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Sample records for arc welding parameters

  1. A dimensionless parameter model for arc welding processes

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerschbach, P.W.

    1994-12-31

    A dimensionless parameter model previously developed for C0{sub 2} laser beam welding has been shown to be applicable to GTAW and PAW autogenous arc welding processes. The model facilitates estimates of weld size, power, and speed based on knowledge of the material`s thermal properties. The dimensionless parameters can also be used to estimate the melting efficiency, which eases development of weld schedules with lower heat input to the weldment. The mathematical relationship between the dimensionless parameters in the model has been shown to be dependent on the heat flow geometry in the weldment.

  2. Effect of Pulse Parameters on Weld Quality in Pulsed Gas Metal Arc Welding: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Kamal; Pal, Surjya K.

    2011-08-01

    The weld quality comprises bead geometry and its microstructure, which influence the mechanical properties of the weld. The coarse-grained weld microstructure, higher heat-affected zone, and lower penetration together with higher reinforcement reduce the weld service life in continuous mode gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Pulsed GMAW (P-GMAW) is an alternative method providing a better way for overcoming these afore mentioned problems. It uses a higher peak current to allow one molten droplet per pulse, and a lower background current to maintain the arc stability. Current pulsing refines the grains in weld fusion zone with increasing depth of penetration due to arc oscillations. Optimum weld joint characteristics can be achieved by controlling the pulse parameters. The process is versatile and easily automated. This brief review illustrates the effect of pulse parameters on weld quality.

  3. Intelligent hybrid system of welding parameters for robotic arc-welding task-level offline programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Pai; Tian, Jiansong; Wu, Lin; Dai, Ming

    2000-10-01

    Welding process parameters are indispensable to program arc welding robot. To simplify off-line programming (OLP) for robotic arc welding, we develop an arc welding expert system whcih can generate welding process parameters automatically. Its input data came from the feature database of welding part, which is set up by our feature modeling system. The expert system has become an important module of our RAWTOLPS (Robotic Arc Welding Task-level Off-Line System). It combines case-based reasoning with heuristic rule-based reasoning methods to deal with the welding process design. Moreover, artificial neural networks are introduced to the systems for reasoning and machine learning, and several network modules are developed to learn from welding process database, based on back-propagation neural networks. After some groups of actual welding process data were used to train the network models, several network models are established to both design the welding process and to predict the weld bead shape. Besides the ANN-based learning, cased-based learning are used in the expert system. These two methods have respectively their own characteristics, and can meet qualifications of different users. The experimental data show that the system can accomplish re-learning and expanding of welding process knowledge, and satisfy the command of the off-line programming system.

  4. Optimization of Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Amit; Khurana, M. K.; Yadav, Pradeep K.

    2016-09-01

    This study presents the application of Taguchi method combined with grey relational analysis to optimize the process parameters of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of AISI 1020 carbon steels for multiple quality characteristics (bead width, bead height, weld penetration and heat affected zone). An orthogonal array of L9 has been implemented to fabrication of joints. The experiments have been conducted according to the combination of voltage (V), current (A) and welding speed (Ws). The results revealed that the welding speed is most significant process parameter. By analyzing the grey relational grades, optimal parameters are obtained and significant factors are known using ANOVA analysis. The welding parameters such as speed, welding current and voltage have been optimized for material AISI 1020 using GMAW process. To fortify the robustness of experimental design, a confirmation test was performed at selected optimal process parameter setting. Observations from this method may be useful for automotive sub-assemblies, shipbuilding and vessel fabricators and operators to obtain optimal welding conditions.

  5. Effect of acoustic field parameters on arc acoustic binding during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weifeng; Fan, Chenglei; Yang, Chunli; Lin, Sanbao

    2016-03-01

    As a newly developed arc welding method, power ultrasound has been successfully introduced into arc and weld pool during ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding process. The advanced process for molten metals can be realized by utilizing additional ultrasonic field. Under the action of the acoustic wave, the plasma arc as weld heat source is regulated and its characteristics make an obvious change. Compared with the conventional arc, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc plasma is bound significantly and becomes brighter. To reveal the dependence of the acoustic binding force on acoustic field parameters, a two-dimensional acoustic field model for ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding device is established. The influences of the radiator height, the central pore radius, the radiator radius, and curvature radius or depth of concave radiator surface are discussed using the boundary element method. Then the authors analyze the resonant mode by this relationship curve between acoustic radiation power and radiator height. Furthermore, the best acoustic binding ability is obtained by optimizing the geometric parameters of acoustic radiator. In addition, three concave radiator surfaces including spherical cap surface, paraboloid of revolution, and rotating single curved surface are investigated systematically. Finally, both the calculation and experiment suggest that, to obtain the best acoustic binding ability, the ultrasonic wave-assisted arc welding setup should be operated under the first resonant mode using a radiator with a spherical cap surface, a small central pore, a large section radius and an appropriate curvature radius.

  6. Elements of arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This paper looks at the following arc welding techniques: (1) shielded metal-arc welding; (2) submerged-arc welding; (3) gas metal-arc welding; (4) flux-cored arc welding; (5) electrogas welding; (6) gas tungsten-arc welding; and (7) plasma-arc welding.

  7. Welding arc plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  8. Effect of Submerged Arc Welding Parameters on the Microstructure of SA516 and A709 Steel Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanie, James

    The effects of submerged arc welding (SAW) current and speed on the microstructures of SA516 grade 70 and A709 grade 50 steel welds were studied in this research. Steel plates 17 mm-thick were submerged arc welded using different welding currents (from 700 to 850 A) and welding speeds (from 5.3 to 15.3 mm/s). The effect of heat input on the weld metal chemistry, morphologies and chemistry of inclusions and nucleation of acicular ferrite (AF), grain boundary ferrite (GBF) and Widmanstatten ferrite (WF) were evaluated. Optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) microanalysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the microstructures of the developed weld joints. PAX-it image analysis software program was utilized for quantitative analysis of the microstructures. The results showed that it is difficult to ascribe changes in the microstructure that occurred in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the weld metal regions to a single welding process parameter. Inclusion analysis revealed two types of inclusions formed in the weld metals for both steels. They are spherical and faceted inclusions. It was also observed that acicular ferrite nucleated only on the spherical inclusions. EDS analysis showed that the two inclusions have different chemical compositions. The results further showed that the total oxygen content of the weld metals of both steels generally increased with welding current, but decreased with increasing welding speed. The prior austenite grain width decreased with increasing welding speed, but increased with increasing welding current (increased heat input). For both SA516 and A709 steel welds, the proportion of acicular ferrite (AF) in the weld metals increased initially, while those of grain boundary ferrite (GBF) and Widmanstatten ferrite (WF) decreased with increasing welding current when welding current was increased from 700 A to 800 A. With further increase in the

  9. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  10. Application of welding science to welding engineering: A lumped parameter gas metal arc welding dynamic process model

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, P.E.; Smartt, H.B.; Johnson, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    We develop a model of the depth of penetration of the weld pool in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) which demonstrates interaction between the arc, filler wire and weld pool. This model is motivated by the observations of Essers and Walter which suggest a relationship between droplet momentum and penetration depth. A model of gas metal arc welding was augmented to include an improved model of mass transfer and a simple model of accelerating droplets in a plasma jet to obtain the mass and momentum of impinging droplets. The force of the droplets and depth of penetration is correlated by a dimensionless linear relation used to predict weld pool depth for a range of values of arc power and contact tip to workpiece distance. Model accuracy is examined by comparing theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of the pool depth obtained from bead on plate welds of carbon steel in an argon rich shielding gas. Moreover, theoretical predictions of pool depth are compared to the results obtained from the heat conduction model due to Christensen et al. which suggest that in some cases the momentum of impinging droplets is a better indicator of the depth of the weld pool and the presence of a deep, narrow penetration.

  11. Welding arc length control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a welding arc length control system. The system includes, in its broadest aspects, a power source for providing welding current, a power amplification system, a motorized welding torch assembly connected to the power amplification system, a computer, and current pick up means. The computer is connected to the power amplification system for storing and processing arc weld current parameters and non-linear voltage-ampere characteristics. The current pick up means is connected to the power source and to the welding torch assembly for providing weld current data to the computer. Thus, the desired arc length is maintained as the welding current is varied during operation, maintaining consistent weld penetration.

  12. ARc Welding (Industrial Processing Series).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ARC WELDING , *BIBLIOGRAPHIES), (*ARC WELDS, BIBLIOGRAPHIES), ALUMINUM ALLOYS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, CHROMIUM ALLOYS, METAL PLATES, SPOT WELDING , STEEL...INERT GAS WELDING , MARAGING STEELS, MICROSTRUCTURE, HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, HEAT RESISTANT METALS, WELDABILITY, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, RESISTANCE WELDING

  13. DC arc weld starter

    DOEpatents

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  14. Parameters optimization of hybrid fiber laser-arc butt welding on 316L stainless steel using Kriging model and GA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhongmei; Shao, Xinyu; Jiang, Ping; Cao, Longchao; Zhou, Qi; Yue, Chen; Liu, Yang; Wang, Chunming

    2016-09-01

    It is of great significance to select appropriate welding process parameters for obtaining optimal weld geometry in hybrid laser-arc welding. An integrated optimization approach by combining Kriging model and GA is proposed to optimize process parameters. A four-factor, five-level experiment using Taguchi L25 is conducted considering laser power (P), welding current (A), distance between laser and arc (D) and traveling speed (V). Kriging model is adopted to approximate the relationship between process parameters and weld geometry, namely depth of penetration (DP), bead width (BW) and bead reinforcement (BR). The constructed Kriging model was used for parameters optimization by GA to maximize DP, minimize BW and ensure BR at a desired value. The effects of process parameters on weld geometry are analyzed. Microstructure and micro-hardness are also discussed. Verification experiments demonstrate that the obtained optimum values are in good agreement with experimental results.

  15. Plasma arc welding weld imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has a transparent shield cup disposed about the constricting nozzle, the cup including a small outwardly extending polished lip. A guide tube extends externally of the torch and has a free end adjacent to the lip. First and second optical fiber bundle assemblies are supported within the guide tube. Light from a strobe light is transmitted along one of the assemblies to the free end and through the lip onto the weld site. A lens is positioned in the guide tube adjacent to the second assembly and focuses images of the weld site onto the end of the fiber bundle of the second assembly and these images are transmitted along the second assembly to a video camera so that the weld site may be viewed continuously for monitoring the welding process.

  16. Variable polarity arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E. O., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Technological advances generate within themselves dissatisfactions that lead to further advances in a process. A series of advances in welding technology which culminated in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process and an advance instituted to overcome the latest dissatisfactions with the process: automated VPPA welding are described briefly.

  17. Optimization of Process Parameters of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding onto 316L Using Ensemble of Metamodels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qi; Jiang, Ping; Shao, Xinyu; Gao, Zhongmei; Cao, Longchao; Yue, Chen; Li, Xiongbin

    2016-08-01

    Hybrid laser-arc welding (LAW) provides an effective way to overcome problems commonly encountered during either laser or arc welding such as brittle phase formation, cracking, and porosity. The process parameters of LAW have significant effects on the bead profile and hence the quality of joint. This paper proposes an optimization methodology by combining non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II) and ensemble of metamodels (EMs) to address multi-objective process parameter optimization in LAW onto 316L. Firstly, Taguchi experimental design is adopted to generate the experimental samples. Secondly, the relationships between process parameters ( i.e., laser power ( P), welding current ( A), distance between laser and arc ( D), and welding speed ( V)) and the bead geometries are fitted using EMs. The comparative results show that the EMs can take advantage of the prediction ability of each stand-alone metamodel and thus decrease the risk of adopting inappropriate metamodels. Then, the NSGA-II is used to facilitate design space exploration. Besides, the main effects and contribution rates of process parameters on bead profile are analyzed. Eventually, the verification experiments of the obtained optima are carried out and compared with the un-optimized weld seam for bead geometries, weld appearances, and welding defects. Results illustrate that the proposed hybrid approach exhibits great capability of improving welding quality in LAW.

  18. Electric arc welding gun

    DOEpatents

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  19. Alternating-Polarity Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Brief reversing polarity of welding current greatly improves quality of welds. NASA technical memorandum recounts progress in art of variable-polarity plasma-arc (VPPA) welding, with emphasis on welding of aluminum-alloy tanks. VPPA welders offer important advantages over conventional single-polarity gas/tungsten arc welders.

  20. Pulsed Long Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krampit, N. Yu

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents a method and an appliance for pulsed arc welding. The method supports dosage of energy required for melting each bead of electrode metal starting from the detachment of a bead. The appliance including a sensor to register bead detachment shows this moment due to the voltage burst in the arc space. Transferred beads of electrode metal are of similar size because of the dosage of energy used for melting each bead, as the consequence, the process is more stable and starting conditions to transfer electrode metal are similar, as the result, a produced weld is improved.

  1. APPARATUS FOR ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Lingafelter, J.W.

    1960-04-01

    An apparatus is described in which a welding arc created between an annular electrode and a workpiece moves under the influence of an electromagnetic field about the electrode in a closed or annular path. This mode of welding is specially suited to the enclosing of nuclear-fuel slugs in a protective casing. For example, a uranium slug is placed in an aluminum can, and an aluminum closure is welded to the open end of the can along a closed or annular path conforming to the periphery of the end closure.

  2. Effect of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding Parameters on Hydrogen-Assisted Cracking of Type 321 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozenak, Paul; Unigovski, Yaakov; Shneck, Roni

    2016-05-01

    The susceptibility of AISI type 321 stainless steel welded by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process to hydrogen-assisted cracking (HAC) was studied in a tensile test combined with in situ cathodic charging. Specimen charging causes a decrease in ductility of both the as-received and welded specimens. The mechanical properties of welds depend on welding parameters. For example, the ultimate tensile strength and ductility increase with growing shielding gas (argon) rate. More severe decrease in the ductility was obtained after post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). In welded steels, in addition to discontinuous grain boundary carbides (M23C6) and dense distribution of metal carbides MC ((Ti, Nb)C) precipitated in the matrix, the appearance of delta-ferrite phase was observed. The fracture of sensitized specimens was predominantly intergranular, whereas the as-welded specimens exhibited mainly transgranular regions. High-dislocation density regions and stacking faults were found in delta-ferrite formed after welding. Besides, thin stacking fault plates and epsilon-martensite were found in the austenitic matrix after the cathodic charging.

  3. Neural-Network Modeling Of Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Kristinn; Barnett, Robert J.; Springfield, James F.; Cook, George E.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Bjorgvinsson, Jon B.

    1994-01-01

    Artificial neural networks considered for use in monitoring and controlling gas/tungsten arc-welding processes. Relatively simple network, using 4 welding equipment parameters as inputs, estimates 2 critical weld-bead paramaters within 5 percent. Advantage is computational efficiency.

  4. Mathematical Model Of Variable-Polarity Plasma Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Mathematical model of variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding process developed for use in predicting characteristics of welds and thus serves as guide for selection of process parameters. Parameters include welding electric currents in, and durations of, straight and reverse polarities; rates of flow of plasma and shielding gases; and sizes and relative positions of welding electrode, welding orifice, and workpiece.

  5. Sensors control gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Siewert, T.A.; Madigan, R.B.; Quinn, T.P.

    1997-04-01

    The response time of a trained welder from the time a weld problem is identified to the time action is taken is about one second--especially after a long, uneventful period of welding. This is acceptable for manual welding because it is close to the time it takes for the weld pool to solidify. If human response time were any slower, manual welding would not be possible. However, human response time is too slow to respond to some weld events, such as melting of the contact tube in gas metal arc welding (GMAW), and only automated intelligent control systems can react fast enough to correct or avoid these problems. Control systems incorporate welding knowledge that enables intelligent decisions to be made about weld quality and, ultimately, to keep welding parameters in the range where only high-quality welds are produced. This article discusses the correlation of electrical signals with contact-tube wear, changes in shielding gas, changes in arc length, and other weld process data.

  6. Signal Analysis of Gas Tungsten Arc Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagar, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding is a process in which the input parameters such as current, voltage and travel speed, can be easily controlled and/or monitored. However, weld quality is not solely a function of these parameters. An adaptive method of observing weld quality is desired to improve weld quality assurance. The use of dynamic electrical properties of the welding arc as a weld quality monitor was studied. The electrical properties of the arc are characterized by the current voltage transfer function. The hardware and software necessary to collect the data at a maximum rate of 45 kHz and to allow the off-line processing of this data are tested. The optimum input current waveform is determined. Bead-on-plate welds to observe such characteristics of the weld as the fundamental frequency of the puddle are studied. Future work is planned to observe changes of the arc response with changes in joint geometry, base metal chemistry, and shielding gas composition are discussed.

  7. Gas arc constriction for plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, William F. (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has an inert gas applied circumferentially about the arc column externally of the constricting nozzle so as to apply a constricting force on the arc after it has exited the nozzle orifice and downstream of the auxiliary shielding gas. The constricting inert gas is supplied to a plenum chamber about the body of the torch and exits through a series of circumferentially disposed orifices in an annular wall forming a closure at the forward end of the constricting gas plenum chamber. The constricting force of the circumferential gas flow about the arc concentrates and focuses the arc column into a more narrow and dense column of energy after exiting the nozzle orifice so that the arc better retains its energy density prior to contacting the workpiece.

  8. Method for defect free keyhole plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwig, Dennis D. (Inventor); Hunt, James F. (Inventor); Ryan, Patrick M. (Inventor); Fisher, Walter J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A plasma arc welding process for welding metal of increased thickness with one pass includes operating the plasma arc welding apparatus at a selected plasma gas flow rate, travel speed and arc current, to form a weld having a penetration ratio to weld height to weld width, and maintaining the penetration ratio at less than 0.74. Parameters for the plasma gas flow rate, travel speed and arc current are adjusted to a steady state condition during a start up period and maintained during the steady state condition to complete a weld. During a terminal stopping period, the travel speed is stopped and instantaneously replaced by filler wire which adds material to fill the keyhole that had been formed by the welding process. Parameters are subsequently adjusted during the stopping period to terminate the weld in a sound manner.

  9. Controlling Arc Length in Plasma Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Circuit maintains arc length on irregularly shaped workpieces. Length of plasma arc continuously adjusted by control circuit to maintain commanded value. After pilot arc is established, contactor closed and transfers arc to workpiece. Control circuit then half-wave rectifies ac arc voltage to produce dc control signal proportional to arc length. Circuit added to plasma arc welding machines with few wiring changes. Welds made with circuit cleaner and require less rework than welds made without it. Beads smooth and free of inclusions.

  10. Percussive arc welding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hollar, Jr., Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    A percussive arc welding apparatus includes a generally cylindrical actuator body having front and rear end portions and defining an internal recess. The front end of the body includes an opening. A solenoid assembly is provided in the rear end portion in the internal recess of the body, and an actuator shaft assembly is provided in the front end portion in the internal recess of the actuator body. The actuator shaft assembly includes a generally cylindrical actuator block having first and second end portions, and an actuator shaft having a front end extending through the opening in the actuator body, and the rear end connected to the first end portion of the actuator block. The second end portion of the actuator block is in operational engagement with the solenoid shaft by a non-rigid connection to reduce the adverse rebound effects of the actuator shaft. A generally transversely extending pin is rigidly secured to the rear end of the shaft. One end of the pin is received in a slot in the nose housing sleeve to prevent rotation of the actuator shaft during operation of the apparatus.

  11. Weld arc simulator

    DOEpatents

    Burr, Melvin J.

    1990-01-30

    An arc voltage simulator for an arc welder permits the welder response to a variation in arc voltage to be standardized. The simulator uses a linear potentiometer connected to the electrode to provide a simulated arc voltage at the electrode that changes as a function of electrode position.

  12. Control of arc length during gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Madigan, R.B.; Quinn, T.P.

    1994-12-31

    An arc-length control system has been developed for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) under spray transfer welding conditions. The ability to monitor and control arc length during arc welding allows consistent weld characteristics to be maintained and therefore improves weld quality. Arc length control has only been implemented for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), where an automatic voltage control (AVC) unit adjusts torch-to-work distance. The system developed here compliments the voltage- and current-sensing techniques commonly used for control of GMAW. The system consists of an arc light intensity sensor (photodiode), a Hall-effect current sensor, a personal computer and software implementing a data interpretation and control algorithms. Arc length was measured using both arc light and arc current signals. Welding current was adjusted to maintain constant arc length. A proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller was used. Gains were automatically selected based on the desired welding conditions. In performance evaluation welds, arc length varied from 2.5 to 6.5 mm while welding up a sloped workpiece (ramp in CTWD) without the control. Arc length was maintained within 1 mm of the desired (5 mm ) with the control.

  13. The effect of welding parameters on penetration in GTA welds

    SciTech Connect

    Shirali, A.A. ); Mills, K.C. )

    1993-07-01

    The effect of various welding parameters on the penetration of GTA welds has been investigated. Increases in welding speed were found to reduce penetration; however, increases in welding current were observed to increase the penetration in high sulfur (HS) casts and decrease penetration in low sulfur (LS) steels. Plots of penetration as a function of increasing linear energy (the heat supplied per unit length of weld) revealed a similar trend with increased penetration in HS casts, but the penetration in LS casts was unaffected by increases in linear energy. These results support the Burgardt-Heiple proposition that changes in welding parameters on penetration can be explained in terms of their effect, sequentially, on the temperature gradient and the Marangoni forces operating in the weld pool. Increases in arc length were found to decrease weld penetration regardless of the sulfur concentration of the steel, and the effects of electrode geometry and welding position on weld penetration were also investigated.

  14. Automatic Control Of Length Of Welding Arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F.

    1991-01-01

    Nonlinear relationships among current, voltage, and length stored in electronic memory. Conceptual microprocessor-based control subsystem maintains constant length of welding arc in gas/tungsten arc-welding system, even when welding current varied. Uses feedback of current and voltage from welding arc. Directs motor to set position of torch according to previously measured relationships among current, voltage, and length of arc. Signal paths marked "calibration" or "welding" used during those processes only. Other signal paths used during both processes. Control subsystem added to existing manual or automatic welding system equipped with automatic voltage control.

  15. Welding arc initiator

    DOEpatents

    Correy, Thomas B.

    1989-01-01

    An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome.

  16. Welding arc initiator

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1989-05-09

    An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome. 3 figs.

  17. Preventing Arc Welding From Damaging Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, Noel; Mareen, D.

    1988-01-01

    Shielding technique developed to protect sensitive electronic equipment from damage due to electromagnetic disturbances produced by arc welding. Established acceptable alternative in instances in which electronic equipment cannot be removed prior to arc welding. Guidelines established for open, unshielded welds. Procedure applicable to robotics or computer-aided manufacturing.

  18. Computer Control For Gas/Tungsten-Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, Kristinn; Springfield, James F.; Barnett, Robert J.; Cook, George E.

    1994-01-01

    Prototype computer-based feedback control system developed for use in gas/tungsten arc welding. Beyond improving welding technician's moment-to-moment general control of welding process, control system designed to assist technician in selecting appropriate welding-process parameters, and provide better automatic voltage control. Modular for ease of reconfiguration and upgrading. Modularity also reflected in software. Includes rack-mounted computer, based on VME bus, containing Intel 80286 and 80386 processors.

  19. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal vapor dominated laser-arc hybrid welding plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ribic, B.; DebRoy, T.; Burgardt, P.

    2011-04-15

    During laser-arc hybrid welding, plasma properties affect the welding process and the weld quality. However, hybrid welding plasmas have not been systematically studied. Here we examine electron temperatures, species densities, and electrical conductivity for laser, arc, and laser-arc hybrid welding using optical emission spectroscopy. The effects of arc currents and heat source separation distances were examined because these parameters significantly affect weld quality. Time-average plasma electron temperatures, electron and ion densities, electrical conductivity, and arc stability decrease with increasing heat source separation distance during hybrid welding. Heat source separation distance affects these properties more significantly than the arc current within the range of currents considered. Improved arc stability and higher electrical conductivity of the hybrid welding plasma result from increased heat flux, electron temperatures, electron density, and metal vapor concentrations relative to arc or laser welding.

  20. Arc-starting aid for GTA welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiffen, E. L.

    1977-01-01

    Three-in-one handtool combining arc-gap gage, electrode tip sander, and electrode projection gate, effectively improves initiation on gas tungsten arc (GTA), automatic skate-welding machines. Device effects ease in polishing electrode tips and setting exactly initial arc gap before each weld pass.

  1. Arc spot welding technique for underwater use

    SciTech Connect

    Koga, H.; Ide, Y.; Ogawa, Y.

    1995-12-31

    An arc spot welding equipment with special local cavity shroud was developed for underwater salvaging activity. Arc spot welding for lapped plates is an effective method to recover defects. This method in surface is so simple to use widely in the field of railways and chemical plants manufacturing. But there is some problems on the reliability of joint strength and bead shapes. A special arc spot nozzle to improve welding quality was developed. A small outlet of air jet at the bottom of the nozzle was created to maintain the swirl flow of shielding gas and certain rejection of excessive molten metal. This nozzle covers the welding part completely, then it also works as a local cavity shroud under water. This paper describes the design and function of the nozzle for CO{sub 2} arc spot welding system. A programmable controller manages the welding sequence of shielding gas flow, air jet flow, and arcing time. This welding gun is operated manually, but the operation is only to press the gun on the weld point. After that welding will proceed automatically, and arcing time is about three seconds. Whole time for welding which includes pre and post gas flow time is less than ten seconds for surface use, it is required some more additional pre drying process of welding point for underwater use to guarantee the high quality welding results. Fundamental analysis of welding conditions and the effects of air jet were considered.

  2. Visualization of Gas Tungsten Arc Weld Pools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    flow visualization of Gas Tungsten Arc weld pools for HY-80 steel is presented using a pulsed laser light source and a conventional night~vision...visualization of Gas Tungsten Arc weld pools for HY-80 steel is presented using a pulsed laser light source and a conventional night-vision image-intensifier...effects of electromagnetic stirring on GTA welds in austenitic stainless steel . Changes in shape and solidification structure of welds observed

  3. Comparative study on interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-GTA welding and laser-GMA welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Minghua; Xu, Jiannan; Xin, Lijun; Zhao, Zuofu; Wu, Fufa

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes an investigation on differences in interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-gas tungsten arc (LT) welding and laser-gas metal arc (LM) welding. The characteristics of LT heat source and LM heat source, such as plasma behavior, heat penetration ability and spectral information were comparably studied. Based on the plasma discharge theory, the interactions during plasma discharge were modeled and analyzed. Results show that in both LT and LM welding, coupling discharge between the laser keyhole plasma and arc happens, which strongly enhance the arc. But, the enhancing effect in LT welding is much more sensitive than that in LM welding when parameters are adjusted.

  4. Automated Variable-Polarity Plasma-Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numes, A. C., Jr.; Bayless, E. O., Jr.; Jones, S. C., III; Munafo, P.; Munafo, A.; Biddle, A.; Wilson, W.

    1984-01-01

    Variable-polarity plasma-arc methods produces better welds at lower cost than gas-shielded tungsten-arc welding in assemblies. Weld porosity very low and costs of joint preparation, depeaking, inspection, and weld repair minimized.

  5. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    DOEpatents

    Smartt, Herschel B.; Einerson, Carolyn J.; Watkins, Arthur D.

    1989-01-01

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections.

  6. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    DOEpatents

    Smartt, H.B.; Einerson, C.J.; Watkins, A.D.

    1987-08-10

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. Welding Module 6. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching a three-unit module in gas tungsten arc welding. The module has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The basic principles involved in gas tungsten arc welding, supplies, and applications are covered. The materials included…

  8. Grain refinement control in TIG arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. F.; Whiffen, E. L. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A method for controlling grain size and weld puddle agitation in a tungsten electrode inert gas welding system to produce fine, even grain size and distribution is disclosed. In the method the frequency of dc welding voltage pulses supplied to the welding electrode is varied over a preselected frequency range and the arc gas voltage is monitored. At some frequency in the preselected range the arc gas voltage will pass through a maximum. By maintaining the operating frequency of the system at this value, maximum weld puddle agitation and fine grain structure are produced.

  9. APPARATUS AND METHOD FOR ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Noland, R.A.; Stone, C.C.

    1960-05-10

    An apparatus and method are given for forming a welding arc which is rotated by a magnetic field very rapidly about an annular electrode so that a weld is produced simultaneously over all points of an annular or closed path. This invention inhibits outgassing from the jacket of a fuel slug which is being welded by adjusting the pressure throughout the welding cycle to establish a balance between the gas pressure within the jacket and that of the atmosphere surrounding the jacket. Furthermore, an improved control of the magnetic field producing rotation of the welding arc is disclosed whereby this rotation is prevented from splashing about the metal being welded as the welding arc makes it molten.

  10. METHOD OF OBTAINING AN IMPROVED WELD IN INERT ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1962-12-11

    A method is reported for inert arc welding. An a-c welding current is applied to the workpiece and welding electrode such that the positive portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode positive, has only sufficient energy to clean the surface of the workpiece and the negative portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode negative, contains the energy required to weld. (AEC)

  11. Finite element analysis of arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, E.

    1980-01-01

    Analytical models of the gas tungsten-arc welding process into finite element computer programs provides a valuable tool for determining the welding thermal cycle, weld bead shape, and penetration characteristics, as well as for evaluating the stresses and distortions generated as a result of the temperature transients. The analysis procedures are applicable to planar or axisymmetric welds with arbitrary cross-sectional geometries, under quasistationary conditions. The method used for determining temperatures features an iteration procedure to accurately account for the latent heat absorbed during melting and liberated during solidification of the weld. By simulating the heat input from the arc to the workpiece by a normal distribution function, temperature transients, weld bead dimensions, and cooling rates are evaluated as functions of both the magnitude and distribution of heat input, weldment geometry, and weld speed (or duration of heating for stationary arcs). Modeling of the welding thermal cycle is a prerequisite to analytical treatments of metallurgical changes in weld metal and heat-affected zone material, residual stresses and distortions, and weld defects. A quasistationary formulation for moving welds enables temperatures to be calculated using a two-dimensional heat conduction computer program. The present limitation of high welding speed can, however, be relaxed without altering the two-dimensional framework of the procedure.

  12. Emissions of chromium (VI) from arc welding.

    PubMed

    Heung, William; Yun, Myoung-Jin; Chang, Daniel P Y; Green, Peter G; Halm, Chris

    2007-02-01

    The presence of Cr in the +6 oxidation state (Cr[VI]) is still observed in ambient air samples in California despite steps taken to reduce emissions from plating operations. One known source of emission of Cr(VI) is welding, especially with high Cr-content materials, such as stainless steels. An experimental effort was undertaken to expand and update Cr(VI) emission factors by conducting tests on four types of arc-welding operations: gas-metal arc welding (GMAW), shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), fluxcore arc welding, and pulsed GMAW. Standard American Welding Society hood results were compared with a total enclosure method that permitted isokinetic sampling for particle size-cut measurement, as well as total collection of the aerosol. The fraction of Cr(VI) emitted per unit mass of Cr electrode consumed was determined. Consistent with AP-42 data, initial results indicate that a significant fraction of the total Cr in the aerosol is in the +6 oxidation state. The fraction of Cr(VI) and total aerosol mass produced by the different arc welding methods varies with the type of welding process used. Self-shielded electrodes that do not use a shield gas, for example, SMAW, produce greater amounts of Cr(VI) per unit mass of electrode consumed. The formation of Cr(VI) from standard electrode wires used for welding mild steel was below the method detection limit after eliminating an artifact in the analytical method used.

  13. The variable polarity plasma arc welding process: Characteristics and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Zhu, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    Significant advantages of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process include faster welding, fewer repairs, less joint preparation, reduced weldment distortion, and absence of porosity. The power distribution was analyzed for an argon plasma gas flow constituting the fluid in the VPPA Welding Process. The major heat loss at the torch nozzle is convective heat transfer; in the space between the outlet of the nozzle and the workpiece; radiative heat transfer; and in the keyhole in the workpiece, convective heat transfer. The power absorbed at the workpiece produces the molten puddle that solidifies into the weld bead. Crown and root widths, and crown and root heights of the weld bead are predicted. The basis is provided for an algorithm for automatic control of VPPA welding machine parameters to obtain desired weld bead dimensions.

  14. Heat transfer in GTA welding arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huft, Nathan J.

    Heat transfer characteristics of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) arcs with arc currents of 50 to 125 A and arc lengths of 3 to 11 mm were measured experimentally through wet calorimetry. The data collected were used to calculate how much heat reported to the cathode and anode and how much was lost from the arc column. A Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) macro was written to further analyze the data and account for Joule heating within the electrodes and radiation and convection losses from the arc, providing a detailed account of how heat was generated and dissipated within the system. These values were then used to calculate arc efficiencies, arc column voltages, and anode and cathode fall voltages. Trends were noted for variances in the arc column voltage, power dissipated from the arc column, and the total power dissipated by the system with changing arc length. Trends for variances in the anode and cathode fall voltages, total power dissipated, Joule heating within the torches and electrodes with changing arc current were also noted. In addition, the power distribution between the anode and cathode for each combination of arc length and arc current was examined. Keywords: Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, GTAW, anode fall, cathode fall, heat transfer, wet calorimetry

  15. Shielded Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 4. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in shielded metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety; theory, power sources, and…

  16. Gas Metal Arc Welding. Welding Module 5. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching an eight-unit module in gas metal arc welding. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The following topics are covered in the module: safety and testing, gas metal arc…

  17. Aligning Plasma-Arc Welding Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, Jeff; Fairley, Mike

    1989-01-01

    Tool aids in alignment of oscillator probe on variable-polarity plasma-arc welding torch. Probe magnetically pulls arc from side to side as it moves along joint. Tensile strength of joint depends on alignment of weld bead and on alignment of probe. Operator installs new tool on front of torch body, levels it with built-in bubble glass, inserts probe in slot on tool, and locks probe in place. Procedure faster and easier and resulting alignment more accurate and repeatable.

  18. 29 CFR 1926.351 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arc welding and cutting. 1926.351 Section 1926.351 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Welding and Cutting § 1926.351 Arc welding and... for arc welding and cutting, and are of a capacity capable of safely handling the maximum...

  19. Welding torch with arc light reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A welding torch arc light reflector is disclosed for welding torches having optical viewing systems. A schematic of a welding torch having an internal coaxial viewing system consisting of a lens which focuses the field of view of the weld scene of the workpiece onto the end of the fiberoptic bundle is provided. The transmitted image of the fiberoptic bundle is provided to a camera lens which focuses it onto a TV sensor array for transmission. To improve the parity of the image of the monitoring system, an arc light reflector is shown fitted to the end of the torch housing or gas cup. The arc light reflector has an internal conical section portion which is polished to serve as a mirror which reflects the bright arc light back onto the darker areas of the weld area and thereby provides a more detailed image for the monitoring system. The novelty of the invention lies in the use of an arc light reflector on welding torches having optical viewing systems.

  20. Welding torch with arc light reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Stephen S.

    1986-12-01

    A welding torch arc light reflector is disclosed for welding torches having optical viewing systems. A schematic of a welding torch having an internal coaxial viewing system consisting of a lens which focuses the field of view of the weld scene of the workpiece onto the end of the fiberoptic bundle is provided. The transmitted image of the fiberoptic bundle is provided to a camera lens which focuses it onto a TV sensor array for transmission. To improve the parity of the image of the monitoring system, an arc light reflector is shown fitted to the end of the torch housing or gas cup. The arc light reflector has an internal conical section portion which is polished to serve as a mirror which reflects the bright arc light back onto the darker areas of the weld area and thereby provides a more detailed image for the monitoring system. The novelty of the invention lies in the use of an arc light reflector on welding torches having optical viewing systems.

  1. ARC length control for plasma welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A control system to be used with a plasma arc welding apparatus is disclosed. The plasma arc welding apparatus includes a plasma arc power supply, a contactor, and an electrode assembly for moving the electrode relative to a work piece. The electrode assembly is raised or lowered by a drive motor. The present apparatus includes a plasma arc adapter connected across the power supply to measure the voltage across the plasma arc. The plasma arc adapter forms a dc output signal input to a differential amplifier. A second input is defined by an adjustable resistor connected to a dc voltage supply to permit operator control. The differential amplifier forms an output difference signal provided to an adder circuit. The adder circuit then connects with a power amplifier which forms the driving signal for the motor. In addition, the motor connects to a tachometor which forms a feedback signal delivered to the adder to provide damping, therby avoiding servo loop overshoot.

  2. Sensing the gas metal arc welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, N. M.; Johnson, J. A.; Smartt, H. B.; Watkins, A. D.; Larsen, E. D.; Taylor, P. L.; Waddoups, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    Control of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) requires real-time sensing of the process. Three sensing techniques for GMAW are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These are (1) noncontacting ultrasonic sensing using a laser/EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) to detect defects in the solidified weld on a pass-by-pass basis, (2) integrated optical sensing using a CCD camera and a laser stripe to obtain cooling rate and weld bead geometry information, and (3) monitoring fluctuations in digitized welding voltage data to detect the mode of metal droplet transfer and assure that the desired mass input is achieved.

  3. Sensing the gas metal arc welding process

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, N.M.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.; Watkins, A.D.; Larsen, E.D.; Taylor, P.L. ); Waddoups, M.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Control of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) requires real-time sensing of the process. Three sensing techniques for GMAW are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These are (1) noncontacting ultrasonic sensing using a laser/EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) to detect defects in the solidified weld on a pass-bypass basis, (2) integrated optical sensing using a CCD camera and a laser stripe to obtain cooling rate and weld bead geometry information, and (3) monitoring fluctuations in digitized welding voltage data to detect the mode of metal droplet transfer and assure that the desired mass input is achieved.

  4. Sensing the gas metal arc welding process

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, N.M.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.; Watkins, A.D.; Larsen, E.D.; Taylor, P.L.; Waddoups, M.A.

    1992-10-01

    Control of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) requires real-time sensing of the process. Three sensing techniques for GMAW are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These are (1) noncontacting ultrasonic sensing using a laser/EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) to detect defects in the solidified weld on a pass-bypass basis, (2) integrated optical sensing using a CCD camera and a laser stripe to obtain cooling rate and weld bead geometry information, and (3) monitoring fluctuations in digitized welding voltage data to detect the mode of metal droplet transfer and assure that the desired mass input is achieved.

  5. PC-based arc ignition and arc length control system for gas tungsten arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y. ); Cook, G.E.; Barnett, R.J.; Springfield, J.F. . School of Engineering)

    1992-10-01

    In this paper, a PC-based digital control system for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) is presented. This system controls the arc ignition process, the arc length, and the process of welding termination. A DT2818 made by Data Translation is used for interface and A/D and D/A conversions. The digital I/O ports of the DT2818 are used for control of wirefeed, shield gas, cooling water, welding power supply, etc. The DT2818 is housed in a PC. The welding signals and status are displayed on the screen for in-process monitoring. A user can control the welding process by the keyboard.

  6. Closed circuit TV system automatically guides welding arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephans, D. L.; Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    Closed circuit television /CCTV/ system automatically guides a welding torch to position the welding arc accurately along weld seams. Digital counting and logic techniques incorporated in the control circuitry, ensure performance reliability.

  7. What makes an electric welding arc perform its required function

    SciTech Connect

    Correy, T.B.

    1982-09-01

    The physics of direct current and alternating current welding arcs, the heat transfer of direct current welding arcs, the characteristics of dc welding and ac welding power supplies and recommendations for the procurement and maintenance of precision power supplies are discussed. (LCL)

  8. Vaccum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Krotz, P. D.; Todd, D. T.; Liaw, Y. K.

    1995-01-01

    This two year program will investigate Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. VGTAW appears to offer a significant improvement in weldability because of the clean environment and lower heat input needed. The overall objective of the program is to develop the VGTAW technology and implement it into a manufacturing environment that will result in lower cost, better quality and higher reliability aerospace components for the space shuttle and other NASA space systems. Phase 1 of this program was aimed at demonstrating the process's ability to weld normally difficult-to-weld materials. Phase 2 will focus on further evaluation, a hardware demonstration and a plan to implement VGTAW technology into a manufacturing environment. During Phase 1, the following tasks were performed: (1) Task 11000 Facility Modification - an existing vacuum chamber was modified and adapted to a GTAW power supply; (2) Task 12000 Materials Selection - four difficult-to-weld materials typically used in the construction of aerospace hardware were chosen for study; (3) Task 13000 VGTAW Experiments - welding experiments were conducted under vacuum using the hollow tungsten electrode and evaluation. As a result of this effort, two materials, NARloy Z and Incoloy 903, were downselected for further characterization in Phase 2; and (4) Task 13100 Aluminum-Lithium Weld Studies - this task was added to the original work statement to investigate the effects of vacuum welding and weld pool vibration on aluminum-lithium alloys.

  9. Sensor control of robot arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sias, F. R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A basic problem in the application of robots for welding which is how to guide a torch along a weld seam using sensory information was studied. Improvement of the quality and consistency of certain Gas Tungsten Arc welds on the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) that are too complex geometrically for conventional automation and therefore are done by hand was examined. The particular problems associated with space shuttle main egnine (SSME) manufacturing and weld-seam tracking with an emphasis on computer vision methods were analyzed. Special interface software for the MINC computr are developed which will allow it to be used both as a test system to check out the robot interface software and later as a development tool for further investigation of sensory systems to be incorporated in welding procedures.

  10. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding and Plasma Arc Cutting. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    This welding curriculum guide treats two topics in detail: the care of tungsten electrodes and the entire concept of contamination control and the hafnium electrode and its importance in dual-air cutting systems that use compressed shop air for plasma arc cutting activities. The guide contains three units of instruction that cover the following…

  11. Analysis of acoustic signals on CO{sub 2} arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Y.; Morita, T.; Sumitomo, T.; Koga, H.

    1995-12-31

    The sound emitted during the arc welding process is closely related to the welding phenomenon, and sometimes it provides useful information for monitoring and controlling the welding process. It is important to use different kinds of information to control the welding process to improve the quality of controlling system, especially for underwater welding. Because the recovery process of weld defects is a time and money consuming matter, and sometimes it is difficult to monitor the arc condition by a visual system. The fundamental analysis of acoustic signals and their relations with the other parameters such as arc voltage, arc current and a vibration of weld plate had been carried out in order to understand the feature of acoustic signals and to develop effective signal processing algorithm. All of the data were recorded by the cassette recorder. After the experiment was completed, the analysis of recorded data was carried out by using of a signal processor and a computer system.

  12. Internal Filler-Wire Feed For Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.; Dyer, Gerald E.

    1990-01-01

    Tungsten electrode for gas/tungsten arc welding contains lengthwise channel for feeding filler wire to weld joint. Channel makes it unnecessary to feed wire through guides outside electrode, conserving valuable space near weld and protects wire from deformation by contact with other parts in vicinity of weld. Helpful in robotic or automatic welding.

  13. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  14. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  15. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  16. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  17. 49 CFR 195.226 - Welding: Arc burns.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding: Arc burns. 195.226 Section 195.226 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.226 Welding: Arc burns. (a) Each arc burn must be repaired. (b) An arc burn...

  18. Robotic Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffery, Waris S.

    1993-01-01

    The need for automated plasma welding was identified in the early stages of the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) because it requires approximately 1.3 miles of welding for assembly. As a result of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process's ability to make virtually defect-free welds in aluminum, it was chosen to fulfill the welding needs. Space Station Freedom will be constructed of 2219 aluminum utilizing the computer controlled VPPAW process. The 'Node Radial Docking Port', with it's saddle shaped weld path, has a constantly changing surface angle over 360 deg of the 282 inch weld. The automated robotic VPPAW process requires eight-axes of motion (six-axes of robot and two-axes of positioner movement). The robot control system is programmed to maintain Torch Center Point (TCP) orientation perpendicular to the part while the part positioner is tilted and rotated to maintain the vertical up orientation as required by the VPPAW process. The combined speed of the robot and the positioner are integrated to maintain a constant speed between the part and the torch. A laser-based vision sensor system has also been integrated to track the seam and map the surface of the profile during welding.

  19. Robotic Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffery, Waris S.

    1993-02-01

    The need for automated plasma welding was identified in the early stages of the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP) because it requires approximately 1.3 miles of welding for assembly. As a result of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process's ability to make virtually defect-free welds in aluminum, it was chosen to fulfill the welding needs. Space Station Freedom will be constructed of 2219 aluminum utilizing the computer controlled VPPAW process. The 'Node Radial Docking Port', with it's saddle shaped weld path, has a constantly changing surface angle over 360 deg of the 282 inch weld. The automated robotic VPPAW process requires eight-axes of motion (six-axes of robot and two-axes of positioner movement). The robot control system is programmed to maintain Torch Center Point (TCP) orientation perpendicular to the part while the part positioner is tilted and rotated to maintain the vertical up orientation as required by the VPPAW process. The combined speed of the robot and the positioner are integrated to maintain a constant speed between the part and the torch. A laser-based vision sensor system has also been integrated to track the seam and map the surface of the profile during welding.

