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Sample records for arc energy limiting

  1. Investigation on the Arc Ignition Characteristics and Energy Absorption of Liquid Metal Current Limiter Based on Self-Pinch Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Xingbao; Sun, Haishun; Yang, Zhuo; Zhang, Junmin

    2016-05-01

    The GaInSn liquid metal current limiter based on the fluid pinch effect has broad application prospects due to its particular properties. However, the limited rated current and ability of power dissipation are the critical problems for its wide application. Firstly, the temperature distribution of the liquid metal current limiter (LMCL) was obtained by experiments with a rated current of 1 kA and the arc ignition phenomenon was observed with 1.5 kA, which indicates that the rated current is mainly limited by the arc rather than the high temperature compared to the traditional switchgears. Furthermore, an improved method is proposed by adding the paralleled pure resistance, impedance or another LMCL element to protect the setup from the fault energy concentration in the setup. The problem of a slower arc voltage increasing rate can be solved by adding a paralleled impedance with suitable parameters. Finally, the current limiting properties based on the improved method were investigated and the alternating oscillating current was found between two paralleled LMCL elements owing to their deviation of arc ignition in reality. supported by the Technology Project of State Grid (No. SGSNKYOOKJJS1501564) and the National Key Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (No. 2015CB251005)

  2. Energy balance in MIG arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnick, M.; Hertel, M.; Fuessel, U.; Uhrlandt, D.

    2013-06-01

    Recent studies of metal inert gas (MIG) processes by spectroscopy and fluid simulations have shown that metal evaporation causes a specific spatial structure of the arc, and among others a minimum of plasma temperature at the arc centre. Changes in the arc structure and in the heat transfer to the material are closely connected with the arc energy balance; its detailed analysis has not been carried out so far under the specific impact of metal vapour. In this paper, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of an MIG arc in argon including iron evaporation at the wire tip are considered. The main terms in the energy balance are discussed focusing on a comparison of the arc regions with and without metal vapour. In addition, a simple approach of the energy balance at a cross section of the MIG arc is proposed where all details of the heat transport are neglected. The MHD model and the simplified approach are in good agreement and clearly demonstrate that the specific structure in an MIG arc is mainly caused by the different temperature dependence of the plasma radiation and the electrical conductivity in argon or in argon mixtures with iron vapour.

  3. Anode energy transfer in a transient arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valensi, F.; Ratovoson, P.; Razafinimanana, M.; Gleizes, A.

    2017-04-01

    This work deals with experimental investigation of a transient arc. Arc configuration and electrode erosion were studied in order to quantify the energy transfer to the electrodes as a function of maximal current, time constant and electrodes material. Experiments with two consecutive arcs allow demonstrating non stationary behaviour of the arc electrode interaction. This is due to the fact that while the duration of the experiments is far larger than plasma phenomena time constants, it is comparable to those of electrode heating and melting processes.

  4. Magnetically operated limit switch has improved reliability, minimizes arcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiner, R.

    1966-01-01

    Limit switch for reliable, low-travel, snap action with negligible arcing uses an electrically nonconductive permanent magnet consisting of a ferrimagnetic ceramic and ferromagnetic pole shoes which form a magnetic and electrically conductive circuit with a ferrous-metal armature.

  5. Optical arc sensor using energy harvesting power source

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Nam Rho, Hee Hyuk

    2016-06-03

    Wireless sensors without external power supply gained considerable attention due to convenience both in installation and operation. Optical arc detecting sensor equipping with self sustaining power supply using energy harvesting method was investigated. Continuous energy harvesting method was attempted using thermoelectric generator to supply standby power in micro ampere scale and operating power in mA scale. Peltier module with heat-sink was used for high efficiency electricity generator. Optical arc detecting sensor with hybrid filter showed insensitivity to fluorescent and incandescent lamps under simulated distribution panel condition. Signal processing using integrating function showed selective arc discharge detection capability to different arc energy levels, with a resolution below 17 J energy difference, unaffected by bursting arc waveform. The sensor showed possibility for application to arc discharge detecting sensor in power distribution panel. Also experiment with proposed continuous energy harvesting method using thermoelectric power showed possibility as a self sustainable power source of remote sensor.

  6. Optical arc sensor using energy harvesting power source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Kyoo Nam; Rho, Hee Hyuk

    2016-06-01

    Wireless sensors without external power supply gained considerable attention due to convenience both in installation and operation. Optical arc detecting sensor equipping with self sustaining power supply using energy harvesting method was investigated. Continuous energy harvesting method was attempted using thermoelectric generator to supply standby power in micro ampere scale and operating power in mA scale. Peltier module with heat-sink was used for high efficiency electricity generator. Optical arc detecting sensor with hybrid filter showed insensitivity to fluorescent and incandescent lamps under simulated distribution panel condition. Signal processing using integrating function showed selective arc discharge detection capability to different arc energy levels, with a resolution below 17J energy difference, unaffected by bursting arc waveform. The sensor showed possibility for application to arc discharge detecting sensor in power distribution panel. Also experiment with proposed continuous energy harvesting method using thermoelectric power showed possibility as a self sustainable power source of remote sensor.

  7. Arc Energy Estimations: Applications in Lightning-Induced Concrete Spall

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, L K; Ong, M M

    2008-06-03

    After lightning contacts a building, the possibility of a physical break in its conductive path to ground may exist. Given such a break, an electric field may develop across the gap until it exceeds the breakdown strength of the non-conducting, or dielectric, material. Breakdown subsequently occurs and energy is dissipated during the development of an arc channel. If the dielectric is concrete, a concern exists that the energy available for arc formation may be capable of launching pieces of spall into sensitive equipment. This paper discusses the mechanisms of energy dissipation in arc formation and quantifies the energy available for concrete spall.

  8. Energy Balance in DC Arc Plasma Melting Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Peng; Meng, Yuedong; Yu, Xinyao; Chen, Longwei; Jiang, Yiman; Ni, Guohua; Chen, Mingzhou

    2009-04-01

    In order to treat hazardous municipal solid waste incinerator's (MSWI) fly ash, a new DC arc plasma furnace was developed. Taking an arc of 100 V/1000 A DC as an example, the heat transfer characteristics of the DC arc plasma, ablation of electrodes, heat properties of the fly ash during melting, heat transfer characteristics of the flue gas, and heat loss of the furnace were analyzed based on the energy conservation law, so as to achieve the total heat information and energy balance during plasma processing, and to provide a theoretical basis for an optimized design of the structure and to improve energy efficiency.

  9. Vacuum arc plasma thrusters with inductive energy storage driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schein, Jochen (Inventor); Gerhan, Andrew N. (Inventor); Woo, Robyn L. (Inventor); Au, Michael Y. (Inventor); Krishnan, Mahadevan (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An apparatus for producing a vacuum arc plasma source device using a low mass, compact inductive energy storage circuit powered by a low voltage DC supply acts as a vacuum arc plasma thruster. An inductor is charged through a switch, subsequently the switch is opened and a voltage spike of Ldi/dt is produced initiating plasma across a resistive path separating anode and cathode. The plasma is subsequently maintained by energy stored in the inductor. Plasma is produced from cathode material, which allows for any electrically conductive material to be used. A planar structure, a tubular structure, and a coaxial structure allow for consumption of cathode material feed and thereby long lifetime of the thruster for long durations of time.

  10. Note: Limitations of the optoelectronic control for carbon nanoparticles synthesis via arc-discharge in solution.

    PubMed

    Darias-González, J G; Hernández-Tabares, L; Carrillo-Barroso, E; Ledo-Pereda, L M; Arteche-Díaz, J; Desdín-García, L F

    2014-03-01

    Submerged electric arc discharge in liquids has shown to be a promising method for synthesizing a wide variety of nanomaterials. However, it requires an accurate current stability control to ensure the desired purity and structure of the products. The discharge stability control through light emission has been previously studied, but still requires further investigation to clarify the influence of some parameters. The present work has studied the solution's transmittance variation over time, the correlation between the arc light emission and the arc current, and the feasibility of controlling the arc current by using a specific wavelength of the arc light spectrum. Several limitations of the optoelectronic control were found at low currents (I < 50 A).

  11. Arcing and rf signal generation during target irradiation by a high-energy, pulsed neutral particle beam

    SciTech Connect

    Robiscoe, R.T.

    1988-02-01

    We present a theory describing the dynamics of arc discharges in bulk dielectric materials on board space-based vehicles. Such ''punch-through'' arcs can occur in target satellites irradiated by high-energy (250 MeV), pulsed (100 mA x 10 ms) neutral particle beams. We treat the arc as a capacitively limited avalanche current in the target dielectric material, and we find expressions for the arc duration, charge transport, currents, and discharge energy. These quantities are adjusted to be consistent with known scaling laws for the area of charge depleted by the arc. After a brief account of the statistical distribution of voltages at which the arc starts and stops, we calculate the signal strength and frequency spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation broadcast by the arc. We find that arcs from thick ()similarreverse arrowto)1 cm) targets can generate rf signals detectable up to 1000 km from the target, bu a radio receiver operating at frequency 80 MHz, bandwidth 100 kHz, and detection threshold -105 dBm. These thick-target arc signals are 10 to 20 dB above ambient noise at the receiver, and they provide target hit assessment if the signal spectrum can be sampled at several frequencies in the nominal range 30-200 MHz. Thin-target ()similarreverse arrowto)1 mm) arc signals are much weaker, but when they are detecable in conjunction with thick-target signals, target discrimination is possible by comparing the signal frequency spectra. 24 refs., 12 figs.

  12. luxS and arcB control aerobic growth of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans under iron limitation.

    PubMed

    Fong, Karen P; Gao, Ling; Demuth, Donald R

    2003-01-01

    LuxS is responsible for the production of autoinducer 2 (AI-2), which functions in Vibrio harveyi as a quorum-sensing signal that controls the cell density-dependent expression of the lux operon. In nonluminescent organisms, the physiologic role of AI-2 is not clear. We report that inactivation of luxS in Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans JP2 results in reduced growth of the mutant, but not the wild-type organism, under aerobic, iron-limited conditions. Stunted cultures of the luxS mutant A. actinomycetemcomitans JP2-12 grew to high cell density when subcultured under iron-replete conditions. In addition, the mutant strain grew to high cell density under iron limitation after transformation with a plasmid containing a functional copy of luxS. Results of real-time PCR showed that A. actinomycetemcomitans JP2-12 exhibited significantly reduced expression of afuA (eightfold), fecBCDE (10-fold), and ftnAB (>50-fold), which encode a periplasmic ferric transport protein, a putative ferric citrate transporter, and ferritin, respectively. The expressions of putative receptors for transferrin, hemoglobin, and hemophore binding protein were also reduced at more modest levels (two- to threefold). In contrast, expressions of sidD and frpB (encoding putative siderophore receptors) were increased 10- and 3-fold, respectively, in the luxS mutant. To better understand the mechanism of the AI-2 response, the A. actinomycetemcomitans genome was searched for homologs of the V. harveyi signal transduction proteins, LuxP, LuxQ, LuxU, and LuxO. Interestingly, ArcB was found to be most similar to LuxQ sensor/kinase. To determine whether arcB plays a role in the response of A. actinomycetemcomitans to AI-2, an arcB-deficient mutant was constructed. The isogenic arcB mutant grew poorly under anaerobic conditions but grew normally under aerobic iron-replete conditions. However, the arcB mutant failed to grow aerobically under iron limitation, and reverse transcriptase PCR showed that

  13. Plateau Variation of Arc Current Near the Interruption Limit in a Gas Circuit Breaker

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-20

    Limit in a Gas Circuit Breaker DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release, distribution unlimited This paper is part of the following report: TITLE...near the interruption limit in a gas circuit breaker M. Borghei* and J. Mahdavi** *Physics Department,Islamic Azad University,Karaj,Iran...deals with thermal arc- circuit interaction interruption such as shown in Fig.l.a or reheating of as found in other gas puffer circuit - breakers and a

  14. Dissipation of Electrical Energy in Submerged Arc Furnaces Producing Silicomanganese and High-Carbon Ferromanganese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenkamp, Joalet Dalene; Hockaday, Christopher James; Gous, Johan Petrus; Nzima, Thabo Witness

    2017-09-01

    Submerged-arc furnace technology is applied in the primary production of ferroalloys. Electrical energy is dissipated to the process via a combination of arcing and resistive heating. In processes where a crater forms between the charge zone and the reaction zone, electrical energy is dissipated mainly through arcing, e.g., in coke-bed based processes, through resistive heating. Plant-based measurements from a device called "Arcmon" indicated that in silicomanganese (SiMn) production, at times up to 15% of the electrical energy used is transferred by arcing, 30% in high-carbon ferromanganese (HCFeMn) production, compared with 5% in ferrochromium and 60% in ferrosilicon production. On average, the arcing is much less at 3% in SiMn and 5% in HCFeMn production.

  15. Dissipation of Electrical Energy in Submerged Arc Furnaces Producing Silicomanganese and High-Carbon Ferromanganese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenkamp, Joalet Dalene; Hockaday, Christopher James; Gous, Johan Petrus; Nzima, Thabo Witness

    2017-06-01

    Submerged-arc furnace technology is applied in the primary production of ferroalloys. Electrical energy is dissipated to the process via a combination of arcing and resistive heating. In processes where a crater forms between the charge zone and the reaction zone, electrical energy is dissipated mainly through arcing, e.g., in coke-bed based processes, through resistive heating. Plant-based measurements from a device called "Arcmon" indicated that in silicomanganese (SiMn) production, at times up to 15% of the electrical energy used is transferred by arcing, 30% in high-carbon ferromanganese (HCFeMn) production, compared with 5% in ferrochromium and 60% in ferrosilicon production. On average, the arcing is much less at 3% in SiMn and 5% in HCFeMn production.

  16. Arc tracking energy balance for copper and aluminum aeronautic cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, T.; Valensi, F.; Teulet, P.; Cressault, Y.; Zink, T.; Caussé, R.

    2017-04-01

    Arc tracking tests have been carried out between two voluntarily damaged aeronautic cables. Copper or aluminum conductors have been exposed to short circuits under alternating current. Various data have been recorded (arc voltage and current, radiated power and ablated mass), enabling to determine a power balance, in which every contribution is estimated. The total power is mainly transferred to the cables (between 50 and 65%, depending on the current and the cable type), and causes the melting and partial vaporization of the metallic core and insulating material, or is conducted or radiated. The other part is deposited into the arc column, being either radiated, convected or conducted.

  17. Optimization of Stability Constrained Geometrically Nonlinear Shallow Trusses Using an Arc Length Sparse Method with a Strain Energy Density Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrinda, Glenn A.; Nguyen, Duc T.

    2008-01-01

    A technique for the optimization of stability constrained geometrically nonlinear shallow trusses with snap through behavior is demonstrated using the arc length method and a strain energy density approach within a discrete finite element formulation. The optimization method uses an iterative scheme that evaluates the design variables' performance and then updates them according to a recursive formula controlled by the arc length method. A minimum weight design is achieved when a uniform nonlinear strain energy density is found in all members. This minimal condition places the design load just below the critical limit load causing snap through of the structure. The optimization scheme is programmed into a nonlinear finite element algorithm to find the large strain energy at critical limit loads. Examples of highly nonlinear trusses found in literature are presented to verify the method.

  18. Locating very high energy gamma ray sources with arc minute accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akerlof, C. W.; Cawley, M. F.; Chantell, M.; Fegan, D. J.; Harris, K.; Hillas, A. M.; Jennings, D. G.; Lamb, R. C.; Lawrence, M. A.; Lang, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The angular accuracy of gamma-ray detectors is intrinsically limited by the physical processes involved in photon detection. Although a number of point-like sources were detected by the COS-B satellite, only two were unambiguously identified by time signature with counterparts at longer wavelengths. By taking advantage of the extended longitudinal structure of Very High Energy gamma-ray showers, measurements in the TeV energy range can pinpoint source coordinates to arc minute accuracy. This was demonstrated using Cerenkov air shower imaging techniques. With two telescopes in coincidence, the individual event circular probable error will be 0.13 deg. The half-cone angle of the field of view is effectively 1 deg.

  19. Effects of an anode sheath on energy and momentum transfer in vacuum arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenxing; Zhou, Zhipeng; Tian, Yunbo; Wang, Haoran; Wang, Jianhua; Geng, Yingsan; Liu, Zhiyuan

    2017-07-01

    Anode phenomena under high-current vacuum arcs have a significant impact on the interrupting capacity of vacuum interrupters. However, the vacuum arc energy flux and momentum flux on the anode—which are necessary boundary conditions for simulations—are either set to an imaginary distribution or calculated using simple formulas without considering anode sheath regulatory effects. The objective of this paper is to reveal the anode sheath effects on regulating the energy and momentum transfer from the arc column to the anode surface in vacuum arcs. A particle-in-cell model for the anode sheath is developed. The required input parameters are obtained from a magnetohydrodynamic model for the arc column. From the results, there exists a sheath near the anode with a negative voltage drop. Both the electron density and the ion density significantly decline in the anode sheath region. The kinetic energy of the ions absorbed by the anode consists of directed kinetic energy, random kinetic energy, and sheath acceleration energy. The sheath acceleration energy contribution is the largest, and the random kinetic energy also accounts for a large part that cannot be ignored. The arc pressure on the anode surface is mainly caused by ion impact, and the accelerating effect of the anode sheath on the ions cannot be neglected in pressure calculations. In addition, in the case of an arc current at 15 kA, the input energy and momentum upon the anode surface is not obviously affected by the evaporated atoms at surface temperatures of 1600 K and 2000 K.

  20. The Limit of Resolution and Detectability of the ArcCHECK QA Phantom in small field Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy and Stereotactic Radiosurgery Quality Assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Tara

    Purpose: To determine the limit of detectability and resolution of the ArcCheck QA Phantom (Sun Nuclear, Inc.) for quality assurance of volumetric-modulated arc therapy and stereotactic radiosurgery procedures when used in small field sizes. Methods: Eight different square field sizes (0.6x0.6, 1x1, 2x2, 3x3, 5x5, 7x7, 10x10, 15x15 cm2) were measured on the ArcCheck QA phantom at three different gantry angles: 0, 90, and 270 degrees, using a 6 MV beam at its maximum dose rate of 600 MU/min and a dose computed from a 200 MU beam from the Varian Edge linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) at the University of Toledo Dana Cancer Center. Four different types of errors were introduced into quality-assurance analysis procedures. Measured square field sizes were compared against the same measured square field sizes with induced collimator and MLC errors. Induced collimator errors were defined by an expansion of the jaw-defined field size by 1 mm on all axes, a collimator shift of 1 mm on the X2 and Y2 axes, a table shift by 1 mm vertically and longitudinally at 270 and 90 degrees and a table shift of 1mm laterally and longitudinally for angles of 0 and 180 degrees. MLC induced errors included the addition of one and subsequently two opposing MLC leaves in the center of each square field. Dose distributions for the normal square fields and square fields with induced errors were imported into SNC patient software (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL) in the form of DICOM RT dose files and measured dose distributions were compared between the normally measured square fields and fields containing induced errors. Percent pass rates were computed using gamma analysis criteria of 2 mm/2% with a threshold value of 20%. Point dose ratios were also analyzed for fields with induced MLC errors and output factors were calculated in order to determine the magnitude of the effect that these induced errors had on output measurements as compared with the ability of

  1. Review of Innovative Energy Savings Technology for the Electric Arc Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Baek; Sohn, Il

    2014-09-01

    A review of the energy innovations for the electric arc furnace (EAF) steelmaking route is discussed. Preheating of scrap using vertical and horizontal shafts that have been commercially successful in lowering the energy consumption to as much as 90 kWh/t reaching almost the operational limit to heating input scrap materials into the EAF is discussed. Bucket-type and twin-shell preheaters have also shown to be effective in lowering the overall power consumption by 60 kWh/t, but these have been less effective than the vertical shaft-type preheaters. Beyond the scrap preheating technologies, the utilization of waste heat of the slags from the laboratory scale to the pilot scale has shown possible implementation of a granulation and subsequent heat exchange with forced air for energy recovery from the hot slags. Novel techniques to increase metal recovery have shown that laboratory-scale testing of localized Fe concentration into the primary spinel crystals was possible allowing the separation of an Fe-rich crystal from an Fe-depleted amorphous phase. A possible future process for converting the thermal energy of the CO/CO2 off-gases from the EAF into chemical energy was introduced.

  2. Ion energy distribution functions of vacuum arc plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Byon, Eungsun; Anders, Andre

    2002-09-16

    The velocity distribution function of vacuum arc ions can be measured by a time-of-flight technique similar to a method originally proposed by Yushkov. The measuring principle makes use of the well-justified assumption that the ion drift velocity from the cathode spot region to a collector is approximately constant. It is shown that the negative time derivative of the collector current is directly proportional to the ion distribution function provided that the time-averaged source intensity (i.e., emission of ions from cathode spots) is constant until the arc is rapidly switched off. In the experiment, arc termination took about 700 ns, which is much faster than the decay of the ion current measured at the collector placed in more than 2 meters distance from the cathode. The experimental distribution functions for most cathode materials show one large peak with a tail and one or more small peaks at higher ion velocities. The distribution functions for some other materials exhibit several peaks. No conclusive answer can be given about the nature of these peaks. Arguments are presented that the peaks are not caused by different charge states or plasma contamination but rather due to insufficiently averaged source fluctuations and/or acceleration by plasma instabilities.

  3. Compact compressive arc and beam switchyard for energy recovery linac-driven ultraviolet free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkermans, J. A. G.; Di Mitri, S.; Douglas, D.; Setija, I. D.

    2017-08-01

    High gain free electron lasers (FELs) driven by high repetition rate recirculating accelerators have received considerable attention in the scientific and industrial communities in recent years. Cost-performance optimization of such facilities encourages limiting machine size and complexity, and a compact machine can be realized by combining bending and bunch length compression during the last stage of recirculation, just before lasing. The impact of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on electron beam quality during compression can, however, limit FEL output power. When methods to counteract CSR are implemented, appropriate beam diagnostics become critical to ensure that the target beam parameters are met before lasing, as well as to guarantee reliable, predictable performance and rapid machine setup and recovery. This article describes a beam line for bunch compression and recirculation, and beam switchyard accessing a diagnostic line for EUV lasing at 1 GeV beam energy. The footprint is modest, with 12 m compressive arc diameter and ˜20 m diagnostic line length. The design limits beam quality degradation due to CSR both in the compressor and in the switchyard. Advantages and drawbacks of two switchyard lines providing, respectively, off-line and on-line measurements are discussed. The entire design is scalable to different beam energies and charges.

  4. Lead angles and emitting electron energies of Io-controlled decameter radio arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, S. L. G.; Pétin, A.; Zarka, P.; Bonfond, B.; Cecconi, B.

    2010-08-01

    The Io-controlled radio arcs are emissions in the decametric radio range which appear arc shaped in the time-frequency plane. Their occurrence is controlled by Io's position, so it has been for long inferred that they are powered by the Io-Jupiter electrodynamic interaction. Their frequency ranges correspond to the electron cyclotron frequencies along the Io Flux tube, so they are expected to be generated by cyclotron maser instability (CMI). The arc shape was proposed to be a consequence of the strong anisotropy of the decametric radio emissions beaming, combined with the topology of the magnetic field in the source and the observation geometry. Recent papers succeeded at reproducing the morphologies of a few typical radio arcs by modeling in three dimensions the observation geometry, using the best available magnetic field model and a beaming angle variation consistent with a loss-cone driven CMI. In the continuation of these studies, we present here the systematic modeling of a larger number of observations of the radio arcs emitted in Jupiter's southern hemisphere (including multiple arcs or arcs exhibiting abrupt changes of shape), which permits to obtain a statistical determination of the emitting field line localization (lead angle) relative to the instantaneous Io field line, and of the emitting particle velocities or energies. Variations of these parameters relative to Io's longitude are also measured and compared to the location of the UV footprints of the Io-Jupiter interaction. It is shown that the data are better organized in a reference frame attached to the UV spot resulting from the main Alfvén wing resulting from the Io-Jupiter interaction. It is proposed that the radio arcs are related to the first reflected Alfvén wing rather than to the main one.

  5. Micro-scale Plasma Arc Gasification for Waste Treatment and Energy Production Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caraccio, Anne

    2015-01-01

    As NASA continues to develop technology for spaceflight beyond low earth orbit, we must develop the right systems for sustaining human life on a long duration or planetary mission. Plasma arc gasification (PAG) is an energy efficient mechanism of waste management for power generation and synthetic gas(syngas) production.

  6. How energy conservation limits our measurements.

    PubMed

    Navascués, Miguel; Popescu, Sandu

    2014-04-11

    Observations in quantum mechanics are subject to complex restrictions arising from the principle of energy conservation. Determining such restrictions, however, has been so far an elusive task, and only partial results are known. In this Letter, we discuss how constraints on the energy spectrum of a measurement device translate into limitations on the measurements which we can effect on a target system with a nonconstant energy operator. We provide efficient algorithms to characterize such limitations and, in case the target is a two-level quantum system, we quantify them exactly. Our Letter, thus, identifies the boundaries between what is possible or impossible to measure, i.e., between what we can see or not, when energy conservation is at stake.

  7. Fundamental Limits to Nonlinear Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji Hosseinloo, Ashkan; Turitsyn, Konstantin

    2015-12-01

    Linear and nonlinear vibration energy harvesting has been the focus of considerable research in recent years. However, fundamental limits on the harvestable energy of a harvester subjected to an arbitrary excitation force and different constraints is not yet fully understood. Understanding these limits is not only essential for an assessment of the technology potential, but it also provides a broader perspective on the current harvesting mechanisms and guidance in their improvement. Here, we derive the fundamental limits on the output power of an ideal energy harvester for arbitrary excitation waveforms and build on the current analysis framework for the simple computation of this limit for more sophisticated setups. We show that the optimal harvester maximizes the harvested energy through a mechanical analog of a buy-low-sell-high strategy. We also propose a nonresonant passive latch-assisted harvester to realize this strategy for an effective harvesting. It is shown that the proposed harvester harvests energy more effectively than its linear and bistable counterparts over a wider range of excitation frequencies and amplitudes. The buy-low-sell-high strategy also reveals why the conventional bistable harvester works well at low-frequency excitation.

  8. Enthalpy By Energy Balance for Aerodynamic Heating Facility at NASA Ames Research Center Arc Jet Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hightower, T. Mark; MacDonald, Christine L.; Martinez, Edward R.; Balboni, John A.; Anderson, Karl F.; Arnold, Jim O. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) Arc Jet Facilities' Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) has been instrumented for the Enthalpy By Energy Balance (EB2) method. Diagnostic EB2 data is routinely taken for all AHF runs. This paper provides an overview of the EB2 method implemented in the AHF. The chief advantage of the AHF implementation over earlier versions is the non-intrusiveness of the instruments used. For example, to measure the change in cooling water temperature, thin film 1000 ohm Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs) are used with an Anderson Current Loop (ACL) as the signal conditioner. The ACL with 1000 ohm RTDs allows for very sensitive measurement of the increase in temperature (Delta T) of the cooling water to the arc heater, which is a critical element of the EB2 method. Cooling water flow rates are measured with non-intrusive ultrasonic flow meters.

  9. Vacuum arc plasma thrusters with inductive energy storage driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, Mahadevan (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A plasma thruster with a cylindrical inner and cylindrical outer electrode generates plasma particles from the application of energy stored in an inductor to a surface suitable for the formation of a plasma and expansion of plasma particles. The plasma production results in the generation of charged particles suitable for generating a reaction force, and the charged particles are guided by a magnetic field produced by the same inductor used to store the energy used to form the plasma.

  10. A possible energy source to power stable auroral red arcs - Precipitating electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, D. W.; Kleckner, E. W.; Gurgiolo, C.; Winningham, J. D.; Kozyra, J. U.

    1987-01-01

    Results of coincident measurements by ground-based photometers and the low-altitude plasma instrument on board the Dynamics Explorer 2 satellite are presented that demonstrate the association of precipitating low-energy electrons with stable auroral red (SAR) arcs. A search of available data has yielded 23 instances of DE 2 overflights during the presence of SAR arcs being monitored by the photometers. For each case, downward fluxes of electrons are found to be enhanced along field lines penetrating the arcs in relation to regions both north and south of the features. Modeling of the atmospheric response to these influxes indicates that these electrons can represent a major source of the energy required to establish temperature profiles within the ionospheric electron gas that are sufficient to produce the recorded 6300-A emission rates. The sensitivity of these results to uncertainties of the assumed spacecraft potential and thermospheric composition has been investigated and found to be important, but does not alter the conclusion that precipitating electrons are a fundamental link in the production of SAR arcs.

  11. Music algorithm for imaging of a sound-hard arc in limited-view inverse scattering problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Won-Kwang

    2017-07-01

    MUltiple SIgnal Classification (MUSIC) algorithm for a non-iterative imaging of sound-hard arc in limited-view inverse scattering problem is considered. In order to discover mathematical structure of MUSIC, we derive a relationship between MUSIC and an infinite series of Bessel functions of integer order. This structure enables us to examine some properties of MUSIC in limited-view problem. Numerical simulations are performed to support the identified structure of MUSIC.

  12. Distributed energy store railgun; The limiting case

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, R.A. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that when the limiting case of a distributed energy store railgun is analyzed, i.e., the case where the space between adjacent energy stores become indefinitely small, three important results are obtained. First, the shape of the current pulse delivered by each store is sinusoidal and an exponential tail. Second, the rail-to-rail voltage behind the rear-most active store approaches zero. Third, it is not possible to choose parameters in such a way that capacitor crowbars can be eliminated.

  13. Plasma ARC/SCWO Sysems for Waste-to-Energy Applications Utilizing Milwaste Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TR-2013-00213 PLASMA ARC/SCWO SYSTEMS FOR WASTE-TO- ENERGY APPLICATIONS UTILIZING MILWASTE FUELS Ralph H. Yates General...APPLICATIONS UTILIZING MILWASTE FUELS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8651-04-C-0158 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 0909999F 6. AUTHOR(S...program was a research and development program aimed at developing a solid waste treatment technology to compliment General Atomics’ (GA’s) existing

  14. Evaluation of the chromium oxide arc spraying treatment on solar energy collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandezarroyo, Gloria; Gonzalezgarcia-Conde, Antonio; Moralespoyato, Francisco; Arrerajaraiz, Jose Maria; Blancotemprano, Cristina; Camonalvarez, Francisco

    Accelerated aging tests were performed on steel specimens coated with plasma gun Cr2O3 arc sprays. The chromium oxide coating is attractive due to its radiation absorptance characteristic, especially for solar thermal energy absorption applications. The use of plasma blowpipes gives low porosity coatings. Collector efficiency curves were determined and compared to the curves of conventional black paint collectors. The efficiency is close to conventional painting. The excellent behavior at high temperatures makes this treatment applicable to concentrated radiation absorbers.

  15. Theoretical efficiency limits for thermoradiative energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Strandberg, Rune

    2015-02-07

    A new method to produce electricity from heat called thermoradiative energy conversion is analyzed. The method is based on sustaining a difference in the chemical potential for electron populations above and below an energy gap and let this difference drive a current through an electric circuit. The difference in chemical potential originates from an imbalance in the excitation and de-excitation of electrons across the energy gap. The method has similarities to thermophotovoltaics and conventional photovoltaics. While photovoltaic cells absorb thermal radiation from a body with higher temperature than the cell itself, thermoradiative cells are hot during operation and emit a net outflow of photons to colder surroundings. A thermoradiative cell with an energy gap of 0.25 eV at a temperature of 500 K in surroundings at 300 K is found to have a theoretical efficiency limit of 33.2%. For a high-temperature thermoradiative cell with an energy gap of 0.4 eV, a theoretical efficiency close to 50% is found while the cell produces 1000 W/m{sup 2} has a temperature of 1000 K and is placed in surroundings with a temperature of 300 K. Some aspects related to the practical implementation of the concept are discussed and some challenges are addressed. It is, for example, obvious that there is an upper boundary for the temperature under which solid state devices can work properly over time. No conclusions are drawn with regard to such practical boundaries, because the work is aimed at establishing upper limits for ideal thermoradiative devices.

  16. Schlieren technique applied to the arc temperature measurement in a high energy density cutting torch

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, L.; Mancinelli, B.; Artana, G.; Kelly, H.

    2010-01-15

    Plasma temperature and radial density profiles of the plasma species in a high energy density cutting arc have been obtained by using a quantitative schlieren technique. A Z-type two-mirror schlieren system was used in this research. Due to its great sensibility such technique allows measuring plasma composition and temperature from the arc axis to the surrounding medium by processing the gray-level contrast values of digital schlieren images recorded at the observation plane for a given position of a transverse knife located at the exit focal plane of the system. The technique has provided a good visualization of the plasma flow emerging from the nozzle and its interactions with the surrounding medium and the anode. The obtained temperature values are in good agreement with those values previously obtained by the authors on the same torch using Langmuir probes.

  17. Schlieren technique applied to the arc temperature measurement in a high energy density cutting torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevosto, L.; Artana, G.; Mancinelli, B.; Kelly, H.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma temperature and radial density profiles of the plasma species in a high energy density cutting arc have been obtained by using a quantitative schlieren technique. A Z-type two-mirror schlieren system was used in this research. Due to its great sensibility such technique allows measuring plasma composition and temperature from the arc axis to the surrounding medium by processing the gray-level contrast values of digital schlieren images recorded at the observation plane for a given position of a transverse knife located at the exit focal plane of the system. The technique has provided a good visualization of the plasma flow emerging from the nozzle and its interactions with the surrounding medium and the anode. The obtained temperature values are in good agreement with those values previously obtained by the authors on the same torch using Langmuir probes.

  18. Load limiting energy absorbing lightweight debris catcher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B. (Inventor); Schneider, William C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    In the representative embodiment of the invention disclosed, a load limiting, energy absorbing net is arranged to overlay a normally-covered vent opening in the rear bulkhead of the space orbiter vehicle. Spatially-disposed flexible retainer straps are extended from the net and respectively secured to bulkhead brackets spaced around the vent opening. The intermediate portions of the straps are doubled over and stitched together in a pattern enabling the doubled-over portions to progressively separate at a predicable load designed to be well below the tensile capability of the straps as the stitches are successively torn apart by the forces imposed on the retainer members whenever the cover plate is explosively separated from the bulkhead and propelled into the net. By arranging these stitches to be successively torn away at a load below the strap strength in response to forces acting on the retainers that are less than the combined strength of the retainers, this tearing action serves as a predictable compact energy absorber for safely halting the cover plate as the retainers are extended as the net is deployed. The invention further includes a block of an energy-absorbing material positioned in the net for receiving loose debris produced by the explosive release of the cover plate.

  19. Hollow cathode arc discharge as an effective energy source for welding processes in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerovnyi, V. M.; Khakhalev, A. D.

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation of thermal and physical properties of the hollow cathode arc discharge (HCAD) with respect to its application for welding processes in vacuum. The following main parameters of the arc discharge were studied: the external voltage-current (V-I) characteristics; plasma parameters inside the cathode cavity and in the arc external column and the radial heat flux density distribution into the anode. Langmuir electrical probes have been utilized to investigate plasma parameters. Electron energy distribution function was determined from the probe V-I characteristics by the computation of an inverse ill-posed problem. It was shown that, depending on welding parameters, HCAD can exist in two different forms: diffusive or constricted. At currents below 60 A, HCAD has the diffusive form, and with the increase in the current it changes to the constricted form. The discharge constriction phenomenon, we believe, could be explained by the appearance in the external plasma of high velocity electrons with energies from 12 to 22 eV. Parameters of the heat flux into the anode were investigated with spot and split-anode calorimeters. The heat flux density on the anode of the diffusive form of the discharge has a Gaussian distribution. The heat flux of the constricted form is significantly different from the diffusive one and can be approximated by the sum of two combined normal-circular heat sources with different power concentration coefficients. It was also found that the efficiency parameter of the discharge energy transfer to the anode can reach 0.7-0.86 of the discharge voltage, which confirmed that HCAD is a highly effective energy source for welding processes in vacuum. Examples of industrial applications of HCAD for welding, brazing and alloying in vacuum are presented.

  20. Dynamically limiting energy consumed by cooling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-06-09

    Cooling methods are provided which include providing: one or more coolant-cooled structures associated with an electronics rack, a coolant loop coupled in fluid communication with one or more passages of the coolant-cooled structure(s), one or more heat exchange units coupled to facilitate heat transfer from coolant within the coolant loop, and N controllable components associated with the coolant loop or the heat exchange unit(s), wherein N.gtoreq.1. The N controllable components facilitate circulation of coolant through the coolant loop or transfer of heat from the coolant via the heat exchange unit(s). A controller is also provided to dynamically adjust operation of the N controllable components, based on Z input parameters and one or more specified constraints, and provide a specified cooling to the coolant-cooled structure(s), while limiting energy consumed by the N controllable components, wherein Z.gtoreq.1.

  1. Dynamically limiting energy consumed by cooling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; David, Milnes P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Schultz, Mark D.

    2015-05-26

    Cooling apparatuses and methods are provided which include one or more coolant-cooled structures associated with an electronics rack, a coolant loop coupled in fluid communication with one or more passages of the coolant-cooled structure(s), one or more heat exchange units coupled to facilitate heat transfer from coolant within the coolant loop, and N controllable components associated with the coolant loop or the heat exchange unit(s), wherein N.gtoreq.1. The N controllable components facilitate circulation of coolant through the coolant loop or transfer of heat from the coolant via the heat exchange unit(s). A controller is coupled to the N controllable components, and dynamically adjusts operation of the N controllable components, based on Z input parameters and one or more specified constraints, to provide a specified cooling to the coolant-cooled structure(s), while limiting energy consumed by the N controllable components, wherein Z.gtoreq.1.

  2. mARC Treatment of Hypopharynx Carcinoma with Flat and Flattening-Filter-Free Beam Energies – A Planning Study

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Katharina; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Nuesken, Frank; Licht, Norbert; Rübe, Christian; Dzierma, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Background The recently implemented mARC-rotation-technique is capable to deliver high dose rate bursts. For the case of hypopharynx cancer plans we evaluate whether the mARC can achieve an advantage in treatment time in comparison to IMRT. These plans consider two arcs with flat and flattening filter free (FFF) beam energies. Materials and Methods For 8 hypopharynx-cancer patients step-and-shoot-IMRT and mARC plans were created retrospectively using flat and FFF beam energy. The comparison of the plan scenarios considered measures of quality for PTV coverage and sparing of organs at risk. All plans were irradiated on an anthromorphic phantom equipped with thermoluminescent dosimeters to measure scattered dose and treatment times. Results A visual comparison of the dose distribution did not show a marked preference for either technique or energy. The statistical evaluation yielded significant differences in favor of the mARC technique and the FFF energy. Scattered dose could be decreased markedly by the use of the mARC technique. Treatment times could be reduced up to 3 minutes with the use of mARC in comparison to IMRT. The high dose rate energy results in another time advantage of about 1 minute. Conclusions All four plan scenarios yielded equally good quality plans. A combination of the mARC technique with FFF 7 MV high dose rate resulted in a decrease of treatment times from about 9 minutes to 5–6 minutes in comparison to 6 MV IMRT. PMID:27741272

  3. On the Absorption Spectrum of Noble Gases at the Arc Spectrum Limit

    PubMed Central

    Fano, Ugo; Pupillo, Guido; Zannoni, Alberto; Clark, Charles W.

    2005-01-01

    Rydberg spectral lines of an atom are sometimes superimposed on the continuous spectrum of a different configuration. Effects of interaction among different configurations in one of these cases are theoretically investigated, and a formula is obtained that describes the behavior of absorption spectrum intensity. This offers qualitative justification of some experimental results obtained by BEUTLER in studies of absorption arc spectra of noble gases and Ib spectra of some metal vapors. PMID:27308180

  4. Comparative characteristics of electron energy spectrum in PIG and arc type discharge plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanyuk, L. I.; Suavilnyy, N. Y.

    1978-01-01

    The electron distribution functions relative to the velocity component directed along the magnetic field are compared for PIG and arc type discharges. The identity of these functions for the plasma region pierced by the primary electron beam and their difference in the peripheral part of the discharge are shown. It is concluded that the electron distribution function in the PIG type discharge is formed during one transit of the primary electron through the discharge gap. The mechanisms of electron energy spectrum formation in both the axis region and the peripheral region of the discharge are discussed.

  5. Energy and power limits for microbial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaRowe, D.; Amend, J.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this presentation is to describe a quantitative framework for determining how energy limits microbial activity, biomass and, ultimately, biogeochemical processes. Although this model can be applied to any environment, its utility is demonstrated in marine sediments, which are an attractive test habitat because they encompass a broad spectrum of energy levels, varying amounts of biomass and are ubiquitous. The potential number of active microbial cells in Arkonas Basin (Baltic Sea) sediments are estimated as a function of depth by quantifying the amount of energy that is available to them and the rate at which it is supplied: power. The amount of power supplied per cubic centimeter of sediment is determined by calculating the Gibbs energy of fermentation and sulfate reduction in combination with the rate of particulate organic carbon, POC, degradation. The Reactive Continuum Model (Boudreau and Ruddick, 1991), RCM, is used to determine the rate at which POC is made available for microbial consumption. The RCM represents POC as containing a range of different types of organic compounds whose ability to be consumed by microorganisms varies as a function of the age of the sediment and on the distribution of compound types that were initially deposited. The sediment age model and RCM parameters determined by (Mogollon et al., 2012) are used. The power available for fermentation and sulfate reduction coupled to H2 and acetate oxidation varies from 10-8 W cm-3 at the sediment water interface to between 10-11 - 10-12 W cm-3 at 3.5 meters below the seafloor, mbsf. Using values of maintenance powers for each of these catabolic activities taken from the literature, the total number of active cells in these sediments similarly decreases from just less than 108 cell cm-3 at the SWI to 4.6 x 104 cells cm-3 at 3.5 mbsf. The number of moles of POC decreases from 2.6 x 10-5 to 9.5 x 10-6, also becoming more recalcitrant with depth. Boudreau, B. P. and Ruddick, B. R

  6. On the anticorrelation of the electric field and peak electron energy within an auroral arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallinckrodt, A. J.; Carlson, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with an example of a strongly anticorrelated electric field and particle precipitation, taking into account an application of an extended version of the model of Evans et al. (1977) to the data. A striking feature of the data reported is the high degree of anticorrelation between electric field strength and peak precipitating electron energy. A simple model consisting of a constant current traversing a region in which the conductivities increase in proportion to ionospheric energy deposition provides a qualitative explanation of the observations. However, when the effects of neutral winds, ionization transport, Hall currents, and arc motion, and the nonlinearity of the relationship between peak precipitating electron energy and equilibrium are considered, the conclusions become less clear.

  7. On the anticorrelation of the electric field and peak electron energy within an auroral arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallinckrodt, A. J.; Carlson, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with an example of a strongly anticorrelated electric field and particle precipitation, taking into account an application of an extended version of the model of Evans et al. (1977) to the data. A striking feature of the data reported is the high degree of anticorrelation between electric field strength and peak precipitating electron energy. A simple model consisting of a constant current traversing a region in which the conductivities increase in proportion to ionospheric energy deposition provides a qualitative explanation of the observations. However, when the effects of neutral winds, ionization transport, Hall currents, and arc motion, and the nonlinearity of the relationship between peak precipitating electron energy and equilibrium are considered, the conclusions become less clear.

  8. Optimization of photon beam energies in gold nanoparticle enhanced arc radiation therapy using Monte Carlo methods.

    PubMed

    Koger, B; Kirkby, C

    2016-12-02

    As a recent area of development in radiation therapy, gold nanoparticle (GNP) enhanced radiation therapy has shown potential to increase tumour dose while maintaining acceptable levels of healthy tissue toxicity. In this study, the effect of varying photon beam energy in GNP enhanced arc radiation therapy (GEART) is quantified through the introduction of a dose scoring metric, and GEART is compared to a conventional radiotherapy treatment. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code was used to model several simple phantoms consisting of a spherical tumour containing GNPs (concentration: 15 mg Au g(-1) tumour, 0.8 mg Au g(-1) normal tissue) in a cylinder of tissue. Several monoenergetic photon beams, with energies ranging from 20 keV to 6 MeV, as well as 100, 200, and 300 kVp spectral beams, were used to irradiate the tumour in a 360° arc treatment. A dose metric was then used to compare tumour and tissue doses from GEART treatments to a similar treatment from a 6 MV spectrum. This was also performed on a simulated brain tumour using patient computed tomography data. GEART treatments showed potential over the 6 MV treatment for many of the simulated geometries, delivering up to 88% higher mean dose to the tumour for a constant tissue dose, with the effect greatest near a source energy of 50 keV. This effect is also seen with the inclusion of bone in a brain treatment, with a 14% increase in mean tumour dose over 6 MV, while still maintaining acceptable levels of dose to the bone and brain.

  9. Optimization of photon beam energies in gold nanoparticle enhanced arc radiation therapy using Monte Carlo methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koger, B.; Kirkby, C.

    2016-12-01

    As a recent area of development in radiation therapy, gold nanoparticle (GNP) enhanced radiation therapy has shown potential to increase tumour dose while maintaining acceptable levels of healthy tissue toxicity. In this study, the effect of varying photon beam energy in GNP enhanced arc radiation therapy (GEART) is quantified through the introduction of a dose scoring metric, and GEART is compared to a conventional radiotherapy treatment. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code was used to model several simple phantoms consisting of a spherical tumour containing GNPs (concentration: 15 mg Au g-1 tumour, 0.8 mg Au g-1 normal tissue) in a cylinder of tissue. Several monoenergetic photon beams, with energies ranging from 20 keV to 6 MeV, as well as 100, 200, and 300 kVp spectral beams, were used to irradiate the tumour in a 360° arc treatment. A dose metric was then used to compare tumour and tissue doses from GEART treatments to a similar treatment from a 6 MV spectrum. This was also performed on a simulated brain tumour using patient computed tomography data. GEART treatments showed potential over the 6 MV treatment for many of the simulated geometries, delivering up to 88% higher mean dose to the tumour for a constant tissue dose, with the effect greatest near a source energy of 50 keV. This effect is also seen with the inclusion of bone in a brain treatment, with a 14% increase in mean tumour dose over 6 MV, while still maintaining acceptable levels of dose to the bone and brain.

  10. Energy service companies -- The sky's the limit

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, M.; Montross, C.

    1998-07-01

    The term ESCO has a different meaning to different people. Increasingly, the term is used in its broadest sense to describe any company providing services related to a customer's energy acquisition and use. Previously, the term ESCO was synonymous with contractors who installed new equipment that was paid for by the energy cost savings that resulted. As a result of competition, restructuring and de-regulation of the electricity and gas sectors, the range of firms offering energy services now includes: local utilities using services to retain customers, remote utilities offering services to customers outside their franchise as a door opener to future commodity sales, local and remote utilities who see services as a more lucrative growth opportunity than commodities or transportation of the commodity, facility managers taking advantage of outsourcing trends and using energy management to reduce costs, power marketers, power brokers, aggregators combining energy analysis to segment their customers with processes to identify potential conservation and load management opportunities, cogeneration developers, and agents who help their customers navigate the uncharted waters of the deregulated energy business. This paper will review the impact of the broader definition of ESCOs with a view toward forecasting future trends in the industry including consideration of the fact that the term, energy service, may, itself, be too narrow a definition for a successful business of industry.

  11. Large-Area Chemical and Biological Decontamination Using a High Energy Arc Lamp (HEAL) System.

    SciTech Connect

    Duty, Chad E; Smith, Rob R; Vass, Arpad Alexander; Ilgner, Ralph H; Brown, Gilbert M

    2008-01-01

    Methods for quickly decontaminating large areas exposed to chemical and biological (CB) warfare agents can present significant logistical, manpower, and waste management challenges. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is pursuing an alternate method to decompose CB agents without the use of toxic chemicals or other potentially harmful substances. This process uses a high energy arc lamp (HEAL) system to photochemically decompose CB agents over large areas (12 m2). Preliminary tests indicate that more than 5 decades (99.999%) of an Anthrax spore simulant (Bacillus globigii) were killed in less than 7 seconds of exposure to the HEAL system. When combined with a catalyst material (TiO2) the HEAL system was also effective against a chemical agent simulant, diisopropyl methyl phosphonate (DIMP). These results demonstrate the feasibility of a rapid, large-area chemical and biological decontamination method that does not require toxic or corrosive reagents or generate hazardous wastes.

  12. High energy arcing fault fires in switchgear equipment : a literature review.

    SciTech Connect

    Nowlen, Steven Patrick; Brown, Jason W.; Wyant, Francis John

    2008-10-01

    In power generating plants, switchgear provide a means to isolate and de-energize specific electrical components and buses in order to clear downstream faults, perform routine maintenance, and replace necessary electrical equipment. These protective devices may be categorized by the insulating medium, such as air or oil, and are typically specified by voltage classes, i.e. low, medium, and high voltage. Given their high energy content, catastrophic failure of switchgear by means of a high energy arcing fault (HEAF) may occur. An incident such as this may lead to an explosion and fire within the switchgear, directly impact adjacent components, and possibly render dependent electrical equipment inoperable. Historically, HEAF events have been poorly documented and discussed in little detail. Recent incidents involving switchgear components at nuclear power plants, however, were scrupulously investigated. The phenomena itself is only understood on a very elementary level from preliminary experiments and theories; though many have argued that these early experiments were inaccurate due to primitive instrumentation or poorly justified methodologies and thus require re-evaluation. Within the past two decades, however, there has been a resurgence of research that analyzes previous work and modern technology. Developing a greater understanding of the HEAF phenomena, in particular the affects on switchgear equipment and other associated switching components, would allow power generating industries to minimize and possibly prevent future occurrences, thereby reducing costs associated with repair and downtime. This report presents the findings of a literature review focused on arc fault studies for electrical switching equipment. The specific objective of this review was to assess the availability of the types of information needed to support development of improved treatment methods in fire Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for nuclear power plant applications.

  13. Energy coupling between DNA binding and subunit association is responsible for the specificity of DNA-Arc interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Silva, J. L.; Silveira, C. F.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of several DNA molecules on the free energy of subunit association of Arc repressor were measured. The association studies under equilibrium conditions were performed by the dissociating perturbation of hydrostatic pressure. The magnitude of stabilization of the subunit interaction was determined by the specificity of the protein-DNA interaction. Operator DNA stabilized the free energy of association by about 2.2 kcal/mol of monomeric unit, whereas poly(dG-dC) stabilized the subunit interaction by only 0.26 kcal. Measurements of the stabilizing free energy at different DNA concentrations revealed a stoichiometry of two dimers per 21 bp for the operator DNA sequence and for the nonspecific DNA poly(dA-dT). However, the maximum stabilization was much larger for operator sequence (delta p = 1,750 bar) as compared for poly(dA-dT) (delta p = 750 bar). The importance of the free-energy linkage for the recognition process was corroborated by its absence in a mutant Arc protein (PL8) that binds to operator and nonspecific DNA sequences with equal, low affinity. We conclude that the coupling accounts for the high specificity of the Arc-operator DNA interaction. We hypothesize a mutual coupling between the protein subunits and the two DNA strands, in which the much higher persistency of the associated form when Arc is bound to operator would stabilize the interactions between the two DNA strands. PMID:8318899

  14. Geometric Limitation and Tensile Properties of Wire and Arc Additive Manufacturing 5A06 Aluminum Alloy Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Haibin; Li, Jinglong; Xiong, Jiangtao; Lin, Xin; Zhang, Fusheng

    2017-02-01

    Wire and arc additive manufacture (WAAM), as an emerging and promising technology of metal additive manufacturing, it lacks of experimental works to clarify the feature of geometrical configuration, microstructure and tensile properties, which can be used for further evaluating whether the as-deposited part can be used directly, and providing design reference for structure optimization. Taking 5A06 aluminum alloy additive manufacturing for example, in this paper, the geometric limitation and tensile property criteria are characterized using experimental method. The minimum angle and curvature radius that can be made by WAAM are 20° and 10 mm when the layer width is 7.2 mm. It shows isotropy when loading in build direction and perpendicular one. When loading in the direction of parallel and perpendicular to texture orientation, the tensile properties are anisotropic. The difference between them is 22 MPa.

  15. Relationship between the Cascadia fore-arc mantle wedge, nonvolcanic tremor, and the downdip limit of seismogenic rupture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, Patricia A.; Hyndman, Roy D.; Blair, James Luke

    2014-01-01

    Great earthquakes anticipated on the Cascadia subduction fault can potentially rupture beyond the geodetically and thermally inferred locked zone to the depths of episodic tremor and slip (ETS) or to the even deeper fore-arc mantle corner (FMC). To evaluate these extreme rupture limits, we map the FMC from southern Vancouver Island to central Oregon by combining published seismic velocity structures with a model of the Juan de Fuca plate. These data indicate that the FMC is somewhat shallower beneath Vancouver Island (36–38 km) and Oregon (35–40 km) and deeper beneath Washington (41–43 km). The updip edge of tremor follows the same general pattern, overlying a slightly shallower Juan de Fuca plate beneath Vancouver Island and Oregon (∼30 km) and a deeper plate beneath Washington (∼35 km). Similar to the Nankai subduction zone, the best constrained FMC depths correlate with the center of the tremor band suggesting that ETS is controlled by conditions near the FMC rather than directly by temperature or pressure. Unlike Nankai, a gap as wide as 70 km exists between the downdip limit of the inferred locked zone and the FMC. This gap also encompasses a ∼50 km wide gap between the inferred locked zones and the updip limit of tremor. The separation of these features offers a natural laboratory for determining the key controls on downdip rupture limits.

  16. Simulation of the Process of Arc Energy-Effect in High Voltage Auto-Expansion SF6 Circuit Breaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Mingzhe; Yang, Qian; Fan, Chunduo

    2005-12-01

    A new magnetic hydro-dynamics (MHD) model of arc in H.V. auto-expansion SF6 circuit breaker that takes into consideration nozzle ablation due to both radiation and thermal conduction is presented in this paper. The effect of PTFE (polytetrafluorethylene) vapor is considered in the mass, momentum and energy conservation equations of the constructed model. Then, the gas flow fields with and without conduction considered are simulated. By comparing the aforementioned two results, it is indicated that the arc's maximal temperature with conduction considered is 90 percent of that without considering conduction.

  17. Microbial Life Under Extreme Energy Limitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; Jorgensen, Bo Barker

    2013-01-01

    A great number of the bacteria and archaea on Earth are found in subsurface environments in a physiological state that is poorly represented or explained by laboratory cultures. Microbial cells in these very stable and oligotrophic settings catabolize 104- to 106-fold more slowly than model organisms in nutrient-rich cultures, turn over biomass on timescales of centuries to millennia rather than hours to days, and subsist with energy fluxes that are 1,000-fold lower than the typical culture-based estimates of maintenance requirements. To reconcile this disparate state of being with our knowledge of microbial physiology will require a revised understanding of microbial energy requirements, including identifying the factors that comprise true basal maintenance and the adaptations that might serve to minimize these factors.

  18. The Limit of Free Magnetic Energy in Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2012-01-01

    By measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region fs magnetic field, it has been found previously that (1) there is an abrupt upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region fs magnetic flux content, and (2) the free energy is usually near its limit when the field explodes in a CME/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy ]limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, from measurement of Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograms, we find the magnetic condition that underlies the free ]energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free ]energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find that (1) in active regions at and near their free ]energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non ]free magnetic energy the potential field would have is approximately 1 in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free ]energy limit. This shows that most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than 1 cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches 1, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is 1 or greater, most active regions are compelled to explode. From these results we surmise the magnetic condition that determines the free ]energy limit is the ratio of the free magnetic energy to the non-free energy the active region fs field would have were it completely relaxed to its potential ]field configuration, and that this ratio is approximately 1 at the free-energy limit and in the main sequence of explosive active regions.

  19. Comparative dosimetry of volumetric modulated arc therapy and limited-angle static intensity-modulated radiation therapy for early-stage larynx cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Riegel, Adam C.; Antone, Jeffrey; Schwartz, David L.

    2013-04-01

    To compare relative carotid and normal tissue sparing using volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for early-stage larynx cancer. Seven treatment plans were retrospectively created on 2 commercial treatment planning systems for 11 consecutive patients with T1-2N0 larynx cancer. Conventional plans consisted of opposed-wedged fields. IMRT planning used an anterior 3-field beam arrangement. Two VMAT plans were created, a full 360° arc and an anterior 180° arc. Given planning target volume (PTV) coverage of 95% total volume at 95% of 6300 cGy and maximum spinal cord dose below 2500 cGy, mean carotid artery dose was pushed as low as possible for each plan. Deliverability was assessed by comparing measured and planned planar dose with the gamma (γ) index. Full-arc planning provided the most effective carotid sparing but yielded the highest mean normal tissue dose (where normal tissue was defined as all soft tissue minus PTV). Static IMRT produced next-best carotid sparing with lower normal tissue dose. The anterior half-arc produced the highest carotid artery dose, in some cases comparable with conventional opposed fields. On the whole, carotid sparing was inversely related to normal tissue dose sparing. Mean γ indexes were much less than 1, consistent with accurate delivery of planned treatment. Full-arc VMAT yields greater carotid sparing than half-arc VMAT. Limited-angle IMRT remains a reasonable alternative to full-arc VMAT, given its ability to mediate the competing demands of carotid and normal tissue dose constraints. The respective clinical significance of carotid and normal tissue sparing will require prospective evaluation.

  20. Possibilities and limitations of wind energy utilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feustel, J.

    1981-10-01

    The existing wind resource, the most favorable locations, applications, and designs of windpowered generators are reviewed, along with descriptions of current and historic wind turbines and lines of research. Coastal regions, plains, hill summits, and mountains with funneling regions are noted to have the highest annual wind averages, with energy densities exceeding the annual solar insolation at average wind speeds of 5-7.9 m/sec. Applications for utility-grade power production, for irrigation, for mechanical heat production, and for pumped storage in water towers or reservoirs are mentioned, as well as electrical power production in remote areas and for hydrogen production by electrolysis. Power coefficients are discussed, with attention given to the German Growian 3 MW machine. It is shown that the least economically sound wind turbines, the machines with outputs below 100 kW, can vie with diesel plant economics in a good wind regime if the wind turbine operates for 15 yr.

  1. Beam dynamics limits for low-energy RHIC operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov,A.V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Chang, X.; Kayran, D.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Pozdeyev, E.; Satogata, T.

    2008-08-25

    There is a strong interest in low-energy RHIC operations in the single-beam total energy range of 2.5-25 GeV/nucleon [1-3]. Collisions in this energy range, much of which is below nominal RHIC injection energy, will help to answer one of the key questions in the field of QCD about the existence and location of a critical point on the QCD phase diagram [4]. There have been several short test runs during 2006-2008 RHIC operations to evaluate RHIC operational challenges at these low energies [5]. Beam lifetimes observed during the test runs were limited by machine nonlinearities. This performance limit can be improved with sufficient machine tuning. The next luminosity limitation comes from transverse and longitudinal Intra-beam Scattering (IBS), and ultimately from the space-charge limit. Here we summarize dynamic effects limiting beam lifetime and possible improvement with electron cooling.

  2. Valorisation of electric arc furnace steel slag as raw material for low energy belite cements.

    PubMed

    Iacobescu, R I; Koumpouri, D; Pontikes, Y; Saban, R; Angelopoulos, G N

    2011-11-30

    In this paper, the valorisation of electric arc furnace steel slag (EAFS) in the production of low energy belite cements is studied. Three types of clinkers were prepared with 0 wt.% (BC), 5 wt.% (BC5) and 10 wt.% (BC10) EAFS, respectively. The design of the raw mixes was based on the compositional indices lime saturation factor (LSF), alumina ratio (AR) and silica ratio (SR). The clinkering temperature was studied for the range 1280-1400°C; firing was performed at 1380°C based on the results regarding free lime and the evolution of microstructure. In order to activate the belite, clinkers were cooled fast by blown air and concurrent crushing. The results demonstrate that the microstructure of the produced clinkers is dominated by belite and alite crystals, with tricalcium aluminate and tetracalcium-alumino-ferrite present as micro-crystalline interstitial phases. The prepared cements presented low early strength development as expected for belite-rich compositions; however the 28-day results were 47.5 MPa, 46.6 MPa and 42.8 MPa for BC, BC5 and BC10, respectively. These values are comparable with OPC CEMI 32.5 N (32.5-52.5 MPa) according to EN 197-1. A fast setting behaviour was also observed, particularly in the case of BC10, whereas soundness did not exceed 1mm.

