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Sample records for arai masakuzu iwamoto

  1. 46. ARAI. Aerial view of ARAI buildings as they looked ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. ARA-I. Aerial view of ARA-I buildings as they looked in 1981. From left to right, buildings are tank (ARA-727), contaminated waste storage tank (ARA-629), trailer, hot cell building (ARA-626), fuel oil storage tank (ARA-728), guard house (ARA-628), shop and maintenance building (ARA-627), and two trailers. Ineel photo no. 81-297. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. 48. ARAI. Interior view of part of metallurgical laboratory in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. ARA-I. Interior view of part of metallurgical laboratory in ARA-626, hot cell building. This room houses metallurgical, polishing, cutting, and preparation equipment. Ineel photo no. 81-33. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. 125. ARAI Contaminated waste storage tank (ARA729). Shows location of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    125. ARA-I Contaminated waste storage tank (ARA-729). Shows location of tank on the ARA-I site, section views, connecting pipeline, and other details. Norman Engineering Company 961-area/SF-301-3. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0301-00-613-102711. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  4. 49. ARAI. Interior view of fatigue laboratory in ARA627, shop ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. ARA-I. Interior view of fatigue laboratory in ARA-627, shop and maintenance building. Ineel photo no. 82-7701. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. 4. ARAI Shop and maintenance building ARA627. West side and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. ARA-I Shop and maintenance building ARA-627. West side and north end. Camera facing southeast. Shows original (lower roofed section) and later addition. Metal building next to south end is related to decontamination and demolition activities. Ineel photo no. 1-7. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  6. 9. ARAI Shop and maintenance building ARA627 interior view. Metal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. ARA-I Shop and maintenance building ARA-627 interior view. Metal roll-up door on north end (rear) of building. Camera facing northeast. Ineel photo no. 1-12. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. 117. ARAI Shop and maintenance (ARA627) building roof and floor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    117. ARA-I Shop and maintenance (ARA-627) building roof and floor plan. Includes room finish and equipment schedule. Norman Engineering Company 961-area/SF-627-A-1. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0627-00-613-102759. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  8. 116. ARAI Details of hot cell section of building ARA626. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    116. ARA-I Details of hot cell section of building ARA-626. Shows manipulator openings in operating face of hot cell, start/stop buttons, and other details. Norman Engineering Company 961/area/SF-626-E-6. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-10-613-102731. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  9. 111. ARAI Hot cell (ARA626) Building elevations of north, south, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    111. ARA-I Hot cell (ARA-626) Building elevations of north, south, east, and west sides. Includes details of personnel decontamination area, dark room, and other features. Norman Engineering Company: 961-area/SF-626-A-3. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-00-613-102723. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  10. 121. ARAI Guard house (ARA628). Drawing shows north, south, east, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    121. ARA-I Guard house (ARA-628). Drawing shows north, south, east, and west elevations, floor plan, counter details, and roof plan. Norman Engineering Corporation 961-area/SF-628-A-1. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 063-0628-00-613-102772. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. 119. ARAI Shop and maintenance (ARA627) building sections and details ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    119. ARA-I Shop and maintenance (ARA-627) building sections and details of interior mesh partitions. Norman Engineering Company 961-area/SF-627-A-3. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0627-00-613-102761. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  12. 112. ARAI Hot cell (ARA626) Building roof plan and details ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    112. ARA-I Hot cell (ARA-626) Building roof plan and details of roof ventilating equipment and parapet. Norman Engineering Company: 961-area/SF-626-A-2. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-00-613-102722. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. 114. ARAI Hot cell (ARA626) Building details of fuel storage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    114. ARA-I Hot cell (ARA-626) Building details of fuel storage pit in plan and section. Spaces shown for 20 elements. Norman Engineering Company: 961-area/SF-626-S-4. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-60-613-102752. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. 115. ARAI Details of hot cell section of building ARA626. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    115. ARA-I Details of hot cell section of building ARA-626. Shows location of high density concrete, viewing windows, filters, monorail crane, bridge crane, and other details. Norman Engineering Company 961-area/SF-626-MS-1. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-40-613-102737. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. 118. ARAI Shop and maintenance (ARA627) building elevations of north, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    118. ARA-I Shop and maintenance (ARA-627) building elevations of north, south, east, and west sides and other details of door and window types. Norman Engineering Company 961-area/SF-627-A-2. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0627-00-613-102760. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. 123. ARAI Substation (ARA726) plan, elevation, security fence details, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    123. ARA-I Substation (ARA-726) plan, elevation, security fence details, and sections. Norman Engineering Company 961-area/SF-726-E-1. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0726-10-613-102778. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Arabinose-induced binding of AraC protein to araI2 activates the araBAD operon promoter.

    PubMed

    Lee, N; Francklyn, C; Hamilton, E P

    1987-12-01

    The state of Escherichia coli araI DNA occupancy by AraC protein has been found to change from a two-turn to a four-turn occupancy upon the addition of the inducer arabinose. The araI site is separable into two contiguous regions, araI1 and araI2. araI1 binds both ligand-bound and ligand-free AraC protein, whereas araI2 binds AraC protein in the presence of arabinose only. A mutation in araI and a known mutation in araC led to the loss of araI2 binding, while binding to araI1 was unaffected. Both mutants failed to activate the promoter of the araBAD operon. We propose that araI2 occupancy by AraC protein leads to RNA polymerase recognition of the araBAD promoter and that araI1 acts as a switch mechanism allowing both the repressor and the activator forms of AraC protein to regulate the araBAD promoter.

  18. Comment on 'Podiform chromitites do form beneath mid-ocean ridges' by Arai, S. and Miura, M.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollinson, Hugh; Adetunji, Jacob

    2016-06-01

    We note with interest the recent paper by Arai and Miura entitled 'Podiform chromitites do form beneath mid-ocean ridges' (Arai and Miura, 2015) written, we presume, in response to our paper which sought to represent the opposing view and was entitled 'Mantle podiform chromitites do not form beneath mid-ocean ridges: a case study from the Moho Transition Zone of the Oman ophiolite' (Rollinson and Adetunji, 2013). Here we take the opportunity to further clarify our views.

  19. 122. ARAI Pump House (ARA629). Drawing shows north, south, east, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    122. ARA-I Pump House (ARA-629). Drawing shows north, south, east, and west elevations, floor plan, foundation plan, and other details. Note small enclosure at southwest corner of building to contain chlorination equipment. Norman Engineering Company 961-area/SF-629-A-1. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0629-00-613-102774. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. 124. ARAI Reservoir (ARA727), later named water storage tank. Shows ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    124. ARA-I Reservoir (ARA-727), later named water storage tank. Shows plan of 100,000-gallon tank, elevation, image of "danger radiation hazard" sign, and other details. Norman Engineering Company 961-area/SF-727-S-1. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0727-60-613-102779. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. 120. ARAI Expansion of ARA627 shop and maintenance building for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    120. ARA-I Expansion of ARA-627 shop and maintenance building for new use as materials and metallurgy laboratory. Shows ground floor plan addition of gas analyzer room, fatigue testing room, microscope room, and offices. Idaho Nuclear Corporation 1230-ARA-627-A-5. Date: June 1970. Ineel index code no. 068-0627-00-400-154062. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  2. 113. ARAI Hot cell (ARA626) Building wall sections and details ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    113. ARA-I Hot cell (ARA-626) Building wall sections and details of radio chemistry lab. Shows high-bay roof over hot cells and isolation rooms below grade storage pit for fuel elements. Norman Engineering Company: 961-area/SF-626-A-4. Date: January 1959. Ineel index code no. 068-0626-00-613-102724. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. Retraction: 'Alendronate and vitamin D2 for prevention of hip fracture in Parkinson's disease: A randomized controlled trial,' by Sato, Y., Iwamoto, J., Kanoko, T., and Satoh, K.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    The above article, published online on 14 March 2006 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), and in Volume 21, Issue 7, Pages 924-929, has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the Editor-in-Chief, Jose A. Obeso, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed due to an acknowledgement from the authors that the co-authors did not participate in study design, data collection, data analysis, interpretation of data and drafting the manuscript. Thus all co-authors are honorary. Reference Sato, Y., Iwamoto, J., Kanoko, T., and Satoh, K. (2006) Alendronate and vitamin D2 for prevention of hip fracture in Parkinson's disease: A randomized controlled trial. Mov Disord. doi: 10.1002/mds.20825.

  4. Palaeointensities from Pliocene lava sequences in Iceland: emphasis on the problem of Arai plot with two linear segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hidefumi; Yamamoto, Yuhji

    2016-05-01

    Palaeointensity experiments were carried out to a sample collection from two sections of basalt lava flow sequences of Pliocene age in north central Iceland (Chron C2An) to further refine the knowledge of the behaviour of the palaeomagnetic field. Selection of samples was mainly based on their stability of remanence to thermal demagnetization as well as good reversibility in variations of magnetic susceptibility and saturation magnetization with temperature, which would indicate the presence of magnetite as a product of deuteric oxidation of titanomagnetite. Among 167 lava flows from two sections, 44 flows were selected for the Königsberger-Thellier-Thellier experiment in vacuum. In spite of careful pre-selection of samples, an Arai plot with two linear segments, or a concave-up appearance, was often encountered during the experiments. This non-ideal behaviour was probably caused by an irreversible change in the domain state of the magnetic grains of the pseudo-single-domain (PSD) range. This is assumed because an ideal linear plot was obtained in the second run of the palaeointensity experiment in which a laboratory thermoremanence acquired after the final step of the first run was used as a natural remanence. This experiment was conducted on six selected samples, and no clear difference between the magnetic grains of the experimented and pristine sister samples was found by scanning electron microscope and hysteresis measurements, that is, no occurrence of notable chemical/mineralogical alteration, suggesting that no change in the grain size distribution had occurred. Hence, the two-segment Arai plot was not caused by the reversible multidomain/PSD effect in which the curvature of the Arai plot is dependent on the grain size. Considering that the irreversible change in domain state must have affected data points at not only high temperatures but also low temperatures, fv ≥ 0.5 was adopted as one of the acceptance criteria where fv is a vectorially defined

  5. Classification accuracy of actuarial risk assessment instruments.

    PubMed

    Neller, Daniel J; Frederick, Richard I

    2013-01-01

    Users of commonly employed actuarial risk assessment instruments (ARAIs) hope to generate numerical probability statements about risk; however, ARAI manuals often do not explicitly report data that are essential for understanding the classification accuracy of the instruments. In addition, ARAI manuals often contain data that have the potential for misinterpretation. The authors of the present article address the accurate generation of probability statements. First, they illustrate how the reporting of numerical probability statements based on proportions rather than predictive values can mislead users of ARAIs. Next, they report essential test characteristics that, to date, have gone largely unreported in ARAI manuals. Then they discuss a graphing method that can enhance the practice of clinicians who communicate risk via numerical probability statements. After the authors review several strategies for selecting optimal cut-off scores, they show how the graphing method can be used to estimate positive predictive values for each cut-off score of commonly used ARAIs, across all possible base rates. They also show how the graphing method can be used to estimate base rates of violent recidivism in local samples.

  6. The Opposing Roles of Nucleophosmin and the ARF Tumor Suppressor in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    Tanaka, K.; Matsuda, S.; Yokoyama, R.; Iwamoto, Y.; Tsuneyoshi, M. J. Pathol., 2005, 207, 410. [130] Puig, S.; Castro, J.; Ventura, P.J.; Ruiz , A...Ascaso, C.; Malvehy, J.; Estivill, X.; Mascaro, J.M.; Lecha, M.; Castel , T. Melanoma Res., 2000, 10 , 231. [165] Perrone, F.; Oggionni, M.; Birindelli

  7. Bone Mass Gained in Response to External Loading is Preserved for Several Weeks Following Cessation of Loading in 10 Week C57BL/6J Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    levels with only 3 months of retirement from exercise11,12. Another study involv- ing gymnasts also showed that bone density gained by long term loading... gymnasts . Calcif Tissue Int 2001; 69(1):7-12. 14. Iwamoto J, Yeh JK, Aloia JF. Effect of deconditioning on cortical and cancellous bone growth in the

  8. National Strategies for Developing Human Resources through Technical and Vocational Education and Training. The 2001 KRIVET International Conference on Technical and Vocational Education and Training [Proceedings] (Seoul, South Korea, November 21-23, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korea Research Inst. for Vocational Education and Training, Seoul.

    This document contains 19 papers and case studies, in English and Korean, from a conference on national strategies for developing human resources through technical and vocational education and training. The following are representative: "The Need to Innovate and Optimize Resources [Keynote]" (Wataru Iwamoto); "School to Work…

  9. Systemic Responses of Barley to the 3-hydroxy-decanoyl-homoserine Lactone Producing Plant Beneficial Endophyte Acidovorax radicis N35

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shengcai; Li, Dan; Trost, Eva; Mayer, Klaus F.; Vlot, A. Corina; Heller, Werner; Schmid, Michael; Hartmann, Anton; Rothballer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing auto-inducers of the N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) type produced by Gram-negative bacteria have different effects on plants including stimulation on root growth and/or priming or acquirement of systemic resistance in plants. In this communication the influence of AHL production of the plant growth promoting endophytic rhizosphere bacterium Acidovorax radicis N35 on barley seedlings was investigated. A. radicis N35 produces 3-hydroxy-C10-homoserine lactone (3-OH-C10-HSL) as the major AHL compound. To study the influence of this QS autoinducer on the interaction with barley, the araI-biosynthesis gene was deleted. The comparison of inoculation effects of the A. radicis N35 wild type and the araI mutant resulted in remarkable differences. While the N35 wild type colonized plant roots effectively in microcolonies, the araI mutant occurred at the root surface as single cells. Furthermore, in a mixed inoculum the wild type was much more prevalent in colonization than the araI mutant documenting that the araI mutation affected root colonization. Nevertheless, a significant plant growth promoting effect could be shown after inoculation of barley with the wild type and the araI mutant in soil after 2 months cultivation. While A. radicis N35 wild type showed only a very weak induction of early defense responses in plant RNA expression analysis, the araI mutant caused increased expression of flavonoid biosynthesis genes. This was corroborated by the accumulation of several flavonoid compounds such as saponarin and lutonarin in leaves of root inoculated barley seedlings. Thus, although the exact role of the flavonoids in this plant response is not clear yet, it can be concluded, that the synthesis of AHLs by A. radicis has implications on the perception by the host plant barley and thereby contributes to the establishment and function of the bacteria-plant interaction. PMID:28018401

  10. Possible risks to human lungs from magnetometric dust clearance experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, T. D.

    1981-03-01

    Cohen, Arai and Brain did a magnetization study on smokers and nonsmokers from which they conclude that the dust clearance ability of the cigarette smoker's lungs is markedly impaired. Their conclusion may be incorrect because they overlooked that during the magnetization phase of their experiment, iron oxide clusters were preferentially formed in smoker's bronchi because of their high mucus content and consequent low resistance to redistribution of particles. Prudence dictates avoidance of the Cohen, Arai, Brain type study until health hazards related to this work are investigated.

  11. Proceedings of the International Wire and Cable Symposium (38th) Held in Atlanta, Georgia on November 14-16, 1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    Flame of the Static Fatigue Life of Optical Fibers in Retardant. Low Aggrossivity Cables" Bending" M Fullso and Y. Iwamoto. KDD Research & 1984 William...Washington, DC 179 Eight Fiber Ribbons-H. Sawano, Y. Kikuchi, K. Development and Application of Low-Smoke, Flame - Kobayashl, N. Okada, M. Misono. H...Montreal. Ouebec, Canada Ltd., Yokohama. Japan 344 Development of Flame Retardant Halogen.Froe Low Smoke. Fire Retardant Cable Jackets Based on

  12. Modulation of Ionic Channel Function by Protein Phosphorylation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-12

    and chemical synthesis of oligomeric channel proteins. In: Membrane Electrochemistry. I. Vodyanoy and M. Blank, ed(s). American Chemical Society, ACS...A250 (1992). Grove, A., J.M. Tomich, T. Iwamoto, G.L. Reddy, S. Marrer, M.S. Montal and M. Montal. Design and synthesis of four-helix bundle channel... dihydropyridine - sensitive calcium channel protein. In: Miles Symposium on Nimodipine. On calcium channel antagonists in the central nervous system

  13. Actuability of Underactuated Manipulators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    of a manipulator with passive joints in operational space. IEEE Transactions on Robotics and Automation, 9(1), February 1993. [6] !irohiko Arai and...Susumu Tachi Position control of a manipulator with passive joints using dynamic coupling. IEEE Transactions on Robotics and Automation, 7(4), August

  14. Opponent Modeling and Spatial Similarity to Retrieve and Reuse Superior Plays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    M.: On behavior classification in adversarial environments. In Parker, L., Bekey, G., Barhen, J., eds.: Distributed Autonomous Robotic Systems 4...Kaminka, G.: An empirical study of coaching. In Asama, H., Arai, T., Fukuda, T., Hasegawa, T., eds.: Distributed Autonomous Robotic Systems 5. Springer

  15. Beating the Defense: Using Plan Recognition to Inform Learning Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Robotic Systems 5. Berlin: Springer. Ros, R., López de Mántaras, R., Arcos, J.L., & Veloso, M.M. (2007). Team playing behavior in robot soccer: A...P., Veloso, M., & Kaminka, G. (2002). An empirical study of coaching. In H. Asama, T. Arai, T. Fukuda, & T. Hasegawa (Eds.) Distributed Autonomous

  16. Effect of low-temperature treatments on pseudo-Thellier paleointensity determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yongjae; Dunlop, David J.; Ã-Zdemir, Ã.-Zden

    2003-04-01

    In paleointensity determination on multidomain (MD) magnetite, demagnetization is always easier than restoring remanence in companion acquisition steps. As a result, paleointensity results follow a convex-down curve on the Arai plot. In an attempt to overcome this problem, the effect of systematic low-temperature demagnetization (LTD) on pseudo-Thellier results was examined. LTD was applied not only to the initial anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM, simulating natural remanent magnetization or NRM) but also after each partial anhysteretic remanent magnetization (pARM) acquisition step. Three practical benefits of systematic LTD were discovered. (1) LTD-treated pseudo-Thellier results always yielded more accurate intensity values regardless of grain size and sample lithology. (2) LTD improved the behavior of MD magnetite in paleointensity determination, although not as much as for single-domain and pseudosingle-domain grains. (3) An unanticipated bonus was a more even distribution of data points on the Arai plot, resulting from the fact that LTD causes a shift of points toward the upper end of the Arai curves. Constructing a three-dimensional map of the distributions χ and χLTD was successful in quantitatively explaining behavior on the Arai plots.

  17. Another look at the (im-)precision of individual risk estimates made using actuarial risk assessment instruments.

    PubMed

    Hart, Stephen D; Cooke, David J

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the precision of individual risk estimates made using actuarial risk assessment instruments (ARAIs) by discussing some major conceptual issues and then illustrating them by analyzing new data. We used a standard multivariate statistical procedure, logistic regression, to create a new ARAI based on data from a follow-up study of 90 adult male sex offenders. We indexed predictive precision at the group level using confidence intervals for group mean probability estimates, and at the individual level using prediction intervals for individual probability estimates. Consistent with past research, ARAI scores were moderately and significantly predictive of failure in the aggregate, but group probability estimates had substantial margins of error and individual probability estimates had very large margins of error. We conclude that, without major advances in our understanding of the causes of violence, ARAIs cannot be used to estimate the specific probability or absolute likelihood of future violence with any reasonable degree of precision or certainty. The implications for conducting violence risk assessments in forensic mental health are discussed.

  18. Pre-Equilibrium Cluster Emission with Pickup and Knockout

    SciTech Connect

    Betak, E.

    2005-05-24

    We present a generalization of the Iwamoto-Harada-Bisplinghoff pre-equilibrium model of light cluster formation and emission, which is enhanced by allowing for possible admixtures of knockout for strongly coupled ejectiles, like {alpha}'s. The model is able to attain the Weisskopf-Ewing formula for compound-nucleus decay at long-time limit; it keeps the philosophy of pre-equilibrium decay during the equilibration stage and it describes the initial phase of a reaction as direct process(es) expressed using the language of the exciton model.

  19. Radiation-Induce Immune Modulation in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Pei Liao,* Chun-Chieh Wang,*Il Lisa H. Butterfield,* James S. Economou,t Antoni Ribas ,t Wilson S. Meng,4 Keisuke S. Iwamoto,* and William H. McBride2...prostate cancer model. Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.. 59:579- 583, 2004. Liao, Y-P., C-C. Wang, L.H. Butterfield, J.S. Economou, A. Ribas , W.S. Meng...A. Ribas and W.H. McBride: Radiation modulates tumor antigen presentation by dendritic cells. In: Abstracts of Papers for the 95 "h Annual Meeting of

  20. A Low Frequency Electromagnetic Sensor for Underwater Geo-Location

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    20. S. Hashi, S. Yabukami, M . Toyoda, M . Ohya , K. Ishiyama, Y. Okazaki, and K. I. Arai, “Magnetic motion capture system using LC resonant magnetic...marker composed of Ni-Zn ferrite core,” J. Appl. Phys., vol.99, p. 08B312, 2006. 21. M . Toyoda, S. Hashi, S. Yabukami, M . Ohya , K. Ishiyama, Y...versus distance and frequency inside 1 S/ m (left column) and 4 S/ m (right column) salt water. ......................................... 17 Figure 8. The

  1. The CIRP International Workshop on Concurrent Engineering for Product Realization (1st) Held in Tokyo, Japan on June 27 - 28, 1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    Director of RPI Design Research Center) - - H. Yoshikawa (Japan, Vice President of University of Tokyo, Chairman of Scientific committee/Japan IMS...A, SF-02150 ESPOO Finland Tel.+358-0451-3315 Fax.+358-0351-3318, 3293 Prof. Eiji Arai Dept. Precision Machinery Engineering Tokyo Metropolitan...Fax 518-276-2702 Professor Hiroyuki Yoshikawa Department of Precision Machinery Engineering The University of Tokyo Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113

  2. 14. ARAII Contextual view from distance, camera facing east. Two ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. ARA-II Contextual view from distance, camera facing east. Two story building near center of view is administration building ARA-613. Trailers, containers, and crane are part of demolition preparations. Buildings at right side of view are buildings ARA-626 and ARA-627 at ARA-I. Ineel photo no. 2-5. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. Effect of low-temperature demagnetization on Thellier paleointensity determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. V.; Kulakov, E.