  20. Cheaper Custom Shielding Cups For Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.

    1992-01-01

    New way of making special-purpose shielding cups for gas/tungsten arc welding from hobby ceramic greatly reduces cost. Pattern machined in plastic. Plaster-of-paris mold made, and liquid ceramic poured into mold. Cost 90 percent less than cup machined from lava rock.

  1. Gas metal arc welding in refurbishment of cobalt base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriary, M. S.; Miladi Gorji, Y.; Kolagar, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Refurbishments of superalloys which are used in manufacturing gas turbine hot components usually consists of removing cracks and other defects by blending and then repair welding in order to reconstruct damaged area. In this study, the effects of welding parameters on repair of FSX-414 superalloy, as the most applicable cobalt base superalloy in order to manufacture gas turbine nozzles, by use of Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) technic were investigated. Results then were compared by Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW). Metallographic and SEM studies of the microstructure of the weld and HAZ showed that there are no noticeable defects in the microstructure by use of GMAW. Also, chemical analysis and morphologies of carbide in both methods are similar. Hardness profile of the GM AW structure then also compared with GTAW and no noticeable difference was observed between the profiles. Also, proper tensile properties, compared with GTAW, can be achieved by use of optimum parameters that can be obtained by examining the current and welding speed. Tensile properties of optimized condition of the GMAW then were compared with GTAW. It was seen that the room and high temperature tensile properties of the GMAW structure is very similar and results confirmed that changing the technic did not have any significant influence on the properties.

  2. Numerical Study for Gta Weld Shape Variation by Coupling Welding Arc and Weld Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenchao; Lu, Shanping; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    A numerical modeling of the welding arc and weld pool is studied for moving GTA welding to investigate the effect of the surface active element oxygen and the plasma drag force on the weld shape. Based on the 2D axisymmetric numerical modeling of the argon arc, the heat flux, current density and plasma drag force are obtained under different welding currents. Numerical calculations to the weld pool development are carried out for moving GTA welding on SUS304 stainless steel with different oxygen contents 30 ppm and 220 ppm, respectively. The results show that the plasma drag force is another dominating driving force affecting the liquid pool flow pattern, except for the Marangoni force. The different welding currents will change the temperature distribution and plasma drag force on the pool surface, and affect the strength of Marangoni convection and the weld shape. The weld D/W ratio initially increases, followed by a constant value around 0.5 with the increasing welding current under high oxygen content. The weld D/W ratio under the low oxygen content slightly decreases with the increasing welding current. The predicted weld shape by simulation agrees well with experimental results.

  3. Inert-Gas Diffuser For Plasma Or Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Spencer, Carl N.; Hosking, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    Inert-gas diffuser provides protective gas cover for weld bead as it cools. Follows welding torch, maintaining continuous flow of argon over newly formed joint and prevents it from oxidizing. Helps to ensure welds of consistently high quality. Devised for plasma arc keyhole welding of plates of 0.25-in. or greater thickness, also used in tungsten/inert-gas and other plasma or arc welding processes.

  4. Variable-Polarity Plasma Arc Welding Of Alloy 2219

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Daniel W.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Report presents results of study of variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding of aluminum alloy 2219. Consists of two parts: Examination of effects of microsegregation and transient weld stress on macrosegregation in weld pool and, electrical characterization of straight- and reverse-polarity portions of arc cycle.

  5. Arc instability in shallow water wet welding

    SciTech Connect

    Nixon, J.H.; Graham, S.R.B.

    1993-12-31

    A series of wet welding trials, undertaken at Cranfield as part of a larger program, examined the relative stability of the process across a range of shallow water depths. The effect of welder skill, and the use of computer based data logging equipment, was also evaluated. By means of the data logging system, it was confirmed that welding carried out at a depth of 6 meters was markedly more stable than similar welds at 1.5 and 3 meters. Objective effects of welder skill were also noted, most markedly the ability of the skilled welder to operate at lower arc voltages and travel speeds. The use of the computer based data logging and analysis system was of great assistance in the program, and the use of similar equipment is highly recommended.

  6. Hydrogen mitigation in submerged arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimowicz, Steven

    With the role of hydrogen in weld metal well understood in its relation to cold cracking, there has been a push to produce welds with lower and lower diffusible hydrogen contents. The push for lower diffusible hydrogen contents has placed pressure on consumables manufactures to create consumables that can achieve the requirements for lower diffusible hydrogen content. Currently EM12K flux is produced so that it can achieve below 4 ml of diffusible hydrogen for every 100g of weld metal deposited (ml/100g) for submerged arc welding (SAW). The recent trend for industry is to preferentially achieve diffusible hydrogen contents below 3 ml/100g. Making it necessary to find a way to modify the flux to achieve a lower diffusible hydrogen content for the welds it produces. To achieve this goal a two phase plan was developed. The first phase was to characterize the entire welding system for hydrogen. Since the goal of the project is hydrogen mitigation, any amount of hydrogen that could be reduced is helpful and therefore must first be discovered. Sources of hydrogen may be found by analyzing the welding wire and base metal, as well as breaking the flux down into its components and production steps. The wire was analyzed for total hydrogen content as was the base metal. The flux and its components were analyzed using differential thermal analysis-simultaneous thermal analysis (DTA-STA) and later vacuum degassing for moisture content. The analysis of the wire showed that the copper coating on the wire was the largest contributor of hydrogen. There was lubricant present on the wire surface as well, but it did not contribute as much as the copper coating. It was found that a simple low temperature baking of the wire was enough to remove the lubricant and coating moisture. The base metal was found to have a similar total hydrogen content to that of the wire. The breakdown of the flux and production process for moisture content analysis revealed that the production process

  7. Sensoring Fusion Data from the Optic and Acoustic Emissions of Electric Arcs in the GMAW-S Process for Welding Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro, Sadek Crisóstomo Absi; Cayo, Eber Huanca

    2012-01-01

    The present study shows the relationship between welding quality and optical-acoustic emissions from electric arcs, during welding runs, in the GMAW-S process. Bead on plate welding tests was carried out with pre-set parameters chosen from manufacturing standards. During the welding runs interferences were induced on the welding path using paint, grease or gas faults. In each welding run arc voltage, welding current, infrared and acoustic emission values were acquired and parameters such as arc power, acoustic peaks rate and infrared radiation rate computed. Data fusion algorithms were developed by assessing known welding quality parameters from arc emissions. These algorithms have showed better responses when they are based on more than just one sensor. Finally, it was concluded that there is a close relation between arc emissions and quality in welding and it can be measured from arc emissions sensing and data fusion algorithms. PMID:22969330

  8. Sensoring fusion data from the optic and acoustic emissions of electric arcs in the GMAW-S process for welding quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Sadek Crisóstomo Absi; Cayo, Eber Huanca

    2012-01-01

    The present study shows the relationship between welding quality and optical-acoustic emissions from electric arcs, during welding runs, in the GMAW-S process. Bead on plate welding tests was carried out with pre-set parameters chosen from manufacturing standards. During the welding runs interferences were induced on the welding path using paint, grease or gas faults. In each welding run arc voltage, welding current, infrared and acoustic emission values were acquired and parameters such as arc power, acoustic peaks rate and infrared radiation rate computed. Data fusion algorithms were developed by assessing known welding quality parameters from arc emissions. These algorithms have showed better responses when they are based on more than just one sensor. Finally, it was concluded that there is a close relation between arc emissions and quality in welding and it can be measured from arc emissions sensing and data fusion algorithms.

  9. Thermocapillary and arc phenomena in stainless steel welding

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, S.W.; Olson, D.L.; Burgardt, P.

    1999-02-01

    This investigation characterized the effects of power level and Gaussian heat source size on thermocapillary-induced weld shape and estimated the relative influence of various possible arc phenomena in determining weld shape. Welds made with the CTAW process were compared with similar ones made with a conduction-mode EBW process and the differences were related to arc effects. Evidence of thermocapillary flow was readily apparent in both the GTA welds and the conduction-mode EB welds and was qualitatively similar in both. The similarity between the results obtained with the two processes serves to demonstrate that thermocapillary convection is the dominant factor in heat-to-heat weld shape variability. However, a similar one-to-one correspondence between welds produced with the two processes does not exist. Especially at high power, the EB welds showed stronger thermocapillary convection than the GTA welds. One important arc factor that limits thermocapillary flow in ar welds appears to be an increase in arc size with arc length and arc current. A non-Gaussian arc power distribution in GTAW seems to be most important in limiting the fluid flow. Apparently, the arc power distribution is more nearly rectangular in shape for an argon gas arc. At higher currents, above 200 A, plasma shear force may also be an important contributor to weld shape development. The conduction-mode EB welds demonstrate that thermocapillary flow reversal probably does not occur in welds made with a simple Gaussian heat source. The complex shape behavior is likely a result of an arc effect such as plasma shear.

  10. Thermocapillary and arc phenomena in stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, S.W.

    1993-10-01

    Goal was to study effect of power level and distribution on thermocapiilary-induced weld shape and of arc factors on weld shape. Thermocapillarity was apparent in both conduction mode EB welds and GTA welds, particularly in the former. A non-Gaussian arc distribution is suggested for accounting for the differences between the twoss processes. At higher current levels (200--300 A), plasma shear force also contributes to weld shape development. Evidence suggests that thermocapillary flow reversal is not a factor in normal GTA welds; EDB flow reversal occurs only at high power density levels where the keyhole mode is present.

  11. A numerical analysis of a stationary gas tungsten welding arc considering various electrode angles

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Na, S.J.

    1996-09-01

    The influences of parameters such as electrode angle, welding current and arc length on the gas tungsten arc welding process using Ar shielding gas were studied assuming the current density distribution along the cathode surface. Its distribution was assumed to have a Gaussian form, which is characterized by the maximum current density at the electrode tip or the distribution parameter. For determining these two values according to the electrode angle and welding current, the temperature distributions of a 60-deg angle electrode were calculated for 100, 200 and 300 A welding currents and compared with the experimental measurements obtained by previous research. Using these assumed current density distributions as the boundary condition for the current continuity equation, the heat flux and current density on the base plate were calculated for various influencing parameters and compared with the experimental results obtained under the same welding conditions. Furthermore, other transporting phenomena acting on the anode plate, such as arc pressure and shear stress, were calculated.

  12. Control of Gas Tungsten Arc welding pool shape by trace element addition to the weld pool

    DOEpatents

    Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

    1984-03-13

    An improved process for Gas Tungsten Arc welding maximizes the depth/width ratio of the weld pool by adding a sufficient amount of a surface active element to insure inward fluid flow, resulting in deep, narrow welds. The process is especially useful to eliminate variable weld penetration and shape in GTA welding of steels and stainless steels, particularly by using a sulfur-doped weld wire in a cold wire feed technique.

  13. Signal analysis of voltage noise in welding arcs. [gas tungsten arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elis, E.; Eagar, T. W.

    1982-01-01

    Gas tungsten arc welds were made on low alloy steel plates to which intentional defects (discontinuities) were imposed. Disruption of shielding gas, welding over surface films, and tack welds produce changes in what is otherwise a relatively uniform voltage signal. The arc voltage was 15 volts + or - 2 volts with 300 mV ripple noise from the power supply. Changes in this steady noise voltage varied from 50 mV to less than one millivolt depending on the severity and the type of change experienced. In some instances the changes were easily detected by analysis of the signal in real time, while in other cases the signal had to transformed to the frequency domain in order to detect the changes. Discontinuities as small as 1.5 mm in length were detected. The ultimate sensitivity and reproducibility of the technique is still being investigated.

  14. 29 CFR 1910.254 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... or the Safety Standard for Transformer-Type Arc-Welding Machines, ANSI C33.2—1956, Underwriters... conditions. (i) Standard machines for arc welding service shall be designed and constructed to carry their... service conditions may exist, and in such circumstances machines shall be especially designed to...

  15. 29 CFR 1910.254 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... or the Safety Standard for Transformer-Type Arc-Welding Machines, ANSI C33.2—1956, Underwriters... subpart S of this part. (ii) On all types of arc welding machines, control apparatus shall be enclosed... shall be in accordance with the requirements of subpart S of this part. (2) Grounding. (i) The frame...

  16. 29 CFR 1910.254 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... or the Safety Standard for Transformer-Type Arc-Welding Machines, ANSI C33.2—1956, Underwriters... subpart S of this part. (ii) On all types of arc welding machines, control apparatus shall be enclosed... shall be in accordance with the requirements of subpart S of this part. (2) Grounding. (i) The frame...

  17. Shielded Metal Arc Pipe Welding. Teacher Edition. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; And Others

    This second edition of the shielded metal arc pipe welding curriculum guide presents both basic and advanced pipe welding skills. All specifications for procedure and welder qualification are presented according to national standards. The standards also include the test position for both groove and fillet pipe welding. The guide contains three…

  18. Arc-Light Reflector For Television Weld Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S.

    1989-01-01

    Conical, stainless-steel mirror attached to end of welding torch improves distribution of light on work-piece as welding monitored through torch by television. Television monitoring protects operators from intense arc light and facilitates automated welding. Simple, small, and easy to install and remove, mirror relatively nonintrusive.

  19. Use of the Plasma Spectrum RMS Signal for Arc-Welding Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Mirapeix, Jesus; Cobo, Adolfo; Fuentes, Jose; Davila, Marta; Etayo, Juan Maria; Lopez-Higuera, Jose-Miguel

    2009-01-01

    A new spectroscopic parameter is used in this paper for on-line arc-welding quality monitoring. Plasma spectroscopy applied to welding diagnostics has typically relied on the estimation of the plasma electronic temperature, as there is a known correlation between this parameter and the quality of the seams. However, the practical use of this parameter gives rise to some uncertainties that could provoke ambiguous results. For an efficient on-line welding monitoring system, it is essential to prevent the appearance of false alarms, as well as to detect all the possible defects. In this regard, we propose the use of the root mean square signal of the welding plasma spectra, as this parameter will be proven to exhibit a good correlation with the quality of the resulting seams. Results corresponding to several arc-welding field tests performed on Inconel and titanium specimens will be discussed and compared to non-destructive evaluation techniques.

  20. Use of the Plasma Spectrum RMS Signal for Arc-Welding Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Mirapeix, Jesus; Cobo, Adolfo; Fuentes, Jose; Davila, Marta; Etayo, Juan Maria; Lopez-Higuera, Jose-Miguel

    2009-01-01

    A new spectroscopic parameter is used in this paper for on-line arc-welding quality monitoring. Plasma spectroscopy applied to welding diagnostics has typically relied on the estimation of the plasma electronic temperature, as there is a known correlation between this parameter and the quality of the seams. However, the practical use of this parameter gives rise to some uncertainties that could provoke ambiguous results. For an efficient on-line welding monitoring system, it is essential to prevent the appearance of false alarms, as well as to detect all the possible defects. In this regard, we propose the use of the root mean square signal of the welding plasma spectra, as this parameter will be proven to exhibit a good correlation with the quality of the resulting seams. Results corresponding to several arc-welding field tests performed on Inconel and titanium specimens will be discussed and compared to non-destructive evaluation techniques. PMID:22346696

  1. A Glove Box Enclosed Gas-Tungsten Arc Welding System

    SciTech Connect

    Reevr, E, M; Robino, C.V.

    1999-07-01

    This report describes an inert atmosphere enclosed gas-tungsten arc welding system which has been assembled in support of the MC2730, MC2730A and MC 3500 Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Enhanced Surveillance Program. One goal of this program is to fabricate welds with microstructures and impurity levels which are similar to production heat source welds previously produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Mound Facility. These welds will subsequently be used for high temperature creep testing as part of the overall component lifetime assessment. In order to maximize the utility of the welding system, means for local control of the arc atmosphere have been incorporated and a wide range of welding environments can easily be evaluated. The gas-tungsten arc welding system used in the assembly is computer controlled, includes two-axis and rotary motion, and can be operated in either continuous or pulsed modes. The system can therefore be used for detailed research studies of welding impurity effects, development of prototype weld schedules, or to mimic a significant range of production-like welding conditions. Fixturing for fabrication of high temperature creep test samples have been designed and constructed, and weld schedules for grip-tab and test welds have been developed. The microstructure of these welds have been evaluated and are consistent with those used during RTG production.

  2. A comparison of the physics of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Electron Beam Welding (EBW), and Laser Beam Welding (LBW)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The physics governing the applicability and limitations of gas tungsten arc (GTA), electron beam (EB), and laser beam (LB) welding are compared. An appendix on the selection of laser welding systems is included.

  3. Robotic arc welding is off and running at Caterpillar

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, B.

    2000-04-01

    Many experts have long regarded Caterpillar Inc., Peoria, Ill, as not only the largest but perhaps the wisest user of arc welding technology in the world. So it is no surprise Caterpillar was in on the ground floor when robots were first introduced to arc welding. In the early years, which started almost 20 years ago, there were growing pains. There was a huge amount of research into robotic arc welding at the Caterpillar Manufacturing Development Center in East Peoria, Ill., and developments in advanced robotic systems continue today at the Tech Center in Mossville, Ill. The original spadework has paid off to the extent the company now has several hundred robots in operation throughout its plants worldwide specifically engaged in arc welding. Why all this effort? What was the goal? Howard Ludewig, project manager, welding engineering, answered both questions quickly and to the point: Quality, productivity and environmental impact. There was a time not too many years ago when welders wielding semiautomatic guns performed most of the welding operations in a typical Caterpillar manufacturing plant. Most of the welds were made with flux-cored wire. Today, most of the welders have become robot operators or have moved to other jobs. Robotic arc welding systems now make the welds the welders produced in the past. Nowadays, the welds are made mostly by solid, not flux-cored, wire. Things are quiet. The plant area is clean.

  4. Modeling of the Weld Shape Development During the Autogenous Welding Process by Coupling Welding Arc with Weld Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenchao; Lu, Shanping; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    2010-10-01

    A numerical model of the welding arc is coupled to a model for the heat transfer and fluid flow in the weld pool of a SUS304 stainless steel during a moving GTA welding process. The described model avoids the use of the assumption of the empirical Gaussian boundary conditions, and at the same time, provides reliable boundary conditions to analyze the weld pool. Based on the two-dimensional axisymmetric numerical modeling of the argon arc, the heat flux to workpiece, the input current density, and the plasma drag stress are obtained. The arc temperature contours, the distributions of heat flux, and current density at the anode are in fair agreement with the reported experimental results. Numerical simulation and experimental studies to the weld pool development are carried out for a moving GTA welding on SUS304 stainless steel with different oxygen content from 30 to 220 ppm. The calculated result show that the oxygen can change the Marangoni convection from outward to inward direction on the liquid pool surface and make the wide shallow weld shape become narrow deep one. The calculated result for the weld shape and weld D/W ratio agrees well with the experimental one.

  5. Thermal insulation of wet shielded metal arc welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Patrick J.

    1993-06-01

    Computational and experimental studies were performed to determine the effect of static thermal insulation on the quality of wet shielded metal arc welds (SMAW). A commercially available heat flow and fluid dynamics spectral-element computer program was used to model a wet SMAW and to determine the potential effect on the weld cooling rate of placing thermal insulation adjacent to the weld line. Experimental manual welds were made on a low carbon equivalent (0.285) mild steel and on a higher carbon equivalent (0.410) high tensile strength steel, using woven fabrics of alumina-boria-silica fibers to insulate the surface of the plate being welded. The effect of the insulation on weld quality was evaluated through the use of post-weld Rockwell Scale hardness measurements on the surface of the weld heat affected zones (HAZ's) and by visual inspection of sectioned welds at 10 X magnification. The computational simulation demonstrated a 150% increase in surface HAZ peak temperature and a significant decrease in weld cooling rate with respect to uninsulated welds, for welds in which ideal insulation had been placed on the base plate surface adjacent to the weld line. Experimental mild steel welds showed a reduction in surface HAZ hardness attributable to insulation at a 77% significance level. A visual comparison of the cross-sections of two welds made in 0.410 carbon equivalent steel-with approximately equivalent heat input-revealed underbead cracking in the uninsulated weld but not in the insulated weld.

  6. Recent progress on gas tungsten arc welding of vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, M.L.; King, J.F.; Alexander, D.J.

    1997-08-01

    Emphasis has been placed on welding 6.4 mm plate, primarily by gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding. The weld properties were tested using blunt notch Charpy testing to determine the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Erratic results were attributed to hydrogen and oxygen contamination of the welds. An improved gas clean-up system was installed on the welding glove box and the resulting high purity welds had Charpy impact properties similar to those of electron beam welds with similar grain size. A post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) of 950{degrees}C for two hours did not improve the properties of the weld in cases where low concentrations of impurities were attained. Further improvements in the gas clean-up system are needed to control hydrogen contamination.

  7. Wet underwater welding trials with commercial manual metal arc electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Abson, D.J.; Cooper, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    Six commercial wet underwater welding manual metal arc electrodes were evaluated in trials which simulated repairs to structures in shallow water. Welding was carried out both vertically down and overhead, at a depth of approximately 5 meters. One of the electrodes was an austenitic stainless steel, and the remainder were ferritic steel, containing low levels of carbon and manganese. Two weld configurations were employed in 8 mm thick C-Mn steel plate. Each weld was radiographed, sectioned, and examined metallographically. Tensile, Charpy and hardness testing were carried out. The trials revealed significant differences in the handleability of the six commercial electrodes. Handleability was better when welding vertically than when welding overhead, and was also better for fillet welds than for butt welds. Worm-holes and porosity were common in the latter. Extensive cracking occurred in the panels welded with the stainless steel electrode, preventing the extraction of mechanical test specimens from them. For the weld metal of the ferritic steel butt welds, strength and hardness increased with increasing alloying. Weld metal Charpy toughness varied widely between the different deposits. HAZ toughness was higher than that of the weld metal, but followed the trend of the weld metal data. On the patch plates, failure occurred in the parent steel on cross weld tensile specimens for the ferritic consumables, and in weld metal for the panels welded with the stainless steel electrodes. Viewed overall, two of the ferritic electrodes gave the best handleability and mechanical properties. However, fine-scale cracking was observed in the vertical butt weld deposited with one of them, and thus the other ferritic electrode gave the best all-round behavior. The remaining electrodes showed poorer handleability and a higher incidence of weld defects, including the extensive cracking observed in the butt welds produced with the stainless steel electrode.

  8. Design of a robust fuzzy controller for the arc stability of CO(2) welding process using the Taguchi method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongcheol; Rhee, Sehun

    2002-01-01

    CO(2) welding is a complex process. Weld quality is dependent on arc stability and minimizing the effects of disturbances or changes in the operating condition commonly occurring during the welding process. In order to minimize these effects, a controller can be used. In this study, a fuzzy controller was used in order to stabilize the arc during CO(2) welding. The input variable of the controller was the Mita index. This index estimates quantitatively the arc stability that is influenced by many welding process parameters. Because the welding process is complex, a mathematical model of the Mita index was difficult to derive. Therefore, the parameter settings of the fuzzy controller were determined by performing actual control experiments without using a mathematical model of the controlled process. The solution, the Taguchi method was used to determine the optimal control parameter settings of the fuzzy controller to make the control performance robust and insensitive to the changes in the operating conditions.

  9. Plasma arc welding repair of space flight hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David S.

    1993-01-01

    A technique to weld repair the main combustion chamber of Space Shuttle Main Engines has been developed. The technique uses the plasma arc welding process and active cooling to seal cracks and pinholes in the hot-gas wall of the main combustion chamber liner. The liner hot-gas wall is made of NARloy-Z, a copper alloy previously thought to be unweldable using conventional arc welding processes. The process must provide extensive heat input to melt the high conductivity NARloy-Z while protecting the delicate structure of the surrounding material. The higher energy density of the plasma arc process provides the necessary heat input while active water cooling protects the surrounding structure. The welding process is precisely controlled using a computerized robotic welding system.

  10. Plasma arc welding repair of space flight hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David S.

    1993-01-01

    Repair and refurbishment of flight and test hardware can extend the useful life of very expensive components. A technique to weld repair the main combustion chamber of space shuttle main engines has been developed. The technique uses the plasma arc welding process and active cooling to seal cracks and pinholes in the hot-gas wall of the main combustion chamber liner. The liner hot-gas wall is made of NARloyZ, a copper alloy previously thought to be unweldable using conventional arc welding processes. The process must provide extensive heat input to melt the high conductivity NARloyZ while protecting the delicate structure of the surrounding material. The higher energy density of the plasma arc process provides the necessary heat input while active water cooling protects the surrounding structure. The welding process is precisely controlled using a computerized robotic welding system.

  11. Adaptive tracking of weld joints using active contour model in arc-welding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaeseon; Koh, Kyoungchul; Cho, Hyungsuck

    2001-02-01

    12 This paper presents a vision processing scheme to automatic weld joint tracking in robotic arc welding process. Particular attention is concentrated on its robustness against various optical disturbances, such as arc glares and weld spatters radiating from the melted weld pool. Underlying the developed vision processing is a kind of model-based pattern searching, which is necessarily accompanied by two separate stages of modeling and tracking. In the modeling stage, a syntactic approach is adopted to identify unknown weld joint structure. The joint profile identified in the modeling stage is used as a starting point for successive tracking of variations in the geometry of weld joint during welding, which is automatically achieved by an active contour model technology following feature- based template matching. The performance of the developed scheme is investigated through a series of practical welding experiments.

  12. A Compact Gas/Tungsten-Arc Welding Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgen, Gene E.

    1991-01-01

    Compact gas/tungsten-arc welding torch delivers 100-A current, yet used in confined spaces inaccessible to even smallest commercially available torch. Despite its extremely small size, torch contains all usual components and delivers high current.

  13. Stability evaluation of short-circuiting gas metal arc welding based on ensemble empirical mode decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Wang, Kehong; Zhou, Zhilan; Zhou, Xiaoxiao; Fang, Jimi

    2017-03-01

    The arc of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) contains abundant information about its stability and droplet transition, which can be effectively characterized by extracting the arc electrical signals. In this study, ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) was used to evaluate the stability of electrical current signals. The welding electrical signals were first decomposed by EEMD, and then transformed to a Hilbert–Huang spectrum and a marginal spectrum. The marginal spectrum is an approximate distribution of amplitude with frequency of signals, and can be described by a marginal index. Analysis of various welding process parameters showed that the marginal index of current signals increased when the welding process was more stable, and vice versa. Thus EEMD combined with the marginal index can effectively uncover the stability and droplet transition of GMAW.

  14. Study of Mechanical Properties and Characterization of Pipe Steel welded by Hybrid (Friction Stir Weld + Root Arc Weld) Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong Chae; Sanderson, Samuel; Mahoney, Murray; Wasson, Andrew J; Fairchild, Doug P; Wang, Yanli; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has recently attracted attention as an alternative construction process for gas/oil transportation applications due to advantages compared to fusion welding techniques. A significant advantage is the ability of FSW to weld the entire or nearly the entire wall thickness in a single pass, while fusion welding requires multiple passes. However, when FSW is applied to a pipe or tube geometry, an internal back support anvil is required to resist the plunging forces exerted during FSW. Unfortunately, it may not be convenient or economical to use internal backing support due to limited access for some applications. To overcome this issue, ExxonMobil recently developed a new concept, combining root arc welding and FSW. That is, a root arc weld is made prior to FSW that supports the normal loads associated with FSW. In the present work, mechanical properties of a FSW + root arc welded pipe steel are reported including microstructure and microhardness.

  15. Internal Wire Guide For Gas/Tungsten-Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.; Dyer, Gerald E.

    1990-01-01

    Wire kept in shielding gas, preventing oxidation. Guide inside gas cup of gas/tungsten-arc welding torch feeds filler wire to weld pool along line parallel to axis of torch. Eliminates problem of how to place and orient torch to provide clearance for external wire guide.

  16. Microstructure, Texture, and Mechanical Property Analysis of Gas Metal Arc Welded AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Saptarshi; Mukherjee, Manidipto; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2015-03-01

    The present study elaborately explains the effect of welding parameters on the microstructure, texture, and mechanical properties of gas metal arc welded AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel sheet (as received) of 4 mm thickness. The welded joints were prepared by varying welding speed (WS) and current simultaneously at a fixed heat input level using a 1.2-mm-diameter austenitic filler metal (AISI 316L). The overall purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the variation of welding conditions on: (i) Microstructural constituents using optical microscope and transmission electron microscope; (ii) Micro-texture evolution, misorientation distributions, and grain boundaries at welded regions by measuring the orientation data from electron back scattered diffraction; and (iii) Mechanical properties such as hardness and tensile strength, and their correlation with the microstructure and texture. It has been observed that the higher WS along with the higher welding current (weld metal W1) can enhance weld metal mechanical properties through alternation in microstructure and texture of the weld metal. Higher δ-ferrite formation and high-angle boundaries along with the <101> + <001> grain growth direction of the weld metal W1 were responsible for dislocation pile-ups, SFs, deformation twinning, and the induced martensite with consequent strain hardening during tensile deformation. Also, fusion boundary being the weakest link in the welded structure, failure took place mainly at this region.

  17. 49 CFR 178.61 - Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with... steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam. (a) Type, size and service pressure. A DOT 4BW cylinder is a welded type steel cylinder with a longitudinal electric-arc welded seam, a...

  18. 49 CFR 178.61 - Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with... steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam. (a) Type, size and service pressure. A DOT 4BW cylinder is a welded type steel cylinder with a longitudinal electric-arc welded seam, a...

  19. 49 CFR 178.61 - Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with... steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam. (a) Type, size and service pressure. A DOT 4BW cylinder is a welded type steel cylinder with a longitudinal electric-arc welded seam, a...

  20. 49 CFR 178.61 - Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with... steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam. (a) Type, size and service pressure. A DOT 4BW cylinder is a welded type steel cylinder with a longitudinal electric-arc welded seam, a...

  1. 30 CFR 75.1106 - Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or... Protection § 75.1106 Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame underground. All welding, cutting, or... conducted in fireproof enclosures. Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame in other than...

  2. 30 CFR 75.1106 - Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or... Protection § 75.1106 Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame underground. All welding, cutting, or... conducted in fireproof enclosures. Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame in other than...

  3. 30 CFR 75.1106 - Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or... Protection § 75.1106 Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame underground. All welding, cutting, or... conducted in fireproof enclosures. Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame in other than...

  4. 30 CFR 75.1106 - Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or... Protection § 75.1106 Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame underground. All welding, cutting, or... conducted in fireproof enclosures. Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame in other than...

  5. 30 CFR 75.1106 - Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame underground.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or... Protection § 75.1106 Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame underground. All welding, cutting, or... conducted in fireproof enclosures. Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame in other than...

  6. Unique variable polarity plasma arc welding for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Since the introduction of the Plasma Arc Torch in 1955 and subsequent to the work at Boeing in the 1960's, significant improvements crucial to success have been made in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Process at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Several very important advantages to this process are given, and the genesis of PA welding, the genesis of VPPA welding, special equiment requirements, weld property development, results with other aluminum alloys, and the eventual successful VPPA transition to production operations are discussed.

  7. Study on visual image information detection of external angle weld based on arc welding robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaorui; Liu, Nansheng; Sheng, Wei; Hu, Xian; Ai, Xiaopu; Wei, Yiqing

    2009-11-01

    Nowadays, the chief development trend in modern welding technology is welding automation and welding intelligence. External angle weld has a certain proportion in mechanical manufacture industries. In the real-time welding process, due to hot deformation and the fixture of workpieces used frequently, torch will detach welding orbit causes deviation, which will affect welding quality. Therefore, elimination weld deviation is the key to the weld automatic tracking system. In this paper, the authors use the self-developed structured light vision sensor system which has significant advantage compared with arc sensors to capture real-time weld images. In the project of VC++6.0 real-time weld image processing, after binaryzation with threshold value seventy, 3*1 median filter, thinning, obtain weld main stripe. Then, using the extraction algorithm this paper proposed to obtain weld feature points, and compute position of weld. Experiment result verified that the extraction algorithm can locate feature points rapidly and compute the weld deviation accurately.

  8. Self-clamping arc light reflector for welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    This invention is directed to a coaxial extending metal mirror reflector attached to the electrode housing or gas cup on a welding torch. An electric welding torch with an internal viewing system for robotic welding is provded with an annular arc light reflector to reflect light from the arc back onto the workpiece. The reflector has a vertical split or gap in its surrounding wall to permit the adjacent wall ends forming the split to be sprung open slightly to permit the reflector to be removed or slipped onto the torch housing or gas cup. The upper opening of the reflector is slightly smaller than the torch housing or gas cup and therefore, when placed on the torch housing or gas cup has that springiness to cause it to clamp tightly on the housing or gas cup. The split or gap also serves to permit the feed of weld wire through to the weld area,

  9. Self-clamping arc light reflector for welding torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Stephen S.

    1987-07-01

    This invention is directed to a coaxial extending metal mirror reflector attached to the electrode housing or gas cup on a welding torch. An electric welding torch with an internal viewing system for robotic welding is provded with an annular arc light reflector to reflect light from the arc back onto the workpiece. The reflector has a vertical split or gap in its surrounding wall to permit the adjacent wall ends forming the split to be sprung open slightly to permit the reflector to be removed or slipped onto the torch housing or gas cup. The upper opening of the reflector is slightly smaller than the torch housing or gas cup and therefore, when placed on the torch housing or gas cup has that springiness to cause it to clamp tightly on the housing or gas cup. The split or gap also serves to permit the feed of weld wire through to the weld area,

  10. Extended electrode technique. [gas metal arc welding of metal plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaper, V. D.; Pollack, A.

    1972-01-01

    The extended electrode technique is a unique welding process which utilizes manual gas-metal-arc (GMAW) semi-automatic equipment and close, square butt joints to effectively produce a weld. The technique takes advantage of the resistance heating of the electode extension to effect the root pass. Weldments as large as 72-X30-X2-inch have been fabricated with this technique under normal shipyard welding conditions. Mechanical properties and explosion bulge tests indicate that satisfactory results are obtained with this process. Potential savings of approximately 50 percent can be achieved in flat welding and repair of heavy structural steel members.

  11. Analysis of hybrid Nd:Yag laser-MAG arc welding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Guen, E.; Fabbro, R.; Carin, M.; Coste, F.; Le Masson, P.

    2011-10-01

    In the hybrid laser-arc welding process, a laser beam and an electric arc are coupled in order to combine the advantages of both processes: high welding speed, low thermal load and high depth penetration thanks to the laser; less demanding on joint preparation/fit-up, typical of arc welding. Thus the hybrid laser-MIG/MAG (Metal Inert or Active Gas) arc welding has very interesting properties: the improvement of productivity results in higher welding speeds, thicker welded materials, joint fit-up allowance, better stability of molten pool and improvement of joint metallurgical quality. The understanding of the main relevant involved physical processes are therefore necessary if one wants for example elaborate adequate simulations of this process. Also, for an efficient use of this process, it is necessary to precisely understand the complex physical phenomena that govern this welding technique. This paper investigates the analysis of the effect of the main operating parameters for the laser alone, MAG alone and hybrid Laser/MAG welding processes. The use of a high speed video camera allows us to precisely characterize the melt pool 3D geometry such as the measurements of its depression and its length and the phenomena occurring inside the melt pool through keyhole-melt pool-droplet interaction. These experimental results will form a database that is used for the validation of a three-dimensional thermal model of the hybrid welding process for a rather wide range of operating parameters where the 3-D geometry of the melt pool is taken into account.

  12. Welding structures in gas tungsten arc-welded zircaloy-4

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, T.E.; Saggese, M.E.

    1982-02-01

    Microstructures were obtained by welding tubes to end caps in fuel elements. The final joint properties are influenced by different structural elements including microstructure, porosity, and inclusions. The secondary structure found after welding is Widmanstaetten. Welding thermal cycles are inherently inhomogeneous, affecting both plate width and /beta/ primary grain. 4 refs.

  13. Shielding conditions of local cavity for underwater arc spot welding

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Y.; Koga, H.

    1996-12-01

    Arc spot welding to join lapped plates is an effective maintenance operation for emergent recovering technique of defects under water. The welding operation is easy and effective except for an excessive amount of weld metal for deep penetration. A special nozzle for CO{sub 2} arc spot welding was designed to maintain this defect. A large amount of swirl shielding gas flow is adopted to discharge the excessive weld metal and to reduce digging action of weld pool. An additional high speed air jet is supplied to reinforce these effects. Almost flat weld bead is obtained by using of this nozzle. The effect of swirl shielding flow and additional air jet on the pressure is studied. When an excessive axial gas flow is used, a pressure at the weld pool becomes high enough to press down the weld surface below original surface level of base plate, and some molten metal is splashed out. Then, it is difficult to get a sound weld geometry. A swirl gas flow is tried to reduce the static pressure on the weld pool. The pressure on the weld pool by the swirl flow becomes much lower compared to the case by axial flow. When the swirl flow is used, a flat bead can be obtained. But some molten metal which is blown out by the swirl gas is resolidified at the edge of the nozzle. The additional high speed air jet is required to blow out the splashed metal from the nozzle completely. It has a suction effect itself. The pressure on the weld pool is also decreased. But the interaction between the swirl flow and the additional jet shows a complicated manner. This paper discusses the interaction between main shielding gas flow and the additional air jet to guarantee the good shielding condition for underwater use.

  14. Underwater cladding with laser beam and plasma arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.A.; Fusaro, R.; Jones, M.G.; Solomon, H.D.; Milian-Rodriguez, R.R.

    1997-01-01

    Two welding processes, plasma arc (transferred arc) (PTA) and laser beam, were investigated to apply cladding to austenitic stainless steels and Inconel 600. These processes have long been used to apply cladding layers , but the novel feature being reported here is that these cladding layers were applied underwater, with a water pressure equivalent to 24 m (80 ft). Being able to apply the cladding underwater is very important for many applications, including the construction of off-shore oil platforms and the repair of nuclear reactors. In the latter case, being able to weld underwater eliminates the need for draining the reactor and removing the fuel. Welding underwater in reactors presents numerous challenges, but the ability to weld without having to drain the reactor and remove the fuel provides a huge cost savings. Welding underwater in reactors must be done remotely, but because of the radioactive corrosion products and neutron activation of the steels, remote welding would also be required even if the reactor is drained and the fuel removed. In fact, without the shielding of the water, the remote welding required if the reactor is drained might be even more difficult than that required with underwater welds. Furthermore, as shall be shown, the underwater welds that the authors have made were of high quality and exhibit compressive rather than tensile residual stresses.

  15. An investigation into underwater wet welding using the flux cored arc welding process

    SciTech Connect

    Brydon, A.M.; Nixon, J.H.

    1995-12-31

    For the last two years, Cranfield has been carrying out a program of process investigations into wet underwater welding (Graham and Nixon 1993, Nixon and Webb 1994), and has demonstrated that it is possible to markedly improve the stability and consistency of the process by using control techniques developed for hyperbaric welding. In the project reported below, an initial evaluation of wet flux cored arc welding was undertaken. Although there continues to be considerable resistance to the use of wet welding on structures in the North Sea, continued pressure to reduce repair and maintenance costs is causing the industry to re-examine techniques previously discounted, such as wet welding (Anon 1993).

  16. Parametric Studies Of Weld Quality Of Tungsten Inert Gas Arc Welding Of Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar Pal, Pradip; Nandi, Goutam; Ghosh, Nabendu

    2011-01-17

    Effect of current and gas flow rate on quality of weld in tungsten inter gas arc welding of austenitic stainless steel has been studied in the present work through experiments and analyses. Butt welded joints have been made by using several levels of current and gas flow rate. The quality of the weld has been evaluated in terms of ultimate and breaking strengths of the welded specimens. The observed data have been interpreted, discussed and analyzed by using Grey--Taguchi methodology. Optimum parametric setting has been predicted and validated as well.

  17. Differences between Laser and Arc Welding of HSS Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němeček, Stanislav; Mužík, Tomáš; Míšek, Michal

    Conventional welding processes often fail to provide adequate joints in high strength steels with multiphase microstructures. One of the promising techniques is laser beam welding: working without filler metal and with sufficient capacity for automotive and transportation industry (where the amount of AHSS steels increases each year, as well as the length of laser welds). The paper compares microstructures and properties of HSS (high strength steel) joints made by MAG (Metal Active Gas) and laser welding. The effects of main welding parameters (heat input, welding speed and others) are studied on multiphase TRIP 900 steel tubes and martensitic sheets DOCOL 1200, advanced materials for seat frames and other automotive components. Whereas the strength of conventional welds is significantly impaired, laser welding leaves strength of the base material nearly unaffected. As the nature of fracture changes during loading and depending on the welding method, failure mechanisms upon cross tension tests have been studied as well.

  18. Study for the electric arc of alternative current at the single phase welding machine using the Matlab/Simulink environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baciu, I.; Ghiormez, L.; Vasar, C.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper is presented a mathematical model of the electric arc for an alternative current welding machine of low power. The electric arc model is based on dividing the voltage-current characteristic of the electric arc in many functioning zones. For the model of the entire welding machine are used real parameters as the ones of the proper welding machine. The voltage and current harmonics spectrum that is obtained during the welding process is presented. Also, the waveforms for the current and voltage of the electric arc plotted against time and the voltage-current characteristic of the electric arc are illustrated. The electric arc is considered as being supplied by alternative voltage from the electrical power network using a single phase transformer which has the output voltage of 80 volts. The model of the welding machine is developed in Simulink and the variations of some parameters of the electric arc are obtained by modifying of them in a Matlab function. Also, in this paper is presented the total harmonic distortion for the voltage and current of the electric arc obtained during simulation of the welding machine.

  19. Welding of NOREM iron-base hardfacing alloy wire products: Procedures for gas tungsten arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Phillps, M.K.; Findlan, S.J. . Nondestructive Evaluation Center)

    1992-09-01

    New wire products have been successfully fabricated and procedures developed for automatic gas tungsten arc welding of wear-resistant NOREM iron-base alloys. Research demonstrated that sound multilayer welds on carbon and stainless steel substrates can be obtained without the use of preheating. These developments point to the advantages of NOREM alloys for field applications, such as valve refurbishing.

  20. Study of issues in difficult-to-weld thick materials by hybrid laser arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazar Atabaki, Mehdi

    There is a high interest for the high strength-to-weight ratio with good ductility for the welds of advanced alloys. The concern about the welding of thick materials (Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) and 5xxx and 6xxx series of aluminum alloys) has stimulated the development of manufacturing processes to overcome the associated issues. The need to weld the dissimilar materials (AHSS and aluminum alloys) is also required for some specific applications in different industries. Hence, the requirement in the development of a state-of-the-art welding procedure can be helpful to fulfill the constraints. Among the welding methods hybrid laser/arc welding (HLAW) has shown to be an effective method to join thick and difficult-to-weld materials. This process benefits from both advantages of the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and laser welding processes. The interaction of the arc and laser can help to have enough penetration of weld in thick plates. However, as the welding of dissimilar aluminum alloys and steels is very difficult because of the formation of brittle intermetallics the present work proposed a procedure to effectively join the alloys. The reports showed that the explosively welded aluminum alloys to steels have the highest toughness, and that could be used as an "insert" (TRICLAD) for welding the thick plates of AHSS to aluminum alloys. Therefore, the HLAW of the TRICLAD-Flange side (Aluminum alloy (AA 5456)) to the Web side (Aluminum alloys (AA 6061 and AA 5456)) and the TRICLAD-Flange side (ASTM A516) to the Web side (AHSS) was studied in the present work. However, there are many issues related to HLAW of the dissimilar steels as well as dissimilar aluminum alloys that have to be resolved in order to obtain sound welds. To address the challenges, the most recent welding methods for joining aluminum alloys to steels were studied and the microstructural development, mechanical properties, and on-line monitoring of the welding processes were discussed as well

  1. Manganese in occupational arc welding fumes--aspects on physiochemical properties, with focus on solubility.

    PubMed

    Taube, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    Physicochemical properties, such as particle sizes, composition, and solubility of welding fumes are decisive for the bioaccessibility of manganese and thereby for the manganese cytotoxic and neurotoxic effects arising from various welding fumes. Because of the diverse results within the research on welding fume solubility, this article aims to review and discuss recent literature on physicochemical properties of gas metal arc welding, shielded metal arc welding, and flux-cored arc welding fumes, with focus on solubility properties. This article also presents a short introduction to the literature on arc welding techniques, health effects from manganese, and occupational exposure to manganese among welders.

  2. Development of a Three-Dimensional Heat-Transfer Model for the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding Process Using the Finite Element Method Coupled with a Genetic Algorithm Based Identification of Uncertain Input Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, S.; de, A.

