Science.gov

Sample records for arc root motions

  1. Anode arc motion in high power arcjets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, W. J.; O'Hair, E. A.; Hatfield, L. L.; Kristiansen, M.; Mankins, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    The long-term operational lifetime of most medium to high power arcjets is currently limited by the rapid deterioration of the arcjet electrodes. To a large extent, the rate of this deterioration is related to the motion of the arc discharge on the electrode surfaces. This paper details a series of experiments aimed at studying the temporal behavior of dc arcs on a water-cooled radially-segmented 30 kW class arcjet anode. The experimental anode used for these tests was made of copper, and was divided into four equivalent radial segments which were electrically isolated with aluminum oxide gaskets. The current carried by each segment was measured independently using four calibrated resistive shunts, and was analyzed by digital computer. The tests were limited to nitrogen propellant over a current range of 100-250 A dc. Results show that for the range of total currents considered here, the current distribution in the segmented arcjet anode is generally asymmetric, exhibiting random fluctuations over a wide range of frequencies.

  2. Anode arc motion in high power arcjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, W. J.; O'Hair, E. A.; Hatfield, L. L.; Kristiansen, M.; Mankins, J. S.

    1992-07-01

    The long-term operational lifetime of most medium to high power arcjets is currently limited by the rapid deterioration of the arcjet electrodes. To a large extent, the rate of this deterioration is related to the motion of the arc discharge on the electrode surfaces. This paper details a series of experiments aimed at studying the temporal behavior of dc arcs on a water-cooled radially-segmented 30 kW class arcjet anode. The experimental anode used for these tests was made of copper, and was divided into four equivalent radial segments which were electrically isolated with aluminum oxide gaskets. The current carried by each segment was measured independently using four calibrated resistive shunts, and was analyzed by digital computer. The tests were limited to nitrogen propellant over a current range of 100-250 A dc. Results show that for the range of total currents considered here, the current distribution in the segmented arcjet anode is generally asymmetric, exhibiting random fluctuations over a wide range of frequencies.

  3. Direct probing of anode arc root dynamics and voltage instability in a dc non-transferred arc plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorui, S.; Tiwari, N.; Meher, K. C.; Jan, A.; Bhat, A.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    The transient dynamics of the anode arc root in a dc non-transferred arc plasma torch is captured through fast photography and directly correlated with the associated voltage instability for the first time. The coexistence of multiple arc roots, the transition to a single arc root, root formation and extinction are investigated for the steady, takeover and re-strike modes of the arc. Contrary to the usual concept, the emerging plasma jet of a dc non-transferred arc plasma torch is found to carry current. An unusually long self-propelled arc plasma jet, a consequence of the phenomenon, is demonstrated.

  4. Gravitational removal of volcanic arc roots in Cordilleran orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, C. A.; Ducea, M. N.; DeCelles, P. G.; Beaumont, C.

    2013-12-01

    Cordilleran orogens, such as the central Andes, form above subduction zones and their evolution depends on processes associated with oceanic plate subduction and continental plate shortening. Such orogens are characterized by abundant arc volcanism and the formation of thick (>30 km) granitoid batholiths. The magma composition is consistent with a multi-stage model, in which parental mantle-derived basaltic magmas stagnate within the continental lithosphere and then undergo differentiation. Felsic partial melts rise through the crust, leaving a high-density garnet pyroxenite root in the deep lithosphere. Here, we study the dynamics of gravitational removal of this root using regional two-dimensional thermal-mechanical models of subduction below a continent. In the models, the volcanic arc location is determined dynamically based on subduction zone thermal structure, and formation of the batholith-root complex is simulated by changing the density of the volcanic arc lithosphere over time. For the lithosphere structure used in our models, arc roots that undergo even a small density increase are readily removed through gravitational foundering for a wide range of root strengths and subduction rates. The dynamics of removal depend on the relative rates of downward gravitational growth and horizontal shearing by subduction-induced mantle flow. Gravitational growth dominates for high root densification rates, high root viscosities and low subduction rates, leading to drip-like removal of the root as a single downwelling over 1-3 Myr. At lower growth rates, the root is removed over ~6 Myr through shear entrainment, as it is carried sideways by mantle flow and then subducted on top of the oceanic plate. In all models, >80% of the root is removed, making this an effective way to thin mantle lithosphere in the volcanic arc region. This can help resolve the mass problem in the central Andes, where observations indicate a thin mantle lithosphere, despite significant crustal

  5. Loss of total arc of motion in collegiate baseball players.

    PubMed

    Ruotolo, Charles; Price, Eric; Panchal, Anand

    2006-01-01

    Published studies on asymptomatic athletes show an increase in external rotation and decrease in internal rotation while maintaining the total arc of motion of the glenohumeral joint. The purpose of this study was to determine whether overhand athletes with shoulder pain maintained their total arc of motion. Sixty-seven college-level baseball players were examined. Internal rotation and external rotation of the glenohumeral joint, measured at 90 degrees of abduction, and total arc of shoulder motion were compared between dominant and nondominant extremities in athletes with and without shoulder pain. Dominant shoulders in the pain group had a mean arc of 136.2 degrees compared with 145.8 degrees in the nondominant group, for a side-to-side difference of 9.6 degrees. We demonstrate that college-level baseball players with shoulder pain have a significant decrease in total arc of shoulder motion and internal rotation compared with their nondominant shoulder and with pain-free athletes.

  6. Influence of a transverse magnetic field on arc root movements in a dc plasma torch: Diamagnetic effect of arc column

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Keun Su

    2009-03-23

    The effect of a transverse magnetic field on the anodic arc root movement inside a dc plasma torch has been investigated. The arc voltage fluctuation, which represents the degree of the arc instability, was reduced to 28.6% of the original value and the high frequency components in the voltage signal also decreased in their magnitudes. The inherent arc instability in a dc thermal plasma torch seems to be suppressed by a diamagnetic effect of the arc column. Furthermore, the measured voltage wave forms indicated that the arc root attachment mode would be controllable by a transverse magnetic field.

  7. Arc distribution and motion during the vacuum arc remelting process as detected with a magnetostatic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodside, Rigel

    Currently, the temporal arc distribution across the ingot during the vacuum arc remelting (VAR) process is not a known or monitored parameter. It is has previously been shown that arcs can spatially constrict during VAR, and this constriction can lead to undesired defects in the material. Additionally, correct accounting for the heat flux, electric current flux, and mass flux into the ingot are critical to achieving realistic solidification models of the VAR process. An arc position measurement system capable of locating slow moving arcs and determining the arc distribution within an industrial VAR furnace was developed. The system is based on non-invasive magnetic field measurements and VAR specific forms of the magnetostatic Biot-Savart Law. Electromagnetic finite element modeling assists the analysis. The measurement system was installed on an industrial VAR furnace at the ATI facility in Albany, OR. Data were taken during the commercial production of titanium alloy. Although more arcs were present than could be resolved with the number of sensors applied, overall arc distribution shifts were detected. Arc distribution and motion during the final production of Ti-6Al-4V were examined. It is shown that several characteristic arc distribution modes can develop. This behavior was not apparent in the existing signals used to control the furnace, indicating the measurement system provides new information. Finally, a solidification model was used to assess the potential impact of the different arc distribution modes. It is shown the magnetohydrodynamic stirring patterns in the molten pool are affected, which results in localized variations in solidification times in particular at the side wall.

  8. Stud arc welding in a magnetic field - Investigation of the influences on the arc motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartz-Behrend, K.; Marqués, J. L.; Forster, G.; Jenicek, A.; Müller, M.; Cramer, H.; Jilg, A.; Soyer, H.; Schein, J.

    2014-11-01

    Stud arc welding is widely used in the construction industry. For welding of studs with a diameter larger than 14 mm a ceramic ferrule is usually necessary in order to protect the weld pool. Disadvantages of using such a ferrule are that more metal is molten than necessary for a high quality welded joint and that the ferrule is a consumable generally thrown away after the welding operation. Investigations show that the ferrule can be omitted when the welding is carried out in a radially symmetric magnetic field within a shielding gas atmosphere. Due to the Lorentz force the arc is laterally shifted so that a very uniform and controlled melting of the stud contact surface as well as of the work piece can be achieved. In this paper a simplified physical model is presented describing how the parameters welding current, flux density of the magnetic field, radius of the arc and mass density of the shielding gas influence the velocity of the arc motion. The resulting equation is subsequently verified by comparing it to optical measurements of the arc motion. The proposed model can be used to optimize the required field distribution for the magnetic field stud welding process.

  9. Experimental Study of the Influence of Gassing Material on Blow Open Force and Arc Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingwen; Chen, Degui; Liu, Hongwu; Shi, Zongqian; Wang, Jianhua

    2007-12-01

    The study of arc behavior is important to understand the dynamic phenomena concerning the interruption process in a variety of switching devices. This paper is devoted to investigate the influence of gassing material on blow open force and arc motion. To one double-breaker model, measuring the arc current, voltage and force acting on the moving conductor, the characteristics of the ratio of the emerging blow open force over arc power FB/(ui) could be obtained. With the help of a 2-D optical fiber measurement system, to one arc chamber model, arc motion behavior was measured, too. It is demonstrated that, with the action of gassing material, FB/(ui) will increase 2.5 times, and the arc will enter the splitter plates much easier.

  10. Driven Motion and Instability of an Atmospheric Pressure Arc

    SciTech Connect

    Max Karasik

    1999-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure arcs are used extensively in applications such as welding and metallurgy. However, comparatively little is known of the physics of such arcs in external magnetic fields and the mechanisms of the instabilities present. In order to address questions of equilibrium and stability of such arcs, an experimental arc furnace is constructed and operated in air with graphite cathode and steel anode at currents 100-250 A. The arc is diagnosed with a gated intensified camera and a collimated photodiode array, as well as fast voltage and current probes.

  11. Plate motion controls on back-arc spreading. [Cenozoic movement in Western Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fein, J. B.; Jurdy, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    The motions of the subducting and the overriding plates influence the spatial and temporal distribution of back-arc spreading. Cenozoic plate motions in hot spot-fixed and no-net-rotation reference frames were studied with attention to correlations between changes in motion and episodes of back-arc spreading in the western Pacific. The results suggest that major back-arc opening occurs when both the overriding plate retreats from the trench in an absolute sense and the subducting plate undergoes a significant speed-up. Neither phenomenon alone is sufficient to initiate spreading. Three major plate velocity increases can be identified in the Cenozoic: (1) the Pacific plate 5-9 Ma; (2) the Indian plate at 27 Ma; and (3) the Pacific plate at 43 Ma, due to its shift from northerly to more westerly motion. At the present time, the Indian and Philippine are the only overriding plates that are retreating from their Pacific trenches and back-arc spreading occurs only on these two retreating plates. Although the Indian plate has been retreating for at least 25 Ma, back-arc spreading began only following the Pacific plate speed-up 5-9 Ma. Earlier, during the Indian plate speed-up, no overriding plates were retreating strongly and no back-arc spreading epsiodes are preserved from this time. For the earliest Pacific plate shift at 43 Ma, the Eurasian plate was not advancing, thus creating the only favorable plate kinematic conditions in the Cenozoic for back-arc basin formation in this region. It is unclear whether extension in the Japan Sea is a result of these conditions.

  12. Vacuum arc cathode spot motion in oblique magnetic fields: An interpretation of the Robson experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilis, I. I.

    2016-09-01

    A model was developed of vacuum arc cathode spot motion in a magnetic field that obliquely intercepts the cathode surface. The model takes into account a force under an electric field caused by retrograde spot motion across the normal component of the magnetic field, producing a drift velocity component in the direction of the acute angle between the magnetic field and the cathode surface. The relationship between velocity of the retrograde direction and drift velocity of the cathode spot motion to the acute angle was developed. The dependencies of the drift angle θ on the acute angle φ, magnetic field strength B, and arc current I were calculated. It was found that the calculated θ increased with φ, B, and I in accordance with Robson's measurements.

  13. arc6, an extreme chloroplast division mutant of Arabidopsis also alters proplastid proliferation and morphology in shoot and root apices.

    PubMed

    Robertson, E J; Pyke, K A; Leech, R M

    1995-09-01

    The arc6 (accumulation and replication of chloroplasts) mutant of Arabidopsis has only two greatly enlarged chloroplasts per mature leaf mesophyll cell compared with ninety chloroplasts per cell in the wild type. The mutation is a single nuclear gene and the plant phenotype is normal. Shoot and root apical meristems of arc6 plants have been examined to determine how early during plastid development the mutant arc6 phenotype can be recognised. In the cells of the arc6 apical meristem there are only two proplastids, which are larger than wild type with a highly variable morphology. In the cells of the leaf primordia where differentiation of proplastids to chloroplasts occurs arc6 plastids are larger and at a more advanced developmental stage than wild-type plastids. In arc6 root cells statoliths and other plastids also show grossly abnormal morphology and the statoliths are greatly increased in size. During arc6 stomatal guard cell development the perturbation in proplastid population dynamics affects plastid segregation and 30% of stomata lack plastids in one or both guard cells. Our evidence would suggest that ARC6 is expressed throughout the vegetative cells of the Arabidopsis seedling with major effects on both the proplastid phenotype and the proplastid population. ARC6 is the first gene to be identified in Arabidopsis which has a global effect on plastid development in cells arising from both the shoot and root meristems, and is of major importance in the nuclear control of plastid differentiation in higher plants.

  14. Obliquely convergent plate motion and its relation with forearc sliver movement, El Salvador volcanic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikoff, B.; DeMets, C.; Garibaldi, N.; Hernandez, W.; Hernandez, D.

    2012-12-01

    The magmatic arc in El Salvador is interpreted to result from the subduction of the Cocos plate underneath the Caribbean plate along the Middle America trench. In addition, El Salvador contains a fore-arc sliver that moves 11 mm/yr westward relative to the back-arc. Well-defined strike-slip faults along the magmatic arc accommodate forearc sliver motion, but are offset at several locations by en echelon pull-apart step-overs with abundant normal faults. All basaltic-andesitic magmatic centers (San Miguel, San Vincente, San Salvador, Santa Ana) are located within these step-overs, while the two major rhyolitic calderas (Ilopango, Coatepeque) occur directly along the strike-slip faults. There are two puzzling aspects about the strike-slip tectonism. First, a silicic, shallow magma body that intrudes the San Miguel fault zone (part of the El Salvador fault system) was emplaced syn-tectonically (sigmoidal field and magnetic foliations, subhorizontally plunging magnetic lineations and dextral shear at the microscale). Within the dextrally sheared portion of the intrusion, an obsidian band with a 40Ar/39Ar age of 7.46 Ma indicates that dextral strike-slip tectonism in the Salvadoran arc has been an ongoing process for ~7.5 Ma. This casts significant doubt on whether Cocos ridge subduction (that started ~1 Ma ago) is the cause of the ongoing forearc movement. The potentially more significant problem is that the fore-arc sliver in El Salvador moves 11 mm/yr westward relative to the back-arc despite a nearly orthogonal angle of convergence (with a convergence rate of ~77 mm/yr) near El Salvador and absence of significant frictional coupling along the subduction interface. Further, GPS indicates that the Nicaraguan and Salvadoran forearcs define a semi-rigid sliver moving at nearly the same trench-parallel rates despite along-trench changes in the subduction angle. Consequently, it is tempting to attribute the movement of both forearc slivers to Cocos ridge subduction

  15. Assessing the Dosimetric Impact of Real-Time Prostate Motion During Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Azcona, Juan Diego; Xing, Lei; Chen, Xin; Bush, Karl; Li, Ruijiang

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To develop a method for dose reconstruction by incorporating the interplay effect between aperture modulation and target motion, and to assess the dosimetric impact of real-time prostate motion during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods and Materials: Clinical VMAT plans were delivered with the TrueBeam linac for 8 patients with prostate cancer. The real-time target motion during dose delivery was determined based on the 2-dimensional fiducial localization using an onboard electronic portal imaging device. The target shift in each image was correlated with the control point with the same gantry angle in the VMAT plan. An in-house-developed Monte Carlo simulation tool was used to calculate the 3-dimensional dose distribution for each control point individually, taking into account the corresponding real-time target motion (assuming a nondeformable target with no rotation). The delivered target dose was then estimated by accumulating the dose from all control points in the plan. On the basis of this information, dose–volume histograms and 3-dimensional dose distributions were calculated to assess their degradation from the planned dose caused by target motion. Thirty-two prostate motion trajectories were analyzed. Results: The minimum dose to 0.03 cm{sup 3} of the gross tumor volume (D{sub 0.03cc}) was only slightly degraded after taking motion into account, with a minimum value of 94.1% of the planned dose among all patients and fractions. However, the gross tumor volume receiving prescription dose (V{sub 100%}) could be largely affected by motion, dropping below 60% in 1 trajectory. We did not observe a correlation between motion magnitude and dose degradation. Conclusions: Prostate motion degrades the delivered dose to the target in an unpredictable way, although its effect is reduced over multiple fractions, and for most patients the degradation is small. Patients with greater prostate motion or those treated with stereotactic body

  16. Study of Mechanical Properties and Characterization of Pipe Steel welded by Hybrid (Friction Stir Weld + Root Arc Weld) Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong Chae; Sanderson, Samuel; Mahoney, Murray; Wasson, Andrew J; Fairchild, Doug P; Wang, Yanli; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has recently attracted attention as an alternative construction process for gas/oil transportation applications due to advantages compared to fusion welding techniques. A significant advantage is the ability of FSW to weld the entire or nearly the entire wall thickness in a single pass, while fusion welding requires multiple passes. However, when FSW is applied to a pipe or tube geometry, an internal back support anvil is required to resist the plunging forces exerted during FSW. Unfortunately, it may not be convenient or economical to use internal backing support due to limited access for some applications. To overcome this issue, ExxonMobil recently developed a new concept, combining root arc welding and FSW. That is, a root arc weld is made prior to FSW that supports the normal loads associated with FSW. In the present work, mechanical properties of a FSW + root arc welded pipe steel are reported including microstructure and microhardness.

  17. Upper plate absolute motion and slab-anchor force control on back-arc deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuret, A.; Lallemand, S.

    2003-04-01

    In order to test how the combined effects of overriding plate motion and trench migration can account for the variability of back-arc tectonic regimes, their "normal to the trench" absolute motion components and the strain regime of all oceanic subduction zones were compiled. Strain regime was estimated following Jarrard (1986), in a semiquantitative way. The upper plate absolute motion (Vup) is calculated in the hotspot HS3-NUVEL1A (Gripp and Gordon, 2002) reference frame and trench migration (Vt) from Vup, corrected from deformation rate of back-arc region, mainly given by GPS data. As slabs tend to sink because of their age-related-mass-excess relative to the surrounding mantle, it is generally assumed that most of the trenches have a spontaneous seaward motion (trench rollback). Ages at trench have thus also been compiled ( from Muller et al, 1997) to test a possible control of trench migration with slab age. Our values underline a high control of strain regime by Vup, but inconsistencies still remain with this single parameter. To account for all the observed deformations, trench migration is needed. There are more or less as much subduction zones with seaward Vt as landward ones, and, for 90% of subduction zones, Vt never reach 50 mm/y in the two directions. The expected relation between trench migration and slab age is far to be verified: landward trench migrations exist in many subduction zones, and, among them, many have old slabs. Several examples indicate that the slab tend to follow the trench migration and, so, to move transversely in the surrounding mantle. As a consequence, Vt is close to the "normal to the trench" slab migration and gives informations about the slab anchor force : slabs are not perfectly anchored but their possible motions appear to be limited. This 50 mm/y limitation of slab migration may provide new constraints on the poorly known slab-anchor force. No evidence of age related trench rollback have beeen found. It does not

  18. Influence of Thermal Parameters on the Structure and Intensity of Vortex Motion of a Melt in DC Arc Furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazak, O. V.

    2013-11-01

    The vortex motion of a metal melt in a dc bottom-electrode arc furnace has been modeled numerically with allowance for different thermal parameters. The motion of the melt was described by magnetic hydrodynamic equations for a nonisothermal liquid. An algorithm of solution of the problem within the framework of standard packages of applied programs has been developed. It has been shown that a determining contribution to the vortex motion of the metal melt is made by the electromagnetic Lorentz force. It has been established that a significant influence is exerted by convective flows resulting from the nonuniform distribution of heat that is released in the electric-arc region. A nonuniform distribution of the Joule heat from the electric current flowing over the melt exerts a minor influence on the structure and intensity of the vortex melt motion.

  19. Gravity-Induced Amyloplast Motion in Hypocotyl and Root Statocytes of Cress Seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svegzdiene, D.; Rakleviciene, D.; Koryzeiene, D.

    2008-06-01

    Amyloplast motion was studied by the analysis of plastid positioning in hypocotyl endodermal and root columella cells of cress seedlings during a subsequent 6-min period of gravitropic stimulation at 90°. As compared with root statocytes, a more rapid sedimentation of amyloplasts was determined in endodermal cells with simultaneous sliding towards cell centre by comparable rate within the first minute. During the second minute, the plastids remained almost in the same position in hypocotyl statocytes while they shifted slightly downwards continuing intensively to slide along root ones. After the 6 min, their shift in the both directions was more pronounced in roots than in hypocotyls. The data allow that amyloplast motion is affected by the gravity in common with the elastic cytoskeleton forces, which pull actively the plastids along the cells of the both organs. However, a quantitative relation of these forces in hypocotyl and root statocytes differs significantly during the two first minutes of gravitropic stimulation.

  20. Simulation of Motion, Heating, and Breakup of Molten Metal Droplets in the Plasma Jet at Plasma-Arc Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharlamov, M. Yu.; Krivtsun, I. V.; Korzhyk, V. N.; Ryabovolyk, Y. V.; Demyanov, O. I.

    2015-04-01

    The mathematical model for the process of plasma-arc wire spraying is proposed, which describes behavior of molten metal droplets in the plasma jet, allowing for the processes of their deformation and gas-dynamic breakup. Numerical analysis of the processes of motion, heating, and breakup of molten metal droplets, detached from the sprayed wire at plasma-arc spraying of coatings, was performed. It is shown that during molten droplets movement in the plasma jet their multiple breakup takes place, leading to formation of sprayed particles with dimensions much smaller than dimensions of initial droplets, detached from the sprayed wire tip.

  1. Comment on ``A new estimate for present-day Cocos-Caribbean plate motion: Implications for slip along the Central American volcanic arc'' by Charles DeMets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán-Speziale, Marco; Gómez, Juan Martín

    2002-10-01

    We comment on ``A new estimate for present-day Cocos-Caribbean plate motion: Implications for slip along the Central American volcanic arc'' by Charles DeMets. We find the following inconsistencies in his model: Components of relative motion along the arc are small and variable, not uniform. There is no single surface faulting and earthquakes occur on faults along and perpendicular to the arc. Earthquakes also stop in the middle of the arc. Geometrically, the model calls for buttressing, but there is no evidence for this.

  2. Investigation on Plasma Jet Flow Phenomena During DC Air Arc Motion in Bridge-Type Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Guofu; Bo, Kai; Chen, Mo; Zhou, Xue; Qiao, Xinlei

    2016-05-01

    Arc plasma jet flow in the air was investigated under a bridge-type contacts in a DC 270 V resistive circuit. We characterized the arc plasma jet flow appearance at different currents by using high-speed photography, and two polished contacts were used to search for the relationship between roughness and plasma jet flow. Then, to make the nature of arc plasma jet flow phenomena clear, a simplified model based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory was established and calculated. The simulated DC arc plasma was presented with the temperature distribution and the current density distribution. Furthermore, the calculated arc flow velocity field showed that the circular vortex was an embodiment of the arc plasma jet flow progress. The combined action of volume force and contact surface was the main reason of the arc jet flow. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51307030, 51277038)

  3. Simultaneous MV-kV imaging for intrafractional motion management during volumetric-modulated arc therapy delivery*

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Margie A.; Sonnick, Mark; Pham, Hai; Regmi, Rajesh; Xiong, Jian-ping; Morf, Daniel; Mageras, Gig S.; Zelefsky, Michael; Zhang, Pengpeng

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and clinical feasibility of a motion monitoring method employing simultaneously acquired MV and kV images during volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Short-arc digital tomosynthesis (SA-DTS) is used to improve the quality of the MV images that are then combined with orthogonally acquired kV images to assess 3D motion. An anthropomorphic phantom with implanted gold seeds was used to assess accuracy of the method under static, typical prostatic, and respiratory motion scenarios. Automatic registration of kV images and single MV frames or MV SA-DTS reconstructed with arc lengths from 2° to 7° with the appropriate reference fiducial template images was performed using special purpose-built software. Clinical feasibility was evaluated by retrospectively analyzing images acquired over four or five sessions for each of three patients undergoing hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy. The standard deviation of the registration error in phantom using MV SA-DTS was similar to single MV images for the static and prostate motion scenarios (σ = 0.25 mm). Under respiratory motion conditions, the standard deviation of the registration error increased to 0.7mm and 1.7 mm for single MV and MV SA-DTS, respectively. Registration failures were observed with the respiratory scenario only and were due to motion-induced fiducial blurring. For the three patients studied, the mean and standard deviation of the difference between automatic registration using 4° MV SA-DTS and manual registration using single MV images results was 0.07±0.52mm. The MV SA-DTS results in patients were, on average, superior to single-frame MV by nearly 1 mm — significantly more than what was observed in phantom. The best MV SA-DTS results were observed with arc lengths of 3° to 4°. Registration failures in patients using MV SA-DTS were primarily due to blockage of the gold seeds by the MLC. The failure rate varied from 2% to 16%. Combined MV SA

  4. Thermal motion of carbon clusters and production of carbon nanotubes by gravity-free arc discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Mieno, T.; Takeguchi, M.

    2006-05-15

    Thermal and diffusion properties of hot gas around a dc arc discharge under a gravity-free condition are investigated using a jet plane in order to improve the arc production of carbon clusters. Spherically symmetric temperature distribution of He gas around the arc plasma and monotonic slow expansion of the high-temperature region are observed. By means of the passive-type Mie scattering method, random slow diffusion of carbon clusters around the arc plasma is clearly observed under the gravity-free condition. This indicates that carbon clusters including single-walled carbon nanotubes are synthesized around the arc plasma where the He temperature is higher than 1000 K. It is confirmed that large bundles of fatter single-walled carbon nanotubes are produced under the gravity-free condition.

  5. Reliability of Measurement of Glenohumeral Internal Rotation, External Rotation, and Total Arc of Motion in 3 Test Positions

    PubMed Central

    Kevern, Mark A.; Beecher, Michael; Rao, Smita

    2014-01-01

    Context: Athletes who participate in throwing and racket sports consistently demonstrate adaptive changes in glenohumeral-joint internal and external rotation in the dominant arm. Measurements of these motions have demonstrated excellent intrarater and poor interrater reliability. Objective: To determine intrarater reliability, interrater reliability, and standard error of measurement for shoulder internal rotation, external rotation, and total arc of motion using an inclinometer in 3 testing procedures in National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I baseball and softball athletes. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Athletic department. Patients or Other Participants Thirty-eight players participated in the study. Shoulder internal rotation, external rotation, and total arc of motion were measured by 2 investigators in 3 test positions. The standard supine position was compared with a side-lying test position, as well as a supine test position without examiner overpressure. Results: Excellent intrarater reliability was noted for all 3 test positions and ranges of motion, with intraclass correlation coefficient values ranging from 0.93 to 0.99. Results for interrater reliability were less favorable. Reliability for internal rotation was highest in the side-lying position (0.68) and reliability for external rotation and total arc was highest in the supine-without-overpressure position (0.774 and 0.713, respectively). The supine-with-overpressure position yielded the lowest interrater reliability results in all positions. The side-lying position had the most consistent results, with very little variation among intraclass correlation coefficient values for the various test positions. Conclusions: The results of our study clearly indicate that the side-lying test procedure is of equal or greater value than the traditional supine-with-overpressure method. PMID:25188316

  6. SU-E-T-562: Motion Tracking Optimization for Conformal Arc Radiotherapy Plans: A QUASAR Phantom Based Study

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z; Wang, I; Yao, R; Podgorsak, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study is to use plan parameters optimization (Dose rate, collimator angle, couch angle, initial starting phase) to improve the performance of conformal arc radiotherapy plans with motion tracking by increasing the plan performance score (PPS). Methods: Two types of 3D conformal arc plans were created based on QUASAR respiratory motion phantom with spherical and cylindrical targets. Sinusoidal model was applied to the MLC leaves to generate motion tracking plans. A MATLAB program was developed to calculate PPS of each plan (ranges from 0–1) and optimize plan parameters. We first selected the dose rate for motion tracking plans and then used simulated annealing algorithm to search for the combination of the other parameters that resulted in the plan of the maximal PPS. The optimized motion tracking plan was delivered by Varian Truebeam Linac. In-room cameras and stopwatch were used for starting phase selection and synchronization between phantom motion and plan delivery. Gaf-EBT2 dosimetry films were used to measure the dose delivered to the target in QUASAR phantom. Dose profiles and Truebeam trajectory log files were used for plan delivery performance evaluation. Results: For spherical target, the maximal PPS (PPSsph) of the optimized plan was 0.79: (Dose rate: 500MU/min, Collimator: 90°, Couch: +10°, starting phase: 0.83π). For cylindrical target, the maximal PPScyl was 0.75 (Dose rate: 300MU/min, Collimator: 87°, starting phase: 0.97π) with couch at 0°. Differences of dose profiles between motion tracking plans (with the maximal and the minimal PPS) and 3D conformal plans were as follows: PPSsph=0.79: %ΔFWHM: 8.9%, %Dmax: 3.1%; PPSsph=0.52: %ΔFWHM: 10.4%, %Dmax: 6.1%. PPScyl=0.75: %ΔFWHM: 4.7%, %Dmax: 3.6%; PPScyl=0.42: %ΔFWHM: 12.5%, %Dmax: 9.6%. Conclusion: By achieving high plan performance score through parameters optimization, we can improve target dose conformity of motion tracking plan by decreasing total MLC leaf travel distance

  7. Motion as a perturbation: Measurement-guided dose estimates to moving patient voxels during modulated arc deliveries

    SciTech Connect

    Feygelman, Vladimir; Zhang, Geoffrey; Hunt, Dylan; Opp, Daniel; Stambaugh, Cassandra; Wolf, Theresa K.; Nelms, Benjamin E.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To present a framework for measurement-guided VMAT dose reconstruction to moving patient voxels from a known motion kernel and the static phantom data, and to validate this perturbation-based approach with the proof-of-principle experiments. Methods: As described previously, the VMAT 3D dose to a static patient can be estimated by applying a phantom measurement-guided perturbation to the treatment planning system (TPS)-calculated dose grid. The fraction dose to any voxel in the presence of motion, assuming the motion kernel is known, can be derived in a similar fashion by applying a measurement-guided motion perturbation. The dose to the diodes in a helical phantom is recorded at 50 ms intervals and is transformed into a series of time-resolved high-density volumetric dose grids. A moving voxel is propagated through this 4D dose space and the fraction dose to that voxel in the phantom is accumulated. The ratio of this motion-perturbed, reconstructed dose to the TPS dose in the phantom serves as a perturbation factor, applied to the TPS fraction dose to the similarly situated voxel in the patient. This approach was validated by the ion chamber and film measurements on four phantoms of different shape and structure: homogeneous and inhomogeneous cylinders, a homogeneous cube, and an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom. A 2D motion stage was used to simulate the motion. The stage position was synchronized with the beam start time with the respiratory gating simulator. The motion patterns were designed such that the motion speed was in the upper range of the expected tumor motion (1-1.4 cm/s) and the range exceeded the normally observed limits (up to 5.7 cm). The conformal arc plans for X or Y motion (in the IEC 61217 coordinate system) consisted of manually created narrow (3 cm) rectangular strips moving in-phase (tracking) or phase-shifted by 90 Degree-Sign (crossing) with respect to the phantom motion. The XY motion was tested with the computer-derived VMAT

  8. Effects of aortic root motion on wall stress in the Marfan aorta before and after personalised aortic root support (PEARS) surgery.

    PubMed

    Singh, S D; Xu, X Y; Pepper, J R; Izgi, C; Treasure, T; Mohiaddin, R H

    2016-07-01

    Aortic root motion was previously identified as a risk factor for aortic dissection due to increased longitudinal stresses in the ascending aorta. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of aortic root motion on wall stress and strain in the ascending aorta and evaluate changes before and after implantation of personalised external aortic root support (PEARS). Finite element (FE) models of the aortic root and thoracic aorta were developed using patient-specific geometries reconstructed from pre- and post-PEARS cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) images in three Marfan patients. The wall and PEARS materials were assumed to be isotropic, incompressible and linearly elastic. A static load on the inner wall corresponding to the patients' pulse pressure was applied. Cardiovascular MR cine images were used to quantify aortic root motion, which was imposed at the aortic root boundary of the FE model, with zero-displacement constraints at the distal ends of the aortic branches and descending aorta. Measurements of the systolic downward motion of the aortic root revealed a significant reduction in the axial displacement in all three patients post-PEARS compared with its pre-PEARS counterparts. Higher longitudinal stresses were observed in the ascending aorta when compared with models without the root motion. Implantation of PEARS reduced the longitudinal stresses in the ascending aorta by up to 52%. In contrast, the circumferential stresses at the interface between the supported and unsupported aorta were increase by up to 82%. However, all peak stresses were less than half the known yield stress for the dilated thoracic aorta. PMID:27255604

  9. Exact solution for the self-induced motion of a vortex filament in the arc-length representation of the local induction approximation.

    PubMed

    Van Gorder, Robert A

    2012-11-01

    We review two formulations of the fully nonlinear local induction equation approximating the self-induced motion of the vortex filament (in the local induction approximation), corresponding to the Cartesian and arc-length coordinate systems. The arc-length representation put forth by Umeki [Theor. Comput. Fluid Dyn. 24, 383 (2010)] results in a type of 1+1 derivative nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation describing the motion of such a vortex filament. We obtain exact stationary solutions to this derivative NLS equation; such exact solutions are a rarity. These solutions are periodic in space and we determine the nonlinear dependence of the period on the amplitude.

  10. Assimilation of the plutonic roots of the Andean arc controls variations in U-series disequilibria at Volcan Llaima, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reubi, O.; Bourdon, B.; Dungan, M. A.; Koornneef, J. M.; Sellés, D.; Langmuir, C. H.; Aciego, S.

    2011-02-01

    U-series disequilibria provide important constraints on the processes and time scales of melt production, differentiation, and transport in subduction settings. Such constraints, which are essential for understanding the chemical evolution of the continental crust, are conventionally based on the assumption that the U-series disequilibria measured in mafic lavas are produced during mantle metasomatism and melting, and that intracrustal differentiation and assimilation have limited impacts. Here we show that mantle-derived U-series disequilibria in mafic lavas erupted at Volcán Llaima, Chile are significantly diminished by assimilation of plutonic rocks forming Llaima's subvolcanic basement. This contamination process is extremely subtle in terms of "classical" indicators of crustal assimilation like Sr, Nd or Pb isotopes because it is a manifestation of assimilative recycling of the plutonic roots of the arc. This process results in variations in U-series disequilibria and incompatible trace element ratios that are significant compared to regional and global variability in arc magmas. Furthermore, it yields linear correlations between U-series excesses and incompatible trace element ratios that are generally interpreted as slab-fluid indicators and chronometers, or tracers of sediment recycling in subduction zone. Cannibalization of ancestral magmas by ascending melts warrants careful evaluation when considering the components and chemical fluxes in subduction zones. Linear arrays defined by activity ratios of U-series nuclides with different half-lives may be the most reliable indicators of assimilative recycling of ancestral intrusive magmas.

  11. Gas motion and heat transfer in a hollow cylinder with applications to arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solana, P.; Kapadia, P.; Dowden, J.

    1999-10-01

    The problem of the steady heat transfer in a hollow cylinder subject to intense heating on its walls is studied and solved analytically. The heat supplied to the inner cylinder wall is supposed to be generated by the action of a laser beam on a gas circulating inside the hollow cylinder, acting as the cathode of an arc-welding device. The inverse problem is also solved and analysed for a variety of heat flux profiles. The analytical solution is compared with former numerical approaches of the inverse problem.

  12. Vacuum-arc plasma-beam motion in curved magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidalevich, Evgeny; Goldsmith, Samuel; Boxman, Raymond

    1994-05-01

    A theoretical model is presented for transport of vacuum arc generated metal vapor plasma through a magnetized quarter-tours duct used for filtering out macroparticles in order to deposit high quality thin films. The model utilizes a two fluid approximation which takes into account collisions among the plasma particles. It is found that centrifugal forces must lead to a charge separation generated field, that determines plasma drift in the centrifugal force direction to the duct wall and give rise to ion loss. Another cause for plasma is the plasma pressure gradient. The plasma output flux is an increasing function of the magnetic field strength. The plasma flux in the output plane is asymmetrically skewed to favor the outside half. A further asymmetry in the flux distribution in the direction of the torroidal axis of symmetry is introduced if ions of different charge states are present in the plasma.

  13. Effect of interfractional shoulder motion on low neck nodal targets for patients treated using volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT).

    PubMed

    Casey, Kevin E; Wong, Pei-Fong; Tung, Samuel S

    2015-07-08

    VMAT is an important tool in the treatment of head and neck cancers, many of which also require treatment to the supraclavicular lymph nodes. However, full VMAT arcs treating this nodal region necessarily cause entrance beam to pass through patients' shoulders. Thus, interfractional variations in shoulder position may cause unwanted dose perturbations. To assess this possibility, six patients undergoing treatment at our institution for head and neck cancers with associated supraclavicular lymph node treatment were imaged with in-room CT-on-rails during the course of their treatments. This allowed for the establishment of a true record of the actual shoulder position during selected treatment fractions. Then, a full VMAT plan and a plan with VMAT arcs superior to the shoulder and a static anteroposterior field inferiorly were copied onto the patients' weekly image sets. The average one-dimensional shoulder motion was generally within 10 mm of the simulated position, with some notable exceptions. The standard deviation in week-to-week shoulder position relative to simulation was 4.3 mm and 4.2 mm in the SI and AP dimensions, respectively. The average nodal target mean dose across all fractions sampled was within 5% of planned for all patients and both plans. Similarly, the average D95 for the nodal target was within 5% of planned across all fractions sampled, with the single exception of the full VMAT plan for one patient. In most cases, the standard deviation in both target mean dose and D95 was smaller with the VMAT+static AP field plan than it was with the full VMAT plan.

  14. Origin of the oceanic basalt basement of the Solomon Islands arc and its relationship to the Ontong Java Plateau-insights from Cenozoic plate motion models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    Cenozoic global plate motion models based on a hotspot reference frame may provide a useful framework for analyzing the tectonic evolution of the Solomon Islands convergent margin. A postulated late Miocene collision of the Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) with a NE-facing arc is consistent with the predicted path of the OJP across the Pacific Basin and its Miocene arrival at the trench. Late-stage igneous activity (65-30 Ma) predicted for the OJP as it rode over the Samoan hotspot occurred in correlative stratigraphic sections on Malaita, the supposed accreted flake of OJP in the Solomon Islands arc. Convergence similar to the present velocities between Australia and the Pacific plates was characteristic of the last 43 million years. Prior to 43 Ma Pacific-Australia plate motions were divergent, seemingly at odds with geologic evidence for early Tertiary convergence, particularly in Papua New Guinea. A postulated South Pacific plate may have existed between Australia and the Pacific plate and would have allowed implied northward subduction along the northeastern Australia plate boundary that lasted into the early Eocene. Subsequent reorganization of plate motions in the middle Eocene correlates with middle Eocene marginal basin formation along ridges oblique to the main plate boundary. Cessation of spreading on the Pacific-South Pacific Ridge and its subsequent subduction beneath Asia followed the change in Pacific plate motion at 43 Ma. A trapped remnant of the extinct, NW-trending ridge may still lie beneath the western Philippine Sea. The terminal deformation, metamorphism and ophiolite obduction in the Eocene orogen of the southwest Pacific also correlates with the major change in Pacific plate motion at 43 Ma and the subsequent compression of the dying Eocene arc against outlying continental and oceanic crustal blocks of the Australian plate. The Solomon Islands oceanic basement may represent juxtaposition of oceanic plateaus of the Australian plate beneath

  15. Poster — Thur Eve — 31: Dosimetric Effect of Respiratory Motion on RapidArc Lung SBRT Treatment Delivered by TrueBeam Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Runqing; Zhan, Lixin; Osei, Ernest

    2014-08-15

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) allows fast delivery of stereotactic radiotherapy. However, the discrepancies between the calculated and delivered dose distributions due to respiratory motion and dynamic multileaf collimators (MLCs) interplay are not avoidable. The purpose of this study is to investigate RapidArc lung SBRT treatment delivered by the flattening filter-free (FFF) beam and flattened beam with Varian TrueBeam machine. CIRS Dynamic Thorax Phantom with in-house made lung tumor insertion was CT scanned both in free breathing and 4DCT. 4DCT was used to determine the internal target volume. The free breathing CT scan was used for treatment planning. A 5 mm margin was given to ITV to generate a planning target volume. Varian Eclipse treatment planning was used to generate RapidArc plans based on the 6 MV flattened beam and 6MV FFF beam. The prescription dose was 48 Gy in 4 fractions. At least 95% of PTV was covered by the prescribed dose. The RapidArc plans with 6 MV flattened beam and 6MV FFF beam were delivered with Varian TrueBeam machine. The dosimetric measurements were performed with Gafchromic XR-RV3 film, which was placed in the lung tumor insertion. The interplay between the dynamic MLC-based delivery of VMAT and the respiratory motion of the tumor degraded target coverage and created undesired hot or cold dose spots inside the lung tumor. Lung SBRT RapidArc treatments delivered by the FFF beam of TrueBeam linear accelerator is superior to the flattened beam. Further investigation will be performed by Monte Carlo simulation.

  16. Complexity of In-situ zircon U-Pb-Hf isotope systematics during arc magma genesis at the roots of a Cretaceous arc, Fiordland, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milan, L. A.; Daczko, N. R.; Clarke, G. L.; Allibone, A. H.

    2016-11-01

    Zircons from seventeen samples of Western Fiordland Orthogneiss (WFO) diorites and three samples of country rock (two schists and one Darran Suite diorite) from the lowermost exposed sections of the Median Batholith, Fiordland, New Zealand, were analysed for in-situ U-Pb and Hf-isotopes. The WFO represents the deeper levels of Early Cretaceous continental arc magmatism on the Pacific margin of Gondwana, marking the final stage of long-lived arc magmatism on the margin spanning the Palaeozoic. The WFO plutons were emplaced at high-P (mid to deep crust at c. 8-12 kbar) between 124 and 114 Ma. Minor very high-P (c. 18 kbar) WFO eclogite and omphacite granulite facies orthogneiss (Breaksea Orthogneiss) are inferred to have crystallised in the base of thickened crust at c. 124 Ma. Zircons from the Breaksea Orthogneiss are considered to be variably affected by Pb-loss due to emplacement of the adjacent (Malaspina) Pluton at c. 114 Ma. By identifying Pb-loss, magmatic ages were able to be inferred in respect to apparent Pb-loss ages. Hf isotope data for the WFO define an excursion to less radiogenic Hf isotope ratios with time, reflecting increased recycling of an old source component. Peaks at c. 555, 770 and 2480 Ma, determine the age spectra of inherited populations of zircons within the WFO. This contrasts with detrital zircon patterns in country rocks of the Takaka terrane, which include peaks at c. 465 Ma, and 1250-900 Ma that are absent in the WFO inheritance pattern. These results indicate a previously unrecognised Precambrian lower crustal component of New Zealand. Recycling of this lower crust became increasingly important as a source for the final stage or Mesozoic arc magmatism along this segment of the palaeo-Pacific margin of Gondwana.

  17. Response of long, flexible cantilever beams applied root motions. [spacecraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralich, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for an analysis of the response of long, flexible cantilever beams to applied root rotational accelerations. Maximum values of deformation, slope, bending moment, and shear are found as a function of magnitude and duration of acceleration input. Effects of tip mass and its eccentricity and rotatory inertia on the response are also investigated. It is shown that flexible beams can withstand large root accelerations provided the period of applied acceleration can be kept small relative to the beam fundamental period.

  18. Dosimetric Impact of Breathing Motion in Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Treatment Using Image-Modulated Radiotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rao Min; Wu Jianzhou; Cao Daliang; Wong, Tony; Mehta, Vivek; Shepard, David; Ye Jinsong

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of tumor motion on dose delivery in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer, using fixed field intensity- modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods and Materials: For each of 10 patients with stage I/II non-small-cell pulmonary tumors, a respiration-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) study was carried out. The internal target volume was delineated on the maximum intensity projection CT, which was reconstructed from the 4DCT dataset. A 5-mm margin was used for generation of the planning target volume. VMAT and five-field IMRT plans were generated using Pinnacle{sup 3} SmartArc and direct machine parameter optimization, respectively. All plans were generated for an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator using 6-MV photons. Simulation was performed to study the interplay between multileaf collimator (MLC) sequences and target movement during the delivery of VMAT and IMRT. For each plan, 4D dose was calculated using deformable image registration of the 4DCT images. Target volume coverage and doses to critical structures calculated using 4D methodology were compared with those calculated using 3D methodology. Results: For all patients included in this study, the interplay effect was found to present limited impact (less than 1% of prescription) on the target dose distribution, especially for SBRT, in which fewer fractions (three fractions) are delivered. Dose to the gross tumor volume (GTV) was, on average, slightly decreased (1% of prescription) in the 4D calculation compared with the 3D calculation. The motion impact on target dose homogeneity was patient-dependent and relatively small. Conclusions: Both VMAT and IMRT plans experienced negligible interplay effects between MLC sequence and tumor motion. For the most part, the 3D doses to the GTV and critical structures provided good approximations of the 4D dose calculations.

  19. Dosimetric effect of respiratory motion on volumetric-modulated arc therapy-based lung SBRT treatment delivered by TrueBeam machine with flattening filter-free beam.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Yang, Yong; Li, Tianfang; Fallon, Kevin; Heron, Dwight E; Huq, M Saiful

    2013-11-04

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the interplay effect between dynamic MLC movement and tumor respiratory motion in volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT)-based lung SBRT treatment delivered by the flattening filter-free (FFF) beam of a Varian TrueBeam machine. Six lung cancer patients with tumor motions ranging between 0.5-1.6 cm were recruited in this study. All patients underwent 4D-CT scan with audiocoaching. A two-arc VMAT plan was retrospectively generated using Varian's Eclipse planning system for each patient. To explicitly describe the interplay effect, the contributions of each control point in the original static VMAT plans to each respiratory phase were calculated, and then ten new VMAT plans corresponding to different respiratory phases were generated and imported back into Eclipse planning system to calculate the radiation dose based on the CT images of related respiratory phase. An in-house 4D dose calculation program with deformable registration capacity was used to calculate the accumulative 4D dose distribution of the targets. For all patients, the PTV coverage dropped significantly with increased respiratory motion amplitude. However, V100 and D90 of the GTV and GTV + 5 mm, which mimic the target with setup error of less than 5 mm, were either unchanged or slightly increased up to 1.2%, and the variations of their minimum doses were less than 3.2%. Our results indicated that for VMAT-based lung SBRT treatment delivered by FFF beam of TrueBeam machine, the impact of interplay effects on target coverage is insignificant, as long as a sufficient margin was given.

  20. Unstable behavior of anodic arc discharge for synthesis of nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, Sophia; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2016-09-01

    A short carbon arc operating with a high ablation rate of the graphite anode exhibits a combined motion of the arc and the arc attachment to the anode. A characteristic time scale of this motion is in a 10‑3 s range. The arc exhibits a negative differential resistance before the arc motion occurs. Thermal processes in the arc plasma region interacting with the ablating anode are considered as possible causes of this unstable arc behavior. It is also hypothesized that the arc motion could potentially cause mixing of the various nanoparticles synthesized in the arc in the high ablation regime.

  1. Unstable behavior of anodic arc discharge for synthesis of nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, Sophia; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2016-09-01

    A short carbon arc operating with a high ablation rate of the graphite anode exhibits a combined motion of the arc and the arc attachment to the anode. A characteristic time scale of this motion is in a 10-3 s range. The arc exhibits a negative differential resistance before the arc motion occurs. Thermal processes in the arc plasma region interacting with the ablating anode are considered as possible causes of this unstable arc behavior. It is also hypothesized that the arc motion could potentially cause mixing of the various nanoparticles synthesized in the arc in the high ablation regime.

  2. SU-E-T-389: Effect of Interfractional Shoulder Motion On Low Neck Nodal Targets for Patients Treated Using Volume Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, K; Wong, P; Tung, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of interfractional shoulder motion on targets in the low neck for head and neck patients treated with volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: Three patients with head and neck cancer were selected. All three required treatment to nodal regions in the low neck in addition to the primary tumor. The patients were immobilized during simulation and treatment with a custom thermoplastic mask covering the head and shoulders. One VMAT plan was created for each patient utilizing two full 360° arcs. A second plan was created consisting of two superior VMAT arcs matched to an inferior static AP supraclavicular field. A CT-on-rails alignment verification was performed weekly during each patient's treatment course. The weekly CT images were registered to the simulation CT and the target contours were deformed and applied to the weekly CT. The two VMAT plans were copied to the weekly CT datasets and recalculated to obtain the dose to the low neck contours. Results: The average observed shoulder position shift in any single dimension relative to simulation was 2.5 mm. The maximum shoulder shift observed in a single dimension was 25.7 mm. Low neck target mean doses, normalized to simulation and averaged across all weekly recalculations were 0.996, 0.991, and 1.033 (Full VMAT plan) and 0.986, 0.995, and 0.990 (Half-Beam VMAT plan) for the three patients, respectively. The maximum observed deviation in target mean dose for any individual weekly recalculation was 6.5%, occurring with the Full VMAT plan for Patient 3. Conclusion: Interfractional variation in dose to low neck nodal regions was quantified for three head and neck patients treated with VMAT. Mean dose was 3.3% higher than planned for one patient using a Full VMAT plan. A Half-Beam technique is likely a safer choice when treating the supraclavicular region with VMAT.

  3. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic of motion. Contents include: (1) "First Word" (Zach Tobias); (2) "Cosmic Collisions" (Robert Irion); (3) "The Mobile Cell" (Karen E. Kalumuck); (4) "The Paths of Paths" (Steven Vogel); (5) "Fragments" (Pearl Tesler); (6) "Moving Pictures" (Amy Snyder); (7) "Plants on the Go" (Katharine…

  4. The nature of fluctuations in a double arc argon-nitrogen plasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Tu Xin; Yan Jianhua; Yu Liang; Cen, Kefa; Cheron, Bruno

    2007-09-24

    The dynamic behavior of the double arc argon-nitrogen plasma jet is investigated by combined means of the fast Fourier transform, correlation function, and Wigner distribution. The restrike mode is identified as the fluctuation behavior in an argon-nitrogen plasma jet. The Fourier spectra exhibit two characteristic frequencies of 150 Hz and 4.1 kHz, which indicates that the nature of fluctuations in the double arc argon-nitrogen plasma can be ascribed to the power supply undulation and both arc roots motion on the anode channels. It is further found that the double anode torch could inhibit and reduce the restrike phenomenon.

  5. Westward extension of the Levantine Basin to the Eratosthenes Seamount and the Cyprus Arc - no evidence for strike-slip motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimke, Jennifer; Ehrhardt, Axel

    2013-04-01

    The Eastern Mediterranean represents a complex pattern of micro plates. A side by side distribution of diverse tectonic situations like collision, subduction, obduction and shear makes this area a very interesting spot on earth. Whereas subduction of Neo-Tethys oceanic crust is still ongoing at the Hellenic Arc, a collision occurred eastward when the Eratosthenes Seamount (ESM) entered the Cyprus Arc. If subduction is still active further east towards the Syrian coast remains unclear. The collision related deformation of the ESM and the adjacent Levantine Basin will be discussed in this paper. We present a new set of 2D multichannel seismic data, acquired in 2010 with the RV Maria S Merian, which is a dense line grid with NW-SE and NE-SW trending profiles crossing the ESM and the western part of the Levantine Basin south of Cyprus. We show first results of the profiles that were processed up to Pre-Stack Depth Migration. Based on the dense line grid with distances of not more than 5 nautical miles, we picked the key horizons in the Levantine Basin and generated reliable 3D-grids of the horizons. With this dense line grid, it was possible to trace the western extension of the Levantine Basin sometimes also referred to as Baltim Hecataeus Line (BHL), which is a fault lineament of Mesozoic age separating the Levantine Basin from the ESM. This extension is observed on every NW-SE and NE-SW trending profile and we were able to trace it even further north and south of the ESM. The BHL is believed to be reactivated as a linear sinistral transform fault that compensates the northward motion of the African-Arabian plate with respect to the blocked ESM. With our data we can show that the western extension of the Levantine Basin does not coincide with a sinistral transform fault and that it is rather a normal fault with a meandering NNE-SSW trending strike.

  6. Nonlinear Equations of Motion for Cantilever Rotor Blades in Hover with Pitch Link Flexibility, Twist, Precone, Droop, Sweep, Torque Offset, and Blade Root Offset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Nonlinear equations of motion for a cantilever rotor blade are derived for the hovering flight condition. The blade is assumed to have twist, precone, droop, sweep, torque offset and blade root offset, and the elastic axis and the axes of center of mass, tension, and aerodynamic center coincident at the quarter chord. The blade is cantilevered in bending, but has a torsional root spring to simulate pitch link flexibility. Aerodynamic forces acting on the blade are derived from strip theory based on quasi-steady two-dimensional airfoil theory. The equations are hybrid, consisting of one integro-differential equation for root torsion and three integro-partial differential equations for flatwise and chordwise bending and elastic torsion. The equations are specialized for a uniform blade and reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations by Galerkin's method. They are linearized for small perturbation motions about the equilibrium operating condition. Modal analysis leads to formulation of a standard eigenvalue problem where the elements of the stability matrix depend on the solution of the equilibrium equations. Two different forms of the root torsion equation are derived that yield virtually identical numerical results. This provides a reasonable check for the accuracy of the equations.

  7. Micro-computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy comparisons of two nickel-titanium rotary root canal instruments used with reciprocating motion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Chul; Hwang, You-Jeong; Jung, Da-Woon; You, Sung-Yeop; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol; Lee, WooCheol

    2013-01-01

    The single-file root canal instrumentation technique using reciprocating motion has been gaining concern. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the shaping ability of single ProTaper F2 file and WaveOne Primary file when they were used in the curved root canal with reciprocation motion and to investigate the durability of the file after use with a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Changes in structure model index (SMI), root canal volume, curvature, surface area, and degree of transportation were measured from the cross-sectional images of the prepared canals using the micro-CT system with an isotropic resolution of 16 μm. Results showed that there were no differences in the changes of root canal volume, surface area, and SMI between the two file groups after the preparation (p > 0.05). The ProTaper group showed a curvature straightening value of 25.45 ± 12.51%, while the WaveOne group showed 27.30 ± 10.91%, and there was no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05). The transportation values between the two groups showed no significant differences (p > 0.05). SEM revealed that 60% of ProTaper files showed initiation of microcracks on the surface while those were detected on the only one WaveOne file. The single-file technique using either WaveOne Primary or ProTaper F2 can be safely used under each reciprocating motion without creating an increased apical transportation in curved canals. However, the metallurgic property resists cyclic fatigue was more favorable with WaveOne under the scanning evaluation.

  8. [Endodontics in motion: new concepts, materials and techniques 3. The role of irrigants during root canal treatment].

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, L W M

    2015-10-01

    The aims of root canal irrigation are the chemical dissolution or disruption and the mechanical detachment of pulp tissue, dentin debris and smear layer (instrumentation products), microorganisms (planktonic or biofilm) and their products from the root canal wall, their removal out of the root canal system and their chemical dissolution or disruption. Each of the endodontic irrigation systems has its own irrigant flow characteristics, which should fulfill these aims. Without flow (convection), the irrigant would have to be distributed through diffusion. This process is slow and depends on temperature and concentration gradients. On the other hand, convection is a faster and more efficient transport mechanism. During irrigant flow, frictional forces will occur, for example between the irrigant and the root canal wall (wall shear stress). These frictional forces have a mechanical cleaning effect on the root canal wall. These frictional forces are the result of the flow characteristics related to the different irrigation systems.

  9. [Endodontics in motion: new concepts, materials and techniques 3. The role of irrigants during root canal treatment].

