial cross-talk during heat shock in Arabidopsis cell culture.

    PubMed

    Rikhvanov, Eugene G; Gamburg, Kim Z; Varakina, Nina N; Rusaleva, Tatyana M; Fedoseeva, Irina V; Tauson, Elena L; Stupnikova, Irina V; Stepanov, Alexey V; Borovskii, Genadii B; Voinikov, Victor K

    2007-11-01

    Apart from energy generation, mitochondria perform a signalling function determining the life and death of a cell under stress exposure. In the present study we have explored patterns of heat-induced synthesis of Hsp101, Hsp70, Hsp17.6 (class I), Hsp17.6 (class II) and Hsp60, and the development of induced thermotolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana cell culture under conditions of mitochondrial dysfunction. It was shown that treatment by mitochondrial inhibitors and uncouplers at the time of mild heat shock downregulates HSP synthesis, which is important for induced thermotolerance in plants. The exposure to elevated temperature induced an increase in cell oxygen consumption and hyperpolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Taken together, these facts suggest that mitochondrial functions are essential for heat-induced HSP synthesis and development of induced thermotolerance in A. thaliana cell culture, suggesting that mitochondrial-nuclear cross-talk is activated under stress conditions. Treatment of Arabidopsis cell culture at 50 degrees C initiates a programmed cell death determined by the time course of viability decrease, DNA fragmentation and cytochrome c release from mitochondria. As treatment at 37 degrees C protected Arabidopsis cells from heat-induced cell death, it may be suggested that Hsp101, Hsp70 and small heat-shock proteins, the synthesis of which is induced under these conditions, are playing an anti-apoptotic role in the plant cell. On the other hand, drastic heat shock upregulated mitochondrial Hsp60 synthesis and induced its release from mitochondria to the cytosol, indicating a pro-apoptotic role of plant Hsp60.

  14. Over-expression of ThpI from Choristoneura fumiferana enhances tolerance to cold in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bo; Xiong, Ai-Sheng; Peng, Ri-He; Xu, Jing; Jin, Xiao-Fen; Meng, Xiu-Rong; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2010-02-01

    Thermal hysteresis proteins (Thps) known as antifreeze proteins for their antifreeze activity, depress the freezing point of water below the melting point in many polar marine fishes, terrestrial arthropods and plants. For the purpose of breeding cold-resistant plants, we designed to introduce the Thp gene into the plants. The physiological and biochemical effect of high-lever expression of the modified Choristoneura fumiferana Thp (ThpI) in Arabidopsis thaliana plants was analyzed. Under low temperature stress, the ThpI transgenic plants exhibited stronger growth than wild-type plants. The elevated cold tolerance of the ThpI over-expressing plants was confirmed by the changes of electrolyte leakage activity, malonyldialdehyde and proline contents. These results preliminarily showed that the Thp possibly be used to enhance the low temperature-tolerant ability of plants.

  15. Identification of cis-acting promoter elements in cold- and dehydration-induced transcriptional pathways in Arabidopsis, rice, and soybean.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Kyonoshin; Todaka, Daisuke; Mizoi, Junya; Yoshida, Takuya; Kidokoro, Satoshi; Matsukura, Satoko; Takasaki, Hironori; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y; Yoshiwara, Kyouko; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2012-01-01

    The genomes of three plants, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), rice (Oryza sativa), and soybean (Glycine max), have been sequenced, and their many genes and promoters have been predicted. In Arabidopsis, cis-acting promoter elements involved in cold- and dehydration-responsive gene expression have been extensively analysed; however, the characteristics of such cis-acting promoter sequences in cold- and dehydration-inducible genes of rice and soybean remain to be clarified. In this study, we performed microarray analyses using the three species, and compared characteristics of identified cold- and dehydration-inducible genes. Transcription profiles of the cold- and dehydration-responsive genes were similar among these three species, showing representative upregulated (dehydrin/LEA) and downregulated (photosynthesis-related) genes. All (4(6) = 4096) hexamer sequences in the promoters of the three species were investigated, revealing the frequency of conserved sequences in cold- and dehydration-inducible promoters. A core sequence of the abscisic acid-responsive element (ABRE) was the most conserved in dehydration-inducible promoters of all three species, suggesting that transcriptional regulation for dehydration-inducible genes is similar among these three species, with the ABRE-dependent transcriptional pathway. In contrast, for cold-inducible promoters, the conserved hexamer sequences were diversified among these three species, suggesting the existence of diverse transcriptional regulatory pathways for cold-inducible genes among the species.

  16. Transcription of exogenous and endogenous deoxyribonucleic acid templates in cold-shocked Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhl, S J; Brown, L R

    1980-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthesis was examined in cold-shocked Bacillus subtilis cells. The cells were grown to mid-log stage, harvested, and cold shocked. RNA synthesis was monitored by the incorporation of [3H]uridine triphosphate or [alpha 32P]adenosine triphosphate into trichloroacetic acid-precipitable material in the presence of all four nucleoside triphosphates. The inhibition of RNA synthesis in cold-shocked cells by lipiarmycin, ethidium bromide, rifampin. or streptolydigin was analyzed using mutant or wild-type cells. Also examined were the effects of temperature, salt concentration, and the addition of polyamines or highly phosphorylated nucleotides. In ultraviolet-irradiated and cold-shocked cells, RNA wynthesis decreased to low levels. The addition of exogenous phi 29 or TSP-1 template to these cells caused a 13- to 20-fold increase in RNA synthesis, as monitored by trichloroacetic acid-precipitable counts. RNA synthesized in the presence of phi 29 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) hybridizes mainly to EcoRI fragments A and C of phi 29 DBA, These two fragments direct transcription by purified RNA polymerase in vitro and hybridize to early phi 29 DNA produced in vivo. Our results with TSP-1 DNA in this system indicated that the RNA produced hybridizes to the same fragments as early RNA produced in vivo. Plasmic pUB110 DNA was not transcribed in this system. Images PMID:6157674

  17. Typhoon induced summer cold shock advected by Kuroshio off eastern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Yi-Chun; Zheng, Zhe-Wen; Zheng, Quanan; Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh; Lee, Chia-Ying; Chern, Shi-We; Chao, Yan-Hao

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we used satellite observations, in-situ measurements, and numerical modelling to investigate an extreme temperature change triggered by a typhoon in the ocean near the Kuroshio region off eastern Taiwan. With the westward passage of Typhoon Morakot in 2009 through Taiwan, a distinct cool wake was generated at the southeastern corner of Taiwan (CWSET) and moved towards the downstream Kuroshio region; it involved a precipitous cooling of at least 4 °C within 10-20 km of the coast. Rapid and drastic temperature drops triggered by the CWSET and advected by the strong conveyor belt effect of the Kuroshio Current are highly probable sources of cold shocks in summer. We clarified the mechanism that generated the CWSET through a series of sensitivity experiments using the Regional Oceanic Modeling System. The cold shock was mainly triggered by local wind stress associated with the typhoon. In addition, the Kuroshio Current was demonstrated to have played a crucial role in both the generation of upwelling off the southeastern coast of Taiwan during the passage of the typhoon and the transporting of this impact downstream. This process was verified through a systematic analysis of all typhoons moving westward through Taiwan from 2005 to 2013. Cold-shock stress is thought to be linked with naturally occurring 'fish kills', and obtaining a more thorough understanding of the CWSET will be helpful for protecting aquaculture off the eastern coast of Taiwan from the impacts of cold shocks triggered by typhoons moving westward through Taiwan in summer.

  18. Cold stress affects H(+)-ATPase and phospholipase D activity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Muzi, Carlo; Camoni, Lorenzo; Visconti, Sabina; Aducci, Patrizia

    2016-11-01

    Low temperature is an environmental stress that greatly influences plant performance and distribution. Plants exposed to cold stress exhibit modifications of plasma membrane physical properties that can affect their functionality. Here it is reported the effect of low temperature exposure of Arabidopsis plants on the activity of phospholipase D and H(+)-ATPase, the master enzyme located at the plasma membrane. The H(+)-ATPase activity was differently affected, depending on the length of cold stress imposed. In particular, an exposure to 4 °C for 6 h determined the strong inhibition of the H(+)-ATPase activity, that correlates with a reduced association with the regulatory 14-3-3 proteins. A longer exposure first caused the full recovery of the enzymatic activity followed by a significant activation, in accordance with both the increased association with 14-3-3 proteins and induction of H(+)-ATPase gene transcription. Different time lengths of cold stress treatment were also shown to strongly stimulate the phospholipase D activity and affect the phosphatidic acid levels of the plasma membranes. Our results suggest a functional correlation between the activity of phospholipase D and H(+)-ATPase mediated by phosphatidic acid release during the cold stress response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Chlorophyll fluorescence emission as a reporter on cold tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana accessions

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Anamika; Höermiller, Imke I; Heyer, Arnd G; Nedbal, Ladislav

    2011-01-01

    Non-invasive, high-throughput screening methods are valuable tools in breeding for abiotic stress tolerance in plants. Optical signals such as chlorophyll fluorescence emission can be instrumental in developing new screening techniques. In order to examine the potential of chlorophyll fluorescence to reveal plant tolerance to low temperatures, we used a collection of nine Arabidopsis thaliana accessions and compared their fluorescence features with cold tolerance quantified by the well established electrolyte leakage method on detached leaves. We found that, during progressive cooling, the minimal chlorophyll fluorescence emission rose strongly and that this rise was highly dependent on the cold tolerance of the accessions. Maximum quantum yield of PSII photochemistry and steady state fluorescence normalized to minimal fluorescence were also highly correlated to the cold tolerance measured by the electrolyte leakage method. In order to further increase the capacity of the fluorescence detection to reveal the low temperature tolerance, we applied combinatorial imaging that employs plant classification based on multiple fluorescence features. We found that this method, by including the resolving power of several fluorescence features, can be well employed to detect cold tolerance already at mild sub-zero temperatures. Therefore, there is no need to freeze the screened plants to the largely damaging temperatures of around −15°C. This, together with the method's easy applicability, represents a major advantage of the fluorescence technique over the conventional electrolyte leakage method. PMID:21427532

  20. ICE1: a regulator of cold-induced transcriptome and freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Ohta, Masaru; Kanrar, Siddhartha; Lee, Byeong-ha; Hong, Xuhui; Agarwal, Manu; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2003-01-01

    Cold temperatures trigger the expression of the CBF family of transcription factors, which in turn activate many downstream genes that confer chilling and freezing tolerance to plants. We report here the identification of ICE1 (inducer of CBF expression 1), an upstream transcription factor that regulates the transcription of CBF genes in the cold. An Arabidopsis ice1 mutant was isolated in a screen for mutations that impair cold-induced transcription of a CBF3 promoter-luciferase reporter gene. The ice1 mutation blocks the expression of CBF3 and decreases the expression of many genes downstream of CBFs, which leads to a significant reduction in plant chilling and freezing tolerance. ICE1 encodes a MYC-like bHLH transcriptional activator. ICE1 binds specifically to the MYC recognition sequences in the CBF3 promoter. ICE1 is expressed constitutively, and its overexpression in wild-type plants enhances the expression of the CBF regulon in the cold and improves freezing tolerance of the transgenic plants. PMID:12672693

  1. Cold shock response and adaptation at near-freezing temperature in microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Masayori; Phadtare, Sangita

    2004-06-09

    Microorganisms that naturally encounter sharp temperature shifts must develop strategies for responding and adapting to these shifts. Escherichia coli, which are adapted to living at both warm temperatures inside animals and cooler ambient temperatures, respond to low temperatures (10 degrees to 15 degrees C) by adjusting membrane lipid composition and increasing the production of proteins that act as "RNA chaperones" required for transcription and translation and proteins that facilitate ribosomal assembly. In contrast, yeast, which are adapted to cooler temperatures, show a relatively minor cold shock response after temperature shifts from 30 degrees to 10 degrees C but respond with a dramatic increase in the synthesis of trehalose and a heat shock protein when exposed to freezing or near-freezing temperatures. This emphasizes the fact that different groups of microorganisms exhibit distinct types of cold shock responses.

  2. Heat or Eat? Cold-Weather Shocks and Nutrition in Poor American Families

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Jayanta; DeLeire, Thomas; Haider, Steven; Currie, Janet

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. The authors sought to determine the effects of cold-weather periods on budgets and nutritional outcomes among poor American families. Methods. The Consumer Expenditure Survey was used to track expenditures on food and home fuels, and the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was used to track calorie consumption, dietary quality, vitamin deficiencies, and anemia. Results. Both poor and richer families increased fuel expenditures in response to unusually cold weather. Poor families reduced food expenditures by roughly the same amount as their increase in fuel expenditures, whereas richer families increased food expenditures. Conclusions. Poor parents and their children spend less on and eat less food during cold-weather budgetary shocks. Existing social programs fail to buffer against these shocks. PMID:12835201

  3. Identification and transcriptional control of Caulobacter crescentus genes encoding proteins containing a cold shock domain.

    PubMed

    Lang, Elza A S; Marques, Marilis V

    2004-09-01

    The cold shock proteins are small peptides that share a conserved domain, called the cold shock domain (CSD), that is important for nucleic acid binding. The Caulobacter crescentus genome has four csp genes that encode proteins containing CSDs. Three of these (cspA, cspB, and cspC) encode peptides of about 7 kDa and are very similar to the cold shock proteins of other bacteria. Analysis by reverse transcription-PCR of the fourth gene (cspD), which was previously annotated as encoding a 7-kDa protein, revealed that the mRNA is larger and probably encodes a putative 21-kDa protein, containing two CSDs. A search in protein sequences databases revealed that this new domain arrangement has thus far only been found among deduced peptides of alpha-proteobacteria. Expression of each Caulobacter csp gene was studied both in response to cold shock and to growth phase, and we have found that only cspA and cspB are induced by cold shock, whereas cspC and cspD are induced at stationary phase, with different induction rates. The transcription start sites were determined for each gene, and a deletion mapping of the cspD promoter region defined a sequence required for maximal levels of expression, indicating that regulation of this gene occurs at the transcriptional level. Deletion of cspA, but not cspD, caused a reduction in viability when cells were incubated at 10 degrees C for prolonged times, suggesting that cspA is important for adaptation to a low temperature.

  4. Overexpression of the HspL Promotes Agrobacterium tumefaciens Virulence in Arabidopsis Under Heat Shock Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hau-Hsuan; Liu, Yin-Tzu; Huang, Si-Chi; Tung, Chin-Yi; Huang, Fan-Chen; Tsai, Yun-Long; Cheng, Tun-Fang; Lai, Erh-Min

    2015-02-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens transfers a specific DNA fragment from the resident tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid and effector virulence (Vir) proteins to plant cells during infection. A. tumefaciens VirB1-11 and VirD4 proteins assemble as the type IV secretion system (T4SS), which mediates transfer of the T-DNA and effector Vir protein into plant cells, thus resulting in crown gall disease in plants. Previous studies revealed that an α-crystallin-type, small heat-shock protein (HspL) is a more effective VirB8 chaperone than three other small heat-shock proteins (HspC, HspAT1, and HspAT2). Additionally, HspL contributes to efficient T4SS-mediated DNA transfer and tumorigenesis under room-temperature growth. In this study, we aimed to characterize the impact of HspL on Agrobacterium-mediated transformation efficiency under heat-shock treatment. During heat shock, transient transformation efficiency and VirB8 protein accumulation were lower in the hspL deletion mutant than in the wild type. Overexpression of HspL in A. tumefaciens enhanced the transient transformation efficiency in root explants of both susceptible and recalcitrant Arabidopsis ecotypes. In addition, the reduced transient transformation efficiency during heat stress was recovered by overexpression of HspL in A. tumefaciens. HspL may help maintain VirB8 homeostasis and elevate Agrobacterium-mediated transformation efficiency under both heat-shock and nonheat-shock growth.

  5. Effects of plasma aerodynamic actuation on oblique shock wave in a cold supersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Li, Yinghong; Cheng, Bangqin; Su, Changbing; Song, Huimin; Wu, Yun

    2009-08-01

    Wedge oblique shock wave control using an arc discharge plasma aerodynamic actuator was investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Schlieren photography measurements in a small-scale short-duration supersonic wind tunnel indicated that the shock wave angle decreased and its start point shifted upstream with the plasma aerodynamic actuation. Also the shock wave intensity weakened, as shown by the decrease in the gas static pressure ratio of flow downstream and upstream of the shock wave. Moreover, the shock wave control effect was intensified when a static magnetic field was applied. Under test conditions of Mach 2.2, magnetic control and input voltage 3 kV, the start point of the shock wave shifted 4 mm upstream, while its angle and intensity decreased 8.6% and 8.8%, respectively. A thermal choking model was proposed to deduce the change laws of oblique shock wave control by surface arc discharge. The theoretical result was consistent with the experimental result, which demonstrated that the thermal choking model can effectively forecast the effect of plasma actuation on an oblique shock wave in a cold supersonic flow.

  6. [Mechanism of dwarfing effect of tomato (Solanum lycopersicon) seedlings induced by cold-shock treatment under high temperature stress].

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-li; Bi, Ming-ming; Chen, Fei; Sun, Zhi-qiang

    2015-07-01

    To explore the dwarfing mechanism of tomato seedlings induced by cold-shock treatment followed by high temperature, tomato seedlings were subjected to cold-shock treatment once a day at 8:00 with temperature of 5, 10 and 15 °C for 10, 20 and 30 min, respectively, and ethylene production rate was measured. Plant height, ethylene production and gibberellin (GA3) content of the seedlings treated with T10 °C D10 min (cold-shock with 10 °C for 10 min), coupled with utilization of growth regulators, were also evaluated. The results showed that the release of ethylene was increased with the decrease of cold-shock temperature and extension of treatment time. The cold-shock treatment of 5 °C and 30 min had the highest ethylene production rate of 60.3 nL h-1 . g-1, which was 6.5 times of the control. None of ethephon (ETH), silver thiosulphate (STS), GA, or paclobutrazol (PP333) could completely block high ethylene production induced by cold-shock treatment. Tomato seedlings with cold-shock treatment (T10 °C D10 min ) resulted in reduction in GA3 content by 38.1% compared with the value of control (130.6 µg . g-1). Neither ethephon nor STS had significant effect on the dwarfing induced by cold-shock. However, GA3 weakened the dwarfing effect induced by cold-shock treatment (T10 °C D10 min), while PP333 greatly enhanced it. The dwarfing effect by cold-shock treatment of T10 °C D10 min was equivalent to that of application of 4.0 mg . L-1 PP333 based on the seedling height as an evaluation indicator. It was concluded that cold-shock treatment stimulated shoot ethylene production and blocked GA3 synthesis. GA3 played a vital role in dwarfing effect on tomato seedling induced by cold-shock treatment. Cold-shock with 10 °C and duration of 10 min could promote the growth of tomato seedlings with shorter stem and higher dry mass accumulation.

  7. Conserved TRAM Domain Functions as an Archaeal Cold Shock Protein via RNA Chaperone Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Yue, Lei; Zhou, Liguang; Qi, Lei; Li, Jie; Dong, Xiuzhu

    2017-01-01

    Cold shock proteins (Csps) enable organisms to acclimate to and survive in cold environments and the bacterial CspA family exerts the cold protection via its RNA chaperone activity. However, most Archaea do not contain orthologs to the bacterial csp. TRAM, a conserved domain among RNA modification proteins ubiquitously distributed in organisms, occurs as an individual protein in most archaeal phyla and has a structural similarity to Csp proteins, yet its biological functions remain unknown. Through physiological and biochemical studies on four TRAM proteins from a cold adaptive archaeon Methanolobus psychrophilus R15, this work demonstrated that TRAM is an archaeal Csp and exhibits RNA chaperone activity. Three TRAM encoding genes (Mpsy_0643, Mpsy_3043, and Mpsy_3066) exhibited remarkable cold-shock induced transcription and were preferentially translated at lower temperature (18°C), while the fourth (Mpsy_2002) was constitutively expressed. They were all able to complement the cspABGE mutant of Escherichia coli BX04 that does not grow in cold temperatures and showed transcriptional antitermination. TRAM3066 (gene product of Mpsy_3066) and TRAM2002 (gene product of Mpsy_2002) displayed sequence-non-specific RNA but not DNA binding activity, and TRAM3066 assisted RNases in degradation of structured RNA, thus validating the RNA chaperone activity of TRAMs. Given the chaperone activity, TRAM is predicted to function beyond a Csp.

  8. The effect of cold priming on the fitness of Arabidopsis thaliana accessions under natural and controlled conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cvetkovic, Jelena; Müller, Klaus; Baier, Margarete

    2017-01-01

    Priming improves an organism's performance upon a future stress. To test whether cold priming supports protection in spring and how it is affected by cold acclimation, we compared seven Arabidopsis accessions with different cold acclimation potentials in the field and in the greenhouse for growth, photosynthetic performance and reproductive fitness in March and May after a 14 day long cold-pretreatment at 4 °C. In the plants transferred to the field in May, the effect of the cold pretreatment on the seed yield correlated with the cold acclimation potential of the accessions. In the March transferred plants, the reproductive fitness was most supported by the cold pretreatment in the accessions with the weakest cold acclimation potential. The fitness effect was linked to long-term effects of the cold pretreatment on photosystem II activity stabilization and leaf blade expansion. The study demonstrated that cold priming stronger impacts on plant fitness than cold acclimation in spring in accessions with intermediate and low cold acclimation potential. PMID:28276450

  9. Cold Shock Proteins: A Minireview with Special Emphasis on Csp-family of Enteropathogenic Yersinia

    PubMed Central

    Keto-Timonen, Riikka; Hietala, Nina; Palonen, Eveliina; Hakakorpi, Anna; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved a number of mechanisms for coping with stress and adapting to changing environmental conditions. Many bacteria produce small cold shock proteins (Csp) as a response to rapid temperature downshift (cold shock). During cold shock, the cell membrane fluidity and enzyme activity decrease, and the efficiency of transcription and translation is reduced due to stabilization of nucleic acid secondary structures. Moreover, protein folding is inefficient and ribosome function is hampered. Csps are thought to counteract these harmful effects by serving as nucleic acid chaperons that may prevent the formation of secondary structures in mRNA at low temperature and thus facilitate the initiation of translation. However, some Csps are non-cold inducible and they are reported to be involved in various cellular processes to promote normal growth and stress adaptation responses. Csps have been shown to contribute to osmotic, oxidative, starvation, pH and ethanol stress tolerance as well as to host cell invasion. Therefore, Csps seem to have a wider role in stress tolerance of bacteria than previously assumed. Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis are enteropathogens that can spread through foodstuffs and cause an enteric infection called yersiniosis. Enteropathogenic Yersinia are psychrotrophs that are able to grow at temperatures close to 0°C and thus they set great challenges for the modern food industry. To be able to efficiently control psychrotrophic Yersinia during food production and storage, it is essential to understand the functions and roles of Csps in stress response of enteropathogenic Yersinia. PMID:27499753

  10. Cold Shock Proteins: A Minireview with Special Emphasis on Csp-family of Enteropathogenic Yersinia.

    PubMed

    Keto-Timonen, Riikka; Hietala, Nina; Palonen, Eveliina; Hakakorpi, Anna; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved a number of mechanisms for coping with stress and adapting to changing environmental conditions. Many bacteria produce small cold shock proteins (Csp) as a response to rapid temperature downshift (cold shock). During cold shock, the cell membrane fluidity and enzyme activity decrease, and the efficiency of transcription and translation is reduced due to stabilization of nucleic acid secondary structures. Moreover, protein folding is inefficient and ribosome function is hampered. Csps are thought to counteract these harmful effects by serving as nucleic acid chaperons that may prevent the formation of secondary structures in mRNA at low temperature and thus facilitate the initiation of translation. However, some Csps are non-cold inducible and they are reported to be involved in various cellular processes to promote normal growth and stress adaptation responses. Csps have been shown to contribute to osmotic, oxidative, starvation, pH and ethanol stress tolerance as well as to host cell invasion. Therefore, Csps seem to have a wider role in stress tolerance of bacteria than previously assumed. Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis are enteropathogens that can spread through foodstuffs and cause an enteric infection called yersiniosis. Enteropathogenic Yersinia are psychrotrophs that are able to grow at temperatures close to 0°C and thus they set great challenges for the modern food industry. To be able to efficiently control psychrotrophic Yersinia during food production and storage, it is essential to understand the functions and roles of Csps in stress response of enteropathogenic Yersinia.

  11. Translation suppression promotes stress granule formation and cell survival in response to cold shock

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Sarah; Cherkasova, Valeria; Bankhead, Peter; Bukau, Bernd; Stoecklin, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Cells respond to different types of stress by inhibition of protein synthesis and subsequent assembly of stress granules (SGs), cytoplasmic aggregates that contain stalled translation preinitiation complexes. Global translation is regulated through the translation initiation factor eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) and the mTOR pathway. Here we identify cold shock as a novel trigger of SG assembly in yeast and mammals. Whereas cold shock–induced SGs take hours to form, they dissolve within minutes when cells are returned to optimal growth temperatures. Cold shock causes eIF2α phosphorylation through the kinase PERK in mammalian cells, yet this pathway is not alone responsible for translation arrest and SG formation. In addition, cold shock leads to reduced mitochondrial function, energy depletion, concomitant activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and inhibition of mTOR signaling. Compound C, a pharmacological inhibitor of AMPK, prevents the formation of SGs and strongly reduces cellular survival in a translation-dependent manner. Our results demonstrate that cells actively suppress protein synthesis by parallel pathways, which induce SG formation and ensure cellular survival during hypothermia. PMID:22875991

  12. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of the Bacillus subtilis cold-shock response.

    PubMed

    Kaan, Tanja; Homuth, Georg; Mäder, Ulrike; Bandow, Julia; Schweder, Thomas

    2002-11-01

    The transcriptome of Bacillus subtilis was analysed at different time points (30, 60 and 90 min) after a temperature downshift from 37 to 18 degrees C using DNA macroarrays. This approach allowed the identification of around 50 genes exhibiting an increased mRNA level and around 50 genes exhibiting a decreased mRNA level under cold-shock conditions. Many of the repressed genes encode enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of amino acids, nucleotides and coenzymes, indicating metabolic adaptation of the cells to the decreased growth rate at the lower temperature. The strongest cold-inducible gene encodes fatty acid desaturase, which forms unsaturated fatty acids from saturated phospholipid precursors, thereby increasing membrane fluidity. The cold-shock-induced increase of mRNA levels of the classical cold-shock genes cspB, cspC and cspD could be verified. Furthermore, besides many genes encoding proteins of unknown function, some genes encoding ribosomal proteins were transcriptionally up-regulated, which points to an adaptive reprogramming of the ribosomes under cold-shock conditions. Interestingly, the amount of mRNA specified by the operon ptb-bcd-buk-lpd-bkdA1-bkdA2-bkdB, which encodes enzymes involved in degradation of branched-chain amino acids, also increases after a temperature downshift. As cells utilize the isoleucine and valine degradation intermediates alpha-methylbutyryl-CoA and isobutyryl-CoA for synthesis of branched-chain fatty acids, this finding reflects the adaptation of membrane lipid composition, ensuring the maintenance of appropriate membrane fluidity at low temperatures. The results of the DNA array analyses were verified for several selected genes by RNA slot-blot analysis and compared with two-dimensional PAGE analyses.

  13. [Effects of cold-shock on the growth and flower bud differentiation of tomato seedlings under high temperature stress].

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng-li; Xia, Ya-zhen; Sun, Zhi-qiang

    2016-02-01

    In order to explore the effects of cold-shock on the growth and flower bud differentiation of tomato seedlings under high temperature, tomato seedlings were subjected to cold-shock treat- ments every day with 10 °C for 10 minutes in. an artificial climate chamber. Tomato seedlings were treated with cold-shock at the first true leaf stage and the treatment lasted for 15 days. Tomato seed- lings without cold-shock were used as control. At the fourth true leaf period of tomato seedlings, five plants were randomly sampled and the growth characteristics and the ultrastructure changes of meso- phyll cell of tomato seedlings were examined. The flower bud differentiation process of tomato seed- lings was observed at the periods of the second, fourth and sixth true leaves respectively. Flowering and fruiting of tomato seedlings were also investigated after transplanting. The results showed that the stem diameter and health index of tomato seedlings with cold-shock were enhanced by 7.2% and 55.5% compared with seedlings without cold-shock. Mesophyll cells of the seedlings with cold-shock arranged loosely and various organelles such as chloroplasts and mitochondria were morphologically integrated, while chloroplasts and mitochondria of seedlings mesophyll cells without cold-shock swelled up and thylakoids vacuolized apparently. The flower bud differentiation process of seedlings with cold-shock could be advanced significantly at the early seedling stage compared with the control and the advancement was weakened with the seedling growing. Fruit set number and percentage on the first and second inflorescence of tomato plants transplanted by seedlings with cold-shock were enhanced significantly compared with those of the control. These results indicated that the injury of membrane structure of various organelles, especially chloroplast and mitochondria could be allevia- ted by cold-shock treatment under high temperature tress. Cold-shock treatment could not only im- prove the

  14. Identification of ICE2, a gene involved in cold acclimation which determines freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Fursova, Oksana V; Pogorelko, Gennady V; Tarasov, Valentin A

    2009-01-15

    Several transcription factors are presently known to regulate the response to cold stress. Here we describe a new positive regulator, ICE2, which is a transcription factor of the bHLH family that participates in the response to deep freezing through the cold acclimation-dependent pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. An overexpression of ICE2 (as we named the At1g12860 locus) in transgenic Arabidopsis plants results in increased tolerance to deep freezing stress after cold acclimation. The seeds of transgenic lines that overexpressed ICE2 were characterized by decreased levels of carbohydrate and increased levels of lipids. The analysis of expression of CBF1 gene (also known as DREB1B), which have been shown to be required for the complete development of cold acclimation response in Arabidopsis indicated a difference between expression of the CBF1 gene in transgenic plants and the wild-type control plants, Col-0. These results suggested that the CBF1 transcription factor, known as one of the regulators of the cold stress response, has a dominant role in providing freezing tolerance in transgenic plants characterized by overexpression of ICE2.

  15. The role of cold work on the shock response of tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millett, J. C. F.; Whiteman, G.; Park, N. T.; Case, S.; Bourne, N. K.

    2013-06-01

    The effect of prior cold work on the shock response of tantalum has been investigated via plate impact. As-received and 50% cold-rolled material has been studied to determine the Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL), shear strength evolution behind the shock front, and spall strength. Results show that there is a significant drop in both HEL and shear strength due to cold-rolling, but as the thickness of the target (or time) increases, results converge between the two states. Results suggest that this is due to the cold-rolling process moving dislocations away from the surrounding interstitial solute atoms that collect there, thus reducing the initial stress to initiate yield. In other words, the main contribution of cold-rolling is to increase the population of mobile dislocations within the microstructure rather that just increase the dislocation density as a whole. In contrast, the spall strength in both states appears almost identical. It is suggested that the high Peierls stress prevents a large increase in dislocation density during rolling and hence reduces any post rolling strengthening that might be observed in the spallation response. Finally, we observe a significant change in spall response below a pulse width of 150 ns. We believe that this represents a change from a nucleation and growth of ductile voids type mechanism to one based on ductile fracture of atomic planes. The fact that at these low pulse durations, results appear to trend towards the theoretical strength of tantalum would lend support to this hypothesis.

  16. Identification of endogenously S-nitrosylated proteins in Arabidopsis plantlets: effect of cold stress on cysteine nitrosylation level.

    PubMed

    Puyaubert, Juliette; Fares, Abasse; Rézé, Nathalie; Peltier, Jean-Benoît; Baudouin, Emmanuel

    2014-02-01

    S-nitrosylation is a nitric oxide (NO)-based post-translational modification regulating protein function and signalling. We used a combination between the biotin switch method and labelling with isotope-coded affinity tag to identify endogenously S-nitrosylated peptides in Arabidopsis thaliana proteins extracted from plantlets. The relative level of S-nitrosylation in the identified peptides was compared between unstressed and cold-stress seedlings. We thereby detected 62 endogenously nitrosylated peptides out of which 20 are over-nitrosylated following cold exposure. Taken together these data provide a new repertoire of endogenously S-nitrosylated proteins in Arabidopsis with cysteine S-nitrosylation site. Furthermore they highlight the quantitative modification of the S-nitrosylation status of specific cysteine following cold stress.

  17. Cold Shock Induces qnrA Expression in Shewanella algae ▿

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong Bin; Park, Chi Hye; Gavin, Mariah; Jacoby, George A.; Hooper, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Plasmid-carried quinolone resistance genes, like qnrA, are widespread in Enterobacteriaceae. To gain insight into its little-understood native functions, we studied the effect of environmental conditions on chromosomal qnrA expression in Shewanella algae. Among conditions of DNA damage, oxidative and osmotic stress, starvation, heat, and cold, only cold shock increased gene expression, as measured by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). Induction was graded and occurred during growth arrest, suggesting that qnrA may contribute to the adaptation of Shewanella to low temperatures. PMID:21078945

  18. Populus euphratica APYRASE2 Enhances Cold Tolerance by Modulating Vesicular Trafficking and Extracellular ATP in Arabidopsis Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shurong; Sun, Jian; Zhao, Rui; Ding, Mingquan; Zhang, Yinan; Sun, Yuanling; Wang, Wei; Tan, Yeqing; Liu, Dandan; Ma, Xujun; Hou, Peichen; Wang, Meijuan; Lu, Cunfu; Shen, Xin; Chen, Shaoliang

    2015-01-01

    Apyrase and extracellular ATP play crucial roles in mediating plant growth and defense responses. In the cold-tolerant poplar, Populus euphratica, low temperatures up-regulate APYRASE2 (PeAPY2) expression in callus cells. We investigated the biochemical characteristics of PeAPY2 and its role in cold tolerance. We found that PeAPY2 predominantly localized to the plasma membrane, but punctate signals also appeared in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. PeAPY2 exhibited broad substrate specificity, but it most efficiently hydrolyzed purine nucleotides, particularly ATP. PeAPY2 preferred Mg2+ as a cofactor, and it was insensitive to various, specific ATPase inhibitors. When PeAPY2 was ectopically expressed in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), cold tolerance was enhanced, based on root growth measurements and survival rates. Moreover, under cold stress, PeAPY2-transgenic plants maintained plasma membrane integrity and showed reduced cold-elicited electrolyte leakage compared with wild-type plants. These responses probably resulted from efficient plasma membrane repair via vesicular trafficking. Indeed, transgenic plants showed accelerated endocytosis and exocytosis during cold stress and recovery. We found that low doses of extracellular ATP accelerated vesicular trafficking, but high extracellular ATP inhibited trafficking and reduced cell viability. Cold stress caused significant increases in root medium extracellular ATP. However, under these conditions, PeAPY2-transgenic lines showed greater control of extracellular ATP levels than wild-type plants. We conclude that Arabidopsis plants that overexpressed PeAPY2 could increase membrane repair by accelerating vesicular trafficking and hydrolyzing extracellular ATP to avoid excessive, cold-elicited ATP accumulation in the root medium and, thus, reduced ATP-induced inhibition of vesicular trafficking. PMID:26224801

  19. Populus euphratica APYRASE2 Enhances Cold Tolerance by Modulating Vesicular Trafficking and Extracellular ATP in Arabidopsis Plants.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shurong; Sun, Jian; Zhao, Rui; Ding, Mingquan; Zhang, Yinan; Sun, Yuanling; Wang, Wei; Tan, Yeqing; Liu, Dandan; Ma, Xujun; Hou, Peichen; Wang, Meijuan; Lu, Cunfu; Shen, Xin; Chen, Shaoliang

    2015-09-01

    Apyrase and extracellular ATP play crucial roles in mediating plant growth and defense responses. In the cold-tolerant poplar, Populus euphratica, low temperatures up-regulate APYRASE2 (PeAPY2) expression in callus cells. We investigated the biochemical characteristics of PeAPY2 and its role in cold tolerance. We found that PeAPY2 predominantly localized to the plasma membrane, but punctate signals also appeared in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. PeAPY2 exhibited broad substrate specificity, but it most efficiently hydrolyzed purine nucleotides, particularly ATP. PeAPY2 preferred Mg(2+) as a cofactor, and it was insensitive to various, specific ATPase inhibitors. When PeAPY2 was ectopically expressed in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), cold tolerance was enhanced, based on root growth measurements and survival rates. Moreover, under cold stress, PeAPY2-transgenic plants maintained plasma membrane integrity and showed reduced cold-elicited electrolyte leakage compared with wild-type plants. These responses probably resulted from efficient plasma membrane repair via vesicular trafficking. Indeed, transgenic plants showed accelerated endocytosis and exocytosis during cold stress and recovery. We found that low doses of extracellular ATP accelerated vesicular trafficking, but high extracellular ATP inhibited trafficking and reduced cell viability. Cold stress caused significant increases in root medium extracellular ATP. However, under these conditions, PeAPY2-transgenic lines showed greater control of extracellular ATP levels than wild-type plants. We conclude that Arabidopsis plants that overexpressed PeAPY2 could increase membrane repair by accelerating vesicular trafficking and hydrolyzing extracellular ATP to avoid excessive, cold-elicited ATP accumulation in the root medium and, thus, reduced ATP-induced inhibition of vesicular trafficking. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Structure and flexibility of the thermophilic cold-shock protein of Thermus aquaticus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Bonghwan; Jeong, Ki-Woong; Kim, Yangmee

    2014-08-29

    The thermophilic bacterium Thermus aquaticus is a well-known source of Taq polymerase. Here, we studied the structure and dynamics of the T. aquaticus cold-shock protein (Ta-Csp) to better understand its thermostability using NMR spectroscopy. We found that Ta-Csp has a five-stranded β-barrel structure with five salt bridges which are important for more rigid structure and a higher melting temperature (76 °C) of Ta-Csp compared to mesophilic and psychrophilic Csps. Microsecond to millisecond time scale exchange processes occur only at the β1-β2 surface region of the nucleic acid binding site with an average conformational exchange rate constant of 674 s(-1). The results imply that thermophilic Ta-Csp has a more rigid structure and may not need high structural flexibility to accommodate nucleic acids upon cold shock compared to its mesophile and psychrophile counterparts.

  1. PpCBF3 from Cold-Tolerant Kentucky Bluegrass Involved in Freezing Tolerance Associated with Up-Regulation of Cold-Related Genes in Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Xu, Bin; Yang, Zhimin; Huang, Bingru

    2015-01-01

    Dehydration-Responsive Element Binding proteins (DREB)/C-repeat (CRT) Binding Factors (CBF) have been identified as transcriptional activators during plant responses to cold stress. The objective of this study was to determine the physiological roles of a CBF gene isolated from a cold-tolerant perennial grass species, Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.), which designated as PpCBF3, in regulating plant tolerance to freezing stress. Transient transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll protoplast with PpCBF3-eGFP fused protein showed that PpCBF3 was localized to the nucleus. RT-PCR analysis showed that PpCBF3 was specifically induced by cold stress (4°C) but not by drought stress [induced by 20% polyethylene glycol 6000 solution (PEG-6000)] or salt stress (150 mM NaCl). Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing PpCBF3 showed significant improvement in freezing (-20°C) tolerance demonstrated by a lower percentage of chlorotic leaves, lower cellular electrolyte leakage (EL) and H2O2 and O2.- content, and higher chlorophyll content and photochemical efficiency compared to the wild type. Relative mRNA expression level analysis by qRT-PCR indicated that the improved freezing tolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing PpCBF3 was conferred by sustained activation of downstream cold responsive (COR) genes. Other interesting phenotypic changes in the PpCBF3-transgenic Arabidopsis plants included late flowering and slow growth or ‘dwarfism’, both of which are desirable phenotypic traits for perennial turfgrasses. Therefore, PpCBF3 has potential to be used in genetic engineering for improvement of turfgrass freezing tolerance and other desirable traits. PMID:26177510

  2. Transcriptomic Profiling of Arabidopsis thaliana Mutant pad2.1 in Response to Combined Cold and Osmotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepak; Datta, Riddhi; Hazra, Saptarshi; Sultana, Asma; Mukhopadhyay, Ria; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of glutathione (GSH) in stress tolerance, defense response and antioxidant signaling is an established fact. In this study transcriptome analysis of pad2.1, an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, after combined osmotic and cold stress treatment has been performed to explore the intricate position of GSH in the stress and defense signaling network in planta. Microarray data revealed the differential regulation of about 1674 genes in pad2.1 amongst which 973 and 701 were significantly up- and down-regulated respectively. Gene enrichment, functional pathway analysis by DAVID and MapMan analysis identified various stress and defense related genes viz. members of heat shock protein family, peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PPIase), thioredoxin peroxidase (TPX2), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), NBS-LRR type resistance protein etc. as down-regulated. The expression pattern of the above mentioned stress and defense related genes and APETALA were also validated by comparative proteomic analysis of combined stress treated Col-0 and pad2.1. Functional annotation noted down-regulation of UDP-glycosyl transferase, 4-coumarate CoA ligase 8, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase 4 (CAD4), ACC synthase and ACC oxidase which are the important enzymes of phenylpropanoid, lignin and ethylene (ET) biosynthetic pathway respectively. Since the only difference between Col-0 (Wild type) and pad2.1 is the content of GSH, so, this study suggested that in addition to its association with specific stress responsive genes and proteins, GSH provides tolerance to plants by its involvement with phenylpropanoid, lignin and ET biosynthesis under stress conditions. PMID:25822199

  3. A DEAD Box RNA Helicase Is Critical for Pre-mRNA Splicing, Cold-Responsive Gene Regulation, and Cold Tolerance in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Qingmei; Wu, Jianmin; Zhang, Yanyan; Jiang, Changhua; Liu, Renyi; Chai, Chenglin; Zhu, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    Cold stress resulting from chilling and freezing temperatures substantially reduces crop production worldwide. To identify genes critical for cold tolerance in plants, we screened Arabidopsis thaliana mutants for deregulated expression of a firefly luciferase reporter gene under the control of the C-REPEAT BINDING FACTOR2 (CBF2) promoter (CBF2:LUC). A regulator of CBF gene expression1 (rcf1-1) mutant that is hypersensitive to cold stress was chosen for in-depth characterization. RCF1 encodes a cold-inducible DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box RNA helicase. Unlike a previously reported DEAD box RNA helicase (LOW EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENES4 [LOS4]) that regulates mRNA export, RCF1 does not play a role in mRNA export. Instead, RCF1 functions to maintain proper splicing of pre-mRNAs; many cold-responsive genes are mis-spliced in rcf1-1 mutant plants under cold stress. Functional characterization of four genes (PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR5 [PRR5], SHAGGY-LIKE SERINE/THREONINE KINASE12 [SK12], MYB FAMILY TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR CIRCADIAN1 [CIR1], and SPFH/PHB DOMAIN-CONTAINING MEMBRANE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN [SPFH]) that are mis-spliced in rcf1-1 revealed that these genes are cold-inducible positive (CIR1 and SPFH) and negative (PRR5 and SK12) regulators of cold-responsive genes and cold tolerance. Together, our results suggest that the cold-inducible RNA helicase RCF1 is essential for pre-mRNA splicing and is important for cold-responsive gene regulation and cold tolerance in plants. PMID:23371945

  4. The eukaryote chaperonin CCT is a cold shock protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Somer, Lilach; Shmulman, Oshrit; Dror, Tali; Hashmueli, Sharon; Kashi, Yechezkel

    2002-01-01

    The eukaryotic Hsp60 cytoplasmic chaperonin CCT (chaperonin containing the T-complex polypeptide–1) is essential for growth in budding yeast, and mutations in individual CCT subunits have been shown to affect assembly of tubulin and actin. The present research focused mainly on the expression of the CCT subunits, CCTα and CCTβ, in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Previous studies showed that, unlike most other chaperones, CCT in yeast does not undergo induction following heat shock. In this study, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein levels of CCT subunits following exposure to low temperatures, were examined. The Northern blot analysis indicated a 3- to 4-fold increase in mRNA levels of CCTα and CCTβ genes after cold shock at 4°C. Interestingly, Western blot analysis showed that cold shock induces an increase in the CCTα protein, which is expressed at 10°C, but not at 4°C. Transfer of 4°C cold-shocked cells to 10°C induced a 5-fold increase in the CCTα protein level. By means of fluorescent immunostaining and confocal microscopy, we found CCTα to be localized in the cortex and the cell cytoplasm of S. cerevisiae. Localization of CCTα was not affected at low temperatures. Co-localization of CCT and filaments of actin and tubulin was not observed by microscopy. The induction pattern of the CCTα protein suggests that expression of the chaperonin may be primarily important during the recovery from low temperatures and the transition to growth at higher temperatures, as found for other Hsps during the recovery phase from heat shock. PMID:11892987

  5. Regulation of Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 rrnA-reporter gene fusions in response to cold shock.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Ann M; O'Connell, Kevin P; Thomashow, Michael F

    2002-09-01

    We previously reported that mutants of Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 carrying luxAB insertions in each of the three 16S rRNA genes exhibited a dramatic (> or = 28-fold) increase in luminescence following a temperature downshift from 30 to 15 degrees C. These results raised the possibility that the rRNA operons (rrn) of S. meliloti were cold shock loci. In testing this possibility, we found that fusion of the S. meliloti 1021 rrnA promoter to two different reporter genes, luxAB and uidA, resulted in hybrid genes that were transiently upregulated (as measured by transcript accumulation) about four- to sixfold in response to a temperature downshift. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the rrn promoters are transiently upregulated in response to cold shock. However, much of the apparent cold shock regulation of the initial luxAB insertions was due to an unexpected mechanism: an apparent temperature-dependent inhibition of translation. Specifically, the rrnA sequences from +1 to +172 (relative to the start of transcription) were found to greatly decrease the ability of S. meliloti to translate hybrid rrn-luxAB transcripts into active protein at 30 degrees C. This effect, however, was largely eliminated at 15 degrees C. Possible mechanisms for the apparent transient increase in rrnA promoter activity and temperature-dependent inhibition of translation are discussed.

  6. Functional conservation of cold shock domains in bacteria and higher plants.

    PubMed

    Nakaminami, Kentaro; Karlson, Dale T; Imai, Ryozo

    2006-06-27

    In Escherichia coli, a family of cold shock proteins (CSPs) function as transcription antiterminators or translational enhancers at low temperature by destabilizing RNA secondary structure. A wheat nucleic acid-binding protein (WCSP1) was found to contain a cold shock domain (CSD) bearing high similarity to E. coli cold shock proteins. In the present study, a series of mutations were introduced into WCSP1, and its functionality was investigated by using in vivo and in vitro assays in the context of functional conservation with E. coli CSPs. Constitutive expression of WT WCSP1 in an E. coli cspA, cspB, cspE, cspG quadruple deletion mutant complemented its cold-sensitive phenotype, suggesting that WCSP1 shares a function with E. coli CSPs for cold adaptation. In addition, transcription antitermination activity was demonstrated for WCSP1 by using an E. coli strain that has a hairpin loop upstream of a chloramphenicol resistance gene. In vitro dsDNA melting assays clearly demonstrated that WCSP1 melts dsDNA, an activity that was positively correlated to the ability to bind ssDNA. When mutations were introduced at critical residues within the consensus RNA binding motifs (RNP1 and RNP2) of WCSP1, it failed to melt dsDNA. Studies with WCSP1-GFP fusion proteins documented patterns that are consistent with ER and nuclear localization. In vivo and in vitro functional analyses, coupled with subcellular localization data, suggest that WCSP1 may function as a RNA chaperone to destabilize secondary structure and is involved in the regulation of translation under low temperature.

  7. Lipid remodelling: Unravelling the response to cold stress in Arabidopsis and its extremophile relative Eutrema salsugineum.

    PubMed

    Barrero-Sicilia, Cristina; Silvestre, Susana; Haslam, Richard P; Michaelson, Louise V

    2017-10-01

    Environmental constraints limit the geographic distribution of many economically important crops. Cold stress is an important abiotic stress that affects plant growth and development, resulting in loss of vigour and surface lesions. These symptoms are caused by, among other metabolic processes, the altered physical and chemical composition of cell membranes. As a major component of cell membranes lipids have been recognized as having a significant role in cold stress, both as a mechanical defence through leaf surface protection and plasma membrane remodelling, and as signal transduction molecules. We present an overview integrating gene expression and lipidomic data published so far in Arabidopsis and its relative the extremophile Eutrema salsugineum. This data enables a better understanding of the contribution of the lipidome in determining the ability to tolerate suboptimal temperature conditions. Collectively this information will allow us to identify the key lipids and pathways responsible for resilience, enabling the development of new approaches for crop tolerance to stress. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Stress-responsive expression patterns and functional characterization of cold shock domain proteins in cabbage (Brassica rapa) under abiotic stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min Ji; Park, Ye Rin; Park, Su Jung; Kang, Hunseung

    2015-11-01

    Although the functional roles of cold shock domain proteins (CSDPs) have been demonstrated during the growth, development, and stress adaptation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), rice (Oryza sativa), and wheat (Triticum aestivum), the functions of CSDPs in other plants species, including cabbage (Brassica rapa), are largely unknown. To gain insight into the roles of CSDPs in cabbage under stress conditions, the genes encoding CSDPs in cabbage were isolated, and the functional roles of CSDPs in response to environmental stresses were analyzed. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that the levels of BrCSDP transcripts increased during cold, salt, or drought stress, as well as upon ABA treatment. Among the five BrCSDP genes found in the cabbage genome, one CSDP (BRU12051), named BrCSDP3, was unique in that it is localized to the chloroplast as well as to the nucleus. Ectopic expression of BrCSDP3 in Arabidopsis resulted in accelerated seed germination and better seedling growth compared to the wild-type plants under high salt or dehydration stress conditions, and in response to ABA treatment. BrCSDP3 did not affect the splicing of intron-containing genes and processing of rRNAs in the chloroplast. BrCSDP3 had the ability to complement RNA chaperone-deficient Escherichia coli mutant cells under low temperatures as well as DNA- and RNA-melting abilities, suggesting that it possesses RNA chaperone activity. Taken together, these results suggest that BrCSDP3, harboring RNA chaperone activity, plays a role as a positive regulator in seed germination and seedling growth under stress conditions.

  9. Screening of genes regulated by cold shock in Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 and time course expression of cold-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Shengkang; Xiao, Xiang; Sun, Ping; Wang, Fengping

    2008-06-01

    The differential gene transcription of a deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 in response to cold shock was analyzed by RNA arbitrarily primed PCR. Ninety primer sets were used to scan two different RNA pools derived from the culture of cold shock and its control (culture at its optimal grown temperature). Ninety-four putative differentially expressed fragments were identified and cloned. Six out of the 94 fragments were confirmed to be truly differentially transcribed in terms of cold shock by reverse Northern dot blot and then sequenced. Sequence blast analysis showed that the six differentially transcribed genes are putative genes for zonular occludens toxin, chaperon GroEL, efflux transporter, Sua5/YciO/YrdC/YwlC family protein, betaine-aldehyde dehydrogenase, and DEAD box RNA helicase, respectively. The time course expression profiles of these six genes from 0 to 90 min upon cold shock were quantified by real-time PCR. Deletion mutation of the highest induced gene--RNA helicase gene, had no significant impact on the growth of the strain no matter upon cold shock or under permanent low temperature. It is suggested that one or more additional DEAD box RNA helicase genes compensate for the loss of the function of the mutated gene.

  10. Suppression of Arabidopsis RING E3 ubiquitin ligase AtATL78 increases tolerance to cold stress and decreases tolerance to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, Woo Taek

    2013-08-19

    AtATL78 is an Arabidopsis RING E3 ubiquitin ligase. RT-PCR and promoter-GUS assays revealed that AtATL78 was up-regulated by cold stress and down-regulated by drought. AtATL78 was localized at the plasma-membrane. Suppression of AtATL78 increased tolerance to cold stress but decreased tolerance to drought. Our data suggests that AtATL78 is a negative regulator of cold stress response and a positive regulator of drought stress response in Arabidopsis. These results further suggest that AtATL78 plays opposing roles in cold and drought stress responses.

  11. Three heat shock proteins from Spodoptera exigua: Gene cloning, characterization and comparative stress response during heat and cold shocks.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Zou, Qi; Zheng, Huizhen; Zhang, Fan; Tang, Bin; Wang, Shigui

    2011-06-01

    To gain insight into the comparative function in stress response of HSPs in insects, three HSP cDNAs were cloned from the fat body of the beet armyworm Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae). SexHSP70, SexHSP74 and SexHSP83 cDNAs encoding the protein of 667, 685 and 717 amino acids, with the pI of 5.52, 5.75 and 5.02, respectively. Northern blotting revealed that all three SexHSP mRNAs are expressed in the fat body, mid-gut, spermary and tracheae. SexHSP70, SexHSP74and SexHSP83 mRNAs were expressed in the fat body and whole body at different levels during different developmental stages. The three SexHSP transcripts were highly expressed in the fat body on the first day of fifth instar larvae, on the fourth and seventh days of the pupa stage, and in the whole body on the initial stages of larvae. Under heat and cold shock conditions, SexHSP70 and SexHSP83 mainly functioned during heat shock and cooling and SexHSP83 also had a function in the recovery stage. SexHSP74 had important functions in short-term heat shock and recovery, as well as long-term cooling. The results revealed that long-term shocking can affect SexHSP74 and SexHSP83 expression and long-term cooling can influence SexHSP83 expression during the recovery stage.

  12. Low-temperature-induced transcription factors in grapevine enhance cold tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Takuhara, Yuki; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Suzuki, Shunji

    2011-06-15

    We report the characterization of low-temperature-induced transcription factors in grapevine (Vitis vinifera). Four transcription factors were identified in low-temperature-treated grapevine. The expression of V. vinifera C-repeat-binding factors, VvCBF2, VvCBF4, and VvCBFL, and V. vinifera B-box-type zinc finger protein, VvZFPL, was immediately induced and upregulated in leaves by the low-temperature treatment. Similar induction of the gene expression was observed in low-temperature-treated stems and flowers, although VvZFPL was constitutively expressed in flowers. Tendrils expressed all the four genes constitutively. In berry skin, VvCBF2 and VvCBFL were induced by the low-temperature treatment before the onset of véraison, while only VvCBF2 was induced under the low-temperature condition after the onset of véraison. The overexpression of VvCBF2 and VvZFPL in Arabidopsis plants led to longer hypocotyls than the control plants. The rosette leaves of these plants were smaller and had lower chlorophyll contents than those of the control plants, resulting in a pale green color. Finally, the VvCBF2- and VvZFPL-overexpressing plants revealed growth retardation. These results suggest that VvCBF2 and VvZFPL may affect photomorphogenesis and growth in grapevine. Meanwhile, no morphological changes were detected in the VvCBF4- and VvCBFL-overexpressing plants. The cold tolerance test demonstrated that all of the overexpressing plants remained viable and noticeably healthy compared with the control plants even after exposure to severe cold treatment, suggesting that VvCBF2, VvCBF4, VvCBFL, or VvZFPL may enhance cold tolerance in grapevine.

  13. Acyl-lipid desaturase 1 primes cold acclimation response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingjie; Thelen, Jay J

    2016-09-01

    Membrane fluidity change has long been suggested as the primary mechanism by which, plants adapt to cold stress, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not completely established. In this study, we found that a knockout of acyl-lipid/CoA desaturase 1 gene (ADS1; EC 1.14.99) enhances freezing tolerance after cold acclimation (CA). Fatty acid composition analysis demonstrated that 18:1 content in ads1 mutant plants was 20% lower than in wild-type (WT) grown at 23°C. Lipidomics revealed that 34C-species of monogalactosyl diacylglycerol (MGDG) content in ads1 mutants were 3.3-14.9% lower than in WT. Lipid positional analysis identified 10% lower 18:1 fatty acid content at the sn-2 position of MGDG. The cytosolic calcium content in ads1 mutant plants was also approximately two-times higher than that of WT in response to cold shock. Each of these biochemical differences between WT and ads1 mutant disappeared after CA. Subcellular localization of C- and N-terminal enhanced-fluorescence-fusion proteins indicated that ADS1 localized exclusively to chloroplasts. These observations suggest that ADS1-mediated alteration of chloroplast membrane fluidity is required to prime a CA response, and is the upstream event of cytosolic calcium signaling.

  14. The cold signaling attenuator HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENE1 activates FLOWERING LOCUS C transcription via chromatin remodeling under short-term cold stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Hoon; Park, Ju-Hyung; Lee, Sangmin; To, Taiko Kim; Kim, Jong-Myong; Seki, Motoaki; Park, Chung-Mo

    2013-11-01

    Exposure to short-term cold stress delays flowering by activating the floral repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) in Arabidopsis thaliana. The cold signaling attenuator HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENE1 (HOS1) negatively regulates cold responses. Notably, HOS1-deficient mutants exhibit early flowering, and FLC expression is suppressed in the mutants. However, it remains unknown how HOS1 regulates FLC expression. Here, we show that HOS1 induces FLC expression by antagonizing the actions of FVE and its interacting partner histone deacetylase 6 (HDA6) under short-term cold stress. HOS1 binds to FLC chromatin in an FVE-dependent manner, and FVE is essential for the HOS1-mediated activation of FLC transcription. HOS1 also interacts with HDA6 and inhibits the binding of HDA6 to FLC chromatin. Intermittent cold treatments induce FLC expression by activating HOS1, which attenuates the activity of HDA6 in silencing FLC chromatin, and the effects of intermittent cold are diminished in hos1 and fve mutants. These observations indicate that HOS1 acts as a chromatin remodeling factor for FLC regulation under short-term cold stress.

  15. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Yeast Transcriptome Upon Heat and Cold Shock

    PubMed Central

    Becerra, M.; Lombardía, L. J.; González-Siso, M. I.; Rodríguez-Belmonte, E.; Hauser, N. C.