  3. Reducing scan angle using adaptive prior knowledge for a limited-angle intrafraction verification (LIVE) system for conformal arc radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yawei; Yin, Fang-Fang; Zhang, You; Ren, Lei

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an adaptive prior knowledge guided image estimation technique to reduce the scan angle needed in the limited-angle intrafraction verification (LIVE) system for 4D-CBCT reconstruction. The LIVE system has been previously developed to reconstruct 4D volumetric images on-the-fly during arc treatment for intrafraction target verification and dose calculation. In this study, we developed an adaptive constrained free-form deformation reconstruction technique in LIVE to further reduce the scanning angle needed to reconstruct the 4D-CBCT images for faster intrafraction verification. This technique uses free form deformation with energy minimization to deform prior images to estimate 4D-CBCT based on kV-MV projections acquired in extremely limited angle (orthogonal 3°) during the treatment. Note that the prior images are adaptively updated using the latest CBCT images reconstructed by LIVE during treatment to utilize the continuity of the respiratory motion. The 4D digital extended-cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom and a CIRS 008A dynamic thoracic phantom were used to evaluate the effectiveness of this technique. The reconstruction accuracy of the technique was evaluated by calculating both the center-of-mass-shift (COMS) and 3D volume-percentage-difference (VPD) of the tumor in reconstructed images and the true on-board images. The performance of the technique was also assessed with varied breathing signals against scanning angle, lesion size, lesion location, projection sampling interval, and scanning direction. In the XCAT study, using orthogonal-view of 3° kV and portal MV projections, this technique achieved an average tumor COMS/VPD of 0.4  ±  0.1 mm/5.5  ±  2.2%, 0.6  ±  0.3 mm/7.2  ±  2.8%, 0.5  ±  0.2 mm/7.1  ±  2.6%, 0.6  ±  0.2 mm/8.3  ±  2.4%, for baseline drift, amplitude variation, phase shift, and patient breathing signal variation

  4. Arc driver operation for either efficient energy transfer or high-current generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dannenberg, R. E.; Silva, A. F.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation is made to establish predictable electric arcs along triggered paths for research purposes, the intended application being the heating of the driver gas of a 1 MJ electrically driven shock tube. Trigger conductors consisting of wires, open tubes, and tubes pressurized with different gases were investigated either on the axis of the arc chamber or spiraled along the chamber walls. Design criteria are presented for successful arc initiation with reproducible voltage-current characteristics. Results are compared with other facilities and several application areas are discussed.

  5. Gas arc constriction for plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, William F. (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has an inert gas applied circumferentially about the arc column externally of the constricting nozzle so as to apply a constricting force on the arc after it has exited the nozzle orifice and downstream of the auxiliary shielding gas. The constricting inert gas is supplied to a plenum chamber about the body of the torch and exits through a series of circumferentially disposed orifices in an annular wall forming a closure at the forward end of the constricting gas plenum chamber. The constricting force of the circumferential gas flow about the arc concentrates and focuses the arc column into a more narrow and dense column of energy after exiting the nozzle orifice so that the arc better retains its energy density prior to contacting the workpiece.

  6. Towards a theory for Neptune's arc rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldreich, P.; Tremaine, S.; Borderies, N.

    1986-08-01

    It is proposed that the incomplete rings of Neptune consist of a number of short arcs centered on the corotation resonances of a single satellite. The satellite must have a radius of the order of 100 km or more and move on an inclined orbit. Corotation resonances are located at potential maxima. Thus, mechanical energy dissipated by interparticle collisions must be continually replenished to prevent the arcs from spreading. It is shown that each corotation resonance is associated with a nearby Lindblad resonance, which excites the ring particles' orbital eccentricity, thus supplying the energy required to maintain the arc. The ultimate energy reservoir is the satellite's orbital energy. Therefore, interaction with the arcs damps the satellite's orbital inclination. The self-gravity of the arcs limits their contraction and enforces a relation between arc length and mass. The estimated arc masses are so small, of the order of 10 to the 16th g, that the satellite's orbital inclination suffers negligible decay over the age of the solar system. The inferred surface mass densities are comparable to those found in the major rings of Saturn and Uranus.

  7. Towards a theory for Neptune's arc rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldreich, P.; Tremaine, S.; Borderies, N.

    1986-01-01

    It is proposed that the incomplete rings of Neptune consist of a number of short arcs centered on the corotation resonances of a single satellite. The satellite must have a radius of the order of 100 km or more and move on an inclined orbit. Corotation resonances are located at potential maxima. Thus, mechanical energy dissipated by interparticle collisions must be continually replenished to prevent the arcs from spreading. It is shown that each corotation resonance is associated with a nearby Lindblad resonance, which excites the ring particles' orbital eccentricity, thus supplying the energy required to maintain the arc. The ultimate energy reservoir is the satellite's orbital energy. Therefore, interaction with the arcs damps the satellite's orbital inclination. The self-gravity of the arcs limits their contraction and enforces a relation between arc length and mass. The estimated arc masses are so small, of the order of 10 to the 16th g, that the satellite's orbital inclination suffers negligible decay over the age of the solar system. The inferred surface mass densities are comparable to those found in the major rings of Saturn and Uranus.

  8. Numerical simulation of ac plasma arc thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Han-Ming; Carey, G. F.; Oakes, M. E.

    1994-05-01

    A mathematical model and approximate analysis for the energy distribution of an ac plasma arc with a moving boundary is developed. A simplified electrical conductivity function is assumed so that the dynamic behavior of the arc may be determined, independent of the gas type. The model leads to a reduced set of non-linear partial differential equations which governs the quasi-steady ac arc. This system is solved numerically and it is found that convection plays an important role, not only in the temperature distribution, but also in arc disruptions. Moreover, disruptions are found to be influenced by convection only for a limited frequency range. The results of the present studies are applicable to the frequnecy range of 10-10(exp 2) Hz which includes most industry ac arc frequencies.

  9. Numerical Simulation of AC Plasma Arc Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Han-Ming; Carey, G. F.; Oakes, M. E.

    1994-05-01

    A mathematical model and approximate analysis for the energy distribution of an ac plasma arc with a moving boundary is developed. A simplified electrical conductivity function is assumed so that the dynamic behavior of the arc may be determined, independent of the gas type. The model leads to a reduced set of non-linear partial differential equations which governs the quasi-steady ac arc. This system is solved numerically and it is found that convection plays an important role, not only in the temperature distribution, but also in arc disruptions. Moreover, disruptions are found to be influenced by convection only for a limited frequency range. The results of the present studies are applicable to the frequency range of 10-102 Hz which includes most industry ac arc frequencies.

  10. Limiting energy spectrum of a saturated radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, Michael; Davidson, Gerald T.

    1988-01-01

    The condition for magnetospheric wave growth in the presence of anisotropic charged particle distributions is used to extend the Kennel-Petschek theory that traditionally imposes an upper bound on the integral flux of charged particles at energies above a certain threshold to provide a limit on the differential flux at any energy above this threshold. A closed-form expression is derived for the limiting energy spectrum consistent with marginal occurrence of a magnetospheric maser at all wave frequencies below a certain fraction of the electron or proton gyrofrequency. The bounded integral can be recast in such a way that repeated differentiations with respect to v(parallel) actually generate a closed expression for the limiting form of the velocity space distribution, and thus for the limiting energy spectrum of the corresponding particles, whenever the anisotropy parameter is an integer.

  11. Accurate calculation of diffraction-limited encircled and ensquared energy.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Torben B

    2015-09-01

    Mathematical properties of the encircled and ensquared energy functions for the diffraction-limited point-spread function (PSF) are presented. These include power series and a set of linear differential equations that facilitate the accurate calculation of these functions. Asymptotic expressions are derived that provide very accurate estimates for the relative amount of energy in the diffraction PSF that fall outside a square or rectangular large detector. Tables with accurate values of the encircled and ensquared energy functions are also presented.

  12. The dosimetric effects of photon energy on the quality of prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Mattes, Malcolm D; Tai, Cyril; Lee, Alvin; Ashamalla, Hani; Ikoro, N C

    2014-01-01

    Studies comparing the dosimetric effects of high- and low-energy photons to treat prostate cancer using 3-dimensional conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapy have yielded mixed results. With the advent of newer radiation delivery systems like volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), the impact of changing photon energy is readdressed. Sixty-five patients treated for prostate cancer at our institution from 2011 to 2012 underwent CT simulation. A target volume encompassing the prostate and entire seminal vesicles was treated to 50.4 Gy, followed by a boost to the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles to a total dose of 81 Gy. The VMAT plans were generated for 6-MV and 10-MV photons under identical optimization conditions using the Eclipse system version 8.6 (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The analytical anisotropic algorithm was used for all dose calculations. Plans were normalized such that 98% of the planning target volume (PTV) received 100% of the prescribed dose. Dose-volumetric data from the treatment planning system was recorded for both 6-MV and 10-MV plans, which were compared for both the entire cohort and subsets of patients stratified according to the anterior-posterior separation. Plans using 10-MV photons had statistically significantly lower relative integral dose (4.1%), gradient measure (4.1%), skin Dmax (16.9%), monitor units (13.0%), and bladder V(30) (3.1%) than plans using 6-MV photons (P < .05). There was no difference in rectal dose, high-dose-region bladder dose, PTV coverage, or conformity index. The benefit of 10-MV photons was more pronounced for thicker patients (anterior-posterior separation >21 cm) for most parameters, with statistically significant differences in bladder V(30), bladder V(65), integral dose, conformity index, and monitor units. The main dosimetric benefits of 10-MV as compared with 6-MV photons are seen in thicker patients, though for the entire cohort 10-MV plans resulted in a lower integral dose

  13. Minority additive distributions in a ceramic metal-halide arc lamp using high-energy x-ray induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, J. J.; Adler, H. G.; Shastri, S. D.; Lawler, J. E.

    2001-09-01

    X-ray induced fluorescence is used to measure the elemental densities of minority additives in a metal-halide arc contained inside a translucent ceramic envelope. A monochromatic x-ray beam from the Sector 1 Insertion Device beamline at the Advanced Photon Source is used to excite K-shell x-ray fluorescence in the constituents of a ceramic metal-halide arc lamp dosed with DyI3 and CsI. Fluorescence and scattered photons are collected by a cryogenic energy-resolving Ge detector. The high signal-to-noise spectra show strong fluorescence from Dy, Cs, and I, as well as elastic scattering from Hg. Radial distributions of the absolute elemental densities of Dy, Cs, and I are obtained.

  14. Minority additive distributions in a ceramic metal-halide arc lamp using high-energy x-ray induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, J. J.; Adler, H. G.; Shastri, S. D.; Lawler, J. E.

    2001-09-24

    X-ray induced fluorescence is used to measure the elemental densities of minority additives in a metal-halide arc contained inside a translucent ceramic envelope. A monochromatic x-ray beam from the Sector 1 Insertion Device beamline at the Advanced Photon Source is used to excite K-shell x-ray fluorescence in the constituents of a ceramic metal-halide arc lamp dosed with DyI{sub 3} and CsI. Fluorescence and scattered photons are collected by a cryogenic energy-resolving Ge detector. The high signal-to-noise spectra show strong fluorescence from Dy, Cs, and I, as well as elastic scattering from Hg. Radial distributions of the absolute elemental densities of Dy, Cs, and I are obtained.

  15. Energy potential of municipal solid waste is limited

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-01

    Energy recovery from municipal solid waste has the potential for making only a limited contribution to the nation`s overall energy production. Although the current contribution of waste-derived energy production is less than one-half of 1 percent of the nation`s total energy Supply, DOE has set a goal for energy from waste at 2 percent of the total supply by 2010. The industry`s estimates show a smaller role for waste as an energy source in the future. The energy potential from waste is limited not only by the volume and energy content of the waste itself, but also by the factors affecting the use of waste disposal options, including public opposition and the availability of financing. Energy production from waste combustors and from landfill gases generates pollutants, although these are reduced through current regulations that require the use of emissions control technology and define operational criteria for the facilities. Although DOE estimates that one-third of the energy available from waste is available in the form of energy savings through the recycling of materials, the Department`s research in this area is ongoing.

  16. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sengbusch, E; Pérez-Andújar, A; DeLuca, P M; Mackie, T R

    2009-02-01

    Several compact proton accelerator systems for use in proton therapy have recently been proposed. Of paramount importance to the development of such an accelerator system is the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that must be reached by the treatment system. The commonly used value for the maximum kinetic energy required for a medical proton accelerator is 250 MeV, but it has not been demonstrated that this energy is indeed necessary to treat all or most patients eligible for proton therapy. This article quantifies the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, necessary to treat a given percentage of patients with rotational proton therapy, and examines the impact of this energy threshold on the cost and feasibility of a compact, gantry-mounted proton accelerator treatment system. One hundred randomized treatment plans from patients treated with IMRT were analyzed. The maximum radiological pathlength from the surface of the patient to the distal edge of the treatment volume was obtained for 180 degrees continuous arc proton therapy and for 180 degrees split arc proton therapy (two 90 degrees arcs) using CT# profiles from the Pinnacle (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) treatment planning system. In each case, the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that would be necessary to treat the patient was calculated using proton range tables for various media. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to quantify neutron production in a water phantom representing a patient as a function of the maximum proton kinetic energy achievable by a proton treatment system. Protons with a kinetic energy of 240 MeV, immediately prior to entry into the patient, were needed to treat 100% of patients in this study. However, it was shown that 90% of patients could be treated at 198 MeV, and 95% of patients could be treated at 207 MeV. Decreasing the

  17. Maximum proton kinetic energy and patient-generated neutron fluence considerations in proton beam arc delivery radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sengbusch, E.; Pérez-Andújar, A.; DeLuca, P. M.; Mackie, T. R.

    2009-01-01

    Several compact proton accelerator systems for use in proton therapy have recently been proposed. Of paramount importance to the development of such an accelerator system is the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that must be reached by the treatment system. The commonly used value for the maximum kinetic energy required for a medical proton accelerator is 250 MeV, but it has not been demonstrated that this energy is indeed necessary to treat all or most patients eligible for proton therapy. This article quantifies the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, necessary to treat a given percentage of patients with rotational proton therapy, and examines the impact of this energy threshold on the cost and feasibility of a compact, gantry-mounted proton accelerator treatment system. One hundred randomized treatment plans from patients treated with IMRT were analyzed. The maximum radiological pathlength from the surface of the patient to the distal edge of the treatment volume was obtained for 180° continuous arc proton therapy and for 180° split arc proton therapy (two 90° arcs) using CT# profiles from the Pinnacle™ (Philips Medical Systems, Madison, WI) treatment planning system. In each case, the maximum kinetic energy of protons, immediately prior to entry into the patient, that would be necessary to treat the patient was calculated using proton range tables for various media. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to quantify neutron production in a water phantom representing a patient as a function of the maximum proton kinetic energy achievable by a proton treatment system. Protons with a kinetic energy of 240 MeV, immediately prior to entry into the patient, were needed to treat 100% of patients in this study. However, it was shown that 90% of patients could be treated at 198 MeV, and 95% of patients could be treated at 207 MeV. Decreasing the proton kinetic

  18. Characterization of plasma chemistry and ion energy in cathodic arc plasma from Ti-Si cathodes of different compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, A. O.; Zhirkov, I.; Dahlqvist, M.; Jensen, J.; Hultman, L.; Rosen, J.

    2013-04-28

    Arc plasma from Ti-Si compound cathodes with up to 25 at. % Si was characterized in a DC arc system with respect to chemistry and charge-state-resolved ion energy. The plasma ion composition showed a lower Si content, diverging up to 12 at. % compared to the cathode composition, yet concurrently deposited films were in accordance with the cathode stoichiometry. Significant contribution to film growth from neutrals is inferred besides ions, since the contribution from macroparticles, estimated by scanning electron microscopy, cannot alone account for the compositional difference between cathode, plasma, and film. The average ion charge states for Ti and Si were higher than reference data for elemental cathodes. This result is likely related to TiSi{sub x} phases of higher cohesive energies in the compound cathodes and higher effective electron temperature in plasma formation. The ion energy distributions extended up to {approx}200 and {approx}130 eV for Ti and Si, respectively, with corresponding average energies of {approx}60 and {approx}30 eV. These averages were, however, not dependent on Si content in the cathode, except for 25 at. % Si where the average energies were increased up to 72 eV for Ti and 47 eV for Si.

  19. Beam lifetime and limitations during low-energy RHIC operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.V.; Bai, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.; Kayran, D.; Montag, C.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.; Wang, G.

    2011-03-28

    The low-energy physics program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), motivated by a search for the QCD phase transition critical point, requires operation at low energies. At these energies, large nonlinear magnetic field errors and large beam sizes produce low beam lifetimes. A variety of beam dynamics effects such as Intrabeam Scattering (IBS), space charge and beam-beam forces also contribute. All these effects are important to understand beam lifetime limitations in RHIC at low energies. During the low-energy RHIC physics run in May-June 2010 at beam {gamma} = 6.1 and {gamma} = 4.1, gold beam lifetimes were measured for various values of space-charge tune shifts, transverse acceptance limitation by collimators, synchrotron tunes and RF voltage. This paper summarizes our observations and initial findings.

  20. High energy limit of single photon channeling radiation spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokonov, M. Kh.; Efendiev, K. V.

    2006-11-01

    The properties of channeling radiation spectra for above 100 GeV electrons have been studied with account of multiple scattering and radiation cooling. It has been shown, that the shape of a spectrum does not depend neither on energy of electrons, nor on the atomic number of a target when the energy of electrons exceeds ˜1 TeV. The consideration is based on the uniform field approximation (UFA). Simple phenomenological expressions are presented which describe the radiation spectrum with good degree of accuracy. It has been shown, that the radiation length in the high energy limit depends weakly on the energy of incident electrons.

  1. 75 FR 6378 - Covanta Pylmouth Renewable Energy Limited Partnership Covanta Energy Marketing LLC Covanta Power...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... Marketing LLC Covanta Power, LLC; Notice of Filing February 2, 2010. Take notice that, on February 1, 2010, Covanta Pylmouth Renewable Energy Limited Partnership, Covanta Energy Marketing LLC, and Covanta Power...

  2. Disruption runaway modeling, ripple effects and energy limits

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, A.J.

    1990-07-18

    Several models of runaway electron generation during a disruption are described and applied to the problem of determining the radiation loss and energy limit of runaway electrons. In particular the prediction of orbits and energy limits for proposed ITER design are discussed. It was found that resonance between the electron gyrofrequency and the fundamental ripple frequency can lead to large synchrotron radiation losses and create an upper bound on runaway energy. Interactions with the second harmonic of the ripple field are very sensitive to ripple amplitude and may lead to a further reduction in runaway energy. In ITER this effect can limit the runaway energy to values of 270 MeV. A lump circuit model of the plasma can be used to determine the coupled interactions of the runaway currents with the plasma and control circuit currents. Depending on what is assumed about the perpendicular energy of the runaway electrons. Maximum values of runaway energy predicted for ITER are in the range of 35 to 120 MeV. 4 refs., 15 figs.

  3. Upper limits on the total radiant energy of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Willson, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Limits on the total radiant energy of solar flares during the period February-November 1980 are established using data collected by the solar-constant monitor (ACRIM) on the Solar Maximum Mission satellite. Results show typical limits of 6 x 10 to the 29th erg/sec for a 32-second integration time, with 5-sigma statistical significance, for an impulsive emission. For a gradual component, about 4 x 10 to the 32nd ergs total radiant energy is found. The limits are determined to lie about an order of magnitude higher than the total radiant energy estimated from the various known emission components, which indicates the presence of a heretofore unknown dominant component of flare radiation.

  4. Upper limits on the total radiant energy of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Willson, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Limits on the total radiant energy of solar flares during the period February-November 1980 are established using data collected by the solar-constant monitor (ACRIM) on the Solar Maximum Mission satellite. Results show typical limits of 6 x 10 to the 29th erg/sec for a 32-second integration time, with 5-sigma statistical significance, for an impulsive emission. For a gradual component, about 4 x 10 to the 32nd ergs total radiant energy is found. The limits are determined to lie about an order of magnitude higher than the total radiant energy estimated from the various known emission components, which indicates the presence of a heretofore unknown dominant component of flare radiation.

  5. Arc Voltage Between Deion Grid Affected by Division of Arc in Magnetic Driven Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inuzuka, Yutaro; Yamato, Takashi; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic driven arc has been applied to DC breaker and fault current limiters. However, it has not been researched, especially stagnation and re-strike of the arc. In this paper, the arc voltage between deion grid affected by division of arc in magnetic driven arc and arc behavior are measured by using the oscilloscope and HSVC (High Speed Video Camera). As a result, arc voltage increased because of division of the arc. The arc mean moving speed increases with increasing the external magnetic field. However, when the arc was not stalemate, the arc moving speed does not change so much. The arc re-strike time increases and stalemate time decreases with increasing the external magnetic field. Therefore, the anode spot moving speed increases 8 times because arc re-strike occurs easily with the external magnetic field. Thus, the erosion of electrodes decreases and the arc movement becomes the smooth. When the arc is divided, the arc voltage increased because of the electrode fall voltage. Therefore, the arc voltage increases with increasing the number of deion grid.

  6. Physical Limits of Solar Energy Conversion in the Earth System.

    PubMed

    Kleidon, Axel; Miller, Lee; Gans, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Solar energy provides by far the greatest potential for energy generation among all forms of renewable energy. Yet, just as for any form of energy conversion, it is subject to physical limits. Here we review the physical limits that determine how much energy can potentially be generated out of sunlight using a combination of thermodynamics and observed climatic variables. We first explain how the first and second law of thermodynamics constrain energy conversions and thereby the generation of renewable energy, and how this applies to the conversions of solar radiation within the Earth system. These limits are applied to the conversion of direct and diffuse solar radiation - which relates to concentrated solar power (CSP) and photovoltaic (PV) technologies as well as biomass production or any other photochemical conversion - as well as solar radiative heating, which generates atmospheric motion and thus relates to wind power technologies. When these conversion limits are applied to observed data sets of solar radiation at the land surface, it is estimated that direct concentrated solar power has a potential on land of up to 11.6 PW (1 PW=10(15) W), whereas photovoltaic power has a potential of up to 16.3 PW. Both biomass and wind power operate at much lower efficiencies, so their potentials of about 0.3 and 0.1 PW are much lower. These estimates are considerably lower than the incoming flux of solar radiation of 175 PW. When compared to a 2012 primary energy demand of 17 TW, the most direct uses of solar radiation, e.g., by CSP or PV, have thus by far the greatest potential to yield renewable energy requiring the least space to satisfy the human energy demand. Further conversions into solar-based fuels would be reduced by further losses which would lower these potentials. The substantially greater potential of solar-based renewable energy compared to other forms of renewable energy simply reflects much fewer and lower unavoidable conversion losses when solar

  7. Metabolic models to investigate energy limited anaerobic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, J; Premier, G C; Guwy, A J; Dinsdale, R; Kleerebezem, R

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is shifting from a philosophy of solely pollutants removal to a philosophy of combined resource recovery and waste treatment. Simultaneous wastewater treatment with energy recovery in the form of energy rich products, brings renewed interest to non-methanogenic anaerobic bioprocesses such as the anaerobic production of hydrogen, ethanol, solvents, VFAs, bioplastics and even electricity from microbial fuel cells. The existing kinetic-based modelling approaches, widely used in aerobic and methanogenic wastewater treatment processes, do not seem adequate in investigating such energy limited microbial ecosystems. The great diversity of similar microbial species, which share many of the fermentative reaction pathways, makes quantify microbial groups very difficult and causes identifiability problems. A modelling approach based on the consideration of metabolic reaction networks instead of on separated microbial groups is suggested as an alternative to describe anaerobic microbial ecosystems and in particular for the prediction of product formation as a function of environmental conditions imposed. The limited number of existing relevant fermentative pathways in conjunction with the fact that anaerobic reactions proceed very close to thermodynamic equilibrium reduces the complexity of such approach and the degrees of freedom in terms of product formation fluxes. In addition, energy limitation in these anaerobic microbial ecosystems makes plausible that selective forces associated with energy further define the system activity by favouring those conversions/microorganisms which provide the most energy for growth under the conditions imposed.

  8. Klystron Gun Arcing and Modulator Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S

    2004-05-04

    The demand for 500 kV and 265 amperes peak to power an X-Band klystron brings up protection issues for klystron faults and the energy dumped into the arc from the modulator. This situation is made worse when more than one klystron will be driven from a single modulator, such as the existing schemes for running two and eight klystrons. High power pulsed klystrons have traditionally be powered by line type modulators which match the driving impedance with the load impedance and therefore current limit at twice the operating current. Multiple klystrons have the added problems of a lower modulator source impedance and added stray capacitance, which converts into appreciable energy at high voltages like 500kV. SLAC has measured the energy dumped into klystron arcs in a single and dual klystron configuration at the 400 to 450 kV level and found interesting characteristics in the arc formation. The author will present measured data from klystron arcs powered from line-type modulators in several configurations. The questions arise as to how the newly designed solid-state modulators, running multiple tubes, will react to a klystron arc and how much energy will be dumped into the arc.

  9. Adding high time resolution to charge-state-specific ion energy measurements for pulsed copper vacuum arc plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Koichi; Han, Liang; Zhou, Xue; Anders, André

    2015-08-01

    Charge-state-resolved ion energy-time distributions of pulsed Cu arc plasma were obtained by using direct (time-dependent) acquisition of the ion detection signal from a commercial ion mass-per-charge and energy-per-charge analyzer. We find a shift of energies of Cu2+, Cu3+ and Cu4+ ions to lower values during the first few hundred microseconds after arc ignition, which is evidence for particle collisions in the plasma. The generation of Cu+ ions in the later part of the pulse, measured by the increase of Cu+ signal intensity and an associated slight reduction of the mean charge state, points to charge exchange reactions between ions and neutrals. At the very beginning of the pulse, when the plasma expands into vacuum and the plasma potential strongly fluctuates, ions with much higher energy (over 200 eV) are observed. Early in the pulse, the ion energies observed are approximately proportional to the ion charge state, and we conclude that the acceleration mechanism is primarily based on acceleration in an electric field. This field is directed away from the cathode, indicative of a potential hump. Measurements by a floating probe suggest that potential structures travel, and ions moving in the traveling field can gain high energies up to a few hundred electron-volts. Later in the pulse, the approximate proportionality is lost, which is related to increased smearing out of different energies due to collisions with neutrals, and/or to a change of the acceleration character from electrostatic to ‘gas-dynamic’, i.e. dominated by pressure gradient.

  10. 78 FR 3893 - Enbridge Energy, Limited Partnership; Notice of Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-17

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Enbridge Energy, Limited Partnership; Notice of Technical Conference The... conference be held to address issues raised by Enbridge Energy, Limited Partnership's proposed revision to its downstream Nomination Verification Procedure. \\1\\ Enbridge Energy, Limited Partnership, 141 FERC...

  11. Energy Education for Rural, Limited-Resource Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Sue; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes an energy education project aimed at limited-resource families in Oklahoma. Program delivery was accomplished through mailed flyers, public meetings, and individualized instruction. Educational materials covered housing structure modification and behavior change. The "Choctaw Project" was judged to be a success. (CT)

  12. Unified limiting form of graviton radiation at extreme energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciafaloni, Marcello; Colferai, Dimitri; Coradeschi, Francesco; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2016-02-01

    We derive the limiting form of graviton radiation in gravitational scattering at trans-Planckian energies (E ≫MP) and small deflection angles. We show that—owing to the graviton's spin 2—such a limiting form unifies the soft and Regge regimes of emission, by covering a broad angular range, from forward fragmentation to the deeply central region. The single-exchange emission amplitudes have a nice expression in terms of the transformation phases of helicity amplitudes under rotations. As a result, the multiple-exchange emission amplitudes can be resummed via an impact parameter b -space factorization theorem that takes into account all coherence effects. We then see the emergence of an energy spectrum of the emitted radiation which, being tuned on ℏ/R ˜MP2/E ≪MP, is reminiscent of Hawking's radiation. Such a spectrum is much softer than the one naïvely expected for increasing input energies and neatly solves a potential energy crisis. Furthermore, by including rescattering corrections in the (quantum) factorization formula, we are able to recover the classical limit and find the corresponding quantum corrections. Perspectives for the extrapolation of such limiting radiation towards the classical collapse regime (where b is of the order of the gravitational radius R ) are also discussed.

  13. Intrinsic Energy Dissipation Limits in Nano and Micromechanical Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Srikanth Subramanian

    Resonant microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) have enabled miniaturization of high-performance inertial sensors, radio-frequency filters, timing references and mass-based chemical sensors. Despite the increasing prevalence of MEMS resonators for these applications, the energy dissipation in these structures is not well-understood. Accurate prediction of the energy loss and the resulting quality factor (Q) has significant design implications because it is directly related to device performance metrics including sensitivity for resonant sensors, bandwidth for radio-frequency filters and phase-noise for timing references. In order to assess the future potential for MEMS resonators it is critically important to evaluate the energy dissipation limits, which will dictate the ultimate performance resonant MEMS devices can achieve. This work focuses on the derivation and evaluation of the intrinsic mechanical energy dissipation limit for single-crystal nano and micromechanical resonators due to anharmonic phonon-phonon scattering in the Akhiezer regime. The energy loss is derived using perturbation theory and the linearized Boltzmann transport equation for phonons, and includes the direction and polarization dependent mode-Gruneisen parameters in order to capture the strain-induced anharmonicity among phonon branches. Evaluation of the quality factor limit reveals that Akhiezer damping, previously thought to depend only on material properties, has a strong dependence on crystal orientation and resonant mode shape. The robust model provides a dissipation limit for all resonant modes including shear-mode vibrations, which have significantly reduced energy loss because dissipative phonon-phonon scattering is restricted to volume-preserving phonon branches, indicating that Lame or wine-glass mode resonators will have the highest upper limit on mechanical efficiency. Finally, the analytical dissipation model is integrated with commercial finite element software in order to

  14. Prospects and Limits of Energy Storage in Batteries.

    PubMed

    Abraham, K M

    2015-03-05

    Energy densities of Li ion batteries, limited by the capacities of cathode materials, must increase by a factor of 2 or more to give all-electric automobiles a 300 mile driving range on a single charge. Battery chemical couples with very low equivalent weights have to be sought to produce such batteries. Advanced Li ion batteries may not be able to meet this challenge in the near term. The state-of-the-art of Li ion batteries is discussed, and the challenges of developing ultrahigh energy density rechargeable batteries are identified. Examples of ultrahigh energy density battery chemical couples include Li/O2, Li/S, Li/metal halide, and Li/metal oxide systems. Future efforts are also expected to involve all-solid-state batteries with performance similar to their liquid electrolyte counterparts, biodegradable batteries to address environmental challenges, and low-cost long cycle-life batteries for large-scale energy storage. Ultimately, energy densities of electrochemical energy storage systems are limited by chemistry constraints.

  15. SU-E-T-326: Dosimetric Impact of Beam Energies and Jaw Tracking On Intracranial Tumors Using RapidArc

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, S; Keeling, V; Ali, I; Ahmad, S; Algan, O

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the dosimetric impact of jaw tracking and beam energies on dose conformity and normal-brain-tissue doses for intracranial tumors using VMAT (RapidArc). Methods: Seven patients with 1–2 and three patients with 4–6 intracranial tumors were planned using RapidArc for Varian TrueBeam STx machine with beam energies 6MV-FFF (Flattening-Filter-Free), 8MV, 10MV, and 10MV-FFF. The prescription dose ranged from 14–23Gy. Between 2 and 8 arcs were used with the following geometries: 2 full coplanar arcs and the non-coplanar half arcs. Plans were optimized (jaw tracking ON) with a high priority to Normal-Tissue-Objective and normal-brain-tissue. Plans were calculated on 1mm grid size using AAA algorithm and then normalized so that 99% of each target volume received the prescription dose. Plans for the 6MV-FFF were also optimized without jaw tracking (No-JT) for comparison. Plan quality was assessed by target coverage using Paddick Conformity Index (PCI), sparing of normal-brain-tissue through analysis of V4Gy, V8Gy and V12Gy, and integral dose. Results: The average PCI ± standard deviation was 0.76±0.21 and 0.76±0.22 for 6MV-FFF and 10 MV-FFF, respectively. The average ratio in normal brain tissue volume (reported as follows V4,V8,V12) were (1.12±0.07,1.12±0.07,1.14±0.04), (1.12±0.08,1.12±0.09,1.13±0.06), (1.19±0.10,1.18±0.10,1.20±0.04), and (1.04±0.03,1.03±0.03,1.03±0.04) for 8MV/6MV-FFF, 10MV-FFF/6MV-FFF, 10MV/6MV-FFF, 6MV-FFF No-JT/6MV-FFF, respectively. Statistically significant differences in normal-brain-tissue for V4, V8, and V12 were observed in all cases for the different energies (p-values <0.05). V4 data shows significant differences in JT vs. No-JT (p=0.04), however no difference was found for V8 and V12. Brain tissue sparing from best to worst occurred in this order 6MV-FFF, 6MV-FFF no-JT, 10MV-FFF, 8MV, and 10MV. The average ratio of integral brain dose was 1.05±0.04 (p=0.21), 1.04±0.05 (p=0.33), 1.09±0.06 (p=0

  16. Toward efficient aeroelastic energy harvesting through limit cycle shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschmeier, Benjamin; Bryant, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Increasing demand to harvest energy from renewable resources has caused significant research interest in unsteady aerodynamic and hydrodynamic phenomena. Apart from the traditional horizontal axis wind turbines, there has been significant growth in the study of bio-inspired oscillating wings for energy harvesting. These systems are being built to harvest electricity for wireless devices, as well as for large scale mega-watt power generation. Such systems can be driven by aeroelastic flutter phenomena which, beyond a critical wind speed, will cause the system to enter into limitcycle oscillations. When the airfoil enters large amplitude, high frequency motion, leading and trailing edge vortices form and, when properly synchronized with the airfoil kinematics, enhance the energy extraction efficiency of the device. A reduced order dynamic stall model is employed on a nonlinear aeroelastic structural model to investigate whether the parameters of a fully passive aeroelastic device can be tuned to produce limit cycle oscillations at desired kinematics. This process is done through an optimization technique to find the necessary structural parameters to achieve desired structural forces and moments corresponding to a target limit cycle. Structural nonlinearities are explored to determine the essential nonlinearities such that the system's limit cycle closely matches the desired kinematic trajectory. The results from this process demonstrate that it is possible to tune system parameters such that a desired limit cycle trajectory can be achieved. The simulations also demonstrate that the high efficiencies predicted by previous computational aerodynamics studies can be achieved in fully passive aeroelastic devices.

  17. An Investigation of Energy Coupling in Various Arc Susceptible and Resistant Conductors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    which has been shown to cause siani ’rant con-amination 4,, DITE -and Russian Takarnaks [’I as wveIl as tne ?LT, LSX, arnd Ilacroto= Tokamaks (3] i-s...sian Tokamaks [35,36). Consequently, its effect on plasma contamination has resulted in increased investigation into its initiation, development...V. 85,86, p. 1047-1061, 19777 7 - i 2. Goodal., D.H.J., Conlon T.W,, Scofiel., C,, and McCracken, G.M., "Inveshgation of Arcing in the DITE Tokamak

  18. Performance of carbon arc-discharge nanotubes to hydrogen energy storage.

    PubMed

    Farhat, S; Weinberger, B; Lamari, F D; Izouyar, T; Noe, L; Monthioux, M

    2007-10-01

    Adsorption properties of gram-scale samples of different kind of arc discharge nanotubes were studied, namely: (A) raw collaret collected on the cathode, (B) raw soots collected on the lateral reactor wall, (C) thermally treated soot, and (D) thermally then chemically treated soot. The morphology, structure, and composition of these materials were characterized by SEM, TEM, TGA, and BET. In addition, hydrogen adsorption isotherms were recorded experimentally for A, B, and D samples over the pressure range of 0 to 55 bar at ambient temperature. Our experiments indicated a maximum-yet weak-hydrogen storage at room temperature of approximately 0.13 H2 wt% for the purified product (D).

  19. Stringy symmetries and their high-energy limits [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chuan-Tsung; Lee, Jen-Chi

    2005-03-01

    We derive stringy symmetries with conserved charges of arbitrarily high spins from the decoupling of two types of zero-norm states in the old covariant first quantized (OCFQ) spectrum of open bosonic string. These symmetries are valid to all energy α‧ and all loop orders χ in string perturbation theory. The high-energy limit α‧ → ∞ of these stringy symmetries can then be used to fix the proportionality constants between scattering amplitudes of different string states algebraically without referring to Gross and Mende's saddle point calculation of high-energy string-loop amplitudes. These proportionality constants are, as conjectured by Gross, independent of the scattering angle ϕCM and the order χ of string perturbation theory. However, we also discover some new nonzero components of high-energy amplitudes not found previously by Gross and Manes. These components are essential to preserve massive gauge invariances or decouple massive zero-norm states of string theory. A set of massive scattering amplitudes and their high energy limit are calculated explicitly to justify our results.

  20. Effect of non-uniform electron energy distribution function on plasma production in large arc driven negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, T.; Koga, S.; Terasaki, R.; Hatayama, A.; Inoue, T.; Dairaku, M.; Kashiwagi, M.; Taniguchi, M.; Tobari, H.; Tsuchida, K.; Umeda, N.; Watanabe, K.

    2012-02-15

    Spatially non-uniform electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in an arc driven negative ion source (JAEA 10A negative ion source: 10 A NIS) is calculated numerically by a three-dimensional Monte Carlo kinetic model for electrons to understand spatial distribution of plasma production (such as atomic and ionic hydrogen (H{sup 0}/H{sup +}) production) in source chamber. The local EEDFs were directly calculated from electron orbits including electromagnetic effects and elastic/inelastic collision forces. From the EEDF, spatial distributions of H{sup 0}/H{sup +} production rate were obtained. The results suggest that spatial non-uniformity of H{sup 0}/H{sup +} productions is enhanced by high energy component of EEDF.

  1. Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy and determination of the three dimensional potential energy surface for Ar-CS.

    PubMed

    Niida, Chisato; Nakajima, Masakazu; Sumiyoshi, Yoshihiro; Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Kohguchi, Hiroshi; Endo, Yasuki

    2014-03-14

    Pure rotational transitions of the Ar-CS van der Waals complex have been observed by Fourier Transform Microwave (FTMW) and FTMW-millimeter wave double resonance spectroscopy. Rotational transitions of v(s) = 0, 1, and 2 were able to be observed for normal CS, together with those of C(34)S in v(s) = 0, where vs stands for the quantum number of the CS stretching vibration. The observed transition frequencies were analyzed by a free rotor model Hamiltonian, where rovibrational energies were calculated as dynamical motions of the three nuclei on a three-dimensional potential energy surface, expressed by analytical functions with 57 parameters. Initial values for the potential parameters were obtained by high-level ab initio calculations. Fifteen parameters were adjusted among the 57 parameters to reproduce all the observed transition frequencies with the standard deviation of the fit to be 0.028 MHz.

  2. Experimental limit on the cosmic diffuse ultrahigh energy neutrino flux.

    PubMed

    Gorham, P W; Hebert, C L; Liewer, K M; Naudet, C J; Saltzberg, D; Williams, D

    2004-07-23

    We report results from 120 h of live time with the Goldstone lunar ultrahigh energy neutrino experiment (GLUE). The experiment searches for < or = 10 ns microwave pulses from the lunar regolith, appearing in coincidence at two large radio telescopes separated by 22 km and linked by optical fiber. Such pulses would arise from subsurface electromagnetic cascades induced by interactions of > or = 100 EeV (1 EeV = 10(18) eV neutrinos in the lunar regolith. No candidates are yet seen, and the implied limits constrain several current models for ultrahigh energy neutrino fluxes.

  3. Temporal evolution of ion energy distribution functions and ion charge states of Cr and Cr-Al pulsed arc plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Koichi; Anders, André

    2015-11-15

    To study the temporal evolution of ion energy distribution functions, charge-state-resolved ion energy distribution functions of pulsed arc plasmas from Cr and Cr-Al cathodes were recorded with high time resolution by using direct data acquisition from a combined energy and mass analyzer. The authors find increases in intensities of singly charged ions, which is evidence that charge exchange reactions took place in both Cr and Cr-Al systems. In Cr-Al plasmas, the distributions of high-charge-state ions exhibit high energy tails 50 μs after discharge ignition, but no such tails were observed at 500 μs. The energy ratios of ions of different charge states at the beginning of the pulse, when less neutral atoms were in the space in front of the cathode, suggest that ions are accelerated by an electric field. The situation is not so clear after 50 μs due to particle collisions. The initial mean ion charge state of Cr was about the same in Cr and in Cr-Al plasmas, but it decreased more rapidly in Cr-Al plasmas compared to the decay in Cr plasma. The faster decay of the mean ion charge state and ion energy caused by the addition of Al into a pure Cr cathode suggests that the mean ion charge state is determined not only by ionization processes at the cathode spot but also by inelastic collision between different elements.

  4. Load-limiting landing gear footpad energy absorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Chris; Tsai, Ted

    1994-01-01

    As a precursor to future manned missions to the moon, an inexpensive, unmanned vehicle that could carry small, scientific payloads to the lunar surface was studied by NASA. The vehicle, called the Common Lunar Lander, required extremely optimized structural systems to increase the potential payload mass. A lightweight energy-absorbing system (LAGFEAS), which also acts as a landing load-limiter was designed to help achieve this optimized structure. Since the versatile and easily tailored system is a load-limiter, it allowed for the structure to be designed independently of the ever-changing landing energy predictions. This paper describes the LAGFEAS system and preliminary verification testing performed at NASA's Johnson Space Center for the Common Lunar Lander program.

  5. Factorization of tree QCD amplitudes in the high-energy limit and in the collinear limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Duca, Vittorio; Frizzo, Alberto; Maltoni, Fabio

    2000-03-01

    In the high-energy limit, we compute the gauge-invariant three-parton forward clusters, which in the BFKL theory constitute the tree parts of the NNLO impact factors. In the triple collinear limit, we obtain the polarized double-splitting functions. For the unpolarized and the spin-correlated double-splitting functions, our results agree with the ones obtained by Campbell-Glover and Catani-Grazzini, respectively. In addition, we compute the four-gluon forward cluster, which in the BFKL theory forms the tree part of the NNNLO gluonic impact factor. In the quadruple collinear limit we obtain the unpolarized triple-splitting functions, while in the limit of a three-parton central cluster we derive the Lipatov vertex for the production of three gluons, relevant for the calculation of a BFKL ladder at NNLL accuracy. Finally, motivated by the reorganization of the color in the high-energy limit, we introduce a color decomposition of the purely gluonic tree amplitudes in terms of the linearly independent subamplitudes only.

  6. Radiation pressure acceleration: The factors limiting maximum attainable ion energy

    DOE PAGES

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; ...

    2016-04-15

    Radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is a highly efficient mechanism of laser-driven ion acceleration, with near complete transfer of the laser energy to the ions in the relativistic regime. However, there is a fundamental limit on the maximum attainable ion energy, which is determined by the group velocity of the laser. The tightly focused laser pulses have group velocities smaller than the vacuum light speed, and, since they offer the high intensity needed for the RPA regime, it is plausible that group velocity effects would manifest themselves in the experiments involving tightly focused pulses and thin foils. However, in this case,more » finite spot size effects are important, and another limiting factor, the transverse expansion of the target, may dominate over the group velocity effect. As the laser pulse diffracts after passing the focus, the target expands accordingly due to the transverse intensity profile of the laser. Due to this expansion, the areal density of the target decreases, making it transparent for radiation and effectively terminating the acceleration. The off-normal incidence of the laser on the target, due either to the experimental setup, or to the deformation of the target, will also lead to establishing a limit on maximum ion energy.« less

  7. Radiation pressure acceleration: The factors limiting maximum attainable ion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Pegoraro, F.; Leemans, W. P.

    2016-04-15

    Radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is a highly efficient mechanism of laser-driven ion acceleration, with near complete transfer of the laser energy to the ions in the relativistic regime. However, there is a fundamental limit on the maximum attainable ion energy, which is determined by the group velocity of the laser. The tightly focused laser pulses have group velocities smaller than the vacuum light speed, and, since they offer the high intensity needed for the RPA regime, it is plausible that group velocity effects would manifest themselves in the experiments involving tightly focused pulses and thin foils. However, in this case, finite spot size effects are important, and another limiting factor, the transverse expansion of the target, may dominate over the group velocity effect. As the laser pulse diffracts after passing the focus, the target expands accordingly due to the transverse intensity profile of the laser. Due to this expansion, the areal density of the target decreases, making it transparent for radiation and effectively terminating the acceleration. The off-normal incidence of the laser on the target, due either to the experimental setup, or to the deformation of the target, will also lead to establishing a limit on maximum ion energy.

  8. Radiation pressure acceleration: The factors limiting maximum attainable ion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Pegoraro, F.; Leemans, W. P.

    2016-05-15

    Radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) is a highly efficient mechanism of laser-driven ion acceleration, with near complete transfer of the laser energy to the ions in the relativistic regime. However, there is a fundamental limit on the maximum attainable ion energy, which is determined by the group velocity of the laser. The tightly focused laser pulses have group velocities smaller than the vacuum light speed, and, since they offer the high intensity needed for the RPA regime, it is plausible that group velocity effects would manifest themselves in the experiments involving tightly focused pulses and thin foils. However, in this case, finite spot size effects are important, and another limiting factor, the transverse expansion of the target, may dominate over the group velocity effect. As the laser pulse diffracts after passing the focus, the target expands accordingly due to the transverse intensity profile of the laser. Due to this expansion, the areal density of the target decreases, making it transparent for radiation and effectively terminating the acceleration. The off-normal incidence of the laser on the target, due either to the experimental setup, or to the deformation of the target, will also lead to establishing a limit on maximum ion energy.

  9. New limit on logotropic unified dark energy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, V. M. C.; Avelino, P. P.

    2017-07-01

    A unification of dark matter and dark energy in terms of a logotropic perfect dark fluid has recently been proposed, where deviations with respect to the standard ΛCDM model are dependent on a single parameter B. In this paper we show that the requirement that the linear growth of cosmic structures on comoving scales larger than 8h-1Mpc is not significantly affected with respect to the standard ΛCDM result provides the strongest limit to date on the model (B < 6 ×10-7), an improvement of more than three orders of magnitude over previous upper limits on the value of B. We further show that this limit rules out the logotropic Unified Dark Energy model as a possible solution to the small scale problems of the ΛCDM model, including the cusp problem of Dark Matter halos or the missing satellite problem, as well as the original version of the model where the Planck energy density was taken as one of the two parameters characterizing the logotropic dark fluid.

  10. Pushing the high-energy limit of plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Bisio, Francesco; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; Moroni, Riccardo; Maidecchi, Giulia; Alabastri, Alessandro; Gonella, Grazia; Giglia, Angelo; Andolfi, Laura; Nannarone, Stefano; Mattera, Lorenzo; Canepa, Maurizio

    2014-09-23

    The localized surface plasmon resonance of metal nanoparticles allows confining the eletromagnetic field in nanosized volumes, creating high-field "hot spots", most useful for enhanced nonlinear optical spectroscopies. The commonly employed metals, Au and Ag, yield plasmon resonances only spanning the visible/near-infrared range. Stretching upward, the useful energy range of plasmonics requires exploiting different materials. Deep-ultraviolet plasmon resonances happen to be achievable with one of the cheapest and most abundant materials available: aluminum indeed holds the promise of a broadly tunable plasmonic response, theoretically extending far into the deep-ultraviolet. Complex nanofabrication and the unavoidable Al oxidation have so far prevented the achievement of this ultimate high-energy response. A nanofabrication technique producing purely metallic Al nanoparticles has at last allowed to overcome these limits, pushing the plasmon resonance to 6.8 eV photon energy (≈180 nm) and thus significantly broadening the spectral range of plasmonics' numerous applications.

  11. 78 FR 6091 - Enbridge Energy, Limited Partnership; Notice of Filing of Supplement to Facilities Surcharge...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Enbridge Energy, Limited Partnership; Notice of Filing of Supplement to Facilities Surcharge Settlement Take notice that on December 12, 2012, Enbridge Energy, Limited...

  12. 76 FR 43682 - Shetek Wind Inc. Jeffers South, LLC Allco Renewable Energy Limited v. Midwest Independent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Shetek Wind Inc. Jeffers South, LLC Allco Renewable Energy Limited v... Renewable Energy Limited (collectively Complainants) filed a formal complaint against the Midwest...

  13. Energy and population: transitional issues and eventual limits.

    PubMed

    Werbos, P J

    1990-08-01

    The implication of population size for US energy requirements is explored in this essay. The basic argument is that the present supply of fuels and energy technologies is not sustainable in the long run, that a wide range of choices is possible when a complete transition is made to sustainable technologies, and that the growth of population and the composition of this growth during the next 30 years are the most serious problems impacting on the achievement of sustainable technology. The importance and future of fuel oil is discussed as well as the transition to sustainable energy supplies: conservation, renewables, nuclear and coal. Dependency on oil can only be changed through time and the infusion of money, but even with these givens, the transition is also dependent on the political and budgetary climate. The race is between crisis and cure. It is argued that the soft energy systems (biomass, solar water heater, wind, hydro, and geothermal energy) along with conservation will increase easily and naturally, but the total potential from these sources amounts to only 10% of the present US energy supply. Conservation offers greater hope because 80% of end-use fossil fuel is used in transportation and industry. Further growth of the population in the US would create a demand to desalinate water, which would increase the demand for energy. A totally soft energy economy is probably not feasible without a drastic reduction in US population. The expected direction is in the increased use of coal, and then nuclear energy. Unfortunately, coal contributes to greenhouse warming, and the supply is limited to 60-100 years. Nuclear proliferation and terrorism is connected to the widespread use of nuclear energy. Some breakthrough technology with cold fusion may offer a safer alternative. High technology renewables such as solar cells can be competitive with nuclear energy, if prices can be kept down. on earth or in space, are being investigated. Exploring a variety of advanced

  14. Energy density and rate limitations in structural composite supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, J. F.; Gienger, E.; Wetzel, E. D.; Xu, K.

    2012-06-01

    The weight and volume of conventional energy storage technologies greatly limits their performance in mobile platforms. Traditional research efforts target improvements in energy density to reduce device size and mass. Enabling a device to perform additional functions, such as bearing mechanical load, is an alternative approach as long as the total mass efficiency exceeds that of the individual materials it replaces. Our research focuses on structural composites that function as batteries and supercapacitors. These multifunctional devices could be used to replace conventional structural components, such as vehicle frame elements, to provide significant system-level weight reductions and extend mission times. Our approach is to design structural properties directly into the electrolyte and electrode materials. Solid polymer electrolyte materials bind the system and transfer load to the fibers while conducting ions between the electrodes. Carbon fiber electrodes provide a route towards optimizing both energy storage and load-bearing capabilities, and may also obviate the need for a separate current collector. The components are being integrated using scalable, cost-effective composite processing techniques that are amenable to complex part shapes. Practical considerations of energy density and rate behavior are described here as they relate to materials used. Our results highlight the viability as well as the challenges of this multifunctional approach towards energy storage.

  15. Welding arc plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  16. Reconstruction of limited-angle dual-energy CT using mutual learning and cross-estimation (MLCE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huayu; Xing, Yuxiang

    2016-03-01

    Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging has gained a lot of attenuation because of its capability to discriminate materials. We proposes a flexible DECT scan strategy which can be realized on a system with general X-ray sources and detectors. In order to lower dose and scanning time, our DECT acquires two projections data sets on two arcs of limited-angular coverage (one for each energy) respectively. Meanwhile, a certain number of rays from two data sets form conjugate sampling pairs. Our reconstruction method for such a DECT scan mainly tackles the consequent limited-angle problem. Using the idea of artificial neural network, we excavate the connection between projections at two different energies by constructing a relationship between the linear attenuation coefficient of the high energy and that of the low one. We use this relationship to cross-estimate missing projections and reconstruct attenuation images from an augmented data set including projections at views covered by itself (projections collected in scanning) and by the other energy (projections estimated) for each energy respectively. Validated by our numerical experiment on a dental phantom with rather complex structures, our DECT is effective in recovering small structures in severe limited-angle situations. This DECT scanning strategy can much broaden DECT design in reality.

  17. High-energy (> 70 KeV) x-ray conversion efficiency measurement on the ARC laser at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Hui; Hermann, M. R.; Kalantar, D. H.; ...

    2017-03-16

    Here, the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) laser system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to ultimately provide eight beamlets with a pulse duration adjustable from 1 to 30 ps, and energies up to 1.5 kJ per beamlet. Currently, four beamlets have been commissioned. In the first set of 6 commissioning target experiments, the individual beamlets were fired onto gold foil targets with energy up to 1 kJ per beamlet at 20–30 ps pulse length. The x-ray energy distribution and pulse duration were measured, yielding energy conversion efficiencies of 4–9 × 10–4 for x-rays with energies greater than 70more » keV. With greater than 3 J of such x-rays, ARC provides a high-precision x-ray backlighting capability for upcoming inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density physics experiments on NIF.« less

  18. High-energy (>70 keV) x-ray conversion efficiency measurement on the ARC laser at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Hermann, M. R.; Kalantar, D. H.; Martinez, D. A.; Di Nicola, P.; Tommasini, R.; Landen, O. L.; Alessi, D.; Bowers, M.; Browning, D.; Brunton, G.; Budge, T.; Crane, J.; Di Nicola, J.-M.; Döppner, T.; Dixit, S.; Erbert, G.; Fishler, B.; Halpin, J.; Hamamoto, M.; Heebner, J.; Hernandez, V. J.; Hohenberger, M.; Homoelle, D.; Honig, J.; Hsing, W.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S.; LaFortune, K.; Lawson, J.; Nagel, S. R.; Negres, R. A.; Novikova, L.; Orth, C.; Pelz, L.; Prantil, M.; Rushford, M.; Shaw, M.; Sherlock, M.; Sigurdsson, R.; Wegner, P.; Widmayer, C.; Williams, G. J.; Williams, W.; Whitman, P.; Yang, S.

    2017-03-01

    The Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) laser system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to ultimately provide eight beamlets with a pulse duration adjustable from 1 to 30 ps, and energies up to 1.5 kJ per beamlet. Currently, four beamlets have been commissioned. In the first set of 6 commissioning target experiments, the individual beamlets were fired onto gold foil targets with energy up to 1 kJ per beamlet at 20-30 ps pulse length. The x-ray energy distribution and pulse duration were measured, yielding energy conversion efficiencies of 4-9 × 10-4 for x-rays with energies greater than 70 keV. With greater than 3 J of such x-rays, ARC provides a high-precision x-ray backlighting capability for upcoming inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density physics experiments on NIF.

  19. Optimum rocket propulsion for energy-limited transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuppero, Anthony; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    In order to effect large-scale return of extraterrestrial resources to Earth orbit, it is desirable to optimize the propulsion system to maximize the mass of payload returned per unit energy expended. This optimization problem is different from the conventional rocket propulsion optimization. A rocket propulsion system consists of an energy source plus reaction mass. In a conventional chemical rocket, the energy source and the reaction mass are the same. For the transportation system required, however, the best system performance is achieved if the reaction mass used is from a locally available source. In general, the energy source and the reaction mass will be separate. One such rocket system is the nuclear thermal rocket, in which the energy source is a reactor and the reaction mass a fluid which is heated by the reactor and exhausted. Another energy-limited rocket system is the hydrogen/oxygen rocket where H2/O2 fuel is produced by electrolysis of water using a solar array or a nuclear reactor. The problem is to choose the optimum specific impulse (or equivalently exhaust velocity) to minimize the amount of energy required to produce a given mission delta-v in the payload. The somewhat surprising result is that the optimum specific impulse is not the maximum possible value, but is proportional to the mission delta-v. In general terms, at the beginning of the mission it is optimum to use a very low specific impulse and expend a lot of reaction mass, since this is the most energy efficient way to transfer momentum. However, as the mission progresses, it becomes important to minimize the amount of reaction mass expelled, since energy is wasted moving the reaction mass. Thus, the optimum specific impulse will increase with the mission delta-v. Optimum I(sub sp) is derived for maximum payload return per energy expended for both the case of fixed and variable I(sub sp) engines. Sample missions analyzed include return of water payloads from the moons of Mars and of

  20. Optimum rocket propulsion for energy-limited transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuppero, Anthony; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    In order to effect large-scale return of extraterrestrial resources to Earth orbit, it is desirable to optimize the propulsion system to maximize the mass of payload returned per unit energy expended. This optimization problem is different from the conventional rocket propulsion optimization. A rocket propulsion system consists of an energy source plus reaction mass. In a conventional chemical rocket, the energy source and the reaction mass are the same. For the transportation system required, however, the best system performance is achieved if the reaction mass used is from a locally available source. In general, the energy source and the reaction mass will be separate. One such rocket system is the nuclear thermal rocket, in which the energy source is a reactor and the reaction mass a fluid which is heated by the reactor and exhausted. Another energy-limited rocket system is the hydrogen/oxygen rocket where H2/O2 fuel is produced by electrolysis of water using a solar array or a nuclear reactor. The problem is to choose the optimum specific impulse (or equivalently exhaust velocity) to minimize the amount of energy required to produce a given mission delta-v in the payload. The somewhat surprising result is that the optimum specific impulse is not the maximum possible value, but is proportional to the mission delta-v. In general terms, at the beginning of the mission it is optimum to use a very low specific impulse and expend a lot of reaction mass, since this is the most energy efficient way to transfer momentum. However, as the mission progresses, it becomes important to minimize the amount of reaction mass expelled, since energy is wasted moving the reaction mass. Thus, the optimum specific impulse will increase with the mission delta-v. Optimum I(sub sp) is derived for maximum payload return per energy expended for both the case of fixed and variable I(sub sp) engines. Sample missions analyzed include return of water payloads from the moons of Mars and of

  1. Hall-effect arc protector

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, Richard A.; Kotter, Dale K.

    1997-01-01

    The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored.

  2. Hall-effect arc protector

    DOEpatents

    Rankin, R.A.; Kotter, D.K.

    1997-05-13

    The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored. 2 figs.

  3. High field tunneling as a limiting factor of maximum energy density in dielectric energy storage capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qin; Wang, Yong; Zhou, Xin; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, Shihai

    2008-04-01

    In several low loss dielectric materials, it was observed that the energy loss remains very small under low and medium electric fields but dramatically increases at high field which is believed to be due to tunneling current. The increase of tunneling current at high field is due to the decrease of barrier width and height and is a universal phenomenon in all dielectric materials. Due to the requirement of high energy efficiency, high field conduction places a limit for the maximum operation field, which could be lower than the breakdown field and act as the limiting factor of energy density.

  4. UV DRIVEN EVAPORATION OF CLOSE-IN PLANETS: ENERGY-LIMITED, RECOMBINATION-LIMITED, AND PHOTON-LIMITED FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, James E.; Alvarez, Marcelo A.

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the evaporation of close-in exoplanets irradiated by ionizing photons. We find that the properties of the flow are controlled by the ratio of the recombination time to the flow timescale. When the recombination timescale is short compared to the flow timescale, the flow is in approximate local ionization equilibrium with a thin ionization front where the photon mean free path is short compared to the flow scale. In this “recombination-limited” flow the mass-loss scales roughly with the square root of the incident flux. When the recombination time is long compared to the flow timescale the ionization front becomes thick and encompasses the entire flow with the mass-loss rate scaling linearly with flux. If the planet's potential is deep, then the flow is approximately “energy-limited”; however, if the planet's potential is shallow, then we identify a new limiting mass-loss regime, which we term “photon-limited.” In this scenario, the mass-loss rate is purely limited by the incoming flux of ionizing photons. We have developed a new numerical approach that takes into account the frequency dependence of the incoming ionizing spectrum and performed a large suite of 1D simulations to characterize UV driven mass-loss around low-mass planets. We find that the flow is “recombination-limited” at high fluxes but becomes “energy-limited” at low fluxes; however, the transition is broad occurring over several orders of magnitude in flux. Finally, we point out that the transitions between the different flow types do not occur at a single flux value but depend on the planet's properties, with higher-mass planets becoming “energy-limited” at lower fluxes.

