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Sample records for arabidopsis ran binding

  1. An Arabidopsis Ran-binding protein, AtRanBP1c, is a co-activator of Ran GTPase-activating protein and requires the C-terminus for its cytoplasmic localization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Soo-Hwan; Roux, Stanley J.

    2003-01-01

    Ran-binding proteins (RanBPs) are a group of proteins that bind to Ran (Ras-related nuclear small GTP-binding protein), and thus either control the GTP/GDP-bound states of Ran or help couple the Ran GTPase cycle to a cellular process. AtRanBP1c is a Ran-binding protein from Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. that was recently shown to be critically involved in the regulation of auxin-induced mitotic progression [S.-H. Kim et al. (2001) Plant Cell 13:2619-2630]. Here we report that AtRanBP1c inhibits the EDTA-induced release of GTP from Ran and serves as a co-activator of Ran-GTPase-activating protein (RanGAP) in vitro. Transient expression of AtRanBP1c fused to a beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter reveals that the protein localizes primarily to the cytosol. Neither the N- nor C-terminus of AtRanBP1c, which flank the Ran-binding domain (RanBD), is necessary for the binding of PsRan1-GTP to the protein, but both are needed for the cytosolic localization of GUS-fused AtRanBP1c. These findings, together with a previous report that AtRanBP1c is critically involved in root growth and development, imply that the promotion of GTP hydrolysis by the Ran/RanGAP/AtRanBP1c complex in the cytoplasm, and the resulting concentration gradient of Ran-GDP to Ran-GTP across the nuclear membrane could be important in the regulation of auxin-induced mitotic progression in root tips of A. thaliana.

  2. Antisense expression of an Arabidopsis ran binding protein renders transgenic roots hypersensitive to auxin and alters auxin-induced root growth and development by arresting mitotic progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S. H.; Arnold, D.; Lloyd, A.; Roux, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    We cloned a cDNA encoding an Arabidopsis Ran binding protein, AtRanBP1c, and generated transgenic Arabidopsis expressing the antisense strand of the AtRanBP1c gene to understand the in vivo functions of the Ran/RanBP signal pathway. The transgenic plants showed enhanced primary root growth but suppressed growth of lateral roots. Auxin significantly increased lateral root initiation and inhibited primary root growth in the transformants at 10 pM, several orders of magnitude lower than required to induce these responses in wild-type roots. This induction was followed by a blockage of mitosis in both newly emerged lateral roots and in the primary root, ultimately resulting in the selective death of cells in the tips of both lateral and primary roots. Given the established role of Ran binding proteins in the transport of proteins into the nucleus, these findings are consistent with a model in which AtRanBP1c plays a key role in the nuclear delivery of proteins that suppress auxin action and that regulate mitotic progress in root tips.

  3. Characterization of proteins that interact with the GTP-bound form of the regulatory GTPase Ran in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Haizel, T; Merkle, T; Pay, A; Fejes, E; Nagy, F

    1997-01-01

    Ran, a small soluble GTP-binding protein, has been shown to be essential for the nuclear translocation of proteins and it is also thought to be involved in regulating cell cycle progression in mammalian and yeast cells. Genes encoding Ran-like proteins have been isolated from different higher plant species. Overexpression of plant Ran cDNAs, similarly to their mammalian/yeast homologues, suppresses the phenotype of the pim46-1 cell cycle mutant in yeast cells. The mammalian/yeast Ran proteins have been shown to interact with a battery of Ran-binding proteins, including the guanidine nucleotide exchange factor RCC1, the GTPase-activating Ran-GAP, nucleoporins and other Ran-binding proteins (RanBPs) specific for Ran-GTP. Here, the characterization of the first Ran-binding proteins from higher plants is reported. The yeast two-hybrid system was used to isolate cDNA clones encoding proteins of approximately 28 kDa (At-RanBP1a, At-RanBP1b) that interact with the GTP-bound forms of the Ran1, Ran2 and Ran3 proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana. The deduced amino acid sequences of the At-RanBP1s display high similarity (60%) to mammalian/yeast RanBP1 proteins and contain the characteristic Ran-binding domains. Furthermore, interaction of the plant Ran and RanBP1 proteins, is shown to require the acidic C-terminal domain (-DEDDDL) of Ran proteins in addition to the presence of an intact Ran-binding domain. In whole cell extracts, the GST-RanBP1a fusion protein binds specifically to GTP-Ran and will not interact with Rab/Ypt-type small GTP-binding proteins. Finally, in good agreement with their proposed biological function, the At-Ran and the At-RanBP genes are expressed coordinately and show the highest level of expression in meristematic tissues.

  4. GAP Activity, but Not Subcellular Targeting, Is Required for Arabidopsis RanGAP Cellular and Developmental Functions[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Boruc, Joanna; Griffis, Anna H.N.; Rodrigo-Peiris, Thushani; Zhou, Xiao; Tilford, Bailey; Van Damme, Daniël; Meier, Iris

    2015-01-01

    The Ran GTPase activating protein (RanGAP) is important to Ran signaling involved in nucleocytoplasmic transport, spindle organization, and postmitotic nuclear assembly. Unlike vertebrate and yeast RanGAP, plant RanGAP has an N-terminal WPP domain, required for nuclear envelope association and several mitotic locations of Arabidopsis thaliana RanGAP1. A double null mutant of the two Arabidopsis RanGAP homologs is gametophyte lethal. Here, we created a series of mutants with various reductions in RanGAP levels by combining a RanGAP1 null allele with different RanGAP2 alleles. As RanGAP level decreases, the severity of developmental phenotypes increases, but nuclear import is unaffected. To dissect whether the GAP activity and/or the subcellular localization of RanGAP are responsible for the observed phenotypes, this series of rangap mutants were transformed with RanGAP1 variants carrying point mutations abolishing the GAP activity and/or the WPP-dependent subcellular localization. The data show that plant development is differentially affected by RanGAP mutant allele combinations of increasing severity and requires the GAP activity of RanGAP, while the subcellular positioning of RanGAP is dispensable. In addition, our results indicate that nucleocytoplasmic trafficking can tolerate both partial depletion of RanGAP and delocalization of RanGAP from the nuclear envelope. PMID:26091693

  5. Interactions of an Arabidopsis RanBPM homologue with LisH-CTLH domain proteins revealed high conservation of CTLH complexes in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background RanBPM (Ran-binding protein in the microtubule-organizing centre) was originally reported as a centrosome-associated protein in human cells. However, RanBPM protein containing highly conserved SPRY, LisH, CTLH and CRA domains is currently considered as a scaffolding protein with multiple cellular functions. A plant homologue of RanBPM has not yet been characterized. Results Based on sequence similarity, we identified a homologue of the human RanBPM in Arabidopsis thaliana. AtRanBPM protein has highly conserved SPRY, LisH, CTLH and CRA domains. Cell fractionation showed that endogenous AtRanBPM or expressed GFP-AtRanBPM are mainly cytoplasmic proteins with only a minor portion detectable in microsomal fractions. AtRanBPM was identified predominantly in the form of soluble cytoplasmic complexes ~230 – 500 kDa in size. Immunopurification of AtRanBPM followed by mass spectrometric analysis identified proteins containing LisH and CRA domains; LisH, CRA, RING-U-box domains and a transducin/WD40 repeats in a complex with AtRanBPM. Homologues of identified proteins are known to be components of the C-terminal to the LisH motif (CTLH) complexes in humans and budding yeast. Microscopic analysis of GFP-AtRanBPM in vivo and immunofluorescence localization of endogenous AtRanBPM protein in cultured cells and seedlings of Arabidopsis showed mainly cytoplasmic and nuclear localization. Absence of colocalization with γ-tubulin was consistent with the biochemical data and suggests another than a centrosomal role of the AtRanBPM protein. Conclusion We showed that as yet uncharacterized Arabidopsis RanBPM protein physically interacts with LisH-CTLH domain-containing proteins. The newly identified high molecular weight cytoplasmic protein complexes of AtRanBPM showed homology with CTLH types of complexes described in mammals and budding yeast. Although the exact functions of the CTLH complexes in scaffolding of protein degradation, in protein interactions and in

  6. The Inner Nuclear Membrane Protein Nemp1 Is a New Type of RanGTP-Binding Protein in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Shibano, Takashi; Mamada, Hiroshi; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Taira, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    The inner nuclear membrane (INM) protein Nemp1/TMEM194A has previously been suggested to be involved in eye development in Xenopus, and contains two evolutionarily conserved sequences in the transmembrane domains (TMs) and the C-terminal region, named region A and region B, respectively. To elucidate the molecular nature of Nemp1, we analyzed its interacting proteins through those conserved regions. First, we found that Nemp1 interacts with itself and lamin through the TMs and region A, respectively. Colocalization of Nemp1 and lamin at the INM suggests that the interaction with lamin participates in the INM localization of Nemp1. Secondly, through yeast two-hybrid screening using region B as bait, we identified the small GTPase Ran as a probable Nemp1-binding partner. GST pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation assays using region B and Ran mutants revealed that region B binds directly to the GTP-bound Ran through its effector domain. Immunostaining experiments using transfected COS-7 cells revealed that full-length Nemp1 recruits Ran near the nuclear envelope, suggesting a role for Nemp1 in the accumulation of RanGTP at the nuclear periphery. At the neurula-to-tailbud stages of Xenopus embryos, nemp1 expression overlapped with ran in several regions including the eye vesicles. Co-knockdown using antisense morpholino oligos for nemp1 and ran caused reduction of cell densities and severe eye defects more strongly than either single knockdown alone, suggesting their functional interaction. Finally we show that Arabidopsis thaliana Nemp1-orthologous proteins interact with A. thaliana Ran, suggesting their evolutionally conserved physical and functional interactions possibly in basic cellular functions including nuclear transportation. Taken together, we conclude that Nemp1 represents a new type of RanGTP-binding protein. PMID:25946333

  7. The Inner Nuclear Membrane Protein Nemp1 Is a New Type of RanGTP-Binding Protein in Eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Shibano, Takashi; Mamada, Hiroshi; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Taira, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    The inner nuclear membrane (INM) protein Nemp1/TMEM194A has previously been suggested to be involved in eye development in Xenopus, and contains two evolutionarily conserved sequences in the transmembrane domains (TMs) and the C-terminal region, named region A and region B, respectively. To elucidate the molecular nature of Nemp1, we analyzed its interacting proteins through those conserved regions. First, we found that Nemp1 interacts with itself and lamin through the TMs and region A, respectively. Colocalization of Nemp1 and lamin at the INM suggests that the interaction with lamin participates in the INM localization of Nemp1. Secondly, through yeast two-hybrid screening using region B as bait, we identified the small GTPase Ran as a probable Nemp1-binding partner. GST pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation assays using region B and Ran mutants revealed that region B binds directly to the GTP-bound Ran through its effector domain. Immunostaining experiments using transfected COS-7 cells revealed that full-length Nemp1 recruits Ran near the nuclear envelope, suggesting a role for Nemp1 in the accumulation of RanGTP at the nuclear periphery. At the neurula-to-tailbud stages of Xenopus embryos, nemp1 expression overlapped with ran in several regions including the eye vesicles. Co-knockdown using antisense morpholino oligos for nemp1 and ran caused reduction of cell densities and severe eye defects more strongly than either single knockdown alone, suggesting their functional interaction. Finally we show that Arabidopsis thaliana Nemp1-orthologous proteins interact with A. thaliana Ran, suggesting their evolutionally conserved physical and functional interactions possibly in basic cellular functions including nuclear transportation. Taken together, we conclude that Nemp1 represents a new type of RanGTP-binding protein.

  8. Samp1, a RanGTP binding transmembrane protein in the inner nuclear membrane.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, Balaje; Jafferali, Mohammed Hakim; Figueroa, Ricardo A; Hallberg, Einar

    2016-07-01

    Samp1 is a transmembrane protein of the inner nuclear membrane (INM), which interacts with the nuclear lamina and the Linker of Nucleoskeleton and Cytoskeleton (LINC) complex in interphase and during mitosis, it localizes to the mitotic spindle. Samp1 was recently found to coprecipitate a protein complex containing Ran, a GTPase with fundamental regulatory functions both in interphase and in mitosis. To investigate the interaction between Samp1 and Ran in further detail, we have designed and expressed recombinant fusion proteins of the Chaetomium thermophilum homolog of Samp1 (Ct.Samp1) and human Ran. Pulldown experiments show that Samp1 binds directly to Ran and that Samp1 binds better to RanGTP compared to RanGDP. Samp1 also preferred RanGTP over RanGDP in living tsBN2 cells. We also show that the Ran binding domain is located between amino acids 75-135 in the nucleoplasmically exposed N-terminal tail of Samp1. This domain is unique for Samp1, without homology in any other proteins in fungi or metazoa. Samp1 is the first known transmembrane protein that binds to Ran and could provide a unique local binding site for RanGTP in the INM. Samp1 overexpression resulted in increased Ran concentrations in the nuclear periphery supporting this idea. PMID:27541860

  9. Samp1, a RanGTP binding transmembrane protein in the inner nuclear membrane

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaraghavan, Balaje; Jafferali, Mohammed Hakim; Figueroa, Ricardo A.; Hallberg, Einar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Samp1 is a transmembrane protein of the inner nuclear membrane (INM), which interacts with the nuclear lamina and the Linker of Nucleoskeleton and Cytoskeleton (LINC) complex in interphase and during mitosis, it localizes to the mitotic spindle. Samp1 was recently found to coprecipitate a protein complex containing Ran, a GTPase with fundamental regulatory functions both in interphase and in mitosis. To investigate the interaction between Samp1 and Ran in further detail, we have designed and expressed recombinant fusion proteins of the Chaetomium thermophilum homolog of Samp1 (Ct.Samp1) and human Ran. Pulldown experiments show that Samp1 binds directly to Ran and that Samp1 binds better to RanGTP compared to RanGDP. Samp1 also preferred RanGTP over RanGDP in living tsBN2 cells. We also show that the Ran binding domain is located between amino acids 75–135 in the nucleoplasmically exposed N-terminal tail of Samp1. This domain is unique for Samp1, without homology in any other proteins in fungi or metazoa. Samp1 is the first known transmembrane protein that binds to Ran and could provide a unique local binding site for RanGTP in the INM. Samp1 overexpression resulted in increased Ran concentrations in the nuclear periphery supporting this idea. PMID:27541860

  10. Crystallographic and Biochemical Analysis of the Ran-Binding Zinc Finger Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Partridge, James R.; Schwartz, Thomas U.; MIT

    2009-08-13

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) resides in circular openings within the nuclear envelope and serves as the sole conduit to facilitate nucleocytoplasmic transport in eukaryotes. The asymmetric distribution of the small G protein Ran across the nuclear envelope regulates directionality of protein transport. Ran interacts with the NPC of metazoa via two asymmetrically localized components, Nup153 at the nuclear face and Nup358 at the cytoplasmic face. Both nucleoporins contain a stretch of distinct, Ran-binding zinc finger domains. Here, we present six crystal structures of Nup153-zinc fingers in complex with Ran and a 1.48 {angstrom} crystal structure of RanGDP. Crystal engineering allowed us to obtain well diffracting crystals so that all ZnF-Ran complex structures are refined to high resolution. Each of the four zinc finger modules of Nup153 binds one Ran molecule in apparently non-allosteric fashion. The affinity is measurably higher for RanGDP than for RanGTP and varies modestly between the individual zinc fingers. By microcalorimetric and mutational analysis, we determined that one specific hydrogen bond accounts for most of the differences in the binding affinity of individual zinc fingers. Genomic analysis reveals that only in animals do NPCs contain Ran-binding zinc fingers. We speculate that these organisms evolved a mechanism to maintain a high local concentration of Ran at the vicinity of the NPC, using this zinc finger domain as a sink.

  11. Importin {beta}-type nuclear transport receptors have distinct binding affinities for Ran-GTP

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Silvia; Schlenstedt, Gabriel

    2011-03-18

    Highlights: {yields} Determination of binding properties of nuclear transport receptor/Ran-GTP complexes. {yields} Biosensor measurements provide constants for dissociation, on-rates, and off-rates. {yields} The affinity of receptors for Ran-GTP is widely divergent. {yields} Dissociation constants differ for three orders of magnitude. {yields} The cellular concentration of yeast Ran is not limiting. -- Abstract: Cargos destined to enter or leave the cell nucleus are typically transported by receptors of the importin {beta} family to pass the nuclear pore complex. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprises 14 members of this protein family, which can be divided in importins and exportins. The Ran GTPase regulates the association and dissociation of receptors and cargos as well as the transport direction through the nuclear pore. All receptors bind to Ran exclusively in its GTP-bound state and this event is restricted to the nuclear compartment. We determined the Ran-GTP binding properties of all yeast transport receptors by biosensor measurements and observed that the affinity of importins for Ran-GTP differs significantly. The dissociation constants range from 230 pM to 270 nM, which is mostly based on a variability of the off-rate constants. The divergent affinity of importins for Ran-GTP suggests the existence of a novel mode of nucleocytoplasmic transport regulation. Furthermore, the cellular concentration of {beta}-receptors and of other Ran-binding proteins was determined. We found that the number of {beta}-receptors altogether about equals the amounts of yeast Ran, but Ran-GTP is not limiting in the nucleus. The implications of our results for nucleocytoplasmic transport mechanisms are discussed.

  12. Characterization of the nuclear protein import mechanism using Ran mutants with altered nucleotide binding specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Weis, K; Dingwall, C; Lamond, A I

    1996-01-01

    The small nuclear GTP binding protein Ran is required for transport of nuclear proteins through the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Although it is known that GTP hydrolysis by Ran is essential for this reaction, it has been unclear whether additional energy-consuming steps are also required. To uncouple the energy requirements for Ran from other nucleoside triphosphatases, we constructed a mutant derivative of Ran that has an altered nucleotide specificity from GTP to xanthosine 5' triphosphate. Using this Ran mutant, we demonstrate that nucleotide hydrolysis by Ran is sufficient to promote efficient nuclear protein import in vitro. Under these conditions, protein import could no longer be inhibited with non-hydrolysable nucleotide analogues, indicating that no Ran-independent energy-requiring steps are essential for the protein translocation reaction through the NPC. We further provide evidence that nuclear protein import requires Ran in the GDP form in the cytoplasm. This suggests that a coordinated exchange reaction from Ran-GDP to Ran-GTP at the pore is necessary for translocation into the nucleus. Images PMID:9003787

  13. The Small G Protein AtRAN1 Regulates Vegetative Growth and Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peipei; Zang, Aiping; Chen, Haiying; Cai, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved small G-protein Ran plays important role in nuclear translocation of proteins, cell cycle regulation, and nuclear envelope maintenance in mammalian cells and yeast. Arabidopsis Ran proteins are encoded by a family of four genes and are highly conserved at the protein level. However, their biological functions are poorly understood. We report here that AtRAN1 plays an important role in vegetative growth and the molecular improvement of stress tolerance in Arabidopsis. AtRAN1 overexpression promoted vegetative growth and enhanced abiotic tolerance, while the atran1 atran3 double mutant showed higher freezing sensitivity than WT. The AtRAN1 gene is ubiquitously expressed in plants, and the expression levels are higher in the buds, flowers and siliques. Subcellular localization results showed that AtRAN1 is mainly localized in the nucleus, with some present in the cytoplasm. AtRAN1 could maintain cell division and cell cycle progression and promote the formation of an intact nuclear envelope, especially under freezing conditions. PMID:27258048

  14. Conserved charged residues in the leucine-rich repeat domain of the Ran GTPase activating protein are required for Ran binding and GTPase activation.

    PubMed Central

    Haberland, J; Gerke, V

    1999-01-01

    GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) for Ran, a Ras-related GTPase participating in nucleocytoplasmic transport, have been identified in different species ranging from yeast to man. All RanGAPs are characterized by a conserved domain consisting of eight leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) interrupted at two positions by so-called separating regions, the latter being unique for RanGAPs within the family of LRR proteins. The cytosolic RanGAP activity is essential for the Ran GTPase cycle which in turn provides directionality in nucleocytoplasmic transport, but the structural basis for the interaction between Ran and its GAP has not been elucidated. In order to gain a better understanding of this interaction we generated a number of mutant RanGAPs carrying amino acid substitutions in the LRR domain and analysed their complex formation with Ran as well as their ability to stimulate the intrinsic GTPase activity of the G protein. We show that conserved charged residues present in the separating regions of the LRR domain are indispensable for efficient Ran binding and GAP activity. These separating regions contain three conserved arginines which could possibly serve as catalytic residues similar to the arginine fingers identified in GAPs for other small GTPases. However, mutations in two of these arginines do not affect the GAP activity and replacement of the third conserved arginine (Arg91 in human RanGAP) severely interferes not only with GAP activity but also with Ran binding. This indicates that RanGAP-stimulated GTP hydrolysis on Ran does not involve a catalytic arginine residue but requires certain charged residues of the LRR domain of the GAP for mediating the protein-protein interaction. PMID:10527945

  15. Ran Binding Protein 9 (RanBP9) is a novel mediator of cellular DNA damage response in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Dario; Scarpa, Mario; Tessari, Anna; Uka, Rexhep; Amari, Foued; Lee, Cindy; Richmond, Timothy; Foray, Claudia; Sheetz, Tyler; Braddom, Ashley; Burd, Christin E.; Parvin, Jeffrey D.; Ludwig, Thomas; Croce, Carlo M.; Coppola, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Ran Binding Protein 9 (RanBP9, also known as RanBPM) is an evolutionary conserved scaffold protein present both in the nucleus and the cytoplasm of cells whose biological functions remain elusive. We show that active ATM phosphorylates RanBP9 on at least two different residues (S181 and S603). In response to IR, RanBP9 rapidly accumulates into the nucleus of lung cancer cells, but this nuclear accumulation is prevented by ATM inhibition. RanBP9 stable silencing in three different lung cancer cell lines significantly affects the DNA Damage Response (DDR), resulting in delayed activation of key components of the cellular response to IR such as ATM itself, Chk2, γH2AX, and p53. Accordingly, abrogation of RanBP9 expression reduces homologous recombination-dependent DNA repair efficiency, causing an abnormal activation of IR-induced senescence and apoptosis. In summary, here we report that RanBP9 is a novel mediator of the cellular DDR, whose accumulation into the nucleus upon IR is dependent on ATM kinase activity. RanBP9 absence hampers the molecular mechanisms leading to efficient repair of damaged DNA, resulting in enhanced sensitivity to genotoxic stress. These findings suggest that targeting RanBP9 might enhance lung cancer cell sensitivity to genotoxic anti-neoplastic treatment. PMID:26943034

  16. Canoe binds RanGTP to promote Pins(TPR)/Mud-mediated spindle orientation.

    PubMed

    Wee, Brett; Johnston, Christopher A; Prehoda, Kenneth E; Doe, Chris Q

    2011-10-31

    Regulated spindle orientation maintains epithelial tissue integrity and stem cell asymmetric cell division. In Drosophila melanogaster neural stem cells (neuroblasts), the scaffolding protein Canoe (Afadin/Af-6 in mammals) regulates spindle orientation, but its protein interaction partners and mechanism of action are unknown. In this paper, we use our recently developed induced cell polarity system to dissect the molecular mechanism of Canoe-mediated spindle orientation. We show that a previously uncharacterized portion of Canoe directly binds the Partner of Inscuteable (Pins) tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. The Canoe-Pins(TPR) interaction recruits Canoe to the cell cortex and is required for activation of the Pins(TPR)-Mud (nuclear mitotic apparatus in mammals) spindle orientation pathway. We show that the Canoe Ras-association (RA) domains directly bind RanGTP and that both the Canoe(RA) domains and RanGTP are required to recruit Mud to the cortex and activate the Pins/Mud/dynein spindle orientation pathway.

  17. Nuclear size is sensitive to NTF2 protein levels in a manner dependent on Ran binding.

    PubMed

    Vuković, Lidija D; Jevtić, Predrag; Zhang, Zhaojie; Stohr, Bradley A; Levy, Daniel L

    2016-03-15

    Altered nuclear size is associated with many cancers, and determining whether cancer-associated changes in nuclear size contribute to carcinogenesis necessitates an understanding of mechanisms of nuclear size regulation. Although nuclear import rates generally positively correlate with nuclear size, NTF2 levels negatively affect nuclear size, despite the role of NTF2 (also known as NUTF2) in nuclear recycling of the import factor Ran. We show that binding of Ran to NTF2 is required for NTF2 to inhibit nuclear expansion and import of large cargo molecules in Xenopus laevis egg and embryo extracts, consistent with our observation that NTF2 reduces the diameter of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) in a Ran-binding-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that ectopic NTF2 expression in Xenopus embryos and mammalian tissue culture cells alters nuclear size. Finally, we show that increases in nuclear size during melanoma progression correlate with reduced NTF2 expression, and increasing NTF2 levels in melanoma cells is sufficient to reduce nuclear size. These results show a conserved capacity for NTF2 to impact on nuclear size, and we propose that NTF2 might be a new cancer biomarker.

  18. Selective impairment of a subset of Ran-GTP-binding domains of ran-binding protein 2 (Ranbp2) suffices to recapitulate the degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) triggered by Ranbp2 ablation.

    PubMed

    Patil, Hemangi; Saha, Arjun; Senda, Eugene; Cho, Kyoung-in; Haque, MdEmdadul; Yu, Minzhong; Qiu, Sunny; Yoon, Dosuk; Hao, Ying; Peachey, Neal S; Ferreira, Paulo A

    2014-10-24

    Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) degeneration underpins diseases triggered by disparate genetic lesions, noxious insults, or both. The pleiotropic Ranbp2 controls the expression of intrinsic and extrinsic pathological stressors impinging on cellular viability. However, the physiological targets and mechanisms controlled by Ranbp2 in tissue homeostasis, such as RPE, are ill defined. We show that mice, RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-), with selective Ranbp2 ablation in RPE develop pigmentary changes, syncytia, hypoplasia, age-dependent centrifugal and non-apoptotic degeneration of the RPE, and secondary leakage of choriocapillaris. These manifestations are accompanied by the development of F-actin clouds, metalloproteinase-11 activation, deregulation of expression or subcellular localization of critical RPE proteins, atrophic cell extrusions into the subretinal space, and compensatory proliferation of peripheral RPE. To gain mechanistic insights into what Ranbp2 activities are vital to the RPE, we performed genetic complementation analyses of transgenic lines of bacterial artificial chromosomes of Ranbp2 harboring loss of function of selective Ranbp2 domains expressed in a Ranbp2(-/-) background. Among the transgenic lines produced, only Tg(RBD2/3*-HA)::RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-)-expressing mutations, which selectively impair binding of RBD2/3 (Ran-binding domains 2 and 3) of Ranbp2 to Ran-GTP, recapitulate RPE degeneration, as observed with RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-). By contrast, Tg(RBD2/3*-HA) expression rescues the degeneration of cone photoreceptors lacking Ranbp2. The RPE of RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-) and Tg(RBD2/3*-HA)::RPE-cre::Ranbp2(-/-) share proteostatic deregulation of Ran GTPase, serotransferrin, and γ-tubulin and suppression of light-evoked electrophysiological responses. These studies unravel selective roles of Ranbp2 and its RBD2 and RBD3 in RPE survival and functions. We posit that the control of Ran GTPase by Ranbp2 emerges as a novel therapeutic target in diseases promoting

  19. The C terminus of fragile X mental retardation protein interacts with the multi-domain Ran-binding protein in the microtubule-organising centre.

    PubMed

    Menon, Rajesh P; Gibson, Toby J; Pastore, Annalisa

    2004-10-01

    Absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) causes fragile X syndrome, the most common form of hereditary mental retardation. FMRP is a mainly cytoplasmic protein thought to be involved in repression of translation, through a complex network of protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions. Most of the currently known protein partners of FMRP recognise the conserved N terminus of the protein. No interaction has yet been mapped to the highly charged, poorly conserved C terminus, so far thought to be involved in RNA recognition through an RGG motif. In the present study, we show that a two-hybrid bait containing residues 419-632 of human FMRP fishes out a protein that spans the sequence of the Ran-binding protein in the microtubule-organising centre (RanBPM/RanBP9). Specific interaction of RanBPM with FMRP was confirmed by in vivo and in vitro assays. In brain tissue sections, RanBPM is highly expressed in the neurons of cerebral cortex and the cerebellar purkinje cells, in a pattern similar to that described for FMRP. Sequence analysis shows that RanBPM is a multi-domain protein. The interaction with FMRP was mapped in a newly identified CRA motif present in the RanBPM C terminus. Our results suggest that the functional role of RanBPM binding is modulation of the RNA-binding properties of FMRP.

  20. Lil3 dimerization and chlorophyll binding in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Mork-Jansson, Astrid Elisabeth; Gargano, Daniela; Kmiec, Karol; Furnes, Clemens; Shevela, Dmitriy; Eichacker, Lutz Andreas

    2015-10-01

    The two-helix light harvesting like (Lil) protein Lil3 belongs to the family of chlorophyll binding light harvesting proteins of photosynthetic membranes. A function in tetrapyrrol synthesis and stabilization of geranylgeraniol reductase has been shown. Lil proteins contain the chlorophyll a/b-binding motif; however, binding of chlorophyll has not been demonstrated. We find that Lil3.2 from Arabidopsis thaliana forms heterodimers with Lil3.1 and binds chlorophyll. Lil3.2 heterodimerization (25±7.8 nM) is favored relative to homodimerization (431±59 nM). Interaction of Lil3.2 with chlorophyll a (231±49 nM) suggests that heterodimerization precedes binding of chlorophyll in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  1. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  2. Mutations in the YRB1 gene encoding yeast ran-binding-protein-1 that impair nucleocytoplasmic transport and suppress yeast mating defects.

    PubMed Central

    Künzler, M; Trueheart, J; Sette, C; Hurt, E; Thorner, J

    2001-01-01

    We identified two temperature-sensitive (ts) mutations in the essential gene, YRB1, which encodes the yeast homolog of Ran-binding-protein-1 (RanBP1), a known coregulator of the Ran GTPase cycle. Both mutations result in single amino acid substitutions of evolutionarily conserved residues (A91D and R127K, respectively) in the Ran-binding domain of Yrb1. The altered proteins have reduced affinity for Ran (Gsp1) in vivo. After shift to restrictive temperature, both mutants display impaired nuclear protein import and one also reduces poly(A)+ RNA export, suggesting a primary defect in nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. Consistent with this conclusion, both yrb1ts mutations display deleterious genetic interactions with mutations in many other genes involved in nucleocytoplasmic transport, including SRP1 (alpha-importin) and several beta-importin family members. These yrb1ts alleles were isolated by their ability to suppress two different types of mating-defective mutants (respectively, fus1Delta and ste5ts), indicating that reduction in nucleocytoplasmic transport enhances mating proficiency. Indeed, in both yrb1ts mutants, Ste5 (scaffold protein for the pheromone response MAPK cascade) is mislocalized to the cytosol, even in the absence of pheromone. Also, both yrb1ts mutations suppress the mating defect of a null mutation in MSN5, which encodes the receptor for pheromone-stimulated nuclear export of Ste5. Our results suggest that reimport of Ste5 into the nucleus is important in downregulating mating response. PMID:11238397

  3. Arabidopsis chloroplast chaperonin 10 is a calmodulin-binding protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse cellular activities in plants through the action of calmodulin (CaM). By using (35)S-labeled CaM to screen an Arabidopsis seedling cDNA expression library, a cDNA designated as AtCh-CPN10 (Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast chaperonin 10) was cloned. Chloroplast CPN10, a nuclear-encoded protein, is a functional homolog of E. coli GroES. It is believed that CPN60 and CPN10 are involved in the assembly of Rubisco, a key enzyme involved in the photosynthetic pathway. Northern analysis revealed that AtCh-CPN10 is highly expressed in green tissues. The recombinant AtCh-CPN10 binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion mutants revealed that there is only one CaM-binding site in the last 31 amino acids of the AtCh-CPN10 at the C-terminal end. The CaM-binding region in AtCh-CPN10 has higher homology to other chloroplast CPN10s in comparison to GroES and mitochondrial CPN10s, suggesting that CaM may only bind to chloroplast CPN10s. Furthermore, the results also suggest that the calcium/CaM messenger system is involved in regulating Rubisco assembly in the chloroplast, thereby influencing photosynthesis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  4. The RNA-binding protein repertoire of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Marondedze, Claudius; Thomas, Ludivine; Serrano, Natalia L.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Gehring, Chris

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have essential roles in determining the fate of RNA from synthesis to decay and have been studied on a protein-by-protein basis, or computationally based on a number of well-characterised RNA-binding domains. Recently, high-throughput methods enabled the capture of mammalian RNA-binding proteomes. To gain insight into the role of Arabidopsis thaliana RBPs at the systems level, we have employed interactome capture techniques using cells from different ecotypes grown in cultures and leaves. In vivo UV-crosslinking of RNA to RBPs, oligo(dT) capture and mass spectrometry yielded 1,145 different proteins including 550 RBPs that either belong to the functional category ‘RNA-binding’, have known RNA-binding domains or have orthologs identified in mammals, C. elegans, or S. cerevisiae in addition to 595 novel candidate RBPs. We noted specific subsets of RBPs in cultured cells and leaves and a comparison of Arabidopsis, mammalian, C. elegans, and S. cerevisiae RBPs reveals a common set of proteins with a role in intermediate metabolism, as well as distinct differences suggesting that RBPs are also species and tissue specific. This study provides a foundation for studies that will advance our understanding of the biological significance of RBPs in plant developmental and stimulus specific responses. PMID:27405932

  5. Abnormal centrosome amplification in cells through the targeting of Ran-binding protein-1 by the human T cell leukemia virus type-1 Tax oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Peloponese, Jean-Marie; Haller, Kerstin; Miyazato, Akiko; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2005-01-01

    Human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus etiologically causal of adult T cell leukemia. The virus encodes a Tax oncoprotein that functions in transcriptional regulation, cell cycle control, and transformation. Because adult T cell leukemia like many other human cancers is a disease of genomic instability with frequent gains and losses of chromosomes, to understand this disease it is important to comprehend how HTLV-1 engenders aneuploidy in host cells. In this regard, loss of cell cycle checkpoints permits tolerance of aneuploidy but does not explain how aneuploidy is created. We show here that HTLV-1 Tax causes abnormal centrosome fragmentation in the mitotic phase of the cell cycle. We report that Tax directly binds Ran and Ran-binding protein-1, locates to centrosomes/spindle poles, and causes supernumerary centrosomes. PMID:16365316

  6. Identification of different roles for RanGDP and RanGTP in nuclear protein import.

    PubMed Central

    Görlich, D; Panté, N; Kutay, U; Aebi, U; Bischoff, F R

    1996-01-01

    The importin-alpha/beta heterodimer and the GTPase Ran play key roles in nuclear protein import. Importin binds the nuclear localization signal (NLS). Translocation of the resulting import ligand complex through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) requires Ran and is terminated at the nucleoplasmic side by its disassembly. The principal GTP exchange factor for Ran is the nuclear protein RCC1, whereas the major RanGAP is cytoplasmic, predicting that nuclear Ran is mainly in the GTP form and cytoplasmic Ran is in the GDP-bound form. Here, we show that nuclear import depends on cytoplasmic RanGDP and free GTP, and that RanGDP binds to the NPC. Therefore, import might involve nucleotide exchange and GTP hydrolysis on NPC-bound Ran. RanGDP binding to the NPC is not mediated by the Ran binding sites of importin-beta, suggesting that translocation is not driven from these sites. Consistently, a mutant importin-beta deficient in Ran binding can deliver its cargo up to the nucleoplasmic side of the NPC. However, the mutant is unable to release the import substrate into the nucleoplasm. Thus, binding of nucleoplasmic RanGTP to importin-beta probably triggers termination, i.e. the dissociation of importin-alpha from importin-beta and the subsequent release of the import substrate into the nucleoplasm. Images PMID:8896452

  7. Determinants of Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier 1 (SUMO1) Protein Specificity, E3 Ligase, and SUMO-RanGAP1 Binding Activities of Nucleoporin RanBP2

    SciTech Connect

    Gareau, Jaclyn R.; Reverter, David; Lima, Christopher D.

    2012-02-16

    The RanBP2 nucleoporin contains an internal repeat domain (IR1-M-IR2) that catalyzes E3 ligase activity and forms a stable complex with SUMO-modified RanGAP1 and UBC9 at the nuclear pore complex. RanBP2 exhibits specificity for SUMO1 as RanGAP1-SUMO1/UBC9 forms a more stable complex with RanBP2 compared with RanGAP1-SUMO2 that results in greater protection of RanGAP-SUMO1 from proteases. The IR1-M-IR2 SUMO E3 ligase activity also shows a similar preference for SUMO1. We utilized deletions and domain swap constructs in protease protection assays and automodification assays to define RanBP2 domains responsible for RanGAP1-SUMO1 protection and SUMO1-specific E3 ligase activity. Our data suggest that elements in both IR1 and IR2 exhibit specificity for SUMO1. IR1 protects RanGAP1-SUMO1/UBC9 and functions as the primary E3 ligase of RanBP2, whereas IR2 retains the ability to interact with SUMO1 to promote SUMO1-specific E3 ligase activity. To determine the structural basis for SUMO1 specificity, a hybrid IR1 construct and IR1 were used to determine three new structures for complexes containing UBC9 with RanGAP1-SUMO1/2. These structures show more extensive contacts among SUMO, UBC9, and RanBP2 in complexes containing SUMO1 compared with SUMO2 and suggest that differences in SUMO specificity may be achieved through these subtle conformational differences.

  8. The ran decathlon: multiple roles of Ran.

    PubMed

    Sazer, S; Dasso, M

    2000-04-01

    The Ran GTPase system affects many cellular processes, including the regulation of cell cycle progression, nuclear envelope structure and function, and nucleocytoplasmic transport. The biochemical basis for the involvement of Ran in nuclear import and export has been well documented, but the direct targets of Ran in other cellular processes have not yet been identified. There is, however, mounting evidence that Ran directly affects at least some of these other cellular processes by mechanisms independent of its role in transport. In this Commentary we discuss evidence linking Ran to different aspects of cell function, and how these multiple facets of Ran's activity may relate to each other. PMID:10704362

  9. RAN-Binding Protein 9 is Involved in Alternative Splicing and is Critical for Male Germ Cell Development and Male Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Jianqiang; Tang, Chong; Li, Jiachen; Zhang, Ying; Bhetwal, Bhupal P.; Zheng, Huili; Yan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    As a member of the large Ran-binding protein family, Ran-binding protein 9 (RANBP9) has been suggested to play a critical role in diverse cellular functions in somatic cell lineages in vitro, and this is further supported by the neonatal lethality phenotype in Ranbp9 global knockout mice. However, the exact molecular actions of RANBP9 remain largely unknown. By inactivation of Ranbp9 specifically in testicular somatic and spermatogenic cells, we discovered that Ranbp9 was dispensable for Sertoli cell development and functions, but critical for male germ cell development and male fertility. RIP-Seq and proteomic analyses revealed that RANBP9 was associated with multiple key splicing factors and directly targeted >2,300 mRNAs in spermatocytes and round spermatids. Many of the RANBP9 target and non-target mRNAs either displayed aberrant splicing patterns or were dysregulated in the absence of Ranbp9. Our data uncovered a novel role of Ranbp9 in regulating alternative splicing in spermatogenic cells, which is critical for normal spermatogenesis and male fertility. PMID:25474150

  10. Yrb4p, a yeast ran-GTP-binding protein involved in import of ribosomal protein L25 into the nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Schlenstedt, G; Smirnova, E; Deane, R; Solsbacher, J; Kutay, U; Görlich, D; Ponstingl, H; Bischoff, F R

    1997-01-01

    Gsp1p, the essential yeast Ran homologue, is a key regulator of transport across the nuclear pore complex (NPC). We report the identification of Yrb4p, a novel Gsp1p binding protein. The 123 kDa protein was isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and found to be related to importin-beta, the mediator of nuclear localization signal (NLS)-dependent import into the nucleus, and to Pse1p. Like importin-beta, Yrb4p and Pse1p specifically bind to Gsp1p-GTP, protecting it from GTP hydrolysis and nucleotide exchange. The GTPase block of Gsp1p complexed to Yrb4p or Pse1p is released by Yrb1p, which contains a Gsp1p binding domain distinct from that of Yrb4p. This might reflect an in vivo function for Yrb1p. Cells disrupted for YRB4 are defective in nuclear import of ribosomal protein L25, but show no defect in the import of proteins containing classical NLSs. Expression of a Yrb4p mutant deficient in Gsp1p-binding is dominant-lethal and blocks bidirectional traffic across the NPC in wild-type cells. L25 binds to Yrb4p and Pse1p and is released by Gsp1p-GTP. Consistent with its putative role as an import receptor for L25-like proteins, Yrb4p localizes to the cytoplasm, the nucleoplasm and the NPC. PMID:9321403

  11. A strong loss-of-function mutation in RAN1 results in constitutive activation of the ethylene response pathway as well as a rosette-lethal phenotype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeste, K. E.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    A recessive mutation was identified that constitutively activated the ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis and resulted in a rosette-lethal phenotype. Positional cloning of the gene corresponding to this mutation revealed that it was allelic to responsive to antagonist1 (ran1), a mutation that causes seedlings to respond in a positive manner to what is normally a competitive inhibitor of ethylene binding. In contrast to the previously identified ran1-1 and ran1-2 alleles that are morphologically indistinguishable from wild-type plants, this ran1-3 allele results in a rosette-lethal phenotype. The predicted protein encoded by the RAN1 gene is similar to the Wilson and Menkes disease proteins and yeast Ccc2 protein, which are integral membrane cation-transporting P-type ATPases involved in copper trafficking. Genetic epistasis analysis indicated that RAN1 acts upstream of mutations in the ethylene receptor gene family. However, the rosette-lethal phenotype of ran1-3 was not suppressed by ethylene-insensitive mutants, suggesting that this mutation also affects a non-ethylene-dependent pathway regulating cell expansion. The phenotype of ran1-3 mutants is similar to loss-of-function ethylene receptor mutants, suggesting that RAN1 may be required to form functional ethylene receptors. Furthermore, these results suggest that copper is required not only for ethylene binding but also for the signaling function of the ethylene receptors.

  12. Targeting zinc finger domains with small molecules: solution structure and binding studies of the RanBP2-type zinc finger of RBM5

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Biancamaria; Fattorusso, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The RNA Binding Motif protein 5 (RBM5), also known as Luca15 or H37, is a component of prespliceosomal complexes, that regulates the alternative splicing of several mRNAs, such as Fas and caspase-2. The rbm5 gene is located at the 2p21.3 chromosomal region, which is strongly associated with lung cancer and many other cancers. Both increased and decreased levels of RBM5 can play a role in tumor progression. In particular, down-regulation of rbm5 is involved in lung cancer and other cancers upon Ras activation, and, also, represents a molecular signature associated with metastasis in various solid tumors. On the other hand, up-regulation of rbm5 occurs in breast and ovarian cancer. Moreover, RBM5 was also found to be involved in the early stage of the HIV-1 viral cycle, representing a potential target for the treatment of the HIV-1 infection. While the molecular basis for RNA recognition and ubiquitin interaction have been structurally characterized, small molecules binding this ZF domain that may contribute to characterize their activity and to develop potential therapeutic agents have not been yet reported. Via an NMR screening of a fragment library we identified several binders and the complex of the most promising one, named compound 1, with the RBM5 ZF1 was structurally characterized in solution. Interestingly, the binding mechanism reveals that compound 1 occupies the RNA binding pocket and is therefore able to compete with the RNA to bind RBM5 RanBP2-type ZF domain, as indicated by NMR studies. PMID:22162216

  13. Arabidopsis dynamin-related protein 1A polymers bind, but do not tubulate, liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Backues, Steven K.; Bednarek, Sebastian Y.

    2010-03-19

    The Arabidopsis dynamin-related protein 1A (AtDRP1A) is involved in endocytosis and cell plate maturation in Arabidopsis. Unlike dynamin, AtDRP1A does not have any recognized membrane binding or protein-protein interaction domains. We report that GTPase active AtDRP1A purified from Escherichia coli as a fusion to maltose binding protein forms homopolymers visible by negative staining electron microscopy. These polymers interact with protein-free liposomes whose lipid composition mimics that of the inner leaflet of the Arabidopsis plasma membrane, suggesting that lipid-binding may play a role in AtDRP1A function. However, AtDRP1A polymers do not appear to assemble and disassemble in a dynamic fashion and do not have the ability to tubulate liposomes in vitro, suggesting that additional factors or modifications are necessary for AtDRP1A's in vivo function.

  14. Duplicate gene divergence by changes in microRNA binding sites in Arabidopsis and Brassica.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sishuo; Adams, Keith L

    2015-03-01

    Gene duplication provides large numbers of new genes that can lead to the evolution of new functions. Duplicated genes can diverge by changes in sequences, expression patterns, and functions. MicroRNAs play an important role in the regulation of gene expression in many eukaryotes. After duplication, two paralogs may diverge in their microRNA binding sites, which might impact their expression and function. Little is known about conservation and divergence of microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in plants. We analyzed microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa. We found that duplicates are more often targeted by microRNAs than singletons. The vast majority of duplicated genes in A. thaliana with microRNA binding sites show divergence in those sites between paralogs. Analysis of microRNA binding sites in genes derived from the ancient whole-genome triplication in B. rapa also revealed extensive divergence. Paralog pairs with divergent microRNA binding sites show more divergence in expression patterns compared with paralog pairs with the same microRNA binding sites in Arabidopsis. Close to half of the cases of binding site divergence are caused by microRNAs that are specific to the Arabidopsis genus, indicating evolutionarily recent gain of binding sites after target gene duplication. We also show rapid evolution of microRNA binding sites in a jacalin gene family. Our analyses reveal a dynamic process of changes in microRNA binding sites after gene duplication in Arabidopsis and highlight the role of microRNA regulation in the divergence and contrasting evolutionary fates of duplicated genes.

  15. Duplicate gene divergence by changes in microRNA binding sites in Arabidopsis and Brassica.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sishuo; Adams, Keith L

    2015-03-01

    Gene duplication provides large numbers of new genes that can lead to the evolution of new functions. Duplicated genes can diverge by changes in sequences, expression patterns, and functions. MicroRNAs play an important role in the regulation of gene expression in many eukaryotes. After duplication, two paralogs may diverge in their microRNA binding sites, which might impact their expression and function. Little is known about conservation and divergence of microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in plants. We analyzed microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa. We found that duplicates are more often targeted by microRNAs than singletons. The vast majority of duplicated genes in A. thaliana with microRNA binding sites show divergence in those sites between paralogs. Analysis of microRNA binding sites in genes derived from the ancient whole-genome triplication in B. rapa also revealed extensive divergence. Paralog pairs with divergent microRNA binding sites show more divergence in expression patterns compared with paralog pairs with the same microRNA binding sites in Arabidopsis. Close to half of the cases of binding site divergence are caused by microRNAs that are specific to the Arabidopsis genus, indicating evolutionarily recent gain of binding sites after target gene duplication. We also show rapid evolution of microRNA binding sites in a jacalin gene family. Our analyses reveal a dynamic process of changes in microRNA binding sites after gene duplication in Arabidopsis and highlight the role of microRNA regulation in the divergence and contrasting evolutionary fates of duplicated genes. PMID:25644246

  16. A calmodulin binding protein from Arabidopsis is induced by ethylene and contains a DNA-binding motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.; Reddy, V. S.; Golovkin, M.

    2000-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a key calcium sensor in all eukaryotes, regulates diverse cellular processes by interacting with other proteins. To isolate CaM binding proteins involved in ethylene signal transduction, we screened an expression library prepared from ethylene-treated Arabidopsis seedlings with 35S-labeled CaM. A cDNA clone, EICBP (Ethylene-Induced CaM Binding Protein), encoding a protein that interacts with activated CaM was isolated in this screening. The CaM binding domain in EICBP was mapped to the C-terminus of the protein. These results indicate that calcium, through CaM, could regulate the activity of EICBP. The EICBP is expressed in different tissues and its expression in seedlings is induced by ethylene. The EICBP contains, in addition to a CaM binding domain, several features that are typical of transcription factors. These include a DNA-binding domain at the N terminus, an acidic region at the C terminus, and nuclear localization signals. In database searches a partial cDNA (CG-1) encoding a DNA-binding motif from parsley and an ethylene up-regulated partial cDNA from tomato (ER66) showed significant similarity to EICBP. In addition, five hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome also showed a very high sequence similarity with EICBP, indicating that there are several EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis. The structural features of EICBP are conserved in all EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis, suggesting that they may constitute a new family of DNA binding proteins and are likely to be involved in modulating gene expression in the presence of ethylene.

  17. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer biosensors that detect Ran conformational changes and a Ran x GDP-importin-beta -RanBP1 complex in vitro and in intact cells.

    PubMed

    Plafker, Kendra; Macara, Ian G

    2002-08-16

    The Ran GTPase plays a central role in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Association of Ran x GTP with transport carriers (karyopherins) triggers the loading/unloading of export or import cargo, respectively. The C-terminal tail of Ran x GTP is deployed in an extended conformation when associated with a Ran binding domain or importins. To monitor tail orientation, a Ran-GFP fusion was labeled with the fluorophore Alexa546. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurs efficiently between the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Alexa546 for Ran x GDP and Ran x GTP, suggesting that the tail is tethered in both states. However, Ran x GTP complexes with importin-beta, RanBP1, and Crm1 all show reduced FRET consistent with tail extension. Displacement of the C-terminal tail of Ran by karyopherins may be a general mechanism to facilitate RanBP1 binding. A Ran x GDP-RanBP1-importin-beta complex also displayed a low FRET signal. To detect this complex in vivo, a bipartite biosensor consisting of Ran-Alexa546 plus GST-GFP-RanBP1, was co-injected into the cytoplasm of cells. The Ran redistributed predominantly to the nucleus, and RanBP1 remained cytoplasmic. Nonetheless, a robust cytoplasmic FRET signal was detectable, which suggests that a significant fraction of cytoplasmic Ran.GDP may exist in a ternary complex with RanBP1 and importins.

  18. Protein interactors of acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP2 mediate cadmium tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Li, Hong-Ye; Xiao, Shi; Chye, Mee-Len

    2010-08-01

    In our recent paper in the Plant Journal, we reported that Arabidopsis thaliana lysophospholipase 2 (lysoPL2) binds acyl-CoA-binding protein 2 (ACBP2) to mediate cadmium [Cd(II)] tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis. ACBP2 contains ankyrin repeats that have been previously shown to mediate protein-protein interactions with an ethylene-responsive element binding protein (AtEBP) and a farnesylated protein 6 (AtFP6). Transgenic Arabidopsis ACBP2-overexpressors, lysoPL2-overexpressors and AtFP6-overexpressors all display enhanced Cd(II) tolerance, in comparison to wild type, suggesting that ACBP2 and its protein partners work together to mediate Cd(II) tolerance. Given that recombinant ACBP2 and AtFP6 can independently bind Cd(II) in vitro, they may be able to participate in Cd(II) translocation. The binding of recombinant ACBP2 to [(14)C]linoleoyl-CoA and [(14)C]linolenoyl-CoA implies its role in phospholipid repair. In conclusion, ACBP2 can mediate tolerance to Cd(II)-induced oxidative stress by interacting with two protein partners, AtFP6 and lysoPL2. Observations that ACBP2 also binds lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC) in vitro and that recombinant lysoPL2 degrades lysoPC, further confirm an interactive role for ACBP2 and lysoPL2 in overcoming Cd(II)-induced stress.

  19. Arabidopsis AtADF1 is functionally affected by mutations on actin binding sites.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chun-Hai; Tang, Wei-Ping; Liu, Jia-Yao

    2013-03-01

    The plant actin depolymerizing factor (ADF) binds to both monomeric and filamentous actin, and is directly involved in the depolymerization of actin filaments. To better understand the actin binding sites of the Arabidopsis thaliana L. AtADF1, we generated mutants of AtADF1 and investigated their functions in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of mutants harboring amino acid substitutions revealed that charged residues (Arg98 and Lys100) located at the α-helix 3 and forming an actin binding site together with the N-terminus are essential for both G- and F-actin binding. The basic residues on the β-strand 5 (K82/A) and the α-helix 4 (R135/A, R137/A) form another actin binding site that is important for F-actin binding. Using transient expression of CFP-tagged AtADF1 mutant proteins in onion (Allium cepa) peel epidermal cells and transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana L. plants overexpressing these mutants, we analyzed how these mutant proteins regulate actin organization and affect seedling growth. Our results show that the ADF mutants with a lower affinity for actin filament binding can still be functional, unless the affinity for actin monomers is also affected. The G-actin binding activity of the ADF plays an essential role in actin binding, depolymerization of actin polymers, and therefore in the control of actin organization. PMID:23190411

  20. Profiling Protein Kinases and Other ATP Binding Proteins in Arabidopsis Using Acyl-ATP Probes*

    PubMed Central

    Villamor, Joji Grace; Kaschani, Farnusch; Colby, Tom; Oeljeklaus, Julian; Zhao, David; Kaiser, Markus; Patricelli, Matthew P.; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Many protein activities are driven by ATP binding and hydrolysis. Here, we explore the ATP binding proteome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana using acyl-ATP (AcATP)1 probes. These probes target ATP binding sites and covalently label lysine residues in the ATP binding pocket. Gel-based profiling using biotinylated AcATP showed that labeling is dependent on pH and divalent ions and can be competed by nucleotides. The vast majority of these AcATP-labeled proteins are known ATP binding proteins. Our search for labeled peptides upon in-gel digest led to the discovery that the biotin moiety of the labeled peptides is oxidized. The in-gel analysis displayed kinase domains of two receptor-like kinases (RLKs) at a lower than expected molecular weight, indicating that these RLKs lost the extracellular domain, possibly as a result of receptor shedding. Analysis of modified peptides using a gel-free platform identified 242 different labeling sites for AcATP in the Arabidopsis proteome. Examination of each individual labeling site revealed a preference of labeling in ATP binding pockets for a broad diversity of ATP binding proteins. Of these, 24 labeled peptides were from a diverse range of protein kinases, including RLKs, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and calcium-dependent kinases. A significant portion of the labeling sites could not be assigned to known nucleotide binding sites. However, the fact that labeling could be competed with ATP indicates that these labeling sites might represent previously uncharacterized nucleotide binding sites. A plot of spectral counts against expression levels illustrates the high specificity of AcATP probes for protein kinases and known ATP binding proteins. This work introduces profiling of ATP binding activities of a large diversity of proteins in plant proteomes. The data have been deposited in ProteomeXchange with the identifier PXD000188. PMID:23722185

  1. The RanBP2/RanGAP1*SUMO1/Ubc9 SUMO E3 ligase is a disassembly machine for Crm1-dependent nuclear export complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ritterhoff, Tobias; Das, Hrishikesh; Hofhaus, Götz; Schröder, Rasmus R.; Flotho, Annette; Melchior, Frauke

    2016-01-01

    Continuous cycles of nucleocytoplasmic transport require disassembly of transport receptor/Ran-GTP complexes in the cytoplasm. A basic disassembly mechanism in all eukaryotes depends on soluble RanGAP and RanBP1. In vertebrates, a significant fraction of RanGAP1 stably interacts with the nucleoporin RanBP2 at a binding site that is flanked by FG-repeats and Ran-binding domains, and overlaps with RanBP2's SUMO E3 ligase region. Here, we show that the RanBP2/RanGAP1*SUMO1/Ubc9 complex functions as an autonomous disassembly machine with a preference for the export receptor Crm1. We describe three in vitro reconstituted disassembly intermediates, which show binding of a Crm1 export complex via two FG-repeat patches, cargo-release by RanBP2's Ran-binding domains and retention of free Crm1 at RanBP2 after Ran-GTP hydrolysis. Intriguingly, all intermediates are compatible with SUMO E3 ligase activity, suggesting that the RanBP2/RanGAP1*SUMO1/Ubc9 complex may link Crm1- and SUMO-dependent functions. PMID:27160050

  2. The Arabidopsis cell cycle F-box protein SKP2A binds to auxin.

    PubMed

    Jurado, Silvia; Abraham, Zamira; Manzano, Concepción; López-Torrejón, Gema; Pacios, Luis F; Del Pozo, Juan C

    2010-12-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana S-Phase Kinase-Associated Protein 2A (SKP2A) is an F-box protein that regulates the proteolysis of cell cycle transcription factors. The plant hormone auxin regulates multiple aspects of plant growth and development, including cell division. We found that auxin induces the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of SKP2A both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that this hormone acts as a signal to trigger SKP2A proteolysis. In this article, we show that auxin binds directly and specifically to SKP2A. By TIR1-based superposition and docking analyzes, we identified an auxin binding site in SKP2A. Mutations in this binding site reduce the ability of SKP2A to bind to auxin and generate nondegradable SKP2A forms. In addition, these non-auxin binding proteins are unable to promote E2FC/DPB degradation in vivo or to induce cell division in the root meristem. Auxin binds to TIR1 to promote its interaction with the auxin/indole-3-acetic acid target proteins. Here, we show that auxin also enhanced the interaction between SKP2A and DPB. Finally, a mutation in SKP2A leads to auxin-resistant root growth, an effect that is additive with the tir1-1 phenotype. Thus, our data indicate that SKP2A is an auxin binding protein that connects auxin signaling with cell division.

  3. Solution structure of telomere binding domain of AtTRB2 derived from Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Ji-Hye; Lee, Won Kyung; Kim, Heeyoun; Kim, Eunhee; Cheong, Chaejoon; Cho, Myeon Haeng; Lee, Weontae

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • We have determined solution structure of Myb domain of AtTRB2. • The Myb domain of AtTRB2 is located in the N-terminal region. • The Myb domain of AtTRB2 binds to plant telomeric DNA without fourth helix. • Helix 2 and 3 of the Myb domain of AtTRB2 are involved in DNA recognition. • AtTRB2 is a novel protein distinguished from other known plant TBP. - Abstract: Telomere homeostasis is regulated by telomere-associated proteins, and the Myb domain is well conserved for telomere binding. AtTRB2 is a member of the SMH (Single-Myb-Histone)-like family in Arabidopsis thaliana, having an N-terminal Myb domain, which is responsible for DNA binding. The Myb domain of AtTRB2 contains three α-helices and loops for DNA binding, which is unusual given that other plant telomere-binding proteins have an additional fourth helix that is essential for DNA binding. To understand the structural role for telomeric DNA binding of AtTRB2, we determined the solution structure of the Myb domain of AtTRB2 (AtTRB2{sub 1–64}) using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In addition, the inter-molecular interaction between AtTRB2{sub 1–64} and telomeric DNA has been characterized by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and NMR titration analyses for both plant (TTTAGGG)n and human (TTAGGG)n telomere sequences. Data revealed that Trp28, Arg29, and Val47 residues located in Helix 2 and Helix 3 are crucial for DNA binding, which are well conserved among other plant telomere binding proteins. We concluded that although AtTRB2 is devoid of the additional fourth helix in the Myb-extension domain, it is able to bind to plant telomeric repeat sequences as well as human telomeric repeat sequences.

  4. Nucleotide Binding Site Communication in Arabidopsis thaliana Adenosine 5;-Phosphosulfate Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Ravilious, Geoffrey E.; Jez, Joseph M.

    2012-08-31

    Adenosine 5{prime}-phosphosulfate kinase (APSK) catalyzes the ATP-dependent synthesis of adenosine 3{prime}-phosphate 5{prime}-phosphosulfate (PAPS), which is an essential metabolite for sulfur assimilation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Using APSK from Arabidopsis thaliana, we examine the energetics of nucleotide binary and ternary complex formation and probe active site features that coordinate the order of ligand addition. Calorimetric analysis shows that binding can occur first at either nucleotide site, but that initial interaction at the ATP/ADP site was favored and enhanced affinity for APS in the second site by 50-fold. The thermodynamics of the two possible binding models (i.e. ATP first versus APS first) differs and implies that active site structural changes guide the order of nucleotide addition. The ligand binding analysis also supports an earlier suggestion of intermolecular interactions in the dimeric APSK structure. Crystallographic, site-directed mutagenesis, and energetic analyses of oxyanion recognition by the P-loop in the ATP/ADP binding site and the role of Asp136, which bridges the ATP/ADP and APS/PAPS binding sites, suggest how the ordered nucleotide binding sequence and structural changes are dynamically coordinated for catalysis.

  5. Calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA) 3 mediates biotic defense responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Galon, Yael; Nave, Roy; Boyce, Joy M; Nachmias, Dikla; Knight, Marc R; Fromm, Hillel

    2008-03-19

    Calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA) 3 (also called SR1) is a calmodulin-binding transcription factor in Arabidopsis. Two homozygous T-DNA insertion mutants (camta3-1, camta3-2) showed enhanced spontaneous lesions. Transcriptome analysis of both mutants revealed 6 genes with attenuated expression and 99 genes with elevated expression. Of the latter, 32 genes are related to defense against pathogens (e.g. WRKY33, PR1 and chitinase). Propagation of a virulent strain of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea were attenuated in both mutants. Moreover, both mutants accumulated high levels of H2O2. We suggest that CAMTA3 regulates the expression of a set of genes involved in biotic defense responses.

  6. High affinity RGD-binding sites at the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana links the cell wall.

    PubMed

    Canut, H; Carrasco, A; Galaud, J P; Cassan, C; Bouyssou, H; Vita, N; Ferrara, P; Pont-Lezica, R

    1998-10-01

    The heptapeptide Tyr-Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD--the essential structure recognised by animal cells in substrate adhesion molecules) was tested on epidermal cells of onion and cultured cells of Arabidopsis upon plasmolysis. Dramatic changes were observed on both types of cells following treatment: on onion cells, Hechtian strands linking the cell wall to the membrane were lost, while Arabidopsis cells changed from concave to convex plasmolysis. A control heptapeptide Tyr-Gly-Asp-Gly-Arg-Ser-Pro had no effect on the shape of plasmolysed cells. Protoplasts isolated from Arabidopsis cells agglutinate in the presence of ProNectinF, a genetically engineered protein of 72 kDa containing 13 RGD sequences: several protoplasts may adhere to a single molecule of ProNectinF. The addition of the RGD-heptapeptide disrupted the adhesion between the protoplasts. Purified plasma membrane from Arabidopsis cells exhibits specific binding sites for the iodinated RGD-heptapeptide. The binding is saturable, reversible, and two types of high affinity sites (Kd1 approximately 1 nM, and Kd2 approximately 40 nM) can be discerned. Competitive inhibition by several structurally related peptides and proteins noted the specific requirement for the RGD sequence. Thus, the RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis fulfils the adhesion features of integrins, i.e. peptide specificity, subcellular location, and involvement in plasma membrane-cell wall attachments.

  7. High affinity RGD-binding sites at the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana links the cell wall.

    PubMed

    Canut, H; Carrasco, A; Galaud, J P; Cassan, C; Bouyssou, H; Vita, N; Ferrara, P; Pont-Lezica, R

    1998-10-01

    The heptapeptide Tyr-Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD--the essential structure recognised by animal cells in substrate adhesion molecules) was tested on epidermal cells of onion and cultured cells of Arabidopsis upon plasmolysis. Dramatic changes were observed on both types of cells following treatment: on onion cells, Hechtian strands linking the cell wall to the membrane were lost, while Arabidopsis cells changed from concave to convex plasmolysis. A control heptapeptide Tyr-Gly-Asp-Gly-Arg-Ser-Pro had no effect on the shape of plasmolysed cells. Protoplasts isolated from Arabidopsis cells agglutinate in the presence of ProNectinF, a genetically engineered protein of 72 kDa containing 13 RGD sequences: several protoplasts may adhere to a single molecule of ProNectinF. The addition of the RGD-heptapeptide disrupted the adhesion between the protoplasts. Purified plasma membrane from Arabidopsis cells exhibits specific binding sites for the iodinated RGD-heptapeptide. The binding is saturable, reversible, and two types of high affinity sites (Kd1 approximately 1 nM, and Kd2 approximately 40 nM) can be discerned. Competitive inhibition by several structurally related peptides and proteins noted the specific requirement for the RGD sequence. Thus, the RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis fulfils the adhesion features of integrins, i.e. peptide specificity, subcellular location, and involvement in plasma membrane-cell wall attachments. PMID:9807828

  8. RAN1 is involved in plant cold resistance and development in rice (Oryza sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peipei; Cai, Weiming

    2014-01-01

    Of the diverse abiotic stresses, low temperature is one of the major limiting factors that lead to a series of morphological, physiological, biochemical, and molecular changes in plants. Ran, an evolutionarily conserved small G-protein family, has been shown to be essential for the nuclear translocation of proteins. It also mediates the regulation of cell cycle progression in mammalian cells. However, little is known about Ran function in rice (Oryza sativa). We report here that Ran gene OsRAN1 is essential for the molecular improvement of rice for cold tolerance. Ran also affects plant morphogenesis in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana. OsRAN1 is ubiquitously expressed in rice tissues with the highest expression in the spike. The levels of mRNA encoding OsRAN1 were greatly increased by cold and indoleacetic acid treatment rather than by addition of salt and polyethylene glycol. Further, OsRAN1 overexpression in Arabidopsis increased tiller number, and altered root development. OsRAN1 overexpression in rice improves cold tolerance. The levels of cellular free Pro and sugar levels were highly increased in transgenic plants under cold stress. Under cold stress, OsRAN1 maintained cell division and cell cycle progression, and also promoted the formation of an intact nuclear envelope. The results suggest that OsRAN1 protein plays an important role in the regulation of cellular mitosis and the auxin signalling pathway. PMID:24790113

  9. Mutations in Ran system affected telomere silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Naoyuki Kobayashi, Masahiko; Shimizu, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Ken-ichi; Murakami, Seishi; Nishimoto, Takeharu

    2007-11-23

    The Ran GTPase system regulates the direction and timing of several cellular events, such as nuclear-cytosolic transport, centrosome formation, and nuclear envelope assembly in telophase. To gain insight into the Ran system's involvement in chromatin formation, we investigated gene silencing at the telomere in several mutants of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which had defects in genes involved in the Ran system. A mutation of the RanGAP gene, rna1-1, caused reduced silencing at the telomere, and partial disruption of the nuclear Ran binding factor, yrb2-{delta}2, increased this silencing. The reduced telomere silencing in rna1-1 cells was suppressed by a high dosage of the SIR3 gene or the SIT4 gene. Furthermore, hyperphosphorylated Sir3 protein accumulated in the rna1-1 mutant. These results suggest that RanGAP is required for the heterochromatin structure at the telomere in budding yeast.

  10. Arabidopsis RNA-binding Protein FCA Regulates MicroRNA172 Processing in Thermosensory Flowering*

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae-Hoon; Seo, Pil Joon; Ahn, Ji Hoon; Park, Chung-Mo

    2012-01-01

    Ambient temperature fluctuates diurnally and seasonally. It profoundly influences the timing of flowering in plants. The floral integrator FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) mediates ambient temperature signals via the thermosensory pathway in Arabidopsis flowering. microRNA172 (miR172), which promotes flowering by inducing FT, also responds to changes in ambient temperature. However, it is largely unknown how miR172 integrates ambient temperature signals into the flowering genetic network. Here, we show that Arabidopsis RNA-binding protein FCA promotes the processing of primary microRNA172 transcripts (pri-miR172) in response to changes in ambient temperature. Ambient temperature regulates miR172 biogenesis primarily at the pri-miR172 processing step. miR172 abundance is elevated at 23 °C but not at 16 °C. miR172 accumulation at 23 °C requires functional FCA. FCA binds to the flanking sequences of the stem-loop within the pri-miR172 transcripts via the RNA recognition motif. FCA also binds to the primary transcripts of other temperature-responsive miRNAs, such as miR398 and miR399. Notably, levels of FCA mRNAs and proteins increase at 23 °C but remain low at 16 °C, supporting the role of FCA in temperature perception. Our data show that FCA regulation of miR172 processing is an early event in the thermosensory flowering pathway. We propose that the FCA-miR172 regulon provides an adaptive strategy that fine tunes the onset of flowering under fluctuating ambient temperature conditions. PMID:22431732

  11. Auxin binding protein 1 (ABP1) is not required for either auxin signaling or Arabidopsis development.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yangbin; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Da; Dai, Xinhua; Estelle, Mark; Zhao, Yunde

    2015-02-17

    Auxin binding protein 1 (ABP1) has been studied for decades. It has been suggested that ABP1 functions as an auxin receptor and has an essential role in many developmental processes. Here we present our unexpected findings that ABP1 is neither required for auxin signaling nor necessary for plant development under normal growth conditions. We used our ribozyme-based CRISPR technology to generate an Arabidopsis abp1 mutant that contains a 5-bp deletion in the first exon of ABP1, which resulted in a frameshift and introduction of early stop codons. We also identified a T-DNA insertion abp1 allele that harbors a T-DNA insertion located 27 bp downstream of the ATG start codon in the first exon. We show that the two new abp1 mutants are null alleles. Surprisingly, our new abp1 mutant plants do not display any obvious developmental defects. In fact, the mutant plants are indistinguishable from wild-type plants at every developmental stage analyzed. Furthermore, the abp1 plants are not resistant to exogenous auxin. At the molecular level, we find that the induction of known auxin-regulated genes is similar in both wild-type and abp1 plants in response to auxin treatments. We conclude that ABP1 is not a key component in auxin signaling or Arabidopsis development. PMID:25646447

  12. Auxin binding protein 1 (ABP1) is not required for either auxin signaling or Arabidopsis development.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yangbin; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Da; Dai, Xinhua; Estelle, Mark; Zhao, Yunde

    2015-02-17

    Auxin binding protein 1 (ABP1) has been studied for decades. It has been suggested that ABP1 functions as an auxin receptor and has an essential role in many developmental processes. Here we present our unexpected findings that ABP1 is neither required for auxin signaling nor necessary for plant development under normal growth conditions. We used our ribozyme-based CRISPR technology to generate an Arabidopsis abp1 mutant that contains a 5-bp deletion in the first exon of ABP1, which resulted in a frameshift and introduction of early stop codons. We also identified a T-DNA insertion abp1 allele that harbors a T-DNA insertion located 27 bp downstream of the ATG start codon in the first exon. We show that the two new abp1 mutants are null alleles. Surprisingly, our new abp1 mutant plants do not display any obvious developmental defects. In fact, the mutant plants are indistinguishable from wild-type plants at every developmental stage analyzed. Furthermore, the abp1 plants are not resistant to exogenous auxin. At the molecular level, we find that the induction of known auxin-regulated genes is similar in both wild-type and abp1 plants in response to auxin treatments. We conclude that ABP1 is not a key component in auxin signaling or Arabidopsis development.

  13. Cellular localization of the Ca2+ binding TCH3 protein of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antosiewicz, D. M.; Polisensky, D. H.; Braam, J.

    1995-01-01

    TCH3 is an Arabidopsis touch (TCH) gene isolated as a result of its strong and rapid upregulation in response to mechanical stimuli, such as touch and wind. TCH3 encodes an unusual calcium ion-binding protein that is closely related to calmodulin but has the potential to bind six calcium ions. Here it is shown that TCH3 shows a restricted pattern of accumulation during Arabidopsis vegetative development. These data provide insight into the endogenous signals that may regulate TCH3 expression and the sites of TCH3 action. TCH3 is abundant in the shoot apical meristem, vascular tissue, the root columella and pericycle cells that give rise to lateral roots. In addition, TCH3 accumulation in cells of developing shoots and roots closely correlates with the process of cellular expansion. Following wind stimulation, TCH3 becomes more abundant in specific regions including the branchpoints of leaf primordia and stipules, pith parenchyma, and the vascular tissue. The consequences of TCH3 upregulation by wind are therefore spatially restricted and TCH3 may function at these sites to modify cell or tissue characteristics following mechanical stimulation. Because TCH3 accumulates specifically in cells and tissues that are thought to be under the influence of auxin, auxin levels may regulate TCH3 expression during development. TCH3 is upregulated in response to low levels of exogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), but not by inactive auxin-related compounds. These results suggest that TCH3 protein may play roles in mediating physiological responses to auxin and mechanical environmental stimuli.

  14. Telomere repeat binding proteins are functional components of Arabidopsis telomeres and interact with telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Procházková Schrumpfová, Petra; Vychodilová, Ivona; Dvořáčková, Martina; Majerská, Jana; Dokládal, Ladislav; Schořová, Šárka; Fajkus, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Although telomere-binding proteins constitute an essential part of telomeres, in vivo data indicating the existence of a structure similar to mammalian shelterin complex in plants are limited. Partial characterization of a number of candidate proteins has not identified true components of plant shelterin or elucidated their functional mechanisms. Telomere repeat binding (TRB) proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana bind plant telomeric repeats through a Myb domain of the telobox type in vitro, and have been shown to interact with POT1b (Protection of telomeres 1). Here we demonstrate co-localization of TRB1 protein with telomeres in situ using fluorescence microscopy, as well as in vivo interaction using chromatin immunoprecipitation. Classification of the TRB1 protein as a component of plant telomeres is further confirmed by the observation of shortening of telomeres in knockout mutants of the trb1 gene. Moreover, TRB proteins physically interact with plant telomerase catalytic subunits. These findings integrate TRB proteins into the telomeric interactome of A. thaliana. PMID:24397874

  15. Specific armadillo repeat sequences facilitate β-catenin nuclear transport in live cells via direct binding to nucleoporins Nup62, Nup153, and RanBP2/Nup358.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manisha; Jamieson, Cara; Johnson, Michael; Molloy, Mark P; Henderson, Beric R

    2012-01-01

    β-Catenin transduces the Wnt signal from the membrane to nucleus, and certain gene mutations trigger its nuclear accumulation leading to cell transformation and cancer. β-Catenin shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm independent of classical Ran/transport receptor pathways, and this movement was previously hypothesized to involve the central Armadillo (Arm) domain. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) assays were used to delineate functional transport regions of the Arm domain in living cells. The strongest nuclear import/export activity was mapped to Arm repeats R10-12 using both in vivo FRAP and in vitro export assays. By comparison, Arm repeats R3-8 of β-catenin were highly active for nuclear import but displayed a comparatively weak export activity. We show for the first time using purified components that specific Arm sequences of β-catenin interact directly in vitro with the FG repeats of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) components Nup62, Nup98, and Nup153, indicating an independent ability of β-catenin to traverse the NPC. Moreover, a proteomics screen identified RanBP2/Nup358 as a binding partner of Arm R10-12, and β-catenin was confirmed to interact with endogenous and ectopic forms of Nup358. We further demonstrate that knock-down of endogenous Nup358 and Nup62 impeded the rate of nuclear import/export of β-catenin to a greater extent than that of importin-β. The Arm R10-12 sequence facilitated transport even when β-catenin was bound to the Arm-binding partner LEF-1, and its activity was stimulated by phosphorylation at Tyr-654. These findings provide functional evidence that the Arm domain contributes to regulated β-catenin transport through direct interaction with the NPC.

  16. Tentative Identification of the Second Substrate Binding Site in Arabidopsis Phytochelatin Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Ju-Chen; Yang, Chien-Chih; Sui, Yu-Ting; Lin, Shin-Yu; Juang, Rong-Huay

    2013-01-01

    Phytochelatin synthase (PCS) uses the substrates glutathione (GSH, γGlu-Cys-Gly) and a cadmium (Cd)-bound GSH (Cd∙GS2) to produce the shortest phytochelatin product (PC2, (γGlu-Cys)2-Gly) through a ping-pong mechanism. The binding of the 2 substrates to the active site, particularly the second substrate binding site, is not well-understood. In this study, we generated a structural model of the catalytic domain of Arabidopsis AtPCS1 (residues 12–218) by using the crystal structure of the γGlu-Cys acyl-enzyme complex of the PCS of the cyanobacterium Nostoc (NsPCS) as a template. The modeled AtPCS1 revealed a cavity in proximity to the first substrate binding site, consisting of 3 loops containing several conserved amino acids including Arg152, Lys185, and Tyr55. Substitutions of these amino acids (R152K, K185R, or double mutation) resulted in the abrogation of enzyme activity, indicating that the arrangement of these 2 positive charges is crucial for the binding of the second substrate. Recombinant AtPCS1s with mutations at Tyr55 showed lower catalytic activities because of reduced affinity (3-fold for Y55W) for the Cd∙GS2, further suggesting the role of the cation-π interaction in recognition of the second substrate. Our study results indicate the mechanism for second substrate recognition in PCS. The integrated catalytic mechanism of PCS is further discussed. PMID:24340051

  17. Crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana calmodulin7 and insight into its mode of DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Mazumder, Mohit; Gupta, Nisha; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2016-09-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a Ca(2+) sensor that participates in several cellular signaling cascades by interacting with various targets, including DNA. It has been shown that Arabidopsis thaliana CaM7 (AtCaM7) interacts with Z-box DNA and functions as a transcription factor [Kushwaha R et al. (2008) Plant Cell 20, 1747-1759; Abbas N et al. (2014) Plant Cell 26, 1036-1052]. The crystal structure of AtCaM7, and a model of the AtCAM7-Z-box complex suggest that Arg-127 determines the DNA-binding ability by forming crucial interactions with the guanine base. We validated the model using biolayer interferometry, which confirmed that AtCaM7 interacts with Z-box DNA with high affinity. In contrast, the AtCaM2/3/5 isoform does not show any binding, although it differs from AtCaM7 by only a single residue. PMID:27500568

  18. Comparative conventional- and quantum dot-labeling strategies for LPS binding site detection in Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll protoplasts

    PubMed Central

    Mgcina, Londiwe S.; Dubery, Ian A.; Piater, Lizelle A.

