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Sample records for arachidonic acid-induced ear

  1. Phenylethanoids in the herb of Plantago lanceolata and inhibitory effect on arachidonic acid-induced mouse ear edema.

    PubMed

    Murai, M; Tamayama, Y; Nishibe, S

    1995-10-01

    The five phenylethanoids, acteoside (1), cistanoside F (2), lavandulifolioside (3), plantamajoside (4) and isoacteoside (5) were isolated from the herb of Plantago lanceolata L. (Plantaginaceae). Compounds 1, the major phenylethanoid in the herb of P. lanceolata L., and 4, the major phenylethanoid in the herb of P. asiatica L., showed inhibitory effects on arachidonic acid-induced mouse ear edema. PMID:7480214

  2. Phenylethanoids in the herb of Plantago lanceolata and inhibitory effect on arachidonic acid-induced mouse ear edema.

    PubMed

    Murai, M; Tamayama, Y; Nishibe, S

    1995-10-01

    The five phenylethanoids, acteoside (1), cistanoside F (2), lavandulifolioside (3), plantamajoside (4) and isoacteoside (5) were isolated from the herb of Plantago lanceolata L. (Plantaginaceae). Compounds 1, the major phenylethanoid in the herb of P. lanceolata L., and 4, the major phenylethanoid in the herb of P. asiatica L., showed inhibitory effects on arachidonic acid-induced mouse ear edema.

  3. A new 5-lipoxygenase selective inhibitor derived from Artocarpus communis strongly inhibits arachidonic acid-induced ear edema.

    PubMed

    Koshihara, Y; Fujimoto, Y; Inoue, H

    1988-06-01

    Natural compounds isolated from the Indonesian plant, Artocarpus communis, inhibit 5-lipoxygenase of cultured mastocytoma cells. One of five compounds, AC-5-1, strongly inhibits 5-lipoxygenase with a half-inhibition dose of 5 +/- 0.12 X 10(-8) M. However, prostaglandin synthesizing activity is not inhibited until 10(-5) M. AC-5-1 is a highly selective inhibitor for 5-lipoxygenase. The AC-5-1 at 10(-5) M inhibits 96% of leukotriene C4 synthesis of mouse peritoneal cells facilitated by calcium-ionophore. Arachidonic acid-induced ear edema of mice, an in vivo inflammatory model, involving leukotriene induction, is strongly inhibited by AC-5-1 in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition is the strongest of any inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase reported previously. Since the natural compound AC-5-1 can selectively inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and affect in vivo inflammation, it will be interesting to investigate the role of leukotrienes on inflammation and other physiological processes.

  4. Intravenous anesthetic propofol suppresses prostaglandin E2 and cysteinyl leukotriene production and reduces edema formation in arachidonic acid-induced ear inflammation.

    PubMed

    Inada, Takefumi; Hirota, Kiichi; Shingu, Koh

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is an intravenous drug widely used for anesthesia and sedation. Previously, propofol was shown to inhibit cyclo-oxygenase (COX) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activities. Because these enzyme-inhibiting effects have only been demonstrated in vitro, this study sought to ascertain whether similar effects might also be observed in vivo. In the current studies, effects of propofol were tested in a murine model of arachidonic acid-induced ear inflammation. Specifically, propofol - as a pre-treatment -- was intraperitoneally and then topical application of arachidonic acid was performed. After 1 h, tissue biopsies were collected and tested for the presence of edema and for levels of inflammatory mediators. The results indicated that the administration of propofol significantly suppressed ear edema formation, tissue myeloperoxidase activity, and tissue production of both prostaglandin E2 and cysteinyl leukotrienes. From the data, it can be concluded that propofol could exert anti-COX and anti-5-LOX activities in an in vivo model and that these activities in turn could have, at least in part, suppressed arachidonic acid-induced edema formation in the ear.

  5. Activation of the central histaminergic system mediates arachidonic-acid-induced cardiovascular effects.

    PubMed

    Altinbas, Burcin; Topuz, Bora Burak; İlhan, Tuncay; Yilmaz, Mustafa Sertac; Erdost, Hatice; Yalcin, Murat

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explain the involvement of the central histaminergic system in arachidonic acid (AA)-induced cardiovascular effects in normotensive rats using hemodynamic, immunohistochemistry, and microdialysis studies. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered AA (0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 μmol) induced dose- and time-dependent increases in mean arterial pressure and decreased heart rate in conscious normotensive Sprague-Dawley rats. Central injection of AA (0.5 μmol) also increased posterior hypothalamic extracellular histamine levels and produced strong COX-1 but not COX-2 immunoreactivity in the posterior hypothalamus of rats. Moreover, the cardiovascular effects and COX-1 immunoreactivity in the posterior hypothalamus induced by AA (0.5 μmol; i.c.v.) were almost completely blocked by the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (50 and 100 nmol; i.c.v.) and partially blocked by the H1 receptor blocker chlorpheniramine (100 nmol; i.c.v.) and the H3-H4 receptor antagonist thioperamide (50 and 100 nmol; i.c.v.). In conclusion, these results indicate that centrally administered AA induces pressor and bradycardic responses in conscious rats. Moreover, we suggest that AA may activate histaminergic neurons and increase extracellular histamine levels, particularly in the posterior hypothalamus. Acting as a neurotransmitter, histamine is potentially involved in AA-induced cardiovascular effects under normotensive conditions.

  6. Arachidonic acid-induced oxidative injury to cultured spinal cord neurons.

    PubMed

    Toborek, M; Malecki, A; Garrido, R; Mattson, M P; Hennig, B; Young, B

    1999-08-01

    Spinal cord trauma can cause a marked release of free fatty acids, in particular, arachidonic acid (AA), from cell membranes. Free fatty acids, and AA by itself, may lead to secondary damage to spinal cord neurons. To study this hypothesis, cultured spinal cord neurons were exposed to increasing concentrations of AA (0.01-10 microM). AA-induced injury to spinal cord neurons was assessed by measurements of cellular oxidative stress, intracellular calcium levels, activation of nuclear factor-KB (NF-kappaB), and cell viability. AA treatment increased intracellular calcium concentrations and decreased cell viability. Oxidative stress increased significantly in neurons exposed to 1 and 10 microM AA. In addition, AA treatment activated NF-kappaB and decreased levels of the inhibitory subunit, IKB. It is interesting that manganese superoxide dismutase protein levels and levels of intracellular total glutathione increased in neurons exposed to this fatty acid for 24 h, consistent with a compensatory response to increased oxidative stress. These results strongly support the hypothesis that free fatty acids contribute to the tissue injury observed following spinal cord trauma. PMID:10428065

  7. Role of endoperoxides in arachidonic acid-induced vasoconstriction in the isolated perfused kidney of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Quilley, J.; McGiff, J. C.; Nasjletti, A.

    1989-01-01

    1. Administration of arachidonic acid caused dose-dependent vasoconstriction in the isolated rat kidney perfused in situ with Krebs-Henseleit solution. 2. Inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase with indomethacin or meclofenamate reduced the renal vasoconstrictor effect of arachidonic acid. 3. The renal vasoconstrictor effect of arachidonic acid was unaffected by CGS-13080 at concentrations that effectively reduced thromboxane A2 (TxA2) synthesis by platelets and the kidney. 4. The endoperoxide/TxA2 receptor antagonist, SQ 29,548, abolished the renal vasoconstrictor effect of arachidonic acid and of U46619, an endoperoxide analogue. In contrast, SQ 29,548 did not affect the renal vasoconstrictor response to angiotensin II, prostaglandin E2 or F2 alpha. 5. These data suggest that the vasoconstrictor effect of arachidonic acid in the isolated kidney of the rat is mediated by its metabolites, including the prostaglandin endoperoxides. PMID:2522332

  8. Arachidonic acid-induced mobilization of calcium in human neutrophils: evidence for a multicomponent mechanism of action.

    PubMed Central

    Naccache, P. H.; McColl, S. R.; Caon, A. C.; Borgeat, P.

    1989-01-01

    1. The mechanism(s) involved in the mobilization of calcium induced by arachidonic acid in human neutrophils was investigated. 2. The addition of arachidonic acid to a suspension of human neutrophils led to a time- and concentration-dependent mobilization of calcium which was the result of two separate and experimentally differentiable processes. The latter consisted of a rapid and transient phase followed by a slower and more sustained response. 3. The initial phase of calcium mobilization elicited by arachidonic acid was decreased in the presence of EGTA, inhibited by pertussis toxin as well as by nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), and diminished following a pre-incubation with leukotriene B4, but not platelet-activating factor. 4. The characteristics of the first phase of the mobilization of calcium were consistent with an interaction of the fatty acid with the leukotriene B4 receptors, either directly or indirectly following the synthesis of leukotriene B4, as well as with a release of internal calcium. 5. The second, slower and more sustained phase of calcium mobilization was more apparent at high concentrations (greater than or equal to 8-16 microM) of arachidonic acid, and was relatively insensitive to pertussis toxin, EGTA or NDGA. 6. The characteristics of the 'slow' phase of calcium mobilization by arachidonic acid are consistent with its being associated primarily with a release of calcium from internal storage pools. 7. The data presented indicate that the mechanism of mobilization of calcium by arachidonic acid in human neutrophils is complex and involves specific activation pathways employed, in part at least, by other neutrophil agonists.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2547474

  9. Adenoviral expression of 15-lipoxygenase-1 in rabbit aortic endothelium: role in arachidonic acid-induced relaxation.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Nitin T; Holmes, Blythe B; Cui, Lijie; Viita, Helena; Yla-Herttuala, Seppo; Campbell, William B

    2007-02-01

    Endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of the rabbit aorta is mediated by either nitric oxide (NO) or arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites from cyclooxygenase (COX) and 15-lipoxygenase (15-LO) pathways. 15-LO-1 metabolites of AA, 11,12,15-trihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (THETA), and 15-hydroxy-11,12-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (HEETA) cause concentration-dependent relaxation. We tested the hypothesis that in the 15-LO pathway of AA metabolism, 15-LO-1 is sufficient and is the rate-limiting step in inducing relaxations in rabbit aorta. Aorta and rabbit aortic endothelial cells were treated with adenoviruses containing human 15-LO-1 cDNA (Ad-15-LO-1) or beta-galactosidase (Ad-beta-Gal). Ad-15-LO-1-transduction increased the expression of a 75-kDa protein corresponding to 15-LO-1, detected by immunoblotting with an anti-human15-LO-1 antibody, and increased the production of HEETA and THETA from [(14)C]AA. Immunohistochemical studies on Ad-15-LO-1-transduced rabbit aorta showed the presence of 15-LO-1 in endothelial cells. Ad-15-LO-1-treated aortic rings showed enhanced relaxation to AA (max 31.7 +/- 3.2%) compared with Ad-beta-Gal-treated (max 12.7 +/- 3.2%) or control nontreated rings (max 13.1 +/- 1.6%) (P < 0.01). The relaxations in Ad-15-LO-1-treated aorta were blocked by the 15-LO inhibitor cinnamyl-3,4-dihydroxy-a-cyanocinnamate. Overexpression of 15-LO-1 in the rabbit aortic endothelium is sufficient to increase the production of the vasodilatory HEETA and THETA and enhance the relaxations to AA. This confirms the role of HEETA and THETA as endothelium-derived relaxing factors.

  10. Low Na intake suppresses expression of CYP2C23 and arachidonic acid-induced inhibition of ENaC.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Lin, Dao-Hong; Wang, Tong; Babilonia, Elisa; Wang, Zhijian; Jin, Yan; Kemp, Rowena; Nasjletti, Alberto; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2006-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that arachidonic acid (AA) inhibits epithelial Na channels (ENaC) through the cytochrome P-450 (CYP) epoxygenase-dependent pathway (34). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that low Na intake suppresses the expression of CYP2C23, which is mainly responsible for converting AA to epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) in the kidney (11) and attenuates the AA-induced inhibition of ENaC. Immunostaining showed that CYP2C23 is expressed in the Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP)-positive and aquaporin 2 (AQP2)-positive tubules. This suggests that CYP2C23 is expressed in the thick ascending limb (TAL) and collecting duct (CD). Na restriction significantly suppressed the expression of CYP2C23 in the TAL and CD. Western blot also demonstrated that the expression of CYP2C23 in renal cortex and outer medulla diminished in rats on Na-deficient diet (Na-D) but increased in those on high-Na diet (4%). Moreover, the content of 11,12-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) decreased in the isolated cortical CD from rats on Na-D compared with those on a normal-Na diet (0.5%). Patch-clamp study showed that application of 15 microM AA inhibited the activity of ENaC by 77% in the CCD of rats on a Na-D for 3 days. However, the inhibitory effect of AA on ENaC was significantly attenuated in rats on Na-D for 14 days. Furthermore, inhibition of CYP epoxygenase with MS-PPOH increased the ENaC activity in the CCD of rats on a control Na diet. We also used microperfusion technique to examine the effect of MS-PPOH on Na transport in the distal nephron. Application of MS-PPOH significantly increased Na absorption in the distal nephron of control rats but had no significant effect on Na absorption in rats on Na-D for 14 days. We conclude that low Na intake downregulates the activity and expression of CYP2C23 and attenuates the inhibitory effect of AA on Na transport. PMID:16849695

  11. The Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Arachidonic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid Induce Mouse Dendritic Cells Maturation but Reduce T-Cell Responses In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Johan A.; Wold, Agnes E.; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie; Östman, Sofia M.

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) might regulate T-cell activation and lineage commitment. Here, we measured the effects of omega-3 (n-3), n-6 and n-9 fatty acids on the interaction between dendritic cells (DCs) and naïve T cells. Spleen DCs from BALB/c mice were cultured in vitro with ovalbumin (OVA) with 50 μM fatty acids; α-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid (AA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), linoleic acid or oleic acid and thereafter OVA-specific DO11.10 T cells were added to the cultures. Fatty acids were taken up by the DCs, as shown by gas chromatography analysis. After culture with arachidonic acid or DHA CD11c+ CD11b+ and CD11c+ CD11bneg DCs expressed more CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86 and PDL-1, while IAd remained unchanged. However, fewer T cells co-cultured with these DCs proliferated (CellTrace Violetlow) and expressed CD69 or CD25, while more were necrotic (7AAD+). We noted an increased proportion of T cells with a regulatory T cell (Treg) phenotype, i.e., when gating on CD4+ FoxP3+ CTLA-4+, CD4+ FoxP3+ Helios+ or CD4+ FoxP3+ PD-1+, in co-cultures with arachidonic acid- or DHA-primed DCs relative to control cultures. The proportion of putative Tregs was inversely correlated to T-cell proliferation, indicating a suppressive function of these cells. With arachidonic acid DCs produced higher levels of prostaglandin E2 while T cells produced lower amounts of IL-10 and IFNγ. In conclusion arachidonic acid and DHA induced up-regulation of activation markers on DCs. However arachidonic acid- and DHA-primed DCs reduced T-cell proliferation and increased the proportion of T cells expressing FoxP3, indicating that these fatty acids can promote induction of regulatory T cells. PMID:26619195

  12. The effect of the menstrual cycle and of decompression stress on arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation and on intrinsic platelet thromboxane production in women compared with men.

    PubMed

    Markham, S M; Dubin, N H; Rock, J A

    1991-12-01

    Menstrual cycle variations in platelet aggregation and thromboxane production in association with sex steroids have been reported. External stimuli such as decompression sickness have been associated with clotting activity changes, specifically, increased platelet aggregation. Differences in response of platelets from women and men, when subjected to such a stress, have been observed. This study evaluated the ability of washed platelets from women in the proliferative and secretory phases of the menstrual cycle to aggregate in response to arachidonic acid and the aggregation difference between washed platelets from women and men in response to decompression stress and arachidonic acid. Additionally, platelet thromboxane production differences between the assessed platelet populations were compared. Our results indicate no difference in platelet aggregability between phases of the menstrual cycle. A significant aggregation difference between platelets from women and men was noted. Platelets from women were more sensitive to arachidonic acid aggregation. These differences were not affected by decompression stress. No difference in thromboxane B2 production was noted between the platelet populations evaluated.

  13. Arachidonic acid-induced expression of the organic solute and steroid transporter-beta (Ost-beta) in a cartilaginous fish cell line.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Ho; Parton, Angela; Czechanski, Anne; Ballatori, Nazzareno; Barnes, David

    2008-07-01

    The organic solute and steroid transporter (OST/Ost) is a unique membrane transport protein heterodimer composed of subunits designated alpha and beta, that transports conjugated steroids and prostaglandin E(2) across the plasma membrane. Ost was first identified in the liver of the cartilaginous fish Leucoraja erinacea, the little skate, and subsequently was found in many other species, including humans and rodents. The present study describes the isolation of a new cell line, LEE-1, derived from an early embryo of L. erinacea, and characterizes the expression of Ost in these cells. The mRNA size and amino acid sequence of Ost-beta in LEE-1 were identical to that previously reported for Ost-beta from skate liver, and the primary structure was identical to that of the spiny dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias) with the exception of a single amino acid. Ost-beta was found both on the plasma membrane and intracellularly in LEE-1 cells, consistent with its localization in other cell types. Interestingly, arachidonic acid, the precursor to eicosanoids, strongly induced Ost-beta expression in LEE-1 cells and a lipid mixture containing arachidonic acid also induced Ost-alpha. Overall, the present study describes the isolation of a novel marine cell line, and shows that this cell line expresses relatively high levels of Ost when cultured in the presence of arachidonic acid. Although the function of this transport protein in embryo-derived cells is unknown, it may play a role in the disposition of eicosanoids or steroid-derived molecules.

  14. Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Effects of Pyeongwisan on LPS-Stimulated Murine Macrophages and Mouse Models of Acetic Acid-Induced Writhing Response and Xylene-Induced Ear Edema

    PubMed Central

    Oh, You-Chang; Jeong, Yun Hee; Cho, Won-Kyung; Ha, Jeong-Ho; Gu, Min Jung; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2015-01-01

    Pyeongwisan (PW) is an herbal medication used in traditional East Asian medicine to treat anorexia, abdominal distension, borborygmus and diarrhea caused by gastric catarrh, atony and dilatation. However, its effects on inflammation-related diseases are unknown. In this study, we investigated the biological effects of PW on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammation in macrophages and on local inflammation in vivo. We investigated the biological effects of PW on the production of inflammatory mediators, pro-inflammatory cytokines and related products as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Additionally, we evaluated the analgesic effect on the acetic acid-induced writhing response and the inhibitory activity on xylene-induced ear edema in mice. PW showed anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting the production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). In addition, PW strongly suppressed inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), a NO synthesis enzyme, induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and inhibited NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation. Also, PW suppressed TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β cytokine production in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophage cells. Furthermore, PW showed an analgesic effect on the writhing response and an inhibitory effect on mice ear edema. We demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects and inhibitory mechanism in macrophages as well as inhibitory activity of PW in vivo for the first time. Our results suggest the potential value of PW as an inflammatory therapeutic agent developed from a natural substance. PMID:25569097

  15. [Elicitor activity of chitosan and arachidonic acid: their similarity and distinction].

    PubMed

    Vasiukova, N I; Gerasimova, N G; Chalenko, G I; Ozeretskovskaia, O L

    2012-01-01

    Two elicitors-chitosan and arachidonic acid-induced the same defense responses in potatoes, stimulating the processes of wound reparation and inducing the formation of phytoalexins, inhibitors of proteinase, and active forms of oxygen. However, chitosan induced the defense potential of plant tissues at concentrations higher than those of arachidonic acid. The protective action of chitosan was defined by two parameters, i.e., the ability to induce the immune responses in plant tissues and to exhibit a toxic effect on the pathogen development, causing late blight and seedling blight, whereas the elicitor effect of arachidonic acid depended on its ability to induce the defense potential of plant tissues only.

  16. Pierced Ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Pierced Ears KidsHealth > For Kids > Pierced Ears Print A A ... cool, but infected ears do not! Getting Your Ears Pierced It's important to get your ears pierced ...

  17. Swimmer's Ear

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    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Swimmer's Ear KidsHealth > For Kids > Swimmer's Ear Print A A ... How Do I Know if I Have Swimmer's Ear? Swimmer's ear may start with some itching, but ...

  18. Ear Tubes

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    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Tubes Ear Tubes Patient Health Information News media ... and throat specialist) may be considered. What are ear tubes? Ear tubes are tiny cylinders placed through ...

  19. Swimmer's ear

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    ... such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) Vinegar (acetic acid) ear drops People with chronic swimmer's ear may ... drop of alcohol with 1 drop of white vinegar and placing the mixture into the ears after ...

  20. Ear Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... ear, where they make your eardrum vibrate. The vibrations are transmitted through three tiny bones, called ossicles, in your middle ear. The vibrations travel to your inner ear, a snail-shaped ...

  1. Ear Infections

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Ear Infections Overview How does the ear work? A tube called the eustachian (say: "you-stay-shee-an") tube connects the middle ear with the back of the nose. Normally this ...

  2. Cauliflower Ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes What's Cauliflower Ear? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Cauliflower Ear? Print A A A Text Size Have you ever seen someone whose ear looks bumpy and lumpy? The person might have ...

  3. Ear barotrauma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ear popping - barotrauma; Pressure-related ear pain; Eustachian tube dysfunction - barotrauma ... air pressure outside of the body. The Eustachian tube is a connection between the middle ear and ...

  4. Ear Pieces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiJulio, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art project wherein students make fanciful connections between art and medicine. This project challenges students to interpret "ear idioms" (e.g. "blow it out your ear," "in one ear and out the other") by relying almost entirely on realistic ear drawings, the placement of them, marks, and values. In that…

  5. Ear trauma.

    PubMed

    Eagles, Kylee; Fralich, Laura; Stevenson, J Herbert

    2013-04-01

    Understanding basic ear anatomy and function allows an examiner to quickly and accurately identify at-risk structures in patients with head and ear trauma. External ear trauma (ie, hematoma or laceration) should be promptly treated with appropriate injury-specific techniques. Tympanic membrane injuries have multiple mechanisms and can often be conservatively treated. Temporal bone fractures are a common cause of ear trauma and can be life threatening. Facial nerve injuries and hearing loss can occur in ear trauma.

  6. Your Ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... Protect your hearing by wearing earplugs at loud music concerts and around noisy machinery, like in wood ... For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? What Is an Ear Infection? ...

  7. Ear wax

    MedlinePlus

    The ear canal is lined with hair follicles and glands that produce a waxy oil called cerumen. The wax will most ... Wax can build up and block the ear canal. Wax blockage is one of the most common ...

  8. Ear Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... affects the middle ear and is called otitis media. The tubes inside the ears become clogged with fluid and mucus. This can affect hearing, because sound cannot get through all that fluid. If your child isn't old enough to say "My ear ...

  9. Super Ears.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Stan

    1995-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students design, construct, and test "super ears" to investigate sound and hearing. Students work in groups of three and explore how the outer ear funnels sound waves to the inner ear and how human hearing compares to that of other animals. (NB)

  10. cAMP increases mitochondrial cholesterol transport through the induction of arachidonic acid release inside this organelle in Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Castilla, Rocío; Duarte, Alejandra; Maloberti, Paula; Paz, Cristina; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated the direct effect of arachidonic acid on cholesterol transport in intact cells or isolated mitochondria from steroidogenic cells and the effect of cyclic-AMP on the specific release of this fatty acid inside the mitochondria. We show for the first time that cyclic-AMP can regulate the release of arachidonic acid in a specialized compartment of MA-10 Leydig cells, e.g. the mitochondria, and that the fatty acid induces cholesterol transport through a mechanism different from the classical pathway. Arachidonic acid and arachidonoyl-CoA can stimulate cholesterol transport in isolated mitochondria from nonstimulated cells. The effect of arachidonoyl-CoA is inhibited by the reduction in the expression or in the activity of a mitochondrial thioesterase that uses arachidonoyl-CoA as a substrate to release arachidonic acid. cAMP-induced arachidonic acid accumulation into the mitochondria is also reduced when the mitochondrial thioesterase activity or expression is blocked. This new feature in the regulation of cholesterol transport by arachidonic acid and the release of arachidonic acid in specialized compartment of the cells could offer novel means for understanding the regulation of steroid synthesis but also would be important in other situations such as neuropathological disorders or oncology disorders, where cholesterol transport plays an important role.

  11. Human monocyte differentiation stage affects response to arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Alvarez, Elizabeth; Pelaez, Carlos A; García, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    AA-induced cell death mechanisms acting on human monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM), U937 promonocytes and PMA-differentiated U937 cells were studied. Arachidonic acid induced apoptosis and necrosis in monocytes and U937 cells but only apoptosis in MDM and U937D cells. AA increased both types of death in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cells and increased the percentage of TNFalpha+ cells and reduced IL-10+ cells. Experiments blocking these cytokines indicated that AA-mediated death was TNFalpha- and IL-10-independent. The differences in AA-mediated cell death could be explained by high ROS, calpain and sPLA-2 production and activity in monocytes. Blocking sPLA-2 in monocytes and treatment with antioxidants favored M. tuberculosis control whereas AA enhanced M. tuberculosis growth in MDM. Such evidence suggested that AA-modulated effector mechanisms depend on mononuclear phagocytes' differentiation stage.

  12. Ear emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... and ruptured eardrums can be caused by: Inserting cotton swabs, toothpicks, pins, pens, or other objects into ... The person will have severe pain. Place sterile cotton gently in the outer ear canal to keep ...

  13. Elephant ear

    MedlinePlus

    The harmful substances in elephant ear plants are: Oxalic acid Asparagine, a protein found in this plant Note: ... days to a week if treated correctly. Rarely, oxalic acid may cause swelling severe enough to block the ...

  14. Role of arachidonic acid cascade in Rhinella arenarum oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Maria Eugenia; Arias-Torres, Ana Josefina; Zelarayán, Liliana Isabel

    2015-08-01

    There are no studies that document the production of prostaglandins (PGs) or their role in Rhinella arenarum oocyte maturation. In this study, we analysed the effect of arachidonic acid (AA) and prostaglandins (PGs) on maturation, activation and pronuclear formation in R. arenarum oocytes. Our results demonstrated that AA was capable of inducing maturation in time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. Arachidonic acid-induced maturation was inhibited by indomethacin. PGs from AA hydrolysis, such as prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) and, to a lesser extent, PGE2, induced meiosis resumption. Oocyte maturation in response to PGF2α was similar to that produced by progesterone (P4). Oocyte response to PGE1 was scarce. Rhinella arenarum oocyte PGF2α-induced maturation showed seasonal variation. From February to June, oocytes presented low sensitivity to PGF2α. In following periods, this response increased until a maximum was reached during October to January, a close temporal correlation with oocyte response to P4 being observed. The effect of PGF2α on maturation was verified by analysing the capacity of oocytes to activate and form pronuclei after being injected with homologous sperm. The cytological analysis of activated oocytes demonstrated the absence of cortical granules in oocytes, suggesting that PGF2α induces germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and meiosis resumption up to metaphase II. In turn, oocytes matured by the action of PGF2α were able to form pronuclei after fertilization in a similar way to oocyte maturated by P4. In microinjection of mature cytoplasm experiments, the transformation of pre-maturation promoting factor (pre-MPF) to MPF was observed when oocytes were treated with PGF2α. In summary, our results illustrated the participation of the AA cascade and its metabolites in maturation, activation and pronuclei formation in R. arenarum. PMID:24964276

  15. Ear examination

    MedlinePlus

    The ear canal differs in size, shape, and color from person to person. Normally, the canal is skin-colored and has small hairs. Yellowish-brown earwax may be present. The eardrum is a light-gray color or a shiny pearly-white. Light should reflect off ...

  16. Cosmetic ear surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Otoplasty; Ear pinning; Ear surgery - cosmetic; Ear reshaping; Pinnaplasty ... Cosmetic ear surgery may be done in the surgeon's office, an outpatient clinic, or a hospital. It can be performed under ...

  17. Ear Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Plastic Surgery Ear Plastic Surgery Patient Health Information ... they may improve appearance and self-confidence. Can Ear Deformities Be Corrected? Formation of the ear during ...

  18. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Patient Health Information ... with a hearing loss. How Does the Healthy Ear Work? The ear has three main parts: the ...

  19. Better Ear Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Better Ear Health Better Ear Health Patient Health Information News ... often helpful to those with this condition. Swimmer’s Ear An infection of the outer ear structures caused ...

  20. How the Ear Works

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You How the Ear Works How the Ear Works Patient Health Information News media interested in ... public relations staff at newsroom@entnet.org . The ear has three main parts: the outer ear (including ...

  1. Arachidonate metabolism in bovine gallbladder muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, M.; Hidaka, T.; Ueta, T.; Ogura, R.

    1983-04-01

    Incubation of (1-/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid (AA) with homogenates of bovine gallbladder muscle generated a large amount of radioactive material having the chromatographic mobility of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (stable product of PGI2) and smaller amounts of products that comigrated with PGF2 alpha PGE2. Formation of these products was inhibited by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. The major radioactive product identified by thin-layer chromatographic mobility and by gas chromatography - mass spectrometric analysis was found to be 6-keto-PGF1 alpha. The quantitative metabolic pattern of (1-/sup 14/C)PGH2 was virtually identical to that of (1-/sup 14/C)AA. Incubation of arachidonic acid with slices of bovine gallbladder muscle released labile anti-aggregatory material in the medium, which was inhibited by aspirin or 15-hydroperoxy-AA. These results indicate that bovine gallbladder muscle has a considerable enzymatic capacity to produce PGI2 from arachidonic acid.

  2. Transgenic production of arachidonic acid in oilseeds.

    PubMed

    Petrie, James R; Shrestha, Pushkar; Belide, Srinivas; Mansour, Maged P; Liu, Qing; Horne, James; Nichols, Peter D; Singh, Surinder P

    2012-02-01

    We describe a transgenic microalgal Δ9-elongase pathway transformed in both Brassica napus and Arabidopsis thaliana seed resulting in the production of arachidonic acid (ARA). This pathway is noteworthy for both the production of ARA in seed tissue and the low levels of intermediate C20 fatty acids that accumulate. We also demonstrate that the arachidonic acid is naturally enriched at the sn2 position in triacylglycerol. This is the first report of ARA production by the Δ9-elongase pathway in an oilseed.

  3. Benign ear cyst or tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Osteomas; Exostoses; Tumor - ear; Cysts - ear; Ear cysts; Ear tumors; Bony tumor of the ear canal ... bony tumors of the ear canal (exostoses and osteomas) are caused by excess growth of bone. Repeated ...

  4. Ear tube insertion

    MedlinePlus

    Myringotomy; Tympanostomy; Ear tube surgery; Pressure equalization tubes; Ventilating tubes; Ear infection - tubes; Otitis - tubes ... trapped fluid can flow out of the middle ear. This prevents hearing loss and reduces the risk ...

  5. Ears and Altitude

    MedlinePlus

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ears and Altitude Ears and Altitude Patient Health Information ... uncomfortable feeling of fullness or pressure. Why do ears pop? Normally, swallowing causes a little click or ...

  6. Ear tube insertion - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100045.htm Ear tube insertion - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... 4 Overview The eardrum (tympanic membrane) separates the ear canal from the middle ear. Update Date 8/ ...

  7. Travel Inside the Ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menu Home Health Info Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Balance Taste and Smell Voice, Speech, and Language ... here Home » Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Travel Inside the Ear Video When sound waves ...

  8. Middle ear infection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A middle ear infection is also known as otitis media. It is one of the most common of childhood infections. With this illness, the middle ear becomes red, swollen, and inflamed because of bacteria ...

  9. Ear drainage culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... needed. Your health care provider will use a cotton swab to collect the sample from inside the ... Using a cotton swab to take a sample of drainage from the outer ear is not painful. However, ear pain may ...

  10. Ear Infection and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Infection and Vaccines Ear Infection and Vaccines Patient Health Information News ... or may need reinsertion over time. What about vaccines? A vaccine is a preparation administered to stimulate ...

  11. Ear Infections in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... shaped organ that converts sound vibrations from the middle ear into electrical signals. The auditory nerve carries these signals from the cochlea to the brain. Other nearby parts of the ear also can be involved in ...

  12. Ear surgery - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100016.htm Ear surgery - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Overview This image demonstrates normal appearance of the ears in relation to the face. Update Date 10/ ...

  13. Ear infection - chronic

    MedlinePlus

    Middle ear infection - chronic; Otitis media - chronic; Chronic otitis media; Chronic ear infection ... Chole RA. Chronic otitis media, mastoiditis, and petrositis. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. ...

  14. Licofelone attenuates quinolinic acid induced Huntington like symptoms: possible behavioral, biochemical and cellular alterations.

    PubMed

    Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2011-03-30

    Cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase enzymes are involved in arachidonic acid metabolism. Emerging evidence indicates that cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitors prevent neurodegenerative processes and related complications. Therefore, the present study has been designed to explore the neuroprotective potential of licofelone (dual COX-2/5-LOX inhibitor) against quinolinic acid induced Huntington like symptom in rats. Intrastriatal administration of quinolinic acid significantly caused reduction in body weight and motor function (locomotor activity, rotarod performance and beam walk test), oxidative defense (as evidenced by increased lipid peroxidation, nitrite concentration and decreased endogenous antioxidant enzymes), alteration in mitochondrial enzyme complex (I, II and IV) activities, raised TNF-α level and striatal lesion volume as compared to sham treated animals. Licofelone (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg) treatment significantly improved body weight, locomotor activity, rotarod performance, balance beam walk performance, oxidative defense, mitochondrial enzyme complex activities and attenuated TNF-α level and striatal lesion as compared to control (quinolinic acid). The present study highlights that licofelone attenuates behavioral, biochemical and cellular alterations against quinolinic acid induced neurotoxicity and this could be an important therapeutic avenue to ameliorate the Huntington like symptoms. PMID:21237233

  15. Inhibition of arachidonate release from rat peritoneal macrophage by biflavonoids.

    PubMed

    Lee, S J; Son, K H; Chang, H W; Kang, S S; Kim, H P

    1997-12-01

    Biflavonoid is one of unique classes of naturally-occurring bioflavonoid. Previously, certain biflavonoids were found to possess the inhibitory effects on phospholipase A(2) activity and lymphocytes proliferation(1) suggesting their anti-inflammatory/immunoregulatory potential. In this study, effects of several biflavonoids on arachidonic acid release from rat peritoneal macrophages were investigated, because arachidonic acid released from the activated macrophages is one of the indices of inflammatory conditions. When resident peritoneal macrophages labeled with [(3)H]arachidonic acid were activated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or calcium ionophore, A23187, radioactivity released in the medium was increased approximately 4.1 approximately 7.3 fold after 120 min incubation compared to the spontaneous release in the control incubation. In this condition, biflavonoids (10 uM) such as ochnaflavone, ginkgetin and isoginkgetin, showed inhibition of arachidonate release from macrophages activated by PMA (32.5 approximately 40.0% inhibition) or A23187 (21.7 approximately 41.7% inhibition). Amentoflavone showed protection only against PMA-induced arachidonate release, while apigenin, a monomer of these biflavonoids, did not show the significant inhibition up to 10 uM. Staurosporin (1 uM), a protein kinase C inhibitor, showed an inhibitory effect only against PMA-induced arachidonate release (96.8% inhibition). Inhibition of arachidonate release from the activated macrophages may contribute to an anti-inflammatory potential of biflavonoidsin vivo.

  16. Middle Ear Infections and Ear Tube Surgery (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Zika & Pregnancy Middle Ear Infections and Ear Tube Surgery KidsHealth > For Parents > Middle Ear Infections and Ear ... medio y colocación de tubos de ventilación Why Surgery? Many kids get middle ear infections (known as ...

  17. Pathology of the Ear

    PubMed Central

    Orengo, Ida; Robbins, Kerri; Marsch, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    The external ear is exposed to weathering and trauma; it also has sparse vascularity, making it prone to infection and disease. The external location of the cutaneous ear makes it easily visible for diagnosis and accessible for treatment. In this article, the authors focus on diseases of the ear that are most commonly encountered and may be subject to surgical and medical evaluation and/or treatment. Epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical course, and treatment for each disease entity are discussed. PMID:23115534

  18. [Evolution of the ear].

    PubMed

    Qvist, Morten Rosenkilde

    2009-12-14

    The evolution of the ear may be traced through transitional fossils, comparative anatomy and embryology. The organ of hearing evolved from receptors of the vestibulary organ of fish. The tympanic ear developed in amphibians at the transition to terrestrial life, and the hyomandibula was isolated as the first middle ear bone, the columella stapes. Reptile jaw bones, quadratum and articulare, transformed to malleus and incus in mammals. With selective advantages during the evolution, an increasing structural complexity of the ear accompanied improved sound transmission and reception.

  19. Biochemical and subcellular distribution of arachidonic acid in rat myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, Y.; Gross, R.W.; Sobel, B.E.; Saffitz, J.E. )

    1987-12-01

    Selective release of arachidonic acid from prelabeled phospholipid pools has been observed following exposure of neonatal rat cardiac myocytes to metabolic inhibitors in vitro and has been correlated temporally with the development of irreversible sarcolemmal damage. Hydrolysis of phospholipids with release of arachidonic acid may be an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of sarcolemmal damage induced by ischemia. To elucidate potential subcellular loci of arachidonic acid release in ischemic myocardium, the authors characterized the phospholipid composition of adult rat myocardial sarcolemma and delineated the biochemical and subcellular distribution of radiolabeled arachidonic acid in neonatal rat myocytes incubated with ({sup 3}H)-arachidonic acid for selected intervals. Radioactivity was located almost exclusively in mitochondria and internal cytoplasmic membranes (primarily sarcoplasmic reticulum), which collectively contained 90% of myocyte radioactivity. These results indicate that radiolabeled arachidonic acid released from prelabeled phospholipid pools on exposure of neonatal rat myocytes to oxidative inhibitors is derived from mitochondria and internal cell membranes. The diminutive labeling of the sarcolemma suggests that turnover of arachidonoyl phospholipids is slower in the sarcolemma than in other membranous organelles.

  20. Ear - blocked at high altitudes

    MedlinePlus

    ... ears; Flying and blocked ears; Eustachian tube dysfunction - high altitude ... the middle ear and the back of the nose and upper throat. ... down from high altitudes. Chewing gum the entire time you are ...

  1. Ear canal cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Holt, J J

    1992-06-01

    Although cholesteatomas are more commonly found in the middle ear and the mastoid, the disease can occur in the external ear canal. All cases of ear canal cholesteatoma treated by the author were reviewed. There were nine ears in seven patients, who had an average age of 62 years. The lesions ranged in size from a few millimeters to extensive mastoid destruction. Smaller lesions can be managed by frequent cleaning as an office procedure. Larger lesions require surgery, either canaloplasty or mastoidectomy. The otolaryngologist should suspect this disease in the elderly. Microscopic examination of the ear with meticulous cleaning of all wax, especially in elderly patients, is most useful in detecting early disease. Frequent applications of mineral oil to the canal should be used in the management of the disease and to prevent recurrence.

  2. Ear problems in swimmers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mao-Che; Liu, Chia-Yu; Shiao, An-Suey; Wang, Tyrone

    2005-08-01

    Acute diffuse otitis externa (swimmer's ear), otomycosis, exostoses, traumatic eardrum perforation, middle ear infection, and barotraumas of the inner ear are common problems in swimmers and people engaged in aqua activities. The most common ear problem in swimmers is acute diffuse otitis externa, with Pseudomonas aeruginosa being the most common pathogen. The symptoms are itching, otalgia, otorrhea, and conductive hearing loss. The treatment includes frequent cleansing of the ear canal, pain control, oral or topical medications, acidification of the ear canal, and control of predisposing factors. Swimming in polluted waters and ear-canal cleaning with cotton-tip applicators should be avoided. Exostoses are usually seen in people who swim in cold water and present with symptoms of accumulated debris, otorrhea and conductive hearing loss. The treatment for exostoses is transmeatal surgical removal of the tumors. Traumatic eardrum perforations may occur during water skiing or scuba diving and present with symptoms of hearing loss, otalgia, otorrhea, tinnitus and vertigo. Tympanoplasty might be needed if the perforations do not heal spontaneously. Patients with chronic otitis media with active drainage should avoid swimming, while patients who have undergone mastoidectomy and who have no cavity problems may swim. For children with ventilation tubes, surface swimming is safe in a clean, chlorinated swimming pool. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss and some degree of vertigo may occur after diving because of rupture of the round or oval window membrane.

  3. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Risk factors for acute ear infections include: Attending day care (especially centers with more than 6 children) Changes ... hands and toys often. If possible, choose a day care that has 6 or fewer children. This can ...

  4. Ear Injuries (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eardrum, ear canal, ossicles, cochlea, or the vestibular nerve. Here's a look at the most common ... may cause permanent hearing loss or balance problems. Vestibular therapy may help kids with balance problems. And ...

  5. Middle Ear Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ...

  6. Sports injuries of the ear.

    PubMed

    Wagner, G A

    1972-07-01

    The author describes common sports injuries involving the ear. Such injuries include hematoma, lacerations, foreign bodies (tattoo), and thermal injuries. Ear canal injuries include swimmer's ear and penetrating injuries. Tympanum injuries include tympanic membrane perforations, ossicular discontinuity, eustachian tube dysfunction, temporal bone fractures and traumatic facial nerve palsy. Inner ear injuries include traumatic sensorineural deafness. The author emphasizes the management of these injuries.

  7. [Inner Ear Hearing Loss].

    PubMed

    Hesse, G

    2016-06-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most dominant handicaps in modern societies, which additionally very often is not realized or not admitted. About one quarter of the general population suffers from inner ear hearing loss and is therefore restricted in communicational skills. Demographic factors like increasing age play an important role as well as environmental influences and an increasing sound and noise exposure especially in leisure activities. Thus borders between a "classical" presbyacusis - if it ever existed - and envirionmentally induced hearing loss disappear. Today restrictions in hearing ability develop earlier in age but at the same time they are detected and diagnosed earlier. This paper can eventually enlighten the wide field of inner ear hearing loss only fragmentarily; therefore mainly new research, findings and developments are reviewed. The first part discusses new aspects of diagnostics of inner ear hearing loss and different etiologies. PMID:27259171

  8. Listening to the Ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Christopher Alan

    Otoacoustic emissions demonstrate that the ear creates sound while listening to sound, offering a promising acoustic window on the mechanics of hearing in awake, listening human beings. That window is clouded, however, by an incomplete knowledge of wave reflection and transmission, both forth and back within the cochlea and through the middle ear. This thesis "does windows," addressing wave propagation and scattering on both sides of the middle ear. A summary of highlights follows. Measurements of the cochlear input impedance in cat are used to identify a new symmetry in cochlear mechanics--termed "tapering symmetry" after its geometric interpretation in simple models--that guarantees that the wavelength of the traveling wave changes slowly with position near the stapes. Waves therefore propagate without reflection through the basal turns of the cochlea. Analytic methods for solving the cochlear wave equations using a perturbative scattering series are given and used to demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, conventional cochlear models exhibit negligible internal reflection whether or not they accurately represent the tapering symmetries of the inner ear. Frameworks for the systematic "deconstruction" of eardrum and middle-ear transduction characteristics are developed and applied to the analysis of noninvasive measurements of middle-ear and cochlear mechanics. A simple phenomenological model of inner-ear compressibility that correctly predicts hearing thresholds in patients with missing or disarticulated middle-ear ossicles is developed and used to establish an upper bound on cochlear compressibility several orders of magnitude smaller than that provided by direct measurements. Accurate measurements of stimulus -frequency evoked otoacoustic emissions are performed and used to determine the form and frequency variation of the cochlear traveling-wave ratio noninvasively. Those measurements are inverted to obtain the spatial distribution of mechanical

  9. Listening to the ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shera, Christopher A.

    Otoacoustic emissions demonstrate that the ear creates sound while listening to sound, offering a promising acoustic window on the mechanics of hearing in awake, listening human beings. That window is clouded, however, by an incomplete knowledge of wave reflection and transmission, both forth and back within the cochlea and through the middle ear. This thesis "does windows," addressing wave propagation and scattering on both sides of the middle ear. A summary of highlights follows. Measurements of the cochlear input impedance in cat are used to identify a new symmetry in cochlear mechanics-termed "tapering symmetry" after its geometric interpretation in simple models-that guarantees that the wavelength of the traveling wave changes slowly with position near the stapes. Waves therefore propagate without reflection through the basal turns of the cochlea. Analytic methods for solving the cochlear wave equations using a perturbative scattering series are given and used to demonstrate that, contrary to common belief, conventional cochlear models exhibit negligible internal reflection whether or not they accurately represent the tapering symmetries of the inner ear. Frameworks for the systematic "deconstruction" of eardrum and middle-ear transduction characteristics are developed and applied to the analysis of noninvasive measurements of middle-ear and cochlear mechanics. A simple phenomenological model of inner-ear compressibility that correctly predicts hearing thresholds in patients with missing or disarticulated middle-ear ossicles is developed and used to establish an upper bound on cochlear compressibility several orders of magnitude smaller than that provided by direct measurements. Accurate measurements of stimulus frequency evoked otoacoustic emissions are performed and used to determine the form and frequency variation of the cochlear traveling-wave ratio noninvasively. Those measurements are inverted to obtain the spatial distribution of mechanical

  10. The red ear syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Red Ear Syndrome (RES) is a very rare disorder, with approximately 100 published cases in the medical literature. Red ear (RE) episodes are characterised by unilateral or bilateral attacks of paroxysmal burning sensations and reddening of the external ear. The duration of these episodes ranges from a few seconds to several hours. The attacks occur with a frequency ranging from several a day to a few per year. Episodes can occur spontaneously or be triggered, most frequently by rubbing or touching the ear, heat or cold, chewing, brushing of the hair, neck movements or exertion. Early-onset idiopathic RES seems to be associated with migraine, whereas late-onset idiopathic forms have been reported in association with trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs). Secondary forms of RES occur with upper cervical spine disorders or temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction. RES is regarded refractory to medical treatments, although some migraine preventative treatments have shown moderate benefit mainly in patients with migraine-related attacks. The pathophysiology of RES is still unclear but several hypotheses involving peripheral or central nervous system mechanisms have been proposed. PMID:24093332

  11. From Ear to Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimura, Doreen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper Doreen Kimura gives a personal history of the "right-ear effect" in dichotic listening. The focus is on the early ground-breaking papers, describing how she did the first dichotic listening studies relating the effects to brain asymmetry. The paper also gives a description of the visual half-field technique for lateralized stimulus…

  12. External Otitis (Swimmer's Ear)

    MedlinePlus

    ... drops, keeping water out of the ear, and pain relievers are the most common forms of treatment. External otitis may involve the entire canal, as ... does not allow fungus to grow as well. Treatment of boils depends on ... relievers, such as oxycodone with acetaminophen , can be given ...

  13. Ear, Nose & Throat Issues & Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Throat Issues & Down Syndrome Ear, Nose & Throat Issues & Down Syndrome Ear, nose, and throat (ENT) problems are common ... What ENT Problems Are Common in Children With Down Syndrome? External Ear Canal Stenosis Stenotic ear canals (narrow ...

  14. Low-set ears and pinna abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    Low-set ears; Microtia; "Lop" ear; Pinna abnormalities; Genetic defect-pinna; Congenital defect-pinna ... The outer ear or "pinna" forms when the baby is growing in the mother's womb. The growth of this ear part ...

  15. [Blast injuries of the ear].

    PubMed

    Haralampiev, K; Ristić, B

    1991-01-01

    Blast injury of the ear is the actual military medical problem. The ear, due to its anatomo-physiologic characteristics, is more sensitive to effects of blast waves than other organs and systems. The anatomic and functional ear damages, their symptoms, etiology and clinical course are described. The diagnosis and treatment have been pointed out. PMID:1807053

  16. Ear Infections and Language Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Joanne E.; Zeisel, Susan A.

    Ear infections in infants and preschoolers can cause mild or moderate temporary hearing loss, which may in turn affect a child's ability to understand and learn language. Noting that providing children with proper medical treatment for ear infections or middle ear fluid is important in preventing possible problems with language development, this…

  17. Arachidonic acid assimilation by thrombocytes from white carneau pigeons

    SciTech Connect

    Saxon, D.J.; Blankenship, T.

    1986-03-01

    The metabolism of arachidonic acid was investigated using thrombocyte-enriched-plasma from RBWC and WC-II white carneau pigeons, which differ genetically in their susceptibility to atherosclerosis. Thrombocytes were incubated at 42 C with (/sup 14/C) arachidonate in Puck's solution. After a 1 hour labeling period the WC-II cells had taken up 69% and RBWC 77% of the (/sup 14/C)arachidonate from the medium. When 8,11,14-eicosatrienoic acid or 5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid were added to incubation media the (/sup 14/C) uptake was reduced in each type cell, with WC-II exhibiting the greatest effect. Release of (/sup 14/C)molecules from cells labeled with (/sup 14/)Carachidonate was studied using calcium ionophore and indomethacin. Indomethacin inhibited (/sup 14/C) molecule release similarly in both RBWC and WC-II cells. Calcium ionophore was twice as effective in stimulating (/sup 14/C)molecule release from WC-II than RBWC cells. Therefore, the WE-II cells (from pigeons greater in susceptibility to atherosclerosis) are more sensitive to calcium ionophore than the REWC cells.

  18. Drug delivery to the ear.

    PubMed

    Hoskison, E; Daniel, M; Al-Zahid, S; Shakesheff, K M; Bayston, R; Birchall, J P

    2013-01-01

    Drug delivery to the ear is used to treat conditions of the middle and inner ear such as acute and chronic otitis media, Ménière's disease, sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus. Drugs used include antibiotics, antifungals, steroids, local anesthetics and neuroprotective agents. A literature review was conducted searching Medline (1966-2012), Embase (1988-2012), the Cochrane Library and Ovid (1966-2012), using search terms 'drug delivery', 'middle ear', 'inner ear' and 'transtympanic'. There are numerous methods of drug delivery to the middle ear, which can be categorized as topical, systemic (intravenous), transtympanic and via the Eustachian tube. Localized treatments to the ear have the advantages of targeted drug delivery allowing higher therapeutic doses and minimizing systemic side effects. The ideal scenario would be a carrier system that could cross the intact tympanic membrane loaded with drugs or biochemical agents for the treatment of middle and inner ear conditions.

  19. Proliferation-dependent changes in release of arachidonic acid from endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Whatley, R E; Satoh, K; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M; Prescott, S M

    1994-01-01

    Stimulation of endothelial cells resulted in release of arachidonic acid from phospholipids. The magnitude of this response decreased as the cells became confluent and the change coincided with a decrease in the percentage of cells in growth phases (G2+M); this was not a consequence of time in culture or a factor in the growth medium. Preconfluent cells released approximately 30% of arachidonic acid; confluent cells released only 6%. The decreasing release of arachidonic acid was demonstrated using metabolic labeling, mass measurements of arachidonic acid, and measurement of PGI2. The decrease was not due to a changing pool of arachidonic acid, and mass measurements showed no depletion of arachidonic acid. Release from each phospholipid and from each phospholipid class decreased with confluence. Conversion of confluent cells to the proliferative phenotype by mechanical wounding of the monolayer caused increased release of arachidonic acid. Potential mechanisms for these changes were investigated using assays of phospholipase activity. Phospholipase A2 activity changed in concert with the alteration in release, a consequence of changes in phosphorylation of the enzyme. The increased release of arachidonic acid from preconfluent, actively dividing cells may have important physiologic implications and may help elucidate mechanisms regulating release of arachidonic acid. Images PMID:7962534

  20. Modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism by Rous sarcoma virus

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, K.; Aderem, A.; Hanafusa, H. )

    1989-07-01

    Arachidonic acid (C{sub 20:4}) metabolites were released constitutively from wild-type Rous sarcoma virus-transformed chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF). {sup 3}H-labeled C{sub 20:4} and its metabolites were released from unstimulated and uninfected CEF only in response to stimuli such as serum, phorbol ester, or the calcium ionophore A23187. High-pressure liquid chromatography analysis showed that the radioactivity released from ({sup 3}H)arachidonate-labeled transformed cells was contained in free arachidonate and in the cyclooxygenase products prostaglandin E{sub 2} and prostaglandin F{sub 2} alpha; no lipoxygenase products were identified. The release of C{sub 20:4} and its metabolites from CEF infected with pp60{sup src} deletion mutants was correlated with serum-independent DNA synthesis and with the expression of the mRNA for 9E3, a gene expressed in Rous sarcoma virus-transformed cells which has homology with several mitogenic and inflammatory peptides. {sup 3}H-labeled C{sub 20:4} release was not correlated with p36 phosphorylation, which argues against a role for this protein as a phospholipase A{sub 2} inhibitor. CEF infected with other oncogenic viruses encoding a tyrosine kinase also released C{sub 20:4}, as did CEF infected with viruses that contained mos and ras; however, infection with a crk-containing virus did not result in stimulation of {sup 3}H-labeled C{sub 20:4} release, suggesting that utilization of this signaling pathway is specific for particular transformation stimuli.

  1. The ear: Diagnostic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Vignaud, J.; Jardin, C.; Rosen, L.

    1986-01-01

    This is an English translation of volume 17-1 of Traite de radiodiagnostic and represents a reasonably complete documentation of the diseases of the temporal bone that have imaging manifestations. The book begins with chapters on embryology, anatomy and radiography anatomy; it continues with blood supply and an overview of temporal bone pathology. Subsequent chapters cover malformations, trauma, infections, tumors, postoperative changes, glomus tumors, vertebasilar insufficiency, and facial nerve canal lesions. A final chapter demonstrates and discusses magnetic resonance images of the ear and cerebellopontine angle.

  2. Fungal arachidonic acid-rich oil: research, development and industrialization.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiao-Jun; Ren, Lu-Jing; Nie, Zhi-Kui; Huang, He; Ouyang, Ping-Kai

    2014-09-01

    Fungal arachidonic acid (ARA)-rich oil is an important microbial oil that affects diverse physiological processes that impact normal health and chronic disease. In this article, the historic developments and technological achievements in fungal ARA-rich oil production in the past several years are reviewed. The biochemistry of ARA, ARA-rich oil synthesis and the accumulation mechanism are first introduced. Subsequently, the fermentation and downstream technologies are summarized. Furthermore, progress in the industrial production of ARA-rich oil is discussed. Finally, guidelines for future studies of fungal ARA-rich oil production are proposed in light of the current progress, challenges and trends in the field.

  3. Inner ear decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Farmer, J C; Thomas, W G; Youngblood, D G; Bennett, P B

    1976-09-01

    With recent increases in commercial, military, and sport diving to deeper depths, inner ear injuries during such exposures have been encountered more frequently and noted during several phases of diving: during compression, at stable deep depths, with excessive noise exposure in diving, and during decompression. The pathophysiology of these injuries differs, depending upon the phase of diving in which the injuries occur. In this report, 23 cases of hearing loss, tinnitus, and/or vertigo occurring during or shortly after decompression are presented. Thirteen of these cases occurred in helium-oxygen dives involving a change to air during the latter stages of decompression. A significant correlation is present between prompt recompression treatment, relief of symptoms, and lack of residual deficits. Current knowledge indicates that the management of otologic decompression sickness should include: 1. prompt recompression to at least 99 feet deeper than the symptom onset depth; 2. recompression using the previous helium-oxygen mixture when the injuries occur during or shortly after a switch from helium-oxygen to air during the latter stages of decompression; 3. the use of parenteral diazepam for symptom relief and cyclic inhalations of oxygen enriched treatment gases; and 4. the avoidance of further diving by divers who exhibit permanent inner ear injuries after the acute symptoms have subsided.

  4. Arachidonic acid enhances reproduction in Daphnia magna and mitigates changes in sex ratios induced by pyriproxyfen.

    PubMed

    Ginjupalli, Gautam K; Gerard, Patrick D; Baldwin, William S

    2015-03-01

    Arachidonic acid is 1 of only 2 unsaturated fatty acids retained in the ovaries of crustaceans and an inhibitor of HR97g, a nuclear receptor expressed in adult ovaries. The authors hypothesized that, as a key fatty acid, arachidonic acid may be associated with reproduction and potentially environmental sex determination in Daphnia. Reproduction assays with arachidonic acid indicate that it alters female:male sex ratios by increasing female production. This reproductive effect only occurred during a restricted Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata diet. Next, the authors tested whether enriching a poorer algal diet (Chlorella vulgaris) with arachidonic acid enhances overall reproduction and sex ratios. Arachidonic acid enrichment of a C. vulgaris diet also enhances fecundity at 1.0 µM and 4.0 µM by 30% to 40% in the presence and absence of pyriproxyfen. This indicates that arachidonic acid is crucial in reproduction regardless of environmental sex determination. Furthermore, the data indicate that P. subcapitata may provide a threshold concentration of arachidonic acid needed for reproduction. Diet-switch experiments from P. subcapitata to C. vulgaris mitigate some, but not all, of arachidonic acid's effects when compared with a C. vulgaris-only diet, suggesting that some arachidonic acid provided by P. subcapitata is retained. In summary, arachidonic acid supplementation increases reproduction and represses pyriproxyfen-induced environmental sex determination in D. magna in restricted diets. A diet rich in arachidonic acid may provide protection from some reproductive toxicants such as the juvenile hormone agonist pyriproxyfen. Environ Toxicol Chem 2015;34:527-535. © 2014 SETAC.

  5. Cannabinoids influence lipid-arachidonic acid pathways in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Smesny, Stefan; Rosburg, Timm; Baur, Kati; Rudolph, Nicole; Sauer, Heinrich

    2007-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests modulating effects of cannabinoids on time of onset, severity, and outcome of schizophrenia. Efforts to discover the underlying pathomechanism have led to the assumption of gene x environment interactions, including premorbid genetical vulnerability and worsening effects of continuing cannabis use. The objective of this cross-sectional study is to investigate the relationship between delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol intake and niacin sensitivity in schizophrenia patients and healthy controls. Intensity of niacin skin flushing, indicating disturbed prostaglandin-mediated processes, was used as peripheral marker of lipid-arachidonic acid pathways and investigated in cannabis-consuming and nonconsuming schizophrenia patients and in healthy controls. Methylnicotinate was applied in three concentrations onto the forearm skin. Flush response was assessed in 3-min intervals over 15 min using optical reflection spectroscopy. In controls, skin flushing was significantly decreased in cannabis-consuming as compared to nonconsuming individuals. When comparing the nonconsuming subgroups, patients showed significantly decreased flush response. The populations as a whole (patients and controls) showed an inverse association between skin flushing and sum scores of Symptom Check List 90-R. Results demonstrate an impact of long-term cannabis use on lipid-arachidonic acid pathways. Considering pre-existing vulnerability of lipid metabolism in schizophrenia, observed effects of cannabis use support the notion of a gene x environment interaction.