    2008-11-01

    An accurate estimation of the temperature field in weld pool and its surrounding area is important for a priori determination of the weld-pool dimensions and the weld thermal cycles. A finite element based three-dimensional (3-D) quasi-steady heat-transfer model is developed in the present work to compute temperature field in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. The numerical model considers temperature-dependent material properties and latent heat of melting and solidification. A novelty of the numerical model is that the welding heat source is considered in the form of an adaptive volumetric heat source that confirms to the size and the shape of the weld pool. The need to predefine the dimensions of the volumetric heat source is thus overcome. The numerical model is further integrated with a parent-centric recombination (PCX) operated generalized generation gap (G3) model based genetic algorithm to identify the magnitudes of process efficiency and arc radius that are usually unknown but required for the accurate estimation of the net heat input into the workpiece. The complete numerical model and the genetic algorithm based optimization code are developed indigenously using an Intel Fortran Compiler. The integrated model is validated further with a number of experimentally measured weld dimensions in GTA-welded samples in stainless steels.

  3. 30 CFR 77.1112 - Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame; safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 77.1112 Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame; safeguards. (a) When welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame near...

  4. 30 CFR 77.1112 - Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame; safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 77.1112 Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame; safeguards. (a) When welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame near...

  5. 30 CFR 77.1112 - Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame; safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 77.1112 Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame; safeguards. (a) When welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame near...

  6. 30 CFR 77.1112 - Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame; safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 77.1112 Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame; safeguards. (a) When welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame near...

  7. 30 CFR 77.1112 - Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame; safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or... WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 77.1112 Welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame; safeguards. (a) When welding, cutting, or soldering with arc or flame near...

  8. Modeling of Linear Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maran, P.; Sornakumar, T.; Sundararajan, T.

    2008-08-01

    A heat and fluid flow model has been developed to solve the gas tungsten arc (GTA) linear welding problem for austenitic stainless steel. The moving heat source problem associated with the electrode traverse has been simplified into an equivalent two-dimensional (2-D) transient problem. The torch residence time has been calculated from the arc diameter and torch speed. The mathematical formulation considers buoyancy, electromagnetic induction, and surface tension forces. The governing equations have been solved by the finite volume method. The temperature and velocity fields have been determined. The theoretical predictions for weld bead geometry are in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  9. Immunotoxicology of arc welding fume: Worker and experimental animal studies

    PubMed Central

    Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C.; Erdely, Aaron; Antonini, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Arc welding processes generate complex aerosols composed of potentially hazardous metal fumes and gases. Millions of workers worldwide are exposed to welding aerosols daily. A health effect of welding that is of concern to the occupational health community is the development of immune system dysfunction. Increased severity, frequency, and duration of upper and lower respiratory tract infections have been reported among welders. Specifically, multiple studies have observed an excess mortality from pneumonia in welders and workers exposed to metal fumes. Although several welder cohort and experimental animal studies investigating the adverse effects of welding fume exposure on immune function have been performed, the potential mechanisms responsible for these effects are limited. The objective of this report was to review both human and animal studies that have examined the effect of welding fume pulmonary exposure on local and systemic immune responses. PMID:22734811

  10. Heat flow in variable polarity plasma arc welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.

    1992-01-01

    The space shuttle external tank and the space station Freedom are fabricated by the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding. Heat sink effects (taper) are observed when there are irregularities in the work-piece configuration especially if these irregularities are close to the weld bead. These heat sinks affect the geometry of the weld bead, and in extreme cases they could cause defects such as incomplete fusion. Also, different fixtures seem to have varying heat sink effects. The objective of the previous, present, and consecutive research studies is to investigate the effect of irregularities in the work-piece configuration and fixture differences on the weld bead geometry with the ultimate objective to compensate automatically for the heat sink effects and achieve a perfect weld.

  11. Immunotoxicology of arc welding fume: worker and experimental animal studies.

    PubMed

    Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Erdely, Aaron; Antonini, James M

    2012-01-01

    Arc welding processes generate complex aerosols composed of potentially hazardous metal fumes and gases. Millions of workers worldwide are exposed to welding aerosols daily. A health effect of welding that is of concern to the occupational health community is the development of immune system dysfunction. Increased severity, frequency, and duration of upper and lower respiratory tract infections have been reported among welders. Specifically, multiple studies have observed an excess mortality from pneumonia in welders and workers exposed to metal fumes. Although several welder cohort and experimental animal studies investigating the adverse effects of welding fume exposure on immune function have been performed, the potential mechanisms responsible for these effects are limited. The objective of this report was to review both human and animal studies that have examined the effect of welding fume pulmonary exposure on local and systemic immune responses.

  12. Heat sink effects in variable polarity plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Shuttle External Tank is fabricated by the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding process. In VPPA welding, a noble gas, usually argon, is directed through an arc to emerge from the torch as a hot plasma jet. This jet is surrounded by a shielding gas, usually helium, to protect the weld from contamination with air. The high velocity, hot plasma jet completely penetrates the workpiece (resembling a line heat source) when operated in the 'keyhole' mode. The metal melts on touching the side of the jet, as the torch travels in the perpendicular direction to the direction of the jet, and melted metal moves around the plasma jet in the keyhole forming a puddle which solidifies behind the jet. Heat sink effects are observed when there are irregularities in the workpiece configuration, especially, if these irregularities are close to the weld bead. These heat sinks affect the geometry of the weld bead, i.e., in extreme cases they could cause defects such as incomplete fusion. Also, different fixtures seem to have varying heat sink effects. The objective of this research is to study the effect of irregularities in workpiece configuration and fixture differences (heat sink effects) on the weld bead geometry with the ultimate objective to compensate for the heat sink effects and achieve a perfect weld. Experiments were performed on different workpiece geometries and compared to approximate models.

  13. Parametric studies on tensile strength in joining AA6061- T6 and AA7075-T6 by gas metal arc welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishak, M.; Noordin, N. F. M.; Shah, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    Proper selection of the welding parameters can result in better joining. In this study, the effects of various welding parameters on tensile strength in joining dissimilar aluminum alloys AA6061-T6 and AA7075-T6 were investigated. 2 mm thick samples of both base metals were welded by semi-automatic gas metal arc welding (GMAW) using filler wire ER5356. The welding current, arc voltage and welding speed were chosen as variables parameters. The strength of each specimen after the welding operations were tested and the effects of these parameters on tensile strength were identified by using Taguchi method. The range of parameter for welding current were chosen from 100 to 115 A, arc voltage from 17 to 20 V and welding speed from 2 to 5 mm/s. L16 orthogonal array was used to obtained 16 runs of experiments. It was found that the highest tensile strength (194.34 MPa) was obtained with the combination of a welding current of 115 A, welding voltage of 18 V and welding speed of 4 mm/s. Through analysis of variance (ANOVA), the welding voltage was the most effected parameter on tensile strength with percentage of contribution at 41.30%.

  14. Real-time sensing and monitoring in robotic gas metal arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. S.; Gao, J. Q.; Hu, J. K.

    2007-01-01

    A real-time monitoring system is developed for detecting abnormal conditions in robotic gas metal arc welding. The butt-joint test pieces with simulated large gaps are used to intentionally introduce step disturbance of welding conditions. During the welding process, the welding voltage and current signals are sampled and processed on-line to extract the characteristic information reflecting the process quality. After the first statistical processing, it is found that seven statistical parameters (the mean, standard deviation, coefficient of variance and kurtosis of welding voltage; the mean, coefficient of variance and kurtosis of welding current) show variations during the step disturbance. Through the second statistical processing of the means of the welding voltage for subgroups of continuous measurement, the statistical control chart is obtained, and an SPC (statistical process control)-based on-line identifying method is developed. Ten robotic welding experiments are conducted to verify the real-time monitoring system. It is found that the correct identification rates for normal and abnormal welding conditions are 100% and 95%, respectively.

  15. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Hybrid Welded Joints with Laser and CO2-Shielded Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahba, M.; Mizutani, M.; Katayama, S.

    2016-07-01

    With the objective of reducing the operating costs, argon-rich shielding gas was replaced by 100% CO2 gas in hybrid laser-arc welding of shipbuilding steel. The welding parameters were optimized to obtain buried-arc transfer in order to mitigate spatter formation. Sound butt joints could be successfully produced for plates of 14 and 17 mm thickness in one welding pass. Subsequently, the welded joints were subjected to different tests to evaluate the influence of CO2 shielding gas on the mechanical properties of the welded joints. All tensile-tested specimens failed in the base material, indicating the higher strength of the welded joints. The impact toughness of the welded joints, measured at -20 °C, reached approximately 76% of that of the base material, which was well above the limit set by the relevant standard. The microstructure of the fusion zone consisted of grain boundary ferrite and acicular ferrite uniformly over the plate thickness except for the joint root where the microstructure was chiefly ferrite with an aligned second phase. This resulted in higher hardness in the root region compared with the top and middle parts of the fusion zone.

  16. Arc Welding of Mg Alloys: Oxide Films, Irregular Weld Shape and Liquation Cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Xiao

    The use of Mg alloys for vehicle weight reduction has been increasing rapidly worldwide. Gas-metal arc welding (GMAW) has the potential for mass-production welding of Mg alloys. Recently, the University of Wisconsin demonstrated in bead-on-plate GMAW of Mg alloys that severe spatter can be eliminated by using controlled short circuiting (CSC), and severe hydrogen porosity can be eliminated by removing Mg(OH)2. The present study aimed at actual butt and lap welding of Mg alloys by CSC-GMAW and susceptibility of Mg alloys to weld-edge cracking using the circular-patch welding test. Sound welds were made without spatter and hydrogen porosity butt and lap welding of AZ 31 Mg using CSC-GMAW , with butt welds approaching 100% of the base-metal strength. However, three new significant issues were found to occur easily and degrade the weld quality significantly: 1. formation of oxide films inside butt welds, 2. formation of high crowns on butt welds, and 3. formation of fingers from lap welds. The mechanisms of their formation were established, and the methods for their elimination or reduction were demonstrated. Circular-patch welds were made on most widely used Mg casting alloy AZ91, the most widely used Mg wrought alloy AZ31 with three different Mg filler wires AZ31, AZ61 and AZ92. The susceptibility to cracking along the weld edge was predicted and compared against the experimental results. Such a prediction has not been made for welds of Mg alloys before.

  17. Agricultural Construction Volume I. Arc Welding Project Construction. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brzozowski, Dick; Admire, Myron

    This guide contains instructor's materials for teaching a secondary agricultural construction course consisting of instructional units on arc welding (8 lessons) and project construction (14 lessons). The materials for each unit include student objectives, a list of competencies from which the objectives were derived, suggestions for motivating…

  18. 29 CFR 1910.254 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... controls for reducing no load voltage is recommended to reduce the shock hazard. (4) Design. (i) A... subpart S of this part. (ii) On all types of arc welding machines, control apparatus shall be enclosed... the terminal shall be marked to indicate that it is grounded. (v) No connections for portable...

  19. Looking north at uing press of the submerged arc weld ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking north at u-ing press of the submerged arc weld (saw) line of the main pipe mill building, bay 7. - U.S. Steel National Tube Works, Main Pipe Mill Building, Along Monongahela River, McKeesport, Allegheny County, PA

  20. Study of inertia welding: the sensitivity of weld configuration and strength to variations in welding parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Mote, M.W.

    1981-12-01

    An experiment is described which is designed to demonstrate the forgiveness of inertia welding, that is, the relative insensitivity of weld strength to variations in energy (rotational speed of parts) and axial force. Although easily observed variations in the welding parameters produced easily observed changes in weldment configuration and changes in dimension (upset), only extremes in parameters produced changes in weld strength. Consequently, process monitoring and product inspection would be sufficient for quality assurance in a production environment.

  1. Development of an intelligent system for cooling rate and fill control in GMAW. [Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW)

    SciTech Connect

    Einerson, C.J.; Smartt, H.B.; Johnson, J.A.; Taylor, P.L. ); Moore, K.L. )

    1992-01-01

    A control strategy for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is developed in which the welding system detects certain existing conditions and adjusts the process in accordance to pre-specified rules. This strategy is used to control the reinforcement and weld bead centerline cooling rate during welding. Relationships between heat and mass transfer rates to the base metal and the required electrode speed and welding speed for specific open circuit voltages are taught to a artificial neural network. Control rules are programmed into a fuzzy logic system. TRADITOINAL CONTROL OF THE GMAW PROCESS is based on the use of explicit welding procedures detailing allowable parameter ranges on a pass by pass basis for a given weld. The present work is an exploration of a completely different approach to welding control. In this work the objectives are to produce welds having desired weld bead reinforcements while maintaining the weld bead centerline cooling rate at preselected values. The need for this specific control is related to fabrication requirements for specific types of pressure vessels. The control strategy involves measuring weld joint transverse cross-sectional area ahead of the welding torch and the weld bead centerline cooling rate behind the weld pool, both by means of video (2), calculating the required process parameters necessary to obtain the needed heat and mass transfer rates (in appropriate dimensions) by means of an artificial neural network, and controlling the heat transfer rate by means of a fuzzy logic controller (3). The result is a welding machine that senses the welding conditions and responds to those conditions on the basis of logical rules, as opposed to producing a weld based on a specific procedure.

  2. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  3. Numerical analysis of fume formation mechanism in arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashiro, Shinichi; Zeniya, Tasuku; Yamamoto, Kentaro; Tanaka, Manabu; Nakata, Kazuhiro; Murphy, Anthony B.; Yamamoto, Eri; Yamazaki, Kei; Suzuki, Keiichi

    2010-11-01

    In order to clarify the fume formation mechanism in arc welding, a quantitative investigation based on the knowledge of interaction among the electrode, arc and weld pool is indispensable. A fume formation model consisting of a heterogeneous condensation model, a homogeneous nucleation model and a coagulation model has been developed and coupled with the GTA or GMA welding model. A series of processes from evaporation of metal vapour to fume formation from the metal vapour was totally investigated by employing this simulation model. The aim of this paper is to visualize the fume formation process and clarify the fume formation mechanism theoretically through a numerical analysis. Furthermore, the reliability of the simulation model was also evaluated through a comparison of the simulation result with the experimental result. As a result, it was found that the size of the secondary particles consisting of small particles with a size of several tens of nanometres reached 300 nm at maximum and the secondary particle was in a U-shaped chain form in helium GTA welding. Furthermore, it was also clarified that most part of the fume was produced in the downstream region of the arc originating from the metal vapour evaporated mainly from the droplet in argon GMA welding. The fume was constituted by particles with a size of several tens of nanometres and had similar characteristics to that of GTA welding. On the other hand, if the metal transfer becomes unstable and the metal vapour near the droplet diffuses directly towards the surroundings of the arc not getting into the plasma flow, the size of the particles reaches several hundred nanometres.

  4. More About Arc-Welding Process for Making Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jeanette M.; Leidecker, Henning

    2005-01-01

    High-quality batches of carbon nanotubes are produced at relatively low cost in a modified atmospheric-pressure electric-arc welding process that does not include the use of metal catalysts. What would normally be a welding rod and a weldment are replaced by an amorphous carbon anode rod and a wider, hollow graphite cathode rod. Both electrodes are water-cooled. The cathode is immersed in ice water to about 0.5 cm from the surface. The system is shielded from air by flowing helium during arcing. As the anode is consumed during arcing at 20 to 25 A, it is lowered to maintain it at an approximately constant distance above the cathode. The process causes carbon nanotubes to form on the lowest 5 cm of the anode. The arcing process is continued until the anode has been lowered to a specified height. The nanotube-containing material is then harvested. The additional information contained in the instant report consists mostly of illustrations of carbon nanotubes and a schematic diagram of the arc-welding setup, as modified for the production of carbon nanotubes.

  5. Microstructure and mechanical properties of laser-arc hybrid welding joint of GH909 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting; Yan, Fei; Liu, Sang; Li, Ruoyang; Wang, Chunming; Hu, Xiyuan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, laser-arc hybrid welding of 10 mm thick low-thermal-expansion superalloy GH909 components was carried out to obtain a joint with good performance. This investigation was conducted using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, energy diffraction spectrum and other methodologies. The results showed that weld joints with a desirable wineglass-shaped weld profile can be obtained employing appropriate process parameters. The different grains in between the upper central seam and the bottom seam were associated with the temperature gradient, the pool's flow and the welding thermal cycle. MC-type carbides and eutectic phases (γ+Laves) were produced at grain boundaries due to the component segregation during the welding process. In addition, γ‧ strengthening phase presented in the interior of grains, which kept a coherent relationship with the matrix. The lowest hardness value occurred in the weld center, which indicated that it was the weakest section in the whole joint. The average tensile strength of the joints reached to 632.90 MPa, nearly 76.84% of the base metal. The fracture analysis revealed that the fracture mode of the joint was ductile fracture and the main reason for joint failure was as a result of the occurrence of porosities produced in the weld during the welding process.

  6. Effect of Cut Quality on Hybrid Laser Arc Welding of Thick Section Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokhi, F.; Nielsen, S. E.; Schmidt, R. H.; Pedersen, S. S.; Kristiansen, M.

    From an industrial point of view, in a laser cutting-welding production chain, it is of great importance to know the influence of the attainable laser cut quality on the subsequent hybrid laser arc welding process. Many studies have been carried out in the literature to obtain lower surface roughness values on the laser cut edge. However, in practice, the cost and reliability of the cutting process is crucial and it does not always comply with obtaining the highest surface quality. In this study, a number of experiments on 25 mm steel plates were carried out to evaluate the influence of cut surface quality on the final quality of the subsequent hybrid laser welded joints. The different cut surfaces were obtained by different industrial cutting methods including laser cutting, abrasive water cutting, plasma cutting, and milling. It was found that the mentioned cutting methods could be used as preparation processes for the subsequent hybrid laser arc welding. However, cut quality could determine the choice of process parameters of the following hybrid laser arc welding.

  7. Evaluation and monitoring of UVR in Shield Metal ARC Welding processing.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chiung-yu; Liu, Hung-hsin; Chang, Cheng-ping; Shieh, Jeng-yueh; Lan, Cheng-hang

    2007-08-01

    This study established a comprehensive approach to monitoring UVR magnitude from Shield Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) processing and quantified the effective exposure based on measured data. The irradiances from welding UVR were calculated with biological effective parameter (Slambda) for human exposure assessment. The spectral weighting function for UVR measurement and evaluation followed the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) guidelines. Arc welding processing scatters bright light with UVR emission over the full UV spectrum (UVA, UVB, and UVC). The worst case of effective irradiance from a 50 cm distance arc spot with a 200 A electric current and an electrode E6011 (4 mm) is 311.0 microW cm(-2) and has the maximum allowance time (Tmax) of 9.6 s. Distance is an important factor affecting the irradiance intensity. The worst case of the effective irradiance values from arc welding at 100, 200, and 300 cm distances are 76.2, 16.6, and 12.1 microW cm(-2) with Tmax of 39.4, 180.7, and 247.9 s, respectively. Protective materials (glove and mask) were demonstrated to protect workers from hazardous UVR exposure. From this study, the methodology of UVR monitoring in SMAW processing was developed and established. It is recommended that welders should be fitted with appropriate protective materials for protection from UVR emission hazards.

  8. Metal Transfer in Gas Metal Arc Welding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-17

    their measurements. Predictions can also be compared to integral measurements as by Halmoy [1980] for melting rate and by Ueguri, Hara and Komura ...10 No. 3. Ue-,uri, S., K. Hara and H. Komura , 1985. Welding J., 64 pp. 242s-250s. van Doormaal, J.P. and G.D. Raithby, 1985. ASME paper 85-HT-9

  9. Component temperature versus laser-welding parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.H.

    1983-01-01

    Applications have arisen in which the component temperature near a laser weld is critical because of possible damage to the explosive powder adjacent to the member being welded. To evaluate the thermal excursion experienced at the powder cavity wall, a study was conducted using assemblies that had been equipped with 0.05 mm diameter thermocouple wires. The main goal of the study was to determine how changes in the laser welding parameters owuld affect the powder cavity wall temperature. The objective lens-to-work distance, pulse rate, and beam power parameters were varied. The peak temperature varied from 117/sup 0/C to 311/sup 0/C in response to welding parameter changes. The study concluded that by utilizing a selected set of welding parameters, the design requirement of a 160/sup 0/C maximum powder cavity wall temperature could easily be satisfied.

  10. Electrochemical Testing of Gas Tungsten Arc Welded and Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Welded Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Day, S D; Wong, F M G; Gordon, S R; Wong, L L; Rebak, R B

    2003-09-07

    Alloy 22 (N06022) is the material selected for the fabrication of the outer shell of the nuclear waste containers for the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository site. A key technical issue in the Yucca Mountain waste package program has been the integrity of container weld joints. The currently selected welding process for fabricating and sealing the containers is the traditional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIG method. An appealing faster alternative technique is reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding. Standard electrochemical tests were carried on GTAW and RPEB welds as well as on base metal to determine their relative corrosion behavior in SCW at 90 C (alkaline), 1 M HCl at 60 C (acidic) and 1 M NaCl at 90 C (neutral) solutions. Results show that for all practical purposes, the three tested materials had the electrochemical behavior in the three tested solutions.

  11. Fabrication Of Double Wall Tube By U-O Press Forming And Pulsed Gas Tungsten Arc-welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasuga, Yukio; Kawamori, Shigehiro; Kuroda, Kiyoshi; Okai, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Double walled tubes were trially fabricated by press-forming and arc-welding, as difficulty in fabrication was anticipated in the case of roll-forming. U-O press-formed double walled sheets are TIG arc- welded. For determination of welding conditions, overlapped flat sheets were employed and butt-welded including pulsed arc-welding. Pulse from 1 to 100Hz is effective to obtain penetrated weld bead. With this, the double walled tube could be arc-welded, which could not be achieved by conventional TIG arc-welding.

  12. The variable polarity plasma arc welding process: Its application to the Space Shuttle external tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Bayless, O. E., Jr.; Jones, C. S., III; Munafo, A. P.; Wilson, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    The technical history of the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding process being introduced as a partial replacement for the gas shielded tungsten arc process in assembly welding of the space shuttle external tank is described. Interim results of the weld strength qualification studies, and plans for further work on the implementation of the VPPA process are included.

  13. Shielded Metal Arc Welding Consumables for Advanced High Strength Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    100 ksi) depends on the availability of adequate welding consumables. In the case of shielded metal arc welding, the electrodes must provide...associated with the potassium silicate binder (K2 SiO3 .nH2 0). The fluxes were then crushed and sized to 14# Tyler mesh (1.7 mm screen aperture) to...determined that the hydrated potassium silicate binder (K2 SiO3 .nH20) used in this investi- gation was 50 wt. pct. potassium silicate (K 2SiO 3 ) and

  14. Mechanical Characteristics of Welded Joints of Aluminum Alloy 6061 T6 Formed by Arc and Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astarita, A.; Squillace, A.; Nele, L.

    2016-01-01

    Butt welds formed by arc welding in inert gas with nonconsumable electrode (tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding) and by friction stir welding (FSW) from aluminum alloy AA6061 T6 are studied. Comparative analysis of the structures and mechanical properties of the welded joints is performed using the results of optical and electron microscopy, tensile tests, tests for residual bending ductility, and measurements of microhardness. The changes in the microstructure in different zones and the degrees of degradation of the mechanical properties after the welding are determined. It is shown that the size of the tool for the friction stir welding affects the properties of the welds. Quantitative results showing the relation between the microscopic behavior of the alloy and the welding-induced changes in the microstructure are obtained. Friction stir welding is shown to provide higher properties of the welds.

  15. The effect of welding parameters on surface quality of AA6351 aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yacob, S.; MAli, M. A.; Ahsan, Q.; Ariffin, N.; Ali, R.; Arshad, A.; Wahab, M. I. A.; Ismail, S. A.; Roji, NS M.; Din, W. B. W.; Zakaria, M. H.; Abdullah, A.; Yusof, M. I.; Kamarulzaman, K. Z.; Mahyuddin, A.; Hamzah, M. N.; Roslan, R.

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, the effects of gas metal arc welding-cold metal transfer (GMAW-CMT) parameters on surface roughness are experimentally assessed. The purpose of this study is to develop a better understanding of the effects of welding speed, material thickness and contact tip to work distance on the surface roughness. Experiments are conducted using single pass gas metal arc welding-cold metal transfer (GMAW-CMT) welding technique to join the material. The material used in this experiment was AA6351 aluminum alloy with the thickness of 5mm and 6mm. A Mahr Marsuft XR 20 machine was used to measure the average roughness (Ra) of AA6351 joints. The main and interaction effect analysis was carried out to identify process parameters that affect the surface roughness. The results show that all the input process parameters affect the surface roughness of AA6351 joints. Additionally, the average roughness (Ra) results also show a decreasing trend with increased of welding speed. It is proven that gas metal arc welding-cold metal transfer (GMAW-CMT)welding process has been successful in term of providing weld joint of good surface quality for AA6351 based on the low value surface roughness condition obtained in this setup. The outcome of this experimental shall be valuable for future fabrication process in order to obtained high good quality weld.

  16. Gas tungsten arc welding in a microgravity environment: Work done on GAS payload G-169

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welcher, Blake A.; Kolkailah, Faysal A.; Muir, Arthur H., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    GAS payload G-169 is discussed. G-169 contains a computer-controlled Gas Tungsten Arc Welder. The equipment design, problem analysis, and problem solutions are presented. Analysis of data gathered from other microgravity arc welding and terrestrial Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) experiments are discussed in relation to the predicted results for the GTAW to be performed in microgravity with payload G-169.

  17. Occupational asthma due to gas metal arc welding on mild steel.

    PubMed Central

    Vandenplas, O.; Dargent, F.; Auverdin, J. J.; Boulanger, J.; Bossiroy, J. M.; Roosels, D.; Vande Weyer, R.

    1995-01-01

    Occupational asthma has been documented in electric arc welders exposed to manual metal arc welding on stainless steel. A subject is described who developed late and dual asthmatic reactions after occupational-type challenge exposure to gas metal arc welding on uncoated mild steel. PMID:7597679

  18. Grain refinement control in gas-shielded arc welding of aluminum tubing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, W. F.; Whiffen, E. L.

    1974-01-01

    When sections are being welded, operator varies pulse rate of power supply and simultaneously monitors signal on oscilloscope until rate is found which produces maximum arc gas voltage. Remainder of welding is performed with power supply set at this pulse rate, producing desired maximum weld puddle agitation and fine uniform weld of grain structure.

  19. The Impact of Teaching Oxy-Fuel Welding on Gas Metal Arc Welding Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sgro, Sergio D.; Field, Dennis W.; Freeman, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    Industrial technology programs around the country must be sensitive to the demands of manufacturing and industry as they continue to replace "vocational" curriculum with high-tech alternatives. This article examines whether or not teaching oxyacetylene welding in the industrial technology classroom is required to learn arc welding…

  20. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Frye, Lowell D.

    1984-01-01

    A gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to provide a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surfaces are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy contiguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  1. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    DOEpatents

    Frye, L.D.

    1982-03-25

    The present invention is directed to a gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to profice a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surface are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy continguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  2. Physics Of Variable-Polarity Plasma Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Daniel W.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of some of the physical and chemical effects that occur during variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) keyhole welding of 2219 aluminum alloy. Comprised three major programs: (1) determination of effects of chemical additions (i.e., impurities) on structure and shape of bead and keyhole; (2) determination of flow in regions surrounding keyhole; (3) development of analog used easily to study flow in keyhole region.

  3. Effects of electrode bevel angle on argon arc properties and weld shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W. C.; Lu, S. P.; Li, D. Z.; Y Li, Y.

    2012-07-01

    A numerical modeling of coupled welding arc with weld pool is established using FLUENT software for moving shielded GTA welding to systematically investigate the effects of electrode bevel angle on the argon arc properties as well as the weld shape on SUS304 stainless steel. The calculated results show that the argon arc is constricted and the peak values of heat flux and shear stress on the weld pool decrease with increasing electrode bevel angle, while the radial distribution of heat flux and shear stress varying slightly. The weld shape is controlled by the pool flow patterns driving by the surface tension, gas shear stress, electromagnetic force and buoyancy. The Marangoni convection induced by surface tension plays an important role on weld shapes. All the weld shapes are wide and shallow with low weld metal oxygen content, while the narrow and deep weld shapes form under high weld metal oxygen content, which is related with the oxygen concentration in the shielding gas. The weld depth/width (D/W) ratio increases with increasing electrode bevel angle for high weld metal oxygen content and is not sensitive to the electrode bevel angle under low weld metal oxygen content. The calculated results for the weld shape, weld size and weld D/W ratio agree well with the experimental ones.

  4. Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder Metallurgy Produced Titanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Muth, Thomas R; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Frederick, David Alan; Contescu, Cristian I; Chen, Wei; Lim, Yong Chae; Peter, William H; Feng, Zhili

    2013-01-01

    ORNL undertook an investigation using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate, to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal / minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders, are critical to achieve equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

  5. Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Modeling and Prediction of Weld Microstructure in MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Martensitic Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    most of the commercially available metallic materials, in particular steels (including stainless steels ), super alloys, aluminum alloys, etc., can...REPORT Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Modeling and Prediction of Weld Microstructure in MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Martensitic Steel 14. ABSTRACT 16...Welding Process Modeling and Prediction of Weld Microstructure in MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Martensitic Steel Report Title ABSTRACT A conventional gas metal

  6. Plasma Arc Welding: How it Works

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur

    2004-01-01

    The physical principles of PAW from basic arcs to keyholing to variable polarity are outlined. A very brief account of the physics of PAW with an eye to the needs of a welder is presented. Understanding is usually (but not always) superior to handbooks and is required (unless dumb luck intervenes) for innovation. And, in any case, all welders by nature desire to know. A bit of history of the rise and fall of the Variable Polarity (VP) PA process in fabrication of the Space Shuttle External Tank is included.

  7. Hollow cathode arc discharge as an effective energy source for welding processes in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerovnyi, V. M.; Khakhalev, A. D.

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation of thermal and physical properties of the hollow cathode arc discharge (HCAD) with respect to its application for welding processes in vacuum. The following main parameters of the arc discharge were studied: the external voltage-current (V-I) characteristics; plasma parameters inside the cathode cavity and in the arc external column and the radial heat flux density distribution into the anode. Langmuir electrical probes have been utilized to investigate plasma parameters. Electron energy distribution function was determined from the probe V-I characteristics by the computation of an inverse ill-posed problem. It was shown that, depending on welding parameters, HCAD can exist in two different forms: diffusive or constricted. At currents below 60 A, HCAD has the diffusive form, and with the increase in the current it changes to the constricted form. The discharge constriction phenomenon, we believe, could be explained by the appearance in the external plasma of high velocity electrons with energies from 12 to 22 eV. Parameters of the heat flux into the anode were investigated with spot and split-anode calorimeters. The heat flux density on the anode of the diffusive form of the discharge has a Gaussian distribution. The heat flux of the constricted form is significantly different from the diffusive one and can be approximated by the sum of two combined normal-circular heat sources with different power concentration coefficients. It was also found that the efficiency parameter of the discharge energy transfer to the anode can reach 0.7-0.86 of the discharge voltage, which confirmed that HCAD is a highly effective energy source for welding processes in vacuum. Examples of industrial applications of HCAD for welding, brazing and alloying in vacuum are presented.

  8. Shielded Metal Arc Welding and Carbon Arc Cutting--Air. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition [and] Student Workbook. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Eddie; Knapp, John

    This document contains the teacher and student texts and student workbook for a secondary-level course in shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and carbon arc cutting that consists of units on the following topics: SMAW safety; SMAW equipment, applications, and techniques; hardfacing; and carbon arc cutting--air. The teacher edition includes the…

  9. Hybrid laser-arc welding of galvanized high-strength steels in a gap-free lap-joint configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shanglu

    In order to meet the industry demands for increased fuel efficiency and enhanced mechanical and structural performance of vehicles as well as provided excellent corrosion resistance, more and more galvanized advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) have been used to fabricate automobile parts such as panels, bumpers, and front rails. The automotive industry has shown tremendous interest in using laser welding to join galvanized dual phase steels because of lower heat input and higher welding speed. However, the laser welding process tends to become dramatically unstable in the presence of highly pressurized zinc vapor because of the low boiling point of zinc, around 906°C, compared to higher melting point of steel, over 1500°C. A large number of spatters are produced by expelling the liquid metal from the molten pool by the pressurized zinc vapor. Different weld defects such as blowholes and porosities appear in the welds. So far, limited information has been reported on welding of galvanized high strength dual-phase steels in a gap-free lap joint configuration. There is no open literature on the successful attainment of defect-free welds from the laser or hybrid welding of galvanized high-strength steels. To address the significant industry demand, in this study, different welding techniques and monitoring methods are used to study the features of the welding process of galvanized DP steels in a gap-free lap joint configuration. The current research covers: (i) a feasibility study on the welding of galvanized DP 980 steels in a lap joint configuration using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), laser welding, hybrid laser/arc welding with the common molten pool, laser welding with the assistance of GTAW preheating source and hybrid laser-variable polarity gas tungsten arc welding (Laser-VPGTAW) techniques (Chapter 2-4); (ii) a welding process monitoring of the welding techniques including the use of machine vision and acoustic emission technique (Chapter 5); (iii

  10. Artificial Optical Radiation photobiological hazards in arc welding.

    PubMed

    Gourzoulidis, G A; Achtipis, A; Topalis, F V; Kazasidis, M E; Pantelis, D; Markoulis, A; Kappas, C; Bourousis, C A

    2016-08-01

    Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) is associated with crucial social, economic, cultural and technical issues. A highly specialized OHS sector deals with the photobiological hazards from artificial optical radiation (AOR), which is divided into visible light, UV and IR emitted during various activities and which is legally covered by European Directive 2006/25/EC. Among the enormous amount of sources emitting AOR, the most important non-coherent ones to consider for health effects to the whole optical range, are arcs created during metal welding. This survey presents the effort to assess the complicated exposure limits of the Directive in the controlled environment of a welding laboratory. Sensors covering the UV and blue light range were set to measure typical welding procedures reproduced in the laboratory. Initial results, apart from apparently justifying the use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) due to even subsecond overexposures measured, also set the basis to evaluate PPE's properties and support an integrated risk assessment of the complex welding environment. These results can also improve workers' and employer's information and training about radiation hazards, which is a crucial OHS demand.

  11. A Study of the Thermal Profiles During Autogenous Arc Welding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California STA DTIC RAD ELECTE JUN 2 9 1989 • D THESIS A STUDY OF THE THERMAL PROFILES DURING AUTOGENOUS ARC...WELDING by Robert L. Ue March 1989 Thesis Advisor Yogendra Joshi Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. j 7 .. 43 Unclassified security...L. LIe 13a T)pe of Report 13b Time Covered 14 Date of Report (year. month, day) 15 Page Count Master’s Thesis From To March 1989 163 16 Supplementary

  12. Stability of a pendant droplet in gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, P.E.

    1998-07-01

    The authors develop a model of metal transfer in gas metal arc welding and compute the critical mass of a pendant droplet in order to ascertain the size and frequency of droplets detaching from the consumable metal electrode. These results are used to predict the mode of metal transfer for a range of voltage and current encompassing free flight transfer, and the transition between globular and spray transfer. This model includes an efficient method to compute the stability of a pendant droplet and the location of the liquid bridge connecting the primary droplet and the residual liquid remaining after detachment of the primary droplet.

  13. Method and device for reducing overpenetration at the start of plasma arc welds

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, John M.; Lehmann, John M.; Ryan, Patrick M.

    1998-01-01

    A shim for improving plasma arc weld quality has ends tapered at about 25.degree. and notches at each end roughly centered over the corner between the tapered ends and main body of the shim. The improved shim allows lower starting plasma arc heat input and reduces the occurrence of sagging, or overpenetration, of the weld.

  14. Improved Back-Side Purge-Gas Chambers For Plasma Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ezell, Kenneth G.; Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Improved chambers for inert-gas purging of back sides of workpieces during plasma arc welding in keyhole (full-penetration) mode based on concept of directing flows of inert gases toward, and concentrating them on, hot weld zones. Tapered chamber concentrates flow of inert gas on plasma arc plume and surrounding metal.

  15. Optimization of Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) Process for Maximum Ballistic Limit in MIL A46100 Steel Welded All-Metal Armor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Ramaswami, S.; Snipes, J. S.; Yavari, R.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2015-01-01

    Our recently developed multi-physics computational model for the conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW) joining process has been upgraded with respect to its predictive capabilities regarding the process optimization for the attainment of maximum ballistic limit within the weld. The original model consists of six modules, each dedicated to handling a specific aspect of the GMAW process, i.e., (a) electro-dynamics of the welding gun; (b) radiation-/convection-controlled heat transfer from the electric arc to the workpiece and mass transfer from the filler metal consumable electrode to the weld; (c) prediction of the temporal evolution and the spatial distribution of thermal and mechanical fields within the weld region during the GMAW joining process; (d) the resulting temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the material microstructure throughout the weld region; (e) spatial distribution of the as-welded material mechanical properties; and (f) spatial distribution of the material ballistic limit. In the present work, the model is upgraded through the introduction of the seventh module in recognition of the fact that identification of the optimum GMAW process parameters relative to the attainment of the maximum ballistic limit within the weld region entails the use of advanced optimization and statistical sensitivity analysis methods and tools. The upgraded GMAW process model is next applied to the case of butt welding of MIL A46100 (a prototypical high-hardness armor-grade martensitic steel) workpieces using filler metal electrodes made of the same material. The predictions of the upgraded GMAW process model pertaining to the spatial distribution of the material microstructure and ballistic limit-controlling mechanical properties within the MIL A46100 butt weld are found to be consistent with general expectations and prior observations.

  16. Modifying welding process parameters can reduce the neurotoxic potential of manganese-containing welding fumes

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Krishnan; Lin, Gary X.; Jefferson, Amy M.; Stone, Samuel; Afshari, Aliakbar; Keane, Michael J.; McKinney, Walter; Jackson, Mark; Chen, Bean T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared L.; Roberts, Jenny R.; Frazer, David G.; Antonini, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Welding fumes (WF) are a complex mixture of toxic metals and gases, inhalation of which can lead to adverse health effects among welders. The presence of manganese (Mn) in welding electrodes is cause for concern about the potential development of Parkinson’s disease (PD)-like neurological disorder. Consequently, from an occupational safety perspective, there is a critical need to prevent adverse exposures to WF. As the fume generation rate and physicochemical characteristics of welding aerosols are influenced by welding process parameters like voltage, current or shielding gas, we sought to determine if changing such parameters can alter the fume profile and consequently its neurotoxic potential. Specifically, we evaluated the influence of voltage on fume composition and neurotoxic outcome. Rats were exposed by whole-body inhalation (40 mg/m3; 3 h/day × 5 d/week × 2 weeks) to fumes generated by gas–metal arc welding using stainless steel electrodes (GMA-SS) at standard/regular voltage (25 V; RVSS) or high voltage (30 V; HVSS). Fumes generated under these conditions exhibited similar particulate morphology, appearing as chain-like aggregates; however, HVSS fumes comprised of a larger fraction of ultrafine particulates that are generally considered to be more toxic than their ne counterparts. Paradoxically, exposure to HVSS fumes did not elicit dopaminergic neurotoxicity, as monitored by the expression of dopaminergic and PD-related markers. We show that the lack of neurotoxicity is due to reduced solubility of Mn in HVSS fumes. Our findings show promise for process control procedures in developing prevention strategies for Mn-related neurotoxicity during welding; however, it warrants additional investigations to determine if such modifications can be suitably adapted at the workplace to avert or reduce adverse neurological risks. PMID:25549921

  17. Modifying welding process parameters can reduce the neurotoxic potential of manganese-containing welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Krishnan; Lin, Gary X; Jefferson, Amy M; Stone, Samuel; Afshari, Aliakbar; Keane, Michael J; McKinney, Walter; Jackson, Mark; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared L; Roberts, Jenny R; Frazer, David G; Antonini, James M

    2015-02-03

    Welding fumes (WF) are a complex mixture of toxic metals and gases, inhalation of which can lead to adverse health effects among welders. The presence of manganese (Mn) in welding electrodes is cause for concern about the potential development of Parkinson's disease (PD)-like neurological disorder. Consequently, from an occupational safety perspective, there is a critical need to prevent adverse exposures to WF. As the fume generation rate and physicochemical characteristics of welding aerosols are influenced by welding process parameters like voltage, current or shielding gas, we sought to determine if changing such parameters can alter the fume profile and consequently its neurotoxic potential. Specifically, we evaluated the influence of voltage on fume composition and neurotoxic outcome. Rats were exposed by whole-body inhalation (40 mg/m(3); 3h/day × 5 d/week × 2 weeks) to fumes generated by gas-metal arc welding using stainless steel electrodes (GMA-SS) at standard/regular voltage (25 V; RVSS) or high voltage (30 V; HVSS). Fumes generated under these conditions exhibited similar particulate morphology, appearing as chain-like aggregates; however, HVSS fumes comprised of a larger fraction of ultrafine particulates that are generally considered to be more toxic than their fine counterparts. Paradoxically, exposure to HVSS fumes did not elicit dopaminergic neurotoxicity, as monitored by the expression of dopaminergic and PD-related markers. We show that the lack of neurotoxicity is due to reduced solubility of Mn in HVSS fumes. Our findings show promise for process control procedures in developing prevention strategies for Mn-related neurotoxicity during welding; however, it warrants additional investigations to determine if such modifications can be suitably adapted at the workplace to avert or reduce adverse neurological risks.

  18. Review of Fillet Weld Strength Parameters for Shipbuilding.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    AD-ACED 356M ASSACHUJSETTS INST OF TECH CAMRaIDOS DEPT OF OCEAN E-EcTC Pft 13110 REVIEW OF FILLET WELD STREMOYN PARAMETERS FOR SHIPSUILOINS. RU) FES...hours are devoted to welding . A further analysis indicated that 75 percent of the welded joints were fillet welded . Inasmuch as the requirements of...fillet weld sizes have not been revised for many years, the Ship Structure Committee considered a review and analysis of current marine fillet weld

  19. Modeling of Fume Formation from Shielded Metal Arc Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivapirakasam, S. P.; Mohan, Sreejith; Santhosh Kumar, M. C.; Surianarayanan, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a semi-empirical model of fume formation rate (FFR) from a shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process has been developed. The model was developed for a DC electrode positive (DCEP) operation and involves the calculations of droplet temperature, surface area of the droplet, and partial vapor pressures of the constituents of the droplet to predict the FFR. The model was further extended for predicting FFR from nano-coated electrodes. The model estimates the FFR for Fe and Mn assuming constant proportion of other elements in the electrode. Fe FFR was overestimated, while Mn FFR was underestimated. The contribution of spatters and other mechanism in the arc responsible for fume formation were neglected. A good positive correlation was obtained between the predicted and experimental FFR values which highlighted the usefulness of the model.

  20. Modeling of Fume Formation from Shielded Metal Arc Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivapirakasam, S. P.; Mohan, Sreejith; Santhosh Kumar, M. C.; Surianarayanan, M.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a semi-empirical model of fume formation rate (FFR) from a shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process has been developed. The model was developed for a DC electrode positive (DCEP) operation and involves the calculations of droplet temperature, surface area of the droplet, and partial vapor pressures of the constituents of the droplet to predict the FFR. The model was further extended for predicting FFR from nano-coated electrodes. The model estimates the FFR for Fe and Mn assuming constant proportion of other elements in the electrode. Fe FFR was overestimated, while Mn FFR was underestimated. The contribution of spatters and other mechanism in the arc responsible for fume formation were neglected. A good positive correlation was obtained between the predicted and experimental FFR values which highlighted the usefulness of the model.

  1. UAH mathematical model of the variable polarity plasma ARC welding system calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    Significant advantages of Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welding process include faster welding, fewer repairs, less joint preparation, reduced weldment distortion, and absence of porosity. A mathematical model is presented to analyze the VPPA welding process. Results of the mathematical model were compared with the experimental observation accomplished by the GDI team.

  2. NOREM applications guidelines: Procedures for gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding of NOREM cobalt-free hardfacing alloys. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.K.; Findlan, S.J.

    1995-11-01

    Wire products have been successfully fabricated and new procedures developed for machine and manual gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of the iron-base NORM hardfacing alloys. These developments enhance the attractiveness of NORM alloys both in replacement valves and in field repairs of installed valves. This report describes the GTAW procedures and summarizes plasma transferred arc welding (PTAW) parameters for shop applications of NORM alloys. The work described here provides a wider range of acceptable welding conditions than those described in EPRI report TR-101094. In addition to its ``welder friendly`` status, the NORM alloy also exhibits wear resistance equivalent to that of cobalt-base hardfacing alloys. NORM alloys should be considered for further applications in both nuclear and fossil plant valves.