    2003-01-01

    DNA arrays were used to measure changes in transcript levels as yeast cells responded to temperature shocks. The number of genes upregulated by temperature shifts from 30 ℃ to 37℃ or 45℃ was correlated with the severity of the stress. Pre-adaptation of cells, by growth at 37 ℃ previous to the 45℃ shift, caused a decrease in the number of genes related to this response. Heat shock also caused downregulation of a set of genes related to metabolism, cell growth and division, transcription, ribosomal proteins, protein synthesis and destination. Probably all of these responses combine to slow down cell growth and division during heat shock, thus saving energy for cell rescue. The presence of putative binding sites for Xbp1p in the promoters of these genes suggests a hypothetical role for this transcriptional repressor, although other mechanisms may be considered. The response to cold shock (4℃) affected a small number of genes, but the vast majority of those genes induced by exposure to 4 ℃ were also induced during heat shock; these genes share in their promoters cis-regulatory elements previously related to other stress responses. PMID:18629074

  16. Cold regulation of plastid ascorbate peroxidases serves as a priming hub controlling ROS signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    van Buer, Jörn; Cvetkovic, Jelena; Baier, Margarete

    2016-07-20

    Short cold periods comprise a challenge to plant growth and development. Series of cold stresses improve plant performance upon a future cold stress. This effect could be provoked by priming, training or acclimation dependent hardening. Here, we compared the effect of 24 h (short priming stimulus) and of 2 week long cold-pretreatment (long priming stimulus) on the response of Arabidopsis thaliana to a single 24 h cold stimulus (triggering) after a 5 day long lag-phase, to test Arabidopsis for cold primability. Three types of pretreatment dependent responses were observed: (1) The CBF-regulon controlled gene COR15A was stronger activated only after long-term cold pretreatment. (2) The non-chloroplast specific stress markers PAL1 and CHS were more induced by cold after long-term and slightly stronger expressed after short-term cold priming. (3) The chloroplast ROS signaling marker genes ZAT10 and BAP1 were less activated by the triggering stimulus in primed plants. The effects on ZAT10 and BAP1 were more pronounced in 24 h cold-primed plants than in 14 day long cold-primed ones demonstrating independence of priming from induction and persistence of primary cold acclimation responses. Transcript and protein abundance analysis and studies in specific knock-out lines linked the priming-specific regulation of ZAT10 and BAP1 induction to the priming-induced long-term regulation of stromal and thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase (sAPX and tAPX) expression. The plastid antioxidant system, especially, plastid ascorbate peroxidase regulation, transmits information on a previous cold stress over time without the requirement of establishing cold-acclimation. We hypothesize that the plastid antioxidant system serves as a priming hub and that priming-dependent regulation of chloroplast-to-nucleus ROS signaling is a strategy to prepare plants under unstable environmental conditions against unpredictable stresses by supporting extra-plastidic stress protection.

  17. Toward understanding life under subzero conditions: the significance of exploring psychrophilic "cold-shock" proteins.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Emanuele

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the behavior of proteins under freezing conditions is vital for detecting and locating extraterrestrial life in cold environments, such as those found on Mars and the icy moons of Jupiter and Saturn. This review highlights the importance of studying psychrophilic "cold-shock" proteins, a topic that has yet to be explored. A strategy for analyzing the psychrophilic RNA helicase protein CsdA (Psyc_1082) from Psychrobacter arcticus 273-4 as a key protein for life under freezing temperatures is proposed. The experimental model presented here was developed based on previous data from investigations of Escherichia coli, P. arcticus 273-4, and RNA helicases. P. arcticus 273-4 is considered a model for life in freezing environments. It is capable of growing in temperatures as cold as -10°C by using physiological strategies to survive not only in freezing temperatures but also under low-water-activity and limited-nutrient-availability conditions. The analyses of its genome, transcriptome, and proteome revealed specific adaptations that allow it to inhabit freezing environments by adopting a slow metabolic strategy rather than a cellular dormancy state. During growth at subzero temperatures, P. arcticus 273-4 genes related to energy metabolism and carbon substrate incorporation are downregulated, and genes for maintenance of membranes, cell walls, and nucleic acid motion are upregulated. At -6°C, P. arcticus 273-4 does not upregulate the expression of either RNA or protein chaperones; however, it upregulates the expression of its cold-shock induced DEAD-box RNA helicase protein A (CsdA - Psyc_1082). CsdA - Psyc_1082 was investigated as a key helper protein for sustaining life in subzero conditions. Proving CsdA - Psyc_1082 to be functional as a key protein for life under freezing temperatures may extend the known minimum growth temperature of a mesophilic cell and provide key information about the mechanisms that underlie cold-induced biological systems in

  18. Metabolic quenching of Corynebacterium glutamicum: efficiency of methods and impact of cold shock.

    PubMed

    Wellerdiek, Max; Winterhoff, Dajana; Reule, Waldemar; Brandner, Jürgen; Oldiges, Marco

    2009-08-01

    Representative and valid cytoplasmic concentrations are essential for ensuring the significance of results in the field of metabolome analysis. One of the most crucial points in this respect is the sampling itself. A rapid and sudden stopping of the metabolism on a timescale that is much faster than the conversion rates of investigated metabolites is worthwhile. This can be achieved by applying of cold methanol quenching combined with reproducible, fast, and automated sampling. Unfortunately, quenching the metabolism by a sharp temperature shift leads to what is known as cold shock or the cell-leakage effect. In the present work, we applied a microstructure heat exchanger to analyze the cold shock effect using Corynebacterium glutamicum as a model microorganism. Using this apparatus together with a silicon pipe, it was possible to assay the leakage effect on a timescale starting at 1 s after cooling cell suspension. The high turnover rates not only require a rapid quenching technique, but also the correct application. Moreover, we succeeded in showing that even when the required appropriate setup of methanol quenching is not used, the metabolism is not stopped within the required timescale. By applying robust techniques like rapid sampling in combination with reproducible sample processing, we ensured fast and reliable metabolic inactivation during all steps.

  19. The susceptibility of Streptococcus thermophilus 14085 to organic acid, simulated gastric juice, bile salt and disinfectant as influenced by cold shock treatment.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shiu-Hui; Lai, Ying-Jang; Chou, Cheng-Chun

    2013-02-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus is a thermophilic lactic acid bacterium which is used as the starter organism for the fermentation of yoghurt and some cheese. In the present study, S. thermophilus BCRC 14085 was subjected to cold shock treatment by exposure at 10 °C for 2 h. The effect of cold shock on the susceptibility of S. thermophilus in subsequent lethal stress environments such as simulated gastric juice (pH 2.0-3.0), bile solution (2.0%) and various organic acids (0.75 M, pH 3.5) including propionic, lactic, acetic, citric and tartaric acid was investigated. In addition, the survival of cold-shocked and non-shocked S. thermophilus exposed to disinfectants, Clidox-S and Quatricide, were compared. Results revealed that cold shock enhanced the tolerance of S. thermophilus in the presence of simulated gastric juice (pH 2.5 and 2.8), while in bile solution, the population increase of cold-shocked cells is higher than that of non-shocked cells after 12 h of incubation. Furthermore, the susceptibility of S. thermophilus, regardless of cold shock, to organic acid varied with the kinds of organic acid examined. The cold-shocked S. thermophilus showed a significantly less survival (P < 0.05) than that of the non-shocked cells when exposed to lactic or acetic acid. Furthermore, cold shock reduced the survival of S. thermophilus when exposed to Quatricide but not Clidox-S.

  20. Laser interferometry and emission spectroscopy measurements of cold-sprayed copper thermite shocked to 35 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neel, Christopher; Lacina, David; Johnson, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Plate impact experiments were conducted on a cold-sprayed Al-CuO thermite at peak stresses between 5-35 GPa to determine the Hugoniot curve and characterize any shock induced energetic reaction. Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) measurements were used to obtain particle velocity histories and shock speed information for both the shock loading and unloading behavior of the material. A jump in shock velocity was observed in the Hugoniot curve when the material was shocked beyond 20 GPa, suggesting a volume-increasing reaction occurs in this shocked Al-CuO thermite near 20 GPa. To better characterize any shock-induced thermite reactions, emission spectroscopy measurements were obtained at stresses above 20 GPa. The best time-resolved spectra obtained thus far, at 25 GPa, does not support the fast thermite reaction hypothesis.

  1. A Soybean C2H2-Type Zinc Finger Gene GmZF1 Enhanced Cold Tolerance in Transgenic Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xue-Feng; Xu, Zhao-Shi; Liu, Meng-Meng; Shan, Shu-Guang; Cheng, Xian-Guo

    2014-01-01

    Zinc finger proteins were involved in response to different environmental stresses in plant species. A typical Cys2/His2-type (C2H2-type) zinc finger gene GmZF1 from soybean was isolated and was composed of 172 amino acids containing two conserved C2H2-type zinc finger domains. Phylogenetic analysis showed that GmZF1 was clustered on the same branch with six C2H2-type ZFPs from dicotyledonous plants excepting for GsZFP1, and distinguished those from monocotyledon species. The GmZF1 protein was localized at the nucleus, and has specific binding activity with EP1S core sequence, and nucleotide mutation in the core sequence of EPSPS promoter changed the binding ability between GmZF1 protein and core DNA element, implying that two amino acid residues, G and C boxed in core sequence TGACAGTGTCA possibly play positive regulation role in recognizing DNA-binding sites in GmZF1 proteins. High accumulation of GmZF1 mRNA induced by exogenous ABA suggested that GmZF1 was involved in an ABA-dependent signal transduction pathway. Over-expression of GmZF1 significantly improved the contents of proline and soluble sugar and decreased the MDA contents in the transgenic lines exposed to cold stress, indicating that transgenic Arabidopsis carrying GmZF1 gene have adaptive mechanisms to cold stress. Over-expression of GmZF1 also increased the expression of cold-regulated cor6.6 gene by probably recognizing protein-DNA binding sites, suggesting that GmZF1 from soybean could enhance the tolerance of Arabidopsis to cold stress by regulating expression of cold-regulation gene in the transgenic Arabidopsis. PMID:25286048

  2. The spermatozoa of the dasyurid marsupial, Sminthopsis crassicaudata, are highly susceptible to cold shock.

    PubMed

    Czarny, N A; Rodger, J C

    2010-01-01

    Since the late 1970s research has suggested that marsupial spermatozoa did not suffer cold shock. We have re-examined cold shock to investigate problems with freezing of spermatozoa from a dasyurid marsupial, the fat-tailed dunnart (Sminthopsis crassicaudata). Epididymal spermatozoa were rapidly cooled to 0.5 degrees C in a pre-cooled tube held in an iced-water slurry. Upon re-warming all spermatozoa were immotile and the addition of 10% or 20% egg yolk to the sperm medium had no beneficial effect. Spermatozoa that were rapidly cooled to 4 degrees C maintained only 2% motility when re-warmed but the addition of at least 10% egg yolk was beneficial and upon re-warming greater than 65% of the initial motility was maintained. In order to achieve motile spermatozoa at 0 degrees C, controlled-rate cooling at 0.5 degrees C min(-1) was examined. In the absence of egg yolk there was a significant decline in the percentage of motile spermatozoa below 4 degrees C. However, the inclusion of at least 10% egg yolk resulted in no loss of motility in spermatozoa cooled to 0 degrees C. This is the first experimental study indicating that spermatozoa from a marsupial are highly susceptible to cold shock and that the impact of rapid chilling can be mitigated by the addition of 10% egg yolk. The ability to successfully cool the spermatozoa of S. crassicaudata to 0 degrees C may have an important role in future studies examining dasyurid sperm cryopreservation.

  3. Cold stratification and exogenous nitrates entail similar functional proteome adjustments during Arabidopsis seed dormancy release.

    PubMed

    Arc, Erwann; Chibani, Kamel; Grappin, Philippe; Jullien, Marc; Godin, Béatrice; Cueff, Gwendal; Valot, Benoit; Balliau, Thierry; Job, Dominique; Rajjou, Loïc

    2012-11-02

    Despite having very similar initial pools of stored mRNAs and proteins in the dry state, mature Arabidopsis seeds can either proceed toward radicle protrusion or stay in a dormant state upon imbibition. Dormancy breaking, a prerequisite to germination completion, can be induced by different treatments though the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Thus, we investigated the consequence of such treatments on the seed proteome. Two unrelated dormancy-releasing treatments were applied to dormant seeds, namely, cold stratification and exogenous nitrates, in combination with differential proteomic tools to highlight the specificities of the imbibed dormant state. The results reveal that both treatments lead to highly similar proteome adjustments. In the imbibed dormant state, enzymes involved in reserve mobilization are less accumulated and it appears that several energetically costly processes associated to seed germination and preparation for subsequent seedling establishment are repressed. Our data suggest that dormancy maintenance is associated to an abscisic-acid-dependent recapitulation of the late maturation program resulting in a higher potential to cope with environmental stresses. The comparison of the present results with previously published -omic data sets reinforces and extends the assumption that post-transcriptional, translational, and post-translational regulations are determinant for seed germination.

  4. Source of nitrogen associated with recovery of relative growth rate in Arabidopsis thaliana acclimated to sustained cold treatment.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Lindsey J; Sherlock, David J; Atkin, Owen K

    2015-06-01

    To determine (1) whether acclimation of carbon metabolism to low temperatures results in recovery of the relative growth rate (RGR) of plants in the cold and (2) the source of N underpinning cold acclimation in Arabidopsis thaliana, we supplied plants with a nutrient solution labelled with (15) N and subjected them to a temperature shift (from 23 to 5 °C). Whole-plant RGR of cold-treated plants was initially less than 30% of that of warm-maintained control plants. After 14 d, new leaves with a cold-acclimated phenotype emerged, with the RGR of cold-treated plants increasing by 50%; there was an associated recovery of root RGR and doubling of the net assimilation rate (NAR). The development of new tissues in the cold was supported initially by re-allocation of internal sources of N. In the longer term, the majority (80%) of N in the new leaves was derived from the external solution. Hence, both the nutrient status of the plant and the current availability of N from external sources are important in determining recovery of growth at low temperature. Collectively, our results reveal that both increased N use efficiency and increases in nitrogen content per se play a role in the recovery of carbon metabolism in the cold.

  5. Improved drought tolerance in wheat plants overexpressing a synthetic bacterial cold shock protein gene SeCspA

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tai-Fei; Xu, Zhao-Shi; Guo, Jin-Kao; Wang, Yan-Xia; Abernathy, Brian; Fu, Jin-Dong; Chen, Xiao; Zhou, Yong-Bin; Chen, Ming; Ye, Xing-Guo; Ma, You-Zhi

    2017-01-01

    Cold shock proteins (CSPs) enhance acclimatization of bacteria to adverse environmental circumstances. The Escherichia coli CSP genes CspA and CspB were modified to plant-preferred codon sequences and named as SeCspA and SeCspB. Overexpression of exogenous SeCspA and SeCspB in transgenic Arabidopsis lines increased germination rates, survival rates, and increased primary root length compared to control plants under drought and salt stress. Investigation of several stress-related parameters in SeCspA and SeCspB transgenic wheat lines indicated that these lines possessed stress tolerance characteristics, including lower malondialdehyde (MDA) content, lower water loss rates, lower relative Na+ content, and higher chlorophyll content and proline content than the control wheat plants under drought and salt stresses. RNA-seq and qRT-PCR expression analysis showed that overexpression of SeCsp could enhance the expression of stress-responsive genes. The field experiments showed that the SeCspA transgenic wheat lines had great increases in the 1000-grain weight and grain yield compared to the control genotype under drought stress conditions. Significant differences in the stress indices revealed that the SeCspA transgenic wheat lines possessed significant and stable improvements in drought tolerance over the control plants. No such improvement was observed for the SeCspB transgenic lines under field conditions. Our results indicated that SeCspA conferred drought tolerance and improved physiological traits in wheat plants. PMID:28281578

  6. NbCSPR underlies age-dependent immune responses to bacterial cold shock protein in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Saur, Isabel M L; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Sklenar, Jan; Holton, Nicholas J; Smakowska, Elwira; Belkhadir, Youssef; Zipfel, Cyril; Rathjen, John P

    2016-03-22

    Plants use receptor kinases (RKs) and receptor-like proteins (RLPs) as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to sense pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that are typical of whole classes of microbes. After ligand perception, many leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing PRRs interact with the LRR-RK BRI1-ASSOCIATED KINASE 1 (BAK1). BAK1 is thus expected to interact with unknown PRRs. Here, we used BAK1 as molecular bait to identify a previously unknown LRR-RLP required for the recognition of the csp22 peptide derived from bacterial cold shock protein. We established a method to identify proteins that interact with BAK1 only after csp22 treatment. BAK1 was expressed transiently in Nicotiana benthamiana and immunopurified after treatment with csp22. BAK1-associated proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. We identified several proteins including known BAK1 interactors and a previously uncharacterized LRR-RLP that we termed RECEPTOR-LIKE PROTEIN REQUIRED FOR CSP22 RESPONSIVENESS (NbCSPR). This RLP associates with BAK1 upon csp22 treatment, and NbCSPR-silenced plants are impaired in csp22-induced defense responses. NbCSPR confers resistance to bacteria in an age-dependent and flagellin-induced manner. As such, it limits bacterial growth and Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of flowering N. benthamiana plants. Transgenic expression of NbCSPR into Arabidopsis thaliana conferred responsiveness to csp22 and antibacterial resistance. Our method may be used to identify LRR-type RKs and RLPs required for PAMP perception/responsiveness, even when the active purified PAMP has not been defined.

  7. NbCSPR underlies age-dependent immune responses to bacterial cold shock protein in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Saur, Isabel M. L.; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Sklenar, Jan; Holton, Nicholas J.; Smakowska, Elwira; Belkhadir, Youssef; Zipfel, Cyril; Rathjen, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Plants use receptor kinases (RKs) and receptor-like proteins (RLPs) as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to sense pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that are typical of whole classes of microbes. After ligand perception, many leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing PRRs interact with the LRR-RK BRI1-ASSOCIATED KINASE 1 (BAK1). BAK1 is thus expected to interact with unknown PRRs. Here, we used BAK1 as molecular bait to identify a previously unknown LRR-RLP required for the recognition of the csp22 peptide derived from bacterial cold shock protein. We established a method to identify proteins that interact with BAK1 only after csp22 treatment. BAK1 was expressed transiently in Nicotiana benthamiana and immunopurified after treatment with csp22. BAK1-associated proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. We identified several proteins including known BAK1 interactors and a previously uncharacterized LRR-RLP that we termed RECEPTOR-LIKE PROTEIN REQUIRED FOR CSP22 RESPONSIVENESS (NbCSPR). This RLP associates with BAK1 upon csp22 treatment, and NbCSPR-silenced plants are impaired in csp22-induced defense responses. NbCSPR confers resistance to bacteria in an age-dependent and flagellin-induced manner. As such, it limits bacterial growth and Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of flowering N. benthamiana plants. Transgenic expression of NbCSPR into Arabidopsis thaliana conferred responsiveness to csp22 and antibacterial resistance. Our method may be used to identify LRR-type RKs and RLPs required for PAMP perception/responsiveness, even when the active purified PAMP has not been defined. PMID:26944079

  8. Cold Shock Proteins Are Expressed in the Retina Following Exposure to Low Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Contartese, Daniela S.; Rolón, Federico; Sarotto, Anibal; Dorfman, Veronica B.; Loidl, Cesar F.; Martínez, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia has been proposed as a therapeutic intervention for some retinal conditions, including ischemic insults. Cold exposure elevates expression of cold-shock proteins (CSP), including RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) and cold inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP), but their presence in mammalian retina is so far unknown. Here we show the effects of hypothermia on the expression of these CSPs in retina-derived cell lines and in the retina of newborn and adult rats. Two cell lines of retinal origin, R28 and mRPE, were exposed to 32°C for different time periods and CSP expression was measured by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Neonatal and adult Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a cold environment (8°C) and expression of CSPs in their retinas was studied by Western blotting, multiple inmunofluorescence, and confocal microscopy. RBM3 expression was upregulated by cold in both R28 and mRPE cells in a time-dependent fashion. On the other hand, CIRP was upregulated in R28 cells but not in mRPE. In vivo, expression of CSPs was negligible in the retina of newborn and adult rats kept at room temperature (24°C). Exposure to a cold environment elicited a strong expression of both proteins, especially in retinal pigment epithelium cells, photoreceptors, bipolar, amacrine and horizontal cells, Müller cells, and ganglion cells. In conclusion, CSP expression rapidly rises in the mammalian retina following exposure to hypothermia in a cell type-specific pattern. This observation may be at the basis of the molecular mechanism by which hypothermia exerts its therapeutic effects in the retina. PMID:27556928

  9. Cold Shock Proteins Are Expressed in the Retina Following Exposure to Low Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Larrayoz, Ignacio M; Rey-Funes, Manuel; Contartese, Daniela S; Rolón, Federico; Sarotto, Anibal; Dorfman, Veronica B; Loidl, Cesar F; Martínez, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia has been proposed as a therapeutic intervention for some retinal conditions, including ischemic insults. Cold exposure elevates expression of cold-shock proteins (CSP), including RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) and cold inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP), but their presence in mammalian retina is so far unknown. Here we show the effects of hypothermia on the expression of these CSPs in retina-derived cell lines and in the retina of newborn and adult rats. Two cell lines of retinal origin, R28 and mRPE, were exposed to 32°C for different time periods and CSP expression was measured by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Neonatal and adult Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a cold environment (8°C) and expression of CSPs in their retinas was studied by Western blotting, multiple inmunofluorescence, and confocal microscopy. RBM3 expression was upregulated by cold in both R28 and mRPE cells in a time-dependent fashion. On the other hand, CIRP was upregulated in R28 cells but not in mRPE. In vivo, expression of CSPs was negligible in the retina of newborn and adult rats kept at room temperature (24°C). Exposure to a cold environment elicited a strong expression of both proteins, especially in retinal pigment epithelium cells, photoreceptors, bipolar, amacrine and horizontal cells, Müller cells, and ganglion cells. In conclusion, CSP expression rapidly rises in the mammalian retina following exposure to hypothermia in a cell type-specific pattern. This observation may be at the basis of the molecular mechanism by which hypothermia exerts its therapeutic effects in the retina.

  10. Arabidopsis HEAT SHOCK TRANSCRIPTION FACTORA1b overexpression enhances water productivity, resistance to drought, and infection

    PubMed Central

    Richard, François; Bowden, Laura; Morison, James I.L.; Mullineaux, Philip M.

    2013-01-01

    Heat-stressed crops suffer dehydration, depressed growth, and a consequent decline in water productivity, which is the yield of harvestable product as a function of lifetime water consumption and is a trait associated with plant growth and development. Heat shock transcription factor (HSF) genes have been implicated not only in thermotolerance but also in plant growth and development, and therefore could influence water productivity. Here it is demonstrated that Arabidopsis thaliana plants with increased HSFA1b expression showed increased water productivity and harvest index under water-replete and water-limiting conditions. In non-stressed HSFA1b-overexpressing (HSFA1bOx) plants, 509 genes showed altered expression, and these genes were not over-represented for development-associated genes but were for response to biotic stress. This confirmed an additional role for HSFA1b in maintaining basal disease resistance, which was stress hormone independent but involved H2O2 signalling. Fifty-five of the 509 genes harbour a variant of the heat shock element (HSE) in their promoters, here named HSE1b. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR confirmed binding of HSFA1b to HSE1b in vivo, including in seven transcription factor genes. One of these is MULTIPROTEIN BRIDGING FACTOR1c (MBF1c). Plants overexpressing MBF1c showed enhanced basal resistance but not water productivity, thus partially phenocopying HSFA1bOx plants. A comparison of genes responsive to HSFA1b and MBF1c overexpression revealed a common group, none of which harbours a HSE1b motif. From this example, it is suggested that HSFA1b directly regulates 55 HSE1b-containing genes, which control the remaining 454 genes, collectively accounting for the stress defence and developmental phenotypes of HSFA1bOx. PMID:23828547

  11. The Heat-Shock Element Is a Functional Component of the Arabidopsis APX1 Gene Promoter1

    PubMed Central

    Storozhenko, Sergei; De Pauw, Pascal; Van Montagu, Marc; Inzé, Dirk; Kushnir, Sergei

    1998-01-01

    Ascorbate peroxidases are important enzymes that detoxify hydrogen peroxide within the cytosol and chloroplasts of plant cells. To better understand their role in oxidative stress tolerance, the transcriptional regulation of the apx1 gene from Arabidopsis was studied. The apx1 gene was expressed in all tested organs of Arabidopsis; mRNA levels were low in roots, leaves, and stems and high in flowers. Steady-state mRNA levels in leaves or cell suspensions increased after treatment with methyl viologen, ethephon, high temperature, and illumination of etiolated seedlings. A putative heat-shock cis element found in the apx1 promoter was shown to be recognized by the tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) heat-shock factor in vitro and to be responsible for the in vivo heat-shock induction of the gene. The heat-shock cis element also contributed partially to the induction of the gene by oxidative stress. By using in vivo dimethyl sulfate footprinting, we showed that proteins interacted with a G/C-rich element found in the apx1 promoter. PMID:9808745

  12. Production of diploid male gametes in Arabidopsis by cold-induced destabilization of postmeiotic radial microtubule arrays.

    PubMed

    De Storme, Nico; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Geelen, Danny

    2012-12-01

    Whole-genome duplication through the formation of diploid gametes is a major route for polyploidization, speciation, and diversification in plants. The prevalence of polyploids in adverse climates led us to hypothesize that abiotic stress conditions can induce or stimulate diploid gamete production. In this study, we show that short periods of cold stress induce the production of diploid and polyploid pollen in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using a combination of cytological and genetic analyses, we demonstrate that cold stress alters the formation of radial microtubule arrays at telophase II and consequently leads to defects in postmeiotic cytokinesis and cell wall formation. As a result, cold-stressed male meiosis generates triads, dyads, and monads that contain binuclear and polynuclear microspores. Fusion of nuclei in binuclear and polynuclear microspores occurs spontaneously before pollen mitosis I and eventually leads to the formation of diploid and polyploid pollen grains. Using segregation analyses, we also found that the majority of cold-induced dyads and triads are genetically equivalent to a second division restitution and produce diploid gametes that are highly homozygous. In a broader perspective, these findings offer insights into the fundamental mechanisms that regulate male gametogenesis in plants and demonstrate that their sensitivity to environmental stress has evolutionary significance and agronomic relevance in terms of polyploidization.

  13. Components of the Arabidopsis C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element binding factor cold-response pathway are conserved in Brassica napus and other plant species.

    PubMed

    Jaglo, K R; Kleff, S; Amundsen, K L; Zhang, X; Haake, V; Zhang, J Z; Deits, T; Thomashow, M F

    2001-11-01

    Many plants increase in freezing tolerance in response to low, nonfreezing temperatures, a phenomenon known as cold acclimation. Cold acclimation in Arabidopsis involves rapid cold-induced expression of the C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element binding factor (CBF) transcriptional activators followed by expression of CBF-targeted genes that increase freezing tolerance. Here, we present evidence for a CBF cold-response pathway in Brassica napus. We show that B. napus encodes CBF-like genes and that transcripts for these genes accumulate rapidly in response to low temperature followed closely by expression of the cold-regulated Bn115 gene, an ortholog of the Arabidopsis CBF-targeted COR15a gene. Moreover, we show that constitutive overexpression of the Arabidopsis CBF genes in transgenic B. napus plants induces expression of orthologs of Arabidopsis CBF-targeted genes and increases the freezing tolerance of both nonacclimated and cold-acclimated plants. Transcripts encoding CBF-like proteins were also found to accumulate rapidly in response to low temperature in wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Norstar) and rye (Secale cereale L. cv Puma), which cold acclimate, as well as in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum var. Bonny Best, Castle Mart, Micro-Tom, and D Huang), a freezing-sensitive plant that does not cold acclimate. An alignment of the CBF proteins from Arabidopsis, B. napus, wheat, rye, and tomato revealed the presence of conserved amino acid sequences, PKK/RPAGRxKFxETRHP and DSAWR, that bracket the AP2/EREBP DNA binding domains of the proteins and distinguish them from other members of the AP2/EREBP protein family. We conclude that components of the CBF cold-response pathway are highly conserved in flowering plants and not limited to those that cold acclimate.

  14. Components of the Arabidopsis C-Repeat/Dehydration-Responsive Element Binding Factor Cold-Response Pathway Are Conserved in Brassica napus and Other Plant Species1

    PubMed Central

    Jaglo, Kirsten R.; Kleff, Susanne; Amundsen, Keenan L.; Zhang, Xin; Haake, Volker; Zhang, James Z.; Deits, Thomas; Thomashow, Michael F.

    2001-01-01

    Many plants increase in freezing tolerance in response to low, nonfreezing temperatures, a phenomenon known as cold acclimation. Cold acclimation in Arabidopsis involves rapid cold-induced expression of the C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element binding factor (CBF) transcriptional activators followed by expression of CBF-targeted genes that increase freezing tolerance. Here, we present evidence for a CBF cold-response pathway in Brassica napus. We show that B. napus encodes CBF-like genes and that transcripts for these genes accumulate rapidly in response to low temperature followed closely by expression of the cold-regulated Bn115 gene, an ortholog of the Arabidopsis CBF-targeted COR15a gene. Moreover, we show that constitutive overexpression of the Arabidopsis CBF genes in transgenic B. napus plants induces expression of orthologs of Arabidopsis CBF-targeted genes and increases the freezing tolerance of both nonacclimated and cold-acclimated plants. Transcripts encoding CBF-like proteins were also found to accumulate rapidly in response to low temperature in wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv Norstar) and rye (Secale cereale L. cv Puma), which cold acclimate, as well as in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum var. Bonny Best, Castle Mart, Micro-Tom, and D Huang), a freezing-sensitive plant that does not cold acclimate. An alignment of the CBF proteins from Arabidopsis, B. napus, wheat, rye, and tomato revealed the presence of conserved amino acid sequences, PKK/RPAGRxKFxETRHP and DSAWR, that bracket the AP2/EREBP DNA binding domains of the proteins and distinguish them from other members of the AP2/EREBP protein family. We conclude that components of the CBF cold-response pathway are highly conserved in flowering plants and not limited to those that cold acclimate. PMID:11706173

  15. Cold shock Y-box protein-1 participates in signaling circuits with auto-regulatory activities.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Sabine; Raffetseder, Ute; Djudjaj, Sonja; Schreiter, Anja; Kadereit, Bert; Michele, Melanie; Pabst, Melanie; Zhu, Cheng; Mertens, Peter R

    2012-01-01

    The cold shock protein Y-box (YB) binding-1 is an example of a highly regulated protein with pleiotropic functions. Besides activities as a transcription factor in the nucleus or regulator of translation in the cytoplasm, recent findings indicate extracellular effects and secretion via a non-classical secretion pathway. This review summarizes regulatory pathways in which YB-1 participates, all iterating auto-regulatory loops. Schematics are developed that elucidate the cold shock protein activities in (i) fine-tuning its own expression level following platelet-derived growth factor-B-, thrombin- or interferon-γ-dependent signaling, (ii) as a component of the messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complex for interleukin-2 synthesis in T-cell commitment/activation, (iii) pro-fibrogenic cell phenotypic changes mediated by transforming growth factor-β, and (iv) receptor Notch-3 cleavage and signal transduction. Emphasis is put forward on subcellular protein translocation mechanisms and underlying signaling pathways. These have mostly been analysed in cell culture systems and rarely in experimental models. In sum, YB-1 seems to fulfill a pacemaker role in diverse diseases, both inflammatory/pro-fibrogenic as well as tumorigenic. A clue towards potential intervention strategies may reside in the understanding of the outlined auto-regulatory loops and means to interfere with cycling pathways. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Numerical Studies of the Application of Shock Tube Technology for Cold Gas Dynamic Spray Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickel, R.; Bobzin, K.; Lugscheider, E.; Parkot, D.; Varava, W.; Olivier, H.; Luo, X.

    2007-12-01

    A new method for a combustion-free spraying is studied fundamentally by modeling and simulation in comparison with first experiments. The article focuses on the numerical simulation of the gas-particle nozzle flow, which is generated by the shock reflection at the end wall section of a shock tube. To study the physical fundamentals of this process, at present only a single shot operation is considered. The particles are injected downstream of the nozzle throat into a supersonic nozzle flow. The measurements of the particle velocity made by a laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) set up show that the maximum velocity amounts to 1220 m/s for stainless steel particles of 15 μm diameter. The CFD-Code (Fluent) is first verified by a comparison with available numerical and experimental data for gas and gas-particle flow fields in a long Laval-nozzle. The good agreement implied the great potential of the new dynamic process concept for cold-gas coating applications. Then the flow fields in the short Laval nozzle designed and realized by the Shock Wave Laboratory (SWL) are investigated. The gas flow for experimentally obtained stagnation conditions is simulated. The gas-particle flow without and with the influence of the particles on the gas flow is calculated by the Surface Engineering Institute (IOT) and compared with experiments. The influence of the injection parameters on the particle velocities is investigated, as well.

  17. RNA-Seq-Based Analysis of the Physiologic Cold Shock-Induced Changes in Moraxella catarrhalis Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Spaniol, Violeta; Wyder, Stefan; Aebi, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Background Moraxella catarrhalis, a major nasopharyngeal pathogen of the human respiratory tract, is exposed to rapid downshifts of environmental temperature when humans breathe cold air. The prevalence of pharyngeal colonization and respiratory tract infections caused by M. catarrhalis is greatest in winter. We investigated how M. catarrhalis uses the physiologic exposure to cold air to regulate pivotal survival systems that may contribute to M. catarrhalis virulence. Results In this study we used the RNA-seq techniques to quantitatively catalogue the transcriptome of M. catarrhalis exposed to a 26°C cold shock or to continuous growth at 37°C. Validation of RNA-seq data using quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated the RNA-seq results to be highly reliable. We observed that a 26°C cold shock induces the expression of genes that in other bacteria have been related to virulence a strong induction was observed for genes involved in high affinity phosphate transport and iron acquisition, indicating that M. catarrhalis makes a better use of both phosphate and iron resources after exposure to cold shock. We detected the induction of genes involved in nitrogen metabolism, as well as several outer membrane proteins, including ompA, m35-like porin and multidrug efflux pump (acrAB) indicating that M. catarrhalis remodels its membrane components in response to downshift of temperature. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a 26°C cold shock enhances the induction of genes encoding the type IV pili that are essential for natural transformation, and increases the genetic competence of M. catarrhalis, which may facilitate the rapid spread and acquisition of novel virulence-associated genes. Conclusion Cold shock at a physiologically relevant temperature of 26°C induces in M. catarrhalis a complex of adaptive mechanisms that could convey novel pathogenic functions and may contribute to enhanced colonization and virulence. PMID:23844181

  18. Heat shock protein Hsp90-2 expression in the Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings under clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozeko, Liudmyla

    Heat shock proteins 90 kDa (Hsp90) are abundant under normal conditions and induced by stress. This family is distinguished from other chaperones in that most of its substrates are signal transduction proteins. Previously, we determined some time-dependent increase in the Hsp90 level in pea seedlings in response to simulated microgravity that indicated a stress-reaction. However, expression of the individual members of the Hsp90 family have specific pattern. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible alterations in the gene expression pattern of cytosolic Hsp90-2 in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings under 2D-clinorotation. To obtain detailed expression pattern of the HSP90-2 genes we used seeds that provides a resource of loss-of-function mutations gene expression patterns via translational fusions with the reporter gene, GUS (a line N 166718, NASC). There were two variants of the experiment: 1) seedlings grew under clinorotation for 10, 12, 14 d; 2) seedlings grew in the stationary conditions for 10 d followed by clinorotation for 3 h -at 22o C and 16h light cycle. The seedlings grown in the stationary conditions were used as a control. GUS staining showed that HSP90-2 expression was regulated during seedling development and affected by clinorotation in the heterozygous mutant plants. In the homozygous for the mutation plants, HSP90-2 expression was stable during seedling development and not affected by clinorotation. GUS staining was observed in cotyledons, leaves and hypocotyls of the seedlings (especially intense in vascular bundles), indicating intensive cellular processes with participation of this chaperone. Possible pathways of influence of clinorotation on HSP90-2 expression are discussed.

  19. Prefoldins Negatively Regulate Cold Acclimation in Arabidopsis thaliana by Promoting Nuclear Proteasome-Mediated HY5 Degradation.

    PubMed

    Perea-Resa, Carlos; Rodríguez-Milla, Miguel A; Iniesto, Elisa; Rubio, Vicente; Salinas, Julio

    2017-06-05

    The process of cold acclimation is an important adaptive response whereby many plants from temperate regions increase their freezing tolerance after being exposed to low non-freezing temperatures. The correct development of this response relies on proper accumulation of a number of transcription factors that regulate expression patterns of cold-responsive genes. Multiple studies have revealed a variety of molecular mechanisms involved in promoting the accumulation of these transcription factors. Interestingly, however, the mechanisms implicated in controlling such accumulation to ensure their adequate levels remain largely unknown. In this work, we demonstrate that prefoldins (PFDs) control the levels of HY5, an Arabidopsis transcription factor with a key role in cold acclimation by activating anthocyanin biosynthesis, in response to low temperature. Our results show that, under cold conditions, PFDs accumulate into the nucleus through a DELLA-dependent mechanism, where they interact with HY5, triggering its ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. The degradation of HY5 would result, in turn, in anthocyanin biosynthesis attenuation, ensuring the accurate development of cold acclimation. These findings uncover an unanticipated nuclear function for PFDs in plant responses to abiotic stresses. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cold shock genes cspA and cspB from Caulobacter crescentus are posttranscriptionally regulated and important for cold adaptation.

    PubMed

    Mazzon, Ricardo R; Lang, Elza A S; Silva, Carolina A P T; Marques, Marilis V

    2012-12-01

    Cold shock proteins (CSPs) are nucleic acid binding chaperones, first described as being induced to solve the problem of mRNA stabilization after temperature downshift. Caulobacter crescentus has four CSPs: CspA and CspB, which are cold induced, and CspC and CspD, which are induced only in stationary phase. In this work we have determined that the synthesis of both CspA and CspB reaches the maximum levels early in the acclimation phase. The deletion of cspA causes a decrease in growth at low temperature, whereas the strain with a deletion of cspB has a very subtle and transient cold-related growth phenotype. The cspA cspB double mutant has a slightly more severe phenotype than that of the cspA mutant, suggesting that although CspA may be more important to cold adaptation than CspB, both proteins have a role in this process. Gene expression analyses were carried out using cspA and cspB regulatory fusions to the lacZ reporter gene and showed that both genes are regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Deletion mapping of the long 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of each gene identified a common region important for cold induction, probably via translation enhancement. In contrast to what was reported for other bacteria, these cold shock genes have no regulatory regions downstream from ATG that are important for cold induction. This work shows that the importance of CspA and CspB to C. crescentus cold adaptation, mechanisms of regulation, and pattern of expression during the acclimation phase apparently differs in many aspects from what has been described so far for other bacteria.

  1. Parameter Estimation for Gene Regulatory Networks from Microarray Data: Cold Shock Response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Dahlquist, Kam D; Fitzpatrick, Ben G; Camacho, Erika T; Entzminger, Stephanie D; Wanner, Nathan C

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the dynamics of a gene regulatory network controlling the cold shock response in budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The medium-scale network, derived from published genome-wide location data, consists of 21 transcription factors that regulate one another through 31 directed edges. The expression levels of the individual transcription factors were modeled using mass balance ordinary differential equations with a sigmoidal production function. Each equation includes a production rate, a degradation rate, weights that denote the magnitude and type of influence of the connected transcription factors (activation or repression), and a threshold of expression. The inverse problem of determining model parameters from observed data is our primary interest. We fit the differential equation model to published microarray data using a penalized nonlinear least squares approach. Model predictions fit the experimental data well, within the 95% confidence interval. Tests of the model using randomized initial guesses and model-generated data also lend confidence to the fit. The results have revealed activation and repression relationships between the transcription factors. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the model is most sensitive to changes in the production rate parameters, weights, and thresholds of Yap1, Rox1, and Yap6, which form a densely connected core in the network. The modeling results newly suggest that Rap1, Fhl1, Msn4, Rph1, and Hsf1 play an important role in regulating the early response to cold shock in yeast. Our results demonstrate that estimation for a large number of parameters can be successfully performed for nonlinear dynamic gene regulatory networks using sparse, noisy microarray data.

  2. Purification and Characterization of a Novel Cold Shock Protein-Like Bacteriocin Synthesized by Bacillus thuringiensis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tianpei; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Pan, Jieru; Su, Xiaoyu; Jin, Xin; Guan, Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), one of the most successful biopesticides, may expand its potential by producing bacteriocins (thuricins). The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial potential of a novel Bt bacteriocin, thuricin BtCspB, produced by Bt BRC-ZYR2. The results showed that this bacteriocin has a high similarity with cold-shock protein B (CspB). BtCspB lost its activity after proteinase K treatment; however it was active at 60 °C for 30 min and was stable in the pH range 5–7. The partial loss of activity after the treatments of lipase II and catalase were likely due to the change in BtCspB structure and the partial degradation of BtCspB, respectively. The loss of activity at high temperatures and the activity variation at different pHs were not due to degradation or large conformational change. BtCspB did not inhibit four probiotics. It was only active against B. cereus strains 0938 and ATCC 10987 with MIC values of 3.125 μg/mL and 0.781 μg/mL, and MBC values of 12.5 μg/mL and 6.25 μg/mL, respectively. Taken together, these results provide new insights into a novel cold shock protein-like bacteriocin, BtCspB, which displayed promise for its use in food preservation and treatment of B. cereus-associated diseases. PMID:27762322

  3. Hsp60 expression profiles in the reef-building coral Seriatopora caliendrum subjected to heat and cold shock regimes.

    PubMed

    Seveso, Davide; Montano, Simone; Strona, Giovanni; Orlandi, Ivan; Galli, Paolo; Vai, Marina

    2016-08-01

    Climate changes have increased the intensity/frequency of extreme thermal events, which represent serious threats to the health of reef-building corals. Since the vulnerability of corals exposed to thermal stresses are related to their ability to regulate Heat shock proteins (Hsps), we have analyzed together the time related expression profiles of the mitochondrial Hsp60 and the associated changes in tissue pigmentation in Seriatopora caliendrum subjected to 48 h of heat and cold treatments characterized by moderate (±2 °C) and severe (±6 °C) shocks. For the first time, an Hsp60 response was observed in a scleractinian coral exposed to cold stresses. Furthermore, the Hsp60 modulations and the changes in the tissue coloration were found to be specific for each treatment. A strong down-regulation at the end of the treatments was observed following both the severe shocks, but only the severe heat stress led to bleaching in concert with the lowest levels of Hsp60, suggesting that a severe heat shock can be more deleterious than an exposure to a severe cold temperature. On the contrary, a moderate cold stress seems to be more harmful than a moderate temperature increase, which could allow coral acclimation. Our results can provide a potential framework for understanding the physiological tolerance of corals under possible future climate changes.

  4. Role of the ribosome-associated protein PY in the cold-shock response of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Fabio; Brandi, Anna; Dzeladini, Nadire; Fabbretti, Attilio; Carzaniga, Thomas; Piersimoni, Lolita; Pon, Cynthia L; Giuliodori, Anna Maria

    2013-04-01

    Protein Y (PY) is an Escherichia coli cold-shock protein which has been proposed to be responsible for the repression of bulk protein synthesis during cold adaptation. Here, we present in vivo and in vitro data which clarify the role of PY and its mechanism of action. Deletion of yfiA, the gene encoding protein PY, demonstrates that this protein is dispensable for cold adaptation and is not responsible for the shutdown of bulk protein synthesis at the onset of the stress, although it is able to partially inhibit translation. In vitro assays reveal that the extent of PY inhibition changes with different mRNAs and that this inhibition is related to the capacity of PY of binding 30S subunits with a fairly strong association constant, thus stimulating the formation of 70S monomers. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that PY competes with the other ribosomal ligands for the binding to the 30S subunits. Overall these results suggest an alternative model to explain PY function during cold shock and to reconcile the inhibition caused by PY with the active translation observed for some mRNAs during cold shock. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Role of the ribosome-associated protein PY in the cold-shock response of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Di Pietro, Fabio; Brandi, Anna; Dzeladini, Nadire; Fabbretti, Attilio; Carzaniga, Thomas; Piersimoni, Lolita; Pon, Cynthia L; Giuliodori, Anna Maria

    2013-01-01

    Protein Y (PY) is an Escherichia coli cold-shock protein which has been proposed to be responsible for the repression of bulk protein synthesis during cold adaptation. Here, we present in vivo and in vitro data which clarify the role of PY and its mechanism of action. Deletion of yfiA, the gene encoding protein PY, demonstrates that this protein is dispensable for cold adaptation and is not responsible for the shutdown of bulk protein synthesis at the onset of the stress, although it is able to partially inhibit translation. In vitro assays reveal that the extent of PY inhibition changes with different mRNAs and that this inhibition is related to the capacity of PY of binding 30S subunits with a fairly strong association constant, thus stimulating the formation of 70S monomers. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that PY competes with the other ribosomal ligands for the binding to the 30S subunits. Overall these results suggest an alternative model to explain PY function during cold shock and to reconcile the inhibition caused by PY with the active translation observed for some mRNAs during cold shock. PMID:23420694

  6. The Arabidopsis 14-3-3 Protein RARE COLD INDUCIBLE 1A Links Low-Temperature Response and Ethylene Biosynthesis to Regulate Freezing Tolerance and Cold Acclimation[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Catalá, Rafael; López-Cobollo, Rosa; Mar Castellano, M.; Angosto, Trinidad; Alonso, José M.; Ecker, Joseph R.; Salinas, Julio

    2014-01-01

    In plants, the expression of 14-3-3 genes reacts to various adverse environmental conditions, including cold, high salt, and drought. Although these results suggest that 14-3-3 proteins have the potential to regulate plant responses to abiotic stresses, their role in such responses remains poorly understood. Previously, we showed that the RARE COLD INDUCIBLE 1A (RCI1A) gene encodes the 14-3-3 psi isoform. Here, we present genetic and molecular evidence implicating RCI1A in the response to low temperature. Our results demonstrate that RCI1A functions as a negative regulator of constitutive freezing tolerance and cold acclimation in Arabidopsis thaliana by controlling cold-induced gene expression. Interestingly, this control is partially performed through an ethylene (ET)-dependent pathway involving physical interaction with different ACC SYNTHASE (ACS) isoforms and a decreased ACS stability. We show that, consequently, RCI1A restrains ET biosynthesis, contributing to establish adequate levels of this hormone in Arabidopsis under both standard and low-temperature conditions. We further show that these levels are required to promote proper cold-induced gene expression and freezing tolerance before and after cold acclimation. All these data indicate that RCI1A connects the low-temperature response with ET biosynthesis to modulate constitutive freezing tolerance and cold acclimation in Arabidopsis. PMID:25122152

  7. Transcript and hormone analyses reveal the involvement of ABA-signalling, hormone crosstalk and genotype-specific biological processes in cold-shock response in wheat.

    PubMed

    Kalapos, Balázs; Dobrev, Petre; Nagy, Tibor; Vítámvás, Pavel; Györgyey, János; Kocsy, Gábor; Marincs, Ferenc; Galiba, Gábor

    2016-12-01

    The effect of one-day cold-shock on the transcriptome and phytohormones (auxin, cytokinins, abscisic, jasmonic and salicylic acids) was characterised in freezing-sensitive (Chinese Spring), highly freezing-tolerant (Cheyenne) and moderately freezing-tolerant (Chinese Spring substituted with Cheyenne's 5A chromosome) wheat genotypes. Altogether, 636 differentially expressed genes responding to cold-shock were identified. Defence genes encoding LEA proteins, dehydrins, chaperons and other temperature-stress responsive proteins were up-regulated in a genotype-independent manner. Abscisic acid was up-regulated by cold accompanied by adherent expression of its metabolic genes. Data revealed the involvement of particular routes within ABA-dependent signalling in response to cold-shock in the examined genotypes. Cold-shock affected gene expression along carbohydrate metabolic pathways. In photosynthesis, cold-shock changed the expression of a number of genes in the same way as it was previously reported for ABA. Overrepresentation analysis of the differentially expressed genes supported the ABA-signalling and carbohydrate metabolism results, and revealed some pronounced biological process GO categories associated with the cold-shock response of the genotypes. Protein network analysis indicated differences between the genotypes in the information flow along their signal perception and transduction, suggesting different biochemical and cellular strategies in their reaction to cold-shock.

  8. Comparative Cold Shock Expression and Characterization of Fungal Dye-Decolorizing Peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Christoph J; Zelena, Kateryna; Berger, Ralf G

    2016-08-01

    Dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) from Auricularia auricula-judae, Bjerkandera adusta, Pleurotus ostreatus and Marasmius scorodonius (Basidiomycota) were expressed in Escherichia coli using the cold shock-inducible expression system pCOLD I DNA. Functional expression was achieved without the addition of hemin or the co-expression of any chaperones. The presence or absence of the native signal sequence had a strong impact on the success of the expression, but the effect was not consistent for the different DyPs. While BaDyP and AajDyP were stable at 50 °C, the more thermolabile MsP2 and PoDyp, upon catalytic intervention, lend themselves to more rapid thermal inactivation. The bleaching of norbixin (E 160b) using MsP2 was most efficient at pH 4.0, while BaDyP and AajDypP worked best in the weakly acidic to neutral range, indicating a choice of DyPs for a broad field of applications in different food matrices.

  9. Relativistic electron beam transport through cold and shock-heated carbon samples from aerogel to diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauland, C. M.; Wei, M.; Zhang, S.; Santos, J.; Nicolai, P.; Theobald, W.; Kim, J.; Forestier-Colleoni, P.; Beg, F.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the transport physics of a relativistic electron beam in various plasma regimes is crucial for many high-energy-density applications, such as fast heating for advanced ICF schemes and ion sources. Most short pulse laser-matter interaction experiments for transport studies have been performed with initially cold targets where the resistivity is far from that in warm dense plasmas. We present three experiments that have been performed on OMEGA EP in order to extend fast electron transport and energy coupling studies in pre-assembled plasmas from different carbon samples. Each experiment has used one 4 ns long pulse UV beam (1014 W/cm2) to drive a shockwave through the target and a 10 ps IR beam (1019 W/cm2) to create an electron beam moving opposite the shock propagation direction. These shots were compared with initially cold target shots without the UV beam. We fielded three different samples including 340 mg/cc CRF foam, vitreous carbon at 1.4 g/cc, and high density carbon at 3.4 g/cc. Electrons were diagnosed via x-ray fluorescence measurements from a buried Cu tracer in the target, as well as bremsstrahlung emission and escaped electrons reaching an electron spectrometer. Proton radiograph was also performed in the foam shots. Details of each experiment, available data and particle-in-cell simulations will be presented. This work is supported by US DOE NLUF Program, Grant Number DE-NA0002728.

  10. Interaction of field-aligned cold plasma flows with an equatorially-trapped hot plasma - Electrostatic shock formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra

    1993-01-01

    Effects of equatorially trapped hot plasma on the highly supersonic cold-plasma flow occurring during early stage plasmaspheric refilling are studied by means of numerical simulations. It is shown that the equatorially trapped hot ions set up a potential barrier for the cold ion beams and facilitate formation of electrostatic shocks by reflecting them from the equatorial region. Simulations with and without the hot plasma show different flow properties; the formation of electrostatic shocks occur only in the former case. The simulation with the hot plasma also reveals that the magnetic trapping in conjunction with the evolution of the electrostatic potential barrier produces ion velocity distribution functions consisting of a cold core and a hot ring in the perpendicular velocity. Such a distribution function provides a source of free energy for equatorial waves. The corresponding electron population is warm and field-aligned.

  11. Interaction of field-aligned cold plasma flows with an equatorially-trapped hot plasma - Electrostatic shock formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra

    1993-01-01

    Effects of equatorially trapped hot plasma on the highly supersonic cold-plasma flow occurring during early stage plasmaspheric refilling are studied by means of numerical simulations. It is shown that the equatorially trapped hot ions set up a potential barrier for the cold ion beams and facilitate formation of electrostatic shocks by reflecting them from the equatorial region. Simulations with and without the hot plasma show different flow properties; the formation of electrostatic shocks occur only in the former case. The simulation with the hot plasma also reveals that the magnetic trapping in conjunction with the evolution of the electrostatic potential barrier produces ion velocity distribution functions consisting of a cold core and a hot ring in the perpendicular velocity. Such a distribution function provides a source of free energy for equatorial waves. The corresponding electron population is warm and field-aligned.

  12. Bovine oocytes show a higher tolerance to heat shock in the warm compared with the cold season of the year.

    PubMed

    Maya-Soriano, M J; López-Gatius, F; Andreu-Vázquez, C; López-Béjar, M

    2013-01-15

    Heat stress is especially harmful for bovine ovarian follicle development and oocyte competence. In this study, we assessed the effects of heat shock on oocyte maturation in oocytes collected during the cold (February-March; n = 114) or warm (May-June; n = 116) periods of the year. In both cases, cumulus-oocyte complexes were matured under control (38 °C) and heat shock conditions (41.5 °C, 18-21 h of maturation). For each oocyte, nuclear stage, cortical granule distribution and steroidogenic activity of cumulus cells were evaluated. Based on the odds ratio, heat-shocked oocytes were 26.83 times more likely to show an anomalous metaphase II morphology. When matured under heat shock conditions, oocytes obtained in both seasons were similarly affected in terms of nuclear maturation, whereas a seasonal effect was observed on cytoplasmic maturation. For oocytes collected during the cold season, the likelihood to show an anomalous maturation was 25.96 times higher when exposed to the heat treatment than when matured under control conditions. By contrast, oocytes collected during the warm season matured under control or heat shock did not show significant risk of showing an anomalous cytoplasmic maturation. Our findings indicate an increased rate of premature oocytes in response to heat shock as well as a higher tolerance to this stress of oocytes harvested in the warm season compared with those collected in the colder period.

  13. Habituation of the cold shock response may include a significant perceptual component.

    PubMed

    Barwood, Martin J; Corbett, Jo; Wagstaff, Christopher R D

    2014-02-01

    Accidental immersion in cold water is a risk factor for many occupations. Habituation to cold-water immersion (CWI) is one practical means of reducing the cold shock response (CSR) on immersion. We investigated whether repeated thermoneutral water immersion (TWI) induced a perceptual habituation (i.e., could lessen perceived threat and anxiety) and consequently reduce the CSR on subsequent CWI. There were 12 subjects who completed seven 7-min head-out immersions. Immersions one and seven were CWls [15.0 (0.1) degrees C], and immersions two to six were TWI [34.9 (0.10) degrees C]. Anxiety 120-cm visual analogue scale) and the cardiorespiratory responses [heart rate (f(C)), respiratory frequency (f(R)), tidal volume (V(T)), and minute ventilation (V(E))] to immersion were measured throughout. Data were compared within subject between conditions using ANOVA to an alpha level of 0.05. Acute anxiety was significantly reduced after repeated exposure to the immersion scenario (i.e., TWI): CWI-1: 6.3 (4.4) cm; and CWI-2: 4.5 (4.0) cm [condition mean (SD)]. These differences did not influence the peak in the CSR. The f(C), f(R), and V(E) responses were similar between CWI-1 and CWI-2. V(T) response was significantly lower in CWI-2; mean (SD) across the immersion: CWI-1 1.27 (0.17) vs. CWI-2 1.11 0.21 L. Repeated TWI lessened the anxiety associated with CWI (perceptual habituation). This had a negligible effect on the primary components of the CSR, but did lower VT, which may reduce the volume of any aspirated water in an emergency situation. Reducing the threat appraisal of an environmental stressor may be a useful biproduct of survival training, thereby minimizing psychophysiological strain.

  14. Hydrogen Peroxide Acts Upstream of Nitric Oxide in the Heat Shock Pathway in Arabidopsis Seedlings1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Guo, Yunjing; Jia, Lixiu; Chu, Hongye; Zhou, Shuo; Chen, Kunming; Wu, Dan; Zhao, Liqun

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that nitric oxide (NO) functions as a signal in thermotolerance. To illustrate its relationship with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the tolerance of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to heat shock (HS), we investigated the effects of heat on Arabidopsis seedlings of the following types: the wild type; three NADPH oxidase-defective mutants that exhibit reduced endogenous H2O2 levels (atrbohB, atrbohD, and atrbohB/D); and a mutant that is resistant to inhibition by fosmidomycin (noa1, for nitric oxide-associated protein1). After HS, the NO levels in atrbohB, atrbohD, and atrbohB/D seedlings were lower than that in wild-type seedlings. Treatment of the seedlings with sodium nitroprusside or S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine partially rescued their heat sensitivity, suggesting that NO is involved in H2O2 signaling as a downstream factor. This point was verified by phenotypic analyses and thermotolerance testing of transgenic seedlings that overexpressed Nitrate reductase2 and NOA1, respectively, in an atrbohB/D background. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays, western blotting, and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that NO stimulated the DNA-binding activity of HS factors and the accumulation of HS proteins through H2O2. These data indicate that H2O2 acts upstream of NO in thermotolerance, which requires increased HS factor DNA-binding activity and HS protein accumulation. PMID:24510762

  15. Anti-oxidative responses of zebrafish (Danio rerio) gill, liver and brain tissues upon acute cold shock.

    PubMed

    Wu, Su Mei; Liu, Jia-Hao; Shu, Li-Hsin; Chen, Ching Hsein

    2015-09-01

    The present study seeks to detect oxidative damage and to compare anti-oxidative responses among liver, gills and brain of adult zebrafish that were cooled from 28 °C (control) to 12 °C (treatment) for 0-24 h. The lipid peroxidation of liver, gill and brain tissues significantly increased at 1h after transfer, but reactive oxygen species in the treatment group increased significantly after 24 h as compared to the control. The fish were found to develop a cascading anti-oxidative mechanism beginning with an increase in Cu/Zn-SOD levels, followed by increased CAT and GPx mRNA expressions in the three tissue types. Both smtB and mt2 mRNAs increased in the hepatic and brain tissues following 1h of cold stress, but only smtB exhibited a significant increase in the gills at 1 h and 6 h after transfer to 12 °C. Furthermore, cellular apoptosis in the brain was not evident after cold shock, but liver and gills showed cellular apoptosis at 1-3 h, with another peak in the liver at 6 h after cold shock. The results suggest that the cold shock induced oxidative stress, and the enzymatic (SOD, GPx and CAT) and non-enzymatic (mt-2 and smt-B) mRNA expressions all play a role in the resulting anti-oxidation within 1-6 h of cold shock. A functional comparison showed that the brain had the most powerful antioxidant defense system of the three tissue types since it had the highest smtB mRNA expression and a lower level of cell apoptosis than the liver and gills after exposure to cold stress.