  6. Wax blockage in the ear (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The ear canal is lined with hair follicles and glands that produce a waxy oil called cerumen. Sometimes the ... wax than can be easily excreted out the ear. This extra wax may harden within the ear ...

  7. Otoscopic exam of the ear (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... intrument which is used to look into the ear canal. The ear speculum (a cone-shaped viewing piece of the otoscope) is slowly inserted into the ear canal while looking into the otoscope. The speculum ...

  8. Middle ear infection (otitis media) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an inflammation and/or infection of the middle ear. Acute otitis media (acute ear infection) occurs ... or viral infection of the fluid of the middle ear, which causes production of fluid or pus. ...

  9. Successful Bilateral Composite Ear Reattachment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary: A successful bilateral ear composite graft nonmicrosurgical reattachment is presented. In cases where suitable vessels are unavailable for microsurgical revascularization, the reconstructive challenge can be formidable for salvaging the unique anatomic and aesthetic structure of the ear. The case is presented of an 18-year-old woman who was a victim of an assault wherein both of her ears were intentionally amputated by her attacker. She underwent successful surgical reattachment followed by a postoperative regimen of hyperbaric oxygen, cooling, and meticulous wound care. The patient achieved 100% survival of her left ear graft and 95% survival of her right ear graft. Clinical photographs at 18 months are presented, along with a discussion of the possible implications for other reconstructive applications. PMID:25289367

  10. Ear Reconstruction in Young Children.

    PubMed

    Reinisch, John

    2015-12-01

    The use of a porous high-density polyethylene ear implant, rather than a costal cartilage framework, allows ear reconstruction in young children before they enter school. The fact that the growth of the normal ear matures early allows for good symmetry. If the implant is covered completely with a large, well-vascularized superficial parietal fascia flap and appropriately color-matched skin, an ear with excellent projection and definition can be obtained with minimal complications and long-term viability. Ear reconstruction in young children is preferred by the author because the necessary fascial flap coverage is thinner, easier to harvest than in older patients, and can be done in a single outpatient procedure with minimal discomfort or psychological trauma. PMID:26667634

  11. Measurement of the incorporation of orally administered arachidonic acid into tissue lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Kulmacz, R.J.; Sivarajan, M.; Lands, W.E.

    1986-01-01

    The applicability of a stable isotope method to monitor the mixing of dietary arachidonic acid with endogenous arachidonic acid in tissue lipids was evaluated. Rats were fed octadeuterated arachidonic acid during a 20-day period, and the entry of the dietary acid into lipid esters of various tissues was examined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis of their fatty acids. The rats were maintained on a fat-free diet from weaning until 63 days old to enhance the ratio of the dietary acid to endogenous arachidonate. Three separate forms of eicosatetraenoic acid in the tissue lipids could be distinguished by GC-MS: octadeuterated arachidonic acid (recent dietary origin), unlabeled arachidonic acid (maternal origin) and unlabeled 4,7,10,13-eicosatetraenoic acid (originating from palmitoleic acid). The total eicosatetraenoic acid in the tissue lipids contained about 90% arachidonate from recent dietary origin in lung, kidney, heart and fat, 70% in muscle and liver and 27% in brain. The n-7 isomer of eicosatetraenoic acid was estimated to make up 6% or less of the total eicosatetraenoic acid in lung, kidney, brain, muscle and heart tissue lipids, but it comprised around 15% of the total eicosatetraenoic acid in liver. The unlabeled arachidonic acid of maternal origin thus comprised only about 10% of the eicosatetraenoic acid in all tissues examined except muscle and brain, where it was 24% and 70% of the eicosatetraenoic acid, respectively.

  12. Arachidonic acid enhances turnover of the dermal skeleton: studies on zebrafish scales.

    PubMed

    de Vrieze, Erik; Moren, Mari; Metz, Juriaan R; Flik, Gert; Lie, Kai Kristoffer

    2014-01-01

    In fish nutrition, the ratio between omega-3 and omega-6 poly-unsaturated fatty acids influences skeletal development. Supplementation of fish oils with vegetable oils increases the content of omega-6 fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid in the diet. Arachidonic acid is metabolized by cyclooxygenases to prostaglandin E2, an eicosanoid with effects on bone formation and remodeling. To elucidate effects of poly-unsaturated fatty acids on developing and existing skeletal tissues, zebrafish (Danio rerio) were fed (micro-) diets low and high in arachidonic acid content. Elasmoid scales, dermal skeletal plates, are ideal to study skeletal metabolism in zebrafish and were exploited in the present study. The fatty acid profile resulting from a high arachidonic acid diet induced mild but significant increase in matrix resorption in ontogenetic scales of adult zebrafish. Arachidonic acid affected scale regeneration (following removal of ontogenetic scales): mineral deposition was altered and both gene expression and enzymatic matrix metalloproteinase activity changed towards enhanced osteoclastic activity. Arachidonic acid also clearly stimulates matrix metalloproteinase activity in vitro, which implies that resorptive effects of arachidonic acid are mediated by matrix metalloproteinases. The gene expression profile further suggests that arachidonic acid increases maturation rate of the regenerating scale; in other words, enhances turnover. The zebrafish scale is an excellent model to study how and which fatty acids affect skeletal formation.

  13. Surgical correction of constricted ear combined with Stahl's ear.

    PubMed

    Bi, Ye; Lin, Lin; Yang, Qinhua; Pan, Bo; Zhao, Yanyong; He, Leren; Jiang, Haiyue

    2015-07-01

    Constricted ear combined with Stahl's ear is a rare ear deformity, which is a kind of complex congenital auricular deformity. From 1 January 2007 to 1 January 2014, 19 patients with constricted ear combined with Stahl's ear (Spock ear) were enrolled in this study, most of which were unilaterally deformed. To correct the deformity, a double Z-shaped skin incision was made on the posterior side of the auricle, with the entire layer of cartilage cut parallel to the helix traversing the third crus to form a fan-shaped cartilage flap. The superior crura of the antihelix were shaped by the folding cartilage rim. The cartilage of the abnormal third crus was made part of the new superior crura of antihelix, and the third crus was eliminated. The postoperative aesthetic assessment of the reshaped auricle was graded by both doctors and patients (or their parents). Out of the 19 patients, the number of satisfying cases of the symmetry, helix stretch, elimination of the third crus, the cranioauricular angle, and the substructure of the reshaped ears was 14 (nine excellent and five good), 16 (six excellent and 10 good), 17 (eight excellent and nine good), 15 (five excellent and 10 good), and 13 (two excellent and 11 good), respectively. With a maximum of a 90-month follow-up, no complication was observed. The results of the study suggested that this rare deformity could be corrected by appropriate surgical treatment, with a satisfied postoperative appearance.

  14. Multiple Osteomas in Middle Ear

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongxin; Li, Qiuhuan; Gong, Shusheng; Liu, Honggang; Yu, Zilong; Zhang, Luo

    2012-01-01

    Since the first description of middle ear osteomas by Thomas in 1964, only few reports were published within the English literatures (Greinwalid et al., 1998; Shimizu et al., 2003; Cho et al., 2005; and Jang et al., 2009), and only one case of the multiple osteomas in middle ear was described by Kim et al., 2006, which arose from the promontory, lateral semicircular canal, and epitympanum. Here we describe a patient with multiple middle ear osteomas arising from the promontory, incus, Eustachian tube, and bony semicanal of tensor tympani muscle. This patient also contracted the chronic otitis media in the ipsilateral ear. The osteomas were successfully removed by performing type III tympanoplasty in one stage. PMID:22928138

  15. Keloid above the ear (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Keloids are overgrowths of scar tissue that follow skin injuries. Keloids may appear after such minor trauma as ear piercing. Dark skinned individuals tend to form keloids more readily than lighter skinned individuals.

  16. What Is an Ear Infection?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Back-to-School Butterflies? ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes What Is an Ear Infection? KidsHealth > For Kids > What ...

  17. Avoiding Infection After Ear Piercing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ...

  18. Middle Ear Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the first 2 to 4 years of life for several reasons: Their eustachian tubes are shorter and more horizontal than those of adults, which lets bacteria and viruses find their way into the middle ear more ...

  19. Ear identification: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cameriere, Roberto; DeAngelis, Danilo; Ferrante, Luigi

    2011-07-01

    Although several papers have recently been devoted to establishing the validity of identification using the ear, this part of the human body still remains underexploited in forensic science. The perfect overlap of two images of the same ear is not really possible, but photographs of the ears as a reliable means of inferring the identity of an individual are poorly treated in the literature. In this study, we illustrate a simple, reproducible method, which divides the photograph of an ear into four parts-helix, antihelix, concha, and lobe-by means of a suitable grid of four straight lines. Although the division does not follow exact anatomical features, their edges do join anatomical points which are more easily identifiable. Measurement of certain areas of these parts can be combined to produce a code allowing personal identification. This method produces false-positive identifications of <0.2%. Last, the repeatability and reproducibility aspects of the method are tested.

  20. "Swimmer's Ear" (Otitis Externa) Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Work: Healthy Swimming Policy & Recommendations Fast Facts Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Drinking Water Healthy Swimming Global ... you requested has moved to Ear Infections. Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Drinking Water Healthy Swimming Global ...

  1. 21 CFR 870.2710 - Ear oximeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear oximeter. 870.2710 Section 870.2710 Food and... CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2710 Ear oximeter. (a) Identification. An ear... ear. The amount of reflected or scattered light as indicated by this device is used to measure...

  2. 21 CFR 870.2710 - Ear oximeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear oximeter. 870.2710 Section 870.2710 Food and... CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2710 Ear oximeter. (a) Identification. An ear... ear. The amount of reflected or scattered light as indicated by this device is used to measure...

  3. 21 CFR 870.2710 - Ear oximeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear oximeter. 870.2710 Section 870.2710 Food and... CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2710 Ear oximeter. (a) Identification. An ear... ear. The amount of reflected or scattered light as indicated by this device is used to measure...

  4. 21 CFR 870.2710 - Ear oximeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear oximeter. 870.2710 Section 870.2710 Food and... CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2710 Ear oximeter. (a) Identification. An ear... ear. The amount of reflected or scattered light as indicated by this device is used to measure...

  5. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid-induced pemphigus vulgaris: case report.

    PubMed

    Baroni, Adone; Russo, Teresa; Faccenda, Franco; Piccolo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced pemphigus is a well-established variety of pemphigus, presenting with clinical and histopathologic features identical to idiopathic form. Medical history plays a fundamental role in the diagnosis of drug-induced pemphigus. A large variety of drugs have been implicated in its pathogenesis and they may induce acantholysis via biochemical and/or immune mechanism. We present a case of a 69-year-old woman affected by amoxicillin/clavulanic acid-induced pemphigus and discuss its pathogenetic mechanism.

  6. Ear problems and injuries in athletes.

    PubMed

    Cassaday, Kacie; Vazquez, Gerardo; Wright, Justin M

    2014-01-01

    The ear is an unique organ--the principal structure involved in both hearing and balance. Although not common, problems with the ear may be encountered in specific sporting populations. Common conditions affecting the ear in the athlete include otitis externa, an infection of the external ear; external auditory canal exostoses, or abnormal bony growths in the canal; and otitis media, an infection of the middle ear. Given its position on the head, the ear is subject to trauma, often resulting in an auricular hematoma. Divers, due to pressure changes on descent and ascent, are subject to both ear barotrauma and ear decompression sickness. This article will discuss recognition, treatment, and prevention of these conditions affecting the ear in the athlete.

  7. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing.

  8. 3D printed bionic ears.

    PubMed

    Mannoor, Manu S; Jiang, Ziwen; James, Teena; Kong, Yong Lin; Malatesta, Karen A; Soboyejo, Winston O; Verma, Naveen; Gracias, David H; McAlpine, Michael C

    2013-06-12

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological tissue with functional electronics could enable the creation of bionic organs possessing enhanced functionalities over their human counterparts. Conventional electronic devices are inherently two-dimensional, preventing seamless multidimensional integration with synthetic biology, as the processes and materials are very different. Here, we present a novel strategy for overcoming these difficulties via additive manufacturing of biological cells with structural and nanoparticle derived electronic elements. As a proof of concept, we generated a bionic ear via 3D printing of a cell-seeded hydrogel matrix in the anatomic geometry of a human ear, along with an intertwined conducting polymer consisting of infused silver nanoparticles. This allowed for in vitro culturing of cartilage tissue around an inductive coil antenna in the ear, which subsequently enables readout of inductively-coupled signals from cochlea-shaped electrodes. The printed ear exhibits enhanced auditory sensing for radio frequency reception, and complementary left and right ears can listen to stereo audio music. Overall, our approach suggests a means to intricately merge biologic and nanoelectronic functionalities via 3D printing. PMID:23635097

  9. Ear disorders in scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Azizi, M H

    2011-01-01

    History of underwater diving dates back to antiquity. Breath-hold technique in diving was known to the ancient nations. However, deep diving progressed only in the early decades of the 19th century as the result of advancements in efficient underwater technologies which subsequently led to invention of sophisticated sets of scuba diving in the 20th century. Currently, diving is performed for various purposes including commercial, recreational, military, underwater construction, oil industry, underwater archeology and scientific assessment of marine life. By increasing popularity of underwater diving, dive-related medical conditions gradually became more evident and created a new challenge for the health care professionals, so that eventually, a specialty the so-called "diving medicine" was established. Most of the diving-associated disorders appear in the head and neck. The most common of all occupational disorders associated with diving are otologic diseases. External otitis has been reported as the most common otolaryngologic problem in underwater divers. Exostosis of the external ear canal may be formed in divers as the result of prolonged diving in cold waters. Other disorders of the ear and paranasal sinuses in underwater divers are caused by barometric pressure change (i.e., barotraumas), and to a lesser extent by decompression sickness. Barotrauma of the middle ear is the most prevalent barotrauma in divers. The inner ear barotraumas, though important, is less common. The present paper is a brief overview of diving-related ear disorders particularly in scuba divers.

  10. 3D finite element model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing middle ear functions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuelin; Gan, Rong Z

    2016-10-01

    Chinchilla is a commonly used animal model for research of sound transmission through the ear. Experimental measurements of the middle ear transfer function in chinchillas have shown that the middle ear cavity greatly affects the tympanic membrane (TM) and stapes footplate (FP) displacements. However, there is no finite element (FE) model of the chinchilla ear available in the literature to characterize the middle ear functions with the anatomical features of the chinchilla ear. This paper reports a recently completed 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear based on X-ray micro-computed tomography images of a chinchilla bulla. The model consisted of the ear canal, TM, middle ear ossicles and suspensory ligaments, and the middle ear cavity. Two boundary conditions of the middle ear cavity wall were simulated in the model as the rigid structure and the partially flexible surface, and the acoustic-mechanical coupled analysis was conducted with these two conditions to characterize the middle ear function. The model results were compared with experimental measurements reported in the literature including the TM and FP displacements and the middle ear input admittance in chinchilla ear. An application of this model was presented to identify the acoustic role of the middle ear septa-a unique feature of chinchilla middle ear cavity. This study provides the first 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing the middle ear functions through the acoustic-mechanical coupled FE analysis.

  11. 3D finite element model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing middle ear functions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuelin; Gan, Rong Z

    2016-10-01

    Chinchilla is a commonly used animal model for research of sound transmission through the ear. Experimental measurements of the middle ear transfer function in chinchillas have shown that the middle ear cavity greatly affects the tympanic membrane (TM) and stapes footplate (FP) displacements. However, there is no finite element (FE) model of the chinchilla ear available in the literature to characterize the middle ear functions with the anatomical features of the chinchilla ear. This paper reports a recently completed 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear based on X-ray micro-computed tomography images of a chinchilla bulla. The model consisted of the ear canal, TM, middle ear ossicles and suspensory ligaments, and the middle ear cavity. Two boundary conditions of the middle ear cavity wall were simulated in the model as the rigid structure and the partially flexible surface, and the acoustic-mechanical coupled analysis was conducted with these two conditions to characterize the middle ear function. The model results were compared with experimental measurements reported in the literature including the TM and FP displacements and the middle ear input admittance in chinchilla ear. An application of this model was presented to identify the acoustic role of the middle ear septa-a unique feature of chinchilla middle ear cavity. This study provides the first 3D FE model of the chinchilla ear for characterizing the middle ear functions through the acoustic-mechanical coupled FE analysis. PMID:26785845

  12. The Essentiality of Arachidonic Acid in Infant Development

    PubMed Central

    Hadley, Kevin B.; Ryan, Alan S.; Forsyth, Stewart; Gautier, Sheila; Salem, Norman

    2016-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (ARA, 20:4n-6) is an n-6 polyunsaturated 20-carbon fatty acid formed by the biosynthesis from linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6). This review considers the essential role that ARA plays in infant development. ARA is always present in human milk at a relatively fixed level and is accumulated in tissues throughout the body where it serves several important functions. Without the provision of preformed ARA in human milk or infant formula the growing infant cannot maintain ARA levels from synthetic pathways alone that are sufficient to meet metabolic demand. During late infancy and early childhood the amount of dietary ARA provided by solid foods is low. ARA serves as a precursor to leukotrienes, prostaglandins, and thromboxanes, collectively known as eicosanoids which are important for immunity and immune response. There is strong evidence based on animal and human studies that ARA is critical for infant growth, brain development, and health. These studies also demonstrate the importance of balancing the amounts of ARA and DHA as too much DHA may suppress the benefits provided by ARA. Both ARA and DHA have been added to infant formulas and follow-on formulas for more than two decades. The amounts and ratios of ARA and DHA needed in infant formula are discussed based on an in depth review of the available scientific evidence. PMID:27077882

  13. Dietary arachidonic acid in perinatal nutrition: a commentary.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, Lotte; Fewtrell, Mary; Agostoni, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is supplied together with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in infant formulas, but we have limited knowledge about the effects of supplementation with either of these long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) on growth and developmental outcomes. AA is present in similar levels in breast milk throughout the world, whereas the level of DHA is highly diet dependent. Autopsy studies show similar diet-dependent variation in brain DHA, whereas AA is little affected by intake. Early intake of DHA has been shown to affect visual development, but the effect of LCPUFA on neurodevelopment remains to be established. Few studies have found any functional difference between infants supplemented with DHA alone compared to DHA+AA, but some studies show neurodevelopmental advantages in breast-fed infants of mothers supplemented with n-3 LCPUFA alone. It also remains to be established whether the AA/DHA balance could affect allergic and inflammatory outcomes later in life. Disentangling effects of genetic variability and dietary intake on AA and DHA-status and on functional outcomes may be an important step in the process of determining whether AA-intake is of any physiological or clinical importance. However, based on the current evidence we hypothesize that dietary AA plays a minor role on growth and development relative to the impact of dietary DHA.

  14. Ancestral genetic complexity of arachidonic acid metabolism in Metazoa.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dongjuan; Zou, Qiuqiong; Yu, Ting; Song, Cuikai; Huang, Shengfeng; Chen, Shangwu; Ren, Zhenghua; Xu, Anlong

    2014-09-01

    Eicosanoids play an important role in inducing complex and crucial physiological processes in animals. Eicosanoid biosynthesis in animals is widely reported; however, eicosanoid production in invertebrate tissue is remarkably different to vertebrates and in certain respects remains elusive. We, for the first time, compared the orthologs involved in arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism in 14 species of invertebrates and 3 species of vertebrates. Based on parsimony, a complex AA-metabolic system may have existed in the common ancestor of the Metazoa, and then expanded and diversified through invertebrate lineages. A primary vertebrate-like AA-metabolic system via cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX), and cytochrome P450 (CYP) pathways was further identified in the basal chordate, amphioxus. The expression profiling of AA-metabolic enzymes and lipidomic analysis of eicosanoid production in the tissues of amphioxus supported our supposition. Thus, we proposed that the ancestral complexity of AA-metabolic network diversified with the different lineages of invertebrates, adapting with the diversity of body plans and ecological opportunity, and arriving at the vertebrate-like pattern in the basal chordate, amphioxus.

  15. Arachidonic acid metabolism in fibroblasts derived from canine myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, D.R.; Prescott, S.M.

    1986-03-05

    Canine fibroblasts from normal or healing infarcted myocardium were grown in culture. The cells were morphologically indistinguishable, but the doubling time of cells from healing myocardium was 39.6 +/- 3.5 hr whereas that of normals was 24 +/- 3.7 (n=5, p < .025). Fibroblasts incorporated (/sup 3/H)arachidonate (AA) into phospholipids. Calcium ionophore A23187 (10 ..mu..M) caused release and metabolism of (/sup 3/H) AA. A23187 or AA (10..mu..M) induced production of 6-keto PGF1..cap alpha.., PGE2, and a hydroxy metabolite of AA. RIA of 6-keto PGF1..cap alpha.. showed that subconfluent cells from healing myocardium produced 1202 +/- 354 pg/mg protein whereas that of normals was 551 +/- 222 (n=7, p < .025). Histamine and bradykinin also induced AA metabolism but were less potent. They examined the effect of AA released from deteriorating myocytes on AA metabolism by cultured fibroblasts. They confirmed that isolated myocytes labelled with (/sup 3/H)AA released but did not metabolize (/sup 3/H)AA. In coincubations, fibroblasts incorporated myocyte-derived AA. Subsequent stimulation of the fibroblasts with A23187 induced the synthesis of 6-keto PGF1..cap alpha.., PGE2 and a hydroxy metabolite. The fibroblast content of healing myocardium was 35-1000 times that of normal tissue (n=7). Thus even a moderate change in AA metabolism, amplified by the AA released from deteriorating myocytes, may be a significant physiologic or pathologic event.

  16. Arachidonate 12-lipoxygenases with reference to their selective inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Shozo . E-mail: yamamosh@kyoto-wu.ac.jp; Katsukawa, Michiko; Nakano, Ayumi; Hiraki, Emi; Nishimura, Kohji; Jisaka, Mitsuo; Yokota, Kazushige; Ueda, Natsuo

    2005-12-09

    Lipoxygenase is a dioxygenase recognizing a 1-cis,4-cis-pentadiene of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The enzyme oxygenates various carbon atoms of arachidonic acid as a substrate and produces 5-, 8-, 12- or 15-hydroperoxy eicosatetraenoic acid with a conjugated diene chromophore. The enzyme is referred to as 5-, 8-, 12- or 15-lipoxygenase, respectively. Earlier we found two isoforms of 12-lipoxygenase, leukocyte- and platelet-type enzymes, which were distinguished by substrate specificity, catalytic activity, primary structure, gene intron size, and antigenicity. Recently, the epidermis-type enzyme was found as the third isoform. Attempts have been made to find isozyme-specific inhibitors of 12-lipoxygenase, and earlier we found hinokitol, a tropolone, as a potent inhibitor selective for the platelet-type 12-lipoxygenase. More recently, we tested various catechins of tea leaves and found that (-)-geotechnical gallate was a potent and selective inhibitor of human platelet 12-lipoxygenase with an IC{sub 5} of 0.14 {mu}M. The compound was much less active with 12-lipoxygenase of leukocyte-type, 15-, 8-, and 5-lipoxygenases, and cyclo oxygenases-1 and -2.

  17. Ancestral genetic complexity of arachidonic acid metabolism in Metazoa.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dongjuan; Zou, Qiuqiong; Yu, Ting; Song, Cuikai; Huang, Shengfeng; Chen, Shangwu; Ren, Zhenghua; Xu, Anlong

    2014-09-01

    Eicosanoids play an important role in inducing complex and crucial physiological processes in animals. Eicosanoid biosynthesis in animals is widely reported; however, eicosanoid production in invertebrate tissue is remarkably different to vertebrates and in certain respects remains elusive. We, for the first time, compared the orthologs involved in arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism in 14 species of invertebrates and 3 species of vertebrates. Based on parsimony, a complex AA-metabolic system may have existed in the common ancestor of the Metazoa, and then expanded and diversified through invertebrate lineages. A primary vertebrate-like AA-metabolic system via cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX), and cytochrome P450 (CYP) pathways was further identified in the basal chordate, amphioxus. The expression profiling of AA-metabolic enzymes and lipidomic analysis of eicosanoid production in the tissues of amphioxus supported our supposition. Thus, we proposed that the ancestral complexity of AA-metabolic network diversified with the different lineages of invertebrates, adapting with the diversity of body plans and ecological opportunity, and arriving at the vertebrate-like pattern in the basal chordate, amphioxus. PMID:24801744

  18. Arachidonic acid stimulates /sup 45/calcium efflux and HPL release in isolated trophoblast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitler, P.; Murphy, E.; Handwerger, S.

    1986-01-13

    Previous investigations from this laboratory have indicated that arachidonic acid stimulates a rapid, dose-dependent and reversible increase in hPL release which is not dependent on cyclooxygenase or lipoxygenase metabolism. To investigate further the mechanism by which arachidonic acid stimulates the release of hPL, the effect of arachidonic acid on the release of /sup 45/Ca from perifused cells prelabelled with /sup 45/Ca was examined in an enriched cell culture population of term human syncytiotrophoblast. Arachidonic acid (10-100 ..mu..M) stimulated a dose-dependent, rapid, and reversible increase in the release of both /sup 45/Ca and hPL from the perifused placental cells. On the other hand, palmitic acid had little effect on either hPL release or /sup 45/Ca release even at concentrations as high as 100 ..mu..M. Ionophore A23187 (1-10..mu..M) also stimulated a dose-dependent and reversible increase in hPL release. Since arachidonic acid increases the mobilization of cellular calcium, as reflected by the increased /sup 45/calcium efflux, and since an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration appears to stimulate an increase in hPL release, these results suggest that the stimulation of hPL release by arachidonic acid may be due, at least in part, to the effects of the fatty acid on cellular calcium mobilization. 26 references, 5 figures.

  19. DOCOSAHEXAENOIC ACID AND ARACHIDONIC ACID PREVENT ESSENTIAL FATTY ACID DEFICIENCY AND HEPATIC STEATOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hau D.; Meisel, Jonathan A.; de Meijer, Vincent E.; Fallon, Erica M.; Gura, Kathleen M.; Nose, Vania; Bistrian, Bruce R.; Puder, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Essential fatty acids are important for growth, development, and physiologic function. Alpha-linolenic acid and linoleic acid are the precursors of docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acid, respectively, and have traditionally been considered the essential fatty acids. However, we hypothesized that docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid can function as the essential fatty acids. Methods Using a murine model of essential fatty acid deficiency and consequent hepatic steatosis, we provided mice with varying amounts of docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acids to determine whether exclusive supplementation of docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acids could prevent essential fatty acid deficiency and inhibit or attenuate hepatic steatosis. Results Mice supplemented with docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acids at 2.1% or 4.2% of their calories for 19 days had normal liver histology and no biochemical evidence of essential fatty acid deficiency, which persisted when observed after 9 weeks. Conclusion Supplementation of sufficient amounts of docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acids alone without alpha-linolenic and linoleic acids meets essential fatty acid requirements and prevents hepatic steatosis in a murine model. PMID:22038210

  20. Vasopressin induces release of arachidonic acid from vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grillone, L.R.; Clark, M.A.; Heckman, G.; Schmidt, D.; Stassen, F.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1986-05-01

    Cultured smooth muscle cells (A-10), derived from rat thoracic aorta, have vascular (V/sub 1/) vasopressin receptors. They have previously shown that these receptors mediate phosphatidylinositol turnover, Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, and inhibition of isoproterenol-induced increases in cAMP. Here they studied the effect of vasopressin on arachidonic acid metabolism of A-10 cells. Cells were incubated for 18-20 hr with (/sup 3/H)-arachidonic acid (80 Ci/mmol). Vasopressin stimulated release of arachidonic acid in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Significant release of arachidonic acid was observed after 4 min with 10/sup -9/ M vasopressin. Maximum release was reached 4 min after addition of 10/sup -7/ M vasopressin (1100 dpm/10/sup 6/ cells). About 800 dmp were released after 1 and 4 min with 10/sup -7/ M and 10/sup -8/ M vasopressin, respectively. The vasopressin-stimulated release of arachidonic acid was blocked by the specific V/sub 1//V/sub 2/ vasopressin antagonist d(CH2)5D-Tyr(Et)VAVP. These data indicate that vascular smooth muscle cells increase arachidonic acid release in response to vasopressin. This response is likely mediated by V/sub 1/ receptors.

  1. Correlation between arachidonic acid oxygenation and luminol-induced chemiluminescence in neutrophils: inhibition by diethyldithiocarbamate.

    PubMed

    Chabannes, B; Perraut, C; El Habib, R; Moliere, P; Pacheco, Y; Lagarde, M

    1997-04-01

    Neutrophils from allergic subjects were hypersensitive to stimulation by low calcium ionophore concentration (0.15 microM), resulting in an increased formation of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), 5S-hydroxy-6,8,11,14-(E,Z,Z,Z)-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), and other arachidonic acid metabolites through the 5-lipoxygenase pathway. In parallel, luminol-dependent chemiluminescence was also higher in neutrophils from allergic patients at the basal state and after stimulation by calcium ionophore, revealing an enhancement of radical oxygen species and peroxide production. The activity of glutathione peroxidase, the main enzyme responsible for hydroperoxide reduction, was lowered in these cells. Diethyl-dithiocarbamate (DTC) induced a concentration-dependent decrease in chemiluminescence and arachidonic acid metabolism after neutrophil stimulation. These data show that the elevation of arachidonic acid metabolism in neutrophils from allergic patients is strongly correlated with oxidative status. This elevation may be the consequence of an increased cellular hydroperoxide known to activate 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activity and/or an increased arachidonic acid availability, due either to phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activation or inhibition of arachidonate reesterification into phospholipids. Lowering this oxidative status was associated with a concomitant decrease of this metabolism. Our results suggest that the effect of DTC may be the consequence of an inhibition of peroxyl radical and cellular lipid hydroperoxide production. Thus, DTC may modulate arachidonic acid metabolism in neutrophils by modulating the cellular hydroperoxide level.

  2. Activation and regulation of arachidonic acid release in rabbit peritoneal neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, W.

    1988-01-01

    Arachidonic acid release in rabbit neutrophils can be enhanced by the addition of chemotactic fMet-Leu-Phe, platelet-activating factor, PAF, or the calcium ionophore A23187. Over 80% of the release ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid comes from phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol. The release is dose-dependent and increases with increasing concentration of the stimulus. The A23187-induced release increases with increasing time of the stimulation. ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid release, but not the rise in the concentration of intracellular calcium, is inhibited in pertussis toxin-treated neutrophils stimulated with PAF. The ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid released by A23187 is potentiated while that release by fMET-Leu-Phe or PAF is inhibited in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, PMA, treated rabbit neutrophils. The protein kinase C inhibitor 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine, H-7, has no effect on the potentiation by PMA of the A23187-induced release, it prevents the inhibition by PMA of the release produced by PAF or fMet-Leu-Phe. In addition, PMA increases arachidonic acid release in H-7-treated cells stimulated with fMet-Leu-Phe. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59022 increases the level of diacylglycerol in neutrophils stimulated with fMet-Leu-Phe. Furthermore, R59022 potentiates ({sup 3}H) arachidonic acid release produced by fMet-Leu-Phe. This potentiation is not inhibited by H-7, in fact, it is increased in H-7-treated neutrophils.

  3. In vitro release of arachidonic acid and in vivo responses to respirable fractions of cotton dust

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, T.A.; Edwards, J.H.; Al-Zubaidy, T.S.; Brown, R.C.; Poole, A.; Nicholls, P.J.

    1986-04-01

    It was considered that the fall in lung function seen after exposure to cotton dust may be attributable in part to the activity of arachidonic acid metabolites, such as leucotrienes as well as to the more established release of histamine by cotton dust. However, we found that cotton and barley dusts elicited poor release of arachidonic acid from an established macrophage like cell line compared with that observed with other organic dusts. In the experimental animal, pulmonary cellular responses to both cotton and barley dust were similar to those evoked by moldy hay and pigeon dropping dusts, although after multiple doses a more severe response was seen to cotton and barley. Since both moldy hay and pigeon droppings elicit a greater arachidonic acid release than cotton or barley, a role for arachidonic acid in inducing the cellular response is less likely than other factors. There are limitations to our conclusions using this system, i.e., the arachidonic acid may be released in a nonmetabolized form, although it is noted that the two dusts with the greatest arachidonic acid release produce their clinical responses in humans largely by hypersensitivity mechanisms.

  4. Vascular permeabilization by intravenous arachidonate in the rat peritoneal cavity: antagonism by antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Guerra, Miriam; Hannaert, Patrick; Hider, Hamida; Chiavaroli, Carlo; Garay, Ricardo P

    2003-04-11

    Arachidonic acid was investigated for its vascular permeabilizing potential in the rat peritoneal cavity and for its mechanism of action. The antagonistic potential of antioxidants (vitamin E, vitamin C and troxerutin) was also evaluated. Vascular permeability was equated to the rate of extravasation of Evans blue dye from plasma into the peritoneal cavity. Baseline permeability was linear up to 2 h, with a rate constant (k) of 0.0031+/-0.0007 h(-1). Intravenous arachidonate (from 30 microg/kg to 3 mg/kg) induced an immediate, dose-related and significant increase in permeability (ranging from 80% to 150%), which was comparable to the effect induced by similar doses of serotonin. Aspirin (10 mg/kg) reduced the arachidonate-induced permeability by 75%, but interestingly neither the stable thromboxane A(2) receptor agonist U46619 (prostaglandin H(2) endoperoxide epoxymethane) nor prostacyclin was able to increase peritoneal vascular permeability. In contrast, the permeabilizing action of arachidonic acid was very sensitive to antioxidant agents. Thus, vitamin C and the flavonoid compound troxerutin (100 mg/kg) fully abolished arachidonate-induced permeability, whereas vitamin E had only a partial effect (40-100% inhibition). In conclusion, intravenous administration of arachidonic acid strongly enhanced peritoneal vascular permeability in the rat, apparently via free radical generation. This rat peritoneal model can be used to evaluate the in vivo antinflammatory potential of antioxidant drugs.

  5. γ-Hydroxybutyric Acid-Induced Electrographic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Joseph; Lucey, Brendan P.; Duntley, Stephen P.; Darken, Rachel S.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of absence-like electrographic seizures during NREM sleep in a patient who was taking sodium oxybate, a sodium salt of γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB). An overnight full montage electroencephalography (EEG) study revealed numerous frontally predominant rhythmic 1.5-2 Hz sharp waves and spike-wave activity during stage N2 and N3 sleep at the peak dose time for sodium oxybate, resembling atypical absence-like electrographic seizures. The patient was later weaned off sodium oxybate, and a repeat study did not show any such electrographic seizures. Absence-like seizures induced by GHB had previously been described in experimental animal models. We present the first reported human case of absence-like electrographic seizure associated with sodium oxybate. Citation: Cheung J, Lucey BP, Duntley SP, Darken RS. γ-hydroxybutyric acid-induced electrographic seizures. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(7):811-812. PMID:25024661

  6. Increased isoprostane levels in oleic acid-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Koichi; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Tsushima, Kenji; Yoshikawa, Sumiko; Yokoyama, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Rikimaru; Obata, Toru

    2009-10-16

    The present study was performed to examine a role of oxidative stress in oleic acid-induced lung injury model. Fifteen anesthetized sheep were ventilated and instrumented with a lung lymph fistula and vascular catheters for blood gas analysis and measurement of isoprostanes (8-epi prostaglandin F2{alpha}). Following stable baseline measurements, oleic acid (0.08 ml/kg) was administered and observed 4 h. Isoprostane was measured by gas chromatography mass spectrometry with the isotope dilution method. Isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph were significantly increased 2 h after oleic acid administration and then decreased at 4 h. The percent increases in isoprostane levels in plasma and lung lymph at 2 h were significantly correlated with deteriorated oxygenation at the same time point, respectively. These findings suggest that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of the pulmonary fat embolism-induced acute lung injury model in sheep and that the increase relates with the deteriorated oxygenation.

  7. Proteomic study on usnic-acid-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Zhao, Xiaoping; Lu, Xiaoyan; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Yi

    2012-07-25

    Usnic acid, a lichen metabolite, is used as a dietary supplement for weight loss. However, clinical studies have shown that usnic acid causes hepatotoxicity. The present study aims to investigate the mechanism of usnic acid hepatotoxicity in vivo. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to analyze the expression profiles of differentially regulated and expressed proteins in rat liver after usnic acid administration. The results reveal the differential expression of 10 proteins in usnic-acid-treated rats compared to the normal controls. These proteins are associated with oxidative stress, lipid metabolism, and several other molecular pathways. The endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria may be the primary targets of usnic-acid-induced hepatotoxicity.

  8. Physiological functioning of the ear and masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The physiological functions of the ear and the role masking plays in speech communication are examined. Topics under investigation include sound analysis of the ear, the aural reflex, and various types of noise masking.

  9. How to Prevent Painful Swimmer's Ear

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159452.html How to Prevent Painful Swimmer's Ear Simple steps after a day in the water ... 2016 SATURDAY, June 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Swimmer's ear -- a common summertime problem among children -- is easy ...

  10. Role of Arachidonic Acid in Promoting Hair Growth

    PubMed Central

    Munkhbayar, Semchin; Jang, Sunhyae; Cho, A-Ri; Choi, Soon-Jin; Shin, Chang Yup; Eun, Hee Chul; Kim, Kyu Han

    2016-01-01

    Background Arachidonic acid (AA) is an omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid present in all mammalian cell membranes, and involved in the regulation of many cellular processes, including cell survival, angiogenesis, and mitogenesis. The dermal papilla, composed of specialized fibroblasts located in the bulb of the hair follicle, contributes to the control of hair growth and the hair cycle. Objective This study investigated the effect of AA on hair growth by using in vivo and in vitro models. Methods The effect of AA on human dermal papilla cells (hDPCs) and hair shaft elongation was evaluated by MTT assay and hair follicle organ culture, respectively. The expression of various growth and survival factors in hDPCs were investigated by western blot or immunohistochemistry. The ability of AA to induce and prolong anagen phase in C57BL/6 mice was analyzed. Results AA was found to enhance the viability of hDPCs and promote the expression of several factors responsible for hair growth, including fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF-7) and FGF-10. Western blotting identified the role of AA in the phosphorylation of various transcription factors (ERK, CREB, and AKT) and increased expression of Bcl-2 in hDPCs. In addition, AA significantly promoted hair shaft elongation, with increased proliferation of matrix keratinocytes, during ex vivo hair follicle culture. It was also found to promote hair growth by induction and prolongation of anagen phase in telogen-stage C57BL/6 mice. Conclusion This study concludes that AA plays a role in promoting hair growth by increasing the expression of growth factors in hDPCs and enhancing follicle proliferation and survival. PMID:26848219

  11. Kinetic investigation of human 5-lipoxygenase with arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Monica; Kumar, Ramakrishnan B; Balagunaseelan, Navisraj; Hamberg, Mats; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Rådmark, Olof; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes

    2016-08-01

    Human 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) is responsible for the formation of leukotriene (LT)A4, a pivotal intermediate in the biosynthesis of the leukotrienes, a family of proinflammatory lipid mediators. 5-LOX has thus gained attention as a potential drug target. However, details of the kinetic mechanism of 5-LOX are still obscure. In this Letter, we investigated the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 5-LOX with its physiological substrate, arachidonic acid (AA). The observed KIE is 20±4 on kcat and 17±2 on kcat/KM at 25°C indicating a non-classical reaction mechanism. The observed rates show slight temperature dependence at ambient temperatures ranging from 4 to 35°C. Also, we observed low Arrhenius prefactor ratio (AH/AD=0.21) and a small change in activation energy (Ea(D)-Ea(H)=3.6J/mol) which suggests that 5-LOX catalysis involves tunneling as a mechanism of H-transfer. The measured KIE for 5-LOX involves a change in regioselectivity in response to deuteration at position C7, resulting in H-abstraction form C10 and formation of 8-HETE. The viscosity experiments influence the (H)kcat, but not (D)kcat. However the overall kcat/KM is not affected for labeled or unlabeled AA, suggesting that either the product release or conformational rearrangement might be involved in dictating kinetics of 5-LOX at saturating conditions. Investigation of available crystal structures suggests the role of active site residues (F421, Q363 and L368) in regulating the donor-acceptor distances, thus affecting H-transfer as well as regiospecificity. In summary, our study shows that that the H-abstraction is the rate limiting step for 5-LOX and that the observed KIE of 5-LOX is masked by a change in regioselectivity. PMID:27363940

  12. The caecilian ear: further observations.

    PubMed

    Wever, E G; Gans, C

    1976-10-01

    The structure of the ear is examined in two species of caecilians, Ichthyophis glutinosus and I. orthoplicatus, and the sensitivity to aerial sounds is assessed in terms of the electrical potentials of the cochlea. The results are in general agreement with previous reports on other caecilian species. PMID:1068485

  13. Adenomatous tumors of the middle ear.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, Stanley; Koss, Shira

    2015-04-01

    Adenomatous tumors are an uncommon cause of a middle ear mass. Clinical findings may be nonspecific, leading to difficulties in differentiation from other middle ear tumors. Controversy also exists whether to classify middle ear adenoma and carcinoid as separate neoplasms, or alternatively within a spectrum of the same pathologic entity. Most adenomatous middle ear tumors are indolent in behavior, with a benign histologic appearance and slowly progressive growth. The mainstay of treatment is complete surgical resection, which affords the greatest likelihood of cure.

  14. Ear recognition based on Gabor features and KFDA.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li; Mu, Zhichun

    2014-01-01

    We propose an ear recognition system based on 2D ear images which includes three stages: ear enrollment, feature extraction, and ear recognition. Ear enrollment includes ear detection and ear normalization. The ear detection approach based on improved Adaboost algorithm detects the ear part under complex background using two steps: offline cascaded classifier training and online ear detection. Then Active Shape Model is applied to segment the ear part and normalize all the ear images to the same size. For its eminent characteristics in spatial local feature extraction and orientation selection, Gabor filter based ear feature extraction is presented in this paper. Kernel Fisher Discriminant Analysis (KFDA) is then applied for dimension reduction of the high-dimensional Gabor features. Finally distance based classifier is applied for ear recognition. Experimental results of ear recognition on two datasets (USTB and UND datasets) and the performance of the ear authentication system show the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  15. Pediatric Obesity and Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Obesity and Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders Pediatric Obesity and Ear, ... all children be regularly screened for snoring. Middle ear infections Acute otitis media (AOM) and chronic ear ...

  16. Maitotoxin: Effects on calcium channels, phosphoinositide breakdown, and arachidonate release in pheochromocytoma PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, O.H.; Padgett, W.L.; Nishizawa, Y.; Gusovsky, F.; Yasumoto, T.; Daly, J.W. )

    1990-02-01

    Maitotoxin (MTX) increases formation of (3H)inositol phosphates from phosphoinositides and release of (3H)arachidonic acid from phospholipids in pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. Formation of (3H)inositol phosphates is detected within 1 min of incubation even with concentrations as low as 0.3 ng/ml (90 pm) MTX, whereas release of (3H)arachidonic acid is not detected until 20 min even with concentrations as high as 1 ng/ml (300 pm) MTX. Stimulation of arachidonic acid release can be detected at 0.03 ng/ml (9 pm) MTX, whereas 0.1 ng/ml (30 pm) MTX is the threshold for detection of phosphoinositide breakdown. Organic and inorganic calcium channel blockers, except Cd2+ and a high concentration of Mn2+, have no effect on MTX-elicited phosphoinositide breakdown, whereas inorganic blockers (e.g., Co2+, Mn2+, Cd2+), but not organic blockers (nifedipine, verapamil, diltiazem), inhibit MTX-stimulated arachidonic acid release. All calcium channel blockers, however, inhibited MTX-elicited influx of 45Ca2+ and the MTX-elicited increase in internal Ca2+ measured with fura-2 was markedly reduced by nifedipine. MTX-elicited phosphoinositide breakdown and arachidonic acid release are abolished or reduced, respectively, in the absence of extracellular calcium plus chelating agent. The calcium ionophore A23187 has little or no effect alone but, in combination with MTX, A23187 inhibits MTX-elicited phosphoinositide breakdown and enhances arachidonic acid release, the latter even in the absence of extracellular calcium. The results suggest that different sites and/or mechanisms are involved in stimulation of calcium influx, breakdown of phosphoinositides, and release of arachidonic acid by MTX.

  17. Immunologic Disorders of the Inner Ear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, William C.; Hughes, Gordon B.

    1997-01-01

    Immune inner ear disease represents a series of immune system mediated problems that can present with hearing loss, dizziness, or both. The etiology, presentation, testing, and treatment of primary immune inner ear disease is discussed. A review of secondary immune inner ear disease is presented for comparison. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  18. Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? KidsHealth > For Kids > Can Loud Music Hurt My Ears? Print A A A Text ... up? Oh! You want to know if loud music can hurt your ears . Are you asking because ...

  19. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ear prosthesis is a silicone rubber solid device intended to be implanted to reconstruct the...

  20. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ear prosthesis is a silicone rubber solid device intended to be implanted to reconstruct the...

  1. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ear prosthesis is a silicone rubber solid device intended to be implanted to reconstruct the...

  2. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ear prosthesis is a silicone rubber solid device intended to be implanted to reconstruct the...

  3. 21 CFR 878.3590 - Ear prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear prosthesis. 878.3590 Section 878.3590 Food and... GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3590 Ear prosthesis. (a) Identification. An ear prosthesis is a silicone rubber solid device intended to be implanted to reconstruct the...

  4. LDV measurement of bird ear vibrations to determine inner ear impedance and middle ear power flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muyshondt, Pieter G. G.; Pires, Felipe; Dirckx, Joris J. J.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical behavior of the middle ear structures in birds and mammals is affected by the fluids in the inner ear (IE) that are present behind the oval window. In this study, the aim was to gather knowledge of the acoustic impedance of the IE in the ostrich, to be able to determine the effect on vibrations and power flow in the single-ossicle bird middle ear for future studies. To determine the IE impedance, vibrations of the ossicle were measured for both the quasi-static and acoustic stimulus frequencies. In the acoustic regime, vibrations were measured with a laser Doppler vibrometer and electromagnetic stimulation of the ossicle. The impedance of the inner ear could be determined by means of a simple RLC model in series, which resulted in a stiffness reactance of KIE = 0.20.1012 Pa/m3, an inertial impedance of MIE = 0.652.106 Pa s2/m3, and a resistance of RIE = 1.57.109 Pa s/m. The measured impedance is found to be considerably smaller than what is found for the human IE.

  5. RAS is required for epidermal growth factor-stimulated arachidonic acid release in rat-1 fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Warner, L C; Hack, N; Egan, S E; Goldberg, H J; Weinberg, R A; Skorecki, K L

    1993-12-01

    Previous studies have provided suggestive evidence for an interaction between ras activation and signalling pathways involved in agonist-stimulated arachidonic acid release in a variety of cell systems. In order to clarify this interaction, we have measured epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated arachidonic acid release in rat-1 fibroblasts transfected with the N-17 dominant negative mutation of ras. Cells transfected with the N-17 ras mutant, display a markedly attenuated arachidonic acid-release response to EGF, compared to sham-transfected and non-transfected cells. In contrast, the response to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) was not attenuated in the N-17-mutant expressing cells. No differences were detected between sham-transfected and N-17 mutant expressing cells in levels of immunodetectable EGF receptor, cytosolic phospholipase A2 or mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. Attenuation of EGF-stimulated arachidonic acid release in the N-17 mutant expressing cells, was accompanied by a marked diminution in EGF-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of MAP kinase. We conclude that the signalling pathway involved in epidermal growth factor-stimulated arachidonic acid release is similar to the signalling pathway for mitogenic responses to epidermal growth factor and requires ras activation, likely followed by a downstream cascade of kinases eventuating in MAP kinase activation.

  6. Unsaturated fatty acids induce non-canonical autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Niso-Santano, Mireia; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Pietrocola, Federico; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Mariño, Guillermo; Cianfanelli, Valentina; Ben-Younès, Amena; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Markaki, Maria; Sica, Valentina; Izzo, Valentina; Chaba, Kariman; Bauvy, Chantal; Dupont, Nicolas; Kepp, Oliver; Rockenfeller, Patrick; Wolinski, Heimo; Madeo, Frank; Lavandero, Sergio; Codogno, Patrice; Harper, Francis; Pierron, Gérard; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Cecconi, Francesco; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-01-01

    To obtain mechanistic insights into the cross talk between lipolysis and autophagy, two key metabolic responses to starvation, we screened the autophagy-inducing potential of a panel of fatty acids in human cancer cells. Both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids such as palmitate and oleate, respectively, triggered autophagy, but the underlying molecular mechanisms differed. Oleate, but not palmitate, stimulated an autophagic response that required an intact Golgi apparatus. Conversely, autophagy triggered by palmitate, but not oleate, required AMPK, PKR and JNK1 and involved the activation of the BECN1/PIK3C3 lipid kinase complex. Accordingly, the downregulation of BECN1 and PIK3C3 abolished palmitate-induced, but not oleate-induced, autophagy in human cancer cells. Moreover, Becn1+/− mice as well as yeast cells and nematodes lacking the ortholog of human BECN1 mounted an autophagic response to oleate, but not palmitate. Thus, unsaturated fatty acids induce a non-canonical, phylogenetically conserved, autophagic response that in mammalian cells relies on the Golgi apparatus. PMID:25586377

  7. Characterization of salicylic acid-induced genes in Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Park, Y-S; Min, H-J; Ryang, S-H; Oh, K-J; Cha, J-S; Kim, H Y; Cho, T-J

    2003-06-01

    Salicylic acid is a messenger molecule in the activation of defense responses in plants. In this study, we isolated four cDNA clones representing salicylic acid-induced genes in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis) by subtractive hybridization. Of the four clones, the BC5-2 clone encodes a putative glucosyltransferase protein. The BC5-3 clone is highly similar to an Arabidopsis gene encoding a putative metal-binding farnesylated protein. The BC6-1 clone is a chitinase gene with similarities to a rapeseed class IV chitinase. Class IV chitinases have deletions in the chitin-binding and catalytic domains and the BC6-1 chitinase has an additional deletion in the catalytic domain. The BCP8-1 clone is most homologous to an Arabidopsis gene that contains a tandem array of two thiJ-like sequences. These four cabbage genes were barely expressed in healthy leaves, but were strongly induced by salicylic acid and benzothiadiazole. Expression of the three genes represented by the BC5-2, BC5-3 and BCP8-1 clones were also induced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, a nonhost pathogen that elicits a hypersensitive response in Chinese cabbage. None of these four genes, however, was strongly induced by methyl jasmonate or by ethylene.

  8. Sulfuric acid-induced corrosion of aluminum surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Q.; Freedman, A.; Robinson, G.N.

    1995-12-01

    The sulfuric acid-induced corrosion of smooth (2 nm average roughness) aluminum surfaces has been studied in real times using an in situ Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectrometer and a quartz crystal microbalance. Submicron thick, 35 to 55 weight percent (5 to 12 molal), sulfuric acid films were formed on room temperature metal surfaces by the reaction of gas-phase SO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O vapor in a flowing gas system at a total pressure of {approximately}200 Torr. The deposition of the acid films and subsequent changes in their chemical composition resulting from corrosion of the aluminum substrate could be monitored using characteristic infrared absorption features. The corrosion process always significantly perturbed the spectral signature of the films from that which was observed on inert gold surfaces. Using changes in spectral features that are linked to the production of Al{sup 3+} as indicators of corrosion, the authors conclude the rate of corrosion of the metal is strongly enhanced by both higher relative humidities and increased rates of sulfuric acid deposition.

  9. Computerized image analysis for acetic acid induced intraepithelial lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Ferris, Daron G.; Lieberman, Rich W.

    2008-03-01

    Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN) exhibits certain morphologic features that can be identified during a visual inspection exam. Immature and dysphasic cervical squamous epithelium turns white after application of acetic acid during the exam. The whitening process occurs visually over several minutes and subjectively discriminates between dysphasic and normal tissue. Digital imaging technologies allow us to assist the physician analyzing the acetic acid induced lesions (acetowhite region) in a fully automatic way. This paper reports a study designed to measure multiple parameters of the acetowhitening process from two images captured with a digital colposcope. One image is captured before the acetic acid application, and the other is captured after the acetic acid application. The spatial change of the acetowhitening is extracted using color and texture information in the post acetic acid image; the temporal change is extracted from the intensity and color changes between the post acetic acid and pre acetic acid images with an automatic alignment. The imaging and data analysis system has been evaluated with a total of 99 human subjects and demonstrate its potential to screening underserved women where access to skilled colposcopists is limited.

  10. Sphingoid bases inhibit acid-induced demineralization of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Valentijn-Benz, Marianne; van 't Hof, Wim; Bikker, Floris J; Nazmi, Kamran; Brand, Henk S; Sotres, Javier; Lindh, Liselott; Arnebrant, Thomas; Veerman, Enno C I

    2015-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite (HAp), the main constituent of dental enamel, is inherently susceptible to the etching and dissolving action of acids, resulting in tooth decay such as dental caries and dental erosion. Since the prevalence of erosive wear is gradually increasing, there is urgent need for agents that protect the enamel against erosive attacks. In the present study we studied in vitro the anti-erosive effects of a number of sphingolipids and sphingoid bases, which form the backbone of sphingolipids. Pretreatment of HAp discs with sphingosine, phytosphingosine (PHS), PHS phosphate and sphinganine significantly protected these against acid-induced demineralization by 80 ± 17%, 78 ± 17%, 78 ± 7% and 81 ± 8%, respectively (p < 0.001). On the other hand, sphingomyelin, acetyl PHS, octanoyl PHS and stearoyl PHS had no anti-erosive effects. Atomic force measurement revealed that HAp discs treated with PHS were almost completely and homogeneously covered by patches of PHS. This suggests that PHS and other sphingoid bases form layers on the surface of HAp, which act as diffusion barriers against H(+) ions. In principle, these anti-erosive properties make PHS and related sphingosines promising and attractive candidates as ingredients in oral care products.

  11. Fatty acid remodeling by LPCAT3 enriches arachidonate in phospholipid membranes and regulates triglyceride transport

    PubMed Central

    Hashidate-Yoshida, Tomomi; Harayama, Takeshi; Hishikawa, Daisuke; Morimoto, Ryo; Hamano, Fumie; Tokuoka, Suzumi M; Eto, Miki; Tamura-Nakano, Miwa; Yanobu-Takanashi, Rieko; Mukumoto, Yoshiko; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Okamura, Tadashi; Kita, Yoshihiro; Shindou, Hideo; Shimizu, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in phospholipids affect the physical properties of membranes, but it is unclear which biological processes are influenced by their regulation. For example, the functions of membrane arachidonate that are independent of a precursor role for eicosanoid synthesis remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the lack of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3 (LPCAT3) leads to drastic reductions in membrane arachidonate levels, and that LPCAT3-deficient mice are neonatally lethal due to an extensive triacylglycerol (TG) accumulation and dysfunction in enterocytes. We found that high levels of PUFAs in membranes enable TGs to locally cluster in high density, and that this clustering promotes efficient TG transfer. We propose a model of local arachidonate enrichment by LPCAT3 to generate a distinct pool of TG in membranes, which is required for normal directionality of TG transfer and lipoprotein assembly in the liver and enterocytes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06328.001 PMID:25898003

  12. Actions of gallic esters on the arachidonic acid metabolism of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Christow, S; Luther, H; Ludwig, P; Gruner, S; Schewe, T

    1991-04-01

    Gallic esters with a varying chain length of its alcohol moiety produced strong inhibition of the conversion of [1-14C]-arachidonic acid to 5S-hydroxy-6E,8Z,11Z,14Z-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE) by isolated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Octyl gallate and decyl gallate were the most powerful inhibitors with a concentration of half-inhibition of about 1 mumol . 1-1. Additionally these compounds caused however at 10 mumol . 1-1 a complete inhibition of the incorporation of arachidonic acid in triacylglycerols and phospholipids which is assumed to be a consequence of the damage to the energy metabolism of the cells. In contrast, the other gallic esters enhance the incorporation of arachidonic acid in the ester lipids in addition to moderate inhibition of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway.

  13. The War of Jenkins’ Ear

    PubMed Central

    Graboyes, Evan M.; Hullar, Timothy E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective In 1731, Spanish sailors boarded the British brig Rebecca off the coast of Cuba and sliced off the left ear of its captain, Robert Jenkins. This traumatic auriculectomy was used as a pretext by the British to declare war on Spain in 1739, a conflict that is now known as the War of Jenkins’ Ear. Here, we examine the techniques available for auricular repair at the time of Jenkins’ injury and relate them to the historical events surrounding the incident. Methods Review of relevant original published manuscripts and monographs. Results Surgeons in the mid-18th century did not have experience with repair of traumatic total auriculectomies. Some contemporary surgeons favored auricular prostheses over surgical treatment. Methods for the reconstruction of partial defects were available, and most authors advocated a local post-auricular flap instead of a free tissue transfer. Techniques for repair of defects of the auricle lagged behind those for repair of the nose. Conclusion Limitations in care of traumatic auricular defects may have intensified the significance of Jenkins’ injury and helped lead to the War of Jenkins’ Ear, but conflict between Britain and Spain was probably unavoidable due to their conflicting commercial interests in the Caribbean. PMID:23444484

  14. Protein kinase C, arachidonate metabolism, and tracheal smooth muscle - effects of temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.; Baraban, J.; Menkes, H.

    1986-03-01

    Cooling causes airway obstruction in asthma. Contractions of airway smooth muscle may be produced through the phosphatidylinositol cycle and the activation of protein kinase C. Protein kinase C can be activated directly with phorbol esters. The authors studied the effects of temperature on responses to phorbol 12,13-diacetate (PDA) in guinea pig tracheal rings bathed in Krebs-Henseleit solution. At 37/sup 0/C, 1 ..mu..M PDA relaxed the tissue (tension fell 0.60 +/- S.E. 0.04 g). At 27/sub 0/C, 1 ..mu..M PDA contracted the tissue (tension rose 0.050 +/- 0.05 g). In comparison, near maximum contractions produced by 4 ..mu..M carbachol were 2.00 +/- 0.09 g at 37/sub 0/C and 1.90 +/- 0.09 g at 27/sup 0/C. Butler-Gralla et al. showed that phorbol esters may stimulate the release of arachidonic acid from cultured cells. In order to determine whether arachidonate metabolites play a role in responses observed in guinea pig trachea, the authors used indomethacin (a cyclooxygenase inhibitor), FPL 55712 (a leukotriene receptor antagonist) and Na arachidonate. At 37/sup 0/C, 3 ..mu..M indomethacin pretreatment abolished relaxationby 1 uM PDA. At 27/sup 0/C, 10 uM FPL 55712 pretreatment abolished contractions by 1 ..mu..M PDA. Like PDA, 1 ..mu..M Na arachidonate produced relaxation at 37/sup 0/C and contraction at 27/sup 0/C. The authors conclude that the effects of PDA at different temperatures parallel the effects of Na arachidonate. These results suggest that the effects of PDA in the guinea pig trachea are related to the release of endogenous arachidonic acid and that the cyclooxygenase pathway predominates at high temperature and the lipoxygenase pathway predominates at low temperature.