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the effect of low-temperature demagnetization (LTD) on paleointensity determinations using the double-heating Thellier method. Model experiments were conducted on synthetic samples containing single-domain (SD), pseudosingle-domain (PSD), or multidomain (MD) magnetite grains, as well as mixture of SD and MD magnetite. In order to model a natural remanent magnetization (NRM) before the experiments, a thermal remanent magnetization (TRM) was imparted in the samples in a 50 μT magnetic field. LTD was performed after each Thellier heating by three successive cycles of the samples through the Verwey transition temperature (~120 K) in a field-free environment. The magnetic remanence was measured both before and after each LTD. The effect of LTD on paleointensity determinations from SD samples was negligible; both pre-LTD and post-LTD data defined linear high-temperature (>300°C) segments on the Arai plots that yielded paleofield values statistically indistinguishable from the field of original TRM acquisition. The PSD and SD/MD mixture samples yielded concave-up Arai plots underestimating the laboratory field by 10-20 percent. The LTD treatment resulted in steeper and more linear high-temperature (>350°C) segments on the Arai plots giving accurate estimates of the TRM acquisition field. The Arai plots measured from MD samples were substantially non-linear and failed to provide acceptable paleointensity results both before and after LTD. Our experimental results indicate that the integration of LTD with the Thellier experimental protocol improves the accuracy and quality of paleointensity determinations from samples containing SD and PSD magnetite, but is ineffective for very large, MD grains.

  4. Weathering Tests on Protective Helmets Approved to Australian Standard AS 1698 (for Vehicle Users).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    Expanded Polystyrene HELMETI Colour Production; SAA Size ,Length Width j Mass Circumference Date Serial No. cm imm mm nu qm nun L A White July 󈨒 B535336...HELMET DETAILS Make: ARAI Model: S-75 Shell: Fibreglass Reinforced Polyester Resin Liner: Expanded Polystyrene HELMET Colour Production SAA Size...Reinforced Polyester Resin Liner; Expanded Polystyrene (with thin plastic inner shell) HELMET Colour Production’ SAA Size Length Width Mass

  5. The DNA loop model for ara repression: AraC protein occupies the proposed loop sites in vivo and repression-negative mutations lie in these same sites.

    PubMed

    Martin, K; Huo, L; Schleif, R F

    1986-06-01

    Two sets of experiments have been performed to test the DNA loop model of repression of the araBAD operon of Escherichia coli. First, dimethyl sulfate methylation protection measurements on normally growing cells show that the AraC regulatory protein occupies the araI site in the presence and absence of the inducer arabinose. Similarly, the araO2 site is shown to be occupied by AraC protein in the presence and absence of arabinose; however, its occupancy by AraC is greatly reduced when araI and adjacent sequences are deleted. Thus, AraC protein binds to araO2 cooperatively with some other component of the ara system located at least 60 base pairs away. Second, the mutational analysis presented here shows that the DNA components required for repression of araBAD are araI, araO2, and perhaps the araBAD operon RNA polymerase binding site.

  6. Reconstructing the Geomagnetic Field in West Africa: First Absolute Intensity Results from Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Kapper, Lisa; Donadini, Fabio; Serneels, Vincent; Tema, Evdokia; Goguitchaichvili, Avto; Julio Morales, Juan

    2017-01-01

    We present absolute geomagnetic intensities from iron smelting furnaces discovered at the metallurgical site of Korsimoro, Burkina Faso. Up to now, archaeologists recognized four different types of furnaces based on different construction methods, which were related to four subsequent time periods. Additionally, radiocarbon ages obtained from charcoal confine the studied furnaces to ages ranging from 700–1700 AD, in good agreement with the archaeologically determined time periods for each type of furnace. Archaeointensity results reveal three main groups of Arai diagrams. The first two groups contain specimens with either linear Arai diagrams, or slightly curved diagrams or two phases of magnetization. The third group encompasses specimens with strong zigzag or curvature in their Arai diagrams. Specimens of the first two groups were accepted after applying selection criteria to guarantee the high quality of the results. Our data compared to palaeosecular variation curves show a similar decreasing trend between 900–1500 AD. However, they reveal larger amplitudes at around 800 AD and 1650 AD than the reference curves and geomagnetic field models. Furthermore, they agree well with archaeomagnetic data from Mali and Senegal around 800 AD and with volcanic data around 1700 AD. PMID:28350006

  7. Effect of static pressure on absolute paleointensity recording with implications for meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, Michael W. R.; Gilder, Stuart A.

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the influence of hydrostatic and nonhydrostatic stress on the recording process of magnetic field intensity with particular relevance for meteorites that experienced pressures lower than 5 GPa corresponding to the lowest shock stage classification (S1) in meteorites. Thermal remanent magnetizations were imparted on natural obsidian samples containing pseudo-single domain titanomagnetite, analogous to some achondritic meteorites. Thellier-type paleointensity experiments were carried out at ambient conditions after pressure cycling to 0.6, 1.2, and 1.8 GPa. Each experiment used 10 samples to assess reproducibility, which is better than ±5%. The recorded paleointensity decreased 10%/GPa under hydrostatic stress and 20%/GPa under nonhydrostatic stress, leading to the fundamental conclusion that paleointensity results from meteorites may be appreciably underestimated. Pressure cycling shifts the blocking and unblocking spectra, thereby producing more linear slopes on an Arai diagram with increasing strain. We explain why, for samples with a single magnetization component that does not alter, a two-step paleointensity protocol sufficiently resolves the true paleointensity. Moreover, we propose that pressure cycling of pseudo-single domain bearing samples will remove the inherent curvature of the Arai slope, thereby allowing one to obtain a more accurate estimate of the true paleointensity. This likely also holds true for samples possessing multidomain grains. Conversely, linear trends on Arai plots in meteorites might have their origin in a pressure effect that does not necessarily reflect the ubiquitous presence of single domain particles.

  8. The site for catabolite deactivation in the L-arabinose BAD operon in Escherichia coli B/r.

    PubMed

    Bass, R; Heffernan, L; Sweadner, K; Englesberg, E

    1976-10-11

    A series of deletions beginning in the leu operon and continuing into the araC gene and also into the ara controlling site region were analyzed in reciprocal merodiploids, e.g., F' A2Cc67/B24delta719, F' B24delta719/A2Cc67, for their effects on catabolite deactivation (CD). The results of these experiments are consistent with placing the catabolite gene activator-cyclic AMP sensitive site in the controlling site region between araB and araO. With a deletion mutant, delta1109, that places araBAD under leu control when transcription begins at leuP, the araBAD operon is immune to CD even though araCGA, araP and araI are intact and functional. To focus attention on the fine structure and related functions of this region we propose that the three proteins that function therein have separate sites of action: araI (initiator-site for activator), araP (promoter-site for RNA polymerase) and ara(CGA) (catabolite gene activator-site for CGA-cAMP). None of the eighteen initiator constitutive mutants (Ic) tested have any significant effect on catabolite derepression or on the maximal level of expression of the operon supporting the view that the araI site may be distinct from araP and ARA(CGA). A series of constitutive mutants in the araC gene (Cc) also have no pronounced effect on catabolite deactivation.

  9. Facility Information for: U.S. Army Tactical Vehicle Organizational and Support Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    Ia -Owse - Ř-.t 󈧅 ’t-unota) keep .at e-~. l-m 1(.Cr A - X L P ae,.o P___ _ receses -.-o-n-., Im C rtrd- arai> pi pa- tp in. ma. _ _ _ -a !,i r k...Receing clerk the bys. (See space 14: "entrv/tlsp4tchi. 3. atent of reference manuals: I Motor eroesnt. 4. ikl h( 4r (Ach Co. and Sn. needs a reference...nIqht he possible to provide enough space on I or 2 carts to keep SDc’ supplies and PLL items.) 3. The carts Could also be Secured in the lin. tool ,cto

  10. Butadiene-Isoprene Block Copolymers and Their Hydrogenated Derivatives.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    polymerization reactivities butadienes dienes i soprene benzene compounds * anions chemorheo logy AB1STRACT (000010 an 0ee 06 It nese.m ill fdef’ 6F...Foclur, A. G. Kitchen, C. C. Baird , Am. Chem. Soc. Div. Og Coat. Plast. Chem. Pap., 34(1), 130, (1974). 11. O.L. Marrs, F. E. Naylor, and L.O. Edmonds , J...York (1977). 2. A. V. Tobolsky, "Properties and Structure of Polymers," Chap. V, John Wiley & Sons, NY (1960). 3. K. Arai and Y. Naito, J. Soc. Rheol

  11. The properties of Q-deformed hyperbolic and trigonometric functions in quantum deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Deta, U. A. E-mail: utamadeta@unesa.ac.id; Suparmi

    2015-09-30

    Quantum deformation has been studied due to its relation with applications in nuclear physics, conformal field theory, and statistical-quantum theory. The q-deformation of hyperbolic function was introduced by Arai. The application of q-deformed functions has been widely used in quantum mechanics. The properties of this two kinds of system explained in this paper including their derivative. The graph of q-deformed functions presented using Matlab. The special case is given for modified Poschl-Teller plus q-deformed Scarf II trigonometry potentials.

  12. Measuring the Average Thickness of a Plate Using a Bayesian Method and Free Vibration Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    form, the model is constructed with the implicit assumption that the corrosion is uniform. A more detailed model that included details of the pitting ...PROCEDURE The test specimen was a 0.76m by 0.60m (30” by 24”, 5:4 aspect ratio), 1.55mm (1/16”) thick 6061 -T6 aluminum plate. The density was...considering corrosion effect.” Marine Struc- tures, 21(4):402 – 419. [3] T. Nakai, H. Matsushita, N. Yamamoto, and H. Arai, 2004. “Effect of pitting

  13. Under-Researched Demographics: Heavy Episodic Drinking and Alcohol-Related Problems Among Asian Americans.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Derek Kenji; Kaya, Aylin; Grivel, Margaux; Clinton, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Asian Americans represent the fastest- growing population in the United States (Le 2010). At the same time, there is evidence that problematic drinking rates are increasing among young-adult Asian Americans (Grant et al. 2004). Accordingly, it is essential to understand the etiological determinants and mechanisms of risk that may help explain this growth in problematic alcohol use among this group. The high prevalence of the ALDH2*2 and ADH1B*2 alleles in a large percentage of Asian subgroups has been studied as a potential protective factors against alcohol abuse, yet some individuals who possess these genes still engage in problematic alcohol use (Wall et al. 2001). Other social and psychological factors may account for this discrepancy. Thus, some factors, such as negative physiological alcohol expectancies, are protective against alcohol abuse in this population (Hendershot et al. 2009). Sociocultural factors such as acculturation and nativity also may help explain drinking patterns among this group. The literature suggests that vast and significant within-group differences exist among Asian Americans, such that individuals who were born in the United States and/or are more acculturated are at elevated risk for alcohol abuse and related problems (Hahm et al. 2003). Differences also have been observed among Asian-American ethnic subgroups, with some groups (e.g., Japanese, Korean, and multi-Asian Americans) reporting higher rates of drinking compared with others (e.g., Chinese and Vietnamese Americans) (Iwamoto et al. 2012). Furthermore, Asian Americans who report higher levels of depressive symptoms, psychological distress, and perceived discrimination seem to be at a heightened risk for abusing alcohol (Iwamoto et al. 2011a; Nishimura et al. 2005; Yoo et al. 2010). Finally, an emerging body of research examining gender-relevant factors, including feminine and masculine norms, may help explain within-group differences among Asian-American women and men. Thus

  14. Mutations in the L-arabinose operon of Escherichia coli B/r with reduced initiator function.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, I L; Sheppard, D E

    1977-05-01

    Partial reversion mutants derived from a strain containing a strongly polar initiator-defective mutation (araI1036) in the L-arabinose operon were found to have several characteristics expected of mutants with reduced initiator function. These reversion mutations are cotransduced with the ara region and are probably within the araI region. Furthermore, they permit induction of the L-arabinose operon to a level only one-third of the normal wild-type level. These partially functional initiator regions reduce the expression of structural genes in the cis position only; they function quite independently of wild-type or defective initiator regions in the trans position. These mutants exhibit a two- to threefold increase in the rate of expression of ara operon genes within one-tenth of a generation after a shift of the growth temperature from 28 to 42 degrees C. This suggests that the temperature optimum for initiation of operon expression is higher for the partial revertant strains than it is for strains containing a wild-type initiator region.

  15. Arabinose-leucine deletion mutants of Escherichia coli B-r.

    PubMed

    Kessler, D P; Englesberg, E

    1969-06-01

    The control of ara gene expression was studied in mutants of Escherichia coli B/r containing deletions which fused the l-arabinose gene complex with the leucine operon (the normal gene order being araDABIOC...leuDCBAO). Complementation experiments with stable merodiploids showed that expression of ara genes cis to araC-leu deletions was controlled by the trans-acting product of the araC gene. Expression of ara genes cis to araB-leu deletions was under leucine control. These studies confirm the existence of a region between genes araC and araB essential for normal activator controlled expression of the ara structural genes. One deletion was characterized as an araO-leu deletion. Its effect on ara gene expression was unique in that ara genes were susceptible to potential regulation by both l-arabinose and leucine. These experiments suggest that two different species of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) may be produced for the ara-leu region as a result of this deletion. One, under l-arabinose-activator control, is initiated in the l-arabinose region; the other, under leucine control, is initiated in the leucine region. The latter indicates that araI can be transcribed. Whether araI is transcribed in the former instance (mRNA made under activator control) remains to be established.

  16. Mineral chemistry of the chromian spinels and chromitites in mafic and ultramafic rocks sampled from oceanic floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, N.

    2014-12-01

    Chromite or chromian spinel (simply called "spinel" after this) is common a mineral in mafic and ultramafic deep-seated rocks. The chemistry, especially Cr/(Cr+Al) ratio and Mg/(Me+Fe2+) ratio, is well known index of degree of melting of the mantle source. The chromitite composed of high density of spinel is explained as a reaction product between different degrees of fractionation of basaltic melts (Arai and Yurimoto, 1994). Therefore, tracing spinel chemistry helps to reveal complex processes of the petrogenesis. Contrary to its common occurrence in ophiolites, there are few chromitite samples reported from the ocean floor, although spinel are very common mineral in the mafic and ultramafic samples. A chromitite "minipod" included in a troctolite with a hybrid origin of melt-impregnated dunite was reported from Hess Deep at the junction of East Pacific Rise and Galapagos Rift (Site 895, ODP Leg 147; Arai and Matsukage, 1996). A Spinel-rich seam (2-3 cm thick) in dunite at Atlantis Bank, Southwestern Indian Ridge was sampled during a dive investigation using by the manned submersible Shinkai 6500 (Morishita et al., 2007) and some dredged samples (Payot et al., 2014). A few samples are reported from Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Site 1271 during ODP Leg 209 (Abe, 2011). Some of them show high temperature metamorphism up to the mid-amphibolite facies. Here shows the comparison of chromitites and spinel in the different ocean and will be assumed the petrogenesis.

  17. Arabinose-Leucine Deletion Mutants of Escherichia coli B/r

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Donald P.; Englesberg, Ellis

    1969-01-01

    The control of ara gene expression was studied in mutants of Escherichia coli B/r containing deletions which fused the l-arabinose gene complex with the leucine operon (the normal gene order being araDABIOC...leuDCBAO). Complementation experiments with stable merodiploids showed that expression of ara genes cis to araC-leu deletions was controlled by the trans-acting product of the araC gene. Expression of ara genes cis to araB-leu deletions was under leucine control. These studies confirm the existence of a region between genes araC and araB essential for normal activator controlled expression of the ara structural genes. One deletion was characterized as an araO-leu deletion. Its effect on ara gene expression was unique in that ara genes were susceptible to potential regulation by both l-arabinose and leucine. These experiments suggest that two different species of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) may be produced for the ara-leu region as a result of this deletion. One, under l-arabinose-activator control, is initiated in the l-arabinose region; the other, under leucine control, is initiated in the leucine region. The latter indicates that araI can be transcribed. Whether araI is transcribed in the former instance (mRNA made under activator control) remains to be established. PMID:4892369

  18. Compositional Evidence for Launch Pairing of the YQ and Elephant Moraine Lunar Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korotev, R. L.; Jollitt, B. L.; Zeigler, R. A.; Haskin, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    Arai and Warren provide convincing evidence that QUE (Queen Alexandra Range) 94281 derives from the same regolith as Y (Yamato) 793274 and, therefore, that the two meteorites were likely ejected from the Moon by the same impact. Recently discovered Y981031 is paired with Y793274. The "YQ" meteorites (Y793274/Y981031 and QUE 94281 are unique among lunar meteorites in being regolith breccias composed of subequal amounts of mare volcanic material (a VLT [very-low-Ti] basalt or gabbro) and feldspathic highland material. EET (Elephant Moraine) 87521 and its pair EET 96008 are fragmental breccias composed mainly of VLT basalt or gabbro. Warren, Arai, and colleagues note that the volcanic components of the YQ and EET meteorites are texturally similar more similar to each other than either is to mare basalts of the Apollo collection. Warren and colleagues address the issue of possible launch pairing of YQ and EET, but note compositional differences between EET and the volcanic component of YQ, as inferred from extrapolations of regressions to high FeO concentration. We show here that: (1) EET 87/96 consists of fragments of a differentiated magma body, (2) subsamples of EET represent a mixing trend between Fe-rich and Mg-rich differentiates, and (3) the inferred volcanic component of YQ is consistent with a point on the EET mixing line. Thus, there is no compositional impediment to the hypothesis that YQ is launch paired with EET.

  19. Textural and petrological characteristics of ultrahigh-pressure chromitites, indicating a mantle recycling origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Shoji; Miura, Makoto; Yamamoto, Shinji; Shmelev, Vladimir

    2013-04-01

    Podiform chromitites, which occur as irregular to lens-like chromite-rich bodies within mantle peridotite in ophiolites, show various petrological characteristics, suggesting various origins. Some of them contain ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) minerals such as diamond, moissanite and Fe silicides (= UHP chromitites) (e.g., Robinson et al., 2004; Yang et al., 2007). Their origin is highly enigmatic, because the podiform chromitites have been widely understood as low-P (uppermost mantle level) products (e.g., Arai and Yurimoto, 1994; Zhou et al., 1994). Ordinary podiform chromitites show various lines of evidence for low-P genesis. Chromian spinel (or chromite) frequently contains solid mineral inclusions, and one of their main phases is pargasite, which is stable up to 3 GPa (e.g., Niida and Green, 1999), one of typical low-P minerals. The melt-harzburgite intereaction is a fundamental process in podiform chromitite genesis (e.g., Arai and Yurimoto, 1994), and associated with incongruent melting of orthopyroxene in harzburgite to form dunite and relatively Si-rich melt, which is operative at low-P conditions (e.g., Kushiro, 1969). We are strongly required to incorporate the genesis UHP chromitite into the framework of podiform chromitite genesis. Arai (2010) proposed a hypothesis of deep mantle recycling of ordinary low-P chromitite for the genesis of UHP chromitite. We try to examine petrographical and petrological characteristics of UHP chromitites to check the hypothesis of Arai (2010). Some peculiar textures of podiform chromities, such as orbicular, nodular and anti-nodular textures, are interpreted to be primary igneous and particular to ordinary low-P igneous chromitites (cf. Nicolas, 1989). To be interesting, the nodular texture, characterized by oval aggregates of chromian spinel (= chromite nodules; ~1 cm across) set in olivine-rich matrix, is also observed in some of UHP chromitites from the Luobusa ophiolite, Tibet (e.g., Yamamoto et al., 2009). We carefully

  20. Testing paleointensity determinations on recent lava flows and scorias from Miyakejima, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, K.

    2013-12-01

    Still no consensus has been reached on paleointensity method. Even the classical Thellier method has not been fully tested on recent lava flows with known geomagnetic field intensity based on a systematic sampling scheme. In this study, Thellier method was applied for 1983, 1962 and 1940 basaltic lava flows and scorias from Miyakejima, Japan. Several vertical lava sections and quenched scorias, which are quite variable in magnetic mineralogy and grain size, provide an unparalleled opportunity to test paleointensity methods. Thellier experiments were conducted on a completely automated three-component spinner magnetometer with thermal demagnetizer 'tspin'. Specimens were heated in air, applied laboratory field was 45 microT, and pTRM checks were performed at every two heating steps. Curie points and hysteresis properties were obtained on small fragments removed from cylindrical specimens. For lava flows sigmoidal curves were commonly observed on the Arai diagrams. Especially the interior part of lava flows always revealed sigmoidal patterns and sometimes resulted in erroneously blurred behaviors. The directions after zero-field heating were not necessarily stable in the course of the Thellier experiments. It was very difficult, for the interior part, to ascertain linear segments on Arai diagrams corresponding to the geomagnetic field intensity at the eruption. Upper and lower clinker samples also generally revealed sigmoidal or upward concave curves on Arai diagrams. Neither lower nor higher temperature portions of the sigmoids or concaves gave the expected geomagnetic field intensities. However, there were two exceptional cases of lava flows giving correct field intensities: upper clinkers with relatively low unblocking temperatures (< 400 deg.C) and lower clinkers with broad unblocking temperature ranges from room temperature to 600 deg.C. A most promising target for paleointensity experiments within the volcanic rocks is scoria. Scoria samples always carry single

  1. Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    JL Bump; RF Luther

    2006-02-09

    This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments.