  3. Computational Modeling of Microstructural-Evolution in AISI 1005 Steel During Gas Metal Arc Butt Welding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    of the commercially available metallic materials, in particular, steels (including stainless steels ), super alloys, aluminum alloys, etc.; (b) welding...REPORT Computational Modeling of Microstructural-Evolution in AISI 1005 Steel During Gas Metal Arc Butt Welding 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...Computational Modeling of Microstructural-Evolution in AISI 1005 Steel During Gas Metal Arc Butt Welding Report Title ABSTRACT A fully coupled (two-way

  4. Optimization of resistance spot welding parameters for microalloyed steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viňáš, Ján; Kaščák, Ľuboš; Greš, Miroslav

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the results of resistance spot welding of hot-dip galvanized microalloyed steel sheets used in car body production. The spot welds were made with various welding currents and welding time values, but with a constant pressing force of welding electrodes. The welding current and welding time are the dominant characteristics in spot welding that affect the quality of spot welds, as well as their dimensions and load-bearing capacity. The load-bearing capacity of welded joints was evaluated by tensile test according to STN 05 1122 standard and dimensions and inner defects were evaluated by metallographic analysis by light optical microscope. Thewelding parameters of investigated microalloyed steel sheets were optimized for resistance spot welding on the pneumatic welding machine BPK 20.

  5. Effect of PTA Hardfaced Interlayer Thickness on Ballistic Performance of Shielded Metal Arc Welded Armor Steel Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, M.; Balasubramanian, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2013-03-01

    Ballistic performance of armor steel welds is very poor due to the usage of low strength and low hardness austenitic stainless steel fillers, which are traditionally used to avoid hydrogen induced cracking. In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to study the effect of plasma transferred arc hardfaced interlayer thickness on ballistic performance of shielded metal arc welded armor steel weldments. The usefulness of austenitic stainless steel buttering layer on the armor grade quenched and tempered steel base metal was also considered in this study. Joints were fabricated using three different thickness (4, 5.5, and 7 mm) hardfaced middle layer by plasma transferred arc hardfacing process between the top and bottom layers of austenitic stainless steel using shielded metal arc welding process. Sandwiched joint, in addition with the buttering layer served the dual purpose of weld integrity and ballistic immunity due to the high hardness of hardfacing alloy and the energy absorbing capacity of soft backing weld deposits. This paper will provide some insight into the usefulness of austenitic stainless steel buttering layer on the weld integrity and plasma transferred arc hardfacing layer on ballistic performance enhancement of armor steel welds.

  6. Weldability characteristics of shielded metal arc welded high strength quenched and tempered plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, R.; Mukerjee, D.; Jha, S.; Narasimhan, K.; Veeraraghavan, R.

    2002-02-01

    High strength, quench and tempered (Q&T) plates having yield strength of a minimum of 670 MPa and conforming to SA 517 Gr. F specification were successfully developed at Rourkela Steel Plant in plates up to 40 mm thickness. The plates are used extensively for the fabrication of impellers, penstocks, excavators, dumpers, and raw material handling devices, where welding is an important processing step. SA 517 Gr. F plates, characterized by a relatively high carbon equivalent (CE: ˜0.6) and alloyed with Ni, Cr, Mo, Cu, and V, are susceptible to a crack-sensitive microstructure and cold cracking during welding. In view of the above, the present study investigated the weldability properties of 20 mm thick plates using the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process. Implant and elastic restraint cracking (ERC) tests were carried out to assess the cold cracking resistance of the weld joint under different welding conditions. Preheat of 100 °C, partial or full rebake, and a heat input of 14.9 to 15.4 KJ/cm resulted in static fatigue limit (SFL) values well in excess of the minimum specified yield strength (MSYS) of 670 MPa and a critical restraint intensity (K cr) value of 34,650 MPa, indicating adequate cold cracking resistance. Lamellar tear tests conducted using full thickness plates at heat input levels ranging from 9.7 to 14.4 KJ/cm and weld restraint loads (WRL) of 510 to 685 MPa showed no incidence of lamellar tear upon visual, ultrasonic, and four-section macroexamination. The weld joint, based on optimized welding parameters, exhibited adequate tensile strength (812.4 MPa) and low temperature impact toughness 88.3 and 63.4 J (9.2 and 6.6 kg-m) at -40 °C for weld metal (WM), and heat-affected zone (HAZ) properties, respectively. The crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) values of WM and HAZ (0.40 and 0.36 mm, respectively) were superior to that of the parent metal (0.29 mm), indicating adequate resistance of weld joint to brittle fracture. It was concluded that

  7. Underwater plasma-MIG arc welding: Shielding technique and pressure reduction by a centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.; Mewes, D.; Bartzsch, J.; Draugelates, U.

    1995-12-31

    In comparison to hyperbaric underwater welding in diving chambers, wet welding techniques promise higher flexibility and lower costs. One technique for creating a local dry and pressure reduced welding zone is the use of a centrifugal pump. Results of experimental investigations in combination with a plasma-MIG arc welding system are presented in this paper. Special importance is attached to the local pressure reduction in view of the fact that low pressure, i.e. a high pressure difference between surrounding water and dry welding area, is a good condition for welding but is difficult to be obtained with other shielding systems than pressure chambers. Plasma-MIG welding has been done under water with a good result on the weld quality. Values of the hardness of the joint and the appearance of the weld structure are nearly comparable to atmospheric welds.

  8. 49 CFR 178.61 - Specification 4BW welded steel cylinders with electric-arc welded longitudinal seam.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... DOT 4BW cylinder is a welded type steel cylinder with a longitudinal electric-arc welded seam, a water... a maximum wall stress of 24,000 p.s.i. in the formula described in paragraph (f)(4) of this section... weldable steel, the carbon content of which may not exceed 0.25 percent. (f) Wall thickness. For...

  9. Welding of NOREM iron-base hardfacing alloy wire products: Procedures for gas tungsten arc welding. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Phillps, M.K.; Findlan, S.J.

    1992-09-01

    New wire products have been successfully fabricated and procedures developed for automatic gas tungsten arc welding of wear-resistant NOREM iron-base alloys. Research demonstrated that sound multilayer welds on carbon and stainless steel substrates can be obtained without the use of preheating. These developments point to the advantages of NOREM alloys for field applications, such as valve refurbishing.

  10. Electrical Evaluation Of Welding Machines Based On The Arc Properties. Application To SMAW, GMAW And GTAW Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguel, V.; Martínez, A.; Manjabacas, M. C.; Coello, J.; Calatayud, A.

    2009-11-01

    In this work, a methodology to obtain the electrical behavior of arc welding equipments is presented. The method is based on the electrical arc fundamentals and it is applied to Shielding Metal Arc Welding and to Gas Metal Arc Welding processes. For the first one, different arc points are achieved by practicing several arc lengths. For MIG process, different arc lengths are made by changing the feel wire velocity. Arc current and voltage are measured for the different arc length in both cases. Finally, a Gas Tungsten Arc Welding equipment has been used to obtain the electrical arc characteristics as a function of arc length. Different considerations about the thermal and electrical principles related to the arc behavior have been made.

  11. FLUXES FOR MECHANIZED ELECTRIC WELDING,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    WELDING FLUXES, WELDING ), (* WELDING , WELDING FLUXES), ARC WELDING , WELDS, STABILITY, POROSITY, WELDING RODS, STEEL, CERAMIC MATERIALS, FLUXES(FUSION), TITANIUM ALLOYS, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, COPPER ALLOYS, ELECTRODEPOSITION

  12. A study of gas flow pattern, undercutting and torch modification in variable polarity plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, John C.; Hou, Haihui Ron

    1994-01-01

    A study on the plasma and shield gas flow patterns in variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding was undertaken by shadowgraph techniques. Visualization of gas flow under different welding conditions was obtained. Undercutting is often present with aluminum welds. The effects of torch alignment, shield gas flow rate and gas contamination on undercutting were investigated and suggestions made to minimize the defect. A modified shield cup for the welding torch was fabricated which consumes much less shield gas while maintaining the weld quality. The current torch was modified with a trailer flow for Al-Li welding, in which hot cracking is a critical problem. The modification shows improved weldablility on these alloys.

  13. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding and Plasma Arc Cutting. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition [and] Student Workbook. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Eddie; Knapp, John

    This packet of instructional materials for a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and plasma arc cutting course is comprised of a teacher edition, student edition, and student workbook. The teacher edition consists of introductory pages and teacher pages. Introductory pages include training and competency profile, state duty/task crosswalk,…

  14. Grain Refinement in Al-Mg-Si Alloy TIG Welds Using Transverse Mechanical Arc Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biradar, N. S.; Raman, R.

    2012-11-01

    Reduction in grain size in weld fusion zones (FZs) presents the advantages of increased resistance to solidification cracking and improvement in mechanical properties. Transverse mechanical arc oscillation was employed to obtain grain refinement in the weldment during tungsten inert gas welding of Al-Mg-Si alloy. Electron backscattered diffraction analysis was carried out on AA6061-AA4043 filler metal tungsten inert gas welds. Grain size, texture evolution, misorientation distribution, and aspect ratio of weld metal, PMZ, and BM have been observed at fixed arc oscillation amplitude and at three different frequencies levels. Arc oscillation showed grain size reduction and texture formation. Fine-grained arc oscillated welds exhibited better yield and ultimate tensile strengths and significant improvement in percent elongation. The obtained results were attributed to reduction in equivalent circular diameter of grains and increase in number of subgrain network structure of low angle grain boundaries.

  15. Effect of friction stir welding parameters on defect formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, S. Yu.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Eliseev, A. A.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Filippov, A. V.; Ivanov, A. N.

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir welding is a perspective method for manufacturing automotive parts, aviation and space technology. One of the major problems is the formation of welding defects and weld around the welding zone. The formation of defect is the main reason failure of the joint. A possible way to obtain defect-free welded joints is the selection of the correct welding parameters. Experimental results describing the effect of friction stir welding process parameters on the defects of welded joints on aluminum alloy AMg5M have been shown. The weld joint defects have been characterized using the non-destructive radioscopic and ultrasound phase array methods. It was shown how the type and size of defects determine the welded joint strength.

  16. Microsegregation in high-molybdenum austenitic stainless steel laser beam and gas tungsten arc welds

    SciTech Connect

    Kujanpaeae, V.P.; David, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel with 6% molybdenum (thickness 6 mm) was welded using laser beam (LB) and gas tungsten arc (GTA) processes at various welding speeds. Depending on the welding speed the primary dendrite spacing ranged from 12 to 17 ..mu..m and from 2 to 7 ..mu..m for the GTA and LB welds, respectively. Extensive segregation of molybdenum was observed in the GTA welds. The segregation ratio for molybdenum, C/sub ID//C/sub D/, was found to be 1.9 in the GTA weld, and 1.2 in the LB weld. Distribution of iron, chromium and nickel was found nearly uniform in both welds. A recovered microstructure was observed after a post-weld annealing heat treatment. Annealing had a profound effect on the molybdenum segregation ratio in the laser weld. The critical pitting temperature (CPT) determined by a standard test was 55/sup 0/C for welds made using both processes, whereas it was 75/sup 0/C for the base metal. Upon homogenization the CPT of the laser beam weld increased to the base metal value, while that of the gas tungsten arc weld remained at 60/sup 0/C.

  17. Investigation of plasma arc welding as a method for the additive manufacturing of titanium-(6)aluminum-(4)vanadium alloy components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinoha, Joe N.

    -4V alloy substrates. Cylindrical weld metal deposits were built by employing an automatic wire feeder, turntable positioner, and vertical torch positioner. A total of four cylindrical weld metal specimens were built with various combinations of essential plasma arc welding process parameters. The temperature of the weld metal deposit was taken with a thermocouple after allowing a specified amount of time to pass before depositing the next weld track. An analytical heat flow model was created that estimated the temperature of the weld metal deposit in relation to the number of tracks deposited. The analytical heat flow model was adjusted to match the experimental data that was obtained and revealed that the rate of production could be increased if the rate of thermal energy losses from the deposit were increased. Cross-sections of the weld metal deposits were examined to observe the effects of thermal energy input on the weld metal macrostructure, microstructure, and grain size. Results from the metallographic inspections revealed an increase in grain size and coarsening of the structure as the number of weld tracks in the deposit increased.

  18. Prediction of Welded Joint Strength in Plasma Arc Welding: A Comparative Study Using Back-Propagation and Radial Basis Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Kadivendi; Vundavilli, Pandu R.; Manzoor Hussain, M.; Saiteja, M.

    2016-09-01

    Welding input parameters such as current, gas flow rate and torch angle play a significant role in determination of qualitative mechanical properties of weld joint. Traditionally, it is necessary to determine the weld input parameters for every new welded product to obtain a quality weld joint which is time consuming. In the present work, the effect of plasma arc welding parameters on mild steel was studied using a neural network approach. To obtain a response equation that governs the input-output relationships, conventional regression analysis was also performed. The experimental data was constructed based on Taguchi design and the training data required for neural networks were randomly generated, by varying the input variables within their respective ranges. The responses were calculated for each combination of input variables by using the response equations obtained through the conventional regression analysis. The performances in Levenberg-Marquardt back propagation neural network and radial basis neural network (RBNN) were compared on various randomly generated test cases, which are different from the training cases. From the results, it is interesting to note that for the above said test cases RBNN analysis gave improved training results compared to that of feed forward back propagation neural network analysis. Also, RBNN analysis proved a pattern of increasing performance as the data points moved away from the initial input values.

  19. Stainless steel submerged arc weld fusion line toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfield, A.R.; Held, P.R.; Wilkowski, G.M.

    1995-04-01

    This effort evaluated the fracture toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines. The incentive was to explain why cracks grow into the fusion line in many pipe tests conducted with cracks initially centered in SAWS. The concern was that the fusion line may have a lower toughness than the SAW. It was found that the fusion line, Ji. was greater than the SAW toughness but much less than the base metal. Of greater importance may be that the crack growth resistance (JD-R) of the fusion line appeared to reach a steady-state value, while the SAW had a continually increasing JD-R curve. This explains why the cracks eventually turn to the fusion line in the pipe experiments. A method of incorporating these results would be to use the weld metal J-R curve up to the fusion-line steady-state J value. These results may be more important to LBB analyses than the ASME flaw evaluation procedures, since there is more crack growth with through-wall cracks in LBB analyses than for surface cracks in pipe flaw evaluations.

  20. A Study on the Application of Submerged Arc Welding for Thin Plate of A-Grade 3.2 Thickness Steel in Ship Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong-Soo; Yun, Jin-Oh; Lim, Dong-Yong; Jang, Yong-Won; Kim, Bong-Joon; Oh, Chong-In

    2010-06-01

    This paper is focused on application submerged arc welding process, which offers many advantages compared to conventional CO2 welding process, for thin plate in ship structure. For this purpose, optimized welding conditions are determined according to combination of wire & flux, relationship between welding parameters, bead shapes and mechanical tests such as tensile, bend and hardness. Also finite element(FE) based numerical simulation of thermal history and welding residual stress in welded joint of A-grade 3.2 thickness steel has been checked to qualitative tendency in this paper. In conclusion our company applied to this method in work piece and it was no problem. From the result of this study, it makes substantial saving of time and manufacturing cost and raises the welding quality of product.

  1. Taguchi Optimization of Pulsed Current GTA Welding Parameters for Improved Corrosion Resistance of 5083 Aluminum Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastkerdar, E.; Shamanian, M.; Saatchi, A.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the Taguchi method was used as a design of experiment (DOE) technique to optimize the pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) parameters for improved pitting corrosion resistance of AA5083-H18 aluminum alloy welds. A L9 (34) orthogonal array of the Taguchi design was used, which involves nine experiments for four parameters: peak current ( P), base current ( B), percent pulse-on time ( T), and pulse frequency ( F) with three levels was used. Pitting corrosion resistance in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution was evaluated by anodic polarization tests at room temperature and calculating the width of the passive region (∆ E pit). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed on the measured data and S/ N (signal to noise) ratios. The "bigger is better" was selected as the quality characteristic (QC). The optimum conditions were found as 170 A, 85 A, 40%, and 6 Hz for P, B, T, and F factors, respectively. The study showed that the percent pulse-on time has the highest influence on the pitting corrosion resistance (50.48%) followed by pulse frequency (28.62%), peak current (11.05%) and base current (9.86%). The range of optimum ∆ E pit at optimum conditions with a confidence level of 90% was predicted to be between 174.81 and 177.74 mVSCE. Under optimum conditions, the confirmation test was carried out, and the experimental value of ∆ E pit of 176 mVSCE was in agreement with the predicted value from the Taguchi model. In this regard, the model can be effectively used to predict the ∆ E pit of pulsed current gas tungsten arc welded joints.

  2. Is electric arc welding linked to manganism or Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    McMillan, Grant

    2005-01-01

    Manganese and its inorganic compounds are widely used in many industries and have been accepted as occupational neurotoxins that have caused a distinct and disabling clinical entity, manganism, in several types of work, notably where exposure is by way of dust. There is inconclusive and inconsistent evidence that, in these occupations, subclinical neurological effects, detectable only by neurobehavioural studies, may be caused by low doses. This has prompted a re-evaluation of occupational exposure limits. Some countries, including the UK, already demand much higher levels of protection against exposure than 5 years ago. Welding is the most common source of occupational exposure as manganese is an essential component of steel and so its compounds are inevitable components of fume emitted from steel welding processes. There it is found in respirable particles, often as complex oxides (spinels), sometimes within a core protected by a silicon oxide shell - as distinct from the much simpler form of particle formed by disintegration in processes such as mining and ore milling where manganism has been diagnosed convincingly. Millions of workers are at risk of exposure to manganese-containing compounds in fumes from electric arc welding of steel. In recent years it has been asserted that neurological and neurobehavioural disorders may develop consequent to exposure to steel welding fumes and that employment as a welder is associated with the unusually early onset of Parkinson's disease. Causal relationships have been postulated. Welders have been recorded as having been exposed to high levels of manganese-containing fume, especially where they have worked in confined, unventilated spaces, although this appears from limited data to be the exception rather than the rule. Even then the dose received is generally less than in mining or ore crushing. When care is taken to exclude exposures from hardfacing and burning and cutting arc processes, where manganese may form a high

  3. The Application of Robotic ARC Welding to Shipbuilding.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    welding manhours), pipe welding (18-23 percent), burning (18-15 percent...diminish [11]. 3.3.5. Outfitting -. The primary application of welding to the outfit of a ship is pipe welding . The majority of welding occurs during its...surrounding the pipe to be joined with a GNMAW weld head. For small pipe diameters (6 inches and below), lightweight, hand-held systems 9. are available.

  4. The effect of impurity gasses on variable polarity plasma arc welded 2219 aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclure, John C.; Torres, Martin R.; Gurevitch, Alan C.; Newman, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding has been used with considerable success by NASA for the welds on the Space Shuttle External Tank as well as by others concerned with high quality welded structures. The effects of gaseous contaminants on the appearance of VPPA welds on 2219 aluminum are examined so that a welder can recognize that such contamination is present and take corrective measures. There are many possible sources of such contamination including, contaminated gas bottles, leaks in the gas plumbing, inadequate shield gas flow, condensed moisture in the gas lines or torch body, or excessive contaminants on the workpiece. The gasses chosen for study in the program were nitrogen, oxygen, methane, and hydrogen. Welds were made in a carefully controlled environment and comparisons were made between welds with various levels of these contaminants and welds made with research purity (99.9999 percent) gasses. Photographs of the weld front and backside as well as polished and etched cross sections are presented.

  5. The Study of Complex (Ti, Zr, Cs) Nanopowder Influencing the Effective Ionization Potential of Arc Discharge When Mma Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapozhkov, S. B.; Burakova, E. M.

    2016-08-01

    Strength is one of the most important characteristics of a weld joint. Mechanical properties of a weld metal can be improved in a variety of ways. One of the possibilities is to add a nanopowder to the weld metal. Authors of the paper suggest changing the production process of MMA welding electrodes via adding nanopowder Ti, Zr, Cs to electrode components through liquid glass. Theoretical research into the nanopowder influence on the effective ionization potential (Ueff) of welding arc discharge is also necessitated. These measures support arcing stability, improve strength of a weld joint, as the consequence, ensure quality enhancing of a weld joint and the structure on the whole.

  6. Arc Welding-Pipe, 3-25. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This instructor guide and text for a secondary-postsecondary level course in arc welding-pipe comprise one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. Purpose of the course is to teach students to weld 5-inch mild steel schedule 80 pipe,…

  7. The Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding Process: Its Application to the Space Shuttle External Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Bayless, E. O., Jr.; Wilson, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes progress in the implementation of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process at the External Tank (ET) assembly facility. Design allowable data has been developed for thicknesses up to 1.00 in. More than 24,000 in. of welding on liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen cylinders has been made without an internal defect.

  8. Description and Preliminary Training Evaluation of an Arc Welding Simulator. Research Report SRR 73-23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Macy L.; And Others

    A prototype arc welding training simulator was designed to provide immediate, discriminative feedback and the capacity for concentrated practice. Two randomly selected groups of welding trainees were compared to evaluate the simulator, one group being trained using the simulator and the other using conventional practice. Preliminary data indicated…

  9. Determinants of occupational exposure to metals by gas metal arc welding and risk management measures: a biomonitoring study.

    PubMed

    Persoons, Renaud; Arnoux, Damien; Monssu, Théodora; Culié, Olivier; Roche, Gaëlle; Duffaud, Béatrice; Chalaye, Denis; Maitre, Anne

    2014-12-01

    Welding fumes contain various toxic metals including chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni) and manganese (Mn). An assessment of the risk to health of local and systemic exposure to welding fumes requires the assessment of both external and internal doses. The aims of this study were to test the relevance in small and medium sized enterprises of a biomonitoring strategy based on urine spot-samples, to characterize the factors influencing the internal doses of metals in gas metal arc welders and to recommend effective risk management measures. 137 welders were recruited and urinary levels of metals were measured by ICP-MS on post-shift samples collected at the end of the working week. Cr, Ni and Mn mean concentrations (respectively 0.43, 1.69 and 0.27 μg/g creatinine) were well below occupational health guidance values, but still higher than background levels observed in the general population, confirming the absorption of metals generated in welding fumes. Both welding parameters (nature of base metal, welding technique) and working conditions (confinement, welding and grinding durations, mechanical ventilation and welding experience) were predictive of occupational exposure. Our results confirm the interest of biomonitoring for assessing health risks and recommending risk management measures for welders.

  10. [Arc spectrum diagnostic and heat coupling mechanism analysis of double wire pulsed MIG welding].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-qiang; Li, Huan; Yang, Li-jun; Zheng, Kai; Gao, Ying

    2015-01-01

    A double wire pulsed MIG welding test system was built in the present paper, in order to analyze the heat-coupling mechanism of double wire pulsed MIG welding, and study are temperature field. Spectroscopic technique was used in diagnostic analysis of the are, plasma radiation was collected by using hollow probe method to obtain the arc plasma optical signal The electron temperature of double wire pulsed MIG welding arc plasma was calculated by using Boltzmann diagram method, the electron temperature distribution was obtained, a comprehensive analysis of the arc was conducted combined with the high speed camera technology and acquisition means of electricity signal. The innovation of this paper is the combination of high-speed camera image information of are and optical signal of arc plasma to analyze the coupling mechanism for dual arc, and a more intuitive analysis for are temperature field was conducted. The test results showed that a push-pull output was achieved and droplet transfer mode was a drop in a pulse in the welding process; Two arcs attracted each other under the action of a magnetic field, and shifted to the center of the arc in welding process, so a new heat center was formed at the geometric center of the double arc, and flowing up phenomenon occurred on the arc; Dual arc electronic temperature showed an inverted V-shaped distribution overall, and at the geometric center of the double arc, the arc electron temperature at 3 mm off the workpiece surface was the highest, which was 16,887.66 K, about 4,900 K higher than the lowest temperature 11,963.63 K.

  11. Multi-objective optimization of weld geometry in hybrid fiber laser-arc butt welding using Kriging model and NSGA-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhongmei; Shao, Xinyu; Jiang, Ping; Wang, Chunming; Zhou, Qi; Cao, Longchao; Wang, Yilin

    2016-06-01

    An integrated multi-objective optimization approach combining Kriging model and non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm-II (NSGA-II) is proposed to predict and optimize weld geometry in hybrid fiber laser-arc welding on 316L stainless steel in this paper. A four-factor, five-level experiment using Taguchi L25 orthogonal array is conducted considering laser power ( P), welding current ( I), distance between laser and arc ( D) and traveling speed ( V). Kriging models are adopted to approximate the relationship between process parameters and weld geometry, namely depth of penetration (DP), bead width (BW) and bead reinforcement (BR). NSGA-II is used for multi-objective optimization taking the constructed Kriging models as objective functions and generates a set of optimal solutions with pareto-optimal front for outputs. Meanwhile, the main effects and the first-order interactions between process parameters are analyzed. Microstructure is also discussed. Verification experiments demonstrate that the optimum values obtained by the proposed integrated Kriging model and NSGA-II approach are in good agreement with experimental results.

  12. ARC+(Registered Trademark) and ARC PC Welding Simulators: Teach Welders with Virtual Interactive 3D Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choquet, Claude

    2011-01-01

    123 Certification Inc., a Montreal based company, has developed an innovative hands-on welding simulator solution to help build the welding workforce in the most simple way. The solution lies in virtual reality technology, which has been fully tested since the early 90's. President and founder of 123 Certification Inc., Mr. Claude Choquet Ing. Msc. IWE. acts as a bridge between the welding and the programming world. Working in these fields for more than 20 years. he has filed 12 patents world-wide for a gesture control platform with leading edge hardware related to simulation. In the summer of 2006. Mr Choquet was proud to be invited to the annual IIW International Weld ing Congress in Quebec City to launch the ARC+ welding simulator. A 100% virtual reality system and web based training center was developed to simulate multi process. multi-materiaL multi-position and multi pass welding. The simulator is intended to train welding students and apprentices in schools or industries. The welding simulator is composed of a real welding e[eetrode holder (SMAW-GTAW) and gun (GMAW-FCAW). a head mounted display (HMD), a 6 degrees of freedom tracking system for interaction between the user's hands and head. as well as external audio speakers. Both guns and HMD are interacting online and simultaneously. The welding simulation is based on the law of physics and empirical results from detailed analysis of a series of welding tests based on industrial applications tested over the last 20 years. The simulation runs in real-time, using a local logic network to determine the quality and shape of the created weld. These results are based on the orientation distance. and speed of the welding torch and depth of penetration. The welding process and resulting weld bc.1d are displayed in a virtual environment with screenplay interactive training modules. For review. weld quality and recorded process values can be displayed and diagnosed after welding. To help in the le.tming process, a

  13. Characteristics and performance of the variable polarity plasma arc welding process used in the Space Shuttle external tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Lee, C. C.; Liu, J. W.

    1990-01-01

    Significant advantages of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process include faster welding, fewer repairs, less joint preparation, reduced weldment distortion, and absence of porosity. Flow profiles and power distribution of argon plasma gas as a working fluid to produce plasma arc jet in the VPPA welding process was analyzed. Major loss of heat transfer for flow through the nozzle is convective heat transfer; for the plasma jet flow between the outlet of the nozzle and workpiece is radiative heat transfer; and for the flow through the keyhole of the workpiece is convective heat transfer. The majority of the power absorbed by the keyhole of the workpiece is used for melting the solid metal workpiece into a molten metallic puddle. The crown and root widths and the crown and root heights can be predicted. An algorithm for promoting automatic control of flow parameters and the dimensions of the final product of the welding specification to be used for the VPPA Welding System operated at MSFC are provided.

  14. Hazard of ultraviolet radiation emitted in gas tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Utsunomiya, Akihiro; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) emitted during arc welding frequently causes keratoconjunctivitis and erythema. The extent of the hazard of UVR varies depending on the welding method and conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the levels of UVR that are present under various conditions. In this study, we experimentally evaluated the hazard of UVR emitted in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of aluminum alloys. The degree of hazard of UVR is measured by the effective irradiance defined in the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists guidelines. The effective irradiances measured in this study are in the range 0.10-0.91 mW/cm(2) at a distance of 500 mm from the welding arc. The maximum allowable exposure times corresponding to these levels are only 3.3-33 s/day. This demonstrates that unprotected exposure to UVR emitted by GTAW of aluminum alloys is quite hazardous in practice. In addition, we found the following properties of the hazard of UVR. (1) It is more hazardous at higher welding currents than at lower welding currents. (2) It is more hazardous when magnesium is included in the welding materials than when it is not. (3) The hazard depends on the direction of emission from the arc.

  15. Hazard of ultraviolet radiation emitted in gas tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    PubMed Central

    NAKASHIMA, Hitoshi; UTSUNOMIYA, Akihiro; FUJII, Nobuyuki; OKUNO, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) emitted during arc welding frequently causes keratoconjunctivitis and erythema. The extent of the hazard of UVR varies depending on the welding method and conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the levels of UVR that are present under various conditions. In this study, we experimentally evaluated the hazard of UVR emitted in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of aluminum alloys. The degree of hazard of UVR is measured by the effective irradiance defined in the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists guidelines. The effective irradiances measured in this study are in the range 0.10–0.91 mW/cm2 at a distance of 500 mm from the welding arc. The maximum allowable exposure times corresponding to these levels are only 3.3–33 s/day. This demonstrates that unprotected exposure to UVR emitted by GTAW of aluminum alloys is quite hazardous in practice. In addition, we found the following properties of the hazard of UVR. (1) It is more hazardous at higher welding currents than at lower welding currents. (2) It is more hazardous when magnesium is included in the welding materials than when it is not. (3) The hazard depends on the direction of emission from the arc. PMID:26632121

  16. Laser-Arc Hybrid Welding of Dissimilar Titanium Alloy and Stainless Steel Using Copper Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ming; Chen, Cong; Wang, Lei; Wang, Zemin; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2015-05-01

    Laser-arc hybrid welding with Cu3Si filler wire was employed to join dissimilar Ti6Al4V titanium alloy and AISI316 stainless steel (316SS). The effects of welding parameters on bead shape, microstructure, mechanical properties, and fracture behavior were investigated in detail. The results show that cross-weld tensile strength of the joints is up to 212 MPa. In the joint, obvious nonuniformity of the microstructure is found in the fusion zone (FZ) and at the interfaces from the top to the bottom, which could be improved by increasing heat input. For the homogeneous joint, the FZ is characterized by Fe67- x Si x Ti33 dendrites spreading on α-Cu matrix, and the two interfaces of 316SS/FZ and FZ/Ti6Al4V are characterized by a bamboo-like 316SS layer and a CuTi2 layer, respectively. All the tensile samples fractured in the hardest CuTi2 layer at Ti6Al4V side of the joints. The fracture surface is characterized by river pattern revealing brittle cleavage fracture. The bead formation mechanisms were discussed according to the melt flow and the thermodynamic calculation.

  17. Evaluation Of Four Welding Arc Processes Applied To 6061 Aluminium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, A.; Paillard, P.; Baudin, T.; Jobez, S.; Castagne, J.-F.

    2011-01-17

    At a time when greenhouse gas emissions must be reduced, the use of the aluminium alloys is expanding, in particular in the transportation industry. In order to extend the possibilities of aluminium assembly design, new Metal Inert Gas (MIG) welding processes have been conceived. They work at lower temperatures than usual arc processes (classic MIG or Tungsten Inert Gas). This study compares four arc welding processes, applied to the 6061 aluminium alloy. These four weld processes have been studied through the metallurgical analysis of the weld beads. Metallography, micro-hardness testings, X Ray radiography have been carried out on the produced weld beads. The processes are classified according to the quality of the beads like geometry of beads, size of the heat affected zone and presence of defects.

  18. Effect of welding parameters on high-power diode laser welding on thin sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salminen, Antti; Jansson, Anssi; Kujanpaa, Veli

    2003-06-01

    High power diode laser (HPDL) is the newest laser tool for industrial manufacturing. The most promising areas of application of HPDL are thin sheet welding and hardening. The HPDL has several advantages and disadvantages compared to lasers CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers currently used for welding. There is quite a few industrial applications in which diode laser is the most suitable laser. A typical industrial installation consists of a HPDL, an industrial robot, work piece manipulation and safety enclosures. The HPDL welding process is at this moment conduction limited and has therefore different parameters than the keyhole welding. In this study the basic HPDL welding parameters and the effect of the parameters on the welding process, weld quality and efficiency are examined. Joint types tested are butt joint and fillet lap joint. The parameters tested are beam intensity, welding speed, spot size, beam impingement angle. The materials tested are common carbon steel and stainless steel. By the experiments carried out it can be seen that all of these parameters have an effect on the weld quality and the absorption of the laser power during welding. The higher the beam intensity is the shorter also the throughput time is. However, in case of fillet joint the maximum welding speed and best visual out look are achieved with totally different set of parameters. Based on these experiments it can, however, be seen that reliable welding parameters can be established for the welding of various industrial products. The beam quality of the diode laser is not optimum for high speed keyhole welding but it is a flexible tool to be used for different joint types.

  19. A self-organizing fuzzy control approach to arc sensor for weld joint tracking in gas metal arc welding of butt joints

    SciTech Connect

    Na, S.J. ); Kim, J.W.

    1993-02-01

    For the artificial intelligence (AI) approach to automatic control, the fuzzy rule-based control schemes have been successfully applied to the control of complex processes. The arc welding process is one of the processes due to the fact that it possesses complex and nonlinear characteristics such as a moving distributed heat source, a current path and metal transfer. One possible solution to the design of an effective controller suitable for such a process is to use the fuzzy control scheme. The fuzzy rule-based control can easily realize the heuristic rules obtained from human experiences that cannot be expressed in mathematical form. In this study, an arc sensor, which utilizes the electrical signal obtained from the welding arc itself, was developed for CO[sub 2] gas metal arc welding of butt joints using the fuzzy set theory. A simple fuzzy controller without any adaptation was implemented for the weld joint tracking. A set of fixed rules, which was designed based upon the experiments, and a self-organizing fuzzy controller, which could improve the control rules automatically, were examined. Through a series of experiments, the performance and learning action of the proposed self-organizing fuzzy controller were assessed.

  20. Effect of parameters in diode laser welding of steel sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujanpaeae, Veli; Maaranen, Petteri; Kostamo, Tapio

    2003-03-01

    Austenitic stainless steel sheets and ordinary cold-rolled carbon steel sheets with variable thickness were welded with 1 kW diode laser. Different weld joints were utilized. The optimal parameters for each case were determined. The joints were examined by metallography and mechanical testing. The results show that diode laser is an optimal tool for sheet metal welding, when a considerable narrow weld is aimed. The edges prepared by mechanical sheering are acceptable as the joint preparation. The tensile strength and ductility of all the joints were acceptable and on the same level or better than that of base metal. The shielding gas seems to play a much higher role than in conventional laser welding (CO2 or Nd:YAG laser welding). When using the non-oxidizing shielding gas (nitrogen or argon), the welding speed to be reached is much slower than when welding without any shielding gas. This is probably due to the increase of absorption by oxygen.

  1. Preventing Oxidation Near Gas/Tungsten-Arc Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, K. J.

    1987-01-01

    Auxiliary argon jets create more nearly complete nonoxidizing atmosphere. Pyramid-shaped cup directs stream of additional argon over weld. Gas supplements provided by automatic welding machine so oxidation more completely suppressed.

  2. Interfacial microstructure and properties of copper clad steel produced using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z.; Chen, Y.; Haghshenas, M.; Nguyen, T.; Galloway, J.; Gerlich, A.P.

    2015-06-15

    A preliminary study compares the feasibility and microstructures of pure copper claddings produced on a pressure vessel A516 Gr. 70 steel plate, using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding. A combination of optical and scanning electron microscopy is used to characterize the grain structures in both the copper cladding and heat affected zone in the steel near the fusion line. The friction stir welding technique produces copper cladding with a grain size of around 25 μm, and no evidence of liquid copper penetration into the steel. The gas metal arc welding of copper cladding exhibits grain sizes over 1 mm, and with surface microcracks as well as penetration of liquid copper up to 50 μm into the steel substrate. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that metallurgical bonding is produced in both processes. Increased diffusion of Mn and Si into the copper cladding occurs when using gas metal arc welding, although some nano-pores were detected in the FSW joint interface. - Highlights: • Cladding of steel with pure copper is possible using either FSW or GMAW. • The FSW yielded a finer grain structure in the copper, with no evidence of cracking. • The FSW joint contains some evidence of nano-pores at the interface of the steel/copper. • Copper cladding by GMAW contained surface cracks attributed to high thermal stresses. • The steel adjacent to the fusion line maintained a hardness value below 248 HV.

  3. On-line quality monitoring in short-circuit gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Adolfsson, S. |; Bolmsjoe, G.; Claesson, I.

    1999-02-01

    This paper addresses the problems involved in the automatic monitoring of the weld quality produced by robotized short-arc welding. A simple statistical change detection algorithm for the weld quality, the repeated Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT), was used. The algorithm may similarly be viewed as a cumulative sum (CUSUM) type test, and is well-suited to detecting sudden minor changes in the monitored test statistic. The test statistic is based on the variance of the weld voltage, wherein it will be shown that the variance decreases when the welding process is not operating under optimal conditions. The performance of the algorithm is assessed through the use of experimental data. The results obtained from the algorithm show that it is possible to detect changes in weld quality automatically and on-line.

  4. Development of an improved GTA (gas tungsten arc) weld temperature monitor fixture

    SciTech Connect

    Hollar, D.L.

    1990-05-01

    An initial design weld temperature control fixture was implemented into final closure of an electronic assembly in November 1986. Use of this fixture indicated several areas that could be improved. Review of these areas with the process engineer and the weld operator provided the ideas to be incorporated into the new design Phase 2 fixture. Some primary areas of change and improvement included fixture mobility to provide better accessibility to the weld joint area, automatic timed blow cooling of the weld joint, and a feature to assure proper thermocouple placement. The resulting Phase 2 fixture design provided all of the essential weld temperature monitoring features in addition to several significant improvements. Technology developed during this project will pave the way to similar process monitoring of other manual gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding applications. 9 figs.

  5. Underwater wet flux-cored arc welding development of stainless steel and nickel-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Findlan, S.J.; Frederick, G.J.

    1995-12-31

    The inaccessibility and high radiation fields of components in the lower two thirds of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) has generated the need for an automated underwater wet welding process to address repair applications. Mechanical methods presently employed for this type of repair application produce crevices, which promote concerns of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC), crevice corrosion and pitting. To address these concerns, the EPRI Repair and Replacement Applications Center (RRAC) has developed underwater wet flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) technology for the welding of stainless steel and nickel based materials. The benefits of underwater wet welding include: (1) provides a permanent repair; (2) offers crevice-five conditions; (3) reduces future inspection requirements (4) eliminates the potential for ``loose parts`` (5) can be performed in a timely approach. Underwater wet shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) has been successfully used to repair components in radiation areas of the upper section of the RPV, although this process is a manual operation and is impractical for remote applications. The developmental work at the EPRI RRAC is directed towards remote repair applications of nickel-based and stainless steel components, which are inaccessible with normal manual repair techniques, e.g., access hole covers. The flux-cored arc welding process (FCAW) was considered a viable option for underwater development, due to the ease of automation, out of position welding proficiency and self-shielding capabilities.

  6. Hybrid Laser-arc Welding of 17-4 PH Martensitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Ma, Junjie; Atabaki, Mehdi Mazar; Pillai, Raju; Kumar, Biju; Vasudevan, Unnikrishnan; Sreshta, Harold; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2015-06-01

    17-4 PH stainless steel has wide applications in severe working conditions due to its combination of good corrosion resistance and high strength. The weldability of 17-4 PH stainless steel is challenging. In this work, hybrid laser-arc welding was developed to weld 17-4 PH stainless steel. This method was chosen based on its advantages, such as deep weld penetration, less filler materials, and high welding speed. The 17-4 PH stainless steel plates with a thickness of 19 mm were successfully welded in a single pass. During the hybrid welding, the 17-4 PH stainless steel was immensely susceptible to porosity and solidification cracking. The porosity was avoided by using nitrogen as the shielding gas. The nitrogen stabilized the keyhole and inhibited the formation of bubbles during welding. Solidification cracking easily occurred along the weld centerline at the root of the hybrid laser-arc welds. The microstructural evolution and the cracking susceptibility of 17-4 PH stainless steel were investigated to remove these centerline cracks. The results showed that the solidification mode of the material changed due to high cooling rate at the root of the weld. The rapid cooling rate caused the transformation from ferrite to austenite during the solidification stage. The solidification cracking was likely formed as a result of this cracking-susceptible microstructure and a high depth/width ratio that led to a high tensile stress concentration. Furthermore, the solidification cracking was prevented by preheating the base metal. It was found that the preheating slowed the cooling rate at the root of the weld, and the ferrite-to-austenite transformation during the solidification stage was suppressed. Delta ferrite formation was observed in the weld bead as well no solidification cracking occurred by optimizing the preheating temperature.

  7. OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY (OSU) TRAINING RESEARCH ISOTOPE GENERAL ATOMICS (TRIGA) OVERPACK CLOSURE WELDING PROCESS PARAMETER DEVELOPMENT & QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    CANNELL, G.R.

    2006-09-11

    Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) from the Oregon State University (OSU) TRIGA{reg_sign} Reactor is currently being stored in thirteen 55-gallon drums at the Hanford Site's low-level burial grounds. This fuel is soon to be retrieved from buried storage and packaged into new containers (overpacks) for interim storage at the Hanford Interim Storage Area (ISA). One of the key activities associated with this effort is final closure of the overpack by welding. The OSU fuel is placed into an overpack, a head inserted into the overpack top, and welded closed. Weld quality, for typical welded fabrication, is established through post-weld testing and nondestructive examination (NDE); however, in this case, once the SNF is placed into the overpack, routine testing and NDE are not feasible. An alternate approach is to develop and qualify the welding process/parameters, demonstrate beforehand that they produce the desired weld quality, and then verify parameter compliance during production welding. Fluor engineers have developed a Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) technique and parameters, demonstrating that weld quality requirements for closure of packaged SNF overpacks are met, using this alternate approach. The following reviews the activities performed for this development and qualification effort.

  8. Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder-Metallurgy-Produced Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muth, T. R.; Yamamoto, Y.; Frederick, D. A.; Contescu, C. I.; Chen, W.; Lim, Y. C.; Peter, W. H.; Feng, Z.

    2013-05-01

    An investigation was undertaken using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas-forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap, where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal and minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders are critical for achieving equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

  9. Hazard of ultraviolet radiation emitted in gas metal arc welding of mild steel

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hitoshi; Utsunomiya, Akihiro; Takahashi, Jyunya; Fujii, Nobuyuki; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) emitted during arc welding frequently causes keratoconjunctivitis and erythema in the workplace. The degree of hazard from UVR exposure depends on the welding method and conditions. Therefore, it is important to identify the UVR levels present under various conditions. Methods: We experimentally evaluated the UVR levels emitted in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of mild steel. We used both a pulsed welding current and a non-pulsed welding current. The shielding gases were 80% Ar + 20% CO2 and 100% CO2. The effective irradiance defined in the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists guidelines was used to quantify the UVR hazard. Results: The effective irradiance measured in this study was in the range of 0.51-12.9 mW/cm2 at a distance of 500 mm from the arc. The maximum allowable exposure times at these levels are only 0.23-5.9 s/day. Conclusions: The following conclusions were made regarding the degree of hazard from UVR exposure during the GMAW of mild steel: (1) It is more hazardous at higher welding currents than at lower welding currents. (2) At higher welding currents, it is more hazardous when 80% Ar + 20% CO2 is used as a shielding gas than when 100% CO2 is used. (3) It is more hazardous for pulsed welding currents than for non-pulsed welding currents. (4) It appears to be very hazardous when metal transfer is the spray type. This study demonstrates that unprotected exposure to UVR emitted by the GMAW of mild steel is quite hazardous. PMID:27488036

  10. Examination of the physical processes associated with the keyhole region of variable polarity plasma arc welds in aluminum alloy 2219

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Daniel W.

    1987-01-01

    The morphology and properties of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld composite zone are intimately related to the physical processes associated with the keyhole. This study examined the effects of oxide, halide, and sulfate additions to the weld plate on the keyhole and the weld pool. Changes in both the arc plasma character and the bead morphology were correlated to the chemical environment of the weld. Pool behavior was observed by adding flow markers to actual VPPA welds. A low temperature analog to the welding process was developed. The results of the study indicate that oxygen, even at low partial pressures, can disrupt the stable keyhole and weld pool. The results also indicate that the Marangoni surface tension driven flows dominate the weld pool over the range of welding currents studied.

  11. Achieving High Strength Joint of Pure Copper Via Laser-Cold Metal Transfer Arc Hybrid Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yulong; Chen, Cong; Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-06-01

    Fiber laser-cold metal transfer arc hybrid welding of pure copper was studied. Weld porosity was tested by X-ray nondestructive testing. Microstructure and fracture features were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were evaluated by cross weld tensile test. Full penetrated and continuous welds were obtained by hybrid welding once the laser power reached 2 kW, while they could not be obtained by laser welding alone, even though the laser power reached 5 kW. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS), the yield strength (YS), and the elongation of the best hybrid weld material were up to 227, 201 MPa, and 21.5 pct, respectively. The joint efficiencies in UTS and YS of hybrid weld were up to 84 and 80 pct of the BM, respectively. The fracture location changes from the fusion zone to the heat-affected zone with the increase of laser power. Besides, the mechanisms of process stability and porosity suppression were clarified by laser-arc interaction and pool behavior. The strengthening mechanism was discussed by microstructure characteristics.