  5. Limit on rotational energy available to excite Jovian aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eviatar, A.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    There is a fundamental relationship between the power that is extracted from Jupiter's rotation to drive magnetospheric processes and the rate at which mass is injected into the Io plasma torus. Half of this power is consumed by bulk motion of the plasma and the other half represents an upper limit on the energy from rotation available for dissipation and in particular to excite the Jovian aurora. Since the rotation of the planet is the only plausible source of energy, the power inferred from the observed auroral intensities requires a plasma injection rate of 2.6 x 10 to the 29th AMU/sec or greater. This in turn leads to a residence time of a torus particle of 48 days or less. These results raise doubts about the applicability of equilibrium thermodynamics to the determination of plasma parameters in the Io torus.

  6. Limit on rotational energy available to excite Jovian aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eviatar, A.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    There is a fundamental relationship between the power that is extracted from Jupiter's rotation to drive magnetospheric processes and the rate at which mass is injected into the Io plasma torus. Half of this power is consumed by bulk motion of the plasma and the other half represents an upper limit on the energy from rotation available for dissipation and in particular to excite the Jovian aurora. Since the rotation of the planet is the only plausible source of energy, the power inferred from the observed auroral intensities requires a plasma injection rate of 2.6 x 10 to the 29th AMU/sec or greater. This in turn leads to a residence time of a torus particle of 48 days or less. These results raise doubts about the applicability of equilibrium thermodynamics to the determination of plasma parameters in the Io torus.

  7. Gaps between Jets in the high energy limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forshaw, Jeffrey R.; Kyrieleis, Albrecht; Seymour, Michael H.

    2005-06-01

    We use perturbative QCD to calculate the parton level cross section for the production of two jets that are far apart in rapidity, subject to a limitation on the total transverse momentum Q0 in the interjet region. We specifically address the question of how to combine the approach which sums all leading logarithms in Q/Q0 (where Q is the jet transverse momentum) with the BFKL approach, in which leading logarithms of the scattering energy are summed. This paper constitutes progress towards the simultaneous summation of all important logarithms. Using an ``all orders'' matching, we are able to obtain results for the cross section which correctly reproduce the two approaches in the appropriate limits.

  8. Arcing in LEO - Does the Whole Array Discharge?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Vayner, Boris V.; Galofaro, Joel T.; Hillard, G. Barry

    2005-01-01

    The conventional wisdom about solar array arcing in LEO is that only the parts the solar array that are swept over by the arc-generated plasma front are discharged in the initial arc. This limits the amount of energy that can be discharged. Recent work done at the NASA Glenn Research Center has shown that this idea is mistaken. In fact, the capacitance of the entire solar array may be discharged, which for large arrays leads to very large and possibly debilitating arcs, even if no sustained arc occurs. We present the laboratory work that conclusively demonstrates this fact by using a grounded plate that prevents the arc-plasma front from reaching certain array strings. Finally, we discuss the dependence of arc strength and arc pulse width on the capacitance that is discharged, and provide a physical mechanism for discharge of the entire array, even when parts of the array are not accessible to the arc-plasma front. Mitigation techniques are also presented.

  9. Arcing in LEO - Does the Whole Array Discharge?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Vayner, Boris V.; Galofaro, Joel T.; Hillard, G. Barry

    2005-01-01

    The conventional wisdom about solar array arcing in LEO is that only the parts the solar array that are swept over by the arc-generated plasma front are discharged in the initial arc. This limits the amount of energy that can be discharged. Recent work done at the NASA Glenn Research Center has shown that this idea is mistaken. In fact, the capacitance of the entire solar array may be discharged, which for large arrays leads to very large and possibly debilitating arcs, even if no sustained arc occurs. We present the laboratory work that conclusively demonstrates this fact by using a grounded plate that prevents the arc-plasma front from reaching certain array strings. Finally, we discuss the dependence of arc strength and arc pulse width on the capacitance that is discharged, and provide a physical mechanism for discharge of the entire array, even when parts of the array are not accessible to the arc-plasma front. Mitigation techniques are also presented.

  10. Arcing in LEO: Does the Whole Array Discharge?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Vayner, Boris V.; Galofaro, Joel T.; Hillard, G. Barry

    2005-01-01

    The conventional wisdom about solar array arcing in LEO is that only the parts of the solar array that are swept over by the arc-generated plasma front are discharged in the initial arc. This limits the amount of energy that can be discharged. Recent work done at the NASA Glenn Research Center has shown that this idea is mistaken. In fact, the capacitance of the entire solar array may be discharged, which for large arrays leads to very large and possibly debilitating arcs, even if no sustained arc occurs. We present the laboratory work that conclusively demonstrates this fact by using a grounded plate that prevents the arc-plasma front from reaching certain array strings. Finally, we discuss the dependence of arc strength and arc pulse width on the capacitance that is discharged, and provide a physical mechanism for discharge of the entire array, even when parts of the array are not accessible to the arc-plasma front. Mitigation techniques are also presented.

  11. Usefulness and Limitations of Energy Limited Escape: Titan and Other Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Robert E.; Volkov, Alexey N.; Tucker, Orenthal J.

    2015-11-01

    Because thermal conduction and IR cooling are inefficient heat transfer processes, adiabatic expansion leading to molecular escape is often the dominant cooling process for energy deposited in the upper atmosphere of planetary bodies. This led to the use of the energy-limited escape (EL) approximation in which the loss rate is roughly proportional to the heating rate, Q. In applying the EL approximation, it was also frequently assumed that the adiabatic expansion resulted in the gas outflow going sonic. Johnson et al. (2013) used molecular kinetic simulations of an atmosphere with a heated layer to show this was not necessarily the case and estimated a critical heating rate, Qc. For Q greater than ~Qc a sonic point formed below the exobase where the gas properties were collision dominated. As Q increased above ~Qc sonic escape was eventually limited by the energy and number fluxes from the below the heated layer. In that case, adiabatic cooling did dominate upper atmosphere cooling, but the escape rate did not increase with increasing Q as predicted by the EL model. Instead, the escape rate remained nearly constant and the energy per molecule carried off increased nearly monotonically with Q. For heating rates from about twice Qc to more than an order of magnitude lower, the molecular escape rate was well approximated by the energy limited rate, but the upper atmospheric structure could not be described by a fluid model with a sonic point and escape was Jeans-like although the Jeans expressions was often a poor approximation. That is, molecules escape from well below the nominal exobase and collisions remained important well above it (Tucker et al. 2009; 2013) resulting in enhanced-Jeans-like escape (Volkov et al. 2011a,b; Erwin et al. 2013). Here we give a new expression for the escape rate produced by adiabatic cooling and expansion of the upper atmosphere and apply it to atmospheric loss from an early Titan atmosphere and related atmospheres.Ref.: Erwin,J.T., et

  12. Optimization of Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) Process for Maximum Ballistic Limit in MIL A46100 Steel Welded All-Metal Armor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Ramaswami, S.; Snipes, J. S.; Yavari, R.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2015-01-01

    Our recently developed multi-physics computational model for the conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW) joining process has been upgraded with respect to its predictive capabilities regarding the process optimization for the attainment of maximum ballistic limit within the weld. The original model consists of six modules, each dedicated to handling a specific aspect of the GMAW process, i.e., (a) electro-dynamics of the welding gun; (b) radiation-/convection-controlled heat transfer from the electric arc to the workpiece and mass transfer from the filler metal consumable electrode to the weld; (c) prediction of the temporal evolution and the spatial distribution of thermal and mechanical fields within the weld region during the GMAW joining process; (d) the resulting temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the material microstructure throughout the weld region; (e) spatial distribution of the as-welded material mechanical properties; and (f) spatial distribution of the material ballistic limit. In the present work, the model is upgraded through the introduction of the seventh module in recognition of the fact that identification of the optimum GMAW process parameters relative to the attainment of the maximum ballistic limit within the weld region entails the use of advanced optimization and statistical sensitivity analysis methods and tools. The upgraded GMAW process model is next applied to the case of butt welding of MIL A46100 (a prototypical high-hardness armor-grade martensitic steel) workpieces using filler metal electrodes made of the same material. The predictions of the upgraded GMAW process model pertaining to the spatial distribution of the material microstructure and ballistic limit-controlling mechanical properties within the MIL A46100 butt weld are found to be consistent with general expectations and prior observations.

  13. Two-parton scattering in the high-energy limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron-Huot, Simon; Gardi, Einan; Vernazza, Leonardo

    2017-06-01

    Considering 2 → 2 gauge-theory scattering with general colour in the high-energy limit, we compute the Regge-cut contribution to three loops through next-to-next-to-leading high-energy logarithms (NNLL) in the signature-odd sector. Our formalism is based on using the non-linear Balitsky-JIMWLK rapidity evolution equation to derive an effective Hamiltonian acting on states with a fixed number of Reggeized gluons. A new effect occurring first at NNLL is mixing between states with k and k + 2 Reggeized gluons due non-diagonal terms in this Hamiltonian. Our results are consistent with a recent determination of the infrared structure of scattering amplitudes at three loops, as well as a computation of 2 → 2 gluon scattering in \\mathcal{N} = 4 super Yang-Mills theory. Combining the latter with our Regge-cut calculation we extract the three-loop Regge trajectory in this theory. Our results open the way to predict high-energy logarithms through NNLL at higher-loop orders.

  14. The dosimetric impact of different photon beam energy on RapidArc radiotherapy planning for cervix carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lalit; Yadav, Girigesh; Raman, Kothanda; Bhushan, Manindra; Pal, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to know the effect of three different photon energies viz., 6, 10, and 15 mega voltage (MV) on RapidArc (RA) planning for deep-seated cervix tumor and to develop clinically acceptable RA plans with suitable photon energy. RA plans were generated for 6, 10, and 15 MV photon energies for twenty patients reported with cervix carcinoma. RA plans were evaluated in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage, dose to organs at risk (OARs), conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), gradient measure, external volume index of dose distribution produced, total number of monitor units (MUs), nontumor integral dose (ID), and low dose volume of normal tissue. A two-sample paired t-test was performed to compare the dosimetric parameters of RA plans. Irrespective of photon energy used for RA planning, plans were dosimetrically similar in terms of PTV coverage, OARs sparing, CI and HI. The numbers of MUs were 13.4 ± 1.4% and 18.2 ± 1.5% higher and IDs were 2.7 ± 0.8% and 3.7 ± 0.9% higher in 6 MV plans in comparison to that in the 10 and 15 MV plans, respectively. V1Gy, V2Gy, V3Gy, and V4Gy were higher in 6 MV plans in comparison to that in 10 and 15 MV plans. Based on this study, 6 MV photon beam is a good choice for RA planning in case of cervix carcinoma, as it does not deliver additional exposure to patients caused by photoneutrons produced in high energy beams.

  15. Limits to sustained energy intake. XXIII. Does heat dissipation capacity limit the energy budget of lactating bank voles?

    PubMed

    Sadowska, Edyta T; Król, Elżbieta; Chrzascik, Katarzyna M; Rudolf, Agata M; Speakman, John R; Koteja, Paweł

    2016-03-01

    Understanding factors limiting sustained metabolic rate (SusMR) is a central issue in ecological physiology. According to the heat dissipation limit (HDL) theory, the SusMR at peak lactation is constrained by the maternal capacity to dissipate body heat. To test that theory, we shaved lactating bank voles (Myodes glareolus) to experimentally elevate their capacity for heat dissipation. The voles were sampled from lines selected for high aerobic exercise metabolism (A; characterized also by increased basal metabolic rate) and unselected control lines (C). Fur removal significantly increased the peak-lactation food intake (mass-adjusted least square means ± s.e.; shaved: 16.3 ± 0.3 g day(-1), unshaved: 14.4 ± 0.2 g day(-1); P<0.0001), average daily metabolic rate (shaved: 109 ± 2 kJ day(-1), unshaved: 97 ± 2 kJ day(-1); P<0.0001) and metabolisable energy intake (shaved: 215 ± 4 kJ day(-1), unshaved: 185 ± 4 kJ day(-1); P<0.0001), as well as the milk energy output (shaved: 104 ± 4 kJ day(-1); unshaved: 93 ± 4 kJ day(-1); P=0.021) and litter growth rate (shaved: 9.4 ± 0.7 g 4 days(-1), unshaved: 7.7 ± 0.7 g 4 days(-1); P=0.028). Thus, fur removal increased both the total energy budget and reproductive output at the most demanding period of lactation, which supports the HDL theory. However, digestive efficiency was lower in shaved voles (76.0 ± 0.3%) than in unshaved ones (78.5 ± 0.2%; P<0.0001), which may indicate that a limit imposed by the capacity of the alimentary system was also approached. Shaving similarly affected the metabolic and reproductive traits in voles from the A and C lines. Thus, the experimental evolution model did not reveal a difference in the limiting mechanism between animals with inherently different metabolic rates. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Momentum and energy dependent resolution function of the ARCS neutron chopper spectrometer at high momentum transfer: Comparing simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diallo, S. O.; Lin, J. Y. Y.; Abernathy, D. L.; Azuah, R. T.

    2016-11-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering at high momentum transfers (i.e. Q ≥ 20 A ˚), commonly known as deep inelastic neutron scattering (DINS), provides direct observation of the momentum distribution of light atoms, making it a powerful probe for studying single-particle motions in liquids and solids. The quantitative analysis of DINS data requires an accurate knowledge of the instrument resolution function Ri(Q , E) at each momentum Q and energy transfer E, where the label i indicates whether the resolution was experimentally observed i = obs or simulated i=sim. Here, we describe two independent methods for determining the total resolution function Ri(Q , E) of the ARCS neutron instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The first method uses experimental data from an archetypical system (liquid 4He) studied with DINS, which are then numerically deconvoluted using its previously determined intrinsic scattering function to yield Robs(Q , E). The second approach uses accurate Monte Carlo simulations of the ARCS spectrometer, which account for all instrument contributions, coupled to a representative scattering kernel to reproduce the experimentally observed response S(Q , E). Using a delta function as scattering kernel, the simulation yields a resolution function Rsim(Q , E) with comparable lineshape and features as Robs(Q , E), but somewhat narrower due to the ideal nature of the model. Using each of these two Ri(Q , E) separately, we extract characteristic parameters of liquid 4He such as the intrinsic linewidth α2 (which sets the atomic kinetic energy < K > ∼α2) in the normal liquid and the Bose-Einstein condensate parameter n0 in the superfluid phase. The extracted α2 values agree well with previous measurements at saturated vapor pressure (SVP) as well as at elevated pressure (24 bars) within experimental precision, independent of which Ri(Q , y) is used to analyze the data. The actual observed n0 values at each Q vary little

  17. Cathodic arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2003-10-29

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas standout due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. Industrial processes often use cathodic arc plasma in reactive mode. In contrast, the science of arcs has focused on the case of vacuum arcs. Future research directions include closing the knowledge gap for reactive mode, large area coating, linear sources and filters, metal plasma immersion process, with application in high-tech and biomedical fields.

  18. Tritium handling experience at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

    SciTech Connect

    Suppiah, S.; McCrimmon, K.; Lalonde, S.; Ryland, D.; Boniface, H.; Muirhead, C.; Castillo, I.

    2015-03-15

    Canada has been a leader in tritium handling technologies as a result of the successful CANDU reactor technology used for power production. Over the last 50 to 60 years, capabilities have been established in tritium handling and tritium management in CANDU stations, tritium removal processes for heavy and light water, tritium measurement and monitoring, and understanding the effects of tritium on the environment. This paper outlines details of tritium-related work currently being carried out at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). It concerns the CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange) process for detritiation, tritium-compatible electrolysers, tritium permeation studies, and tritium powered batteries. It is worth noting that AECL offers a Tritium Safe-Handling Course to national and international participants, the course is a mixture of classroom sessions and hands-on practical exercises. The expertise and facilities available at AECL is ready to address technological needs of nuclear fusion and next-generation nuclear fission reactors related to tritium handling and related issues.

  19. Convergent evolution of the arginine deiminase pathway: the ArcD and ArcE arginine/ornithine exchangers.

    PubMed

    Noens, Elke E E; Lolkema, Juke S

    2017-02-01

    The arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway converts L-arginine into L-ornithine and yields 1 mol of ATP per mol of L-arginine consumed. The L-arginine/L-ornithine exchanger in the pathway takes up L-arginine and excretes L-ornithine from the cytoplasm. Analysis of the genomes of 1281 bacterial species revealed the presence of 124 arc gene clusters encoding the pathway. About half of the clusters contained the gene encoding the well-studied L-arginine/L-ornithine exchanger ArcD, while the other half contained a gene, termed here arcE, encoding a membrane protein that is not a homolog of ArcD. The arcE gene product of Streptococcus pneumoniae was shown to take up L-arginine and L-ornithine with affinities of 0.6 and 1 μmol/L, respectively, and to catalyze metabolic energy-independent, electroneutral exchange. ArcE of S. pneumoniae could replace ArcD in the ADI pathway of Lactococcus lactis and provided the cells with a growth advantage. In contrast to ArcD, ArcE catalyzed translocation of the pathway intermediate L-citrulline with high efficiency. A short version of the ADI pathway is proposed for L-citrulline catabolism and the presence of the evolutionary unrelated arcD and arcE genes in different organisms is discussed in the context of the evolution of the ADI pathway.

  20. Interface Series: Energy and Exercise. V. Limiting Reagents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bent, Henry A.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses different foods with reference to oxidation and energy production. Amino acid assays are provided for eggs, steak, rice, and lentils and white and dark turkey meat is analyzed for energy and power outputs. (MA)

  1. At the Limit: Introducing Energy with Human Senses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinken, Lisa; Heusler, Stefan; Carmesin, Hans-Otto

    2016-12-01

    Energy belongs to the core ideas of the physics curriculum. But at the same time, energy is one of the most complex topics in science education since it occurs in multiple ways, such as motion, sound, light, and thermal energy. It can neither be destroyed nor created, but only converted. Due to the variety of relevant scales and abstractness of the term energy, the question arises how to introduce energy at the introductory physics level. The aim of this article is to demonstrate how the concept of energy can become meaningful in the context of the human senses. Three simple experiments to investigate the minimal amount of energy that is required to generate a sensory perception are presented. In this way students can learn that even different sensory perceptions can be compared by using energy as the unifying concept.

  2. Interface Series: Energy and Exercise. V. Limiting Reagents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bent, Henry A.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses different foods with reference to oxidation and energy production. Amino acid assays are provided for eggs, steak, rice, and lentils and white and dark turkey meat is analyzed for energy and power outputs. (MA)

  3. At the Limit: Introducing Energy with Human Senses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinken, Lisa; Heusler, Stefan; Carmesin, Hans-Otto

    2016-01-01

    Energy belongs to the core ideas of the physics curriculum. But at the same time, energy is one of the most complex topics in science education since it occurs in multiple ways, such as motion, sound, light, and thermal energy. It can neither be destroyed nor created, but only converted. Due to the variety of relevant scales and abstractness of…

  4. At the Limit: Introducing Energy with Human Senses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinken, Lisa; Heusler, Stefan; Carmesin, Hans-Otto

    2016-01-01

    Energy belongs to the core ideas of the physics curriculum. But at the same time, energy is one of the most complex topics in science education since it occurs in multiple ways, such as motion, sound, light, and thermal energy. It can neither be destroyed nor created, but only converted. Due to the variety of relevant scales and abstractness of…

  5. 77 FR 31347 - High Prairie Pipeline, LLC v. Enbridge Energy, Limited Partnership; Notice of Complaint

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission High Prairie Pipeline, LLC v. Enbridge Energy, Limited Partnership; Notice... Applicable to Oil Pipeline Proceedings, High Prairie Pipeline, LLC (Complainant) filed a formal...

  6. 75 FR 10243 - Enbridge Energy, Limited Partnership; Notice of Filing of Supplement to Facilities Surcharge...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-05

    ...: 2010-4612] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. OR10-7-000] Enbridge Energy, Limited Partnership; Notice of Filing of Supplement to Facilities Surcharge Settlement February 25, 2010. Take notice that on February 19, 2010, Enbridge Energy, Limited Partnership...

  7. A comparative study on the arc and melting efficiencies of arc welding processes

    SciTech Connect

    DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    A study was conducted on the arc and melting efficiency of the plasma arc, gas tungsten arc, gas metal arc, and submerged arc welding processes. Arc efficiency was determined as a function of current for each process using A36 steel base metal. Melting efficiency was evaluated with variations in arc power and travel speed during deposition of austenitic stainless steel filler wire onto A36 steel substrates. The arc efficiency did not vary significantly within a given process over the range of currents investigated. The consumable electrode processes exhibited the highest arc efficiency (0.84), followed by the gas tungsten arc (0.67) and plasma arc (0.47) processes. A semi-empirical relation was developed for the melting efficiency as a function of net arc power and travel speed which described the experimental data reasonably well. An interaction was observed between the arc and melting efficiency. A low arc efficiency factor limits the power delivered to the substrate which, in turn, limits the maximum travel speed for a given set of conditions. High melting efficiency is favored by high arc powers and travel speeds. As a result, a low arc efficiency can limit the maximum obtainable melting efficiency.

  8. Reducing energy demand: what are the practical limits?

    PubMed

    Cullen, Jonathan M; Allwood, Julian M; Borgstein, Edward H

    2011-02-15

    Concern over the global energy system, whether driven by climate change, national security, or fears of shortage, is being discussed widely and in every arena but with a bias toward energy supply options. While demand reduction is often mentioned in passing, it is rarely a priority for implementation, whether through policy or through the search for innovation. This paper aims to draw attention to the opportunity for major reduction in energy demand, by presenting an analysis of how much of current global energy demand could be avoided. Previous work led to a "map" of global energy use that traces the flow of energy from primary sources (fuels or renewable sources), through fuel refinery, electricity generation, and end-use conversion devices, to passive systems and the delivery of final energy services (transport, illumination, and sustenance). The key passive systems are presented here and analyzed through simple engineering models with scalar equations using data based on current global practice. Physically credible options for change to key design parameters are identified and used to predict the energy savings possible for each system. The result demonstrates that 73% of global energy use could be saved by practically achievable design changes to passive systems. This reduction could be increased by further efficiency improvements in conversion devices. A list of the solutions required to achieve these savings is provided.

  9. Energy limitation of hummingbird populations in tropical and temperate communities.

    PubMed

    Montgomerie, Robert D; Gass, C L

    1981-08-01

    Regular censuses were conducted at both a temperate alpine and a tropical lowland site to determine seasonal changes in the composition of hummingbird communities and the availability of their food. From these data we calculated the total daily energy demand by the hummingbirds (Daily Energy Expenditure; DEE) and the daily energy supply available from floral nectar (Daily Energy Production; DEP) for each community census. Despite differences in habitat type and hummingbird community structure between these two sites, the hummingbird populations were often at or near carrying capacity. On average, all of the daily nectar production was cropped by the birds. We suggest that the supply/demand economics of coevolved mutualisms favour the evolution of complete resource use.

  10. Limiting technologies for particle beams and high energy physics

    SciTech Connect

    Panofsky, W.K.H.

    1985-07-01

    Since 1930 the energy of accelerators had grown by an order of magnitude roughly every 7 years. Like all exponential growths, be they human population, the size of computers, or anything else, this eventually will have to come to an end. When will this happen to the growth of the energy of particle accelerators and colliders. Fortunately, as the energy of accelerators has grown the cost per unit energy has decreased almost as fast as has the increase in energy. The result is that while the energy has increased so dramatically the cost per new installation has increased only by roughly an order of magnitude since the 1930's (corrected for inflation), while the number of accelerators operating at the frontier of the field has shrunk. As is shown in the by now familiar Livingston chart this dramatic decrease in cost has been achieved largely by a succession of new technologies, in addition to the more moderate gains in efficiency due to improved design, economies of scale, etc. We are therefore facing two questions: (1) Is there good reason scientifically to maintain the exponential growth, and (2) Are there new technologies in sight which promise continued decreases in unit costs. The answer to the first question is definitely yes; the answer to the second question is maybe.

  11. Element- and charge-state-resolved ion energies in the cathodic arc plasma from composite AlCr cathodes in argon, nitrogen and oxygen atmospheres

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Robert; Polcik, Peter; Anders, André

    2015-01-01

    The energy distribution functions of ions in the cathodic arc plasma using composite AlCr cathodes were measured as a function of the background gas pressure in the range 0.5 to 3.5 Pa for different cathode compositions and gas atmospheres. The most abundant aluminium ions were Al+ regardless of the background gas species, whereas Cr2+ ions were dominating in Ar and N2 and Cr+ in O2 atmospheres. The energy distributions of the aluminium and chromium ions typically consisted of a high-energy fraction due to acceleration in the expanding plasma plume from the cathode spot and thermalised ions that were subjected to collisions in the plasma cloud. The fraction of the latter increased with increasing background gas pressure. Atomic nitrogen and oxygen ions showed similar energy distributions as the aluminium and chromium ions, whereas the argon and molecular nitrogen and oxygen ions were formed at greater distance from the cathode spot and thus less subject to accelerating gradients. In addition to the positively charged metal and gas ions, negatively charged oxygen and oxygen-containing ions were observed in O2 atmosphere. The obtained results are intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the ion energies and charge states in the arc plasma of AlCr composite cathodes in different gas atmospheres as such plasmas are frequently used to deposit thin films and coatings. PMID:26120236

  12. Element- and charge-state-resolved ion energies in the cathodic arc plasma from composite AlCr cathodes in argon, nitrogen and oxygen atmospheres

    DOE PAGES

    Franz, Robert; Polcik, Peter; Anders, André

    2015-06-01

    The energy distribution functions of ions in the cathodic arc plasma using composite AlCr cathodes were measured as a function of the background gas pressure in the range 0.5 to 3.5 Pa for different cathode compositions and gas atmospheres. The most abundant aluminium ions were Al+ regardless of the background gas species, whereas Cr2+ ions were dominating in Ar and N2 and Cr+ in O2 atmospheres. The energy distributions of the aluminium and chromium ions typically consisted of a high-energy fraction due to acceleration in the expanding plasma plume from the cathode spot and thermalised ions that were subjected tomore » collisions in the plasma cloud. The fraction of the latter increased with increasing background gas pressure. Atomic nitrogen and oxygen ions showed similar energy distributions as the aluminium and chromium ions, whereas the argon and molecular nitrogen and oxygen ions were formed at greater distance from the cathode spot and thus less subject to accelerating gradients. In addition to the positively charged metal and gas ions, negatively charged oxygen and oxygen-containing ions were observed in O2 atmosphere. The obtained results are intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the ion energies and charge states in the arc plasma of AlCr composite cathodes in different gas atmospheres as such plasmas are frequently used to deposit thin films and coatings.« less

  13. Element- and charge-state-resolved ion energies in the cathodic arc plasma from composite AlCr cathodes in argon, nitrogen and oxygen atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Franz, Robert; Polcik, Peter; Anders, André

    2015-06-25

    The energy distribution functions of ions in the cathodic arc plasma using composite AlCr cathodes were measured as a function of the background gas pressure in the range 0.5 to 3.5 Pa for different cathode compositions and gas atmospheres. The most abundant aluminium ions were Al(+) regardless of the background gas species, whereas Cr(2+) ions were dominating in Ar and N2 and Cr(+) in O2 atmospheres. The energy distributions of the aluminium and chromium ions typically consisted of a high-energy fraction due to acceleration in the expanding plasma plume from the cathode spot and thermalised ions that were subjected to collisions in the plasma cloud. The fraction of the latter increased with increasing background gas pressure. Atomic nitrogen and oxygen ions showed similar energy distributions as the aluminium and chromium ions, whereas the argon and molecular nitrogen and oxygen ions were formed at greater distance from the cathode spot and thus less subject to accelerating gradients. In addition to the positively charged metal and gas ions, negatively charged oxygen and oxygen-containing ions were observed in O2 atmosphere. The obtained results are intended to provide a comprehensive overview of the ion energies and charge states in the arc plasma of AlCr composite cathodes in different gas atmospheres as such plasmas are frequently used to deposit thin films and coatings.

  14. Thermal efficiency of arc welding processes

    SciTech Connect

    DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1995-12-01

    A study was conducted on the arc and melting efficiency of the plasma arc, gas tungsten arc, gas metal arc, and submerged arc welding processes. The results of this work are extended to develop a quantitative method for estimating weld metal dilution in a companion paper. Arc efficiency was determined as a function of current for each process using A36 steel base metal. Melting efficiency was evaluated with variations in arc power and travel speed during deposition of austenitic stainless steel filler metal onto A36 steel substrates. The arc efficiency did not vary significantly within a given process over the range of currents investigated. A semi-empirical relation was developed for the melting efficiency as a function of net arc power and travel speed, which described the experimental data well. An interaction was observed between the arc and melting efficiency. A low arc efficiency factor limits the power delivered to the substrate which, in turn, limits the maximum travel speed for a given set of conditions. High melting efficiency is favored by high arc powers and travel speeds. As a result, a low arc efficiency can limit the maximum obtainable melting efficiency.

  15. Elements of arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This paper looks at the following arc welding techniques: (1) shielded metal-arc welding; (2) submerged-arc welding; (3) gas metal-arc welding; (4) flux-cored arc welding; (5) electrogas welding; (6) gas tungsten-arc welding; and (7) plasma-arc welding.

  16. New limits on coupled dark energy from Planck

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Jun-Qing

    2013-11-01

    Recently, the Planck collaboration has released the first cosmological papers providing the high resolution, full sky, maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies. It is crucial to understand that whether the accelerating expansion of our universe at present is driven by an unknown energy component (Dark Energy) or a modification to general relativity (Modified Gravity). In this paper we study the coupled dark energy models, in which the quintessence scalar field nontrivially couples to the cold dark matter, with the strength parameter of interaction β. Using the Planck data alone, we obtain that the strength of interaction between dark sectors is constrained as β < 0.102 at 95% confidence level, which is tighter than that from the WMAP9 data alone. Combining the Planck data with other probes, like the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO), Type-Ia supernovae ''Union2.1 compilation'' and the CMB lensing data from Planck measurement, we find the tight constraint on the strength of interaction β < 0.052 (95% C.L.). Interestingly, we also find a non-zero coupling β = 0.078±0.022 (68% C.L.) when we use the Planck, the ''SNLS'' supernovae samples, and the prior on the Hubble constant from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) together. This evidence for the coupled dark energy models mainly comes from a tension between constraints on the Hubble constant from the Planck measurement and the local direct H{sub 0} probes from HST.

  17. Atmospheric Energy Limits on Subsurface Life on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, B. P.; Yung, Y. L.; Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    It has been suggested that the terrestrial biomass of subterranean organisms may equal or exceed that at the surface. Taken as a group, these organisms can live in heavily saline conditions at temperatures from 115 C to as low as -20 C. Such conditions might exist on Mars beneath the surface oxidant in an aquifer or hydrothermal system, where the surrounding rock would also protect against the solar ultraviolet radiation. The way that such systems could obtain energy and carbon is not completely clear, although it is believed that on Earth, energy flows from the interaction of highly reduced basalt with groundwater produce H2, while carbon is derived from CO2 dissolved in the groundwater. Another potential source is the Martian atmosphere, acting as a photochemical conduit of solar insolation.

  18. Impurity photovoltaic effect: Fundamental energy conversion efficiency limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Andrew S.; Green, Martin A.

    2002-08-01

    In the past, minimal improvements have been predicted for efficiency enhancement of solar cells using the impurity photovoltaic (IPV) effect, where optical excitation through midgap defect levels allows the use of long wavelength photons to increase the conversion efficiency of sunlight to electricity. In the present work, the principle of detailed balance is used to calculate the limiting efficiency of solar cells with the inclusion of the impurity photovoltaic effect, in the idealized case when all transitions are assumed to be radiative. Based on these calculations, the limiting efficiency of the IPV device with a large number of different defect species is determined to be 77.2%. The terrestrial performance of the IPV device is also investigated by comparing its spectral sensitivity with that of tandem solar cell designs.

  19. The mathematical modelling of arc welding operation

    SciTech Connect

    Szekely, J.

    1990-01-01

    This report described the progress that was made during the grant period which examined the mathematical modeling of arc welding operations with emphasis on the transport phenomena occurring at the interface between the welding arc and weld pool. Work that has been carried out during the last three years of this specific project broke entirely new ground by quantifying the importance of free surface phenomena in arc welding systems. the most critical finding of this work was to emphasize the importance of the two way coupling between weld pool behavior and that of the energy source. More specifically, we have been able to model the interaction of a welding arc with a significantly deformed weld pool surface and we have shown that the deformed weld pool shape may have a very marked effect on the heat flux falling on the weld pool. This work is to be contrasted with most previous studies which model the weld pool independently of the welding arc and vice-versa. We have also been able to model the collapse of strongly deformed weld pools and the resultant gas occlusions. Furthermore, we have begun examination of the nature of the stability of the free surface using classical mathematics (Kelvin-Helmholtz instability). The importance in specifying the free surface lies in its effects on the arc behavior (nature of the heat and current flux). This in turn affects the surface temperature distribution on the weld pool which controls (a) the strength of Marangoni flows, and (b) the vaporization rates of volatile species. The former controls the type of pool shape that can be obtained due to convective flows while the latter controls, in part, the net heat input into the workpiece and limits the peak surface temperature. As a result of these understandings, heavy emphases are placed on quantifying the free surface. 49 refs., 15 figs.

  20. 76 FR 17411 - Enbridge Energy, Limited Partnership; Notice of Filing of Supplement to Facilities Surcharge...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Enbridge Energy, Limited Partnership; Notice of Filing of Supplement to... Supplement to the Settlement should file its intervention or protest with the Federal Energy...

  1. 77 FR 15098 - Enbridge Energy, Limited Partnership; Notice of Filing of Supplement to Facilities Surcharge...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Enbridge Energy, Limited Partnership; Notice of Filing of Supplement to... Supplement to the Settlement should file its intervention or protest with the Federal Energy...

  2. 76 FR 71007 - Shetek Wind Inc., Jeffers South, LLC and Allco Renewable Energy Limited, Midwest Independent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Shetek Wind Inc., Jeffers South, LLC and Allco Renewable Energy Limited... intervention to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street, NE., Washington, DC 20426. This...

  3. Vibrational energy distribution analysis (VEDA): scopes and limitations.

    PubMed

    Jamróz, Michał H

    2013-10-01

    The principle of operations of the VEDA program written by the author for Potential Energy Distribution (PED) analysis of theoretical vibrational spectra is described. Nowadays, the PED analysis is indispensible tool in serious analysis of the vibrational spectra. To perform the PED analysis it is necessary to define 3N-6 linearly independent local mode coordinates. Already for 20-atomic molecules it is a difficult task. The VEDA program reads the input data automatically from the Gaussian program output files. Then, VEDA automatically proposes an introductory set of local mode coordinates. Next, the more adequate coordinates are proposed by the program and optimized to obtain maximal elements of each column (internal coordinate) of the PED matrix (the EPM parameter). The possibility for an automatic optimization of PED contributions is a unique feature of the VEDA program absent in any other programs performing PED analysis.

  4. Vibrational Energy Distribution Analysis (VEDA): Scopes and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamróz, Michał H.

    2013-10-01

    The principle of operations of the VEDA program written by the author for Potential Energy Distribution (PED) analysis of theoretical vibrational spectra is described. Nowadays, the PED analysis is indispensible tool in serious analysis of the vibrational spectra. To perform the PED analysis it is necessary to define 3N-6 linearly independent local mode coordinates. Already for 20-atomic molecules it is a difficult task. The VEDA program reads the input data automatically from the Gaussian program output files. Then, VEDA automatically proposes an introductory set of local mode coordinates. Next, the more adequate coordinates are proposed by the program and optimized to obtain maximal elements of each column (internal coordinate) of the PED matrix (the EPM parameter). The possibility for an automatic optimization of PED contributions is a unique feature of the VEDA program absent in any other programs performing PED analysis.

  5. Thermodynamical Limit for Correlated Gaussian Random Energy Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contucci, P.; Esposti, M. Degli; Giardinà, C.; Graffi, S.

    Let {EΣ(N)}ΣΣN be a family of |ΣN|=2N centered unit Gaussian random variables defined by the covariance matrix CN of elements cN(Σ,τ):=Av(EΣ(N)Eτ(N)) and the corresponding random Hamiltonian. Then the quenched thermodynamical limit exists if, for every decomposition N=N1+N2, and all pairs (Σ,τ)ΣN×ΣN: where πk(Σ),k=1,2 are the projections of ΣΣN into ΣNk. The condition is explicitly verified for the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick, the even p-spin, the Derrida REM and the Derrida-Gardner GREM models.

  6. Thermodynamic limitation on boron energy realization in ramjet propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gany, Alon

    2014-05-01

    This study addresses a specific boron combustion aspect, revealing that thermodynamic conditions associated with highly boron-loaded ramjet combustors, may lead to blockage of the reaction between boron and air, causing termination of the combustion process, incomplete chemical reaction, and only partial realization of the potential boron combustion energy. Sustained boron combustion may take place when the evaporation rate of the protective liquid boron oxide layer B2O3(l) on the boron particles exceeds its generation rate by the oxidation reaction, typically at temperatures above 1900-2000 K. However, if the actual partial pressure of gaseous boron oxide B2O3(g) produced in the combustion process attains the equilibrium vapor pressure of boron oxide at the conditions existing in the combustion chamber, condensation of the boron oxide to form a liquid layer on the boron particle surfaces may take place, extinguishing the particle combustion by blocking the reaction between the boron and the surrounding oxidizing gas. The study predicts conditions for blockage and incomplete boron combustion over a range of chamber pressures and temperatures. This effect may be characteristic to combustors employing boron-containing fuels, but may not be encountered in the combustion of individual boron particles in air.

  7. Hf-Nd isotope and trace element constraints on subduction inputs at island arcs: limitations of Hf anomalies as sediment input indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, H. K.; Turner, S.; MacPherson, C.; Davidson, J. P.; Gertisser, R.

    2010-12-01

    New Nd-Hf isotope and trace element data for Javanese volcanoes are combined with recently published data to place constraints on subduction inputs at the Sunda arc in Indonesia and assess the value of Hf anomalies (expressed as Hf/Hf* and Sm/Hf ratios) as tracers of such inputs. Hf anomaly does not correlate with Hf isotope ratio in Javanese lavas however, Hf/Hf* and Sm/Hf ratios do correlate with SiO2. Contrary to previous work, we show that Hf anomaly variation may be controlled by fractionation of clinopyroxene and/or amphibole during magmatic differentiation and does not represent the magnitude or type of subduction input in some arcs. Correlation of Sm/Hf with indices of differentiation for other arcs (e.g. Vanuatu, New Britain, Mariana) suggests that differentiation control on Sm/Hf ratios of volcanic rocks may be a relatively common phenomenon. This study corroborates the use of Nd-Hf isotope co-variations in arc volcanic rocks to ascertain subduction input characteristics. The trajectories of regional volcano groups (East, Central and West Java) in Nd-Hf isotope space reveal heterogeneity in the subducted sediment input along Java, which reflects present-day spatial variations in sediment compositions on the down-going plate in the Java Trench.

  8. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  9. SU-E-J-53: Dosimetric Evaluation at Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Treatment of Prostate Cancer Using Single Or Double Arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, D; Salmon, H; Pavan, G; Nardi, S; Anderson, E; Fairbanks, L; Junior, J; Cursino, F; Colodette, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Evaluate and compare retrospective prostate treatment plan using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (RapidArc™ - Varian) technique with single or double arcs at COI Group. Methods: Ten patients with present prostate and seminal vesicle neoplasia were replanned as a target treatment volume and a prescribed dose of 78 Gy. A baseline planning, using single arc, was developed for each case reaching for the best result on PTV, in order to minimize the dose on organs at risk (OAR). Maintaining the same optimization objectives used on baseline plan, two copies for optimizing single and double arcs, have been developed. The plans were performed with 10 MV photon beam energy on Eclipse software, version 11.0, making use of Trilogy linear accelerator with Millenium HD120 multileaf collimator. Comparisons on PTV have been performed, such as: maximum, minimum and mean dose, gradient dose, as well as the quantity of monitor units, treatment time and homogeneity and conformity index. OARs constrains dose have been evaluated, comparing both optimizations. Results: Regarding PTV coverage, the difference of the minimum, maximum and mean dose were 1.28%, 0.7% and 0.2% respectively higher for single arc. When analyzed the index of homogeneity found a difference of 0.99% higher when compared with double arcs. However homogeneity index was 0.97% lower on average by using single arc. The doses on the OARs, in both cases, were in compliance to the recommended limits RTOG 0415. With the use of single arc, the quantity of monitor units was 10,1% lower, as well as the Beam-On time, 41,78%, when comparing double arcs, respectively. Conclusion: Concerning the optimization of patients with present prostate and seminal vesicle neoplasia, the use of single arc reaches similar objectives, when compared to double arcs, in order to decrease the treatment time and the quantity of monitor units.

  10. Hf-Nd isotope and trace element constraints on subduction inputs at island arcs: Limitations of Hf anomalies as sediment input indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, Heather K.; Turner, Simon; Macpherson, Colin G.; Gertisser, Ralf; Davidson, Jon P.

    2011-04-01

    New Nd-Hf isotope and trace element data for Javanese volcanoes are combined with recently published data to place constraints on subduction inputs at the Sunda arc in Indonesia and assess the value of Hf anomalies (expressed as Hf/Hf* and Sm/Hf ratios) as tracers of such inputs. Hf anomaly does not correlate with Hf isotope ratio in Javanese lavas, however, Hf/Hf* and Sm/Hf ratios do correlate with SiO 2. Contrary to previous work, we show that Hf anomaly variation may be controlled by fractionation of clinopyroxene and/or amphibole during magmatic differentiation and does not represent the magnitude or type of subduction input in some arcs. Correlation of Sm/Hf with indices of differentiation for other arcs (e.g., Vanuatu, New Britain, and Mariana) suggests that differentiation control on Sm/Hf ratios in volcanic arc rocks may be a relatively common phenomenon. This study corroborates the use of Nd-Hf isotope co-variations in arc volcanic rocks to ascertain subduction input characteristics. The trajectories of regional volcano groups (East, Central and West Java) in Nd-Hf isotope space reveal heterogeneity in the subducted sediment input along Java, which reflects present-day spatial variations in sediment compositions on the down-going plate in the Java Trench. The high Sm/Hf ratio required in the sediment end-member for some Javanese basalts suggests that partial melting of subducted sediment occurs in the presence of residual zircon, and is inconsistent with residual monazite or allanite.

  11. 76 FR 18212 - FPL Energy Maine Hydro LLC; Madison Paper Industries; Merimil Limited Partnership; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission FPL Energy Maine Hydro LLC; Madison Paper Industries; Merimil Limited... strongly encourages electronic filing, documents may also be paper-filed. To paper-file, mail an original...

  12. 75 FR 22578 - Application To Export Electric Energy; Centre Lane Trading Limited

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... Application To Export Electric Energy; Centre Lane Trading Limited AGENCY: Office of Electricity Delivery and... applied for authority to transmit electric energy from the United States to Canada pursuant to section 202... application from CLT for authority to transmit electric energy from the United States to Canada as a...

  13. 75 FR 50950 - Federal Speculative Position Limits for Referenced Energy Contracts and Associated Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... COMMISSION 17 CFR Parts 1, 20, and 151 RIN 3038-AC85 Federal Speculative Position Limits for Referenced...'' or ``Commission'') proposed to implement position limits for futures and option contracts based on a... Limits for Referenced Energy Contracts and Associated Regulations,'' for ease of reference, herein...

  14. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  15. The Γ-Limit of the Two-Dimensional Ohta-Kawasaki Energy. Droplet Arrangement via the Renormalized Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Dorian; Muratov, Cyrill B.; Serfaty, Sylvia

    2014-05-01

    This is the second in a series of papers in which we derive a Γ-expansion for the two-dimensional non-local Ginzburg-Landau energy with Coulomb repulsion known as the Ohta-Kawasaki model in connection with diblock copolymer systems. In this model, two phases appear, which interact via a nonlocal Coulomb type energy. Here we focus on the sharp interface version of this energy in the regime where one of the phases has very small volume fraction, thus creating small "droplets" of the minority phase in a "sea" of the majority phase. In our previous paper, we computed the Γ-limit of the leading order energy, which yields the averaged behavior for almost minimizers, namely that the density of droplets should be uniform. Here we go to the next order and derive a next order Γ-limit energy, which is exactly the Coulombian renormalized energy obtained by Sandier and Serfaty as a limiting interaction energy for vortices in the magnetic Ginzburg-Landau model. The derivation is based on the abstract scheme of Sandier-Serfaty that serves to obtain lower bounds for 2-scale energies and express them through some probabilities on patterns via the multiparameter ergodic theorem. Thus, without appealing to the Euler-Lagrange equation, we establish for all configurations which have "almost minimal energy" the asymptotic roundness and radius of the droplets, and the fact that they asymptotically shrink to points whose arrangement minimizes the renormalized energy in some averaged sense. Via a kind of Γ-equivalence, the obtained results also yield an expansion of the minimal energy and a characterization of the zero super-level sets of the minimizers for the original Ohta-Kawasaki energy. This leads to the expectation of seeing triangular lattices of droplets as energy minimizers.

  16. Generalized energy-aperture product limit for multi-beam and spotlight SARs

    SciTech Connect

    Karr, T.J.

    1995-12-21

    The SAR energy-aperture product limit is extended to multi-beam SARS, Spotlight and moving spotlight SARS. This fundamental limit bounds the tradeoff between energy and antenna size. The kinematic relations between design variables such as platform speed, pulse repetition frequency, beam width and area rate are analyzed in a unified framework applicable to a wide variety of SARs including strip maps, spotlights, vermer arrays and multi-beam SARS, both scanning and swept-beam. Then the energy-aperture product limit is derived from the signal-to noise requirement and the kinematic constraints. The derivation clarifies impact of multiple beams and spotlighting on SAR performance.

  17. The production of W-0.35HfC (Mol %) wirebar by arc melting and high energy rate extrusion of small diameter ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckman, R. William; Begg, Lester L.

    1991-01-01

    Tungsten alloy fiber reinforced tungsten is a candidate emitter material for space nuclear thermionic multi-kilowatt power systems. Fuel swelling which results in emitter deformation has been a primary concern for being able to achieve long lived (7 years or greater) thermionic fuel elements (TFE) operating at temperatures at or above 1900 K. The tungsten alloy (W-0.35 mo/%HfC) has extremely attractive mechanical properties above 1900 K and is a candidate reinforcement of tungsten for emitters. Because of its high strength, processing of the W-035HfC alloy to small diameter (0.38mm) wire has been difficult and the yield of useable product has been low. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate that by vacuum arc melting 38mm diameter ingots and high energy rate extrusions, small diameter (18mm) rod could be produced which is more compatible with swaging equipment used in tungsten wire production. Six 38 mm diameter ingots of W-0.35 HfC were produced by consumable electrode vacuum arc melting. The ingots were clad in 46 mm diameter molybdenum heated to 2270K and successfully extruded through a zirconia coated die at a reduction ratio of 7:1. The microstructure of the as-extruded bars is highly worked and should be amenable to processing to small diameter wire.

  18. The production of W-0. 35HfC (Mol %) wirebar by arc melting and high energy rate extrusion of small diameter ingots

    SciTech Connect

    Buckman, R.W. Jr. ); Begg, L.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Tungsten alloy fiber reinforced tungsten is a candidate emitter material for space nuclear thermionic multi-kilowatt power systems. Fuel swelling which results in emitter deformation has been a primary concern for being able to achieve long lived (7 years or greater) thermionic fuel elements (TFE) operating at temperatures at or above 1900 K. The tungsten alloy (W-0.35 mo/%HfC) has extremely attractive mechanical properties above 1900 K and is a candidate reinforcement of tungsten for emitters. Because of its high strength, processing of the W-035HfC alloy to small diameter (0.38mm) wire has been difficult and the yield of useable product has been low. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate that by vacuum arc melting 38mm diameter ingots and high energy rate extrusions, small diameter (18mm) rod could be produced which is more compatible with swaging equipment used in tungsten wire production. Six 38 mm diameter ingots of W-0.35 HfC were produced by consumable electrode vacuum arc melting. The ingots were clad in 46 mm diameter molybdenum heated to 2270K and successfully extruded through a zirconia coated die at a reduction ratio of 7:1. The microstructure of the as-extruded bars is highly worked and should be amenable to processing to small diameter wire.

  19. Energy turnover in European hares is centrally limited during early, but not during peak lactation.

    PubMed

    Valencak, Teresa G; Ruf, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    We investigated metabolizable energy intake (MEI) and milk energy output in European hares throughout gestation and lactation in females raising three young, i.e., close to maximum litter size in this precocial species. We hypothesized that herbivorous hares may face a central limitation of energy turnover during lactation, imposed by maximum capacity of the gastrointestinal tract. Females were provided with low-energy or high-energy diets, either continually, or during lactation only. Unexpectedly, females on either diet reached identical peak MEIs (>6 times BMR) during late lactation, with females on low-energy diet increasing food intake proportionally. Thus, we reject our hypothesis that in lactating hares, peak MEI is centrally limited. During early lactation, MEI and milk transfer was, however, significantly impaired in females on the low-energy diet, indicating a temporal central limitation due to a time-lag caused by the readjustment of energy intake capacity. Importantly, irrespective of the diet, females significantly increased peak MEI late in the breeding season. Consequently, earlier in the season, when energy reserves are still high, energy throughput was not limited by physiological constraints at all. We conclude that extreme MEI may have fitness costs, and that females maximize lifetime reproductive success by actively down-regulating MEI whenever possible.

  20. The Limit of Magnetic-Shear Energy in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2012-01-01

    It has been found previously, by measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region's magnetic field, (1) that there is a sharp upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region's magnetic flux content, and (2) that most active regions are near this limit when their field explodes in a coronal mass ejection/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy-limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, we present evidence that specifies the underlying magnetic condition that gives rise to the free-energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free-energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find evidence that (1) in active regions at and near their free-energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non-free magnetic energy the potential field would have is of the order of one in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free-energy limit. Evidently, most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than one cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches one, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is one, most active regions are compelled to explode.

  1. The Limit of Magnetic-Shear Energy in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2013-01-01

    It has been found previously, by measuring from active ]region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region fs magnetic field, (1) that there is a sharp upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region fs magnetic flux content, and (2) that most active regions are near this limit when their field explodes in a CME/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main ]sequence path bordering the free ]energy ]limit line in (flux content, free ]energy proxy) phase space. Here we present evidence that specifies the underlying magnetic condition that gives rise to the free ]energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find evidence that (1) in active regions at and near their free ]energy limit, the ratio of magnetic ]shear free energy to the non ]free magnetic energy the potential field would have is of order 1 in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free ]energy limit. Evidently, most active regions in which this core ]field energy ratio is much less than 1 cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches 1, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is 1, most active regions are compelled to explode.

  2. The Limit of Magnetic-Shear Energy in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2012-01-01

    It has been found previously, by measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region's magnetic field, (1) that there is a sharp upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region's magnetic flux content, and (2) that most active regions are near this limit when their field explodes in a coronal mass ejection/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy-limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, we present evidence that specifies the underlying magnetic condition that gives rise to the free-energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free-energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find evidence that (1) in active regions at and near their free-energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non-free magnetic energy the potential field would have is of the order of one in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free-energy limit. Evidently, most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than one cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches one, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is one, most active regions are compelled to explode.

  3. Limited Energy Study, Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP), Fort Knox, Kentucky; Executive Summaty

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-05

    Systems Corp surveyed and completed energy analyses for 37 buildings, and eight ballfields. The energy conservation opportunities ( ECOs ) evaluated...prepared using M-CACES. Life cycle cost analyses were performed using the Life cycle Cost in Design (LCCID) computer program. Project development

  4. Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP), FY93 Limited Energy Study, Milan Army Ammunition Plant, Milan, Tennessee.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-11-11

    alternative Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECO’s). To develop the field data into various alternative ECO concepts or models, we utilized an ’Excel...ECO’s were then analyzed for suitability for the Energy Conservation lnvestment Program (ECIP) using the govemmenrs software package called Life Cycle Cost in Design (LCCID).

  5. Role of Bremsstrahlung Radiation in Limiting the Energy of Runaway Electrons in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtiari, M.; Takechi, M.; Tamai, H.; Miura, Y.; Kusama, Y.; Kamada, Y.; Kramer, G.J.

    2005-06-03

    Bremsstrahlung radiation of runaway electrons is found to be an energy limit for runaway electrons in tokamaks. The minimum and maximum energy of runaway electron beams is shown to be limited by collisions and bremsstrahlung radiation, respectively. It is also found that a massive injection of a high-Z gas such as xenon can terminate a disruption-generated runaway current before the runaway electrons hit the walls.

  6. Limits on the Diffuse Flux of Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos from the RICE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J.; Allen, Chris; Bean, A.; Besson, David Z.; Box, D. J.; Buniy, R.; Drees, J.; Frichter, George M., IV; Kravchenko, Igor; McKay, D.; Meyers, J.; Miller, T.; Perry, L.; Piccirillo, L.; Ralston, John P.; Razzaque, S.; Schmitz, D. W.; Seckel, David; Seunarine, S.; Spiczak, G. M.

    2003-02-01

    Upper limits are presented on the diffuse flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos, based on analysis of data taken by the RICE experiment during August, 2000. The RICE receiver array at South Pole monitors cold ice for radio-wavelength Cherenkov radiation resulting from neutrino-induced in-ice showers. For energies above 1 EeV, RICE monitors over 25 km3 sr. We discuss limits based on both hadronic and electromagnetic showers.

  7. Limited energy study, Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP), Fort Knox, Kentucky. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    1993-11-05

    Systems Corp surveyed and completed energy analyses for 37 buildings, and eight ballfields. The energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) evaluated were ceiling reflectance, high efficiency indoor lighting, indoor lighting controls, and ballfield lighting and control systems. Cost estimates were prepared using M-CACES. Life cycle cost analyses were performed using the Life cycle Cost in Design (LCCID) computer program. Project development brochures (PDBs) and DD1391 forms were prepared for a Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP) project. The project that was developed represents $93,956 in annual savings with favorable simple paybacks and saving to investment ratios (SIRs).

  8. Systems and methods for controlling energy use during a demand limiting period

    DOEpatents

    Wenzel, Michael J.; Drees, Kirk H.

    2016-04-26

    Systems and methods for limiting power consumption by a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) subsystem of a building are shown and described. A feedback controller is used to generate a manipulated variable based on an energy use setpoint and a measured energy use. The manipulated variable may be used for adjusting the operation of an HVAC device.

  9. Energy Engineering Analysis Program, Limited Energy Study, Fort Hunter-Liggett, California; Volume 4 - programming documents

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Implement energy conservation retrofits in 44 buildings. (Current mission). This project will contribute toward achieving Department of Defense facility energy goals of a 20-percent reduction in energy use per gross square feet by FY2000 versus FY1985 baseline levels. This project will save $124,184 annually, resulting in a 5.9-year simple payback and a savings to investment ratio of 2.25. The annual energy savings is 2,188 MBTU of electricity, 3,277 MBTU of fuel oil and 4,242 MBTU of propane. All buildings and retrofit actions will be in active use throughout the amortization period. Unnecessary energy is currently being consumed for space heating and cooling systems, lighting systems, and generation of domestic hot water in facilities. If this project is not accomplished, an annual energy and operations and maintenance expense of $124,184 that could be avoided will be incurred. This project has been coordinated with the installation physical security plan, and no security improvements are required.

  10. HOLLOW CARBON ARC DISCHARGE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-10-11

    A device is described for producing an energetic, direct current, hollow, carbon-arc discharge in an evacuated container and within a strong magnetic field. Such discharges are particularly useful not only in dissociation and ionization of high energy molecular ion beams, but also in acting as a shield or barrier against the instreaming of lowenergy neutral particles into a plasma formed within the hollow discharge when it is used as a dissociating mechanism for forming the plasma. There is maintained a predetermined ratio of gas particles to carbon particles released from the arc electrodes during operation of the discharge. The carbon particles absorb some of the gas particles and are pumped along and by the discharge out of the device, with the result that smaller diffusion pumps are required than would otherwise be necessary to dispose of the excess gas.

  11. Measurement of the energy-spread contribution to information transfer limits in HR-TEM

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Tiemeijer, Peter C.; Sidorov, Maxim V.

    2002-02-18

    Sub-Angstrom TEM of materials at intermediate voltages requires a sub-Angstrom information limit for the microscope. With a Scherzer resolution of 1.7 Angstrom, but a sub-Angstrom information limit, the one-Angstrom microscope (OAM) project at the NCEM is able to generate resolution below 0.8 Angstrom. Microscope information limit comes from damping of transfer by the temporal coherence. A major term contributing to temporal coherence is energy spread in the electron beam. We derive a new expression for the energy spread, and show how it can be measured from the result that is obtained using a standard electron spectrometer.

  12. Quantitative food web analysis supports the energy-limitation hypothesis in cave stream ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Venarsky, Michael P; Huntsman, Brock M; Huryn, Alexander D; Benstead, Jonathan P; Kuhajda, Bernard R

    2014-11-01

    Energy limitation has long been the primary assumption underlying conceptual models of evolutionary and ecological processes in cave ecosystems. However, the prediction that cave communities are actually energy-limited in the sense that constituent populations are consuming all or most of their resource supply is untested. We assessed the energy-limitation hypothesis in three cave streams in northeastern Alabama (USA) by combining measurements of animal production, demand, and resource supplies (detritus, primarily decomposing wood particles). Comparisons of animal consumption and detritus supply rates in each cave showed that all, or nearly all, available detritus was required to support macroinvertebrate production. Furthermore, only a small amount of macroinvertebrate prey production remained to support other predatory taxa (i.e., cave fish and salamanders) after accounting for crayfish consumption. Placing the energy demands of a cave community within the context of resource supply rates provided quantitative support for the energy-limitation hypothesis, confirming the mechanism (limited energy surpluses) that likely influences the evolutionary processes and population dynamics that shape cave communities. Detritus-based surface ecosystems often have large detrital surpluses. Thus, cave ecosystems, which show minimal surpluses, occupy the extreme oligotrophic end of the spectrum of detritus-based food webs.

  13. Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP), limited energy study - lighting, Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-09-23

    Systems Corp surveyed and completed energy analyses for 95 representative buildings at Fort Campbell, categorized as Korean War Barracks, Airfield Buildings, and Blanchfield Hospital buildings B and C. The energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) evaluated were high efficiency interior and exterior lighting, and indoor lighting controls. Cost estimates were prepared using MeansData for Windows Spreadsheets, Version 2.Oa. Life cycle cost analyses were performed using the Life Cycle Cost in Design (LCCID) computer program. Project development brochures (PDBs) and DD1391 forms were prepared for four Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP) projects. The total of the four projects that were developed represent $385,283 in annual savings with a simple payback of 6.37 years and a saving to investment ratio (SIR) of 1.89.

  14. Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP), Limited Energy Study - Lighting, Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Executive Summary.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-23

    Buildings, and Blanchfield Hospital buildings B and C. The energy conservation opportunities ( ECOs ) evaluated were high efficiency interior and exterior...were performed using the Life Cycle Cost in Design (LCCID) computer program. Project development brochures (PDBs) and DD1391 forms were prepared for

  15. Limited Energy Study (GLASS), Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP), Fort Knox, Kentucky. Executive Summary.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-10-28

    and warehouse facilities. The energy conservation opportunities ( ECOs ) evaluated were infrared heat and window/wall insulation. Cost estimates were...prepared using MeansData for Windows Spreadsheets, Version 2.0a. Life cycle cost analyses were performed using the Life Cycle Cost in Design (LCCID

  16. Thermodynamic limits to the efficiency of solar energy conversion by quantum devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.; Byvik, C. E.; Smith, B. T.