  16. Comparative physiology and transcriptional networks underlying the heat shock response in Populus trichocarpa, Arabidopsis thaliana and Glycine max

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, David; Wullschleger, Stan D; Yang, Xiaohan; Karve, Abhijit A; Gunter, Lee E; Jawdy, Sara; Allen, Sara M

    2011-01-01

    The heat shock response continues to be layered with additional complexity as interactions and crosstalk among heat shock proteins (HSPs), the reactive oxygen network and hormonal signalling are discovered. However, comparative analyses exploring variation in each of these processes among species remain relatively unexplored. In controlled environment experiments, photosynthetic response curves were conducted from 22 to 42 C and indicated that temperature optimum of light-saturated photosynthesis was greater for Glycine max relative to Arabidopsis thaliana or Populus trichocarpa. Transcript profiles were taken at defined states along the temperature response curves, and inferred pathway analysis revealed species-specific variation in the abiotic stress and the minor carbohydrate raffinose/galactinol pathways. A weighted gene co-expression network approach was used to group individual genes into network modules linking biochemical measures of the antioxidant system to leaf-level photosynthesis among P. trichocarpa, G. max and A. thaliana. Network-enabled results revealed an expansion in the G. max HSP17 protein family and divergence in the regulation of the antioxidant and heat shock modules relative to P. trichocarpa and A. thaliana. These results indicate that although the heat shock response is highly conserved, there is considerable species-specific variation in its regulation.

  17. Comparative physiology and transcriptional networks underlying the heat shock response in Populus trichocarpa, Arabidopsis thaliana and Glycine max.

    PubMed

    Weston, David J; Karve, Abhijit A; Gunter, Lee E; Jawdy, Sara S; Yang, Xiaohan; Allen, Sara M; Wullschleger, Stan D

    2011-09-01

    The heat shock response continues to be layered with additional complexity as interactions and crosstalk among heat shock proteins (HSPs), the reactive oxygen network and hormonal signalling are discovered. However, comparative analyses exploring variation in each of these processes among species remain relatively unexplored. In controlled environment experiments, photosynthetic response curves were conducted from 22 to 42 °C and indicated that temperature optimum of light-saturated photosynthesis was greater for Glycine max relative to Arabidopsis thaliana or Populus trichocarpa. Transcript profiles were taken at defined states along the temperature response curves, and inferred pathway analysis revealed species-specific variation in the abiotic stress and the minor carbohydrate raffinose/galactinol pathways. A weighted gene co-expression network approach was used to group individual genes into network modules linking biochemical measures of the antioxidant system to leaf-level photosynthesis among P. trichocarpa, G. max and A. thaliana. Network-enabled results revealed an expansion in the G. max HSP17 protein family and divergence in the regulation of the antioxidant and heat shock modules relative to P. trichocarpa and A. thaliana. These results indicate that although the heat shock response is highly conserved, there is considerable species-specific variation in its regulation.

  18. Divergent Regulation of CBF Regulon on Cold Tolerance and Plant Phenotype in Cassava Overexpressing Arabidopsis CBF3 Gene

    PubMed Central

    An, Dong; Ma, Qiuxiang; Yan, Wei; Zhou, Wenzhi; Liu, Guanghua; Zhang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Cassava is a tropical origin plant that is sensitive to chilling stress. In order to understand the CBF cold response pathway, a well-recognized regulatory mechanism in temperate plants, in cassava, overexpression of an Arabidopsis CBF3 gene is studied. This gene renders cassava increasingly tolerant to cold and drought stresses but is associated with retarded plant growth, leaf curling, reduced storage root yield, and reduced anthocyanin accumulation in a transcript abundance-dependent manner. Physiological analysis revealed that the transgenic cassava increased proline accumulation, reduced malondialdehyde production, and electrolyte leakage under cold stress. These transgenic lines also showed high relative water content when faced with drought. The expression of partial CBF-targeted genes in response to cold displayed temporal and spatial variations in the wild-type and transgenic plants: highly inducible in leaves and less altered in apical buds. In addition, anthocyanin accumulation was inhibited by downregulating the expression of genes involved in its biosynthesis and by interplaying between the CBF3 and the endogenous transcription factors. Thus, the heterologous CBF3 modulates the expression of stress-related genes and carries out a series of physiological adjustments under stressful conditions, showing a varied regulation pattern of CBF regulon from that of cassava CBFs. PMID:27999588

  19. Characteristic Scale and Bimodality in Galaxies: Cold Streams, Shock Heating, Feedback and Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekel, Avishai; Birnboim, Yuval

    2004-12-01

    We address the origin of the robustly observed bi-modality in galaxy properties at a characteristic stellar mass of ~ 3 × 10 10Msolar. As seen in large surveys at low redshift and indicated at z ~ 1, less massive galaxies tend to be star-forming blue (some very blue) discs in the ``field'', correlated along a ``fundamental line'' of L/M, surface brightness, internal velocity and metallicity rising with mass. More massive galaxies are mostly spheroids of red (some very red) old stars in groups or clusters, with surface brightness and metallicity ~constant and halo M/L rising with mass. The spheroids tend to host AGNs. We propose that the bi-modality is the combined effect of the thermal history of the infalling gas and several feedback processes, aided by the gravitational growth of fluctuations into groups of galaxies. In haloes below a critical mass ~ 10 12Msolar, single discs are built by cold streams, not heated by a shock in the extended dark halo, yielding efficient early star formation. It is regulated by supernova and radiative feedback into a long sequence of bursts, giving rise to the blue galaxies along the fundamental line. Further grwoth along the blue sequence into L*-size galaxies is allowed above the threshold mass by mergers and by cold streams, especially in low density environments. This phase of star formation is possibly observed as LIRGs at z <~ 1 and as luminous dusty objects at z ~ 2. Only above the critical mass is the infalling gas shock-heated to near the virial temperature. This hot, dilute gas is vulnerable to feedback from an energetic source such as an AGN, which shuts off the cold gas supply and prevents further disc growth and star formation, especially in clustered galaxies. Subsequent passive evolution, accompanied by gas-poor mergeres, lead to ``red-and-dead'' massive spheroids sharing a common halo in a group, some existing already at z ~ 1. The critical mass is predicted to slightly rise with z. When the detailed models of

  20. Effect of sequential heat and cold shocks on nuclear phenotypes of the blood-sucking insect, Panstrongylus megistus (Burmeister) (Hemiptera, Reduviidae).

    PubMed

    Garcia, Simone L; Pacheco, Raquel M; Rodrigues, Vera L C C; Mello, Maria Luiza S

    2002-12-01

    Thermal shocks induce changes in the nuclear phenotypes that correspond to survival (heterochromatin decondensation, nuclear fusion) or death (apoptosis, necrosis) responses in the Malpighian tubules of Panstrongylus megistus. Since thermal tolerance increased survival and molting rate in this species following sequential shocks, we investigated whether changes in nuclear phenotypes accompanied the insect survival response to sequential thermal shocks. Fifth instar nymphs were subjected to a single heat (35 or 40 degrees C, 1 h) or cold (5 or 0 degrees C, 1 h) shock and then subjected to a second shock for 12 h at 40 or 0 degrees C, respectively, after 8, 18, 24 and 72 h at 28 degrees C (control temperature). As with specimen survival, sequential heat and cold shocks induced changes in frequency of the mentioned nuclear phenotypes although their patterns differed. The heat shock tolerance involved decrease in apoptosis simultaneous to increase in cell survival responses. Sequential cold shocks did not involve cell/nuclear fusion and even elicited increase in necrosis with advancing time after shocks. The temperatures of 40 and 0 degrees C were more effective than the temperatures of 35 and 5 degrees C in eliciting the heat and cold shock tolerances, respectively, as shown by cytological analysis of the nuclear phenotypes. It is concluded that different sequential thermal shocks can trigger different mechanisms of cellular protection against stress in P. megistus, favoring the insect to adapt to various ecotopes.

  1. Characterization of the Staphylococcus aureus Heat Shock, Cold Shock, Stringent, and SOS Responses and Their Effects on Log-Phase mRNA Turnover†

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Kelsi L.; Roberts, Corbette; Disz, Terrence; Vonstein, Veronika; Hwang, Kaitlyn; Overbeek, Ross; Olson, Patrick D.; Projan, Steven J.; Dunman, Paul M.

    2006-01-01

    Despite its being a leading cause of nosocomal and community-acquired infections, surprisingly little is known about Staphylococcus aureus stress responses. In the current study, Affymetrix S. aureus GeneChips were used to define transcriptome changes in response to cold shock, heat shock, stringent, and SOS response-inducing conditions. Additionally, the RNA turnover properties of each response were measured. Each stress response induced distinct biological processes, subsets of virulence factors, and antibiotic determinants. The results were validated by real-time PCR and stress-mediated changes in antimicrobial agent susceptibility. Collectively, many S. aureus stress-responsive functions are conserved across bacteria, whereas others are unique to the organism. Sets of small stable RNA molecules with no open reading frames were also components of each response. Induction of the stringent, cold shock, and heat shock responses dramatically stabilized most mRNA species. Correlations between mRNA turnover properties and transcript titers suggest that S. aureus stress response-dependent alterations in transcript abundances can, in part, be attributed to alterations in RNA stability. This phenomenon was not observed within SOS-responsive cells. PMID:16980476

  2. Arabidopsis actin capping protein (AtCP) subunits have different expression patterns, and downregulation of AtCPB confers increased thermotolerance of Arabidopsis after heat shock stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jue; Qian, Dong; Fan, Tingting; Jia, Honglei; An, Lizhe; Xiang, Yun

    2012-09-01

    As a heterodimer actin-binding protein, capping protein is composed of α and β subunits, and can stabilize the actin filament cytoskeleton by binding to F-actin ends to inhibit G-actin addition or loss from that end. Until now, studies on plant capping protein have focused on biochemical functions in vitro, and so the expression patterns and physiological functions of actin capping protein in Arabidopsis (AtCP) are poorly understood. In the present study, real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis showed that although AtCP α and β subunits (i.e. AtCPA and AtCPB) were expressed in various tissues, their expression patterns were significantly different. GUS staining further indicated they were present in different parts of the same organs. We also demonstrated that the expression levels of both subunits were induced by heat shock stress. However, only the atcpβ-mutant showed enhanced thermotolerance, and confocal microscopy showed that the actin filaments of the atcpβ-mutant were much more complete than that in the wild-type and the atcpα-mutant after heat treatment at 45 °C for 40 and 45 min. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that AtCPA and AtCPB showed distinct expression patterns in vivo, and that downregulation of AtCPB conferred increased plant thermotolerance after heat shock stress.

  3. Cold shock induces the insertion of a cryptic exon in the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) mRNA.

    PubMed

    Ars, E; Serra, E; de la Luna, S; Estivill, X; Lázaro, C

    2000-03-15

    Alternative splicing is a regulatory process of gene expression based on the flexibility in the selection of splice sites. In this manuscript we present the characterisation of an alternative splicing of the NF1 pre-mRNA induced by cold-shock conditions. We demonstrate that the accuracy of the splicing mechanism was perturbed after keeping samples for a short period of time at room temperature, resulting in the insertion of a 31-bp cryptic exon between exons 4a and 4b of the NF1 mRNA. This alternative splicing is not cell type specific and is not induced by other stress conditions such as heat shock or hyper-osmolarity. The alternative spliced mRNA is efficiently transported to the cytoplasm and it is proven to belong to the poly A(+)mRNA fraction. Previous misleading interpretations about this transcript, together with our finding relating its presence to cold shock and not to the NF1 disease, strongly indicate that this phenomenon should be taken into account in genetic testing when RNA methodology is used for mutation detection. This is the first description of an alternative splicing induced by cold shock in a human pre-mRNA and should provide further insights into the factors that control alternative splicing.

  4. Responses of antioxidant enzymes to cold and high light are not correlated to freezing tolerance in natural accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Distelbarth, H; Nägele, T; Heyer, A G

    2013-11-01

    Low temperatures and high light cause imbalances in primary and secondary reactions of photosynthesis, and thus can result in oxidative stress. Plants employ a range of low-molecular weight antioxidants and antioxidant enzymes to prevent oxidative damage, and antioxidant defence is considered an important component of stress tolerance. To figure out whether oxidative stress and antioxidant defence are key factors defining the different cold acclimation capacities of natural accessions of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, we investigated hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) production, antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation during a time course of cold treatment and exposure to high light in four differentially cold-tolerant natural accessions of Arabidopsis (C24, Nd, Rsch, Te) that span the European distribution range of the species. All accessions except Rsch (from Russia) had elevated H2 O2 in the cold, indicating that production of reactive oxygen species is part of the cold response in Arabidopsis. Glutathione reductase activity increased in all but Rsch, while ascorbate peroxidase and superoxide dismutase were unchanged and catalase decreased in all but Rsch. Under high light, the Scandinavian accession Te had elevated levels of H2 O2 . Te appeared most sensitive to oxidative stress, having higher malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in the cold and under high light, while only high light caused elevated MDA in the other accessions. Although the most freezing-tolerant, Te had the highest sensitivity to oxidative stress. No correlation was found between freezing tolerance and activity of antioxidant enzymes in the four accessions investigated, arguing against a key role for antioxidant defence in the differential cold acclimation capacities of Arabidopsis accessions. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  5. The Role of Inducible Hsp70, and Other Heat Shock Proteins, in Adaptive Complex of Cold Tolerance of the Fruit Fly (Drosophila melanogaster)

    PubMed Central

    Štětina, Tomáš; Koštál, Vladimír; Korbelová, Jaroslava

    2015-01-01

    Background The ubiquitous occurrence of inducible Heat Shock Proteins (Hsps) up-regulation in response to cold-acclimation and/or to cold shock, including massive increase of Hsp70 mRNA levels, often led to hasty interpretations of its role in the repair of cold injury expressed as protein denaturation or misfolding. So far, direct functional analyses in Drosophila melanogaster and other insects brought either limited or no support for such interpretations. In this paper, we analyze the cold tolerance and the expression levels of 24 different mRNA transcripts of the Hsps complex and related genes in response to cold in two strains of D. melanogaster: the wild-type and the Hsp70- null mutant lacking all six copies of Hsp70 gene. Principal Findings We found that larvae of both strains show similar patterns of Hsps complex gene expression in response to long-term cold-acclimation and during recovery from chronic cold exposures or acute cold shocks. No transcriptional compensation for missing Hsp70 gene was seen in Hsp70- strain. The cold-induced Hsps gene expression is most probably regulated by alternative splice variants C and D of the Heat Shock Factor. The cold tolerance in Hsp70- null mutants was clearly impaired only when the larvae were exposed to severe acute cold shock. No differences in mortality were found between two strains when the larvae were exposed to relatively mild doses of cold, either chronic exposures to 0°C or acute cold shocks at temperatures down to -4°C. Conclusions The up-regulated expression of a complex of inducible Hsps genes, and Hsp70 mRNA in particular, is tightly associated with cold-acclimation and cold exposure in D. melanogaster. Genetic elimination of Hsp70 up-regulation response has no effect on survival of chronic exposures to 0°C or mild acute cold shocks, while it negatively affects survival after severe acute cold shocks at temperaures below -8°C. PMID:26034990

  6. The Role of Inducible Hsp70, and Other Heat Shock Proteins, in Adaptive Complex of Cold Tolerance of the Fruit Fly (Drosophila melanogaster).

    PubMed

    Štětina, Tomáš; Koštál, Vladimír; Korbelová, Jaroslava

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitous occurrence of inducible Heat Shock Proteins (Hsps) up-regulation in response to cold-acclimation and/or to cold shock, including massive increase of Hsp70 mRNA levels, often led to hasty interpretations of its role in the repair of cold injury expressed as protein denaturation or misfolding. So far, direct functional analyses in Drosophila melanogaster and other insects brought either limited or no support for such interpretations. In this paper, we analyze the cold tolerance and the expression levels of 24 different mRNA transcripts of the Hsps complex and related genes in response to cold in two strains of D. melanogaster: the wild-type and the Hsp70- null mutant lacking all six copies of Hsp70 gene. We found that larvae of both strains show similar patterns of Hsps complex gene expression in response to long-term cold-acclimation and during recovery from chronic cold exposures or acute cold shocks. No transcriptional compensation for missing Hsp70 gene was seen in Hsp70- strain. The cold-induced Hsps gene expression is most probably regulated by alternative splice variants C and D of the Heat Shock Factor. The cold tolerance in Hsp70- null mutants was clearly impaired only when the larvae were exposed to severe acute cold shock. No differences in mortality were found between two strains when the larvae were exposed to relatively mild doses of cold, either chronic exposures to 0°C or acute cold shocks at temperatures down to -4°C. The up-regulated expression of a complex of inducible Hsps genes, and Hsp70 mRNA in particular, is tightly associated with cold-acclimation and cold exposure in D. melanogaster. Genetic elimination of Hsp70 up-regulation response has no effect on survival of chronic exposures to 0°C or mild acute cold shocks, while it negatively affects survival after severe acute cold shocks at temperatures below -8°C.

  7. Acute anxiety increases the magnitude of the cold shock response before and after habituation.

    PubMed

    Barwood, Martin James; Corbett, Jo; Green, Richard; Smith, Tim; Tomlin, Perry; Weir-Blankenstein, Lydia; Tipton, Michael J

    2013-03-01

    Cold immersion evokes the life-threatening cold shock response (CSR). We hypothesised that anxiety may increase the magnitude of (Study 1), and diminish habituation to (Study 2), the CSR. Study 1: eleven participants completed two 7-min immersions in cold water (15 °C). On one occasion, to induce anxiety, participants were instructed that the water would be 5 °C colder (ANX); it was unchanged. The other immersion was a control (CON). Study 2: ten different participants completed seven, 7-min immersions. Immersions 1-5 induced habituation. Immersions 6 and 7 were counter-balanced to produce anxiety (ANX) or acted as a control (CON). Anxiety (20 cm scale) and cardiorespiratory responses (cardiac frequency [f(c)]), respiratory frequency [f(R)], tidal volume [V(T)], minute ventilation [V(E)]) were measured in both studies. Results of study 1: participants were more anxious in the ANX immersion (mean [SD]; CON 5.3 [3.6] and ANX 8.4 [5.0] cm). f(c) peaked at higher levels in ANX (136.4 [15.0]; CON: 124.0 [17.6] b min(-1)) and was higher pre-immersion and in minutes 3 and 5-7 by 7.2 [2.1] b min(-1). ANX [Formula: see text] was higher pre immersion and in minutes 5-6. Results of study 2: repeated immersion habituated the CSR. Anxiety was greater prior to ANX (CON 1.9 [2.3], ANX 6.6 [4.8] cm). f (c) in ANX was higher prior to immersion and in minutes 1-2, 4-6 cf CON; ANX f (c) was not different to the CSR seen in pre-habituation. f (R) was higher in minute 1 of immersion 1 (cf min 1 CON and ANX) following which it exceeded the CSR in CON. The magnitude and duration of CSR (f(c), V(E)) increased with anxiety. Anxiety diminishes CSR habituation.

  8. Gene Expression, Protein Function and Pathways of Arabidopsis thaliana Responding to Silver Nanoparticles in Comparison to Silver Ions, Cold, Salt, Drought, and Heat

    PubMed Central

    Kohan-Baghkheirati, Eisa; Geisler-Lee, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely used in industry due to their unique physical and chemical properties. However, AgNPs have caused environmental concerns. To understand the risks of AgNPs, Arabidopsis microarray data for AgNP, Ag+, cold, salt, heat and drought stresses were analyzed. Up- and down-regulated genes of more than two-fold expression change were compared, while the encoded proteins of shared and unique genes between stresses were subjected to differential enrichment analyses. AgNPs affected the fewest genes (575) in the Arabidopsis genome, followed by Ag+ (1010), heat (1374), drought (1435), salt (4133) and cold (6536). More genes were up-regulated than down-regulated in AgNPs and Ag+ (438 and 780, respectively) while cold down-regulated the most genes (4022). Responses to AgNPs were more similar to those of Ag+ (464 shared genes), cold (202), and salt (163) than to drought (50) or heat (30); the genes in the first four stresses were enriched with 32 PFAM domains and 44 InterPro protein classes. Moreover, 111 genes were unique in AgNPs and they were enriched in three biological functions: response to fungal infection, anion transport, and cell wall/plasma membrane related. Despite shared similarity to Ag+, cold and salt stresses, AgNPs are a new stressor to Arabidopsis. PMID:28347022

  9. A comparison of the transcriptome of Drosophila melanogaster in response to entomopathogenic fungus, ionizing radiation, starvation and cold shock

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The molecular mechanisms that determine the organism's response to a variety of doses and modalities of stress factors are not well understood. Results We studied effects of ionizing radiation (144, 360 and 864 Gy), entomopathogenic fungus (10 and 100 CFU), starvation (16 h), and cold shock (+4, 0 and -4°C) on an organism's viability indicators (survival and locomotor activity) and transcriptome changes in the Drosophila melanogaster model. All stress factors but cold shock resulted in a decrease of lifespan proportional to the dose of treatment. However, stress-factors affected locomotor activity without correlation with lifespan. Our data revealed both significant similarities and differences in differential gene expression and the activity of biological processes under the influence of stress factors. Conclusions Studied doses of stress treatments deleteriously affect the organism's viability and lead to different changes of both general and specific cellular stress response mechanisms. PMID:26694630

  10. The Lin28 cold-shock domain remodels pre-let-7 microRNA.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Florian; Schütz, Anja; Döge, Nadine; Heinemann, Udo

    2012-08-01

    The RNA-binding protein Lin28 regulates the processing of a developmentally important group of microRNAs, the let-7 family. Lin28 blocks the biogenesis of let-7 in embryonic stem cells and thereby prevents differentiation. It was shown that both RNA-binding domains (RBDs) of this protein, the cold-shock domain (CSD) and the zinc-knuckle domain (ZKD) are indispensable for pri- or pre-let-7 binding and blocking its maturation. Here, we systematically examined the nucleic acid-binding preferences of the Lin28 RBDs and determined the crystal structure of the Lin28 CSD in the absence and presence of nucleic acids. Both RNA-binding domains bind to single-stranded nucleic acids with the ZKD mediating specific binding to a conserved GGAG motif and the CSD showing only limited sequence specificity. However, only the isolated Lin28 CSD, but not the ZKD, can bind with a reasonable affinity to pre-let-7 and thus is able to remodel the terminal loop of pre-let-7 including the Dicer cleavage site. Further mutagenesis studies reveal that the Lin28 CSD induces a conformational change in the terminal loop of pre-let-7 and thereby facilitates a subsequent specific binding of the Lin28 ZKD to the conserved GGAG motif.

  11. The Lin28 cold-shock domain remodels pre-let-7 microRNA

    PubMed Central

    Mayr, Florian; Schütz, Anja; Döge, Nadine; Heinemann, Udo

    2012-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein Lin28 regulates the processing of a developmentally important group of microRNAs, the let-7 family. Lin28 blocks the biogenesis of let-7 in embryonic stem cells and thereby prevents differentiation. It was shown that both RNA-binding domains (RBDs) of this protein, the cold-shock domain (CSD) and the zinc-knuckle domain (ZKD) are indispensable for pri- or pre-let-7 binding and blocking its maturation. Here, we systematically examined the nucleic acid-binding preferences of the Lin28 RBDs and determined the crystal structure of the Lin28 CSD in the absence and presence of nucleic acids. Both RNA-binding domains bind to single-stranded nucleic acids with the ZKD mediating specific binding to a conserved GGAG motif and the CSD showing only limited sequence specificity. However, only the isolated Lin28 CSD, but not the ZKD, can bind with a reasonable affinity to pre-let-7 and thus is able to remodel the terminal loop of pre-let-7 including the Dicer cleavage site. Further mutagenesis studies reveal that the Lin28 CSD induces a conformational change in the terminal loop of pre-let-7 and thereby facilitates a subsequent specific binding of the Lin28 ZKD to the conserved GGAG motif. PMID:22570413

  12. Up-regulation of heat shock proteins is essential for cold survival during insect diapause

    PubMed Central

    Rinehart, Joseph P.; Li, Aiqing; Yocum, George D.; Robich, Rebecca M.; Hayward, Scott A. L.; Denlinger, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Diapause, the dormancy common to overwintering insects, evokes a unique pattern of gene expression. In the flesh fly, most, but not all, of the fly's heat shock proteins (Hsps) are up-regulated. The diapause up-regulated Hsps include two members of the Hsp70 family, one member of the Hsp60 family (TCP-1), at least four members of the small Hsp family, and a small Hsp pseudogene. Expression of an Hsp70 cognate, Hsc70, is uninfluenced by diapause, and Hsp90 is actually down-regulated during diapause, thus diapause differs from common stress responses that elicit synchronous up-regulation of all Hsps. Up-regulation of the Hsps begins at the onset of diapause, persists throughout the overwintering period, and ceases within hours after the fly receives the signal to reinitiate development. The up-regulation of Hsps appears to be common to diapause in species representing diverse insect orders including Diptera, Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, and Hymenoptera as well as in diapauses that occur in different developmental stages (embryo, larva, pupa, adult). Suppressing expression of Hsp23 and Hsp70 in flies by using RNAi did not alter the decision to enter diapause or the duration of diapause, but it had a profound effect on the pupa's ability to survive low temperatures. We thus propose that up-regulation of Hsps during diapause is a major factor contributing to cold-hardiness of overwintering insects. PMID:17522254

  13. Gonadal development and fertility of triploid grass puffer Takifugu niphobles induced by cold shock treatment.

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Masaomi; Takeuchi, Yutaka; Miyaki, Kadoo; Yoshizaki, Goro

    2013-04-01

    Tiger puffer Takifugu rubripes is one of the most valuable fish species in Japan; however, there has not been much progress in their selective breeding until recently despite their potential in aquaculture. Their long generation time and the large body size of their broodstock make breeding difficult. Recently, we made a surrogate broodstock, which produced gametes of different species in salmonids. Therefore, by using closely related recipients, which have small body sizes and short generation times, it is possible to accelerate breeding of the tiger puffer. Thus, we considered the grass puffer Takifugu niphobles, which has a short generation time and a small maturation size, as a potential recipient for gamete production of the tiger puffer. Furthermore, if sterile triploid individuals are used as recipients, the resulting surrogate broodstock would produce only donor-derived gametes. Therefore, we examined conditions for inducing triploidy by suppressing meiosis II to retain the second polar body in grass puffer. We found that cold shock treatment, which is 5°C for 30 min starting from 5 min after fertilization, is optimal to obtain high triploidization and hatching rates. Although the resulting triploid grass puffers produced small amounts of gametes in both sexes, the offspring derived from the gametes could not live for over 3 days. Furthermore, we found that triploid grass puffer showed normal plasma sex steroid levels compared with diploids. These are important characteristics of triploid grass puffer as surrogate recipients used for germ cell transplantation.

  14. Cold-shock RNA-binding protein CspR is also exposed to the surface of Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Michaux, Charlotte; Saavedra, Luis Felipe Romero; Reffuveille, Fany; Bernay, Benoît; Goux, Didier; Hartke, Axel; Verneuil, Nicolas; Giard, Jean-Christophe

    2013-10-01

    CspR has been characterized recently as a cold-shock RNA-binding protein in Enterococcus faecalis, a natural member of the gastro-intestinal tract capable of switching from a commensal relationship with the host to an important nosocomial pathogen. In addition to its involvement in the cold-shock response, CspR also plays a role in the long-term survival and virulence of E. faecalis. In the present study, we demonstrated that anti-CspR immune rabbit serum protected larvae of Galleria mellonella against a lethal challenge of the WT strain. These results suggested that CspR might have a surface location. This hypothesis was verified by Western blot that showed detection of CspR in the total as well as in the surface protein fraction. In addition, identification of surface polypeptides by proteolytic shaving of intact bacterial cells followed by liquid chromatography-MS-MS revealed that cold-shock proteins (EF1367, EF2939 and CspR) were present on the cell surface. Lastly, anti-CspR immune rabbit serum was used for immunolabelling and detected with colloidal gold-labelled goat anti-rabbit IgG in order to determine the immunolocalization of CspR on E. faecalis WT strain. Electron microscopy images confirmed that the cold-shock protein RNA-binding protein CspR was present in both cytoplasmic and surface parts of the cell. These data strongly suggest that CspR, in addition to being located intracellularly, is also present in the extracellular protein fraction of the cells and has important functions in the infection process of Galleria larvae.

  15. Putrescine Is Involved in Arabidopsis Freezing Tolerance and Cold Acclimation by Regulating Abscisic Acid Levels in Response to Low Temperature1

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, Juan C.; López-Cobollo, Rosa; Alcázar, Rubén; Zarza, Xavier; Koncz, Csaba; Altabella, Teresa; Salinas, Julio; Tiburcio, Antonio F.; Ferrando, Alejandro

    2008-01-01

    The levels of endogenous polyamines have been shown to increase in plant cells challenged with low temperature; however, the functions of polyamines in the regulation of cold stress responses are unknown. Here, we show that the accumulation of putrescine under cold stress is essential for proper cold acclimation and survival at freezing temperatures because Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants defective in putrescine biosynthesis (adc1, adc2) display reduced freezing tolerance compared to wild-type plants. Genes ADC1 and ADC2 show different transcriptional profiles upon cold treatment; however, they show similar and redundant contributions to cold responses in terms of putrescine accumulation kinetics and freezing sensitivity. Our data also demonstrate that detrimental consequences of putrescine depletion during cold stress are due, at least in part, to alterations in the levels of abscisic acid (ABA). Reduced expression of NCED3, a key gene involved in ABA biosynthesis, and down-regulation of ABA-regulated genes are detected in both adc1 and adc2 mutant plants under cold stress. Complementation analysis of adc mutants with ABA and reciprocal complementation tests of the aba2-3 mutant with putrescine support the conclusion that putrescine controls the levels of ABA in response to low temperature by modulating ABA biosynthesis and gene expression. PMID:18701673

  16. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Genes Commonly Induced by Botrytis cinerea Infection, Cold, Drought and Oxidative Stresses in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ameri, Salma; Al-Mahmoud, Bassam; Awwad, Falah; Al-Rawashdeh, Ahmed; Iratni, Rabah; AbuQamar, Synan

    2014-01-01

    Signaling pathways controlling biotic and abiotic stress responses may interact synergistically or antagonistically. To identify the similarities and differences among responses to diverse stresses, we analyzed previously published microarray data on the transcriptomic responses of Arabidopsis to infection with Botrytis cinerea (a biotic stress), and to cold, drought, and oxidative stresses (abiotic stresses). Our analyses showed that at early stages after B. cinerea inoculation, 1498 genes were up-regulated (B. cinerea up-regulated genes; BUGs) and 1138 genes were down-regulated (B. cinerea down-regulated genes; BDGs). We showed a unique program of gene expression was activated in response each biotic and abiotic stress, but that some genes were similarly induced or repressed by all of the tested stresses. Of the identified BUGs, 25%, 6% and 12% were also induced by cold, drought and oxidative stress, respectively; whereas 33%, 7% and 5.5% of the BDGs were also down-regulated by the same abiotic stresses. Coexpression and protein-protein interaction network analyses revealed a dynamic range in the expression levels of genes encoding regulatory proteins. Analysis of gene expression in response to electrophilic oxylipins suggested that these compounds are involved in mediating responses to B. cinerea infection and abiotic stress through TGA transcription factors. Our results suggest an overlap among genes involved in the responses to biotic and abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis. Changes in the transcript levels of genes encoding components of the cyclopentenone signaling pathway in response to biotic and abiotic stresses suggest that the oxylipin signal transduction pathway plays a role in plant defense. Identifying genes that are commonly expressed in response to environmental stresses, and further analyzing the functions of their encoded products, will increase our understanding of the plant stress response. This information could identify targets for genetic

  17. Expression of cspH, encoding the cold shock protein in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium UK-1.

    PubMed

    Kim, B H; Bang, I S; Lee, S Y; Hong, S K; Bang, S H; Lee, I S; Park, Y K

    2001-10-01

    Both Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli contain the cspH gene encoding CspH, one of the cold shock proteins (CSPs). In this study, we investigated the expression of cspH in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and found that it was induced in response to a temperature downshift during exponential phase. The cspH promoter was activated at 37 degrees C, and its mRNA was more stable than the other csp mRNAs at 37 degrees C. Moreover, lacZ expression of the translational cspH-lacZ fusion was induced at that temperature. Interestingly, the cspH mRNA had a much shorter 5'-untranslated region than those in the other cold-shock-inducible genes, and the promoter sequence, which was only 55 bp, was sufficient for cspH expression. The 14-base downstream box located 12 bases downstream of the initiation codon of cspH mRNA was essential for its cold shock activation.

  18. The plastid metalloprotease FtsH6 and small heat shock protein HSP21 jointly regulate thermomemory in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sedaghatmehr, Mastoureh; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Balazadeh, Salma

    2016-01-01

    Acquired tolerance to heat stress is an increased resistance to elevated temperature following a prior exposure to heat. The maintenance of acquired thermotolerance in the absence of intervening stress is called ‘thermomemory' but the mechanistic basis for this memory is not well defined. Here we show that Arabidopsis HSP21, a plastidial small heat shock protein that rapidly accumulates after heat stress and remains abundant during the thermomemory phase, is a crucial component of thermomemory. Sustained memory requires that HSP21 levels remain high. Through pharmacological interrogation and transcriptome profiling, we show that the plastid-localized metalloprotease FtsH6 regulates HSP21 abundance. Lack of a functional FtsH6 protein promotes HSP21 accumulation during the later stages of thermomemory and increases thermomemory capacity. Our results thus reveal the presence of a plastidial FtsH6–HSP21 control module for thermomemory in plants. PMID:27561243

  19. Overexpression of a Panax ginseng tonoplast aquaporin alters salt tolerance, drought tolerance and cold acclimation ability in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yanhui; Lin, Wuling; Cai, Weiming; Arora, Rajeev

    2007-08-01

    Water movement across cellular membranes is regulated largely by a family of water channel proteins called aquaporins (AQPs). Since several abiotic stresses such as, drought, salinity and freezing, manifest themselves via altering water status of plant cells and are linked by the fact that they all result in cellular dehydration, we overexpressed an AQP (tonoplast intrinsic protein) from Panax ginseng, PgTIP1, in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants to test its role in plant's response to drought, salinity and cold acclimation (induced freezing tolerance). Under favorable conditions, PgTIP1 overexpression significantly increased plant growth as determined by the biomass production, and leaf and root morphology. PgTIP1 overexpression had beneficial effect on salt-stress tolerance as indicated by superior growth status and seed germination of transgenic plants under salt stress; shoots of salt-stressed transgenic plants also accumulated greater amounts of Na(+) compared to wild-type plants. Whereas PgTIP1 overexpression diminished the water-deficit tolerance of plants grown in shallow (10 cm deep) pots, the transgenic plants were significantly more tolerant to water stress when grown in 45 cm deep pots. The rationale for this contrasting response, apparently, comes from the differences in the root morphology and leaf water channel activity (speed of dehydration/rehydration) between the transgenic and wild-type plants. Plants overexpressed with PgTIP1 exhibited lower (relative to wild-type control) cold acclimation ability; however, this response was independent of cold-regulated gene expression. Our results demonstrate a significant function of PgTIP1 in growth and development of plant cells, and suggest that the water movement across tonoplast (via AQP) represents a rate-limiting factor for plant vigor under favorable growth conditions and also significantly affect responses of plant to drought, salt and cold stresses.

  20. Interplay between heat shock proteins HSP101 and HSA32 prolongs heat acclimation memory posttranscriptionally in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ting-ying; Juan, Yu-ting; Hsu, Yang-hsin; Wu, Sze-hsien; Liao, Hsiu-ting; Fung, Raymond W M; Charng, Yee-yung

    2013-04-01

    Heat acclimation improves the tolerance of organisms to severe heat stress. Our previous work showed that in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the "memory" of heat acclimation treatment decayed faster in the absence of the heat-stress-associated 32-kD protein HSA32, a heat-induced protein predominantly found in plants. The HSA32 null mutant attains normal short-term acquired thermotolerance but is defective in long-term acquired thermotolerance. To further explore this phenomenon, we isolated Arabidopsis defective in long-term acquired thermotolerance (dlt) mutants using a forward genetic screen. Two recessive missense alleles, dlt1-1 and dlt1-2, encode the molecular chaperone heat shock protein101 (HSP101). Results of immunoblot analyses suggest that HSP101 enhances the translation of HSA32 during recovery after heat treatment, and in turn, HSA32 retards the decay of HSP101. The dlt1-1 mutation has little effect on HSP101 chaperone activity and thermotolerance function but compromises the regulation of HSA32. In contrast, dlt1-2 impairs the chaperone activity and thermotolerance function of HSP101 but not the regulation of HSA32. These results suggest that HSP101 has a dual function, which could be decoupled by the mutations. Pulse-chase analysis showed that HSP101 degraded faster in the absence of HSA32. The autophagic proteolysis inhibitor E-64d, but not the proteasome inhibitor MG132, inhibited the degradation of HSP101. Ectopic expression of HSA32 confirmed its effect on the decay of HSP101 at the posttranscriptional level and showed that HSA32 was not sufficient to confer long-term acquired thermotolerance when the HSP101 level was low. Taken together, we propose that a positive feedback loop between HSP101 and HSA32 at the protein level is a novel mechanism for prolonging the memory of heat acclimation.

  1. Overexpression of Heat Shock Factor Gene HsfA3 Increases Galactinol Levels and Oxidative Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chieun; Chung, Woo Sik; Lim, Chae Oh

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factors (Hsfs) are central regulators of abiotic stress responses, especially heat stress responses, in plants. In the current study, we characterized the activity of the Hsf gene HsfA3 in Arabidopsis under oxidative stress conditions. HsfA3 transcription in seedlings was induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS), exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and an endogenous H2O2 propagator, 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone (DBMIB). HsfA3-overexpressing transgenic plants exhibited increased oxidative stress tolerance compared to untransformed wild-type plants (WT), as revealed by changes in fresh weight, chlorophyll fluorescence, and ion leakage under light conditions. The expression of several genes encoding galactinol synthase (GolS), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs), which function as antioxidants in plant cells, was induced in HsfA3 overexpressors. In addition, galactinol levels were higher in HsfA3 overexpressors than in WT under unstressed conditions. In transient transactivation assays using Arabidopsis leaf protoplasts, HsfA3 activated the transcription of a reporter gene driven by the GolS1 or GolS2 promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that GolS1 and GolS2 are directly regulated by HsfA3. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that GolS1 and GolS2 are directly regulated by HsfA3 and that GolS enzymes play an important role in improving oxidative stress tolerance by increasing galactinol biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:27109422

  2. Variation of heat shock protein gene expression in the brain of cold-induced pulmonary hypertensive chickens.

    PubMed

    Hassanpour, H; Khosravi Alekoohi, Z; Madreseh, S; Bahadoran, S; Nasiri, L

    2016-10-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR was carried out to evaluate gene expression of heat shock proteins (HSP) (HSP27, HSP56, HSP60, HSP70, HSP90 and ubiquitin) in the brain (hindbrain, midbrain, forebrain) of chickens with cold-induced pulmonary hypertension. The ratio of the right ventricle to the total ventricle (index of pulmonary hypertension in chickens) was increased in the cold-induced pulmonary hypertensive chickens at 42 d of age compared with control. The HSP genes were expressed in the three parts of the brain in the two experimental groups. In the hindbrain of cold-induced pulmonary hypertensive chickens, the relative gene expression of HSP27, HSP60, HSP70 and HSP90 was decreased while gene expression of HSP56 and ubiquitin was increased compared with controls. In the midbrain of cold induced-pulmonary hypertensive chickens, the expression of HSP56, HSP60, HSP70 and ubiquitin genes was increased compared with controls while HSP27 and HSP90 were decreased. In the forebrain of cold induced-pulmonary hypertensive chickens, the expression of HSP56, HSP60, HSP70 and ubiquitin genes was increased while the expression of the HSP27 gene was decreased compared with controls. It is concluded that overexpression of HSPs in the forebrain and midbrain probably delays the pathological process of cold stress whereas diminished expression of HSP genes in the hindbrain may affect the normal function of brain centres in this area to exacerbate pulmonary hypertension.

  3. A Temperature-Independent Cold-Shock Protein Homolog Acts as a Virulence Factor in Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Burbank, Lindsey P; Stenger, Drake C

    2016-05-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, causal agent of Pierce's disease (PD) of grapevine, is a fastidious organism that requires very specific conditions for replication and plant colonization. Cold temperatures reduce growth and survival of X. fastidiosa both in vitro and in planta. However, little is known regarding physiological responses of X. fastidiosa to temperature changes. Cold-shock proteins (CSP), a family of nucleic acid-binding proteins, act as chaperones facilitating translation at low temperatures. Bacterial genomes often encode multiple CSP, some of which are strongly induced following exposure to cold. Additionally, CSP contribute to the general stress response through mRNA stabilization and posttranscriptional regulation. A putative CSP homolog (Csp1) with RNA-binding activity was identified in X. fastidiosa Stag's Leap. The csp1 gene lacked the long 5' untranslated region characteristic of cold-inducible genes and was expressed in a temperature-independent manner. As compared with the wild type, a deletion mutant of csp1 (∆csp1) had decreased survival rates following cold exposure and salt stress in vitro. The deletion mutant also was significantly less virulent in grapevine, as compared with the wild type, in the absence of cold stress. These results suggest an important function of X. fastidiosa Csp1 in response to cellular stress and during plant colonization.

  4. Positron-acoustic shock waves associated with cold viscous positron fluid in superthermal electron-positron-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Uddin, M. J. Alam, M. S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2015-06-15

    A theoretical investigation is made on the positron-acoustic (PA) shock waves (SHWs) in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion plasma containing immobile positive ions, cold mobile positrons, and hot positrons and electrons following the kappa (κ) distribution. The cold positron kinematic viscosity is taken into account, and the reductive perturbation method is used to derive the Burgers equation. It is found that the viscous force acting on cold mobile positron fluid is a source of dissipation and is responsible for the formation of the PA SHWs. It is also observed that the fundamental properties of the PA SHWs are significantly modified by the effects of different parameters associated with superthermal (κ distributed) hot positrons and electrons.

  5. Sperm production and mating potential of males after a cold shock on pupae of the parasitoid wasp Dinarmus basalis (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

    PubMed

    Lacoume, Sandrine; Bressac, Christophe; Chevrier, Claude

    2007-10-01

    For ectothermic species, temperature is a key environmental factor influencing several aspects of their physiology and ecology, acting particularly on reproduction. To measure the consequences of a severe thermal stress during development on male reproduction, a cold shock (1h at -18 degrees C) was tested on Dinarmus basalis pupae. D. basalis (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) is a parasitoid wasp in which sperm management in both male and female is of prime importance. After a cold shock, developmental success was reduced, with a quarter of cold-shocked males not emerging correctly. The stress effects were estimated at the level of sperm stock in seminal vesicles of males at different ages and on the ability of 2-day-old males to access females in single and multiple mating and in male-male competition. Cold-shocked males had a reduced sperm stock compared to control males and this difference persisted with age. The rate of sperm production was similar in both groups. The consequences of a cold shock on male reproductive ability were perceptible in multiple mating and male-male competition but not in single mating. Cold-shocked males were at a disadvantage, inseminating fewer females and copulating less frequently. Finally, male pupae of D. basalis were able to withstand severe temperature stresses and their reproductive functions were partially preserved.

  6. Optimization of conditions for germination of cold-stored Arabidopsis thaliana pollen.

    PubMed

    Bou Daher, Firas; Chebli, Youssef; Geitmann, Anja

    2009-03-01

    One of the rare weak points of the model plant Arabidopsis is the technical problem associated with the germination of its male gametophyte and the generation of the pollen tube in vitro. Arabidopsis pollen being tricellular has a notoriously low in vitro germination compared to species with bicellular pollen. This drawback strongly affects the reproducibility of experiments based on this cellular system. Together with the fact that pollen collection from this species is tedious, these are obstacles for the standard use of Arabidopsis pollen for experiments that require high numbers of pollen tubes and for which the percentage of germination needs to be highly reproducible. The possibility of freeze-storing pollen after bulk collection is a potential way to solve these problems, but necessitates methods that ensure continued viability and reproducible capacity to germinate. Our objective was the optimization of germination conditions for Arabidopsis pollen that had been freeze-stored. We optimized the concentrations of various media components conventionally used for in vitro pollen germination. We found that in general 4 mM calcium, 1.62 mM boric acid, 1 mM potassium, 1 mM magnesium, 18% sucrose at pH 7 and a temperature of 22.5 degrees C are required for optimal pollen germination. However, different experimental setups may deviate in their requirements from this general protocol. We suggest how to optimally use these optimized methods for different practical experiments ranging from morphological observations of pollen tubes in optical and electron microscopy to their bulk use for molecular and biochemical analyses or for experimental setups for which a specific medium stiffness is critical.

  7. The grapevine basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor positively modulates CBF-pathway and confers tolerance to cold-stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weirong; Zhang, Ningbo; Jiao, Yuntong; Li, Ruimin; Xiao, Dongming; Wang, Zhenping

    2014-08-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-type transcription factors play diverse roles in plant physiological response and stress-adaptive regulation network. Here, we identified one grapevine bHLH transcription factor from a cold-tolerant accession 'Heilongjiang seedling' of Chinese wild Vitis amurensis (VabHLH1) as a transcriptional activator involved in cold stress. We also compared with its counterpart from a cold-sensitive Vitis vinifera cv. Cabernet Sauvignon (VvbHLH1). These two putative proteins are characterized by the presence of the identically conserved regions of 54 amino acid residues of bHLH signature domain, and shared 99.1% amino acid identity, whereas several stress-related cis-regulatory elements located in both promoter regions differed in types and positions. Expressions of two bHLHs in grapevine leaves were induced by cold stress, but evidently differ between two grapevine genotypes upon cold exposure. Two grapevine bHLH proteins were exclusively localized to the nucleus and exhibited strong transcriptional activation activities in yeast cells. Overexpression of either VabHLH1 or VvbHLH1 transcription factor did not affect the growth and development of transgenic Arabidopsis plants, but enhanced tolerance to cold stress. The improved tolerance in VabHLH1- or VvbHLH1-overexpressing Arabidopsis plants is associated with multiple physiological and biochemical changes that occurred during the time-course cold stress. These most common changes include the evaluated levels of proline, decreased amounts of malondialdehyde and reduced membrane injury as reflected by electrolyte leakage. VabHLH1 and VvbHLH1 displayed overlapping, but not identical, roles in activating the corresponding CBF cold signaling pathway, especially in regulating the expression of CBF3 and RD29A. Our findings demonstrated that two grapevine bHLHs act as positive regulators of the cold stress response, modulating the level of COR gene expression, which in turn confer tolerance to cold

  8. Characterization of cspB, a Bacillus subtilis inducible cold shock gene affecting cell viability at low temperatures.

    PubMed Central

    Willimsky, G; Bang, H; Fischer, G; Marahiel, M A

    1992-01-01

    A new class of cold shock-induced proteins that may be involved in an adaptive process required for cell viability at low temperatures or may function as antifreeze proteins in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been identified. We purified a small Bacillus subtilis cold shock protein (CspB) and determined its amino-terminal sequence. By using mixed degenerate oligonucleotides, the corresponding gene (cspB) was cloned on two overlapping fragments of 5 and 6 kb. The gene encodes an acidic 67-amino-acid protein (pI 4.31) with a predicted molecular mass of 7,365 Da. Nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence comparisons revealed 61% identity to the major cold shock protein of E. coli and 43% identity to a family of eukaryotic DNA binding proteins. Northern RNA blot and primer extension studies indicated the presence of one cspB transcript that was initiated 119 bp upstream of the initiation codon and was found to be induced severalfold when exponentially growing B. subtilis cell cultures were transferred from 37 degrees C to 10 degrees C. Consistent with this cold shock induction of cspB mRNA, a six- to eightfold induction of a cspB-directed beta-galactosidase synthesis was observed upon downshift in temperature. To investigate the function of CspB, we inactivated the cold shock protein by replacing the cspB gene in the B. subtilis chromosome with a cat-interrupted copy (cspB::cat) by marker replacement recombination. The viability of cells of this mutant strain, GW1, at freezing temperatures was strongly affected. However, the effect of having no CspB in GW1 could be slightly compensated for when cells were preincubated at 10 degrees C before freezing. These results indicate that CspB belongs to a new type of stress-inducible proteins that might be able to protect B. subtilis cells from damage caused by ice crystal formation during freezing. Images PMID:1400185

  9. A novel MYB transcription factor, GmMYBJ1, from soybean confers drought and cold tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Su, Lian-Tai; Li, Jing-Wen; Liu, De-Quan; Zhai, Ying; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Li, Xiao-Wei; Zhang, Qing-Lin; Wang, Ying; Wang, Qing-Yu

    2014-03-15

    MYB transcription factors play important roles in the regulation of plant growth, developmental metabolism and stress responses. In this study, a new MYB transcription factor gene, GmMYBJ1, was isolated from soybean [Glycine max (L.)]. The GmMYBJ1 cDNA is 1296bp in length with an open reading frame (ORF) of 816 bp encoding for 271 amino acids. The amino acid sequence displays similarities to the typical R2R3 MYB proteins reported in other plants. Transient expression analysis using the GmMYBJ1-GFP fusion gene in onion epidermal cells revealed that the GmMYBJ1 protein is targeted to the nucleus. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that GmMYBJ1 expression was induced by abiotic stresses, such as drought, cold, salt and exogenous abscisic acid (ABA). Compared to wild-type (WT) plants, transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing GmMYBJ1 exhibited an enhanced tolerance to drought and cold stresses. These results indicate that GmMYBJ1 has the potential to be utilized in transgenic breeding lines to improve abiotic stress tolerance.

  10. Pattern of CsICE1 expression under cold or drought treatment and functional verification through analysis of transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Z T; Li, C; Shi, H; Wang, H; Wang, Y

    2015-09-22

    CsICE1 is thought to be involved in hardiness resistance of tea plants. Using seedling cuttings of biennial Wuniuzao in this study, the pattern of CsICE1 expression under cold temperature (4°, -5°C), drought [20% polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG-6000)], and plant hormone [200 mg/L abscisic acid (ABA), 1 mg/L brassinolide (BR)] treatment was studied by real-time quantitative PCR. Additionally, stress resistance, such as the freezing resistance of CsICE1, was studied using Arabidopsis lines transformed with sense or anti-sense CsICE1 via Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection. Our results showed that CsICE1 mRNA could be induced under -5°C, PEG, ABA, or BR treatment, although the pattern of expression differed for all treatments. Compared to wild type (WT) and anti-sense ICE1 transgenic lines, sense lines displayed higher relative germination rates under salt and drought stress. After freezing treatment, the sense transgenic lines over-expressing CsICE1 showed a higher survival rate, increased levels of proline, and decreased levels of malonaldehyde. Conversely, compared with WT, anti-sense ICE1 transgenic lines had lower proline levels and higher malonaldehyde levels under freezing conditions. Our study indicates that CsICE1 is an important anti-freezing gene and that over-expression of CsICE1 can improve cold resistance and enhance salt and drought tolerance of transgenic lines.

  11. Cold acclimation of Arabidopsis thaliana results in incomplete recovery of photosynthetic capacity, associated with an increased reduction of the chloroplast stroma.

    PubMed

    Savitch, L V; Barker-Astrom, J; Ivanov, A G; Hurry, V; Oquist, G; Huner, N P; Gardeström, P

    2001-12-01

    The effects of short-term cold stress and long-term cold acclimation on the light reactions of photosynthesis were examined in vivo to assess their contributions to photosynthetic acclimation to low temperature in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.. All photosynthetic measurements were made at the temperature of exposure: 23 degrees C for non-acclimated plants and 5 degrees C for cold-stressed and cold-acclimated plants. Three-day cold-stress treatments at 5 degrees C inhibited light-saturated rates of CO2 assimilation and O2 evolution by approximately 75%. The 3-day exposure to 5 degrees C also increased the proportion of reduced QA by 50%, decreased the yield of PSII electron transport by 65% and decreased PSI activity by 31%. In contrast, long-term cold acclimation resulted in a strong but incomplete recovery of light-saturated photosynthesis at 5 degrees C. The rates of light-saturated CO2 and O2 gas exchange and the in vivo yield of PSII activity under light-saturating conditions were only 35-40% lower, and the relative redox state of QA only 20% lower, at 5 degrees C after cold acclimation than in controls at 23 degrees C. PSI activity showed full recovery during long-term cold acclimation. Neither short-term cold stress nor long-term cold acclimation of Arabidopsis was associated with a limitation in ATP, and both treatments resulted in an increase in the ATP/NADPH ratio. This increase in ATP/NADPH was associated with an inhibition of PSI cyclic electron transport but there was no apparent change in the Mehler reaction activity in either cold-stressed or cold-acclimated leaves. Cold acclimation also resulted in an increase in the reduction state of the stroma, as indicated by an increased total activity and activation state of NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase, and increased light-dependent activities of the major regulatory enzymes of the oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway. We suggest that the photosynthetic capacity during cold stress as well as cold

  12. Overexpression of pigeonpea stress-induced cold and drought regulatory gene (CcCDR) confers drought, salt, and cold tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Tamirisa, Srinath; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2014-01-01

    A potent cold and drought regulatory protein-encoding gene (CcCDR) was isolated from the subtractive cDNA library of pigeonpea plants subjected to drought stress. CcCDR was induced by different abiotic stress conditions in pigeonpea. Overexpression of CcCDR in Arabidopsis thaliana imparted enhanced tolerance against major abiotic stresses, namely drought, salinity, and low temperature, as evidenced by increased biomass, root length, and chlorophyll content. Transgenic plants also showed increased levels of antioxidant enzymes, proline, and reducing sugars under stress conditions. Furthermore, CcCDR-transgenic plants showed enhanced relative water content, osmotic potential, and cell membrane stability, as well as hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) as compared with control plants. Localization studies confirmed that CcCDR could enter the nucleus, as revealed by intense fluorescence, indicating its possible interaction with various nuclear proteins. Microarray analysis revealed that 1780 genes were up-regulated in CcCDR-transgenics compared with wild-type plants. Real-time PCR analysis on selected stress-responsive genes, involved in ABA-dependent and -independent signalling networks, revealed higher expression levels in transgenic plants, suggesting that CcCDR acts upstream of these genes. The overall results demonstrate the explicit role of CcCDR in conferring multiple abiotic stress tolerance at the whole-plant level. The multifunctional CcCDR seems promising as a prime candidate gene for enhancing abiotic stress tolerance in diverse plants. PMID:24868035

  13. Shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... you think a person is in shock: Call 911 for immediate medical help. Check the person's airway, ... help. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call 911 any time a person has symptoms of shock. ...

  14. Arabidopsis RING E3 ubiquitin ligase AtATL80 is negatively involved in phosphate mobilization and cold stress response in sufficient phosphate growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Suh, Ji Yeon; Kim, Woo Taek

    2015-08-07

    Phosphate (Pi) remobilization in plants is critical to continuous growth and development. AtATL80 is a plasma membrane (PM)-localized RING E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase that belongs to the Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL) family. AtATL80 was upregulated by long-term low Pi (0-0.02 mM KH2PO4) conditions in Arabidopsis seedlings. AtATL80-overexpressing transgenic Arabidopsis plants (35S:AtATL80-sGFP) displayed increased phosphorus (P) accumulation in the shoots and lower biomass, as well as reduced P-utilization efficiency (PUE) under high Pi (1 mM KH2PO4) conditions compared to wild-type plants. The loss-of-function atatl80 mutant line exhibited opposite phenotypic traits. The atatl80 mutant line bolted earlier than wild-type plants, whereas AtATL80-overexpressors bloomed significantly later and produced lower seed yields than wild-type plants under high Pi conditions. Thus, AtATL80 is negatively correlated not only with P content and PUE, but also with biomass and seed yield in Arabidopsis. In addition, AtATL80-overexpressors were significantly more sensitive to cold stress than wild-type plants, while the atatl80 mutant line exhibited an increased tolerance to cold stress. Taken together, our results suggest that AtATL80, a PM-localized ATL-type RING E3 Ub ligase, participates in the Pi mobilization and cold stress response as a negative factor in Arabidopsis.

  15. Epididymal and ejaculated cat spermatozoa are resistant to cold shock but egg yolk promotes sperm longevity during cold storage at 4 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Hermansson, U; Axnér, E

    2007-04-15

    The aims were to evaluate the susceptibility of feline ejaculated and epididymal spermatozoa to cold shock and to evaluate the effect of egg yolk in the preservation extender. Ejaculated and epididymal spermatozoa from eight males were subjected to a slow (0.5 degrees C/min) or a fast (3 degrees C/min) cooling rate with controls kept in room temperature. Ejaculated and epididymal spermatozoa from another eight males were cooled in a plain Tris buffer (Tris) or in Tris with 20% egg yolk (EYT) and evaluated for 96 h. Subjective motility (MOT), plasma membrane integrity (PMI), and acrosome integrity (ACRI) were evaluated. Cooling did not induce sperm damage regarding PMI (P=0.6) or ACRI (P=0.19) and chilled spermatozoa had better overall MOT (P=0.046) than controls. EYT was better for MOT (P>0.05) from 48 h of cold storage than Tris. EYT was also better for overall ACRI (P<0.0001) while Tris was better for overall PMI (P=0.0004). There were no interactions between time and treatment (P>0.05) for PMI or ACRI. Ejaculated spermatozoa had better overall MOT (P<0.05) and PMI (P<0.05) than epididymal spermatozoa, and higher ACRI in experiment 1 (P=0.0003) but not in experiment 2 (P=0.117). Source of spermatozoa did not affect the susceptibility to cooling or the effect of egg yolk as there were no interactions (P>0.05) between source of spermatozoa and treatment (cooling or control) or between time, source and extender (P>0.05). In conclusion cat spermatozoa were tolerant to cold shock and egg yolk was beneficial for preservation of MOT and ACRI but not PMI.