  12. Effects of Welding Parameters Onto Keyhole Geometry for Partial Penetration Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vänskä, M.; Abt, F.; Weber, R.; Salminen, A.; Graf, T.

    The material and parameters like welding speed and laser beam parameters define the geometry of the keyhole. The keyhole geometry affects the weld geometry, such as width and depth, and in some cases it should be considered when selecting welding parameters. In-situ X-ray videography makes it possible to obtain time-and space resolved information about the keyhole geometry during the welding process. This paper describes the partial penetration laser welding experiments and shows the effects of a welding speed and a focal point position change onto some geometry values of the keyhole. Two different joint types were used, bead on plate to simulate a very good machined joint preparation and laser cut I-butt joint.

  13. TRXRD observations of microstructural evolution in self-shielded flux cored arc weld deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, S S; Elmer, J W; David, S A; Quintana, M

    2000-06-28

    Inclusion formation and microstructure development in self-shielded flux cored arc welds has been investigated before [1,2]. Results showed that the liquid metal reactions could promote either Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or AlN formation depending upon the aluminum concentration in the weld metal. The residual aluminum that remained in solution was found to modify the solidification behavior of liquid to {delta}-ferrite and subsequent transformation of {delta}-ferrite to austenite during weld cooling. In this work, the microstructure evolution in the heat-affected-zone (HAZ) of self-shielded flux cored arc weld (FCAW-S) overlays were investigated using in-situ Time-Resolved X-ray Diffraction (TRXRD) with a high flux Synchrotron radiation beam [3, 4].

  14. The importance of spatter formed in shielded metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Molleda, F. Mora, J.; Molleda, J.R.; Mora, E.; Mellor, B.G.

    2007-10-15

    Spatter results when droplets of liquid metal that have been ejected from the weld pool by the impact of small droplets from the covered electrode solidify and weld to the surface of the base material. The present paper studies spatter and reveals why these small droplets do not oxidise during their short trajectory and accounts for why they arrive with sufficient heat to weld to the adjacent base material. Welds were thus performed on mild steel using covered electrodes (rutile type) to obtain spatter on the adjacent base material. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray mapping were used to study the above mentioned phenomena.

  15. Effect of process parameters on temperature distribution in twin-electrode TIG coupling arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangjun; Xiong, Jun; Gao, Hongming; Wu, Lin

    2012-10-01

    The twin-electrode TIG coupling arc is a new type of welding heat source, which is generated in a single welding torch that has two tungsten electrodes insulated from each other. This paper aims at determining the distribution of temperature for the coupling arc using the Fowler-Milne method under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium. The influences of welding current, arc length, and distance between both electrode tips on temperature distribution of the coupling arc were analyzed. Based on the results, a better understanding of the twin-electrode TIG welding process was obtained.

  16. A theoretical study of the influence of technological friction stir welding parameters on weld structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafurov, Sergey; Shilko, Evgeny; Kolubaev, Evgeny; Psakhie, Sergey

    2015-10-01

    Computer simulation by the movable cellular automaton method was performed to study the dynamics of friction stir welding of duralumin plates. It was shown that the ratio of the rotation rate to the translational velocity of the rotating tool has a great influence on the quality of the welded joint. A suitably chosen ratio of these parameters combined with an additional ultrasonic impact reduces considerably the porosity and the amount of microcracks in the weld.

  17. Narrow groove gas tungsten arc welding of ASTM A508 Class 4 steel for improved toughness properties

    SciTech Connect

    Penik, M.A. Jr.

    1997-04-01

    Welding of heavy section steel has traditionally used the automatic submerged arc welding (ASAW) process because of the high deposition rates achievable. However, the properties, particularly fracture toughness, of the weld are often inferior when compared to base material. This project evaluated the use of narrow groove gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) to improve weld material properties. The welding procedures were developed for ASTM A508 Class 4 base material using a 1% Ni filler material complying to AWS Specification A.23-90-EF3-F3-N. A narrow groove joint preparation was used in conjunction with the GTAW process so competitive fabrication rates could be achieved when compared to the ASAW process. Weld procedures were developed to refine weld substructure to achieve better mechanical properties. Two heaters of weld wire were used to examine the effects of minor filler metal chemistry differences on weld mechanical properties. Extensive metallographic evaluations showed excellent weld quality with a refined microstructure. Chemical analysis of the weld metal showed minimal weld dilution by the base metal. Mechanical testing included bend and tensile tests to ensure weld quality and strength. A Charpy impact energy curve versus temperature and fracture toughness curve versus temperature were developed for each weld wire heat. Results of fracture toughness and Charpy impact testing indicated an improved transition temperature closer to that of the base material properties.

  18. The temporal nature of forces acting on metal drops in gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.A.; Eagar, T.W.; Lang, J.H.

    1996-12-31

    At moderate and high welding currents, the most important forces in gas metal arc welding acting on the molten electrode are magnetic forces arising from the interaction between the welding current and its own magnetic field. These forces drive the dynamic evolution of the drop and also depend on the instantaneous shape of the drop. In this paper, experimentally observed manifestations of magnetic forces are shown, and a technique for approximating the temporal evolution of these forces from experimentally measured drop shapes is reported. The technique provides quantitative data illustrating the large increase in the magnetic forces as a drop detaches from the electrode.

  19. Effect of preheat on residual stress distributions in arc-welded mild steel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Adedayo, S.M.; Adeyemi, M.B.

    2000-02-01

    Residual stress distribution in the longitudinal and transverse directions on a 6-mm-thick arc-welded mild steel plate was experimentally examined with and without initial preheat. Stress measurements were completed by monitoring strain changes on mounted strain gauges resulting from successive milling of the welded plate specimens. Machining stresses were also compensated for by carrying out measurements of strain changes due to milling operation of a stress-free unwelded annealed mild steel plate. High tensile residual stresses exist close to the weld line in both longitudinal and transverse stresses. Maximum longitudinal residual stress values existing close to the weld line are reduced (between 50 and 75%) due to the effect of initial metal preheat of 200 C of the welded steel plate.

  20. Surface preparation effects on GTA (gas tungsten arc) weld penetration in JBK-75 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.D.; Heiple, C.R.; Sturgill, P.L.; Robertson, A.M.; Jamsay, R.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a study are reported here on the effects of surface preparation on the shape of GTA welds on JBK-75, an austenitic precipitation hardenable stainless steel similar to A286. Minor changes in surface (weld groove) preparation produced substantial changes in the penetration characteristics and welding behavior of this alloy. Increased and more consistent weld penetration (higher d/w ratios) along with improved arc stability and less arc wander result from wire brushing and other abrasive surface preparations, although chemical and machining methods did not produce any improvement in penetration. Abrasive treatments roughen the surface, increase the surface area, and increase the surface oxide thickness. The increased weld d/w ratio is attributed to oxygen added to the weld pool from the surface oxide on the base metal. The added oxygen alters the surface-tension driven fluid flow pattern in the weld pool. Similar results were observed with changes in filler wire surface oxide thickness, caused by changes in wire production conditions. 15 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Specifics of Pulsed Arc Welding Power Supply Performance Based On A Transistor Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krampit, N. Yu; Kust, T. S.; Krampit, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Specifics of designing a pulsed arc welding power supply device are presented in the paper. Electronic components for managing large current was analyzed. Strengths and shortcomings of power supply circuits based on thyristor, bipolar transistor and MOSFET are outlined. As a base unit for pulsed arc welding was chosen MOSFET transistor, which is easy to manage. Measures to protect a transistor are given. As for the transistor control device is a microcontroller Arduino which has a low cost and adequate performance of the work. Bead transfer principle is to change the voltage on the arc in the formation of beads on the wire end. Microcontroller controls transistor when the arc voltage reaches the threshold voltage. Thus there is a separation and transfer of beads without splashing. Control strategies tested on a real device and presented. The error in the operation of the device is less than 25 us, it can be used controlling drop transfer at high frequencies (up to 1300 Hz).

  2. Unraveling the Processing Parameters in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is translated along a weld seam, literally stirring the edges of the seam together. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path or paths is required. In this study, various markers are used to trace the flow paths of the metal. X-ray radiographs record the segmentation and position of the wire. Several variations in the trajectories can be differentiated within the weld zone.

  3. In-Situ Phase Mapping and Direct Observations of Phase Transformations During Arc Welding of 1045 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J; Palmer, T

    2005-09-13

    In-situ Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) experiments were performed during gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of AISI 1045 C-Mn steel. Ferrite ({alpha}) and austenite ({gamma}) phases were identified and quantified in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) from the real time x-ray diffraction data. The results were compiled along with weld temperatures calculated using a coupled thermal fluids weld model to create a phase map of the HAZ. This map shows the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} transformation taking place during weld heating and the reverse {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation taking place during weld cooling. Superheating is required to complete the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation, and the amount of superheat above the A3 temperature was shown to vary with distance from the centerline of the weld. Superheat values as high as 250 C above the A3 temperature were observed at heating rates of 80 C/s. The SRXRD experiments also revealed details about the {gamma} phase not observable by conventional techniques, showing that {gamma} is present with two distinct lattice parameters as a result of inhomogeneous distribution of carbon and manganese in the starting pearlitic/ferritic microstructure. During cooling, the reverse {gamma} {yields} {alpha} phase transformation was shown to depend on the HAZ location. In the fine grained region of the HAZ, at distances greater than 2 mm from the fusion line, the {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation begins near the A3 temperature and ends near the A1 temperature. In this region of the HAZ where the cooling rates are below 40 C/s, the transformation occurs by nucleation and growth of pearlite. For HAZ locations closer to the fusion line, undercoolings of 200 C or more below the A1 temperature are required to complete the {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation. In this region of the HAZ, grain growth coupled with cooling rates in excess of 50 C/s causes the transformation to occur by a bainitic mechanism.

  4. Retinal burns caused by exposure to MIG-welding arcs: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Brittain, G P

    1988-08-01

    A new generation of arc welder has recently become widely available at a price which is within reach of most amateurs and part-time mechanics, known as the MIG welder (metal-arc inert gas welder). In MIG welding the arc is ensheathed in a stream of inert gas which prevents the molten metal from oxidising. The stream of gas changes the character of the emitted radiation, and it is possible that this type of welder poses a greater threat to sight than previously recognised. Radiation in the ultraviolet range emitted by arc welders is absorbed by the unprotected cornea and lens, giving rise to a keratoconjunctivitis, or 'arc-eye,' which, though intensely painful, is not considered a threat to sight. Radiation in the visible and near infrared spectrum, however, penetrates the eye to be absorbed by the retina and may cause thermal or photochemical damage which may be permanent and sight-threatening. Retinal injuries resulting from exposure to ordinary electric welding arcs have been reported, but such injuries are uncommon. Two cases of retinal burns resulting from exposure to MIG welder emissions which presented on consecutive days to the Leicester Royal Infirmary are presented. This is the first report of such injuries relating specifically to MIG welding.

  5. Software development to support sensor control of robot arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silas, F. R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The development of software for a Digital Equipment Corporation MINC-23 Laboratory Computer to provide functions of a workcell host computer for Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) robotic welding is documented. Routines were written to transfer robot programs between the MINC and an Advanced Robotic Cyro 750 welding robot. Other routines provide advanced program editing features while additional software allows communicatin with a remote computer aided design system. Access to special robot functions were provided to allow advanced control of weld seam tracking and process control for future development programs.

  6. Gas Metal Arc Welding and Flux-Cored Arc Welding. Third Edition. Teacher Edition [and] Student Edition [and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, John; Harper, Eddie

    This packet, containing a teacher's edition, a student edition, and a student workbook, introduces students to high deposition welding and processes for "shielding" a weld. In addition to general information, the teacher edition consists of introductory pages and teacher pages, as well as unit information that corresponds to the…

  7. Numerical Simulation to Study the Effect of Arc Travelling Speed and Welding Sequences on Residual Stresses in Welded Sections of New Ferritic P92 Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaowei; Gong, Jianming; Zhao, Yanping; Wang, Yanfei; Ge, Zhiqiang

    2016-02-01

    New ferritic P92 steel is widely used in modern power plants due to its good combination of mechanical and physical properties. However, cracks are often formed in the welded sections during the fabrication or service. In order to ensure the structure integrity, the effects of residual stresses need to be considered. The objective of this paper is to investigate the influence of arc travelling speed and welding sequences on the residual stresses distribution in the welded sections of P92 pipes by finite element method (FEM). Results show that arc travelling speed and welding sequences have great effects on residual stresses distribution. With the arc travelling speed increasing, the residual stresses increase. Meanwhile, welding sequences of case B present smaller residual stresses and more symmetrical distribution of residual stresses at the weld centre line. Therefore, using slower arc travelling speed and case B welding sequences can be useful to decrease the residual stresses, which provides a reference for optimizing the welding technology and improving the fabrication process of new ferritic P92 welded pipes with small diameter and thick wall.

  8. 29 CFR 1910.254 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... shall not be used to draw welding current directly from any a.c. power source having a voltage exceeding... precautions are used to avoid sparking at connection of the work-lead cable. (iii) Chains, wire ropes,...

  9. Recent progress on gas tungsten arc welding of vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.F.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Goodwin, G.M.; Alexander, D.J.

    1997-04-01

    This is a progress report on a continuing research project to acquire a fundamental understanding of the metallurgical processes in the welding of vanadium alloys. It also has the goal of developing techniques for welding structural vanadium alloys. The alloy V-4Cr-4Ti is used as a representative alloy of the group; it is also the prime candidate vanadium alloy for the U.S. Fusion Program at the present time. However, other alloys of this class were used in the research as necessary. The present work focuses on recent findings of hydrogen embrittlement found in vanadium alloy welds. It was concluded that the atmosphere in the inert gas glove box was insufficient for welding 6mm thick vanadium alloy plates.

  10. Effect of pulsed current GTA welding parameters on the fusion zone microstructure of AA 6061 aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, T. Senthil; Balasubramanian, V.; Babu, S.; Sanavullah, M. Y.

    2007-08-01

    AA6061 aluminium alloy (Al-Mg-Si alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of food processing equipment, chemical containers, passenger cars, road tankers, and railway transport systems. The preferred process for welding these aluminium alloys is frequently Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) welding due to its comparatively easy applicability and lower cost. In the case of single pass GTA welding of thinner sections of this alloy, the pulsed current has been found beneficial due to its advantages over the conventional continuous current processes. The use of pulsed current parameters has been found to improve the mechanical properties of the welds compared to those of continuous current welds of this alloy due to grain refinement occurring in the fusion zone. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to develop a mathematical model to predict the fusion zone grain diameter incorporating pulsed current welding parameters. Statistical tools such as design of experiments, analysis of variance, and regression analysis are used to develop the mathematical model. The developed model can be effectively used to predict the fusion grain diameter at a 95% confidence level for the given pulsed current parameters. The effect of pulsed current GTA welding parameters on the fusion zone grain diameter of AA 6061 aluminium alloy welds is reported in this paper.

  11. Gravitational effects on the weld pool shape and microstructural evolution during gas tungsten arc and laser beam welding of 304 stainless steel and Al-4 wt% Cu alloy.

    PubMed

    Kang, Namhyun; Singh, Jogender; Kulkarni, Anil K

    2004-11-01

    Effects of gravitational acceleration were investigated on the weld pool shape and microstructural evolution for 304 stainless steel and Al-4wt% Cu alloy. Effects of welding heat source were investigated by using laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). As the gravitational level was increased from low gravity (LG approximately 1.2 g) to high gravity (HG approximately 1.8 g) using a NASA KC-135 aircraft, the weld pool shape for 304 stainless steel was influenced considerably during GTAW. However, insignificant change in the microstructure and solute distribution was observed at gravitational levels between LG and HG. The GTAW on Al-4 wt% Cu alloy was used to investigate the effect of gravitational orientation on the weld solidification behavior. Gravitational orientation was manipulated by varying the welding direction with respect to gravity vector; that is, by welding upward opposing gravity ( ||-U) and downward with gravity ( ||-D) on a vertical weld piece and welding perpendicular to gravity (perpendicular) on a horizontal weld piece. Under the same welding conditions, a larger primary dendrite spacing in the ||-U weld was observed near the weld pool surface and the fusion boundary than in the case of perpendicular or ||-D welds. The ||-D weld exhibited different solidification morphology and abnormal S shape of solidification rate curve during its growth. For 304 stainless steel GTAW, significant effects of gravitational orientation were observed on the weld pool shape that was associated with weld surface morphology and convection flow. However, the weld pool shape for LBW was mostly constant with respect to the gravitational orientation.

  12. Laser Submerged Arc Welding (LUPuS) with Solid State Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisgen, Uwe; Olschok, Simon; Jakobs, Stefan

    The laser beam-submerged arc hybrid welding method originates from the knowledge that, with increasing penetration depth, the laser beam process has a tendency to pore formation in the lower weld regions. The coupling with the energy-efficient submerged-arc process improves degassing and reduces the tendency to pore formation. The newly developed hybrid welding process allows the welding of plates with a thickness larger than 20 mm in a single pass and the welding of thicker plates with the double-sided single pass technique. In this special hybrid process, the use of CO2-lasers causes problems when forward sliding flux of slag meets the laser beam path and forms an uncontrollable plasma plume in the beam path. This plasma then shields the work piece from the laser power and thus provokes the collapse of the laser keyhole and leads to process instability. The substitution of the CO2-laser with a modern solid-state laser significantly improves the performance and the stability of the hybrid process. This contribution will demonstrate the latest results and improvements by means of welding results gained with steel plates with a thickness of up to 40mm.

  13. Liquation Cracking in Arc and Friction-Stir Welding of Mg-Zn Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Dustin C.; Chai, Xiao; Tang, Xin; Kou, Sindo

    2015-01-01

    As compared to Al alloys, which are known to be susceptible to liquation ( i.e., liquid formation) and liquation-induced cracking, most Mg alloys have a lower eutectic temperature and thus are likely to be even more susceptible. The present study was conducted to study liquation and liquation cracking in Mg alloys during arc welding and friction-stir welding (FSW). Binary Mg-Zn alloys were selected as a model material in view of their very low eutectic temperature of 613 K (340 °C). Mg-Zn alloys with 2, 4, and 6 wt pct of Zn were cast and welded in the as-cast condition by both gas-tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and FSW. A simple test for liquation cracking was developed, which avoided interference by solidification cracking in the nearby fusion zone. Liquation and liquation cracking in GTAW were found to be in the decreasing order of Mg-6Zn, Mg-4Zn, and Mg-2Zn. Liquation cracking occurred in FSW of Mg-6Zn but not Mg-4Zn or Mg-2Zn. Instead of a continuous ribbon-like flash connected to the weld edge, small chips, and powder covered the weld surface of Mg-6Zn. The results from GTAW and FSW were discussed in light of the binary Mg-Zn phase diagram and the curves of temperature vs fraction solid during solidification.

  14. Post-weld Tempered Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Hybrid Laser-Arc Welded Cast Martensitic Stainless Steel CA6NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirakhorli, Fatemeh; Cao, Xinjin; Pham, Xuan-Tan; Wanjara, Priti; Fihey, Jean-Luc

    2016-12-01

    Manufacturing of hydroelectric turbine components involves the assembly of thick-walled stainless steels using conventional multi-pass arc welding processes. By contrast, hybrid laser-arc welding may be an attractive process for assembly of such materials to realize deeper penetration depths, higher production rates, narrower fusion, and heat-affected zones, and lower distortion. In the present work, single-pass hybrid laser-arc welding of 10-mm thick CA6NM, a low carbon martensitic stainless steel, was carried out in the butt joint configuration using a continuous wave fiber laser at its maximum power of 5.2 kW over welding speeds ranging from 0.75 to 1.2 m/minute. The microstructures across the weldment were characterized after post-weld tempering at 873 K (600 °C) for 1 hour. From microscopic examinations, the fusion zone was observed to mainly consist of tempered lath martensite and some residual delta-ferrite. The mechanical properties were evaluated in the post-weld tempered condition and correlated to the microstructures and defects. The ultimate tensile strength and Charpy impact energy values of the fully penetrated welds in the tempered condition were acceptable according to ASTM, ASME, and industrial specifications, which bodes well for the introduction of hybrid laser-arc welding technology for the manufacturing of next generation hydroelectric turbine components.

  15. Nuclear Technology. Course 28: Welding Inspection. Module 28-3, Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG), Metal Inert Gas (MIG) and Submerged Arc Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This third in a series of ten modules for a course titled Welding Inspection presents the apparatus, process techniques, procedures, applications, associated defects, and inspection for the tungsten inert gas, metal inert gas, and submerged arc welding processes. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1)…

  16. Toughness of 12%Cr ferritic/martensitic steel welds produced by non-arc welding processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, B.J.; Gooch, T.G.

    1998-08-01

    Low carbon 12%Cr steels can offer reduced life cycle costs in many applications. The present work examined the behavior of commercial steels of varying composition when subject to low heat input welding by the electron beam (EB) process and to a forge cycle by linear friction welding (LFW). Charpy impact testing was carried out on the high temperature heat-affected zone (HAZ)/fusion boundary or weld interface, with metallographic examination. With EB welding, the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) was below 0 C (32 F) only for steel of low ferrite factor giving a fully martensitic weld area. Higher ferrite factor alloys showed predominantly ferritic transformed microstructures and a transition well above room temperature. Grain coarsening was found even with low EB process power, the peak grain size increasing with both heat input and steel ferrite factor. Use of LFW gave a fine weld area structure and DBTTs around 0 C even in high ferrite factor (FF) material.

  17. Adaptive weld control for high-integrity welding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Bradley W.

    Adaptive, closed-loop weld control is necessary to maintain high-integrity, zero-defect welds. Conventional weld control techniques using weld parameter feedback control loops are sufficient to maintain set points, but fall short when confronted with unexpected variations in part/tooling temperature and mechanical structure, weldment material, arc skew angle, or calibration in weld parameter feedback measurement. Modern technology allows closed-loop control utilizing input from real-time weld monitoring sensors and inspection devices. Weld puddle parameters, bead profile parameters, and weld seam position are fed back into the weld control loop which adapts for the weld condition variations and drives them back to a desired state, thereby preventing weld defects or perturbations. Parameters such as arc position relative to the weld seam, puddle symmetry, arc length, weld width, and bead shape can be extracted from sensor imagery and used in closed-loop active weld control. All weld bead and puddle measurements are available for real-time display and statistical process control analysis, after which the data is archived to permanent storage or later retrieval and analysis.

  18. 29 CFR 1915.56 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... shall be bonded, and periodic inspections shall be conducted to ensure that no condition of electrolysis... objects. (2) Hot electrode holders shall not be dipped in water, since to do so may expose the arc...

  19. 29 CFR 1915.56 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... shall be bonded, and periodic inspections shall be conducted to ensure that no condition of electrolysis... objects. (2) Hot electrode holders shall not be dipped in water, since to do so may expose the arc...

  20. 29 CFR 1915.56 - Arc welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... shall be bonded, and periodic inspections shall be conducted to ensure that no condition of electrolysis... objects. (2) Hot electrode holders shall not be dipped in water, since to do so may expose the arc...

  1. In situ strain and temperature measurement and modelling during arc welding

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Miller, Roger G.; ...

    2014-12-26

    In this study, experiments and numerical models were applied to investigate the thermal and mechanical behaviours of materials adjacent to the weld pool during arc welding. In the experiment, a new high temperature strain measurement technique based on digital image correlation (DIC) was developed and applied to measure the in situ strain evolution. In contrast to the conventional DIC method that is vulnerable to the high temperature and intense arc light involved in fusion welding processes, the new technique utilised a special surface preparation method to produce high temperature sustaining speckle patterns required by the DIC algorithm as well asmore » a unique optical illumination and filtering system to suppress the influence of the intense arc light. These efforts made it possible for the first time to measure in situ the strain field 1 mm away from the fusion line. The temperature evolution in the weld and the adjacent regions was simultaneously monitored by an infrared camera. Finally and additionally, a thermal–mechanical finite element model was applied to substantiate the experimental measurement.« less

  2. Laser-ultrasonic inspection of hybrid laser-arc welded HSLA-65 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lévesque, D.; Rousseau, G.; Wanjara, P.; Cao, X.; Monchalin, J.-P.

    2014-02-01

    The hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) process is a relatively low heat input joining technology that combines the synergistic qualities of both the high energy density laser beam for deep penetration and the arc for wide fit-up gap tolerance. This process is especially suitable for the shipbuilding industry where thick-gauge section, long steel plates have been widely used in a butt joint configuration. In this study, preliminary exploration was carried out to detect and visualize the welding defects using laser ultrasonics combined with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). Results obtained on 9.3 mm thick butt-welded HSLA-65 steel plates indicated that the laser-ultrasonic SAFT inspection technique can successfully detect and visualize the presence of porosity, lack of fusion and internal crack defects. This was further confirmed by X-ray digital radiography and metallography. The results obtained clearly show the potential of using the laser-ultrasonic technology for the automated inspection of hybrid laser-arc welds.

  3. Variable polarity plasma arc welding on the Space Shuttle external tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Bayless, E. O., Jr.; Jones, C. S., III; Munafo, P. M.; Biddle, A. P.; Wilson, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    Variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) techniques used at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for the fabrication of the Space Shuttle External Tank are presentedd. The high plasma arc jet velocities of 300-2000 m/s are produced by heating the plasma gas as it passes through a constraining orifice, with the plasma arc torch becoming a miniature jet engine. As compared to the GTA jet, the VPPA has the following advantages: (1) less sensitive to contamination, (2) a more symmetrical fusion zone, and (3) greater joint penetration. The VPPA welding system is computerized, operating with a microprocessor, to set welding variables in accordance with set points inputs, including the manipulator and wire feeder, as well as torch control and power supply. Some other VPPA welding technique advantages are: reduction in weld repair costs by elimination of porosity; reduction of joint preparation costs through elimination of the need to scrape or file faying surfaces; reduction in depeaking costs; eventual reduction of the 100 percent-X-ray inspection requirements. The paper includes a series of schematic and block diagrams.

  4. In situ strain and temperature measurement and modelling during arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Miller, Roger G.; Feng, Zhili

    2014-12-26

    In this study, experiments and numerical models were applied to investigate the thermal and mechanical behaviours of materials adjacent to the weld pool during arc welding. In the experiment, a new high temperature strain measurement technique based on digital image correlation (DIC) was developed and applied to measure the in situ strain evolution. In contrast to the conventional DIC method that is vulnerable to the high temperature and intense arc light involved in fusion welding processes, the new technique utilised a special surface preparation method to produce high temperature sustaining speckle patterns required by the DIC algorithm as well as a unique optical illumination and filtering system to suppress the influence of the intense arc light. These efforts made it possible for the first time to measure in situ the strain field 1 mm away from the fusion line. The temperature evolution in the weld and the adjacent regions was simultaneously monitored by an infrared camera. Finally and additionally, a thermal–mechanical finite element model was applied to substantiate the experimental measurement.

  5. Laser-ultrasonic inspection of hybrid laser-arc welded HSLA-65 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Lévesque, D.; Rousseau, G.; Monchalin, J.-P.; Wanjara, P.; Cao, X.

    2014-02-18

    The hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) process is a relatively low heat input joining technology that combines the synergistic qualities of both the high energy density laser beam for deep penetration and the arc for wide fit-up gap tolerance. This process is especially suitable for the shipbuilding industry where thick-gauge section, long steel plates have been widely used in a butt joint configuration. In this study, preliminary exploration was carried out to detect and visualize the welding defects using laser ultrasonics combined with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). Results obtained on 9.3 mm thick butt-welded HSLA-65 steel plates indicated that the laser-ultrasonic SAFT inspection technique can successfully detect and visualize the presence of porosity, lack of fusion and internal crack defects. This was further confirmed by X-ray digital radiography and metallography. The results obtained clearly show the potential of using the laser-ultrasonic technology for the automated inspection of hybrid laser-arc welds.

  6. Intelligent Welding Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, George E.; Kumar, Ramaswamy; Prasad, Tanuji; Andersen, Kristinn; Barnett, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    Control system adapts to changing design requirements and operating conditions. Proposed control system for gas/tungsten arc welding requires only that operator specifies such direct parameters of welds as widths and depths of penetration. In control system for robotic welder, components and functions intimately connected with welding process assigned to controller domain. More general functions assigned to supervisor domain. Initial estimate of indirect parameters of welding process applied to system only at beginning of weld (t=0); after start of welding, outputs from multivariable controller takes place of estimate.

  7. Influencing the arc and the mechanical properties of the weld metal in GMA-welding processes by additive elements on the wire electrode surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesling, V.; Schram, A.; Müller, T.; Treutler, K.

    2016-03-01

    Under the premise of an increasing scarcity of raw materials and increasing demands on construction materials, the mechanical properties of steels and its joints are gaining highly important. In particular high- and highest-strength steels are getting in the focus of the research and the manufacturing industry. To the same extent, the requirements for filler metals are increasing as well. At present, these low-alloy materials are protected by a copper coating (<1μm) against corrosion. In addition, the coating realizes a good ohmic contact and good sliding properties between the welding machine and the wire during the welding process. By exchanging the copper with other elements it should be possible to change the mechanical properties of the weld metal and the arc stability during gas metal arc welding processes and keep the basic functions of the coating nearly untouched. On a laboratory scale solid wire electrodes with coatings of various elements and compounds such as titanium oxide were made and processed with a Gas Metal Arc Welding process. During the processing a different process behavior between the wire electrodes, coated and original, could be observed. The influences ranges from greater/shorter arc-length over increasing/decreasing droplets to larger/smaller arc foot point. Furthermore, the weld metal of the coated electrodes has significantly different mechanical and technological characteristics as the weld metal from the copper coated ground wire. The yield strength and tensile strength can be increased by up to 50%. In addition, the chemical composition of the weld metal was influenced by the application of coatings with layer thicknesses to 15 microns in the lower percentage range (up to about 3%). Another effect of the coating is a modified penetration. The normally occurring “argon finger” can be suppressed or enhanced by the choice of the coating. With the help of the presented studies it will be shown that Gas Metal Arc Welding processes

  8. [Inhalation exposure to welding fumes of arc welders in processing Cr-Ni steel in large chemical industry].

    PubMed

    Dyrba, B C; Richter, K H

    1989-05-01

    For clearing up the inhalative load by welding fumes and gases of arc welders in industrial workshops mainly working on Cr-Ni-steels the following welding processes were studied: tungsten inert-gas (TIG), electrode-by-hand (EH), metal inert-gas (MIG), and plasma cutting (plasma). From the total load by welding fumes follows the rank TIG less than EH less than plasma less than MIG. Observing the maximum allowable concentration (MACD) for the total welding fume, no MACD for Cr and Ni was found exceeded. Regarding the welding gases ozone and CO no limit values were exceeded. From the results conclusions were made.

  9. [Sidero-fibrosis of the lungs after decades of arc welding].

    PubMed

    Steurich, F; Feyerabend, R

    1997-06-01

    The case of a patient is described who suffered from pulmonary siderofibrosis, histologically confirmed as a long-term cause of arc welding for several decades. In spite of this, there was no severe alteration of lung function. Pulmonary siderosis in welders was considered to be a benign pneumoconiosis. However, in recent years it has been noticed that siderosis is accompanied by disorders of pulmonary function, depending in particular on the quality of the working place, technology of welding, and duration of the exposition. Especially in smaller workshops without medical service and regular control of the craftsmen, unfavourable working conditions are frequent.

  10. Video Game Device Haptic Interface for Robotic Arc Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Corrie I. Nichol; Milos Manic

    2009-05-01

    Recent advances in technology for video games have made a broad array of haptic feedback devices available at low cost. This paper presents a bi-manual haptic system to enable an operator to weld remotely using the a commercially available haptic feedback video game device for the user interface. The system showed good performance in initial tests, demonstrating the utility of low cost input devices for remote haptic operations.

  11. Correlation of Flux Composition and Inclusion Characteristics With Submerged Arc Weld Metal Properties in HY-100 Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    WITH SUBMERGED ARC WELD METAL PROPERTIES IN HY- 100 STEEL by Kent William Kettell September 1993 Thesis Advisor: Alan G. Fox Approved for public... STEEL 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Kettell, Kent William ,3a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year.Month.Day) 15. PAGE COUNT Master’s...necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP HY- 100 steel , submerged arc welding, SAW, fluxes, basicity index, non-metallic inclusions

  12. A study on the influence of reflected arc light on vision sensors for welding automation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.W.; Na, S.J.

    1996-12-01

    Vision sensors using optical triangulation have been widely sued for automatic welding systems in various ways. Their reliability is, however, seriously influenced by the arc light reflected from the base metal surface. In this study, the reliability of vision sensors was analyzed for the variation of the arc noise by considering the reflectance of the base metal surface. The property of the surface reflection of the base metal was modeled using the bidirectional reflectance-distribution function (BRDF), and then the intensity variation of the reflected arc was formulated for various configurations of the torch, base metal and sensor. The experimental data of the arc light reflection were obtained for two materials, mild steel and stainless steel, each having different surface reflection characteristics. It was found that the results calculated from the proposed model were in good agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Characterization of HAZ of API X70 Microalloyed Steel Welded by Cold-Wire Tandem Submerged Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadijoo, Mohsen; Kenny, Stephen; Collins, Laurie; Henein, Hani; Ivey, Douglas G.

    2017-03-01

    High-strength low-carbon microalloyed steels may be adversely affected by the high-heat input and thermal cycle that they experience during tandem submerged arc welding. The heat-affected zone (HAZ), particularly the coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ), i.e., the region adjacent to the fusion line, has been known to show lower fracture toughness compared with the rest of the steel. The deterioration in toughness of the CGHAZ is attributed to the formation of martensite-austenite (M-A) constituents, local brittle zones, and large prior austenite grains (PAG). In the present work, the influence of the addition of a cold wire at various wire feed rates in cold-wire tandem submerged arc welding, a recently developed welding process for pipeline manufacturing, on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the HAZ of a microalloyed steel has been studied. The cold wire moderates the heat input of welding by consuming the heat of the trail electrode. Macrostructural analysis showed a decrease in the CGHAZ size by addition of a cold wire. Microstructural evaluation, using both tint etching optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, indicated the formation of finer PAGs and less fraction of M-A constituents with refined morphology within the CGHAZ when the cold wire was fed at 25.4 cm/min. This resulted in an improvement in the HAZ impact fracture toughness. These improvements are attributed to lower actual heat introduced to the weldment and lower peak temperature in the CGHAZ by cold-wire addition. However, a faster feed rate of the cold wire at 76.2 cm/min adversely affected the toughness due to the formation of slender M-A constituents caused by the relatively faster cooling rate in the CGHAZ.

  14. Dissimilar Arc Welding of Advanced High-Strength Car-Body Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo Spena, P.; D'Aiuto, F.; Matteis, P.; Scavino, G.

    2014-11-01

    A widespread usage of new advanced TWIP steel grades for the fabrication of car-body parts is conditional on the employment of appropriate welding methods, especially if dissimilar welding must be performed with other automotive steel grades. Therefore, the microstructural features and the mechanical response of dissimilar butt weld seams of TWIP and 22MnB5 steel sheets after metal-active-gas arc welding are examined. The microstructural and mechanical characterization of the welded joints was carried out by optical metallography, microhardness and tensile testing, and fractographic examination. The heat-affected zone on the TWIP side was fully austenitic and the only detectable effect was grain coarsening, while on the 22MnB5 side it exhibited newly formed martensite and tempered martensite. The welded tensile specimens exhibited a much larger deformation on the TWIP steel side than on the 22MnB5. The fracture generally occurred at the interface between the fusion zone and the heat-affected zones, with the fractures surfaces being predominantly ductile. The ultimate tensile strength of the butt joints was about 25% lower than that of the TWIP steel.

  15. Camera Would Monitor Weld-Pool Contours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S.; Gutow, David A.

    1990-01-01

    Weld pool illuminated and viewed coaxially along welding torch. Proposed monitoring subsystem for arc welder provides image in which horizontal portions of surface of weld pool highlighted. Monitoring and analyzing subsystems integrated into overall control system of robotic welder. Control system sets welding parameters to adapt to changing conditions, maintaining surface contour giving desired pattern of reflections.

  16. Ballistic-Failure Mechanisms in Gas Metal Arc Welds of MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Steel: A Computational Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-12

    distribution is unlimited. Ballistic-Failure Mechanisms in Gas Metal Arc Welds of Mil A46100 Armor- Grade Steel : A Computational Investigation The views...Welds of Mil A46100 Armor- Grade Steel : A Computational Investigation Report Title In our recent work, a multi-physics computational model for the...utility of the upgraded GMAW process model, it is next applied to the case of butt-welding of a prototypical high-hardness armor- grade martensitic steel

  17. The Influence of Friction Stir Weld Tool Form and Welding Parameters on Weld Structure and Properties: Nugget Bulge in Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Brendel, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Although friction stir welding (FSW) was patented in 1991, process development has been based upon trial and error and the literature still exhibits little understanding of the mechanisms determining weld structure and properties. New concepts emerging from a better understanding of these mechanisms enhance the ability of FSW engineers to think about the FSW process in new ways, inevitably leading to advances in the technology. A kinematic approach in which the FSW flow process is decomposed into several simple flow components has been found to explain the basic structural features of FSW welds and to relate them to tool geometry and process parameters. Using this modelling approach, this study reports on a correlation between the features of the weld nugget, process parameters, weld tool geometry, and weld strength. This correlation presents a way to select process parameters for a given tool geometry so as to optimize weld strength. It also provides clues that may ultimately explain why the weld strength varies within the sample population.

  18. Direct Observations of Austenite, Bainite and Martensite Formation During Arc Welding of 1045 Steel using Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J; Palmer, T; Babu, S; Zhang, W; DebRoy, T

    2004-02-17

    In-situ Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD) experiments were performed during stationary gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of AISI 1045 C-Mn steel. These synchrotron-based experiments tracked, in real time, phase transformations in the heat-affected zone of the weld under rapid heating and cooling conditions. The diffraction patterns were recorded at 100 ms intervals, and were later analyzed using diffraction peak profile analysis to determine the relative fraction of ferrite ({alpha}) and austenite ({gamma}) phases in each diffraction pattern. Lattice parameters and diffraction peak widths were also measured throughout the heating and cooling cycle of the weld, providing additional information about the phases that were formed. The experimental results were coupled with a thermofluid weld model to calculate the weld temperatures, allowing time-temperature transformation kinetics of the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation to be evaluated. During heating, complete austenitization was observed in the heat affected zone of the weld and the kinetics of the {alpha} {yields} {gamma} phase transformation were modeled using a Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) approach. The results from the 1045 steel weld were compared to those of a 1005 low carbon steel from a previous study. Differences in austenitization rates of the two steels were attributed to differences in the base metal microstructures, particularly the relative amounts of pearlite and the extent of the allotriomorphic ferrite phase. During weld cooling, the austenite transformed to a mixture of bainite and martensite. In situ diffraction was able to distinguish between these two non-equilibrium phases based on differences in their lattice parameters and their transformation rates, resulting in the first real time x-ray diffraction observations of bainite and martensite formation made during welding.

  19. The dynamics of droplet formation and detachment in gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.; Clark, D.E.; Carlson, N.M.; Watkins, A.D.; Lethcoe, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental measurements of gas metal arc welding are required for the development and confirmation of models of the process. This paper reports on two experiments that provide information for models of the arc physics and of the weld pool dynamics. The heat transfer efficiency of the spray transfer mode in gas metal arc welding was measured using a calorimetry technique. The efficiency varied from 75 to 85%. A special fixture was used to measure the droplet contribution, which is determined to be between 35 and 45% of the total input energy. A series of experiments was performed at a variety of conditions ranging from globular to spray to streaming transfer. The transfer was observed by taking high-speed movies at 500 to 5000 frames per second of the backlighted droplets. An automatic image analysis system was used to obtain information about the droplets including time between detachments, droplet size, and droplet acceleration. At the boundary between the globular and spray modes, the droplet size varies between small droplets that melt off faster than average, resulting in a smaller electrode extension, and large droplets that melt off slower than average, resulting in an increase in the electrode extension. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Abnormal macropore formation during double-sided gas tungsten arc welding of magnesium AZ91D alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Jun You Guoqiang; Long Siyuan; Pan Fusheng

    2008-08-15

    One of the major concerns during gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of cast magnesium alloys is the presence of large macroporosity in weldments, normally thought to occur from the presence of gas in the castings. In this study, a double-sided GTA welding process was adopted to join wrought magnesium AZ91D alloy plates. Micropores were formed in the weld zone of the first side that was welded, due to precipitation of H{sub 2} as the mushy zone freezes. When the reverse side was welded, the heat generated caused the mushy zone in the initial weld to reform. The micropores in the initial weld then coalesced and expanded to form macropores by means of gas expansion through small holes that are present at the grain boundaries in the partially melted zone. Macropores in the partially melted zone increase with increased heat input, so that when a filler metal is used the macropores are smaller in number and in size.

  1. Microstructure evolution of Al/Mg butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc with Zn filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Fei; Zhang Zhaodong; Liu Liming

    2012-07-15

    Based on the idea of alloying welding seam, Gas tungsten arc welding method with pure Zn filler metal was chosen to join Mg alloy and Al alloy. The microstructures, phases, element distribution and fracture morphology of welding seams were examined. The results indicate that there was a transitional zone in the width of 80-100 {mu}m between the Mg alloy substrate and fusion zone. The fusion zone was mainly composed of MgZn{sub 2}, Zn-based solid solution and Al-based solid solution. The welding seam presented distinct morphology in different location owning to the quite high cooling rate of the molten pool. The addition of Zn metal could prevent the formation of Mg-Al intermetallics and form the alloyed welding seam during welding. Therefore, the tensile strengths of joints have been significantly improved compared with those of gas tungsten arc welded joints without Zn metal added. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are welded successfully. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc wire is employed as a filler metal to form the alloyed welding seam. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An alloyed welding seam is benefit for improving of the joint tensile strength.

  2. GUI for studying the parameters influence of the electric arc model for a three-phase electric arc furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghiormez, L.; Prostean, O.; Panoiu, M.; Panoiu, C.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis regarding the modeling of the behavior for a three-phase electric arc furnace installation. Therefore, a block diagram is implemented in Simulink that represents the modeling of the entire electric arc furnace installation. This block diagram contains also the modeling of the electric arc which is the element that makes the electric arc furnace behaving as a nonlinear load. The values for the model parameters of the electric arc furnace installation are like the ones from the real installation taken into consideration. Other model parameters are the electric arc model ones. In order to study the influence of the parameters of the electric arc models, it is developed a Matlab program that contains the graphical user interfaces. These interfaces make connection with the models of the electric arc implemented in Simulink. The interfaces allow the user to modify parameters for each of the electric arc model. Current and voltage of the electric arc are the variables taken into account to study the influence of the parameters on the electric arc models. Waveforms for voltage and current of the electric arc are illustrated when a parameter of the model is modified in order to analyze the importance of this parameter on the electric arc model. Also, for each of the models is presented the voltage-current characteristic of the electric arc because this characteristic gives information about the behavior of the electric arc furnace installation.

  3. Laser transmission welding of ABS: Effect of CNTs concentration and process parameters on material integrity and weld formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Vidal, E.; Quintana, I.; Gadea, C.

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports a study of the laser transmission welding of polymeric joints composed by two ABS (acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene) sheets, one transparent (natural ABS) and the other absorbent (filled by different percentages of carbon nanotubes (CNTs)). The objective of this work is to analyze the effect of process parameters and CNTs concentrations on weld formation and mechanical resistance of the weld joints.

  4. Determination of the Effect of Current and Travel Speed of Gas Metal-Arc Welding on the Mechanical Properties of A36, A516, and A514 Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    Identify by block number) steel welded joints gas metal-arc welding 70. AWTRr A ass is ,eYe slob If neoemy Md identify by block numfber) This study was...impact properties of butt joint welds produced by fully automatic gas metal-arc weld - ing (GMAW) in carbon steel (A36), pressure-vessel steel (A5 16), and...with American Society for CURRENT AND TRAVEL SPEED OF GAS Testing and Materials [ASTM] A201 mild steel up to METAL-ARC WELDING ON THE MECHAN- 2 in. (51

  5. Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding of 10-mm-Thick Cast Martensitic Stainless Steel CA6NM: As-Welded Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirakhorli, Fatemeh; Cao, Xinjin; Pham, Xuan-Tan; Wanjara, Priti; Fihey, Jean-Luc

    2016-07-01

    Cast CA6NM martensitic stainless steel plates, 10 mm in thickness, were welded using hybrid laser-arc welding. The effect of different welding speeds on the as-welded joint integrity was characterized in terms of the weld bead geometry, defects, microstructure, hardness, ultimate tensile strength, and impact energy. Significant defects such as porosity, root humping, underfill, and excessive penetration were observed at a low welding speed (0.5 m/min). However, the underfill depth and excessive penetration in the joints manufactured at welding speeds above 0.75 m/min met the specifications of ISO 12932. Characterization of the as-welded microstructure revealed untempered martensite and residual delta ferrite dispersed at prior-austenite grain boundaries in the fusion zone. In addition, four different heat-affected zones in the weldments were differentiated through hardness mapping and inference from the Fe-Cr-Ni ternary phase diagram. The tensile fracture occurred in the base metal for all the samples and fractographic analysis showed that the crack path is within the martensite matrix, along primary delta ferrite-martensite interfaces and within the primary delta ferrite. Additionally, Charpy impact testing demonstrated slightly higher fracture energy values and deeper dimples on the fracture surface of the welds manufactured at higher welding speeds due to grain refinement and/or lower porosity.