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria is recognized as a microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) and not only induces an innate immune response in plants, but also stimulates the development of characteristic defense responses. However, identification and characterization of a cell surface LPS-receptor/binding site, as described in mammals, remains elusive in plants. As an amphiphilic, macromolecular lipoglycan, intact LPS potentially contains three MAMP-active regions, represented by the O-polysaccharide chain, the core and the lipid A. Binding site studies with intact labeled LPS were conducted in Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts and quantified using flow cytometry fluorescence changes. Quantum dots (Qdots), which allow non-covalent, hydrophobic labeling were used as a novel strategy in this study and compared to covalent, hydrophilic labeling with Alexa 488. Affinity for LPS-binding sites was clearly demonstrated by concentration-, temperature-, and time-dependent increases in protoplast fluorescence following treatment with the labeled LPS. Moreover, this induced fluorescence increase was convincingly reduced following pre-treatment with excess unlabeled LPS, thereby indicating reversibility of LPS binding. Inhibition of the binding process is also reported using endo- and exocytosis inhibitors. Here, we present evidence for the anticipated presence of LPS-specific binding sites in Arabidopsis protoplasts, and furthermore propose Qdots as a more sensitive LPS-labeling strategy in comparison to the conventional Alexa 488 hydrazide label for binding studies. PMID:26029233

  19. Molecular cloning, structural and expression profiling of DlRan genes during somatic embryogenesis in Dimocarpus longan Lour.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhizhen; Lai, Chengchun; Zhang, Yaling; Lai, Zhongxiong

    2016-01-01

    To clone and examine expression profiles of DlRan genes during somatic embryogenesis in Dimocarpus longan Lour. Thirty cDNA sequences and two genomic sequences encoding DlRan proteins were isolated from longan embryogenic cultures. Structural analysis of DlRan genes revealed that the longan Ran gene family is more expanded than that of Arabidopsis. Expression analysis of DlRan genes during somatic embryogenesis uncovered a high abundance of DlRan genes in early embryogenic cultures and heart- and torpedo-shaped embryos. The expression of DlRan genes in embryogenic calli was affected by exogenous 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid treatment. DlRan is involved in 2,4-D induced somatic embryogenesis and development of somatic embryos in longan. PMID:27026877

  20. Arabidopsis LBP/BPI related-1 and -2 bind to LPS directly and regulate PR1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Iizasa, Sayaka; Iizasa, Ei’ichi; Matsuzaki, Sawako; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kodama, Yutaka; Watanabe, Keiichi; Nagano, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and acts as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern that triggers immune responses in both plants and animals. LPS-binding protein (LBP) and bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI), which bind to LPS and play important roles in immunity of mammals, have been well studied. However, the molecule contributing to LPS binding in plants is mostly unknown. The Arabidopsis genome carries two genes encoding LBP/BPI-related proteins which we designated as AtLBP/BPI related-1 (AtLBR-1) and AtLBP/BPI related-2 (AtLBR-2). We found that their N-terminal domains were co-purified with cell wall-derived LPS when expressed in E. coli. Since this finding implied the direct binding of AtLBRs to LPS, we also confirmed binding by using LPS-free AtLBRs and purified LPS. AtLBRs directly bind to both rough and smooth types of LPS. We also demonstrated that LPS-treated atlbr mutant Arabidopsis exhibit a significant delay of induction of defence-related gene pathogenesis-related 1 (PR1) but no other PR genes. Furthermore, LPS-treated atlbr mutants showed defects in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. These results demonstrate that, as well as LBP and BPI of mammals, AtLBRs also play an important role in the LPS-induced immune response of plants. PMID:27273538

  1. Encephalomyocarditis virus Leader protein hinge domain is responsible for interactions with Ran GTPase

    SciTech Connect

    Bacot-Davis, Valjean R.; Palmenberg, Ann C.

    2013-08-15

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), a Cardiovirus, initiates its polyprotein with a short 67 amino acid Leader (L) sequence. The protein acts as a unique pathogenicity factor, with anti-host activities which include the triggering of nuclear pore complex hyperphosphorylation and direct binding inhibition of the active cellular transport protein, Ran GTPase. Chemical modifications and protein mutagenesis now map the Ran binding domain to the L hinge-linker region, and in particular, to amino acids 35–40. Large deletions affecting this region were shown previously to diminish Ran binding. New point mutations, especially K35Q, D37A and W40A, preserve the intact L structure, abolish Ran binding and are deficient for nucleoporin (Nup) hyperphosphorylation. Ran itself morphs through multiple configurations, but reacts most effectively with L when in the GDP format, preferably with an empty nucleotide binding pocket. Therefore, L:Ran binding, mediated by the linker-hinge, is a required step in L-induced nuclear transport inhibition. - Highlights: • The hinge domain provides critical residues in Cardiovirus L:Ran complex formation. • Leader prefers to bind Ran in a nucleotide free, GDP-conformation. • L-induced Nup62 phosphorylation is reduced with Ran-deficient binding mutations.

  2. Fibrillin 5 Is Essential for Plastoquinone-9 Biosynthesis by Binding to Solanesyl Diphosphate Synthases in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Ha; Lee, Yongjik

    2015-01-01

    Fibrillins are lipid-associated proteins in plastids and are ubiquitous in plants. They accumulate in chromoplasts and sequester carotenoids during the development of flowers and fruits. However, little is known about the functions of fibrillins in leaf tissues. Here, we identified fibrillin 5 (FBN5), which is essential for plastoquinone-9 (PQ-9) biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. Homozygous fbn5-1 mutations were seedling-lethal, and XVE:FBN5-B transgenic plants expressing low levels of FBN5-B had a slower growth rate and were smaller than wild-type plants. In chloroplasts, FBN5-B specifically interacted with solanesyl diphosphate synthases (SPSs) 1 and 2, which biosynthesize the solanesyl moiety of PQ-9. Plants containing defective FBN5-B accumulated less PQ-9 and its cyclized product, plastochromanol-8, but the levels of tocopherols were not affected. The reduced PQ-9 content of XVE:FBN5-B transgenic plants was consistent with their lower photosynthetic performance and higher levels of hydrogen peroxide under cold stress. These results indicate that FBN5-B is required for PQ-9 biosynthesis through its interaction with SPS. Our study adds FBN5 as a structural component involved in the biosynthesis of PQ-9. FBN5 binding to the hydrophobic solanesyl moiety, which is generated by SPS1 and SPS2, in FBN5-B/SPS homodimeric complexes stimulates the enzyme activity of SPS1 and SPS2. PMID:26432861

  3. Retinoblastoma and Its Binding Partner MSI1 Control Imprinting in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Jullien, Pauline E; Mosquna, Assaf; Ingouff, Mathieu; Sakata, Tadashi; Ohad, Nir; Berger, Frédéric

    2008-01-01

    Parental genomic imprinting causes preferential expression of one of the two parental alleles. In mammals, differential sex-dependent deposition of silencing DNA methylation marks during gametogenesis initiates a new cycle of imprinting. Parental genomic imprinting has been detected in plants and relies on DNA methylation by the methyltransferase MET1. However, in contrast to mammals, plant imprints are created by differential removal of silencing marks during gametogenesis. In Arabidopsis, DNA demethylation is mediated by the DNA glycosylase DEMETER (DME) causing activation of imprinted genes at the end of female gametogenesis. On the basis of genetic interactions, we show that in addition to DME, the plant homologs of the human Retinoblastoma (Rb) and its binding partner RbAp48 are required for the activation of the imprinted genes FIS2 and FWA. This Rb-dependent activation is mediated by direct transcriptional repression of MET1 during female gametogenesis. We have thus identified a new mechanism required for imprinting establishment, outlining a new role for the Retinoblastoma pathway, which may be conserved in mammals. PMID:18700816

  4. Ethylene regulates monomeric GTP-binding protein gene expression and activity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Moshkov, Igor E; Mur, Luis A J; Novikova, Galina V; Smith, Aileen R; Hall, Michael A

    2003-04-01

    Ethylene rapidly and transiently up-regulates the activity of several monomeric GTP-binding proteins (monomeric G proteins) in leaves of Arabidopsis as determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and autoradiographic analyses. The activation is suppressed by the receptor-directed inhibitor 1-methylcyclopropene. In the etr1-1 mutant, constitutive activity of all the monomeric G proteins activated by ethylene is down-regulated relative to wild type, and ethylene treatment has no effect on the levels of activity. Conversely, in the ctr1-1 mutant, several of the monomeric G proteins activated by ethylene are constitutively up-regulated. However, the activation profile of ctr1-1 does not exactly mimic that of ethylene-treated wild type. Biochemical and molecular evidence suggested that some of these monomeric G proteins are of the Rab class. Expression of the genes for a number of monomeric G proteins in response to ethylene was investigated by reverse transcriptase-PCR. Rab8 and Ara3 expression was increased within 10 min of ethylene treatment, although levels fell back significantly by 40 min. In the etr1-1 mutant, expression of Rab8 was lower than wild type and unaffected by ethylene; in ctr1-1, expression of Rab8 was much higher than wild type and comparable with that seen in ethylene treatments. Expression in ctr1-1 was also unaffected by ethylene. Thus, the data indicate a role for monomeric G proteins in ethylene signal transduction.

  5. Mutational definition of binding requirements of an hnRNP-like protein in Arabidopsis using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Leder, Verena; Lummer, Martina; Tegeler, Kathrin; Humpert, Fabian; Lewinski, Martin; Schüttpelz, Mark; Staiger, Dorothee

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • We use FCS to investigate binding site requirements for the hnRNP-like protein AtGRP7. • We identify three nucleotides critical for AtGRP7 binding to its own intron. • Mutation of the conserved R{sup 49} abolishes binding altogether. • The paralogue AtGRP8 binds to an overlapping motif with different sequence requirement. • The glycine-rich stretch of a plant hnRNP-like protein contributes to binding. - Abstract: Arabidopsis thaliana glycine-rich RNA binding protein 7 (AtGRP7) is part of a negative feedback loop through which it regulates alternative splicing and steady-state abundance of its pre-mRNA. Here we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to investigate the requirements for AtGRP7 binding to its intron using fluorescently-labelled synthetic oligonucleotides. By systematically introducing point mutations we identify three nucleotides that lead to an increased K{sub d} value when mutated and thus are critical for AtGRP7 binding. Simultaneous mutation of all three residues abrogates binding. The paralogue AtGRP8 binds to an overlapping motif but with a different sequence preference, in line with overlapping but not identical functions of this protein pair. Truncation of the glycine-rich domain reduces the binding affinity of AtGRP7, showing for the first time that the glycine-rich stretch of a plant hnRNP-like protein contributes to binding. Mutation of the conserved R{sup 49} that is crucial for AtGRP7 function in pathogen defence and splicing abolishes binding.

  6. Using Centromere Mediated Genome Elimination to Elucidate the Functional Redundancy of Candidate Telomere Binding Proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Fulcher, Nick; Riha, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Proteins that bind to telomeric DNA form the key structural and functional constituents of telomeres. While telomere binding proteins have been described in the majority of organisms, their identity in plants remains unknown. Several protein families containing a telomere binding motif known as the telobox have been previously described in Arabidopsis thaliana. Nonetheless, functional evidence for their involvement at telomeres has not been obtained, likely due to functional redundancy. Here we performed genetic analysis on the TRF-like family consisting of six proteins (TRB1, TRP1, TRFL1, TRFL2, TRFL4, and TRF9) which have previously shown to bind telomeric DNA in vitro. We used haploid genetics to create multiple knock-out plants deficient for all six proteins of this gene family. These plants did not exhibit changes in telomere length, or phenotypes associated with telomere dysfunction. This data demonstrates that this telobox protein family is not involved in telomere maintenance in Arabidopsis. Phylogenetic analysis in major plant lineages revealed early diversification of telobox proteins families indicating that telomere function may be associated with other telobox proteins. PMID:26779251

  7. Cloning and Characterization of Two NAD Kinases from Arabidopsis. Identification of a Calmodulin Binding Isoform1[w

    PubMed Central

    Turner, William L.; Waller, Jeffrey C.; Vanderbeld, Barb; Snedden, Wayne A.

    2004-01-01

    NAD kinase (NADK; ATP:NAD 2′-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.23), an enzyme found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, generates the important pyridine nucleotide NADP from substrates ATP and NAD. The role of NADKs in plants is poorly understood, and cDNAs encoding plant NADKs have not previously been described to our knowledge. We have cloned two cDNAs from Arabidopsis predicted to encode NADK isoforms, designated NADK1 and NADK2, respectively. Expressed as recombinant proteins in bacteria, both NADK1 and NADK2 were catalytically active, thereby confirming their identity as NADKs. Transcripts for both isoforms were detected in all tissues examined and throughout development. Although the predicted catalytic regions for NADK1 and NADK2 show sequence similarity to NADKs from other organisms, NADK2 possesses a large N-terminal extension that appears to be unique to plants. Using recombinant glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins and calmodulin (CaM)-affinity chromatography, we delineated a Ca2+-dependent CaM-binding domain to a 45-residue region within the N-terminal extension of NADK2. Although recombinant NADK2 was not responsive to CaM in vitro, immunoblot analysis suggests that native NADK2 is a CaM-binding protein. In Arabidopsis crude extracts, CaM-dependent NADK activity was much greater than CaM-independent activity throughout development, particularly in young seedlings. A native CaM-dependent NADK was partially purified from Arabidopsis seedlings (KmNAD = 0.20 mM, KmMg2+−ATP = 0.17 mM). The enzyme was fully activated by conserved CaM (S0.5 = 2.2 nm) in the presence of calcium but displayed differential responsiveness to eight CaM-like Arabidopsis proteins. Possible roles for NADKs in plants are discussed in light of our observations. PMID:15247403

  8. Mutational Analysis of the Arabidopsis Nucleotide Binding Site–Leucine-Rich Repeat Resistance Gene RPS2

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yi; Yuan, Fenghua; Leister, R. Todd; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Katagiri, Fumiaki

    2000-01-01

    Disease resistance proteins containing a nucleotide binding site (NBS) and a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) region compose the largest class of disease resistance proteins. These so-called NBS-LRR proteins confer resistance against a wide variety of phytopathogens. To help elucidate the mechanism by which NBS-LRR proteins recognize and transmit pathogen-derived signals, we analyzed mutant versions of the Arabidopsis NBS-LRR protein RPS2. The RPS2 gene confers resistance against Pseudomonas syringae strains carrying the avirulence gene avrRpt2. The activity of RPS2 derivatives in response to AvrRpt2 was measured by using a functional transient expression assay or by expressing the mutant proteins in transgenic plants. Directed mutagenesis revealed that the NBS and an N-terminal leucine zipper (LZ) motif were critical for RPS2 function. Mutations near the N terminus, including an LZ mutation, resulted in proteins that exhibited a dominant negative effect on wild-type RPS2. Scanning the RPS2 molecule with a small in-frame internal deletion demonstrated that RPS2 does not have a large dispensable region. Overexpression of RPS2 in the transient assay in the absence of avrRpt2 also led to an apparent resistant response, presumably a consequence of a low basal activity of RPS2. The NBS and LZ were essential for this overdose effect, whereas the entire LRR was dispensable. RPS2 interaction with a 75-kD protein (p75) required an N-terminal portion of RPS2 that is smaller than the region required for the overdose effect. These findings illuminate the pathogen recognition mechanisms common among NBS-LRR proteins. PMID:11148296

  9. Ran-dependent docking of importin-beta to RanBP2/Nup358 filaments is essential for protein import and cell viability.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Masakazu; Haeger, Anna; Jeganathan, Karthik B; van Ree, Janine H; Malureanu, Liviu; Wälde, Sarah; Joseph, Jomon; Kehlenbach, Ralph H; van Deursen, Jan M

    2011-08-22

    RanBP2/Nup358, the major component of the cytoplasmic filaments of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), is essential for mouse embryogenesis and is implicated in both macromolecular transport and mitosis, but its specific molecular functions are unknown. Using RanBP2 conditional knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts and a series of mutant constructs, we show that transport, rather than mitotic, functions of RanBP2 are required for cell viability. Cre-mediated RanBP2 inactivation caused cell death with defects in M9- and classical nuclear localization signal (cNLS)-mediated protein import, nuclear export signal-mediated protein export, and messenger ribonucleic acid export but no apparent mitotic failure. A short N-terminal RanBP2 fragment harboring the NPC-binding domain, three phenylalanine-glycine motifs, and one Ran-binding domain (RBD) corrected all transport defects and restored viability. Mutation of the RBD within this fragment caused lethality and perturbed binding to Ran guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-importin-β, accumulation of importin-β at nuclear pores, and cNLS-mediated protein import. These data suggest that a critical function of RanBP2 is to capture recycling RanGTP-importin-β complexes at cytoplasmic fibrils to allow for adequate cNLS-mediated cargo import. PMID:21859863

  10. The Arabidopsis Cell Cycle F-Box Protein SKP2A Binds to Auxin[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Jurado, Silvia; Abraham, Zamira; Manzano, Concepción; López-Torrejón, Gema; Pacios, Luis F.; Del Pozo, Juan C.

    2010-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana S-Phase Kinase-Associated Protein 2A (SKP2A) is an F-box protein that regulates the proteolysis of cell cycle transcription factors. The plant hormone auxin regulates multiple aspects of plant growth and development, including cell division. We found that auxin induces the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of SKP2A both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that this hormone acts as a signal to trigger SKP2A proteolysis. In this article, we show that auxin binds directly and specifically to SKP2A. By TIR1-based superposition and docking analyzes, we identified an auxin binding site in SKP2A. Mutations in this binding site reduce the ability of SKP2A to bind to auxin and generate nondegradable SKP2A forms. In addition, these non-auxin binding proteins are unable to promote E2FC/DPB degradation in vivo or to induce cell division in the root meristem. Auxin binds to TIR1 to promote its interaction with the auxin/indole-3-acetic acid target proteins. Here, we show that auxin also enhanced the interaction between SKP2A and DPB. Finally, a mutation in SKP2A leads to auxin-resistant root growth, an effect that is additive with the tir1-1 phenotype. Thus, our data indicate that SKP2A is an auxin binding protein that connects auxin signaling with cell division. PMID:21139066

  11. Chloroplast RNA-Binding Protein RBD1 Promotes Chilling Tolerance through 23S rRNA Processing in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Leiyun; Yang, Fen; Wang, Yi; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Hua, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Plants have varying abilities to tolerate chilling (low but not freezing temperatures), and it is largely unknown how plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana achieve chilling tolerance. Here, we describe a genome-wide screen for genes important for chilling tolerance by their putative knockout mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Out of 11,000 T-DNA insertion mutant lines representing half of the genome, 54 lines associated with disruption of 49 genes had a drastic chilling sensitive phenotype. Sixteen of these genes encode proteins with chloroplast localization, suggesting a critical role of chloroplast function in chilling tolerance. Study of one of these proteins RBD1 with an RNA binding domain further reveals the importance of chloroplast translation in chilling tolerance. RBD1 is expressed in the green tissues and is localized in the chloroplast nucleoid. It binds directly to 23S rRNA and the binding is stronger under chilling than at normal growth temperatures. The rbd1 mutants are defective in generating mature 23S rRNAs and deficient in chloroplast protein synthesis especially under chilling conditions. Together, our study identifies RBD1 as a regulator of 23S rRNA processing and reveals the importance of chloroplast function especially protein translation in chilling tolerance. PMID:27138552

  12. Chloroplast RNA-Binding Protein RBD1 Promotes Chilling Tolerance through 23S rRNA Processing in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Bai, Ge; Wang, Shu; Yang, Leiyun; Yang, Fen; Wang, Yi; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Hua, Jian

    2016-05-01

    Plants have varying abilities to tolerate chilling (low but not freezing temperatures), and it is largely unknown how plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana achieve chilling tolerance. Here, we describe a genome-wide screen for genes important for chilling tolerance by their putative knockout mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Out of 11,000 T-DNA insertion mutant lines representing half of the genome, 54 lines associated with disruption of 49 genes had a drastic chilling sensitive phenotype. Sixteen of these genes encode proteins with chloroplast localization, suggesting a critical role of chloroplast function in chilling tolerance. Study of one of these proteins RBD1 with an RNA binding domain further reveals the importance of chloroplast translation in chilling tolerance. RBD1 is expressed in the green tissues and is localized in the chloroplast nucleoid. It binds directly to 23S rRNA and the binding is stronger under chilling than at normal growth temperatures. The rbd1 mutants are defective in generating mature 23S rRNAs and deficient in chloroplast protein synthesis especially under chilling conditions. Together, our study identifies RBD1 as a regulator of 23S rRNA processing and reveals the importance of chloroplast function especially protein translation in chilling tolerance. PMID:27138552

  13. Cellulose binding protein from the parasitic nematode Heterodera schachtii interacts with Arabidopsis pectin methylesterase: cooperative cell wall modification during parasitism.

    PubMed

    Hewezi, Tarek; Howe, Peter; Maier, Tom R; Hussey, Richard S; Mitchum, Melissa Goellner; Davis, Eric L; Baum, Thomas J

    2008-11-01

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes secrete a complex of cell wall-digesting enzymes, which aid in root penetration and migration. The soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines also produces a cellulose binding protein (Hg CBP) secretory protein. To determine the function of CBP, an orthologous cDNA clone (Hs CBP) was isolated from the sugar beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii, which is able to infect Arabidopsis thaliana. CBP is expressed only in the early phases of feeding cell formation and not during the migratory phase. Transgenic Arabidopsis expressing Hs CBP developed longer roots and exhibited enhanced susceptibility to H. schachtii. A yeast two-hybrid screen identified Arabidopsis pectin methylesterase protein 3 (PME3) as strongly and specifically interacting with Hs CBP. Transgenic plants overexpressing PME3 also produced longer roots and exhibited increased susceptibility to H. schachtii, while a pme3 knockout mutant showed opposite phenotypes. Moreover, CBP overexpression increases PME3 activity in planta. Localization studies support the mode of action of PME3 as a cell wall-modifying enzyme. Expression of CBP in the pme3 knockout mutant revealed that PME3 is required but not the sole mechanism for CBP overexpression phenotype. These data indicate that CBP directly interacts with PME3 thereby activating and potentially targeting this enzyme to aid cyst nematode parasitism.

  14. Identification of the Raptor-binding motif on Arabidopsis S6 kinase and its use as a TOR signaling suppressor.

    PubMed

    Son, Ora; Kim, Sunghan; Hur, Yoon-Sun; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2016-03-25

    TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase signaling plays central role as a regulator of growth and proliferation in all eukaryotic cells and its key signaling components and effectors are also conserved in plants. Unlike the mammalian and yeast counterparts, however, we found through yeast two-hybrid analysis that multiple regions of the Arabidopsis Raptor (regulatory associated protein of TOR) are required for binding to its substrate. We also identified that a 44-amino acid region at the N-terminal end of Arabidopsis ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) specifically interacted with AtRaptor1, indicating that this region may contain a functional equivalent of the TOS (TOR-Signaling) motif present in the mammalian TOR substrates. Transient over-expression of this 44-amino acid fragment in Arabidopsis protoplasts resulted in significant decrease in rDNA transcription, demonstrating a feasibility of developing a new plant-specific TOR signaling inhibitor based upon perturbation of the Raptor-substrate interaction.

  15. Biochemical and biophysical characterization of the selenium-binding and reducing site in Arabidopsis thaliana homologue to mammals selenium-binding protein 1.

    PubMed

    Schild, Florie; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Palencia, Andrés; Cobessi, David; Sarret, Géraldine; Zubieta, Chloé; Jourdain, Agnès; Dumas, Renaud; Forge, Vincent; Testemale, Denis; Bourguignon, Jacques; Hugouvieux, Véronique

    2014-11-14

    The function of selenium-binding protein 1 (SBP1), present in almost all organisms, has not yet been established. In mammals, SBP1 is known to bind the essential element selenium but the binding site has not been identified. In addition, the SBP family has numerous potential metal-binding sites that may play a role in detoxification pathways in plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, AtSBP1 over-expression increases tolerance to two toxic compounds for plants, selenium and cadmium, often found as soil pollutants. For a better understanding of AtSBP1 function in detoxification mechanisms, we investigated the chelating properties of the protein toward different ligands with a focus on selenium using biochemical and biophysical techniques. Thermal shift assays together with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry revealed that AtSBP1 binds selenium after incubation with selenite (SeO3(2-)) with a ligand to protein molar ratio of 1:1. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirmed the 1:1 stoichiometry and revealed an unexpectedly large value of binding enthalpy suggesting a covalent bond between selenium and AtSBP1. Titration of reduced Cys residues and comparative mass spectrometry on AtSBP1 and the purified selenium-AtSBP1 complex identified Cys(21) and Cys(22) as being responsible for the binding of one selenium. These results were validated by site-directed mutagenesis. Selenium K-edge x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy performed on the selenium-AtSBP1 complex demonstrated that AtSBP1 reduced SeO3(2-) to form a R-S-Se(II)-S-R-type complex. The capacity of AtSBP1 to bind different metals and selenium is discussed with respect to the potential function of AtSBP1 in detoxification mechanisms and selenium metabolism. PMID:25274629

  16. Biochemical and Biophysical Characterization of the Selenium-binding and Reducing Site in Arabidopsis thaliana Homologue to Mammals Selenium-binding Protein 1*

    PubMed Central

    Schild, Florie; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Palencia, Andrés; Cobessi, David; Sarret, Géraldine; Zubieta, Chloé; Jourdain, Agnès; Dumas, Renaud; Forge, Vincent; Testemale, Denis; Bourguignon, Jacques; Hugouvieux, Véronique

    2014-01-01

    The function of selenium-binding protein 1 (SBP1), present in almost all organisms, has not yet been established. In mammals, SBP1 is known to bind the essential element selenium but the binding site has not been identified. In addition, the SBP family has numerous potential metal-binding sites that may play a role in detoxification pathways in plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, AtSBP1 over-expression increases tolerance to two toxic compounds for plants, selenium and cadmium, often found as soil pollutants. For a better understanding of AtSBP1 function in detoxification mechanisms, we investigated the chelating properties of the protein toward different ligands with a focus on selenium using biochemical and biophysical techniques. Thermal shift assays together with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry revealed that AtSBP1 binds selenium after incubation with selenite (SeO32−) with a ligand to protein molar ratio of 1:1. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirmed the 1:1 stoichiometry and revealed an unexpectedly large value of binding enthalpy suggesting a covalent bond between selenium and AtSBP1. Titration of reduced Cys residues and comparative mass spectrometry on AtSBP1 and the purified selenium-AtSBP1 complex identified Cys21 and Cys22 as being responsible for the binding of one selenium. These results were validated by site-directed mutagenesis. Selenium K-edge x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy performed on the selenium-AtSBP1 complex demonstrated that AtSBP1 reduced SeO32− to form a R-S-Se(II)-S-R-type complex. The capacity of AtSBP1 to bind different metals and selenium is discussed with respect to the potential function of AtSBP1 in detoxification mechanisms and selenium metabolism. PMID:25274629

  17. Identification of an Arabidopsis thaliana protein that binds to tomato mosaic virus genomic RNA and inhibits its multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisaki, Koki; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2008-10-25

    The genomic RNAs of positive-strand RNA viruses carry RNA elements that play positive, or in some cases, negative roles in virus multiplication by interacting with viral and cellular proteins. In this study, we purified Arabidopsis thaliana proteins that specifically bind to 5' or 3' terminal regions of tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) genomic RNA, which contain important regulatory elements for translation and RNA replication, and identified these proteins by mass spectrometry analyses. One of these host proteins, named BTR1, harbored three heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K-homology RNA-binding domains and preferentially bound to RNA fragments that contained a sequence around the initiation codon of the 130K and 180K replication protein genes. The knockout and overexpression of BTR1 specifically enhanced and inhibited, respectively, ToMV multiplication in inoculated A. thaliana leaves, while such effect was hardly detectable in protoplasts. These results suggest that BTR1 negatively regulates the local spread of ToMV.

  18. Regulation of Active DNA Demethylation by a Methyl-CpG-Binding Domain Protein in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Han; Zeng, Jun; Cao, Zhendong; Li, Yan; Qian, Weiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Active DNA demethylation plays crucial roles in the regulation of gene expression in both plants and animals. In Arabidopsis thaliana, active DNA demethylation is initiated by the ROS1 subfamily of 5-methylcytosine-specific DNA glycosylases via a base excision repair mechanism. Recently, IDM1 and IDM2 were shown to be required for the recruitment of ROS1 to some of its target loci. However, the mechanism(s) by which IDM1 is targeted to specific genomic loci remains to be determined. Affinity purification of IDM1- and IDM2- associating proteins demonstrated that IDM1 and IDM2 copurify together with two novel components, methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 7 (MBD7) and IDM2-like protein 1 (IDL1). IDL1 encodes an α-crystallin domain protein that shows high sequence similarity with IDM2. MBD7 interacts with IDM2 and IDL1 in vitro and in vivo and they form a protein complex associating with IDM1 in vivo. MBD7 directly binds to the target loci and is required for the H3K18 and H3K23 acetylation in planta. MBD7 dysfunction causes DNA hypermethylation and silencing of reporter genes and a subset of endogenous genes. Our results suggest that a histone acetyltransferase complex functions in active DNA demethylation and in suppression of gene silencing at some loci in Arabidopsis. PMID:25933434

  19. Up-regulated expression of Ran reveals its potential role to deltamethrin stress in Kc cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Xu, Qin; Chi, Qingping; Hu, Junli; Li, Fengliang; Cheng, Luogen

    2016-05-25

    The GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran has mostly been reported to be an essential player in nuclear transport, chromosome alignment, microtubule dynamics, centrosome duplication, kinetochore attachment of microtubules, nuclear-envelope dynamics, and phagocytosis. However, until now, there has been no report showing the involvement of Ran in DM stress. In this paper, two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis showed that the expression level of Ran in Kc cells in response to DM was higher than that in the control group. In addition, quantitative analysis using real-time PCR revealed that the expression of Ran was obviously up-regulated at various concentrations of DM. Western blot analysis showed that Ran was up-regulated 2.27-fold over the control at 48h. Because we still could not pinpoint whether Ran was actually involved in DM stress reaction, to further verify the role of Ran in stress reaction, RNA interference and cell transfection were utilized. Overexpression of Ran in cells conferred a degree of protection against DM after 72h. Furthermore, interference with Ran significantly decrease cell viability. All of the above findings strongly imply that Ran may participate in the development of stress reaction to DM. Therefore, investigating the possible role of Ran in DM stress will broaden our limited knowledge regarding DM stress inducible genes. PMID:26924245

  20. The Interaction Between Ran and NTF2 is Required for Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Quimby, B. Booth; Wilson, Cassandra A.; Corbett, Anita H.

    2000-01-01

    The small GTPase Ran is required for the trafficking of macromolecules into and out of the nucleus. Ran also has been implicated in cell cycle control, specifically in mitotic spindle assembly. In interphase cells, Ran is predominately nuclear and thought to be GTP bound, but it is also present in the cytoplasm, probably in the GDP-bound state. Nuclear transport factor 2 (NTF2) has been shown to import RanGDP into the nucleus. Here, we examine the in vivo role of NTF2 in Ran import and the effect that disruption of Ran imported into the nucleus has on the cell cycle. A temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae NTF2 that does not bind to Ran is unable to import Ran into the nucleus at the nonpermissive temperature. Moreover, when Ran is inefficiently imported into the nucleus, cells arrest in G2 in a MAD2 checkpoint-dependent manner. These findings demonstrate that NTF2 is required to transport Ran into the nucleus in vivo. Furthermore, we present data that suggest that depletion of nuclear Ran triggers a spindle-assembly checkpoint-dependent cell cycle arrest. PMID:10930458

  1. Localized regulation of axonal RanGTPase controls retrograde injury signaling in peripheral nerve

    PubMed Central

    Yudin, Dmitry; Hanz, Shlomit; Yoo, Soonmoon; Iavnilovitch, Elena; Willis, Dianna; Gradus, Tal; Vuppalanchi, Deepika; Segal-Ruder, Yael; Ben-Yaakov, Keren; Hieda, Miki; Yoneda, Yoshihiro; Twiss, Jeffery L.; Fainzilber, Mike

    2008-01-01

    Summary Peripheral sensory neurons respond to axon injury by activating an importin-dependent retrograde signaling mechanism. How is this mechanism regulated? Here we show that Ran GTPase and its associated effectors RanBP1 and RanGAP regulate the formation of importin signaling complexes in injured axons. A gradient of nuclear RanGTP versus cytoplasmic RanGDP is thought to be fundamental for the organization of eukaryotic cells. Surprisingly, we find RanGTP in sciatic nerve axoplasm, distant from neuronal cell bodies and nuclei, and in association with dynein and importin α. Following injury, localized translation of RanBP1 stimulates RanGTP dissociation from importins and subsequent hydrolysis, thereby allowing binding of newly synthesized importin β to importin α and dynein. Perturbation of RanGTP hydrolysis or RanBP1 blockade at axonal injury sites reduces the neuronal conditioning lesion response. Thus, neurons employ localized mechanisms of Ran regulation to control retrograde injury signaling in peripheral nerve. PMID:18667152

  2. Characterization of a Ran gene from Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici involved in fungal growth and anti-cell death

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yulin; Yao, Juanni; Zhang, Yanru; Li, Shumin; Kang, Zhensheng

    2016-01-01

    Ran, an important family of small GTP-binding proteins, has been shown to regulate a variety of important cellular processes in many eukaryotes. However, little is known about Ran function in pathogenic fungi. In this study, we report the identification and functional analysis of a Ran gene (designated PsRan) from Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), an important fungal pathogen affecting wheat production worldwide. The PsRan protein contains all conserved domains of Ran GTPases and shares more than 70% identity with Ran proteins from other organisms, indicating that Ran proteins are conserved in different organisms. PsRan shows a low level of intra-species polymorphism and is localized to the nucleus. qRT-PCR analysis showed that transcript level of PsRan was induced in planta during Pst infection. Silencing of PsRan did not alter Pst virulence phenotype but impeded fungal growth of Pst. In addition, heterologous overexpression of PsRan in plant failed to induce cell death but suppressed cell death triggered by a mouse BAX gene or a Pst Ras gene. Our results suggest that PsRan is involved in the regulation of fungal growth and anti-cell death, which provides significant insight into Ran function in pathogenic fungi. PMID:27734916

  3. The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN protein is able to specifically bind DNA through its single Cys2-His2 zinc finger motif.

    PubMed

    Dathan, Nina; Zaccaro, Laura; Esposito, Sabrina; Isernia, Carla; Omichinski, James G; Riccio, Andrea; Pedone, Carlo; Di Blasio, Benedetto; Fattorusso, Roberto; Pedone, Paolo V

    2002-11-15

    The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN (SUP) gene has been shown to be important in maintaining the boundary between stamens and carpels, and is presumed to act by regulating cell proliferation. In this work, we show that the SUP protein, which contains a single Cys2-His2 zinc finger domain including the QALGGH sequence, highly conserved in the plant zinc finger proteins, binds DNA. Using a series of deletion mutants, it was determined that the minimal domain required for specific DNA binding (residues 15-78) includes the single zinc finger and two basic regions located on either side of this motif. Furthermore, amino acid substitutions in the zinc finger or in the basic regions, including a mutation that knocks out the function of the SUP protein in vivo (glycine 63 to aspartate), have been found to abolish the activity of the SUP DNA-binding domain. These results strongly suggest that the SUP protein functions in vivo by acting as a DNA-binding protein, likely involved in transcriptional regulation. The association of both an N-terminal and a C-terminal basic region with a single Cys2-His2 zinc finger represents a novel DNA-binding motif suggesting that the mechanism of DNA recognition adopted by the SUP protein is different from that described so far in other zinc finger proteins. PMID:12433998

  4. Photochemical properties of the flavin mononucleotide-binding domains of the phototropins from Arabidopsis, rice, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Masahiro; Swartz, Trevor E; Olney, Margaret A; Onodera, Akihiko; Mochizuki, Nobuyoshi; Fukuzawa, Hideya; Asamizu, Erika; Tabata, Satoshi; Kanegae, Hiromi; Takano, Makoto; Christie, John M; Nagatani, Akira; Briggs, Winslow R

    2002-06-01

    Phototropins (phot1 and phot2, formerly designated nph1 and npl1) are blue-light receptors that mediate phototropism, blue light-induced chloroplast relocation, and blue light-induced stomatal opening in Arabidopsis. Phototropins contain two light, oxygen, or voltage (LOV) domains at their N termini (LOV1 and LOV2), each a binding site for the chromophore flavin mononucleotide (FMN). Their C termini contain a serine/threonine protein kinase domain. Here, we examine the kinetic properties of the LOV domains of Arabidopsis phot1 and phot2, rice (Oryza sativa) phot1 and phot2, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii phot. When expressed in Escherichia coli, purified LOV domains from all phototropins examined bind FMN tightly and undergo a self-contained photocycle, characterized by fluorescence and absorption changes induced by blue light (T. Sakai, T. Kagawa, M. Kasahara, T.E. Swartz, J.M. Christie, W.R. Briggs, M. Wada, K. Okada [2001] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 98: 6969-6974; M. Salomon, J.M. Christie, E. Knieb, U. Lempert, W.R. Briggs [2000] Biochemistry 39: 9401-9410). The photocycle involves the light-induced formation of a cysteinyl adduct to the C(4a) carbon of the FMN chromophore, which subsequently breaks down in darkness. In each case, the relative quantum efficiencies for the photoreaction and the rate constants for dark recovery of LOV1, LOV2, and peptides containing both LOV domains are presented. Moreover, the data obtained from full-length Arabidopsis phot1 and phot2 expressed in insect cells closely resemble those obtained for the tandem LOV-domain fusion proteins expressed in E. coli. For both Arabidopsis and rice phototropins, the LOV domains of phot1 differ from those of phot2 in their reaction kinetic properties and relative quantum efficiencies. Thus, in addition to differing in amino acid sequence, the phototropins can be distinguished on the basis of the photochemical cycles of their LOV domains. The LOV domains of C. reinhardtii phot also undergo light

  5. Computational Study of the Binding Mechanism of Actin-Depolymerizing Factor 1 with Actin in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue; Dong, Chun-Hai; Yang, Jian Ming; Yao, Xiao Jun

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a highly conserved protein. It plays important roles in cellular function and exists either in the monomeric (G-actin) or polymeric form (F-actin). Members of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family bind to both G-actin and F-actin and play vital roles in actin dynamics by manipulating the rates of filament polymerization and depolymerization. It has been reported that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants of actin-depolymerizing factor 1 (ADF1) in Arabidopsis thaliana decreased the binding affinity of ADF for the actin monomer. To investigate the binding mechanism and dynamic behavior of the ADF1–actin complex, we constructed a homology model of the AtADF1–actin complex based on the crystal structure of AtADF1 and the twinfilin C-terminal ADF-H domain in a complex with a mouse actin monomer. The model was then refined for subsequent molecular dynamics simulations. Increased binding energy of the mutated system was observed using the Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area and Poisson–Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-GB/PBSA) methods. To determine the residues that make decisive contributions to the ADF1 actin-binding affinity, per-residue decomposition and computational alanine scanning analyses were performed, which provided more detailed information on the binding mechanism. Root-mean-square fluctuation and principal component analyses confirmed that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants induced an increased conformational flexibility. The comprehensive molecular insight gained from this study is of great importance for understanding the binding mechanism of ADF1 and G-actin. PMID:27414648

  6. Computational Study of the Binding Mechanism of Actin-Depolymerizing Factor 1 with Actin in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Wang, Xue; Dong, Chun-Hai; Yang, Jian Ming; Yao, Xiao Jun

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a highly conserved protein. It plays important roles in cellular function and exists either in the monomeric (G-actin) or polymeric form (F-actin). Members of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family bind to both G-actin and F-actin and play vital roles in actin dynamics by manipulating the rates of filament polymerization and depolymerization. It has been reported that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants of actin-depolymerizing factor 1 (ADF1) in Arabidopsis thaliana decreased the binding affinity of ADF for the actin monomer. To investigate the binding mechanism and dynamic behavior of the ADF1-actin complex, we constructed a homology model of the AtADF1-actin complex based on the crystal structure of AtADF1 and the twinfilin C-terminal ADF-H domain in a complex with a mouse actin monomer. The model was then refined for subsequent molecular dynamics simulations. Increased binding energy of the mutated system was observed using the Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area and Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-GB/PBSA) methods. To determine the residues that make decisive contributions to the ADF1 actin-binding affinity, per-residue decomposition and computational alanine scanning analyses were performed, which provided more detailed information on the binding mechanism. Root-mean-square fluctuation and principal component analyses confirmed that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants induced an increased conformational flexibility. The comprehensive molecular insight gained from this study is of great importance for understanding the binding mechanism of ADF1 and G-actin. PMID:27414648

  7. Developmental Functions of miR156-Regulated SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingli; Hu, Tieqiang; Zhao, Jianfei; Park, Mee-Yeon; Earley, Keith W; Wu, Gang; Yang, Li; Poethig, R Scott

    2016-08-01

    Correct developmental timing is essential for plant fitness and reproductive success. Two important transitions in shoot development-the juvenile-to-adult vegetative transition and the vegetative-to-reproductive transition-are mediated by a group of genes targeted by miR156, SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN (SBP) genes. To determine the developmental functions of these genes in Arabidopsis thaliana, we characterized their expression patterns, and their gain-of-function and loss-of-function phenotypes. Our results reveal that SBP-LIKE (SPL) genes in Arabidopsis can be divided into three functionally distinct groups: 1) SPL2, SPL9, SPL10, SPL11, SPL13 and SPL15 contribute to both the juvenile-to-adult vegetative transition and the vegetative-to-reproductive transition, with SPL9, SP13 and SPL15 being more important for these processes than SPL2, SPL10 and SPL11; 2) SPL3, SPL4 and SPL5 do not play a major role in vegetative phase change or floral induction, but promote the floral meristem identity transition; 3) SPL6 does not have a major function in shoot morphogenesis, but may be important for certain physiological processes. We also found that miR156-regulated SPL genes repress adventitious root development, providing an explanation for the observation that the capacity for adventitious root production declines as the shoot ages. miR156 is expressed at very high levels in young seedlings, and declines in abundance as the shoot develops. It completely blocks the expression of its SPL targets in the first two leaves of the rosette, and represses these genes to different degrees at later stages of development, primarily by promoting their translational repression. These results provide a framework for future studies of this multifunctional family of transcription factors, and offer new insights into the role of miR156 in Arabidopsis development. PMID:27541584

  8. Developmental Functions of miR156-Regulated SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tieqiang; Park, Mee-Yeon; Earley, Keith W.; Wu, Gang; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Correct developmental timing is essential for plant fitness and reproductive success. Two important transitions in shoot development—the juvenile-to-adult vegetative transition and the vegetative-to-reproductive transition—are mediated by a group of genes targeted by miR156, SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN (SBP) genes. To determine the developmental functions of these genes in Arabidopsis thaliana, we characterized their expression patterns, and their gain-of-function and loss-of-function phenotypes. Our results reveal that SBP-LIKE (SPL) genes in Arabidopsis can be divided into three functionally distinct groups: 1) SPL2, SPL9, SPL10, SPL11, SPL13 and SPL15 contribute to both the juvenile-to-adult vegetative transition and the vegetative-to-reproductive transition, with SPL9, SP13 and SPL15 being more important for these processes than SPL2, SPL10 and SPL11; 2) SPL3, SPL4 and SPL5 do not play a major role in vegetative phase change or floral induction, but promote the floral meristem identity transition; 3) SPL6 does not have a major function in shoot morphogenesis, but may be important for certain physiological processes. We also found that miR156-regulated SPL genes repress adventitious root development, providing an explanation for the observation that the capacity for adventitious root production declines as the shoot ages. miR156 is expressed at very high levels in young seedlings, and declines in abundance as the shoot develops. It completely blocks the expression of its SPL targets in the first two leaves of the rosette, and represses these genes to different degrees at later stages of development, primarily by promoting their translational repression. These results provide a framework for future studies of this multifunctional family of transcription factors, and offer new insights into the role of miR156 in Arabidopsis development. PMID:27541584

  9. Glycine-rich RNA-binding proteins are functionally conserved in Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa during cold adaptation process

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joo Yeol; Kim, Won Yong; Kwak, Kyung Jin; Oh, Seung Han; Han, Yeon Soo; Kang, Hunseung

    2010-01-01

    Contrary to the increasing amount of knowledge regarding the functional roles of glycine-rich RNA-binding proteins (GRPs) in Arabidopsis thaliana in stress responses, the physiological functions of GRPs in rice (Oryza sativa) currently remain largely unknown. In this study, the functional roles of six OsGRPs from rice on the growth of E. coli and plants under cold or freezing stress conditions have been evaluated. Among the six OsGRPs investigated, OsGRP1, OsGRP4, and OsGRP6 were shown to have the ability to complement cold-sensitive BX04 E. coli mutant cells under low temperature conditions, and this complementation ability was correlated closely with their DNA- and RNA-melting abilities. Moreover, OsGRP1 and OsGRP4 rescued the growth-defect of a cold-sensitive Arabidopsis grp7 mutant plant under cold and freezing stress, and OsGRP6 conferred freezing tolerance in the grp7 mutant plant, in which the expression of AtGRP7 was suppressed and is sensitive to cold and freezing stresses. OsGRP4 and OsGRP6 complemented the defect in mRNA export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in grp7 mutants during cold stress. Considering that AtGRP7 confers freezing tolerance in plants and harbours RNA chaperone activity during the cold adaptation process, the results of the present study provide evidence that GRPs in rice and Arabidopsis are functionally conserved, and also suggest that GRPs perform a function as RNA chaperones during the cold adaptation process in monocotyledonous plants, as well as in dicotyledonous plants. PMID:20231330

  10. Arabidopsis membrane-associated acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP1 is involved in stem cuticle formation

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yan; Xiao, Shi; Kim, Juyoung; Lung, Shiu-Cheung; Chen, Liang; Tanner, Julian A.; Suh, Mi Chung; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-anchored Arabidopsis thaliana ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN1 (AtACBP1) plays important roles in embryogenesis and abiotic stress responses, and interacts with long-chain (LC) acyl-CoA esters. Here, AtACBP1 function in stem cuticle formation was investigated. Transgenic Arabidopsis transformed with an AtACBP1pro::GUS construct revealed β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression on the stem (but not leaf) surface, suggesting a specific role in stem cuticle formation. Isothermal titration calorimetry results revealed that (His)6-tagged recombinant AtACBP1 interacts with LC acyl-CoA esters (18:1-, 18:2-, and 18:3-CoAs) and very-long-chain (VLC) acyl-CoA esters (24:0-, 25:0-, and 26:0-CoAs). VLC fatty acids have been previously demonstrated to act as precursors in wax biosynthesis. Gas chromatography (GC)–flame ionization detector (FID) and GC–mass spectrometry (MS) analyses revealed that an acbp1 mutant showed a reduction in stem and leaf cuticular wax and stem cutin monomer composition in comparison with the wild type (Col-0). Consequently, the acbp1 mutant showed fewer wax crystals on the stem surface in scanning electron microscopy and an irregular stem cuticle layer in transmission electron microscopy in comparison with the wild type. Also, the mutant stems consistently showed a decline in expression of cuticular wax and cutin biosynthetic genes in comparison with the wild type, and the mutant leaves were more susceptible to infection by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Taken together, these findings suggest that AtACBP1 participates in Arabidopsis stem cuticle formation by trafficking VLC acyl-CoAs. PMID:25053648

  11. The N-Terminus of the Floral Arabidopsis TGA Transcription Factor PERIANTHIA Mediates Redox-Sensitive DNA-Binding

    PubMed Central

    Gutsche, Nora; Zachgo, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis TGA transcription factor (TF) PERIANTHIA (PAN) regulates the formation of the floral organ primordia as revealed by the pan mutant forming an abnormal pentamerous arrangement of the outer three floral whorls. The Arabidopsis TGA bZIP TF family comprises 10 members, of which PAN and TGA9/10 control flower developmental processes and TGA1/2/5/6 participate in stress-responses. For the TGA1 protein it was shown that several cysteines can be redox-dependently modified. TGA proteins interact in the nucleus with land plant-specific glutaredoxins, which may alter their activities posttranslationally. Here, we investigated the DNA-binding of PAN to the AAGAAT motif under different redox-conditions. The AAGAAT motif is localized in the second intron of the floral homeotic regulator AGAMOUS (AG), which controls stamen and carpel development as well as floral determinacy. Whereas PAN protein binds to this regulatory cis-element under reducing conditions, the interaction is strongly reduced under oxidizing conditions in EMSA studies. The redox-sensitive DNA-binding is mediated via a special PAN N-terminus, which is not present in other Arabidopsis TGA TFs and comprises five cysteines. Two N-terminal PAN cysteines, Cys68 and Cys87, were shown to form a disulfide bridge and Cys340, localized in a C-terminal putative transactivation domain, can be S-glutathionylated. Comparative land plant analyses revealed that the AAGAAT motif exists in asterid and rosid plant species. TGA TFs with N-terminal extensions of variable length were identified in all analyzed seed plants. However, a PAN-like N-terminus exists only in the rosids and exclusively Brassicaceae homologs comprise four to five of the PAN N-terminal cysteines. Redox-dependent modifications of TGA cysteines are known to regulate the activity of stress-related TGA TFs. Here, we show that the N-terminal PAN cysteines participate in a redox-dependent control of the PAN interaction with a highly conserved

  12. The N-Terminus of the Floral Arabidopsis TGA Transcription Factor PERIANTHIA Mediates Redox-Sensitive DNA-Binding.

    PubMed

    Gutsche, Nora; Zachgo, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis TGA transcription factor (TF) PERIANTHIA (PAN) regulates the formation of the floral organ primordia as revealed by the pan mutant forming an abnormal pentamerous arrangement of the outer three floral whorls. The Arabidopsis TGA bZIP TF family comprises 10 members, of which PAN and TGA9/10 control flower developmental processes and TGA1/2/5/6 participate in stress-responses. For the TGA1 protein it was shown that several cysteines can be redox-dependently modified. TGA proteins interact in the nucleus with land plant-specific glutaredoxins, which may alter their activities posttranslationally. Here, we investigated the DNA-binding of PAN to the AAGAAT motif under different redox-conditions. The AAGAAT motif is localized in the second intron of the floral homeotic regulator AGAMOUS (AG), which controls stamen and carpel development as well as floral determinacy. Whereas PAN protein binds to this regulatory cis-element under reducing conditions, the interaction is strongly reduced under oxidizing conditions in EMSA studies. The redox-sensitive DNA-binding is mediated via a special PAN N-terminus, which is not present in other Arabidopsis TGA TFs and comprises five cysteines. Two N-terminal PAN cysteines, Cys68 and Cys87, were shown to form a disulfide bridge and Cys340, localized in a C-terminal putative transactivation domain, can be S-glutathionylated. Comparative land plant analyses revealed that the AAGAAT motif exists in asterid and rosid plant species. TGA TFs with N-terminal extensions of variable length were identified in all analyzed seed plants. However, a PAN-like N-terminus exists only in the rosids and exclusively Brassicaceae homologs comprise four to five of the PAN N-terminal cysteines. Redox-dependent modifications of TGA cysteines are known to regulate the activity of stress-related TGA TFs. Here, we show that the N-terminal PAN cysteines participate in a redox-dependent control of the PAN interaction with a highly conserved

  13. TCS1, a Microtubule-Binding Protein, Interacts with KCBP/ZWICHEL to Regulate Trichome Cell Shape in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Juan; Wang, Xiaohong; Mao, Tonglin; Yuan, Ming; Li, Yunhai

    2016-01-01

    How cell shape is controlled is a fundamental question in developmental biology, but the genetic and molecular mechanisms that determine cell shape are largely unknown. Arabidopsis trichomes have been used as a good model system to investigate cell shape at the single-cell level. Here we describe the trichome cell shape 1 (tcs1) mutants with the reduced trichome branch number in Arabidopsis. TCS1 encodes a coiled-coil domain-containing protein. Pharmacological analyses and observations of microtubule dynamics show that TCS1 influences the stability of microtubules. Biochemical analyses and live-cell imaging indicate that TCS1 binds to microtubules and promotes the assembly of microtubules. Further results reveal that TCS1 physically associates with KCBP/ZWICHEL, a microtubule motor involved in the regulation of trichome branch number. Genetic analyses indicate that kcbp/zwi is epistatic to tcs1 with respect to trichome branch number. Thus, our findings define a novel genetic and molecular mechanism by which TCS1 interacts with KCBP to regulate trichome cell shape by influencing the stability of microtubules. PMID:27768706

  14. The EF-Hand Ca2+ Binding Protein MICU Choreographs Mitochondrial Ca2+ Dynamics in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Carraretto, Luca; Teardo, Enrico; Cendron, Laura; Füßl, Magdalena; Doccula, Fabrizio G.; Szabò, Ildikò

    2015-01-01

    Plant organelle function must constantly adjust to environmental conditions, which requires dynamic coordination. Ca2+ signaling may play a central role in this process. Free Ca2+ dynamics are tightly regulated and differ markedly between the cytosol, plastid stroma, and mitochondrial matrix. The mechanistic basis of compartment-specific Ca2+ dynamics is poorly understood. Here, we studied the function of At-MICU, an EF-hand protein of Arabidopsis thaliana with homology to constituents of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter machinery in mammals. MICU binds Ca2+ and localizes to the mitochondria in Arabidopsis. In vivo imaging of roots expressing a genetically encoded Ca2+ sensor in the mitochondrial matrix revealed that lack of MICU increased resting concentrations of free Ca2+ in the matrix. Furthermore, Ca2+ elevations triggered by auxin and extracellular ATP occurred more rapidly and reached higher maximal concentrations in the mitochondria of micu mutants, whereas cytosolic Ca2+ signatures remained unchanged. These findings support the idea that a conserved uniporter system, with composition and regulation distinct from the mammalian machinery, mediates mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in plants under in vivo conditions. They further suggest that MICU acts as a throttle that controls Ca2+ uptake by moderating influx, thereby shaping Ca2+ signatures in the matrix and preserving mitochondrial homeostasis. Our results open the door to genetic dissection of mitochondrial Ca2+ signaling in plants. PMID:26530087

  15. The structure and NO binding properties of the nitrophorin-like heme-binding protein from Arabidopsis thaliana gene locus At1g79260.1

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Blouin, George C.; Bitto, Eduard; Olson, John S.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2010-10-19

    The protein from Arabidopsis thaliana gene locus At1g79260.1 is comprised of 166-residues and is of previously unknown function. Initial structural studies by the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG) suggested that this protein might bind heme, and consequently, the crystal structures of apo and heme-bound forms were solved to near atomic resolution of 1.32 {angstrom} and 1.36 {angstrom}, respectively. The rate of hemin loss from the protein was measured to be 3.6 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}, demonstrating that it binds heme specifically and with high affinity. The protein forms a compact 10-stranded {beta}-barrel that is structurally similar to the lipocalins and fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs). One group of lipocalins, the nitrophorins (NP), are heme proteins involved in nitric oxide (NO) transport and show both sequence and structural similarity to the protein from At1g79260.1 and two human homologues, all of which contain a proximal histidine capable of coordinating a heme iron. Rapid-mixing and laser photolysis techniques were used to determine the rate constants for carbon monoxide (CO) binding to the ferrous form of the protein (k{prime}{sub CO} = 0.23 {micro}M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, k{sub CO} = 0.050 s{sup -1}) and NO binding to the ferric form (k{prime}{sub NO} = 1.2 {micro}M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, k{sub NO} = 73 s{sup -1}). Based on both structural and functional similarity to the nitrophorins, we have named the protein nitrobindin and hypothesized that it plays a role in NO transport. However, one of the two human homologs of nitrobindin contains a THAP domain, implying a possible role in apoptosis.

  16. Site-specific mutations of conserved residues in the phosphate-binding loop of the Arabidopsis UMP/CMP kinase alter ATP and UMP binding.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Thornburg, R

    1998-10-15

    All eukaryotic UMP/CMP kinases contain a glycine-rich sequence GGPG(S/A)GK at the N-terminus. This sequence is homologous to the conserved sequence GXXGXGK found in other ATP-binding proteins. To study the role of this conserved sequence in Arabidopsis UMP/CMP kinase, five conserved residues were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis to generate seven mutant enzymes: G21A, G22A, G24A, G26A, K27R, K27M, and K27E. The G21A and G26A mutants were degraded during the purification phase and were thus unable to be purified. Kinetic studies on the other mutants, when compared to studies on the wild-type enzyme, revealed that this sequence is important for ATP binding and enzyme catalysis. All mutants had a decreased kcat/KATPm value. The G22A and G24A mutants had about half of the kcat value of wildtype and 3.9-fold and 3.3-fold increases in KATPm values, respectively. The kcat/KATPm values in the K27M and K27E mutants were changed significantly and decreased by 1000-fold and 2600-fold, respectively. The removal of the terminal positive charge of Lys27 in the K27M and K27E mutants resulted in 20% of the kcat value of wildtype. However, both mutants had a remarkable increase in KATPm value by 241-fold and 552-fold, respectively. Therefore, the positive charge of Lys27 plays an important role on both ATP binding and enzyme catalysis. Interestingly, the results also showed that the mutations that affected ATP binding also had an effect on UMP binding. PMID:9784243

  17. Brassica RNA binding protein ERD4 is involved in conferring salt, drought tolerance and enhancing plant growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rai, Archana N; Tamirisa, Srinath; Rao, K V; Kumar, Vinay; Suprasanna, P

    2016-03-01

    'Early responsive to dehydration' (ERD) genes are a group of plant genes having functional roles in plant stress tolerance and development. In this study, we have isolated and characterized a Brassica juncea 'ERD' gene (BjERD4) which encodes a novel RNA binding protein. The expression pattern of ERD4 analyzed under different stress conditions showed that transcript levels were increased with dehydration, sodium chloride, low temperature, heat, abscisic acid and salicylic acid treatments. The BjERD4 was found to be localized in the chloroplasts as revealed by Confocal microscopy studies. To study the function, transgenic Arabidopsis plants were generated and analyzed for various morphological and physiological parameters. The overexpressing transgenic lines showed significant increase in number of leaves with more leaf area and larger siliques as compared to wild type plants, whereas RNAi:ERD4 transgenic lines showed reduced leaf number, leaf area, dwarf phenotype and delayed seed germination. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing BjERD4 gene also exhibited enhanced tolerance to dehydration and salt stresses, while the knockdown lines were susceptible as compared to wild type plants under similar stress conditions. It was observed that BjERD4 protein could bind RNA as evidenced by the gel-shift assay. The overall results of transcript analysis, RNA gel-shift assay, and transgenic expression, for the first time, show that the BjERD4 is involved in abiotic stress tolerance besides offering new clues about the possible roles of BjERD4 in plant growth and development. PMID:26711633

  18. Brassica RNA binding protein ERD4 is involved in conferring salt, drought tolerance and enhancing plant growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rai, Archana N; Tamirisa, Srinath; Rao, K V; Kumar, Vinay; Suprasanna, P

    2016-03-01

    'Early responsive to dehydration' (ERD) genes are a group of plant genes having functional roles in plant stress tolerance and development. In this study, we have isolated and characterized a Brassica juncea 'ERD' gene (BjERD4) which encodes a novel RNA binding protein. The expression pattern of ERD4 analyzed under different stress conditions showed that transcript levels were increased with dehydration, sodium chloride, low temperature, heat, abscisic acid and salicylic acid treatments. The BjERD4 was found to be localized in the chloroplasts as revealed by Confocal microscopy studies. To study the function, transgenic Arabidopsis plants were generated and analyzed for various morphological and physiological parameters. The overexpressing transgenic lines showed significant increase in number of leaves with more leaf area and larger siliques as compared to wild type plants, whereas RNAi:ERD4 transgenic lines showed reduced leaf number, leaf area, dwarf phenotype and delayed seed germination. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing BjERD4 gene also exhibited enhanced tolerance to dehydration and salt stresses, while the knockdown lines were susceptible as compared to wild type plants under similar stress conditions. It was observed that BjERD4 protein could bind RNA as evidenced by the gel-shift assay. The overall results of transcript analysis, RNA gel-shift assay, and transgenic expression, for the first time, show that the BjERD4 is involved in abiotic stress tolerance besides offering new clues about the possible roles of BjERD4 in plant growth and development.

  19. The Arabidopsis RNA-Binding Protein AtRGGA Regulates Tolerance to Salt and Drought Stress1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosone, Alfredo; Batelli, Giorgia; Nurcato, Roberta; Aurilia, Vincenzo; Punzo, Paola; Bangarusamy, Dhinoth Kumar; Ruberti, Ida; Sassi, Massimiliano; Leone, Antonietta; Costa, Antonello; Grillo, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Salt and drought stress severely reduce plant growth and crop productivity worldwide. The identification of genes underlying stress response and tolerance is the subject of intense research in plant biology. Through microarray analyses, we previously identified in potato (Solanum tuberosum) StRGGA, coding for an Arginine Glycine Glycine (RGG) box-containing RNA-binding protein, whose expression was specifically induced in potato cell cultures gradually exposed to osmotic stress. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ortholog, AtRGGA, is a functional RNA-binding protein required for a proper response to osmotic stress. AtRGGA gene expression was up-regulated in seedlings after long-term exposure to abscisic acid (ABA) and polyethylene glycol, while treatments with NaCl resulted in AtRGGA down-regulation. AtRGGA promoter analysis showed activity in several tissues, including stomata, the organs controlling transpiration. Fusion of AtRGGA with yellow fluorescent protein indicated that AtRGGA is localized in the cytoplasm and the cytoplasmic perinuclear region. In addition, the rgga knockout mutant was hypersensitive to ABA in root growth and survival tests and to salt stress during germination and at the vegetative stage. AtRGGA-overexpressing plants showed higher tolerance to ABA and salt stress on plates and in soil, accumulating lower levels of proline when exposed to drought stress. Finally, a global analysis of gene expression revealed extensive alterations in the transcriptome under salt stress, including several genes such as ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE2, GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE TAU9, and several SMALL AUXIN UPREGULATED RNA-like genes showing opposite expression behavior in transgenic and knockout plants. Taken together, our results reveal an important role of AtRGGA in the mechanisms of plant response and adaptation to stress. PMID:25783413

  20. The Arabidopsis CBP20 targets the cap-binding complex to the nucleus, and is stabilized by CBP80.

    PubMed

    Kierzkowski, Daniel; Kmieciak, Maciej; Piontek, Paulina; Wojtaszek, Przemyslaw; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia; Jarmolowski, Artur

    2009-09-01

    The cap-binding protein complex (CBC) binds to the caps of all RNA polymerase II transcripts, and plays an important role in RNA metabolism. We characterized interactions, localization and nuclear-cytoplasmic transport of two subunits of the Arabidopsis thaliana cap-binding protein complex (AtCBC): AtCBP20 and AtCBP80. Using CFP/YFP-tagged proteins, we show that transport of AtCBC from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in the plant cell is different from that described in other eukaryotic cells. We show that the smaller subunit of the complex, AtCBP20, plays a crucial role in the nuclear import of AtCBC. The C-terminal part of AtCBP20 contains two functionally independent nuclear localization signals (NLSs). At least one of these two NLSs is required for the import of CBC into the plant nucleus. The interaction between the A. thaliana CBP20 and CBP80 was also analyzed in detail, using the yeast two-hybrid system and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assays. The N-terminal part of AtCBP20 is essential for interaction with AtCBP80. Furthermore, AtCBP80 is important for the protein stability of the smaller subunit of CBC. Based on these data, we propose a model for the nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of the CBC complex in plants.

  1. TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 and GLABRA1 Compete for Binding to GLABRA3 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pesch, Martina; Schultheiß, Ilka; Klopffleisch, Karsten; Clemen, Christoph S.; Hülskamp, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The MBW (for R2R3MYB, basic helix-loop-helix [bHLH], and WD40) genes comprise an evolutionarily conserved gene cassette that regulates several traits such as (pro)anthocyanin and anthocyanin biosynthesis and epidermal cell differentiation in plants. Trichome differentiation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is governed by GLABRA1 (GL1; R2R3MYB), GL3 (bHLH), and TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1; WD40). They are thought to form a trimeric complex that acts as a transcriptional activation complex. We provide evidence that these three MBW proteins form either GL1 GL3 or GL3 TTG1 dimers. The formation of each dimer is counteracted by the respective third protein in yeast three-hybrid assays, pulldown experiments (luminescence-based mammalian interactome), and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy-fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies. We further show that two target promoters, TRIPTYCHON (TRY) and CAPRICE (CPC), are differentially regulated: GL1 represses the activation of the TRY promoter by GL3 and TTG1, and TTG1 suppresses the activation of the CPC promoter by GL1 and GL3. Our data suggest that the transcriptional activation by the MBW complex involves alternative complex formation and that the two dimers can differentially regulate downstream genes. PMID:25926482

  2. Mechanism of the stress-induced collapse of the Ran distribution.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Yoshinari; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Saiwaki, Takuya; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2006-02-15

    The small GTPase Ran plays a central role in several key nuclear functions, including nucleocytoplasmic transport, cell cycle progression, and assembly of the nuclear envelope. In a previous study, we showed that cellular stress induces the nuclear accumulation of importin alpha, and that this appears to be triggered by a collapse in the Ran gradient, leading to the down-regulation of classical nuclear transport. We report here that a decrease in stress-induced ATP is associated with an increase in cytoplasmic Ran levels. A luciferin-luciferase assay showed that cellular stress decreased the intracellular levels of ATP. Treatment of the cells with ATP-depleting agents altered the distribution of Ran. Furthermore, when exogenous ATP was introduced in oxidative stress-treated cells, a normal distribution of Ran was restored. In addition, a pull-down experiment with an importin beta1 variant that binds to RanGTP showed that oxidative stress was accompanied by a decrease in intracellular RanGTP levels. These findings indicate that the decrease in ATP levels induced by cellular stress causes a decrease in RanGTP levels and a collapse of Ran distribution. PMID:16368437

  3. Mechanism of the stress-induced collapse of the Ran distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, Yoshinari; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Saiwaki, Takuya; Yoneda, Yoshihiro . E-mail: yyoneda@anat3.med.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2006-02-15

    The small GTPase Ran plays a central role in several key nuclear functions, including nucleocytoplasmic transport, cell cycle progression, and assembly of the nuclear envelope. In a previous study, we showed that cellular stress induces the nuclear accumulation of importin {alpha}, and that this appears to be triggered by a collapse in the Ran gradient, leading to the down-regulation of classical nuclear transport. We report here that a decrease in stress-induced ATP is associated with an increase in cytoplasmic Ran levels. A luciferin-luciferase assay showed that cellular stress decreased the intracellular levels of ATP. Treatment of the cells with ATP-depleting agents altered the distribution of Ran. Furthermore, when exogenous ATP was introduced in oxidative stress-treated cells, a normal distribution of Ran was restored. In addition, a pull-down experiment with an importin {beta}1 variant that binds to RanGTP showed that oxidative stress was accompanied by a decrease in intracellular RanGTP levels. These findings indicate that the decrease in ATP levels induced by cellular stress causes a decrease in RanGTP levels and a collapse of Ran distribution.

  4. Purification and simultaneous immobilization of Arabidopsis thaliana hydroxynitrile lyase using a family 2 carbohydrate-binding module.

    PubMed

    Kopka, Benita; Diener, Martin; Wirtz, Astrid; Pohl, Martina; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Krauss, Ulrich

    2015-05-01

    Tedious, time- and labor-intensive protein purification and immobilization procedures still represent a major bottleneck limiting the widespread application of enzymes in synthetic chemistry and industry. We here exemplify a simple strategy for the direct site-specific immobilization of proteins from crude cell extracts by fusion of a family 2 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) derived from the exoglucanase/xylanase Cex from Cellulomonas fimi to a target enzyme. By employing a tripartite fusion protein consisting of the CBM, a flavin-based fluorescent protein (FbFP), and the Arabidopsis thaliana hydroxynitrile lyase (AtHNL), binding to cellulosic carrier materials can easily be monitored via FbFP fluorescence. Adsorption properties (kinetics and quantities) were studied for commercially available Avicel PH-101 and regenerated amorphous cellulose (RAC) derived from Avicel. The resulting immobilizates showed similar activities as the wild-type enzyme but displayed increased stability in the weakly acidic pH range. Finally, Avicel, RAC and cellulose acetate (CA) preparations were used for the synthesis of (R)-mandelonitrile in micro-aqueous methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) demonstrating the applicability and stability of the immobilizates for biotransformations in both aqueous and organic reaction systems.

  5. The C-terminal domain of the Arabidopsis AtMBD7 protein confers strong chromatin binding activity

    SciTech Connect

    Zemach, Assaf; Paul, Laju K.; Stambolsky, Perry; Efroni, Idan; Rotter, Varda; Grafi, Gideon

    2009-12-10

    The Arabidopsis MBD7 (AtMBD7) - a naturally occurring poly MBD protein - was previously found to be functional in binding methylated-CpG dinucleotides in vitro and localized to highly methylated chromocenters in vivo. Furthermore, AtMBD7 has significantly lower mobility within the nucleus conferred by cooperative activity of its three MBD motifs. Here we show that besides the MBD motifs, AtMBD7 possesses a strong chromatin binding domain located at its C-terminus designated sticky-C (StkC). Mutational analysis showed that a glutamic acid residue near the C-terminus is essential though not sufficient for the StkC function. Further analysis demonstrated that this motif can render nuclear proteins highly immobile both in plant and animal cells, without affecting their native subnuclear localization. Thus, the C-terminal, StkC motif plays an important role in fastening AtMBD7 to its chromosomal, CpG-methylated sites. It may be possible to utilize this motif for fastening nuclear proteins to their chromosomal sites both in plant and animal cells for research and gene therapy applications.

  6. Requirement of calcium binding, myristoylation, and protein-protein interaction for the Copine BON1 function in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqing; Gou, Mingyue; Sun, Qi; Hua, Jian

    2010-09-24

    Copines are highly conserved proteins with lipid-binding activities found in animals, plants, and protists. They contain two calcium-dependent phospholipid binding C2 domains at the amino terminus and a VWA domain at the carboxyl terminus. The biological roles of most copines are not understood and the biochemical properties required for their functions are largely unknown. The Arabidopsis copine gene BON1/CPN1 is a negative regulator of cell death and defense responses. Here we probed the potential biochemical activities of BON1 through mutagenic studies. We found that mutations of aspartates in the C2 domains did not alter plasma membrane localization but compromised BON1 activity. Mutation at putative myristoylation residue glycine 2 altered plasma membrane localization of BON1 and rendered BON1 inactive. Mass spectrometry analysis of BON1 further suggests that the N-peptide of BON1 is modified. Furthermore, mutations that affect the interaction between BON1 and its functional partner BAP1 abolished BON1 function. This analysis reveals an unanticipated regulation of copine protein localization and function by calcium and lipid modification and suggests an important role in protein-protein interaction for the VWA domain of copines.

  7. Encephalomyocarditis virus Leader protein hinge domain is responsible for interactions with Ran GTPase.

    PubMed

    Bacot-Davis, Valjean R; Palmenberg, Ann C

    2013-08-15

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), a Cardiovirus, initiates its polyprotein with a short 67 amino acid Leader (L) sequence. The protein acts as a unique pathogenicity factor, with anti-host activities which include the triggering of nuclear pore complex hyperphosphorylation and direct binding inhibition of the active cellular transport protein, Ran GTPase. Chemical modifications and protein mutagenesis now map the Ran binding domain to the L hinge-linker region, and in particular, to amino acids 35-40. Large deletions affecting this region were shown previously to diminish Ran binding. New point mutations, especially K35Q, D37A and W40A, preserve the intact L structure, abolish Ran binding and are deficient for nucleoporin (Nup) hyperphosphorylation. Ran itself morphs through multiple configurations, but reacts most effectively with L when in the GDP format, preferably with an empty nucleotide binding pocket. Therefore, L:Ran binding, mediated by the linker-hinge, is a required step in L-induced nuclear transport inhibition.

  8. ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR 96 positively regulates Arabidopsis resistance to necrotrophic pathogens by direct binding to GCC elements of jasmonate - and ethylene-responsive defence genes.

    PubMed

    Catinot, Jérémy; Huang, Jing-Bo; Huang, Pin-Yao; Tseng, Min-Yuan; Chen, Ying-Lan; Gu, Shin-Yuan; Lo, Wan-Sheng; Wang, Long-Chi; Chen, Yet-Ran; Zimmerli, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    The ERF (ethylene responsive factor) family is composed of transcription factors (TFs) that are critical for appropriate Arabidopsis thaliana responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here we identified and characterized a member of the ERF TF group IX, namely ERF96, that when overexpressed enhances Arabidopsis resistance to necrotrophic pathogens such as the fungus Botrytis cinerea and the bacterium Pectobacterium carotovorum. ERF96 is jasmonate (JA) and ethylene (ET) responsive and ERF96 transcripts accumulation was abolished in JA-insensitive coi1-16 and in ET-insensitive ein2-1 mutants. Protoplast transactivation and electrophoresis mobility shift analyses revealed that ERF96 is an activator of transcription that binds to GCC elements. In addition, ERF96 mainly localized to the nucleus. Microarray analysis coupled to chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR of Arabidopsis overexpressing ERF96 revealed that ERF96 enhances the expression of the JA/ET defence genes PDF1.2a, PR-3 and PR-4 as well as the TF ORA59 by direct binding to GCC elements present in their promoters. While ERF96-RNAi plants demonstrated wild-type resistance to necrotrophic pathogens, basal PDF1.2 expression levels were reduced in ERF96-silenced plants. This work revealed ERF96 as a key player of the ERF network that positively regulates the Arabidopsis resistance response to necrotrophic pathogens.

  9. Dual binding of 14-3-3 protein regulates Arabidopsis nitrate reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Chi, Jen-Chih; Roeper, Juliane; Schwarz, Guenter; Fischer-Schrader, Katrin

    2015-03-01

    14-3-3 proteins represent a family of ubiquitous eukaryotic proteins involved in numerous signal transduction processes and metabolic pathways. One important 14-3-3 target in higher plants is nitrate reductase (NR), whose activity is regulated by different physiological conditions. Intra-molecular electron transfer in NR is inhibited following 14-3-3 binding to a conserved phospho-serine motif located in hinge 1, a surface exposed loop between the catalytic molybdenum and central heme domain. Here we describe a novel 14-3-3 binding site within the NR N-terminus, an acidic motif conserved in NRs of higher plants, which significantly contributes to 14-3-3-mediated inhibition of NR. Deletion or mutation of the N-terminal acidic motif resulted in a significant loss of 14-3-3 mediated inhibition of Ser534 phosphorylated NR-Mo-heme (residues 1-625), a previously established model of NR regulation. Co-sedimentation and crosslinking studies with NR peptides comprising each of the two binding motifs demonstrated direct binding of either peptide to 14-3-3. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy disclosed high-affinity binding of 14-3-3ω to the well-known phospho-hinge site and low-affinity binding to the N-terminal acidic motif. A binding groove-deficient 14-3-3ω variant retained interaction to the acidic motif, but lost binding to the phospho-hinge motif. To our knowledge, NR is the first enzyme that harbors two independent 14-3-3 binding sites with different affinities, which both need to be occupied by 14-3-3ω to confer full inhibition of NR activity under physiological conditions. PMID:25578809

  10. PhosphoThr Peptide Binding Globally Rigidifies much of the FHA Domain from Arabidopsis Receptor Kinase-Associated Protein Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhaofeng; Lee, Gui-in; Liang, Xiangyang; Gallazzi, Fabio; Arunima, A.; Van Doren, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    A net increase in the backbone rigidity of the kinase-interacting FHA domain (KI-FHA) from the Arabidopsis receptor kinase-associated protein phosphatase (KAPP) accompanies the binding of a phosphoThr peptide from its CLV1 receptor-like kinase partner, according to 15N NMR relaxation at 11.7 and 14.1 T. All of the loops of free KI-FHA display evidence of nsec-scale motions. Many of these same residues have residual dipolar couplings that deviate from structural predictions. Binding of the CLV1 pT868 peptide seems to reduce nsec-scale fluctuations of all loops, including half of the residues of recognition loops. Residues important for affinity are found to be rigid, i.e. conserved residues and residues of the subsite for the key pT+3 peptide position. –This behavior parallels SH2 and PTB domain recognition of pTyr peptides. PhosphoThr peptide binding increases KI-FHA backbone rigidity (S2) of three recognition loops, a loop nearby, seven strands from the β-sandwich, and a distal loop. Compensating the trend of increased rigidity, binding enhances fast mobility at a few sites in four loops on the periphery of the recognition surface and in two loops on the far side of the β-sandwich. Line broadening evidence of µsec to msec-scale fluctuations occurs across the six-stranded β-sheet and nearby edges of the β-sandwich; this forms a network connected by packing of interior side chains and H-bonding. A patch of the slowly fluctuating residues coincides with the site of segment-swapped dimerization in crystals of the FHA domain of human Chfr. Phosphopeptide binding introduces µsec to msec-scale fluctuations to more residues of the long 8/9 recognition loop of KI-FHA. The rigidity of this FHA domain appears to couple as a whole to pThr peptide binding. PMID:16042389

  11. Molecular structure of the GARP family of plant Myb-related DNA binding motifs of the Arabidopsis response regulators.