  16. Engineering carpel-specific cold stress tolerance: a case study in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Artlip, Timothy S; Wisniewski, Michael E; Takatsuji, Hiroshi; Bassett, Carole L

    2016-08-01

    Climate change predictions forecast an increase in early spring frosts that could result in severe damage to perennial crops. For example, the Easter freeze of April 2007 left several states in the United States reporting a complete loss of that year's peach crop. The most susceptible organ to early frost damage in fruit trees is the carpel, particularly during bloom opening. In this study, we explored the use of a carpel-specific promoter (ZPT2-10) from petunia (Petunia hybrida var. Mitchell) to drive expression of the peach dehydrin PpDhn1. In peach, this gene is exceptionally responsive to low temperature but has not been observed to be expressed in carpels. This study examined carpel-specific properties of a petunia promoter driving the expression of the GUS gene (uidA) in transgenic Arabidopsis flowers and developed a carpel-specific ion leakage test to assess freezing tolerance. A homozygous Arabidopsis line (line 1-20) carrying the petunia ZPT2-10 promoter::PpDhn1 construct was obtained and freezing tolerance in the transgenic line was compared with an untransformed control. Overexpression of PpDhn1 in line 1-20 provided as much as a 1.9°C increase in carpel freezing tolerance as measured by electrolyte leakage. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  17. Engineering carpel-specific cold stress tolerance: a case study in Arabidopsis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Freezing temperatures during winter generally do not injure floral buds of horticulturally important crops. Entry into dormancy coupled with cold acclimation provides adequate protection unless the temperatures are exceptionally low. This measure of protection is lost in spring when the floral bud...

  18. Chinese Wild-Growing Vitis amurensis ICE1 and ICE2 Encode MYC-Type bHLH Transcription Activators that Regulate Cold Tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weirong; Jiao, Yuntong; Li, Ruimin; Zhang, Ningbo; Xiao, Dongming; Ding, Xiaoling; Wang, Zhenping

    2014-01-01

    Winter hardiness is an important trait for grapevine breeders and producers, so identification of the regulatory mechanisms involved in cold acclimation is of great potential value. The work presented here involves the identification of two grapevine ICE gene homologs, VaICE1 and VaICE2, from an extremely cold-tolerant accession of Chinese wild-growing Vitis amurnensis, which are phylogenetically related to other plant ICE1 genes. These two structurally different ICE proteins contain previously reported ICE-specific amino acid motifs, the bHLH-ZIP domain and the S-rich motif. Expression analysis revealed that VaICE1 is constitutively expressed but affected by cold stress, unlike VaICE2 that shows not such changed expression as a consequence of cold treatment. Both genes serve as transcription factors, potentiating the transactivation activities in yeasts and the corresponding proteins localized to the nucleus following transient expression in onion epidermal cells. Overexpression of either VaICE1 or VaICE2 in Arabidopsis increase freezing tolerance in nonacclimated plants. Moreover, we show that they result in multiple biochemical changes that were associated with cold acclimation: VaICE1/2-overexpressing plants had evaluated levels of proline, reduced contents of malondialdehyde (MDA) and decreased levels of electrolyte leakage. The expression of downstream cold responsive genes of CBF1, COR15A, and COR47 were significantly induced in Arabidopsis transgenically overexpressing VaICE1 or VaICE2 upon cold stress. VaICE2, but not VaICE1 overexpression induced KIN1 expression under cold-acclimation conditions. Our results suggest that VaICE1 and VaICE2 act as key regulators at an early step in the transcriptional cascade controlling freezing tolerance, and modulate the expression levels of various low-temperature associated genes involved in the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) pathway. PMID:25019620

  19. Two cysteine proteinase inhibitors from Arabidopsis thaliana, AtCYSa and AtCYSb, increasing the salt, drought, oxidation and cold tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxin; Liu, Shenkui; Takano, Tetsuo

    2008-09-01

    Two cysteine proteinase inhibitors (cystatins) from Arabidopsis thaliana, designated AtCYSa and AtCYSb, were characterized. Recombinant GST-AtCYSa and GST-AtCYSb were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. They inhibit the catalytic activity of papain, which is generally taken as evidence for cysteine proteinase inhibitor function. Northern blot analyses showed that the expressions of AtCYSa and AtCYSb gene in Arabidopsis cells and seedlings were strongly induced by multiple abiotic stresses from high salt, drought, oxidant, and cold. Interestingly, the promoter region of AtCYSa gene contains a dehydration-responsive element (DRE) and an abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive element (ABRE), which identifies it as a DREB1A and AREB target gene. Under normal conditions, AtCYSa was expressed in 35S: DREB1A and 35S: AREB1 plants at a higher level than in WT plants, while AtCYSa gene was expressed in 35S: DREB2A plants at the same level as in WT plants. Under stress conditions (salt, drought and cold), AtCYSa was expressed more in all three transgenic plants than in WT plants. Over-expression of AtCYSa and AtCYSb in transgenic yeast and Arabidopsis plants increased the resistance to high salt, drought, oxidative, and cold stresses. Taken together, these data raise the possibility of using AtCYSa and AtCYSb to genetically improve environmental stresses tolerance in plants.

  20. Wing shielding of high velocity jet and shock-associated noise with cold and hot flow jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U.; Groesbeck, D.; Wagner, J.

    1976-01-01

    Jet exhaust noise shielding data are presented for cold and hot flows (ambient to 1,100 K) and pressure ratios from 1.7 to 2.75. A nominal 9.5-cm diameter conical nozzle was used with simple shielding surfaces that were varied in length from 28.8 to 114.3 cm. The nozzle was located 8.8 cm above the surfaces. The acoustic data with the various sheilding lengths are compared to each other and to that for the nozzle alone. In general, short shielding surfaces that provided shielding for subsonic jets did not provide as much shielding for jets with shock noise, however, long shielding surfaces did shield shock noise effectively.

  1. Wing shielding of high-velocity jet and shock-associated noise with cold and hot flow jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Glahn, U.; Groesbeck, D.; Wagner, J.

    1976-01-01

    Jet exhaust noise shielding data are presented for cold and hot flows (ambient to 1100 K) and pressure ratios from 1.7 to 2.75. A nominal 9.5-cm diameter conical nozzle was used with simple shielding surfaces that were varied in length from 28.8 to 114.3 cm. The nozzle was located 8.8 cm above the surfaces. The acoustic data with the various shielding lengths are compared to each other and to that for the nozzle alone. In general, short shielding surfaces that provided shielding for subsonic jets did not provide as much shielding for jets with shock noise; however, long shielding surfaces did shield shock noise effectively.

  2. Wing shielding of high-velocity jet and shock-associated noise with cold and hot flow jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Glahn, U.; Groesbeck, D.; Wagner, J.

    1976-01-01

    Jet exhaust noise shielding data are presented for cold and hot flows (ambient to 1100 K) and pressure ratios from 1.7 to 2.75. A nominal 9.5-cm diameter conical nozzle was used with simple shielding surfaces that were varied in length from 28.8 to 114.3 cm. The nozzle was located 8.8 cm above the surfaces. The acoustic data with the various shielding lengths are compared to each other and to that for the nozzle alone. In general, short shielding surfaces that provided shielding for subsonic jets did not provide as much shielding for jets with shock noise; however, long shielding surfaces did shield shock noise effectively.

  3. Expression of mt2 and smt-B upon cadmium exposure and cold shock in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Wu, Su Mei; Zheng, Yu Da; Kuo, Chien-Hsien

    2008-08-01

    Metallothionein-2 (mt2) and similar to metallothionein-B (smt-B) are included in the MT gene family. The objective of this study was to compare mt2 and smt-B messenger (m)RNA expressions after cadmium exposure and cold shock with whole-mount in situ hybridization in immature zebrafish (Danio rerio) and with a semi-quantitative RT-PCR in mature zebrafish. Three-day post-fertilization (dpf) larvae were treated with 0, 0.08, 0.26, and 0.89 microM cadmium for 24 and 48 h, and some larvae were challenged with a normal (28.5 degrees C) or low temperature (12 degrees C) for 12, 24, and 48 h. Results were obtained. (1) During embryonic and larval development, mt2 mRNA existed at 6 h post-fertilization (hpf), and the level rapidly increased to 24 hpf, then it gradually increased with further larval growth. smt-B was found at 12 hpf, and it also rapidly increased to 24 hpf, but remained constant during further larval development. (2) The mt2 mRNA signals and whole-body Cd contents displayed dose- and time-dependent responses after Cd exposure. After cold shock, mt2 mRNA signals also showed time-dependent expression. But smt-B mRNA signals were not appeared by either challenge. Besides, mature zebrafish were treated with 1.78 microM Cd and found that the highest levels of smt-B mRNA (smt-B/beta-actin) appeared in brain, and seems a reverse expression between smt-B mRNA and mt2 in brain after Cd exposure. Apparently, mt2 is possibly more relevant to Cd detoxification and cold shock adaptation in zebrafish larvae compared to smt-B, but smt-B might be related to certain physiological functions in neural (or brain) of mature zebrafish.

  4. Discrimination of Psychrotrophic and Mesophilic Strains of the Bacillus cereus Group by PCR Targeting of Major Cold Shock Protein Genes

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Kevin P.; Mayr, Ralf; von Stetten, Felix; Stewart, Gordon S. A. B.; Scherer, Siegfried

    1998-01-01

    Detection of psychrotrophic strains (those able to grow at or below 7°C) of the Bacillus cereus group (Bacillus cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus mycoides) in food products is at present extremely slow with conventional microbiology. This is due to an inability to discriminate these cold-adapted strains from their mesophilic counterparts (those able to grow only above 7°C) by means other than growth at low temperature, which takes 5 to 10 days for detection. Here we report the development of a single PCR assay that, using major cold shock protein-specific primers and appropriate annealing temperatures, is capable of both rapidly identifying bacteria of the B. cereus group and discriminating between psychrotrophic and mesophilic strains. It is intended that this development help to more accurately predict the shelf life of refrigerated pasteurized food and dairy products and to reduce the incidence of food poisoning by psychrotrophic strains of the B. cereus group. PMID:9726910

  5. Transcriptome analysis of Arabidopsis mutants suggests a crosstalk between ABA, ethylene and GSH against combined cold and osmotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepak; Hazra, Saptarshi; Datta, Riddhi; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of ethylene and abscisic acid in providing stress tolerance and defence response to plants is widely recognized. However, little is known about the cross-talk between glutathione with ethylene and abscisic acid to combat stress in planta. Here, transcriptome analysis of combined cold and osmotic stress treated Arabidopsis mutants were carried out to elucidate the crosstalk between the abscisic acid, ethylene and glutathione. Microarray experiment revealed the differential regulation of about 2313 and 4131 transcripts in ein2 (ethylene insensitive mutant) and aba1.6 (abscisic acid mutant) respectively. Functional analysis exposed common down-regulated stress and defence, secondary metabolite biosynthesis viz. phenylpropanoid, lignin and flavonols, redox and transcription factors related genes in ein2, aba1.6 and pad2.1 (glutathione mutant) in response to combined stress treatment. The reduced glutathione content was less in stress treated mutants in comparison to Col-0. Again, selective down-regulated transcripts in stress treated mutants were noted up-regulated after glutathione feeding. Some of the important differentially expressed genes were also validated by comparative proteomics analysis of stress treated mutants. In summary, our results suggested the role of ethylene and abscisic acid in inducing stress-responsive genes and proteins by activating glutathione biosynthesis to combat abiotic stress conditions in plant system. PMID:27845361

  6. Physiologic cold shock of Moraxella catarrhalis affects the expression of genes involved in the iron acquisition, serum resistance and immune evasion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Moraxella catarrhalis, a major nasopharyngeal pathogen of the human respiratory tract, is exposed to rapid downshifts of environmental temperature when humans breathe cold air. It was previously shown that the prevalence of pharyngeal colonization and respiratory tract infections caused by M. catarrhalis are greatest in winter. The aim of this study was to investigate how M. catarrhalis uses the physiologic exposure to cold air to upregulate pivotal survival systems in the pharynx that may contribute to M. catarrhalis virulence. Results A 26°C cold shock induces the expression of genes involved in transferrin and lactoferrin acquisition, and enhances binding of these proteins on the surface of M. catarrhalis. Exposure of M. catarrhalis to 26°C upregulates the expression of UspA2, a major outer membrane protein involved in serum resistance, leading to improved binding of vitronectin which neutralizes the lethal effect of human complement. In contrast, cold shock decreases the expression of Hemagglutinin, a major adhesin, which mediates B cell response, and reduces immunoglobulin D-binding on the surface of M. catarrhalis. Conclusion Cold shock of M. catarrhalis induces the expression of genes involved in iron acquisition, serum resistance and immune evasion. Thus, cold shock at a physiologically relevant temperature of 26°C induces in M. catarrhalis a complex of adaptive mechanisms that enables the bacterium to target their host cellular receptors or soluble effectors and may contribute to enhanced growth, colonization and virulence. PMID:21838871

  7. The role of Xylella fastidiosa cold shock proteins in Pierce’s disease of grapes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pierce’s disease of grapevine, caused by the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) is limited to warmer climates, and plant infection can be eliminated by cold winter conditions. Milder winters can increase the likelihood of pathogen persistence from one growing season to the next. Cold adaptat...

  8. Diverse accumulation of several dehydrin-like proteins in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis), Arabidopsis thaliana and yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus) mitochondria under cold and heat stress.

    PubMed

    Rurek, Michal

    2010-08-18

    Dehydrins represent hydrophilic proteins acting mainly during cell dehydration and stress response. Dehydrins are generally thermostable; however, the so-called dehydrin-like (dehydrin-related) proteins show variable thermolability. Both groups immunoreact with antibodies directed against the K-segment of dehydrins. Plant mitochondrial dehydrin-like proteins are poorly characterized. The purpose of this study was to extend previous reports on plant dehydrins by comparing the level of immunoprecipitated dehydrin-like proteins in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis), Arabidopsis thaliana and yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus) mitochondria under cold and heat stress. All the analyzed plant species showed constitutive accumulation of thermostable mitochondrial putative dehydrins ranging from 50 to 70 kDa. The mitochondrial dehydrin-like proteins observed in cauliflower and Arabidopsis ranged from 10 to 100 kDa and in lupin imbibed seeds and hypocotyls--from 20 to 90 kDa. Cold treatment increased mainly the accumulation of 10-100 kDa cauliflower and Arabidopsis dehydrin-like proteins, in the patterns different in cauliflower leaf and inflorescence mitochondria. However, in lupin mitochondria, cold affected mainly 25-50 kDa proteins and seemed to induce the appearance of some novel dehydrin-like proteins. The influence of frost stress on cauliflower leaf mitochondrial dehydrin- like proteins was less significant. The impact of heat stress was less significant in lupin and Arabidopsis than in cauliflower inflorescence mitochondria. Cauliflower mitochondrial dehydrin-like proteins are localized mostly in the mitochondrial matrix; it seems that some of them may interact with mitochondrial membranes. All the results reveal an unexpectedly broad spectrum of dehydrin-like proteins accumulated during some abiotic stress in the mitochondria of the plant species analyzed. They display only limited similarity in size to those reported previously in maize, wheat and rye

  9. Diverse accumulation of several dehydrin-like proteins in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis), Arabidopsis thaliana and yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus) mitochondria under cold and heat stress

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dehydrins represent hydrophilic proteins acting mainly during cell dehydration and stress response. Dehydrins are generally thermostable; however, the so-called dehydrin-like (dehydrin-related) proteins show variable thermolability. Both groups immunoreact with antibodies directed against the K-segment of dehydrins. Plant mitochondrial dehydrin-like proteins are poorly characterized. The purpose of this study was to extend previous reports on plant dehydrins by comparing the level of immunoprecipitated dehydrin-like proteins in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis), Arabidopsis thaliana and yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus) mitochondria under cold and heat stress. Results All the analyzed plant species showed constitutive accumulation of thermostable mitochondrial putative dehydrins ranging from 50 to 70 kDa. The mitochondrial dehydrin-like proteins observed in cauliflower and Arabidopsis ranged from 10 to 100 kDa and in lupin imbibed seeds and hypocotyls - from 20 to 90 kDa. Cold treatment increased mainly the accumulation of 10-100 kDa cauliflower and Arabidopsis dehydrin-like proteins, in the patterns different in cauliflower leaf and inflorescence mitochondria. However, in lupin mitochondria, cold affected mainly 25-50 kDa proteins and seemed to induce the appearance of some novel dehydrin-like proteins. The influence of frost stress on cauliflower leaf mitochondrial dehydrin- like proteins was less significant. The impact of heat stress was less significant in lupin and Arabidopsis than in cauliflower inflorescence mitochondria. Cauliflower mitochondrial dehydrin-like proteins are localized mostly in the mitochondrial matrix; it seems that some of them may interact with mitochondrial membranes. Conclusions All the results reveal an unexpectedly broad spectrum of dehydrin-like proteins accumulated during some abiotic stress in the mitochondria of the plant species analyzed. They display only limited similarity in size to those reported previously

  10. Raffinose Synthesis in Chlorella vulgaris Cultures after a Cold Shock 1

    PubMed Central

    Salerno, Graciela L.; Pontis, Horacio G.

    1989-01-01

    Chlorella vulgaris cultures have been submitted to a chilling shock, bringing down the growing temperature from to 24°C to 4°C. Growth was stopped immediately, and concomitantly there was an accumulation of sucrose and a decrease in the starch content. The enzymes involved in sucrose metabolism were differentially affected by the chilling shock. Sucrose phosphate synthase activity increased while sucrose synthase was not affected. Simultaneously with the chilling shock, raffinose began to accumulate. When algal cultures were returned at 24°C, raffinose disappeared. The presence of raffinose in algal cells has not been reported before. PMID:16666596

  11. Model Uracil-Rich RNAs and Membrane Protein mRNAs Interact Specifically with Cold Shock Proteins in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Benhalevy, Daniel; Bochkareva, Elena S; Biran, Ido; Bibi, Eitan

    2015-01-01

    Are integral membrane protein-encoding mRNAs (MPRs) different from other mRNAs such as those encoding cytosolic mRNAs (CPRs)? This is implied from the emerging concept that MPRs are specifically recognized and delivered to membrane-bound ribosomes in a translation-independent manner. MPRs might be recognized through uracil-rich segments that encode hydrophobic transmembrane helices. To investigate this hypothesis, we designed DNA sequences encoding model untranslatable transcripts that mimic MPRs or CPRs. By utilizing in vitro-synthesized biotinylated RNAs mixed with Escherichia coli extracts, we identified a highly specific interaction that takes place between transcripts that mimic MPRs and the cold shock proteins CspE and CspC, which are normally expressed under physiological conditions. Co-purification studies with E. coli expressing 6His-tagged CspE or CspC confirmed that the specific interaction occurs in vivo not only with the model uracil-rich untranslatable transcripts but also with endogenous MPRs. Our results suggest that the evolutionarily conserved cold shock proteins may have a role, possibly as promiscuous chaperons, in the biogenesis of MPRs.

  12. UV irradiation/cold shock-mediated apoptosis is switched to bubbling cell death at low temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsin-Ping; Huang, Shenq-Shyang; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Hsu, Li-Jin; Chang, Nan-Shan

    2015-01-01

    When COS7 fibroblasts and other cells were exposed to UVC irradiation and cold shock at 4°C for 5 min, rapid upregulation and nuclear accumulation of NOS2, p53, WWOX, and TRAF2 occurred in 10–30 min. By time-lapse microscopy, an enlarging gas bubble containing nitric oxide (NO) was formed in the nucleus in each cell that finally popped out to cause “bubbling death”. Bubbling occurred effectively at 4 and 22°C, whereas DNA fragmentation was markedly blocked at 4°C. When temperature was increased to 37°C, bubbling was retarded and DNA fragmentation occurred in 1 hr, suggesting that bubbling death is switched to apoptosis with increasing temperatures. Bubbling occurred prior to nuclear uptake of propidium iodide and DAPI stains. Arginine analog Nω-LAME inhibited NO synthase NOS2 and significantly suppressed the bubbling death. Unlike apoptosis, there were no caspase activation and flip-over of membrane phosphatidylserine (PS) during bubbling death. Bubbling death was significantly retarded in Wwox knockout MEF cells, as well as in cells overexpressing TRAF2 and dominant-negative p53. Together, UV/cold shock induces bubbling death at 4°C and the event is switched to apoptosis at 37°C. Presumably, proapoptotic WWOX and p53 block the protective TRAF2 to execute the bubbling death. PMID:25779665

  13. [Changes in heat shock protein synthesis and thermotolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings as a result of inhibition of Hsp90 by geldanamycin].

    PubMed

    Kozeko, L G

    2014-01-01

    The influence of geldanamycin (GA), which is a specific inhibitor of heat shock protein Hsp90 activities, on synthesis of Hsp70 and Hsp90 and thermotolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings has been studied. Incubation of seedlings with GA was shown to induce synthesis of these stress proteins under normal conditions. Treatment of seeds with the Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in the elevated constitutive levels of Hsp70 and Hsp90 in seedlings as well as increased induction of their synthesis under heat shock, at that the effect of GA increased with its concentration. These up-regulation of Hsp promoted thermotolerance of seedlings. The obtained results are considered as evidence for autoregulation of heat shock protein synthesis and regulation of plant tolerance by Hsp90.

  14. Shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart cannot pump blood effectively. This may happen after a heart attack. Neurogenic shock is caused by damage to the nervous system. Symptoms of shock include Confusion or lack of alertness Loss of consciousness Sudden and ongoing rapid heartbeat Sweating Pale skin ...

  15. New insights into the genetic basis of natural chilling and cold shock tolerance in rice by genome-wide association analysis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yan; Guo, Zilong; Li, Xiaokai; Ye, Haiyan; Li, Xianghua; Xiong, Lizhong

    2016-03-01

    In order to understand cold adaptability and explore additional genetic resources for the cold tolerance improvement of rice, we investigated the genetic variation of 529 rice accessions under natural chilling and cold shock stress conditions at the seedling stage using genome-wide association studies; a total of 132 loci were identified. Among them, 12 loci were common for both chilling and cold shock tolerance, suggesting that rice has a distinct and overlapping genetic response and adaptation to the two stresses. Haplotype analysis of a known gene OsMYB2, which is involved in cold tolerance, revealed indica-japonica differentiation and latitude tendency for the haplotypes of this gene. By checking the subpopulation and geographical distribution of accessions with tolerance or sensitivity under these two stress conditions, we found that the chilling tolerance group, which mainly consisted of japonica accessions, has a wider latitudinal distribution than the chilling sensitivity group. We conclude that the genetic basis of natural chilling stress tolerance in rice is distinct from that of cold shock stress frequently used for low-temperature treatment in the laboratory and the cold adaptability of rice is associated with the subpopulation and latitudinal distribution. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Effect of a cold shock on the activity and composition of the communities of ammonium-oxidizing microorganisms in a chestnut soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherobaeva, A. S.; Stepanov, A. L.; Kravchenko, I. K.

    2012-05-01

    The simulation of a cold shock was performed in an incubation experiment with soil microcosms by a sharp decrease of the temperature to negative values and the subsequent analysis of the nitrification rate of the ammonium-oxidizing microorganisms. Three procedures of the cold shock effect were selected: long, short-time, and cyclic. A significant decrease of the nitrifying activity was recorded after the long effect, whereas the 8-, 16-, and 24-hour cold shocks did not affect the intensity of nitrification. A cyclic temperature decrease alternating with periods of incubation under high temperatures also did not affect the nitrifying activity of the microorganisms. We suppose that the domination of mesophilic microorganisms with a resistant enzyme system or of psychrophilic and psychrotolerant microorganisms contributes to the preservation of a high nitrification level in soils with frequent alternations of high and low temperatures.

  17. Leaves of the Arabidopsis maltose exporter1 Mutant Exhibit a Metabolic Profile with Features of Cold Acclimation in the Warm

    PubMed Central

    Purdy, Sarah J.; Bussell, John D.; Nunn, Christopher P.; Smith, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Arabidopsis plants accumulate maltose from starch breakdown during cold acclimation. The Arabidopsis mutant, maltose excess1-1, accumulates large amounts of maltose in the plastid even in the warm, due to a deficient plastid envelope maltose transporter. We therefore investigated whether the elevated maltose level in mex1-1 in the warm could result in changes in metabolism and physiology typical of WT plants grown in the cold. Principal Findings Grown at 21 °C, mex1-1 plants were much smaller, with fewer leaves, and elevated carbohydrates and amino acids compared to WT. However, after transfer to 4 °C the total soluble sugar pool and amino acid concentration was in equal abundance in both genotypes, although the most abundant sugar in mex1-1 was still maltose whereas sucrose was in greatest abundance in WT. The chlorophyll a/b ratio in WT was much lower in the cold than in the warm, but in mex1-1 it was low in both warm and cold. After prolonged growth at 4 °C, the shoot biomass, rosette diameter and number of leaves at bolting were similar in mex1-1 and WT. Conclusions The mex1-1 mutation in warm-grown plants confers aspects of cold acclimation, including elevated levels of sugars and amino acids and low chlorophyll a/b ratio. This may in turn compromise growth of mex1-1 in the warm relative to WT. We suggest that elevated maltose in the plastid could be responsible for key aspects of cold acclimation. PMID:24223944

  18. Tomato expressing Arabidopsis glutaredoxin gene AtGRXS17 confers tolerance to chilling stress via modulating cold responsive components

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ying; Wu, Qingyu; Sprague, Stuart A; Park, Jungeun; Oh, Myungmin; Rajashekar, C B; Koiwa, Hisashi; Nakata, Paul A; Cheng, Ninghui; Hirschi, Kendal D; White, Frank F; Park, Sunghun

    2015-01-01

    Chilling stress is a production constraint of tomato, a tropical origin, chilling-sensitive horticultural crop. The development of chilling tolerant tomato thus has significant potential to impact tomato production. Glutaredoxins (GRXs) are ubiquitous oxidoreductases, which utilize the reducing power of glutathione to reduce disulfide bonds of substrate proteins and maintain cellular redox homeostasis. Here, we report that tomato expressing Arabidopsis GRX gene AtGRXS17 conferred tolerance to chilling stress without adverse effects on growth and development. AtGRXS17-expressing tomato plants displayed lower ion leakage, higher maximal photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm) and increased accumulation of soluble sugar compared with wild-type plants after the chilling stress challenge. Furthermore, chilling tolerance was correlated with increased antioxidant enzyme activities and reduced H2O2 accumulation. At the same time, temporal expression patterns of the endogenous C-repeat/DRE-binding factor 1 (SlCBF1) and CBF mediated-cold regulated genes were not altered in AtGRXS17-expressing plants when compared with wild-type plants, and proline concentrations remained unchanged relative to wild-type plants under chilling stress. Green fluorescent protein -AtGRXS17 fusion proteins, which were initially localized in the cytoplasm, migrated into the nucleus during chilling stress, reflecting a possible role of AtGRXS17 in nuclear signaling of chilling stress responses. Together, our findings demonstrate that genetically engineered tomato plants expressing AtGRXS17 can enhance chilling tolerance and suggest a genetic engineering strategy to improve chilling tolerance without yield penalty across different crop species. PMID:26623076

  19. Overexpression of AtLEA3-3 confers resistance to cold stress in Escherichia coli and provides enhanced osmotic stress tolerance and ABA sensitivity in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pengshan; Liu, Fei; Ma, Miao; Gong, Jiao; Wang, Qiujun; Jia, Pengfei; Zheng, Guochang; Liu, Heng

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) group 3 proteins significantly respond to changes in environmental conditions. However, reports that demonstrate their biological role, especially in Arabidopsis, are notably limited. This study examines the functional roles of the Arabidopsis LEA group 3 proteins AtLEA3-3 and AtLEA3-4 in abiotic stress and ABA treatments. Expression of AtLEA3-3 and AtLEA3-4 is upregulated by ABA, high salinity, and osmotic stress. Results on the ectopic expression of AtLEA3-3 and AtLEA3-4 in E. coli suggest that both proteins play important roles in resistance to cold stress. Overexpression of AtLEA3-3 in Arabidopsis (AtLEA3-3-OE) confers salt and osmotic stress tolerance that is characterized during germination and early seedling establishment. However, AtLEA3-3-OE lines show sensitivity to ABA treatment during early seedling development. These results suggest that accumulation of AtLEA3-3 mRNA and/or proteins may help heterologous ABA re-initiate second dormancy during seedling establishment. Analysis of yellow fluorescent fusion proteins localization shows that AtLEA3-3 and AtLEA3-4 are mainly distributed in the ER and that AtLEA3-3 also localizes in the nucleus, and in response to salt, mannitol, cold, or BFA treatments, the localization of AtLEA3-3 and AtLEA3-4 is altered and becomes more condensed. Protein translocalization may be a positive and effective strategy for responding to abiotic stresses. Taken together, these results suggest that AtLEA3-3 has an important function during seed germination and seedling development of Arabidopsis under abiotic stress conditions.

  20. Cold tolerance in sealworm ( Pseudoterranova decipiens) due to heat-shock adaptations.

    PubMed

    Stormo, S K; Praebel, K; Elvevoll, E O

    2009-09-01

    Third-stage larvae of Pseudoterranova decipiens commonly infect whitefish such as cod, and the parasite can be transferred to humans through lightly prepared (sushi) meals. Because little is known about the nematode's cold tolerance capacity, we examined the nematode's ability to supercool, and whether or not cold acclimation could induce physiological changes that might increase its ability to tolerate freezing conditions. Even if third-stage Pseudoterranova decipiens larvae have some supercooling ability, they show no potential for freezing avoidance because they are not able to withstand inoculative freezing. Still, they have the ability to survive freezing at high subzero temperatures, something which suggests that these nematodes have a moderate freeze tolerance. We also show that acclimation to high temperatures triggers trehalose accumulation to an even greater extent than cold acclimation. Trehalose is a potential cryoprotectant which has been shown to play a vital role in the freeze tolerance of nematodes. We suggest that the trehalose accumulation observed for the cold acclimation is a general response to thermal stress, and that the nematode's moderate freeze tolerance may be acquired through adaptation to heat rather than coldness.

  1. Cassava C-repeat binding factor 1 gene responds to low temperature and enhances cold tolerance when overexpressed in Arabidopsis and cassava.

    PubMed

    An, Dong; Ma, Qiuxiang; Wang, Hongxia; Yang, Jun; Zhou, Wenzhi; Zhang, Peng

    2017-05-01

    Cassava MeCBF1 is a typical CBF transcription factor mediating cold responses but its low expression in apical buds along with a retarded response cause inefficient upregulation of downstream cold-related genes, rendering cassava chilling-sensitive. Low temperature is a major abiotic stress factor affecting survival, productivity and geographic distribution of important crops worldwide. The C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element binding transcription factors (CBF/DREB) are important regulators of abiotic stress response in plants. In this study, MeCBF1, a CBF-like gene, was identified in the tropical root crop cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz). The MeCBF1 encodes a protein that shares strong homology with DREB1As/CBFs from Arabidopsis as well as other species. The MeCBF1 was localized to the nucleus and is mainly expressed in stem and mature leaves, but not in apical buds or stem cambium. MeCBF1 expression was not only highly responsive to cold, but also significantly induced by salt, PEG and ABA treatment. Several stress-associated cis-elements were found in its promoter region, e.g., ABRE-related, MYC recognition sites, and MYB responsive element. Compared with AtCBF1, the MeCBF1 expression induced by cold in cassava was retarded and upregulated only after 4 h, which was also confirmed by its promoter activity. Overexpression of MeCBF1 in transgenic Arabidopsis and cassava plants conferred enhanced crytolerance. The CBF regulon was smaller and not entirely co-regulated with MeCBF1 expression in overexpressed cassava. The retarded MeCBF1 expression in response to cold and attenuated CBF-regulon might lead cassava to chilling sensitivity.

  2. Upregulation of Heat Shock Proteins is Essential for Cold Survival during Insect Diapause

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Diapause, the dormancy common to overwintering insects, evokes a unique pattern of gene expression. In the flesh fly most, but not all, of the fly’s heat shock proteins (Hsps) are upregulated. The diapause upregulated Hsps include two members of the Hsp70 family, one member of the Hsp60 family (TC...

  3. Spaceflight engages heat shock protein and other molecular chaperone genes in tissue culture cells of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zupanska, Agata K; Denison, Fiona C; Ferl, Robert J; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Gravity has been a major force throughout the evolution of terrestrial organisms, and plants have developed exquisitely sensitive, regulated tropisms and growth patterns that are based on the gravity vector. The nullified gravity during spaceflight allows direct assessment of gravity roles. The microgravity environments provided by the Space Shuttle and International Space Station have made it possible to seek novel insights into gravity perception at the organismal, tissue, and cellular levels. Cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana perceive and respond to spaceflight, even though they lack the specialized cell structures normally associated with gravity perception in intact plants; in particular, genes for a specific subset of heat shock proteins (HSPs) and factors (HSFs) are induced. Here we ask if similar changes in HSP gene expression occur during nonspaceflight changes in gravity stimulation. Quantitative RT-qPCR was used to evaluate mRNA levels for Hsp17.6A and Hsp101 in cell cultures exposed to four conditions: spaceflight (mission STS-131), hypergravity (centrifugation at 3 g or 16 g), sustained two-dimensional clinorotation, and transient milligravity achieved on parabolic flights. We showed that HSP genes were induced in cells only in response to sustained clinorotation. Transient microgravity intervals in parabolic flight and various hypergravity conditions failed to induce HSP genes. We conclude that nondifferentiated cells do indeed sense their gravity environment and HSP genes are induced only in response to prolonged microgravity or simulated microgravity conditions. We hypothesize that HSP induction upon microgravity indicates a role for HSP-related proteins in maintaining cytoskeletal architecture and cell shape signaling.

  4. Simultaneous Over-Expression of PaSOD and RaAPX in Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana Confers Cold Stress Tolerance through Increase in Vascular Lignifications

    PubMed Central

    Shafi, Amrina; Dogra, Vivek; Gill, Tejpal; Ahuja, Paramvir Singh; Sreenivasulu, Yelam

    2014-01-01

    Antioxidant enzymes play a significant role in eliminating toxic levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated during stress from living cells. In the present study, two different antioxidant enzymes namely copper-zinc superoxide dismutase derived from Potentilla astrisanguinea (PaSOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (RaAPX) from Rheum austral both of which are high altitude cold niche area plants of Himalaya were cloned and simultaneously over-expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana to alleviate cold stress. It was found that the transgenic plants over-expressing both the genes were more tolerant to cold stress than either of the single gene expressing transgenic plants during growth and development. In both single (PaSOD, RaAPX) and double (PaSOD + RaAPX) transgenic plants higher levels of total antioxidant enzyme activities, chlorophyll content, total soluble sugars, proline content and lower levels of ROS, ion leakage were recorded when compared to the WT during cold stress (4°C), besides increase in yield. In the present study, Confocal and SEM analysis in conjunction with qPCR data on the expression pattern of lignin biosynthetic pathway genes revealed that the cold stress tolerance of the transgenic plants might be because of the peroxide induced up-regulation of lignin by antioxidant genes mediated triggering. PMID:25330211

  5. A transcriptome resource for the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 under cold and high hydrostatic pressure shock stress.

    PubMed

    Jian, Huahua; Li, Shengkang; Tang, Xixiang; Xiao, Xiang

    2016-12-01

    Low temperature and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) are two of the most remarkable environmental factors influencing deep-sea ecosystem. The adaptive mechanisms of microorganisms which live in these extreme environments to low temperature and high pressure warrant investigation. In this study, the global gene expression patterns of the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 in response to cold (0 °C) and HHP (50 MPa) shock were evaluated through DNA microarray analysis. Results revealed that 22, 66, and 106 genes were differentially expressed after WP3 was respectively exposed to cold shock for 30, 60, and 90 min. Of these genes, 16 genes were identified as common differentially expressed genes (DEGs). After 30 min and 120 min of HHP shock, 5 and 10 genes were respectively identified as DEGs. The hierarchical clustering analysis of the DEG pattern indicated that WP3 may employ different adaptive strategies to cope with cold and HHP shock stress. Taken together, our study provided a transcriptome resource for deep-sea bacterial responses to cold and HHP stress. This study also established a basis for further investigations on environmental adaptive mechanisms utilized by benthic bacteria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Preferential translation mediated by Hsp81-3 5'-UTR during heat shock involves ribosome entry at the 5'-end rather than an internal site in Arabidopsis suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Hideyuki; Shinmyo, Atsuhiko; Kato, Ko

    2008-01-01

    Translational inhibition of most mRNAs and preferential translation of mRNAs coding heat shock proteins (Hsps) occur in most cells under heat shock stress. For most Hsp mRNAs, preferential translation in heat-shocked cells is conferred by their 5'-untranslated regions (5'-UTRs). However, the preferential translation directed by 5'-UTRs during heat shock remains mostly unknown in plants. Here, we found that the mRNA of Hsp81-3, which is an Arabidopsis Hsp90 family gene, continued to be associated with polysomes in heat-shocked Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells. The Hsp81-3 5'-UTR was found to contribute to the efficient translation of capped reporter mRNAs in heat-shocked Arabidopsis protoplasts using a transient expression assay. Further characterization of the Hsp81-3 5'-UTR revealed that the anterior half of the 5'-UTR is important for the efficient translation in heat-shocked protoplasts. Moreover, the Hsp81-3 5'-UTR was highly capable of enhancing translation from uncapped reporter mRNAs relative to the 5'-UTR of a housekeeping gene in both normal and heat-shocked protoplasts. These Hsp81-3 5'-UTR-directed translations both in capped and uncapped reporter mRNAs were substantially reduced by the insertion of an upstream AUG at the 5'-end of the 5'-UTR, indicating that ribosomes are recruited to the 5'-end of the Hsp81-3 5'-UTR regardless of temperature and the presence or absence of the cap structure. These results suggest that the preferential translation of Hsp81-3 mRNA in heat-shocked Arabidopsis cells involves a ribosome scanning from the 5'-end of the 5'-UTR rather than ribosome entry to the internal site.

  7. The bow shock, cold fronts and disintegrating cool core in the merging galaxy group RX J0751.3+5012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, H. R.; Fabian, A. C.; McNamara, B. R.; Edge, A. C.; Sanders, J. S.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Baum, S. A.; Donahue, M.; O'Dea, C. P.

    2014-10-01

    We present a new Chandra X-ray observation of the off-axis galaxy group merger RX J0751.3+5012. The hot atmospheres of the two colliding groups appear highly distorted by the merger. The images reveal arc-like cold fronts around each group core, produced by the motion through the ambient medium, and the first detection of a group merger shock front. We detect a clear density and temperature jump associated with a bow shock of Mach number M = 1.9 ± 0.4 ahead of the northern group. Using galaxy redshifts and the shock velocity of 1100 ± 300 km s-1, we estimate that the merger axis is only ˜10° from the plane of the sky. From the projected group separation of ˜90 kpc, this corresponds to a time since closest approach of ˜0.1 Gyr. The northern group hosts a dense, cool core with a ram pressure stripped tail of gas extending ˜100 kpc. The sheared sides of this tail appear distorted and broadened by Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. We use the presence of this substructure to place an upper limit on the magnetic field strength and, for Spitzer-like viscosity, show that the development of these structures is consistent with the critical perturbation length above which instabilities can grow in the intragroup medium. The northern group core also hosts a galaxy pair, UGC 4052, with a surrounding IR and near-UV ring ˜40 kpc in diameter. The ring may have been produced by tidal stripping of a smaller galaxy by UGC 4052 or it may be a collisional ring generated by a close encounter between the two large galaxies.

  8. Production of human β-actin and a mutant using a bacterial expression system with a cold shock vector.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Minoru; Ito, Katsunori; Kunihiro, Sachio; Yamasaki, Chihoko; Haragauchi, Mihoko

    2011-07-01

    Actin is the most abundant protein in the cytoplasm of most eukaryotic cells and is involved in a variety of cellular functions. It has been difficult to produce actin in bacterial expression systems in good yields. In this study, we developed a new simple method for the production of recombinant actin in Escherichia coli cells. Human β-actin was successfully expressed using a cold shock vector, pCold, in the bacterial expression system. The expressed β-actin (hexahistidine-tagged) was separated with a Ni-chelating resin, followed by a polymerization/depolymerization cycle or column chromatography with the Ni-chelating resin. The purified recombinant β-actin showed a normal polymerization ability compared with β-actin purified from human platelets. We produced a recombinant mutant actin with a Gly-168Arg mutation in the system and confirmed that it exhibited an impaired polymerization ability. The system developed in this study will provide a useful method for the production of actin isoforms and their mutants. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Cross-repressive interactions between SOC1 and the GATAs GNC and GNL/CGA1 in the control of greening, cold tolerance, and flowering time in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Richter, René; Bastakis, Emmanouil; Schwechheimer, Claus

    2013-08-01

    The paralogous and functionally redundant GATA transcription factors GNC (for GATA, NITRATE-INDUCIBLE, CARBON-METABOLISM INVOLVED) and GNL/CGA1 (for GNC-LIKE/CYTOKININ-RESPONSIVE GATA FACTOR1) from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) promote greening and repress flowering downstream from the phytohormone gibberellin. The target genes of GNC and GNL with regard to flowering time control have not been identified as yet. Here, we show by genetic and molecular analysis that the two GATA factors act upstream from the flowering time regulator SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1 (SOC1) to directly repress SOC1 expression and thereby repress flowering. Interestingly, this analysis inversely also reveals that the MADS box transcription factor SOC1 directly represses GNC and GNL expression to control cold tolerance and greening, two further physiological processes that are under the control of SOC1. In summary, these findings support the case of a cross-repressive interaction between the GATA factors GNC and GNL and the MADS box transcription factor SOC1 in flowering time control on the one side and greening and cold tolerance on the other that may be governed by the various signaling inputs that are integrated at the level of SOC1 expression.

  10. Comparison of plasma membrane proteomic changes of Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells (T87 Line) after cold and ABA treatment in association with freezing tolerance development.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Takahashi, Daisuke; Kawamura, Yukio; Uemura, Matsuo

    2012-03-01

    The plasma membrane (PM) is the primary site of freezing injury in plants. To determine global changes in PM protein profiles in association with freezing tolerance development, proteome analysis of the purified PM of Arabidopsis suspension-cultured cells (T87 line) was conducted with label-free protein quantification technology. Freezing tolerance of Arabidopsis cells at the lag growth phase (8 d old) increased after cold acclimation (CA) or ABA treatment. Proteome analysis assigned 658 proteins in the PM in total, of which 45.3% (298 proteins) were predicted to have transmembrane domains. They were classified into several functional categories, with the primary categories being proteins in transporters, signal transduction, protein destination and storage, and cell structure. After CA, 271 proteins increased and 111 proteins decreased. ABA treatment resulted in 185 increased and 56 decreased proteins. Of these, 139 increased and 49 decreased proteins were identified in common after both CA and ABA treatment. In addition, there were proteins specifically expressed in cold- (132 increased and 62 decreased) or ABA- (46 increased and 7 decreased) treated cells. Collectively, our results clearly show that (i) responses of the PM proteome to CA and ABA treatment overlap substantially but, at the same time, some proteins exhibited different response patterns in each treatment; and (ii) the majority of ABA-responsive proteins are CA-responsive proteins but not vice versa, suggesting complex interactions of CA and ABA signaling pathways in the PM proteome responses.

  11. Intergenic sequence between Arabidopsis caseinolytic protease B-cytoplasmic/heat shock protein100 and choline kinase genes functions as a heat-inducible bidirectional promoter.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ratnesh Chandra; Grover, Anil

    2014-11-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the At1g74310 locus encodes for caseinolytic protease B-cytoplasmic (ClpB-C)/heat shock protein100 protein (AtClpB-C), which is critical for the acquisition of thermotolerance, and At1g74320 encodes for choline kinase (AtCK2) that catalyzes the first reaction in the Kennedy pathway for phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis. Previous work has established that the knockout mutants of these genes display heat-sensitive phenotypes. While analyzing the AtClpB-C promoter and upstream genomic regions in this study, we noted that AtClpB-C and AtCK2 genes are head-to-head oriented on chromosome 1 of the Arabidopsis genome. Expression analysis showed that transcripts of these genes are rapidly induced in response to heat stress treatment. In stably transformed Arabidopsis plants harboring this intergenic sequence between head-to-head oriented green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase reporter genes, both transcripts and proteins of the two reporters were up-regulated upon heat stress. Four heat shock elements were noted in the intergenic region by in silico analysis. In the homozygous transfer DNA insertion mutant Salk_014505, 4,393-bp transfer DNA is inserted at position -517 upstream of ATG of the AtClpB-C gene. As a result, AtCk2 loses proximity to three of the four heat shock elements in the mutant line. Heat-inducible expression of the AtCK2 transcript was completely lost, whereas the expression of AtClpB-C was not affected in the mutant plants. Our results suggest that the 1,329-bp intergenic fragment functions as a heat-inducible bidirectional promoter and the region governing the heat inducibility is possibly shared between the two genes. We propose a model in which AtClpB-C shares its regulatory region with heat-induced choline kinase, which has a possible role in heat signaling.

  12. Universal Stress Protein Exhibits a Redox-Dependent Chaperone Function in Arabidopsis and Enhances Plant Tolerance to Heat Shock and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Young Jun; Melencion, Sarah Mae Boyles; Lee, Eun Seon; Park, Joung Hun; Alinapon, Cresilda Vergara; Oh, Hun Taek; Yun, Dae-Jin; Chi, Yong Hun; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2015-01-01

    Although a wide range of physiological information on Universal Stress Proteins (USPs) is available from many organisms, their biochemical, and molecular functions remain unidentified. The biochemical function of AtUSP (At3g53990) from Arabidopsis thaliana was therefore investigated. Plants over-expressing AtUSP showed a strong resistance to heat shock and oxidative stress, compared with wild-type and Atusp knock-out plants, confirming the crucial role of AtUSP in stress tolerance. AtUSP was present in a variety of structures including monomers, dimers, trimers, and oligomeric complexes, and switched in response to external stresses from low molecular weight (LMW) species to high molecular weight (HMW) complexes. AtUSP exhibited a strong chaperone function under stress conditions in particular, and this activity was significantly increased by heat treatment. Chaperone activity of AtUSP was critically regulated by the redox status of cells and accompanied by structural changes to the protein. Over-expression of AtUSP conferred a strong tolerance to heat shock and oxidative stress upon Arabidopsis, primarily via its chaperone function. PMID:26734042

  13. A seed preferential heat shock transcription factor from wheat provides abiotic stress tolerance and yield enhancement in transgenic Arabidopsis under heat stress environment.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Harsh; Khurana, Neetika; Agarwal, Preeti; Khurana, Jitendra P; Khurana, Paramjit

    2013-01-01

    Reduction in crop yield and quality due to various abiotic stresses is a worldwide phenomenon. In the present investigation, a heat shock factor (HSF) gene expressing preferentially in developing seed tissues of wheat grown under high temperatures was cloned. This newly identified heat shock factor possesses the characteristic domains of class A type plant HSFs and shows high similarity to rice OsHsfA2d, hence named as TaHsfA2d. The transcription factor activity of TaHsfA2d was confirmed through transactivation assay in yeast. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing TaHsfA2d not only possess higher tolerance towards high temperature but also showed considerable tolerance to salinity and drought stresses, they also showed higher yield and biomass accumulation under constant heat stress conditions. Analysis of putative target genes of AtHSFA2 through quantitative RT-PCR showed higher and constitutive expression of several abiotic stress responsive genes in transgenic Arabidopsis plants over-expressing TaHsfA2d. Under stress conditions, TaHsfA2d can also functionally complement the T-DNA insertion mutants of AtHsfA2, although partially. These observations suggest that TaHsfA2d may be useful in molecular breeding of crop plants, especially wheat, to improve yield under abiotic stress conditions.

  14. Improvement of Arabidopsis Biomass and Cold, Drought and Salinity Stress Tolerance by Modified Circadian Clock-Associated PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATORs.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Norihito; Takao, Saori; Kudo, Toru; Kiba, Takatoshi; Wang, Yin; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2016-05-01

    Plant circadian clocks control the timing of a variety of genetic, metabolic and physiological processes. Recent studies revealed a possible molecular mechanism for circadian clock regulation. Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR (PRR) genes, including TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1 (TOC1), encode clock-associated transcriptional repressors that act redundantly. Disruption of multiple PRR genes results in drastic phenotypes, including increased biomass and abiotic stress tolerance, whereas PRR single mutants show subtle phenotypic differences due to genetic redundancy. In this study, we demonstrate that constitutive expression of engineered PRR5 (PRR5-VP), which functions as a transcriptional activator, can increase biomass and abiotic stress tolerance, similar to prr multiple mutants. Concomitant analyses of relative growth rate, flowering time and photosynthetic activity suggested that increased biomass of PRR5-VP plants is mostly due to late flowering, rather than to alterations in photosynthetic activity or growth rate. In addition, genome-wide gene expression profiling revealed that genes related to cold stress and water deprivation responses were up-regulated in PRR5-VP plants. PRR5-VP plants were more resistant to cold, drought and salinity stress than the wild type, whereas ft tsf and gi, well-known late flowering and increased biomass mutants, were not. These findings suggest that attenuation of PRR function by a single transformation of PRR-VP is a valuable method for increasing biomass as well as abiotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis. Because the PRR gene family is conserved in vascular plants, PRR-VP may regulate biomass and stress responses in many plants, but especially in long-day annual plants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. ZmMKK4, a novel group C mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase in maize (Zea mays), confers salt and cold tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xiangpei; Pan, Jiaowen; Zhang, Maoying; Xing, Xin; Zhou, Yan; Liu, Yang; Li, Dapeng; Li, Dequan

    2011-08-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are signalling modules that transduce extracellular signalling to a range of cellular responses. Plant MAPK cascades have been implicated in development and stress response. In this study, we isolated a novel group C MAPKK gene, ZmMKK4, from maize. Northern blotting analysis revealed that the ZmMKK4 transcript expression was up-regulated by cold, high salt and exogenous H(2)O(2,) but down-regulated by exogenous abscisic acid (ABA). Over-expression of ZmMKK4 in Arabidopsis conferred tolerance to cold and salt stresses by increased germination rate, lateral root numbers, plant survival rate, chlorophyll, proline and soluble sugar contents, and antioxidant enzyme [peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT)] activities compared with control plants. Furthermore, ZmMKK4 enhanced a 37 kDa kinase activity after cold and salt stresses. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the transcript levels of stress-responsive transcription factors and functional genes were higher in ZmMKK4-over-expressing plants than in control plants. In addition, ZmMKK4 protein is localized in the nucleus. Taken together, these results indicate that ZmMKK4 is a positive regulator of salt and cold tolerance in plants. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Shock compression response of cold-rolled Ni/Al multilayer composites

    DOE PAGES

    Specht, Paul E.; Weihs, Timothy P.; Thadhani, Naresh N.

    2017-01-06

    Uniaxial strain, plate-on-plate impact experiments were performed on cold-rolled Ni/Al multilayer composites and the resulting Hugoniot was determined through time-resolved measurements combined with impedance matching. The experimental Hugoniot agreed with that previously predicted by two dimensional (2D) meso-scale calculations. Additional 2D meso-scale simulations were performed using the same computational method as the prior study to reproduce the experimentally measured free surface velocities and stress profiles. Finally, these simulations accurately replicated the experimental profiles, providing additional validation for the previous computational work.

  17. Interrelated Effects of Cold Shock and Osmotic Pressure on the Permeability of the Escherichia coli Membrane to Permease Accumulated Substrates1

    PubMed Central

    Leder, Irwin G.

    1972-01-01

    Permease studies are generally carried out by incubating cells in growth medium with labeled substrate, collecting the cells on microporous membrane filters, and washing them free from extracellular radioactivity with ice-cold medium. Studies of thiomethylgalactoside, valine, and galactose accumulation indicate that in several strains of Escherichia coli the bacterial membrane is exquisitely sensitive to isosmotic cold shock. Substrate pools formed at 25 C may suffer almost total loss if the cells are rapidly chilled to approximately 0 C during sampling. In glycerol-grown cells, this rapid efflux of substrate is prevented or minimized if the cells are subjected at the moment of cold shock to a simultaneous hyperosmotic transition. Because of this protective effect, the apparent size of a permease accumulated substrate pool is extremely sensitive to the osmotic composition of the incubation medium and may appear to be increased as much as 10-fold when the osmolarity is reduced from approximately 0.3 to 0.1 osmolar. These differences vanish when sampling and washing are carried out with medium at room temperature. It is suggested that isosmotic cold shock causes crystallization of the liquid-like lipids within the membrane. The hydrophilic channels created in this process would facilitate the rapid efflux of permease accumulated substrates. The imposition of a simultaneous hyperosmotic transition by dehydrating the cell periphery would cause increased lipid interaction, thus preserving the integrity of the cells membrane. PMID:4591477

  18. CspR, a Cold Shock RNA-Binding Protein Involved in the Long-Term Survival and the Virulence of Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Michaux, Charlotte; Martini, Cecilia; Shioya, Koki; Ahmed Lecheheb, Sandra; Budin-Verneuil, Aurélie; Cosette, Pascal; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Hartke, Axel; Verneuil, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    By coprecipitation, we identified RNA-binding proteins in the Gram-positive opportunistic pathogen Enterococcus faecalis known to be deficient of the RNA chaperone Hfq. In particular, we characterized one belonging to the cold shock protein (Csp) family (Ef2925) renamed CspR for cold shock protein RNA binding. Compared to the wild-type strain, the ΔcspR mutant was less virulent in an insect infection model (Galleria mellonella) and exhibited a decreased persistence in mouse kidneys and a low survival rate in peritoneal macrophages. As expected, we found that the ΔcspR mutant strain was more impaired in its growth than the parental strain under cold conditions and in its long-term survival under nutrient starvation. All these phenotypes were restored after complementation of the ΔcspR mutant. In addition, Western blot analysis showed that CspR was overexpressed under cold shock conditions and in the stationary phase. Since CspR may act as an RNA chaperone, putative targets were identified using a global proteomic approach completed with transcriptomic assays. This study revealed that 19 proteins were differentially expressed in the ΔcspR strain (9 upregulated, 10 downregulated) and that CspR mainly acted at the posttranscriptional level. These data highlight for the first time the role of the RNA-binding protein CspR as a regulator in E. faecalis and its requirement in stress response and virulence in this important human pathogen. PMID:23086208

  19. CspR, a cold shock RNA-binding protein involved in the long-term survival and the virulence of Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Michaux, Charlotte; Martini, Cecilia; Shioya, Koki; Ahmed Lecheheb, Sandra; Budin-Verneuil, Aurélie; Cosette, Pascal; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Hartke, Axel; Verneuil, Nicolas; Giard, Jean-Christophe

    2012-12-01

    By coprecipitation, we identified RNA-binding proteins in the Gram-positive opportunistic pathogen Enterococcus faecalis known to be deficient of the RNA chaperone Hfq. In particular, we characterized one belonging to the cold shock protein (Csp) family (Ef2925) renamed CspR for cold shock protein RNA binding. Compared to the wild-type strain, the ΔcspR mutant was less virulent in an insect infection model (Galleria mellonella) and exhibited a decreased persistence in mouse kidneys and a low survival rate in peritoneal macrophages. As expected, we found that the ΔcspR mutant strain was more impaired in its growth than the parental strain under cold conditions and in its long-term survival under nutrient starvation. All these phenotypes were restored after complementation of the ΔcspR mutant. In addition, Western blot analysis showed that CspR was overexpressed under cold shock conditions and in the stationary phase. Since CspR may act as an RNA chaperone, putative targets were identified using a global proteomic approach completed with transcriptomic assays. This study revealed that 19 proteins were differentially expressed in the ΔcspR strain (9 upregulated, 10 downregulated) and that CspR mainly acted at the posttranscriptional level. These data highlight for the first time the role of the RNA-binding protein CspR as a regulator in E. faecalis and its requirement in stress response and virulence in this important human pathogen.

  20. Transcript profiling of an Arabidopsis PSEUDO RESPONSE REGULATOR arrhythmic triple mutant reveals a role for the circadian clock in cold stress response.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Norihito; Kusano, Miyako; Fukushima, Atsushi; Kita, Masanori; Ito, Shogo; Yamashino, Takafumi; Saito, Kazuki; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Mizuno, Takeshi

    2009-03-01

    Arabidopsis PSEUDO RESPONSE REGULATOR (PRR) genes are components of the circadian clock mechanism. In order to understand the scope of genome-wide transcriptional regulation by PRR genes, a comparison survey of gene expression in wild-type Arabidopsis and a prr9-11 prr7-10 prr5-10 triple mutant (d975) using mRNA collected during late daytime was conducted using an Affymetrix ATH-1 GeneChip. The expression of 'night genes' increased and the expression of 'day genes' decreased toward the end of the diurnal light phase, but expression of these genes was essentially constant in d975. The expression levels of 'night genes' were lower, whereas the expression of 'day genes' was higher in d975 than in the wild type. Bioinformatics approaches have indicated that the set of up-regulated genes in d975 and the set of cold-responsive genes have significant overlap. We found that d975 is more tolerant to cold, high salinity and drought stresses than the wild type. In addition, dehydration-responsive element B1/C-repeat-binding factor (DREB1/CBF), which is expressed around mid-day, is more highly expressed in d975. Raffinose and L-proline accumulated at higher levels in d975 even when plants were grown under normal conditions. These results suggest that PRR9, PRR7 and PRR5 are involved in a mechanism that anticipates diurnal cold stress and which initiates a stress response by mediating cyclic expression of stress response genes, including DREB1/CBF.