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, L W M

    2015-10-01

    The aims of root canal irrigation are the chemical dissolution or disruption and the mechanical detachment of pulp tissue, dentin debris and smear layer (instrumentation products), microorganisms (planktonic or biofilm) and their products from the root canal wall, their removal out of the root canal system and their chemical dissolution or disruption. Each of the endodontic irrigation systems has its own irrigant flow characteristics, which should fulfill these aims. Without flow (convection), the irrigant would have to be distributed through diffusion. This process is slow and depends on temperature and concentration gradients. On the other hand, convection is a faster and more efficient transport mechanism. During irrigant flow, frictional forces will occur, for example between the irrigant and the root canal wall (wall shear stress). These frictional forces have a mechanical cleaning effect on the root canal wall. These frictional forces are the result of the flow characteristics related to the different irrigation systems. PMID:26465016

  10. Petrology and tectonic significance of gabbros, tonalites, shoshonites, and anorthosites in a late Paleozoic arc-root complex in the Wrangellia Terrane, southern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, J.S. ); Barker, F. )

    1989-11-01

    Plutonic rocks intrusive into the late Paleozoic Tetelna Formation of southern Alaska are the underpinnings of the late Paleozoic Skolai arc of the Wrangellia Terrane. There are four groups of intrusive rocks within the Skolai arc: (1) Gabbro-diorite plutons that contain gabbroic to anorthositic cumulates along with a differentiated series of gabbros and diorites of basaltic to andesitic composition; (2) Silicic intrusions including tonalite, granodiorite, and granite; (3) Monzonitic to syenitic plutonic rocks of the Ahtell complex and related dikes and sills; (4) Fault-bounded bytownite anorthosite of uncertain age and association. These anorthosites may be related to post-Skolai, Nikolai Greenstone magmatism. The silicic rocks yield discordant U-Pb zircon ages of 290-320 Ma (early to late Pennsylvanian). The monzonitic rocks of the Ahtell complex have shoshonitic chemistry. Similar shoshonitic rocks are widespread in both the Wrangellia terrane and the neighboring Alexander terrane and intrude the contact between the two. In modern oceanic arcs, shoshonitic rocks are typically associated with tectonic instability occurring during the initial stages of subduction or just prior to or during termination or flip of an established subduction zone. The nature of any tectonic instability which may have led to the cessation of subduction in the Skolai arc is unclear. Possibilities include collision of the arc with a ridge, an oceanic plateau, another arc, or a continental fragment. One possibility is that the shoshonitic magmatism marks the late Paleozoic amalgamation of Wrangellia and the Alexander terrane. The scarcity of arc rocks predating the shoshonites in the Alexander terrane supports this possibility, but structural corroboration is lacking.

  11. Reconstruction of atonic bladder innervation after spinal cord injury: A bladder reflex arc with afferent and efferent pathways.

    PubMed

    He, Jun; Li, Guitao; Luo, Dixin; Sun, Hongtao; Qi, Yong; Li, Yiyi; Jin, Xunjie

    2015-11-01

    Background Establishing bladder reflex arcs only with the efferent pathway to induce micturition after spinal cord injury (SCI) has been successful. However, the absence of sensory function and micturition desires can lead to serious complications. Objectives To reconstruct a bladder reflex arc with both afferent and efferent pathways to achieve atonic bladder innervation after SCI. Methods A reflex arc was established by microanastomosis of the S2 dorsal root to the peripheral process of the L5 dorsal ganglion and the L5 ventral root to the S2 ventral root. The functions of the reflex arc were evaluated using electrophysiology, wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) tracing, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) immunocytochemistry analysis. Hind-paw motion was evaluated by CatWalk gait. Results Compound action potentials and compound muscle action potentials were recorded at the right L5 dorsal root following electrical stimulation of right S2 dorsal root. Similar to the control side, these were not significantly different before or after the spinal cord destruction between L6 and S4. WGA-HRP tracing and CGRP immunocytochemistry showed that construction of the afferent and efferent pathways of the bladder reflex arc encouraged axonal regeneration of motor and sensory nerves, which then made contact with the anterior and posterior horns of the spinal cord, ultimately reestablishing axoplasmic transportation. Gait analysis showed that at 3 months following the operation, only the regularity index was significantly different as compared with 1 day before the operation, other parameters showing no difference. Conclusion Bladder reflex arc with the afferent and efferent pathways reconstructs the micturition function without great influence on the motion of leg.

  12. Dosimetric Impact of Intrafraction Motion During RapidArc Stereotactic Vertebral Radiation Therapy Using Flattened and Flattening Filter-Free Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, Chin Loon; Dahele, Max; Cuijpers, Johan P.; Senan, Suresh; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To study the dosimetric impact of relatively short-duration intrafraction shifts during a single fraction of RapidArc delivery for vertebral stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using flattened (FF) and flattening filter-free (FFF) beams. Methods and Materials: The RapidArc plans, each with 2 to 3 arcs, were generated for 9 patients using 6-MV FF and 10-MV FFF beams with maximum dose rates of 1000 and 2400 MU/min, respectively. A total of 1272 plans were created to estimate the dosimetric consequences in target and spinal cord volumes caused by intrafraction shifts during one of the arcs. Shifts of 1, 2, and 3 mm for periods of 5, 10, and 30 seconds, and 5 mm for 5 and 10 seconds, were modelled during a part of the arc associated with high doses and steep dose gradients. Results: For FFF plans, shifts of 2 mm over 10 seconds and 30 seconds could increase spinal cord D{sub max} by up to 6.5% and 13%, respectively. Dosimetric deviations in FFF plans were approximately 2-fold greater than in FF plans. Reduction in target coverage was <1% for 83% and 96% of the FFF and FF plans, respectively. Conclusion: Even short-duration intrafraction shifts can cause significant dosimetric deviations during vertebral SBRT delivery, especially when using very high dose rate FFF beams and when the shift occurs in that part of the arc delivering high doses and steep gradients. The impact is greatest on the spinal cord and its planning-at-risk volume. Accurate and stable patient positioning is therefore required for vertebral SBRT.

  13. Cathodic arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2003-10-29

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas standout due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. Industrial processes often use cathodic arc plasma in reactive mode. In contrast, the science of arcs has focused on the case of vacuum arcs. Future research directions include closing the knowledge gap for reactive mode, large area coating, linear sources and filters, metal plasma immersion process, with application in high-tech and biomedical fields.

  14. Characterization of an atmospheric double arc argon-nitrogen plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, X.; Cheron, B. G.; Yan, J. H.; Yu, L.; Cen, K. F.

    2008-05-15

    In the framework of studies devoted to hazardous waste destruction, an original dc double anode plasma torch has been designed and tested, which produces an elongated, weak fluctuation and reproducible plasma jet at atmospheric pressure. The arc instabilities and dynamic behavior of the double arc argon-nitrogen plasma jet are investigated through the oscillations of electrical signals by combined means of fast Fourier transform and Wigner distribution. In our experiment, the restrike mode is identified as the typical fluctuation behavior in an argon-nitrogen plasma jet. The Fourier spectra and Wigner distributions exhibit two characteristic frequencies of 150 Hz and 4.1 kHz, which reveals that the nature of fluctuations in the double arc argon-nitrogen plasma can be ascribed to the undulation of the power supply and both arc roots motion on the anode channels. In addition, the microscopic properties of the plasma jet inside and outside the arc chamber are investigated by means of optical emission spectroscopy, which yields excitation, electronic, rotational, and vibrational temperatures, as well as the electron number density. The results allow us to examine the validity criteria of a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) state in the plasma arc. The measured electron densities are in good agreement with those calculated from the LTE model, which indicates that the atmospheric double arc argon-nitrogen plasma in the core region is close to the LTE state under our experimental conditions.

  15. Vacuum arc deposition devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxman, R. L.; Zhitomirsky, V. N.

    2006-02-01

    The vacuum arc is a high-current, low-voltage electrical discharge which produces a plasma consisting of vaporized and ionized electrode material. In the most common cathodic arc deposition systems, the arc concentrates at minute cathode spots on the cathode surface and the plasma is emitted as a hypersonic jet, with some degree of contamination by molten droplets [known as macroparticles (MPs)] of the cathode material. In vacuum arc deposition systems, the location and motion of the cathode spots are confined to desired surfaces by an applied magnetic field and shields around undesired surfaces. Substrates are mounted on a holder so that they intercept some portion of the plasma jet. The substrate often provides for negative bias to control the energy of depositing ions and heating or cooling to control the substrate temperature. In some systems, a magnetic field is used to guide the plasma around an obstacle which blocks the MPs. These elements are integrated with a deposition chamber, cooling, vacuum gauges and pumps, and power supplies to produce a vacuum arc deposition system.

  16. Vacuum arc deposition devices

    SciTech Connect

    Boxman, R.L.; Zhitomirsky, V.N.

    2006-02-15

    The vacuum arc is a high-current, low-voltage electrical discharge which produces a plasma consisting of vaporized and ionized electrode material. In the most common cathodic arc deposition systems, the arc concentrates at minute cathode spots on the cathode surface and the plasma is emitted as a hypersonic jet, with some degree of contamination by molten droplets [known as macroparticles (MPs)] of the cathode material. In vacuum arc deposition systems, the location and motion of the cathode spots are confined to desired surfaces by an applied magnetic field and shields around undesired surfaces. Substrates are mounted on a holder so that they intercept some portion of the plasma jet. The substrate often provides for negative bias to control the energy of depositing ions and heating or cooling to control the substrate temperature. In some systems, a magnetic field is used to guide the plasma around an obstacle which blocks the MPs. These elements are integrated with a deposition chamber, cooling, vacuum gauges and pumps, and power supplies to produce a vacuum arc deposition system.

  17. Influence of motion pattern on apical transportation and centering ability of WaveOne single-file technique in curved root canals

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, Mandana; Paymanpour, Payam; Kangarloo, Ali; Haddadpur, Sahar; Dianat, Omid; Ketabi, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate apical transportation and centering ability of single-file instruments, WaveOne primary, with full rotation versus reciprocation movement using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) analysis in curved mesiobuccal (MB) root canal of human mandibular molars. Materials and Methods: Thirty MB canals of mandibular molars were randomly divided into two groups according to the instrument motion (n = 15): Group 1, reciprocation/WaveOne primary; Group 2, continuous rotation/WaveOne primary. After preparation, the amount of apical transportation and centering ability were assessed by evaluating pre- and post-instrumentation CBCT scans in three section (1, 3, and 5 mm from apical foramen). Statistical analysis of the data was performed using Mann-Whitney U-test and Friedman test (α = 0.05). Results: There was no statistically significant difference between two experimental groups in terms of apical transportation and centering ratio at 1, 3, and 5 mm from apical foramen (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Apical transportation and centering ability of WaveOne primary reciprocating instrument did not significantly differ between two motion patterns. PMID:26962310

  18. Record Of Both Tectonic Related Vertical Motions and Global Sea Level Rise by Marine Terraces along an Active Arc Volcano. Example of Basse-Terre, Lesser Antilles (French West-Indies).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabre, M.; Moysan, M.; Graindorge, D.; Jean-Frederic, L.; Philippon, M. M.; Marcaillou, B.; Léticée, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Volcano-tectonic history of the Caribbean plate provides direct insight onto the dynamic of the North American Plate westward subduction. Basse-Terre Island is a volcanic chain that belongs to the Lesser Antilles active volcanic arc with a southward decreasing age of volcanism from 3 Ma to present day.We investigate records of vertical motion along Basse-Terre through a morphostructural analysis of the Pleistocene-Holocene shallow-water carbonate platforms and associated terraces that surround Basse-Terre Island. This study is based on new high-resolution bathymetric and dense seismic data acquired during the GEOTREF oceanographic survey (2015, February). Our bathymetric and topographic Digital Terrain Model together with the "Litto3D" Lidar data (IGN/SHOM) images the island topography and the platform bathymetry to a depth of 200m with horizontal and vertical resolutions of 5m and ~cm respectively. This detailed study highlights the morphostructure of terraces built during the last transgression in order to identify and quantify their vertical motions. We analyze inherited morphology and structures of the forearc that affect the platform to discuss effects of the regional tectonics context. A particular emphasis is put on the influence of the NW-SE arc parallel transtensive Montserrat-Bouillante fault system onto the platform geometry. At last, the distribution of Basse-Terre terraces is compared with terraces distribution around other Lesser Antilles island and the Bahamas stable margin platform. We aim at discriminating the influence of the Pleistocene global sea-level rise from the one of tectonic vertical deformations.

  19. Steady rotation of the Cascade arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, Ray E.; McCaffrey, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Displacement of the Miocene Cascade volcanic arc (northwestern North America) from the active arc is in the same sense and at nearly the same rate as the present clockwise block motions calculated from GPS velocities in a North American reference frame. Migration of the ancestral arc over the past 16 m.y. can be explained by clockwise rotation of upper-plate blocks at 1.0°/m.y. over a linear melting source moving westward 1–4.5 km/m.y. due to slab rollback. Block motion and slab rollback are in opposite directions in the northern arc, but both are westerly in the southern extensional arc, where rollback may be enhanced by proximity to the edge of the Juan de Fuca slab. Similarities between post–16 Ma arc migration, paleomagnetic rotation, and modern GPS block motions indicate that the secular block motions from decadal GPS can be used to calculate long-term strain rates and earthquake hazards. Northwest-directed Basin and Range extension of 140 km is predicted behind the southern arc since 16 Ma, and 70 km of shortening is predicted in the northern arc. The GPS rotation poles overlie a high-velocity slab of the Siletzia terrane dangling into the mantle beneath Idaho (United States), which may provide an anchor for the rotations.

  20. Elements of arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This paper looks at the following arc welding techniques: (1) shielded metal-arc welding; (2) submerged-arc welding; (3) gas metal-arc welding; (4) flux-cored arc welding; (5) electrogas welding; (6) gas tungsten-arc welding; and (7) plasma-arc welding.

  1. Motion sickness.

    PubMed

    Golding, J F

    2016-01-01

    Over 2000 years ago the Greek physician Hippocrates wrote, "sailing on the sea proves that motion disorders the body." Indeed, the word "nausea" derives from the Greek root word naus, hence "nautical," meaning a ship. The primary signs and symptoms of motion sickness are nausea and vomiting. Motion sickness can be provoked by a wide variety of transport environments, including land, sea, air, and space. The recent introduction of new visual technologies may expose more of the population to visually induced motion sickness. This chapter describes the signs and symptoms of motion sickness and different types of provocative stimuli. The "how" of motion sickness (i.e., the mechanism) is generally accepted to involve sensory conflict, for which the evidence is reviewed. New observations concern the identification of putative "sensory conflict" neurons and the underlying brain mechanisms. But what reason or purpose does motion sickness serve, if any? This is the "why" of motion sickness, which is analyzed from both evolutionary and nonfunctional maladaptive theoretic perspectives. Individual differences in susceptibility are great in the normal population and predictors are reviewed. Motion sickness susceptibility also varies dramatically between special groups of patients, including those with different types of vestibular disease and in migraineurs. Finally, the efficacy and relative advantages and disadvantages of various behavioral and pharmacologic countermeasures are evaluated. PMID:27638085

  2. A comparison of the seismic structure of oceanic island arc crust and continental accreted arc terranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Amalgamation of island arcs and their accretion to pre-existing continents is considered to have been one of the primary mechanisms of continental growth over the last 3 Ga, with arc terranes identified within Late Archean, Proterozoic, and Phanerozoic continental crust. Crustal-scale seismic refraction surveys can provide P wave velocity models that can be used as a proxy for crustal composition, and although they indicate some velocity variation in accreted arcs, these terranes have significantly lower velocities, and are hence significantly more felsic, than modern island arcs. Modern oceanic arcs exhibit significant variations in crustal thickness, from as little as 10 km in the Bonin arc to 35 km in the Aleutian and northern Izu arcs. Although globally island arcs appear to have a mafic composition, intermediate composition crust is inferred in central America and parts of the Izu arc. The absence of a sharp velocity contrast at the Moho appears to be a first order characteristic of island arc crust, and indicates the existence of a broad crust-mantle transition zone. Multichannel seismic reflection surveys complement refraction surveys by revealing structures associated with variations in density and seismic velocity at the scale of a few hundred meters or less to depths of 60 km or more. Surveys from the Mariana and Aleutian arcs show that modern middle and lower arc crust is mostly non-reflective, but reflections are observed from depths 5-25 km below the refraction Moho suggesting the localized presence of arc roots that may comprise gabbro, garnet gabbro, and pyroxenite within a broad transition from mafic lower crust to ultramafic mantle. Such reflective, high velocity roots are likely separated from the overlying arc crust prior to, or during arc-continent collision, and seismic reflections within accreted arc crust document the collisional process and final crustal architecture.

  3. Modeling Arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Insepov, Z.; Norem, J.; Vetizer, S.; Mahalingam, S.

    2011-12-23

    Although vacuum arcs were first identified over 110 years ago, they are not yet well understood. We have since developed a model of breakdown and gradient limits that tries to explain, in a self-consistent way: arc triggering, plasma initiation, plasma evolution, surface damage and gradient limits. We use simple PIC codes for modeling plasmas, molecular dynamics for modeling surface breakdown, and surface damage, and mesoscale surface thermodynamics and finite element electrostatic codes for to evaluate surface properties. Since any given experiment seems to have more variables than data points, we have tried to consider a wide variety of arcing (rf structures, e beam welding, laser ablation, etc.) to help constrain the problem, and concentrate on common mechanisms. While the mechanisms can be comparatively simple, modeling can be challenging.

  4. Preliminary results, Central Gneiss Complex of the Coast Range batholith, southeastern Alaska: the roots of a high-K, calc-alkaline arc?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, F.; Arth, Joseph G.

    1984-01-01

    The Central Gneiss Complex (CGC) of the Coast Range batholith is the oldest unit of the batholith east of Ketchikan, Alaska, being dated by the zircon UPb method (by T.W. Stern) at 128-140 Ma. Heterogeneous, layered, commonly migmatitic, orthogneiss of hornblende-biotite quartz diorite, tonalite, quartz monzodiorite and granodiorite compositions (IUGS terminology) form the major part of the CGC. These gneisses show a range of 50-65% SiO2 and are high in Al2O3 (c. 15-19%), K2O (1.5-4%) and Sr (800-900 ppm). Most major elements show coherent, typically magmatic trends with SiO2. La and Rb show maxima at ??? 58% SiO2. Initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios are relatively high and range from 0.7052 to 0.7066. Wallrocks of the CGC are mostly metagraywacke, pelite and metavolcanic rocks at amphibolite facies; they are geochemically dissimilar to the CGC. Major and minor elements of the CGC are very similar to those of high-K orogenic, calc-alkaline andesitic suites. The CGC may have formed largely by fractionation of mantle-derived, high AlKSr basaltic liquid in an ascending diapir, having hornblende, plagioclase, and biotite as major precipitating phases. The CGC probably represents the plutonic equivalent of a continental-margin or Andean arc that formed when the Taku terrane of the Insular belt on the west collided with the previously emplaced (but also allochthonous) Stikine terrane on the east in Late Jurassic or Early Cretaceous time. ?? 1984.

  5. Investigation of arc length versus flange thickness while using an arc voltage controller

    SciTech Connect

    Daumeyer, G.J.

    1994-11-01

    An arc voltage controller (AVC) for gas tungsten arc welding will change arc length when flange thickness changes while all other variables, including AVC setting, are held constant. A procedure for calibrating an LVDT (linear variable displacement transducer) used for electrode assembly motion monitoring was proven for laboratory setups and special investigations. A partial characterization on the deadband and sensitivity control settings of the Cyclomatic AVC was completed.

  6. Cloud Arcs

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... a sinking motion elsewhere, are very common, the degree of organization exhibited here is relatively rare, as the wind field at different altitudes usually disrupts such patterns. The degree of self organization of this cloud image, whereby three or four such circular events ...

  7. The Banda Arc subduction enigma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spakman, Wim; Hall, Robert

    2010-05-01

    The spectacularly curved Banda arc comprises young oceanic crust enclosed by a volcanic inner arc, outer arc islands, and a trough parallel to the Australian continental margin. Seismicity defines a spoon-shaped lithospheric fold in the upper mantle for which there are two contrasting explanations: deformation of a single subducted slab, or two different slabs subducted from north and south. We show that the Banda arc resulted from subduction of a single slab. Based on geology and seismic tomography, we argue that the arc formed since 15 Ma by subduction of a Jurassic oceanic embayment within the Australian plate. Viewed in an Atlantic-Indian hotspot reference frame, the stationary E-W striking Java trench propagated ESE into the Banda embayment by hinge rollback. Extension of the upper plate formed oceanic crust in the present Banda Sea between stretched continental crust of Australian origin. Slab morphology depends primarily on the geometry of the continental margin enclosing the embayment. Our model explains the first order tectonic development of the Banda region and links slab deformation to absolute plate motion.

  8. Critical Length Criterion and the Arc Chain Model for Calculating the Arcing Time of the Secondary Arc Related to AC Transmission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Haoxi; Li, Qingmin; Xing, Jinyuan; Li, Jinsong; Chen, Qiang

    2015-06-01

    The prompt extinction of the secondary arc is critical to the single-phase reclosing of AC transmission lines, including half-wavelength power transmission lines. In this paper, a low-voltage physical experimental platform was established and the motion process of the secondary arc was recorded by a high-speed camera. It was found that the arcing time of the secondary arc rendered a close relationship with its arc length. Through the input and output power energy analysis of the secondary arc, a new critical length criterion for the arcing time was proposed. The arc chain model was then adopted to calculate the arcing time with both the traditional and the proposed critical length criteria, and the simulation results were compared with the experimental data. The study showed that the arcing time calculated from the new critical length criterion gave more accurate results, which can provide a reliable criterion in term of arcing time for modeling and simulation of the secondary arc related with power transmission lines. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51277061 and 51420105011)

  9. Analysis of optical perturbations of the SLC arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, W.T.; Sands, M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper establishes the analytical framework in solving optical pertubations in a transport line in general and the SLC Arc specifically. The Formulation presented here is applicable to any transport system in a straightforward way. The equations of motion of a perturbed betatron function and dispersion function are presented. Sources of field errors for the SLC Arc system are discussed. Magnitudes of pertubations to the optical functions for the SLC Arc are estimated. (JDH)

  10. Gas arc constriction for plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, William F. (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has an inert gas applied circumferentially about the arc column externally of the constricting nozzle so as to apply a constricting force on the arc after it has exited the nozzle orifice and downstream of the auxiliary shielding gas. The constricting inert gas is supplied to a plenum chamber about the body of the torch and exits through a series of circumferentially disposed orifices in an annular wall forming a closure at the forward end of the constricting gas plenum chamber. The constricting force of the circumferential gas flow about the arc concentrates and focuses the arc column into a more narrow and dense column of energy after exiting the nozzle orifice so that the arc better retains its energy density prior to contacting the workpiece.

  11. Characteristics of Atmospheric Pressure Rotating Gliding Arc Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Zhu, Fengsen; Tu, Xin; Bo, Zheng; Cen, Kefa; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a novel direct current (DC) atmospheric pressure rotating gliding arc (RGA) plasma reactor has been developed for plasma-assisted chemical reactions. The influence of the gas composition and the gas flow rate on the arc dynamic behaviour and the formation of reactive species in the N2 and air gliding arc plasmas has been investigated by means of electrical signals, high speed photography, and optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics. Compared to conventional gliding arc reactors with knife-shaped electrodes which generally require a high flow rate (e.g., 10-20 L/min) to maintain a long arc length and reasonable plasma discharge zone, in this RGA system, a lower gas flow rate (e.g., 2 L/min) can also generate a larger effective plasma reaction zone with a longer arc length for chemical reactions. Two different motion patterns can be clearly observed in the N2 and air RGA plasmas. The time-resolved arc voltage signals show that three different arc dynamic modes, the arc restrike mode, takeover mode, and combined modes, can be clearly identified in the RGA plasmas. The occurrence of different motion and arc dynamic modes is strongly dependent on the composition of the working gas and gas flow rate. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51576174), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20120101110099) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. 2015FZA4011)

  12. Characteristics of Atmospheric Pressure Rotating Gliding Arc Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Zhu, Fengsen; Tu, Xin; Bo, Zheng; Cen, Kefa; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a novel direct current (DC) atmospheric pressure rotating gliding arc (RGA) plasma reactor has been developed for plasma-assisted chemical reactions. The influence of the gas composition and the gas flow rate on the arc dynamic behaviour and the formation of reactive species in the N2 and air gliding arc plasmas has been investigated by means of electrical signals, high speed photography, and optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics. Compared to conventional gliding arc reactors with knife-shaped electrodes which generally require a high flow rate (e.g., 10–20 L/min) to maintain a long arc length and reasonable plasma discharge zone, in this RGA system, a lower gas flow rate (e.g., 2 L/min) can also generate a larger effective plasma reaction zone with a longer arc length for chemical reactions. Two different motion patterns can be clearly observed in the N2 and air RGA plasmas. The time-resolved arc voltage signals show that three different arc dynamic modes, the arc restrike mode, takeover mode, and combined modes, can be clearly identified in the RGA plasmas. The occurrence of different motion and arc dynamic modes is strongly dependent on the composition of the working gas and gas flow rate. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51576174), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20120101110099) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. 2015FZA4011)

  13. Structure of propagating arc in a magneto-hydrodynamic rail plasma actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Miles D.; Choi, Young-Joon; Sirohi, Jayant; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-01-01

    The spatio-temporal evolution of a magnetically driven arc in a rail plasma flow actuator has been characterized with high-speed imaging, electrical measurements, and spectroscopy. The arc draws a peak current of ~1 kA. High-speed framing cameras were used to observe the complex arc propagation phenomenon. In particular, the anode and cathode roots were observed to have different modes of transit, which resulted in distinct types of electrode degradation on the anode and cathode surfaces. Observations of the arc electrical properties and induced magnetic fields are used to explain the transit mechanism of the arc. Emission spectroscopy revealed the arc temperature and species composition as a function of transit distance of the arc. The results obtained offer significant insights into the electromagnetic properties of the arc-rail system as well as arc-surface interaction phenomena in a propagating arc.

  14. Of Eggs and Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Joseph A.; Thomas, P. C.; Helfenstein, P.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Hedman, M. M.; Agarwal, M.

    2012-10-01

    New scenarios for the origins of Saturn’s rings/interior moons have directed scientific attention to the region just exterior to Saturn’s main rings. Four satellites (Aegaeon = Ae; Anthe = An; Methone = Me; Pallene = Pa) discovered by the Cassini mission on either side of Mimas’s orbit perhaps comprise a distinct class of ring-moon. They are tiny (R = 0.3-2.5 km); three (AeAnMe) are trapped in co-rotation resonances with Mimas and reside within ring-arcs; and at least two (MePa) have remarkably regular shapes. Images with pixel scales as fine as 27 m taken in May 2012 reveal Methone to be ovoid within 10 m (from sub-pixel limb detection) and devoid of any craters (>130 m) across its 9 km2 of surface; Pallene and even tiny Aegaeon have similar appearances in lesser-quality images. Numerical simulations demonstrate that particles comprising the surrounding ring-arcs populate the same resonances as their embedded moons; escape speeds from the moons are < 0.5 m/s, smaller than the 2 m/s that dynamically characterize the resonant well. We investigate the gentle transfer of particles back and forth between the ring-arcs and any embedded bodies. In this environment, the moons’ shapes are smooth equipotentials; electrostatic effects may also determine how grains settle to surfaces. Considering these shapes to represent equipotential surfaces for rotating, tidally distorted, homogeneous bodies, we infer mean satellite densities of 250+/-60 (Pa), 310+/-30 (Me), and 540+/-120 (Ae) kg m-3. About half of Methone’s leading hemisphere is covered by a sharply bounded, lemon-shaped, relatively dark region, having a form reminiscent of Mimas’s thermal anomaly (Howett et al. 2011). Its (601 nm) albedo is 13% lower than the bounding brighter material. An irregularly shaped, even-darker (by 4%) blotch straddles the apex of the moon’s motion. Impacts with circum-planetary meteoroids and plasma are likely responsible for these features.

  15. Bulk arc strain, crustal thickening, magma emplacement, and mass balances in the Mesozoic Sierra Nevada arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenrong; Paterson, Scott; Saleeby, Jason; Zalunardo, Sean

    2016-03-01

    Quantifying crustal deformation is important for evaluating mass balance, material transfer, and the interplay between tectonism and magmatism in continental arcs. We present a dataset of >650 finite strain analyses compiled from published works and our own studies with associated structural, geochronologic, and geobarometric information in central and southern Sierra Nevada, California, to quantify the arc crust deformation. Our results show that Mesozoic tectonism results in 65% arc-perpendicular bulk crust shortening under a more or less plane strain condition. Mesozoic arc magmatism replaced ∼80% of this actively deforming arc crust with plutons requiring significantly greater crustal thickening. We suggest that by ∼85 Ma, the arc crust thickness was ∼80 km with a 30-km-thick arc root, resulting in a ∼5 km elevation. Most tectonic shortening and magma emplacement must be accommodated by downward displacements of crustal materials into growing crustal roots at the estimated downward transfer rate of 2-13 km/Myr. The downward transfer of crustal materials must occur in active magma channels, or in "escape channels" in between solidified plutons that decrease in size with time and depth resulting in an increase in the intensity of constrictional strain with depth. We argue that both tectonism and magmatism control the thickness of the crust and surface elevation with slight modification by surface erosion. The downward transported crustal materials initially fertilize the MASH zone thus enhancing to the generation of additional magmas. As the crustal root grows it may potentially pinch out and cool the mantle wedge and thus cause reduction of arc magmatism.

  16. Rotating arc spark plug

    DOEpatents

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  17. Dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR): a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Anna; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Qiuwen

    2014-01-20

    Compared to other radiation therapy modalities, clinical electron beam therapy has remained practically unchanged for the past few decades even though electron beams with multiple energies are widely available on most linacs. In this paper, we present the concept of dynamic electron arc radiotherapy (DEAR), a new conformal electron therapy technique with synchronized couch motion. DEAR utilizes combination of gantry rotation, couch motion, and dose rate modulation to achieve desirable dose distributions in patient. The electron applicator is kept to minimize scatter and maintain narrow penumbra. The couch motion is synchronized with the gantry rotation to avoid collision between patient and the electron cone. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of DEAR delivery and demonstrate the potential of DEAR to improve dose distributions on simple cylindrical phantoms. DEAR was delivered on Varian's TrueBeam linac in Research Mode. In conjunction with the recorded trajectory log files, mechanical motion accuracies and dose rate modulation precision were analyzed. Experimental and calculated dose distributions were investigated for different energies (6 and 9 MeV) and cut-out sizes (1×10 cm(2) and 3×10 cm(2) for a 15×15 cm(2) applicator). Our findings show that DEAR delivery is feasible and has the potential to deliver radiation dose with high accuracy (root mean square error, or RMSE of <0.1 MU, <0.1° gantry, and <0.1 cm couch positions) and good dose rate precision (1.6 MU min(-1)). Dose homogeneity within ±2% in large and curved targets can be achieved while maintaining penumbra comparable to a standard electron beam on a flat surface. Further, DEAR does not require fabrication of patient-specific shields. These benefits make DEAR a promising technique for conformal radiotherapy of superficial tumors.

  18. DC arc weld starter

    DOEpatents

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  19. Philippine Sea Slab and South-Ryukyu Arc Sliver Accommodation of Arc-Continent Collision East of Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallemand, S.; Theunissen, T.; Font, Y.; Schnurle, P.; Lee, C.; Liu, C.

    2011-12-01

    The southern termination of the Ryukyu arc-trench system underwent a complex polyphased and extremely rapid tectonic evolution during the last 5 to 8 My. At first, the relative motion of the Philippine Sea plate (PSP) has changed about 5 My ago from a northward to a northwestward motion relative to Eurasia. Secondly, the Ryukyu trench has propagated from east to west during the same time period resulting in a tectonic inversion along the former passive margin of the South China Sea into the active margin of the S-Ryukyu trench. Thirdly, the convergence rate along the neo-formed S-Ryukyu trench dramatically increased from 8 to 13 cm/yr since at least 2 My when the Southern Okinawa Trough (SOT) started to rift. At the same time, the oceanic subduction of the South China Sea beneath the northern Manila arc progressively evolved into a continental subduction of the Chinese platform at the origin of the Taiwan orogen. The timing of these various kinematic and tectonic events should have been recorded in the deformed sedimentary basins and fold-and-thrust belts in the region. Unfortunately, a large part is now below the sea-level and no or a few age constraints are available. The recent joint project between Taiwan-USA & France (TAIGER & ACTS) gave us the opportunity to considerably increase the resolution of the seismic imagery around the island and especially in the most highly deformed area east of Taiwan along the S-Ryukyu forearc. We already knew that the seismic activity focussed in this region but we ignored how the converging plates deformed. We can now argue that the PSP strongly deforms in the vicinity of its deep interaction with the root of the Taiwan orogen. The north-dipping PSP slab buckles and tears along two diverging directions with a down-faulted part subducting beneath the SOT.

  20. Intra-arc basins

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    Convergent-margin tectonic models feature forearc and back-arc basins and generally portray the arc itself as structurally static. However, intra-arc tectonics not only control distribution and petrology of extrusives and plutons, but also generate basins along the magmatic axis. Magma withdrawal and crustal loading by volcanic edifices contribute to subsidence, but most intra-arc basins are grabens or half-grabens indicative of extension. Grabens are isolated or continuous along long segments of the arc. Basin development may alternate with periods of arc uplife. No unique set of conditions causes intra-arc extension; numerous scenarios may initiate extension and subsidence of thermally weakened arc crust. Transtension related to oblique convergence contributed to the formation of most modern intra-arc basins. Andean basins may result from gravitational spreading of an unusually highstanding arc. Intra-arc basin sediment traps may starve arc-adjacent basins from coarse volcaniclastic detritus. Terrestrial intra-arc basins accommodate thick volcanic and volcaniclastic sediment sections, including lacustrine sequences. Marine intra-arc basins include bounding carbonate shelves, marginal and local intrabasinal submarine fans and aprons, and basin plains receiving pelagic and hemipelagic sediments. Structural patterns are appropriate for trapping hydrocarbons, source rocks are commonly present, and high heat flow favors early maturation. Reservoir quality is typically poor because of volcaniclastic diagenesis, but secondary porosity from dissolution of framework feldspars and carbonate or laumontite cements, and the known productivity of some volcanic reservoirs, suggest the potential for hydrocarbon accumulations. Geothermal resources and modest coal potential have also been recognized.

  1. Rethinking Recycling in Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P.; Behn, M. D.; Jagoutz, O.

    2012-12-01

    Hacker et al EPSL 2011 and Behn et al Nature Geosci 2011 investigated pathways for return of buoyant, subducted material to arc crust. These include (1) diapirs rising into the hot mantle wedge, with extensive melts adding a component to arc magmas, (2) flow of material back up a relatively cold "subduction channel", adding solids to the lower crust and small-degree partial melts to the upper crust, (3) flow from the forearc along the base of arc crust, and (4) imbrication of forearc material into arc crust. These processes add felsic, incompatible-element-rich components to arc crust. The flux of incompatible elements such as Th in arc lavas, thought to be mainly recycled from subducted sediments, is > sediment subduction flux. There are large uncertainties: arc crustal growth rates are imprecise; young, primitive arc lavas may not be representative of magmatic flux into arc crust; sediment subduction flux may have varied. Nevertheless, this result is found for all arcs examined, using recently published growth rates. Perhaps arc growth rates that include subduction erosion are systematically overestimated. Instead or in addition, maybe significant Th comes from material other than sediments. Here, we consider the implications of pathways 1-4 for arc growth rates and incompatible element enrichment, in the context of subduction erosion and arc-arc collision. Subducting arc lithologies can become separated, with only felsic components returned to arc crust. Buoyant lithologies are mobile in viscous instabilities at > 700-800°C. Whereas thin layers such as sediments may become mobile all at once, instabilities may periodically strip the hottest parts from the top of thick buoyant layers, replacing them with hot mantle. In arc-arc collision, the top of a subducting plate starts at about 0°C on the seafloor, so heating is slow. In subduction erosion, forearc material in the subducting package can be > 200°C before erosion so buoyant lithologies reach 700-800

  2. Arc initiation in cathodic arc plasma sources

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre

    2002-01-01

    A "triggerless" arc initiation method and apparatus is based on simply switching the arc supply voltage to the electrodes (anode and cathode). Neither a mechanical trigger electrode nor a high voltage flashover from a trigger electrode is required. A conducting path between the anode and cathode is provided, which allows a hot spot to form at a location where the path connects to the cathode. While the conductive path is eroded by the cathode spot action, plasma deposition ensures the ongoing repair of the conducting path. Arc initiation is achieved by simply applying the relatively low voltage of the arc power supply, e.g. 500 V-1 kV, with the insulator between the anode and cathode coated with a conducting layer and the current at the layer-cathode interface concentrated at one or a few contact points. The local power density at these contact points is sufficient for plasma production and thus arc initiation. A conductive surface layer, such as graphite or the material being deposited, is formed on the surface of the insulator which separates the cathode from the anode. The mechanism of plasma production (and arc initiation) is based on explosive destruction of the layer-cathode interface caused by joule heating. The current flow between the thin insulator coating and cathode occurs at only a few contact points so the current density is high.

  3. Monitoring ARC services with GangliARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, D.; Karpenko, D.

    2012-12-01

    Monitoring of Grid services is essential to provide a smooth experience for users and provide fast and easy to understand diagnostics for administrators running the services. GangliARC makes use of the widely-used Ganglia monitoring tool to present web-based graphical metrics of the ARC computing element. These include statistics of running and finished jobs, data transfer metrics, as well as showing the availability of the computing element and hardware information such as free disk space left in the ARC cache. Ganglia presents metrics as graphs of the value of the metric over time and shows an easily-digestable summary of how the system is performing, and enables quick and easy diagnosis of common problems. This paper describes how GangliARC works and shows numerous examples of how the generated data can quickly be used by an administrator to investigate problems. It also presents possibilities of combining GangliARC with other commonly-used monitoring tools such as Nagios to easily integrate ARC monitoring into the regular monitoring infrastructure of any site or computing centre.

  4. Behavior of vacuum arcs between spiral contacts with reduced spacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, M. B.

    1994-05-01

    The use of reduced gaps in applications of high-current vacuum arc devices presents a number of interesting challenges. Specifically, standard contact designs have been developed over several decades to achieve controlled motion of high-current ac arcs in vacuum interrupters. For medium-voltage applications, the optimal maximum contact gap can typically range from about 6 mm to about 2 cm. However, the influence of the contact design may be gap dependent, so additional research may be appropriate if the contacts are to be used at smaller gaps. For example, the current through spiral contacts produces a magnetic field perpendicular to the arc column, but this will force the arc to move outward and run along the periphery of the petals only if a threshold separation is achieved. In this investigation, a framing camera was used to record the appearance and motion of drawn vacuum arcs between spiral-petal contacts with final gaps of 2 to 3 mm. After the rupture of the molten bridge, a high-pressure arc column formed and expanded across the width of the spiral arm. At the reduced gap, an intense anode spot formed if the peak current exceeded approximately 15 kA. Compared to results previously obtained at larger gaps, the arc motion was greatly reduced, and severe contact damage was observed at lower currents.

  5. Welding arc plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  6. Trajectory Modulated Arc Therapy: A Fully Dynamic Delivery With Synchronized Couch and Gantry Motion Significantly Improves Dosimetric Indices Correlated With Poor Cosmesis in Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Jieming; Atwood, Todd; Eyben, Rie von; Fahimian, Benjamin; Chin, Erika; Horst, Kathleen; Otto, Karl; Hristov, Dimitre

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To develop planning and delivery capabilities for linear accelerator–based nonisocentric trajectory modulated arc therapy (TMAT) and to evaluate the benefit of TMAT for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with the patient in prone position. Methods and Materials: An optimization algorithm for volumetrically modulated arc therapy (VMAT) was generalized to allow for user-defined nonisocentric TMAT trajectories combining couch rotations and translations. After optimization, XML scripts were automatically generated to program and subsequently deliver the TMAT plans. For 10 breast patients in the prone position, TMAT and 6-field noncoplanar intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were generated under equivalent objectives and constraints. These plans were compared with regard to whole breast tissue volume receiving more than 100%, 80%, 50%, and 20% of the prescription dose. Results: For TMAT APBI, nonisocentric collision-free horizontal arcs with large angular span (251.5 ± 7.9°) were optimized and delivered with delivery time of ∼4.5 minutes. Percentage changes of whole breast tissue volume receiving more than 100%, 80%, 50%, and 20% of the prescription dose for TMAT relative to IMRT were −10.81% ± 6.91%, −27.81% ± 7.39%, −14.82% ± 9.67%, and 39.40% ± 10.53% (P≤.01). Conclusions: This is a first demonstration of end-to-end planning and delivery implementation of a fully dynamic APBI TMAT. Compared with IMRT, TMAT resulted in marked reduction of the breast tissue volume irradiated at high doses.

  7. Fast motion-including dose error reconstruction for VMAT with and without MLC tracking.

    PubMed

    Ravkilde, Thomas; Keall, Paul J; Grau, Cai; Høyer, Morten; Poulsen, Per R

    2014-12-01

    Multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking is a promising and clinically emerging treatment modality for radiotherapy of mobile tumours. Still, new quality assurance (QA) methods are warranted to safely introduce MLC tracking in the clinic. The purpose of this study was to create and experimentally validate a simple model for fast motion-including dose error reconstruction applicable to intrafractional QA of MLC tracking treatments of moving targets.MLC tracking experiments were performed on a standard linear accelerator with prototype MLC tracking software guided by an electromagnetic transponder system. A three-axis motion stage reproduced eight representative tumour trajectories; four lung and four prostate. Low and high modulation 6 MV single-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy treatment plans were delivered for each trajectory with and without MLC tracking, as well as without motion for reference. Temporally resolved doses were measured during all treatments using a biplanar dosimeter. Offline, the dose delivered to each of 1069 diodes in the dosimeter was reconstructed with 500 ms temporal resolution by a motion-including pencil beam convolution algorithm developed in-house. The accuracy of the algorithm for reconstruction of dose and motion-induced dose errors throughout the tracking and non-tracking beam deliveries was quantified. Doses were reconstructed with a mean dose difference relative to the measurements of-0.5% (5.5% standard deviation) for cumulative dose. More importantly, the root-mean-square deviation between reconstructed and measured motion-induced 3%/3 mm γ failure rates (dose error) was 2.6%. The mean computation time for each calculation of dose and dose error was 295 ms. The motion-including dose reconstruction allows accurate temporal and spatial pinpointing of errors in absorbed dose and is adequately fast to be feasible for online use. An online implementation could allow treatment intervention in case of erroneous dose delivery in both

  8. TIGER Arc Modification Application

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Hillary

    1995-03-06

    The application enables the geometric correction of TIGER arcs to a more accurate spatial data set. This is done in a structured automated environment according to Census Bureau guidelines and New Mexico state GIS standards. Arcs may be deleted, added, combined, split, and moved relative to a coverage or image displayed in the background.

  9. Lazy arc consistency

    SciTech Connect

    Schiex, T.; Gaspin, C.; Regin, J.C.; Verfaillie, G.

    1996-12-31

    Arc consistency filtering is widely used in the framework of binary constraint satisfaction problems: with a low complexity, inconsistency may be detected and domains are filtered. In this paper, we show that when detecting inconsistency is the objective, a systematic domain filtering is useless and a lazy approach is more adequate. Whereas usual arc consistency algorithms produce the maximum arc consistent sub-domain, when it exists, we propose a method, called LAC{tau}, which only looks for any arc consistent sub-domain. The algorithm is then extended to provide the additional service of locating one variable with a minimum domain cardinality in the maximum arc consistent sub-domain, without necessarily computing all domain sizes. Finally, we compare traditional AC enforcing and lazy AC enforcing using several benchmark problems, both randomly generated CSP and real life problems.

  10. Motion Sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... people traveling by car, train, airplanes and especially boats. Motion sickness can start suddenly, with a queasy ... motion sickness. For example, down below on a boat, your inner ear senses motion, but your eyes ...

  11. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Deichelbohrer, Paul R [Richland, WA

    1986-01-01

    A portable, hand held electric arc saw has a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc to erode a workpiece. Electric current is supplied to the blade by biased brushes and a slip ring which are mounted in the frame. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads stretched between two pulleys are used to facilitate movement of the electric arc saw. The pulleys are formed of dielectric material to electrically insulate the crawler treads from the frame.

  12. Tokamak ARC damage

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage.

  13. Welding arc initiator

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1989-05-09

    An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome. 3 figs.

  14. Welding arc initiator

    DOEpatents

    Correy, Thomas B.

    1989-01-01

    An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome.

  15. Real-time prostate motion assessment: image-guidance and the temporal dependence of intra-fraction motion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The rapid adoption of image-guidance in prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) results in longer treatment times, which may result in larger intrafraction motion, thereby negating the advantage of image-guidance. This study aims to qualify and quantify the contribution of image-guidance to the temporal dependence of intrafraction motion during prostate IMRT. Methods One-hundred and forty-three patients who underwent conventional IMRT (n=67) or intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT/RapidArc, n=76) for localized prostate cancer were evaluated. Intrafraction motion assessment was based on continuous RL (lateral), SI (longitudinal), and AP (vertical) positional detection of electromagnetic transponders at 10 Hz. Daily motion amplitudes were reported as session mean, median, and root-mean-square (RMS) displacements. Temporal effect was evaluated by categorizing treatment sessions into 4 different classes: IMRTc (transponder only localization), IMRTcc (transponder + CBCT localization), IMATc (transponder only localization), or IMATcc (transponder + CBCT localization). Results Mean/median session times were 4.15/3.99 min (IMATc), 12.74/12.19 min (IMATcc), 5.99/5.77 min (IMRTc), and 12.98/12.39 min (IMRTcc), with significant pair-wise difference (p<0.0001) between all category combinations except for IMRTcc vs. IMATcc (p>0.05). Median intrafraction motion difference between CBCT and non-CBCT categories strongly correlated with time for RMS (t-value=17.29; p<0.0001), SI (t-value=−4.25; p<0.0001), and AP (t-value=2.76; p<0.0066), with a weak correlation for RL (t-value=1.67; p=0.0971). Treatment time reduction with non-CBCT treatment categories showed reductions in the observed intrafraction motion: systematic error (Σ)<0.6 mm and random error (σ)<1.2 mm compared with ≤0.8 mm and <1.6 mm, respectively, for CBCT-involved treatment categories. Conclusions For treatment durations >4-6 minutes, and without any intrafraction motion mitigation protocol

  16. Metal halide arc discharge lamp having short arc length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muzeroll, Martin E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A metal halide arc discharge lamp includes a sealed light-transmissive outer jacket, a light-transmissive shroud located within the outer jacket and an arc tube assembly located within the shroud. The arc tube assembly includes an arc tube, electrodes mounted within the arc tube and a fill material for supporting an arc discharge. The electrodes have a spacing such that an electric field in a range of about 60 to 95 volts per centimeter is established between the electrodes. The diameter of the arc tube and the spacing of the electrodes are selected to provide an arc having an arc diameter to arc length ratio in a range of about 1.6 to 1.8. The fill material includes mercury, sodium iodide, scandium tri-iodide and a rare gas, and may include lithium iodide. The lamp exhibits a high color rendering index, high lumen output and high color temperature.

  17. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-18

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45[degree] to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures.

  18. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven; Sanders, David M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45.degree. to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

  19. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.

    1983-08-08

    A portable, hand-held electric arc saw apparatus comprising a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc between the blade and a workpiece of opposite polarity. Electrically conducting means are provided on said frame for transmitting current to said blade. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads are employed to facilitate movement of the apparatus relative to the workpiece.

  20. The modelling of an SF6 arc in a supersonic nozzle: II. Current zero behaviour of the nozzle arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Liu, J.; Yan, J. D.; Fang, M. T. C.

    2016-08-01

    The present work (part II) forms the second part of an investigation into the behaviour of SF6 nozzle arc. It is concerned with the aerodynamic and electrical behaviour of a transient nozzle arc under a current ramp specified by a rate of current decay (di/dt) before current zero and a voltage ramp (dV/dt) after current zero. The five flow models used in part I [1] for cold gas flow and DC nozzle arcs have been applied to study the transient arc at three stagnation pressures (P 0) and two values of di/dt for the current ramp, representing a wide range of arcing conditions. An analysis of the physical mechanisms encompassed in each flow model is given with an emphasis on the adequacy of a particular model in describing the rapidly varying arc around current zero. The critical rate of rise of recovery voltage (RRRV) is found computationally and compared with test results of Benenson et al [2]. For transient nozzle arcs, the RRRV is proportional to the square of P 0, rather than to the square root of P 0 for DC nozzle arcs. The physical mechanisms responsible for the strong dependence of RRRV on P 0 have been investigated. The relative merits of the flow models employed are discussed.

  1. Geometric and dosimetric accuracy of dynamic tumor-tracking conformal arc irradiation with a gimbaled x-ray head

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Tomohiro; Miyabe, Yuki Yamada, Masahiro; Kaneko, Shuji; Monzen, Hajime; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Sawada, Akira; Kokubo, Masaki

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The Vero4DRT system has the capability for dynamic tumor-tracking (DTT) stereotactic irradiation using a unique gimbaled x-ray head. The purposes of this study were to develop DTT conformal arc irradiation and to estimate its geometric and dosimetric accuracy. Methods: The gimbaled x-ray head, supported on an O-ring gantry, was moved in the pan and tilt directions during O-ring gantry rotation. To evaluate the mechanical accuracy, the gimbaled x-ray head was moved during the gantry rotating according to input command signals without a target tracking, and a machine log analysis was performed. The difference between a command and a measured position was calculated as mechanical error. To evaluate beam-positioning accuracy, a moving phantom, which had a steel ball fixed at the center, was driven based on a sinusoidal wave (amplitude [A]: 20 mm, time period [T]: 4 s), a patient breathing motion with a regular pattern (A: 16 mm, average T: 4.5 s), and an irregular pattern (A: 7.2–23.0 mm, T: 2.3–10.0 s), and irradiated with DTT during gantry rotation. The beam-positioning error was evaluated as the difference between the centroid position of the irradiated field and the steel ball on images from an electronic portal imaging device. For dosimetric accuracy, dose distributions in static and moving targets were evaluated with DTT conformal arc irradiation. Results: The root mean squares (RMSs) of the mechanical error were up to 0.11 mm for pan motion and up to 0.14 mm for tilt motion. The RMSs of the beam-positioning error were within 0.23 mm for each pattern. The dose distribution in a moving phantom with tracking arc irradiation was in good agreement with that in static conditions. Conclusions: The gimbal positional accuracy was not degraded by gantry motion. As in the case of a fixed port, the Vero4DRT system showed adequate accuracy of DTT conformal arc irradiation.

  2. Back arc extension in the Okinawa Trough

    SciTech Connect

    Sibuet, J.; Letouzey, J.; Barbier, F.; Charvet, J.; Foucher, J.; Hilde, T.W.C.; Kimura, M.; Ling-Yun, C.; Marsset, B.; Muller, C.; and others

    1987-12-10

    The Okinawa Trough, lying to the east of China, is a back arc basin formed by extension within continental lithosphere behind the Ryukyu trench-arc system. Middle to late Miocene uplift, associated with normal faulting of the initially adjacent Ryukyu nonvolcanic arc and the Taiwan-Sinzi folded belt, corresponds to the first rifting phase. The timing of rifting is supported by the presence of marine sediments of corresponding age drilled in the northern Okinawa Trough. The rifting occurred after a major early Miocene change in the motion of the Philippine plate with respect to Eurasia and ceased during the Pliocene. A second rifting phase started about 2 m.y. ago, at the Plio-Pleistocene boundary and has continue until the present time. It has proceeded to a more advanced stage in the middle and southern Okinawa Trough than it has farther north. Detailed bathymetric (Sea Beam), seismic reflection and magnetics data collected during the POP 1 cruise of the R/V Jean Charcot reveal the principal features of the extensional processes. The back are spreading phase started very recently in the southern and middle Okinawa Trough, as exemplified by several and echelon and, in some cases, overlapping active, central graben oriented N70/sup 0/ E--N80/sup 0/ E. Some of these depressions are intruded by volcanic ridges of fresh back arc basalt with associated large magnetic anomalies. Transform faults between these en echelon active rifts are not obvious.

  3. The Role of Water Vapor and Dissociative Recombination Processes in Solar Array Arc Initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galofar, J.; Vayner, B.; Degroot, W.; Ferguson, D.

    2002-01-01

    Experimental plasma arc investigations involving the onset of arc initiation for a negatively biased solar array immersed in low-density plasma have been performed. Previous studies into the arc initiation process have shown that the most probable arcing sites tend to occur at the triple junction involving the conductor, dielectric and plasma. More recently our own experiments have led us to believe that water vapor is the main causal factor behind the arc initiation process. Assuming the main component of the expelled plasma cloud by weight is water, the fastest process available is dissociative recombination (H2O(+) + e(-) (goes to) H* + OH*). A model that agrees with the observed dependency of arc current pulse width on the square root of capacitance is presented. A 400 MHz digital storage scope and current probe was used to detect arcs at the triple junction of a solar array. Simultaneous measurements of the arc trigger pulse, the gate pulse, the arc current and the arc voltage were then obtained. Finally, a large number of measurements of individual arc spectra were obtained in very short time intervals, ranging from 10 to 30 microseconds, using a 1/4 a spectrometer coupled with a gated intensified CCD. The spectrometer was systematically tuned to obtain optical arc spectra over the entire wavelength range of 260 to 680 nanometers. All relevant atomic lines and molecular bands were then identified.

  4. The statistical difference between bending arcs and regular polar arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullen, A.; Fear, R. C.; Milan, S. E.; Carter, J. A.; Karlsson, T.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the Polar UVI data set by Kullen et al. (2002) of 74 polar arcs is reinvestigated, focusing on bending arcs. Bending arcs are typically faint and form (depending on interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By direction) on the dawnside or duskside oval with the tip of the arc splitting off the dayside oval. The tip subsequently moves into the polar cap in the antisunward direction, while the arc's nightside end remains attached to the oval, eventually becoming hook-shaped. Our investigation shows that bending arcs appear on the opposite oval side from and farther sunward than most regular polar arcs. They form during By-dominated IMF conditions: typically, the IMF clock angle increases from 60 to 90° about 20 min before the arc forms. Antisunward plasma flows from the oval into the polar cap just poleward of bending arcs are seen in Super Dual Auroral Radar Network data, indicating dayside reconnection. For regular polar arcs, recently reported characteristics are confirmed in contrast to bending arcs. This includes plasma flows along the nightside oval that originate close to the initial arc location and a significant delay in the correlation between IMF By and initial arc location. In our data set, the highest correlations are found with IMF By appearing at least 1-2 h before arc formation. In summary, bending arcs are distinctly different from regular arcs and cannot be explained by existing polar arc models. Instead, these results are consistent with the formation mechanism described in Carter et al. (2015), suggesting that bending arcs are caused by dayside reconnection.

  5. Root Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Grierson, Claire; Nielsen, Erik; Ketelaarc, Tijs; Schiefelbein, John

    2014-01-01

    Roots hairs are cylindrical extensions of root epidermal cells that are important for acquisition of nutrients, microbe interactions, and plant anchorage. The molecular mechanisms involved in the specification, differentiation, and physiology of root hairs in Arabidopsis are reviewed here. Root hair specification in Arabidopsis is determined by position-dependent signaling and molecular feedback loops causing differential accumulation of a WD-bHLH-Myb transcriptional complex. The initiation of root hairs is dependent on the RHD6 bHLH gene family and auxin to define the site of outgrowth. Root hair elongation relies on polarized cell expansion at the growing tip, which involves multiple integrated processes including cell secretion, endomembrane trafficking, cytoskeletal organization, and cell wall modifications. The study of root hair biology in Arabidopsis has provided a model cell type for insights into many aspects of plant development and cell biology. PMID:24982600

  6. Control of arc length during gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Madigan, R.B.; Quinn, T.P.

    1994-12-31

    An arc-length control system has been developed for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) under spray transfer welding conditions. The ability to monitor and control arc length during arc welding allows consistent weld characteristics to be maintained and therefore improves weld quality. Arc length control has only been implemented for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), where an automatic voltage control (AVC) unit adjusts torch-to-work distance. The system developed here compliments the voltage- and current-sensing techniques commonly used for control of GMAW. The system consists of an arc light intensity sensor (photodiode), a Hall-effect current sensor, a personal computer and software implementing a data interpretation and control algorithms. Arc length was measured using both arc light and arc current signals. Welding current was adjusted to maintain constant arc length. A proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller was used. Gains were automatically selected based on the desired welding conditions. In performance evaluation welds, arc length varied from 2.5 to 6.5 mm while welding up a sloped workpiece (ramp in CTWD) without the control. Arc length was maintained within 1 mm of the desired (5 mm ) with the control.

  7. Saturn's elusive transpolar arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radioti, Aikaterini; Grodent, Denis; Gérard, Jean-Claude; Milan, Steve; Fear, Robert; Jackman, Caitriona; Bonfond, Bertrand; Pryor, Wayne

    2014-05-01

    Variations of the polar auroral emissions in response to magnetic reconnection provide evidence of the mechanisms which couple solar wind mass, energy and momentum into the magnetosphere. A signature of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling related to tail reconnection and one of the most spectacular auroral emissions at Earth is the transpolar arc or 'theta aurora'. It represents the optical emission associated with closed field lines embedded within a region of open magnetic field lines (polar cap). Here we report the discovery of a transpolar arc at Saturn from UVIS Cassini spacecraft observations. We discuss the possibility the transpolar arc at Saturn is related to tail reconnection similar to Earth and we address the role of solar wind in the magnetotail dynamics at Saturn.