    1981-01-01

    The second law of thermodynamics imposes a strict limitation to the energy converted from direct solar radiation to useful work by a quantum device. This limitation requires that the amount of energy converted to useful work (energy in any form other than heat) can be no greater than the change in free energy of the radiation fields. Futhermore, in any real energy conversion device, not all of this available free energy in the radiation field can be converted to work because of basic limitations inherent in the device itself. A thermodynamic analysis of solar energy conversion by a completely general prototypical quantum device is presented. This device is completely described by two parameters, its operating temperature T sub R and the energy threshold of its absorption spectrum. An expression for the maximum thermodynamic efficiency of a quantum solar converter was derived in terms of these two parameters and the incident radiation spectrum. Efficiency curves for assumed solar spectral irradiance corresponding to air mass zero and air mass 1.5 are presented.

  17. High-energy limit of collision-induced false vacuum decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, Sergei; Levkov, Dmitry

    2015-06-01

    We develop a consistent semiclassical description of field-theoretic collision-induced tunneling at arbitrary high collision energies. As a playground we consider a (1 + 1)-dimensional false vacuum decay initiated by a collision of N particles at energy E, paying special attention to the realistic case of N = 2 particles. We demonstrate that the cross section of this process is exponentially suppressed at all energies. Moreover, the respective suppressesion exponent F N ( E) exhibits a specific behavior which is significant for our semiclassical method and assumed to be general: it decreases with energy, reaches absolute minimum F = F min( N ) at a certain threshold energy E = E rt( N ), and stays constant at higher energies. We show that the minimal suppression F min( N ) and threshold energy can be evaluated using a special class of semiclassical solutions which describe exponentially suppressed transitions but nevertheless evolve in real time. Importantly, we argue that the cross section at energies above E rt( N ) is computed perturbatively in the background of the latter solutions, and the terms of this perturbative expansion stay bounded in the infinite-energy limit. Transitions in the high-energy regime proceed via emission of many soft quanta with total energy E rt; the energy excess E - E rt remains in the colliding particles till the end of the process.

  18. 75 FR 27330 - FPL Energy Maine Hydro LLC, Madison Paper Industries, and Merimil Limited Partnership; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission FPL Energy Maine Hydro LLC, Madison Paper Industries, and Merimil Limited... for Environmental Analysis, and Soliciting Comments, Recommendations, Preliminary Terms and Conditions... Maine Hydro LLC, Madison Paper Industries, and Merimil Limited Partnership. e. Name of Project: Brassua...

  19. Life under extreme energy limitation: a synthesis of laboratory- and field-based investigations.

    PubMed

    Lever, Mark A; Rogers, Karyn L; Lloyd, Karen G; Overmann, Jörg; Schink, Bernhard; Thauer, Rudolf K; Hoehler, Tori M; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-09-01

    The ability of microorganisms to withstand long periods with extremely low energy input has gained increasing scientific attention in recent years. Starvation experiments in the laboratory have shown that a phylogenetically wide range of microorganisms evolve fitness-enhancing genetic traits within weeks of incubation under low-energy stress. Studies on natural environments that are cut off from new energy supplies over geologic time scales, such as deeply buried sediments, suggest that similar adaptations might mediate survival under energy limitation in the environment. Yet, the extent to which laboratory-based evidence of starvation survival in pure or mixed cultures can be extrapolated to sustained microbial ecosystems in nature remains unclear. In this review, we discuss past investigations on microbial energy requirements and adaptations to energy limitation, identify gaps in our current knowledge, and outline possible future foci of research on life under extreme energy limitation. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Energy saving in WWTP: Daily benchmarking under uncertainty and data availability limitations.

    PubMed

    Torregrossa, D; Schutz, G; Cornelissen, A; Hernández-Sancho, F; Hansen, J

    2016-07-01

    Efficient management of Waste Water Treatment Plants (WWTPs) can produce significant environmental and economic benefits. Energy benchmarking can be used to compare WWTPs, identify targets and use these to improve their performance. Different authors have performed benchmark analysis on monthly or yearly basis but their approaches suffer from a time lag between an event, its detection, interpretation and potential actions. The availability of on-line measurement data on many WWTPs should theoretically enable the decrease of the management response time by daily benchmarking. Unfortunately this approach is often impossible because of limited data availability. This paper proposes a methodology to perform a daily benchmark analysis under database limitations. The methodology has been applied to the Energy Online System (EOS) developed in the framework of the project "INNERS" (INNovative Energy Recovery Strategies in the urban water cycle). EOS calculates a set of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for the evaluation of energy and process performances. In EOS, the energy KPIs take in consideration the pollutant load in order to enable the comparison between different plants. For example, EOS does not analyse the energy consumption but the energy consumption on pollutant load. This approach enables the comparison of performances for plants with different loads or for a single plant under different load conditions. The energy consumption is measured by on-line sensors, while the pollutant load is measured in the laboratory approximately every 14 days. Consequently, the unavailability of the water quality parameters is the limiting factor in calculating energy KPIs. In this paper, in order to overcome this limitation, the authors have developed a methodology to estimate the required parameters and manage the uncertainty in the estimation. By coupling the parameter estimation with an interval based benchmark approach, the authors propose an effective, fast and reproducible

  1. Gliding arc triggered microwave plasma arc at atmospheric pressure for coal gasification application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Vishal; Visani, A.; Patil, C.; Patel, B. K.; Sharma, P. K.; John, P. I.; Nema, S. K.

    2014-08-01

    Plasma torch is device that efficiently converts electrical energy in to thermal energy for various high temperature applications. The conventional plasma torch comprises of consumable electrodes namely anode and cathode electrodes. The replacement of these electrodes is a complex process owing to its cooling and process shut down requirements. However, microwave plasma arc is electrode-less plasma arc system that is an alternative method to conventional arc technology for generating plasma arc. In this technique, microwave power is efficiently coupled to generate plasma arc by using the property of polar molecule to absorb microwave power. The absorption of microwave power is in form of losses due to intermolecular friction and high collisions between the molecules. This is an efficient method because all microwave power can be absorbed by plasma arc. The main feature of microwave plasma arc is its large uniform high temperature column which is not possible with conventional arc discharge methods. Such type of plasma discharge is very useful in applications where sufficient residence time for treat materials is required. Microwave arc does not require any consumable electrodes and hence, it can be operated continuously that makes it very useful for hazardous effluent treatment applications. Further, microwave cannot ionize neutral particles at atmospheric pressure and hence, a gliding arc is initiated between two thin electrodes in the cavity by applying very low power high voltage (3kV) AC source. In this report, the method for generating microwave arc of 1kW power using commercial microwave oven is elaborated.

  2. A General Design Framework for MIMO Wireless Energy Transfer With Limited Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jie; Zhang, Rui

    2016-05-01

    Multi-antenna or multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) technique can significantly improve the efficiency of radio frequency (RF) signal enabled wireless energy transfer (WET). To fully exploit the energy beamforming gain at the energy transmitter (ET), the knowledge of channel state information (CSI) is essential, which, however, is difficult to be obtained in practice due to the hardware limitation of the energy receiver (ER). To overcome this difficulty, under a point-to-point MIMO WET setup, this paper proposes a general design framework for a new type of channel learning method based on the ER's energy measurement and feedback. Specifically, the ER measures and encodes the harvested energy levels over different training intervals into bits, and sends them to the ET via a feedback link of limited rate. Based on the energy-level feedback, the ET adjusts transmit beamforming in subsequent training intervals and obtains refined estimates of the MIMO channel by leveraging the technique of analytic center cutting plane method (ACCPM) in convex optimization. Under this general design framework, we further propose two specific feedback schemes termed energy quantization and energy comparison, where the feedback bits at each interval are generated at the ER by quantizing the measured energy level at the current interval and comparing it with those in the previous intervals, respectively. Numerical results are provided to compare the performance of the two feedback schemes. It is shown that energy quantization performs better when the number of feedback bits per interval is large, while energy comparison is more effective with small number of feedback bits.

  3. Weld arc simulator

    DOEpatents

    Burr, Melvin J.

    1990-01-30

    An arc voltage simulator for an arc welder permits the welder response to a variation in arc voltage to be standardized. The simulator uses a linear potentiometer connected to the electrode to provide a simulated arc voltage at the electrode that changes as a function of electrode position.

  4. Weld arc simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, M.J.

    1989-03-01

    An arc voltage simulator for an arc welder permits the welder response to a variation in arc voltage to be standardized. The simulator uses a linear potentiometer connected to the electrode to provide a simulated arc voltage at the electrode that changes as a function of electrode position.

  5. Weld arc simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, M.J.

    1990-01-30

    This patent describes an arc voltage simulator for an arc welder which permits the welder response to a variation in arc voltage to be standardized. The simulator uses a linear potentiometer connected to the electrode to provide a simulated arc voltage at the electrode that changes as a function of electrode position.

  6. Constraining heavy decaying dark matter with the high energy gamma-ray limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashev, O. E.; Kuznetsov, M. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    We consider decaying dark matter with masses 1 07≲M ≲1 016 GeV as a source of ultrahigh energy (UHE) gamma rays. Using recent limits on UHE gamma-ray flux for energies Eγ>2 ×1 014 eV , provided by extensive air shower observatories, we put limits on masses and lifetimes of the dark matter. We also discuss possible dark matter decay origin of tentative 100 PeV photon flux detected with the EAS-MSU experiment.

  7. NEW LIMITS ON EARLY DARK ENERGY FROM THE SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Reichardt, C. L.; De Putter, R.; Zahn, O.; Hou, Z.

    2012-04-10

    We present new limits on early dark energy (EDE) from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite on large angular scales and South Pole Telescope on small angular scales. We find a strong upper limit on the EDE density of {Omega}{sub e} < 0.018 at 95% confidence, a factor of three improvement over WMAP data alone. We show that adding lower-redshift probes of the expansion rate to the CMB data improves constraints on the dark energy equation of state, but not the EDE density. We also explain how small-scale CMB temperature anisotropy constrains EDE.

  8. Limits on the ultra-high energy electron neutrino flux from the RICE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, I.; Frichter, G. M.; Miller, T.; Piccirillo, L.; Seckel, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Adams, J.; Seunarine, S.; Allen, C.; Bean, A.; Besson, D.; Box, D. J.; Buniy, R.; Drees, J.; McKay, D.; Meyers, J.; Perry, L.; Ralston, J.; Razzaque, S.; Schmitz, D. W.

    2003-11-01

    Upper limits are presented on the diffuse flux of ultra-high energy νe, based on analysis of data taken by the RICE experiment during August, 2000. The RICE receiver array at South Pole monitors cold ice for radio-wavelength Cherenkov radiation resulting from neutrino induced in-ice showers. For energies above 1 EeV, RICE is an effective detector of over 15 km 3 sr. Potential signal events are separated from backgrounds using vertex location, event reconstruction, and signal shape. These are the first terrestrial limits exploiting the physics of radio-Cherenkov emissions from charged current νe+ N→e+ N' interactions.

  9. Robust upper limit of the neutron i13/2 single-particle energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Y.; Jiang, H.

    2014-10-01

    The upper limit of the neutron i13/2 single-particle energy (ɛi13/2) is estimated in the random quasiparticle ensemble with single-particle energies. The ɛi13/2 distributions under constraints from Te134,135 and Xe136,137 spectra demonstrate that the i13/2 single-particle state can be physically mixed with the f7/2⊗3- configuration only if ɛi13/2<3 MeV. Thus, our ensemble calculation suggests a robust upper limit of 3 MeV.

  10. High energy runaway electron transport deduced from photonuclear activation of the PLT limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Stavely, J.M. Jr.; Strachan, J.D.

    1981-07-01

    In large tokamaks, runaway electrons may be accelerated up to energies over 20 MeV by the toroidal electric field. When these particles leave the plasma, they impact the material limiters and emit bremsstrahlung hard x-rays. This bremsstrahlung may cause photonuclear reactions in the limiter, leaving radioisotopes behind. Both the amount of activation and its spatial distribution on the limiter provide information on the confinement of high energy electrons. The stainless steel poloidal ring limiter from the Princeton Large Torus has been analyzed and six observable photonuclear reactions with energy thresholds have been found for the reactions varying from 8 to 23 MeV. The amount of activation from each reaction determines the average number of runaway electrons above each activation threshold energy. The inferred runaway electron population decreases exponentially with energy as exp (-E/3.2 MeV) implying an energetic runaway electron confinement time of 50 to 80 msec. The poloidal variation of the activation can be described by a 0.02 cm scrape-off layer step size which implies about a 90 msec confinement time.

  11. The high-energy neutrino background - Limitations on models of deuterium production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichler, D.

    1979-01-01

    It is pointed out that Epstein's (1977) model for deuterium production via high-energy spallation reactions produces high-energy neutrinos in sufficient quantity to stand out above those that are produced by cosmic-ray interactions in earth's atmosphere. That the Reines experiment detected neutrinos of atmospheric origin without detecting any cosmic component restricts deuterium production by spallation reactions to very high redshifts (z at least about 300). Improved neutrino experiments may be able to push these limits back to recombination.

  12. 76 FR 76153 - Allco Renewable Energy Limited v. Massachusetts Electric Company d/b/a National Grid; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Allco Renewable Energy Limited v. Massachusetts Electric Company d/b/a... Renewable Energy Limited filed a formal complaint against Massachusetts Electric Company (National Grid...

  13. Dilution in single pass arc welds

    SciTech Connect

    DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1996-06-01

    A study was conducted on dilution of single pass arc welds of type 308 stainless steel filler metal deposited onto A36 carbon steel by the plasma arc welding (PAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), gas metal arc welding (GMAW), and submerged arc welding (SAW) processes. Knowledge of the arc and melting efficiency was used in a simple energy balance to develop an expression for dilution as a function of welding variables and thermophysical properties of the filler metal and substrate. Comparison of calculated and experimentally determined dilution values shows the approach provides reasonable predictions of dilution when the melting efficiency can be accurately predicted. The conditions under which such accuracy is obtained are discussed. A diagram is developed from the dilution equation which readily reveals the effect of processing parameters on dilution to aid in parameter optimization.

  14. Three-dimensional modeling of the plasma arc in arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Hu, J.; Tsai, H. L.

    2008-11-01

    Most previous three-dimensional modeling on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) focuses on the weld pool dynamics and assumes the two-dimensional axisymmetric Gaussian distributions for plasma arc pressure and heat flux. In this article, a three-dimensional plasma arc model is developed, and the distributions of velocity, pressure, temperature, current density, and magnetic field of the plasma arc are calculated by solving the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy, as well as part of the Maxwell's equations. This three-dimensional model can be used to study the nonaxisymmetric plasma arc caused by external perturbations such as an external magnetic field. It also provides more accurate boundary conditions when modeling the weld pool dynamics. The present work lays a foundation for true three-dimensional comprehensive modeling of GTAW and GMAW including the plasma arc, weld pool, and/or electrode.

  15. Three-dimensional modeling of the plasma arc in arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, G.; Tsai, H. L.; Hu, J.

    2008-11-15

    Most previous three-dimensional modeling on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) focuses on the weld pool dynamics and assumes the two-dimensional axisymmetric Gaussian distributions for plasma arc pressure and heat flux. In this article, a three-dimensional plasma arc model is developed, and the distributions of velocity, pressure, temperature, current density, and magnetic field of the plasma arc are calculated by solving the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy, as well as part of the Maxwell's equations. This three-dimensional model can be used to study the nonaxisymmetric plasma arc caused by external perturbations such as an external magnetic field. It also provides more accurate boundary conditions when modeling the weld pool dynamics. The present work lays a foundation for true three-dimensional comprehensive modeling of GTAW and GMAW including the plasma arc, weld pool, and/or electrode.

  16. Review of switching arcs and plasma chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benenson, D. M.; Gilmour, A. S., Jr.; Dollinger, R. E.; Nagamatsu, H. T.; Pfender, E.; Warder, R. C., Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Physical processes in switching arcs are considered in such applications as circuit interruption (in high pressure, high voltage gas blast circuit breakers and vacuum arc interrupters), fault current limiting (principally through vacuum arc devices), and pulse power systems (using vacuum arcs). The physics of arc heaters, associated with processes in the anode region, are described. Analytical models of (1) the current zero region and interrupter performance of gas blast interrupters and (2) the heat transfer mechanisms in the anode region of arc heaters, are discussed. Selected diagnostic techniques are presented. Applications of plasma chemistry involving the high pressure, equilibrium (thermal) plasma are noted. Low pressure (nonequilibrium) plasma processing is described through mechanisms associated with coating, deposition, and etching applications.

  17. Cold plasma boundaries and auroral arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcilwain, C. E.

    1981-01-01

    Auroral arcs often extend for more than a thousand kilometers with little deviation of their relative position within the auroral oval. At high altitudes, the outer limits of the plasmasphere are usually marked by sharp decreases in the cold plasma densities. It is suggested that some auroral arcs follow the ionospheric trace of these boundary shells.

  18. SU-E-T-493: Influence of Filtered and Flatting Filter Free Photon Beam of 10 Megavolts Energy On Rapid Arc Radiotherapy Planning for Cervix Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Girigesh, Y; Kumar, L; Raman, K; Mishra, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Aim of this study is to determine the dosimetric influence of Filtered and Flatting Filter Free Photon Beam of 10 MV energy on RA planning for Ca. Cervix. Methods: CT data sets of eleven patients reported with carcinoma cervix were used for RA planning for 10MV -FFB and 10MV-FFFB. RA plans were generated using two full arcs.All RA plans were generated to deliver a dose of 50.4Gy in 28 fractions for PTV and ALARA for OAR’s. All plans were analysed for PTV Coverage, conformity Index, homogeneity index, dose to OAR’s, integral dose to normal tissue and total monitor units were studied. Results: DVH was used to evaluate RA plans for both 10MV-FFB and 10MV-FFFB photon beam. Planning results show a comparable PTV coverage for both energies. Results shows volume of PTV receiving prescription dose were 95.10+ 0.09% and 95.09 +0.11%, and volume of PTV receiving a dose of 107% is 0.45+0.96% and 5.25+8.9%, homogeneity index (HI) were 1.051+0.007 and 1.066+0.008, Conformity Index(CI) were 1.003+0.019 and 1.012+0.013, Mean Integral dose were 2.65+0.34 and 2.60+0.33(*10−5Gy.cm3) for 10MV-FFB and 10MV-FFFB respectively. 10MV-FB shows statistically significant (p<0.05) improvement in mean doses to bladder, rectum, bowel and mean total number of MU’s and also shows remarkable decrease in mean total no. of MU’s by 43.7% in comparison to 10MV-FFFB. There is statistically significant (p<0.05) difference found in CI and HI for 10MV-FB in comparison to 10MV -FFF beam. 10MV-FFFB shows statistically significant (p<0.05) for mean NTID and delivers 1.65 % less NTID in comparison to 10 MV- FB. Conclusion: 10MV-FB is superior to 10MV-FFFB for rapid arc planning in case of Cervix carcinomas, it offers better target coverage and OAR’s sparing, comparable mean Integral dose to normal tissues and 10 MV- FB also produced highly conformal and homogeneous dose distribution in comparison to 10MV-FFFB.

  19. Analysis of Arc Characteristics and Flow Field in Arc Chamber of High-Voltage SF6 Auto-Expansion Circuit Breaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junmin; Chen, Zhang

    2008-10-01

    A new magnetic hydro-dynamics model for nozzle arc emphasizing the interaction of arc with PTFE (polytetrafluorethylene) vapour is established based on the conservation equations. The interruption of auto-expansion circuit breaker is simulated numerically by finite element method and the influence of PTFE vapour on the arc is analysed with this model. The results reveal that the flow field inside the arc chamber is determined by the arc current, the arcing time, the nozzle arc and the clogging of its thermal boundary. The establishment of quenching pressure relies on both SF6 gas and PTFE vapour that absorbed arc energy in the nozzle. The PTFE vapour leads to an increase in the pressure of nozzle arc obviously, and a decrease in the temperature of arc. But it enhances the temperature of arc at zero current and slows down the decreasing rate of arc temperature as the current decreases.

  20. Estimation of the electron beam energy spread for TEM information limit

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Tiemeijer, Peter C.; Sidorov, Maxim V.

    2002-02-20

    Sub-Angstrom TEM of materials requires focal-series reconstruction (FSR) or electron holography to retrieve the electron wave at the specimen exit-surface to very high resolution. As a consequence, we need to measure the microscope information limit. With a sub-Angstrom information limit, the one-Angstrom microscope (OAM) project at the NCEM has achieved sub-Angstrom resolution by FSR. We present a new method of estimating the information limit of the microscope, based on energy-spread measurements with an image filter.

  1. Limited-angle multi-energy CT using joint clustering prior and sparsity regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huayu; Xing, Yuxiang

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we present an easy-to-implement Multi-energy CT scanning strategy and a corresponding reconstruction method, which facilitate spectral CT imaging by improving the data efficiency the number-of-energy- channel fold without introducing visible limited-angle artifacts caused by reducing projection views. Leveraging the structure coherence at different energies, we first pre-reconstruct a prior structure information image using projection data from all energy channels. Then, we perform a k-means clustering on the prior image to generate a sparse dictionary representation for the image, which severs as a structure information constraint. We com- bine this constraint with conventional compressed sensing method and proposed a new model which we referred as Joint Clustering Prior and Sparsity Regularization (CPSR). CPSR is a convex problem and we solve it by Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers (ADMM). We verify our CPSR reconstruction method with a numerical simulation experiment. A dental phantom with complicate structures of teeth and soft tissues is used. X-ray beams from three spectra of different peak energies (120kVp, 90kVp, 60kVp) irradiate the phantom to form tri-energy projections. Projection data covering only 75◦ from each energy spectrum are collected for reconstruction. Independent reconstruction for each energy will cause severe limited-angle artifacts even with the help of compressed sensing approaches. Our CPSR provides us with images free of the limited-angle artifact. All edge details are well preserved in our experimental study.

  2. 77 FR 22568 - Madison Paper Industries, FPL Energy Maine Hydro, LLC, Merimil Limited Partnership; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... Partnership; Notice of Authorization for Continued Project Operation On March 29, 2007, the Madison Paper Industries, FPL Energy Maine Hydro, LLC, and Merimil Limited Partnership, licensees for the Brassua... Partnership are authorized to continue operation of the Brassua Hydroelectric Project, until such time as...

  3. A limit on the energy transfer rate from the human fat store in hypophagia.

    PubMed

    Alpert, Seymour S

    2005-03-07

    A limit on the maximum energy transfer rate from the human fat store in hypophagia is deduced from experimental data of underfed subjects maintaining moderate activity levels and is found to have a value of (290+/-25) kJ/kgd. A dietary restriction which exceeds the limited capability of the fat store to compensate for the energy deficiency results in an immediate decrease in the fat free mass (FFM). In cases of a less severe dietary deficiency, the FFM will not be depleted. The transition between these two dietary regions is developed and a criterion to distinguish the regions is defined. An exact mathematical solution for the decrease of the FFM is derived for the case where the fat mass (FM) is in its limited energy transfer mode. The solution shows a steady-state term which is in agreement with conventional ideas, a term indicating a slow decrease of much of the FFM moderated by the limited energy transferred from the fat store, and a final term showing an unprotected rapid decrease of the remaining part of the FFM. The average resting metabolic rate of subjects undergoing hypophagia is shown to decrease linearly as a function of the FFM with a slope of (249+/-25) kJ/kgd. This value disagrees with the results of other observers who have measured metabolic rates of diverse groups. The disagreement is explained in terms of individual metabolic properties as opposed to those of the larger population.

  4. Energy-limited escape revised. The transition from strong planetary winds to stable thermospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salz, M.; Schneider, P. C.; Czesla, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Gas planets in close proximity to their host stars experience photoevaporative mass loss. The energy-limited escape concept is generally used to derive estimates for the planetary mass-loss rates. Our photoionization hydrodynamics simulations of the thermospheres of hot gas planets show that the energy-limited escape concept is valid only for planets with a gravitational potential lower than log 10(-ΦG)< 13.11 erg g-1 because in these planets the radiative energy input is efficiently used to drive the planetary wind. Massive and compact planets with log 10(-ΦG) ≳ 13.6 erg g-1 exhibit more tightly bound atmospheres in which the complete radiative energy input is re-emitted through hydrogen Lyα and free-free emission. These planets therefore host hydrodynamically stable thermospheres. Between these two extremes the strength of the planetary winds rapidly declines as a result of a decreasing heating efficiency. Small planets undergo enhanced evaporation because they host expanded atmospheres that expose a larger surface to the stellar irradiation. We present scaling laws for the heating efficiency and the expansion radius that depend on the gravitational potential and irradiation level of the planet. The resulting revised energy-limited escape concept can be used to derive estimates for the mass-loss rates of super-Earth-sized planets as well as massive hot Jupiters with hydrogen-dominated atmospheres.

  5. Upper limit on the diffuse flux of ultrahigh energy tau neutrinos from the Pierre Auger Observatory.

    PubMed

    Abraham, J; Abreu, P; Aglietta, M; Aguirre, C; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Allison, P; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Anzalone, A; Aramo, C; Argirò, S; Arisaka, K; Armengaud, E; Arneodo, F; Arqueros, F; Asch, T; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Atulugama, B S; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avila, G; Bäcker, T; Badagnani, D; Barbosa, A F; Barnhill, D; Barroso, S L C; Bauleo, P; Beatty, J J; Beau, T; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellido, J A; BenZvi, S; Berat, C; Bergmann, T; Bernardini, P; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanch-Bigas, O; Blanco, F; Blasi, P; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Bohácová, M; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Boratav, M; Brack, J; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Burton, R E; Busca, N G; Caballero-Mora, K S; Cai, B; Camin, D V; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Carvalho, W; Castellina, A; Catalano, O; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chou, A; Chye, J; Clark, P D J; Clay, R W; Colombo, E; Conceição, R; Connolly, B; Contreras, F; Coppens, J; Cordier, A; Cotti, U; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Criss, A; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Donato, C; de Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; de Mello Junior, W J M; de Mello Neto, J R T; DeMitri, I; de Souza, V; del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Della Selva, A; Delle Fratte, C; Dembinski, H; Di Giulio, C; Diaz, J C; Dobrigkeit, C; D'Olivo, J C; Dornic, D; Dorofeev, A; dos Anjos, J C; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Dutan, I; DuVernois, M A; Engel, R; Epele, L; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Etchegoyen, A; Facal San Luis, P; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferrer, F; Ferry, S; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipcic, A; Fleck, I; Fonte, R; Fracchiolla, C E; Fulgione, W; García, B; García Gámez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garrido, X; Geenen, H; Gelmini, G; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giller, M; Glass, H; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Gomez Albarracin, F; Gómez Berisso, M; Gómez Herrero, R; Gonçalves, P; Gonçalves do Amaral, M; Gonzalez, D; Gonzalez, J G; González, M; Góra, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Grassi, V; Grillo, A F; Grunfeld, C; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Gutiérrez, J; Hague, J D; Hamilton, J C; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Hauschildt, T; Healy, M D; Hebbeker, T; Hebrero, G; Heck, D; Hojvat, C; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Hörandel, J; Horneffer, A; Horvat, M; Hrabovský, M; Huege, T; Hussain, M; Iarlori, M; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Kaducak, M; Kampert, K H; Karova, T; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapik, R; Knapp, J; Koang, D-H; Krieger, A; Krömer, O; Kuempel, D; Kunka, N; Kusenko, A; La Rosa, G; Lachaud, C; Lago, B L; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; Lee, J; Leigui de Oliveira, M A; Letessier-Selvon, A; Leuthold, M; Lhenry-Yvon, I; López, R; Lopez Agüera, A; Lozano Bahilo, J; Luna García, R; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Mancarella, G; Manceñido, M E; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Maris, I C; Marquez Falcon, H R; Martello, D; Martínez, J; Martínez Bravo, O; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; McCauley, T; McEwen, M; McNeil, R R; Medina, M C; Medina-Tanco, G; Meli, A; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menschikov, A; Meurer, Chr; Meyhandan, R; Micheletti, M I; Miele, G; Miller, W; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Monnier Ragaigne, D; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, J C; Morris, C; Mostafá, M; Muller, M A; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navarro, J L; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Newman-Holmes, C; Newton, D; Nguyen Thi, T; Nierstenhoefer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Nozka, L; Oehlschläger, J; Ohnuki, T; Olinto, A; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Ortolani, F; Ostapchenko, S; Otero, L; Pacheco, N; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parlati, S; Pastor, S; Patel, M; Paul, T; Pavlidou, V; Payet, K; Pech, M; Pekala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrov, Y; Pham Ngoc, Diep; Pham Ngoc, Dong; Pham Thi, T N; Pichel, A; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pimenta, M; Pinto, T; Pirronello, V; Pisanti, O; Platino, M; Pochon, J; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Rautenberg, J; Redondo, A; Reucroft, S; Revenu, B; Rezende, F A S; Ridky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Rivière, C; Rizi, V; Roberts, M; Robledo, C; Rodriguez, G; Rodríguez Frías, D; Rodriguez Martino, J; Rodriguez Rojo, J; Rodriguez-Cabo, I; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Roth, M; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santander, M; Santo, C E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, F; Schmidt, T; Scholten, O; Schovánek, P; Schüssler, F; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Segreto, A; Semikoz, D; Settimo, M; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Siffert, B B; Sigl, G; Smetniansky De Grande, N; Smiałkowski, A; Smída, R; Smith, A G K; Smith, B E; Snow, G R; Sokolsky, P; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Spinka, H; Squartini, R; Strazzeri, E; Stutz, A; Suarez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Sutherland, M S; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Takahashi, J; Tamashiro, A; Tamburro, A; Taşcău, O; Tcaciuc, R; Thomas, D; Ticona, R; Tiffenberg, J; Timmermans, C; Tkaczyk, W; Todero Peixoto, C J; Tomé, B; Tonachini, A; Torres, I; Torresi, D; Travnicek, P; Tripathi, A; Tristram, G; Tscherniakhovski, D; Tueros, M; Tunnicliffe, V; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Valdés Galicia, J F; Valiño, I; Valore, L; van den Berg, A M; van Elewyck, V; Vázquez, R A; Veberic, D; Veiga, A; Velarde, A; Venters, T; Verzi, V; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vorobiov, S; Voyvodic, L; Wahlberg, H; Wainberg, O; Walker, P; Warner, D; Watson, A A; Westerhoff, S; Wieczorek, G; Wiencke, L; Wilczyńska, B; Wilczyński, H; Wileman, C; Winnick, M G; Wu, H; Wundheiler, B; Yamamoto, T; Younk, P; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zech, A; Zepeda, A; Ziolkowski, M

    2008-05-30

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory is sensitive to Earth-skimming tau neutrinos that interact in Earth's crust. Tau leptons from nu(tau) charged-current interactions can emerge and decay in the atmosphere to produce a nearly horizontal shower with a significant electromagnetic component. The data collected between 1 January 2004 and 31 August 2007 are used to place an upper limit on the diffuse flux of nu(tau) at EeV energies. Assuming an E(nu)(-2) differential energy spectrum the limit set at 90% C.L. is E(nu)(2)dN(nu)(tau)/dE(nu)<1.3 x 10(-7) GeV cm(-2) s(-1) sr(-1) in the energy range 2 x 10(17) eV< E(nu)< 2 x 10(19) eV.

  6. On the crossing of electronic energy levels of diatomic molecules at the large-D limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Qicun; Kais, Sabre; Remacle, Françoise; Levine, R. D.

    2001-06-01

    Analytical and numerical results are presented for the intersection of electronic energies of the same space symmetry for electrons in the field of two Coulomb centers in D-dimensions. We discuss why such crossings are allowed and may be less "exceptional" than one could think because even for a diatomic molecule there is more than one parameter in the electronic Hamiltonian. For a one electron diatomic molecule at the large-D limit, the electronic energies are shown analytically to diverge quadratically from the point of their intersection. The one electron two Coulomb centers problem allows a separation of variables even when the charges on the two centers are not equal. The case of two electrons, where their Coulombic repulsion precludes an exact symmetry, is therefore treated in the large-D limit. It is then found that, in addition to the quadratic intersection, there is also a curve crossing where the energies diverge linearly.

  7. Upper Limit on the Diffuse Flux of Ultrahigh Energy Tau Neutrinos from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Argirò, S.; Arisaka, K.; Armengaud, E.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Atulugama, B. S.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barnhill, D.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blasi, P.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Boratav, M.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Cai, B.; Camin, D. V.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Carvalho, W.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chye, J.; Clark, P. D. J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceição, R.; Connolly, B.; Contreras, F.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Demitri, I.; de Souza, V.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dornic, D.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Duvernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Epele, L.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrer, F.; Ferry, S.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fonte, R.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fulgione, W.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Geenen, H.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Herrero, R.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonçalves Do Amaral, M.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, M.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grassi, V.; Grillo, A. F.; Grunfeld, C.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutiérrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Hamilton, J. C.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hauschildt, T.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebrero, G.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J.; Horneffer, A.; Horvat, M.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Luna García, R.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mancarella, G.; Manceñido, M. E.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Martello, D.; Martínez, J.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McCauley, T.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina, M. C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meli, A.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menschikov, A.; Meurer, Chr.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Nguyen Thi, T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ohnuki, T.; Olinto, A.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Ortolani, F.; Ostapchenko, S.; Otero, L.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Pastor, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pękala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrov, Y.; Pham Ngoc, Diep; Pham Ngoc, Dong; Pham Thi, T. N.; Pichel, A.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pinto, T.; Pirronello, V.; Pisanti, O.; Platino, M.; Pochon, J.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Redondo, A.; Reucroft, S.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, M.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodríguez Frías, D.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schovánek, P.; Schüssler, F.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Smetniansky de Grande, N.; Smiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Smith, A. G. K.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sokolsky, P.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Takahashi, J.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torres, I.; Torresi, D.; Travnicek, P.; Tripathi, A.; Tristram, G.; Tscherniakhovski, D.; Tueros, M.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Elewyck, V.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Veiga, A.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walker, P.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zech, A.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2008-05-01

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory is sensitive to Earth-skimming tau neutrinos that interact in Earth’s crust. Tau leptons from ντ charged-current interactions can emerge and decay in the atmosphere to produce a nearly horizontal shower with a significant electromagnetic component. The data collected between 1 January 2004 and 31 August 2007 are used to place an upper limit on the diffuse flux of ντ at EeV energies. Assuming an Eν-2 differential energy spectrum the limit set at 90% C.L. is Eν2dNντ/dEν<1.3×10-7GeVcm-2s-1sr-1 in the energy range 2×1017eV

  8. Metal vapor arc ion plating

    DOEpatents

    Bertram, L.A.; Fisher, R.W.; Mattox, D.M.; Zanner, F.J.

    1986-09-09

    A method and apparatus for ion plating are described. The apparatus uses more negative than a first electrode voltage in a vacuum arc remelt system to attract low energy ions from the anode electrode to the article to be plated. 2 figs.

  9. Limiting Energy Dissipation Induces Glassy Kinetics in Single-Cell High-Precision Responses.

    PubMed

    Das, Jayajit

    2016-03-08

    Single cells often generate precise responses by involving dissipative out-of-thermodynamic-equilibrium processes in signaling networks. The available free energy to fuel these processes could become limited depending on the metabolic state of an individual cell. How does limiting dissipation affect the kinetics of high-precision responses in single cells? I address this question in the context of a kinetic proofreading scheme used in a simple model of early-time T cell signaling. Using exact analytical calculations and numerical simulations, I show that limiting dissipation qualitatively changes the kinetics in single cells marked by emergence of slow kinetics, large cell-to-cell variations of copy numbers, temporally correlated stochastic events (dynamic facilitation), and ergodicity breaking. Thus, constraints in energy dissipation, in addition to negatively affecting ligand discrimination in T cells, can create a fundamental difficulty in determining single-cell kinetics from cell-population results. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Limiting Energy Dissipation Induces Glassy Kinetics in Single-Cell High-Precision Responses

    PubMed Central

    Das, Jayajit

    2016-01-01

    Single cells often generate precise responses by involving dissipative out-of-thermodynamic-equilibrium processes in signaling networks. The available free energy to fuel these processes could become limited depending on the metabolic state of an individual cell. How does limiting dissipation affect the kinetics of high-precision responses in single cells? I address this question in the context of a kinetic proofreading scheme used in a simple model of early-time T cell signaling. Using exact analytical calculations and numerical simulations, I show that limiting dissipation qualitatively changes the kinetics in single cells marked by emergence of slow kinetics, large cell-to-cell variations of copy numbers, temporally correlated stochastic events (dynamic facilitation), and ergodicity breaking. Thus, constraints in energy dissipation, in addition to negatively affecting ligand discrimination in T cells, can create a fundamental difficulty in determining single-cell kinetics from cell-population results. PMID:26958894

  11. Study of the large reduced density gradient limit for the exchange energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazquez, Jose; Carmona-Espindola, Javier; Vela, Alberto; Trickey, Sam

    The generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for the Kohn-Sham exchange-correlation functional has become widely used in electronic structure calculations of small, medium and large systems, because it provides rather reasonable results with moderate computational effort. Usually the GGA for exchange (X) is expressed in terms of an analytical expression of the X enhancement function, Fx(s), where s is the reduced density gradient. When a non-empirical approach based on constraint satisfaction is followed, the analytical expression of Fx(s) is the result of interpolating between the small- and large-s limits. However, neither of those limits is uniquely defined. In both cases there are several possibilities. The present work is a study of the influence of the several large-s limit possibilities upon the calculation of properties that depend on energy differences, versus those that depend on response functions, and excitation energies.

  12. Exciton size and binding energy limitations in one-dimensional organic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kraner, S. Koerner, C.; Leo, K.; Scholz, R.; Plasser, F.

    2015-12-28

    In current organic photovoltaic devices, the loss in energy caused by the charge transfer step necessary for exciton dissociation leads to a low open circuit voltage, being one of the main reasons for rather low power conversion efficiencies. A possible approach to avoid these losses is to tune the exciton binding energy to a value of the order of thermal energy, which would lead to free charges upon absorption of a photon, and therefore increase the power conversion efficiency towards the Shockley-Queisser limit. We determine the size of the excitons for different organic molecules and polymers by time dependent density functional theory calculations. For optically relevant transitions, the exciton size saturates around 0.7 nm for one-dimensional molecules with a size longer than about 4 nm. For the ladder-type polymer poly(benzimidazobenzophenanthroline), we obtain an exciton binding energy of about 0.3 eV, serving as a lower limit of the exciton binding energy for the organic materials investigated. Furthermore, we show that charge transfer transitions increase the exciton size and thus identify possible routes towards a further decrease of the exciton binding energy.

  13. Exciton size and binding energy limitations in one-dimensional organic materials.

    PubMed

    Kraner, S; Scholz, R; Plasser, F; Koerner, C; Leo, K

    2015-12-28

    In current organic photovoltaic devices, the loss in energy caused by the charge transfer step necessary for exciton dissociation leads to a low open circuit voltage, being one of the main reasons for rather low power conversion efficiencies. A possible approach to avoid these losses is to tune the exciton binding energy to a value of the order of thermal energy, which would lead to free charges upon absorption of a photon, and therefore increase the power conversion efficiency towards the Shockley-Queisser limit. We determine the size of the excitons for different organic molecules and polymers by time dependent density functional theory calculations. For optically relevant transitions, the exciton size saturates around 0.7 nm for one-dimensional molecules with a size longer than about 4 nm. For the ladder-type polymer poly(benzimidazobenzophenanthroline), we obtain an exciton binding energy of about 0.3 eV, serving as a lower limit of the exciton binding energy for the organic materials investigated. Furthermore, we show that charge transfer transitions increase the exciton size and thus identify possible routes towards a further decrease of the exciton binding energy.

  14. Evaluation of select heat and pressure measurement gauges for potential use in the NRC/OECD High Energy Arc Fault (HEAF) test program.

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Carlos; Wente, William Baker; Figueroa, Victor G.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to improve the current state of the art in fire probabilistic risk assessment methodology, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Regulatory Research, contracted Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to conduct a series of scoping tests to identify thermal and mechanical probes that could be used to characterize the zone of influence (ZOI) during high energy arc fault (HEAF) testing. For the thermal evaluation, passive and active probes were exposed to HEAF-like heat fluxes for a period of 2 seconds at the SNLs National Solar Thermal Test Facility to determine their ability to survive and measure such an extreme environment. Thermal probes tested included temperature lacquers (passive), NANMAC thermocouples, directional flame thermometers, modified plate thermometers, infrared temperature sensors, and a Gardon heat flux gauge. Similarly, passive and active pressure probes were evaluated by exposing them to pressures resulting from various high-explosive detonations at the Sandia Terminal Ballistic Facility. Pressure probes included bikini pressure gauges (passive) and pressure transducers. Results from these tests provided good insight to determine which probes should be considered for use during future HEAF testing.

  15. The Γ-Limit of the Two-Dimensional Ohta-Kawasaki Energy. I. Droplet Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Dorian; Muratov, Cyrill B.; Serfaty, Sylvia

    2013-11-01

    This is the first in a series of two papers in which we derive a Γ-expansion for a two-dimensional non-local Ginzburg-Landau energy with Coulomb repulsion, also known as the Ohta-Kawasaki model, in connection with diblock copolymer systems. In that model, two phases appear, which interact via a nonlocal Coulomb type energy. We focus on the regime where one of the phases has very small volume fraction, thus creating small "droplets" of the minority phase in a "sea" of the majority phase. In this paper we show that an appropriate setting for Γ-convergence in the considered parameter regime is via weak convergence of the suitably normalized charge density in the sense of measures. We prove that, after a suitable rescaling, the Ohta-Kawasaki energy functional Γ-converges to a quadratic energy functional of the limit charge density generated by the screened Coulomb kernel. A consequence of our results is that minimizers (or almost minimizers) of the energy have droplets which are almost all asymptotically round, have the same radius and are uniformly distributed in the domain. The proof relies mainly on the analysis of the sharp interface version of the energy, with the connection to the original diffuse interface model obtained via matching upper and lower bounds for the energy. We thus also obtain an asymptotic characterization of the energy minimizers in the diffuse interface model.

  16. VERITAS Upper Limit on the Very High Energy Emission from the Radio Galaxy NGC 1275

    DOE PAGES

    Acciari, V. A.; Aliu, E.; Arlen, T.; ...

    2009-11-16

    We report the recent detection by the Fermi γ-ray space telescope of high-energy γ-rays from the radio galaxy NGC 1275 that makes the observation of the very high energy (VHE: E>100 GeV) part of its broadband spectrum particularly interesting, especially for the understanding of active galactic nuclei with misaligned multi-structured jets. The radio galaxy NGC 1275 was recently observed by VERITAS at energies above 100 GeV for about 8 hr. No VHE γ-ray emission was detected by VERITAS from NGC 1275. Finally, a 99% confidence level upper limit of 2.1% of the Crab Nebula flux level is obtained at themore » decorrelation energy of approximately 340 GeV, corresponding to 19% of the power-law extrapolation of the Fermi Large Area Telescope result.« less

  17. VERITAS UPPER LIMIT ON THE VERY HIGH ENERGY EMISSION FROM THE RADIO GALAXY NGC 1275

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W.; Aliu, E.; Boltuch, D.; Arlen, T.; Celik, O.; Aune, T.; Bautista, M.; Cogan, P.; Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R.; Bradbury, S. M.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cui, W.; Duke, C.

    2009-12-01

    The recent detection by the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope of high-energy gamma-rays from the radio galaxy NGC 1275 makes the observation of the very high energy (VHE: E>100 GeV) part of its broadband spectrum particularly interesting, especially for the understanding of active galactic nuclei with misaligned multi-structured jets. The radio galaxy NGC 1275 was recently observed by VERITAS at energies above 100 GeV for about 8 hr. No VHE gamma-ray emission was detected by VERITAS from NGC 1275. A 99% confidence level upper limit of 2.1% of the Crab Nebula flux level is obtained at the decorrelation energy of approximately 340 GeV, corresponding to 19% of the power-law extrapolation of the Fermi Large Area Telescope result.

  18. VERITAS Upper Limit on the Very High Energy Emission from the Radio Galaxy NGC 1275

    SciTech Connect

    Acciari, V. A.; Aliu, E.; Arlen, T.; Aune, T.; Bautista, M.; Beilicke, M.; Benbow, W.; Boltuch, D.; Bradbury, S. M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Byrum, K.; Cannon, A.; Celik, O.; Cesarini, A.; Ciupik, L.; Cogan, P.; Cui, W.; Dickherber, R.; Duke, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Finley, J. P.; Fortin, P.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Galante, N.; Gall, D.; Gibbs, K.; Gillanders, G. H.; Godambe, S.; Grube, J.; Guenette, R.; Gyuk, G.; Hanna, D.; Holder, J.; Horan, D.; Hui, C. M.; Humensky, T. B.; Imran, A.; Kaaret, P.; Karlsson, N.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Konopelko, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Lang, M. J.; LeBohec, S.; Maier, G.; McCann, A.; McCutcheon, M.; Millis, J.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Ong, R. A.; Otte, A. N.; Pandel, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pohl, M.; Quinn, J.; Ragan, K.; Reynolds, P. T.; Roache, E.; Rose, H. J.; Schroedter, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Smith, A. W.; Steele, D.; Swordy, S. P.; Theiling, M.; Toner, J. A.; Varlotta, A.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Vincent, S.; Wagner, R. G.; Wakely, S. P.; Ward, J. E.; Weekes, T. C.; Weinstein, A.; Weisgarber, T.; Williams, D. A.; Wissel, S.; Wood, M.; Zitzer, B.; Kataoka, J.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cheung, C. C.; Lott, B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tosti, G.

    2009-11-16

    We report the recent detection by the Fermi γ-ray space telescope of high-energy γ-rays from the radio galaxy NGC 1275 that makes the observation of the very high energy (VHE: E>100 GeV) part of its broadband spectrum particularly interesting, especially for the understanding of active galactic nuclei with misaligned multi-structured jets. The radio galaxy NGC 1275 was recently observed by VERITAS at energies above 100 GeV for about 8 hr. No VHE γ-ray emission was detected by VERITAS from NGC 1275. Finally, a 99% confidence level upper limit of 2.1% of the Crab Nebula flux level is obtained at the decorrelation energy of approximately 340 GeV, corresponding to 19% of the power-law extrapolation of the Fermi Large Area Telescope result.

  19. Satellite observations of new particle and field signatures associated with SAR arc field lines at magnetospheric heights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Cravens, T. E.; Nagy, A. F.; Gurnett, D. A.; Huff, R. L.; Comfort, R. H.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Brace, L. H.

    1987-01-01

    Enhancements in thermal ion densities, an oxygen dominated ring current at energies below 17 keV, and invariant latitude-limited bands of intense ELF hiss have been discovered on Stable Auroral Red (SAR) arc field lines at magnetospheric heights. These new signatures were revealed by an examination of 31 coordinated data sets taken simultaneously at magnetospheric and ionospheric heights by the De-1 and -2 satellites during SAR arc traversals within the period September 1981 through April 1982. Data sets from DE-2, for the first time, provide information on the location of a SAR arc (determined by the F region electron temperature enhancement) during the nearly simultaneous passage of these field lines by DE-1 in the magnetosphere. These new high altitude signatures are examined in the context of possible magnetospheric SAR arc energy source mechanisms.

  20. Satellite observations of new particle and field signatures associated with SAR arc field lines at magnetospheric heights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Cravens, T. E.; Nagy, A. F.; Gurnett, D. A.; Huff, R. L.; Comfort, R. H.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Brace, L. H.

    1987-01-01

    Enhancements in thermal ion densities, an oxygen dominated ring current at energies below 17 keV, and invariant latitude-limited bands of intense ELF hiss have been discovered on Stable Auroral Red (SAR) arc field lines at magnetospheric heights. These new signatures were revealed by an examination of 31 coordinated data sets taken simultaneously at magnetospheric and ionospheric heights by the De-1 and -2 satellites during SAR arc traversals within the period September 1981 through April 1982. Data sets from DE-2, for the first time, provide information on the location of a SAR arc (determined by the F region electron temperature enhancement) during the nearly simultaneous passage of these field lines by DE-1 in the magnetosphere. These new high altitude signatures are examined in the context of possible magnetospheric SAR arc energy source mechanisms.

  1. The Confinement of Neptune's Ring Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porco, C.; Namouni, F.

    2002-09-01

    The stability of the narrow ring arcs of Neptune has been a puzzle since their discovery. First detected in 1984 from the Earth in stellar occultations and imaged by the Voyager spacecraft in 1989, the 5 arcs spanning approximately 40 deg in longitude are apparently confined against the rapid azimuthal and radial spreading that results from energy dissipation in inter-particle collisions. Voyager data were used to argue in favor of an arc confinement model (Goldreich et al. AJ 1986; Porco, Science 1991) that relies on both the vertical and mean angular motions of the nearby Neptunian moon, Galatea, to produce a pair of Lindblad (LR) and corotation inclination (CIR) resonances capable of trapping ring particles into a sequence of arcs. However, HST and Earth-based observations taken in 1998 (Dumas et al. Nature 1999; Sicardy et al. Nature 1999) indicate a revised arc mean angular motion which displaces the arcs away from the CIR, leaving their stability once again unexplained. In this presentation, we will discuss the workings of a hitherto neglected resonance which relies on Galatea's orbital eccentricity and which, together with the LR, is likely responsible for the angular confinement of the arcs. The action of this resonance, which operates through the precession of Galatea's eccentric orbit forced by the arcs' inertia, will allow a determination of the arcs' mass from future measurements of Galatea's eccentricity. We acknowledge the financial support of NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program and the Southwest Research Institute's Internal Research Grant program.

  2. Improved limit to the diffuse flux of ultrahigh energy neutrinos from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE PAGES

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-05-26

    Neutrinos in the cosmic ray flux with energies near 1 EeV and above are detectable with the Surface Detector array (SD) of the Pierre Auger Observatory. We report here on searches through Auger data from 1 January 2004 until 20 June 2013. No neutrino candidates were found, yielding a limit to the diffuse flux of ultrahigh energy neutrinos that challenges the Waxman-Bahcall bound predictions. Neutrino identification is attempted using the broad time structure of the signals expected in the SD stations, and is efficiently done for neutrinos of all flavors interacting in the atmosphere at large zenith angles, as wellmore » as for “Earth-skimming” neutrino interactions in the case of tau neutrinos. In this paper the searches for downward-going neutrinos in the zenith angle bins 60°–75° and 75°–90° as well as for upward-going neutrinos, are combined to give a single limit. In addition, the 90% C.L. single-flavor limit to the diffuse flux of ultrahigh energy neutrinos with an E–2 spectrum in the energy range 1.0 × 1017 eV – 2.5 × 1019 eV is E2νdNν/dEν < 6.4 × 10–9 GeV cm–2 s–1 sr–1.« less

  3. Improved limit to the diffuse flux of ultrahigh energy neutrinos from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; García, B.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; López Casado, A.; Louedec, K.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Mello, V. B. B.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Müller, S.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; PÈ©kala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scarso, C.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanca, D.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vasquez, R.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyński, H.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yang, L.; Yapici, T.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zhu, Y.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    Neutrinos in the cosmic ray flux with energies near 1 EeV and above are detectable with the Surface Detector array (SD) of the Pierre Auger Observatory. We report here on searches through Auger data from 1 January 2004 until 20 June 2013. No neutrino candidates were found, yielding a limit to the diffuse flux of ultrahigh energy neutrinos that challenges the Waxman-Bahcall bound predictions. Neutrino identification is attempted using the broad time structure of the signals expected in the SD stations, and is efficiently done for neutrinos of all flavors interacting in the atmosphere at large zenith angles, as well as for "Earth-skimming" neutrino interactions in the case of tau neutrinos. In this paper the searches for downward-going neutrinos in the zenith angle bins 60°-75° and 75°-90° as well as for upward-going neutrinos, are combined to give a single limit. The 90% C.L. single-flavor limit to the diffuse flux of ultrahigh energy neutrinos with an E-2 spectrum in the energy range 1.0 ×1 017 eV - 2.5 ×1 019 eV is Eν2d Nν/d Eν<6.4 ×10-9 GeV cm-2 s-1 sr-1 .

  4. Convective combustion in porous media: singular limit of high activation energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Peter V.; Weiss, Georg S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a system of degenerate reaction diffusion equations which describes a convective (pressure driven) regime of combustion in porous media. The goal of this paper is to study the behaviour of this system in the limit of high activation energy. We show that the limit solution for this problem in arbitrary spatial dimension solves a parabolic equation with memory term similar to one arising in solid combustion. Moreover, under the additional assumption of the solution being time increasing, we prove that the limit problem coincides with Stefan problem for supercooled water with spatially inhomogeneous coefficients. We also obtain the precise limit problem for (not necessarily planar) travelling waves in any dimension.

  5. An Energy-Based Limit State Function for Estimation of Structural Reliability in Shock Environments

    DOE PAGES

    Guthrie, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    limit state function is developed for the estimation of structural reliability in shock environments. This limit state function uses peak modal strain energies to characterize environmental severity and modal strain energies at failure to characterize the structural capacity. The Hasofer-Lind reliability index is briefly reviewed and its computation for the energy-based limit state function is discussed. Applications to two degree of freedom mass-spring systems and to a simple finite element model are considered. For these examples, computation of the reliability index requires little effort beyond a modal analysis, but still accounts for relevant uncertainties in both the structure and environment.more » For both examples, the reliability index is observed to agree well with the results of Monte Carlo analysis. In situations where fast, qualitative comparison of several candidate designs is required, the reliability index based on the proposed limit state function provides an attractive metric which can be used to compare and control reliability.« less

  6. Decontamination Strategy for Large Area and/or Equipment Contaminated with Chemical and Biological Agents using a High Energy Arc Lamp (HEAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Schoske, Richard; Kennedy, Patrick; Duty, Chad E; Smith, Rob R; Huxford, Theodore J; Bonavita, Angelo M; Engleman, Greg; Vass, Arpad Alexander; Griest, Wayne H; Ilgner, Ralph H; Brown, Gilbert M

    2009-04-01

    A strategy for the decontamination of large areas and or equipment contaminated with Biological Warfare Agents (BWAs) and Chemical Warfare Agents (CWAs) was demonstrated using a High Energy Arc Lamp (HEAL) photolysis system. This strategy offers an alternative that is potentially quicker, less hazardous, generates far less waste, and is easier to deploy than those currently fielded by the Department of Defense (DoD). For example, for large frame aircraft the United States Air Force still relies on the combination of weathering (stand alone in environment), air washing (fly aircraft) and finally washing the aircraft with Hot Soapy Water (HSW) in an attempt to remove any remaining contamination. This method is laborious, time consuming (upwards of 12+ hours not including decontamination site preparation), and requires large amounts of water (e.g., 1,600+ gallons for a single large frame aircraft), and generates large amounts of hazardous waste requiring disposal. The efficacy of the HEAL system was demonstrated using diisopropyl methyl phosphonate (DIMP) a G series CWA simulant, and Bacillus globigii (BG) a simulant of Bacillus anthracis. Experiments were designed to simulate the energy flux of a field deployable lamp system that could stand-off 17 meters from a 12m2 target area and uniformly expose a surface at 1360 W/m2. The HEAL system in the absence of a catalyst reduced the amount of B. globigii by five orders of magnitude at a starting concentration of 1.63 x 107 spores. In the case of CWA simulants, the HEAL system in the presence of the catalyst TiO2 effectively degraded DIMP sprayed onto a 100mm diameter Petri dish in 5 minutes.

  7. Limits to sustained energy intake. XVI. Body temperature and physical activity of female mice during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gamo, Yuko; Bernard, Amelie; Mitchell, Sharon E; Hambly, Catherine; Al Jothery, Aqeel; Vaanholt, Lobke M; Król, Elzbieta; Speakman, John R

    2013-06-15

    Lactation is the most energy-demanding phase of mammalian reproduction, and lactation performance may be affected by events during pregnancy. For example, food intake may be limited in late pregnancy by competition for space in the abdomen between the alimentary tract and fetuses. Hence, females may need to compensate their energy budgets during pregnancy by reducing activity and lowering body temperature. We explored the relationships between energy intake, body mass, body temperature and physical activity throughout pregnancy in the MF1 mouse. Food intake and body mass of 26 females were recorded daily throughout pregnancy. Body temperature and physical activity were monitored every minute for 23 h a day by implanted transmitters. Body temperature and physical activity declined as pregnancy advanced, while energy intake and body mass increased. Compared with a pre-mating baseline period, mice increased energy intake by 56% in late pregnancy. Although body temperature declined as pregnancy progressed, this served mostly to reverse an increase between baseline and early pregnancy. Reduced physical activity may compensate the energy budget of pregnant mice but body temperature changes do not. Over the last 3 days of pregnancy, food intake declined. Individual variation in energy intake in the last phase of pregnancy was positively related to litter size at birth. As there was no association between the increase in body mass and the decline in intake, we suggest the decline was not caused by competition for abdominal space. These data suggest overall reproductive performance is probably not constrained by events during pregnancy.

  8. H + D2 Reaction Dynamics in the Limit of Low Product Recoil Energy.

    PubMed

    Aldegunde, J; Herráez-Aguilar, D; Jambrina, P G; Aoiz, F J; Jankunas, J; Zare, R N

    2012-10-18

    Both experiment and theory recently showed that the H + D2(v = 0, j = 0) → HD(v' = 4, j') + D reactions at a collision energy of 1.97 eV display a seemingly anomalous HD product angular distribution that moves in the backward direction as the value of j' increases and the corresponding energy available for product recoil decreases. This behavior was attributed to the presence of a centrifugal barrier along the reaction path. Here, we show, using fully quantum mechanical calculations, that for low recoil energies, the collision mechanism is nearly independent of the HD internal state and the HD product becomes aligned, with its rotational angular momentum j' pointing perpendicular to the recoil momentum k'. As the kinetic energy to overcome this barrier becomes limited, the three atoms adopt a nearly collinear configuration in the transition-state region to permit reaction, which strongly polarizes the resulting HD product. These results are expected to be general for any chemical reaction in the low recoil energy limit.

  9. Local detection of electromagnetic energy transport below the diffraction limit in metal nanoparticle plasmon waveguides.

    PubMed

    Maier, Stefan A; Kik, Pieter G; Atwater, Harry A; Meltzer, Sheffer; Harel, Elad; Koel, Bruce E; Requicha, Ari A G

    2003-04-01

    Achieving control of light-material interactions for photonic device applications at nanoscale dimensions will require structures that guide electromagnetic energy with a lateral mode confinement below the diffraction limit of light. This cannot be achieved by using conventional waveguides or photonic crystals. It has been suggested that electromagnetic energy can be guided below the diffraction limit along chains of closely spaced metal nanoparticles that convert the optical mode into non-radiating surface plasmons. A variety of methods such as electron beam lithography and self-assembly have been used to construct metal nanoparticle plasmon waveguides. However, all investigations of the optical properties of these waveguides have so far been confined to collective excitations, and direct experimental evidence for energy transport along plasmon waveguides has proved elusive. Here we present observations of electromagnetic energy transport from a localized subwavelength source to a localized detector over distances of about 0.5 microm in plasmon waveguides consisting of closely spaced silver rods. The waveguides are excited by the tip of a near-field scanning optical microscope, and energy transport is probed by using fluorescent nanospheres.

  10. Energy-transport and drift-diffusion limits of nonisentropic Euler-Poisson equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiang

    Two relaxation limits in critical spaces for the scaled nonisentropic Euler-Poisson equations with the momentum relaxation time and energy relaxation time are considered. As the first step of this justification, the uniform (global) classical solutions to the Cauchy problem in Chemin-Lerner's spaces with critical regularity are constructed. Furthermore, by the compactness argument, it is rigorously justified that the scaled classical solutions converge to the solutions of energy-transport equations and drift-diffusion equations, respectively, with respect to different time scales.

  11. Application of Energy Processor Model for Diagnostic Symptom Limit Value Determination in Steam Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galka, Tomasz

    1999-09-01

    With growing importance of quantitative technical condition assessment in critical machinery, the need for adequate determination of diagnostic symptom limit values is becoming vital. Such determination may be based on the energy processor model of a machine [1]. The general model should, for each specific case, be developed in order to account for unique features of machine design and operation. The paper describes such an approach for large steam turbines, operated by utility power stations. The energy processor model, adopted for these machines, is described and its mathematical description is presented, based on resonable simplifying assumptions. Possibilities of the determination of model parameters from data obtained during normal operation are outlined and discussed.