  1. Shock.

    PubMed

    Wacker, David A; Winters, Michael E

    2014-11-01

    Critically ill patients with undifferentiated shock are complex and challenging cases in the ED. A systematic approach to assessment and management is essential to prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. The simplified, systematic approach described in this article focuses on determining the presence of problems with cardiac function (the pump), intravascular volume (the tank), or systemic vascular resistance (the pipes). With this approach, the emergency physician can detect life-threatening conditions and implement time-sensitive therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. "Shocking" masculinity: Stanley Milgram, "obedience to authority," and the "crisis of manhood" in Cold War America.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Ian

    2011-06-01

    Stanley Milgram's study of "obedience to authority" is one of the best-known psychological experiments of the twentieth century. This essay examines the study's special charisma through a detailed consideration of the intellectual, cultural, and gender contexts of Cold War America. It suggests that Milgram presented not a "timeless" experiment on "human nature" but, rather, a historically contingent, scientifically sanctioned "performance" of American masculinity at a time of heightened male anxiety. The essay argues that this gendered context invested the obedience experiments with an extraordinary plausibility, immediacy, and relevance. Immersed in a discourse of masculinity besieged, many Americans read the obedience experiments not as a fanciful study of laboratory brutality but as confirmation of their worst fears. Milgram's extraordinary success thus lay not in his "discovery" of the fragility of individual conscience but in his theatrical flair for staging culturally relevant masculine performances.

  3. Expression of selected Ginkgo biloba heat shock protein genes after cold treatment could be induced by other abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fuliang; Cheng, Hua; Cheng, Shuiyuan; Li, Linling; Xu, Feng; Yu, Wanwen; Yuan, Honghui

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play various stress-protective roles in plants. In this study, three HSP genes were isolated from a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library of Ginkgo biloba leaves treated with cold stress. Based on the molecular weight, the three genes were designated GbHSP16.8, GbHSP17 and GbHSP70. The full length of the three genes were predicted to encode three polypeptide chains containing 149 amino acids (Aa), 152 Aa, and 657 Aa, and their corresponding molecular weights were predicted as follows: 16.67 kDa, 17.39 kDa, and 71.81 kDa respectively. The three genes exhibited distinctive expression patterns in different organs or development stages. GbHSP16.8 and GbHSP70 showed high expression levels in leaves and a low level in gynoecia, GbHSP17 showed a higher transcription in stamens and lower level in fruit. This result indicates that GbHSP16.8 and GbHSP70 may play important roles in Ginkgo leaf development and photosynthesis, and GbHSP17 may play a positive role in pollen maturation. All three GbHSPs were up-regulated under cold stress, whereas extreme heat stress only caused up-regulation of GbHSP70, UV-B treatment resulted in up-regulation of GbHSP16.8 and GbHSP17, wounding treatment resulted in up-regulation of GbHSP16.8 and GbHSP70, and abscisic acid (ABA) treatment caused up-regulation of GbHSP70 primarily.

  4. Expression of Selected Ginkgo biloba Heat Shock Protein Genes After Cold Treatment Could Be Induced by Other Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Fuliang; Cheng, Hua; Cheng, Shuiyuan; Li, Linling; Xu, Feng; Yu, Wanwen; Yuan, Honghui

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play various stress-protective roles in plants. In this study, three HSP genes were isolated from a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library of Ginkgo biloba leaves treated with cold stress. Based on the molecular weight, the three genes were designated GbHSP16.8, GbHSP17 and GbHSP70. The full length of the three genes were predicted to encode three polypeptide chains containing 149 amino acids (Aa), 152 Aa, and 657 Aa, and their corresponding molecular weights were predicted as follows: 16.67 kDa, 17.39 kDa, and 71.81 kDa respectively. The three genes exhibited distinctive expression patterns in different organs or development stages. GbHSP16.8 and GbHSP70 showed high expression levels in leaves and a low level in gynoecia, GbHSP17 showed a higher transcription in stamens and lower level in fruit. This result indicates that GbHSP16.8 and GbHSP70 may play important roles in Ginkgo leaf development and photosynthesis, and GbHSP17 may play a positive role in pollen maturation. All three GbHSPs were up-regulated under cold stress, whereas extreme heat stress only caused up-regulation of GbHSP70, UV-B treatment resulted in up-regulation of GbHSP16.8 and GbHSP17, wounding treatment resulted in up-regulation of GbHSP16.8 and GbHSP70, and abscisic acid (ABA) treatment caused up-regulation of GbHSP70 primarily. PMID:22754330

  5. Molecular Cloning and Induced Expression of Six Small Heat Shock Proteins Mediating Cold-Hardiness in Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Juan; Shi, Zuo-Kun; Shen, Qi-Da; Xu, Cai-Di; Wang, Bing; Meng, Zhao-Jun; Wang, Shi-Gui; Tang, Bin; Wang, Su

    2017-01-01

    The main function of small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) as molecular chaperones is to protect proteins from denaturation under adverse conditions. Molecular and physiological data were used to examine the sHSPs underlying cold-hardiness in Harmonia axyridis. Complementary DNA sequences were obtained for six H. axyridis sHSPs based on its transcriptome, and the expression of the genes coding for these sHSPs was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) in several developmental stages, under short-term cooling or heating conditions, and in black and yellow females of experimental and overwintering populations under low-temperature storage. In addition, we measured water content and the super cooling and freezing points (SCP and FP, respectively) of H. axyridis individuals from experimental and overwintering populations. The average water content was not significantly different between adults of both populations, but the SCP and FP of the overwintering population were significantly lower than that of the experimental population. Overall, the six sHSPs genes showed different expression patterns among developmental stages. In the short-term cooling treatment, Hsp16.25 and Hsp21.00 expressions first increased and then decreased, while Hsp10.87 and Hsp21.56 expressions increased during the entire process. Under short-term heating, the expressions of Hsp21.00, Hsp21.62, Hsp10.87, and Hsp16.25 showed an increasing trend, whereas Hsp36.77 first decreased and then increased. Under low-temperature storage conditions, the expression of Hsp36.77 decreased, while the expressions of Hsp21.00 and Hsp21.62 were higher than that of the control group in the experimental population. The expression of Hsp36.77 first increased and then decreased, whereas Hsp21.56 expression was always higher than that of the control group in the overwintering population. Thus, differences in sHSPs gene expression were correlated with the H. axyridis forms, suggesting that the mechanism of cold

  6. Molecular Cloning and Induced Expression of Six Small Heat Shock Proteins Mediating Cold-Hardiness in Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui-Juan; Shi, Zuo-Kun; Shen, Qi-Da; Xu, Cai-Di; Wang, Bing; Meng, Zhao-Jun; Wang, Shi-Gui; Tang, Bin; Wang, Su

    2017-01-01

    The main function of small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) as molecular chaperones is to protect proteins from denaturation under adverse conditions. Molecular and physiological data were used to examine the sHSPs underlying cold-hardiness in Harmonia axyridis. Complementary DNA sequences were obtained for six H. axyridis sHSPs based on its transcriptome, and the expression of the genes coding for these sHSPs was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) in several developmental stages, under short-term cooling or heating conditions, and in black and yellow females of experimental and overwintering populations under low-temperature storage. In addition, we measured water content and the super cooling and freezing points (SCP and FP, respectively) of H. axyridis individuals from experimental and overwintering populations. The average water content was not significantly different between adults of both populations, but the SCP and FP of the overwintering population were significantly lower than that of the experimental population. Overall, the six sHSPs genes showed different expression patterns among developmental stages. In the short-term cooling treatment, Hsp16.25 and Hsp21.00 expressions first increased and then decreased, while Hsp10.87 and Hsp21.56 expressions increased during the entire process. Under short-term heating, the expressions of Hsp21.00, Hsp21.62, Hsp10.87, and Hsp16.25 showed an increasing trend, whereas Hsp36.77 first decreased and then increased. Under low-temperature storage conditions, the expression of Hsp36.77 decreased, while the expressions of Hsp21.00 and Hsp21.62 were higher than that of the control group in the experimental population. The expression of Hsp36.77 first increased and then decreased, whereas Hsp21.56 expression was always higher than that of the control group in the overwintering population. Thus, differences in sHSPs gene expression were correlated with the H. axyridis forms, suggesting that the mechanism of cold

  7. Altered growth, pigmentation, and antimicrobial susceptibility properties of Staphylococcus aureus due to loss of the major cold shock gene cspB.

    PubMed

    Duval, Brea D; Mathew, Anselmo; Satola, Sarah W; Shafer, William M

    2010-06-01

    An insertional mutation made in the major cold shock gene cspB in Staphylococcus aureus strain COL, a methicillin-resistant clinical isolate, yielded a mutant that displayed a reduced capacity to respond to cold shock and many phenotypic characteristics of S. aureus small-colony variants: a growth defect at 37 degrees C, a reduction in pigmentation, and altered levels of susceptibility to many antimicrobials. In particular, a cspB null mutant displayed increased resistance to aminoglycosides, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and paraquat and increased susceptibility to daptomycin, teicoplanin, and methicillin. With the exception of the increased susceptibility to methicillin, which was due to a complete loss of the type I staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element, these properties were restored to wild-type levels by complementation when cspB was expressed in trans. Taken together, our results link a stress response protein (CspB) of S. aureus to important phenotypic properties that include resistance to certain antimicrobials.

  8. Purification, characterization and safety assessment of the introduced cold shock protein B in DroughtGard maize.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cunxi; Burzio, Luis A; Koch, Michael S; Silvanovich, Andre; Bell, Erin

    2015-03-01

    DroughtGard maize was developed through constitutive expression of cold shock protein B (CSPB) from Bacillus subtilis to improve performance of maize (Zea mays) under water-limited conditions. B. subtilis commonly occurs in fermented foods and CSPB has a history of safe use. Safety studies were performed to further evaluate safety of CSPB introduced into maize. CSPB was compared to proteins found in current allergen and protein toxin databases and there are no sequence similarities between CSPB and known allergens or toxins. In order to validate the use of Escherichia coli-derived CSPB in other safety studies, physicochemical and functional characterization confirmed that the CSPB produced by DroughtGard possesses comparable molecular weight, immunoreactivity, and functional activity to CSPB produced from E. coli and that neither is glycosylated. CSPB was completely digested with sequential exposure to pepsin and pancreatin for 2 min and 30 s, respectively, suggesting that CSPB will be degraded in the mammalian digestive tract and would not be expected to be allergenic. Mice orally dosed with CSPB at 2160 mg/kg, followed by analysis of body weight gains, food consumption and clinical observations, showed no discernible adverse effects. This comprehensive safety assessment indicated that the CSPB protein from DroughtGard is safe for food and feed consumption.

  9. Similarity and difference in the unfolding of thermophilic and mesophilic cold shock proteins studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoqin; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2006-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to unfold a homologous pair of thermophilic and mesophilic cold shock proteins at high temperatures. The two proteins differ in just 11 of 66 residues and have very similar structures with a closed five-stranded antiparallel beta-barrel. A long flexible loop connects the N-terminal side of the barrel, formed by three strands (beta1-beta3), with the C-terminal side, formed by two strands (beta4-beta5). The two proteins were found to follow the same unfolding pathway, but with the thermophilic protein showing much slower unfolding. Unfolding started with the melting of C-terminal strands, leading to exposure of the hydrophobic core. Subsequent melting of beta3 and the beta-hairpin formed by the first two strands then resulted in unfolding of the whole protein. The slower unfolding of the thermophilic protein could be attributed to ion pair formation of Arg-3 with Glu-46, Glu-21, and the C-terminal. These ion pairs were also found to be important for the difference in folding stability between the pair of proteins. Thus electrostatic interactions appear to play similar roles in the difference in folding stability and kinetics between the pair of proteins.

  10. Cold Shock Domain Family Members YB-1 and MSY4 Share Essential Functions during Murine Embryogenesis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhi Hong; Books, Jason T.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2006-01-01

    Three cold shock domain (CSD) family members (YB-1, MSY2, and MSY4) exist in vertebrate species ranging from frogs to humans. YB-1 is expressed throughout embryogenesis and is ubiquitously expressed in adult animals; it protects cells from senescence during periods of proliferative stress. YB-1-deficient embryos die unexpectedly late in embryogenesis (embryonic day 18.5 [E18.5] to postnatal day 1) with a runting phenotype. We have now determined that MSY4, but not MSY2, is also expressed during embryogenesis; its abundance declines substantially from E9.5 to E17.5 and is undetectable on postnatal day 1(adult mice express MSY4 in testes only). Whole-mount analysis revealed similar patterns of YB-1 and MSY4 RNA expression in E11.5 embryos. To determine whether MSY4 delays the death of YB-1-deficient embryos, we created and analyzed MSY4-deficient mice and then generated YB-1 and MSY4 double-knockout embryos. MSY4 is dispensable for normal development and survival, but the testes of adult mice have excessive spermatocyte apoptosis and seminiferous tubule degeneration. Embryos doubly deficient for YB-1 and MSY4 are severely runted and die much earlier (E8.5 to E11.5) than YB-1-deficient embryos, suggesting that MSY4 indeed shares critical cellular functions with YB-1 in the embryonic tissues where they are coexpressed. PMID:16954378

  11. Recognition of T-rich single-stranded DNA by the cold shock protein Bs-CspB in solution

    PubMed Central

    Zeeb, Markus; Max, Klaas E.A.; Weininger, Ulrich; Löw, Christian; Sticht, Heinrich; Balbach, Jochen

    2006-01-01

    Cold shock proteins (CSP) belong to the family of single-stranded nucleic acid binding proteins with OB-fold. CSP are believed to function as ‘RNA chaperones’ and during anti-termination. We determined the solution structure of Bs-CspB bound to the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) fragment heptathymidine (dT7) by NMR spectroscopy. Bs-CspB reveals an almost invariant conformation when bound to dT7 with only minor reorientations in loop β1–β2 and β3–β4 and of few aromatic side chains involved in base stacking. Binding studies of protein variants and mutated ssDNA demonstrated that Bs-CspB associates with ssDNA at almost diffusion controlled rates and low sequence specificity consistent with its biological function. A variation of the ssDNA affinity is accomplished solely by changes of the dissociation rate. 15N NMR relaxation and H/D exchange experiments revealed that binding of dT7 increases the stability of Bs-CspB and reduces the sub-nanosecond dynamics of the entire protein and especially of loop β3–β4. PMID:16956971

  12. A novel B cell epitope in cold-shock DEAD-box protein A from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanan; Zhu, Ting; Yu, Shenye; Liu, Huifang; Wang, Xiumei; Chen, Liping; Si, Wei; Pang, Hai; Liu, Siguo

    2013-06-01

    In this study, a hybridoma-based technique and phage display technology were used to obtain mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against cold-shock DEAD-box protein A (CsdA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and to determine the location of the relevant epitope. One highly specific mAb, named A3G5, was developed against the recombinant CsdA protein (rCsdA) and could detect rCsdA protein in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and Western blot assays. By screening a phage displayed library of random 12-mers (Ph.D.-12), 10 positive phage clones were randomly selected after three rounds of bio-panning and identified by ELISA. Eight of these clones were sequenced, and their amino acid sequences were deduced. One B-cell epitope (-APDPPLSRR-) in the rCsdA protein was identified with mAb A3G5. A synthetic peptide (-MAPDPPLSRR-) (Cpep) matched well with the CsdA sequence at 443-451 aa and was confirmed by affinity ELISA, competitive inhibition assays and the development of an immune response in mice. These results may be of great potential value in the further analysis of the function and structure of the CsdA protein from M. tuberculosis.

  13. Interaction of the main cold shock protein CS7.4 (CspA) of Escherichia coli with the promoter region of hns.

    PubMed

    Brandi, A; Pon, C L; Gualerzi, C O

    1994-01-01

    Escherichia coli protein CS7.4 (CspA), homologous to the class of eukaryotic Y-box DNA-binding proteins, is a cold shock transcriptional activator of at least two genes, hns and gyrA. It was demonstrated that all or nearly all the elements necessary for the stimulation of hns transcription by CS7.4 protein are located in the proximal 110 bp DNA fragment of this gene with no additional elements being present in a longer fragment (660 bp) extending further upstream from the hns promoter. Protein CS7.4 bound strongly to the 110 bp segment of the hns promoter in crude extracts of cold shocked cells, but the purified protein displayed a weak interaction with the same DNA fragment. Purified CS7.4 protein also caused increased or decreased accessibility to DNase I at different sites of the 110 bp fragment of hns but the majority of these effects was seen only in the presence of RNA polymerase. Since gel shift experiments showed that protein CS7.4 stimulated the binding of RNA polymerase to the promoter of hns and since it is known that there are similarities between CS7.4 and ssDNA-binding proteins, we suggest that formation of the open complex by the RNA polymerase or protein-protein contacts between CS7.4 and the RNA polymerase are prerequisites for and/or the effects of the interaction of CS7.4 with its DNA target. The presence of a conserved CCAAT element in the hns promoter region, on the other hand, was found not to be stringently required for cold shock activation since expression of E coli of an hns-cat fusion containing the Proteus vulgaris hns promoter lacking a CCAAT box increased over four-fold after cold shock.

  14. Differential distribution of Y-box-binding protein 1 and cold shock domain protein A in developing and adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Lindquist, Jonathan A; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Brandt, Sabine; Steiner, Johann; Bogerts, Bernhard; Mertens, Peter R

    2015-07-01

    The two cold shock domain containing proteins, Y-box-binding protein-1 and cold shock domain protein A were immunolocalized in developing and adult human brain. With the exception of a small population of hypothalamic astrocytes, brain Y-box-binding protein-1 was predominantly found in multiple neurons in the mature human CNS, which might be related to its involvement in neurotransmission and other neuron-associated functions. Cold shock domain protein A was typically observed in astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, choroid plexus epithelia and nerve fibers. However, in circumscribed brain regions as hypothalamus, habenula, and cerebellum, this protein was also expressed in neurons. In the prenatal brain, both proteins were found to be abundantly expressed in radial glial cells, neuroblasts and neurons, which might be an anatomical correlate of the proposed roles of both proteins in cell proliferation and differentiation. In addition, Y-box-binding protein-1 was identified in cultured, lipopolysaccharide-stimulated microglial cells, which underscores its putative role as a mediator in immune and inflammatory processes.

  15. Cold activation of a plasma membrane-tethered NAC transcription factor induces a pathogen resistance response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Seo, Pil Joon; Kim, Mi Jung; Park, Ju-Young; Kim, Sun-Young; Jeon, Jin; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Jungmook; Park, Chung-Mo

    2010-02-01

    Cold signals interact with other environmental cues to modulate plant developmental processes. Recent studies have shown that many Pathogenesis-Related (PR) genes are induced and disease resistance is enhanced after exposure to low temperatures, linking cold signals with pathogenesis in plants. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and signaling schemes are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that cold stimulates proteolytic activation of a plasma membrane-tethered NAC (NAM/ATAF1/2/CUC2) transcription factor NTL6. The transcriptionally active NTL6 protein enters the nucleus, where it induces a subset of PR genes by directly binding to a conserved sequence in the promoters of cold-responsive PR genes, such as PR1, PR2, and PR5. While transgenic plants overexpressing an active NTL6 form exhibited enhanced disease resistance, RNAi plants with reduced NTL6 activity were more susceptible to pathogen infection at low temperatures. Accordingly, cold induction of PR1 disappeared in the RNAi plants. Consistent with the close relationship between cold and pathogenesis, cold-acclimated plants showed enhanced resistance to pathogen infection. In this signaling cascade, controlled activation of the membrane-tethered, dormant NTL6 transcription factor serves as a molecular link that incorporates cold signals into pathogen resistance responses. However, the NTL6-mediated cold induction of the PR genes is independent of salicylic acid (SA). The PR genes were still induced by SA in the NTL6 RNAi plants. Cold regulation of the PR genes through the membrane-mediated transcriptional control is thought to be an adaptive process that ensures quick plant responses to incoming pathogens that frequently occur during cold seasons.

  16. Common and distinct functions of Arabidopsis class A1 and A2 heat shock factors in diverse abiotic stress responses and development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsiang-chin; Charng, Yee-yung

    2013-09-01

    There are 21 heat shock factor (HSF) homologs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), of which members of class A1 (HSFA1a/HSFA1b/HSFA1d/HSFA1e) play the major role in activating the transcription of heat-induced genes, including HSFA2. Once induced, HSFA2 becomes the dominant HSF and is able to form heterooligomeric complexes with HSFA1. However, whether HSFA2 could function independently as a transcription regulator in the absence of the HSFA1s was undetermined. To address this question, we introduced a Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter:HSFA2 construct into hsfa1a/hsfa1b/hsfa1d/hsfa1e quadruple knockout (QK) and wild-type (Wt) backgrounds to yield transgenic lines A2QK and A2Wt, respectively. Constitutive expression of HSFA2 rescued the developmental defects of the QK mutant and promoted callus formation in A2QK, but not in A2Wt, after heat treatment. Transcriptome analysis showed that heat stress response genes are differentially regulated by the HSFA1s and HSFA2; the genes involved in metabolism and redox homeostasis are preferentially regulated by HSFA2, while HSFA1-preferring genes are enriched in transcription function. Ectopic expression of HSFA2 complemented the defects of QK in tolerance to different heat stress regimes, and to hydrogen peroxide, but not to salt and osmotic stresses. Furthermore, we showed that HSFA1a/HSFA1b/HSFA1d are involved in thermotolerance to mild heat stress at temperatures as low as 27°C. We also noticed subfunctionalization of the four Arabidopsis A1-type HSFs in diverse abiotic stress responses. Overall, this study reveals the overlapping and distinct functions of class A1 and A2 HSFs and may enable more precise use of HSFs in engineering stress tolerance in the future.

  17. The CLO3403/CLO3404 two-component system of Clostridium botulinum E1 Beluga is important for cold shock response and growth at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Mascher, Gerald; Derman, Yagmur; Kirk, David G; Palonen, Eveliina; Lindström, Miia; Korkeala, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    In order to survive a temperature downshift, bacteria have to sense the changing environment and adjust their metabolism and structure. Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs) play a central role in sensing and responding to many different environmental stimuli. Although the nonproteolytic (group II) Clostridium botulinum represents a major hazard in chilled foods, the cold adaption mechanisms of group II C. botulinum organisms are not known. Here, we show that the CLO3403/CLO3404 TCS of C. botulinum E1 Beluga is involved in the cold shock response and growth at 12°C. Cold shock induced the expression of the genes encoding the histidine kinase (clo3403) and the response regulator (clo3404) by more than 100-fold after 5 h relative to their expression in a nonshocked culture at the corresponding time point. The involvement of CLO3403/CLO3404 in growth at low temperature was demonstrated by impaired growth of the insertional clo3403 and clo3404 knockout mutants at 12°C compared to the growth of the wild-type culture. Additionally, the inactivation of clo3403 had a negative effect on motility. The growth efficiency at 12°C of the TCS mutants and the motility of the kinase mutants were restored by introducing a plasmid harboring the operon of the CLO3403/CLO3404 TCS. The results suggest that the CLO3403/CLO3404 TCS is important for the cold tolerance of C. botulinum E1 Beluga.

  18. A mutation in Thermosensitive Male Sterile 1, encoding a heat shock protein with DnaJ and PDI domains, leads to thermosensitive gametophytic male sterility in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke-Zhen; Xia, Chuan; Liu, Xiao-Lei; Dou, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Wei; Chen, Li-Qun; Zhang, Xue-Qin; Xie, Li-Fen; He, Luyan; Ma, Xuan; Ye, De

    2009-03-01

    In most flowering plant species, pollination and fertilization occur during the hot summer, so plants must have evolved a mechanism that ensures normal growth of their pollen tubes at high temperatures. Despite its importance to plant reproduction, little is known about the molecular basis of thermotolerance in pollen tubes. Here we report the identification and characterization of a novel Arabidopsis gene, Thermosensitive Male Sterile 1 (TMS1), which plays an important role in thermotolerance of pollen tubes. TMS1 encodes a Hsp40-homologous protein with a DnaJ domain and an a_ERdj5_C domain found in protein disulfide isomerases (PDI). Purified TMS1 expressed in Escherichia coli (BL21 DE3) had the reductive activity of PDI. TMS1 was expressed in pollen grains, pollen tubes and other vegetative tissues, including leaves, stems and roots. Heat shock treatment at 37 degrees C increased its expression levels in growing pollen tubes as well as in vegetative tissues. A knockout mutation in TMS1 grown at 30 degrees C had greatly retarded pollen tube growth in the transmitting tract, resulting in a significant reduction in male fertility. Our study suggests that TMS1 is required for thermotolerance of pollen tubes in Arabidopsis, possibly by functioning as a co-molecular chaperone.

  19. Transcriptional regulation of heat shock proteins and ascorbate peroxidase by CtHsfA2b from African bermudagrass conferring heat tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuyun; Huang, Wanlu; Yang, Zhimin; Liu, Jun; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress transcription factor A2s (HsfA2s) are key regulators in plant response to high temperature. Our objectives were to isolate an HsfA2 gene (CtHsfA2b) from a warm-season grass species, African bermudagrass (Cynodon transvaalensis Burtt-Davy), and to determine the physiological functions and transcriptional regulation of HsfA2 for improving heat tolerance. Gene expression analysis revealed that CtHsfA2b was heat-inducible and exhibited rapid response to increasing temperature. Ectopic expression of CtHsfA2b improved heat tolerance in Arabidopsis and restored heat-sensitive defects of Arabidopsis hsfa2 mutant, which was demonstrated by higher survival rate and photosynthetic parameters, and lower electrolyte leakage in transgenic plants compared to the WT or hsfa2 mutant. CtHsfA2b transgenic plants showed elevated transcriptional regulation of several downstream genes, including those encoding ascorbate peroxidase (AtApx2) and heat shock proteins [AtHsp18.1-CI, AtHsp22.0-ER, AtHsp25.3-P and AtHsp26.5-P(r), AtHsp70b and AtHsp101-3]. CtHsfA2b was found to bind to the heat shock element (HSE) on the promoter of AtApx2 and enhanced transcriptional activity of AtApx2. These results suggested that CtHsfA2b could play positive roles in heat protection by up-regulating antioxidant defense and chaperoning mechanisms. CtHsfA2b has the potential to be used as a candidate gene to genetically modify cool-season species for improving heat tolerance. PMID:27320381

  20. PprM, a Cold Shock Domain-Containing Protein from Deinococcus radiodurans, Confers Oxidative Stress Tolerance to Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun-Ha; Singh, Harinder; Appukuttan, Deepti; Jeong, Sunwook; Choi, Yong Jun; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Narumi, Issay; Lim, Sangyong

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a representative microorganism that is frequently used for industrial biotechnology; thus its cellular robustness should be enhanced for the widespread application of E. coli in biotechnology. Stress response genes from the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans have been used to enhance the stress tolerance of E. coli. In the present study, we introduced the cold shock domain-containing protein PprM from D. radiodurans into E. coli and observed that the tolerance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was significantly increased in recombinant strains (Ec-PprM). The overexpression of PprM in E. coli elevated the expression of some OxyR-dependent genes, which play important roles in oxidative stress tolerance. Particularly, mntH (manganese transporter) was activated by 9-fold in Ec-PprM, even in the absence of H2O2 stress, which induced a more than 2-fold increase in the Mn/Fe ratio compared with wild type. The reduced production of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (·OH) and low protein carbonylation levels (a marker of oxidative damage) in Ec-PprM indicate that the increase in the Mn/Fe ratio contributes to the protection of cells from H2O2 stress. PprM also conferred H2O2 tolerance to E. coli in the absence of OxyR. We confirmed that the H2O2 tolerance of oxyR mutants reflected the activation of the ycgZ-ymgABC operon, whose expression is activated by H2O2 in an OxyR-independent manner. Thus, the results of the present study showed that PprM could be exploited to improve the robustness of E. coli. PMID:28119668

  1. PprM, a Cold Shock Domain-Containing Protein from Deinococcus radiodurans, Confers Oxidative Stress Tolerance to Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun-Ha; Singh, Harinder; Appukuttan, Deepti; Jeong, Sunwook; Choi, Yong Jun; Jung, Jong-Hyun; Narumi, Issay; Lim, Sangyong

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a representative microorganism that is frequently used for industrial biotechnology; thus its cellular robustness should be enhanced for the widespread application of E. coli in biotechnology. Stress response genes from the extremely radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans have been used to enhance the stress tolerance of E. coli. In the present study, we introduced the cold shock domain-containing protein PprM from D. radiodurans into E. coli and observed that the tolerance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was significantly increased in recombinant strains (Ec-PprM). The overexpression of PprM in E. coli elevated the expression of some OxyR-dependent genes, which play important roles in oxidative stress tolerance. Particularly, mntH (manganese transporter) was activated by 9-fold in Ec-PprM, even in the absence of H2O2 stress, which induced a more than 2-fold increase in the Mn/Fe ratio compared with wild type. The reduced production of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (·OH) and low protein carbonylation levels (a marker of oxidative damage) in Ec-PprM indicate that the increase in the Mn/Fe ratio contributes to the protection of cells from H2O2 stress. PprM also conferred H2O2 tolerance to E. coli in the absence of OxyR. We confirmed that the H2O2 tolerance of oxyR mutants reflected the activation of the ycgZ-ymgABC operon, whose expression is activated by H2O2 in an OxyR-independent manner. Thus, the results of the present study showed that PprM could be exploited to improve the robustness of E. coli.

  2. Molecular characterization of the cold- and heat-induced Arabidopsis PXL1 gene and its potential role in transduction pathways under temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chang Gyo; Hwang, Sun-Goo; Park, Yong Chan; Park, Hyeon Mi; Kim, Dong Sub; Park, Duck Hwan; Jang, Cheol Seong

    2015-03-15

    LRR-RLK (Leucine-Rich Repeat Receptor-Like Kinase) proteins are believed to play essential roles in cell-to-cell communication during various cellular processes including development, hormone perception, and abiotic stress responses. We isolated an LRR-RLK gene previously named Arabidopsis PHLOEM INTERCALATED WITH XYLEM-LIKE 1 (AtPXL1) and examined its expression patterns. AtPXL1 was highly induced by cold and heat stress, but not by drought. The fluorescence signal of 35S::AtPXL1-EGFP was closely localized to the plasma membrane. A yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay exhibited that AtPXL1 interacts with both proteins, A. thaliana histidine-rich dehydrin1 (AtHIRD1) and A. thaliana light-harvesting protein complex I (AtLHCA1). We found that AtPXL1 possesses autophosphorylation activity and phosphorylates AtHIRD1 and AtLHCA1 in an in vitro assay. Subsequently, we found that the knockout line (atpxl1) showed hypersensitive phenotypes when subjected to cold and heat during the germination stage, while the AtPXL1 overexpressing line as well as wild type plants showed high germination rates compared to the knockout plants. These results provide an insight into the molecular function of AtPXL1 in the regulation of signal transduction pathways under temperature fluctuations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Overexpression of WsSGTL1 Gene of Withania somnifera Enhances Salt Tolerance, Heat Tolerance and Cold Acclimation Ability in Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Manoj K.; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Singh, Ruchi; Singh, Gaurav; Sharma, Lokendra K.; Pandey, Vibha; Kumari, Nishi; Misra, Pratibha

    2013-01-01

    Background Sterol glycosyltrnasferases (SGT) are enzymes that glycosylate sterols which play important role in plant adaptation to stress and are medicinally important in plants like Withania somnifera. The present study aims to find the role of WsSGTL1 which is a sterol glycosyltransferase from W. somnifera, in plant’s adaptation to abiotic stress. Methodology The WsSGTL1 gene was transformed in Arabidopsis thaliana through Agrobacterium mediated transformation, using the binary vector pBI121, by floral dip method. The phenotypic and physiological parameters like germination, root length, shoot weight, relative electrolyte conductivity, MDA content, SOD levels, relative electrolyte leakage and chlorophyll measurements were compared between transgenic and wild type Arabidopsis plants under different abiotic stresses - salt, heat and cold. Biochemical analysis was done by HPLC-TLC and radiolabelled enzyme assay. The promoter of the WsSGTL1 gene was cloned by using Genome Walker kit (Clontech, USA) and the 3D structures were predicted by using Discovery Studio Ver. 2.5. Results The WsSGTL1 transgenic plants were confirmed to be single copy by Southern and homozygous by segregation analysis. As compared to WT, the transgenic plants showed better germination, salt tolerance, heat and cold tolerance. The level of the transgene WsSGTL1 was elevated in heat, cold and salt stress along with other marker genes such as HSP70, HSP90, RD29, SOS3 and LEA4-5. Biochemical analysis showed the formation of sterol glycosides and increase in enzyme activity. When the promoter of WsSGTL1 gene was cloned from W. somnifera and sequenced, it contained stress responsive elements. Bioinformatics analysis of the 3D structure of the WsSGTL1 protein showed functional similarity with sterol glycosyltransferase AtSGT of A. thaliana. Conclusions Transformation of WsSGTL1 gene in A. thaliana conferred abiotic stress tolerance. The promoter of the gene in W.somnifera was found to have stress

  4. Expression of csp genes in E. coli K-12 in defined rich and defined minimal media during normal growth, and after cold-shock.

    PubMed

    Czapski, Tiffaney R; Trun, Nancy

    2014-08-15

    Cold-shock proteins (Csps) are a family of small nucleic acid-binding proteins found in 72% of sequenced bacterial genomes. Where it has been examined, at least one csp gene is required for cell viability. In Escherichia coli K-12, there are nine homologous csp genes named A-I. Regulation studies performed on individual members of this family have suggested that cspA, cspB, cspG, and cspI are cold-induced, cspC and cspE are constitutively expressed, cspD is stationary phase induced, and the induction patterns for cspF and cspH have yet to be determined. Aside from microarray studies, transcript levels from all nine csp genes have never been assayed using the same technique or in the same cells. The purpose of this study was to use quantitative RT-PCR to establish csp expression patterns for all nine csp genes at 37°C in defined rich and defined minimal media, and after a shift to 15°C for either 1h or 4h. We found that transcript levels for each of the csp genes changed throughout the growth curve. Transcripts for cspA, -B, and -E were more abundant than those detected for the other csp genes in defined rich medium. cspE mRNA levels in defined minimal medium were drastically higher than mRNA for the other csp genes. Of the nine csp genes, only cspI showed a significant increase in mRNA accumulation after cold-shock in defined rich medium. When mRNA accumulation was compared across the nine csp genes, there were more cspE transcripts in the cell than cspA, -B, -G, or -I transcripts after 1h cold-shock in either defined rich or defined minimal media. In defined minimal medium, transcription of cspA, -B, -G, and -I was induced after cold-shock. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The REIL1 and REIL2 Proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana Are Required for Leaf Growth in the Cold1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Stefanie; Dethloff, Frederik; Beine-Golovchuk, Olga; Kopka, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved proteins REI1-LIKE (REIL1) and REIL2 have four conserved zinc finger domains and are Arabidopsis thaliana homologs of the cytosolic 60S ribosomal maturation factor Rei1p (for Required for isotropic bud growth1 protein) from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and its paralog Reh1p (for REI1 homologue1 protein). The yeast and A. thaliana paralogs result from independent gene duplications. The A. thaliana REIL paralogs are required specifically in the cold (10°C) but not for growth at optimal temperature (20°C). A reil1-1 reil2-1 double mutant is arrested at 10°C prior to the emergence of the first rosette leaf. Two allelic reil2 mutants, reil2-1 and reil2-2, form small spoon-shaped leaves at 10°C. This phenomenon reverts after emergence of the inflorescence in the cold or upon shift to 20°C. Except for a slightly delayed germination, a reil1-1 mutant shows no further growth phenotype under the currently investigated conditions. A comparative analysis demonstrates conserved coexpression of orthologous genes from yeast and A. thaliana that are coregulated with yeast rei1 or with A. thaliana REIL2, respectively. The conserved correlations point to a role of A. thaliana REIL proteins in the maturation of the eukaryotic ribosomal 60S subunit. We support this conclusion by heterologous complementation of the cold-induced growth defect of the yeast Δrei1 deletion. PMID:24038679

  6. Use of Recombinant Aequorin to Study Calcium Homeostasis and Monitor Calcium Transients in Response to Heat and Cold Shock in Cyanobacteria1

    PubMed Central

    Torrecilla, Ignacio; Leganés, Francisco; Bonilla, Ildefonso; Fernández-Piñas, Francisca

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the possibility of Ca2+ signaling in cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) by measuring intracellular free Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]i) in a recombinant strain of the nitrogen fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena strain sp. PCC7120, which constitutively expresses the Ca2+-binding photoprotein apoaequorin. The homeostasis of intracellular Ca2+ in response to increasing external Ca2+ has been studied in this strain. The resting level of free Ca2+ in Anabaena was found to be between 100 and 200 nm. Additions of increasing concentrations of external Ca2+ gave a transient burst of [Ca2+]i followed by a very quick decline, reaching a plateau within seconds that brought the level of [Ca2+]i back to the resting value. These results indicate that Anabaena strain sp. PCC7120 is able to regulate its internal Ca2+ levels. We also monitored Ca2+ transients in our recombinant strain in response to heat and cold shock. The cell's response to both stresses was dependent on the way they were induced. The use of inhibitors suggests that heat shock mobilizes cytosolic Ca2+ from both intracellular and extracellular sources, while the Ca2+ source for cold shock signaling is mostly extracellular. PMID:10806234

  7. A new mutant of Arabidopsis disturbed in its roots, right-handed slanting, and gravitropism defines a gene that encodes a heat-shock factor.

    PubMed

    Fortunati, A; Piconese, S; Tassone, P; Ferrari, S; Migliaccio, F

    2008-01-01

    A new mutant of Arabidopsis named rha1 is characterized and the gene involved cloned. In roots, the mutant shows minimal right-handed slanting, reduced gravitropic response, notable resistance to 2,4-D, but scarce resistance to IAA and NAA. The roots also show a clear resistance to the auxin transport inhibitors TIBA and NPA, and to ethylene. Other characteristics are a reduced number of lateral roots and reduced size of shoot and root in the seedlings. The gene, cloned through TAIL-PCR, was found to be a heat-shock factor that maps on chromosome 5, close to and above the RFLP marker m61. The rha1 structure, mRNA, and translation product are reported. Since, so far, no other gravitropic mutant has been described as mutated in a heat-shock factor, rha1 belongs to a new group of mutants disturbed in slanting, gravitropism, and auxin physiology. As shown through the RT-PCR analyses of its expression, the gene retains the function connected with heat shock. If the characteristics connected with auxin physiology are considered, however, it is also likely that the gene, as a transcription factor, could be involved in root circumnutation, gravitropic response, and hormonal control of differentiation. Since GUS staining under the gene promoter was localized mainly in the mature tissues, rha1 does not seem to be involved in the first steps of gravitropism, but is rather related to the general response to auxin. The alterations in slanting (mainly due to reduced chiral circumnutation) and gravitropism lead to the supposition that the two processes may have, at least in part, common origins.

  8. The unified ICE-CBF pathway provides a transcriptional feedback control of freezing tolerance during cold acclimation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ye Seul; Lee, Minyoung; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Lee, Hyo-Jun; Park, Chung-Mo

    2015-09-01

    During cold acclimation, C-repeat binding factors (CBFs) activate downstream targets, such as cold-regulated genes, leading to the acquisition of freezing tolerance in plants. Inducer of CBF expression 1 (ICE1) plays a key role by activating CBF3 expression in shaping the cold-induced transcriptome. While the ICE1-CBF3 regulon constitutes a major cold acclimation pathway, gene regulatory networks governing the CBF signaling are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that ICE1 and its paralog ICE2 induce CBF1, CBF2, and CBF3 by binding to the gene promoters. ICE2, like ICE1, was ubiquitinated by the high expression of osmotically responsive gene 1 (HOS1) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Whereas ICE2-defective ice2-2 mutant did not exhibit any discernible freezing-sensitive phenotypes, ice1-2 ice2-2/+ plant, which is defective in ICE1 and has a heterozygotic ice2 mutation, exhibited significantly reduced freezing tolerance. Accordingly, all three CBF genes were markedly down-regulated in the ice1-2 ice2-2/+ plant, indicating that ICE1 and ICE2 are functionally redundant with different implementations in inducing CBF genes. Together with the negative regulation of CBF3 by CBF2, we propose that the unified ICE-CBF pathway provides a transcriptional feedback of freezing tolerance to sustain plant development and survival during cold acclimation.

  9. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase HOS1 Regulates Arabidopsis Flowering by Mediating CONSTANS Degradation Under Cold Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae-Hoon; Seo, Pil Joon; Park, Chung-Mo

    2012-01-01

    The timing of flowering is coordinated by a web of gene regulatory networks that integrates developmental and environmental cues in plants. Light and temperature are two major environmental determinants that regulate flowering time. Although prolonged treatment with low nonfreezing temperatures accelerates flowering by stable repression of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), repeated brief cold treatments delay flowering. Here, we report that intermittent cold treatments trigger the degradation of CONSTANS (CO), a central activator of photoperiodic flowering; daily treatments caused suppression of the floral integrator FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and delayed flowering. Cold-induced CO degradation is mediated via a ubiquitin/proteasome pathway that involves the E3 ubiquitin ligase HIGH EXPRESSION OF OSMOTICALLY RESPONSIVE GENE 1 (HOS1). HOS1-mediated CO degradation occurs independently of the well established cold response pathways. It is also independent of the light signaling repressor CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1) E3 ligase and light wavelengths. CO has been shown to play a key role in photoperiodic flowering. Here, we demonstrated that CO served as a molecular hub, integrating photoperiodic and cold stress signals into the flowering genetic pathways. We propose that the HOS1-CO module contributes to the fine-tuning of photoperiodic flowering under short term temperature fluctuations, which often occur during local weather disturbances. PMID:23135282

  10. Implications of alternative electron sinks in increased resistance of PSII and PSI photochemistry to high light stress in cold-acclimated Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A G; Rosso, D; Savitch, L V; Stachula, P; Rosembert, M; Oquist, G; Hurry, V; Hüner, N P A

    2012-09-01

    Exposure of control (non-hardened) Arabidopsis leaves to high light stress at 5 °C resulted in a decrease of both photosystem II (PSII) (45 %) and Photosystem I (PSI) (35 %) photochemical efficiencies compared to non-treated plants. In contrast, cold-acclimated (CA) leaves exhibited only 35 and 22 % decrease of PSII and PSI photochemistry, respectively, under the same conditions. This was accompanied by an accelerated rate of P700(+) re-reduction, indicating an up-regulation of PSI-dependent cyclic electron transport (CET). Interestingly, the expression of the NDH-H gene and the relative abundance of the Ndh-H polypeptide, representing the NDH-complex, decreased as a result of exposure to low temperatures. This indicates that the NDH-dependent CET pathway cannot be involved and the overall stimulation of CET in CA plants is due to up-regulation of the ferredoxin-plastoquinone reductase, antimycin A-sensitive CET pathway. The lower abundance of NDH complex also implies lower activity of the chlororespiratory pathway in CA plants, although the expression level and overall abundance of the other well-characterized component involved in chlororespiration, the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX), was up-regulated at low temperatures. This suggests increased PTOX-mediated alternative electron flow to oxygen in plants exposed to low temperatures. Indeed, the estimated proportion of O(2)-dependent linear electron transport not utilized in carbon assimilation and not directed to photorespiration was twofold higher in CA Arabidopsis. The possible involvement of alternative electron transport pathways in inducing greater resistance of both PSII and PSI to high light stress in CA plants is discussed.

  11. Responses of the bed bug, Cimex lectularius, to temperature extremes and dehydration: levels of tolerance, rapid cold hardening and expression of heat shock proteins.

    PubMed

    Benoit, J B; Lopez-Martinez, G; Teets, N M; Phillips, S A; Denlinger, D L

    2009-12-01

    This study of the bed bug, Cimex lectularius, examines tolerance of adult females to extremes in temperature and loss of body water. Although the supercooling point (SCP) of the bed bugs was approximately -20 degrees C, all were killed by a direct 1 h exposure to -16 degrees C. Thus, this species cannot tolerate freezing and is killed at temperatures well above its SCP. Neither cold acclimation at 4 degrees C for 2 weeks nor dehydration (15% loss of water content) enhanced cold tolerance. However, bed bugs have the capacity for rapid cold hardening, i.e. a 1-h exposure to 0 degrees C improved their subsequent tolerance of -14 and -16 degrees C. In response to heat stress, fewer than 20% of the bugs survived a 1-h exposure to 46 degrees C, and nearly all were killed at 48 degrees C. Dehydration, heat acclimation at 30 degrees C for 2 weeks and rapid heat hardening at 37 degrees C for 1 h all failed to improve heat tolerance. Expression of the mRNAs encoding two heat shock proteins (Hsps), Hsp70 and Hsp90, was elevated in response to heat stress, cold stress and during dehydration and rehydration. The response of Hsp90 was more pronounced than that of Hsp70 during dehydration and rehydration. Our results define the tolerance limits for bed bugs to these commonly encountered stresses of temperature and low humidity and indicate a role for Hsps in responding to these stresses.

  12. The Arabidopsis RCC1 Family Protein TCF1 Regulates Freezing Tolerance and Cold Acclimation through Modulating Lignin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Gareth I.; Wang, Shuangfeng; Shang, Zhonglin; Shi, Yiting; Yang, Shuhua; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cell water permeability and cell wall properties are critical to survival of plant cells during freezing, however the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we report that a specifically cold-induced nuclear protein, Tolerant to Chilling and Freezing 1 (TCF1), interacts with histones H3 and H4 and associates with chromatin containing a target gene, BLUE-COPPER-BINDING PROTEIN (BCB), encoding a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein that regulates lignin biosynthesis. Loss of TCF1 function leads to reduced BCB transcription through affecting H3K4me2 and H3K27me3 levels within the BCB gene, resulting in reduced lignin content and enhanced freezing tolerance. Furthermore, plants with knocked-down BCB expression (amiRNA-BCB) under cold acclimation had reduced lignin accumulation and increased freezing tolerance. The pal1pal2 double mutant (lignin content reduced by 30% compared with WT) also showed the freezing tolerant phenotype, and TCF1 and BCB act upstream of PALs to regulate lignin content. In addition, TCF1 acts independently of the CBF (C-repeat binding factor) pathway. Our findings delineate a novel molecular pathway linking the TCF1-mediated cold-specific transcriptional program to lignin biosynthesis, thus achieving cell wall remodeling with increased freezing tolerance. PMID:26393916

  13. Rapid cold hardening and expression of heat shock protein genes in the B-biotype Bemisia tabaci.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haihong; Lei, Zhongren; Li, Xue; Oetting, Ronald D

    2011-02-01

    This paper describes the rapid cold hardening processes of the sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius). It was found that all developmental stages of B. tabaci have the capacity of rapid cold hardening and the length of time required to induce maximal cold hardiness at 0 °C varies with stage. There was only 18.3% survival when adult whiteflies were transferred directly from 26 °C to -8.5 °C for 2 h. However, exposure to 0 °C for 1 h before transfer to -8.5 °C increased the survival to 81.2%. The whiteflies show "prefreeze" mortality when they were exposed to temperatures above the supercooling point (SCP), although the range of SCP of whiteflies is -26 °C to -29 °C. The rapid cold hardening had no effect on SCP and reduced the lower lethal temperature of adults from -9 °C to -11 °C. Rapid cold-hardened adults had a similar lifespan as the control group but deposited fewer eggs than nonhardened individuals. The expression profiles during cold hardening and recovery from this process revealed that HSP90 did not respond to cold stress. However, HSP70 and HSP20 were significantly induced by cold with different temporal expression patterns. These results suggest that the rapid cold hardening response is possibly advantageous to whiteflies that are often exposed to drastic temperature fluctuations in spring or autumn in northern China, and the expression of HSP70 and HSP20 may be associated with the cold tolerance of B. tabaci.

  14. Genes encoding glycine-rich Arabidopsis thaliana proteins with RNA-binding motifs are influenced by cold treatment and an endogenous circadian rhythm.

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, C D; Kreps, J A; Simon, A E

    1994-01-01

    We have characterized the expression of two members of a class of Arabidopsis thaliana glycine-rich, putative RNA-binding proteins that we denote Ccr1 and Ccr2. Southern blot analysis indicates that Ccr1 and Ccr2 are members of a small gene family. Both Ccr1 and Ccr2 mRNA levels were influenced by a circadian rhythm that has an unusual phase for plants, with maximal accumulation at 6:00 PM and minimal accumulation at 10:00 AM. The level of CCR1 protein, however, remained relatively constant throughout the cycle. The transcript accumulation patterns of the Ccr1 and Ccr2 genes differed considerably from conditions that affect the expression of similar genes from maize, sorghum, and carrot. Levels of Ccr1 and Ccr2 mRNAs were unchanged in wounded plants, increased at least 4-fold in cold-stressed plants, and decreased 2- to 3-fold in abscisic acid-treated plants. Ccr1 transcript levels decreased in response to drought, whereas Ccr2 transcript levels increased under the same conditions. Based on the presence of additional Ccr transcripts in dark-grown plants, we propose that Ccr transcripts may be subjected to a light- or dark-mediated regulation. PMID:7513083

  15. Stimulation of translation by human Unr requires cold shock domains 2 and 4, and correlates with poly(A) binding protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Ray, Swagat; Anderson, Emma C

    2016-03-03

    The RNA binding protein Unr, which contains five cold shock domains, has several specific roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression. It can act as an activator or inhibitor of translation initiation, promote mRNA turnover, or stabilise mRNA. Its role depends on the mRNA and other proteins to which it binds, which includes cytoplasmic poly(A) binding protein 1 (PABP1). Since PABP1 binds to all polyadenylated mRNAs, and is involved in translation initiation by interaction with eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G), we investigated whether Unr has a general role in translational control. We found that Unr strongly stimulates translation in vitro, and mutation of cold shock domains 2 or 4 inhibited its translation activity. The ability of Unr and its mutants to stimulate translation correlated with its ability to bind RNA, and to interact with PABP1. We found that Unr stimulated the binding of PABP1 to mRNA, and that Unr was required for the stable interaction of PABP1 and eIF4G in cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Unr reduced the overall level of cellular translation in cells, as well as that of cap-dependent and IRES-dependent reporters. These data describe a novel role for Unr in regulating cellular gene expression.

  16. Solution structure of the RNA-binding cold-shock domain of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii NAB1 protein and insights into RNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Anne L; Landsberg, Michael J; Ross, Ian L; Kruse, Olaf; Mobli, Mehdi; Hankamer, Ben

    2015-07-01

    Light-harvesting complex (LHC) proteins are among the most abundant proteins on Earth and play critical roles in photosynthesis, both in light capture and in photoprotective mechanisms. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii nucleic acid-binding protein 1 (NAB1) is a negative regulator of LHC protein translation. Its N-terminal cold-shock domain (CSD) binds to a 13-nt element [CSD consensus sequence (CSDCS)] found in the mRNA of specific LHC proteins associated with Photosystem II (PSII), an interaction which regulates LHC expression and, consequently, PSII-associated antenna size, structure and function. In the present study, we elucidated the solution structure of the NAB1 CSD as determined by heteronuclear NMR. The CSD adopts a characteristic five-stranded anti parallel β-barrel fold. Upon addition of CSDCS RNA, a large number of NMR chemical shift perturbations were observed, corresponding primarily to surface-exposed residues within the highly conserved β2- and β3-strands in the canonical RNA-binding region, but also to residues on β-strand 5 extending the positive surface patch and the overall RNA-binding site. Additional chemical shift perturbations that accompanied RNA binding involved buried residues, suggesting that transcript recognition is accompanied by conformational change. Our results indicate that NAB1 associates with RNA transcripts through a mechanism involving its CSD that is conserved with mechanisms of sequence-specific nucleic acid recognition employed by ancestrally related bacterial cold-shock proteins (CSPs). © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  17. Heterologous expression of Arabidopsis C-repeat binding factor 3 (AtCBF3) and cold-regulated 15A (AtCOR15A) enhanced chilling tolerance in transgenic eggplant (Solanum melongena L.).

    PubMed

    Wan, Faxiang; Pan, Yu; Li, Jinghua; Chen, Xiangfu; Pan, Yanglu; Wang, Yongqing; Tian, Shibing; Zhang, Xingguo

    2014-12-01

    Our study shows that the expression of AtCBF3 and AtCOR15A improved the chilling tolerance in transgenic eggplant. In an attempt to improve chilling tolerance of eggplant (Solanum melongena L) plants, Arabidopsis C-repeat binding factor 3 (AtCBF3) and cold-regulated 15A (AtCOR15A) genes both driven by an Arabidopsis RESPONSIVE TO DESSICATION 29A promoter (AtRD29A) were transferred into the plants of eggplant cultivar Sanyueqie. Two independent homozygous transgenic lines were tested for their cold tolerance. The leaves of the transgenic plants in both lines withered much slower and slighter than the wild-type plants after exposure to cold stress treatment at 2 ± 1 °C. The gene expression of AtCBF3 and AtCOR15A was significantly increased as well as the proline content and the levels of catalase and peroxidase activities, while the relative electrical conductivity and the malondialdehyde content were remarkably decreased in the transgenic plants compared with the wild type at 4 ± 0.5 °C. The results showed that the expression of the exogenous AtCBF3 and AtCOR15A could promote the cold adaptation process to protect eggplant plants from chilling stress.

  18. The Responses of Arabidopsis Early Light-Induced Protein2 to Ultraviolet B, High Light, and Cold Stress Are Regulated by a Transcriptional Regulatory Unit Composed of Two Elements1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hayami, Natsuki; Sakai, Yusaku; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Tatsunori; Tokizawa, Mutsutomo; Iuchi, Satoshi; Kurihara, Yukio; Matsui, Minami; Nomoto, Mika; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y.

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Early Light-Induced Protein (ELIP) is thought to act as a photoprotectant, reducing the damaging effects of high light (HL). Expression of ELIP2 is activated by multiple environmental stresses related to photoinhibition. We have identified putative regulatory elements in an ELIP2 promoter using an octamer-based frequency comparison method, analyzed the role of these elements using synthetic promoters, and revealed a key transcriptional regulatory unit for ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation, HL, and cold stress responses. The unit is composed of two elements, designated as Elements A (TACACACC) and B (GGCCACGCCA), and shows functionality only when paired. Our genome-wide correlation analysis between possession of these elements in the promoter region and expression profiles in response to UV-B, HL, and cold suggests that Element B receives and integrates these multiple stress signals. In vitro protein-DNA binding assays revealed that LONG HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5), a basic domain-Leucine zipper transcription factor, directly binds to Element B. In addition, mutant analysis of HY5 showed partial involvement in the UV-B and HL responses but not in the cold stress response. These results suggest that signals for UV-B, HL, and cold stress join at Element B, which recognizes the signals of multiple transcription factors, including HY5. PMID:26175515

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum-localized small heat shock protein that accumulates in mulberry tree (Morus bombycis Koidz.) during seasonal cold acclimation is responsive to abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Ukaji, Norifumi; Kuwabara, Chikako; Kanno, Yuri; Seo, Mitsunori; Takezawa, Daisuke; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2010-04-01

    With seasonal changes, several proteins accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-enriched fraction in the bark of mulberry tree (Morus bombycis Koidz.). Results of partial amino acid sequence analysis in our previous study suggested that one of these proteins is the ER-localized small heat shock protein (sHSP), designated 20-kD winter-accumulating protein (WAP20). In the present study, molecular and biochemical properties of WAP20 were investigated in detail. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA has the predicted signal sequence to the ER, retention signal to the ER and two consensus regions conserved in sHSPs. Recombinant WAP20 expressed in Escherichia coli also showed typical biochemical features of sHSPs, including the formation of a high-molecular-mass complex between 200 and 300 kD under native conditions, promotion of the renaturation of chemically denaturated citrate synthase and prevention of heat stress-induced aggregation of the enzyme. Transcript levels of WAP20 in the bark tissue were seasonally changed, showing high expression levels from mid-October to mid-December, and the transcript levels were additionally increased and decreased by cold treatment and warm treatment, respectively. WAP20 transcripts were detected abundantly in bark tissue rather than xylem and winter bud tissues during seasonal cold acclimation. The bark tissue specificity of WAP20 accumulation was also observed by exogenous application of phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) in de-acclimated twigs, whereas WAP20 transcripts were increased in all of these tissues by heat shock treatment at 37 degrees C in summer twigs. The results suggest that ABA may be involved in the expression of the WAP20 gene in bark tissue of the mulberry tree during seasonal cold acclimation.

  20. Quantification of heat shock protein mRNA expression in warm and cold anoxic turtles (Trachemys scripta) using an external RNA control for normalization.

    PubMed

    Stecyk, Jonathan A W; Couturier, Christine S; Fagernes, Cathrine E; Ellefsen, Stian; Nilsson, Göran E

    2012-03-01

    The mRNA expression of heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) and heat-shock cognate 70 (HSC70) was examined in cardiac chambers and telencephalon of warm- (21°C) and cold-acclimated (5°C) turtles (Trachemys scripta) exposed to normoxia, prolonged anoxia or anoxia followed by reoxygenation. Additionally, the suitability of total RNA as well as mRNA from β-actin, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and cyclophilin A (PPIA) for normalizing gene expression data was assessed, as compared to the use of an external RNA control. Measurements of HSP90 and HSC70 mRNA expression revealed that anoxia and reoxygenation have tissue- and gene-specific effects. By and large, the alterations support previous investigations on HSP protein abundance in the anoxic turtle heart and brain, as well as the hypothesized roles of HSP90 and HSC70 during stress and non-stress conditions. However, more prominent was a substantially increased HSP90 and HSC70 mRNA expression in the cardiac chambers with cold acclimation. The finding provides support for the notion that cold temperature induces a number of adaptations in tissues of anoxia-tolerant vertebrates that precondition them for winter anoxia. β-actin, GAPDH and PPIA mRNA expression and total RNA also varied with oxygenation state and acclimation temperature in a tissue- and gene-specific manner, as well as among tissue types, thus disqualifying them as suitable for real-time RT-PCR normalization. Thus, the present data highlights the advantages of normalizing real-time RT-PCR data to an external RNA control, an approach that also allows inter-tissue and potentially inter-species comparisons of target gene expression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A nonparametric mean-variance smoothing method to assess Arabidopsis cold stress transcriptional regulator CBF2 overexpression microarray data.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pingsha; Maiti, Tapabrata

    2011-01-01

    Microarray is a powerful tool for genome-wide gene expression analysis. In microarray expression data, often mean and variance have certain relationships. We present a non-parametric mean-variance smoothing method (NPMVS) to analyze differentially expressed genes. In this method, a nonlinear smoothing curve is fitted to estimate the relationship between mean and variance. Inference is then made upon shrinkage estimation of posterior means assuming variances are known. Different methods have been applied to simulated datasets, in which a variety of mean and variance relationships were imposed. The simulation study showed that NPMVS outperformed the other two popular shrinkage estimation methods in some mean-variance relationships; and NPMVS was competitive with the two methods in other relationships. A real biological dataset, in which a cold stress transcription factor gene, CBF2, was overexpressed, has also been analyzed with the three methods. Gene ontology and cis-element analysis showed that NPMVS identified more cold and stress responsive genes than the other two methods did. The good performance of NPMVS is mainly due to its shrinkage estimation for both means and variances. In addition, NPMVS exploits a non-parametric regression between mean and variance, instead of assuming a specific parametric relationship between mean and variance. The source code written in R is available from the authors on request.