  8. Arc electrode interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, X.; Berns, D.; Heberlein, J.

    1994-01-01

    The project consisted of two parts: (1) the cathode interaction studies which were a continuation of previous work and had the objective of increasing our understanding of the microscopic phenomena controlling cathode erosion in arc jet thrusters, and (2) the studies of the anode attachment in arc jet thrusters. The cathode interaction studies consisted of (1) a continuation of some modeling work in which the previously derived model for the cathode heating was applied to some specific gases and electrode materials, and (2) experimental work in which various diagnostics was applied to the cathode. The specific diagnostics used were observation of the cathode tip during arcing using a Laser Strobe Video system in conjunction with a tele-microscope, a monochromator with an optical multichannel analyzer for the determination of the cathode temperature distribution, and various ex situ materials analysis methods. The emphasis of our effort was shifted to the cathode materials analysis because a parallel project was in place during the second half of 1993 with a visiting scientist pursuing arc electrode materials studies. As a consequence, the diagnostic investigations of the arc in front of the cathode had to be postponed to the first half of 1994, and we are presently preparing these measurements. The results of last year's study showed some unexpected effects influencing the cathode erosion behavior, such as increased erosion away from the cathode tip, and our understanding of these effects should improve our ability to control cathode erosion. The arc jet anode attachment studies concentrated on diagnostics of the instabilities in subsonic anode attachment arc jet thrusters, and were supplemental measurements to work which was performed by one of the authors who spent the summer as an intern at NASA Lewis Research Center. A summary of the results obtained during the internship are included because they formed an integral part of the study. Two tasks for 1994, the

  9. Pulsed Long Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krampit, N. Yu

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents a method and an appliance for pulsed arc welding. The method supports dosage of energy required for melting each bead of electrode metal starting from the detachment of a bead. The appliance including a sensor to register bead detachment shows this moment due to the voltage burst in the arc space. Transferred beads of electrode metal are of similar size because of the dosage of energy used for melting each bead, as the consequence, the process is more stable and starting conditions to transfer electrode metal are similar, as the result, a produced weld is improved.

  10. Arc reattachment driven by a turbulent boundary layer: implications for the sweeping of lightning arcs along aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra-Garcia, C.; Nguyen, N. C.; Peraire, J.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.

    2016-09-01

    A lightning channel attached to an aircraft in flight will be swept along the aircraft’s surface in response to the relative velocity between the arc’s root (attached to a moving electrode) and the bulk of the arc, which is stationary with respect to the air. During this process, the reattachment of the arc to new locations often occurs. The detailed description of this swept stroke is still at an early stage of research, and it entails the interaction between an electrical arc and the flow boundary layer. In this paper we examine the implications of the structure of the boundary layer for the arc sweeping and reattachment process by considering different velocity profiles, both for laminar and turbulent flow, as well as a high fidelity description, using large eddy simulation, of transitional flow over an airfoil. It is found that the local velocity fluctuations in a turbulent flow may be important contributors to the reattachment of the arc, through a combination of an increased potential drop along the arc and local approaches of the arc to the surface. Specific flow features, such as the presence of a laminar recirculation bubble, can also contribute to the possibility of reattachment.

  11. Cloud Arcs in the Western Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Small cumulus clouds in this natural-color view from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer have formed a distinctive series of quasi-circular arcs. Clues regarding the formation of these arcs can be found by noting that larger clouds exist in the interior of each arc.

    The interior clouds are thicker and likely to be more convectively active than the other clouds, causing much of the air near the centers of the arcs to rise. This air spreads out horizontally in all directions as it rises and continues to spread out as it begins to sink back to the surface. This pushes any existing small cumulus clouds away from the central region of convection.

    As the air sinks, it also warms, preventing other small clouds from forming, so that the regions just inside the arcs are kept clear. At the arcs, the horizontal flow of sinking air is now quite weak and on meeting the undisturbed air it can rise again slightly -- possibly assisting in the formation of new small cumulus clouds. Although examples of the continuity of air, in which every rising air motion must be compensated by a sinking motion elsewhere, are very common, the degree of organization exhibited here is relatively rare, as the wind field at different altitudes usually disrupts such patterns. The degree of self organization of this cloud image, whereby three or four such circular events form a quasi-periodic pattern, probably also requires a relatively uncommon combination of wind, temperature and humidity conditions for it to occur.

    The image was acquired by MISR's nadir camera on March 11, 2002, and is centered west of the Marshall Islands. Enewetak Atoll is discernible through thin cloud as the turquoise band near the right-hand edge of the image.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously from pole to pole, and views almost the entire globe every 9 days. This image is a portion of the data acquired during Terra orbit 11863, and covers an area of about 380

  12. Plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The motion of tectonic plates on the earth is characterized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the NUVEL-1 global model of current plate motions, diffuse plate boundaries and the oceanic lithosphere, the relation between plate motions and distributed deformations, accelerations and the steadiness of plate motions, the distribution of current Pacific-North America motion across western North America and its margin, plate reconstructions and their uncertainties, hotspots, and plate dynamics. A comprehensive bibliography is provided. 126 refs.

  13. The volcanoes of an oceanic arc from origin to destruction: A case from the northern Luzon Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Yu-Ming; Song, Sheng-Rong

    2013-09-01

    Volcanoes were created, grew, uplifted, became dormant or extinct, and were accreted as part of continents during continuous arc-continent collision. Volcanic rocks in Eastern Taiwan's Coastal Range (CR) are part of the northern Luzon Arc, an oceanic island arc produced by the subduction of the South China Sea Plate beneath the Philippine Sea Plate. Igneous rocks are characterized by intrusive bodies, lava and pyroclastic flows, and volcaniclastic rocks with minor tephra deposits. Based on volcanic facies associations, Sr-Nd isotopic geochemistry, and the geography of the region, four volcanoes were identified in the CR: Yuemei, Chimei, Chengkuangao, and Tuluanshan. Near-vent facies associations show different degrees of erosion in the volcanic edifices for Chimei, Chengkuangao, and Tuluanshan. Yuemei lacks near-vent rocks, implying that Yuemei's main volcanic body may have been subducted at the Ryukyu Trench with the northward motion of the Philippine Sea Plate. These data suggest a hypothesis for the evolution of volcanism and geomorphology during arc growth and ensuing arc-continent collision in the northern Luzon Arc, which suggests that these volcanoes were formed from the seafloor, emerging as islands during arc volcanism. They then became dormant or extinct during collision, and finally, were uplifted and accreted by additional collision. The oldest volcano, Yuemei, may have already been subducted into the Ryukyu Trench.

  14. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  15. Variable polarity arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E. O., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Technological advances generate within themselves dissatisfactions that lead to further advances in a process. A series of advances in welding technology which culminated in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process and an advance instituted to overcome the latest dissatisfactions with the process: automated VPPA welding are described briefly.

  16. Gas tungsten arc welder

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  17. Geometrical and electromagnetic effects on arc propagation in a railplug ignitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekici, O.; Matthews, R. D.; Ezekoye, O. A.

    2007-12-01

    Three-dimensional simulation of arc motion is presented for conditions representative of those for a railplug ignitor. A railplug ignitor is a miniature rail-gun used to deliver an arc ignition source for internal combustion engine applications. Computations explored the influence of the railplug geometry, effects of an external magnetic field, and impact of the circuit current on arc velocity. One underlying question about arc motion in railplug systems has been the influence of the expansion velocity associated with energy deposition on arc motion. A single open end muzzle would result in higher velocities if the expansion effects are dominant. This was tested by simulating two types of geometries, single open end and double open end muzzles. The double open end configuration was shown to have faster arc propagation velocities. A discussion of the mechanisms is presented. A simple scaling analysis was found to explain the increased arc propagation velocity associated with application of an external magnetic field. Increasing the circuit current was found to increase the final arc propagation velocity, although the early time velocities were slower for larger currents.

  18. Influence of axial self-magnetic field component on arcing behavior of spiral-shaped contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Dingyu; Xiu, Shixin Wang, Yi; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Yali; Bi, Dongli

    2015-10-15

    The transverse magnetic field (TMF) contact design is commonly used in vacuum interrupters. When arcing occurs between the TMF contacts, the contact structure can create a self-induced magnetic field that drives the arc to move and rotate on the contact, and thus local overheating and severe erosion can be avoided. However, TMF contacts could also create an axial self-magnetic component, and the influence of this component on the arc behavior has not been considered to date. In this paper, five different types of Cu-Cr spiral-shaped TMF contacts with three different structures are investigated in a demountable vacuum chamber that contains a high-speed charge-coupled device video camera. It was found that the contact structure greatly influenced the arc behavior, especially in terms of arc rotation and the effective contact area, while contacts with the same slot structure but different diameters showed similar arc behavior and arc motion. The magnetic field distribution and the Lorentz force of each of the three different contact structures are simulated, and the axial self-magnetic field was first taken into consideration for investigation of the TMF contact design. It was found that contact designs that have higher axial self-magnetic field components tend to have arc columns with larger diameters and show poorer arc motion and rotation performance in the experiments.

  19. Hall-effect arc protector

    DOEpatents

    Rankin, R.A.; Kotter, D.K.

    1997-05-13

    The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored. 2 figs.

  20. Hall-effect arc protector

    DOEpatents

    Rankin, Richard A.; Kotter, Dale K.

    1997-01-01

    The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored.

  1. Differential preservation in the geologic record of intraoceanic arc sedimentary and tectonic processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy; Clift, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Records of ancient intraoceanic arc activity, now preserved in continental suture zones, are commonly used to reconstruct paleogeography and plate motion, and to understand how continental crust is formed, recycled, and maintained through time. However, interpreting tectonic and sedimentary records from ancient terranes after arc–continent collision is complicated by preferential preservation of evidence for some arc processes and loss of evidence for others. In this synthesis we examine what is lost, and what is preserved, in the translation from modern processes to the ancient record of intraoceanic arcs. Composition of accreted arc terranes differs as a function of arc–continent collision geometry. ‘Forward-facing’ collision can accrete an oceanic arc on to either a passive or an active continental margin, with the arc facing the continent and colliding trench- and forearc-side first. In a ‘backward-facing’ collision, involving two subduction zones with similar polarity, the arc collides backarc-first with an active continental margin. The preservation of evidence for contemporary sedimentary and tectonic arc processes in the geologic record depends greatly on how well the various parts of the arc survive collision and orogeny in each case. Preservation of arc terranes likely is biased towards those that were in a state of tectonic accretion for tens of millions of years before collision, rather than tectonic erosion. The prevalence of tectonic erosion in modern intraoceanic arcs implies that valuable records of arc processes are commonly destroyed even before the arc collides with a continent. Arc systems are most likely to undergo tectonic accretion shortly before forward-facing collision with a continent, and thus most forearc and accretionary-prism material in ancient arc terranes likely is temporally biased toward the final stages of arc activity, when sediment flux to the trench was greatest and tectonic accretion prevailed. Collision geometry

  2. Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavenda, B. H.

    1985-02-01

    Brownian motion, the doubly random motion of small particles suspended in a liquid due to molecular collisions, and its implications and applications in the history of modern science are discussed. Topics examined include probabilistic phenomena, the kinetic theory of gases, Einstein's atomic theory of Brownian motion, particle displacement, diffusion measurements, the determination of the mass of the atom and of Avogadro's number, the statistical mechanics of thermodynamics, nonequilibrium systems, Langevin's equation of motion, time-reversed evolution, mathematical analogies, and applications in economics and radio navigation. Diagrams and drawings are provided.

  3. Semicircular Rashba arc spin polarizer

    SciTech Connect

    Bin Siu, Zhuo; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Ghee Tan, Seng

    2014-05-07

    In this work, we study the generation of spin polarized currents using curved arcs of finite widths, in which the Rashba spin orbit interaction (RSOI) is present. Compared to the 1-dimensional RSOI arcs with zero widths studied previously, the finite width presents charge carriers with another degree of freedom along the transverse width of the arc, in addition to the longitudinal degree of freedom along the circumference of the arc. The asymmetry in the transverse direction due to the difference in the inner and outer radii of the arc breaks the antisymmetry of the longitudinal spin z current in a straight RSOI segment. This property can be exploited to generate spin z polarized current output from the RSOI arc by a spin unpolarized current input. The sign of the spin current can be manipulated by varying the arc dimensions.

  4. The fractal nature of vacuum arc cathode spots

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2005-05-27

    Cathode spot phenomena show many features of fractals, for example self-similar patterns in the emitted light and arc erosion traces. Although there have been hints on the fractal nature of cathode spots in the literature, the fractal approach to spot interpretation is underutilized. In this work, a brief review of spot properties is given, touching the differences between spot type 1 (on cathodes surfaces with dielectric layers) and spot type 2 (on metallic, clean surfaces) as well as the known spot fragment or cell structure. The basic properties of self-similarity, power laws, random colored noise, and fractals are introduced. Several points of evidence for the fractal nature of spots are provided. Specifically power laws are identified as signature of fractal properties, such as spectral power of noisy arc parameters (ion current, arc voltage, etc) obtained by fast Fourier transform. It is shown that fractal properties can be observed down to the cutoff by measurement resolution or occurrence of elementary steps in physical processes. Random walk models of cathode spot motion are well established: they go asymptotically to Brownian motion for infinitesimal step width. The power spectrum of the arc voltage noise falls as 1/f {sup 2}, where f is frequency, supporting a fractal spot model associated with Brownian motion.

  5. The Architecture, Chemistry, and Evolution of Continental Magmatic Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducea, Mihai N.; Saleeby, Jason B.; Bergantz, George

    2015-05-01

    Continental magmatic arcs form above subduction zones where the upper plate is continental lithosphere and/or accreted transitional lithosphere. The best-studied examples are found along the western margin of the Americas. They are Earth's largest sites of intermediate magmatism. They are long lived (tens to hundreds of millions of years) and spatially complex; their location migrates laterally due to a host of tectonic causes. Episodes of crustal and lithospheric thickening alternating with periods of root foundering produce cyclic vertical changes in arcs. The average plutonic and volcanic rocks in these arcs straddle the compositional boundary between an andesite and a dacite, very similar to that of continental crust; about half of that comes from newly added mafic material from the mantle. Arc products of the upper crust differentiated from deep crustal (>40 km) residual materials, which are unstable in the lithosphere. Continental arcs evolve into stable continental masses over time; trace elemental budgets, however, present challenges to the concept that Phanerozoic arcs are the main factories of continental crust.

  6. HOLLOW CARBON ARC DISCHARGE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-10-11

    A device is described for producing an energetic, direct current, hollow, carbon-arc discharge in an evacuated container and within a strong magnetic field. Such discharges are particularly useful not only in dissociation and ionization of high energy molecular ion beams, but also in acting as a shield or barrier against the instreaming of lowenergy neutral particles into a plasma formed within the hollow discharge when it is used as a dissociating mechanism for forming the plasma. There is maintained a predetermined ratio of gas particles to carbon particles released from the arc electrodes during operation of the discharge. The carbon particles absorb some of the gas particles and are pumped along and by the discharge out of the device, with the result that smaller diffusion pumps are required than would otherwise be necessary to dispose of the excess gas.

  7. Vacuum arc behavior and its voltage characteristics in drawing process controlled by composite magnetic fields along axial and transverse directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijun; Deng, Jie; Wang, Haijing; Jia, Shenli; Qin, Kang; Shi, Zongqian

    2015-10-01

    In this research, drawing vacuum arc (VA) experiments were conducted using composite contacts under currents ranging from 5 kA to 20 kA root mean square (rms). The new type of contact comprised an axial magnetic field (AMF) configuration and a transverse magnetic field (TMF) configuration. The TMF plate was in the center, surrounded by the AMF plate. The contact generated both AMFs and TMFs simultaneously. VA appearances and arc voltages were recorded, and the VA was modeled as a conductor for electromagnetic force analysis in ANSYS software. The results showed that the coaxiality of operating mechanisms significantly influenced arc behavior just as the arc was ignited. When arc brightness did not increase after ignition, there was a voltage drop accompanied with diffusion of the VA. As to VA development, when an arc was ignited on an AMF plate, it spread on the plate and rotated. Over time the arc current increased, the constricting arc forms, and the arc column rotated on the TMF plate under the action of Ampere's force. With regard to the influence of a magnetic field on a VA at different stages, in the initial drawing arc stage the TMF was dominant, and the arc started to rotate under the action of Ampere's force. Afterwards, the AMF was dominant, with a steadily burning arc. As for contact melting, in the initial arcing period, a contracted short arc caused severe melting and erosion of the contact plate. When the ignition spot or root was close to the slot of plate, the electromagnetic force pushed the arc toward slot and contact edge, resulting in local erosion of the slot region.

  8. Vacuum arc behavior and its voltage characteristics in drawing process controlled by composite magnetic fields along axial and transverse directions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lijun Deng, Jie; Wang, Haijing; Jia, Shenli; Qin, Kang; Shi, Zongqian

    2015-10-15

    In this research, drawing vacuum arc (VA) experiments were conducted using composite contacts under currents ranging from 5 kA to 20 kA root mean square (rms). The new type of contact comprised an axial magnetic field (AMF) configuration and a transverse magnetic field (TMF) configuration. The TMF plate was in the center, surrounded by the AMF plate. The contact generated both AMFs and TMFs simultaneously. VA appearances and arc voltages were recorded, and the VA was modeled as a conductor for electromagnetic force analysis in ANSYS software. The results showed that the coaxiality of operating mechanisms significantly influenced arc behavior just as the arc was ignited. When arc brightness did not increase after ignition, there was a voltage drop accompanied with diffusion of the VA. As to VA development, when an arc was ignited on an AMF plate, it spread on the plate and rotated. Over time the arc current increased, the constricting arc forms, and the arc column rotated on the TMF plate under the action of Ampere's force. With regard to the influence of a magnetic field on a VA at different stages, in the initial drawing arc stage the TMF was dominant, and the arc started to rotate under the action of Ampere's force. Afterwards, the AMF was dominant, with a steadily burning arc. As for contact melting, in the initial arcing period, a contracted short arc caused severe melting and erosion of the contact plate. When the ignition spot or root was close to the slot of plate, the electromagnetic force pushed the arc toward slot and contact edge, resulting in local erosion of the slot region.

  9. Sensitivity analysis of physics and planning SmartArc parameters for single and partial arc VMAT planning.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai; Yan, Di; Tyagi, Neelam

    2012-11-08

    We investigate the sensitivity of various physics and planning SmartArc parameters to generate single and partial arc VMAT plans with equivalent or better plan quality as IMRT. Patients previously treated with step-and-shoot IMRT for several treatment sites were replanned using SmartArc. These treatment sites included head and neck, prostate, lung, and spine. Effect of various physics and planning SmartArc parameters, such as continuous vs. binned dose rate, dynamic leaf gap, leaf speed, maximum delivery time, number of arcs, and control point spacing, were investigated for Elekta Axesse and Synergy linacs. Absolute dose distribution was measured by using the ArcCHECK 3D cylindrical diode array. For all cases investigated, plan metrics such as conformity indices and dose homogeneity indices increased, while plan QA decreased with increasing leaf speed. Leaf speed had a significant impact on the segment size for low dose per fractionation cases. Constraining leaf motion to a lower speed not only avoids tiny large leaf travel and low-dose rate value, but also achieves better PTV coverage (defined as the volume receiving prescription dose) with less total MUs. Maximum delivery time, the number of arcs, and the spacing of control points all had similar effects as the leaf motion constraint on dose rate and segment size. The maximum delivery time had a significant effect on the optimization, acting as a hard constraint. Increasing the control point spacing from 2 to 6 degrees increased the PTV coverage, but reduced the absolute dose gamma passing rate. Plans generated using continuous and binned dose rate modes did not show any difference in the quality and the delivery for the Elekta machines. Dosimetric analysis with a 3D cylindrical QA phantom resulted in 93.6%-99.3% of detectors with a gamma index (3%/2 mm) < 1 for all cases.

  10. Treatment planning for volumetric modulated arc therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bedford, James L.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a specific type of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in which the gantry speed, multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf position, and dose rate vary continuously during delivery. A treatment planning system for VMAT is presented. Methods: Arc control points are created uniformly throughout one or more arcs. An iterative least-squares algorithm is used to generate a fluence profile at every control point. The control points are then grouped and all of the control points in a given group are used to approximate the fluence profiles. A direct-aperture optimization is then used to improve the solution, taking into account the allowed range of leaf motion of the MLC. Dose is calculated using a fast convolution algorithm and the motion between control points is approximated by 100 interpolated dose calculation points. The method has been applied to five cases, consisting of lung, rectum, prostate and seminal vesicles, prostate and pelvic lymph nodes, and head and neck. The resulting plans have been compared with segmental (step-and-shoot) IMRT and delivered and verified on an Elekta Synergy to ensure practicality. Results: For the lung, prostate and seminal vesicles, and rectum cases, VMAT provides a plan of similar quality to segmental IMRT but with faster delivery by up to a factor of 4. For the prostate and pelvic nodes and head-and-neck cases, the critical structure doses are reduced with VMAT, both of these cases having a longer delivery time than IMRT. The plans in general verify successfully, although the agreement between planned and measured doses is not very close for the more complex cases, particularly the head-and-neck case. Conclusions: Depending upon the emphasis in the treatment planning, VMAT provides treatment plans which are higher in quality and/or faster to deliver than IMRT. The scheme described has been successfully introduced into clinical use.

  11. Circuit model of surface arcing

    SciTech Connect

    Robiscoe, R.T.; Sui, Z.

    1988-11-01

    An electrical breakdown on a highly charged dielectric surface can result in a discharge along the surface, i.e., a flashover arc. We construct a simple circuit model for such an arc: the discharge of a capacitor C (related to the initial charged area) through a series inductor L and resistor R (related to the arc considered as a plasma). The arc current assumes a very simple form over most of its dynamic range, and such measured arc quantities as total charge transport, pulse width, peak current, and rise time are easily calculated. Moreover, straightforward a priori estimates of C, L, and R values give calculated arc quantities in good agreement with observation, for both typical magnitudes and areal scaling. We also analyze the effect on areal scaling of allowing the arc resistance R to ''switch'' during the evolution of the arc, from a small value characteristic of the arc plasma to a large value characteristic of the dielectric surface. Finally, we consider some aspects of the electromagnetic radiation generated by the arc.

  12. Probe characterization of high-current driven metal plasma in a vacuum-arc rail gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, T.; Roychowdhury, P.; Venkatramani, N.

    2004-10-01

    The characteristics of metal plasma launched by high-current electric arc in a vacuum-arc rail gun are determined by employing electrical and magnetic probes. These measurements are validated by results from theoretical simulations. The arc coupled nonlinear circuit equations are solved simultaneously with the Newtonian arc motion and revealed the undercritically damped behavior of the arc current identical to the arc-current signal recorded by the Rogowski magnetic probe. Similarly the arc velocity and displacement derived from the signatures of B-dot probes are shown to concur closely with the results of J ×B propulsion from simulation. The heating of plasma is formulated in a three-electron population regime with direct arc energy coupling through magnetohydrodynamic, ion-acoustic, Coulomb, and neutral interactions. This results in high temperature (Te) of hundreds of eV in the arc as revealed by the simulation. Hence Te of the rapidly cooling and equilibrating plasma that emerged from the muzzle is high around 80-90eV, which is confirmed by Langmuir electric probe measurements. Density ne of this metal plasma is shown to be in the range 4×1021-6×1021m-3 and includes multiple ion charge states. The exit velocity of the plasma measured by a pair of Langmuir probes is close to 2.2×106cm/s and matched well with the arc velocity determined by the B-dot probes and the results from simulation.

  13. Controlling Arc Length in Plasma Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Circuit maintains arc length on irregularly shaped workpieces. Length of plasma arc continuously adjusted by control circuit to maintain commanded value. After pilot arc is established, contactor closed and transfers arc to workpiece. Control circuit then half-wave rectifies ac arc voltage to produce dc control signal proportional to arc length. Circuit added to plasma arc welding machines with few wiring changes. Welds made with circuit cleaner and require less rework than welds made without it. Beads smooth and free of inclusions.

  14. Target tracking using DMLC for volumetric modulated arc therapy: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Baozhou; Rangaraj, Dharanipathy; Papiez, Lech; Oddiraju, Swetha; Yang Deshan; Li, H. Harold

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Target tracking using dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) is a promising approach for intrafraction motion management in radiation therapy. The purpose of this work is to develop a DMLC tracking algorithm capable of delivering volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to the targets that experience two-dimensional (2D) rigid motion in the beam's eye view. Methods: The problem of VMAT delivery to moving targets is formulated as a control problem with constraints. The relationships between gantry speed, gantry acceleration, MLC leaf-velocity, dose rate, and target motion are derived. An iterative search algorithm is developed to find numerical solutions for efficient delivery of a specific VMAT plan to the moving target using 2D DMLC tracking. The delivery of five VMAT lung plans is simulated. The planned and delivered fluence maps in the target-reference frame are calculated and compared. Results: The simulation demonstrates that the 2D tracking algorithm is capable of delivering the VMAT plan to a moving target fast and accurately without violating the machine constraints and the integrity of the treatment plan. The average delivery time is only 29 s longer than that of no-tracking delivery, 101 versus 72 s, respectively. The fluence maps are normalized to 200 MU and the average root-mean-square error between the desired and the delivered fluence is 2.1 MU, compared to 14.8 MU for no-tracking and 3.6 MU for one-dimensional tracking. Conclusions: A locally optimal MLC tracking algorithm for VMAT delivery is proposed, aiming at shortest delivery time while maintaining treatment plan invariant. The inconsequential increase of treatment time due to DMLC tracking is clinically desirable, which makes VMAT with DMLC tracking attractive in treating moving tumors.

  15. APPARATUS FOR ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Lingafelter, J.W.

    1960-04-01

    An apparatus is described in which a welding arc created between an annular electrode and a workpiece moves under the influence of an electromagnetic field about the electrode in a closed or annular path. This mode of welding is specially suited to the enclosing of nuclear-fuel slugs in a protective casing. For example, a uranium slug is placed in an aluminum can, and an aluminum closure is welded to the open end of the can along a closed or annular path conforming to the periphery of the end closure.

  16. Joan of Arc.

    PubMed

    Foote-Smith, E; Bayne, L

    1991-01-01

    For centuries, romantics have praised and historians and scientists debated the mystery of Joan of Arc's exceptional achievements. How could an uneducated farmer's daughter, raised in harsh isolation in a remote village in medieval France, have found the strength and resolution to alter the course of history? Hypotheses have ranged from miraculous intervention to creative psychopathy. We suggest, based on her own words and the contemporary descriptions of observers, that the source of her visions and convictions was in part ecstatic epileptic auras and that she joins the host of creative religious thinkers suspected or known to have epilepsy, from St. Paul and Mohammed to Dostoevsky, who have changed western civilization. PMID:1743152

  17. Arcing on dc power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moores, Greg; Heller, R. P.; Sutanto, Surja; Dugal-Whitehead, Norma R.

    1992-01-01

    Unexpected and undesirable arcing on dc power systems can produce hazardous situations aboard space flights. The potential for fire and shock might exist in a situation where there is a broken conductor, a loose power connection, or a break in the insulation of the power cable. Such arcing has been found to be reproducible in a laboratory environment. Arcing tests show that the phenomena can last for several seconds and yet be undetectable by present protection schemes used in classical power relaying and remote power controller applications. This paper characterizes the arcing phenomena and suggests future research that is needed.

  18. Electric arc welding gun

    DOEpatents

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  19. Automated Root Tracking with "Root System Analyzer"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Jin, Meina; Ockert, Charlotte; Bol, Roland; Leitner, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Crucial factors for plant development are water and nutrient availability in soils. Thus, root architecture is a main aspect of plant productivity and needs to be accurately considered when describing root processes. Images of root architecture contain a huge amount of information, and image analysis helps to recover parameters describing certain root architectural and morphological traits. The majority of imaging systems for root systems are designed for two-dimensional images, such as RootReader2, GiA Roots, SmartRoot, EZ-Rhizo, and Growscreen, but most of them are semi-automated and involve mouse-clicks in each root by the user. "Root System Analyzer" is a new, fully automated approach for recovering root architectural parameters from two-dimensional images of root systems. Individual roots can still be corrected manually in a user interface if required. The algorithm starts with a sequence of segmented two-dimensional images showing the dynamic development of a root system. For each image, morphological operators are used for skeletonization. Based on this, a graph representation of the root system is created. A dynamic root architecture model helps to determine which edges of the graph belong to an individual root. The algorithm elongates each root at the root tip and simulates growth confined within the already existing graph representation. The increment of root elongation is calculated assuming constant growth. For each root, the algorithm finds all possible paths and elongates the root in the direction of the optimal path. In this way, each edge of the graph is assigned to one or more coherent roots. Image sequences of root systems are handled in such a way that the previous image is used as a starting point for the current image. The algorithm is implemented in a set of Matlab m-files. Output of Root System Analyzer is a data structure that includes for each root an identification number, the branching order, the time of emergence, the parent

  20. Root gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, P. H.

    1995-01-01

    When a plant root is reoriented within the gravity field, it responds by initiating a curvature which eventually results in vertical growth. Gravity sensing occurs primarily in the root tip. It may involve amyloplast sedimentation in the columella cells of the root cap, or the detection of forces exerted by the mass of the protoplast on opposite sides of its cell wall. Gravisensing activates a signal transduction cascade which results in the asymmetric redistribution of auxin and apoplastic Ca2+ across the root tip, with accumulation at the bottom side. The resulting lateral asymmetry in Ca2+ and auxin concentration is probably transmitted to the elongation zone where differential cellular elongation occurs until the tip resumes vertical growth. The Cholodny-Went theory proposes that gravity-induced auxin redistribution across a gravistimulated plant organ is responsible for the gravitropic response. However, recent data indicate that the gravity-induced reorientation is more complex, involving both auxin gradient-dependent and auxin gradient-independent events.

  1. Root canal

    MedlinePlus

    Endodontic therapy ... the root of a tooth. Generally, there is pain and swelling in the area. The infection can ... You may have some pain or soreness after the procedure. An over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drug, such as ibuprofen or naproxen, can help relieve ...

  2. TAMA. TIGER Arc Modification Application

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, H.

    1994-06-03

    The application enables the geometric correction of TIGER arcs to a more accurate spatial data set. This is done in a structured automated environment according to Census Bureau guidelines and New Mexico state GIS standards. Arcs may be deleted, added, combined, split, and moved relative to a coverage or image displayed in the background.

  3. Alternating-Polarity Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Brief reversing polarity of welding current greatly improves quality of welds. NASA technical memorandum recounts progress in art of variable-polarity plasma-arc (VPPA) welding, with emphasis on welding of aluminum-alloy tanks. VPPA welders offer important advantages over conventional single-polarity gas/tungsten arc welders.

  4. Arc Reflector For Welding Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.

    1990-01-01

    Arc-light reflector for through-the-torch welding vision system designed expressly for use in welding ducts of small diameter. Cylindrical reflector positioned to reflect light diffusely from welding arc onto nearby surface of workpiece for most advantageous viewing along axis of welding torch.

  5. ArcS, the cognate sensor kinase in an atypical Arc system of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Lassak, Jürgen; Henche, Anna-Lena; Binnenkade, Lucas; Thormann, Kai M

    2010-05-01

    The availability of oxygen is a major environmental factor for many microbes, in particular for bacteria such as Shewanella species, which thrive in redox-stratified environments. One of the best-studied systems involved in mediating the response to changes in environmental oxygen levels is the Arc two-component system of Escherichia coli, consisting of the sensor kinase ArcB and the cognate response regulator ArcA. An ArcA ortholog was previously identified in Shewanella, and as in Escherichia coli, Shewanella ArcA is involved in regulating the response to shifts in oxygen levels. Here, we identified the hybrid sensor kinase SO_0577, now designated ArcS, as the previously elusive cognate sensor kinase of the Arc system in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Phenotypic mutant characterization, transcriptomic analysis, protein-protein interaction, and phosphotransfer studies revealed that the Shewanella Arc system consists of the sensor kinase ArcS, the single phosphotransfer domain protein HptA, and the response regulator ArcA. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that HptA might be a relict of ArcB. Conversely, ArcS is substantially different with respect to overall sequence homologies and domain organizations. Thus, we speculate that ArcS might have adopted the role of ArcB after a loss of the original sensor kinase, perhaps as a consequence of regulatory adaptation to a redox-stratified environment.

  6. The Influence of Contact Space on Arc Commutation Process in Air Circuit Breaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Chunping; Ding, Juwen; Yang, Fei; Dong, Delong; Rong, Mingzhe; Xu, Dan

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a 3D magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) arc simulation model is applied to analyze the arc motion during current interruption in a certain air circuit breaker (ACB). The distributions of pressure, temperature, gas flow and current density of the arc plasma in the arc region are calculated, and the factors influencing the commutation process are analyzed according to the calculated results. Based on the airflow in the arc chamber, the causes of arc commutation asynchrony and the back commutation are investigated. It indicates that a reasonable contact space design is crucial to a successful arc commutation process. To verify the simulation results, the influence of contact space on arc voltage and arc commutation is tested. This research can provide methods and references to the optimization of ACB design. supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (Nos. 2015CB251002, 6132620303) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51221005, 51377128, 51577144), and Science and Technology Project Through Grid State Corporation (No. SGSNKYOOKJJS1501564)

  7. Effect of CO{sub 2} laser irradiation on arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Nobuyuki; Agano, Yasuo; Tsukamoto, Masahiro

    1996-12-31

    Combination welding was performed using a CO{sub 2} laser and MIG arc under various conditions to investigate the effectiveness of combining these two welding methods for high speed welding of thick plates. The penetration depth of combination welding was affected by the assist gas flow rate similar to when laser welding is performed at a low welding speed. Penetration was governed by the laser, while the bead width was governed by the arc. Laser-arc combination welding enabled welding of 12mm thick mild steel at a welding speed of 2000 mm/min with proper selection of the assist gas flow rate and root gap.

  8. Saturn's elusive nightside polar arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radioti, A.; Grodent, D.; Gérard, J.-C.; Milan, S. E.; Fear, R. C.; Jackman, C. M.; Bonfond, B.; Pryor, W.

    2014-09-01

    Nightside polar arcs are some of the most puzzling auroral emissions at Earth. They are features which extend from the nightside auroral oval into the open magnetic field line region (polar cap), and they represent optical signatures of magnetotail dynamics. Here we report the first observation of an arc at Saturn, which is attached at the nightside main oval and extends into the polar cap region, resembling a terrestrial transpolar arc. We show that Earth-like polar arcs can exceptionally occur in a fast rotational and internally influenced magnetosphere such as Saturn's. Finally, we discuss the possibility that the polar arc at Saturn is related to tail reconnection and we address the role of solar wind in the magnetotail dynamics at Saturn.

  9. Laser Assisted Plasma Arc Welding

    SciTech Connect

    FUERSCHBACH,PHILLIP W.

    1999-10-05

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effecter to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (< 1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  10. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, K.N.

    1999-05-18

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

  11. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, Kamal N.

    1999-01-01

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

  12. Enthalpy modulation of a laminar pulsed nitrogen arc jet: time-resolved diagnostics and model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rat, V.; Krowka, J.; Coudert, J. F.

    2015-08-01

    In most studies, plasma spraying of liquid feedstock for ceramic coating elaboration requires limiting the arc motion to obtain stable plasma and to favour homogeneous treatment of nanomaterials. In this chapter, an alternative approach is proposed and consists of using a pulsed arc jet modulating the specific enthalpy in time. The momentum and heat transfers can be controlled provided a synchronous injection of materials is associated with it. The rotational temperatures of the nitrogen arc jet are measured by means of time-resolved optical emission spectroscopy synchronized with the arc voltage. The enthalpy modulation ratio (hmax/hmin) is shown to be close to 2.68. A simplified model of the dynamics of heat transfers is used to interpret diagnostics and highlights a time delay between arc voltage and enthalpy at the nozzle exit due to the characteristic time of heat transfers and residence time of plasma.

  13. Commissioning of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Bedford, James L. Warrington, Alan P.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) involves the simultaneous use of dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) techniques and gantry arcing; appropriate quality assurance is therefore required. This article describes the development and implementation of procedures for commissioning VMAT on a commercial linear accelerator (Elekta PreciseBeam VMAT with MLCi and Beam Modulator heads). Materials and Methods: Tests for beam flatness and symmetry at the variable dose rates required for VMAT were performed. Multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration was investigated using dynamic prescriptions. The cumulative dose delivered by a sliding window aperture was measured and compared with calculated values. Rotational accuracy was evaluated using dynamic prescriptions which required accurate correlated motion of both gantry and MLC leaves. Finally, measured and calculated dose distributions for complete VMAT treatment plans were compared and evaluated. Results: Beam symmetry was found to be better than 3% down to dose rates of 75 MU/min. MLC calibration provided continuity of dose at match planes of better than 4%, which was comparable to interleaf leakage effects. Integrated sliding window doses were within 3% of those calculated. Tests for rotational accuracy showed uniformity of peripheral dose mostly within {+-}4% of local control point dose, or approximately {+-}0.2% of total central dose. A two-arc prostate case showed an absolute dose difference between calculations and measurements of less than 3%, with gamma (3% and 3 mm) of better than 95%. Conclusions: VMAT has been successfully commissioned and has been introduced into clinical use. The Elekta DMLC has also been shown to be suitable for sliding window delivery.

  14. What's Motion Sickness?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes What's Motion Sickness? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Motion Sickness? Print ... motion sickness might get even worse. continue Avoiding Motion Sickness To avoid motion sickness: Put your best ...

  15. Slab detachment of subducted Indo-Australian plate beneath Sunda arc, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Bhaskar; Gahalaut, V. K.

    2011-04-01

    Necking, tearing, slab detachment and subsequently slab loss complicate the subduction zone processes and slab architecture. Based on evidences which include patterns of seismicity, seismic tomography and geochemistry of arc volcanoes, we have identified a horizontal slab tear in the subducted Indo-Australian slab beneath the Sunda arc. It strongly reflects on trench migration, and causes along-strike variations in vertical motion and geochemically distinct subduction-related arc magmatism. We also propose a model for the geodynamic evolution of slab detachment.

  16. Brownian Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavenda, Bernard H.

    1985-01-01

    Explains the phenomenon of Brownian motion, which serves as a mathematical model for random processes. Topics addressed include kinetic theory, Einstein's theory, particle displacement, and others. Points out that observations of the random course of a particle suspended in fluid led to the first accurate measurement of atomic mass. (DH)

  17. Magmatic control along a strike-slip volcanic arc: The central Aeolian arc (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruch, J.; Vezzoli, L.; De Rosa, R.; Di Lorenzo, R.; Acocella, V.

    2016-02-01

    The regional stress field in volcanic areas may be overprinted by that produced by magmatic activity, promoting volcanism and faulting. In particular, in strike-slip settings, the definition of the relationships between the regional stress field and magmatic activity remains elusive. To better understand these relationships, we collected stratigraphic, volcanic, and structural field data along the strike-slip central Aeolian arc (Italy): here the islands of Lipari and Vulcano separate the extensional portion of the arc (to the east) from the contractional one (to the west). We collected >500 measurements of faults, extension fractures, and dikes at 40 sites. Most structures are NNE-SSW to NNW-SSE oriented, eastward dipping, and show almost pure dip-slip motion, consistent with an E-W extension direction, with minor dextral and sinistral shear. Our data highlight six eruptive periods during the last 55 ka, which allow considering both islands as a single magmatic system, in which tectonic and magmatic activities steadily migrated eastward and currently focus on a 10 km long × 2 km wide active segment. Faulting appears to mostly occur in temporal and spatial relation with magmatic events, supporting that most of the observable deformation derives from transient magmatic activity (shorter term, days to months), rather than from steady longer-term regional tectonics (102-104 years). More in general, the central Aeolian case shows how magmatic activity may affect the structure and evolution of volcanic arcs, overprinting any strike-slip motion with magma-induced extension at the surface.

  18. Investigation of the effects of shear on arc-electrode erosion using a modified arc-electrode mass loss model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Bryan T.

    The electrodes are the attachment points for an electric arc where electrons and positive ions enter and leave the gas, creating a flow of current. Electrons enter the gas at the cathode and are removed at the anode. Electrons then flow out through the leads on the anode and are replenished from the power supply through the leads on the cathode. Electric arc attachment to the electrode surface causes intensive heating and subsequent melting and vaporization. At that point a multitude of factors can contribute to mass loss, to include vaporization (boiling), material removal via shear forces, chemical reactions, evaporation, and ejection of material in jets due to pressure effects. If these factors were more thoroughly understood and could be modeled, this knowledge would guide the development of an electrode design with minimal erosion. An analytic model was developed by a previous researcher that models mass loss by melting, evaporation and boiling with a moving arc attachment point. This pseudo one-dimensional model includes surface heat flux in periodic cycles of heating and cooling to model motion of a spinning arc in an annular electrode where the arc periodically returns to the same spot. This model, however, does not account for removal of material due to shear or pressure induced effects, or the effects of chemical reactions. As a result of this, the model under-predicts material removal by about 50%. High velocity air flowing over an electrode will result in a shear force which has the potential to remove molten material as the arc melts the surface on its path around the electrode. In order to study the effects of shear on mass loss rate, the model from this previous investigator has been altered to include this mass loss mechanism. The results of this study have shown that shear is a viable mechanism for mass loss in electrodes and can account for the mismatch between theoretical and experimental rates determined by previous investigators. The results of

  19. The use of RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc therapy to deliver stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy to intracranial and extracranial targets.

    PubMed

    Roa, Dante E; Schiffner, Daniel C; Zhang, Juying; Dietrich, Salam N; Kuo, Jeffrey V; Wong, Jason; Ramsinghani, Nilam S; Al-Ghazi, Muthana S A L

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-three targets in 16 patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) were analyzed in terms of dosimetric homogeneity, target conformity, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, monitor unit (MU) usage, and beam-on time per fraction using RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) vs. multifield sliding-window intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Patients underwent computed tomography simulation with site-specific immobilization. Magnetic resonance imaging fusion and optical tracking were incorporated as clinically indicated. Treatment planning was performed using Eclipse v8.6 to generate sliding-window IMRT and 1-arc and 2-arc RapidArc plans. Dosimetric parameters used for target analysis were RTOG conformity index (CI(RTOG)), homogeneity index (HI(RTOG)), inverse Paddick Conformity Index (PCI), D(mean) and D5-D95. OAR sparing was analyzed in terms of D(max) and D(mean). Treatment delivery was evaluated based on measured beam-on times delivered on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator and recorded MU values. Dosimetric conformity, homogeneity, and OAR sparing were comparable between IMRT, 1-arc RapidArc and 2-arc RapidArc plans. Mean beam-on times ± SD for IMRT and 1-arc and 2-arc treatments were 10.5 ± 7.3, 2.6 ± 1.6, and 3.0 ± 1.1 minutes, respectively. Mean MUs were 3041, 1774, and 1676 for IMRT, 1-, and 2-arc plans, respectively. Although dosimetric conformity, homogeneity, and OAR sparing were similar between these techniques, SRS and SBRT fractions treated with RapidArc were delivered with substantially less beam-on time and fewer MUs than IMRT. The rapid delivery of SRS and SBRT with RapidArc improved workflow on the linac with these otherwise time-consuming treatments and limited the potential for intrafraction organ and patient motion, which can cause significant dosimetric errors. These clinically important advantages make image-guided RapidArc useful in the delivery of SRS and SBRT to

  20. The use of RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc therapy to deliver stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy to intracranial and extracranial targets

    SciTech Connect

    Roa, Dante E.; Schiffner, Daniel C.; Zhang Juying; Dietrich, Salam N.; Kuo, Jeffrey V.; Wong, Jason; Ramsinghani, Nilam S.; Al-Ghazi, Muthana S.A.L.

    2012-10-01

    Twenty-three targets in 16 patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) were analyzed in terms of dosimetric homogeneity, target conformity, organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing, monitor unit (MU) usage, and beam-on time per fraction using RapidArc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) vs. multifield sliding-window intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Patients underwent computed tomography simulation with site-specific immobilization. Magnetic resonance imaging fusion and optical tracking were incorporated as clinically indicated. Treatment planning was performed using Eclipse v8.6 to generate sliding-window IMRT and 1-arc and 2-arc RapidArc plans. Dosimetric parameters used for target analysis were RTOG conformity index (CI{sub RTOG}), homogeneity index (HI{sub RTOG}), inverse Paddick Conformity Index (PCI), D{sub mean} and D5-D95. OAR sparing was analyzed in terms of D{sub max} and D{sub mean}. Treatment delivery was evaluated based on measured beam-on times delivered on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator and recorded MU values. Dosimetric conformity, homogeneity, and OAR sparing were comparable between IMRT, 1-arc RapidArc and 2-arc RapidArc plans. Mean beam-on times {+-} SD for IMRT and 1-arc and 2-arc treatments were 10.5 {+-} 7.3, 2.6 {+-} 1.6, and 3.0 {+-} 1.1 minutes, respectively. Mean MUs were 3041, 1774, and 1676 for IMRT, 1-, and 2-arc plans, respectively. Although dosimetric conformity, homogeneity, and OAR sparing were similar between these techniques, SRS and SBRT fractions treated with RapidArc were delivered with substantially less beam-on time and fewer MUs than IMRT. The rapid delivery of SRS and SBRT with RapidArc improved workflow on the linac with these otherwise time-consuming treatments and limited the potential for intrafraction organ and patient motion, which can cause significant dosimetric errors. These clinically important advantages make image-guided RapidArc useful in the delivery

  1. The 2013 Crete (Hellenic Arc) Earthquake Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakostas, V. G.; Papadimitriou, E. E.; Vallianatos, F.

    2014-12-01

    The western Hellenic Arc is a well known place of active interplate deformation, where the convergence motion vector is perpendicular to the subduction front. On 12 October 2013 this area was hit by a strong (Mw=6.7) earthquake, occurred on a thrust fault onto the coupled part of the overriding and descending plates, with the compression axis being oriented in the direction of plate convergence. This was the first strong (M>6.0) event to have occurred onto this segment of the descending slab, which has accommodated the largest (M8.3) known earthquake in the Mediterranean area, and to be recorded by the Hellenic Unified Seismological Network (HUSN) that has been considerably improved in the last five years. The first 2-days relocated seismicity shows activation of the upper part of the descending slab, downdip of the plate interface and forming a relatively narrow aftershock area on map view. The less densely visited by aftershocks area, where the main shock is also encompassed, is considered as the high-slip area along the downdip portion of the subducting plane. Dense concentration of the intraslab aftershocks are probably due to the increase of static stress generated by the main shock. A spectacular feature of the aftershock activity concerns the lateral extension of the slipped area, which appears very sharply defined. This provides evidence on localized coupling and aseismically creeping areas, explaining the low coupling ratio in the Hellenic Arc, as it derives from comparison between relative plate motion and seismic energy release. Elucidating the issue of how far the associated large-slip zone might be extended along the plate interface during the main rupture is crucial in assessing future earthquake hazards from subduction events in the study area. This research has been co-funded by the European Union (European Social Fund) and Greek national resources under the framework of the "THALES Program: SEISMO FEAR HELLARC" project.

  2. Arc spot grouping: An entanglement of arc spot cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kajita, Shin; Hwangbo, Dogyun; Ohno, Noriyasu; Tsventoukh, Mikhail M.; Barengolts, Sergey A.

    2014-12-21

    In recent experiments, clear transitions in velocity and trail width of an arc spot initiated on nanostructured tungsten were observed on the boundary of the thick and thin nanostructured layer regions. The velocity of arc spot was significantly decreased on the thick nanostructured region. It was suggested that the grouping decreased the velocity of arc spot. In this study, we try to explain the phenomena using a simple random walk model that has properties of directionality and self-avoidance. And grouping feature was added by installing an attractive force between spot cells with dealing with multi-spots. It was revealed that an entanglement of arc spot cells decreased the spot velocity, and spot cells tend to stamp at the same location many times.

  3. Plasma arc welding torch having means for vortexing plasma gas exiting the welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A plasma arc welding torch is described wherein a plasma gas is directed through the body of the welding torch and out of the body across the tip of the welding electrode disposed at the forward end of the body. The plasma gas is provided with a vortexing motion prior to exiting the body by a vortex motion imparting member which is mounted in an orifice housing member and carried in the forward portion of the torch body. The orifice housing member is provided with an orifice of an predetermined diameter through which the electric arc and the plasma gas exits.

  4. Temporal evolution characteristics of an annular-mode gliding arc discharge in a vortex flow

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Tian-Liang; Liu, Jing-Lin; Li, Xiao-Song; Liu, Jin-Bao; Song, Yuan-Hong; Xu, Yong; Zhu, Ai-Min

    2014-05-15

    An annular-mode gliding arc discharge powered by a 50 Hz alternating current (ac) supply was studied in a vortex flow of dry and humid air. Its temporal evolution characteristics were investigated by electrical measurement, temporally resolved imaging, and temporally resolved optical emission spectroscopic measurements. Three discharge stages of arc-ignition, arc-gliding, and arc-extinction were clearly observed in each half-cycle of the discharge. During the arc-gliding stage, the intensity of light emission from the arc root at the cathode was remarkably higher than that at other areas. The spectral intensity of N{sub 2}(C{sup 3}Π{sub u}−B{sup 3}Π{sub g}) during the arc-ignition stage was much higher than that during the arc-gliding stage, which was contrary to the temporal evolutions of spectral intensities for N{sub 2}{sup +}(B{sup 2}Σ{sub u}{sup +}−X{sup 2}Σ{sub g}{sup +}) and OH(A{sup 2}Σ{sup +}−X{sup 2}Π{sub i}). Temporally resolved vibrational and rotational temperatures of N{sub 2} were also presented and decreased with increasing the water vapor content.

  5. Arc of opportunity.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Adam Vai

    2011-07-01

    Born in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, the author had a 20 year career in diplomacy, political affairs, and development policy analysis at the Pacific Islands Forum, the United Nations in New York; the Prime Minister's Department in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and in the Foreign Ministry of PNG. He has also been involved in theatre for over a decade in PNG, and participated in a three-month program at the Eugene O'Neill Theatre Center in Connecticut, USA. He is currently the Business Development Manager at the Torres Strait Regional Authority (Commonwealth) on Thursday Island. Since 1975 the Australian government's overseas development policy has supported various sectoral programs in its neighbouring countries, in particular Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. The "creative" field has not been prominent in this strategy. While natural resources and the sports sectors have gained much greater attention, in terms of being viable international commercial enterprises, the arts, have remained stagnant. In this paper the need for joint programs genuinely supporting "wellbeing" and promoting social enterprise throughout the "arc of opportunity" is described to harness Melanesian creativity to compete successfully in world-markets, starting with penetration of the largest economy at its door-step: Australia.

  6. Arc of opportunity.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Adam Vai

    2011-07-01

    Born in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, the author had a 20 year career in diplomacy, political affairs, and development policy analysis at the Pacific Islands Forum, the United Nations in New York; the Prime Minister's Department in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and in the Foreign Ministry of PNG. He has also been involved in theatre for over a decade in PNG, and participated in a three-month program at the Eugene O'Neill Theatre Center in Connecticut, USA. He is currently the Business Development Manager at the Torres Strait Regional Authority (Commonwealth) on Thursday Island. Since 1975 the Australian government's overseas development policy has supported various sectoral programs in its neighbouring countries, in particular Papua New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. The "creative" field has not been prominent in this strategy. While natural resources and the sports sectors have gained much greater attention, in terms of being viable international commercial enterprises, the arts, have remained stagnant. In this paper the need for joint programs genuinely supporting "wellbeing" and promoting social enterprise throughout the "arc of opportunity" is described to harness Melanesian creativity to compete successfully in world-markets, starting with penetration of the largest economy at its door-step: Australia. PMID:21878026

  7. Percussive arc welding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hollar, Jr., Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    A percussive arc welding apparatus includes a generally cylindrical actuator body having front and rear end portions and defining an internal recess. The front end of the body includes an opening. A solenoid assembly is provided in the rear end portion in the internal recess of the body, and an actuator shaft assembly is provided in the front end portion in the internal recess of the actuator body. The actuator shaft assembly includes a generally cylindrical actuator block having first and second end portions, and an actuator shaft having a front end extending through the opening in the actuator body, and the rear end connected to the first end portion of the actuator block. The second end portion of the actuator block is in operational engagement with the solenoid shaft by a non-rigid connection to reduce the adverse rebound effects of the actuator shaft. A generally transversely extending pin is rigidly secured to the rear end of the shaft. One end of the pin is received in a slot in the nose housing sleeve to prevent rotation of the actuator shaft during operation of the apparatus.

  8. [Motion sickness].

    PubMed

    Taillemite, J P; Devaulx, P; Bousquet, F

    1997-01-01

    Motion sickness is a general term covering sea-sickness, car-sickness, air-sickness, and space-sickness. Symptoms can occur when a person is exposed to unfamiliar movement whether real or simulated. Despite progress in the technology and comfort of modern transportation (planes, boats, and overland vehicles), a great number of travelers still experience motion sickness. Bouts are characterized by an initial phase of mild discomfort followed by neurologic and gastro-intestinal manifestations. The delay in onset depends on specific circumstances and individual susceptibility. Attacks are precipitated by conflicting sensory, visual, and vestibular signals but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Most medications used for prevention and treatment (e.g. anticholinergics and antihistamines) induce unwanted sedation. Furthermore no one drug is completely effective or preventive under all conditions.

  9. Origin of Enriched Geochemical Signatures in Continental Arc Rocks by Antithetic Subduction of Continental Lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazner, A. F.; Brandon, M. T.

    2002-12-01

    The source materials for magmas in continental arcs are not well known. Magmas are typically assumed to be derived from the subducted slab, subducted sediment, and mantle wedge, but some continental arcs have isotopic signatures that are inconsistent with these sources. For example, a large volume of the Sierra Nevada batholith consists of rocks that have initial Sr ratios of about 0.706-0.708 and ɛNd values ranging from -3 to -8. Late Cenozoic volcanic rocks erupted through the batholith, and their entrained xenoliths, have similar isotopic compositions. These characteristics are inconsistent with derivation from only the sources above and are most easily explained by derivation from enriched continental lithospheric mantle. However, there was never enough lithospheric mantle under the arc to produce the observed volume of enriched arc rocks; mass balance fails by one or two orders of magnitude, and lithosphere cannot flow by viscous processes to provide material to the arc. A possible solution to this problem lies in kinematic mass balance of the arc system. In many continental arcs (e.g., Cenozoic Andes, Mesozoic northern Cordillera and Sierra Nevada), thrust faults have carried the arc at least 100-200 km toward the craton. This motion requires moving a comparable amount of sub-detachment lower crust and mantle toward the arc and produces a tremendous cross-sectional balance problem. Geologic field studies and geodynamic modeling indicate that this antithetic subduction feeds continental lithosphere into the convecting mantle wedge where it can contribute to magma genesis. This process provides a large volume of enriched and probably fertile continental lithospheric mantle to the arc system and may account for the unusual geochemical signatures of some arc rocks.

  10. Adhesion strategy and early bond strengths of glass-fiber posts luted into root canals.

    PubMed

    Faria-e-Silva, André Luis; Mendonça, Adriano Augusto Melo; Garcez, Rosa Maria Viana de Bragança; Oliveira, Aline da Silva de; Moreira, Andressa Goicochea; Moraes, Rafael Ratto de

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of coinitiator solutions and self-adhesive resin cement on the early retention of glass-fiber posts. Cylindrical glass-fiber posts were luted into 40 incisor roots with different adhesion strategies (n = 10): SB2, Single Bond 2 + conventional resin cement (RelyX ARC); AP, Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus (SBMP) activator + primer + ARC; APC, SBMP activator + primer + catalyst + ARC; and UNI, self-adhesive cement (RelyX Unicem). Pull-out bond strength results at 10 min after cementation showed APC > UNI > SB2 = AP (P < 0.05). The adhesion strategy significantly affected early bonding to root canals.

  11. Tracking Motions Of Manually Controlled Welding Torches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Carolyn; Gangl, Ken

    1996-01-01

    Techniques for measuring motions of manually controlled welding torches undergoing development. Positions, orientations, and velocities determined in real time during manual arc welding. Makes possible to treat manual welding processes more systematically so manual welds made more predictable, especially in cases in which mechanical strengths and other properties of welded parts highly sensitive to heat inputs and thus to velocities and orientations of welding torches.

  12. Igniting flare-up events in Cordilleran arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducea, Mihai N.; Barton, Mark D.

    2007-11-01

    High-flux pulses of magmatism that make up most of the exposed North American Cordilleran arcs are derived primarily from upper plate lithospheric source materials, and not the mantle wedge as most models would predict, based on a compilation of thousands of previously published Sr, Nd, and O isotopic data. Mass balance calculations show that no more than 50% of that mass can be mantle-derived. Flare-ups must have fundamentally developed simultaneously with crustal/lithospheric thickening, thus implying a connection. Subduction erosion from the trench side, and retroarc shortening from the foreland side are the main tectonic shortening processes that operate in conjunction with high flux magmatism during subduction, and therefore are likely triggers for flare-up events in arc. These arcs represent the sites of crustal differentiation, and thus contribute to net continental growth, only if dense residual lower crust was returned to the convective mantle. Isotopic data shown here suggest that if convective removal of batholithic roots takes place, it must be a consequence and not a cause of episodic flare-ups. The Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex in South America may be the most recent continental arc segment in flare-up mode.