  6. Plasma ARC Welding of High-Performance-Ship Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-05-01

    1 ,10 SMay 1979 DTNSRDG/ SME -78/ 34 rO MAJOR DTNSRDC ORGANIZATIONAL COMPONENTS DTNSR DC COMMANDER 0 TECHNICAL DIRECTOR 01 OFFICE R-I N-CHARGE _____OF...RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBERLI DTNSRDC/ SME -78/34 , .•--fi 4. TITLE (and SuIftlti. --" S. TYPE OF RE ORT._.E.IFLOi.OV RF.P•:"•’)~~ ~ ~~ /Revlpet..•,.. _LASMA.ARC...8217 : ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. TABLE 2 - TENSILE TEST RESULTS SpOC imun Ytlld Strounth T’n mil• StrIe lngth I|loniinttirol Lwait IL’ ,i ifr pin

  7. ELECTRIC WELDING EQUIPMENT AND AUTOMATION OF WELDING IN CONSTRUCTION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    WELDING , *ARC WELDING , AUTOMATION, CONSTRUCTION, INDUSTRIES, POWER EQUIPMENT, GENERATORS, POWER TRANSFORMERS, RESISTANCE WELDING , SPOT WELDING , MACHINES, AUTOMATIC, STRUCTURES, WIRING DIAGRAMS, USSR.

  8. Heat and fluid flow in complex joints during gas metal arc welding—Part I: Numerical model of fillet welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Kim, C.-H.; DebRoy, T.

    2004-05-01

    Gas metal arc (GMA) fillet welding is one of the most important processes for metal joining because of its high productivity and amiability to automation. This welding process is characterized by the complicated V-shaped joint geometry, a deformable weld pool surface, and the additions of hot metal droplets. In the present work, a three-dimensional numerical heat transfer and fluid flow model was developed to examine the temperature profiles, velocity fields, weld pool shape and size, and the nature of the solidified weld bead geometry during GMA fillet welding. The model solved the equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy using a boundary fitted curvilinear coordinate system. Apart from the direct transport of heat from the welding arc, additional heat from the metal droplets was modeled considering a volumetric heat source. The deformation of the weld pool surface was calculated by minimizing the total surface energy. Part I of this article is focused on the details of the numerical model such as coordinate transformation and calculation of volumetric heat source and free surface profile. An application of the model to GMA fillet welding of mild steel is described in an accompanying article (W. Zhang, C.-H. Kim and T. DebRoy, J. Appl Phys. 95, 5220 (2004)).

  9. Influence of control parameters on the joint tracking performance of a coaxial weld vision system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangl, K. J.; Weeks, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The first phase of a series of evaluations of a vision-based welding control sensor for the Space Shuttle Main Engine Robotic Welding System is described. The robotic welding system is presently under development at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This evaluation determines the standard control response parameters necessary for proper trajectory of the welding torch along the joint.

  10. Study of Radiographic Linear Indications and Subsequent Microstructural Features in Gas Tungsten Arc Welds of Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walley, J. L.; Nunes, A. C.; Clounch, J. L.; Russell, C. K.

    2007-01-01

    This study presents examples and considerations for differentiating linear radiographic indications produced by gas tungsten arc welds in a 0.05-in-thick sheet of Inconel 718. A series of welds with different structural features, including the enigma indications and other defect indications such as lack of fusion and penetration, were produced, radiographed, and examined metallographically. The enigma indications were produced by a large columnar grain running along the center of the weld nugget occurring when the weld speed was reduced sufficiently below nominal. Examples of respective indications, including the effect of changing the x-ray source location, are presented as an aid to differentiation. Enigma, nominal, and hot-weld specimens were tensile tested to demonstrate the harmlessness of the enigma indication. Statistical analysis showed that there is no difference between the strengths of these three weld conditions.

  11. Mass Transfer of Nickel-Base Alloy Covered Electrode During Shielded Metal Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Renyao; He, Guo

    2013-03-01

    The mass transfer in shielded metal arc welding of a group of nickel-base alloy covered electrodes according to AWS specification A5.11-A5.11M was investigated by directly measuring their deposited metal compositions. The results indicate that the chromium mass-transfer coefficient is in the range of 86 to 94 pct, iron in the range of 82 to 89 pct, manganese in the range of 60 to 73 pct, niobium in the range of 44 to 56 pct, and silicon in the range of 41 to 47 pct. The metal mass-transfer coefficient from the core wire is markedly higher than that from the coating. The basicity of slag, the metal contents in the flux coating, and the welding current together affect the mass transfer. As the basicity of slag increases, the mass-transfer coefficients of Mn, Fe, and Cr slightly increase, but those of Nb and Si decrease significantly. As the niobium and manganese contents increase in the coating, their mass-transfer coefficients also increase. However, iron is different. The content of iron in the coating in the range of 8 to 20 wt pct results in the optimal effective mass transfer. The lower, or higher, iron content leads to lower mass-transfer coefficient. As the welding current increases, the mass-transfer coefficients of niobium and manganese decrease, but chromium and silicon increase. Iron has the lowest mass-transfer coefficient when welded under the operating current of 100 A.

  12. [Effect of welding arcs on the eyes of patients with contact lenses (literature study)].

    PubMed

    Stahler, D; Teubel, H; Karsten, H

    1989-01-01

    Two accidents had been reported from abroad, within which contact lense users grew blind after staying quite near at electrical arcs. It is supposed that the contact lenses had been "welded" with the cornea by influence of the electromagnetic radiation. Removal of lenses shall have caused the cornea "ablation" and thus the subjects permanent blindness. Nilsson et al. (1, 2, 5) performed intensive animal tests which proved, that contact lenses get hot in special spectral ranges thus underlying a certain drying up. The "welding" between contact lenses and the cornea could not be confirmed by test animals, but partial glueing of contact lenses and cornea and surface lesions of the epithelium as well in some cases. Hüer and Conrads (3, 4) experimenting on enucleated pigs' eyes, reported on similar results.

  13. The Origin of Acicular Ferrite in Gas Metal Arc and Submerged ARC Welds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    Ti/Al ........ .. 120 Figure 4.4 SAW % Acicular Ferrite vs Inclusion VF . . 121 Figure 4.5 Micrograph of TiN Inclusion in HY-80 Steel 122 Figure 4.6...Figure 4.19 SAW Strength vs %CG/%XF/CFE ... ........ .. 136 Figure 4.20 SAW DBTT vs CG/AF/Weld Mn ... ......... .. 137 viii LIST OF TABLES TABLE 2.1...COMPOSITION OF HIGH STRENGTH STEELS . . .. 48 TABLE 2.2 MECH. PROP. LIMITS OF HIGH STRENGTH STEELS 49 TABLE 2.3 HY-100 SAW ELECTRODE CHEMISTRY ...... 49

  14. Intelligent Modeling Combining Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System and Genetic Algorithm for Optimizing Welding Process Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowtham, K. N.; Vasudevan, M.; Maduraimuthu, V.; Jayakumar, T.

    2011-04-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel is used as a structural material for steam generator components of power plants. Generally, tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding is preferred for welding of these steels in which the depth of penetration achievable during autogenous welding is limited. Therefore, activated flux TIG (A-TIG) welding, a novel welding technique, has been developed in-house to increase the depth of penetration. In modified 9Cr-1Mo steel joints produced by the A-TIG welding process, weld bead width, depth of penetration, and heat-affected zone (HAZ) width play an important role in determining the mechanical properties as well as the performance of the weld joints during service. To obtain the desired weld bead geometry and HAZ width, it becomes important to set the welding process parameters. In this work, adaptative neuro fuzzy inference system is used to develop independent models correlating the welding process parameters like current, voltage, and torch speed with weld bead shape parameters like depth of penetration, bead width, and HAZ width. Then a genetic algorithm is employed to determine the optimum A-TIG welding process parameters to obtain the desired weld bead shape parameters and HAZ width.

  15. Characteristics of Extra Narrow Gap Weld of HSLA Steel Welded by Single-Seam per Layer Pulse Current GMA Weld Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, B. P.; Ghosh, P. K.

    2017-02-01

    Butt weld joints are produced using pulse current gas metal arc welding process by employing the technique of centrally laid multi-pass single-seam per layer weld deposition in extra narrow groove of thick HSLA steel plates. The weld joints are prepared by using different combination of pulse parameters. The selection of parameter of pulse current gas metal arc welding is done considering a summarized influence of simultaneously interacting pulse parameters defined by a dimensionless hypothetical factor ϕ. The effect of diverse pulse parameters on the characteristics of weld has been studied. Weld joint is also prepared by using commonly used multi-pass multi-seam per layer weld deposition in conventional groove. The extra narrow gap weld joints have been found much superior to the weld joint prepared by multi-pass multi-seam per layer deposition in conventional groove with respect to its metallurgical characteristics and mechanical properties.

  16. Characteristics of Extra Narrow Gap Weld of HSLA Steel Welded by Single-Seam per Layer Pulse Current GMA Weld Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, B. P.; Ghosh, P. K.

    2017-03-01

    Butt weld joints are produced using pulse current gas metal arc welding process by employing the technique of centrally laid multi-pass single-seam per layer weld deposition in extra narrow groove of thick HSLA steel plates. The weld joints are prepared by using different combination of pulse parameters. The selection of parameter of pulse current gas metal arc welding is done considering a summarized influence of simultaneously interacting pulse parameters defined by a dimensionless hypothetical factor ϕ. The effect of diverse pulse parameters on the characteristics of weld has been studied. Weld joint is also prepared by using commonly used multi-pass multi-seam per layer weld deposition in conventional groove. The extra narrow gap weld joints have been found much superior to the weld joint prepared by multi-pass multi-seam per layer deposition in conventional groove with respect to its metallurgical characteristics and mechanical properties.

  17. Optimization of process parameters of pulsed TIG welded maraging steel C300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepak, P.; Jualeash, M. J.; Jishnu, J.; Srinivasan, P.; Arivarasu, M.; Padmanaban, R.; Thirumalini, S.

    2016-09-01

    Pulsed TIG welding technology provides excellent welding performance on thin sections which helps to increase productivity, enhance weld quality, minimize weld costs, and boost operator efficiency and this has drawn the attention of the welding society. Maraging C300 steel is extensively used in defence and aerospace industry and thus its welding becomes an area of paramount importance. In pulsed TIG welding, weld quality depends on the process parameters used. In this work, Pulsed TIG bead-on-plate welding is performed on a 5mm thick maraging C300 plate at different combinations of input parameters: peak current (Ip), base current (Ib) and pulsing frequency (HZ) as per box behnken design with three-levels for each factor. Response surface methodology is utilized for establishing a mathematical model for predicting the weld bead depth. The effect of Ip, Ib and HZ on the weld bead depth is investigated using the developed model. The weld bead depth is found to be affected by all the three parameters. Surface and contour plots developed from regression equation are used to optimize the processing parameters for maximizing the weld bead depth. Optimum values of Ip, Ib and HZ are obtained as 259 A, 120 A and 8 Hz respectively. Using this optimum condition, maximum bead depth of the weld is predicted to be 4.325 mm.

  18. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Gas-Tungsten-Arc-Welded Ti-15-3 Beta Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandar, K.; Subramanya Sarma, V.; Pant, Bhanu; Phanikumar, G.

    2009-11-01

    Microstructure and mechanical properties of gas-tungsten-arc (GTA)-welded Ti-15V-3Cr-3Sn-3Al alloy in direct current electrode negative mode are characterized. The thermal profile was measured during welding with continuous current (CC) and pulsed current (PC) at different frequencies. A single-step postweld aging of the welded samples at subtransus temperature was attempted to study precipitation of alpha phase. Two different morphologies of alpha phase are observed along with a partitioning of alloying elements into the two phases. Processing conditions for higher strength are identified and correlated with the thermal profile. Microstructure changes due to postweld heat treatment were characterized.

  19. Robotic gas metal arc welding of small diameter saddle type joints using multi-stripe structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonser, Gary R.; Parker, Graham A.

    1999-11-01

    Single-stripe structured light sensors are widely used in conjunction with arc welding robots for seam-tracking purposes. The interaction of the projected light with the weld joint and component surfaces produces characteristic line shapes with feature points that can be recognized at high speed by an underlying vision system. Unfortunately they are suitable only for the major classes of weld joint typically encountered within industry--long, straight, or gently curving fillet or butt joints. We present a multistripe structured light sensor that detects and measures the position of the saddle type weld joint formed by two small (< 50-mm)-diameter intersecting tubes. The underlying image processing algorithms detect the weld feature points from each stripe along with four calibration points to generate the entire weld path in the robot workcell base coordinate system before welding commences. The system is validated within an existing welding application; detecting 93% of the weld feature points within +/- 0.4 mm when used on 30-mm-diam tubes.

  20. Effect of B2O3 containing fluxes on the microstructure and mechanical properties in submerged arc welded mild steel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, P.; Roy, J.; Rai, R. N.; Prasada Rao, A. K.; Saha, S. C.

    2016-02-01

    This paper represents a study on the effect of B2O3 additions in fluxes on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the weld metal formed during Submerged Arc Welding of Mild Steel plates. Five fluxes with about 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10 and 12.5% B2O3 were used with a low carbon electrode. Welding process parameters were kept constant for all the conditions. The microstructure of weld metal for each flux consisted mainly of acicular ferrite, polygonal ferrite, grain boundary ferrites and equiaxed pearlite. It was noted that the Vicker's hardness value was a function of boron content and shows a mixed trend. Impact Energy and Tensile Strength were increased with the increase in boron content in welds this can be attributed to relation with the higher acicular ferrite percentage. However an optimum level of toughness and tensile strength was available with 7.5% and 5% of B2O3 respectively. A qualitative comparison has also be done with fresh flux by means of full metallography and mechanically.

  1. Effect of Weld Characteristic on Mechanical Strength of Laser-Arc Hybrid-Welded Al-Mg-Si-Mn Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Gao, Ming; Jiang, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-11-01

    Laser-arc hybrid welding (LAHW) was employed to improve the tensile properties of the joints of 8-mm-thick Al-Mg-Si-Mn alloy (AA6082) using Al-5Mg filler wire. The weld microstructures were examined by scanning electron microscope, electron backscattered diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy in detail. The LAHW joints with pore-free and high-tensile performances were obtained. The strength enhancement of the fusion zone and heat-affected zone in the LAHW joint was mainly attributed to the grain refinement strengthening and the precipitation strengthening, respectively. The microstructure characteristics were related to the effects of laser-arc interaction on the energy transfer within the molten pool. The arc caused the majority of laser energy to dissipate out of the keyhole, and then it reduced the heat input. The lower heat input refined the grain size, weakened the overaging effect, and thus improved the tensile strength.

  2. Ballistic-Failure Mechanisms in Gas Metal Arc Welds of Mil A46100 Armor-Grade Steel: A Computational Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Snipes, J. S.; Galgalikar, R.; Ramaswami, S.; Yavari, R.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2014-09-01

    In our recent work, a multi-physics computational model for the conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW) joining process was introduced. The model is of a modular type and comprises five modules, each designed to handle a specific aspect of the GMAW process, i.e.: (i) electro-dynamics of the welding-gun; (ii) radiation-/convection-controlled heat transfer from the electric-arc to the workpiece and mass transfer from the filler-metal consumable electrode to the weld; (iii) prediction of the temporal evolution and the spatial distribution of thermal and mechanical fields within the weld region during the GMAW joining process; (iv) the resulting temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the material microstructure throughout the weld region; and (v) spatial distribution of the as-welded material mechanical properties. In the present work, the GMAW process model has been upgraded with respect to its predictive capabilities regarding the spatial distribution of the mechanical properties controlling the ballistic-limit (i.e., penetration-resistance) of the weld. The model is upgraded through the introduction of the sixth module in the present work in recognition of the fact that in thick steel GMAW weldments, the overall ballistic performance of the armor may become controlled by the (often inferior) ballistic limits of its weld (fusion and heat-affected) zones. To demonstrate the utility of the upgraded GMAW process model, it is next applied to the case of butt-welding of a prototypical high-hardness armor-grade martensitic steel, MIL A46100. The model predictions concerning the spatial distribution of the material microstructure and ballistic-limit-controlling mechanical properties within the MIL A46100 butt-weld are found to be consistent with prior observations and general expectations.

  3. Microstructural Response of Directionally Solidified René 80 Superalloy to Gas-Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidhu, R. K.; Ojo, O. A.; Chaturvedi, M. C.

    2009-01-01

    The microstructural response of directionally solidified René 80 (DS René 80) superalloy to gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welding was investigated. Rapid heating during welding resulted in a significant grain-boundary liquation of solid-state reaction product γ' precipitates, intergranular elemental segregation induced M5B3 borides, and secondary solidification constituents MC carbides and sulfocarbides, which were all present in the preweld heat-treated alloy. Liquation of these particles embrittled the grain boundaries in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and caused microfissuring along the liquated grain boundaries. Nevertheless, contrary to the generally observed increase in HAZ cracking in superalloys with an increase in Ti and Al concentration, due to increase in the alloy’s hardness, significantly reduced cracking was observed in DS René 80 compared to the conventionally cast IN738 welded under the same conditions, despite its hardness being higher than that of IN738. This was related to the nature of base-metal grain- boundary intersections at the fusion-zone boundary in these materials.

  4. Factors Affecting the Capture Efficiency of a Fume Extraction Torch for Gas Metal Arc Welding

    PubMed Central

    Bonthoux, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Welding fumes are classified as Group 2B ‘possibly carcinogenic’ and this prompts to the implementation of local exhaust ventilation (LEV). The fume extraction torch with LEV integrated into the tool is the most attractive solution but its capture efficiency is often disappointing in practice. This study assesses the main parameters affecting fume capture efficiency namely the extraction flow rate, the positioning of the suction openings on the torch, the angle of inclination of the torch to the workpiece during welding, the metal transfer modes, and the welding deposition rate. The theoretical velocity induced by suction, estimated from the extraction flow rate and the position of the suction openings, is the main parameter affecting effectiveness of the device. This is the design parameter and its value should never be <0.25 m s−1. The angle of the torch relative to the workpiece also has a great deal of influence. To improve efficiency, work station layouts need to favour positions where the torch is held with angles closer to perpendicular (<15°). Welding with high deposition rates (>1.1g s−1) and spray transfer leads to low capture efficiency if induced velocities are <0.5 m s−1. The results of the study can be used in the design of integrated on-torch extraction systems and provide information for fixing system objectives. PMID:27074798

  5. Development and Testing of an Experimental Polysensory Instructional System for Teaching Electric Arc Welding Processes. Report No. 24. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sergeant, Harold A.

    The population of the study consisted of 15 high school industrial arts students, 10 freshman and sophomore college students, and 10 adults. A polysensory, self-pacing instructional system was developed which included (1) pretests and post tests, (2) a general instruction book, (3) equipment to practice arc welding, (4) programed instruction…

  6. An Investigation of Mechanical Properties of Shielded Metal Arc Welding and Friction Stir Welding in 7020-T6 A1 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalal, Shawnim R.; Saeed, Mohammedtahir M.; Khider, Gawhar I.

    2014-06-01

    Two different types of welds, shielded metal arc (SMA) welding and friction stir welding (FSW) have been used to weld Aluminum alloy 7020-T6.Investigation has been carried out on mechanical properties such as (yield and tensile strength, impact, harnesses, ductility ,and microstructure) . The result shows that both method could be used to weld such alloy although FSW weld show higher mechanical properties comparison to SMA with joint efficiency equal to 97% compared to 58% in SMA .The extension of the heat affected zone is higher in SMA method in comparison to the FSW and localized grain size for FSW in the stirred zone was 15-18 micron and it was 37- 39 micron for SMA, while it was 32-35 micron for the base metal.In general decay of mechanical properties of SMA joints, was due to high temperature experienced by the material, but in FSW joint lower temperature are involved in the process due to sever plastic deformation induced by the tool motion.

  7. Set up an Arc Welding Code with Enthalpy Method in Upwind Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Je-Ee.

    2010-05-01

    In this study, a numerical code with enthalpy method in upwind scheme is proposed to estimate the distribution of thermal stress in the molten pool, which is primarily determined by the type of the input power and travel speed of heating source. To predict the cracker deficit inside the workpiece, a simulated program satisfying the diagonal domination and Scarborough criterion provides a stable iteration. Meantime, an experimental performance, operated by robot arm "DR-400" to provide a steady and continuous arc welding, was also conducted to verify the simulated result. By surveying the consistence of molten pool bounded by contrast shade and simulated melting contour on the surface of workpiece, the validity of model proposed to predict the thermal cracker has been successfully identified.

  8. Abnormal distribution of microhardness in tungsten inert gas arc butt-welded AZ61 magnesium alloy plates

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Nan; Shen Jun; Xie Weidong; Wang Linzhi; Wang Dan; Min Dong

    2010-07-15

    In this study, the effects of heat input on the distribution of microhardness of tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welded hot-extruded AZ61 magnesium alloy joints were investigated. The results show that with an increase of heat input, the distributions of microhardness at the top and bottom of the welded joints are different because they are determined by both the effect of grain coarsening and the effect of dispersion strengthening. With an increase of the heat input, the microhardness of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) at the top and bottom of welded joints and the fusion zone (FZ) at the bottom of welded joints decreased gradually, while the microhardness of the FZ at the top of welded joints decreased initially and then increased sharply. The reason for the abnormal distribution of microhardness of the FZ at the top of the welded joints is that this area is close to the heat source during welding and then large numbers of hard {beta}-Mg{sub 17}(Al,Zn){sub 12} particles are precipitated. Hence, in this case, the effect of dispersion strengthening dominated the microhardness.

  9. Mechanical properties and microstructures of a magnesium alloy gas tungsten arc welded with a cadmium chloride flux

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.D.; Liu, L.M. Shen, Y.; Wang, L.

    2008-01-15

    Gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds were prepared on 5-mm thick plates of wrought magnesium AZ31B alloy, using an activated flux. The microstructural characteristics of the weld joint were investigated using optical and scanning microscopy, and the fusion zone microstructure was compared with that of the base metal. The elemental distribution was also investigated by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Mechanical properties were determined by standard tensile tests on small-scale specimens. The as-welded fusion zone prepared using a CdCl{sub 2} flux exhibited a larger grain size than that prepared without flux; the microstructure consisted of matrix {alpha}-Mg, eutectic {alpha}-Mg and {beta}-Al{sub 12}Mg{sub 17}. The HAZ was observed to be slightly wider for the weld prepared with a CdCl{sub 2} flux compared to that prepared without flux; thus the tensile strength was lower for the flux-prepared weld. The fact that neither Cd nor Cl was detected in the weld seam by EPMA indicates that the CdCl{sub 2} flux has a small effect on convection in the weld pool.

  10. Evolution of weld metal microstructure in shielded metal arc welding of X70 HSLA steel with cellulosic electrodes: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Ghomashchi, Reza Costin, Walter; Kurji, Rahim

    2015-09-15

    The microstructure of weld joint in X70 line pipe steel resulted from shielded metal arc welding with E6010 cellulosic electrodes is characterized using optical and electron microscopy. A range of ferritic morphologies have been identified ranging from polygonal inter- and intra-prior austenite grains allotriomorphic, idiomorphic ferrites to Widmanstätten, acicular and bainitic ferrites. Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) analysis using Image Quality (IQ) and Inverse Pole Figure (IPF) maps through superimposition of IQ and IPF maps and measurement of percentages of high and low angle grain boundaries was identified to assist in differentiation of acicular ferrite from Widmanstätten and bainitic ferrite morphologies. In addition two types of pearlitic structures were identified. There was no martensite detected in this weld structure. The morphology, size and chemistry of non-metallic inclusions are also discussed briefly. - Highlights: • Application of EBSD reveals orientation relationships in a range of phases for shielded metal arc welding of HSLA steel. • Nucleation sites of various ferrite morphologies identified • Formation of upper and lower bainite and their morphologies.

  11. Metal cutting analogy for establishing Friction Stir Welding process parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, Sylvester Allen

    A friction stir weld (FSW) is a solid state joining operation whose processing parameters are currently determined by lengthy trial and error methods. To implement FSWing rapidly in various applications will require an approach for predicting process parameters based on the physics of the process. Based on hot working conditions for metals, a kinematic model has been proposed for calculating the shear strain and shear strain rates during the FSW process, validation of the proposed model with direct measuring is difficult however. Since the shear strain and shear strain rates predicted for the FSW process, are similar to those predicted in metal cutting, validation of the FSW algorithms with microstructural studies of metal chips may be possible leading to the ability to predict FSW processing parameters.

  12. Infrared measurement of base metal temperature in gas tungsten arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Farson, D.; Richardson, R.; Li, X.

    1998-09-01

    Quantification of infrared (IR) radiation is a convenient, non-contact method for making the base metal temperature measurements needed for on-line feedback controls. However, the problem of interference from the arc is a complicating factor in applying IR temperature sensing to welding. The objective of this research is to implement and test a top-face, non-contact temperature measurement system based on optical pyrometry. Investigations relating to the development of an infrared temperature measurement system are described. An apparatus consisting of a fiberoptic cable, a silicon photodiode/power meter and a computer data acquisition system were configured and used for the tests. Results of the experiments showed that radiation from both the arc and the hot tungsten electrode were important sources of interference in the IR emissions from the base metal. Attenuation of the interfering radiation using a band-pass optical filter and a specially-designed gas cup was investigated. Finally, the sensing system was calibrated using thermocouple measurements of actual base metal temperature.

  13. Control of Cr6+ emissions from gas metal arc welding using a silica precursor as a shielding gas additive.

    PubMed

    Topham, Nathan; Wang, Jun; Kalivoda, Mark; Huang, Joyce; Yu, Kuei-Min; Hsu, Yu-Mei; Wu, Chang-Yu; Oh, Sewon; Cho, Kuk; Paulson, Kathleen

    2012-03-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)) emitted from welding poses serious health risks to workers exposed to welding fumes. In this study, tetramethylsilane (TMS) was added to shielding gas to control hazardous air pollutants produced during stainless steel welding. The silica precursor acted as an oxidation inhibitor when it decomposed in the high-temperature welding arc, limiting Cr(6+) formation. Additionally, a film of amorphous SiO(2) was deposited on fume particles to insulate them from oxidation. Experiments were conducted following the American Welding Society (AWS) method for fume generation and sampling in an AWS fume hood. The results showed that total shielding gas flow rate impacted the effectiveness of the TMS process. Increasing shielding gas flow rate led to increased reductions in Cr(6+) concentration when TMS was used. When 4.2% of a 30-lpm shielding gas flow was used as TMS carrier gas, Cr(6+) concentration in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) fumes was reduced to below the 2006 Occupational Safety and Health Administration standard (5 μg m(-3)) and the efficiency was >90%. The process also increased fume particle size from a mode size of 20 nm under baseline conditions to 180-300 nm when TMS was added in all shielding gas flow rates tested. SiO(2) particles formed in the process scavenged nanosized fume particles through intercoagulation. Transmission electron microscopy imagery provided visual evidence of an amorphous film of SiO(2) on some fume particles along with the presence of amorphous SiO(2) agglomerates. These results demonstrate the ability of vapor phase silica precursors to increase welding fume particle size and minimize chromium oxidation, thereby preventing the formation of hexavalent chromium.

  14. Welding fumes from stainless steel gas metal arc processes contain multiple manganese chemical species.

    PubMed

    Keane, Michael; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean

    2010-05-01

    Fumes from a group of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes used on stainless steel were generated using three different metal transfer modes and four different shield gases. The objective was to identify and measure manganese (Mn) species in the fumes, and identify processes that are minimal generators of Mn species. The robotic welding system was operated in short-circuit (SC) mode (Ar/CO2 and He/Ar), axial spray (AXS) mode (Ar/O2 and Ar/CO2), and pulsed axial-spray (PAXS) mode (Ar/O2). The fumes were analyzed for Mn by a sequential extraction process followed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, and by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Total elemental Mn, iron (Fe), chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) were separately measured after aqua regia digestion and ICP-AES analysis. Soluble Mn2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, and Ni2+ in a simple biological buffer (phosphate-buffered saline) were determined at pH 7.2 and 5.0 after 2 h incubation at 37 C by ion chromatography. Results indicate that Mn was present in soluble form, acid-soluble form, and acid-soluble form after reduction by hydroxylamine, which represents soluble Mn0 and Mn2+ compounds, other Mn2+ compounds, and (Mn3+ and Mn4+) compounds, respectively. The dominant fraction was the acid-soluble Mn2+ fraction, but results varied with the process and shield gas. Soluble Mn mass percent in the fume ranged from 0.2 to 0.9%, acid-soluble Mn2+ compounds ranged from 2.6 to 9.3%, and acid plus reducing agent-soluble (Mn3+ and Mn4+) compounds ranged from 0.6 to 5.1%. Total Mn composition ranged from 7 to 15%. XRD results showed fumes had a crystalline content of 90-99% Fe3O4, and showed evidence of multiple Mn oxides, but overlaps and weak signals limited identification. Small amounts of the Mn2+ in the fume (<0.01 to ≈ 1% or <0.1 to ≈ 10 microg ml(-1)) and Ni2+ (<0.01 to ≈ 0.2% or <0.1 to ≈ 2 mg ml(-1)) ions were found in biological buffer media, but amounts were highly dependent on pH and the

  15. Influence of Processing Parameters on the Flow Path in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, J. A.; Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid phase welding process that unites thermal and mechanical aspects to produce a high quality joint. The process variables are rpm, translational weld speed, and downward plunge force. The strain-temperature history of a metal element at each point on the cross-section of the weld is determined by the individual flow path taken by the particular filament of metal flowing around the tool as influenced by the process variables. The resulting properties of the weld are determined by the strain-temperature history. Thus to control FSW properties, improved understanding of the processing parameters on the metal flow path is necessary.

  16. The Effect of Constant and Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding on Joint Properties of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel to 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neissi, R.; Shamanian, M.; Hajihashemi, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, dissimilar 316L austenitic stainless steel/2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) joints were fabricated by constant and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding process using ER2209 DSS as a filler metal. Microstructures and joint properties were characterized using optical and electron scanning microscopy, tensile, Charpy V-notch impact and micro-hardness tests, and cyclic polarization measurements. Microstructural observations confirmed the presence of chromium nitride and delta ferrite in the heat-affected zone of DSS and 316L, respectively. In addition, there was some deviation in the austenite/ferrite ratio of the surface welding pass in comparison to the root welding pass. Besides having lower pitting potential, welded joints produced by constant current gas tungsten arc welding process, consisted of some brittle sigma phase precipitates, which resulted in some impact energy reduction. The tensile tests showed high tensile strength for the weld joints in which all the specimens were broken in 316L base metal.

  17. Multiphysics Modeling and Simulations of Mil A46100 Armor-Grade Martensitic Steel Gas Metal Arc Welding Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-23

    Multiphysics Modeling and Simulations of Mil A46100 Armor-Grade Martensitic Steel Gas Metal Arc Welding Process M. Grujicic, S. Ramaswami, J.S...hardness armor martensitic steel . The model consists of five distinct modules, each covering a specific aspect of the GMAW process, i.e., (a) dynamics...FZ, and the adjacent heat-affected zone, HAZ) of a prototypical high-hardness armor-grade martensitic steel MIL A46100 (Ref 1). It is hoped that the

  18. Parametric Optimization Of Gas Metal Arc Welding Process By Using Grey Based Taguchi Method On Aisi 409 Ferritic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Nabendu; Kumar, Pradip; Nandi, Goutam

    2016-10-01

    Welding input process parameters play a very significant role in determining the quality of the welded joint. Only by properly controlling every element of the process can product quality be controlled. For better quality of MIG welding of Ferritic stainless steel AISI 409, precise control of process parameters, parametric optimization of the process parameters, prediction and control of the desired responses (quality indices) etc., continued and elaborate experiments, analysis and modeling are needed. A data of knowledge - base may thus be generated which may be utilized by the practicing engineers and technicians to produce good quality weld more precisely, reliably and predictively. In the present work, X-ray radiographic test has been conducted in order to detect surface and sub-surface defects of weld specimens made of Ferritic stainless steel. The quality of the weld has been evaluated in terms of yield strength, ultimate tensile strength and percentage of elongation of the welded specimens. The observed data have been interpreted, discussed and analyzed by considering ultimate tensile strength ,yield strength and percentage elongation combined with use of Grey-Taguchi methodology.

  19. Design for low-cost gas metal arc weld-based aluminum 3-D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haselhuhn, Amberlee S.

    Additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3-D printing, has the potential to change the state of manufacturing across the globe. Parts are made, or printed, layer by layer using only the materials required to form the part, resulting in much less waste than traditional manufacturing methods. Additive manufacturing has been implemented in a wide variety of industries including aerospace, medical, consumer products, and fashion, using metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, and even organic tissues. However, traditional 3-D printing technologies, particularly those used to print metals, can be prohibitively expensive for small enterprises and the average consumer. A low-cost open-source metal 3-D printer has been developed based upon gas metal arc weld (GMAW) technology. Using this technology, substrate release mechanisms have been developed, allowing the user to remove a printed metal part from a metal substrate by hand. The mechanical and microstructural properties of commercially available weld alloys were characterized and used to guide alloy development in 4000 series aluminum-silicon alloys. Wedge casting experiments were performed to screen magnesium, strontium, and titanium boride alloying additions in hypoeutectic aluminum-silicon alloys for their properties and the ease with which they could be printed. Finally, the top performing alloys, which were approximately 11.6% Si modified with strontium and titanium boride were cast, extruded, and drawn into wire. These wires were printed and the mechanical and microstructural properties were compared with those of commercially available alloys. This work resulted in an easier-to-print aluminum-silicon-strontium alloy that exhibited lower porosity, equivalent yield and tensile strengths, yet nearly twice the ductility compared to commercial alloys.

  20. Microstructural changes of a thermally aged stainless steel submerged arc weld overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, T.; Kameda, J.; Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T.; Matsukawa, Y.; Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K.

    2012-06-01

    The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes in stainless steel submerged arc weld-overlay cladding of reactor pressure vessels was investigated using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to post-welding heat treatments (PWHTs), with a subsequent furnace cooling, a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was observed due to spinodal decomposition in the δ-ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 °C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the δ-ferrite phase. The degree of the spinodal decomposition in the submerged arc weld sample was similar to that in the electroslag weld one reported previously. We also observed a carbide on the γ-austenite and δ-ferrite interface. There were no Cr depleted zones around the carbide.

  1. Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Mechanical and Electrochemical Properties of Gas Metal Arc-Welded 316L (X2CrNiMo 17-13-2) Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, F.; Ahmad, A.; Farooq, A.; Haider, W.

    2016-10-01

    In the present research work, corrosion behavior of post-weld heat-treated (PWHT) AISI 316L (X2CrNiMo 17-13-2) specimens joined by gas metal arc welding is compared with as-welded samples by using potentiodynamic polarization technique. Welded samples were PWHT at 1323 K for 480 s and quenched. Mechanical properties, corrosion behavior and microstructures of as-welded and PWHT specimens were investigated. Microstructural studies have shown grain size refinement after PWHT. Ultimate tensile strength and yield strength were found maximum for PWHT samples. Bend test have shown that PWHT imparted ductility in welded sample. Fractographic analysis has evidenced ductile behavior for samples. Potentiodynamic polarization test was carried out in a solution composed of 1 M H2SO4 and 1 N NaCl. Corrosion rate of weld region was 127.6 mpy, but after PWHT, it was decreased to 13.12 mpy.

  2. Welding IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding IV, a competency-based course in advanced arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with proficiency in: (1) single vee groove welding using code specifications established by the American Welding Society…

  3. Investigation in the use of plasma arc welding and alternative feedstock delivery method in additive manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhuzaim, Abdullah F.

    The work conducted for this thesis was to investigate the use of plasma arc welding (PAW) and steel shot as a means of additive manufacturing. A robotic PAW system and automatic shot feeder were used to manufacture linear walls approximately 100 mm long by 7 mm wide and 20 mm tall. The walls were built, layer-by-layer, on plain carbon steel substrate by adding individual 2.5 mm diameter plain carbon steel shot. Each layer was built, shot-by-shot, using a pulse of arc current to form a molten pool on the deposit into which each shot was deposited and melted. The deposition rate, a measure of productivity, was approximately 50 g/hour. Three walls were built using the same conditions except for the deposit preheat temperature prior to adding each new layer. The deposit preheat temperature was controlled by allowing the deposit to cool after each layer for an amount of time called the inter-layer wait time. The walls were sectioned and grain size and hardness distribution were measured as a function of wall height. The results indicated that, for all specimens, deposit grain size increased and hardness decreased as wall height increased. Furthermore, average grain size decreased and hardness increased as interlayer wait time increased. An analytical heat flow model was developed to study the influence of interlayer wait time on deposit temperature and therefore grain size and hardness. The results of the model indicated that as wall height increased, the rate of deposit heat removal by conduction to the substrate decreased leading to a higher preheat temperature after a fixed interlayer wait time causing grain size to increase as wall height increased. However, the model results also show that as wall height increased, the deposit surface area from which heat energy is lost via convection and radiation increased. The model also demonstrated that the use of a means of forced convection to rapidly remove heat from the deposit could be an effective way to boost

  4. Improved microstructure and mechanical properties in gas tungsten arc welded aluminum joints by using graphene nanosheets/aluminum composite filler wires.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, M; Gholami, A R; Eynalvandpour, A; Ahmadi, E; Fattahi, Y; Akhavan, S

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, different amounts of graphene nanosheets (GNSs) were added to the 4043 aluminum alloy powders by using the mechanical alloying method to produce the composite filler wires. With each of the produced composite filler wires, one all-weld metal coupon was welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding process. The microstructure, mechanical properties and fracture surface morphology of the weld metals have been evaluated and the results are compared. As the amount of GNSs in the composition of filler wire is increased, the microstructure of weld metal was changed from the dendritic structure to fine equiaxed grains. Furthermore, the tensile strength and microhardness of weld metal was improved, and is attributed to the augmented nucleation and retarded growth. From the results, it was seen that the GNSs/Al composite filler wire can be used to improve the microstructure and mechanical properties of GTA weld metals of aluminum and its alloys.

  5. VPPA weld model evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccutcheon, Kimble D.; Gordon, Stephen S.; Thompson, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    NASA uses the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process extensively for fabrication of Space Shuttle External Tanks. This welding process has been in use at NASA since the late 1970's but the physics of the process have never been satisfactorily modeled and understood. In an attempt to advance the level of understanding of VPPAW, Dr. Arthur C. Nunes, Jr., (NASA) has developed a mathematical model of the process. The work described in this report evaluated and used two versions (level-0 and level-1) of Dr. Nunes' model, and a model derived by the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH) from Dr. Nunes' level-1 model. Two series of VPPAW experiments were done, using over 400 different combinations of welding parameters. Observations were made of VPPAW process behavior as a function of specific welding parameter changes. Data from these weld experiments was used to evaluate and suggest improvements to Dr. Nunes' model. Experimental data and correlations with the model were used to develop a multi-variable control algorithm for use with a future VPPAW controller. This algorithm is designed to control weld widths (both on the crown and root of the weld) based upon the weld parameters, base metal properties, and real-time observation of the crown width. The algorithm exhibited accuracy comparable to that of the weld width measurements for both aluminum and mild steel welds.

  6. Submerged-arc welding slags: characterization and leaching strategies for the removal of aluminum and titanium.

    PubMed

    Annoni, Raquel; Souza, Poliana Santos; Petrániková, Martina; Miskufova, Andrea; Havlík, Tomáš; Mansur, Marcelo Borges

    2013-01-15

    In the present study, submerged-arc welding slags were characterized by applying a variety of methods, including X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, particle size, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The content of Al proved to be quite similar within neutral and acid slags (10-14%), while that of Ti proved to be much higher in acid slags (approximately 10%) than in neutral slags (<1%). The presence of spinel structures associated with Al species could also be identified in the analyzed samples. This characterization study was accompanied by leaching tests performed under changing operating conditions in an attempt to evaluate to what extent the Al and Ti bearing components could be removed from the slags. The leaching work involved three distinct strategies: (i) NaOH leaching followed by H(2)SO(4) leaching, (ii) acid leaching (HCl and H(2)SO(4)) using oxidizing/reducing agents, and (iii) slag calcination followed by H(2)SO(4) leaching. In the best result, 80% of Al was extracted in one single leaching stage after calcination of the acid slag with NaCl+C at 900 °C. By contrast, the removal of Ti proved to be unsatisfactory.

  7. Fracture properties of a neutron-irradiated stainless steel submerged arc weld cladding overlay

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.; Berggren, R.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of stainless steel cladding to increase the resistance of an operating nuclear reactor pressure vessel to extension of surface flaws depends greatly on the properties of the irradiated cladding. Therefore, weld overlay cladding irradiated at temperatures and fluences relevant to power reactor operation was examined. The cladding was applied to a pressure vessel steel plate by the submerged arc, single-wire, oscillating-electrode method. Three layers of cladding provided a thickness adequate for fabrication of test specimens. The first layer was type 309, and the upper two layers were type 308 stainless steel. The type 309 was diluted considerably by excessive melting of the base plate. Specimens were taken from near the base plate-cladding interface and also from the upper layers. Charpy V-notch and tensile specimens were irradiated at 288/sup 0/C to a fluence of 2 x 10/sup 23/ neutrons/m/sup 2/ (>1 MeV). 10 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Pulsed GMAW Parameter Variation to Minimize Interference from Tack Welds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    since welding is done to support a wide variety of work -- hull structure, foundations, piping , sheetmetal, etc. Further insight is gained by examining...100 Table 2.7 Shipyard welding utilization. (7) Item structural 55-65 pipe 18-23 burning 15-18 sheetmetal 3- 7 naval auxiliary ships, but for naval...combatants, pipe welding would have a 37 higher percentage relative to structure. To summarize, it is clear that while outfitting dominates naval

  9. Arc and resistance welding and tumours of the endocrine glands: a Swedish case-control study with focus on extremely low frequency magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Hakansson, N; Stenlund, C; Gustavsson, P; Johansen, C; Floderus, B

    2005-01-01

    Background: Mechanisms for potential effects of extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields on carcinogenesis have not been identified. A potential pathway could be an interaction with the endocrine system. Aims: To analyse occupational exposure to ELF magnetic fields from welding, and tumours of the endocrine glands. Methods: This case-control study was based on a cohort with an increased prevalence of high exposed individuals. A total of 174 incident cases of tumours of the endocrine glands, 1985–94, were identified and data were obtained from 140 (80%) of these cases; 1692 controls frequency matched on sex and age were selected, and information on 1306 (77%) individuals was obtained. A short questionnaire was sent to a work administrator at the workplaces of the cases and controls. The exposure assessment was based on questions about job tasks, exposure to different types of welding, and exposure to solvents. Results: There was an overall increased risk for all tumours of the endocrine glands for individuals who had been welding sometime during the follow up. The increased risk was attributable to arc welding; for resistance welding there was no clear evidence of an association. We found an increased risk for the adrenal glands in relation to arc welding, and for the parathyroid glands in relation to both arc welding and resistance welding. An imprecise increase in risk was also noted for tumours of the pituitary gland for arc welding. No confounding effect was found for solvent exposure, and there was no sign of biological interaction. Conclusion: The increased risks of endocrine gland tumours related to welding might be explained by exposure to high levels of ELF magnetic fields. PMID:15837851

  10. [The use of a focused arc welding technic for gold and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys].

    PubMed

    Dielert, E

    1978-10-01

    Joint work on small amounts of dental alloy Au-Ag-Cu (10 x 10 x 1 mm) and Co-Cr-Mo (20 x 10 x 1 mm) is relatively simple with the microplasma welding technique. The welding results are good after a short practice period. The welding technique should be improved in two points. The suitability and reliability of welding should be studied.