  2. Absolute paleointensity results from the Equator and the Pliocene-Pleistocene dipole field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Kent, D. V.

    2013-12-01

    The current geomagnetic field (GMF) of the Earth is mostly geocentric dipolar with intensities in polar regions (~60 μT) about twice as high as in equatorial regions (~30 μT). However, Lawrence et al. [2009] found that the 0-5 Ma average paleointensity from 41 lava flow sites in Antarctica (~78°S) was only 31.5 μT. We present absolute paleointensity results from lava flows of similar age (0-3 Ma) from the Galapagos Islands located within 1°S of the Equator using a recently developed multidomain (MD) correction technique [Wang and Kent, 2013] on fresh subsets of the same samples that were recently analyzed for PSV [Kent, Wang & Rochette, 2010]. After standard Thellier series paleointensity experiments, we gave the samples total thermal remanent magnetizations (tTRM) by cooling from their Curie point in the presence of a laboratory-applied field (15 μT). We then repeated the paleointensity experiment on each sample, with the laboratory-applied tTRM as a synthetic natural remanent magnetization (NRM), using the same laboratory-applied field and temperature steps to obtain a synthetic Arai signature, which should only represent the domain-state dependent properties of the sample. We corrected the Arai diagrams from the original paleointensity experiment by using the Arai signatures from the repeated experiment, which neutralizes the typical MD concave-up Arai effect. We experimented on 3 specimens from each of 51 lava sites, 29 of which gave acceptable paleointensity results from one or more specimen(s). The average paleointensity of the 29 successful lava flow sites is ~29 μT (~23 μT for geometric mean). In these 29 sites, 12 of them are of normal polarity, yielding an average paleointensity of ~32 μT (geometric mean ~24 μT), and 17 of them are of reverse polarity, yielding an average paleointensity of ~27 μT (geometric mean ~23 μT). Mean paleomagnetic directions of the normal and reverse polarity sites are statistically antipodal and within a few degrees

  3. Geomagnetic field behaviour preceding a Superchron: new evidence for a weak Devonian geomagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, L.; Anwar, T.; Scherbakova, V.; Biggin, A. J.; Kravchinsky, V. A.; Shatsillo, A.; Holt, J.; Pavlov, V.

    2015-12-01

    The ~50 million year transition from the peak in reversal frequency in the Middle Jurassic (~170Ma), associated with a weak geomagnetic field, to the stable and apparently strong field during the Cretaceous Normal Superchron (84-121Ma), represents a dramatic change in time-averaged geomagnetic field behaviour during the Mesozoic Era. New evidence from Siberian samples suggests there is a similar transition in geomagnetic field behaviour during the Palaeozoic, with a weak geomagnetic field in the Upper Devonian preceding the Permo-Carboniferous Superchron (262-318Ma). Both sites, the Viluy Traps and the Zharovsk complex of the Patom Margin, have seemingly reliable, published palaeomagnetic directions and new age constraints, 364.4 ± 1.7Ma (40Ar/39A) 371-377Ma (U-Pb) respectively. The samples were measured using the Thermal Thellier-Coe protocol with partial thermo-remanent magnetisation (pTRM) and tail checks and the Microwave Thellier-IZZI protocol with pTRM checks. Accepted Arai plots show positive pTRM checks, a clear relation between distinct primary directional and palaeointensity components and little to no zig-zagging. Three distinct magneto-mineralogical types were identified from SEM and rock magnetic techniques; low Ti- and intermediate Ti- titanomagnetite and possible maghemite, with mineral type affecting the success rate of samples but resulting in no significant variation in palaeointensity results. The Arai plots also commonly have a distinct two-slope concave-up shape, although non-heating, pseudo-Thellier experiments have supported this resulting from a strong overprint component rather than alteration or multi-domain effects. Results from these experiments give low site mean values between 2.3-29.9μT (Virtual Dipole Moments 4-50.6 ZAm2). The apparently periodic (~180 million years) transitions in geomagnetic field behaviour may indicate the influence of mantle convection changing heat flow across the Core Mantle Boundary.

  4. Was the Earth's Magnetic Field Weak in the Late Devonian?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, T.; Biggin, A. J.; Kravchinsky, V. A.; Pavlov, V.

    2014-12-01

    Very few data exist to describe geomagnetic field behaviour in the Late Devonian (LD). Samples, which have recently been Ar-Ar dated to 364-377 Myr ago, of LD-aged volcanics and instrusives from the Viluy large igneous province in Siberia are investigated. These units have already demonstrated reliable, palaeomagnetic directions consistent with the retention of a primary remanence. Microwave Thellier-type palaeointensity experiments (mostly IZZI protocol with partial thermoremanent magnetization checks) were performed on 55 samples from 16 sites, of which, 12 samples from 4 sites provide satisfactory paleointensity data. Arai plots are strongly concave-up in shape but multiple lines of evidence support that this is caused by a strong component of magnetisation overprinting a weak primary magnetisation rather than by lab-induced alteration or multidomain behaviour. The samples display corresponding distinct directional components, positive pTRM checks and little or no zig-zagging of the Arai plot. Furthermore, the results of non-heating pseudo-Thellier experiments support the existence of a strong component overprinting a much weaker one. The site-mean paleointensities, ranging from 5.3-11.1 μT and which correspond to a virtual axial dipole moments (VADMs) of (1.0-2.1) ×1022 Am2, indicate that the LD was a time of extremely weak magnetic field intensity. It provides the evidence that the superchron state, between ~310 and 265 Myr ago, is preceded by very weak field in the LD (~60 Myr before the superchron). If low dipole moment can be considered an indicator of high reversal frequency (as appears to be the case in the mid-Jurassic) then our results support that rapid transitions between reversal hyperactivity and superchron states are a recurring feature in the palaeomagnetic record, potentially linked to simultaneous episodes of true polar wander.

  5. Distribution, morphology, and biochemical genetics of Coryphaenoides armatus and C. yaquinae (Pisces:Macrouridae) in the central and eastern North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Raymond R.; Waples, Robin S.

    1983-11-01

    A morphological and electrophoretic analysis of Coryphaenoides armatus (Hector) and C. yaquinae Iwamoto and Stein was made because their morphological similarity has led to their confusion by previous workers and generated uncertainty about their specific distinctness. The results show that C. armatus and C. yaquinae are closely related but distinct species and are distinguihable by differences in the number and arrangement of premaxillary and mandibular rows of teeth, and by fixed differences in electromorphs at five presumptive gene loci: Mdh-1, Mdh-2, Sod, Gdh, and Gpi-A. The respective distribution in the central and eastern North Pacific are also distinct. C. armatus ranges mostly along the continental rise and slope of western North America between about 2000 and 4300 m, whereas C. yaquinae ranges mostly in the North Pacific basin to at least 5825 m and co-occurs with C. armatus between about 3400 and 4300 m on the continental rise. The distributions are explained by suggesting that C. yaquinae is adapted for life beneath the North Pacific central gyre by virtue of a reduced metabolic rate relative to C. armatus.

  6. Dynamical model of surrogate reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Aritomo, Y.; Chiba, S.; Nishio, K.

    2011-08-15

    A new dynamical model is developed to describe the whole process of surrogate reactions: Transfer of several nucleons at an initial stage, thermal equilibration of residues leading to washing out of shell effects, and decay of populated compound nuclei are treated in a unified framework. Multidimensional Langevin equations are employed to describe time evolution of collective coordinates with a time-dependent potential energy surface corresponding to different stages of surrogate reactions. The new model is capable of calculating spin distributions of the compound nuclei, one of the most important quantities in the surrogate technique. Furthermore, various observables of surrogate reactions can be calculated, for example, energy and angular distribution of ejectile and mass distributions of fission fragments. These features are important to assess validity of the proposed model itself, to understand mechanisms of the surrogate reactions, and to determine unknown parameters of the model. It is found that spin distributions of compound nuclei produced in {sup 18}O+{sup 238}U{yields}{sup 16}O+{sup 240}*U and {sup 18}O+{sup 236}U{yields}{sup 16}O+{sup 238}*U reactions are equivalent and much less than 10({h_bar}/2{pi}) and therefore satisfy conditions proposed by Chiba and Iwamoto [Phys. Rev. C 81, 044604 (2010)] if they are used as a pair in the surrogate ratio method.

  7. Distinguishing between the abyssal macrourids Coryphaenoides yaquinae and C. armatus from in situ photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, A. J.; Priede, I. G.; Craig, J.

    2012-06-01

    The scavenging fish communities at abyssal depths of the Pacific Ocean are dominated by two species of macrourids; the rough abyssal grenadier Coryphaenoides yaquinaeIwamoto and Stein, 1974 and the abyssal grenadier C. armatus (Hector, 1875). These two species are morphologically very similar, and in the absence of physical specimens are notoriously difficult to distinguish from photographic data. In an era of increasing reliance on imaging technology in the deep sea, we provide an analysis of images of the two species from around the Pacific Rim with supplementary data from the Atlantic and Southern Oceans. Our results show that image-specific morphometric characters are inadequate to distinguish the two species. However, the way in which artificial illumination is reflected from the body is both sufficient, and consistently different to distinguish between the two species. The results are also corroborated by known geographic and bathymetric distributions. This analysis is intended to provide a reliable method of identification from deep-sea imaging systems in the absence of standard fishing techniques.

  8. Quantum memory effects in the dynamics of electrons in gold clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzweil, Yair; Baer, Roi

    2006-02-01

    Electron dynamics in metallic clusters are examined using a time-dependent density functional theory that includes a “memory term,” i.e., attempts to describe temporal nonlocal correlations. Using the Iwamoto, Gross, and Kohn exchange-correlation (XC) kernel, we construct a translationally invariant memory action from which an XC potential is derived that is translationally covariant and exerts zero net force on the electrons. An efficient and stable numerical method to solve the resulting Kohn-Sham equations is presented. Using this framework, we study memory effects on electron dynamics in spherical jellium gold clusters. We find memory significantly broadens the surface plasmon absorption line, yet considerably less than measured in real gold clusters, attributed to the inadequacy of the jellium model. Memory effects on nonlinear spectroscopy are studied as well: a real-time pump-probe setup is used to study the temporal decay profile of the plasmon, finding a fast decay followed by slower tail; and in high harmonic generation, we show that memory narrows and redshifts emission lines.

  9. Pointed-end capping by tropomodulin modulates actomyosin crossbridge formation in skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Ochala, Julien; Gokhin, David S.; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Fowler, Velia M.

    2014-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, thick and thin filaments are arranged in a myofibrillar lattice. Tropomodulin 1 (Tmod1) is a pointed-end capping and tropomyosin-binding protein that controls thin-filament assembly, stability, and lengths. It remains unknown whether Tmods have other functional roles, such as regulating muscle contractility. To investigate this, we recorded and analyzed the mechanical properties and X-ray diffraction patterns of single membrane-permeabilized skeletal muscle fibers from mice lacking Tmod1. Results show that absence of Tmod1 and its replacement by Tmod3 and Tmod4 may impair initial tropomyosin movement over actin subunits during thin-filament activation, thus reducing both the fraction of actomyosin crossbridges in the strongly bound state (−29%) and fiber force-generating capacity (−31%). Therefore, Tmods are novel regulators of actomyosin crossbridge formation and muscle contractility, and future investigations and models of skeletal muscle force production must incorporate Tmods.—Ochala, J., Gokhin, D. S., Iwamoto, H., Fowler, V. M. Pointed-end capping by tropomodulin modulates actomyosin crossbridge formation in skeletal muscle fibers. PMID:24072783

  10. Quantitative evaluation on contributions of laminar, turbulence and secondary flow to momentum and heat transfer in rhombic ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Naoya

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, Direct Numerical Simulation of turbulent flow in rhombic ducts have been carried out to investigate effects of the corner angle on the friction and heat transfer. Due to secondary flow of the second kind, the friction and heat transfer are enhanced in the corner, while turbulence enhances momentum and heat transfer near the wall away from the corner. In previous studies, turbulence and secondary flows are supposed to enhance momentum and heat transfer, qualitatively. The quantitative estimation of their contribution has not been clarified yet. Fukagata, Iwamoto and Kasagi (2002) have theoretically driven the FIK-identity to evaluate quantitative contributions of laminar and turbulence to the friction in turbulent channel. In this study, the FIK-identity has been numerically applied to DNS data in the rhombic ducts to evaluate quantitative contributions of laminar, turbulence and secondary flow to the momentum and heat transfer. From the results, it is quantitatively clarified that the contributions of turbulence and secondary flow to heat transfer are larger than that to friction in the rhombic ducts.

  11. 3D finite element simulation of effects of deflection rate on energy absorption for TRIP steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Asuka; Pham, Hang; Iwamoto, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Recently, with the requirement of lighter weight and more safety for a design of automobile, energy absorption capability of structural materials has become important. TRIP (Transformation-induced Plasticity) steel is expected to apply to safety members because of excellent energy absorption capability and ductility. Past studies proved that such excellent characteristics in TRIP steel are dominated by strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT) during plastic deformation. Because SIMT strongly depends on deformation rate and temperature, an investigation of the effects of deformation rate and temperature on energy absorption in TRIP is essential. Although energy absorption capability of material can be estimated by J-integral experimentally by using pre-cracked specimen, it is difficult to determine volume fraction of martensite and temperature rise during the crack extension. In addition, their effects on J-integral, especially at high deformation rate in experiment might be quite hard. Thus, a computational prediction needs to be performed. In this study, bending deformation behavior of pre-cracked specimen until the onset point of crack extension are predicted by 3D finite element simulation based on the transformation kinetics model proposed by Iwamoto et al. (1998). It is challenged to take effects of temperature, volume fraction of martensite and deformation rate into account. Then, the mechanism for higher energy absorption characteristic will be discussed.

  12. Toward a general view of mantle peridotite beneath the volcanic front: petrology of peridotite xenoliths from Bezymyanny volcano (central Kamchatka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimaru, S.; Arai, S.; Tamura, A.; Okrugin, V. M.; Shcherbakov, V.; Plechov, P.

    2012-04-01

    We have a large amount of data about petrological and geochemical features of upper mantle peridotites based on researches of mantle xenoliths, ophiolites or solid intrusions. But the nature of sub-arc mantle, especially beneath a volcanic front, has not been fully understood due to the scarcity of occurrences of mantle-derived materials there. Kamchatka Peninsula is one of the active volcanic arcs, having 29 active volcanoes, and 13 volcanoes of them contain cognate or mantle peridotite xenoliths (Erlich et al., 1979). Peridotite xenoliths derived from the upper mantle beneath the volcanic front are expected from 9 of them (Erlich et al., 1979). Avachinsky (Avacha) volcano is the most famous of them because of its easy accessibility and high xenolith production. Peridotite xenoliths from Avacha record high degree of melting and multiple stages of metasomatism (e.g., Ishimaru et al., 2007; Ionov, 2010). Formation of secondary orthopyroxenes replacing olivine is one of characteristics of arc-derived peridotite xenoliths (e.g., Arai & Kida, 2000; McInnes et al., 2001). In addition, we found peculiar metasomatisms, e.g., Ni enrichment (e.g., Ishimaru and Arai, 2008), in the Avacha peridotite xenolith suite. Here, we show petrological and geochemical features of ultramafic xenoliths from Bezymyanny volcano, central Kamchatka, to obtain a more generalized view of the sub-front mantle. We examined 2 harzburgite xenoliths from Bezymyanny. They are composed of fine-grained minerals (cf. Arai and Kida, 2000), and occasionally contain hornblende and/or phlogopite. Almost all orthopyroxenes show irregular shapes and replace olivine, indicating a secondary origin. At the boundary between the harzburgite and host andesite, we observed hornblende and secondary orthopyroxenes. At the xenoliths' interior, Fo content of olivine and Cr# (= Cr/(Cr + Al) atomic ratio) of chromian spinel are high, 91-92 and 0.43-0.69, respectively, and the Fo content decreases to 76 at the boundary

  13. Thellier's Betes Noires and how to Recognize Them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlop, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    When Emile Thellier invented his classic paleointensity determination method, he made it quite clear that it applied only to NRMs which had originated as TRMs carried by non-interacting single-domain grains. Baked clays and bricks satisfied his stringent requirements but volcanic rocks were tested and rejected as unsuitable. While most paleomagnetists would regard Thellier's stance as unduly rigid, it certainly would help improve the usual dismal success rate in paleointensity studies if at the outset one could recognize and discard Thellierś betes noires: (1) NRMs of non-TRM origin, such as CRMs and TCRMs, which are particularly insidious because they may yield linear Arai plots with the wrong slope; (2) interacting grains, which compromise the independence of non-overlapping pTRMs; (3) grains larger than single-domain size with non-reciprocal blocking and unblocking. Pre-screening based on physical mechanisms would also be an improvement compared to relying solely on reliability parameters and checks. These are effective in detecting laboratory alteration of a rock but less so in filtering out samples which behave reversibly, yet are flawed recorders of the paleofield. FORC diagrams combine analysis of coercivity distribution, strength of interactions, and basic domain state. Their effectiveness in weeding out magnetic deviants has been demonstrated by Carvallo et al. (JGR 111, B12103, 2006). However, the CRM/TCRM problem remains severe. Almost all CRMs measured by Draeger et al. (GJI 166, 12-32, 2006) had ideal Arai plots but field intensity values were in error by as much as a factor 2. Unfortunately CRM/TCRM is not easily diagnosed in individual samples, and we are driven to reconsider Thellier's dictum: don't take risks by using rocks whose NRM could be other than TRM. Unfortunately this includes many attractive candidates, volcanic glasses, baked contacts and most metamorphic rocks among them. A crude approach might be to reject those samples in a

  14. Estimation of water velocity and heat flux in horizontal bypaths of the alluvial fan, using waveforms of seasonal variations in spring water temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Y.; Onodera, S.; Kitaoka, K.

    2013-12-01

    In the alluvial fan, there are many palaeochannels which are composed of more permeabile media like gravel and sand, and many springs and wells on those have been useful for human life as well as ecosystem. These type of the springs have the different waveforms of the seasonal thermal variation from those of the river or air which is the thermal source. In detail, the phase shifting and amplitude declining are confirmed in springs. In this research, we examine to confirm the thermal waveforms in the river and springs and to estimate the horizontal bypass flow velocities in palaeochannels around the river in the alluvial fan. The study areas are Egawa springs in Tokushima Prefecture and Asahi river springs in Okayama prefecture of western Japan. On the Egawa springs, Koenuma(1939) and Arai and Yokohata(1990) had reported that the seasonal variation phase of the spring temperature was delayed about 2 months and the amplitude range was declined 10-15 degrees Celsius as compared with the Yoshino River. At the springs of Asahi River, the temperature data was collected 1 week interval. The temperature data of Egawa springs (Arai and Yokohata, 1990) and Asahi River springs was analyzed, assuming the subsurface water flow only through the bypath as the one-dimensional advection-diffusion equation and heat flux from the ground surface depends on the temperature gradient between the aquifer and the upper layer. The analytical solution of this equation was verified by parameter fittings with the data. The Darcy velocity of subsurface flow was estimated about 1.7 m/day in Egawa springs and about 1.3 m/day in Asahi River springs. If the hydraulic gradient is 0.001, the hydraulic conductivity was estimated about 1.8 cm/s in the Egawa Spring. The value was similar to 1.5-3.3 cm/s by Murashimo et al. (1963). In the Asahi River springs, the hydraulic conductivity was also estimated to be about 1.5 cm/s, which was similar to Egawa Spring. The distribution of one

  15. Seismic ambient noise H/V spectral ratio using the ACA (autocorrelations of coda of autocorrelations) approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Piña, J.; Campillo, M.; Luzón, F.; García-Jerez, A.; Albarello, D.; Lunedei, E.

    2012-12-01

    The seismic ambient noise horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios (NHVSR) are valuable for microzonation, and seismic prospecting. This is particularly true for low-cost dense spatial sampling projects. Arai and Tokimatsu (2004) proposed to use average energy densities to compose the ratios. It means that H/V comes from the square root of the ratio of averages. On the other hand, a popular approach makes the average of spectral ratios. For ergodic processes peak values are usually the same using these two approaches. Sometimes however, the observations are insufficient and computed values for low frequencies display large variability and the corresponding H/V estimates may be inaccurate. The bias caused by localized sources may be the source of errors in the estimates. In this work we propose to compute the NHVSR using the Autocorrelations of Coda of Autocorrelations. This ACA approach is inspired in the work by Stehly et al. (2008). They used the Correlations of Coda of Correlations (C3) to isotropize the field. In our ACA approach the whole time series, say of 30 minutes, for each component is autocorrelated and the averages of the spectral density of selected windows (late coda windows are eliminated) are then improved estimates of directional energy densities. The computation of NHVSR using ACA appears more stable and free of transient effects. It remains to establish how this may be accounted for in forward calculation of H/V spectral ratios for models like a layered medium (e.g. Sánchez-Sesma et al., 2011; Albarello and Lunedei, 2011). This will require further scrutiny. References. Albarello, D. & E. Lunedei (2011). Structure of ambient vibration wavefield in the frequency range of engineering interest ([0.5, 20] Hz): insights from numerical modelling. Near Surface Geophysics 9, 543-559. Arai, H. & K. Tokimatsu (2004). S-wave velocity profiling by inversion of microtremor H/V spectrum, Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am. 94, 53-63. Sánchez-Sesma, F. J., M. Rodr

  16. New archaeomagnetic data recovered from the study of celtiberic remains from central Spain (Numantia and Ciadueña, 3rd-1st centuries BC). Implications on the fidelity of the Iberian paleointensity database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osete, M. L.; Chauvin, A.; Catanzariti, G.; Jimeno, A.; Campuzano, S. A.; Benito-Batanero, J. P.; Tabernero-Galán, C.; Roperch, P.