  2. cDNA-AFLP analysis reveals heat shock proteins play important roles in mediating cold, heat, and drought tolerance in Ammopiptanthus mongolicus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huiming; Li, Zhaochun; Zhou, Meiliang; Cheng, Hongmei

    2014-03-01

    Ammopiptanthus mongolicus (Maxim.ex kom.) Cheng F. is the only evergreen broadleaf shrub endemic to the desert of central Asian and it can survive at drought, salt, and alkali stress. It is believed that A. mongolicus is an important germplasm containing abiotic-tolerance genes. In order to identify drought-, cold-, and heat-responsive genes and to gain a better understanding of stress responses in A. mongolicus, genome-wide investigation of drought-, cold-, and heat-responsive genes was performed in A. mongolicus using cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism. Selective amplification with 240 primer combinations generated 5,000 differentially expressed transcript derived fragments (TDFs). Of these, 201 TDFs with differential expression patterns were excised from gels, reamplified by PCR, and sequenced. The gene expression patterns of 11 regulated genes were further investigated by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis. Sequencing and similarity analysis revealed that TDFs present homologies chiefly with proteins involved in various abiotic and biotic stress and developmental responses. The information presented in this study reveals that heat shock proteins play an active role in mediating drought, cold, and heat tolerance in A. mongolicus.

  3. Light signalling mediated by phytochrome plays an important role in cold-induced gene expression through the C-repeat/dehydration responsive element (C/DRE) in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoun-Joung; Kim, Yun-Kyoung; Park, Jin-Young; Kim, Jungmook

    2002-03-01

    Low temperature induces a number of genes that encode the proteins promoting tolerance to freezing, mediated by ABA-dependent and ABA-independent pathways in plants. The cis-acting element called C/DRE is known to respond to low temperature independently of ABA action. To investigate the signalling and network of ABA-independent pathways, the transgenic Arabidopsis plants were generated containing several copies of the C/DRE derived from cor15a gene with a minimal promoter fused to a GUS reporter gene. The transgenic plants containing four copies of the C/DRE (4C/DRE-GUS) showed responsiveness to cold and drought treatments and were used for characterization of cold signalling and cross-talk. Cold-induced GUS expression was inhibited by okadaic acid at 1 nM, indicating that protein phosphatase 2A might act as a positive regulator. Light was shown to activate cold- and drought-induced GUS expression. Photo-reversibility of the GUS mRNA by red and far-red light with concomitant cold treatment suggests a role of phytochrome as a photoreceptor in mediating light signalling to activate the cold-induced gene expression through the C/DRE. Furthermore, GUS expression analysis in phyA or phyB or phyAphyB mutant backgrounds showed that phytochrome B is a primary photoreceptor responsible for the activation of cold-stress signalling in response to light. Light enhanced the induction kinetics of CBF1, 2, and 3 encoding the cognate transcription factors, and cor15a, in a consecutive manner compared to the dark condition in the cold, suggesting that the connection point between cold and light signalling mediated by phytochrome is at a higher step than the expression of CBF genes.

  4. THE EFFECT OF LASER SHOCK PEENING ON THE LIFE AND FAILURE MODE OF A COLD PILGER DIE

    SciTech Connect

    Lavender, Curt A.; Hong, Sung-tae; Smith, Mark T.; Johnson, Robert T.; Lahrman, David

    2008-08-11

    The laser shock peening process was used to increase fatigue life of pilger dies made of A2 tool steel by imparting compressive residual stresses to fatigue prone areas of the dies. The result of X-Ray diffraction analysis indicated that deep, high- magnitude compressive residual stresses were generated by the laser shock peening process, and the peened dies exhibited a significant increase of in-service life. Fractography of the failed dies indicates that the fracture mechanism was altered by the peening process.

  5. Results of molten salt panel and component experiments for solar central receivers: Cold fill, freeze/thaw, thermal cycling and shock, and instrumentation tests

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, J.E.; Ralph, M.E.; Chavez, J.M.; Dunkin, S.R.; Rush, E.E.; Ghanbari, C.M.; Matthews, M.W.

    1995-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted with a molten salt loop at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM to resolve issues associated with the operation of the 10MW{sub e} Solar Two Central Receiver Power Plant located near Barstow, CA. The salt loop contained two receiver panels, components such as flanges and a check valve, vortex shedding and ultrasonic flow meters, and an impedance pressure transducer. Tests were conducted on procedures for filling and thawing a panel, and assessing components and instrumentation in a molten salt environment. Four categories of experiments were conducted: (1) cold filling procedures, (2) freeze/thaw procedures, (3) component tests, and (4) instrumentation tests. Cold-panel and -piping fill experiments are described, in which the panels and piping were preheated to temperatures below the salt freezing point prior to initiating flow, to determine the feasibility of cold filling the receiver and piping. The transient thermal response was measured, and heat transfer coefficients and transient stresses were calculated from the data. Freeze/thaw experiments were conducted with the panels, in which the salt was intentionally allowed to freeze in the receiver tubes, then thawed with heliostat beams. Slow thermal cycling tests were conducted to measure both how well various designs of flanges (e.g., tapered flanges or clamp type flanges) hold a seal under thermal conditions typical of nightly shut down, and the practicality of using these flanges on high maintenance components. In addition, the flanges were thermally shocked to simulate cold starting the system. Instrumentation such as vortex shedding and ultrasonic flow meters were tested alongside each other, and compared with flow measurements from calibration tanks in the flow loop.

  6. A temperature-independent cold-shock protein homolog acts as a virulence factor in Xylella fastidiosa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Xylella fastidiosa (Xf), causal agent of Pierce’s Disease (PD) of grapevine, is mainly prevalent in warmer climates. Subjecting Xf-infected grapevines to cold temperatures can, in many cases, effectively eliminate the bacterial population. However, little is known regarding physiological responses o...

  7. Global changes in gene expression, assayed by microarray hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR, during acclimation of three Arabidopsis thaliana accessions to sub-zero temperatures after cold acclimation.

    PubMed

    Le, Mai Q; Pagter, Majken; Hincha, Dirk K

    2015-01-01

    During cold acclimation plants increase in freezing tolerance in response to low non-freezing temperatures. This is accompanied by many physiological, biochemical and molecular changes that have been extensively investigated. In addition, plants of many species, including Arabidopsis thaliana, become more freezing tolerant during exposure to mild, non-damaging sub-zero temperatures after cold acclimation. There is hardly any information available about the molecular basis of this adaptation. Here, we have used microarrays and a qRT-PCR primer platform covering 1,880 genes encoding transcription factors (TFs) to monitor changes in gene expression in the Arabidopsis accessions Columbia-0, Rschew and Tenela during the first 3 days of sub-zero acclimation at -3 °C. The results indicate that gene expression during sub-zero acclimation follows a tighly controlled time-course. Especially AP2/EREBP and WRKY TFs may be important regulators of sub-zero acclimation, although the CBF signal transduction pathway seems to be less important during sub-zero than during cold acclimation. Globally, we estimate that approximately 5% of all Arabidopsis genes are regulated during sub-zero acclimation. Particularly photosynthesis-related genes are down-regulated and genes belonging to the functional classes of cell wall biosynthesis, hormone metabolism and RNA regulation of transcription are up-regulated. Collectively, these data provide the first global analysis of gene expression during sub-zero acclimation and allow the identification of candidate genes for forward and reverse genetic studies into the molecular mechanisms of sub-zero acclimation.

  8. Carbon partitioning and the impact of starch deficiency on the initial response of Arabidopsis to chilling temperatures.

    PubMed

    Sicher, Richard

    2011-08-01

    Metabolites and stress related transcripts were measured in Arabidopsis thaliana in response to chilling temperatures. Rates of carbon assimilation increased 17% on average in response to cold treatment. Sucrose, glucose and fructose accumulation consumed 42% of the carbon from A but leaf starch only could synthesize ~10% of observed changes in soluble sugars. Carbohydrates were the only major class of metabolites that accumulated during the first 24 h of cold treatment. Except maltose and raffinose, carbohydrate accumulation was abolished when cold treatments were in darkness. Starch hydrolysis was correlated with maltose accumulation and increased expression of BAM3, which encodes a β-amylase necessary for starch mobilization. Hexose accumulation was delayed 6 h and raffinose accumulation was not observed in a starchless (pgm1) mutant. Changes of expression of five stress-induced transcripts in response to cold were similar in the wild type and in the pgm1 mutant. Three of five stress related transcripts had decreased expression when cold treatments were performed in the dark compared to the light. Therefore, starch hydrolysis may augment hexose and raffinose accumulations during the first 24 h after a cold shock and a partial cold stress response was observed in Arabidopsis during cold treatments in the dark.

  9. The cold sensitivity of a mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking a mitochondrial heat shock protein 70 is suppressed by loss of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Schilke, B; Forster, J; Davis, J; James, P; Walter, W; Laloraya, S; Johnson, J; Miao, B; Craig, E

    1996-08-01

    SSH1, a newly identified member of the heat shock protein (hsp70) multigene family of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encodes a protein localized to the mitochondrial matrix. Deletion of the SSH1 gene results in extremely slow growth at 23 degrees C or 30 degrees C, but nearly wild-type growth at 37 degrees C. The matrix of the mitochondria contains another hsp70, Ssc1, which is essential for growth and required for translocation of proteins into mitochondria. Unlike SSC1 mutants, an SSH1 mutant showed no detectable defects in import of several proteins from the cytosol to the matrix compared to wild type. Increased expression of Ssc1 partially suppressed the cold-sensitive growth defect of the SSH1 mutant, suggesting that when present in increased amounts, Ssc1 can at least partially carry out the normal functions of Ssh1. Spontaneous suppressors of the cold-sensitive phenotype of an SSH1 null mutant were obtained at a high frequency at 23 degrees C, and were all found to be respiration deficient. 15 of 16 suppressors that were analyzed lacked mitochondrial DNA, while the 16th had reduced amounts. We suggest that Ssh1 is required for normal mitochondrial DNA replication, and that disruption of this process in ssh1 cells results in a defect in mitochondrial function at low temperatures.

  10. Intergenic Sequence between Arabidopsis Caseinolytic Protease B-Cytoplasmic/Heat Shock Protein100 and Choline Kinase Genes Functions as a Heat-Inducible Bidirectional Promoter1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Ratnesh Chandra; Grover, Anil

    2014-01-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the At1g74310 locus encodes for caseinolytic protease B-cytoplasmic (ClpB-C)/heat shock protein100 protein (AtClpB-C), which is critical for the acquisition of thermotolerance, and At1g74320 encodes for choline kinase (AtCK2) that catalyzes the first reaction in the Kennedy pathway for phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis. Previous work has established that the knockout mutants of these genes display heat-sensitive phenotypes. While analyzing the AtClpB-C promoter and upstream genomic regions in this study, we noted that AtClpB-C and AtCK2 genes are head-to-head oriented on chromosome 1 of the Arabidopsis genome. Expression analysis showed that transcripts of these genes are rapidly induced in response to heat stress treatment. In stably transformed Arabidopsis plants harboring this intergenic sequence between head-to-head oriented green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase reporter genes, both transcripts and proteins of the two reporters were up-regulated upon heat stress. Four heat shock elements were noted in the intergenic region by in silico analysis. In the homozygous transfer DNA insertion mutant Salk_014505, 4,393-bp transfer DNA is inserted at position −517 upstream of ATG of the AtClpB-C gene. As a result, AtCk2 loses proximity to three of the four heat shock elements in the mutant line. Heat-inducible expression of the AtCK2 transcript was completely lost, whereas the expression of AtClpB-C was not affected in the mutant plants. Our results suggest that the 1,329-bp intergenic fragment functions as a heat-inducible bidirectional promoter and the region governing the heat inducibility is possibly shared between the two genes. We propose a model in which AtClpB-C shares its regulatory region with heat-induced choline kinase, which has a possible role in heat signaling. PMID:25281707

  11. Molecular sensing of bacteria in plants. The highly conserved RNA-binding motif RNP-1 of bacterial cold shock proteins is recognized as an elicitor signal in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Felix, Georg; Boller, Thomas

    2003-02-21

    To detect microbial infection multicellular organisms have evolved sensing systems for pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Here, we identify bacterial cold shock protein (CSP) as a new such PAMP that acts as a highly active elicitor of defense responses in tobacco. Tobacco cells perceive a conserved domain of CSP and synthetic peptides representing 15 amino acids of this domain-induced responses at subnanomolar concentrations. Central to the elicitor-active domain is the RNP-1 motif KGFGFITP, a motif conserved also in many RNA- and DNA-binding proteins of eukaryotes. Csp15-Nsyl, a peptide representing the domain with highest homology to csp15 in a protein of Nicotiana sylvestris exhibited only weak activity in tobacco cells. Crystallographic and genetic data from the literature show that the RNP-1 domain of bacterial CSPs resides on a protruding loop and exposes a series of aromatic and basic side chains to the surface that are essential for the nucleotide-binding activity of CSPs. Similarly, these side chains were also essential for elicitor activity and replacement of single residues in csp15 with Ala strongly reduced or abolished activity. Most strikingly, csp15-Ala10, a peptide with the RNP-1 motif modified to KGAGFITP, lacked elicitor activity but acted as a competitive antagonist for CSP-related elicitors. Bacteria commonly have a small family of CSP-like proteins including both cold-inducible and noninducible members, and Csp-related elicitor activity was detected in extracts from all bacteria tested. Thus, the CSP domain containing the RNP-1 motif provides a structure characteristic for bacteria in general, and tobacco plants have evolved a highly sensitive chemoperception system to detect this bacterial PAMP.

  12. Cold shock protein A plays an important role in the stress adaptation and virulence of Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Wang, Shuangshan; Wu, Qingmin

    2014-05-01

    Brucella melitensis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that mainly resides within macrophages. The mechanisms employed by Brucella to adapt to harsh intracellular environments and survive within host macrophages are not clearly understood. Here, we constructed a cspA gene deletion mutant, NIΔcspA, that did not exhibit any discernible growth defect at a normal culture temperature (37 °C) or at a low temperature (15 °C). However, expression of the cspA gene in Brucella was induced by cold, acidic, and oxidative conditions, as determined via quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Unlike its parental strain, B. melitensis NI, the NIΔcspA mutant showed an increased sensitivity to acidic and H2 O2 stresses, especially during the mid-log-phase, and these stress conditions would presumably be encountered by bacteria during intracellular infections. Moreover, macrophage and mouse infection assays indicated that the NIΔcspA mutant fails to replicate in cultured J774.A1 murine macrophages and is rapidly cleared from the spleens of experimentally infected BALB/c mice. These findings suggest that the Brucella cspA gene makes an essential contribution to virulence in vitro and in vivo, most likely by allowing brucellae to adapt appropriately to the harsh environmental conditions encountered within host macrophages.

  13. A novel mechanism of repression of the vascular endothelial growth factor promoter, by single strand DNA binding cold shock domain (Y-box) proteins in normoxic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Coles, Leeanne S; Diamond, Peter; Lambrusco, Lidia; Hunter, Julie; Burrows, Julie; Vadas, Mathew A; Goodall, Gregory J

    2002-11-15

    Overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is implicated in a number of diseases. It is therefore critical that mechanisms exist to strictly regulate VEGF expression. A hypoxia-responsive (HR) region of the VEGF promoter which binds the HIF-1 transcription factor is a target for many signals that up-regulate VEGF transcription. Repressors targeting the HIF-1 transcription factor have been identified but no repressors directly binding the HR promoter region had been reported. We now report a novel mechanism of repression of the VEGF HR region involving DNA binding. We find that single strand DNA-specific cold shock domain (CSD or Y-box) proteins repress the HR region via a binding site downstream of the HIF-1 site. The repressor site is functional in unstimulated, normoxic fibroblasts and represents a novel means to prevent expression of VEGF in the absence of appropriate stimuli. We characterized complexes forming on the VEGF repressor site and identified a previously unreported nuclear CSD protein complex containing dbpA. Nuclear dbpA appears to bind as a dimer and we determined a means by which nuclear CSD proteins may enter double strand DNA to bind to their single strand sites to bring about repression of the VEGF HR region.

  14. RSK-mediated nuclear accumulation of the cold-shock Y-box protein-1 controls proliferation of T cells and T-ALL blasts.

    PubMed

    Gieseler-Halbach, Steffi; Meltendorf, Stefan; Pierau, Mandy; Weinert, Soenke; Heidel, Florian H; Fischer, Thomas; Handschuh, Juliane; Braun-Dullaeus, Ruediger C; Schrappe, Martin; Lindquist, Jonathan A; Mertens, Peter R; Thomas, Ulrich; Brunner-Weinzierl, Monika C

    2017-02-01

    Deregulated proliferation is key to tumor progression. Although unrestricted proliferation of solid tumor cells correlates with the cold-shock protein Y-box (YB)-binding protein-1 accumulation in the nuclei, little is known about its expression and function in hematopoietic malignancies, such as T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Here we show that YB-1 protein is highly enriched in the nuclei of activated T cells and malignant human T-ALL cell lines but not in resting T cells. YB-1 S(102) mutations that either mimic (S102D) or prevent phosphorylation (S102N) led to accumulation of YB-1 in the nucleus of T cells or strictly excluded it, respectively. Inactivation of ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) was sufficient to abrogate T-cell and T-ALL cell proliferation, suggesting that RSK mediates cell-cycle progression, possibly dependent on YB-1-phosphorylation. Indeed, phosphomimetic YB-1(S102D) enhanced proliferation implying that S(102) phosphorylation is a prerequisite for malignant T-cell proliferation. At initial diagnosis of T-ALL, YB-1 localization was significantly altered in the nuclei of tumor blasts derived from bone marrow or peripheral blood. Our data show deregulated YB-1 in the nucleus as a yet unreported characteristic of T-ALL blasts and may refine strategies to restrict progression of hematopoietic tumors.

  15. A Hypothetical Protein of Alteromonas macleodii AltDE1 (amad1_06475) Predicted to be a Cold-Shock Protein with RNA Chaperone Activity

    PubMed Central

    Oany, Arafat Rahman; Ahmad, Shah Adil Ishtiyaq; Kibria, KM Kaderi; Hossain, Mohammad Uzzal; Jyoti, Tahmina Pervin

    2014-01-01

    Alteromonas macleodii AltDE1 is a deep sea protobacteria that is distinct from the surface isolates of the same species. This study was designed to elucidate the biological function of amad1_06475, a hypothetical protein of A. macleodii AltDE1. The 70 residues protein sequence showed considerable homology with cold-shock proteins (CSPs) and RNA chaperones from different organisms. Multiple sequence alignment further supported the presence of conserved csp domain on the protein sequence. The three-dimensional structure of the protein was also determined, and verified by PROCHECK, Verify3D, and QMEAN programs. The predicted structure contained five anti-parallel β-strands and RNA-binding motifs, which are characteristic features of prokaryotic CSPs. Finally, the binding of a thymidine-rich oligonucleotide and a single uracil molecule in the active site of the protein further strengthens our prediction about the function of amad1_06475 as a CSP and thereby acting as a RNA chaperone. The binding was performed by molecular docking tools and was compared with similar binding of 3PF5 (PDB) and 2HAX (PDB), major CSPs of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus caldolyticus, respectively. PMID:25574135

  16. Contribution of proton linkage to the thermodynamic stability of the major cold-shock protein of Escherichia coli CspA.

    PubMed

    Petrosian, S A; Makhatadze, G I

    2000-02-01

    The stability of protein is defined not only by the hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic effect, van der Waals interactions, and salt bridges. Additional, much more subtle contributions to protein stability can arise from surface residues that change their properties upon unfolding. The recombinant major cold shock protein of Escherichia coli CspA an all-beta protein unfolds reversible in a two-state manner, and behaves in all other respects as typical globular protein. However, the enthalpy of CspA unfolding strongly depends on the pH and buffer composition. Detailed analysis of the unfolding enthalpies as a function of pH and buffers with different heats of ionization shows that CspA unfolding in the pH range 5.5-9.0 is linked to protonation of an amino group. This amino group appears to be the N-terminal alpha-amino group of the CspA molecule. It undergoes a 1.6 U shift in pKa values between native and unfolded states. Although this shift in pKa is expected to contribute approximately 5 kJ/mol to CspA stabilization energy the experimentally observed stabilization is only approximately 1 kJ/mol. This discrepancy is related to a strong enthalpy-entropy compensation due, most likely, to the differences in hydration of the protonated and deprotonated forms of the alpha-amino group.

  17. Ectopic over-expression of BhHsf1, a heat shock factor from the resurrection plant Boea hygrometrica, leads to increased thermotolerance and retarded growth in transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Wang, Zhi; Jing, Yanjun; Wang, Lili; Liu, Xia; Liu, Yongxiu; Deng, Xin

    2009-11-01

    Plant heat shock transcription factors (Hsfs) are commonly found to be involved in various stress responses. Several Hsfs displayed dwarf phenotype while conferred stress tolerance when over-expressed. However, the underlying mechanisms were not fully understood. Here we report the cloning and characterization of an Hsf (BhHsf1) from the resurrection plant Boea hygrometrica. Drought, heat and wound can induce BhHsf1 expression. The over-expression of BhHsf1 conferred growth retardation and stress tolerance in both Arabidopsis and tobacco. Evidence was presented to show that the growth retardation of aerial organs in the transgenic plants was resulted from the reduction of cell proliferation. Gene expression profiling using microarray hybridization and pathway analysis showed that Hsps and stress-associated genes were induced whereas the genes related to DNA replication and mitotic cell cycle were down-regulated in BhHsf1 over-expression Arabidopsis, which was in consistence with the observation of the impaired nuclear endoreduplication. Taking together, our results suggest that BhHsf1 may play dual roles in mediating the processes in heat stress tolerance and growth retardation via regulation of target genes related to stress protection and mitotic cell cycle.

  18. Flying-fox (Pteropus spp.) sperm membrane fatty acid composition, its relationship to cold shock injury and implications for cryopreservation success.

    PubMed

    Melville, D F; Johnston, S D; Miller, R R

    2012-12-01

    The very large acrosome of Pteropus species spermatozoa is prone to damage during cooling procedures. Cryogenic succuss has been linked to membrane composition, therefore the lipid composition of five Pteropus species sperm acrosomal and plasma membranes were investigated to provide insight into reasons for cold shock susceptibility. Rapid chilling and re-warming of spermatozoa from three Pteropus species resulted in a decrease (P<0.05) in acrosomal integrity. Biochemical analysis of lipids revealed that stearic acid (18:0) was the predominant saturated fatty acid and oleic acid (18:1, n-9) the predominant unsaturated fatty acid in both acrosomal and plasma membranes. Linolenic acid (18:3, n-3) was only detected in plasma membranes of Pteropus hypomelanus and was detected in acrosomal membranes of all Pteropus spp. studied (except Pteropus giganteus). Although detected in both plasma and acrosomal membranes of Pteropus vampyrus, docosahexaenoic acid (22:6) was not detected at all in Pteropus poliocephalus, only in trace levels in the acrosomal and plasma membranes of P. giganteus and P. hypomelanus and not in acrosomal membranes of Pteropus rodricensis. No difference was seen in the levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) within plasma membranes, however PUFAs were lower (P<0.05) in acrosomal membranes of P. giganteus compared with P. vampyrus. Pteropus spp. spermatozoa have a very low ratio of unsaturated/saturated membrane fatty acids (<0.5). Membranes containing more PUFAs are more fluid, so the use of cryogenic media which improves membrane fluidity should improve Pteropus spp. spermatozoal viability post-thaw. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Expression analysis of the csp-like genes from Corynebacterium glutamicum encoding homologs of the Escherichia coli major cold-shock protein cspA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wan-Soo; Park, Soo-Dong; Lee, Seok-Myung; Kim, Younhee; Kim, Pil; Lee, Heung-Shick

    2007-08-01

    Three csp-like genes were identified in the Corynebacterium glutamicum genome and designated cspA, cspB, and cspA2. The genes cspA and cspA2 encode proteins, comprising of 67 amino acid residues, respectively. They share 83% identity with each other. Identity of those proteins with Escherichia coli Csp proteins was near 50%. The cspB gene encodes a protein composed of 127 amino acids, which has 40% and 35% sequence identity with CspA and CspA2, respectively, especially at its N-terminal region. Analysis of the gene expression profiles was done using transcriptional cat fusion, which identified not only active expression of the three genes at the physiological growth temperature of 30 degrees C but also growth phase-dependent expression with the highest activity at late log phase. The promoters of cspA and cspA2 were more active than that of cspB. The expression of the two genes increased by 30% after a temperature downshift to 15 degrees C, and such stimulation was more evident in the late growth phase. In addition, the cspA gene appeared to show DNA-binding activity in vivo, and the activity increased at lower temperatures. Interestingly, the presence of cspA in multicopy hindered the growth of the host C. glutamicum cells at 20 degrees C, but not at 30 degrees C. Altogether, these data suggest that cspA, cspB, and cspA2 perform functions related to cold shock as well as normal cellular physiology. Moreover, CspA and its ortholog CspA2 may perform additional functions as a transcriptional regulator.

  20. Early turn formation and chain collapse drive fast folding of the major cold shock protein CspA of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Vu, Dung M; Brewer, Scott H; Dyer, R Brian

    2012-11-13

    The folding mechanism of the β-sheet protein CspA, the major cold shock protein of Escherichia coli, was previously reported to be a concerted, two-state process. We have reexamined the folding of CspA using multiple spectroscopic probes of the equilibrium transition and laser-induced temperature jump (T-jump) to achieve better time resolution of the kinetics. Equilibrium temperature-dependent Fourier transform infrared (1634 cm(-1)) and tryptophan fluorescence measurements reveal probe-dependent thermal transitions with midpoints (T(m)) of 66 ± 1 and 61 ± 1 °C, respectively. Singular-value decomposition analysis with global fitting of the temperature-dependent infrared (IR) difference spectra reveals two spectral components with distinct melting transitions with different midpoints. T-jump relaxation measurements of CspA probed by IR and fluorescence spectroscopy show probe-dependent multiexponential kinetics characteristic of non-two-state folding. The frequency-dependent IR transients all show biphasic relaxation with average time constants of 50 ± 7 and 225 ± 25 μs at a T(f) of 77 °C and almost equal amplitudes. Similar biphasic kinetics are observed using Trp fluorescence of the wild-type protein and the Y42W and T68W mutants, with comparable lifetimes. All of these observations support a model for the folding of CspA through a compact intermediate state. The transient IR and fluorescence spectra are consistent with a diffuse intermediate having β-turns and substantial β-sheet structure. The loop β3-β4 structure is likely not folded in the intermediate state, allowing substantial solvent penetration into the barrel structure.

  1. Early Turn Formation and Chain Collapse Drive Fast Folding of the Major Cold Shock Protein CspA of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Dung M.; Brewer, Scott H.; Dyer, R. Brian

    2012-01-01

    The folding mechanism of the β-sheet protein CspA, the major cold shock protein of Escherichia coli, was previously reported to be a concerted, two-state process. We have reexamined the folding of CspA using multiple spectroscopic probes of the equilibrium transition and laser-induced temperature jump (T-jump) to achieve better time resolution of the kinetics. Equilibrium temperature-dependent Fourier transform infrared (1634 cm–1) and tryptophan fluorescence measurements reveal probe-dependent thermal transitions with midpoints (Tm) of 66 ± 1 and 61 ± 1 °C, respectively. Singular-value decomposition analysis with global fitting of the temperature-dependent infrared (IR) difference spectra reveals two spectral components with distinct melting transitions with different midpoints. T-Jump relaxation measurements of CspA probed by IR and fluorescence spectroscopy show probe-dependent multiexponential kinetics characteristic of non-two-state folding. The frequency-dependent IR transients all show biphasic relaxation with average time constants of 50 ± 7 and 225 ± 25 μs at a Tf of 77 °C and almost equal amplitudes. Similar biphasic kinetics are observed using Trp fluorescence of the wild-type protein and the Y42W and T68W mutants, with comparable lifetimes. All of these observations support a model for the folding of CspA through a compact intermediate state. The transient IR and fluorescence spectra are consistent with a diffuse intermediate having β-turns and substantial β-sheet structure. The loop β3–β4 structure is likely not folded in the intermediate state, allowing substantial solvent penetration into the barrel structure. PMID:23098216

  2. Comparison of Noise Source Localization Data with Flow Field Data Obtained in Cold Supersonic Jets and Implications Regarding Broadband Shock Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary; Wernet, Mark; Clem, Michelle; Fagan, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Phased array noise source localization have been compared with 2 types of flow field data (BOS and PIV). The data show that: 1) the higher frequency noise in a BBSN hump is generated further downstream than the lower frequency noise. This is due to a) the shock spacing decreasing and b) the turbulent structure size increasing with distance downstream. 2) BBSN can be created by very weak shocks. 3) BBSN is not created by the strong shocks just downstream of the nozzle because the turbulent structures have not grown large enough to match the shock spacing. 4) The point in the flow where the shock spacing equals the average size of the turbulent structures is a hot spot for shock noise. 5) Some of the shocks responsible for producing the first hump also produce the second hump.

  3. Heat Shock Factors HsfB1 and HsfB2b Are Involved in the Regulation of Pdf1.2 Expression and Pathogen Resistance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mukesh; Busch, Wolfgang; Birke, Hannah; Kemmerling, Birgit; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Schöffl, Friedrich

    2009-01-01

    In order to assess the functional roles of heat stress-induced class B-heat shock factors in Arabidopsis, we investigated T-DNA knockout mutants of AtHsfB1 and AtHsfB2b. Micorarray analysis of double knockout hsfB1/hsfB2b plants revealed as strong an up-regulation of the basal mRNA-levels of the defensin genes Pdf1.2a/b in mutant plants. The Pdf expression was further enhanced by jasmonic acid treatment or infection with the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola. The single mutant hsfB2b and the double mutant hsfB1/B2b were significantly improved in disease resistance after A. brassicicola infection. There was no indication for a direct interaction of Hsf with the promoter of Pdf1.2, which is devoid of perfect HSE consensus Hsf-binding sequences. However, changes in the formation of late HsfA2-dependent HSE binding were detected in hsfB1/B2b plants. This suggests that HsfB1/B2b may interact with class A-Hsf in regulating the shut-off of the heat shock response. The identification of Pdf genes as targets of Hsf-dependent negative regulation is the first evidence for an interconnection of Hsf in the regulation of biotic and abiotic responses. PMID:19529832

  4. Heat shock factors HsfB1 and HsfB2b are involved in the regulation of Pdf1.2 expression and pathogen resistance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Busch, Wolfgang; Birke, Hannah; Kemmerling, Birgit; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Schöffl, Friedrich

    2009-01-01

    In order to assess the functional roles of heat stress-induced class B-heat shock factors in Arabidopsis, we investigated T-DNA knockout mutants of AtHsfB1 and AtHsfB2b. Micorarray analysis of double knockout hsfB1/hsfB2b plants revealed as strong an up-regulation of the basal mRNA-levels of the defensin genes Pdf1.2a/b in mutant plants. The Pdf expression was further enhanced by jasmonic acid treatment or infection with the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola. The single mutant hsfB2b and the double mutant hsfB1/B2b were significantly improved in disease resistance after A. brassicicola infection. There was no indication for a direct interaction of Hsf with the promoter of Pdf1.2, which is devoid of perfect HSE consensus Hsf-binding sequences. However, changes in the formation of late HsfA2-dependent HSE binding were detected in hsfB1/B2b plants. This suggests that HsfB1/B2b may interact with class A-Hsf in regulating the shut-off of the heat shock response. The identification of Pdf genes as targets of Hsf-dependent negative regulation is the first evidence for an interconnection of Hsf in the regulation of biotic and abiotic responses.

  5. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D{sub 2} molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D{sub 2} fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into {sup 4}He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; {sup 3}He to {sup 4}He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He.

  6. Developmental and Stress Regulation of RCI2A and RCI2B, Two Cold-Inducible Genes of Arabidopsis Encoding Highly Conserved Hydrophobic Proteins1

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Joaquín; Catalá, Rafael; Salinas, Julio

    2001-01-01

    The capability of most higher plants to tolerate environmental conditions strongly depends on their developmental stage. In addition, environmental factors have pleiotropic effects on many developmental processes. The interaction between plant development and environmental conditions implies that some genes must be regulated by both environmental factors and developmental cues. To understand their developmental regulation and obtain possible clues on their functions, we have isolated genomic clones for RCI2A and RCI2B, two genes from Arabidopsis ecotype Columbia (Col), whose expression is induced in response to low temperature, dehydration, salt stress, and abscisic acid. The promoters of RCI2A and RCI2B were fused to the uidA (GUS)-coding sequence and the resulting constructs used to transform Arabidopsis. GUS activity was analyzed in transgenic plants during development under both stressed and unstressed conditions. Transgenic plants with either the RCI2A or RCI2B promoter showed strong GUS expression during the first stages of seed development and germination, in vascular bundles, pollen, and most interestingly in guard cells. When transgenic plants were exposed to low temperature, dehydration, salt stress, or abscisic acid, reporter gene expression was induced in most tissues. These results indicate that RCI2A and RCI2B are regulated at transcriptional level during plant development and in response to different environmental stimuli and treatments. The potential role of RCI2A and RCI2B in plant development and stress response is discussed. PMID:11299347

  7. The complete sequence of a heterochromatic island from a higher eukaryote. The Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Washington University Genome Sequencing Center, and PE Biosystems Arabidopsis Sequencing Consortium.

    PubMed

    2000-02-04

    Heterochromatin, constitutively condensed chromosomal material, is widespread among eukaryotes but incompletely characterized at the nucleotide level. We have sequenced and analyzed 2.1 megabases (Mb) of Arabidopsis thaliana chromosome 4 that includes 0.5-0.7 Mb of isolated heterochromatin that resembles the chromosomal knobs described by Barbara McClintock in maize. This isolated region has a low density of expressed genes, low levels of recombination and a low incidence of genetrap insertion. Satellite repeats were absent, but tandem arrays of long repeats and many transposons were found. Methylation of these sequences was dependent on chromatin remodeling. Clustered repeats were associated with condensed chromosomal domains elsewhere. The complete sequence of a heterochromatic island provides an opportunity to study sequence determinants of chromosome condensation.

  8. NnHSP17.5, a cytosolic class II small heat shock protein gene from Nelumbo nucifera, contributes to seed germination vigor and seedling thermotolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuliang; Chen, Huhui; Chu, Pu; Li, Yin; Tan, Bin; Ding, Yu; Tsang, Edward W T; Jiang, Liwen; Wu, Keqiang; Huang, Shangzhi

    2012-02-01

    In plants, small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are unusually abundant and diverse proteins involved in various abiotic stresses, but their functions in seed vigor remain to be fully explored. In this study, we report the isolation and functional characterization of a sHSP gene, NnHSP17.5, from sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) in seed germination vigor and seedling thermotolerance. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis indicate that NnHSP17.5 is a cytosolic class II sHSP, which was further supported by the cytosolic localization of the NnHSP17.5-YFP fusion protein. NnHSP17.5 was specifically expressed in seeds under normal conditions, and was strongly up-regulated in germinating seeds upon heat and oxidative stresses. Transgenic Arabidopsis seeds ectopically expressing NnHSP17.5 displayed enhanced seed germination vigor and exhibited increased superoxide dismutase activity after accelerated aging treatment. In addition, improved basal thermotolerance was also observed in the transgenic seedlings. Taken together, this work highlights the importance of a plant cytosolic class II sHSP both in seed germination vigor and seedling thermotolerance.

  9. Exploring the Temperature-Stress Metabolome of Arabidopsis1[w

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Fatma; Kopka, Joachim; Haskell, Dale W.; Zhao, Wei; Schiller, K. Cameron; Gatzke, Nicole; Sung, Dong Yul; Guy, Charles L.

    2004-01-01

    Metabolic profiling analyses were performed to determine metabolite temporal dynamics associated with the induction of acquired thermotolerance in response to heat shock and acquired freezing tolerance in response to cold shock. Low-Mr polar metabolite analyses were performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Eighty-one identified metabolites and 416 unidentified mass spectral tags, characterized by retention time indices and specific mass fragments, were monitored. Cold shock influenced metabolism far more profoundly than heat shock. The steady-state pool sizes of 143 and 311 metabolites or mass spectral tags were altered in response to heat and cold shock, respectively. Comparison of heat- and cold-shock response patterns revealed that the majority of heat-shock responses were shared with cold-shock responses, a previously unknown relationship. Coordinate increases in the pool sizes of amino acids derived from pyruvate and oxaloacetate, polyamine precursors, and compatible solutes were observed during both heat and cold shock. In addition, many of the metabolites that showed increases in response to both heat and cold shock in this study were previously unlinked with temperature stress. This investigation provides new insight into the mechanisms of plant adaptation to thermal stress at the metabolite level, reveals relationships between heat- and cold-shock responses, and highlights the roles of known signaling molecules and protectants. PMID:15557093

  10. Transcriptional response of abscisic acid (ABA) metabolism and transport to cold and heat stress applied at the reproductive stage of development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Baron, Kevin N; Schroeder, Dana F; Stasolla, Claudio

    2012-06-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays an important role in developmental processes in addition to mediating plant adaptation to stress. In the current study, transcriptional response of 17 genes involved in ABA metabolism and transport has been examined in vegetative and reproductive organs exposed to cold and heat stress. Temperature stress activated numerous genes involved in ABA biosynthesis, catabolism and transport; however, several ABA biosynthesis genes (ABA1, ABA2, ABA4, AAO3, NCED3) were differentially expressed (up- or down-regulated) in an organ-specific manner. Key genes (CYP707As) involved in ABA catabolism responded differentially to temperature stress. Cold stress strongly activated ABA catabolism in all organs examined, whereas heat stress triggered more subtle activation and repression of select CYP707A genes. Genes involved in conjugation (UGT71B6), hydrolysis (AtBG1), and transport (ABCG25, ABCG40) of ABA or ABA glucose ester responded to temperature stress and displayed unique organ-specific expression patterns. Comparing the transcriptional response of vegetative and reproductive organs revealed ABA homeostasis is differentially regulated at the whole plant level. Taken together our findings indicate organs in close physical proximity undergo vastly different transcriptional programs in response to abiotic stress and developmental cues. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cold Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH COLD STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Workers who ... cold environments may be at risk of cold stress. Extreme cold weather is a dangerous situation that ...

  12. Molecular diagnostics of interstellar shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartquist, T. W.; Dalgarno, A.; Oppenheimer, M.

    1980-01-01

    The chemistry of molecules in shocked regions of the interstellar gas is considered and calculations are carried out for a region subjected to a shock at a velocity of 8 km/sec. Substantial enhancements are predicted in the concentrations of the molecules H2S, SO, and SiO compared to those anticipated in cold interstellar clouds.

  13. Molecular diagnostics of interstellar shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartquist, T. W.; Dalgarno, A.; Oppenheimer, M.

    1980-02-01

    The chemistry of molecules in shocked regions of the interstellar gas is considered and calculations are carried out for a region subjected to a shock at a velocity of 8 km/sec. Substantial enhancements are predicted in the concentrations of the molecules H2S, SO, and SiO compared to those anticipated in cold interstellar clouds.

  14. Development of Spalangia cameroni and Muscidifurax raptor (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) on live house fly (Diptera: Muscidae) pupae and pupae killed by heat shock, irradiation, and cold.

    PubMed

    Geden, C J; Kaufman, P E

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the suitability of killed house fly (Musca domestica L) pupae for production of two economically important pupal parasitoids. Two-day-old fly pupae were subjected to heat shock treatments of varying temperatures and durations in an oven at >or=70% RH; exposure to temperatures of 55 degrees C or higher for 15 min or longer resulted in 100% mortality. Exposure to 50 degrees C resulted in 40 and 91% mortality at 15 and 60 min, respectively. All (100%) pupae placed in a -80 degrees C freezer were killed after 10-min exposure; exposure times of <5 min resulted in <21% mortality. Progeny production of Spalangia cameroni Perkins and Muscidifurax raptor Girault and Sanders (Hymeoptera: Pteromalidae) from pupae killed by heat shock or 50 kR of gamma radiation was not significantly different from production on live hosts on the day when pupae were killed. Freeze-killed pupae produced 16% fewer S. cameroni than live pupae and an equivalent amount of M. raptor progeny on the day when pupae were killed. When killed pupae were stored in freezer bags at 4 degrees C for 4 mo, heat-killed, irradiated, and freeze-killed pupae remained as effective for production of M. raptor as live pupae. Production of S. cameroni on heat-killed and irradiated pupae was equal to parasitoid production on live pupae for up to 2 mo of storage, after which production on killed pupae declined to 63% of that observed with live pupae. Production of S. cameroni on freeze-killed pupae was 73-78% of production using live pupae during weeks 2-8 of storage and declined to 41 and 28% after 3 and 4 mo, respectively. Killing pupae by heat shock provides a simple and low-cost method for stockpiling high-quality hosts for mass-rearing both of these filth fly biological control agents.

  15. The cold equation of state of tantalum

    SciTech Connect

    Greeff, Carl W; Rudin, Sven P; Corckett, Scott D; Wills, John M

    2009-01-01

    In high-pressure isentropic compression experiments (ICE), the pressure is dominated by the cold curve. In order to obtain an accurate semi-empirical cold curve for Ta, we calculate the thermal pressure from ab initio phonon and electronic excitation spectra. The cold curve is then inferred from ultrasonic and shock data. Our empirical cold pressure is compared to density functional calculations and found to be closer to GGA results at low pressure and to approach LDA at high pressure.

  16. Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In ... avoid colds. There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try Getting plenty of rest Drinking ...

  17. Cold Urticaria

    MedlinePlus

    ... throat when consuming cold food or drink Severe reactions may include: A whole-body response (anaphylaxis), which ... to cold water. The majority of cold urticaria reactions occur when skin is exposed to temperatures lower ...

  18. Cardiogenic shock

    MedlinePlus

    Shock - cardiogenic ... electrical system of the heart (heart block) Cardiogenic shock occurs when the heart is unable to pump ... orthostatic hypotension) Weak (thready) pulse To diagnose cardiogenic shock, a catheter (tube) may be placed in the ...

  19. Molecular cloning and cold shock induced overexpression of the DNA encoding phor sensor domain from Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a target molecule for novel anti-tubercular drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langi, Gladys Emmanuella Putri; Moeis, Maelita R.; Ihsanawati, Giri-Rachman, Ernawati Arifin

    2014-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the sole cause of Tuberculosis (TB), is still a major global problem. The discovery of new anti-tubercular drugs is needed to face the increasing TB cases, especially to prevent the increase of cases with resistant Mtb. A potential novel drug target is the Mtb PhoR sensor domain protein which is the histidine kinase extracellular domain for receiving environmental signals. This protein is the initial part of the two-component system PhoR-PhoP regulating 114 genes related to the virulence of Mtb. In this study, the gene encoding PhoR sensor domain (SensPhoR) was subcloned from pGEM-T SensPhoR from the previous study (Suwanto, 2012) to pColdII. The construct pColdII SensPhoR was confirmed through restriction analysis and sequencing. Using the construct, SensPhoR was overexpressed at 15°C using Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Low temperature was chosen because according to the solubility prediction program of recombinant proteins from The University of Oklahama, the PhoR sensor domain has a chance of 79.8% to be expressed as insoluble proteins in Escherichia coli's (E. coli) cytoplasm. This prediction is also supported by other similar programs: PROSO and PROSO II. The SDS PAGE result indicated that the PhoR sensor domain recombinant protein was overexpressed. For future studies, this protein will be purified and used for structure analysis which can be used to find potential drugs through rational drug design.

  20. Rha1, a new mutant of Arabidopsis disturbed in root slanting, gravitropism and auxin physiology

    PubMed Central

    Fortunati, Alessio; Piconese, Silvia; Tassone, Paola; Ferrari, Simone

    2008-01-01

    A new Arabidopsis mutant is characterized (rha1) that shows, in the roots, reduced right-handed slanting, reduced gravitropism and resistance to 2,4-D, TIBA, NPA and ethylene. It also shows reduced length in the shoot and root, reduced number of lateral roots and shorter siliques. The gene was cloned through TAIL-PCR and resulted in a HSF. Because none of the known gravitropic and auxinic mutants result from damage in a HSF, rha1 seems to belong to a new class of this group of mutants. Quantitative PCR analysis showed that the expression of the gene is increased by heat and cold shock, and by presence of 2,4-D in the media. Study of the expression through the GUS reporter gene revealed increased expression in clinostated and gravistimulated plants, but only in adult tissues, and not in the apical meristems of shoots and roots. PMID:19704429

  1. Cold adaptations.

    PubMed

    Launay, Jean-Claude; Savourey, Gustave

    2009-07-01

    Nowdays, occupational and recreational activities in cold environments are common. Exposure to cold induces thermoregulatory responses like changes of behaviour and physiological adjustments to maintain thermal balance either by increasing metabolic heat production by shivering and/or by decreasing heat losses consecutive to peripheral cutaneous vasoconstriction. Those physiological responses present a great variability among individuals and depend mainly on biometrical characteristics, age, and general cold adaptation. During severe cold exposure, medical disorders may occur such as accidental hypothermia and/or freezing or non-freezing cold injuries. General cold adaptations have been qualitatively classified by Hammel and quantitatively by Savourey. This last classification takes into account the quantitative changes of the main cold reactions: higher or lower metabolic heat production, higher or lesser heat losses and finally the level of the core temperature observed at the end of a standardized exposure to cold. General cold adaptations observed previously in natives could also be developed in laboratory conditions by continuous or intermittent cold exposures. Beside general cold adaptation, local cold adaptation exists and is characterized by a lesser decrease of skin temperature, a more pronounced cold induced vasodilation, less pain and a higher manual dexterity. Adaptations to cold may reduce the occurrence of accidents and improve human performance as surviving in the cold. The present review describes both general and local cold adaptations in humans and how they are of interest for cold workers.

  2. The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency-associated transcript (LAT) protects cells against cold-shock-induced apoptosis by maintaining phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT).

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Dale; Hsiang, Chinhui; Jiang, Xianzhi; Osorio, Nelson; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Jones, Clinton; Wechsler, Steven L

    2015-10-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency-associated transcript (LAT) blocks apoptosis and inhibits caspase-3 activation. We previously showed that serum starvation (removal of serum from tissue culture media), which takes several days to induce apoptosis, results in decreased levels of both AKT (protein kinase B) and phosphorylated AKT (pAKT) in cells not expressing LAT. In contrast in mouse neuroblastoma cells expressing LAT, AKT, and pAKT levels remained high. AKT is a serine/threonine protein kinase that promotes cell survival. To examine the effect of LAT on AKT-pAKT using a different and more rapid method of inducing apoptosis, a stable cell line expressing LAT was compared to non-LAT expressing cells as soon as 15 min following recovery from cold-shock-induced apoptosis. Expression of LAT appeared to inhibit dephosphorylation of pAKT. This protection correlated with blocking numerous pro-apoptotic events that are inhibited by pAKT. These results support the hypothesis that inhibiting dephosphorylation of pAKT may be one of the pathways by which LAT protects cells against apoptosis.

  3. The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency-associated transcript (LAT) protects cells against cold-shock-induced apoptosis by maintaining phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT)

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Dale; Hsiang, Chinhui; Jiang, Xianzhi; Osorio, Nelson; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Jones, Clinton

    2017-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency-associated transcript (LAT) blocks apoptosis and inhibits caspase-3 activation. We previously showed that serum starvation (removal of serum from tissue culture media), which takes several days to induce apoptosis, results in decreased levels of both AKT (protein kinase B) and phosphorylated AKT (pAKT) in cells not expressing LAT. In contrast in mouse neuroblastoma cells expressing LAT, AKT, and pAKT levels remained high. AKT is a serine/threonine protein kinase that promotes cell survival. To examine the effect of LAT on AKT-pAKT using a different and more rapid method of inducing apoptosis, a stable cell line expressing LAT was compared to non-LAT expressing cells as soon as 15 min following recovery from cold-shock-induced apoptosis. Expression of LAT appeared to inhibit dephosphorylation of pAKT. This protection correlated with blocking numerous pro-apoptotic events that are inhibited by pAKT. These results support the hypothesis that inhibiting dephosphorylation of pAKT may be one of the pathways by which LAT protects cells against apoptosis. PMID:26071090

  4. Association of the cold-shock DEAD-box RNA helicase RhlE to the RNA degradosome in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Angel A; Vicente, Alexandre M; Hardwick, Steven W; Alvelos, Daniela M; Mazzon, Ricardo R; Luisi, Ben F; Marques, Marilis V

    2017-04-10

    In diverse bacterial lineages, multi-enzyme assemblies have evolved that are central elements of RNA metabolism and RNA-mediated regulation. The aquatic, Gram-negative bacteria Caulobacter crescentus, which has been a model system for studying the bacterial cell cycle, has an RNA degradosome assembly that is formed by the endoribonuclease RNase E and includes the DEAD-box RNA helicase RhlB. Immunoprecipitations of extracts from cells expressing an epitope-tagged RNase E reveal that RhlE, another member of the DEAD-box helicase family, associates with the degradosome at temperatures below the optimum for growth. Phenotype analyses of mutant strains for rhlE, rhlB and rhlE/rhlB show that RhlE is important for cell fitness at low temperature, and its role may not be substituted by RhlB. Transcriptional and translational fusions of rhlE to the lacZ reporter gene and immunoblot analysis of an epitope-tagged RhlE indicate that its expression is induced upon temperature decrease mainly through post-transcriptional regulation. RNase E pulldown assays show that other proteins, including the transcription termination factor Rho, a second DEAD-box RNA helicase and ribosomal protein S1 also associate with the degradosome at low temperature. The results suggest that the RNA degradosome assembly can be remodeled with environmental change to alter its repertoire of helicases and other accessory proteins.IMPORTANCE DEAD-box RNA helicases are often present in the RNA degradosome complex, helping to unwind secondary structures to facilitate degradation. Caulobacter crescentus is an interesting organism to investigate degradosome remodeling with temperature, because it thrives in freshwater bodies and withstands low temperature. In this study we show that at low temperature the cold-induced DEAD-box RNA helicase RhlE is recruited to the RNA degradosome, along with other helicases and the Rho protein. RhlE is essential for bacterial fitness at low temperature, and its function may not

  5. The formation of ion acoustic shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. B.; Fried, B. D.; Coroniti, F. V.

    1973-01-01

    Recent experiments performed in the double plasma (DP) device have verified the existence of electrostatic ion acoustic laminar shocks. The influence of the piston on the shock structure is investigated by modeling the DP device and by numerically solving the temporal and spatial evolution of the shock. In order to isolate piston effects, as opposed to kinetic theory effects such as reflected ions and trapped electrons, the DP plasma is modeled as a cold ion fluid with isothermal Boltzmann electrons. It is shown that laminar shock transitions with structure agreeing with DP shock experiments can be excited.

  6. Common cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000678.htm Common cold To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The common cold most often causes a runny nose, nasal congestion, ...

  7. Cold Sore

    MedlinePlus

    ... genitals. Most people who are infected with the virus that causes cold sores never develop signs and symptoms. Cold sores ... an infection — test positive for evidence of the virus that causes cold sores. People who have weakened immune systems are ...

  8. Nonselective block by La3+ of Arabidopsis ion channels involved in signal transduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. D.; Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Lanthanide ions such as La3+ are frequently used as blockers to test the involvement of calcium channels in plant and animal signal transduction pathways. For example, the large rise in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration triggered by cold shock in Arabidopsis seedlings is effectively blocked by 10 mM La3+ and we show here that the simultaneous large membrane depolarization is similarly blocked. However, a pharmacological tool is only as useful as it is selective and the specificity of La3+ for calcium channels was brought into question by our finding that it also blocked a blue light (BL)-induced depolarization that results from anion channel activation and believed not to involve calcium channels. This unexpected inhibitory effect of La3+ on the BL-induced depolarization is explained by our finding that 10 mM La3+ directly and completely blocked the BL-activated anion channel when applied to excised patches. We have investigated the ability of La3+ to block noncalcium channels in Arabidopsis. In addition to the BL-activated anion channel, 10 mM La3+ blocked a cation channel and a stretch-activated channel in patches of plasma membrane excised from hypocotyl cells. In root cells, 10 mM La3+ inhibited the activity of an outward-rectifying potassium channel at the whole cell and single-channel level by 47% and 58%, respectively. We conclude that La3+ is a nonspecific blocker of multiple ionic conductances in Arabidopsis and may disrupt signal transduction processes independently of any effect on Ca2+ channels.

  9. Nonselective block by La3+ of Arabidopsis ion channels involved in signal transduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. D.; Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Lanthanide ions such as La3+ are frequently used as blockers to test the involvement of calcium channels in plant and animal signal transduction pathways. For example, the large rise in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration triggered by cold shock in Arabidopsis seedlings is effectively blocked by 10 mM La3+ and we show here that the simultaneous large membrane depolarization is similarly blocked. However, a pharmacological tool is only as useful as it is selective and the specificity of La3+ for calcium channels was brought into question by our finding that it also blocked a blue light (BL)-induced depolarization that results from anion channel activation and believed not to involve calcium channels. This unexpected inhibitory effect of La3+ on the BL-induced depolarization is explained by our finding that 10 mM La3+ directly and completely blocked the BL-activated anion channel when applied to excised patches. We have investigated the ability of La3+ to block noncalcium channels in Arabidopsis. In addition to the BL-activated anion channel, 10 mM La3+ blocked a cation channel and a stretch-activated channel in patches of plasma membrane excised from hypocotyl cells. In root cells, 10 mM La3+ inhibited the activity of an outward-rectifying potassium channel at the whole cell and single-channel level by 47% and 58%, respectively. We conclude that La3+ is a nonspecific blocker of multiple ionic conductances in Arabidopsis and may disrupt signal transduction processes independently of any effect on Ca2+ channels.

  10. Design of an optimal promoter involved in the heat-induced transcriptional pathway in Arabidopsis, soybean, rice and maize.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Kyonoshin; Ogata, Takuya; Kanamori, Norihito; Yoshiwara, Kyouko; Goto, Shingo; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y; Tokoro, Yuko; Noda, Chihiro; Takaki, Yuta; Urawa, Hiroko; Iuchi, Satoshi; Urano, Kaoru; Yoshida, Takuhiro; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2017-02-01

    Interactions between heat shock (HS) factors (HSFs) and heat shock response elements (HSEs) are important during the heat shock response (HSR) of flora and fauna. Moreover, plant HSFs that are involved in heat stress are also involved in abiotic stresses such as dehydration and cold as well as development, cell differentiation and proliferation. Because the specific combination of HSFs and HSEs involved in plants under heat stress remains unclear, the mechanism of their interaction has not yet been utilized in molecular breeding of plants for climate change. For the study reported herein, we compared the sequences of HS-inducible genes and their promoters in Arabidopsis, soybean, rice and maize and then designed an optimal HS-inducible promoter. Our analyses suggest that, for the four species, the abscisic acid-independent, HSE/HSF-dependent transcriptional pathway plays a major role in HS-inducible gene expression. We found that an 18-bp sequence that includes the HSE has an important role in the HSR, and that those sequences could be classified as representative of monocotyledons or dicotyledons. With the HS-inducible promoter designed based on our bioinformatic predictions, we were able to develop an optimal HS-specific inducible promoter for seedlings or single cells in roots. These findings demonstrate the utility of our HS-specific inducible promoter, which we expect will contribute to molecular breeding efforts and cell-targeted gene expression in specific plant tissues.

  11. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Kruse, R J

    1995-01-01

    There are two categories of cold injury. The first is hypothermia, which is a systemic injury to cold, and the second is frostbite, which is a local injury. Throughout history, entire armies, from George Washington to the Germans on the Russian Front in World War II, have fallen prey to prolonged cold exposure. Cold injury is common and can occur in all seasons if ambient temperature is lower than the core body temperature. In the 1985 Boston Marathon, even though it was 76 degrees and sunny, there were 75 runners treated for hypothermia. In general, humans adapt poorly to cold exposure. Children are at particular risk because of their relatively greater surface area/body mass ratio, causing them to cool even more rapidly than adults. Because of this, the human's best defense against cold injury is to limit his/her exposure to cold and to dress appropriately. If cold injury has occurred and is mild, often simple passive rewarming such as dry blankets and a warm room are sufficient treatment.

  12. Formation of ion-acoustic shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. B.; Fried, B. D.; Coroniti, F. V.

    1974-01-01

    The formation of an ion-acoustic shock in a numerically modeled two-chamber double plasma device is investigated for a plasma of cold ions and isothermal Boltzmann electrons. An initial potential ramp applied to the driver chamber launches an ion-acoustic pulse into the target chamber which steepens into a shock. The quasi-steady shock structure agrees with observed double plasma shocks. An upper limit of Mach 1.6 is observed independent of the potential ramp magnitude, in agreement with theory.

  13. Pickup ion mediated plasmas: Shock wave structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafavi, P.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.

    2016-03-01

    Energetic particles such as pickup ions, solar energetic particles, or cosmic rays play an important role in determining shock structure. Cosmic-ray modified shocks were discussed by Axford et al. [2]. Jokipii and Williams [8] considered the effect of cosmic ray viscosity on the structure of cold thermal gas shocks mediated by cosmic rays. In the present paper, we consider a background thermal gas of arbitrary temperature to extend their work. The Zank et al. [7] model is used to determine the shock structure when energetic particle collisionless heat flux and viscosity is included.