  12. An upper limit on the high-energy gamma-ray emission of Vela X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattox, J. R.; Oegelman, H.; Kanbach, G.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of high-energy gamma-ray emission from the X-ray binary Vela X-1 was investigated by analyzing the COS-B satellite observations, using the COS-B X-ray detector for a phase coherent analysis in the search of rotational periodicity. The rotational upper limit is compared to the X-ray, TeV, and PeV fluxes reported by Chodil et al. (1967), North et al. (1984), and Protheroe et al. (1984), respectively. It was found that, under certain conditions, the upper limit determined here is not inconsistent with the reports of TeV and PeV emission.

  13. An upper limit on the high-energy gamma-ray emission of Vela X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattox, J. R.; Oegelman, H.; Kanbach, G.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of high-energy gamma-ray emission from the X-ray binary Vela X-1 was investigated by analyzing the COS-B satellite observations, using the COS-B X-ray detector for a phase coherent analysis in the search of rotational periodicity. The rotational upper limit is compared to the X-ray, TeV, and PeV fluxes reported by Chodil et al. (1967), North et al. (1984), and Protheroe et al. (1984), respectively. It was found that, under certain conditions, the upper limit determined here is not inconsistent with the reports of TeV and PeV emission.

  14. Electric arc discharge damage to ion thruster grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, D. D.; Nakanishi, S.; Finke, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    Arcs representative of those occurring between the grids of a mercury ion thruster were simulated. Parameters affecting an arc and the resulting damage were studied. The parameters investigated were arc energy, arc duration, and grid geometry. Arc attenuation techniques were also investigated. Potentially serious damage occurred at all energy levels representative of actual thruster operating conditions. Of the grids tested, the lowest open-area configuration sustained the least damage for given conditions. At a fixed energy level a long duration discharge caused greater damage than a short discharge. Attenuation of arc current using various impedances proved to be effective in reducing arc damage. Faults were also deliberately caused using chips of sputtered materials formed during the operation of an actual thruster. These faults were cleared with no serious grid damage resulting using the principles and methods developed in this study.

  15. New Limits on the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Neutrino Flux from the ANITA Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gorham, P.W.; Allison, P.; Barwick, S.W.; Beatty, J.J.; Besson, D.Z.; Binns, W.R.; Chen, C.; Chen, P.; Clem, J.M.; Connolly, A.; Dowkontt, P.F.; DuVernois, M.A.; Field, R.C.; Goldstein, D.; Goodhue, A.; Hast, C.; Hebert, C.L.; Hoover, S.; Israel, M.H.; Kowalski, J.; Learned, J.G.; /Hawaii U. /Caltech, JPL /Hawaii U. /Minnesota U. /Hawaii U. /Ohio State U. /Hawaii U. /UC, Irvine /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Caltech, JPL /SLAC /University Coll. London /Ohio State U. /SLAC /Hawaii U. /UCLA /Delaware U. /Hawaii U. /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.

    2011-12-01

    We report initial results of the first flight of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA-1) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of a diffuse flux of cosmic neutrinos above energies of E{sub v} = 3 x 10{sup 18} eV. ANITA-1 flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. We report here on our initial analysis, which was performed as a blind search of the data. No neutrino candidates are seen, with no detected physics background. We set model-independent limits based on this result. Upper limits derived from our analysis rule out the highest cosmogenic neutrino models. In a background horizontal-polarization channel, we also detect six events consistent with radio impulses from ultrahigh energy extensive air showers.

  16. An asymptotic-preserving scheme for the semiconductor Boltzmann equation toward the energy-transport limit

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jingwei; Wang, Li

    2015-01-15

    We design an asymptotic-preserving scheme for the semiconductor Boltzmann equation which leads to an energy-transport system for electron mass and energy as mean free path goes to zero. As opposed to the classical drift-diffusion limit where the stiff collisions are all in one scale, new difficulties arise in the two-scale stiff collision terms because the simple BGK penalization [15] fails to drive the solution to the correct limit. We propose to set up a spatially dependent threshold on the penalization of the stiffer collision operator such that the evolution of the solution resembles a Hilbert expansion at the continuous level. Formal asymptotic analysis and numerical results confirm the efficiency and accuracy of our scheme.

  17. Low pressure arc electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenn, P. D.; Richter, R.

    1970-01-01

    Reducing the pressure in the vicinity of the arc attachment point by allowing the gas to flow through a supersonic nozzle minimizes local heating rates, prevents ablation, and increases the efficiency of coaxial gas-flow arcs.

  18. Lower Limits on Ultrahigh-energy Cosmic Ray and Jet powers of TeV Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzaque, Soebur; Dermer, Charles D.; Finke, Justin D.

    2012-02-01

    Lower limits on the power emitted in ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), which are assumed to be protons with energy >~ 1017-1020 eV, are derived for TeV blazars with the assumption that the observed TeV γ-rays are generated due to interactions of these protons with cosmic microwave photons. The limits depend on the spectrum of the injected UHECR protons. While for a -2.2 injection spectrum the lower limits on the powers emitted in UHECRs by 1ES 0229+200, 1ES 1101-232, and 1ES 0347-121 are lower than their respective synchrotron luminosities (~1046 erg s-1), in the case of 1ES 1426+428 it exceeds the corresponding synchrotron luminosity by up to an order of magnitude. The proposed Auger North Observatory should be able to detect 4 × 1019 eV cosmic-ray (CR) protons from 1ES 1426+428 within a few years of operation and test the TeV γ-ray production model by UHECR energy losses while propagating along the line of sight or constrain the intergalactic magnetic field to be larger than ~10-16 G in case of no detection. The lower limits on the apparent-isotropic jet power from accelerated 1010-1020 eV proton spectra in the blazar jet is of the order of the Eddington luminosity of a 109 M ⊙ black hole for a CR injection spectrum -2.2 or harder for all blazars considered except for 1ES 1426+428. In the case of the latter, the apparent-isotropic jet power exceeds the Eddington luminosity by an order of magnitude. For an injection spectrum softer than -2.2, as is required to fit the observed CR data above ~1017-1018 eV, the Eddington luminosity is exceeded by the lower limits on the jet power for all blazars considered.

  19. CO2 conversion in a gliding arc plasma: 1D cylindrical discharge model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weizong; Berthelot, Antonin; Kolev, Stanimir; Tu, Xin; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2016-12-01

    CO2 conversion by a gliding arc plasma is gaining increasing interest, but the underlying mechanisms for an energy-efficient process are still far from understood. Indeed, the chemical complexity of the non-equilibrium plasma poses a challenge for plasma modeling due to the huge computational load. In this paper, a one-dimensional (1D) gliding arc model is developed in a cylindrical frame, with a detailed non-equilibrium CO2 plasma chemistry set, including the CO2 vibrational kinetics up to the dissociation limit. The model solves a set of time-dependent continuity equations based on the chemical reactions, as well as the electron energy balance equation, and it assumes quasi-neutrality in the plasma. The loss of plasma species and heat due to convection by the transverse gas flow is accounted for by using a characteristic frequency of convective cooling, which depends on the gliding arc radius, the relative velocity of the gas flow with respect to the arc and on the arc elongation rate. The calculated values for plasma density and plasma temperature within this work are comparable with experimental data on gliding arc plasma reactors in the literature. Our calculation results indicate that excitation to the vibrational levels promotes efficient dissociation in the gliding arc, and this is consistent with experimental investigations of the gliding arc based CO2 conversion in the literature. Additionally, the dissociation of CO2 through collisions with O atoms has the largest contribution to CO2 splitting under the conditions studied. In addition to the above results, we also demonstrate that lumping the CO2 vibrational states can bring a significant reduction of the computational load. The latter opens up the way for 2D or 3D models with an accurate description of the CO2 vibrational kinetics.

  20. On the influence of nonlinearities on vibrational energy transduction under band-limited noise excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, K.; Su, D.; Zheng, R.; Cartmell, M.

    2016-09-01

    Vibrational energy harvesters are often excited by band-limited noise excitations. In this paper, the influence of the stiffness nonlinearity on the transduction of the energy harvester and the relative performance of linear, monostable hardening-type and bistable energy harvesters are compared and investigated. The performance is experimentally compared under band-limited noise excitations of different levels, bandwidths, and centre frequencies at first. The rms output power delivered to the same load resistance is measured and compared under the same excitation levels, which indicts the constant electrical damping level. It is shown that the effect of nonlinearities is strongly dependent on the excitation parameters. Under a moderate excitation level it is shown that the monostable hardening-type oscillator performs worse than its linear counterpart under band-limited excitation. However, the results also illustrate that for the most part of the frequency and bandwidth range considered, the bistable harvester can outperforms the linear variant but for around the peak output area. Moreover, the comparison is also numerically conducted with the consideration of the optimised electrical damping level and the displacement constraint of the device. General conclusions are drawn based on the experimental observations.

  1. Rotating arc spark plug

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  2. Reinvestigation of the charge density distribution in arc discharge fusion system

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Lin Horng; Yee, Lee Kim; Nan, Phua Yeong; Thung, Yong Yun; Khok, Yong Thian; Rahman, Faidz Abd

    2015-04-24

    A continual arc discharge system has been setup and the light intensity of arc discharge has been profiled. The mathematical model of local energy density distribution in arc discharge fusion has been simulated which is in good qualitative agreement with light intensity profile of arc discharge in the experiments. Eventually, the local energy density distribution of arc discharge system is able to be precisely manipulated to act as heat source in the fabrication of fused fiber devices.

  3. An upper limit to ground state energy fluctuations in nuclear masses

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, Jorge G.; Frank, Alejandro; Barea, Jose; Velazquez, Victor; Isacker, Piet van; Zuker, Andres P.

    2007-02-12

    Shell model calculations are employed to estimate un upper limit of statistical fluctuations in the nuclear ground state energies. In order to mimic the presence of quantum chaos associated with neutron resonances at energies between 6 to 10 MeV, calculations include random interactions in the upper shells. The upper bound for the energy fluctuations at mid-shell is shown to have the form {sigma}(A) {approx_equal} 20A-1.34 MeV. This estimate is consistent with the mass errors found in large shell model calculations along the N=126 line, and with local mass error estimated using the Garvey-Kelson relations, all being smaller than 100 keV.

  4. High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, Georg; George, E. Victor; Krupke, William F.; Sooy, Walter; Sutton, Steven B.

    1996-01-01

    High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes.

  5. High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, G.; George, E.V.; Krupke, W.F.; Sooy, W.; Sutton, S.B.

    1996-06-11

    High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes. 5 figs.

  6. Breaking the theoretical scaling limit for predicting quasiparticle energies: the stochastic GW approach.

    PubMed

    Neuhauser, Daniel; Gao, Yi; Arntsen, Christopher; Karshenas, Cyrus; Rabani, Eran; Baer, Roi

    2014-08-15

    We develop a formalism to calculate the quasiparticle energy within the GW many-body perturbation correction to the density functional theory. The occupied and virtual orbitals of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian are replaced by stochastic orbitals used to evaluate the Green function G, the polarization potential W, and, thereby, the GW self-energy. The stochastic GW (sGW) formalism relies on novel theoretical concepts such as stochastic time-dependent Hartree propagation, stochastic matrix compression, and spatial or temporal stochastic decoupling techniques. Beyond the theoretical interest, the formalism enables linear scaling GW calculations breaking the theoretical scaling limit for GW as well as circumventing the need for energy cutoff approximations. We illustrate the method for silicon nanocrystals of varying sizes with N_{e}>3000 electrons.

  7. An upper limit of ground-state energy fluctuations in nuclear masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Jorge G.; Velázquez, Víctor; Frank, Alejandro; Barea, José; Van Isacker, Piet; Zuker, Andrés P.

    2006-07-01

    Shell model calculations are employed to estimate an upper limit of statistical fluctuations in the nuclear ground-state energies. In order to mimic the presence of quantum chaos associated with neutron resonances at energies between 6 and 10 MeV, calculations include random interactions in the upper shells. The upper bound for the energy fluctuations at mid-shell is shown to have the form σ(A)ap20 A-1.34 MeV. This estimate is consistent with the mass errors found in large-shell model calculations along the N=126 line, and with local mass error estimated using the Garvey-Kelson relations, all being smaller than 100 keV. It agrees in both size and functional form with the fluctuations deduced independently from second-order perturbation theory.

  8. An upper limit to ground state energy fluctuations in nuclear masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Jorge G.; Velázquez, Víctor; Frank, Alejandro; Barea, José; Van Isacker, Piet; Zuker, Andrés P.

    2007-02-01

    Shell model calculations are employed to estimate un upper limit of statistical fluctuations in the nuclear ground state energies. In order to mimic the presence of quantum chaos associated with neutron resonances at energies between 6 to 10 MeV, calculations include random interactions in the upper shells. The upper bound for the energy fluctuations at mid-shell is shown to have the form σ(A) ≈ 20A-1.34 MeV. This estimate is consistent with the mass errors found in large shell model calculations along the N=126 line, and with local mass error estimated using the Garvey-Kelson relations, all being smaller than 100 keV.

  9. RESEARCH ON ELECTRIC ARC REDUCTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CARBON DIOXIDE , REDUCTION(CHEMISTRY), ELECTRIC ARCS, CHEMICAL REACTIONS, HEAT OF REACTION, GAS FLOW, OXYGEN, CARBON COMPOUNDS, MONOXIDES, ELECTRODES, LABORATORY EQUIPMENT, HIGH TEMPERATURE, PLASMAS(PHYSICS), ENERGY.

  10. Revised upper limit to energy extraction from a Kerr black hole.

    PubMed

    Schnittman, Jeremy D

    2014-12-31

    We present a new upper limit on the energy that may be extracted from a Kerr black hole by means of particle collisions in the ergosphere (i.e., the "collisional Penrose process"). Earlier work on this subject has focused largely on particles with critical values of angular momentum falling into an extremal Kerr black hole from infinity and colliding just outside the horizon. While these collisions are able to reach arbitrarily high center-of-mass energies, it is very difficult for the reaction products to escape back to infinity, effectively limiting the peak efficiency of such a process to roughly 130%. When we allow one of the initial particles to have impact parameter b>2M, and thus not get captured by the horizon, it is able to collide along outgoing trajectories, greatly increasing the chance that the products can escape. For equal-mass particles annihilating to photons, we find a greatly increased peak energy of Eout≈6×Ein. For Compton scattering, the efficiency can go even higher, with Eout≈14×Ein, and for repeated scattering events, photons can both be produced and escape to infinity with Planck-scale energies.

  11. Peak energy turnover in lactating European hares: a test of the heat dissipation limitation hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Valencak, T G; Hackländer, K; Ruf, T

    2010-08-15

    It has been suggested that maximum sustained metabolic rate (SusMR) in mammals as reached, for instance, during lactation, is due to a limited capacity for heat dissipation. Here, we experimentally tested whether heat dissipation limitation (HDL) also constrains energy turnover in lactating European hares. Experimentally, we made use of the fact that hares nurse their young only once per day, which allowed us to keep females and young either at the same or at different ambient temperatures. During the last lactation week (week 4) females kept at thermoneutrality (22 degrees C), irrespective of the cold load of their young, had significantly lower rates of metabolisable energy intake (MEI) than cold-exposed mothers (5 degrees C), as predicted by the HDL hypothesis. However, in week 2 of lactation females at thermoneutrality rearing cold-exposed young were able to increase MEI to levels indistinguishable from those of cold-exposed females. Thus, even at thermoneutral temperature females reached maximum rates of energy turnover, which was inconsistent with the HDL hypothesis. We conclude that SusMR in lactating European hares typically results not from physiological constraints but from an active restriction of their energy turnover in order to maximise lifetime reproductive success.

  12. DC arc weld starter

    DOEpatents

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  13. Implications of limiting CO2 concentrations for land use and energy.

    PubMed

    Wise, Marshall; Calvin, Katherine; Thomson, Allison; Clarke, Leon; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Sands, Ronald; Smith, Steven J; Janetos, Anthony; Edmonds, James

    2009-05-29

    Limiting atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations to low levels requires strategies to manage anthropogenic carbon emissions from terrestrial systems as well as fossil fuel and industrial sources. We explore the implications of fully integrating terrestrial systems and the energy system into a comprehensive mitigation regime that limits atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We find that this comprehensive approach lowers the cost of meeting environmental goals but also carries with it profound implications for agriculture: Unmanaged ecosystems and forests expand, and food crop and livestock prices rise. Finally, we find that future improvement in food crop productivity directly affects land-use change emissions, making the technology for growing crops potentially important for limiting atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

  14. Limits to anaerobic energy and cytosolic concentration in the living cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglietti, A.

    2015-11-01

    For many physical systems at any given temperature, the set of all states where the system's free energy reaches its largest value can be determined from the system's constitutive equations of internal energy and entropy, once a state of that set is known. Such an approach is fraught with complications when applied to a living cell, because the cell's cytosol contains thousands of solutes, and thus thousands of state variables, which makes determination of its state impractical. We show here that, when looking for the maximum energy that the cytosol can store and release, detailed information on cytosol composition is redundant. Compatibility with cell's life requires that a single variable that represents the overall concentration of cytosol solutes must fall between defined limits, which can be determined by dehydrating and overhydrating the cell to its maximum capacity. The same limits are shown to determine, in particular, the maximum amount of free energy that a cell can supply in fast anaerobic processes, starting from any given initial state. For a typical skeletal muscle in normal physiological conditions this energy, i.e., the maximum anaerobic capacity to do work, is calculated to be about 960 J per kg of muscular mass. Such energy decreases as the overall concentration of solutes in the cytosol is increased. Similar results apply to any kind of cell. They provide an essential tool to understand and control the macroscopic response of single cells and multicellular cellular tissues alike. The applications include sport physiology, cell aging, disease produced cell damage, drug absorption capacity, to mention the most obvious ones.

  15. Limits to anaerobic energy and cytosolic concentration in the living cell.

    PubMed

    Paglietti, A

    2015-01-01

    For many physical systems at any given temperature, the set of all states where the system's free energy reaches its largest value can be determined from the system's constitutive equations of internal energy and entropy, once a state of that set is known. Such an approach is fraught with complications when applied to a living cell, because the cell's cytosol contains thousands of solutes, and thus thousands of state variables, which makes determination of its state impractical. We show here that, when looking for the maximum energy that the cytosol can store and release, detailed information on cytosol composition is redundant. Compatibility with cell's life requires that a single variable that represents the overall concentration of cytosol solutes must fall between defined limits, which can be determined by dehydrating and overhydrating the cell to its maximum capacity. The same limits are shown to determine, in particular, the maximum amount of free energy that a cell can supply in fast anaerobic processes, starting from any given initial state. For a typical skeletal muscle in normal physiological conditions this energy, i.e., the maximum anaerobic capacity to do work, is calculated to be about 960 J per kg of muscular mass. Such energy decreases as the overall concentration of solutes in the cytosol is increased. Similar results apply to any kind of cell. They provide an essential tool to understand and control the macroscopic response of single cells and multicellular cellular tissues alike. The applications include sport physiology, cell aging, disease produced cell damage, drug absorption capacity, to mention the most obvious ones.

  16. Research on the activating flux gas tungsten arc welding and plasma arc welding for stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Her-Yueh

    2010-10-01

    A systematic study of the effects of activating flux in the weld morphology, arc profile, and angular distortion and microstructure of two different arc welding processes, namely, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) and Plasma Arc Welding (PAW), was carried out. The results showed that the activating fluxes affected the penetration capability of arc welding on stainless steel. An increase in energy density resulting from the arc constriction and anode spot reduction enhanced the penetration capability. The Depth/Width (D/W) ratio of the weld played a major role in causing angular distortion of the weldment. Also, changes in the cooling rate, due to different heat source characteristics, influenced the microstructure from the fusion line to the centre of the weld.

  17. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1987-11-17

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile. 2 figs.

  18. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1985-08-05

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

  19. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.

    1987-01-01

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

  20. Critical Length Criterion and the Arc Chain Model for Calculating the Arcing Time of the Secondary Arc Related to AC Transmission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Haoxi; Li, Qingmin; Xing, Jinyuan; Li, Jinsong; Chen, Qiang

    2015-06-01

    The prompt extinction of the secondary arc is critical to the single-phase reclosing of AC transmission lines, including half-wavelength power transmission lines. In this paper, a low-voltage physical experimental platform was established and the motion process of the secondary arc was recorded by a high-speed camera. It was found that the arcing time of the secondary arc rendered a close relationship with its arc length. Through the input and output power energy analysis of the secondary arc, a new critical length criterion for the arcing time was proposed. The arc chain model was then adopted to calculate the arcing time with both the traditional and the proposed critical length criteria, and the simulation results were compared with the experimental data. The study showed that the arcing time calculated from the new critical length criterion gave more accurate results, which can provide a reliable criterion in term of arcing time for modeling and simulation of the secondary arc related with power transmission lines. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51277061 and 51420105011)

  1. DEVICE AND METHOD FOR PRODUCING A HIGH INTENSITY ARC DISCHARGE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-01-01

    A device is described for producing an energetic d-c carbon arc discharge between widely spaced electrodes with arc currents in excess of 100 amperes in a magnetic field of about 3000 gauss and witnin an evacuated enclo sure at a pressure of about 10/sup -5/ mm Hg. No defining electrodes are used in the device, thus essentially eliminating the problems of shorting which heretofore limited the amount of current that could be produced in an arc discharge. The energetic carbon arc discharge is sustained by the potential across the electrodes and by carbon ions and electrons released from the electrodes during arc operation. A large part of the potential drop of the arc occurs along the arc and many energetic electrons reach the anode because the arc pressure is relatively low, and few collisions occur. The carbon discharge is also an efficient ion pump.

  2. Theoretical Limits of Energy Density in Silicon-Carbon Composite Anode Based Lithium Ion Batteries

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Ranjan; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si) is under consideration as a potential next-generation anode material for the lithium ion battery (LIB). Experimental reports of up to 40% increase in energy density of Si anode based LIBs (Si-LIBs) have been reported in literature. However, this increase in energy density is achieved when the Si-LIB is allowed to swell (volumetrically expand) more than graphite based LIB (graphite-LIB) and beyond practical limits. The volume expansion of LIB electrodes should be negligible for applications such as automotive or mobile devices. We determine the theoretical bounds of Si composition in a Si–carbon composite (SCC) based anode to maximize the volumetric energy density of a LIB by constraining the external dimensions of the anode during charging. The porosity of the SCC anode is adjusted to accommodate the volume expansion during lithiation. The calculated threshold value of Si was then used to determine the possible volumetric energy densities of LIBs with SCC anode (SCC-LIBs) and the potential improvement over graphite-LIBs. The level of improvement in volumetric and gravimetric energy density of SCC-LIBs with constrained volume is predicted to be less than 10% to ensure the battery has similar power characteristics of graphite-LIBs. PMID:27311811

  3. Theoretical Limits of Energy Density in Silicon-Carbon Composite Anode Based Lithium Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Dash, Ranjan; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2016-06-17

    Silicon (Si) is under consideration as a potential next-generation anode material for the lithium ion battery (LIB). Experimental reports of up to 40% increase in energy density of Si anode based LIBs (Si-LIBs) have been reported in literature. However, this increase in energy density is achieved when the Si-LIB is allowed to swell (volumetrically expand) more than graphite based LIB (graphite-LIB) and beyond practical limits. The volume expansion of LIB electrodes should be negligible for applications such as automotive or mobile devices. We determine the theoretical bounds of Si composition in a Si-carbon composite (SCC) based anode to maximize the volumetric energy density of a LIB by constraining the external dimensions of the anode during charging. The porosity of the SCC anode is adjusted to accommodate the volume expansion during lithiation. The calculated threshold value of Si was then used to determine the possible volumetric energy densities of LIBs with SCC anode (SCC-LIBs) and the potential improvement over graphite-LIBs. The level of improvement in volumetric and gravimetric energy density of SCC-LIBs with constrained volume is predicted to be less than 10% to ensure the battery has similar power characteristics of graphite-LIBs.

  4. Master Limited Partnerships and Real Estate Investment Trusts: Opportunities and Potential Complications for Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, D.; Settle, E.

    2013-11-01

    Master Limited Partnerships (MLPs) and Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) are two proposed investment vehicles which have the potential to lower renewable energy assets' high cost of capital; a critical factor in the Department of Energy's goal for renewable energy to achieve grid-parity with traditional sources of electric generation. Due to current U.S. federal income tax laws, regulations, and administrative interpretations, REITs and MLPs cannot finance a significant portion of the cost of renewable energy assets. Efforts are underway to alter these rules by changing the definition of 'real property' (REIT) and 'qualified income' (MLP). However, even with rule changes, both investment vehicles have structural challenges to efficiently finance renewable energy assets. Among them are 1) effectively utilizing the U.S. federal income tax incentives; 2) administratively structuring the investments to not be overly onerous or complicated, given the potential for pooling a relatively large amount of small assets; and 3) attracting and retaining a large enough investment community to participate in the funding opportunities. This report summarizes these challenges so that if proposed federal changes are made, stakeholders have an understanding of the possible outcomes.

  5. Theoretical Limits of Energy Density in Silicon-Carbon Composite Anode Based Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Ranjan; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2016-06-01

    Silicon (Si) is under consideration as a potential next-generation anode material for the lithium ion battery (LIB). Experimental reports of up to 40% increase in energy density of Si anode based LIBs (Si-LIBs) have been reported in literature. However, this increase in energy density is achieved when the Si-LIB is allowed to swell (volumetrically expand) more than graphite based LIB (graphite-LIB) and beyond practical limits. The volume expansion of LIB electrodes should be negligible for applications such as automotive or mobile devices. We determine the theoretical bounds of Si composition in a Si–carbon composite (SCC) based anode to maximize the volumetric energy density of a LIB by constraining the external dimensions of the anode during charging. The porosity of the SCC anode is adjusted to accommodate the volume expansion during lithiation. The calculated threshold value of Si was then used to determine the possible volumetric energy densities of LIBs with SCC anode (SCC-LIBs) and the potential improvement over graphite-LIBs. The level of improvement in volumetric and gravimetric energy density of SCC-LIBs with constrained volume is predicted to be less than 10% to ensure the battery has similar power characteristics of graphite-LIBs.

  6. Bacterial defense against aging: role of the Escherichia coli ArcA regulator in gene expression, readjusted energy flux and survival during stasis.

    PubMed

    Nyström, T; Larsson, C; Gustafsson, L

    1996-07-01

    Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and N-terminal amino acid sequencing analysis, we demonstrate that a mutant of the global regulatory protein ArcA fails to decrease the synthesis of the TCA cycle enzymes malate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, lipoamide dehydrogenase E3 and succinate dehydrogenase in response to stasis, while the increased production of the glycolysis enzymes phosphoglycerate mutase and pyruvate kinase is unaffected. Microcalorimetric and respiratory measurements show that the continued production of TCA cycle enzymes in the (delta)arcA mutant is manifested as an elevated rate of respiration and total metabolic activity during starvation. The (delta)arcA mutant is severely impaired in surviving prolonged periods of exogenous carbon starvation, a phenotype that can be alleviated by overproducing the superoxide dismutase SodA. In addition, flow cytometry demonstrates that starving (delta)arcA mutant cells, in contrast to wild-type cells, fail to perform reductive division, remain large and contain multiple chromosomal copies. We suggest that the ArcA-dependent reduced production of electron donors and the decreased level and activity of the aerobic respiratory apparatus during growth arrest is an integral part of a defense system aimed at avoiding the damaging effects of oxygen radicals and controlling the rate of utilization of endogenous reserves.

  7. Evaluation of the clinical usefulness of modulated arc treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Kyu; Jang, Hong Seok; Kim, Yeon Sil; Choi, Byung Ock; Kang, Young-Nam; Nam, Sang Hee; Park, Hyeong Wook; Kim, Shin Wook; Shin, Hun Joo; Lee, Jae Choon; Kim, Ji Na; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Jin Young

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical usefulness of modulated arc (mARC) treatment techniques. The mARC treatment plans for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were made in order to verify the clinical usefulness of mARC. A pre-study was conducted to find the best plan condition for mARC treatment, and the usefulness of the mARC treatment plan was evaluated by comparing it with other Arc treatment plans such as tomotherapy and RapidArc plans. In the case of mARC, the optimal condition for the mARC plan was determined by comparing the dosimetric performance of the mARC plans developed by using various parameters, which included the photon energy (6 MV, 10 MV), the optimization point angle (6°- 10°intervals), and the total number of segments (36 - 59 segments). The best dosimetric performance of mARC was observed at a 10 MV photon energy, a point angle 6 degrees, and 59 segments. The treatment plans for the three different techniques were compared by using the following parameters: the conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), the target coverage, the dose to the OARs, the number of monitor units (MU), the beam on time, and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). As a result, the three different treatment techniques showed similar target coverages. The mARC plan had the lowest V20 (volume of lung receiving > 20 Gy) and MU per fraction compared with both the RapidArc and the tomotherapy plans. The mARC plan reduced the beam on time as well. Therefore, the results of this study provide satisfactory evidence that the mARC technique can be considered as a useful clinical technique for radiation treatment.

  8. Limits on the thermal energy release from radioactive wastes in a mined geologic repository

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, J.A.

    1983-03-01

    The theraml energy release of nuclear wastes is a major factor in the design of geologic repositories. Thermal limits need to be placed on various aspets of the geologic waste disposal system to avoid or retard the degradation of repository performance because of increased temperatures. The thermal limits in current use today are summarized in this report. These limits are placed in a hierarchial structure of thermal criteria consistent with the failure mechanism they are trying to prevent. The thermal criteria hierarchy is used to evaluate the thermal performance of a sample repository design. The design consists of disassembled BWR spent fuel, aged 10 years, close packed in a carbon steel canister with 15 cm of crushed salt backfill. The medium is bedded salt. The most-restrictive temperature for this design is the spent-fuel centerline temperature limit of 300/sup 0/C. A sensitivity study on the effects of additional cooling prior to disposal on repository thermal limits and design is performed.

  9. Non-equilibrium modelling of transferred arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidar, J.

    1999-02-01

    A two-temperature, variable-density, arc model has been developed for description of high-current free-burning arcs, including departures from thermodynamic and chemical equilibrium in the plasma. The treatment includes the arc, the anode and the cathode and considers the separate energy balance of the electrons and the heavy particles, together with the continuity equations for these species throughout the plasma. The output includes a two-dimensional distribution for the temperatures and densities both of the electrons and of the heavy particles, plasma velocity, current density and electrical potential throughout the arc. For a 200 A arc in pure argon at 1 atm, we calculate large differences between the temperatures of the electrons and the heavy particles in the plasma region near the cathode tip, together with large departures from local chemical plasma equilibrium. In the main body of the arc at high plasma temperatures, we predict minor differences between the temperatures of the electrons and the heavy particles, which are inconsistent with recent measurements using laser-scattering techniques showing differences of up to several thousand degrees. However, we find that, for the region in front of the cathode tip, the ground-state level of the neutral atoms is overpopulated relative to the corresponding populations under conditions of LTE, in agreement with experimental observations. These departures from LTE are caused by the injection of a large mass flow of cold gas into the arc core due to arc constriction at the tip of the cathode.

  10. Geographic variation of surface energy partitioning in the climatic mean predicted from a thermodynamic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhara, C.

    2015-12-01

    Convective and longwave radiative cooling are the two principle mechanisms by which the earth's surface transfers heat into the atmosphere and that shape surface temperature. However, this partitioning is not sufficiently constrained by energy and mass balances alone. We use a simple energy balance model in which surface temperatures and convective fluxes are determined with the additional thermodynamic constraint of maximum convective power. We assume that convection acts as a perfect heat engine operating at this limit. Applying our approach at regional scales, we find that the geographic variation of heat fluxes in the climatological mean reproduce ECMWF reanalysis with a high correlation (r2 = 0.88) despite a uniform bias. Our global estimates of the convective flux and surface temperature, with bias correction, is within 4% of satellite based estimates. Our results show that given total surface radiative forcing, the ratio between the surface cooling fluxes remains nearly constant. This provides an insight into surface energy partitioning that could be useful in setting physical limits to equilibrium climate sensitivity.

  11. Disk-to-disk transfer as the rate-limiting step for energy flow in phycobilisomes

    SciTech Connect

    Glazer, A.N.; Yeh, S.W.; Webb, S.P.; Clark, J.H.

    1985-01-25

    A broadly tunable picosecond laser source and an ultrafast streak camera were used to measure temporally and spectrally resolved emission from intact phycobilisomes and from individual phycobiliproteins as a function of excitation wavelength. Both wild-type and mutant phycobilisomes of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6701 were examined, as well as two biliproteins, R-phycoerythrin (240 kilodaltons, 34 bilins) and allophycocyanin (100 kilodaltons, 6 bilins). Measurements of intact phycobilisomes with known structural differences showed that the addition of an average of 1.6 phycoerythrin disks in the phycobilisome rod increased the overall energy transfer time by 30 +/- 5 picoseconds. In the isolated phycobiliproteins the onset of emission was as prompt as that of a solution of rhodamine B laser dye and was independent of excitation wavelength. This imposes an upper limit of 8 picoseconds (instrument-limited) on the transfer time from sensitizing to fluorescing chromophores in these biliproteins. These results indicate that disk-to-disk transfer is the slowest energy transfer process in phycobilisomes and, in combination with previous structural analyses, show that with respect to energy transfer the lattice of approximately 625 light-harvesting chromophores in the Synechocystis 6701 wild-type phycobilisome functions as a linear five-point array.

  12. LIMITS TO THE FRACTION OF HIGH-ENERGY PHOTON EMITTING GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Akerlof, Carl W.; Zheng, WeiKang

    2013-02-20

    After almost four years of operation, the two instruments on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have shown that the number of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with high-energy photon emission above 100 MeV cannot exceed roughly 9% of the total number of all such events, at least at the present detection limits. In a recent paper, we found that GRBs with photons detected in the Large Area Telescope have a surprisingly broad distribution with respect to the observed event photon number. Extrapolation of our empirical fit to numbers of photons below our previous detection limit suggests that the overall rate of such low flux events could be estimated by standard image co-adding techniques. In this case, we have taken advantage of the excellent angular resolution of the Swift mission to provide accurate reference points for 79 GRB events which have eluded any previous correlations with high-energy photons. We find a small but significant signal in the co-added field. Guided by the extrapolated power-law fit previously obtained for the number distribution of GRBs with higher fluxes, the data suggest that only a small fraction of GRBs are sources of high-energy photons.

  13. Climatic correlates of tree mortality in water- and energy-limited forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Das, Adrian J.; Stephenson, Nathan L.; Flint, Alan; Das, Tapash; van Mantgem, Phillip J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent increases in tree mortality rates across the western USA are correlated with increasing temperatures, but mechanisms remain unresolved. Specifically, increasing mortality could predominantly be a consequence of temperature-induced increases in either (1) drought stress, or (2) the effectiveness of tree-killing insects and pathogens. Using long-term data from California’s Sierra Nevada mountain range, we found that in water-limited (low-elevation) forests mortality was unambiguously best modeled by climatic water deficit, consistent with the first mechanism. In energy-limited (high-elevation) forests deficit models were only equivocally better than temperature models, suggesting that the second mechanism is increasingly important in these forests. We could not distinguish between models predicting mortality using absolute versus relative changes in water deficit, and these two model types led to different forecasts of mortality vulnerability under future climate scenarios. Our results provide evidence for differing climatic controls of tree mortality in water- and energy-limited forests, while highlighting the need for an improved understanding of tree mortality processes.

  14. Climatic correlates of tree mortality in water- and energy-limited forests.

    PubMed

    Das, Adrian J; Stephenson, Nathan L; Flint, Alan; Das, Tapash; van Mantgem, Phillip J

    2013-01-01

    Recent increases in tree mortality rates across the western USA are correlated with increasing temperatures, but mechanisms remain unresolved. Specifically, increasing mortality could predominantly be a consequence of temperature-induced increases in either (1) drought stress, or (2) the effectiveness of tree-killing insects and pathogens. Using long-term data from California's Sierra Nevada mountain range, we found that in water-limited (low-elevation) forests mortality was unambiguously best modeled by climatic water deficit, consistent with the first mechanism. In energy-limited (high-elevation) forests deficit models were only equivocally better than temperature models, suggesting that the second mechanism is increasingly important in these forests. We could not distinguish between models predicting mortality using absolute versus relative changes in water deficit, and these two model types led to different forecasts of mortality vulnerability under future climate scenarios. Our results provide evidence for differing climatic controls of tree mortality in water- and energy-limited forests, while highlighting the need for an improved understanding of tree mortality processes.

  15. Lower limits on ultrahigh-energy cosmic ray and jet powers of TeV blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzaque, Soebur; Dermer, Charles; Finke, Justin

    2012-03-01

    Lower limits on the power emitted in ultrahigh-energy cosmic ray (UHECR) protons are derived for TeV blazars with the assumption that the observed TeV gamma rays are generated due to interactions of these protons with cosmic microwave photons. This mechanism may be at work in four blazars, namely 1ES 0229+200; 1ES 1101-232; 1ES 0347-121 and 1ES 1426+428, which are at sufficiently high redshift (>0.1) that allow efficient cascade development to make TeV emission and which are non-varying or very weakly varying at >TeV energies. The lower limits on the UHECR power are lower than the respective synchrotron luminosities in case of all blazars except for 1ES 1426+428. The proposed Auger North Observatory can detect 40 EeV cosmic rays from this extraordinary source and test the UHECR-generated TeV emission model, which requires the intergalactic magnetic field strength to be below 10-16 G. The lower limits on the jet power for all four TeV blazars exceed the Eddington luminosity of a 10^9 solar mass black hole in case the injected UHECR spectrum is softer than -2.2.

  16. Climatic Correlates of Tree Mortality in Water- and Energy-Limited Forests

    PubMed Central

    Das, Adrian J.; Stephenson, Nathan L.; Flint, Alan; Das, Tapash; van Mantgem, Phillip J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent increases in tree mortality rates across the western USA are correlated with increasing temperatures, but mechanisms remain unresolved. Specifically, increasing mortality could predominantly be a consequence of temperature-induced increases in either (1) drought stress, or (2) the effectiveness of tree-killing insects and pathogens. Using long-term data from California’s Sierra Nevada mountain range, we found that in water-limited (low-elevation) forests mortality was unambiguously best modeled by climatic water deficit, consistent with the first mechanism. In energy-limited (high-elevation) forests deficit models were only equivocally better than temperature models, suggesting that the second mechanism is increasingly important in these forests. We could not distinguish between models predicting mortality using absolute versus relative changes in water deficit, and these two model types led to different forecasts of mortality vulnerability under future climate scenarios. Our results provide evidence for differing climatic controls of tree mortality in water- and energy-limited forests, while highlighting the need for an improved understanding of tree mortality processes. PMID:23936118

  17. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, K.N.

    1999-05-18

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

  18. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, Kamal N.

    1999-01-01

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

  19. Charge-State-Resolved Ion Energy Distribution Functions ofCathodic Vacuum Arcs: A Study Involving the Plasma Potential and BiasedPlasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim

    2006-03-09

    There are divergent results in the literature on the(in)dependence of the ion velocity distribution functions on the ioncharge states. Apparently, most time-of-flight methods of measurementsindicate independence whereas most measurements with electrostaticanalyzers state the opposite. It is shown here that this grouping iscoincidental with investigations of pulsed and continuous arcs. Allresults can be consolidated by taking ion-neutral interaction intoaccount, especially charge exchange collisions with the metal neutralsproduced by the arc itself. The velocity distribution functions areindependent of charge state when produced at cathode spots but becomecharge-state dependent when the plasma interacts withneutrals.

  20. An energy-limited model of algal biofuel production: Toward the next generation of advanced biofuels

    DOE PAGES

    Dunlop, Eric H.; Coaldrake, A. Kimi; Silva, Cory S.; ...

    2013-10-22

    Algal biofuels are increasingly important as a source of renewable energy. The absence of reliable thermodynamic and other property data, and the large amount of kinetic data that would normally be required have created a major barrier to simulation. Additionally, the absence of a generally accepted flowsheet for biofuel production means that detailed simulation of the wrong approach is a real possibility. This model of algal biofuel production estimates the necessary data and places it into a heuristic model using a commercial simulator that back-calculates the process structure required. Furthermore, complex kinetics can be obviated for now by putting themore » simulator into energy limitation and forcing it to solve for the missing design variables, such as bioreactor surface area, productivity, and oil content. The model does not attempt to prescribe a particular approach, but provides a guide towards a sound engineering approach to this challenging and important problem.« less

  1. Ion energy spectrum of expanding laser-plasma with limited mass

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M.; Kang, Y.-G.; Nishihara, K.; Fujioka, S.; Nishimura, H.

    2005-06-15

    A simple analytical model is presented for hydrodynamic expansion of laser-produced plasma with a limited mass, which expands quasi-isothermally during laser irradiation and quasiadiabatically after turning off the laser. During the isothermal expansion, the masses undergo entire disintegration under a relatively long laser pulse, while the ions are being kept accelerated. This physical picture significantly contrasts with that described by the orthodox self-similar solution for a semi-infinite planar rarefaction wave. The two successive expansions, i.e., isothermal expansion followed by adiabatic expansion, are described, respectively, by different self-similar solutions, which are found to be connected smoothly with each other in time and space. The ion energy spectrum obtained by the model reproduces well experimental results obtained under different geometrical conditions. The maximum ion kinetic energy is also estimated in terms of the laser and target parameters.

  2. An energy-limited model of algal biofuel production: Toward the next generation of advanced biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlop, Eric H.; Coaldrake, A. Kimi; Silva, Cory S.; Seider, Warren D.

    2013-10-22

    Algal biofuels are increasingly important as a source of renewable energy. The absence of reliable thermodynamic and other property data, and the large amount of kinetic data that would normally be required have created a major barrier to simulation. Additionally, the absence of a generally accepted flowsheet for biofuel production means that detailed simulation of the wrong approach is a real possibility. This model of algal biofuel production estimates the necessary data and places it into a heuristic model using a commercial simulator that back-calculates the process structure required. Furthermore, complex kinetics can be obviated for now by putting the simulator into energy limitation and forcing it to solve for the missing design variables, such as bioreactor surface area, productivity, and oil content. The model does not attempt to prescribe a particular approach, but provides a guide towards a sound engineering approach to this challenging and important problem.

  3. Limits on low-energy neutrino fluxes with the Mont Blanc liquid scintillator detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglietta, M.; Antonioli, P.; Badino, G.; Bologna, G.; Castagnoli, C.; Castellina, A.; Dadykin, V. L.; Fulgione, W.; Galeotti, P.; Khalchukov, F. F.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kortchaguin, P. V.; Kortchaguin, V. B.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Malguin, A. S.; Periale, L.; Ryassny, V. G.; Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Saavedra, O.; Trinchero, G.; Vernetto, S.; Yakushev, V. F.; Zatsepin, G. T.

    1992-11-01

    The LSD liquid scintillation detector has been operating since 1985 as an underground neutrino observatory in the Mont Blanc Laboratory with the main objective of detecting antineutrino bursts from collapsing stars. In August 1988 the construction of an additional lead and borex paraffin shield considerably reduced the radioactive background and increased the sensitivity of the apparatus. In this way the search for steady fluxes of low-energy neutrinos of different flavours through their interactions with free protons and carbon nuclei of the scintillator was made possible. No evidence for a galactic collapse was observed during the whole period of measurement. The corresponding 90% c.l. upper limit on the galactic collapses rate is 0.45 y -1 for a burst duration of ΔT ⩽ 10 s. After analysing the last 3 years data, the following 90% c.l. upper limits on the steady neutrino and antineutrino fluxes were obtained:

  4. Limits on Light-Speed Anisotropies from Compton Scattering of High-Energy Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocquet, J.-P.; Moricciani, D.; Bellini, V.; Beretta, M.; Casano, L.; D'Angelo, A.; di Salvo, R.; Fantini, A.; Franco, D.; Gervino, G.; Ghio, F.; Giardina, G.; Girolami, B.; Giusa, A.; Gurzadyan, V. G.; Kashin, A.; Knyazyan, S.; Lapik, A.; Lehnert, R.; Levi Sandri, P.; Lleres, A.; Mammoliti, F.; Mandaglio, G.; Manganaro, M.; Margarian, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Messi, R.; Nedorezov, V.; Perrin, C.; Randieri, C.; Rebreyend, D.; Rudnev, N.; Russo, G.; Schaerf, C.; Sperduto, M. L.; Sutera, M. C.; Turinge, A.; Vegna, V.

    2010-06-01

    The possibility of anisotropies in the speed of light relative to the limiting speed of electrons is considered. The absence of sidereal variations in the energy of Compton-edge photons at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility’s GRAAL facility constrains such anisotropies representing the first nonthreshold collision-kinematics study of Lorentz violation. When interpreted within the minimal standard-model extension, this result yields the two-sided limit of 1.6×10-14 at 95% confidence level on a combination of the parity-violating photon and electron coefficients (κ˜o+)YZ, (κ˜o+)ZX, cTX, and cTY. This new constraint provides an improvement over previous bounds by 1 order of magnitude.

  5. Limits on light-speed anisotropies from Compton scattering of high-energy electrons.

    PubMed

    Bocquet, J-P; Moricciani, D; Bellini, V; Beretta, M; Casano, L; D'Angelo, A; Di Salvo, R; Fantini, A; Franco, D; Gervino, G; Ghio, F; Giardina, G; Girolami, B; Giusa, A; Gurzadyan, V G; Kashin, A; Knyazyan, S; Lapik, A; Lehnert, R; Levi Sandri, P; Lleres, A; Mammoliti, F; Mandaglio, G; Manganaro, M; Margarian, A; Mehrabyan, S; Messi, R; Nedorezov, V; Perrin, C; Randieri, C; Rebreyend, D; Rudnev, N; Russo, G; Schaerf, C; Sperduto, M L; Sutera, M C; Turinge, A; Vegna, V

    2010-06-18

    The possibility of anisotropies in the speed of light relative to the limiting speed of electrons is considered. The absence of sidereal variations in the energy of Compton-edge photons at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility's GRAAL facility constrains such anisotropies representing the first nonthreshold collision-kinematics study of Lorentz violation. When interpreted within the minimal standard-model extension, this result yields the two-sided limit of 1.6×10(-14) at 95% confidence level on a combination of the parity-violating photon and electron coefficients (κ(o+))(YZ), (κ(o+))(ZX), c(TX), and c(TY). This new constraint provides an improvement over previous bounds by 1 order of magnitude.

  6. Spectral energy distributions of T Tauri stars - Disk flaring and limits on accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenyon, S. J.; Hartmann, L.

    1987-01-01

    The Adams et al. (1987) conclusion that much of the IR excess emission in the spectral energy distribution of T Tauri stars arises from reprocessing of stellar radiation by a dusty circumstellar disk is presently supported by analyses conducted in light of various models of these stars' spectra. A low mass reprocessing disk can, however, produce these spectra as well as a massive accretion disk. The detection of possible boundary layer radiation in the optical and near-UV regions poses the strongest limits on accretion rates. Disk accretion in the T Tauri phase does not significantly modify stellar evolution.

  7. Phosphate limited fed-batch processes: impact on carbon usage and energy metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Schuhmacher, Tom; Löffler, Michael; Hurler, Thilo; Takors, Ralf

    2014-11-20

    Phosphate starvation is often applied as a tool to limit cell growth in microbial production processes without hampering carbon and/or nitrogen supply alternatively. This contribution focuses on the interplay of process induced phosphate starvation and microbial performance studying an l-tryptophan overproducing Escherichia coli strain as a model for highly ATP demanding processes in comparison with an E. coli wildtype strain. To enable a time-resolved analysis, constant phosphate feeding strategies were applied to elongate the transition from phosphate saturated to phosphate limited cell growth. With increasing phosphate limitation, a reduced cellular efficiency of ATP formation via respiratory chain activity and the ATP synthase complex was found for both strains. Process balancing, transcriptome analysis and flux balance analysis are pointing toward a multi-stage decoupling scenario, which in essence deteriorates the stoichiometric ratio of ATP formation to proton translocation, thereby affecting ATP availability from respiration and carbon usage. Starting off with a potential influence on ATP-synthase efficiency (stage 1), decoupling is further increased by modified respiratory activity (stage 2) and byproduct overflow (stage 3) finally resulting in a metabolic breakdown entering complete phosphate depletion (stage 4). The decoupling is initiated by phosphate limitation; further effects are mainly mediated on metabolic level through ATP availability and energy charge, additionally affected by ATP demanding product synthesis.

  8. Metabolic Strategies in Energy-Limited Microbial Communities in the Anoxic Subsurface (Frasassi Cave System, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, R. L.; Jones, D. S.; Schaperdoth, I.; Steinberg, L.; Macalady, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    Two major sources of energy, light and chemical potential, are available to microorganisms. However, energy is not always abundant and is often a limiting factor in microbial survival and replication. The anoxic, terrestrial subsurface offers a unique opportunity to study microorganisms and their potentially novel metabolic strategies that are relevant for understanding biogeochemistry and biosignatures as related to the non-photosynthetic, energy-limited environments on the modern and ancient Earth and elsewhere in the solar system. Geochemical data collected in a remote stratified lake 600 m below ground surface in the sulfidic Frasassi cave system (Italy) suggest that little redox energy is available for life, consistent with low signal from domain-specific FISH probes. The carbon isotope signatures of biofilms (-33‰) and DIC (-9‰) in the anoxic water suggest in situ production by lithoautotrophs using RuBisCO. 16S rDNA libraries constructed from the biofilm are dominated by diverse sulfate reducing bacteria. The remaining bacterial and archaeal clones affiliate with more than 11 major uncultivated or novel prokaryotic lineages. Diverse dsrAB gene sequences are consistent with high sulfate concentrations and undetectable or extremely low oxygen, nitrate, and iron concentrations. However, the electron donor for sulfate reduction is unclear. Methane is detectable in the anoxic water although no 16S rDNA sequences associated with known methanogens or anaerobic methane oxidizers were retrieved. mcrA gene sequences retrieved from the biofilm by cloning are not related to cultivated methanogens or to known anaerobic methane oxidizers. Non-purgable organic carbon (NPOC) is below detection limits (i.e. <42 μM acetate) suggesting that alternative electron donors or novel metabolisms may be important. A sample collected by cave divers in October 2009 was pyrosequenced at the Pennsylvania State University Genomics Core Facility using Titanium chemistry (454 Life

  9. Modeling Multi-Arc Spraying Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.

    2016-06-01

    The use of plasma as energy source in thermal spraying enables among others the processing of feed stock materials with very high melting temperatures as coating materials. New generation multi-arc plasma spraying systems are widely spread and promise several advantages in comparison to the conventional single-arc systems. Numerical modeling of multi-arc plasma spraying offers the possibility to increase the understanding about this process. This study focuses on the numerical modeling of three-cathode spraying systems, introducing the recent activities in this field and discussing the numerical aspects which influence the prediction power of the models.

  10. LOWER LIMITS ON ULTRAHIGH-ENERGY COSMIC RAY AND JET POWERS OF TeV BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Razzaque, Soebur; Dermer, Charles D.; Finke, Justin D.

    2012-02-01

    Lower limits on the power emitted in ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), which are assumed to be protons with energy {approx}> 10{sup 17}-10{sup 20} eV, are derived for TeV blazars with the assumption that the observed TeV {gamma}-rays are generated due to interactions of these protons with cosmic microwave photons. The limits depend on the spectrum of the injected UHECR protons. While for a -2.2 injection spectrum the lower limits on the powers emitted in UHECRs by 1ES 0229+200, 1ES 1101-232, and 1ES 0347-121 are lower than their respective synchrotron luminosities ({approx}10{sup 46} erg s{sup -1}), in the case of 1ES 1426+428 it exceeds the corresponding synchrotron luminosity by up to an order of magnitude. The proposed Auger North Observatory should be able to detect 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} eV cosmic-ray (CR) protons from 1ES 1426+428 within a few years of operation and test the TeV {gamma}-ray production model by UHECR energy losses while propagating along the line of sight or constrain the intergalactic magnetic field to be larger than {approx}10{sup -16} G in case of no detection. The lower limits on the apparent-isotropic jet power from accelerated 10{sup 10}-10{sup 20} eV proton spectra in the blazar jet is of the order of the Eddington luminosity of a 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} black hole for a CR injection spectrum -2.2 or harder for all blazars considered except for 1ES 1426+428. In the case of the latter, the apparent-isotropic jet power exceeds the Eddington luminosity by an order of magnitude. For an injection spectrum softer than -2.2, as is required to fit the observed CR data above {approx}10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} eV, the Eddington luminosity is exceeded by the lower limits on the jet power for all blazars considered.

  11. Rethinking Recycling in Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P.; Behn, M. D.; Jagoutz, O.

    2012-12-01

    Hacker et al EPSL 2011 and Behn et al Nature Geosci 2011 investigated pathways for return of buoyant, subducted material to arc crust. These include (1) diapirs rising into the hot mantle wedge, with extensive melts adding a component to arc magmas, (2) flow of material back up a relatively cold "subduction channel", adding solids to the lower crust and small-degree partial melts to the upper crust, (3) flow from the forearc along the base of arc crust, and (4) imbrication of forearc material into arc crust. These processes add felsic, incompatible-element-rich components to arc crust. The flux of incompatible elements such as Th in arc lavas, thought to be mainly recycled from subducted sediments, is > sediment subduction flux. There are large uncertainties: arc crustal growth rates are imprecise; young, primitive arc lavas may not be representative of magmatic flux into arc crust; sediment subduction flux may have varied. Nevertheless, this result is found for all arcs examined, using recently published growth rates. Perhaps arc growth rates that include subduction erosion are systematically overestimated. Instead or in addition, maybe significant Th comes from material other than sediments. Here, we consider the implications of pathways 1-4 for arc growth rates and incompatible element enrichment, in the context of subduction erosion and arc-arc collision. Subducting arc lithologies can become separated, with only felsic components returned to arc crust. Buoyant lithologies are mobile in viscous instabilities at > 700-800°C. Whereas thin layers such as sediments may become mobile all at once, instabilities may periodically strip the hottest parts from the top of thick buoyant layers, replacing them with hot mantle. In arc-arc collision, the top of a subducting plate starts at about 0°C on the seafloor, so heating is slow. In subduction erosion, forearc material in the subducting package can be > 200°C before erosion so buoyant lithologies reach 700-800

  12. Arc Distribution During the Vacuum Arc Remelting of Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodside, C. Rigel; King, Paul E.; Nordlund, Chris

    2013-02-01

    Currently, the temporal distribution of electric arcs across the ingot during vacuum arc remelting (VAR) is not a known or monitored process parameter. Previous studies indicate that the distribution of arcs can be neither diffuse nor axisymmetric about the center of the furnace. Correct accounting for the heat flux, electric current flux, and mass flux into the ingot is critical to achieving realistic solidification models of the VAR process. The National Energy Technology Laboratory has developed an arc position measurement system capable of locating arcs and determining the arc distribution within an industrial VAR furnace. The system is based on noninvasive magnetic field measurements and a VAR specific form of the Biot-Savart law. The system was installed on a coaxial industrial VAR furnace at ATI Albany Operations in Albany, OR. This article reports on the different arc distributions observed during production of Ti-6Al-4V. It is shown that several characteristic arc distribution modes can develop. This behavior is not apparent in the existing signals used to control the furnace, indicating the measurement system is providing new information. It is also shown that the different arc distribution modes observed may impact local solidification times, particularly at the side wall.

  13. Arc distribution during the vacuum arc remelting of Ti-6Al-4V

    SciTech Connect

    Woodside, Charles Rigel; King, Paul E.; Nordlund, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Currently, the temporal distribution of electric arcs across the ingot during vacuum arc remelting (VAR) is not a known or monitored process parameter. Previous studies indicate that the distribution of arcs can be neither diffuse nor axisymmetric about the center of the furnace. Correct accounting for the heat flux, electric current flux, and mass flux into the ingot is critical to achieving realistic solidification models of the VAR process. The National Energy Technology Laboratory has developed an arc position measurement system capable of locating arcs and determining the arc distribution within an industrial VAR furnace. The system is based on noninvasive magnetic field measurements and a VAR specific form of the Biot–Savart law. The system was installed on a coaxial industrial VAR furnace at ATI Albany Operations in Albany, OR. This article reports on the different arc distributions observed during production of Ti-6Al-4V. It is shown that several characteristic arc distribution modes can develop. This behavior is not apparent in the existing signals used to control the furnace, indicating the measurement system is providing new information. It is also shown that the different arc distribution modes observed may impact local solidification times, particularly at the side wall.

  14. Arc initiation in cathodic arc plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2002-01-01

    A "triggerless" arc initiation method and apparatus is based on simply switching the arc supply voltage to the electrodes (anode and cathode). Neither a mechanical trigger electrode nor a high voltage flashover from a trigger electrode is required. A conducting path between the anode and cathode is provided, which allows a hot spot to form at a location where the path connects to the cathode. While the conductive path is eroded by the cathode spot action, plasma deposition ensures the ongoing repair of the conducting path. Arc initiation is achieved by simply applying the relatively low voltage of the arc power supply, e.g. 500 V-1 kV, with the insulator between the anode and cathode coated with a conducting layer and the current at the layer-cathode interface concentrated at one or a few contact points. The local power density at these contact points is sufficient for plasma production and thus arc initiation. A conductive surface layer, such as graphite or the material being deposited, is formed on the surface of the insulator which separates the cathode from the anode. The mechanism of plasma production (and arc initiation) is based on explosive destruction of the layer-cathode interface caused by joule heating. The current flow between the thin insulator coating and cathode occurs at only a few contact points so the current density is high.

  15. Effects of shielding gas hydrogen content on the arc behavior in gas tungsten arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Onsoien, M.I.; Olson, D.L.; Liu, S.

    1994-12-31

    The primary role of the shielding gas in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) is to protect the weld pool and tungsten electrode from the oxygen and nitrogen in the surrounding atmosphere. Traditionally inert gases such as argon and helium have been used, either as pure gases or mixed with each other. However, additions of small amounts of hydrogen have been reported to improve weld bead penetration and enable higher welding speeds to be used. The present work was performed to investigate the effect of small hydrogen additions on the arc behavior in GTAW, and to further the fundamental understanding of the effect of shielding gas on arc characteristics. GTAW bead-on-plate welds were made on 12.5 mm x 150 mm x 75 mm Type 304 stainless steel test coupons. The welding current, voltage, and their variations were continuously monitored during welding. After welding, each test coupon was sectioned and prepared using standard metallographic techniques and etched in Vilella`s etch for macroexamination of the weld bead cross section. Bead width, depth, and cross-sectional area were measured using a LECO image analysator system. The influence of hydrogen content in an argon has tungsten arc was characterized. The electrical behavior of the arc, including the arc resistance, was measured as a function of current and hydrogen content. A better fundamental understanding of arc behavior and energy transfer was achieved using these experimental gas mixes. The results allow the following conclusions to be drawn: (1) Small additions of hydrogen in the argon based shielding gas in gas tungsten arc welding significantly change the weld bead geometry due to changes in the arc column. (2) Selection of the right argon, hydrogen shielding gas mixture to give the optimum arc column characteristics for a given condition can improve weld quality and increase productivity. (3) The resistance of the arc column was found to be an adequate parameter to describe the arc column behavior.

  16. Casimir free energy of dielectric films: classical limit, low-temperature behavior and control.

    PubMed

    Klimchitskaya, G L; Mostepanenko, V M

    2017-07-12

    The Casimir free energy of dielectric films, both free-standing in vacuum and deposited on metallic or dielectric plates, is investigated. It is shown that the values of the free energy depend considerably on whether the calculation approach used neglects or takes into account the dc conductivity of film material. We demonstrate that there are material-dependent and universal classical limits in the former and latter cases, respectively. The analytic behavior of the Casimir free energy and entropy for a free-standing dielectric film at low temperature is found. According to our results, the Casimir entropy goes to zero when the temperature vanishes if the calculation approach with neglected dc conductivity of a film is employed. If the dc conductivity is taken into account, the Casimir entropy takes the positive value at zero temperature, depending on the parameters of a film, i.e. the Nernst heat theorem is violated. By considering the Casimir free energy of SiO2 and Al2O3 films deposited on a Au plate in the framework of two calculation approaches, we argue that physically correct values are obtained by disregarding the role of dc conductivity. A comparison with the well known results for the configuration of two parallel plates is made. Finally, we compute the Casimir free energy of SiO2, Al2O3 and Ge films deposited on high-resistivity Si plates of different thicknesses and demonstrate that it can be positive, negative and equal to zero. The effect of illumination of a Si plate with laser light is considered. Possible applications of the obtained results to thin films used in microelectronics are discussed.