    PubMed

    Hosoda, Kazuo; Imamura, Aya; Katoh, Etsuko; Hatta, Tomohisa; Tachiki, Mari; Yamada, Hisami; Mizuno, Takeshi; Yamazaki, Toshimasa

    2002-09-01

    The B motif is a signature of type-B response regulators (ARRs) involved in His-to-Asp phosphorelay signal transduction systems in Arabidopsis. Homologous motifs occur widely in the GARP family of plant transcription factors. To gain general insight into the structure and function of B motifs (or GARP motifs), we characterized the B motif derived from a representative ARR, ARR10, which led to a number of intriguing findings. First, the B motif of ARR10 (named ARR10-B and extending from Thr-179 to Ser-242) possesses a nuclear localization signal, as indicated by the intracellular localization of a green fluorescent protein-ARR10-B fusion protein in onion epidermal cells. Second, the purified ARR10-B molecule binds specifically in vitro to DNA with the core sequence AGATT. This was demonstrated by several in vitro approaches, including PCR-assisted DNA binding site selection, gel retardation assays, and surface plasmon resonance analysis. Finally, the three-dimensional structure of ARR10-B in solution was determined by NMR spectroscopy, showing that it contains a helix-turn-helix structure. Furthermore, the mode of interaction between ARR10-B and the target DNA was assessed extensively by NMR spectroscopy. Together, these results lead us to propose that the mechanism of DNA recognition by ARR10-B is essentially the same as that of homeodomains. We conclude that the B motif is a multifunctional domain responsible for both nuclear localization and DNA binding and suggest that these insights could be applicable generally to the large GARP family of plant transcription factors. PMID:12215502

  12. Saccharomyces cerevisiae FKBP12 binds Arabidopsis thaliana TOR and its expression in plants leads to rapamycin susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Sormani, Rodnay; Yao, Lei; Menand, Benoît; Ennar, Najla; Lecampion, Cécile; Meyer, Christian; Robaglia, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    Background The eukaryotic TOR pathway controls translation, growth and the cell cycle in response to environmental signals such as nutrients or growth-stimulating factors. The TOR protein kinase can be inactivated by the antibiotic rapamycin following the formation of a ternary complex between TOR, rapamycin and FKBP12 proteins. The TOR protein is also found in higher plants despite the fact that they are rapamycin insensitive. Previous findings using the yeast two hybrid system suggest that the FKBP12 plant homolog is unable to form a complex with rapamycin and TOR, while the FRB domain of plant TOR is still able to bind to heterologous FKBP12 in the presence of rapamycin. The resistance to rapamycin is therefore limiting the molecular dissection of the TOR pathway in higher plants. Results Here we show that none of the FKBPs from the model plant Arabidopsis (AtFKBPs) is able to form a ternary complex with the FRB domain of AtTOR in the presence of rapamycin in a two hybrid system. An antibody has been raised against the AtTOR protein and binding of recombinant yeast ScFKBP12 to native Arabidopsis TOR in the presence of rapamycin was demonstrated in pull-down experiments. Transgenic lines expressing ScFKBP12 were produced and were found to display a rapamycin-dependent reduction of the primary root growth and a lowered accumulation of high molecular weight polysomes. Conclusion These results further strengthen the idea that plant resistance to rapamycin evolved as a consequence of mutations in plant FKBP proteins. The production of rapamycin-sensitive plants through the expression of the ScFKBP12 protein illustrates the conservation of the TOR pathway in eukaryotes. Since AtTOR null mutants were found to be embryo lethal [1], transgenic ScFKBP12 plants will provide an useful tool for the post-embryonic study of plant TOR functions. This work also establish for the first time a link between TOR activity and translation in plant cells PMID:17543119

  13. A trihelix DNA binding protein counterbalances hypoxia-responsive transcriptional activation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Giuntoli, Beatrice; Lee, Seung Cho; Licausi, Francesco; Kosmacz, Monika; Oosumi, Teruko; van Dongen, Joost T; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2014-09-01

    Transcriptional activation in response to hypoxia in plants is orchestrated by ethylene-responsive factor group VII (ERF-VII) transcription factors, which are stable during hypoxia but destabilized during normoxia through their targeting to the N-end rule pathway of selective proteolysis. Whereas the conditionally expressed ERF-VII genes enable effective flooding survival strategies in rice, the constitutive accumulation of N-end-rule-insensitive versions of the Arabidopsis thaliana ERF-VII factor RAP2.12 is maladaptive. This suggests that transcriptional activation under hypoxia that leads to anaerobic metabolism may need to be fine-tuned. However, it is presently unknown whether a counterbalance of RAP2.12 exists. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses identified an uncharacterized trihelix transcription factor gene, which we named HYPOXIA RESPONSE ATTENUATOR1 (HRA1), as highly up-regulated by hypoxia. HRA1 counteracts the induction of core low oxygen-responsive genes and transcriptional activation of hypoxia-responsive promoters by RAP2.12. By yeast-two-hybrid assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation we demonstrated that HRA1 interacts with the RAP2.12 protein but with only a few genomic DNA regions from hypoxia-regulated genes, indicating that HRA1 modulates RAP2.12 through protein-protein interaction. Comparison of the low oxygen response of tissues characterized by different levels of metabolic hypoxia (i.e., the shoot apical zone versus mature rosette leaves) revealed that the antagonistic interplay between RAP2.12 and HRA1 enables a flexible response to fluctuating hypoxia and is of importance to stress survival. In Arabidopsis, an effective low oxygen-sensing response requires RAP2.12 stabilization followed by HRA1 induction to modulate the extent of the anaerobic response by negative feedback regulation of RAP2.12. This mechanism is crucial for plant survival under suboptimal oxygenation conditions. The discovery of the feedback loop regulating the oxygen

  14. Both ran and importins have the ability to function as nuclear mRNA export factors.

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Rui; Bogerd, Hal P; Wiegand, Heather L; Cullen, Bryan R

    2002-01-01

    The Ran protein regulates nucleocytoplasmic transport mediated by the karyopherin family of nuclear transport factors. Ran is converted to the active, GTP bound form in the nucleus and then binds to a conserved domain found in all karyopherins. This interaction induces cargo binding for exportins and cargo release for importins. In either case, the Ran.GTP is then transported to the cytoplasm by the karyopherin, where it is hydrolyzed to Ran.GDP. To ask whether Ran could function as a nuclear mRNA export factor, we fused Ran to the MS2 coat protein and inserted MS2 RNA-binding sites into an unspliced cat mRNA that is normally sequestered in the nucleus. Coexpression of MS2-Ran induced cat mRNA export and CAT enzyme expression as effectively as, for example, an MS2-Rev fusion protein. MS2-Ran dependent nuclear mRNA export was reduced by inhibitors specific for Crm1, but not blocked as was seen with MS2-Rev. Consistent with the hypothesis that Crm1 is not the only karyopherin cofactor for MS2-Ran mediated mRNA export, we show that not only Crm1 but also CAS, transportin, importin beta and exportin t can all export mRNA from the nucleus when tethered via the MS2 RNA-binding domain. In contrast, two shuttling hnRNPs, hnRNP A1 and hnRNP K, proved unable to function as nuclear RNA export factors when expressed as MS2 fusions. Together, these data argue that karyopherins that normally function to transport proteins into or out of the nucleus are also capable of exporting tethered mRNA molecules. PMID:11911364

  15. TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE27 affects aluminum sensitivity by modulating the O-acetylation of xyloglucan and aluminum-binding capacity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao Fang; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Bao Cai; Mansoori, Nasim; Wan, Jiang Xue; Liu, Yu; Wang, Zhi Wei; Shi, Yuan Zhi; Zhou, Yi Hua; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2014-09-01

    Xyloglucan (XyG) has been reported to contribute to the aluminum (Al)-binding capacity of the cell wall in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, the influence of O-acetylation of XyG, accomplished by the putative O-acetyltransferase TRICHOME BIREFRINGENCE-LIKE27 (TBL27 [AXY4]), on its Al-binding capacity is not known. In this study, we found that the two corresponding TBL27 mutants, axy4-1 and axy4-3, were more Al sensitive than wild-type Columbia-0 plants. TBL27 was expressed in roots as well as in leaves, stems, flowers, and siliques. Upon Al treatment, even within 30 min, TBL27 transcript accumulation was strongly down-regulated. The mutants axy4-1 and axy4-3 accumulated significantly more Al in the root and wall, which could not be correlated with pectin content or pectin methylesterase activity, as no difference in the mutants was observed compared with the wild type when exposed to Al stress. The increased Al accumulation in the wall of the mutants was found to be in the hemicellulose fraction. While the total sugar content of the hemicellulose fraction did not change, the O-acetylation level of XyG was reduced by Al treatment. Taken together, we conclude that modulation of the O-acetylation level of XyG influences the Al sensitivity in Arabidopsis by affecting the Al-binding capacity in the hemicellulose. PMID:25006026

  16. The Arabidopsis thaliana DNA-binding protein AHL19 mediates verticillium wilt resistance.

    PubMed

    Yadeta, Koste A; Hanemian, Mathieu; Smit, Patrick; Hiemstra, Jelle A; Pereira, Andy; Marco, Yves; Thomma, Bart P H J

    2011-12-01

    Verticillium spp. are destructive soilborne fungal pathogens that cause vascular wilt diseases in a wide range of plant species. Verticillium wilts are particularly notorious, and genetic resistance in crop plants is the most favorable means of disease control. In a gain-of-function screen using an activation-tagged Arabidopsis mutant collection, we identified four mutants, A1 to A4, which displayed enhanced resistance toward the vascular wilt species Verticillium dahliae, V. albo-atrum and V. longisporum but not to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. raphani. Further testing revealed that mutant A2 displayed enhanced Ralstonia solanacearum resistance, while mutants A1 and A3 were more susceptible toward Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Identification of the activation tag insertion site in the A1 mutant revealed an insertion in close proximity to the gene encoding AHL19, which was constitutively expressed in the mutant. AHL19 knock-out alleles were found to display enhanced Verticillium susceptibility whereas overexpression of AHL19 resulted in enhanced Verticillium resistance, showing that AHL19 acts as a positive regulator of plant defense. PMID:21864046

  17. Binding Properties of the N-Acetylglucosamine and High-Mannose N-Glycan PP2-A1 Phloem Lectin in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Beneteau, Julie; Renard, Denis; Marché, Laurent; Douville, Elise; Lavenant, Laurence; Rahbé, Yvan; Dupont, Didier; Vilaine, Françoise; Dinant, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Phloem Protein2 (PP2) is a component of the phloem protein bodies found in sieve elements. We describe here the lectin properties of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PP2-A1. Using a recombinant protein produced in Escherichia coli, we demonstrated binding to N-acetylglucosamine oligomers. Glycan array screening showed that PP2-A1 also bound to high-mannose N-glycans and 9-acyl-N-acetylneuraminic sialic acid. Fluorescence spectroscopy-based titration experiments revealed that PP2-A1 had two classes of binding site for N,N′,N″-triacetylchitotriose, a low-affinity site and a high-affinity site, promoting the formation of protein dimers. A search for structural similarities revealed that PP2-A1 aligned with the Cbm4 and Cbm22-2 carbohydrate-binding modules, leading to the prediction of a β-strand structure for its conserved domain. We investigated whether PP2-A1 interacted with phloem sap glycoproteins by first characterizing abundant Arabidopsis phloem sap proteins by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Then we demonstrated that PP2-A1 bound to several phloem sap proteins and that this binding was not completely abolished by glycosidase treatment. As many plant lectins have insecticidal activity, we also assessed the effect of PP2-A1 on weight gain and survival in aphids. Unlike other mannose-binding lectins, when added to an artificial diet, recombinant PP2-A1 had no insecticidal properties against Acyrthosiphon pisum and Myzus persicae. However, at mid-range concentrations, the protein affected weight gain in insect nymphs. These results indicate the presence in PP2-A1 of several carbohydrate-binding sites, with potentially different functions in the trafficking of endogenous proteins or in interactions with phloem-feeding insects. PMID:20442276

  18. The Arabidopsis acetylated histone-binding protein BRAT1 forms a complex with BRP1 and prevents transcriptional silencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cui-Jun; Hou, Xiao-Mei; Tan, Lian-Mei; Shao, Chang-Rong; Huang, Huan-Wei; Li, Yong-Qiang; Li, Lin; Cai, Tao; Chen, She; He, Xin-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements and other repetitive DNA sequences are usually subject to DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing. However, anti-silencing mechanisms that promote transcription in these regions are not well understood. Here, we describe an anti-silencing factor, Bromodomain and ATPase domain-containing protein 1 (BRAT1), which we identified by a genetic screen in Arabidopsis thaliana. BRAT1 interacts with an ATPase domain-containing protein, BRP1 (BRAT1 Partner 1), and both prevent transcriptional silencing at methylated genomic regions. Although BRAT1 mediates DNA demethylation at a small set of loci targeted by the 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylase ROS1, the involvement of BRAT1 in anti-silencing is largely independent of DNA demethylation. We also demonstrate that the bromodomain of BRAT1 binds to acetylated histone, which may facilitate the prevention of transcriptional silencing. Thus, BRAT1 represents a potential link between histone acetylation and transcriptional anti-silencing at methylated genomic regions, which may be conserved in eukaryotes. PMID:27273316

  19. The Arabidopsis floral repressor BFT delays flowering by competing with FT for FD binding under high salinity.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jae Yong; Lee, Hyo-Jun; Seo, Pil Joon; Jung, Jae-Hoon; Ahn, Ji Hoon; Park, Chung-Mo

    2014-02-01

    Soil salinity is one of the most serious agricultural problems that significantly reduce crop yields in the arid and semi-arid regions. It influences various phases of plant growth and developmental processes, such as seed germination, leaf and stem growth, and reproductive propagation. Salt stress delays the onset of flowering in many plant species. We have previously reported that the Arabidopsis BROTHER OF FT AND TFL1 (BFT) acts as a floral repressor under salt stress. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the BFT function in the salt regulation of flowering induction is unknown. In this work, we found that BFT delays flowering under high salinity by competing with FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) for binding to the FD transcription factor. The flowering time of FD-deficient fd-2 mutant was insensitive to high salinity. BFT interacts with FD in the nucleus via the C-terminal domain of FD, which is also required for the interaction of FD with FT, and interferes with the FT-FD interaction. These observations indicate that BFT constitutes a distinct salt stress signaling pathway that modulates the function of the FT-FD module and possibly provides an adaptation strategy that fine-tunes photoperiodic flowering under high salinity.

  20. The TITAN5 gene of Arabidopsis encodes a protein related to the ADP ribosylation factor family of GTP binding proteins.

    PubMed

    McElver, J; Patton, D; Rumbaugh, M; Liu, C; Yang, L J; Meinke, D

    2000-08-01

    The titan (ttn) mutants of Arabidopsis exhibit dramatic alterations in mitosis and cell cycle control during seed development. Endosperm development in these mutants is characterized by the formation of giant polyploid nuclei with enlarged nucleoli. Embryo development is accompanied by significant cell enlargement in some mutants (ttn1 and ttn5) but not others (ttn2 and ttn3). We describe here the molecular cloning of TTN5 using a T-DNA-tagged allele. A second allele with a similar phenotype contains a nonsense mutation in the same coding region. The predicted protein is related to ADP ribosylation factors (ARFs), members of the RAS family of small GTP binding proteins that regulate various cellular functions in eukaryotes. TTN5 is most closely related in sequence to the ARL2 class of ARF-like proteins isolated from humans, rats, and mice. Although the cellular functions of ARL proteins remain unclear, the ttn5 phenotype is consistent with the known roles of ARFs in the regulation of intracellular vesicle transport.

  1. SQUAMOSA Promoter Binding Protein–Like7 Is a Central Regulator for Copper Homeostasis in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Makoto; Fukazawa, Mitsue; Kobayashi, Yoshichika; Shikanai, Toshiharu

    2009-01-01

    Expression of miR398 is induced in response to copper deficiency and is involved in the degradation of mRNAs encoding copper/zinc superoxide dismutase in Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that SPL7 (for SQUAMOSA promoter binding protein–like7) is essential for this response of miR398. SPL7 is homologous to Copper response regulator1, the transcription factor that is required for switching between plastocyanin and cytochrome c6 in response to copper deficiency in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. SPL7 bound directly to GTAC motifs in the miR398 promoter in vitro, and these motifs were essential and sufficient for the response to copper deficiency in vivo. SPL7 is also required for the expression of multiple microRNAs, miR397, miR408, and miR857, involved in copper homeostasis and of genes encoding several copper transporters and a copper chaperone, indicating its central role in response to copper deficiency. Consistent with this idea, the growth of spl7 plants was severely impaired under low-copper conditions. PMID:19122104

  2. Overexpression of the carbohydrate binding module of strawberry expansin2 in Arabidopsis thaliana modifies plant growth and cell wall metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Cristina F; Villarreal, Natalia M; Rossi, Franco R; Martínez, Santiago; Martínez, Gustavo A; Civello, Pedro M

    2015-05-01

    Several cell wall enzymes are carbohydrate active enzymes that contain a putative Carbohydrate Binding Module (CBM) in their structures. The main function of these non-catalitic modules is to facilitate the interaction between the enzyme and its substrate. Expansins are non-hydrolytic proteins present in the cell wall, and their structure includes a CBM in the C-terminal that bind to cell wall polymers such as cellulose, hemicelluloses and pectins. We studied the ability of the Expansin2 CBM (CBMFaEXP2) from strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa, Duch) to modify the cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana. Plants overexpressing CBMFaEXP2 were characterized phenotypically and biochemically. Transgenic plants were taller than wild type, possibly owing to a faster growth of the main stem. Cell walls of CBMFaEXP2-expressing plants were thicker and contained higher amount of pectins. Lower activity of a set of enzymes involved in cell wall degradation (PG, β-Gal, β-Xyl) was found, and the expression of the corresponding genes (AtPG, Atβ-Gal, Atβ-Xyl5) was reduced also. In addition, a decrease in the expression of two A. thaliana Expansin genes (AtEXP5 and AtEXP8) was observed. Transgenic plants were more resistant to Botrytis cinerea infection than wild type, possibly as a consequence of higher cell wall integrity. Our results support the hypothesis that the overexpression of a putative CBM is able to modify plant cell wall structure leading to modulation of wall loosening and plant growth. These findings might offer a tool to controlling physiological processes where cell wall disassembly is relevant, such as fruit softening. PMID:25837738

  3. Overexpression of the carbohydrate binding module of strawberry expansin2 in Arabidopsis thaliana modifies plant growth and cell wall metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Cristina F; Villarreal, Natalia M; Rossi, Franco R; Martínez, Santiago; Martínez, Gustavo A; Civello, Pedro M

    2015-05-01

    Several cell wall enzymes are carbohydrate active enzymes that contain a putative Carbohydrate Binding Module (CBM) in their structures. The main function of these non-catalitic modules is to facilitate the interaction between the enzyme and its substrate. Expansins are non-hydrolytic proteins present in the cell wall, and their structure includes a CBM in the C-terminal that bind to cell wall polymers such as cellulose, hemicelluloses and pectins. We studied the ability of the Expansin2 CBM (CBMFaEXP2) from strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa, Duch) to modify the cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana. Plants overexpressing CBMFaEXP2 were characterized phenotypically and biochemically. Transgenic plants were taller than wild type, possibly owing to a faster growth of the main stem. Cell walls of CBMFaEXP2-expressing plants were thicker and contained higher amount of pectins. Lower activity of a set of enzymes involved in cell wall degradation (PG, β-Gal, β-Xyl) was found, and the expression of the corresponding genes (AtPG, Atβ-Gal, Atβ-Xyl5) was reduced also. In addition, a decrease in the expression of two A. thaliana Expansin genes (AtEXP5 and AtEXP8) was observed. Transgenic plants were more resistant to Botrytis cinerea infection than wild type, possibly as a consequence of higher cell wall integrity. Our results support the hypothesis that the overexpression of a putative CBM is able to modify plant cell wall structure leading to modulation of wall loosening and plant growth. These findings might offer a tool to controlling physiological processes where cell wall disassembly is relevant, such as fruit softening.

  4. Protein export from the nucleus requires the GTPase Ran and GTP hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Moroianu, J; Blobel, G

    1995-01-01

    Nuclei of digitonin-permeabilized cells that had been preloaded with a model transport substrate in a cytosol-dependent import reaction were subsequently incubated to investigate which conditions would result in export of transport substrate. We found that up to 80% of the imported substrate was exported when recombinant human Ran and GTP were present in the export reaction. Ran-mediated export was inhibited by nonhydrolyzable GTP analogs and also by wheat germ agglutinin but was unaffected by a nonhydrolyzable ATP analog. Moreover, a recombinant human Ran mutant that was deficient in its GTPase activity inhibited export. These data indicate that export of proteins from the nucleus requires Ran and GTP hydrolysis but not ATP hydrolysis. We also found that digitonin-permeabilized cells were depleted of their endogenous nuclear Ran, thus allowing detection of Ran as a limiting factor for export. In contrast, most endogenous karyopherin alpha was retained in nuclei of digitonin-permeabilized cells. Unexpectedly, exogenously added, fluorescently labeled Ran, although it accessed the nuclear interior, was found to dock at the nuclear rim in a punctate pattern, suggesting the existence of Ran-binding sites at the nuclear pore complex. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:7753805

  5. A plant small polypeptide is a novel component of DNA-binding protein phosphatase 1-mediated resistance to plum pox virus in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Castelló, María José; Carrasco, Jose Luis; Navarrete-Gómez, Marisa; Daniel, Jacques; Granot, David; Vera, Pablo

    2011-12-01

    DNA-binding protein phosphatases (DBPs) have been identified as a novel class of plant-specific regulatory factors playing a role in plant-virus interactions. NtDBP1 from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) was shown to participate in transcriptional regulation of gene expression in response to virus infection in compatible interactions, and AtDBP1, its closest relative in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), has recently been found to mediate susceptibility to potyvirus, one of the most speciose taxa of plant viruses. Here, we report on the identification of a novel family of highly conserved small polypeptides that interact with DBP1 proteins both in tobacco and Arabidopsis, which we have designated DBP-interacting protein 2 (DIP2). The interaction of AtDIP2 with AtDBP1 was demonstrated in vivo by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, and AtDIP2 was shown to functionally interfere with AtDBP1 in yeast. Furthermore, reducing AtDIP2 gene expression leads to increased susceptibility to the potyvirus Plum pox virus and to a lesser extent also to Turnip mosaic virus, whereas overexpression results in enhanced resistance. Therefore, we describe a novel family of conserved small polypeptides in plants and identify AtDIP2 as a novel host factor contributing to resistance to potyvirus in Arabidopsis.

  6. Metal binding to the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain of the PIB ATPase HMA4 is required for metal transport in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Clémentine; Lekeux, Gilles; Ukuwela, Ashwinie A; Xiao, Zhiguang; Charlier, Jean-Benoit; Bosman, Bernard; Carnol, Monique; Motte, Patrick; Damblon, Christian; Galleni, Moreno; Hanikenne, Marc

    2016-03-01

    PIB ATPases are metal cation pumps that transport metals across membranes. These proteins possess N- and C-terminal cytoplasmic extensions that contain Cys- and His-rich high affinity metal binding domains, which may be involved in metal sensing, metal ion selectivity and/or in regulation of the pump activity. The PIB ATPase HMA4 (Heavy Metal ATPase 4) plays a central role in metal homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana and has a key function in zinc and cadmium hypertolerance and hyperaccumulation in the extremophile plant species Arabidopsis halleri. Here, we examined the function and structure of the N-terminal cytoplasmic metal-binding domain of HMA4. We mutagenized a conserved CCTSE metal-binding motif in the domain and assessed the impact of the mutations on protein function and localization in planta, on metal-binding properties in vitro and on protein structure by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. The two Cys residues of the motif are essential for the function, but not for localization, of HMA4 in planta, whereas the Glu residue is important but not essential. These residues also determine zinc coordination and affinity. Zinc binding to the N-terminal domain is thus crucial for HMA4 protein function, whereas it is not required to maintain the protein structure. Altogether, combining in vivo and in vitro approaches in our study provides insights towards the molecular understanding of metal transport and specificity of metal P-type ATPases. PMID:26797794

  7. Metal binding to the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain of the PIB ATPase HMA4 is required for metal transport in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Clémentine; Lekeux, Gilles; Ukuwela, Ashwinie A; Xiao, Zhiguang; Charlier, Jean-Benoit; Bosman, Bernard; Carnol, Monique; Motte, Patrick; Damblon, Christian; Galleni, Moreno; Hanikenne, Marc

    2016-03-01

    PIB ATPases are metal cation pumps that transport metals across membranes. These proteins possess N- and C-terminal cytoplasmic extensions that contain Cys- and His-rich high affinity metal binding domains, which may be involved in metal sensing, metal ion selectivity and/or in regulation of the pump activity. The PIB ATPase HMA4 (Heavy Metal ATPase 4) plays a central role in metal homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana and has a key function in zinc and cadmium hypertolerance and hyperaccumulation in the extremophile plant species Arabidopsis halleri. Here, we examined the function and structure of the N-terminal cytoplasmic metal-binding domain of HMA4. We mutagenized a conserved CCTSE metal-binding motif in the domain and assessed the impact of the mutations on protein function and localization in planta, on metal-binding properties in vitro and on protein structure by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. The two Cys residues of the motif are essential for the function, but not for localization, of HMA4 in planta, whereas the Glu residue is important but not essential. These residues also determine zinc coordination and affinity. Zinc binding to the N-terminal domain is thus crucial for HMA4 protein function, whereas it is not required to maintain the protein structure. Altogether, combining in vivo and in vitro approaches in our study provides insights towards the molecular understanding of metal transport and specificity of metal P-type ATPases.

  8. Arabidopsis cytosolic acyl-CoA-binding proteins ACBP4, ACBP5 and ACBP6 have overlapping but distinct roles in seed development

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, An-Shan; Haslam, Richard P.; Michaelson, Louise V.; Liao, Pan; Chen, Qin-Fang; Sooriyaarachchi, Sanjeewani; Mowbray, Sherry L.; Napier, Johnathan A.; Tanner, Julian A.; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cytosolic ACBPs (acyl-CoA-binding proteins) bind acyl-CoA esters and maintain a cytosolic acyl-CoA pool, but the thermodynamics of their protein–lipid interactions and physiological relevance in plants are not well understood. Arabidopsis has three cytosolic ACBPs which have been identified as AtACBP4, AtACBP5 and AtACBP6, and microarray data indicated that all of them are expressed in seeds; AtACBP4 is expressed in early embryogenesis, whereas AtACBP5 is expressed later. ITC (isothermal titration calorimetry) in combination with transgenic Arabidopsis lines were used to investigate the roles of these three ACBPs from Arabidopsis thaliana. The dissociation constants, stoichiometry and enthalpy change of AtACBP interactions with various acyl-CoA esters were determined using ITC. Strong binding of recombinant (r) AtACBP6 with long-chain acyl-CoA (C16- to C18-CoA) esters was observed with dissociation constants in the nanomolar range. However, the affinity of rAtACBP4 and rAtACBP5 to these acyl-CoA esters was much weaker (dissociation constants in the micromolar range), suggesting that they interact with acyl-CoA esters differently from rAtACBP6. When transgenic Arabidopsis expressing AtACBP6pro::GUS was generated, strong GUS (β-glucuronidase) expression in cotyledonary-staged embryos and seedlings prompted us to measure the acyl-CoA contents of the acbp6 mutant. This mutant accumulated higher levels of C18:1-CoA and C18:1- and C18:2-CoAs in cotyledonary-staged embryos and seedlings, respectively, in comparison with the wild type. The acbp4acbp5acbp6 mutant showed the lightest seed weight and highest sensitivity to abscisic acid during germination, suggesting their physiological functions in seeds. PMID:25423293

  9. Redox-mediated Mechanisms Regulate DNA Binding Activity of the G-group of Basic Region Leucine Zipper (bZIP) Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis*

    PubMed Central

    Shaikhali, Jehad; Norén, Louise; de Dios Barajas-López, Juan; Srivastava, Vaibhav; König, Janine; Sauer, Uwe H.; Wingsle, Gunnar; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Strand, Åsa

    2012-01-01

    Plant genes that contain the G-box in their promoters are responsive to a variety of environmental stimuli. Bioinformatics analysis of transcriptome data revealed that the G-box element is significantly enriched in promoters of high light-responsive genes. From nuclear extracts of high light-treated Arabidopsis plants, we identified the AtbZIP16 transcription factor as a component binding to the G-box-containing promoter fragment of light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding protein2.4 (LHCB2.4). AtbZIP16 belongs to the G-group of Arabidopsis basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) type transcription factors. Although AtbZIP16 and its close homologues AtbZIP68 and AtGBF1 bind the G-box, they do not bind the mutated half-sites of the G-box palindrome. In addition, AtbZIP16 interacts with AtbZIP68 and AtGBF1 in the yeast two-hybrid system. A conserved Cys residue was shown to be necessary for redox regulation and enhancement of DNA binding activity in all three proteins. Furthermore, transgenic Arabidopsis lines overexpressing the wild type version of bZIP16 and T-DNA insertion mutants for bZIP68 and GBF1 demonstrated impaired regulation of LHCB2.4 expression. Finally, overexpression lines for the mutated Cys variant of bZIP16 provided support for the biological significance of Cys330 in redox regulation of gene expression. Thus, our results suggest that environmentally induced changes in the redox state regulate the activity of members of the G-group of bZIP transcription factors. PMID:22718771

  10. The RanGTP Pathway: From Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Transport to Spindle Assembly and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Cavazza, Tommaso; Vernos, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase Ran regulates the interaction of transport receptors with a number of cellular cargo proteins. The high affinity binding of the GTP-bound form of Ran to import receptors promotes cargo release, whereas its binding to export receptors stabilizes their interaction with the cargo. This basic mechanism linked to the asymmetric distribution of the two nucleotide-bound forms of Ran between the nucleus and the cytoplasm generates a switch like mechanism controlling nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. Since 1999, we have known that after nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD) Ran and the above transport receptors also provide a local control over the activity of factors driving spindle assembly and regulating other aspects of cell division. The identification and functional characterization of RanGTP mitotic targets is providing novel insights into mechanisms essential for cell division. Here we review our current knowledge on the RanGTP system and its regulation and we focus on the recent advances made through the characterization of its mitotic targets. We then briefly review the novel functions of the pathway that were recently described. Altogether, the RanGTP system has moonlighting functions exerting a spatial control over protein interactions that drive specific functions depending on the cellular context. PMID:26793706

  11. Arabidopsis sigma factor binding proteins are activators of the WRKY33 transcription factor in plant defense.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zhibing; Li, Ying; Wang, Fei; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2011-10-01

    Necrotrophic pathogens are important plant pathogens that cause many devastating plant diseases. Despite their impact, our understanding of the plant defense response to necrotrophic pathogens is limited. The WRKY33 transcription factor is important for plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens; therefore, elucidation of its functions will enhance our understanding of plant immunity to necrotrophic pathogens. Here, we report the identification of two WRKY33-interacting proteins, nuclear-encoded SIGMA FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN1 (SIB1) and SIB2, which also interact with plastid-encoded plastid RNA polymerase SIGMA FACTOR1. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain an N-terminal chloroplast targeting signal and a putative nuclear localization signal, suggesting that they are dual targeted. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation indicates that WRKY33 interacts with SIBs in the nucleus of plant cells. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain a short VQ motif that is important for interaction with WRKY33. The two VQ motif-containing proteins recognize the C-terminal WRKY domain and stimulate the DNA binding activity of WRKY33. Like WRKY33, both SIB1 and SIB2 are rapidly and strongly induced by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Resistance to B. cinerea is compromised in the sib1 and sib2 mutants but enhanced in SIB1-overexpressing transgenic plants. These results suggest that dual-targeted SIB1 and SIB2 function as activators of WRKY33 in plant defense against necrotrophic pathogens.

  12. The Histone Deacetylase Complex 1 Protein of Arabidopsis Has the Capacity to Interact with Multiple Proteins Including Histone 3-Binding Proteins and Histone 1 Variants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Craig; Asensi-Fabado, Maria A.; Donald, Naomi A.; Hannah, Matthew A.; Amtmann, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins can adopt multiple conformations, thereby enabling interaction with a wide variety of partners. They often serve as hubs in protein interaction networks. We have previously shown that the Histone Deacetylase Complex 1 (HDC1) protein from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) interacts with histone deacetylases and quantitatively determines histone acetylation levels, transcriptional activity, and several phenotypes, including abscisic acid sensitivity during germination, vegetative growth rate, and flowering time. HDC1-type proteins are ubiquitous in plants, but they contain no known structural or functional domains. Here, we explored the protein interaction spectrum of HDC1 using a quantitative bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) epidermal cells. In addition to binding histone deacetylases, HDC1 directly interacted with histone H3-binding proteins and corepressor-associated proteins but not with H3 or the corepressors themselves. Surprisingly, HDC1 also was able to interact with variants of the linker histone H1. Truncation of HDC1 to the ancestral core sequence narrowed the spectrum of interactions and of phenotypic outputs but maintained binding to a H3-binding protein and to H1. Thus, HDC1 provides a potential link between H1 and histone-modifying complexes. PMID:26951436

  13. The Histone Deacetylase Complex 1 Protein of Arabidopsis Has the Capacity to Interact with Multiple Proteins Including Histone 3-Binding Proteins and Histone 1 Variants.

    PubMed

    Perrella, Giorgio; Carr, Craig; Asensi-Fabado, Maria A; Donald, Naomi A; Páldi, Katalin; Hannah, Matthew A; Amtmann, Anna

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins can adopt multiple conformations, thereby enabling interaction with a wide variety of partners. They often serve as hubs in protein interaction networks. We have previously shown that the Histone Deacetylase Complex 1 (HDC1) protein from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) interacts with histone deacetylases and quantitatively determines histone acetylation levels, transcriptional activity, and several phenotypes, including abscisic acid sensitivity during germination, vegetative growth rate, and flowering time. HDC1-type proteins are ubiquitous in plants, but they contain no known structural or functional domains. Here, we explored the protein interaction spectrum of HDC1 using a quantitative bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) epidermal cells. In addition to binding histone deacetylases, HDC1 directly interacted with histone H3-binding proteins and corepressor-associated proteins but not with H3 or the corepressors themselves. Surprisingly, HDC1 also was able to interact with variants of the linker histone H1. Truncation of HDC1 to the ancestral core sequence narrowed the spectrum of interactions and of phenotypic outputs but maintained binding to a H3-binding protein and to H1. Thus, HDC1 provides a potential link between H1 and histone-modifying complexes.

  14. A Conserved KIN17 Curved DNA-Binding Domain Protein Assembles with SQUAMOSA PROMOTER-BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE7 to Adapt Arabidopsis Growth and Development to Limiting Copper Availability[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Molina, Antoni; Xing, Shuping; Huijser, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Proper copper (Cu) homeostasis is required by living organisms to maintain essential cellular functions. In the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the SQUAMOSA PROMOTER-BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE7 (SPL7) transcription factor participates in reprogramming global gene expression during Cu insufficiency in order to improve the metal uptake and prioritize its distribution to Cu proteins of major importance. As a consequence, spl7 null mutants show morphological and physiological disorders during Cu-limited growth, resulting in lower fresh weight, reduced root elongation, and chlorosis. On the other hand, the Arabidopsis KIN17 homolog belongs to a well-conserved family of essential eukaryotic nuclear proteins known to be stress activated and involved in DNA and possibly RNA metabolism in mammals. In the study presented here, we uncovered that Arabidopsis KIN17 participates in promoting the Cu deficiency response by means of a direct interaction with SPL7. Moreover, the double mutant kin17-1 spl7-2 displays an enhanced Cu-dependent phenotype involving growth arrest, oxidative stress, floral bud abortion, and pollen inviability. Taken together, the data presented here provide evidence for SPL7 and KIN17 protein interaction as a point of convergence in response to both Cu deficiency and oxidative stress. PMID:24335506

  15. Characterization of Peptidyl-Prolyl Cis-Trans Isomerase- and Calmodulin-Binding Activity of a Cytosolic Arabidopsis thaliana Cyclophilin AtCyp19-3

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Gundeep; Singh, Supreet; Singh, Harpreet; Chawla, Mrinalini; Dutta, Tanima; Kaur, Harsimran; Bender, Kyle; Snedden, W. A.; Kapoor, Sanjay; Pareek, Ashwani; Singh, Prabhjeet

    2015-01-01

    Cyclophilins, which bind to immunosuppressant cyclosporin A (CsA), are ubiquitous proteins and constitute a multigene family in higher organisms. Several members of this family are reported to catalyze cis-trans isomerisation of the peptidyl-prolyl bond, which is a rate limiting step in protein folding. The physiological role of these proteins in plants, with few exceptions, is still a matter of speculation. Although Arabidopsis genome is predicted to contain 35 cyclophilin genes, biochemical characterization, imperative for understanding their cellular function(s), has been carried only for few of the members. The present study reports the biochemical characterization of an Arabidopsis cyclophilin, AtCyp19-3, which demonstrated that this protein is enzymatically active and possesses peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) activity that is specifically inhibited by CsA with an inhibition constant (Ki) of 18.75 nM. The PPIase activity of AtCyp19-3 was also sensitive to Cu2+, which covalently reacts with the sulfhydryl groups, implying redox regulation. Further, using calmodulin (CaM) gel overlay assays it was demonstrated that in vitro interaction of AtCyp19-3 with CaM is Ca2+-dependent, and CaM-binding domain is localized to 35–70 amino acid residues in the N-terminus. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays showed that AtCyp19-3 interacts with CaM in vivo also, thus, validating the in vitro observations. However, the PPIase activity of the Arabidopsis cyclophilin was not affected by CaM. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of Ca2+ signaling and cyclophilin activity in Arabidopsis. PMID:26317213

  16. The Ran Pathway in Drosophila melanogaster Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jack W. C.; Barker, Amy R.; Wakefield, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, the small GTPase Ran has emerged as a central regulator of both mitosis and meiosis, particularly in the generation, maintenance, and regulation of the microtubule (MT)-based bipolar spindle. Ran-regulated pathways in mitosis bear many similarities to the well-characterized functions of Ran in nuclear transport and, as with transport, the majority of these mitotic effects are mediated through affecting the physical interaction between karyopherins and Spindle Assembly Factors (SAFs)—a loose term describing proteins or protein complexes involved in spindle assembly through promoting nucleation, stabilization, and/or depolymerization of MTs, through anchoring MTs to specific structures such as centrosomes, chromatin or kinetochores, or through sliding MTs along each other to generate the force required to achieve bipolarity. As such, the Ran-mediated pathway represents a crucial functional module within the wider spindle assembly landscape. Research into mitosis using the model organism Drosophila melanogaster has contributed substantially to our understanding of centrosome and spindle function. However, in comparison to mammalian systems, very little is known about the contribution of Ran-mediated pathways in Drosophila mitosis. This article sets out to summarize our understanding of the roles of the Ran pathway components in Drosophila mitosis, focusing on the syncytial blastoderm embryo, arguing that it can provide important insights into the conserved functions on Ran during spindle formation. PMID:26636083

  17. Identification of Important Regions for Ethylene Binding and Signaling in the Transmembrane Domain of the ETR1 Ethylene Receptor of Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wuyi; Esch, Jeff J.; Shiu, Shin-Han; Agula, Hasi; Binder, Brad M.; Chang, Caren; Patterson, Sara E.; Bleecker, Anthony B.

    2006-01-01

    The ethylene binding domain (EBD) of the Arabidopsis thaliana ETR1 receptor is modeled as three membrane-spanning helices. We surveyed ethylene binding activity in different kingdoms and performed a bioinformatic analysis of the EBD. Ethylene binding is confined to land plants, Chara, and a group of cyanobacteria but is largely absent in other organisms, consistent with our finding that EBD-like sequences are overrepresented among plant and cyanobacterial species. We made amino acid substitutions in 37 partially or completely conserved residues of the EBD and assayed their effects on ethylene binding and signaling. Mutations primarily in residues in Helices I and II midregions eliminated ethylene binding and conferred constitutive signaling, consistent with the inverse-agonist model of ethylene receptor signaling and indicating that these residues define the ethylene binding pocket. The largest class of mutations, clustered near the cytoplasmic ends of Helices I and III, gave normal ethylene binding activity yet still conferred constitutive signaling. Therefore, these residues may play a role in turning off the signal transmitter domain of the receptor. By contrast, only two mutations were loss of function with respect to signaling. These findings yield insight into the structure and function of the EBD and suggest a conserved role of the EBD as a negative regulator of the signal transmitter domain. PMID:17189345

  18. The bi-lobe-associated LRRP1 regulates Ran activity in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Brasseur, Anaïs; Bayat, Shima; Chua, Xiu Ling; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Qing; Low, Boon Chuan; He, Cynthia Y

    2014-11-15

    Cilia and flagella are conserved eukaryotic organelles important for motility and sensory. The RanGTPase, best known for nucleocytoplasmic transport functions, may also play a role in protein trafficking into the specialized flagellar/ciliary compartments, although the regulatory mechanisms controlling Ran activity at the flagellum remain unclear. The unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei contains a single flagellum necessary for cell movement, division and morphogenesis. Correct flagellum functions require flagellar attachment to the cell body, which is mediated by a specialized flagellum attachment zone (FAZ) complex that is assembled together with the flagellum during the cell cycle. We have previously identified the leucine-rich-repeat protein 1 LRRP1 on a bi-lobe structure at the proximal base of flagellum and FAZ. LRRP1 is essential for bi-lobe and FAZ biogenesis, consequently affecting flagellum-driven cell motility and division. Here, we show that LRRP1 forms a complex with Ran and a Ran-binding protein, and regulates Ran-GTP hydrolysis in T. brucei. In addition to mitotic inhibition, depletion of Ran inhibits FAZ assembly in T. brucei, supporting the presence of a conserved mechanism that involves Ran in the regulation of flagellum functions in an early divergent eukaryote. PMID:25217630

  19. The bi-lobe-associated LRRP1 regulates Ran activity in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Brasseur, Anaïs; Bayat, Shima; Chua, Xiu Ling; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Qing; Low, Boon Chuan; He, Cynthia Y

    2014-11-15

    Cilia and flagella are conserved eukaryotic organelles important for motility and sensory. The RanGTPase, best known for nucleocytoplasmic transport functions, may also play a role in protein trafficking into the specialized flagellar/ciliary compartments, although the regulatory mechanisms controlling Ran activity at the flagellum remain unclear. The unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei contains a single flagellum necessary for cell movement, division and morphogenesis. Correct flagellum functions require flagellar attachment to the cell body, which is mediated by a specialized flagellum attachment zone (FAZ) complex that is assembled together with the flagellum during the cell cycle. We have previously identified the leucine-rich-repeat protein 1 LRRP1 on a bi-lobe structure at the proximal base of flagellum and FAZ. LRRP1 is essential for bi-lobe and FAZ biogenesis, consequently affecting flagellum-driven cell motility and division. Here, we show that LRRP1 forms a complex with Ran and a Ran-binding protein, and regulates Ran-GTP hydrolysis in T. brucei. In addition to mitotic inhibition, depletion of Ran inhibits FAZ assembly in T. brucei, supporting the presence of a conserved mechanism that involves Ran in the regulation of flagellum functions in an early divergent eukaryote.

  20. Arabidopsis acyl-CoA-binding proteins ACBP4 and ACBP5 are subcellularly localized to the cytosol and ACBP4 depletion affects membrane lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shi; Li, Hong-Ye; Zhang, Jiao-Ping; Chan, Suk-Wah; Chye, Mee-Len

    2008-12-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) are encoded by six genes, and they display varying affinities for acyl-CoA esters. Recombinant ACBP4 and ACBP5 have been shown to bind oleoyl-CoA esters in vitro. In this study, the subcellular localizations of ACBP4 and ACBP5 were determined by biochemical fractionation followed by western blot analyses using anti-ACBP4 and anti-ACBP5 antibodies and immuno-electron microscopy. Confocal microscopy of autofluorescence-tagged ACBP4 and ACBP5, expressed transiently in onion epidermal cells and in transgenic Arabidopsis, confirmed their expression in the cytosol. Taken together, ACBP4 and ACBP5 are available in the cytosol to bind and transfer cytosolic oleoyl-CoA esters. Lipid profile analysis further revealed that an acbp4 knockout mutant showed decreases in membrane lipids (digalactosyldiacylglycerol, monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol) while acbp4-complemented lines attained levels similar to wild type, suggesting that ACBP4 plays a role in the biosynthesis of membrane lipids including galactolipids and phospholipids.

  1. Arabidopsis Sec1/Munc18 protein SEC11 is a competitive and dynamic modulator of SNARE binding and SYP121-dependent vesicle traffic.

    PubMed

    Karnik, Rucha; Grefen, Christopher; Bayne, Robert; Honsbein, Annegret; Köhler, Tim; Kioumourtzoglou, Dimitrios; Williams, Mary; Bryant, Nia J; Blatt, Michael R

    2013-04-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana Qa-SNARE SYP121 (=SYR1/PEN1) drives vesicle traffic at the plasma membrane of cells throughout the vegetative plant. It facilitates responses to drought, to the water stress hormone abscisic acid, and to pathogen attack, and it is essential for recovery from so-called programmed stomatal closure. How SYP121-mediated traffic is regulated is largely unknown, although it is thought to depend on formation of a fusion-competent SNARE core complex with the cognate partners VAMP721 and SNAP33. Like SYP121, the Arabidopsis Sec1/Munc18 protein SEC11 (=KEULE) is expressed throughout the vegetative plant. We find that SEC11 binds directly with SYP121 both in vitro and in vivo to affect secretory traffic. Binding occurs through two distinct modes, one requiring only SEC11 and SYP121 and the second dependent on assembly of a complex with VAMP721 and SNAP33. SEC11 competes dynamically for SYP121 binding with SNAP33 and VAMP721, and this competition is predicated by SEC11 association with the N terminus of SYP121. These and additional data are consistent with a model in which SYP121-mediated vesicle fusion is regulated by an unusual "handshaking" mechanism of concerted SEC11 debinding and rebinding. They also implicate one or more factors that alter or disrupt SEC11 association with the SYP121 N terminus as an early step initiating SNARE complex formation.

  2. An hnRNP-like RNA-binding protein affects alternative splicing by in vivo interaction with transcripts in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Streitner, Corinna; Köster, Tino; Simpson, Craig G.; Shaw, Paul; Danisman, Selahattin; Brown, John W. S.; Staiger, Dorothee

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) of pre-mRNAs is an important regulatory mechanism shaping the transcriptome. In plants, only few RNA-binding proteins are known to affect AS. Here, we show that the glycine-rich RNA-binding protein AtGRP7 influences AS in Arabidopsis thaliana. Using a high-resolution RT–PCR-based AS panel, we found significant changes in the ratios of AS isoforms for 59 of 288 analyzed AS events upon ectopic AtGRP7 expression. In particular, AtGRP7 affected the choice of alternative 5′ splice sites preferentially. About half of the events are also influenced by the paralog AtGRP8, indicating that AtGRP7 and AtGRP8 share a network of downstream targets. For 10 events, the AS patterns were altered in opposite directions in plants with elevated AtGRP7 level or lacking AtGRP7. Importantly, RNA immunoprecipitation from plant extracts showed that several transcripts are bound by AtGRP7 in vivo and indeed represent direct targets. Furthermore, the effect of AtGRP7 on these AS events was abrogated by mutation of a single arginine that is required for its RNA-binding activity. This indicates that AtGRP7 impacts AS of these transcripts via direct interaction. As several of the AS events are also controlled by other splicing regulators, our data begin to provide insights into an AS network in Arabidopsis. PMID:23042250

  3. Identification of a novel type of WRKY transcription factor binding site in elicitor-responsive cis-sequences from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Machens, Fabian; Becker, Marlies; Umrath, Felix; Hehl, Reinhard

    2014-03-01

    Using a combination of bioinformatics and synthetic promoters, novel elicitor-responsive cis-sequences were discovered in promoters of pathogen-upregulated genes from Arabidopsis thaliana. One group of functional sequences contains the conserved core sequence GACTTTT. This core sequence and adjacent nucleotides are essential for elicitor-responsive gene expression in a parsley protoplast system. By yeast one-hybrid screening, WRKY70 was selected with a cis-sequence harbouring the core sequence GACTTTT but no known WRKY binding site (W-box). Transactivation experiments, mutation analyses, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrate that the sequence CGACTTTT is the binding site for WRKY70 in the investigated cis-sequence and is required for WRKY70-activated gene expression. Using several cis-sequences in transactivation experiments and binding studies, the CGACTTTT sequence can be extended to propose YGACTTTT as WRKY70 binding site. This binding site, designated WT-box, is enriched in promoters of genes upregulated in a WRKY70 overexpressing line. Interestingly, functional WRKY70 binding sites are present in the promoter of WRKY30, supporting recent evidence that both factors play a role in the same regulatory network. PMID:24104863

  4. Genome-Wide Analysis of Ethylene-Responsive Element Binding Factor-Associated Amphiphilic Repression Motif-Containing Transcriptional Regulators in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Kagale, Sateesh; Links, Matthew G.; Rozwadowski, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif is a transcriptional regulatory motif identified in members of the ethylene-responsive element binding factor, C2H2, and auxin/indole-3-acetic acid families of transcriptional regulators. Sequence comparison of the core EAR motif sites from these proteins revealed two distinct conservation patterns: LxLxL and DLNxxP. Proteins containing these motifs play key roles in diverse biological functions by negatively regulating genes involved in developmental, hormonal, and stress signaling pathways. Through a genome-wide bioinformatics analysis, we have identified the complete repertoire of the EAR repressome in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) comprising 219 proteins belonging to 21 different transcriptional regulator families. Approximately 72% of these proteins contain a LxLxL type of EAR motif, 22% contain a DLNxxP type of EAR motif, and the remaining 6% have a motif where LxLxL and DLNxxP are overlapping. Published in vitro and in planta investigations support approximately 40% of these proteins functioning as negative regulators of gene expression. Comparative sequence analysis of EAR motif sites and adjoining regions has identified additional preferred residues and potential posttranslational modification sites that may influence the functionality of the EAR motif. Homology searches against protein databases of poplar (Populus trichocarpa), grapevine (Vitis vinifera), rice (Oryza sativa), and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) revealed that the EAR motif is conserved across these diverse plant species. This genome-wide analysis represents the most extensive survey of EAR motif-containing proteins in Arabidopsis to date and provides a resource enabling investigations into their biological roles and the mechanism of EAR motif-mediated transcriptional regulation. PMID:20097792

  5. AtVPS34, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase of Arabidopsis thaliana, is an essential protein with homology to a calcium-dependent lipid binding domain.

    PubMed

    Welters, P; Takegawa, K; Emr, S D; Chrispeels, M J

    1994-11-22

    The cDNA encoding phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase was cloned from Arabidopsis thaliana, and the derived amino acid sequence (AtVPS34) has a significantly higher homology to yeast PI 3-kinase (VPS34) than to the mammalian (p110). The protein has two conserved domains: a catalytic site with the ATP-binding site near the C terminus and a calcium-dependent lipid-binding domain near the N terminus. The plant cDNA does not rescue a yeast vps34 deletion mutant, but a chimeric gene in which the coding sequence for the C-terminal third of VPS34 is replaced by the corresponding sequence from the plant gene does rescue the yeast mutant. PI 3-kinase activity is detectable in extracts from plants that overexpress the plant PI 3-kinase. Expression of antisense constructs gives rise to second-generation transformed plants severely inhibited in growth and development.

  6. CONSTANS and the CCAAT Box Binding Complex Share a Functionally Important Domain and Interact to Regulate Flowering of Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wenkel, Stephan; Turck, Franziska; Singer, Kamy; Gissot, Lionel; Gourrierec, José Le; Samach, Alon; Coupland, George

    2006-01-01

    The CCT (for CONSTANS, CONSTANS-LIKE, TOC1) domain is found in 45 Arabidopsis thaliana proteins involved in processes such as photoperiodic flowering, light signaling, and regulation of circadian rhythms. We show that this domain exhibits similarities to yeast HEME ACTIVATOR PROTEIN2 (HAP2), which is a subunit of the HAP2/HAP3/HAP5 trimeric complex that binds to CCAAT boxes in eukaryotic promoters. Moreover, we demonstrate that CONSTANS (CO), which promotes Arabidopsis flowering, interacts with At HAP3 and At HAP5 in yeast, in vitro, and in planta. Mutations in CO that delay flowering affect residues highly conserved between CCT and the DNA binding domain of HAP2. Taken together, these data suggest that CO might replace At HAP2 in the HAP complex to form a trimeric CO/At HAP3/At HAP5 complex. Flowering was delayed by overexpression of At HAP2 or At HAP3 throughout the plant or in phloem companion cells, where CO is expressed. This phenotype was correlated with reduced abundance of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) mRNA and no change in CO mRNA levels. At HAP2 or At HAP3 overexpression may therefore impair formation of a CO/At HAP3/At HAP5 complex leading to reduced expression of FT. During plant evolution, the number of genes encoding HAP proteins was greatly amplified, and these proteins may have acquired novel functions, such as mediating the effect of CCT domain proteins on gene expression. PMID:17138697

  7. Ectopic overexpression of SsCBF1, a CRT/DRE-binding factor from the nightshade plant Solanum lycopersicoides, confers freezing and salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Li, Zhenjun; Li, Jingfu; Wang, Aoxue

    2014-01-01

    The C-repeat (CRT)/dehydration-responsive element (DRE) binding factor (CBF/DREB1) transcription factors play a key role in cold response. However, the detailed roles of many plant CBFs are far from fully understood. A CBF gene (SsCBF1) was isolated from the cold-hardy plant Solanum lycopersicoides. A subcellular localization study using GFP fusion protein indicated that SsCBF1 is localized in the nucleus. We delimited the SsCBF1 transcriptional activation domain to the C-terminal segment comprising amino acid residues 193-228 (SsCBF1(193-228)). The expression of SsCBF1 could be dramatically induced by cold, drought and high salinity. Transactivation assays in tobacco leaves revealed that SsCBF1 could specifically bind to the CRT cis-elements in vivo to activate the expression of downstream reporter genes. The ectopic overexpression of SsCBF1 conferred increased freezing and high-salinity tolerance and late flowering phenotype to transgenic Arabidopsis. RNA-sequencing data exhibited that a set of cold and salt stress responsive genes were up-regulated in transgenic Arabidopsis. Our results suggest that SsCBF1 behaves as a typical CBF to contribute to plant freezing tolerance. Increased resistance to high-salinity and late flowering phenotype derived from SsCBF1 OE lines lend more credence to the hypothesis that plant CBFs participate in diverse physiological and biochemical processes related to adverse conditions.

  8. The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN protein is able to specifically bind DNA through its single Cys2–His2 zinc finger motif

    PubMed Central

    Dathan, Nina; Zaccaro, Laura; Esposito, Sabrina; Isernia, Carla; Omichinski, James G.; Riccio, Andrea; Pedone, Carlo; Di Blasio, Benedetto; Fattorusso, Roberto; Pedone, Paolo V.

    2002-01-01

    The Arabidopsis SUPERMAN (SUP) gene has been shown to be important in maintaining the boundary between stamens and carpels, and is presumed to act by regulating cell proliferation. In this work, we show that the SUP protein, which contains a single Cys2–His2 zinc finger domain including the QALGGH sequence, highly conserved in the plant zinc finger proteins, binds DNA. Using a series of deletion mutants, it was determined that the minimal domain required for specific DNA binding (residues 15–78) includes the single zinc finger and two basic regions located on either side of this motif. Furthermore, amino acid substitutions in the zinc finger or in the basic regions, including a mutation that knocks out the function of the SUP protein in vivo (glycine 63 to aspartate), have been found to abolish the activity of the SUP DNA-binding domain. These results strongly suggest that the SUP protein functions in vivo by acting as a DNA-binding protein, likely involved in transcriptional regulation. The association of both an N-terminal and a C-terminal basic region with a single Cys2–His2 zinc finger represents a novel DNA-binding motif suggesting that the mechanism of DNA recognition adopted by the SUP protein is different from that described so far in other zinc finger proteins. PMID:12433998

  9. RanBP3 Regulates Melanoma Cell Proliferation via Selective Control of Nuclear Export.

    PubMed

    Pathria, Gaurav; Garg, Bhavuk; Wagner, Christine; Garg, Kanika; Gschaider, Melanie; Jalili, Ahmad; Wagner, Stephan N

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome region maintenance 1-mediated nucleocytoplasmic transport has been shown as a potential anticancer target in various malignancies. However, the role of the most characterized chromosome region maintenance 1 cofactor ran binding protein 3 (RanBP3) in cancer cell biology has never been investigated. Utilizing a loss-of-function experimental setting in a vast collection of genetically varied melanoma cell lines, we observed the requirement of RanBP3 in melanoma cell proliferation and survival. Mechanistically, we suggest the reinstatement of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-Smad2/3-p21(Cip1) tumor-suppressor axis as part of the RanBP3 silencing-associated antiproliferative program. Employing extensive nuclear export sequence analyses and immunofluorescence-based protein localization studies, we further present evidence suggesting the requirement of RanBP3 function for the nuclear exit of the weak nuclear export sequence-harboring extracellular signal-regulated kinase protein, although it is dispensable for general CRM1-mediated nuclear export of strong nuclear export sequence-harboring cargoes. Rendering mechanistic support to RanBP3 silencing-mediated apoptosis, consequent to extracellular signal-regulated kinase nuclear entrapment, we observed increased levels of cytoplasmically restricted nonphosphorylated/active proapoptotic Bcl-2-antagonist of cell death (BAD) protein. Last, we present evidence suggesting the frequently activated mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in melanoma as a potential founding basis for a deregulated post-translational control of RanBP3 activity. Collectively, the presented data suggest RanBP3 as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in human melanoma.

  10. The Arabidopsis GAGA-Binding Factor BASIC PENTACYSTEINE6 Recruits the POLYCOMB-REPRESSIVE COMPLEX1 Component LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 to GAGA DNA Motifs1

    PubMed Central

    Hecker, Andreas; Brand, Luise H.; Peter, Sébastien; Simoncello, Nathalie; Kilian, Joachim; Gaudin, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Polycomb-repressive complexes (PRCs) play key roles in development by repressing a large number of genes involved in various functions. Much, however, remains to be discovered about PRC-silencing mechanisms as well as their targeting to specific genomic regions. Besides other mechanisms, GAGA-binding factors in animals can guide PRC members in a sequence-specific manner to Polycomb-responsive DNA elements. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) GAGA-motif binding factor protein BASIC PENTACYSTEINE6 (BPC6) interacts with LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1), a PRC1 component, and associates with VERNALIZATION2 (VRN2), a PRC2 component, in vivo. By using a modified DNA-protein interaction enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay, we could show that BPC6 was required and sufficient to recruit LHP1 to GAGA motif-containing DNA probes in vitro. We also found that LHP1 interacts with VRN2 and, therefore, can function as a possible scaffold between BPC6 and VRN2. The lhp1-4 bpc4 bpc6 triple mutant displayed a pleiotropic phenotype, extreme dwarfism and early flowering, which disclosed synergistic functions of LHP1 and group II plant BPC members. Transcriptome analyses supported this synergy and suggested a possible function in the concerted repression of homeotic genes, probably through histone H3 lysine-27 trimethylation. Hence, our findings suggest striking similarities between animal and plant GAGA-binding factors in the recruitment of PRC1 and PRC2 components to Polycomb-responsive DNA element-like GAGA motifs, which must have evolved through convergent evolution. PMID:26025051

  11. RanBPM Protein Acts as a Negative Regulator of BLT2 Receptor to Attenuate BLT2-mediated Cell Motility*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jun-Dong; Kim, Joo-Young; Kim, Ae-Kyoung; Jang, Sung Key; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2013-01-01

    BLT2, a low affinity receptor for leukotriene B4 (LTB4), is a member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and is involved in many signal transduction pathways associated with various cellular phenotypes, including chemotactic motility. However, the regulatory mechanism for BLT2 has not yet been demonstrated. To understand the regulatory mechanism of BLT2, we screened and identified the proteins that bind to BLT2. Using a yeast two-hybrid assay with the BLT2 C-terminal domain as bait, we found that RanBPM, a previously proposed scaffold protein, interacts with BLT2. We demonstrated the specific interaction between BLT2 and RanBPM by GST pulldown assay and co-immunoprecipitation assay. To elucidate the biological function of the RanBPM-BLT2 interaction, we evaluated the effects of RanBPM overexpression or knockdown. We found that BLT2-mediated motility was severely attenuated by RanBPM overexpression and that knockdown of endogenous RanBPM by shRNA strongly promoted BLT2-mediated motility, suggesting a negative regulatory function of RanBPM toward BLT2. Furthermore, we observed that the addition of BLT2 ligands caused the dissociation of BLT2 and RanBPM, thus releasing the negative regulatory effect of RanBPM. Finally, we propose that Akt-induced BLT2 phosphorylation at residue Thr355, which occurs after the addition of BLT2 ligands, is a potential mechanism by which BLT2 dissociates from RanBPM, resulting in stimulation of BLT2 signaling. Taken together, our results suggest that RanBPM acts as a negative regulator of BLT2 signaling to attenuate BLT2-mediated cell motility. PMID:23928309

  12. In vitro mutation analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana small GTP-binding proteins and detection of GAP-like activities in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Anai, T; Matsui, M; Nomura, N; Ishizaki, R; Uchimiya, H

    1994-06-13

    Previously, we have reported the molecular cloning of ara genes encoding a small GTP-binding protein from Arabidopsis thaliana. The criterion based on amino acid sequences suggest that such an ara gene family can be classified to be of the YPT/rab type. To examine the biochemical properties of ARA proteins, several deletions and point mutations were introduced into ara cDNAs. Mutant proteins were expressed in E. coli as GST-chimeric molecules and analyzed in terms of their GTP-binding or GTP-hydrolysing ability in vitro. The results indicate that four conserved amino acid sequence regions of ARA proteins are necessary for GTP-binding. A point mutation of Asn at position 72 for ARA-2, or 71 for ARA-4, to Ile decreased GTP-binding and a point mutation of Gln at position 126 for ARA-2, or 125 for ARA-4, to Leu suppressed GTP-hydrolysis activity. Furthermore, certain factors associated with the membrane fraction accelerated GTPase activities of ARA proteins, suggesting the presence of GTPase activating protein(s) (GAP(s)) in the vesicular transport system of higher plant cells.

  13. Vacuolar Transport of Abscisic Acid Glucosyl Ester Is Mediated by ATP-Binding Cassette and Proton-Antiport Mechanisms in Arabidopsis1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Burla, Bo; Pfrunder, Stefanie; Nagy, Réka; Francisco, Rita Maria; Lee, Youngsook; Martinoia, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a key plant hormone involved in diverse physiological and developmental processes, including abiotic stress responses and the regulation of stomatal aperture and seed germination. Abscisic acid glucosyl ester (ABA-GE) is a hydrolyzable ABA conjugate that accumulates in the vacuole and presumably also in the endoplasmic reticulum. Deconjugation of ABA-GE by the endoplasmic reticulum and vacuolar β-glucosidases allows the rapid formation of free ABA in response to abiotic stress conditions such as dehydration and salt stress. ABA-GE further contributes to the maintenance of ABA homeostasis, as it is the major ABA catabolite exported from the cytosol. In this work, we identified that the import of ABA-GE into vacuoles isolated from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mesophyll cells is mediated by two distinct membrane transport mechanisms: proton gradient-driven and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Both systems have similar Km values of approximately 1 mm. According to our estimations, this low affinity appears nevertheless to be sufficient for the continuous vacuolar sequestration of ABA-GE produced in the cytosol. We further demonstrate that two tested multispecific vacuolar ABCC-type ABC transporters from Arabidopsis exhibit ABA-GE transport activity when expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), which also supports the involvement of ABC transporters in ABA-GE uptake. Our findings suggest that the vacuolar ABA-GE uptake is not mediated by specific, but rather by several, possibly multispecific, transporters that are involved in the general vacuolar sequestration of conjugated metabolites. PMID:24028845

  14. A GTPase distinct from Ran is involved in nuclear protein import

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Signal-dependent transport of proteins into the nucleus is a multi-step process mediated by nuclear pore complexes and cytosolic transport factors. One of the cytosolic factors, Ran, is the only GTPase that has a characterized role in the nuclear import pathway. We have used a mutant form of Ran with altered nucleotide binding specificity to investigate whether any other GTPases are involved in nuclear protein import. D125N Ran (XTP-Ran) binds specifically to xanthosine triphosphate (XTP) and has a greatly reduced affinity for GTP, so it is no longer sensitive to inhibition by nonhydrolyzable analogues of GTP such as guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S). using in vitro transport assays, we have found that nuclear import supported by XTP-Ran is nevertheless inhibited by the addition of non-hydrolyzable GTP analogues. This in conjunction with the properties of the inhibitory effect indicates that at least one additional GTPase is involved in the import process. Initial characterization suggests that the inhibited GTPase plays a direct role in protein import and could be a component of the nuclear pore complex. PMID:8655588

  15. RAN translation-What makes it run?

    PubMed

    Green, Katelyn M; Linsalata, Alexander E; Todd, Peter K

    2016-09-15

    Nucleotide-repeat expansions underlie a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative and neuromuscular disorders for which there are currently no effective therapies. Recently, it was discovered that such repetitive RNA motifs can support translation initiation in the absence of an AUG start codon across a wide variety of sequence contexts, and that the products of these atypical translation initiation events contribute to neuronal toxicity. This review examines what we currently know and do not know about repeat associated non-AUG (RAN) translation in the context of established canonical and non-canonical mechanisms of translation initiation. We highlight recent findings related to RAN translation in three repeat expansion disorders: CGG repeats in fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), GGGGCC repeats in C9orf72 associated amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and CAG repeats in Huntington disease. These studies suggest that mechanistic differences may exist for RAN translation dependent on repeat type, repeat reading frame, and the surrounding sequence context, but that for at least some repeats, RAN translation retains a dependence on some of the canonical translational initiation machinery. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:RNA Metabolism in Disease.

  16. Lynne Cherry's "A River Ran Wild."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledford, Carolyn; Brent, Rebecca

    1997-01-01

    Paraphrases the book "A River Ran Wild" by Lynne Cherry, contrasts how Native American and European settlers use a river, and discusses the pollution and cleanup of the river. Provides classroom discussion questions, and individual or group activities in language arts, art, role-playing, geography, and interviewing. Includes an annotated…

  17. Arabidopsis PEN3/PDR8, an ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Contributes to Nonhost Resistance to Inappropriate Pathogens That Enter by Direct Penetration[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Mónica; Dittgen, Jan; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara; Hou, Bi-Huei; Molina, Antonio; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Lipka, Volker; Somerville, Shauna

    2006-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is a host to the powdery mildew Erysiphe cichoracearum and nonhost to Blumeria graminis f. sp hordei, the powdery mildew pathogenic on barley (Hordeum vulgare). Screening for Arabidopsis mutants deficient in resistance to barley powdery mildew identified PENETRATION3 (PEN3). pen3 plants permitted both increased invasion into epidermal cells and initiation of hyphae by B. g. hordei, suggesting that PEN3 contributes to defenses at the cell wall and intracellularly. pen3 mutants were compromised in resistance to the necrotroph Plectosphaerella cucumerina and to two additional inappropriate biotrophs, pea powdery mildew (Erysiphe pisi) and potato late blight (Phytophthora infestans). Unexpectedly, pen3 mutants were resistant to E. cichoracearum. This resistance was salicylic acid–dependent and correlated with chlorotic patches. Consistent with this observation, salicylic acid pathway genes were hyperinduced in pen3 relative to the wild type. The phenotypes conferred by pen3 result from the loss of function of PLEIOTROPIC DRUG RESISTANCE8 (PDR8), a highly expressed putative ATP binding cassette transporter. PEN3/PDR8 tagged with green fluorescent protein localized to the plasma membrane in uninfected cells. In infected leaves, the protein concentrated at infection sites. PEN3/PDR8 may be involved in exporting toxic materials to attempted invasion sites, and intracellular accumulation of these toxins in pen3 may secondarily activate the salicylic acid pathway. PMID:16473969

  18. AcEBP1, an ErbB3-Binding Protein (EBP1) from halophyte Atriplex canescens, negatively regulates cell growth and stress responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingtao; Yu, Gang; Sun, Xinhua; Zhang, Xianghui; Liu, Jinliang; Pan, Hongyu

    2016-07-01

    An ErbB-3-binding protein gene AcEBP1, also known as proliferation-associated 2G4 gene (PA2G4s) belonging to the M24 superfamily, was obtained from the saltbush Atriplex canescens. Subcellular localization imaging showed the fusion protein AcEBP1-eGFP was located in the nucleus of epidermal cells in Nicotiana benthamiana. The AcEBP1 gene expression levels were up-regulated under salt, osmotic stress, and hormones treatment as revealed by qRT-PCR. Overexpression of AcEBP1 in Arabidopsis demonstrated that AcEBP1 was involved in root cell growth and stress responses (NaCl, osmotic stress, ABA, low temperature, and drought). These phenotypic data were correlated with the expression patterns of stress responsive genes and PR genes. The AcEBP1 transgenic Arabidopsis plants also displayed increased sensitivity under low temperature and evaluated resistance to drought stress. Together, these results demonstrate that AcEBP1 negatively affects cell growth and is a regulator under stress conditions. PMID:27181948

  19. An Arabidopsis cDNA encoding a DNA-binding protein that is highly similar to the DEAH family of RNA/DNA helicase genes.

    PubMed

    Isono, K; Yamamoto, H; Satoh, K; Kobayashi, H

    1999-09-15

    A cDNA encoding a putative RNA and/or DNA helicase has been isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA libraries. The cloned cDNA is 5166 bases long, and its largest open reading frame encodes 1538 amino acids. The central region of the predicted protein is homologous to a group of nucleic acid helicases from the DEAD/H family. However, the N- and C-terminal regions of the Arabidopsis cDNA product are distinct from these animal DEIH proteins. We have found that the C-terminal region contains three characteristic sequences: (i) two DNA-binding segments that form a probe helix (PH) involved in DNA recognition; (ii) an SV40-type nuclear localization signal; and (iii) 11 novel tandem-repeat sequences each consisting of about 28 amino acids. We have designated this cDNA as NIH (nuclear DEIH-boxhelicase). Functional character-ization of a recombinant fusion product containing the repeated region indicates that NIH may form homodimers, and that this is the active form in solution. Based on this information and the observation that the sequence homology is limited to the DEAH regions, we conclude that the biological roles of the plant helicase NIH differ from those of the animal DEIH family. PMID:10471743

  20. The Italian Strong Motion Network (RAN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Giovanni; Ammirati, Alfredo; de Nardis, Rita; Filippi, Luisa; Gallo, Antonella; Lavecchia, Giusy; Sirignano, Sebastiano; Zambonelli, Elisa; Nicoletti, Mario

    2014-05-01

    A network for the strong motion monitoring of the territory allows recording data that provide an excellent opportunity to study the source, path, and site effects on the ground motions, specifically in near source area, for updating seismic hazard map and consequently construction codes and earthquake resistant design. Strong motion data also help to increase the effective preparation and response to seismic emergencies and the ability of a community to quickly recover from the damages of an earthquake contributes to lower the seismic risk usually measured in term of casualties and economic losses. The Italian network for monitoring the strong movement of the national territory (RAN) is the result of a fruitful cooperation over the last 16 years between the Italian government, the regions and local authorities and now counts more than 500 stations. Over the years, as a priority the DPC has focused mainly on the expansion of the network in terms of the number of measurement points and technological improvement of instrumentation as well as the data transmission system. A data acquisition centre was implemented in which the Antelope software collects, processes and archives, automatically, the data of the RAN and of the external strong motion networks that contribute to the database of the RAN. Recently the DPC has dedicated specific resources to improve the response of the network, in particular, in case of emergency. The efficiency of the network on a daily basis is not less than 95% and temporary networks were installed in the epicentral area within 24 hours after the earthquake and connected to the data acquisition centre in Rome. A fast seismic data analysis is essential to provide useful information to Authorities which make decisions immediately after a strong earthquake occurrence. During a strong earthquake, the modern accelerometers are the only instruments which can provide near source high-quality data that are important both for scientific and for civil

  1. Light stress photodynamics of chlorophyll-binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana thylakoid membranes revealed by high-resolution mass spectrometric studies.

    PubMed

    Galetskiy, D N; Lohscheider, J N; Kononikhin, A S; Kharybin, O N; Popov, I A; Adamska, I; Nikolaev, E N

    2011-01-01

    In higher plants the light energy is captured by the photosynthetic pigments that are bound to photosystem I and II and their light-harvesting complex (LHC) subunits. In this study, we examined the photodynamic changes within chlorophyll-protein complexes in the thylakoid membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves adapted to low light and subsequently exposed to light stress. Chlorophyll-protein complexes were isolated using sucrose density gradient centrifugation and blue-native polyacrylamid gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE). Proteome analysis was performed using SDS-PAGE, HPLC and high resolution mass spectrometry. We identified several rarely expressed and stress-induced chlorophyll-binding proteins, showed changes in localization of early light-induced protein family and LHC protein family members between different photosynthetic complexes and assembled/disassembled subcomplexes under light stress conditions and discuss their role in a variety of light stress-related processes.

  2. Light stress photodynamics of chlorophyll-binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana thylakoid membranes revealed by high-resolution mass spectrometric studies.

    PubMed

    Galetskiy, D N; Lohscheider, J N; Kononikhin, A S; Kharybin, O N; Popov, I A; Adamska, I; Nikolaev, E N

    2011-01-01

    In higher plants the light energy is captured by the photosynthetic pigments that are bound to photosystem I and II and their light-harvesting complex (LHC) subunits. In this study, we examined the photodynamic changes within chlorophyll-protein complexes in the thylakoid membrane of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves adapted to low light and subsequently exposed to light stress. Chlorophyll-protein complexes were isolated using sucrose density gradient centrifugation and blue-native polyacrylamid gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE). Proteome analysis was performed using SDS-PAGE, HPLC and high resolution mass spectrometry. We identified several rarely expressed and stress-induced chlorophyll-binding proteins, showed changes in localization of early light-induced protein family and LHC protein family members between different photosynthetic complexes and assembled/disassembled subcomplexes under light stress conditions and discuss their role in a variety of light stress-related processes. PMID:21460887

  3. RNA Binding Proteins RZ-1B and RZ-1C Play Critical Roles in Regulating Pre-mRNA Splicing and Gene Expression during Development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhe; Zhu, Danling; Lin, Xiaoya; Miao, Jin; Gu, Lianfeng; Deng, Xian; Yang, Qian; Sun, Kangtai; Zhu, Danmeng; Cao, Xiaofeng; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Dean, Caroline; Aoyama, Takashi; Gu, Hongya; Qu, Li-Jia

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear-localized RNA binding proteins are involved in various aspects of RNA metabolism, which in turn modulates gene expression. However, the functions of nuclear-localized RNA binding proteins in plants are poorly understood. Here, we report the functions of two proteins containing RNA recognition motifs, RZ-1B and RZ-1C, in Arabidopsis thaliana. RZ-1B and RZ-1C were localized to nuclear speckles and interacted with a spectrum of serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins through their C termini. RZ-1C preferentially bound to purine-rich RNA sequences in vitro through its N-terminal RNA recognition motif. Disrupting the RNA binding activity of RZ-1C with SR proteins through overexpression of the C terminus of RZ-1C conferred defective phenotypes similar to those observed in rz-1b rz-1c double mutants, including delayed seed germination, reduced stature, and serrated leaves. Loss of function of RZ-1B and RZ-1C was accompanied by defective splicing of many genes and global perturbation of gene expression. In addition, we found that RZ-1C directly targeted FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), promoting efficient splicing of FLC introns and likely also repressing FLC transcription. Our findings highlight the critical role of RZ-1B/1C in regulating RNA splicing, gene expression, and many key aspects of plant development via interaction with proteins including SR proteins.