  14. Annular arc accelerator shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibowitz, L. P. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An annular arc accelerator shock tube employs a cold gas driver to flow a stream of gas from an expansion section through a high voltage electrode section to a test section, thus driving a shock wave in front of it. A glow discharge detects the shock wave and actuates a trigger generator which in turn fires spark-gap switches to discharge a bank of capacitors across a centered cathode and an annular anode in tandem electrode sections. The initial shock wave passes through the anode section from the cathode section thereby depositing energy into the flow gas without the necessity of any diaphragm opening in the gas flow from the expansion section through the electrode sections.

  15. Sterility Caused by Floral Organ Degeneration and Abiotic Stresses in Arabidopsis and Cereal Grains

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ashley R.; Zhao, Dazhong

    2016-01-01

    Natural floral organ degeneration or abortion results in unisexual or fully sterile flowers, while abiotic stresses lead to sterility after initiation of floral reproductive organs. Since normal flower development is essential for plant sexual reproduction and crop yield, it is imperative to have a better understanding of plant sterility under regular and stress conditions. Here, we review the functions of ABC genes together with their downstream genes in floral organ degeneration and the formation of unisexual flowers in Arabidopsis and several agriculturally significant cereal grains. We further explore the roles of hormones, including auxin, brassinosteroids, jasmonic acid, gibberellic acid, and ethylene, in floral organ formation and fertility. We show that alterations in genes affecting hormone biosynthesis, hormone transport and perception cause loss of stamens/carpels, abnormal floral organ development, poor pollen production, which consequently result in unisexual flowers and male/female sterility. Moreover, abiotic stresses, such as heat, cold, and drought, commonly affect floral organ development and fertility. Sterility is induced by abiotic stresses mostly in male floral organ development, particularly during meiosis, tapetum development, anthesis, dehiscence, and fertilization. A variety of genes including those involved in heat shock, hormone signaling, cold tolerance, metabolisms of starch and sucrose, meiosis, and tapetum development are essential for plants to maintain normal fertility under abiotic stress conditions. Further elucidation of cellular, biochemical, and molecular mechanisms about regulation of fertility will improve yield and quality for many agriculturally valuable crops. PMID:27790226

  16. AtGRP2, a cold-induced nucleo-cytoplasmic RNA-binding protein, has a role in flower and seed development.

    PubMed

    Fusaro, Adriana Flores; Bocca, Silvia Nora; Ramos, Rose Lucia Braz; Barrôco, Rosa Maria; Magioli, Claudia; Jorge, Vanessa Cardeal; Coutinho, Tatiana Cardoso; Rangel-Lima, Camila Martins; De Rycke, Riet; Inzé, Dirk; Engler, Gilbert; Sachetto-Martins, Gilberto

    2007-05-01

    The glycine-rich protein AtGRP2 is one of the four members of the cold-shock domain (CSD) protein family in Arabidopsis. It is characterized by the presence of a nucleic acid-binding CSD domain, two glycine-rich domains and two CCHC zinc-fingers present in nucleic acid-binding proteins. In an attempt to further understand the role of CSD/GRP proteins in plants, we have proceeded to the functional characterization of the AtGRP2 gene. Here, we demonstrate that AtGRP2 is a nucleo-cytoplasmic protein involved in Arabidopsis development with a possible function in cold-response. Expression analysis revealed that the AtGRP2 gene is active in meristematic tissues, being modulated during flower development. Down-regulation of AtGRP2 gene, using gene-silencing techniques resulted in early flowering, altered stamen number and affected seed development. A possible role of AtGRP2 as an RNA chaperone is discussed.

  17. Cold intolerance

    MedlinePlus

    Some causes of cold intolerance are: Anemia Anorexia nervosa Blood vessel problems, such as Raynaud phenomenon Chronic severe illness General poor health Underactive thyroid ( hypothyroidism ) Problem with the hypothalamus (a part ...

  18. Overexpression of MuHSP70 gene from Macrotyloma uniflorum confers multiple abiotic stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Masand, Shikha; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2016-02-01

    A 70-KD heat shock protein (HSP70) is one of the most conserved chaperones. It is involved in de novo protein folding and prevents the aggregation of unfolded proteins under lethal environmental factors. The purpose of this study is to characterise a MuHSP70 from horsegram (Macrotyloma uniflorum) and elucidating its role in stress tolerance of plants. A MuHSP70 was cloned and characterised from a natural drought stress tolerant HPK4 variety of horsegram (M. uniflorum). For functional characterization, MuHSP70 was overexpressed in transgenic Arabidopsis. Overexpression of MuHSP70 was found to provide tolerance to the transgenic Arabidopsis against various stresses such as heat, cold, drought, salinity and oxidative stress. MuHSP70 transgenics were observed to maintain the shoot biomass, root length, relative water content, and chlorophyll content during exposure to multi-stresses relative to non-transgenic control. Transgenic lines have further shown the reduced levels of MDA, H2O2, and proteolytic activity. Together, these findings suggest that overexpression of MuHSP70 plays an important role in improving abiotic stress tolerance and could be a crucial candidate gene for exploration in crop improvement program.

  19. Electrostatic shocks as nonlinear ion acoustic waves. [in auroral zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, E.; Hudson, M.

    1976-01-01

    A cold fluid approach is presented which yields exact double-layer solutions that can be used to model electrostatic S-type shocks. Solutions derived from the two-temperature electron model are presented in order to show the range of amplitudes and scale lengths possible for this plasma model and to examine how shock properties depend on orientation of the shock. The dependence of various double-layer quantities on plasma composition is then considered for the cold electron beam model. Double-layer solutions pertinent to describing electrostatic shocks are pointed out.

  20. Systemic low temperature signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gorsuch, Peter A; Sargeant, Alexander W; Penfield, Steven D; Quick, W Paul; Atkin, Owen K

    2010-09-01

    When leaves are exposed to low temperature, sugars accumulate and transcription factors in the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) family are expressed, which, together with CBF-independent pathways, are known to contribute to the cold acclimation process and an increase in freezing tolerance. What is not known, however, is whether expression of these cold-regulated genes can be induced systemically in response to a localized cold treatment. To address this, pre-existing, mature leaves of warm-grown Arabidopsis thaliana were exposed to a localized cold treatment (near 10 °C) whilst conjoined newly developing leaves continued only to experience warmer temperatures. In initial experiments on wild-type A. thaliana (Col-0) using real-time reverse transcription--PCR (RT-PCR) we observed that some genes--including CBF genes, certain downstream cold-responsive (COR) targets and CBF-independent transcription factors--respond to a direct 9 °C treatment of whole plants. In subsequent experiments, we found that the treatment of expanded leaves with temperatures near 10 °C can induce cold-associated genes in conjoined warm-maintained tissues. CBF1 showed a particularly strong systemic response, although CBF-independent transcription factors also responded. Moreover, the localized cold treatment of A. thaliana (C24) plants with a luciferase reporter fused to the promoter region of KIN2 indicated that in warm-maintained leaves, KIN2 might respond to a systemic signal from remote, directly cold-treated leaves. Collectively, our study provides strong evidence that the processes involved in cold acclimation are partially mediated by a signal that acts systemically. This has the potential to act as an early-warning system to enable developing leaves to cope better with the cold environment in which they are growing.

  1. Functional analysis of the Hikeshi-like protein and its interaction with HSP70 in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, Shinya; Ohama, Naohiko; Mizoi, Junya; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • HKL, a Hikeshi homologous gene is identified in Arabidopsis. • HKL interacts with two HSP70 isoforms and regulates the subcellular localization of HSC70-1. • The two HSP70 translocate into nucleus in response to heat stress. • Overexpression of HKL confers thermotolerance in transgenic plants. - Abstract: Heat shock proteins (HSPs) refold damaged proteins and are an essential component of the heat shock response. Previously, the 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) has been reported to translocate into the nucleus in a heat-dependent manner in many organisms. In humans, the heat-induced translocation of HSP70 requires the nuclear carrier protein Hikeshi. In the Arabidopsis genome, only one gene encodes a protein with high homology to Hikeshi, and we named this homolog Hikeshi-like (HKL) protein. In this study, we show that two Arabidopsis HSP70 isoforms accumulate in the nucleus in response to heat shock and that HKL interacts with these HSP70s. Our histochemical analysis revealed that HKL is predominantly expressed in meristematic tissues, suggesting the potential importance of HKL during cell division in Arabidopsis. In addition, we show that HKL regulates HSP70 localization, and HKL overexpression conferred thermotolerance to transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Our results suggest that HKL plays a positive role in the thermotolerance of Arabidopsis plants and cooperatively interacts with HSP70.

  2. Genomic and transcriptomic analyses reveal distinct biological functions for cold shock proteins (VpaCspA and VpaCspD) in Vibrio parahaemolyticus CHN25 during low-temperature survival.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chunhua; Sun, Boyi; Liu, Taigang; Zheng, Huajun; Gu, Wenyi; He, Wei; Sun, Fengjiao; Wang, Yaping; Yang, Meicheng; Bei, Weicheng; Peng, Xu; She, Qunxin; Xie, Lu; Chen, Lanming

    2017-06-05

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus causes serious seafood-borne gastroenteritis and death in humans. Raw seafood is often subjected to post-harvest processing and low-temperature storage. To date, very little information is available regarding the biological functions of cold shock proteins (CSPs) in the low-temperature survival of the bacterium. In this study, we determined the complete genome sequence of V. parahaemolyticus CHN25 (serotype: O5:KUT). The two main CSP-encoding genes (VpacspA and VpacspD) were deleted from the bacterial genome, and comparative transcriptomic analysis between the mutant and wild-type strains was performed to dissect the possible molecular mechanisms that underlie low-temperature adaptation by V. parahaemolyticus. The 5,443,401-bp V. parahaemolyticus CHN25 genome (45.2% G + C) consisted of two circular chromosomes and three plasmids with 4,724 predicted protein-encoding genes. One dual-gene and two single-gene deletion mutants were generated for VpacspA and VpacspD by homologous recombination. The growth of the ΔVpacspA mutant was strongly inhibited at 10 °C, whereas the VpacspD gene deletion strongly stimulated bacterial growth at this low temperature compared with the wild-type strain. The complementary phenotypes were observed in the reverse mutants (ΔVpacspA-com, and ΔVpacspD-com). The transcriptome data revealed that 12.4% of the expressed genes in V. parahaemolyticus CHN25 were significantly altered in the ΔVpacspA mutant when it was grown at 10 °C. These included genes that were involved in amino acid degradation, secretion systems, sulphur metabolism and glycerophospholipid metabolism along with ATP-binding cassette transporters. However, a low temperature elicited significant expression changes for 10.0% of the genes in the ΔVpacspD mutant, including those involved in the phosphotransferase system and in the metabolism of nitrogen and amino acids. The major metabolic pathways that were altered by the dual-gene deletion

  3. Cold injuries.

    PubMed

    Long, William B; Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to cold can produce a variety of injuries that occur as a result of man's inability to adapt to cold. These injuries can be divided into localized injury to a body part, systemic hypothermia, or a combination of both. Body temperature may fall as a result of heat loss by radiation, evaporation, conduction, and convection. Hypothermia or systemic cold injury occurs when the core body temperature has decreased to 35 degrees C (95 degrees F) or less. The causes of hypothermia are either primary or secondary. Primary, or accidental, hypothermia occurs in healthy individuals inadequately clothed and exposed to severe cooling. In secondary hypothermia, another illness predisposes the individual to accidental hypothermia. Hypothermia affects multiple organs with symptoms of hypothermia that vary according to the severity of cold injury. The diagnosis of hypothermia is easy if the patient is a mountaineer who is stranded in cold weather. However, it may be more difficult in an elderly patient who has been exposed to a cold environment. In either case, the rectal temperature should be checked with a low-reading thermometer. The general principals of prehospital management are to (1) prevent further heat loss, (2) rewarm the body core temperature in advance of the shell, and (3) avoid precipitating ventricular fibrillation. There are two general techniques of rewarming--passive and active. The mechanisms of peripheral cold injury can be divided into phenomena that affect cells and extracellular fluids (direct effects) and those that disrupt the function of the organized tissue and the integrity of the circulation (indirect effects). Generally, no serious damage is seen until tissue freezing occurs. The mildest form of peripheral cold injury is frostnip. Chilblains represent a more severe form of cold injury than frostnip and occur after exposure to nonfreezing temperatures and damp conditions. Immersion (trench) foot, a disease of the sympathetic nerves and blood

  4. Cold urticaria.

    PubMed

    Claudy, A

    2001-11-01

    Cold urticaria is one form of urticaria that may be associated with other forms of physical urticarias. Frequency is generally estimated at two or three per 100. The triggering effect of cold is found at history taking in most of the cases. The urticaria is usually superficial, and more rarely associated with deep and/or mucosal urticaria. The diagnosis is based on history taking and the ice cube test. An exhaustive search for an etiologic factor is often unfruitful, and the presence of a cryopathy should lead to a complete work-up. Therapy of cold urticaria may prove to be difficult. In patients with secondary cold urticaria, underlying disease must be treated in order to resolve the skin symptoms. H1-antihistamines can be used but the clinical responses are highly variable. Short-time treatment with low concentration corticosteroids suppresses the symptoms only partially and temporarily. In patients who do not respond to previous treatments, induction of cold tolerance may be proposed but the procedure is difficult to carry out in daily life over an extended period. Key word: cryoglobulins.

  5. Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Christopher W.; Rosengart, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Septic shock is a clinical emergency that occurs in more than 230 000 US patients each year. OBSERVATIONS AND ADVANCES In the setting of suspected or documented infection, septic shock is typically defined in a clinical setting by low systolic (≤90 mm Hg) or mean arterial blood pressure (≤65 mm Hg) accompanied by signs of hypoperfusion (eg, oliguria, hyperlactemia, poor peripheral perfusion, or altered mental status). Focused ultrasonography is recommended for the prompt recognition of complicating physiology (eg, hypovolemia or cardiogenic shock), while invasive hemodynamic monitoring is recommended only for select patients. In septic shock, 3 randomized clinical trials demonstrate that protocolized care offers little advantage compared with management without a protocol. Hydroxyethyl starch is no longer recommended, and debate continues about the role of various crystalloid solutions and albumin. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The prompt diagnosis of septic shock begins with obtainment of medical history and performance of a physical examination for signs and symptoms of infection and may require focused ultrasonography to recognize more complex physiologic manifestations of shock. Clinicians should understand the importance of prompt administration of intravenous fluids and vasoactive medications aimed at restoring adequate circulation, and the limitations of protocol-based therapy, as guided by recent evidence. PMID:26284722

  6. Signal transduction during cold stress in plants.

    PubMed

    Solanke, Amolkumar U; Sharma, Arun K

    2008-04-01

    Cold stress signal transduction is a complex process. Many physiological changes like tissue break down and senescence occur due to cold stress. Low temperature is initially perceived by plasma membrane either due to change in membrane fluidity or with the help of sensors like Ca(2+) permeable channels, histidine kinases, receptor kinases and phospholipases. Subsequently, cytoskeleton reorganization and cytosolic Ca(2+) influx takes place. Increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) is sensed by CDPKs, phosphatase and MAPKs, which transduce the signals to switch on transcriptional cascades. Photosynthetic apparatus have also been thought to be responsible for low temperature perception and signal transduction. Many cold induced pathways are activated to protect plants from deleterious effects of cold stress, but till date, most studied pathway is ICE-CBF-COR signaling pathway. However, the importance of CBF independent pathways in cold acclimation is supported by few Arabidopsis mutants' studies. Cold stress signaling has certain pathways common with other abiotic and biotic stress signaling which suggest cross-talks among these. Most of the economically important crops are sensitive to low temperature, but very few studies are available on cold susceptible crop plants. Therefore, it is necessary to understand signal transducing components from model plants and utilize that knowledge to improve survival of cold sensitive crop plants at low temperature.

  7. Arabidopsis hybrid speciation processes

    PubMed Central

    Schmickl, Roswitha; Koch, Marcus A.

    2011-01-01

    The genus Arabidopsis provides a unique opportunity to study fundamental biological questions in plant sciences using the diploid model species Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata. However, only a few studies have focused on introgression and hybrid speciation in Arabidopsis, although polyploidy is a common phenomenon within this genus. More recently, there is growing evidence of significant gene flow between the various Arabidopsis species. So far, we know Arabidopsis suecica and Arabidopsis kamchatica as fully stabilized allopolyploid species. Both species evolved during Pleistocene glaciation and deglaciation cycles in Fennoscandinavia and the amphi-Beringian region, respectively. These hybrid studies were conducted either on a phylogeographic scale or reconstructed experimentally in the laboratory. In our study we focus at a regional and population level. Our research area is located in the foothills of the eastern Austrian Alps, where two Arabidopsis species, Arabidopsis arenosa and A. lyrata ssp. petraea, are sympatrically distributed. Our hypothesis of genetic introgression, migration, and adaptation to the changing environment during the Pleistocene has been confirmed: We observed significant, mainly unidirectional gene flow between the two species, which has given rise to the tetraploid A. lyrata. This cytotype was able to escape from the narrow ecological niche occupied by diploid A. lyrata ssp. petraea on limestone outcrops by migrating northward into siliceous areas, leaving behind a trail of genetic differentiation. PMID:21825128

  8. COLD TRAP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1963-03-12

    An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

  9. A Strong Merger Shock in Abell 665

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasadia, S.; Sun, M.; Sarazin, C.; Morandi, A.; Markevitch, M.; Wik, D.; Feretti, L.; Giovannini, G.; Govoni, F.

    2016-01-01

    Deep (103 ks) Chandra observations of Abell 665 have revealed rich structures in this merging galaxy cluster, including a strong shock and two cold fronts. The newly discovered shock has a Mach number of M =?3.0 +/- 0.6, propagating in front of a cold disrupted cloud. This makes Abell 665 the second cluster, after the Bullet cluster, where a strong merger shock of M is approximately 3 has been detected. The shock velocity from jump conditions is consistent with (2.7 +/- 0.7) × 10(exp 3) km s(exp -1). The new data also reveal a prominent southern cold front with potentially heated gas ahead of it. Abell 665 also hosts a giant radio halo. There is a hint of diffuse radio emission extending to the shock at the north, which needs to be examined with better radio data. This new strong shock provides a great opportunity to study the reacceleration model with the X-ray and radio data combined.

  10. A Strong Merger Shock in Abell 665

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasadia, S.; Sun, M.; Sarazin, C.; Morandi, A.; Markevitch, M.; Wik, D.; Feretti, L.; Giovannini, G.; Govoni, F.

    2016-01-01

    Deep (103 ks) Chandra observations of Abell 665 have revealed rich structures in this merging galaxy cluster, including a strong shock and two cold fronts. The newly discovered shock has a Mach number of M =?3.0 +/- 0.6, propagating in front of a cold disrupted cloud. This makes Abell 665 the second cluster, after the Bullet cluster, where a strong merger shock of M is approximately 3 has been detected. The shock velocity from jump conditions is consistent with (2.7 +/- 0.7) × 10(exp 3) km s(exp -1). The new data also reveal a prominent southern cold front with potentially heated gas ahead of it. Abell 665 also hosts a giant radio halo. There is a hint of diffuse radio emission extending to the shock at the north, which needs to be examined with better radio data. This new strong shock provides a great opportunity to study the reacceleration model with the X-ray and radio data combined.

  11. Shock Wave Structure Mediated by Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafavi, P.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.

    2016-12-01

    Energetic particles such as cosmic rays, Pick Up Ions (PUIs), and solar energetic particles can affect all facets of plasma physics and astrophysical plasma. Energetic particles play an especially significant role in the dissipative process at shocks and in determining their structure. The very interesting recent observations of shocks in the inner heliosphere found that many shocks appear to be significantly mediated by solar energetic particles which have a pressure that exceeds considerably both the thermal gas pressure and the magnetic field pressure. Energetic particles contribute an isotropic scalar pressure to the plasma system at the leading order, as well as introducing dissipation via a collisionless heat flux (diffusion) at the next order and a collisionless stress tensor (viscosity) at the second order. Cosmic-ray modified shocks were discussed by Axford et al. (1982), Drury (1983), and Webb (1983). Zank et al. (2014) investigated the incorporation of PUIs in the supersonic solar wind beyond 10AU, in the inner Heliosheath and in the Very Local Interstellar Medium. PUIs do not equilibrate collisionally with the background plasma in these regimes. In the absence of equilibration between plasma components, a separate coupled plasma description for the energetic particles is necessary. This model is used to investigate the structure of shock waves assuming that we can neglect the magnetic field. Specifically, we consider the dissipative role that both the energetic particle collisionless heat flux and viscosity play in determining the structure of collisionless shock waves. We show that the incorporation of both energetic particle collisionless heat flux and viscosity is sufficient to completely determine the structure of a shock. Moreover, shocks with three sub-shocks converge to the weak sub-shocks. This work differs from the investigation of Jokipii and Williams (1992) who restricted their attention to a cold thermal gas. For a cold thermal non

  12. Dust acoustic shock waves in two temperatures charged dusty grains

    SciTech Connect

    El-Shewy, E. K.; Abdelwahed, H. G.; Elmessary, M. A.

    2011-11-15

    The reductive perturbation method has been used to derive the Korteweg-de Vries-Burger equation and modified Korteweg-de Vries-Burger for dust acoustic shock waves in a homogeneous unmagnetized plasma having electrons, singly charged ions, hot and cold dust species with Boltzmann distributions for electrons and ions in the presence of the cold (hot) dust viscosity coefficients. The behavior of the shock waves in the dusty plasma has been investigated.

  13. Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes oral herpes, or cold sores. Type 1 herpes virus infects more than half of the U.S. population by the time they reach their 20s. Type 2 usually affects the genital area Some people have no symptoms from the ...

  14. Cold Hands

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have a problem with the nerves or blood circulation or a problem with tissue damage in your hands or fingers. ... of causes. Having cold hands could signal a problem with your blood circulation or the blood vessels in your hands. Make ...

  15. Project COLD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazanjian, Wendy C.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Project COLD (Climate, Ocean, Land, Discovery) a scientific study of the Polar Regions, a collection of 35 modules used within the framework of existing subjects: oceanography, biology, geology, meterology, geography, social science. Includes a partial list of topics and one activity (geodesic dome) from a module. (Author/SK)

  16. Reactive oxygen species trigger a regulatory module invovled in the early responses of rice seedlings to cold stress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plants respond to low temperature through an intricately coordinated transcriptional network controlled by specific groups of transcription factors. Major regulatory pathways in plants that evolved to withstand freezing by cold acclimation have been elucidated in Arabidopsis. A prominent pathway i...

  17. Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Lansing, Allan M.

    1963-01-01

    Septic shock may be defined as hypotension caused by bacteremia and accompanied by decreased peripheral blood flow, evidenced by oliguria. Clinically, a shaking chill is the warning signal. The immediate cause of hypotension is pooling of blood in the periphery, leading to decreased venous return: later, peripheral resistance falls and cardiac failure may occur. Irreversible shock is comparable to massive reactive hyperemia. Reticuloendothelial failure, histamine release, and toxic hypersensitivity may be factors in the pathogenesis of septic shock. Adrenal failure does not usually occur, but large doses of corticosteroid are employed therapeutically to counteract the effect of histamine release or hypersensitivity to endotoxin. The keys to successful therapy are time, antibiotics, vasopressors, cortisone and correction of acidosis. PMID:14063936

  18. Hot, Cold, and Really Cold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a physics experiment investigating temperature prediction and the relationship between the physical properties of heat units, melting, dissolving, states of matter, and energy loss. Details the experimental setup, which requires hot and cold water, a thermometer, and ice. Notes that the experiment employs a deliberate counter-intuitive…

  19. Hot, Cold, and Really Cold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a physics experiment investigating temperature prediction and the relationship between the physical properties of heat units, melting, dissolving, states of matter, and energy loss. Details the experimental setup, which requires hot and cold water, a thermometer, and ice. Notes that the experiment employs a deliberate counter-intuitive…

  20. Raman spectroscopy of hypersonic shock waves

    PubMed

    Ramos; Mate; Tejeda; Fernandez; Montero

    2000-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy is shown to be an efficient diagnostic methodology for the study of hypersonic shock waves. As a test, absolute density and rotational population profiles have been measured across five representative normal shock waves of N2 generated in a free jet, spanning the Mach number range 7.7cold, scattered, and rethermalized molecules) across these shock waves shows a largely bimodal rotational distribution function with additional contribution of scattered molecules, in close analogy with the velocity distribution function known from helium shock waves [G. Pham-Van-Diep et al., Science 245, 624 (1989)]. Quantitative data on invariance trends of density profiles and properties of the wake beyond the shock waves are reported.

  1. The Arabidopsis Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    McClung, C. Robertson; Salomé, Patrice A.; Michael, Todd P.

    2002-01-01

    Rhythms with periods of approximately 24 hr are widespread in nature. Those that persist in constant conditions are termed circadian rhythms and reflect the activity of an endogenous biological clock. Plants, including Arabidopsis, are richly rhythmic. Expression analysis, most recently on a genomic scale, indicates that the Arabidopsis circadian clock regulates a number of key metabolic pathways and stress responses. A number of sensitive and high-throughput assays have been developed to monitor the Arabidopsis clock. These assays have facilitated the identification of components of plant circadian systems through genetic and molecular biological studies. Although much remains to be learned, the framework of the Arabidopsis circadian system is coming into focus. Dedication This review is dedicated to the memory of DeLill Nasser, a wonderful mentor and an unwavering advocate of both Arabidopsis and circadian rhythms research. PMID:22303209

  2. Habitat-Associated Life History and Stress-Tolerance Variation in Arabidopsis arenosa1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Baduel, Pierre; Arnold, Brian; Weisman, Cara M.; Hunter, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Weediness in ephemeral plants is commonly characterized by rapid cycling, prolific all-in flowering, and loss of perenniality. Many species made transitions to weediness of this sort, which can be advantageous in high-disturbance or human-associated habitats. The molecular basis of this shift, however, remains mostly mysterious. Here, we use transcriptome sequencing, genome resequencing scans for selection, and stress tolerance assays to study a weedy population of the otherwise nonweedy Arabidopsis arenosa, an obligately outbreeding relative of Arabidopsis thaliana. Although weedy A. arenosa is widespread, a single genetic lineage colonized railways throughout central and northern Europe. We show that railway plants, in contrast to plants from sheltered outcrops in hill/mountain regions, are rapid cycling, have lost the vernalization requirement, show prolific flowering, and do not return to vegetative growth. Comparing transcriptomes of railway and mountain plants across time courses with and without vernalization, we found that railway plants have sharply abrogated vernalization responsiveness and high constitutive expression of heat- and cold-responsive genes. Railway plants also have strong constitutive heat shock and freezing tolerance compared with mountain plants, where tolerance must be induced. We found 20 genes with good evidence of selection in the railway population. One of these, LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL, is known in A. thaliana to regulate many stress-response genes that we found to be differentially regulated among the distinct habitats. Our data suggest that, beyond life history regulation, other traits like basal stress tolerance also are associated with the evolution of weediness in A. arenosa. PMID:26941193

  3. Natural Genetic Variation of Freezing Tolerance in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hannah, Matthew A.; Wiese, Dana; Freund, Susanne; Fiehn, Oliver; Heyer, Arnd G.; Hincha, Dirk K.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature is a primary determinant of plant growth and survival. Using accessions of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) originating from Scandinavia to the Cape Verde Islands, we show that freezing tolerance of natural accessions correlates with habitat winter temperatures, identifying low temperature as an important selective pressure for Arabidopsis. Combined metabolite and transcript profiling show that during cold exposure, global changes of transcripts, but not of metabolites, correlate with the ability of Arabidopsis to cold acclimate. There are, however, metabolites and transcripts, including several transcription factors, that correlate with freezing tolerance, indicating regulatory pathways that may be of primary importance for this trait. These data identify that enhanced freezing tolerance is associated with the down-regulation of photosynthesis and hormonal responses and the induction of flavonoid metabolism, provide evidence for naturally increased nonacclimated freezing tolerance due to the constitutive activation of the C-repeat binding factors pathway, and identify candidate transcriptional regulators that correlate with freezing tolerance. PMID:16844837

  4. Acquisition of freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis and two contrasting ecotypes of the extremophile Eutrema salsugineum (Thellungiella salsuginea).

    PubMed

    Khanal, Nityananda; Moffatt, Barbara A; Gray, Gordon R

    2015-05-15

    Eutrema salsugineum (Thellungiella salsuginea) is an extremophile, a close relative of Arabidopsis, but possessing much higher constitutive levels of tolerance to abiotic stress. This study aimed to characterize the freezing tolerance of Arabidopsis (Columbia ecotype) and two ecotypes of Eutrema (Yukon and Shandong) isolated from contrasting geographical locations. Under our growth conditions, maximal freezing tolerance was observed after two- and three-weeks of cold acclimation for Arabidopsis and Eutrema, respectively. The ecotypes of Eutrema and Arabidopsis do not differ in their constitutive level of freezing tolerance or short-term cold acclimation capacity. However Eutrema remarkably outperforms Arabidopsis in long-term acclimation capacity suggesting a wider phenotypic plasticity for the trait of freezing tolerance. The combination of drought treatment and one-week of cold acclimation was more effective than long-term cold acclimation in achieving maximum levels of freezing tolerance in Eutrema, but not Arabidopsis. Furthermore, it was demonstrated growth conditions, particularly irradiance, are determinates of the level of freezing tolerance attained during cold acclimation suggesting a role for photosynthetic processes in adaptive stress responses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of warm streaming electrons on electrostatic shock solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, Earl; Hudson, Mary

    1986-01-01

    A plasma model consisting of warm downward streaming electrons, cool Boltzmann electrons, cold upward streaming ions, and hot Boltzmann ions is considered. It is shown that there is little difference between having a finite temperature in the electron beam and leaving the beam cold. This implies a greater utility for a cold electron beam model, and adds weight to the idea that the smaller amplitude electrostatic shocks seen in conjunction with ion beams are nonlinear ion acoustic modes.

  6. Carbon partitioning and the impact of starch deficiency on the initial response of Arabidopsis to chilling temperatures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Specific metabolites and RNA transcripts were measured in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves in response to chilling temperatures. During the first 24 h of cold treatment eight soluble carbohydrates increased 9.4 fold on average during cold treatment. Except for maltose and raffinose carbohydrate accumul...

  7. COLD TRAPS

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  8. Abiotic stresses induce different localizations of anthocyanins in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kovinich, Nik; Kayanja, Gilbert; Chanoca, Alexandra; Otegui, Marisa S; Grotewold, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Anthocyanins are induced in plants in response to abiotic stresses such as drought, high salinity, excess light, and cold, where they often correlate with enhanced stress tolerance. Numerous roles have been proposed for anthocyanins induced during abiotic stresses including functioning as ROS scavengers, photoprotectants, and stress signals. We have recently found different profiles of anthocyanins in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants exposed to different abiotic stresses, suggesting that not all anthocyanins have the same function. Here, we discuss these findings in the context of other studies and show that anthocyanins induced in Arabidopsis in response to various abiotic stresses have different localizations at the organ and tissue levels. These studies provide a basis to clarify the role of particular anthocyanin species during abiotic stress. PMID:26179363

  9. [Anaphylactic shock].

    PubMed

    Müller-Werdan, U; Werdan, K

    2000-02-25

    IgE-dependent and IgE-independent hypersensitivity reactions, the latter due to physical, chemical or hyperosmolar stimuli, may evolve as anaphylaxis or an anaphylactoid reaction, by an escalating release of mediators from mast cells and basophils. Without immediate treatment, anaphylaxis goes along with substantial morbidity (shock, multiple organ failure) and mortality; within minutes this explosive clinical response can be fatal. The severity of anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions is graded from stages 0 to IV in order to guide the management of this disease, stage III corresponding to anaphylactic shock. Severe anaphylactic reactions may take a progressive course despite adequate therapy; even in the case of an initial favourable response to treatment measures life-threatening symptoms may recur; there may be late-phase reactions 6 to 12 hours after the initial reaction. For the initial emergency management a differentiation between IgE-mediated and IgE-independent anaphylactoid reactions is not required. These are the pertinent principles of therapy in hypotensive and hypoxic patients: removal of the likely noxious agent at the site of introduction, provision of a patent airway, 100% oxygen supplementation, intravenous fluid therapy and pharmacological support with catecholamines. After primary care the monitoring and therapy of the patient with anaphylactic shock has to be continued on the intensive care unit. Guidelines for management of acute anaphylaxis referring to both the stage of disease including shock and the main clinical manifestation (cutaneous, pulmonary, cardiovascular) have been established by a German interdisciplinary consensus conference and were published in 1994; consensus guidelines for emergency medical treatment have been communicated by the ILCOR (1997) and the Project Team of the Resuscitation Council (UK) (1999).

  10. A merger shock in A2034

    SciTech Connect

    Owers, Matt S.; Couch, Warrick J.; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Ma, Cheng-Jiun; David, Laurence P.; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Van Weeren, Reinout J.

    2014-01-10

    We present a 250 ks Chandra observation of the cluster merger A2034 with the aim of understanding the nature of a sharp edge previously characterized as a cold front. The new data reveal that the edge is coherent over a larger opening angle and is significantly more bow-shock-shaped than previously thought. Within ∼27° about the axis of symmetry of the edge, the density, temperature, and pressure drop abruptly by factors of 1.83{sub −0.08}{sup +0.09}, 1.85{sub −0.41}{sup +0.41}, and 3.4{sub −0.7}{sup +0.8}, respectively. This is inconsistent with the pressure equilibrium expected of a cold front and we conclude that the edge is a shock front. We measure a Mach number M=1.59{sub −0.07}{sup +0.06} and corresponding shock velocity v {sub shock} ≅ 2057 km s{sup –1}. Using spectra collected at the MMT with the Hectospec multi-object spectrograph, we identify 328 spectroscopically confirmed cluster members. Significantly, we find a local peak in the projected galaxy density associated with a bright cluster galaxy that is located just ahead of the nose of the shock. The data are consistent with a merger viewed within ∼23° of the plane of the sky. The merging subclusters are now moving apart along a north-south axis approximately 0.3 Gyr after a small impact parameter core passage. The gas core of the secondary subcluster, which was driving the shock, appears to have been disrupted by the merger. Without a driving 'piston,' we speculate that the shock is dying. Finally, we propose that the diffuse radio emission near the shock is due to the revival of pre-existing radio plasma that has been overrun by the shock.

  11. Cold Urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Stephen I.; Soter, Nicholas A.; Center, David M.; Austen, K. Frank

    1977-01-01

    Sera were obtained from the venous effluents of cold-challenged arms of patients with idiopathic cold urticaria without plasma or serum cryoproteins; these sera exhibited increased neutrophil chemotactic activity without alterations of the complement system. A two- to fourfold augmentation of the base-line neutrophil chemotactic activity of serum from the immersed extremity began within 1 min, peaked at 2 min, and returned to base-line levels within 15 min, whereas there was no change in the serum chemotactic activity in the control arm. The augmented chemotactic activity in the serum specimens from the challenged arm of each patient appeared in a high molecular-weight region, as assessed by the difference in activity recovered after Sephadex G-200 gel filtration of the paired lesional and control specimens. Sequential purification of this high molecular-weight activity by anion- and cation-exchange chromatography revealed a single peak of activity at both steps. The partially purified material continued to exhibit a high molecular weight, being excluded on Sepharose 4B, and had a neutral isoelectric point. The partially purified material showed a preferential chemotactic activity for neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes, required a gradient for expression of this function, and exhibited a capacity to deactivate this cell type. This active principle, termed high molecular-weight neutrophil chemotactic factor, exhibited a time-course of release that could be superimposed upon that of histamine and the low molecular-weight eosinophil chemotactic factor and may represent another mast cell-derived mediator. PMID:874083

  12. Shock waves in dusty plasma with two temperature superthermal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghai, Yashika; Saini, N. S.

    2017-03-01

    An investigation of dust acoustic shock waves in dusty plasma containing two temperature ions is presented. The present investigation is motivated by the observations of Geotail spacecraft that report the occurrence of two temperature ion populations in Earth's magnetotail. We have derived Burgers equation to study dust acoustic shock structures in an unmagnetized plasma with two temperature superthermal ions. We have also derived the modified Burgers equation at critical values of physical parameters for which nonlinear coefficient (A) of Burgers equation vanishes. The numerical analysis is performed in context with observations in Earth's magnetotail and the influence of various plasma parameters viz. ions temperature ratio, superthermality of hot and cold ions, kinematic viscosity etc. has been observed on characteristics of DA shocks. It is observed that the amplitude of positive shocks via Burgers equation decreases whereas that of modified shocks with higher order nonlinearity increases with increase in superthermality of cold ions.

  13. [Definition of shock types].

    PubMed

    Adams, H A; Baumann, G; Gänsslen, A; Janssens, U; Knoefel, W; Koch, T; Marx, G; Müller-Werdan, U; Pape, H C; Prange, W; Roesner, D; Standl, T; Teske, W; Werner, G; Zander, R

    2001-11-01

    Definitions of shock types. Hypovolaemic shock is a state of insufficient perfusion of vital organs with consecutive imbalance of oxygen supply and demand due to an intravascular volume deficiency with critically impaired cardiac preload. Subtypes are haemorrhagic shock, hypovolaemic shock in the narrow sense, traumatic-haemorrhagic shock and traumatic-hypovolaemic shock. Cardiac shock is caused by a primary critical cardiac pump failure with consecutive inadequate oxygen supply of the organism. Anaphylactic shock is an acute failure of blood volume distribution (distributive shock) and caused by IgE-dependent, type-I-allergic, classical hypersensibility, or a physically, chemically, or osmotically induced IgE-independent anaphylactoid hypersensibility. The septic shock is a sepsis-induced distribution failure of the circulating blood volume in the sense of a distributive shock. The neurogenic shock is a distributive shock induced by generalized and extensive vasodilatation with consecutive hypovolaemia due to an imbalance of sympathetic and parasympathetic regulation of vascular smooth muscles.

  14. Shock wave consolidated MgB 2 bulk samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzawa, Hidenori; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Ohashi, Wataru; Kakimoto, Etsuji; Dohke, Kiyotaka; Atou, Toshiyuki; Fukuoka, Kiyoto; Kikuchi, Masae; Kawasaki, Masashi; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2004-10-01

    Commercially available MgB 2 powders were consolidated into bulk samples by two different shock wave consolidation methods: underwater shock consolidation method and gun method. Resistance vs. temperature of the samples was measured by the four-terminal method for pulsed currents of up to 3 A in self-field, as well as Vickers hardness, SEM micrographs of fraction surfaces, packing densities, and X-ray diffraction patterns. These results, in comparison with cold isostatic pressed samples, indicated that the underwater shock consolidated sample was superior in grain connectivity to the others. This is probably because the underwater shock consolidation generated most anisotropic and hence high frictional, compressive, intergrain forces.

  15. Multiple shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenker, Stephen H.; Stanford, Douglas

    2014-12-01

    Using gauge/gravity duality, we explore a class of states of two CFTs with a large degree of entanglement, but with very weak local two-sided correlation. These states are constructed by perturbing the thermofield double state with thermal-scale operators that are local at different times. Acting on the dual black hole geometry, these perturbations create an intersecting network of shock waves, supporting a very long wormhole. Chaotic CFT dynamics and the associated fast scrambling time play an essential role in determining the qualitative features of the resulting geometries.

  16. Isolation and functional characterization of cold-regulated promoters, by digitally identifying peach fruit cold-induced genes from a large EST dataset

    PubMed Central

    Tittarelli, Andrés; Santiago, Margarita; Morales, Andrea; Meisel, Lee A; Silva, Herman

    2009-01-01

    Background Cold acclimation is the process by which plants adapt to the low, non freezing temperatures that naturally occur during late autumn or early winter. This process enables the plants to resist the freezing temperatures of winter. Temperatures similar to those associated with cold acclimation are also used by the fruit industry to delay fruit ripening in peaches. However, peaches that are subjected to long periods of cold storage may develop chilling injury symptoms (woolliness and internal breakdown). In order to better understand the relationship between cold acclimation and chilling injury in peaches, we isolated and functionally characterized cold-regulated promoters from cold-inducible genes identified by digitally analyzing a large EST dataset. Results Digital expression analyses of EST datasets, revealed 164 cold-induced peach genes, several of which show similarities to genes associated with cold acclimation and cold stress responses. The promoters of three of these cold-inducible genes (Ppbec1, Ppxero2 and Pptha1) were fused to the GUS reporter gene and characterized for cold-inducibility using both transient transformation assays in peach fruits (in fruta) and stable transformation in Arabidopsis thaliana. These assays demonstrate that the promoter Pptha1 is not cold-inducible, whereas the Ppbec1 and Ppxero2 promoter constructs are cold-inducible. Conclusion This work demonstrates that during cold storage, peach fruits differentially express genes that are associated with cold acclimation. Functional characterization of these promoters in transient transformation assays in fruta as well as stable transformation in Arabidopsis, demonstrate that the isolated Ppbec1 and Ppxero2 promoters are cold-inducible promoters, whereas the isolated Pptha1 promoter is not cold-inducible. Additionally, the cold-inducible activity of the Ppbec1 and Ppxero2 promoters suggest that there is a conserved heterologous cold-inducible regulation of these promoters in

  17. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold ... tos y el resfriado Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ...

  18. Cold symptoms (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Colds are caused by a virus and can occur year-round. The common cold generally involves a runny nose, nasal congestion, and sneezing. Other symptoms include sore throat, cough, and headache. A cold usually lasts ...

  19. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold ... Someone Quit? Avoiding DXM Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ...

  20. Shock Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The electrician pictured is installing a General Electric Ground Fault Interrupter (GFI), a device which provides protection against electrical shock in the home or in industrial facilities. Shocks due to defective wiring in home appliances or other electrical equipment can cause severe burns, even death. As a result, the National Electrical Code now requires GFIs in all new homes constructed. This particular type of GFI employs a sensing element which derives from technology acquired in space projects by SCI Systems, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama, producer of sensors for GE and other manufacturers of GFI equipment. The sensor is based on the company's experience in developing miniaturized circuitry for space telemetry and other spacecraft electrical systems; this experience enabled SCI to package interruptor circuitry in the extremely limited space available and to produce sensory devices at practicable cost. The tiny sensor measures the strength of the electrical current and detects current differentials that indicate a fault in the functioning of an electrical system. The sensing element then triggers a signal to a disconnect mechanism in the GFI, which cuts off the current in the faulty circuit.

  1. Radiation from Shock-Accelerated Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-ichi; Choi, E. J.; Min, K. W.; Niemiec, J.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma instabilities excited in collisionless shocks are responsible for particle acceleration, generation of magnetic fields , and associated radiation. We have investigated the particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic jet propagating into an unmagnetized plasma. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and slowed while the ambient electrons are swept up to create a partially developed hydrodynamic-like shock structure. The shock structure depends on the composition of the jet and ambient plasma (electron-positron or electron-ions). Strong electromagnetic fields are generated in the reverse , jet shock and provide an emission site. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the shock. We have calculated, self-consistently, the radiation from electrons accelerated in the turbulent magnetic fields. We found that the synthetic spectra depend on the Lorentz factor of the jet, its thermal temperature and strength of the generated magnetic fields. The detailed properties of the radiation are important for understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jet shocks, and supernova remnants

  2. Structure of Energetic Particle Mediated Shocks Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafavi, P.; Zank, G. P.; Webb, G. M.

    2017-05-01

    The structure of collisionless shock waves is often modified by the presence of energetic particles that are not equilibrated with the thermal plasma (such as pickup ions [PUIs] and solar energetic particles [SEPs]). This is relevant to the inner and outer heliosphere and the Very Local Interstellar Medium (VLISM), where observations of shock waves (e.g., in the inner heliosphere) show that both the magnetic field and thermal gas pressure are less than the energetic particle component pressures. Voyager 2 observations revealed that the heliospheric termination shock (HTS) is very broad and mediated by energetic particles. PUIs and SEPs contribute both a collisionless heat flux and a higher-order viscosity. We show that the incorporation of both effects can completely determine the structure of collisionless shocks mediated by energetic ions. Since the reduced form of the PUI-mediated plasma model is structurally identical to the classical cosmic ray two-fluid model, we note that the presence of viscosity, at least formally, eliminates the need for a gas sub-shock in the classical two-fluid model, including in that regime where three are possible. By considering parameters upstream of the HTS, we show that the thermal gas remains relatively cold and the shock is mediated by PUIs. We determine the structure of the weak interstellar shock observed by Voyager 1. We consider the inclusion of the thermal heat flux and viscosity to address the most general form of an energetic particle-thermal plasma two-fluid model.

  3. Geometrical shock dynamics of fast magnetohydrodynamic shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostert, Wouter; Pullin, Dale I.; Samtaney, Ravi; Wheatley, Vincent

    2016-11-01

    We extend the theory of geometrical shock dynamics (GSD, Whitham 1958), to two-dimensional fast magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks moving in the presence of nonuniform magnetic fields of general orientation and strength. The resulting generalized area-Mach number rule is adapted to MHD shocks moving in two spatial dimensions. A partially-spectral numerical scheme developed from that of Schwendeman (1993) is described. This is applied to the stability of plane MHD fast shocks moving into a quiescent medium containing a uniform magnetic field whose field lines are inclined to the plane-shock normal. In particular, we consider the time taken for an initially planar shock subject to an initial perturbed magnetosonic Mach number distribution, to first form shock-shocks. Supported by KAUST OCRF Award No. URF/1/2162-01.

  4. Cold confusion

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G.

    1989-07-01

    On March 23 two chemists, Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons startled the world with a press conference at the University of Utah where they announced that they had achieved nuclear fusion at room temperatures. As evidence they cited the production of ''excess'' amounts of heat in an electrochemical apparatus and observation of neutron production. While the production of heat in a chemical apparatus is not in itself unusual the observation of neutrons is certainly extraordinary. As it turned out, though, careful measurements of the neutron production in electrochemical apparatus similar to that used by Fleischmann and Pons carried out at dozens of other laboratories has shown that the neutron production fails by many orders of magnitude to support the assertion by Fleischmann and Pons that their discovery represents a new and cheap source of fusion power. In particular, independent measurements of the neutron production rate suggest that the actual rate of fusion energy production probably does not exceed 1 trillionth of a watt. This paper discusses the feasibility that cold fusion is actually being achieved. 7 refs.

  5. Vascular development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zheng-Hua; Freshour, Glenn; Hahn, Michael G; Burk, David H; Zhong, Ruiqin

    2002-01-01

    Vascular tissues, xylem and phloem, form a continuous network throughout the plant body for transport of water, minerals, and food. Characterization of Arabidopsis mutants defective in various aspects of vascular formation has demonstrated that Arabidopsis is an ideal system for investigating the molecular mechanisms controlling vascular development. The processes affected in these mutants include initiation or division of procambium or vascular cambium, formation of continuous vascular cell files, differentiation of procambium or vascular cambium into vascular tissues, cell elongation, patterned secondary wall thickening, and biosynthesis of secondary walls. Identification of the genes affected by some of these mutations has revealed essential roles in vascular development for a cytokinin receptor and several factors mediating auxin transport or signaling. Mutational studies have also identified a number of Arabidopsis mutants defective in leaf venation pattern or vascular tissue organization in stems. Genetic evidence suggests that the vascular tissue organization is regulated by the same positional information that determines organ polarity.

  6. Cold energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-04

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  7. Cold energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, John P.

    2015-12-01

    Deviations in Q for resonant superconducting radio frequency niobium accelerator cavities are generally correlated with resistivity loss mechanisms. Field dependent Qs are not well modeled by these classical loss mechanisms, but rather can represent a form of precision cavity surface thermometry. When the field dependent Q variation shows improvement with increasing B field level the classical treatment of this problem is inadequate. To justify this behavior hydrogen as a ubiquitous impurity in niobium, which creates measurable property changes, even at very low concentrations is typically considered the cause of such anomalous behavior. This maybe the case in some instances, but more importantly any system operating with a highly coherent field with a significant time dependent magnetic component at near 2° K will have the ability to organize the remaining free spins within the London penetration depth to form a coupled energy reservoir in the form of low mass spin waves. The niobium resonant cavities are composed of a single isotope with a large nuclear spin. When the other loss mechanisms are stripped away this may be the gain medium activated by the low level residual magnetic fields. It was found that one resonant cavity heat treatment produced optimum surface properties and then functioned as a MASER extracting energy from the 2° K thermal bath while cooling the cavity walls. The cavity operating in this mode is a simulator of what can take place in the wider but not colder universe using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as a thermal source. The low mass, long lifetimes, and the scale of the magnetic spin waves on the weakly magnetized interstellar medium allows energy to be stored that is many orders of magnitude colder than the cosmic microwave background. A linear accelerator cavity becomes a tool to explore the properties of the long wave length magnetic spin waves that populate this cold low energy regime.

  8. FUM2, a Cytosolic Fumarase, Is Essential for Acclimation to Low Temperature in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Beth C; Miller, Matthew A E; Feil, Regina; Rattray, Nicholas; Bowsher, Caroline G; Goodacre, Royston; Lunn, John E; Johnson, Giles N

    2016-09-01

    Although cold acclimation is a key process in plants from temperate climates, the mechanisms sensing low temperature remain obscure. Here, we show that the accumulation of the organic acid fumaric acid, mediated by the cytosolic fumarase FUM2, is essential for cold acclimation of metabolism in the cold-tolerant model species Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). A nontargeted metabolomic approach, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, identifies fumarate as a key component of the cold response in this species. Plants of T-DNA insertion mutants, lacking FUM2, show marked differences in their response to cold, with contrasting responses both in terms of metabolite concentrations and gene expression. The fum2 plants accumulated higher concentrations of phosphorylated sugar intermediates and of starch and malate. Transcripts for proteins involved in photosynthesis were markedly down-regulated in fum2.2 but not in wild-type Columbia-0. Plants of fum2 show a complete loss of the ability to acclimate photosynthesis to low temperature. We conclude that fumarate accumulation plays an essential role in low temperature sensing in Arabidopsis, either indirectly modulating metabolic or redox signals or possibly being itself directly involved in cold sensing.

  9. On the transition from electromagnetic to electrostatic shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockem, Anne; Fiuza, Frederico; Boella, Elisabetta; Fonseca, Ricardo; Silva, Luis

    2012-10-01

    Electrostatic and electromagnetic shocks are relevant in various unmagnetized scenarios. The first can be produced in the laboratory by the interaction of a laser with a near-critical density target and are of interest for the generation of quasi-monoenergetic ion beams, e.g. for cancer therapy, whereas electromagnetic shocks are more relevant in astrophysical scenarios. We explore the conditions under which these shocks are generated in a scenario of two colliding plasma slabs, each consisting of cold ions and electrons with non-zero temperature. The main features of the shock character are discussed as a function of the initial fluid velocity and the electron temperature, and the governing regimes are theoretically predicted, by considering the shock formation time scales and the relevant scales for the instabilities mediating the shock formation. Particle-in-cell simulations confirm the theoretical findings and show the transition between both regimes.

  10. Permeability enhancement by shock cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Reuschlé, Thierry; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The permeability of an efficient reservoir, e.g. a geothermal reservoir, should be sufficient to permit the circulation of fluids. Generally speaking, permeability decreases over the life cycle of the geothermal system. As a result, is usually necessary to artificially maintain and enhance the natural permeability of these systems. One of the methods of enhancement -- studied here -- is thermal stimulation (injecting cold water at low pressure). This goal of this method is to encourage new thermal cracks within the reservoir host rocks, thereby increasing reservoir permeability. To investigate the development of thermal microcracking in the laboratory we selected two granites: a fine-grained (Garibaldi Grey granite, grain size = 0.5 mm) and a course-grained granite (Lanhelin granite, grain size = 2 mm). Both granites have an initial porosity of about 1%. Our samples were heated to a range of temperatures (100-1000 °C) and were either cooled slowly (1 °C/min) or shock cooled (100 °C/s). A systematic microstructural (2D crack area density, using standard stereological techniques, and 3D BET specific surface area measurements) and rock physical property (porosity, P-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability) analysis was undertaken to understand the influence of slow and shock cooling on our reservoir granites. Microstructurally, we observe that the 2D crack surface area per unit volume and the specific surface area increase as a result of thermal stressing, and, for the same maximum temperature, crack surface area is higher in the shock cooled samples. This observation is echoed by our rock physical property measurements: we see greater changes for the shock cooled samples. We can conclude that shock cooling is an extremely efficient method of generating thermal microcracks and modifying rock physical properties. Our study highlights that thermal treatments are likely to be an efficient method for the "matrix" permeability enhancement of

  11. Arabidopsis brassinosteroid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Belkhadir, Youssef; Wang, Xuelu; Chory, Joanne

    2006-12-05

    Plants control their size through the action of several phytohormones. One class of growth-promoting hormones is the brassinosteroids (BRs), the polyhydroxylated steroid hormones of plants. Here, we present the Arabidopsis-specific proteins that are the founding members of key BR signaling pathway components found in all plants. The genetic studies that identified these components are unique to Arabidopsis owing to its rapid generation time, sophisticated genetics, and facile transformation protocols, thereby highlighting the importance of a reference plant for understanding fundamental processes in all land plants.

  12. Colds and the Flu

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014October 2014familydoctor.org editorial staff OverviewWhat is the common cold and the flu?The common cold and the flu are viral infections of the ... have a cold or the flu?Although the common cold and the flu share many similar symptoms, they ...

  13. Cold remedies (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Sore throat, cough, stuffy nose, sneezing, runny nose, fever, chills, and muscle aches are all symptoms associated with the common cold. Over-the-counter medicines for a cold only alleviate cold symptoms but do not shorten the duration of a cold. As always, ...

  14. Facts about the Common Cold

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Influenza Facts About The Common Cold What Is a Cold? Colds are minor infections ... for 10 to 40 percent of colds. Other common cold viruses include coronavirus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) . ...

  15. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns are altered during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Popp, Michael P.; Gurley, William B.; Guy, Charles; Norwood, Kelly L.; Ferl, Robert J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments results in differential gene expression. A 5-day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β-Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on gene expression patterns initially by using the Adh/GUS transgene to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response (Paul, A.L., Daugherty, C.J., Bihn, E.A., Chapman, D.K., Norwood, K.L., Ferl, R.J., 2001. Transgene expression patterns indicate that spaceflight affects stress signal perception and transduction in arabidopsis, Plant Physiol. 126, 613-621). As a follow-on to the reporter gene analysis, we report here the evaluation of genome-wide patterns of native gene expression within Arabidopsis shoots utilizing the Agilent DNA array of 21,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - Taqman®). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays probed with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to RNA isolated from ground control plants revealed 182 genes that were differentially expressed in response to the spaceflight mission by more than 4-fold, and of those only 50 genes were expressed at levels chosen to support a conservative change call. None of the genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were induced to this level. However, genes related to heat shock were dramatically induced - but in a pattern and under growth conditions that are not easily explained by elevated temperatures. These gene expression data are discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment and with regard to potential future spaceflight experiment

  16. Particle Acceleration in Shock-Shock Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, Masaru; Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Hada, Tohru

    2015-04-01

    Collisionless shock waves play a crucial role in producing high energy particles. One of the most plausible acceleration mechanisms is the first order Fermi acceleration in which non-thermal particles statistically gain energy while scattered by MHD turbulence both upstream and downstream of a shock. Indeed, X-ray emission from energetic particles accelerated at supernova remnant shocks is often observed [e.g., Uchiyama et al., 2007]. Most of the previous studies on shock acceleration assume the presence of a single shock. In space, however, two shocks frequently come close to or even collide with each other. For instance, it is observed that a CME (coronal mass ejection) driven shock collides with the earth's bow shock [Hietala et al., 2011], or interplanetary shocks pass through the heliospheric termination shock [Lu et al., 1999]. Colliding shocks are observed also in high power laser experiments [Morita et al., 2013]. It is expected that shock-shock interactions efficiently produce high energy particles. A previous work using hybrid simulation [Cargill et al., 1986] reports efficient ion acceleration when supercritical two shocks collide. In the hybrid simulation, however, the electron dynamics cannot be resolved so that electron acceleration cannot be discussed in principle. Here, we perform one-dimensional full Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations to examine colliding two symmetric oblique shocks and the associated electron acceleration. In particular, the following three points are discussed in detail. 1. Energetic electrons are observed upstream of the two shocks before their collision. These energetic electrons are efficiently accelerated through multiple reflections at the two shocks (Fermi acceleration). 2. The reflected electrons excite large amplitude upstream waves. Electron beam cyclotron instability [Hasegawa, 1975] and electron fire hose instability [Li et al., 2000] appear to occur. 3. The large amplitude waves can scatters energetic electrons in

  17. Low Temperature Induces the Accumulation of Alcohol Dehydrogenase mRNA in Arabidopsis thaliana, a Chilling-Tolerant Plant.