  17. Casimir free energy of dielectric films: classical limit, low-temperature behavior and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2017-07-01

    The Casimir free energy of dielectric films, both free-standing in vacuum and deposited on metallic or dielectric plates, is investigated. It is shown that the values of the free energy depend considerably on whether the calculation approach used neglects or takes into account the dc conductivity of film material. We demonstrate that there are material-dependent and universal classical limits in the former and latter cases, respectively. The analytic behavior of the Casimir free energy and entropy for a free-standing dielectric film at low temperature is found. According to our results, the Casimir entropy goes to zero when the temperature vanishes if the calculation approach with neglected dc conductivity of a film is employed. If the dc conductivity is taken into account, the Casimir entropy takes the positive value at zero temperature, depending on the parameters of a film, i.e. the Nernst heat theorem is violated. By considering the Casimir free energy of SiO2 and Al2O3 films deposited on a Au plate in the framework of two calculation approaches, we argue that physically correct values are obtained by disregarding the role of dc conductivity. A comparison with the well known results for the configuration of two parallel plates is made. Finally, we compute the Casimir free energy of SiO2, Al2O3 and Ge films deposited on high-resistivity Si plates of different thicknesses and demonstrate that it can be positive, negative and equal to zero. The effect of illumination of a Si plate with laser light is considered. Possible applications of the obtained results to thin films used in microelectronics are discussed.

  18. Intrinsic potential for immediate biodegradation of toluene in a pristine, energy-limited aquifer.

    PubMed

    Herzyk, Agnieszka; Maloszewski, Piotr; Qiu, Shiran; Elsner, Martin; Griebler, Christian

    2014-06-01

    Pristine and energy-limited aquifers are considered to have a low resistance and resilience towards organic pollution. An experiment in an indoor aquifer system revealed an unexpected high intrinsic potential for the attenuation of a short-term toluene contamination. A 30 h pulse of 486 mg of toluene, used as a model contaminant, and deuterated water (D2O) through an initially pristine, oxic, and organic carbon poor sandy aquifer revealed an immediate aerobic toluene degradation potential. Based on contaminant and tracer break-through curves, as well as mass balance analyses and reactive transport modelling, a contaminant removal of 40 % over a transport distance of only 4.2 m in less than one week of travel time was obtained. The mean first-order degradation rate constant was λ = 0.178 day(-1), corresponding to a half-life time constant T1/2 of 3.87 days. Toluene-specific stable carbon isotope analysis independently proved that the contaminant mass removal can be attributed to microbial biodegradation. Since average doubling times of indigenous bacterial communities were in the range of months to years, the aerobic biodegradation potential observed is assumed to be present and active in the pristine, energy-limited groundwater ecosystems at any time. Follow-up experiments and field studies will help to quantify the immediate natural attenuation potential of aquifers for selected priority contaminants and will try to identify the key-degraders within the autochthonous microbial communities.

  19. Forming limit prediction of powder forging process by the energy-based elastoplastic damage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Hung-Yang; Cheng, Jung-Ho; Huang, Cheng-Chao

    2004-06-01

    An energy-based elastoplastic damage model is developed and then applied to predict the deformation and fracture initiation in powder forging processes. The fracture mechanism is investigated by the newly proposed damage model, which is based on the plastic energy dissipation. The developed formulations are implemented into finite element program ABAQUS in order to simulate the complex loading conditions. The forming limits of sintered porous metals under various operational conditions are explored by comparing the relevant experiments with the finite element analyses. The sintered iron-powder preforms of various initial relative densities (RDs) and aspect ratios are compressed until crack initiates. The deformation level of the bulged billets at fracture stroke obtained from compressive fracture tests is utilized to validate the finite element model and then the forming limit diagrams are constructed with the validated model. This model is further verified by the gear blank forging. The fracture site and corresponding deformation level are predicted by the finite element simulations. Meanwhile, the gear forging experiment is performed on the sintered preforms. The predicted results agree well with the experimental observations.

  20. Time-resolved phosphorescence of proteins: structural studies using energy transfer in the rapid diffusion limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gafni, Ari; Mersol, Joseph V.; Steel, Duncan G.

    1990-05-01

    Room temperature phosphorescence emitted by tryptophan residues in deoxygenated aqueous solutions of proteins is extremely sensitive to the environment of these residues and can be utilized for the detailed study of protein structure and dynamics. The long decay time of their triplet state makes the phosphorescent tryptophans suitable donors for resonance energy transfer in the rapid diffusion limit. As shown by Stryer et al. (Ann. Rev. Biophys. Bioeng. 11, 203 (1982)) proper data analysis can then yield the distance of closest approach between the donor-acceptor pair. This method can thus allow one to map the distances of phosphorescent tryptophans from the surface of the protein. In the present study a laser-based photon counting system was used to follow the room-temperature phosphorescence decays of alkaline phosphatase and horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase and to study the quenching of their triplet states by several molecules whose absorption spectra overlap the long-lived emission of these proteins. The results demonstrate the potential applicability of these measurements for the mapping of phosphorescent tryptophan residues and confirm the phosphorescence of alkaline phosphatase to originate in Trp-109. Limitations to the applicability of the energy-transfer approach arise from quenching mechanisms which compete with resonance transfer. Two such processes - electron transfer and exchange interactions - are discussed.

  1. Investigation of energy partitioning from Leopard short-pulse laser interactions in mass limited targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, B.; Sawada, H.; Yabuuchi, T.; McLean, H.; Patel, P.; Beg, F.

    2013-10-01

    The energy distribution in the interaction of a high-intensity, short-pulse laser with a mass limited target was investigated by simultaneously collecting x-ray and particle data. The Leopard laser system at the Nevada Terawatt Facility delivered 15 J of energy in a 350 fs pulse duration. With a beam spot size limited to within 8 μm, the target interaction achieved a peak intensity of 1019 W/cm2 at 20° incidence. The size of the Cu foil targets was varied from 2-20 μm in thickness and from 50 by 50 μm to 2000 by 2000 μm in surface area. A Bragg crystal x-ray spectrometer and a spherical crystal imager were used to measure 7.5-9.5 keV x-rays and 8.05 keV monochromatic x-ray images respectively. The escaping electrons and protons in the rear were monitored with a magnet-based electron spectrometer and radiochromic film. Preliminary results show both a decrease of the K β/K α ratio and a stronger He α emission for smaller sized targets, less than 250 by 250 μm. The detailed analyses of the K α images and particle data will be presented.

  2. Energy-limited escape revisited: A transition from strong planetary winds to stable thermospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salz, M.; Schneider, P. C.; Czesla, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2015-10-01

    Hot Jupiters are thought to suffer from mass loss through planetary winds powered by strong high-energy irradiation. These photoevaporative winds can affect planetary evolution. We carried out photoionization-hydrodynamics simulations of the thermospheres of hot gas planets in the solar neighborhood using our new interface between the PLUTO and CLOUDY codes called TPCI. These detailed simulations reveal efficient radiative cooling in the atmospheres of massive and compact Jovian planets, whose gravitational potential surpasses the critical limit of log_{10}( -Φ_{G}) > 13.11 erg g^{-1}. In contrast to widely-made assumptions, our modeling shows that planets like HAT-P-2 b host stable thermospheres in radiative equilibrium, whereas smaller gas giants, indeed, show considerable mass-loss rates. Hence, the heating efficiency of the absorption of EUV radiation in the planetary thermospheres depends on the gravitational potential of the planet. We present a scaling law for the heating efficiencies that can be used in the well-known energy-limited escape formula and provides easily accessible mass-loss estimates for a wide range of irradiated planets from super-Earth type planets to the most massive hot Jupiters. The trend of the heating efficiency versus the gravitational potential is reflected in the planetary Lyα absorption and emission signals. These signals can be used to distinguish between two types of thermospheres in hot gas planets: strong, cool planetary winds with Lyα absorption and hot, stable thermospheres with Lyα emission.

  3. The Tertiary Arc Chain in the Western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honza, E.

    1991-02-01

    The arcs bordering the Pacific Plate on the Western and Southwestern Pacific rim are reconstructed since their initiation in the Eocene and Oligocene. They occur in a zone forming an arc chain from the Western Pacific tropics to the eastern margin of Australia. They are the Bonin, Mariana, Yap, Palau, Halmahera, North New Guinea-West Melanesia, Solomon, Vanuatu, and Tonga-Kermadec Arcs, designated here the Tertiary Arc Chain. They are associated with the formation and consumption of backarc basins. Reversals of arc polarity and episodic subduction has occurred in some of them. The Tertiary Arc Chain is characterized by four major stages in its evolution which can be seen characteristically in some of the arcs. The first stage is the occurrence of the arc chain from the middle Eocene to earliest Oligocene. The second stage is the formation of the backarc basins from the early to late Oligocene. The third stage is the occurrence of double arcs on the inner side of the arc chain in the early to middle Miocene and the fourth stage is the reversal of arc polarities due to collisions since the late Miocene. The backarc basins associated with the arcs of the Tertiary Arc Chain have fixed limits of duration in their evolution. The backarc basins initially form 15 million years after the initiation of the volcanic arc. Several to 10 million years after the initial opening, backarc spreading terminates. Approximately 20 million years after the cessation of the backarc spreading, a second phase of opening occurs in the backarc region. In the case of arc collision, reversal of the arc polarity occurs if there is oceanic crust on the backarc side, and opening of a backarc basin occurs within several million years. These occurrences and durations have a variation of ca. 3-5 million years.

  4. Long arc stabilities with various arc gas flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, K.; Takeda, K.; Sugimoto, M.; Noguchi, Y.

    2014-11-01

    A new arc torch for use in magnetically driven arc device was developed with a commercially available TIG welding arc torch. The torch has a water-cooling system to the torch nozzle and has a nozzle nut to supply a swirling-free plasma gas flow. Its endurance against arc thermal load is examined. Features of its generated arc are investigated.

  5. Electromagnetic radiation generated by arcing in low density plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vayner, Boris V.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Snyder, David B.; Doreswamy, C. V.

    1996-01-01

    An unavoidable step in the process of space exploration is to use high-power, very large spacecraft launched into Earth orbit. Obviously, the spacecraft will need powerful energy sources. Previous experience has shown that electrical discharges occur on the surfaces of a high-voltage array, and these discharges (arcs) are undesirable in many respects. Moreover, any high voltage conductor will interact with the surrounding plasma, and that interaction may result in electrical discharges between the conductor and plasma (or between two conductors with different potentials, for example, during docking and extravehicular activity). One very important aspect is the generation of electromagnetic radiation by arcing. To prevent the negative influence of electromagnetic noise on the operation of spacecraft systems, it seems necessary to determine the spectra and absolute levels of the radiation, and to determine limitations on the solar array bias voltage that depend on the parameters of LEO plasma and the technical requirements of the spacecraft equipment. This report describes the results of an experimental study and computer simulation of the electromagnetic radiation generated by arcing on spacecraft surfaces. A large set of high quality data was obtained during the Solar Array Module Plasma Interaction Experiment (SAMPIE, flight STS-62) and ground test. These data include the amplitudes of current, pulse forms, duration of each arc, and spectra of plasma waves. A theoretical explanation of the observed features is presented in this report too. The elaborated model allows us to determine the parameters of the electromagnetic noise for different frequency ranges, distances from the arcing site, and distinct kinds of plasma waves.

  6. Red Arcs on Tethys

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-29

    Unusual arc-shaped, reddish streaks cut across the surface of Saturn's ice-rich moon Tethys in this enhanced-color mosaic. The red streaks are narrow, curved lines on the moon's surface, only a few miles (or kilometers) wide but several hundred miles (or kilometers) long. The red streaks are among the most unusual color features on Saturn's moons to be revealed by Cassini's cameras. A few of the red arcs can be faintly seen in Cassini imaging observations made earlier in the mission, but the color images for this observation, which were obtained in April 2015, were the first to show large northern areas of Tethys under the illumination and viewing conditions necessary to see the features clearly. As the Saturn system moved into its northern hemisphere summer over the past few years, northern latitudes have become increasingly well illuminated. As a result, the red arc features have become clearly visible for the first time. The origin of the features and their reddish color is currently a mystery to Cassini scientists. Possibilities being studied include ideas that the reddish material is exposed ice with chemical impurities, or the result of outgassing from inside Tethys. The streaks could also be associated with features like fractures that are below the resolution of the available images. Except for a few small craters on Dione, reddish tinted features are rare on other moons of Saturn. However, many reddish features are observed on the geologically young surface of Jupiter's moon Europa. Images taken using clear, green, infrared and ultraviolet spectral filters were combined to create the view, which highlights subtle color differences across Tethys' surface at wavelengths not visible to human eyes. The moon's surface is fairly uniform in natural color. The yellowish tones on the left side of the view are a result of alteration of the moon's surface by high-energy particles from Saturn's magnetosphere. This particle radiation slams into the moon's trailing

  7. Vertical distribution of vibrational energy of molecular nitrogen in a stable auroral red arc and its effect on ionospheric electron densities. Ph.D. Thesis - Catholic Univ. of Am.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, G. P.

    1973-01-01

    Previous solutions of the problem of the distribution of vibrationally excited molecular nitrogen in the thermosphere have either assumed a Boltzmann distribution and considered diffusion as one of the loss processes or solved for the energy level populations and neglected diffusion. Both of the previous approaches are combined by solving the time dependent continuity equations, including the diffusion process, for the first six energy levels of molecular nitrogen for conditions in the thermosphere corresponding to a stable auroral red arc. The primary source of molecular nitrogen excitation was subexcitation, and inelastic collisions between thermal electrons and molecular nitrogen. The reaction rates for this process were calculated from published cross section calculations. The loss processes for vibrational energy were electron and atomic oxygen quenching and vibrational energy exchange. The coupled sets of nonlinear, partial differential equations were solved numerically by employing finite difference equations.

  8. Implications of Limiting CO2 Concentrations for Land Use and Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Sands, Ronald D.; Smith, Steven J.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Edmonds, James A.

    2009-05-29

    This paper is the first to simultaneously examine the implications of extending the concept of placing a value on carbon beyond fossil fuel and industrial emissions to all sources, including those associated with land use and land use change. The paper reports a variety of results that have bearing on recent discussions in the literature regarding the role of bioenergy and the indirect emission of carbon through land-use change as well as the burgeoning literature on interactions between bioenergy and crop prices. This paper goes beyond results currently in the literature by using an integrated assessment model to assess energy use and supply, atmospheric composition, land use, and terrestrial carbon in the context of limiting the concentration of atmospheric CO2. We find that when the concept of valuing carbon emissions is extended to all carbon emissions, regardless of origin, that in contrast to a mitigation scenario where only fossil fuel and industrial carbon emissions are valued, deforestation is replaced by afforestation and expanded unmanaged ecosystems; the cost of limiting CO2 concentrations falls; crop prices rise; and human diets are transformed as people shift away from consumption of beef and other carbon-intensive protein sources. The increase in crop prices flows directly from the consideration of land-use change emissions in a comprehensive emissions mitigation program and occurs even in the absence of the use of purpose-grown bioenergy. Finally, we find that the assumed rate of improvement in food and fiber crop productivity (e.g. wheat, rice, corn) has a strong influence on land-use change emissions, making the technology for growing crops potentially as important for limiting atmospheric CO2 concentrations as energy technologies such as CO2 capture and storage.

  9. What limits photosynthetic energy conversion efficiency in nature? Lessons from the oceans.

    PubMed

    Falkowski, Paul G; Lin, Hanzhi; Gorbunov, Maxim Y

    2017-09-26

    Constraining photosynthetic energy conversion efficiency in nature is challenging. In principle, two yield measurements must be made simultaneously: photochemistry, fluorescence and/or thermal dissipation. We constructed two different, extremely sensitive and precise active fluorometers: one measures the quantum yield of photochemistry from changes in variable fluorescence, the other measures fluorescence lifetimes in the picosecond time domain. By deploying the pair of instruments on eight transoceanic cruises over six years, we obtained over 200 000 measurements of fluorescence yields and lifetimes from surface waters in five ocean basins. Our results revealed that the average quantum yield of photochemistry was approximately 0.35 while the average quantum yield of fluorescence was approximately 0.07. Thus, closure on the energy budget suggests that, on average, approximately 58% of the photons absorbed by phytoplankton in the world oceans are dissipated as heat. This extraordinary inefficiency is associated with the paucity of nutrients in the upper ocean, especially dissolved inorganic nitrogen and iron. Our results strongly suggest that, in nature, most of the time, most of the phytoplankton community operates at approximately half of its maximal photosynthetic energy conversion efficiency because nutrients limit the synthesis or function of essential components in the photosynthetic apparatus.This article is part of the themed issue 'Enhancing photosynthesis in crop plants: targets for improvement'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  10. Therapy Imaging: Limitations Of Imaging With High Energy X-Ray Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, P.; Rawlinson, J. A.; Fenster, A.

    1987-01-01

    One of the major problems in radiation therapy is ensuring that the correct region of the patient receives the prescribed x-ray treatment and that the surrounding tissues are spared. One way to identify patient positioning errors is to make an image using the radiotherapy treatment beam. We have examined two of the factors that can influence the quality of images made with high energy x-ray beams: (i) the size of the x-ray source, and; (ii) the signal-to-noise characteristics of the detectors used to form images with high energy x-ray beams. We have developed a novel method of measuring the source distributions for 60Co machines and linear accelerators and from the measurements have been able to obtain the modulation transfer functions of their x-ray sources. We have also measured the modulation transfer functions (MTFs) and the noise power spectra (NPS) of the x-ray detectors. Based on these measurements, we conclude that images made with high energy x-ray beams are limited by film granularity and that improved images can be obtained by alternative detector systems.

  11. Physiological performance of warm-adapted marine ectotherms: Thermal limits of mitochondrial energy transduction efficiency.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Eloy; Hendricks, Eric; Menze, Michael A; Torres, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Thermal regimes in aquatic systems have profound implications for the physiology of ectotherms. In particular, the effect of elevated temperatures on mitochondrial energy transduction in tropical and subtropical teleosts may have profound consequences on organismal performance and population viability. Upper and lower whole-organism critical temperatures for teleosts suggest that subtropical and tropical species are not susceptible to the warming trends associated with climate change, but sub-lethal effects on energy transduction efficiency and population dynamics remain unclear. The goal of the present study was to compare the thermal sensitivity of processes associated with mitochondrial energy transduction in liver mitochondria from the striped mojarra (Eugerres plumieri), the whitemouth croaker (Micropogonias furnieri) and the palometa (Trachinotus goodei), to those of the subtropical pinfish (Lagodon rhomboides) and the blue runner (Caranx crysos). Mitochondrial function was assayed at temperatures ranging from 10 to 40°C and results obtained for both tropical and subtropical species showed a reduction in the energy transduction efficiency of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system in most species studied at temperatures below whole-organism critical temperature thresholds. Our results show a loss of coupling between O2 consumption and ATP production before the onset of the critical thermal maxima, indicating that elevated temperature may severely impact the yield of ATP production per carbon unit oxidized. As warming trends are projected for tropical regions, increasing water temperatures in tropical estuaries and coral reefs could impact long-term growth and reproductive performance in tropical organisms, which are already close to their upper thermal limit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Instability of a Short Anodic Arc Used for Synthesis of Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, Sophia; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2016-10-01

    The short anodic arc discharge is used for the synthesis of nanomaterials and had been presumed stable. We report the results of electrical and fast imaging measurements that reveal a combined motion of the arc column and the arc attachment region to the anode when the arc is operated with a high ablation rate. The arc exhibits a negative differential resistance before the arc motion occurs. The observed arc motion correlates with the arc voltage and current oscillations. The characteristic time of these instabilities is in a 10-3 sec range. Thermal processes in the arc plasma region interacting with the ablating anode are considered as possible causes of this unstable arc behavior. The measured negative differential resistance of the arc during the oscillations indirectly supports the thermal model. Our model suggests that the injection of the ablating material into the plasma locally reduces the energy flux to the surface and leads to the arc shifting to the adjacent position. The observed arc motion can potentially cause the mixing of the various nanoparticles synthesized in the arc in the high ablation regime leading to the poor selectivity characteristic of the arc synthesis of nanomaterials. US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  13. Decoupling criterion based on limited energy loss condition for groove measurement using optical scanning microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Li, Mengzhou; Li, Qiang; Tan, Jiubin

    2016-12-01

    In confocal metrology, the lateral and axial responses are coupled in narrow regions near groove edges. This coupling results in an area with an uncertain profile, particularly for measurements of tight structures or deep grooves. In this paper, to delineate the area with measurement accuracy loss, an analytical model depicting the coupling relationships between the groove depth, the coupled portions and the NA of the objective used is introduced. Based on this model, the limited energy lost (LEL) decoupling criterion is presented that can enable users to choose suitable numerical apertures before performing measurements, predict the extents of the areas with measurement accuracy loss, and identify readout areas that yield accurate height measurements. The theory was verified by using confocal microscopes and is also applicable to far-field optical scanning metrology.

  14. The Global Array of Primitve Arc Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. W.; Jagoutz, O. E.

    2015-12-01

    harzburgitic residue. Primitive high-K shoshonitic or low-Si alkaline arc melts occur in Sulawesi, Sunda, Mago, and Mexico (2 types), spatially mostly very much limited. We interpret these as derived from limited volumes of metasomatized mantle either residing in the subarc lithosphere or entrained into the mantle wedge.

  15. The UN's 'Sustainable Energy for All' initiative is compatible with a warming limit of 2 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogelj, Joeri; McCollum, David L.; Riahi, Keywan

    2013-06-01

    Progress towards climate protection has been modest over the past decades despite the ever-increasing urgency for concerted action against global warming. Partly as a response to this, but more directly as a means to promote sustainable development and poverty eradication, the United Nations has initiated a process to promote three global energy objectives: energy access, renewable energy and energy efficiency. Here we discuss the consistency of the proposed energy-related objectives with the overarching climate goal of limiting global temperature increase to below 2 °C. We find that achieving the three energy objectives could provide an important entry point to climate protection, and that sustainability and poverty eradication can go hand in hand with mitigating climate risks. Using energy indicators as the sole metrics for climate action may, however, ultimately fall short of the mark: eventually, only limits on cumulative greenhouse gas emissions will lead to stringent climate protection.

  16. NASA GRC and MSFC Space-Plasma Arc Testing Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Vayner, Boris V.; Galofaro, Joel T,; Hillard, G. Barry; Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd

    2005-01-01

    Tests of arcing and current collection in simulated space plasma conditions have been performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio, for over 30 years and at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, for almost as long. During this period, proper test conditions for accurate and meaningful space simulation have been worked out, comparisons with actual space performance in spaceflight tests and with real operational satellites have been made, and NASA has achieved our own internal standards for test protocols. It is the purpose of this paper to communicate the test conditions, test procedures, and types of analysis used at NASA GRC and MSFC to the space environmental testing community at large, to help with international space-plasma arcing-testing standardization. To be discussed are: 1.Neutral pressures, neutral gases, and vacuum chamber sizes. 2. Electron and ion densities, plasma uniformity, sample sizes, and Debuy lengths. 3. Biasing samples versus self-generated voltages. Floating samples versus grounded. 4. Power supplies and current limits. Isolation of samples from power supplies during arcs. 5. Arc circuits. Capacitance during biased arc-threshold tests. Capacitance during sustained arcing and damage tests. Arc detection. Prevention sustained discharges during testing. 6. Real array or structure samples versus idealized samples. 7. Validity of LEO tests for GEO samples. 8. Extracting arc threshold information from arc rate versus voltage tests. 9. Snapover and current collection at positive sample bias. Glows at positive bias. Kapon (R) pyrolisis. 10. Trigger arc thresholds. Sustained arc thresholds. Paschen discharge during sustained arcing. 11. Testing for Paschen discharge threshold. Testing for dielectric breakdown thresholds. Testing for tether arcing. 12. Testing in very dense plasmas (ie thruster plumes). 13. Arc mitigation strategies. Charging mitigation strategies. Models. 14. Analysis of test results

  17. Two Types of Transpolar Arc Development, Event Studies with Data Set of ASTRID-2, DMSP, FAST, and SuperDARN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narita, Yasuhito; Maezawa, Kiyoshi; Toshinori, Mukai; Kullen, A.; Ivchenko, N.; Marklund, G.; Frederick, R.; Carlson, C. W.; Spann, J. F.; Parks, G. K.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Aurorae which appear in the polar cap are called transpolar arcs, polar cap arcs, sun-aligned arcs, or occasionally Theta-aurora because of its spatial distribution resembling Greek character 'Theta.' Morphology, IMF (Interplanetary Magnetic Field) relationship, and ionospheric convection patterns were studied in quest of mechanisms of transpolar arcs. Four events were analyzed: 1999/Jan/22/19:00 - 23/01:30 (1 event: a) 1999/Jan/24/06:00 - 10:00 (1 event: b) 1999/Feb/1 1/20:00 - 12/02:00 (2 events: c, d), with data set of ExB drift velocity data obtained by electric field measurements of ASTRID-2 and FAST, DMSP ion driftmeter data, and line-of-sight velocity data of SuperDARN. POLAR-UVI image data were used for spatial and temporal variations of transpolar arcs and ACE data set were used for investigation of IMF relationship. IMF-Bz was strongly positive (Bz from +8nT to +20 nT) during periods of all four transpolar arcs. In events (a),(b),(c), transpolar arcs appeared immediately after the direction of IMF turned northward, though IMF was fluctuating in event (b). A sudden increase of IMF-By, from +3nT to +18nT, was observed in event (d). Two different types of transpolar arc development were observed in POLAR-UVI: one which begins as a split from dawn or dusk sector of auroral oval and shifts poleward in event (a),(c),(d), and another which is initially a patch of auroral oval disturbed by substorm but develops as a transpolar arc, forming a growing finger-like shape from midnight sector (event b). Sunward flow, associated with positive IMF-Bz, were observed within newly-created polar caps in event (a),(c),(d). Not clear ionospheric convection pattern was seen across the polar cap arc in event (b) die to limitation of data set. In event (c), O+ with energy more than 1 keV were observed by FAST within a transpolar arc, suggesting that their origin be from plasma sheet. Transpolar arcs are thought to be projection of plasma sheet bifurcation into lobe regime. There

  18. Two Types of Transpolar Arc Development, Event Studies with Data Set of ASTRID-2, DMSP, FAST, and SuperDARN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narita, Yasuhito; Maezawa, Kiyoshi; Toshinori, Mukai; Kullen, A.; Ivchenko, N.; Marklund, G.; Frederick, R.; Carlson, C. W.; Spann, J. F.; Parks, G. K.; hide

    2002-01-01

    Aurorae which appear in the polar cap are called transpolar arcs, polar cap arcs, sun-aligned arcs, or occasionally Theta-aurora because of its spatial distribution resembling Greek character 'Theta.' Morphology, IMF (Interplanetary Magnetic Field) relationship, and ionospheric convection patterns were studied in quest of mechanisms of transpolar arcs. Four events were analyzed: 1999/Jan/22/19:00 - 23/01:30 (1 event: a) 1999/Jan/24/06:00 - 10:00 (1 event: b) 1999/Feb/1 1/20:00 - 12/02:00 (2 events: c, d), with data set of ExB drift velocity data obtained by electric field measurements of ASTRID-2 and FAST, DMSP ion driftmeter data, and line-of-sight velocity data of SuperDARN. POLAR-UVI image data were used for spatial and temporal variations of transpolar arcs and ACE data set were used for investigation of IMF relationship. IMF-Bz was strongly positive (Bz from +8nT to +20 nT) during periods of all four transpolar arcs. In events (a),(b),(c), transpolar arcs appeared immediately after the direction of IMF turned northward, though IMF was fluctuating in event (b). A sudden increase of IMF-By, from +3nT to +18nT, was observed in event (d). Two different types of transpolar arc development were observed in POLAR-UVI: one which begins as a split from dawn or dusk sector of auroral oval and shifts poleward in event (a),(c),(d), and another which is initially a patch of auroral oval disturbed by substorm but develops as a transpolar arc, forming a growing finger-like shape from midnight sector (event b). Sunward flow, associated with positive IMF-Bz, were observed within newly-created polar caps in event (a),(c),(d). Not clear ionospheric convection pattern was seen across the polar cap arc in event (b) die to limitation of data set. In event (c), O+ with energy more than 1 keV were observed by FAST within a transpolar arc, suggesting that their origin be from plasma sheet. Transpolar arcs are thought to be projection of plasma sheet bifurcation into lobe regime. There

  19. Stretched arc discharge in produced water.

    PubMed

    Cho, Y I; Wright, K C; Kim, H S; Cho, D J; Rabinovich, A; Fridman, A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of stretching an arc discharge in produced water to increase the volume of produced water treated by plasma. Produced water is the wastewater generated by hydraulic fracturing of shale during the production phase in shale-oil or shale-gas exploration. The electric conductivity of produced water is in the range of 50-200 mS/cm, which provides both a challenge and opportunity for the application of plasmas. Stretching of an arc discharge in produced water was accomplished using a ground electrode and two high-voltage electrodes: one positioned close to the ground electrode and the other positioned farther away from the ground. The benefit of stretching the arc is that the contact between the arc and water is significantly increased, resulting in more efficient plasma treatment in both performance and energy cost.

  20. Collisions near Kerr black holes: lower limit of energy between orbiting and incoming particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowski, Mieszko

    2017-01-01

    In our paper we investigate the lower limit of collisional energy of test particles near the Kerr black hole. In particular we examine the minimal Lorentz factor between the freely falling particles and the particles orbiting around a black hole. We consider collisions on the innermost stable circular orbit and examine near-extreme case, where collisions take place near an event horizon. By fine-tuning the particles' angular momentum, the Lorentz factor of the collision can always be minimized to a value dependent on the black hole's spin. We identified that this minimal value is always less than 2√{2}-1/√{3} and more than √{12}-1/√{6} (the limits are the values for an extreme Kerr and Schwarzschild, respectively). It implies that this kind of collisions of compact objects are expected to be highly energetic near supermassive black holes. In addition, we show that an interaction between black hole's and particle's spins has an influence on minimal Lorentz factor. This contribution is nonnegligible for near-extreme black holes. We also discuss the relation between our results and sci-fi movie Interstellar.

  1. Energy Efficiency Optimization for Downlink Cloud RAN with Limited Fronthaul Capacity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Ma, Lin; Xu, Yubin

    2017-06-26

    In the downlink cloud radio access network (C-RAN), fronthaul compression has been developed to combat the performance bottleneck caused by the capacity-limited fronthaul links. Nevertheless, the state-of-arts focusing on fronthaul compression for spectral efficiency improvement become questionable for energy efficiency (EE) maximization, especially for meeting its requirements of large-scale implementation. Therefore, this paper aims to develop a low-complexity algorithm with closed-form solution for the EE maximization problem in a downlink C-RAN with limited fronthaul capacity. To solve such a non-trivial problem, we first derive an optimal solution using branch-and-bound approach to provide a performance benchmark. Then, by transforming the original problem into a parametric subtractive form, we propose a low-complexity two-layer decentralized (TLD) algorithm. Specifically, a bisection search is involved in the outer layer, while in the inner layer we propose an alternating direction method of multipliers algorithm to find a closed-form solution in a parallel manner with convergence guaranteed. Simulations results demonstrate that the TLD algorithm can achieve near optimal solution, and its EE is much higher than the spectral efficiency maximization one. Furthermore, the optimal and TLD algorithms are also extended to counter the channel error. The results show that the robust algorithms can provide robust performance in the case of lacking perfect channel state information.

  2. The bungling giant: Atomic Energy Canada Limited and next-generation nuclear technology, 1980--1994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Ian James

    From 1980--1994 Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL), the Crown Corporation responsible for the development of nuclear technology in Canada, ventured into the market for small-scale, decentralized power systems with the Slowpoke Energy System (SES), a 10MW nuclear reactor for space heating in urban and remote areas. The SES was designed to be "passively" or "inherently" safe, such that even the most catastrophic failure of the system would not result in a serious accident (e.g. a meltdown or an explosion). This Canadian initiative, a beneficiary of the National Energy Program, was the first and by far the most successful attempt at a passively safe, decentralized nuclear power system anywhere in the world. Part one uses archival documentation and interviews with project leaders to reconstruct the history of the SES. The standard explanations for the failure of the project, cheap oil, public resistance to the technology, and lack of commercial expertise, are rejected. Part two presents an alternative explanation for the failure of AECL to commercialize the SES. In short, technological momentum towards large-scale nuclear designs led to structural restrictions for the SES project. These restrictions manifested themselves internally to the company (e.g., marginalization of the SES) and externally to the company (e.g., licensing). In part three, the historical lessons of the SES are used to refine one of the central tenets of Popper's political philosophy, "piecemeal social engineering." Popper's presentation of the idea is lacking in detail; the analysis of the SES provides some empirical grounding for the concept. I argue that the institutions surrounding traditional nuclear power represent a form utopian social engineering, leading to consequences such as the suspension of civil liberties to guarantee security of the technology. The SES project was an example of a move from the utopian social engineering of large-scale centralized nuclear technology to the piecemeal

  3. Series and parallel arc-fault circuit interrupter tests.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jay Dean; Fresquez, Armando J.; Gudgel, Bob; Meares, Andrew

    2013-07-01

    While the 2011 National Electrical Codeª (NEC) only requires series arc-fault protection, some arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) manufacturers are designing products to detect and mitigate both series and parallel arc-faults. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has extensively investigated the electrical differences of series and parallel arc-faults and has offered possible classification and mitigation solutions. As part of this effort, Sandia National Laboratories has collaborated with MidNite Solar to create and test a 24-string combiner box with an AFCI which detects, differentiates, and de-energizes series and parallel arc-faults. In the case of the MidNite AFCI prototype, series arc-faults are mitigated by opening the PV strings, whereas parallel arc-faults are mitigated by shorting the array. A range of different experimental series and parallel arc-fault tests with the MidNite combiner box were performed at the Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory (DETL) at SNL in Albuquerque, NM. In all the tests, the prototype de-energized the arc-faults in the time period required by the arc-fault circuit interrupt testing standard, UL 1699B. The experimental tests confirm series and parallel arc-faults can be successfully mitigated with a combiner box-integrated solution.

  4. In the Arc

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-15

    NASA Cassini spacecraft image holds an unseen treasure orbiting within the bright arc of Saturn G ring: the tiny moonlet Aegaeon. Too small to be seen here, it is thought to be the source of the debris forming the bright arc in the lower right.

  5. TIGER Arc Modification Application

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Hillary

    1995-03-06

    The application enables the geometric correction of TIGER arcs to a more accurate spatial data set. This is done in a structured automated environment according to Census Bureau guidelines and New Mexico state GIS standards. Arcs may be deleted, added, combined, split, and moved relative to a coverage or image displayed in the background.

  6. WSTF electrical arc projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linley, Larry

    1994-09-01

    The objectives of these projects include the following: validate method used to screen wire insulation with arc tracking characteristics; determine damage resistance to arc as a function of source voltage and insulation thickness; investigate propagation characteristics of Kapton at low voltages; and investigate pyrolytic properties of polyimide insulated (Kapton) wire for low voltage (less than 35 VDC) applications. Supporting diagrams and tables are presented.

  7. WSTF electrical arc projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linley, Larry

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of these projects include the following: validate method used to screen wire insulation with arc tracking characteristics; determine damage resistance to arc as a function of source voltage and insulation thickness; investigate propagation characteristics of Kapton at low voltages; and investigate pyrolytic properties of polyimide insulated (Kapton) wire for low voltage (less than 35 VDC) applications. Supporting diagrams and tables are presented.

  8. Lazy arc consistency

    SciTech Connect

    Schiex, T.; Gaspin, C.; Regin, J.C.; Verfaillie, G.

    1996-12-31

    Arc consistency filtering is widely used in the framework of binary constraint satisfaction problems: with a low complexity, inconsistency may be detected and domains are filtered. In this paper, we show that when detecting inconsistency is the objective, a systematic domain filtering is useless and a lazy approach is more adequate. Whereas usual arc consistency algorithms produce the maximum arc consistent sub-domain, when it exists, we propose a method, called LAC{tau}, which only looks for any arc consistent sub-domain. The algorithm is then extended to provide the additional service of locating one variable with a minimum domain cardinality in the maximum arc consistent sub-domain, without necessarily computing all domain sizes. Finally, we compare traditional AC enforcing and lazy AC enforcing using several benchmark problems, both randomly generated CSP and real life problems.

  9. Smarter finance for cleaner energy: open up master limited partnerships (MLPs) and real estate investment trusts (REITs) to renewable energy investment

    SciTech Connect

    Mormann, Feliz; Reicher, Dan

    2012-11-15

    Master Limited Partnerships (MLPs) and Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs)—both well-established investment structures—should be opened up to renewable energy investment. MLPs and, more recently, REITs have a proven track record for promoting oil, gas, and other traditional energy sources. When extended to renewable energy projects these tools will help promote growth, move renewables closer to subsidy independence, and vastly broaden the base of investors in America’s energy economy. The extension of MLPs and REITs to renewables enjoys significant support from the investment and clean energy communities. In addition, MLPs for renewables also enjoy bipartisan political backing in Congress.

  10. A bottom-up assessment method of limitations to and vulnerability of energy supply in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissner, Tabea; Olonscheck, Mady; Walther, Carsten; Kropp, Jürgen P.; Reusser, Dominik

    2015-04-01

    Sufficient energy access is essential for development and adequate livelihood conditions, as the majority of societal activities depend on reliable and sufficient energy. Especially in developing and threshold countries, energy access remains limited and intermittent. Moreover, compared to developed countries, often the expenditures for energy constitute a huge part of the available money. The vulnerability of energy systems to the impacts of climate change differs depending on the utilized source of energy. A special characteristic of developing and threshold countries is the fact that the spatial heterogeneity of the energy supply structure, especially between urban and rural regions, is generally larger than in developed countries, while the adaptive capacity of people is often much lower. A sound consideration of these complex conditions is a necessary basis for determining in how far climate change impacts can further diminish energy access in regions, where energy access is already limited. The topic of energy vulnerability has often been addressed for developed countries, but assessments for less developed countries remain scarce. On the one hand, data needed for energy vulnerability assessments, as they exist for the developed world, is usually not available. On the other hand, existing assessment methods for the developed world are often not transferable because they focus on specific supply infrastructure or energy carriers. Transferability is also hindered by the large differences in energy access and energy use patterns. We propose a novel approach to assess domestic energy supply vulnerability, by reversing the usual chain of assessment. On the basis of a basket of household energy needs for different purposes, we first assess which sources are used in order to fulfil specific energy needs. By focussing on the regionally specific energy carriers, we are able to significantly reduce data needs and assess directly, how energy vulnerability may play out

  11. Arginine-Ornithine Antiporter ArcD Controls Arginine Metabolism and Interspecies Biofilm Development of Streptococcus gordonii*♦

    PubMed Central

    Sakanaka, Akito; Kuboniwa, Masae; Takeuchi, Hiroki; Hashino, Ei; Amano, Atsuo

    2015-01-01

    Arginine is utilized by the oral inhabitant Streptococcus gordonii as a substrate of the arginine deiminase system (ADS), eventually producing ATP and NH3, the latter of which is responsible for microbial resistance to pH stress. S. gordonii expresses a putative arginine-ornithine antiporter (ArcD) whose function has not been investigated despite relevance to the ADS and potential influence on inter-bacterial communication with periodontal pathogens that utilize amino acids as a main energy source. Here, we generated an S. gordonii ΔarcD mutant to explore the role of ArcD in physiological homeostasis and bacterial cross-feeding. First, we confirmed that S. gordonii ArcD plays crucial roles for mediating arginine uptake and promoting bacterial growth, particularly under arginine-limited conditions. Next, metabolomic profiling and transcriptional analysis of the ΔarcD mutant revealed that deletion of this gene caused intracellular accumulation of ornithine leading to malfunction of the ADS and suppression of de novo arginine biosynthesis. The mutant strain also showed increased susceptibility to low pH stress due to reduced production of ammonia. Finally, accumulation of Fusobacterium nucleatum was found to be significantly decreased in biofilm formed by the ΔarcD mutant as compared with the wild-type strain, although ornithine supplementation restored fusobacterium biovolume in dual-species biofilms with the ΔarcD mutant and also enhanced single species biofilm development by F. nucleatum. Our results are the first direct evidence showing that S. gordonii ArcD modulates not only alkali and energy production but also interspecies interaction with F. nucleatum, thus initiating a middle stage of periodontopathic biofilm formation, by metabolic cross-feeding. PMID:26085091

  12. Cross-arc Variations in Lava Chemistry in the Tonga Arc-Lau Back Arc System, 19- 23°S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, P. J.; Bezos, A.; Langmuir, C. H.; Escrig, S.; Matzen, A. K.; Asimow, P.; Arculus, R.

    2007-12-01

    produces hydrous melts. We suggest that Tofua arc formed completely from the wet side. Seamounts have a small input from the dry side and a greater input from the wet side compared to ELSC, consistent with their location. Our data suggest that the contribution from the wet side varies in composition along the length of the axis, and that the distinctiveness at each latitude is maintained across the arc from Tofua to ELSC. In the north, the relationships between arc, back-arc and seamounts are more complex. Segment NELSC-1 (Bezos et al., in prep and this meeting) displays two distinctive mixing trends toward different subduction components. Neither of the subduction components of NELSC-1 matches the Tofua arc at this latitude: they are both too low in Ba and Pb relative to H2O. This reflects the great distance between Tofua arc and NELSC-1. The seamounts chemistry seems to reflect their proximity to ELSC or Tofua arc. Seamounts that are close to NELSC-1 fall on mixing arrays of NELSC-1. Seamounts that are closer to Tofua arc lie on a mixing arrays between Tofua arc and NELSC-1. A seamount at the northern end of NELSC-1 has more chemical affinity to the ILSC that is offset to the NW from the northern tip of ELSC. It seems that the subduction components associated with Tofua have a limited range of influence toward the back arc.

  13. The DES Bright Arcs Survey: Hundreds of Candidate Strongly Lensed Galaxy Systems from the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification and Year 1 Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, H. T.; Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Lindgren, K. A.; Nord, B.; Gaitsch, H.; Gaitsch, S.; Lin, H.; Allam, S.; Collett, T. E.; Furlanetto, C.; Gill, M. S. S.; More, A.; Nightingale, J.; Odden, C.; Pellico, A.; Tucker, D. L.; da Costa, L. N.; Fausti Neto, A.; Kuropatkin, N.; Soares-Santos, M.; Welch, B.; Zhang, Y.; Frieman, J. A.; Abdalla, F. B.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Evrard, A. E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; García-Bellido, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Menanteau, F.; Miquel, R.; Nichol, R. C.; Nugent, P.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Sheldon, E.; Smith, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; DES Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    We report the results of searches for strong gravitational lens systems in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification and Year 1 observations. The Science Verification data span approximately 250 sq. deg. with a median i-band limiting magnitude for extended objects (10σ) of 23.0. The Year 1 data span approximately 2000 sq. deg. and have an i-band limiting magnitude for extended objects (10σ) of 22.9. As these data sets are both wide and deep, they are particularly useful for identifying strong gravitational lens candidates. Potential strong gravitational lens candidate systems were initially identified based on a color and magnitude selection in the DES object catalogs or because the system is at the location of a previously identified galaxy cluster. Cutout images of potential candidates were then visually scanned using an object viewer and numerically ranked according to whether or not we judged them to be likely strong gravitational lens systems. Having scanned nearly 400,000 cutouts, we present 374 candidate strong lens systems, of which 348 are identified for the first time. We provide the R.A. and decl., the magnitudes and photometric properties of the lens and source objects, and the distance (radius) of the source(s) from the lens center for each system.

  14. Long-Wavelength Limit of Photochemical Energy Conversion in Photosystem I

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In Photosystem I (PS I) long-wavelength chlorophylls (LWC) of the core antenna are known to extend the spectral region up to 750 nm for absorbance of light that drives photochemistry. Here we present clear evidence that even far-red light with wavelengths beyond 800 nm, clearly outside the LWC absorption bands, can still induce photochemical charge separation in PS I throughout the full temperature range from 295 to 5 K. At room temperature, the photoaccumulation of P700+• was followed by the absorbance increase at 826 nm. At low temperatures (T < 100 K), the formation of P700+•FA/B–• was monitored by the characteristic EPR signals of P700+• and FA/B–• and by the characteristic light-minus-dark absorbance difference spectrum in the QY region. P700 oxidation was observed upon selective excitation at 754, 785, and 808 nm, using monomeric and trimeric PS I core complexes of Thermosynechococcus elongatus and Arthrospira platensis, which differ in the amount of LWC. The results show that the LWC cannot be responsible for the long-wavelength excitation-induced charge separation at low temperatures, where thermal uphill energy transfer is frozen out. Direct energy conversion of the excitation energy from the LWC to the primary radical pair, e.g., via a superexchange mechanism, is excluded, because no dependence on the content of LWC was observed. Therefore, it is concluded that electron transfer through PS I is induced by direct excitation of a proposed charge transfer (CT) state in the reaction center. A direct signature of this CT state is seen in absorbance spectra of concentrated PS I samples, which reveal a weak and featureless absorbance band extending beyond 800 nm, in addition to the well-known bands of LWC (C708, C719 and C740) in the range between 700 and 750 nm. The present findings suggest that nature can exploit CT states for extending the long wavelength limit in PSI even beyond that of LWC. Similar mechanisms may work in other photosynthetic

  15. History of Neptune's Ring Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.; Colwell, J. E.; Canup, R. M.

    1997-07-01

    The recent dynamical calculations for Neptune's Adams ring arcs by Foryta and Sicardy (1996) and Hanninen and Porco (1997) determine the basic evolutionary parameters for this system. The ring evolution is dominated by stochastic events, particularly chaotic motion that causes a migration between the corotation sites (FS96) and collisions near quadrature (HP97). A basic problem is that the high velocity collisions that produce the dusty arcs at the Galatea corotation resonances rapidly depopulate these sites (Colwell and Esposito 1990). With the new results in hand for the evolution of the ring particles over periods of less than a century, we can now calculate the long-term stochastic evolution of the Adams ring. Using a finite Markov chain as a model for this stochastic process, we follow the suggestion by FS96 that corotation sites provide preferential locations for accretion. A more general conclusion is that the longitudinal concentration of material in a few nearby sites (and that the majority of the Adams ring material is residing there) requires either an exceedingly recent event (EC92) or that the corotation sites be absorbing states of the Markov chain.In the latter case, the competing processes of chaotic diffusion and frustrated accretion can provide the arc and clump features as recurrent transient events near the Roche limit. Similar phenomena would be expected for Saturn's F and G rings.

  16. Welding arc initiator

    DOEpatents

    Correy, Thomas B.

    1989-01-01

    An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome.

  17. Welding arc initiator

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1989-05-09

    An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome. 3 figs.

  18. Arc spraying in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianjun

    2001-03-01

    Although are spraying is not a new technique, recent development of arc spraying device systems, spray wires, research on the coating mechanism, and the dynamic behavior of spraying make it a most active thermal spray process. In China, the arc spraying technique is the most efficient way for long life corrosion protection of steel structures. In addition, the arc spraying process is widely used for renovation and surface modification of machine components, mold making for plastic products, high-temperature corrosion resistance for waterwalls of boilers, antisliding coatings, self-lubricating coatings, etc.

  19. Tokamak ARC damage

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage.

  20. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Deichelbohrer, Paul R [Richland, WA

    1986-01-01

    A portable, hand held electric arc saw has a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc to erode a workpiece. Electric current is supplied to the blade by biased brushes and a slip ring which are mounted in the frame. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads stretched between two pulleys are used to facilitate movement of the electric arc saw. The pulleys are formed of dielectric material to electrically insulate the crawler treads from the frame.

  1. Waste Management Improvement Initiatives at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited - 13091

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Nicholas; Adams, Lynne; Wong, Pierre

    2013-07-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) has been in operation for over 60 years. Radioactive, mixed, hazardous and non-hazardous wastes have been and continue to be generated at CRL as a result of research and development, radioisotope production, reactor operation and facility decommissioning activities. AECL has implemented several improvement initiatives at CRL to simplify the interface between waste generators and waste receivers: - Introduction of trained Waste Officers representing their facilities or activities at CRL; - Establishment of a Waste Management Customer Support Service as a Single-Point of Contact to provide guidance to waste generators for all waste management processes; and - Implementation of a streamlined approach for waste identification with emphasis on early identification of waste types and potential disposition paths. As a result of implementing these improvement initiatives, improvements in waste management and waste transfer efficiencies have been realized at CRL. These included: 1) waste generators contacting the Customer Support Service for information or guidance instead of various waste receivers; 2) more clear and consistent guidance provided to waste generators for waste management through the Customer Support Service; 3) more consistent and correct waste information provided to waste receivers through Waste Officers, resulting in reduced time and resources required for waste management (i.e., overall cost); 4) improved waste minimization and segregation approaches, as identified by in-house Waste Officers; and 5) enhanced communication between waste generators and waste management groups. (authors)

  2. Permissible Emission Limit Estimation via Iterative Back-Calculation: Case of Assaluyeh Energy Zone, Southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Khajehpour, Hossein; Saboohi, Yadollah; Tsatsaronis, George

    2017-08-16

    In this research work, an environmental policy procedure for setting a cap on emissions, as a crucial step in any total emission control system, has been provided and evaluated. It is shown that general regulations on emission intensities and rates do not guarantee that ambient air quality standards are met in intense industrial zones. Local emission limits are necessary to meet ambient air quality standards in these zones. To that end, we used dispersion simulators to back-calculate pollutant concentration thresholds for a large and intense energy system in the Assaluyeh region of southern Iran. Verified modeling results indicate 218 days of pollutant concentration threshold exceedance in Assaluyeh in a simulated year. Back-calculation to assess the total permissible emission level indicates the need for 68% reduction in total emission to meet ambient air quality standards. We then used the model to help identify effective control strategies including emission reductions and appropriate timing of specific operations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Limitations of Electronic Energy Transfer in the Determination of Lipid Nanodomain Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Šachl, Radek; Humpolíčková, Jana; Štefl, Martin; Johansson, Lennart B.-Å.; Hof, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Even though superresolution microscopy indicates that size of plasma membrane rafts is <20 nm, those structures have never been observed. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is therefore still the most powerful optical method for characterization of such domains. In this letter we investigate relation between nanodomain affinity of a donor-acceptor (D/A) pair and the detectable nanodomain size/area. We show that probes with high affinity to the liquid-ordered (Lo) phase are required for detecting domain sizes of a few nanometers, and/or domains that occupy a few percent of the bilayer area. A combination of donors and acceptors that prefer different phases is the more favorable approach. For instance, a D/A pair with the distribution constant of donors KD = 5 and acceptors KA = 0.01 can resolve a broad spectrum of nanodomain sizes. On the other hand, currently available donors and acceptors that prefer the same phase, either the liquid-disordered (Ld) or Lo phase, are not so convenient for determining domain sizes <20 nm. Here the detection limits of FRET experiments employing several commonly used D/A pairs have been investigated. PMID:22261076

  4. An experimental study of secondary electron emission in the limit of low electron energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, V. I.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Koepke, M. E.

    2013-09-01

    Study of secondary electron emission (SEE) from solid surfaces is important for many areas of science and technology, including but not limited to the formation of electron clouds in particle accelerators, plasma measurements by electrostatic probes and operation of Hall plasma thrusters. The measurements at low incident electron energy below 2eV are very challenging. The goal of this work is to measure SEE coefficient for molybdenum surface in contact with plasmas. In this study nearly mono-energetic electrons arising in plasma-chemical reactions like pair collisions of metastable atoms have been used for the measurements. Variation of the target voltage and measurement of the corresponding electron current from the mono-energetic electrons allows us to obtain the SEE coefficient. It is experimentally demonstrated that the coefficient is close to zero (less than 0.1) for clean targets and may have much higher value for contaminated targets with some absorbed gas on the surface. This work has been supported by DoE contract No. DE-SC0001939 and SPbGU.

  5. Metal halide arc discharge lamp having short arc length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muzeroll, Martin E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A metal halide arc discharge lamp includes a sealed light-transmissive outer jacket, a light-transmissive shroud located within the outer jacket and an arc tube assembly located within the shroud. The arc tube assembly includes an arc tube, electrodes mounted within the arc tube and a fill material for supporting an arc discharge. The electrodes have a spacing such that an electric field in a range of about 60 to 95 volts per centimeter is established between the electrodes. The diameter of the arc tube and the spacing of the electrodes are selected to provide an arc having an arc diameter to arc length ratio in a range of about 1.6 to 1.8. The fill material includes mercury, sodium iodide, scandium tri-iodide and a rare gas, and may include lithium iodide. The lamp exhibits a high color rendering index, high lumen output and high color temperature.

  6. Limited Energy Study, Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP) Fort Knox, Kentucky. Volume 1, Sections 1-3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-05

    Systems Corp surveyed and completed energy analyses for 37 buildings, and eight ballfields. The energy conservation opportunities ( ECOs ) evaluated...prepared using M-CACES. Life cycle cost analyses were performed using the Life Cycle Cost in Design (LCCID) computer program. Project development

  7. ARC-1964-A-31910

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1964-01-24

    Dr. Dean R. Chapman a Ames Research Center scientists studing tektits, holding a simulated tektite created in the Ames arc jet facility (left) and authentic Australian tektite over a map of Australia.

  8. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-18

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45[degree] to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures.

  9. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven; Sanders, David M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45.degree. to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

  10. Improving the Mach number capabilities of arc driven shock tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. A., III; Santiago, J.; I, L.

    1980-01-01

    New systematic trends in one of the performance parameters of pressure loaded arc driven shock tubes have been determined. For a given configuration, the Mach number increases with the cube root of capacitor energy; however, the initial driver gas pressure is relatively unimportant. A qualitative model based on the assumption of Joule-preheating by the arc discharge is discussed.

  11. A sustained-arc ignition system for internal combustion engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenough, A. G.

    1977-01-01

    A sustained-arc ignition system was developed for internal combustion engines. It produces a very-long-duration ignition pulse with an energy in the order of 100 millijoules. The ignition pulse waveform can be controlled to predetermined actual ignition requirements. The design of the sustained-arc ignition system is presented in the report.

  12. Anode heat transfer in a constricted tube arc.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukens, L. A.; Incropera, F. P.

    1971-01-01

    The complex energy exchange mechanisms occurring on the most severely heated component of an arc constrictor, the anode, have been investigated. Measurements performed to determine the anode heat flux for a cascade, atmospheric argon arc of the Maecker type are described. The results are used to check the validity of an existing anode heat transfer model.

  13. The loss of material from the cathode of metal arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seeliger, R.; Wulfhekel, H.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of arc length, cathode thickness, current strength, gas pressure and the chemical nature of the cathode material and filling gases upon the material loss from Cu, Fe, and Ag cathodes in arcs. The results show that the analysis of the phenomenon is complex and the energy balance is difficult to formulate.

  14. Computational Modeling of Arc-Slag Interaction in DC Furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Quinn G.

    2017-02-01

    The plasma arc is central to the operation of the direct-current arc furnace, a unit operation commonly used in high-temperature processing of both primary ores and recycled metals. The arc is a high-velocity, high-temperature jet of ionized gas created and sustained by interactions among the thermal, momentum, and electromagnetic fields resulting from the passage of electric current. In addition to being the primary source of thermal energy, the arc jet also couples mechanically with the bath of molten process material within the furnace, causing substantial splashing and stirring in the region in which it impinges. The arc's interaction with the molten bath inside the furnace is studied through use of a multiphase, multiphysics computational magnetohydrodynamic model developed in the OpenFOAM® framework. Results from the computational solver are compared with empirical correlations that account for arc-slag interaction effects.

  15. Computational Modeling of Arc-Slag Interaction in DC Furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Quinn G.

    2016-11-01

    The plasma arc is central to the operation of the direct-current arc furnace, a unit operation commonly used in high-temperature processing of both primary ores and recycled metals. The arc is a high-velocity, high-temperature jet of ionized gas created and sustained by interactions among the thermal, momentum, and electromagnetic fields resulting from the passage of electric current. In addition to being the primary source of thermal energy, the arc jet also couples mechanically with the bath of molten process material within the furnace, causing substantial splashing and stirring in the region in which it impinges. The arc's interaction with the molten bath inside the furnace is studied through use of a multiphase, multiphysics computational magnetohydrodynamic model developed in the OpenFOAM® framework. Results from the computational solver are compared with empirical correlations that account for arc-slag interaction effects.

  16. Limited energy study, Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP) Fort Knox, Kentucky. Volume 1, sections 1-3. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-11-05

    Systems Corp surveyed and completed energy analyses for 37 buildings, and eight ballfields. The energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) evaluated were ceiling reflectance, high efficiency indoor lighting, indoor lighting controls, and ballfield lighting and control systems. Cost estimates were prepared using M-CACES. Life cycle cost analyses were performed using the Life Cycle Cost in Design (LCCID) computer program. Project development brochures (PDBs) and DD1391 forms were prepared for a Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP) project. The project that was developed represents $93,956 in annual savings with favorable simple paybacks and saving to investment ratios (SIRs).

  17. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.

    1983-08-08

    A portable, hand-held electric arc saw apparatus comprising a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc between the blade and a workpiece of opposite polarity. Electrically conducting means are provided on said frame for transmitting current to said blade. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads are employed to facilitate movement of the apparatus relative to the workpiece.

  18. Fluid simulation of carbon arc plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Kentaro; Raitses, Yevgeny; Kaganovich, Igor

    2016-09-01

    An arc discharge using graphite electrodes is known to produce carbon nanomaterials, e.g. nanotubes and fullerenes. In order to understand where and how such nanomaterials are synthesized, the plasma properties inside the arc discharge must be characterized. The mechanism of the carbon arc plasma is as follows. Carbon particles evaporate from the graphite anode, which is mainly heated by the electrons. Carbon atoms and ions condensate and form a deposit on the cathode, from which the electrons are thermionically emitted. A one-dimensional fluid model is developed to study the characteristics of the carbon arc plasma in atmospheric pressures. Sheath models for the anode and cathode are coupled to the fluid simulation to obtain the material temperature and sheath potential. In the model, thermal nonequilibrium is assumed and atomic carbon, dimer, and trimer are considered. A typical operating condition of a carbon arc plasma is discharge voltage of 20 V, discharge current of 60 A, the electron radius of 6 to 12 mm, and background pressure of 500 Torr. Transition from low to high ablation mode is obtained from the simulations with a smaller electrode radius and with a larger discharge current, which agrees with experimental observations. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  19. Models for residential- and commercial-sector energy-conservation analysis: applications, limitations, and future potential. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Henry E.; Fullen, Robert E.

    1980-09-01

    This report reviews four of the major models used by the Department of Energy (DOE) for energy conservation analyses in the residential- and commercial-building sectors. The objective is to provide a critical analysis of how these models can serve as tools for DOE and its Conservation Policy Office in evaluating and quantifying their policy and program requirements. For this, the study brings together information on the models' analytical structure and their strengths and limitations in policy applications these are then employed to assess the most-effective role for each model in addressing future issues of buildings energy-conservation policy and analysis. The four models covered are: Oak Ridge Residential Energy Model; Micro Analysis of Transfers to Households/Comprehensive Human Resources Data System (MATH/CHRDS) Model; Oak Ridge Commercial Energy Model; and Brookhaven Buildings Energy Conservation Optimization Model (BECOM).