  15. Effects of compounds in leaves of Salix matsudana on arachidonic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi-Nan; Zhang, Jing; Han, Li-Kun; Sekiya, Keizo; Kimura, Yoshiyuki; Okuda, Hiromichi

    2005-12-01

    Apigenin 7-O-beta-D-glucopyranuronide (1), luteolin 7-O-beta-D-glucopyranuronide (2), m-hydroxybenzyl beta-D-glucoside (3), and chrysoeriol 7-O-beta-D-glucopyranuronide (4) were isolated for the first time from the leaves of Salix matsudana. Furthermore, the effects of compounds 1, 2 and 3 on arachidonic acid metabolism were studied. These compounds inhibited significantly the production of 12-hydroxy-5, 8, 10, 14-eicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE). In addition, the aglycon apigenin inhibited not only 12-HETE but also thromboxane B(2) (TXB(2)). The effect of compound (4) on arachidonic acid metabolism is now under investigation. PMID:16327246

  16. Ear canal dynamic motion as a source of power for in-ear devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delnavaz, Aidin; Voix, Jérémie

    2013-02-01

    Ear canal deformation caused by temporomandibular joint (jaw joint) activity, also known as "ear canal dynamic motion," is introduced in this paper as a candidate source of power to possibly recharge hearing aid batteries. The geometrical deformation of the ear canal is quantified in 3D by laser scanning of different custom ear moulds. An experimental setup is proposed to measure the amount of power potentially available from this source. The results show that 9 mW of power is available from a 15 mm3 dynamic change in the ear canal volume. Finally, the dynamic motion and power capability of the ear canal are investigated in a group of 12 subjects.

  17. Numerical simulation of the human ear and the dynamic analysis of the middle ear sound transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, W.; Ma, J.; Huang, X.

    2013-06-01

    Based on the clinical CT of normal right ear, a 3-D ?nite element (FE) model of the human ear consisting of the external ear canal, middle ear(tympanic membrane, ossicular chain, ligaments, tendons), and inner ear (including semicircular canals, vestibular, spiral cochlear)was constructed in this paper. The complicated structures and inner boundary conditions of middle ear were described in this model. Model analysis and acoustic-structure-?uid coupled dynamic frequency response analysis were conducted on the model. The validity of this model was confirmed by comparing the results with published experimental data. The amplitudes and velocities of tympanic membrane and stapes footplate, sound pressure gain across the middle ear, and the cochlear input impedance were derived. Besides, it was concluded that the ear canal can amplify the sound signal in low frequencies.The modes of vibration of middle ear auditory ossicles, oval window and round window have been analysed. This model can well simulate the acoustic behavior with the interaction of external ear, middle ear and inner ear, which can supply more valuable theoretical support for development and improvement of hearing-aid and artificial inner ear.

  18. Prominent ears: Anthropometric study of the external ear of primary school children of Harare, Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Muteweye, Wilfred; Muguti, Godfrey I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Prominent ear is the most common congenital ear deformity affecting 5% of children in the Western world and has profound psychosocial effects on the bearer. It is important to know the prevalence in the local population to have a better appreciation of the local burden of the abnormality as well as to know the parameters of ear morphology locally. These parameters can be useful in the diagnosis and evaluation of ear anomalies and may help reconstructive surgeons in reproducing an anatomically correct ear of an African/Zimbabwean child. Objectives To evaluate the frequency of prominent ears in black school going children in Zimbabwe and to establish morphometric properties of the ear. Design Prospective observational, cross sectional study. Setting Three Primary schools in Harare. Two in a high density area and one in a low density area. Materials and methods Three Primary schools in Harare were selected at random. The following measurements were taken: ear lengths, ear projection and face height using a sliding caliper. Three hundred and five healthy pupils of the age range 9–13 years of both sexes were included in the study, whilst children with congenital anomalies, ear tumours and history of ear trauma were excluded. Results The mean ear height across the cohort was 56.95 ± 5.00 (right ear) and 56.86 ± 4.92 (left ear). Ear projection was 19.52 ± 2.14 (right ear) and 19.59 ± 2.09 (left ear). Gender related differences were noted. Mean ear height was significantly higher in males (p-value = 0.000). Ear projection was higher in males compared to females. A total of 6.89% had prominent ears. Among males, 7.69% had prominent ears whilst 6.17% of females had prominent ears. Conclusion The prevalence of prominent ear among black African children in the studied population is comparable to that of Caucasians. The study provides a set of biometric data of auricular dimensions for normal black African children aged 9–13 years. PMID:26468372

  19. Ear infections in autistic and normal children.

    PubMed

    Konstantareas, M M; Homatidis, S

    1987-12-01

    The frequency of ear infections, ear tube drainage, and deafness was examined through parental reports in autistic and yoke-matched, normal children. For the autistic group these difficulties were additionally examined as a function of the children's cognitive and communication abilities, verbal versus nonverbal status, sex, and degree of autistic symptomatology. Autistic children had a greater incidence of ear infections than matched normal peers. Lower-functioning children had an earlier onset of ear infections than their higher-functioning autistic peers. Ear infections coexisted with low-set ears, and with a higher autistic symptomatology score. The findings are discussed in terms of greater CNS vulnerability in the autistic children, which is likely present since embryogenesis. The possible adverse consequences of intermittent hearing loss on language, cognitive, and socioaffective development are considered.

  20. [Hypopharyngeal carcinoma and red ear drum].

    PubMed

    Bender, B; Widmann, G; Riechelmann, H; Schmutzhard, J

    2011-04-01

    A 46-year-old male patient with an unresectable hypopharyngeal carcinoma was treated with primary radio-chemotherapy. At follow-up, the patient presented with a red ear drum and combined hearing loss. Because of radiotherapy-induced tubal dysfunction, paracentesis was performed. Biopsy of the polypoid middle ear mucosa revealed petrous bone infiltration of hypopharyngeal carcinoma. MRI studies revealed paracarotideal tumor infiltration to the petrous bone and the middle ear arising from a cervical retropharyngeal lymph node metastasis. PMID:20963385

  1. Identification of an Arachidonic Acid-Producing Bacterium and Description of Kineococcus arachidonicus sp. nov.

    SciTech Connect

    Fliermans, C.B.

    2001-05-15

    The identification of bacterial with the ability to produce polyunsaturated fatty acids as been limited almost exclusively to gram-negative, psychrophilic, marine microorganisms. Here we describe a new gram-type-positive bactgerium, strain SRS30216T, that produces the polyunsaturated fatty acid, arachidonic acid, and is neither psychrophilic nor a marine isolate.

  2. An Effective 3D Ear Acquisition System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yahui; Lu, Guangming; Zhang, David

    2015-01-01

    The human ear is a new feature in biometrics that has several merits over the more common face, fingerprint and iris biometrics. It can be easily captured from a distance without a fully cooperative subject. Also, the ear has a relatively stable structure that does not change much with the age and facial expressions. In this paper, we present a novel method of 3D ear acquisition system by using triangulation imaging principle, and the experiment results show that this design is efficient and can be used for ear recognition. PMID:26061553

  3. Development and Integration of the Ear.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Jennifer C; Tucker, Abigail S

    2015-01-01

    The perception of our environment via sensory organs plays a crucial role in survival and evolution. Hearing, one of our most developed senses, depends on the proper function of the auditory system and plays a key role in social communication, integration, and learning ability. The ear is a composite structure, comprised of the external, middle, and inner ear. During development, the ear is formed from the integration of a number of tissues of different embryonic origin, which initiate in distinct areas of the embryo at different time points. Functional connections between the components of the hearing apparatus have to be established and maintained during development and adulthood to allow proper sound submission from the outer to the middle and inner ear. This highly organized and intimate connectivity depends on intricate spatiotemporal signaling between the various tissues that give rise to the structures of the ear. Any alterations in this chain of events can lead to the loss of integration, which can subsequently lead to conductive hearing loss, in case of outer and middle ear defects or sensorineural hearing loss, if inner ear structures are defective. This chapter aims to review the current knowledge concerning the development of the three ear compartments as well as mechanisms and signaling pathways that have been implicated in the coordination and integration process of the ear.

  4. An Effective 3D Ear Acquisition System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yahui; Lu, Guangming; Zhang, David

    2015-01-01

    The human ear is a new feature in biometrics that has several merits over the more common face, fingerprint and iris biometrics. It can be easily captured from a distance without a fully cooperative subject. Also, the ear has a relatively stable structure that does not change much with the age and facial expressions. In this paper, we present a novel method of 3D ear acquisition system by using triangulation imaging principle, and the experiment results show that this design is efficient and can be used for ear recognition.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Inner Ear Development

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Doris K.; Kelley, Matthew W.

    2012-01-01

    The inner ear is a structurally complex vertebrate organ built to encode sound, motion, and orientation in space. Given its complexity, it is not surprising that inner ear dysfunction is a relatively common consequence of human genetic mutation. Studies in model organisms suggest that many genes currently known to be associated with human hearing impairment are active during embryogenesis. Hence, the study of inner ear development provides a rich context for understanding the functions of genes implicated in hearing loss. This chapter focuses on molecular mechanisms of inner ear development derived from studies of model organisms. PMID:22855724

  6. Development and Integration of the Ear.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Jennifer C; Tucker, Abigail S

    2015-01-01

    The perception of our environment via sensory organs plays a crucial role in survival and evolution. Hearing, one of our most developed senses, depends on the proper function of the auditory system and plays a key role in social communication, integration, and learning ability. The ear is a composite structure, comprised of the external, middle, and inner ear. During development, the ear is formed from the integration of a number of tissues of different embryonic origin, which initiate in distinct areas of the embryo at different time points. Functional connections between the components of the hearing apparatus have to be established and maintained during development and adulthood to allow proper sound submission from the outer to the middle and inner ear. This highly organized and intimate connectivity depends on intricate spatiotemporal signaling between the various tissues that give rise to the structures of the ear. Any alterations in this chain of events can lead to the loss of integration, which can subsequently lead to conductive hearing loss, in case of outer and middle ear defects or sensorineural hearing loss, if inner ear structures are defective. This chapter aims to review the current knowledge concerning the development of the three ear compartments as well as mechanisms and signaling pathways that have been implicated in the coordination and integration process of the ear. PMID:26589927

  7. Listening to Nature's orchestra with peculiar ears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager, David D.

    2003-04-01

    Insects use hearing for the crucial tasks of communicating with conspecifics and avoiding predators. Although all are based on the same acoustic principles, the diversity of insect ears is staggering and instructive. For instance, a South African grasshopper demonstrates that hearing conspecific calls is possible over distances 1 km with ears that do not have tympana. Actually, these creatures have six pairs of ears that play different roles in behavior. In numerical contrast, praying mantises have just a single ear in the ventral midline. The ear is very effective at detecting ultrasonic bat cries. However, the bioacoustics of sound transduction by two tympana facing each other in a deep, narrow slit is a puzzle. Tachinid flies demonstrate that directional hearing at 5 kHz is possible with a pair of ears fused together to give a total size of 1 mm. The ears are under the fly's chin. Hawk moths have their ears built into their mouthparts and the tympanum is more like a hollow ball than the usual membrane. As an apt last example, cicada ears are actually part of the orchestra: their tympana function both in sound reception and sound production.

  8. An Effective 3D Ear Acquisition System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yahui; Lu, Guangming; Zhang, David

    2015-01-01

    The human ear is a new feature in biometrics that has several merits over the more common face, fingerprint and iris biometrics. It can be easily captured from a distance without a fully cooperative subject. Also, the ear has a relatively stable structure that does not change much with the age and facial expressions. In this paper, we present a novel method of 3D ear acquisition system by using triangulation imaging principle, and the experiment results show that this design is efficient and can be used for ear recognition. PMID:26061553

  9. Ozone-induced alterations in arachidonic acid metabolism in cultured lung cell types

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most sensitive cells to ozone (O/sub 3/) damage is the pulmonary endothelial cell which may mediate the response of the lung to injury by productions of the autacoid prostacyclin (PGl/sub 2/), a metabolite of arachidonic acid. Exposure of endothelial cell cultures to ozone produced a concentration dependent decreases in the synthesis of PGl/sub 2/. Release of /sup 3/H-arachidonic acid from endothelial cells was increased after two hours of 0.3 and 1.0 ppm O/sub 3/ exposure while incubation of cells with 20 ..mu..M and arachidonate (4 min) after exposure resulted in a decreased PGl/sub 2/ synthesis. Cells exposed to 1.0 ppm O/sub 3/ did not have a decreased PGl/sub 2/ production when incubated with 5 ..mu..M PGH/sub 2/ immediately after exposure. These results are consistent with an O/sub 3/-induced inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity. O/sub 3/ exposure (1.0 ppm) produced a rapid decrease in endothelial PGl/sub 2/ synthesis. The data suggest that cyclooxygenase was not inactivated by increased autooxidation due to metabolism of increased free arachidonate. PGl/sub 2/ synthesis returned to control amounts within 12 hours after ozone exposure similar to the recovery time of irreversibly inhibited cyclooxygenase suggesting that recovery was due to de novo synthesis of enzyme. Lipid peroxides and/or hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/) may have caused the inhibition of cyclooxygenase. Incubation of cells with catalase (5 U/ml) protected against the O/sub 3/-induced depression in PGl/sub 2/ synthesis. Exogenously added H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ (greater than or equal to 75 ..mu..M) caused a stimulation of basal PGl/sub 2/ production but depressed arachidonate-stimulated synthesis. O/sub 3/ exposure (2 hr, 1.0 ppm) produced altered metabolism of arachidonate in other important lung cell types, e.g., a decreased PGl/sub 2/ synthesis in smooth muscle cultures. Exposure of lung macrophages to O/sub 3/ caused an increase in almost all arachidonate metabolites produced.

  10. Vascular permeabilization by intravenous arachidonate in the rat peritoneal cavity: antagonism by ethamsylate.

    PubMed

    Hannaert, Patrick; Alvarez-Guerra, Miriam; Hider, Hamida; Chiavaroli, Carlo; Garay, Ricardo P

    2003-04-11

    The hemostatic agent, ethamsylate, inhibits arachidonic acid metabolism by a mechanism independent of cyclooxygenase activity and blocks carrageenan-induced rat paw edema. Here, ethamsylate was investigated for (i) in vivo actions on the free radical-dependent, permeabilizing responses to arachidonic acid and (ii) its antioxidant potential in vitro. Vascular permeability was equated to the extravasation rate of Evans blue from plasma into the rat peritoneal cavity. Antioxidant potential was investigated by classical in vitro tests for superoxide radicals, hydroxyl radicals (OH(.)), and nitric oxide. Intravenous ethamsylate induced a very important and significant reduction of permeability responses to arachidonate, both when given preventively and cumulatively. Thus, (i) ethamsylate significantly reversed arachidonate-induced permeabilization, even at the lowest dose tested (44+/-5% at 10 mg/kg) and (ii) a maximal reversal (about 70%) was reached between 50 and 200 mg/kg ethamsylate. In contrast, ethamsylate (100 mg/kg) was unable to antagonize the vascular permeabilization induced by serotonin (5-HT). In antioxidant assays, ethamsylate showed scavenging properties against hydroxyl radicals generated by the Fenton reaction (H(2)O(2)/Fe(2+)) even at 0.1 microM (-20+/-3%). OH(.) scavenging by ethamsylate reached 42+/-8% at 10 microM and 57+/-7% at 1 mM and was comparable to that of reference compounds (vitamin E, troxerutin, and mannitol). Conversely, ethamsylate was a poor scavenger of superoxide and nitric oxide radicals. In conclusion, intravenous ethamsylate potently antagonized the peritoneal vascular permeabilization induced by arachidonate, an action likely due to its antioxidant properties, particularly against hydroxyl radical. Such a mechanism can explain previous observations that ethamsylate inhibits carrageenan-induced rat paw edema. Whether it also participates in the hemostatic action of ethamsylate deserves further investigation.

  11. Docosahexaenoic acid and other fatty acids induce a decrease in pHi in Jurkat T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Aires, Virginie; Hichami, Aziz; Moutairou, Kabirou; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2003-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) induced rapid (t1/2=33 s) and dose-dependent decreases in pHi in BCECF-loaded human (Jurkat) T-cells. Addition of 5-(N,N-dimethyl)-amiloride, an inhibitor of Na+/H+ exchanger, prolonged DHA-induced acidification as a function of time, indicating that the exchanger is implicated in pHi recovery. Other fatty acids like oleic acid, arachidonic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, but not palmitic acid, also induced a fall in pHi in these cells. To assess the role of calcium in the DHA-induced acidification, we conducted experiments in Ca2+-free (0% Ca2+) and Ca2+-containing (100% Ca2+) buffer. We observed that there was no difference in the degree of DHA-induced transient acidification in both the experimental conditions, though pHi recovery was faster in 0% Ca2+ medium than that in 100% Ca2+ medium. In the presence of BAPTA, a calcium chelator, a rapid recovery of DHA-induced acidosis was observed. Furthermore, addition of CaCl2 into 0% Ca2+ medium curtailed DHA-evoked rapid pHi recovery. In 0% Ca2+ medium, containing BAPTA, DHA did not evoke increases in [Ca2+]i, though this fatty acid still induced a rapid acidification in these cells. These observations suggest that calcium is implicated in the long-lasting DHA-induced acidosis. DHA-induced rapid acidification may be due to its deprotonation in the plasma membrane (flip-flop model), as suggested by the following observations: (1) DHA with a –COOH group induced intracellular acidification, but this fatty acid with a –COOCH3 group failed to do so, and (2) DHA, but not propionic acid, -induced acidification was completely reversed by addition of fatty acid-free bovine serum albumin in these cells. These results suggest that DHA induces acidosis via deprotonation and Ca2+ mobilization in human T-cells. PMID:14645139

  12. Chrysophanic Acid Induces Necrosis but not Necroptosis in Human Renal Cell Carcinoma Caki-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chrysophanic acid, also known as chrysophanol, has a number of biological activities. It enhances memory and learning abilities, raises superoxide dismutase activity, and has anti-cancer effects in several model systems. According to previous reports, chrysophanic acid-induced cell death shares features of necrotic cell death. However, the molecular and cellular processes underlying chrysophanic acid-induced cell death remain poorly understood. Methods: Chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was monitored by cell viability assay and Annexin V-propidium iodide (PI) staining of renal cell carcinoma Caki-2 cells. The induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) by chrysophanic acid and the suppression of ROS by anti-oxidants were evaluated by 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate staining. The expression and phosphorylation of proteins that are involved in apoptosis and necroptosis were detected by immunoblotting. Results: The extent of chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was concentration and time dependent, and dead cells mainly appeared in the PI-positive population, which is a major feature of necrosis, upon fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. Chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was associated with the generation of intracellular ROS, and this effect was reversed by pretreatment with N-acetyl cysteine. Chrysophanic acid-induced cell death was not associated with changes in apoptotic or necroptotic marker proteins. Conclusions: The cell death induced by chrysophanic acid resembled neither apoptotic nor necroptotic cell death in human renal cell carcinoma Caki-2 cells. PMID:27390736

  13. Effects of omega-3 fatty acids on vascular smooth muscle cells: reduction in arachidonic acid incorporation into inositol phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Yerram, N R; Spector, A A

    1989-07-01

    A rapid increase in arachidonic acid incorporation into phosphatidylinositol (PI) occurred following exposure of cultured porcine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells to calcium ionophore A23187. This response was specific for PI and phosphatidic acid; none of the other phosphoglycerides showed any increase in arachidonic acid incorporation. The incorporation of [3H]inositol also was increased, indicating that complete synthesis of PI rather than only fatty acylation occurred in response to the ionophore. The presence of omega-3 fatty acids, especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), reduced arachidonic acid but not inositol incorporation into PI. Stimulated incorporation of EPA also occurred under these conditions, suggesting that EPA replaces arachidonic acid in the newly synthesized pool of PI. Although much less arachidonic acid was incorporated into the polyphosphoinositides following exposure to the ionophore, arachidonic acid incorporation into these phosphorylated derivatives also decreased when EPA was present. These findings suggest that when omega-3 fatty acids are available, less arachidonic acid is channeled into the inositol phospholipids of activated smooth muscle cells because of replacement by EPA. This may represent a mechanism whereby omega-3 fatty acids, especially EPA, can accumulate in the metabolically active pools of inositol phospholipids and thereby possibly influence the properties or responsiveness of vascular smooth muscle.

  14. Ear canal hyperostosis--surfer's ear. An improved surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Seftel, D M

    1977-01-01

    The increased populatiry of surfing has produced a marked augmentation in the incidence of ear canal exostosis. However, when it becomes moderately severe, I prefer to call it "hyperostosis." Exposure to cold ocean water for many years can be an important etiologic factor in hyperostosis. There is a serious risk, and a high incidence of tympanic membrane perforations during the removal of large external canal hyperostosis. This injury can be prevented by placing a sheet of Silastic against the tympanic membrane beforehand. I describe the method. Serious degrees of hyperostosis, causing transient hearing loss and otitis externa, are increasingly common in coastal towns, where cold-water surfing is a popular year-around sport. PMID:831701

  15. Arachidonate and docosahexaenoate added to infant formula influence fatty acid composition and subsequent eicosanoid production in neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Huang, M C; Craig-Schmidt, M C

    1996-09-01

    As natural components of human milk, arachdonic and docosahexaenoic acids play important roles in neonatal development; thus, addition of these fatty acids to infant formula has been suggested. This study examined the effects of supplementation of infant formula with microbial sources of either arachidonate or docosahexaenoate or both on accretion of these fatty acids in phospholipids and subsequent modulation of eicosanoid production in neonatal pig lung. One-day-old piglets received for 25 d one of four diets (n = 5): 1) standard diet containing a fat blend similar to that of conventional infant formula, 2) diet containing 0.9 g/100 g of total fatty acids as arachidonate, 3) diet containing 0.7 g/100 g as docosahexaenoate, or 4) a diet containing both 1.0 g/100 g as arachidonate and 0.8 g/100 g as docosahexaenoate. Arachidonate supplementation resulted in 30-60% significantly greater arachidonate in lung phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine. In phosphatidylinositol, however, arachidonate was resistant to dietary manipulation. Accretion of docosahexaenoate in all three phospholipid classes was 2.6- to 4.7-fold greater in docosahexaenoate-supplemented groups than in the standard group. Inclusion of arachidonate in the diet augmented both prostacyclin and thromboxane production by 25 to 35%. Docosahexaenoate supplementation resulted in the least eicosanoid production among the treatments, and significant suppression was observed for thromboxane when supplementation with both fatty acids was compared with supplementation with arachidonate alone. Thus, dietary arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid at concentrations only slightly greater than those found in human milk tended to exercise opposing effects on lung eicosanoid production.

  16. [Noise level evaluation in acute ear trauma].

    PubMed

    Bobodzhanov, U B

    2003-01-01

    Subjective noise in the ears can be defined as a pathological acoustic sensation arising in the ear in different pathology of the acoustic analyzer. To make the treatment of the injury more effective, topical diagnosis of the acoustic analyzer affection is desirable.

  17. Playing by Ear: Foundation or Frill?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Many people divide musicians into two types: those who can read music and those who play by ear. Formal music education tends to place great emphasis on producing musically literate performers but devotes much less attention to teaching students to make music without notation. Some would suggest that playing by ear is a specialized skill that is…

  18. INNER EAR EMBRYOGENESIS: GENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL DETERMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The anatomy and developmental molecular genetics of the inner ear from establishment of the otic placode to formation of the definitive cochlea and vestibular apparatus will be reviewed and the complex 3-D structural changes that shape the developing inner ear will be illustrated...

  19. 21 CFR 870.2710 - Ear oximeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear oximeter. 870.2710 Section 870.2710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2710 Ear oximeter. (a) Identification. An...

  20. Cutaneous lesions of the external ear

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Michael; Sand, Daniel; Brors, Dominik; Altmeyer, Peter; Mann, Benno; Bechara, Falk G

    2008-01-01

    Skin diseases on the external aspect of the ear are seen in a variety of medical disciplines. Dermatologists, othorhinolaryngologists, general practitioners, general and plastic surgeons are regularly consulted regarding cutaneous lesions on the ear. This article will focus on those diseases wherefore surgery or laser therapy is considered as a possible treatment option or which are potentially subject to surgical evaluation. PMID:18261212

  1. Biometric recognition using 3D ear shape.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ping; Bowyer, Kevin W

    2007-08-01

    Previous works have shown that the ear is a promising candidate for biometric identification. However, in prior work, the preprocessing of ear images has had manual steps and algorithms have not necessarily handled problems caused by hair and earrings. We present a complete system for ear biometrics, including automated segmentation of the ear in a profile view image and 3D shape matching for recognition. We evaluated this system with the largest experimental study to date in ear biometrics, achieving a rank-one recognition rate of 97.8 percent for an identification scenario and an equal error rate of 1.2 percent for a verification scenario on a database of 415 subjects and 1,386 total probes.

  2. Inner ear barotrauma from scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, M F; Hetherington, H H; Hull, J J

    1999-03-01

    Inner ear barotrauma among scuba divers is believed to be caused by any of three conditions: a hemorrhage in the inner ear, a tear of the labyrinthine membrane, or a perilymphatic fistula. These injuries may occur concurrently or separately. Hemorrhage and membrane rupture are managed conservatively, while fistula requires surgical repair. In this report, we describe three cases of inner ear barotrauma in scuba divers. We also discuss the proposed etiologies of this injury and the controversy over whether or not divers who have suffered an inner ear trauma can safely resume scuba diving. Although the older literature clearly suggests otherwise, we believe that scuba divers who completely recover from inner (or middle) ear barotrauma may return to diving as long as they exercise caution and care.

  3. Perspective methods of human identification: Ear biometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choraś, M.

    2008-03-01

    Geometrical methods of feature extraction from ear images in order to perform human identification are presented. Geometrical approach is motivated by the actual procedures used by police and forensic experts (so-called ear otoscopy). In their work, geometrical features of ears such as size, height, width, and shapes of earlobe are useful and valid proofs of identity. The contribution of the article is development of the new and original methods of geometrical feature extraction from 2D ear images. Four novel algorithms of ear feature extraction from contour images are described in detail. Moreover, identification results obtained for each of the methods, based on the distance of feature vectors in the feature space, are presented.

  4. Arachidonic acid release and prostaglandin synthesis in a macrophage-like cell line exposed to asbestos.

    PubMed

    Brown, R C; Poole, A

    1984-10-01

    A macrophage-like cell line (P388D1) has been treated with asbestos and the release of arachidonic acid and its metabolites has been studied using two methods. In the first monolayer cultures of the cells were labelled with tritiated arachidonic acid and the release of label into the medium was quantified: secondly the synthesis and release of prostaglandins E2 and F2 alpha were followed using radioimmune assay. Crocidolite asbestos caused the greatest release of tritium while the medium from chrysotile-treated cultures contained more of both prostaglandins. Both of the fibrous dusts were significantly more active in both test systems than were the two 'inert' materials--titanium dioxide and milled sample of crocidolite. It is suggested that these phenomena are due to the effect of mineral dusts on phospholipase activity and that differences in this activity are associated with differences in the pathogenicity of various mineral dusts. PMID:6098173

  5. The skeletal muscle arachidonic acid cascade in health and inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Korotkova, Marina; Lundberg, Ingrid E

    2014-05-01

    Muscle atrophy and weakness are often observed in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases, and are the major clinical features of the autoimmune myopathies, polymyositis and dermatomyositis. A general understanding of the pathogenesis of muscle atrophy and the impaired muscle function associated with chronic inflammatory diseases has not been clarified. In this context, arachidonic acid metabolites, such as the prostaglandin and leukotriene subfamilies, are of interest because they contribute to immune and nonimmune processes. Accumulating evidence suggests that prostaglandins and leukotrienes are involved in causing muscular pain and inflammation, and also in myogenesis and the repair of muscles. In this Review, we summarize novel findings that implicate prostaglandins and leukotrienes in the muscle atrophy and weakness that occur in inflammatory diseases of the muscles, with a focus on inflammatory myopathies. We discuss the role of the arachidonic acid cascade in skeletal muscle growth and function, and individual metabolites as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of inflammatory muscle diseases.

  6. Differential stimulation of luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) and arachidonic acid metabolism in rat peritoneal neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, R.J.; Adams, L.M.; Cullinan, C.A.; Berkenkopf, J.W.; Weichman, B.M.

    1986-03-05

    Phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA) induced the production of radical oxygen species (ROS) from rat peritoneal neutrophils as assessed by CL. ROS generation occurred in a time- (maximum at 13.5 min) and dose- (concentration range of 1.7-498 nM) related fashion. However, 166 nM PMA did not induce either cyclooxygenase (CO) or lipoxygenase (LPO) product formation by 20 min post-stimulation. Conversely, A23187, at concentrations between 0.1 and 10 ..mu..M, stimulated both pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism, but had little or no effect upon ROS production. When suboptimal concentrations of PMA (5.5 nM) and A23187 (0.1-1 ..mu..M) were coincubated with the neutrophils, a synergistic ROS response was elicited. However, arachidonic acid metabolism in the presence of PMA was unchanged relative to A12187 alone. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) inhibited both PMA-induced CL (IC/sub 50/ = 0.9 ..mu..M) and A23187-induced arachidonic acid metabolism (IC/sub 50/ = 1.7 ..mu..M and 6.0 ..mu..M for LPO and CO, respectively). The mixed LPO-CO inhibitor, BW755C, behaved in a qualitatively similar manner to NDGA, whereas the CO inhibitors, indomethacin, piroxicam and naproxen had no inhibitory effect on ROS generation at concentrations as high as 100 ..mu..M. These results suggest that NDGA and BW755C may inhibit CL and arachidonic acid metabolism by distinct mechanisms in rat neutrophils.

  7. Kinetic isotope effects in the oxidation of arachidonic acid by soybean lipoxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Jacquot, Cyril; Peng, Sheng; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2008-11-15

    The reaction of soybean lipoxygenase-1 with linoleic acid has been extensively studied and displays very large kinetic isotope effects. In this work, substrate and solvent kinetic isotope effects as well as the viscosity dependence of the oxidation of arachidonic acid were investigated. The hydrogen atom abstraction step was rate-determining at all temperatures, but was partially masked by a viscosity-dependent step at ambient temperatures. The observed KIEs on k(cat) were large ( approximately 100 at 25 degrees C).

  8. Reduced phospholipase A2 activity is not accompanied by reduced arachidonic acid release.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, H; Maxwell, P; Hack, N; Skorecki, K

    1994-01-14

    Arachidonic acid release in cells highly over expressing cytosolic phospholipase A2 has been attributed to mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 on serine-505. To investigate the role of cytosolic phospholipase A2 in cellular physiology, we attempted to inhibit cytosolic phospholipase A2 in the intact cell employing an antisense RNA strategy. Swiss 3T3 cells were stably transfected with an antisense cytosolic phospholipase A2 expression vector. A clone of cells with reduced immunodetectable cytosolic phospholipase A2, compared to a vector transfected cell line, was identified by Western blotting and a corresponding decrease in phospholipase A2 activity was confirmed by enzymatic assay in cell free extracts. However, arachidonic acid release from intact cells in response to agonists was not different between antisense and control cell lines. Thus, arachidonic acid release in intact cells with decreased cytosolic phospholipase A2 activity is likely to be modulated by rate limiting factors that are extrinsic to cytosolic phospholipase A2.

  9. Stimulated arachidonate metabolism during foam cell transformation of mouse peritoneal macrophages with oxidized low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Yokode, M; Kita, T; Kikawa, Y; Ogorochi, T; Narumiya, S; Kawai, C

    1988-01-01

    Changes in arachidonate metabolism were examined in mouse peritoneal macrophages incubated with various types of lipoproteins. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) was incorporated by macrophages and stimulated macrophage prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene C4 syntheses, respectively, 10.8- and 10.7-fold higher than by the control. Production of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, a stable metabolite of prostacyclin, was also stimulated. No stimulation was found with native LDL, which was minimally incorporated by the cells. Acetylated LDL and beta-migrating very low density lipoprotein (beta-VLDL), though incorporated more efficiently than oxidized LDL, also had no stimulatory effect. When oxidized LDL was separated into the lipoprotein-lipid peroxide complex and free lipid peroxides, most of the stimulatory activity was found in the former fraction, indicating that stimulation of arachidonate metabolism in the cell is associated with uptake of the lipoprotein-lipid peroxide complex. These results suggest that peroxidative modification of LDL could contribute to the progression of atheroma by stimulating arachidonate metabolism during incorporation into macrophages. Images PMID:3125226

  10. Inhibition of arachidonic acid metabolism decreases tumor cell invasion and matrix metalloproteinase expression.

    PubMed

    Koontongkaew, Sittichai; Monthanapisut, Paopanga; Saensuk, Theeranuch

    2010-11-01

    Head and neck cancers are known to synthesize arachidonic acid metabolites. Interfering with arachidonic acid metabolism may inhibit growth and invasiveness of cancer cells. In this study we investigate effects of sulindac (the non-selective COX inhibitor), aspirin (the irreversible, preferential COX-1 inhibitor), NS-398 (the selective COX-2 inhibitor), NDGA (nordihydroguaiaretic acid, the selective LOX inhibitor) and ETYA (5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid, the COX and LOX inhibitor) on cell viability, MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities, and in vitro invasion of cancer cells derived from primary and metastatic head and neck, and colon cancers. The inhibitors of COX and/or LOX could inhibit cell proliferation, MMP activity and invasion in head and neck and colon cancer cells. However, the inhibitory effect was obviously observed in colon cancer cells. Inhibition of arachidonic acid metabolism caused a decrease in cancer cell motility, which partially explained by the inhibition of MMPs. Therefore, COX and LOX pathways play important roles in head and neck cancer cell growth. PMID:20654727

  11. Lipoxygenase-mediated pro-radical effect of melatonin via stimulation of arachidonic acid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Radogna, F.; Sestili, P.; Martinelli, C.; Paolillo, M.; Paternoster, L.; Albertini, M.C.; Accorsi, A.; Gualandi, G.; Ghibelli, L.

    2009-07-15

    We have shown that melatonin immediately and transiently stimulates intracellular free radical production on a set of leukocytes, possibly as a consequence of calmodulin binding. We show here that melatonin-induced ROS are produced by lipoxygenase (LOX), since they are prevented by a set of LOX inhibitors, and are accompanied by increase of the 5-LOX product 5-HETE. LOX activation is accompanied by strong liberation of AA; inhibition of Ca{sup 2+}-independent, but not Ca{sup 2+}-dependent, phospholipase A2 (PLA2), prevents both melatonin-induced arachidonic acid and ROS production, whereas LOX inhibition only prevents ROS, indicating that PLA2 is upstream with respect to LOX, as occurs in many signaling pathways. Chlorpromazine, an inhibitor of melatonin-calmodulin interaction, inhibits both ROS and arachidonic acid production, thus possibly placing calmodulin at the origin of a melatonin-induced pro-radical pathway. Interestingly, it is known that Ca{sup 2+}-independent PLA2 binds to calmodulin: our results are compatible with PLA2 being liberated by melatonin from a steady-state calmodulin sequestration, thus initiating an arachidonate signal transduction. These results delineate a novel molecular pathway through which melatonin may participate to the inflammatory response.

  12. Factors Affecting the Elicitation of Sesquiterpenoid Phytoalexin Accumulation by Eicosapentaenoic and Arachidonic Acids in Potato 1

    PubMed Central

    Bostock, Richard M.; Laine, Roger A.; Kuć, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    Eicosapentaenoic and arachidonic acids in extracts of Phytophthora infestans mycelium were identified as the most active elicitors of sesquiterpenoid phytoalexin accumulation in potato tuber slices. These fatty acids were found free or esterified in all fractions with elicitor activity including cell wall preparations. Yeast lipase released a major portion of eicosapentaenoic and arachidonic acids from lyophilized mycelium. Concentration response curves comparing the elicitor activity of the polyunsaturated fatty acids to a cell-free sonicate of P. infestans mycelium indicated that the elicitor activity of the sonicated mycelium exceeded that which would be obtained by the amount of eicosapentaenoic and arachidonic acids (free and esterified) present in the mycelium. Upon acid hydrolysis of lyophilized mycelium, elicitor activity was obtained only from the fatty acid fraction. However, the fatty acids accounted for only 21% of the activity of the unhydrolyzed mycelium and the residue did not enhance their activity. Centrifugation of the hydrolysate, obtained from lyophilized mycelium treated with 2n NaOH, 1 molarity NaBH4 at 100°C, yielded a supernatant fraction with little or no elicitor activity. Addition of this material to the fatty acids restored the activity to that which was present in the unhydrolyzed mycelium. The results indicate that the elicitor activity of the unsaturated fatty acids is enhanced by heat and base-stable factors in the mycelium. PMID:16662691

  13. Effect of inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism on alpha-aminoisobutyric acid transport in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Udey, M C; Parker, C W

    1982-02-01

    The role of arachidonic acid metabolism (or metabolites) in the modulation of alpha-aminoisobutyric acid transport in resting and concanavalin A-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes was evaluated using previously characterized inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism. Nordihydroguairetic acid (a nonselective antioxidant), 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (an inhibitor of lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase activities), indomethacin and acetylsalicylic acid (selective cyclooxygenase inhibitors), and 1-benzylimidazole, Ro-22-3581 and Ro-22-3582 (thromboxane synthetase inhibitors) proved to be potent inhibitors of amino acid transport activity in normal resting and lectin-activated lymphocytes at concentrations known to decrease thromboxane A2 production. The rank order of effectiveness of these various inhibitors compared favorably with their relative potencies as inhibitors of thromboxane B2 synthesis under the same conditions, as determined by radioimmunoassay. Inhibitory effects noted were not due to overt cytotoxicity and seemed to involve changes primarily in the Vmax and not the Km of the transport process. Drug-induced alterations in the magnitude of concanavalin A binding were not observed. These results suggest that the activity of amino acid transport systems can be influenced by certain arachidonic acid metabolites, probably thromboxanes, in both stimulated and unstimulated lymphocytes. In addition, these findings may provide a partial explanation for the observation that inhibitors of thromboxane formation prevent lymphocyte mitogenesis.

  14. Glial choristoma of the middle ear.

    PubMed

    Shemanski, Karen A; Voth, Spencer E; Patitucci, Lana B; Ma, Yuxiang; Popnikolov, Nikolay; Katsetos, Christos D; Sataloff, Robert T

    2013-12-01

    Glial choristomas are isolated masses of mature brain tissue that are found outside the spinal cord or cranial cavity. These masses are rare, especially in the middle ear. We describe the case of an 81-year-old man who presented with left-sided chronic otitis media, mastoiditis, hearing loss, tinnitus, and aural fullness. He was found to have a glial choristoma of the middle ear on the left. Otologic surgeons should be aware of the possibility of finding such a mass in the middle ear and be familiar with the differences in treatment between glial choristomas and the more common encephaloceles.

  15. Surgical Management of Ear Diseases in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Csomos, Rebecca; Bosscher, Georgia; Mans, Christoph; Hardie, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Otitis externa and media are frequently diagnosed disorders in rabbits and are particularly common in lop-eared breeds because of the specific anatomy of the ear canal. Medical management for otitis externa and media often provides only a temporary improvement in clinical signs. Surgery by means of partial or total ear canal ablation (PECA or TECA) combined with lateral bulla osteotomy (LBO) represents a feasible approach that is well tolerated and provides a good clinical outcome. Short-term complications associated with PECA/TECA-LBO include facial nerve paralysis and vestibular disease.

  16. [Ear keloid and clinical research progress].

    PubMed

    Du, Guangyuan; Zhu, Jiang

    2014-04-01

    Keloid refers to the damaged skin due to excessive fibroblast proliferation. Ear is one predilection site. The pathogenesis of ear keloid is not very clear, and the treatment is also varied. Surgery, postoperative radiotherapy and laser treatment, steroid hormones, pressure therapy are the basic treatment methods. Integrated application of a variety of treatments, classification research and new materials using revealed the prospect for the treatment of the disease. This thesis reviews literature about ear keloid in recent 10 years, and introduces this disease and clinical research progress.

  17. EARS: Electronic Access to Reference Service.

    PubMed Central

    Weise, F O; Borgendale, M

    1986-01-01

    Electronic Access to Reference Service (EARS) is a front end to the Health Sciences Library's electronic mail system, with links to the online public catalog. EARS, which became operational in September 1984, is accessed by users at remote sites with either a terminal or microcomputer. It is menu-driven, allowing users to request: a computerized literature search, reference information, a photocopy of a journal article, or a book. This paper traces the history of EARS and discusses its use, its impact on library staff and services, and factors that influence the diffusion of new technology. PMID:3779167

  18. Injuries of the external ear.

    PubMed

    Templer, J; Renner, G J

    1990-10-01

    Ear injuries occur in people of all ages but predominate in active people such as wrestlers, boxers, and bike riders. The types and extent of injury are a function of the force causing the injury. Shearing forces of moderate intensity cause hematoma formation, whereas greater force causes lacerations or even amputation. Sharp objects cause lacerations determined by the force, direction, and point of impact. The high ratio of surface area to mass makes the auricle vulnerable to extremes of temperature. People participating in high-risk activities should wear protective headgear. The goal of treatment is to restore the normal contours while preventing infection. Hematoma results in disfigurement by organization or chondritis. Evacuation and pressure dressings using sterile technique correct the condition. Second-degree burns are treated by regular cleansing and application of topical antimicrobials. Deeper burns require debridement, biologic dressings, or burying the cartilage subcutaneously for later reconstruction. Simple lacerations are closed under aseptic technique using either skin-to-skin sutures only or sutures of the skin combined with intercartilage sutures. Extensive and complex lacerations require meticulous care to match all fragments and prevent infection or loss of tissue. Bare cartilage must be covered with vascularized tissue. The treatment of total amputation is controversial. Some advocate reattachment as a composite graft using intravenous low molecular weight dextrans and heparin as adjuvants. Mladick dermabrades the amputated pinna, reattaches it with sutures, and then slips it into a pocket of elevated postauricular skin for 2 weeks. Others urge microvascular reanastomosis of the small nutrient vessels. Brent and Byrd separate the cartilage from its overlying skin and envelope it first with vascularized temporoparietal fascia and then a split-thickness skin graft. Chondritis is the most feared complication of injury or surgery of the pinna. It

  19. Directional Sensitivity of the Human Ear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitt, John D.; Bazley, Martin

    1985-01-01

    Presents a classroom experiment that demonstrates the directional sensitivity of the human ear. Outlines the activity's procedures and provides a diagrammatical view of the experimental arrangement. Also included is an analysis of the expected results. (ML)

  20. Neonatal Ear Molding: Timing and Technique.

    PubMed

    Anstadt, Erin Elizabeth; Johns, Dana Nicole; Kwok, Alvin Chi-Ming; Siddiqi, Faizi; Gociman, Barbu

    2016-03-01

    The incidence of auricular deformities is believed to be ∼11.5 per 10,000 births, excluding children with microtia. Although not life-threatening, auricular deformities can cause undue distress for patients and their families. Although surgical procedures have traditionally been used to reconstruct congenital auricular deformities, ear molding has been gaining acceptance as an efficacious, noninvasive alternative for the treatment of newborns with ear deformations. We present the successful correction of bilateral Stahl's ear deformity in a newborn through a straightforward, nonsurgical method implemented on the first day of life. The aim of this report is to make pediatric practitioners aware of an effective and simple molding technique appropriate for correction of congenital auricular anomalies. In addition, it stresses the importance of very early initiation of ear cartilage molding for achieving the desired outcome.

  1. Mozart ear: diagnosis, treatment, and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Ken; Yotsuyanagi, Takatoshi; Saito, Tamotsu; Isogai, Noritaka; Mori, Hiromasa; Itani, Yoshihito

    2011-11-01

    Mozart ear is a congenital auricular deformity, which is mainly characterized by a bulging appearance of the anterosuperior portion of the auricle, a convexly protruded cavum conchae, and a slit-like narrowing of the orifice of the external auditory meatus. It is said to be uncommon, and because no one has yet fully described neither the disease nor the treatment, the concept of Mozart ear has not been unified. This report describes a case of a 13-year-old girl presented with an unusual congenital deformity which showed the features of Mozart ear. It is an extremely rare deformity that only about 4 clinical cases have been reported in medical literature thereby a treatment method has not been fully discussed. For surgical correction of our cases, we excised deformed conchal cartilage, turned it over, regrafted, and maintained a cosmetically positive result. We also reviewed and described the origin, current concept, and treatment method of Mozart ear.

  2. Evolution: Fossil Ears and Underwater Sonar.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Olivier

    2016-08-22

    A key innovation in the history of whales was the evolution of a sonar system together with high-frequency hearing. Fossils of an archaic toothed whale's inner ear bones provide clues for a stepwise emergence of underwater echolocation ability.

  3. Middle Ear Adenoma: Case Report and Discussion

    PubMed Central

    Vrugt, B.; Huber, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Despite modern radiological workup, surgeons can still be surprised by intraoperative findings or by the pathologist's report. Materials & Methods. We describe the case of a 52-year-old male who was referred to our clinic with a single sided conductive hearing loss. He ultimately underwent middle ear exploration and excision of a middle ear tumour followed by second look and ossiculoplasty a year later. Results. Though preoperative CT and MRI scanning were suggestive of a congenital cholesteatoma, the pathologist's report diagnosed a middle ear adenoma. Discussion. Middle ear glandular tumors are extremely rare and, despite numerous histological techniques, continue to defy satisfactory classification. Most surgeons advocate surgical excision though evidence of the tumour's natural course and risk of recurrence is lacking. PMID:25045567

  4. Ear Infections in Autistic and Normal Children. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konstantareas, M. Mary; Homatidis, Soula

    1987-01-01

    Evaluation of the frequency of ear infections, ear tube drainage, and deafness for 51 autistic children (ages 2-18) indicated that autistic children had a greater incidence of ear infections than matched normal peers and lower functioning children had an earlier onset of ear infections than higher functioning autistic peers. (Author)

  5. An analysis of the acoustic input impedance of the ear.

    PubMed

    Withnell, Robert H; Gowdy, Lauren E

    2013-10-01

    Ear canal acoustics was examined using a one-dimensional lossy transmission line with a distributed load impedance to model the ear. The acoustic input impedance of the ear was derived from sound pressure measurements in the ear canal of healthy human ears. A nonlinear least squares fit of the model to data generated estimates for ear canal radius, ear canal length, and quantified the resistance that would produce transmission losses. Derivation of ear canal radius has application to quantifying the impedance mismatch at the eardrum between the ear canal and the middle ear. The length of the ear canal was found, in general, to be longer than the length derived from the one-quarter wavelength standing wave frequency, consistent with the middle ear being mass-controlled at the standing wave frequency. Viscothermal losses in the ear canal, in some cases, may exceed that attributable to a smooth rigid wall. Resistance in the middle ear was found to contribute significantly to the total resistance. In effect, this analysis "reverse engineers" physical parameters of the ear from sound pressure measurements in the ear canal.

  6. 38 CFR 4.87 - Schedule of ratings-ear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Schedule of ratings-ear...—ear. Diseases of the Ear Rating 6200Chronic suppurative otitis media, mastoiditis, or cholesteatoma... of the substance 10 6208Malignant neoplasm of the ear (other than skin only) 100 Note: A rating...

  7. 21 CFR 874.4140 - Ear, nose, and throat bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat bur. 874.4140 Section 874...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4140 Ear, nose, and throat bur. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat bur is a device consisting of an interchangeable drill bit that...

  8. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Middle ear mold. 874.3430 Section 874.3430 Food... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle...

  9. 38 CFR 4.87 - Schedule of ratings-ear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Schedule of ratings-ear...—ear. Diseases of the Ear Rating 6200Chronic suppurative otitis media, mastoiditis, or cholesteatoma... of the substance 10 6208Malignant neoplasm of the ear (other than skin only) 100 Note: A rating...

  10. 38 CFR 4.87 - Schedule of ratings-ear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Schedule of ratings-ear...—ear. Diseases of the Ear Rating 6200Chronic suppurative otitis media, mastoiditis, or cholesteatoma... of the substance 10 6208Malignant neoplasm of the ear (other than skin only) 100 Note: A rating...

  11. 21 CFR 874.4140 - Ear, nose, and throat bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat bur. 874.4140 Section 874...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4140 Ear, nose, and throat bur. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat bur is a device consisting of an interchangeable drill bit that...

  12. 38 CFR 4.87 - Schedule of ratings-ear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Schedule of ratings-ear...—ear. Diseases of the Ear Rating 6200Chronic suppurative otitis media, mastoiditis, or cholesteatoma... of the substance 10 6208Malignant neoplasm of the ear (other than skin only) 100 Note: A rating...

  13. 38 CFR 4.87 - Schedule of ratings-ear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Schedule of ratings-ear...—ear. Diseases of the Ear Rating 6200Chronic suppurative otitis media, mastoiditis, or cholesteatoma... of the substance 10 6208Malignant neoplasm of the ear (other than skin only) 100 Note: A rating...

  14. 21 CFR 874.4140 - Ear, nose, and throat bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat bur. 874.4140 Section 874...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4140 Ear, nose, and throat bur. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat bur is a device consisting of an interchangeable drill bit that...

  15. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Middle ear mold. 874.3430 Section 874.3430 Food... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle...

  16. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Middle ear mold. 874.3430 Section 874.3430 Food... DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle...

  17. 21 CFR 874.4140 - Ear, nose, and throat bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4140 Ear, nose, and throat bur. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat bur is a device consisting of an interchangeable drill bit that is... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat bur. 874.4140 Section...

  18. 21 CFR 874.4140 - Ear, nose, and throat bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4140 Ear, nose, and throat bur. (a) Identification. An ear, nose, and throat bur is a device consisting of an interchangeable drill bit that is... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear, nose, and throat bur. 874.4140 Section...

  19. Continuous monitoring of ear temperature in boars.

    PubMed

    Bekkering, J; Hoy, S

    2007-01-01

    Seventy boars penned singly in an artificial insemination station were included in this analysis. Each had a special ear tag with an integrated sensor to measure the skin temperature of the ear every 3 min. The readings were averaged per animal and hour, thus, over 18 months, resulted in a total of 37,7351 data points. In the whole investigation period, the system did not work for some days and some sensors did not work for hours. A diurnal rhythm was found for the ear temperature with its minimum reached between 5 and 6 am (22.07 degrees C) and the maximum between 4 and 6 pm (28.90 degrees C). If the ambient temperature was increased by 5 Kelvin then the skin temperature at the ear also increased by 3 to 5 Kelvin. On days when semen was collected, the ear temperature was higher during the relevant hours than at comparable times on days without semen collection. The results of 322 measurements taken from 70 boars, including 24 boars with increased rectal temperature (> 39.3 degrees C), showed that the coefficient of correlation between skin and rectal temperature was low (r = 0.36). Thus, the measurement of the skin temperature at the ear cannot be used as a significant or safe parameter for predicting the rectal temperature and sowith the health status of the animal.

  20. Acid-induced aggregation propensity of nivolumab is dependent on the Fc.

    PubMed

    Liu, Boning; Guo, Huaizu; Xu, Jin; Qin, Ting; Xu, Lu; Zhang, Junjie; Guo, Qingcheng; Zhang, Dapeng; Qian, Weizhu; Li, Bohua; Dai, Jianxin; Hou, Sheng; Guo, Yajun; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Nivolumab, an anti-programmed death (PD)1 IgG4 antibody, has shown notable success as a cancer treatment. Here, we report that nivolumab was susceptible to aggregation during manufacturing, particularly in routine purification steps. Our experimental results showed that exposure to low pH caused aggregation of nivolumab, and the Fc was primarily responsible for an acid-induced unfolding phenomenon. To compare the intrinsic propensity of acid-induced aggregation for other IgGs subclasses, tocilizumab (IgG1), panitumumab (IgG2) and atezolizumab (aglyco-IgG1) were also investigated. The accurate pH threshold of acid-induced aggregation for individual IgG Fc subclasses was identified and ranked as: IgG1 < aglyco-IgG1 < IgG2 < IgG4. This result was cross-validated by thermostability and conformation analysis. We also assessed the effect of several protein stabilizers on nivolumab, and found mannitol ameliorated the acid-induced aggregation of the molecule. Our results provide valuable insight into downstream manufacturing process development, especially for immune checkpoint modulating molecules with a human IgG4 backbone. PMID:27310175

  1. MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory


    MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of water disinfection by chlorination. Several studies have demonstrated the hepatocarcinogenicity of DCA in rodents when administered in dri...

  2. Structure and function of the mammalian middle ear. I: Large middle ears in small desert mammals.

    PubMed

    Mason, Matthew J

    2016-02-01

    Many species of small desert mammals are known to have expanded auditory bullae. The ears of gerbils and heteromyids have been well described, but much less is known about the middle ear anatomy of other desert mammals. In this study, the middle ears of three gerbils (Meriones, Desmodillus and Gerbillurus), two jerboas (Jaculus) and two sengis (elephant-shrews: Macroscelides and Elephantulus) were examined and compared, using micro-computed tomography and light microscopy. Middle ear cavity expansion has occurred in members of all three groups, apparently in association with an essentially 'freely mobile' ossicular morphology and the development of bony tubes for the middle ear arteries. Cavity expansion can occur in different ways, resulting in different subcavity patterns even between different species of gerbils. Having enlarged middle ear cavities aids low-frequency audition, and several adaptive advantages of low-frequency hearing to small desert mammals have been proposed. However, while Macroscelides was found here to have middle ear cavities so large that together they exceed brain volume, the bullae of Elephantulus are considerably smaller. Why middle ear cavities are enlarged in some desert species but not others remains unclear, but it may relate to microhabitat.

  3. Luteolin prevents uric acid-induced pancreatic β-cell dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ying; Shi, Xuhui; Shuai, Xuanyu; Xu, Yuemei; Liu, Yun; Liang, Xiubin; Wei, Dong; Su, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Elevated uric acid causes direct injury to pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we examined the effects of luteolin, an important antioxidant, on uric acid-induced β-cell dysfunction. We first evaluated the effect of luteolin on nitric oxide (NO) formation in uric acid-stimulated Min6 cells using the Griess method. Next, we performed transient transfection and reporter assays to measure transcriptional activity of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Western blotting assays were also performed to assess the effect of luteolin on the expression of MafA and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in uric acid-treated cells. Finally, we evaluated the effect of luteolin on uric acid-induced inhibition of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in Min6 cells and freshly isolated mouse pancreatic islets. We found that luteolin significantly inhibited uric acid-induced NO production, which was well correlated with reduced expression of iNOS mRNA and protein. Furthermore, decreased activity of NF-κB was implicated in inhibition by luteolin of increased iNOS expression induced by uric acid. Besides, luteolin significantly increased MafA expression in Min6 cells exposed to uric acid, which was reversed by overexpression of iNOS. Moreover, luteolin prevented uric acid-induced inhibition of GSIS in both Min6 cells and mouse islets. In conclusion, luteolin protects pancreatic β-cells from uric acid-induced dysfunction and may confer benefit on the protection of pancreatic β-cells in hyperuricemia-associated diabetes. PMID:25050113

  4. An evaluation of tympanometric estimates of ear canal volume.

    PubMed

    Shanks, J E; Lilly, D J

    1981-12-01

    The accuracy of tympanometric estimates of ear canal volume was evaluated by testing the following two assumptions on which the procedure is based: (a) ear canal volume does not change when ear canal pressure is varied, and (b) an ear canal pressure of 200 daPa drives the impedance of the middle ear transmission system to infinity so the immittance measured at 200 daPa can be attributed to the ear canal volume alone. The first assumption was tested by measuring the changes in ear canal volume in eight normal subjects for ear canal pressures between +/- 400 daPa using a manometric procedure based on Boyle's gas law. The data did not support the first assumption. Ear canal volume changed by a mean of .113 ml over the +/- 400 daPa pressure range with slightly larger volume changes occurring for negative ear canal pressures than for positive ear canal pressures. Most of the volume change was attributed to movement of the probe and to movement of the cartilaginous walls of the ear canal. The second assumption was tested by comparing estimates of ear canal volume from susceptance tympanograms with a direct measurement of ear canal volume adjusted for changes in volume due to changes in ear canal pressure between +/- 400 daPa. These data failed to support the second assumption. All tympanometric estimates of ear canal volume were larger than the measured volumes. The largest error (39%) occurred for an ear canal pressure of 200 daPa at 220 Hz, whereas the smallest error (10%) occurred for an ear canal pressure of -400 daPa at 660 Hz. This latter susceptance value (-400 daPa at 660 Hz) divided by three is suggested to correct the 220-Hz tympanogram to the plane of the tympanic membrane. Finally, the effects of errors in estimating ear canal volume on static immittance and on tympanometry are discussed. PMID:7329051

  5. Prolonged Radiant Exposure of the Middle Ear during Transcanal Endoscopic Ear Surgery.

    PubMed

    Shah, Parth V; Kozin, Elliott D; Remenschneider, Aaron K; Dedmon, Matthew M; Nakajima, Hideko Heidi; Cohen, Michael S; Lee, Daniel J

    2015-07-01

    Transcanal endoscopic ear surgery (EES) provides a high-resolution, wide-field view of the middle ear compared with the conventional operating microscope, reducing the need for a postauricular incision or mastoidectomy. Our group has shown in cadaveric human temporal bone studies that radiant energy from the endoscope tip can quickly elevate temperatures of the tympanic cavity. Elevated temperatures of the middle ear are associated with acute auditory brainstem response shifts in animal models. In EES, proposed methods to decrease middle ear temperature include frequent removal of the endoscope and the use of suction to rapidly dissipate heat; however, the routine application of such cooling techniques remains unknown. Herein, we aim to quantify the duration that the tympanic cavity is typically exposed to the endoscope during routine endoscopic middle ear surgery. We find that the tympanic cavity is exposed to the endoscope without a cooling mechanism for a prolonged period of time.