  13. Regional bond strengths to root canal dentin of fiber posts luted with three cementation systems.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Giovana Mongruel; Gomes, Osnara Maria Mongruel; Reis, Alessandra; Gomes, João Carlos; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Calixto, Abraham Lincoln

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of the cementation system on the regional push-out bond strength and failure pattern of fiber posts to radicular dentin. The roots of 48 extracted human incisors were prepared and divided into 3 groups (n = 16), according to the cementation system: AdperScotchbond Multi-Purpose + resin cement RelyX ARC (SBMP+ARC); Adper SingleBond 2 + RelyX ARC (SB+ARC) and; RelyX U100 self-adhesive resin cement (U100). The posts were cemented as per manufacturer's instructions for each cementation system. After 1 week, the roots were sectioned transversely into 6 discs. Two discs were obtained from the cervical, middle and apical thirds and the push-out test was carried out. The failure pattern was examined on all debonded specimens. The data were analyzed by two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's test. When U100 was used, no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) was observed among the different root regions. Statistically higher push-out bond strength values were detected in the cervical third for SBMP+ARC and SB+ARC (p<0.05). The U100 showed significantly more mixed failures than SBMP+ARC in the apical third (p<0.05). In conclusion, the self-adhesive cement RelyX U100 was the only cement not sensitive to the root canal region.

  14. Using SHRIMP zircon dating to unravel tectonothermal events in arc environments. The early Palaeozoic arc of NW Iberia revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abati, J.; Castineiras, P.G.; Arenas, R.; Fernandez-Suarez, J.; Barreiro, J.G.; Wooden, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Dating of zircon cores and rims from granulites developed in a shear zone provides insights into the complex relationship between magmatism and metamorphism in the deep roots of arc environments. The granulites belong to the uppermost allochthonous terrane of the NW Iberian Massif, which forms part of a Cambro-Ordovician magmatic arc developed in the peri-Gondwanan realm. The obtained zircon ages confirm that voluminous calc-alkaline magmatism peaked around 500Ma and was shortly followed by granulite facies metamorphism accompanied by deformation at c. 480Ma, giving a time framework for crustal heating, regional metamorphism, deformation and partial melting, the main processes that control the tectonothermal evolution of arc systems. Traces of this arc can be discontinuously followed in different massifs throughout the European Variscan Belt, and we propose that the uppermost allochthonous units of the NW Iberian Massif, together with the related terranes in Europe, constitute an independent and coherent terrane that drifted away from northern Gondwana prior to the Variscan collisional orogenesis. ?? 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. A simple kinetic theory of auroral arc scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Y. T.

    1986-01-01

    A kinetic theory of the origins of the auroral arc scale spectrum is presented in this paper. The conceptual basis of the theory is current conservation in a turbulent plasma at the magnetospheric equatorial region in which a field-aligned current is generated and the local electrostatic potential structure is forced to adjust to the presence of the field-aligned current. This simple model uses an ad hoc Ohm's law relationship between the perpendicular current and the perpendicular electric field, but with a negative conductance in the generator region so that J(perpendicular) x E(perpendicular) is less than 0. An exact solution of a simple model of the concept yields a bistatic auroral generator for which multiple-arc formation is predicted if the field-aligned current exceeds a critical value. The predicted scale spectrum is inversely proportional to the square root of the field-aligned current strength spectrum.

  16. A role for actin arcs in the leading edge advance of migrating cells

    PubMed Central

    Burnette, Dylan T.; Manley, Suliana; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Sougrat, Rachid; Davidson, Michael W.; Kachar, Bechara; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The migration of epithelial cells requires coordination of two actin modules at the leading edge: one in the lamellipodium and one in the lamella. How the two modules connect mechanistically to regulate directed edge motion is not understood. Using a combination of live-cell imaging and photoactivation approaches, we demonstrate that the actin network of the lamellipodium evolves spatio-temporally into the lamella. This occurs during the retraction phase of edge motion when myosin II redistributes to the cell edge and condenses the lamellipodial-actin into an arc-like bundle (i.e., actin arc) parallel to the edge. The newly formed actin arc moves rearward and couples to focal adhesions as it enters the lamella. We propose net edge extension occurs by nascent focal adhesions advancing the site at which new actin arcs slow down and form the base of the next protrusion event. The actin arc thus serves as a structural element underlying the temporal and spatial connection between the lamellipodium and lamella to drive directed cell motion. PMID:21423177

  17. High pressure neon arc lamp

    DOEpatents

    Sze, Robert C.; Bigio, Irving J.

    2003-07-15

    A high pressure neon arc lamp and method of using the same for photodynamic therapies is provided. The high pressure neon arc lamp includes a housing that encloses a quantity of neon gas pressurized to about 500 Torr to about 22,000 Torr. At each end of the housing the lamp is connected by electrodes and wires to a pulse generator. The pulse generator generates an initial pulse voltage to breakdown the impedance of the neon gas. Then the pulse generator delivers a current through the neon gas to create an electrical arc that emits light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. A method for activating a photosensitizer is provided. Initially, a photosensitizer is administered to a patient and allowed time to be absorbed into target cells. Then the high pressure neon arc lamp is used to illuminate the target cells with red light having wavelengths from about 620 nanometers to about 645 nanometers. The red light activates the photosensitizers to start a chain reaction that may involve oxygen free radicals to destroy the target cells. In this manner, a high pressure neon arc lamp that is inexpensive and efficiently generates red light useful in photodynamic therapy is provided.

  18. Three-dimensional, Time-Resolved, Intrafraction Motion Monitoring Throughout Stereotactic Liver Radiation Therapy on a Conventional Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Worm, Esben S.; Høyer, Morten; Fledelius, Walter; Poulsen, Per R.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the time-resolved 3-dimensional (3D) internal motion throughout stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of tumors in the liver using standard x-ray imagers of a conventional linear accelerator. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with implanted gold markers received 11 treatment courses of 3-fraction SBRT in a stereotactic body-frame on a conventional linear accelerator. Two pretreatment and 1 posttreatment cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans were acquired during each fraction. The CBCT projection images were used to estimate the internal 3D marker motion during CBCT acquisition with 11-Hz resolution by a monoscopic probability-based method. Throughout the treatment delivery by conformal or volumetric modulated arc fields, simultaneous MV portal imaging (8 Hz) and orthogonal kV imaging (5 Hz) were applied to determine the 3D marker motion using either MV/kV triangulation or the monoscopic method when marker segmentation was unachievable in either MV or kV images. The accuracy of monoscopic motion estimation was quantified by also applying monoscopic estimation as a test for all treatments during which MV/kV triangulation was possible. Results: Root-mean-square deviations between monoscopic estimations and triangulations were less than 1.0 mm. The mean 3D intrafraction and intrafield motion ranges during liver SBRT were 17.6 mm (range, 5.6-39.5 mm) and 11.3 mm (2.1-35.5mm), respectively. The risk of large intrafraction baseline shifts correlated with intrafield respiratory motion range. The mean 3D intrafractional marker displacement relative to the first CBCT was 3.4 mm (range, 0.7-14.5 mm). The 3D displacements exceeded 8.8 mm 10% of the time. Conclusions: Highly detailed time-resolved internal 3D motion was determined throughout liver SBRT using standard imaging equipment. Considerable intrafraction motion was observed. The demonstrated methods provide a widely available approach for motion monitoring that, combined with motion

  19. Orbit Determination Using SLR Data for STSAT-2C: Short-arc Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Rok; Park, Eunseo; Kucharski, Daniel; Lim, Hyung-Chul

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we present the results of orbit determination (OD) using satellite laser ranging (SLR) data for the Science and Technology Satellite (STSAT)-2C by a short-arc analysis. For SLR data processing, the NASA/GSFC GEODYN II software with one year (2013/04 - 2014/04) of normal point observations is used. As there is only an extremely small quantity of SLR observations of STSAT-2C and they are sparsely distribution, the selection of the arc length and the estimation intervals for the atmospheric drag coefficients and the empirical acceleration parameters was made on an arc-to-arc basis. For orbit quality assessment, the post-fit residuals of each short-arc and orbit overlaps of arcs are investigated. The OD results show that the weighted root mean square post-fit residuals of short-arcs are less than 1 cm, and the average 1-day orbit overlaps are superior to 50/600/900 m for the radial/cross-track/along-track components. These results demonstrate that OD for STSAT-2C was successfully achieved with cm-level range precision. However its orbit quality did not reach the same level due to the availability of few and sparse measurement conditions. From a mission analysis viewpoint, obtaining the results of OD for STSAT-2C is significant for generating enhanced orbit predictions for more frequent tracking.

  20. Probe characterization of high-current driven metal plasma in a vacuum-arc rail gun

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayan, T.; Roychowdhury, P.; Venkatramani, N.

    2004-10-15

    The characteristics of metal plasma launched by high-current electric arc in a vacuum-arc rail gun are determined by employing electrical and magnetic probes. These measurements are validated by results from theoretical simulations. The arc coupled nonlinear circuit equations are solved simultaneously with the Newtonian arc motion and revealed the undercritically damped behavior of the arc current identical to the arc-current signal recorded by the Rogowski magnetic probe. Similarly the arc velocity and displacement derived from the signatures of B-dot probes are shown to concur closely with the results of JxB propulsion from simulation. The heating of plasma is formulated in a three-electron population regime with direct arc energy coupling through magnetohydrodynamic, ion-acoustic, Coulomb, and neutral interactions. This results in high temperature (T{sub e}) of hundreds of eV in the arc as revealed by the simulation. Hence T{sub e} of the rapidly cooling and equilibrating plasma that emerged from the muzzle is high around 80-90 eV, which is confirmed by Langmuir electric probe measurements. Density n{sub e} of this metal plasma is shown to be in the range 4x10{sup 21}-6x10{sup 21} m{sup -3} and includes multiple ion charge states. The exit velocity of the plasma measured by a pair of Langmuir probes is close to 2.2x10{sup 6} cm/s and matched well with the arc velocity determined by the B-dot probes and the results from simulation.

  1. Welding arc length control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a welding arc length control system. The system includes, in its broadest aspects, a power source for providing welding current, a power amplification system, a motorized welding torch assembly connected to the power amplification system, a computer, and current pick up means. The computer is connected to the power amplification system for storing and processing arc weld current parameters and non-linear voltage-ampere characteristics. The current pick up means is connected to the power source and to the welding torch assembly for providing weld current data to the computer. Thus, the desired arc length is maintained as the welding current is varied during operation, maintaining consistent weld penetration.

  2. Flow Dynamics in Arc Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Lowke, John J.; Tanaka, Manabu

    2008-02-21

    The state of the art for numerical computations has now advanced so that the capability is within sight of calculating weld shapes for any arc current, welding gas, welding material or configuration. Inherent in these calculations is 'flow dynamics' applied to plasma flow in the arc and liquid metal flow in the weld pool. Examples of predictions which are consistent with experiment, are discussed for (1) conventional tungsten inert gas welding, (2) the effect of a fraction of a percent of sulfur in steel, which can increase weld depth by more than a factor of two through changes in the surface tension, (3) the effect of a flux, which can produce increased weld depth due to arc constriction, (4) use of aluminium instead of steel, when the much larger thermal conductivity of aluminium greatly reduces the weld depth and (5) addition of a few percent of hydrogen to argon, which markedly increases weld depth.

  3. Flow Dynamics in Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowke, John J.; Tanaka, Manabu

    2008-02-01

    The state of the art for numerical computations has now advanced so that the capability is within sight of calculating weld shapes for any arc current, welding gas, welding material or configuration. Inherent in these calculations is "flow dynamics" applied to plasma flow in the arc and liquid metal flow in the weld pool. Examples of predictions which are consistent with experiment, are discussed for (1) conventional tungsten inert gas welding (2) the effect of a fraction of a percent of sulfur in steel, which can increase weld depth by more than a factor of two through changes in the surface tension (3) the effect of a flux, which can produce increased weld depth due to arc constriction (4) use of aluminium instead of steel, when the much larger thermal conductivity of aluminium greatly reduces the weld depth and (5) addition of a few percent of hydrogen to argon, which markedly increases weld depth.

  4. Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    MOOG, Inc. supplies hydraulic actuators for the Space Shuttle. When MOOG learned NASA was interested in electric actuators for possible future use, the company designed them with assistance from Marshall Space Flight Center. They also decided to pursue the system's commercial potential. This led to partnership with InterActive Simulation, Inc. for production of cabin flight simulators for museums, expositions, etc. The resulting products, the Magic Motion Simulator 30 Series, are the first electric powered simulators. Movements are computer-guided, including free fall to heighten the sense of moving through space. A projection system provides visual effects, and the 11 speakers of a digital laser based sound system add to the realism. The electric actuators are easier to install, have lower operating costs, noise, heat and staff requirements. The U.S. Space & Rocket Center and several other organizations have purchased the simulators.

  5. Late Neogene kinematics of intra-arc oblique shear zones: The Petilia-Rizzuto Fault Zone (Calabrian Arc, Central Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dijk, J. P.

    1994-10-01

    The kinematics of intra-arc shear zones play a key role in the secondary shaping of orogenic arcs such as the Calabrian Arc (central Mediterranean). Comparison of the Neogene structural development of the Petilia-Rizzuto Fault Zone and the basement structure of the bordering Sila massif reveals that the fault zone is the surface expression of a deep NW-SE trending sinistral crustal oblique shear zone. This shear zone continues over a length of more than 130 km across the northern segment of the Calabrian Arc and shows a post-Eocene sinistral displacement of about 50 km. The late Neogene forearc basin development and syndepositional tectonics along the fault zone are reconstructed in great detail by analyzing the middle Miocene-Recent tectonic sequence stratigraphy. A strike-slip cycle can be recognized whereby the subsequent activity of Riedel shears, tensional faults, and P shears, positive flower structures and principle displacement wrench faults, can accurately be traced in time. Observed phenomena are discussed in terms of the activity of a conjugate system of oblique thrust zones within the growing accretionary complex. The evolution of special types of thrust belt basins is illustrated. These include oblique thin-skinned pull-apart basins, oblique rhomboidal "harmonica" basins, and "detached slab" basins (new terms introduced here), evolving one into the other. A new feature illustrated is the recurrent basin inversion which generated passive roof duplexes through back-shear motion and out-of-sequence thrusting along the wedge. The fault patterns and the style of inversion tectonics imply an E-W directed axis of effective compressive stress in this part of the arc. This resulted from an interaction of (1) local E-W directed compression related to a differential displacement of two parallel segments of the arc (generated by the migration to the southeast of the Calabrian Arc and opening of the Tyrrhenian backarc basin); (2) alternating NW-SE directed

  6. A tale of two arcs? Plate tectonics of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) arc using subducted slab constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J. E.; Suppe, J.; Renqi, L.; Kanda, R. V. S.

    2014-12-01

    Published plate reconstructions typically show the Izu-Bonin Marianas arc (IBM) forming as a result of long-lived ~50 Ma Pacific subduction beneath the Philippine Sea. These reconstructions rely on the critical assumption that the Philippine Sea was continuously coupled to the Pacific during the lifetime of the IBM arc. Because of this assumption, significant (up to 1500 km) Pacific trench retreat is required to accommodate the 2000 km of Philippine Sea/IBM northward motion since the Eocene that is constrained by paleomagnetic data. In this study, we have mapped subducted slabs of mantle lithosphere from MITP08 global seismic tomography (Li et al., 2008) and restored them to a model Earth surface to constrain plate tectonic reconstructions. Here we present two subducted slab constraints that call into question current IBM arc reconstructions: 1) The northern and central Marianas slabs form a sub-vertical 'slab wall' down to maximum 1500 km depths in the lower mantle. This slab geometry is best explained by a near-stationary Marianas trench that has remained +/- 250 km E-W of its present-day position since ~45 Ma, and does not support any significant Pacific slab retreat. 2) A vanished ocean is revealed by an extensive swath of sub-horizontal slabs at 700 to 1000 km depths in the lower mantle below present-day Philippine Sea to Papua New Guinea. We call this vanished ocean the 'East Asian Sea'. When placed in an Eocene plate reconstruction, the East Asian Sea fits west of the reconstructed Marianas Pacific trench position and north of the Philippine Sea plate. This implies that the Philippine Sea and Pacific were not adjacent at IBM initiation, but were in fact separated by a lost ocean. Here we propose a new IBM arc reconstruction constrained by subducted slabs mapped under East Asia. At ~50 Ma, the present-day IBM arc initiated at equatorial latitudes from East Asian Sea subduction below the Philippine Sea. A separate arc was formed from Pacific subduction below

  7. Louisville seamount subduction and its implication on mantle flow beneath the central Tonga-Kermadec arc.

    PubMed

    Timm, Christian; Bassett, Daniel; Graham, Ian J; Leybourne, Matthew I; de Ronde, Cornel E J; Woodhead, Jon; Layton-Matthews, Daniel; Watts, Anthony B

    2013-01-01

    Subduction of intraplate seamounts beneath a geochemically depleted mantle wedge provides a seldom opportunity to trace element recycling and mantle flow in subduction zones. Here we present trace element and Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of lavas from the central Tonga-Kermadec arc, west of the contemporary Louisville-Tonga trench intersection, to provide new insights into the effects of Louisville seamount subduction. Elevated (206)Pb/(204)Pb, (208)Pb/(204)Pb, (86)Sr/(87)Sr in lavas from the central Tonga-Kermadec arc front are consistent with localized input of subducted alkaline Louisville material (lavas and volcaniclastics) into sub-arc partial melts. Furthermore, absolute Pacific Plate motion models indicate an anticlockwise rotation in the subducted Louisville seamount chain that, combined with estimates of the timing of fluid release from the subducting slab, suggests primarily trench-normal mantle flow beneath the central Tonga-Kermadec arc system. PMID:23591887

  8. Louisville seamount subduction and its implication on mantle flow beneath the central Tonga-Kermadec arc.

    PubMed

    Timm, Christian; Bassett, Daniel; Graham, Ian J; Leybourne, Matthew I; de Ronde, Cornel E J; Woodhead, Jon; Layton-Matthews, Daniel; Watts, Anthony B

    2013-01-01

    Subduction of intraplate seamounts beneath a geochemically depleted mantle wedge provides a seldom opportunity to trace element recycling and mantle flow in subduction zones. Here we present trace element and Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of lavas from the central Tonga-Kermadec arc, west of the contemporary Louisville-Tonga trench intersection, to provide new insights into the effects of Louisville seamount subduction. Elevated (206)Pb/(204)Pb, (208)Pb/(204)Pb, (86)Sr/(87)Sr in lavas from the central Tonga-Kermadec arc front are consistent with localized input of subducted alkaline Louisville material (lavas and volcaniclastics) into sub-arc partial melts. Furthermore, absolute Pacific Plate motion models indicate an anticlockwise rotation in the subducted Louisville seamount chain that, combined with estimates of the timing of fluid release from the subducting slab, suggests primarily trench-normal mantle flow beneath the central Tonga-Kermadec arc system.

  9. Dynamics of cathode spots in low-pressure arc plasma removing oxide layer on steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Z. L.; Yang, K.; Liu, H. X.; Zhang, Y. C.; Li, H.; Zhu, X. D.

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of cathode spots has been investigated in low-pressure arc plasma for removing oxide layer on low carbon steel surfaces. The motion of cathode spots was observed with a high speed camera, and the arc voltage was analyzed by fast Fourier transform. The spots move on clean steel surface as a random walk, and the low-frequency components dominated the voltage waveform. However, the spots on steel surfaces with oxide layer tend to burn on the rim of the eroded area formed in the previous arcing, and the low-frequency components decrease correspondingly. The "color" of the colored random noise for arc voltage varies from the approximate brown noise for clean steel surface to pink noise for thick oxide layer, where the edge effect of boundary is considered to play a significant role.

  10. Root cause analysis following nephrectomy after extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL).

    PubMed

    Cahill, Katie; Cruz, Eneida; Guilbert, Mary Beth; Oser, Meg O'Toole

    2008-12-01

    An adverse event after a routine extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy procedure set into motion a root cause analysis methodology to decipher why and how the event occurred and offer a solution to prevent it from happening again. The process of performing a root cause analysis is discussed in detail.

  11. Extended electrode technique. [gas metal arc welding of metal plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaper, V. D.; Pollack, A.

    1972-01-01

    The extended electrode technique is a unique welding process which utilizes manual gas-metal-arc (GMAW) semi-automatic equipment and close, square butt joints to effectively produce a weld. The technique takes advantage of the resistance heating of the electode extension to effect the root pass. Weldments as large as 72-X30-X2-inch have been fabricated with this technique under normal shipyard welding conditions. Mechanical properties and explosion bulge tests indicate that satisfactory results are obtained with this process. Potential savings of approximately 50 percent can be achieved in flat welding and repair of heavy structural steel members.

  12. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding and Plasma Arc Cutting. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    This welding curriculum guide treats two topics in detail: the care of tungsten electrodes and the entire concept of contamination control and the hafnium electrode and its importance in dual-air cutting systems that use compressed shop air for plasma arc cutting activities. The guide contains three units of instruction that cover the following…

  13. TOPICAL REVIEW: High-speed imaging in plasma arc cutting: a review and new developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, V.; Concetti, A.; Ghedini, E.; Dallavalle, S.; Vancini, M.

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: (i) to review all the achievements in our understanding of the phenomena related to plasma arc cutting (PAC) technology by means of high-speed camera (HSC) imaging and flow visualization techniques and (ii) to report on new studies that make use of recent and advanced instrumentation for HSC diagnostics, also highlighting some previously uncovered research subjects. In the last decade HSC imaging and flow visualization techniques have progressed considerably as a powerful qualitative diagnostic technique for investigating some of the fundamental phenomena typically occurring in PAC technology. More recently, HSC imaging has also been used to investigate pre-cut phases in PAC analysis, such as pilot arcing and piercing of mild steel and stainless steel plates with dual gas torches in various operating conditions, providing new insight into the process and highlighting some interesting plasma behaviour. HSC imaging of pilot arcing has been used to investigate the influence of the arc current, plasma pressure and swirl strength on the shape of the arc, on the type of the rotational motion of its attachment on the nozzle tip and to track trajectories and velocities of hafnium particles emitted from the electrode insert during that phase. HSC imaging can also highlight the behaviour of the arc during piercing phases and the possible presence of short non-destructive double arcing, otherwise impossible to recognize.

  14. Unzipping of the volcano arc, Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, R.J.; Smoot, N.C.; Rubin, M.

    1984-01-01

    A working hypothesis for the recent evolution of the southern Volcano Arc, Japan, is presented which calls upon a northward-progressing sundering of the arc in response to a northward-propagating back-arc basin extensional regime. This model appears to explain several localized and recent changes in the tectonic and magrnatic evolution of the Volcano Arc. Most important among these changes is the unusual composition of Iwo Jima volcanic rocks. This contrasts with normal arc tholeiites typical of the rest of the Izu-Volcano-Mariana and other primitive arcs in having alkaline tendencies, high concentrations of light REE and other incompatible elements, and relatively high silica contents. In spite of such fractionated characteristics, these lavas appear to be very early manifestations of a new volcanic and tectonic cycle in the southern Volcano Arc. These alkaline characteristics and indications of strong regional uplift are consistent with the recent development of an early stage of inter-arc basin rifting in the southern Volcano Arc. New bathymetric data are presented in support of this model which indicate: 1. (1) structural elements of the Mariana Trough extend north to the southern Volcano Arc. 2. (2) both the Mariana Trough and frontal arc shoal rapidly northwards as the Volcano Arc is approached. 3. (3) rugged bathymetry associated with the rifted Mariana Trough is replaced just south of Iwo Jima by the development of a huge dome (50-75 km diameter) centered around Iwo Jima. Such uplifted domes are the immediate precursors of rifts in other environments, and it appears that a similar situation may now exist in the southern Volcano Arc. The present distribution of unrifted Volcano Arc to the north and rifted Mariana Arc to the south is interpreted not as a stable tectonic configuration but as representing a tectonic "snapshot" of an arc in the process of being rifted to form a back-arc basin. ?? 1984.

  15. Thermal efficiency of arc welding processes

    SciTech Connect

    DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1995-12-01

    A study was conducted on the arc and melting efficiency of the plasma arc, gas tungsten arc, gas metal arc, and submerged arc welding processes. The results of this work are extended to develop a quantitative method for estimating weld metal dilution in a companion paper. Arc efficiency was determined as a function of current for each process using A36 steel base metal. Melting efficiency was evaluated with variations in arc power and travel speed during deposition of austenitic stainless steel filler metal onto A36 steel substrates. The arc efficiency did not vary significantly within a given process over the range of currents investigated. A semi-empirical relation was developed for the melting efficiency as a function of net arc power and travel speed, which described the experimental data well. An interaction was observed between the arc and melting efficiency. A low arc efficiency factor limits the power delivered to the substrate which, in turn, limits the maximum travel speed for a given set of conditions. High melting efficiency is favored by high arc powers and travel speeds. As a result, a low arc efficiency can limit the maximum obtainable melting efficiency.

  16. Total Marrow Irradiation With RapidArc Volumetric Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Aydogan, Bulent; Yeginer, Mete; Kavak, Gulbin O.; Fan, John; Radosevich, James A.; Gwe-Ya, Kim

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To develop a volumetric arc therapy (VMAT)-total marrow irradiation (TMI) technique for patients with hematologic malignancies. Methods and Materials: VMAT planning was performed for 6 patients using RapidArc technology. The planning target volume consisted of all the bones in the body from the head to the mid-femur, excluding the extremities, except for the humerus, plus a 3.0-mm margin. The organs at risk included the lungs, heart, liver, kidneys, bowels, brain, eyes, and oral cavity. The VMAT-TMI technique consisted of three plans: the head and neck, the chest, and the pelvis, each with three 330{sup o} arcs. The plans were prescribed to ensure, at a minimum, 95% planning target volume dose coverage with the prescription dose (percentage of volume receiving dose of {>=}12 Gy was 95%). The treatments were delivered and verified using MapCheck and ion chamber measurements. Results: The VMAT-TMI technique reported in the present study provided comparable dose distributions with respect to the fixed gantry linear accelerator intensity-modulated TMI. RapidArc planning was less subjective and easier, and, most importantly, the delivery was more efficient. RapidArc reduced the treatment delivery time to approximately 18 min from 45 min with the fixed gantry linear accelerator intensity-modulated TMI. When the prescription dose coverage was reduced to 85% from 95% and the mandible and maxillary structures were not included in the planning target volume as reported in a tomotherapy study, a considerable organ at risk dose reduction of 4.2-51% was observed. The average median dose for the lungs and lenses was reduced to 5.6 Gy from 7.2 Gy and 2.4 Gy from 4.5 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: The RapidArc VMAT technique improved the treatment planning, dose conformality, and, most importantly, treatment delivery efficiency. The results from our study suggest that the RapidArc VMAT technology can be expected to facilitate the clinical transition of TMI.

  17. Polar motion from laser tracking of artificial satellites.

    PubMed

    Smith, D E; Kolenkiewicz, R; Dunn, P J; Plotkin, H H; Johnson, T S

    1972-10-27

    Measurements of the range to the Beacon Explorer C spacecraft from a single laser tracking system at Goddard Space Flight Center have been used to determine the change in latitude of the station arising from polar motion. A precision of 0.03 arc second was obtained for the latitude during a 5-month period in 1970.

  18. Polar motion from laser tracking of artificial satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Kolenkiewicz, R.; Plotkin, H. H.; Johnson, T. S.; Dunn, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of the range to the Beacon Explorer C spacecraft from a single laser tracking system at Goddard Space Flight Center have been used to determine the change in latitude of the station arising from polar motion. A precision of 0.03 arc second was obtained for the latitude during a 5-month period in 1970.

  19. Root responses to flooding.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Margret

    2013-06-01

    Soil water-logging and submergence pose a severe threat to plants. Roots are most prone to flooding and the first to suffer from oxygen shortage. Roots are vital for plant function, however, and maintenance of a functional root system upon flooding is essential. Flooding-resistant plants possess a number of adaptations that help maintain oxygen supply to the root. Plants are also capable of initiating organogenesis to replace their original root system with adventitious roots if oxygen supply becomes impossible. This review summarizes current findings on root development and de novo root genesis in response to flooding.

  20. Metal vapor arc ion plating

    SciTech Connect

    Bertram, L.A.; Fisher, R.W.; Mattox, D.M.; Zanner, F.J.

    1986-09-09

    A method and apparatus for ion plating are described. The apparatus uses more negative than a first electrode voltage in a vacuum arc remelt system to attract low energy ions from the anode electrode to the article to be plated. 2 figs.

  1. Arc furnace steelmaking - an excerpt

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, F.

    1982-01-01

    According to the author, the arc furnace, with its small capital investment and economic plant size, seems destined to grow. The article reviews technical developments against a breakdown of costs and highlights new developments which have recently come to the fore. Energy considerations are covered.

  2. Multihole Arc-Welding Orifice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swaim, Benji D.

    1989-01-01

    Modified orifice for variable-polarity plasma-arc welding directs welding plume so it creates clean, even welds on both Inconel(R) and aluminum alloys. Includes eight holes to relieve back pressure in plasma. Quality of welds on ferrous and nonferrous alloys improved as result.

  3. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  4. The variable polarity plasma arc welding process: Characteristics and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Zhu, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    Significant advantages of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process include faster welding, fewer repairs, less joint preparation, reduced weldment distortion, and absence of porosity. The power distribution was analyzed for an argon plasma gas flow constituting the fluid in the VPPA Welding Process. The major heat loss at the torch nozzle is convective heat transfer; in the space between the outlet of the nozzle and the workpiece; radiative heat transfer; and in the keyhole in the workpiece, convective heat transfer. The power absorbed at the workpiece produces the molten puddle that solidifies into the weld bead. Crown and root widths, and crown and root heights of the weld bead are predicted. The basis is provided for an algorithm for automatic control of VPPA welding machine parameters to obtain desired weld bead dimensions.

  5. Rotating Drive for Electrical-Arc Machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fransen, C. D.

    1986-01-01

    Rotating drive improves quality of holes made by electrical-arc machining. Mechanism (Uni-tek, rotary head, or equivalent) attached to electrical-arc system. Drive rotates electrode as though it were mechanical drill, while an arc disintegrates metal in workpiece, thereby creating hole. Rotating electrode method often used in electric-discharge machining. NASA innovation is application of technique to electrical-arc machining.

  6. STRUVE arc and EUPOS® stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasmane, Ieva; Kaminskis, Janis; Balodis, Janis; Haritonova, Diana

    2013-04-01

    The Struve Geodetic Arc was developed in Years 1816 to 1855, 200 years ago. Historic information on the points of the Struve Geodetic Arc are included in the UNESCO World Heritage list in 2005. Nevertheless, the sites of many points are still not identified nor included in the data bases nowadays. Originally STRUVE arc consisted of 258 main triangles with 265 triangulation points. Currently 34 of the original station points are identified and included in the in the UNESCO World Heritage list. identified original measurement points of the Meridian Arc are located in Sweden (7 points), Norway (15), Finland (83), Russia (1), Estonia (22), Latvia (16), Lithuania (18), Belorussia (28), Ukraine (59) and Moldova (27). In Year 2002 was initiated another large coverage project - European Position Determination System "EUPOS®". Currently there are about 400 continuously operating GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) stations covering EU countries Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Bulgaria, Romania and East European countries Ukraine and Moldavia. EUPOS® network is a ground based GNSS augmentation system widely used for geodesy, land surveying, geophysics and navigation. It gives the opportunity for fast and accurate position determination never available before. It is an honorable task to use the EUPOS® system for research of the Struve triangulation former sites. Projects with Struve arc can popularize geodesy, geo-information and its meaning in nowadays GIS and GNSS systems. Struve Arc and its points is unique cooperation cross-border object which deserve special attention because of their natural beauty and historical value for mankind. GNSS in geodesy discovers a powerful tool for the verification and validation of the height values of geodetic leveling benchmarks established historically almost 200 years ago. The differential GNSS and RTK methods appear very useful to identify vertical displacement of landscape by means of

  7. Laboratory experiments on arc deflection and instability

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.; Karasik, M.

    2000-03-21

    This article describes experiments on arc deflection instability carried out during the past few years at the Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The approach has been that of plasma physicists interested in arcs, but they believe these results may be useful to engineers who are responsible for controlling arc behavior in large electric steel furnaces.

  8. Auditory motion affects visual biological motion processing.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A; van der Zwan, R; Billard, A; Petreska, B; Clarke, S; Blanke, O

    2007-02-01

    The processing of biological motion is a critical, everyday task performed with remarkable efficiency by human sensory systems. Interest in this ability has focused to a large extent on biological motion processing in the visual modality (see, for example, Cutting, J. E., Moore, C., & Morrison, R. (1988). Masking the motions of human gait. Perception and Psychophysics, 44(4), 339-347). In naturalistic settings, however, it is often the case that biological motion is defined by input to more than one sensory modality. For this reason, here in a series of experiments we investigate behavioural correlates of multisensory, in particular audiovisual, integration in the processing of biological motion cues. More specifically, using a new psychophysical paradigm we investigate the effect of suprathreshold auditory motion on perceptions of visually defined biological motion. Unlike data from previous studies investigating audiovisual integration in linear motion processing [Meyer, G. F. & Wuerger, S. M. (2001). Cross-modal integration of auditory and visual motion signals. Neuroreport, 12(11), 2557-2560; Wuerger, S. M., Hofbauer, M., & Meyer, G. F. (2003). The integration of auditory and motion signals at threshold. Perception and Psychophysics, 65(8), 1188-1196; Alais, D. & Burr, D. (2004). No direction-specific bimodal facilitation for audiovisual motion detection. Cognitive Brain Research, 19, 185-194], we report the existence of direction-selective effects: relative to control (stationary) auditory conditions, auditory motion in the same direction as the visually defined biological motion target increased its detectability, whereas auditory motion in the opposite direction had the inverse effect. Our data suggest these effects do not arise through general shifts in visuo-spatial attention, but instead are a consequence of motion-sensitive, direction-tuned integration mechanisms that are, if not unique to biological visual motion, at least not common to all types of

  9. Chamber free fusion welding root side purging method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, William F. (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparati are presented for non-chamber root side purging in fusion welding of oxygen reactive metals which require that the molten weld zone and local solid areas of the weld seam remaining at high temperatures be shielded from normal atmosphere to prevent degradation of the welded area. The apparati provide an inert atmosphere to the root side of a weld joint through a porous medium whereby the jet-like thrust of the plasma arc actually draws the continuously supplied inert atmosphere into the path of the molten or high temperature solid weld zone. The porous medium is configured so it can be placed at the borders of the weld seam and substantially parallel to the seam without restricting the view of the root side of the seam. The inert gas is dispersed evenly through the porous media and across the weld seam, at the point of arc penetration and in front of and behind the arc. The apparati can be constructed so as to limit the amount of inert gas flow and can be mobile and travel synchronously with the welding arc.

  10. Chamber free fusion welding root side purging method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dailey, J. R. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparati are presented for non-chamber root side purging in fusion welding of oxygen reactive metals which require that the molten weld zone and local solid areas of the weld seam remaining at high temperatures be shielded from normal atmosphere to prevent degradation of the welded area. The apparati provide an inert atmosphere to the root side of a weld joint through a porous medium whereby the jet-like thrust of the plasma arc actually draws the continuously supplied inert atmosphere into the path of the molten or high temperature solid weld zone. The porous medium is configured so it can be placed at the borders of the weld seam and substantially parallel to the seam without restricting the view of the root side of the seam. The inert gas is dispersed evenly through the porous media and across the weld seam, at the point of arc penetration and in front of and behind the arc. The apparati can be constructed so as to limit the amount of inert gas flow and can be mobile and travel synchronously with the welding arc.

  11. Crustal structure of the Caribbean-northeastern South America arc-continent collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christeson, Gail L.; Mann, Paul; Escalona, Alejandro; Aitken, Trevor J.

    2008-08-01

    We present the results of a 568-km-long regional wide-angle seismic profile conducted in the southeastern Caribbean that crosses an active island arc, a remnant arc, two basins possibly floored by oceanic crust, an allochthonous terrane of forearc affinity, and the passive margin of northern South America. The velocity structures of the Late Cretaceous Aves Ridge remnant arc and Miocene and younger Lesser Antilles arc are remarkably similar, which implies that magmatic processes have remained moderately steady over time. Crustal thickness is ˜26 km at the Aves Ridge and ˜24 km at the Lesser Antilles arc. In comparison to the Izu-Bonin and Aleutian arcs, the Lesser Antilles arc is thinner and has no evidence for a lower crustal cumulate layer, which is consistent with the estimated low magma production rates of the Lesser Antilles arc. Crustal thickness beneath the Grenada and Tobago basins is 4-10 km, and the velocity structure suggests that these basins could be floored by oceanic crust. A decrease of ˜1 km/s in average seismic velocity of the upper crust is observed from NW to SE across the North Coast fault zone; we argue that this marks the suture between the far-traveled Caribbean arc and the passive margin of the South American continent. Current strike-slip motion between the Caribbean and South American plates is located ˜30 km to the south, and thus material originally deposited on the South American passive margin has now been transferred to the Caribbean plate.

  12. The arcs of the Western Alps and the Northern Apennines: an updated view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubscher, Hans P.

    1988-01-01

    The arcs of the Western Alps and the Northern Apennines and the link between them are in the process of being investigated using the European Geotraverse and they have historically been interpreted in many different ways. New information, particularly geophysical, further constrains possible models. Both arcs have evolved in several stages. sometimes complexly interrelated and sometimes independent of each other. Compressional belts produced in these stages have either been of the "push-arc" type (indentation into a deformable mass) or the "pull-arc" type (backward migration of hinge of a subduction zone, leading to small extensional basins known as back-arc basins and "pores", with an arcuate mountain range on the subduction side). Extensional periods with the possible formation of pull-arcs in the Alps comprise the Gosau period between the Eo- and Meso-Alpine push-arc phases and the "Oligocene lull" period between the Meso- and the Neo-Alpine push-arc phases. In the Northern Apennines, remainders of the Meso-Alpine nappes were involved in Oligocene-Early Miocene pull-arc formation associated with spreading in the Balearic Sea, followed by push-arc formation particularly in the Middle Miocene and by renewed pull-arc formation from the latest Late Miocene to the present. During all of these developments, the Moho was modified by such processes as lithospheric stretching, asthenospheric intrusions, subhorizontal shearing and isostatic uplift. The present Moho configuration is consequently a collage of Moho patches formed at different intervals. Both push- and pull-arcs are laterally bounded by complementary strike-slip or transform zones. These too were modified in the course of history and their final geometry is consequently of a very complex nature. In the Alps for instance, the Insubric fault zone appears to have been the main dextral transform fault of the Neogene push-arc, until it was sinistrally kinked by the Giudicarie fault zone and probably deactivated

  13. Multivariate respiratory motion prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dürichen, R.; Wissel, T.; Ernst, F.; Schlaefer, A.; Schweikard, A.

    2014-10-01

    In extracranial robotic radiotherapy, tumour motion is compensated by tracking external and internal surrogates. To compensate system specific time delays, time series prediction of the external optical surrogates is used. We investigate whether the prediction accuracy can be increased by expanding the current clinical setup by an accelerometer, a strain belt and a flow sensor. Four previously published prediction algorithms are adapted to multivariate inputs—normalized least mean squares (nLMS), wavelet-based least mean squares (wLMS), support vector regression (SVR) and relevance vector machines (RVM)—and evaluated for three different prediction horizons. The measurement involves 18 subjects and consists of two phases, focusing on long term trends (M1) and breathing artefacts (M2). To select the most relevant and least redundant sensors, a sequential forward selection (SFS) method is proposed. Using a multivariate setting, the results show that the clinically used nLMS algorithm is susceptible to large outliers. In the case of irregular breathing (M2), the mean root mean square error (RMSE) of a univariate nLMS algorithm is 0.66 mm and can be decreased to 0.46 mm by a multivariate RVM model (best algorithm on average). To investigate the full potential of this approach, the optimal sensor combination was also estimated on the complete test set. The results indicate that a further decrease in RMSE is possible for RVM (to 0.42 mm). This motivates further research about sensor selection methods. Besides the optical surrogates, the sensors most frequently selected by the algorithms are the accelerometer and the strain belt. These sensors could be easily integrated in the current clinical setup and would allow a more precise motion compensation.

  14. ION PRODUCING MECHANISM (ARC EXTERNAL TO BLOCK)

    DOEpatents

    Brobeck, W.H.

    1958-09-01

    This patent pentains to an ion producing mechanism employed in a calutron which has the decided advantage of an increased amount of ionization effectuated by the arc, and a substantially uniform arc in poiat of time, i arc location and along the arc length. The unique features of the disclosed ion source lie in the specific structural arrangement of the source block, gas ionizing passage, filament shield and filament whereby the arc is established both within the ionizing passage and immediately outside the exit of the ionizing passage at the block face.

  15. Self Motion Perception and Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    The studies conducted in this research project examined several aspects of motion sickness in animal models. A principle objective of these studies was to investigate the neuroanatomy that is important in motion sickness with the objectives of examining both the utility of putative models and defining neural mechanisms that are important in motion sickness.

  16. Measurement of transient force produced by a propagating arc magnetohydrodynamic plasma actuator in quiescent atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young Joon; Sirohi, Jayant; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2015-10-01

    An experimental study was conducted on a magnetohydrodynamic plasma actuator consisting of two parallel, six inch long, copper electrodes flush mounted on an insulating ceramic plate. An electrical arc is generated by a  ∼1 kA current pulse at  ∼100 V across the electrodes. A self-induced Lorentz force drives the arc along the electrodes. The motion of the arc induces flow in the surrounding air through compression as well as entrainment, and generates a transient force, about  ∼4 ms in duration. Experiments were performed on a prototype actuator in quiescent atmospheric air to characterize the motion of the arc and the momentum transferred to the surrounding air. Measurements included transient force and total impulse generated by the actuator as well as the armature voltage and current. The arc shape and transit velocity were determined by high-speed imaging. A peak force of 0.4 N imparting an impulse of 0.68 mN-s was measured for a peak current of 1.2 kA. The force scaled with the square of the armature current and the impulse scaled linearly with the spent capacitor energy. The results provide insight into the mechanisms of body force generation and momentum transfer of a magnetohydrodynamic plasma actuator.

  17. Parametric Study on Arc Behavior of Magnetically Diffused Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tang; Li, Hui; Bai, Bing; Liao, Mengran; Xia, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    A model coupling the plasma with a cathode body is applied in the simulation of the diffuse state of a magnetically rotating arc. Four parametric studies are performed: on the external axial magnetic field (AMF), on the cathode shape, on the total current and on the inlet gas velocity. The numerical results show that: the cathode attachment focuses in the center of the cathode tip with zero AMF and gradually shifts off the axis with the increase of AMF; a larger cathode conical angle corresponds to a cathode arc attachment farther away off axis; the maximum values of plasma temperature increase with the total current; the plasma column in front of the cathode tip expands more severely in the axial direction, with a higher inlet speed; the cathode arc attachment shrinks towards the tip as the inlet speed increases. The various results are supposed to be explained by the joint effect of coupled cathode surface heating and plasma rotating flow. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11475174, 11035005 and 50876101)

  18. Robotic Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffery, Waris S.

    1993-01-01

    The need for automated plasma welding was identified in the early stages of the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) because it requires approximately 1.3 miles of welding for assembly. As a result of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process's ability to make virtually defect-free welds in aluminum, it was chosen to fulfill the welding needs. Space Station Freedom will be constructed of 2219 aluminum utilizing the computer controlled VPPAW process. The 'Node Radial Docking Port', with it's saddle shaped weld path, has a constantly changing surface angle over 360 deg of the 282 inch weld. The automated robotic VPPAW process requires eight-axes of motion (six-axes of robot and two-axes of positioner movement). The robot control system is programmed to maintain Torch Center Point (TCP) orientation perpendicular to the part while the part positioner is tilted and rotated to maintain the vertical up orientation as required by the VPPAW process. The combined speed of the robot and the positioner are integrated to maintain a constant speed between the part and the torch. A laser-based vision sensor system has also been integrated to track the seam and map the surface of the profile during welding.

  19. A Glove Box Enclosed Gas-Tungsten Arc Welding System

    SciTech Connect

    Reevr, E, M; Robino, C.V.

    1999-07-01

    This report describes an inert atmosphere enclosed gas-tungsten arc welding system which has been assembled in support of the MC2730, MC2730A and MC 3500 Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Enhanced Surveillance Program. One goal of this program is to fabricate welds with microstructures and impurity levels which are similar to production heat source welds previously produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Mound Facility. These welds will subsequently be used for high temperature creep testing as part of the overall component lifetime assessment. In order to maximize the utility of the welding system, means for local control of the arc atmosphere have been incorporated and a wide range of welding environments can easily be evaluated. The gas-tungsten arc welding system used in the assembly is computer controlled, includes two-axis and rotary motion, and can be operated in either continuous or pulsed modes. The system can therefore be used for detailed research studies of welding impurity effects, development of prototype weld schedules, or to mimic a significant range of production-like welding conditions. Fixturing for fabrication of high temperature creep test samples have been designed and constructed, and weld schedules for grip-tab and test welds have been developed. The microstructure of these welds have been evaluated and are consistent with those used during RTG production.

  20. Self-Motion Perception and Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Motion sickness typically is considered a bothersome artifact of exposure to passive motion in vehicles of conveyance. This condition seldom has significant impact on the health of individuals because it is of brief duration, it usually can be prevented by simply avoiding the eliciting condition and, when the conditions that produce it are unavoidable, sickness dissipates with continued exposure. The studies conducted examined several aspects of motion sickness in animal models. A principle objective of these studies was to investigate the neuroanatomy that is important in motion sickness with the objectives of examining both the utility of putative models and defining neural mechanisms that are important in motion sickness.

  1. Filters for cathodic arc plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.; Bilek, Marcela M. M.; Brown, Ian G.

    2002-01-01

    Cathodic arc plasmas are contaminated with macroparticles. A variety of magnetic plasma filters has been used with various success in removing the macroparticles from the plasma. An open-architecture, bent solenoid filter, with additional field coils at the filter entrance and exit, improves macroparticle filtering. In particular, a double-bent filter that is twisted out of plane forms a very compact and efficient filter. The coil turns further have a flat cross-section to promote macroparticle reflection out of the filter volume. An output conditioning system formed of an expander coil, a straightener coil, and a homogenizer, may be used with the magnetic filter for expanding the filtered plasma beam to cover a larger area of the target. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this filter can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  2. Crustal thickness and images of the lithospheric discontinuities in the Gibraltar arc and surrounding areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancilla, Flor de Lis; Stich, Daniel; Morales, José; Martín, Rosa; Diaz, Jordi; Pazos, Antonio; Córdoba, Diego; Pulgar, Javier A.; Ibarra, Pedro; Harnafi, Mimoun; Gonzalez-Lodeiro, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    The Gibraltar arc and surrounding areas are a complex tectonic region and its tectonic evolution since Miocene is still under debate. Knowledge of its lithospheric structure will help to understand the mechanisms that produced extension and westward motion of the Alboran domain, simultaneously with NW-SE compression driven by Africa-Europe plates convergence. We perform a P-wave receiver function analysis in which we analyse new data recorded at 83 permanent and temporary seismic broad-band stations located in the South of the Iberian peninsula. These data are stacked and combined with data from a previous study in northern Morocco to build maps of thickness and average vP/vS ratio for the crust, and cross-sections to image the lithospheric discontinuities beneath the Gibraltar arc, the Betic and Rif Ranges and their Iberian and Moroccan forelands. Crustal thickness values show strong lateral variations in the southern Iberia peninsula, ranging from ˜19 to ˜46 km. The Variscan foreland is characterized by a relatively flat Moho at ˜31 km depth, and an average vP/vS ratio of ˜1.72, similar to other Variscan terranes, which may indicate that part of the lower crustal orogenic root was lost. The thickest crust is found at the contact between the Alboran domain and the External Zones of the Betic Range, while crustal thinning is observed southeastern Iberia (down to 19 km) and in the Guadalquivir basin where the thinning at the Iberian paleomargin could be still preserved. In the cross-sections, we see a strong change between the eastern Betics, where the Iberian crust underthrusts and couples to the Alboran crust, and the western Betics, where the underthrusting Iberian crust becomes partially delaminated and enters into the mantle. The structures largely mirror those on the Moroccan side where a similar detachment was observed in northern Morocco. We attribute a relatively shallow strong negative-polarity discontinuity to the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary

  3. Short arc optical survey techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berbert, J. H.; Loveless, F. M.

    1971-01-01

    The effect of the gravity parameter, mu, the choice and local survey of the fixed origin station, and the choice of initial datum on the results of short arc satellite survey adjustments were investigated using GEOS 1 MOTS optical observations from 13 stations. It is concluded that each of these parameters has an effect on derived network scale on the order of 0.000002 for the nominal variations used. A particular solution using assumed best available values for these parameters is recommended.

  4. Welding arc maculopathy and fluphenazine.

    PubMed Central

    Power, W. J.; Travers, S. P.; Mooney, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    A 45-year-old male patient presented with a bilateral maculopathy following unprotected exposure of less than two minutes' duration to a manual metal arc welding unit. He had been receiving the drug fluphenazine for the previous 10 years for treatment of depression. We believe that the drug fluphenazine, which had accumulated in his retinal pigment epithelium, may have rendered him particularly susceptible to retinal photic damage. Images PMID:1854700

  5. Optimized Hybrid MV-kV Imaging Protocol for Volumetric Prostate Arc Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wu; Wiersma, Rodney D.; Xing, Lei

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To develop a real-time prostate position monitoring technique for modern arc radiotherapy through novel usage of cine-MV imaging together with as-needed kV imaging. Methods We divided the task of monitoring intrafraction prostate motion into two steps for rotational deliveries: (i) to detect potential target motion beyond a pre-defined threshold using MV images from different viewing angles by taking advantage of gantry rotation during arc therapy and (ii) to verify the displacement and determine whether an intervention is needed using fiducial/tumor position information acquired from combined MV-kV imaging (by turning on the kV imager). A Varian Trilogy™ linac with onboard kV imager was used to examine selected typical trajectories using a 4D motion phantom. The performance of the algorithm was evaluated using phantom measurements and computer simulation for 536 Calypso-measured tracks from 17 patients. Results Fiducial displacement relative to the MV beam was limited to within a range of 3mm for 99.9% of the time with better than 1mm accuracy. On average, only ∼0.5 intervention per arc delivery was needed to achieve this level of accuracy. Compared to other fluoroscopy-based tracking techniques, kV usage is significantly reduced to an average of less than 15 times per arc delivery. Conclusions By focusing the attention to detecting a pre-defined abnormal motion (i.e., “failure” detection) and utilizing the inherent mechanism of gantry rotation during arc radiotherapy, the current approach provides us with a high confidence about the prostate position in real-time without paying the unwanted overhead of continuous or periodic kV imaging strategy. PMID:20472354

  6. Cross-flow blowing of a two-dimensional stationary arc.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, T. K.

    1971-01-01

    It is demonstrated in an analysis that the electrons emitted from the cathode undergo collisions with the heavy particles and are deflected in the flow direction by the component of a collisional force associated with the relative difference in flow velocities between electrons and heavy particles. The resultant motion of the electrons describing the arc is thus caused by a combined action of the collisional force that results from the externally applied electric field. An expression is given which enables computation of the arc shape to be made provided the velocity distribution of the cross-flow and the distribution of the externally applied electric field are prescribed.

  7. A perfect focus of the internal tide from the Mariana Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhongxiang; D'Asaro, Eric

    2011-07-01

    The Mariana Arc of ridges and islands forms an ˜1300-km-long arc of a circle, ˜630 km in radius centered at 17°N, 139.6°E. The hypothesis that the westward-propagating internal tides originating from the arc converge in a focal region is tested by examining the dominant M2 internal tides observed with air-launched expendable bathythermographs (AXBTs) and altimetric data from multiple satellites. The altimetric and AXBT observations agree well, though they measure different aspects of the internal tidal motion. M2 internal tides radiate both westward and eastward from the Mariana Arc, with isophase lines parallel to the arc and sharing the same center. The westward-propagating M2 internal tides converge in a focal region, and diverge beyond the focus. The focusing leads to energetic M2 internal tides in the focal region. The spatially smoothed energy flux is about 6.5 kW/m, about four times the mean value at the arc; the spatially un-smoothed energy flux may reach up to 17 kW/m. The size of the focus is close to the Rayleigh estimate; it is thus a perfect focus.

  8. GIS based ArcPRZM-3 model for bentazon leaching towards groundwater.

    PubMed

    Akbar, Tahir Ali; Lin, Henry

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater contamination due to pesticide applications on agricultural lands is of great environmental concern. The mathematical models help to understand the mechanism of pesticide leaching in soils towards groundwater. We developed a user-friendly model called ArcPRZM-3 by integrating widely used Pesticide Root Zone Model version 3 (PRZM-3) using Visual Basic and Geographic Information System (GIS) based Avenue programming. ArcPRZM-3 could be used to simulate pesticide leaching towards groundwater with user-friendly input interfaces coupled with databases of crops, soils and pesticides. The outputs from ArcPRZM-3 could be visualized in user-friendly formats of tables, charts and maps. In this study we evaluated ArcPRZM-3 model by simulating bentazon leaching in soil towards groundwater. ArcPRZM-3 was applied to 37 sites in Woodruff County, Arkansas, USA to observe the daily average dissolved bentazon concentration for soybean, sorghum and rice at a depth of 1.8 m for a period of two years. Nineteen ranks of bentazon leaching potential were obtained using ArcPRZM-3 for all sites having different soil and crop combinations. ArcPRZM-3 simulation results for bentazon were compatible with the field monitored data in term of relative ranking and trend, although some uncertainties exist. This study indicated that macropore flow mechanism would be important in analyzing the effect of irrigation on groundwater contamination due to pesticides. Overall, ArcPRZM-3 could be used to simulate pesticide leaching towards groundwater more efficiently and effectively as compared to PRZM-3.

  9. Plasma Heating and Flow in an Auroral Arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Pollock, C. J.; Reasoner, D. L.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Austin, B.; Kintner, P. M.; Bonnell, J.

    1996-01-01

    We report direct observations of the three-dimensional velocity distribution of selected topside ionospheric ion species in an auroral context between 500 and 550 km altitude. We find heating transverse to the local magnetic field in the core plasma, with significant heating of 0(+), He(+), and H(+), as well as tail heating events that occur independently of the core heating. The 0(+) velocity distribution departs from bi-Maxwellian, at one point exhibiting an apparent ring-like shape. However, these observations are shown to be aliased within the auroral arc by temporal variations that arc not well-resolved by the core plasma instrument. The dc electric field measurements reveal superthermal plasma drifts that are consistent with passage of the payload through a series of vortex structures or a larger scale circularly polarized hydromagnetic wave structure within the auroral arc. The dc electric field also shows that impulsive solitary structures, with a frequency spectrum in the ion cyclotron frequency range, occur in close correlation with the tail heating events. The drift and core heating observations lend support to the idea that core ion heating is driven at low altitudes by rapid convective motions imposed by the magnetosphere. Plasma wave emissions at ion frequencies and parallel heating of the low-energy electron plasma are observed in conjunction with this auroral form; however, the conditions are much more complex than those typically invoked in previous theoretical treatments of superthermal frictional heating. The observed ion heating within the arc clearly exceeds that expected from frictional heating for the light ion species H(+) and He(+), and the core distributions also contain hot transverse tails, indicating an anomalous transverse heat source.

  10. Physical characteristics of welding arc ignition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Linan; Song, Yonglun; Xiao, Tianjiao; Ran, Guowei

    2012-07-01

    The existing research of welding arc mainly focuses on the stable combustion state and the research on the mechanism of welding arc ignition process is quite lack. The tungsten inert gas(TIG) touch arc ignition process is observed via a high speed camera and the high time resolution spectral diagnosis system. The changing phenomenon of main ionized element provided the electrons in the arc ignition is found. The metallic element is the main contributor to provide the electrons at the beginning of the discharging, and then the excitated shielding gas element replaces the function of the metallic element. The electron density during the period of the arc ignition is calculated by the Stark-broadened lines of Hα. Through the discussion with the repeatability in relaxation phenomenon, the statistical regularity in the arc ignition process is analyzed. The similar rules as above are observed through the comparison with the laser-assisted arc ignition experiments and the metal inert gas(MIG) arc ignition experiments. This research is helpful to further understanding on the generation mechanism of welding arc ignition and also has a certain academic and practical significance on enriching the welding physical theoretical foundation and improving the precise monitoring on automatic arc welding process.

  11. Stability measurements of PPL atmospheric pressure arc

    SciTech Connect

    Roquemore, L.; Zweben, S.J.; Wurden, G.A.

    1997-12-31

    Experiments on the stability of atmospheric pressure arcs have been started at PPL to understand and improve the performance of arc furnaces used for processing applications in metallurgy and hazardous waste treatment. Previous studies have suggested that the violent instabilities in such arcs may be due to kink modes. A 30 kW, 500 Amp CW DC experimental arc furnace was constructed with a graphite cathode and a molten steel anode. The arc plasma is diagnosed with 4000 frames/sec digital camera, Hall probes, and voltage and current monitors. Under certain conditions, the arc exhibits an intermittent helical instability, with the helix rotating at {approx}600 Hz. The nature of the instability is investigated. A possible instability mechanism is the self-magnetic field of the arc, with saturation occurring due to inhomogeneous heating in a helical arc. The effect of external DC and AC magnetic fields on the instability is investigated. Additionally, arc deflection due to external transverse magnetic field is investigated. The deflection angle is found to be proportional to the applied field, and is in good agreement with a simple model of the {rvec J} x {rvec b} force on the arc jet.