    2016-11-01

    Variations of geomagnetic field in the Iberian Peninsula prior to roman times are poorly constrained. Here we report new archaeomagnetic results from four ceramic collections and two combustion structures recovered in two pre-roman (celtiberic) archaeological sites in central Spain. The studied materials have been dated by archaeological evidences and supported by five radiocarbon dates. Rock magnetic experiments indicate that the characteristic remanent manetization (ChRM) is carried by a low coercivity magnetic phase with Curie temperatures of 530-575 °C, most likely Ti-poor titanomagnetite/titanomaghemite. Archaeointensity determinations were carried out by using the classical Thellier-Thellier protocol including tests and corrections for magnetic anisotropy and cooling rate dependency. Two magnetic behaviours were depicted during the laboratory treatment. Black potsherds and poor heated samples from the kilns, presented two magnetization components, alterations or curved Arai plots and were therefore rejected. In contrast, well heated specimens (red ceramic fragments and well heated samples from the kilns) show one single well defined component of magnetization going through the origin and linear Arai plots providing successful archaeointensity determinations. The effect of anisotropy of the thermoremanent magnetization (ATRM) on paleointensity analysis was systematically investigated obtaining very high ATRM corrections on fine pottery specimens. In some cases, differences between the uncorrected and ATRM corrected paleointensity values reached up to 86 %. The mean intensity values obtained from three selected set of samples were 64.3 ± 5.8 μT; 56.8 ± 3.8 and 56.7 ± 4.6 μT (NUS2, CI2 and CIA, respectively), which contribute to better understand the evolution of the palaeofield intensity in central Iberia during the 3rd-1st centuries BC. The direction of the field at first century BC has also been determined from oriented samples from CIA kilns (D = 357

  17. PILLARED CLAYS AS SUPERIOR CATALYSTS FOR SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    R.Q. Long; N. Tharappiwattananon; W.B. Li; R.T. Yang

    2000-09-01

    Removal of NO{sub x} (NO + NO{sub 2}) from exhaust gases is a challenging subject. V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based catalysts are commercial catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH{sub 3} for stationary sources. However, for diesel and lean-burn gasoline engines in vehicles, hydrocarbons would be the preferred reducing agents over NH{sub 3} because of the practical problems associated with the use of NH{sub 3} (i.e., handling and slippage through the reactor). The noble-metal three-way catalysts are not effective under these conditions. The first catalyst found to be active for selective catalytic reduction of NO by hydrocarbons in the presence of excess oxygen was copper exchanged ZSM-5 and other zeolites, reported in 1990 by Iwamoto in Japan and Held et al. in Germany. Although Cu-ZSM-5 is very active and the most intensively studied catalyst, it suffers from severe deactivation in engine tests, mainly due to H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}. In this project, we found that ion-exchanged pillared clays and MCM-41 catalysts showed superior SCR activities of NO with hydrocarbon. All Cu{sup 2+}-exchanged pillared clays showed higher SCR activities than Cu-ZSM-5 reported in the literature. In particular, H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} only slightly deactivated the SCR activity of Cu-TiO{sub 2}-PILC, whereas severe deactivation was observed for Cu-ZSM-5. Moreover, Pt/MCM-41 provided the highest specific NO reduction rates as compared with other Pt doped catalysts, i.e., Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Pt/SiO{sub 2} and Pt/ZSM-5. The Pt/MCM-41 catalyst also showed a good stability in the presence of H{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2}.

  18. Vehicular pollution modeling using the operational street pollution model (OSPM) for Chembur, Mumbai (India).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Awkash; Ketzel, Matthias; Patil, Rashmi S; Dikshit, Anil Kumar; Hertel, Ole

    2016-06-01

    Megacities in India such as Mumbai and Delhi are among the most polluted places in the world. In the present study, the widely used operational street pollution model (OSPM) is applied for assessing pollutant loads in the street canyons of Chembur, a suburban area just outside Mumbai city. Chembur is both industrialized and highly congested with vehicles. There are six major street canyons in this area, for which modeling has been carried out for NOx and particulate matter (PM). The vehicle emission factors for Indian cities have been developed by Automotive Research Association of India (ARAI) for PM, not specifically for PM10 or PM2.5. The model has been applied for 4 days of winter season and for the whole year to see the difference of effect of meteorology. The urban background concentrations have been obtained from an air quality monitoring station. Results have been compared with measured concentrations from the routine monitoring performed in Mumbai. NOx emissions originate mainly from vehicles which are ground-level sources and are emitting close to where people live. Therefore, those emissions are highly relevant. The modeled NOx concentration compared satisfactorily with observed data. However, this was not the case for PM, most likely because the emission inventory did not contain emission terms due to resuspended particulate matter.

  19. Nova Sagittarii 2014 = PNV J18250860-2236024 AND Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2014-02-01

    Details of discovery of Nova Sagittarii 2014 (PNV J18250860-2236024) and procedures for observing and reporting observations are announced. Discovered by Sigeru Furuyama (Tone-machi, Ibaraki-ken, Japan) andreported by S. Nakano (Sumoto, Japan) at unfiltered CCD magnitude 8.7 on 2014 Jan. 26.857 UT. Coordinates: R.A. 18 25 08.60 Decl. = -22 36 02.4 (2000.0). Nova Sgr 2014 is Fe II-type classical nova past maximum, per low-resolution spectra obtained by A. Arai on 2014 Jan. 30.87 UT. Announced in IAU CBAT CBET 3802 (D. W. E. Green, ed.). Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations. Also, an Erratum is reported. In AAVSO Alert Notice 496, Mati Morel (MMAT, Thornton, NSW, Australia) was credited with the discovery of the 1989 outburst of V745 Sco. The discoverer was William Liller (LIW, Vina del Mar, Chile), who observed V745 Sco on 1989 July 30.08 UT at magnitude 9.7 (PROBLICOM discovery using 2415 film with orange filter).

  20. Linear growth rates of types I and II convective modes within the rotating-cone boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, S. J.

    2010-04-01

    Experimental observations have shown that the transition characteristics of the boundary-layer flow over rotating cones depends on the cone half-angle. In particular, pairs of counter-rotating Görtler-type vortices are observed over cones with slender half-angles and co-rotating vortices are observed over broad cones. Garrett et al (2009 J. Fluid Mech. 622 209-32) have hypothesized the existence of a centrifugal instability mode over slender cones that is more dangerous than the types I (crossflow) and II (streamline curvature) modes which dominate over rotating disks and broad cones. Work is currently underway to clarify this alternative mode; however, a clear understanding of the growth rates of types I and II modes is crucial to the ultimate understanding of how the dominant mode changes with half-angle. In this paper, we demonstrate that the maximum growth rate for types I and II modes decreases with reduced half-angle, which clears the way for the dominance of the alternative instability mode. Furthermore, it is suggested that vortices travelling at 75% of the cone surface speed will be selected over smooth, clean rotating cones with half-angle such that the type I mode is dominant. Interestingly, this vortex speed has been experimentally observed by Kobayashi and Arai within the rotating-sphere boundary layer.

  1. Improvements to the Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) Paleo and Rock Magnetic Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarboe, N.; Minnett, R.; Tauxe, L.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Constable, C.; Jonestrask, L.

    2015-12-01

    The Magnetic Information Consortium (MagIC) database (http://earthref.org/MagIC/) continues to improve the ease of data uploading and editing, the creation of complex searches, data visualization, and data downloads for the paleomagnetic, geomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities. Online data editing is now available and the need for proprietary spreadsheet software is therefore entirely negated. The data owner can change values in the database or delete entries through an HTML 5 web interface that resembles typical spreadsheets in behavior and uses. Additive uploading now allows for additions to data sets to be uploaded with a simple drag and drop interface. Searching the database has improved with the addition of more sophisticated search parameters and with the facility to use them in complex combinations. A comprehensive summary view of a search result has been added for increased quick data comprehension while a raw data view is available if one desires to see all data columns as stored in the database. Data visualization plots (ARAI, equal area, demagnetization, Zijderveld, etc.) are presented with the data when appropriate to aid the user in understanding the dataset. MagIC data associated with individual contributions or from online searches may be downloaded in the tab delimited MagIC text file format for susbsequent offline use and analysis. With input from the paleomagnetic, geomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities, the MagIC database will continue to improve as a data warehouse and resource.

  2. A New Interface for the Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) Paleo and Rock Magnetic Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarboe, N.; Minnett, R.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Tauxe, L.; Constable, C.; Shaar, R.; Jonestrask, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Magnetic Information Consortium (MagIC) database (http://earthref.org/MagIC/) continues to improve the ease of uploading data, the creation of complex searches, data visualization, and data downloads for the paleomagnetic, geomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities. Data uploading has been simplified and no longer requires the use of the Excel SmartBook interface. Instead, properly formatted MagIC text files can be dragged-and-dropped onto an HTML 5 web interface. Data can be uploaded one table at a time to facilitate ease of uploading and data error checking is done online on the whole dataset at once instead of incrementally in an Excel Console. Searching the database has improved with the addition of more sophisticated search parameters and with the ability to use them in complex combinations. Searches may also be saved as permanent URLs for easy reference or for use as a citation in a publication. Data visualization plots (ARAI, equal area, demagnetization, Zijderveld, etc.) are presented with the data when appropriate to aid the user in understanding the dataset. Data from the MagIC database may be downloaded from individual contributions or from online searches for offline use and analysis in the tab delimited MagIC text file format. With input from the paleomagnetic, geomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities, the MagIC database will continue to improve as a data warehouse and resource.

  3. Influence on Human Sleep Patterns of Lowering and Delaying the Minimum Core Body Temperature by Slow Changes in the Thermal Environment

    PubMed Central

    Togo, Fumiharu; Aizawa, Seika; Arai, Jun-ichiro; Yoshikawa, Shoko; Ishiwata, Takayuki; Shephard, Roy J.; Aoyagi, Yukitoshi

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: We hypothesized that appropriate changes in thermal environment would enhance the quality of sleep. Design/Setting: Controlled laboratory study. Participants: Healthy young men (n = 7, mean age 26 years). Interventions: Nocturnal sleep structures in i-nude subjects were compared between a condition where an ambient temperature (Ta) of 29.5°C was maintained throughout the night (constant Ta), and a second condition (dynamic Ta) where Ta changed slowly within the thermoneutral range (from 27.5°C to 29.5°C). Measurements and Results: Statistically significant (P < 0.05) results included a lower and a later occurrence of minimum core body temperature (Tc), and a longer duration of slow-wave (stages 3+4) sleep in dynamic versus constant Ta. However, total sleep time, sleep efficiency, the total durations of light (stages 1+2) and rapid eye movement sleep, and the latencies to sleep onset, slow-wave sleep, and rapid eye movement sleep did not differ between conditions. Conclusions: Lowering the minimum and delaying the nadir of nocturnal Tc increases slow-wave sleep (probably by an increase of dry heat loss); use of this tactic might improve the overall quality of sleep. Citation: Togo F; Aizawa S; Arai J et al. Influence on Human Sleep Patterns of Lowering and Delaying the Minimum Core Body Temperature by Slow Changes in the Thermal Environment. SLEEP 2007;30(6):797-802. PMID:17580602

  4. Visualizing vowel-production mechanism using simple educational tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Takayuki

    2005-09-01

    To develop intuitive and effective methods for educating Acoustics to students of different ages and from varied backgrounds, Arai [J. Phonetic Soc. Jpn. 5, 31-38, (2001)] replicated Chiba and Kajiyama's physical models of the human vocal tract as educational tools and verified that the physical models and sound sources, such as an artificial larynx, yield a simple but powerful demonstration of vowel production in the classroom. We have also started exhibiting our models at the Science Museum ``Ru-Ku-Ru'' in Shizuoka City, Japan. We further extended our model to a lung model as well as several head-shaped models with visible vocal tract to demonstrate the total vowel-production mechanism from phonation to articulation. The lung model imitates the human respiratory system with a diaphragm. In the head-shaped model, the midsaggital cross section is visible from the outside. To adjust the degree of nasopharyngeal coupling, the velum may be rotated. Another head-shaped model with the manipulable tongue position was also developed. Two test results were compared before and after using these physical models, and the educational effectiveness of the models was confirmed. The homepage of the vocal-tract models is available at http://www.splab.ee.sophia.ac.jp/Vocal-Tract-Model/index-e.htm. [Work supported by KAKENHI (17500603).

  5. Clinical and molecular analysis of the enamelin gene ENAM in Colombian families with autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Sandra; Torres, Diana; Briceño, Ignacio; Gómez, Ana Maria; Baquero, Eliana

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the phenotype, clinical characteristics and presence of mutations in the enamelin gene ENAM in five Colombian families with autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (ADAI). 22 individuals (15 affected and seven unaffected) belonging to five Colombian families with ADAI and eight individuals (three affected and five unaffected) belonging to three Colombian families with autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta (ARAI) that served as controls for molecular alterations and inheritance patterns were studied. Clinical, radiographic and genetic evaluations were done in all individuals. Eight exons and three intron-exon boundaries were sequenced for mutation analysis. Two of the five families with ADAI had the hypoplasic phenotype, two had the hypocalcified phenotype and one had the hypomaturative phenotype. Anterior open bite and mandibular retrognathism were the most frequent skeletal abnormalities in the families with ADAI. No mutations were found. These findings suggest that ADAI in these Colombian families was unrelated to previously described mutations in the ENAM gene. These results also indicate that other regions not included in this investigation, such as the promoter region, introns and other genes should be considered as potential ADAI candidates. PMID:23055792

  6. Clinical and molecular analysis of the enamelin gene ENAM in Colombian families with autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Sandra; Torres, Diana; Briceño, Ignacio; Gómez, Ana Maria; Baquero, Eliana

    2012-07-01

    In this study, we analyzed the phenotype, clinical characteristics and presence of mutations in the enamelin gene ENAM in five Colombian families with autosomal dominant amelogenesis imperfecta (ADAI). 22 individuals (15 affected and seven unaffected) belonging to five Colombian families with ADAI and eight individuals (three affected and five unaffected) belonging to three Colombian families with autosomal recessive amelogenesis imperfecta (ARAI) that served as controls for molecular alterations and inheritance patterns were studied. Clinical, radiographic and genetic evaluations were done in all individuals. Eight exons and three intron-exon boundaries were sequenced for mutation analysis. Two of the five families with ADAI had the hypoplasic phenotype, two had the hypocalcified phenotype and one had the hypomaturative phenotype. Anterior open bite and mandibular retrognathism were the most frequent skeletal abnormalities in the families with ADAI. No mutations were found. These findings suggest that ADAI in these Colombian families was unrelated to previously described mutations in the ENAM gene. These results also indicate that other regions not included in this investigation, such as the promoter region, introns and other genes should be considered as potential ADAI candidates.

  7. Nova Sco 2011 No. 2 = PNV J16364440-4132340 = PNV J16364300-4132460

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2011-09-01

    Announcement of discovery of Nova Sco 2011 No. 2 = PNV J16364440-4132340 = PNV J16364300-4132460. Discovered independently by John Seach (Chatsworth Island, NSW, Australia, on 2011 Sep. 06.37 UT at mag=9.8 (DSLR)) and by Yuji Nakamura (Kameyama, Mie, Japan, on 2011 Sep. 06.4313 UT at mag=9.7 C (CCD)). Posted on the IAU Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams Transient Object Confirmation Page (TOCP) as PNV J16364440-4132340 (Nakamura) and PNV J16364300-4132460 (Seach); identifications consolidated in VSX under PNV J16364440-4132340. Spectra obtained by A. Arai et al. on 2011 Sep. 7.42 UT suggest a highly reddened Fe II-type classical nova. Spectra by F. Walter and J. Seron obtained Sep. 2011 8.091 UT confirm a young galactic nova; they report spectra are reminiscent of an early recurrent nova. Initially announced in AAVSO Special Notice #251 (Matthew Templeton) and IAU Central Bureau Electronic Telegram 2813 (Daniel W. E. Green, ed.). Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations.

  8. Holocene archeointensities from mid European ceramics, slags, burned sediments and cherts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapper, Kathrin Lisa; Donadini, Fabio; Hirt, Ann M.

    2015-04-01

    The Earth's geomagnetic field intensity in the past can be determined from archeological artifacts. These archeointensity data are important inputs for geomagnetic field models and local reference curves of Earth's magnetic field. Although archeointensities have been measured on materials for more than half a century ago, data are still scarce before 1000 BC and for the Alpine area in general. This investigation presents new absolute archeointensity data from a time period of 5000-700 BC from Italy and Switzerland. The archeological materials that were studied are ceramics, copper slag, and burned sediments from fireplaces. In addition, we investigated archeointensities from burned cherts, in order to uncover if they are a suitable material for paleomagnetism. Rock magnetic properties of all samples indicate magnetite, and small amounts of maghemite and hematite in the pseudosingle domain range as the ferromagnetic carriers. The IZZI protocol was used for 96 specimens to obtain absolute intensities; 23 ceramics, slags and burned cherts passed the threshold criteria, which we applied. The choice of the threshold values allowed us to obtain the linear part in the Arai diagram, which corresponds to the characteristic remanent magnetization. Burned sediments did not pass the threshold criteria, most probably because they acquired a thermochemical remanent magnetization during their formation. We demonstrate that magnetic susceptibility and saturation isothermal remanent magnetization can be used to select cherts that are suitable for paleointensity determinations. After applying anisotropy and cooling rate corrections, the new archeointensity values are lower for some samples, but fit well with available models and other archeomagnetic data.

  9. A system of recurrent neural networks for modularising, parameterising and dynamic analysis of cell signalling networks.

    PubMed

    Samarasinghe, S; Ling, H

    2017-02-04

    In this paper, we show how to extend our previously proposed novel continuous time Recurrent Neural Networks (RNN) approach that retains the advantage of continuous dynamics offered by Ordinary Differential Equations (ODE) while enabling parameter estimation through adaptation, to larger signalling networks using a modular approach. Specifically, the signalling network is decomposed into several sub-models based on important temporal events in the network. Each sub-model is represented by the proposed RNN and trained using data generated from the corresponding ODE model. Trained sub-models are assembled into a whole system RNN which is then subjected to systems dynamics and sensitivity analyses. The concept is illustrated by application to G1/S transition in cell cycle using Iwamoto et al. (2008) ODE model. We decomposed the G1/S network into 3 sub-models: (i) E2F transcription factor release; (ii) E2F and CycE positive feedback loop for elevating cyclin levels; and (iii) E2F and CycA negative feedback to degrade E2F. The trained sub-models accurately represented system dynamics and parameters were in good agreement with the ODE model. The whole system RNN however revealed couple of parameters contributing to compounding errors due to feedback and required refinement to sub-model 2. These related to the reversible reaction between CycE/CDK2 and p27, its inhibitor. The revised whole system RNN model very accurately matched dynamics of the ODE system. Local sensitivity analysis of the whole system model further revealed the most dominant influence of the above two parameters in perturbing G1/S transition, giving support to a recent hypothesis that the release of inhibitor p27 from Cyc/CDK complex triggers cell cycle stage transition. To make the model useful in a practical setting, we modified each RNN sub-model with a time relay switch to facilitate larger interval input data (≈20min) (original model used data for 30s or less) and retrained them that produced

  10. Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Panagia, Nino; Sahu, Kailash

    2001-07-01

    Participants; Preface; Gamma-ray burst-supernova relation B. Paczynski; Observations of gamma-ray bursts G. Fishman; Fireballs T. Piran; Gamma-ray mechanisms M. Rees; Prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts R. Kehoe, C. Akerlof, R. Balsano, S. Barthelmy, J. Bloch, P. Butterworth, D. Casperson, T. Cline, S. Fletcher, F. Frontera, G. Gisler, J. Heise, J. Hills, K. Hurley, B. Lee, S. Marshall, T. McKay, A. Pawl, L. Piro, B. Priedhorsky, J. Szymanski and J. Wren; X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts L. Piro; The first year of optical-IR observations of SN1998bw I. Danziger, T. Augusteijn, J. Brewer, E. Cappellaro, V. Doublier, T. Galama, J. Gonzalez, O. Hainaut, B. Leibundgut, C. Lidman, P. Mazzali, K. Nomoto, F. Patat, J. Spyromilio, M. Turatto, J. Van Paradijs, P. Vreeswijk and J. Walsh; X-ray emission of Supernova 1998bw in the error box of GRB980425 E. Pian; Direct analysis of spectra of type Ic supernovae D. Branch; The interaction of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts with their surroundings R. Chevalier; Magnetars, soft gamma-ray repeaters and gamma-ray bursts A. Harding; Super-luminous supernova remnants Y. -H. Chu, C. -H. Chen and S. -P. Lai; The properties of hypernovae: SNe Ic 1998bw, 1997ef, and SN IIn 1997cy K. Nomoto, P. Mazzali, T. Nakamura, K. Iwanmoto, K. Maeda, T. Suzuki, M. Turatto, I. Danziger and F. Patat; Collapsars, Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Supernovae S. Woosley, A. MacFadyen and A. Heger; Pre-supernova evolution of massive stars N. Panagia and G. Bono; Radio supernovae and GRB 980425 K. Weiler, N. Panagia, R. Sramek, S. Van Dyk, M. Montes and C. Lacey; Models for Ia supernovae and evolutionary effects P. Hoflich and I. Dominguez; Deflagration to detonation A. Khokhlov; Universality in SN Iae and the Phillips relation D. Arnett; Abundances from supernovae F. -K. Thielemann, F. Brachwitz, C. Freiburghaus, S. Rosswog, K. Iwamoto, T. Nakamura, K. Nomoto, H. Umeda, K. Langanke, G. Martinez-Pinedo, D. Dean, W. Hix and M. Strayer; Sne, GRBs, and the

  11. Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D.; Zabel, Richard W.