  6. Arachidonic acid-dependent carbon-eight volatile synthesis from wounded liverwort (Marchantia polymorpha).

    PubMed

    Kihara, Hirotomo; Tanaka, Maya; Yamato, Katsuyuki T; Horibata, Akira; Yamada, Atsushi; Kita, Sayaka; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kajikawa, Masataka; Fukuzawa, Hideya; Kohchi, Takayuki; Akakabe, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Kenji

    2014-11-01

    Eight-carbon (C8) volatiles, such as 1-octen-3-ol, octan-3-one, and octan-3-ol, are ubiquitously found among fungi and bryophytes. In this study, it was found that the thalli of the common liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, a model plant species, emitted high amounts of C8 volatiles mainly consisting of (R)-1-octen-3-ol and octan-3-one upon mechanical wounding. The induction of emission took place within 40min. In intact thalli, 1-octen-3-yl acetate was the predominant C8 volatile while tissue disruption resulted in conversion of the acetate to 1-octen-3-ol. This conversion was carried out by an esterase showing stereospecificity to (R)-1-octen-3-yl acetate. From the transgenic line of M. polymorpha (des6(KO)) lacking arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, formation of C8 volatiles was only minimally observed, which indicated that arachidonic and/or eicosapentaenoic acids were essential to form C8 volatiles in M. polymorpha. When des6(KO) thalli were exposed to the vapor of 1-octen-3-ol, they absorbed the alcohol and converted it into 1-octen-3-yl acetate and octan-3-one. Therefore, this implied that 1-octen-3-ol was the primary C8 product formed from arachidonic acid, and further metabolism involving acetylation and oxidoreduction occurred to diversify the C8 products. Octan-3-one was only minimally formed from completely disrupted thalli, while it was formed as the most abundant product in partially disrupted thalli. Therefore, it is assumed that the remaining intact tissues were involved in the conversion of 1-octen-3-ol to octan-3-one in the partially disrupted thalli. The conversion was partly promoted by addition of NAD(P)H into the completely disrupted tissues, suggesting an NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductase was involved in the conversion. PMID:25174554

  7. UVB irradiation and distribution of arachidonic acid (20:4) and stearic acid (18:0) in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Punnonen, K; Jansén, C T

    1989-04-01

    Human keratinocytes (NCTC 2544) in culture were labeled with either 14C-arachidonic acid or 14C-stearic acid and then exposed to UVB irradiation (9 or 90 mJ/cm2). Exposure of the keratinocytes to UVB irradiation resulted in considerable rearrangement of the membrane fatty acids. Following UVB irradiation the percentage amounts of 14C-arachidonic acid and 14C-stearic acid were significantly decreased in phospholipids, in phosphatidylethanolamine and in phosphatidylcholine. The liberation of stearic acid from phospholipids was accompanied by accumulation of radiolabel into the culture medium, but in 14C-arachidonic acid-labeled cells the amount of radiolabel in the culture medium was not changed following UVB irradiation despite liberation of arachidonic acid from phospholipids. It seems evident that, following UVB irradiation, the rate of reincorporation of liberated 14C-arachidonic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid, is higher and thus different from that of a saturated fatty acid, 14C-stearic acid. The present study suggests that exposure of keratinocytes to UVB irradiation is followed by liberation of both saturated and unsaturated fatty acids and also considerable reacylation of the unsaturated fatty acids.

  8. Vibrational structure of the polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and arachidonic acid studied by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Johannes; Noack, Kristina; Bartelmess, Juergen; Walter, Christian; Dörnenburg, Heike; Leipertz, Alfred

    2010-02-01

    The spectroscopic discrimination of the two structurally similar polyunsaturated C 20 fatty acids (PUFAs) 5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid and 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (arachidonic acid) is shown. For this purpose their vibrational structures are studied by means of attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The fingerprint regions of the recorded spectra are found to be almost identical, while the C-H stretching mode regions around 3000 cm -1 show such significant differences as results of electronic and molecular structure alterations based on the different degree of saturation that both fatty acids can be clearly distinguished from each other.

  9. Production of arachidonic and linoleic acid metabolites by guinea pig tracheal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Oosthuizen, M.J.; Engels, F.; Van Esch, B.; Henricks, P.A.; Nijkamp, F.P. )

    1990-08-01

    Pulmonary epithelial cells may be responsible for regulating airway smooth muscle function, in part by release of fatty acid-derived mediators. Incubation of isolated guinea pig tracheal epithelial cells with radiolabeled arachidonic acid (AA) leads to the production of 5- and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5- and 15-HETE) and smaller amounts of leukotriene (LT) B4 and C4 and 12-hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid (HHT). Epithelial cells also are able to release linoleic acid (LA) metabolites. Incubation with radiolabeled linoleic acid leads to the formation of 9- and 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9- and 13-HODE). The biological significance of these mediators produced by epithelial cells is discussed.

  10. Carcinoid tumor of the middle ear.

    PubMed

    Nikanne, Elina; Kantola, Olli; Parviainen, Tapani

    2004-08-01

    Although carcinoid tumors are labeled as neuroendocrine tumors they can also originate in tissue lacking neuroendocrine cells, such as that in the middle ear. Symptoms of a carcinoid tumor in the middle ear are common ear symptoms such as fullness, pain and hearing loss. Carcinoid tumors have also been considered to be slow-growing. Both these aspects can easily lead to a relatively late diagnosis of carcinoid tumor of the middle ear. The diagnosis is made histologically, and the tumor is primarily treated surgically. In the follow-up of patients, octreotide scanning has proved to be a sensitive method in cases of both recurrence and metastasis. Our patient was a 34-year-old, otherwise healthy female with left-sided acute otitis media and facial palsy in her left ear. She had also suffered from the same symptoms 4 years earlier. She was treated with an operation, and the histologic diagnosis was a carcinoid tumor. In the follow-up of the patient we used octreotide scanning.

  11. Evolution and development of the vertebrate ear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzsch, B.; Beisel, K. W.

    2001-01-01

    This review outlines major aspects of development and evolution of the ear, specifically addressing issues of cell fate commitment and the emerging molecular governance of these decisions. Available data support the notion of homology of subsets of mechanosensors across phyla (proprioreceptive mechanosensory neurons in insects, hair cells in vertebrates). It is argued that this conservation is primarily related to the specific transducing environment needed to achieve mechanosensation. Achieving this requires highly conserved transcription factors that regulate the expression of the relevant structural genes for mechanosensory transduction. While conserved at the level of some cell fate assignment genes (atonal and its mammalian homologue), the ear has also radically reorganized its development by implementing genes used for cell fate assignment in other parts of the developing nervous systems (e.g., neurogenin 1) and by evolving novel sets of genes specifically associated with the novel formation of sensory neurons that contact hair cells (neurotrophins and their receptors). Numerous genes have been identified that regulate morphogenesis, but there is only one common feature that emerges at the moment: the ear appears to have co-opted genes from a large variety of other parts of the developing body (forebrain, limbs, kidneys) and establishes, in combination with existing transcription factors, an environment in which those genes govern novel, ear-related morphogenetic aspects. The ear thus represents a unique mix of highly conserved developmental elements combined with co-opted and newly evolved developmental elements.

  12. Patterning and cell fate in ear development.

    PubMed

    Alsina, Berta; Giraldez, Fernando; Pujades, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    The inner ear is a complex structure responsible for the senses of audition and balance in vertebrates. The ear is organised into different sense organs that are specialised to detect specific stimuli such as sound and linear or angular accelerations. The elementary sensory unit of the ear consists of hair cells, supporting cells, neurons and Schwann cells. Hair cells are the mechano-electrical transducing elements, and otic neurons convey information coded in electrical impulses to the brain. With the exception of the Schwann cells, all cellular elements of the inner ear derive from the otic placode. This is an ectodermal thickening that is specified in the head ectoderm adjacent to the caudal hindbrain. The complex organisation of the ear requires precise coupling of regional specification and cell fate decisions during development, i.e. specificity in defining particular spatial domains containing particular cell types. Those decisions are taken early in development and are the subject of this article. We review here recent work on: i) early patterning of the otic placode, ii) the role of neural tube signals in the patterning of the otic vesicle, and iii) the genes underlying cell fate determination of neurons and sensory hair cells.

  13. BK Channels in the Vertebrate Inner Ear.

    PubMed

    Pyott, S J; Duncan, R K

    2016-01-01

    The perception of complex acoustic stimuli begins with the deconstruction of sound into its frequency components. This spectral processing occurs first and foremost in the inner ear. In vertebrates, two very different strategies of frequency analysis have evolved. In nonmammalian vertebrates, the sensory hair cells of the inner ear are intrinsically electrically tuned to a narrow band of acoustic frequencies. This electrical tuning relies on the interplay between BK channels and voltage-gated calcium channels. Systematic variations in BK channel density and kinetics establish a gradient in electrical resonance that enables the coding of a broad range of acoustic frequencies. In contrast, mammalian hair cells are extrinsically tuned by mechanical properties of the cochlear duct. Even so, mammalian hair cells also express BK channels. These BK channels play critical roles in various aspects of mammalian auditory signaling, from developmental maturation to protection against acoustic trauma. This review summarizes the anatomical localization, biophysical properties, and functional contributions of BK channels in vertebrate inner ears. Areas of future research, based on an updated understanding of the biology of both BK channels and the inner ear, are also highlighted. Investigation of BK channels in the inner ear continues to provide fertile research grounds for examining both BK channel biophysics and the molecular mechanisms underlying signal processing in the auditory periphery. PMID:27238269

  14. Ear Acupuncture in European Traditional Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Firenzuoli, Fabio

    2007-01-01

    Auricular acupuncture is a diagnostic and treatment system based on normalizing the body's dysfunction through stimulation of definite points on the ear. Rudimentary forms of acupuncture which probably arose during the Stone Age have survived in many parts of the world right down to present day. It was used in the ancient Egypt, Rome, Greece and all the Mediterranean area. It is a microacupuncture technique similar to reflexology, and was first described in France in 1950 by Paul Nogier who is considered the Father of modern ear acupuncture. It was speculated that the technique works because groups of pluripotent cells contain information from the whole organism and create regional organization centers representing different parts of the body. Nevertheless stimulation of a reflex point in the ear seems relieve symptoms of distant pathologies. Modern research is confirming the efficacy of ear acupuncture for analgesia and anxiety related disease, while tobacco dependence and other substance abuse still need confirmation. Actually main methodological problems with auricular acupuncture are that exist too many maps with little agreement regarding point location in the ear, and that the correspondence or reflex systems does not correlated with modern knowledge of anatomy and physiology. PMID:18227925

  15. Passive and active middle ear implants

    PubMed Central

    Beutner, Dirk; Hüttenbrink, Karl-Bernd

    2011-01-01

    Besides eradication of chronic middle ear disease, the reconstruction of the sound conduction apparatus is a major goal of modern ear microsurgery. The material of choice in cases of partial ossicular replacement prosthesis is the autogenous ossicle. In the event of more extensive destruction of the ossicular chain diverse alloplastic materials, e.g. metals, ceramics, plastics or composits are used for total reconstruction. Their specialised role in conducting sound energy within a half-open implant bed sets high demands on the biocompatibility as well as the acoustic-mechanic properties of the prosthesis. Recently, sophisticated titanium middle ear implants allowing individual adaptation to anatomical variations are widely used for this procedure. However, despite modern developments, hearing restoration with passive implants often faces its limitations due to tubal-middle-ear dysfunction. Here, implantable hearing aids, successfully used in cases of sensorineural hearing loss, offer a promising alternative. This article reviews the actual state of affairs of passive and active middle ear implants. PMID:22073102

  16. Opium addiction and cauliflower ears: a case report.

    PubMed

    Muthusamy, E

    1991-02-01

    The case of an elderly Chinese male opium addict with cauliflower ears is discussed. He had no history of contact sports that could have led to auricular trauma resulting in deformed ears. Besides cauliflower ears, he had features of chronic bronchitis. The association between opium addiction and cauliflower ears was first described way back in 1932. It was attributed to the prolonged opium induced sleep on hard surface subjecting the ears to repeated pressure and trauma. With the changing pattern of drug abuse, opium abuse related cauliflower ears will become a vanishing sign.

  17. [Bone Conduction and Active Middle Ear Implants].

    PubMed

    Volkenstein, S; Thomas, J P; Dazert, S

    2016-05-01

    The majority of patients with moderate to severe hearing loss can be supplied with conventional hearing aids depending on severity and cause for hearing loss in a satisfying way. However, some patients either do not benefit enough from conventional hearing aids or cannot wear them due to inflammatory reactions and chronic infections of the external auditory canal or due to anatomical reasons. For these patients there are fully- and semi-implantable middle ear and bone conduction implants available. These devices either directly stimulate the skull (bone conduction devices), middle ear structures (active middle ear implants) or the cochlea itself (direct acoustic stimulation). Patients who failed surgical hearing rehabilitation or do not benefit from conventional hearing aids may achieve a significant better speech understanding and tremendous improvement in quality of life by implantable hearing devices with careful attention to the audiological and anatomical indication criteria.

  18. Endoscopic anatomy of the pediatric middle ear.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, otologists have aimed to produce a clean, dry, safe ear with the best possible hearing result. More recently, "less invasively" has been added to this list of goals. The development of small-diameter, high-quality rigid endoscopes and high-definition video systems has made totally endoscopic, transcanal surgery a reality in adult otology and a possibility in pediatric otology. This article reviews the anatomy of the pediatric middle ear and its surrounding airspaces and structures based on the work of dozens of researchers over the past 50 years. It will focus on the developmental changes in ear anatomy from birth through the first decade, when structure and function change most rapidly. Understanding the limits and possibilities afforded by new endoscopic technologies, the pediatric otologist can strive for results matching or exceeding those achieved by more invasive surgical approaches.

  19. Precise individualized armature for ear reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evenhouse, Raymond J.; Chen, Xiaoming

    1991-04-01

    The cosmetic result of an ear restored surgically or via prosthetics is dependent on the surgeon''s ability to carve a precise cartilage armature at the time of surgery or the prosthetist''s ability to sculpt in wax an exact duplicate of the patient''s " missing" ear. Introducing CAD/CAM technology into the process benefits the esthetic outcome of these procedures. By utilizing serial section information derived from CAT MRI or moulage techniques a mirrorimage of the patient''s " donor" ear is generated. The resulting earform data is then used for the design of a cartilage armature produced by multi-axis milling or to produce by stereolithography a model which serves as the basis for a prosthesis.

  20. Epidemiology and aetiology of middle ear cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Kemppainen, H O; Puhakka, H J; Laippala, P J; Sipilä, M M; Manninen, M P; Karma, P H

    1999-01-01

    A total of 500 patients with cholesteatoma diagnosed and operated during 1982-91 in the region of Tampere University Hospital and Mikkeli Central Hospital in Finland were analysed retrospectively. The mean annual incidence was 9.2 per 100,000 inhabitants (range 3.7-13.9) and during the study period the annual incidence decreased significantly. The incidence was higher among males under the age of 50 years. There was no accumulation of cholesteatoma diseases in lower social groups. The majority (72.4%) of cholesteatoma patients had suffered from otitis media episodes. Tympanostomy was carried out in 10.2% and adenoidectomy or adenotonsillectomy in 15.9% of all cholesteatoma ears prior to cholesteatoma surgery. Cholesteatoma behind an intact tympanic membrane with no history of otitis media was verified in 0.6% of patients and in cleft palate patients in 8%. In this study, 13.2% of patients had ear trauma or ear operation in anamnes.

  1. [Complications Resulting from Taking Ear Impressions].

    PubMed

    Sugiuchi, Tomoko; Kodera, Kazuoki; Zusho, Hiroyuki; Asano, Yoshikazu; Kanesada, Keiko; Hayashida, Mitsuhiro; Kanaya, Koichiro; Tokumaru, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    In 2012, we carried out a study in a large sample to understand the secondary injuries caused during the taking ear impressions for hearing aids. This study is a follow-up of previous research conducted in 1986 (285 medical institutions) and 1999 (98 medical institutions). We posted a questionnaire survey to the otolaryngology departments of 3,257 medical institutions. The response rate to the questionnaire was 62.9% (2,050 of the 3,257 institutions), and the results indicated that 301 of the 2050 institutions (14.7%) had experience with secondary injuries, with a total of 460 cases reported. In 342 of the 460 cases (74.3%), the secondary injuries occurred at hearing-aid dealerships, followed by 67 cases (14.6%) at affiliated medical institutions, and 51 cases (11.1%) in other locations, including other medical institutions, rehabilitation counseling centers, and educational institutions. The most common type of secondary injury (298 cases, 64.8%) was caused by the presence of foreign bodies in the ear, which in turn was a result of complications occurring during the removal of residual ear impression material. Of these 298 cases, 32 required excision of the foreign bodies and surgical intervention under general anesthesia. The remaining 10 cases exhibited isolated tympanic membrane perforation without foreign body-related complications. Furthermore, 146 cases (31.7%) developed bleeding and otitis externa following removal of the ear impression, and there were reports of cases with bleeding that required long-term outpatient care and treatment. Therefore, since retention of a foreign body in the ear and tympanic membrane perforation can occur even in patients without a history of surgery or prior otologic history, adjustment of hearing aids requires prior otorhinolaryngological examination. Furthermore, because of the risk of secondary injury when taking ear impressions, this procedure must be performed with caution under the guidance of an otolaryngologist.

  2. [The tempestuous history of middle ear operation].

    PubMed

    Betlejewski, Stanisław; Betlejewski, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    The paper is a review of primary and secondary historical and scientific literature concerning the surgical treatment of the middle ear diseases. The development of mastoid surgery can be traced through the past 4 centuries. Once used as a means of evacuating a postauricular abscess, it has evolved to become a method for gaining entry into the middle ear to control acute and chronic ear diseases, or for treatment of otogenic complications. Earlier works led the way to the postauricular "Wilde incision", which gave rise to Schwartze mastoidectomy. Oscar Wilde's ultimate demise from an otogenic meningitis appears all the more ironic when one considers the role his father, Sir William Wilde, played as one of the founding fathers of modern otology. The death of baron von Berger after mastoidectomy performed for treatment of tinnitus and hypacusis, stopped the further development of surgical procedures for about hundred years. The Joseph Toynbee's "Diseases of the ear" was the first work about ear diseases on a pathologic anatomical base, and fundamental for otology of the German speaking countries in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Otology was emerging as a specific specialty. Von Tröltsch was the first surgeon, who proposed the antral opening through the external ear canal. When Schwartze and his assistant, Eysell, published their paper: "On the Artificial Opening of the Mastoid Air Cells," a century or so had passed since the few previous attempts to remove the tegmen of the mastoid had been reported. One of the greatest otologists of the 19th century was Adam Politzer, His influence on the 50 years of otology has never been equaled. It is in his honor that the International Society of Otology bears his name.

  3. High intensity anthropogenic sound damages fish ears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, Robert D.; Fewtrell, Jane; Popper, Arthur N.

    2003-01-01

    Marine petroleum exploration involves the repetitive use of high-energy noise sources, air-guns, that produce a short, sharp, low-frequency sound. Despite reports of behavioral responses of fishes and marine mammals to such noise, it is not known whether exposure to air-guns has the potential to damage the ears of aquatic vertebrates. It is shown here that the ears of fish exposed to an operating air-gun sustained extensive damage to their sensory epithelia that was apparent as ablated hair cells. The damage was regionally severe, with no evidence of repair or replacement of damaged sensory cells up to 58 days after air-gun exposure.

  4. Middle ear cholesteatoma in 11 dogs

    PubMed Central

    Greci, Valentina; Travetti, Olga; Di Giancamillo, Mauro; Lombardo, Rocco; Giudice, Chiara; Banco, Barbara; Mortellaro, Carlo M.

    2011-01-01

    Middle ear cholesteatoma is a rare condition in dogs with chronic otitis. Otorrhea, otodinia, and pain on temporomandibular joint palpation are the most common clinical signs. Neurological abnormalities are often detectable. Computed tomography reveals the presence of an expansive and invasive unvascularized lesion involving the tympanic cavity and the bulla, with little or no contrast enhancement after administration of contrast mediu. Video-otoscopy may detect pearly growth or white/yellowish scales in the middle ear cavity. Surgery is the only therapy but is associated with a high risk of recurrence. PMID:22131579

  5. Salivary gland choristoma of the middle ear.

    PubMed

    Bottrill, I D; Chawla, O P; Ramsay, A D

    1992-07-01

    A salivary gland choristoma is an extremely uncommon tumour in the middle ear space. It appears to be a developmental abnormality and may be associated with abnormalities of adjacent structures. It usually presents with unilateral conductive deafness which may be long-standing and the tumour often pursues a benign, slow growing course. It is usually possible to excise it, but problems may arise as there may be variable associated anatomical abnormalities of the middle ear. We present the nineteenth recorded case, review the literature and discuss the management of this condition.

  6. Evaluation of Bioequivalency and Toxicological Effects of Three Sources of Arachidonic Acid (ARA) in Domestic Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Tyburczy, Cynthia; Brenna, Margaret E.; DeMari, Joseph A.; Kothapalli, Kumar S. D.; Blank, Bryant S.; Valentine, Helen; McDonough, Sean P.; Banavara, Dattatreya; Diersen-Schade, Deborah A.; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (ARA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are routinely added to infant formula to support growth and development. We evaluated the bioequivalence and safety of three ARA-rich oils for potential use in infant formula using the neonatal pig model. The primary outcome for bioequivalence was brain accretion of ARA and DHA. Days 3 to 22 of age, domestic pigs fed one of three formulas, each containing ARA at ~0.64% and DHA at ~0.34% total fatty acids (FA). Control diet ARA was provided by ARASCO® and all diets had DHA from DHASCO® (Martek Biosciences Corp., Columbia, MD). The experimental diets a1 and a2 provided ARA from Refined Arachidonic acid-rich Oil (RAO; Cargill, Inc., Wuhan, China) and SUNTGA40S (Nissui, Nippon Suisan Kaisha, Ltd., Tokyo, Japan), respectively. Formula intake and growth were similar across all diets, and ARA was bioequivalent across treatments in the brain, retina, heart, liver and day 21 RBC. DHA levels in the brain, retina and heart were unaffected by diet. Liver sections, clinical chemistry, and hematological parameters were normal. We conclude that RAO and SUNTGA40S, when added to formula to supply ~0.64% ARA are safe and nutritionally bioequivalent to ARASCO in domestic piglets. PMID:21722692

  7. The role of iron in prostaglandin synthesis: ferrous iron mediated oxidation of arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Rao, G H; Gerrard, J M; Eaton, J W; White, J G

    1978-07-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is the essential substrate for production of platelet endoperoxides and thromboxanes. Iron or heme is an essential cofactor for the peroxidase, lipoxygenase and cyclo-oxygenase enzymes involved in formation of these products. The present study has examined the direct interactions between iron and arachidonic acid. Iron caused the oxidation of AA into more polar products which could be detected by UV absorbtion at 232 nM or the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) reaction. High pressure liquid chromatography, chem-ionization and electron-impact mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy suggest that the major product was a hydroperoxide of AA. Ferrous iron (Fe++) and oxygen were absolute requirements. Fe++ was converted to the ferric iron (Fe+++) state during oxidation of AA, but Fe+++ could not substitute for Fe++. No other enzymes, cofactors or ions were involved. Conversion of AA to a hydroperoxide by Fe++ was inhibited by the antioxidant, 2, (3)-Tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole, the radical scavenger, nitroblue tetrazolium, and iron chelating agents, including EDTA, imidazole and dihydroxybenzoic acid. The reaction was not affected by superoxide dismutase, catalase or aspirin. These findings and preliminary studies of the Fe++ induced oxidation product of AA as a substrate for prostaglandin synthesis and inhibitor of prostacyclin production indicate the critical role of Fe++ in AA activation.

  8. Omega-3 PUFAs Lower the Propensity for Arachidonic Acid Cascade Overreactions.

    PubMed

    Lands, Bill

    2015-01-01

    A productive view of the benefits from omega-3 (n-3) nutrients is that the dietary essential omega-6 (n-6) linoleic acid has a very narrow therapeutic window which is widened by n-3 nutrients. The benefit from moderate physiological actions of the arachidonic acid cascade can easily shift to harm from excessive pathophysiological actions. Recognizing the factors that predispose the cascade to an unwanted overactivity gives a rational approach for arranging beneficial interactions between the n-3 and n-6 essential nutrients that are initial components of the cascade. Much detailed evidence for harmful cascade actions was collected by pharmaceutical companies as they developed drugs to decrease those actions. A remaining challenge is to understand the factors that predispose the cascade toward unwanted outcomes and create the need for therapeutic interventions. Such understanding involves recognizing the similar dynamics for dietary n-3 and n-6 nutrients in forming the immediate precursors of the cascade plus the more vigorous actions of the n-6 precursor, arachidonic acid, in forming potent mediators that amplify unwanted cascade outcomes. Tools have been developed to aid deliberate day-to-day quantitative management of the propensity for cascade overactivity in ways that can decrease the need for drug treatments.

  9. Arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acid metabolism in bovine neutrophils and platelets: effect of calcium ionophore

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S.M.; Laegreid, W.W.; Heidel, J.R.; Straub, K.M.; Liggitt, H.D.; Silflow, R.M.; Breeze, R.G.; Leid, R.W.

    1987-09-01

    Substitution of dietary fatty acids has potential for altering the inflammatory response. The purpose of the present study was to define the metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) secreted by bovine peripheral blood neutrophils and platelets. High performance liquid chromatography was used to characterize cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase metabolites secreted in response to the calcium ionophore A23187. Cells were prelabelled with /sup 3/H-AA or /sup 3/H-EPA prior to challenge with the calcium ionophore. Bovine neutrophils secreted leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE) as the major metabolites of AA, as well as the corresponding leukotriene B5 (LTB5) and 5-hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid (5-HEPE) metabolites of EPA. Peptidoleukotrienes derived from /sup 3/H-AA or /sup 3/H-EPA were not detected under these conditions. The major tritiated metabolites secreted from bovine platelets were: thromboxane A2, measured as the stable metabolite thromboxane B2 (TXB2); hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid (HHT) and 12-HETE derived from /sup 3/H-AA; and the omega-3 analogs TXB3 and 12-HEPE, derived from /sup 3/H-EPA. Preferred substrate specificities existed amongst the AA- and EPA-derived metabolites for the intermediary enzymes involved in the arachidonic acid cascade. These findings support the hypothesis that substitution of membrane-bound AA by EPA has potential for modulation of the host inflammatory response following cellular phospholipid mobilization.

  10. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 is coupled to hormonally regulated release of arachidonic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, L L; Lin, A Y; Knopf, J L

    1992-01-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) binds to natural membrane vesicles in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion, resulting in the selective release of arachidonic acid, thus implicating cPLA2 in the hormonally regulated production of eicosanoids. Here we report that the treatment of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells overexpressing cPLA2 with ATP or thrombin resulted in an increased release of arachidonic acid as compared with parental CHO cells, demonstrating the hormonal coupling of cPLA2. In contrast, CHO cells overexpressing a secreted form of mammalian PLA2 (sPLA2-II) failed to show any increased hormonal responsiveness. Interestingly, we have noted that the activation of cPLA2 with a wide variety of agents stimulates the phosphorylation of cPLA2 on serine residues. Pretreatment of cells with staurosporin blocked the ATP-mediated phosphorylation of cPLA2 and strongly inhibited the activation of the enzyme. Increased cPLA2 activity was also observed in lysates prepared from ATP-treated cells and was sensitive to phosphatase treatment. These results suggest that in addition to Ca2+, the phosphorylation of cPLA2 plays an important role in the agonist-induced activation of cPLA2. Images PMID:1631101

  11. Equine tracheal epithelial membrane strips - An alternate method for examining epithelial cell arachidonic acid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.R.; Derksen, F.J.; Robinson, N.E.; Peter-Golden, M.L. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor )

    1990-02-26

    Arachidonic acid metabolism by tracheal epithelium can be studied using enzymatically dispersed cell suspensions or cell cultures. Both techniques require considerable tissue disruption and manipulation and may not accurately represent in vivo activity. The authors have developed an alternate method for obtaining strips of equine tracheal epithelium without enzymatic digestion. In the horse, a prominent elastic lamina supports the tracheal epithelium. By physical splitting this lamina, they obtained strips ({le}12 x 1.5 cm) of pseudostratified columnar epithelium attached to a layer of elastic tissue 30-100 {mu}m thick. Epithelial strips (1.2 x 0.5 cm) were attached to plexiglass rods and incubated with ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid in M199 medium (0.5 {mu}Ci/ml) for 24 hours at 37C. The strips incorporated 36{+-}4% (mean {+-} SEM) of the total radioactivity and released 8.0{+-}1.2% of incorporated radioactivity when stimulated by 5.0 {mu}M calcium ionophore A23187. The extracted supernatant was processed using HPLC, resulting in peaks of radioactivity that co-eluted with authentic PGE{sub 2}, PGF{sub 2}{alpha}, and 12-HETE standards. The greatest activity corresponded to the PGE{sub 2} and PGF{sub 2}{alpha} standards, which is a similar pattern to that reported for cultured human tracheal epithelium.

  12. Effect of ethanol amine plasmalogens on Fe-induced peroxidation of arachidonic acid in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles.

    PubMed

    Omodeo Salè, M F; Rizzo, A M; Masserini, M

    2000-12-01

    We have investigated the influence of ethanolamine plasmalogens on iron-induced oxidation of arachidonic acid in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles. Lipoperoxidation was induced by the addition of 50 microM FeSO4 and studied above (50 degrees C) and below (15 degrees C) the gel-to liquid transition temperature of the vesicles, at two different pH values (7.4 or 6.4). The extent of peroxidation was measured as thiobarbituric reactive product formed and the influence exerted by ethanolamine plasmalogens (PEPL) in this process was compared to that of dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) and diacylphosphatidylethanolamines (DAPE). The extent of peroxidation of arachidonic acid embedded in DPPC vesicles was similar at the two temperatures and greater at 50 degrees C under acidic conditions. However, the peroxidative process was significantly decreased at 50 degrees C in the presence of PEPL, but not of DPPE or DAPE and the inhibitory effect was enhanced at pH 6.4. The possibility that a different phase distribution of the phospholipids, namely a transition from a lamellar to a hexagonal phase, may play a role in the scavenger effect of ethanolamine plasmalogens is discussed. PMID:11145167

  13. The effect of ozone exposure on rat alveolar macrophage arachidonic acid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, M.C.; Eling, T.E.; Dailey, L.A.; Friedman, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Rat alveolar macrophages were prelabeled with {sup 3}H-arachidonic acid ({sup 3}H-AA) and exposed to air or O3 (0.1-1.0 ppm) in vitro for 2 h. Alveolar macrophages released 3.6-fold more tritium at the 1.0 ppm exposure concentration compared with air-exposed macrophages. A significantly increased production of several {sup 3}H-AA metabolites, including 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, thromboxane B2, 12-hydroxy-5,8,10-heptadecatrienoic acid, prostaglandins E2 and D2, leukotrienes B4 and D4, and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid was formed by macrophages exposed to 1.0 ppm O3 compared with air-exposed macrophages as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. O3 exposure did not alter macrophage {sup 3}H-AA metabolism in response to calcium ionophore A23187. The largest tritiated peak observed in the HPLC chromatograms of O{sub 3}-exposed cells was a polar complex of products that contained various phospholipids and neutral lipids (including diacylglycerol) and possibly degradation products of {sup 3}H-AA and some of its metabolites. These changes in macrophage arachidonic acid metabolism may play an important role in the lung response to O{sub 3} exposure in vivo.

  14. Plasma phospholipid arachidonic acid and lignoceric acid are associated with the risk of cardioembolic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Yoonsu; Do, Hyun Ju; Oh, Kyungmi; Seo, Woo-Keun; Shin, Min-Jeong

    2015-11-01

    Cardioembolic (CE) stroke is the most severe subtype of ischemic stroke with high recurrence and mortality. However, there is still little information on the association of plasma fatty acid (FA) with CE stroke. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis whether the composition of plasma phospholipid FA is associated with the risk of CE stroke. The study subjects were collected from the Korea University Stroke Registry. Twenty-one subjects were selected as CE stroke group, and 39 age- and sex-matched subjects with non-CE stroke were selected as controls. Sociodemographic factors, clinical measurements, and plasma phospholipid FA compositions were compared between the groups. Logistic regression was used to obtain estimates of the associations between the relevant FAs and CE stroke. The result showed that the CE stroke group had higher levels of free FA and lower levels of triglycerides before and after adjustment (all P < .05). In the regression analysis, elaidic acid (18:1Tn9) and arachidonic acid (20:4n6) were positively related, but lignoceric acid (24:0) was negatively related to CE stroke in all constructed models (all P < .05). In conclusion, plasma phospholipid FA composition was associated with CE stroke risk in Korean population, with higher proportions of elaidic acid and arachidonic acid and lower proportion of lignoceric acid in CE stroke. PMID:26452419

  15. Omega-3 PUFAs Lower the Propensity for Arachidonic Acid Cascade Overreactions

    PubMed Central

    Lands, Bill

    2015-01-01

    A productive view of the benefits from omega-3 (n-3) nutrients is that the dietary essential omega-6 (n-6) linoleic acid has a very narrow therapeutic window which is widened by n-3 nutrients. The benefit from moderate physiological actions of the arachidonic acid cascade can easily shift to harm from excessive pathophysiological actions. Recognizing the factors that predispose the cascade to an unwanted overactivity gives a rational approach for arranging beneficial interactions between the n-3 and n-6 essential nutrients that are initial components of the cascade. Much detailed evidence for harmful cascade actions was collected by pharmaceutical companies as they developed drugs to decrease those actions. A remaining challenge is to understand the factors that predispose the cascade toward unwanted outcomes and create the need for therapeutic interventions. Such understanding involves recognizing the similar dynamics for dietary n-3 and n-6 nutrients in forming the immediate precursors of the cascade plus the more vigorous actions of the n-6 precursor, arachidonic acid, in forming potent mediators that amplify unwanted cascade outcomes. Tools have been developed to aid deliberate day-to-day quantitative management of the propensity for cascade overactivity in ways that can decrease the need for drug treatments. PMID:26301244

  16. Influence of phenolic constituents from Yucca schidigera bark on arachidonate metabolism in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wenzig, Eva M; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna; Kunert, Olaf; Bauer, Rudolf

    2008-10-01

    Yucca schidigera Roezl. (Agavaceae) has been traditionally used to treat a variety of diseases including arthritis and rheumatism. Phenolic constituents isolated from yucca bark, such as resveratrol, trans-3,3',5,5'-tetrahydroxy-4'-methoxystilbene, and the yuccaols, have been shown to possess various activities in vitro, such as antioxidant, radical scavenging, iNOS expression inhibitory, and platelet aggregation inhibitory effects. In the present study, the influence of a phenolic-rich fraction from yucca bark and of its main phenolic constituents on key enzymes of arachidonate metabolism was investigated. The fraction and the pure phenolics were shown to inhibit COX-1, COX-2, and LTB 4 formation by 5-LOX in vitro to different extents. The degree of COX-1 inhibition was found to be strongly dependent on the substitution pattern of ring B of the stilbenic moiety. The same trend was observed for the COX-2 inhibitory potential, which was, however, in general much lower for the yuccaols as compared with resveratrol. Resveratrol was also the only compound possessing an LTB 4 formation inhibitory activity. The inhibitory activity on key enzymes of arachidonate metabolism observed in this study might contribute to the explanation of the anti-inflammatory and antiplatelet effects observed for Y. schidigera and its phenolic constituents.

  17. Protective Effect of Ocimum basilicum Essential Oil Against Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Rashidian, Amir; Roohi, Parnia; Mehrzadi, Saeed; Ghannadi, Ali Reza; Minaiyan, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    Ocimum basilicum L has been traditionally used for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in Iran. This study investigates the ameliorative effect of Ocimum basilicum essential oil on an acetic acid-induced colitis model in rats. Ocimum basilicum essential oil with 2 doses (200 and 400 μL/kg) significantly ameliorated wet weight/length ratio of colonic tissue compared to the control group. Higher doses of essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg) significantly reduced ulcer severity, ulcer area, and ulcer index. On the other hand, histological examination revealed the diminution of total colitis index as a marker for inflammatory cell infiltration in the colonic segments of rats treated with Ocimum basilicum essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg). The increased level of myeloperoxidase was significantly decreased after the treatment with the essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg). These results suggest that Ocimum basilicum exhibits protective effect against acetic acid-induced colitis.

  18. Fatty acid-induced changes in vascular reactivity in healthy adult rats.

    PubMed

    Christon, Raymond; Marette, André; Badeau, Mylène; Bourgoin, Frédéric; Mélançon, Sébastien; Bachelard, Hélène

    2005-12-01

    Dietary fatty acids (FAs) are known to modulate endothelial dysfunction, which is the first stage of atherosclerosis. However, their exact role in this initial phase is still unclear. The effects of isolated or combined (by 2) purified FAs from the main FA families were studied on the vascular response of isolated thoracic aorta in healthy rats to get a better understanding of the mechanisms of action of dietary FAs in regulating vascular endothelial function. Cumulative contraction curves to phenylephrine and relaxation curves to carbachol and then to sodium nitroprusside were obtained in the absence or presence of the FAs studied allowing endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent ability of the smooth muscle to relax to be assessed in each experimental group. The endothelium-dependent vasodilator response to carbachol was lowered by eicosapentaenoic acid, whereas it was not altered either by docosahexaenoic acid alone or by combined eicosapentaenoic acid-docosahexaenoic acid, oleic acid, or stearic acid, and it was increased by linoleic acid (LA). A decreased phenylephrine-induced contraction was observed after incubation with arachidonic acid and with stearic acid. On the other hand, the endothelium-dependent relaxation was reduced by the addition of combined LA-arachidonic acid and LA-oleic acid. In conclusion, these data point out the differential effects of different types of FAs and of FAs alone vs combined on vascular reactivity. The complex nature of these effects could be partially linked to metabolic specificities of endothelial cells and to interactions between some FAs.

  19. Minocycline ameliorates prenatal valproic acid induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopment disorder. One percent worldwide population suffers with autism and males suffer more than females. Microglia plays an important role in neurodevelopment, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. The present study has been designed to investigate the role of minocycline in prenatal valproic acid induced autism in rats. Animals with prenatal valproic acid have reduced social interaction (three chamber social behaviour apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (both in prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complexes I, II, IV). Furthermore, prenatal valproic acid treated animals have shown an increase in locomotion (actophotometer), anxiety (elevated plus maze), brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (both in brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Treatment with minocycline significantly attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, minocycline has also attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Thus, it may be concluded that prenatal valproic acid has induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairment in animals, which were significantly attenuated by minocycline. Minocycline should be explored further for its therapeutic benefits in autism.

  20. Protective effect of hispidulin on kainic acid-induced seizures and neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Wang, Su Jane; Huang, Shu Kuei

    2015-05-15

    Hispidulin is a flavonoid compound which is an active ingredient in a number of traditional Chinese medicinal herbs, and it has been reported to inhibit glutamate release. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hispidulin protects against seizures induced by kainic acid, a glutamate analog with excitotoxic properties. The results indicated that intraperitoneally administering hispidulin (10 or 50mg/kg) to rats 30 min before intraperitoneally injecting kainic acid (15 mg/kg) increased seizure latency and decreased seizure score. In addition, hispidulin substantially attenuated kainic acid-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death, and this protective effect was accompanied by the suppression of microglial activation and the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the hippocampus. Moreover, hispidulin reduced kainic acid-induced c-Fos expression and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in the hippocampus. These data suggest that hispidulin has considerable antiepileptic, neuroprotective, and antiinflammatory effects on kainic acid-induced seizures in rats. PMID:25746462

  1. Houttuyniae Herba Attenuates Kainic Acid-Induced Neurotoxicity via Calcium Response Modulation in the Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Geun; Jeong, Hyun Uk; Hong, Sung In; Oh, Myung Sook

    2015-12-01

    Epilepsy is a complex neurological disorder characterized by the repeated occurrence of electrical activity known as seizures. This activity induces increased intracellular calcium, which ultimately leads to neuronal damage. Houttuyniae Herba, the aerial part of Houttuynia cordata, has various pharmacological effects and is widely used as a traditional herb. In the present study, we evaluated the protective effects of Houttuyniae Herba water extract on kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity. Kainic acid directly acts on calcium release, resulting in seizure behavior, neuronal damage, and cognitive impairment. In a rat primary hippocampal culture system, Houttuyniae Herba water extract significantly protected neuronal cells from kainic acid toxicity. In a seizure model where mice received intracerebellar kainic acid injections, Houttuyniae Herba water extract treatment resulted in a lower seizure stage score, ameliorated cognitive impairment, protected neuronal cells against kainic acid-induced toxicity, and suppressed neuronal degeneration in the hippocampus. In addition, Houttuyniae Herba water extract regulated increases in the intracellular calcium level, its related downstream pathways (reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial dysfunction), and calcium/calmodulin complex kinase type II immunoreactivity in the mouse hippocampus, which resulted from calcium influx stimulation induced by kainic acid. These results demonstrate the neuroprotective effects of Houttuyniae Herba water extract through inhibition of calcium generation in a kainic acid-induced epileptic model. PMID:26366753

  2. Minocycline ameliorates prenatal valproic acid induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopment disorder. One percent worldwide population suffers with autism and males suffer more than females. Microglia plays an important role in neurodevelopment, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. The present study has been designed to investigate the role of minocycline in prenatal valproic acid induced autism in rats. Animals with prenatal valproic acid have reduced social interaction (three chamber social behaviour apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (both in prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complexes I, II, IV). Furthermore, prenatal valproic acid treated animals have shown an increase in locomotion (actophotometer), anxiety (elevated plus maze), brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (both in brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Treatment with minocycline significantly attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, minocycline has also attenuated prenatal valproic acid induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium and blood brain barrier permeability. Thus, it may be concluded that prenatal valproic acid has induced autistic behaviour, biochemistry and blood brain barrier impairment in animals, which were significantly attenuated by minocycline. Minocycline should be explored further for its therapeutic benefits in autism. PMID:26551768

  3. [An ear thermometer based on infrared thermopiles sensor].

    PubMed

    Xie, Haiyuan; Qian, Mingli

    2013-09-01

    According to the development of body temperature measurement mode, an ear thermometer with infrared thermopiles sensor is designed for body thermometry Compared with oral thermometer, the accuracy of ear thermometer is acceptable.

  4. Results of bone conduction following surgery for chronic ear disease.

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, E; Seppä, J

    1997-01-01

    Preoperative and postoperative bone conduction thresholds were compared in 181 chronic ears operated on over a 5-year period between 1990 to 1994. In the majority (92%) of cases the bone conduction thresholds remained unchanged (+/-10 dB). Nine ears (5%) showed better thresholds after surgery, with improvements ranging from 11 dB to 25 dB. This improvement was especially noted in ears with severe tympanic pathology. One ear with a large labyrinthine fistula became totally deaf after surgery. In 5 ears (3%) bone-conduction thresholds deteriorated, but remained measurable at all frequencies tested. In these latter cases this impairment ranged from 11 dB to 27 dB. Cholesteatomatous ears having intact ossicular chains were found to be at the highest risk of inner ear damage when "canal wall-down" mastoidectomies were performed. Methods for prevention of sensorineural hearing loss following chronic ear surgery are discussed. PMID:9332894

  5. Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis Media) and Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... You Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis Media) and Hearing Loss Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis Media) and Hearing ... learning important speech and language skills. Types of hearing loss Conductive hearing loss is a form of hearing ...

  6. Ear tube surgery - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000220.htm Ear tube surgery - what to ask your doctor To ... enable JavaScript. Your child is being evaluated for ear tube insertion. This is the placement of tubes ...

  7. 1 in 10 Americans Has Experienced Ringing in the Ears

    MedlinePlus

    ... in 10 Americans Has Experienced Ringing in the Ears Study also found association between prolonged exposure to ... in 10 Americans has experienced ringing in the ears, a condition called tinnitus, and that is likely ...

  8. Protein tyrosine phosphatases regulate arachidonic acid release, StAR induction and steroidogenesis acting on a hormone-dependent arachidonic acid-preferring acyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Cano, Florencia; Poderoso, Cecilia; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Castilla, Rocío; Maloberti, Paula; Castillo, Fernanda; Neuman, Isabel; Paz, Cristina; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2006-06-01

    The activation of the rate-limiting step in steroid biosynthesis, that is the transport of cholesterol into the mitochondria, is dependent on PKA-mediated events triggered by hormones like ACTH and LH. Two of such events are the protein tyrosine dephosphorylation mediated by protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and the release of arachidonic acid (AA) mediated by two enzymes, ACS4 (acyl-CoA synthetase 4) and Acot2 (mitochondrial thioesterase). ACTH and LH regulate the activity of PTPs and Acot2 and promote the induction of ACS4. Here we analyzed the involvement of PTPs on the expression of ACS4. We found that two PTP inhibitors, acting through different mechanisms, are both able to abrogate the hormonal effect on ACS4 induction. PTP inhibitors also reduce the effect of cAMP on steroidogenesis and on the level of StAR protein, which facilitates the access of cholesterol into the mitochondria. Moreover, our results indicate that exogenous AA is able to overcome the inhibition produced by PTP inhibitors on StAR protein level and steroidogenesis. Then, here we describe a link between PTP activity and AA release, since ACS4 induction is under the control of PTP activity, being a key event for AA release, StAR induction and steroidogenesis.

  9. Evolution: Fossil Ears and Underwater Sonar.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Olivier

    2016-08-22

    A key innovation in the history of whales was the evolution of a sonar system together with high-frequency hearing. Fossils of an archaic toothed whale's inner ear bones provide clues for a stepwise emergence of underwater echolocation ability. PMID:27554653

  10. Ear Infections - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... on this page, please enable JavaScript. French (français) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Russian (Русский) Somali (af Soomaali) ... moyenne - français (French) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Japanese (日本語) Middle Ear Infection 中耳炎 - 日本語 (Japanese) Bilingual ...

  11. Getting Teens to Read with Their Ears

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fues, Marianne Cole

    2009-01-01

    Audiobooks have been around for years in various formats, like cassette tapes and CDs. This article describes a new type of audiobook on the market which is generating an interest in "reading." The device, called Playaway, is the size of a MP3 player and comes with a lanyard and ear buds. Buttons on the back of the player control the speed and…

  12. "Hot Tub Rash" and "Swimmer's Ear" (Pseudomonas)

    MedlinePlus

    Facts About “Hot Tub Rash” and “Swimmer’s Ear” (Pseudomonas) What is Pseudomonas and how can it affect me? Pseudomonas (sue-doh- ... a major cause of infections commonly known as “hot tub rash” and “swimmer’s ear.” This germ is ...

  13. Play It by Ear. Hearing Conservation Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Dianne R.

    This curriculum was designed to help teachers teach their fourth-grade students about hearing and the effects of loud noises on hearing. The program describes the human ear and how it works, explains the health effects of noise, and offers ways for students to protect their hearing from unsafe noise levels. Students are taught how hearing is…

  14. Ear biometric recognition using local texture descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzaoui, Amir; Hadid, Abdenour; Boukrouche, Abdelhani

    2014-09-01

    Automated personal identification using the shape of the human ear is emerging as an appealing modality in biometric and forensic domains. This is mainly due to the fact that the ear pattern can provide rich and stable information to differentiate and recognize people. In the literature, there are many approaches and descriptors that achieve relatively good results in constrained environments. The recognition performance tends, however, to significantly decrease under illumination variation, pose variation, and partial occlusion. In this work, we investigate the use of local texture descriptors, namely local binary patterns, local phase quantization, and binarized statistical image features for robust human identification from two-dimensional ear imaging. In contrast to global image descriptors which compute features directly from the entire image, local descriptors representing the features in small local image patches have proven to be more effective in real-world conditions. Our extensive experimental results on the benchmarks IIT Delhi-1, IIT Delhi-2, and USTB ear databases show that local texture features in general and BSIF in particular provide a significant performance improvement compared to the state-of-the-art.

  15. Adenomatous tumors of the middle ear.

    PubMed

    Batsakis, J G

    1989-09-01

    Primary adenomatous tumors of the middle ear are preponderantly benign, resectable lesions and arise from the mucosa (adenomas) or salivary tissue (choristomas). Malignant variants are ill defined, are not characterized histologically, and represent less than 10% of the adenomatous tumors. Their presence may be signaled clinically by facial nerve paralysis, invasion of bone, and chronic otorrhea.

  16. Diving injuries to the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Farmer, J C

    1977-01-01

    Most of the previous literature concerning otologic problems in compressed gas environments has emphasized middle ear barotrauma. With recent increases in commercial, military, and sport diving to deeper depths, inner ear disturbances during these exposures have been noted more frequently. Studies of inner ear physiology and pathology during diving indicate that the causes and treatment of these problems differ depending upon the phase and type of diving. Humans exposed to simulated depths of up to 305 meters without barotrauma or decompression sickness develop transient, conductive hearing losses with no audiometric evidence of cochlear dysfunction. Transient vertigo and nystagmus during diving have been noted with caloric stimulation, resulting from the unequal entry of cold water into the external auditory canals, and with asymmetric middle ear pressure equilibration during ascent and descent (alternobaric vertigo). Equilibrium disturbances noted with nitrogen narcosis, oxygen toxicity, hypercarbia, or hypoxia appear primarily related to the effects of these conditions upon the central nervous system and not to specific vestibular end-organ dysfunction. Compression of humans in helium-oxygen at depths greater than 152.4 meters results in transient symptoms of tremor, dizziness, and nausea plus decrements in postural equilibrium and psychomotor performance, the high pressure nervous syndrome. Vestibular function studies during these conditions indicate that these problems are due to central dysfunction and not to vestibular end-organ dysfunction. Persistent inner ear injuries have been noted during several phases of diving: 1) Such injuries during compression (inner ear barotrauma) have been related to round window ruptures occurring with straining, or a Valsalva's maneuver during inadequate middle ear pressure equilibration. Divers who develop cochlear and/or vestibular symptoms during shallow diving in which decompression sickness is unlikely or during

  17. Diving injuries to the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Farmer, J C

    1977-01-01

    Most of the previous literature concerning otologic problems in compressed gas environments has emphasized middle ear barotrauma. With recent increases in commercial, military, and sport diving to deeper depths, inner ear disturbances during these exposures have been noted more frequently. Studies of inner ear physiology and pathology during diving indicate that the causes and treatment of these problems differ depending upon the phase and type of diving. Humans exposed to simulated depths of up to 305 meters without barotrauma or decompression sickness develop transient, conductive hearing losses with no audiometric evidence of cochlear dysfunction. Transient vertigo and nystagmus during diving have been noted with caloric stimulation, resulting from the unequal entry of cold water into the external auditory canals, and with asymmetric middle ear pressure equilibration during ascent and descent (alternobaric vertigo). Equilibrium disturbances noted with nitrogen narcosis, oxygen toxicity, hypercarbia, or hypoxia appear primarily related to the effects of these conditions upon the central nervous system and not to specific vestibular end-organ dysfunction. Compression of humans in helium-oxygen at depths greater than 152.4 meters results in transient symptoms of tremor, dizziness, and nausea plus decrements in postural equilibrium and psychomotor performance, the high pressure nervous syndrome. Vestibular function studies during these conditions indicate that these problems are due to central dysfunction and not to vestibular end-organ dysfunction. Persistent inner ear injuries have been noted during several phases of diving: 1) Such injuries during compression (inner ear barotrauma) have been related to round window ruptures occurring with straining, or a Valsalva's maneuver during inadequate middle ear pressure equilibration. Divers who develop cochlear and/or vestibular symptoms during shallow diving in which decompression sickness is unlikely or during

  18. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.205 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class...

  19. 15 CFR 734.2 - Important EAR terms and principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Important EAR terms and principles... OF THE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS § 734.2 Important EAR terms and principles. (a) Subject to the EAR—Definition. (1) “Subject to the EAR” is a term used in the EAR to describe those items...

  20. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.105 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class...

  1. 15 CFR 734.2 - Important EAR terms and principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Important EAR terms and principles... OF THE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS § 734.2 Important EAR terms and principles. (a) Subject to the EAR—Definition. (1) “Subject to the EAR” is a term used in the EAR to describe those items...

  2. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.105 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class...

  3. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.105 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class...

  4. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.305 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class...

  5. 40 CFR 211.206-1 - Real ear method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Real ear method. 211.206-1 Section 211... PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.206-1 Real ear method. (a) The value of sound... “Method for the Measurement of Real-Ear Protection of Hearing Protectors and Physical Attenuation...

  6. 40 CFR 211.206-1 - Real ear method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Real ear method. 211.206-1 Section 211... PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.206-1 Real ear method. (a) The value of sound... “Method for the Measurement of Real-Ear Protection of Hearing Protectors and Physical Attenuation...

  7. 40 CFR 211.206-1 - Real ear method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Real ear method. 211.206-1 Section 211... PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.206-1 Real ear method. (a) The value of sound... “Method for the Measurement of Real-Ear Protection of Hearing Protectors and Physical Attenuation...

  8. 15 CFR 734.2 - Important EAR terms and principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Important EAR terms and principles... OF THE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS § 734.2 Important EAR terms and principles. (a) Subject to the EAR—Definition. (1) “Subject to the EAR” is a term used in the EAR to describe those items...

  9. 15 CFR 734.2 - Important EAR terms and principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Important EAR terms and principles... OF THE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS § 734.2 Important EAR terms and principles. (a) Subject to the EAR—Definition. (1) “Subject to the EAR” is a term used in the EAR to describe those items...

  10. 15 CFR 734.2 - Important EAR terms and principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Important EAR terms and principles... OF THE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS § 734.2 Important EAR terms and principles. (a) Subject to the EAR—Definition. (1) “Subject to the EAR” is a term used in the EAR to describe those items...

  11. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.305 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class...

  12. 40 CFR 211.206-1 - Real ear method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Real ear method. 211.206-1 Section 211... PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.206-1 Real ear method. (a) The value of sound... “Method for the Measurement of Real-Ear Protection of Hearing Protectors and Physical Attenuation...

  13. 40 CFR 211.206-1 - Real ear method.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Real ear method. 211.206-1 Section 211... PRODUCT NOISE LABELING Hearing Protective Devices § 211.206-1 Real ear method. (a) The value of sound... “Method for the Measurement of Real-Ear Protection of Hearing Protectors and Physical Attenuation...

  14. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.205 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class...

  15. The development of the mammalian outer and middle ear.

    PubMed

    Anthwal, Neal; Thompson, Hannah

    2016-02-01

    The mammalian ear is a complex structure divided into three main parts: the outer; middle; and inner ear. These parts are formed from all three germ layers and neural crest cells, which have to integrate successfully in order to form a fully functioning organ of hearing. Any defect in development of the outer and middle ear leads to conductive hearing loss, while defects in the inner ear can lead to sensorineural hearing loss. This review focuses on the development of the parts of the ear involved with sound transduction into the inner ear, and the parts largely ignored in the world of hearing research: the outer and middle ear. The published data on the embryonic origin, signalling, genetic control, development and timing of the mammalian middle and outer ear are reviewed here along with new data showing the Eustachian tube cartilage is of dual embryonic origin. The embryonic origin of some of these structures has only recently been uncovered (Science, 339, 2013, 1453; Development, 140, 2013, 4386), while the molecular mechanisms controlling the growth, structure and integration of many outer and middle ear components are hardly known. The genetic analysis of outer and middle ear development is rather limited, with a small number of genes often affecting either more than one part of the ear or having only very small effects on development. This review therefore highlights the necessity for further research into the development of outer and middle ear structures, which will be important for the understanding and treatment of conductive hearing loss.

  16. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.205 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class...

  17. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.305 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class...

  18. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.205 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class...

  19. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle...

  20. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.105 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class...

  1. 21 CFR 874.3430 - Middle ear mold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3430 Middle ear mold. (a) Identification. A middle ear mold is a preformed device that is intended to be implanted to reconstruct the middle...

  2. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.205 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class...

  3. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.105 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class...

  4. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.305 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class...

  5. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305... (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.305 Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class...

  6. Ear Cubes for local controlled drug delivery to the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Gehrke, M; Sircoglou, J; Gnansia, D; Tourrel, G; Willart, J-F; Danede, F; Lacante, E; Vincent, C; Siepmann, F; Siepmann, J

    2016-07-25

    A new type of advanced drug delivery systems is proposed: Miniaturized implants, which can be placed into tiny holes drilled into (or close to) the oval window. They consist of two parts: 1) A cylinder, which is inserted into the hole crossing the oval window. The cylinder (being longer than the depth of the hole) is partly located within the inner ear and surrounded by perilymph. This provides direct access to the target site, and at the same time assures implant fixation. 2) A cuboid, which is located in the middle ear, serving as a drug reservoir. One side of the cuboid is in direct contact with the oval window. Drug release into the cochlea occurs by diffusion through the cylindrical part of the Ear Cubes and by diffusion from the cuboid into and through the oval window. High precision molds were used to prepare two differently sized Ear Cubes by injection molding. The miniaturized implants were based on silicone and loaded with different amounts of dexamethasone (10 to 30 % w/w). The systems were thoroughly characterized before and upon exposure to artificial perilymph at 37°C. Importantly, drug release can effectively be controlled and sustained during long time periods (up to several years). Furthermore, the implants did not swell or erode to a noteworthy extent during the observation period. Drug diffusion through the polymeric matrix, together with limited dexamethasone solubility effects, seem to control the resulting drug release kinetics, which can roughly be estimated using mathematical equations derived from Fick's second law. Importantly, the proposed Ear Cubes are likely to provide much more reliable local long term drug delivery to the inner ear compared to liquid or semi-solid dosage forms administered into the middle ear, due to a more secured fixation. Furthermore, they require less invasive surgeries and can accommodate higher drug amounts compared to intracochlear implants. Thus, they offer the potential to open up new horizons for innovative

  7. Increasing dietary linoleic acid does not increase tissue arachidonic acid content in adults consuming Western-type diets: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Linoleic acid, with a DRI of 12-17 g/d, is the most highly consumed polyunsaturated fatty acid in the Western diet and is found in virtually all commonly consumed foods. The concern with dietary linoleic acid, being the metabolic precursor of arachidonic acid, is its consumption may enrich tissues with arachidonic acid and contribute to chronic and overproduction of bioactive eicosanoids. However, no systematic review of human trials regarding linoleic acid consumption and subsequent changes in tissue levels of arachidonic acid has been undertaken. Objective In this study, we reviewed the human literature that reported changes in dietary linoleic acid and its subsequent impact on changing tissue arachidonic acid in erythrocytes and plasma/serum phospholipids. Design We identified, reviewed, and evaluated all peer-reviewed published literature presenting data outlining changes in dietary linoleic acid in adult human clinical trials that reported changes in phospholipid fatty acid composition (specifically arachidonic acid) in plasma/serum and erythrocytes within the parameters of our inclusion/exclusion criteria. Results Decreasing dietary linoleic acid by up to 90% was not significantly correlated with changes in arachidonic acid levels in the phospholipid pool of plasma/serum (p = 0.39). Similarly, when dietary linoleic acid levels were increased up to six fold, no significant correlations with arachidonic acid levels were observed (p = 0.72). However, there was a positive relationship between dietary gamma-linolenic acid and dietary arachidonic acid on changes in arachidonic levels in plasma/serum phospholipids. Conclusions Our results do not support the concept that modifying current intakes of dietary linoleic acid has an effect on changing levels of arachidonic acid in plasma/serum or erythrocytes in adults consuming Western-type diets. PMID:21663641

  8. Acute doxorubicin cardiotoxicity alters cardiac cytochrome P450 expression and arachidonic acid metabolism in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Zordoky, Beshay N.M.; Anwar-Mohamed, Anwar; Aboutabl, Mona E.