  12. Tectonomagmatism in continental arcs: evidence from the Sark arc complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, Wes; Moreno, Teresa

    2002-07-01

    The island of Sark (Channel Islands, UK) exposes syntectonic plutons and country rock gneisses within a Precambrian (Cadomian) continental arc. This Sark arc complex records sequential pulses of magmatism over a period of 7 Ma (ca. 616-609 Ma). The earliest intrusion (ca. 616 Ma) was a composite sill that shows an ultramafic base overlain by a magma-mingled net vein complex subsequently deformed at near-solidus temperatures into the amphibolitic and tonalitic Tintageu banded gneisses. The deformation was synchronous with D 2 deformation of the paragneissic envelope, with both intrusion and country rock showing flat, top-to-the-south LS fabrics. Later plutonism injected three homogeneous quartz diorite-granodiorite sheets: the Creux-Moulin pluton (150-250 m; ca. 614 Ma), the Little Sark pluton (>700 m; 611 Ma), and the Northern pluton (>500 m; 609 Ma). Similar but thinner sheets in the south (Derrible-Hogsback-Dixcart) and west (Port es Saies-Brecqhou) are interpreted as offshoots from the Creux-Moulin pluton and Little Sark pluton, respectively. All these plutons show the same LS fabric seen in the older gneisses, with rare magmatic fabrics and common solid state fabrics recording syntectonic crystallisation and cooling. The cooling rate increased rapidly with decreasing crystallisation age: >9 Ma for the oldest intrusion to cool to lower amphibolite conditions, 7-8 Ma for the Creux Moulin pluton, 5-6 Ma for the Little Sark pluton, and <3 Ma for the Northern pluton. This cooling pattern is interpreted as recording extensional exhumation during D 2. The initiation of the D 2 event is suggested to have been a response to the intrusion of the Tintageu magma which promoted a rapid increase in strain rate (>10 -14 s -1) that focussed extensional deformation into the Sark area. The increased rates of extension allowed ingress of the subsequent quartz diorite-granodiorite sheets, although strain rate slowly declined as the whole complex cooled during exhumation. The

  13. Examining Rotational Ground Motion Induced by Tornados

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, Elijah; Dunn, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Ring lasers are well known for their ability to detect rotation and to serve as replacements for mechanical gyroscopes. The sensitivity of large ring lasers to various forms of ground motion is less familiar. Since ring lasers preferentially measure rotational ground motion and a standard seismograph is designed to measure translational and vertical ground motion, each device responds to different aspects of ground movement. Therefore, the two instruments will be used to explore responses to microseisms, earthquake generated shear waves, and in particular tornado generated ground movement. On April 27, 2014 an EF4 tornado devastated Vilonia, AR a small town ~ 21 km from the Hendrix College ring laser. The proximity of the tornado's path to the ring laser interferometer and to a seismograph located in Vilonia provided the opportunity to examine the response of these instruments to tornadic generated ground motion. Our measurements suggest tornadic weather systems can produce both rotational and lateral ground motion. This contention is supported by an after the fact damage survey which found that the tornado flattened a forest in which trees were uprooted and laid down in a pair of converging arcs with the centerline pointed in the direction of the tornado's path.

  14. ARC length control for plasma welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A control system to be used with a plasma arc welding apparatus is disclosed. The plasma arc welding apparatus includes a plasma arc power supply, a contactor, and an electrode assembly for moving the electrode relative to a work piece. The electrode assembly is raised or lowered by a drive motor. The present apparatus includes a plasma arc adapter connected across the power supply to measure the voltage across the plasma arc. The plasma arc adapter forms a dc output signal input to a differential amplifier. A second input is defined by an adjustable resistor connected to a dc voltage supply to permit operator control. The differential amplifier forms an output difference signal provided to an adder circuit. The adder circuit then connects with a power amplifier which forms the driving signal for the motor. In addition, the motor connects to a tachometor which forms a feedback signal delivered to the adder to provide damping, therby avoiding servo loop overshoot.

  15. Plasma arc torch with coaxial wire feed

    DOEpatents

    Hooper, Frederick M

    2002-01-01

    A plasma arc welding apparatus having a coaxial wire feed. The apparatus includes a plasma arc welding torch, a wire guide disposed coaxially inside of the plasma arc welding torch, and a hollow non-consumable electrode. The coaxial wire guide feeds non-electrified filler wire through the tip of the hollow non-consumable electrode during plasma arc welding. Non-electrified filler wires as small as 0.010 inches can be used. This invention allows precision control of the positioning and feeding of the filler wire during plasma arc welding. Since the non-electrified filler wire is fed coaxially through the center of the plasma arc torch's electrode and nozzle, the wire is automatically aimed at the optimum point in the weld zone. Therefore, there is no need for additional equipment to position and feed the filler wire from the side before or during welding.

  16. Dilution in single pass arc welds

    SciTech Connect

    DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1996-06-01

    A study was conducted on dilution of single pass arc welds of type 308 stainless steel filler metal deposited onto A36 carbon steel by the plasma arc welding (PAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), gas metal arc welding (GMAW), and submerged arc welding (SAW) processes. Knowledge of the arc and melting efficiency was used in a simple energy balance to develop an expression for dilution as a function of welding variables and thermophysical properties of the filler metal and substrate. Comparison of calculated and experimentally determined dilution values shows the approach provides reasonable predictions of dilution when the melting efficiency can be accurately predicted. The conditions under which such accuracy is obtained are discussed. A diagram is developed from the dilution equation which readily reveals the effect of processing parameters on dilution to aid in parameter optimization.

  17. The Root Pressure Phenomenon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    Describes experiments demonstrating that root pressure in plants is probably controlled by a circadian rhythm (biological clock). Root pressure phenomenon plays significant part in water transport in contradiction with prevalent belief. (PS)

  18. Using Square Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, William Wynne

    1976-01-01

    This article describes techniques which enable the user of a comparatively simple calculator to perform calculations of cube roots, nth roots, trigonometric, and inverse trigonometric functions, logarithms, and exponentials. (DT)

  19. Similar and Contrasting Response of Rifting and Transtension in the Gulf of California and Walker Lane to Preceding Arc Magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, C. D.; Faulds, J. E.

    2006-12-01

    The Gulf of California (GC) and Walker Lane (WL) have undergone strikingly similar development with strike- slip faulting following initial extension. They differ significantly in the amount of Pacific-North American plate motion taken up by each: essentially all relative motion in the GC and ~25% in the WL. In both areas, ancestral arc magmatism preceded and probably focused deformation, perhaps because heating and/or hydration weakened the lithosphere. However, differences in migration of the Rivera (RTJ) and Mendocino triple junctions (MTJ) related to differences in the orientation of plate boundaries determined how strike-slip faulting developed. Abrupt southward jumps in the RTJ led to abrupt cessation of magmatism over arc lengths of as much as 1000 km and initiation of east-northeast extension within the future GC. The best known jump was at ~13 Ma, but an earlier jump occurred at ~18 Ma. Arc magmatism has been best documented in Baja California, Sonora, and Nayarit, although Baja constituted the most-trenchward fringe of the ancestral arc. New and published data indicate that Sinaloa underwent a similar history of arc magmatism. The greatest volume of the arc immediately preceding RTJ jumps was probably in mainland Mexico. Arc magmatism shut off following these jumps, extension began in the future GC, and strike-slip faulting either followed or accompanied extension in the GC. In contrast, the MTJ migrated progressively northward. New and published data indicate magmatism generally shut off coincident with this retreat, but distinct nodes or zones of magmatism, presumably unrelated to subduction, persisted or initiated after arc activity ceased. We have suggested that the WL has grown progressively northward, following the retreating arc, and that the northern WL is its youngest part. However, the timing of initiation of strike-slip faulting in most of the WL is poorly known and controversial. Testing our hypothesis requires determining initiation and

  20. Comparative study of two- and three-dimensional modeling on arc discharge phenomena inside a thermal plasma torch with hollow electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Keun Su; Park, Jin Myung; Choi, Sooseok; Kim, Jongin; Hong, Sang Hee

    2008-02-15

    A comparative study between two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) modeling is carried out on arc discharge phenomena inside a thermal plasma torch with hollow electrodes, in order to evaluate the effects of arc root configuration characterized by either 2D annular or 3D highly localized attachment on the electrode surface. For this purpose, a more precise 3D transient model has been developed by taking account of 3D arc current distribution and arc root rotation. The 3D simulation results apparently reveal that the 3D arc root attachment brings about the inherent 3D and turbulence nature of plasma fields inside the torch. It is also found that the constricted arc column near the vortex chamber plays an important role in heating and acceleration of injected arc gases by concentrating arc currents on the axis of the hollow electrodes. The inherent 3D nature of arc discharge is well preserved inside the cathode region, while these 3D features slowly diminish behind the vortex chamber where the turbulent flow begins to be developed in the anode region. Based on the present simulation results, it is noted that the mixing effects of the strong turbulent flow on the heat and mass transfer are mainly responsible for the gradual relaxation of the 3D structures of plasma fields into the 2D axisymmetric ones that eventually appear in the anode region near the torch exit. From a detailed comparison of the 3D results with the 2D ones, the arc root configuration seems to have a significant effect on the heat transfer to the electrode surfaces interacting with the turbulent plasma flow. That is, in the 2D simulation based on an axisymmetric stationary model, the turbulence phenomena are fairly underestimated and the amount of heat transferred to the cold anode wall is calculated to be smaller than that obtained in the 3D simulation. For the validation of the numerical simulations, calculated plasma temperatures and axial velocities are compared with experimentally measured ones

  1. Discrete square root smoothing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaminski, P. G.; Bryson, A. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The basic techniques applied in the square root least squares and square root filtering solutions are applied to the smoothing problem. Both conventional and square root solutions are obtained by computing the filtered solutions, then modifying the results to include the effect of all measurements. A comparison of computation requirements indicates that the square root information smoother (SRIS) is more efficient than conventional solutions in a large class of fixed interval smoothing problems.

  2. Nomenclature of SLC Arc beamline components

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, J.; Weng, W.T.

    1986-04-10

    This note defines I and C formal names for beamline components in the Arc as specified in the TRANSPORT decks ARCN FINAL and ARCS FINAL of June 5, 1985. The formal name consists of three fields: the primary name, the zone and the unit number. The general principles and guidelines are explained in Reference 1. The rationale and the final resolutions of the naming conventions for the Arc are explained.

  3. Arcing injuries in a fatal electrocution.

    PubMed

    Nagesh, K R; Kanchan, Tanuj; Rastogi, Prateek; Arun, M

    2009-06-01

    Electric arc injuries tend to be very severe and can cause skin burns by direct heat exposure or by igniting clothes. It produces intense heat, and fatal lesions can occur even when the victim is several feet from the arc. A fatal case of accidental high-voltage electrocution is reported, where multiple skin to bone-deep oval and circular lesions of varying dimensions caused by arcing was present. PMID:19465814

  4. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  5. Paraspinal volumetric modulated arc therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, J L; Convery, H M; Hansen, V N; Saran, F H

    2012-01-01

    Objectives : The processes involved in the treatment of paraspinal tumours by volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are described here by means of an illustrative case. Methods : Az single anticlockwise arc from gantry angle 179° to 181° was constructed using SmartArc (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, WI) with control points spaced at 2°. The dose prescription was 60 Gy in 30 fractions to cover the planning target volume (PTV) as uniformly as possible while sparing the 0.3-cm planning risk volume (PRV) around the spinal cord. The plan was verified before treatment using a diode array phantom and radiochromic film. Treatment delivery was on a Synergy linear accelerator with a beam modulator head (Elekta Ltd, Crawley, UK). Results Homogeneous dose coverage of the PTV was achieved with a D2% of 62.0 Gy and D98% of 55.6 Gy. Maximum spinal cord dose was 49.9 Gy to 0.1 cm3 and maximum dose to the spinal cord PRV was 55.4 Gy to 0.1 cm3. At pre-treatment verification, the percentage of the high-dose region receiving a dose within 3% and 3 mm of the planned dose was 98.8% with the diode array and 93.4% with film. Delivery time was 2 min 15 s and the course of treatment was successfully completed. Conclusions VMAT was successfully planned, verified and delivered for this challenging tumour site. VMAT provides a very suitable method of treating complex paraspinal tumours, offering a high-quality conformal dose distribution with a short delivery time. PMID:22215885

  6. Characteristics of Arc Voltage of High-Current Air Arc in Sealed Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shinya; Kokura, Kentaro; Minoda, Kyohei; Sato, Shinji

    Effect of arc voltage on different factor of design and control was investigated for high current in order to develop design guide of circuit breaker. In this study, dependences on these factors which are current, arc length, surface area on electrode and internal pressure of arc voltage were evaluated quantitatively. As a result of the evaluations, it was estimated that arc voltage near electrode surface rise linearly with arc current and the area on the surface to the power -0.8, and the voltage in arc column rise pressure increase to the power 0.3. We confirmed the validity of the characteristics of the estimated voltage by comparison with the generated voltage in an actual arc extinguishing chamber. The characteristics of the estimated voltage would be provided as effective guidelines to design arc extinguishing chambers.

  7. Plasma arc melting of zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Tubesing, P.K.; Korzekwa, D.R.; Dunn, P.S.

    1997-12-31

    Zirconium, like some other refractory metals, has an undesirable sensitivity to interstitials such as oxygen. Traditionally, zirconium is processed by electron beam melting to maintain minimum interstitial contamination. Electron beam melted zirconium, however, does not respond positively to mechanical processing due to its large grain size. The authors undertook a study to determine if plasma arc melting (PAM) technology could be utilized to maintain low interstitial concentrations and improve the response of zirconium to subsequent mechanical processing. The PAM process enabled them to control and maintain low interstitial levels of oxygen and carbon, produce a more favorable grain structure, and with supplementary off-gassing, improve the response to mechanical forming.

  8. Corky root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corky root rot (corchosis) was first reported in Argentina in 1985, but the disease was presumably present long before that. The disease occurs in most alfalfa-growing areas of Argentina but is more common in older stands. In space-planted alfalfa trials scored for root problems, corky root rot was ...

  9. WHY ROOTING FAILS.

    SciTech Connect

    CREUTZ,M.

    2007-07-30

    I explore the origins of the unphysical predictions from rooted staggered fermion algorithms. Before rooting, the exact chiral symmetry of staggered fermions is a flavored symmetry among the four 'tastes.' The rooting procedure averages over tastes of different chiralities. This averaging forbids the appearance of the correct 't Hooft vertex for the target theory.

  10. Metals purification by improved vacuum arc remelting

    DOEpatents

    Zanner, Frank J.; Williamson, Rodney L.; Smith, Mark F.

    1994-12-13

    The invention relates to improved apparatuses and methods for remelting metal alloys in furnaces, particularly consumable electrode vacuum arc furnaces. Excited reactive gas is injected into a stationary furnace arc zone, thus accelerating the reduction reactions which purify the metal being melted. Additionally, a cooled condensation surface is disposed within the furnace to reduce the partial pressure of water in the furnace, which also fosters the reduction reactions which result in a purer produced ingot. Methods and means are provided for maintaining the stationary arc zone, thereby reducing the opportunity for contaminants evaporated from the arc zone to be reintroduced into the produced ingot.

  11. Automatic Control Of Length Of Welding Arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F.

    1991-01-01

    Nonlinear relationships among current, voltage, and length stored in electronic memory. Conceptual microprocessor-based control subsystem maintains constant length of welding arc in gas/tungsten arc-welding system, even when welding current varied. Uses feedback of current and voltage from welding arc. Directs motor to set position of torch according to previously measured relationships among current, voltage, and length of arc. Signal paths marked "calibration" or "welding" used during those processes only. Other signal paths used during both processes. Control subsystem added to existing manual or automatic welding system equipped with automatic voltage control.

  12. Atmospheric spreading of protons in auroral arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iglesias, G. E.; Vondrak, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    A model is developed to calculate the effect of atmospheric spreading on the flux and angular distribution of protons in homogeneous auroral arcs. An expression is derived that indicates the angular distribution in the atmosphere as a function of distance from arc center, neutral scale height, arc width, and initial angular distribution. The results of the model agree favorably with those based on Monte-Carlo calculations. From these results the enhancement factors needed to compute the original proton current above the atmosphere are obtained. A technique is indicated for determining the incident angular distribution from rocket-based measurements of the arc width and angular distribution.

  13. The Abundance of Large Arcs From CLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bingxiao; Postman, Marc; Meneghetti, Massimo; Coe, Dan A.; Clash Team

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an automated arc-finding algorithm to perform a rigorous comparison of the observed and simulated abundance of large lensed background galaxies (a.k.a arcs). We use images from the CLASH program to derive our observed arc abundance. Simulated CLASH images are created by performing ray tracing through mock clusters generated by the N-body simulation calibrated tool -- MOKA, and N-body/hydrodynamic simulations -- MUSIC, over the same mass and redshift range as the CLASH X-ray selected sample. We derive a lensing efficiency of 15 ± 3 arcs per cluster for the X-ray selected CLASH sample and 4 ± 2 arcs per cluster for the simulated sample. The marginally significant difference (3.0 σ) between the results for the observations and the simulations can be explained by the systematically smaller area with magnification larger than 3 (by a factor of ˜4) in both MOKA and MUSIC mass models relative to those derived from the CLASH data. Accounting for this difference brings the observed and simulated arc statistics into full agreement. We find that the source redshift distribution does not have big impact on the arc abundance but the arc abundance is very sensitive to the concentration of the dark matter halos. Our results suggest that the solution to the "arc statistics problem" lies primarily in matching the cluster dark matter distribution.

  14. Rooting Gene Trees without Outgroups: EP Rooting

    PubMed Central

    Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Little, Roderick J. A.; Lake, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Gene sequences are routinely used to determine the topologies of unrooted phylogenetic trees, but many of the most important questions in evolution require knowing both the topologies and the roots of trees. However, general algorithms for calculating rooted trees from gene and genomic sequences in the absence of gene paralogs are few. Using the principles of evolutionary parsimony (EP) (Lake JA. 1987a. A rate-independent technique for analysis of nucleic acid sequences: evolutionary parsimony. Mol Biol Evol. 4:167–181) and its extensions (Cavender, J. 1989. Mechanized derivation of linear invariants. Mol Biol Evol. 6:301–316; Nguyen T, Speed TP. 1992. A derivation of all linear invariants for a nonbalanced transversion model. J Mol Evol. 35:60–76), we explicitly enumerate all linear invariants that solely contain rooting information and derive algorithms for rooting gene trees directly from gene and genomic sequences. These new EP linear rooting invariants allow one to determine rooted trees, even in the complete absence of outgroups and gene paralogs. EP rooting invariants are explicitly derived for three taxon trees, and rules for their extension to four or more taxa are provided. The method is demonstrated using 18S ribosomal DNA to illustrate how the new animal phylogeny (Aguinaldo AMA et al. 1997. Evidence for a clade of nematodes, arthropods, and other moulting animals. Nature 387:489–493; Lake JA. 1990. Origin of the metazoa. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 87:763–766) may be rooted directly from sequences, even when they are short and paralogs are unavailable. These results are consistent with the current root (Philippe H et al. 2011. Acoelomorph flatworms are deuterostomes related to Xenoturbella. Nature 470:255–260). PMID:22593551

  15. The electric field structure of auroral arcs as determined from barium plasma injection experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.

    1981-01-01

    Barium plasma injection experiments have revealed a number of features of electric fields in and near auroral forms extending from a few hundred to many thousands of km in altitude. There is evidence for V-type potential structures over some auroras, but not in others. For some auroral arcs, large E fields are found at ionospheric altitudes outside the arc but the E field inside the arc is near zero. In a few other auroras, most recently one investigated in an experiment conducted from Poker Flat on March 22, 1980, large, rapidly fluctuating E fields were detected by barium plasma near 600 km altitude. These E fields suggest that the motion of auroral rays can be an effect of low-altitude electric fields, or that V-type potential structures may be found at low altitudes.

  16. Dosimetric evaluation of the interplay effect in respiratory-gated RapidArc radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Craig; Yang, Yong Li, Tianfang; Zhang, Yongqian; Heron, Dwight E.; Huq, M. Saiful

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with gating capability has had increasing adoption in many clinics in the United States. In this new technique, dose rate, gantry rotation speed, and the leaf motion speed of multileaf collimators (MLCs) are modulated dynamically during gated beam delivery to achieve highly conformal dose coverage of the target and normal tissue sparing. Compared with the traditional gated intensity-modulated radiation therapy technique, this complicated beam delivery technique may result in larger dose errors due to the intrafraction tumor motion. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the dosimetric influence of the interplay effect for the respiration-gated VMAT technique (RapidArc, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Our work consisted of two parts: (1) Investigate the interplay effect for different target residual errors during gated RapidArc delivery using a one-dimensional moving phantom capable of producing stable sinusoidal movement; (2) Evaluate the dosimetric influence in ten clinical patients’ treatment plans using a moving phantom driven with a patient-specific respiratory curve. Methods: For the first part of this study, four plans were created with a spherical target for varying residual motion of 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 cm. Appropriate gating windows were applied for each. The dosimetric effect was evaluated using EDR2 film by comparing the gated delivery with static delivery. For the second part of the project, ten gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy cases were selected and reoptimized to be delivered by the gated RapidArc technique. These plans were delivered to a phantom, and again the gated treatments were compared to static deliveries by the same methods. Results: For regular sinusoidal motion, the dose delivered to the target was not substantially affected by the gating windows when evaluated with the gamma statistics, suggesting the interplay effect has a small role in respiratory-gated RapidArc

  17. Nonchamber, Root-Side, Inert-Gas Purging During Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Improved apparatus distributes inert gas to protect against oxidation on root side of weld during welding and after welding while joint remains hot. Simple and lightweight; readily moved along weld path in synchronism with torch. Because it concentrates inert gas where needed, consumes gas at relatively low rate, and not necessary to monitor oxygen content of protective atmosphere. Apparatus does not obscure view of root side of weld. Used for full-penetration plasma-arc welding of such reactive metals as aluminum/lithium alloys and titanium.

  18. Discrimination and identification of periodic motion trajectories.

    PubMed

    Or, Charles C-F; Thabet, Michel; Wilkinson, Frances; Wilson, Hugh R

    2011-07-12

    Humans are extremely sensitive to radial deformations of static circular contours (F. Wilkinson, H. R. Wilson, & C. Habak, 1998). Here, we investigate detection and identification of periodic motion trajectories defined by these radial frequency (RF) patterns over a range of radial frequencies of 2-5 cycles. We showed that the average detection thresholds for RF trajectories range from 1 to 4 min of arc and performance improves as a power-law function of radial frequency. RF trajectories are also detected for a range of speeds. We also showed that spatiotemporal global processing is involved in trajectory detection, as improvement in detection performance with increasing radial deformation displayed cannot be accounted for by local probability summation. Finally, identification of RF trajectories is possible over this RF range. Overall thresholds are about 6 times higher than previously reported for static stimuli. These novel stimuli should be a useful tool to investigate motion trajectory learning and discrimination in humans and other primates.

  19. Neoproterozoic oceanic arc remnants in the Moroccan Anti-Atlas: reconstructing deep to shallow arc crustal sequence and tracking Pan-African subduction-accretion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantafyllou, Antoine; Berger, Julien; Baele, Jean-Marc; Bruguier, Olivier; Diot, Hervé; Ennih, Nasser; Plissart, Gaëlle; Monnier, Christophe; Spagna, Paul; Watlet, Arnaud; Vandycke, Sara

    2015-04-01

    established that they were recrystallized under garnet-granulites P-T conditions (up to ~1000°C at 12 kbar). Preliminary geochemical data of hornblende-gabbros and garnet-bearing granulites portray similar trace geochemical signatures ((La/Sm)N: 0.8-1.6 ; (Nb/La) < 0.46) as studied paleo-arc complexes. These P-T results and new geochemical data argue that Asmlil mafic complex could represent a deep arc root comparable to the deep section of exposed oceanic arcs (i.e. Kohistan, Talkeetna, Amalaoulaou). We propose that Iriri and Asmlil units depict the deep-to-shallow sequence of a single Cryogenian oceanic arc (760-740 Ma), as discrete exposures along the southern edge of Anti-Atlas ophiolitic assemblages. Nevertheless, this primary arc has been likely broke up and intruded by subsequent hydrous arc-related magmas under medium- to high-grade P-T conditions (700 to 650 Ma). We interpret this period as an oceanic pre-collision stage when subduction geometry is intensively perturbed (c.g. composite subductions, polarity inversion), doping production of typical hydrous arc magma that intrudes original arc. This complex arc melange has been lastly accreted and sealed on the West African Craton margin.

  20. Modernization of the control system and the electrical equipment of DSV vacuum arc furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dednev, A. A.; Kisselman, M. A.; Nekhamin, S. M.; Kalinin, V. I.; Koshelev, Yu. N.

    2010-06-01

    The results of modernizing one of the DSV-3.2-G1 arc furnaces at OAO Elektrostal’ Metallurgical Works are presented. New automatic control system ACS DSV-3.2 with functions of maintenance, control, and correction of the main technical parameters of vacuum arc remelting is created. The electric furnace is equipped with a modern visual control system for a heat and a unique inert gas (helium) supply system. The rod motion drive is replaced by a modern drive with frequency control of its motion velocity. New control cabinet and desk made of modern elements are mounted. Melting of a pilot series of EP-718 alloy ingots supports the high quality and reliability of the new control systems.

  1. Increasing the arc efficiency by the removal of arc electromagnetic blowing in electric arc furnaces: I. Effect of electromagnetic blowing and the slag height on the arc efficiency in an electric arc furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, A. N.; Sokolov, A. Yu.; Lugovoi, Yu. A.

    2012-06-01

    The effect of electromagnetic blowing and the slag layer height on the arc efficiency is analytically studied. An arc is blown from under an electrode toward the furnace walls under an electromagnetic force. The arc efficiency of a 100-t high-power electric arc furnace changes from 0.47 to 0.76 when the slag height increases from 0 to 550 mm.

  2. Deep rooting in winter wheat: rooting nodes of deep roots in two cultivars with deep and shallow root systems.

    PubMed

    Araki, H; Iijima, M

    2001-09-01

    Deep rooting of wheat has been suggested that it influences the tolerance to various environmental stresses. In this study, the nodes from which the deepest penetrated roots had emerged were examined in winter wheat. The wheat was grown in long tubes with or without mechanical stress and in large root boxes. The length and growth angle of each axile root were examined to analyze the difference in the vertical distribution of the roots between the two wheat cultivars, one with a deep and one with a shallow root system. In Shiroganekomugi, a Japanese winter wheat cultivar with a shallow root system, the rooting depths of the seminal and nodal roots decreased as the rooting nodes advanced acropetally. Six out of nine deepest roots were seminal root in the non-mechanical stress conditions. In Mutsubenkei, a Japanese winter wheat cultivar with a deep root system, grown in root boxes, not only the seminal roots but also the coleoptilar and the first nodal roots penetrated to a depth of more than 1.3 m in the root box, and became the deepest roots. In both cultivars, the seminal roots became the deepest roots under the mechanical stress conditions. There were no clear tendencies in the root growth angles among the rooting nodes in the wheat root system. This indicates that the length of the axile roots can explain the differences in the rooting depths among axile roots in a wheat root system. On the other hand, the axile roots of Mutsubenkei elongated significantly more vertically than those of Shiroganekomugi. This suggests that not only seminal but also nodal roots exhibit strong positive gravitropism and penetrate deeply in a cultivar with a deep root system. In wheat cultivars, it is likely that the extent of its Root Depth Index results partly from the gravitropic responses of both seminal and nodal roots.

  3. Opening of the Grenada back-arc Basin and evolution of the Caribbean plate during the Mesozoic and early Paleogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouysse, Philippe

    1988-06-01

    Geological and geophysical data indicate that the Grenada Basin was presumably created, during the Paleocene, by sundering of a proto-Eastern Caribbean arc into a remnant arc to the west (Aves Swell) and an active arc to the east (Lesser Antilles Ridge). Grenada Basin spreading is thought to have been penecontemporaneous with the creation of the Yucatan Basin located at the opposite side of the Caribbean Sea. I suggest that a continuous Mesozoic Caribbean Arc (M.C.A.), including the Greater Antilles, the Aves-Lesser Antilles system, and the Aruba-Blanquilla Chain (Netherland-Venezuelan Antilles), was initiated in the Pacific, probably about 130-120 Ma ago. Its arrival in front of, and its subsequent motion inside the Central Atlantic ("Tethyan") seaway caused the opening of both Yucatan and Grenada basins which occurred at the two initial points of contact with the North and South American cratons. In contrast to the style of many other island arcs, this back-arc spreading event occurred only once in the long history of the M.C.A. The Lesser Antilles appear to be the oldest currently active intra-oceanic island arc.

  4. Dynamic Electrode Forces in Gas Metal Arc Welding.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Lawrence Anthony

    In gas metal arc welding, a low-voltage electric -arc plasma is maintained between a work-piece and a wire electrode, both of which are melted by the arc. This thesis examines the dynamic forces that affect the detachment of molten metal drops from the consumable wire electrode. Unlike drops falling from a water faucet, the drops in gas metal arc welding experience strong magnetic forces generated by the interaction of the welding current with its own magnetic field. An extensive set of clear high-speed motion images of metal drops detaching from a welding electrode was collected under a wide variety of conditions. The images are used to measure the surface tension of steel as it is found in a gas metal arc welding plasma. Impulse-response oscillations of pendent molten steel drops are also measured. A derivation of the magnetic forces acting on necking drops is performed. Numerical computations of these forces are performed by using shapes fitted to high -speed images of molten steel drops as they are ejected from the electrode by magnetic forces during short-duty -cycle current pulsing. A dynamic model of drop detachment is developed and used to study the competition between the retaining surface tension force and other forces (magnetic, gravitational, and inertial). Simulations performed with this model are compared with extensive measurements of constant-current welding images and with limited measurements of pulsed -current welding images. The comparisons indicate that the experimental magnetic forces are much less potent than the calculated magnetic forces when welding-current transients are not present. A hypothesis is advanced that internal flows are able to develop under the relatively quiescent conditions that exist during drop development in constant -current welding. An apparatus was constructed to axially vibrate the electrode as it is consumed. Experiments using inertial forces to induce drop detachment are shown. Comparisons of experimental

  5. Interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-arc hybrid welding of magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liming; Chen, Minghua

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents the results of the investigation on the interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-arc hybrid welding on magnesium alloy AZ31B using the spectral diagnose technique. By comparably analyzing the variation in plasma information (the shape, the electron temperature and density) of single tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding with the laser-arc hybrid welding, it is found that the laser affects the arc plasma through the keyhole forming on the workpiece. Depending on the welding parameters there are three kinds of interactions taking place between laser and arc plasma.

  6. Orbital evolution of Neptune's ring arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliatti-Winter, Silvia; Madeira, Gustavo

    2016-10-01

    Voyager 2 spacecraft sent several images of the Neptune's ring system in 1989. These images show a set of arcs (Courage, Liberté, Egalité and Fraternité), previously detected by stellar occultation in 1984, embedded in the tenuous Adams ring. In order to maintain the confinement of the arcs against the spreading, Renner et al. (2015) proposeda model which the Adams ring has a collection of small coorbital satellites placed in specific positions. These coorbitals would be responsible for maintaining the arcs particles. In this work we analyse the orbital evolution of the particles coorbital to the satellites by adding the effects of the solar radiation force. Our numerical results show that due to this dissipative effect the smallest particles, 1μm in size, leave the arc in less than 10years. Larger particles leave the arc, but can stay confined between the coorbital satellites. De Pater et al. (2005) suggested that a small moonlet embedded in the arc Fraternité can be the source of the arcs and even theAdams ring through an erosion mechanism. Our preliminary results showed that a moonlet up to 200m in radius can stay in the arc without causing any significant variation in the eccentricities of the coorbitals and the particles.

  7. Spinarc gas tungsten arc torch holder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brace, D. F.; Crockett, J. L.

    1970-01-01

    Semiautomatic welding torch enables operator to control arc length, torch angle, and spring tension when welding small diameter aluminum tubing. Tungsten is preset for the weld to make arc initiation easier and to eliminate searching for the joint through a dark welding lens.

  8. Risk assessment of metal vapor arcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Monika C. (Inventor); Leidecker, Henning W. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method for assessing metal vapor arcing risk for a component is provided. The method comprises acquiring a current variable value associated with an operation of the component; comparing the current variable value with a threshold value for the variable; evaluating compared variable data to determine the metal vapor arcing risk in the component; and generating a risk assessment status for the component.

  9. Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Paul S.; Korzekwa, Deniece R.

    1999-01-01

    Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting. The level of oxygen and carbon impurities in tantalum was reduced by plasma arc melting the tantalum using a flowing plasma gas generated from a gas mixture of helium and hydrogen. The flowing plasma gases of the present invention were found to be superior to other known flowing plasma gases used for this purpose.

  10. Preventing Arc Welding From Damaging Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, Noel; Mareen, D.

    1988-01-01

    Shielding technique developed to protect sensitive electronic equipment from damage due to electromagnetic disturbances produced by arc welding. Established acceptable alternative in instances in which electronic equipment cannot be removed prior to arc welding. Guidelines established for open, unshielded welds. Procedure applicable to robotics or computer-aided manufacturing.

  11. Redundant Grounding Circuit For Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.

    1988-01-01

    Arc burns at loose ground connections prevented. Protective grounding scheme for arc-welding power supply includes four ground leads to workpiece and circuit that automatically turns off welding current if one or two ground leads becomes disconnected. Prevents burns and inadvertent welding occuring where full welding current passes through single loose ground contact.

  12. Essay on Gyroscopic Motions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tea, Peter L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Explains gyroscopic motions to college freshman or high school seniors who have learned about centripetal acceleration and the transformations of a couple. Contains several figures showing the direction of forces and motion. (YP)

  13. Arc burst pattern analysis fault detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, B. Don (Inventor); Aucoin, B. Michael (Inventor); Benner, Carl L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for detecting an arcing fault on a power line carrying a load current. Parameters indicative of power flow and possible fault events on the line, such as voltage and load current, are monitored and analyzed for an arc burst pattern exhibited by arcing faults in a power system. These arcing faults are detected by identifying bursts of each half-cycle of the fundamental current. Bursts occurring at or near a voltage peak indicate arcing on that phase. Once a faulted phase line is identified, a comparison of the current and voltage reveals whether the fault is located in a downstream direction of power flow toward customers, or upstream toward a generation station. If the fault is located downstream, the line is de-energized, and if located upstream, the line may remain energized to prevent unnecessary power outages.

  14. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1985-08-05

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

  15. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, R.S.

    1987-11-17

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile. 2 figs.

  16. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, Ronald S.

    1987-01-01

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

  17. An advanced arc track resistant airframe wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beatty, J.

    1995-11-01

    Tensolite, a custom cable manufacturer specializing in high temperature materials as the dielectric medium, develops an advance arc track resistant airframe wire called Tufflite 2000. Tufflite 2000 has the following advantages over the other traditional wires: lighter weight and smaller in diameter; excellent wet and dry arc track resistance; superior dynamic cut-through performance even at elevated temperatures; flight proven performance on Boeing 737 and 757 airplanes; and true 260 C performance by utilizing Nickel plated copper conductors. This paper reports the different tests performed on Tufflite 2000: accelerated aging, arc resistance (wet and dry), dynamic cut through, humidity resistance, wire-to-wire abrasion, flammability, smoke, weight, notch sensitivity, flexibility, and markability. It particularly focuses on the BSI (British Standards Institute) dry arc resistance test and BSI wet arc tracking.

  18. An advanced arc track resistant airframe wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, J.

    1995-01-01

    Tensolite, a custom cable manufacturer specializing in high temperature materials as the dielectric medium, develops an advance arc track resistant airframe wire called Tufflite 2000. Tufflite 2000 has the following advantages over the other traditional wires: lighter weight and smaller in diameter; excellent wet and dry arc track resistance; superior dynamic cut-through performance even at elevated temperatures; flight proven performance on Boeing 737 and 757 airplanes; and true 260 C performance by utilizing Nickel plated copper conductors. This paper reports the different tests performed on Tufflite 2000: accelerated aging, arc resistance (wet and dry), dynamic cut through, humidity resistance, wire-to-wire abrasion, flammability, smoke, weight, notch sensitivity, flexibility, and markability. It particularly focuses on the BSI (British Standards Institute) dry arc resistance test and BSI wet arc tracking.

  19. Sensor Control of Robot Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sias, F. R., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The potential for using computer vision as sensory feedback for robot gas-tungsten arc welding is investigated. The basic parameters that must be controlled while directing the movement of an arc welding torch are defined. The actions of a human welder are examined to aid in determining the sensory information that would permit a robot to make reproducible high strength welds. Special constraints imposed by both robot hardware and software are considered. Several sensory modalities that would potentially improve weld quality are examined. Special emphasis is directed to the use of computer vision for controlling gas-tungsten arc welding. Vendors of available automated seam tracking arc welding systems and of computer vision systems are surveyed. An assessment is made of the state of the art and the problems that must be solved in order to apply computer vision to robot controlled arc welding on the Space Shuttle Main Engine.

  20. Laser assisted arc welding for aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerschbach, P.W.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effector to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (<1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  1. Surface deformation and slab-mantle interaction during Banda arc subduction rollback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spakman, Wim; Hall, Robert

    2010-08-01

    The spectacularly curved Banda arc comprises young oceanic crust enclosed by a volcanic inner arc, outer arc islands and a trough parallel to the Australian continental margin. Strong seismic activity in the upper mantle defines a folded surface, for which there are two contrasting explanations: deformation of a single slab or two separate slabs subducting from the north and south. Here we combine seismic tomography with the plate tectonic evolution of the region to infer that the Banda arc results from subduction of a single slab. Our palaeogeographic reconstruction shows that a Jurassic embayment, which consisted of dense oceanic lithosphere enclosed by continental crust, once existed within the Australian plate. Banda subduction began about 15million years ago when active Java subduction tore eastwards into the embayment. The present morphology of the subducting slab is only partially controlled by the shape of the embayment. As the Australian plate moved northward at a high speed of about 7cmyr-1, the Banda oceanic slab rolled back towards the south-southeast accompanied by active delamination separating the crust from the denser mantle. Increasing resistance of the mantle to plate motion progressively folded the slab and caused strong deformation of the crust. The Banda arc represents an outstanding example of large-scale deformation of the Earth's crust in response to coupling between the crust, slab and surrounding mantle.

  2. Influence of the arc plasma parameters on the weld pool profile in TIG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toropchin, A.; Frolov, V.; Pipa, A. V.; Kozakov, R.; Uhrlandt, D.

    2014-11-01

    Magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of the arc and fluid simulations of the weld pool can be beneficial in the analysis and further development of arc welding processes and welding machines. However, the appropriate coupling of arc and weld pool simulations needs further improvement. The tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process is investigated by simulations including the weld pool. Experiments with optical diagnostics are used for the validation. A coupled computational model of the arc and the weld pool is developed using the software ANSYS CFX. The weld pool model considers the forces acting on the motion of the melt inside and on the surface of the pool, such as Marangoni, drag, electromagnetic forces and buoyancy. The experimental work includes analysis of cross-sections of the workpieces, highspeed video images and spectroscopic measurements. Experiments and calculations have been performed for various currents, distances between electrode and workpiece and nozzle diameters. The studies show the significant impact of material properties like surface tension dependence on temperature as well as of the arc structure on the weld pool behaviour and finally the weld seam depth. The experimental weld pool profiles and plasma temperatures are in good agreement with computational results.

  3. Three-dimensional modeling of the plasma arc in arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, G.; Tsai, H. L.; Hu, J.

    2008-11-15

    Most previous three-dimensional modeling on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) focuses on the weld pool dynamics and assumes the two-dimensional axisymmetric Gaussian distributions for plasma arc pressure and heat flux. In this article, a three-dimensional plasma arc model is developed, and the distributions of velocity, pressure, temperature, current density, and magnetic field of the plasma arc are calculated by solving the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy, as well as part of the Maxwell's equations. This three-dimensional model can be used to study the nonaxisymmetric plasma arc caused by external perturbations such as an external magnetic field. It also provides more accurate boundary conditions when modeling the weld pool dynamics. The present work lays a foundation for true three-dimensional comprehensive modeling of GTAW and GMAW including the plasma arc, weld pool, and/or electrode.

  4. A modular approach to intensity-modulated arc therapy optimization with noncoplanar trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, Dávid; Bortfeld, Thomas; Unkelbach, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Utilizing noncoplanar beam angles in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the potential to combine the benefits of arc therapy, such as short treatment times, with the benefits of noncoplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans, such as improved organ sparing. Recently, vendors introduced treatment machines that allow for simultaneous couch and gantry motion during beam delivery to make noncoplanar VMAT treatments possible. Our aim is to provide a reliable optimization method for noncoplanar isocentric arc therapy plan optimization. The proposed solution is modular in the sense that it can incorporate different existing beam angle selection and coplanar arc therapy optimization methods. Treatment planning is performed in three steps. First, a number of promising noncoplanar beam directions are selected using an iterative beam selection heuristic; these beams serve as anchor points of the arc therapy trajectory. In the second step, continuous gantry/couch angle trajectories are optimized using a simple combinatorial optimization model to define a beam trajectory that efficiently visits each of the anchor points. Treatment time is controlled by limiting the time the beam needs to trace the prescribed trajectory. In the third and final step, an optimal arc therapy plan is found along the prescribed beam trajectory. In principle any existing arc therapy optimization method could be incorporated into this step; for this work we use a sliding window VMAT algorithm. The approach is demonstrated using two particularly challenging cases. The first one is a lung SBRT patient whose planning goals could not be satisfied with fewer than nine noncoplanar IMRT fields when the patient was treated in the clinic. The second one is a brain tumor patient, where the target volume overlaps with the optic nerves and the chiasm and it is directly adjacent to the brainstem. Both cases illustrate that the large number of angles utilized by isocentric noncoplanar VMAT plans

  5. A modular approach to intensity-modulated arc therapy optimization with noncoplanar trajectories.

    PubMed

    Papp, Dávid; Bortfeld, Thomas; Unkelbach, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Utilizing noncoplanar beam angles in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has the potential to combine the benefits of arc therapy, such as short treatment times, with the benefits of noncoplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans, such as improved organ sparing. Recently, vendors introduced treatment machines that allow for simultaneous couch and gantry motion during beam delivery to make noncoplanar VMAT treatments possible. Our aim is to provide a reliable optimization method for noncoplanar isocentric arc therapy plan optimization. The proposed solution is modular in the sense that it can incorporate different existing beam angle selection and coplanar arc therapy optimization methods. Treatment planning is performed in three steps. First, a number of promising noncoplanar beam directions are selected using an iterative beam selection heuristic; these beams serve as anchor points of the arc therapy trajectory. In the second step, continuous gantry/couch angle trajectories are optimized using a simple combinatorial optimization model to define a beam trajectory that efficiently visits each of the anchor points. Treatment time is controlled by limiting the time the beam needs to trace the prescribed trajectory. In the third and final step, an optimal arc therapy plan is found along the prescribed beam trajectory. In principle any existing arc therapy optimization method could be incorporated into this step; for this work we use a sliding window VMAT algorithm. The approach is demonstrated using two particularly challenging cases. The first one is a lung SBRT patient whose planning goals could not be satisfied with fewer than nine noncoplanar IMRT fields when the patient was treated in the clinic. The second one is a brain tumor patient, where the target volume overlaps with the optic nerves and the chiasm and it is directly adjacent to the brainstem. Both cases illustrate that the large number of angles utilized by isocentric noncoplanar VMAT plans

  6. Objects in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    One thing scientists study is how objects move. A famous scientist named Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) spent a lot of time observing objects in motion and came up with three laws that describe how things move. This explanation only deals with the first of his three laws of motion. Newton's First Law of Motion says that moving objects will continue…

  7. The Ophiolite - Oceanic Fore-Arc Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, M. K.; Pearce, J. A.; Stern, R. J.; Ishizuka, O.; Petronotis, K. E.

    2014-12-01

    Miyashiro (1973, EPSL) put forward the hypothesis that many ophiolites are generated in subduction zone settings. More recently, ophiolitic sequences including MORB-like basalts underlying boninites or other subduction-related rock types have been linked to near-trench spreading during subduction infancy (e.g., Stern and Bloomer, 1992, GSA Bull.; Shervais, 2001, G-cubed; Stern et al., 2012, Lithos.). These contentions were given strong support by the results of Shinkai 6500 diving in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) fore-arc (e.g., Reagan et al., 2010, G-cubed; Ishizuka et al., 2011, EPSL; Reagan et al., 2013, EPSL). Based on widely spaced dives and grab sampling at disbursed dive stops, these studies concluded that the most abundant and most submerged volcanic rocks in the IBM fore-arc are MORB-like basalts (fore-arc basalts or FAB), and that these basalts appear to be part of a crustal sequence of gabbro, dolerite, FAB, boninite, and normal arc lavas overlying depleted peridotite. This ophiolitic sequence was further postulated to make up most or all of the IBM fore-arc from Guam to Japan, with similar magmatic ages (52 Ma FAB to 45 Ma arc) north to south, reflecting a western-Pacific wide subduction initiation event. At the time of this writing, IODP Expedition 352 is about to set sail, with a principal goal of drilling the entire volcanic sequence in the Bonin fore-arc. This drilling will define the compositional gradients through the volcanic sequence associated with subduction initiation and arc infancy, and test the hypothesized oceanic fore-arc - ophiolite genetic relationship. A primary goal of this expedition is to illustrate how mantle compositions and melting processes evolved during decompression melting of asthenosphere during subduction initiation to later flux melting of depleted mantle. These insights will provide important empirical constraints for geodynamic models of subduction initiation and early arc development.

  8. Plasma arc welding weld imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has a transparent shield cup disposed about the constricting nozzle, the cup including a small outwardly extending polished lip. A guide tube extends externally of the torch and has a free end adjacent to the lip. First and second optical fiber bundle assemblies are supported within the guide tube. Light from a strobe light is transmitted along one of the assemblies to the free end and through the lip onto the weld site. A lens is positioned in the guide tube adjacent to the second assembly and focuses images of the weld site onto the end of the fiber bundle of the second assembly and these images are transmitted along the second assembly to a video camera so that the weld site may be viewed continuously for monitoring the welding process.

  9. Motion discrimination of throwing a baseball using forearm electrical impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takao; Kusuhara, Toshimasa; Yamamoto, Yoshitake

    2013-04-01

    The extroversion or hyperextension of elbow joint cause disorders of elbow joint in throwing a baseball. A method, which is easy handling and to measure motion objectively, can be useful for evaluation of throwing motion. We investigated a possibility of motion discrimination of throwing a baseball using electrical impedance method. The parameters of frequency characteristics (Cole-Cole arc) of forearm electrical impedance were measured during four types of throwing a baseball. Multiple discriminant analysis was used and the independent variables were change ratios of 11 parameters of forearm electrical impedance. As results of 120 data with four types of throwing motion in three subjects, hitting ratio was very high and 95.8%. We can expect to discriminate throwing a baseball using multiple discriminant analysis of impedance parameters.

  10. Analysis of arc emission spectra of stainless steel electric arc furnace slag affected by fluctuating arc voltage.

    PubMed

    Aula, Matti; Mäkinen, Ari; Fabritius, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Control of chromium oxidation in the electric arc furnace (EAF) is a significant problem in stainless steel production due to variations of the chemical compositions in the EAF charge. One potential method to control chromium oxidation is to analyze the emission spectrum of the electric arc in order to find indicators of rising chromium content in slag. The purpose of this study was to determine if slag composition can be gained by utilizing electric arc emission spectra in the laboratory environment, despite electric arc voltage fluctuations and varying slag composition. The purpose of inducing voltage fluctuation was to simulate changes in the industrial EAF process. The slag samples were obtained from Outokumpu Stainless Oy Tornio Works, and three different arc currents were used. The correlation analysis showed that the emission spectra offer numerous peak ratios with high correlations to the X-ray fluorescence-measured slag CrO(x)/FeO(x) and MnO/SiO2 ratios. These ratios are useful in determining if the reduction agents have been depleted in the EAF. The results suggest that analysis of laboratory-scale electric arc emission spectra is suitable for indicating the high CrO(x) or MnO content of the slag despite the arc fluctuations. Reliable analysis of other slag components was not successful.

  11. Root canal irrigants

    PubMed Central

    Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu

    2010-01-01

    Successful root canal therapy relies on the combination of proper instrumentation, irrigation, and obturation of the root canal. Of these three essential steps of root canal therapy, irrigation of the root canal is the most important determinant in the healing of the periapical tissues. The primary endodontic treatment goal must thus be to optimize root canal disinfection and to prevent reinfection. In this review of the literature, various irrigants and the interactions between irrigants are discussed. We performed a Medline search for English-language papers published untill July 2010. The keywords used were ‘root canal irrigants’ and ‘endodontic irrigants.’ The reference lists of each article were manually checked for additional articles of relevance. PMID:21217955

  12. Modeling the role of back-arc spreading in controlling 3-D circulation and temperature patterns in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kincaid, C.

    2005-12-01

    Subduction of oceanic lithosphere provides a dominant driving force for mantle dynamics and plate tectonics, and strongly modulates the thermal evolution of the mantle. Magma generation in arc environments is related to slab temperatures, slab dehydration/wedge hydration processes and circulation patterns in the mantle wedge. A series of laboratory experiments is used to model three-dimensional aspects of flow in subduction zones, and the consequent temperature variations in the slab and overlying mantle wedge. The experiments utilize a tank of glucose syrup to simulate the mantle and a Phenolic plate to represent subducting oceanic lithosphere. Different modes of plate sinking are produced using hydraulic pistons. The effects of longitudinal, rollback and slab-steepening components of slab motions are considered, along with different thicknesses of the over-riding lithosphere. Models look specifically at how distinct modes of back-arc spreading alter subduction zone temperatures and flow in the mantle wedge. Results show remarkably different temperature and circulation patterns when spreading is produced by rollback of the trench-slab-arc relative to a stationary overriding back-arc plate versus spreading due to motion of the overriding plate away from a fixed trench location. For rollback-induced spreading, flow trajectories in the wedge are shallow (e.g., limited upwelling), both the sub-arc and back-arc regions are supplied by material flowing around the receding slab. Flow lines in the sub-arc wedge are strongly trench-parallel. In these cases, strong lateral variations in slab surface temperature (SST) are recorded (hot at plate center, cool at plate edge). When the trench is fixed in space and spreading is produced by motion of the overriding plate, strong vertical flow velocities are recorded in the wedge, both the shallow sub-arc and back-arc regions are supplied by flow from under the overriding plate producing strong vertical shear. In these cases SSTs

  13. Motion of the Scotia sea plates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, C.; Livermore, R.; Pollitz, F.

    2003-01-01

    Earthquake data from the Scotia Arc to early 2002 are reviewed in the light of satellite gravity and other data in order to derive a model for the motion of plates in the Scotia Sea region. Events with magnitude ???5, which occurred on or near the boundaries of the Scotia and Sandwich plates, and for which Centroid Moment Tensor (CMT) solutions are available, are examined. The newer data fill some of the previous sampling gaps along the boundaries of the Scotia and Sandwich plates, and provide tighter constraints on relative motions. Variations in the width of the Brunhes anomaly on evenly spaced marine magnetic profiles over the East Scotia Ridge provide new estimates of Scotia-Sandwich plate spreading rates. Since there are no stable fracture zones in the east Scotia Sea, the mean azimuth of sea floor fabric mapped by sidescan is used to constrain the direction of spreading. 18 new rate estimates and four azimuths from the East Scotia Ridge are combined with 68 selected earthquake slip vectors from the boundaries of the Scotia Sea in a least-squares inversion for the best-fitting set of Euler poles and angular rotation rates describing the 'present-day' motions of the Scotia and Sandwich plates relative to South America and Antarctica. Our preferred model (TLP2003) gives poles that are similar to previous estimates, except for Scotia Plate motion with respect to South America, which is significantly different from earlier estimates; predicted rates of motion also differ slightly. Our results are much more robust than earlier work. We examine the implications of the model for motion and deformation along the various plate boundaries, with particular reference to the North and South Scotia Ridges, where rates are obtained by closure.

  14. Arc Evolution in Response to the Subduction of Buoyant Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Luke; Fourel, Loic; Goes, Saskia; Morra, Gabriele

    2015-04-01

    The subduction of buoyant features such as aseismic ridges or oceanic plateaux has been invoked to explain arc deformation, flat subduction and increase in seismic coupling. Other studies have challenged these ideas, attributing a larger role to the overriding plate. However, many open questions remain about the dynamics of the relative simple case of a single freely subducting plate. How big does a plateau need to be to change the arc shape? What is the control of plate's strength on the impact of buoyant features? How do the velocities adapt to the subduction of less dense material? In the present study, we propose a systematic approach in order to tackle these questions. We use a new 3-D coupled fluid-solid subduction model where the interaction between the slab and the isoviscous mantle is only calculated on the slab surface, significantly increasing computational efficiency. The oceanic plate rheology is visco-elasto-plastic and its top surface is free. We find that arc shape is significantly altered by the subduction of buoyant plateaux. Along the subduction plane through the plateau and depending on its size, the dip angle and the retreat velocity significantly decrease. Flat subduction is obtained in the case of large and strongly buoyant plateau/ridge. An interesting feature is that retreat velocity increases right after the plateau or ridge has finished subducting in order to catch up with the rest of the plate. The gradient in retreat velocity obtained along the trench may cause the slab to have a heterogeneous response to ridge push, eventually leading to slab advance where buoyant material is present. We apply our models to the Izu-Bonin-Marianas (IBM) trench and propose that subduction of the buoyant Caroline Island Ridge at the southern edge of the Mariana trench can explain both trench motion history and the current morphology of the IBM slab as imaged by seismic tomography.

  15. Subduction initiation adjacent to a relic island arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, W.; Gurnis, M.

    2013-12-01

    Although plate tectonics is well established, how subduction initiates over tectonic history has remained obscure. It has been proposed that passive margins may be a possible place for subduction initiation, but there is no obvious Cenozoic example of such a scenario, including along the passive margins of the Atlantic Ocean. With a computational method that follows the deformation of a visco-elasto-plastic medium, here we show that a favourable locale for subduction initiation is the juxtaposition of an old oceanic plate adjacent to a young, but relic arc. Significant density anomalies leading to subduction initiation arise from two major factors. One is the compositional difference between the relic arc crust and the oceanic lithospheric mantle; the other is the thermal difference due to the age offset between the two plates. With such a setup, we observe spontaneous subduction initiation if the oceanic crust is significantly weakened by pore fluid pressure. If the oceanic crust is relatively strong, a small amount of plate convergence is required to induce subduction. The evidence that Izu-Bonin-Mariana and Tonga-Kermedec subduction zones both initiate adjacent to a relic island arc support our conclusions. The initiation of both subduction zones at 51-52 Ma with commensurate compression on their respective overriding plates support a causal link between both subduction initiation events through a change in Pacific Plate motion. Our results provide an explanation for the rarity of subduction initiation at the passive margins. The continental lithosphere is typically old and cold. Consequently, the thermal effects cancel the compositional buoyancy contrast between the continental crust and the oceanic lithospheric mantle, making subduction initiation difficult at passive margins.

  16. Unsteady aerodynamic modeling for arbitrary motions. [for active control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Results indicating that unsteady aerodynamic loads derived under the assumption of simple harmonic motions executed by airfoil or wing can be extended to arbitrary motions are summarized. The generalized Theodorsen (1953) function referable to loads due to simple harmonic oscillations of a wing section in incompressible flow, the Laplace inversion integral for unsteady aerodynamic loads, calculations of root loci of aeroelastic loads, and analysis of generalized compressible transient airloads are discussed.

  17. Subduction, back-arc spreading and global mantle flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, B. H.; Oconnell, R. J.; Raefsky, A.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that the subducted lithosphere associated with Benioff zones provides the only direct evidence about the flow in the earth's interior associated with plate motions. It is the primary objective of the present investigation to study the relation between the orientation of subducting lithosphere and the flow patterns (both local and global) near subduction zones. Most of the calculations conducted are based on simple flow models for radially symmetric, Newtonian viscous spheres. The investigation is concerned with the possibility that a simple model of global mantle flow could account for some features of subduction zones. It is found that such a model can account for the orientation of the seismic zones, and, in addition, also for features related to back-arc spreading and perhaps the maximum earthquake size.

  18. Acoustic characteristics of electric arc furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherednichenko, V. S.; Bikeev, R. A.; Cherednichenko, A. V.; Ognev, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model is constructed to describe the appearance and development of the noise characteristics of superpower electric arc furnaces. The noise formation is shown to be related to the pulsation of the axial plasma flows in arc discharges because of the electrodynamic pressure oscillations caused by the interaction of the self-magnetic field with the current passing in an arc. The pressure in the arc axis changes at a frequency of 100 Hz at the maximum operating pressure of 66 kPa for an arc current of 80 kA. The main ac arc sound frequencies are multiples of 100 Hz, which is supported in the practice of operation of electric arc furnaces. The sound intensity in the furnace laboratory reaches 160 dB and is decreased to 115-120 dB in the working furnace area due to shielding by the furnace jacket, the molten metal, and the molten slag. The appropriateness of increasing the hermetic sealing of electric furnaces and creating furnaces operating at low currents and high transformer voltages is corroborated.