  4. Arabidopsis WD REPEAT DOMAIN55 Interacts with DNA DAMAGED BINDING PROTEIN1 and Is Required for Apical Patterning in the Embryo[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Bjerkan, Katrine N.; Jung-Roméo, Sabrina; Jürgens, Gerd; Genschik, Pascal; Grini, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    CUL4-RING ubiquitin E3 ligases (CRL4s) were recently shown to exert their specificity through the binding of various substrate receptors, which bind the CUL4 interactor DNA DAMAGED BINDING PROTEIN1 (DDB1) through a WDxR motif. In a segregation-based mutagenesis screen, we identified a WDxR motif–containing protein (WDR55) required for male and female gametogenesis and seed development. We demonstrate that WDR55 physically interacts with Arabidopsis thaliana DDB1A in planta, suggesting that WDR55 may be a novel substrate recruiter of CRL4 complexes. Examination of mutants revealed a failure in the fusion of the polar cells in embryo sac development, in addition to embryo and endosperm developmental arrest at various stages ranging from the zygote stage to the globular stage. wdr55-2 embryos suggest a defect in the transition to bilateral symmetry in the apical embryo domain, further supported by aberrant apical embryo localization of DORNROESCHEN, a direct target of the auxin response factor protein MONOPTEROS. Moreover, the auxin response pattern, as determined using the synthetic auxin-responsive reporter ProDR5:GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN, was shifted in the basal embryo and suspensor but does not support a strong direct link to auxin response. Interestingly, the observed embryo and endosperm phenotype is reminiscent of CUL4 or DDB1A/B loss of function and thus may support a regulatory role of a putative CRL4WDR55 E3 ligase complex. PMID:22447688

  5. Reduced naphthylphthalamic acid binding in the tir3 mutant of Arabidopsis is associated with a reduction in polar auxin transport and diverse morphological defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruegger, M.; Dewey, E.; Hobbie, L.; Brown, D.; Bernasconi, P.; Turner, J.; Muday, G.; Estelle, M.

    1997-01-01

    Polar auxin transport plays a key role in the regulation of plant growth and development. To identify genes involved in this process, we have developed a genetic procedure to screen for mutants of Arabidopsis that are altered in their response to auxin transport inhibitors. We recovered a total of 16 independent mutants that defined seven genes, called TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESPONSE (TIR) genes. Recessive mutations in one of these genes, TIR3, result in altered responses to transport inhibitors, a reduction in polar auxin transport, and a variety of morphological defects that can be ascribed to changes in indole-3-acetic acid distribution. Most dramatically, tir3 seedlings are strongly deficient in lateral root production, a process that is known to depend on polar auxin transport from the shoot into the root. In addition, tir3 plants display a reduction in apical dominance as well as decreased elongation of siliques, pedicels, roots, and the inflorescence. Biochemical studies indicate that tir3 plants have a reduced number of N-1-naphthylphthalamic (NPA) binding sites, suggesting that the TIR3 gene is required for expression, localization, or stabilization of the NPA binding protein (NBP). Alternatively, the TIR3 gene may encode the NBP. Because the tir3 mutants have a substantial defect in NPA binding, their phenotype provides genetic evidence for a role for the NBP in plant growth and development.

  6. The Chromodomain of LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN 1 Is Essential for H3K27me3 Binding and Function during Arabidopsis Development

    PubMed Central

    Exner, Vivien; Aichinger, Ernst; Shu, Huan; Wildhaber, Thomas; Alfarano, Pietro; Caflisch, Amedeo; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Köhler, Claudia; Hennig, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are essential to maintain gene expression patterns during development. Transcriptional repression by PcG proteins involves trimethylation of H3K27 (H3K27me3) by Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) in animals and plants. PRC1 binds to H3K27me3 and is required for transcriptional repression in animals, but in plants PRC1-like activities have remained elusive. One candidate protein that could be involved in PRC1-like functions in plants is LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN 1 (LHP1), because LHP1 associates with genes marked by H3K27me3 in vivo and has a chromodomain that binds H3K27me3 in vitro. Here, we show that disruption of the chromodomain of Arabidopsis thaliana LHP1 abolishes H3K27me3 recognition, releases gene silencing and causes similar phenotypic alterations as transcriptional lhp1 null mutants. Therefore, binding to H3K27me3 is essential for LHP1 protein function. PMID:19399177

  7. Analysis of the DNA-Binding Activities of the Arabidopsis R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor Family by One-Hybrid Experiments in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kelemen, Zsolt; Sebastian, Alvaro; Xu, Wenjia; Grain, Damaris; Salsac, Fabien; Avon, Alexandra; Berger, Nathalie; Tran, Joseph; Dubreucq, Bertrand; Lurin, Claire; Lepiniec, Loïc; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Dubos, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The control of growth and development of all living organisms is a complex and dynamic process that requires the harmonious expression of numerous genes. Gene expression is mainly controlled by the activity of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins called transcription factors (TFs). Amongst the various classes of eukaryotic TFs, the MYB superfamily is one of the largest and most diverse, and it has considerably expanded in the plant kingdom. R2R3-MYBs have been extensively studied over the last 15 years. However, DNA-binding specificity has been characterized for only a small subset of these proteins. Therefore, one of the remaining challenges is the exhaustive characterization of the DNA-binding specificity of all R2R3-MYB proteins. In this study, we have developed a library of Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB open reading frames, whose DNA-binding activities were assayed in vivo (yeast one-hybrid experiments) with a pool of selected cis-regulatory elements. Altogether 1904 interactions were assayed leading to the discovery of specific patterns of interactions between the various R2R3-MYB subgroups and their DNA target sequences and to the identification of key features that govern these interactions. The present work provides a comprehensive in vivo analysis of R2R3-MYB binding activities that should help in predicting new DNA motifs and identifying new putative target genes for each member of this very large family of TFs. In a broader perspective, the generated data will help to better understand how TF interact with their target DNA sequences. PMID:26484765

  8. Defective nuclear import of Tpr in Progeria reflects the Ran sensitivity of large cargo transport.

    PubMed

    Snow, Chelsi J; Dar, Ashraf; Dutta, Anindya; Kehlenbach, Ralph H; Paschal, Bryce M

    2013-05-13

    The RanGTPase acts as a master regulator of nucleocytoplasmic transport by controlling assembly and disassembly of nuclear transport complexes. RanGTP is required in the nucleus to release nuclear localization signal (NLS)-containing cargo from import receptors, and, under steady-state conditions, Ran is highly concentrated in the nucleus. We previously showed the nuclear/cytoplasmic Ran distribution is disrupted in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS) fibroblasts that express the Progerin form of lamin A, causing a major defect in nuclear import of the protein, translocated promoter region (Tpr). In this paper, we show that Tpr import was mediated by the most abundant import receptor, KPNA2, which binds the bipartite NLS in Tpr with nanomolar affinity. Analyses including NLS swapping revealed Progerin did not cause global inhibition of nuclear import. Rather, Progerin inhibited Tpr import because transport of large protein cargoes was sensitive to changes in the Ran nuclear/cytoplasmic distribution that occurred in HGPS. We propose that defective import of large protein complexes with important roles in nuclear function may contribute to disease-associated phenotypes in Progeria.

  9. Lysine-acetylation as a fundamental regulator of Ran function: Implications for signaling of proteins of the Ras-superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Knyphausen, Philipp; Kuhlmann, Nora; de Boor, Susanne; Lammers, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The small GTP-binding protein Ran is involved in the regulation of essential cellular processes in interphase but also in mitotic cells: Ran controls the nucleocytoplasmic transport of proteins and RNA, it regulates mitotic spindle formation and nuclear envelope assembly. Deregulations in Ran dependent processes were implicated in the development of severe diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. To understand how Ran-function is regulated is therefore of highest importance. Recently, several lysine-acetylation sites in Ran were identified by quantitative mass-spectrometry, some being located in highly important regions such as the P-loop, switch I, switch II and the G5/SAK motif. We recently reported that lysine-acetylation regulates nearly all aspects of Ran-function such as RCC1 catalyzed nucleotide exchange, intrinsic nucleotide hydrolysis, its interaction with NTF2 and the formation of import- and export-complexes. As a hint for its biological importance, we identified Ran-specific lysine-deacetylases (KDACs) and -acetyltransferases (KATs). Also for other small GTPases such as Ras, Rho, Cdc42, and for many effectors and regulators thereof, lysine-acetylation sites were discovered. However, the functional impact of lysine-acetylation as a regulator of protein function has only been marginally investigated so far. We will discuss recent findings of lysine-acetylation as a novel modification to regulate Ras-protein signaling. PMID:26507377

  10. Nuclear Export of Smads by RanBP3L Regulates Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling and Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fenfang; Lin, Xia; Xu, Pinglong; Zhang, Zhengmao; Chen, Yanzhen; Wang, Chao; Han, Jiahuai; Zhao, Bin; Xiao, Mu

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play vital roles in regulating stem cell maintenance and differentiation. BMPs can induce osteogenesis and inhibit myogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells. Canonical BMP signaling is stringently controlled through reversible phosphorylation and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Smad1, Smad5, and Smad8 (Smad1/5/8). However, how the nuclear export of Smad1/5/8 is regulated remains unclear. Here we report that the Ran-binding protein RanBP3L acts as a nuclear export factor for Smad1/5/8. RanBP3L directly recognizes dephosphorylated Smad1/5/8 and mediates their nuclear export in a Ran-dependent manner. Increased expression of RanBP3L blocks BMP-induced osteogenesis of mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and promotes myogenic induction of C2C12 mouse myoblasts, whereas depletion of RanBP3L expression enhances BMP-dependent stem cell differentiation activity and transcriptional responses. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that RanBP3L, as a nuclear exporter for BMP-specific Smads, plays a critical role in terminating BMP signaling and regulating mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. PMID:25755279

  11. Identification of Phosphoinositide-Binding Protein PATELLIN2 as a Substrate of Arabidopsis MPK4 MAP Kinase during Septum Formation in Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takamasa; Matsushima, Chiyuki; Nishimura, Shingo; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Sasabe, Michiko; Machida, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    The phosphorylation of proteins by protein kinases controls many cellular and physiological processes, which include intracellular signal transduction. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of such controls and numerous substrates of protein kinases remain to be characterized. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is of particular importance in a variety of extracellular and intracellular signaling processes. In plant cells, the progression of cytokinesis is an excellent example of an intracellular phenomenon that requires the MAPK cascade. However, the way in which MAPKs control downstream processes during cytokinesis in plant cells remains to be fully determined. We show here that comparisons, by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis, of phosphorylated proteins from wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and mutant plants defective in a MAPK cascade allow identification of substrates of a specific MAPK. Using this method, we identified the PATELLIN2 (PATL2) protein, which has a SEC14 domain, as a substrate of MPK4 MAP kinase. PATL2 was concentrated at the cell division plane, as is MPK4, and had binding affinity for phosphoinositides. This binding affinity was altered after phosphorylation of PATL2 by MPK4, suggesting a role for the MAPK cascade in the formation of cell plates via regeneration of membranes during cytokinesis. PMID:27335345

  12. A mutation in the Arabidopsis HYL1 gene encoding a dsRNA binding protein affects responses to abscisic acid, auxin, and cytokinin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, C.; Fedoroff, N.

    2000-01-01

    Both physiological and genetic evidence indicate interconnections among plant responses to different hormones. We describe a pleiotropic recessive Arabidopsis transposon insertion mutation, designated hyponastic leaves (hyl1), that alters the plant's responses to several hormones. The mutant is characterized by shorter stature, delayed flowering, leaf hyponasty, reduced fertility, decreased rate of root growth, and an altered root gravitropic response. It also exhibits less sensitivity to auxin and cytokinin and hypersensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA). The auxin transport inhibitor 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid normalizes the mutant phenotype somewhat, whereas another auxin transport inhibitor, N-(1-naph-thyl)phthalamic acid, exacerbates the phenotype. The gene, designated HYL1, encodes a 419-amino acid protein that contains two double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) binding motifs, a nuclear localization motif, and a C-terminal repeat structure suggestive of a protein-protein interaction domain. We present evidence that the HYL1 gene is ABA-regulated and encodes a nuclear dsRNA binding protein. We hypothesize that the HYL1 protein is a regulatory protein functioning at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level.

  13. FOREVER YOUNG FLOWER Negatively Regulates Ethylene Response DNA-Binding Factors by Activating an Ethylene-Responsive Factor to Control Arabidopsis Floral Organ Senescence and Abscission.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Han; Li, Pei-Fang; Chen, Ming-Kun; Lee, Yung-I; Yang, Chang-Hsien

    2015-08-01

    In this study of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we investigated the relationship between FOREVER YOUNG FLOWER (FYF) and Ethylene Response DNA-binding Factors (EDFs) and functionally analyzed a key FYF target, an Ethylene-Responsive Factor (ERF), that controls flower senescence/abscission. Ectopic expression of EDF1/2/3/4 caused promotion of flower senescence/abscission and the activation of the senescence-associated genes. The presence of a repressor domain in EDFs and the enhancement of the promotion of senescence/abscission in EDF1/2/3/4+SRDX (converting EDFs to strong repressors by fusion with the ERF-associated amphiphilic repression motif repression domain SRDX) transgenic plants suggested that EDFs act as repressors. The significant reduction of β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression by 35S:FYF in EDF1/2/3/4:GUS plants indicates that EDF1/2/3/4 functions downstream of FYF in regulating flower senescence/abscission. In this study, we also characterized an ERF gene, FOREVER YOUNG FLOWER UP-REGULATING FACTOR1 (FUF1), which is up-regulated by FYF during flower development. Ectopic expression of FUF1 caused similar delayed flower senescence/abscission as seen in 35S:FYF plants. This phenotype was correlated with deficient abscission zone formation, ethylene insensitivity, and down-regulation of EDF1/2/3/4 and abscission-associated genes in 35S:FUF1 flowers. In contrast, significant promotion of flower senescence/abscission and up-regulation of EDF1/2/3/4 were observed in 35S:FUF1+SRDX transgenic dominant-negative plants, in which FUF1 is converted to a potent repressor by fusion to an SRDX-suppressing motif. Thus, FUF1 acts as an activator in suppressing EDF1/2/3/4 function and senescence/abscission of the flowers. Our results reveal that FYF regulates flower senescence/abscission by negatively regulating EDF1/2/3/4, which is the downstream gene in the ethylene response, by activating FUF1 in Arabidopsis.

  14. FOREVER YOUNG FLOWER Negatively Regulates Ethylene Response DNA-Binding Factors by Activating an Ethylene-Responsive Factor to Control Arabidopsis Floral Organ Senescence and Abscission1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Han; Li, Pei-Fang; Chen, Ming-Kun; Lee, Yung-I; Yang, Chang-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    In this study of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we investigated the relationship between FOREVER YOUNG FLOWER (FYF) and Ethylene Response DNA-binding Factors (EDFs) and functionally analyzed a key FYF target, an Ethylene-Responsive Factor (ERF), that controls flower senescence/abscission. Ectopic expression of EDF1/2/3/4 caused promotion of flower senescence/abscission and the activation of the senescence-associated genes. The presence of a repressor domain in EDFs and the enhancement of the promotion of senescence/abscission in EDF1/2/3/4+SRDX (converting EDFs to strong repressors by fusion with the ERF-associated amphiphilic repression motif repression domain SRDX) transgenic plants suggested that EDFs act as repressors. The significant reduction of β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression by 35S:FYF in EDF1/2/3/4:GUS plants indicates that EDF1/2/3/4 functions downstream of FYF in regulating flower senescence/abscission. In this study, we also characterized an ERF gene, FOREVER YOUNG FLOWER UP-REGULATING FACTOR1 (FUF1), which is up-regulated by FYF during flower development. Ectopic expression of FUF1 caused similar delayed flower senescence/abscission as seen in 35S:FYF plants. This phenotype was correlated with deficient abscission zone formation, ethylene insensitivity, and down-regulation of EDF1/2/3/4 and abscission-associated genes in 35S:FUF1 flowers. In contrast, significant promotion of flower senescence/abscission and up-regulation of EDF1/2/3/4 were observed in 35S:FUF1+SRDX transgenic dominant-negative plants, in which FUF1 is converted to a potent repressor by fusion to an SRDX-suppressing motif. Thus, FUF1 acts as an activator in suppressing EDF1/2/3/4 function and senescence/abscission of the flowers. Our results reveal that FYF regulates flower senescence/abscission by negatively regulating EDF1/2/3/4, which is the downstream gene in the ethylene response, by activating FUF1 in Arabidopsis. PMID:26063506

  15. The Arabidopsis KH-Domain RNA-Binding Protein ESR1 Functions in Components of Jasmonate Signalling, Unlinking Growth Restraint and Resistance to Stress

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Louise F.; Kamphuis, Lars G.; Hane, James K.; Oñate-Sánchez, Luis; Singh, Karam B.

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play important roles in the protection of cells against toxins and oxidative damage where one Arabidopsis member, GSTF8, has become a commonly used marker gene for early stress and defense responses. A GSTF8 promoter fragment fused to the luciferase reporter gene was used in a forward genetic screen for Arabidopsis mutants with up-regulated GSTF8 promoter activity. This identified the esr1-1 (enhanced stress response 1) mutant which also conferred increased resistance to the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. Through positional cloning, the ESR1 gene was found to encode a KH-domain containing RNA-binding protein (At5g53060). Whole transcriptome sequencing of esr1-1 identified altered expression of genes involved in responses to biotic and abiotic stimuli, hormone signaling pathways and developmental processes. In particular was an overall significant enrichment for jasmonic acid (JA) mediated processes in the esr1-1 down-regulated dataset. A subset of these genes were tested for MeJA inducibility and we found the expression of some but not all were reduced in esr1-1. The esr1-1 mutant was not impaired in other aspects of JA-signalling such as JA- sensitivity or development, suggesting ESR1 functions in specific components of the JA-signaling pathway. Examination of salicylic acid (SA) regulated marker genes in esr1-1 showed no increase in basal or SA induced expression suggesting repression of JA-regulated genes is not due to antagonistic SA-JA crosstalk. These results define new roles for KH-domain containing proteins with ESR1 unlinking JA-mediated growth and defense responses. PMID:25985302

  16. The Arabidopsis KH-Domain RNA-Binding Protein ESR1 Functions in Components of Jasmonate Signalling, Unlinking Growth Restraint and Resistance to Stress.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Louise F; Kamphuis, Lars G; Hane, James K; Oñate-Sánchez, Luis; Singh, Karam B

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play important roles in the protection of cells against toxins and oxidative damage where one Arabidopsis member, GSTF8, has become a commonly used marker gene for early stress and defense responses. A GSTF8 promoter fragment fused to the luciferase reporter gene was used in a forward genetic screen for Arabidopsis mutants with up-regulated GSTF8 promoter activity. This identified the esr1-1 (enhanced stress response 1) mutant which also conferred increased resistance to the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. Through positional cloning, the ESR1 gene was found to encode a KH-domain containing RNA-binding protein (At5g53060). Whole transcriptome sequencing of esr1-1 identified altered expression of genes involved in responses to biotic and abiotic stimuli, hormone signaling pathways and developmental processes. In particular was an overall significant enrichment for jasmonic acid (JA) mediated processes in the esr1-1 down-regulated dataset. A subset of these genes were tested for MeJA inducibility and we found the expression of some but not all were reduced in esr1-1. The esr1-1 mutant was not impaired in other aspects of JA-signalling such as JA- sensitivity or development, suggesting ESR1 functions in specific components of the JA-signaling pathway. Examination of salicylic acid (SA) regulated marker genes in esr1-1 showed no increase in basal or SA induced expression suggesting repression of JA-regulated genes is not due to antagonistic SA-JA crosstalk. These results define new roles for KH-domain containing proteins with ESR1 unlinking JA-mediated growth and defense responses.

  17. A C-Repeat Binding Factor Transcriptional Activator (CBF/DREB1) from European Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) Induces Freezing Tolerance When Expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Oakenfull, Rachael J.; Baxter, Robert; Knight, Marc R.

    2013-01-01

    Freezing stress affects all plants from temperate zones to the poles. Global climate change means such freezing events are becoming less predictable. This in turn reduces the ability of plants to predict the approaching low temperatures and cold acclimate. This has consequences for crop yields and distribution of wild plant species. C-repeat binding factors (CBFs) are transcription factors previously shown to play a vital role in the acclimation process of Arabidopsis thaliana, controlling the expression of hundreds of genes whose products are necessary for freezing tolerance. Work in other plant species cements CBFs as key determinants in the trait of freezing tolerance in higher plants. To test the function of CBFs from highly freezing tolerant plants species we cloned and sequenced CBF transcription factors from three Vaccinium species (Vaccinium myrtillus, Vaccinium uliginosum and Vaccinium vitis-idaea) which we collected in the Arctic. We tested the activity of CBF transcription factors from the three Vaccinium species by producing transgenic Arabidopsis lines overexpressing them. Only the Vaccinium myrtillus CBF was able to substantially activate COR (CBF-target) gene expression in the absence of cold. Correspondingly, only the lines expressing the Vaccinium myrtillus CBF were constitutively freezing tolerant. The basis for the differences in potency of the three Vaccinium CBFs was tested by observing cellular localisation and protein levels. All three CBFs were correctly targeted to the nucleus, but Vaccinium uliginosum CBF appeared to be relatively unstable. The reasons for lack of potency for Vaccinium vitis-idaea CBF were not due to stability or targeting, and we speculate that this was due to altered transcription factor function. PMID:23349799

  18. Human Dectin-1 isoform E is a cytoplasmic protein and interacts with RanBPM.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianhui; Sun, Maoyun; Guo, Liang; Liu, Weicheng; Jiang, Jianhai; Chen, Xiaoning; Zhou, Lei; Gu, Jianxin

    2006-09-01

    Human Dectin-1, a type II transmembrane receptor, is alternatively spliced, generating eight isoforms. Of these isoforms, the isoform E (hDectin-1E) is structurally unique, containing a complete C-type lectin-like domain as well as an ITAM-like sequence. So far, little is known about its function. In the present study, we demonstrated that hDectin-1E was not secreted and it mainly resided in the cytoplasm. Using yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified a Ran-binding protein, RanBPM, as an interacting partner of hDectin-1E. GST pull-down assays showed that RanBPM interacted directly with hDectin-1E and the region containing SPRY domain was sufficient for the interaction. The binding of hDectin-1E and RanBPM was further confirmed in vivo by co-immunoprecipitation assay and confocal microscopic analysis. Taken together, our data provide a clue to the understanding of the function about hDectin-1E. PMID:16870151

  19. Mechanistic Insights from Structural Analyses of Ran-GTPase-Driven Nuclear Export of Proteins and RNAs.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-22

    Understanding how macromolecules are rapidly exchanged between the nucleus and the cytoplasm through nuclear pore complexes is a fundamental problem in biology. Exportins are Ran-GTPase-dependent nuclear transport factors that belong to the karyopherin-β family and mediate nuclear export of a plethora of proteins and RNAs, except for bulk mRNA nuclear export. Exportins bind cargo macromolecules in a Ran-GTP-dependent manner in the nucleus, forming exportin-cargo-Ran-GTP complexes (nuclear export complexes). Transient weak interactions between exportins and nucleoporins containing characteristic FG (phenylalanine-glycine) repeat motifs facilitate nuclear pore complex passage of nuclear export complexes. In the cytoplasm, nuclear export complexes are disassembled, thereby releasing the cargo. GTP hydrolysis by Ran promoted in the cytoplasm makes the disassembly reaction virtually irreversible and provides thermodynamic driving force for the overall export reaction. In the past decade, X-ray crystallography of some of the exportins in various functional states coupled with functional analyses, single-particle electron microscopy, molecular dynamics simulations, and small-angle solution X-ray scattering has provided rich insights into the mechanism of cargo binding and release and also begins to elucidate how exportins interact with the FG repeat motifs. The knowledge gained from structural analyses of nuclear export is being translated into development of clinically useful inhibitors of nuclear export to treat human diseases such as cancer and influenza.

  20. Arabidopsis AtbHLH112 regulates the expression of genes involved in abiotic stress tolerance by binding to their E-box and GCG-box motifs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yujia; Ji, Xiaoyu; Nie, Xianguang; Qu, Min; Zheng, Lei; Tan, Zilong; Zhao, Huimin; Huo, Lin; Liu, Shengnan; Zhang, Bing; Wang, Yucheng

    2015-08-01

    Plant basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors play essential roles in abiotic stress tolerance. However, most bHLHs have not been functionally characterized. Here, we characterized the functional role of a bHLH transcription factor from Arabidopsis, AtbHLH112, in response to abiotic stress. AtbHLH112 is a nuclear-localized protein, and its nuclear localization is induced by salt, drought and abscisic acid (ABA). In addition, AtbHLH112 serves as a transcriptional activator, with the activation domain located at its N-terminus. In addition to binding to the E-box motifs of stress-responsive genes, AtbHLH112 binds to a novel motif with the sequence 'GG[GT]CC[GT][GA][TA]C' (GCG-box). Gain- and loss-of-function analyses showed that the transcript level of AtbHLH112 is positively correlated with salt and drought tolerance. AtbHLH112 mediates stress tolerance by increasing the expression of P5CS genes and reducing the expression of P5CDH and ProDH genes to increase proline levels. AtbHLH112 also increases the expression of POD and SOD genes to improve reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging ability. We present a model suggesting that AtbHLH112 is a transcriptional activator that regulates the expression of genes via binding to their GCG- or E-boxes to mediate physiological responses, including proline biosynthesis and ROS scavenging pathways, to enhance stress tolerance.

  1. Overexpression of a LAM domain containing RNA-binding protein LARP1c induces precocious leaf senescence in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bangyue; Jia, Jianheng; Yang, Min; Yan, Chunxia; Han, Yuzhen

    2012-10-01

    Leaf senescence is the final stage of leaf life history, and it can be regulated by multiple internal and external cues. La-related proteins (LARPs), which contain a well-conserved La motif (LAM) domain and normally a canonical RNA recognition motif (RRM) or noncanonical RRM-like motif, are widely present in eukaryotes. Six LARP genes (LARP1a-1c and LARP6a-6c) are present in Arabidopsis, but their biological functions have not been studied previously. In this study, we investigated the biological roles of LARP1c from the LARP1 family. Constitutive or inducible overexpression of LARP1c caused premature leaf senescence. Expression levels of several senescence-associated genes and defense-related genes were elevated upon overexpression of LARP1c. The LARP1c null mutant 1c-1 impaired ABA-, SA-, and MeJA-induced leaf senescence in detached leaves. Gene expression profiles of LARP1c showed age-dependent expression in rosette leaves. Taken together, our results suggest LARP1c is involved in regulation of leaf senescence. PMID:22965746

  2. On code verification of RANS solvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eça, L.; Klaij, C. M.; Vaz, G.; Hoekstra, M.; Pereira, F. S.

    2016-04-01

    This article discusses Code Verification of Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) solvers that rely on face based finite volume discretizations for volumes of arbitrary shape. The study includes test cases with known analytical solutions (generated with the method of manufactured solutions) corresponding to laminar and turbulent flow, with the latter using eddy-viscosity turbulence models. The procedure to perform Code Verification based on grid refinement studies is discussed and the requirements for its correct application are illustrated in a simple one-dimensional problem. It is shown that geometrically similar grids are recommended for proper Code Verification and so the data should not have scatter making the use of least square fits unnecessary. Results show that it may be advantageous to determine the extrapolated error to cell size/time step zero instead of assuming that it is zero, especially when it is hard to determine the asymptotic order of grid convergence. In the RANS examples, several of the features of the ReFRESCO solver are checked including the effects of the available turbulence models in the convergence properties of the code. It is shown that it is required to account for non-orthogonality effects in the discretization of the diffusion terms and that the turbulence quantities transport equations can deteriorate the order of grid convergence of mean flow quantities.

  3. Redundant ERF-VII Transcription Factors Bind to an Evolutionarily Conserved cis-Motif to Regulate Hypoxia-Responsive Gene Expression in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gasch, Philipp; Fundinger, Moritz; Müller, Jana T; Lee, Travis; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Mustroph, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    The response of Arabidopsis thaliana to low-oxygen stress (hypoxia), such as during shoot submergence or root waterlogging, includes increasing the levels of ∼50 hypoxia-responsive gene transcripts, many of which encode enzymes associated with anaerobic metabolism. Upregulation of over half of these mRNAs involves stabilization of five group VII ethylene response factor (ERF-VII) transcription factors, which are routinely degraded via the N-end rule pathway of proteolysis in an oxygen- and nitric oxide-dependent manner. Despite their importance, neither the quantitative contribution of individual ERF-VIIs nor the cis-regulatory elements they govern are well understood. Here, using single- and double-null mutants, the constitutively synthesized ERF-VIIs RELATED TO APETALA2.2 (RAP2.2) and RAP2.12 are shown to act redundantly as principle activators of hypoxia-responsive genes; constitutively expressed RAP2.3 contributes to this redundancy, whereas the hypoxia-induced HYPOXIA RESPONSIVE ERF1 (HRE1) and HRE2 play minor roles. An evolutionarily conserved 12-bp cis-regulatory motif that binds to and is sufficient for activation by RAP2.2 and RAP2.12 is identified through a comparative phylogenetic motif search, promoter dissection, yeast one-hybrid assays, and chromatin immunopurification. This motif, designated the hypoxia-responsive promoter element, is enriched in promoters of hypoxia-responsive genes in multiple species. PMID:26668304

  4. Polypyrimidine Tract Binding Protein Homologs from Arabidopsis Are Key Regulators of Alternative Splicing with Implications in Fundamental Developmental Processes[W

    PubMed Central

    Rühl, Christina; Stauffer, Eva; Kahles, André; Wagner, Gabriele; Drechsel, Gabriele; Rätsch, Gunnar; Wachter, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) generates transcript variants by variable exon/intron definition and massively expands transcriptome diversity. Changes in AS patterns have been found to be linked to manifold biological processes, yet fundamental aspects, such as the regulation of AS and its functional implications, largely remain to be addressed. In this work, widespread AS regulation by Arabidopsis thaliana Polypyrimidine tract binding protein homologs (PTBs) was revealed. In total, 452 AS events derived from 307 distinct genes were found to be responsive to the levels of the splicing factors PTB1 and PTB2, which predominantly triggered splicing of regulated introns, inclusion of cassette exons, and usage of upstream 5′ splice sites. By contrast, no major AS regulatory function of the distantly related PTB3 was found. Dependent on their position within the mRNA, PTB-regulated events can both modify the untranslated regions and give rise to alternative protein products. We find that PTB-mediated AS events are connected to diverse biological processes, and the functional implications of selected instances were further elucidated. Specifically, PTB misexpression changes AS of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR6, coinciding with altered rates of abscisic acid–dependent seed germination. Furthermore, AS patterns as well as the expression of key flowering regulators were massively changed in a PTB1/2 level-dependent manner. PMID:23192226

  5. Transcriptome-Wide Identification of RNA Targets of Arabidopsis SERINE/ARGININE-RICH45 Uncovers the Unexpected Roles of This RNA Binding Protein in RNA Processing[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yajun; Hamilton, Michael; Ben-Hur, Asa; Reddy, Anireddy S.N.

    2015-01-01

    Plant SR45 and its metazoan ortholog RNPS1 are serine/arginine-rich (SR)-like RNA binding proteins that function in splicing/postsplicing events and regulate diverse processes in eukaryotes. Interactions of SR45 with both RNAs and proteins are crucial for regulating RNA processing. However, in vivo RNA targets of SR45 are currently unclear. Using RNA immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing, we identified over 4000 Arabidopsis thaliana RNAs that directly or indirectly associate with SR45, designated as SR45-associated RNAs (SARs). Comprehensive analyses of these SARs revealed several roles for SR45. First, SR45 associates with and regulates the expression of 30% of abscisic acid (ABA) signaling genes at the postsplicing level. Second, although most SARs are derived from intron-containing genes, surprisingly, 340 SARs are derived from intronless genes. Expression analysis of the SARs suggests that SR45 differentially regulates intronless and intron-containing SARs. Finally, we identified four overrepresented RNA motifs in SARs that likely mediate SR45’s recognition of its targets. Therefore, SR45 plays an unexpected role in mRNA processing of intronless genes, and numerous ABA signaling genes are targeted for regulation at the posttranscriptional level. The diverse molecular functions of SR45 uncovered in this study are likely applicable to other species in view of its conservation across eukaryotes. PMID:26603559

  6. Transcriptome-Wide Identification of RNA Targets of Arabidopsis SERINE/ARGININE-RICH45 Uncovers the Unexpected Roles of This RNA Binding Protein in RNA Processing.

    PubMed

    Xing, Denghui; Wang, Yajun; Hamilton, Michael; Ben-Hur, Asa; Reddy, Anireddy S N

    2015-12-01

    Plant SR45 and its metazoan ortholog RNPS1 are serine/arginine-rich (SR)-like RNA binding proteins that function in splicing/postsplicing events and regulate diverse processes in eukaryotes. Interactions of SR45 with both RNAs and proteins are crucial for regulating RNA processing. However, in vivo RNA targets of SR45 are currently unclear. Using RNA immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing, we identified over 4000 Arabidopsis thaliana RNAs that directly or indirectly associate with SR45, designated as SR45-associated RNAs (SARs). Comprehensive analyses of these SARs revealed several roles for SR45. First, SR45 associates with and regulates the expression of 30% of abscisic acid (ABA) signaling genes at the postsplicing level. Second, although most SARs are derived from intron-containing genes, surprisingly, 340 SARs are derived from intronless genes. Expression analysis of the SARs suggests that SR45 differentially regulates intronless and intron-containing SARs. Finally, we identified four overrepresented RNA motifs in SARs that likely mediate SR45's recognition of its targets. Therefore, SR45 plays an unexpected role in mRNA processing of intronless genes, and numerous ABA signaling genes are targeted for regulation at the posttranscriptional level. The diverse molecular functions of SR45 uncovered in this study are likely applicable to other species in view of its conservation across eukaryotes. PMID:26603559

  7. Excitation energy transfer and charge separation are affected in Arabidopsis thaliana mutants lacking light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding protein Lhcb3.

    PubMed

    Adamiec, Małgorzata; Gibasiewicz, Krzysztof; Luciński, Robert; Giera, Wojciech; Chełminiak, Przemysław; Szewczyk, Sebastian; Sipińska, Weronika; van Grondelle, Rienk; Jackowski, Grzegorz

    2015-12-01

    The composition of LHCII trimers as well as excitation energy transfer and charge separation in grana cores of Arabidopsis thaliana mutant lacking chlorophyll a/b binding protein Lhcb3 have been investigated and compared to those in wild-type plants. In grana cores of lhcb3 plants we observed increased amounts of Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 apoproteins per PSII core. The additional copies of Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 are expected to substitute for Lhcb3 in LHCII trimers M as well as in the LHCII "extra" pool, which was found to be modestly enlarged as a result of the absence of Lhcb3. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements reveal a deceleration of the fast phase of excitation dynamics in grana cores of the mutant by ~15 ps, whereas the average fluorescence lifetime is not significantly altered. Monte Carlo modeling predicts a slowing down of the mean hopping time and an increased stabilization of the primary charge separation in the mutant. Thus our data imply that absence of apoprotein Lhcb3 results in detectable differences in excitation energy transfer and charge separation.

  8. The methylated N-terminal tail of RCC1 is required for stabilisation of its interaction with chromatin by Ran in live cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Regulator of chromosome condensation 1 (RCC1) is the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ran GTPase. Localised generation of Ran-GTP by RCC1 on chromatin is critical for nucleocytoplasmic transport, mitotic spindle assembly and nuclear envelope formation. Both the N-terminal tail of RCC1 and its association with Ran are important for its interaction with chromatin in cells. In vitro, the association of Ran with RCC1 induces a conformational change in the N-terminal tail that promotes its interaction with DNA. Results We have investigated the mechanism of the dynamic interaction of the α isoform of human RCC1 (RCC1α) with chromatin in live cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions. We show that the N-terminal tail stabilises the interaction of RCC1α with chromatin and this function can be partially replaced by another lysine-rich nuclear localisation signal. Removal of the tail prevents the interaction of RCC1α with chromatin from being stabilised by RanT24N, a mutant that binds stably to RCC1α. The interaction of RCC1α with chromatin is destabilised by mutation of lysine 4 (K4Q), which abolishes α-N-terminal methylation, and this interaction is no longer stabilised by RanT24N. However, α-N-terminal methylation of RCC1α is not regulated by the binding of RanT24N. Conversely, the association of Ran with precipitated RCC1α does not require the N-terminal tail of RCC1α or its methylation. The mobility of RCC1α on chromatin is increased by mutation of aspartate 182 (D182A), which inhibits guanine-nucleotide exchange activity, but RCC1αD182A can still bind nucleotide-free Ran and its interaction with chromatin is stabilised by RanT24N. Conclusions These results show that the stabilisation of the dynamic interaction of RCC1α with chromatin by Ran in live cells requires the N-terminal tail of RCC1α. α-N-methylation is not regulated by formation of the binary complex with Ran, but

  9. Lars-Göran Öst.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Gerhard; Holmes, Emily A; Carlbring, Per

    2013-01-01

    Lars-Göran Öst is one of the most eminent clinical researchers in the field of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and a founder of CBT in Sweden. He has recently retired from his position as professor in clinical psychology at Stockholm University, Sweden. In this paper, we sketch a brief description of the body of work by Öst. Examples of his innovative and pioneering new treatment methods include the one-session treatment for specific phobias, as well as applied relaxation for a range of anxiety disorders and health conditions. While Öst remains active in the field, he has contributed significantly to the development and dissemination of CBT in Sweden as well as in the world.

  10. The GTPase RAN regulates multiple steps of the centrosome life cycle.

    PubMed

    Lavia, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Growing lines of evidence implicate the small GTPase RAN, its regulators and effectors--predominantly, nuclear transport receptors--in practically all aspects of centrosome biology in mammalian cells. These include duplication licensing, cohesion, positioning, and microtubule-nucleation capacity. RAN cooperates with the protein nuclear export vector exportin 1/CRM1 to recruit scaffolding proteins containing nuclear export sequences that play roles in the structural organization of centrosomes. Together, they also limit centrosome reduplication by regulating the localization of key "licensing" proteins during the centrosome duplication cycle. In parallel, RAN also regulates the capacity of centrosomes to nucleate and organize functional microtubules, and this predominanlty involves importin vectors: many factors regulating microtubule nucleation or function harbor nuclear localization sequences that interact with importin molecules and such interaction inhibits their activity. Active RANGTP binding to importin molecules removes the inhibition and releases microtubule regulatory factors in the free productive form. A dynamic scenario emerges, in which RAN is pivotal in linking spatiotemporal control of centrosome regulators to the cell cycle machinery. PMID:26725228

  11. Overexpression of Arabidopsis Dehydration-Responsive Element-Binding protein 2A confers tolerance to salinity stress to transgenic canola.

    PubMed

    Shafeinie, Alireza; Mohammadi, Valiollah; Alizadeh, Houshang; Zali, Abas Ali

    2014-05-01

    Stress responsive transcriptional regulation is an adaptive strategy of plants that alleviates the adverse effects of environmental stresses. The ectopic overexpression of Dehydration-Responsive Element Binding transcription factors (DREBs) either in homologous or in heterologous plants are the classical transcriptional regulators involved in plant responses to drought, salt and cold stresses. To elucidate the transcriptional mechanism associated with the DREB2A gene after removing PEST sequence, which acts as a signal peptide for protein degradation, 34 transgenic T0 canola plants overexpressing DREB2A were developed. The quantitative Real time PCR of transgenic plants showed higher expression of downstream stress-responsive genes including COR14, HSF3, HSP70, PEROX and RD20. The transgenic plants exhibited enhanced tolerance to salt stress. At the high concentration of NaCl the growth of non-transformed plants had been clearly diminished, whereas transgenic line was survived. These results indicated that transformed DREB2A gene might improve the plant response to salinity in transgenic canola plants. PMID:26030994

  12. Structure of transportin SR2, a karyopherin involved in human disease, in complex with Ran

    PubMed Central

    Tsirkone, Vicky G.; Beutels, Katrien G.; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Debyser, Zeger; Christ, Frauke; Strelkov, Sergei V.

    2014-01-01

    Transportin SR2 (TRN-SR2) is a β-type karyopherin responsible for the nuclear import of specific cargoes, including serine/arginine-rich splicing factors. The protein has been implicated in a variety of human diseases, including HIV infection, primary biliary cirrhosis and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 1F. Towards understanding its molecular mechanism, a 2.9 Å resolution crystal structure of human TRN-SR2 complexed with the small GTPase Ran has been determined. TRN-SR2 is composed of 20 α-helical HEAT repeats forming a solenoid-like fold. The first nine repeats form a ‘cradle’ for the binding of RanGTP, revealing similarities but also differences with respect to the related importin 13 complex. PMID:24915079

  13. Ras-Related Nuclear Protein Ran3B Gene Is Involved in Hormone Responses in the Embryogenic Callus of Dimocarpus longan Lour.

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Qilin; Lin, Yuling; Zhang, Dongmin; Lai, Ruilian; Lai, Zhongxiong

    2016-01-01

    Ras-related guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding nuclear protein (Ran) GTPases function as molecular switches and regulate diverse cellular events in eukaryotes. Our previous work suggested that DlRan3B is active during longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) somatic embryogenesis (SE) processes. Herein, subcellular localization of DlRan3B was found to be localized in the nucleus and expression profiling of DlRan3B was performed during longan SE and after exposure to plant hormones (indoleacetic acid (IAA), gibberellin A3 (GA3), salicylic acid (SA), methyl jasmonte (MeJA), and abscisic acid (ABA)). We cloned and sequenced 1569 bp of 5′-flanking sequence of DlRan3B (GenBank: JQ279697). Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the promoter contained plant hormone-related regulatory elements. Deletion analysis and responses to hormones identified stimulative and repressive regulatory elements in the DlRan3B promoter. The key elements included those responding to auxin, gibberellin, SA, MeJA, and ABA. DlRan3B was located in the nucleus and accumulated in the late stage of longan SE. The expression of DlRan3B was significantly induced by IAA, GA3, and ABA, but suppressed by SA and MeJA. Promoter transcription was induced by IAA and GA3, but suppressed by SA. Thus, DlRan3B might participate in auxin, gibberellin, and ABA responses during longan late SE, and DlRan3B is involved in phytohormone responsiveness. PMID:27271605

  14. Proteomics Identification of Nuclear Ran GTPase as an Inhibitor of Human VRK1 and VRK2 (Vaccinia-related Kinase) Activities*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-García, Marta; López-Sánchez, Inmaculada; Lazo, Pedro A.

    2008-01-01

    Human vaccinia-related kinase (VRK) 1 is a novel serine-threonine kinase that regulates several transcription factors, nuclear envelope assembly, and chromatin condensation and is also required for cell cycle progression. The regulation of this kinase family is unknown. Mass spectrometry has permitted the identification of Ran as an interacting and regulatory protein of the VRK serine-threonine kinase activities. The stable interaction has been validated by pulldown of endogenous proteins as well as by reciprocal immunoprecipitations. The three members of the VRK family stably interact with Ran, and the interaction was not affected by the bound nucleotide, GDP or GTP. The interaction was stronger with the RanT24N that is locked in its inactive conformation and cannot bind nucleotides. None of the kinases phosphorylated Ran or RCC1. VRK1 does not directly interact with RCC1, but if Ran is present they can be isolated as a complex. The main effect of the interaction of inactive RanGDP with VRK1 is the inhibition of its kinase activity, which was detected by a reduction in VRK1 autophosphorylation and a reduction in phosphorylation of histone H3 in residues Thr-3 and Ser-10. The kinase activity inhibition can be relieved by the interaction with the constitutively active RanGTP or RanL43E, which locks Ran in its GTP-bound active conformation. In this complex, the interaction with VRK proteins does not alter the effect of its guanine exchange factor, RCC1. Ran is a novel negative regulator of nuclear VRK1 and VRK2 kinase activity, which may vary in different subcellular localizations generating an asymmetric intracellular distribution of kinase activity depending on local protein interactions. PMID:18617507

  15. JACALIN-LECTIN LIKE1 Regulates the Nuclear Accumulation of GLYCINE-RICH RNA-BINDING PROTEIN7, Influencing the RNA Processing of FLOWERING LOCUS C Antisense Transcripts and Flowering Time in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jun; Li, Chunhua; Xu, Shujuan; Xing, Lijing; Xu, Yunyuan; Chong, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Lectins selectively recognize sugars or glycans for defense in living cells, but less is known about their roles in the development process and the functional network with other factors. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) JACALIN-LECTIN LIKE1 (AtJAC1) functions in flowering time control. Loss of function of AtJAC1 leads to precocious flowering, whereas overexpression of AtJAC1 causes delayed flowering. AtJAC1 influences flowering through regulation of the key flowering repressor gene FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Genetic analysis revealed that AtJAC1’s function is mostly dependent on GLYCINE-RICH RNA-BINDING PROTEIN7 (GRP7), an upstream regulator of FLC. Biochemical and cell biological data indicated that AtJAC1 interacted physically with GRP7 specifically in the cytoplasm. AtJAC1 influences the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of GRP7, with predominant nuclear localization of GRP7 when AtJAC1 function is lost but retention of GRP7 in the cytoplasm when AtJAC1 is overexpressed. A temporal inducible assay suggested that AtJAC1’s regulation of flowering could be compromised by the nuclear accumulation of GRP7. In addition, GRP7 binds to the antisense precursor messenger RNA of FLC through a conserved RNA motif. Loss of GRP7 function leads to the elevation of total FLC antisense transcripts and reduced proximal-distal polyadenylation ratio, as well as histone methylation changes in the FLC gene body region and increased total functional sense FLC transcript. Attenuating the direct binding of GRP7 with competing artificial RNAs leads to changes of FLC antisense precursor messenger RNA processing and flowering transition. Taken together, our study indicates that AtJAC1 coordinates with GRP7 in shaping plant development through the regulation of RNA processing in Arabidopsis. PMID:26392261

  16. RAN/TC4 mutants identify a common requirement for snRNP and protein import into the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Kinetic competition experiments have demonstrated that at least some factors required for the nuclear import of proteins and U snRNPs are distinct. Both import processes require energy, and in the case of protein import, the energy requirement is known to be at least partly met by GTP hydrolysis by the Ran GTPase. We have compared the effects of nonhydrolyzable GTP analogues and two mutant Ran proteins on the nuclear import of proteins and U snRNPs in vitro. The mutant Ran proteins have different defects; Q69L (glutamine 69 changed to leucine) is defective in GTP hydrolysis while T24N (threonine 24 changed to asparagine) is defective in binding GTP. Both protein and snRNP import are sensitive either to the presence of the two mutant Ran proteins, which act as dominant negative inhibitors of nuclear import, or to incubation with nonhydrolyzable GTP analogues. This demonstrates that there is a requirement for a GTPase activity for the import of U snRNPs, as well as proteins, into the nucleus. The dominant negative effects of the two mutant Ran proteins indicate that the pathways of protein and snRNP import share at lease one common component. PMID:8636225

  17. Ran-unassisted nuclear migration of a 97-kD component of nuclear pore-targeting complex.

    PubMed

    Kose, S; Imamoto, N; Tachibana, T; Shimamoto, T; Yoneda, Y

    1997-11-17

    A 97-kD component of nuclear pore-targeting complex (the beta-subunit of nuclear pore-targeting complex [PTAC]/importin/karyopherin) mediates the import of nuclear localization signal (NLS)-containing proteins by anchoring the NLS receptor protein (the alpha-subunit of PTAC/importin/karyopherin) to the nuclear pore complex (NPC). The import requires a small GTPase Ran, which interacts directly with the beta-subunit. The present study describes an examination of the behavior of the beta-subunit in living cells and in digitonin-permeabilized cells. In living cells, cytoplasmically injected beta-subunit rapidly migrates into the nucleus. The use of deletion mutants reveals that nuclear migration of the beta-subunit requires neither Ran- nor alpha-subunit-binding but only the NPC-binding domain of this molecule, which is also involved in NLS-mediated import. Furthermore, unlike NLS-mediated import, a dominant-negative Ran, defective in GTP-hydrolysis, did not inhibit nuclear migration of the beta-subunit. In the digitonin-permeabilized cell-free import assay, the beta-subunit transits rapidly through the NPC into the nucleus in a saturating manner in the absence of exogenous addition of soluble factors. These results show that the beta-subunit undergoes translocation at the NPC in a Ran-unassisted manner when it does not carry alpha-subunit/NLS substrate. Therefore, a requirement for Ran arises only when the beta-subunit undergoes a translocation reaction together with the alpha-subunit/NLS substrate. The results provide an insight to the yet unsolved question regarding the mechanism by which proteins are directionally transported through the NPC, and the role of Ran in this process.

  18. Two transcription factors, DREB1 and DREB2, with an EREBP/AP2 DNA binding domain separate two cellular signal transduction pathways in drought- and low-temperature-responsive gene expression, respectively, in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Kasuga, M; Sakuma, Y; Abe, H; Miura, S; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, K; Shinozaki, K

    1998-08-01

    Plant growth is greatly affected by drought and low temperature. Expression of a number of genes is induced by both drought and low temperature, although these stresses are quite different. Previous experiments have established that a cis-acting element named DRE (for dehydration-responsive element) plays an important role in both dehydration- and low-temperature-induced gene expression in Arabidopsis. Two cDNA clones that encode DRE binding proteins, DREB1A and DREB2A, were isolated by using the yeast one-hybrid screening technique. The two cDNA libraries were prepared from dehydrated and cold-treated rosette plants, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of DREB1A and DREB2A showed no significant sequence similarity, except in the conserved DNA binding domains found in the EREBP and APETALA2 proteins that function in ethylene-responsive expression and floral morphogenesis, respectively. Both the DREB1A and DREB2A proteins specifically bound to the DRE sequence in vitro and activated the transcription of the b-glucuronidase reporter gene driven by the DRE sequence in Arabidopsis leaf protoplasts. Expression of the DREB1A gene and its two homologs was induced by low-temperature stress, whereas expression of the DREB2A gene and its single homolog was induced by dehydration. Overexpression of the DREB1A cDNA in transgenic Arabidopsis plants not only induced strong expression of the target genes under unstressed conditions but also caused dwarfed phenotypes in the transgenic plants. These transgenic plants also revealed freezing and dehydration tolerance. In contrast, overexpression of the DREB2A cDNA induced weak expression of the target genes under unstressed conditions and caused growth retardation of the transgenic plants. These results indicate that two independent families of DREB proteins, DREB1 and DREB2, function as trans-acting factors in two separate signal transduction pathways under low-temperature and dehydration conditions, respectively. PMID

  19. Coupling Turbulence in Hybrid LES-RANS Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, Stephen L.

    2011-01-01

    A formulation is proposed for hybrid LES-RANS computations that permits accurate computations during resolution changes, so that resolution may be changed at will in order to employ only as much resolution in each subdomain as is required by the physics. The two components of this formulation, establishing the accuracy of a hybrid model at constant resolutions throughout the RANS-to-LES range and maintaining that accuracy when resolution is varied, are demonstrated for decaying, homogeneous, isotropic turbulence.

  20. The Arabidopsis homolog of trithorax, ATX1, binds phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate, and the two regulate a common set of target genes.

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez-Venegas,R.; Sadder, M.; Hlavacka, A.; Baluska, F.; Xia, Y.; Firsov, A.; Sarath, G.; Moriyama, H.; Dubrovsky, J.; Avramova, Z.

    2006-01-01

    The Arabidopsis homolog of trithorax, ATX1, regulates numerous functions in Arabidopsis beyond the homeotic genes. Here, we identified genome-wide targets of ATX1 and showed that ATX1 is a receptor for a lipid messenger, phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate, PI5P. PI5P negatively affects ATX1 activity, suggesting a regulatory pathway connecting lipid-signaling with nuclear functions. We propose a model to illustrate how plants may respond to stimuli (external or internal) that elevate cellular PI5P levels by altering expression of ATX1-controlled genes.

  1. The endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica stimulates the expression of nitrate reductase and the starch-degrading enzyme glucan-water dikinase in tobacco and Arabidopsis roots through a homeodomain transcription factor that binds to a conserved motif in their promoters.

    PubMed

    Sherameti, Irena; Shahollari, Bationa; Venus, Yvonne; Altschmied, Lothar; Varma, Ajit; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2005-07-15

    Piriformospora indica, an endophytic fungus of the Sebacinaceae family, promotes growth of Arabidopsis and tobacco seedlings and stimulates nitrogen accumulation and the expression of the genes for nitrate reductase and the starch-degrading enzyme glucan-water dikinase (SEX1) in roots. Neither growth promotion nor stimulation of the two enzymes requires heterotrimeric G proteins. P. indica also stimulates the expression of the uidA gene under the control of the Arabidopsis nitrate reductase (Nia2) promoter in transgenic tobacco seedlings. At least two regions (-470/-439 and -103/-89) are important for Nia2 promoter activity in tobacco roots. One of the regions contains an element, ATGATAGATAAT, that binds to a homeodomain transcription factor in vitro. The message for this transcription factor is up-regulated by P. indica. The transcription factor also binds to a CTGATAGATCT segment in the SEX1 promoter in vitro. We propose that the growth-promoting effect initiated by P. indica is accompanied by a co-regulated stimulation of enzymes involved in nitrate and starch metabolisms. PMID:15710607

  2. Formation of a Trimeric Xpo1-Ran[GTP]-Ded1 Exportin Complex Modulates ATPase and Helicase Activities of Ded1

    PubMed Central

    Hauk, Glenn; Bowman, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    The DEAD-box RNA helicase Ded1, which is essential in yeast and known as DDX3 in humans, shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm and takes part in several basic processes including RNA processing and translation. A key interacting partner of Ded1 is the exportin Xpo1, which together with the GTP-bound state of the small GTPase Ran, facilitates unidirectional transport of Ded1 out of the nucleus. Here we demonstrate that Xpo1 and Ran[GTP] together reduce the RNA-stimulated ATPase and helicase activities of Ded1. Binding and inhibition of Ded1 by Xpo1 depend on the affinity of the Ded1 nuclear export sequence (NES) for Xpo1 and the presence of Ran[GTP]. Association with Xpo1/Ran[GTP] reduces RNA-stimulated ATPase activity of Ded1 by increasing the apparent KM for the RNA substrate. Despite the increased KM, the Ded1:Xpo1:Ran[GTP] ternary complex retains the ability to bind single stranded RNA, suggesting that Xpo1/Ran[GTP] may modulate the substrate specificity of Ded1. These results demonstrate that, in addition to transport, exportins such as Xpo1 also have the capability to alter enzymatic activities of their cargo. PMID:26120835

  3. Numerical Study of Flow Past a Circular Cylinder Using RANS, Hybrid RANS/LES and PANS Formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmiligui, Alaa A.; Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Massey, Steven J.; Pao, S. Paul

    2004-01-01

    Two multiscale type turbulence models are implemented in the PAB3D solver. The models are based on modifying the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The first scheme is a hybrid RANS/LES model utilizing the two-equation (k(sub epsilon)) model with a RANS/LES transition function dependent on grid spacing and the computed turbulence length scale. The second scheme is a modified version of the partially averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) model, where the unresolved kinetic energy parameter (f(sub k)) is allowed to vary as a function of grid spacing and the turbulence length scale. Solutions from these models are compared to RANS results and experimental data for a stationary and rotating cylinder. The parameter f(sub k) varies between zero and one and has the characteristic to be equal to one in the viscous sub layer, and when the RANS turbulent viscosity becomes smaller than the LES viscosity. The formulation, usage methodology, and validation example are presented to demonstrate the enhancement of PAB3D's time-accurate and turbulence modeling capabilities. The models are compared to RANS results and experimental data for turbulent separated flows (TS) and laminar separated flows (LS) around stationary and rotating cylinders. For a stationary cylinder, the TS case is accurately simulated using the general two-equation k(sub epsilon) turbulence model (eddy-viscosity model). PAB3D accurately predicts the drag coefficient (CD), lift coefficient (CL) and the Strouhal number (St). The LS case was a challenge for the RANS computation with an eddy-viscosity turbulence model. The RANS/LES and PANS performed well and showed marked improvements over the RANS solution. The modified PANS model was the most accurate. For the rotating cylinder, the spin ratio varied from zero to one, and the PANS results were in good agreement with published experimental data. RANS/LES and PANS capture both temporal and spatial fluctuations and produce large-scale structures that do not

  4. COPT6 is a plasma membrane transporter that functions in copper homeostasis in Arabidopsis and is a novel target of SQUAMOSA promoter binding protein-like 7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Among the mechanisms controlling copper homeostasis in plants is the regulation of its uptake and tissue partitioning. Here we characterized a newly identified member of the conserved CTR/COPT family of copper transporters in Arabidopsis thaliana, COPT6. We showed that COPT6 resides at the plasma me...

  5. A KH-domain RNA-binding protein interacts with FIERY2/CTD phosphatase-like 1 and splicing factors and is important for pre-mRNA splicing in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Cui, Peng; Chen, Hao; Ali, Shahjahan; Zhang, Shoudong; Xiong, Liming

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes encode hundreds of RNA-binding proteins, yet the functions of most of these proteins are unknown. In a genetic study of stress signal transduction in Arabidopsis, we identified a K homology (KH)-domain RNA-binding protein, HOS5 (High Osmotic Stress Gene Expression 5), as required for stress gene regulation and stress tolerance. HOS5 was found to interact with FIERY2/RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) carboxyl terminal domain (CTD) phosphatase-like 1 (FRY2/CPL1) both in vitro and in vivo. This interaction is mediated by the first double-stranded RNA-binding domain of FRY2/CPL1 and the KH domains of HOS5. Interestingly, both HOS5 and FRY2/CPL1 also interact with two novel serine-arginine (SR)-rich splicing factors, RS40 and RS41, in nuclear speckles. Importantly, FRY2/CPL1 is required for the recruitment of HOS5. In fry2 mutants, HOS5 failed to be localized in nuclear speckles but was found mainly in the nucleoplasm. hos5 mutants were impaired in mRNA export and accumulated a significant amount of mRNA in the nuclei, particularly under salt stress conditions. Arabidopsis mutants of all these genes exhibit similar stress-sensitive phenotypes. RNA-seq analyses of these mutants detected significant intron retention in many stress-related genes under salt stress but not under normal conditions. Our study not only identified several novel regulators of pre-mRNA processing as important for plant stress response but also suggested that, in addition to RNAP II CTD that is a well-recognized platform for the recruitment of mRNA processing factors, FRY2/CPL1 may also recruit specific factors to regulate the co-transcriptional processing of certain transcripts to deal with environmental challenges. PMID:24146632

  6. Conserved cis-regulatory elements for DNA-binding-with-one-finger and homeo-domain-leucine-zipper transcription factors regulate companion cell-specific expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana SUCROSE TRANSPORTER 2 gene.

    PubMed

    Schneidereit, Alexander; Imlau, Astrid; Sauer, Norbert

    2008-09-01

    The transition from young carbon-importing sink leaves of higher plants to mature carbon-exporting source leaves is paralleled by a complete reversal of phloem function. While sink-leaf phloem mediates the influx of reduced carbon from older source leaves and the release of this imported carbon to the sink-leaf mesophyll, source-leaf phloem catalyzes the uptake of photoassimilates into companion cells (CCs) and sieve elements (SEs) and the net carbon export from the leaf. Phloem loading in source leaves with sucrose, the main or exclusive transport form for fixed carbon in most higher plants, is catalyzed by plasma membrane-localized sucrose transporters. Consistent with the described physiological switch from sink to source, the promoter of the Arabidopsis AtSUC2 gene is active only in source-leaf CCs of Arabidopsis or of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). For the identification of regulatory elements involved in this companion cell-specific and source-specific gene expression, we performed detailed analyses of the AtSUC2 promoter by truncation and mutagenesis. A 126-bp promoter fragment was identified, which seems to contain these fragments and which drives AtSUC2-typical expression when combined with a 35S minimal promoter. Within this fragment, linker-scanning analyses revealed two cis-regulatory elements that were further characterized as putative binding sites for transcription factors of the DNA-binding-with-one-finger or the homeo-domain-leucine-zipper families. Similar or identical binding sites are found in other genes and in different plant species, suggesting an ancient regulatory mechanism for this important physiological switch. PMID:18551303

  7. The Arabidopsis ATP-binding Cassette Protein AtMRP5/AtABCC5 Is a High Affinity Inositol Hexakisphosphate Transporter Involved in Guard Cell Signaling and Phytate Storage*

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Réka; Grob, Hanne; Weder, Barbara; Green, Porntip; Klein, Markus; Frelet-Barrand, Annie; Schjoerring, Jan K.; Brearley, Charles; Martinoia, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    Arabidopsis possesses a superfamily of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Among these, the multidrug resistance-associated protein AtMRP5/AtABCC5 regulates stomatal aperture and controls plasma membrane anion channels of guard cells. Remarkably, despite the prominent role of AtMRP5 in conferring partial drought insensitivity upon Arabidopsis, we know little of the biochemical function of AtMRP5. Our phylogenetic analysis showed that AtMRP5 is closely related to maize MRP4, mutation of which confers a low inositol hexakisphosphate kernel phenotype. We now show that insertion mutants of AtMRP5 display a low inositol hexakisphosphate phenotype in seed tissue and that this phenotype is associated with alterations of mineral cation and phosphate status. By heterologous expression in yeast, we demonstrate that AtMRP5 encodes a specific and high affinity ATP-dependent inositol hexakisphosphate transporter that is sensitive to inhibitors of ABC transporters. Moreover, complementation of the mrp5-1 insertion mutants of Arabidopsis with the AtMRP5 cDNA driven from a guard cell-specific promoter restores the sensitivity of the mutant to abscisic acid-mediated inhibition of stomatal opening. Additionally, we show that mutation of residues of the Walker B motif prevents restoring the multiple phenotypes associated with mrp5-1. Our findings highlight a novel function of plant ABC transporters that may be relevant to other kingdoms. They also extend the signaling repertoire of this ubiquitous inositol polyphosphate signaling molecule. PMID:19797057

  8. Involvement of RTE1 in conformational changes promoting ETR1 ethylene receptor signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Josephine S; Rivarola, Maximo; Chang, Caren

    2008-11-01

    Ethylene is an important regulator of plant growth, development and responses to environmental stresses. Arabidopsis perceives ethylene through five homologous receptors that negatively regulate ethylene responses. RTE1, a novel gene conserved in plants, animals and some protists, was recently identified as a positive regulator of the ETR1 ethylene receptor. Here, we genetically analyze the dependence of ETR1 on RTE1 in order to obtain further insight into RTE1 function. The function of RTE1 was found to be independent and distinct from that of RAN1, which encodes a copper transporter required for ethylene receptor function. We tested the ability of an rte1 loss-of-function mutation to suppress 11 etr1 ethylene-binding domain mis-sense mutations, all of which result in dominant ethylene insensitivity due to constitutive signaling. This suppression test uncovered two classes of etr1 mutations -RTE1-dependent and RTE1-independent. The nature of these mutations suggests that the ethylene-binding domain is a possible target of RTE1 action. Based on these findings, we propose that RTE1 promotes ETR1 signaling through a conformational effect on the ethylene-binding domain.

  9. Production of a Brassica napus Low-Molecular Mass Acyl-Coenzyme A-Binding Protein in Arabidopsis Alters the Acyl-Coenzyme A Pool and Acyl Composition of Oil in Seeds1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yurchenko, Olga; Singer, Stacy D.; Nykiforuk, Cory L.; Gidda, Satinder; Mullen, Robert T.; Moloney, Maurice M.; Weselake, Randall J.

    2014-01-01

    Low-molecular mass (10 kD) cytosolic acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein (ACBP) has a substantial influence over fatty acid (FA) composition in oilseeds, possibly via an effect on the partitioning of acyl groups between elongation and desaturation pathways. Previously, we demonstrated that the expression of a Brassica napus ACBP (BnACBP) complementary DNA in the developing seeds of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) resulted in increased levels of polyunsaturated FAs at the expense of eicosenoic acid (20:1cisΔ11) and saturated FAs in seed oil. In this study, we investigated whether alterations in the FA composition of seed oil at maturity were correlated with changes in the acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) pool in developing seeds of transgenic Arabidopsis expressing BnACBP. Our results indicated that both the acyl-CoA pool and seed oil of transgenic Arabidopsis lines expressing cytosolic BnACBP exhibited relative increases in linoleic acid (18:2cisΔ9,12; 17.9%–44.4% and 7%–13.2%, respectively) and decreases in 20:1cisΔ11 (38.7%–60.7% and 13.8%–16.3%, respectively). However, alterations in the FA composition of the acyl-CoA pool did not always correlate with those seen in the seed oil. In addition, we found that targeting of BnACBP to the endoplasmic reticulum resulted in FA compositional changes that were similar to those seen in lines expressing cytosolic BnACBP, with the most prominent exception being a relative reduction in α-linolenic acid (18:3cisΔ9,12,15) in both the acyl-CoA pool and seed oil of the former (48.4%–48.9% and 5.3%–10.4%, respectively). Overall, these data support the role of ACBP in acyl trafficking in developing seeds and validate its use as a biotechnological tool for modifying the FA composition of seed oil. PMID:24740000

  10. The Arabidopsis ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR1 Regulates Abiotic Stress-Responsive Gene Expression by Binding to Different cis-Acting Elements in Response to Different Stress Signals1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Mei-Chun; Liao, Po-Ming; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Lin, Tsan-Piao

    2013-01-01

    ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR1 (ERF1) is an upstream component in both jasmonate (JA) and ethylene (ET) signaling and is involved in pathogen resistance. Accumulating evidence suggests that ERF1 might be related to the salt stress response through ethylene signaling. However, the specific role of ERF1 in abiotic stress and the molecular mechanism underlying the signaling cross talk still need to be elucidated. Here, we report that ERF1 was highly induced by high salinity and drought stress in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The salt stress induction required both JA and ET signaling but was inhibited by abscisic acid. ERF1-overexpressing lines (35S:ERF1) were more tolerant to drought and salt stress. They also displayed constitutively smaller stomatal aperture and less transpirational water loss. Surprisingly, 35S:ERF1 also showed enhanced heat tolerance and up-regulation of heat tolerance genes compared with the wild type. Several suites of genes activated by JA, drought, salt, and heat were found in microarray analysis of 35S:ERF1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays found that ERF1 up-regulates specific suites of genes in response to different abiotic stresses by stress-specific binding to GCC or DRE/CRT. In response to biotic stress, ERF1 bound to GCC boxes but not DRE elements; conversely, under abiotic stress, we observed specific binding of ERF1 to DRE elements. Furthermore, ERF1 bound preferentially to only one among several GCC box or DRE/CRT elements in the promoter region of its target genes. ERF1 plays a positive role in salt, drought, and heat stress tolerance by stress-specific gene regulation, which integrates JA, ET, and abscisic acid signals. PMID:23719892

  11. AthaMap web tools for database-assisted identification of combinatorial cis-regulatory elements and the display of highly conserved transcription factor binding sites in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Nils Ole; Galuschka, Claudia; Schindler, Martin; Bülow, Lorenz; Hehl, Reinhard

    2005-07-01

    The AthaMap database generates a map of cis-regulatory elements for the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. AthaMap contains more than 7.4 x 10(6) putative binding sites for 36 transcription factors (TFs) from 16 different TF families. A newly implemented functionality allows the display of subsets of higher conserved transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). Furthermore, a web tool was developed that permits a user-defined search for co-localizing cis-regulatory elements. The user can specify individually the level of conservation for each TFBS and a spacer range between them. This web tool was employed for the identification of co-localizing sites of known interacting TFs and TFs containing two DNA-binding domains. More than 1.8 x 10(5) combinatorial elements were annotated in the AthaMap database. These elements can also be used to identify more complex co-localizing elements consisting of up to four TFBSs. The AthaMap database and the connected web tools are a valuable resource for the analysis and the prediction of gene expression regulation at http://www.athamap.de. PMID:15980498

  12. The proteins encoded by the pogo-like Lemi1 element bind the TIRs and subterminal repeated motifs of the Arabidopsis Emigrant MITE: consequences for the transposition mechanism of MITEs

    PubMed Central

    Loot, Céline; Santiago, Néstor; Sanz, Alicia; Casacuberta, Josep M.

    2006-01-01

    MITEs (miniature inverted-repeated transposable elements) are a particular class of defective DNA transposons usually present within genomes as high copy number populations of highly homogeneous elements. Although an active MITE, the mPing element, has recently been characterized in rice, the transposition mechanism of MITEs remains unknown. It has been proposed that transposases of related transposons could mobilize MITEs in trans. Moreover, it has also been proposed that the presence of conserved terminal inverted-repeated (TIR) sequences could be the only requirement of MITEs for mobilization, allowing divergent or unrelated elements to be mobilized by a particular transposase. We present here evidence for a recent mobility of the Arabidopsis Emigrant MITE and we report on the capacity of the proteins encoded by the related Lemi1 transposon, a pogo-related element, to specifically bind Emigrant elements. This suggests that Lemi1 could mobilize Emigrant elements and makes the Lemi1/Emigrant couple an ideal system to study the transposition mechanism of MITEs. Our results show that Lemi1 proteins bind Emigrant TIRs but also bind cooperatively to subterminal repeated motifs. The requirement of internal sequences for the formation of proper DNA/protein structure could affect the capacity of divergent MITEs to be mobilized by distantly related transposases. PMID:17003053

  13. Eye-Movement Control in RAN and Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuperman, Victor; Van Dyke, Julie A.; Henry, Regina

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the "visual scanning hypothesis", which suggests that fluent oculomotor control is an important component underlying the predictive relationship between Rapid Automatized Naming (RAN) tasks and reading ability. Our approach was to isolate components of saccadic planning, articulation, and lexical retrieval in 3…

  14. Counting and RAN: Predictors of Arithmetic Calculation and Reading Fluency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koponen, Tuire; Salmi, Paula; Eklund, Kenneth; Aro, Tuija

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether counting and rapid automatized naming (RAN) could operate as significant predictors of both later arithmetic calculation and reading fluency. The authors also took an important step to clarify the cognitive mechanisms underlying these predictive relationships by controlling for the effect of phonological awareness and…

  15. Spatial organization of the Ran pathway by microtubules in mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Doogie; Yu, Che-Hang; Needleman, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Concentration gradients of soluble proteins are believed to be responsible for control of morphogenesis of subcellular systems, but the mechanisms that generate the spatial organization of these subcellular gradients remain poorly understood. Here, we use a newly developed multipoint fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy technique to study the ras-related nuclear protein (Ran) pathway, which forms soluble gradients around chromosomes in mitosis and is thought to spatially regulate microtubule behaviors during spindle assembly. We found that the distribution of components of the Ran pathway that influence microtubule behaviors is determined by their interactions with microtubules, resulting in microtubule nucleators being localized by the microtubules whose formation they stimulate. Modeling and perturbation experiments show that this feedback makes the length of the spindle insensitive to the length scale of the Ran gradient, allows the spindle to assemble outside the peak of the Ran gradient, and explains the scaling of the spindle with cell size. Such feedback between soluble signaling pathways and the mechanics of the cytoskeleton may be a general feature of subcellular organization. PMID:27439876

  16. Spatial organization of the Ran pathway by microtubules in mitosis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Doogie; Yu, Che-Hang; Needleman, Daniel J

    2016-08-01

    Concentration gradients of soluble proteins are believed to be responsible for control of morphogenesis of subcellular systems, but the mechanisms that generate the spatial organization of these subcellular gradients remain poorly understood. Here, we use a newly developed multipoint fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy technique to study the ras-related nuclear protein (Ran) pathway, which forms soluble gradients around chromosomes in mitosis and is thought to spatially regulate microtubule behaviors during spindle assembly. We found that the distribution of components of the Ran pathway that influence microtubule behaviors is determined by their interactions with microtubules, resulting in microtubule nucleators being localized by the microtubules whose formation they stimulate. Modeling and perturbation experiments show that this feedback makes the length of the spindle insensitive to the length scale of the Ran gradient, allows the spindle to assemble outside the peak of the Ran gradient, and explains the scaling of the spindle with cell size. Such feedback between soluble signaling pathways and the mechanics of the cytoskeleton may be a general feature of subcellular organization. PMID:27439876

  17. RANS simulations of a simplified tractor/trailer geometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Christopher John; McWherter-Payne, Mary Anna; Salari, Kambiz; Payne, Jeffrey L.

    2003-07-01

    Steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations are presented for the three-dimensional flow over a simplified tractor/trailer geometry at zero degrees yaw angle. The simulations are conducted using a multi-block, structured computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The turbulence closure model employed is the two-equation Menter k-{omega} model. The discretization error is estimated by employing two grid levels: a fine mesh of 20 million cells and a coarser mesh of 2.5 million cells. Simulation results are compared to experimental data obtained at the NASA-Ames 7 x 10 ft wind tunnel. Quantities compared include vehicle drag, surface pressures, and time-averaged velocities in the trailer near wake. The results indicate that the RANS approach is able to accurately predict the surface pressure on the vehicle, with the exception of the base region. The pressure predictions in the base region are poor due to the inability of the RANS model to accurately capture the near-wake vortical structure. However, the gross pressure levels in the base region are in reasonable agreement with experiment, and thus the overall vehicle drag is well predicted.

  18. Neural Systems for Rapid Automatized Naming in Skilled Readers: Unraveling the RAN-Reading Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misra, Maya; Katzir, Tamar; Wolf, Maryanne; Poldrack, Russell A.

    2004-01-01

    The majority of children and adults with reading disabilities exhibit pronounced difficulties on naming-speed measures such as tests of rapid automatized naming (RAN). RAN tasks require speeded naming of serially presented stimuli and share key characteristics with reading, but different versions of the RAN task vary in their sensitivity: The RAN…

  19. Understanding the Relations between RAN Letter Subtest Components and Word Reading in First-Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuhaus, Graham F.; Swank, Paul R.

    2002-01-01

    First grade students (n=221) were tested on measures of verbal fluency, visual attention, phonological awareness, orthographic recognition, rapid automated naming (RAN) of letters and objects, and reading. Findings indicated that word reading was directly and significantly predicted by RAN letter naming and general RAN cognitive processing time of…

  20. SUMO modification through rapamycin-mediated heterodimerization reveals a dual role for Ubc9 in targeting RanGAP1 to nuclear pore complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Shanshan; Zhang Hong; Matunis, Michael J. . E-mail: mmatunis@jhsph.edu

    2006-04-15

    SUMOs (small ubiquitin-related modifiers) are eukaryotic proteins that are covalently conjugated to other proteins and thereby regulate a wide range of important cellular processes. The molecular mechanisms by which SUMO modification influences the functions of most target proteins and cellular processes, however, remain poorly defined. A major obstacle to investigating the effects of SUMO modification is the availability of a system for selectively inducing the modification or demodification of an individual protein. To address this problem, we have developed a procedure using the rapamycin heterodimerizer system. This procedure involves co-expression of rapamycin-binding domain fusion proteins of SUMO and candidate SUMO substrates in living cells. Treating cells with rapamycin induces a tight association between SUMO and a single SUMO substrate, thereby allowing specific downstream effects to be analyzed. Using RanGAP1 as a model SUMO substrate, the heterodimerizer system was used to investigate the molecular mechanism by which SUMO modification targets RanGAP1 from the cytoplasm to nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Our results revealed a dual role for Ubc9 in targeting RanGAP1 to NPCs: In addition to conjugating SUMO-1 to RanGAP1, Ubc9 is also required to form a stable ternary complex with SUMO-1 modified RanGAP1 and Nup358. As illustrated by our studies, the rapamycin heterodimerizer system represents a novel tool for studying the molecular effects of SUMO modification.

  1. A novel-type phosphatidylinositol phosphate-interactive, Ca-binding protein PCaP1 in Arabidopsis thaliana: stable association with plasma membrane and partial involvement in stomata closure.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Chisako; Miwa, Chika; Tanaka, Natsuki; Kato, Mariko; Suito, Momoe; Tsuchihira, Ayako; Sato, Yori; Segami, Shoji; Maeshima, Masayoshi

    2016-05-01

    The Ca(2+)-binding protein-1 (PCaP1) of Arabidopsis thaliana is a new type protein that binds to phosphatidylinositol phosphates and Ca(2+)-calmodulin complex as well as free Ca(2+). Although biochemical properties, such as binding to ligands and N-myristoylation, have been revealed, the intracellular localization, tissue and cell specificity, integrity of membrane association and physiological roles of PCaP1 are unknown. We investigated the tissue and intracellular distribution of PCaP1 by using transgenic lines expressing PCaP1 linked with a green fluorescence protein (GFP) at the carboxyl terminus of PCaP1. GFP fluorescence was obviously detected in most tissues including root, stem, leaf and flower. In these tissues, PCaP1-GFP signal was observed predominantly in the plasma membrane even under physiological stress conditions but not in other organelles. The fluorescence was detected in the cytosol when the 25-residue N-terminal sequence was deleted from PCaP1 indicating essential contribution of N-myristoylation to the plasma membrane anchoring. Fluorescence intensity of PCaP1-GFP in roots was slightly decreased in seedlings grown in medium supplemented with high concentrations of iron for 1 week and increased in those grown with copper. In stomatal guard cells, PCaP1-GFP was strictly, specifically localized to the plasma membrane at the epidermal-cell side but not at the pore side. A T-DNA insertion mutant line of PCaP1 did not show marked phenotype in a life cycle except for well growth under high CO2 conditions. However, stomata of the mutant line did not close entirely even in high osmolarity, which usually induces stomata closure. These results suggest that PCaP1 is involved in the stomatal movement, especially closure process, in leaves and response to excessive copper in root and leaf as a mineral nutrient as a physiological role.