    2010-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a potent anti-neoplastic antibiotic used to treat a variety of malignancies; however, its use is limited by dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. Moreover, there is a strong correlation between cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated arachidonic acid metabolites and the pathogenesis of many cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, in the current study, we have investigated the effect of acute DOX toxicity on the expression of several CYP enzymes and their associated arachidonic acid metabolites in the heart of male Sprague-Dawley rats. Acute DOX toxicity was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of 15 mg/kg of the drug. Our results showed that DOX treatment for 24 h caused a significant induction of CYP1A1, CYP1B1, CYP2C11, CYP2J3, CYP4A1, CYP4A3, CYP4F1, CYP4F4, and EPHX2 gene expression in the heart of DOX-treated rats as compared to the control. Similarly, there was a significant induction of CYP1A1, CYP1B1, CYP2C11, CYP2J3, CYP4A, and sEH proteins after 24 h of DOX administration. In the heart microsomes, acute DOX toxicity significantly increased the formation of 20-HETE which is consistent with the induction of the major CYP omega-hydroxylases: CYP4A1, CYP4A3, CYP4F1, and CYP4F4. On the other hand, the formation of 5,6-, 8,9-, 11,12-, and 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) was significantly reduced, whereas the formation of their corresponding dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids was significantly increased. The decrease in the cardioprotective EETs can be attributed to the increase of sEH activity parallel to the induction of the EPHX2 gene expression in the heart of DOX-treated rats. In conclusion, acute DOX toxicity alters the expression of several CYP and sEH enzymes with a consequent alteration in arachidonic acid metabolism. These results may represent a novel mechanism by which this drug causes progressive cardiotoxicity.

  9. Involvement of Nitric Oxide on Calcium Mobilization and Arachidonic Acid Pathway Activation during Platelet Aggregation with different aggregating agonists

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Debipriya; Mazumder, Sahana; Kumar Sinha, Asru

    2016-01-01

    Platelet aggregation by different aggregating agonists is essential in the normal blood coagulation process, the excess of which caused acute coronary syndrome (ACS). In all cases, the activation of arachidonic acid by cycloxygenase was needed for the synthesis of thromboxane A2 (TXA2) but the mechanism of arachidonic acid release in platelets remains obscure. Studies were conducted to determine the role of nitric oxide (NO), if any, on the release of arachidonic acid in platelets. The cytosolic Ca2+ was visualized and quantitated by fluorescent spectroscopy by using QUIN-2. NO was measured by methemoglobin method. Arachidonic acid was determined by HPLC. TXA2 was measured as ThromboxaneB2 (TXB2) by ELISA. Treatment of platelets in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) with different aggregating agents resulted in the inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) which inhibited the production of NO synthesis and increased TXA2 synthesis. Furthermore, the treatment of washed PRP with different platelet aggregating agents resulted in the increase of [Ca2+] in nM ranges. In contrast, the pre-treatment of washed PRP with aspirin increased platelet NO level and inhibited the Ca2+ mobilization and TXA2 synthesis. These results indicated that the aggregation of platelets by different aggregating agonists was caused by the cytosolic Ca2+ mobilization due to the inhibition of NOS. PMID:27127451

  10. Effects of thyroid hormone status on metabolic pathways of arachidonic acid in mice and humans: A targeted metabolomic approach.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xuan; Sa, Rina; Ye, Cheng; Zhang, Duo; Zhang, Shengjie; Xia, Hongfeng; Wang, Yu-cheng; Jiang, Jingjing; Yin, Huiyong; Ying, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Symptoms of cardiovascular diseases are frequently found in patients with hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. However, it is unknown whether arachidonic acid metabolites, the potent mediators in cardiovascular system, are involved in cardiovascular disorders caused by hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. To answer this question, serum levels of arachidonic acid metabolites in human subjects with hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism and mice with hypothyroidism or thyroid hormone treatment were determined by a mass spectrometry-based method. Over ten arachidonic acid metabolites belonging to three catalytic pathways: cyclooxygenases, lipoxygenases, and cytochrome P450, were quantified simultaneously and displayed characteristic profiles under different thyroid hormone status. The level of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, a cytochrome P450 metabolite, was positively correlated with thyroid hormone level and possibly contributed to the elevated blood pressured in hyperthyroidism. The increased prostanoid (PG) I2 and decreased PGE2 levels in hypothyroid patients might serve to alleviate atherosclerosis associated with dyslipidemia. The elevated level of thromboxane (TX) A2, as indicated by TXB2, in hyperthyroid patients and mice treated with thyroid hormone might bring about pulmonary hypertension frequently found in hyperthyroid patients. In conclusion, our prospective study revealed that arachidonic acid metabolites were differentially affected by thyroid hormone status. Certain metabolites may be involved in cardiovascular disorders associated with thyroid diseases. PMID:25841349

  11. Mechanism for release of arachidonic acid during guinea pig platelet aggregation: a role for the diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor RHC 80267

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, D.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanism of the release of arachidonic acid from phospholipids after the stimulation of guinea pig platelets with collagen, thrombin and platelet activating factor (PAF) was studied. RHC 80267, a diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor, and indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, were used. Various in vitro assays for enzymes involved in arachidonic acid release and metabolism were conducted. Platelet aggregation and simultaneous release of ADP from platelets were monitored using a Chrono-log Lumiaggregometer. Platelets were labeled with (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid to facilitate sensitive determination of small changes in platelet phospholipids during platelet aggregation. In the present investigation it is shown that collagen, thrombin and PAF increased phospholipase C activity. It was also discovered that cyclooxygenase products were responsible for further stimulation (a positive feed-back) of phospholipase C activity, while diacylglycerol provided a negative feed-back control over receptor-stimulated phospholipase C activity and inhibited ADP release. The guinea pig platelet is an ideal model to study phospholipase C-diacylglycerol lipase pathway for the release of arachidonic acid from platelet phospholipids because it does not have any phospholipase A/sub 2/ activity. It was observed that cyclooxygenase products were responsible for collagen-induced guinea pig platelet aggregation. Indomethacin completely inhibited collagen-induced platelet aggregation, was less effective against thrombin, and had no effect on PAF-induced platelet aggregation. On the other hand, RHC 80267 was a powerful inhibitor of aggregation and ADP release induced by all three of these potent aggregating agents.

  12. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Ear Care in Coastal Karnataka

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathi, Keerthan; Kanthila, Jayashree

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ear as an organ is necessary for the perception of sound and body balance. Ear infection, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and excessive use of mobile phone for listening to music at high volume all can reduce hearing. No earlier study was available in the costal Karnataka population, regarding the practice of ear care. The study objective was to ascertain the level of knowledge of the community regarding ear care, to find out whether some of the common conditions affecting hearing are known and to find out the common practices involved in maintaining ear hygiene. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 500 subjects in two tertiary care hospitals by convenient sampling, using self-administered questionnaire. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice across the age groups, religion & education background were studied. Results Across different education groups, 66.7%-90% did not know that ‘cold’ can cause ear infection and 46.7%-75.0% did not know that diabetes and hypertension can reduce hearing. When there is ear pain or discharge, people put ear drops available at home in 48.3%-75.0% across 3 age groups; 58.5%-61.5% across 3 religions and 44.8%-67.9% across 5 education groups. No statistically significant difference was found in the practice of pouring oil into ears across religions. A total of 58.6%-100% daily clean inside the ear and 70-100% use cotton buds. Conclusion General perception of the people is that ear is necessary only for hearing. Majority did not know that nasal infection can affect the ear and that DM and hypertension can cause hearing loss. When there is ear pain and discharge, most of the adults put drops that are available at home. Pouring oil into the ears and cleaning inside the ear canals is routinely practiced in costal Karnataka. PMID:26816922

  13. Rapid extraction of oxygenated metabolites of arachidonic acid from biological samples using octadecylsilyl silica.

    PubMed

    Powell, W S

    1980-11-01

    A rapid procedure for the efficient extraction of prostaglandins, thromboxanes and hydroxy fatty acids from urine, plasma and tissue homogenates has been developed. Fractions containing these substances are acidified and passed through a column of octadecylsilyl silica, which retains oxygenated metabolites of arachidonic acid. Phospholipids, proteins and very polar materials either are not retained or can be eluted with dilute aqueous ethanol. Nonpolar lipids and monohydroxy fatty acids are then eluted with petroleum ether or benzene. Subsequent elution of the column with methyl formate gives a fraction containing prostaglandins and thromboxanes which is much less contaminated with extraneous material than that obtained by conventional extraction of aqueous media with organic solvents. The methyl formate can be removed rapidly under a stream of nitrogen and the components of the sample purified directly by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). An improved method for the purification of prostaglandins and TXB2 by HPLC on silica columns is reported.

  14. Neutrophil chemotaxis and arachidonic acid metabolism are not linked: evidence from metal ion probe studies

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, S.R.; Turner, R.A.; Smith, D.M.; Johnson, J.A.

    1986-03-05

    Heavy metal ions can inhibit arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism protect against ionophore cytotoxicity (ibid) and inhibit neutrophil chemotaxis. In this study they used Au/sup 3 +/, Zn/sup 2 +/, Cr/sup 3 +/, Mn/sup 2 +/ and Cu/sup 2 +/ as probes of the interrelationships among AA metabolism, ionophore-mediated cytotoxicity, and chemotaxis. Phospholipid deacylation was measured in ionophore-treated cells prelabeled with /sup 3/H-AA. Eicosanoid release from ionophore-treated cells was monitored by radioimmunoassay. Cytoprotection was quantitated as ability to exclude trypan blue. Chemotaxis toward f-met-leu-phe was measured by leading front analysis. The results imply that metal ions attenuate ionophore cytotoxicity by blocking phospholipid deacylation and eicosanoid release. In contrast to previous reports, no correlation between AA metabolism and chemotaxis was demonstrated, suggesting that these 2 processes are not linked.

  15. Eicosanoids Derived From Arachidonic Acid and Their Family Prostaglandins and Cyclooxygenase in Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yui, Kunio; Imataka, George; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Ohara, Naoki; Naito, Yukiko

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA)-derived lipid mediators are called eicosanoids. Eicosanoids have emerged as key regulators of a wide variety of physiological responses and pathological processes, and control important cellular processes. AA can be converted into biologically active compounds by metabolism by cyclooxygenases (COX). Beneficial effect of COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib add-on therapy has been reported in early stage of schizophrenia. Moreover, add-on treatment of celecoxib attenuated refractory depression and bipolar depression. Further, the COX/prostaglandin E pathway play an important role in synaptic plasticity and may be included in pathophysiology in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In this regard, plasma transferrin, which is an iron mediator related to eicosanoid signaling, may be related to social impairment of ASD. COX-2 is typically induced by inflammatory stimuli in the majority of tissues, and the only isoform responsible for propagating the inflammatory response. Thus, COX-2 inhibitors considered as the best target for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26521945

  16. Arachidonic Acid Derivatives and Their Role in Peripheral Nerve Degeneration and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Camara-Lemarroy, Carlos Rodrigo; Gonzalez-Moreno, Emmanuel Irineo; Guzman-de la Garza, Francisco Javier; Fernandez-Garza, Nancy Esthela

    2012-01-01

    After peripheral nerve injury, a process of axonal degradation, debris clearance, and subsequent regeneration is initiated by complex local signaling, called Wallerian degeneration (WD). This process is in part mediated by neuroglia as well as infiltrating inflammatory cells and regulated by inflammatory mediators such as cytokines, chemokines, and the activation of transcription factors also related to the inflammatory response. Part of this neuroimmune signaling is mediated by the innate immune system, including arachidonic acid (AA) derivatives such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes. The enzymes responsible for their production, cyclooxygenases and lipooxygenases, also participate in nerve degeneration and regeneration. The interactions between signals for nerve regeneration and neuroinflammation go all the way down to the molecular level. In this paper, we discuss the role that AA derivatives might play during WD and nerve regeneration, and the therapeutic possibilities that arise. PMID:22997489

  17. Altered Arachidonate Distribution in Macrophages from Caveolin-1 Null Mice Leading to Reduced Eicosanoid Synthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Astudillo, Alma M.; Pérez-Chacón, Gema; Meana, Clara; Balgoma, David; Pol, Albert; del Pozo, Miguel A.; Balboa, María A.; Balsinde, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    In this work we have studied the effect of caveolin-1 deficiency on the mechanisms that regulate free arachidonic acid (AA) availability. The results presented here demonstrate that macrophages from caveolin-1-deficient mice exhibit elevated fatty acid incorporation and remodeling and a constitutively increased CoA-independent transacylase activity. Mass spectrometry-based lipidomic analyses reveal stable alterations in the profile of AA distribution among phospholipids, manifested by reduced levels of AA in choline glycerophospholipids but elevated levels in ethanolamine glycerophospholipids and phosphatidylinositol. Furthermore, macrophages from caveolin-1 null mice show decreased AA mobilization and prostaglandin E2 and LTB4 production upon cell stimulation. Collectively, these results provide insight into the role of caveolin-1 in AA homeostasis and suggest an important role for this protein in the eicosanoid biosynthetic response. PMID:21852231

  18. Eicosapentaenoic and arachidonic acids purification from the red microalga Porphyridium cruentum.

    PubMed

    Guil-Guerrero, J L; Belarbi, E H; Rebolloso-Fuentes, M M

    2000-01-01

    The polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) eicosapentaenoic and arachidonic acids (EPA and AA), which have several pharmaceutical properties, have been purified from the red microalga Porphyridium cruentum. The process consists of only four main steps: (i) simultaneous extraction and saponification of the microalgal biomass; (ii) urea inclusion method (iii) PUFA esterification (iv) argentated silica gel column chromatography of the urea concentrate. Total AA and EPA recoveries reached 39.5% and 50.8% respectively for a purity approximately 97% for both fatty acids. Therefore, recovery of highly pure PUFA could be improved in organisms that are rich in two or more fatty acids of interest. The results of several procedures for AA and EPA recovery from several authors by using this microalga were compared.

  19. Liquid human milk fortifier significantly improves docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acid status in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Berseth, C L; Harris, C L; Wampler, J L; Hoffman, D R; Diersen-Schade, D A

    2014-09-01

    We report the fatty acid composition of mother׳s own human milk from one of the largest US cohorts of lactating mothers of preterm infants. Milk fatty acid data were used as a proxy for intake at enrollment in infants (n=150) who received human milk with a powder human milk fortifier (HMF; Control) or liquid HMF [LHMF; provided additional 12mg docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), 20mg arachidonic acid (ARA)/100mL human milk]. Mothers provided milk samples (n=129) and reported maternal DHA consumption (n=128). Infant blood samples were drawn at study completion (Study Day 28). Human milk and infant PPL fatty acids were analyzed using capillary column gas chromatography. DHA and ARA were within ranges previously published for US term and preterm human milk. Compared to Control HMF (providing no DHA or ARA), human milk fortified with LHMF significantly increased infant PPL DHA and ARA and improved preterm infant DHA and ARA status.

  20. Arachidonic acid diet attenuates brain Aβ deposition in Tg2576 mice.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Takashi; Nishitsuji, Kazuchika; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Jung, Cha-Gyun; Kontani, Masanori; Tokuda, Hisanori; Kawashima, Hiroshi; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Michikawa, Makoto

    2015-07-10

    The amyloid β-protein (Aβ) is believed to play a causative role in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Because the amyloid precursor protein (APP), a substrate of Aβ, and β-secretase and γ-secretase complex proteins, which process APP to generate Aβ, are all membrane proteins, it is possible to assume that alterations in brain lipid metabolism modulate APP and/or Aβ metabolism. However, the role of polyunsaturated fatty acids in Aβ metabolism remains unknown. We report here that 9 months-treatment of Tg2576 mice with arachidonic acid (ARA)-containing (ARA+) diet prevented brain Aβ deposition in 17-month-old Tg2576 mice. APP processing to generate soluble APPα, CTF-β, and Aβ synthesis was attenuated in Tg2576 mice fed with the ARA+ diet. These findings suggest that ARA+ diet could prevent Aβ deposition through the alteration of APP processing in Tg2576 mice.

  1. Potential, pH, and arachidonate gate hydrogen ion currents in human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    DeCoursey, T E; Cherny, V V

    1993-01-01

    Indirect evidence indicates that a proton-selective conductance is activated during the respiratory burst in neutrophils. A voltage- and time-dependent H(+)-selective conductance, gH, in human neutrophils is demonstrated here directly by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The gH is extremely low at large negative potentials, increases slowly upon membrane depolarization, and does not inactivate. It is enhanced at high external pH or low internal pH and is inhibited by Cd2+ and Zn2+. Arachidonic acid, which plays a pivotal role in inflammatory reactions, amplifies the gH. The properties of the gH described here are compatible with its activation during the respiratory burst in stimulated neutrophils, in which it may facilitate sustained superoxide anion release by dissipating metabolically generated acid. PMID:7506066

  2. Better-ear glimpsing in hearing-impaired listeners

    PubMed Central

    Best, Virginia; Mason, Christine R.; Kidd, Gerald; Iyer, Nandini; Brungart, Douglas S.

    2015-01-01

    When competing speech sounds are spatially separated, listeners can make use of the ear with the better target-to-masker ratio. Recent studies showed that listeners with normal hearing are able to efficiently make use of this “better-ear,” even when it alternates between left and right ears at different times in different frequency bands, which may contribute to the ability to listen in spatialized speech mixtures. In the present study, better-ear glimpsing in listeners with bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment, who perform poorly in spatialized speech mixtures, was investigated. The results suggest that this deficit is not related to better-ear glimpsing. PMID:25698053

  3. The Synthesis and In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of Fluorinated Arachidonic Acid: Implications for Imaging Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pichika, Rama; Taha, Ameer Y.; Gao, Fei; Kotta, Kishore; Cheon, Yewon; Chang, Lisa; Kiesewetter, Dale; Rapoport, Stanley I.; Eckelman, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is found in high concentrations in brain phospholipids and is released as a second messenger during neurotransmission and much more so during neuroinflammation and excitotoxicity. Upregulated brain AA metabolism associated with neuroinflammation has been imaged in rodents using [1-14C]AA and with PET in Alzheimer disease patients using [1-11C]AA. Radiotracer brain AA uptake is independent of cerebral blood flow, making it an ideal tracer despite altered brain functional activity. However, the 20.4-min radioactive half-life of 11C-AA and challenges of routinely synthesizing 11C fatty acids limit their translational utility as PET biomarkers. Methods As a first step to develop a clinically useful 18F-fluoroarachidonic acid (18F-FAA) with a long radioactive half-life of 109.8 min, we report here a high-yield stereoselective synthetic method of non-radioactive 20-19F-FAA. We tested its in vivo pharmacokinetics by infusing purified nonradioactive 19F-FAA intravenously for 5 min at 2 doses in unanesthetized mice and measured its plasma and brain distribution using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Results Incorporation coefficients of injected 19F-FAA into brain phospholipids (ratio of brain 19F-FAA concentration to plasma input function) were 3- to 29-fold higher for choline glycerophospholipid and phosphatidylinositol than for ethanolamine glycerophospholipid and phosphatidylserine at each of the 2 tested doses. The selectivities and values of incorporation coefficients were comparable to those reported after [1-14C]AA (the natural arachidonate) infusion in mice. Conclusion These results suggest that it would be worthwhile to translate our stereoselective synthetic method for 19F-FAA to synthesize positron-emitting 18F-FAA for human brain AA metabolism in neuroinflammatory disorders such as Alzheimer disease. PMID:22851635

  4. In Vitro and In Vivo Activities of Arachidonic Acid against Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium▿

    PubMed Central

    El Ridi, Rashika; Aboueldahab, Marwa; Tallima, Hatem; Salah, Mohamed; Mahana, Noha; Fawzi, Samia; Mohamed, Shadia H.; Fahmy, Omar M.

    2010-01-01

    The development of arachidonic acid (ARA) for treatment of schistosomiasis is an entirely novel approach based on a breakthrough discovery in schistosome biology revealing that activation of parasite tegument-bound neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) by unsaturated fatty acids, such as ARA, induces exposure of parasite surface membrane antigens to antibody binding and eventual attrition of developing schistosomula and adult worms. Here, we demonstrate that 5 mM ARA leads to irreversible killing of ex vivo 1-, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-week-old Schistosoma mansoni and 9-, 10-, and 12-week-old Schistosoma haematobium worms within 3 to 4 h, depending on the parasite age, even when the worms were maintained in up to 50% fetal calf serum. ARA-mediated worm attrition was prevented by nSMase inhibitors, such as CaCl2 and GW4869. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed that ARA-mediated worm killing was associated with spine destruction, membrane blebbing, and disorganization of the apical membrane structure. ARA-mediated S. mansoni and S. haematobium worm attrition was reproduced in vivo in a series of 6 independent experiments using BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice, indicating that ARA in a pure form (Sigma) or included in infant formula (Nestle) consistently led to 40 to 80% decrease in the total worm burden. Arachidonic acid is already marketed for human use in the United States and Canada for proper development of newborns and muscle growth of athletes; thus, ARA has potential as a safe and cost-effective addition to antischistosomal therapy. PMID:20479203

  5. In vitro and in vivo activities of arachidonic acid against Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium.

    PubMed

    El Ridi, Rashika; Aboueldahab, Marwa; Tallima, Hatem; Salah, Mohamed; Mahana, Noha; Fawzi, Samia; Mohamed, Shadia H; Fahmy, Omar M

    2010-08-01

    The development of arachidonic acid (ARA) for treatment of schistosomiasis is an entirely novel approach based on a breakthrough discovery in schistosome biology revealing that activation of parasite tegument-bound neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase) by unsaturated fatty acids, such as ARA, induces exposure of parasite surface membrane antigens to antibody binding and eventual attrition of developing schistosomula and adult worms. Here, we demonstrate that 5 mM ARA leads to irreversible killing of ex vivo 1-, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-week-old Schistosoma mansoni and 9-, 10-, and 12-week-old Schistosoma haematobium worms within 3 to 4 h, depending on the parasite age, even when the worms were maintained in up to 50% fetal calf serum. ARA-mediated worm attrition was prevented by nSMase inhibitors, such as CaCl(2) and GW4869. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed that ARA-mediated worm killing was associated with spine destruction, membrane blebbing, and disorganization of the apical membrane structure. ARA-mediated S. mansoni and S. haematobium worm attrition was reproduced in vivo in a series of 6 independent experiments using BALB/c or C57BL/6 mice, indicating that ARA in a pure form (Sigma) or included in infant formula (Nestle) consistently led to 40 to 80% decrease in the total worm burden. Arachidonic acid is already marketed for human use in the United States and Canada for proper development of newborns and muscle growth of athletes; thus, ARA has potential as a safe and cost-effective addition to antischistosomal therapy. PMID:20479203

  6. Phosphate limitation promotes unsaturated fatty acids and arachidonic acid biosynthesis by microalgae Porphyridium purpureum.

    PubMed

    Su, Gaomin; Jiao, Kailin; Li, Zheng; Guo, Xiaoyi; Chang, Jingyu; Ndikubwimana, Theoneste; Sun, Yong; Zeng, Xianhai; Lu, Yinghua; Lin, Lu

    2016-07-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are highly appreciated on their nutritive value for human health and aquaculture. P. purpureum, one of the red microalgae acknowledged as a promising accumulator of ARA, was chosen as the target algae in the present research. Effects of sodium bicarbonate (0.04-1.2 g/L), temperature (25, 30 and 33 °C) and phosphate (0.00-0.14 g/L) on biomass yield, total fatty acids (TFA) and arachidonic acid (ARA) accumulation were investigated systemically. NaHCO3 dose of 0.8 g/L and moderate temperature of 30 °C were preferred. In addition, TFA and ARA production were significantly enhanced by an appropriate concentration of phosphate, and the highest TFA yield of 666.38 mg/L and ARA yield of 159.74 mg/L were obtained at a phosphate concentration of 0.035 g/L. Interestingly, with phosphate concentration continuing to fall, UFA/TFA and ARA/EPA ratios were increased accordingly, suggesting that phosphate limitation promoted unsaturated fatty acids and arachidonic acid biosynthesis. Low concentration of phosphate may be favored to increase the enzymatic activities of ∆6-desaturase, which played a key role in catalyzing the conversion of C16:0 to C18:2, and thus the selectivity of UFA increased. Meanwhile, the increase of ARA selectivity could be attributed to ω6 pathway promotion and ∆17-desaturase activity inhibition with phosphate limitation. Phosphate limitation strategy enhanced unsaturated fatty acids and ARA biosynthesis in P. purpureum, and can be applied in commercial scale manufacturing and commercialization of ARA. PMID:27004948

  7. Arachidonic acid metabolites do not mediate toluene diisocyanate-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, T.; Thompson, J.E.; Sheppard, D.

    1988-05-01

    Arachidonic acid metabolites have previously been demonstrated to mediate the airway hyperresponsiveness observed in guinea pigs and dogs after exposure to ozone. Guinea pigs were treated with indomethacin (a cyclooxygenase inhibitor), U-60,257 (piriprost, a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor), or BW775c (a lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase inhibitor) and exposed to air or 3 ppm TDI. Airway responsiveness to acetylcholine aerosol was examined 2 h after exposure. In control animals, the provocative concentration of acetylcholine which caused a 200% increase in pulmonary resistance over baseline (PC200) was significantly less (p less than 0.05) after exposure to TDI (8.6 +/- 2.0 mg/ml, geometric mean + geometric SE, n = 10) than after exposure to air (23.9 + 2.5 mg/ml, n = 14). The airway responsiveness to acetylcholine in animals treated with indomethacin or piriprost and exposed to TDI was not different from that of control animals exposed to TDI. Treatment with BW755c enhanced the airway hyperresponsiveness observed in animals exposed to TDI without altering the PC200 of animals exposed to air. The PC200 of animals treated with BW755c and exposed to TDI (2.3 + 0.8 mg/ml, n = 8) was significantly lower than the PC200 of control animals exposed to TDI (p less than 0.025). These results suggest that products of arachidonic acid metabolism are not responsible for TDI-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs. BW755c, however, appears to potentiate the TDI-induced airway hyperresponsiveness to acetylcholine by an as yet unidentified mechanism.

  8. Phosphate limitation promotes unsaturated fatty acids and arachidonic acid biosynthesis by microalgae Porphyridium purpureum.

    PubMed

    Su, Gaomin; Jiao, Kailin; Li, Zheng; Guo, Xiaoyi; Chang, Jingyu; Ndikubwimana, Theoneste; Sun, Yong; Zeng, Xianhai; Lu, Yinghua; Lin, Lu

    2016-07-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are highly appreciated on their nutritive value for human health and aquaculture. P. purpureum, one of the red microalgae acknowledged as a promising accumulator of ARA, was chosen as the target algae in the present research. Effects of sodium bicarbonate (0.04-1.2 g/L), temperature (25, 30 and 33 °C) and phosphate (0.00-0.14 g/L) on biomass yield, total fatty acids (TFA) and arachidonic acid (ARA) accumulation were investigated systemically. NaHCO3 dose of 0.8 g/L and moderate temperature of 30 °C were preferred. In addition, TFA and ARA production were significantly enhanced by an appropriate concentration of phosphate, and the highest TFA yield of 666.38 mg/L and ARA yield of 159.74 mg/L were obtained at a phosphate concentration of 0.035 g/L. Interestingly, with phosphate concentration continuing to fall, UFA/TFA and ARA/EPA ratios were increased accordingly, suggesting that phosphate limitation promoted unsaturated fatty acids and arachidonic acid biosynthesis. Low concentration of phosphate may be favored to increase the enzymatic activities of ∆6-desaturase, which played a key role in catalyzing the conversion of C16:0 to C18:2, and thus the selectivity of UFA increased. Meanwhile, the increase of ARA selectivity could be attributed to ω6 pathway promotion and ∆17-desaturase activity inhibition with phosphate limitation. Phosphate limitation strategy enhanced unsaturated fatty acids and ARA biosynthesis in P. purpureum, and can be applied in commercial scale manufacturing and commercialization of ARA.

  9. Surfactant-induced alteration of arachidonic acid metabolism of mammalian cells in culture.

    PubMed

    De Leo, V A; Harber, L C; Kong, B M; De Salva, S J

    1987-04-01

    Primary irritancy in human and animal skin is characterized by an inflammatory reaction mediated, in part, by membrane-derived arachidonate metabolites. One of the mechanisms of this reaction was investigated in cultured mammalian cells using three surfactants: linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS), alkyl ethoxylate sulfate (AEOS), and TWEEN 20. These compounds listed in order in vivo irritancy are LAS greater than AEOS greater than TWEEN 20. Each of these compounds was studied in C3H-10T1/2 cells and human keratinocytes which had been prelabeled with 3H-labeled arachidonic acid (AA). After labeling, media were removed, cells were washed, and fresh media with or without surfactant were added. Cells were then incubated for 2 hr, media were removed and centrifuged, and an aliquot was assayed by liquid scintillation for release of label. In C3H-10T1/2 cells LAS and AEOS in 5-50 microM concentration stimulated 2 to 10 times the release of [3H]AA as compared to controls. In contrast, concentrations of 50-100 microM of TWEEN were required to release [3H]AA. With keratinocytes the same rank order of surfactant concentrations necessary for release was obtained as found with C3H-10T1/2 cells. High-performance liquid chromatography of media extracts of both cell systems revealed surfactant stimulation of the production of cyclooxygenase AA metabolites. These results confirm the induction of release by primary irritants of fatty acid groups from membrane phospholipids. Subsequent metabolism of these fatty acid groups are an integral part of the primary irritant response. Data presented with three known irritants in this in vitro model show a direct correlation with in vivo studies.

  10. Fish oil supplementation maintains adequate plasma arachidonate in cats, but similar amounts of vegetable oils lead to dietary arachidonate deficiency from nutrient dilution.

    PubMed

    Angell, Rebecca J; McClure, Melena K; Bigley, Karen E; Bauer, John E

    2012-05-01

    Because fatty acid (FA) metabolism of cats is unique, effects of dietary fish and vegetable oil supplementation on plasma lipids, lipoproteins, lecithin/cholesterol acyl transferase activities, and plasma phospholipid and esterified cholesterol (EC) FAs were investigated. Cats were fed a commercial diet supplemented with 8 g oil/100 g diet for 4 weeks using either high-oleic-acid sunflower oil (diet H), Menhaden fish oil (diet M), or safflower oil (diet S). When supplemented, diet M contained sufficient arachidonate (AA), but diets H and S were deficient. We hypothesized that diet M would modify plasma lipid metabolism, increase FA long-chain n-3 (LCn-3) FA content but not deplete AA levels. Also, diet S would show linoleic acid (LA) accumulation without conversion to AA, and both vegetable oil supplements would dilute dietary AA content when fed to meet cats' energy needs. Plasma samples on weeks 0, 2, and 4 showed no alterations in total cholesterol or nonesterified FA concentrations. Unesterified cholesterol decreased and EC increased in all groups, whereas lecithin/cholesterol acyl transferase activities were unchanged. Diet M showed significant triacylglycerol lowering and decreased pre-β-lipoprotein cholesterol. Plasma phospholipid FA profiles revealed significant enrichment of 18:1n-9 with diet H, LA and 20:2n-6 with diet S, and FA LCn-3FA with diet M. Depletion of AA was observed with diets H and S but not with diet M. Diet M EC FA profiles revealed specificities for LA and 20:5n-3 but not 22:5n-3 or 22:6n-3. Oversupplementation of some commercial diets with vegetable oils causes AA depletion in young cats due to dietary dilution. Findings are consistent with the current recommendations for at least 0.2 g AA/kg diet and that fish oil supplements provide both preformed LCn-3 polyunsaturated FA and AA.

  11. Light-evoked arachidonic acid release in the retina: illuminance/duration dependence and the effects of quinacrine, mellitin and lithium. Light-evoked arachidonic acid release.

    PubMed

    Jung, H; Remé, C

    1994-03-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is the precursor molecule of a variety of cellular lipid mediators that interact with retinal physiology. In this study, we investigated the time- and illuminance-dependence of the release of AA in the rat retina in vitro in control and lithium-pretreated rats. We also studied the effects of the specific phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitor quinacrine and the specific PLA2 stimulator mellitin on the release of AA. Isolated rat retinas were labelled with 3H-AA for 90 min in vitro in darkness and the incorporation of AA into retinal phospholipids was monitored by thin-layer chromatography. The release of 3H-AA in the incubation medium was determined under different illuminance and timing conditions, with the addition of quinacrine and mellitin, and after pretreatment of the animals with lithium. Light exposure of the prelabelled isolated retinas evoked up to a two-fold increase in AA release compared with retinas incubated for the same time in darkness. The AA release was dependent on illuminance time (10,000 1x white fluorescent light for 0.25, 2, 5 and 10 min) and illuminance level (0, 100, 1000, 5000, and 10,000 1x for 10 min). Complete rhodopsin bleaching occurred after 2 min at 10,000 1x. Quinacrine significantly suppressed the light-elicited AA release whereas mellitin increased the release of AA in dark-adapted and light-exposed retinas. Lithium pretreatment, which is known to potentiate light-evoked rod outer segment disruptions, significantly augmented the light-evoked AA release. Our results confirm a light-stimulated release of AA in the retina.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Effect of selenium and vitamin E deficiencies on the fate of arachidonic acid in rat isolated lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Uotila, P.; Puustinen, T.

    1985-06-01

    The fate of exogenous /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid (/sup 14/C-AA) was investigated in the isolated lungs of rats fed selenium and vitamin E deficient diet or diets supplemented with selenium and/or vitamin E. When 80 nmol of /sup 14/C-AA was infused into the pulmonary circulation most of the infused /sup 14/C-AA was found in different phospholipid and neutral lipid fractions of the perfused lungs. Only less than ten percent of the infused radioactivity was recovered in the perfusion effluent. The amount of arachidonate metabolites in the perfusion effluent was negligible, and most of the radioactivity in the perfusion effluent consisted of unmetabolized arachidonate. Selenium deficiency had no significant effect on the distribution of /sup 14/C-AA in different lung lipid fractions. However, in the lungs of vitamin E deficient rats the amount of radioactivity was slightly increased in the neutral lipid fraction, which was due to the increased amount of /sup 14/C-AA in the diacylglycerols. The amount of radioactivity was increased especially in the 1,3-diacylglycerols. The amount of radioactivity was increased especially in the 1,3-diacylglycerols. The amount of /sup 14/C-AA in the triacylglycerols and in different phospholipids was not significantly changed. The present study might indicate that selenium deficiency has no significant effect on the fate of exogenous arachidonic acid in isolated rat lungs, and that vitamin E deficiency would slightly increase the amount of arachidonic acid in the diacylglycerols.

  13. The increased level of COX-dependent arachidonic acid metabolism in blood platelets from secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Morel, Agnieszka; Miller, Elzbieta; Bijak, Michal; Saluk, Joanna

    2016-09-01

    Platelet activation is increasingly postulated as a possible component of the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), especially due to the increased risk of cardiovascular events in MS. Arachidonic acid cascade metabolized by cyclooxygenase (COX) is a key pathway of platelet activation. The aim of our study was to investigate the COX-dependent arachidonic acid metabolic pathway in blood platelets from secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SP MS) patients. The blood samples were obtained from 50 patients (man n = 22; female n = 28), suffering from SP MS, diagnosed according to the revised McDonald criteria. Platelet aggregation was measured in platelet-rich plasma after arachidonic acid stimulation. The level of COX activity and thromboxane B2 concentration were determined by ELISA method. Lipid peroxidation was assessed by measuring the level of malondialdehyde. The results were compared with a control group of healthy volunteers. We found that blood platelets obtained from SP MS patients were more sensitive to arachidonic acid and their response measured as platelet aggregation was stronger (about 14 %) relative to control. We also observed a significantly increased activity of COX (about 40 %) and synthesis of thromboxane B2 (about 113 %). The generation of malondialdehyde as a marker of lipid peroxidation was about 10 % higher in SP MS than in control. Cyclooxygenase-dependent arachidonic acid metabolism is significantly increased in blood platelets of patients with SP MS. Future clinical studies are required to recommend the use of low-dose aspirin, and possibly other COX inhibitors in the prevention of cardiovascular risk in MS. PMID:27507559

  14. Gotch ear in a goat: a case report.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Kristine T; Varela-Stokes, Andrea S; Paddock, Christopher D; Goddard, Jerome

    2011-08-01

    A 1-year-old castrated male Saanen goat was observed to have drooping and edema of the left ear consistent with published accounts of gotch ear in cattle associated with a tick bite. The goat's left ear was edematous from the tip of the pinna to the base of the ear. No signs of trauma or infectious processes were observed. Three engorged Gulf Coast ticks (Amblyomma maculatum) were observed attached inside the ear. Ticks were removed and the ear biopsied at tick attachment sites. The affected ear was treated topically with betadine after removal of the ticks. No other treatment was administered. The goat remained free of clinical signs and the edema of the ear resolved within 3 days after tick removal. No clinical adverse effects of the condition were evident. All three ticks were positive for spotted fever group rickettsia by polymerase chain reaction analysis and showed 100% similarity with the homologous sequence of Rickettsia parkeri. There was no immunohistochemical evidence of spotted fever group rickettsia in the ear samples, supporting the hypothesis that gotch ear is not due to rickettsial infection. This report represents the first apparent case of gotch ear in a goat. PMID:21395411

  15. Gotch ear in a goat: a case report.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Kristine T; Varela-Stokes, Andrea S; Paddock, Christopher D; Goddard, Jerome

    2011-08-01

    A 1-year-old castrated male Saanen goat was observed to have drooping and edema of the left ear consistent with published accounts of gotch ear in cattle associated with a tick bite. The goat's left ear was edematous from the tip of the pinna to the base of the ear. No signs of trauma or infectious processes were observed. Three engorged Gulf Coast ticks (Amblyomma maculatum) were observed attached inside the ear. Ticks were removed and the ear biopsied at tick attachment sites. The affected ear was treated topically with betadine after removal of the ticks. No other treatment was administered. The goat remained free of clinical signs and the edema of the ear resolved within 3 days after tick removal. No clinical adverse effects of the condition were evident. All three ticks were positive for spotted fever group rickettsia by polymerase chain reaction analysis and showed 100% similarity with the homologous sequence of Rickettsia parkeri. There was no immunohistochemical evidence of spotted fever group rickettsia in the ear samples, supporting the hypothesis that gotch ear is not due to rickettsial infection. This report represents the first apparent case of gotch ear in a goat.

  16. Estimation of outer-middle ear transmission using DPOAEs and fractional-order modeling of human middle ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghibolhosseini, Maryam

    Our ability to hear depends primarily on sound waves traveling through the outer and middle ear toward the inner ear. Hence, the characteristics of the outer and middle ear affect sound transmission to/from the inner ear. The role of the middle and outer ear in sound transmission is particularly important for otoacoustic emissions (OAEs), which are sound signals generated in a healthy cochlea, and recorded by a sensitive microphone placed in the ear canal. OAEs are used to evaluate the health and function of the cochlea; however, they are also affected by outer and middle ear characteristics. To better assess cochlear health using OAEs, it is critical to quantify the impact of the outer and middle ear on sound transmission. The reported research introduces a noninvasive approach to estimate outer-middle ear transmission using distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs). In addition, the role of the outer and middle ear on sound transmission was investigated by developing a physical/mathematical model, which employed fractional-order lumped elements to include the viscoelastic characteristics of biological tissues. Impedance estimations from wideband refectance measurements were used for parameter fitting of the model. The model was validated comparing its estimates of the outer-middle ear sound transmission with those given by DPOAEs. The outer-middle ear transmission by the model was defined as the sum of forward and reverse outer-middle ear transmissions. To estimate the reverse transmission by the model, the probe-microphone impedance was calculated through estimating the Thevenin-equivalent circuit of the probe-microphone. The Thevenin-equivalent circuit was calculated using measurements in a number of test cavities. Such modeling enhances our understanding of the roles of different parts of the outer and middle ear and how they work together to determine their function. In addition, the model would be potentially helpful in diagnosing pathologies of

  17. Diseases of the middle ear in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Minovi, Amir; Dazert, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Middle ear diseases in childhood play an important role in daily ENT practice due to their high incidence. Some of these like acute otitis media or otitis media with effusion have been studied extensively within the last decades. In this article, we present a selection of important childhood middle ear diseases and discuss the actual literature concerning their treatment, management of complications and outcome. Another main topic of this paper deals with the possibilities of surgical hearing rehabilitation in childhood. The bone-anchored hearing aid BAHA® and the active partially implantable device Vibrant Soundbridge® could successfully be applied for children. In this manuscript, we discuss the actual literature concerning clinical outcomes of these implantable hearing aids. PMID:25587371

  18. Analysis of OH Bolted Ear Connection

    SciTech Connect

    Wands, Bob; /Fermilab

    1987-12-30

    The D0 endcap calorimeter outer hadronic (OH) modules play a major structural role in the calorimeter assembly. The disrete modules, once connected together, form a ring within which other massive calorimetry will reside. It has been proposed that the connection of the OH at the downstream end be accomplished by extending the downstream endplates in the radial direction to form 'ears', and then through-bolting between adjacent ears as shown in Fig. 1. A single 2 1/4 in. dia. bolt is used, and previous calculations have determined that the design load on this joint should be 130,000 lbs tension. The high load and serious consequences of failure make this a critical component in the calorimeter assembly. The purpose of this analysis is to investigate the stresses in the connection and other mechanical characteristics which determine joint performance.

  19. Ewing Sarcoma of the External Ear Canal.

    PubMed

    Binnetoglu, Adem; Baglam, Tekin; Tokuc, Gulnur; Kecelioglu Binnetoglu, Kiymet; Gerin, Fatma; Sari, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ewing sarcoma (ES) is a high-grade malignant tumor that has skeletal and extraskeletal forms and consists of small round cells. In the head and neck region, reported localization of extraskeletal ES includes the larynx, thyroid gland, submandibular gland, nasal fossa, pharynx, skin, and parotid gland, but not the external ear canal. Methods. We present the unique case of a 2-year-old boy with extraskeletal ES arising from the external ear canal, mimicking auricular hematoma. Results. Surgery was performed and a VAC/IE (vincristine, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide alternating with ifosfamide, and etoposide) regimen was used for adjuvant chemotherapy for 12 months. Conclusion. The clinician should consider extraskeletal ES when diagnosing tumors localized in the head and neck region because it may be manifested by a nonspecific clinical picture mimicking common otorhinolaryngologic disorders. PMID:27313930

  20. Ringing Ears: The Neuroscience of Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Larry E.; Eggermont, Jos J.; Caspary, Donald M.; Shore, Susan E.; Melcher, Jennifer R.; Kaltenbach, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Tinnitus is a phantom sound (ringing of the ears) that affects quality of life for millions around the world and is associated in most cases with hearing impairment. This symposium will consider evidence that deafferentation of tonotopically-organized central auditory structures leads to increased neuron spontaneous firing rates and neural synchrony in the hearing loss region. This region covers the frequency spectrum of tinnitus sounds, which are optimally suppressed following exposure to band-limited noise covering the same frequencies. Cross-modal compensations in subcortical structures may contribute to tinnitus and its modulation by jaw-clenching and eye movements. Yet many older individuals with impaired hearing do not have tinnitus, possibly because age-related changes in inhibitory circuits are better preserved. A brain network involving limbic and other nonauditory regions is active in tinnitus and may be driven when spectrotemporal information conveyed by the damaged ear does not match that predicted by central auditory processing. PMID:21068300

  1. Benfotiamine attenuates nicotine and uric acid-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction in the rat.

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Sharma, Ramica; Singh, Manjeet

    2008-01-01

    The study has been designed to investigate the effect of benfotiamine, a thiamine derivative, in nicotine and uric acid-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in rats. Nicotine (2 mg kg(-1)day(-1), i.p., 4 weeks) and uric acid (150 mg kg(-1)day(-1), i.p., 3 weeks) were administered to produce VED in rats. The development of VED was assessed by employing isolated aortic ring preparation and estimating serum and aortic concentration of nitrite/nitrate. Further, the integrity of vascular endothelium was assessed using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of thoracic aorta. Moreover, the oxidative stress was assessed by estimating serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and aortic superoxide anion generation. The administration of nicotine and uric acid produced VED by impairing the integrity of vascular endothelium and subsequently decreasing serum and aortic concentration of nitrite/nitrate and attenuating acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation. Further, nicotine and uric acid produced oxidative stress, which was assessed in terms of increase in serum TBARS and aortic superoxide generation. However, treatment with benfotiamine (70 mg kg(-1)day(-1), p.o.) or atorvastatin (30 mg kg(-1)day(-1) p.o., a standard agent) markedly prevented nicotine and uric acid-induced VED and oxidative stress by improving the integrity of vascular endothelium, increasing the concentration of serum and aortic nitrite/nitrate, enhancing the acetylcholine-induced endothelium dependent relaxation and decreasing serum TBARS and aortic superoxide anion generation. Thus, it may be concluded that benfotiamine reduces the oxidative stress and consequently improves the integrity of vascular endothelium and enhances the generation of nitric oxide to prevent nicotine and uric acid-induced experimental VED. PMID:18951979

  2. Lipopolysaccharide Stimulates Butyric Acid-Induced Apoptosis in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Fukushima, Kazuo; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    1999-01-01

    We previously reported that butyric acid, an extracellular metabolite from periodontopathic bacteria, induced apoptosis in murine thymocytes, splenic T cells, and human Jurkat T cells. In this study, we examined the ability of butyric acid to induce apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on this apoptosis. Butyric acid significantly inhibited the anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody- and concanavalin A-induced proliferative responses in a dose-dependent fashion. This inhibition of PBMC growth by butyric acid depended on apoptosis in vitro. It was characterized by internucleosomal DNA digestion and revealed by gel electrophoresis followed by a colorimetric DNA fragmentation assay to occur in a concentration-dependent fashion. Butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis was accompanied by caspase-3 protease activity but not by caspase-1 protease activity. LPS potentiated butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed that LPS increased the proportion of sub-G1 cells and the number of late-stage apoptotic cells induced by butyric acid. Annexin V binding experiments with fractionated subpopulations of PBMC in flow cytometory revealed that LPS accelerated the butyric acid-induced CD3+-T-cell apoptosis followed by similar levels of both CD4+- and CD8+-T-cell apoptosis. The addition of LPS to PBMC cultures did not cause DNA fragmentation, suggesting that LPS was unable to induce PBMC apoptosis directly. These data suggest that LPS, in combination with butyric acid, potentiates CD3+ PBMC T-cell apoptosis and plays a role in the apoptotic depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells. PMID:9864191

  3. The acid-induced folded state of Sac7d is the native state.

    PubMed Central

    Bedell, J. L.; McCrary, B. S.; Edmondson, S. P.; Shriver, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    Sac7d unfolds at low pH in the absence of salt, with the greatest extent of unfolding obtained at pH 2. We have previously shown that the acid unfolded protein is induced to refold by decreasing the pH to 0 or by addition of salt (McCrary BS, Bedell J. Edmondson SP, Shriver JW, 1998, J Mol Biol 276:203-224). Both near-ultraviolet circular dichroism spectra and ANS fluorescence enhancements indicate that the acid- and salt-induced folded states have a native fold and are not molten globular. 1H,15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence NMR spectra confirm that the native, acid-, and salt-induced folded states are essentially identical. The most significant differences in amide 1H and 15N chemical shifts are attributed to hydrogen bonding to titrating carboxyl side chains and through-bond inductive effects. The 1H NMR chemical shifts of protons affected by ring currents in the hydrophobic core of the acid- and salt-induced folded states are identical to those observed in the native. The radius of gyration of the acid-induced folded state at pH 0 is shown to be identical to that of the native state at pH 7 by small angle X-ray scattering. We conclude that acid-induced collapse of Sac7d does not lead to a molten globule but proceeds directly to the native state. The folding of Sac7d as a function of pH and anion concentration is summarized with a phase diagram that is similar to those observed for other proteins that undergo acid-induced folding except that the A-state is encompassed by the native state. These results demonstrate that formation of a molten globule is not a general property of proteins that are refolded by acid. PMID:11106160

  4. Clavulanic acid induces penile erection and yawning in male rats: comparison with apomorphine.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Fabrizio; Melis, Maria Rosaria; Angioni, Laura; Argiolas, Antonio

    2013-02-01

    The beta-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid induced penile erection and yawning in a dose dependent manner when given intraperitoneally (IP, 0.05-5mg/kg), perorally (OS, 0.1-5mg/kg) and intracereboventricularly (ICV, 0.01-5 μg/rat) to male rats. The effect resembles that of the dopamine receptor agonist apomorphine given subcutaneously (SC) (0.02-0.25mg/kg), although the responses of the latter followed a U inverted dose-response curve, disappearing at doses higher than 0.1mg/kg. Clavulanic acid responses were reduced by about 55% by haloperidol, a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist (0.1mg/kg IP), and by d(CH(2))(5)Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin, an oxytocin receptor antagonist (2 μg/rat ICV), both given 15 min before clavulanic acid. A higher reduction of clavulanic acid responses (more than 80%) was also found with morphine, an opioid receptor agonist (5mg/kg IP), and with mianserin, a serotonin 5HT(2c) receptor antagonist (0.2mg/kg SC). In contrast, no reduction was found with naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist (1mg/kg IP). The ability of haloperidol, d(CH(2))(5)Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin and morphine to reduce clavulanic acid induced penile erection and yawning suggests that clavulanic acid induces these responses, at least in part, by increasing central dopaminergic neurotransmission. Dopamine in turn activates oxytocinergic neurotransmission and centrally released oxytocin induces penile erection and yawning. However, since both penile erection and yawning episodes were reduced not only by the blockade of central dopamine and oxytocin receptors and by the stimulation of opioid receptors, which inhibits oxytocinergic neurotransmission, but also by mianserin, an increase of central serotonin neurotransmission is also likely to participate in these clavulanic acid responses.

  5. A study of ozone-induced edema in the isolated rat lung in relation to arachidonic acid metabolism, mixed-function oxidases and angiotensin converting enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Dutta, S; Chatterjee, M; Teknos, T N; Carlson, R W

    1990-01-01

    In order to elucidate the role of arachidonic acid in the pathogenesis of ozone-induced pulmonary edema, isolated rat lungs were exposed to 14C-arachidonic acid in the presence or absence of ozone and the incorporation of radiolabelled arachidonate into pulmonary cell lipids was studied. The perfusates from these studies were also subjected to differential extraction and thin layer chromatography (t.l.c.) to determine synthesis of both cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase products. In the presence of an edemagenic concentration of ozone, isolated lungs incorporated significantly less exogenous arachidonic acid into phosphatidyl choline and phosphatidyl ethanolamine, whereas incorporation into phosphatidyl inositol or serine was not affected. The edemagenic concentration of ozone also increased production of a variety of arachidonic acid metabolites via cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways. In separate studies, a similar ozone exposure did not affect 14CO2 production, resulting from the metabolism of 14C-antipyrine by mixed function oxidases (MFO). Similarly, an edemagenic concentration of ozone did not affect pulmonary angiotensin converting enzyme activity (ACE) as determined by the rate of formation of 14C-hippuric acid from 14C-hippuryl-histidyl-leucine (14C-HHL). Thus, acute ozone exposure is specifically associated with a reduced incorporation of arachidonate into phospholipids and with an increased conversion of arachidonate into bio-active metabolites.

  6. Salivary gland choristoma of the middle ear.

    PubMed

    Mischke, R E; Brackmann, D E; Gruskin, P

    1977-07-01

    We discuss the eighth reported case of a benign salivary gland tumor in the middle ear. The lesion was a smooth lobulated mass and was found to be intimately associated with the tympanic portion of the facial nerve. Recommended treatment is biopsy without attempting removal. This concept of management is supported by a report of a similar case with a 15-year follow-up.

  7. Unsaturated fatty acid-induced non-canonical autophagy: unusual? or unappreciated?

    PubMed Central

    Bankaitis, Vytas A

    2015-01-01

    The breakdown of cellular components via autophagy is crucial for cellular homeostasis. In this issue of The EMBO Journal, Niso-Santano et al (2015) report the important observation that feeding cells with saturated or unsaturated fatty acids triggers mechanistically distinct autophagic responses. Feeding cells saturated fatty acid induced the canonical, BECN1/PI3K-dependent autophagy pathway. Conversely, the unsaturated fatty acid oleate triggered autophagic responses that were independent of the BECN1/PI3K complex, but that required a functional Golgi system. PMID:25762589

  8. Why Do Elephants Flap Their Ears?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koffi, Moise; Jiji, Latif; Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2009-11-01

    It is estimated that a 4200 kg elephant generates as much as 5.12 kW of heat. How the elephant dissipates its metabolic heat and regulates its body temperature has been investigated during the past seven decades. Findings and conclusions differ sharply. The high rate of metabolic heat coupled with low surface area to volume ratio and the absence of sweat glands eliminate surface convection as the primary mechanism for heat removal. Noting that the elephant ears have high surface area to volume ratio and an extensive vascular network, ear flapping is thought to be the principal thermoregulatory mechanism. A computational and experimental program is carried out to examine flow and heat transfer characteristics. The ear is modeled as a uniformly heated oscillating rectangular plate. Our computational work involves a three-dimensional time dependent CFD code with heat transfer capabilities to obtain predictions of the flow field and surface temperature distributions. This information was used to design an experimental setup with a uniformly heated plate of size 0.2m x 0.3m oscillating at 1.6 cycles per second. Results show that surface temperature increases and reaches a steady periodic oscillation after a period of transient oscillation. The role of the vortices shed off the plate in heat transfer enhancement will be discussed.

  9. Immunohistochemical techniques for the human inner ear.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Ivan A; Ishiyama, Gail; Hosokawa, Seiji; Hosokawa, Kumiko; Acuna, Dora; Linthicum, Fred H; Ishiyama, Akira

    2016-10-01

    In this review, we provide a description of the recent methods used for immunohistochemical staining of the human inner ear using formalin-fixed frozen, paraffin and celloidin-embedded sections. We also show the application of these immunohistochemical methods in auditory and vestibular endorgans microdissected from the human temporal bone. We compare the advantages and disadvantages of immunohistochemistry (IHC) in the different types of embedding media. IHC in frozen and paraffin-embedded sections yields a robust immunoreactive signal. Both frozen and paraffin sections would be the best alternative in the case where celloidin-embedding technique is not available. IHC in whole endorgans yields excellent results and can be used when desiring to detect regional variations of protein expression in the sensory epithelia. One advantage of microdissection is that the tissue is processed immediately and IHC can be made within 1 week of temporal bone collection. A second advantage of microdissection is the excellent preservation of both morphology and antigenicity. Using celloidin-embedded inner ear sections, we were able to detect several antigens by IHC and immunofluorescence using antigen retrieval methods. These techniques, previously applied only in animal models, allow for the study of numerous important proteins expressed in the human temporal bone potentially opening up a new field for future human inner ear research. PMID:27480257

  10. Analytical model of internally coupled ears.

    PubMed

    Vossen, Christine; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; van Hemmen, J Leo

    2010-08-01

    Lizards and many birds possess a specialized hearing mechanism: internally coupled ears where the tympanic membranes connect through a large mouth cavity so that the vibrations of the tympanic membranes influence each other. This coupling enhances the phase differences and creates amplitude differences in the tympanic membrane vibrations. Both cues show strong directionality. The work presented herein sets out the derivation of a three dimensional analytical model of internally coupled ears that allows for calculation of a complete vibration profile of the membranes. The analytical model additionally provides the opportunity to incorporate the effect of the asymmetrically attached columella, which leads to the activation of higher membrane vibration modes. Incorporating this effect, the analytical model can explain measurements taken from the tympanic membrane of a living lizard, for example, data demonstrating an asymmetrical spatial pattern of membrane vibration. As the analytical calculations show, the internally coupled ears increase the directional response, appearing in large directional internal amplitude differences (iAD) and in large internal time differences (iTD). Numerical simulations of the eigenfunctions in an exemplary, realistically reconstructed mouth cavity further estimate the effects of its complex geometry.

  11. Salivary gland choristoma of the middle ear.

    PubMed

    Fois, Paolo; Giannuzzi, Anna Lisa; Paties, Carlo Terenzio; Falcioni, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Choristoma of the middle ear is a rare condition characterized by the presence of normal salivary gland tissue in the middle ear space. Salivary gland choristomas are benign lesions that are frequently associated with ossicular chain and facial nerve anomalies. Total surgical excision is indicated when there is no risk of damaging the facial nerve. We describe a new case of salivary gland choristoma of the middle ear, and we discuss the etiology, histologic features, and management of such lesions. Our patient was a 22-year-old woman in whom we surgically removed a whitish retrotympanic mass. Intraoperatively, we also detected an ossicular chain malformation. Histologic examination of the choristoma revealed the presence of salivary gland tissue. Furthermore, the lesion contained an extensive and previously undescribed component: a well-defined pseudostratified respiratory-type epithelium, similar to that of a normal eustachian tube. Ten months after removal of the choristoma, we surgically repaired the ossicular chain anomalies. No recurrence was noted on follow-up.