  19. Initial development of the Banda Volcanic Arc

    SciTech Connect

    Hartono, H.M.S. )

    1990-06-01

    The initial development of the Banda Volcanic Arc can be determined by obtaining absolute ages of granites or volcanics, stratigraphy of the Eocene Metan Volcanics of Timor as the oldest formation containing Banda Volcanic Arc extrusives, and tectonic analysis. Banda Arc volcanism is the result of subduction of oceanic crust under the volcanic arc. The time of initial subduction is related to initial seafloor spreading between Australia and Antarctica, which is identical to geomagnetic polarity time 34 (82 mybp). Therefore, 82 mybp can be used as one of the criteria to determine the birth of the Banda Volcanic Arc. With present available time data for determining the birth of the Banda Volcanic Arc, the minimum age coincides with the age of the Metan Volcanics (Eocene, 39-56 mybp) and the maximum age coincides with initial seafloor spreading between Australia and Antarctica (82 mybp). This time span is too long. With the assumption that it needs some time to develop from transcurrent faulting to subduction and volcanism, it is proposed that the initial development of Banda Arc volcanism was during early Tertiary.

  20. Ultrasound in arc welding: a review.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Tiago Vieira; Bohórquez, Carlos Enrique Niño

    2015-02-01

    During the last decade, the introduction of ultrasound techniques in arc welding with the intention of improving the operational performance and technical characteristics of the welding processes have been studied intensively. In this work is presented a broad review of the literature surrounding the utilization of this technique. Firstly, we discuss the use of traditional mechanical transducers to generate ultrasound in arc welding. Furthermore, we describe the various methods and their application in arc-welding processes. After, is presented a recent method of introducing ultrasonic energy in arc welding, which forms a potential alternative to the use of traditional mechanical type transducers. This method was originally developed in the late 1990s and is called arc with ultrasonic excitation of current. Here, the arc acts not only as a thermal source but also as an emission mechanism for ultrasound, acting directly on the weld pool. We presented and discussed various innovative concepts based on this method, which allows the introduction of ultrasonic energy in the arc welding without the need of any auxiliary device of welding. In addition, we also presented the variations of this method reported in the literature. Finally, we have described the respective effects attributed to the use of this method in the welding of different materials using various welding processes.

  1. Towards a theory for Neptune's arc rings

    SciTech Connect

    Goldreich, P.; Tremaine, S.; Borderies, N.

    1986-08-01

    It is proposed that the incomplete rings of Neptune consist of a number of short arcs centered on the corotation resonances of a single satellite. The satellite must have a radius of the order of 100 km or more and move on an inclined orbit. Corotation resonances are located at potential maxima. Thus, mechanical energy dissipated by interparticle collisions must be continually replenished to prevent the arcs from spreading. It is shown that each corotation resonance is associated with a nearby Lindblad resonance, which excites the ring particles' orbital eccentricity, thus supplying the energy required to maintain the arc. The ultimate energy reservoir is the satellite's orbital energy. Therefore, interaction with the arcs damps the satellite's orbital inclination. The self-gravity of the arcs limits their contraction and enforces a relation between arc length and mass. The estimated arc masses are so small, of the order of 10 to the 16th g, that the satellite's orbital inclination suffers negligible decay over the age of the solar system. The inferred surface mass densities are comparable to those found in the major rings of Saturn and Uranus. 15 references.

  2. Ultrasound in arc welding: a review.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Tiago Vieira; Bohórquez, Carlos Enrique Niño

    2015-02-01

    During the last decade, the introduction of ultrasound techniques in arc welding with the intention of improving the operational performance and technical characteristics of the welding processes have been studied intensively. In this work is presented a broad review of the literature surrounding the utilization of this technique. Firstly, we discuss the use of traditional mechanical transducers to generate ultrasound in arc welding. Furthermore, we describe the various methods and their application in arc-welding processes. After, is presented a recent method of introducing ultrasonic energy in arc welding, which forms a potential alternative to the use of traditional mechanical type transducers. This method was originally developed in the late 1990s and is called arc with ultrasonic excitation of current. Here, the arc acts not only as a thermal source but also as an emission mechanism for ultrasound, acting directly on the weld pool. We presented and discussed various innovative concepts based on this method, which allows the introduction of ultrasonic energy in the arc welding without the need of any auxiliary device of welding. In addition, we also presented the variations of this method reported in the literature. Finally, we have described the respective effects attributed to the use of this method in the welding of different materials using various welding processes. PMID:25455190

  3. Contribution For Arc Temperature Affected By Current Increment Ratio At Peak Current In Pulsed Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Ryota; Mitubori, Hironori; Iwao, Toru

    2015-11-01

    Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding is one of the high quality welding. However, parameters of the pulsed arc welding are many and complicated. if the welding parameters are not appropriate, the welding pool shape becomes wide and shallow.the convection of driving force contributes to the welding pool shape. However, in the case of changing current waveform as the pulse high frequency TIG welding, the arc temperature does not follow the change of the current. Other result of the calculation, in particular, the arc temperature at the reaching time of peak current is based on these considerations. Thus, the accurate measurement of the temperature at the time is required. Therefore, the objective of this research is the elucidation of contribution for arc temperature affected by current increment ratio at peak current in pulsed arc. It should obtain a detail knowledge of the welding model in pulsed arc. The temperature in the case of increment of the peak current from the base current is measured by using spectroscopy. As a result, when the arc current increases from 100 A to 150 A at 120 ms, the transient response of the temperature didn't occur during increasing current. Thus, during the current rise, it has been verified by measuring. Therefore, the contribution for arc temperature affected by current increment ratio at peak current in pulsed arc was elucidated in order to obtain more knowledge of welding model of pulsed arc.

  4. Reconstruction of Late Cretaceous Magmatic Arcs in the Northern Andes: Single Versus Multiple Arc Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, A.; Jaramillo, J. S.; Leon, S.; Hincapie, S.; Mejia, D.; Patino, A. M.; Vanegas, J.; Zapata, S.; Valencia, V.; Jimenez, G.; Monsalve, G.

    2014-12-01

    Although magmatic rocks are major tracers of the geological evolution of convergent margins, pre-collisional events such as subduction erosion, collisional thrusting or late collisional strike slip segmentation may difficult the recognizing of multiple arc systems and therefore the existence of paleogeographic scenarios with multiple subduction systems. New field, U-Pb geochronology and whole rock geochemistry constraints from the northwestern segment of the Central Cordillera in the states of Antioquia and Caldas (Colombia) are used to understand the nature of the Late Cretaceous arc magmatism and evaluate the existence of single or multiple Pacific and Caribbean arc systems in the growth of the Northwestern Andes. The new results integrated with additional field and published information is used to suggest the existence of at least three different magmatic arcs. (1) An Eastern Continental arc built within a well defined Permian to Triassic continental crust that record a protracted 90-70 Ma magmatic evolution, (2) a 90-80 arc formed within attenuated continental crust and associated oceanic crust, (3) 90-88 Ma arc formed over a Late Cretaceous plateau crust. The eastern arcs were formed as part of double eastern vergent subduction system, where the most outboard arc represent a fringing arc formed over detached fragments of continental crust, whereas the easternmost continental arc growth by the closure an subduction of and older and broad Triassic to Early Jurassic back-arc ocean. Its closure also end up in ophiolite emplacement. The third allochtonous oceanic arc was formed over the Caribbean plateau crust and was accreted to the continental margin in the Late Cretaceous. Ongoing paleomagnetic, deformational, gravimetric and basin analysis will be integrate to test this model and understand the complex Late Cretaceous tectonic evolution of the Northern Andes.

  5. Human joint motion estimation for electromyography (EMG)-based dynamic motion control.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Hosoda, Ryo; Venture, Gentiane

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to investigate a joint motion estimation method from Electromyography (EMG) signals during dynamic movement. In most EMG-based humanoid or prosthetics control systems, EMG features were directly or indirectly used to trigger intended motions. However, both physiological and nonphysiological factors can influence EMG characteristics during dynamic movements, resulting in subject-specific, non-stationary and crosstalk problems. Particularly, when motion velocity and/or joint torque are not constrained, joint motion estimation from EMG signals are more challenging. In this paper, we propose a joint motion estimation method based on muscle activation recorded from a pair of agonist and antagonist muscles of the joint. A linear state-space model with multi input single output is proposed to map the muscle activity to joint motion. An adaptive estimation method is proposed to train the model. The estimation performance is evaluated in performing a single elbow flexion-extension movement in two subjects. All the results in two subjects at two load levels indicate the feasibility and suitability of the proposed method in joint motion estimation. The estimation root-mean-square error is within 8.3% ∼ 10.6%, which is lower than that being reported in several previous studies. Moreover, this method is able to overcome subject-specific problem and compensate non-stationary EMG properties.

  6. Flexible Momentum Compaction Return Arcs for RLAs

    SciTech Connect

    Trbojevic, Dejan; Bogacz, Alex; Bogacz, Slawomir; Bogacz, Alex; Bogacz, Slawomir; Johnson, Rolland; Popovic, Milorad

    2008-07-01

    Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders require rapid acceleration of short-lived muons to multi-GeV and TeV energies. A Recirculating Linear Accelerator (RLA) that uses a single Linac and teardrop return arcs can provide exceptionally fast and economical acceleration to the extent that the focusing range of the RLA quadrupoles allows each muon to pass several times through each high-gradient cavity and the cost of the return arcs is appropriate. Flexible Momentum Compaction (FMC) lattice designs for the teardrop return arcs provide sufficient momentum acceptance to allow multiple passes of each sign of muon in one string of magnets to improve cost-effectiveness.

  7. Formation of the G-ring arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, N. C. S.; Vieira Neto, E.; Foryta, D. W.

    2016-09-01

    Since 2004, the images obtained by the Cassini spacecraft's on-board cameras have revealed the existence of several small satellites in the Saturn system. Some of these small satellites are embedded in arcs of particles. While these satellites and their arcs are known to be in corotation resonances with Mimas, their origin remains unknown. This work investigates one possible process for capturing bodies into a corotation resonance, which involves increasing the eccentricity of a perturbing body. Therefore, through numerical simulations and analytical studies, we show a scenario in which the excitation of Mimas's eccentricity could capture particles in a corotation resonance. This is a possible explanation for the origin of the arcs.

  8. The Global Array of Primitve Arc Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M. W.; Jagoutz, O. E.

    2015-12-01

    A longstanding question concerns the nature of the melts forming in the subarc mantle and giving rise to arc magmatism. The global array of primitive arc melts (1180 volcanic rocks in 25 arcs extracted from the georoc database, calculated to be in equilibrium with mantle olivine) yields five principal melt types: calc-alkaline basalts and high-Mg andesites, tholeiitic basalts and high-Mg andesites, and shoshonitic or alkaline arc melts; many arcs have more than one type. Primitive calc-alkaline basalts occur in 11 arcs but most strikingly, 8 continental arcs (incl. Aleutians, Cascades, Japan, Mexico, Kamtschatka) have a continuous range of calc-alkaline basalts to high-Mg andesites with mostly 48-58 wt% SiO2. In each arc, these are spatially congruent, trace element patterns overlap, and major elements form a continuum. Their Ca-Mg-Si systematics suggests saturation in olivine+opx+cpx. We hence interpret the large majority of high-Mg andesites as derived from primitive calc-alkaline basalts through fractionation and reaction in the shallower mantle. Removal of anhydrous mantle phases at lower pressures increases SiO2 and H2O-contents while Mg# and Ni remain buffered to mantle values. Primitive tholeiitic basalts (Cascades, Kermadec, Marianas, Izu-Bonin, Japan, Palau, Sunda) have a much lesser subduction signal (e.g. in LILE) than the calc-alkaline suite. These tholeiites have been interpreted to form through decompression melting, but also characterize young intraoceanic arcs. In the two continental arcs with both tholeiitic and calc-alkaline primitive basalts (clearly distinct in trace patterns), there is no clear spatial segregation (Casacades, Japan). Three intraoceanic arcs (Marianas, Izu-Bonin, Tonga) have primitive tholeiitic, highly depleted high-Mg andesites (boninites) with HFSE and HREE slightly above primitive mantle values. These deviate in majors from the array formed by the basalts and calc-alkaline andesites suggesting that only these formed from a

  9. Modeling Multi-Arc Spraying Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.

    2016-06-01

    The use of plasma as energy source in thermal spraying enables among others the processing of feed stock materials with very high melting temperatures as coating materials. New generation multi-arc plasma spraying systems are widely spread and promise several advantages in comparison to the conventional single-arc systems. Numerical modeling of multi-arc plasma spraying offers the possibility to increase the understanding about this process. This study focuses on the numerical modeling of three-cathode spraying systems, introducing the recent activities in this field and discussing the numerical aspects which influence the prediction power of the models.

  10. Melting Efficiency During Plasma Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, J.C.; Evans, D. M.; Tang, W.; Nunes, A. C.

    1999-01-01

    A series of partial penetration Variable Polarity Plasma Arc welds were made at equal power but various combinations of current and voltage on 2219 aluminum. Arc Efficiency was measured calorimetrically and ranged between 48% and 66%. Melting efficiency depends on the weld pool shape. Increased current increases the melting efficiency as it increases the depth to width ratio of the weld pool. Higher currents are thought to raise arc pressure and depress the liquid at the bottom of the weld pool causing a more nearly two dimensional heat flow condition.

  11. Metal vapor arc switch electromagnetic accelerator technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mongeau, P. P.

    1984-01-01

    A multielectrode device housed in an insulator vacuum vessel, the metal vapor vacuum switch has high power capability and can hold off voltages up to the 100 kilovolt level. Such switches can be electronically triggered and can interrupt or commutate at a zero current crossing. The physics of arc initiation, arc conduction, and interruption are examined, including material considerations; inefficiencies; arc modes; magnetic field effects; passive and forced extinction; and voltage recovery. Heating, electrode lifetime, device configuration, and external circuit configuration are discussed. The metal vapor vacuum switch is compared with SCRs, GTOs, spark gaps, ignitrons, and mechanical breakers.

  12. Electrical Arc Ignition Testing for Constellation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Kyle; Gallus, Timothy; Smith, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Materials and Processes Branch requested that NASA JSC White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) perform testing for the Constellation Program to evaluate the hazard of electrical arc ignition of materials that could be in close proximity to batteries. Specifically, WSTF was requested to perform wire-break electrical arc tests to determine the current threshold for ignition of generic cotton woven fabric samples with a fixed voltage of 3.7 V, a common voltage for hand-held electrical devices. The wire-break test was developed during a previous test program to evaluate the hazard of electrical arc ignition inside the Extravehicular Mobility Unit [1].

  13. Arc - arc collisional tectonics within the Central Mobile Belt of the Newfoundland Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagorevski, A.; Rogers, N.; van Staal, C. R.; McNicoll, V. J.; Valverde-Vaquero, P.

    2007-12-01

    The Central Mobile Belt of Newfoundland Appalachians records the Ordovician arc - arc collision between the peri-Laurentian Red Indian Lake Arc of the Annieopsquotch accretionary tract (c. 480-460 Ma), and the peri- Gondwanan Victoria - Popelogan Arc (c. 473-453 Ma), which marks the closure of the Cambro-Ordovician Iapetus Ocean. Although the arc systems are in part coeval, they are distinguishable by the preservation of distinct structural histories and stratigraphies, unique basement characteristics as demonstrated by lead isotopic values of volcanic massive sulphide deposits and faunal differences. A modern analogue of such an arc - arc collision is observed in the Molucca and Solomon seas of the southwest Pacific. From such modern analogues it is evident that the Victoria - Popelogan Arc occupied a lower-plate setting during collision. This tectonic setting is demonstrated by subsidence of the Victoria - Popelogan Arc similar to the collision induced subsidence that is developed on the Australian active margin and Halmahera arcs of the Southwest Pacific. The timing of Victoria - Popelogan Arc subsidence is constrained by three age dates that form the last vestiges of arc volcanism (457 ± 2; 456.8 ± 3.1; 457 ± 3.6 Ma). These volcanic rocks are immediately overlain by Caradocian black shale of the Point Leamington Formation that marks the base of the Badger Group and the initiation of a successor basin. Caradocian black shale is noticeably absent from the top of the Red Indian Lake Arc with this time interval instead represented by a sub-Silurian unconformity, formed in response to collisional uplift. Emergence of the peri- Laurentian margin is demonstrated by detritus from it preserved in the Badger Group, which as it stratigraphically overlies the peri-Gondwanan Victoria - Popelogan Arc, requires that Iapetus was closed by this time. Following this collision, subduction stepped back into the outboard Tetagouche - Exploits back-arc basin. Whereas correlative

  14. Linear volcanic segments in the Sunda Arc, Indonesia: Implications for arc lithosphere control upon volcano distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, C. G.; Pacey, A.; McCaffrey, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    The overall curvature of many subduction zones is immediately apparent and the term island arc betrays the common assumption that subduction zone magmatism occurs in curved zones. This assumption can be expressed by approximating island arcs as segments of small circles on the surface of a sphere. Such treatments predict that the location of arc volcanoes is related to their vertical separation from the slab (in fact, the depth to seismicity in the slab) and require that the primary control on the locus of magmatism lies either within the subducted slab or the mantle wedge that separates the subducted and overriding lithospheric plates. The concept of curved arcs ignores longstanding observations that magmatism in many subduction systems occurs as segments of linearly arranged volcanic centres. Further evidence for this distribution comes from the close relationship between magmatism and large scale, arc-parallel fabrics in some arcs. Similarly, exposures of deep arc crust or mantle often reveal elongation of magmatic intrusions sub-parallel to the inferred trend of the arc. The Sunda Arc forms the Indonesian islands from Sumatra to Alor and provides an important test for models of volcano distribution for several reasons. First, Sunda has hosted abundant historic volcanic activity. Second, with the notable exception of Krakatau, every volcano in the arc is subaerial from base to cone and, therefore, can be readily identified where there is a suitable extent of local mapping that can be used to ground-truth satellite imagery. Third, there are significant changes in the stress regime along the length of the arc, allowing the influence of the upper plate to be evaluated by comparison of different arc segments. Finally, much of the Sunda Arc has proved difficult to accommodate in models that try to relate volcano distribution to the depth to the subducted slab. We apply an objective line-fitting protocol; the Hough Transform, to explore the distribution of volcanoes

  15. Irrational Square Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misiurewicz, Michal

    2013-01-01

    If students are presented the standard proof of irrationality of [square root]2, can they generalize it to a proof of the irrationality of "[square root]p", "p" a prime if, instead of considering divisibility by "p", they cling to the notions of even and odd used in the standard proof?

  16. Trees and Roots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lethonee A.

    Constructing a family history can be significant in helping persons understand and appreciate the root system that supports and sustains them. Oral history can be a valuable resource in family research as Alex Haley demonstrated in writing "Roots." The major difficulty of using oral tradition in tracing a family history is that family members with…

  17. Modeling of the anode surface deformation in high-current vacuum arcs with AMF contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaolong; Wang, Lijun; Deng, Jie; Jia, Shenli; Qin, Kang; Shi, Zongqian

    2016-02-01

    azimuthal velocity of the anode melting pool for arc current 12.5 kA root-mean-square (rms) is larger than that for 17.5 kA (rms), which is likely to be caused by the thinner liquid layer, and also a smaller melting pool mass of 12.5 kA.

  18. Root Nutrient Foraging1

    PubMed Central

    Giehl, Ricardo F.H.; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2014-01-01

    During a plant's lifecycle, the availability of nutrients in the soil is mostly heterogeneous in space and time. Plants are able to adapt to nutrient shortage or localized nutrient availability by altering their root system architecture to efficiently explore soil zones containing the limited nutrient. It has been shown that the deficiency of different nutrients induces root architectural and morphological changes that are, at least to some extent, nutrient specific. Here, we highlight what is known about the importance of individual root system components for nutrient acquisition and how developmental and physiological responses can be coupled to increase nutrient foraging by roots. In addition, we review prominent molecular mechanisms involved in altering the root system in response to local nutrient availability or to the plant's nutritional status. PMID:25082891

  19. Effects of shielding gas hydrogen content on the arc behavior in gas tungsten arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Onsoien, M.I.; Olson, D.L.; Liu, S.

    1994-12-31

    The primary role of the shielding gas in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) is to protect the weld pool and tungsten electrode from the oxygen and nitrogen in the surrounding atmosphere. Traditionally inert gases such as argon and helium have been used, either as pure gases or mixed with each other. However, additions of small amounts of hydrogen have been reported to improve weld bead penetration and enable higher welding speeds to be used. The present work was performed to investigate the effect of small hydrogen additions on the arc behavior in GTAW, and to further the fundamental understanding of the effect of shielding gas on arc characteristics. GTAW bead-on-plate welds were made on 12.5 mm x 150 mm x 75 mm Type 304 stainless steel test coupons. The welding current, voltage, and their variations were continuously monitored during welding. After welding, each test coupon was sectioned and prepared using standard metallographic techniques and etched in Vilella`s etch for macroexamination of the weld bead cross section. Bead width, depth, and cross-sectional area were measured using a LECO image analysator system. The influence of hydrogen content in an argon has tungsten arc was characterized. The electrical behavior of the arc, including the arc resistance, was measured as a function of current and hydrogen content. A better fundamental understanding of arc behavior and energy transfer was achieved using these experimental gas mixes. The results allow the following conclusions to be drawn: (1) Small additions of hydrogen in the argon based shielding gas in gas tungsten arc welding significantly change the weld bead geometry due to changes in the arc column. (2) Selection of the right argon, hydrogen shielding gas mixture to give the optimum arc column characteristics for a given condition can improve weld quality and increase productivity. (3) The resistance of the arc column was found to be an adequate parameter to describe the arc column behavior.

  20. Numerical investigations of arc behaviour in gas metal arc welding using ANSYS CFX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnick, M.; Fuessel, U.; Hertel, M.; Spille-Kohoff, A.; Murphy, A. B.

    2011-06-01

    Current numerical models of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) are trying to combine magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) models of the arc and volume of fluid (VoF) models of metal transfer. They neglect vaporization and assume an argon atmosphere for the arc region, as it is common practice for models of gas tungsten arc welding. These models predict temperatures above 20 000 K and a temperature distribution similar to tungsten inert gas (TIG) arcs. However, current spectroscopic temperature measurements in GMAW arcs demonstrate much lower arc temperatures. In contrast to TIG arcs they found a central local minimum of the radial temperature distribution. The paper presents a GMAW arc model that considers metal vapour and which is in a very good agreement with experimentally observed temperatures. Furthermore, the model is able to predict the local central minimum in the radial temperature and the radial electric current density distributions for the first time. The axially symmetric model of the welding torch, the work piece, the wire and the arc (fluid domain) implements MHD as well as turbulent mixing and thermal demixing of metal vapour in argon. The mass fraction of iron vapour obtained from the simulation shows an accumulation in the arc core and another accumulation on the fringes of the arc at 2000 to 5000 K. The demixing effects lead to very low concentrations of iron between these two regions. Sensitive analyses demonstrate the influence of the transport and radiation properties of metal vapour, and the evaporation rate relative to the wire feed. Finally the model predictions are compared with the measuring results of Zielińska et al.

  1. Lifespans of Cascade Arc volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    Compiled argon ages reveal inception, eruptive episodes, ages, and durations of Cascade stratovolcanoes and their ancestral predecessors. Geologic mapping and geochronology show that most Cascade volcanoes grew episodically on multiple scales with periods of elevated behavior lasting hundreds of years to ca. 100 kyr. Notable examples include the paleomag-constrained, few-hundred-year-long building of the entire 15-20 km3 Shastina edifice at Mt. Shasta, the 100 kyr-long episode that produced half of Mt. Rainier's output, and the 30 kyr-long episode responsible for all of South and Middle Sister. Despite significant differences in timing and rates of construction, total durations of active and ancestral volcanoes at discrete central-vent locations are similar. Glacier Peak, Mt. Rainier, Mt. Adams, Mt. Hood, and Mt. Mazama all have inception ages of 400-600 ka. Mt. St. Helens, Mt. Jefferson, Newberry Volcano, Mt. Shasta and Lassen Domefield have more recent inception ages of 200-300 ka. Only the Sisters cluster and Mt. Baker have established eruptive histories spanning less than 50 kyr. Ancestral volcanoes centered 5-20 km from active stratocones appear to have similar total durations (200-600 kyr), but are less well exposed and dated. The underlying mechanisms governing volcano lifecycles are cryptic, presumably involving tectonic and plumbing changes and perhaps circulation cycles in the mantle wedge, but are remarkably consistent along the arc.

  2. Stretched arc discharge in produced water.

    PubMed

    Cho, Y I; Wright, K C; Kim, H S; Cho, D J; Rabinovich, A; Fridman, A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of stretching an arc discharge in produced water to increase the volume of produced water treated by plasma. Produced water is the wastewater generated by hydraulic fracturing of shale during the production phase in shale-oil or shale-gas exploration. The electric conductivity of produced water is in the range of 50-200 mS/cm, which provides both a challenge and opportunity for the application of plasmas. Stretching of an arc discharge in produced water was accomplished using a ground electrode and two high-voltage electrodes: one positioned close to the ground electrode and the other positioned farther away from the ground. The benefit of stretching the arc is that the contact between the arc and water is significantly increased, resulting in more efficient plasma treatment in both performance and energy cost. PMID:25638080

  3. Laboratory arc furnace features interchangeable hearths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. L.; Kruger, O. L.

    1967-01-01

    Laboratory arc furnace using rapidly interchangeable hearths gains considerable versatility in casting so that buttons or special shaped castings can be produced. It features a sight glass for observation.

  4. Detached auroral arcs in the trough region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anger, C. D.; Moshupi, M. C.; Wallis, D. D.; Murphree, J. S.; Brace, L. H.; Shepherd, G. G.

    1978-01-01

    In a previous paper, Moshupi et al. (1977) have reported on the occurrence of rare auroral 'patches' equatorward of the normally well-defined boundary of diffuse aurora. Some less spectacular but more common arclike features were observed in the same 'trough' region (between the plasmapause and the auroral oval) during the period 1972-1975. These 'detached' arcs show some similarities to stable auroral red arcs in terms of their location and occurrence, but are completely different spectroscopically in that the stable auroral red arcs produce almost pure atomic oxygen red line emissions, whereas the detached arcs are deficient in red line emission - a feature implying totally different production mechanisms. The characteristics of the detached lines are described, including their unusual local time/longitude dependence.

  5. Stretched arc discharge in produced water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y. I.; Wright, K. C.; Kim, H. S.; Cho, D. J.; Rabinovich, A.; Fridman, A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of stretching an arc discharge in produced water to increase the volume of produced water treated by plasma. Produced water is the wastewater generated by hydraulic fracturing of shale during the production phase in shale-oil or shale-gas exploration. The electric conductivity of produced water is in the range of 50-200 mS/cm, which provides both a challenge and opportunity for the application of plasmas. Stretching of an arc discharge in produced water was accomplished using a ground electrode and two high-voltage electrodes: one positioned close to the ground electrode and the other positioned farther away from the ground. The benefit of stretching the arc is that the contact between the arc and water is significantly increased, resulting in more efficient plasma treatment in both performance and energy cost.

  6. Arc tracks on nanostructured surfaces after microbreakdowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinelnikov, D.; Bulgadaryan, D.; Hwangbo, D.; Kajita, S.; Kolodko, D.; Kurnaev, V.; Ohno, N.

    2016-09-01

    Studying of initial steps of unipolar arc ignition process is important for reduction of probability of arcing between the plasma and the wall in thermonuclear devices. Tungsten nano-fuzz surface formed by helium plasma irradiation at high fluences and temperatures is a perfect material for arc ignition. Snowflake-like craters were detected on the fuzzy surfaces after short micro-breakdowns. Such sort of craters have not been observed before on any other metallic surfaces. These specific traces are formed due to unique properties of the fuzz structure. The nano-fuzz could be easily melted and vaporized by micro-breakdown current, due to its porosity and bad thermal conductivity, and formation of low conducting metallic vapour under the cathode spot causes discharge movement to the nearest place. Thus, even low current arc can easily move and leave traces, which could be easily observed by a secondary electron microscope.

  7. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  8. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  9. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  10. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  11. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  12. Arc voltage measurements of the hyperbaric MIG process

    SciTech Connect

    Huismann, G.; Hoffmeister, H.

    1996-12-01

    As a vital part of the MIG process, the arc controls the stability of the process, the melting of the filler wire and the base material. In order to control and describe the arc behavior, it is necessary to know the voltage- current- arc length relations, or the arc characteristics. Knowledge of arc characteristics is necessary for control of the MIG process and further automation of welding systems, in particular, at hyperbaric welding. In literature, information on arc characteristics for hyperbaric open arc pulsed process is not available so far. Therefore, in the present work, arc characteristics were measured for a pressure range of 1 to 16 bar. In measuring arc voltages and arc lengths of MIG arcs, specific problems are encountered as compared to TIG arcs where the distance between the electrode and work piece can be taken as the arc length and the ohmic voltage drop in the tungsten electrode is low. The movement of the electrode in the MIG process and the deformation of the molten wire end together with weld pool fluctuations are providing a complex system. For determining the arc characteristics certain simplifications are thus required which have been applied in this work. This paper presents a new concept on measuring arc lengths and voltages in the open MIG arc.

  13. Basins in ARC-continental collisions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.; Busby, Cathy; Azor, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Arc-continent collisions occur commonly in the plate-tectonic cycle and result in rapidly formed and rapidly collapsing orogens, often spanning just 5-15 My. Growth of continental masses through arc-continent collision is widely thought to be a major process governing the structural and geochemical evolution of the continental crust over geologic time. Collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with passive continental margins (a situation in which the arc, on the upper plate, faces the continent) involve a substantially different geometry than collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with active continental margins (a situation requiring more than one convergence zone and in which the arc, on the lower plate, backs into the continent), with variable preservation potential for basins in each case. Substantial differences also occur between trench and forearc evolution in tectonically erosive versus tectonically accreting margins, both before and after collision. We examine the evolution of trenches, trench-slope basins, forearc basins, intra-arc basins, and backarc basins during arc-continent collision. The preservation potential of trench-slope basins is low; in collision they are rapidly uplifted and eroded, and at erosive margins they are progressively destroyed by subduction erosion. Post-collisional preservation of trench sediment and trench-slope basins is biased toward margins that were tectonically accreting for a substantial length of time before collision. Forearc basins in erosive margins are usually floored by strong lithosphere and may survive collision with a passive margin, sometimes continuing sedimentation throughout collision and orogeny. The low flexural rigidity of intra-arc basins makes them deep and, if preserved, potentially long records of arc and collisional tectonism. Backarc basins, in contrast, are typically subducted and their sediment either lost or preserved only as fragments in melange sequences. A substantial proportion of the sediment derived from

  14. Influence of metal vapour on arc temperatures in gas-metal arc welding: convection versus radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Anthony B.

    2013-06-01

    The presence of metal vapour in gas-metal arc welding has been shown to have two strong effects on the arc plasma: a decrease in temperature throughout the arc, and the formation of a local temperature minimum near the arc axis. These effects have been attributed, on the basis of different computational models, to either the increased radiative emission associated with the presence of metal vapour in the arc plasma, or the influence of the metal vapour influx on convective flow in the arc. This question is investigated using a three-dimensional computational model in which the production and the transport of metal vapour are taken into account self-consistently. Parameters relevant to welding of thin sheets of aluminum are examined. For these conditions, it is found that the first effect (the decrease in temperature throughout the arc) is due to both the increased radiative emission and the influence of the metal vapour influx on flow. The second effect (the local temperature minimum, which in this case occurs just below the wire electrode) is a consequence of the influence of aluminum vapour produced from the wire electrode on flow in the arc. By examining published results and the energy balance in the plasma, it is shown that for welding of steel with higher arc currents, the increased radiative emission can lead to a local temperature minimum at a greater distance from the wire electrode.

  15. Sensitivity of collapsed arc QA method for delivery errors in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Tony; Xing, Aitang; Vial, Philp; Thwaites, David; Holloway, Lois; Arumugam, Sankar

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the sensitivity of an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) to detecting introduced Volumetric Arc Therapy (VMAT) treatment errors was studied using the Collapsed Arc method. Two clinical Head and Neck (H&N) and Prostate treatment plans had gantry dependent dose and MLC errors introduced to the plans. These plans were then delivered to an Elekta Synergy Linear Accelerator EPID and compared to the original treatment planning system Collapsed Arc dose matrix. With the Collapsed Arc technique the EPID was able to detect MLC errors down to 2mm and dose errors of down to 3% depending on the treatment plan complexity and gamma tolerance used.

  16. Arc distribution during the vacuum arc remelting of Ti-6Al-4V

    SciTech Connect

    Woodside, Charles Rigel; King, Paul E.; Nordlund, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Currently, the temporal distribution of electric arcs across the ingot during vacuum arc remelting (VAR) is not a known or monitored process parameter. Previous studies indicate that the distribution of arcs can be neither diffuse nor axisymmetric about the center of the furnace. Correct accounting for the heat flux, electric current flux, and mass flux into the ingot is critical to achieving realistic solidification models of the VAR process. The National Energy Technology Laboratory has developed an arc position measurement system capable of locating arcs and determining the arc distribution within an industrial VAR furnace. The system is based on noninvasive magnetic field measurements and a VAR specific form of the Biot–Savart law. The system was installed on a coaxial industrial VAR furnace at ATI Albany Operations in Albany, OR. This article reports on the different arc distributions observed during production of Ti-6Al-4V. It is shown that several characteristic arc distribution modes can develop. This behavior is not apparent in the existing signals used to control the furnace, indicating the measurement system is providing new information. It is also shown that the different arc distribution modes observed may impact local solidification times, particularly at the side wall.

  17. Arc Distribution During the Vacuum Arc Remelting of Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodside, C. Rigel; King, Paul E.; Nordlund, Chris

    2013-02-01

    Currently, the temporal distribution of electric arcs across the ingot during vacuum arc remelting (VAR) is not a known or monitored process parameter. Previous studies indicate that the distribution of arcs can be neither diffuse nor axisymmetric about the center of the furnace. Correct accounting for the heat flux, electric current flux, and mass flux into the ingot is critical to achieving realistic solidification models of the VAR process. The National Energy Technology Laboratory has developed an arc position measurement system capable of locating arcs and determining the arc distribution within an industrial VAR furnace. The system is based on noninvasive magnetic field measurements and a VAR specific form of the Biot-Savart law. The system was installed on a coaxial industrial VAR furnace at ATI Albany Operations in Albany, OR. This article reports on the different arc distributions observed during production of Ti-6Al-4V. It is shown that several characteristic arc distribution modes can develop. This behavior is not apparent in the existing signals used to control the furnace, indicating the measurement system is providing new information. It is also shown that the different arc distribution modes observed may impact local solidification times, particularly at the side wall.

  18. Ground-Sensing Circuit For Arc Welders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.

    1989-01-01

    Ground-sensing circuit for arc-welding power supply prevents arc burns at loose ground connections on workpiece. Used with ac supply or dc supply of either polarity. Includes oscillator/detector pairs normally shorted out by ground connections to workpiece. When one or more of these four connections broken, one or more oscillator signals applied across power diodes and detected. Detected oscillator signal trips shutoff relay.

  19. Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding Tanks Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turichin, G.; Tsibulskiy, I.; Kuznetsov, M.; Akhmetov, A.; Klimova-Korsmik, O.

    2016-04-01

    The results investigate hybrid laser-arc welding of high strength steels using design responsible metallic construction and the highest strength body of vehicles. Welds from modern high strength steels grade Hardox 400, Hardox 450, Armox 600T and AB were created. High power fiber laser LS-15 with output 15 kW and arc rectifier VDU - 1500 DC were used in the experiment. Results of the metallographic research and mechanical tests are presented.

  20. Aligning Plasma-Arc Welding Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeff; Fairley, Mike

    1989-01-01

    Tool aids in alignment of oscillator probe on variable-polarity plasma-arc welding torch. Probe magnetically pulls arc from side to side as it moves along joint. Tensile strength of joint depends on alignment of weld bead and on alignment of probe. Operator installs new tool on front of torch body, levels it with built-in bubble glass, inserts probe in slot on tool, and locks probe in place. Procedure faster and easier and resulting alignment more accurate and repeatable.

  1. Metal Vapor Arcing Risk Assessment Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Monika C.; Leidecker, Henning W.

    2010-01-01

    The Tin Whisker Metal Vapor Arcing Risk Assessment Tool has been designed to evaluate the risk of metal vapor arcing and to help facilitate a decision toward a researched risk disposition. Users can evaluate a system without having to open up the hardware. This process allows for investigating components at risk rather than spending time and money analyzing every component. The tool points to a risk level and provides direction for appropriate action and documentation.

  2. 1981N1 - A Neptune arc?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    An object in the vicinity of Neptune detected in 1981 by simultaneous stellar occultation measurements at observatories near Tucson, Arizona, was interpreted as a new Neptune satellite. A reinterpretation suggests that it may have instead been a Neptune arc similar to one observed in 1984. The 1981 object, however, did not occult the star during simultaneous observations at Flagstaff, Arizona. This result constrains possible arc geometries.

  3. The Personal Motion Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Brian Vandellyn

    1993-01-01

    The Neutral Body Posture experienced in microgravity creates a biomechanical equilibrium by enabling the internal forces within the body to find their own balance. A patented reclining chair based on this posture provides a minimal stress environment for interfacing with computer systems for extended periods. When the chair is mounted on a 3 or 6 axis motion platform, a generic motion simulator for simulated digital environments is created. The Personal Motion Platform provides motional feedback to the occupant in synchronization with their movements inside the digital world which enhances the simulation experience. Existing HMD based simulation systems can be integrated to the turnkey system. Future developments are discussed.

  4. Physical and Chemical Variations During Episodic Behavior of Mesozoic Cordilleran Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, S. R.; Kirsch, M.; Cao, W.

    2015-12-01

    Models of episodic or cyclic behavior in Mesozoic Cordilleran continental arcs often examine broad patterns based on a single event or cycle. However, our comparison of multiple events/cycles both in single arc segments and in multiple, along-strike segments over ~15,000 km indicate that significant variations occur. For example during the three flare-ups peaking at ~225, ~161, and ~98 Ma in the Sierran segment, magma addition rates (MARs) indicate that the Triassic flare-up produced 3 times and the Cretaceous ~7 times as much magma as the Jurassic and 100 to 1000 times more magma than during lulls. Isostatic modeling combining arc shortening + MARs thus results in small roots/surface elevations in the Jurassic and Triassic and a large root/surface elevation during the Cretaceous. Age-constrained geochemical data in the Mesozoic Sierra Nevada show both general and specific flare-up versus lull trends. General trends during flare-ups include decrease in ɛNdi median values, and an increase to higher median values of SiO2, 87Sr/86Sri, Sr/Y, and (Sm/Yb)n. However these median values vary dramatically from one flare-up/lull episode to the next. For example the change in 87Sr/86Sri, Sr/Y, (Sm/Yb)n during flare-ups and lulls is not as pronounced for the Triassic and Jurassic events compared to the Cretaceous. And the Early Cretaceous displays unusually high median values in Sr/Y and (Sm/Yb)n. These patterns draw attention to a potential correlation between MARs and geochemical patterns. Although MARs are largely unavailable for other arc segments, along-strike, arc segment comparisons of zircon age spectra indicate flare-up periodicity of ~60-80 Ma over variable spatial scales ranging up to ~6000 km. Variations occur in all of the above geochemical measurements in both general and specific flare-up trends. Our results suggest that driving mechanisms for flare-ups/lulls vary along this Mesozoic arc and that second order effects vary between flare-ups and arc segments.

  5. Ion source with improved primary arc collimation

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1985-01-01

    An improved negative ion source is provided in which a self-biasing, molybdenum collimator is used to define the primary electron stream arc discharge from a filament operated at a negative potential. The collimator is located between the anode and the filament. It is electrically connected to the anode by means of an appropriate size resistor such that the collimator is biased at essentially the filament voltage during operation. Initially, the full arc voltage appears across the filament to collimator until the arc discharge strikes. Then the collimator biases itself to essentially filament potential due to current flow through the resistor thus defining the primary electron stream without intercepting any appreciable arc power. The collimator aperture is slightly smaller than the anode aperture to shield the anode from the arc power, thereby preventing the exposure of the anode to the full arc power which, in the past, has caused overheating and erosion of the anode collimator during extended time pulsed-beam operation of the source. With the self-biasing collimator of this invention, the ion source may be operated from short pulse periods to steady-state without destroying the anode.

  6. Dynamics of a discrete auroral arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruening, K.; Goertz, C. K.

    1986-06-01

    Porcupine Flight 4 data were used to determine the field-aligned currents associated with a southward moving discrete auroral arc in the postmidnight sector. Three different methods were used for determining the field-aligned current which should give identical results if the arcs are quasi-stationary and no parallel electric field exists between the payload and the dynamo region of the ionosphere. As long as the rocket is above the arc, the three methods agree. The integral of precipitating electron flux, the local magnetic field perturbations, and the divergence of the horizontal Pedersen current all indicate an upward current of 5 + or - 3 microamperes/sq m. Immediately north of the arc a strong downward current of about 10-20 microamperes/sq m is detected. The magnitude, however, is not well known because the rocket's velocity relative to the arc cannot be clearly established. Further north of the southward moving arc, the two methods that can be applied (magnetic field perturbations and divergence of the horizontal Pedersen current) yield contradictory results not only about the magnitude of the current but also about the direction of the current. It is suggested that this discrepancy is due to time-dependent electric field.

  7. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ26Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from -0.25 to -0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (-0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ26Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid-mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration.

  8. Apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition

    DOEpatents

    Buhrmaster, Carol L.; Clark, Denis E.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspenion of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

  9. Method for gas-metal arc deposition

    DOEpatents

    Buhrmaster, Carol L.; Clark, Denis E.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1990-01-01

    Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment wiht the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

  10. Dynamics of a discrete auroral arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruening, K.; Goertz, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    Porcupine Flight 4 data were used to determine the field-aligned currents associated with a southward moving discrete auroral arc in the postmidnight sector. Three different methods were used for determining the field-aligned current which should give identical results if the arcs are quasi-stationary and no parallel electric field exists between the payload and the dynamo region of the ionosphere. As long as the rocket is above the arc, the three methods agree. The integral of precipitating electron flux, the local magnetic field perturbations, and the divergence of the horizontal Pedersen current all indicate an upward current of 5 + or - 3 microamperes/sq m. Immediately north of the arc a strong downward current of about 10-20 microamperes/sq m is detected. The magnitude, however, is not well known because the rocket's velocity relative to the arc cannot be clearly established. Further north of the southward moving arc, the two methods that can be applied (magnetic field perturbations and divergence of the horizontal Pedersen current) yield contradictory results not only about the magnitude of the current but also about the direction of the current. It is suggested that this discrepancy is due to time-dependent electric field.

  11. Micro-arcing in radio frequency plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Y.; Bilek, M. M. M.; McKenzie, D. R.; Boswell, R. W.; Charles, C.

    2004-10-01

    Micro-arcing and breakdown of the wall plasma sheath in radio frequency (RF) plasmas is studied in a hollow cathode system, using a Langmuir probe to measure the floating potential. Micro-arcing was induced reproducibly by controlling the floating potential. By dc grounding the hollow cathode, a negative current can flow to ground resulting in a higher voltage sheath between the plasma and the earthed vacuum vessel. The wall arcing threshold of the plasma potential in this system is in the vicinity of 50 V. In the present system, the charging process to rebuild the plasma potential, which is about a few tens of milliseconds, is much slower than the microsecond discharge. The arcing frequency was found to depend strongly on the plasma potential and the pressure. We propose a mechanism for the dependence of the frequency of periodic micro-arcing based on the development of electron field emission sites. The measurement of floating potential is suggested as a useful parameter to monitor and prevent micro-arcing in RF plasmas.

  12. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism.

    PubMed

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2016-06-28

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ(26)Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from -0.25 to -0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (-0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ(26)Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid-mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration.

  13. Klystron Gun Arcing and Modulator Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, S

    2004-05-04

    The demand for 500 kV and 265 amperes peak to power an X-Band klystron brings up protection issues for klystron faults and the energy dumped into the arc from the modulator. This situation is made worse when more than one klystron will be driven from a single modulator, such as the existing schemes for running two and eight klystrons. High power pulsed klystrons have traditionally be powered by line type modulators which match the driving impedance with the load impedance and therefore current limit at twice the operating current. Multiple klystrons have the added problems of a lower modulator source impedance and added stray capacitance, which converts into appreciable energy at high voltages like 500kV. SLAC has measured the energy dumped into klystron arcs in a single and dual klystron configuration at the 400 to 450 kV level and found interesting characteristics in the arc formation. The author will present measured data from klystron arcs powered from line-type modulators in several configurations. The questions arise as to how the newly designed solid-state modulators, running multiple tubes, will react to a klystron arc and how much energy will be dumped into the arc.

  14. Method for gas-metal arc deposition

    DOEpatents

    Buhrmaster, C.L.; Clark, D.E.; Smartt, H.B.

    1990-11-13

    Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites are disclosed. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite. 1 fig.

  15. Mandibular first molar with single root and single root canal

    PubMed Central

    Munavalli, Anil; Kambale, Sharnappa; Ramesh, Sachhi; Ajgaonkar, Nishant

    2015-01-01

    Mandibular molars demonstrate considerable anatomic complexities and abnormalities with respect to number of roots and root canals. Clinicians should be aware that there is a possibility of the existence of a fewer number of roots and root canals than the normal root canal anatomy. Mandibular first molar with a single root and single canal was diagnosed with the aid of dental operating microscope and multiple angled radiographs. This case report presents a rare case of successful endodontic management of mandibular first molar with a single root and root canal. PMID:26180424

  16. Rates, Mechanisms, and Implications of Crustal Assimilation in Continental Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungan, M.; Davidson, J.

    2002-12-01

    chemical consequences for whole-rock compositions of arc basalts at the Tatara-San Pedro complex (TSPC), Chilean Andes. This occurrence, although thermally challenged according to the traditional paradigm, demonstrates that significant modifications of trace element abundances and ratios need not shift the host magma composition outside the basaltic range. In fact, the retention of micro-xenolithic clots rich in olivine and augite has produced positive correlations between incompatible and compatible elements in some magmas, and 87Sr/86Sr decreases from 0.7041 to 0.7039 with increasing Rb (8-27 ppm). Hornblende and phlogopite in mafic arc plutonic xenoliths promote rapid digestion by lowering solidus temperatures and such melts amplify the chemical overprint in contaminated magmas, but partially melted gabbroic and troctolitic xenoliths lacking hydrous minerals are widespread at the TSPC, and many mafic magmas contain micro-xenolithic plutonic crystal clots derived from such lithologies that volumetrically rival the true phenocryst assemblage. Among the implications of these observations is that long-lived arc volcanoes may extensively recycle their own plutonic roots. [1] Huppert HH and Sparks RSJ (1985) E.P.S.Lett., 74, 371-386. [2] Dungan et al. (1986) J. Geophys. Res., 91, 5999-6028. [3] Philpotts AR and Asher PM (1993) J. Petrol., 34, 1029-1058. [4] Heliker C (1995) J. Volc. Geoth. Res., 6, 115-135. [5] Reiners et al. (1995) Geology, 23, 563-566. [6] Spera FJ and Bohrson WA (2001) J. Petrol., 42, 999-1018. [7] Grove et al. (1988) Contrib. Min. Petrol., 99, 320-343. [8] Dungan et al. (2001) J. Petrol., 42, 555-626.

  17. Root hydrotropism: an update.

    PubMed

    Cassab, Gladys I; Eapen, Delfeena; Campos, María Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    While water shortage remains the single-most important factor influencing world agriculture, there are very few studies on how plants grow in response to water potential, i.e., hydrotropism. Terrestrial plant roots dwell in the soil, and their ability to grow and explore underground requires many sensors for stimuli such as gravity, humidity gradients, light, mechanical stimulations, temperature, and oxygen. To date, extremely limited information is available on the components of such sensors; however, all of these stimuli are sensed in the root cap. Directional growth of roots is controlled by gravity, which is fixed in direction and intensity. However, other environmental factors, such as water potential gradients, which fluctuate in time, space, direction, and intensity, can act as a signal for modifying the direction of root growth accordingly. Hydrotropism may help roots to obtain water from the soil and at the same time may participate in the establishment of the root system. Current genetic analysis of hydrotropism in Arabidopsis has offered new players, mainly AHR1, NHR1, MIZ1, and MIZ2, which seem to modulate how root caps sense and choose to respond hydrotropically as opposed to other tropic responses. Here we review the mechanism(s) by which these genes and the plant hormones abscisic acid and cytokinins coordinate hydrotropism to counteract the tropic responses to gravitational field, light or touch stimuli. The biological consequence of hydrotropism is also discussed in relation to water stress avoidance.

  18. TH-C-BRD-08: Reducing the Effect of Respiratory Motion On the Delivered Dose in Proton Therapy Through Proper Field Angle Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Matney, J; Park, P; Court, L; Zhu, X; Li, H; Mohan, R; Liu, W; Dong, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This work investigated a novel planning strategy of selecting radiotherapy beam angles that minimizes the change in water equivalent thickness (dWET) during respiration in order to reduce the effects of respiratory motion in passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT). Methods: In a clinical trial treating locally-advanced lung cancer with proton therapy, 2–4 co-planar beams were previously selected by dosimetrists in the design of physician-approved PSPT treatment plans. The authors identified a cohort of patients in which respiratory motion affected the planned PSPT dose delivery. For this cohort, this work analyzed dWET during respiration over a 360 degree arc of potential treatment angles around the patient: the dWET was defined as the difference in WET between the full-exhale (T50) and full-inhale (T0) phases of the simulation 4DCT. New PSPT plans were redesigned by selecting new beam angles that demonstrated significant reduction in the value of dWET. Between the T50 and T0 phases, the root-mean-square deviation of dose and the change in dose-volume histogram curves (dAUC) for anatomical structures were calculated to compare the original to dWET reduction plans. Results: To date, three plans were retrospectively redesigned based on dWET analysis. In the dWET reduction plan, the root mean square dose (T50-T0) was reduced by 15–35% and the DVH dAUC values were reduced by more than 60%.The PSPT plans redesigned by selecting appropriate field angles to minimize dWET demonstrated less dosimetric variation due to respiration. Conclusion: We have introduced the use of a new metric to quantify respiratory motion in proton therapy: dWET. The use of dWET allows us to minimize the impact of respiratory motion of the entire anatomy in the beam path. This work is a proof of principle that dWET could suggest field angles in proton therapy that are more robust to the effects of respiratory motion.

  19. Crustal growth of oceanic island arc inferred from seismic structure of Mariana arc-backarc system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, N.; Kodaira, S.; Ito, A.; Klemperer, S. L.; Kaneda, Y.; Suyehiro, K.

    2004-12-01

    The Izu-Ogasawara-Marina arc (IBM arc) is one of the typical oceanic island arcs and it has developed repeating magmatic arc volcanisms and backarc spreading since Eocene. Because tectonics of the IBM arc is relatively simple and does not include collisions between the arc and a continent, it is one of best targets to research crustal growth. In 2003, wide-angle seismic survey using 106 ocean bottom seismographs had been carried out as a part of Margin program in collaboration between US and Japan in Mariana region. The seismic line runs from a serpentine diaper near the trench to Parece Vela basin through the Mariana arc, the Marina trough and the West Mariana ridge. We present the characteristics of the seismic structure of the Mariana arc-backarc system and discuss the crustal growth process by comparison with a structure of the northern Izu-Ogasawara arc. Main structural characteristics of the Mariana arc-backarc system are (1) variation of the crustal thickness (Mariana arc: 20 km, West Mariana ridge: 17 km, Mariana trough and Parece Vela basin: 6 km), (2) distribution of an andesitic middle crust with about P-wave velocity of 6 km/s, (3) variation of P-wave velocity in the middle crust (4) velocity anomalies of the lower crust in transition area between the arc and the backarc, (5) thickening of the lower crust under the Mariana trough axis and (6) slow mantle velocities under the Mariana arc, Mariana trough axis and the West Mariana ridge. Above characteristics from (1) to (4) are common to the seismic structure of the northern Izu-Ogasawara arc. In particular, the vertical P-wave velocity gradients of the middle crust under the forearc in both regions tend to become large rather than those under the arc. Main differences of seismic structures between both regions are the velocity gradients and an existence of a thin transition layer between the middle and lower crust. These differences and similarities of the velocity gradient might originate the age and

  20. THE REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION OF GIANT ARCS IN THE SLOAN GIANT ARCS SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, Matthew B.; Gladders, Michael D.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Oguri, Masamune; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Sharon, Keren; Dahle, Haakon

    2011-01-20

    We measure the redshift distribution of a sample of 28 giant arcs discovered as a part of the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey. Gemini/GMOS-North spectroscopy provides precise redshifts for 24 arcs, and 'redshift desert' constrains for the remaining 4 arcs. This is a direct measurement of the redshift distribution of a uniformly selected sample of bright giant arcs, which is an observable that can be used to inform efforts to predict giant arc statistics. Our primary giant arc sample has a median redshift z = 1.821 and nearly two-thirds of the arcs, 64%, are sources at z {approx}> 1.4, indicating that the population of background sources that are strongly lensed into bright giant arcs resides primarily at high redshift. We also analyze the distribution of redshifts for 19 secondary strongly lensed background sources that are not visually apparent in Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging, but were identified in deeper follow-up imaging of the lensing cluster fields. Our redshift sample for the secondary sources is not spectroscopically complete, but combining it with our primary giant arc sample suggests that a large fraction of all background galaxies that are strongly lensed by foreground clusters reside at z {approx}> 1.4. Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests indicate that our well-selected, spectroscopically complete primary giant arc redshift sample can be reproduced with a model distribution that is constructed from a combination of results from studies of strong-lensing clusters in numerical simulations and observational constraints on the galaxy luminosity function.

  1. Motion compensator for holographic motion picture camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    When reference beam strikes target it undergoes Doppler shift dependent upon target velocity. To compensate, object beam is first reflected from rotating cylinder that revolves in direction opposite to target but at same speed. When beam strikes target it is returned to original frequency and is in phase with reference beam. Alternatively this motion compensator may act on reference beam.

  2. Seeing blur: 'motion sharpening' without motion.

    PubMed Central

    Georgeson, Mark A; Hammett, Stephen T

    2002-01-01

    It is widely supposed that things tend to look blurred when they are moving fast. Previous work has shown that this is true for sharp edges but, paradoxically, blurred edges look sharper when they are moving than when stationary. This is 'motion sharpening'. We show that blurred edges also look up to 50% sharper when they are presented briefly (8-24 ms) than at longer durations (100-500 ms) without motion. This argues strongly against high-level models of sharpening based specifically on compensation for motion blur. It also argues against a recent, low-level, linear filter model that requires motion to produce sharpening. No linear filter model can explain our finding that sharpening was similar for sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal gratings, since linear filters can never distort sine waves. We also conclude that the idea of a 'default' assumption of sharpness is not supported by experimental evidence. A possible source of sharpening is a nonlinearity in the contrast response of early visual mechanisms to fast or transient temporal changes, perhaps based on the magnocellular (M-cell) pathway. Our finding that sharpening is not diminished at low contrast sets strong constraints on the nature of the nonlinearity. PMID:12137571

  3. Economic strategies of plant absorptive roots vary with root diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, D. L.; Wang, J. J.; Kardol, P.; Wu, H. F.; Zeng, H.; Deng, X. B.; Deng, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Plant roots typically vary along a dominant ecological axis, the root economics spectrum, depicting a tradeoff between resource acquisition and conservation. For absorptive roots, which are mainly responsible for resource acquisition, we hypothesized that root economic strategies differ with increasing root diameter. To test this hypothesis, we used seven plant species (a fern, a conifer, and five angiosperms from south China) for which we separated absorptive roots into two categories: thin roots (thickness of root cortex plus epidermis < 247 µm) and thick roots. For each category, we analyzed a range of root traits related to resource acquisition and conservation, including root tissue density, different carbon (C), and nitrogen (N) fractions (i.e., extractive, acid-soluble, and acid-insoluble fractions) as well as root anatomical traits. The results showed significant relationships among root traits indicating an acquisition-conservation tradeoff for thin absorptive roots while no such trait relationships were found for thick absorptive roots. Similar results were found when reanalyzing data of a previous study including 96 plant species. The contrasting economic strategies between thin and thick absorptive roots, as revealed here, may provide a new perspective on our understanding of the root economics spectrum.

  4. Objects in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2008-01-01

    Objects in motion attract children. The following activity helps children explore the motion of bodies riding in a vehicle and safely demonstrates the answer to their questions, "Why do I need a seatbelt?" Children will enjoy moving the cup around, even if all they "see" is a cup rather than understanding it represents a car. They will understand…

  5. Object motion analysis study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of optical data processing (ODP) techniques for motion analysis in two-dimensional imagery was studied. The basic feasibility of this approach was demonstrated, but inconsistent performance of the photoplastic used for recording spatial filters prevented totally automatic operation. Promising solutions to the problems encountered are discussed, and it is concluded that ODP techniques could be quite useful for motion analysis.