    2004-01-01

    For juvenile chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, sockeye salmon O. nerka, and steelhead O. mykiss that migrate through reservoirs, hydroelectric projects, and free-flowing sections of the Snake and Columbia Rivers, survival estimates are essential to develop effective strategies for recovering depressed stocks. Many management strategies were based on estimates of system survival (Raymond 1979; Sims and Ossiander 1981) derived in a river system considerably different from today's (Williams and Matthews 1995; Williams et al. 2001). Knowledge of the magnitude, locations, and causes of smolt mortality under present passage conditions, and under conditions projected for the future, are necessary to develop strategies that will optimize smolt survival during migration. From 1993 through 2002, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and the University of Washington (UW) demonstrated the feasibility of using three statistical models to estimate survival of PIT-tagged (Prentice et al. 1990a) juvenile salmonids passing through Snake River dams and reservoirs (Iwamoto et al. 1994; Muir et al. 1995, 1996, 2001a, 2003; Smith et al. 1998, 2000a,b; Hockersmith et al. 1999; Zabel et al. 2001, 2002). Evaluation of assumptions for these models indicated that all were generally satisfied, and accurate and precise survival estimates were obtained. In 2003, NMFS and UW completed the eleventh year of the study. Flow levels during the early portion of the 2003 spring migration were similar to 2002, and only slightly higher than in the drought conditions during 2001. However, flow levels were much greater during the later part of the migration in 2003. Spill levels were similar to 2002, much higher than in 2001. Research objectives were to: (1) estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the yearling chinook salmon and steelhead migrations; (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions; and (3) evaluate

  12. Comparison between two methods for forward calculation of ambient noise H/V spectral ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Jerez, A.; Luzón, F.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Santoyo, M. A.; Albarello, D.; Lunedei, E.; Campillo, M.; Iturrarán-Viveros, U.

    2011-12-01

    The analysis of horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios of ambient noise (NHVSR) is a valuable tool for seismic prospecting, particularly if both a dense spatial sampling and a low-cost procedure are required. Unfortunately, the computation method still lacks of a unanimously accepted theoretical basis and different approaches are currently being used for inversion of the ground structure from the measured H/V curves. Two major approaches for forward calculation of NHVSRs in a layered medium are compared in this work. The first one was developed by Arai and Tokimatsu (2004) and recently improved by Albarello and Lunedei (2011). It consists of a description of the wavefield as generated by Far Surface point Forces (FSF method). The second one is based on the work of Sánchez-Sesma et al. (2011) who consider ambient noise as a Diffuse WaveField (DWF method), taking advantage of the proportionality between its Fourier-transformed autocorrelation (power spectrum) and the imaginary part of the Green function when source and receiver are the same. In both methods, the NHVSR is written as (PH/PV)1/2, where PH and PV are the horizontal and vertical power spectra. In the FSF method these quantities are given by PV∝⊙m(1+1/2χm2α2)(ARm/kRm)2 PH∝⊙m{(1+1/2χm2α2)(ARm/kRm)2χm2+1/2α2(ALm/kLm)2} where kRm, χm and ARm are wavenumber, ellipticity and medium response of the m-th Rayleigh wave mode; kLm and ALm correspond to the m-th Love wave mode and α is the horizontal-to-vertical load ratio of the ambient noise sources. Some common factors are omitted in the expressions of PV and PH. On the other hand, the DWF method deals with the full wavefield including both surface and body waves. In order to make the comparison easier, and taking into account that surface waves are often the dominant components in wide spectral ranges, body wave contributions are neglected here. In this case, the PH and PV power spectra for the DWF method are reduced to the simple expressions: PV

  13. Glassy and Metastable Crystalline BaTi2O5 by Containerless Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoda, Shinichi; Kentei Yu, Yu; Kumar, Vijaya; Kameko, Masashi

    metastable a-and b-BaTi2 O5 are constructed with non-centrosymmetric geometry TiO5 polyhedra, which provides higher potential for yielding high dielectric constants, pyroelectric and nonlinear op-tical properties than that of normal 4-or 6-coordinate Ti-O polyhedra. In addition, all lanthanide elements can be doped into the unusual glassy BaTi2 O5 structure to open up new possibilities for creating new bulk glasses, metastable phases and nano-crystalline ceramics with peculiar electronic and optical properties, such as giant permittivity and strong upconversion luminescence. References [1] Y. Akishige, K. Fukano, and H. Shigematsu, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. p2, 42, L946 (2003). [2] J. Yu, Y. Arai, T. Masaki, T. Ishikawa, S. Yoda, S. Kohara, H. Taniguchi, M. Itoh, and Y. Kuroiwa, Chem. Matter. 18 p.2169 (2006) [3] J. Yu, S. Kohara, S. Nozawa, K. Itoh, S. Miyoshi, Y. Arai, A. Masuno, H. Taniguchi, M. Itoh, M. Takata, T. Fukunaga, S. Koshihara, Y. Kuroiwa, and S. Yoda, Chem. Matter. 21, p259 (2009).

  14. "Black-colored olivines" in peridotites: dehydrogenation from hydrous olivines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Shoji; Hoshikawa, Chihiro; Miura, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Fresh olivines that are black to the naked eye are found in some dunites. Peridotites are easily converted to be black in color, when serpentinized, due to production of secondary fine magnetite particles. The dunites that contain fresh but black-colored olivines are usually coarse-grained. These coarse olivine grains are sometimes very heterogeneous in color; the blackish part grades to whitish parts in single grains. The black color is due to homegeneous distribution of minute (< 10 microns) black particles in olivine. They are rod-like or plate-like in shape in thin section, sometimes being aligned under crystallographic control of the host olivine. Olivines are clear and free of these inclusions around primary chromian spinel inclusions or chromian spinel lamellae (Arai, 1978). Raman spectroscopy indicates the minute black particles are magnetite always associated with diopside. It is interesting to note that olivine in mantle peridotites accompanied by the black-colored dunites is totally free of the black inclusions, giving the ordinary colors (pale yellow to whitish) of Mg-rich olivine. It is not likely that the magnetite inclusions formed through secondary oxidation of olivine by invasion of oxygen, which is possible along cracks or grain boundaries. They most probably formed due to dehydrogenation from primary OH-bearing olivines upon cooling. Hydrogen was quickly diffused out from the olivines to leave magnetite and excess silica. The excess silica was possibly combined with a monticellite component to form diopside. The OH-bearing (hydrous) olivines can be precipitated from hydrous magmas, and the hydrous nature of the magma can promote an increase in grain size due to faster diffusion of elements. The minute inclusions of magnetite + diopside is thus an indicator of primary hydrous character of host olivine.

  15. Long-term continuous observation of vertical gradient of water temperature on the deep seafloor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, S.; Hino, R.; Ito, Y.; Kubota, T.; Inazu, D.

    2015-12-01

    We have conducted ocean bottom pressure observations near the Japan Trench and the Kuril Trench using self-pop-up type instruments to detect seafloor vertical displacement accompanied by slip events along the plate boundary faults. Recently, we have started similar observation campaigns in the Hikurangi subduction zone, off the North Island of New Zealand since 2013. As a result of the observations, we have observed an uplift of 5 m due to the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake (Ito et al., 2011) and transient crustal deformations accompanied by slow slip events preceding the earthquake (Ito et al., 2013). Precision thermometer, usually used for temperature compensation of the pressure readings, occasionally recorded strange temperature changes related to occurrence of submarine earthquakes or tsunamis. Arai et al. (2013) interpreted noticeable temperature changes observed after the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake and interpreted it as the result of the turbidity current induced by massive tsunami. Inazu et al. (2015) pointed out a possibility that the temperature disturbance recorded just after the Tohoku-Oki earthquake above the large coseismic slip zone was due to the discharged of submarine groundwater associated with the earthquake. In order to describe these strange temperature signals more quantitatively, we started trial observations allowing investigation of water temperature field on the deep seafloor. In this study, we installed two precision temperature loggers top and bottom of the ocean bottom pressure recorders, with ~ 60 cm in height, to measure vertical gradients of seawater temperature as well as the ocean bottom pressures. Here, we report about 1-year continuous records retrieved from the Japan Trench and off New Zealand. During the observation off New Zealand, an evident slow slip event was identified by the onshore geodetic observations near the locations of our seafloor pressure-temperature monitoring. We are now exploring possible thermal and pressure

  16. Introducing a New Interface for the Online MagIC Database by Integrating Data Uploading, Searching, and Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarboe, N.; Minnett, R.; Constable, C.; Koppers, A. A.; Tauxe, L.

    2013-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) is dedicated to supporting the paleomagnetic, geomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities through the development and maintenance of an online database (http://earthref.org/MAGIC/), data upload and quality control, searches, data downloads, and visualization tools. While MagIC has completed importing some of the IAGA paleomagnetic databases (TRANS, PINT, PSVRL, GPMDB) and continues to import others (ARCHEO, MAGST and SECVR), further individual data uploading from the community contributes a wealth of easily-accessible rich datasets. Previously uploading of data to the MagIC database required the use of an Excel spreadsheet using either a Mac or PC. The new method of uploading data utilizes an HTML 5 web interface where the only computer requirement is a modern browser. This web interface will highlight all errors discovered in the dataset at once instead of the iterative error checking process found in the previous Excel spreadsheet data checker. As a web service, the community will always have easy access to the most up-to-date and bug free version of the data upload software. The filtering search mechanism of the MagIC database has been changed to a more intuitive system where the data from each contribution is displayed in tables similar to how the data is uploaded (http://earthref.org/MAGIC/search/). Searches themselves can be saved as a permanent URL, if desired. The saved search URL could then be used as a citation in a publication. When appropriate, plots (equal area, Zijderveld, ARAI, demagnetization, etc.) are associated with the data to give the user a quicker understanding of the underlying dataset. The MagIC database will continue to evolve to meet the needs of the paleomagnetic, geomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities.

  17. Regulation of the Escherichia coli L-arabinose operon studied by gel electrophoresis DNA binding assay.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, W; Schleif, R F

    1984-09-25

    DNA binding properties of the proteins required for induction of the Escherichia coli L-arabinose operon were measured using a polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis assay. The mechanisms of induction and repression were studied by observing the multiple interactions of RNA polymerase, cyclic AMP receptor protein and araC protein with short DNA fragments containing either the araC or araBAD promoter regions. These studies show that binding of araC protein to the operator site, araO1, directly blocks RNA polymerase binding at the araC promoter, pC. We find that cyclic AMP receptor protein and araC protein do not bind co-operatively at their respective sites to linear DNA fragments containing the pBAD promoter. Nevertheless, both these positive effectors must be present on the DNA to stimulate binding of RNA polymerase. Additionally, binding of the proteins to the DNA is not sufficient; araC protein must also be in the inducing state, for RNA polymerase to bind. Equilibrium binding constraints and kinetics were determined for araC protein binding to the araI and the araO1 sites. In the presence of inducer, L-arabinose, araC protein binds with equal affinity to DNA fragments containing either of these sites. In the presence of anti-inducer, D-fucose, the affinity for both sites is reduced 40-fold. The apparent equilibrium binding constants for both states of the protein vary in parallel with the buffer salt concentration. This result suggests that the inducing and repressing forms of araC protein displace a similar number of cations upon binding DNA.

  18. Ti-based catalytic effect on hydrogen desorption in crystalline NaBH4: an ab initio investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moysés Araújo, C.; Jena, Puru

    2005-03-01

    The application of hydrogen fuel cell technology in portable electronic devices and transportation vehicles has led to a great deal of interest in the study of complex alkali hydrides (MXH4 with M=Na, Li and X=Al,B) primarily due to their high gravimetric hydrogen density (eg.18.5% in LiBH4). In particular, NaBH4 slurry has been suggested as the most promising system for applications in fuel cell technology (1) as it provides one of the simplest ways of generating hydrogen. Additionally, the NaBH4 itself is also a promising hydrogen storage material since it has one of the highest gravimetric hydrogen density (13.0 wt%) among the alkali metal hydrides. However, its irreversibility with respect to hydrogen absorpton/desorption cycle limits its practical application for hydrogen storage. To overcome this limitation we have explored the role of Ti on the electronic and crystalline structures of NaBH4. Using density functional calculations we show that Ti prefers to occupy the Na site in sodium borohydride. In addition, Ti weakens the strength of the covalent bond between B and H atoms and the hydrogen removal energy is reduced from 5.64 eV in pure sodium borohydride to 4.70 eV when doped with Ti. Thus, Ti might work as a catalytic agent allowing hydrogen to desorb at a lower temperature. Calculations are underway to examine if other dopants may be even better candidates for hydrogen desorption from sodium borohydride. 1. Z. P. Li, B. H. Liu, K. Arai, K. Asaba and S. Suda Journal of Power Sources 126, 28 (2004).

  19. Paleointensity estimates from historic and modern Hawaiian lava flows using glassy basalt as a primary source material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cromwell, G.; Tauxe, L.; Staudigel, H.; Ron, H.

    2015-04-01

    Published paleointensity estimates derived from lavas extruded in known fields are highly variable and rarely recover the expected field strength within an accuracy of better than 10%. Inconsistent results on modern volcanic rocks lend even greater uncertainty to intensity experiments performed on lava flows emplaced during periods of unknown geomagnetic field strength. The majority of published paleointensity data are collected from the slowly cooled, massive centers of lava flows, where the magnetic grains are more likely to be multi-domain and produce non-ideal experimental results. Glassy volcanic material (found on subaerial lava flow tops and in sub-aqueous and subglacial environments), however is rapidly cooled, and therefore most likely of all volcanic materials to behave as single-domain particles demanded by Néel theory. We present a new paleointensity study of historic and modern Hawaiian lavas and test the viability of subaerially emplaced glassy basaltic material as an accurate recorder of magnetic field intensity. Six of eight lava flows sampled on the Big Island of Hawaii (1843, 1859, 1935, 1950, 1960, 1990 C.E.) produce well behaved Arai plots and recover an average intensity to within 2.7 μT of the expected field strength or better than 8% accuracy. We apply very strict selection criteria, including a minimum of three specimens per site, to prevent extraneous field estimates from affecting the final results. Individual volcanic glass results from the 1960 C.E. lava flow have a much lower variance than published data from the same volcanic unit. Glassy materials should therefore be collected wherever possible as they allow recovery of geomagnetic field strength with unprecedented accuracy.

  20. A Quantifier-Free String Theory for ALOGTIME Reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitt, François

    2007-02-01

    The main contribution of this work is the definition of a quantifier-free string theory T_1 suitable for formalizing ALOGTIME reasoning. After describing L_1 -- a new, simple, algebraic characterization of the complexity class ALOGTIME based on strings instead of numbers -- the theory T_1 is defined (based on L_1), and a detailed formal development of T_1 is given. Then, theorems of T_1 are shown to translate into families of propositional tautologies that have uniform polysize Frege proofs, T_1 is shown to prove the soundness of a particular Frege system F, and F is shown to provably p-simulate any proof system whose soundness can be proved in T_1. Finally, T_1 is compared with other theories for ALOGTIME reasoning in the literature. To our knowledge, this is the first formal theory for ALOGTIME reasoning whose basic objects are strings instead of numbers, and the first quantifier-free theory formalizing ALOGTIME reasoning in which a direct proof of the soundness of some Frege system has been given (in the case of first-order theories, such a proof was first given by Arai for his theory AID). Also, the polysize Frege proofs we give for the propositional translations of theorems of T_1 are considerably simpler than those for other theories, and so is our proof of the soundness of a particular F-system in T_1. Together with the simplicity of T_1's recursion schemes, axioms, and rules these facts suggest that T_1 is one of the most natural theories available for ALOGTIME reasoning.

  1. Thellier GUI: An integrated tool for analyzing paleointensity data from Thellier-type experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaar, Ron; Tauxe, Lisa

    2013-03-01

    Thellier-type experiments are a method used to estimate the intensity of the ancient geomagnetic field from samples carrying thermoremanent magnetization. The analysis of Thellier-type experimental data is conventionally done by manually interpreting data from each specimen individually. The main limitations of this approach are: (1) manual interpretation is highly subjective and can be biased by misleading concepts, (2) the procedure is time consuming, and (3) unless the measurement data are published, the final results cannot be reproduced by readers. These issues compound when trying to combine together paleointensity data from a collection of studies. Here, we address these problems by introducing the Thellier GUI: a comprehensive tool for interpreting Thellier-type experimental data. The tool presents a graphical user interface, which allows manual interpretation of the data, but also includes two new interpretation tools: (1) Thellier Auto Interpreter: an automatic interpretation procedure based on a given set of experimental requirements, and 2) Consistency Test: a self-test for the consistency of the results assuming groups of samples that should have the same paleointensity values. We apply the new tools to data from two case studies. These demonstrate that interpretation of non-ideal Arai plots is nonunique and different selection criteria can lead to significantly different conclusions. Hence, we recommend adopting the automatic interpretation approach, as it allows a more objective interpretation, which can be easily repeated or revised by others. When the analysis is combined with a Consistency Test, the credibility of the interpretations is enhanced. We also make the case that published paleointensity studies should include the measurement data (as supplementary files or as a contributions to the MagIC database) so that results based on a particular data set can be reproduced and assessed by others.

  2. Novel triterpenoids inhibit both DNA polymerase and DNA topoisomerase.

    PubMed Central

    Mizushina, Y; Iida, A; Ohta, K; Sugawara, F; Sakaguchi, K

    2000-01-01

    As described previously, we found that new triterpenoid compounds, designated fomitellic acids A and B, which selectively inhibit the activities of mammalian DNA polymerases alpha and beta [Mizushina, Tanaka, Kitamura, Tamai, Ikeda, Takemura, Sugawara, Arai, Matsukage, Yoshida and Sakaguchi (1998) Biochem. J. 330, 1325-1332; Tanaka, Kitamura, Mizushina, Sugawara and Sakaguchi (1998) J. Nat. Prod. 61, 193-197] and that a known triterpenoid, ursolic acid, is an inhibitor of human DNA topoisomerases I and II (A. Iida, Y. Mizushina and K. Sakaguchi, unpublished work). Here we report that all of these triterpenoids are potent inhibitors of calf DNA polymerase alpha, rat DNA polymerase beta and human DNA topoisomerases I and II, and show moderate inhibitory effects on plant DNA polymerase II and human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase. However, these compounds did not influence the activities of prokaryotic DNA polymerases such as Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I or other DNA metabolic enzymes such as human telomerase, T7 RNA polymerase and bovine deoxyribonuclease I. These triterpenoids were not only mammalian DNA polymerase inhibitors but also inhibitors of DNA topoisomerases I and II even though the enzymic characteristics of DNA polymerases and DNA topoisomerases, including their modes of action, amino acid sequences and three-dimensional structures, differed markedly. These triterpenoids did not bind to DNA, suggesting that they act directly on these enzymes. Because the three-dimensional structures of fomitellic acids were shown by computer simulation to be very similar to that of ursolic acid, the DNA-binding sites of both enzymes, which compete for the inhibitors, might be very similar. Fomitellic acid A and ursolic acid prevented the growth of NUGC cancer cells, with LD(50) values of 38 and 30 microM respectively. PMID:10970789

  3. Priming of Early Closure: Evidence for the Lexical Boost during Sentence Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Traxler, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Two self-paced reading experiments investigated priming in sentences containing “early” vs. “late closure” ambiguities. Early closure sentences impose relatively large processing costs at the point of syntactic disambiguation (Frazier & Rayner, 1982). The current study investigated a possible way to reduce processing costs. Target sentences were temporarily ambiguous and were disambiguated towards either the preferred “late” closure analysis or the dispreferred “early” closure analysis. Each target sentence was preceded by a prime that was either structurally identical or that required a different syntactic analysis. In Experiment 1, all of the prime sentences shared the same critical verb as the target (Arai et al., 2007; Carminati et al., 2008; Tooley et al., 2009, in press; Traxler et al., in press; Weber & Indefrey, 2009). In Experiment 2, verb repetition was eliminated by reorganizing the stimuli from Experiment 1. In Experiment 1, processing of the disambiguating verb was facilitated when an “early” closure target sentence followed an “early” closure prime. In Experiment 2, there were no significant priming effects, although an overall difference in processing time favored “late closure” targets. Combined analyses verified that the pattern of results in Experiment 1 differed significantly from Experiment 2. These experiments provide the first indication that “early” closure analyses can be primed and that such priming is more robust when a critical verb appears in both the prime and the target sentence. The results add to the body of data indicating a “lexical boost” for syntactic priming effects during comprehension. They have implications for theories of syntactic representation and processing (e.g., Boland & Blodgett, 2006; Vosse & Kempen, 2009; Sag et al., 2003). PMID:25750915

  4. Microscopic observation of titanomagnetite grains during palaeointensity experiments of volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hidefumi; Yamamoto, Yuhji

    2014-01-01

    Titanomagnetite (Tmt) grains, some partially maghemitized, of various oxidation levels were microscopically observed under reflected light as a function of temperature step in a Königsberger Thellier Thellier experiment in air. The reflected light microscopy indicated that the brownish colour of homogeneous Tmt turned blue at ˜300 °C. This false blue colour was caused by submicron scale rugged stripes on the surface, according to scanning electron microscope observations, which was made after the final heating step. The typical grey-to-bluish colour of maghemitized parts of Tmt grains turned to a brownish colour at ˜300 °C, indicating inversion of titanomaghemite to a mixture of magnetite and ilmenite (Ilm) or haematite (Hem). Although these observations were from Tmt grains on the sample surface, oxidation must have proceeded similarly within samples because the surface changes in the Tmt grains were highly correlated with behaviour of data points on Arai plots. Alterations in Tmt after heating at 610 °C in air for increasing times from 10 to 500 min were evaluated by reflected light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy at the end of the experiment. Mottled patches gradually emerged in the Tmt grains during subsequent heatings. However, the formation of new Ilm lamellae was not observed, even after the final 500 min heating. In conclusion, the alteration of Tmt during laboratory heating in air at ˜600 °C is likely not due to the typical high-temperature oxidation that forms trellis-type Ilm lamellae. Below ˜400 °C, the process should be closer to low-temperature oxidation. On the other hand, maghemitized parts of Tmt grains invert instantaneously at 300 °C, and a trellis-type structure with Hem lamellae soon emerges when heated at 610 °C.