  12. Ear recognition from one sample per person.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Mu, Zhichun; Zhang, Baoqing; Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Biometrics has the advantages of efficiency and convenience in identity authentication. As one of the most promising biometric-based methods, ear recognition has received broad attention and research. Previous studies have achieved remarkable performance with multiple samples per person (MSPP) in the gallery. However, most conventional methods are insufficient when there is only one sample per person (OSPP) available in the gallery. To solve the OSPP problem by maximizing the use of a single sample, this paper proposes a hybrid multi-keypoint descriptor sparse representation-based classification (MKD-SRC) ear recognition approach based on 2D and 3D information. Because most 3D sensors capture 3D data accessorizing the corresponding 2D data, it is sensible to use both types of information. First, the ear region is extracted from the profile. Second, keypoints are detected and described for both the 2D texture image and 3D range image. Then, the hybrid MKD-SRC algorithm is used to complete the recognition with only OSPP in the gallery. Experimental results on a benchmark dataset have demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method in resolving the OSPP problem. A Rank-one recognition rate of 96.4% is achieved for a gallery of 415 subjects, and the time involved in the computation is satisfactory compared to conventional methods. PMID:26024226

  13. Ear Recognition from One Sample Per Person

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long; Mu, Zhichun; Zhang, Baoqing; Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Biometrics has the advantages of efficiency and convenience in identity authentication. As one of the most promising biometric-based methods, ear recognition has received broad attention and research. Previous studies have achieved remarkable performance with multiple samples per person (MSPP) in the gallery. However, most conventional methods are insufficient when there is only one sample per person (OSPP) available in the gallery. To solve the OSPP problem by maximizing the use of a single sample, this paper proposes a hybrid multi-keypoint descriptor sparse representation-based classification (MKD-SRC) ear recognition approach based on 2D and 3D information. Because most 3D sensors capture 3D data accessorizing the corresponding 2D data, it is sensible to use both types of information. First, the ear region is extracted from the profile. Second, keypoints are detected and described for both the 2D texture image and 3D range image. Then, the hybrid MKD-SRC algorithm is used to complete the recognition with only OSPP in the gallery. Experimental results on a benchmark dataset have demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method in resolving the OSPP problem. A Rank-one recognition rate of 96.4% is achieved for a gallery of 415 subjects, and the time involved in the computation is satisfactory compared to conventional methods. PMID:26024226

  14. Ear recognition from one sample per person.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Mu, Zhichun; Zhang, Baoqing; Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Biometrics has the advantages of efficiency and convenience in identity authentication. As one of the most promising biometric-based methods, ear recognition has received broad attention and research. Previous studies have achieved remarkable performance with multiple samples per person (MSPP) in the gallery. However, most conventional methods are insufficient when there is only one sample per person (OSPP) available in the gallery. To solve the OSPP problem by maximizing the use of a single sample, this paper proposes a hybrid multi-keypoint descriptor sparse representation-based classification (MKD-SRC) ear recognition approach based on 2D and 3D information. Because most 3D sensors capture 3D data accessorizing the corresponding 2D data, it is sensible to use both types of information. First, the ear region is extracted from the profile. Second, keypoints are detected and described for both the 2D texture image and 3D range image. Then, the hybrid MKD-SRC algorithm is used to complete the recognition with only OSPP in the gallery. Experimental results on a benchmark dataset have demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method in resolving the OSPP problem. A Rank-one recognition rate of 96.4% is achieved for a gallery of 415 subjects, and the time involved in the computation is satisfactory compared to conventional methods.

  15. Endoscopic assisted cochlear implants in ear malformations.

    PubMed

    Marchioni, Daniele; Soloperto, Davide; Guarnaccia, Maria C; Genovese, Elisabetta; Alicandri-Ciufelli, Matteo; Presutti, Livio

    2015-10-01

    The aim of present study is to describe the use of the endoscopic assisted cochlear implant approach in cases with severely malformed temporal bones and with anomalous anatomy of the inner ear and tympanic cavity. Eight patients with malformed middle and inner ear and bilateral profound hearing loss were operated using an endoscopic assisted cochlear implant procedure at our tertiary university referral center between January and September 2013. Five patients received a cochlear implant using a suprameatal endoscopic assisted approach. A chart review of clinical data and videos from the operations was performed. All procedures were re-analyzed and codified. In all patients, discharge from hospital was on the third day post-surgery. No immediate or late postoperative complications were noted. The current mean follow-up is 6 months, with range between 4 and 12 months. This approach proved to be successful in cochlear implant placement. It guaranteed a very good control on the facial nerve, even in cases with difficult anatomical conditions, mainly thanks to the endoscopic procedure. It also permitted an appropriate anatomical orientation of the abnormal middle ear with a direct safe cochleostomy, when the round window position would have been difficult to treat using a traditional approach. PMID:25085636

  16. Analytical model of internally coupled ears.

    PubMed

    Vossen, Christine; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; van Hemmen, J Leo

    2010-08-01

    Lizards and many birds possess a specialized hearing mechanism: internally coupled ears where the tympanic membranes connect through a large mouth cavity so that the vibrations of the tympanic membranes influence each other. This coupling enhances the phase differences and creates amplitude differences in the tympanic membrane vibrations. Both cues show strong directionality. The work presented herein sets out the derivation of a three dimensional analytical model of internally coupled ears that allows for calculation of a complete vibration profile of the membranes. The analytical model additionally provides the opportunity to incorporate the effect of the asymmetrically attached columella, which leads to the activation of higher membrane vibration modes. Incorporating this effect, the analytical model can explain measurements taken from the tympanic membrane of a living lizard, for example, data demonstrating an asymmetrical spatial pattern of membrane vibration. As the analytical calculations show, the internally coupled ears increase the directional response, appearing in large directional internal amplitude differences (iAD) and in large internal time differences (iTD). Numerical simulations of the eigenfunctions in an exemplary, realistically reconstructed mouth cavity further estimate the effects of its complex geometry. PMID:20707461

  17. Do Swiftlets have an ear for echolocation? The functional morphology of Swiftlets' middle ears.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Henri A; Gea, Stefan; Maas, Steve; Bout, Ron G; Dirckx, Joris J J; Decraemer, Willem F; Povel, G David E

    2007-03-01

    The Oilbird and many Swiftlet species are unique among birds for their ability to echolocate. Echolocaters may benefit from improved hearing sensitivity. Therefore, morphological adaptations to echolocation might be present in echolocating birds' middle ears. We studied the functional morphology of the tympano-ossicular chain of seven specimens of four echolocating Swiftlet species and one specimen each of five non-echolocating species. Three dimensional (3D) reconstructions were made from micro-Computer-Tomographic (muCT) scans. The reconstructions were used in functional morphological analyses and model calculations. A two dimensional (2D) rigid rod model with fixed rotational axes was developed to study footplate output-amplitudes and to describe how changes in the arrangement of the tympano-ossicular chain affect its function. A 3D finite element model was used to predict ossicular-chain movement and to investigate the justification of the 2D approach. No morphological adaptations towards echolocation were found in the middle-ear lever system or in the mass impedance of the middle ear. A wide range of middle-ear configurations result in maximum output-amplitudes and all investigated species are congruent with these predicted best configurations. Echolocation is unlikely to depend on adaptations in the middle ear tympano-ossicular chain. PMID:17229537

  18. Middle-ear velocity transfer function, cochlear input immittance, and middle-ear efficiency in chinchilla.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, Michael E; Rosowski, John J

    2013-10-01

    The transfer function H(V) between stapes velocity V(S) and sound pressure near the tympanic membrane P(TM) is a descriptor of sound transmission through the middle ear (ME). The ME power transmission efficiency (MEE), the ratio of sound power entering the cochlea to power entering the middle ear, was computed from H(V) measured in seven chinchilla ears and previously reported measurements of ME input admittance Y(TM) and ME pressure gain G(MEP) [Ravicz and Rosowski, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 2437-2454 (2012); J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 133, 2208-2223 (2013)] in the same ears. The ME was open, and a pressure sensor was inserted into the cochlear vestibule for most measurements. The cochlear input admittance Y(C) computed from H(V) and G(MEP) is controlled by a combination of mass and resistance and is consistent with a minimum-phase system up to 27 kHz. The real part Re{Y(C)}, which relates cochlear sound power to inner-ear sound pressure, decreased gradually with frequency up to 25 kHz and more rapidly above that. MEE was about 0.5 between 0.1 and 8 kHz, higher than previous estimates in this species, and decreased sharply at higher frequencies.

  19. Rabbit's ear in cold acclimation studied on the change in ear temperature.

    PubMed

    Harada, E; Kanno, T

    1975-03-01

    The role of the rabbit's ear in cold acclimation was studied by varying the temperature of a climatic room in the range from -10 to +30 degrees C; The skin temperature in a nonanesthetized rabbit's ear showed a characteristic response to changes in ambient temperatures; plotting the ear temperature against the ambient temperature yielded an S-shaped curve. The mean ambient temperature corresponding to the inflection point on the S-shaped curve shifted significantly from about 13 degrees C to about 8 degrees C after cold acclimated of a group fed for 7 wk at -10 degrees C. The shift of the S-shaped curve after cold acclimation may not be due to the change in the norepinephrine sensitivity of the vascular beds of the ear: the effect of norepinephrine on the pressure-flow curve in the isolated rabbit's ear was almost unchanged between the control and the cold-acclimated groups. It is proposed that the shift of the inflection point gives a qualitative index of the acclimated state of the rabbit at a particular temperature. PMID:1150550

  20. [ANALYSIS OF ARACHIDONIC ACID RELATIVE CONTENT CHANGES IN ERYTHROCYTES AND PLATELETS PHOSPHOLIPIDS MEMBRANES FEATURES IN CORONARY HEART DISEASE WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    Lizogub, V G; Zavalska, T V; Merkulova, I O; Bryuzgina, T S

    2015-01-01

    Erythrocytes and platelets phospholipid membranes fatty acid spectrum was detected in coronary heart disease and atrial fibrillation patients and in patients with coronary heart disease without atrial fibrillation. 87 patients were investigated. Significant decrease in the arachidonic acid relative content in coronary heart disease patients compared with healthy individuals was related. As well as a significant decrease in the arachidonic acid relative content in coronary heart disease and atrial fibrillation patients compared with coronary heart disease patients without atrial fibrillation was related too. These dates may indicate that decreasing relative content arachidonic acid can be possible pathogenetic link in the development of arrhythmias.

  1. [Materials for reconstruction of the middle ear].

    PubMed

    Geyer, G

    1999-02-01

    To rehabilitate most cases of conductive hearing loss closure of ear drum perforations and rebuilding of the ossicular chain can be performed. Due to the great number of biocompatible bone substitute materials available it is occasionally difficult for the surgeon to choose the most favorable substitute. Autogenous structures (ossicles, cortical bone, cartilage) and allogenous tissues (ossicles, cortical bone, cartilage, dentin) are possible bone replacement materials. Xenogenic tissue is currently not used in middle ear surgery. Ionomer cement is a hybrid material for replacement of bone but does not fit direct classification of the various classes of alloplastic materials in current use: that is, metals (gold, steel wire, platinum, titanium), plastics (polyethylene, polytetrafluorethylene) and ceramics (ceramic oxide, carbon, calcium-phosphate ceramic, vitreous ceramic). For restoration of the sound conductive apparatus preference is given to autogenous ossicles because cortical bone is resorbed and cartilage weakens over time. Most surgeons do not use allogenous tissue, because of the possible transmission of such infectious disease as immunodeficiency syndrome or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Only dentin deserves special attention as a possible bone substitute in the middle ear because its form can be preserved during sterilization. Based on the observations available to date, it becomes apparent that titanium implants hold greater promise than gold. Form-stable synthetic materials are not generally recommended due to foreign body reactions which have been confirmed by many investigators. Ceramic materials (e.g. ceramic oxide, carbon, calcium-phosphate ceramic, glass ceramic) are well tolerated in the middle ear and have also proved to be useful over time. Hybrid bone substitute ionomer cement is easily workable and well integrated, showing a good functional outcome. For many years good results in otosclerosis surgery have been achieved with a prosthesis made of

  2. Role of hepatocyte S6K1 in palmitic acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, lipotoxicity, insulin resistance and in oleic acid-induced protection.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Virginia; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Muntané, Jordi; Kozma, Sara C; Valverde, Ángela M

    2015-06-01

    The excess of saturated free fatty acids, such as palmitic acid, that induces lipotoxicity in hepatocytes, has been implicated in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease also associated with insulin resistance. By contrast, oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, attenuates the effects of palmitic acid. We evaluated whether palmitic acid is directly associated with both insulin resistance and lipoapoptosis in mouse and human hepatocytes and the impact of oleic acid in the molecular mechanisms that mediate both processes. In human and mouse hepatocytes palmitic acid at a lipotoxic concentration triggered early activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related kinases, induced the apoptotic transcription factor CHOP, activated caspase 3 and increased the percentage of apoptotic cells. These effects concurred with decreased IR/IRS1/Akt insulin pathway. Oleic acid suppressed the toxic effects of palmitic acid on ER stress activation, lipoapoptosis and insulin resistance. Besides, oleic acid suppressed palmitic acid-induced activation of S6K1. This protection was mimicked by pharmacological or genetic inhibition of S6K1 in hepatocytes. In conclusion, this is the first study highlighting the activation of S6K1 by palmitic acid as a common and novel mechanism by which its inhibition by oleic acid prevents ER stress, lipoapoptosis and insulin resistance in hepatocytes.

  3. Functional evaluation of iodoacetic acid induced photoreceptor degeneration in the cat.

    PubMed

    Nan, Yan; Zhang, Qin; Ren, Chaoran; Huang, Xin; Gao, Jie; Li, Xiaoxin; Pu, Mingliang

    2013-06-01

    Iodoacetic acid (IAA) has been applied to different species to acutely induce photoreceptor degeneration. The purpose of the present study was to use this toxin to thoroughly eliminate photoreceptors and induce complete blindness in the cat. IAA was delivered by single ear vein injection (20 mg kg(-1)). Six months after the IAA treatment, functional evaluations including pupillary light reflex (PLR), electroretinogram (ERG), visual behavior tests were performed. Morphological examinations were carried out after the functional evaluation. The present result shows that, six months after the IAA application, animals lost visual functions and became completely blind. High dose IAA application via ear vein delivery created an acute and reliable complete photoreceptor degeneration model in the cat. This model can be applied to genetic and cellular therapies for visual function restoration. PMID:23657794

  4. Obestatin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata; Konturek, Peter; Ambroży, Tadeusz; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Obestatin, a 23-amino acid peptide derived from the proghrelin, has been shown to exhibit some protective and therapeutic effects in the gut. The aim of present study was to determine the effect of obestatin administration on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Materials and Methods. Studies have been performed on male Wistar rats. Colitis was induced by a rectal enema with 3.5% acetic acid solution. Obestatin was administered intraperitoneally twice a day at a dose of 8 nmol/kg, starting 24 h after the induction of colitis. Seven or 14 days after the induction of colitis, the healing rate of the colon was evaluated. Results. Treatment with obestatin after induction of colitis accelerated the healing of colonic wall damage and this effect was associated with a decrease in the colitis-evoked increase in mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase and content of interleukin-1β. Moreover, obestatin administration significantly reversed the colitis-evoked decrease in mucosal blood flow and DNA synthesis. Conclusion. Administration of exogenous obestatin exhibits therapeutic effects in the course of acetic acid-induced colitis and this effect is related, at least in part, to the obestatin-evoked anti-inflammatory effect, an improvement of local blood flow, and an increase in cell proliferation in colonic mucosa.

  5. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Gałązka, Krystyna; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Gil, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafał; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis. PMID:27598133

  6. Exogenous Ghrelin Accelerates the Healing of Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Matuszyk, Aleksandra; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Ceranowicz, Dagmara; Gałązka, Krystyna; Bonior, Joanna; Jaworek, Jolanta; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Gil, Krzysztof; Olszanecki, Rafał; Dembiński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that ghrelin reduces colonic inflammation induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid and dextran sodium sulfate. In the present study we determined the effect of treatment with ghrelin on the course of acetic acid-induced colitis in rats. Rectal administration of 3% acetic acid solution led to induction of colitis in all animals. Damage of the colonic wall was accompanied by an increase in mucosal concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well mucosal activity of myeloperoxidase. Moreover, induction of colitis led to a reduction in colonic blood flow and DNA synthesis. Administration of ghrelin after induction of colitis led to faster regeneration of the colonic wall and reduction in colonic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, and myeloperoxidase. In addition, treatment with ghrelin improved mucosal DNA synthesis and blood flow. Our study disclosed that ghrelin exhibits a strong anti-inflammatory and healing effect in acetic acid-induced colitis. Our current observation in association with previous findings that ghrelin exhibits curative effect in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis suggest that therapeutic effect of ghrelin in the colon is universal and independent of the primary cause of colitis. PMID:27598133

  7. Icariin, a major constituent from Epimedium brevicornum, attenuates ibotenic acid-induced excitotoxicity in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zong, Nan; Li, Fei; Deng, Yuanyuan; Shi, Jingshan; Jin, Feng; Gong, Qihai

    2016-10-15

    Excitotoxicity is one of the most extensively studied causes of neuronal death and plays an important role in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Icariin is a flavonoid component of a traditional Chinese medicine reported to possess a broad spectrum of pharmacological effects. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of icariin against learning and memory impairment induced by excitotoxicity. Here, we demonstrated that rats receiving intracerebroventricular injection of excitatory neurotoxin ibotenic acid exhibited impaired learning and memory. Oral administration of icariin at doses of 20 and 40mg/kg rescued behavioral performance and protected against neurotoxicity in rat hippocampus by suppressing ibotenic acid induced pro-apoptosis. Furthermore, Western blott of hippocampal specimens revealed that icariin up-regulated the expression of calbindin-D28k protein following ibotenic acid administration. Additionally, icariin inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family phosphorylation and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling, implicating the MAPK signaling and NF-κB signaling pathways were involved in the mechanism underlying icariin-mediated neuroprotection against ibotenic acid-induced excitotoxicity. These data suggested that icariin could be a potential agent for treatment of excitotoxicity-related diseases, including AD. PMID:27368415

  8. Nucleic acid-induced antiviral immunity in invertebrates: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Hui; Weng, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Guo

    2015-02-01

    Nucleic acids derived from viral pathogens are typical pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). In mammals, the recognition of viral nucleic acids by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which include Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I-like receptors (RLRs), induces the release of inflammatory cytokines and type I interferons (IFNs) through the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 3/7 pathways, triggering the host antiviral state. However, whether nucleic acids can induce similar antiviral immunity in invertebrates remains ambiguous. Several studies have reported that nucleic acid mimics, especially dsRNA mimic poly(I:C), can strongly induce non-specific antiviral immune responses in insects, shrimp, and oyster. This behavior shows multiple similarities to the hallmarks of mammalian IFN responses. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of nucleic acid-induced antiviral immunity in invertebrates. We also discuss the potential recognition and regulatory mechanisms that confer non-specific antiviral immunity on invertebrate hosts.

  9. Protective Effect of Ocimum basilicum Essential Oil Against Acetic Acid-Induced Colitis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Rashidian, Amir; Roohi, Parnia; Mehrzadi, Saeed; Ghannadi, Ali Reza; Minaiyan, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    Ocimum basilicum L has been traditionally used for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in Iran. This study investigates the ameliorative effect of Ocimum basilicum essential oil on an acetic acid-induced colitis model in rats. Ocimum basilicum essential oil with 2 doses (200 and 400 μL/kg) significantly ameliorated wet weight/length ratio of colonic tissue compared to the control group. Higher doses of essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg) significantly reduced ulcer severity, ulcer area, and ulcer index. On the other hand, histological examination revealed the diminution of total colitis index as a marker for inflammatory cell infiltration in the colonic segments of rats treated with Ocimum basilicum essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg). The increased level of myeloperoxidase was significantly decreased after the treatment with the essential oil (200 and 400 μL/kg). These results suggest that Ocimum basilicum exhibits protective effect against acetic acid-induced colitis. PMID:26620574

  10. Comparative neuroprotective profile of statins in quinolinic acid induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Puneet; Kumar, Anil

    2011-01-01

    A possible neuroprotective role has been recently suggested for 3H3MGCoA reductase inhibitors (statins). Here, we sought to determine neuroprotective effect of statins in quinolinic acid induced neurotoxicity in rats. Rats were surgically administered quinolinic acid and treated with Atorvastatin (10, 20 mg/kg), simvastatin (15, 30 mg/kg) and fluvastatin (5, 10 mg/kg) once daily up to 3 weeks. Atorvastatin (10, 20 mg/kg), simvastatin (30 mg/kg) and fluvastatin (10 mg/kg) treatment significantly attenuated the quinolinic acid induced behavioral (locomotor activity, rotarod performance and beam walk test), biochemical (lipid peroxidation, nitrite concentration, SOD and catalase), mitochondrial enzyme complex alterations in rats suggesting their free radical scavenging potential. Additionally, atorvastatin (10, 20 mg/kg), simvastatin (30 mg/kg) and fluvastatin (10 mg/kg) significantly decrease the TNF-α level and striatal lesion volume in quinolinic acid treated animals indicating their anti-inflammatory effects. In comparing the protective effect of different statins, atorvastatin is effective at both the doses while simvastatin and fluvastatins at respective lower doses were not able to produce the protective effect in quinolinic acid treated animals. These modulations can account, at least partly, for the beneficial effect of statins in our rodent model of striatal degeneration. Our findings show that statins could be explored as possible neuroprotective agents for neurodegenerative disorders such as HD. PMID:20696189

  11. Icariin, a major constituent from Epimedium brevicornum, attenuates ibotenic acid-induced excitotoxicity in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zong, Nan; Li, Fei; Deng, Yuanyuan; Shi, Jingshan; Jin, Feng; Gong, Qihai

    2016-10-15

    Excitotoxicity is one of the most extensively studied causes of neuronal death and plays an important role in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Icariin is a flavonoid component of a traditional Chinese medicine reported to possess a broad spectrum of pharmacological effects. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of icariin against learning and memory impairment induced by excitotoxicity. Here, we demonstrated that rats receiving intracerebroventricular injection of excitatory neurotoxin ibotenic acid exhibited impaired learning and memory. Oral administration of icariin at doses of 20 and 40mg/kg rescued behavioral performance and protected against neurotoxicity in rat hippocampus by suppressing ibotenic acid induced pro-apoptosis. Furthermore, Western blott of hippocampal specimens revealed that icariin up-regulated the expression of calbindin-D28k protein following ibotenic acid administration. Additionally, icariin inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family phosphorylation and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling, implicating the MAPK signaling and NF-κB signaling pathways were involved in the mechanism underlying icariin-mediated neuroprotection against ibotenic acid-induced excitotoxicity. These data suggested that icariin could be a potential agent for treatment of excitotoxicity-related diseases, including AD.

  12. Salicylic acid induces mitochondrial injury by inhibiting ferrochelatase heme biosynthesis activity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vipul; Liu, Shujie; Ando, Hideki; Ishii, Ryohei; Tateno, Shumpei; Kaneko, Yuki; Yugami, Masato; Sakamoto, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Nureki, Osamu; Handa, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Salicylic acid is a classic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Although salicylic acid also induces mitochondrial injury, the mechanism of its antimitochondrial activity is not well understood. In this study, by using a one-step affinity purification scheme with salicylic acid-immobilized beads, ferrochelatase (FECH), a homodimeric enzyme involved in heme biosynthesis in mitochondria, was identified as a new molecular target of salicylic acid. Moreover, the cocrystal structure of the FECH-salicylic acid complex was determined. Structural and biochemical studies showed that salicylic acid binds to the dimer interface of FECH in two possible orientations and inhibits its enzymatic activity. Mutational analysis confirmed that Trp301 and Leu311, hydrophobic amino acid residues located at the dimer interface, are directly involved in salicylic acid binding. On a gel filtration column, salicylic acid caused a shift in the elution profile of FECH, indicating that its conformational change is induced by salicylic acid binding. In cultured human cells, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis, whereas salicylic acid did not exert its inhibitory effect in FECH knockdown cells. Concordantly, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis in zebrafish embryos. Strikingly, the salicylic acid-induced effect in zebrafish was partially rescued by FECH overexpression. Taken together, these findings illustrate that FECH is responsible for salicylic acid-induced inhibition of heme synthesis, which may contribute to its antimitochondrial and anti-inflammatory function. This study establishes a novel aspect of the complex pharmacological effects of salicylic acid.

  13. Effects of ear-canal pressurization on middle-ear bone- and air-conduction responses

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Kenji; Shimizu, Yoshitaka; Kim, Namkeun; Du, Yu; Puria, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    In extremely loud noise environments, it is important to not only protect one’s hearing against noise transmitted through the air-conduction (AC) pathway, but also through the bone-conduction (BC) pathways. Much of the energy transmitted through the BC pathways is concentrated in the mid-frequency range around 1.5–2 kHz, which is likely due to the structural resonance of the middle ear. One potential approach for mitigating this mid-frequency BC noise transmission is to introduce a positive or negative static pressure in the ear canal, which is known to reduce BC as well as AC hearing sensitivity. In the present study, middle-ear ossicular velocities at the umbo and stapes were measured using human cadaver temporal bones in response to both BC and AC excitations, while static air pressures of ±400 mm H2O were applied in the ear canal. For the maximum negative pressure of −400 mm H2O, mean BC stapes-velocity reductions of about 5–8 dB were observed in the frequency range from 0.8 to 2.5 kHz, with a peak reduction of 8.6(± 4.7) dB at 1.6 kHz. Finite-element analysis indicates that the peak BC-response reduction tends to be in the mid-frequency range because the middle-ear BC resonance, which is typically around 1.5–2 kHz, is suppressed by the pressure-induced stiffening of the middle-ear structure. The measured data also show that the BC responses are reduced more for negative static pressures than for positive static pressures. This may be attributable to a difference in the distribution of the stiffening among the middle-ear components depending on the polarity of the static pressure. The characteristics of the BC-response reductions are found to be largely consistent with the available psychoacoustic data, and are therefore indicative of the relative importance of the middle-ear mechanism in BC hearing. PMID:19944139

  14. Ear Cubes for local controlled drug delivery to the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Gehrke, M; Sircoglou, J; Gnansia, D; Tourrel, G; Willart, J-F; Danede, F; Lacante, E; Vincent, C; Siepmann, F; Siepmann, J

    2016-07-25

    A new type of advanced drug delivery systems is proposed: Miniaturized implants, which can be placed into tiny holes drilled into (or close to) the oval window. They consist of two parts: 1) A cylinder, which is inserted into the hole crossing the oval window. The cylinder (being longer than the depth of the hole) is partly located within the inner ear and surrounded by perilymph. This provides direct access to the target site, and at the same time assures implant fixation. 2) A cuboid, which is located in the middle ear, serving as a drug reservoir. One side of the cuboid is in direct contact with the oval window. Drug release into the cochlea occurs by diffusion through the cylindrical part of the Ear Cubes and by diffusion from the cuboid into and through the oval window. High precision molds were used to prepare two differently sized Ear Cubes by injection molding. The miniaturized implants were based on silicone and loaded with different amounts of dexamethasone (10 to 30 % w/w). The systems were thoroughly characterized before and upon exposure to artificial perilymph at 37°C. Importantly, drug release can effectively be controlled and sustained during long time periods (up to several years). Furthermore, the implants did not swell or erode to a noteworthy extent during the observation period. Drug diffusion through the polymeric matrix, together with limited dexamethasone solubility effects, seem to control the resulting drug release kinetics, which can roughly be estimated using mathematical equations derived from Fick's second law. Importantly, the proposed Ear Cubes are likely to provide much more reliable local long term drug delivery to the inner ear compared to liquid or semi-solid dosage forms administered into the middle ear, due to a more secured fixation. Furthermore, they require less invasive surgeries and can accommodate higher drug amounts compared to intracochlear implants. Thus, they offer the potential to open up new horizons for innovative

  15. Chinchilla middle-ear admittance and sound power: high-frequency estimates and effects of inner-ear modifications.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, Michael E; Rosowski, John J

    2012-10-01

    The middle-ear input admittance relates sound power into the middle ear (ME) and sound pressure at the tympanic membrane (TM). ME input admittance was measured in the chinchilla ear canal as part of a larger study of sound power transmission through the ME into the inner ear. The middle ear was open, and the inner ear was intact or modified with small sensors inserted into the vestibule near the cochlear base. A simple model of the chinchilla ear canal, based on ear canal sound pressure measurements at two points along the canal and an assumption of plane-wave propagation, enables reliable estimates of Y(TM,) the ME input admittance at the TM, from the admittance measured relatively far from the TM. Y(TM) appears valid at frequencies as high as 17 kHz, a much higher frequency than previously reported. The real part of Y(TM) decreases with frequency above 2 kHz. Effects of the inner-ear sensors (necessary for inner ear power computation) were small and generally limited to frequencies below 3 kHz. Computed power reflectance was ~0.1 below 3.5 kHz, lower than with an intact ME below 2.5 kHz, and nearly 1 above 16 kHz.

  16. Arachidonic acid supply and metabolism in human infants born at full term.

    PubMed

    Koletzko, B; Decsi, T; Demmelmair, H

    1996-01-01

    Infants need arachidonic acid (AA; C20:4n-6) for eicosanoid synthesis and deposition in growing tissues, including brain. Human milk supplies preformed AA in amounts considered to meet accretion in membrane-rich tissues, but vegetable oil-based infant formulas do not contain AA. We studied two groups of ten healthy infants, each fed human milk or formula, and analyzed plasma lipid composition. Percentage contributions of AA to plasma phospholipids were stable over two months after birth in breast-fed infants, but infants fed formula developed significantly (P < 0.05) lower levels at the ages of two weeks (formula 6.9% vs. breast 9.4%, w/w), one month (6.2 vs. 9.1%), and two months (5.7 vs. 8.4%). In a second trial, we randomized infants to receive (from birth to age four months) formula without or with both AA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6n-3) at levels typical for mature human milk. Infants fed conventional formula showed a continuous decrease of phospholipid AA over time, whereas feeding of formula supplemented with AA and DHA led to significantly higher AA levels, similar to those in breast-fed infants (two months: supplemented 9.6% vs. unsupplemented 7.1%; four months: 8.7 vs. 6.6%). In order to estimate infantile capacity for endogenous synthesis of AA, we fed four term neonates with newly diagnosed phenylketonuria (mean age 18 d) a formula with all fat contributed by corn oil, which has a higher natural 13C-enrichment than European human milk or formula. Analysis of 13C-enrichment in plasma fatty acids over four days allowed us to estimate infantile AA synthesis. We found an increased 13C-value in plasma AA of all infants, which indicates that term neonates can synthesize AA. However, with a simplified isotope balance equation, we estimate that endogenous synthesis contributed only about 23% of total plasma arachidonic acid by day four. We conclude that full-term infants fed formula may require a dietary supply of some preformed AA if the biochemical

  17. Astrocyte arachidonate and palmitate uptake and metabolism is differentially modulated by dibutyryl-cAMP treatment.

    PubMed

    Seeger, D R; Murphy, C C; Murphy, E J

    2016-07-01

    Astrocytes play a vital role in brain lipid metabolism; however the impact of the phenotypic shift in astrocytes to a reactive state on arachidonic acid metabolism is unknown. Therefore, we determined the impact of dibutyryl-cAMP (dBcAMP) treatment on radiolabeled arachidonic acid ([1-(14)C]20:4n-6) and palmitic acid ([1-(14)C]16:0) uptake and metabolism in primary cultured murine cortical astrocytes. In dBcAMP treated astrocytes, total [1-(14)C]20:4n-6 uptake was increased 1.9-fold compared to control, while total [1-(14)C]16:0 uptake was unaffected. Gene expression of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases (Acsl), acyl-CoA hydrolase (Acot7), fatty acid binding protein(s) (Fabp) and alpha-synuclein (Snca) were determined using qRT-PCR. dBcAMP treatment increased expression of Acsl3 (4.8-fold) and Acsl4 (1.3-fold), which preferentially use [1-(14)C]20:4n-6 and are highly expressed in astrocytes, consistent with the increase in [1-(14)C]20:4n-6 uptake. However, expression of Fabp5 and Fabp7 were significantly reduced by 25% and 45%, respectively. Acot7 (20%) was also reduced, suggesting dBcAMP treatment favors acyl-CoA formation. dBcAMP treatment enhanced [1-(14)C]20:4n-6 (2.2-fold) and [1-(14)C]16:0 (1.6-fold) esterification into total phospholipids, but the greater esterification of [1-(14)C]20:4n-6 is consistent with the observed uptake through increased Acsl, but not Fabp expression. Although total [1-(14)C]16:0 uptake was not affected, there was a dramatic decrease in [1-(14)C]16:0 in the free fatty acid pool as esterification into the phospholipid pool was increased, which is consistent with the increase in Acsl3 and Acsl4 expression. In summary, our data demonstrates that dBcAMP treatment increases [1-(14)C]20:4n-6 uptake in astrocytes and this increase appears to be due to increased expression of Acsl3 and Acsl4 coupled with a reduction in Acot7 expression. PMID:27255639

  18. Auditory evoked responses from Ear-EEG recordings.

    PubMed

    Kidmose, P; Looney, D; Mandic, D P

    2012-01-01

    A method for brain monitoring based on measuring electroencephalographic (EEG) signals from electrodes placed in-the-ear (Ear-EEG) was recently proposed. The Ear-EEG recording methodology provides a non-invasive, discreet and unobtrusive way of measuring electrical brain signals and has great potential as an enabling method for brain monitoring in everyday life. This work aims at further establishing the Ear-EEG recording methodology by considering auditory evoked potentials, and by comparing Ear-EEG responses with conventional on-scalp recordings and with well established results from the literature. It is shown that both steady state and transient responses can be obtained from Ear-EEG, and that these responses have similar characteristics and quality compared to EEG obtained from conventional on-scalp recordings.

  19. Effect of Arachidonic Acid on the Rate of Oxygen Consumption in Isolated Cardiomyocytes from Intact Rats and Animals with Ischemic or Diabetic Injury to the Heart.

    PubMed

    Egorova, M V; Kutsykova, T V; Afanas'ev, S A; Popov, S V

    2015-12-01

    We studied the rate of oxygen consumption by isolated cardiomyocytes from intact rats and animals with experimental myocardial infarction or streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus. The measurements were performed in standard incubation medium under various conditions of oxygenation and after addition of arachidonic acid (20 μmol/liter). Under normoxic conditions, arachidonic acid improves respiration of cardiomyocytes from intact animals, but reduces this parameter in cells isolated from animals with pathologies. The intensity of O2 consumption by cardiomyocytes from intact rats and animals with pathologies was shown to decrease during hypoxia. Addition of arachidonic acid aggravated inhibition of respiration for cardiomyocytes from intact rats and specimens with myocardial infarction, but had no effect in diabetes mellitus. The effect of arachidonic acid on oxygen consumption rate is probably mediated by a nonspecific mechanism realized at the mitochondrial level.

  20. Chitosan-induced phospholipase A2 activation and arachidonic acid mobilization in P388D1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bianco, I D; Balsinde, J; Beltramo, D M; Castagna, L F; Landa, C A; Dennis, E A

    2000-01-28

    We have found that chitosan, a polysaccharide present in fungal cell walls, is able to activate macrophages for enhanced mobilization of arachidonic acid in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Studies aimed at identifying the intracellular effector(s) implicated in chitosan-induced arachidonate release revealed the involvement of the cytosolic Group IV phospholipase A2 (PLA2), as judged by the inhibitory effect of methyl arachidonoyl fluorophosphonate but not of bromoenol lactone. Interestingly, priming of the macrophages with lipopolysaccharide renders the cells more sensitive to a subsequent stimulation with chitosan, and this enhancement is totally blocked by the secretory PLA2 inhibitor 3-(3-acetamide)-1-benzyl-2-ethylindolyl-5-oxy-propanesulfonic acid (LY311727). Collectively, the results of this work establish chitosan as a novel macrophage-activating factor that elicits AA mobilization in P388D1 macrophages by a mechanism involving the participation of two distinct phospholipases A2. PMID:10682846

  1. Conservative management of inner ear barotrauma resulting from scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Parell, G J; Becker, G D

    1985-06-01

    Fourteen patients who experienced inner ear barotrauma (IEBT) while scuba diving were examined shortly after the episode and were followed up until symptoms resolved or stabilized. On the basis of these observations and a review of the literature, three types of IEBT are hypothesized that usually result from forceful autoinflation of the middle ear: (1) hemorrhage within the inner ear, (2) labyrinthine membrane tear, and (3) perilymph fistula through the round or oval window. Presenting symptoms, treatment regimens, and final results are detailed.

  2. Computed Tomography Staging of Middle Ear Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek Abdel; Ghonim, Mohamed Rashad; Ashraf, Bassem

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background To establish computed tomography (CT) staging of middle ear cholesteatoma and assess its impact on the selection of the surgical procedure. Material/Methods Prospective study was conducted on 61 consecutive patients (mean age 26.8 years) with middle ear cholesteatoma. CT scan of the temporal bone and surgery were performed in all patients. CT staging classified cholesteatoma according to its location in the tympanic cavity (T); extension into the mastoid (M); and associated complications (C). Cholesteatoma was staged as stage I (T1, T2), stage II (T3, M1, M2, C1), and stage III (C2). Results The overall sensitivity of CT staging of cholesteatoma compared to surgery was 88% with excellent agreement and correlation between CT findings and intra-operative findings (K=0.863, r=0.86, P=0.001). There was excellent agreement and correlation of CT staging with surgical findings for T location (K=0.811, r=0.89, P=0.001), good for M extension (K=0.734, r=0.88, P=0.001), and excellent for associated C complications (K=1.00, r=1.0, P=0.001). Atticotympanotomy was carried out in stage I (n=14), intact canal wall surgery was performed in stage II (n=38), and canal wall down surgery was done in stage III (n=5) and stage II (n=4). Conclusions We established CT staging of middle ear cholesteatoma that helps surgeons to select an appropriate surgery. PMID:26171086

  3. Systemic elevations of free radical oxidation products of arachidonic acid are associated with angiographic evidence of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Shishehbor, Mehdi H; Zhang, Renliang; Medina, Hector; Brennan, Marie-Luise; Brennan, Danielle M; Ellis, Stephen G; Topol, Eric J; Hazen, Stanley L

    2006-12-01

    Oxidant stress is widely believed to participate in cardiovascular disease pathogenesis. However, progress in defining appropriate systemic antioxidant targeted therapies has been hindered by uncertainty in defining clinically relevant systemic oxidant stress measures. In a case control study, 50 subjects with CAD (>50% stenosis in one or more major coronary vessels) and 54 without CAD (<30% stenosis in all major coronary vessels) were tested. Plasma was isolated and stored under conditions designed to prevent artificial lipid peroxidation. Systemic levels of multiple (n=9) specific fatty acid oxidation products including individual hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids (HODEs), hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), and F(2)-isoprostanes were simultaneously measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with on-line tandem mass spectrometry, along with traditional risk factors and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Of the markers monitored, only 9-HETE and F(2)-isoprostanes, both products of free radical-mediated arachidonic acid oxidation, were significantly elevated in patients with angiographically defined CAD (9-HETE, 8.7 +/- 4 vs 6.8 +/- 4 micromol/mol arachidonate, P = 0.011; and F(2)-isoprostanes, 9.4 +/- 5 vs 6.2 +/- 3 micromol/mol arachidonate, P < 0.001). In multivariable analyses with simultaneous adjustment for Framingham risk score and C-reactive protein, 9-HETE (4th quartile OR = 4.8, 95% CI=1.3 to 17.1; P = 0.016) and F(2)-isoprostanes (4th quartile OR=9.7, 95% CI=2.56 to 36.9; P < 0.001) remained strong and independent predictors of CAD risk. Systemic levels of 9-HETE and F(2)-isoprostanes are independently associated with angiographic evidence of CAD and appear superior to other specific oxidation products of arachidonic and linoleic acids as predictors of the presence of angiographically evident coronary artery disease.

  4. EARS, MARS combined radio observations - 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomezzoli, Giancarlo

    2014-02-01

    The Lyrid meteor shower was generated on 21-22 April 2014 by the passage of the Earth through the path of the debris of the comet C/1861 G1 (Thatcher). The Camelopardalids meteor shower was generated on 23-24 May 2014 by the passage of the Earth through the path of the debris of the comet 209P/Linear. The EurAstro Radio Station (EARS) and the Malta Astro Radio Station (MARS) were operated in parallel for two combined radio observation campaigns. The campaigns revealed that further combined radio observation campaigns are necessary to solve the problem of estimating the number of lost radio meteor echoes.

  5. Historical development of active middle ear implants.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Matthew L; Pelosi, Stanley; Haynes, David S

    2014-12-01

    Active middle ear implants (AMEIs) are sophisticated technologies designed to overcome many of the shortcomings of conventional hearing aids, including feedback, distortion, and occlusion effect. Three AMEIs are currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for implantation in patients with sensorineural hearing loss. In this article, the history of AMEI technologies is reviewed, individual component development is outlined, past and current implant systems are described, and design and implementation successes and dead ends are highlighted. Past and ongoing challenges facing AMEI development are reviewed.

  6. Incorporating anthropometry into design of ear-related products.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bor-Shong

    2008-01-01

    To achieve mass customization and collaborative product design, human factors and ergonomics should play a key development role. The purpose of this study was to provide product designers with the anthropometic dimensions of outer ears for different demographic data, including gender and age. The second purpose was to compare the dimensions of various ear-related products (i.e., earphone, bluetooth earphone and ear-cup earphone) with the anthropometic database and recommend appropriate solutions for design. Two hundred subjects aged 20-59 was selected for this study and divided into four age stratifications. Further, three different dimensions of the outer ear (i.e., the earhole length, the ear connection length and the length of the pinna) were measured by superimposed grid photographic technique. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to investigate the effects of gender, and age on ear dimensions. The results showed that all ear dimensions had significant gender effects. A comparison between the anthropometric dimensions and those of current products revealed that most current ear-related products need to be redesigned using anthropometric data. The shapes of earhole and pinna are not circular. Consequently, ear products need to be elongated so that users may feel more comfortably and not have the product slip off easily.

  7. 3D ear identification based on sparse representation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Ding, Zhixuan; Li, Hongyu; Shen, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Biometrics based personal authentication is an effective way for automatically recognizing, with a high confidence, a person's identity. Recently, 3D ear shape has attracted tremendous interests in research field due to its richness of feature and ease of acquisition. However, the existing ICP (Iterative Closet Point)-based 3D ear matching methods prevalent in the literature are not quite efficient to cope with the one-to-many identification case. In this paper, we aim to fill this gap by proposing a novel effective fully automatic 3D ear identification system. We at first propose an accurate and efficient template-based ear detection method. By utilizing such a method, the extracted ear regions are represented in a common canonical coordinate system determined by the ear contour template, which facilitates much the following stages of feature extraction and classification. For each extracted 3D ear, a feature vector is generated as its representation by making use of a PCA-based local feature descriptor. At the stage of classification, we resort to the sparse representation based classification approach, which actually solves an l1-minimization problem. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work introducing the sparse representation framework into the field of 3D ear identification. Extensive experiments conducted on a benchmark dataset corroborate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed approach. The associated Matlab source code and the evaluation results have been made publicly online available at http://sse.tongji.edu.cn/linzhang/ear/srcear/srcear.htm.

  8. A case report of meningioma extending to the middle ear

    PubMed Central

    Kusunoki, Takeshi; Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Miyashita, Mie

    2012-01-01

    Extracranial meningioma with extension into a middle ear is very uncommon. A 74-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with right ear bleeding when removing earwax. In this case, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, her past history and operative findings would consider as infiltrative growth from the right sphenoid ridge meningioma to the right middle ear via the right petrous pyramid and bilateral optic nerve. She underwent only partial extirpation with decompression for optic nerve, rather than total extirpation including middle ear and temporal bone, due to wide invasion of the middle cranial fossa and caversinus sinus. PMID:24765466

  9. Neuroendocrine Adenoma of the Middle Ear: A Rare Histopathological Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    McGinness, Sam; Coleman, Hedley; Varikatt, Winny; da Cruz, Melville

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours occur throughout the body but are rare in the head and neck region and particularly rare in the middle ear. Clinical findings are often nonspecific and therefore pose a diagnostic challenge. Furthermore, the nomenclature of neuroendocrine tumours of the middle ear is historically controversial. Herein a case is presented of a middle ear adenoma in a 33-year-old patient who presented with otalgia, hearing loss, and facial nerve palsy. A brief discussion is included regarding the histopathological features of middle ear adenomas and seeks to clarify the correct nomenclature for these tumours. PMID:27429819

  10. Bovine chromosomal regions affecting rheological traits in acid-induced skim milk gels.

    PubMed

    Glantz, M; Gustavsson, F; Bertelsen, H P; Stålhammar, H; Lindmark-Månsson, H; Paulsson, M; Bendixen, C; Gregersen, V R

    2015-02-01

    The production of fermented milk products has increased worldwide during the last decade and is expected to continue to increase during the coming decade. The quality of these products may be optimized through breeding practices; however, the relations between cow genetics and technological properties of acid milk gels are not fully known. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify chromosomal regions affecting acid-induced coagulation properties and possible candidate genes. Skim milk samples from 377 Swedish Red cows were rheologically analyzed for acid-induced coagulation properties using low-amplitude oscillation measurements. The resulting traits, including gel strength, coagulation time, and yield stress, were used to conduct a genome-wide association study. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were identified using the BovineHD SNPChip (Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA), resulting in almost 621,000 segregating markers. The genome was scanned for putative quantitative trait loci (QTL) regions, haplotypes based on highly associated SNP were inferred, and the additive genetic effects of haplotypes within each QTL region were analyzed using mixed models. A total of 8 genomic regions were identified, with large effects of the significant haplotype explaining between 4.8 and 9.8% of the phenotypic variance of the studied traits. One major QTL was identified to overlap between gel strength and yield stress, the QTL identified with the most significant SNP closest to the gene coding for κ-casein (CSN3). In addition, a chromosome-wide significant region affecting yield stress on BTA 11 was identified to be colocated with PAEP, coding for β-lactoglobulin. Furthermore, the coagulation properties of the genetic variants within the 2 genes were compared with the coagulation properties identified by the patterns of the haplotypes within the regions, and it was discovered that the haplotypes were more diverse and in one case slightly better at explaining the

  11. Morphometric study of the external and middle ear anatomy in sheep: a possible model for ear experiments.

    PubMed

    Seibel, Valter Alberto Ayres; Lavinsky, Luiz; De Oliveira, José Alfredo Preto

    2006-09-01

    Sheep are a potentially useful model for otologic surgical training and experimentation, currently limited by the scarcity of morphological comparisons between the structure of the ear in sheep and in humans. A detailed morphometric study of the ear in sheep was carried out using computed tomography. Measurements made with AutoCAD Release 14 were compared with measurements for the human ear reported in the literature. In general, ear structures in sheep are two-thirds the size of those in humans. The important anatomical similarities found in this study between the ear in sheep and in humans suggest that sheep may be a useful model for surgical training and experimentation in some middle ear procedures. PMID:16287111

  12. The effects of xanthoangelol E on arachidonic acid metabolism in the gastric antral mucosa and platelet of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Fujita, T; Sakuma, S; Sumiya, T; Nishida, H; Fujimoto, Y; Baba, K; Kozawa, M

    1992-08-01

    The effects of a new chalcone derivative, xanthoangelol E, isolated from Angelica keiskei Koidzumi, on arachidonic acid metabolism in the gastric antral mucosa and platelet of the rabbit were examined. When gastric antral mucosal slices were incubated with xanthoangelol E (0.05-1.0 mM), there was no significant effect on the production of prostaglandin (PG) E2, PGF2 alpha and their metabolites. On the other hand, this compound inhibited effectively the production of thromboxane B2 and 12-hydroxy-5,8,10-heptadecatrienoic acid from exogenous arachidonic acid in platelets, and the concentration required for 50% inhibition (IC50) was approximately 5 microM. The formation of 12-hydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic acid was also reduced by this drug (IC50, 50 microM). These results suggest that xanthoangelol E has the potential to modulate arachidonic acid metabolism in platelets and that this action may participate in some pharmacological effect of the plant.

  13. The biosynthesis of N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA), a putative endocannabinoid and endovanilloid, via conjugation of arachidonic acid with dopamine.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sherry Shu-Jung; Bradshaw, Heather B; Benton, Valery M; Chen, Jay Shih-Chieh; Huang, Susan M; Minassi, Alberto; Bisogno, Tiziana; Masuda, Kim; Tan, Bo; Roskoski, Robert; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Walker, J Michael

    2009-10-01

    N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA) is an endogenous ligand that activates the cannabinoid type 1 receptor and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 channel. Two potential biosynthetic pathways for NADA have been proposed, though no conclusive evidence exists for either. The first is the direct conjugation of arachidonic acid with dopamine and the other is via metabolism of a putative N-arachidonoyl tyrosine (NA-tyrosine). In the present study we investigated these biosynthetic mechanisms and report that NADA synthesis requires TH in dopaminergic terminals; however, NA-tyrosine, which we identify here as an endogenous lipid, is not an intermediate. We show that NADA biosynthesis primarily occurs through an enzyme-mediated conjugation of arachidonic acid with dopamine. While this conjugation likely involves a complex of enzymes, our data suggest a direct involvement of fatty acid amide hydrolase in NADA biosynthesis either as a rate-limiting enzyme that liberates arachidonic acid from AEA, or as a conjugation enzyme, or both.

  14. Arachidonic Acid Enhances Reproduction in Daphnia magna and Mitigates Changes in Sex Ratios Induced by Pyriproxyfen

    PubMed Central

    Ginjupalli, Gautam K.; Gerard, Patrick D.; Baldwin, William S.

    2016-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is one of only two unsaturated fatty acids retained in the ovaries of crustaceans, and an inhibitor of HR97g, a nuclear receptor expressed in adult ovaries. We hypothesized that as a key fatty acid, AA may be associated with reproduction and potentially environmental sex determination in Daphnia. Reproduction assays with AA indicate that it alters female/male sex ratios by increasing female production. This reproductive effect only occurred during a restricted P. subcapitata diet. Next, we tested whether enriching a poorer algal diet (C. vulgaris) with AA enhances overall reproduction and sex ratios. AA enrichment of a C. vulgaris diet also enhances fecundity at 1.0 and 4.0μM by 30–40% in the presence and absence of pyriproxyfen. This indicates that AA is crucial in reproduction regardless of environmental sex determination. Furthermore, our data indicates that P. subcapitata may provide a threshold concentration of AA needed for reproduction. Diet switch experiments from P. subcapitata to C. vulgaris mitigate some but not all of AA’s effects when compared to a C. vulgaris only diet, suggesting that some AA provided by P. subcapitata is retained. In summary, AA supplementation increases reproduction and represses pyriproxyfen-induced environmental sex determination in D. magna in restricted diets. A diet rich in AA may provide protection from some reproductive toxicants such as the juvenile hormone agonist, pyriproxyfen. PMID:25393616

  15. Arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) gene polymorphism is associated with Alzheimer's disease and body mass index.

    PubMed

    Šerý, Omar; Hlinecká, Lýdia; Povová, Jana; Bonczek, Ondřej; Zeman, Tomáš; Janout, Vladimír; Ambroz, Petr; Khan, Naim A; Balcar, Vladimir J

    2016-03-15

    Dementias of old age, in particular Alzheimer's disease (AD), pose a growing threat to the longevity and quality of life of individuals as well as whole societies world-wide. The risk factors are both genetic and environmental (life-style) and there is an overlap with similar factors predisposing to cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Using a case-control genetic approach, we have identified a SNP (rs10507391) in ALOX5 gene, previously associated with an increased risk of stroke, as a novel genetic risk factor for AD. ALOX5 gene encodes a 5'-lipoxygenase (5'-LO) activating protein (FLAP), a crucial component of the arachidonic acid/leukotriene inflammatory cascade. A-allele of rs4769874 polymorphism increases the risk of AD 1.41-fold (p<0.0001), while AA genotype does so 1.79-fold (p<0.0001). In addition, GG genotype of rs4769874 polymorphism is associated with a modest increase in body mass index (BMI). We discuss potential biochemical mechanisms linking the SNP to AD and suggest possible preventive pharmacotherapies some of which are based on commonly available natural products. Finally, we set the newly identified AD risk factors into a broader context of similar CVD risk factors to generate a more comprehensive picture of interacting genetics and life-style habits potentially leading to the deteriorating mental health in the old age. PMID:26944113

  16. Effect of heavy metal ions on neutrophil arachidonic acid metabolism and chemotaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.M.; Turner, S.R.; Johnson, J.A.; Turner, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    Heavy metal ions can inhibit arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism, protect against ionophore cytotoxicity (ibid) and inhibit neutrophil chemotaxis. In this study they used Au/sup +3/, Zn/sup +2/, Cr/sup +3/, Mn/sup +2/, and Cu/sup +2/ as probes of the interrelationships among AA metabolism, ionophore-mediated cytotoxicity, and chemotaxis. Phospholipid deacylation was measured in ionophore-treated cells prelabeled with /sup 3/H-AA. Eicosanoid release from ionophore-treated cells was monitored both qualitatively by thin-layer chromatography of /sup 3/H-AA metabolities and quantitatively by radioimmunoassay. Cytoprotection was quantitated as ability to exclude trypan blue. Chemotaxis toward f-Met-Leu-Phe was measured by leading front analysis. The results imply that metal ions attenuate ionophore cytotoxicity by blocking phospholipid deacylation and eicosanoid production. In contrast to previous reports, the data obtained using Au/sup +3/ and Cu/sup +2/ demonstrates no correlation between AA metabolism and chemotaxis, suggesting that these 2 processes are not linked.

  17. Metabolic fate of arachidonic acid in hepatocytes of continuously endotoxemic rats.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez de Turco, E B; Spitzer, J A

    1988-01-01

    The present experiments were designed to characterize the kinetics of [1-14C]arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism as a function of time in hepatocytes obtained from rats infused continuously for 30 h with a nonlethal dose of Escherichia coli endotoxin (ET). Chronic endotoxemia greatly reduces the ability of hepatocytes to utilize [1-14C]AA, which is reflected from the earliest times of incubation in very low labeling of intermediates in the biosynthetic pathways of glycerolipids (phosphatidic acid and diacylglycerol) and slower removal of [1-14C]AA from the free fatty acid pool as compared with saline-infused rats. At later times of incubation, the labeling of phospholipids (especially phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol [PI]), but not of triacylglycerides is decreased. Analysis of fatty acid composition of individual phospholipids from cells of ET-infused rats reveals that the content of AA is significantly reduced only in PI. Hence an impairment in activation/acylation enzymatic mechanisms could affect the turnover of metabolically active phospholipid pools, i.e., PI, involved in signal transmission processes, and result in increased availability of 20:4 for eicosanoid synthesis, contributing to cellular metabolic perturbations in endotoxicosis. PMID:3125225

  18. Systematic Analysis Reveals that Cancer Mutations Converge on Deregulated Metabolism of Arachidonate and Xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Francesco; Schulze, Almut; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-07-19

    Mutations are the basis of the clonal evolution of most cancers. Nevertheless, a systematic analysis of whether mutations are selected in cancer because they lead to the deregulation of specific biological processes independent of the type of cancer is still lacking. In this study, we correlated the genome and transcriptome of 1,082 tumors. We found that nine commonly mutated genes correlated with substantial changes in gene expression, which primarily converged on metabolism. Further network analyses circumscribed the convergence to a network of reactions, termed AraX, that involves the glutathione- and oxygen-mediated metabolism of arachidonic acid and xenobiotics. In an independent cohort of 4,462 samples, all nine mutated genes were consistently correlated with the deregulation of AraX. Among all of the metabolic pathways, AraX deregulation represented the strongest predictor of patient survival. These findings suggest that oncogenic mutations drive a selection process that converges on the deregulation of the AraX network. PMID:27396332

  19. Arachidonic Acid Monooxygenase: Genetic and Biochemical Approaches to Physiological/Pathophysiological Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Capdevila, Jorge H.; Wang, Wenhui; Falck, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Studies with rat genetic models of hypertension pointed to roles for the CYP2C and CYP4A arachidonic acid epoxygenases and ω-hydroxylases in tubular transport, hemodynamics, and blood pressure control. Further progress in defining their physiological functions and significance to human hypertension requires conclusive identifications of the relevant genes and proteins. Here we discuss unequivocal evidence of roles for the murine Cyp4a14, Cyp4a10, and Cyp2c44 genes in the pathophysiology of hypertension by showing that: a) Cyp4a14(-/-) mice develop sexually dimorphic hypertension associated with renal vasoconstriction, and up-regulated expression of Cyp4a12a and pro-hypertensive 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) levels, and b) Cyp4a10(-/-) and Cyp2c44(-/-) mice develop salt sensitive hypertension linked to downregulation or lack of the Cyp2c44 epoxygenase, reductions in anti-hypertensive epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), and increases in distal sodium reabsorption. Based on these studies, the human CYP4A11 and CYPs 2C8 and 2C9 genes and their products are identified as potential candidates for studies of the molecular basis of human hypertension. PMID:25986599

  20. Relative incorporation of arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acids into human platelet phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, B.J.; Holub, B.J.

    1985-11-01

    The incorporation of arachidonic acid (AA) as compared to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) into human platelet phospholipids was tested by incubating washed platelets with a known mixture of (3H)AA and (14C)EPA. Following incubation, the platelet lipids were extracted, the individual phospholipids--phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)- were separated by thin layer chromatography, and their corresponding (3H)/(14C) ratios were determined. Based on a (3H)/(14C) ratio of unity for the substrate mixture, the PC, PS, PI and PE exhibited ratios of 0.55, 0.93, 1.12 and 0.74, respectively, which were significantly different from 1.00 in all instances except in the case of PS. These results indicate that PC and PE selectively incorporated EPA, while PI showed preference toward AA. These selectivities may account partly for the differing AA/EPA mass ratios that have been observed among the individual phospholipids of human subjects consuming fish oils.

  1. Prenatal arachidonic acid exposure and selected immune-related variables in childhood.

    PubMed

    Dirix, Chantal E H; Hogervorst, Janneke G F; Rump, Patrick; Hendriks, Johannes J E; Bruins, Maaike; Hornstra, Gerard

    2009-08-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is considered essential in fetal development and some of its metabolites are thought to be important mediators of the immune responses. Therefore, we studied whether prenatal exposure to AA is associated with some immune-related clinical conditions and plasma markers in childhood. In 280 children aged 7 years, atopy, lung function and plasma inflammation markers were measured and their relationships with early AA exposure were studied by linear and logistic regression analyses. AA exposure was deduced from AA concentrations in plasma phospholipids of the mothers collected at several time points during pregnancy and at delivery, and in umbilical cord plasma and arterial and venous wall phospholipids. In unadjusted regression analyses, significant positive associations were observed between maternal AA concentrations at 16 and 32 weeks of pregnancy (proxies for fetal AA exposure) and peak expiratory flow decline after maximal physical exercise and plasma fibrinogen concentrations of their children, respectively. However, after correction for relevant covariables, only trends remained. A significant negative relationship was observed between AA concentrations in cord plasma (reflecting prenatal AA exposure) and the average daily amplitude of peak expiratory flow at rest, which lost significance after appropriate adjustment. Because of these few, weak and inconsistent relationships, a major impact of early-life exposure to AA on atopy, lung function and selected plasma inflammation markers of children at 7 years of age seems unlikely.