  6. Measuring mandibular motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J.; Rositano, S.; Taylor, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Mandibular motion along three axes is measured by three motion transducers on floating yoke that rests against mandible. System includes electronics to provide variety of outputs for data display and processing. Head frame is strapped to test subject's skull to provide fixed point of reference for transducers.

  7. Motion through Syntactic Frames

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feist, Michele I.

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of (Talmy, 1985), (Talmy, 1985) and (Talmy, 2000) typology sparked significant interest in linguistic relativity in the arena of motion language. Through careful analysis of the conflation patterns evident in the language of motion events, Talmy noted that one class of languages, V-languages, tends to encode path along with the…

  8. Making Sense of Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    When watching a small child with a toy car, it is seen that interest in motion comes early. Children often suggest speed through sounds such as "RRRrrrRRRooooommMMMmmmm" as the toy car is made to speed up, slow down, or accelerate through a turn. Older children start to consider force and motion studies in more detail, and experiences in school…

  9. Aristotle, Motion, and Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Jane

    Aristotle rejects a world vision of changing reality as neither useful nor beneficial to human life, and instead he reaffirms both change and eternal reality, fuses motion and rest, and ends up with "well-behaved" changes. This concept of motion is foundational to his world view, and from it emerges his theory of knowledge, philosophy of nature,…

  10. Quantitative measurements of root water uptake and root hydraulic conductivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Javaux, Mathieu; Meunier, Felicien; Couvreur, Valentin; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    How is root water uptake distributed along the root system and what root properties control this distribution? Here we present a method to: 1) measure root water uptake and 2) inversely estimate the root hydraulic conductivities. The experimental method consists in using neutron radiography to trace deuterated water (D2O) in soil and roots. The method was applied to lupines grown aluminium containers filled with a sandy soil. When the lupines were 4 weeks old, D2O was locally injected in a selected soil regions and its transport was monitored in soil and roots using time-series neutron radiography. By image processing, we quantified the concentration of D2O in soil and roots. We simulated the transport of D2O into roots using a diffusion-convection numerical model. The diffusivity of the roots tissue was inversely estimated by simulating the transport of D2O into the roots during night. The convective fluxes (i.e. root water uptake) were inversely estimating by fitting the experiments during day, when plants were transpiring, and assuming that root diffusivity did not change. The results showed that root water uptake was not uniform along the roots. Water uptake was higher at the proximal parts of the lateral roots and it decreased by a factor of 10 towards the distal parts. We used the data of water fluxes to inversely estimate the profile of hydraulic conductivities along the roots of transpiring plants growing in soil. The water fluxes in the lupine roots were simulated using the Hydraulic Tree Model by Doussan et al. (1998). The fitting parameters to be adjusted were the radial and axial hydraulic conductivities of the roots. The results showed that by using the root architectural model of Doussan et al. (1998) and detailed information of water fluxes into different root segments we could estimate the profile of hydraulic conductivities along the roots. We also found that: 1) in a tap-rooted plant like lupine water is mostly taken up by lateral roots; (2) water

  11. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions....

  12. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions....

  13. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions....

  14. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions....

  15. 41 CFR 60-30.8 - Motions; disposition of motions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Motions; disposition of motions. 60-30.8 Section 60-30.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Other Provisions Relating to... EXECUTIVE ORDER 11246 Prehearing Procedures § 60-30.8 Motions; disposition of motions. (a) Motions....

  16. Brownian motion goes ballistic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florin, Ernst-Ludwig

    2012-02-01

    It is the randomness that is considered the hallmark of Brownian motion, but already in Einstein's seminal 1905 paper on Brownian motion it is implied that this randomness must break down at short time scales when the inertia of the particle kicks in. As a result, the particle's trajectories should lose its randomness and become smooth. The characteristic time scale for this transition is given by the ratio of the particle's mass to its viscous drag coefficient. For a 1 μm glass particle in water and at room temperature, this timescale is on the order of 100 ns. Early calculations, however, neglected the inertia of the liquid surrounding the particle which induces a transition from random diffusive to non-diffusive Brownian motion already at much larger timescales. In this first non-diffusive regime, particles of the same size but with different densities still move at almost the same rate as a result of hydrodynamic correlations. To observe Brownian motion that is dominated by the inertia of the particle, i.e. ballistic motion, one has to observe the particle at significantly shorter time scales on the order of nanoseconds. Due to the lack of sufficiently fast and precise detectors, such experiments were so far not possible on individual particles. I will describe how we were able to observe the transition from hydrodynamically dominated Brownian motion to ballistic Brownian motion in a liquid. I will compare our data with current theories for Brownian motion on fast timescales that take into account the inertia of both the liquid and the particle. The newly gained ability to measure the fast Brownian motion of an individual particle paves the way for detailed studies of confined Brownian motion and Brownian motion in heterogeneous media. [4pt] [1] Einstein, A. "Uber die von der molekularkinetischen Theorie der W"arme geforderte Bewegung von in ruhenden Fl"ussigkeiten suspendierten Teilchen. Ann. Phys. 322, 549--560 (1905). [0pt] [2] Lukic, B., S. Jeney, C

  17. Dynamic accuracy of inertial measurement units during simple pendulum motion.

    PubMed

    Brodie, M A; Walmsley, A; Page, W

    2008-06-01

    A motion measurement system based on inertial measurement units (IMUs) has been suggested as an alternative to contemporary video motion capture. This paper reports an investigation into the accuracy of IMUs in estimating 3D orientation during simple pendulum motion. The IMU vendor's (XSens Technologies) accuracy claim of 3 degrees root mean squared (RMS) error is tested. IMUs are integrated electronic devices that contain accelerometers, magnetometers and gyroscopes. The motion of a pendulum swing was measured using both IMUs and video motion capture as a reference. The IMU raw data were processed by the Kalman filter algorithm supplied by the vendor and a custom fusion algorithm developed by the authors. The IMU measurement of pendulum motion using the vendor's Kalman filter algorithm did not compare well with the video motion capture with a RMS error of between 8.5 degrees and 11.7 degrees depending on the length and type of pendulum swing. The maximum orientation error was greater than 30 degrees , occurring approximately eight seconds into the motion. The custom fusion algorithm estimation of orientation compared well with the video motion capture with a RMS error of between 0.8 degrees and 1.3 degrees . Future research should concentrate on developing a general purpose fusion algorithm and vendors of IMUs should provide details about the errors to be expected in different measurement situations, not just those in a 'best case' scenario. PMID:18568821

  18. Stochastic ground motion simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Xiaodan, Sun; Beer, Michael; Kougioumtzoglou, Ioannis A.; Patelli, Edoardo; Siu-Kui Au, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Strong earthquake ground motion records are fundamental in engineering applications. Ground motion time series are used in response-history dynamic analysis of structural or geotechnical systems. In such analysis, the validity of predicted responses depends on the validity of the input excitations. Ground motion records are also used to develop ground motion prediction equations(GMPEs) for intensity measures such as spectral accelerations that are used in response-spectrum dynamic analysis. Despite the thousands of available strong ground motion records, there remains a shortage of records for large-magnitude earthquakes at short distances or in specific regions, as well as records that sample specific combinations of source, path, and site characteristics.

  19. Reading with Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Margaret I.

    1986-01-01

    Recommends a method of teaching Russian vocabulary that focuses on new words in context and on their structure: root, prefix, suffix, sound changes, and borrowings. Sources for teachers are given in the bibliography. (LMO)

  20. Posterior meniscal root injuries

    PubMed Central

    Moatshe, Gilbert; Chahla, Jorge; Slette, Erik; Engebretsen, Lars; Laprade, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    Meniscal root tears (MRTs) are defined as radial tears within 1 cm of the meniscal root insertion, or an avulsion of the insertion of the meniscus. These injuries change joint loading due to failure of the meniscus to convert axial loads into hoop stresses, resulting in joint overloading and degenerative changes in the knee. Meniscal root repair is recommended in patients without advanced osteoarthritis (Outerbridge 3–4), in order to restore joint congruence and loading and therefore to avoid the long-term effect of joint overloading. Several techniques have been described. Improved knee function has been reported after meniscal root repair, but there are still conflicting reports on whether surgical treatment can prevent osteoarthritis. PMID:27347730

  1. Roots in plant ecology.

    PubMed

    Cody, M L

    1986-09-01

    In 1727 the pioneer vegetation scientist Stephen Hales realized that I much that was of importance to his subject material took place below on ground. A good deal of descriptive work on plant roots and root systems was done in the subsequent two centuries; in crop plants especially, the gross morphology of root systems was well known by the early 20th century. These descriptive studies were extended to natural grasslands by Weaver and his associates and to deserts by Cannon by the second decade of this century, but since that time the study of subterranean growth form appears to have lapsed, as a recent review by Kummerow indicates. Nevertheless, growth form is an important aspect of plant ecology, and subterranean growth form is especially relevant to the study of vegetation in and areas (which is the main subject of this commentary). Moreover, there is a real need for more research to be directed towards understanding plant root systems in general. PMID:21227785

  2. Towards Understanding the Sunda and Banda Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, R.

    2014-12-01

    The present change from oceanic subduction beneath the Sunda Arc to arc-continent collision east of Sumba is merely the latest stage in a complex collision history that began more than 20 million years ago. Understanding present-day tectonics requires restoring the pre-collisional margins and unravelling the history of the entire Sunda-Banda Arc, not just a segment centred on Sumba. Seismic tomography displays a single folded slab beneath the Banda Arc around which mantle has flowed. Above this is a wide actively deforming zone of complex geology. Australian crust was first added to the Sunda margin in the Cretaceous. Early Miocene closure of the oceanic gap north of Australia led to further additions of continental crust during collision of the Sula Spur. Few microcontinental fragments were sliced from New Guinea as commonly interpreted. Most are parts of the Sula Spur fragmented by extension and strike-slip faulting during development of subduction zones and rollback into the Banda embayment. Many metamorphic 'basement' rocks are significantly younger than expected. They were metamorphosed during multiple episodes of extension which also exhumed the sub-lithospheric mantle, melted the deep continental crust, created new ocean basins, and dispersed continental crust throughout the inner and outer arc, and forearc, so that in places Australian crust is colliding with Australian crust. Thus, many of the arc volcanoes are built on continental not oceanic crust, and sediment eroded from recently emergent islands is compositionally different to subducted sediment that contributed to arc magmas. The published literature is inadequate. New fieldwork and data are required, particularly in remote areas, with integration of information from a variety of sources (e.g. industry seismic and multibeam bathymetry, remotely acquired imagery) and sub-disciplines (e.g. geochronology, geochemistry, seismology, modelling). No single methodology can provide a complete solution.

  3. Lumped circuit model for transient arc discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Robiscoe, R.T.; Kadish, A.; Maier II, W.B.

    1988-11-01

    Electrical breakdown of highly charged insulating systems can result in an arc discharge, i.e., a sudden, intense pulse of current. We model such arcs by a simple circuit: the discharge of a capacitor C (related to the initial charge reservoir) through a series inductor L and resistor R. For R = V*/chemically bondI/sub a/chemically bond, where V* is a positive constant and I/sub a/ is the arc current, an essentially arbitrary dependence for L = L(I/sub a/), a constant capacitance, and a circuit starting voltage V/sub 0/, we establish four remarkable results for the subsequent arc discharge: (1) no discharge occurs at all unless chemically bondV/sub 0/chemically bond>V*; (2) if n is the largest non-negative integer for which chemically bondV/sub 0/chemically bondgreater than or equal to(2n+1)V*, then the arc current will reverse sign precisely n times and will decline in amplitude by 2V* at each extreme; (3) the discharge stops abruptly at a final voltage V/sub f/ = (-1)/sup n//sup +1/(V/sub 0/-(n+1)2V* sgn V/sub 0/); (4) maxima and minima in I/sub a/ occur at voltages V = +- V*. Results (1) and (3) provide the threshold condition and finite final potential necessary for any realistic arc discharge theory, while result (2) suggests an experiment to look for a finite number of current oscillations in a highly driven arc. Result (4) suggests an experimental method for determining V*.

  4. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius.

  5. arcControlTower: the System for Atlas Production and Analysis on ARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipčič, Andrej; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    PanDA, the Atlas management and distribution system for production and analysis jobs on EGEE and OSG clusters, is based on pilot jobs to increase the throughput and stability of the job execution on grid. The ARC middleware uses a specific approach which tightly connects the job requirements with cluster capabilities like resource usage, software availability and caching of input files. The pilot concept renders the ARC features useless. The arcControlTower is the job submission system which merges the pilot benefits and ARC advantages. It takes the pilot payload from the panda server and submits the jobs to the Nordugrid ARC clusters as regular jobs, with all the job resources known in advance. All the pilot communication with the PanDA server is done by the arcControlTower, so it plays the role of a pilot factory and the pilot itself. There are several advantages to this approach: no grid middleware is needed on the worker nodes, the fair-share between the production and user jobs is tuned with the arcControlTower load parameters, the jobs can be controlled by ARC client tools. The system could be extended to other submission systems using central distribution.

  6. GeoBrainArc: Enabling Geospatial Interoperability in ArcGIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P.; di, L.; Zhang, B.

    2008-12-01

    In recent years, a growing number of geospatial Web services designed to deal with distributed geospatial information over network have emerged as the maturation of web service technologies. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) has published a series of specifications that address geospatial interoperability requirement, standards and implementations to enhance the discovery, retrieval and handling of geospatial information and geospatial processing service. More and more government agencies, such as NASA, FGDC and EPA, publish their data using OGC protocols. ESRI is a leading global GIS software provider, and its flagship product ArcGIS Desktop has significant market share in commercial desktop solutions. To provide worldwide ArcGIS users an interoperable way of accessing OGC Web services for integrating and analyzing distributed heterogeneous geospatial data, we design and implement an extension of ArcGIS: GeoBrainArc. It can be easily installed as a component tool of ArcGIS. With the GeoBrainArc, ArcGIS users now is able to dynamically discover data and services over network using OGC Catalo Service for Web (CS/W), interactively access to and display remote sensing data from distributed OGC Web Coverage Service (WCS) and OGC Web Map Service (WMS), and visualize and analyze vector data from different OGC Web Feature Service (WFS). Thus, all those data from OGC Web services, just like other local data, is seamlessly integrated into the ArcGIS environment regardless of their locations, formats and projections.

  7. Acoustic Monitoring of Plasma Arcs in Direct Current Electric Arc Furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burchell, J. J.; Aldrich, C.; Eksteen, J. J.; Niesler, T. R.; Jemwa, G. T.

    2009-12-01

    In this article, the extraction of features from acoustic signals generated by a 60-kW direct current electric arc furnace and the use of these features to infer the arc length of the plasma jets in the furnace were considered. A sensor capable of such measurements would be more robust to the unobservable fluctuations of the arc length and would, in principle, allow better control of smelting operations. The collected data comprised sets of five separate 10-second recordings of the acoustic signal, furnace current, and voltage, each at nominal arc lengths of 5, 15, and 25 mm. In the approach, time-frequency features initially were obtained through filter bank analysis of the signals. Reduction of the dimensionality of these filter bank features was then performed using a nonlinear subspace method called kernel Fisher discriminant analysis. Finally, kernel discriminant features were used to infer the arc length via a nearest neighbor classification model that associated three classes of arc lengths (5, 15, and 25 mm) with their corresponding features. The results of the small number of experiments suggest that a significant statistical relationship exists between the length of a plasma arc and its acoustic signal despite potentially large variations in arc phenomena inside the furnace.

  8. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius. PMID:26558995

  9. Gas Metal Arc Welding and Flux-Cored Arc Welding. Teacher Edition. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    These instructional materials are designed to improve instruction in Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) and Flux-Cored Arc Welding (FCAW). The following introductory information is included: use of this publication; competency profile; instructional/task analysis; related academic and workplace skills list; tools, materials, and equipment list; and…

  10. The phenomenology of rooting.

    PubMed

    Kerievsky, Bruce Stephen

    2010-09-01

    This paper examines the attractions of passionate involvement in wanting particular outcomes, which is popularly known as rooting. The author's lifelong personal experience is the source of his analysis, along with the insights provided by spiritual literature and especially the work of Dr. Thomas Hora, with whom the author studied for 30 years. The phrase "choiceless awareness," utilized by J. Krishnamurti, and attained via meditation, is seen as the means of transcending a rooting mode of being in the world.

  11. Forming Completely Penetrated Welded T-joints when Pulsed Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krampit, N. Yu; Krampit, M. A.; Sapozhkov, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    The paper is focused on revealing the influence of welding parameters on weld formation when pulsed arc welding. As an experimental sample a T-joint over 10 mm was selected. Welding was carried out in flat position, which required no edge preparation but provided mono-directional guaranteed root penetration. The following parameters of welding were subjected to investigation: gap in the joint, wire feed rate and incline angles of the torch along and across the weld axis. Technological recommendations have been made with respect to pulsed arc welding; the cost price of product manufacturing can be reduced on their basis due to reduction of labor input required by machining, lowering consumption of welding materials and electric power.

  12. SIRTF/IRS cryogenic grating drive mechanism (ARC second positioning at 4 K)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubitschek, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    The requirements, design, and test results of a grating drive mechanism for the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) science instrument on the proposed superfluid helium-cooled Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) are described. The IRS grating drive mechanism, tested in the fall of 1989, satisfied all performance requirements in vacuum at 4 K. Measured mechanism performance included: 1.4 arc sec root-mean-square (rms) error positioning resolution; 2.2 arc sec rms position repeatability error, less than 10 millijoules/deg dissipated power; and 170 deg angular range of travel. Mechanisms that precisely position optical elements at very low cryogenic temperatures (at/below 4 K) are vital to the operating success of a number of proposed infrared scientific instruments like those in SIRTF.

  13. Use of the Plasma Spectrum RMS Signal for Arc-Welding Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Mirapeix, Jesus; Cobo, Adolfo; Fuentes, Jose; Davila, Marta; Etayo, Juan Maria; Lopez-Higuera, Jose-Miguel

    2009-01-01

    A new spectroscopic parameter is used in this paper for on-line arc-welding quality monitoring. Plasma spectroscopy applied to welding diagnostics has typically relied on the estimation of the plasma electronic temperature, as there is a known correlation between this parameter and the quality of the seams. However, the practical use of this parameter gives rise to some uncertainties that could provoke ambiguous results. For an efficient on-line welding monitoring system, it is essential to prevent the appearance of false alarms, as well as to detect all the possible defects. In this regard, we propose the use of the root mean square signal of the welding plasma spectra, as this parameter will be proven to exhibit a good correlation with the quality of the resulting seams. Results corresponding to several arc-welding field tests performed on Inconel and titanium specimens will be discussed and compared to non-destructive evaluation techniques. PMID:22346696

  14. Motion sickness in migraine sufferers.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Dawn A; Furman, Joseph M; Balaban, Carey D

    2005-12-01

    Motion sickness commonly occurs after exposure to actual motion, such as car or amusement park rides, or virtual motion, such as panoramic movies. Motion sickness symptoms may be disabling, significantly limiting business, travel and leisure activities. Motion sickness occurs in approximately 50% of migraine sufferers. Understanding motion sickness in migraine patients may improve understanding of the physiology of both conditions. Recent literature suggests important relationships between the trigeminal system and vestibular nuclei that may have implications for both motion sickness and migraine. Studies demonstrating an important relationship between serotonin receptors and motion sickness susceptibility in both rodents and humans suggest possible new motion sickness prevention therapies.

  15. Effects of shielding gas compositions on arc plasma and metal transfer in gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Z. H.; Liao, S. M.; Tsai, H. L.

    2010-02-15

    This article presents the effects of shielding gas compositions on the transient transport phenomena, including the distributions of temperature, flow velocity, current density, and electromagnetic force in the arc and the metal, and arc pressure in gas metal arc welding of mild steel at a constant current input. The shielding gas considered includes pure argon, 75% Ar, 50% Ar, and 25% Ar with the balance of helium. It is found that the shielding gas composition has significant influences on the arc characteristics; droplet formation, detachment, transfer, and impingement onto the workpiece; and weld pool dynamics and weld bead profile. As helium increases in the shielding gas, the droplet size increases but the droplet detachment frequency decreases. For helium-rich gases, the current converges at the workpiece with a 'ring' shape which produces non-Gaussian-like distributions of arc pressure and temperature along the workpiece surface. Detailed explanations to the physics of the very complex but interesting transport phenomena are given.

  16. Earthquake location in island arcs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engdahl, E.R.; Dewey, J.W.; Fujita, K.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive data set of selected teleseismic P-wave arrivals and local-network P- and S-wave arrivals from large earthquakes occurring at all depths within a small section of the central Aleutians is used to examine the general problem of earthquake location in island arcs. Reference hypocenters for this special data set are determined for shallow earthquakes from local-network data and for deep earthquakes from combined local and teleseismic data by joint inversion for structure and location. The high-velocity lithospheric slab beneath the central Aleutians may displace hypocenters that are located using spherically symmetric Earth models; the amount of displacement depends on the position of the earthquakes with respect to the slab and on whether local or teleseismic data are used to locate the earthquakes. Hypocenters for trench and intermediate-depth events appear to be minimally biased by the effects of slab structure on rays to teleseismic stations. However, locations of intermediate-depth events based on only local data are systematically displaced southwards, the magnitude of the displacement being proportional to depth. Shallow-focus events along the main thrust zone, although well located using only local-network data, are severely shifted northwards and deeper, with displacements as large as 50 km, by slab effects on teleseismic travel times. Hypocenters determined by a method that utilizes seismic ray tracing through a three-dimensional velocity model of the subduction zone, derived by thermal modeling, are compared to results obtained by the method of joint hypocenter determination (JHD) that formally assumes a laterally homogeneous velocity model over the source region and treats all raypath anomalies as constant station corrections to the travel-time curve. The ray-tracing method has the theoretical advantage that it accounts for variations in travel-time anomalies within a group of events distributed over a sizable region of a dipping, high

  17. The geochemistry and petrogenesis of the Paleoproterozoic Green Mountain arc: A composite(?), bimodal, oceanic, fringing arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, D.S.; Barnes, C.G.; Premo, W.R.; Snoke, A.W.

    2011-01-01

    The inferred subduction affinity of the ~1780-Ma Green Mountain arc, a dominantly bimodal igneous terrane (together with immature marine and volcaniclastic sedimentary rocks) accreted to the southern margin of the Wyoming province, is integral to arc-accretion models of the Paleoproterozoic growth of southern Laurentia. Conversely, the dominantly bimodal nature of many putative arc-related igneous suites throughout southern Laurentia, including the Green Mountain arc, has also been used to support models of growth by extension of pre-existing crust. We report new geochemical and isotopic data from ~1780-Ma gabbroic and granodioritic to tonalitic rocks of the Big Creek Gneiss, interpreted as consanguineous with previously studied metavolcanic rocks of the Green Mountain Formation.The ~1780-Ma Big Creek Gneiss mafic rocks show clear geochemical signatures of a subduction origin and provide no supporting evidence for extensional tectonism. The ~1780-Ma Big Creek Gneiss felsic rocks are attributed to partial melting of mafic and/or mixed lower-crustal material. The bimodal nature of the suite results from the combination of arc basalts and felsic crustal melts. The lack of andesite is consistent with the observed tholeiitic differentiation trend of the mafic magmas. The lower e{open}Nd(1780Ma) values for the felsic rocks vs. the mafic rocks suggest that the unexposed lower crust of the arc may be older than the arc and that Trans-Hudson- or Penokean-aged rocks possibly form the substratum of the arc. Our results reinforce previous interpretations that arc-related magmatism played a key role in the Paleoproterozoic crustal growth of southern Laurentia, but also support the possibility of unexposed older crust as basement to the arcs. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  18. BROADBAND PHOTOMETRY OF 105 GIANT ARCS: REDSHIFT CONSTRAINTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR GIANT ARC STATISTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Bayliss, Matthew B.

    2012-01-10

    We measure the photometric properties of 105 giant arcs that were identified in systematic searches for galaxy-cluster-scale strong lenses in the Second Red-Sequence Cluster Survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The cluster lenses span 0.2 < z{sub l} < 1.2 in redshift, with a median z-bar{sub l}=0.58. Using broadband color criteria we sort the entire arc sample into redshift bins based on u-g and g-r colors, and also r-z colors for the {approx}90% of arcs that have z-band data. This analysis yields broad redshift constraints with 71{sup +5}{sub -4%} of the arcs at z {>=} 1.0, 64{sup +6}{sub -4%} at z {>=} 1.4, 56{sup +5}{sub -4%} at z {>=} 1.9, and 21{sup +4}{sub -2%} at z {>=} 2.7. The remaining 29{sup +03}{sub -5%} have z < 1. The inferred median redshift is z-bar{sub s}= 2.0{+-}0.1, in good agreement with a previous determination from a smaller sample of brighter arcs (g {approx}< 22.5). This agreement confirms that z{sub s} = 2.0 {+-} 0.1 is the typical redshift for giant arcs with g {approx}< 24 that are produced by cluster-scale strong lenses and that there is no evidence for strong evolution in the redshift distribution of arcs over a wide range of g-band magnitudes (20 {<=} g {<=}24). Establishing that half of all giant arcs are at z {approx}> 2 contributes significantly toward relieving the tension between the number of arcs observed and the number expected in a {Lambda}CDM cosmology, but there is considerable evidence to suggest that a discrepancy persists. Additionally, this work confirms that forthcoming large samples of giant arcs will supply the observational community with many magnified galaxies at z {approx}> 2.

  19. Physics of arcing, and implications to sputter deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2005-03-15

    Arc and glow discharges are defined based on their cathode processes. Arcs are characterized by collective electron emission, which can be stationary with hot cathodes (thermionic arcs), or non-stationary with cold cathodes (cathodic arcs). A brief review on cathodic arc properties serves as the starting point to better understand arcing phenomena in sputtering. Although arcing occurs in both metal and reactive sputtering, it is more of an issue in the reactive case. Arcing occurs if sufficiently high field strength leads to thermal runaway of an electron emission site. The role of insulating layers and surface potential adjustment through current leakage is highlighted. In the situation of magnetron sputtering with ''racetrack'', the need for a model with two spatial dimensions is shown. In many cases, arcing is initiated by breakdown of dielectric layers and inclusions. It is most efficiently prevented if formation and excessive charge-up of dielectric layers and inclusions can be avoided.

  20. Character of the Jovian decametric arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staelin, D. H.

    1981-09-01

    The planetary radio astronomy (PRA) experiment on the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 spacecraft reveals strong radiation in the form of arcs when the data are displayed in time-frequency coordinates. The vertex frequencies of these arcs, i.e., the central frequencies at which the arcs are first or last observed, are correlated with the magnetic field strength at the foot of the L = 6 shell magnetic flux tubes that emitted the arcs, provided that the emission is conical with a cone angle that varies slightly in a prescribed way. This interpretation further supports the association of the left circularly polarized arcs with the southern hemisphere, where the relation between vertex frequency and magnetic field strength is preserved. One way to produce a frequency dependent cone angle is described; it is relevant to processes where the cyclotron emission originates directly from streaming electrons with apparent cyclotron frequencies that are both relativistically depressed and Doppler shifted. This process is qualitatively consistent with the cone angles inferred from the PRA data.

  1. Electric Arc and Electrochemical Surface Texturing Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Snyder, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    Surface texturing of conductive materials can readily be accomplished by means of a moving electric arc which produces a plasma from the environmental gases as well as from the vaporized substrate and arc electrode materials. As the arc is forced to move across the substrate surface, a condensate from the plasma re-deposits an extremely rough surface which is intimately mixed and attached to the substrate material. The arc textured surfaces produce greatly enhanced thermal emittance and hold potential for use as high temperature radiator surfaces in space, as well as in systems which use radiative heat dissipation such as computer assisted tomography (CAT) scan systems. Electrochemical texturing of titanium alloys can be accomplished by using sodium chloride solutions along with ultrasonic agitation to produce a random distribution of craters on the surface. The crater size and density can be controlled to produce surface craters appropriately sized for direct bone in-growth of orthopaedic implants. Electric arc texturing and electrochemical texturing techniques, surface properties and potential applications will be presented.

  2. Ion source with improved primary arc collimation

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1983-12-16

    An improved negative ion source is provided in which a self-biasing, molybdenum collimator is used to define the primary electron stream arc discharge from a filament operated at a negative potential. The collimator is located between the anode and the filament. It is electrically connected to the anode by means of an appropriate size resistor such that the collimator is biased at essentially the filament voltage during operation. Initially, the full arc voltage appears across the filament to collimator until the arc discharge strikes. Then the collimator biases itself to essentially filament potential due to current flow through the resistor thus defining the primary electron stream without intercepting any appreciable arc power. The collimator aperture is slightly smaller than the anode aperture to shield the anode from the arc power which, in the past, has caused overheating and erosion of the anode collimator during extended time pulsed-beam operation of the source. With the self-biasing collimator of this invention, the ion source may be operated from short pulse periods to steady-state without destroying the anode.

  3. Vertical Arc for ILC Low Emittance Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2005-06-07

    The design and parameters of a vertical arc for the ILC Low Emittance Transport (LET) are reviewed. A 1 TeV CM ILC which relies upon 30 MV/m accelerating cavities with a packing fraction of 65% will require almost 48 km of main linac, which suggests that the total site length including BDS and bunch compressors will be on the order of 53 km. If built in a laser-straight tunnel with the low-energy ends near the surface, and assuming a perfectly spherical ''cue ball'' planetary surface with radius 6370 km, the collider halls will necessarily be 55 meters below grade, as shown in the top plot of Figure 1. Such depths would demand extensive use of deep tunneling, which would potentially drive up the cost and difficulty of ILC construction. An alternate solution is to use discrete vertical arcs at a few locations to allow a ''piecewise straight'' construction in which the depth of the tunnel below grade does not vary by more than a few meters. This approach is shown schematically in the bottom plot of Figure 1. In this Note we consider the issues for a design with one such vertical arc at the 250 GeV/c point (ie, midway down the linac for 1 TeV CM), and a second arc at the entrance to the BDS (ie, the entire BDS lies in one plane, with vertical arcs at each end).

  4. Welding torch with arc light reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A welding torch arc light reflector is disclosed for welding torches having optical viewing systems. A schematic of a welding torch having an internal coaxial viewing system consisting of a lens which focuses the field of view of the weld scene of the workpiece onto the end of the fiberoptic bundle is provided. The transmitted image of the fiberoptic bundle is provided to a camera lens which focuses it onto a TV sensor array for transmission. To improve the parity of the image of the monitoring system, an arc light reflector is shown fitted to the end of the torch housing or gas cup. The arc light reflector has an internal conical section portion which is polished to serve as a mirror which reflects the bright arc light back onto the darker areas of the weld area and thereby provides a more detailed image for the monitoring system. The novelty of the invention lies in the use of an arc light reflector on welding torches having optical viewing systems.

  5. Visualizing motion in video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Lisa M.; Crayne, Susan

    2000-05-01

    In this paper, we present a visualization system and method for measuring, inspecting and analyzing motion in video. Starting from a simple motion video, the system creates a still image representation which we call a digital strobe photograph. Similar to visualization techniques used in conventional film photography to capture high-speed motion using strobe lamps or very fast shutters, and to capture time-lapse motion where the shutter is left open, this methodology creates a single image showing the motion of one or a small number of objects over time. Based on digital background subtraction, we assume that the background is stationary or at most slowing changing and that the camera position is fixed. The method is capable of displaying the motion based on a parameter indicating the time step between successive movements. It can also overcome problems of visualizing movement that is obscured by previous movements. The method is used in an educational software tool for children to measure and analyze various motions. Examples are given using simple physical objects such as balls and pendulums, astronomical events such as the path of the stars around the north pole at night, or the different types of locomotion used by snakes.

  6. Evaluation of volumetric modulated arc therapy for cranial radiosurgery using multiple noncoplanar arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Audet, Chantal; Poffenbarger, Brett A.; Chang, Pauling; Jackson, Paul S.; Lundahl, Robert E.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Ray, Gordon R.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a commercial volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), using multiple noncoplanar arcs, for linac-based cranial radiosurgery, as well as evaluate the combined accuracy of the VMAT dose calculations and delivery. Methods: Twelve patients with cranial lesions of variable size (0.1-29 cc) and two multiple metastases patients were planned (Eclipse RapidArc AAA algorithm, v8.6.15) using VMAT (1-6 noncoplanar arcs), dynamic conformal arc (DCA, {approx}4 arcs), and IMRT (nine static fields). All plans were evaluated according to a conformity index (CI), healthy brain tissue doses and volumes, and the dose to organs at risk. A 2D dose distribution was measured (Varian Novalis Tx, HD120 MLC, 1000 MU/min, 6 MV beam) for the {approx}4 arc VMAT treatment plans using calibrated film dosimetry. Results: The CI (0-1 best) average for all plans was best for {approx}4 noncoplanar arc VMAT at 0.86 compared with {approx}0.78 for IMRT and a single arc VMAT and 0.68 for DCA. The volumes of healthy brain receiving 50% of the prescribed target coverage dose or more (V{sub 50%}) were lowest for the four arc VMAT [RA(4)] and DCA plans. The average ratio of the V{sub 50%} for the other plans to the RA(4) V{sub 50%} were 1.9 for a single noncoplanar arc VMAT [RA(1nc)], 1.4 for single full coplanar arc VMAT [RA(1f)] and 1.3 for IMRT. The V{sub 50%} improved significantly for single isocenter multiple metastases plan when two noncoplanar VMAT arcs were added to a full single coplanar one. The maximum dose to 5 cc of the outer 1 cm rim of healthy brain which one may want to keep below nonconsequential doses of 300-400 cGy, was 2-3 times greater for IMRT, RA(1nc) and RA(1f) plans compared with the multiple noncoplanar arc DCA and RA(4) techniques. Organs at risk near (0-4 mm) to targets were best spared by (i) single noncoplanar arcs when the targets are lateral to the organ at risk and (ii) by skewed nonvertical planes of IMRT fields when the targets are not lateral to the

  7. Root architecture impacts on root decomposition rates in switchgrass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaff, M.; Schadt, C.; Garten, C. T.; Jastrow, J. D.; Phillips, J.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2010-12-01

    Roots strongly contribute to soil organic carbon accrual, but the rate of soil carbon input via root litter decomposition is still uncertain. Root systems are built up of roots with a variety of different diameter size classes, ranging from very fine to very coarse roots. Since fine roots have low C:N ratios and coarse roots have high C:N ratios, root systems are heterogeneous in quality, spanning a range of different C:N ratios. Litter decomposition rates are generally well predicted by litter C:N ratios, thus decomposition of roots may be controlled by the relative abundance of fine versus coarse roots. With this study we asked how root architecture (i.e. the relative abundance of fine versus coarse roots) affects the decomposition of roots systems in the biofuels crop switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.). To understand how root architecture affects root decomposition rates, we collected roots from eight switchgrass cultivars (Alamo, Kanlow, Carthage, Cave-in-Rock, Forestburg, Southlow, Sunburst, Blackwell), grown at FermiLab (IL), by taking 4.8-cm diameter soil cores from on top of the crown and directly next to the crown of individual plants. Roots were carefully excised from the cores by washing and analyzed for root diameter size class distribution using WinRhizo. Subsequently, root systems of each of the plants (4 replicates per cultivar) were separated in 'fine' (0-0.5 mm), 'medium' (0.5-1 mm) and 'coarse' roots (1-2.5 mm), dried, cut into 0.5 cm (medium and coarse roots) and 2 mm pieces (fine roots), and incubated for 90 days. For each of the cultivars we established five root-treatments: 20g of soil was amended with 0.2g of (1) fine roots, (2) medium roots, (3) coarse roots, (4) a 1:1:1 mixture of fine, medium and coarse roots, and (5) a mixture combining fine, medium and coarse roots in realistic proportions. We measured CO2 respiration at days 1, 3, 7, 15, 30, 60 and 90 during the experiment. The 13C signature of the soil was -26‰, and the 13C signature

  8. Generalized compliant motion primitive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Paul G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to a general primitive for controlling a telerobot with a set of input parameters. The primitive includes a trajectory generator; a teleoperation sensor; a joint limit generator; a force setpoint generator; a dither function generator, which produces telerobot motion inputs in a common coordinate frame for simultaneous combination in sensor summers. Virtual return spring motion input is provided by a restoration spring subsystem. The novel features of this invention include use of a single general motion primitive at a remote site to permit the shared and supervisory control of the robot manipulator to perform tasks via a remotely transferred input parameter set.

  9. Quasars: Millisecond-of-Arc Structure Revealed by Very-Long-Baseline Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Knight, C A; Robertson, D S; Rogers, A E; Shapiro, I I; Whitney, A R; Clark, T A; Goldstein, R M; Marandino, G E; Vandenberg, N R

    1971-04-01

    Observations with the Goldstone-Haystack radio interferometer of the quasars 3C 279 and 3C 273 have disclosed the presence of fine structure in their radio emissions. Although the interpretation is not unique, the fringe-amplitude data for quasar 3C 279 are quite consistent with emissions from two points, each contributing equally to the correlated flux. The separation of the two points is estimated to be (1.55 +/- 0.05) x 10(-3) arc second, or about 20 light years at the distance of 3 x 10(9) light years inferred from optical red-shift data. The formal uncertainty in the right-ascension component of the separation is about 6 x 10(-6) arc second; differential proper motion in this direction at half the speed of light could be discerned within a year. The fringe-amplitude data of quasar 3C 273 allow similar, but less definitive, interpretations.

  10. Transonic shock-induced dynamics of a flexible wing with a thick circular-arc airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Robert M.; Dansberry, Bryan E.; Farmer, Moses G.; Eckstrom, Clinton V.; Seidel, David A.; Rivera, Jose A., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Transonic shock boundary layer oscillations occur on rigid models over a small range of Mach numbers on thick circular-arc airfoils. Extensive tests and analyses of this phenomena have been made in the past but essentially all of them were for rigid models. A simple flexible wing model with an 18 pct. circular arc airfoil was constructed and tested in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel to study the dynamic characteristics that a wing might have under these circumstances. In the region of shock boundary layer oscillations, buffeting of the first bending mode was obtained. This mode was well separated in frequency from the shock boundary layer oscillations. A limit cycle oscillation was also measured in a third bending like mode, involving wind vertical bending and splitter plate motion, which was in the frequency range of the shock boundary layer oscillations. Several model configurations were tested, and a few potential fixes were investigated.

  11. The "Green" Root Beer Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2010-01-01

    No, your students will not be drinking green root beer for St. Patrick's Day--this "green" root beer laboratory promotes environmental awareness in the science classroom, and provides a venue for some very sound science content! While many science classrooms incorporate root beer-brewing activities, the root beer lab presented in this article has…

  12. Along-arc and inter-arc variations in volcanic gas CO2/S signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiuppa, Alessandro; Robidoux, Philippe; Fischer, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    Improving the current estimates of the global volcanic arc CO2 output requires a more accurate knowledge of the volcanic gas CO2/S ratio signature of each individual arc segment. This, when multiplied by sulphur (S) productivity of each arc segment (derived by either studies on melt inclusions or UV-based gas measurements), could in principle yield the individual arc CO2 output and, by summation, the global arc CO2 output. Unfortunately, the process is complicated, among others, by the limited volcanic gas dataset we have available, particularly for poorly explored, but potentially highly productive arc segments (Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, etc). We here review the currently available dataset of CO2/S ratios in the volcanic gas literature, and combine this with novel gas observations (partially obtained using the currently expanding DCO-DECADE Multi-GAS network) to provide experimental evidence for the existence of substantial variations in volcanic gas chemistry along individual arc segments, and from one arc segment to another. In Central America [1], for instance, we identify distinct volcanic gas CO2/S (molar) ratio signatures for magmatic volatiles in Nicaragua (~3), Costa Rica (~0.5-1.0) and El Salvador (~1.0), which we ascribe to variable extents of sedimentary carbon addition to a MORB-type (Costa Rica-like) mantle wedge. Globally, volcanic gas CO2/S ratios are typically found to be low (~1.0) in arc segments (e.g., Japan, Kuril-Kamchatka, Chile) where small amount of limestones enter the slab; whilst larger slab/crustal carbon contributions typically correspond to higher CO2/S ratio signatures for gases of other arcs, such as Indonesia (~4.0) or Italy (6 to 9). We find that CO2/S ratios of arc gases positively correlate with Ba/La and U/Th ratios in the corresponding magmas, these trace-element ratios being thought as petrological proxies for the addition slab-fluids to the magma generation zone. This relation implies a dominant slab-derivation of carbon

  13. Improving Delivery Accuracy of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy to a Moving Tumor Using Simplified Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young Eun; Cho, Byungchul; Kim, Su Ssan; Song, Si Yeol; Choi, Eun Kyung; Ahn, Seung Do; Yi, Byongyong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a simplified volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique for more accurate dose delivery in thoracic stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials For each of the 22 lung SBRT cases treated with respiratory-gated VMAT, a dose rate modulated arc therapy (DrMAT) plan was retrospectively generated. A dynamic conformal arc therapy plan with 33 adjoining coplanar arcs was designed and their beam weights were optimized by an inverse planning process. All sub-arc beams were converted into a series of control points with varying MLC segment and dose rates and merged into an arc beam for a DrMAT plan. The plan quality of original VMAT and DrMAT was compared in terms of target coverage, compactness of dose distribution, and dose sparing of organs at risk. To assess the delivery accuracy, the VMAT and DrMAT plans were delivered to a motion phantom programmed with the corresponding patients’ respiratory signal; results were compared using film dosimetry with gamma analysis. Results The plan quality of DrMAT was equivalent to that of VMAT in terms of target coverage, dose compactness, and dose sparing for the normal lung. In dose sparing for other critical organs, DrMAT was less effective than VMAT for the spinal cord, heart, and esophagus while being well within the limits specified by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Delivery accuracy of DrMAT to a moving target was similar to that of VMAT using a gamma criterion of 2%/2mm but was significantly better using a 2%/1mm criterion, implying the superiority of DrMAT over VMAT in SBRT for thoracic/abdominal tumors with respiratory movement. Conclusion We developed a DrMAT technique for SBRT that produces plans of a quality similar to that achieved with VMAT but with better delivery accuracy. This technique is well-suited for small tumors with motion uncertainty. PMID:27333199

  14. Recovery of motion parameters from distortions in scanned images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey B.

    1997-01-01

    Scanned images, such as those produced by the scanning-laser ophthalmoscope (SLO), show distortions when there is target motion. This is because pixels corresponding to different image regions are acquired sequentially, and so, in essence, are slices of different snapshots. While these distortions create problems for image registration algorithms, they are potentially useful for recovering target motion parameters at temporal frequencies above the frame rate. Stetter, Sendtner and Timberlake measured large distortions in SLO images to recover the time course of rapid horizontal saccadic eye movements. Here, this work is extended with the goal of automatically recovering small eye movements in two dimensions. Eye position during the frame interval is modeled using a low dimensional parametric description, which in turn is used to generate predicted distortions of a reference template. The input image is then registered to the distorted template using normalized cross correlation. The motion parameters are then varied, and the correlation recomputed, to find the motion which maximizes the peak value of the correlation. The location and value of the correlation maximum are determined with sub-pixel precision using biquadratic interpolation, yielding eye position resolution better than 1 arc minute. This method of motion parameter estimation is tested using actual SLO images as well as simulated images. Motion parameter estimation might also be applied to individual video lines in order to reduce pipeline delays for a near real-time system.

  15. Plasma arc heated secondary combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Haun, R.; Paulson, B.; Schlienger, M.; Goerz, D.; Kerns, J.; Vernazza, J.

    1995-02-01

    This paper describes a secondary combustion chamber (SCC) for hazardous waste treatment systems that uses a plasma arc torch as the heat source. Developed under a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between Retech, Inc. and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the unit is intended primarily to handle the off-gas from a Plasma Arc Centrifugal Treatment (PACT) system. ft is designed to heat the effluent gas which may contain volatile organic compounds, and maintain the gas temperature above 1000 C for two seconds or more. The benefits of using a plasma arc gas heater are described in comparison to a conventional fossil fuel heated SCC. Thermal design considerations are discussed. Analysis and experimental results are presented to show the effectiveness in destroying hazardous compounds and reducing the total volume of gaseous emissions.

  16. APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Noland, R.A.; Stone, C.C.

    1960-05-10

    An apparatus and method are given for forming a welding arc which is rotated by a magnetic field very rapidly about an annular electrode so that a weld is produced simultaneously over all points of an annular or closed path. This invention inhibits outgassing from the jacket of a fuel slug which is being welded by adjusting the pressure throughout the welding cycle to establish a balance between the gas pressure within the jacket and that of the atmosphere surrounding the jacket. Furthermore, an improved control of the magnetic field producing rotation of the welding arc is disclosed whereby this rotation is prevented from splashing about the metal being welded as the welding arc makes it molten.

  17. A demonstration of motion base design alternatives for the National Advanced Driving Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccauley, Michael E.; Sharkey, Thomas J.; Sinacori, John B.; Laforce, Soren; Miller, James C.; Cook, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    A demonstration of the capability of NASA's Vertical Motion Simulator to simulate two alternative motion base designs for the National Advanced Driving simulator (NADS) is reported. The VMS is located at ARC. The motion base conditions used in this demonstration were as follows: (1) a large translational motion base; and (2) a motion base design with limited translational capability. The latter had translational capability representative of a typical synergistic motion platform. These alternatives were selected to test the prediction that large amplitude translational motion would result in a lower incidence or severity of simulator induced sickness (SIS) than would a limited translational motion base. A total of 10 drivers performed two tasks, slaloms and quick-stops, using each of the motion bases. Physiological, objective, and subjective measures were collected. No reliable differences in SIS between the motion base conditions was found in this demonstration. However, in light of the cost considerations and engineering challenges associated with implementing a large translation motion base, performance of a formal study is recommended.

  18. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism.

    PubMed

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2016-06-28

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ(26)Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from -0.25 to -0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (-0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ(26)Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid-mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration. PMID:27303032

  19. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ26Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from −0.25 to −0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (−0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ26Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid−mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration. PMID:27303032

  20. Magnesium isotope geochemistry in arc volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Fang-Zhen; Hu, Yan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2016-06-01

    Incorporation of subducted slab in arc volcanism plays an important role in producing the geochemical and isotopic variations in arc lavas. The mechanism and process by which the slab materials are incorporated, however, are still uncertain. Here, we report, to our knowledge, the first set of Mg isotopic data for a suite of arc lava samples from Martinique Island in the Lesser Antilles arc, which displays one of the most extreme geochemical and isotopic ranges, although the origin of this variability is still highly debated. We find the δ26Mg of the Martinique Island lavas varies from ‑0.25 to ‑0.10, in contrast to the narrow range that characterizes the mantle (‑0.25 ± 0.04, 2 SD). These high δ26Mg values suggest the incorporation of isotopically heavy Mg from the subducted slab. The large contrast in MgO content between peridotite, basalt, and sediment makes direct mixing between sediment and peridotite, or assimilation by arc crust sediment, unlikely to be the main mechanism to modify Mg isotopes. Instead, the heavy Mg isotopic signature of the Martinique arc lavas requires that the overall composition of the mantle wedge is buffered and modified by the preferential addition of heavy Mg isotopes from fluids released from the altered subducted slab during fluid‑mantle interaction. This, in turn, suggests transfer of a large amount of fluid-mobile elements from the subducting slab to the mantle wedge and makes Mg isotopes an excellent tracer of deep fluid migration.

  1. Commissioning and quality assurance of Dynamic WaveArc irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sato, Sayaka; Miyabe, Yuki; Takahashi, Kunio; Yamada, Masahiro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Ishihara, Yoshitomo; Yokota, Kenji; Kaneko, Shuji; Mizowaki, Takashi; Monzen, Hajime; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    A novel three-dimensional unicursal irradiation technique "Dynamic WaveArc" (DWA), which employs simultaneous and continuous gantry and O-ring rotation during dose delivery, has been implemented in Vero4DRT. The purposes of this study were to develop a commissioning and quality assurance procedure for DWA irradiation, and to assess the accuracy of the mechanical motion and dosimetric control of Vero4DRT. To determine the mechanical accuracy and the dose accuracy with DWA irradiation, 21 verification test patterns with various gantry and ring rotational directions and speeds were generated. These patterns were irradiated while recording the irradiation log data. The differences in gantry position, ring position, and accumulated MU (EG, ER, and EMU, respectively) between the planned and actual values in the log at each time point were evaluated. Furthermore, the doses delivered were measured using an ionization chamber and spherical phantom. The constancy of radiation output during DWA irradiation was examined by comparison with static beam irradiation. The mean absolute error (MAE) of EG and ER were within 0.1° and the maximum error was within 0.2°. The MAE of EMU was within 0.7 MU, and maximum error was 2.7 MU. Errors of accumulated MU were observed only around control points, changing gantry, and ring velocity. The gantry rotational range, in which EMU was greater than or equal to 2.0 MU, was not greater than 3.2%. It was confirmed that the extent of the large differences in accumulated MU was negligibly small during the entire irradiation range. The variation of relative output value for DWA irradiation was within 0.2%, and this was equivalent to conventional arc irradiation with a rotating gantry. In conclusion, a verification procedure for DWA irradiation was designed and implemented. The results demonstrated that Vero4DRT has adequate mechanical accuracy and beam output constancy during gantry and ring rotation. PMID:26103177

  2. Glutamate signalling in roots.

    PubMed

    Forde, Brian G

    2014-03-01

    As a signalling molecule, glutamate is best known for its role as a fast excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian nervous system, a role that requires the activity of a family of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs). The unexpected discovery in 1998 that Arabidopsis thaliana L. possesses a family of iGluR-related (GLR) genes laid the foundations for an assessment of glutamate's potential role as a signalling molecule in plants that is still in progress. Recent advances in elucidating the function of Arabidopsis GLR receptors has revealed similarities with iGluRs in their channel properties, but marked differences in their ligand specificities. The ability of plant GLR receptors to act as amino-acid-gated Ca(2+) channels with a broad agonist profile, combined with their expression throughout the plant, makes them strong candidates for a multiplicity of amino acid signalling roles. Although root growth is inhibited in the presence of a number of amino acids, only glutamate elicits a specific sequence of changes in growth, root tip morphology, and root branching. The recent finding that the MEKK1 gene is a positive regulator of glutamate sensitivity at the root tip has provided genetic evidence for the existence in plants of a glutamate signalling pathway analogous to those found in animals. This short review will discuss the most recent advances in understanding glutamate signalling in roots, considering them in the context of previous work in plants and animals.

  3. Projectile Motion with Mathematica.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Alwis, Tilak

    2000-01-01

    Describes how to use the computer algebra system (CAS) Mathematica to analyze projectile motion with and without air resistance. These experiments result in several conjectures leading to theorems. (Contains 17 references.) (Author/ASK)

  4. Motional EMF demonstration experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingman, Robert; Popescu, Sabin

    2001-03-01

    A simple quantitative motional emf experiment. The induced voltage is recorded in this computer-based experiment as a coil is moved through the field of a permanent magnet. Results compare closely with predicted values.

  5. Vision and Motion Pictures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grambo, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    Presents activities on persistence of vision that involve students in a hands-on approach to the study of early methods of creating motion pictures. Students construct flip books, a Zoetrope, and an early movie machine. (DDR)

  6. A Projectile Motion Bullseye.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, William G.

    1985-01-01

    Explains a projectile motion experiment involving a bow and arrow. Procedures to measure "muzzle" velocity, bow elastic potential energy, range, flight time, wind resistance, and masses are considered. (DH)

  7. Dizziness and Motion Sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... special tests of eye motion after warm or cold water or air is used to stimulate the ... Get enough fluids Treat infections, including ear infections, colds, flu, sinus congestion, and other respiratory infections If ...

  8. Molecular Motion Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shourd, Melvin L.

    1977-01-01

    Describes the construction of an inexpensive apparatus which utilizes the oscillatory motion of 60 cycle AC current in conjunction with an electromagnetic to illustrate various principles and processes in geology. (SL)

  9. Toying with Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galus, Pamela J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a variety of activities that support the development of an understanding of Newton's laws of motion. Activities use toy cars, mobile roads, and a seat-of-nails. Includes a scoring rubric. (DDR)

  10. Grain refinement control in TIG arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. F.; Whiffen, E. L. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A method for controlling grain size and weld puddle agitation in a tungsten electrode inert gas welding system to produce fine, even grain size and distribution is disclosed. In the method the frequency of dc welding voltage pulses supplied to the welding electrode is varied over a preselected frequency range and the arc gas voltage is monitored. At some frequency in the preselected range the arc gas voltage will pass through a maximum. By maintaining the operating frequency of the system at this value, maximum weld puddle agitation and fine grain structure are produced.

  11. Gas exhaust nozzle for ARC furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Buhler, K.

    1984-10-09

    Arc furnace has a furnace shell, a furnace lid with lid ring and a lid lifting and swivelling means as well as a lid opening in the furnace lid for exhausting the flue gas from the interior of the furnace and a flue gas exhaust nozzle for removing the flue gases above the lid opening, the nozzle being supported on the furnace lid ring. By means of this design feature as well as a guide arrangement and a locking means the flue gas exhaust nozzle can be completely integrated into the operating steps of the arc furnace in a simple and economical fashion.

  12. Electric-arc steam plasma generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anshakov, A. S.; Urbakh, E. K.; Radko, S. I.; Urbakh, A. E.; Faleev, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    Investigation results on the arc plasmatorch for water-steam heating are presented. The construction arrangement of steam plasma generator with copper electrodes of the stepped geometry was firstly implemented. The energy characteristics of plasmatorch and erosion of electrodes reflect the features of their behavior at arc glow in the plasma-forming environment of steam. The results of numerical study of the thermal state of the composite copper-steel electrodes had a significant influence on optimization of anode water-cooling aimed at improvement of its operation life.

  13. Corrosion and arc erosion in MHD channels

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, R.J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Pollina, R.J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Avco-Everett Research Lab., Everett, MA )

    1991-10-01

    The objective of this task is to study the corrosion and arc erosion of MHD materials in a cooperative effort with, and to support, the MHD topping cycle program. Materials tested in the Avco Research Laboratory/Textron facility, or materials which have significant MHD importance, will be analyzed to document their physical deterioration. Conclusions shall be drawn about their wear mechanisms and lifetime in the MHD environment with respect to the following issues; sulfur corrosion, electrochemical corrosion, and arc erosion. The impact of any materials or slag conditions on the level of power output and on the level of leakage current in the MHD channel will also be noted, where appropriate.

  14. Plasma distribution of cathodic ARC deposition system

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, S.; Raoux, S.; Krishnan, K.; MacGill, R.A.; Brown, I.G.

    1996-08-01

    The plasma distribution using a cathodic arc plasma source with and without magnetic macroparticle filter has been determined by depositing on a transparent plastic substrate and measuring the film absorption. It was found that the width of the distribution depends on the arc current, and it also depends on the cathode material which leads to a spatial separation of the elements when an alloy cathode is used. By applying a magnetic multicusp field near the exit of the magnetic filter, it was possible to modify the plasma distribution and obtain a flat plasma profile with a constant and homogeneous elemental distribution.

  15. Arc-driven rail accelerator research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Pradosh K.

    1987-01-01

    Arc-driven rail accelerator research is analyzed by considering wall ablation and viscous drag in the plasma. Plasma characteristics are evaluated through a simple fluid-mechanical analysis considering only wall ablation. By equating the energy dissipated in the plasma with the radiation heat loss, the average properties of the plasma are determined as a function of time and rate of ablation. Locations of two simultaneously accelerating arcs were determined by optical and magnetic probes and fron streak camera photographs. All three measurements provide consistent results.

  16. Patterns of seismogenesis for giant plate-boundary earthquakes in island-arc-type subduction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, S. H.