  11. Joining of dissimilar AZ31B magnesium alloy and SS400 mild steel by hybrid gas tungsten arc friction stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, SungMin

    2013-11-01

    The joining of dissimilar materials, magnesium alloy (AZ31B) and mild steel (SS400), was performed using a hybrid gas tungsten arc-friction stir welding (HGTAFSW) method that applied a preceding gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) preheating heat source to a mild steel plate surface during friction stir welding (FSW). The mechanical and microstructural characteristics of the HGTAFS welds were evaluated and compared to those of FS welds to confirm the effect of the additional GTAW preheating heat source. The tensile strength of the HGTAFS welds was approximately 91% of that of the magnesium alloy base metal but higher than that of the FS welds. This was attributed to the enhanced material plastic flow and partial annealing effect in the magnesium alloy and mild steel materials by GTAW reheating of the mild steel side, which induced a significant increase in the elongation of the welds. The concentration profiles indicated that no intermetallic FeAl and FeAl3 compounds had formed according to the phase diagram, which led to a decrease in joint strength. Overall, the use of HGTAFSW by applying a GTAW preheating heat source to a mild steelplate surface resulted in a mechanically sounder and metallurgically defect-free welds compared to FSW.

  12. Modeling of plasma and thermo-fluid transport in hybrid welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribic, Brandon D.

    Hybrid welding combines a laser beam and electrical arc in order to join metals within a single pass at welding speeds on the order of 1 m min -1. Neither autonomous laser nor arc welding can achieve the weld geometry obtained from hybrid welding for the same process parameters. Depending upon the process parameters, hybrid weld depth and width can each be on the order of 5 mm. The ability to produce a wide weld bead increases gap tolerance for square joints which can reduce machining costs and joint fitting difficulty. The weld geometry and fast welding speed of hybrid welding make it a good choice for application in ship, pipeline, and aerospace welding. Heat transfer and fluid flow influence weld metal mixing, cooling rates, and weld bead geometry. Cooling rate affects weld microstructure and subsequent weld mechanical properties. Fluid flow and heat transfer in the liquid weld pool are affected by laser and arc energy absorption. The laser and arc generate plasmas which can influence arc and laser energy absorption. Metal vapors introduced from the keyhole, a vapor filled cavity formed near the laser focal point, influence arc plasma light emission and energy absorption. However, hybrid welding plasma properties near the opening of the keyhole are not known nor is the influence of arc power and heat source separation understood. A sound understanding of these processes is important to consistently achieving sound weldments. By varying process parameters during welding, it is possible to better understand their influence on temperature profiles, weld metal mixing, cooling rates, and plasma properties. The current literature has shown that important process parameters for hybrid welding include: arc power, laser power, and heat source separation distance. However, their influence on weld temperatures, fluid flow, cooling rates, and plasma properties are not well understood. Modeling has shown to be a successful means of better understanding the influence of

  13. Characterization and Optimization of Ni-WC Composite Weld Matrix Deposited by Plasma-Transferred Arc Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahaei, Ali; Horley, Paul; Merlin, Mattia; Torres-Torres, David; Garagnani, Gian Luca; Praga, Rolando; Vázquez, Felipe J. García; Arizmendi-Morquecho, Ana

    2017-01-01

    This work is dedicated to optimization of carbide particle system in a weld bead deposited by PTAW technique over D2 tool steel with high chromium content. The paper reports partial melting of the original carbide grains of the Ni-based filling powder, and growing of the secondary carbide phase (Cr, Ni)_3 W_3 C in the form of dendrites with wide branches that enhanced mechanical properties of the weld. The optimization of bead parameters was made with design of experiment methodology complemented by a complex sample characterization including SEM, EDXS, XRD, and nanoindentation measurements. It was shown that the preheat of the substrate to a moderate temperature 523 K (250° C) establishes linear pattern of metal flow in the weld pool, resulting in the most homogeneous distribution of the primary carbides in the microstructure of weld bead.

  14. Characterization and Optimization of Ni-WC Composite Weld Matrix Deposited by Plasma-Transferred Arc Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahaei, Ali; Horley, Paul; Merlin, Mattia; Torres-Torres, David; Garagnani, Gian Luca; Praga, Rolando; Vázquez, Felipe J. García; Arizmendi-Morquecho, Ana

    2017-03-01

    This work is dedicated to optimization of carbide particle system in a weld bead deposited by PTAW technique over D2 tool steel with high chromium content. The paper reports partial melting of the original carbide grains of the Ni-based filling powder, and growing of the secondary carbide phase (Cr, Ni)_3W_3C in the form of dendrites with wide branches that enhanced mechanical properties of the weld. The optimization of bead parameters was made with design of experiment methodology complemented by a complex sample characterization including SEM, EDXS, XRD, and nanoindentation measurements. It was shown that the preheat of the substrate to a moderate temperature 523 K (250° C) establishes linear pattern of metal flow in the weld pool, resulting in the most homogeneous distribution of the primary carbides in the microstructure of weld bead.

  15. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  16. In-situ spatially resolved x-ray diffraction mapping of the alpha to beta to alpha transformation in commercially pure titanium arc welds

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J. W., LLNL

    1998-05-15

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) is used to map the {alpha}{r_arrow}{beta}{r_arrow}{alpha} phase transformation in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of commercially pure titanium gas tungsten arc welds. In-situ SRXRD experiments were conducted on arc welds using a 200 pm diameter x-ray beam at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). A map was created which identifies six HAZ microstructural regions that exist between the liquid weld pool and the base metal during welding. The first region is single phase {beta}-Ti that forms in a 2- to 3-mm band adjacent to the liquid weld pool. The second region is back transformed {alpha}-Ti that forms behind the portion of the HAZ where {beta}-Ti was once present at higher temperatures. The third region is completely recrystallized {alpha}-Ti that forms in a 2- to 3-mm band surrounding the single phase {beta}-Ti region. Recrystallized {alpha}-Ti was observed by itself and also with varying amounts of {beta}-Ti. The fourth region of the weld is the partially transformed zone where {alpha}-Ti and {beta}-Ti coexist during welding. The fifth region is directly behind the partially transformed zone and consists of a mixture of recrystallized and back transformed {alpha}-Ti The sixth region is farthest from the weld pool and consists of {alpha}-Ti that is undergoing annealing and recrystallization. Annealing of the base metal was observed to some degree in all of the SRXRD patterns, showing that annealing exceeded 13 mm from the centerline of the weld. Although the microstructure consisted predominantly of {alpha}-Ti, both prior to the weld and after the weld, the (002) texture of the starting material was altered during welding to produce a predominantly (101) texture within the resulting HAZ.

  17. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehigh County Area Vocational-Technical School, Schnecksville, PA.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 12-unit secondary course in welding. Purpose stated for the flexible entry and exit course is to help students master manipulative skills to develop successful welding techniques and to gain an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in the welding field. Units cover oxyacetylene…

  18. Effect of welding parameters on the mechanical and microstructural properties of friction stir welded AA- 2014 joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, R.; Bhatty, M. B.; Iqbal, F.; Zaigham, H.; Salam, I.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the effect of processing parameters on the mechanical and microstructural properties of aluminum AA2014-T6 joints produced by friction stir welding was analyzed. Friction stir welding was carried out on a milling machine. Different samples were produced by varying the tool rotational rates (700, 1000 rpm) and travel speeds (45-105 mm/min). Tensile tests performed at room temperature were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the joints. In order to analyze the microstructural evolution of the material, the welds’ cross-sections were observed under optical microscope. The results shows that the resulting microstructure is free of defects and tensile strength of the welded joints is upto 75% of the base metal strength.

  19. Designing shielded metal arc consumables for underwater wet welding in offshore applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Osio, A.; Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.; Ibarra, S.

    1995-08-01

    The use of underwater wet welding for offshore repairs has been limited mainly because of porosity and low toughness in the resulting welds. With appropriate consumable design, however, it is possible to reduce porosity and to enhance weld metal toughness through microstructural refinement. New titanium and boron-based consumables have been developed with which high toughness acicular ferrite (AF) can be produced in underwater wet welds. Titanium, by means of oxide formation, promoted an increase in the amount of acicular ferrite in the weld metal, while boron additions decreased the amount of grain boundary ferrite (GBF), further improving the microstructure. Porosity reduction was possible through the addition of calcium carbonate at approximately 13 wt percent in the electrode coating. However, weld metal decarbonization also resulted with the addition of carbonate.

  20. Automatic Submerged ARC Welding With Metal Power Additions to Increase Productivity and Maintain Quality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    Manager of Welding Engineering PROPOSAL WELDING OF CARBON STEEL AND HY80 UTILIZING THE BULK WELDING PROCESS May 9, 1983 PREPARED BY: NEWPORT NEwS...12 joints with carbon steel and 12 with HY80 , utilizing three The joints will requirements of Benefits 1. Deposition times that different size double...of Joint Variations and Deposition Rates Filler Metal/Base Material Chemical Analyses; Carbon Steel /HIS Filler Metal/Base Material Chemical Analyses

  1. Plutonium metal and oxide container weld development and qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, R.; Horrell, D.R.; Hoth, C.W.; Pierce, S.W.; Rink, N.A.; Rivera, Y.M.; Sandoval, V.D.

    1996-01-01

    Welds were qualified for a container system to be used for long-term storage of plutonium metal and oxide. Inner and outer containers are formed of standard tubing with stamped end pieces gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welded onto both ends. The weld qualification identified GTA parameters to produce a robust weld that meets the requirements of the Department of Energy standard DOE-STD-3013-94, ``Criteria for the Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides.``

  2. Determination of Some Parameters for Fatigue Life in Welded Joints Using Fracture Mechanics Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mukhtar, A. M.; Biermann, H.; Hübner, P.; Henkel, S.

    2010-12-01

    In this work, the parameters stress intensity factor (SIF), initial and final crack lengths ( a i and a f), crack growth parameters ( C and m), and fatigue strength (FAT) are investigated. The determination of initial crack length seems to be the most serious factor in fatigue life and strength calculations for welded joints. A fracture mechanics approach was used in these calculations based on SIF which was calculated with the finite element method (FEM). The weld toe crack was determined to be equal to 0.1 mm, whereas the weld root crack's length was varied depending on the degree of the weld penetration. These initial crack length values are applicable for all types of joints which have the same crack phenomenon. As based on the above calculated parameters, the new limits of FAT for new geometries which are not listed yet in recommendations can be calculated according to the current approach.

  3. Sensitivity analysis of physics and planning SmartArc parameters for single and partial arc VMAT planning.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai; Yan, Di; Tyagi, Neelam

    2012-11-08

    We investigate the sensitivity of various physics and planning SmartArc parameters to generate single and partial arc VMAT plans with equivalent or better plan quality as IMRT. Patients previously treated with step-and-shoot IMRT for several treatment sites were replanned using SmartArc. These treatment sites included head and neck, prostate, lung, and spine. Effect of various physics and planning SmartArc parameters, such as continuous vs. binned dose rate, dynamic leaf gap, leaf speed, maximum delivery time, number of arcs, and control point spacing, were investigated for Elekta Axesse and Synergy linacs. Absolute dose distribution was measured by using the ArcCHECK 3D cylindrical diode array. For all cases investigated, plan metrics such as conformity indices and dose homogeneity indices increased, while plan QA decreased with increasing leaf speed. Leaf speed had a significant impact on the segment size for low dose per fractionation cases. Constraining leaf motion to a lower speed not only avoids tiny large leaf travel and low-dose rate value, but also achieves better PTV coverage (defined as the volume receiving prescription dose) with less total MUs. Maximum delivery time, the number of arcs, and the spacing of control points all had similar effects as the leaf motion constraint on dose rate and segment size. The maximum delivery time had a significant effect on the optimization, acting as a hard constraint. Increasing the control point spacing from 2 to 6 degrees increased the PTV coverage, but reduced the absolute dose gamma passing rate. Plans generated using continuous and binned dose rate modes did not show any difference in the quality and the delivery for the Elekta machines. Dosimetric analysis with a 3D cylindrical QA phantom resulted in 93.6%-99.3% of detectors with a gamma index (3%/2 mm) < 1 for all cases.

  4. Optimizing friction stir welding parameters to maximize tensile strength of AA2219 aluminum alloy joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu, S.; Elangovan, K.; Balasubramanian, V.; Balasubramanian, M.

    2009-04-01

    AA2219 aluminium alloy (Al-Cu-Mn alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of lightweight structures requiring a high strength-to-weight ratio and good corrosion resistance. In contrast to the fusion welding processes that are routinely used for joining structural aluminium alloys, the friction stir welding (FSW) process is an emerging solid state joining process in which the material that is being welded does not melt and recast. This process uses a non-consumable tool to generate frictional heat in the abutting surfaces. The welding parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding speed, axial force etc., and the tool pin profile play a major role in determining the joint strength. An attempt has been made here to develop a mathematical model to predict the tensile strength of friction stir welded AA2219 aluminium alloy by incorporating FSW process parameters. A central composite design with four factors and five levels has been used to minimize the number of experimental conditions. The response surface method (RSM) has been used to develop the model. The developed mathematical model has been optimized using the Hooke and Jeeves search technique to maximize the tensile strength of the friction stir welded AA2219 aluminium alloy joints.

  5. Parameter Design in Fusion Welding of AA 6061 Aluminium Alloy using Desirability Grey Relational Analysis (DGRA) Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adalarasan, R.; Santhanakumar, M.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, yield strength, ultimate strength and micro-hardness of the lap joints formed with Al 6061 alloy sheets by using the processes of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding and Metal Inert Gas (MIG) welding were studied for various combinations of the welding parameters. The parameters taken for study include welding current, voltage, welding speed and inert gas flow rate. Taguchi's L9 orthogonal array was used to conduct the experiments and an integrated technique of desirability grey relational analysis was disclosed for optimizing the welding parameters. The ignored robustness in desirability approach is compensated by the grey relational approach to predict the optimal setting of input parameters for the TIG and MIG welding processes which were validated through the confirmation experiments.

  6. Microstructure formation in partially melted zone during gas tungsten arc welding of AZ91 Mg cast alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Tianping Chen, Zhan W.; Gao Wei

    2008-11-15

    During gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of AZ91 Mg cast alloy, constitutional liquid forms locally in the original interdendritic regions in the partially melted zone (PMZ). The PMZ re-solidification behaviour has not been well understood. In this study, the gradual change of the re-solidification microstructure within PMZ from base metal side to weld metal side was characterised. High cooling rate experiments using Gleeble thermal simulator were also conducted to understand the morphological change of the {alpha}-Mg/{beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase interface formed during re-solidification after partial melting. It was found that the original partially divorced eutectic structure has become a more regular eutectic phase in most of the PMZ, although close to the fusion boundary the re-solidified eutectic is again a divorced one. Proceeding the eutectic re-solidification, if the degree of partial melting is sufficiently high, {alpha}-Mg re-solidified with a cellular growth, resulting in a serrated interface between {alpha}-Mg and {alpha}-Mg/{beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} in the weld sample and between {alpha}-Mg and {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} (fully divorced eutectic) in Gleeble samples. The morphological changes affected by the peak temperature and cooling rate are also explained.

  7. Remote automatic plasma arc-closure welding of a dry-storage canister for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Sprecace, R.P.; Blankenship, W.P.

    1982-12-31

    A carbon steel storage canister has been designed for the dry encapsulation of spent nuclear fuel assemblies or of logs of vitrified high level radioactive waste. The canister design is in conformance with the requirements of the ASME Code, Section III, Division 1 for a Class 3 vessel. The canisters will be loaded and sealed as part of a completely remote process sequence to be performed in the hot bay of an experimental encapsulation facility at the Nevada Test Site. The final closure to be made is a full penetration butt weld between the canister body, a 12.75-in O.D. x 0.25-in wall pipe, and a mating semiellipsoidal closure lid. Due to a combination of design, application and facility constraints, the closure weld must be made in the 2G position (canister vertical). The plasma arc welding system is described, and the final welding procedure is described and discussed in detail. Several aspects and results of the procedure development activity, which are of both specific and general interest, are highlighted; these include: The critical welding torch features which must be exactly controlled to permit reproducible energy input to, and gas stream interaction with, the weld puddle. A comparison of results using automatic arc voltage control with those obtained using a mechanically fixed initial arc gap. The optimization of a keyhole initiation procedure. A comparison of results using an autogenous keyhole closure procedure with those obtained using a filler metal addition. The sensitivity of the welding process and procedure to variations in joint configuration and dimensions and to variations in base metal chemistry. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of the plasma arc process for this application are summarized from the current viewpoint, and the applicability of this process to other similar applications is briefly indicated.

  8. One Side Welding--Flux Development--and Study of Multiple Arc Behavior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1971-01-01

    containing 19% iron powder (977-39C). The top is flat and has good surface tie-in but the bottom is completely underfilled because of the lack of iron...electrodes in 1 1/2 inch ABS Gd. C. plate are slightly underfilled on top but the bottom has good shape. Cross sections of the welds show good contour...This weld shape should be avoided because of the possibility of voids and entrapped slag particles in the center of the weld between the two

  9. The Concept of Electrically Assisted Friction Stir Welding (EAFSW) and Application to the Processing of Various Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    TZM) 2617 5.2 Good for Al, some success with mild steel , bronze & Ti- 6-4 Steel (SS, tool, mild) -1540 10-70 Good for aluminum alloys Tantalum 2996...lbs. This compares with forces of about 1000 lbs or so for conventional FSW welds in aluminum . With optimization of parameters, a higher weld speed...welding ( FSW ). Since 1991, friction stir welding provides an alternative to arc welding as a metal joining method in numerous applications. In FSW

  10. Influences of process parameters on tensile strength of friction stir welded cast A319 aluminium alloy joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaraman, M.; Sivasubramanian, R.; Balasubramanian, V.; Babu, S.

    2009-04-01

    Fusion welding of cast A319 (Al-Si-Cu) alloy will lead to many problems including porosity, micro-fissuring, and hot cracking. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) can be used to weld A319 alloy without these defects. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to study the effect of FSW process parameters on the tensile strength of A319 alloy welded joints. Joints were made using different combinations of tool rotation speed, welding speed, and axial force, each at four levels. The quality of weld zone was analyzed using macrostructure and microstructure analysis. Tensile strength of the joints were evaluated and correlated with the weld zone microstructure. The joint fabricated with a 1200 rpm tool rotation speed, 40 mm/min welding speed, and 4 kN axial force showed superior tensile strength compared with the other joints.

  11. Method for enhanced control of welding processes

    DOEpatents

    Sheaffer, Donald A.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Tung, David M.; Schroder, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Method and system for producing high quality welds in welding processes, in general, and gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding, in particular by controlling weld penetration. Light emitted from a weld pool is collected from the backside of a workpiece by optical means during welding and transmitted to a digital video camera for further processing, after the emitted light is first passed through a short wavelength pass filter to remove infrared radiation. By filtering out the infrared component of the light emitted from the backside weld pool image, the present invention provides for the accurate determination of the weld pool boundary. Data from the digital camera is fed to an imaging board which focuses on a 100.times.100 pixel portion of the image. The board performs a thresholding operation and provides this information to a digital signal processor to compute the backside weld pool dimensions and area. This information is used by a control system, in a dynamic feedback mode, to automatically adjust appropriate parameters of a welding system, such as the welding current, to control weld penetration and thus, create a uniform weld bead and high quality weld.

  12. The ways of reliability enhancement of welded metal structures for critical applications in the conditions of low climatic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraev, Yu. N.; Bezborodov, V. P.; Gladkovsky, S. V.; Golikov, N. I.

    2016-11-01

    The paper studies how the energy parameters of an effective welding technology based on adaptive pulse-arc welding method influence the microstructure, mechanical characteristics and fatigue strength of low carbon steel 09G2S welded joint. It is established that the application of the adaptive pulse-arc welding method with modulated current (CMW) as compared to the welding method with direct current (DCW) allows one to obtain a welded joint of this steel with high reserve impact strength, dynamic fracture toughness and fatigue strength of metallic structures at operation temperatures up to -60°C.

  13. Observation of the mechanisms causing two kinds of undercut during laser hybrid arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Jan; Norman, Peter; Kaplan, Alexander F. H.; Rubin, Per; Lamas, Javier; Yañez, Armando

    2011-06-01

    Two different kinds of undercut were identified when laser hybrid welding hot rolled HSLA-steel in either the as-rolled condition or with the top surface mill scale removed. The presence of mill scale on the steel surface was found to give a sharp angled undercut combined with a sharp oxide inclusion at the edge of the weld which would have the same mechanical effect as a crack in this position. Removal of the surface oxides before welding resulted in the elimination of the oxide inclusions and a more rounded undercut geometry indicative of superior mechanical properties, particularly fatigue life. The mechanisms of the formation of both types of undercut have been analysed by high speed photography and SEM.

  14. Flux formation for underwater wet flux-cored arc welding of nickel-based and austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Findlan, S.J.; Frederick, G.J.

    1993-08-17

    A flux formulation is described for underwater wet flux-cored arc welding, said flux formulation being free of halogen-containing components and having the following composition: 40-80%: Rutile, Titania (TiO[sub 2]), 0-30%: Zirconium oxide (ZrO[sub 2]), 0-10%: Silicon oxide (SiO[sub 2]), 0-5%: Potassium titanate (K[sub 2]O/TiO[sub 3] at ratio of 3:1). 0-30%: Lithium silicate (Li[sub 2]SiO[sub 3]), 0-15%: Lithium carbonate (Li[sub 2]CO[sub 3]), provided that the sum of the contents of lithium silicate (Li[sub 2]SiO[sub 3]) and lithium carbonate (Li[sub 2]CO[sub 3]) be no less than 10%.

  15. Fatique Resistant, Energy Efficient Welding Program, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Egland, Keith; Ludewig, Howard

    2006-05-25

    The program scope was to affect the heat input and the resultant weld bead geometry by synchronizing robotic weave cycles with desired pulsed waveform shapes to develop process parameters relationships and optimized pulsed gas metal arc welding processes for welding fatique-critical structures of steel, high strength steel, and aluminum. Quality would be addressed by developing intelligent methods of weld measurement that accurately predict weld bead geometry from process information. This program was severely underfunded, and eventually terminated. The scope was redirected to investigate tandem narrow groove welding of steel butt joints during the one year of partial funding. A torch was designed and configured to perform a design of experiments of steel butt weld joints that validated the feasability of the process. An initial cost model estimated a 60% cost savings over conventional groove welding by eliminating the joint preparation and reducing the weld volume needed.

  16. Automatic welding comes of age. [Offshore

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.L. Jr.

    1981-07-01

    Automatic pipe welding systems today fall into three main categories: gas metal arc welding, gas-tungsten arc welding, and flash-butt welding. The first automatic welding devices used offshore were the CRC and H.C. Price systems. Both use gas metal arc welding with a consumable steel filler wire. The recently developed McDermott flash-butt welding system is described. (DLC)

  17. High Temperature Corrosion studies on Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welded Alloy C-276 in Molten Salt Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, M.; Arivarasu, M.; Arivazhagan, N.; Puneeth, T.; Sivakumar, N.; Murugan, B. Arul; Sathishkumar, M.; Sivalingam, S.

    2016-09-01

    Alloy C-276 is widely used in the power plant environment due to high strength and corrosion in highly aggressive environment. The investigation on high- temperature corrosion resistance of the alloy C-276 PCGTA weldment is necessary for prolonged service lifetime of the components used in corrosive environments. Investigation has been carried out on Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding by autogenous and different filler wires (ERNiCrMo-3 and ERNiCrMo-4) under molten state of K2SO4-60% NaCl environment at 675oC under cyclic condition. Thermogravimetric technique was used to establish the kinetics of corrosion. Weight gained in the molten salt reveals a steady-state parabolic rate law while the kinetics with salt deposits displays multi-stage growth rates. PCGTA ERNiCrMo-3 shows the higher parabolic constant compared to others. The scale formed on the weldment samples upon hot corrosion was characterized by using X-ray diffraction, SEM and EDAX analysis to understand the degradation mechanisms. From the results of the experiment the major phases are identified as Cr2O3, Fe2O3, and NiCr2O4. The result showed that weld fabricated by ERNiCrMo-3 found to be more prone to degradation than base metal and ERNiCrMo-4 filler wire due to higher segregation of alloying element of Mo and W in the weldment

  18. A Non-Intrusive GMA Welding Process Quality Monitoring System Using Acoustic Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Cayo, Eber Huanca; Alfaro, Sadek Crisostomo Absi

    2009-01-01

    Most of the inspection methods used for detection and localization of welding disturbances are based on the evaluation of some direct measurements of welding parameters. This direct measurement requires an insertion of sensors during the welding process which could somehow alter the behavior of the metallic transference. An inspection method that evaluates the GMA welding process evolution using a non-intrusive process sensing would allow not only the identification of disturbances during welding runs and thus reduce inspection time, but would also reduce the interference on the process caused by the direct sensing. In this paper a nonintrusive method for weld disturbance detection and localization for weld quality evaluation is demonstrated. The system is based on the acoustic sensing of the welding electrical arc. During repetitive tests in welds without disturbances, the stability acoustic parameters were calculated and used as comparison references for the detection and location of disturbances during the weld runs. PMID:22399990

  19. A Non-Intrusive GMA Welding Process Quality Monitoring System Using Acoustic Sensing.

    PubMed

    Cayo, Eber Huanca; Alfaro, Sadek Crisostomo Absi

    2009-01-01

    Most of the inspection methods used for detection and localization of welding disturbances are based on the evaluation of some direct measurements of welding parameters. This direct measurement requires an insertion of sensors during the welding process which could somehow alter the behavior of the metallic transference. An inspection method that evaluates the GMA welding process evolution using a non-intrusive process sensing would allow not only the identification of disturbances during welding runs and thus reduce inspection time, but would also reduce the interference on the process caused by the direct sensing. In this paper a nonintrusive method for weld disturbance detection and localization for weld quality evaluation is demonstrated. The system is based on the acoustic sensing of the welding electrical arc. During repetitive tests in welds without disturbances, the stability acoustic parameters were calculated and used as comparison references for the detection and location of disturbances during the weld runs.

  20. Operational parameter fields in hyperbaric plasma keyhole welding of mild steel line pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmeister, H.; Huismann, G.; Sommer, U.; Knagenhjelm, H.O.

    1996-12-01

    Based on recent work on orbital plasma keyhole welding of Duplex Stainless Steels and Low Carbon Martensitic 12--13% Cr-Steels, the capability of the plasma keyhole process for hyperbaric positional welding is explored. Based on respective nozzle geometry development, constant position welding of 100 mm OD 5 mm wall thickness St 35 pipe test pieces is carried out at constant welding speeds of 3mm/s at various constant currents and plasma Argon gas flow rates. As a result, the operational parameter fields are basically limited by lack of penetration (LOP) at too low gas flows and cutting (CT) together with dropping at too high gas flow rates. Based on present hyperbaric specifications for fabrication, limiting conditions for minimum root weld widths of 3mm and maximum root reinforcements of 2mm are established, for 11 and 41 bar as well as for the 3h, 6h and 12 h position. As common operating parameter sets for all positions, 135 A and 1.5 l/min plasma gas flow and 120 A and 1.8 l/min plasma gas flow are identified for 11 bar and 41 bar respectively.

  1. Effect of Welding Parameters on Microstructure, Thermal, and Mechanical Properties of Friction-Stir Welded Joints of AA7075-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfi, Amir Hossein; Nourouzi, Salman

    2014-06-01

    A high-strength Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy AA7075-T6 was friction-stir welded with various process parameter combinations incorporating the design of the experiment to investigate the effect of welding parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties. A three-factors, five-level central composition design (CCD) has been used to minimize the number of experimental conditions. The friction-stir welding parameters have significant influence on the heat input and temperature profile, which in turn regulates the microstructural and mechanical properties of the joints. The weld thermal cycles and transverse distribution of microhardness of the weld joints were measured, and the tensile properties were tested. The fracture surfaces of tensile specimens were observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the formation of friction-stir processing zone has been analyzed macroscopically. Also, an equation was derived to predict the final microhardness and tensile properties of the joints, and statistical tools are used to develop the relationships. The results show that the peak temperature during welding of all the joints was up to 713 K (440 °C), which indicates the key role of the tool shoulder diameter in deciding the maximum temperature. From this investigation, it was found that the joint fabricated at a rotational speed of 1050 rpm, welding speed of 100 mm/min, and shoulder diameter of 14 mm exhibited higher mechanical properties compared to the other fabricated joints.

  2. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of CO{sub 2} laser and gas tungsten arc welds of an Al-Li-Cu alloy 2195

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, K.H.; Baeslack, W.A. III; Szabo, A.

    1994-12-31

    Lithium-containing aluminum alloys offer an attractive combination of low density and high strength and stiffness and have been the focus of vigorous research for their promising aerospace applications. To achieve the full potential advantages in using these alloys, the integrity of welded joints, both n the fusion zone and the heat-affected zone, must be ensured. In the present study, Weldalite{sup TM} 049 (designated as alloy 2195) with nominal composition of Al-1.0Li-4.0Cu-0.4Mg0.4Ag-0.14Zr (wt%) was welded autogenously using the gas tungsten-arc (GTA) and CO{sub 2} laser beam (LB) welding processes. The average ultimate tensile strengths for as-welded, 160{degrees}C/16 h-aged, and 190{degrees}C/16 h-aged GTA welds were 296.4 MPa, 304.6 MPa, and 336.8 MPa, and corresponded to joint efficiencies of 61.4%, 48.1% and 56.0%, respectively. Porosity was found occasionally in the laser welds and slightly affected the performance of the aluminum weldments. For laser welds, average ultimate tensile strengths and corresponding joint efficiencies for a-welded, 160{degrees}C/16 h-aged, and 190{degrees}C/16 h-aged weldments were 293.2 MPa (60.8%) 305.9 MPa (48.3%), and 331.0 MPa (55.0%), respectively. Scanning electron fractography revealed that failure of the GTA and LB tensile specimens occurred either within the weld metal or along the fusion boundary. The latter was related to the existence of an equiaxed band along the fusion boundary.

  3. New materials for welding and surfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, N. A.; Galevsky, G. V.; Kryukov, R. E.; Titova, D. A.; Shurupov, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    The paper provides description of research into the influence of new materials and technologies on quality parameters of welds and deposited metal carried out in the research and production centre “Welding processes and technologies”. New welding technologies of tanks for northern conditions are considered, as well as technologies of submerged arc welding involving fluxing agents AN - 348, AN - 60, AN - 67, OK.10.71 and carbon-fluorine containing additives; new flux cored wires and surfacing technologies, teaching programs and a trainer for welders are designed.

  4. Relation between biomarkers in exhaled breath condensate and internal exposure to metals from gas metal arc welding.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeyer, Frank; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Weiss, Tobias; Lehnert, Martin; Gawrych, Katarzyna; Kendzia, Benjamin; Harth, Volker; Henry, Jana; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Concerning possible harmful components of welding fumes, besides gases and quantitative aspects of the respirable welding fumes, particle-inherent metal toxicity has to be considered.The objective of this study was to investigate the effect markers leukotriene B4 (LTB4),prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and 8-isoprostane (8-Iso PGF2α) as well as the acid–base balance(pH) in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) of 43 full-time gas metal arc welders (20 smokers) in relation to welding fume exposure. We observed different patterns of iron, chromium and nickel in respirable welding fumes and EBC. Welders with undetectable chromium in EBC(group A, n = 24) presented high iron and nickel concentrations. In this group, higher 8-isoPGF2α and LTB4 concentrations could be revealed compared to welders with detectable chromium and low levels of both iron and nickel in EBC (group B): 8-iso PGF2α443.3 pg mL−1 versus 247.2 pg mL−1; p = 0.001 and LTB4 30.5 pg mL−1 versus 17.3 pgmL−1; p = 0.016. EBC-pH was more acid in samples of group B (6.52 versus 6.82; p = 0.011).Overall, effect markers in welders were associated with iron concentrations in EBC according to smoking habits--non-smokers/smokers: LTB4 (rs = 0.48; p = 0.02/rs = 0.21; p = 0.37),PGE2 (rs = 0.15; p = 0.59/rs = 0.47; p = 0.07), 8-iso PGF2α (rs = 0.18; p = 0.54/rs = 0.59;p = 0.06). Sampling of EBC in occupational research provides a matrix for the simultaneous monitoring of metal exposure and effects on target level. Our results suggest irritative effects in the airways of healthy welders. Further studies are necessary to assess whether these individual results might be used to identify welders at elevated risk for developing a respiratory disease.

  5. Robotic Vision for Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Vision system for robotic welder looks at weld along axis of welding electrode. Gives robot view of most of weld area, including yet-unwelded joint, weld pool, and completed weld bead. Protected within welding-torch body, lens and fiber bundle give robot closeup view of weld in progress. Relayed to video camera on robot manipulator frame, weld image provides data for automatic control of robot motion and welding parameters.

  6. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  7. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Harold; Whitney, Gregory

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment as welders and preparing them for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains an overview of new and emerging welding technologies, a competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and an annotated bibliography.…

  8. Effect of Continuous and Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding on Dissimilar Weldments Between Hastelloy C-276/AISI 321 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sumitra; Taiwade, Ravindra V.; Vashishtha, Himanshu

    2017-03-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to join Hastelloy C-276 nickel-based superalloy and AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel using ERNiCrMo-4 filler. The joints were fabricated by continuous and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding processes. Experimental studies to ascertain the structure-property co-relationship with or without pulsed current mode were carried out using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. Further, the energy-dispersive spectroscope was used to evaluate the extent of microsegregation. The microstructure of fusion zone was obtained as finer cellular dendritic structure for pulsed current mode, whereas columnar structure was formed with small amount of cellular structure for continuous current mode. The scanning electron microscope examination witnessed the existence of migrated grain boundaries at the weld interfaces. Moreover, the presence of secondary phases such as P and μ was observed in continuous current weld joints, whereas they were absent in pulsed current weld joints, which needs to be further characterized. Moreover, pulsed current joints resulted in narrower weld bead, refined morphology, reduced elemental segregation and improved strength of the welded joints. The outcomes of the present investigation would help in obtaining good quality dissimilar joints for industrial applications and AISI 321 ASS being cheaper consequently led to cost-effective design also.

  9. Effect of Continuous and Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding on Dissimilar Weldments Between Hastelloy C-276/AISI 321 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sumitra; Taiwade, Ravindra V.; Vashishtha, Himanshu

    2017-02-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to join Hastelloy C-276 nickel-based superalloy and AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel using ERNiCrMo-4 filler. The joints were fabricated by continuous and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding processes. Experimental studies to ascertain the structure-property co-relationship with or without pulsed current mode were carried out using an optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. Further, the energy-dispersive spectroscope was used to evaluate the extent of microsegregation. The microstructure of fusion zone was obtained as finer cellular dendritic structure for pulsed current mode, whereas columnar structure was formed with small amount of cellular structure for continuous current mode. The scanning electron microscope examination witnessed the existence of migrated grain boundaries at the weld interfaces. Moreover, the presence of secondary phases such as P and μ was observed in continuous current weld joints, whereas they were absent in pulsed current weld joints, which needs to be further characterized. Moreover, pulsed current joints resulted in narrower weld bead, refined morphology, reduced elemental segregation and improved strength of the welded joints. The outcomes of the present investigation would help in obtaining good quality dissimilar joints for industrial applications and AISI 321 ASS being cheaper consequently led to cost-effective design also.

  10. Characterization of Mg/Al butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc filling with Zn–29.5Al–0.5Ti filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fei; Wang, Hongyang; Liu, Liming

    2014-04-01

    The multivariate alloying design of a welding joint is used in the Mg to Al welding process. A Zn–29.5Al–0.5Ti alloy is added as filler metal in gas tungsten arc welding of Mg and Al alloy joint based on the analysis of Al and Mg alloy characteristics. The tensile strength, microstructure, and phase constitution of the weld seam are analyzed. The formation of brittle and hard Mg–Al intermetallic compounds is avoided because of the effects of Zn, Al, and Ti. The average tensile strength of the joint is 148 MPa. Al{sub 3}Ti is first precipitated and functions as the nucleus of heterogeneous nucleation during solidification. Moreover, the precipitated Al–MgZn{sub 2} hypoeutectic phase exhibited a feather-like structure, which enhances the property of the Mg–Al dissimilar joint. - Highlights: • Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are butt welded by fusion welding. • The effect of Ti in filler metal is investigated. • The formation of Mg–Al intermetallic compounds is avoided.

  11. Temporal pulse shaping: a key parameter for the laser welding of dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Caroline; Poulon-Quintin, Angeline

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to describe the effect of pulse shaping on the prevention of internal defects during laser welding for two dental alloys mainly used in prosthetic dentistry. Single spot, weld beads, and welds with 80 % overlapping were performed on Co-Cr-Mo and Pd-Ag-Sn cast plates with a pulsed neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser. A specific welding procedure using adapted parameters to each alloy was completed. All the possibilities for pulse shaping were tested: (1) the square pulse shape as a default setting, (2) a rising edge slope for gradual heating, (3) a falling edge slope to slow the cooling process, and (4) a combination of rising and falling edges. The optimization of the pulse shape is supposed to produce defect-free welds (crack, pores, voids). Cross-section SEM observations and Vickers microhardness measurements were made. Pd-Ag-Sn was highly sensitive to hot cracking, and Co-Cr-Mo was more sensitive to voids and small porosities (sometimes combined with cracks). Using a slow cooling ramp allowed a better control on the solidification process for those two alloys always preventing internal defects. A rapid slope should be preferred for Co-Cr-Mo alloys due to its low-laser beam reflectivity. On the opposite, for Pd-Ag-Sn alloy, a slow rising slope should be preferred because this alloy has a high-laser beam reflectivity.

  12. Development of Fiber Laser Weld Parameters for Stainless Steel and Refractory Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J; Pong, R

    2009-05-19

    Laser welds were made in 21-6-9 stainless steel, vanadium and tantalum using LLNL's new 6kW fiber laser to target 1 mm penetration depths. The materials were machined into flat coupon samples with standard step-joint geometries, and were welded in a continuous wave mode. The laser was characterized using the Primes laser beam diagnostic system so that the beams can be reproduced in the future. The optical configuration consisted of a 200 {micro}m fiber, 200 mm collimator and 250 mm focusing lens, which delivered electron-beam level power densities in the 5 to 20 kW/mm2 range. The three different materials required different power densities to produce the desired penetration, and this report summarizes the results of this screening study that was directed at developing a first approximation to the proper welding parameters for future work. The results show that 1 mm penetrations can be achieved using a 400W beam for 21-6-9 stainless steel, a 600W beam for vanadium, and a 1,100W beam for tantalum using sharp focus and a travel speed of 40 inch/min. Future welds should incorporate a trailing gas shield to prevent discoloration of the surface and to prevent oxygen and nitrogen pickup in the welds.

  13. Flash butt welding of marine pipeline materials

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.L. Jr.; Paton, B.E.; Lebedev, V.K.; Kutchuk-Yatsenko, S.I.

    1982-04-01

    US engineers agree that Soviet flash butt welding machines used to join segments of marine pipelines substantially reduce manpower and increase production rates over conventional methods (manual shielded metal arc welding). Extensive tests with a Soviet-built prototype machine (K775) and US-manufactured support equipment confirmed the system's reliability, wide operating tolerances, and easy adaptability to variable welding parameters. In addition, radiographic, ultrasonic, and mechanical tests demonstrated that a strip-chart recording of welding parameters is a good indicator of weld quality, lending itself to in-process control and rapid diagnosis of equipment problems. Because of the K775 prototype's success, McDermott is proceeding with the design and manufacture of production flash butt welding machines for marine pipeline construction.

  14. Influence of Solute Content and Solidification Parameters on Grain Refinement of Aluminum Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schempp, Philipp; Cross, Carl Edward; Pittner, Andreas; Rethmeier, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Grain refinement provides an important possibility to enhance the mechanical properties ( e.g., strength and ductility) and the weldability (susceptibility to solidification cracking) of aluminum weld metal. In the current study, a filler metal consisting of aluminum base metal and different amounts of commercial grain refiner Al Ti5B1 was produced. The filler metal was then deposited in the base metal and fused in a GTA welding process. Additions of titanium and boron reduced the weld metal mean grain size considerably and resulted in a transition from columnar to equiaxed grain shape ( CET). In commercial pure aluminum (Alloy 1050A), the grain-refining efficiency was higher than that in the Al alloys 6082 and 5083. Different welding and solidification parameters influenced the grain size response only slightly. Furthermore, the observed grain-size reduction was analyzed by means of the undercooling parameter P and the growth restriction parameter Q, which revealed the influence of solute elements and nucleant particles on grain size.

  15. Variation of plasma parameters of vacuum arc column with gap distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wen; Yuan, Zhao; He, Junjia

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of a two-dimensional (2D) magneto-hydrodynamic model, we studied long-gap-distance vacuum arcs in a uniform axial magnetic field and determined the effect of gap distance varying in a large range on plasma parameters. Simulation results showed that with increasing gap distance, the parameters of the plasma near the cathode are almost invariant, except for ion number density, but the parameters of the plasma in front of the anode clearly vary; meanwhile, joule heat gradually becomes the main source of energy for the arc column. In a short gap, a clear current constriction can be found in the entire arc column. Whereas when the gap distance exceeds a certain value, a sharp contraction of the current only arises in front of the anode.

  16. Improved Gas Metal Arc Welding Multi-Physics Process Model and Its Application to MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Steel Butt-welds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    within the weld. Design/methodology/approach The improved GMAW process model is next applied to the case of butt-welding of MIL A46100 (a...improved GMAW process model pertaining to the spatial distribution of the material microstructure and properties within the MIL A46100 butt-weld are

  17. Monte-Carlo Inversion of Travel-Time Data for the Estimation of Weld Model Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, A. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2011-06-01

    The quality of ultrasonic array imagery is adversely affected by uncompensated variations in the medium properties. A method for estimating the parameters of a general model of an inhomogeneous anisotropic medium is described. The model is comprised of a number of homogeneous sub-regions with unknown anisotropy. Bayesian estimation of the unknown model parameters is performed via a Monte-Carlo Markov chain using the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Results are demonstrated using simulated weld data.

  18. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  19. Gas Metal Arc Weld (GMAW) Qualification of 7020-T651 Aluminum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    beam, and push-pull wire feed........................................................9 Fig. 6 Drawing of v-groove joint and end tabs used for ballistic...procedure 806-1, 5087 wire , GMAW-P, page 3 ........................52 vii Fig. C-1 Drawing of the 25.04-mm-thick qualification panels (QPs...plate made with the condition of 5556A wire , GMAW-P mode, and 25.04-mm plate thickness. Fig. 4 Drawing and tension specimens for welds of 39.94-mm

  20. EDITORIAL Metal vapour in atmospheric-pressure arcs Metal vapour in atmospheric-pressure arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Anthony B.

    2010-11-01

    Metal vapour has a significant, and in some cases dominant, influence in many applications of atmospheric-pressure plasmas, including arc welding, circuit interruption and mineral processing. While the influence of metal vapour has long been recognized, it is only recently that diagnostic and computational tools have been sufficiently well-developed to allow this influence to be more thoroughly examined and understood. Some unexpected findings have resulted: for example, that the presence of metal vapour in gas-metal arc welding leads to local minima in the temperature and current density in the centre of the arc. It has become clear that the presence of metal vapour, as well as having intrinsic scientific interest, plays an important role in determining the values of critical parameters in industrial applications, such as the weld penetration in arc welding and the extinction time in circuit breakers. In gas-tungsten arc welding, metal vapour concentrations are formed by evaporation of the weld pool, and are relatively low, typically at most a few per cent. Moreover, the convective flow of the plasma near the weld pool tends to direct the metal vapour plume radially outwards. In gas-metal arc welding, in contrast, metal vapour concentrations can reach over 50%. In this case, the metal vapour is produced mainly by evaporation of the wire electrode, and the strong downwards convective flow below the electrode concentrates the metal vapour in the central region of the arc. The very different metal concentrations and distributions in the two welding processes mean that the metal vapour has markedly different influences on the arc. In gas-tungsten arc welding, the current density distribution is broadened near the weld pool by the influence of the metal vapour on the electrical conductivity of the plasma, and the arc voltage is decreased. In contrast, in gas-metal arc welding, the arc centre is cooled by increased radiative emission and the arc voltage is increased. In

  1. A rotating two-phase gas/liquid flow for pressure reduction in underwater plasma arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Steinkamp, H.; Creutz, M.; Mewes, D.; Bartzsch, J.

    1994-12-31

    Plasma arc welding processes are used in off-shore industry for the construction and maintenance in the wet surrounding of underwater structures and pipelines. In greater water depth the density of the plasma gas increase because of the greater hydrostatic pressure. This causes an increase of the conductive heat losses to the wet surrounding. To keep up the energy flux to the workpiece a pressure reduction is favorable against the surrounding. To keep up the energy flux to the workpiece a pressure reduction is favorable against the surrounding. The plasma arc has to burn in a locally dry area. This requirement can be fulfilled by a rotating disc placed above the workpiece. In the gap between the lower end of the cylinder and the workpiece a rotating two-phase flow is maintained. The flow around the rotating disc is experimentally investigated. The rotating disc is placed above the surface of the workpiece which is simulated by a flat plate. Water is forced out of the cylinder due to centrifugal forces set up by the rotating disc and flat plate. The velocity distribution in the flow is measured by Laser-Doppler-Anemometry. The phase distribution in the two-phase flow in the gap is measured by local electrical probes. The static pressure in the gaseous atmosphere is reduced in comparison to the hydrostatic pressure of the surrounding water. The pressure reduction is given by the void fraction, the phase distribution and the volume flow rates of both phases in the gap as well as by the speed of revolution and the design of the disc and the work surface. Apart from the investigations on the fluid dynamics, the method to reduce the pressure was technically proved. Experiments were carried out under water with a plasma MIG welder.