  2. A novel-type phosphatidylinositol phosphate-interactive, Ca-binding protein PCaP1 in Arabidopsis thaliana: stable association with plasma membrane and partial involvement in stomata closure.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Chisako; Miwa, Chika; Tanaka, Natsuki; Kato, Mariko; Suito, Momoe; Tsuchihira, Ayako; Sato, Yori; Segami, Shoji; Maeshima, Masayoshi

    2016-05-01

    The Ca(2+)-binding protein-1 (PCaP1) of Arabidopsis thaliana is a new type protein that binds to phosphatidylinositol phosphates and Ca(2+)-calmodulin complex as well as free Ca(2+). Although biochemical properties, such as binding to ligands and N-myristoylation, have been revealed, the intracellular localization, tissue and cell specificity, integrity of membrane association and physiological roles of PCaP1 are unknown. We investigated the tissue and intracellular distribution of PCaP1 by using transgenic lines expressing PCaP1 linked with a green fluorescence protein (GFP) at the carboxyl terminus of PCaP1. GFP fluorescence was obviously detected in most tissues including root, stem, leaf and flower. In these tissues, PCaP1-GFP signal was observed predominantly in the plasma membrane even under physiological stress conditions but not in other organelles. The fluorescence was detected in the cytosol when the 25-residue N-terminal sequence was deleted from PCaP1 indicating essential contribution of N-myristoylation to the plasma membrane anchoring. Fluorescence intensity of PCaP1-GFP in roots was slightly decreased in seedlings grown in medium supplemented with high concentrations of iron for 1 week and increased in those grown with copper. In stomatal guard cells, PCaP1-GFP was strictly, specifically localized to the plasma membrane at the epidermal-cell side but not at the pore side. A T-DNA insertion mutant line of PCaP1 did not show marked phenotype in a life cycle except for well growth under high CO2 conditions. However, stomata of the mutant line did not close entirely even in high osmolarity, which usually induces stomata closure. These results suggest that PCaP1 is involved in the stomatal movement, especially closure process, in leaves and response to excessive copper in root and leaf as a mineral nutrient as a physiological role. PMID:26979064

  3. The light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding proteins Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 play complementary roles during state transitions in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pietrzykowska, Malgorzata; Suorsa, Marjaana; Semchonok, Dmitry A; Tikkanen, Mikko; Boekema, Egbert J; Aro, Eva-Mari; Jansson, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    Photosynthetic light harvesting in plants is regulated by phosphorylation-driven state transitions: functional redistributions of the major trimeric light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) to balance the relative excitation of photosystem I and photosystem II. State transitions are driven by reversible LHCII phosphorylation by the STN7 kinase and PPH1/TAP38 phosphatase. LHCII trimers are composed of Lhcb1, Lhcb2, and Lhcb3 proteins in various trimeric configurations. Here, we show that despite their nearly identical amino acid composition, the functional roles of Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 are different but complementary. Arabidopsis thaliana plants lacking only Lhcb2 contain thylakoid protein complexes similar to wild-type plants, where Lhcb2 has been replaced by Lhcb1. However, these do not perform state transitions, so phosphorylation of Lhcb2 seems to be a critical step. In contrast, plants lacking Lhcb1 had a more profound antenna remodeling due to a decrease in the amount of LHCII trimers influencing thylakoid membrane structure and, more indirectly, state transitions. Although state transitions are also found in green algae, the detailed architecture of the extant seed plant light-harvesting antenna can now be dated back to a time after the divergence of the bryophyte and spermatophyte lineages, but before the split of the angiosperm and gymnosperm lineages more than 300 million years ago. PMID:25194026

  4. The Light-Harvesting Chlorophyll a/b Binding Proteins Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 Play Complementary Roles during State Transitions in Arabidopsis[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pietrzykowska, Malgorzata; Suorsa, Marjaana; Semchonok, Dmitry A.; Tikkanen, Mikko; Boekema, Egbert J.; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic light harvesting in plants is regulated by phosphorylation-driven state transitions: functional redistributions of the major trimeric light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) to balance the relative excitation of photosystem I and photosystem II. State transitions are driven by reversible LHCII phosphorylation by the STN7 kinase and PPH1/TAP38 phosphatase. LHCII trimers are composed of Lhcb1, Lhcb2, and Lhcb3 proteins in various trimeric configurations. Here, we show that despite their nearly identical amino acid composition, the functional roles of Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 are different but complementary. Arabidopsis thaliana plants lacking only Lhcb2 contain thylakoid protein complexes similar to wild-type plants, where Lhcb2 has been replaced by Lhcb1. However, these do not perform state transitions, so phosphorylation of Lhcb2 seems to be a critical step. In contrast, plants lacking Lhcb1 had a more profound antenna remodeling due to a decrease in the amount of LHCII trimers influencing thylakoid membrane structure and, more indirectly, state transitions. Although state transitions are also found in green algae, the detailed architecture of the extant seed plant light-harvesting antenna can now be dated back to a time after the divergence of the bryophyte and spermatophyte lineages, but before the split of the angiosperm and gymnosperm lineages more than 300 million years ago. PMID:25194026

  5. Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Strzalka, Wojciech; Aggarwal, Chhavi

    2013-01-01

    The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a key component of the eukaryotic DNA replication machinery. It also plays an important role in DNA repair mechanisms. Despite the intense scientific research on yeast and human PCNA, information describing the function of this protein in plants is still very limited. In the previous study Arabidopsis PCNA2 but not PCNA1 was proposed to be functionally important in DNA polymerase η-dependent postreplication repair. In addition to the above study, PCNA2 but not PCNA1 was also shown to be necessary for Arabidopsis DNA polymerase λ-dependent oxidative DNA damage bypass. Taking into account the reported differences between PCNA1 and PCNA2, we tested the idea of a possible cooperation between PCNA1 and PCNA2 in the plant cell. In a bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay an interaction between PCNA1 and PCNA2 was observed in the nucleus, as well as in the cytoplasm. This finding, together with our previous results, indicates that PCNA1 and PCNA2 may cooperate in planta by forming homo- and heterotrimeric rings. The observed interaction might be relevant when distinct functions for PCNA1 and PCNA2 are considered. PMID:23656863

  6. Arabidopsis AtNaKR1 is a phloem mobile metal-binding protein necessary for phloem function and root meristem maintenance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The SODIUM POTASSIUM ROOT DEFECTIVE 1 (NaKR1) encodes a soluble metal binding protein that is specifically expressed in companion cells of the phloem. The nakr1-1 mutant phenotype includes high Na+, K+, and Rb+ accumulation in leaves, short roots, and late flowering. Starch accumulation in the leave...

  7. Crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of Nup358/RanBP2

    PubMed Central

    Kassube, Susanne A.; Stuwe, Tobias; Lin, Daniel H.; Antonuk, C. Danielle; Napetschnig, Johanna; Blobel, Günter; Hoelz, André

    2014-01-01

    Key steps in mRNA export are the nuclear assembly of messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs), the translocation of mRNPs through the nuclear pore complex (NPC), and the mRNP remodeling events at the cytoplasmic side of the NPC. Nup358/RanBP2 is a constituent of the cytoplasmic filaments of the NPC specific to higher eukaryotes and provides a multitude of binding sites for the nucleocytoplasmic transport machinery. Here, we present the crystal structure of the Nup358 N-terminal domain (NTD) at 0.95-Å resolution. The structure reveals an α-helical domain that harbors three central tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR), flanked on each side by an additional solvating amphipathic α helix. Overall, the NTD adopts an unusual extended conformation that lacks the characteristic peptide-binding groove observed in canonical TPR domains. Strikingly, the vast majority of the NTD surface exhibits an evolutionarily conserved, positive electrostatic potential, and we demonstrate that the NTD possesses the capability to bind single-stranded RNA in solution. Together, these data suggest that the NTD contributes to mRNP remodeling events at the cytoplasmic face of the NPC. PMID:23353830

  8. Measurement of neutron diffraction with compact neutron source RANS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Y.; Takamura, M.; Taketani, A.; Sunaga, H.; Otake, Y.; Suzuki, H.; Kumagai, M.; Oba, Y.; Hama, T.

    2016-11-01

    Diffraction is used as a measurement technique for crystal structure. X-rays or electron beam with wavelength that is close to the lattice constant of the crystal is often used for the measurement. They have sensitivity in surface (0.01mm) of heavy metals due to the mean free path for heavy ions. Neutron diffraction has the probe of the internal structure of the heavy metals because it has a longer mean free path than that of the X-rays or the electrons. However, the neutron diffraction measurement is not widely used because large facilities are required in the many neutron sources. RANS (Riken Accelerator-driven Compact Neutron Source) is developed as a neutron source which is usable easily in laboratories and factories. In RANS, fast neutrons are generated by 7MeV protons colliding on a Be target. Some fast neutrons are moderated with polyethylene to thermal neutrons. The thermal neutrons of 10meV which have wavelength of 10nm can be used for the diffraction measurement. In this study, the texture evolution in steels was measured with RANS and the validity of the compact neutron source was proved. The texture of IF steel sheets with the thickness of 1.0mm was measured with 10minutes run. The resolution is 2% and is enough to analyze a evolution in texture due to compression/tensile deformation or a volume fraction of two phases in the steel sample. These results have proven the possibility to use compact neutron source for the analysis of mesoscopic structure of metallic materials.

  9. AtPPR2, an Arabidopsis pentatricopeptide repeat protein, binds to plastid 23S rRNA and plays an important role in the first mitotic division during gametogenesis and in cell proliferation during embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuqing; Li, Cong; Wang, Hai; Chen, Hao; Berg, Howard; Xia, Yiji

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are mainly involved in regulating post-transcriptional processes in mitochondria and plastids, including chloroplasts. Mutations in the Arabidopsis PPR2 gene have previously been found to cause defects in seed development and reduced transmission through male and female gametophytes. However, the exact function of AtPPR2 has not been defined. We found that a loss-of-function mutation of AtPPR2 leads to arrest of the first mitotic division during both male and female gametogenesis. In addition, the Atppr2 mutation causes delayed embryogenesis, leading to embryonic lethality. Mutation in emb2750, which appears to be a weak mutant allele of the AtPPR2 locus, also results in defective seeds. However, a majority of emb2750 seeds were able to germinate, but their cotyledons were albino and often deformed, and growth of the emb2750 seedlings were arrested after germination. AtPPR2 is mainly expressed in plant parts that undergo cell division, and AtPPR2 protein was localized to chloroplasts. RNA immunoprecipitation and protein gel mobility shift assays showed that AtPPR2 binds to plastid 23S rRNA. Our study adds to a growing body of evidence that plastids and/or chloroplasts play a key role in cell division. AtPPR2 may modulate the translational process to fine-tune plastid function, thereby regulating cell division. PMID:21435048

  10. The RNA Binding Protein Tudor-SN Is Essential for Stress Tolerance and Stabilizes Levels of Stress-Responsive mRNAs Encoding Secreted Proteins in Arabidopsis[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    dit Frey, Nicolas Frei; Muller, Philippe; Jammes, Fabien; Kizis, Dimosthenis; Leung, Jeffrey; Perrot-Rechenmann, Catherine; Bianchi, Michele Wolfe

    2010-01-01

    Tudor-SN (TSN) copurifies with the RNA-induced silencing complex in animal cells where, among other functions, it is thought to act on mRNA stability via the degradation of specific dsRNA templates. In plants, TSN has been identified biochemically as a cytoskeleton-associated RNA binding activity. In eukaryotes, it has recently been identified as a conserved primary target of programmed cell death–associated proteolysis. We have investigated the physiological role of TSN by isolating null mutations for two homologous genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. The double mutant tsn1 tsn2 displays only mild growth phenotypes under nonstress conditions, but germination, growth, and survival are severely affected under high salinity stress. Either TSN1 or TSN2 alone can complement the double mutant, indicating their functional redundancy. TSN accumulates heterogeneously in the cytosol and relocates transiently to a diffuse pattern in response to salt stress. Unexpectedly, stress-regulated mRNAs encoding secreted proteins are significantly enriched among the transcripts that are underrepresented in tsn1 tsn2. Our data also reveal that TSN is important for RNA stability of its targets. These findings show that TSN is essential for stress tolerance in plants and implicate TSN in new, potentially conserved mechanisms acting on mRNAs entering the secretory pathway. PMID:20484005

  11. Blocking the QB-binding site of photosystem II by tenuazonic acid, a non-host-specific toxin of Alternaria alternata, activates singlet oxygen-mediated and EXECUTER-dependent signalling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiguo; Kim, Chanhong; Lee, Je Min; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Fei, Zhangjun; Wang, Liangsheng; Apel, Klaus

    2015-06-01

    Necrotrophic fungal pathogens produce toxic compounds that induce cell death in infected plants. Often, the primary targets of these toxins and the way a plant responds to them are not known. In the present work, the effect of tenuazonic acid (TeA), a non-host-specific toxin of Alternaria alternata, on Arabidopsis thaliana has been analysed. TeA blocks the QB -binding site at the acceptor side of photosystem II (PSII). As a result, charge recombination at the reaction centre (RC) of PSII is expected to enhance the formation of the excited triplet state of the RC chlorophyll that promotes generation of singlet oxygen ((1)O₂). (1)O₂ activates a signalling pathway that depends on the two EXECUTER (EX) proteins EX1 and EX2 and triggers a programmed cell death response. In seedlings treated with TeA at half-inhibition concentration (1)O₂-mediated and EX-dependent signalling is activated as indicated by the rapid and transient up-regulation of (1)O₂-responsive genes in wild type, and its suppression in ex1/ex2 mutants. Lesion formation occurs when seedlings are exposed to higher concentrations of TeA for a longer period of time. Under these conditions, the programmed cell death response triggered by (1)O₂-mediated and EX-dependent signalling is superimposed by other events that also contribute to lesion formation.

  12. Validating the BHR RANS model for variable density turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Israel, Daniel M; Gore, Robert A; Stalsberg - Zarling, Krista L

    2009-01-01

    The BHR RANS model is a turbulence model for multi-fluid flows in which density variation plays a strong role in the turbulence processes. In this paper they demonstrate the usefulness of BHR over a wide range of flows which include the effects of shear, buoyancy, and shocks. The results are in good agreement with experimental and DNS data across the entire set of validation cases, with no need to retune model coefficients between cases. The model has potential application to a number of aerospace related flow problems.

  13. Defining the RNA-binding glycine-rich (RBG) gene superfamily: new insights into nomenclature, phylogeny, and evolutionary trends obtained by genome-wide comparative analysis of Arabidopsis, Chinese cabbage, rice and maize genomes.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Panneerselvam; Kim, Jin A; Jeong, Mi-Jeong; Kang, Chang Ho; Lee, Soo In

    2015-12-01

    RNA-binding glycine-rich (RBG) proteins play diverse roles in plant growth, development, protection and genome organization. An overly broad definition for class IV glycine-rich proteins (GRPs), namely RNA-binding activity and a glycine-rich C-terminus, has resulted in many distantly related and/or non-related proteins being grouped into this class of RBGs. This definition has hampered the study of RBG evolution. In this study, we used a comparative genomic approach consisting of ortholog, homolog, synteny and phylogenetic analyses to legitimately exclude all distantly/non-related proteins from class IV GRPs and to identify 15, 22, 12 and 18 RBG proteins in Arabidopsis, Chinese cabbage, rice and maize genomes, respectively. All identified RBGs could be divided into three subclasses, namely RBGA, RBGB and RBGD, which may be derived from a common ancestor. We assigned RBGs excluded from class IV GRPs to a separate RBG superfamily. RBGs have evolved and diversified in different species via different mechanisms; segmental duplication and recombination have had major effects, with tandem duplication, intron addition/deletion and domain recombination/deletion playing minor roles. Loss and retention of duplicated RBGs after polyploidization has been species and subclass specific. For example, following recent whole-genome duplication and triplication in maize and Chinese cabbage, respectively, most duplicated copies of RBGA have been lost in maize while RBGD duplicates have been retained; in Chinese cabbage, in contrast, RBGA duplicates have been retained while RBGD duplicates have been lost. Our findings reveal fundamental information and shed new light on the structural characteristics and evolutionary dynamics of RBGs.

  14. Defining the RNA-binding glycine-rich (RBG) gene superfamily: new insights into nomenclature, phylogeny, and evolutionary trends obtained by genome-wide comparative analysis of Arabidopsis, Chinese cabbage, rice and maize genomes.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Panneerselvam; Kim, Jin A; Jeong, Mi-Jeong; Kang, Chang Ho; Lee, Soo In

    2015-12-01

    RNA-binding glycine-rich (RBG) proteins play diverse roles in plant growth, development, protection and genome organization. An overly broad definition for class IV glycine-rich proteins (GRPs), namely RNA-binding activity and a glycine-rich C-terminus, has resulted in many distantly related and/or non-related proteins being grouped into this class of RBGs. This definition has hampered the study of RBG evolution. In this study, we used a comparative genomic approach consisting of ortholog, homolog, synteny and phylogenetic analyses to legitimately exclude all distantly/non-related proteins from class IV GRPs and to identify 15, 22, 12 and 18 RBG proteins in Arabidopsis, Chinese cabbage, rice and maize genomes, respectively. All identified RBGs could be divided into three subclasses, namely RBGA, RBGB and RBGD, which may be derived from a common ancestor. We assigned RBGs excluded from class IV GRPs to a separate RBG superfamily. RBGs have evolved and diversified in different species via different mechanisms; segmental duplication and recombination have had major effects, with tandem duplication, intron addition/deletion and domain recombination/deletion playing minor roles. Loss and retention of duplicated RBGs after polyploidization has been species and subclass specific. For example, following recent whole-genome duplication and triplication in maize and Chinese cabbage, respectively, most duplicated copies of RBGA have been lost in maize while RBGD duplicates have been retained; in Chinese cabbage, in contrast, RBGA duplicates have been retained while RBGD duplicates have been lost. Our findings reveal fundamental information and shed new light on the structural characteristics and evolutionary dynamics of RBGs. PMID:26123085

  15. Arabidopsis CULLIN4-Damaged DNA Binding Protein 1 Interacts with CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1-SUPPRESSOR OF PHYA Complexes to Regulate Photomorphogenesis and Flowering Time[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haodong; Huang, Xi; Gusmaroli, Giuliana; Terzaghi, William; Lau, On Sun; Yanagawa, Yuki; Zhang, Yu; Li, Jigang; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Zhu, Danmeng; Deng, Xing Wang

    2010-01-01

    CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1) possesses E3 ligase activity and promotes degradation of key factors involved in the light regulation of plant development. The finding that CULLIN4 (CUL4)-Damaged DNA Binding Protein1 (DDB1) interacts with DDB1 binding WD40 (DWD) proteins to act as E3 ligases implied that CUL4-DDB1 may associate with COP1-SUPPRESSOR OF PHYA (SPA) protein complexes, since COP1 and SPAs are DWD proteins. Here, we demonstrate that CUL4-DDB1 physically associates with COP1-SPA complexes in vitro and in vivo, likely via direct interaction of DDB1 with COP1 and SPAs. The interactions between DDB1 and COP1, SPA1, and SPA3 were disrupted by mutations in the WDXR motifs of MBP-COP1, His-SPA1, and His-SPA3. CUL4 cosuppression mutants enhanced weak cop1 photomorphogenesis and flowered early under short days. Early flowering of short day–grown cul4 mutants correlated with increased FLOWERING LOCUS T transcript levels, whereas CONSTANS transcript levels were not altered. De-etiolated1 and COP1 can bind DDB1 and may work with CUL4-DDB1 in distinct complexes, but they mediate photomorphogenesis in concert. Thus, a series of CUL4-DDB1-COP1-SPA E3 ligase complexes may mediate the repression of photomorphogenesis and, possibly, of flowering time. PMID:20061554

  16. Multivariate Fronthaul Quantization for Downlink C-RAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonju; Simeone, Osvaldo; Kang, Joonhyuk; Shamai, Shlomo

    2016-10-01

    The Cloud-Radio Access Network (C-RAN) cellular architecture relies on the transfer of complex baseband signals to and from a central unit (CU) over digital fronthaul links to enable the virtualization of the baseband processing functionalities of distributed radio units (RUs). The standard design of digital fronthauling is based on either scalar quantization or on more sophisticated point to-point compression techniques operating on baseband signals. Motivated by network-information theoretic results, techniques for fronthaul quantization and compression that improve over point-to-point solutions by allowing for joint processing across multiple fronthaul links at the CU have been recently proposed for both the uplink and the downlink. For the downlink, a form of joint compression, known in network information theory as multivariate compression, was shown to be advantageous under a non-constructive asymptotic information-theoretic framework. In this paper, instead, the design of a practical symbol-by-symbol fronthaul quantization algorithm that implements the idea of multivariate compression is investigated for the C-RAN downlink. As compared to current standards, the proposed multivariate quantization (MQ) only requires changes in the CU processing while no modification is needed at the RUs. The algorithm is extended to enable the joint optimization of downlink precoding and quantization, reduced-complexity MQ via successive block quantization, and variable-length compression. Numerical results, which include performance evaluations over standard cellular models, demonstrate the advantages of MQ and the merits of a joint optimization with precoding.

  17. Activation of an ER-body-localized beta-glucosidase via a cytosolic binding partner in damaged tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Atsushi J; Matsushima, Ryo; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2005-07-01

    The ER body is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived organelle. Because ER bodies are induced by wounding and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment in rosette leaves, they might be responsible for defense systems. Recently, we isolated nai1 mutants that have no ER body and showed that the levels of PYK10 and PBP1 (PYK10-binding protein 1: At3g16420) were decreased in nai1 mutants. PYK10 is a beta-glucosidase that is localized in ER bodies. PBP1 consists of two repeated regions, each of which is highly homologous to the alpha-chain of jacalin, a carbohydrate-binding protein (lectin) of Artocarpus integriforia. We show in this study that PYK10 has two forms, an active form and an inactive form. The amount of active form increased during incubation of root homogenate. On the other hand, PYK10 separated into soluble and insoluble forms. Active PYK10 molecules mainly occurred as the insoluble form and inactive PYK10 molecules remain soluble. This suggests that the activation of PYK10 needs polymerization. In homogenates of both a pbp1 mutant and the wild type, PYK10 becomes insoluble, while PYK10 activity in pbp1 is only half of that in the wild type. PBP1 has an ability to interact with PYK10. Nonetheless, PBP1 does not bind active PYK10. These results suggest that PBP1 has some effect on the activation of PYK10. In addition, PBP1 was found to have a different subcellular distribution from PYK10. PBP1 may act like a molecular chaperone that facilitates the correct polymerization of PYK10, when tissues are damaged and subcellular structures are destroyed by pests.

  18. Lesions in the mRNA cap-binding gene ABA HYPERSENSITIVE 1 suppress FRIGIDA-mediated delayed flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Isabel C; Michaels, Scott D; Schomburg, Fritz M; Amasino, Richard M

    2004-10-01

    Recessive mutations that suppress the late-flowering phenotype conferred by FRIGIDA (FRI) and FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and which also result in serrated leaf morphology were identified in T-DNA and fast-neutron mutant populations. Molecular analysis showed that the mutations are caused by lesions in the gene encoding the large subunit of the nuclear mRNA cap-binding protein, ABH1 (ABA hypersensitive1). The suppression of late flowering is caused by the inability of FRI to increase FLC mRNA levels in the abh1 mutant background. The serrated leaf morphology of abh1 is similar to the serrate (se) mutant and, like abh1, se is also a suppressor of FRI-mediated late flowering although it is a weaker suppressor than abh1. Unlike se, in abh1 the rate of leaf production and the number of juvenile leaves are not altered. The abh1 lesion affects several developmental processes, perhaps because the processing of certain mRNAs in these pathways is more sensitive to loss of cap-binding activity than the majority of cellular mRNAs. PMID:15361145

  19. The ARID-HMG DNA-binding protein AtHMGB15 is required for pollen tube growth in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chuan; Wang, Yu-Jiao; Liang, Yan; Niu, Qian-Kun; Tan, Xiao-Yun; Chu, Liang-Cui; Chen, Li-Qun; Zhang, Xue-Qin; Ye, De

    2014-09-01

    In flowering plants, male gametes (sperm cells) develop within male gametophytes (pollen grains) and are delivered to female gametes for double fertilization by pollen tubes. Therefore, pollen tube growth is crucial for reproduction. The mechanisms that control pollen tube growth remain poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the ARID-HMG DNA-binding protein AtHMGB15 plays an important role in pollen tube growth. This protein is preferentially expressed in pollen grains and pollen tubes and is localized in the vegetative nuclei of the tricellular pollen grains and pollen tubes. Knocking down AtHMGB15 expression via a Ds insertion caused retarded pollen tube growth, leading to a significant reduction in the seed set. The athmgb15-1 mutation affected the expression of 1686 genes in mature pollen, including those involved in cell wall formation and modification, cell signaling and cellular transport during pollen tube growth. In addition, it was observed that AtHMGB15 binds to DNA in vitro and interacts with the transcription factors AGL66 and AGL104, which are required for pollen maturation and pollen tube growth. These results suggest that AtHMGB15 functions in pollen tube growth through the regulation of gene expression. PMID:24923357

  20. Lesions in the mRNA cap-binding gene ABA HYPERSENSITIVE 1 suppress FRIGIDA-mediated delayed flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Isabel C; Michaels, Scott D; Schomburg, Fritz M; Amasino, Richard M

    2004-10-01

    Recessive mutations that suppress the late-flowering phenotype conferred by FRIGIDA (FRI) and FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and which also result in serrated leaf morphology were identified in T-DNA and fast-neutron mutant populations. Molecular analysis showed that the mutations are caused by lesions in the gene encoding the large subunit of the nuclear mRNA cap-binding protein, ABH1 (ABA hypersensitive1). The suppression of late flowering is caused by the inability of FRI to increase FLC mRNA levels in the abh1 mutant background. The serrated leaf morphology of abh1 is similar to the serrate (se) mutant and, like abh1, se is also a suppressor of FRI-mediated late flowering although it is a weaker suppressor than abh1. Unlike se, in abh1 the rate of leaf production and the number of juvenile leaves are not altered. The abh1 lesion affects several developmental processes, perhaps because the processing of certain mRNAs in these pathways is more sensitive to loss of cap-binding activity than the majority of cellular mRNAs.

  1. Differential expression of Ran GTPase during HMBA-induced differentiation in murine erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Vanegas, N; García-Sacristán, A; López-Fernández, L A; Párraga, M; del Mazo, J; Hernández, P; Schvartzman, J B; Krimer, D B

    2003-07-01

    Murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells undergo erythroid differentiation in vitro when treated with hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA). To identify genes involved in the commitment of MEL cells to differentiate, we screened a cDNA library constructed from HMBA-induced cells by differential hybridization and isolated GTPase Ran as a down-regulated gene. We observed that Ran was expressed in a biphasic mode. Following a decrease in mRNA level during the initial hours of induction, Ran re-expressed at 24-48 h, and gradually declined again. To investigate the role of Ran during MEL differentiation we constructed MEL transfectants capable to express or block Ran mRNA production constitutively. No effects were observed on cell growth and proliferation. Blockage of Ran, however, interfered with MEL cell differentiation resulting in a decrease of cell survival in the committed population.

  2. Rapid automatized naming (RAN) and reading fluency: implications for understanding and treatment of reading disabilities.

    PubMed

    Norton, Elizabeth S; Wolf, Maryanne

    2012-01-01

    Fluent reading depends on a complex set of cognitive processes that must work together in perfect concert. Rapid automatized naming (RAN) tasks provide insight into this system, acting as a microcosm of the processes involved in reading. In this review, we examine both RAN and reading fluency and how each has shaped our understanding of reading disabilities. We explore the research that led to our current understanding of the relationships between RAN and reading and what makes RAN unique as a cognitive measure. We explore how the automaticity that supports RAN affects reading across development, reading abilities, and languages, and the biological bases of these processes. Finally, we bring these converging areas of knowledge together by examining what the collective studies of RAN and reading fluency contribute to our goals of creating optimal assessments and interventions that help every child become a fluent, comprehending reader.

  3. Molecular phylogeny of a RING E3 ubiquitin ligase, conserved in eukaryotic cells and dominated by homologous components, the muskelin/RanBPM/CTLH complex.

    PubMed

    Francis, Ore; Han, Fujun; Adams, Josephine C

    2013-01-01

    origin of muskelin in opisthokonts as a RanBPM-binding protein.

  4. Arabidopsis CaM1 and CaM4 Promote Nitric Oxide Production and Salt Resistance by Inhibiting S-Nitrosoglutathione Reductase via Direct Binding

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dan; Peng, Xuan; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Jiaojiao; Zhao, Junfeng; Chen, Kunming; Zhao, Liqun

    2016-01-01

    Salt is a major threat to plant growth and crop productivity. Calmodulin (CaM), the most important multifunctional Ca2+ sensor protein in plants, mediates reactions against environmental stresses through target proteins; however, direct proof of the participation of CaM in salt tolerance and its corresponding signaling pathway in vivo is lacking. In this study, we found that AtCaM1 and AtCaM4 produced salt-responsive CaM isoforms according to real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses; this result was verified based on a phenotypic analysis of salt-treated loss-of-function mutant and transgenic plants. We also found that the level of nitric oxide (NO), an important salt-responsive signaling molecule, varied in response to salt treatment depending on AtCaM1 and AtCaM4 expression. GSNOR is considered as an important and widely utilized regulatory component of NO homeostasis in plant resistance protein signaling networks. In vivo and in vitro protein-protein interaction assays revealed direct binding between AtCaM4 and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR), leading to reduced GSNOR activity and an increased NO level. Overexpression of GSNOR intensified the salt sensitivity of cam4 mutant plants accompanied by a reduced internal NO level, whereas a gsnor deficiency increased the salt tolerance of cam4 plants accompanied by an increased internal NO level. Physiological experiments showed that CaM4-GSNOR, acting through NO, reestablished the ion balance to increase plant resistance to salt stress. Together, these data suggest that AtCaM1 and AtCaM4 serve as signals in plant salt resistance by promoting NO accumulation through the binding and inhibition of GSNOR. This could be a conserved defensive signaling pathway in plants and animals. PMID:27684709

  5. Arabidopsis miR171-targeted scarecrow-like proteins bind to GT cis-elements and mediate gibberellin-regulated chlorophyll biosynthesis under light conditions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhaoxue; Hu, Xupeng; Cai, Wenjuan; Huang, Weihua; Zhou, Xin; Luo, Qian; Yang, Hongquan; Wang, Jiawei; Huang, Jirong

    2014-08-01

    An extraordinarily precise regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis is essential for plant growth and development. However, our knowledge on the complex regulatory mechanisms of chlorophyll biosynthesis is very limited. Previous studies have demonstrated that miR171-targeted scarecrow-like proteins (SCL6/22/27) negatively regulate chlorophyll biosynthesis via an unknown mechanism. Here we showed that SCLs inhibit the expression of the key gene encoding protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) in light-grown plants, but have no significant effect on protochlorophyllide biosynthesis in etiolated seedlings. Histochemical analysis of β-glucuronidase (GUS) activity in transgenic plants expressing pSCL27::rSCL27-GUS revealed that SCL27-GUS accumulates at high levels and suppresses chlorophyll biosynthesis at the leaf basal proliferation region during leaf development. Transient gene expression assays showed that the promoter activity of PORC is indeed regulated by SCL27. Consistently, chromatin immunoprecipitation and quantitative PCR assays showed that SCL27 binds to the promoter region of PORC in vivo. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that SCL27 is directly interacted with G(A/G)(A/T)AA(A/T)GT cis-elements of the PORC promoter. Furthermore, genetic analysis showed that gibberellin (GA)-regulated chlorophyll biosynthesis is mediated, at least in part, by SCLs. We demonstrated that SCL27 interacts with DELLA proteins in vitro and in vivo by yeast-two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation analysis and found that their interaction reduces the binding activity of SCL27 to the PORC promoter. Additionally, we showed that SCL27 activates MIR171 gene expression, forming a feedback regulatory loop. Taken together, our data suggest that the miR171-SCL module is critical for mediating GA-DELLA signaling in the coordinate regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis and leaf growth in light.

  6. How Is RAN Related to Reading Fluency? A Comprehensive Examination of the Prominent Theoretical Accounts

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Timothy C.; Spanoudis, George C.; Georgiou, George K.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the prominent theoretical explanations of the RAN-reading relationship in a relatively transparent language (Greek) in a sample of children (n = 286) followed from Grade 1 to Grade 2. Specifically, we tested the fit of eight different models, as defined by the type of reading performance predicted (oral vs. silent word reading fluency), the type of RAN tasks (non-alphanumeric vs. alphanumeric), and the RAN effects (direct vs. indirect). Working memory, attention, processing speed, and motor skills were used as “common cause” variables predicting both RAN and reading fluency and phonological awareness and orthographic processing were used as mediators of RAN's effects on reading fluency. The findings of both concurrent and longitudinal analyses indicated that RAN is a unique predictor of oral reading fluency, but not silent reading fluency. Using alphanumeric or non-alphanumeric RAN did not particularly affect the RAN-reading relationship. Both phonological awareness and orthographic processing partly mediated RAN's effects on reading fluency. Theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.

  7. How Is RAN Related to Reading Fluency? A Comprehensive Examination of the Prominent Theoretical Accounts

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Timothy C.; Spanoudis, George C.; Georgiou, George K.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the prominent theoretical explanations of the RAN-reading relationship in a relatively transparent language (Greek) in a sample of children (n = 286) followed from Grade 1 to Grade 2. Specifically, we tested the fit of eight different models, as defined by the type of reading performance predicted (oral vs. silent word reading fluency), the type of RAN tasks (non-alphanumeric vs. alphanumeric), and the RAN effects (direct vs. indirect). Working memory, attention, processing speed, and motor skills were used as “common cause” variables predicting both RAN and reading fluency and phonological awareness and orthographic processing were used as mediators of RAN's effects on reading fluency. The findings of both concurrent and longitudinal analyses indicated that RAN is a unique predictor of oral reading fluency, but not silent reading fluency. Using alphanumeric or non-alphanumeric RAN did not particularly affect the RAN-reading relationship. Both phonological awareness and orthographic processing partly mediated RAN's effects on reading fluency. Theoretical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:27605918

  8. How Is RAN Related to Reading Fluency? A Comprehensive Examination of the Prominent Theoretical Accounts.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Timothy C; Spanoudis, George C; Georgiou, George K

    2016-01-01

    We examined the prominent theoretical explanations of the RAN-reading relationship in a relatively transparent language (Greek) in a sample of children (n = 286) followed from Grade 1 to Grade 2. Specifically, we tested the fit of eight different models, as defined by the type of reading performance predicted (oral vs. silent word reading fluency), the type of RAN tasks (non-alphanumeric vs. alphanumeric), and the RAN effects (direct vs. indirect). Working memory, attention, processing speed, and motor skills were used as "common cause" variables predicting both RAN and reading fluency and phonological awareness and orthographic processing were used as mediators of RAN's effects on reading fluency. The findings of both concurrent and longitudinal analyses indicated that RAN is a unique predictor of oral reading fluency, but not silent reading fluency. Using alphanumeric or non-alphanumeric RAN did not particularly affect the RAN-reading relationship. Both phonological awareness and orthographic processing partly mediated RAN's effects on reading fluency. Theoretical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:27605918

  9. LES/RANS Simulation of a Supersonic Reacting Wall Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Jack R.; Boles, John A.; Baurle, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents results from large-eddy / Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (LES/RANS) simulations of the well-known Burrows-Kurkov supersonic reacting wall-jet experiment. Generally good agreement with experimental mole fraction, stagnation temperature, and Pitot pressure profiles is obtained for non-reactive mixing of the hydrogen jet with a non-vitiated air stream. A lifted flame, stabilized between 10 and 22 cm downstream of the hydrogen jet, is formed for hydrogen injected into a vitiated air stream. Flame stabilization occurs closer to the hydrogen injection location when a three-dimensional combustor geometry (with boundary layer development resolved on all walls) is considered. Volumetric expansion of the reactive shear layer is accompanied by the formation of large eddies which interact strongly with the reaction zone. Time averaged predictions of the reaction zone structure show an under-prediction of the peak water concentration and stagnation temperature, relative to experimental data and to results from a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes calculation. If the experimental data can be considered as being accurate, this result indicates that the present LES/RANS method does not correctly capture the cascade of turbulence scales that should be resolvable on the present mesh. Instead, energy is concentrated in the very largest scales, which provide an over-mixing effect that excessively cools and strains the flame. Predictions improve with the use of a low-dissipation version of the baseline piecewise parabolic advection scheme, which captures the formation of smaller-scale structures superimposed on larger structures of the order of the shear-layer width.

  10. Reduced function of the RNA-binding protein FPA rescues a T-DNA insertion mutant in the Arabidopsis ZHOUPI gene by promoting transcriptional read-through.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaohua; Li, Xin; Goodrich, Justin; Wu, Chunxia; Wei, Haichao; Yang, Suxin; Feng, Xianzhong

    2016-07-01

    T-DNA insertion mutants have been widely used to investigate plant gene functions. Unexpectedly, in several reported cases, the phenotype of T-DNA insertion mutations can be suppressed because of trans T-DNA interactions associated with epigenetic modification, which indicates that caution is needed when T-DNA mutants are used. In the present study, we characterized a novel process suppressing a T-DNA mutation. The spz2 (suppressor of zou 2) mutant was isolated as a suppressor of the phenotype of the zou-4 mutant caused by a T-DNA insertion in the first intron. The spz2 mutation partially recovered the native ZOU gene expression in the zou-4 background, but not in two other zou alleles, zou-2 and zou-3, with T-DNAs inserted in the exon and intron, respectively. The suppressed phenotype was inherited in a Mendelian fashion and is not associated with epigenetic modification. The recovery of the native ZOU gene expression in the spz2 zou-4 double mutant is caused by transcriptional read-through of the intronic T-DNA as a result of decreased proximal polyadenylation. SPZ2 encodes an RNA-binding protein, FPA, which is known to regulate polyadenylation site selection. This is the first example of FPA rescuing a T-DNA insertion mutation by affecting the polyadenylation site selection. PMID:27164978

  11. PIL5, a phytochrome-interacting bHLH protein, regulates gibberellin responsiveness by binding directly to the GAI and RGA promoters in Arabidopsis seeds.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eunkyoo; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Hu, Jianhong; Yusuke, Jikumaru; Jung, Byunghyuck; Paik, Inyup; Lee, Hee-Seung; Sun, Tai-ping; Kamiya, Yuji; Choi, Giltsu

    2007-04-01

    Previous work showed that PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR3-LIKE5 (PIL5), a light-labile basic helix-loop-helix protein, inhibits seed germination by repressing GIBBERELLIN 3beta-HYDROXYLASE1 (GA3ox1) and GA3ox2 and activating a gibberellic acid (GA) catabolic gene (GA2ox2). However, we show persistent light-dependent and PIL5-inhibited germination behavior in the absence of both de novo GA biosynthesis and deactivation by GA2ox2, suggesting that PIL5 regulates not only GA metabolism but also GA responsiveness. PIL5 increases the expression of two GA repressor (DELLA) genes, GA-INSENSITIVE (GAI) and REPRESSOR OF GA1-3 (RGA/RGA1), in darkness. The hypersensitivity of gai-t6 rga-28 to red light and the suppression of germination defects of a rga-28 PIL5 overexpression line show the significant role of this transcriptional regulation in seed germination. PIL5 also increases abscisic acid (ABA) levels by activating ABA biosynthetic genes and repressing an ABA catabolic gene. PIL5 binds directly to GAI and RGA promoters but not to GA and ABA metabolic gene promoters. Together, our results show that light signals perceived by phytochromes cause a reduction in the PIL5 protein level, which in turn regulates the transcription of two DELLA genes directly and that of GA and ABA metabolic genes indirectly.

  12. Altered Profile of Secondary Metabolites in the Root Exudates of Arabidopsis ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter Mutants1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Badri, Dayakar V.; Loyola-Vargas, Victor M.; Broeckling, Corey D.; De-la-Peña, Clelia; Jasinski, Michal; Santelia, Diana; Martinoia, Enrico; Sumner, Lloyd W.; Banta, Lois M.; Stermitz, Frank; Vivanco, Jorge M.

    2008-01-01

    Following recent indirect evidence suggesting a role for ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in root exudation of phytochemicals, we identified 25 ABC transporter genes highly expressed in the root cells most likely to be involved in secretion processes. Of these 25 genes, we also selected six full-length ABC transporters and a half-size transporter for in-depth molecular and biochemical analyses. We compared the exuded root phytochemical profiles of these seven ABC transporter mutants to those of the wild type. There were three nonpolar phytochemicals missing in various ABC transporter mutants compared to the wild type when the samples were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. These data suggest that more than one ABC transporter can be involved in the secretion of a given phytochemical and that a transporter can be involved in the secretion of more than one secondary metabolite. The primary and secondary metabolites present in the root exudates of the mutants were also analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, which allowed for the identification of groups of compounds differentially found in some of the mutants compared to the wild type. For instance, the mutant Atpdr6 secreted a lower level of organic acids and Atmrp2 secreted a higher level of amino acids as compared to the wild type. We conclude that the release of phytochemicals by roots is partially controlled by ABC transporters. PMID:18065561

  13. The RNA-binding protein HOS5 and serine/arginine-rich proteins RS40 and RS41 participate in miRNA biogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Cui, Peng; Xiong, Liming

    2015-09-30

    MicroRNAs are a class of small regulatory RNAs that are generated from primary miRNA (pri-miRNA) transcripts with a stem-loop structure. Accuracy of the processing of pri-miRNA into mature miRNA in plants can be enhanced by SERRATE (SE) and HYPONASTIC LEAVES 1 (HYL1). HYL1 activity is regulated by the FIERY2 (FRY2)/RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatase-like 1 (CPL1). Here, we discover that HIGH OSMOTIC STRESS GENE EXPRESSION 5 (HOS5) and two serine/arginine-rich splicing factors RS40 and RS41, previously shown to be involved in pre-mRNA splicing, affect the biogenesis of a subset of miRNA. These proteins are required for correct miRNA strand selection and the maintenance of miRNA levels. FRY2 dephosphorylates HOS5 whose phosphorylation status affects its subnuclear localization. HOS5 and the RS proteins bind both intronless and intron-containing pri-miRNAs. Importantly, all of these splicing-related factors directly interact with both HYL1 and SE in nuclear splicing speckles. Our results indicate that these splicing factors are directly involved in the biogenesis of a group of miRNA.

  14. The RNA-binding protein HOS5 and serine/arginine-rich proteins RS40 and RS41 participate in miRNA biogenesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Cui, Peng; Xiong, Liming

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of small regulatory RNAs that are generated from primary miRNA (pri-miRNA) transcripts with a stem-loop structure. Accuracy of the processing of pri-miRNA into mature miRNA in plants can be enhanced by SERRATE (SE) and HYPONASTIC LEAVES 1 (HYL1). HYL1 activity is regulated by the FIERY2 (FRY2)/RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatase-like 1 (CPL1). Here, we discover that HIGH OSMOTIC STRESS GENE EXPRESSION 5 (HOS5) and two serine/arginine-rich splicing factors RS40 and RS41, previously shown to be involved in pre-mRNA splicing, affect the biogenesis of a subset of miRNA. These proteins are required for correct miRNA strand selection and the maintenance of miRNA levels. FRY2 dephosphorylates HOS5 whose phosphorylation status affects its subnuclear localization. HOS5 and the RS proteins bind both intronless and intron-containing pri-miRNAs. Importantly, all of these splicing-related factors directly interact with both HYL1 and SE in nuclear splicing speckles. Our results indicate that these splicing factors are directly involved in the biogenesis of a group of miRNA. PMID:26227967

  15. RAN as a predictor of reading skills, and vice versa: results from a randomised reading intervention.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Ulrika

    2014-07-01

    Although phonemic awareness is a well-known factor predicting early reading development, there is also evidence that Rapid Automatized Naming (RAN) is an independent factor that contributes to early reading. The aim of this study is to examine phonemic awareness and RAN as predictors of reading speed, reading comprehension and spelling for children with reading difficulties. It also investigates a possible reciprocal relationship between RAN and reading skills, and the possibility of enhancing RAN by intervention. These issues are addressed by examining longitudinal data from a randomised reading intervention study carried out in Sweden for 9-year-old children with reading difficulties (N = 112). The intervention comprised three main elements: training of phonics, reading comprehension strategies and reading speed. The analysis of the data was carried out using structural equation modelling. The results demonstrated that after controlling for autoregressive effects and non-verbal IQ, RAN predicts reading speed whereas phonemic awareness predicts reading comprehension and spelling. RAN was significantly enhanced by training and a reciprocal relationship between reading speed and RAN was found. These findings contribute to support the view that both phonemic awareness and RAN independently influence early phases of reading, and that both are possible to enhance by training.

  16. A functional investigation of RAN letters, digits, and objects: how similar are they?

    PubMed

    Cummine, Jacqueline; Szepesvari, Eszter; Chouinard, Brea; Hanif, Wahab; Georgiou, George K

    2014-12-15

    Although rapid automatized naming (RAN) of letters, digits, and objects are popular tasks and have been used interchangeably to predict academic performance, it remains unknown if they tap into the same neural regions. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the neural overlap across different RAN tasks. Fifteen university students were assessed on RAN digits, letters, and objects using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Results showed a common neural pattern that included regions related to motor planning (e.g., cerebellum), semantic access (middle temporal gyrus), articulation (supplementary motor association, motor/pre-motor, anterior cingulate cortex), and grapheme-phoneme mapping (ventral supramarginal gyrus). However, RAN digits and letters showed many unique regions of activation over and above RAN objects particularly in semantic and articulatory regions, including precuneus, bilateral supramarginal gyrus, nucleus accumbens and thalamus. The only region unique to RAN objects included bilateral fusiform, a region commonly implicated in object processing. Overall, our results provide the first neural evidence for a stronger relationship between RAN letters and digits than when either task is compared to RAN objects. PMID:25172183

  17. Different RAN Components Relate to Reading at Different Points in Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiou, George K.; Papadopoulos, Timothy C.; Kaizer, Eleni L.

    2014-01-01

    The present 10-year longitudinal study examined how rapid automatized naming (RAN) components--articulation time and pause time--relate to reading fluency. Seventy-five Greek-speaking children were followed from Grade 1 to Grade 10 and were assessed five times (in Grades 1, 2, 4, 6, and 10) on RAN (digits and objects) and reading fluency (word…

  18. Developmental Changes in the Relations between RAN, Phonological Awareness, and Reading in Spanish Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodríguez, Cristina; van den Boer, Madelon; Jiménez, Juan E.; de Jong, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the developmental relations of phonological awareness (PA) and rapid automatized naming (RAN) with reading in a cross-sectional study with 874 Spanish children from Grades 2 to 6. Our main prediction was that the RAN-reading relationship would decrease due to a gradual change in reading strategy, from serial decoding to sight word…

  19. Examining the Cross-Lagged Relationships between RAN and Word Reading in Chinese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Wei; Georgiou, George K.; Deng, Ciping

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this 4-year longitudinal study was to specify the direction of the relationship between RAN and word reading (accuracy and fluency) in Chinese. This is important in light of arguments that the developmental relationships between RAN and reading can disclose changes in the reading processes underlying reading as development proceeds.…

  20. RAN as a Predictor of Reading Skills, and Vice Versa: Results from a Randomised Reading Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Ulrika

    2014-01-01

    Although phonemic awareness is a well-known factor predicting early reading development, there is also evidence that Rapid Automatized Naming (RAN) is an independent factor that contributes to early reading. The aim of this study is to examine phonemic awareness and RAN as predictors of reading speed, reading comprehension and spelling for…

  1. RAN Components and Reading Development from Grade 3 to Grade 5: What Underlies Their Relationship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgiou, George K.; Parrila, Rauno; Kirby, John R.

    2009-01-01

    We examined (a) how rapid automatized naming (RAN) components--articulation time and pause time--predict reading accuracy and reading fluency in Grades 4 and 5, and (b) what cognitive-processing skills (phonological processing, orthographic processing, or speed of processing) mediate the RAN-reading relationship. Sixty children were followed from…

  2. What Does Rapid Automatized Naming Measure? A New RAN Task Compared to Naming and Lexical Decision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wile, Tammy L.; Borowsky, Ron

    2004-01-01

    The present research investigated the relationship between Rapid Automatized Naming (RAN) performance, letter-string reading measures of sight vocabulary (SV) and phonetic decoding (PD), and lexical decision. Criterion-based naming rates were obtained from three types of RAN tasks: digits, letters, and letter sounds. Latency measures were obtained…

  3. Involvement of Ran in the regulation of phagocytosis against virus infection in S2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ting; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2013-12-01

    Phagocytosis plays important roles in innate and adaptive immunity in animals. Some small G proteins are found to be related to phagocytosis. However, the Ran GTPase has not been intensively characterized in immunity. In this paper, the sequence analysis showed that the Ran was highly conserved in animals, suggesting that its function was preserved during animal evolution. The results showed that Ran was upregulated in S2 cells in response to DCV infection. It was further revealed that the antiviral phagocytosis could be mediated by Ran in S2 cells. By comparison with the early marker and late marker of phagosomes, the results showed that the Ran protein played an essential role at the early stage of phagocytosis or throughout the entire phagocytic process. Therefore our findings enlarged our limited knowledge about the phagocytosis regulation by small G proteins concerning to the nucleus.

  4. Application of a RG hybrid RANS/LES model to swirling confined turbulent jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Langhe, C.; Merci, B.; Dick, E.

    A renormalization group (RG) based hybrid RANS/LES model is validated for turbulent swirling confined jets. The results are compared with the experimental data of Dellenback et al. (1988, Measurements in turbulent swirling flow through an abrupt axisymmetric expansion. AIAA Journal, 26(6), 669 681) and results for the same flows of an unsteady second-moment closure RANS simulation. A general quality/cost comparison is made between the hybrid RANS/LES and the second-moment closure simulations. In the final section, the hybrid RANS/LES result is further compared to a detached-eddy simulation, dynamic -equation LES and dynamic Smagorinsky LES for one of the flows, and the overall good quality of the RG hybrid RANS/LES model demonstrated.

  5. Unsteady RANS and Large Eddy simulations of multiphase diesel injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, Jenna; Green, Melissa; Akih-Kumgeh, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (URANS) and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of two-phase flow and evaporation of high pressure diesel injection into a quiescent, high temperature environment is investigated. Unsteady RANS and LES are turbulent flow simulation approaches used to determine complex flow fields. The latter allows for more accurate predictions of complex phenomena such as turbulent mixing and physio-chemical processes associated with diesel combustion. In this work we investigate a high pressure diesel injection using the Euler-Lagrange method for multiphase flows as implemented in the Star-CCM+ CFD code. A dispersed liquid phase is represented by Lagrangian particles while the multi-component gas phase is solved using an Eulerian method. Results obtained from the two approaches are compared with respect to spray penetration depth and air entrainment. They are also compared with experimental data taken from the Sandia Engine Combustion Network for ``Spray A''. Characteristics of primary and secondary atomization are qualitatively evaluated for all simulation modes.

  6. Data-driven RANS for prediction of wind turbine wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Viola, Francesco; Ciri, Umberto; Camarri, Simone; Rotea, Mario A.; Leonardi, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    Wind turbine wakes are highly turbulent flows resulting from the interaction between the atmospheric boundary layer and wake vorticity structures. Measurement technologies, such as wind LiDARs, are currently available to perform velocity measurements in a set of locations of wakes past utility-scale wind turbines; however, computational methods are still needed to predict wake downstream evolution. In this work, a low-computational cost and accurate algorithm is proposed for prediction of the spatial evolution of wind turbine wakes. Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes equations (RANS) are formulated in cylindrical coordinates and simplified by using a boundary layer type approximation. Turbulence effects are taken into account with a mixing length model calibrated on the available observations. In this study, observations of wind turbine wakes consist in LES data of wakes produced by a wind turbine operating with different incoming wind and loading conditions. The mixing length calibrated on the LES data is constant in the near wake and only affected by the incoming turbulence, whereas further downstream it increases roughly linearly with the downstream position and with increased slope for increasing rotational speed of the turbine.

  7. Flow Control Analysis on the Hump Model with RANS Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viken, Sally A.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2003-01-01

    A concerted effort is underway at NASA Langley Research Center to create a benchmark for Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) codes. both unstructured and structured, against a data set for the hump model with actuation. The hump model was tested in the NASA Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. The CFD codes used for the analyses are the FUN2D (Full Unstructured Navier-Stokes 2-Dimensional) code, the structured TLNS3D (Thin-Layer Navier-Stokes 3-Dimensional) code, and the structured CFL3D code, all developed at NASA Langley. The current investigation uses the time-accurate Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach to predict aerodynamic performance of the active flow control experimental database for the hump model. Two-dimensional computational results verified that steady blowing and suction and oscillatory suction/blowing can be used to significantly reduce the separated flow region on the model. Discrepancies do exist between the CFD results and experimental data in the region downstream of the slot with the largest differences in the oscillatory cases. Overall, the structured CFD codes exhibited similar behavior with each other for a wide range of control conditions, with the unstructured FUN2D code showing moderately different results in the separated flow region for the suction and oscillatory cases.

  8. RANS and LES simulations of the airflow through nasal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberti, Giacomo

    2015-11-01

    The prediction of detailed flow patterns in nasal cavities using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can provide essential information on the potential relationship between patient-specific geometrical characteristics and health problems. The long-term goal of the OpenNOSE project is to develop a reliable open-source computational tool based on the OpenFOAM CFD toolbox that can assist surgeons in their daily practice. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the turbulence model and boundary conditions on simulations of the airflow in nasal cavities. The geometry, including paranasal sinuses, was reconstructed from a carefully selected CT scan, and RANS and LES simulations were carried out for steady inspiration and expiration. At a flow rate near 20 l/min, the flow is laminar in most of the domain. During the inspiration phase, turbulence develops in nasopharynx and oropharynx regions; during the expiration phase, another vortical region is observed down the nostrils. A comparison between different boundary conditions suggests the use of a total pressure condition, or alternatively a uniform velocity, at the inlet and outlet. In future work the same geometry will be used for setting up a laboratory experiment, intended to cross-validate the numerical results.

  9. RanBP9 at the intersection between cofilin and Aβ pathologies: rescue of neurodegenerative changes by RanBP9 reduction

    PubMed Central

    Woo, J A; Boggess, T; Uhlar, C; Wang, X; Khan, H; Cappos, G; Joly-Amado, A; De Narvaez, E; Majid, S; Minamide, L S; Bamburg, J R; Morgan, D; Weeber, E; Kang, D E

    2015-01-01

    Molecular pathways underlying the neurotoxicity and production of amyloid β protein (Aβ) represent potentially promising therapeutic targets for Alzheimer's disease (AD). We recently found that overexpression of the scaffolding protein RanBP9 increases Aβ production in cell lines and in transgenic mice while promoting cofilin activation and mitochondrial dysfunction. Translocation of cofilin to mitochondria and induction of cofilin–actin pathology require the activation/dephosphorylation of cofilin by Slingshot homolog 1 (SSH1) and cysteine oxidation of cofilin. In this study, we found that endogenous RanBP9 positively regulates SSH1 levels and mediates Aβ-induced translocation of cofilin to mitochondria and induction of cofilin–actin pathology in cultured cells, primary neurons, and in vivo. Endogenous level of RanBP9 was also required for Aβ-induced collapse of growth cones in immature neurons (days in vitro 9 (DIV9)) and depletion of synaptic proteins in mature neurons (DIV21). In vivo, amyloid precursor protein (APP)/presenilin-1 (PS1) mice exhibited 3.5-fold increased RanBP9 levels, and RanBP9 reduction protected against cofilin–actin pathology, synaptic damage, gliosis, and Aβ accumulation associated with APP/PS1 mice. Brains slices derived from APP/PS1 mice showed significantly impaired long-term potentiation (LTP), and RanBP9 reduction significantly enhanced paired pulse facilitation and LTP, as well as partially rescued contextual memory deficits associated with APP/PS1 mice. Therefore, these results underscore the critical importance of endogenous RanBP9 not only in Aβ accumulation but also in mediating the neurotoxic actions of Aβ at the level of synaptic plasticity, mitochondria, and cofilin–actin pathology via control of the SSH1-cofilin pathway in vivo. PMID:25741591

  10. Rans S-12 RPV Takes off with Spacewedge #2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A Rans S-12 remotely piloted 'mothership' takes off from a lakebed runway carrying a Spacewedge research model during 1992 flight tests. The Spacewedge was lauched in flight from the Rans S-12 aircraft and then glided back to a landing under a steerable parafoil. Technology tested in the Spacewedge program was used in developing the X-38 research vehicle. From October 1991 to December 1996, NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility (after 1994, the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California) conducted a research program know as the Spacecraft Autoland Project. This Project was designed to determine the feasibility of the autonomous recovery of a spacecraft using a ram-air parafoil system for the final stages of flight, including a precision landing. The Johnson Space Center and the U.S. Army participated in various phases of the program. The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory developed the software for Wedge 3 under contract to the Army. Four generic spacecraft (each called a Spacewedge or simply a Wedge) were built; the last one was built to test the feasibility of a parafoil for delivering Army cargoes. Technology developed during this program has applications for future spacecraft recovery systems, such as the X-38 Crew Return Vehicle demonstrator. The Spacewedge program demonstrated precision flare and landing into the wind at a predetermined location. The program showed that a flexible, deployable system using autonomous navigation and landing was a viable and practical way to recover spacecraft. NASA researchers conducted flight tests of the Spacewedge at three sites near Dryden, a hillside near Tehachapi, the Rogers Dry Lakebed at Edwards Air Force Base, and the California City Airport Drop Zone. During the first phase of testing 36 flights were made. Phase II consisted of 45 flights using a smaller parafoil. A third Phase of 34 flights was conducted primarily by the Army and resulted in the development of an Army guidance system for precision offset

  11. The interaction of RNA helicase DDX3 with HIV-1 Rev-CRM1-RanGTP complex during the HIV replication cycle

    DOE PAGES

    Mahboobi, Seyed Hanif; Javanpour, Alex A.; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2015-02-27

    Molecular traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm is regulated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which acts as a highly selective channel perforating the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exploits the nucleocytoplasmic pathway to export its RNA transcripts across the NPC to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive study on the HIV life cycle and the many drugs developed to target this cycle, no current drugs have been successful in targeting the critical process of viral nuclear export, even though HIV’s reliance on a single host protein, CRM1, to export its unspliced and partially spliced RNAmore » transcripts makes it a tempting target. Due to recent findings implicating a DEAD-box helicase, DDX3, in HIV replication and a member of the export complex, it has become an appealing target for anti-HIV drug inhibition. In the present research, we have applied a hybrid computational protocol to analyze protein-protein interactions in the HIV mRNA export cycle. This method is based on molecular docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation and accompanied by approximate free energy calculation (MM/GBSA), computational alanine scanning, clustering, and evolutionary analysis. We highlight here some of the most likely binding modes and interfacial residues between DDX3 and CRM1 both in the absence and presence of RanGTP. This work shows that although DDX3 can bind to free CRM1, addition of RanGTP leads to more concentrated distribution of binding modes and stronger binding between CRM1 and RanGTP.« less

  12. The interaction of RNA helicase DDX3 with HIV-1 Rev-CRM1-RanGTP complex during the HIV replication cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Mahboobi, Seyed Hanif; Javanpour, Alex A.; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2015-02-27

    Molecular traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm is regulated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which acts as a highly selective channel perforating the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exploits the nucleocytoplasmic pathway to export its RNA transcripts across the NPC to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive study on the HIV life cycle and the many drugs developed to target this cycle, no current drugs have been successful in targeting the critical process of viral nuclear export, even though HIV’s reliance on a single host protein, CRM1, to export its unspliced and partially spliced RNA transcripts makes it a tempting target. Due to recent findings implicating a DEAD-box helicase, DDX3, in HIV replication and a member of the export complex, it has become an appealing target for anti-HIV drug inhibition. In the present research, we have applied a hybrid computational protocol to analyze protein-protein interactions in the HIV mRNA export cycle. This method is based on molecular docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation and accompanied by approximate free energy calculation (MM/GBSA), computational alanine scanning, clustering, and evolutionary analysis. We highlight here some of the most likely binding modes and interfacial residues between DDX3 and CRM1 both in the absence and presence of RanGTP. This work shows that although DDX3 can bind to free CRM1, addition of RanGTP leads to more concentrated distribution of binding modes and stronger binding between CRM1 and RanGTP.

  13. The Interaction of RNA Helicase DDX3 with HIV-1 Rev-CRM1-RanGTP Complex during the HIV Replication Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Mahboobi, Seyed Hanif; Javanpour, Alex A.; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm is regulated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which acts as a highly selective channel perforating the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exploits the nucleocytoplasmic pathway to export its RNA transcripts across the NPC to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive study on the HIV life cycle and the many drugs developed to target this cycle, no current drugs have been successful in targeting the critical process of viral nuclear export, even though HIV’s reliance on a single host protein, CRM1, to export its unspliced and partially spliced RNA transcripts makes it a tempting target. Due to recent findings implicating a DEAD-box helicase, DDX3, in HIV replication and a member of the export complex, it has become an appealing target for anti-HIV drug inhibition. In the present research, we have applied a hybrid computational protocol to analyze protein-protein interactions in the HIV mRNA export cycle. This method is based on molecular docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation and accompanied by approximate free energy calculation (MM/GBSA), computational alanine scanning, clustering, and evolutionary analysis. We highlight here some of the most likely binding modes and interfacial residues between DDX3 and CRM1 both in the absence and presence of RanGTP. This work shows that although DDX3 can bind to free CRM1, addition of RanGTP leads to more concentrated distribution of binding modes and stronger binding between CRM1 and RanGTP. PMID:25723178

  14. The Arabidopsis Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    McClung, C. Robertson; Salomé, Patrice A.; Michael, Todd P.

    2002-01-01

    Rhythms with periods of approximately 24 hr are widespread in nature. Those that persist in constant conditions are termed circadian rhythms and reflect the activity of an endogenous biological clock. Plants, including Arabidopsis, are richly rhythmic. Expression analysis, most recently on a genomic scale, indicates that the Arabidopsis circadian clock regulates a number of key metabolic pathways and stress responses. A number of sensitive and high-throughput assays have been developed to monitor the Arabidopsis clock. These assays have facilitated the identification of components of plant circadian systems through genetic and molecular biological studies. Although much remains to be learned, the framework of the Arabidopsis circadian system is coming into focus. Dedication This review is dedicated to the memory of DeLill Nasser, a wonderful mentor and an unwavering advocate of both Arabidopsis and circadian rhythms research. PMID:22303209

  15. Tuning a RANS k-e model for jet-in-crossflow simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Lefantzi, Sophia; Ray, Jaideep; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; DeChant, Lawrence Justin

    2013-09-01

    We develop a novel calibration approach to address the problem of predictive ke RANS simulations of jet-incrossflow. Our approach is based on the hypothesis that predictive ke parameters can be obtained by estimating them from a strongly vortical flow, specifically, flow over a square cylinder. In this study, we estimate three ke parameters, C%CE%BC, Ce2 and Ce1 by fitting 2D RANS simulations to experimental data. We use polynomial surrogates of 2D RANS for this purpose. We conduct an ensemble of 2D RANS runs using samples of (C%CE%BC;Ce2;Ce1) and regress Reynolds stresses to the samples using a simple polynomial. We then use this surrogate of the 2D RANS model to infer a joint distribution for the ke parameters by solving a Bayesian inverse problem, conditioned on the experimental data. The calibrated (C%CE%BC;Ce2;Ce1) distribution is used to seed an ensemble of 3D jet-in-crossflow simulations. We compare the ensemble's predictions of the flowfield, at two planes, to PIV measurements and estimate the predictive skill of the calibrated 3D RANS model. We also compare it against 3D RANS predictions using the nominal (uncalibrated) values of (C%CE%BC;Ce2;Ce1), and find that calibration delivers a significant improvement to the predictive skill of the 3D RANS model. We repeat the calibration using surrogate models based on kriging and find that the calibration, based on these more accurate models, is not much better that those obtained with simple polynomial surrogates. We discuss the reasons for this rather surprising outcome.

  16. The Cellular Distribution of RanGAP1 Is Regulated by CRM1-Mediated Nuclear Export in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Cha, Keith; Sen, Progga; Raghunayakula, Sarita; Zhang, Xiang-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The Ran GTPase activating protein RanGAP1 plays an essential role in nuclear transport by stimulating RanGTP hydrolysis in the cytoplasmic compartment. In mammalian cells, unmodified RanGAP1 is predominantly cytoplasmic, whereas modification by small ubiquitin-related modifier protein (SUMO) targets RanGAP1 to the cytoplasmic filaments of nuclear pore complex (NPC). Although RanGAP1 contains nine putative nuclear export signals and a nuclear localization signal, little is known if RanGAP1 shuttles between the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments and how its primary localization in the cytoplasm and at the NPC is regulated. Here we show that inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export using RNAi-knockdown of CRM1 and inactivation of CRM1 by leptomycin B (LMB) results in nuclear accumulation of RanGAP1. LMB treatment induced a more robust redistribution of RanGAP1 from the cytoplasm to the nucleoplasm compared to CRM1 RNAi and also uniquely triggered a decrease or loss of RanGAP1 localization at the NPC, suggesting that LMB treatment is more effective in inhibiting CRM1-mediated nuclear export of RanGAP1. Our time-course analysis of LMB treatment reveals that the NPC-associated RanGAP1 is much more slowly redistributed to the nucleoplasm than the cytoplasmic RanGAP1. Furthermore, LMB-induced nuclear accumulation of RanGAP1 is positively correlated with an increase in levels of SUMO-modified RanGAP1, suggesting that SUMOylation of RanGAP1 may mainly take place in the nucleoplasm. Lastly, we demonstrate that the nuclear localization signal at the C-terminus of RanGAP1 is required for its nuclear accumulation in cells treated with LMB. Taken together, our results elucidate that RanGAP1 is actively transported between the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments, and that the cytoplasmic and NPC localization of RanGAP1 is dependent on CRM1-mediated nuclear export. PMID:26506250

  17. Structural characterization of recombinant IAV polymerase reveals a stable complex between viral PA-PB1 heterodimer and host RanBP5

    PubMed Central

    Swale, Christopher; Monod, Alexandre; Tengo, Laura; Labaronne, Alice; Garzoni, Frédéric; Bourhis, Jean-Marie; Cusack, Stephen; Schoehn, Guy; Berger, Imre; Ruigrok, Rob WH; Crépin, Thibaut

    2016-01-01

    The genome of influenza A virus (IAV) comprises eight RNA segments (vRNA) which are transcribed and replicated by the heterotrimeric IAV RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp). RdRp consists of three subunits (PA, PB1 and PB2) and binds both the highly conserved 3′- and 5′-ends of the vRNA segment. The IAV RdRp is an important antiviral target, but its structural mechanism has remained largely elusive to date. By applying a polyprotein strategy, we produced RdRp complexes and define a minimal human IAV RdRp core complex. We show that PA-PB1 forms a stable heterodimeric submodule that can strongly interact with 5′-vRNA. In contrast, 3′-vRNA recognition critically depends on the PB2 N-terminal domain. Moreover, we demonstrate that PA-PB1 forms a stable and stoichiometric complex with host nuclear import factor RanBP5 that can be modelled using SAXS and we show that the PA-PB1-RanPB5 complex is no longer capable of 5′-vRNA binding. Our results provide further evidence for a step-wise assembly of IAV structural components, regulated by nuclear transport mechanisms and host factor binding. PMID:27095520

  18. Dynamic unified RANS-LES simulations of high Reynolds number separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtarpoor, Reza; Heinz, Stefan; Stoellinger, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The development of hybrid RANS-LES methods is seen to be a very promising approach to enable efficient simulations of high Reynolds number turbulent flows involving flow separation. To contribute to further advances, we present a new, theoretically well based, dynamic hybrid RANS-LES method, referred to as DLUM. It is applied to a high Reynolds number flow involving both attached and separated flow regimes: a periodic hill flow is simulated at a Reynolds number of 37 000. Its performance is compared to pure LES, pure RANS, other hybrid RANS-LES (given by DLUM modifications), and experimental observations. It is shown that the use of this computational method offers huge cost reductions (which scale with Re/200, Re refers to the Reynolds number) of very high Reynolds number flow simulations compared to LES, it is much more accurate than RANS, and more accurate than LES, which is not fully resolved. In particular, this conclusion does also apply to the comparison of DLUM and pure LES simulations on rather coarse grids, which are often simply required to deal with simulations of very high Reynolds number flows: the DLUM provides mean velocity fields which are hardly affected by the grid, whereas LES velocity fields reveal significant shortcomings. We identified the reason for the superior performance of our new dynamic hybrid RANS-LES method compared to LES: it is the model's ability to respond to a changing resolution with adequate turbulent viscosity changes by ensuring simultaneously a physically correct turbulence length scale specification under the presence of interacting RANS and LES modes.

  19. Down-modulation of nucleoporin RanBP2/Nup358 impaired chromosomal alignment and induced mitotic catastrophe

    PubMed Central

    Hashizume, C; Kobayashi, A; Wong, R W

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal missegregation is a common feature of many human tumors. Recent studies have indicated a link between nucleoporin RanBP2/Nup358 and chromosomal segregation during mitosis; however, the molecular details have yet to be fully established. Observed through live cell imaging and flow cytometry, here we show that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of RanBP2 induced G2/M phase arrest, metaphase catastrophe and mitotic cell death. Furthermore, RanBP2 down-modulation disrupted importin/karyopherin β1 as well as the expression and localization of the Ran GTPase activating protein 1. We found that N-terminal of RanBP2 interacted with the N-terminal of importin β1. Moreover, at least a portion of RanBP2 partially localizes at the centrosome during mitosis. Notably, we also found that GTPase Ran is also involved in the regulation of RanBP2–importin β1 interaction. Overall, our results suggest that mitotic arrest and the following cell death were caused by depletion of RanBP2. Our findings point to a crucial role for RanBP2 in proper mitotic progression and faithful chromosomal segregation. PMID:24113188

  20. Model-Form Uncertainty Quantification in RANS Simulation of Wing-Body Junction Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinlong; Wang, Jianxun; Xiao, Heng

    2015-11-01

    Junction flow, known as one of the remaining challenges for computational aerodynamics, occurs when a boundary layer encounters an obstacle mounted on the surface. Previous studies have shown that the RANS models are not capable to provide satisfactory prediction. In this work, a novel open-box, physics-informed Bayesian framework is used to quantify the model-form uncertainties in RANS simulation of junction flow. The first objective is to correct the bias in RANS prediction, by utilizing several observation data. The second one is to quantify the model-form uncertainties, which can enable risk-informed decision-making. To begin with a standard RANS simulation, which is performed on a 3:2 elliptic nose and NACA0020 tail cylinder, uncertainties with empirical prior knowledge and physical constraints are directly injected into the Reynolds stresses term, and the unbiased knowledge from observation data is incorporated by an iterative ensemble Kalman method. Current results show that the bias in the quantities of interest (QoIs) of the RANS prediction, e.g., mean velocity, turbulent kinetic energy, etc, can be significantly corrected by this novel Bayesian framework. The probability density distributions of QoIs show that the model-form uncertainty can be quantified as well.

  1. Determination of Scaled Wind Turbine Rotor Characteristics from Three Dimensional RANS Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmester, S.; Gueydon, S.; Make, M.

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies have shown the importance of 3D effects when calculating the performance characteristics of a scaled down turbine rotor [1-4]. In this paper the results of 3D RANS (Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes) computations by Make and Vaz [1] are taken to calculate 2D lift and drag coefficients. These coefficients are assigned to FAST (Blade Element Momentum Theory (BEMT) tool from NREL) as input parameters. Then, the rotor characteristics (power and thrust coefficients) are calculated using BEMT. This coupling of RANS and BEMT was previously applied by other parties and is termed here the RANS-BEMT coupled approach. Here the approach is compared to measurements carried out in a wave basin at MARIN applying Froude scaled wind, and the direct 3D RANS computation. The data of both a model and full scale wind turbine are used for the validation and verification. The flow around a turbine blade at full scale has a more 2D character than the flow properties around a turbine blade at model scale (Make and Vaz [1]). Since BEMT assumes 2D flow behaviour, the results of the RANS-BEMT coupled approach agree better with the results of the CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation at full- than at model-scale.

  2. Ran GTPase protein promotes human pancreatic cancer proliferation by deregulating the expression of Survivin and cell cycle proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Lin; Lu, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Xiaodi; Sun, Yi; Shi, Yongquan; Fan, Hongwei; Liu, Changhao; Zhou, Jinfeng; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Fan, Daiming; Guo, Xuegang

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •Overexpression of Ran in pancreatic cancer was correlated with histological grade. •Downregulation of Ran could induce cell apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation. •The effects were mediated by cell cycle proteins, Survivin and cleaved Caspase-3. -- Abstract: Ran, a member of the Ras GTPase family, has important roles in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Herein, we detected Ran expression in pancreatic cancer and explored its potential role on tumour progression. Overexpressed Ran in pancreatic cancer tissues was found highly correlated with the histological grade. Downregulation of Ran led to significant suppression of cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase and induction of apoptosis. In vivo studies also validated that result. Further studies revealed that those effects were at least partly mediated by the downregulation of Cyclin A, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E, CDK2, CDK4, phospho-Rb and Survivin proteins and up regulation of cleaved Caspase-3.

  3. Unraveling the circadian clock in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Ma, Ligeng

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous timing system responsible for coordinating an organism’s biological processes with its environment. Interlocked transcriptional feedback loops constitute the fundamental architecture of the circadian clock. In Arabidopsis, three feedback loops, the core loop, morning loop and evening loop, comprise a network that is the basis of the circadian clock. The components of these three loops are regulated in distinct ways, including transcriptional, post-transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms. The discovery of the DNA-binding and repressive activities of TOC1 has overturned our initial concept of its function in the circadian clock. The alternative splicing of circadian clock-related genes plays an essential role in normal functioning of the clock and enables organisms to sense environmental changes. In this review, we describe the regulatory mechanisms of the circadian clock that have been identified in Arabidopsis. PMID:23221775

  4. LES, DNS and RANS for the analysis of high-speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this research is to continue our efforts in advancing the state of knowledge in Large Eddy Simulation (LES), Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS), and Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) methods for the analysis of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. In the first phase of this research, conducted within the past six months, focus was in three directions: RANS of turbulent reacting flows by Probability Density Function (PDF) methods, RANS of non-reacting turbulent flows by advanced turbulence closures, and LES of mixing dominated reacting flows by a dynamics subgrid closure. A summary of our efforts within the past six months of this research is provided in this semi-annual progress report.

  5. Development of a Hybrid RANS/LES Method for Compressible Mixing Layer Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Reshotko, Eli

    2001-01-01

    A hybrid method has been developed for simulations of compressible turbulent mixing layers. Such mixing layers dominate the flows in exhaust systems of modem day aircraft and also those of hypersonic vehicles currently under development. The hybrid method uses a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) procedure to calculate wall bounded regions entering a mixing section, and a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) procedure to calculate the mixing dominated regions. A numerical technique was developed to enable the use of the hybrid RANS/LES method on stretched, non-Cartesian grids. The hybrid RANS/LES method is applied to a benchmark compressible mixing layer experiment. Preliminary two-dimensional calculations are used to investigate the effects of axial grid density and boundary conditions. Actual LES calculations, performed in three spatial directions, indicated an initial vortex shedding followed by rapid transition to turbulence, which is in agreement with experimental observations.

  6. Numerical Study of High-Temperature Jet Flow Using RANS/LES and PANS Formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdol-Hamid, Khaled S.; Elmiligui, Alaa

    2005-01-01

    Two multi-scale-type turbulence models are implemented in the PAB3D solver. The models are based on modifying the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The first scheme is a hybrid RANS/LES model utilizing the two-equation (k(epsilon)) model with a RANS/LES transition function dependent on grid spacing and the computed turbulence length scale. The second scheme is a modified version of the Partially Averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) model, where the unresolved kinetic energy parameter (f(sub k)) is allowed to vary as a function of grid spacing and the turbulence length scale. This parameter is estimated based on a novel two-stage procedure to efficiently estimate the level of scale resolution possible for a given flow on a given grid for Partial Averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS). It has been found that the prescribed scale resolution can play a major role in obtaining accurate flow solutions. The parameter f(sub k) varies between zero and one and equal to one in the viscous sub layer, and when the RANS turbulent viscosity becomes smaller than the LES viscosity. The formulation, usage methodology, and validation examples are presented to demonstrate the enhancement of PAB3D's time-accurate and turbulence modeling capabilities. The accurate simulations of flow and turbulent quantities will provide valuable tool for accurate jet noise predictions. Solutions from these models are compared to RANS results and experimental data for high-temperature jet flows. The current results show promise for the capability of hybrid RANS/LES and PANS in simulating such flow phenomena.