  2. Prenatal arachidonic acid exposure and selected immune-related variables in childhood.

    PubMed

    Dirix, Chantal E H; Hogervorst, Janneke G F; Rump, Patrick; Hendriks, Johannes J E; Bruins, Maaike; Hornstra, Gerard

    2009-08-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is considered essential in fetal development and some of its metabolites are thought to be important mediators of the immune responses. Therefore, we studied whether prenatal exposure to AA is associated with some immune-related clinical conditions and plasma markers in childhood. In 280 children aged 7 years, atopy, lung function and plasma inflammation markers were measured and their relationships with early AA exposure were studied by linear and logistic regression analyses. AA exposure was deduced from AA concentrations in plasma phospholipids of the mothers collected at several time points during pregnancy and at delivery, and in umbilical cord plasma and arterial and venous wall phospholipids. In unadjusted regression analyses, significant positive associations were observed between maternal AA concentrations at 16 and 32 weeks of pregnancy (proxies for fetal AA exposure) and peak expiratory flow decline after maximal physical exercise and plasma fibrinogen concentrations of their children, respectively. However, after correction for relevant covariables, only trends remained. A significant negative relationship was observed between AA concentrations in cord plasma (reflecting prenatal AA exposure) and the average daily amplitude of peak expiratory flow at rest, which lost significance after appropriate adjustment. Because of these few, weak and inconsistent relationships, a major impact of early-life exposure to AA on atopy, lung function and selected plasma inflammation markers of children at 7 years of age seems unlikely. PMID:19173768

  3. Arachidonic Acid Randomizes Endothelial Cell Motion and Regulates Adhesion and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Rossen, Ninna Struck; Hansen, Anker Jon; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine; Oddershede, Lene Broeng

    2011-01-01

    Cell adhesion and migration are essential for the evolution, organization, and repair of living organisms. An example of a combination of these processes is the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis), which is mediated by a directed migration and adhesion of endothelial cells (ECs). Angiogenesis is an essential part of wound healing and a prerequisite of cancerous tumor growth. We investigated the effect of the amphiphilic compound arachidonic acid (AA) on EC adhesion and migration by combining live cell imaging with biophysical analysis methods. AA significantly influenced both EC adhesion and migration, in either a stimulating or inhibiting fashion depending on AA concentration. The temporal evolution of cell adhesion area was well described by a two-phase model. In the first phase, the spreading dynamics were independent of AA concentration. In the latter phase, the spreading dynamics increased at low AA concentrations and decreased at high AA concentrations. AA also affected EC migration; though the instantaneous speed of individual cells remained independent of AA concentration, the individual cells lost their sense of direction upon addition of AA, thus giving rise to an overall decrease in the collective motion of a confluent EC monolayer into vacant space. Addition of AA also caused ECs to become more elongated, this possibly being related to incorporation of AA in the EC membrane thus mediating a change in the viscosity of the membrane. Hence, AA is a promising non-receptor specific regulator of wound healing and angiogenesis. PMID:21966453

  4. Arachidonic acid impairs hypothalamic leptin signaling and hepatic energy homeostasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Licai; Yu, Yinghua; Zhang, Qingsheng; Szabo, Alexander; Wang, Hongqin; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2015-09-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that the consumption of a diet high in n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) is associated with the development of leptin resistance and obesity. We aim to examine the central effect of n-6 PUFA, arachidonic acid (ARA) on leptin sensitivity and leptin-regulated hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism. We found that intracerebroventricular injection of ARA (25 nmol/day) for 2.5 days reversed the effect of central leptin on hypothalamic JAK2, pSTAT3, pAkt, and pFOXO1 protein levels, which was concomitant with a pro-inflammatory response in the hypothalamus. ARA also attenuated the effect of central leptin on hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism by reversing the mRNA expression of the genes involved in gluconeogenesis (G6Pase, PEPCK), glucose transportation (GLUT2), lipogenesis (FAS, SCD1), and cholesterol synthesis (HMG-CoA reductase). These results indicate that an increased exposure to central n-6 PUFA induces central cellular leptin resistance with concomitant defective JAK2-STAT3 and PI3K-Akt signaling.

  5. Effects of Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers on Metabolism of Arachidonic Acid via CYP2C8.

    PubMed

    Senda, Asuna; Mukai, Yuji; Toda, Takaki; Hayakawa, Toru; Yamashita, Miki; Eliasson, Erik; Rane, Anders; Inotsume, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is metabolized to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) via cytochrome enzymes such as CYP 2C9, 2C8 and 2J2. EETs play a role in cardioprotection and regulation of blood pressure. Recently, adverse reactions such as sudden heart attack and fatal myocardial infarction were reported among patients taking angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs). As some ARBs have affinity for these CYP enzymes, metabolic inhibition of AA by ARBs is a possible cause for the increase in cardiovascular events. In this study, we quantitatively investigated the inhibitory effects of ARBs on the formation of EETs and further metabolites, dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs), from AA via CYP2C8. In incubations with recombinant CYP2C8 in vitro, the inhibitory effects were compared by measuring EETs and DHETs by HPLC-MS/MS. Inhibition of AA metabolism by ARBs was detected in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 values of losartan (42.7 µM), telmisartan (49.5 µM), irbesartan (55.6 µM), olmesartan (66.2 µM), candesartan (108 µM), and valsartan (279 µM). Losartan, telmisartan and irbesartan, which reportedly accumulate in the liver and kidneys, have stronger inhibitory effects than other ARBs. The lower concentration of EETs leads to less protective action on the cardiovascular system and a higher incidence of adverse effects such as sudden heart attack and myocardial infarction in patients taking ARBs. PMID:26632190

  6. Improving arachidonic acid fermentation by Mortierella alpina through multistage temperature and aeration rate control in bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Min-Jie; Wang, Cheng; Zheng, Zhi-Yong; Zhu, Li; Zhan, Xiao-Bei; Lin, Chi-Chung

    2016-05-18

    Effective production of arachidonic acid (ARA) using Mortierella alpina was conducted in a 30-L airlift bioreactor. Varying the aeration rate and temperature significantly influenced cell morphology, cell growth, and ARA production, while the optimal aeration rate and temperature for cell growth and product formation were quite different. As a result, a two-stage aeration rate control strategy was constructed based on monitoring of cell morphology and ARA production under various aeration rate control levels (0.6-1.8 vvm). Using this strategy, ARA yield reached 4.7 g/L, an increase of 38.2% compared with the control (constant aeration rate control at 1.0 vvm). Dynamic temperature-control strategy was implemented based on the fermentation performance at various temperatures (13-28°C), with ARA level in total cellular lipid increased by 37.1% comparing to a constant-temperature control (25°C). On that basis, the combinatorial fermentation strategy of two-stage aeration rate control and dynamic temperature control was applied and ARA production achieved the highest level of 5.8 g/L.

  7. Pharmacological manipulation of arachidonic acid-epoxygenase results in divergent effects on renal damage.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Stier, Charles T; Chander, Praveen N; Manthati, Vijay L; Falck, John R; Carroll, Mairéad A

    2014-01-01

    Kidney damage is markedly accelerated by high-salt (HS) intake in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are epoxygenase products of arachidonic acid which possess vasodepressor, natriuretic, and anti-inflammatory activities. We examined whether up-regulation (clofibrate) or inhibition [N-methylsulfonyl-6-(2-propargyloxyphenyl)hexanamide (MS-PPOH)] of epoxygenase would alter systolic blood pressure (SBP) and/or renal pathology in SHRSP on HS intake (1% NaCl drinking solution). Three weeks of treatment with clofibrate induced renal cortical protein expression of CYP2C23 and increased urinary excretion of EETs compared with vehicle-treated SHRSP. SBP and urinary protein excretion (UPE) were significantly lowered with clofibrate treatment. Kidneys from vehicle-treated SHRSP, which were on HS intake for 3 weeks, demonstrated focal lesions of vascular fibrinoid degeneration, which were markedly attenuated with clofibrate treatment. In contrast, 2 weeks of treatment with the selective epoxygenase inhibitor, MS-PPOH, increased UPE without significantly altering neither urinary EET levels nor SBP. Kidneys from vehicle-treated SHRSP, which were on HS intake for 11 days, demonstrated occasional mild damage whereas kidneys from MS-PPOH-treated rats exhibited widespread malignant nephrosclerosis. These results suggest that pharmacological manipulation of epoxygenase results in divergent effects on renal damage and that interventions to increase EET levels may provide therapeutic strategies for treating salt-sensitive hypertension and renal damage.

  8. Arachidonic acid mediates the formation of abundant alpha-helical multimers of alpha-synuclein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iljina, Marija; Tosatto, Laura; Choi, Minee L.; Sang, Jason C.; Ye, Yu; Hughes, Craig D.; Bryant, Clare E.; Gandhi, Sonia; Klenerman, David

    2016-09-01

    The protein alpha-synuclein (αS) self-assembles into toxic beta-sheet aggregates in Parkinson’s disease, while it is proposed that αS forms soluble alpha-helical multimers in healthy neurons. Here, we have made αS multimers in vitro using arachidonic acid (ARA), one of the most abundant fatty acids in the brain, and characterized them by a combination of bulk experiments and single-molecule Fӧrster resonance energy transfer (sm-FRET) measurements. The data suggest that ARA-induced oligomers are alpha-helical, resistant to fibril formation, more prone to disaggregation, enzymatic digestion and degradation by the 26S proteasome, and lead to lower neuronal damage and reduced activation of microglia compared to the oligomers formed in the absence of ARA. These multimers can be formed at physiologically-relevant concentrations, and pathological mutants of αS form less multimers than wild-type αS. Our work provides strong biophysical evidence for the formation of alpha-helical multimers of αS in the presence of a biologically relevant fatty acid, which may have a protective role with respect to the generation of beta-sheet toxic structures during αS fibrillation.

  9. Unraveling the Genetic Basis of Aspirin Hypersensitivity in Asthma Beyond Arachidonate Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se-Min; Park, Jong Sook; Park, Hae-Sim

    2013-01-01

    Although aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) has attracted a great deal of attention because of its association with severe asthma, it remains widely under-diagnosed in the asthmatic population. Oral aspirin challenge is the best method of diagnosing AERD, but this is a time-consuming procedure with serious complications in some cases. Thus, development of non-invasive methods for easy diagnosis is necessary to prevent unexpected complications of aspirin use in susceptible patients. For the past decade, many studies have attempted to elucidate the genetic variants responsible for risk of AERD. Several approaches have been applied in these genetic studies. To date, a limited number of biologically plausible candidate genes in the arachidonate and immune and inflammatory pathways have been studied. Recently, a genome-wide association study was performed. In this review, the results of these studies are summarized, and their limitations discussed. In addition to the genetic variants, changes in methylation patterns on CpG sites have recently been identified in a target tissue of aspirin hypersensitivity. Finally, perspectives on application of new genomic technologies are introduced; these will aid our understanding of the genetic pathogenesis of aspirin hypersensitivity in asthma. PMID:24003382

  10. Inhibition of arachidonic acid metabolism and its implication on cell proliferation and tumour-angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hyde, C A C; Missailidis, S

    2009-06-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) and its metabolites have recently generated a heightened interest due to growing evidence of their significant role in cancer biology. Thus, inhibitors of the AA cascade, first and foremost COX inhibitors, which have originally been of interest in the treatment of inflammatory conditions and certain types of cardiovascular disease, are now attracting attention as an arsenal against cancer. An increasing number of investigations support their role in cancer chemoprevention, although the precise molecular mechanisms that link levels of AA, and its metabolites, with cancer progression have still to be elucidated. This article provides an overview of the AA cascade and focuses on the roles of its inhibitors and their implication in cancer treatment. In particular, emphasis is placed on the inhibition of cell proliferation and neo-angiogenesis through inhibition of the enzymes COX-2, 5-LOX and CYP450. Downstream effects of inhibition of AA metabolites are analysed and the molecular mechanisms of action of a selected number of inhibitors of catalytic pathways reviewed. Lastly, the benefits of dietary omega-3 fatty acids and their mechanisms of action leading to reduced cancer risk and impeded cancer cell growth are mentioned. Finally, a proposal is put forward, suggesting a novel and integrated approach in viewing the molecular mechanisms and complex interactions responsible for the involvement of AA metabolites in carcinogenesis and the protective effects of omega-3 fatty acids in inflammation and tumour prevention. PMID:19239926

  11. Anti-inflammatory effects of chronic aspirin on brain arachidonic acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Basselin, Mireille; Ramadan, Epolia; Chen, Mei; Rapoport, Stanley I

    2011-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators derived from arachidonic acid (AA) modulate peripheral inflammation and its resolution. Aspirin (ASA) is a unique non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, which switches AA metabolism from prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) and thromboxane B₂ (TXB₂) to lipoxin A₄ (LXA₄) and 15-epi-LXA₄. However, it is unknown whether chronic therapeutic doses of ASA are anti-inflammatory in the brain. We hypothesized that ASA would dampen increases in brain concentrations of AA metabolites in a rat model of neuroinflammation, produced by a 6-day intracerebroventricular infusion of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In rats infused with LPS (0.5 ng/h) and given ASA-free water to drink, concentrations in high-energy microwaved brain of PGE₂, TXB₂ and leukotriene B₄ (LTB₄) were elevated. In rats infused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid, 6 weeks of treatment with a low (10 mg/kg/day) or high (100 mg/kg/day) ASA dose in drinking water decreased brain PGE₂, but increased LTB₄, LXA₄ and 15-epi-LXA₄ concentrations. Both doses attenuated the LPS effects on PGE₂, and TXB₂. The increments in LXA₄ and 15-epi-LXA₄ caused by high-dose ASA were significantly greater in LPS-infused rats. The ability of ASA to increase anti-inflammatory LXA₄ and 15-epi-LXA₄ and reduce pro-inflammatory PGE₂ and TXB₂ suggests considering aspirin further for treating clinical neuroinflammation. PMID:20981485

  12. What is the relationship between gestational age and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (ARA) levels?

    PubMed

    Baack, Michelle L; Puumala, Susan E; Messier, Stephen E; Pritchett, Deborah K; Harris, William S

    2015-09-01

    Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) including docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (ARA) are increasingly transferred from mother to fetus late in pregnancy. Infants born before this transfer is complete are at risk for deficiency. This study determines the relationship between gestational age (GA) and circulating LCPUFA levels to better understand the unique needs of premature infants born at various GAs. Whole blood was collected within the first 7 days of life from 60 preterm (≤34 weeks GA) and 30 term infants (≥38 weeks GA) and FA levels were analyzed. Since concurrent intravenous lipid emulsion can skew composition data, blood LCPUFA concentrations were also measured. Levels were compared among groups, and linear regression models were used to examine the association between FA composition and GA. Preterm infants had significantly lower DHA and ARA levels than term peers, and whether assessed as concentrations or compositions, both directly correlated with GA (p<0.0001). Moreover, FA comparisons suggest that premature infants have impaired synthesis of LCPUFAs from precursors and may require preformed DHA and ARA. This study confirms that essential FA status is strongly related to GA, and that those babies born the earliest are at the greatest risk of LCPUFA deficiency.

  13. Arachidonic acid mediates the formation of abundant alpha-helical multimers of alpha-synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Iljina, Marija; Tosatto, Laura; Choi, Minee L.; Sang, Jason C.; Ye, Yu; Hughes, Craig D.; Bryant, Clare E.; Gandhi, Sonia; Klenerman, David

    2016-01-01

    The protein alpha-synuclein (αS) self-assembles into toxic beta-sheet aggregates in Parkinson’s disease, while it is proposed that αS forms soluble alpha-helical multimers in healthy neurons. Here, we have made αS multimers in vitro using arachidonic acid (ARA), one of the most abundant fatty acids in the brain, and characterized them by a combination of bulk experiments and single-molecule Fӧrster resonance energy transfer (sm-FRET) measurements. The data suggest that ARA-induced oligomers are alpha-helical, resistant to fibril formation, more prone to disaggregation, enzymatic digestion and degradation by the 26S proteasome, and lead to lower neuronal damage and reduced activation of microglia compared to the oligomers formed in the absence of ARA. These multimers can be formed at physiologically-relevant concentrations, and pathological mutants of αS form less multimers than wild-type αS. Our work provides strong biophysical evidence for the formation of alpha-helical multimers of αS in the presence of a biologically relevant fatty acid, which may have a protective role with respect to the generation of beta-sheet toxic structures during αS fibrillation. PMID:27671749

  14. Shuffling the cards in signal transduction: Calcium, arachidonic acid and mechanosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Munaron, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Cell signaling is a very complex network of biochemical reactions triggered by a huge number of stimuli coming from the external medium. The function of any single signaling component depends not only on its own structure but also on its connections with other biomolecules. During prokaryotic-eukaryotic transition, the rearrangement of cell organization in terms of diffusional compartmentalization exerts a deep change in cell signaling functional potentiality. In this review I briefly introduce an intriguing ancient relationship between pathways involved in cell responses to chemical agonists (growth factors, nutrients, hormones) as well as to mechanical forces (stretch, osmotic changes). Some biomolecules (ion channels and enzymes) act as “hubs”, thanks to their ability to be directly or indirectly chemically/mechanically co-regulated. In particular calcium signaling machinery and arachidonic acid metabolism are very ancient networks, already present before eukaryotic appearance. A number of molecular “hubs”, including phospholipase A2 and some calcium channels, appear tightly interconnected in a cross regulation leading to the cellular response to chemical and mechanical stimulations. PMID:21537474

  15. Altered macrophage arachidonic acid metabolism induced by endotoxin tolerance: characterization and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T.S.

    1986-01-01

    Altered macrophage arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism may play a role in endotoxic shock and the phenomenon of endotoxin tolerance induced by repeated injections of endotoxin. Studies were initiated to characterize both lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase metabolite formation by endotoxin tolerant and non-tolerant macrophages in response to 4 different stimuli, i.e., endotoxin, glucan, zymosan, and the calcium ionophore A23187. In contrast to previous reports of decreased prostaglandin synthesis by tolerant macrophages, A23187-stimulated immunoreactive (i) leukotriene (LT) C/sub 4/D/sub 4/ and prostaglandin (PG) E/sub 2/ production by tolerant cells was greater than that by non-tolerant controls (p <0.001). However, A23187-stimulated i6-keto PGF/sub 1a/ levels were lower in tolerant macrophages compared to controls (P < 0.05). iL TC/sub 4/D/sub 4/ production was not significantly stimulated by endotoxin or glucan, but was stimulated by zymosan in non-tolerant cells. Synthesis of iLTB/sub 4/ by control macrophages was stimulated by endotoxin (p <0.01). The effect of tolerance on factors that affect AA release was investigated by measuring /sup 14/C-AA incorporation and release and phospholipase A/sub 2/ activity

  16. Epoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid inhibit vasopressin response in toad bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Schlondorff, D.; Petty, E.; Oates, J.A.; Jacoby, M.; Levine, S.D. Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN )

    1987-09-01

    In addition to cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways, the kidney can also metabolize arachidonic acid by a NADPH-dependent cytochrome P-450 enzyme to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs); furthermore, 5,6-EET has been shown to alter electrolyte transport across isolated renal tubules. The authors examined the effects of three ({sup 14}C-labeled)-EETs (5,6-, 11,12-, and 14,15-EET) on osmotic water flow across toad urinary bladder. All three EETs reversibly inhibited vasopressin-stimulated osmotic water flow with 5,6- and 11,12-EET being the most potent. The effects appeared to be independent of prostaglandins EETs inhibited the water flow response to forskolin but not the response to adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) or 8-BrcAMP, consistent with an effect on cAMP generation. To determine whether these effects were due to the EETs or to products of their metabolism, they examined the effects of their vicinal diol hydrolysis products, the dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids. Nonenzymatic conversion of labeled 5,6-EET to its vicinal diol occurred rapidly in the buffer, whereas 11,12-EET was hydrolyzed in a saturable manner only when incubated in the presence of bladder tissue. The dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids formed inhibited water flow in a manner paralleling that of the EETs. The data support the hypothesis that EETs and their physiologically active dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acid metabolites inhibit vasopressin-stimulated water flow predominantly via inhibition of adenylate cyclase.

  17. Arachidonic acid impairs hypothalamic leptin signaling and hepatic energy homeostasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Licai; Yu, Yinghua; Zhang, Qingsheng; Szabo, Alexander; Wang, Hongqin; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2015-09-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that the consumption of a diet high in n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) is associated with the development of leptin resistance and obesity. We aim to examine the central effect of n-6 PUFA, arachidonic acid (ARA) on leptin sensitivity and leptin-regulated hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism. We found that intracerebroventricular injection of ARA (25 nmol/day) for 2.5 days reversed the effect of central leptin on hypothalamic JAK2, pSTAT3, pAkt, and pFOXO1 protein levels, which was concomitant with a pro-inflammatory response in the hypothalamus. ARA also attenuated the effect of central leptin on hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism by reversing the mRNA expression of the genes involved in gluconeogenesis (G6Pase, PEPCK), glucose transportation (GLUT2), lipogenesis (FAS, SCD1), and cholesterol synthesis (HMG-CoA reductase). These results indicate that an increased exposure to central n-6 PUFA induces central cellular leptin resistance with concomitant defective JAK2-STAT3 and PI3K-Akt signaling. PMID:25986657

  18. Accumulation of arachidonic acid-containing phosphatidylinositol at the outer edge of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hiraide, Takanori; Ikegami, Koji; Sakaguchi, Takanori; Morita, Yoshifumi; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Masaki, Noritaka; Waki, Michihiko; Sugiyama, Eiji; Shinriki, Satoru; Takeda, Makoto; Shibasaki, Yasushi; Miyazaki, Shinichiro; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Okuyama, Hiroaki; Inoue, Masahiro; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Konno, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that cancer cells show specific alterations in phospholipid metabolism that contribute to tumour progression in several types of cancer, including colorectal cancer. Questions still remain as to what lipids characterize the outer edge of cancer tissues and whether those cancer outer edge-specific lipid compositions emerge autonomously in cancer cells. Cancer tissue-originated spheroids (CTOSs) that are composed of pure primary cancer cells have been developed. In this study, we aimed to seek out the cancer cell-autonomous acquisition of cancer outer edge-characterizing lipids in colorectal cancer by analysing phospholipids in CTOSs derived from colorectal cancer patients with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). A signal at m/z 885.5 in negative ion mode was detected specifically at the surface regions. The signal was identified as an arachidonic acid (AA)-containing phosphatidylinositol (PI), PI(18:0/20:4), by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Quantitative analysis revealed that the amount of PI(18:0/20:4) in the surface region of CTOSs was two-fold higher than that in the medial region. Finally, PI(18:0/20:4) was enriched at the cancer cells/stromal interface in colorectal cancer patients. These data imply a possible importance of AA-containing PI for colorectal cancer progression, and suggest cells expressing AA-containing PI as potential targets for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:27435310

  19. LPIAT1 regulates arachidonic acid content in phosphatidylinositol and is required for cortical lamination in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeon-Cheol; Inoue, Takao; Sasaki, Junko; Kubo, Takuya; Matsuda, Shinji; Nakasaki, Yasuko; Hattori, Mitsuharu; Tanaka, Fumiharu; Udagawa, Osamu; Kono, Nozomu; Itoh, Toshiki; Ogiso, Hideo; Taguchi, Ryo; Arita, Makoto; Sasaki, Takehiko; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Dietary arachidonic acid (AA) has roles in growth, neuronal development, and cognitive function in infants. AA is remarkably enriched in phosphatidylinositol (PI), an important constituent of biological membranes in mammals; however, the physiological significance of AA-containing PI remains unknown. In an RNA interference–based genetic screen using Caenorhabditis elegans, we recently cloned mboa-7 as an acyltransferase that selectively incorporates AA into PI. Here we show that lysophosphatidylinositol acyltransferase 1 (LPIAT1, also known as MBOAT7), the closest mammalian homologue, plays a crucial role in brain development in mice. Lpiat1−/− mice show almost no LPIAT activity with arachidonoyl-CoA as an acyl donor and show reduced AA contents in PI and PI phosphates. Lpiat1−/− mice die within a month and show atrophy of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Immunohistochemical analysis reveals disordered cortical lamination and delayed neuronal migration in the cortex of E18.5 Lpiat1−/− mice. LPIAT1 deficiency also causes disordered neuronal processes in the cortex and reduced neurite outgrowth in vitro. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AA-containing PI/PI phosphates play an important role in normal cortical lamination during brain development in mice. PMID:23097495

  20. Arachidonate 5 Lipoxygenase Expression in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Promotes Invasion via MMP-9 Induction

    PubMed Central

    Kummer, Nicolas T.; Nowicki, Theodore S; Azzi, Jean Paul; Reyes, Ismael; Iacob, Codrin; Xie, Suqing; Swati, Ismatun; Suslina, Nina; Schantz, Stimson; Tiwari, Raj K.; Geliebter, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) expression and activity has been implicated in tumor pathogenesis, yet its role in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) has not been characterized. ALOX5 protein and mRNA were upregulated in PTC compared to matched, normal thyroid tissue, and ALOX5 expression correlated with invasive tumor histopathology. Evidence suggests that PTC invasion is mediated through the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that can degrade and remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM). A correlation between MMP-9 and ALOX5 protein expression was established by immunohistochemical analysis of PTC and normal thyroid tissues using a tissue array. Transfection of ALOX5 into a PTC cell line (BCPAP) increased MMP-9 secretion and cell invasion across an ECM barrier. The ALOX5 product, 5(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid also increased MMP-9 protein expression by BCPAP in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibitors of MMP-9 and ALOX5 reversed ALOX5-enhanced invasion. Here we describe a new role for ALOX5 as a mediator of invasion via MMP-9 induction; this ALOX5/MMP9 pathway represents a new avenue in the search for functional biomarkers and/or potential therapeutic targets for aggressive PTC. PMID:22253131

  1. What is the Relationship between Gestational Age and Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) and Arachidonic Acid (ARA) Levels?

    PubMed Central

    Baack, Michelle L; Puumala, Susan E; Messier, Stephen E; Pritchett, Deborah K; Harris, William S

    2015-01-01

    Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) including docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (ARA) are increasingly transferred from mother to fetus late in pregnancy. Infants born before this transfer is complete are at risk for deficiency. This study determines the relationship between gestational age (GA) and circulating LCPUFA levels to better understand the unique needs of premature infants born at various GAs. Whole blood was collected within the first 7 days of life from 60 preterm (≤34 weeks GA) and 30 term infants (≥38 weeks GA) and FA levels were analyzed. Since concurrent intravenous lipid emulsion can skew composition data, blood LCPUFA concentrations were also measured. Levels were compared among groups, and linear regression models were used to examine the association between FA composition and GA. Preterm infants had significantly lower DHA and ARA levels than term peers, and whether assessed as concentrations or compositions, both directly correlated with GA (p<0.0001). Moreover, FA comparisons suggest that premature infants have impaired synthesis of LCPUFAs from precursors and may require preformed DHA and ARA. This study confirms that essential FA status is strongly related to GA, and that those babies born the earliest are at the greatest risk of LCPUFA deficiency. PMID:26205427

  2. Impact of Arachidonic Acid and the Leukotriene Signaling Pathway on Vasculogenesis of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Han; Sharifpanah, Fatemeh; Becker, Sven; Wartenberg, Maria; Sauer, Heinrich

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells can differentiate into various kinds of cells, such as endothelial and hematopoietic cells. In addition, some evidence suggests that inflammatory mediators such as leukotrienes (LTs), which include the 5-lipoxygenase (LOX) family, can regulate endothelial cell differentiation. In the present study, the eicosanoid precursor arachidonic acid (AA) stimulated vasculogenesis of ES cells by increasing the number of fetal liver kinase-1+ vascular progenitor cells as well as vascular structures positive for platelet endothelial cell adhesion protein-1 and vascular endothelial cadherin. The stimulation of vasculogenesis and expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in the LT signaling pathway, 5-LOX-activating protein (FLAP), was blunted upon treatment with the FLAP inhibitors AM643 and REV5901. Vasculogenesis was significantly restored upon exogenous addition of LTs. Downstream of FLAP, the LTB4 receptor (BLT1) blocker U75302, the BLT2 receptor blocker LY255283 as well as the cysteinyl LT blocker BAY-u9773 inhibited vasculogenesis of ES cells. AA treatment of differentiating ES cells increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, which was not affected upon either FLAP or cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition. Prevention of ROS generation by either the free radical scavengers vitamin E and N-(2-mercaptopropionyl)glycine or the NADPH oxidase inhibitor VAS2870 downregulated vasculogenesis of ES cells and blunted the provasculogenic effect of AA. In summary, our data demonstrate that proinflammatory AA stimulates vasculogenesis of ES cells via the LT pathway by mechanisms involving ROS generation. PMID:27198524

  3. Myogenic and metabolic feedback in cerebral autoregulation: Putative involvement of arachidonic acid-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Berg, Ronan M G

    2016-07-01

    The present paper presents a mechanistic model of cerebral autoregulation, in which the dual effects of the arachidonic acid metabolites 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) on vascular smooth muscle mediate the cerebrovascular adjustments to a change in cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). 20-HETE signalling in vascular smooth muscle mediates myogenic feedback to changes in vessel wall stretch, which may be modulated by metabolic feedback through EETs released from astrocytes and endothelial cells in response to changes in brain tissue oxygen tension. The metabolic feedback pathway is much faster than 20-HETE-dependent myogenic feedback, and the former thus initiates the cerebral autoregulatory response, while myogenic feedback comprises a relatively slower mechanism that functions to set the basal cerebrovascular tone. Therefore, assessments of dynamic cerebral autoregulation, which may provide information on the response time of the cerebrovasculature, may specifically be used to yield information on metabolic feedback mechanisms, while data based on assessments of static cerebral autoregulation represent the integrated functionality of myogenic and metabolic feedback. PMID:27241246

  4. Arachidonic acid accumulates in the stromal macrophages during thymus involution in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gruia, Alexandra T; Barbu-Tudoran, Lucian; Mic, Ani A; Ordodi, Valentin L; Paunescu, Virgil; Mic, Felix A

    2011-07-01

    Diabetes is a debilitating disease with chronic evolution that affects many tissues and organs over its course. Thymus is an organ that is affected early after the onset of diabetes, gradually involuting until it loses most of its thymocyte populations. We show evidence of accumulating free fatty acids with generation of eicosanoids in the diabetic thymus and we present a possible mechanism for the involution of the organ during the disease. Young rats were injected with streptozotocin and their thymuses examined for cell death by flow cytometry and TUNEL reaction. Accumulation of lipids in the diabetic thymus was investigated by histology and electron microscopy. The identity and quantitation of accumulating lipids was done with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography. The expression and dynamics of the enzymes were monitored via immunohistochemistry. Diabetes causes thymus involution by elevating the thymocyte apoptosis. Exposure of thymocytes to elevated concentration of glucose causes apoptosis. After the onset of diabetes, there is a gradual accumulation of free fatty acids in the stromal macrophages including arachidonic acid, the substrate for eicosanoids. The eicosanoids do not cause thymocyte apoptosis but administration of a cyclooxygenase inhibitor reduces the staining for ED1, a macrophage marker whose intensity correlates with phagocytic activity. Diabetes causes thymus involution that is accompanied by accumulation of free fatty acids in the thymic macrophages. Excess glucose is able to induce thymocyte apoptosis but eicosanoids are involved in the chemoattraction of macrophage to remove the dead thymocytes.

  5. Effect of the middle ear reflex on sound transmission to the inner ear of rat.

    PubMed

    Pilz, P K; Ostwald, J; Kreiter, A; Schnitzler, H U

    1997-03-01

    The effect of the acoustic middle ear reflex (MER) was quantified using electrodes chronically implanted in the middle ears of rats. Cochlear microphonics (CM) and middle ear muscle EMG were measured under light Ketamin anesthesia after stimulation with tone pulses of 5-20 kHz ranging between 75 and 120 dB SPL. With increasing intensity, the CM measured before the onset of the MER increased to a maximum amplitude and then decreased with higher SPLs. At 10 kHz this maximum was reached at 95 dB SPL, for other stimulus frequencies at higher SPLs. After a latency of 10-20 ms, CM to 10 kHz stimuli of 80-95 dB SPL were decreased by the attenuating action of the MER. The lowest threshold of the MER was also measured at 10 kHz (77 dB SPL in the mean). To stimuli greater than 100 dB SPL after a latency of 6-10 ms, the CM amplitude was increased. That this CM increase to intense stimuli is caused by the action of the MER was confirmed by control experiments such as cutting the tendons of the middle ear muscles. The CM decrease to stimuli below 100 dB SPL, as well as the increase to very intense stimuli, can be explained by sound attenuation caused by the MER, together with the nonlinear dependence of CM amplitude on stimulus level. The observed shift of the maxima of the CM input-output function by the MER to higher stimulus levels probably indicates an increase of the dynamic range of the ear.

  6. Valproic Acid-Induced Severe Acute Pancreatitis with Pseudocyst Formation: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Khamrui, Sujan; Kataria, Mohnish; Biswas, Jayanta; Saha, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Valproic acid is the most widely used anti-epilep­tic drug in children, and it is probably the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute pancreatitis. Outcomes for patients with valproic acid-associated pancreatitis vary from full recovery after discontinuation of the drug to severe acute pancreatitis and death. Here, we present a case of valproic acid-induced severe acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation in a 10-year-old girl with cerebral palsy and generalized tonic-clonic seizure. There was no resolution of the pseudocyst after discontinuation of valproic acid. The patient became symptomatic with a progressive increase in the size of the pseudocyst. She was successfully treated with cystogastrostomy and was well at 12-month follow-up. PMID:26366333

  7. Effect of zinc sulphate on acetic acid-induced gastric ulceration in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, K M

    1990-09-01

    The effects of zinc sulphate on gastric ulcer healing rate and mucosal mucus content of acetic acid-induced ulceration in rats have been assessed. Daily treatment with zinc sulphate progressively accelerated ulcer healing in a dose-dependent manner with a significant increase observed on day 15 after ulcer induction in rats treated with 44 and 88 mg kg-1 zinc sulphate. A significant increase in gastric mucosal adherent mucus was also observed in those animals treated with 88 mg kg-1 zinc sulphate. The results suggest that a minimum treatment period of 15 days is needed for the zinc sulphate to be effective, and that zinc ions may promote gastric ulcer healing by enhancing mucus formation to prevent acid back-diffusion into the gastric mucosa.

  8. Esophageal Submucosal Injection of Capsaicin but Not Acid Induces Symptoms in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Robert H; Korsapati, Hariprasad; Bhalla, Vikas; Varki, Nissi; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is a candidate for mediating acid-induced symptoms in the esophagus. We conducted studies to determine if the presence of acid in the mucosa/submucosa and direct activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin elicited symptoms in normal healthy subjects. We also studied the presence of TRPV1 receptors in the esophagus. Methods Unsedated endoscopy was performed on healthy subjects with no symptoms. Using a sclerotherapy needle, normal saline (pH 2.0–7.5) was injected into the mucosa/submucosa, 5 cm above the Z line. In a separate group of healthy subjects, injection of capsaicin and vehicle was also studied. Quality of symptoms was reported using the McGill Pain Questionnaire, and symptom intensity using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Immunohistochemistry was performed on 8 surgical esophagus specimens using TRPV1 antibody. Results Acid injection either did not elicit or elicited mild symptoms in subjects at all pH solutions. Capsaicin but not the vehicle elicited severe heartburn/chest pain in all subjects. Mean VAS for capsaicin was 91 ± 3 and symptoms lasted for 25 ± 1 minutes. Immunohistochemistry revealed a linear TRPV1 staining pattern between the epithelial layer and the submucosa that extended into the papillae. Eighty-five percent of papillae stained positive for TRPV1 with a mean 1.1 positive papillae per high-powered field. Conclusions The mechanism of acid-induced heartburn and chest pain is not the simple interaction of hydrogen ions with afferents located in the esophageal mucosa and submucosa. TRPV1 receptors are present in the lamina propria and their activation induces heartburn and chest pain. PMID:26932896

  9. Proteomic investigation into betulinic acid-induced apoptosis of human cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Pang, Qiuying; Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Aiqin; Luo, Shaman; Wang, Yang; Yan, Xiufeng

    2014-01-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid that exhibits anticancer functions in human cancer cells. This study provides evidence that betulinic acid is highly effective against the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa by inducing dose- and time-dependent apoptosis. The apoptotic process was further investigated using a proteomics approach to reveal protein expression changes in HeLa cells following betulinic acid treatment. Proteomic analysis revealed that there were six up- and thirty down-regulated proteins in betulinic acid-induced HeLa cells, and these proteins were then subjected to functional pathway analysis using multiple analysis software. UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase decarboxylating, chain A Horf6-a novel human peroxidase enzyme that involved in redox process, was found to be down-regulated during the apoptosis process of the oxidative stress response pathway. Consistent with our results at the protein level, an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species was observed in betulinic acid-treated cells. The proteins glucose-regulated protein and cargo-selection protein TIP47, which are involved in the endoplasmic reticulum pathway, were up-regulated by betulinic acid treatment. Meanwhile, 14-3-3 family proteins, including 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε, were down-regulated in response to betulinic acid treatment, which is consistent with the decrease in expression of the target genes 14-3-3β and 14-3-3ε. Furthermore, it was found that the antiapoptotic bcl-2 gene was down-regulated while the proapoptotic bax gene was up-regulated after betulinic acid treatment in HeLa cells. These results suggest that betulinic acid induces apoptosis of HeLa cells by triggering both the endoplasmic reticulum pathway and the ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway.

  10. Neuroprotective effects of butterbur and rough aster against kainic Acid-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sang Hee; Sok, Dai-Eun; Kim, Mee Ree

    2005-01-01

    The separate and combined neuroprotective effects of rough aster (Aster scaber) and butterbur (Petasite japonicus) extracts against oxidative damage in the brain of mice challenged with kainic acid were examined by comparing behavioral changes and biochemical parameters of oxidative stress. Rough aster butanol extract (400 mg/kg) and/or butterbur butanol extract (150 or 400 mg/kg) were administered to male ICR mice, 6-8 weeks old, through a gavage for 4 days consecutively, and on day 4, kainic acid (50 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally. Compared with the vehicle-treated control, no significant changes in body and brain weight were observed in mice administered rough aster or butterbur butanol extract. Administration of kainic acid only, causing a lethality of approximately 54%, resulted in a significant decrease of total glutathione level and increase of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) value in brain tissue. The administration of butterbur or rough aster extract (400 mg/kg) decreased the lethality (50%) of kainic acid to 25%, alleviated the behavioral signs of neurotoxicity, restored the cytosolic glutathione level of brain homogenate to approximately 80% (P < .05), and reduced kainic acid-induced increases in TBARS values. In contrast to no significant neuroprotection by butterbur extract at a low dose (150 mg/kg), the combination of rough aster extract and butterbur extract reduced the lethality to 12.5%. Moreover, the combination delayed the onset time of behavioral signs by twofold, and significantly preserved the level of cytosolic glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities. However, the other biochemical parameters were not altered significantly by the combination. Thus, the combination of two vegetable extracts significantly increased the neuroprotective action against kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity. Based on these findings, the combination of butterbur extract and rough aster extract contains a functional agent or

  11. Phosphatidic acid-induced contraction in guinea-pig taenia coli.

    PubMed

    Ohata, H; Momose, K

    1990-06-01

    Natural phosphatidic acid from egg yolk lecithin (PA) caused a sustained contraction in guinea-pig taenia coli. The contractile response to PA was concentration-dependent (10(-6)-10(-4) M) in the normal medium and the maximal response to PA was about 20% of the response to carbachol (CCh) at 10(-6) M. Phospholipase D mimicked PA-induced contraction. This result suggests that increase in endogenous PA can induce contraction. The PA-induced contraction was not inhibited by atropine (10(-6) M). The contraction was more dependent on concentration of extracellular Ca2+ than CCh-induced contraction. PA increased 45Ca2+ uptake into the tissue. These results suggest that the PA-induced contraction results from increase in Ca2+ influx across plasma membranes, but not release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores in guinea-pig taenia coli. The PA-induced contraction was inhibited to 42% of the control response by propyl gallate (0.2 mM), a combined inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase. This result indicates that a portion of the contraction is related to release of arachidonic acid and its metabolites, and the other portions are based on direct action of PA. These results suggest a possibility that increased PA by agonist stimulation is related to the following extracellular Ca2(+)-dependent contraction.

  12. Sp8 regulates inner ear development.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyeyoung A; Medina-Ruiz, Sofia; Harland, Richard M

    2014-04-29

    A forward genetic screen of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenized Xenopus tropicalis has identified an inner ear mutant named eclipse (ecl). Mutants developed enlarged otic vesicles and various defects of otoconia development; they also showed abnormal circular and inverted swimming patterns. Positional cloning identified specificity protein 8 (sp8), which was previously found to regulate limb and brain development. Two different loss-of-function approaches using transcription activator-like effector nucleases and morpholino oligonucleotides confirmed that the ecl mutant phenotype is caused by down-regulation of sp8. Depletion of sp8 resulted in otic dysmorphogenesis, such as uncompartmentalized and enlarged otic vesicles, epithelial dilation with abnormal sensory end organs. When overexpressed, sp8 was sufficient to induce ectopic otic vesicles possessing sensory hair cells, neurofilament innervation in a thickened sensory epithelium, and otoconia, all of which are found in the endogenous otic vesicle. We propose that sp8 is an important factor for initiation and elaboration of inner ear development.

  13. Sp8 regulates inner ear development.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyeyoung A; Medina-Ruiz, Sofia; Harland, Richard M

    2014-04-29

    A forward genetic screen of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenized Xenopus tropicalis has identified an inner ear mutant named eclipse (ecl). Mutants developed enlarged otic vesicles and various defects of otoconia development; they also showed abnormal circular and inverted swimming patterns. Positional cloning identified specificity protein 8 (sp8), which was previously found to regulate limb and brain development. Two different loss-of-function approaches using transcription activator-like effector nucleases and morpholino oligonucleotides confirmed that the ecl mutant phenotype is caused by down-regulation of sp8. Depletion of sp8 resulted in otic dysmorphogenesis, such as uncompartmentalized and enlarged otic vesicles, epithelial dilation with abnormal sensory end organs. When overexpressed, sp8 was sufficient to induce ectopic otic vesicles possessing sensory hair cells, neurofilament innervation in a thickened sensory epithelium, and otoconia, all of which are found in the endogenous otic vesicle. We propose that sp8 is an important factor for initiation and elaboration of inner ear development. PMID:24722637

  14. Enhanced visualization of inner ear structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemczyk, Kazimierz; Kucharski, Tomasz; Kujawinska, Malgorzata; Bruzgielewicz, Antoni

    2004-07-01

    Recently surgery requires extensive support from imaging technologies in order to increase effectiveness and safety of operations. One of important tasks is to enhance visualisation of quasi-phase (transparent) 3d structures. Those structures are characterized by very low contrast. It makes differentiation of tissues in field of view very difficult. For that reason the surgeon may be extremly uncertain during operation. This problem is connected with supporting operations of inner ear during which physician has to perform cuts at specific places of quasi-transparent velums. Conventionally during such operations medical doctor views the operating field through stereoscopic microscope. In the paper we propose a 3D visualisation system based on Helmet Mounted Display. Two CCD cameras placed at the output of microscope perform acquisition of stereo pairs of images. The images are processed in real-time with the goal of enhancement of quasi-phased structures. The main task is to create algorithm that is not sensitive to changes in intensity distribution. The disadvantages of existing algorithms is their lack of adaptation to occuring reflexes and shadows in field of view. The processed images from both left and right channels are overlaid on the actual images exported and displayed at LCD's of Helmet Mounted Display. A physician observes by HMD (Helmet Mounted Display) a stereoscopic operating scene with indication of the places of special interest. The authors present the hardware ,procedures applied and initial results of inner ear structure visualisation. Several problems connected with processing of stereo-pair images are discussed.

  15. Evaluation of fungal flora in normal and diseased canine ears.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jacquelyn J; Coyner, Kimberly S; Rankin, Shelley C; Lewis, Thomas P; Schick, Anthea E; Shumaker, Amy K

    2010-12-01

    This study was undertaken to characterize otic fungal flora encountered in normal dogs, atopic dogs with no clinical or cytological evidence of otitis and dogs with otitis externa. Forty-two normal dogs, 23 atopic dogs and 32 dogs with otitis were included in the study. Samples for otic fungal culture and cytology were obtained from all animals, for a total of 194 ears. Sixty-seven ear samples (34%) were culture positive for saprophytic fungal organisms, as follows: 43 (64%) Penicillium species, 13 (19%) Aspergillus species and the remaining 17% comprised of various other saprophytic fungal organisms. Cytological evidence of saprophytic fungal colonization or infection was not found in any animal. There was no relationship between positive saprophytic fungal culture and any study group. Thirty-three ear samples (17%) were positive for Malassezia pachydermatis. Cytological findings of Malassezia were significantly associated with positive culture for Malassezia (P = 0.006 left ear; P = 0.019 right ear). Furthermore, increased numbers of Malassezia led to a higher chance of positive culture (P = 0.003 left ear; P = 0.008 right ear; McNemar's test). Malassezia pachydermatis was more likely to be cultured from ears with increased cerumen. Ear type (erect or pendulous) was not significantly associated with positive culture for Malassezia or saprophytic fungal organisms. There was no relationship between positive Malassezia culture and any study group; however, Malassezia was more likely to be cultured from individual dogs in the atopic or otitis groups that also had other dermatological signs consistent with allergic dermatitis and/or pyoderma (P = 0.031 left ear; P = 0.005 right ear). PMID:20868397

  16. [European Portuguese EARS test battery adaptation].

    PubMed

    Alves, Marisa; Ramos, Daniela; Oliveira, Graça; Alves, Helena; Anderson, Ilona; Magalhães, Isabel; Martins, Jorge H; Simões, Margarida; Ferreira, Raquel; Fonseca, Rita; Andrade, Susana; Silva, Luís; Ribeiro, Carlos; Ferreira, Pedro Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Introdução: A utilização de instrumentos de avaliação em saúde adequados é fundamental na gestão da prestação de cuidados. A escassez, em Portugal, de instrumentos específicos para a avaliação do desempenho de crianças utilizadoras de implantes cocleares motivou o trabalho de tradução e de adaptação da bateria de testes EARS (Evaluation of Auditory Responses to Speech) para o português europeu. Esta bateria de testes é hoje um dos instrumentos mais comummente utilizados por equipas de (re)habilitação de crianças surdas com implantes cocleares em todo o mundo. O objetivo a atingir com a validação do EARS foi fornecer às equipas de (re)habilitação um instrumento que permita: (i) monitorizar a evolução individual da reabilitação; (ii) gerir um programa de (re)habilitação de acordo com resultados objetivos, comparáveis entre diferentes equipas de (re)habilitação; (iii) obter dados comparáveis comequipas internacionais; e (iv) melhorar a adesão e a motivação da família e restantes profissionais no ambulatório.Material e Métodos: No processo de tradução e de adaptação da bateria de testes, os procedimentos adotados foram os seguintes: (i) tradução da versão inglesa para português europeu por um tradutor profissional; (ii) revisão dessa tradução realizada por um painel de especialistas constituído por otorrinolaringologistas, terapeutas da fala e técnicos de audiologia; (iii) adaptação dos estímulos de teste pela equipa de terapeutas da fala; e (iv) nova revisão por parte do painel de especialistas.Resultados: São apresentados, para cada um dos instrumentos que compõem a bateria EARS, as adaptações introduzidas, conciliando as características e os objetivos originais dos instrumentos com as particularidades linguísticas e culturais da população portuguesa.Discussão: São discutidas as dificuldades encontradas durante o processo de tradução e de adaptação e as soluções adotadas. São feitas

  17. Role of AQP1 in inner ear in motion sickness.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Deng; Xia, Si-Wen; Dai, Pu; Han, Dong-Yi

    2011-10-24

    Inner ear is critical for the development of motion sickness (MS). The present work was designed to test the role of aquaporins (AQPs) in inner ear in MS. After repetitive stimulus of rotation, the MS symptom was steadily alleviated in mice. After repetitive stimulus of rotation, several AQPs mRNA levels including AQP1, AQP2, AQP3, AQP4, AQP6, AQP7, and AQP9 in the inner ears of mice were analyzed. It was found that AQP1 mRNA level was increased remarkably, which was reconfirmed by Western blotting analysis. In addition, the relationship between AQP1 expression and MS sensitivity was studied and it was shown that AQP1 mRNA level was negatively related to MS index in mice. We sought to examine the function of AQP1 in inner ear using an RNAi approach to reduce the AQP1 protein expression in vivo. It was first observed that AQP1 knockdown in inner ear resulted in a significant increase of MS sensitivity in mice. In conclusion, after repetitive stimulus of rotation, the alleviation of MS symptom in mice was, at least in part, due to the upregulation of AQP1 expression in inner ear. In addition, the sensitivity to MS in mice was, at least in part, dependent on the expression of AQP1 in inner ear. AQP1 in inner ear plays an important role in the development of MS, and might be a potential target for the prevention or management of MS.

  18. [Adaptability of sweet corn ears to a frozen process].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Matheus, Alejandra O; Martínez, Norelkys Maribel; de Bertorelli, Ligia O; De Venanzi, Frank

    2004-12-01

    The effects of frozen condition on the quality of three sweet corn ears (2038, 2010, 2004) and the pattern (Bonanza), were evaluated. Biometrics characteristics like ear size, ear diameter, row and kernel deep were measured as well as chemical and physical measurement in fresh and frozen states. The corn ears were frozen at -95 degrees C by 7 minutes. The yield and stability of the frozen ears were evaluated at 45 and 90 days of frozen storage (-18 degrees C). The average commercial yield as frozen corn ear for all the hybrids was 54.2%. The industry has a similar value range of 48% to 54%. The ear size average was 21.57 cm, row number was 15, ear diameter 45.54 mm and the kernel corn deep was 8.57 mm. All these measurements were found not different from commercial values found for the industry. All corn samples evaluated showed good stability despites the frozen processing and storage. Hybrid 2038 ranked higher in quality. PMID:15969270

  19. Preventing Cauliflower Ear with a Modified Tie-Through Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimeff, Robert J.; Hough, David O.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a quick, simple tie-through suture technique (in which a collodion packing is secured to the auricle with two buttons) for preventing cauliflower ear following external ear trauma in wrestlers and boxers. The technique ensures constant compression; multiple treatments for fluid reaccumulation are rarely necessary. (SM)

  20. Inner ear contribution to bone conduction hearing in the human.

    PubMed

    Stenfelt, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Bone conduction (BC) hearing relies on sound vibration transmission in the skull bone. Several clinical findings indicate that in the human, the skull vibration of the inner ear dominates the response for BC sound. Two phenomena transform the vibrations of the skull surrounding the inner ear to an excitation of the basilar membrane, (1) inertia of the inner ear fluid and (2) compression and expansion of the inner ear space. The relative importance of these two contributors were investigated using an impedance lumped element model. By dividing the motion of the inner ear boundary in common and differential motion it was found that the common motion dominated at frequencies below 7 kHz but above this frequency differential motion was greatest. When these motions were used to excite the model it was found that for the normal ear, the fluid inertia response was up to 20 dB greater than the compression response. This changed in the pathological ear where, for example, otosclerosis of the stapes depressed the fluid inertia response and improved the compression response so that inner ear compression dominated BC hearing at frequencies above 400 Hz. The model was also able to predict experimental and clinical findings of BC sensitivity in the literature, for example the so called Carhart notch in otosclerosis, increased BC sensitivity in superior semicircular canal dehiscence, and altered BC sensitivity following a vestibular fenestration and RW atresia.

  1. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section 344.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of...

  2. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section 344.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of...

  3. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section 344.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of...

  4. CT of adenomas of the middle ear and mastoid cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Van Thong Ho; Rao, V.J.; Mikaelian, D.O.

    1996-03-01

    A case of mixed type adenoma of the middle ear and mastoid is presented in which CT showed complete opacification of the middle ear and mastoid air cells with bulging of the tympanic membrane but without ossicular or bony destruction. 7 refs., 1 figs.

  5. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section 344.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of...

  6. 21 CFR 344.12 - Ear drying aid active ingredient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ear drying aid active ingredient. 344.12 Section 344.12 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....12 Ear drying aid active ingredient. The active ingredient of the product consists of...

  7. Pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia involving the ear from gout: a diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Kelly A; Garcia-Albea, Victoria; Goldberg, Lynne J

    2014-01-01

    The ear is a characteristic location for deposition of uric acid in patients with gout. Pseudocarcinomatous hyperplasia has not been described in this location. We report three patients with tophaceous gout on the ear whose biopsies exhibited epidermal hyperplasia mimicking squamous cell carcinoma, in order to call attention to this potential diagnostic pitfall.

  8. Can you hear me now? Understanding vertebrate middle ear development.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Susan Caroline

    2011-01-01

    The middle ear is a composite organ formed from all three germ layers and the neural crest. It provides the link between the outside world and the inner ear, where sound is transduced and routed to the brain for processing. Extensive classical and modern studies have described the complex morphology and origin of the middle ear. Non-mammalian vertebrates have a single ossicle, the columella. Mammals have three functionally equivalent ossicles, designated the malleus, incus and stapes. In this review, I focus on the role of genes known to function in the middle ear. Genetic studies are beginning to unravel the induction and patterning of the multiple middle ear elements including the tympanum, skeletal elements, the air-filled cavity, and the insertion point into the inner ear oval window. Future studies that elucidate the integrated spatio-temporal signaling mechanisms required to pattern the middle ear organ system are needed. The longer-term translational benefits of understanding normal and abnormal ear development will have a direct impact on human health outcomes.

  9. The maize rachis affects Aspergillus flavus movement during ear development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used to follow infection in ears of maize hybrids resistant and susceptible to the fungus. Developing ears were needle-inoculated with GFP-transformed A. flavus 20 days after silk emergence, and GFP fluorescence in the pith was evalu...

  10. Middle Ear Resonance and Acoustic Immittance Measures in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanks, Wendy D.; Rose, Katie J.

    1993-01-01

    This study established a normal middle ear resonance estimated from sweep frequency tympanometry, established normal equivalent ear canal volume, static acoustic admittance, and tympanometric peak pressure at 226 hertz in 90 children with normal hearing and 68 children with deafness, ages 6-15. No significant intergroup or age differences were…

  11. [Significance of the ear in the determination of age].

    PubMed

    Röhm, E; Adam, E

    1986-01-01

    The morphology of human ear conch is said to be rather individual, but a perfect person-identification by this mean is not possible. It is demonstrated by photographs-made in a 15 years' interval-that ear conch and auricular area can be typically marked by proceeding age and specific diseases.

  12. [Significance of the ear in the determination of age].

    PubMed

    Röhm, E; Adam, E

    1986-01-01

    The morphology of human ear conch is said to be rather individual, but a perfect person-identification by this mean is not possible. It is demonstrated by photographs-made in a 15 years' interval-that ear conch and auricular area can be typically marked by proceeding age and specific diseases. PMID:3741048

  13. Can you hear me now? Understanding vertebrate middle ear development.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Susan Caroline

    2011-01-01

    The middle ear is a composite organ formed from all three germ layers and the neural crest. It provides the link between the outside world and the inner ear, where sound is transduced and routed to the brain for processing. Extensive classical and modern studies have described the complex morphology and origin of the middle ear. Non-mammalian vertebrates have a single ossicle, the columella. Mammals have three functionally equivalent ossicles, designated the malleus, incus and stapes. In this review, I focus on the role of genes known to function in the middle ear. Genetic studies are beginning to unravel the induction and patterning of the multiple middle ear elements including the tympanum, skeletal elements, the air-filled cavity, and the insertion point into the inner ear oval window. Future studies that elucidate the integrated spatio-temporal signaling mechanisms required to pattern the middle ear organ system are needed. The longer-term translational benefits of understanding normal and abnormal ear development will have a direct impact on human health outcomes. PMID:21196256

  14. Distortion product otoacoustic emissions upon ear canal pressurization.

    PubMed

    Zebian, Makram; Schirkonyer, Volker; Hensel, Johannes; Vollbort, Sven; Fedtke, Thomas; Janssen, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the change in distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) level upon ear canal pressurization. DPOAEs were measured on 12 normal-hearing human subjects for ear canal static pressures between -200 and +200 daPa in (50 ± 5) daPa steps. A clear dependence of DPOAE levels on the pressure was observed, with levels being highest at the maximum compliance of the middle ear, and decreasing on average by 2.3 dB per 50 daPa for lower and higher pressures. Ear canal pressurization can serve as a tool for improving the detectability of DPOAEs in the case of middle-ear dysfunction.

  15. Chronic discharging ear in a child: are we missing something?

    PubMed

    Dutta, Mainak; Ghatak, Soumya; Biswas, Gautam

    2013-08-01

    Chronic discharging ear, mostly due to middle or external ear infection, is one of the leading causes for seeking healthcare among the paediatric population in a developing country. However, a long-standing forgotten middle ear foreign body forms a rare cause for such presentation demanding a high index of suspicion from the clinicians. Most of them are iatrogenic or accidental, and are removed by conventional permeatal approach; need for tympanotomy is rarely documented in the recent literature. We report the first case where a large stone was introduced into the middle ear through a pre-existing tympanic membrane perforation by the child himself, and only the second documentation of removal of a middle ear foreign body by tympanotomy in a child.

  16. Segmentation algorithms for ear image data towards biomechanical studies.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana; Gentil, Fernanda; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the segmentation, i.e. the identification, of ear structures in video-otoscopy, computerised tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) image data, has gained significant importance in the medical imaging area, particularly those in CT and MR imaging. Segmentation is the fundamental step of any automated technique for supporting the medical diagnosis and, in particular, in biomechanics studies, for building realistic geometric models of ear structures. In this paper, a review of the algorithms used in ear segmentation is presented. The review includes an introduction to the usually biomechanical modelling approaches and also to the common imaging modalities. Afterwards, several segmentation algorithms for ear image data are described, and their specificities and difficulties as well as their advantages and disadvantages are identified and analysed using experimental examples. Finally, the conclusions are presented as well as a discussion about possible trends for future research concerning the ear segmentation.