  20. Along-arc and inter-arc variations in volcanic gas CO2/S signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiuppa, Alessandro; Robidoux, Philippe; Fischer, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    Improving the current estimates of the global volcanic arc CO2 output requires a more accurate knowledge of the volcanic gas CO2/S ratio signature of each individual arc segment. This, when multiplied by sulphur (S) productivity of each arc segment (derived by either studies on melt inclusions or UV-based gas measurements), could in principle yield the individual arc CO2 output and, by summation, the global arc CO2 output. Unfortunately, the process is complicated, among others, by the limited volcanic gas dataset we have available, particularly for poorly explored, but potentially highly productive arc segments (Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, etc). We here review the currently available dataset of CO2/S ratios in the volcanic gas literature, and combine this with novel gas observations (partially obtained using the currently expanding DCO-DECADE Multi-GAS network) to provide experimental evidence for the existence of substantial variations in volcanic gas chemistry along individual arc segments, and from one arc segment to another. In Central America [1], for instance, we identify distinct volcanic gas CO2/S (molar) ratio signatures for magmatic volatiles in Nicaragua (~3), Costa Rica (~0.5-1.0) and El Salvador (~1.0), which we ascribe to variable extents of sedimentary carbon addition to a MORB-type (Costa Rica-like) mantle wedge. Globally, volcanic gas CO2/S ratios are typically found to be low (~1.0) in arc segments (e.g., Japan, Kuril-Kamchatka, Chile) where small amount of limestones enter the slab; whilst larger slab/crustal carbon contributions typically correspond to higher CO2/S ratio signatures for gases of other arcs, such as Indonesia (~4.0) or Italy (6 to 9). We find that CO2/S ratios of arc gases positively correlate with Ba/La and U/Th ratios in the corresponding magmas, these trace-element ratios being thought as petrological proxies for the addition slab-fluids to the magma generation zone. This relation implies a dominant slab-derivation of carbon

  1. Models for residential-and commercial-sector energy conservation analysis: Applications, limitations, and future potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, H. E.; Fuller, R. E.

    1980-09-01

    Four of the major models used by DOE for energy conservation analyses in the residential and commercial building sectors are reviewed and critically analyzed to determine how these models can serve as tools for DOE and its Conservation Policy Office in evaluating and quantifying their policy and program requirements. The most effective role for each model in addressing future issues of buildings energy conservation policy and analysis is assessed. The four models covered are: Oak Ridge Residential Energy Model; Micro Analysis of Transfers to Households/Comprehensive Human Resources Data System (MATH/CHRDS) Model; Oak Ridge Commercial Energy Model; and Brookhaven Buildings Energy Conservation Optimization Model (BECOM).

  2. Autotrophy at the thermodynamic limit of life: a model for energy conservation in acetogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Schuchmann, Kai; Müller, Volker

    2014-12-01

    Life on earth evolved in the absence of oxygen with inorganic gases as potential sources of carbon and energy. Among the alternative mechanisms for carbon dioxide (CO₂) fixation in the living world, only the reduction of CO₂ by the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, which is used by acetogenic bacteria, complies with the two requirements to sustain life: conservation of energy and production of biomass. However, how energy is conserved in acetogenic bacteria has been an enigma since their discovery. In this Review, we discuss the latest progress on the biochemistry and genetics of the energy metabolism of model acetogens, elucidating how these bacteria couple CO₂ fixation to energy conservation.

  3. Energy Efficiency and Performance Limiting Effects in Thermo-Osmotic Energy Conversion from Low-Grade Heat.

    PubMed

    Straub, Anthony P; Elimelech, Menachem

    2017-10-12

    Low-grade heat energy from sources below 100 C is available in massive quantities around the world, but cannot be converted to electricity effectively using existing technologies due to variability in the heat output and the small temperature difference between the source and environment. The recently developed thermo-osmotic energy conversion (TOEC) process has the potential to harvest energy from low-grade heat sources by using a temperature difference to create a pressurized liquid flux across a membrane, which can be converted to mechanical work via a turbine. In this study, we perform the first analysis of energy efficiency and the expected performance of the TOEC technology, focusing on systems utilizing hydrophobic porous vapor-gap membranes and water as a working fluid. We begin by developing a framework to analyze realistic mass and heat transport in the process, probing the impact of various membrane parameters and system operating conditions. Our analysis reveals that an optimized system can achieve heat-to-electricity energy conversion efficiencies up to 4.1% (34% of the Carnot efficiency) with hot and cold working temperatures of 60 and 20 °C, respectively, and an operating pressure of 5 MPa (50 bar). Lower energy efficiencies, however, will occur in systems operating with high power densities (>5 W m(-2)) and with finite-sized heat exchangers. We identify that the most important membrane properties for achieving high performance are an asymmetric pore structure, high pressure resistance, a high porosity, and a thickness of 30 to 100 µm. We also quantify the benefits in performance from utilizing deaerated water streams, strong hydrodynamic mixing in the membrane module, and high heat exchanger efficiencies. Overall, our study demonstrates the promise of full-scale TOEC systems to extract energy from low-grade heat and identifies key factors for performance optimization moving forward.

  4. Simulation of arc-electrode interaction using sheath modelling in SF6 circuit-breakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruzewski, P.; Martin, A.; Reggio, M.; Trépanier, J.-Y.

    2002-05-01

    The transition layer, or sheath, located at the interface between the electrode and the electric arc plasma in circuit-breaker arcs is modelled and integrated into software for the simulation of arcs. The sheath model includes the equation of the continuity of electrons, the generalized Ohm's law and the equation of conservation of total energy. The latter equation takes into account Joule heating, the radiation from the arc and phenomena on the surface of the electrode such as thermionic and radiative cooling by thermal emission. The resulting arc model can predict electrode and arc temperatures simultaneously.

  5. Thermodynamic limit and boundary energy of the su(3) spin chain with non-diagonal boundary fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Fakai; Yang, Tao; Yang, Zhanying; Cao, Junpeng; Hao, Kun; Yang, Wen-Li

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the thermodynamic limit of the su (n)-invariant spin chain models with unparallel boundary fields. It is found that the contribution of the inhomogeneous term in the associated T-Q relation to the ground state energy does vanish in the thermodynamic limit. This fact allows us to calculate the boundary energy of the system. Taking the su (2) (or the XXX) spin chain and the su (3) spin chain as concrete examples, we have studied the corresponding boundary energies of the models. The method used in this paper can be generalized to study the thermodynamic properties and boundary energy of other high rank models with non-diagonal boundary fields.

  6. Fabrication of dense non-circular nanomagnetic device arrays using self-limiting low-energy glow-discharge processing.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhen; Chang, Long; Nekrashevich, Ivan; Ruchhoeft, Paul; Khizroev, Sakhrat; Litvinov, Dmitri

    2013-01-01

    We describe a low-energy glow-discharge process using reactive ion etching system that enables non-circular device patterns, such as squares or hexagons, to be formed from a precursor array of uniform circular openings in polymethyl methacrylate, PMMA, defined by electron beam lithography. This technique is of a particular interest for bit-patterned magnetic recording medium fabrication, where close packed square magnetic bits may improve its recording performance. The process and results of generating close packed square patterns by self-limiting low-energy glow-discharge are investigated. Dense magnetic arrays formed by electrochemical deposition of nickel over self-limiting formed molds are demonstrated.

  7. On Integral Upper Limits Assuming Power-law Spectra and the Sensitivity in High-energy Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahnen, Max L.

    2017-02-01

    The high-energy non-thermal universe is dominated by power-law-like spectra. Therefore, results in high-energy astronomy are often reported as parameters of power-law fits, or, in the case of a non-detection, as an upper limit assuming the underlying unseen spectrum behaves as a power law. In this paper, I demonstrate a simple and powerful one-to-one relation of the integral upper limit in the two-dimensional power-law parameter space into the spectrum parameter space and use this method to unravel the so-far convoluted question of the sensitivity of astroparticle telescopes.

  8. Critical evaluation of energy intake using the Goldberg cut-off for energy intake:basal metabolic rate. A practical guide to its calculation, use and limitations.

    PubMed

    Black, A E

    2000-09-01

    To re-state the principles underlying the Goldberg cut-off for identifying under-reporters of energy intake, re-examine the physiological principles and update the values to be substituted into the equation for calculating the cut-off, and to examine its use and limitations. New values are suggested for each element of the Goldberg equation. The physical activity level (PAL) for comparison with energy intake:basal metabolic rate (EI:BMR) should be selected to reflect the population under study; the PAL value of 1.55 x BMR is not necessarily the value of choice. The suggested value for average within-subject variation in energy intake is 23% (unchanged), but other sources of variation are increased in the light of new data. For within-subject variation in measured and estimated BMR, 4% and 8.5% respectively are suggested (previously 2.5% and 8%), and for total between-subject variation in PAL, the suggested value is 15% (previously 12.5%). The effect of these changes is to widen the confidence limits and reduce the sensitivity of the cut-off. The Goldberg cut-off can be used to evaluate the mean population bias in reported energy intake, but information on the activity or lifestyle of the population is needed to choose a suitable PAL energy requirement for comparison. Sensitivity for identifying under-reporters at the individual level is limited. In epidemiological studies information on home, leisure and occupational activity is essential in order to assign subjects to low, medium or high PAL levels before calculating the cut-offs. In small studies, it is desirable to measure energy expenditure, or to calculate individual energy requirements, and to compare energy intake directly with energy expenditure.

  9. The statistical difference between bending arcs and regular polar arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullen, A.; Fear, R. C.; Milan, S. E.; Carter, J. A.; Karlsson, T.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the Polar UVI data set by Kullen et al. (2002) of 74 polar arcs is reinvestigated, focusing on bending arcs. Bending arcs are typically faint and form (depending on interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By direction) on the dawnside or duskside oval with the tip of the arc splitting off the dayside oval. The tip subsequently moves into the polar cap in the antisunward direction, while the arc's nightside end remains attached to the oval, eventually becoming hook-shaped. Our investigation shows that bending arcs appear on the opposite oval side from and farther sunward than most regular polar arcs. They form during By-dominated IMF conditions: typically, the IMF clock angle increases from 60 to 90° about 20 min before the arc forms. Antisunward plasma flows from the oval into the polar cap just poleward of bending arcs are seen in Super Dual Auroral Radar Network data, indicating dayside reconnection. For regular polar arcs, recently reported characteristics are confirmed in contrast to bending arcs. This includes plasma flows along the nightside oval that originate close to the initial arc location and a significant delay in the correlation between IMF By and initial arc location. In our data set, the highest correlations are found with IMF By appearing at least 1-2 h before arc formation. In summary, bending arcs are distinctly different from regular arcs and cannot be explained by existing polar arc models. Instead, these results are consistent with the formation mechanism described in Carter et al. (2015), suggesting that bending arcs are caused by dayside reconnection.

  10. Control Limits for Building Energy End Use Based on Engineering Judgment, Frequency Analysis, and Quantile Regression

    SciTech Connect

    Henze, G. P.; Pless, S.; Petersen, A.; Long, N.; Scambos, A. T.

    2014-02-01

    Approaches are needed to continuously characterize the energy performance of commercial buildings to allow for (1) timely response to excess energy use by building operators; and (2) building occupants to develop energy awareness and to actively engage in reducing energy use. Energy information systems, often involving graphical dashboards, are gaining popularity in presenting energy performance metrics to occupants and operators in a (near) real-time fashion. Such an energy information system, called Building Agent, has been developed at NREL and incorporates a dashboard for public display. Each building is, by virtue of its purpose, location, and construction, unique. Thus, assessing building energy performance is possible only in a relative sense, as comparison of absolute energy use out of context is not meaningful. In some cases, performance can be judged relative to average performance of comparable buildings. However, in cases of high-performance building designs, such as NREL's Research Support Facility (RSF) discussed in this report, relative performance is meaningful only when compared to historical performance of the facility or to a theoretical maximum performance of the facility as estimated through detailed building energy modeling.

  11. Energy Engineering Analysis Program, limited energy study of steam distribution systems, Hawthorne Army Ammunition Depot, Hawthorne, Nevada. Programming documents

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The project is a significant part of Hawthorne Army Ammunition Depot`s effort to achieve a 20-percent reduction in energy consumption by FY2000 versus FY1985 baseline levels. The project will also assure that heating services are provided to Industrial Area facilities on a continuing basis, supporting mission requirements.

  12. Creating a model energy efficiency program in an era of limited financial resources

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, M.S.

    1998-07-01

    Implementing cost-effective energy-efficiency projects can be difficult for over-burdened facilities staff. For example, at Stanford University a small energy management staff has responsibility for over 10 million square feet of building space, including student housing, computer facilities, research laboratories, athletic facilities, and a hospital. To address this concern, the Stanford Facilities Department has developed the Energy Retrofit Program (ERP). The ERP provides monetary incentives to departments for carrying out projects that reduce energy consumption. The main benefit of this approach is that small energy management staff can implement a large number of projects by enlisting the help of those who are most familiar with each building. participating departments benefit because they obtain the advantages of high quality, energy-efficient lighting and building controls without using their own budgets. The University benefits because overall energy and maintenance costs are reduced in a consistent, cost-effective manner. During the last four years, Stanford's five million dollar energy-efficiency investment has shown an internal rate of return of over twenty-five percent or approximately seventeen million kilowatt hours per year. This paper describes the pitfalls and benefits of setting up an energy retrofit program and how these lessons can be transferred to diverse facility types.

  13. Limits of the energy-spin phase space beyond the proton drip line : entry distributions fo Pt and Au isobars.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. B.; Cizewski, J. A.; Carpenter, M. P.; Kondev, F. G.; Khoo, T. L.; Lauritsen, T.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Abu Saleem, K.; Ahmad, I.; Amro, H.; Danchev, M.; Davids, C. N.; Hartley, D. J.; Heinz, A.; Lister, C. J.; Ma, W. C.; Poli, G. L.; Ressler, J. J.; Reviol, W.; Riedinger, L. L.; Seweryniak, D.; Wiedenhoever, I.; Rutgers univ.; Illinois Inst. of Tech.; Mississippi State Univ.; Univ. of Tennessee; Univ. of Maryland; Washington Univ.

    2003-01-09

    Entry distributions in angular momentum and excitation energy have been measured for several very proton-rich isotopes of Pt and Au. This is the first systematic study of the energy-spin phase space for nuclei near and beyond the proton drip line. Comparisons are made between the distributions associated with proton-unbound Au nuclei and more stable Pt isobars. In {sup 173}Au the first evidence is seen for the limits of excitation energy and angular momentum which a nucleus beyond the proton drip line can sustain.

  14. Effect of Large Scale Transmission Limitations on Renewable Energy Load Matching for Western U.S.: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Diakov, V.; Short, W.; Gilchrist, B.

    2012-06-01

    Based on the available geographically dispersed data for the Western U.S. (excluding Alaska), we analyze to what extent the geographic diversity of these resources can offset their variability. Without energy storage and assuming unlimited energy flows between regions, wind and PV can meet up to 80% of loads in Western U.S. while less than 10% of the generated power is curtailed. Limiting hourly energy flows by the aggregated transmission line carrying capacities decreases the fraction of the load that can be met with wind and PV generation to approximately 70%.

  15. Nonlinear optical limiting based on energy and charge transfer in fullerene-containing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belousova, I. M.; Danilov, V. V.; Videnichev, D. A.; Gogoleva, N. G.; Ermolaeva, G. M.; Kislyakov, I. M.; Gryaznova, M. V.; Buersing, H.; Walter, D.; Eberle, B.; Ebert, R.

    2009-09-01

    The optical limiting efficiency and the possibility of extending the spectral and time ranges of optical limiters based on fullerene-containing media are studied. The optical limiting of pulses of different durations in solutions of C60 and higher fullerenes, the triplet—triplet transfer in multicomponent fullerene-containing solutions, and the electron transfer in the C60-tetramethylbenzidine-perylene system are investigated.

  16. Arc-driven rail accelerator research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Pradosh K.

    1987-01-01

    Arc-driven rail accelerator research is analyzed by considering wall ablation and viscous drag in the plasma. Plasma characteristics are evaluated through a simple fluid-mechanical analysis considering only wall ablation. By equating the energy dissipated in the plasma with the radiation heat loss, the average properties of the plasma are determined as a function of time and rate of ablation. Locations of two simultaneously accelerating arcs were determined by optical and magnetic probes and fron streak camera photographs. All three measurements provide consistent results.

  17. Laser Beam Submerged Arc Hybrid Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisgen, Uwe; Olschok, Simon; Mavany, Michael; Jakobs, Stefan

    The laser beam submerged arc hybrid welding method originates from the knowledge that, with increasing penetration depth, the laser beam process has a tendency to pore formation in the lower weld regions. The combination with the energy efficient submerged arc process improves the degassing and reduces the tendency to pore formation. The high deposition rate of the SA process in combination with the laser beam process offers, providing the appropriate choice of weld preparation, the possibility of welding plates with a thickness larger than 20 mm in a single pass, and also of welding thicker plates with the double sided single pass technique.

  18. Laser Beam Submerged Arc Hybrid Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisgen, Uwe; Olschok, Simon; Jakobs, Stefan; Schleser, Markus; Mokrov, Oleg; Rossiter, Eduardo

    The laser beam-submerged arc hybrid welding method originates from the knowledge that, with increasing penetration depth, the laser beam process has a tendency to pore formation in the lower weld regions. The coupling with the energy-efficient submerged-arc process improves degassing and reduces the tendency to pore formation. The high deposition rate of the SA process in combination with the laser beam process offers, providing the appropriate choice of weld preparation, the possibility of welding plates with a thickness larger than 20° mm in a single pass, and also of welding thicker plates with the double-sided single pass technique.

  19. Consolidating NASA's Arc Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balboni, John A.; Gokcen, Tahir; Hui, Frank C. L.; Graube, Peter; Morrissey, Patricia; Lewis, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the consolidation of NASA's high powered arc-jet testing at a single location. The existing plasma arc-jet wind tunnels located at the Johnson Space Center were relocated to Ames Research Center while maintaining NASA's technical capability to ground-test thermal protection system materials under simulated atmospheric entry convective heating. The testing conditions at JSC were reproduced and successfully demonstrated at ARC through close collaboration between the two centers. New equipment was installed at Ames to provide test gases of pure nitrogen mixed with pure oxygen, and for future nitrogen-carbon dioxide mixtures. A new control system was custom designed, installed and tested. Tests demonstrated the capability of the 10 MW constricted-segmented arc heater at Ames meets the requirements of the major customer, NASA's Orion program. Solutions from an advanced computational fluid dynamics code were used to aid in characterizing the properties of the plasma stream and the surface environment on the calorimeters in the supersonic flow stream produced by the arc heater.

  20. Control of arc length during gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Madigan, R.B.; Quinn, T.P.

    1994-12-31

    An arc-length control system has been developed for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) under spray transfer welding conditions. The ability to monitor and control arc length during arc welding allows consistent weld characteristics to be maintained and therefore improves weld quality. Arc length control has only been implemented for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), where an automatic voltage control (AVC) unit adjusts torch-to-work distance. The system developed here compliments the voltage- and current-sensing techniques commonly used for control of GMAW. The system consists of an arc light intensity sensor (photodiode), a Hall-effect current sensor, a personal computer and software implementing a data interpretation and control algorithms. Arc length was measured using both arc light and arc current signals. Welding current was adjusted to maintain constant arc length. A proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller was used. Gains were automatically selected based on the desired welding conditions. In performance evaluation welds, arc length varied from 2.5 to 6.5 mm while welding up a sloped workpiece (ramp in CTWD) without the control. Arc length was maintained within 1 mm of the desired (5 mm ) with the control.

  1. Limits to sustained energy intake XXV: milk energy output and thermogenesis in Swiss mice lactating at thermoneutrality

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhi-Jun; Li, Li; Yang, Deng-Bao; Chi, Qing-Sheng; Hambly, Catherine; Speakman, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies at 21 °C and 5 °C suggest that in Swiss mice sustained energy intake (SusEI) and reproductive performance are constrained by the mammary capacity to produce milk. We aimed to establish if this constraint also applied at higher ambient temperature (30 °C). Female Swiss mice lactating at 30 °C had lower asymptotic food intake and weaned lighter litters than those at 21 °C. Resting metabolic rate, daily energy expenditure, milk energy output and suckling time were all lower at 30 °C. In a second experiment we gave mice at 30 °C either 6 or 9 pups to raise. Female performance was independent of litter size, indicating that it is probably not controlled by pup demands. In a third experiment we exposed only the mother, or only the offspring to the elevated temperature. In this case the performance of the mother was only reduced when she was exposed, and not when her pups were exposed, showing that the high temperature directly constrains female performance. These data suggest that at 30 °C SusEI and reproductive performance are likely constrained by the capacity of females to dissipate body heat, and not indirectly via pup demands. Constraints seem to change with ambient temperature in this strain of mouse. PMID:27554919

  2. H2O and CO2 in magmas from the Mariana arc and back arc systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Sally; Stolper, Edward; Stern, Robert

    2000-05-01

    We examined the H2O and CO2 contents of glasses from lavas and xenoliths from the Mariana arc system, an intraoceanic convergent margin in the western Pacific, which contains an active volcanic arc, an actively spreading back arc basin, and active behind-the-arc cross-chain volcanoes. Samples include (1) glass rims from Mariana arc, Mariana trough, and cross-chain submarine lavas; (2) glass inclusions in arc and trough phenocrysts; and (3) glass inclusions from a gabbro + anorthosite xenolith from Agrigan (Mariana arc). Glass rims of submarine arc lavas contain 0.3-1.9 wt % H2O, and CO2 is below detection limits. Where they could be compared, glass inclusions in arc phenocrysts contain more H2O than their host glasses; most arc glasses and phenocryst inclusions contain no detectable CO2, with the exception of those from a North Hiyoshi shoshonite, which contains 400-600 ppm. The glass inclusions from the Agrigan xenolith contain 4-6% H2O, and CO2 is below the detection limit. Glasses from the cross-chain lavas are similar to those from the arc: H2O contents are 1.4-1.7 wt %, and CO2 is below detection limits. Volatile contents in Mariana trough lava glass rims are variable: 0.2-2.8 wt % H2O and 0-300 ppm CO2. Glass inclusions from trough phenocrysts have water contents similar to the host glass, but they can contain up to 875 ppm CO2. Volatile contents of melt inclusions from trough and arc lavas and from the xenolith imply minimum depths of crystallization of ~1-8 km. H2O and CO2 contents of Mariana trough glasses are negatively correlated, indicating saturation of the erupting magma with a CO2-H2O vapor at the pressure of eruption (~400 bars for these samples), with the vapor ranging from nearly pure CO2 at the CO2-rich end of the glass array to nearly pure H2O at the H2O-rich end. Degassing of these magmas on ascent and eruption leads to significant loss of CO2 (thereby masking preeruptive CO2 contents) but minimal disturbance of preeruptive H2O contents. For

  3. Method and apparatus for nondestructive testing. [using high frequency arc discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoop, J. M. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    High voltage is applied to an arc gap adjacent to a test specimen to develop a succession of high frequency arc discharges. Those high frequency arc discharges generate pulses of ultrasonic energy within the test specimen without requiring the arc discharges to contact that test specimen and without requiring a coupling medium. Those pulses can be used for detection of flaws and measurements of certain properties and stresses within the test specimen.

  4. Efficiency and rumen responses in younger and older Holstein heifers limit-fed diets of differing energy density

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of limit-feeding diets of different predicted energy density on the efficiency of utilization of feed and nitrogen and rumen responses in younger and older Holstein heifers. Eight rumen-cannulated Holstein heifers (4 heifers beginning at 257 ± ...

  5. Exceeding the solar cell Shockley-Queisser limit via thermal up-conversion of low-energy photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boriskina, Svetlana V.; Chen, Gang

    2014-03-01

    Maximum efficiency of ideal single-junction photovoltaic (PV) cells is limited to 33% (for 1 sun illumination) by intrinsic losses such as band edge thermalization, radiative recombination, and inability to absorb below-bandgap photons. This intrinsic thermodynamic limit, named after Shockley and Queisser (S-Q), can be exceeded by utilizing low-energy photons either via their electronic up-conversion or via the thermophotovoltaic (TPV) conversion process. However, electronic up-conversion systems have extremely low efficiencies, and practical temperature considerations limit the operation of TPV converters to the narrow-gap PV cells. Here we develop a conceptual design of a hybrid TPV platform, which exploits thermal up-conversion of low-energy photons and is compatible with conventional silicon PV cells by using spectral and directional selectivity of the up-converter. The hybrid platform offers sunlight-to-electricity conversion efficiency exceeding that imposed by the S-Q limit on the corresponding PV cells across a broad range of bandgap energies, under low optical concentration (1-300 suns), operating temperatures in the range 900-1700 K, and in simple flat panel designs. We demonstrate maximum conversion efficiency of 73% under illumination by non-concentrated sunlight. A detailed analysis of non-ideal hybrid platforms that allows for up to 15% of absorption/re-emission losses yields limiting efficiency value of 45% for Si PV cells.

  6. Arc characteristics of submerged arc welding with stainless steel wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke; Wu, Zhi-sheng; Liu, Cui-rong; Chen, Feng-hua

    2014-08-01

    The arc characteristics of submerged arc welding (SAW) with stainless steel wire were studied by using Analysator Hannover (AH). The tests were carried out under the same preset arc voltage combined with different welding currents. By comparing the probability density distribution (PDD) curves of arc voltage and welding current, the changes were analyzed, the metal transfer mode in SAW was deduced, and the characteristics of a stable arc were summarized. The analysis results show that, with an increase of welding parameters, the short-circuiting peak in the PDD curves of arc voltage decreases gradually until it disappears, and the dominant metal transfer mode changes from flux-wall guided transfer to projected transfer and then to streaming transfer. Moreover, when the PDD curves of arc voltage are both unimodal and generally symmetrical, the greater the peak probability and the smaller the peak span, the more stable the arc becomes.

  7. Upper limit on the cosmic-ray photon fraction at EeV energies from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Auger Collaboration; Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Argiró, S.; Arisaka, K.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Carvalho, W.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Chye, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceição, R.; Connolly, B.; Contreras, F.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; Decerprit, G.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dornic, D.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Duvernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrer, F.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonçalves Do Amaral, M.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutiérrez, J.; H˙Ague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebrero, G.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Luna García, R.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Martello, D.; Martínez, J.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Mueller, S.; Mueller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Ortolani, F.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Pastor, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; PeĶala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Pichel, A.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pinto, T.; Pirronello, V.; Pisanti, O.; Platino, M.; Pochon, J.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Reucroft, S.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Smetniansky de Grande, N.; Smiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tarutina, T.; Taşcaǧu, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torres, I.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tuci, V.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.

    2009-07-01

    From direct observations of the longitudinal development of ultra-high energy air showers performed with the Pierre Auger Observatory, upper limits of 3.8%, 2.4%, 3.5% and 11.7% (at 95% c.l.) are obtained on the fraction of cosmic-ray photons above 2, 3, 5 and 10 EeV (1EeV≡1018eV), respectively. These are the first experimental limits on ultra-high energy photons at energies below 10 EeV. The results complement previous constraints on top-down models from array data and they reduce systematic uncertainties in the interpretation of shower data in terms of primary flux, nuclear composition and proton-air cross-section.

  8. Channel model for AC electric arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, H. L.

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the results from calculations of free-burning AC electric arcs in argon. In order to calculate the arc current and arc voltage, the external electric circuit must be taken into consideration. The external circuit is modeled by an equivalent circuit consisting of an ideal AC voltage source, a loss resistance, and an inductance. The qualitative behavior of the current-voltage characteristic is in agreement with observed characteristics, but experimental data are necessary in order to check whether the calculated power loss is reasonable. Non-symmetry was modeled by introducing different anode and cathode falls in the two half periods. An attempt at taking into account different cathode current densities in the two half periods, depending on whether the electrode or silicon melt is cathode, did not give satisfactory results. Thermionic emission was assumed in both half periods, but this may not be the right mechanism when the silicon melt is cathode. The time delay of the AC arc compared to the DC case is modeled by a time constant. It was shown that this preset time constant must be in agreement with the mean 'mechanical' relaxation time in the arc in order to fulfill the energy balance. By updating the time constant until this is achieved, the time constant is eliminated as a parameter that must be chosen a priori.

  9. First NIF ARC target shot results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; di Nicola, P.; Hermann, M.; Kalantar, D.; Martinez, D.; Tommasini, R.; NIF ARC Team

    2015-11-01

    The commissioning of the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) laser system in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is currently in progress. ARC laser is designed to ultimately provide eight beamlets with pulse duration adjustable from 1 to 50 ps, and energies up to 1.7 kJ per beamlet. ARC will add critical capability for the NIF facility for creating precision x-ray backlighters needed for many current NIF ICF and HED experiments. ARC can also produce MeV electrons and protons for new science experiment on NIF. In the initial set of experiments, 4 of the 8 beamlets are being commissioned up to 1 kJ per beam at 30 ps pulse length using foil and wire targets. X-ray energy distribution, spot size and pulse duration are measured using various diagnostics. This talk will describe the shot setup and results. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Emissions of chromium (VI) from arc welding.

    PubMed

    Heung, William; Yun, Myoung-Jin; Chang, Daniel P Y; Green, Peter G; Halm, Chris

    2007-02-01

    The presence of Cr in the +6 oxidation state (Cr[VI]) is still observed in ambient air samples in California despite steps taken to reduce emissions from plating operations. One known source of emission of Cr(VI) is welding, especially with high Cr-content materials, such as stainless steels. An experimental effort was undertaken to expand and update Cr(VI) emission factors by conducting tests on four types of arc-welding operations: gas-metal arc welding (GMAW), shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), fluxcore arc welding, and pulsed GMAW. Standard American Welding Society hood results were compared with a total enclosure method that permitted isokinetic sampling for particle size-cut measurement, as well as total collection of the aerosol. The fraction of Cr(VI) emitted per unit mass of Cr electrode consumed was determined. Consistent with AP-42 data, initial results indicate that a significant fraction of the total Cr in the aerosol is in the +6 oxidation state. The fraction of Cr(VI) and total aerosol mass produced by the different arc welding methods varies with the type of welding process used. Self-shielded electrodes that do not use a shield gas, for example, SMAW, produce greater amounts of Cr(VI) per unit mass of electrode consumed. The formation of Cr(VI) from standard electrode wires used for welding mild steel was below the method detection limit after eliminating an artifact in the analytical method used.

  11. Arc electrode interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, X.; Berns, D.; Heberlein, J.

    1994-01-01

    The project consisted of two parts: (1) the cathode interaction studies which were a continuation of previous work and had the objective of increasing our understanding of the microscopic phenomena controlling cathode erosion in arc jet thrusters, and (2) the studies of the anode attachment in arc jet thrusters. The cathode interaction studies consisted of (1) a continuation of some modeling work in which the previously derived model for the cathode heating was applied to some specific gases and electrode materials, and (2) experimental work in which various diagnostics was applied to the cathode. The specific diagnostics used were observation of the cathode tip during arcing using a Laser Strobe Video system in conjunction with a tele-microscope, a monochromator with an optical multichannel analyzer for the determination of the cathode temperature distribution, and various ex situ materials analysis methods. The emphasis of our effort was shifted to the cathode materials analysis because a parallel project was in place during the second half of 1993 with a visiting scientist pursuing arc electrode materials studies. As a consequence, the diagnostic investigations of the arc in front of the cathode had to be postponed to the first half of 1994, and we are presently preparing these measurements. The results of last year's study showed some unexpected effects influencing the cathode erosion behavior, such as increased erosion away from the cathode tip, and our understanding of these effects should improve our ability to control cathode erosion. The arc jet anode attachment studies concentrated on diagnostics of the instabilities in subsonic anode attachment arc jet thrusters, and were supplemental measurements to work which was performed by one of the authors who spent the summer as an intern at NASA Lewis Research Center. A summary of the results obtained during the internship are included because they formed an integral part of the study. Two tasks for 1994, the

  12. Bright Arcing Loops

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-27

    Several arcing loops rotated into view and swirled above an active region, which gave us a nice profile view of the action (June 26-27, 2016). The arcing plasma is tracing magnetic field lines extending out from the active region. Some darker matter also jiggled back and forth near the active region as well, pulled about by magnetic forces. At one point a lick of plasma pushed its way out from the region but quickly fell back into the sun. The images were taken in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. Movies are also available at the Photojournal. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20882

  13. An Army Discussion on Ground Vehicles and the ARC

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-20

    Intelligent Systems Future Focus for the ARC • Power and Energy – complex... Intelligent Systems – Unmanned ground vehicles (power/energy management, terrain interaction) Power and Energy Mobility and Propulsion Discussion...Survivability – Condition Based Maintenance – Intelligent Systems • Continual increase in focus on Power and Energy based on Army ground vehicle needs THANK YOU!

  14. Limited energy study Geodss Facility, White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This study was performed and this report prepared under Contract No. DACA01-94-D-0033, Delivery Order No. 8. The delivery order was issued by U.S. Army Engineer District, Mobile, to E M C Engineers, Inc. on 8 May 1995. The purpose of this study is to identify and evaluate Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECOs), to determine their energy savings potential and economic feasibility, and to document results for possible future funding.

  15. When should species richness be energy-limited, and how would we know?

    SciTech Connect

    Hurlbert, Allen H.; Stegen, James C.

    2014-04-01

    Energetic constraints are fundamental to ecology and evolution, and empirical relationships between species richness and estimates of available energy have led some to suggest that richness is energetically constrained. However, the mechanism linking energy with richness is rarely specified and predictions of secondary patterns consistent with energy-constrained richness are lacking. Here we lay out the necessary and sufficient assumptions of a causal relationship linking energy gradients to richness gradients. We then describe an eco-evolutionary simulation model that combines spatially-explicit diversification with trait evolution, resource availability, and assemblage-level carrying capacities. Our model identified patterns in richness and phylogenetic structure expected when a spatial gradient in energy availability determines the number of individuals supported in a given area. A comparison to patterns under alternative scenarios, in which fundamental assumptions behind energetic explanations were violated, revealed patterns that are useful for evaluating the importance of energetic constraints in empirical systems. We find that clades arising at the low-energy end of a gradient provide the most powerful inferences regarding whether assumptions are met, and use rockfish (Sebastes) from the northeastern Pacific to show how empirical data can be coupled with model predictions to evaluate the role of energetic constraints in generating observed richness gradients.

  16. The Gibbs free energy of homogeneous nucleation: From atomistic nuclei to the planar limit.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bingqing; Tribello, Gareth A; Ceriotti, Michele

    2017-09-14

    In this paper we discuss how the information contained in atomistic simulations of homogeneous nucleation should be used when fitting the parameters in macroscopic nucleation models. We show how the number of solid and liquid atoms in such simulations can be determined unambiguously by using a Gibbs dividing surface and how the free energy as a function of the number of solid atoms in the nucleus can thus be extracted. We then show that the parameters (the chemical potential, the interfacial free energy, and a Tolman correction) of a model based on classical nucleation theory can be fitted using the information contained in these free-energy profiles but that the parameters in such models are highly correlated. This correlation is unfortunate as it ensures that small errors in the computed free energy surface can give rise to large errors in the extrapolated properties of the fitted model. To resolve this problem we thus propose a method for fitting macroscopic nucleation models that uses simulations of planar interfaces and simulations of three-dimensional nuclei in tandem. We show that when the chemical potentials and the interface energy are pinned to their planar-interface values, more precise estimates for the Tolman length are obtained. Extrapolating the free energy profile obtained from small simulation boxes to larger nuclei is thus more reliable.

  17. The Gibbs free energy of homogeneous nucleation: From atomistic nuclei to the planar limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Bingqing; Tribello, Gareth A.; Ceriotti, Michele

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we discuss how the information contained in atomistic simulations of homogeneous nucleation should be used when fitting the parameters in macroscopic nucleation models. We show how the number of solid and liquid atoms in such simulations can be determined unambiguously by using a Gibbs dividing surface and how the free energy as a function of the number of solid atoms in the nucleus can thus be extracted. We then show that the parameters (the chemical potential, the interfacial free energy, and a Tolman correction) of a model based on classical nucleation theory can be fitted using the information contained in these free-energy profiles but that the parameters in such models are highly correlated. This correlation is unfortunate as it ensures that small errors in the computed free energy surface can give rise to large errors in the extrapolated properties of the fitted model. To resolve this problem we thus propose a method for fitting macroscopic nucleation models that uses simulations of planar interfaces and simulations of three-dimensional nuclei in tandem. We show that when the chemical potentials and the interface energy are pinned to their planar-interface values, more precise estimates for the Tolman length are obtained. Extrapolating the free energy profile obtained from small simulation boxes to larger nuclei is thus more reliable.

  18. On the calculation of the free surface temperature of gas-tungsten-arc weld pools from first principles; Part 1. Modeling the welding arc

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, R.T.C. . Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science); Szekely, J.; Westhoff, R.C. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1992-06-01

    In this paper a mathematical formulation is developed and computed results are presented describing the temperature profiles in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) arcs and, hence, the net heat flux from the welding arc to the weld pool. The formulation consists of the statement of Maxwell's equations, coupled to the Navier-Stokes equations and the differential thermal energy balance equation. The theoretical predictions for the heat flux to the workpiece are in good agreement with experimental measurements-for long arcs. The results of this work provide a fundamental basis for predicting the behavior of arc welding systems from first principles.

  19. Energy limits of electron acceleration in the plasma sheet during substorms: A case study with the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission

    DOE PAGES

    Turner, Drew Lawson; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; ...

    2016-08-01

    Here, we present multipoint observations of earthward moving dipolarization fronts and energetic particle injections from NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale mission with a focus on electron acceleration. From a case study during a substorm on 02 August 2015, we find that electrons are only accelerated over a finite energy range, from a lower energy threshold at ~7–9 keV up to an upper energy cutoff in the hundreds of keV range. At energies lower than the threshold energy, electron fluxes decrease, potentially due to precipitation by strong parallel electrostatic wavefields or initial sources in the lobes. Electrons at energies higher than the thresholdmore » are accelerated cumulatively by a series of impulsive magnetic dipolarization events. This case demonstrates how the upper energy cutoff increases, in this case from ~130 keV to >500 keV, with each dipolarization/injection during sustained activity. We also present a simple model accounting for these energy limits that reveals that electron energization is dominated by betatron acceleration.« less

  20. Energy limits of electron acceleration in the plasma sheet during substorms: A case study with the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Drew Lawson; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Clemmons, J. H.; Mauk, B. H.; Cohen, I. J.; Jaynes, A. N.; Craft, J. V.; Wilder, F. D.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Gershman, D. J.; Avanov, L. A.; Dorelli, J. C.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C. J.; Schmid, D.; Nakamura, R.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Artemyev, A. V.; Runov, A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Spence, H. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    Here, we present multipoint observations of earthward moving dipolarization fronts and energetic particle injections from NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale mission with a focus on electron acceleration. From a case study during a substorm on 02 August 2015, we find that electrons are only accelerated over a finite energy range, from a lower energy threshold at ~7–9 keV up to an upper energy cutoff in the hundreds of keV range. At energies lower than the threshold energy, electron fluxes decrease, potentially due to precipitation by strong parallel electrostatic wavefields or initial sources in the lobes. Electrons at energies higher than the threshold are accelerated cumulatively by a series of impulsive magnetic dipolarization events. This case demonstrates how the upper energy cutoff increases, in this case from ~130 keV to >500 keV, with each dipolarization/injection during sustained activity. We also present a simple model accounting for these energy limits that reveals that electron energization is dominated by betatron acceleration.

  1. Energy limits of electron acceleration in the plasma sheet during substorms: A case study with the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, D. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Clemmons, J. H.; Mauk, B. H.; Cohen, I. J.; Jaynes, A. N.; Craft, J. V.; Wilder, F. D.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Gershman, D. J.; Avanov, L. A.; Dorelli, J. C.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C. J.; Schmid, D.; Nakamura, R.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Artemyev, A. V.; Runov, A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Spence, H. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    We present multipoint observations of earthward moving dipolarization fronts and energetic particle injections from NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale mission with a focus on electron acceleration. From a case study during a substorm on 02 August 2015, we find that electrons are only accelerated over a finite energy range, from a lower energy threshold at 7-9 keV up to an upper energy cutoff in the hundreds of keV range. At energies lower than the threshold energy, electron fluxes decrease, potentially due to precipitation by strong parallel electrostatic wavefields or initial sources in the lobes. Electrons at energies higher than the threshold are accelerated cumulatively by a series of impulsive magnetic dipolarization events. This case demonstrates how the upper energy cutoff increases, in this case from 130 keV to >500 keV, with each dipolarization/injection during sustained activity. We also present a simple model accounting for these energy limits that reveals that electron energization is dominated by betatron acceleration.

  2. Energy Limits of Electron Acceleration in the Plasma Sheet During Substorms: A Case Study with the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, D. L.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Clemmons, J. H.; Mauk, B. H.; Cohen, I. J.; Jaynes, A. N.; Craft, J. V.; Wilder, F. D.; Baker, D. N.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present multipoint observations of earthward moving dipolarization fronts and energetic particle injections from NASAs Magnetospheric Multiscale mission with a focus on electron acceleration. From a case study during a substorm on 02 August 2015, we find that electrons are only accelerated over a finite energy range, from a lower energy threshold at approx. 7-9 keV up to an upper energy cutoff in the hundreds of keV range. At energies lower than the threshold energy, electron fluxes decrease, potentially due to precipitation by strong parallel electrostatic wavefields or initial sources in the lobes. Electrons at energies higher than the threshold are accelerated cumulatively by a series of impulsive magnetic dipolarization events. This case demonstrates how the upper energy cutoff increases, in this case from approx. 130 keV to >500 keV, with each depolarization/injection during sustained activity. We also present a simple model accounting for these energy limits that reveals that electron energization is dominated by betatron acceleration.

  3. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  4. Resource limits and conversion efficiency with implications for climate change and California's energy supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Gregory Donald

    There are two commonly-used approaches to modeling the future supply of mineral resources. One is to estimate reserves and compare the result to extraction rates, and the other is to project from historical time series of extraction rates. Perceptions of abundant oil supplies in the Middle East and abundant coal supplies in the United States are based on the former approach. In both of these cases, an approach based on historical production series results in a much smaller resource estimate than aggregate reserve numbers. This difference is not systematic; natural gas production in the United States shows a strong increasing trend even though modest reserve estimates have resulted in three decades of worry about the gas supply. The implication of a future decline in Middle East oil production is that the market for transportation fuels is facing major changes, and that alternative fuels should be analyzed in this light. Because the U.S. holds very large coal reserves, synthesizing liquid hydrocarbons from coal has been suggested as an alternative fuel supply. To assess the potential of this process, one has to look at both the resource base and the net efficiency. The three states with the largest coal production declines in the 1996 to 2006 period are among the top 5 coal reserve holders, suggesting that gross coal reserves are a poor indicator of future production. Of the three categories of coal reserves reported by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, reserves at existing mines is the narrowest category and is approximately the equivalent of proved developed oil reserves. By this measure, Wyoming has the largest coal reserves in the U.S., and it accounted for all of U.S. coal production growth over the 1996 to 2006 time period. In Chapter 2, multi-cycle Hubbert curve analysis of historical data of coal production from 1850 to 2007 demonstrates that U.S. anthracite and bituminous coal are past their production peak. This result contradicts estimates based

  5. The investigation of carbon nitride films prepared at various arc currents by vacuum cathode arc method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhimin; Xia, Lifang

    2002-08-01

    The carbon nitride films have been prepared in the arc currents range of 20-60 A at the Ar/N2 atmosphere of 50/400 sccm by the vacuum cathode arc deposition method. The properties of the films were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nanoindentation. The N concentration showed a maximum of 35 at% at 20 A and decreased gradually with the arc currents. The films below 40 A consisted of linear polymeric-like component and sp2 graphitic cluster. With the increasing of the arc current from 20 to 40 A, the ID/IG rose and the photoluminescence (PL) fell gradually, which resulted from the development of the sp2 graphitic phase and the decrease of the polymeric-like phase. As a result, the CC bonds increased and sp3CN and sp2CN decreased. Above 40 A, with the increasing of arc currents, ID/IG fell and the PL increased gradually, which reflected the decreasing of sp2 graphitic phase and the modification of C and N atoms in sp2 cluster. The CC bonds and sp3CN fell and the sp2CN rose. The nanohardness of films showed increasing tendency with the arc currents. The variation of the relative ratio and the average energy of N-containing species and C-containing species at the atmosphere would be responsible for the change in the properties of films.

  6. Industry-relevant magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc ultra-high vacuum deposition system for in situ x-ray diffraction studies of thin film growth using high energy synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, J L; Thomson, W; Howard, B; Schell, N; Näslund, L-Å; Rogström, L; Johansson-Jõesaar, M P; Ghafoor, N; Odén, M; Nothnagel, E; Shepard, A; Greer, J; Birch, J

    2015-09-01

    We present an industry-relevant, large-scale, ultra-high vacuum (UHV) magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc deposition system purposefully designed for time-resolved in situ thin film deposition/annealing studies using high-energy (>50 keV), high photon flux (>10(12) ph/s) synchrotron radiation. The high photon flux, combined with a fast-acquisition-time (<1 s) two-dimensional (2D) detector, permits time-resolved in situ structural analysis of thin film formation processes. The high-energy synchrotron-radiation based x-rays result in small scattering angles (<11°), allowing large areas of reciprocal space to be imaged with a 2D detector. The system has been designed for use on the 1-tonne, ultra-high load, high-resolution hexapod at the P07 High Energy Materials Science beamline at PETRA III at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron in Hamburg, Germany. The deposition system includes standard features of a typical UHV deposition system plus a range of special features suited for synchrotron radiation studies and industry-relevant processes. We openly encourage the materials research community to contact us for collaborative opportunities using this unique and versatile scientific instrument.

  7. Simulation of water-energy fluxes through small-scale reservoir systems under limited data availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papoulakos, Konstantinos; Pollakis, Giorgos; Moustakis, Yiannis; Markopoulos, Apostolis; Iliopoulou, Theano; Dimitriadis, Panayiotis; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris; Efstratiadis, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Small islands are regarded as promising areas for developing hybrid water-energy systems that combine multiple sources of renewable energy with pumped-storage facilities. Essential element of such systems is the water storage component (reservoir), which implements both flow and energy regulations. Apparently, the representation of the overall water-energy management problem requires the simulation of the operation of the reservoir system, which in turn requires a faithful estimation of water inflows and demands of water and energy. Yet, in small-scale reservoir systems, this task in far from straightforward, since both the availability and accuracy of associated information is generally very poor. For, in contrast to large-scale reservoir systems, for which it is quite easy to find systematic and reliable hydrological data, in the case of small systems such data may be minor or even totally missing. The stochastic approach is the unique means to account for input data uncertainties within the combined water-energy management problem. Using as example the Livadi reservoir, which is the pumped storage component of the small Aegean island of Astypalaia, Greece, we provide a simulation framework, comprising: (a) a stochastic model for generating synthetic rainfall and temperature time series; (b) a stochastic rainfall-runoff model, whose parameters cannot be inferred through calibration and, thus, they are represented as correlated random variables; (c) a stochastic model for estimating water supply and irrigation demands, based on simulated temperature and soil moisture, and (d) a daily operation model of the reservoir system, providing stochastic forecasts of water and energy outflows. Acknowledgement: This research is conducted within the frame of the undergraduate course "Stochastic Methods in Water Resources" of the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA). The School of Civil Engineering of NTUA provided moral support for the participation of the students

  8. ARc Welding (Industrial Processing Series).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ARC WELDING , *BIBLIOGRAPHIES), (*ARC WELDS, BIBLIOGRAPHIES), ALUMINUM ALLOYS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, CHROMIUM ALLOYS, METAL PLATES, SPOT WELDING , STEEL...INERT GAS WELDING , MARAGING STEELS, MICROSTRUCTURE, HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, HEAT RESISTANT METALS, WELDABILITY, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, RESISTANCE WELDING

  9. An upper limit to the energy of gamma-ray bursts indicates that GRBs/SNe are powered by magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzali, P. A.; McFadyen, A. I.; Woosley, S. E.; Pian, E.; Tanaka, M.

    2014-09-01

    The kinetic energy of supernovae (SNe) accompanied by gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) tends to cluster near 1052 erg, with 2 × 1052 erg an upper limit to which no compelling exceptions are found (assuming a certain degree of asphericity), and it is always significantly larger than the intrinsic energy of the GRB themselves (corrected for jet collimation). This energy is strikingly similar to the maximum rotational energy of a neutron star rotating with period 1 ms. It is therefore proposed that all GRBs associated with luminous SNe are produced by magnetars. GRBs that result from black hole formation (collapsars) may not produce luminous SNe. X-ray flashes, which are associated with less energetic SNe, are produced by neutron stars with weaker magnetic field or lower spin.

  10. Estimation of synchrotron radiation and limiting energy of high-energy runaway electrons in tokamak stochastic magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Solis, J.R.; Sanchez, R.

    2006-01-15

    The increase of synchrotron radiation power emitted by relativistic electrons moving across stochastic magnetic fields in tokamak geometry has been investigated. It will be shown that the guiding-center motion along the magnetic-field lines leads to an enhancement of the electron radiation which, in case of strong turbulence, can dominate the whole radiation process. A threshold stochastic magnetic fluctuation level, b-tilde>({delta}{sub perpendicular}/R){sup 1/2} ({delta}{sub perpendicular} is the perpendicular correlation length of the magnetic-field fluctuations), has been found for turbulence-dominated radiation. The implications that these results can have when estimating the final energy that runaway electron beams confined in tokamaks can reach are also discussed.

  11. Development of circuit model for arcing on solar panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Bhoomi K.; Deshpande, S. P.; Mukherjee, S.; Gupta, S. B.; Ranjan, M.; Rane, R.; Vaghela, N.; Acharya, V.; Sudhakar, M.; Sankaran, M.; Suresh, E. P.

    2010-02-01

    The increased requirements of payload capacity of the satellites have resulted in much higher power requirements of the satellites. In order to minimize the energy loss during power transmission due to cable loss, use of high voltage solar panels becomes necessary. When a satellite encounters space plasma it floats negatively with respect to the surrounding space plasma environment. At high voltage, charging and discharging on solar panels causes the power system breakdown. Once a solar panel surface is charged and potential difference between surface insulator and conductor exceeds certain value, electrostatic discharge (ESD) may occur. This ESD may trigger a secondary arc that can destroy the solar panel circuit. ESD is also called as primary or minor arc and secondary is called major arc. The energy of minor arc is supplied by the charge stored in the coverglass of solar array and is a pulse of typically several 100 ns to several 100 μs duration. The damage caused by minor arc is less compared to major arcs, but it is observed that the minor arc is cause of major arc. Therefore it is important to develop an understanding of minor arc and mitigation techniques. In this paper we present a linear circuit analysis for minor arcs on solar panels. To study arcing event, a ground experimental facility to simulate space plasma environment has been developed at Facilitation Centre for Industrial Plasma Technologies (Institute for Plasma Research) in collaboration with Indian Space Research Organization's ISRO Satellite Technology Centre (ISAC). A linear circuit model has been developed to explain the experimental results by representing the coverglass, solar cell interconnect and wiring by an LCR circuit and the primary arc by an equivalent LR circuit. The aim of the circuit analysis is to predict the arc current which flows through the arc plasma. It is established from the model that the current depends on various parameters like potential difference between insulator

  12. When should species richness be energy limited, and how would we know?

    PubMed

    Hurlbert, Allen H; Stegen, James C

    2014-04-01

    Energetic constraints are fundamental to ecology and evolution, and empirical relationships between species richness and estimates of available energy (i.e. resources) have led some to suggest that richness is energetically constrained. However, the mechanism linking energy with richness is rarely specified and predictions of secondary patterns consistent with energy-constrained richness are lacking. Here, we lay out the necessary and sufficient assumptions of a causal relationship linking energy gradients to richness gradients. We then describe an eco-evolutionary simulation model that combines spatially explicit diversification with trait evolution, resource availability and assemblage-level carrying capacities. Our model identified patterns in richness and phylogenetic structure expected when a spatial gradient in energy availability determines the number of individuals supported in a given area. A comparison to patterns under alternative scenarios, in which fundamental assumptions behind energetic explanations were violated, revealed patterns that are useful for evaluating the importance of energetic constraints in empirical systems. We use a data set on rockfish (genus Sebastes) from the northeastern Pacific to show how empirical data can be coupled with model predictions to evaluate the role of energetic constraints in generating observed richness gradients.

  13. All-silicon tandem solar cells: Practical limits for energy conversion and possible routes for improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xuguang; Puthen-Veettil, Binesh; Xia, Hongze; Yang, Terry Chien-Jen; Lin, Ziyun; Zhang, Tian; Wu, Lingfeng; Nomoto, Keita; Conibeer, Gavin; Perez-Wurfl, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    Silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) embedded in a dielectric matrix is regarded as one of the most promising materials for the third generation photovoltaics, owing to their tunable bandgap that allows fabrication of optimized tandem devices. Previous work has demonstrated fabrication of Si NCs based tandem solar cells by sputter-annealing of thin multi-layers of silicon rich oxide and SiO2. However, these device efficiencies were much lower than expected given that their theoretical values are much higher. Thus, it is necessary to understand the practical conversion efficiency limits for these devices. In this article, practical efficiency limits of Si NC based double junction tandem cells determined by fundamental material properties such as minority carrier, mobility, and lifetime are investigated. The practical conversion efficiency limits for these devices are significantly different from the reported efficiency limits which use Shockley-Queisser assumptions. Results show that the practical efficiency limit of a double junction cell (1.6 eV Si NC top cell and a 25% efficient c-Si PERL cell as the bottom cell) is 32%. Based on these results suggestions for improvement to the performance of Si nanocrystal based tandem solar cells in terms of the different parameters that were simulated are presented.

  14. Transverse amplified spontaneous emission: The limiting factor for output energy of ultra-high power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chvykov, Vladimir; Nees, John; Krushelnick, Karl

    2014-02-01

    For the new generation of the ultra-high power lasers with tens of PW of output power, kJ-level energies have to be reached. Our modeling, applied to Ti:sapphire amplifiers, demonstrates for the first time, according our knowledge, that Transverse Amplified Spontaneous Emission (TASE) places an additional restriction on storing and extracting energy in larger gain apertures, even stronger than transverse parasitic generation (TPG). Nevertheless, we demonstrate that extracting during pumping (EDP) can significantly reduce parasitic losses due to both TASE and TPG.

  15. Variable polarity arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E. O., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Technological advances generate within themselves dissatisfactions that lead to further advances in a process. A series of advances in welding technology which culminated in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process and an advance instituted to overcome the latest dissatisfactions with the process: automated VPPA welding are described briefly.

  16. Gas tungsten arc welder

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  17. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  18. Arc Length Gone Global

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreaux, Gregory M.; Wells, M. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Everyone with a thorough knowledge of single variable calculus knows that integration can be used to find the length of a curve on a given interval, called its arc length. Fortunately, if one endeavors to pose and solve more interesting problems than simply computing lengths of various curves, there are techniques available that do not require an…

  19. Quantum Oscillations from Fermi Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereg-Barnea, Tamar; Refael, Gil; Franz, Marcel; Weber, Heidi; Seradjeh, Babak

    2009-03-01

    Recent experiments[1] in a variety of High Tc superconductors revel 1/B oscillations in the vortex-liquid state. The period of oscillations in underdoped samples is short and can be translated, via the Onsager relation to an area in k-space which makes up a few percents of the Brillouin zone. Quantum oscillations are usually thought of as arising from closed orbits in momentum space along the Fermi surface and are used to measure the Fermi vector. Thus, the observation of quantum oscillations in the cuprates seems to be at odds with the observation of Fermi arcs in ARPES experiments[2] due to their fragmented Fermi surface topology. In this talk we show that quantum oscillations can arise from a partially gapped Fermi surface. We adopt a phenomenological model of arcs which terminate at a regime with a superconducting gap of d-wave symmetry to describe the pseudo gap phase. Without invoking any additional order, quantization of energy is found well below the gap maximum. Semiclassically the quantization condition arises from closed orbits in real-space. When translated to momentum space, the area enclosed by the orbits is much smaller than that of the full Fermi surface. [1]N. Doiron-Leyaraud et al. nature 447, 565 (2007) [2]Kanigel et al. Nature Physics 2 447 (2006)

  20. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Cccc of... - Emission Limitations for Energy Recovery Units That Commenced Construction After June 4, 2010, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emission Limitations for Energy... Limitations for Energy Recovery Units That Commenced Construction After June 4, 2010, or That Commenced... addition was delayed indefinitely. Table 6 to Subpart CCCC of Part 60—Emission Limitations for...

  1. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart Cccc of... - Emission Limitations for Energy Recovery Units That Commenced Construction After June 4, 2010, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emission Limitations for Energy... Limitations for Energy Recovery Units That Commenced Construction After June 4, 2010, or That Commenced... addition was delayed indefinitely. Table 6 to Subpart CCCC of Part 60—Emission Limitations for...

  2. Minima in generalized oscillator strengths of atomic transitions and the approach to the high-energy limit

    SciTech Connect

    Avdonina, N.B.; Fursa, D.; Msezane, A.Z.; Pratt, R.H.

    2005-06-15

    Minima in the generalized oscillator strength (GOS) and the convergence of the GOS to the first Born approximation (FBA) limit for the Ba 6s {sup 1}S{yields}6p {sup 1}P optically allowed transition are investigated. The random-phase approximation with exchange, which takes into account correlation effects among the atomic electrons themselves, and the convergent close-coupling (CCC) approximation are used for the calculations. We find the following. (1) The GOS as a function of the momentum transfer squared K{sup 2} is characterized by a complex structure of multiple minima, significantly different in the two approximations and approaches the high-energy FBA limit only at small K{sup 2} values (less than about 0.5 a.u.). (2) The number of minima calculated in the CCC approximation increases with increase in energy, but does not correspond to the number obtained in the FBA, even at high energy {approx}1 keV. The CCC and FBA minima are in general not directly related. The FBA minima, except for the first, do not correspond to physical observables at these energies. (3) At high energy the interaction between the incident electron and the target remains significant, resulting in slowing down the convergence of the CCC GOS to the corresponding nonrelativistic FBA results.

  3. Measurement of both the equilibrium constant and rate constant for electronic energy transfer by control of the limiting kinetic regimes.

    PubMed

    Vagnini, Michael T; Rutledge, W Caleb; Wagenknecht, Paul S

    2010-02-01

    Electronic energy transfer can fall into two limiting cases. When the rate of the energy transfer back reaction is much faster than relaxation of the acceptor excited state, equilibrium between the donor and acceptor excited states is achieved and only the equilibrium constant for the energy transfer can be measured. When the rate of the back reaction is much slower than relaxation of the acceptor, the energy transfer is irreversible and only the forward rate constant can be measured. Herein, we demonstrate that with trans-[Cr(d(4)-cyclam)(CN)(2)](+) as the donor and either trans-[Cr([15]ane-ane-N(4))(CN)(2)](+) or trans-[Cr(cyclam)(CN)(2)](+) as the acceptor, both limits can be obtained by control of the donor concentration. The equilibrium constant and rate constant for the case in which trans-[Cr([15]ane-ane-N(4))(CN)(2)](+) is the acceptor are 0.66 and 1.7 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The equilibrium constant is in good agreement with the value of 0.60 determined using the excited state energy gap between the donor and acceptor species. For the thermoneutral case in which trans-[Cr(cyclam)(CN)(2)](+) is the acceptor, an experimental equilibrium constant of 0.99 was reported previously, and the rate constant has now been measured as 4.0 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1).

  4. Calculation of pressure and temperature in medium-voltage electrical installations due to fault arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Zhang, J.; Gockenbach, E.

    2008-05-01

    In order to determine the pressure rise due to arc faults in electrical installations, the portion of energy heating the surrounding gas of fault arcs has to be known. The ratio of the portion of energy to the electric energy, the thermal transfer coefficient, is adopted as the kp factor. This paper presents a theoretical approach for the determination of the thermal transfer coefficient and the pressure rise in electrical installations. It is based on the fundamental hydro- and thermodynamic conservation equations and the equation of gas state taking into account melting and evaporation of metals as well as chemical reactions with the surrounding gas. In order to consider the dependence of the arc energy on the gas density, the radiative effect of fault arcs on the energy balance is introduced into the arc model by using the net emission coefficient as a function of gas density, arc temperature and arc radius. The results for a test container show that factors such as the kinds of insulating gases and of electrode materials, the size of test vessels and the gas density considerably influence the thermal transfer coefficient and thus the pressure rise. Furthermore, it is demonstrated, for an example of the arc fault in a compact medium-voltage station with pressure relief openings and a pressure relief channel, that the arc energy and the arc temperature can be simulated based on the changing gas density.