  7. Integrated RANS-LES Computations of Turbomachinery Components: Generic Compressor/Diffuser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlueter, J. U.; Wu, X.; Kim, S.; Alonso, J. J.; Pitsch, H.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of the current study is to apply the coupled RANS-LES approach to a compressor-diffuser geometry of a gas turbine. This flow configuration is important, since the outflow of the compressor alters the flow field in the subsequent diffuser. A detailed knowledge of the flow field in this section allows to optimize the difuser design in order to to achieve a decrease of pressure loss. Here, the NASA stage 35 compressor is coupled with a generic diffuser in order to assess the integrated RANS-LES approach.

  8. Model-Invariant Hybrid LES-RANS Computation of Separated Flow Past Periodic Hills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The requirement that physical quantities not vary with a hybrid LESRANS model's blending parameter imposes conditions on the computation that lead to better results across LES-RANS transitions. This promises to allow placement of those transitions so that LES is performed only where required by the physics, improving computational efficiency. The approach is applied to separated flow past periodic hills, where good predictions of separation-bubble size are seen due to the gradual, controlled, LES-RANS transition and the resulting enhanced near-wall eddy viscosity.

  9. RanBP9 Overexpression Accelerates Loss of Dendritic Spines in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruizhi; Palavicini, Juan Pablo; Wang, Hongjie; Maiti, Panchanan; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Xu, Shaohua; Lloyd, BN; Dawson-Scully, Ken; Kang, David E; Lakshmana, Madepalli K.

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that RanBP9 overexpression increased Aβ generation and amyloid plaque burden, subsequently leading to robust reductions in the levels of several synaptic proteins as well as deficits in the learning and memory skills in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we found striking reduction of spinophilin-immunoreactive puncta (52%, p<0.001) and spinophilin area (62.5%, p<0.001) in the primary cortical neurons derived from RanBP9 transgenic mice (RanBP9-Tg) compared to wild-type (WT) neurons. Similar results were confirmed in WT cortical neurons transfected with EGFP-RanBP9. At 6-months of age, the total spine density in the cortex of RanBP9 single transgenic, APΔE9 double transgenic and APΔE9/RanBP9 triple transgenic mice were similar to WT mice. However, in the hippocampus the spine density was significantly reduced (27%, p<0.05) in the triple transgenic mice compared to WT mice due to reduced number of thin spines (33%, p<0.05) and mushroom spines (22%, p<0.05). This suggests that RanBP9 overexpression in the APΔE9 mice accelerates loss of spines and that hippocampus is more vulnerable. At 12-months of age, cortex showed significant reductions in total spine density in the RanBP9 (22%, p<0.05), APΔE9 (19%, p<0.05) and APΔE9/RanBP9 (33%, p<0.01) mice compared to WT controls due to reductions in mushroom and thin spines. Similarly, in the hippocampus the total spine density was reduced in the RanBP9 (23%, p<0.05), APΔE9 (26%, p<0.05) and APΔE9/RanBP9 (39%, p<0.01) mice due to reductions in thin and mushroom spines. Most importantly, RanBP9 overexpression in the APΔE9 mice further exacerbated the reductions in spine density in both the cortex (14%, p<0.05) and the hippocampus (16%, p<0.05). Because dendritic spines are considered physical traces of memory, loss of spines due to RanBP9 provided the physical basis for the learning and memory deficits. Since RanBP9 protein levels are increased in AD brains, Ran

  10. RanBP9 overexpression accelerates loss of dendritic spines in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruizhi; Palavicini, Juan Pablo; Wang, Hongjie; Maiti, Panchanan; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Xu, Shaohua; Lloyd, B N; Dawson-Scully, Ken; Kang, David E; Lakshmana, Madepalli K

    2014-09-01

    We previously demonstrated that RanBP9 overexpression increased Aβ generation and amyloid plaque burden, subsequently leading to robust reductions in the levels of several synaptic proteins as well as deficits in the learning and memory skills in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we found striking reduction of spinophilin-immunoreactive puncta (52%, p<0.001) and spinophilin area (62.5%, p<0.001) in the primary cortical neurons derived from RanBP9 transgenic mice (RanBP9-Tg) compared to wild-type (WT) neurons. Similar results were confirmed in WT cortical neurons transfected with EGFP-RanBP9. At 6-months of age, the total spine density in the cortex of RanBP9 single transgenic, APΔE9 double transgenic and APΔE9/RanBP9 triple transgenic mice was similar to WT mice. However, in the hippocampus the spine density was significantly reduced (27%, p<0.05) in the triple transgenic mice compared to WT mice due to reduced number of thin spines (33%, p<0.05) and mushroom spines (22%, p<0.05). This suggests that RanBP9 overexpression in the APΔE9 mice accelerates loss of spines and that the hippocampus is more vulnerable. At 12-months of age, the cortex showed significant reductions in total spine density in the RanBP9 (22%, p<0.05), APΔE9 (19%, p<0.05) and APΔE9/RanBP9 (33%, p<0.01) mice compared to WT controls due to reductions in mushroom and thin spines. Similarly, in the hippocampus the total spine density was reduced in the RanBP9 (23%, p<0.05), APΔE9 (26%, p<0.05) and APΔE9/RanBP9 (39%, p<0.01) mice due to reductions in thin and mushroom spines. Most importantly, RanBP9 overexpression in the APΔE9 mice further exacerbated the reductions in spine density in both the cortex (14%, p<0.05) and the hippocampus (16%, p<0.05). Because dendritic spines are considered physical traces of memory, loss of spines due to RanBP9 provided the physical basis for the learning and memory deficits. Since RanBP9 protein levels are increased in AD

  11. Host MicroRNA miR-197 Plays a Negative Regulatory Role in the Enterovirus 71 Infectious Cycle by Targeting the RAN Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wen-Fang; Huang, Ru-Ting; Chien, Kun-Yi; Huang, Jo-Yun; Lau, Kean-Seng; Jheng, Jia-Rong; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Wu, Tzong-Yuan; Chen, Chung-Yung

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterovirus 71 (EV71), a member of Picornaviridae, is associated with severe central nervous system complications. In this study, we identified a cellular microRNA (miRNA), miR-197, whose expression was downregulated by viral infection in a time-dependent manner. In miR-197 mimic-transfected cells, EV71 replication was inhibited, whereas the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) activity was decreased in EV71 strains with or without predicted miR-197 target sites, indicating that miR-197 targets host proteins to modulate viral replication. We thus used a quantitative proteomics approach, aided by the TargetScan algorithm, to identify putative target genes of miR-197. Among them, RAN was selected and validated as a genuine target in a 3′ untranslated region (UTR) reporter assay. Reduced production of RAN by RNA interference markedly reduced the synthesis of EV71-encoded viral proteins and virus titers. Furthermore, reintroduction of nondegradable RAN into these knockdown cells rescued viral protein synthesis. miR-197 levels were modulated by EV71 to maintain RAN mRNA translatability at late times postinfection since we demonstrated that cap-independent translation exerted by its intrinsic IRES activity was occurring at times when translation attenuation was induced by EV71. EV71-induced downregulation of miR-197 expression increased the expression of RAN, which supported the nuclear transport of the essential viral proteins 3D/3CD and host protein hnRNP K for viral replication. Our data suggest that downregulation of cellular miRNAs may constitute a newly identified mechanism that sustains the expression of host proteins to facilitate viral replication. IMPORTANCE Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a picornavirus with a positive-sense single-stranded RNA that globally inhibits the cellular translational system, mainly by cleaving cellular eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and poly(A)-binding protein (PABP), which inhibits the association of the

  12. beta-catenin can be transported into the nucleus in a Ran-unassisted manner.

    PubMed

    Yokoya, F; Imamoto, N; Tachibana, T; Yoneda, Y

    1999-04-01

    The nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin plays an important role in the Wingless/Wnt signaling pathway. This study describes an examination of the nuclear import of beta-catenin in living mammalian cells and in vitro semi-intact cells. When injected into the cell cytoplasm, beta-catenin rapidly migrated into the nucleus in a temperature-dependent and wheat germ agglutinin-sensitive manner. In the cell-free import assay, beta-catenin rapidly migrates into the nucleus without the exogenous addition of cytosol, Ran, or ATP/GTP. Cytoplasmic injection of mutant Ran defective in its GTP hydrolysis did not prevent beta-catenin import. Studies using tsBN2, a temperature-sensitive mutant cell line that possesses a point mutation in the RCC1 gene, showed that the import of beta-catenin is insensitive to nuclear Ran-GTP depletion. These results show that beta-catenin possesses the ability to constitutively translocate through the nuclear pores in a manner similar to importin beta in a Ran-unassisted manner. We further showed that beta-catenin also rapidly exits the nucleus in homokaryons, suggesting that the regulation of nuclear levels of beta-catenin involves both nuclear import and export of this molecule.

  13. Hybrid LES/RANS Simulation of Transverse Sonic Injection into a Mach 2 Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boles, John A.; Edwards, Jack R.; Baurle, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    A computational study of transverse sonic injection of air and helium into a Mach 1.98 cross-flow is presented. A hybrid large-eddy simulation / Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (LES/RANS) turbulence model is used, with the two-equation Menter baseline (Menter-BSL) closure for the RANS part of the flow and a Smagorinsky-type model for the LES part of the flow. A time-dependent blending function, dependent on modeled turbulence variables, is used to shift the closure from RANS to LES. Turbulent structures are initiated and sustained through the use of a recycling / rescaling technique. Two higher-order discretizations, the Piecewise Parabolic Method (PPM) of Colella and Woodward, and the SONIC-A ENO scheme of Suresh and Huyhn are used in the study. The results using the hybrid model show reasonably good agreement with time-averaged Mie scattering data and with experimental surface pressure distributions, even though the penetration of the jet into the cross-flow is slightly over-predicted. The LES/RANS results are used to examine the validity of commonly-used assumptions of constant Schmidt and Prandtl numbers in the intense mixing zone downstream of the injection location.

  14. Western Culture in Japanese Film: Kurosawa's "Throne of Blood" and "Ran."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Peter E.

    Akira Kurosawa, the most popular Asian film maker with audiences in the United States, has found in William Shakespeare's plays themes and plots that resonate within Japanese culture. While the translations of "Macbeth" into "Throne of Blood" and "King Lear" into "Ran" are quite direct and literal with only minor changes in plot and emphasis, in…

  15. Development of Rapid Automatized Naming (RAN) in Simultaneous Kannada-English Biliterate Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siddaiah, Anand; Saldanha, Marita; Venkatesh, Shyamala K.; Ramachandra, Nallur B.; Padakannaya, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    RAN tests were administered to 600 typically developing children, 60 each from grade level one through grade ten (30 boys and 30 girls), who learn two distinct languages, English and Kannada simultaneously from the very first grade. The overall results were in accordance with similar previous studies in English and other European languages. The…

  16. Analysis of vegetation effect on waves using a vertical 2-D RANS model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A vertical two-dimensional (2-D) model has been applied in the simulation of wave propagation through vegetated water bodies. The model is based on an existing model SOLA-VOF which solves the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with the finite difference method on a staggered rectangula...

  17. Pivotal role of the RanBP9-cofilin pathway in Aβ-induced apoptosis and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Woo, J A; Jung, A R; Lakshmana, M K; Bedrossian, A; Lim, Y; Bu, J H; Park, S A; Koo, E H; Mook-Jung, I; Kang, D E

    2012-01-01

    Neurodegeneration associated with amyloid β (Aβ) peptide accumulation, synaptic loss, neuroinflammation, tauopathy, and memory impairments encompass the pathophysiological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We previously reported that the scaffolding protein RanBP9, which is overall increased in brains of AD patients, simultaneously promotes Aβ generation and focal adhesion disruption by accelerating the endocytosis of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and β1-integrin, respectively. Here, we show that RanBP9 protein levels are increased by fourfold in FAD mutant APP transgenic mice. Accordingly, RanBP9 transgenic mice demonstrate significantly increased synapse loss, neurodegeneration, gliosis, and spatial memory deficits. RanBP9 overexpression promotes apoptosis and potentiates Aβ-induced neurotoxicity independent of its capacity to promote Aβ generation. Conversely, RanBP9 reduction by siRNA or gene dosage mitigates Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. Importantly, RanBP9 activates/dephosphorylates cofilin, a key regulator of actin dynamics and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, and siRNA knockdown of cofilin abolishes both Aβ and RanBP9-induced apoptosis. These findings implicate the RanBP9–cofilin pathway as critical therapeutic targets not only for stemming Aβ generation but also antagonizing Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:22361682

  18. Ran GTPase protein promotes metastasis and invasion in pancreatic cancer by deregulating the expression of AR and CXCR4

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lin; Shang, Yulong; Guo, Shikong; Liu, Changhao; Zhou, Lin; Sun, Yi; Nie, Yongzhan; Fan, Daiming; Lu, Yuanyuan; Guo, Xuegang

    2014-01-01

    Ran, a member of the RasGTPase family, has been showed to function in diverse cellular processes of cancer. In the present study, we examined the effects of Ran on the cell motility in pancreatic cancer cells and explored the possible mechanism of Ran’s function in the metastasis of pancreatic cancer. We demonstrated that the expression of Ran was remarkably higher in lymph lode metastases than in primary pancreatic cancer tissues. In the functional studies, stable knockdown of Ran by shRNA could efficiently inhibit the migration and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. By PCR array, we analyzed the differences in the expression levels of metastasis-associated genes before and after the downregulation of Ran, and it was showed that the regulation of pancreatic cancer metastasis by Ran was partially mediated by AR and CXCR4. We further confirmed that AR and CXCR4 were significantly decreased following knockdown of Ran. These data indicated that Ran could regulate the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells through AR and CXCR4. PMID:24840182

  19. Rapid automatized naming (RAN) taps a mechanism that places constraints on the development of early reading fluency.

    PubMed

    Lervåg, Arne; Hulme, Charles

    2009-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that rapid automatized naming (RAN) is a correlate of early reading skills; however, the interpretation of this finding remains controversial. We present the results from a 3-year longitudinal study. RAN, measured with nonalphabetic stimuli before reading instruction has begun, is a predictor of later growth in reading fluency. After reading instruction has started, RAN continues to exert an influence on the development of reading fluency over the next 2 years. However, there is no evidence of a reciprocal influence of reading fluency on the growth of RAN skill. We suggest that RAN taps the integrity of left-hemisphere object-recognition and naming circuits that are recruited to function as a critical component of the child's developing visual word-recognition system. PMID:19619178

  20. Starch Metabolism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Streb, Sebastian; Zeeman, Samuel C.

    2012-01-01

    Starch is the major non-structural carbohydrate in plants. It serves as an important store of carbon that fuels plant metabolism and growth when they are unable to photosynthesise. This storage can be in leaves and other green tissues, where it is degraded during the night, or in heterotrophic tissues such as roots, seeds and tubers, where it is stored over longer time periods. Arabidopsis accumulates starch in many of its tissues, but mostly in its leaves during the day. It has proven to be a powerful genetic system for discovering how starch is synthesised and degraded, and new proteins and processes have been discovered. Such work has major significance for our starch crops, whose yield and quality could be improved by the application of this knowledge. Research into Arabidopsis starch metabolism has begun to reveal how its daily turnover is integrated into the rest of metabolism and adapted to the environmental conditions. Furthermore, Arabidopsis mutant lines deficient in starch metabolism have been employed as tools to study other biological processes ranging from sugar sensing to gravitropism and flowering time control. This review gives a detailed account of the use of Arabidopsis to study starch metabolism. It describes the major discoveries made and presents an overview of our understanding today, together with some as-yet unresolved questions. PMID:23393426

  1. Suppressor Screens in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Yuelin

    2016-01-01

    Genetic screens have proven to be a useful tool in the dissection of biological processes in plants. Specifically, suppressor screens have been widely used to study signal transduction pathways. Here we provide a detailed protocol for ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis used in our suppressor screens in Arabidopsis and discuss the basic principles behind suppressor screen design and downstream analyses. PMID:26577776

  2. Preprophase band formation and cortical division zone establishment: RanGAP behaves differently from microtubules during their band formation.

    PubMed

    Yabuuchi, Takatoshi; Nakai, Tomonori; Sonobe, Seiji; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Mineyuki, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    Correct positioning of the division plane is a prerequisite for plant morphogenesis. The preprophase band (PPB) is a key intracellular structure of division site determination. PPB forms in G2 phase as a broad band of microtubules (MTs) that narrows in prophase and specializes few-micrometer-wide cortical belt region, named the cortical division zone (CDZ), in late prophase. The PPB comprises several molecules, some of which act as MT band organization and others remain in the CDZ marking the correct insertion of the cell plate in telophase. Ran GTPase-activating protein (RanGAP) is accumulated in the CDZ and forms a RanGAP band in prophase. However, little is known about when and how RanGAPs gather in the CDZ, and especially with regard to their relationships to MT band formation. Here, we examined the spatial and temporal distribution of RanGAPs and MTs in the preprophase of onion root tip cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy and showed that the RanGAP band appeared in mid-prophase as the width of MT band was reduced to nearly 7 µm. Treatments with cytoskeletal inhibitors for 15 min caused thinning or broadening of the MT band but had little effects on RanGAP band in mid-prophase and most of late prophase cells. Detailed image analyses of the spatial distribution of RanGAP band and MT band showed that the RanGAP band positioned slightly beneath the MT band in mid-prophase. These results raise a possibility that RanGAP behaves differently from MTs during their band formation. PMID:26237087

  3. Identification of a SUMO-binding motif that recognizes SUMO-modified proteins

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jing; Durrin, Linda K.; Wilkinson, Thomas A.; Krontiris, Theodore G.; Chen, Yuan

    2004-01-01

    Posttranslational modification by the ubiquitin homologue, small ubiquitin-like modifier 1 (SUMO-1), has been established as an important regulatory mechanism. However, in most cases it is not clear how sumoylation regulates various cellular functions. Emerging evidence suggests that sumoylation may play a general role in regulating protein-protein interactions, as shown in RanBP2/Nup358 and RanGAP1 interaction. In this study, we have defined an amino acid sequence motif that binds SUMO. This motif, V/I-X-V/I-V/I, was identified by NMR spectroscopic characterization of interactions among SUMO-1 and peptides derived from proteins that are known to bind SUMO or sumoylated proteins. This motif binds all SUMO paralogues (SUMO-1-3). Using site-directed mutagenesis, we also show that this SUMO-binding motif in RanBP2/Nup358 is responsible for the interaction between RanBP2/Nup358 and sumoylated RanGAP1. The SUMO-binding motif exists in nearly all proteins known to be involved in SUMO-dependent processes, suggesting its general role in sumoylation-dependent cellular functions. PMID:15388847

  4. The design of Förster (fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based molecular sensors for Ran GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Kalab, Petr; Soderholm, Jon

    2010-01-01

    The application of FRET-based molecular bio-sensors provided confirmation of the central model of Ran GTPase function and led to important new insights into its physiological role. In many fields of cell biology, methods employing FRET are a standard approach that is becoming increasingly accessible due to advances in instrumentation and available fluorophores. However, the optimal design of a FRET sensor remains to be the cornerstone of any successful FRET application. Utilizing the recent literature on FRET applications and our studies on Ran, we outline the basic considerations involved in designing molecular FRET sensors. We point to several broadly applicable principles that were used in many different FRET sensors that can detect a wide range of molecular events. Using the FRET sensors for Ran that we created as examples, we then focus on the practical aspects of FRET assays. We describe the preparation of a bipartite FRET sensor consisting of ECFP-Ran and EYFP-importin β and its validation as a reporter for FRET-based high throughput screening in small molecule libraries. Finally, we review the design and optimization of monomolecular FRET sensors that monitor the RanGTP-RanBP1 interaction, and of sensors detecting the RanGTP-regulated importin β cargo release. PMID:20096786

  5. RANS/PDF and LES/FDF for prediction of turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Server Levent

    Probability density function (PDF) and filtered density function (FDF) methodologies are developed and implemented, respectively, for Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent premixed flames. RANS predictions are made of a lean premixed bluff-body flame via the joint velocity-scalar-frequency PDF model. LES of a premixed Bunsen-burner flame is conducted via the scalar FDF methodology. Both simulations employ finite rate kinetics via a reduced methane chemistry mechanism to account for combustion. Prediction results are compared with experimental data, and are shown to capture some of the intricate physics of turbulent premixed combustion. Keywords. large eddy simulation, filtered density function, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes, probability density function, turbulent reacting flows, lean premixed combustion.

  6. Variation in the Dicer and RAN Genes Are Associated with Survival in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Na; Kim, Jung Oh; Lee, Seung Min; Park, Hana; Lee, Ju Ho; Rim, Kyu Sung; Hwang, Seong Gyu; Kim, Nam Keun

    2016-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in microRNA machinery genes might affect microRNA processing and subsequently impact tumorigenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between SNPs in microRNA machinery genes and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a Korean population. Genotyping of six SNPs in microRNA machinery genes was performed using blood samples from 147 patients with HCC and 209 healthy control subjects. None of the six SNPs in microRNA machinery genes were significantly associated with HCC development. However, among the models for six polymorphic loci—DICER (rs3742330 and rs13078), DROSHA (rs10719 and rs6877842), RAN (rs14035) and XPO5 (rs11077)—one allele combination (A-A-T-C-C-C) showed synergistic effects in terms of an increased risk of HCC development (odds ratio = 8.881, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.889–41.750; P = 0.002). Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis showed a significant survival benefit for the DICER rs3742330 GG compared with the AA type (hazard ratio [HR], 0.314; 95% CI, 0.135–0.730; P = 0.007) and for the RAN rs14035 CT compared with the CC genotype (HR, 0.587; 95% CI, 0.349–0.987; P = 0.044). Although we found no direct association between DICER (rs3742330 and rs13078), DROSHA (rs10719 and rs6877842), RAN (rs14035) or XPO5 (rs11077) polymorphisms and HCC risk, we demonstrated that DICER (rs3742330) and RAN (rs14035) were associated with the survival of HCC patients. Future studies with larger samples are needed to determine associations of SNPs in microRNA machinery genes with HCC risk and prognosis. PMID:27611467

  7. Sediment Transport Simulations Coupling DEM with RANS Fluid Solver in Multi- dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calantoni, J.; Torres-Freyermuth, A.; Hsu, T.

    2008-12-01

    Multiphase simulations of the sediment-water interface in a wave bottom boundary layer are accomplished by using a Reynolds averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) fluid solver for water motions coupled to the discrete element method (DEM) for modeling the motions of individual sediment grains. Turbulence closure in the ensemble-averaged fluid-phase equations uses balance equations for fluid turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate. Both 1DV and 2DV implementations of the RANS fluid solver have been coupled to the DEM. In both cases, the DEM is fully three-dimensional where sediment particles have spherical shape and point contacts are assumed with normal and tangential forces at the contact point between particle pairs modeled with springs and friction, respectively. Coupling between sediment-water phases varies from simple one-way coupling where fluid drives sediment motions with no feedback from the sediment, up to fully coupled continuity equations and turbulence closure as well as in the fluid momentum equations where Newton's Third Law is strictly enforced at every fluid time step. Fluid-particle interaction forces include drag, added mass, pressure gradient forces, and turbulent suspension implemented through an eddy-particle interaction model based on a random walk. The 1DV DEM-RANS coupled model was used to simulate sheet flow transport conditions under oscillatory flows. The 2DV DEM-RANS coupled model was used to simulate suspension and transport over small-scale sand ripples. For all cases, the DEM used coarse to fine (0.4 mm - 0.2 mm diameter) sized sediments where grain-grain interactions model viscous dissipation through an effective coefficient of restitution as a function of the collisional Stokes number estimated from published laboratory measurements of particle-particle and particle-wall collisions. Initial comparisons were made with laboratory U-tube measurements for bulk transport rates and time-dependent concentration profiles for sheet flow

  8. Variation in the Dicer and RAN Genes Are Associated with Survival in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Na; Kim, Jung Oh; Lee, Seung Min; Park, Hana; Lee, Ju Ho; Rim, Kyu Sung; Hwang, Seong Gyu; Kim, Nam Keun

    2016-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in microRNA machinery genes might affect microRNA processing and subsequently impact tumorigenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between SNPs in microRNA machinery genes and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a Korean population. Genotyping of six SNPs in microRNA machinery genes was performed using blood samples from 147 patients with HCC and 209 healthy control subjects. None of the six SNPs in microRNA machinery genes were significantly associated with HCC development. However, among the models for six polymorphic loci-DICER (rs3742330 and rs13078), DROSHA (rs10719 and rs6877842), RAN (rs14035) and XPO5 (rs11077)-one allele combination (A-A-T-C-C-C) showed synergistic effects in terms of an increased risk of HCC development (odds ratio = 8.881, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.889-41.750; P = 0.002). Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis showed a significant survival benefit for the DICER rs3742330 GG compared with the AA type (hazard ratio [HR], 0.314; 95% CI, 0.135-0.730; P = 0.007) and for the RAN rs14035 CT compared with the CC genotype (HR, 0.587; 95% CI, 0.349-0.987; P = 0.044). Although we found no direct association between DICER (rs3742330 and rs13078), DROSHA (rs10719 and rs6877842), RAN (rs14035) or XPO5 (rs11077) polymorphisms and HCC risk, we demonstrated that DICER (rs3742330) and RAN (rs14035) were associated with the survival of HCC patients. Future studies with larger samples are needed to determine associations of SNPs in microRNA machinery genes with HCC risk and prognosis. PMID:27611467

  9. Accurate load prediction by BEM with airfoil data from 3D RANS simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Marc S.; Nitzsche, Jens; Hennings, Holger

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, two methods for the extraction of airfoil coefficients from 3D CFD simulations of a wind turbine rotor are investigated, and these coefficients are used to improve the load prediction of a BEM code. The coefficients are extracted from a number of steady RANS simulations, using either averaging of velocities in annular sections, or an inverse BEM approach for determination of the induction factors in the rotor plane. It is shown that these 3D rotor polars are able to capture the rotational augmentation at the inner part of the blade as well as the load reduction by 3D effects close to the blade tip. They are used as input to a simple BEM code and the results of this BEM with 3D rotor polars are compared to the predictions of BEM with 2D airfoil coefficients plus common empirical corrections for stall delay and tip loss. While BEM with 2D airfoil coefficients produces a very different radial distribution of loads than the RANS simulation, the BEM with 3D rotor polars manages to reproduce the loads from RANS very accurately for a variety of load cases, as long as the blade pitch angle is not too different from the cases from which the polars were extracted.

  10. Advanced Signal Processing for Integrated LES-RANS Simulations: Anti-aliasing Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlueter, J. U.

    2003-01-01

    Currently, a wide variety of flow phenomena are addressed with numerical simulations. Many flow solvers are optimized to simulate a limited spectrum of flow effects effectively, such as single parts of a flow system, but are either inadequate or too expensive to be applied to a very complex problem. As an example, the flow through a gas turbine can be considered. In the compressor and the turbine section, the flow solver has to be able to handle the moving blades, model the wall turbulence, and predict the pressure and density distribution properly. This can be done by a flow solver based on the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach. On the other hand, the flow in the combustion chamber is governed by large scale turbulence, chemical reactions, and the presence of fuel spray. Experience shows that these phenomena require an unsteady approach. Hence, for the combustor, the use of a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) flow solver is desirable. While many design problems of a single flow passage can be addressed by separate computations, only the simultaneous computation of all parts can guarantee the proper prediction of multi-component phenomena, such as compressor/combustor instability and combustor/turbine hot-streak migration. Therefore, a promising strategy to perform full aero-thermal simulations of gas-turbine engines is the use of a RANS flow solver for the compressor sections, an LES flow solver for the combustor, and again a RANS flow solver for the turbine section.

  11. Defining boundary conditions for RANS predictions of urban flows using mesoscale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Sanchez, Clara; Gorle, Catherine; van Beeck, Jeroen

    2015-11-01

    Pollutant dispersion and wind flows in urban canopies are major concerns for human health and energy, and the complex nature of the flow and transport processes remains a challenge when using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to predict wind flows. The definition of the inflow boundary condition in Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations (RANS) is one of the uncertainties that will strongly influence the prediction of the flow field, and thus, the dispersion pattern. The goal of the work presented is to define a methodology that improves the level of realism in the inflow condition for RANS simulations by accounting for larger mesoscale effects. The Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) is used to forecast mesoscale flow patterns, and two different approaches are used to define inflow conditions for the RANS simulations performed with OpenFOAM: 1) WRF variables such as local velocity magnitude, ABL height and friction velocity are directly interpolated onto the boundaries of the CFD domain; 2) WRF predictions for the geostrophic wind and friction velocity are applied as a forcing boundary condition. Simulations of the Joint Urban 2003 experimental campaign in Oklahoma City have been performed using both approaches and a comparison of the results will be presented.

  12. Unsteady Three-Dimensional Simulation of a Shear Coaxial GO2/GH2 Rocket Injector with RANS and Hybrid-RAN-LES/DES Using Flamelet Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westra, Doug G.; West, Jeffrey S.; Richardson, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, the analysis and design of liquid rocket engines (LREs) has relied on full-scale testing and one-dimensional empirical tools. The testing is extremely expensive and the one-dimensional tools are not designed to capture the highly complex, and multi-dimensional features that are inherent to LREs. Recent advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools have made it possible to predict liquid rocket engine performance, stability, to assess the effect of complex flow features, and to evaluate injector-driven thermal environments, to mitigate the cost of testing. Extensive efforts to verify and validate these CFD tools have been conducted, to provide confidence for using them during the design cycle. Previous validation efforts have documented comparisons of predicted heat flux thermal environments with test data for a single element gaseous oxygen (GO2) and gaseous hydrogen (GH2) injector. The most notable validation effort was a comprehensive validation effort conducted by Tucker et al. [1], in which a number of different groups modeled a GO2/GH2 single element configuration by Pal et al [2]. The tools used for this validation comparison employed a range of algorithms, from both steady and unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (U/RANS) calculations, large-eddy simulations (LES), detached eddy simulations (DES), and various combinations. A more recent effort by Thakur et al. [3] focused on using a state-of-the-art CFD simulation tool, Loci/STREAM, on a two-dimensional grid. Loci/STREAM was chosen because it has a unique, very efficient flamelet parameterization of combustion reactions that are too computationally expensive to simulate with conventional finite-rate chemistry calculations. The current effort focuses on further advancement of validation efforts, again using the Loci/STREAM tool with the flamelet parameterization, but this time with a three-dimensional grid. Comparisons to the Pal et al. heat flux data will be made for both RANS and

  13. Trichome morphogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, B; Folkers, U; Ilgenfritz, H; Hülskamp, M

    2000-01-01

    Trichomes (plant hairs) in Arabidopsis thaliana are large non-secreting epidermal cells with a characteristic three-dimensional architecture. Because trichomes are easily accessible to a combination of genetic, cell biological and molecular methods they have become an ideal model system to study various aspects of plant cell morphogenesis. In this review we will summarize recent progress in the understanding of trichome morphogenesis. PMID:11128981

  14. Production of a Brassica napus low-molecular mass acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein in Arabidopsis alters the acyl-coenzyme A pool and acyl composition of oil in seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-molecular mass (10 kD) cytosolic acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein (ACBP) has a substantial influence over fatty acid (FA) composition in oilseeds, possibly via an effect on the partitioning of acyl groups between elongation and desaturation pathways. Previously, we demonstrated that the expressio...

  15. Combining dehydration, construct optimization and improved data collection to solve the crystal structure of a CRM1-RanGTP-SPN1-Nup214 quaternary nuclear export complex.

    PubMed

    Monecke, Thomas; Dickmanns, Achim; Weiss, Manfred S; Port, Sarah A; Kehlenbach, Ralph H; Ficner, Ralf

    2015-12-01

    High conformational flexibility is an intrinsic and indispensable property of nuclear transport receptors, which makes crystallization and structure determination of macromolecular complexes containing exportins or importins particularly challenging. Here, the crystallization and structure determination of a quaternary nuclear export complex consisting of the exportin CRM1, the small GTPase Ran in its GTP-bound form, the export cargo SPN1 and an FG repeat-containing fragment of the nuclear pore complex component nucleoporin Nup214 fused to maltose-binding protein is reported. Optimization of constructs, seeding and the development of a sophisticated protocol including successive PEG-mediated crystal dehydration as well as additional post-mounting steps were essential to obtain well diffracting crystals.

  16. The Arabidopsis Nuclear Pore and Nuclear Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Iris; Brkljacic, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear envelope is a double membrane structure that separates the eukaryotic cytoplasm from the nucleoplasm. The nuclear pores embedded in the nuclear envelope are the sole gateways for macromolecular trafficking in and out of the nucleus. The nuclear pore complexes assembled at the nuclear pores are large protein conglomerates composed of multiple units of about 30 different nucleoporins. Proteins and RNAs traffic through the nuclear pore complexes, enabled by the interacting activities of nuclear transport receptors, nucleoporins, and elements of the Ran GTPase cycle. In addition to directional and possibly selective protein and RNA nuclear import and export, the nuclear pore gains increasing prominence as a spatial organizer of cellular processes, such as sumoylation and desumoylation. Individual nucleoporins and whole nuclear pore subcomplexes traffic to specific mitotic locations and have mitotic functions, for example at the kinetochores, in spindle assembly, and in conjunction with the checkpoints. Mutants of nucleoporin genes and genes of nuclear transport components lead to a wide array of defects from human diseases to compromised plant defense responses. The nuclear envelope acts as a repository of calcium, and its inner membrane is populated by functionally unique proteins connected to both chromatin and—through the nuclear envelope lumen—the cytoplasmic cytoskeleton. Plant nuclear pore and nuclear envelope research—predominantly focusing on Arabidopsis as a model—is discovering both similarities and surprisingly unique aspects compared to the more mature model systems. This chapter gives an overview of our current knowledge in the field and of exciting areas awaiting further exploration. PMID:22303264

  17. Importin-β modulates the permeability of the nuclear pore complex in a Ran-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Alan R; Tang, Jeffrey H; Yassif, Jaime; Graf, Michael; Huang, William YC; Groves, Jay T; Weis, Karsten; Liphardt, Jan T

    2015-01-01

    Soluble karyopherins of the importin-β (impβ) family use RanGTP to transport cargos directionally through the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Whether impβ or RanGTP regulate the permeability of the NPC itself has been unknown. In this study, we identify a stable pool of impβ at the NPC. A subpopulation of this pool is rapidly turned-over by RanGTP, likely at Nup153. Impβ, but not transportin-1 (TRN1), alters the pore's permeability in a Ran-dependent manner, suggesting that impβ is a functional component of the NPC. Upon reduction of Nup153 levels, inert cargos more readily equilibrate across the NPC yet active transport is impaired. When purified impβ or TRN1 are mixed with Nup153 in vitro, higher-order, multivalent complexes form. RanGTP dissolves the impβ•Nup153 complexes but not those of TRN1•Nup153. We propose that impβ and Nup153 interact at the NPC's nuclear face to form a Ran-regulated mesh that modulates NPC permeability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04052.001 PMID:25748139

  18. Beyond Rab GTPases Legionella activates the small GTPase Ran to promote microtubule polymerization, pathogen vacuole motility, and infection.

    PubMed

    Hilbi, Hubert; Rothmeier, Eva; Hoffmann, Christine; Harrison, Christopher F

    2014-01-01

    Legionella spp. are amoebae-resistant environmental bacteria that replicate in free-living protozoa in a distinct compartment, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). Upon transmission of Legionella pneumophila to the lung, the pathogens employ an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to grow in LCVs within alveolar macrophages, thus triggering a severe pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. LCV formation is a complex and robust process, which requires the bacterial Icm/Dot type IV secretion system and involves the amazing number of 300 different translocated effector proteins. LCVs interact with the host cell's endosomal and secretory vesicle trafficking pathway. Accordingly, in a proteomics approach as many as 12 small Rab GTPases implicated in endosomal and secretory vesicle trafficking were identified and validated as LCV components. Moreover, the small GTPase Ran and its effector protein RanBP1 have been found to decorate the pathogen vacuole. Ran regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, spindle assembly, and cytokinesis, as well as the organization of non-centrosomal microtubules. In L. pneumophila-infected amoebae or macrophages, Ran and RanBP1 localize to LCVs, and the small GTPase is activated by the Icm/Dot substrate LegG1. Ran activation by LegG1 leads to microtubule stabilization and promotes intracellular pathogen vacuole motility and bacterial growth, as well as chemotaxis and migration of Legionella-infected cells.

  19. Genomic analysis and expression investigation of caleosin gene family in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yue; Xie, Jun; Liu, Rui-Dan; Ni, Xue-Feng; Wang, Xue-Hao; Li, Zhi-Xi; Zhang, Meng

    2014-06-13

    Caleosin is a common lipid-droplet surface protein, which has the ability to bind calcium. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is considered a model organism in plant researches. Although there are growing researches about caleosin in the past few years, a systemic analysis of caleosins in Arabidopsis is still scarce. In this study, a comprehensive investigation of caleosins in Arabidopsis was performed by bioinformatics methods. Firstly, eight caleosins in Arabidopsis are divided into two types, L-caleosin and H-caleosin, according to their molecular weights, and these two types of caleosin have many differences in characteristics. Secondly, phylogenetic tree result indicates that L-caleosin may evolve from H-caleosin. Thirdly, duplication pattern analysis shows that segmental and tandem duplication are main reasons for Arabidopsis caleosin expansion with the equal part. Fourthly, the expression profiles of caleosins are also investigated in silico in different organs and under various stresses and hormones. In addition, based on promoter analysis, caleosin may be involved in calcium signal transduction and lipid accumulation. Thus, the classification and expression analysis of caleosin genes in Arabidopsis provide facilities to the research of phylogeny and functions in this gene family. PMID:24796675

  20. Evolution of NIN-like proteins in Arabidopsis, rice, and Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Schauser, Leif; Wieloch, Wioletta; Stougaard, Jens

    2005-02-01

    Genetic studies in Lotus japonicus and pea have identified Nin as a core symbiotic gene required for establishing symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen fixing bacteria collectively called Rhizobium. Sequencing of additional Lotus cDNAs combined with analysis of genome sequences from Arabidopsis and rice reveals that Nin homologues in all three species constitute small gene families. In total, the Arabidopsis and rice genomes encode nine and three NIN-like proteins (NLPs), respectively. We present here a bioinformatics analysis and prediction of NLP evolution. On a genome scale we show that in Arabidopsis, this family has evolved through segmental duplication rather than through tandem amplification. Alignment of all predicted NLP protein sequences shows a composition with six conserved modules. In addition, Lotus and pea NLPs contain segments that might characterize NIN proteins of legumes and be of importance for their function in symbiosis. The most conserved region in NLPs, the RWP-RK domain, has secondary structure predictions consistent with DNA binding properties. This motif is shared by several other small proteins in both Arabidopsis and rice. In rice, the RWP-RK domain sequences have diversified significantly more than in Arabidopsis. Database searches reveal that, apart from its presence in Arabidopsis and rice, the motif is also found in the algae Chlamydomonas and in the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Thus, the origin of this putative DNA binding region seems to predate the fungus-plant divide. PMID:15785851

  1. Ran Involved in the Development and Reproduction Is a Potential Target for RNA-Interference-Based Pest Management in Nilaparvata lugens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Xia; Lai, Feng-Xiang; Fu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Ran (RanGTPase) in insects participates in the 20-hydroxyecdysone signal transduction pathway in which downstream genes, FTZ-F1, Krüppel-homolog 1 (Kr-h1) and vitellogenin, are involved. A putative Ran gene (NlRan) was cloned from Nilaparvata lugens, a destructive phloem-feeding pest of rice. NlRan has the typical Ran primary structure features that are conserved in insects. NlRan showed higher mRNA abundance immediately after molting and peaked in newly emerged female adults. Among the examined tissues ovary had the highest transcript level, followed by fat body, midgut and integument, and legs. Three days after dsNlRan injection the NlRan mRNA abundance in the third-, fourth-, and fifth-instar nymphs was decreased by 94.3%, 98.4% and 97.0%, respectively. NlFTZ-F1 expression levels in treated third- and fourth-instar nymphs were reduced by 89.3% and 23.8%, respectively. In contrast, NlKr-h1 mRNA levels were up-regulated by 67.5 and 1.5 folds, respectively. NlRan knockdown significantly decreased the body weights, delayed development, and killed >85% of the nymphs at day seven. Two apparent phenotypic defects were observed: (1) Extended body form, and failed to molt; (2) The cuticle at the notum was split open but cannot completely shed off. The newly emerged female adults from dsNlRan injected fifth-instar nymphs showed lower levels of NlRan and vitellogenin, lower weight gain and honeydew excretion comparing with the blank control, and no offspring. Those results suggest that NlRan encodes a functional protein that was involved in development and reproduction. The study established proof of concept that NlRan could serve as a target for dsRNA-based pesticides for N. lugens control. PMID:26554926

  2. Assessment of Higher-Order RANS Closures in a Decelerated Planar Wall-Bounded Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeyapaul, Elbert; Coleman, Gary N.; Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    A reference DNS database is presented, which includes third- and fourth-order moment budgets for unstrained and strained planar channel flow. Existing RANS closure models for third- and fourth-order terms are surveyed, and new model ideas are introduced. The various models are then compared with the DNS data term by term using a priori testing of the higher-order budgets of turbulence transport, velocity-pressure-gradient, and dissipation for both the unstrained and strained databases. Generally, the models for the velocity-pressure-gradient terms are most in need of improvement.

  3. A Unified LES/RANS Approach Using the CE/SE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, William W.; Chang, Sin-Chung (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the proposed research is to develop advanced large eddy simulations (LES) and Reynolds average Navier-Stokes (RANS) capabilities for complex problems using the conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. This proposed use of the CE/SE method is justified by the many demonstrated advantages of the CE/SE method over the traditional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods. The proposed research will produce improved engineering modeling for near-term applications for focus programs as well as long-term impacts on the fundamental understanding of turbulence.

  4. LES, DNS and RANS for the analysis of high-speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adumitroaie, V.; Colucci, P. J.; Taulbee, D. B.; Givi, P.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to continue our efforts in advancing the state of knowledge in large eddy simulation (LES), direct numerical simulation (DNS), and Reynolds averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) methods for the computational analysis of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. In the second phase of this work, covering the period 1 Aug. 1994 - 31 Jul. 1995, we have focused our efforts on two programs: (1) developments of explicit algebraic moment closures for statistical descriptions of compressible reacting flows and (2) development of Monte Carlo numerical methods for LES of chemically reacting flows.

  5. Natural Genetic Variation of Freezing Tolerance in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hannah, Matthew A.; Wiese, Dana; Freund, Susanne; Fiehn, Oliver; Heyer, Arnd G.; Hincha, Dirk K.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature is a primary determinant of plant growth and survival. Using accessions of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) originating from Scandinavia to the Cape Verde Islands, we show that freezing tolerance of natural accessions correlates with habitat winter temperatures, identifying low temperature as an important selective pressure for Arabidopsis. Combined metabolite and transcript profiling show that during cold exposure, global changes of transcripts, but not of metabolites, correlate with the ability of Arabidopsis to cold acclimate. There are, however, metabolites and transcripts, including several transcription factors, that correlate with freezing tolerance, indicating regulatory pathways that may be of primary importance for this trait. These data identify that enhanced freezing tolerance is associated with the down-regulation of photosynthesis and hormonal responses and the induction of flavonoid metabolism, provide evidence for naturally increased nonacclimated freezing tolerance due to the constitutive activation of the C-repeat binding factors pathway, and identify candidate transcriptional regulators that correlate with freezing tolerance. PMID:16844837

  6. In situ SUMOylation analysis reveals a modulatory role of RanBP2 in the nuclear rim and PML bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Saitoh, Noriko . E-mail: hisa@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Uchimura, Yasuhiro; Tachibana, Taro; Sugahara, Satoko; Saitoh, Hisato; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi . E-mail: mnakao@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp

    2006-05-01

    SUMO modification plays a critical role in a number of cellular functions including nucleocytoplasmic transport, gene expression, cell cycle and formation of subnuclear structures such as promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies. In order to identify the sites where SUMOylation takes place in the cell, we developed an in situ SUMOylation assay using a semi-intact cell system and subsequently combined it with siRNA-based knockdown of nucleoporin RanBP2, also known as Nup358, which is one of the known SUMO E3 proteins. With the in situ SUMOylation assay, we found that both nuclear rim and PML bodies, besides mitotic apparatuses, are major targets for active SUMOylation. The ability to analyze possible SUMO conjugation sites would be a valuable tool to investigate where SUMO E3-like activities and/or SUMO substrates exist in the cell. Specific knockdown of RanBP2 completely abolished SUMOylation along the nuclear rim and dislocated RanGAP1 from the nuclear pore complexes. Interestingly, the loss of RanBP2 markedly reduced the number of PML bodies, in contrast to other, normal-appearing nuclear compartments including the nuclear lamina, nucleolus and chromatin, suggesting a novel link between RanBP2 and PML bodies. SUMOylation facilitated by RanBP2 at the nuclear rim may be a key step for the formation of a particular subnuclear organization. Our data imply that SUMO E3 proteins like RanBP2 facilitate spatio-temporal SUMOylation for certain nuclear structure and function.

  7. Time-Asynchronous Robust Cooperative Transmission for the Downlink of C-RAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seok-Hwan; Simeone, Osvaldo; Shitz, Shlomo Shamai

    2016-10-01

    This work studies the robust design of downlink precoding for cloud radio access network (C-RAN) in the presence of asynchronism among remote radio heads (RRHs). Specifically, a C-RAN downlink system is considered in which non-ideal fronthaul links connecting two RRHs to a Baseband Unit (BBU) may cause a time offset, as well as a phase offset, between the transmissions of the two RRHs. The offsets are a priori not known to the BBU. With the aim of counteracting the unknown time offset, a robust precoding scheme is considered that is based on the idea of correlating the signal transmitted by one RRH with a number of delayed versions of the signal transmitted by the other RRH. For this transmission strategy, the problem of maximizing the worst-case minimum rate is tackled while satisfying per-RRH transmit power constraints. Numerical results are reported that verify the advantages of the proposed robust scheme as compared to conventional non-robust design criteria as well as non-cooperative transmission.

  8. Validation of Heat Transfer and Film Cooling Capabilities of the 3-D RANS Code TURBO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyam, Vikram; Ameri, Ali; Chen, Jen-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The capabilities of the 3-D unsteady RANS code TURBO have been extended to include heat transfer and film cooling applications. The results of simulations performed with the modified code are compared to experiment and to theory, where applicable. Wilcox s k-turbulence model has been implemented to close the RANS equations. Two simulations are conducted: (1) flow over a flat plate and (2) flow over an adiabatic flat plate cooled by one hole inclined at 35 to the free stream. For (1) agreement with theory is found to be excellent for heat transfer, represented by local Nusselt number, and quite good for momentum, as represented by the local skin friction coefficient. This report compares the local skin friction coefficients and Nusselt numbers on a flat plate obtained using Wilcox's k-model with the theory of Blasius. The study looks at laminar and turbulent flows over an adiabatic flat plate and over an isothermal flat plate for two different wall temperatures. It is shown that TURBO is able to accurately predict heat transfer on a flat plate. For (2) TURBO shows good qualitative agreement with film cooling experiments performed on a flat plate with one cooling hole. Quantitatively, film effectiveness is under predicted downstream of the hole.

  9. Modelling flows within forested areas using the k—ɛ RaNS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Lopes, A.; Palma, J. M. L. M.; Viana Lopes, J.

    2016-09-01

    A new canopy model for the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RaNS) method with the k—ɛ turbulence model was developed. To derive the effect of vegetation on the transport of turbulent quantities, it uses a Taylor series expansion of the velocity magnitude, which is part of the definition of the canopy drag force, and assumes that the turbulent kinetic energy is much smaller than the kinetic energy of the mean flow. The resultant model is composed by a sum of velocity moments of increasing order. Initially, it was expected that truncating the sum at low-order, including only terms that can be expressed using quantities available within the k—ɛ RaNS model, would provide better accuracy than traditional models, based mainly on dimensional arguments. However, the results obtained with this approach mimic those obtained with a model based on dimensional arguments and calibrated using results of large-eddy simulations, proving the validity of both approaches and showing that the accuracy in the modelling of the flows over vegetation is limited by the k—ɛ model itself and not by the modelling of vegetation effects on turbulence.

  10. Comparative study of hybrid RANS-LES models for separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, G.; Lakshmanan, S. K.; Gopalan, H.; De, A.

    2016-06-01

    Hybrid RANS-LES models are proven to be capable of predicting massively separated flows with reasonable computation cost. In this paper, Spalart-Allmaras (S-A) based detached eddy simulation (DES) model and three SST based hybrid models with different RANS to LES switching criteriaare investigated. The flow over periodic hill at Re = 10,595 is chosen as the benchmark for comparing the performance of the different models due to the complex flow physics and reasonablecomputational cost. The model performances are evaluated based on their prediction capabilities of velocity and stress profiles, and separation and reattachment point. The simulated results are validatedagainst experimental and numerical results available in literature. The S-A DES model predicted separation bubble accurately at the top of the hill, as reported earlier in experiments and other numerical results. This model also correctly predicted velocity and stress profiles in recirculation region. However, the performance of this model was poor in the post reattachment region. On the other hand, the k-ω SST based hybrid models performed poorly in recirculation region, but it fairly predicted stress profiles in post reattachment region.

  11. Development of a Hybrid RANS/LES Method for Turbulent Mixing Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Reshotko, Eli

    2001-01-01

    Significant research has been underway for several years in NASA Glenn Research Center's nozzle branch to develop advanced computational methods for simulating turbulent flows in exhaust nozzles. The primary efforts of this research have concentrated on improving our ability to calculate the turbulent mixing layers that dominate flows both in the exhaust systems of modern-day aircraft and in those of hypersonic vehicles under development. As part of these efforts, a hybrid numerical method was recently developed to simulate such turbulent mixing layers. The method developed here is intended for configurations in which a dominant structural feature provides an unsteady mechanism to drive the turbulent development in the mixing layer. Interest in Large Eddy Simulation (LES) methods have increased in recent years, but applying an LES method to calculate the wide range of turbulent scales from small eddies in the wall-bounded regions to large eddies in the mixing region is not yet possible with current computers. As a result, the hybrid method developed here uses a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) procedure to calculate wall-bounded regions entering a mixing section and uses a LES procedure to calculate the mixing-dominated regions. A numerical technique was developed to enable the use of the hybrid RANS-LES method on stretched, non-Cartesian grids. With this technique, closure for the RANS equations is obtained by using the Cebeci-Smith algebraic turbulence model in conjunction with the wall-function approach of Ota and Goldberg. The LES equations are closed using the Smagorinsky subgrid scale model. Although the function of the Cebeci-Smith model to replace all of the turbulent stresses is quite different from that of the Smagorinsky subgrid model, which only replaces the small subgrid turbulent stresses, both are eddy viscosity models and both are derived at least in part from mixing-length theory. The similar formulation of these two models enables the RANS

  12. ELF3 controls thermoresponsive growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Box, Mathew S; Huang, B Emma; Domijan, Mirela; Jaeger, Katja E; Khattak, Asif Khan; Yoo, Seong Jeon; Sedivy, Emma L; Jones, D Marc; Hearn, Timothy J; Webb, Alex A R; Grant, Alastair; Locke, James C W; Wigge, Philip A

    2015-01-19

    Plant development is highly responsive to ambient temperature, and this trait has been linked to the ability of plants to adapt to climate change. The mechanisms by which natural populations modulate their thermoresponsiveness are not known. To address this, we surveyed Arabidopsis accessions for variation in thermal responsiveness of elongation growth and mapped the corresponding loci. We find that the transcriptional regulator EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3) controls elongation growth in response to temperature. Through a combination of modeling and experiments, we show that high temperature relieves the gating of growth at night, highlighting the importance of temperature-dependent repressors of growth. ELF3 gating of transcriptional targets responds rapidly and reversibly to changes in temperature. We show that the binding of ELF3 to target promoters is temperature dependent, suggesting a mechanism where temperature directly controls ELF3 activity.

  13. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  14. DELLA Proteins and Their Interacting RING Finger Proteins Repress Gibberellin Responses by Binding to the Promoters of a Subset of Gibberellin-Responsive Genes in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeongmoo; Nguyen, Khoa Thi; Park, Eunae; Jeon, Jong-Seong; Choi, Giltsu

    2013-01-01

    DELLA proteins, consisting of GA INSENSITIVE, REPRESSOR OF GA1-3, RGA-LIKE1 (RGL1), RGL2, and RGL3, are central repressors of gibberellin (GA) responses, but their molecular functions are not fully understood. We isolated four DELLA-interacting RING domain proteins, previously designated as BOTRYTIS SUSCEPTIBLE1 INTERACTOR (BOI), BOI-RELATED GENE1 (BRG1), BRG2, and BRG3 (collectively referred to as BOIs). Single mutants of each BOI gene failed to significantly alter GA responses, but the boi quadruple mutant (boiQ) showed a higher seed germination frequency in the presence of paclobutrazol, precocious juvenile-to-adult phase transition, and early flowering, all of which are consistent with enhanced GA signaling. By contrast, BOI overexpression lines displayed phenotypes consistent with reduced GA signaling. Analysis of a gai-1 boiQ pentuple mutant further indicated that the GAI protein requires BOIs to inhibit a subset of GA responses. At the molecular level, BOIs did not significantly alter the stability of a DELLA protein. Instead, BOI and DELLA proteins are targeted to the promoters of a subset of GA-responsive genes and repress their expression. Taken together, our results indicate that the DELLA and BOI proteins inhibit GA responses by interacting with each other, binding to the same promoters of GA-responsive genes, and repressing these genes. PMID:23482857

  15. Molecular analysis of a ras-like nuclear (Ran) gene from Penaeus monodon and its expression at the different ovarian stages of development.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Falin; Zheng, Liming; Yang, Qibin; Qiu, Lihua; Huang, Jianhua; Su, Tiannfeng; Jiang, Shigui

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, a ras-like nuclear (Ran) gene was obtained from the ovary and neurosecretory organ in eyestalk cDNA library of black tiger prawn (Penaeus monodon). The full-length black tiger prawn Ran (PmRan) cDNA consisted of 1140 nucleotides including an open reading frame (ORF) 648 bp, a 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of 117 bp and a 3'UTR of 375 bp with a polyadenylation signal sequence "aataaa" and a poly (A) tail. The ORF encoded a peptide of 215 amino acids with molecular mass 24.6 kDa and a theoretical isoelectric point of 7.39. ScanProsite analysis indicated that PmRan protein sequence contained a small GTPase Ran family motif. Homology analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence of the PmRan with other known Ran sequences by MatGAT software revealed that the PmRan show very high homology with the sequences of other animals (92.1-98.6% similarity, 85.6-98.1% identity). Analysis of the tissue expression pattern of the PmRan gene showed that the PmRan mRNA was expressed in all tested tissues, including hepatopancreas, ovary, muscle, intestine, neurosecretory organ in eyestalk, neurosecretory organ in brain, stomach, and heart, with the highest levels in ovary. Furthermore, the PmRan expression was found to be high level in the six ovarian stages of development. The results indicated PmRan might play an important role in ovarian development.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of immunophilin-like FKBP42 from Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Eckhoff, Andreas; Granzin, Joachim; Kamphausen, Thilo; Büldt, Georg; Schulz, Burkhard; Weiergräber, Oliver H.

    2005-04-01

    The crystallization of FKBP42, a multi-domain member of the FK506-binding protein family, from the plant A. thaliana is reported. Two fragments of FKBP42 from Arabidopsis thaliana covering differing lengths of the molecule have been expressed, purified and crystallized. For each construct, crystals belonging to two different space groups were obtained and subjected to preliminary X-ray analysis.

  17. Lifting DELLA repression of Arabidopsis seed germination by nonproteolytic gibberellin signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DELLA repression of Arabidopsis seed germination can be lifted through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and proteolysis-independent GA signaling. GA-binding to the GID1 (GIBBERELLIN-INSENSITIVE DWARF1) GA receptors stimulates GID1-GA-DELLA complex formation which in turn triggers DELLA protein ubiq...

  18. Prediction of ship resistance in head waves using RANS based solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Hafizul; Akimoto, Hiromichi

    2016-07-01

    Maneuverability prediction of ships using CFD has gained high popularity over the years because of its improving accuracy and economics. This paper discusses the estimation of calm water and added resistance properties of a KVLCC2 model using a light and economical RaNS based solver, called SHIP_Motion. The solver solves overset structured mesh using finite volume method. In the calm water test, total drag coefficient, sinkage and trim values were predicted together with mesh dependency analysis and compared with experimental data. For added resistance in head sea, short wave cases were simulated and compared with experimental and other simulation data. Overall the results were well predicted and showed good agreement with comparative data. The paper concludes that it is well possible to predict ship maneuverability characteristics using the present solver, with reasonable accuracy utilizing minimum computational resources and within acceptable time.

  19. Steady state RANS simulations of temperature fluctuations in single phase turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Kickhofel, J.; Fokken, J.; Kapulla, R.; Prasser, H. M.

    2012-07-01

    Single phase turbulent mixing in nuclear power plant circuits where a strong temperature gradient is present is known to precipitate pipe failure due to thermal fatigue. Experiments in a square mixing channel offer the opportunity to study the phenomenon under simple and easily reproducible boundary conditions. Measurements of this kind have been performed extensively at the Paul Scherrer Inst. in Switzerland with a high density of instrumentation in the Generic Mixing Experiment (GEMIX). As a fundamental mixing phenomena study closely related to the thermal fatigue problem, the experimental results from GEMIX are valuable for the validation of CFD codes striving to accurately simulate both the temperature and velocity fields in single phase turbulent mixing. In the experiments two iso-kinetic streams meet at a shallow angle of 3 degrees and mix in a straight channel of square cross-section under various degrees of density, temperature, and viscosity stratification over a range of Reynolds numbers ranging from 5*10{sup 3} to 1*10{sup 5}. Conductivity measurements, using wire-mesh and wall sensors, as well as optical measurements, using particle image velocimetry, were conducted with high temporal and spatial resolutions (up to 2.5 kHz and 1 mm in the case of the wire mesh sensor) in the mixing zone, downstream of a splitter plate. The present paper communicates the results of RANS modeling of selected GEMIX tests. Steady-state CFD calculations using a RANS turbulence model represent an inexpensive method for analyzing large and complex components in commercial nuclear reactors, such as the downcomer and reactor pressure vessel heads. Crucial to real world applicability, however, is the ability to model turbulent heat fluctuations in the flow; the Turbulent Heat Flux Transport model developed by ANSYS CFX is capable, by implementation of a transport equation for turbulent heat fluxes, of readily modeling these values. Furthermore, the closure of the turbulent heat

  20. Compressible Boundary Layer Predictions at High Reynolds Number using Hybrid LES/RANS Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Jung-Il; Edwards, Jack R.; Baurle, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Simulations of compressible boundary layer flow at three different Reynolds numbers (Re(sub delta) = 5.59x10(exp 4), 1.78x10(exp 5), and 1.58x10(exp 6) are performed using a hybrid large-eddy/Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method. Variations in the recycling/rescaling method, the higher-order extension, the choice of primitive variables, the RANS/LES transition parameters, and the mesh resolution are considered in order to assess the model. The results indicate that the present model can provide good predictions of the mean flow properties and second-moment statistics of the boundary layers considered. Normalized Reynolds stresses in the outer layer are found to be independent of Reynolds number, similar to incompressible turbulent boundary layers.

  1. Galaxy evolution. Isolated compact elliptical galaxies: stellar systems that ran away.

    PubMed

    Chilingarian, Igor; Zolotukhin, Ivan

    2015-04-24

    Compact elliptical galaxies form a rare class of stellar system (~30 presently known) characterized by high stellar densities and small sizes and often harboring metal-rich stars. They were thought to form through tidal stripping of massive progenitors, until two isolated objects were discovered where massive galaxies performing the stripping could not be identified. By mining astronomical survey data, we have now found 195 compact elliptical galaxies in all types of environment. They all share similar dynamical and stellar population properties. Dynamical analysis for nonisolated galaxies demonstrates the feasibility of their ejection from host clusters and groups by three-body encounters, which is in agreement with numerical simulations. Hence, isolated compact elliptical and isolated quiescent dwarf galaxies are tidally stripped systems that ran away from their hosts. PMID:25908816

  2. Galaxy evolution. Isolated compact elliptical galaxies: stellar systems that ran away.

    PubMed

    Chilingarian, Igor; Zolotukhin, Ivan

    2015-04-24

    Compact elliptical galaxies form a rare class of stellar system (~30 presently known) characterized by high stellar densities and small sizes and often harboring metal-rich stars. They were thought to form through tidal stripping of massive progenitors, until two isolated objects were discovered where massive galaxies performing the stripping could not be identified. By mining astronomical survey data, we have now found 195 compact elliptical galaxies in all types of environment. They all share similar dynamical and stellar population properties. Dynamical analysis for nonisolated galaxies demonstrates the feasibility of their ejection from host clusters and groups by three-body encounters, which is in agreement with numerical simulations. Hence, isolated compact elliptical and isolated quiescent dwarf galaxies are tidally stripped systems that ran away from their hosts.

  3. RANS simulation of cavitation and hull pressure fluctuation for marine propeller operating behind-hull condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, Kwang-Jun; Park, Hyung-Gil; Seo, Jongsoo

    2013-12-01

    Simulations of cavitation flow and hull pressure fluctuation for a marine propeller operating behind a hull using the unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) are presented. A full hull body submerged under the free surface is modeled in the computational domain to simulate directly the wake field of the ship at the propeller plane. Simulations are performed in design and ballast draught conditions to study the effect of cavitation number. And two propellers with slightly different geometry are simulated to validate the detectability of the numerical simulation. All simulations are performed using a commercial CFD software FLUENT. Cavitation patterns of the simulations show good agreement with the experimental results carried out in Samsung CAvitation Tunnel (SCAT). The simulation results for the hull pressure fluctuation induced by a propeller are also compared with the experimental results showing good agreement in the tendency and amplitude, especially, for the first blade frequency.

  4. A RANS/DES Numerical Procedure for Axisymmetric Flows with and without Strong Rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade, Andrew Jacob

    2007-01-01

    A RANS/DES numerical procedure with an extended Lax-Wendroff control-volume scheme and turbulence model is described for the accurate simulation of internal/external axisymmetric flow with and without strong rotation. This new procedure is an extension, from Cartesian to cylindrical coordinates, of (1) a second order accurate multi-grid, control-volume integration scheme, and (2) a k-ω turbulence model. This paper outlines both the axisymmetric corrections to the mentioned numerical schemes and the developments of techniques pertaining to numerical dissipation, multi-block connectivity, parallelization, etc. Furthermore, analytical and experimental case studies are presented to demonstrate accuracy and computational efficiency. Notes are also made toward numerical stability of highly rotational flows.

  5. A Synthesis of Hybrid RANS/LES CFD Results for F-16XL Aircraft Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.; Park, Michael A.; Hitzel, Stephan M.; Jirasek, Adam; Lofthouse, Andrew J.; Morton, Scott A.; McDaniel, David R.; Rizzi, Arthur M.

    2015-01-01

    A synthesis is presented of recent numerical predictions for the F-16XL aircraft flow fields and aerodynamics. The computational results were all performed with hybrid RANS/LES formulations, with an emphasis on unsteady flows and subsequent aerodynamics, and results from five computational methods are included. The work was focused on one particular low-speed, high angle-of-attack flight test condition, and comparisons against flight-test data are included. This work represents the third coordinated effort using the F-16XL aircraft, and a unique flight-test data set, to advance our knowledge of slender airframe aerodynamics as well as our capability for predicting these aerodynamics with advanced CFD formulations. The prior efforts were identified as Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamics Project International, with the acronyms CAWAPI and CAWAPI-2. All information in this paper is in the public domain.

  6. The hybrid RANS/LES of partially premixed supersonic combustion using G/Z flamelet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinshui; Wang, Zhenguo; Bai, Xuesong; Sun, Mingbo; Wang, Hongbo

    2016-10-01

    In order to describe partially premixed supersonic combustion numerically, G/Z flamelet model is developed and compared with finite rate model in hybrid RANS/LES simulation to study the strut-injection supersonic combustion flow field designed by the German Aerospace Center. A new temperature calculation method based on time-splitting method of total energy is introduced in G/Z flamelet model. Simulation results show that temperature predictions in partially premixed zone by G/Z flamelet model are more consistent with experiment than finite rate model. It is worth mentioning that low temperature reaction zone behind the strut is well reproduced. Other quantities such as average velocity and average velocity fluctuation obtained by developed G/Z flamelet model are also in good agreement with experiment. Besides, simulation results by G/Z flamelet also reveal the mechanism of partially premixed supersonic combustion by the analyses of the interaction between turbulent burning velocity and flow field.

  7. LES, DNS and RANS for the analysis of high-speed turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Taulbee, Dale B.; Adumitroaie, Virgil; Sabini, George J.; Shieh, Geoffrey S.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to continue our efforts in advancing the state of knowledge in large eddy simulation (LES), direct numerical simulation (DNS), and Reynolds averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) methods for the computational analysis of high-speed reacting turbulent flows. In the second phase of this work, covering the period 1 Sep. 1993 - 1 Sep. 1994, we have focused our efforts on two research problems: (1) developments of 'algebraic' moment closures for statistical descriptions of nonpremixed reacting systems, and (2) assessments of the Dirichlet frequency in presumed scalar probability density function (PDF) methods in stochastic description of turbulent reacting flows. This report provides a complete description of our efforts during this past year as supported by the NASA Langley Research Center under Grant NAG1-1122.

  8. Structure and dynamics of single-ion conducting P(STFSILi)-ran-P(EGMA) copolymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Jennifer; Soles, Christopher

    2015-03-01

    Recently, PEO-based copolymers containing the lithiated STFSI monomer have been investigated for use as single-ion conducting electrolytes in lithium batteries. Single-ion conducting electrolytes eliminate ion concentration gradients that diminish cell performance. The low ionic conductivity of these electrolytes has limited their applicability thus far, but electrolytes based on the STFSI monomer have been shown to have sufficient conductivity to support cell operation at moderate temperatures. We will report on the characterization of the morphology and dynamics of P(STFSI)-ran-P(EGMA) copolymer electrolytes as a function of the monomer ratio (ion loading) and length of the polyethylene glycol comb. Copolymers containing sufficiently short PEG combs remain amorphous at ambient temperatures over a range of STFSI content.

  9. Hopf-Ranãda linked and knotted light beam solution viewed as a null electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Besieris, Ioannis M; Shaarawi, Amr M

    2009-12-15

    The Hopf-Ranãda linked and knotted light beam solution, which has been interpreted physically and extended analytically by Irvine and Bouwmeester recently, is viewed in this Letter as a null electromagnetic field. It is shown, in particular, that the Hopf-Ranãda solution is a variant of a luminal null electromagnetic wave due originally to Robinson and Troutman and reported by Bialynicki-Birula recently. This analogy is motivated by means of a method due to Whittaker and Bateman, and a relationship to well-known scalar luminal localized waves is examined. PMID:20016647

  10. Assessment of Hybrid RANS/LES Turbulence Models for Aeroacoustics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatsa, Veer N.; Lockhard, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Predicting the noise from aircraft with exposed landing gear remains a challenging problem for the aeroacoustics community. Although computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has shown promise as a technique that could produce high-fidelity flow solutions, generating grids that can resolve the pertinent physics around complex configurations can be very challenging. Structured grids are often impractical for such configurations. Unstructured grids offer a path forward for simulating complex configurations. However, few unstructured grid codes have been thoroughly tested for unsteady flow problems in the manner needed for aeroacoustic prediction. A widely used unstructured grid code, FUN3D, is examined for resolving the near field in unsteady flow problems. Although the ultimate goal is to compute the flow around complex geometries such as the landing gear, simpler problems that include some of the relevant physics, and are easily amenable to the structured grid approaches are used for testing the unstructured grid approach. The test cases chosen for this study correspond to the experimental work on single and tandem cylinders conducted in the Basic Aerodynamic Research Tunnel (BART) and the Quiet Flow Facility (QFF) at NASA Langley Research Center. These configurations offer an excellent opportunity to assess the performance of hybrid RANS/LES turbulence models that transition from RANS in unresolved regions near solid bodies to LES in the outer flow field. Several of these models have been implemented and tested in both structured and unstructured grid codes to evaluate their dependence on the solver and mesh type. Comparison of FUN3D solutions with experimental data and numerical solutions from a structured grid flow solver are found to be encouraging.

  11. Fronthaul Compression and Transmit Beamforming Optimization for Multi-Antenna Uplink C-RAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuhan; Yu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    This paper considers the joint fronthaul compression and transmit beamforming design for the uplink cloud radio access network (C-RAN), in which multi-antenna user terminals communicate with a cloud-computing based centralized processor (CP) through multi-antenna base-stations (BSs) serving as relay nodes. A compress-and-forward relaying strategy, named the VMAC scheme, is employed, in which the BSs can either perform single-user compression or Wyner-Ziv coding to quantize the received signals and send the quantization bits to the CP via capacity-limited fronthaul links; the CP performs successive decoding with either successive interference cancellation (SIC) receiver or linear minimum-mean-square-error (MMSE) receiver. Under this setup, this paper investigates the joint optimization of the transmit beamformers at the users and the quantization noise covariance matrices at the BSs for maximizing the network utility. A novel weighted minimum-mean-square-error successive convex approximation (WMMSE-SCA) algorithm is first proposed for maximizing the weighted sum rate under the user transmit power and fronthaul capacity constraints with single-user compression. Assuming a heuristic decompression order, the proposed algorithm is then adapted for optimizing the transmit beamforming and fronthaul compression under Wyner-Ziv coding. This paper also proposes a low-complexity separate design consisting of optimizing transmit beamformers for the Gaussian vector multiple-access channel along with per-antenna quantizers with uniform quantization noise levels across the antennas at each BS. Numerical results show that with optimized beamforming and fronthaul compression, C-RAN can significantly outperform conventional cellular networks. Furthermore, the low complexity separate design already performs very close to the optimized joint design in regime of practical interest.

  12. Use of Arabidopsis thaliana defense-related mutants to dissect the plant response to pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Ausubel, F M; Katagiri, F; Mindrinos, M; Glazebrook, J

    1995-01-01

    The plant defense response to microbial pathogens had been studied primarily by using biochemical and physiological techniques. Recently, several laboratories have developed a variety of pathosystems utilizing Arabidopsis thaliana as a model host so that genetic analysis could also be used to study plant defense responses. Utilizing a pathosystem that involves the infection of Arabidopsis with pathogenic pseudomonads, we have cloned the Arabidopsis disease-resistance gene RPS2, which corresponds to the avirulence gene avrRpt2 in a gene-for-gene relationship. RPS2 encodes a 105-kDa protein containing a leucine zipper, a nucleotide binding site, and 14 imperfect leucine-rich repeats. The RPS2 protein is remarkably similar to the product of the tobacco N gene, which confers resistance to tobacco mosaic virus. We have also isolated a series of Arabidopsis mutants that synthesize decreased levels of an Arabidopsis phytoalexin called camalexin. Analysis of these mutants indicated that camalexin does not play a significant role in limiting growth of avirulent Pseudomonas syringae strains during the hypersensitive defense response but that it may play a role in limiting the growth of virulent strains. More generally, we have shown that we can utilize Arabidopsis to systematically dissect the defense response by isolation and characterization of appropriate defense-related mutants. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:7753782

  13. Distinctive interactions of the Arabidopsis homolog of the 30 kD subunit of the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (AtCPSF30) with other polyadenylation factor subunits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The Arabidopsis ortholog of the 30 kD subunit of the mammalian Cleavage and Polyadenylation Specificity Factor (AtCPSF30) is an RNA-binding endonuclease that is associated with other Arabidopsis CPSF subunits (orthologs of the 160, 100, and 73 kD subunits of CPSF). In order to better u...

  14. Stomatal Development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pillitteri, Lynn Jo; Dong, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Stomata consist of two guard cells that function as turgor-operated valves that regulate gas exchange in plants. In Arabidopsis, a dedicated cell lineage is initiated and undergoes a series of cell divisions and cell-state transitions to produce a stoma. A set of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors regulates the transition and differentiation events through the lineage, while the placement of stomata relative to each other is controlled by intercellular signaling via peptide ligands, transmembrane receptors, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) modules. Some genes involved in regulating stomatal differentiation or density are also involved in hormonal and environmental stress responses, which may provide a link between modulation of stomatal development or function in response to changes in the environment. Premitotic polarlylocalized proteins provide an added layer of regulation, which can be addressed more thoroughly with the identification of additional proteins in this pathway. Linking the networks that control stomatal development promises to bring advances to our understanding of signal transduction, cell polarity, and cell-fate specification in plants. PMID:23864836

  15. A Web-Based Assessment for Phonological Awareness, Rapid Automatized Naming (RAN) and Learning to Read Chinese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Chen-Huei; Kuo, Bor-Chen

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the equivalency of conventional and web-based tests in reading Chinese. Phonological awareness, rapid automatized naming (RAN), reading accuracy, and reading fluency tests were administered to 93 grade 6 children in Taiwan with both test versions (paper-pencil and web-based). The results suggest that conventional and…

  16. Integral Method for the Assessment of U-RANS Effectiveness in Non-Equilibrium Flows and Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pond, Ian; Edabi, Alireza; Dubief, Yves; White, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    Reynolds Average Navier Stokes (RANS) modeling has established itself as a critical design tool in many engineering applications, thanks to its superior computational efficiency. The drawbacks of RANS models are well known, but not necessarily well understood: poor prediction of transition, non equilibrium flows, mixing and heat transfer, to name the ones relevant to our study. In the present study, we use a DNS of a reciprocating channel flow driven by an oscillating pressure gradient to test several low- and high-Reynolds RANS models. Temperature is introduced as a passive scalar to study heat transfer modeling. Low-Reynolds models manage to capture the overall physics of wall shear and heat flux well, yet with some phase discrepancies, whereas high Reynolds models fail. Under the microscope of the integral method for wall shear and wall heat flux, the qualitative agreement appears more serendipitous than driven by the ability of the models to capture the correct physics. The integral method is shown to be more insightful in the benchmarking of RANS models than the typical comparisons of statistical quantities. The authors acknowledges the support of NSF and DOE under grant NSF/DOE 1258697 (VT) and 1258702 (NH).

  17. RAN translation at CGG repeats induces ubiquitin proteasome system impairment in models of fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seok Yoon; He, Fang; Krans, Amy; Frazer, Michelle; Taylor, J Paul; Paulson, Henry L; Todd, Peter K

    2015-08-01

    Fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CGG trinucleotide repeat expansion in the 5' UTR of the Fragile X gene, FMR1. FXTAS is thought to arise primarily from an RNA gain-of-function toxicity mechanism. However, recent studies demonstrate that the repeat also elicits production of a toxic polyglycine protein, FMRpolyG, via repeat-associated non-AUG (RAN)-initiated translation. Pathologically, FXTAS is characterized by ubiquitin-positive intranuclear neuronal inclusions, raising the possibility that failure of protein quality control pathways could contribute to disease pathogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we used Drosophila- and cell-based models of CGG-repeat-associated toxicity. In Drosophila, ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) impairment led to enhancement of CGG-repeat-induced degeneration, whereas overexpression of the chaperone protein HSP70 suppressed this toxicity. In transfected mammalian cells, CGG repeat expression triggered accumulation of a UPS reporter in a length-dependent fashion. To delineate the contributions from CGG repeats as RNA from RAN translation-associated toxicity, we enhanced or impaired the production of FMRpolyG in these models. Driving expression of FMRpolyG enhanced induction of UPS impairment in cell models, while prevention of RAN translation attenuated UPS impairment in cells and suppressed the genetic interaction with UPS manipulation in Drosophila. Taken together, these findings suggest that CGG repeats induce UPS impairment at least in part through activation of RAN translation.

  18. RCC1-dependent activation of Ran accelerates cell cycle and DNA repair, inhibiting DNA damage–induced cell senescence

    PubMed Central

    Cekan, Pavol; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Pan, Yu; Tubman, Emily; Odde, David; Chen, Jin-Qiu; Herrmann, Michelle A.; Kumar, Sheetal; Kalab, Petr

    2016-01-01

    The coordination of cell cycle progression with the repair of DNA damage supports the genomic integrity of dividing cells. The function of many factors involved in DNA damage response (DDR) and the cell cycle depends on their Ran GTPase–regulated nuclear–cytoplasmic transport (NCT). The loading of Ran with GTP, which is mediated by RCC1, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ran, is critical for NCT activity. However, the role of RCC1 or Ran⋅GTP in promoting cell proliferation or DDR is not clear. We show that RCC1 overexpression in normal cells increased cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and accelerated the cell cycle and DNA damage repair. As a result, normal cells overexpressing RCC1 evaded DNA damage–induced cell cycle arrest and senescence, mimicking colorectal carcinoma cells with high endogenous RCC1 levels. The RCC1-induced inhibition of senescence required Ran and exportin 1 and involved the activation of importin β–dependent nuclear import of 53BP1, a large NCT cargo. Our results indicate that changes in the activity of the Ran⋅GTP–regulated NCT modulate the rate of the cell cycle and the efficiency of DNA repair. Through the essential role of RCC1 in regulation of cellular Ran⋅GTP levels and NCT, RCC1 expression enables the proliferation of cells that sustain DNA damage. PMID:26864624

  19. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of luciferase gene mRNA requires CRM1/Exportin1 and RanGTPase.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tominori; Hashimoto, Iwao; Nishikawa, Masao; Yamada, Hisao

    2009-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev (regulator of the expression of the virion) protein was shown to reduce the expression level of the co-transfected luciferase reporter gene (luc+) introduced to monitor transfection efficiency. We studied the mechanism of the inhibitory Rev effect. The effect, caused by nuclear retention of luc+ mRNA, was reversed if rev had a point mutation that makes its nuclear export signal (NES) unable to associate with cellular transport factors. The Rev NES receptor CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance 1)-specific inhibitor, leptomycin B, blocked luc+ mRNA export. This finding was also supported by the overexpression of delta CAN, another specific CRM1 inhibitor that caused inhibition of luciferase gene expression. Experiments involving tsBN2 cells, which have a temperature-sensitive RCC1 (regulator of chromosome condensation 1) allele, demonstrated that luc+ expression required generation of the GTP-bound form of RanGTPase (RanGTP) by RCC1. The constitutive transport element (CTE)-mediated nuclear export of luc+ mRNA was found to also depend upon RanGTP. Nuclear export of luc+ mRNA is thus suggested to involve CRM1 and RanGTP, which Rev employs to transport viral mRNA. The Rev effect is therefore considered to involve competition between two molecules for common transport factors.