    PubMed Central

    Jarillo, J. A.; Leyva, A.; Salinas, J.; Martinez-Zapater, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    mRNA encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) increases in etiolated seedlings and leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. upon exposure to low temperature. The analysis of this response after water stress and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments in Arabidopsis wild type and ABA-deficient and -insensitive mutants indicates that cold accumulation of ADH mRNA could be induced by both anaerobic metabolism and increase of ABA concentration resulting from low temperature exposure. By using one Arabidopsis ADH null mutant, we show that ADH activity is not required for successful development of freezing tolerance in this species. PMID:12231733

  18. Starch Metabolism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Streb, Sebastian; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2012-01-01

    Starch is the major non-structural carbohydrate in plants. It serves as an important store of carbon that fuels plant metabolism and growth when they are unable to photosynthesise. This storage can be in leaves and other green tissues, where it is degraded during the night, or in heterotrophic tissues such as roots, seeds and tubers, where it is stored over longer time periods. Arabidopsis accumulates starch in many of its tissues, but mostly in its leaves during the day. It has proven to be a powerful genetic system for discovering how starch is synthesised and degraded, and new proteins and processes have been discovered. Such work has major significance for our starch crops, whose yield and quality could be improved by the application of this knowledge. Research into Arabidopsis starch metabolism has begun to reveal how its daily turnover is integrated into the rest of metabolism and adapted to the environmental conditions. Furthermore, Arabidopsis mutant lines deficient in starch metabolism have been employed as tools to study other biological processes ranging from sugar sensing to gravitropism and flowering time control. This review gives a detailed account of the use of Arabidopsis to study starch metabolism. It describes the major discoveries made and presents an overview of our understanding today, together with some as-yet unresolved questions. PMID:23393426

  19. Molecular genetic analysis of cold-regulated gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, C; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2002-07-29

    Chilling and freezing temperatures adversely affect the productivity and quality of crops. Hence improving the cold hardiness of crop plants is an important goal in agriculture, which demands a clear understanding of cold stress signal perception and transduction. Pharmacological and biochemical evidence shows that membrane rigidification followed by cytoskeleton rearrangement, Ca(2+) influx and Ca(2+)-dependent phosphorylation are involved in cold stress signal transduction. Cold-responsive genes are regulated through C-repeat/dehydration-responsive elements (CRT/DRE) and abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive element cis elements by transacting factors C-repeat binding factors/dehydration-responsive element binding proteins (CBFs/DREBs) and basic leucine zippers (bZIPs) (SGBF1), respectively. We have carried out a forward genetic analysis using chemically mutagenized Arabidopsis plants expressing cold-responsive RD29A promoter-driven luciferase to dissect cold signal transduction. We have isolated the fiery1 (fry1) mutant and cloned the FRY1 gene, which encodes an inositol polyphosphate 1-phosphatase. The fry1 plants showed enhanced induction of stress genes in response to cold, ABA, salt and dehydration due to higher accumulation of the second messenger, inositol (1,4,5)- triphosphate (IP(3)). Thus our study provides genetic evidence suggesting that cold signal is transduced through changes in IP(3) levels. We have also identified the hos1 mutation, which showed super induction of cold-responsive genes and their transcriptional activators. Molecular cloning and characterization revealed that HOS1 encodes a ring finger protein, which has been implicated as an E3 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme. HOS1 is present in the cytoplasm at normal growth temperatures but accumulates in the nucleus upon cold stress. HOS1 appears to regulate temperature sensing by the cell as cold-responsive gene expression occurs in the hos1 mutant at relatively warm temperatures. Thus HOS1 is a

  20. Collisionless shock waves mediated by Weibel Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseri, Neda; Ruan, Panpan; Zhang, Xi; Khudik, Vladimir; Shvets, Gennady

    2015-11-01

    Relativistic collisionless shocks are common events in astrophysical environments. They are thought to be responsible for generating ultra-high energy particles via the Fermi acceleration mechanism. It has been conjectured that the formation of collisionless shocks is mediated by the Weibel instability that takes place when two initially cold, unmagnetized plasma shells counter-propagate into each other with relativistic drift velocities. Using a PIC code, VLPL, which is modified to suppress numerical Cherenkov instabilities, we study the shock formation and evolution for asymmetric colliding shells with different densities in their own proper reference frame. Plasma instabilities in the region between the shock and the precursor are also investigated using a moving-window simulation that advances the computational domain at the shock's speed. This method helps both to save computation time and avoid severe numerical Cherenkov instabilities, and it allows us to study the shock evolution in a longer time period. Project is supported by US DOE grants DE-FG02-04ER41321 and DE-FG02-07ER54945.

  1. Computational Study of Shock-Associated Noise Characteristics Using LES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-03

    10, 1987, pp. 1093–1109. [25] Löhner, R., Applied CFD Techniques , J. Wiley & Sons, 2008. [26] Kuzmin, D., Möller, M., and Gurris, M., “Algebraic...the shock-free jets. 03-10-2014 Memorandum Report CFD Large-eddy simulations Jet noise Shock-associated broadband noise Screech tone Mixing noise...cold and heated jet conditions is important to the development and optimization of effective noise reduction techniques . The characteristics of

  2. Radiative Shock Waves In Emerging Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. Paul; Doss, F.; Visco, A.

    2011-05-01

    In laboratory experiments we produce radiative shock waves having dense, thin shells. These shocks are similar to shocks emerging from optically thick environments in astrophysics in that they are strongly radiative with optically thick shocked layers and optically thin or intermediate downstream layers through which radiation readily escapes. Examples include shocks breaking out of a Type II supernova (SN) and the radiative reverse shock during the early phases of the SN remnant produced by a red supergiant star. We produce these shocks by driving a low-Z plasma piston (Be) at > 100 km/s into Xe gas at 1.1 atm. pressure. The shocked Xe collapses to > 20 times its initial density. Measurements of structure by radiography and temperature by several methods confirm that the shock wave is strongly radiative. We observe small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces. We describe a variation of the Vishniac instability theory of decelerating shocks and an analysis of associated scaling relations to account for the growth of these perturbations, identify how they scale to astrophysical systems such as SN 1993J, and consider possible future experiments. Collaborators in this work have included H.F. Robey, J.P. Hughes, C.C. Kuranz, C.M. Huntington, S.H. Glenzer, T. Doeppner, D.H. Froula, M.J. Grosskopf, and D.C. Marion ________________________________ * Supported by the US DOE NNSA under the Predictive Sci. Academic Alliance Program by grant DE-FC52-08NA28616, the Stewardship Sci. Academic Alliances program by grant DE-FG52-04NA00064, and the Nat. Laser User Facility by grant DE-FG03-00SF22021.

  3. Pharmacotherapy of circulatory shock.

    PubMed

    Higgins, T L; Chernow, B

    1987-06-01

    The rubric "shock" encompasses a wide spectrum of critical events, which if untreated, result in morbidity and mortality. Understanding of the various forms of shock has evolved rapidly in the past 20 years as new laboratory and clinical observations have been published. In this article, the authors discuss the physiology of the shock state, review the circumstances in which shock becomes likely, and review the etiologies and diagnostic characteristics of distributive (septic, spinal, anaphylactoid/anaphylactic), cardiogenic, hypovolemic, and obstructive shock. The rationale and applications of conventional and controversial therapies are discussed. The therapeutic potentials of current lines of shock research are also discussed.

  4. Cold Stress and the Cold Pressor Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverthorn, Dee U.; Michael, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This…

  5. Cold Stress and the Cold Pressor Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverthorn, Dee U.; Michael, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This…

  6. Oblique ion acoustic shock waves in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shahmansouri, M.; Mamun, A. A.

    2013-08-15

    Ion acoustic (IA) shock waves are studied in a magnetized plasma consisting of a cold viscous ion fluid and Maxwellian electrons. The Korteweg–de Vries–Burgers equation is derived by using the reductive perturbation method. It is shown that the combined effects of external magnetic field and obliqueness significantly modify the basic properties (viz., amplitude, width, speed, etc.) of the IA shock waves. It is observed that the ion-viscosity is a source of dissipation, and is responsible for the formation of IA shock structures. The implications of our results in some space and laboratory plasma situations are discussed.

  7. Cold Weather Pet Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... accordingly. You will probably need to shorten your dog’s walks in very cold weather to protect you ... slipping and falling. Long-haired or thick-coated dogs tend to be more cold-tolerant, but are ...

  8. Cold and Cough Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... What can you do for your cold or cough symptoms? Besides drinking lots of fluids and getting ... medicines. There are lots of different cold and cough medicines, and they do different things. Nasal decongestants - ...

  9. Vitamin C and colds

    MedlinePlus

    ... belief is that vitamin C can cure the common cold . However, research about this claim is conflicting. Although ... Fashner J, Ericson K, Werner S. Treatment of the common cold in children and adults. Am Fam Physician. 2012; ...

  10. Cold medicines and children

    MedlinePlus

    ... aspx . Accessed July 26, 2016. Cherry JD. The common cold. In: Cherry JD, Harrison GJ, Kaplan SL, Steinbach ... 2014:chap 7. Miller EK, Williams JV. The common cold. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, ...

  11. Skin Reactions to Cold

    PubMed Central

    Talpash, Orest

    1976-01-01

    Although skin reactions to cold are seen surprisingly infrequently in Canada, it is important to manage them correctly when they do occur. Frostbite, cold urticarias, Raynaud's disease and phenomenon, and several miscellaneous changes are discussed. PMID:21308019

  12. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... biopsy; Pap smear - cone biopsy; HPV - cone biopsy; Human papilloma virus - cone biopsy; Cervix - cone biopsy; Colposcopy - cone biopsy Images Female reproductive anatomy Cold cone biopsy Cold cone removal References American ...

  13. Arabidopsis assay for mutagenicity.

    PubMed

    Gichner, T; Badayev, S A; Demchenko, S I; Relichová, J; Sandhu, S S; Usmanov, P D; Usmanova, O; Velemínský, J

    1994-10-16

    Four laboratories, two in the Czech Republic (Brno and Prague) and two in the CIS (Moscow and Duschanbe), participated in the International Programme on Chemical Safety's (IPCS) collaborative study to evaluate the utility of the most commonly used plant test systems, including the Arabidopsis thaliana assay, for assessing the mutagenic potential of environmental agents. Out of the five compounds evaluated in the Arabidopsis assay, three compounds, i.e., ethyl methanesulfonate, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, and azidoglycerol, were reported to be mutagenic by all four participating laboratories. Sodium azide (NaN3) demonstrated a negative response in all four laboratories, whereas maleic hydrazide was reported to be weakly mutagenic by one laboratory and nonmutagenic by the other three laboratories.

  14. Spherical and cylindrical imploding and exploding shock waves in plasma system dominated by pair production

    SciTech Connect

    ul Haq, Muhammad Noaman; Saeed, R.; Shah, Asif

    2010-08-15

    The propagation of ion acoustic shock waves in cylindrical and spherical geometries has been investigated. The plasma system consists of cold ions, Boltzmannian electrons and positrons. Spherical, cylindrical Korteweg-de Vries-Burger equations have been derived by reductive perturbation technique and their shock behavior is studied by employing finite difference method. Our main emphasis is on the behavior of shock as it moves toward and away from center of spherical and cylindrical geometries. It is noticed, that the shock wave strength and steepness accrues with time as it moves toward the center and shock enervates as it moves away from center. The strength of shock in spherical geometry is found to dominate over shock strength in cylindrical geometry. Positron concentration, kinematic viscosity are also found to have significant effect on the shock structure and propagation. The results may have relevance in the inertial confinement fusion plasmas.

  15. Detecting shock waves in cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfrommer, C.; Springel, V.; Enßlin, T. A.; Jubelgas, M.

    2006-03-01

    We develop a formalism for the identification and accurate estimation of the strength of structure formation shocks during cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. Shocks play a decisive role not only for the thermalization of gas in virializing structures but also for the acceleration of relativistic cosmic rays (CRs) through diffusive shock acceleration. Our formalism is applicable both to ordinary non-relativistic thermal gas, and to plasmas composed of CRs and thermal gas. To this end, we derive an analytic solution to the one-dimensional Riemann shock tube problem for a composite plasma of CRs and thermal gas. We apply our methods to study the properties of structure formation shocks in high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations of the Lambda cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model. We find that most of the energy is dissipated in weak internal shocks with Mach numbers which are predominantly central flow shocks or merger shock waves traversing halo centres. Collapsed cosmological structures are surrounded by external shocks with much higher Mach numbers up to , but they play only a minor role in the energy balance of thermalization. This is because of the higher pre-shock gas densities within non-linear structures, and the significant increase of the mean shock speed as the characteristic halo mass grows with cosmic time. We show that after the epoch of cosmic reionization the Mach number distribution is significantly modified by an efficient suppression of strong external shock waves due to the associated increase of the sound speed of the diffuse gas. Invoking a model for CR acceleration in shock waves, we find that the average strength of shock waves responsible for CR energy injection is higher than that for shocks that dominate the thermalization of the gas. This implies that the dynamical importance of shock-injected CRs is comparatively large in the low-density, peripheral halo infalling regions, but is less important for the weaker flow shocks

  16. Associations between heat shock protein 70 genetic polymorphisms and calving traits in crossbred Brahman cows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stressors such as heat, cold, toxins, and oxygen deprivation are known to induce heat shock proteins. Genetic polymorphisms associated with heat shock protein genes have been associated with decreased male and female fertility. Our objectives were to 1) confirm single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) ...

  17. Environmental History Modulates Arabidopsis Pattern-Triggered Immunity in a HISTONE ACETYLTRANSFERASE1-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prashant; Yekondi, Shweta; Chen, Po-Wen; Tsai, Chia-Hong; Yu, Chun-Wei; Wu, Keqiang; Zimmerli, Laurent

    2014-06-01

    In nature, plants are exposed to a fluctuating environment, and individuals exposed to contrasting environmental factors develop different environmental histories. Whether different environmental histories alter plant responses to a current stress remains elusive. Here, we show that environmental history modulates the plant response to microbial pathogens. Arabidopsis thaliana plants exposed to repetitive heat, cold, or salt stress were more resistant to virulent bacteria than Arabidopsis grown in a more stable environment. By contrast, long-term exposure to heat, cold, or exposure to high concentrations of NaCl did not provide enhanced protection against bacteria. Enhanced resistance occurred with priming of Arabidopsis pattern-triggered immunity (PTI)-responsive genes and the potentiation of PTI-mediated callose deposition. In repetitively stress-challenged Arabidopsis, PTI-responsive genes showed enrichment for epigenetic marks associated with transcriptional activation. Upon bacterial infection, enrichment of RNA polymerase II at primed PTI marker genes was observed in environmentally challenged Arabidopsis. Finally, repetitively stress-challenged histone acetyltransferase1-1 (hac1-1) mutants failed to demonstrate enhanced resistance to bacteria, priming of PTI, and increased open chromatin states. These findings reveal that environmental history shapes the plant response to bacteria through the development of a HAC1-dependent epigenetic mark characteristic of a primed PTI response, demonstrating a mechanistic link between the primed state in plants and epigenetics.

  18. New Developments in the Physical Chemistry of Shock Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlott, Dana D.

    2011-05-01

    This review discusses new developments in shock compression science with a focus on molecular media. Some basic features of shock and detonation waves, nonlinear excitations that can produce extreme states of high temperature and high pressure, are described. Methods of generating and detecting shock waves are reviewed, especially those using tabletop lasers that can be interfaced with advanced molecular diagnostics. Newer compression methods such as shockless compression and precompression shock that generate states of cold dense molecular matter are discussed. Shock compression creates a metallic form of hydrogen, melts diamond, and makes water a superionic liquid with unique catalytic properties. Our understanding of detonations at the molecular level has improved a great deal as a result of advanced nonequilibrium molecular simulations. Experimental measurements of detailed molecular behavior behind a detonation front might be available soon using femtosecond lasers to produce nanoscale simulated detonation fronts.

  19. New developments in the physical chemistry of shock compression.

    PubMed

    Dlott, Dana D

    2011-01-01

    This review discusses new developments in shock compression science with a focus on molecular media. Some basic features of shock and detonation waves, nonlinear excitations that can produce extreme states of high temperature and high pressure, are described. Methods of generating and detecting shock waves are reviewed, especially those using tabletop lasers that can be interfaced with advanced molecular diagnostics. Newer compression methods such as shockless compression and precompression shock that generate states of cold dense molecular matter are discussed. Shock compression creates a metallic form of hydrogen, melts diamond, and makes water a superionic liquid with unique catalytic properties. Our understanding of detonations at the molecular level has improved a great deal as a result of advanced nonequilibrium molecular simulations. Experimental measurements of detailed molecular behavior behind a detonation front might be available soon using femtosecond lasers to produce nanoscale simulated detonation fronts.

  20. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Diagnosed? The first step in diagnosing cardiogenic shock ... is cardiogenic shock. Tests and Procedures To Diagnose Shock and Its Underlying Causes Blood Pressure Test Medical ...

  1. Cold ions at the dayside magnetopause: implications for magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo-Redondo, Sergio; Andre, Mats; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Lavraud, Benoit; Li, Wenya; Perrone, Denise; Gershman, Daniel; Giles, Barbara; Pollock, Craig; Fuselier, Stephen; Lindqvist, Per-Arne; Torbert, Roy; Russell, Christopher T.

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a key plasma process that couples the shocked solar wind (magnetosheath) to the Earth's magnetosphere. The magnetospheric side of the subsolar magnetopause is often populated by cold (10 eV) plasma of ionospheric origin, in addition to the common hot (10 keV) magnetospheric plasma. The presence of cold plasma mass loads the subsolar region up to several particles per cc. In addition, the ion gyroradius of cold plasma is much smaller than the hot ion gyroradius and introduces a new length-scale into magnetic reconnection and its associated processes. Finally, the cold plasma is heated inside the separatrix region of magnetic reconnection, although this mechanism is not always present. We present MMS observations of magnetic reconnection with the presence of ionospheric cold plasma and investigate the heating mechanisms as well as their implications for the global energy budget.

  2. Characterizing convective cold pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drager, Aryeh J.; van den Heever, Susan C.

    2017-06-01

    Cold pools produced by convective storms play an important role in Earth's climate system. However, a common framework does not exist for objectively identifying convective cold pools in observations and models. The present study investigates convective cold pools within a simulation of tropical continental convection that uses a cloud-resolving model with a coupled land-surface model. Multiple variables are assessed for their potential in identifying convective cold pool boundaries, and a novel technique is developed and tested for identifying and tracking cold pools in numerical model simulations. This algorithm is based on surface rainfall rates and radial gradients in the density potential temperature field. The algorithm successfully identifies near-surface cold pool boundaries and is able to distinguish between connected cold pools. Once cold pools have been identified and tracked, composites of cold pool evolution are then constructed, and average cold pool properties are investigated. Wet patches are found to develop within the centers of cold pools where the ground has been soaked with rainwater. These wet patches help to maintain cool surface temperatures and reduce cold pool dissipation, which has implications for the development of subsequent convection.

  3. The common cold.

    PubMed

    2009-02-01

    1) Most colds are due to viruses and resolve spontaneously after a few days. Available drugs do not modify the course of a viral cold; 2) Some drugs used to treat colds carry a risk of serious adverse effects. This includes nasal sprays, especially vasoconstrictors such as pseudo-ephedrine and, in young children, menthol, camphor, and terpene derivatives.

  4. Coping with Cold Sores

    MedlinePlus

    ... found inside the mouth.) What Causes Cold Sores? Cold sores are caused by a virus called herpes (say: HUR-peez). Herpes is one ... the world. The medical name for the specific virus that causes cold sores is herpes simplex. There are two types ...

  5. Neptune inbound bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Adam; Lepping, Ronald P.

    1995-01-01

    Voyager 2 crossed the inbound or upstream Neptunian bow shock at 1430 spacecraft event time on August 24 in 1989 (Belcher et al., 1989). The plasma and magnetic field measurements allow us to study the solar wind interaction with the outermost gas giant. To fully utilize all of the spacecraft observations, an improved nonlinear least squares, 'Rankine-Hugoniot' magnetohydrodynamic shock-fitting technique has been developed (Szabo, 1994). This technique is applied to the Neptunian data set. We find that the upstream bow shock normal points nearly exactly toward the Sun consistent with any reasonable large-scale model of the bow shock for a near subsolar crossing. The shock was moving outward with a speed of 14 +/- 12 km/s. The shock can be characterized as a low beta, high Mach number, strong quasi-perpendicular shock. Finally, the shock microstructure features are resolved and found to scale well with theoretical expectations.

  6. Toxic Shock Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... toxic shock syndrome results from toxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus (staph) bacteria, but the condition may also be caused ... a skin or wound infection. Bacteria, most commonly Staphylococcus aureus (staph), causes toxic shock syndrome. It can also ...

  7. Shock & Anaphylactic Shock. Learning Activity Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hime, Kirsten

    This learning activity package on shock and anaphylactic shock is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics are…

  8. Understanding the Shock in "Culture Shock."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnell, Jim

    "Culture shock" is the expression generally associated with the frustrations that occur when persons have difficulty functioning in a different culture or when persons are exposed to individuals from another culture. Culture shock typically occurs in a 4-stage process that can unfold over varying lengths of time: the honeymoon, crisis,…

  9. Biomass shock pretreatment

    DOEpatents

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  10. Physiopathology of shock

    PubMed Central

    Bonanno, Fabrizio Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Shock syndromes are of three types: cardiogenic, hemorrhagic and inflammatory. Hemorrhagic shock has its initial deranged macro-hemodynamic variables in the blood volume and venous return. In cardiogenic shock there is a primary pump failure that has cardiac output/mean arterial pressure as initial deranged variables. In Inflammatory Shock it is the microcirculation that is mainly affected, while the initial deranged macrocirculation variable is the total peripheral resistance hit by systemic inflammatory response. PMID:21769210

  11. Transcriptome profiling of Vitis amurensis, an extremely cold-tolerant Chinese wild Vitis species, reveals candidate genes and events that potentially connected to cold stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weirong; Li, Ruimin; Zhang, Ningbo; Ma, Fuli; Jiao, Yuntong; Wang, Zhenping

    2014-11-01

    Vitis amurensis Rupr. is an exceptional wild-growing Vitis (grape) species that can safely survive a wide range of cold conditions, but the underlying cold-adaptive mechanism associated with gene regulation is poorly investigated. We have analyzed the physiochemical and transcriptomic changes caused by cold stress in a cold-tolerant accession, 'Heilongjiang seedling', of Chinese wild V. amurensis. We statistically determined that a total of 6,850 cold-regulated transcripts were involved in cold regulation, including 3,676 up-regulated and 3,174 down-regulated transcripts. A global survey of messenger RNA revealed that skipped exon is the most prevalent form of alternative spicing event. Importantly, we found that the total splicing events increased with the prolonged cold stress. We also identified thirty-eight major TF families that were involved in cold regulation, some of which were previously unknown. Moreover, a large number of candidate pathways for the metabolism or biosynthesis of secondary metabolites were found to be regulated by cold, which is of potential importance in coordinating cold tolerance with growth and development. Several heat shock proteins and heat shock factors were also detected to be intensively cold-regulated. Furthermore, we validated the expression profiles of 16 candidates using qRT-PCR to further confirm the accuracy of the RNA-seq data. Our results provide a genome-wide view of the dynamic changes in the transcriptome of V. amurensis, in which it is evident that various structural and regulatory genes are crucial for cold tolerance/adaptation. Moreover, our robust dataset advances our knowledge of the genes involved in the complex regulatory networks of cold stress and leads to a better understanding of cold tolerance mechanisms in this extremely cold-tolerant Vitis species.

  12. Life in the cold: a proteomic study of cold-repressed proteins in the antarctic bacterium pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125.

    PubMed

    Piette, Florence; D'Amico, Salvino; Mazzucchelli, Gabriel; Danchin, Antoine; Leprince, Pierre; Feller, Georges

    2011-06-01

    The proteomes expressed at 4°C and 18°C by the psychrophilic Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis were compared using two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis with special reference to proteins repressed by low temperatures. Remarkably, the major cold-repressed proteins, almost undetectable at 4°C, were heat shock proteins involved in folding assistance.

  13. Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Publications » DrugFacts » Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse Email Facebook Twitter Revised ... syrup is sometimes diverted for abuse. How Are Cough and Cold Medicines Abused? Cough and cold medicines ...

  14. Anoxic stress and rapid cold hardening enhance cold tolerance of the migratory locust.

    PubMed

    Cui, Feng; Wang, Hongsheng; Zhang, Hanying; Kang, Le

    2014-10-01

    Anoxia and rapid cold hardening (RCH) can increase the cold tolerance of many animals. However, mechanisms underlying these two kinds of stresses remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to explore the relationship of acclimation to cold stress with acclimation to anoxic stress in the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria. RCH at 0°C for 3h promoted the survival of cold stress-exposed locusts. Anoxic hypercapnia (CO2 anoxic treatment) for 40 min exerted an effect similar to that of RCH. Anoxic hypercapnia within 1h can all promote the cold hardiness of locusts. We investigated the transcript levels of six heat shock protein (Hsp) genes, namely, Hsp20.5, Hsp20.6, Hsp20.7, Hsp40, Hsp70, and Hsp90. Four genes, namely, Hsp90, Hsp40, Hsp20.5, and Hsp20.7, showed differential responses to RCH and anoxic hypercapnia treatments. Under cold stress, locusts exposed to the two regimens showed different responses for Hsp90, Hsp20.5, and Hsp20.7. However, the varied responses disappeared after recovery from cold stress. Compared with the control group, the transcript levels of six Hsp genes were generally downregulated in locusts subjected to anoxic hypercapnia or/and RCH. These results indicate that anoxic stress and RCH have different mechanisms of regulating the transcription of Hsp family members even if the two treatments exerted similar effects on cold tolerance of the migratory locust. However, Hsps may not play a major role in the promotion of cold hardiness by the two treatments.

  15. Shock isolator for operating a diode laser on a closed-cycle refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A diode laser mounted within a helium refrigerator is mounted using a braided copper ground strap which provides good impact shock isolation from the refrigerator cold-tip while also providing a good thermal link to the cold-tip. The diode mount also contains a rigid stand-off assembly consisting of alternate sections of nylon and copper which serve as cold stations to improve thermal isolation from the vaccum housing mounting structure. Included in the mount is a Pb-In alloy wafer inserted between the cold-tip and the diode to damp temperature fluctuations occurring at the cold-tip.

  16. Cold Stress Effects on Exposure Tolerance and Exercise Performance.

    PubMed

    Castellani, John W; Tipton, Michael J

    2015-12-15

    Cold weather can have deleterious effects on health, tolerance, and performance. This paper will review the physiological responses and external factors that impact cold tolerance and physical performance. Tolerance is defined as the ability to withstand cold stress with minimal changes in physiological strain. Physiological and pathophysiological responses to short-term (cold shock) and long-term cold water and air exposure are presented. Factors (habituation, anthropometry, sex, race, and fitness) that influence cold tolerance are also reviewed. The impact of cold exposure on physical performance, especially aerobic performance, has not been thoroughly studied. The few studies that have been done suggest that aerobic performance is degraded in cold environments. Potential physiological mechanisms (decreases in deep body and muscle temperature, cardiovascular, and metabolism) are discussed. Likewise, strength and power are also degraded during cold exposure, primarily through a decline in muscle temperature. The review also discusses the concept of thermoregulatory fatigue, a reduction in the thermal effector responses of shivering and vasoconstriction, as a result of multistressor factors, including exhaustive exercise. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Cloning of the heat shock protein 90 and 70 genes from the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, and expression characteristics in relation to thermal stress and development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) of heat shock protein (HSP) genes (Se-hsp90 and Se-hsp70) were cloned from the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, and their expression was investigated in relation to cold shock, heat shock, and development. The open reading frames of Se-hsp90 and Sehsp70 ar...

  18. Comparison of freezing tolerance, compatible solutes and polyamines in geographically diverse collections of Thellungiella sp. and Arabidopsis thaliana accessions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Thellungiella has been proposed as an extremophile alternative to Arabidopsis to investigate environmental stress tolerance. However, Arabidopsis accessions show large natural variation in their freezing tolerance and here the tolerance ranges of collections of accessions in the two species were compared. Results Leaf freezing tolerance of 16 Thellungiella accessions was assessed with an electrolyte leakage assay before and after 14 days of cold acclimation at 4°C. Soluble sugars (glucose, fructose, sucrose, raffinose) and free polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, spermine) were quantified by HPLC, proline photometrically. The ranges in nonacclimated freezing tolerance completely overlapped between Arabidopsis and Thellungiella. After cold acclimation, some Thellungiella accessions were more freezing tolerant than any Arabidopsis accessions. Acclimated freezing tolerance was correlated with sucrose levels in both species, but raffinose accumulation was lower in Thellungiella and only correlated with freezing tolerance in Arabidopsis. The reverse was true for leaf proline contents. Polyamine levels were generally similar between the species. Only spermine content was higher in nonacclimated Thellungiella plants, but decreased during acclimation and was negatively correlated with freezing tolerance. Conclusion Thellungiella is not an extremophile with regard to freezing tolerance, but some accessions significantly expand the range present in Arabidopsis. The metabolite data indicate different metabolic adaptation strategies between the species. PMID:22863402

  19. Shock structure in shock-turbulence interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzis, Diego A.

    2012-12-01

    The structure of a shock wave interacting with isotropic turbulence is investigated. General principles of similarity scaling show that consistency with known physical limiting behavior requires incomplete similarity solutions where the governing non-dimensional parameters, namely, the Reynolds, convective, and turbulent Mach numbers (Rλ, M, and Mt, respectively), can be combined to reduce the number of similarity parameters that describes the phenomenon. An important parameter is found to be K = Mt/Rλ1/2(M - 1) which is proportional to the ratio of laminar shock thickness to the Kolmogorov length scale. The shock thickness under turbulent conditions, on the other hand, is essentially a random variable. Under a quasi-equilibrium assumption, shown to be valid when K2 ≪ 1, analytical results are obtained for the first and second moments of the turbulent shock thickness, velocity gradient, and dilatation at the shock. It is shown that these quantities exhibit universal behavior in the parameter K with corrections in Mt/(M - 1), for velocity fields with arbitrary statistics. Excellent agreement is observed with available data from direct numerical simulations. Two-point statistics of velocity gradients at the shock show that the distribution of dilatation over the shock surface is determined by transverse structure functions of the incoming turbulence. The regimes of the interaction are also investigated. It is found that the appropriate parameter to delimit the different regimes is Mt/(M - 1). Flow retardation ahead of the shock is suggested as a mechanism for so-called broken shocks.

  20. How cold is cold dark matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Armendariz-Picon, Cristian; Neelakanta, Jayanth T. E-mail: jtneelak@syr.edu

    2014-03-01

    If cold dark matter consists of particles, these must be non-interacting and non-relativistic by definition. In most cold dark matter models however, dark matter particles inherit a non-vanishing velocity dispersion from interactions in the early universe, a velocity that redshifts with cosmic expansion but certainly remains non-zero. In this article, we place model-independent constraints on the dark matter temperature to mass ratio, whose square root determines the dark matter velocity dispersion. We only assume that dark matter particles decoupled kinetically while non-relativistic, when galactic scales had not entered the horizon yet, and that their momentum distribution has been Maxwellian since that time. Under these assumptions, using cosmic microwave background and matter power spectrum observations, we place upper limits on the temperature to mass ratio of cold dark matter today (away from collapsed structures). These limits imply that the present cold dark matter velocity dispersion has to be smaller than 54 m/s. Cold dark matter has to be quite cold, indeed.

  1. Nitric oxide in shock.

    PubMed

    Cauwels, A

    2007-09-01

    Refractory hypotension with end-organ hypoperfusion and failure is an ominous feature of shock. Distributive shock is caused by severe infections (septic shock) or severe systemic allergic reactions (anaphylactic shock). In 1986, it was concluded that nitric oxide (NO) is the endothelium-derived relaxing factor that had been discovered 6 years earlier. Since then, NO has been shown to be important for the physiological and pathological control of vascular tone. Nevertheless, although inhibition of NO synthesis restores blood pressure, NO synthase (NOS) inhibition cannot improve outcome, on the contrary. This implies that NO acts as a double-edged sword during septic shock. Consequently, the focus has shifted towards selective inducible NOS (iNOS) inhibitors. The contribution of NO to anaphylactic shock seems to be more straightforward, as NOS inhibition abrogates shock in conscious mice. Surprisingly, however, this shock-inducing NO is not produced by the inducible iNOS, but by the so-called constitutive enzyme endothelial NOS. This review summarizes the contribution of NO to septic and anaphylactic shock. Although NOS inhibition may be promising for the treatment of anaphylactic shock, the failure of a phase III trial indicates that other approaches are required for the successful treatment of septic shock. Amongst these, high hopes are set for selective iNOS inhibitors. But it might also be necessary to shift gears and focus on downstream cardiovascular targets of NO or on other vasodilating phenomena.

  2. Shocks in collisionless plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, G. K.; Lee, E.; Fu, S. Y.; Lin, N.; Liu, Y.; Yang, Z. W.

    2017-06-01

    The Earth's bow shock is the best-known collisionless shock in space. Although much is known about the bow shock, the mechanisms of heating and thermalization processes still remain poorly understood. Collisionless shocks are different from ordinary fluid shocks, because a fraction of the incident solar wind is reflected from the bow shock and the transmitted particles are not immediately thermalized. The reflected particles interact with the incident solar wind producing waves and instabilities that can heat and accelerate particles to high energies. Some of the waves can grow to large amplitudes such as Short Large Amplitude Magnetic Structures. Other upstream nonlinear structures include hot flow anomalies and density holes. The upstream nonlinear structures subsequently convect Earthward with the SW and could impact the structure and dynamics of the bow shock. These observations have clearly indicated that the upstream dynamics are an integral part of the bow shock system. Although much has been learned about the behavior of Earth's bow shock dynamics from the existing data, many fundamental questions remain not answered. This article will review observations of ion dynamics of Earth's bow shock system, what we have learned from recent and past observations. We provide new perspectives from multi-spacecraft Cluster observations about the spatial and temporal variations including the fundamental shock heating, acceleration, and entropy generation processes.

  3. FUM2, a Cytosolic Fumarase, Is Essential for Acclimation to Low Temperature in Arabidopsis thaliana1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Dyson, Beth C.; Miller, Matthew A.E.; Feil, Regina; Rattray, Nicholas; Bowsher, Caroline G.

    2016-01-01

    Although cold acclimation is a key process in plants from temperate climates, the mechanisms sensing low temperature remain obscure. Here, we show that the accumulation of the organic acid fumaric acid, mediated by the cytosolic fumarase FUM2, is essential for cold acclimation of metabolism in the cold-tolerant model species Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). A nontargeted metabolomic approach, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, identifies fumarate as a key component of the cold response in this species. Plants of T-DNA insertion mutants, lacking FUM2, show marked differences in their response to cold, with contrasting responses both in terms of metabolite concentrations and gene expression. The fum2 plants accumulated higher concentrations of phosphorylated sugar intermediates and of starch and malate. Transcripts for proteins involved in photosynthesis were markedly down-regulated in fum2.2 but not in wild-type Columbia-0. Plants of fum2 show a complete loss of the ability to acclimate photosynthesis to low temperature. We conclude that fumarate accumulation plays an essential role in low temperature sensing in Arabidopsis, either indirectly modulating metabolic or redox signals or possibly being itself directly involved in cold sensing. PMID:27440755

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis septic shock.

    PubMed

    Kethireddy, Shravan; Light, R Bruce; Mirzanejad, Yazdan; Maki, Dennis; Arabi, Yaseen; Lapinsky, Stephen; Simon, David; Kumar, Aseem; Parrillo, Joseph E; Kumar, Anand

    2013-08-01

    Septic shock due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is an uncommon but well-recognized clinical syndrome. The objective of this study was to describe the unique clinical characteristics, epidemiologic risk factors, and covariates of survival of patients with MTB septic shock in comparison with other bacterial septic shock. A retrospective nested cohort study was conducted of patients given a diagnosis of MTB septic shock derived from a trinational, 8,670-patient database of patients with septic shock between 1996 and 2007. In the database, 53 patients had been given a diagnosis of MTB shock compared with 5,419 with septic shock associated with isolation of more common bacterial pathogens. Patients with MTB and other bacterial septic shock had in-hospital mortality rates of 79.2% and 49.7%, respectively (P < .0001). Of the cases of MTB shock, all but five patients had recognized respiratory tract involvement. Fifty-five percent of patients (29 of 53) were documented (by direct culture or stain) as having disseminated extrapulmonary involvement. Inappropriate and appropriate initial empirical therapy was delivered in 28 patients (52.8%) and 25 patients (47.2%); survival was 7.1% and 36.0%, respectively (P = .0114). Ten patients (18.9%) did not receive anti-MTB therapy; all died. The median time to appropriate antimicrobial therapy for MTB septic shock was 31.0 h (interquartile range, 18.9-71.9 h). Only 11 patients received anti-MTB therapy within 24 h of documentation of hypotension; six of these (54.5%) survived. Only one of 21 patients (4.8%) who started anti-MTB therapy after 24 h survived (P = .0003 vs < 24 h). Survival differences between these time intervals are not significantly different from those seen with bacterial septic shock due to more common bacterial pathogens. MTB septic shock behaves similarly to bacterial septic shock. As with bacterial septic shock, early appropriate antimicrobial therapy appears to improve mortality.

  5. Habituation and acclimatization of sheep to cold following exposures of varying length and severity

    PubMed Central

    Slee, J.

    1972-01-01

    1. Male and female Scottish Blackface sheep were shorn and exposed for 2 weeks either to a thermoneutral temperature (+30° C), to chronic cold (+8° C) or to +30° C interrupted by daily short cold shocks (-10° C). During and at the end of these conditioning treatments, the sheep also received two acute cold exposures (-20° C, 4 m.p.h. wind for 2-8 hr) 1 week apart. Some of these sheep and a fourth (control) group, were subsequently re-shorn and slowly cooled to +8° C. 2. Resting metabolism and the metabolic response to cooling (both inferred from heart rates) were increased by previous chronic cold treatment. Resistance to body cooling (measured during acute cold exposure) was generally increased by both chronic and acute cold, and non-shivering thermogenesis was probably induced in the female sheep. These effects were defined as acclimatization. 3. In contrast, cold shocks reduced the subsequent metabolic response to cold and encouraged facultative body cooling. This pattern of response (defined as habituation) therefore caused greater thermolability. 4. Habituation and acclimatization were antagonistic. Habituation was removed by acute cold exposure and, conversely, acclimatization was inhibited by short cold shocks. 5. There were sex differences in response but these were confounded by probable differences in insulation and in body condition (males thinner). 6. It was concluded that the induction of different forms of adaptation depended on the length, severity and frequency of cold exposures. Habituation to whole body cold exposure apparently involved central nervous system centres normally receiving peripheral cold stimuli. PMID:4646585

  6. In Planta Response of Arabidopsis to Photothermal Impact Mediated by Gold Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Koo, Yeonjong; Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Pan, Joann; Thompson, Sean M; Lapotko, Dmitri O; Braam, Janet

    2016-02-03

    Biological responses to photothermal effects of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been demonstrated and employed for various applications in diverse systems except for one important class - plants. Here, the uptake of GNPs through Arabidopsis thaliana roots and translocation to leaves are reported. Successful plasmonic nanobubble generation and acoustic signal detection in planta is demonstrated. Furthermore, Arabidopsis leaves harboring GNPs and exposed to continuous laser or noncoherent light show elevated temperatures across the leaf surface and induced expression of heat-shock regulated genes. Overall, these results demonstrate that Arabidopsis can readily take up GNPs through the roots and translocate the particles to leaf tissues. Once within leaves, GNPs can act as photothermal agents for on-demand remote activation of localized biological processes in plants. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Oblique shock waves in a two electron temperature superthermally magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bains, A. S.; Panwar, A.; Ryu, C. M.

    2015-11-01

    A study is presented for the oblique propagation of low-frequency ion acoustic ( IA) shock waves in a magnetized plasma consisting of cold ions and two temperature superthermally distributed electrons. A nonlinear Korteweg de-Vries-Burger ( KdV-Burger) equation is obtained by using the reductive perturbation method (RPM) which governs the dynamics of the IA shock wave. Using the solution of KdV-Burger equation, the characteristics of the IA shock wave have been studied for various plasma parameters. The combined effects of the cold to hot electron temperature ratio (σ), the density ratio of hot electrons to ions (f), the superthermality of cold and hot electrons (κc, κh), the strength of the magnetic field (ω_{ci}), and the obliqueness (θ), significantly influence the profile of the shock wave. The findings in the present study could be important for the electrostatic wave structures in the Saturn's magnetosphere, where two temperature electrons exist with a kappa distribution.

  8. Dynamical Properties of Internal Shocks Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pe’er, Asaf; Long, Killian; Casella, Piergiorgio

    2017-09-01

    Internal shocks between propagating plasma shells, originally ejected at different times with different velocities, are believed to play a major role in dissipating the kinetic energy, thereby explaining the observed light curves and spectra in a large range of transient objects. Even if initially the colliding plasmas are cold, following the first collision, the plasma shells are substantially heated, implying that in a scenario of multiple collisions, most collisions take place between plasmas of non-zero temperatures. Here, we calculate the dynamical properties of plasmas resulting from a collision between arbitrarily hot plasma shells, moving at arbitrary speeds. We provide simple analytical expressions valid for both ultrarelativistic and Newtonian velocities for both hot and cold plasmas. We derive the minimum criteria required for the formation of the two-shock wave system, and show that in the relativistic limit, the minimum Lorentz factor is proportional to the square root of the ratio of the initial plasmas enthalpies. We provide basic scaling laws of synchrotron emission from both the forward and reverse-shock waves, and show how these can be used to deduce the properties of the colliding shells. Finally, we discuss the implications of these results in the study of several astronomical transients, such as X-ray binaries, radio-loud quasars, and gamma-ray bursts.

  9. Finite Time Shock Acceleration at Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Channok, C.; Ruffolo, D.; Desai, M. I.; Mason, G. M.

    2004-05-01

    Observations of energetic ion acceleration at interplanetary shocks sometimes indicate a spectral rollover at ˜ 0.1 to 1 MeV nucl-1. This rollover is not well explained by finite shock width or thickness effects. At the same time, a typical timescale of diffusive shock acceleration is several days, implying that the process of shock acceleration at an interplanetary shock near Earth usually gives only a mild increase in energy to an existing seed particle population. This is consistent with a recent analysis of ACE observations that argues for a seed population at substantially higher energies than the solar wind. Therefore an explanation of typical spectra of interplanetary shock-accelerated ions requires a theory of finite-time shock acceleration, which for long times (or an unusually fast acceleration timescale) tends to the steady-state result of a power-law spectrum. We present analytic and numerical models of finite-time shock acceleration. For a given injection momentum p0, after a very short time there is only a small boost in momentum, at intermediate times the spectrum is a power law with a hump and steep cutoff at a critical momentum, and at longer times the critical momentum increases and the spectrum approaches the steady-state power law. The composition dependence of the critical momentum is different from that obtained for other cutoff mechanisms. The results are compared with observed spectra. Work in Thailand was supported by the Commission for Higher Education, the Rachadapisek Sompoj Fund of Chulalongkorn University, and the Thailand Research Fund. Work at the University of Maryland was supported by NASA contract NAS5-30927 and NASA grant PC 251428.

  10. Shock front nonstationarity of supercritical perpendicular shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hada, Tohru; Oonishi, Makiko; LembèGe, Bertrand; Savoini, Philippe

    2003-06-01

    The shock front nonstationarity of perpendicular shocks in super-critical regime is analyzed by examining the coupling between "incoming" and "reflected" ion populations. For a given set of parameters including the upstream Mach number (MA) and the fraction α of reflected to incoming ions, a self-consistent, time-stationary solution of the coupling between ion streams and the electromagnetic field is sought for. If such a solution is found, the shock is stationary; otherwise, the shock is nonstationary, leading to a self-reforming shock front often observed in full particle simulations of quasi-perpendicular shocks. A parametric study of this numerical model allows us to define a critical αcrit between stationary and nonstationary regimes. The shock can be nonstationary even for relatively low MA(2-5). For a moderate MA(5-10), the critical value αcrit is about 15 to 20%. For very high MA (>10), αcrit saturates around 20%. Moreover, present full simulations show that self-reformation of the shock front occurs for relatively low βi and disappears for high βi, where βi is the ratio of upstream ion plasma to magnetic field pressures. Results issued from the present theoretical model are found to be in good agreement with full particle simulations for low βi case; this agreement holds as long as the motion of reflected ions is coherent enough (narrow ion ring) to be described by a single population in the model. The present model reveals to be "at variance" with full particle simulations results for the high βi case. Present results are also compared with previous hybrid simulations.

  11. Interaction of two collisionless shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cargill, P. J.; Goodrich, C. C.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1986-01-01

    Kinetic simulations of the interaction between two collisionless shocks are presented. During the collision of two perpendicular shocks, the shock electromagnetic field structures pass through each other, while the previously shocked ions are kept separate by the electric field arising in the collision. When two supercritical shocks collide, a fraction of ions are accelerated up to an order of magnitude in energy by first being reflected at one shock, then interacting with the electric fields of the other shock.

  12. Cold stress increases salt tolerance of the extremophytes Eutrema salsugineum (Thellungiella salsuginea) and Eutrema (Thellungiella) botschantzevii.

    PubMed

    Shamustakimova, A O; Leonova, Т G; Taranov, V V; de Boer, A H; Babakov, A V

    2017-01-01

    A comparative study was performed to analyze the effect of cold acclimation on improving the resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana, Eutrema salsugineum and Eutrema botschantzevii plants to salt stress. Shoot FW, sodium and potassium accumulation, metabolite content, expression of proton pump genes VAB1, VAB2,VAB3, VP2, HA3 and genes encoding ion transporters SOS1, HKT1, NHX1, NHX2, NHX5 located in the plasma membrane or tonoplast were determined just after the cold treatment and the onset of the salt stress. In the same cold-acclimated E. botschantzevii plants, the Na(+) concentration after salt treatment was around 80% lower than in non-acclimated plants, whereas the K(+) concentration was higher. As a result of cold acclimation, the expression of, VAB3, NHX2, NHX5 genes and of SOS1, VP2, HA3 genes was strongly enhanced in E. botschantzevii and in E. salsugineum plants correspondently. None of the 10 genes analyzed showed any expression change in A. thaliana plants after cold acclimation. Altogether, the results indicate that cold-induced adaptation to subsequent salt stress exists in the extremophytes E. botschantzevii and to a lesser extend in E. salsugineum and is absent in Arabidopsis. This phenomenon may be attributed to the increased expression of ion transporter genes during cold acclimation in the Eutrema species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. The pathophysiology of shock.

    PubMed

    Skowronski, G A

    1988-06-06

    Shock describes a group of circulatory syndromes, all of which result in generalized cellular hypoxia. This leads to the depletion of adenosine triphosphate, the failure of the sodium-potassium pump, mitochondrial dysfunction, and ultimately, the release of a variety of toxic substances. Eventually these given rise to irreversible cardiovascular collapse because of their effects on the microcirculation. Shock may arise due to a failure of preload (hypovolaemic shock), myocardial contractility (cardiogenic shock), afterload (septic shock) or combinations of these (for example, anaphylactic shock, traumatic shock and neurogenic shock). During shock, important physiological changes occur in the nervous, respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal systems, as well as in intermediary metabolism. Hypotension is not synonymous with shock, and emphasis should be placed on the detection of more subtle, early signs. Management requires a systematic approach in which diagnostic and therapeutic processes take place in parallel. Particular attention must be paid to ventilation, oxygenation, fluid and electrolyte therapy, haemodynamic monitoring and, where appropriate, inotropic drugs. Corticosteroid and opioid antagonist agents probably do not have a role, but other agents, such as thyroid hormones, are under investigation.

  14. Radiation from Accelerated Particles in Shocks and Reconnections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K. I.; Choi, E. J.; Min, K. W.; Niemiec, J.; Zhang, B.; Hardee, P.; Mizuno, Y.; Medvedev, M.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J.; Sol, H.; Pohl, M.; Hartmann, D. H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma instabilities are responsible not only for the onset and mediation of collisionless shocks but also for the associated acceleration of particles. We have investigated particle acceleration and shock structure associated with an unmagnetized relativistic electron-positron jet propagating into an unmagnetized electron-positron plasma. Cold jet electrons are thermalized and slowed while the ambient electrons are swept up to create a partially developed hydrodynamic-like shock structure. In the leading shock, electron density increases by a factor of about 3.5 in the simulation frame. Strong electromagnetic fields are generated in the trailing shock and provide an emission site. These magnetic fields contribute to the electrons transverse deflection and, more generally, relativistic acceleration behind the shock. We have calculated, self-consistently, the radiation from electrons accelerated in the turbulent magnetic fields. We found that the synthetic spectra depend on the Lorentz factor of the jet, its thermal temperature and strength of the generated magnetic fields. Our initial results of a jet-ambient interaction with anti-parallelmagnetic fields show pile-up of magnetic fields at the colliding shock, which may lead to reconnection and associated particle acceleration. We will investigate the radiation in a transient stage as a possible generation mechanism of precursors of prompt emission. In our simulations we calculate the radiation from electrons in the shock region. The detailed properties of this radiation are important for understanding the complex time evolution and spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  15. Cold perception and gene expression differ in Olea europaea seed coat and embryo during drupe cold acclimation.

    PubMed

    D'Angeli, S; Falasca, G; Matteucci, M; Altamura, M M

    2013-01-01

    FAD2 and FAD7 desaturases are involved in cold acclimation of olive (Olea europaea) mesocarp. There is no research information available on cold acclimation of seeds during mesocarp cold acclimation or on differences in the cold response of the seed coat and embryo. How FAD2 and FAD7 affect seed coat and embryo cold responses is unknown. Osmotin positively affects cold acclimation in olive tree vegetative organs, but its role in the seeds requires investigation. OeFAD2.1, OeFAD2.2, OeFAD7 and Oeosmotin were investigated before and after mesocarp acclimation by transcriptomic, lipidomic and immunolabelling analyses, and cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](cyt)) signalling, F-actin changes and seed development were investigated by epifluorescence/histological analyses. Transient [Ca(2+)](cyt) rises and F-actin disassembly were found in cold-shocked protoplasts from the seed coat, but not from the embryo. The thickness of the outer endosperm cuticle increased during drupe exposure to lowering of temperature, whereas the embryo protoderm always lacked cuticle. OeFAD2 transcription increased in both the embryo and seed coat in the cold-acclimated drupe, but linoleic acid (i.e. the product of FAD2 activity) increased solely in the seed coat. Osmotin was immunodetected in the seed coat and endosperm of the cold-acclimated drupe, and not in the embryo. The results show cold responsiveness in the seed coat and cold tolerance in the embryo. We propose a role for the seed coat in maintaining embryo cold tolerance by increasing endosperm cutinization through FAD2 and osmotin activities. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Structure in Radiating Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, Forrest

    2010-11-01

    The basic radiative shock experiment is a shock launched into a gas of high-atomic-number material at high velocities, which fulfills the conditions for radiative losses to collapse the post-shock material to over 20 times the initial gas density. This has been accomplished using the OMEGA Laser Facility by illuminating a Be ablator for 1 ns with a total of 4 kJ, launching the requisite shock, faster than 100 km/sec, into a polyimide shock tube filled with Xe. The experiments have lateral dimensions of 600 μm and axial dimensions of 2-3 mm, and are diagnosed by x-ray backlighting. Repeatable structure beyond the one-dimensional picture of a shock as a planar discontinuity was discovered in the experimental data. One form this took was that of radial boundary effects near the tube walls, extended approximately seventy microns into the system. The cause of this effect - low density wall material which is heated by radiation transport ahead of the shock, launching a new converging shock ahead of the main shock - is apparently unique to high-energy-density experiments. Another form of structure is the appearance of small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces and creating regions of enhanced and diminished aerial density within the layer. The authors have applied an instability theory, a variation of the Vishniac instability of decelerating shocks, to describe the growth of these perturbations. We have also applied Bayesian statistical methods to better understand the uncertainties associated with measuring shocked layer thickness in the presence of tilt. Collaborators: R. P. Drake, H. F. Robey, C. C. Kuranz, C. M. Huntington, M. J. Grosskopf, D. C. Marion.

  17. [Cold-induced urticaria].

    PubMed

    Delorme, N; Drouet, M; Thibaudeau, A; Verret, J L

    2002-09-01

    Cold urticaria is characterized by the development of urticaria, usually superficial and/or angioedematous reaction after cold contact. It was found predominantly in young women. The diagnosis is based on the history and ice cube test. Patients with a negative ice cube test may have represented systemic cold urticaria (atypical acquired cold urticaria) induced by general body cooling. The pathogenesis is poorly understood. Cold urticaria can be classified into acquired and familial disorders, with an autosomal dominant inheritance. Idiopathic cold urticaria is most common type but the research of a cryopathy is necessary. Therapy is often difficult. It is essential that the patient be warned of the dangers of swimming in cold water because systemic hypotension can occur. H1 antihistamines can be used for treatment of cold urticaria but the clinical responses are highly variable. The combination with an H2 antagonists is more effective. Doxepin may be useful in the treatment. Leukotriene receptor antagonists may be a novel, promising drug entity. In patients who do not respond to previous treatments, induction of cold tolerance may be tried.

  18. Cold Antimatter Plasmas, and Aspirations for Cold Antihydrogen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-24

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP012494 TITLE: Cold Antimatter Plasmas, and Aspirations for Cold...part numbers comprise the compilation report: ADP012489 thru ADP012577 UNCLASSIFIED Cold Antimatter Plasmas, and Aspirations for Cold Antihydrogen G...and positrons. The antiprotons come initially from the new Antiproton Decel- erator facility at CERN. Good control of such cold antimatter plasmas is

  19. Shock absorber control system

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Y.; Ohira, M.; Ushida, M.; Miyagawa, T.; Shimodaira, T.

    1987-01-13

    A shock absorber control system is described for controlling a dampening force of a shock absorber of a vehicle comprising: setting means for setting a desired dampening force changeable within a predetermined range; drive means for driving the shock absorber to change the dampening force of the shock absorber linearly; control means for controlling the drive means in accordance with the desired dampening force when the setting of the desired dampening force has been changed; detecting means for detecting an actual dampening force of the shock absorber; and correcting means for correcting the dampening force of the shock absorber by controlling the drive means in accordance with a difference between the desired dampening force and the detected actual dampening force.

  20. Microstructures of shocked quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Gratz, A.J.; Nellis, W.J.

    1991-12-01

    Shock recovery experiments show three phases in shocked single-crystal quartz: melt-glass in a thin network connecting quartz crystallites containing transformation lamellae of diapletic glass. Both melting and solid-state amorphization occur, but in separate regions of the sample. These results are consistent with real-time measurements and suggest that the high-pressure of shocked quartz is six-coordinated glass. Stishovite probably is not synthesized in more than trace amounts along the Hugoniot.

  1. Cold stress and the cold pressor test.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, Dee U; Michael, Joel

    2013-03-01

    Temperature and other environmental stressors are known to affect blood pressure and heart rate. In this activity, students perform the cold pressor test, demonstrating increased blood pressure during a 1- to 2-min immersion of one hand in ice water. The cold pressor test is used clinically to evaluate autonomic and left ventricular function. This activity is easily adapted to an inquiry format that asks students to go to the scientific literature to learn about the test and then design a protocol for carrying out the test in classmates. The data collected are ideal for teaching graphical presentation of data and statistical analysis.

  2. When shock waves collide

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, D.; Hartigan, P.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Foster, J.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; Rosen, P.; Farley, D.; Paguio, R.

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. Furthermore, the experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.

  3. Anti-Shock Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Ames Research Center developed a prototype pressure suit for hemophiliac children, based on research of astronauts' physiological responses in microgravity. Zoex Corporation picked up the design and patents and developed an anti-shock garment for paramedic use. Marketed by Dyna Med, the suit reverses the effect of shock on the body's blood distribution by applying counterpressure to the legs and abdomen, returning blood to vital organs and stabilizing body pressure until the patient reaches a hospital. The DMAST (Dyna Med Anti-Shock Trousers) employ lower pressure than other shock garments, and are non-inflatable.

  4. When Shock Waves Collide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartigan, P.; Foster, J.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; Martinez, D.; Rosen, P.; Farley, D.; Paguio, R.

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. The experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.

  5. Shock initiation of nitromethane

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Holmes, N.C.

    1993-12-31

    The shock initiation processes of nitromethane have been examined by using a fast time-resolved emission spectroscopy at a two-stage gas gun. a broad, but strong emission has been observed in a spectral range between 350 and 700 nm from shocked nitromethane above 9 GPa. The temporal profile suggests that shocked nitromethane detonates through three characteristic periods, namely an induction period, a hock initiation period, and a thermal explosion period. This paper discusses temporal and chemical characteristics of these periods and present the temperature of the shock-detonating nitromethane at pressures between 9 and 15 GPa.

  6. When shock waves collide

    DOE PAGES

    Martinez, D.; Hartigan, P.; Frank, A.; ...

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed tomore » quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. Furthermore, the experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.« less

  7. When shock waves collide

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, D.; Hartigan, P.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Foster, J.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; Rosen, P.; Farley, D.; Paguio, R.

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. Furthermore, the experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.

  8. Heat- and cold-inducible regulation of HSP70 expression in zebrafish ZF4 cells.

    PubMed

    Airaksinen, Susanna; Jokilehto, Terhi; Råbergh, Christina M I; Nikinmaa, Mikko

    2003-10-01

    Elevated temperature induces a rapid heat shock transcription factor (HSFs)-mediated expression of heat shock (hsp) genes. The effect of cold exposure on hsp gene expression has hardly been investigated, although ectothermic animals experience both cold and heat stress. We have previously shown in zebrafish that the expression of hsf1a and a unique isoform hsf1b vary in a tissue-specific manner upon heat stress. In the current study, using a zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryonic cell line (ZF4), we have compared the effects of heat shock (28-->37 degrees C) vs. cold shock (28-->20 degrees C) on the expression of ahsf1a, zhsf1b and hsp70. Concomitantly, the suitability of the ZF4 cells as a model system was verified. The expression pattern of HSP70 proteins following heat or cold exposure is distinct, and the total HSP70 level is upregulated or stable, respectively. Moreover, heat exposure specifically increases the ratio of zhsf1a/b expression (10-fold), whereas cold exposure decreases it to one half. These data suggest that the zhsf1a/zhsf1b ratio is regulated in a temperature-dependent manner, and the ratio may be indicative of the stressor-specific HSP70 expression. Furthermore, the response in ZF4 cells upon heat shock resembles the response observed in zebrafish liver and thus, supports the use of this cell line in stress response studies.

  9. Asymptotic Steady-state Solution to a Bow Shock with an Infinite Mach Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalinewich, Almog; Sari, Re'em

    2016-08-01

    The problem of a cold gas flowing past a stationary obstacle is considered. We study the bow shock that forms around the obstacle and show that at large distances from the obstacle the shock front forms a parabolic solid of revolution. The profiles of the hydrodynamic variables in the interior of the shock are obtained by solution of the hydrodynamic equations in parabolic coordinates. The results are verified with a hydrodynamic simulation. The drag force on the obstacle is also calculated. Finally, we use these results to model the bow shock around an isolated neutron star.

  10. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.