  5. Measurement of the left-right asymmetry in pion-proton radiative exchange and charge exchange scattering from 301 to 625 MeV/c on a transversely polarized target

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, George Jung-Kwang

    1988-05-01

    The left-right asymmetry A/sub N/ in ..pi../sup /minus//p ..-->.. ..gamma..n has been measured at p/sub ..pi.. = 301, 316, 427, 471, 547, 586, and 625 MeV/c using a transversely polarized target. The final-state neutron and gamma were detected in coincidence by two states of matching neutron and gamma detectors at gamma angles centered around 90/degree and 110/degree/ c.m. A gamma detector consisted of an array of 15 counters, each was 15/times/15/times/25 cm/sup 3/ block of lead-glass. A neutron detector consisted of 15 counters also, each one was a cylindrical plastic scintillator 7.6 cm in diameter and 45.7 cm long. The A/sub N/ results are compared with the predictions from the most recent single-pion photoproduction partial-wave analysis by Arai and Fujii. The agreement is poor, casting doubt on the correctness of the value for the radiative-decay amplitude of the neutral Roper resonance now in use. A comparison is made with the 90/degree/recoil proton polarization data of the inverse reaction derived from ..gamma..d scattering, there are substantial discrepencies. Charge exchange (..pi../sup /minus/p/ ..-->.. ..gamma../degree/n) events were the major yield in this experiment. Very precise values of the charge exchange analyzing power were obtained with an error of typically 3%. The charge exchange results are compared with the predictions from recent ..gamma..n partial wave analyses. At the lower incident energies little difference is seen between the VPI, Karlsruhe-Helsinki, and CMU-LBL analyses, and there is excellent agreement with our experiment. From the onset of the Roper resonance the VPI solution is strongly favored.

  6. Origin and significance of spinel pyroxene symplectite in lherzolite xenoliths from Tallante, SE Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Yohei; Arai, Shoji; Morishita, Tomoaki; Ishida, Yoshito

    2008-09-01

    We found spinel pyroxene symplectites in lherzolite xenoliths from Tallante, SE Spain, and investigated their petrographical and geochemical signatures. The spinel pyroxene symplectites are divided into two types, a spinel-type (= opx + cpx + sp) and a plagioclase-type (= opx + cpx + sp + pl) symplectites. The symplectites are always surrounded by lenticular aggregates of coarser-grained spinel pyroxene. The petrography and major-element chemistry of bulk symplectites indicate an origin through subsolidus reaction between olivine and garnet like at Horoman (Japan; Morishita and Arai, Contrib Mineral Petrol 144:509 522, 2003). The spinel pyroxene symplectites at Tallante were of garnet origin. However, the bulk Tallante spinel pyroxene symplectites show a relatively flat rare earth element (REE) distribution with slight light REE (LREE) enrichment, i.e. there was no trace-element signature typical of mantle garnet. They also differ from the Horoman symplectites that occasionally preserve a garnet trace-element signature, i.e. depletion of LREE and enrichment of heavy REE. These conflicting results indicate that the symplectites record slight enrichment in pyroxene compositions during or after depletion by melt extraction and breakdown of garnet by decompression, and all the minerals including symplectite constituents have been homogenized in the stability field of spinel to plagioclase lherzolite, with the assistance of some melt (possibly an alkaline silicate melt; Downes, J Petrol 42:233 250, 2001). Moreover, some of the spinel-type symplectites experienced heating by injection of Si-rich melt, and consequently have been transformed to the plagioclase-type symplectite. The Tallante spinel pyroxene symplectites developed from garnet + olivine and were carried from the garnet lherzolite stability field to the spinel and to the plagioclase lherzolite stability fields. Our data indicates mantle upwelling (mantle diapirism) beneath the Betic Rif zone in southern Spain.

  7. New archaeomagnetic data recovered from the study of celtiberic remains from central Spain (Numancia and Ciadueña, III-I BC).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osete, María Luisa; Chauvin, Annick; Catanzariti, Gianluca; Jimeno, Alfredo; Campuzano, Saioa A.; Benito-Batanero, Juan Pedro; Roperch, Pierrick

    2016-04-01

    Variation of geomagnetic field changes in the Iberian Peninsula between prior to roman times remain very poorly constrained. Here we report results from the archeomagnetic study carried out on four set of ceramics and one combustion structure recovered in two pre-roman (celtiberic) archeological sites in central Spain. Rock magnetic experiments indicate the ChRM is carried by magnetite. Archaeointensity determinations were carried out by using the classical Thellier-Thellier experiment including tests and corrections for magnetic anisotropy and magnetic cooling rate dependency. Well heated specimens (red ceramic fragments and well heated samples from the kiln) show one single well defined component of magnetisation going through the origin and a linear arai plot providing successful archaeointensity determinations. The effect of anisotropy of the termoremanent magnetization (ATRM) on paleointensity analysis was specially investigated obtaining very high ATRM corrections on fine pottery specimens. With differences between the uncorrected and ATRM corrected paleointensity values that reached up to 80-100%. Mean intensity values obtained from three selected groups were 61.1 ±5.9μT; 57.6±3.3 and 56.4± 4.7μT which allows delineate the evolution of the paleofield intensity in central Iberia during the III-I centuries BC. The new archaeointensity data disagrees with previous results from Iberian ceramics which were not corrected by the ATRM effect. But they are in agreement with the most recent French paleointensity curve and latest European intensity model. Both based on a selection of high quality paleointensity data. This result reinforces the idea that the puzzling scatter often observed in the global paleointensity database is likely due to differences in the laboratory protocol. Further data from well contrasted laboratory protocols are still necessary to delineate confidently the evolution of the geomagnetic paleofield during the first millennium BC.

  8. A mitomycin-N6-deoxyadenosine adduct isolated from DNA.

    PubMed

    Palom, Y; Lipman, R; Musser, S M; Tomasz, M

    1998-03-01

    A minor N6-deoxyadenosine adduct of mitomycin C (MC) was isolated from synthetic oligonucleotides and calf thymus DNA, representing the first adduct of MC and a DNA base other than guanine. The structure of the adduct (8) was elucidated using submilligram quantities of total available material. UV difference spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and electrospray mass spectroscopy as well as chemical transformations were utilized in deriving the structure of 8. A series of synthetic oligonucleotides was designed to probe the specificities of the alkylation of adenine by MC. The nature and frequency of the oligonucleotide-MC adducts formed under conditions of reductive activation of MC were determined by their enzymatic digestion to the nucleoside level followed by quantitative analysis of the products by HPLC. The analyses indicated the following: (i) (A)n sequence is favored over (AT)n for adduct formation; (ii) the alkylation favors the duplex structure; (iii) at adenine sites only monofunctional alkylation occurs; (iv) the adenine-to-alkylation frequency in the model oligonucleotides was 0.3-0.6 relative to guanine alkylation at the 5'-ApG sequence but only 0.02-0.1 relative to guanine alkylation at 5'-CpG. The 5'-phosphodiester linkage of the MC-adenine adduct is resistant to snake venom diesterase. The overall ratio of adenine to guanine alkylation in calf thymus DNA was 0.03, indicating that 8 is a minor MC-DNA adduct relative to MC-DNA adducts at guanine residues in the present experimental residues in the present experimental system. However, the HPLC elution time of 8 coincides with that of a major, unknown MC adduct detected previously in mouse mammary tumor cells treated with radiolabeled MC [Bizanek, R., Chowdary, D., Arai, H., Kasai, M., Hughes, C. S., Sartorelli, A. C., Rockwell, S., and Tomasz, M. (1993) Cancer Res. 53, 5127-5134]. Thus, 8 may be identical or closely related to this major adduct formed in vivo. This possibility can now be tested by

  9. The Kinetic Behavior of Benzaldehyde under Hydrothermal Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fecteau, K.; Gould, I.; Hartnett, H. E.; Williams, L. B.; Shock, E.

    2013-12-01

    , metamorphism, and other hydrothermal processes of interest occur in natural systems. References Ikushima, Y., K. Hatakeda, O. Sato, T. Yokoyama, and M. Arai. 2001. Structure and base catalysis of supercritical water in the noncatalytic benzaldehyde disproportionation using water at high temperatures and pressures. Angewandte Chemie, 40, 210-213. Tsao, C.C., Y. Zhou, X. Liu, and T.J. Houser. 1992. Reactions of supercritical water with benzaldehyde, benzylidenebenzylamine, benzyl alcohol, and benzoic acid. The Journal of Supercritical Fluids, 5, 107-113.

  10. Subsurface structure around Omi basin using borehole database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitada, N.; Ito, H.; Takemura, K.; Mitamura, M.

    2015-12-01

    Kansai Geo-informatics Network (KG-NET) is organized as a new system of management of GI-base in 2005. This organization collects the geotechnical and geological information of borehole data more than 60,000 data. GI-base is the database system of the KG-NET and platform to use these borehole data. Kansai Geo-informatics Research Committee (KG-R) is tried to explain the geotechnical properties and geological environment using borehole database in Kansai area. In 2014, KG-R established the 'Shin-Kansai Jiban Omi plain', and explain the subsurface geology and characteristics of geotechnical properties. In this study we introduce this result and consider the sedimental environment and characteristics in this area. Omi Basin is located in the central part of Shiga Prefecture which includes the largest lake in Japan called Lake Biwa. About 15,000 borehole data are corrected to consider the subsurface properties. The outline of topographical and geological characteristics of the basin is divided into west side and east side. The west side area is typical reverse fault called Biwako-Seigan fault zone along the lakefront. From Biwako-Seigan fault, the Omi basin is tilting down from east to west. Otherwise, the east areas distribute lowland and hilly area comparatively. The sedimentary facies are also complicate and difficult to be generally evaluated. So the discussion has been focused about mainly the eastern and western part of Lake Biwa. The widely dispersed volcanic ash named Aira-Tn (AT) deposited before 26,000-29,000 years ago (Machida and Arai, 2003), is sometimes interbedded the humic layers in the low level ground area. However, because most of the sediments are comprised by thick sand and gravels whose deposit age could not be investigated, it is difficult to widely identify the boundary of strata. Three types of basement rocks are distributed mainly (granite, sediment rock, rhyolite), and characteristics of deposit are difference of each backland basement rock

  11. Microwave paleointensities indicate a low paleomagnetic dipole moment at the Permo-Triassic boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Taslima; Hawkins, Louise; Kravchinsky, Vadim A.; Biggin, Andrew J.; Pavlov, Vladimir E.

    2016-11-01

    The quantity of igneous material comprising the Siberian Traps provides a uniquely excellent opportunity to constrain Earth's paleomagnetic field intensity at the Permo-Triassic boundary. There remains however, a contradiction about the strength of the magnetic field that is exacerbated by the limited number of measurement data. To clarify the geomagnetic field behavior during this time period, for the first time, a microwave paleointensity study has been carried out on the Permo-Triassic flood basalts in order to complement existing datasets obtained using conventional thermal techniques. Samples, which have been dated at ∼250 Ma, of the Permo-Triassic trap basalts from the northern extrusive (Maymecha-Kotuy region) and the southeastern intrusive (areas of the Sytikanskaya and Yubileinaya kimberlite pipes) localities on the Siberian platform are investigated. These units have already demonstrated reliable paleomagnetic directions consistent with the retention of a primary remanence. Furthermore, Scanning Electron Microscope analysis confirms the presence of iron oxides likely of primary origin. Microwave Thellier-type paleointensity experiments (IZZI protocol with partial thermoremanent magnetization checks) are performed on 50 samples from 11 sites, of which, 28 samples from 7 sites provide satisfactory paleointensity data. The samples display corresponding distinct directional components, positive pTRM checks and little or no zig-zagging of the Arai or Zijderveld plot, providing evidence to support that the samples are not influenced by lab-induced alteration or multi-domain behavior. The accepted microwave paleointensity results from this study are combined with thermal Thellier-type results from previously published studies to obtain overall estimates for different regions of the Siberian Traps. The mean geomagnetic field intensity obtained from the samples of the northern part is 13.4 ± 12.7 μT (Maymecha-Kotuy region), whereas from the southeastern part

  12. A whole rock absolute paleointensity determination of dacites from the Duffer Formation (ca. 3.467 Ga) of the Pilbara Craton, Australia: An impossible task?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero-Bervera, Emilio; Krasa, David; Van Kranendonk, Martin J.

    2016-09-01

    We have conducted a whole-rock type magnetic and absolute paleointensity determination of the red dacite of the Duffer Formation from the Pilbara Craton, Australia. The age of the dated rock unit is 3467 ± 5 Ma (95% confidence). Vector analyses results of the step-wise alternating field demagnetization (NRM up to 100 mT) and thermal demagnetization (from NRM up to 650 °C) yield three components of magnetization. Curie point determinations indicate three characteristic temperatures, one at 150-200 °C, a second one at ∼450 °C and a third one at ∼580 °C. Magnetic grain-size experiments were performed on small specimens with a variable field translation balance (VFTB). The coercivity of remanence (Hcr) suggests that the NRM is carried by low-coercivity grains that are associated with a magnetite fraction as is shown by the high-temperature component with blocking temperatures above 450 °C and up to at least 580 °C. The ratios of the hysteresis parameters plotted as a modified Day diagram show that most grain sizes are scattered within the Single Domain (SD) and the Superparamagnetic and Single Domain SP-SD domain ranges. In addition to the rock magnetic experiments we have performed absolute paleointensity experiments on the samples using the modified Thellier-Coe double heating method to determine the paleointensities. Partial-TRM (p-TRM) checks were performed systematically to document magnetomineralogical changes during heating. The temperature was incremented by steps of 50 °C between room temperature and 590 °C. The paleointensity determinations were obtained from the slope of Arai diagrams. Our paleointensity results indicate that the paleofield obtained was ∼6.4 ± 0.68 (N = 11) micro-Teslas with a Virtual Dipole Moment (VDM) of 1.51 ± 0.81 × 1022 Am2, from a medium-to high-temperature component ranging from 300 to 590 °C that has been interpreted to be the oldest magnetization yet recorded in paleomagnetic studies of the Duffer Formation. The

  13. Tabulation of comet observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-07-01

    Concerning comets: 1957 III Arend-Roland, 1957 V Mrkos, 1958 III Burnham, 1959 III Bester-Hoffmeister, 1959 VI Alcock, 1959 VIII P/Giacobini-Zinner, 1960 I P/Wild 1, 1960 II Burnham, 1960 III P/Schaumasse, 1960 VIII P/Finlay, 1961 V Wilson-Hubbard, 1961 VIII Seki, 1962 III Seki-Lines, 1962 VIII Humason, 1963 I Ikeya, 1963 III Alcock, 1963 V Pereyra, 1964 VI Tomita-Gerber-Honda, 1964 VIII Ikeya, 1964 IX Everhart, 1979 X Bradfield, 1980 X P/Stephan-Oterma, 1980 XII Meier, 1980 XIII P/Tuttle, 1981 II Panther, 1982 I Bowell, 1982 IV P/Grigg-Skjellerup, 1982 VII P/d'Arrest, 1986 III P/Halley, 1987 IV Shoemaker, 1987 XII P/Hartley 3, 1987 XIX P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 2, 1987 XXIX Bradfield, 1987 XXX Levy, 1987 XXXII McNaught, 1987 XXXIII P/Borrelly, 1987 XXXVI P/Parker-Hartley, 1987 XXXVII P/Helin- Roman-Alu 1, 1988 III Shoemaker-Holt, 1988 V Liller, 1988 VIII P/Ge-Wang, 1988 XI P/Shoemaker-Holt 2, 1988 XIV P/Tempel 2, 1988 XV Machholz, 1988 XX Yanaka, 1988 XXI Shoemaker, 1988 XXIV Yanaka, 1989 III Shoemaker, 1989 V Shoemaker-Holt-Rodriquez, 1989 VIII P/Pons-Winnecke, 1989 X P/Brorsen-Metcalf, 1989 XI P/Gunn, 1989 XIII P/Lovas 1, 1989 XVIII McKenzie-Russell, 1989 XIX Okazaki-Levy-Rudenko, 1989 XX P/Clark, 1989 XXI Helin-Ronan-Alu, 1989 XXII Aarseth-Brewington, 1989h P/Van Biesbroeck, 1989t P/Wild 2, 1989u P/Kearns-Kwee, 1989c1 Austin, 1989e1 Skorichenko-George, 1990a P/Wild 4, 1990b Černis-Kiuchi-Nakamura, 1990c Levy, 1990e P/Wolf-Harrington, 1990f P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdušáková, 1990g McNaught-Hughes, 1990i Tsuchiya-Kiuchi, 1990n P/Taylor, 1990ο P/Shoemaker-Levy 1, 1991a P/Metcalf-Brewington, 1991b Arai, 1991c P/Swift-Gehrels, 1991d Shoemaker-Levy, 1991e P/Shoemaker-Levy 3, 1991h P/Takamizawa, 1991j P/Hartley 1, 1991k P/Mrkos, 1991l Helin-Lawrence, 1991n P/Faye, 1991q P/Levy, 1991t P/Hartley 2, P/Encke, P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1.

  14. The Online MagIC Database: Data Archiving, Compilation, and Visualization for the Geomagnetic, Paleomagnetic and Rock Magnetic Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarboe, N. A.; Koppers, A. A.; Tauxe, L.; Minnett, R.; Constable, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC) is dedicated to supporting the geomagnetic, paleomagnetic, and rock magnetic communities through the development and maintenance of an online database (http://earthref.org/MAGIC/), data upload and quality control, filtered searches, data downloads, and visualization tools. MagIC continues to import updated versions of the IAGA paleomagnetic databases (TRANS, PINT, PSVRL, GPMDB, ARCHEO, MAGST and SECVR) into the MagIC database, but data uploading from individuals in the community is now essential for the MagIC database project to succeed. The highly diverse datasets stored in the database require an extensive data model of over thirty tables and 1000 columns. However, any individual dataset generally requires only a small fraction of these. To promote data uploading from the community, entering data into the MagIC database is facilitated by using Excel on the Mac or PC and the data format is checked by the MagIC console software before uploading. Many data entry errors can be caught and corrected at this stage. After uploading, datasets can be flagged as either public or private, and private datasets can be shared with others using a group name and password. Over 4,000 archived datasets can be queried on-line (http://earthref.org/MAGIC/search/) using an advanced filtering and sorting-type search. A hierarchical system is in place for searching over contributions, locations, sites, samples, specimens or measurements. The Excel spreadsheet and MagIC text format file from each contribution can be accessed and data recovered from searches can be downloaded in the MagIC text format. Searches themselves (reproducing the state of the database at a specific time) can be saved as a permanent URL, if desired, and cited in publications. Where appropriate, plots (equal area, Zijderveld, ARAI, demagnetization, etc.) are associated with the data to give the user a quicker understanding of the underlying dataset and improved browsing

  15. Hydrocarbon micro-inclusions in olivine in high-P titanoclinohumite-bearing dunites: hydrocarbon activity in a subduction zone and Ti mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, S.; Ishimaru, S.; Mizukami, T.

    2012-04-01

    Micro-inclusions of methane and propane were examined in olivine and titanoclinohumite in dunites from Fujiwara, Sanbagawa high-P metamorphic belt, Japan, in order to understand the behavior of hydrocarbons in the subduction zone and mantle wedge. In the Fujiwara dunite, olivines coexist with magnetite and exhibit a wide range of chemical compositions (Fo88-96 and 0.2-0.6 wt% NiO), possibly indicating a deserpentinization origin for the dunite (Ishibashi et al., 1978; Enami, 1980). The primary chromian spinel shows an intermediate Cr/(Cr + Al) atomic ratio, 0.5-0.6, and 1 to 3 wt% TiO2, and are enclosed by its alteration phases (ferritechromite and magnetite) that contain less than 0.8 wt% TiO2. Hydrocarbons are usually associated with serpentine and brucite, with or without magnetite, in individual micro-inclusions, suggesting initial entrapment of hydrocarbon-rich aqueous fluids and subsequent reaction only between their water component and the wall olivine or titanoclinohumite. It is evident that they were not in-situ formed via reaction of olivine and trapped (H2O + CO2) (Miura et al., 2010). The primary rock for the Fujiwara dunite was originally formed as a cumulate from intra-plate magma (Arai et al., 2011), essentially composed of olivine of Fo85-86 and the Ti-rich chromian spinel. After uplift to the surface by some tectonism, it was serpentinized and brecciated to contain carbonaceous matter in the matrix part before incorporation in the subduction zone. The hydrocarbons possibly formed with maturation of the carbonaceous matter in the process of subduction (e.g., Itaya, 1981). The continuously formed hydrocarbons mobilized Ti released upon serpentinization from the primary chromian spinel to leave low-Ti ferritechromite and magnetite in the Fujiwara dunite. Ti was finally stabilized as titanoclinohumite and other Ti-rich minerals during deserpentinization in the Fujiwara dunite within the subduction zone. Ti is possibly mobile within the mantle wedge

  16. The influence of changes in soil moisture in association with geomorphic change on the formation of a subalpine coniferous forest on Mt. Akita-Komagatake, northern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, A.