  20. Arabidopsis thaliana—Aphid Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Joe; Singh, Vijay; Shah, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Aphids are important pests of plants that use their stylets to tap into the sieve elements to consume phloem sap. Besides the removal of photosynthates, aphid infestation also alters source-sink patterns. Most aphids also vector viral diseases. In this chapter, we will summarize on recent significant findings in plant-aphid interaction, and how studies involving Arabidopsis thaliana and Myzus persicae (Sülzer), more commonly known as the green peach aphid (GPA), are beginning to provide important insights into the molecular basis of plant defense and susceptibility to aphids. The recent demonstration that expression of dsRNA in Arabidopsis can be used to silence expression of genes in GPA has further expanded the utility of Arabidopsis for evaluating the contribution of the aphid genome-encoded proteins to this interaction. PMID:22666177

  1. CRM1/Ran-Mediated Nuclear Export of p27Kip1 Involves a Nuclear Export Signal and Links p27 Export and Proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Michael K.; Kotchetkov, Rouslan; Cariou, Sandrine; Resch, Ansgar; Lupetti, Rafaella; Beniston, Richard G.; Melchior, Frauke; Hengst, Ludger; Slingerland, Joyce M.

    2003-01-01

    We show that p27 localization is cell cycle regulated and we suggest that active CRM1/RanGTP-mediated nuclear export of p27 may be linked to cytoplasmic p27 proteolysis in early G1. p27 is nuclear in G0 and early G1 and appears transiently in the cytoplasm at the G1/S transition. Association of p27 with the exportin CRM1 was minimal in G0 and increased markedly during G1-to-S phase progression. Proteasome inhibition in mid-G1 did not impair nuclear import of p27, but led to accumulation of p27 in the cytoplasm, suggesting that export precedes degradation for at least part of the cellular p27 pool. p27-CRM1 binding and nuclear export were inhibited by S10A mutation but not by T187A mutation. A putative nuclear export sequence in p27 is identified whose mutation reduced p27-CRM1 interaction, nuclear export, and p27 degradation. Leptomycin B (LMB) did not inhibit p27-CRM1 binding, nor did it prevent p27 export in vitro or in heterokaryon assays. Prebinding of CRM1 to the HIV-1 Rev nuclear export sequence did not inhibit p27-CRM1 interaction, suggesting that p27 binds CRM1 at a non-LMB-sensitive motif. LMB increased total cellular p27 and may do so indirectly, through effects on other p27 regulatory proteins. These data suggest a model in which p27 undergoes active, CRM1-dependent nuclear export and cytoplasmic degradation in early G1. This would permit the incremental activation of cyclin E-Cdk2 leading to cyclin E-Cdk2-mediated T187 phosphorylation and p27 proteolysis in late G1 and S phase. PMID:12529437

  2. CRM1/Ran-mediated nuclear export of p27(Kip1) involves a nuclear export signal and links p27 export and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Connor, Michael K; Kotchetkov, Rouslan; Cariou, Sandrine; Resch, Ansgar; Lupetti, Rafaella; Beniston, Richard G; Melchior, Frauke; Hengst, Ludger; Slingerland, Joyce M

    2003-01-01

    We show that p27 localization is cell cycle regulated and we suggest that active CRM1/RanGTP-mediated nuclear export of p27 may be linked to cytoplasmic p27 proteolysis in early G1. p27 is nuclear in G0 and early G1 and appears transiently in the cytoplasm at the G1/S transition. Association of p27 with the exportin CRM1 was minimal in G0 and increased markedly during G1-to-S phase progression. Proteasome inhibition in mid-G1 did not impair nuclear import of p27, but led to accumulation of p27 in the cytoplasm, suggesting that export precedes degradation for at least part of the cellular p27 pool. p27-CRM1 binding and nuclear export were inhibited by S10A mutation but not by T187A mutation. A putative nuclear export sequence in p27 is identified whose mutation reduced p27-CRM1 interaction, nuclear export, and p27 degradation. Leptomycin B (LMB) did not inhibit p27-CRM1 binding, nor did it prevent p27 export in vitro or in heterokaryon assays. Prebinding of CRM1 to the HIV-1 Rev nuclear export sequence did not inhibit p27-CRM1 interaction, suggesting that p27 binds CRM1 at a non-LMB-sensitive motif. LMB increased total cellular p27 and may do so indirectly, through effects on other p27 regulatory proteins. These data suggest a model in which p27 undergoes active, CRM1-dependent nuclear export and cytoplasmic degradation in early G1. This would permit the incremental activation of cyclin E-Cdk2 leading to cyclin E-Cdk2-mediated T187 phosphorylation and p27 proteolysis in late G1 and S phase.

  3. Light responses in Photoperiodism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony R. Cashmore

    2006-08-01

    ADO1: An Arabidopsis blue light photoreceptor We have reported the characterization of an Arabidopsis gene encoding the ADAGIO 1 (ADO1) protein (Jarillo et al., 2001a). ADO1 contains a LOV domain, similar to WHITE COLLAR 1 (WC1), a photoreceptor for entrainment of Neurospora circadian rhythms (Froehlich et al., 2002), as well as PHOT1 and PHOT2, the blue light photoreceptors for phototropism (Briggs et al., 2001; Christie et al., 1998; Jarillo et al., 2001b; Kinoshita et al., 2001). Loss of function ado1 mutants show an unusually long periodicity for their free running circadian rhythm (Jarillo et al., 2001a). This observation holds for plants grown under white light as well as blue light and surprisingly, plants grown under red light also show altered circadian properties. The similarity of the LOV domain of ADO1 to those of PHOT1, PHOT2 and WC1 (known flavoprotein photoreceptors) as well as the genetic and molecular properties of ADO1, indicate that ADO1 is likely a new class of blue light photoreceptor. Indeed, the LOV domain of the related FKF1/ADO3 has been shown to bind FMN, and exhibit the in vitro photochemistry characteristic of PHOT1 (Imaizumi et al., 2003). Furthermore, ZTL/ADO1 has been shown to participate in the circadian and proteasome mediated degradation of the Arabidopsis clock protein, TOC1 (Mas et al., 2003). We also showed that the ado1 mutation selectively confers hypersensitivity to red light — when grown under red light (but not blue light) the ado1 mutant possesses an unusually short hypocotyl. This red light hypersensivity is even more severe in a triple ado1 ado2 ado3 mutant — ADO2 and ADO3 being the two other members of this ADAGIO gene family. This finding of a mutant phenotype under red light is somewhat unexpected for a protein thought to function as a photoreceptor for blue light. We have pursued our studies of ADO1 by preparing a mutant gene for which we have altered the codon for the cysteine residue conserved in all LOV

  4. Sperm membrane protein (hSMP-1) and RanBPM complex in the microtubule-organizing centre.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoling; Zhang, Jianchao; Cai, Ying; Miao, Shiying; Zong, Shudong; Koide, S S; Wang, Linfang

    2004-06-01

    hSMP-1 is a human sperm membrane protein expressed during development. It is a testis-specific component produced during male germ cell differentiation. Proteins that interact with hSMP-1 were identified by the application of the yeast two-hybrid system. One of the components, RanBPM, was found to be associated with hSMP-1 under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. In the human testis, RanBPM is produced in spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes, suggesting expression during the early stages of spermatogenesis; whereas in the rat testis, it is located in round and elongated spermatids, similar to hSMP-1, suggesting expression of both components during spermiogenesis. Images obtained by immunofluorescence and confocal scanning microscopy of CHO-K1 cells co-transfected with pEGFP-C1-hSMP-1 and pDsRed1-Nl-RanBPM revealed that RanBPM and hSMP-1 are distributed in discrete loci throughout the cytoplasm. When superimposed, the stained spots appeared as congruent yellow areas, indicative of co-localization and probable complex formation of these two components. This interaction between hSMP-1 and RanBPM may be involved in the process of male germ cell differentiation. In CHO-Kl cells transfected with pEGFP-Cl-hSMP-1, the exogenously expressed hSMP-1 was found to co-localize with alpha-tubulin. Depolymerization of microtubules can be induced in CHO-Kl cells by cold treatment. In cells transfected with the pEGFP-Cl vector, the dispersed tubulins promptly reassembled upon warming. However, in cells transfected with pEGFP-Cl-hSMP-1, reassembly of the dispersed tubulins was blocked even upon rewarming of the cells. These findings suggest that hSMP-1 interacts with tubulins and thereby may modulate microtubule assembly and/or activity.

  5. Arabidopsis DREB2C modulates ABA biosynthesis during germination.

    PubMed

    Je, Jihyun; Chen, Huan; Song, Chieun; Lim, Chae Oh

    2014-09-12

    Plant dehydration-responsive element binding factors (DREBs) are transcriptional regulators of the APETELA2/Ethylene Responsive element-binding Factor (AP2/ERF) family that control expression of abiotic stress-related genes. We show here that under conditions of mild heat stress, constitutive overexpression seeds of transgenic DREB2C overexpression Arabidopsis exhibit delayed germination and increased abscisic acid (ABA) content compared to untransformed wild-type (WT). Treatment with fluridone, an inhibitor of the ABA biosynthesis abrogated these effects. Expression of an ABA biosynthesis-related gene, 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 9 (NCED9) was up-regulated in the DREB2C overexpression lines compared to WT. DREB2C was able to trans-activate expression of NCED9 in Arabidopsis leaf protoplasts in vitro. Direct and specific binding of DREB2C to a complete DRE on the NCED9 promoter was observed in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Exogenous ABA treatment induced DREB2C expression in germinating seeds of WT. Vegetative growth of transgenic DREB2C overexpression lines was more strongly inhibited by exogenous ABA compared to WT. These results suggest that DREB2C is a stress- and ABA-inducible gene that acts as a positive regulator of ABA biosynthesis in germinating seeds through activating NCED9 expression.

  6. Wheat Transcription Factor TaAREB3 Participates in Drought and Freezing Tolerances in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingyi; Li, Qian; Mao, Xinguo; Li, Ang; Jing, Ruilian

    2016-01-01

    AREB (ABA response element binding) proteins in plants play direct regulatory roles in response to multiple stresses, but their functions in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) are not clear. In the present study, TaAREB3, a new member of the AREB transcription factor family, was isolated from wheat. Sequence analysis showed that the TaAREB3 protein is composed of three parts, a conserved N-terminal, a variable M region, and a conserved C-terminal with a bZIP domain. It belongs to the group A subfamily of bZIP transcription factors. TaAREB3 was constitutively expressed in stems, leaves, florets, anthers, pistils, seeds, and most highly, in roots. TaAREB3 gene expression was induced with abscisic acid (ABA) and low temperature stress, and its protein was localized in the nucleus when transiently expressed in tobacco epidermal cells and stably expressed in transgenic Arabidopsis. TaAREB3 protein has transcriptional activation activity, and can bind to the ABRE cis-element in vitro. Overexpression of TaAREB3 in Arabidopsis not only enhanced ABA sensitivity, but also strengthened drought and freezing tolerances. TaAREB3 also activated RD29A, RD29B, COR15A, and COR47 by binding to their promoter regions in transgenic Arabidopsis. These results demonstrated that TaAREB3 plays an important role in drought and freezing tolerances in Arabidopsis. PMID:26884722

  7. Simulating wind and marine hydrokinetic turbines with actuator lines in RANS and LES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachant, Peter; Wosnik, Martin

    2015-11-01

    As wind and marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbine designs mature, focus is shifting towards improving turbine array layouts for maximizing overall power output, i.e., minimizing wake interference for axial-flow or horizontal-axis turbines, or taking advantage of constructive wake interaction for cross-flow or vertical-axis turbines. Towards this goal, an actuator line model (ALM) was developed to provide a computationally feasible method for simulating full turbine arrays inside Navier-Stokes models. The ALM predicts turbine loading with the blade element method combined with sub-models for dynamic stall and flow curvature. The open-source software is written as an extension library for the OpenFOAM CFD package, which allows the ALM body force to be applied to their standard RANS and LES solvers. Turbine forcing is also applied to volume of fluid (VOF) models, e.g., for predicting free surface effects on submerged MHK devices. An additional sub-model is considered for injecting turbulence model scalar quantities based on actuator line element loading. Results are presented for the simulation of performance and wake dynamics of axial- and cross-flow turbines and compared with moderate Reynolds number experiments and body-fitted mesh, blade-resolving CFD. Work supported by NSF-CBET grant 1150797.

  8. Testing of RANS Turbulence Models for Stratified Flows Based on DNS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venayagamoorthy, S. K.; Koseff, J. R.; Ferziger, J. H.; Shih, L. H.

    2003-01-01

    In most geophysical flows, turbulence occurs at the smallest scales and one of the two most important additional physical phenomena to account for is strati cation (the other being rotation). In this paper, the main objective is to investigate proposed changes to RANS turbulence models which include the effects of stratifi- cation more explicitly. These proposed changes were developed using a DNS database on strati ed and sheared homogenous turbulence developed by Shih et al. (2000) and are described more fully in Ferziger et al. (2003). The data generated by Shih, et al. (2000) (hereinafter referred to as SKFR) are used to study the parameters in the k- model as a function of the turbulent Froude number, Frk. A modified version of the standard k- model based on the local turbulent Froude number is proposed. The proposed model is applied to a stratified open channel flow, a test case that differs significantly from the flows from which the modified parameters were derived. The turbulence modeling and results are discussed in the next two sections followed by suggestions for future work.

  9. RANS Simulation of the Heave Response of a Two-Body Floating Point Wave Absorber: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Y.; Li, Y.

    2011-03-01

    A preliminary study on a two-body floating wave absorbers is presented in this paper. A Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes computational method is applied for analyzing the hydrodynamic heave response of the absorber in operational wave conditions. The two-body floating wave absorber contains a float section and a submerged reaction section. For validation purposes, our model is first assumed to be locked. The two sections are forced to move together with each other. The locked single body model is used in a heave decay test, where the RANS result is validated with the experimental measurement. For the two-body floating point absorber simulation, the two sections are connected through a mass-spring-damper system, which is applied to simulate the power take-off mechanism under design wave conditions. Overall, the details of the flow around the absorber and its nonlinear interaction with waves are investigated, and the power absorption efficiency of the two-body floating wave absorber in waves with a constant value spring-damper system is examined.

  10. Aurora A Phosphorylates MCAK to Control Ran-dependent Spindle Bipolarity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Ems-McClung, Stephanie C.

    2008-01-01

    During mitosis, mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK) localizes to chromatin/kinetochores, a cytoplasmic pool, and spindle poles. Its localization and activity in the chromatin region are regulated by Aurora B kinase; however, how the cytoplasmic- and pole-localized MCAK are regulated is currently not clear. In this study, we used Xenopus egg extracts to form spindles in the absence of chromatin and centrosomes and found that MCAK localization and activity are tightly regulated by Aurora A. This regulation is important to focus microtubules at aster centers and to facilitate the transition from asters to bipolar spindles. In particular, we found that MCAK colocalized with NuMA and XMAP215 at the center of Ran asters where its activity is regulated by Aurora A-dependent phosphorylation of S196, which contributes to proper pole focusing. In addition, we found that MCAK localization at spindle poles was regulated through another Aurora A phosphorylation site (S719), which positively enhances bipolar spindle formation. This is the first study that clearly defines a role for MCAK at the spindle poles as well as identifies another key Aurora A substrate that contributes to spindle bipolarity. PMID:18434591

  11. Uncertainty Quantification of RANS dispersion modeling in Oklahoma City during the Joint Urban 2003 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Sanchez, Clara; Gorle, Catherine; van Beeck, Jeroen; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2014-11-01

    The high expansion rate of urban areas makes realistic predictions of dispersion within cities an important research topic. The transport of pollutants is influenced by wind flows that are affected by the large scale variability of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In order to improve the predictive capabilities of Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations (CFD) of the ABL, this atmospheric variability should be included. This work focuses on representing this variability in the inflow boundary conditions using an uncertainty quantification framework for the Joint Urban 2003 experiment. The simulations focus on the Intensive Observation Period number 9, where a continuous release of SF6 took place in downtown Oklahoma. The RANS simulations with the k-epsilon turbulence model were performed with the code OpenFOAM, and an equation for passive scalar transport is solved, using a standard gradient diffusion model for the turbulent dispersion, to obtain the SF6 concentration. To define the inflow boundary conditions three uncertain parameters are used: wind speed, wind direction, and ABL roughness height. To propagate these uncertainties a tensor grid Clenshaw-Curtis Stochastic Collocation approach was used, and a polynomial chaos representation of the velocity and concentration at different field measurement locations was constructed to extract the mean and standard deviations.

  12. Detecting unforgiving roadside contributors through the severity analysis of ran-off-road crashes.

    PubMed

    Roque, Carlos; Moura, Filipe; Lourenço Cardoso, João

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to study the contributors influencing ran-off-road (ROR) crash severities in a setting that has not been analysed in the literature, namely on freeways not designed according to the "forgiving roadside" concept. To accomplish the analysis, ROR crash data were collected on freeway road sections in Portugal and multinomial and mixed logit models were estimated using the driver injury and the most severely injured occupant as outcome variables. Our results are in line with previous findings reported in the literature on ROR crash severity in a number of distinct settings. Most importantly, this study shows the contribution of critical slopes and vehicle rollover towards fatal injuries and highlights the importance of introducing the "forgiving roadside" concept to mitigate ROR crash severity in Portuguese freeways. The study also indicates the importance of protecting errant vehicles particularly in horizontal curves, as these are linked with fatalities. Finally, the empirical findings from the developed models revealed problems in current Portuguese roadside design, especially with regards to criteria for forgiving slopes provision and warrants for safety barrier installation.

  13. RANS Simulation of Passive Scalar Residence Times and Exchange Processes in Idealized and Natural Stream Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drost, Kevin; Jackson, Tracie; Haggerty, Roy; Apte, Sourabh

    2011-11-01

    Natural stream systems contain a variety of dead zones characterized by flow separation, a mixing layer, and a recirculation zone. These dead zones play an important role in stream solute transport studies. Previous published work has focused on idealized storage zone geometries studied in laboratory flumes. Using RANS simulations, this study first examines these idealized geometries to determine the appropriate scaling relationships between idealized dead zone geometries and the residence times of a passive scalar. These scaling relationships are then applied to measurements from natural systems. The field-measured geometries are located in Oak and Soap creeks near Corvallis, Oregon. Field measurements for the natural systems included: (a) survey measurements to delineate storage zone morphologies; (b) Marsh-McBirney and acoustic Doppler velocimetry measurements for model boundary conditions and computation of turbulence parameters; and (c) continuous salt injections within storage zones and electrical conductivity measurements at point locations in the main channel and storage zones to quantify exchange rates and residence times. This work is sponsored by NSF-EAR project #0943570.

  14. Chromatids segregate without centrosomes during Caenorhabditis elegans mitosis in a Ran- and CLASP-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Nahaboo, Wallis; Zouak, Melissa; Askjaer, Peter; Delattre, Marie

    2015-01-01

    During mitosis, chromosomes are connected to a microtubule-based spindle. Current models propose that displacement of the spindle poles and/or the activity of kinetochore microtubules generate mechanical forces that segregate sister chromatids. Using laser destruction of the centrosomes during Caenorhabditis elegans mitosis, we show that neither of these mechanisms is necessary to achieve proper chromatid segregation. Our results strongly suggest that an outward force generated by the spindle midzone, independently of centrosomes, is sufficient to segregate chromosomes in mitotic cells. Using mutant and RNAi analysis, we show that the microtubule-bundling protein SPD-1/MAP-65 and BMK-1/kinesin-5 act as a brake opposing the force generated by the spindle midzone. Conversely, we identify a novel role for two microtubule-growth and nucleation agents, Ran and CLASP, in the establishment of the centrosome-independent force during anaphase. Their involvement raises the interesting possibility that microtubule polymerization of midzone microtubules is continuously required to sustain chromosome segregation during mitosis. PMID:25833711

  15. Simulation of an Isolated Tiltrotor in Hover with an Unstructured Overset-Grid RANS Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    An unstructured overset-grid Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver, FUN3D, is used to simulate an isolated tiltrotor in hover. An overview of the computational method is presented as well as the details of the overset-grid systems. Steady-state computations within a noninertial reference frame define the performance trends of the rotor across a range of the experimental collective settings. Results are presented to show the effects of off-body grid refinement and blade grid refinement. The computed performance and blade loading trends show good agreement with experimental results and previously published structured overset-grid computations. Off-body flow features indicate a significant improvement in the resolution of the first perpendicular blade vortex interaction with background grid refinement across the collective range. Considering experimental data uncertainty and effects of transition, the prediction of figure of merit on the baseline and refined grid is reasonable at the higher collective range- within 3 percent of the measured values. At the lower collective settings, the computed figure of merit is approximately 6 percent lower than the experimental data. A comparison of steady and unsteady results show that with temporal refinement, the dynamic results closely match the steady-state noninertial results which gives confidence in the accuracy of the dynamic overset-grid approach.

  16. Chromatids segregate without centrosomes during Caenorhabditis elegans mitosis in a Ran- and CLASP-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Nahaboo, Wallis; Zouak, Melissa; Askjaer, Peter; Delattre, Marie

    2015-06-01

    During mitosis, chromosomes are connected to a microtubule-based spindle. Current models propose that displacement of the spindle poles and/or the activity of kinetochore microtubules generate mechanical forces that segregate sister chromatids. Using laser destruction of the centrosomes during Caenorhabditis elegans mitosis, we show that neither of these mechanisms is necessary to achieve proper chromatid segregation. Our results strongly suggest that an outward force generated by the spindle midzone, independently of centrosomes, is sufficient to segregate chromosomes in mitotic cells. Using mutant and RNAi analysis, we show that the microtubule-bundling protein SPD-1/MAP-65 and BMK-1/kinesin-5 act as a brake opposing the force generated by the spindle midzone. Conversely, we identify a novel role for two microtubule-growth and nucleation agents, Ran and CLASP, in the establishment of the centrosome-independent force during anaphase. Their involvement raises the interesting possibility that microtubule polymerization of midzone microtubules is continuously required to sustain chromosome segregation during mitosis.

  17. Hybrid RANS/LES of turbulent flow in a rotating rib-roughened channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xun, Qian-Qiu; Wang, Bing-Chen

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of the Coriolis force on the flow field in a rib-roughened channel subjected to either clockwise or counter-clockwise system rotation using hybrid RANS/LES based on wall modelling. A simplified dynamic forcing scheme incorporating backscatter is proposed for the hybrid simulation approach. The flow is characterized by a Reynolds number of Re = 1.5 × 104 and a rotation number Ro ranging from -0.6 to 0.6. The mean flow speed and turbulence level near the roughened wall are enhanced under counter-clockwise rotation and suppressed under clockwise rotation. The Coriolis force significantly influences the stability of the wall shear layer and the free shear layers generated by the ribs. Consequently, it is interesting to observe that the classification of the roughness type relies not only on the pitch ratio, but also on the rotation number in the context of rotating rib-roughened flows. In order to validate the present hybrid approach, the first- and second-order statistical moments of the velocity field obtained from the simulations are thoroughly compared with the available laboratory measurement data.

  18. Improved antifungal activity of amphotericin B-loaded TPGS-b-(PCL-ran-PGA) nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaolong; Jiao, Ronghong; Xie, Chunmei; Xu, Lifa; Huo, Zhen; Dai, Jingjing; Qian, Yunyun; Xu, Weiwen; Hou, Wei; Wang, Jiang; Liang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    To develop amphotericin B-loaded biodegradable TPGS-b-(PCL-ran-PGA) nanoparticles (PLGA-TPGS-AMB NPs) for fungal infection treatment, PLGA-TPGS NPs and PLGA NPs were synthesized by a modified double emulsion method and characterized in terms of size and size distribution, morphology and zeta potential. Drug encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, and in vitro/vivo tests against Candida glabrata were completed. The data showed that both of the two AMB-loaded NPs (PLGA-AMB NPs, PLGA-TPGS-AMB NPs) achieved significantly higher level of antifungal effects than water suspended AMB. In comparison with PLGA-AMB NPs, PLGA-TPGS-AMB NPs had a stronger protective effect against candidiasis and gained an advantage of prolonged antifungal efficacy. In conclusion, PLGA-TPGS-AMB NPs system significantly improves AMB bioavailability by increasing the aqueous dispersibility and improving the antifungal activity. And this would be an excellent choice for the antifungal treatment of the entrapped drug because of its low toxicity and higher effectiveness. PMID:26131089

  19. Towards a Comprehensive Model of Jet Noise Using an Acoustic Analogy and Steady RANS Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven A. E.

    2013-01-01

    An acoustic analogy is developed to predict the noise from jet flows. It contains two source models that independently predict the noise from turbulence and shock wave shear layer interactions. The acoustic analogy is based on the Euler equations and separates the sources from propagation. Propagation effects are taken into account by calculating the vector Green's function of the linearized Euler equations. The sources are modeled following the work of Tam and Auriault, Morris and Boluriaan, and Morris and Miller. A statistical model of the two-point cross-correlation of the velocity fluctuations is used to describe the turbulence. The acoustic analogy attempts to take into account the correct scaling of the sources for a wide range of nozzle pressure and temperature ratios. It does not make assumptions regarding fine- or large-scale turbulent noise sources, self- or shear-noise, or convective amplification. The acoustic analogy is partially informed by three-dimensional steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solutions that include the nozzle geometry. The predictions are compared with experiments of jets operating subsonically through supersonically and at unheated and heated temperatures. Predictions generally capture the scaling of both mixing noise and BBSAN for the conditions examined, but some discrepancies remain that are due to the accuracy of the steady RANS turbulence model closure, the equivalent sources, and the use of a simplified vector Green's function solver of the linearized Euler equations.

  20. Araport: the Arabidopsis Information Portal

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, Vivek; Hanlon, Matthew R.; Contrino, Sergio; Ferlanti, Erik S.; Karamycheva, Svetlana; Kim, Maria; Rosen, Benjamin D.; Cheng, Chia-Yi; Moreira, Walter; Mock, Stephen A.; Stubbs, Joseph; Sullivan, Julie M.; Krampis, Konstantinos; Miller, Jason R.; Micklem, Gos; Vaughn, Matthew; Town, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis Information Portal (https://www.araport.org) is a new online resource for plant biology research. It houses the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence and associated annotation. It was conceived as a framework that allows the research community to develop and release ‘modules’ that integrate, analyze and visualize Arabidopsis data that may reside at remote sites. The current implementation provides an indexed database of core genomic information. These data are made available through feature-rich web applications that provide search, data mining, and genome browser functionality, and also by bulk download and web services. Araport uses software from the InterMine and JBrowse projects to expose curated data from TAIR, GO, BAR, EBI, UniProt, PubMed and EPIC CoGe. The site also hosts ‘science apps,’ developed as prototypes for community modules that use dynamic web pages to present data obtained on-demand from third-party servers via RESTful web services. Designed for sustainability, the Arabidopsis Information Portal strategy exploits existing scientific computing infrastructure, adopts a practical mixture of data integration technologies and encourages collaborative enhancement of the resource by its user community. PMID:25414324

  1. Structure of the exportin Xpo4 in complex with RanGTP and the hypusine-containing translation factor eIF5A

    PubMed Central

    Aksu, Metin; Trakhanov, Sergei; Görlich, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Xpo4 is a bidirectional nuclear transport receptor that mediates nuclear export of eIF5A and Smad3 as well as import of Sox2 and SRY. How Xpo4 recognizes such a variety of cargoes is as yet unknown. Here we present the crystal structure of the RanGTP·Xpo4·eIF5A export complex at 3.2 Å resolution. Xpo4 has a similar structure as CRM1, but the NES-binding site is occluded, and a new interaction site evolved that recognizes both globular domains of eIF5A. eIF5A contains hypusine, a unique amino acid with two positive charges, which is essential for cell viability and eIF5A function in translation. The hypusine docks into a deep, acidic pocket of Xpo4 and is thus a critical element of eIF5A's complex export signature. This further suggests that Xpo4 recognizes other cargoes differently, and illustrates how Xpo4 suppresses – in a chaperone-like manner – undesired interactions of eIF5A inside nuclei. PMID:27306458

  2. The Arabidopsis-related halophyte Thellungiella halophila: boron tolerance via boron complexation with metabolites?

    PubMed

    Lamdan, Netta Li; Attia, Ziv; Moran, Nava; Moshelion, Menachem

    2012-04-01

    Tolerance to boron (B) is still not completely understood. We tested here the hypothesis that Thellungiella halophila, an Arabidopsis thaliana-related 'extremophile' plant, with abundance of B in its natural environment, is tolerant to B, and examined the potential mechanisms of this tolerance. With 1-10 mm B applied ([B](ext)) to Thellungiella and Arabidopsis grown in hydroponics, the steady-state accumulated B concentration ([B](int)) in the root was below [B](ext), and was similar in both, suggesting both extrude B actively. Whether grown in soil or hydroponically, the shoot [B](int) was higher in Arabidopsis than in Thellungiella, suggesting more effective net B exclusion by Thellungiella root. Arabidopsis exhibited toxicity symptoms including reduced shoot fresh weight (FW), but Thellungiella was not affected, even at similar levels of shoot-accumulated [B](int) (about 10 to 40 mm B in 'shoot water'), suggesting additional B tolerance mechanism in Thellungiella shoot. At [B](ext) = 5 mm, the summed shoot concentration of the potentially B-binding polyhydroxyl metabolites (malic acid, fructose, glucose, sucrose and citric acid) in Arabidopsis was below [B](int) , but in Thellungiella it was over twofold higher than [B](int) , and therefore likely to allow appreciable 1:2 boron-metabolite complexation in the shoot. This, we suggest, is an important component of Thellungiella B tolerance mechanism. PMID:21999349

  3. The Arabidopsis-related halophyte Thellungiella halophila: boron tolerance via boron complexation with metabolites?

    PubMed

    Lamdan, Netta Li; Attia, Ziv; Moran, Nava; Moshelion, Menachem

    2012-04-01

    Tolerance to boron (B) is still not completely understood. We tested here the hypothesis that Thellungiella halophila, an Arabidopsis thaliana-related 'extremophile' plant, with abundance of B in its natural environment, is tolerant to B, and examined the potential mechanisms of this tolerance. With 1-10 mm B applied ([B](ext)) to Thellungiella and Arabidopsis grown in hydroponics, the steady-state accumulated B concentration ([B](int)) in the root was below [B](ext), and was similar in both, suggesting both extrude B actively. Whether grown in soil or hydroponically, the shoot [B](int) was higher in Arabidopsis than in Thellungiella, suggesting more effective net B exclusion by Thellungiella root. Arabidopsis exhibited toxicity symptoms including reduced shoot fresh weight (FW), but Thellungiella was not affected, even at similar levels of shoot-accumulated [B](int) (about 10 to 40 mm B in 'shoot water'), suggesting additional B tolerance mechanism in Thellungiella shoot. At [B](ext) = 5 mm, the summed shoot concentration of the potentially B-binding polyhydroxyl metabolites (malic acid, fructose, glucose, sucrose and citric acid) in Arabidopsis was below [B](int) , but in Thellungiella it was over twofold higher than [B](int) , and therefore likely to allow appreciable 1:2 boron-metabolite complexation in the shoot. This, we suggest, is an important component of Thellungiella B tolerance mechanism.

  4. Centromere Satellites From Arabidopsis Populations: Maintenance of Conserved and Variable Domains

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sarah E.; Kettler, Gregory; Preuss, Daphne

    2003-01-01

    The rapid evolution of centromere sequences between species has led to a debate over whether centromere activity is sequence-dependent. The Arabidopsis thaliana centromere regions contain ∼20,000 copies of a 178-bp satellite repeat. Here, we analyzed satellites from 41 Arabidopsis ecotypes, providing the first broad population survey of satellite variation within a species. We found highly conserved segments and consistent sequence lengths in the Arabidopsis satellites and in the published collection of human α-satellites, supporting models for a functional role. Despite this conservation, polymorphisms are significantly enriched at some sites, yielding variation that could restrict binding proteins to a subset of repeat monomers. Some satellite regions vary considerably; at certain bases, consensus sequences derived from each ecotype diverge significantly from the Arabidopsis consensus, indicating substitutions sweep through a genome in less than 5 million years. Such rapid changes generate more variation within the set of Arabidopsis satellites than in genes from the chromosome arms or from the recombinationally suppressed centromere regions. These studies highlight a balance between the mechanisms that maintain particular satellite domains and the forces that disperse sequence changes throughout the satellite repeats in the genome. [Supplemental material is available online at www.genome.org.] PMID:12566397

  5. Numerical evaluation of cavitation shedding structure around 3D Hydrofoil: Comparison of PANS, LES and RANS results with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, B.; Peng, X. X.; Long, X. P.; Luo, X. W.; Wu, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    Results of cavitating turbulent flow simulation around a twisted hydrofoil were presented in the paper using the Partially-Averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) method (Ji et al. 2013a), Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) (Ji et al. 2013b) and Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS). The results are compared with available experimental data (Foeth 2008). The PANS and LES reasonably reproduce the cavitation shedding patterns around the twisted hydrofoil with primary and secondary shedding, while the RANS model fails to simulate the unsteady cavitation shedding phenomenon and yields an almost steady flow with a constant cavity shape and vapor volume. Besides, it is noted that the predicted shedding vapor cavity by PANS is more turbulent and the shedding vortex is stronger than that by LES, which is more consistent with experimental photos.

  6. Function Annotation of an SBP-box Gene in Arabidopsis Based on Analysis of Co-expression Networks and Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Hu, Zongli; Yang, Yuxin; Chen, Xuqing; Chen, Guoping

    2009-01-01

    The SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN–LIKE (SPL) gene family is an SBP-box transcription family in Arabidopsis. While several physiological responses to SPL genes have been reported, their biological role remains elusive. Here, we use a combined analysis of expression correlation, the interactome, and promoter content to infer the biological role of the SPL genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Analysis of the SPL-correlated gene network reveals multiple functions for SPL genes. Network analysis shows that SPL genes function by controlling other transcription factor families and have relatives with membrane protein transport activity. The interactome analysis of the correlation genes suggests that SPL genes also take part in metabolism of glucose, inorganic salts, and ATP production. Furthermore, the promoters of the correlated genes contain a core binding cis-element (GTAC). All of these analyses suggest that SPL genes have varied functions in Arabidopsis. PMID:19333437

  7. Molecular and Genetic Analysis of Hormone-Regulated Differential Cell Elongation in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, Joseph R.

    2002-12-03

    The authors have utilized the response of Arabidopsis seedlings to the plant hormone ethylene to identify new genes involved in the regulation of ethylene biosynthesis, perception, signal transduction and differential cell growth. In building a genetic framework for the action of these genes, they developed a molecular model that has facilitated the understanding of the molecular requirements of ethylene for cell elongation processes. The ethylene response pathway in Arabidopsis appears to be primarily linear and is defined by the genes: ETR1, ETR2, ERS1, ERS2, EIN4, CTR1, EIN2, EIN3, EIN5 EIN6, and EIN. Downstream branches identified by the HLS1, EIR1, and AUX1 genes involve interactions with other hormonal (auxin) signals in the process of differential cell elongation in the hypocotyl hook. Cloning and characterization of HLS1 and three HLS1-LIKE genes in the laboratory has been supported under this award. HLS1 is required for differential elongation of cells in the hypocotyl and may act in the establishment of hormone gradients. Also during the award period, they have identified and begun preliminary characterization of two genes that genetically act upstream of the ethylene receptors. ETO1 and RAN1 encode negative regulators of ethylene biosynthesis and signaling respectively. Progress on the analysis of these genes along with HOOKLESS1 is described.

  8. What If You Ran Your Bookstore Like a Library? The Troubled Book Business Can Learn from Libraries' Willingness to Share

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fister, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Ten years ago, stories like "B&N: The New College Library" (LJ 2/1/98) and "What If You Ran Your Library Like a Bookstore?" (American Libraries, 3/98) kicked up a controversy about the viability of libraries. Ironically, these days it's the book business that has an aura of crisis and gloom, while visits to libraries are surging. Over two billion…

  9. A frequency domain linearized Navier-Stokes method including acoustic damping by eddy viscosity using RANS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmberg, Andreas; Kierkegaard, Axel; Weng, Chenyang

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a method for including damping of acoustic energy in regions of strong turbulence is derived for a linearized Navier-Stokes method in the frequency domain. The proposed method is validated and analyzed in 2D only, although the formulation is fully presented in 3D. The result is applied in a study of the linear interaction between the acoustic and the hydrodynamic field in a 2D T-junction, subject to grazing flow at Mach 0.1. Part of the acoustic energy at the upstream edge of the junction is shed as harmonically oscillating disturbances, which are conveyed across the shear layer over the junction, where they interact with the acoustic field. As the acoustic waves travel in regions of strong shear, there is a need to include the interaction between the background turbulence and the acoustic field. For this purpose, the oscillation of the background turbulence Reynold's stress, due to the acoustic field, is modeled using an eddy Newtonian model assumption. The time averaged flow is first solved for using RANS along with a k-ε turbulence model. The spatially varying turbulent eddy viscosity is then added to the spatially invariant kinematic viscosity in the acoustic set of equations. The response of the 2D T-junction to an incident acoustic field is analyzed via a plane wave scattering matrix model, and the result is compared to experimental data for a T-junction of rectangular ducts. A strong improvement in the agreement between calculation and experimental data is found when the modification proposed in this paper is implemented. Discrepancies remaining are likely due to inaccuracies in the selected turbulence model, which is known to produce large errors e.g. for flows with significant rotation, which the grazing flow across the T-junction certainly is. A natural next step is therefore to test the proposed methodology together with more sophisticated turbulence models.

  10. A Priori Analysis of a Compressible Flamelet Model using RANS Data for a Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinlan, Jesse R.; Drozda, Tomasz G.; McDaniel, James C.; Lacaze, Guilhem; Oefelein, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to make large eddy simulation of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustors more computationally accessible using realistic chemical reaction mechanisms, a compressible flamelet/progress variable (FPV) model was proposed that extends current FPV model formulations to high-speed, compressible flows. Development of this model relied on observations garnered from an a priori analysis of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) data obtained for the Hypersonic International Flight Research and Experimentation (HI-FiRE) dual-mode scramjet combustor. The RANS data were obtained using a reduced chemical mechanism for the combustion of a JP-7 surrogate and were validated using avail- able experimental data. These RANS data were then post-processed to obtain, in an a priori fashion, the scalar fields corresponding to an FPV-based modeling approach. In the current work, in addition to the proposed compressible flamelet model, a standard incompressible FPV model was also considered. Several candidate progress variables were investigated for their ability to recover static temperature and major and minor product species. The effects of pressure and temperature on the tabulated progress variable source term were characterized, and model coupling terms embedded in the Reynolds- averaged Navier-Stokes equations were studied. Finally, results for the novel compressible flamelet/progress variable model were presented to demonstrate the improvement attained by modeling the effects of pressure and flamelet boundary conditions on the combustion.

  11. Critical role of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of Small Heterodimer Partner in maintaining bile acid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kwon, Sanghoon; Byun, Sangwon; Xiao, Zhen; Park, Sean; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Kemper, Byron; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are recently recognized signalling molecules that profoundly affect metabolism. Because of detergent-like toxicity, BA levels must be tightly regulated. An orphan nuclear receptor, Small Heterodimer Partner (SHP), plays a key role in this regulation, but how SHP senses the BA signal for feedback transcriptional responses is not clearly understood. We show an unexpected function of a nucleoporin, RanBP2, in maintaining BA homoeostasis through SUMOylation of SHP. Upon BA signalling, RanBP2 co-localizes with SHP at the nuclear envelope region and mediates SUMO2 modification at K68, which facilitates nuclear transport of SHP and its interaction with repressive histone modifiers to inhibit BA synthetic genes. Mice expressing a SUMO-defective K68R SHP mutant have increased liver BA levels, and upon BA- or drug-induced biliary insults, these mice exhibit exacerbated cholestatic pathologies. These results demonstrate a function of RanBP2-mediated SUMOylation of SHP in maintaining BA homoeostasis and protecting from the BA hepatotoxicity. PMID:27412403

  12. Accuracy of the actuator disc-RANS approach for predicting the performance and wake of tidal turbines.

    PubMed

    Batten, W M J; Harrison, M E; Bahaj, A S

    2013-02-28

    The actuator disc-RANS model has widely been used in wind and tidal energy to predict the wake of a horizontal axis turbine. The model is appropriate where large-scale effects of the turbine on a flow are of interest, for example, when considering environmental impacts, or arrays of devices. The accuracy of the model for modelling the wake of tidal stream turbines has not been demonstrated, and flow predictions presented in the literature for similar modelled scenarios vary significantly. This paper compares the results of the actuator disc-RANS model, where the turbine forces have been derived using a blade-element approach, to experimental data measured in the wake of a scaled turbine. It also compares the results with those of a simpler uniform actuator disc model. The comparisons show that the model is accurate and can predict up to 94 per cent of the variation in the experimental velocity data measured on the centreline of the wake, therefore demonstrating that the actuator disc-RANS model is an accurate approach for modelling a turbine wake, and a conservative approach to predict performance and loads. It can therefore be applied to similar scenarios with confidence.

  13. RanBP2/Nup358 Potentiates the Translation of a Subset of mRNAs Encoding Secretory Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Akef, Abdalla; Cui, Xianying A.; Gueroussov, Serge; Cenik, Can; Roth, Frederick P.; Palazzo, Alexander F.

    2013-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, most mRNAs that encode secreted or membrane-bound proteins contain elements that promote an alternative mRNA nuclear export (ALREX) pathway. Here we report that ALREX-promoting elements also potentiate translation in the presence of upstream nuclear factors. These RNA elements interact directly with, and likely co-evolved with, the zinc finger repeats of RanBP2/Nup358, which is present on the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear pore. Finally we show that RanBP2/Nup358 is not only required for the stimulation of translation by ALREX-promoting elements, but is also required for the efficient global synthesis of proteins targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and likely the mitochondria. Thus upon the completion of export, mRNAs containing ALREX-elements likely interact with RanBP2/Nup358, and this step is required for the efficient translation of these mRNAs in the cytoplasm. ALREX-elements thus act as nucleotide platforms to coordinate various steps of post-transcriptional regulation for the majority of mRNAs that encode secreted proteins. PMID:23630457

  14. Accuracy of the actuator disc-RANS approach for predicting the performance and wake of tidal turbines.

    PubMed

    Batten, W M J; Harrison, M E; Bahaj, A S

    2013-02-28

    The actuator disc-RANS model has widely been used in wind and tidal energy to predict the wake of a horizontal axis turbine. The model is appropriate where large-scale effects of the turbine on a flow are of interest, for example, when considering environmental impacts, or arrays of devices. The accuracy of the model for modelling the wake of tidal stream turbines has not been demonstrated, and flow predictions presented in the literature for similar modelled scenarios vary significantly. This paper compares the results of the actuator disc-RANS model, where the turbine forces have been derived using a blade-element approach, to experimental data measured in the wake of a scaled turbine. It also compares the results with those of a simpler uniform actuator disc model. The comparisons show that the model is accurate and can predict up to 94 per cent of the variation in the experimental velocity data measured on the centreline of the wake, therefore demonstrating that the actuator disc-RANS model is an accurate approach for modelling a turbine wake, and a conservative approach to predict performance and loads. It can therefore be applied to similar scenarios with confidence. PMID:23319711

  15. MicroRNA-1301-Mediated RanGAP1 Downregulation Induces BCR-ABL Nuclear Entrapment to Enhance Imatinib Efficacy in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tsung-Yao; Chen, Ku-Chung; Liu, Hsing-Jin Eugene; Liu, Ann-Jeng; Wang, Kun-Li; Shih, Chwen-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disease. Imatinib (IM), the first line treatment for CML, is excessively expensive and induces various side effects in CML patients. Therefore, it is essential to investigate a new strategy for improving CML therapy. Our immunoblot data revealed that RanGTPase activating protein 1 (RanGAP1) protein levels increased by approximately 30-fold in K562 cells compared with those in normal cells. RanGAP1 is one of the important components of RanGTPase system, which regulates the export of nuclear protein. However, whether RanGAP1 level variation influences BCR-ABL nuclear export is still unknown. In this report, using shRNA to downregulate RanGAP1 expression level augmented K562 cell apoptosis by approximately 40% after treatment with 250 nM IM. Immunofluorescence assay also indicated that three-fold of nuclear BCR-ABL was detected. These data suggest that BCR-ABL nuclear entrapment induced by RanGAP1 downregulation can be used to improve IM efficacy. Moreover, our qRT-PCR data indicated a trend of inverse correlation between the RanGAP1 and microRNA (miR)-1301 levels in CML patients. MiR-1301, targeting the RanGAP1 3' untranslated region, decreased by approximately 100-fold in K562 cells compared with that in normal cells. RanGAP1 downregulation by miR-1301 transfection impairs BCR-ABL nuclear export to increase approximately 60% of cell death after treatment of 250 nM IM. This result was almost the same as treatment with 1000 nM IM alone. Furthermore, immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that Tyr-99 of nuclear P73 was phosphorylated accompanied with nuclear entrapment of BCR-ABL after transfection with RanGAP1 shRNA or miR-1301 in IM-treated K562 cells. Altogether, we demonstrated that RanGAP1 downregulation can mediate BCR-ABL nuclear entrapment to activate P73-dependent apoptosis pathway which is a novel strategy for improving current IM treatment for CML. PMID:27228340

  16. MicroRNA-1301-Mediated RanGAP1 Downregulation Induces BCR-ABL Nuclear Entrapment to Enhance Imatinib Efficacy in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tsung-Yao; Chen, Ku-Chung; Liu, Hsing-Jin Eugene; Liu, Ann-Jeng; Wang, Kun-Li; Shih, Chwen-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disease. Imatinib (IM), the first line treatment for CML, is excessively expensive and induces various side effects in CML patients. Therefore, it is essential to investigate a new strategy for improving CML therapy. Our immunoblot data revealed that RanGTPase activating protein 1 (RanGAP1) protein levels increased by approximately 30-fold in K562 cells compared with those in normal cells. RanGAP1 is one of the important components of RanGTPase system, which regulates the export of nuclear protein. However, whether RanGAP1 level variation influences BCR-ABL nuclear export is still unknown. In this report, using shRNA to downregulate RanGAP1 expression level augmented K562 cell apoptosis by approximately 40% after treatment with 250 nM IM. Immunofluorescence assay also indicated that three-fold of nuclear BCR-ABL was detected. These data suggest that BCR-ABL nuclear entrapment induced by RanGAP1 downregulation can be used to improve IM efficacy. Moreover, our qRT-PCR data indicated a trend of inverse correlation between the RanGAP1 and microRNA (miR)-1301 levels in CML patients. MiR-1301, targeting the RanGAP1 3′ untranslated region, decreased by approximately 100-fold in K562 cells compared with that in normal cells. RanGAP1 downregulation by miR-1301 transfection impairs BCR-ABL nuclear export to increase approximately 60% of cell death after treatment of 250 nM IM. This result was almost the same as treatment with 1000 nM IM alone. Furthermore, immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that Tyr-99 of nuclear P73 was phosphorylated accompanied with nuclear entrapment of BCR-ABL after transfection with RanGAP1 shRNA or miR-1301 in IM-treated K562 cells. Altogether, we demonstrated that RanGAP1 downregulation can mediate BCR-ABL nuclear entrapment to activate P73-dependent apoptosis pathway which is a novel strategy for improving current IM treatment for CML. PMID:27228340

  17. Arabidopsis MYC2 Interacts with DELLA Proteins in Regulating Sesquiterpene Synthase Gene Expression[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Gao-Jie; Xue, Xue-Yi; Mao, Ying-Bo; Wang, Ling-Jian; Chen, Xiao-Ya

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana flowers emit volatile terpenes, which may function in plant–insect interactions. Here, we report that Arabidopsis MYC2, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, directly binds to promoters of the sesquiterpene synthase genes TPS21 and TPS11 and activates their expression. Expression of TPS21 and TPS11 can be induced by the phytohormones gibberellin (GA) and jasmonate (JA), and both inductions require MYC2. The induction of TPS21 and TPS11 results in increased emission of sesquiterpene, especially (E)-β-caryophyllene. DELLAs, the GA signaling repressors, negatively affect sesquiterpene biosynthesis, as the sesquiterpene synthase genes were repressed in plants overaccumulating REPRESSOR OF GA1-3 (RGA), one of the Arabidopsis DELLAs, and upregulated in a penta DELLA-deficient mutant. Yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that DELLAs, represented by RGA, directly interact with MYC2. In yeast cells, the N terminus of MYC2 was responsible for binding to RGA. MYC2 has been proposed as a major mediator of JA signaling and crosstalk with abscisic acid, ethylene, and light signaling pathways. Our results demonstrate that MYC2 is also connected to GA signaling in regulating a subset of genes. In Arabidopsis inflorescences, it integrates both GA and JA signals into transcriptional regulation of sesquiterpene synthase genes and promotes sesquiterpene production. PMID:22669881

  18. Mutations in a new Arabidopsis cyclophilin disrupt its interaction with protein phosphatase 2A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, K.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The heterotrimeric protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a component of multiple signaling pathways in eukaryotes. Disruption of PP2A activity in Arabidopsis is known to alter auxin transport and growth response pathways. We demonstrated that the regulatory subunit A of an Arabidopsis PP2A interacts with a novel cyclophilin, ROC7. The gene for this cyclophilin encodes a protein that contains a unique 30-amino acid extension at the N-terminus, which distinguishes the gene product from all previously identified Arabidopsis cyclophilins. Altered forms of ROC7 cyclophilin with mutations in the conserved DENFKL domain did not bind to PP2A. Unlike protein phosphatase 2B, PP2A activity in Arabidopsis extracts was not affected by the presence of the cyclophilin-binding molecule cyclosporin. The ROC7 transcript was expressed to high levels in all tissues tested. Expression of an ROC7 antisense transcript gave rise to increased root growth. These results indicate that cyclophilin may have a role in regulating PP2A activity, by a mechanism that differs from that employed for cyclophilin regulation of PP2B.

  19. Assessing Gravitropic Responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Barker, Richard; Cox, Benjamin; Silber, Logan; Sangari, Arash; Assadi, Amir; Masson, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana was the first higher organism to have its genome sequenced and is now widely regarded as the model dicot. Like all plants, Arabidopsis develops distinct growth patterns in response to different environmental stimuli. This can be seen in the gravitropic response of roots. Methods to investigate this particular tropism are presented here. First, we describe a high-throughput time-lapse photographic analysis of root growth and curvature response to gravistimulation allowing the quantification of gravitropic kinetics and growth rate at high temporal resolution. Second, we present a protocol that allows a quantitative evaluation of gravitropic sensitivity using a homemade 2D clinostat. Together, these approaches allow an initial comparative analysis of the key phenomena associated with root gravitropism between different genotypes and/or accessions. PMID:26867611

  20. Asparagine Metabolic Pathways in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gaufichon, Laure; Rothstein, Steven J; Suzuki, Akira

    2016-04-01

    Inorganic nitrogen in the form of ammonium is assimilated into asparagine via multiple steps involving glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate synthase (GOGAT), aspartate aminotransferase (AspAT) and asparagine synthetase (AS) in Arabidopsis. The asparagine amide group is liberated by the reaction catalyzed by asparaginase (ASPG) and also the amino group of asparagine is released by asparagine aminotransferase (AsnAT) for use in the biosynthesis of amino acids. Asparagine plays a primary role in nitrogen recycling, storage and transport in developing and germinating seeds, as well as in vegetative and senescence organs. A small multigene family encodes isoenzymes of each step of asparagine metabolism in Arabidopsis, except for asparagine aminotransferase encoded by a single gene. The aim of this study is to highlight the structure of the genes and encoded enzyme proteins involved in asparagine metabolic pathways; the regulation and role of different isogenes; and kinetic and physiological properties of encoded enzymes in different tissues and developmental stages. PMID:26628609

  1. Ethylene perception by the ERS1 protein in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hall, A E; Findell, J L; Schaller, G E; Sisler, E C; Bleecker, A B

    2000-08-01

    Ethylene perception in Arabidopsis is controlled by a family of five genes, including ETR1, ERS1 (ethylene response sensor 1), ERS2, ETR2, and EIN4. ERS1, the most highly conserved gene with ETR1, encodes a protein with 67% identity to ETR1. To clarify the role of ERS1 in ethylene sensing, we biochemically characterized the ERS1 protein by heterologous expression in yeast. ERS1, like ETR1, forms a membrane-associated, disulfide-linked dimer. In addition, yeast expressing the ERS1 protein contains ethylene-binding sites, indicating ERS1 is also an ethylene-binding protein. This finding supports previous genetic evidence that isoforms of ETR1 also function in plants as ethylene receptors. Further, we used the ethylene antagonist 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) to characterize the ethylene-binding sites of ERS1 and ETR1. We found 1-MCP to be both a potent inhibitor of the ethylene-induced seedling triple response, as well as ethylene binding by yeast expressing ETR1 and ERS1. Yeast expressing ETR1 and ERS1 showed nearly identical sensitivity to 1-MCP, suggesting that the ethylene-binding sites of ETR1 and ERS1 have similar affinities for ethylene.

  2. Binding Procurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of the binding procurement process in purchasing Aerospace Flight Battery Systems. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) requested NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group to develop a set of guideline requirements document for Binding Procurement Contracts.

  3. Multidrug Resistance–like Genes of Arabidopsis Required for Auxin Transport and Auxin-Mediated Development

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Bosl; Murphy, Angus S.; Spalding, Edgar P.

    2001-01-01

    Arabidopsis possesses several genes related to the multidrug resistance (MDR) genes of animals, one of which, AtMDR1, was shown to be induced by the hormone auxin. Plants having mutations in AtMDR1 or its closest relative, AtPGP1, were isolated by a reverse genetic strategy. Auxin transport activity was greatly impaired in atmdr1 and atmdr1 atpgp1 double mutant plants. Epinastic cotyledons and reduced apical dominance were mutant phenotypes consistent with the disrupted basipetal flow of auxin. The auxin transport inhibitor 1-naphthylphthalamic acid was shown to bind tightly and specifically to AtMDR1 and AtPGP1 proteins. The results indicate that these two MDR-like genes of Arabidopsis encode 1-naphthylphthalamic acid binding proteins that are required for normal auxin distribution and auxin-mediated development. PMID:11701880

  4. Using "Arabidopsis" Genetic Sequences to Teach Bioinformatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xiaorong

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a new approach to teaching bioinformatics using "Arabidopsis" genetic sequences. Several open-ended and inquiry-based laboratory exercises have been designed to help students grasp key concepts and gain practical skills in bioinformatics, using "Arabidopsis" leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR RLK) genetic…

  5. An International Bioinformatics Infrastructure to Underpin the Arabidopsis Community

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The future bioinformatics needs of the Arabidopsis community as well as those of other scientific communities that depend on Arabidopsis resources were discussed at a pair of recent meetings held by the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Committee (MASC) and the North American Arabidopsis Steering C...

  6. Allele-Specific Virulence Attenuation of the Pseudomonas syringae HopZ1a Type III Effector via the Arabidopsis ZAR1 Resistance Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jennifer D.; Wu, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Plant resistance (R) proteins provide a robust surveillance system to defend against potential pathogens. Despite their importance in plant innate immunity, relatively few of the ∼170 R proteins in Arabidopsis have well-characterized resistance specificity. In order to identify the R protein responsible for recognition of the Pseudomonas syringae type III secreted effector (T3SE) HopZ1a, we assembled an Arabidopsis R gene T–DNA Insertion Collection (ARTIC) from publicly available Arabidopsis thaliana insertion lines and screened it for plants lacking HopZ1a-induced immunity. This reverse genetic screen revealed that the Arabidopsis R protein HOPZ-ACTIVATED RESISTANCE 1 (ZAR1; At3g50950) is required for recognition of HopZ1a in Arabidopsis. ZAR1 belongs to the coiled-coil (CC) class of nucleotide binding site and leucine-rich repeat (NBS–LRR) containing R proteins; however, the ZAR1 CC domain phylogenetically clusters in a clade distinct from other related Arabidopsis R proteins. ZAR1–mediated immunity is independent of several genes required by other R protein signaling pathways, including NDR1 and RAR1, suggesting that ZAR1 possesses distinct signaling requirements. The closely-related T3SE protein, HopZ1b, is still recognized by zar1 Arabidopsis plants indicating that Arabidopsis has evolved at least two independent R proteins to recognize the HopZ T3SE family. Also, in Arabidopsis zar1 plants HopZ1a promotes P. syringae growth indicative of an ancestral virulence function for this T3SE prior to the evolution of recognition by the host resistance protein ZAR1. Our results demonstrate that the Arabidopsis resistance protein ZAR1 confers allele-specific recognition and virulence attenuation of the Pseudomonas syringae T3SE protein HopZ1a. PMID:20368970

  7. Reduction of exportin 6 activity leads to actin accumulation via failure of RanGTP restoration and NTF2 sequestration in the nuclei of senescent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Su Hyun; Park, Tae Jun; Lim, In Kyoung

    2011-04-15

    We have previously reported that G-actin accumulation in nuclei is a universal phenomenon of cellular senescence. By employing primary culture of human diploid fibroblast (HDF) and stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS), we explored whether the failure of actin export to cytoplasm is responsible for actin accumulation in nuclei of senescent cells. Expression of exportin 6 (Exp6) and small G-protein, Ran, was significantly reduced in the replicative senescence, but not yet in SIPS, whereas nuclear import of actin by cofilin was already increased in SIPS. After treatment of young HDF cells with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, rapid reduction of nuclear RanGTP was observed along with cytoplasmic increase of RanGDP. Furthermore, significantly reduced interaction of Exp6 with RanGTP was found by GST-Exp6 pull-down analysis. Failure of RanGTP restoration was accompanied with inhibition of ATP synthesis and NTF2 sequestration in the nuclei along with accordant change of senescence morphology. Indeed, knockdown of Exp6 expression significantly increased actin molecule in the nuclei of young HDF cells. Therefore, actin accumulation in nuclei of senescent cells is most likely due to the failure of RanGTP restoration with ATP deficiency and NTF2 accumulation in nuclei, which result in the decrease of actin export via Exp6 inactivation, in addition to actin import by cofilin activation.

  8. Reduction of exportin 6 activity leads to actin accumulation via failure of RanGTP restoration and NTF2 sequestration in the nuclei of senescent cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Su Hyun; Park, Tae Jun; Lim, In Kyoung

    2011-04-15

    We have previously reported that G-actin accumulation in nuclei is a universal phenomenon of cellular senescence. By employing primary culture of human diploid fibroblast (HDF) and stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS), we explored whether the failure of actin export to cytoplasm is responsible for actin accumulation in nuclei of senescent cells. Expression of exportin 6 (Exp6) and small G-protein, Ran, was significantly reduced in the replicative senescence, but not yet in SIPS, whereas nuclear import of actin by cofilin was already increased in SIPS. After treatment of young HDF cells with H(2)O(2), rapid reduction of nuclear RanGTP was observed along with cytoplasmic increase of RanGDP. Furthermore, significantly reduced interaction of Exp6 with RanGTP was found by GST-Exp6 pull-down analysis. Failure of RanGTP restoration was accompanied with inhibition of ATP synthesis and NTF2 sequestration in the nuclei along with accordant change of senescence morphology. Indeed, knockdown of Exp6 expression significantly increased actin molecule in the nuclei of young HDF cells. Therefore, actin accumulation in nuclei of senescent cells is most likely due to the failure of RanGTP restoration with ATP deficiency and NTF2 accumulation in nuclei, which result in the decrease of actin export via Exp6 inactivation, in addition to actin import by cofilin activation.

  9. Structural basis for cytokinin recognition by Arabidopsis thaliana histidine kinase 4

    PubMed Central

    Hothorn, Michael; Dabi, Tsegaye; Chory, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Cytokinins are classic plant hormones that orchestrate growth, development and the integrity of stem cell populations. Cytokinin receptors are eukaryotic sensor histidine kinases that are activated both by naturally occurring adenine-type cytokinins and by urea-based synthetic compounds. Crystal structures of the Arabidopsis histidine kinase 4 sensor domain in complex with different cytokinin ligands now rationalize the hormone-binding specificity of the receptor and may spur the design of novel cytokinin ligands. PMID:21964459

  10. Multiple instance learning of Calmodulin binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Minhas, Fayyaz ul Amir Afsar; Ben-Hur, Asa

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitously conserved protein that acts as a calcium sensor, and interacts with a large number of proteins. Detection of CaM binding proteins and their interaction sites experimentally requires a significant effort, so accurate methods for their prediction are important. Results: We present a novel algorithm (MI-1 SVM) for binding site prediction and evaluate its performance on a set of CaM-binding proteins extracted from the Calmodulin Target Database. Our approach directly models the problem of binding site prediction as a large-margin classification problem, and is able to take into account uncertainty in binding site location. We show that the proposed algorithm performs better than the standard SVM formulation, and illustrate its ability to recover known CaM binding motifs. A highly accurate cascaded classification approach using the proposed binding site prediction method to predict CaM binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana is also presented. Availability: Matlab code for training MI-1 SVM and the cascaded classification approach is available on request. Contact: fayyazafsar@gmail.com or asa@cs.colostate.edu PMID:22962461

  11. BROTHER OF LUX ARRHYTHMO is a component of the Arabidopsis circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shunhong; Wei, Xiaoping; Pei, Liping; Thompson, Rebecca L; Liu, Yi; Heard, Jacqueline E; Ruff, Thomas G; Beachy, Roger N

    2011-03-01

    BROTHER OF LUX ARRHYTHMO (BOA) is a GARP family transcription factor in Arabidopsis thaliana and is regulated by circadian rhythms. Transgenic lines that constitutively overexpress BOA exhibit physiological and developmental changes, including delayed flowering time and increased vegetative growth under standard growing conditions. Arabidopsis circadian clock protein CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) binds to the evening element of the BOA promoter and negatively regulates its expression. Furthermore, the period of BOA rhythm was shortened in cca1-11, lhy-21 (for LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL), and cca1-11 lhy-21 genetic backgrounds. BOA binds to the promoter of CCA1 through newly identified promoter binding sites and activates the transcription of CCA1 in vivo and in vitro. In transgenic Arabidopsis lines that overexpress BOA, the period length of CCA1 rhythm was increased and the amplitude was enhanced. Rhythmic expression of other clock genes, including LHY, GIGANTEA (GI), and TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION1 (TOC1), was altered in transgenic lines that overexpress BOA. Rhythmic expression of BOA was also affected in mutant lines of toc1-1, gi-3, and gi-4. Results from these studies indicate that BOA is a critical component of the regulatory circuit of the circadian clock.

  12. Dynamic Distribution and Interaction of the Arabidopsis SRSF1 Subfamily Splicing Factors.

    PubMed

    Stankovic, Nancy; Schloesser, Marie; Joris, Marine; Sauvage, Eric; Hanikenne, Marc; Motte, Patrick

    2016-02-01

    Ser/Arg-rich (SR) proteins are essential nucleus-localized splicing factors. Our prior studies showed that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) RSZ22, a homolog of the human SRSF7 SR factor, exits the nucleus through two pathways, either dependent or independent on the XPO1 receptor. Here, we examined the expression profiles and shuttling dynamics of the Arabidopsis SRSF1 subfamily (SR30, SR34, SR34a, and SR34b) under control of their endogenous promoter in Arabidopsis and in transient expression assay. Due to its rapid nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and high expression level in transient assay, we analyzed the multiple determinants that regulate the localization and shuttling dynamics of SR34. By site-directed mutagenesis of SR34 RNA-binding sequences and Arg/Ser-rich (RS) domain, we further show that functional RRM1 or RRM2 are dispensable for the exclusive protein nuclear localization and speckle-like distribution. However, mutations of both RRMs induced aggregation of the protein whereas mutation in the RS domain decreased the stability of the protein and suppressed its nuclear accumulation. Furthermore, the RNA-binding motif mutants are defective for their export through the XPO1 (CRM1/Exportin-1) receptor pathway, but retain nucleocytoplasmic mobility. We performed a yeast two hybrid screen with SR34 as bait and discovered SR45 as a new interactor. SR45 is an unusual SR splicing factor bearing two RS domains. These interactions were confirmed in planta by FLIM-FRET and BiFC and the roles of SR34 domains in protein-protein interactions were further studied. Altogether, our report extends our understanding of shuttling dynamics of Arabidopsis SR splicing factors. PMID:26697894

  13. Internet Resources for Gene Expression Analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hehl, Reinhard; Bülow, Lorenz

    2008-09-01

    The number of online databases and web-tools for gene expression analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana has increased tremendously during the last years. These resources permit the database-assisted identification of putative cis-regulatory DNA sequences, their binding proteins, and the determination of common cis-regulatory motifs in coregulated genes. DNA binding proteins may be predicted by the type of cis-regulatory motif. Further questions of combinatorial control based on the interaction of DNA binding proteins and the colocalization of cis-regulatory motifs can be addressed. The database-assisted spatial and temporal expression analysis of DNA binding proteins and their target genes may help to further refine experimental approaches. Signal transduction pathways upstream of regulated genes are not yet fully accessible in databases mainly because they need to be manually annotated. This review focuses on the use of the AthaMap and PathoPlant((R)) databases for gene expression regulation analysis and discusses similar and complementary online databases and web-tools. Online databases are helpful for the development of working hypothesis and for designing subsequent experiments. PMID:19506727

  14. Internet Resources for Gene Expression Analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hehl, Reinhard; Bülow, Lorenz

    2008-01-01

    The number of online databases and web-tools for gene expression analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana has increased tremendously during the last years. These resources permit the database-assisted identification of putative cis-regulatory DNA sequences, their binding proteins, and the determination of common cis-regulatory motifs in coregulated genes. DNA binding proteins may be predicted by the type of cis-regulatory motif. Further questions of combinatorial control based on the interaction of DNA binding proteins and the colocalization of cis-regulatory motifs can be addressed. The database-assisted spatial and temporal expression analysis of DNA binding proteins and their target genes may help to further refine experimental approaches. Signal transduction pathways upstream of regulated genes are not yet fully accessible in databases mainly because they need to be manually annotated. This review focuses on the use of the AthaMap and PathoPlant® databases for gene expression regulation analysis and discusses similar and complementary online databases and web-tools. Online databases are helpful for the development of working hypothesis and for designing subsequent experiments. PMID:19506727

  15. Synthetic phytochelatins complement a phytochelatin-deficient Arabidopsis mutant and enhance the accumulation of heavy metal(loid)s.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Devesh; Tiwari, Manish; Tripathi, Rudra D; Nath, Pravendra; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2013-05-10

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are naturally occurring thiol-rich peptides containing gamma (γ) peptide bonds and are well known for their metal-binding and detoxification capabilities. Whether synthetic phytochelatins (ECs) can be used as an alternative approach for enhancing the metal-binding capacity of plants has been investigated in this study. The metal-binding potential of ECs has been demonstrated in bacteria; however, no report has investigated the expression of ECs in plants. We have expressed three synthetic genes encoding ECs of different lengths in wild type (WT) Arabidopsis (Col-0 background) and a phytochelatin-deficient Arabidopsis mutant (cad1-3). After exposure to different heavy metals, the transgenic plants were examined for phenotypic changes, and metal accumulation was evaluated. The expression of EC genes rescued the sensitive phenotype of the cad1-3 mutant under heavy metal(loid) stress. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing EC genes accumulated a significantly enhanced level of heavy metal(loid)s in comparison with the WT plant. The mutant complementation and enhanced heavy metal(loid) accumulation in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants suggest that ECs work in a manner similar to that of PCs in plants and that ECs could be used as an alternative for phytoremediation of heavy metal(loid) exposure.

  16. Molecular genetics of root gravitropism and waving in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedbrook, J.; Boonsirichai, K.; Chen, R.; Hilson, P.; Pearlman, R.; Rosen, E.; Rutherford, R.; Batiza, A.; Carroll, K.; Schulz, T.; Masson, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    When Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grow embedded in an agar-based medium, their roots grow vertically downward. This reflects their ability to sense the gravity vector and to position their tip parallel to it (gravitropism). We have isolated a number of mutations affecting root gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana. One of these mutations, named arg1, affects root and hypocotyl gravitropism without promoting defects in starch content or in the ability of seedlings' organs to respond to plant hormones. The ARG1 gene was cloned and shown to code for a protein with a J domain at its amino terminus and a second sequence motif found in several cytoskeleton binding proteins. Mutations in the AGR1 locus promote a strong defect in root gravitropism. Some alleles also confer an increased root resistance to exogenous ethylene and an increased sensitivity to auxin. AGR1 was cloned and found to encode a putative transmembrane protein which might be involved in polar auxin transport, or in regulating the differential growth response to gravistimulation. When Arabidopsis seedlings grow on the surface of agar-based media tilted backward, their roots wave. That wavy pattern of root growth derives from a combined response to gravity, touch and other surface-derived stimuli. It is accompanied by a reversible rotation of the root tip about its axis. A number of mutations affect the presence or the shape of root waves on tilted agar-based surfaces. One of them, wvc1, promotes the formation of compressed root waves under these conditions. The physiological and molecular analyses of this mutant suggest that a tryptophan-derived molecule other than IAA might be an important regulator of the curvature responsible for root waving.

  17. Arabidopsis MSI1 functions in photoperiodic flowering time control

    PubMed Central

    Steinbach, Yvonne; Hennig, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate timing of flowering is crucial for crop yield and the reproductive success of plants. Flowering can be induced by a number of molecular pathways that respond to internal and external signals such as photoperiod, vernalization or light quality, ambient temperature and biotic as well as abiotic stresses. The key florigenic signal FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) is regulated by several flowering activators, such as CONSTANS (CO), and repressors, such as FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Chromatin modifications are essential for regulated gene expression, which often involves the well conserved MULTICOPY SUPRESSOR OF IRA 1 (MSI1)-like protein family. MSI1-like proteins are ubiquitous partners of various complexes, such as POLYCOMB REPRESSIVE COMPLEX2 or CHROMATIN ASSEMBLY FACTOR 1. In Arabidopsis, one of the functions of MSI1 is to control the switch to flowering. Arabidopsis MSI1 is needed for the correct expression of the floral integrator gene SUPPRESSOR OF CO 1 (SOC1). Here, we show that the histone-binding protein MSI1 acts in the photoperiod pathway to regulate normal expression of CO in long day (LD) photoperiods. Reduced expression of CO in msi1-mutants leads to failure of FT and SOC1 activation and to delayed flowering. MSI1 is needed for normal sensitivity of Arabidopsis to photoperiod, because msi1-mutants responded less than wild type to an intermittent LD treatment of plants grown in short days. Finally, genetic analysis demonstrated that MSI1 acts upstream of the CO-FT pathway to enable an efficient photoperiodic response and to induce flowering. PMID:24639681

  18. Danger-associated peptide signaling in Arabidopsis requires clathrin.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Morea, Fausto Andres; Savatin, Daniel V; Dejonghe, Wim; Kumar, Rahul; Luo, Yu; Adamowski, Maciej; Van den Begin, Jos; Dressano, Keini; Pereira de Oliveira, Guilherme; Zhao, Xiuyang; Lu, Qing; Madder, Annemieke; Friml, Jiří; Scherer de Moura, Daniel; Russinova, Eugenia

    2016-09-27

    The Arabidopsis thaliana endogenous elicitor peptides (AtPeps) are released into the apoplast after cellular damage caused by pathogens or wounding to induce innate immunity by direct binding to the membrane-localized leucine-rich repeat receptor kinases, PEP RECEPTOR1 (PEPR1) and PEPR2. Although the PEPR-mediated signaling components and responses have been studied extensively, the contributions of the subcellular localization and dynamics of the active PEPRs remain largely unknown. We used live-cell imaging of the fluorescently labeled and bioactive pep1 to visualize the intracellular behavior of the PEPRs in the Arabidopsis root meristem. We found that AtPep1 decorated the plasma membrane (PM) in a receptor-dependent manner and cointernalized with PEPRs. Trafficking of the AtPep1-PEPR1 complexes to the vacuole required neither the trans-Golgi network/early endosome (TGN/EE)-localized vacuolar H(+)-ATPase activity nor the function of the brefeldin A-sensitive ADP-ribosylation factor-guanine exchange factors (ARF-GEFs). In addition, AtPep1 and different TGN/EE markers colocalized only rarely, implying that the intracellular route of this receptor-ligand pair is largely independent of the TGN/EE. Inducible overexpression of the Arabidopsis clathrin coat disassembly factor, Auxilin2, which inhibits clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), impaired the AtPep1-PEPR1 internalization and compromised AtPep1-mediated responses. Our results show that clathrin function at the PM is required to induce plant defense responses, likely through CME of cell surface-located signaling components.

  19. Molecular genetics of root gravitropism and waving in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sedbrook, J; Boonsirichai, K; Chen, R; Hilson, P; Pearlman, R; Rosen, E; Rutherford, R; Batiza, A; Carroll, K; Schulz, T; Masson, P H

    1998-05-01

    When Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grow embedded in an agar-based medium, their roots grow vertically downward. This reflects their ability to sense the gravity vector and to position their tip parallel to it (gravitropism). We have isolated a number of mutations affecting root gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana. One of these mutations, named arg1, affects root and hypocotyl gravitropism without promoting defects in starch content or in the ability of seedlings' organs to respond to plant hormones. The ARG1 gene was cloned and shown to code for a protein with a J domain at its amino terminus and a second sequence motif found in several cytoskeleton binding proteins. Mutations in the AGR1 locus promote a strong defect in root gravitropism. Some alleles also confer an increased root resistance to exogenous ethylene and an increased sensitivity to auxin. AGR1 was cloned and found to encode a putative transmembrane protein which might be involved in polar auxin transport, or in regulating the differential growth response to gravistimulation. When Arabidopsis seedlings grow on the surface of agar-based media tilted backward, their roots wave. That wavy pattern of root growth derives from a combined response to gravity, touch and other surface-derived stimuli. It is accompanied by a reversible rotation of the root tip about its axis. A number of mutations affect the presence or the shape of root waves on tilted agar-based surfaces. One of them, wvc1, promotes the formation of compressed root waves under these conditions. The physiological and molecular analyses of this mutant suggest that a tryptophan-derived molecule other than IAA might be an important regulator of the curvature responsible for root waving.