    2006-12-01

    The global record of giant earthquake occurrence in subduction zones during the instrumental and historical eras is woefully short; only about 16 events with magnitudes above 8.4 are reasonably well documented since 1700. We find no examples of giant (M > 8.4) interplate thrust events and/or wide-ranging tsunamis sourced in the classic island arcs with fast backarc spreading (Bonin, Marianas, Tonga-Kermadec, Vanuatu, and South Scotia). The Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake of 2004 (SAE) ruptured a sector of the INDIA-BURMA subduction boundary and evidently had no known historical antecedents, suggesting that the return time may be many centuries to millennia and consistent with low convergence rates. Moreover, the persistence of rupture to the north in the weakly volcanic Nicobar/Andaman sector gives one pause to reflect on the assumption that island arcs, especially those with active back-arc spreading such as the Marianas, do not produce great interplate- thrust earthquakes. The Andaman/Nicobar subduction segment is an unusual island arc. Only two arc volcanoes occur between the convergent plate boundary west of the Andamans and the backarc ridge/transform system to the east. Backarc spreading in the Andaman/ Nicobar segment is unusual because the NNW spreading directions are nearly parallel to the trench/deformation-front as do the INDIA-BURMA plate motions across it. This geometry suggests that arc-normal extension, trench migration and associated slab normal motions may not mechanically decouple this subduction system. The Nicobar sector of the rupture for the 2004 event is roughly 200 km wide judging from the aftershock distribution; a distribution that persists to the east under the Nicobar Islands, suggesting that the plate-boundary dip is very shallow in that latitude range. If this is correct, then the down-dip limitation on seismogenic slip set by serpentinized forearc mantle (Hyndman et al., 2003) may not control rupture width as it apparently does for many

  17. Geochemical differences between along-arc and across-arc volcanics in west-central Nicaragua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geilert, Sonja; Freundt, Armin; Wörner, Gerhard; Kutterolf, Steffen

    2012-04-01

    The La Paz Centro - Malpaisillo Lineament (LPML) in west-central Nicaragua is a north-south striking, 20 km long chain of maars and cinder cones, which intersects the northwest-southeast striking main volcanic front. A tectonic control of LPML volcanism is likely but only evident for the Malpaisillo fissure at the northern end of the LPML. Previous work demonstrated geochemical variations implying changes in mantle-source composition (i.e., added slab components) along the Central American Volcanic Arc at spatial scales of some 10's of kilometers. Our study of the LPML shows that minor but systematic changes also occur across the arc within 20 km distance. Variations in trace element ratios such as Zr/Nb, Ba/Th, Ba/La, Th/Zr, U/La and La/Yb along the LPML, i.e. across the volcanic front indicate little change in the degree of partial melting but an increase particularly in the hemipelagic sediment component in the mantle source from the fore arc towards the arc front, followed by a decrease behind the arc. Interestingly, the slab component is most prominent just in front of the arc. About 60 km southeast of the LPML, the Nejapa-Miraflores volcanic and tectonic lineament, which marks a 20 km north-south offset in the arc, differs substantially from the LPML. There is a wide scatter in incompatible trace element ratios indicating a heterogeneous mantle source at small spatial scales (c. 1 km). This mantle heterogeneity may represent vertical rather than across-arc variations and is probably related to the arc offset, because in the absence of such offset at the LPML mantle source conditions vary much less but more systematically.

  18. Fore-arc deformation at the transition between collision and subduction: results from first 3D thermo-mechanical laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutelier, D. A.; Oncken, O.; Ustaszewski, K. M.; Cruden, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    3-D thermo-mechanical laboratory experiments of arc-continent collision investigate the deformation of the fore-arc at the transition between collision and subduction. The deformation of the plates in the collision area propagates into the subduction-collision transition zone via along-strike coupling of the neighboring segments of the plate boundary. The largest along-strike gradient of trench-perpendicular compression produced by a passive margin turning by 90 degrees does not generate sufficiently localized shear strain in the transition zone to cause a strike-slip system because of the fast propagation of arc lithosphere failure. Deformation is thus continuous along-strike, but the deformation mechanism is three-dimensional and progressive structural variations arise because the coupling between neighboring segment induces either advanced or delayed failure of the arc lithosphere and passive margin. During the initial stage of collision, the accretionary wedge is partially subducted, the interplate zone is lubricated, and shear traction drops. Thus large convergence obliquity does not produce a migrating fore-arc sliver. Instead, the fore-arc motion is due to the pressure force generated by subduction of the buoyant continental crust. It follows that convergence obliquity does not yield trench-parallel deformation of the fore-arc and its influence on the collision process is limited. However, convergence obliquity may have shaped the active margin during the stage of oceanic subduction stage, prior to collision, and inherited structures may impact the propagation mechanism.

  19. Effects of Vibrotactile Feedback on Human Learning of Arm Motions

    PubMed Central

    Bark, Karlin; Hyman, Emily; Tan, Frank; Cha, Elizabeth; Jax, Steven A.; Buxbaum, Laurel J.; Kuchenbecker, Katherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Tactile cues generated from lightweight, wearable actuators can help users learn new motions by providing immediate feedback on when and how to correct their movements. We present a vibrotactile motion guidance system that measures arm motions and provides vibration feedback when the user deviates from a desired trajectory. A study was conducted to test the effects of vibrotactile guidance on a subject’s ability to learn arm motions. Twenty-six subjects learned motions of varying difficulty with both visual (V), and visual and vibrotactile (VVT) feedback over the course of four days of training. After four days of rest, subjects returned to perform the motions from memory with no feedback. We found that augmenting visual feedback with vibrotactile feedback helped subjects reduce the root mean square (rms) angle error of their limb significantly while they were learning the motions, particularly for 1DOF motions. Analysis of the retention data showed no significant difference in rms angle errors between feedback conditions. PMID:25486644

  20. The effect of plasma on solar cell array arc characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Tyree, E.

    1985-01-01

    The influence from the ambient plasma on the arc characteristics of a negatively biased solar cell array was investigated. The arc characteristics examined were the peak current during an arc, the decay time as the arc terminates, and the charge lost during the arc. These arc characteristics were examined in a nitrogen plasma with charge densities ranging from 15,000 to 45,000 cu cm. Background gas pressures ranged from 8x1,000,000 to 6x100,000 torr. Over these ranges of parameters no significant effect on the arc characteristics were seen. Arc characteristics were also examined for three gas species: helium, nitrogen and argon. The helium arcs have higher peak currents and shorter decay times than nitrogen and argon arcs. There are slight differences in the arc characteristics between nitrogen and argon. These differences may be caused by the differences in mass of the respective species. Also, evidence is presented for an electron emission mechanism appearing as a precursor to solar array arcs. Occasionally the plasma generator could be turned off, and currents could still be detected in the vacuum system. When these currents are presented, arcs may occur.

  1. The effect of plasma on solar cell array arc characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Tyree, E.

    1984-01-01

    The influence from the ambient plasma on the arc characteristics of a negatively biased solar cell array was investigated. The arc characteristics examined were the peak current during an arc, the decay time as the arc terminates, and the charge lost during the arc. These arc characteristics were examined in a nitrogen plasma with charge densities ranging from 15,000 to 45,000 cu cm. Background gas pressures ranged from 8x1,000,000 to 6x100,000 torr. Over these ranges of parameters no significant effect on the arc characteristics were seen. Arc characteristics were also examined for three gas species: helium, nitrogen and argon. The helium arcs have higher peak currents and shorter decay times than nitrogen and argon arcs. There are slight differences in the arc characteristics between nitrogen and argon. These differences may be caused by the differences in mass of the respective species. Also, evidence is presented for an electron emission mechanism appearing as a precursor to solar array arcs. Occassionally the plasma generator could be turned off, and currents could still be detected in the vacuum system. When these currents are presented, arcs may occur.

  2. Root architecture and root and tuber crop productivity.

    PubMed

    Villordon, Arthur Q; Ginzberg, Idit; Firon, Nurit

    2014-07-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that optimization of root architecture for resource capture is vital for enabling the next green revolution. Although cereals provide half of the calories consumed by humans, root and tuber crops are the second major source of carbohydrates globally. Yet, knowledge of root architecture in root and tuber species is limited. In this opinion article, we highlight what is known about the root system in root and tuber crops, and mark new research directions towards a better understanding of the relation between root architecture and yield. We believe that unraveling the role of root architecture in root and tuber crop productivity will improve global food security, especially in regions with marginal soil fertility and low-input agricultural systems.

  3. Global Patterns of Vertical Root Distributions and Maximum Rooting Depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, H. J.; Jackson, R. B.

    2001-05-01

    Plant roots are important pathways in global biogeochemical cycles. Roots transport water from the soil to the atmosphere and carbon from the atmosphere into the soil, redistribute nutrients and water in the soil profile, and contribute to the weathering of soil minerals. Data on the vertical distribution and maximum depths of roots in the soil profile are needed to quantify these and other processes. The global coverage of such root data is uneven, which makes it desirable to estimate global root distributions and maximum rooting depths from measurements of aboveground vegetation structure, soil parameters, and climatic variables. We analyzed root two databases compiled from the literature to determine the biotic and abiotic factors that influence vertical root distributions in global ecosystems and maximum rooting depths of individual plants. The first database included 520 vertical root profiles from 286 geographic locations. The second database included 1350 rooting depths for individual plants species from water-limited systems globally. Vertical root distributions were characterized by interpolated 50% and 95% rooting depths (the depths above which 50% or 95% of all roots are located). The 95% rooting depths increased with decreasing latitude from 80\\deg to 30\\deg, but showed no clear trend in the tropics. Mean annual evapotranspiration, precipitation, and length of the warm season were all positively correlated with rooting depths. Globally, more than 90% of all profiles had at least 50% of all roots in the upper 0.3 m of the soil profile (incl. organic horizons) and 95% of all roots in the upper 2 m. Deeper 50% and 95% rooting depths were mainly found in water-limited ecosystems. Median rooting depths of individual plants in water-limited ecosystems increased with increasing precipitation from less than 1 m in deserts with <50 mm of mean annual precipitation to about 2 m in climates with 650 to 750 mm mean annual precipitation. Maximum rooting depths were

  4. Wired to the roots

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amutha Sampath; Bais, Harsh P.

    2012-01-01

    Often, plant-pathogenic microbe interactions are discussed in a host-microbe two-component system, however very little is known about how the diversity of rhizospheric microbes that associate with plants affect host performance against pathogens. There are various studies, which specially direct the importance of induced systemic defense (ISR) response in plants interacting with beneficial rhizobacteria, yet we don’t know how rhizobacterial associations modulate plant physiology. In here, we highlight the many dimensions within which plant roots associate with beneficial microbes by regulating aboveground physiology. We review approaches to study the causes and consequences of plant root association with beneficial microbes on aboveground plant-pathogen interactions. The review provides the foundations for future investigations into the impact of the root beneficial microbial associations on plant performance and innate defense responses. PMID:23073006

  5. Large-scale deformation related to the collision of the Aleutian Arc with Kamchatka

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gesit, Eric L.; Scholl, David W.

    1994-01-01

    The far western Aleutian Island Arc is actively colliding with Kamchatka. Westward motion of the Aleutian Arc is brought about by the tangential relative motion of the Pacific plate transferred to major, right-lateral shear zones north and south of the arc. Early geologic mapping of Cape Kamchatka (a promontory of Kamchatka along strike with the Aleutian Arc) revealed many similarities to the geology of the Aleutian Islands. Later studies support the notion that Cape Kamchatka is the farthest west Aleutian “island” and that it has been accreted to Kamchatka by the process of arc-continent collision. Deformation associated with the collision onshore Kamchatka includes gravimetrically determined crustal thickening and formation of a narrow thrust belt of intensely deformed rocks directly west of Cape Kamchatka. The trend of the thrust faults is concave toward the collision zone, indicating a radial distribution of maximum horizontal compressive stress. Offshore, major crustal faults trend either oblique to the Kamchatka margin or parallel to major Aleutian shear zones. These offshore faults are complex, accommodating both strike-slip and thrust displacements as documented by focal mechanisms and seismic reflection data. Earthquake activity is much higher in the offshore region within a zone bounded to the north by the northernmost Aleutian shear zone and to the west by an apparent aseismic front. Analysis of focal mechanisms in the region indicate that the present-day arc-continent “contact zone” is located directly east of Cape Kamchatka. In modeling the dynamics of the collision zone using thin viscous sheet theory, the rheological parameters are only partially constrained to values of n (the effective power law exponent) ≥ 3 and Ar(the Argand number) ≤ 30. These values are consistent with a forearc thermal profile of Kamchatka, previously determined from heat flow modeling. The thin viscous sheet modeling also indicates that onshore thrust faulting

  6. Dextral strike-slip tectonism and arc processes in the Sierra Nevada and Idaho batholiths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikoff, B.; Byerly, A.; Gaschnig, R. M.; Vervoort, J. D.; Kelso, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Both the Sierra Nevada (CA) and Idaho batholiths display clear evidence for magmatism simultaneous with dextral strike-slip movement during the Cretaceous. There is, however, a significant difference between both the style and the timing of the deformation and magmatism in these two magmatic arcs. The Sierra Nevada displays dextral strike-slip tectonism active from 92-80 Ma, as evidenced by a series of dextral shear zones associated with the axis of active magmatism. The concept of the plutons intruding en echelon pull-apart structures in a dextral system has been supported by the recognition of widespread, syn-tectonic shear zones along the axis of the arc. Further, a modern analog can be found in El Salvador, where dextral translation of the forearc has resulted in en echelon dextral shearing in a magmatic arc dominated by arc-perpendicular normal faulting. In contrast, dextral tectonism in Idaho both starts (~103 Ma) and ceases earlier (~90 Ma) than strike-slip motion in the Sierra Nevada batholith. Further, the deformation is better developed, as recorded by the ~5 km thick, dextral transpressional western Idaho shear zone (WISZ). The WISZ deformation affects I-type magmas that are not typically considered part of the Idaho batholith. The main phase of the 85-70 Ma, peraluminous Idaho batholith (Atlanta lobe) only contains local evidence for dextral shearing, such as the NS-oriented Johnson Creek-Profile Gap shear zone. The reasons for this along-strike variation in deformation for Cretaceous magmatic arcs in North America may relate to the collisional and translation histories of offshore terranes.

  7. Cross-arc Variations in Lava Chemistry in the Tonga Arc-Lau Back Arc System, 19- 23°S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, P. J.; Bezos, A.; Langmuir, C. H.; Escrig, S.; Matzen, A. K.; Asimow, P.; Arculus, R.

    2007-12-01

    The Tonga arc system from 19°-23°S consists of the active Tofua arc, the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC; a back arc spreading center), and numerous seamounts between them. We use the excellent sampling of ELSC and 34 nearby seamounts, along with sparser published analyses of Tofua arc, to examine the spatial relations of chemistry and melting in this subduction system. The spatial constraints can be used to better understand the nature and mechanism of enrichment that is caused by subduction. Geochemistry along the axis of ELSC is related to its distance to the Tofua arc, which decreases continuously from 100 km in the north to 40 km in the south. The subduction influence (e.g., fluid mobile elements) along ELSC increases in several sharp gradients towards the south as ELSC gets closer to the arc. The six different tectonic segments of ELSC display mixing relationships in trace element ratio-ratio diagrams (e.g., Ba/La vs Th/La) in which one end member is a subduction component that is distinctive for each segment (Escrig et al., this meeting). We explore whether the distinctive subduction components of each ELSC segment are reflected by the Tofua arc that is adjacent to that segment, and by the intervening seamounts. Relationships between the arc, back arc and seamounts are different in the north and the south. In the south where the arc-back arc distance is smaller, the Tofua arc volcanic rocks share the distinctive trace element characteristics of their corresponding ELSC segment, and extend the mixing trajectories to higher, more arc-like values. Seamounts that are located between Tofua arc and ELSC also share the distinctive trace element characteristics of the local arc + back-arc, and are intermediate in their trace element ratios. These observations are consistent with the model of Langmuir et al., (2006) in which magmas of back arc spreading centers form from two components: a dry side similar to mid-ocean ridges and a wet (trenchward) side that

  8. Plasma plume characterization of a vacuum arc thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekerak, Michael James

    A Vacuum Arc Thruster (VAT) is a thruster that uses the plasma created in a vacuum arc, an electrical discharge in a vacuum that creates high velocity and highly ionized plasmas, as the propellant without additional acceleration. A VAT would be a small and inexpensive low thrust ion thruster, ideal for small satellites and formation flying spacecraft. The purpose of this thesis was to quantitatively and qualitatively examine the VAT plasma plume to determine operating characteristics and limitations. A VAT with a titanium cathode was operated in two regimes: (A) single ˜100mus pulse, discharge current JD=510A, and (B) multiple ˜1500mus pulses at f=40.8Hz, JD=14A. The cathode was 3.18mm diameter Ti rod, surrounded by a 0.80mm thick alumina insulator, set in a molybdenum anode. Three Configurations were tested: Cfg1 (Regime A, cathode recessed 3.00mm from anode), Cfg2 (Regime A, cathode and anode flush), Cfg3 (Regime B, cathode recessed 3.00mm). A semi-empirical model was derived for VAT performance based on the MHD equation of motion using data for ion velocity, ion charge state distribution, ion current fraction (F), and ion current density distribution (ICDD). Additional performance parameters were a2, the peak ion current density angular offset from the cathode normal, and a3, the width of the ion current distribution. Measurements were taken at 162 points on a plane in the plasma plume using a custom faraday probe, and the ICDD empirical form was determined to be a Gaussian. The discharge voltage (VD) and F were Cfg1: VD=25.5V, F=0.025-0.035; Cfg2: VD=40.7V, F=0.08-0.10; Cfg3: VD=14.9V, F=0.006-0.021. For Cfg1, a2 started 15° off-axis while a2˜0 for Cfg2 and 3. In Cfg1, a 3=0.7-0.6, and in Cfg2 a3=1.0-1.1, so the recessed cathode focused the plasma more. However, F is more important for VAT performance because upper and lower bounds for thrust, specific impulse, thrust-to-power, and efficiency were calculated and Cfg2 had the highest performance. High

  9. SU-E-T-538: Lung SBRT Dosimetric Comparison of 3D Conformal and RapidArc Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, R; Zhan, L; Osei, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dose distributions of RapidArc Plan can be quite different from standard 3D conformal radiation therapy. SBRT plans can be optimized with high conformity or mimic the 3D conformal treatment planning with very high dose in the center of the tumor. This study quantifies the dosimetric differences among 3D conformal plan; flattened beam and FFF beam RapidArc Plans for lung SBRT. Methods: Five lung cancer patients treated with 3D non-coplanar SBRT were randomly selected. All the patients were CT scanned with 4DCT to determine the internal target volume. Abdominal compression was applied to minimize respiratory motion for SBRT patients. The prescription dose was 48 Gy in 4 fractions. The PTV coverage was optimized by two groups of objective function: one with high conformity, another mimicking 3D conformal dose distribution with high dose in the center of PTV. Optimization constraints were set to meet the criteria of the RTOG-0915 protocol. All VMAT plans were optimized with the RapidArc technique using four full arcs in Eclipse treatment planning system. The RapidArc SBRT plans with flattened 6MV beam and 6MV FFF beam were generated and dosimetric results were compared with the previous treated 3D non-coplanar plans. Results: All the RapidArc plans with flattened beam and FFF beam had similar results for the PTV and OARs. For the high conformity optimization group, The DVH of PTV exhibited a steep dose fall-off outside the PTV compared to the 3D non-coplanar plan. However, for the group mimicking the 3D conformal target dose distribution, although the PTV is very similar to the 3D conformal plan, the ITV coverage is better than 3D conformal plan. Conclusion: Due to excellent clinical experiences of 3D conformal SBRT treatment, the Rapid Arc optimization mimicking 3D conformal planning may be suggested for clinical use.

  10. SU-E-T-187: Feasibility Study of Stereotactic Liver Radiation Therapy Using Multiple Divided Partial Arcs in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y; Ozawa, S; Tsegmed, U; Nakashima, T; Shintaro, T; Ochi, Y; Kawahara, D; Kimura, T; Nagata, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To verify volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using flattening filter free (FFF) mode with jaw tracking (JT) feature for single breath hold as long as 15 s per arc in liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) against intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) FFF-JT. Methods: Ten hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cases were planned with 10 MV FFF using Pinnacle3 treatment planning system which delivered by TrueBeam to administer 48 Gy/ 4 fractions. Eight non-coplanar beams were assigned to IMRT using step-and-shoot technique. For VMAT, two or three non-coplanar partial arcs (up to 180 degrees) were further divided into subarcs with gantry rotation less than 80 degrees to limit delivery time within 15 s. Dose distributions were verified using OCTAVIUS II system and pass rates were evaluated using gamma analysis with criteria of 3%/3 mm at threshold of 5% to the maximum dose. The actual irradiation time was measured. Results: The VMAT-FFF-JT of partial-arcs with sub-divided arcs was able to produce a highly conformal plan as well as IMRT-FFF-JT. Isodose lines and DVH showed slight improvement in dosimetry when JT was employed for both IMRT and VMAT. Consequently, VMAT-FFF-JT was superior in reducing the dose to liver minus gross tumor volume. VMAT-FFF-JT has shorter total treatment time compared with 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) FFF because the gantry was rotated simultaneously with the beam delivery in VMAT. Moreover, due to the small and regular shape of HCC, VMAT-FFF-JT offered less multileaf collimator motion, thus the interplay effect is expected to be reduced. The patient specific QA of IMRT and VMAT acquired the pass rates higher than 90%. Conclusion: VMAT-FFF-JT could be a promising technique for liver SBRT as the sub-divided arcs method was able to accommodate a single breath hold irradiation time of less than 15 s without deterioration of the dose distribution compared with IMRT-FFF-JT.

  11. DEVICE AND METHOD FOR PRODUCING A HIGH INTENSITY ARC DISCHARGE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-01-01

    A device is described for producing an energetic d-c carbon arc discharge between widely spaced electrodes with arc currents in excess of 100 amperes in a magnetic field of about 3000 gauss and witnin an evacuated enclo sure at a pressure of about 10/sup -5/ mm Hg. No defining electrodes are used in the device, thus essentially eliminating the problems of shorting which heretofore limited the amount of current that could be produced in an arc discharge. The energetic carbon arc discharge is sustained by the potential across the electrodes and by carbon ions and electrons released from the electrodes during arc operation. A large part of the potential drop of the arc occurs along the arc and many energetic electrons reach the anode because the arc pressure is relatively low, and few collisions occur. The carbon discharge is also an efficient ion pump.

  12. Automated Variable-Polarity Plasma-Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numes, A. C., Jr.; Bayless, E. O., Jr.; Jones, S. C., III; Munafo, P.; Munafo, A.; Biddle, A.; Wilson, W.

    1984-01-01

    Variable-polarity plasma-arc methods produces better welds at lower cost than gas-shielded tungsten-arc welding in assemblies. Weld porosity very low and costs of joint preparation, depeaking, inspection, and weld repair minimized.

  13. Arc-shock interaction inside a supersonic nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, M.T.C.; Kwan, S.; Hall, W.

    1996-02-01

    Arcs burning in supersonic nozzles have wide technical applications. They are commonly used in high-voltage circuit breakers, arc heaters, and arc plasma processing systems. The present investigation is aimed at an understanding of the arc behavior inside a modern high-voltage puffer circuit breaker where a high pressure necessary for the generation of a gas blast is produced by the compression of a piston inside the puffer chamber. Flow separation in the thermal layer between the high-temperature arc core and cold flow generates large vortices which deform the shape of the arc core. For the current range investigated, the center of the shock is not sensitive to the current, but is moved upstream relative to that without the arc. The computed features of the interaction are in agreement with the experimental observations of [2] and [3]. The arcing gas is SF{sub 6}.

  14. Optical Arc-Length Sensor For TIG Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Matthew A.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed subsystem of tungsten/inert-gas (TIG) welding system measures length of welding arc optically. Viewed by video camera, in one of three alternative optical configurations. Length of arc measured instead of inferred from voltage.

  15. 29 CFR 1915.56 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... generation of an arc, sparks or heat at any point shall cause rejection of the structure as a ground circuit... or cutter to electric shock. (3) When the arc welder or cutter has occasion to leave his work or...

  16. 29 CFR 1915.56 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... generation of an arc, sparks or heat at any point shall cause rejection of the structure as a ground circuit... or cutter to electric shock. (3) When the arc welder or cutter has occasion to leave his work or...

  17. 29 CFR 1915.56 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... generation of an arc, sparks or heat at any point shall cause rejection of the structure as a ground circuit... or cutter to electric shock. (3) When the arc welder or cutter has occasion to leave his work or...

  18. 29 CFR 1915.56 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... generation of an arc, sparks or heat at any point shall cause rejection of the structure as a ground circuit... or cutter to electric shock. (3) When the arc welder or cutter has occasion to leave his work or...

  19. 29 CFR 1915.56 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... generation of an arc, sparks or heat at any point shall cause rejection of the structure as a ground circuit... or cutter to electric shock. (3) When the arc welder or cutter has occasion to leave his work or...

  20. Dose calculation for hypofractionated volumetric-modulated arc therapy: approximating continuous arc delivery and tongue-and-groove modeling*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Tang, Grace; Zhang, Pengpeng; Hunt, Margie; Lim, Seng B.; LoSasso, Thomas; Mageras, Gig

    2016-01-01

    Hypofractionated treatments generally increase the complexity of a treatment plan due to the more stringent constraints of normal tissues and target coverage. As a result, treatment plans contain more modulated MLC motions that may require extra efforts for accurate dose calculation. This study explores methods to minimize the differences between in-house dose calculation and actual delivery of hypofractionated volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), by focusing on arc approximation and tongue-and-groove (TG) modeling. For dose calculation, the continuous delivery arc is typically approximated by a series of static beams with an angular spacing of 2°. This causes significant error when there is large MLC movement from one beam to the next. While increasing the number of beams will minimize the dose error, calculation time will increase significantly. We propose a solution by inserting two additional apertures at each of the beam angle for dose calculation. These additional apertures were interpolated at two-thirds’ degree before and after each beam. Effectively, there were a total of three MLC apertures at each beam angle, and the weighted average fluence from the three apertures was used for calculation. Because the number of beams was kept the same, calculation time was only increased by about 6%–8%. For a lung plan, areas of high local dose differences (> 4%) between film measurement and calculation with one aperture were significantly reduced in calculation with three apertures. Ion chamber measurement also showed similar results, where improvements were seen with calculations using additional apertures. Dose calculation accuracy was further improved for TG modeling by developing a sampling method for beam fluence matrix. Single element point sampling for fluence transmitted through MLC was used for our fluence matrix with 1 mm resolution. For Varian HDMLC, grid alignment can cause fluence sampling error. To correct this, transmission volume averaging was

  1. PROMOTIONS: PROper MOTION Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleb Wherry, John; Sahai, R.

    2009-05-01

    We report on the development of a software tool (PROMOTIONS) to streamline the process of measuring proper motions of material in expanding nebulae. Our tool makes use of IDL's widget programming capabilities to design a unique GUI that is used to compare images of the objects from two epochs. The software allows us to first orient and register the images to a common frame of reference and pixel scale, using field stars in each of the images. We then cross-correlate specific morphological features in order to determine their proper motions, which consist of the proper motion of the nebula as a whole (PM-neb), and expansion motions of the features relative to the center. If the central star is not visible (quite common in bipolar nebulae with dense dusty waists), point-symmetric expansion is assumed and we use the average motion of high-quality symmetric pairs of features on opposite sides of the nebular center to compute PM-neb. This is then subtracted out to determine the individual movements of these and additional features relative to the nebular center. PROMOTIONS should find wide applicability in measuring proper motions in astrophysical objects such as the expanding outflows/jets commonly seen around young and dying stars. We present first results from using PROMOTIONS to successfully measure proper motions in several pre-planetary nebulae (transition objects between the red giant and planetary nebula phases), using images taken 7-10 years apart with the WFPC2 and ACS instruments on board HST. The authors are grateful to NASA's Undergradute Scholars Research Program (USRP) for supporting this research.

  2. Motion Belts: Visualization of Human Motion Data on a Timeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Hiroshi; Kaihara, Ryota; Saito, Suguru; Nakajima, Masayuki

    Because motion capture system enabled us to capture a number of human motions, the demand for a method to easily browse the captured motion database has been increasing. In this paper, we propose a method to generate simple visual outlines of motion clips, for the purpose of efficient motion data browsing. Our method unfolds a motion clip into a 2D stripe of keyframes along a timeline that is based on semantic keyframe extraction and the best view point selection for each keyframes. With our visualization, timing and order of actions in the motions are clearly visible and the contents of multiple motions are easily comparable. In addition, because our method is applicable for a wide variety of motions, it can generate outlines for a large amount of motions fully automatically.

  3. CW arc-lamp-pumped alexandrite lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Samelson, H.; Walling, J.C.; Wernikowski, T.; Harter, D.J.

    1988-06-01

    The performance characteristics of arc-lamp- (Xe and Hg) pumped, CW alexandrite lasers are described in detail. The modes of operation considered are free running, tuned, and repetitively Q-switched. The experimental arrangement and apparatus are also outlined. The experimental results are discussed in terms of a steady-state model, and the areas of agreement and difficulty are pointed out.

  4. Clinical Applications of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Matuszak, Martha M.; Yan Di; Grills, Inga; Martinez, Alvaro

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To present treatment planning case studies for several treatment sites for which volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) could have a positive impact; and to share an initial clinical experience with VMAT for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Four case studies are presented to show the potential benefit of VMAT compared with conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in pediatric cancer, bone marrow-sparing whole-abdominopelvic irradiation (WAPI), and SBRT of the lung and spine. Details of clinical implementation of VMAT for SBRT are presented. The VMAT plans are compared with conventional techniques in terms of dosimetric quality and delivery efficiency. Results: Volumetric modulated arc therapy reduced the treatment time of spine SBRT by 37% and improved isodose conformality. Conformal and VMAT techniques for lung SBRT had similar dosimetric quality, but VMAT had improved target coverage and took 59% less time to deliver, although monitor units were increased by 5%. In a complex pediatric pelvic example, VMAT reduced treatment time by 78% and monitor units by 25% compared with IMRT. A double-isocenter VMAT technique for WAPI can spare bone marrow while maintaining good delivery efficiency. Conclusions: Volumetric modulated arc therapy is a new technology that may benefit different patient populations, including pediatric cancer patients and those undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and WAPI. Volumetric modulated arc therapy has been used and shown to be beneficial for significantly improving delivery efficiency of lung and spine SBRT.

  5. Initiation of Subduction at Relic Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnis, M.; Leng, W.

    2014-12-01

    Plate tectonics have been well established for tens of years, but how subduction initiates over tectonic history remains obscure. It has been proposed that passive margins may be a possible place for subduction initiation, but there is no obvious Cenozoic example of such a scenario, including along the passive margins of the Atlantic Ocean. With a computational method that follows the deformation of a visco-elasto-plastic medium, here we show that a favourable locale for subduction initiation is the juxtaposition of an old oceanic plate adjacent to a young, but relic arc. The probable enrichment of quartz in the middle to lower arc crust leads to two major factors which may have induced subduction initiation. One is the compositional density difference between the relic arc crust and the oceanic lithospheric mantle; the other is the significantly weakened lithosphere strength due to the rheology of wet quartz. With such a setup, we observe spontaneous subduction initiation within a few million years. The evidence that Izu-Bonin-Mariana and Tonga-Kermedec subduction zones both initiate adjacent to relic island arcs supports our conclusions. Our results provide an explanation for the rarity of subduction initiation at the passive margins. The continental lithosphere is typically old and cold. Consequently, the thermal effects cancel the compositional buoyancy contrast between the continental crust and the oceanic lithospheric mantle, making subduction initiation difficult at passive margins.

  6. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    DOE PAGES

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Gu, Genda

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scatteringmore » creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc ≤ T ≤ Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.« less

  7. Cheaper Custom Shielding Cups For Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.

    1992-01-01

    New way of making special-purpose shielding cups for gas/tungsten arc welding from hobby ceramic greatly reduces cost. Pattern machined in plastic. Plaster-of-paris mold made, and liquid ceramic poured into mold. Cost 90 percent less than cup machined from lava rock.

  8. Gas tungsten arc welder with electrode grinder

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Brown, William F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  9. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Gu, Genda

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scattering creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc ≤ T ≤ Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.

  10. Arc Welding Dictionary 2. Project HIRE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David C.; And Others

    Designed as supplemental material to on-going instruction in the vocational program, this second of three picture dictionary booklets in the Arc Welding series is intended to assist the learning handicapped student to master the core vocabulary taught in the trade. Intended for individual or small group instruction with minimal supervision, this…

  11. Arc Welding Dictionary 3. Project HIRE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David C.; And Others

    Designed as supplemental material to on-going instruction in the vocational program, this third of three picture dictionary booklets in the Arc Welding series is intended to assist the learning handicapped student to master the core vocabulary taught in the trade. Intended for individual or small group instruction with minimal supervision, this…

  12. Neural-Network Modeling Of Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Kristinn; Barnett, Robert J.; Springfield, James F.; Cook, George E.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Bjorgvinsson, Jon B.

    1994-01-01

    Artificial neural networks considered for use in monitoring and controlling gas/tungsten arc-welding processes. Relatively simple network, using 4 welding equipment parameters as inputs, estimates 2 critical weld-bead paramaters within 5 percent. Advantage is computational efficiency.

  13. Arc Welding Dictionary 1. Project HIRE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David C.; And Others

    Designed as supplemental material to on-going instruction in the vocational program, this first of three picture dictionary booklets in the Arc Welding series is intended to assist the learning handicapped student to master the core vocabulary taught in the trade. Intended for individual or small group instruction with minimal supervision, this…

  14. Arc Welding Teacher's Manual. Project HIRE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David C.; And Others

    Designed as supplemental material to on-going instruction in the vocational program, this teacher's manual to the Arc Welding series is intended to accompany three dictionary booklets (available as CE 024 411, CE 024 412, and CE 024 413) for use by handicapped students to help them master the core vocabulary taught in the trade. Information…

  15. Arc tracking of cables for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, D.; Frontzek, F. R.; Hanson, J.; Reher, H. J.; Judd, M. D.; Bryant, D.

    1995-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to develop a new test method that is suitable for the assessment of the resistance of aerospace cables to arc tracking for different specific environmental and network conditions of spacecrafts. This paper reports the purpose, test conditions, test specimen, test procedure, and test acceptance criteria of seven different (200-250 mm long) cables.

  16. Signal Analysis of Gas Tungsten Arc Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagar, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding is a process in which the input parameters such as current, voltage and travel speed, can be easily controlled and/or monitored. However, weld quality is not solely a function of these parameters. An adaptive method of observing weld quality is desired to improve weld quality assurance. The use of dynamic electrical properties of the welding arc as a weld quality monitor was studied. The electrical properties of the arc are characterized by the current voltage transfer function. The hardware and software necessary to collect the data at a maximum rate of 45 kHz and to allow the off-line processing of this data are tested. The optimum input current waveform is determined. Bead-on-plate welds to observe such characteristics of the weld as the fundamental frequency of the puddle are studied. Future work is planned to observe changes of the arc response with changes in joint geometry, base metal chemistry, and shielding gas composition are discussed.

  17. Joan of Arc and DSM III.

    PubMed

    Henker, F O

    1984-12-01

    As an exercise in the use of the current diagnostic manual of psychiatric disorders, the life story of Joan of Arc is summarized from birth until her execution at age 19. Then various psychiatric diagnoses are considered in the light of published criteria, including types of psychoses, psychosexual disorders, and personality disorders. PMID:6390693

  18. Constrained motion control on a hemispherical surface: path planning.

    PubMed

    Berman, Sigal; Liebermann, Dario G; McIntyre, Joseph

    2014-03-01

    Surface-constrained motion, i.e., motion constraint by a rigid surface, is commonly found in daily activities. The current work investigates the choice of hand paths constrained to a concave hemispherical surface. To gain insight regarding paths and their relationship with task dynamics, we simulated various control policies. The simulations demonstrated that following a geodesic path (the shortest path between 2 points on a sphere) is advantageous not only in terms of path length but also in terms of motor planning and sensitivity to motor command errors. These stem from the fact that the applied forces lie in a single plane (that of the geodesic path). To test whether human subjects indeed follow the geodesic, and to see how such motion compares to other paths, we recorded movements in a virtual haptic-visual environment from 11 healthy subjects. The task comprised point-to-point motion between targets at two elevations (30° and 60°). Three typical choices of paths were observed from a frontal plane projection of the paths: circular arcs, straight lines, and arcs close to the geodesic path for each elevation. Based on the measured hand paths, we applied k-means blind separation to divide the subjects into three groups and compared performance indicators. The analysis confirmed that subjects who followed paths closest to the geodesic produced faster and smoother movements compared with the others. The "better" performance reflects the dynamical advantages of following the geodesic path and may also reflect invariant features of control policies used to produce such a surface-constrained motion.

  19. Diffuse degassing through magmatic arc crust (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, C. E.; Ingebritsen, S.

    2013-12-01

    The crust of magmatic arcs plays an important role in the volatile cycle at convergent margins. The fluxes of subduction- and arc-related volatiles such as H2O, C, Cl, S are poorly known. It is commonly believed that gases emitted from volcanoes account nearly quantitatively for the volatiles that cross the Moho beneath the volcanic front. This volcanic degassing may occur during eruption, emission from summit fumaroles and hot springs, or more 'diffuse' delivery to volcano flanks. However, several observations suggest that volatiles also transit arc crust by even more diffuse pathways, which could account for significant volatile loss on long time and length scales. Active metamorphism of arc crust produces crustal-scale permeability that is sufficient to transport a large volume of subducted volatiles (Ingebritsen and Manning, 2002, PNAS, 99, 9113). Arc magmas may reach volatile saturation deeper than the maximum depths recorded by melt inclusions (e.g., Blundy et al., 2010, EPSL, 290, 289), and exhumed sections of magmatic arc crust typically record voluminous plutons reflecting magma crystallization and volatile loss at depths well below the volcanic edifice. At shallower depths, topographically driven meteoric groundwater systems can absorb magmatic volatiles and transport them laterally by tens of km (e.g., James et al., 1999, Geology, 27, 823; Evans et al., 2002, JVGR, 114, 291). Hydrothermal ore deposits formed at subvolcanic depths sequester vast amounts of volatiles, especially sulfur, that are only returned to the surface on the time scale of exhumation and/or erosion. Water-rich metamorphic fluids throughout the crust can readily carry exsolved volcanic gases because the solubilities of volatile bearing minerals such as calcite, anhydrite, and fluorite are quite high at elevated pressure and temperature (e.g., Newton and Manning, 2002, Am Min, 87, 1401; 2005, J Pet, 46, 701; Tropper and Manning, 2007, Chem Geol, 242, 299). Taken together, these

  20. Anatomy of Intra-Oceanic Arc Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, R. J.

    2004-12-01

    Intra-oceanic arc systems (IOAS) are ultimately embedded in orogenic belts and added to the continental crust. Reconstructing fossil IOASs in collision zones requires understanding the salient features of a typical IOAS. IOASs have the relative dimensions of tagliatelle (flat) pasta: much wider (~250 km) than thick (10-30 km), much longer (1000's of km) than wide. IOASs begin to form when subduction begins, either spontaneously (SNSZ) or by forced convergence (INSZ). For SNSZ, IOASs start as broad zones of seafloor spreading associated with subsidence of the adjacent lithosphere, whereas INSZ IOASs are built on trapped crust. IOAS magmatism manifests the evolution of its subduction zone and indirectly the breadth of the subducted ocean. Two stages in SNSZ IOAS magmato-tectonic evolution exist: infancy and maturity. Infancy lasts 5-10 Ma and results in broad zones of seafloor spreading of tholeiite/boninite; this becomes forearc for the mature IOAS and is emplaced as ophiolite during collision (subduction zone failure). Arc maturity begins with true subduction, as the subducted slab reaches depths ~130 km, focusing magmatism to begin building the magmatic arc ~200km away from the trench and allowing the forearc to cool and hydrate. Mature magmatic arcs mostly yield low-K tholeiitic and medium-K calc-alkaline magmas. Magmatic focusing begins crustal thickening beneath the magmatic arc, at ~500m/Ma for the Izu-Bonin-Mariana IOAS. No systematic compositional evolution to more LIL-enriched primitive magmas occurs once IOAS maturity is reached, except when upper plate stress regime (BAB formation, strike- slip faulting) or the nature of subducted material (more/different sediments, young oceanic crust) changes. Thickening is accompanied by processing of crust beneath the magmatic arc, with progressive differentiation into upper volcanic, middle tonalitic, and lower mafic layers, producing an increasingly effective density filter for magma ascent. Crustal layer formation

  1. Anatomy of Intra-Oceanic Arc Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, R. J.

    2007-12-01

    Intra-oceanic arc systems (IOAS) are ultimately embedded in orogenic belts and added to the continental crust. Reconstructing fossil IOASs in collision zones requires understanding the salient features of a typical IOAS. IOASs have the relative dimensions of tagliatelle (flat) pasta: much wider (~250 km) than thick (10-30 km), much longer (1000's of km) than wide. IOASs begin to form when subduction begins, either spontaneously (SNSZ) or by forced convergence (INSZ). For SNSZ, IOASs start as broad zones of seafloor spreading associated with subsidence of the adjacent lithosphere, whereas INSZ IOASs are built on trapped crust. IOAS magmatism manifests the evolution of its subduction zone and indirectly the breadth of the subducted ocean. Two stages in SNSZ IOAS magmato-tectonic evolution exist: infancy and maturity. Infancy lasts 5-10 Ma and results in broad zones of seafloor spreading of tholeiite/boninite; this becomes forearc for the mature IOAS and is emplaced as ophiolite during collision (subduction zone failure). Arc maturity begins with true subduction, as the subducted slab reaches depths ~130 km, focusing magmatism to begin building the magmatic arc ~200km away from the trench and allowing the forearc to cool and hydrate. Mature magmatic arcs mostly yield low-K tholeiitic and medium-K calc-alkaline magmas. Magmatic focusing begins crustal thickening beneath the magmatic arc, at ~500m/Ma for the Izu-Bonin-Mariana IOAS. No systematic compositional evolution to more LIL-enriched primitive magmas occurs once IOAS maturity is reached, except when upper plate stress regime (BAB formation, strike- slip faulting) or the nature of subducted material (more/different sediments, young oceanic crust) changes. Thickening is accompanied by processing of crust beneath the magmatic arc, with progressive differentiation into upper volcanic, middle tonalitic, and lower mafic layers, producing an increasingly effective density filter for magma ascent. Crustal layer formation

  2. Hybrid MV-kV 3D respiratory motion tracking during radiation therapy with low imaging dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huagang; Li, Haiyun; Liu, Zhixiang; Nath, Ravinder; Liu, Wu

    2012-12-01

    A novel real-time adaptive MV-kV imaging framework for image-guided radiation therapy is developed to reduce the thoracic and abdominal tumor targeting uncertainty caused by respiration-induced intrafraction motion with ultra-low patient imaging dose. In our method, continuous stereoscopic MV-kV imaging is used at the beginning of a radiation therapy delivery for several seconds to measure the implanted marker positions. After this stereoscopic imaging period, the kV imager is switched off except for the times when no fiducial marker is detected in the cine-MV images. The 3D time-varying marker positions are estimated by combining the MV 2D projection data and the motion correlations between directional components of marker motion established from the stereoscopic imaging period and updated afterwards; in particular, the most likely position is assumed to be the position on the projection line that has the shortest distance to the first principal component line segment constructed from previous trajectory points. An adaptive windowed auto-regressive prediction is utilized to predict the marker position a short time later (310 ms and 460 ms in this study) to allow for tracking system latency. To demonstrate the feasibility and evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method, computer simulations were performed for both arc and fixed-gantry deliveries using 66 h of retrospective tumor motion data from 42 patients treated for thoracic or abdominal cancers. The simulations reveal that using our hybrid approach, a smaller than 1.2 mm or 1.5 mm root-mean-square tracking error can be achieved at a system latency of 310 ms or 460 ms, respectively. Because the kV imaging is only used for a short period of time in our method, extra patient imaging dose can be reduced by an order of magnitude compared to continuous MV-kV imaging, while the clinical tumor targeting accuracy for thoracic or abdominal cancers is maintained. Furthermore, no additional hardware is required with the

  3. The Roots of Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montoya, Colleen, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This newsletter covers educational issues affecting schools in the Western Regional Educational Laboratory's 4-state region (Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah) and nationwide. The following articles appear in the Volume 4, Number 1 issue: (1) "The Roots of Reading"; (2) "Breaking the Code: Reading Literacy in K-3"; (3) "Improving Secondary…

  4. Great Plains Roots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    Sandy White Hawk, Sicangu Lakota, was adopted by white missionaries as an infant and suffered child abuse. After 33 years, she found her birth family and formed First Nations Orphans Association, which uses songs and ceremonies to help adoptees return to their roots. Until the 1970s, federal agencies and welfare organizations facilitated removal…

  5. Geologically current plate motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, Charles; Gordon, Richard G.; Argus, Donald F.

    2010-04-01

    We describe best-fitting angular velocities and MORVEL, a new closure-enforced set of angular velocities for the geologically current motions of 25 tectonic plates that collectively occupy 97 per cent of Earth's surface. Seafloor spreading rates and fault azimuths are used to determine the motions of 19 plates bordered by mid-ocean ridges, including all the major plates. Six smaller plates with little or no connection to the mid-ocean ridges are linked to MORVEL with GPS station velocities and azimuthal data. By design, almost no kinematic information is exchanged between the geologically determined and geodetically constrained subsets of the global circuit-MORVEL thus averages motion over geological intervals for all the major plates. Plate geometry changes relative to NUVEL-1A include the incorporation of Nubia, Lwandle and Somalia plates for the former Africa plate, Capricorn, Australia and Macquarie plates for the former Australia plate, and Sur and South America plates for the former South America plate. MORVEL also includes Amur, Philippine Sea, Sundaland and Yangtze plates, making it more useful than NUVEL-1A for studies of deformation in Asia and the western Pacific. Seafloor spreading rates are estimated over the past 0.78 Myr for intermediate and fast spreading centres and since 3.16 Ma for slow and ultraslow spreading centres. Rates are adjusted downward by 0.6-2.6mmyr-1 to compensate for the several kilometre width of magnetic reversal zones. Nearly all the NUVEL-1A angular velocities differ significantly from the MORVEL angular velocities. The many new data, revised plate geometries, and correction for outward displacement thus significantly modify our knowledge of geologically current plate motions. MORVEL indicates significantly slower 0.78-Myr-average motion across the Nazca-Antarctic and Nazca-Pacific boundaries than does NUVEL-1A, consistent with a progressive slowdown in the eastward component of Nazca plate motion since 3.16 Ma. It also

  6. Quantifying crustal back-arc extension and shortening in the Northeast Japan arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, S.; Ikeda, Y.; Imaizumi, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Northeast Japan (NEJ) arc has experienced strong extension in Early to Middle Miocene time and contractive deformation since Pliocene time. We determined the amounts of the Miocene extension and Pliocene contraction along four transects across the back-arc region of NEJ arc by area-balancing restoration using seismic reflection, gravity, and surface geologic data. We found that the Miocene extension is as much as 31-56 km while the Pliocene-Quaternary contraction is only 10-15 km. The style of the Miocene extension in the back-arc region of NEJ is highly asymmetric; the zone of concentrated extension (mainly along the Japan Sea margin) is characterized by a breakaway fault on the west, a rollover basement anticline on the east, and abnormally deep (˜10 km) basins and strongly rotated fault blocks in between, suggesting the existence of a large-scale detachment fault at a mid-crustal level beneath the extended zone. We suggest that the Pliocene-Quaternary contractive surface deformation in the back-arc region of NEJ, which is represented by fault-bend folds and fault-propagation folds in rift basins, resulted principally from positive tectonic inversion using the same detachment fault at a mid-crustal depth. Although the strong Pliocene-Quaternary contraction has occurred mainly in the NEJ's back-arc, week deformation has occurred also in the NEJ's forearc, suggesting that the underlying detachment fault has propagated eastward beneath the forearc. To reveal more details of crustal extension and shorting of NEJ arc, it is necessary to estimate the amounts of extension and shortening of the inland area and forearc side precisely. In this presentation, we will demonstrate the tectonic evolution in the back-arc region of Northeast Japan since Miocene time, with recent results of seismic reflection surveys in the inland area and forearc side of NEJ.

  7. Seismicity of the Earth 1900-2010 Aleutian arc and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benz, Harley M.; Herman, Matthew; Tarr, Arthur C.; Hayes, Gavin P.; Furlong, Kevin P.; Villaseñor, Antonio; Dart, Richard L.; Rhea, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This map shows details of the Aleutian arc not visible in an earlier publication. The Aleutian arc extends about 3,000 km from the Gulf of Alaska to the Kamchatka Peninsula. It marks the region where the Pacific plate subducts into the mantle beneath the North America plate. This subduction is responsible for the generation of the Aleutian Islands and the deep offshore Aleutian Trench. Relative to a fixed North America plate, the Pacific plate is moving northwest at a rate that increases from about 55 mm per year at the arc's eastern edge to 75 mm per year near its western terminus. In the east, the convergence of the plates is nearly perpendicular to the plate boundary. However, because of the boundary's curvature, as one travels westward along the arc, the subduction becomes more and more oblique to the boundary until the relative plate motion becomes parallel to the arc at the Near Islands near its western edge. Subduction zones such as the Aleutian arc are geologically complex and produce numerous earthquakes from multiple sources. Deformation of the overriding North America plate generates shallow crustal earthquakes, whereas slip at the interface of the plates generates interplate earthquakes that extend from near the base of the trench to depths of 40 to 60 km. At greater depths, Aleutian arc earthquakes occur within the subducting Pacific plate and can reach depths of 300 km. Since 1900, six great earthquakes have occurred along the Aleutian Trench, Alaska Peninsula, and Gulf of Alaska: M8.4 1906 Rat Islands; M8.6 1938 Shumagin Islands; M8.6 1946 Unimak Island; M8.6 1957 Andreanof Islands; M9.2 1964 Prince William Sound; and M8.7 1965 Rat Islands. Several relevant tectonic elements (plate boundaries and active volcanoes) provide a context for the seismicity presented on the main map panel. The plate boundaries are most accurate along the axis of the Aleutian Trench and more diffuse or speculative in extreme northeastern Russia. The active volcanoes parallel

  8. Dry and wet arc track propagation resistance testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Rex

    1995-01-01

    The wet arc-propagation resistance test for wire insulation provides an assessment of the ability of an insulation to prevent damage in an electrical environment. Results of an arc-propagation test may vary slightly due to the method of arc initiation; therefore a standard test method must be selected to evaluate the general arc-propagation resistance characteristics of an insulation. This test method initiates an arc by dripping salt water over pre-damaged wires which creates a conductive path between the wires. The power supply, test current, circuit resistances, and other variables are optimized for testing 20 guage wires. The use of other wire sizes may require modifications to the test variables. The dry arc-propagation resistance test for wire insulation also provides an assessment of the ability of an insulation to prevent damage in an electrical arc environment. In service, electrical arcs may originate form a variety of factors including insulation deterioration, faulty installation, and chafing. Here too, a standard test method must be selected to evaluate the general arc-propagation resistance characteristics of an insulation. This test method initiates an arc with a vibrating blade. The test also evaluates the ability of the insulation to prevent further arc-propagation when the electrical arc is re-energized.

  9. Theory of the arc discharge in air blast breakers

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, H.F.

    1980-08-01

    The complete set of equations obtaining in the arc's length element are given. The arc length is determined when the external circuit equations are closed by an expression for the arc inductance as a function of the radius and length, in addition to our relationships for the radius and voltage gradients.

  10. 29 CFR 1926.351 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Safety, 49 CFR part 192, Minimum Federal Safety Standards for Gas Pipelines, shall apply. (3) When a... electrical contact exists at all joints. The generation of an arc, sparks, or heat at any point shall cause... may expose the arc welder or cutter to electric shock. (3) When the arc welder or cutter has...

  11. 29 CFR 1926.351 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Safety, 49 CFR part 192, Minimum Federal Safety Standards for Gas Pipelines, shall apply. (3) When a... electrical contact exists at all joints. The generation of an arc, sparks, or heat at any point shall cause... may expose the arc welder or cutter to electric shock. (3) When the arc welder or cutter has...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.351 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Safety, 49 CFR part 192, Minimum Federal Safety Standards for Gas Pipelines, shall apply. (3) When a... electrical contact exists at all joints. The generation of an arc, sparks, or heat at any point shall cause... may expose the arc welder or cutter to electric shock. (3) When the arc welder or cutter has...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.351 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Safety, 49 CFR Part 192, Minimum Federal Safety Standards for Gas Pipelines, shall apply. (3) When a... electrical contact exists at all joints. The generation of an arc, sparks, or heat at any point shall cause... may expose the arc welder or cutter to electric shock. (3) When the arc welder or cutter has...

  14. 29 CFR 1926.351 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Safety, 49 CFR part 192, Minimum Federal Safety Standards for Gas Pipelines, shall apply. (3) When a... electrical contact exists at all joints. The generation of an arc, sparks, or heat at any point shall cause... may expose the arc welder or cutter to electric shock. (3) When the arc welder or cutter has...

  15. Image motion compensation by area correlation and centroid tracking of solar surface features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nein, M. E.; Mcintosh, W. R.; Cumings, N. P.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental solar correlation tracker was tested and evaluated on a ground-based solar magnetograph. Using sunspots as fixed targets, tracking error signals were derived by which the telescope image was stabilized against wind induced perturbations. Two methods of stabilization were investigated; mechanical stabilization of the image by controlled two-axes motion of an active optical element in the telescope beam, and electronic stabilization by biasing of the electron scan in the recording camera. Both approaches have demonstrated telescope stability of about 0.6 arc sec under random perturbations which can cause the unstabilized image to move up to 120 arc sec at frequencies up to 30 Hz.

  16. Space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homick, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    Research on the etiology, prediction, treatment and prevention of space motion sickness, designed to minimize the impact of this syndrome which was experienced frequently and with severity by individuals on the Skylab missions, on Space Shuttle crews is reviewed. Theories of the cause of space motion sickness currently under investigation by NASA include sensory conflict, which argues that motion sickness symptoms result from a mismatch between the total pattern of information from the spatial senses and that stored from previous experiences, and fluid shift, based upon the redistribution of bodily fluids that occurs upon continued exposure to weightlessness. Attempts are underway to correlate space motion sickness susceptibility to different provocative environments, vestibular and nonvestibular responses, and the rate of acquisition and length of retention of sensory adaptation. Space motion sickness countermeasures under investigation include various drug combinations, of which the equal combination of promethazine and ephedrine has been found to be as effective as the scopolomine and dexedrine combination, and vestibular adaptation and biofeedback training and autogenic therapy.

  17. The Particle--Motion Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demana, Franklin; Waits, Bert K.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses solutions to real-world linear particle-motion problems using graphing calculators to simulate the motion and traditional analytic methods of calculus. Applications include (1) changing circular or curvilinear motion into linear motion and (2) linear particle accelerators in physics. (MDH)

  18. THE MOTION OF RX J185635-3754 -- THE NEAREST NEUTRON STAR TO EARTH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph is the sum of three Hubble Space Telescope images. North is down, east is to the right. The image, taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, is 8.8 seconds of arc across (west to east), and 6.6 seconds of arc top-to-bottom (south to north). An arc second is a unit of angular measure. There are 3,600 arc seconds in 1 degree and 360 degrees in a full circle. All stars line up in this composite picture, except the neutron star, which moves across the image in a direction 10 degrees south of east. The three images of the neutron star are labeled by date. The proper motion is 1/3 of a second of arc per year. The small wobble caused by parallax (not visible in the image) has a size of 0.016 seconds of arc, giving a distance of 200 light-years. Credit: NASA and F.M. Walter (State University of New York at Stony Brook)

  19. Numerical investigation of the double-arcing phenomenon in a cutting arc torch

    SciTech Connect

    Mancinelli, B. R.; Minotti, F. O.; Kelly, H.; Prevosto, L.

    2014-07-14

    A numerical investigation of the double-arcing phenomenon in a cutting arc torch is reported. The dynamics of the double-arcing were simulated by using a two-dimensional model of the gas breakdown development in the space-charge layer contiguous to the nozzle of a cutting arc torch operated with oxygen. The kinetic scheme includes ionization of heavy particles by electron impact, electron attachment, electron detachment, electron–ion recombination, and ion–ion recombination. Complementary measurements during double-arcing phenomena were also conducted. A marked rise of the nozzle voltage was found. The numerical results showed that the dynamics of a cathode spot at the exit of the nozzle inner surface play a key role in the raising of the nozzle voltage, which in turn allows more electrons to return to the wall at the nozzle inlet. The return flow of electrons thus closes the current loop of the double-arcing. The increase in the (floating) nozzle voltage is due to the fact that the increased electron emission at the spot is mainly compensated by the displacement current (the ions do not play a relevant role due to its low-mobility) until that the stationary state is achieved and the electron return flow fully-compensates the electron emission at the spot. A fairly good agreement was found between the model and the experiment for a spot emission current growth rate of the order of 7 × 10{sup 4} A/s.

  20. Oceanic, island arc, and back-arc remnants into eastern Kamchatka accretionary complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorchuk, A.V.; Vishnevskaya, V.S.; Izvekov, I.N. )

    1990-06-01

    The Kamchatsky Mts. accretionary complex in the Eastern Kamchatka orogenic belt was studied for identification of the oceanic and suprasubduction components into accretionary wedges. That complex is divided into two tectonic units. The Lower unit is formed sedimentary and tectonic melanges containing arc-related components (Late Senonian volcaniclastics and boninitic gabbro) and oceanic fragments (Fe-Ti-tholeiites, ocean island basalts, and pelagic sediments of Valanginian to Turonian age). The Upper unit consists of ductile deformed oceanic cumulates from troctolites to Fe-Ti-gabbro, 151 to 172 Ma, which are intruded MORB-like diabases with suprasubduction characteristics, 122 to 141 Ma, and are overlain by basalts similar to latter. The Lower and Upper units are separated by a SW-dipping thrust, which is related by an ophiolitoclastic olistostrome of Late Campanian to Early Maestrichtian age. Both units are covered by Paleocene authoclastic deposits. They are all thrusted over the early Neogene island arc complex, 16 to 20 Ma. The Lower unit of the Kamchatsky Mys accretionary complex was originated in a shear zone between a Late Cretaceous island arc and an Early Cretaceous oceanic plate. The Upper unit represents a Jurassic oceanic remnant that formed a basement of Early Cretaceous back-arc or fore-arc basin. Both units were superposed in the latest Cretaceous. The Kamchatsky Mys accretionary complex was emplaced into the Eastern Kamchatka orogenic belt during late Neogene by collision of the early Neogene island arc.