    2015-12-01

    The coniferous forest (largely composed of Abies mariesii) is presently the typical vegetation of the subalpine zone in Japan. Pollen analysis revealed that few A. mariesii were present during the last glacial period, and the species began to expand to the subalpine zone during the Holocene (Morita, 1992). However, on Mt. Akita-Komagatake in northern Japan, the expected predominance of A. mariesii is not extensively observed, and the predominant vegetation is instead the dwarf bamboo (Sasa kurilensis). It is unknown why the area under coniferous forest is small in this region. Therefore, I examined this issue from the perspectives of (1) distribution of vegetation, (2) geomorphology, (3) soil moisture, and (4) vegetation history. (1) Precise digital elevation model data and photographic interpretation showed that this coniferous forest was densely distributed in a flat segment considered to be formed by a landslide; (2) this landslide is thought to have occurred up to 3,699 ± 26 yr BP because a boring-core specimen from the landslide included the AK-3 tephra layer (2,300-2,800 yr BP: Wachi et al, 1997) and the radiocarbon date of the lowermost humic soil layer was 3,699 ± 26 yr BP; (3) the soil in the forest area had higher volumetric water content than that in the non-forest area; and (4) phytolith analysis revealed that the main species in the study site was initially dwarf bamboo, but coniferous forest replaced it after the Towada-a tephra (1035 cal. BP, Machida and Arai, 1992) layer fell. These results suggest that soil water conditions changed because of the formation of the flat segment by the landslide, and the coniferous forest was consequently established. However, the landslide only indirectly affected the formation of the coniferous forest, because the forest developed over several thousand years after the landslide occurred. In other words, more direct reasons for the establishment of the coniferous forest may involve changes in soil moisture. This

  17. Mantle water contents beneath the Rio Grande Rift (NM, USA): FTIR analysis of Rio Puerco and Kilbourne Hole peridotite xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, L. A.; Peslier, A. H.; Brandon, A. D.; Selverstone, J.

    2015-12-01

    Peridotite xenoliths from the Rio Grande Rift (RGR) are being analyzed for H2O contents by FTIR as well as for major and trace element compositions. Nine samples are from the Rio Puerco Volcanic Field (RP) which overlaps the central RGR and southeastern Colorado Plateau; seventeen samples are from Kilbourne Hole (KH) in the southern RGR. Spinel Cr# (Cr/(Cr+Al) = 0.08-0.46) and olivine Mg# (Mg/(Mg+Fe) = 0.883-0.911) of samples fall within the olivine-spinel mantle array from [1], an indicator that these are residues of partial melting. Pyroxene H2O contents in KH correlate with bulk rock and pyroxene Al2O3 contents. The KH clinopyroxene rare earth element (REE) variations fit models of 0-13% fractional melting of a primitive upper mantle. Most KH peridotites have bulk-rock light REE depleted patterns, but five are enriched in light REEs consistent with metasomatism. Variation in H2O content seems unrelated to REE enrichment. Metasomatism is seen in RP pyroxenite xenoliths [2] and will be examined in the peridotites studied here. Olivine H2O contents are low (≤20 ppm), and decrease from core to rim within grains. This is likely due to H loss during xenolith transport by the host magma [3]. Diffusion models of H suggest that mantle H2O contents are still preserved in cores of KH olivine, but not those of RP olivine. The average H2O content of Colorado Plateau clinopyroxene (670 ppm) [4] is ~300 ppm higher than RGR clinopyroxene (350 ppm). This upholds the hypothesis that hydration-induced lithospheric melting occurred during flat-slab subduction of the Farallon plate [5]. Numerical models indicate hydration via slab fluids is possible beneath the plateau, ~600 km from the paleo-trench, but less likely ~850 km away beneath the rift [6]. [1]Arai, 1994 CG 113, 191-204.[2]Porreca et al., 2006 Geosp 2, 333-351.[3]Peslier and Luhr, 2006 EPSL 242, 302-319.[4]Li et al., 2008 JGR 113, 1978-2012.[5]Humphreys et al., 2003 Int Geol Rev 45, 575-595.[6]English et al., 2003 EPSL

  18. Do plumes exist beneath Northwest Kyushu southwest Japan?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashima, H.

    2014-12-01

    A thermal plume model was proposed for the Hot-spot type volcanism at Northwest Kyushu, southwest Japan in the post period of opening of the Sea of Japan. The model regards the Northwest Kyushu Basalts (NWKBs) were magmas fractionated from parental magmas with MgO = 12.8 - 18.8 wt. %, indicating that partial melting occurred at temperatures from 1330 to 1500 °C and at pressures from 1.5 to 3.0 GPa (Sakuyama et al., 2009; 2014). Previous petrological and observations, however, indicate that the NWKBs separated from the source mantle at pressures shallower than those inferred from the plume model. The Mg-Fe-Ni compositions of some NWKBs suggest that they could have been in equilibrium with mantle olivines with Fo = 81 - 87, meaning that they would have been not fractionated but primitive magmas. The NWKBs are associated with primitive high magnesium andesites, indicating that partial melting continued at low pressure such as 0.5 GPa (Mashima, 2009a, b). NWKBs include not garnet lherzolite xenoliths but spinel lherzolite, showing that primitive melt separation occurred at pressure lower than 2GPa (Arai et al., 2001). These lines of evidence indicate that the separation of primitive NWKBs occurred at temperature up to 1250 °C and pressures from 0.5 to 1.5 GPa, significantly lower than those assumed by the plume model. Instead of the plume model, geology of NW Kyushu infers that the volcanism was a consequence of the tectonic evolution of NW Kyushu. The volcanism was leaks of asthenosphere thickened extensional tectonics from the Paleogene to the early Miocene. Orientations of NWKB dikes indicate their eruption was induced by the reactivation of preexisting faults under horizontal compressive stress field oriented to a NW-SE direction. This horizontally compressive stress field would have been caused by mechanical interactions between the subducting Philippine Sea pate and the Eurasian Plate. The NW Kyushu volcanism could be explained in the context of plate

  19. Modeling depression: social dominance-submission gene expression patterns in rat neocortex.

    PubMed

    Kroes, R A; Panksepp, J; Burgdorf, J; Otto, N J; Moskal, J R

    2006-01-01

    protein 27, beta3-tubulin, ribosome-associated membrane protein 4 in subordinate animals. Interleukin-18 has been found to be over-expressed in human depression and panic disorder as well as other physiological stress paradigms [Takeuchi M, Okura T, Mori T, Akita K, Ohta T, Ikeda M, Ikegami H, Kurimoto M (1999) Intracellular production of interleukin-18 in human epithelial-like cell lines is enhanced by hyperosmotic stress in vitro. Cell Tissue Res 297(3):467-473] and heat shock proteins have been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders [Iwamoto K, Kakiuchi C, Bundo M, Ikeda K, Kato T (2004) Molecular characterization of bipolar disorder by comparing gene expression profiles of postmortem brains of major mental disorders. Mol Psychiatry 9(4):406-416; Pongrac JL, Middleton FA, Peng L, Lewis DA, Levitt P, Mirnics K (2004) Heat shock protein 12A shows reduced expression in the prefrontal cortex of subjects with schizophrenia. Biol Psychiatry 56(12):943-950]. Thus, the gene expression changes that we have observed here are consistent with and extend the observations found in the clinical literature and link them to the animal model used here thereby reinforcing its use to better understand the genesis of depression and identify novel therapeutic targets for its treatment.

  20. [Health examination in future at the era of low tuberculosis incidence--from contacts examination toward active epidemiological studies].

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hideo; Shirai, Chika

    2013-03-01

    NAKANISHI, Tomotada IWAMOTO (Kobe Institute of Health). The population ba

  1. Asteroid spin-up fission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pravec, P.

    2014-07-01

    degrees, i.e., near the YORP asymptotic states. The spin rates of primaries of asteroid pairs (unbound systems) are correlated with the secondary-to-primary size ratio; the primaries of pairs with small secondaries rotate at frequencies close to critical, but pairs with larger secondaries have slower primary rotations as a large part of the rotational angular momentum was carried away by the escaped secondary. Relative velocities of the components of asteroid pairs at the time of formation were low, on an order of the escape velocity from the parent body, indicating a gentle push in their formation. There has not been observed any secondary orbiting its primary below the Roche limit for strengthless bodies, consistent with their rubble-pile structure. The shapes of primaries of systems with bound secondaries are nearly spheroidal and they show an equatorial ridge in the highest-resolution radar shape models. The satellite orbits in close binary or triple systems have low inclinations to the primary's equator and the spin states of asteroid pair primaries are close to principal-axis rotation, as expected for material forming the secondary pulled away by the centrifugal force. While the observational data support the theory of formation of small asteroid systems by YORP-induced rotational fission, details of the formation process and evolutionary paths are lacking. I will also mention a few anomalies we have observed. The most striking anomaly is that there are two systems with super-critical angular momentum content, (4951) Iwamoto and (32039) 2000 JO_{23}, which require explanation.

  2. Low-metallicity Star Formation (IAU S255)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Leslie K.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Schneider, Raffaella

    2009-01-01

    'Shea and Michael L. Norman; 16. Damped Lyα systems as probes of chemical evolution over cosmological timescales Miroslava Dessauges-Zavadsky; 17. Connecting high-redshift galaxy populations through observations of local damped Lyman alpha dwarf galaxies Regina E. Schulte-Ladbeck; 18. Chemical enrichment and feedback in low metallicity environments: constraints on galaxy formation Francesca Matteucci; 19. Effects of reionization on dwarf galaxy formation Massimo Ricotti; 20. The importance of following the evolution of the dust in galaxies on their SEDs A. Schurer, F. Calura, L. Silva, A. Pipino, G. L. Granato, F. Matteucci and R. Maiolino; 21. About the chemical evolution of dSphs (and the peculiar globular cluster ωCen) Andrea Marcolini and Annibale D'Ercole; 22. Young star clusters in the small Magellanic cloud: impact of local and global conditions on star formation Elena Sabbi, Linda J. Smith, Lynn R. Carlson, Antonella Nota, Monca Tosi, Michele Cignoni, Jay S. Gallagher III, Marco Sirianni and Margaret Meixner; 23. Modeling the ISM properties of metal-poor galaxies and gamma-ray burst hosts Emily M. Levesque, Lisa J. Kewley, Kirsten Larson and Leonie Snijders; 24. Dwarf galaxies and the magnetisation of the IGM Uli Klein; Session III. Explosive Events in Low-Metallicity Environments: 25. Supernovae and their evolution in a low metallicity ISM Roger A. Chevalier; 26. First stars - type Ib supernovae connection Ken'ichi Nomoto, Masaomi Tanaka, Yasuomi Kamiya, Nozomu Tominaga and Keiichi Maeda; 27. Supernova nucleosynthesis in the early universe Nozomu Tominaga, Hideyuki Umeda, Keiichi Maeda, Ken'ichi Nomoto and Nobuyuki Iwamoto; 28. Powerful explosions at Z = 0? Sylvia Ekström, Georges Meynet, Raphael Hirschi and André Maeder; 29. Wind anisotropy and stellar evolution Cyril Georgy, Georges Meynet and André Maeder; 30. Low-mass and metal-poor gamma-ray burst

  3. Low-Metallicity Star Formation: From the First Stars to Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Leslie K.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Schneider, Raffaella

    2008-12-01

    'Shea and Michael L. Norman; 16. Damped Lyα systems as probes of chemical evolution over cosmological timescales Miroslava Dessauges-Zavadsky; 17. Connecting high-redshift galaxy populations through observations of local damped Lyman alpha dwarf galaxies Regina E. Schulte-Ladbeck; 18. Chemical enrichment and feedback in low metallicity environments: constraints on galaxy formation Francesca Matteucci; 19. Effects of reionization on dwarf galaxy formation Massimo Ricotti; 20. The importance of following the evolution of the dust in galaxies on their SEDs A. Schurer, F. Calura, L. Silva, A. Pipino, G. L. Granato, F. Matteucci and R. Maiolino; 21. About the chemical evolution of dSphs (and the peculiar globular cluster ωCen) Andrea Marcolini and Annibale D'Ercole; 22. Young star clusters in the small Magellanic cloud: impact of local and global conditions on star formation Elena Sabbi, Linda J. Smith, Lynn R. Carlson, Antonella Nota, Monca Tosi, Michele Cignoni, Jay S. Gallagher III, Marco Sirianni and Margaret Meixner; 23. Modeling the ISM properties of metal-poor galaxies and gamma-ray burst hosts Emily M. Levesque, Lisa J. Kewley, Kirsten Larson and Leonie Snijders; 24. Dwarf galaxies and the magnetisation of the IGM Uli Klein; Session III. Explosive Events in Low-Metallicity Environments: 25. Supernovae and their evolution in a low metallicity ISM Roger A. Chevalier; 26. First stars - type Ib supernovae connection Ken'ichi Nomoto, Masaomi Tanaka, Yasuomi Kamiya, Nozomu Tominaga and Keiichi Maeda; 27. Supernova nucleosynthesis in the early universe Nozomu Tominaga, Hideyuki Umeda, Keiichi Maeda, Ken'ichi Nomoto and Nobuyuki Iwamoto; 28. Powerful explosions at Z = 0? Sylvia Ekström, Georges Meynet, Raphael Hirschi and André Maeder; 29. Wind anisotropy and stellar evolution Cyril Georgy, Georges Meynet and André Maeder; 30. Low-mass and metal-poor gamma-ray burst

  4. PHITS-2.76, Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    sections from evaluated nuclear data libraries JENDL-4.0 (Shibata et al 2011). For high energy neutrons and other particles, we have incorporated several models such as JAM (Nara et al 1999), INCL (Cugnon et al 2011), INCL-ELF (Sawada et al 2012) and JQMD (Niita et al 1995) to simulate nuclear reactions up to 100 GeV/u. The special features of PHITS are the event generator mode (Iwamoto et al 2007) and the microdosimetric function (Sato et al 2009). Owing to the event generator mode, PHITS can determine the profiles of all secondary particles generated from a single nuclear interaction even using nuclear data libraries, taking the momentum and energy conservations into account. The microdosimetric function gives the probability densities of deposition energy in microscopic sites such as lineal energy y and specific energy z, using the mathematical model developed based on the results of the track structure simulation. These features are very important for various purposes such as the estimations of soft-error rates of semi-conductor devices induced by neutrons, and relative biological effectiveness of charged particles. From version 2.64, Prompt gamma spectrum and isomer production rates can be precisely estimated, owing to the implementation of EBITEM (ENSDF-Based Isomeric Transition and isomEr production Model). The photo-nuclear reaction model was improved up to 140 MeV. From version 2.76, electron and photon transport algorithm based on EGS5 (Hirayama et al. 2005) was incorporated. Models for describing photo-nuclear reaction above 140 MeV and muon-nuclear reaction were implemented. Event-generator mode version 2 was developed. Relativistic theory can be considered in the JQMD model.

  5. Zonal detached eddy simulation (ZDES) of a spatially developing flat plate turbulent boundary layer over the Reynolds number range 3 150 ⩽ Reθ ⩽ 14 000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deck, Sébastien; Renard, Nicolas; Laraufie, Romain; Sagaut, Pierre

    2014-02-01

    A Wall-Modeled Large Eddy Simulation (WMLES) of a spatially developing zero-pressure gradient smooth flat plate turbulent boundary layer is performed by means of the third mode of the Zonal Detached Eddy Simulation technique. The outer layer is resolved by a Large Eddy Simulation whereas the wall is modeled by a RANS simulation zone, with a RANS/LES interface prescribed at a fixed location. A revisited cost assessment of the Direct Numerical Simulation of high Reynolds numbers (Reθ ⩾ 10 000) wall-bounded flows emphasizes how moderate the cost of the WMLES approach is compared to methods resolving the near-wall dynamics. This makes possible the simulation over a wide Reynolds number range 3 150 ⩽ Reθ ⩽ 14 000, leaving quite enough space for very large scale motions to develop. For a better skin friction prediction, it is shown that the RANS/LES interface should be high enough in the boundary layer and at a location scaling in boundary layer thickness units (e.g., 0.1δ) rather than in wall units. Velocity spectra are compared to experimental data. The outer layer is well resolved, except near the RANS/LES interface where the very simple and robust passive boundary treatment might be improved by a more specific treatment. Besides, the inner RANS zone also contains large scale fluctuations down to the wall. It is shown that these fluctuations fit better to the experimental data for the same interface location that provides a better skin friction prediction. Numerical tests suggest that the observed very large scale motions may appear in an autonomous way, independently from the near-wall dynamics. It still has to be determined whether the observed structures have a physical or a numerical origin. In order to assess how the large scale motions contribute to skin friction, the Reynolds shear stress contribution is studied as suggested by the FIK identity [K. Fukagata, K. Iwamoto, and N. Kasagi, "Contribution of Reynolds stress distribution to the skin friction

  6. Topology in Ordered Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanda, Satoshi; Matsuyama, Toyoki; Oda, Migaku; Asano, Yasuhiro; Yakubo, Kousuke

    2006-08-01

    .]. Nanofibers of hydrogen storage alloy / I. Saita ... [et al.]. Synthesis of stable icosahedral quasicrystals in Zn-Sc based alloys and their magnetic properties / S. Kashimoto and T. Ishimasa. One-armed spiral wave excited by eam pressure in accretion disks in Be/X-Ray binaries / K. Hayasaki and A. T. Okazaki -- IV. Topological defects and excitations. Topological excitations in the ground state of charge density wave systems / P. Monceau. Soliton transport in nanoscale charge-density-wave systems / K. Inagaki, T. Toshima and S. Tanda. Topological defects in triplet superconductors UPt3, Sr[symbol]RuO[symbol], etc. / K. Maki ... [et al.]. Microscopic structure of vortices in type II superconductors / K. Machida ... [et al.]. Microscopic neutron investigation of the Abrikosov state of high-temperature superconductors / J. Mesot. Energy dissipation at nano-scale topological defects of high-Tc superconductors: microwave study / A. Maeda. Pressure induced topological phase transition in the heavy Fermion compound CeAl[symbol] / H. Miyagawa ... [et al.]. Explanation for the unusual orientation of LSCO square vortex lattice in terms of nodal superconductivity / M. Oda. Local electronic states in Bi[symbol]Sr[symbol]CaCu[symbol]O[symbol] / A. Hashimoto ... [et al.] -- V. Topology in quantum phenomena. Topological vortex formation in a Bose-Einstein condensate of alkali-metal atoms / M. Nakahara. Quantum phase transition of [symbol]He confined in nano-porous media / K. Shirahama, K. Yamamoto and Y. Shibayama. A new mean-field theory for Bose-Einstein condensates / T. Kita. Spin current in topological cristals / Y. Asano. Antiferromagnetic defects in non-magnetic hidden order of the heavy-electron system URu[symbol]Si[symbol] / H. Amitsuka, K. Tenya and M. Yokoyama. Magnetic-field dependences of thermodynamic quantities in the vortex state of Type-II superconductors / K. Watanabe, T. Kita and M. Arai. Three-magnon-mediated nuclear spin relaxation in quantum ferrimagnets of topological

  7. Quantum Bio-Informatics IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardi, Luigi; Freudenberg, Wolfgang; Ohya, Masanori

    2011-01-01

    The QP-DYN algorithms / L. Accardi, M. Regoli and M. Ohya -- Study of transcriptional regulatory network based on Cis module database / S. Akasaka ... [et al.] -- On Lie group-Lie algebra correspondences of unitary groups in finite von Neumann algebras / H. Ando, I. Ojima and Y. Matsuzawa -- On a general form of time operators of a Hamiltonian with purely discrete spectrum / A. Arai -- Quantum uncertainty and decision-making in game theory / M. Asano ... [et al.] -- New types of quantum entropies and additive information capacities / V. P. Belavkin -- Non-Markovian dynamics of quantum systems / D. Chruscinski and A. Kossakowski -- Self-collapses of quantum systems and brain activities / K.-H. Fichtner ... [et al.] -- Statistical analysis of random number generators / L. Accardi and M. Gabler -- Entangled effects of two consecutive pairs in residues and its use in alignment / T. Ham, K. Sato and M. Ohya -- The passage from digital to analogue in white noise analysis and applications / T. Hida -- Remarks on the degree of entanglement / D. Chruscinski ... [et al.] -- A completely discrete particle model derived from a stochastic partial differential equation by point systems / K.-H. Fichtner, K. Inoue and M. Ohya -- On quantum algorithm for exptime problem / S. Iriyama and M. Ohya -- On sufficient algebraic conditions for identification of quantum states / A. Jamiolkowski -- Concurrence and its estimations by entanglement witnesses / J. Jurkowski -- Classical wave model of quantum-like processing in brain / A. Khrennikov -- Entanglement mapping vs. quantum conditional probability operator / D. Chruscinski ... [et al.] -- Constructing multipartite entanglement witnesses / M. Michalski -- On Kadison-Schwarz property of quantum quadratic operators on M[symbol](C) / F. Mukhamedov and A. Abduganiev -- On phase transitions in quantum Markov chains on Cayley Tree / L. Accardi, F. Mukhamedov and M. Saburov -- Space(-time) emergence as symmetry breaking effect / I. Ojima

  8. Chromites from the Gogoł;ów-Jordanów Serpentinite Massif (SW Poland) - evidence of the arc setting magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtulek, Piotr; Puziewicz, Jacek; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Bukała, Michał

    2014-05-01

    relatively shallow back arc sub Moho environment (Gonzalez-Jimenez, 2011). The whole rock data from basaltic member of the Ślęża ophiolite unequivocally show their MORB origin (Pin et al., 1988). Thus, our data suggesting back arc origin of chromitites require further examination. References Gonzalez-Jimenez, J.M., Proenza, J.A., Gervilla, F., Melgarejo, J.C., Blanco-Moreno, J.A., Ruiz-Sanchez, R., Griffin, W.L., 2011. High-Cr and high-Al chromitites from the Sagua de Tanamo district, Mayari-Cristal ophiolitic massif (eastern Cuba): Constraints on their origin from mineralogy and geochemistry of chromian spinel and platinum-group elements. Lithos 125, 101-121. Pin, C., Majerowicz, A., Wojciechowska, I., 1988. Upper paleozoic oceanic crust in the Polish Sudetes: Nd-Sm isotope and trace elements evidence. Lithos 21, 195 - 209. Python, M., Ceuleneer, G., Arai, S., 2008. Chromian spinels in mafic-ultramafic mantle dykes: Evidence for a two-stage melt production during the evolution of the Oman ophiolite. Lithos 106, 137-154.