  20. Danger-associated peptide signaling in Arabidopsis requires clathrin.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Morea, Fausto Andres; Savatin, Daniel V; Dejonghe, Wim; Kumar, Rahul; Luo, Yu; Adamowski, Maciej; Van den Begin, Jos; Dressano, Keini; Pereira de Oliveira, Guilherme; Zhao, Xiuyang; Lu, Qing; Madder, Annemieke; Friml, Jiří; Scherer de Moura, Daniel; Russinova, Eugenia

    2016-09-27

    The Arabidopsis thaliana endogenous elicitor peptides (AtPeps) are released into the apoplast after cellular damage caused by pathogens or wounding to induce innate immunity by direct binding to the membrane-localized leucine-rich repeat receptor kinases, PEP RECEPTOR1 (PEPR1) and PEPR2. Although the PEPR-mediated signaling components and responses have been studied extensively, the contributions of the subcellular localization and dynamics of the active PEPRs remain largely unknown. We used live-cell imaging of the fluorescently labeled and bioactive pep1 to visualize the intracellular behavior of the PEPRs in the Arabidopsis root meristem. We found that AtPep1 decorated the plasma membrane (PM) in a receptor-dependent manner and cointernalized with PEPRs. Trafficking of the AtPep1-PEPR1 complexes to the vacuole required neither the trans-Golgi network/early endosome (TGN/EE)-localized vacuolar H(+)-ATPase activity nor the function of the brefeldin A-sensitive ADP-ribosylation factor-guanine exchange factors (ARF-GEFs). In addition, AtPep1 and different TGN/EE markers colocalized only rarely, implying that the intracellular route of this receptor-ligand pair is largely independent of the TGN/EE. Inducible overexpression of the Arabidopsis clathrin coat disassembly factor, Auxilin2, which inhibits clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), impaired the AtPep1-PEPR1 internalization and compromised AtPep1-mediated responses. Our results show that clathrin function at the PM is required to induce plant defense responses, likely through CME of cell surface-located signaling components. PMID:27651494

  1. Surface Mechanical and Rheological Behaviors of Biocompatible Poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PEG) and Poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid-ran-ε-caprolactone)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGACL-PEG) Block Copolymers at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Chang; Lee, Hoyoung; Khetan, Jawahar; Won, You-Yeon

    2015-12-29

    Air-water interfacial monolayers of poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PEG) exhibit an exponential increase in surface pressure under high monolayer compression. In order to understand the molecular origin of this behavior, a combined experimental and theoretical investigation (including surface pressure-area isotherm, X-ray reflectivity (XR) and interfacial rheological measurements, and a self-consistent field (SCF) theoretical analysis) was performed on air-water monolayers formed by a PLGA-PEG diblock copolymer and also by a nonglassy analogue of this diblock copolymer, poly((D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid-ran-caprolactone)-block-ethylene glycol) (PLGACL-PEG). The combined results of this study show that the two mechanisms, i.e., the glass transition of the collapsed PLGA film and the lateral repulsion of the PEG brush chains that occur simultaneously under lateral compression of the monolayer, are both responsible for the observed PLGA-PEG isotherm behavior. Upon cessation of compression, the high surface pressure of the PLGA-PEG monolayer typically relaxes over time with a stretched exponential decay, suggesting that in this diblock copolymer situation, the hydrophobic domain formed by the PLGA blocks undergoes glass transition in the high lateral compression state, analogously to the PLGA homopolymer monolayer. In the high PEG grafting density regime, the contribution of the PEG brush chains to the high monolayer surface pressure is significantly lower than what is predicted by the SCF model because of the many-body attraction among PEG segments (referred to in the literature as the "n-cluster" effects). The end-grafted PEG chains were found to be protein resistant even under the influence of the "n-cluster" effects.

  2. Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of Root Hair Patterning Genes by WRKY75 in Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Rishmawi, Louai; Pesch, Martina; Juengst, Christian; Schauss, Astrid C.; Schrader, Andrea; Hülskamp, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), root hairs are formed in cell files over the cleft of underlying cortex cells. This pattern is established by a well-known gene regulatory network of transcription factors. In this study, we show that WRKY75 suppresses root hair development in nonroot hair files and that it represses the expression of TRIPTYCHON and CAPRICE. The WRKY75 protein binds to the CAPRICE promoter in a yeast one-hybrid assay. Binding to the promoter fragment requires an intact WRKY protein-binding motif, the W box. A comparison of the spatial expression of WRKY75 and the localization of the WRKY75 protein revealed that WRKY75 is expressed in the pericycle and vascular tissue and that the WRKY75 RNA or protein moves into the epidermis. PMID:24676857

  3. Taxonomy and Phylogeny of Arabidopsis (Brassicaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shehbaz, Ihsan A.; O'Kane, Steve L.

    2002-01-01

    Detailed taxonomic, cytological, and phylogenetic accounts of Arabidopsis are presented. As currently delimited, the genus consists of nine species all of which are indigenous to Europe, with the ranges of two species extending into northern and eastern Asia and North American into central United States. A survey of chromosome numbers in the genus is presented, and the country of origin for each count is given. Detailed descriptions of all species and subspecies and keys to all taxa are provided. Generic assignments are updated for the 50 species previously included in Arabidopsis. A cladogram of the species of Arabidopsis based on molecular phylogenetic studies by the authors is given. PMID:22303187

  4. Sulfenome mining in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Waszczak, Cezary; Akter, Salma; Eeckhout, Dominique; Persiau, Geert; Wahni, Khadija; Bodra, Nandita; Van Molle, Inge; De Smet, Barbara; Vertommen, Didier; Gevaert, Kris; De Jaeger, Geert; Van Montagu, Marc; Messens, Joris; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to be potent signaling molecules. Today, oxidation of cysteine residues is a well-recognized posttranslational protein modification, but the signaling processes steered by such oxidations are poorly understood. To gain insight into the cysteine thiol-dependent ROS signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana, we identified the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent sulfenome: that is, proteins with at least one cysteine thiol oxidized to a sulfenic acid. By means of a genetic construct consisting of a fusion between the C-terminal domain of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) AP-1–like (YAP1) transcription factor and a tandem affinity purification tag, we detected ∼100 sulfenylated proteins in Arabidopsis cell suspensions exposed to H2O2 stress. The in vivo YAP1-based trapping of sulfenylated proteins was validated by a targeted in vitro analysis of DEHYDROASCORBATE REDUCTASE2 (DHAR2). In DHAR2, the active site nucleophilic cysteine is regulated through a sulfenic acid-dependent switch, leading to S-glutathionylation, a protein modification that protects the protein against oxidative damage. PMID:25049418

  5. Polyploidy in the Arabidopsis genus.

    PubMed

    Bomblies, Kirsten; Madlung, Andreas

    2014-06-01

    Whole genome duplication (WGD), which gives rise to polyploids, is a unique type of mutation that duplicates all the genetic material in a genome. WGD provides an evolutionary opportunity by generating abundant genetic "raw material," and has been implicated in diversification, speciation, adaptive radiation, and invasiveness, and has also played an important role in crop breeding. However, WGD at least initially challenges basic biological functions by increasing cell size, altering relationships between cell volume and DNA content, and doubling the number of homologous chromosome copies that must be sorted during cell division. Newly polyploid lineages often have extensive changes in gene regulation, genome structure, and may suffer meiotic or mitotic chromosome mis-segregation. The abundance of species that persist in nature as polyploids shows that these problems are surmountable and/or that advantages of WGD might outweigh drawbacks. The molecularly especially tractable Arabidopsis genus has several ancient polyploidy events in its history and contains several independent more recent polyploids. This genus can thus provide important insights into molecular aspects of polyploid formation, establishment, and genome evolution. The ability to integrate ecological and evolutionary questions with molecular and genetic understanding makes comparative analyses in this genus particularly attractive and holds promise for advancing our general understanding of polyploid biology. Here, we highlight some of the findings from Arabidopsis that have given us insights into the origin and evolution of polyploids. PMID:24788061

  6. Applying and validating the RANS-3D flow-solver for evaluating a subsonic serpentine diffuser geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Michael J.; Won, Mark J.; Cosentino, Gary B.; Te, Alexander

    1993-01-01

    Subsonic inlet ducts for advanced, high-performance aircraft are evolving towards complex three-dimensional shapes for reasons of overall integration and weight. These factors lead to diffuser geometries that may sacrifice inlet performance, unless careful attention to design details and boundary layer management techniques are employed. The ability of viscous computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis of such geometries to aid the aircraft configurator in this complex design problem is herein examined. The RANS-3D Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solver is applied to model the complex flowfield occurring in a representative diffuser geometry and the solutions are compared to experimental results from a static test of the inlet duct. The computational results are shown to compare very favorably with experimental results over a range of mass flow rates, including those involving large amounts of separation in the diffuser. In addition, a novel grid topology is presented, and two turbulence models are evaluated in this study as part of the RANS-3D code.

  7. Brassinosteroids Are Master Regulators of Gibberellin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Unterholzner, Simon J; Rozhon, Wilfried; Papacek, Michael; Ciomas, Jennifer; Lange, Theo; Kugler, Karl G; Mayer, Klaus F; Sieberer, Tobias; Poppenberger, Brigitte

    2015-08-01

    Plant growth and development are highly regulated processes that are coordinated by hormones including the brassinosteroids (BRs), a group of steroids with structural similarity to steroid hormones of mammals. Although it is well understood how BRs are produced and how their signals are transduced, BR targets, which directly confer the hormone's growth-promoting effects, have remained largely elusive. Here, we show that BRs regulate the biosynthesis of gibberellins (GAs), another class of growth-promoting hormones, in Arabidopsis thaliana. We reveal that Arabidopsis mutants deficient in BR signaling are severely impaired in the production of bioactive GA, which is correlated with defective GA biosynthetic gene expression. Expression of the key GA biosynthesis gene GA20ox1 in the BR signaling mutant bri1-301 rescues many of its developmental defects. We provide evidence that supports a model in which the BR-regulated transcription factor BES1 binds to a regulatory element in promoters of GA biosynthesis genes in a BR-induced manner to control their expression. In summary, our study underscores a role of BRs as master regulators of GA biosynthesis and shows that this function is of major relevance for the growth and development of vascular plants.

  8. Constitutively active UVR8 photoreceptor variant in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Heijde, Marc; Binkert, Melanie; Yin, Ruohe; Ares-Orpel, Florence; Rizzini, Luca; Van De Slijke, Eveline; Persiau, Geert; Nolf, Jonah; Gevaert, Kris; De Jaeger, Geert; Ulm, Roman

    2013-12-10

    Arabidopsis thaliana UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) is a UV-B photoreceptor that initiates photomorphogenic responses underlying acclimation and UV-B tolerance in plants. UVR8 is a homodimer in its ground state, and UV-B exposure results in its instantaneous monomerization followed by interaction with CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1), a major factor in UV-B signaling. UV-B photoreception by UVR8 is based on intrinsic tryptophan aromatic amino acid residues, with tryptophan-285 as the main chromophore. We generated transgenic plants expressing UVR8 with a single amino acid change of tryptophan-285 to alanine. UVR8(W285A) appears monomeric and shows UV-B-independent interaction with COP1. Phenotypically, the plants expressing UVR8(W285A) exhibit constitutive photomorphogenesis associated with constitutive activation of target genes, elevated levels of anthocyanins, and enhanced, acclimation-independent UV-B tolerance. Moreover, we have identified COP1, REPRESSOR OF UV-B PHOTOMORPHOGENESIS 1 and 2 (RUP1 and RUP2), and the SUPPRESSOR OF PHYA-105 (SPA) family as proteins copurifying with UVR8(W285A). Whereas COP1, RUP1, and RUP2 are known to directly interact with UVR8, we show that SPA1 interacts with UVR8 indirectly through COP1. We conclude that UVR8(W285A) is a constitutively active UVR8 photoreceptor variant in Arabidopsis, as is consistent with the crucial importance of monomer formation and COP1 binding for UVR8 activity.

  9. Aluminum Induces Oxidative Stress Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana1

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Keith D.; Schott, Eric J.; Sharma, Yogesh K.; Davis, Keith R.; Gardner, Richard C.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in gene expression induced by toxic levels of Al were characterized to investigate the nature of Al stress. A cDNA library was constructed from Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings treated with Al for 2 h. We identified five cDNA clones that showed a transient induction of their mRNA levels, four cDNA clones that showed a longer induction period, and two down-regulated genes. Expression of the four long-term-induced genes remained at elevated levels for at least 48 h. The genes encoded peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, blue copper-binding protein, and a protein homologous to the reticuline:oxygen oxidoreductase enzyme. Three of these genes are known to be induced by oxidative stresses and the fourth is induced by pathogen treatment. Another oxidative stress gene, superoxide dismutase, and a gene for Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor were also induced by Al in A. thaliana. These results suggested that Al treatment of Arabidopsis induces oxidative stress. In confirmation of this hypothesis, three of four genes induced by Al stress in A. thaliana were also shown to be induced by ozone. Our results demonstrate that oxidative stress is an important component of the plant's reaction to toxic levels of Al. PMID:9449849

  10. [Regulation pattern of the FRUITFULL (FUL) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana].

    PubMed

    Chu, Tingting; Xie, Hua; Xu, Yong; Ma, Rongcai

    2010-11-01

    FRUITFULL (FUL) is an MADS box gene that functions early in controlling flowering time, meristem identity and cauline leaf morphology and later in carpel and fruit development in Arabidopsis thaliana. In order to clarify the regulation of FUL expression the upstream regulatory region, -2148 bp - +96 bp and the first intron of the FUL gene were cloned, and vectors with a series of deletion of FUL promoter, and the ones fused with the first intron were constructed. Vectors harboring the fusion of cis-acting elements with the constitutive promoters of TUBULIN and ACTIN were also constructed. Beta-Glucuronidase activity assays of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants showed that two cis-elements were involved in the repression of FUL expression, with one of the two being probably the binding site of the transcriptional factor AP1. And the two CArG boxes played a important role in FUL initiation particularly. Furthermore, the first intron of FUL was shown to participate in the development of carpel and stamen as an enhancer.

  11. Quantitative genetic analysis of salicylic acid perception in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dobón, Albor; Canet, Juan Vicente; Perales, Lorena; Tornero, Pablo

    2011-10-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a phytohormone required for a full resistance against some pathogens in Arabidopsis, and NPR1 (Non-Expressor of Pathogenesis Related Genes 1) is the only gene with a strong effect on resistance induced by SA which has been described. There can be additional components of SA perception that escape the traditional approach of mutagenesis. An alternative to that approach is searching in the natural variation of Arabidopsis. Different methods of analyzing the variation between ecotypes have been tried and it has been found that measuring the growth of a virulent isolate of Pseudomonas syringae after the exogenous application of SA is the most effective one. Two ecotypes, Edi-0 and Stw-0, have been crossed, and their F2 has been studied. There are two significant quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in this population, and there is one QTL in each one of the existing mapping populations Col-4 × Laer-0 and Laer-0 × No-0. They have different characteristics: while one QTL is only detectable at low concentrations of SA, the other acts after the point of crosstalk with methyl jasmonate signalling. Three of the QTLs have candidates described in SA perception as NPR1, its interactors, and a calmodulin binding protein.

  12. Brassinosteroids Are Master Regulators of Gibberellin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Unterholzner, Simon J.; Rozhon, Wilfried; Papacek, Michael; Ciomas, Jennifer; Lange, Theo; Kugler, Karl G.; Mayer, Klaus F.; Sieberer, Tobias; Poppenberger, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Plant growth and development are highly regulated processes that are coordinated by hormones including the brassinosteroids (BRs), a group of steroids with structural similarity to steroid hormones of mammals. Although it is well understood how BRs are produced and how their signals are transduced, BR targets, which directly confer the hormone’s growth-promoting effects, have remained largely elusive. Here, we show that BRs regulate the biosynthesis of gibberellins (GAs), another class of growth-promoting hormones, in Arabidopsis thaliana. We reveal that Arabidopsis mutants deficient in BR signaling are severely impaired in the production of bioactive GA, which is correlated with defective GA biosynthetic gene expression. Expression of the key GA biosynthesis gene GA20ox1 in the BR signaling mutant bri1-301 rescues many of its developmental defects. We provide evidence that supports a model in which the BR-regulated transcription factor BES1 binds to a regulatory element in promoters of GA biosynthesis genes in a BR-induced manner to control their expression. In summary, our study underscores a role of BRs as master regulators of GA biosynthesis and shows that this function is of major relevance for the growth and development of vascular plants. PMID:26243314

  13. Opposite stereoselectivities of dirigent proteins in Arabidopsis and schizandra species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kye-Won; Moinuddin, Syed G A; Atwell, Kathleen M; Costa, Michael A; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2012-10-01

    How stereoselective monolignol-derived phenoxy radical-radical coupling reactions are differentially biochemically orchestrated in planta, whereby for example they afford (+)- and (-)-pinoresinols, respectively, is both a fascinating mechanistic and evolutionary question. In earlier work, biochemical control of (+)-pinoresinol formation had been established to be engendered by a (+)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein in Forsythia intermedia, whereas the presence of a (-)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein was indirectly deduced based on the enantiospecificity of downstream pinoresinol reductases (AtPrRs) in Arabidopsis thaliana root tissue. In this study of 16 putative dirigent protein homologs in Arabidopsis, AtDIR6, AtDIR10, and AtDIR13 were established to be root-specific using a β-glucuronidase reporter gene strategy. Of these three, in vitro analyses established that only recombinant AtDIR6 was a (-)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein, whose physiological role was further confirmed using overexpression and RNAi strategies in vivo. Interestingly, its closest homolog, AtDIR5, was also established to be a (-)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein based on in vitro biochemical analyses. Both of these were compared in terms of properties with a (+)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein from Schizandra chinensis. In this context, sequence analyses, site-directed mutagenesis, and region swapping resulted in identification of putative substrate binding sites/regions and candidate residues controlling distinct stereoselectivities of coupling modes.

  14. Family business: the multidrug-resistance related protein (MRP) ABC transporter genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kolukisaoglu, H Uner; Bovet, Lucien; Klein, Markus; Eggmann, Thomas; Geisler, Markus; Wanke, Dierk; Martinoia, Enrico; Schulz, Burkhard

    2002-11-01

    Despite the completion of the sequencing of the entire genome of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., the exact determination of each single gene and its function remains an open question. This is especially true for multigene families. An approach that combines analysis of genomic structure, expression data and functional genomics to ascertain the role of the members of the multidrug-resistance-related protein ( MRP) gene family, a subfamily of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters from Arabidopsis is presented. We used cDNA sequencing and alignment-based re-annotation of genomic sequences to define the exact genic structure of all known AtMRP genes. Analysis of promoter regions suggested different induction conditions even for closely related genes. Expression analysis for the entire gene family confirmed these assumptions. Phylogenetic analysis and determination of segmental duplication in the regions of AtMRP genes revealed that the evolution of the extraordinarily high number of ABC transporter genes in plants cannot solely be explained by polyploidisation during the evolution of the Arabidopsis genome. Interestingly MRP genes from Oryza sativa L. (rice; OsMRP) show very similar genomic structures to those from Arabidopsis. Screening of large populations of T-DNA-mutagenised lines of A. thaliana resulted in the isolation of AtMRP insertion mutants. This work opens the way for the defined analysis of a multigene family of important membrane transporters whose broad variety of functions expands their traditional role as cellular detoxifiers. PMID:12430019

  15. Overexpression of Nelumbo nucifera metallothioneins 2a and 3 enhances seed germination vigor in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuliang; Chu, Pu; Chen, Huhui; Li, Yin; Liu, Jun; Ding, Yu; Tsang, Edward W T; Jiang, Liwen; Wu, Keqiang; Huang, Shangzhi

    2012-03-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are small, cysteine-rich and metal-binding proteins which are involved in metal homeostasis and scavenging of reactive oxygen species. Although plant MTs have been intensively studied, their roles in seeds remain to be clearly established. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of NnMT2a, NnMT2b and NnMT3 from sacred lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) and their roles in seed germination vigor. The transcripts of NnMT2a, NnMT2b and NnMT3 were highly expressed in developing and germinating sacred lotus seeds, and were dramatically up-regulated in response to high salinity, oxidative stresses and heavy metals. Analysis of transformed Arabidopsis protoplasts showed that NnMT2a-YFP and NnMT3-YFP were localized in cytoplasm and nucleoplasm. Transgenic Arabidopsis seeds overexpressing NnMT2a and NnMT3 displayed improved resistance to accelerated aging (AA) treatment, indicating their significant roles in seed germination vigor. These transgenic seeds also exhibited higher superoxide dismutase activity compared to wild-type seeds after AA treatment. In addition, we showed that NnMT2a and NnMT3 conferred improved germination ability to NaCl and methyl viologen on transgenic Arabidopsis seeds. Taken together, these data demonstrate that overexpression of NnMT2a and NnMT3 in Arabidopsis significantly enhances seed germination vigor after AA treatment and under abiotic stresses.

  16. The Arabidopsis Basic/Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor FamilyW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Toledo-Ortiz, Gabriela; Huq, Enamul; Quail, Peter H.

    2003-01-01

    The basic/helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are a superfamily of transcription factors that bind as dimers to specific DNA target sites and that have been well characterized in nonplant eukaryotes as important regulatory components in diverse biological processes. Based on evidence that the bHLH protein PIF3 is a direct phytochrome reaction partner in the photoreceptor's signaling network, we have undertaken a comprehensive computational analysis of the Arabidopsis genome sequence databases to define the scope and features of the bHLH family. Using a set of criteria derived from a previously defined consensus motif, we identified 147 bHLH protein–encoding genes, making this one of the largest transcription factor families in Arabidopsis. Phylogenetic analysis of the bHLH domain sequences permits classification of these genes into 21 subfamilies. The evolutionary and potential functional relationships implied by this analysis are supported by other criteria, including the chromosomal distribution of these genes relative to duplicated genome segments, the conservation of variant exon/intron structural patterns, and the predicted DNA binding activities within subfamilies. Considerable diversity in DNA binding site specificity among family members is predicted, and marked divergence in protein sequence outside of the conserved bHLH domain is observed. Together with the established propensity of bHLH factors to engage in varying degrees of homodimerization and heterodimerization, these observations suggest that the Arabidopsis bHLH proteins have the potential to participate in an extensive set of combinatorial interactions, endowing them with the capacity to be involved in the regulation of a multiplicity of transcriptional programs. We provide evidence from yeast two-hybrid and in vitro binding assays that two related phytochrome-interacting members in the Arabidopsis family, PIF3 and PIF4, can form both homodimers and heterodimers and that all three dimeric

  17. The defective nuclear lamina in Hutchinson-gilford progeria syndrome disrupts the nucleocytoplasmic Ran gradient and inhibits nuclear localization of Ubc9.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Joshua B; Datta, Sutirtha; Snow, Chelsi J; Chatterjee, Mandovi; Ni, Li; Spencer, Adam; Yang, Chun-Song; Cubeñas-Potts, Caelin; Matunis, Michael J; Paschal, Bryce M

    2011-08-01

    The mutant form of lamin A responsible for the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (termed progerin) acts as a dominant negative protein that changes the structure of the nuclear lamina. How the perturbation of the nuclear lamina in progeria is transduced into cellular changes is undefined. Using patient fibroblasts and a variety of cell-based assays, we determined that progerin expression in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome inhibits the nucleocytoplasmic transport of several factors with key roles in nuclear function. We found that progerin reduces the nuclear/cytoplasmic concentration of the Ran GTPase and inhibits the nuclear localization of Ubc9, the sole E2 for SUMOylation, and of TPR, the nucleoporin that forms the basket on the nuclear side of the nuclear pore complex. Forcing the nuclear localization of Ubc9 in progerin-expressing cells rescues the Ran gradient and TPR import, indicating that these pathways are linked. Reducing nuclear SUMOylation decreases the nuclear mobility of the Ran nucleotide exchange factor RCC1 in vivo, and the addition of SUMO E1 and E2 promotes the dissociation of RCC1 and Ran from chromatin in vitro. Our data suggest that the cellular effects of progerin are transduced, at least in part, through reduced function of the Ran GTPase and SUMOylation pathways.

  18. The fifth international conference on Arabidopsis research

    SciTech Connect

    Hangarter, R.; Scholl, R.; Davis, K.; Feldmann, K.

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains abstracts of oral and poster presentations made in conjunction with the Fifth International Conference on Arabidopsis Research held August 19--22, 1993 at the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.

  19. Epigenomic Diversity in a Global Collection of Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions.

    PubMed

    Kawakatsu, Taiji; Huang, Shao-Shan Carol; Jupe, Florian; Sasaki, Eriko; Schmitz, Robert J; Urich, Mark A; Castanon, Rosa; Nery, Joseph R; Barragan, Cesar; He, Yupeng; Chen, Huaming; Dubin, Manu; Lee, Cheng-Ruei; Wang, Congmao; Bemm, Felix; Becker, Claude; O'Neil, Ryan; O'Malley, Ronan C; Quarless, Danjuma X; Schork, Nicholas J; Weigel, Detlef; Nordborg, Magnus; Ecker, Joseph R

    2016-07-14

    The epigenome orchestrates genome accessibility, functionality, and three-dimensional structure. Because epigenetic variation can impact transcription and thus phenotypes, it may contribute to adaptation. Here, we report 1,107 high-quality single-base resolution methylomes and 1,203 transcriptomes from the 1001 Genomes collection of Arabidopsis thaliana. Although the genetic basis of methylation variation is highly complex, geographic origin is a major predictor of genome-wide DNA methylation levels and of altered gene expression caused by epialleles. Comparison to cistrome and epicistrome datasets identifies associations between transcription factor binding sites, methylation, nucleotide variation, and co-expression modules. Physical maps for nine of the most diverse genomes reveal how transposons and other structural variants shape the epigenome, with dramatic effects on immunity genes. The 1001 Epigenomes Project provides a comprehensive resource for understanding how variation in DNA methylation contributes to molecular and non-molecular phenotypes in natural populations of the most studied model plant.

  20. Structural basis for cargo binding and autoinhibition of Bicaudal-D1 by a parallel coiled-coil with homotypic registry

    SciTech Connect

    Terawaki, Shin-ichi; Yoshikane, Asuka; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Wakamatsu, Kaori

    2015-05-01

    Bicaudal-D1 (BICD1) is an α-helical coiled-coil protein mediating the attachment of specific cargo to cytoplasmic dynein. It plays an essential role in minus end-directed intracellular transport along microtubules. The third C-terminal coiled-coil region of BICD1 (BICD1 CC3) has an important role in cargo sorting, including intracellular vesicles associating with the small GTPase Rab6 and the nuclear pore complex Ran binding protein 2 (RanBP2), and inhibiting the association with cytoplasmic dynein by binding to the first N-terminal coiled-coil region (CC1). The crystal structure of BICD1 CC3 revealed a parallel homodimeric coiled-coil with asymmetry and complementary knobs-into-holes interactions, differing from Drosophila BicD CC3. Furthermore, our binding study indicated that BICD1 CC3 possesses a binding surface for two distinct cargos, Rab6 and RanBP2, and that the CC1-binding site overlaps with the Rab6-binding site. These findings suggest a molecular basis for cargo recognition and autoinhibition of BICD proteins during dynein-dependent intracellular retrograde transport. - Highlights: • BICD1 CC3 is a parallel homodimeric coiled-coil with axial asymmetry. • The coiled-coil packing of BICD1 CC3 is adapted to the equivalent heptad position. • BICD1 CC3 has distinct binding sites for two classes of cargo, Rab6 and RanBP2. • The CC1-binding site of BICD1 CC3 overlaps with the Rab6-binding site.

  1. Cytological analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana meiotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Susan J; Sanchez-Moran, Eugenio; Franklin, F Chris H

    2009-01-01

    Advances in molecular biology and in the genetics of Arabidopsis thaliana have led to this organism becoming an important model for the analysis of meiosis in plants. Cytogenetic investigations are pivotal to meiotic studies and a number of technological improvements for Arabidopsis cytology have provided a range of tools to investigate chromosome behaviour during meiosis. This chapter includes protocols on basic cytology, FISH analysis, immunocytology, a procedure for a meiotic time course and electron microscopy.

  2. Cardiovirus Leader proteins bind exportins: Implications for virus replication and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J; Basta, Holly A; Palmenberg, Ann C

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovirus Leader proteins (LX) inhibit cellular nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by directing host kinases to phosphorylate Phe/Gly-containing nuclear pore proteins (Nups). Resolution of the Mengovirus LM structure bound to Ran GTPase, suggested this complex would further recruit specific exportins (karyopherins), which in turn mediate kinase selection. Pull-down experiments and recombinant complex reconstitution now confirm that Crm1 and CAS exportins form stable dimeric complexes with encephalomyocarditis virus LE, and also larger complexes with LE:Ran. shRNA knockdown studies support this idea. Similar activities could be demonstrated for recombinant LS and LT from Theiloviruses. When mutations were introduced to alter the LE zinc finger domain, acidic domain, or dual phosphorylation sites, there was reduced exportin selection. These regions are not involved in Ran interactions, so the Ran and Crm1 binding sites on LE must be non-overlapping. The involvement of exportins in this mechanism is important to viral replication and the observation of trafficking inhibition by LE.

  3. Spatially and temporally restricted expression of PtrMYB021 regulates secondary cell wall formation in Arabidopsis

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Wei; Li, Eryang; Porth, Ilga; Chen, Jin-Gui; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Douglas, Carl J.; Wang, Shucai

    2016-02-02

    Among the R2R3 MYB transcription factors that involve in the regulation of secondary cell wall formation in Arabidopsis, MYB46 alone is sufficient to induce the entire secondary cell wall biosynthesis program. PtrMYB021, the poplar homolog of MYB46, has been reported to regulate secondary cell wall formation when expressed in Arabidopsis. We report here that spatially and temporally restricted expression of PtrMYB021 is critical for its function in regulating secondary cell wall formation. By using quantitative RT-PCR, we found that PtrMYB021 was expressed primarily in xylem tissues. When expressed in Arabidopsis under the control of PtrCesA8, but not the 35S promoter,more » PtrMYB021 increased secondary cell wall thickness, which is likely caused by increased lignification as well as changes in cell wall carbohydrate composition. Consistent with this, elevated expression of lignin and cellulose biosynthetic genes were observed in the transgenic plants. Finally, when expressed in Arabidopsis protoplasts as fusion proteins to the Gal4 DNA binding domain, PtrMYB021 activated the reporter gene Gal4-GUS. In summary, our results suggest that PtrMYB021 is a transcriptional activator, and spatially and temporally restricted expression of PtrMYB021 in Arabidopsis regulates secondary cell wall formation by activating a subset of secondary cell wall biosynthesis genes.« less

  4. Molecular analysis of ethylene-insensitive mutants in arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerowitz, E.

    1991-01-01

    The subject of this study is the biochemical basis of ethylene reception. The Arabidopsis thaliana ETR gene codes for the ethylene receptor or is involved in transduction of the ethylene-generated signal. We have cloned an etr mutation which results in a decrease in the ethylene response of the plant, with a decrease in ethylene binding of about five-fold. Two genes have been found in the cloned region which confer resistance. By sequence analysis, the first protein contains three distinct regions: a transmembrane region, a serine/threonine protein kinase region, and a control region similar to the RAS-binding region of yeast adenylate cyclase. The second protein contains a zinc-finger; since sequence of the first protein shows no mutant-dependent changes, and transition metals have been implicated in ethylene binding, this protein could be the ETR gene product. However, no mutant dependent differences have been found in this protein, either. The mutation could be upstream of the coding region of either gene and involve regulatory elements, so we are continuing to sequence. (MHB)

  5. Early light-induced proteins protect Arabidopsis from photooxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Hutin, Claire; Nussaume, Laurent; Moise, Nicolae; Moya, Ismaël; Kloppstech, Klaus; Havaux, Michel

    2003-04-15

    The early light-induced proteins (ELIPs) belong to the multigenic family of light-harvesting complexes, which bind chlorophyll and absorb solar energy in green plants. ELIPs accumulate transiently in plants exposed to high light intensities. By using an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant (chaos) affected in the posttranslational targeting of light-harvesting complex-type proteins to the thylakoids, we succeeded in suppressing the rapid accumulation of ELIPs during high-light stress, resulting in leaf bleaching and extensive photooxidative damage. Constitutive expression of ELIP genes in chaos before light stress resulted in ELIP accumulation and restored the phototolerance of the plants to the wild-type level. Free chlorophyll, a generator of singlet oxygen in the light, was detected by chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime measurements in chaos leaves before the symptoms of oxidative stress appeared. Our findings indicate that ELIPs fulfill a photoprotective function that could involve either the binding of chlorophylls released during turnover of pigment-binding proteins or the stabilization of the proper assembly of those proteins during high-light stress. PMID:12676998

  6. Simulation of the flow past a circular cylinder in the supercritical regime by blending RANS and variational-multiscale LES models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussaed, Carine; Vittoria Salvetti, Maria; Wornom, Stephen; Koobus, Bruno; Dervieux, Alain

    2014-05-01

    A strategy which blends a variational multiscale large eddy simulation (VMS-LES) model and a RANS model in a hybrid approach is investigated. A smooth blending function, which is based on the value of a blending parameter, is used for switching from VMS-LES to RANS. Different definitions of the blending parameter are investigated. The capabilities of the novel hybrid approach are appraised in the simulation of the flow around a circular cylinder at a Reynolds number 1.4×105, based on the freestream velocity and on the cylinder diameter, in the presence of turbulent boundary-layer due to turbulent inflow conditions. A second study at Reynolds numbers from Re=6.7×105 to 1.25×106 is also presented. The effect of using the VMS-LES approach in the hybrid model is evaluated. Results are compared to those of other RANS, LES and hybrid simulations in the literature and with experimental data

  7. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Assay for the Identification of Arabidopsis Protein-DNA Interactions In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Komar, Dorota N; Mouriz, Alfonso; Jarillo, José A; Piñeiro, Manuel

    2016-01-14

    Intricate gene regulatory networks orchestrate biological processes and developmental transitions in plants. Selective transcriptional activation and silencing of genes mediate the response of plants to environmental signals and developmental cues. Therefore, insights into the mechanisms that control plant gene expression are essential to gain a deep understanding of how biological processes are regulated in plants. The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technique described here is a procedure to identify the DNA-binding sites of proteins in genes or genomic regions of the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. The interactions with DNA of proteins of interest such as transcription factors, chromatin proteins or posttranslationally modified versions of histones can be efficiently analyzed with the ChIP protocol. This method is based on the fixation of protein-DNA interactions in vivo, random fragmentation of chromatin, immunoprecipitation of protein-DNA complexes with specific antibodies, and quantification of the DNA associated with the protein of interest by PCR techniques. The use of this methodology in Arabidopsis has contributed significantly to unveil transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that control a variety of plant biological processes. This approach allowed the identification of the binding sites of the Arabidopsis chromatin protein EBS to regulatory regions of the master gene of flowering FT. The impact of this protein in the accumulation of particular histone marks in the genomic region of FT was also revealed through ChIP analysis.

  8. Apoplastic diffusion barriers in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Nawrath, Christiane; Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus Benni; Geldner, Niko; Reina-Pinto, José J; Kunst, Ljerka

    2013-12-27

    During the development of Arabidopsis and other land plants, diffusion barriers are formed in the apoplast of specialized tissues within a variety of plant organs. While the cuticle of the epidermis is the primary diffusion barrier in the shoot, the Casparian strips and suberin lamellae of the endodermis and the periderm represent the diffusion barriers in the root. Different classes of molecules contribute to the formation of extracellular diffusion barriers in an organ- and tissue-specific manner. Cutin and wax are the major components of the cuticle, lignin forms the early Casparian strip, and suberin is deposited in the stage II endodermis and the periderm. The current status of our understanding of the relationships between the chemical structure, ultrastructure and physiological functions of plant diffusion barriers is discussed. Specific aspects of the synthesis of diffusion barrier components and protocols that can be used for the assessment of barrier function and important barrier properties are also presented.

  9. Apoplastic Diffusion Barriers in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus Benni; Geldner, Niko; Reina-Pinto, José J.; Kunst, Ljerka

    2013-01-01

    During the development of Arabidopsis and other land plants, diffusion barriers are formed in the apoplast of specialized tissues within a variety of plant organs. While the cuticle of the epidermis is the primary diffusion barrier in the shoot, the Casparian strips and suberin lamellae of the endodermis and the periderm represent the diffusion barriers in the root. Different classes of molecules contribute to the formation of extracellular diffusion barriers in an organ- and tissue-specific manner. Cutin and wax are the major components of the cuticle, lignin forms the early Casparian strip, and suberin is deposited in the stage II endodermis and the periderm. The current status of our understanding of the relationships between the chemical structure, ultrastructure and physiological functions of plant diffusion barriers is discussed. Specific aspects of the synthesis of diffusion barrier components and protocols that can be used for the assessment of barrier function and important barrier properties are also presented. PMID:24465172

  10. Identification of Arabidopsis rat Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanmin; Nam, Jaesung; Humara, Jaime M.; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Lee, Lan-Ying; Cao, Hongbin; Valentine, Lisa; Li, Jingling; Kaiser, Anthony D.; Kopecky, Andrea L.; Hwang, Hau-Hsuan; Bhattacharjee, Saikat; Rao, Praveen K.; Tzfira, Tzvi; Rajagopal, Jyothi; Yi, HoChul; Veena; Yadav, Badam S.; Crane, Yan M.; Lin, Kui; Larcher, Yves; Gelvin, Matthew J.K.; Knue, Marnie; Ramos, Cynthia; Zhao, Xiaowen; Davis, Susan J.; Kim, Sang-Ic; Ranjith-Kumar, C.T.; Choi, Yoo-Jin; Hallan, Vipin K.; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Sui, Xiangzhen; Ziemienowicz, Alicja; Matthysse, Ann G.; Citovsky, Vitaly; Hohn, Barbara; Gelvin, Stanton B.

    2003-01-01

    Limited knowledge currently exists regarding the roles of plant genes and proteins in the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation process. To understand the host contribution to transformation, we carried out root-based transformation assays to identify Arabidopsis mutants that are resistant to Agrobacterium transformation (rat mutants). To date, we have identified 126 rat mutants by screening libraries of T-DNA insertion mutants and by using various “reverse genetic” approaches. These mutants disrupt expression of genes of numerous categories, including chromatin structural and remodeling genes, and genes encoding proteins implicated in nuclear targeting, cell wall structure and metabolism, cytoskeleton structure and function, and signal transduction. Here, we present an update on the identification and characterization of these rat mutants. PMID:12805582

  11. The Arabidopsis metacaspase9 degradome.

    PubMed

    Tsiatsiani, Liana; Timmerman, Evy; De Bock, Pieter-Jan; Vercammen, Dominique; Stael, Simon; van de Cotte, Brigitte; Staes, An; Goethals, Marc; Beunens, Tine; Van Damme, Petra; Gevaert, Kris; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2013-08-01

    Metacaspases are distant relatives of the metazoan caspases, found in plants, fungi, and protists. However, in contrast with caspases, information about the physiological substrates of metacaspases is still scarce. By means of N-terminal combined fractional diagonal chromatography, the physiological substrates of metacaspase9 (MC9; AT5G04200) were identified in young seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana on the proteome-wide level, providing additional insight into MC9 cleavage specificity and revealing a previously unknown preference for acidic residues at the substrate prime site position P1'. The functionalities of the identified MC9 substrates hinted at metacaspase functions other than those related to cell death. These results allowed us to resolve the substrate specificity of MC9 in more detail and indicated that the activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (AT4G37870), a key enzyme in gluconeogenesis, is enhanced upon MC9-dependent proteolysis.

  12. Tetrapyrrole Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Ryouichi; Kobayashi, Koichi; Masuda, Tatsuru

    2011-01-01

    Higher plants produce four classes of tetrapyrroles, namely, chlorophyll (Chl), heme, siroheme, and phytochromobilin. In plants, tetrapyrroles play essential roles in a wide range of biological activities including photosynthesis, respiration and the assimilation of nitrogen/sulfur. All four classes of tetrapyrroles are derived from a common biosynthetic pathway that resides in the plastid. In this article, we present an overview of tetrapyrrole metabolism in Arabidopsis and other higher plants, and we describe all identified enzymatic steps involved in this metabolism. We also summarize recent findings on Chl biosynthesis and Chl breakdown. Recent advances in this field, in particular those on the genetic and biochemical analyses of novel enzymes, prompted us to redraw the tetrapyrrole metabolic pathways. In addition, we also summarize our current understanding on the regulatory mechanisms governing tetrapyrrole metabolism. The interactions of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis and other cellular processes including the plastid-to-nucleus signal transduction are discussed. PMID:22303270

  13. Analysis of EF-hand-containing proteins in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Day, Irene S; Reddy, Vaka S; Shad Ali, Gul; Reddy, ASN

    2002-01-01

    Background In plants, calcium (Ca2+) has emerged as an important messenger mediating the action of many hormonal and environmental signals, including biotic and abiotic stresses. Many different signals raise cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]cyt), which in turn is thought to regulate cellular and developmental processes via Ca2+-binding proteins. Three out of the four classes of Ca2+-binding proteins in plants contain Ca2+-binding EF-hand motif(s). This motif is a conserved helix-loop-helix structure that can bind a single Ca2+ ion. To identify all EF-hand-containing proteins in Arabidopsis, we analyzed its completed genome sequence for genes encoding EF-hand-containing proteins. Results A maximum of 250 proteins possibly having EF-hands were identified. Diverse proteins, including enzymes, proteins involved in transcription and translation, protein- and nucleic-acid-binding proteins and a large number of unknown proteins, have one or more putative EF-hands. Phylogenetic analysis identified six major groups that contain some families of proteins. Conclusions The presence of EF-hand motif(s) in a diversity of proteins is consistent with the involvement of Ca2+ in regulating many cellular and developmental processes. Thus far, only 47 of the possible 250 EF-hand proteins have been reported in the literature. Various domains that we identified in many of the uncharacterized EF-hand-containing proteins should help in elucidating their cellular role(s). Our analyses suggest that the Ca2+ messenger system is widely used in plants and that EF-hand-containing proteins are likely to be the key transducers mediating Ca2+ action. PMID:12372144

  14. Aggregation-prone c9FTD/ALS poly(GA) RAN-translated proteins cause neurotoxicity by inducing ER stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Jie; Jansen-West, Karen; Xu, Ya-Fei; Gendron, Tania F; Bieniek, Kevin F; Lin, Wen-Lang; Sasaguri, Hiroki; Caulfield, Thomas; Hubbard, Jaime; Daughrity, Lillian; Chew, Jeannie; Belzil, Veronique V; Prudencio, Mercedes; Stankowski, Jeannette N; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Whitelaw, Ena; Ash, Peter E A; DeTure, Michael; Rademakers, Rosa; Boylan, Kevin B; Dickson, Dennis W; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2014-10-01

    The occurrence of repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation, an atypical form of translation of expanded repeats that results in the synthesis of homopolymeric expansion proteins, is becoming more widely appreciated among microsatellite expansion disorders. Such disorders include amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia caused by a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9ORF72 gene (c9FTD/ALS). We and others have recently shown that this bidirectionally transcribed repeat is RAN translated, and the "c9RAN proteins" thusly produced form neuronal inclusions throughout the central nervous system of c9FTD/ALS patients. Nonetheless, the potential contribution of c9RAN proteins to disease pathogenesis remains poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that poly(GA) c9RAN proteins are neurotoxic and may be implicated in the neurodegenerative processes of c9FTD/ALS. Specifically, we show that expression of poly(GA) proteins in cultured cells and primary neurons leads to the formation of soluble and insoluble high molecular weight species, as well as inclusions composed of filaments similar to those observed in c9FTD/ALS brain tissues. The expression of poly(GA) proteins is accompanied by caspase-3 activation, impaired neurite outgrowth, inhibition of proteasome activity, and evidence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Of importance, ER stress inhibitors, salubrinal and TUDCA, provide protection against poly(GA)-induced toxicity. Taken together, our data provide compelling evidence towards establishing RAN translation as a pathogenic mechanism of c9FTD/ALS, and suggest that targeting the ER using small molecules may be a promising therapeutic approach for these devastating diseases.

  15. 3'-UTR Polymorphisms in the MiRNA Machinery Genes DROSHA, DICER1, RAN, and XPO5 Are Associated with Colorectal Cancer Risk in a Korean Population.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Hwan; Ko, Jung Jae; Kim, Jung Oh; Jeon, Young Joo; Yoo, Jung Ki; Oh, Jisu; Oh, Doyeun; Kim, Jong Woo; Kim, Nam Keun

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs play an important role in cancer initiation and development. The aim of this study was to investigate whether polymorphisms in miRNA machinery genes are associated with the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). RAN rs14035 CT heterozygotes and T allele carriers (CT + TT) genotypes had lower risk of CRC, while the DICER1 rs3742330, DROSHA rs10719, and XPO5 rs11077 polymorphisms were not associated with CRC in the full study sample. Specifically, male RAN rs14035 CT heterozygotes and XPO5 rs11077 AA genotype (CT/AA) carriers experienced reduced CRC susceptibility (both colon and rectal). Subgroup analysis demonstrated that the combined RAN rs14035 CT + TT genotype was associated with rectal cancer, but not colon cancer. In addition, the DICER1 rs3742330 AG genotype was associated with a significantly increased risk of colon cancer. Stratified analysis revealed the RAN rs14035 combined CT+TT genotype was associated with decreased CRC risk in male patients without diabetes mellitus (DM) and in patients with rectal cancer. In addition, we found the RAN rs14035 CC genotype was related to a decreased risk of CRC with respect to tumor size and metabolism of homocysteine and folate. Furthermore, patients diagnosed with hypertension or DM who carried the DROSHA rs10719 CC genotype showed increased CRC risk, while the XPO5 rs11077 AC+CC genotype led to increased CRC risk in patients with hypertension only. Our results indicate variations in RAN rs14035, DICER1 rs3742330, XPO5 rs11077, and DROSHA rs10719 of Korean patients are significantly associated with their risk of CRC.

  16. Aggregation-prone c9FTD/ALS poly(GA) RAN-translated proteins cause neurotoxicity by inducing ER stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Jie; Jansen-West, Karen; Xu, Ya-Fei; Gendron, Tania F; Bieniek, Kevin F; Lin, Wen-Lang; Sasaguri, Hiroki; Caulfield, Thomas; Hubbard, Jaime; Daughrity, Lillian; Chew, Jeannie; Belzil, Veronique V; Prudencio, Mercedes; Stankowski, Jeannette N; Castanedes-Casey, Monica; Whitelaw, Ena; Ash, Peter E A; DeTure, Michael; Rademakers, Rosa; Boylan, Kevin B; Dickson, Dennis W; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2014-10-01

    The occurrence of repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation, an atypical form of translation of expanded repeats that results in the synthesis of homopolymeric expansion proteins, is becoming more widely appreciated among microsatellite expansion disorders. Such disorders include amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia caused by a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the C9ORF72 gene (c9FTD/ALS). We and others have recently shown that this bidirectionally transcribed repeat is RAN translated, and the "c9RAN proteins" thusly produced form neuronal inclusions throughout the central nervous system of c9FTD/ALS patients. Nonetheless, the potential contribution of c9RAN proteins to disease pathogenesis remains poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that poly(GA) c9RAN proteins are neurotoxic and may be implicated in the neurodegenerative processes of c9FTD/ALS. Specifically, we show that expression of poly(GA) proteins in cultured cells and primary neurons leads to the formation of soluble and insoluble high molecular weight species, as well as inclusions composed of filaments similar to those observed in c9FTD/ALS brain tissues. The expression of poly(GA) proteins is accompanied by caspase-3 activation, impaired neurite outgrowth, inhibition of proteasome activity, and evidence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Of importance, ER stress inhibitors, salubrinal and TUDCA, provide protection against poly(GA)-induced toxicity. Taken together, our data provide compelling evidence towards establishing RAN translation as a pathogenic mechanism of c9FTD/ALS, and suggest that targeting the ER using small molecules may be a promising therapeutic approach for these devastating diseases. PMID:25173361

  17. Sequence and nitrate regulation of the Arabidopsis thaliana mRNA encoding nitrate reductase, a metalloflavoprotein with three functional domains

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, N.M.; Smith, M.; Bellissimo, D.; Davis, R.W. )

    1988-07-01

    The sequence of nitrate reductase mRNA from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana has been determined. A 3.0-kilobase-long cDNA was isolated from a {lambda}gt10 cDNA library of Arabidopsis leaf poly(A){sup +} RNA. The cDNA hybridized to a 3.2-kilobase mRNA whose level increased 15-fold in response to treatment of the plant with nitrate. An open reading frame encoding a 917 amino acid protein was found in the sequence. This protein is very similar to tobacco nitrate reductase, being >80% identical within a section of 450 amino acids. By comparing the Arabidopsis protein sequence with other protein sequences, three functional domains were deduced: (i) a molybdenum-pterin-binding domain that is similar to the molybdenum-pterin-binding domain of rat liver sulfite oxidase, (ii) a heme-binding domain that is similar to proteins in the cytochrome b{sub 5} superfamily, and (iii) an FAD-binding domain that is similar to NADH-cytochrome b{sub 5} reductase.

  18. Sequence and nitrate regulation of the Arabidopsis thaliana mRNA encoding nitrate reductase, a metalloflavoprotein with three functional domains.

    PubMed

    Crawford, N M; Smith, M; Bellissimo, D; Davis, R W

    1988-07-01

    The sequence of nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.1) mRNA from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana has been determined. A 3.0-kilobase-long cDNA was isolated from a lambda gt10 cDNA library of Arabidopsis leaf poly(A)+ RNA. The cDNA hybridized to a 3.2-kilobase mRNA whose level increased 15-fold in response to treatment of the plant with nitrate. An open reading frame encoding a 917 amino acid protein was found in the sequence. This protein is very similar to tobacco nitrate reductase, being greater than 80% identical within a section of 450 amino acids. By comparing the Arabidopsis protein sequence with other protein sequences, three functional domains were deduced: (i) a molybdenum-pterin-binding domain that is similar to the molybdenum-pterin-binding domain of rat liver sulfite oxidase, (ii) a heme-binding domain that is similar to proteins in the cytochrome b5 superfamily, and (iii) an FAD-binding domain that is similar to NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase. PMID:3393528

  19. Complex processing patterns of mRNAs of the large ATP synthase operon in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Malik Ghulam, Mustafa; Ghulam, Mustafa Malik; Courtois, Florence; Lerbs-Mache, Silva; Merendino, Livia

    2013-01-01

    Chloroplasts are photosynthetic cell organelles which have evolved from endosymbiosis of the cyanobacterial ancestor. In chloroplasts, genes are still organized into transcriptional units as in bacteria but the corresponding poly-cistronic mRNAs undergo complex processing events, including inter-genic cleavage and 5' and 3' end-definition. The current model for processing proposes that the 3' end of the upstream cistron transcripts and the 5' end of the downstream cistron transcripts are defined by the same RNA-binding protein and overlap at the level of the protein-binding site. We have investigated the processing mechanisms that operate within the large ATP synthase (atp) operon, in Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts. This operon is transcribed by the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase starting from two promoters, which are upstream and within the operon, respectively, and harbors four potential sites for RNA-binding proteins. In order to study the functional significance of the promoters and the protein-binding sites for the maturation processes, we have performed a detailed mapping of the atp transcript ends. Our data indicate that in contrast to maize, atpI and atpH transcripts with overlapping ends are very rare in Arabidopsis. In addition, atpA mRNAs, which overlap with atpF mRNAs, are even truncated at the 3' end, thus representing degradation products. We observe, instead, that the 5' ends of nascent poly-cistronic atp transcripts are defined at the first protein-binding site which follows either one of the two transcription initiation sites, while the 3' ends are defined at the subsequent protein-binding sites or at hairpin structures that are encountered by the progressing RNA polymerase. We conclude that the overlapping mechanisms of mRNA protection have only a limited role in obtaining stable processed atp mRNAs in Arabidopsis. Our findings suggest that during evolution of different plant species as maize and Arabidopsis, chloroplasts have evolved multiple

  20. Mechanisms of progesterone receptor export from nuclei: role of nuclear localization signal, nuclear export signal, and ran guanosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, R K; Amazit, L; Lescop, P; Milgrom, E; Guiochon-Mantel, A

    1998-11-01

    Steroid hormone receptors are, in most cases, mainly nuclear proteins that undergo a continuous nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. The mechanism of the nuclear export of these proteins remains largely unknown. To approach this problem experimentally in vivo, we have prepared cell lines permanently coexpressing the wild-type nuclear progesterone receptor (PR) and a cytoplasmic receptor mutant deleted of its nuclear localization signal (NLS) [(deltaNLS)PR]. Each receptor species was deleted from the epitope recognized by a specific monoclonal antibody, thus allowing separated observation of the two receptor forms in the same cells. Administration of hormone provoked formation of heterodimers during nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and import of (deltaNLS)PR into the nucleus. Washing out of the hormone allowed us to follow the export of (deltaNLS)PR into the cytoplasm. Microinjection of BSA coupled to a NLS inhibited the export of (deltaNLS)PR. On the contrary, microinjection of BSA coupled to a nuclear export signal (NES) was without effect. Moreover, leptomycin B, which inhibits NES-mediated export, was also without effect. tsBN2 cells contain a thermosensitive RCC1 protein (Ran GTP exchange protein). At the nonpermissive temperature, the nuclear export of (deltaNLS)PR could be observed, whereas the export of NES-BSA was suppressed. Microinjection of GTPgammaS confirmed that the export of (deltaNLS)PR was not dependent on GTP hydrolysis. These experiments show that the nuclear export of PR is not NES mediated but probably involves the NLS. It does not involve Ran GTP, and it is not dependent on the hydrolysis of GTP. The nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of steroid hormone receptors thus appears to utilize mechanisms different from those previously described for some viral, regulatory, and heterogeneous ribonuclear proteins. PMID:9817595

  1. Arabidopsis MRG domain proteins bridge two histone modifications to elevate expression of flowering genes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yifeng; Gan, Eng-Seng; Zhou, Jie; Wee, Wan-Yi; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Ito, Toshiro

    2014-01-01

    Trimethylation of lysine 36 of histone H3 (H3K36me3) is found to be associated with various transcription events. In Arabidopsis, the H3K36me3 level peaks in the first half of coding regions, which is in contrast to the 3'-end enrichment in animals. The MRG15 family proteins function as 'reader' proteins by binding to H3K36me3 to control alternative splicing or prevent spurious intragenic transcription in animals. Here, we demonstrate that two closely related Arabidopsis homologues (MRG1 and MRG2) are localised to the euchromatin and redundantly ensure the increased transcriptional levels of two flowering time genes with opposing functions, FLOWERING LOCUS C and FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT). MRG2 directly binds to the FT locus and elevates the expression in an H3K36me3-dependent manner. MRG1/2 binds to H3K36me3 with their chromodomain and interact with the histone H4-specific acetyltransferases (HAM1 and HAM2) to achieve a high expression level through active histone acetylation at the promoter and 5' regions of target loci. Together, this study presents a mechanistic link between H3K36me3 and histone H4 acetylation. Our data also indicate that the biological functions of MRG1/2 have diversified from their animal homologues during evolution, yet they still maintain their conserved H3K36me3-binding molecular function.

  2. ABI3 mediates dehydration stress recovery response in Arabidopsis thaliana by regulating expression of downstream genes.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Sonia; Sengupta, Sourabh; Ray, Anagh; Nag Chaudhuri, Ronita

    2016-09-01

    ABI3, originally discovered as a seed-specific transcription factor is now implicated to act beyond seed physiology, especially during abiotic stress. In non-seed plants, ABI3 is known to act in desiccation stress signaling. Here we show that ABI3 plays a role in dehydration stress response in Arabidopsis. ABI3 gene was upregulated during dehydration stress and its expression was maintained during subsequent stress recovery phases. Comparative gene expression studies in response to dehydration stress and stress recovery were done with genes which had potential ABI3 binding sites in their upstream regulatory regions. Such studies showed that several genes including known seed-specific factors like CRUCIFERIN1, CRUCIFERIN3 and LEA-group of genes like LEA76, LEA6, DEHYDRIN LEA and LEA-LIKE got upregulated in an ABI3-dependent manner, especially during the stress recovery phase. ABI3 got recruited to regions upstream to the transcription start site of these genes during dehydration stress response through direct or indirect DNA binding. Interestingly, ABI3 also binds to its own promoter region during such stress signaling. Nucleosomes covering potential ABI3 binding sites in the upstream sequences of the above-mentioned genes alter positions, and show increased H3 K9 acetylation during stress-induced transcription. ABI3 thus mediates dehydration stress signaling in Arabidopsis through regulation of a group of genes that play a role primarily during stress recovery phase. PMID:27457990

  3. Regulation of Cell Fate Determination by Single-Repeat R3 MYB Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shucai; Chen, Jay

    2014-01-01

    MYB transcription factors regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development. Among the large family of MYB transcription factors, single-repeat R3 MYB are characterized by their short sequence (<120 amino acids) consisting largely of the single MYB DNA-binding repeat. In the model plant Arabidopsis, R3 MYBs mediate lateral inhibition during epidermal patterning and are best characterized for their regulatory roles in trichome and root hair development. R3 MYBs act as negative regulators for trichome formation but as positive regulators for root hair development. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review on the role of R3 MYBs in the regulation of cell type specification in the model plant Arabidopsis.

  4. Regulation of cell fate determination by single-repeat R3 MYB transcription factors in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shucai; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2014-01-01

    MYB transcription factors regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development. Among the large family of MYB transcription factors, single-repeat R3 MYBs are characterized by their short sequence (<120 amino acids) consisting largely of the single MYB DNA-binding repeat. In the model plant Arabidopsis, R3 MYBs mediate lateral inhibition during epidermal patterning and are best characterized for their regulatory roles in trichome and root hair development. R3 MYBs act as negative regulators for trichome formation but as positive regulators for root hair development. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review on the role of R3 MYBs in the regulation of cell type specification in the model plant Arabidopsis. PMID:24782874

  5. Functional interconnection of MYC2 and SPA1 in the photomorphogenic seedling development of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Gangappa, Sreeramaiah N; Prasad, V Babu Rajendra; Chattopadhyay, Sudip

    2010-11-01

    MYC2 is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that cross talks with light, abscisic acid (ABA), and jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathways. Here, we have shown that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MYC2 directly binds to the G-box present in the SUPPRESSOR OF PHYTOCHROME A1 (SPA1) promoter and that it controls the expression of SPA1 in a COP1-dependent manner. Analyses of atmyc2 spa1 double mutants suggest that whereas MYC2 and SPA1 act redundantly to suppress photomorphogenic growth in the dark, they function synergistically for the suppression of photomorphogenic growth in the light. Our studies have also revealed that MYC2-mediated ABA and JA responses are further modulated by SPA1. Taken together, this study demonstrates the molecular and physiological interrelations of MYC2 and SPA1 in light, ABA, and JA signaling pathways.

  6. A kinesin-like protein, KatAp, in the cells of arabidopsis and other plants.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, B; Cyr, R J; Palevitz, B A

    1996-01-01

    The kinesin-like proteins (KLPs) are a large family of plus- or minus-end-directed microtubule motors important in intracellular transport, mitosis, meiosis, and development. However, relatively little is known about plant KLPs. We prepared an antibody against two peptides in the microtubule binding domain of an Arabidopsis KLP (KatAp) encoded by the KatA gene, one of a family of genes encoding KLPs whose motor domain is located near the C terminus of the polypeptide. Such KLPs typically move materials toward the minus end of microtubules. An immunoreactive band (Mr of 140,000) corresponding to KatAp was demonstrated with this antibody on immunoblots of Arabidopsis seedling extracts. During immunofluorescence localizations, the antibody produced weak, variable staining in the cytoplasm and nucleus of interphase Arabidopsis suspension cells but much stronger staining of the mitotic apparatus during division. Staining was concentrated near the midzone during metaphase and was retained there during anaphase. The phragmoplast was also stained. Similar localization patterns were seen in tobacco BY-2 cells. The antibody produced a single band (Mr of 130,000) in murine brain fractions prepared according to procedures that enrich for KLPs (binding to microtubules in the presence of AMP-PNP but not ATP). A similar fraction from carrot suspension cells yielded a cross-reacting polypeptide of similar apparent molecular mass. When dividing BY-2 cells were lysed in the presence of taxol and ATP, antibody staining moved rapidly toward the poles, supporting the presence of a minus-end motor. Movement did not occur without ATP, with AMP-PNP, or with ATP plus antibody. Our results indicate that the protein encoded by KatA, KatAp, is expressed in Arabidopsis and is specifically localized to the midzone of the mitotic apparatus and phragmoplast. A similar protein is also present in other species. PMID:8597656

  7. Melatonin induces the transcripts of CBF/DREB1s and their involvement in both abiotic and biotic stresses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haitao; Qian, Yongqiang; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, Russel J; He, Chaozu

    2015-10-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is a naturally occurring small molecule that acts as an important secondary messenger in plant stress responses. However, the mechanism underlying the melatonin-mediated signaling pathway in plant stress responses has not been established. C-repeat-binding factors (CBFs)/Drought response element Binding 1 factors (DREB1s) encode transcription factors that play important roles in plant stress responses. This study has determined that endogenous melatonin and transcripts level of CBFs (AtCBF1, AtCBF2, and AtCBF3) in Arabidopsis leaves were significantly induced by salt, drought, and cold stresses and by pathogen Pseudomonas syringe pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 infection. Moreover, both exogenous melatonin treatment and overexpression of CBFs conferred enhanced resistance to both abiotic and biotic stresses in Arabidopsis. Notably, AtCBFs and exogenous melatonin treatment positively regulated the mRNA expression of several stress-responsive genes (COR15A, RD22, and KIN1) and accumulation of soluble sugars content such as sucrose in Arabidopsis under control and stress conditions. Additionally, exogenous sucrose also conferred improved resistance to both abiotic and biotic stresses in Arabidopsis. Taken together, this study indicates that AtCBFs confer enhanced resistance to both abiotic and biotic stresses, and AtCBF-mediated signaling pathway and sugar accumulation may be involved in melatonin-mediated stress response in Arabidopsis, at least partially.

  8. Genome-Wide Analysis of Arabidopsis Pentatricopeptide Repeat Proteins Reveals Their Essential Role in Organelle BiogenesisW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Lurin, Claire; Andrés, Charles; Aubourg, Sébastien; Bellaoui, Mohammed; Bitton, Frédérique; Bruyère, Clémence; Caboche, Michel; Debast, Cédrig; Gualberto, José; Hoffmann, Beate; Lecharny, Alain; Le Ret, Monique; Martin-Magniette, Marie-Laure; Mireau, Hakim; Peeters, Nemo; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Szurek, Boris; Taconnat, Ludivine; Small, Ian

    2004-01-01

    The complete sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome revealed thousands of previously unsuspected genes, many of which cannot be ascribed even putative functions. One of the largest and most enigmatic gene families discovered in this way is characterized by tandem arrays of pentatricopeptide repeats (PPRs). We describe a detailed bioinformatic analysis of 441 members of the Arabidopsis PPR family plus genomic and genetic data on the expression (microarray data), localization (green fluorescent protein and red fluorescent protein fusions), and general function (insertion mutants and RNA binding assays) of many family members. The basic picture that arises from these studies is that PPR proteins play constitutive, often essential roles in mitochondria and chloroplasts, probably via binding to organellar transcripts. These results confirm, but massively extend, the very sparse observations previously obtained from detailed characterization of individual mutants in other organisms. PMID:15269332

  9. Crizotinib resistance in acute myeloid leukemia with inv(2)(p23q13)/RAN binding protein 2 (RANBP2) anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion and monosomy 7.

    PubMed

    Takeoka, Kayo; Okumura, Atsuko; Maesako, Yoshitomo; Akasaka, Takashi; Ohno, Hitoshi

    2015-03-01

    This is the first report on the development of a p.G1269A mutation within the kinase domain (KD) of ALK after crizotinib treatment in RANBP2-ALK acute myeloid leukemia (AML). An elderly woman with AML with an inv(2)(p23q13)/RANBP2-ALK and monosomy 7 was treated with crizotinib. After a short-term hematological response and the restoration of normal hematopoiesis, she experienced a relapse of AML. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using the ALK break-apart probe confirmed the inv(2)(p23q13), while G-banded karyotyping revealed the deletion of a segment of the short arm of chromosome 1 [del(1)(p13p22)] after crizotinib therapy. The ALK gene carried a heterozygous mutation at the nucleotide position g.716751G>C within exon 25, causing the p.G1269A amino acid substitution within the ALK-KD. Reverse transcriptase PCR revealed that the mutated ALK allele was selectively transcribed and the mutation occurred in the ALK allele rearranged with RANBP2. As both the del(1)(p13p22) at the cytogenetic level and p.G1269A at the nucleotide level newly appeared after crizotinib treatment, it is likely that they were secondarily acquired alterations involved in crizotinib resistance. Although secondary genetic abnormalities in ALK are most frequently described in non-small cell lung cancers harboring an ALK alteration, this report suggests that an ALK-KD mutation can occur independently of the tumor cell type or fusion partner after crizotinib treatment.

  10. Terpene Specialized Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tholl, Dorothea; Lee, Sungbeom

    2011-01-01

    Terpenes constitute the largest class of plant secondary (or specialized) metabolites, which are compounds of ecological function in plant defense or the attraction of beneficial organisms. Using biochemical and genetic approaches, nearly all Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) enzymes of the core biosynthetic pathways producing the 5-carbon building blocks of terpenes have been characterized and closer insight has been gained into the transcriptional and posttranscriptional/translational mechanisms regulating these pathways. The biochemical function of most prenyltransferases, the downstream enzymes that condense the C5-precursors into central 10-, 15-, and 20-carbon prenyldiphosphate intermediates, has been described, although the function of several isoforms of C20-prenyltranferases is not well understood. Prenyl diphosphates are converted to a variety of C10-, C15-, and C20-terpene products by enzymes of the terpene synthase (TPS) family. Genomic organization of the 32 Arabidopsis TPS genes indicates a species-specific divergence of terpene synthases with tissue- and cell-type specific expression profiles that may have emerged under selection pressures by different organisms. Pseudogenization, differential expression, and subcellular segregation of TPS genes and enzymes contribute to the natural variation of terpene biosynthesis among Arabidopsis accessions (ecotypes) and species. Arabidopsis will remain an important model to investigate the metabolic organization and molecular regulatory networks of terpene specialized metabolism in relation to the biological activities of terpenes. PMID:22303268

  11. Comprehensive Approaches to Multiphase Flows in Geophysics - Application to nonisothermal, nonhomogenous, unsteady, large-scale, turbulent dusty clouds I. Hydrodynamic and Thermodynamic RANS and LES Models

    SciTech Connect

    S. Dartevelle

    2005-09-05

    The objective of this manuscript is to fully derive a geophysical multiphase model able to ''accommodate'' different multiphase turbulence approaches; viz., the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), the Large Eddy Simulation (LES), or hybrid RANSLES. This manuscript is the first part of a larger geophysical multiphase project--lead by LANL--that aims to develop comprehensive modeling tools for large-scale, atmospheric, transient-buoyancy dusty jets and plume (e.g., plinian clouds, nuclear ''mushrooms'', ''supercell'' forest fire plumes) and for boundary-dominated geophysical multiphase gravity currents (e.g., dusty surges, diluted pyroclastic flows, dusty gravity currents in street canyons). LES is a partially deterministic approach constructed on either a spatial- or a temporal-separation between the large and small scales of the flow, whereas RANS is an entirely probabilistic approach constructed on a statistical separation between an ensemble-averaged mean and higher-order statistical moments (the so-called ''fluctuating parts''). Within this specific multiphase context, both turbulence approaches are built up upon the same phasic binary-valued ''function of presence''. This function of presence formally describes the occurrence--or not--of any phase at a given position and time and, therefore, allows to derive the same basic multiphase Navier-Stokes model for either the RANS or the LES frameworks. The only differences between these turbulence frameworks are the closures for the various ''turbulence'' terms involving the unknown variables from the fluctuating (RANS) or from the subgrid (LES) parts. Even though the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic models for RANS and LES have the same set of Partial Differential Equations, the physical interpretations of these PDEs cannot be the same, i.e., RANS models an averaged field, while LES simulates a filtered field. In this manuscript, we also demonstrate that this multiphase model fully fulfills the second law of

  12. Lectin Receptor Kinases Participate in Protein-Protein Interactions to Mediate Plasma Membrane-Cell Wall Adhesions in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Gouget, Anne; Senchou, Virginie; Govers, Francine; Sanson, Arnaud; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Canut, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are disrupted by the RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) tripeptide sequence, a characteristic cell adhesion motif in mammals. In planta induced-O (IPI-O) is an RGD-containing protein from the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans that can disrupt cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions through its RGD motif. To identify peptide sequences that specifically bind the RGD motif of the IPI-O protein and potentially play a role in receptor recognition, we screened a heptamer peptide library displayed in a filamentous phage and selected two peptides acting as inhibitors of the plasma membrane RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis. Moreover, the two peptides also disrupted cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions. Sequence comparison of the RGD-binding peptides with the Arabidopsis proteome revealed 12 proteins containing amino acid sequences in their extracellular domains common with the two RGD-binding peptides. Eight belong to the receptor-like kinase family, four of which have a lectin-like extracellular domain. The lectin domain of one of these, At5g60300, recognized the RGD motif both in peptides and proteins. These results imply that lectin receptor kinases are involved in protein-protein interactions with RGD-containing proteins as potential ligands, and play a structural and signaling role at the plant cell surfaces. PMID:16361528

  13. BRX promotes Arabidopsis shoot growth.

    PubMed

    Beuchat, Julien; Scacchi, Emanuele; Tarkowska, Danuse; Ragni, Laura; Strnad, Miroslav; Hardtke, Christian S

    2010-10-01

    • BREVIS RADIX (BRX) has been identified through a loss-of-function allele in the Umkirch-1 accession in a natural variation screen for Arabidopsis root growth vigor. Physiological and gene expression analyses have suggested that BRX is rate limiting for auxin-responsive gene expression by mediating cross-talk with the brassinosteroid pathway, as impaired root growth and reduced auxin perception of brx can be (partially) rescued by external brassinosteroid application. • Using genetic tools, we show that brx mutants also display significantly reduced cotyledon and leaf growth. • Similar to the root, the amplitude and penetrance of this phenotype depends on genetic background and shares the physiological features, reduced auxin perception and brassinosteroid rescue. Furthermore, reciprocal grafting experiments between mutant and complemented brx shoot scions and root stocks suggest that the shoot phenotypes are not an indirect consequence of the root phenotype. Finally, BRX gain-of-function lines display epinastic leaf growth and, in the case of dominant negative interference, increased epidermal cell size. Consistent with an impact of BRX on brassinosteroid biosynthesis, this phenotype is accompanied by increased brassinosteroid levels. • In summary, our results demonstrate a ubiquitous, although quantitatively variable role of BRX in modulating the growth rate in both the root and shoot.

  14. Arabidopsis Chitinases: a Genomic Survey

    PubMed Central

    Passarinho, Paul A.; de Vries, Sacco C.

    2002-01-01

    Plant chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14) belong to relatively large gene families subdivided in classes that suggest class-specific functions. They are commonly induced upon the attack of pathogens and by various sources of stress, which led to associating them with plant defense in general. However, it is becoming apparent that most of them display several functions during the plant life cycle, including taking part in developmental processes such as pollination and embryo development. The number of chitinases combined with their multiple functions has been an obstacle to a better understanding of their role in plants. It is therefore important to identify and inventory all chitinase genes of a plant species to be able to dissect their function and understand the relations between the different classes. Complete sequencing of the Arabidopsis genome has made this task feasible and we present here a survey of all putative chitinase-encoding genes accompanied by a detailed analysis of their sequence. Based on their characteristics and on studies on other plant chitinases, we propose an overview of their possible functions as well as modified annotations for some of them. PMID:22303199

  15. Early flower development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, D R; Bowman, J L; Meyerowitz, E M

    1990-01-01

    The early development of the flower of Arabidopsis thaliana is described from initiation until the opening of the bud. The morphogenesis, growth rate, and surface structure of floral organs were recorded in detail using scanning electron microscopy. Flower development has been divided into 12 stages using a series of landmark events. Stage 1 begins with the initiation of a floral buttress on the flank of the apical meristem. Stage 2 commences when the flower primordium becomes separate from the meristem. Sepal primordia then arise (stage 3) and grow to overlie the primordium (stage 4). Petal and stamen primordia appear next (stage 5) and are soon enclosed by the sepals (stage 6). During stage 6, petal primordia grow slowly, whereas stamen primordia enlarge more rapidly. Stage 7 begins when the medial stamens become stalked. These soon develop locules (stage 8). A long stage 9 then commences with the petal primordia becoming stalked. During this stage all organs lengthen rapidly. This includes the gynoecium, which commences growth as an open-ended tube during stage 6. When the petals reach the length of the lateral stamens, stage 10 begins. Stigmatic papillae appear soon after (stage 11), and the petals rapidly reach the height of the medial stamens (stage 12). This final stage ends when the 1-millimeter-long bud opens. Under our growing conditions 1.9 buds were initiated per day on average, and they took 13.25 days to progress through the 12 stages from initiation until opening. PMID:2152125

  16. The Transcriptional Coregulator LEUNIG_HOMOLOG Inhibits Light-Dependent Seed Germination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nayoung; Park, Jeongmoo; Kim, Keunhwa; Choi, Giltsu

    2015-08-01

    PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR1 (PIF1) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that inhibits light-dependent seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it remains unclear whether PIF1 requires other factors to regulate its direct targets. Here, we demonstrate that LEUNIG_HOMOLOG (LUH), a Groucho family transcriptional corepressor, binds to PIF1 and coregulates its targets. Not only are the transcriptional profiles of the luh and pif1 mutants remarkably similar, more than 80% of the seeds of both genotypes germinate in the dark. We show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that LUH binds a subset of PIF1 targets in a partially PIF1-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, we found LUH binds and coregulates not only PIF1-activated targets but also PIF1-repressed targets. Together, our results indicate LUH functions with PIF1 as a transcriptional coregulator to inhibit seed germination.

  17. The Transcriptional Coregulator LEUNIG_HOMOLOG Inhibits Light-Dependent Seed Germination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nayoung; Park, Jeongmoo; Kim, Keunhwa; Choi, Giltsu

    2015-08-01

    PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR1 (PIF1) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that inhibits light-dependent seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it remains unclear whether PIF1 requires other factors to regulate its direct targets. Here, we demonstrate that LEUNIG_HOMOLOG (LUH), a Groucho family transcriptional corepressor, binds to PIF1 and coregulates its targets. Not only are the transcriptional profiles of the luh and pif1 mutants remarkably similar, more than 80% of the seeds of both genotypes germinate in the dark. We show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that LUH binds a subset of PIF1 targets in a partially PIF1-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, we found LUH binds and coregulates not only PIF1-activated targets but also PIF1-repressed targets. Together, our results indicate LUH functions with PIF1 as a transcriptional coregulator to inhibit seed germination. PMID:26276832

  18. The Transcriptional Coregulator LEUNIG_HOMOLOG Inhibits Light-Dependent Seed Germination in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nayoung; Park, Jeongmoo; Kim, Keunhwa; Choi, Giltsu

    2015-01-01

    PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR1 (PIF1) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that inhibits light-dependent seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it remains unclear whether PIF1 requires other factors to regulate its direct targets. Here, we demonstrate that LEUNIG_HOMOLOG (LUH), a Groucho family transcriptional corepressor, binds to PIF1 and coregulates its targets. Not only are the transcriptional profiles of the luh and pif1 mutants remarkably similar, more than 80% of the seeds of both genotypes germinate in the dark. We show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that LUH binds a subset of PIF1 targets in a partially PIF1-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, we found LUH binds and coregulates not only PIF1-activated targets but also PIF1-repressed targets. Together, our results indicate LUH functions with PIF1 as a transcriptional coregulator to inhibit seed germination. PMID:26276832

  19. Orthology Analysis and In Vivo Complementation Studies to Elucidate the Role of DIR1 during Systemic Acquired Resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana and Cucumis sativus.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, Marisa; Carella, Philip; Faubert, Jennifer; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Cameron, Robin K

    2016-01-01

    AtDIR1 (Defective in Induced Resistance1) is an acidic lipid transfer protein essential for systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Upon SAR induction, DIR1 moves from locally infected to distant uninfected leaves to activate defense priming; however, a molecular function for DIR1 has not been elucidated. Bioinformatic analysis and in silico homology modeling identified putative AtDIR1 orthologs in crop species, revealing conserved protein motifs within and outside of DIR1's central hydrophobic cavity. In vitro assays to compare the capacity of recombinant AtDIR1 and targeted AtDIR1-variant proteins to bind the lipophilic probe TNS (6,P-toluidinylnaphthalene-2-sulfonate) provided evidence that conserved leucine 43 and aspartic acid 39 contribute to the size of the DIR1 hydrophobic cavity and possibly hydrophobic ligand binding. An Arabidopsis-cucumber SAR model was developed to investigate the conservation of DIR1 function in cucumber (Cucumis sativus), and we demonstrated that phloem exudates from SAR-induced cucumber rescued the SAR defect in the Arabidopsis dir1-1 mutant. Additionally, an AtDIR1 antibody detected a protein of the same size as AtDIR1 in SAR-induced cucumber phloem exudates, providing evidence that DIR1 function during SAR is conserved in Arabidopsis and cucumber. In vitro TNS displacement assays demonstrated that recombinant AtDIR1 did not bind the SAR signals azelaic acid (AzA), glycerol-3-phosphate or pipecolic acid. However, recombinant CsDIR1 and CsDIR2 interacted weakly with AzA and pipecolic acid. Bioinformatic and functional analyses using the Arabidopsis-cucumber SAR model provide evidence that DIR1 orthologs exist in tobacco, tomato, cucumber, and soybean, and that DIR1-mediated SAR signaling is conserved in Arabidopsis and cucumber.

  20. Orthology Analysis and In Vivo Complementation Studies to Elucidate the Role of DIR1 during Systemic Acquired Resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana and Cucumis sativus.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, Marisa; Carella, Philip; Faubert, Jennifer; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Cameron, Robin K

    2016-01-01

    AtDIR1 (Defective in Induced Resistance1) is an acidic lipid transfer protein essential for systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Upon SAR induction, DIR1 moves from locally infected to distant uninfected leaves to activate defense priming; however, a molecular function for DIR1 has not been elucidated. Bioinformatic analysis and in silico homology modeling identified putative AtDIR1 orthologs in crop species, revealing conserved protein motifs within and outside of DIR1's central hydrophobic cavity. In vitro assays to compare the capacity of recombinant AtDIR1 and targeted AtDIR1-variant proteins to bind the lipophilic probe TNS (6,P-toluidinylnaphthalene-2-sulfonate) provided evidence that conserved leucine 43 and a