  17. Alpha adrenoceptors in the rabbit ear thermoregulatory microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Koman, L A; Smith, B P; Gordon, E S; Smith, T L

    1998-03-01

    The rabbit ear microcirculation was analyzed in a chronic unanesthetized model to evaluate alpha adrenergic microvascular control in a thermoregulatory end organ. This model allowed direct measurement of microcirculatory responses without the effects of anesthetics or inflammatory responses induced by acute surgical intervention. The ipsilateral facial artery was catheterized for drug injections into the experimental ear. Microvascular diameter changes following stimulation or blockade of adrenoceptor (AR) subtypes were observed directly through a chronic microvascular chamber implanted in the rabbit ear. Vascular alpha1- and alpha2-ARs appear to be distributed differently across the arterioles and AVAs of the rabbit ear. Both alpha1- and alpha2-ARs appear to contribute to vasoconstriction of AVAs in the conscious rabbit ear. In contrast, alpha1-AR's (vs alpha2-ARs) appear to predominate in adrenergically mediated sympathetic vasoconstriction of arterioles. PMID:9521886

  18. Dichotic listening ear preference after childhood cerebral lesions.

    PubMed

    Woods, B T

    1984-01-01

    Patients with unilateral (right or left) nonprogressive cerebral lesions acquired in infancy (before age one) or childhood (ages one to fifteen) were given a dichotic listening test. The two groups of patients with the childhood lesions showed the pattern of ear preference typically seen after hemispheric lesions in adults; loss of right ear preference after left hemisphere (LH) lesions, and enhanced right ear preference after right hemisphere (RH) lesions. The two groups of patients with the very early lesions failed to show any consistent ear preference or to differ from one another in ear preference. It is postulated that this lack of a consistent lesion effect following very early lateralized brain lesions is due to the greater degree of functional reorganization that takes place after such lesions. PMID:6462424

  19. Tympanometric evaluation of middle ear barotrauma during recreational scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Green, S M; Rothrock, S G; Green, E A

    1993-10-01

    We report the first prospective evaluation of middle ear barotrauma in experienced recreational scuba divers. In this pilot study, tympanometric and otoscopic evaluations were performed daily on two experienced scuba divers engaged in multi-day repetitive diving. Middle ear pressures decreased in proportion to diving frequency, demonstrating eustachian tube dysfunction which promptly reversed upon cessation of diving Otoscopic evidence of traumatic injury to the middle ear occurred in proportion to diving frequency, and also readily reversed upon cessation of diving. Tympanic membrane compliance remained normal, often despite pronounced otoscopic abnormalities. Otologic symptoms and impairment of acuity were not observed. Tympanometry appears to be a valuable modality for the verification of middle ear hemorrhage or tympanic membrane rupture. This preliminary data should assist investigators in planning more comprehensive studies of middle ear barotrauma, including clinical trials of treatment and prophylactic interventions for this common condition.

  20. Inner ear symptoms and disease: Pathophysiological understanding and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Ciuman, Raphael R.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, huge advances have taken place in understanding of inner ear pathophysiology causing sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo. Advances in understanding comprise biochemical and physiological research of stimulus perception and conduction, inner ear homeostasis, and hereditary diseases with underlying genetics. This review describes and tabulates the various causes of inner ear disease and defines inner ear and non-inner ear causes of hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo. The aim of this review was to comprehensively breakdown this field of otorhinolaryngology for specialists and non-specialists and to discuss current therapeutic options in distinct diseases and promising research for future therapies, especially pharmaceutic, genetic, or stem cell therapy. PMID:24362017

  1. [Local drug therapy for inner ear hearing loss].

    PubMed

    Liebau, A; Plontke, S K

    2015-06-01

    The indications for local drug therapy of inner ear hearing loss include sudden sensorineural hearing loss, Menière's disease, autoimmune-associated hearing loss, ototoxicity as a side effect of other therapies, acute acoustic trauma and improvement of the safety and performance of cochlear implants. Various drugs are currently being used and tested for local treatment of inner ear hearing loss, including glucocorticoids, growth factors, apoptosis inhibitors, antioxidants, TNF-α inhibitors and antibodies. To further a better understanding of pharmacokinetics and the development of rational pharmacotherapy of the inner ear, the"liberation, absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination" (LADME) principle can be applied to local therapy of the inner ear. Local application strategies can be differentiated into intratympanic applications to the middle ear cavity and direct intralabyrinthine or intracochlear applications.

  2. Ear infection and hearing loss amongst headphone users.

    PubMed

    Mazlan, R; Saim, L; Thomas, A; Said, R; Liyab, B

    2002-07-01

    The use of headphone has been thought to cause infection in the ear canal and contribute to hearing loss. In this study, we examined 136 Customer Service Representative from Celcom (Malaysia) Sdn. Bhd. who use headphone throughout their working hours. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of ear canal infection and other related diseases of the ear, nose and throat. Their hearing thresholds were also determined using the Amplaid 309 Clinical Audiometer. We found no incidence of infection of the external ear canal amongst the subjects. There were 4 cases of chronic middle ear infection and 4 cases of impacted wax. Hearing impairment was found in 25 subjects (21.2%). However, there was no significant association between hearing loss and the exposure to sound from headphone usage because the high frequencies were not predominantly affected. There was also no association between hearing loss and duration of service.

  3. Radiology of external ear: indications, normal anatomy, and pathological processes.

    PubMed

    Mazón, M; Pont, E; Montesinos, P; Carreres-Polo, J; Más-Estellés, F

    2016-01-01

    The external ear is accessible to direct examination; the clinical history and otoscopy are sufficient to diagnose and treat most diseases of the external ear. We aim to describe the normal anatomy of the external ear, specify the indications for imaging tests, and review the clinical and radiological manifestations of the most common diseases affecting the external ear. We classify these diseases according to their origin into congenital, inflammatory, infectious, or traumatic disease or benign bone tumors or malignant tumors. Imaging does not play an important role in diseases of the external ear, but in certain clinical scenarios it can be crucial for reaching a concrete diagnosis and establishing the best treatment. Computed tomography is the first-choice technique for most diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging complements computed tomography and makes it possible to differentiate among different tissue types and to evaluate the extension of disease accurately.

  4. Scanning laser Doppler vibrometry of the middle ear ossicles.

    PubMed

    Ball, G R; Huber, A; Goode, R L

    1997-04-01

    This paper describes measurements of the vibratory modes of the middle ear ossicles made with a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. Previous studies of the middle ear ossicles with single-point laser Doppler measurements have raised questions regarding the vibrational modes of the ossicular chain. Single-point analysis methods do not have the ability to measure multiple points on the ossicles and, consequently, have limited ability to simultaneously record relative phase information at these points. Using a Polytec Model PSV-100, detailed measurements of the ossicular chain have been completed in the human temporal bone model. This model, when driven with a middle ear transducer, provides detailed three-dimensional data of the vibrational patterns of the middle ear ossicles. Implications for middle ear implantable devices are discussed.

  5. Lithium modifies brain arachidonic and docosahexaenoic metabolism in rat lipopolysaccharide model of neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Basselin, Mireille; Kim, Hyung-Wook; Chen, Mei; Ma, Kaizong; Rapoport, Stanley I; Murphy, Robert C; Farias, Santiago E

    2010-05-01

    Neuroinflammation, caused by 6 days of intracerebroventricular infusion of a low dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 0.5 ng/h), stimulates brain arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism in rats, but 6 weeks of lithium pretreatment reduces this effect. To further understand this action of lithium, we measured concentrations of eicosanoids and docosanoids generated from AA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), respectively, in high-energy microwaved rat brain using LC/MS/MS and two doses of LPS. In rats fed a lithium-free diet, low (0.5 ng/h)- or high (250 ng/h)-dose LPS compared with artificial cerebrospinal fluid increased brain unesterified AA and prostaglandin E(2) concentrations and activities of AA-selective Ca(2+)-dependent cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2))-IV and Ca(2+)-dependent secretory sPLA(2). LiCl feeding prevented these increments. Lithium had a significant main effect by increasing brain concentrations of lipoxygenase-derived AA metabolites, 5- hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE), 5-oxo-eicosatetranoic acid, and 17-hydroxy-DHA by 1.8-, 4.3- and 1.9-fold compared with control diet. Lithium also increased 15-HETE in high-dose LPS-infused rats. Ca(2+)-independent iPLA(2)-VI activity and unesterified DHA and docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-3) concentrations were unaffected by LPS or lithium. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that lithium can increase brain 17-hydroxy-DHA formation, indicating a new and potentially important therapeutic action of lithium.

  6. Intrauterine, postpartum and adult relationships between arachidonic acid (AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Remko S; Luxwolda, Martine F; Janneke Dijck-Brouwer, D A; Muskiet, Frits A J

    2011-11-01

    Erythrocyte (RBC) fatty acid compositions from populations with stable dietary habits but large variations in RBC-arachidonic (AA) and RBC-docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) provided us with insight into relationships between DHA and AA. It also enabled us to estimate the maternal RBC-DHA (mRBC-DHA) status that corresponded with no decrease in mRBC-DHA during pregnancy, or in infant (i) RBC-DHA or mRBC-DHA during the first 3 months postpartum (DHA-equilibrium) while exclusively breastfeeding. At delivery, iRBC-AA is uniformly high and independent of mRBC-AA. Infants born to mothers with low RBC-DHA exhibit higher, but infants born to mothers with high RBC-DHA exhibit lower RBC-DHA than their mothers. This switch from 'biomagnification' into 'bioattenuation' occurs at 6g% mRBC-DHA. At 6g%, mRBC-DHA is stable throughout pregnancy, corresponds with postpartum infant DHA-equilibrium of 6 and 0.4g% DHA in mature milk, but results in postpartum depletion of mRBC-DHA to 5g%. Postpartum maternal DHA-equilibrium is reached at 8g% mRBC-DHA, corresponding with 1g% DHA in mature milk and 7g% iRBC-DHA at delivery that increases to 8g% during lactation. This 8g% RBC-DHA concurs with the lowest risks of cardiovascular and psychiatric diseases in adults. RBC-data from 1866 infants, males and (non-)pregnant females indicated AA vs. DHA synergism at low RBC-DHA, but antagonism at high RBC-DHA. These data, together with high intakes of AA and DHA from our Paleolithic diet, suggest that bioattenuation of DHA during pregnancy and postnatal antagonism between AA and DHA are the physiological standard for humans across the life cycle. PMID:21561751

  7. Enhancement of arachidonic acid signaling pathway by nicotinic acid receptor HM74A

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yuting . E-mail: ytang@prdus.jnj.com; Zhou, Lubing; Gunnet, Joseph W.; Wines, Pamela G.; Cryan, Ellen V.; Demarest, Keith T.

    2006-06-23

    HM74A is a G protein-coupled receptor for nicotinic acid (niacin), which has been used clinically to treat dyslipidemia for decades. The molecular mechanisms whereby niacin exerts its pleiotropic effects on lipid metabolism remain largely unknown. In addition, the most common side effect in niacin therapy is skin flushing that is caused by prostaglandin release, suggesting that the phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2})/arachidonic acid (AA) pathway is involved. Various eicosanoids have been shown to activate peroxisome-proliferator activated receptors (PPAR) that play a diverse array of roles in lipid metabolism. To further elucidate the potential roles of HM74A in mediating the therapeutic effects and/or side effects of niacin, we sought to explore the signaling events upon HM74A activation. Here we demonstrated that HM74A synergistically enhanced UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner in A431 cells. Activation of HM74A also led to Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization and enhanced bradykinin-promoted Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization through Gi protein. While HM74A increased ERK1/2 activation by the bradykinin receptor, it had no effects on UTP-promoted ERK1/2 activation.Furthermore, UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release was significantly decreased in the presence of both MAPK kinase inhibitor PD 098059 and PKC inhibitor GF 109203X. However, the synergistic effects of HM74A were not dramatically affected by co-treatment with both inhibitors, indicating the cross-talk occurred at the receptor level. Finally, stimulation of A431 cells transiently transfected with PPRE-luciferase with AA significantly induced luciferase activity, mimicking the effects of PPAR{gamma} agonist rosiglitazone, suggesting that alteration of AA signaling pathway can regulate gene expression via endogenous PPARs.

  8. Extracts from Tribulus species may modulate platelet adhesion by interfering with arachidonic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Hamed, Arafa I; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The present work was designed to study the effects of crude extracts from Tribulus pterocarpus, T. pentandrus and T. parvispinus on selected biological functions of human blood platelets in vitro. Platelet suspensions were pre-incubated with extracts from aerial parts of T. pterocarpus, T. pentandrus and T. parvispinus, at the final concentrations of 0.5, 5 and 50 µg/ml. Then, for platelet activation thrombin, was used. The effects of crude extracts from T. pterocarpus, T. pentandrus and T. parvispinus on adhesion of blood platelets to collagen were determined by method according to Tuszynski and Murphy. Arachidonic acid metabolism was measured by the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). In these studies we also compared the action of tested crude plant extracts with the effects of the polyphenolic fraction isolated from aerial parts of T. pterocarpus, which has antiplatelet and antioxidative properties. The performed assays demonstrated that the tested crude extract from T. pterocarpus and the phenolic fraction from T. pterocarpus might influence the platelet functions in vitro. The inhibitory, concentration-dependent effects of this tested extract and its phenolic fraction on adhesion of resting platelets and thrombin - stimulated platelets to collagen was found. We also observed that the crude extract from T. pterocarpus, like the polyphenolic fraction from T. pterocarpus reduced TBARS production in blood platelets. In the comparative studies, the tested crude extract from T. pterocarpus was not found to be more effective antiplatelet factor, than the polyphenolic fraction from this plant. The results obtained suggest that T. pterocarpus may be a promising source of natural compounds, valuable in the prevention of the enhanced activity of blood platelets in numerous cardiovascular diseases.

  9. Culture media optimization of Porphyridium purpureum: production potential of biomass, total lipids, arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Mysore Doddaiah; Kathiresan, Shanmugam; Bhattacharya, Sila; Sarada, Ravi

    2016-05-01

    Porphyridium purpureum a red marine microalga is known for phycobiliproteins (PB), polyunsaturated fatty acids and sulphated exopolysaccharides. In the present study, effects of media constituents for the production of different polyunsaturated fatty acids from P. purpureum were considered using a response surface methodology (RSM). A second order polynomial was used to predict the response functions in terms of the independent variables such as the concentrations of sodium chloride, magnesium sulphate, sodium nitrate and potassium dihydrogen phosphate. The response functions were production of biomass yield, total lipid and polyunsaturated fatty acids like arachidonic acid (AA 20:4) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA 20:5). Results corroborated that maximum Biomass (0.95 gL(-1)) yield was at the concentrations of sodium chloride (14.89 gL(-1)), magnesium sulfate (3.93 gL(-1)) and sodium nitrate (0.96 gL(-1)) and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (0.09 gL(-1)). Optimum total lipid (17.9 % w/w) and EPA (34.6 % w/w) content was at the concentrations of sodium chloride (29.98 gL(-1)), magnesium sulfate (9.34 gL(-1)) and sodium nitrate (1.86 gL(-1)). Variation in concentration of potassium dihydrogen phosphate for both lipid (0.01gL(-1)) and EPA content (0.20 gL(-1)) was observed. The optimum conditions for biomass, total lipid, AA and EPA varied indicating their batch mode of growth and interaction effect of the salt.

  10. Lovastatin increases arachidonic acid levels and stimulates thromboxane synthesis in human liver and monocytic cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Hrboticky, N; Tang, L; Zimmer, B; Lux, I; Weber, P C

    1994-01-01

    The effect of lovastatin (LOV), the inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A reductase, on linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6) metabolism was examined in human monocytic Mono Mac 6 (MM6) and hepatoma Hep G2 cells. The desaturation of LA was examined after LOV (72 h, 10 microM) or dimethylsulfoxide (LOV carrier, < 0.1%) and [14C]LA (last 18 h, 0.3 microCi, 5 microM). In both cell lines, LOV reduced the percentage of 14C label associated with LA and increased the percentage of label in the 20:4n-6 and the 22:5n-6 fractions. In Hep G2 but not MM6 cells, this effect was fully reversible by means of coincubation with mevalonic acid (500 microM), but not with cholesterol or lipoproteins. In both cell lines, the LOV-mediated increase in LA desaturation resulted in dose-dependent reductions of LA and elevations of AA in cellular phospholipids. The lipids secreted by LOV-treated Hep G2 cells were also enriched in arachidonic acid (AA). In the MM6 cells, LOV increased release of thromboxane upon stimulation with the calcium ionophore A23187. In summary, our findings of higher LA desaturation and AA enrichment of lipids secreted by the Hep G2 cells suggest that LOV treatment may increase the delivery of AA from the liver to extrahepatic tissues. The changes in membrane fatty acid composition can influence a variety of cellular functions, such as eicosanoid synthesis in monocytic cells. The mechanism appears to be related to the reduced availability of intermediates of cholesterogenesis. PMID:8282787

  11. Induction of renal cytochrome P450 arachidonic acid epoxygenase activity by dietary gamma-linolenic acid.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhigang; Ng, Valerie Y; Su, Ping; Engler, Marguerite M; Engler, Mary B; Huang, Yong; Lin, Emil; Kroetz, Deanna L

    2006-05-01

    Dietary gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), a omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid found in borage oil (BOR), lowers systolic blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). GLA is converted into arachidonic acid (AA) by elongation and desaturation steps. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) are cytochrome P450 (P450)-derived AA eicosanoids with important roles in regulating blood pressure. This study tested the hypothesis that the blood pressure-lowering effect of a GLA-enriched diet involves alteration of P450-catalyzed AA metabolism. Microsomes and RNA were isolated from the renal cortex of male SHRs fed a basal fat-free diet for 5 weeks to which 11% by weight of sesame oil (SES) or BOR was added. There was a 2.6- to 3.5-fold increase in P450 epoxygenase activity in renal microsomes isolated from the BOR-fed SHRs compared with the SES-fed rats. Epoxygenase activity accounted for 58% of the total AA metabolism in the BOR-treated kidney microsomes compared with 33% in the SES-treated rats. More importantly, renal 14,15- and 8,9-EET levels increased 1.6- to 2.5-fold after dietary BOR treatment. The increase in EET formation is consistent with increases in CYP2C23, CYP2C11, and CYP2J protein levels. There were no differences in the level of renal P450 epoxygenase mRNA between the SES- and BOR-treated rats. Enhanced synthesis of the vasodilatory EETs and decreased formation of the vasoconstrictive 20-HETE suggests that changes in P450-mediated AA metabolism may contribute, at least in part, to the blood pressure-lowering effect of a BOR-enriched diet. PMID:16421287

  12. Arachidonic acid-derived signaling lipids and functions in impaired healing

    PubMed Central

    Dhall, Sandeep; Wijesinghe, Dayanjan Shanaka; Karim, Zubair A.; Castro, Anthony; Vemana, Hari Priya; Khasawneh, Fadi T.; Chalfant, Charles E.; Martins-Green, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Very little is known about lipid function during wound healing, and much less during impaired healing. Such understanding will help identify what roles lipid signaling plays in the development of impaired/chronic wounds. We took a lipidomics approach to study the alterations in lipid profile in the LIGHT−/− mouse model of impaired healing which has characteristics that resemble those of impaired/chronic wounds in humans, including high levels of oxidative stress, excess inflammation, increased extracellular matrix degradation and blood vessels with fibrin cuffs. The latter suggests excess coagulation and potentially increased platelet aggregation. We show here that in these impaired wounds there is an imbalance in the arachidonic acid (AA) derived eicosonoids that mediate or modulate inflammatory reactions and platelet aggregation. In the LIGHT−/− impaired wounds there is a significant increase in enzymatically derived breakdown products of AA. We found that early after injury there was a significant increase in the eicosanoids 11-, 12-, and 15-hydroxyeicosa-tetranoic acid, and the proinflammatory leukotrienes (LTD4 and LTE) and prostaglandins (PGE2 and PGF2α). Some of these eicosanoids also promote platelet aggregation. This led us to examine the levels of other eicosanoids known to be involved in the latter process. We found that thromboxane (TXA2/B2), and prostacyclins 6kPGF1α are elevated shortly after wounding and in some cases during healing. To determine whether they have an impact in platelet aggregation and hemostasis, we tested LIGHT−/− mouse wounds for these two parameters and found that, indeed, platelet aggregation and hemostasis are enhanced in these mice when compared with the control C57BL/6 mice. Understanding lipid signaling in impaired wounds can potentially lead to development of new therapeutics or in using existing nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents to help correct the course of healing. PMID:26135854

  13. Arachidonic acid-mediated inhibition of a potassium current in the giant neurons of Aplysia

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.O.

    1990-01-01

    Biochemical and electrophysiological approaches were used to investigate the role of arachidonic acid (AA) in the modulation of an inwardly rectifying potassium current (I{sub R}) in the giant neurons of the marine snail, Aplysia californica. Using ({sup 3}H)AA as tracer, the intracellular free AA pool in Aplysia ganglia was found to be in a state of constant and rapid turnover through deacylation and reacylation of phospholipid, primarily phosphatidyl-inositol. This constant turnover was accompanied by a constant release of free AA and eicosanoids into the extracellular medium. The effects of three pharmacological agents were characterized with regard to AA metabolism in Aplysia ganglia. 4-O-tetra-decanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), an activator of protein kinase C, stimulated liberation of AA from phospholipid, and 4-bromophenacylbromide (BPB), an inhibitor of phospholipate A{sub 2}, inhibited this liberation. Indomethacin at 250 {mu}M was found to inhibit uptake of AA, likely through inhibition of acyl-CoA synthetase. These agents were also found to modulate I{sub R} in ways which were consistent with their biological effects: TPA inhibited I{sub R}, and both BPB and indomethacin stimulated I{sub R} . Modulation of I{sub R} by these substances was found not to involve cAMP metabolism. Acute application of exogenous AA did not affect I{sub R}; however, I{sub R} in giant neurons was found to be inhibited after dialysis with AA or other unsaturated fatty acids. Also, after perfusion with BSA overnight, a treatment which strips the giant neurons of AA in lipid storage, I{sub R} was found to have increased over 2-fold. This perfusion-induced increase was inhibited by the presence of AA or by pretreatment of the giant neurons with BPB. These results suggest AA, provided through constant turnover from phospholipid, mediates constitutive inhibition of I{sub R}.

  14. Media optimization of Parietochloris incisa for arachidonic acid accumulation in an outdoor vertical tubular photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Tababa, Hazel Guevarra; Hirabayashi, Seishiro; Inubushi, Kazuyuki

    2012-08-01

    The green alga Parietochloris incisa contains a significant amount of the nutritionally valuable polyunsaturated fatty acid and arachidonic acid (AA) and is being considered for mass cultivation for commercial AA production. This study was primarily aimed to define a practical medium formulation that can be used in commercial mass cultivation that will contribute to a substantial increase in the AA productivity of P. incisa with concomitant reduction of nutritional cost. The effect of nutrient limitation on growth and AA content of this microalga was explored in a batch culture in outdoor conditions using a vertical tubular photobioreactor. The study was conducted in two parts: the first was primarily focused on the effect of different nitrogen concentration on growth and AA content and the second part compares nitrogen deprivation, combination of nitrogen and phosphorus deprivation, and combined overall nutrient limitations at different levels of deprivation under low and high population densities. Since complete nitrogen deprivation hampers lipid and AA accumulation of P. incisa, thus, a critical value of nitrogen supply that will activate AA accumulation must be elucidated under specific growth conditions. Under the present experimental conditions, 0.5 g(-1) sodium nitrate obtained a higher AA productivity and volumetric yield relative to the nitrogen-deprived culture corresponding to 36.32 mg L(-1) day(-1) and 523.19 mg L(-1). The combined nitrogen and phosphorus limitation seemed to enhance AA productivity better than nitrogen deprivation alone. The effect of overall nutrient limitation indicates that acute nutrient deficiency can trigger rapid lipid and AA syntheses. The effect of light as a consequence of culture cell density was also discussed. This study therefore shows that the nutrient cost can be greatly reduced by adjusting the nutrient levels and culture density to induce AA accumulation in P. incisa. PMID:22798718

  15. Lipid Body Organelles within the Parasite Trypanosoma cruzi: A Role for Intracellular Arachidonic Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Daniel A M; Roque, Natália R; Teixeira, Lívia; Milán-Garcés, Erix A; Carneiro, Alan B; Almeida, Mariana R; Andrade, Gustavo F S; Martins, Jefferson S; Pinho, Roberto R; Freire-de-Lima, Célio G; Bozza, Patrícia T; D'Avila, Heloisa; Melo, Rossana C N

    2016-01-01

    Most eukaryotic cells contain varying amounts of cytosolic lipidic inclusions termed lipid bodies (LBs) or lipid droplets (LDs). In mammalian cells, such as macrophages, these lipid-rich organelles are formed in response to host-pathogen interaction during infectious diseases and are sites for biosynthesis of arachidonic acid (AA)-derived inflammatory mediators (eicosanoids). Less clear are the functions of LBs in pathogenic lower eukaryotes. In this study, we demonstrated that LBs, visualized by light microscopy with different probes and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), are produced in trypomastigote forms of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas' disease, after both host interaction and exogenous AA stimulation. Quantitative TEM revealed that LBs from amastigotes, the intracellular forms of the parasite, growing in vivo have increased size and electron-density compared to LBs from amastigotes living in vitro. AA-stimulated trypomastigotes released high amounts of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and showed PGE2 synthase expression. Raman spectroscopy demonstrated increased unsaturated lipid content and AA incorporation in stimulated parasites. Moreover, both Raman and MALDI mass spectroscopy revealed increased AA content in LBs purified from AA-stimulated parasites compared to LBs from unstimulated group. By using a specific technique for eicosanoid detection, we immunolocalized PGE2 within LBs from AA-stimulated trypomastigotes. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that LBs from the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi are not just lipid storage inclusions but dynamic organelles, able to respond to host interaction and inflammatory events and involved in the AA metabolism. Acting as sources of PGE2, a potent immunomodulatory lipid mediator that inhibits many aspects of innate and adaptive immunity, newly-formed parasite LBs may be implicated with the pathogen survival in its host. PMID:27490663

  16. [Cyclooxygenase inhibitors in some dietary vegetables inhibit platelet aggregation function induced by arachidonic acid].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Hua; Shao, Dong-Hua; Liang, Guo-Wei; Zhang, Ru; Xin, Qin; Zhang, Tao; Cao, Qing-Yun

    2011-10-01

    The study was purposed to investigate whether the cyclooxygenase inhibitors from some dietary vegetables can inhibit platelet aggregation function by the arachidonic acid (AA). The vegetable juice was mixed with platelet rich plasma (PRP), and asprin was used as positive control. The maximum ratio of platelet aggregation induced by AA was measured on the aggregometer; heme and cyclooxygenase-1 (COX(1)) or cyclooxygenase-2 (COX(2)) were added to test tubes containing COX reaction buffer, the mixture was vortex-mixed and exposed to aspirin or vegetable juice, followed by addition of AA and then hydrochloric acid (1 mol/L) was added to stop the COX reaction, followed by chemical reduction with stannous chloride solution. The concentration of COX inhibitors was detected by the enzyme immunoassay kit; vegetable juice (aspirin as positive control) was mixed with whole blood, which was followed by the addition of AA, and then the reaction was stopped by adding indomethacin, centrifuged, then the supernatant was collected, and the plasma thromboxane B(2) (TXB(2)) was measured by radioimmunoassay. The results showed that spinach juice, garlic bolt juice, blanched garlic leave juice and Chinese leek juice could inhibit by 80% human platelet aggregation induced by AA. 4 kinds of vegetables were all found a certain amount of cyclooxygenase inhibitors, which COX(1) and COX(2) inhibitor concentrations of spinach were higher than that of aspirin; 4 vegetable juice could significantly reduce the human plasma concentrations of TXB(2) induced by AA (p < 0.05). It is concluded that 4 kinds of raw vegetables containing cyclooxygenase inhibitors inhibit the production of TXA(2) and thus hinder platelet aggregation. Raw spinach, garlic bolt, blanched garlic and chinese leek inhibit significantly AA-induced human platelet aggregation in vitro. 4 kinds of vegetables may have a good potential perspective of anti-platelet aggregation therapy or prevention of thrombosis.

  17. Acid rain: effects on arachidonic acid metabolism in perfused and ventilated guinea-pig lung.

    PubMed

    Preziosi, P; Ciabattoni, G

    1987-11-01

    Isolated, perfused and ventilated guinea-pig lungs were exposed for 10 min to acid (sulphuric + nitric acid) aerosol mimicking acid rain at pH 4.5 or 2.5, as well as to a control distilled water aerosol (pH 6.0-6.5). Lung perfusing solution was recovered and thromboxane (TX) B2 and leukotriene (LT) B4 were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) techniques. In a series of experiments TXB2 release averaged 0.43 +/- 0.18 (+/- SD) ng/min during exposure to distilled water aerosol and increased to 0.70 +/- 0.30 ng/min during exposure to acid aerosol at pH 4.5 (P less than 0.05). In a second series of experiments TXB2 release was 0.46 +/- 0.18 ng/min and increased to 1.07 +/- 0.51 ng/min (P less than 0.01) after acid aerosol at pH 2.5. In both cases LTB4 release, reflecting lipoxygenase activity, was unchanged. LTC4 levels were not measurable under basal conditions as well as after exposure to acid aerosol. A pneumoconstriction was also observed, being more pronounced after acid aerosol at pH 2.5. Individual sulphuric and nitric acid aerosol component solutions at pH 2.5 evoked TXB2 and airway resistance changes corresponding to those observed with the mixed acid aerosol. LTB4 was not modified. Acid rain inhalation may directly stimulate pathways leading to the bronchoconstrictor and pro-aggregating TXA2 synthesis in isolated guinea-pig lung, without affecting the lipoxygenase pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism.

  18. Effects of a low birthweight infant formula containing human milk levels of docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acids.

    PubMed

    Koletzko, B; Edenhofer, S; Lipowsky, G; Reinhardt, D

    1995-08-01

    Long-chain (LC) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) (LCP) are considered conditionally essential nutrients for low birth weight infants (LBWI). Therefore, enrichment of LBWI formulae with metabolites both linoleic (omega-6) and alpha-linolenic (omega-3) acids at levels typical for human milk has been recommended. However, previous feeding trials with LCP-enriched formulae evaluated only a dietary supplementation with omega-3 LCP from fish oils alone or with both omega-3 and omega-6 LCP at levels considerably lower than usual human milk contents. We studied the effects of an LBWI formula providing the major omega-3 and omega-6 LCP, docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acids, in amounts similar to those in average human milk. Twenty-seven LBWIs were enrolled in this study when they tolerated full enteral feeding (> or = 130 ml milk/kg/day). Infants either received their own mother's milk (n = 8, birthweight 1218 +/- 146 g, gestational age 30.2 +/- 1.5 weeks, mean +/- SD) fortified with protein and minerals (FM-85, Nestle Ag, Munchen, Germany; dosage 5 g/100 ml milk) or were randomly assigned to blinded batches of an LBWI formula (Prematil, Milupa AG, Friedrichsdorf, Germany) without LCP (n = 10, 1280 +/- 229 g, 31.1 +/- 3.1 weeks) or with LCP (n = 9, 1253 +/- 334 g, 30.4 +/- 3.3 wks.). During the study period of 21 days, the three feeding groups did not differ in growth and feeding tolerances as assessed by occurrence of gastric residuals, spitting, or abdominal distention; however, firms stools were noted more frequently in the two formula groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Eugenol: a dual inhibitor of platelet-activating factor and arachidonic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Saeed, S A; Simjee, R U; Shamim, G; Gilani, A H

    1995-07-01

    Eugenol is an active principal and responsible for several pharmacological activities of clove oil. We studied the effects of eugenol on human platelet aggregation, arachidonic acid (AA) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) metabolism and in vivo effects on AA and PAF-induced shock in rabbits. Eugenol strongly inhibited PAF-induced platelet aggregation with lesser effect against AA and collegen. The IC(50) values were against AA: 31 ± 0.5; collagen: 64 ± 0.7 and PAF 7 ± 0.2 μM (n=9) respectively. In addition, eugenol stimulated PAF-acetylhydrolase activity suggesting that inhibition of PAF could be due to its inactivation to lyso-PAF. Pretreatment of rabbits with eugenol (50-100 mg/kg) prevented the lethal effects of intravenous PAF (11 μgg/kg) or AA (2 mg/kg) in a dose-dependent fashion. The protective effects of eugenol in the rabbits, however, were more pronounced against PAF-induced mortality (100% protection). In addition, eugenol also inhibited AA metabolism via cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways in human platelets. Both the production of thromboxane-A(2) and 12-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid was inhibited by eugenol in a concentration-related manner (30-120 μM). In vivo, eugenol (50-100 mg/kg; i.p.) inhibited carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema (P < 0.001). In this test, eugenol was 5 times more potent than aspirin. These results provide evidence that eugenol acts as a dual antagonist of AA and PAF. PMID:23196096

  20. The contribution of arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase in tissue macrophages to adipose tissue remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kwon, H-J; Kim, S-N; Kim, Y-A; Lee, Y-H

    2016-01-01

    Cellular plasticity in adipose tissue involves adipocyte death, its clearance, and de novo adipogenesis, enabling homeostatic turnover and adaptation to metabolic challenges; however, mechanisms regulating these serial events are not fully understood. The present study investigated the roles of arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase (Alox15) in the clearance of dying adipocytes by adipose tissue macrophages. First, upregulation of Alox15 expression and apoptotic adipocyte death in gonadal white adipose tissue (gWAT) were characterized during adipose tissue remodeling induced by β3-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Next, an in vitro reconstruction of adipose tissue macrophages and apoptotic adipocytes recapitulated adipocyte clearance by macrophages and demonstrated that macrophages co-cultured with apoptotic adipocytes increased the expression of efferocytosis-related genes. Genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of Alox15 diminished the levels of adipocyte clearance by macrophages in a co-culture system. Gene expression profiling of macrophages isolated from gWAT of Alox15 knockout (KO) mice demonstrated distinct phenotypes, especially downregulation of genes involved in lipid uptake and metabolism compared to wild-type mice. Finally, in vivo β3-adrenergic stimulation in Alox15 KO mice failed to recruit crown-like structures, a macrophage network clearing dying adipocytes in gWAT. Consequently, in Alox15 KO mice, proliferation/differentiation of adipocyte progenitors and β3-adrenergic remodeling of gWAT were impaired compared to wild-type control mice. Collectively, our data established a pivotal role of Alox15 in the resolution of adipocyte death and in adipose tissue remodeling. PMID:27362803

  1. Culture media optimization of Porphyridium purpureum: production potential of biomass, total lipids, arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Mysore Doddaiah; Kathiresan, Shanmugam; Bhattacharya, Sila; Sarada, Ravi

    2016-05-01

    Porphyridium purpureum a red marine microalga is known for phycobiliproteins (PB), polyunsaturated fatty acids and sulphated exopolysaccharides. In the present study, effects of media constituents for the production of different polyunsaturated fatty acids from P. purpureum were considered using a response surface methodology (RSM). A second order polynomial was used to predict the response functions in terms of the independent variables such as the concentrations of sodium chloride, magnesium sulphate, sodium nitrate and potassium dihydrogen phosphate. The response functions were production of biomass yield, total lipid and polyunsaturated fatty acids like arachidonic acid (AA 20:4) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA 20:5). Results corroborated that maximum Biomass (0.95 gL(-1)) yield was at the concentrations of sodium chloride (14.89 gL(-1)), magnesium sulfate (3.93 gL(-1)) and sodium nitrate (0.96 gL(-1)) and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (0.09 gL(-1)). Optimum total lipid (17.9 % w/w) and EPA (34.6 % w/w) content was at the concentrations of sodium chloride (29.98 gL(-1)), magnesium sulfate (9.34 gL(-1)) and sodium nitrate (1.86 gL(-1)). Variation in concentration of potassium dihydrogen phosphate for both lipid (0.01gL(-1)) and EPA content (0.20 gL(-1)) was observed. The optimum conditions for biomass, total lipid, AA and EPA varied indicating their batch mode of growth and interaction effect of the salt. PMID:27407193

  2. Effect of Arachidonic Acid-enriched Oil Diet Supplementation on the Taste of Broiler Meat

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, H.; Rikimaru, K.; Kiyohara, R.; Yamaguchi, S.

    2012-01-01

    To elucidate the relationship between the arachidonic acid (AA) content and the taste of broiler meat, the effects of AA-enriched oil (AAO) supplements on the fatty acid content and sensory perceptions of thigh meat were evaluated. Four types of oil, including corn oil (CO), a 1:1 mixture of AAO and palm oil (PO) (1/2 AAO), a 1:3 mixture of AAO and PO (1/4 AAO), and a 1:7 mixture of AAO and PO (1/8 AAO) were prepared. Each type of oil was mixed with silicate at a ratio of 7:3, and added to the diet at a final proportion of 5% of fresh matter. Broiler chickens were fed these diets for 1 wk before slaughter. In thigh meat, the AA content of the 1/2 and 1/4 AAO groups was significantly higher than that of the CO group. The AA content in thigh meat (y, mg/g) increased linearly with increasing dietary AAO content (x, g/100 g of diet), according to the equation y = 0.5674+0.4596× (r2 = 0.8454). The content of other fatty acids was not significantly different among the 4 diet groups. Sensory evaluation showed that the flavor intensity, umami (L-glutamate taste), kokumi (continuity, mouthfulness, and thickness), and aftertaste of the 1/2 and 1/4 AAO groups were significantly higher than that of the CO group. There were significant positive correlations between AA content in thigh meat and the flavor intensity, total taste intensity, umami, and aftertaste. These data suggest that the taste of broiler meat can be improved by the amount of dietary AA supplementation. PMID:25049636

  3. Absorption and metabolism of orally fed arachidonic and linoleic acid in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, A.; Melin, T. )

    1988-11-01

    ({sup 3}H)arachidonic (({sup 3}H)20:4) and ({sup 14}C)linoleic acid ({sup 14}C)18:2 were fed to rats in Intralipid or cream. Later (30-240 min) the stomach, small intestine, plasma, and liver were analyzed for radioactivity in different lipid classes. ({sup 3}H)20:4 and ({sup 14}C)18:2 were emptied from the stomach and absorbed by the intestine at similar rates. The ({sup 3}H)20:4:({sup 14}C)18:2 ratio of the lipids in the small intestinal wall increased, however, with time. This was due to a higher retention of ({sup 3}H)20:4 than ({sup 14}C)18:2 in intestinal phospholipids. In contrast, more of the ({sup 14}C)18:2 was in triacylglycerol of the small intestine and plasma. The highest {sup 3}H:{sup 14}C ratios were found in phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol. The {sup 3}H:{sup 14}C ratio of intestinal phosphatidylcholine varied with the type of fat vehicle used, being highest in the Intralipid experiments. After feeding Intralipid (30-60 min), significantly more of the plasma ({sup 3}H)20:4 than plasma ({sup 14}C)18:2 was in diacylglycerol, the {sup 3}H:{sup 14}C ratio of which was much higher than that of plasma free fatty acids. ({sup 3}H)20:4 and ({sup 14}C)18:2 of chyle triacylglycerol are thus metabolized differently.

  4. Lipid Body Organelles within the Parasite Trypanosoma cruzi: A Role for Intracellular Arachidonic Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Daniel A. M.; Roque, Natália R.; Teixeira, Lívia; Milán-Garcés, Erix A.; Carneiro, Alan B.; Almeida, Mariana R.; Andrade, Gustavo F. S.; Martins, Jefferson S.; Pinho, Roberto R.; Freire-de-Lima, Célio G.; Bozza, Patrícia T.; D’Avila, Heloisa

    2016-01-01

    Most eukaryotic cells contain varying amounts of cytosolic lipidic inclusions termed lipid bodies (LBs) or lipid droplets (LDs). In mammalian cells, such as macrophages, these lipid-rich organelles are formed in response to host-pathogen interaction during infectious diseases and are sites for biosynthesis of arachidonic acid (AA)-derived inflammatory mediators (eicosanoids). Less clear are the functions of LBs in pathogenic lower eukaryotes. In this study, we demonstrated that LBs, visualized by light microscopy with different probes and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), are produced in trypomastigote forms of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas’ disease, after both host interaction and exogenous AA stimulation. Quantitative TEM revealed that LBs from amastigotes, the intracellular forms of the parasite, growing in vivo have increased size and electron-density compared to LBs from amastigotes living in vitro. AA-stimulated trypomastigotes released high amounts of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and showed PGE2 synthase expression. Raman spectroscopy demonstrated increased unsaturated lipid content and AA incorporation in stimulated parasites. Moreover, both Raman and MALDI mass spectroscopy revealed increased AA content in LBs purified from AA-stimulated parasites compared to LBs from unstimulated group. By using a specific technique for eicosanoid detection, we immunolocalized PGE2 within LBs from AA-stimulated trypomastigotes. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that LBs from the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi are not just lipid storage inclusions but dynamic organelles, able to respond to host interaction and inflammatory events and involved in the AA metabolism. Acting as sources of PGE2, a potent immunomodulatory lipid mediator that inhibits many aspects of innate and adaptive immunity, newly-formed parasite LBs may be implicated with the pathogen survival in its host. PMID:27490663

  5. A New Model to Study the Role of Arachidonic Acid in Colon Cancer Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yang-Yi; Callaway, Evelyn; M Monk, Jennifer; S Goldsby, Jennifer; Yang, Peiying; Vincent, Logan; S Chapkin, Robert

    2016-09-01

    A significant increase in cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) gene expression has been shown to promote cylcooxygenase-dependent colon cancer development. Controversy associated with the role of COX2 inhibitors indicates that additional work is needed to elucidate the effects of arachidonic acid (AA)-derived (cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase) eicosanoids in cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis. We have recently developed a novel Fads1 knockout mouse model that allows for the investigation of AA-dependent eicosanoid deficiency without the complication of essential fatty acid deficiency. Interestingly, the survival rate of Fads1-null mice is severely compromised after 2 months on a semi-purified AA-free diet, which precludes long-term chemoprevention studies. Therefore, in this study, dietary AA levels were titrated to determine the minimal level required for survival, while maintaining a distinct AA-deficient phenotype. Null mice supplemented with AA (0.1%, 0.4%, 0.6%, 2.0%, w/w) in the diet exhibited a dose-dependent increase (P < 0.05) in AA, PGE2, 6-keto PGF1α, TXB2, and EdU-positive proliferative cells in the colon. In subsequent experiments, null mice supplemented with 0.6% AA diet were injected with a colon-specific carcinogen (azoxymethane) in order to assess cancer susceptibility. Null mice exhibited significantly (P < 0.05) reduced levels/multiplicity of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) as compared with wild-type sibling littermate control mice. These data indicate that (i) basal/minimal dietary AA supplementation (0.6%) expands the utility of the Fads1-null mouse model for long-term cancer prevention studies and (ii) that AA content in the colonic epithelium modulates colon cancer risk. Cancer Prev Res; 9(9); 750-7. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27339171

  6. DIBROMOACETIC ACID-INDUCED ELEVATIONS IN CIRCULATING ESTRADIOL: EFFECTS IN BOTH CYCLING AND OVARIECTOMIZED/STEROID-PRIMED FEMALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    RTD-03-031
    Goldman, JM and Murr, AS. Dibromoacetic Acid-induced Elevations in Circulating Estradiol: Effects in Both Cycling and Ovariectomized/Steroid-primed Female Rats. Reproductive Toxicology (in press).

    Abstract

    Oral exposures to high concentrations of th...

  7. Gallic acid induces apoptosis in EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancers by accelerating EGFR turnover.

    PubMed

    Nam, Boas; Rho, Jin Kyung; Shin, Dong-Myung; Son, Jaekyoung

    2016-10-01

    Gallic acid is a common botanic phenolic compound, which is present in plants and foods worldwide. Gallic acid is implicated in various biological processes such as cell growth and apoptosis. Indeed, gallic acid has been shown to induce apoptosis in many cancer types. However, the molecular mechanisms of gallic acid-induced apoptosis in cancer, particularly lung cancer, are still unclear. Here, we report that gallic acid induces apoptosis in EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, but not in EGFR-WT NSCLC cells. Treatment with gallic acid resulted in a significant reduction in proliferation and induction of apoptosis, only in EGFR-mutant NSCLC cells. Interestingly, treatment with gallic acid led to a robust decrease in EGFR levels, which is critical for NSCLC survival. Treatment with gallic acid had no significant effect on transcription, but induced EGFR turnover. Indeed, treatment with a proteasome inhibitor dramatically reversed gallic acid-induced EGFR downregulation. Moreover, treatment with gallic acid induced EGFR turnover leading to apoptosis in EGFR-TKI (tyrosine kinase inhibitor)-resistant cell lines, which are dependent on EGFR signaling for survival. Thus, these studies suggest that gallic acid can induce apoptosis in EGFR-dependent lung cancers that are dependent on EGFR for growth and survival via acceleration of EGFR turnover.

  8. Gallic acid induces apoptosis in EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancers by accelerating EGFR turnover.

    PubMed

    Nam, Boas; Rho, Jin Kyung; Shin, Dong-Myung; Son, Jaekyoung

    2016-10-01

    Gallic acid is a common botanic phenolic compound, which is present in plants and foods worldwide. Gallic acid is implicated in various biological processes such as cell growth and apoptosis. Indeed, gallic acid has been shown to induce apoptosis in many cancer types. However, the molecular mechanisms of gallic acid-induced apoptosis in cancer, particularly lung cancer, are still unclear. Here, we report that gallic acid induces apoptosis in EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, but not in EGFR-WT NSCLC cells. Treatment with gallic acid resulted in a significant reduction in proliferation and induction of apoptosis, only in EGFR-mutant NSCLC cells. Interestingly, treatment with gallic acid led to a robust decrease in EGFR levels, which is critical for NSCLC survival. Treatment with gallic acid had no significant effect on transcription, but induced EGFR turnover. Indeed, treatment with a proteasome inhibitor dramatically reversed gallic acid-induced EGFR downregulation. Moreover, treatment with gallic acid induced EGFR turnover leading to apoptosis in EGFR-TKI (tyrosine kinase inhibitor)-resistant cell lines, which are dependent on EGFR signaling for survival. Thus, these studies suggest that gallic acid can induce apoptosis in EGFR-dependent lung cancers that are dependent on EGFR for growth and survival via acceleration of EGFR turnover. PMID:27597244

  9. DIBROMOACETIC ACID-INDUCED ELEVATIONS OF ESTRADIOL IN THE CYCLING AND OVARIECTOMOZED/ESTRADIOL-IMPLANTED FEMALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Goldman, JM and Murr, AS. Dibromoacetic Acid-induced Elevations of Estradiol in Both Cycling and Ovariectomized / Estradiol-implanted Female Rats

    ABSTRACT
    Haloacetic acids are one of the principal classes of disinfection by-products generated by the chlorination of mun...

  10. Effect of a novel NK1 receptor selective antagonist (NKP608) on citric acid induced cough and airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    El-Hashim, A Z; Wyss, D; Lewis, C

    2004-01-01

    The effects of an orally administered novel and selective NK1 antagonist, NKP608, on cough and airway obstruction, induced by citric acid in guinea pigs, were investigated. Guinea pigs were pre-treated with 0.03, 0.3 and 1 mg kg(-1) of NKP608, the NK2 antagonist, SR48968 or both 2 h prior to challenge with citric acid (0.6 M) for a 10 min period. Guinea pigs pre-treated with 0.03, 0.3 and 1mgkg(-1) of NKP608 exhibited a significant reduction of 77, 74 and 79%, respectively, in the numbers of cough compared to vehicle pre-treated animals (P<0.05). SR48968, 10 mg kg(-1), alone did not significantly affect the citric acid-induced cough but when co-administered with 1 mg kg(-1) of NKP608, there was a significant 90% reduction in cough. NKP608 did not significantly reduce the citric acid-induced increase in Penh at any of the doses used. SR48968 significantly reduced the citric acid induced airway obstruction by about 50%. However, when SR48968 was co-administered with NKP608, there was a greater (73%) decrease in the airway obstruction compared with SR48968 alone. These data show that NKP608, a selective NK1 receptor antagonist, is a potent inhibitor of citric acid induced cough in guinea pigs and may therefore have value in the therapy of clinical cough.

  11. "Play It by Ear"--Teachers' Responses to Ear-Playing Tasks during One-to-One Instrumental Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varvarigou, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports findings from the Ear-Playing Project in relation to the teaching strategies that 15 instrumental teachers adopted during one-to-one instrumental lessons whilst helping their students to copy music by ear from a recording. Overall, the teachers used a variety of strategies including singing and humming along with or without the…

  12. [Effects of noise on inner ear].

    PubMed

    Bouccara, Didier; Ferrary, Evelyne; Sterkers, Olivier

    2006-11-01

    The effects of noise on health depend both on individual factors and characteristics of sound exposure. In case of acoustic trauma, reversible or irreversible lesions of inner ear components are possible. Most often there is immediately an acute tinnitus and hearing loss. Audiometric tests demonstrate hearing loss on the high frequency, generally focused on 4 kHz. Immediate treatment is recommended even there is no currently indicator of the ability to restore hearing. New perspectives on treatment are directed to local treatment and/or using new procedure as antioxidative treatment. Occupational and leisure are the two conditions in which chronic exposure to noise is found. Detection and prevention of noise-induced hearing loss is easier in case of industrial workers than in case of noise exposition for musicians and other sounds and stage technicians or concert managers, and of course non-professional with exposure to amplified music.

  13. Analysis of Earing in Deep Drawn Cups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aretz, Holger; Aegerter, Johannes; Engler, Olaf

    2010-06-01

    The cup-drawing of a strongly anisotropic sheet metal is simulated using a commercial finite element software along with a user material subroutine. In order to accurately describe the plastic anisotropy of the material the well-known recent yield function `Yld2004-18p' is extended. Regarding the experimental characterization of the considered material the occurrence of dynamic strain aging lead to an oscillating signal of the width change of the tensile samples, which prevented a reliable determination of plastic strain ratios (r-values). Thus, an improved measurement concept was developed that leads to a very robust and reproducible determination of r-values. Furthermore, a novel plane-strain tensile test sample is presented which is used for the characterization of the plastic anisotropy in biaxial loading states. A quantitative comparison with measured earing profiles of deep drawn cups illustrates the predictive capabilities of the numerical simulation.

  14. Mechanics of the exceptional anuran ear

    PubMed Central

    Segenhout, Johannes M.; van Dijk, Pim

    2008-01-01

    The anuran ear is frequently used for studying fundamental properties of vertebrate auditory systems. This is due to its unique anatomical features, most prominently the lack of a basilar membrane and the presence of two dedicated acoustic end organs, the basilar papilla and the amphibian papilla. Our current anatomical and functional knowledge implies that three distinct regions can be identified within these two organs. The basilar papilla functions as a single auditory filter. The low-frequency portion of the amphibian papilla is an electrically tuned, tonotopically organized auditory end organ. The high-frequency portion of the amphibian papilla is mechanically tuned and tonotopically organized, and it emits spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. This high-frequency portion of the amphibian papilla shows a remarkable, functional resemblance to the mammalian cochlea. PMID:18386018

  15. Ear reconstruction with porous polyethylene implants.

    PubMed

    Berghaus, Alexander; Stelter, Klaus; Naumann, Andreas; Hempel, John Martin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a surgical technique using porous polyethylene as the framework material for ear reconstruction. In comparison to the use of rib cartilage, porous polyethylene - first described by Berghaus in 1982 - provides better definition and projection as well as congruency with the opposite side. Hospitalization time is significantly shorter. There are less surgical interventions than with traditional microtia operations that use rib cartilage, and the patient is spared the additional procedure needed to remove the rib cartilage, with all the associated complications as well as the resulting thorax scar. Also, reconstruction can take place at an earlier age, which is advantageous for those concerned. Using porous polyethylene as the frame material, a temporoparietal flap and full-thickness skin cover, we have been able to achieve very convincing results over recent years.

  16. Comparison of ear tissue regeneration in mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Williams-Boyce, P K; Daniel, J C

    1986-01-01

    These studies, on a variety of laboratory, zoo and agricultural animals, show that the phenomenon of replacement of tissues lost in an ear punch is common to some other mammals as well as the rabbit, although the rabbit appears to be the most proficient in this process. It is suggested that the cartilage may be replaced in two ways, namely through the formation of a blastema as originally hypothesised by Markelova (Vorontsova & Liosner, 1960), and also from the perichondrium. The finding of bone tissue is supportive evidence enabling the suggestion that dedifferentiation, followed by deviant redifferentiation, does occur in the process of regeneration. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:3693110

  17. Passage of albumin from the middle ear to the inner ear in otitis media in the chinchilla

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, B.; Goycoolea, M.V.; Schleivert, P.M.; Shea, D.; Schachern, P.; Paparella, M.M.; Carpenter, A.M.

    1981-08-01

    A study of the permeability of the middle ear-inner ear interface for macromolecules was carried out in chinchillas with open and obstructed eustachian tubes utilizing tritiated human serum albumin and immunoelectrophoresis. Tritiated albumin was placed in the round window niche area or normal animals and animals in which the eustachian tubes had been obstructed for 24 hours or 14 days. The tritiated albumin was allowed to remain in the middle ear cavity for 24 hours, Samples of middle ear effusion, perilymph, blood and cerebrospinal fluid were collected and measured for radioactivity. Radioactivity was demonstrated in the perilymph. Samples of middle ear effusions and perilymph were also studied by immunoelectrophoresis with goat antihuman albumin. Albumin placed in the round window niche of an experimental animal could be recovered unchanged in the perilymph. The results suggest a pathophysiologic explanation for the association of otitis media and sensorineural hearing loss or endolymphatic hydrops.

  18. Multiple copies of a bile acid-inducible gene in Eubacterium sp. strain VPI 12708.

    PubMed Central

    Gopal-Srivastava, R; Mallonee, D H; White, W B; Hylemon, P B

    1990-01-01

    Eubacterium sp. strain VPI 12708 is an anaerobic intestinal bacterium which possesses inducible bile acid 7-dehydroxylation activity. Several new polypeptides are produced in this strain following induction with cholic acid. Genes coding for two copies of a bile acid-inducible 27,000-dalton polypeptide (baiA1 and baiA2) have been previously cloned and sequenced. We now report on a gene coding for a third copy of this 27,000-dalton polypeptide (baiA3). The baiA3 gene has been cloned in lambda DASH on an 11.2-kilobase DNA fragment from a partial Sau3A digest of the Eubacterium DNA. DNA sequence analysis of the baiA3 gene revealed 100% homology with the baiA1 gene within the coding region of the 27,000-dalton polypeptides. The baiA2 gene shares 81% sequence identity with the other two genes at the nucleotide level. The flanking nucleotide sequences associated with the baiA1 and baiA3 genes are identical for 930 bases in the 5' direction from the initiation codon and for at least 325 bases in the 3' direction from the stop codon, including the putative promoter regions for the genes. An additional open reading frame (occupying from 621 to 648 bases, depending on the correct start codon) was found in the identical 5' regions associated with the baiA1 and baiA3 clones. The 5' sequence 930 bases upstream from the baiA1 and baiA3 genes was totally divergent. The baiA2 gene, which is part of a large bile acid-inducible operon, showed no homology with the other two genes either in the 5' or 3' direction from the polypeptide coding region, except for a 15-base-pair presumed ribosome-binding site in the 5' region. These studies strongly suggest that a gene duplication (baiA1 and baiA3) has occurred and is stably maintained in this bacterium. Images PMID:2376563

  19. Rho Kinase ROCK2 Mediates Acid-Induced NADPH Oxidase NOX5-S Expression in Human Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Weibiao

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of the progression from Barrett’s esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) are not fully understood. We have shown that NOX5-S may be involved in this progression. However, how acid upregulates NOX5-S is not well known. We found that acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression was significantly decreased by the Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y27632 in BE mucosal biopsies and FLO-1 EA cells. In addition, acid treatment significantly increased the Rho kinase activity in FLO-1 cells. The acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production was significantly decreased by knockdown of Rho kinase ROCK2, but not by knockdown of ROCK1. Conversely, the overexpression of the constitutively active ROCK2, but not the constitutively active ROCK1, significantly enhanced the NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production. Moreover, the acid-induced increase in Rho kinase activity and in NOX5-S mRNA expression was blocked by the removal of calcium in both FLO-1 and OE33 cells. The calcium ionophore A23187 significantly increased the Rho kinase activity and NOX5-S mRNA expression. We conclude that acid-induced increase in NOX5-S expression and H2O2 production may depend on the activation of ROCK2, but not ROCK1, in EA cells. The acid-induced activation of Rho kinase may be mediated by the intracellular calcium increase. It is possible that persistent acid reflux present in BE patients may increase the intracellular calcium, activate ROCK2 and thereby upregulate NOX5-S. High levels of reactive oxygen species derived from NOX5-S may cause DNA damage and thereby contribute to the progression from BE to EA. PMID:26901778

  20. Anti-Inflammation Effects and Potential Mechanism of Saikosaponins by Regulating Nicotinate and Nicotinamide Metabolism and Arachidonic Acid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yu; Bao, Yongrui; Wang, Shuai; Li, Tianjiao; Chang, Xin; Yang, Guanlin; Meng, Xiansheng

    2016-08-01

    Inflammation is an important immune response; however, excessive inflammation causes severe tissue damages and secondary inflammatory injuries. The long-term and ongoing uses of routinely used drugs such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) are associated with serious adverse reactions, and not all patients have a well response to them. Consequently, therapeutic products with more safer and less adverse reaction are constantly being sought. Radix Bupleuri, a well-known traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects. However, saikosaponins (SS) as the main pharmacodynamic active ingredient, their pharmacological effects and action mechanism in anti-inflammation have not been reported frequently. This study aimed to explore the anti-inflammatory activity of SS and clarify the potential mechanism in acute inflammatory mice induced by subcutaneous injection of formalin in hind paws. Paw edema was detected as an index to evaluate the anti-inflammatory efficacy of SS. Then, a metabolomic method was used to investigate the changed metabolites and potential mechanism of SS. Metabolite profiling was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography combined with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-Q-TOF-MS). The detection and identification of the changed metabolites were systematically analyzed by multivariate data and pathway analysis. As a result, 12 different potential biomarkers associated with SS in anti-inflammation were identified, including nicotinate, niacinamide, arachidonic acid (AA), and 20-carboxy-leukotriene B4, which are associated with nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism and arachidonic acid metabolism. The expression levels of biomarkers were effectively modulated towards the normal range by SS. It indicated that SS show their effective anti-inflammatory effects through regulating nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism and arachidonic acid metabolism. PMID:27251379