  9. Melt inclusion record of CO2 and H2O evolution of magma from Kikai-Akahoya caldera-forming eruption of Satsuma-Iojima volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, G.; Morishita, Y.; Kawanabe, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Geological survey and chemical analyses of pyroclastic rocks and melt inclusions in the deposits of Kikai-Akahoya caldera-forming eruption (7.3 ka) of Satsuma-Iojima volcano, Japan, were carried out in order to investigate compositional variation and degassing process οf the magma. Three pyroclastic units were erupted by the eruption successively; Koya-Funakura air-fall pumice (KFA), densely welded Funakura pyroclastic flow deposit and nonwelded Takeshima pyroclastic flow deposit (TPF; Ono et al., 1982). The total mass of the tephra is estimated to be more than 100 km3 (Machida and Arai, 2003). The KFA is a layer of coarse-grained rhyolitic pumice deposit (SiO2=71-72 wt.%) with 2-3m thick. The TPF has a thickness of about 30m and can be divided into at least three units. The deposit mainly consists of rhyolitic pumice (SiO2=70-72 wt.%) and vitric ash with small amount of andesitic scoria (SiO2=58-60 wt.%) and banded pumice. The upper unit is more rich in andesitic scoria than the lower unit. Analyses of major elements and S of the melt inclusions (MIs) in plagioclases and pyroxenes in the pumice and scoria were made by EPMA, and H2O and CO2 by SIMS. Major element composition of MIs in the pumice and scoria is similar to that of groundmass of them, respectively, indicating the melt entrapment just before the eruption. The MIs in the KFA have volatile contents of 4-6 wt.% H2O, <0.007 wt.% CO2 and <0.01 wt.% S. Gas saturation pressure of the magma is calculated to be 100-260 MPa on the basis of the H2O and CO2 contents of the MIs. On the other hand, the MIs in the rhyolitic pumice in the lower TPF have similar H2O and S contents but higher CO2 content (0.01-0.03 wt.%) than those of the KFA. Gas saturation pressure of the magma is calculated to be 130-270 MPa. The MIs in the andesitic scoria in the upper TPF have higher S (0.05-0.12 wt.%), similar CO2 content and lower H2O (2-3 wt.%) contents than those of the lower unit. Gas saturation pressure of the magma is

  10. Mineral Chemistry, Thermometry and Geochronological Constraints on the Petrogenesis of Apollo 14 Melt Breccia 14311 Zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, M.; Mojzsis, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    evidence of a lunar crustal formation event at ca. 4250 Ma and maybe earlier (ca. 4330 Ma), and perhaps arising from the last stage of a lunar magma ocean [8]. It is noteworthy that the younger zircon age grouping coincides with the LHB epoch reported from other radiogenic systems [2,9], with ages reported for other lunar highland breccias and lunar meteorites [2-5,10,11] as well as the oldest terrestrial zircons [12-14]. [1] Hartmann et al. (2000) In Origin of the Earth and Moon, 493--512, [2] Tera et al. (1974) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 22, 1-21, [3] Grange et al. (2009) Geochim. Cosmochim., 73, 3093-3107, [4] Pidgeon et al. (2007) Geochim. Cosmochim., 71, 1370-1381, [5] Nemchim et al. (2009) Meteor. Planet. Sci., 44, 1717-1734, [6] Wielicki et al. (2012) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 321-322, 20-31, [7] Abramov et al. (2011) LPSC XLII Abstract #2674, [8] Meyer et al. (1996) Meteor. Planet. Sci., 31, 370-387, [9] Bogard & Garrison (2003) Meteor. Planet. Sci., 38,669-710, [10] Arai et al. (2010) LPSC XL, Abstract #2379, [11] Liu et al. (2012) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 319-320, 277-286, [12] Trail et al. (2007) Geochim. Cosmochim.,71, 4044-4065, [13] Abbott et al. (2012) PNAS, In press, [14] Bell & Harrison (2012) Goldschmidt XXII, Abstract #2775.

  11. Crystallization of Pyroxene and Spinel in Gabbroic Lunar Meteorite Asuka 881757

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, T.; Takeda, H.; Warren, P. H.

    1995-09-01

    fractional crystallization. Spinels in A881757 are Cr-bearing ulvospinel, which suggests that the spinels crystallized at a relatively late stage. Differences of TiO2 and Cr2O3 among spinels probably reflect different stages in a series of crystallization. More Fe-rich pyroxene crystallized adjacent to more Ti-rich interstitial spinels, or spinels within mesostases, crystallized with greatly Fe-rich pyroxene. These spinels and pyroxenes probably crystallized simultaneously from compositionally evolving liquid[5]. In other words, fractional crystallization of pyroxene and spinel occurred even in PTS scale, because of rapid cooling rate. A881757 was cooled only slightly more slowly than typical mare basalts despite its old age [3] and unusually coarse grain sizes. Together, the inferred rapid cooling and the coarse grain sizes suggest origin in the interior of the relatively thick lava flow. We thank NIPR for samples, Profs. I. Kushiro for discussions, and Mr. H. Yoshida and O. Tachikawa for technical assistances. References: [1] Yanai K.et al. (1993) LPS XXIV, 1555-1556. [2] Warren P. H. and Lindstrom M. M. (1993) LPS XXIV, 1483-1484. [3] Misawa K.et al. (1992) in Proc. 17th Symp. Antarc. Meteorites, 119-121. [4] Yanai K (1991) Proc. LPS, Vol. 21, 317-324. [5] Arai T. et al. (1995) in Proc. 20th Symp. Antarc. Meteorites, 4-7.

  12. Mechanisms of formation of mantle section pyroxenites of Voykar Ophiolite, Polar Urals, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousov, Ivan; Batanova, Valentina; Sobolev, Alexander; Savelieva, Galina

    2010-05-01

    Ural Mountains mark a major mid Paleozoic collision event, which resulted in the closure of an ocean basin separating the Siberian and European plates. Voykar Ophiolite is located in the Northern part of Uralian Ophiolite Belt. Ophiolitic sequence rocks of Polar Urals are usually considered as giant fragments of mantle and MORB-type crust formed in back-arc settings (e.g. Savelieva et al., 1987). Mantle section of Voykar Ophiolite comprises most of the ophiolitic sequence. It is up to 8 km thick and consists mostly of spinel harzburgites with multiple dunitic bodies and pyroxenitic veins representing pathways for different melts/fluids. While it is generally accepted that dunites in mantle sections are formed by melt-rock reaction and mark melt pathways (e.g. Kelemen et al., 1995), formation of pyroxenites is a subject of debate. Often pyroxenites from mantle sections of ophiolites (Varfalvy et al., 1997), as well as pyroxenites from mantle wedge xenoliths (Arai et al., 2006, Bali et al., 2007, Gregoire et al., 2008) are interpreted as interaction products between high-SiO2 melts and mantle peridotites. Such melts are believed to be widespread in SSZ mantle: boninites, high-MgO andesites and adakites. However, some researchers (e.g. Berly et al., 2006, Halama et al., 2009) propose pyroxenite formation in metasomatic reaction with fluid from subducting plate. Moreover, some pyroxenites could be formed by the melt crystallization in hydrous conditions (Muntener et al., 2001). We present comprehensive study of mineral major and trace element compositions from the mantle section rocks of Voykar Ophiolite in order to determine mechanism of formation of pyroxenites in ophiolitic mantle sections. Compositions of clinopyroxene and olivine from pyroxenites were compared to their compositions in harzburgites and dunites. Furthermore, compositions of clinopyroxene and magmatic amphibole from mantle section pyroxenites were used to calculate equilibrium melts. Geochemical data

  13. Geochemistry of sapphirine-apatite-calcite-bearing gabbroic dykes from the Finero Phlogopite Peridotite (Ivrea-Verbano Zone): evidence for multistage interaction with the ambient peridotite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommaso, Giovanardi; Alberto, Zanetti; Maurizio, Mazzucchelli; Tomoaki, Morishita; Antonio, Langone

    2016-04-01

    sapphirine (Giovanardi et al., 2013). The mineral assemblage of the veins is dominated by titanian pargasite towards the host peridotite and by plagioclase at the vein centre. The veins also present phlogopite and spinel. Field and petrographic evidence, major and trace element data and the O isotopic composition of such gabbroic veins indicate that they formed at shallow mantle conditions by multistage fractional crystallisation of a migrating melt unrelated to those forming phlogopite harzburgites. Besides, local strong enrichments in LILE, LREE and 18O in vein minerals confirm that such melt was deeply modified by interaction with the host phlogopite peridotite. The genetic relationships with other intrusive events recorded by the FPP and the associated crustal sequence will be addressed with the aim of placing new constraints on the petrologic and geodynamic evolution of the IVZ. Giovanardi, T., Morishita, T., Zanetti, A., Mazzucchelli, M., Vannucci, R. (2013). Igneous sapphirine as a product of melt-peridotite interactions in the Finero Phlogopite-Peridotite Massif, Western Italian Alps. European Journal of Mineralogy 25, 17-31. Morishita, T., Hattori, K.H., Terada, K., Matsumoto, T., Yamamoto, K., Takebe, M., Ishida, Y., Tamura, A., Arai, S. (2008). Geochemistry of apatite-rich layers in the Finero phlogopite-peridotite massif (Italian Western Alps) and ion microprobe dating of apatite. Chemical Geology 251, 99-111. Zanetti, A., Mazzucchelli, M., Rivalenti, G., Vannucci, R. (1999). The Finero phlogopite-peridotite massif: an example of subduction-related metasomatism. Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology 134, 107-122.

  14. Distribution and PGE mineralization in the formation of chromitite in ophiolite complexes (Ospina-Kitoi Kharanur and ultrabasic massifs of Eastern Sayan, Sousern Siberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiseleva, Olga; Zhmodik, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    New study of PGE in restitic ultrabasic (Kharanur and Ospin-Kitoi) massifs from North and South branches (Dobretsov et al., 1985) of the ophiolite complexes in south-eastern part of the Eastern Sayan show their presence in chromitites of both branches belonging to the different geodynamic settings. Modern concepts model includes several mechanisms of podiform chromitite origin reflected in the chemistry of Cr-spinels (Arai, Yurimoto, 1994; Ballhaus, 1998; Uysal et al., 2009 et al.): 1) partial melting of upper mantle rocks, 2) mixing of primitive melts with melts enriched in SiO2, 3) melt-rock interaction. We estimated the types of interaction of mafic melts with mantle peridotites, with the formation of chromite bodies. For ore chrome spinelides from northern branch (Al2O3) melt = 8 - 14 wt%, (TiO2) melt = 0 - 0,4 wt%, (Fe/Mg) melt = 0,5 - 2,4; Southern branch (Al2O3) melt = 10 - 13 wt%, (TiO2) melt = 0,1 wt%, (Fe/Mg) melt = 0,3 - 1 (Kiseleva, 2014). There are two types of PGE distribution Os-Ir-Ru (I) and Pt-Pd (II). Type I chromitites (mid-Al#Cr-spinels) revealed only Os-Ir-Ru distributions; type II (low-Al#Cr spinelides) show both Os-Ir-Ru and (Pt-Pd) distributions (Kiseleva et al., 2012, 2014). PGE distribution in ultramafic peridotites and chromitites reflects PGE fractionation during partial melting (Barnes et al., 1985; Rehkämper et al., 1997). Processes bringing to extreme fractionation of PGE, may be associated with fluid-saturated supra subduction environment where melting degree near 20% and above is sufficient for the release of PGE from the mantle source (Dick, Bullen, 1984; Naldrett, 2010). Enrichment in PPGE together with a high content of IPGE in same chromite bodies is attributed to the second step of melting, and formation of S-enriched and saturated in PGE melts (Hamlyn, Keays, 1986; Prichard et al., 1996). For type I chromitites platinum group minerals (PGM) are presented by Os-Ir-Ru system. In type II chromitites PGM are represented by Os

  15. Palaeointensity and palaeodirection determinations of Paleoproterozoic dykes in the Kaapvaal Craton (South Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakova, V. V.; Lubnina, N. V.; Shcherbakov, V. P.; Zhidkov, G. V.

    2012-04-01

    of NRM(T) and TRM(T) was used too. Reliable palaeointensity determinations were obtained on only the site N28 of the age 1.85 Ga (Olsson et al., 2010). The rocks from this site demonstrated extremely stable magnetic properties to heating, their Curie points are closed to Tc of the magnetite. The thermodemagnetization curves NRM(T) and TRM(T) are very similar and the positions of check-points on the Arai-Nagata diagrams are close to the initial pTRM values. Seven samples (12 sister cubes) showed very similar intensities of paleofield Hanc lying in the interval 15-23 μT, with the mean VDM = 2.85 Am^2. This result agrees with the widespread opinion that the field in the Paleoproterozoic was considerably less than the modern magnetic field.

  16. Evidence for the formation of boninitic melt in the base of the Salahi mantle section, the northern Oman ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomoto, Y.; Takazawa, E.

    2013-12-01

    The boninites in the Oman ophiolite occur as lavas and dikes of the Alley volcanic sequence (Ishikawa et al., 2002). Moreover, Yamazaki and Miyashita (2008) reported about boninitic dike swarms in the Fizh crustal section. The boninitic melt generation requires hydrous melting of refractory mantle peridotite under an extremely high temperature and low pressure condition. This condition is generally explained by the addition of slab-derived fluids into a hot young oceanic lithosphere, which previously experienced MORB melt extraction. In this study, we report an ultramafic complex mainly composed of dunite which is in equilibrium with chemical composition of boninites in the southwestern part of the Salahi mantle section in the northern Oman ophiolite. Based on the study by Nomoto and Takazawa (2013) the complex consists mainly of massive dunite associated with minor amounts of harzburgite, pyroxenites and wehrlite. We use spinel Cr# (=Cr/[Cr+Al] atomic ratio) as an indicator of extent of melt extraction in harzburgites. For dunites spinel Cr# varies as a function of extent of reaction and of melt composition (Dick and Bullen, 1984; Arai, 1994; Ozawa, 2008). The spinels in the dunites from the complex have Cr# greater than 0.7 indicating highly refractory signature. The range of spinel Cr# is similar to those of spinels in boninites reported worldwide (Umino, 1986; van der Laan et al., 1992; Sobolev and Danyushevsky, 1994; Ishikawa et al., 2002). The complex might be a section of dunite channel that formed by flux melting of harzburgites as a result of infiltration of a voluminous fluid from the basal thrust. We determined the abundances of rare earth elements (REE) in the peridotite clinopyroxenes (cpxs) by LA-ICP-MS to estimate the compositions of the melts in equilibrium with these clinopyroxenes. The chondrite-normalized patterns for clinopyroxenes in the dunites are characterized by enrichments in light REE (LREE) relative to those of the harzburgite

  17. Characterization of the ribosomal RNA gene of Kudoa neothunni (Myxosporea: Multivalvulida) in tunas (Thunnus spp.) and Kudoa scomberi n. sp. in a chub mackerel (Scomber japonicus).

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Chun; Sato, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shuhei; Ohnishi, Takahiro; Kamata, Yoichi; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko

    2013-05-01

    Kudoa neothunni is the first described Kudoa species having six shell valves and polar capsules, previously assigned to the genus Hexacapsula Arai and Matsumoto, 1953. Since its genetic analyses remain to be conducted, the present study characterizes the ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) using two isolates from a yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) with post-harvest myoliquefaction and a northern bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) without tissue degradation. Spores of the two isolates localized in the myofiber of trunk muscles, forming pseudocysts, and showed typical morphology of K. neothunni with six equal-sized shell valves radially arranged in apical view: spores (n = 15) measuring 9.5-11.4 μm in width, 7.3-8.6 μm in suture width, 8.9-10.9 μm in thickness, and 7.3-7.7 μm in length; and polar capsules measuring 3.6-4.1 μm by 1.8-2.3 μm. In lateral view, the spores were pyramidal in shape without apical protrusions. Their 18S and 5.8S rDNA sequences were essentially identical, but variations in the ITS1 (62.4 % similarity across 757-bp length), ITS2 (66.9 % similarity across 599-bp length), and 28S (99.0 % similarity across 2,245-bp length) rDNA regions existed between the two isolates. On phylogenetic trees based on the 18S or 28S rDNA sequence, K. neothunni formed a clade with Kudoa spp. with more than four shell valves and polar capsules, particularly K. grammatorcyni and K. scomberomori. Semiquadrate spores of a kudoid species with four shell valves and polar capsules were detected from minute cysts (0.30-0.75 mm by 0.20-0.40 mm) embedded in the trunk muscle of a chub mackerel (Scomber japonicus) fished in the Sea of Japan. Morphologically, it resembled K. caudata described from a chub mackerel fished in the southeastern Pacific Ocean off Peru; however, it lacked filamentous projections on the shell valves of spores. Additionally, it morphologically resembled K. thunni described from a yellowfin tuna also fished in the Pacific Ocean; spores (n

  18. PREFACE: Ultrathin layers of graphene, h-BN and other honeycomb structures Ultrathin layers of graphene, h-BN and other honeycomb structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geber, Thomas; Oshima, Chuhei

    2012-08-01

    nanometer scale. This special section contains interesting papers on graphene, h-BN and related 'honeycomb' compounds on solid surfaces, which are currently in development. Interfacial interaction strongly modifies the electronic and atomic structures of these overlayer systems and substrate surfaces. In addition, one can recognize a variety of growth phenomena by changing the surface and growth conditions, which are promising as regards fabricating those noble nanosystems. We have great pleasure in acknowledging the enthusiastic response and participation of our invited authors and their diligent preparation of the manuscripts. Ultrathin layers of graphene, h-BN and other honeycomb structures contents Ultrathin layers of graphene, h-BN and other honeycomb structuresThomas Geber and Chuhei Oshima Templating of arrays of Ru nanoclusters by monolayer graphene/Ru Moirés with different periodicitiesEli Sutter, Bin Wang, Peter Albrecht, Jayeeta Lahiri, Marie-Laure Bocquet and Peter Sutter Controllable p-doping of graphene on Ir(111) by chlorination with FeCl3N A Vinogradov, K A Simonov, A V Generalov, A S Vinogradov, D V Vyalikh, C Laubschat, N Mårtensson and A B Preobrajenski Optimizing long-range order, band gap, and group velocities for graphene on close-packed metal surfacesF D Natterer, S Rusponi, M Papagno, C Carbone and H Brune Epitaxial growth of graphene on transition metal surfaces: chemical vapor deposition versus liquid phase depositionSamuel Grandthyll, Stefan Gsell, Michael Weinl, Matthias Schreck, Stefan Hüfner and Frank Müller High-yield boron nitride nanosheets from 'chemical blowing': towards practical applications in polymer compositesXuebin Wang, Amir Pakdel, Chunyi Zhi, Kentaro Watanabe, Takashi Sekiguchi, Dmitri Golberg and Yoshio Bando BCx layers with honeycomb lattices on an NbB2(0001) surfaceChuhei Oshima Epitaxial growth of boron-doped graphene by thermal decomposition of B4CWataru Norimatsu, Koichiro Hirata, Yuta Yamamoto, Shigeo Arai and Michiko

  19. EDITORIAL: On display with transparent conducting films On display with transparent conducting films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2012-03-01

    the sheet resistance of HNO3 treated carbon-nanotube films than the removal of residual N-methylpyrrolidone. Unsurprisingly graphene, the latest carbon wonder material, has also shown remarkable potential as a transparent conducting film. Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) synthesis of graphene has the advantage that it allows fabrication of the sheets to be scaled up. A collaboration of researchers in the USA, Singapore and Korea demonstrated that the conductivity of CVD graphene sheets can be improved by p-doping with AuCl3 [9]. The potential of graphene in a range of applications is also being demonstrated, as researchers in Australia and China show in a report on graphene in transparent conducting electrodes for GaN LED devices [10]. The review in this issue [4] provides a comprehensive overview of graphene as an electrode, including the synthesis, chemical doping and work function engineering of the material, as well as applications in transistors, memories, molecular junctions, touch screens, LCDs, LEDs and solar cells. Back in the early 1950s Gillham and Preston saw the possibility of using their gold sputtered bismuth oxide films for windows that could be electrically heated and took out a patent on their discovery [11]. While they saw potential applications for conducting transparent films, it could be argued that even Gillham and Preston would have been surprised at the extent to which transparent conducting films have infiltrated everyday technology over the 60 years since. It is tempting to wonder what wide reaching ramifications the current fruitful activity in graphene device research may have in the decades to come. References [1] Ayrton W E and Mather T 1894 J. Int. Elec. Eng. 23 376-80 [2] Gillham E J and Preston J S 1952 Proc. Phys. Soc. B 65 649 [3] Ishiguro K, Sasaki T, Arai T and Imai I 1958 J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 13 296-304 [4] Jo G, Choe M, Lee S, Park W, Kahng Y H and Lee T 2012 Nanotechnology 23 112001 [5] Guo P and Aegerter M A 1999 Thin Solid