  5. Further Sensitivity Analysis of Hypothetical Policies to Limit Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    EIA Publications

    2013-01-01

    This analysis supplements the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 alternative cases which imposed hypothetical carbon dioxide emission fees on fossil fuel consumers. It offers further cases that examine the impacts of fees placed only on the emissions from electric power facilities, impacts of returning potential revenues to consumers, and two cap-and-trade policies.

  6. [The effect of limiting neuronal energy metabolism on the level of impulse activity and membrane potentials].

    PubMed

    Voronova, N V; Chumachenko, A A

    1989-01-01

    The changes of the membrane potential and the frequency of impulse activity of the crayfish stretch receptor neuron have been studied under condition of energy supply deficiency. The energetic metabolism inhibitors have been found not to exert a significant effect on the membrane potential. The activity of the glycolysis process and the Krebs cycle have different effect on the sensitivity of the generating mechanism.

  7. Further Sensitivity Analysis of Hypothetical Policies to Limit Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    EIA Publications

    2013-01-01

    This analysis supplements the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 alternative cases which imposed hypothetical carbon dioxide emission fees on fossil fuel consumers. It offers further cases that examine the impacts of fees placed only on the emissions from electric power facilities, impacts of returning potential revenues to consumers, and two cap-and-trade policies.

  8. A stable auroral red (SAR) arc with multiple emission features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendillo, Michael; Finan, Robert; Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Wroten, Joei; Martinis, Carlos; Casillas, Marcus

    2016-10-01

    Stable auroral red (SAR) arcs offer subvisible evidence for storm time linkages between the inner magnetosphere and the midlatitude ionosphere. A SAR arc's defining characteristics are horizon-to-horizon east-west extent, a few degrees of latitude in meridional extent, emission only at the oxygen 6300Å line, and minimal brightness changes during a night—effects readily provided by steady heat conduction from the ring current-plasmapause interaction region. Here we describe a typical SAR arc (brightness 300 rayleighs) with several superimposed patches of emission in two oxygen lines (with a 6300Å/5577Å ratio of 40). We find no evidence for highly localized heating effects but rather evidence from GPS satellites supporting low-energy electron precipitation as the SAR arc modulating mechanism. Seven brightness peaks with average longitude spacing of 4° define a new spatial pattern for SAR arc studies.

  9. Morphology and Dynamics of Auroral Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, S.; Murphy, K. R.; Sibeck, D. G.; Donovan, E.; Spanswick, E.; Fasel, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    A magnetic substorm is the result of an explosive release of energy on the night-side magnetosphere due to the coupling of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) with the Earth's magnetic field resulting in a storage of energy in the night side magnetosphere. The consequential auroral substorm is characterized by a rapid brightening and poleward expansion of the aurora following the release of energy in the night-side magnetosphere. Two predominant hypotheses exist which predict the sequence of events leading to substorm onset and the physical mechanism responsible for triggering this onset, the near-Earth neutral line (NENL) and current disruption models (CD). The NENL model suggest that onset is the result of magnetic reconnection between 10-20 Earth radii in the magnetotail. The CD model suggests onset is the result plasma instabilities forming inside of 10 Earth radii. This study examines a newer model presented by Nishimura et al. (2010, JGR), which suggests that enhanced earthward plasma flows from the distant magnetotail to the near-Earth region lead to sub-storm onset, which is manifested in the aurora by a poleward boundary intensification (PBI) and equatorward motion of a North-South auroral feature. The purpose of this study is to determine and identify the poleward-most and equatorward-most arcs, as well as the morphology of the aurora in order to develop a more complete picture of the auroral substorm and ultimately test the three substorm models described above. Preliminary results demonstrate that equatorward motion of the onset arc during the growth phase is typical and that no distinct North-South arcs exist during the growth phase. Future research will include characterizing the intensity and tracking the brightness of the arcs comparatively as well as the motion within the arc.

  10. Arc products of transformer insulating systems containing tetrachloroethylene. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, B.; Boshart-Mikes, G.; Mikes, F.; Mulak, M.; Peck, W.R.; Mandelcorn, L.; Jones, E.A.; Marshall, G.R.; Studniartz, S.A.

    1986-03-01

    A low current laboratory arc interruption cell was adapted to study the arc products of Wecosol (C/sub 2/Cl/sub 4/) and 75W% C/sub 2/Cl/sub 4/-25W% mineral oil-solid insulation systems for fire resistant transformers to determine the toxicity hazard of arc failures of these transformers. The use of the relatively low current (40 to 50 ampere) arcs was justified on the basis that their maximum temperature was above the chemical reaction temperatures just as in the case of kiloampere arc failures of transformers. Analytical methods were developed to determine arc products, principally for COCl/sub 2/ (phosgene). A relative hazard criterion is presented. The major arc products of the Wecosol systems are Cl/sub 2/, HCl, C/sub 2/Cl/sub 6/ (reaction of Cl/sub 2/ + C/sub 2/Cl/sub 4/) and CCl/sub 4/, and the minor products are COCl/sub 2/, CO and CO/sub 2/. The principal arc failure hazard here would be due to Cl/sub 2/ and HCl, and there is a low probability of COCl/sub 2/ and CO hazards. The major arc products in the 75W% C/sub 2/Cl/sub 4/ + 25W% mineral oil systems are HCl and CCl/sub 4/, and HCl would present the principal arc failure hazard. The minor products include COCl/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/, and COCl/sub 2/ would present a low probability of toxicity hazard. The levels of H/sub 2/ were well below the explosive limits of H/sub 2/ and air. It was concluded that failure arc products from these C/sub 2/Cl/sub 4/ fluid based transformers should not be hazardous in most instances of failure, and that simple precautions would be sufficient to assure safe access and handling. 6 figs., 11 tabs.

  11. Summer declines in activity and body temperature offer polar bears limited energy savings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whiteman, J.P.; Harlow, H.J.; Durner, George M.; Anderson-Sprecher, R.; Albeke, Shannon E.; Regehr, Eric V.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Ben-David, M.

    2015-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) summer on the sea ice or, where it melts, on shore. Although the physiology of “ice” bears in summer is unknown, “shore” bears purportedly minimize energy losses by entering a hibernation-like state when deprived of food. Such a strategy could partially compensate for the loss of on-ice foraging opportunities caused by climate change. However, here we report gradual, moderate declines in activity and body temperature of both shore and ice bears in summer, resembling energy expenditures typical of fasting, nonhibernating mammals. Also, we found that to avoid unsustainable heat loss while swimming, bears employed unusual heterothermy of the body core. Thus, although well adapted to seasonal ice melt, polar bears appear susceptible to deleterious declines in body condition during the lengthening period of summer food deprivation.

  12. Animal physiology. Summer declines in activity and body temperature offer polar bears limited energy savings.

    PubMed

    Whiteman, J P; Harlow, H J; Durner, G M; Anderson-Sprecher, R; Albeke, S E; Regehr, E V; Amstrup, S C; Ben-David, M

    2015-07-17

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) summer on the sea ice or, where it melts, on shore. Although the physiology of "ice" bears in summer is unknown, "shore" bears purportedly minimize energy losses by entering a hibernation-like state when deprived of food. Such a strategy could partially compensate for the loss of on-ice foraging opportunities caused by climate change. However, here we report gradual, moderate declines in activity and body temperature of both shore and ice bears in summer, resembling energy expenditures typical of fasting, nonhibernating mammals. Also, we found that to avoid unsustainable heat loss while swimming, bears employed unusual heterothermy of the body core. Thus, although well adapted to seasonal ice melt, polar bears appear susceptible to deleterious declines in body condition during the lengthening period of summer food deprivation. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. On the Limiting Markov Process of Energy Exchanges in a Rarely Interacting Ball-Piston Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bálint, Péter; Gilbert, Thomas; Nándori, Péter; Szász, Domokos; Tóth, Imre Péter

    2016-08-01

    We analyse the process of energy exchanges generated by the elastic collisions between a point-particle, confined to a two-dimensional cell with convex boundaries, and a `piston', i.e. a line-segment, which moves back and forth along a one-dimensional interval partially intersecting the cell. This model can be considered as the elementary building block of a spatially extended high-dimensional billiard modeling heat transport in a class of hybrid materials exhibiting the kinetics of gases and spatial structure of solids. Using heuristic arguments and numerical analysis, we argue that, in a regime of rare interactions, the billiard process converges to a Markov jump process for the energy exchanges and obtain the expression of its generator.

  14. Secondary electron emission in the limit of low incident electron energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafaev, Aleksandr; Kaganovich, Igor; Soukhomlinov, Vladimir; Grabovskiy, Artiom

    2016-09-01

    A detailed review of experimental and theoretical studies of secondary electron emission (SEE) at low incident electron energies has been recently given in paper. In particularly, discussion of some authors' statement on increase of the SEE yield up to unity if the primary electron energy tends to zero was reviewed. Present paper considers a technique for measurements of SEE yield near a sample surface making use of a magnetic field parallel to the surface. Using this technique it was shown that the SEE yield can approach unity for a polycrystalline, but not for a monocrystalline sample. This result was explained by additional reflection of primary electrons from a potential barrier near the sample surface. Therefore for suppression of the deleterious effects of SEE, e.g, for better performance of accelerators, it is important to monitor and control micro electric-fields arising near a polycrystalline surface.

  15. Limiting Motion for the Parabolic Ginzburg-Landau Equation with Infinite Energy Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Côte, Delphine; Côte, Raphaël

    2017-03-01

    We study a class of solutions to the parabolic Ginzburg-Landau equation in dimension 2 or higher, with ill-prepared infinite energy initial data. We show that, asymptotically, the vorticity evolves according to motion by mean curvature in Brakke's weak formulation. Then, we prove that in the plane, point vortices do not move in the original time scale. These results extend the works of Bethuel, Orlandi and Smets (Ann Math (2) 163(1):37-163, 2006; Duke Math J 130(3):523-614, 2005) to infinite energy data; they allow us to consider point vortices on a lattice (in dimension 2), or filament vortices of infinite length (in dimension 3).

  16. On the Limiting Markov Process of Energy Exchanges in a Rarely Interacting Ball-Piston Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bálint, Péter; Gilbert, Thomas; Nándori, Péter; Szász, Domokos; Tóth, Imre Péter

    2017-02-01

    We analyse the process of energy exchanges generated by the elastic collisions between a point-particle, confined to a two-dimensional cell with convex boundaries, and a `piston', i.e. a line-segment, which moves back and forth along a one-dimensional interval partially intersecting the cell. This model can be considered as the elementary building block of a spatially extended high-dimensional billiard modeling heat transport in a class of hybrid materials exhibiting the kinetics of gases and spatial structure of solids. Using heuristic arguments and numerical analysis, we argue that, in a regime of rare interactions, the billiard process converges to a Markov jump process for the energy exchanges and obtain the expression of its generator.

  17. Limited energy studies, Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Kingport, Tennessee. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1992-08-01

    This study was conducted and this report prepared under Contract No. DACA 01-91-D-0032, Delivery Orders 2 and 3, issued by the U.S. Army Engineer District, Mobile on 9 September 1991. The purpose of this study was to determine the economic feasibility of the following specific energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) associated with the central heating plants at the Holston Army Ammunition Plant (HAAP).

  18. de Sitter limit analysis for dark energy and modified gravity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Felice, Antonio; Frusciante, Noemi; Papadomanolakis, Georgios

    2017-07-01

    The effective field theory of dark energy and modified gravity is supposed to well describe, at low energies, the behavior of the gravity modifications due to one extra scalar degree of freedom. The usual curvature perturbation is very useful when studying the conditions for the avoidance of ghost instabilities as well as the positivity of the squared speeds of propagation for both the scalar and tensor modes, or the Stückelberg field performs perfectly when investigating the evolution of linear perturbations. We show that the viable parameter space identified by requiring no-ghost instabilities and positive squared speeds of propagation does not change by performing a field redefinition, while the requirement of the avoidance of tachyonic instability might instead be different. Therefore, we find it interesting to associate to the general modified gravity theory described in the effective field theory framework, a perturbation field which will inherit all of the properties of the theory. In the present paper we address the following questions: (1) how can we define such a field? and (2) what is the mass of such a field as the background approaches a final de Sitter state? We define a gauge-invariant quantity which identifies the density of the dark energy perturbation field valid for any background. We derive the mass associated to the gauge-invariant dark energy field on a de Sitter background, which we retain to be still a good approximation also at very low redshift (z ≃0 ). On this background we also investigate the value of the speed of propagation and we find that there exist classes of theories which admit a nonvanishing speed of propagation, even in the Horndeski model, for which a zero speed of sound has previously been found in the literature. We finally apply our results to specific well-known models.

  19. Limits to sustained energy intake. XXII. Reproductive performance of two selected mouse lines with different thermal conductance.

    PubMed

    Al Jothery, Aqeel H; Król, Elżbieta; Hawkins, James; Chetoui, Aurore; Saint-Lambert, Alexander; Gamo, Yuko; Shaw, Suzanne C; Valencak, Teresa; Bünger, Lutz; Hill, William G; Vaanholt, Lobke M; Hambly, Catherine; Speakman, John R

    2014-10-15

    Maximal sustained energy intake (SusEI) appears limited, but the factors imposing the limit are disputed. We studied reproductive performance in two lines of mice selected for high and low food intake (MH and ML, respectively), and known to have large differences in thermal conductance (29% higher in the MH line at 21°C). When these mice raised their natural litters, their metabolisable energy intake significantly increased over the first 13 days of lactation and then reached a plateau. At peak lactation, MH mice assimilated on average 45.3% more energy than ML mice (222.9±7.1 and 153.4±12.5 kJ day(-1), N=49 and 24, respectively). Moreover, MH mice exported on average 62.3 kJ day(-1) more energy as milk than ML mice (118.9±5.3 and 56.6±5.4 kJ day(-1), N=subset of 32 and 21, respectively). The elevated milk production of MH mice enabled them to wean litters (65.2±2.1 g) that were on average 50.2% heavier than litters produced by ML mothers (43.4±3.0 g), and pups that were on average 27.2% heavier (9.9±0.2 and 7.8±0.2 g, respectively). Lactating mice in both lines had significantly longer and heavier guts compared with non-reproductive mice. However, inconsistent with the 'central limit hypothesis', the ML mice had significantly longer and heavier intestines than MH mice. An experiment where the mice raised litters of the opposing line demonstrated that lactation performance was not limited by the growth capacity of offspring. Our findings are consistent with the idea that the SusEI at peak lactation is constrained by the capacity of the mothers to dissipate body heat.

  20. Structure and binding energy of the H2S dimer at the CCSD(T) complete basis set limit.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Kono H

    2017-06-21

    This study presents results for the binding energy and geometry of the H2S dimer which have been computed using Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2, MP4) and coupled cluster (CCSD, CCSD(T)) calculations with basis sets up to aug-cc-pV5Z. Estimates of De, EZPE, Do, and dimer geometry have been obtained at each level of theory by taking advantage of the systematic convergence behavior toward the complete basis set (CBS) limit. The CBS limit binding energy values of De are 1.91 (MP2), 1.75 (MP4), 1.41 (CCSD), and 1.69 kcal/mol (CCSD[T]). The most accurate values for the equilibrium S-S distance rSS (without counterpoise correction) are 4.080 (MP2/aug-cc-pV5Z), 4.131 (MP4/aug-cc-pVQZ), 4.225 (CCSD/aug-cc-pVQZ), and 4.146 Å (CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVQZ). This study also evaluates the effect of counterpoise correction on the H2S dimer geometry and binding energy. As regards the structure of (H2S)2, MPn, CCSD, and CCSD(T) level values of rSS, obtained by performing geometry optimizations on the counterpoise-corrected potential energy surface, converge systematically to CBS limit values of 4.099 (MP2), 4.146 (MP4), 4.233 (CCSD), and 4.167 Å (CCSD(T)). The corresponding CBS limit values of the equilibrium binding energy De are 1.88 (MP2), 1.76 (MP4), 1.41 (CCSD), and 1.69 kcal/mol (CCSD(T)), the latter in excellent agreement with the measured binding energy value of 1.68 ± 0.02 kcal/mol reported by Ciaffoni et al. [Appl. Phys. B 92, 627 (2008)]. Combining CBS electronic binding energies De with EZPE predicted by CCSD(T) vibrational second-order perturbation theory calculations yields Do = 1.08 kcal/mol, which is around 0.6 kcal/mol smaller than the measured value of 1.7 ± 0.3 kcal/mol. Overall, the results presented here demonstrate that the application of high level calculations, in particular CCSD(T), in combination with augmented correlation consistent basis sets provides valuable insight into the structure and energetics of the hydrogen sulfide dimer.

  1. Structure and binding energy of the H2S dimer at the CCSD(T) complete basis set limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, Kono H.

    2017-06-01

    This study presents results for the binding energy and geometry of the H2S dimer which have been computed using Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2, MP4) and coupled cluster (CCSD, CCSD(T)) calculations with basis sets up to aug-cc-pV5Z. Estimates of De, EZPE, Do, and dimer geometry have been obtained at each level of theory by taking advantage of the systematic convergence behavior toward the complete basis set (CBS) limit. The CBS limit binding energy values of De are 1.91 (MP2), 1.75 (MP4), 1.41 (CCSD), and 1.69 kcal/mol (CCSD[T]). The most accurate values for the equilibrium S-S distance rSS (without counterpoise correction) are 4.080 (MP2/aug-cc-pV5Z), 4.131 (MP4/aug-cc-pVQZ), 4.225 (CCSD/aug-cc-pVQZ), and 4.146 Å (CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVQZ). This study also evaluates the effect of counterpoise correction on the H2S dimer geometry and binding energy. As regards the structure of (H2S)2, MPn, CCSD, and CCSD(T) level values of rSS, obtained by performing geometry optimizations on the counterpoise-corrected potential energy surface, converge systematically to CBS limit values of 4.099 (MP2), 4.146 (MP4), 4.233 (CCSD), and 4.167 Å (CCSD(T)). The corresponding CBS limit values of the equilibrium binding energy De are 1.88 (MP2), 1.76 (MP4), 1.41 (CCSD), and 1.69 kcal/mol (CCSD(T)), the latter in excellent agreement with the measured binding energy value of 1.68 ± 0.02 kcal/mol reported by Ciaffoni et al. [Appl. Phys. B 92, 627 (2008)]. Combining CBS electronic binding energies De with EZPE predicted by CCSD(T) vibrational second-order perturbation theory calculations yields Do = 1.08 kcal/mol, which is around 0.6 kcal/mol smaller than the measured value of 1.7 ± 0.3 kcal/mol. Overall, the results presented here demonstrate that the application of high level calculations, in particular CCSD(T), in combination with augmented correlation consistent basis sets provides valuable insight into the structure and energetics of the hydrogen sulfide dimer.

  2. DIFFUSED SOLUTE-SOLVENT INTERFACE WITH POISSON-BOLTZMANN ELECTROSTATICS: FREE-ENERGY VARIATION AND SHARP-INTERFACE LIMIT.

    PubMed

    Li, B O; Liu, Yuan

    A phase-field free-energy functional for the solvation of charged molecules (e.g., proteins) in aqueous solvent (i.e., water or salted water) is constructed. The functional consists of the solute volumetric and solute-solvent interfacial energies, the solute-solvent van der Waals interaction energy, and the continuum electrostatic free energy described by the Poisson-Boltzmann theory. All these are expressed in terms of phase fields that, for low free-energy conformations, are close to one value in the solute phase and another in the solvent phase. A key property of the model is that the phase-field interpolation of dielectric coefficient has the vanishing derivative at both solute and solvent phases. The first variation of such an effective free-energy functional is derived. Matched asymptotic analysis is carried out for the resulting relaxation dynamics of the diffused solute-solvent interface. It is shown that the sharp-interface limit is exactly the variational implicit-solvent model that has successfully captured capillary evaporation in hydrophobic confinement and corresponding multiple equilibrium states of underlying biomolecular systems as found in experiment and molecular dynamics simulations. Our phase-field approach and analysis can be used to possibly couple the description of interfacial fluctuations for efficient numerical computations of biomolecular interactions.

  3. DIFFUSED SOLUTE-SOLVENT INTERFACE WITH POISSON–BOLTZMANN ELECTROSTATICS: FREE-ENERGY VARIATION AND SHARP-INTERFACE LIMIT

    PubMed Central

    LI, BO; LIU, YUAN

    2015-01-01

    A phase-field free-energy functional for the solvation of charged molecules (e.g., proteins) in aqueous solvent (i.e., water or salted water) is constructed. The functional consists of the solute volumetric and solute-solvent interfacial energies, the solute-solvent van der Waals interaction energy, and the continuum electrostatic free energy described by the Poisson–Boltzmann theory. All these are expressed in terms of phase fields that, for low free-energy conformations, are close to one value in the solute phase and another in the solvent phase. A key property of the model is that the phase-field interpolation of dielectric coefficient has the vanishing derivative at both solute and solvent phases. The first variation of such an effective free-energy functional is derived. Matched asymptotic analysis is carried out for the resulting relaxation dynamics of the diffused solute-solvent interface. It is shown that the sharp-interface limit is exactly the variational implicit-solvent model that has successfully captured capillary evaporation in hydrophobic confinement and corresponding multiple equilibrium states of underlying biomolecular systems as found in experiment and molecular dynamics simulations. Our phase-field approach and analysis can be used to possibly couple the description of interfacial fluctuations for efficient numerical computations of biomolecular interactions. PMID:26877556

  4. Limits to prediction of energy balance from milk composition measures at individual cow level.

    PubMed

    Løvendahl, P; Ridder, C; Friggens, N C

    2010-05-01

    Frequently updated energy balance (EB) estimates for individual cows are especially useful for dairy herd management, and individual-level estimates form the basis for group-level EB estimates. The accuracy of EB estimates determines the value of this information for management decision support. This study aimed to assess EB accuracy through ANOVA components and by comparing EB estimates based either on milk composition (EBalMilk) or on body condition score (BCS) and body weight (BW) (EBalBody). Energy balance based on milk composition was evaluated using data in which milk composition was measured at each milking. Three breeds (Danish Red, Holstein-Friesian, and Jersey) of cows (299 cows, 623 lactations) in parities 1 to 4 were used. Milk data were smoothed using a rolling local regression. Energy balance based on milk composition was calculated using a partial least squares (PLS) model based on milk fat, protein, and lactose contents and yields, and the daily change in these variables at each day. Energy balance based on BCS and BW was calculated from changes in body condition and BW scored weekly or fortnightly. Equations for calculation of EBalMilk and EBalBody used no common variables and were, therefore, assumed mathematically independent. Traits were analyzed within 3 stages of lactation expected to have high mobilization of body tissue (1, early), almost balanced (2), and deposition of body energy (3, mid to late lactation). In general, EBalMilk and EBalBody followed similar expected changes through lactation. Estimates of covariance were obtained using single-trait mixed models with random regression terms describing the change with time and used for calculation of repeatability as intraclass correlations. Within stage, EBalMilk was less repeatable than EBalBody (0.53, 0.41, 0.43 vs. 0.93, 0.91, 0.86, respectively, for stages 1, 2, and 3), mainly because of a larger residual variance for EBalMilk. Correlations between individual-level estimates of EBal

  5. Thermocapillary and arc phenomena in stainless steel welding

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, S.W.; Olson, D.L.; Burgardt, P.

    1999-02-01

    This investigation characterized the effects of power level and Gaussian heat source size on thermocapillary-induced weld shape and estimated the relative influence of various possible arc phenomena in determining weld shape. Welds made with the CTAW process were compared with similar ones made with a conduction-mode EBW process and the differences were related to arc effects. Evidence of thermocapillary flow was readily apparent in both the GTA welds and the conduction-mode EB welds and was qualitatively similar in both. The similarity between the results obtained with the two processes serves to demonstrate that thermocapillary convection is the dominant factor in heat-to-heat weld shape variability. However, a similar one-to-one correspondence between welds produced with the two processes does not exist. Especially at high power, the EB welds showed stronger thermocapillary convection than the GTA welds. One important arc factor that limits thermocapillary flow in ar welds appears to be an increase in arc size with arc length and arc current. A non-Gaussian arc power distribution in GTAW seems to be most important in limiting the fluid flow. Apparently, the arc power distribution is more nearly rectangular in shape for an argon gas arc. At higher currents, above 200 A, plasma shear force may also be an important contributor to weld shape development. The conduction-mode EB welds demonstrate that thermocapillary flow reversal probably does not occur in welds made with a simple Gaussian heat source. The complex shape behavior is likely a result of an arc effect such as plasma shear.

  6. FY95 limited energy study. Area B nitric acid production facilities, Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Kingsport, Tennessee. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-02

    In June 1995, Affiliated Engineers SE, Inc. (AESE) was retained by the Mobile District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to perform a Limited Energy Study for Holston Army Ammunition Plant, Kingsport, Tennessee. The field survey of existing conditions was completed in July 1995. The results of this field survey were subsequently tabulated and used to generate single line process flow diagrams on Autocad. A subsequent one day field survey was conducted in August 1995. This report summarizes the results obtained from field investigation and the analysis of various alternative Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECO`s). ECO`s were analyzed for suitability for the Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP) using the government`s software package called Life Cycle Cost in Design (LCCID).

  7. Measurement of an upper limit of fission energy release in HOLOG using a germanium gamma ray detector

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.F.

    1998-01-01

    An upper limit of less than 4 mg TNT equivalent fission energy release from the HOLOG experiment was determined using a germanium {gamma}-ray detector to measure the ratio of selected fission-product and plutonium {gamma} rays. Only three hours of {gamma}-ray data collected immediately after the zero-time were analyzed to calculate the above limit. We found no peaks corresponding to the {sup 97} Zr - {sup 97} Nb fission product pair at the gamma-ray energies of E{sub {gamma}} = 743 keV and E{sub {gamma}} = 658 keV, respectively. No information on the plutonium isotopic ratios is revealed because {gamma}-ray peaks in the energy region below 100 keV are not observed due to the high absorption in the containment barrier. The measurement is relatively easy to perform and is not subject to false-positive results because specific fission product and plutonium {gamma} ray energies need to be detected.

  8. Understanding limiting factors in thick electrode performance as applied to high energy density Li-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Du, Zhijia; Wood, David L.; Daniel, Claus; ...

    2017-02-09

    We present that increasing electrode thickness, thus increasing the volume ratio of active materials, is one effective method to enable the development of high energy density Li-ion batteries. In this study, an energy density versus power density optimization of LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 (NCA)/graphite cell stack was conducted via mathematical modeling. The energy density was found to have a maximum point versus electrode thickness (critical thickness) at given discharging C rates. The physics-based factors that limit the energy/power density of thick electrodes were found to be increased cell polarization and underutilization of active materials. The latter is affected by Li-ion diffusion in activemore » materials and Li-ion depletion in the electrolyte phase. Based on those findings, possible approaches were derived to surmount the limiting factors. Finally, the improvement of the energy–power relationship in an 18,650 cell was used to demonstrate how to optimize the thick electrode parameters in cell engineering.« less

  9. Semicircular Rashba arc spin polarizer

    SciTech Connect

    Bin Siu, Zhuo; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Ghee Tan, Seng

    2014-05-07

    In this work, we study the generation of spin polarized currents using curved arcs of finite widths, in which the Rashba spin orbit interaction (RSOI) is present. Compared to the 1-dimensional RSOI arcs with zero widths studied previously, the finite width presents charge carriers with another degree of freedom along the transverse width of the arc, in addition to the longitudinal degree of freedom along the circumference of the arc. The asymmetry in the transverse direction due to the difference in the inner and outer radii of the arc breaks the antisymmetry of the longitudinal spin z current in a straight RSOI segment. This property can be exploited to generate spin z polarized current output from the RSOI arc by a spin unpolarized current input. The sign of the spin current can be manipulated by varying the arc dimensions.

  10. Annular arc accelerator shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibowitz, L. P. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An annular arc accelerator shock tube employs a cold gas driver to flow a stream of gas from an expansion section through a high voltage electrode section to a test section, thus driving a shock wave in front of it. A glow discharge detects the shock wave and actuates a trigger generator which in turn fires spark-gap switches to discharge a bank of capacitors across a centered cathode and an annular anode in tandem electrode sections. The initial shock wave passes through the anode section from the cathode section thereby depositing energy into the flow gas without the necessity of any diaphragm opening in the gas flow from the expansion section through the electrode sections.

  11. Exploring the Limits of Density Functional Approximations for Interaction Energies of Molecular Precursors to Organic Electronics.

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Stephan N; Corminboeuf, Clemence

    2012-11-13

    Neutral and charged assemblies of π-conjugated molecules span the field of organic electronics. Electronic structure computations can provide valuable information regarding the nature of the intermolecular interactions within molecular precursors to organic electronics. Here, we introduce a database of neutral (Pi29n) and radical (Orel26rad) dimer complexes that represent binding energies between organic functional units. The new benchmarks are used to test approximate electronic structure methods. Achieving accurate interaction energies for neutral complexes (Pi29n) is straightforward, so long as dispersion interactions are properly taken into account. However, π-dimer radical cations (Orel26rad) are examples of highly challenging situations for density functional approximations. The role of dispersion corrections is crucial, yet simultaneously long-range corrected exchange schemes are necessary to provide the proper dimer dissociation behavior. Nevertheless, long-range corrected functionals seriously underestimate the binding energy of Orel26rad at equilibrium geometries. In fact, only ωB97X-D, an empirical exchange-correlation functional fitted together with an empirical "classical" dispersion correction, leads to suitable results. Valuable alternatives are the more demanding MP2/6-31G*(0.25) level, as well as the most cost-effective combination involving a dispersion corrected long-range functional together with a smaller practical size basis set (e.g., LC-ωPBEB95-dDsC/6-31G*). The Orel26rad test set should serve as an ideal benchmark for assessing the performance of improved schemes.

  12. Anaerobic energy provision does not limit Wingate exercise performance in endurance-trained cyclists.

    PubMed

    Calbet, J A L; De Paz, J A; Garatachea, N; Cabeza de Vaca, S; Chavarren, J

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of severe acute hypoxia on exercise performance and metabolism during 30-s Wingate tests. Five endurance- (E) and five sprint- (S) trained track cyclists from the Spanish National Team performed 30-s Wingate tests in normoxia and hypoxia (inspired O(2) fraction = 0.10). Oxygen deficit was estimated from submaximal cycling economy tests by use of a nonlinear model. E cyclists showed higher maximal O(2) uptake than S (72 +/- 1 and 62 +/- 2 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1), P < 0.05). S cyclists achieved higher peak and mean power output, and 33% larger oxygen deficit than E (P < 0.05). During the Wingate test in normoxia, S relied more on anaerobic energy sources than E (P < 0.05); however, S showed a larger fatigue index in both conditions (P < 0.05). Compared with normoxia, hypoxia lowered O(2) uptake by 16% in E and S (P < 0.05). Peak power output, fatigue index, and exercise femoral vein blood lactate concentration were not altered by hypoxia in any group. Endurance cyclists, unlike S, maintained their mean power output in hypoxia by increasing their anaerobic energy production, as shown by 7% greater oxygen deficit and 11% higher postexercise lactate concentration. In conclusion, performance during 30-s Wingate tests in severe acute hypoxia is maintained or barely reduced owing to the enhancement of the anaerobic energy release. The effect of severe acute hypoxia on supramaximal exercise performance depends on training background.

  13. Polymer triplet energy levels need not limit photocurrent collection in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Schlenker, Cody W; Chen, Kung-Shih; Yip, Hin-Lap; Li, Chang-Zhi; Bradshaw, Liam R; Ochsenbein, Stefan T; Ding, Feizhi; Li, Xiaosong S; Gamelin, Daniel R; Jen, Alex K-Y; Ginger, David S

    2012-12-05

    We study charge recombination via triplet excited states in donor/acceptor organic solar cells and find that, contrary to intuition, high internal quantum efficiency (IQE) can be obtained in polymer/fullerene blend devices even when the polymer triplet state is significantly lower in energy than the intermolecular charge transfer (CT) state. Our model donor system comprises the copolymer PIDT-PhanQ: poly(indacenodithiophene-co-phenanthro[9,10-b]quinoxaline), which when blended with phenyl-C(71)-butyric acid methyl ester (PC(71)BM) is capable of achieving power conversion efficiencies of 6.0% and IQE ≈ 90%, despite the fact that the polymer triplet state lies 300 meV below the interfacial CT state. However, as we push the open circuit voltage (V(OC)) higher by tailoring the fullerene reduction potential, we observe signatures of a new recombination loss process near V(OC) = 1.0 V that we do not observe for PCBM-based devices. Using photoinduced absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy, we show that a new recombination path opens via the fullerene triplet manifold as the energy of the lowest CT state approaches the energy of the fullerene triplet. This pathway appears active even in cases where direct recombination via the polymer triplet remains thermodynamically accessible. These results suggest that kinetics, as opposed to thermodynamics, can dominate recombination via triplet excitons in these blends and that optimization of charge separation and kinetic suppression of charge recombination may be fruitful paths for the next generation of panchromatic organic solar cell materials with high V(OC) and J(SC).

  14. Optimizing the rapidity limit for nuclear stopping in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Vinayak, Karan Singh; Kumar, Suneel

    2013-03-15

    A systematic study regarding the role of participant matter and spectator matter in nuclear stopping using isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model is presented. The simulations have been carried out with soft equation of state along with the reduced isospin-dependent cross section to study the effect of different types and sizes of rapidity distributions on nuclear stopping for the whole colliding geometry with density-dependent symmetry energy. In addition to that, we attempt to investigate the role of isospin in heavy-ion collisions by calculating the individual contribution of neutrons and protons in nuclear stopping for different systems having different isotopic content.

  15. Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) in emergency radiology: basic principles, techniques, and limitations.

    PubMed

    Aran, Shima; Shaqdan, Khalid W; Abujudeh, Hani H

    2014-08-01

    Recent advances in computed tomography (CT) technology allow for acquisition of two CT datasets with different X-ray spectra. There are different dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) technical approaches such as: the dual-source CT, the fast kilovoltage-switching method, and the sandwich detectors technique. There are various postprocessing algorithms that are available to provide clinically relevant spectral information. There are several clinical applications of DECT that are easily accessible in the emergency setting. In this review article, we aim to provide the emergency radiologist with a discussion on how this new technology works and how some of its applications can be useful in the emergency room setting.

  16. Low-energy limit of scalar electrodynamics in M/sup 6/

    SciTech Connect

    Svetovoi, V.B.; Khariton, N.G.

    1988-10-01

    We consider scalar electrodynamics in the space M/sup 6/ with a nontrivial vacuum with respect to the two extra dimensions. Reduction to four-dimensional space is carried out. The low-energy sector turns out to possess U/sup loc/(1) x O/sup glob/(2) symmetry, which is broken by nonperturbative effects. The gap in the mass spectrum between heavy and light excitations is due to the breaking of the symmetry of the space by the vacuum. The model studied here provides an example of a natural hierarchy of mass scales.

  17. An arc fault detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, Kamal N.

    1997-12-01

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn, opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

  18. Thermodynamic limits for solar energy conversion by a quantum-thermal hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.; Smith, B. T.

    1981-11-01

    The limits are presented fo air mass 1.5 conditions. A maximum conversion efficiency of 74 percent is thermodynamically achievable for the quantum device operating at 3500 K and the heat engine in contact with a reservoir at 0 K. The efficiency drops to 56 percent for a cold reservoir at approximately room temperature conditions. Hybrid system efficiencies exceed 50 percent over receiver temperatures ranging from 1400 K to 4000 K, suggesting little benefit is gained in operating the system above 1400 K. The results are applied to a system consisting of a photovoltaic solar cell in series with a heat engine.

  19. Survival in an extreme habitat: the roles of behaviour and energy limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plath, Martin; Tobler, Michael; Riesch, Rüdiger; García de León, Francisco J.; Giere, Olav; Schlupp, Ingo

    2007-12-01

    Extreme habitats challenge animals with highly adverse conditions, like extreme temperatures or toxic substances. In this paper, we report of a fish ( Poecilia mexicana) inhabiting a limestone cave in Mexico. Several springs inside the cave are rich in toxic H2S. We demonstrate that a behavioural adaptation, aquatic surface respiration (ASR), allows for the survival of P. mexicana in this extreme, sulphidic habitat. Without the possibility to perform ASR, the survival rate of P. mexicana was low even at comparatively low H2S concentrations. Furthermore, we show that food limitation affects the survival of P. mexicana pointing to energetically costly physiological adaptations to detoxify H2S.

  20. Thermodynamic limits for solar energy conversion by a quantum-thermal hybrid system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.; Smith, B. T.

    1981-01-01

    The limits are presented fo air mass 1.5 conditions. A maximum conversion efficiency of 74 percent is thermodynamically achievable for the quantum device operating at 3500 K and the heat engine in contact with a reservoir at 0 K. The efficiency drops to 56 percent for a cold reservoir at approximately room temperature conditions. Hybrid system efficiencies exceed 50 percent over receiver temperatures ranging from 1400 K to 4000 K, suggesting little benefit is gained in operating the system above 1400 K. The results are applied to a system consisting of a photovoltaic solar cell in series with a heat engine.

  1. Tailored edge-ray concentrators for solar energy applications: approaching the thermodynamic limit to concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Jeffrey M.; Ries, Harald

    1993-08-01

    We present a new type of ideal non-imaging secondary concentrator, the tailored edge-ray concentrator (TERC), that can closely approach the thermodynamic limit of concentration, and illustrate it for both linear and point-focus Fresnel reflectors. For large rim-angle heliostat fields, practical-sized secondaries with shapes that should be relatively easy to fabricate can achieve concentrations substantially above those of compound parabolic concentrators (CPCs). This superiority stems from designing so as to accommodate the particular flux from the heliostat field. The edge-ray principle used for generating the new secondary dictates a heliostat tracking strategy different from the conventional one, but equally easy to implement.

  2. Subtoxic product levels limit the epoxidation capacity of recombinant E. coli by increasing microbial energy demands.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Daniel; Fritzsch, Frederik S O; Zhang, Xiumei; Wendisch, Volker F; Blank, Lars M; Bühler, Bruno; Schmid, Andreas

    2013-01-20

    The utilization of the cellular metabolism for cofactor regeneration is a common motivation for the application of whole cells in redox biocatalysis. Introduction of an active oxidoreductase into a microorganism has profound consequences on metabolism, potentially affecting metabolic and biotransformation efficiency. An ambitious goal of systems biotechnology is to design process-relevant and knowledge-based engineering strategies to improve biocatalyst performance. Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) has shown that the competition for NAD(P)H between redox biocatalysis and the energy metabolism becomes critical during asymmetric styrene epoxidation catalyzed by growing Escherichia coli containing recombinant styrene monooxygenase. Engineering TCA-cycle regulation allowed increased TCA-cycle activities, a delay of acetate formation, and enhanced NAD(P)H yields during batch cultivation. However, at low biomass and product concentrations, the cellular metabolism of both the mutants as well as the native host strains could cope with increased NADH demands during continuous two-liquid phase biotransformations, whereas elevated but still subtoxic product concentrations were found to cause a significantly increased NAD(P)H demand and a compromised efficiency of metabolic operation. In conclusion, operational conditions determine cellular energy and NAD(P)H demands and thus the biocatalytic efficiency of whole-cell redox biocatalysts.

  3. Energy efficiency and color quality limits in artificial light sources emulating natural illumination.

    PubMed

    Hertog, Wim; Llenas, Aleix; Quintero, Jesús M; Hunt, Charles E; Carreras, Josep

    2014-12-15

    We present in this work a calculation of the theoretical limits attainable for natural light emulation with regard to the joint optimization of the Luminous Efficacy of Radiation and color fidelity by using multiple reflectance spectra datasets, along with an implementation of a physical device that approaches these limits. A reduced visible spectrum of blackbody radiators is introduced and demonstrated which allows lamps designed to emulate natural light to operate with excellent color fidelity and higher efficiency as compared to full visible spectrum sources. It is shown that even though 3,000K and 5,500K blackbody sources have maximum efficacies of 21 lm/W and 89 lm/W, respectively, reduced-spectrum artificial light sources can exceed those values up to 363 lm/W and 313 lm/W, respectively, while retaining excellent color fidelity. Experimental demonstration approaching these values is accomplished through the design and implementation of a 12-channel light engine which emits arbitrarily-tunable spectra. The color fidelity of the designed spectra is assessed through Color Rendering Maps, showing that color fidelity is preserved uniformly over a large spectral reflectance dataset, unlike other approaches to generate white light.

  4. Competition for Ammonium between Nitrifying and Heterotrophic Bacteria in Dual Energy-Limited Chemostats

    PubMed Central

    Verhagen, Frank J. M.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    1991-01-01

    The absence of nitrification in soils rich in organic matter has often been reported. Therefore, competition for limiting amounts of ammonium between the chemolithotrophic ammonium-oxidizing species Nitrosomonas europaea and the heterotrophic species Arthrobacter globiformis was studied in the presence of Nitrobacter winogradskyi in continuous cultures at dilution rates of 0.004 and 0.01 h−1. Ammonium limitation of A. globiformis was achieved by increasing the glucose concentration in the reservoir stepwise from 0 to 5 mM while maintaining the ammonium concentration at 2 mM. The numbers of N. europaea and N. winogradskyi cells decreased as the numbers of heterotrophic bacteria rose with increasing glucose concentrations for both dilution rates. Critical carbon-to-nitrogen ratios of 11.6 and 9.6 were determined for the dilution rates of 0.004 and 0.01 h−1, respectively. Below these critical values, coexistence of the competing species was found in steady-state situations. Although the numbers were strongly reduced, the nitrifying bacteria were not fully outcompeted by the heterotrophic bacteria above the critical carbon-to-nitrogen ratios. Nitrifying bacteria could probably maintain themselves in the system above the critical carbon-to-nitrogen ratios because they are attached to the glass wall of the culture vessels. The numbers of N. europaea decreased more than did those of N. winogradskyi. This was assumed to be due to heterotrophic growth of the latter species on organic substrates excreted by the heterotrophic bacteria. PMID:16348588

  5. Arc jet diagnostics tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willey, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    Two objectives were addressed during a 10 week 1988 NASA/ASEE summer faculty fellowship at the Johnson Space Center Atmospheric Reentry Materials Structures Evaluation Facility (ARMSEF). These objectives were the evaluation of mass spectrometry for the measurement of atomic and molecular species in an arc jet environment, and the determination of atomic recombination coefficients for reaction cured glass (RCG) coated high temperature surface insulation (HRSI) materials subjected to simulated reentry conditions. Evaluation of mass spectrometry for the measurement of atomic and molecular species provided some of the first measurements of point compositions in arc jet tunnel environments. A major objective of this project centered around the sampling residence time. A three staged vacuum sampling system pulled the molecules and atoms from the arc jet to a quadrupole ionization mass spectrometer in 400 milliseconds. Conditions investigated included a composition survey across the nozzle exit at 3 cm z-distance from the nozzle exit for 3 different currents. Also, a point composition survey was taken around a shock created by the presence of a blunt body.

  6. Aperture modulated arc therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crooks, S. M.; Wu, Xiaodong; Takita, C.; Watzich, M.; Xing, Lei

    2003-05-01

    We show that it is possible to translate an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plan and deliver it as a single arc. This technique is referred to in this paper as aperture modulation arc therapy (AMAT). During this arc, the MLC leaves do not conform to the projection of the target PTV and the machine output of the accelerator has a constant value. Dose was calculated using the CORVUS 4.0 IMRT system, which uses a pencil beam dose algorithm, and treatments were delivered using a Varian 2100C/D Clinac. Results are presented for a head and neck and a prostate case, showing the equivalence of the IMRT and the translated AMAT delivery. For a prostate AMAT delivery, coronal plane film dose for the IMRT and AMAT deliveries agreed within 7.19 +/- 6.62%. For a meningioma the coronal plane dose distributions were similar to a value of 4.6 +/- 6.62%. Dose to the isocentre was measured as being within 2% of the planned value in both cases.

  7. A novel post-arc current measuring equipment based on vacuum arc commutation and arc blow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Minfu; Ge, Guowei; Duan, Xiongying; Huang, Zhihui

    2017-07-01

    The paper proposes a novel post-arc current measuring equipment (NPACME), which is based on the vacuum arc commutation and magnetic arc blow. The NPACME is composed of the vacuum circuit breaker (VCB), shunt resistor, protective gap, high-precision current sensor and externally applied transverse magnetic field (ETMF). The prototype of the NPACME is designed and controlled by optical fiber communications. The vacuum arc commutation between the vacuum arc and the shunt resistor with ETMF is investigated. The test platform is established in the synthetic short-circuit test and the vacuum arc is observed by the high speed CMOS camera. The mathematic description of the vacuum arc commutation is obtained. Based on the current commutation characteristic, the parameters of the NPACME are optimized and the post-arc current is measured. The measuring result of the post-arc current is accurate with small interference and the post-arc charge is obtained. The experimental results verify that the NPACME is correct and accurate, which can be used to measure the post-arc characteristic in breaking test.

  8. Limits to sustainable energy budget during lactation in the striped hamster (Cricetulus barabensis) raising litters of different size.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Jun; Chi, Qing-Sheng; Cao, Jing

    2010-08-01

    A female animal appears to approach an upper limit to the rate of sustained energy intake/metabolic rate (SusEI/MR) during lactation. However, different species of animals may respond differently to the sustainable limit. Here, we measured energy budget during lactation in female striped hamsters raising litters of natural size (Con), and females whose litter size was manipulated during early lactation to support fewer or more pups (minus pups, MP or plus pups, PP). The striped hamsters significantly decreased their body mass and increased food intake from early to late lactation; and MP females had lower weight loss and food intake than the control and PP females. Litter size of the PP group decreased significantly over the period of lactation, and pups were weaned at a similar weight to that of the controls. MP females supported a significantly lower litter mass throughout lactation compared with the control and PP females, but during late lactation the pups from the MP group were significantly heavier. Resting metabolic rate (RMR) did not differ significantly between the three groups and the gross energy intake during peak lactation was 5.0 ×, 4.2 × and 5.0 × RMR for the control, MP and PP females, respectively. Female striped hamsters reached a plateau in food intake at around 14 g/d during peak lactation, which might signify a limit of SusEI at 5.0 × RMR. However, it was not possible to determine whether the limitation on SusEI was imposed centrally by the capacity of the gastrointestinal tract to process food, peripherally by the capacity of the mammary gland to produce milk, or by the capacity of animals to dissipate heat.

  9. EGRET upper limits to the high-energy gamma-ray emission from the millisecond pulsars in nearby globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelson, P. F.; Bertsch, D. L.; Brazier, K.; Chiang, J.; Dingus, B. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Fierro, J.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.

    1994-01-01

    We report upper limits to the high-energy gamma-ray emission from the millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a number of globular clusters. The observations were done as part of an all-sky survey by the energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) during Phase I of the CGRO mission (1991 June to 1992 November). Several theoretical models suggest that MSPs may be sources of high-energy gamma radiation emitted either as primary radiation from the pulsar magnetosphere or as secondary radiation generated by conversion into photons of a substantial part of the relativistic e(+/-) pair wind expected to flow from the pulsar. To date, no high-energy emission has been detected from an individual MSP. However, a large number of MSPs are expected in globular cluster cores where the formation rate of accreting binary systems is high. Model predictions of the total number of pulsars range in the hundreds for some clusters. These expectations have been reinforced by recent discoveries of a substantial number of radio MSPs in several clusters; for example, 11 have been found in 47 Tucanae (Manchester et al.). The EGRET observations have been used to obtain upper limits for the efficiency eta of conversion of MSP spin-down power into hard gamma rays. The upper limits are also compared with the gamma-ray fluxes predicted from theoretical models of pulsar wind emission (Tavani). The EGRET limits put significant constraints on either the emission models or the number of pulsars in the globular clusters.

  10. EGRET upper limits to the high-energy gamma-ray emission from the millisecond pulsars in nearby globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michelson, P. F.; Bertsch, D. L.; Brazier, K.; Chiang, J.; Dingus, B. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Fierro, J.; Hartman, R. C.; Hunter, S. D.; Kanbach, G.

    1994-01-01

    We report upper limits to the high-energy gamma-ray emission from the millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a number of globular clusters. The observations were done as part of an all-sky survey by the energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) during Phase I of the CGRO mission (1991 June to 1992 November). Several theoretical models suggest that MSPs may be sources of high-energy gamma radiation emitted either as primary radiation from the pulsar magnetosphere or as secondary radiation generated by conversion into photons of a substantial part of the relativistic e(+/-) pair wind expected to flow from the pulsar. To date, no high-energy emission has been detected from an individual MSP. However, a large number of MSPs are expected in globular cluster cores where the formation rate of accreting binary systems is high. Model predictions of the total number of pulsars range in the hundreds for some clusters. These expectations have been reinforced by recent discoveries of a substantial number of radio MSPs in several clusters; for example, 11 have been found in 47 Tucanae (Manchester et al.). The EGRET observations have been used to obtain upper limits for the efficiency eta of conversion of MSP spin-down power into hard gamma rays. The upper limits are also compared with the gamma-ray fluxes predicted from theoretical models of pulsar wind emission (Tavani). The EGRET limits put significant constraints on either the emission models or the number of pulsars in the globular clusters.

  11. Kinetic energy discrimination in collision/reaction cell ICP-MS: Theoretical review of principles and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Noriyuki

    2015-08-01

    Kinetic energy discrimination (KED) is one of the means to control cell-formed interferences in collision/reaction cell ICP-MS, and also a technique to reduce polyatomic ion interferences derived from the plasma or vacuum interface in collision cell ICP-MS. The operation of KED is accurately described to explain how spectral interferences from polyatomic ions are reduced by this technique. The cell is operated under non-thermal conditions to implement KED, where the hard sphere collision model is aptly employed to portray the transmission of ions colliding with the cell gas that they don't chemically react with. It is theoretically explained that the analyte atomic ions surmount the energy barrier placed downstream of the cell and the interfering polyatomic ions do not due to their lower kinetic energy than the atomic ions, resulting in polyatomic interference reduction. The intrinsic limitations of this technique are shown to lie in the statistical nature of collision processes, which causes the broadening of ion kinetic energy distribution that hinders efficient KED. The reaction cell operation with KED, where plasma-derived interferences are reduced by the reactive cell gas while cell-formed interferences are suppressed by the energy barrier, is also described in a quantitative manner. This review paper provides an in-depth understanding of KED in cell-based ICP-MS for analysts to make better use of it.

  12. A new look at performance capabilities of arc-driven shock tubes. [for Jupiter entry simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dannenberg, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    High shock-tube velocities simulating Jovian entry have been achieved with arc-driver operation using a method of tailoring electrical circuit impedance to arc-plasma impedance. The concept of impedance matching also prescribes a requirement for minimum electrical capacitance. The technique of developing the strongest shock-generating capability for an arc-driver system with the least total energy is discussed. Several programs using the shock tube for developmental research in energy and industrial applications are outlined.

  13. Low-energy couplings of QCD from current correlators near the chiral limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusti, L.; Hernandez, P.; Laine, M.; Weisz, P.; Wittig, H.

    2004-04-01

    We investigate a new numerical procedure to compute fermionic correlation functions at very small quark masses. Large statistical fluctuations, due to the presence of local ``bumps'' in the wave functions associated with the low-lying eigenmodes of the Dirac operator, are reduced by an exact low-mode averaging. To demonstrate the feasibility of the technique, we compute the two-point correlator of the left-handed vector current with Neuberger fermions in the quenched approximation, for lattices with a linear extent of L approx 1.5 fm, a lattice spacing a approx 0.09 fm, and quark masses down to the epsilon-regime. By matching the results with the corresponding (quenched) chiral perturbation theory expressions, an estimate of (quenched) low-energy constants can be obtained. We find agreement between the quenched values of F extrapolated from the p-regime and extracted in the epsilon-regime.

  14. Distance dependent interaction as the limiting factor for Si nanocluster to Er energy transfer in silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, B.; García, C.; Pellegrino, P.; Navarro-Urrios, D.; Daldosso, N.; Pavesi, L.; Gourbilleau, F.; Rizk, R.

    2006-10-01

    Si excess, Er content, and processing parameters have been optimized in a series of cosputtered oxide layers for maximizing Er emission and lifetime. The amount of excited Er as a function of the incident photon flux has been quantified for resonant (488nm) and nonresonant (476nm) excitations. Results show that a maximum of 3.5% of Er ions is excitable through the Si nanoclusters (Si-nc). This low value cannot be explained only by cooperative upconversion and/or excited state absorption. A short range (0.5nm) distance dependent interaction model is developed that accounts for this low Er population inversion. The model points to the low density of Si-nc [(3-5)×1017cm-3] as the ultimate limiting step for indirect Er excitation in this system.

  15. The layered structure of the carbon arc discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vekselman, Vladislav; Stratton, Brentley; Raitses, Yevgeny; LaboratoryPlasma Nanosynthesis Team

    2016-10-01

    The arc discharge with a consumed anode is commonly used for synthesis of nanomaterials such as fullerenes, nanotubes and, more recently, graphene. The role of the arc plasma in nanosynthesis processes, including ablation of the graphite anode, nucleation and growth of nanostructures remains unclear. Our recent fast frame camera measurements revealed arc oscillations associated with the ablation processes at the anode. More sophisticated measurements using optical emission spectroscopy and spectrally resolved fast framing imaging revealed the complex, layered structure of plasma species distribution, which is dynamically changing. The results of this research include time- and space- resolved distributions of plasma species, plasma electron density and temperature. The obtained experimental data suggest a strong correlation between arc plasma parameters and nanosynthesis processes. This work was supported by US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  16. Controlling Arc Length in Plasma Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Circuit maintains arc length on irregularly shaped workpieces. Length of plasma arc continuously adjusted by control circuit to maintain commanded value. After pilot arc is established, contactor closed and transfers arc to workpiece. Control circuit then half-wave rectifies ac arc voltage to produce dc control signal proportional to arc length. Circuit added to plasma arc welding machines with few wiring changes. Welds made with circuit cleaner and require less rework than welds made without it. Beads smooth and free of inclusions.

  17. Limits to sustained energy intake XXIV: impact of suckling behaviour on the body temperatures of lactating female mice

    PubMed Central

    Gamo, Y.; Bernard, A.; Troup, C.; Munro, F.; Derrer, K.; Jeannesson, N.; Campbell, A.; Gray, H.; Miller, J.; Dixon, J.; Mitchell, S. E.; Hambly, C.; Vaanholt, L. M.; Speakman, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the potential causes of high body temperature (Tb) during lactation in mice as a putative limit on energy intake. In particular we explored whether or not offspring contributed to heat retention in mothers while suckling. Tb and physical activity were monitored in 26 female MF1 mice using intraperitoneally implanted transmitters. In addition, maternal behaviour was scored each minute for 8 h d−1 throughout lactation. Mothers that raised larger litters tended to have higher Tb while nursing inside nests (P < 0.05), suggesting that nursing offspring may have influenced heat retention. However, Tb during nursing was not higher than that recorded during other behaviours. In addition, the highest Tb during the observation period was not measured during nursing behaviour. Finally, there was no indication that mothers discontinued suckling because of a progressive rise in their Tb while suckling. Tb throughout lactation was correlated with daily increases in energy intake. Chronic hyperthermia during lactation was not caused by increased heat retention due to surrounding offspring. Other factors, like metabolic heat produced as a by-product of milk production or energy intake may be more important factors. Heat dissipation limits are probably not a phenomenon restricted to lactation. PMID:27157478

  18. Re-Defining the Subsurface Biosphere: Characterization of Fungal Populations from Energy Limited Deep Marine Subsurface Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reese, B. K.; Ariza, M.; St. Peter, C.; Hoffman, C.; Edwards, K. J.; Mills, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    The detection and characterization of metabolically active fungal populations within the deep marine subsurface will alter current ecosystem models that are limited to bacterial and archaeal populations. Although marine fungi have been studied for over fifty years, a detailed description of fungal populations within the deep subsurface is lacking. Fungi possess metabolic pathways capable of utilizing previously considered non-bioavailable energy reserves. Therefore, metabolically active fungi would occupy a unique niche within subsurface ecosystems, with the potential to provide an organic carbon source for heterotrophic prokaryotic populations not currently being considered in subsurface energy budgets. Sediments from the South Pacific Gyre subsurface, one of the most energy-limited environments on Earth, were collected during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 329. Anaerobic and aerobic sediment slurry cultures using fresh sediment began directly following the completion of the Expedition (December 2010). From these cultures, multiple fungal lineages have been isolated on several media types that vary in carbon concentrations. Physical growth parameters of these subsurface fungal isolates were determined and compared to previously characterized lineages. Additionally, the overall diversity of metabolically active and dormant fungal populations was determined using high throughput sequencing of nucleic acids extracted from in situ cryopreserved South Pacific Gyre sediments. This project provides a robust step in determining the importance and impact of fungal populations within the marine subsurface biosphere.

  19. Bioenergetic Limitations on Slow Microbial Growth in the Subsurface: What is the Burden of Maintenance on the Overall Energy Budget?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeaton, C. M.; Bajracharya, B. M.; Ridenour, C.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2014-12-01

    In low energy environments such as the subsurface, the minimum energy required to maintain cellular integrity and function (maintenance energy) may represent a significant fraction of the total energy available to microbial communities. However, traditional kinetic and thermodynamic models incorporating key microbial processes are often developed using data collected in nutrient rich growth media. In this study, slow microbial growth in the subsurface was simulated using a flow through bioreactor system in experiments designed to determine the maintenance energy requirement of the model subsurface bacterium Shewanella oneidensis. An existing bioreactor system (Applikon EZ-control®, 2.4 L) was modified to include a biomass retention filtration unit (retentostat) resulting in biomass accumulation over time. An artificial low-nutrient groundwater medium was optimized for slow S. oneidensis growth and was supplied and removed from the reactor at flow rates on the order of 1 mL min-1 with a dilution rate of 0.025 h-1. The retentostat was run under electron donor limited conditions with nitrate, a common groundwater contaminant, supplied at 0.025 mM h-1 and lactate supplied in excess at 0.125 mM h-1. Respiratory ammonification of nitrate by S. oneidensis and cell growth was monitored over time (40 days) and compared to parallel incubations in batch reactors. Initial rates of ammonification were similar in the bioreactor and batch reactors, however, optical density and ATP measurements showed slow yet increasing microbial growth over time (generation time = 17 days) in the retentostat. In contrast, cells in the batch reactors did not grow significantly and died within 2 weeks of inoculation. A maintenance energy demand was estimated (2.5 kJ C-mol biomass h-1) by fitting the biomass production rates to the van Verseveld equation. The low maintenance energy demand of S. oneidensis as compared to typical maintenance energies reported in the literature (>10 kJ C-mol biomass

  20. A limited assessment and characterization of the solar radiation energy resources in the Caribbean region

    SciTech Connect

    Hulstrom, R.L.

    1988-02-01

    The objective of our work was to produce a preliminary assessment and characterization of the Caribbean region (Barbados, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Jamaica, and Panama) solar radiation energy resources. Such information will be used to estimate the performance of, and identify the most promising applications of, solar heat technologies in the Caribbean region. We expect the solar radiation resources in the Caribbean region to be very location specific. Sunny areas will have an annual direct-beam resource of about 3,000 kWhm/sup /minus 2// and a global solar radiation resource of about 2,500 kWhm/sup /minus 2//. Cloud-covered areas will have annual solar radiation resources of about 1,500 kWhm/sup /minus 2/ for both the direct-beam and the global solar radiation. Monthly levels of solar radiaion will vary markedly, ranging from an average of 9 to 3 kWhm/sup /minus 2//day/sup /minus 1// for the direct-beam and from an average of 7 to 4 kWhm/sup /minus 2//day/sup /minus 1// for the global solar radiation. The Caribbean region is comparable to the Great Plains region of the US, in terms of annual solar radiation resources; however, thorough ''prospecting'' is required to avoid areas having very low amounts of solar radiation.