  2. Friction Stir Welding in Wrought and Cast Aluminum Alloys: Weld Quality Evaluation and Effects of Processing Parameters on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yi; Lados, Diana A.

    2017-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid-state process widely used for joining similar and dissimilar materials for critical applications in the transportation sector. Understanding the effects of the process on microstructure and mechanical properties is critical in design for structural integrity. In this study, four aluminum alloy systems (wrought 6061-T651 and cast A356, 319, and A390) were processed in both as-fabricated and pre-weld heat-treated (T6) conditions using various processing parameters. The effects of processing and heat treatment on the resulting microstructures, macro-/micro-hardness, and tensile properties were systematically investigated and mechanistically correlated to changes in grain size, characteristic phases, and strengthening precipitates. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature both along and across the welding zones. A new method able to evaluate weld quality (using a weld quality index) was developed based on the stress concentration calculated under tensile loading. Optimum processing parameter domains that provide both defect-free welds and good mechanical properties were determined for each alloy and associated with the thermal history of the process. These results were further related to characteristic microstructural features, which can be used for component design and materials/process optimization.

  3. Friction Stir Welding in Wrought and Cast Aluminum Alloys: Weld Quality Evaluation and Effects of Processing Parameters on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yi; Lados, Diana A.

    2017-04-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid-state process widely used for joining similar and dissimilar materials for critical applications in the transportation sector. Understanding the effects of the process on microstructure and mechanical properties is critical in design for structural integrity. In this study, four aluminum alloy systems (wrought 6061-T651 and cast A356, 319, and A390) were processed in both as-fabricated and pre-weld heat-treated (T6) conditions using various processing parameters. The effects of processing and heat treatment on the resulting microstructures, macro-/micro-hardness, and tensile properties were systematically investigated and mechanistically correlated to changes in grain size, characteristic phases, and strengthening precipitates. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature both along and across the welding zones. A new method able to evaluate weld quality (using a weld quality index) was developed based on the stress concentration calculated under tensile loading. Optimum processing parameter domains that provide both defect-free welds and good mechanical properties were determined for each alloy and associated with the thermal history of the process. These results were further related to characteristic microstructural features, which can be used for component design and materials/process optimization.

  4. Robotic Welding Of Injector Manifold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Shelley, D. Mark

    1992-01-01

    Brief report presents history, up through October 1990, of continuing efforts to convert from manual to robotic gas/tungsten arc welding in fabrication of main injector inlet manifold of main engine of Space Shuttle. Includes photographs of welding machinery, welds, and weld preparations. Of interest to engineers considering establishment of robotic-welding facilities.

  5. Prediction of Weld Penetration in FCAW of HSLA steel using Artificial Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Asl, Y. Dadgar; Mostafa, N. B.; Panahizadeh, V. R.; Seyedkashi, S. M. H.

    2011-01-17

    Flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) is a semiautomatic or automatic arc welding process that requires a continuously-fed consumable tubular electrode containing a flux. The main FCAW process parameters affecting the depth of penetration are welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed. Shallow depth of penetration may contribute to failure of a welded structure since penetration determines the stress-carrying capacity of a welded joint. To avoid such occurrences; the welding process parameters influencing the weld penetration must be properly selected to obtain an acceptable weld penetration and hence a high quality joint. Artificial neural networks (ANN), also called neural networks (NN), are computational models used to express complex non-linear relationships between input and output data. In this paper, artificial neural network (ANN) method is used to predict the effects of welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed on weld penetration depth in gas shielded FCAW of a grade of high strength low alloy steel. 32 experimental runs were carried out using the bead-on-plate welding technique. Weld penetrations were measured and on the basis of these 32 sets of experimental data, a feed-forward back-propagation neural network was created. 28 sets of the experiments were used as the training data and the remaining 4 sets were used for the testing phase of the network. The ANN has one hidden layer with eight neurons and is trained after 840 iterations. The comparison between the experimental results and ANN results showed that the trained network could predict the effects of the FCAW process parameters on weld penetration adequately.

  6. Prediction of Weld Penetration in FCAW of HSLA steel using Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asl, Y. Dadgar; Mostafa, N. B.; Panahizadeh R., V.; Seyedkashi, S. M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) is a semiautomatic or automatic arc welding process that requires a continuously-fed consumable tubular electrode containing a flux. The main FCAW process parameters affecting the depth of penetration are welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed. Shallow depth of penetration may contribute to failure of a welded structure since penetration determines the stress-carrying capacity of a welded joint. To avoid such occurrences; the welding process parameters influencing the weld penetration must be properly selected to obtain an acceptable weld penetration and hence a high quality joint. Artificial neural networks (ANN), also called neural networks (NN), are computational models used to express complex non-linear relationships between input and output data. In this paper, artificial neural network (ANN) method is used to predict the effects of welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed on weld penetration depth in gas shielded FCAW of a grade of high strength low alloy steel. 32 experimental runs were carried out using the bead-on-plate welding technique. Weld penetrations were measured and on the basis of these 32 sets of experimental data, a feed-forward back-propagation neural network was created. 28 sets of the experiments were used as the training data and the remaining 4 sets were used for the testing phase of the network. The ANN has one hidden layer with eight neurons and is trained after 840 iterations. The comparison between the experimental results and ANN results showed that the trained network could predict the effects of the FCAW process parameters on weld penetration adequately.

  7. Welded Permanent Fittings for Titanium Hydraulic Tubing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FITTINGS, *HYDRAULIC EQUIPMENT, RIVETED JOINTS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, PIPES , JET TRANSPORT AIRCRAFT, COLD WORKING, PRESSURE, RUPTURE, ARC WELDING , INERT...GAS WELDING , RADIOGRAPHY, STRESS RELIEVING, SUPERSONIC AIRCRAFT, COMMERCIAL AIRCRAFT.

  8. Charpy toughness and tensile properties of a neutron irradiated stainless steel submerged-arc weld cladding overlay

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, W.R.; Berggren, R.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of stainless steel cladding increasing the resistance of an operating nuclear reactor pressure vessel to extension of surface flaws is highly dependent upon the irradiated properties of the cladding. Therefore, weld overlay cladding irradiated at temperatures and fluences relevant to power reactor operation was examined. The cladding was applied to a pressure vessel steel plate by the submerged-arc, single-wire, oscillating electrode method. Three layers of cladding were applied to provide a cladding thickness adequate for fabrication of test specimens. The first layer was type 309, and the upper two layers were type 308 stainless steel. There was considerable dilution of the type 309 in the first layer of cladding as a result of excessive melting of the base plate. Specimens for the irradiation study were taken from near the base plate/cladding interface and also from the upper layers of cladding. Charpy V-notch and tensile specimens were irradiated at 288/sup 0/C to neutron fluences of 2 x 10/sup 23/ n/m/sup 2/ (E > 1 MeV). When irradiated, both types 308 and 309 cladding showed a 5 to 40% increase in yield strength accompanied by a slight increase in ductility in the temperature range from 25 to 288/sup 0/C. All cladding exhibited ductile-to-brittle transition behavior during impact testing.

  9. Influence of process parameters on the weld lines formation in rapid heat cycle molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorotto, Marco; Lucchetta, Giovanni

    2011-05-01

    The insufficient entanglement of the molecular chains at the v-notch of a weld line impairs the mechanical strength and the surface quality of a plastic product. The rapid heat cycle molding technology (RHCM) has been recently used to enhance surface appearance of the parts, by thermally cycling the mold surface temperature. The mold temperature is the key of RHCM technology because it significantly affects productivity, energy efficiency and the quality of the final polymer part. In this work the influence of mold temperature on the weld lines depth and roughness were studied. Three different materials were tested. To investigate the influence of process parameters, a special mold insert was designed and manufactured. Weld lines geometry and roughness were quantitatively characterized by means of a profilometer. Experimental results show that is possible to increase the temperature to 10° C lower than the glass transition to obtain a high-gloss parts without weld lines with a significant reduction of cycle time and energy consumption.

  10. An Effective Approach Based on Response Surface Methodology for Predicting Friction Welding Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Sare; Deniz Karaoglan, Aslan; Ersozlu, Ismail

    2016-03-01

    The joining of dissimilar metals is one of the most essential necessities of industries. Manufacturing by the joint of alloy steel and normal carbon steel is used in production, because it decreases raw material cost. The friction welding process parameters such as friction pressure, friction time, upset pressure, upset time and rotating speed play the major roles in determining the strength and microstructure of the joints. In this study, response surface methodology (RSM), which is a well-known design of experiments approach, is used for modeling the mathematical relation between the responses (tensile strength and maximum temperature), and the friction welding parameters with minimum number of experiments. The results show that RSM is an effective method for this type of problems for developing models and prediction.

  11. Identifying Combination of Friction Stir Welding Parameters to Maximize Strength of Lap Joints of AA2014-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendrana, C.; Srinivasan, K.; Balasubramanian, V.; Balaji, H.; Selvaraj, P.

    2017-01-01

    AA2014 aluminum alloy (Al-Cu alloy) has been widely utilized in fabrication of lightweight structures like aircraft structures, demanding high strength to weight ratio and good corrosion resistance. The fusion welding of these alloys will lead to solidification problems such as hot cracking. Friction stir welding is a new solid state welding process, in which the material being welded does not melt and recast. Lot of research works have been carried out by many researchers to optimize process parameters and establish empirical relationships to predict tensile strength of friction stir welded butt joints of aluminum alloys. However, very few investigations have been carried out on friction stir welded lap joints of aluminum alloys. Hence, in this investigation, an attempt has been made to optimize friction stir lap welding (FSLW) parameters to attain maximum tensile strength using statistical tools such as design of experiment (DoE), analysis of variance (ANOVA), response graph and contour plots. By this method, it is found that maximum tensile shear fracture load of 12.76 kN can be achieved if a joint is made using tool rotational speed of 900 rpm, welding speed of 110 mm/min, tool shoulder diameter of 12 mm and tool tilt angle of 1.5°.

  12. Rocket measurements within a polar cap arc - Plasma, particle, and electric circuit parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, E. J.; Ballenthin, J. O.; Basu, S.; Carlson, H. C.; Hardy, D. A.; Maynard, N. C.; Kelley, M. C.; Fleischman, J. R.; Pfaff, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented from the Polar Ionospheric Irregularities Experiment (PIIE), conducted from Sondrestrom, Greenland, on March 15, 1985, designed for an investigation of processes which lead to the generation of small-scale (less than 1 km) ionospheric irregularities within polar-cap F-layer auroras. An instrumented rocket was launched into a polar cap F layer aurora to measure energetic electron flux, plasma, and electric circuit parameters of a sun-aligned arc, coordinated with simultaneous measurements from the Sondrestrom incoherent scatter radar and the AFGL Airborne Ionospheric Observatory. Results indicated the existence of two different generation mechanisms on the dawnside and duskside of the arc. On the duskside, parameters are suggestive of an interchange process, while on the dawnside, fluctuation parameters are consistent with a velocity shear instability.

  13. Advanced Welding Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  14. Fusion welding of a modern borated stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Robino, C.V.; Cieslak, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments designed to assess the fabrication and service weldability of 304B4A borated stainless steel were conducted. Welding procedures and parameters for manual gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding, autogenous electron beam (EB) welding and filler-added EB welding were developed and found to be similar to those for austenitic stainless steels. Following the procedure development, four test welds were produced and evaluated by microstructural analysis and Charpy impact testing. Further samples were used for determination of the postweld heat treatment (PWHT) response of the welds. The fusion zone structure of welds in this alloy consists of primary austenite dendrites with an interdendritic eutectic-like austenite/boride constituent. Welds also show an appreciable partially molten zone that consists of the austenite/boride eutectic surrounding unmelted austenite islands. The microstructure of the EB welds was substantially finer than that of the GTA welds, and boride coarsening was not observed in the solid state heat-affected zone (HAZ) of either weld type. The impact toughness of as-welded samples was found to be relatively poor, averaging less than 10 J for both GTA and EB welds. For fusion zone notched GTA and EB samples and centerline notched EB samples, fracture generally occurred along the boundary between the partially molten and solid-state regions of the HAZ. The results of the PWHT study were very encouraging, with typical values of the impact energy for HAZ notched samples approaching 40 J, or twice the minimum code-acceptable value.

  15. Mathematical modelling of convective processes in a weld pool under electric arc surfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarychev, V. D.; Granovskii, A. Yu; Nevskii, S. A.; Konovalov, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    The authors develop the mathematical model of convective processes in a molten pool under electric arc surfacing with flux-cored wire. The model is based on the ideas of how convective flows appear due to temperature gradient and action of electromagnetic forces. Influence of alloying elements in the molten metal was modeled as a non-linear dependence of surface tension upon temperature. Surface tension and its temperature coefficient were calculated according to the electron density functional method with consideration to asymmetric electron distribution at the interface “molten metal / shielding gas”. Simultaneous solution of Navier-Stokes and Maxwell equations according to finite elements method with consideration to the moving heat source at the interface showed that there is a multi-vortex structure in the molten metal. This structure gives rise to a downward heat flux which, at the stage of heating, moves from the centre of the pool and stirs it full width. At the cooling stage this flux moves towards the centre of the pool and a single vortex is formed near the symmetry centre. This flux penetration is ∼ 10 mm. Formation of the downward heat flux is determined by sign reversal of the temperature coefficient of surface tension due to the presence of alloying elements.

  16. Welding and Weldability of Thorium-Doped Iridium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Ohriner, E.K.; King, J.F.

    2000-03-12

    Ir-0.3%W alloys doped with thorium are currently used as post-impact containment material for radioactive fuel in thermoelectric generators that provide stable electrical power for a variety of outer planetary space exploration missions. Welding and weldability of a series of alloys was investigated using arc and laser welding processes. Some of these alloys are prone to severe hot-cracking during welding. Weldability of these alloys was characterized using Sigmajig weldability test. Hot-cracking is influenced to a great extent by the fusion zone microstructure and composition. Thorium content and welding atmosphere were found to be very critical. The weld cracking behavior in these alloys can be controlled by modifying the fusion zone microstructure. Fusion zone microstructure was found to be controlled by welding process, process parameters, and the weld pool shape.

  17. Thermal modeling and adaptive control of scan welding

    SciTech Connect

    Doumanidis, C.C.

    1998-11-01

    This article introduces scan welding as a redesign of classical joining methods, employing automation technology to ensure the overall geometric, material and mechanical integrity of the joint. This is obtained by real-time control of the welding temperature field by a proper dynamic heat input distribution on the weld surface. This distribution is implemented in scan welding by a single torch, sweeping the joint surface by a controlled reciprocating motion, and power adjusted by feedback of infrared temperature measurements in-process. An off-line numerical simulation of the thermal field in scan welding is established, as well as a linearized multivariable model with real-time parameter identification. An adaptive thermal control scheme is thus implemented and validated--both computationally and experimentally on a robotic plasma arc welding (PAW) station. The resulting thermal features related to the generated material structure and properties of the joint are finally analyzed in scan welding tests and simulations.

  18. Advanced fusion welding processes, solid state joining and a successful marriage. [production of aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, F. R.

    1972-01-01

    Joining processes for aerospace systems combine fusion welding and solid state joining during production of metal structures. Detailed characteristics of electron beam welding, plasma arc welding, diffusion welding, inertia welding and weldbond processes are discussed.

  19. A hot-cracking mitigation technique for welding high-strength aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.P.; Dong, P.; Zhang, J.; Tian, X.

    2000-01-01

    A hot-cracking mitigation technique for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) of high-strength aluminum alloy 2024 is presented. The proposed welding technique incorporates a trailing heat sink (an intense cooling source) with respect to the welding torch. The development of the mitigation technique was based on both detailed welding process simulation using advanced finite element techniques and systematic laboratory experiments. The finite element methods were used to investigate the detailed thermomechanical behavior of the weld metal that undergoes the brittle temperature range (BTR) during welding. As expected, a tensile deformation zone within the material BTR region was identified behind the weld pool under conventional GTA welding process conventional GTA welding process conditions for the aluminum alloy studied. To mitigate hot cracking, the tensile zone behind the weld pool must be eliminated or reduce to a satisfactory level if the weld metal hot ductility cannot be further improved. With detailed computational modeling, it was found that by the introduction of a trailing heat sink at some distance behind the welding arc, the tensile strain rate with respect to temperature in the zone encompassing the BTR region can be significantly reduced. A series of parametric studies were also conducted to derive optimal process parameters for the trailing heat sink. The experimental results confirmed the effectiveness of the trailing heat sink technique. With a proper implementation of the trailing heat sink method, hot cracking can be completely eliminated in welding aluminum alloy 2024 (AA 2024).

  20. Long arc stabilities with various arc gas flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, K.; Takeda, K.; Sugimoto, M.; Noguchi, Y.

    2014-11-01

    A new arc torch for use in magnetically driven arc device was developed with a commercially available TIG welding arc torch. The torch has a water-cooling system to the torch nozzle and has a nozzle nut to supply a swirling-free plasma gas flow. Its endurance against arc thermal load is examined. Features of its generated arc are investigated.

  1. Development of New Materials and Technologies for Welding and Surfacing at Research and Production Center "Welding Processes and Technologies"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, N. A.; Kryukov, R. E.; Galevsky, G. V.; Titov, D. A.; Shurupov, V. M.

    2015-09-01

    The paper provides description of research into the influence of new materials and technologies on quality parameters of welds and added metal carried out at research and production center «Welding processes and technologies». New welding technologies of tanks for northern conditions are considered, as well as technologies of submerged arc welding involving fluxing agents AN - 348, AN - 60, AN - 67, OK. 10.71 and carbon-fluorine containing additives, new flux cored wires and surfacing technologies, teaching programs and a trainer for welders are designed.

  2. Dissimilar Friction Stir Welds in Al5186-Al2024: The Effect of Process Parameters on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Mousavi, S. A. A. Akbari; ShamAbadi, S. H.

    2011-01-17

    The effect of tool traverse and rotation speeds on the microstructures and mechanical properties are quantified for welds between non-age-hardening Al5083 and age hardening Al2024 and compared to single alloy joints made from each of the two constituents. In this paper, we report the results of microstructural, mechanical property investigations of Al5186-Al2024 friction stir welds produced using various rotations and traveling speeds of the tool to investigate the effects of the welding parameters on the joint strength. Metallographic studies by optical microscopy, electron probe microscopy, and the utilization of the X-ray diffraction technique have been conducted. It was found that the weld properties were dominated by the thermal input rather than the mechanical deformation by the tool. In particular the larger stresses under the weld tool on the AA5186 side compared to the AA2024 side are related to a transient reduction in yield stress due to dissolution of the hardening precipitates during welding prior to natural aging after welding.

  3. Plasma arc cutting optimization parameters for aluminum alloy with two thickness by using Taguchi method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulnasser, B.; Bhuvenesh, R.

    2016-07-01

    Manufacturing companies define the qualities of thermal removing process based on the dimension and physical appearance of the cutting material surface. The surface roughness of the cutting area for the material and the material removal rate being removed during the manual plasma arc cutting process were importantly considered. Plasma arc cutter machine model PS-100 was used to cut the specimens made from aluminium alloy 1100 manually based on the selected parameters setting. Two different thicknesses of specimens, 3mm and 6mm were used. The material removal rate (MRR) was measured by determining the difference between the weight of specimens before and after the cutting process. The surface roughness (Ra) was measured by using MITUTOYO CS-3100 machine and analysis was conducted to determine the average roughness (Ra) value, Taguchi method was utilized as an experimental layout to obtain MRR and Ra values. The results indicate that the current and cutting speed is the most significant parameters, followed by the arc gap for both rate of material removal and surface roughness.

  4. Wire-Guide Manipulator For Automated Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Tim; White, Kevin; Gordon, Steve; Emerich, Dave; Richardson, Dave; Faulkner, Mike; Stafford, Dave; Mccutcheon, Kim; Neal, Ken; Milly, Pete

    1994-01-01

    Compact motor drive positions guide for welding filler wire. Drive part of automated wire feeder in partly or fully automated welding system. Drive unit contains three parallel subunits. Rotations of lead screws in three subunits coordinated to obtain desired motions in three degrees of freedom. Suitable for both variable-polarity plasma arc welding and gas/tungsten arc welding.

  5. Study of gas tungsten arc welding procedures for tantalum alloy T-111 (Ta-8 W-2Hf) plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, R. E.; Kesterson, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Methods of eliminating or reducing underbread cracking in multipass GTA welds in thick T-111 plate were studied. Single V butt welds prepared using experimental filler metal compositions and standard weld procedures resulted in only moderate success in reducing underbread cracking. Subsequent procedural changes incorporating manual welding, slower weld speeds, and three or fewer fill passes resulted in crack-free single V welds only when the filler metal was free of hafnium. The double V joint design with successive fill passes on opposite sides of the joint produced excellent welds. The quality of each weld was determined metallographically since the cracking, when present, was very slight and undetectable using standard NDT techniques. Tensile and bend tests were performed on selected weldments. The inherent filler metal strength and the joint geometry determined the strength of the weldment. Hardness and electron beam microprobe traverses were made on selected specimens with the result that significant filler metal-base metal dilution as well as hafnium segregation was detected. A tentative explanation of T-111 plate underbread cracking is presented based on the intrinsic effects of hafnium in the weldment.

  6. Weld modeling and control using artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, G.E.; Barnett, R.J.; Andersen, K.; Strauss, A.M.

    1995-11-01

    The arc welding processes play an important role in modern manufacturing. Despite the widespread use of arc welding for joining metals, controlling most welding processes still requires considerable skills and experience on behalf of the human welder. Total automation of welding has not yet been achieved, largely because the physics which determine the success of any welding task, are not yet fully understood and quantified. Artificial neural networks were evaluated for monitoring and control of the variable polarity plasma arc welding process. Three areas of welding application were investigated: weld process modeling, weld process control, and weld bead profile analysis for quality control.

  7. Comparison of microstructure and mechanical properties of ultra-narrow gap laser and gas-metal-arc welded S960 high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Li, Lin; Dong, Shiyun; Crowther, Dave; Thompson, Alan

    2017-04-01

    The microstructural characteristics and mechanical properties, including micro-hardness, tensile properties, three-point bending properties and Charpy impact toughness at different test temperatures of 8 mm thick S960 high strength steel plates were investigated following their joining by multi-pass ultra-narrow gap laser welding (NGLW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) techniques. It was found that the microstructure in the fusion zone (FZ) for the ultra-NGLW joint was predominantly martensite mixed with some tempered martensite, while the FZ for the GMAW joint was mainly consisted of ferrite with some martensite. The strength of the ultra-NGLW specimens was comparable to that of the base material (BM), with all welded specimens failed in the BM in the tensile tests. The tensile strength of the GMAW specimens was reduced approximately by 100 MPa when compared with the base material by a broad and soft heat affected zone (HAZ) with failure located in the soft HAZ. Both the ultra-NGLW and GMAW specimens performed well in three-point bending tests. The GMAW joints exhibited better impact toughness than the ultra-NGLW joints.

  8. Effect of heat input on the microstructure and mechanical properties of tungsten inert gas arc butt-welded AZ61 magnesium alloy plates

    SciTech Connect

    Min Dong; Shen Jun; Lai Shiqiang; Chen Jie

    2009-12-15

    In this paper, the effects of heat input on the microstructures and mechanical properties of tungsten inert gas arc butt-welded AZ61 magnesium alloy plates were investigated by microstructural observations, microhardness tests and tensile tests. The results show that with an increase of the heat input, the grains both in the fusion zone and the heat-affected zone coarsen and the width of the heat-affected zone increased. Moreover, an increase of the heat input resulted in a decrease of the continuous {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase and an increase of the granular {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase in both the fusion zone and the heat-affected zone. The ultimate tensile strength of the welded joint increased with an increase of the heat input, while, too high a heat input resulted in a decrease of the ultimate tensile strength of the welded joint. In addition, the average microhardness of the heat-affected zone and fusion zone decreased sharply with an increase of the heat input and then decreased slowly at a relatively high heat input.

  9. WELDING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  10. Evaluation of the Low Heat Input Process for Weld Repair of Nickel-Base Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durocher, J.; Richards, N. L.

    2011-10-01

    The repair of turbine blades and vanes commonly involves gas tungsten arc welding or an equivalent process, but unfortunately these components are often susceptible to heat-affected zone (HAZ) cracking during the weld repair process. This is a major problem especially in cast alloys due to their coarse-grain size and where the (Al + Ti) contents is in excess of 3-4%; vacuum brazing is also used but mainly on low stress non-rotating components such as vanes. Micro-welding has the potential to deposit small amounts of filler at low heat input levels with minimum HAZ and thus is an attractive process for depositing a quality weld. As with conventional fusion processes, the filler alloy is deposited by the generation of a low power arc between a consumable electrode and the substrate. The low heat input of this process offers unique advantages over more common welding processes such as gas tungsten arc, plasma arc, laser, and electron beam welding. In this study, the low heat input characteristic of micro-welding has been used to simulate weld repair using Inconel (IN) (Inconel and IN are trademarks of INCO Alloys International) 625, Rene (Rene is a trademark of General Electric Company) 41, Nimonic (Nimonic is a trademark of INCO Alloys International) 105 and Inconel 738LC filler alloys, to a cast Inconel 738LC substrate. The effect of micro-welding process parameters on the deposition rate, coating quality, and substrate has been investigated.

  11. Weld pool oscillation during pulsed GTA welding

    SciTech Connect

    Aendenroomer, A.J.R.; Ouden, G. den

    1996-12-31

    This paper deals with weld pool oscillation during pulsed GTA welding and with the possibility to use this oscillation for in-process control of weld penetration. Welding experiments were carried out under different welding conditions. During welding the weld pool was triggered into oscillation by the normal welding pulses or by extra current pulses. The oscillation frequency was measured both during the pulse time and during the base time by analyzing the arc voltage variation using a Fast Fourier Transformation program. Optimal results are obtained when full penetration occurs during the pulse time and partial penetration during the base time. Under these conditions elliptical overlapping spot welds are formed. In the case of full penetration the weld pool oscillates in a low frequency mode (membrane oscillation), whereas in the case of partial penetration the weld pool oscillates in a high frequency mode (surface oscillation). Deviation from the optimal welding conditions occurs when high frequency oscillation is observed during both pulse time and base time (underpenetration) or when low frequency oscillation is observed during both pulse time and base time (overpenetration). In line with these results a penetration sensing system with feedback control was designed, based on the criterion that optimal weld penetration is achieved when two peaks are observed in the frequency distribution. The feasibility of this sensing system for orbital tube welding was confirmed by the results of experiments carried out under various welding conditions.

  12. Automated Arc Welding System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    1991] Coordinated Science Laboratory College of Engineering UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN Approved for Public Release. Distribution...Unclassified None 20. SECURTY CLASSIFCATION AUTHORITY 3. OISTRIBUTIONIAVAILABIUTY OF REPORT 2Approved for public release; lb...Schiano and Dan Henderson for making the many hours of work more fun, and Thierry Bourret, Lake Lattimore and Will Windes for their assis- tance. Finally

  13. Understanding heat and fluid flow in linear GTA welds

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1992-12-31

    A transient heat flow and fluid flow model was used to predict the development of gas tungsten arc (GTA) weld pools in 1.5 mm thick AISI 304 SS. The welding parameters were chosen so as to correspond to an earlier experimental study which produced high-resolution surface temperature maps. The motivation of the present study was to verify the predictive capability of the computational model. Comparison of the numerical predictions and experimental observations indicate good agreement.

  14. Understanding heat and fluid flow in linear GTA welds

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    A transient heat flow and fluid flow model was used to predict the development of gas tungsten arc (GTA) weld pools in 1.5 mm thick AISI 304 SS. The welding parameters were chosen so as to correspond to an earlier experimental study which produced high-resolution surface temperature maps. The motivation of the present study was to verify the predictive capability of the computational model. Comparison of the numerical predictions and experimental observations indicate good agreement.

  15. Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Test Results for Al-Li 2195 Parent Metal, Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welds and Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafley, Robert A.; Wagner, John A.; Domack, Marcia S.

    2000-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate of aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy 2195 plate and weldments was determined at 200-F, ambient temperature and -320-F. The effects of stress ratio (R), welding process, orientation and thickness were studied. Results are compared with plate data from the Space Shuttle Super Lightweight Tank (SLWT) allowables program. Data from the current series of tests, both plate and weldment, falls within the range of data generated during the SLWT allowables program.

  16. Chronic exposure to the ultraviolet radiation levels from arc welding does not result in obvious damage to the human corneal endothelium.

    PubMed

    Oblak, Emil; Doughty, Michael J

    2002-11-01

    Occupational exposure of the cornea to ultraviolet radiation (UVR, e.g. in welding) is a well-known cause of 'arc eye' (photo-keratoconjunctivitis), but has also been considered to be a risk for the development of alterations in the size (polymegethism) and shape (pleomorphism) of the deeper-lying human corneal endothelial cells. Human data are however limited and so a further study was undertaken, with a control group. Non-contact specular micrographs of the central region of the corneal endothelium were obtained from 40 white males aged between 32 and 63 years; 20 were arc welders with an average of 25 +/- 7 years job experience, while the others were office workers (n = 20). All the welders reported occupational exposure to UVR (i.e. welders 'flashes') and up to 3 times per year. None of the subjects had a history of contact lens wear, major eye disease or surgery. The endothelial image was scanned, projected onto an overlay and cell border marking carried out in a masked fashion. The overlay was independently analysed, by a customised semi-automated method, providing cell-border-adjusted data on cell areas and cell shape (sides) on 124 to 260 cells per image. The endothelial cell density (ECD) values were also calculated from individual cell area values. All corneas appeared to be healthy, and showed no fluorescein staining indicating damage to the surface epithelium. Central corneal thickness values were normal at 0.531 +/- 0.031 (mean +/- SD) and 0.527 +/- 0.036 mm in the welders and non-welders respectively. All endothelia appeared healthy, with no evidence of cell oedema. The group-mean endothelial cell area was 393 +/- 35 and 392 +/- 21 microm2, ECD values were 2855 +/- 224 cells mm(-2) and 2852 +/- 210 cells mm(-2), while the percentages of 6-sided cells were 60 +/- 5.2 and 59 +/- 4.1% respectively. Cell area distributions were statistically identical (p > or = 0.8), and cell area-side relationships were marginally, but not statistically different. This

  17. Fast, Nonspattering Inert-Gas Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed welding technique combines best features of metal (other than tungsten)/inert-gas welding, plasma arc welding, and tungsten/inert-gas welding. Advantages include: wire fed to weld joint preheated, therefore fed at high speed without spattering; high-frequency energy does not have to be supplied to workpiece to initiate welding; size of arc gap not critical, power-supply control circuit adjusts voltage across gap to compensate for changes; only low gas-flow rate needed; welding electrode replaced easily as prefabricated assembly; external wire-feeding manipulator not needed; and welding process relatively forgiving of operator error.

  18. Numerical parameter constraints for accurate PIC-DSMC simulation of breakdown from arc initiation to stable arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Christopher; Hopkins, Matthew; Moore, Stan; Boerner, Jeremiah; Cartwright, Keith

    2015-09-01

    Simulation of breakdown is important for understanding and designing a variety of applications such as mitigating undesirable discharge events. Such simulations need to be accurate through early time arc initiation to late time stable arc behavior. Here we examine constraints on the timestep and mesh size required for arc simulations using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method with direct simulation Monte Carlo (DMSC) collisions. Accurate simulation of electron avalanche across a fixed voltage drop and constant neutral density (reduced field of 1000 Td) was found to require a timestep ~ 1/100 of the mean time between collisions and a mesh size ~ 1/25 the mean free path. These constraints are much smaller than the typical PIC-DSMC requirements for timestep and mesh size. Both constraints are related to the fact that charged particles are accelerated by the external field. Thus gradients in the electron energy distribution function can exist at scales smaller than the mean free path and these must be resolved by the mesh size for accurate collision rates. Additionally, the timestep must be small enough that the particle energy change due to the fields be small in order to capture gradients in the cross sections versus energy. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Calibration Fixture For Welding Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holly, Krisztina J.

    1990-01-01

    Compact, lightweight device used in any position or orientation. Calibration fixture designed for use on robotic gas/tungsten-arc welding torch equipped with vision-based seam-tracking system. Through optics in hollow torch cylinder, video camera obtains image of weld, viewing along line of sight coaxial with welding electrode. Attaches to welding-torch cylinder in place of gas cup normally attached in use. By use of longer or shorter extension tube, fixture accommodates welding electrode of unusual length.

  20. Assessment of Corona/Arcing Hazard for Electron Beam Welding in Space Shuttle Bay at LEO for ISWE: Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Russell, C.; Vaughn, J.; Stocks, C.; ODell, D.; Bhat, B.

    1996-01-01

    Test welds were made in argon over a range of pressures from 10-5 to 10-3 torr (the latter pressure an order of magnitude above pressures anticipated in the space shuttle bay during welding) with and without plasma on 304 stainless steel, 6Al-4V titanium, and 5456 aluminum in search of any possible unwanted electrical discharges. Only a faint steady glow of beam-excited atoms around the electron beam and sometimes extending out into the vacuum chamber was observed. No signs of current spiking or of any potentially dangerous electrical discharge were found.

  1. Development of models for welding applications

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, J.R.; Hayer, L.K.

    1990-01-01

    The modeling of welding processes offers considerable potential for help with manufacturing problems but a complete definition of any welding process offers many challenges. However, the modular structure of MARC, and the diverse range of capabilities offered, create a good opportunity for development in this area. This paper discusses these problems and describes techniques used to overcome some of them. Models have been developed to simulate gas tungsten arc (GTA) and electron beam (EB) welding with a moving heat source. Fortran routines for subroutines FLUX and FORCDT have been written to generate a moving heat source. Sequential element activation has permitted the simulation of GTA welding with cold wire feed (CWF), as in filling of a machined weld groove. A program which generates History Definition blocks necessary for this type of welding model is also described in this paper. Semi-infinite heat transfer elements were used to get accurate temperature histories while keeping the size of the model manageable. Time-temperature histories and isothermal contours compare well with experimental measurements, although many areas for improvement and refinement remain. Results have been used to anticipate the necessity for weld parameter changes after part redesign, and the electron beam model relates closely to situations in which information is needed for the minimization of peak temperatures on the underside of the welded part. 8 refs., 11 figs.

  2. Weldability Characteristics of Sintered Hot-Forged AISI 4135 Steel Produced through P/M Route by Using Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Joby; Muthukumaran, S.; Pandey, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Present investigation is an attempt to study the weldability characteristics of sintered hot-forged plates of AISI 4135 steel produced through powder metallurgy (P/M) route using matching filler materials of ER80S B2. Compacts of homogeneously blended elemental powders corresponding to the above steel were prepared on a universal testing machine (UTM) by taking pre-weighed powder blend with a suitable die, punch and bottom insert assembly. Indigenously developed ceramic coating was applied on the entire surface of the compacts in order to protect them from oxidation during sintering. Sintered preforms were hot forged to flat, approximately rectangular plates, welded by pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding (PCGTAW) processes with aforementioned filler materials. Microstructural, tensile and hardness evaluations revealed that PCGTAW process with low heat input could produce weldments of good quality with almost nil defects. It was established that PCGTAW joints possess improved tensile properties compared to the base metal and it was mainly attributed to lower heat input, resulting in finer fusion zone grains and higher fusion zone hardness. Thus, the present investigation opens a new and demanding field in research.

  3. Plasma arc torch with coaxial wire feed

    DOEpatents

    Hooper, Frederick M

    2002-01-01

    A plasma arc welding apparatus having a coaxial wire feed. The apparatus includes a plasma arc welding torch, a wire guide disposed coaxially inside of the plasma arc welding torch, and a hollow non-consumable electrode. The coaxial wire guide feeds non-electrified filler wire through the tip of the hollow non-consumable electrode during plasma arc welding. Non-electrified filler wires as small as 0.010 inches can be used. This invention allows precision control of the positioning and feeding of the filler wire during plasma arc welding. Since the non-electrified filler wire is fed coaxially through the center of the plasma arc torch's electrode and nozzle, the wire is automatically aimed at the optimum point in the weld zone. Therefore, there is no need for additional equipment to position and feed the filler wire from the side before or during welding.

  4. Synthesis of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes by Plasma Arc: Role of Plasma Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhart, Samir; Scott, Carl D.

    2000-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) are porous objects on the molecular scale and have a low density, which gives them potential applications as adsorbent for molecular hydrogen. Their H2 absorption capacity published in the literature varies from 4 to 10% by mass according to the purity of the materials and storage conditions. Optimization of production methods of SWNTs should permit improving these new materials for storage of hydrogen. In this article, we show the potential of using SWNTs in hydrogen storage. In particular, we pose problems associated with synthesis, purification, and opening up of the nanotubes. We present an electric arc process currently used at laboratory scale to produce single wall carbon nanotubes. We discuss, in particular, operating conditions that permit growth of nanotubes and some plasma parameters that assure control of the material. Analysis of the process is carried out with the aid of local measurements of temperature and scanning and transmission electron microscopy of the materials.

  5. Underwater wet welding of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, S.; Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1995-05-01

    Underwater wet welding is conducted directly in water with the shielded metal arc (SMA) and flux cored arc (FCA) welding processes. Underwater wet welding has been demonstrated as an acceptable repair technique down to 100 meters (325 ft.) in depth, but wet welds have been attempted on carbon steel structures down to 200 meters (650 ft.). The primary purpose of this interpretive report is to document and evaluate current understanding of metallurgical behavior of underwater wet welds so that new welding consumables can be designed and new welding practices can be developed for fabrication and repair of high strength steel structures at greater depths. First the pyrometallurgical and physical metallurgy behaviors of underwater weldments are discussed. Second, modifications of the welding consumables and processes are suggested to enhance the ability to apply wet welding techniques.

  6. Recommended Aluminum Pipe Welding Procedures for Corps of Engineers Construction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-01

    tungsten -arc welding process) (4) Use of the extended land joint configuration; O-s (5) Use of current limits set by the Aluminum Association and ALCOA. ~0...Design Used for the 1-In. Schedule 10 Pipe 9 3 Typical Metal Weld Made Using Gas Tungsten -Arc Welding 11 4 Typical Small-Diameter Pipe Tensile Test...aluminum pipe commonly Approach used in military applications (Table 1). The gas Available literature on aluminum welding was tungsten -arc welding

  7. Gas tungsten arc welder

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  8. Method for welding beryllium

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, Raymond D.; Smith, Frank M.; O'Leary, Richard F.

    1997-01-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon.

  9. The effect of weld stresses on weld quality. [stress fields and metal cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chihoski, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    A narrow heat source raises the temperature of a spot on a solid piece of material like metal. The high temperature of the spot decreases with distance from the spot. This is true whether the heat source is an arc, a flame, an electron beam, a plasma jet, a laser beam, or any other source of intense, narrowly defined heat. Stress and strain fields around a moving heat source are organized into a coherent visible system. It is shown that five stresses act across the weld line in turn as an arc passes. Their proportions and positions are considerably altered by weld parameters or condition changes. These pushes and pulls affect the metallurgical character and integrity of the weld area even when there is no apparent difference between after-the-fact examples.

  10. Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  11. Fundamental Mechanisms Affecting Friction Welding under Vacuum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    and interior, is a large problem for arc welding where inert gases replace oxygen inside and spatter can damage surface and cloud optical devices...welded to the surface holding the patch in place. Inside or outside the station, studs can be friction welded to surfaces to attach insulation material...vacuum, surface contamination, material, weld force and weld speed on the integrity of the weld. The vacuum conditions are limited to 10 torr or less

  12. Aviation Maintenance Technology. Airframe. A204. Aircraft Welding. Instructor Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This teacher's guide is designed to aid teachers in leading students through a module on aircraft welding on airframes. The module contains four units that cover the following topics: (1) gas welding and cutting; (2) brazing and soldering; (3) shielded metal arc welding; and (4) gas tungsten arc welding. Each unit follows a standardized format…

  13. SOAR: An extensible suite of codes for weld analysis and optimal weld schedules

    SciTech Connect

    Eisler, G.R.; Fuerschbach, P.W.

    1997-07-01

    A suite of MATLAB-based code modules has been developed to provide optimal weld schedules, regulating weld process parameters for CO2 and pulse Nd:YAG laser welding methods, and arc welding in support of the Smartweld manufacturing initiative at Sandia National Laboratories. The optimization methodology consists of mixed genetic and gradient-based algorithms to query semi-empirical, nonlinear algebraic models. The optimization output provides heat-input-efficient welds for user-specified weld dimensions. User querying of all weld models is available to examine sub-optimal schedules. In addition, a heat conduction equation solver for 2-D heat flow is available to provide the user with an additional check of weld thermal effects. The inclusion of thermodynamic properties allows the extension of the empirical models to include materials other than those tested. All solution methods are provided with graphical user interfaces and display pertinent results in two and three-dimensional form. The code architecture provides an extensible framework to add an arbitrary number of modules.

  14. Improved welding of Rene-41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunez, S.

    1970-01-01

    Gas-tungsten arc welding with a filler of Rene-41 produces strong welded joints. When Rene-41 is used, resistance to strain-age cracking is greatly increased by post-weld solution annealing in an inert atmosphere. Mechanical properties of Rene-41 and Hastelloy-W are compared.

  15. Time-dependent calculations of molten pool formation and thermal plasma with metal vapour in gas tungsten arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, M.; Yamamoto, K.; Tashiro, S.; Nakata, K.; Yamamoto, E.; Yamazaki, K.; Suzuki, K.; Murphy, A. B.; Lowke, J. J.

    2010-11-01

    A gas tungsten arc (GTA) was modelled taking into account the contamination of the plasma by metal vapour from the molten anode. The whole region of GTA atmosphere including the tungsten cathode, the arc plasma and the anode was treated using a unified numerical model. A viscosity approximation was used to express the diffusion coefficient in terms of viscosity of the shielding gas and metal vapour. The transient two-dimensional distributions of temperature, velocity of plasma flow and iron vapour concentration were predicted, together with the molten pool as a function of time for a 150 A arc current at atmospheric pressure, both for helium and argon gases. It was shown that the thermal plasma in the GTA was influenced by iron vapour from the molten pool surface and that the concentration of iron vapour in the plasma was dependent on the temperature of the molten pool. GTA on high sulfur stainless steel was calculated to discuss the differences between a low sulfur and a high sulfur stainless steel anode. Helium was selected as the shielding gas because a helium GTA produces more metal vapour than an argon GTA. In the GTA on a high sulfur stainless steel anode, iron vapour and current path were constricted. Radiative emission density in the GTA on high sulfur stainless steel was also concentrated in the centre area of the arc plasma together with the iron vapour although the temperature distributions were almost the same as that in the case of a low sulfur stainless steel anode.

  16. Characterization of the Micro-Welding Process for Repair of Nickel Base Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durocher, J.; Richards, N. L.

    2007-12-01

    Micro-welding is a low-heat input process whereby a metal or cermet, is deposited by the generation of a low-power arc between a consumable electrode and a substrate. The low-heat input of this process offers unique advantages over more common welding processes such as gas tungsten arc, plasma arc, laser, and electron beam welding. At present, the repair of turbine blades and vanes commonly involves gas tungsten arc welding and these components are susceptible to heat affected zone cracking during the weld repair process; vacuum brazing is also used but mainly on low-stress components such as stators. In this study, the low-heat input characteristic of micro-welding has been utilized to simulate repair of Inconel (Trade Mark of Special Metals) 625, Inconel 718, and Inconel 722 filler alloys to a cast Inconel 738 substrate. The effect of micro-welding process parameters on the deposition rate, coating quality, and substrate has been investigated.

  17. WELDED JACKETED URANIUM BODY

    DOEpatents

    Gurinsky, D.H.

    1958-08-26

    A fuel element is presented for a neutronic reactor and is comprised of a uranium body, a non-fissionable jacket surrounding sald body, thu jacket including a portion sealed by a weld, and an inclusion in said sealed jacket at said weld of a fiux having a low neutron capture cross-section. The flux is provided by combining chlorine gas and hydrogen in the intense heat of-the arc, in a "Heliarc" welding muthod, to form dry hydrochloric acid gas.

  18. Effects of the laser beam superficial heat treatment on the gas Tungsten arc Ti-6al-4v welded metal microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voiculescu, I.; Dontu, Octavian; Geanta, V.; Ganatsios, S.

    2008-03-01

    The microstructure of the weld and the extent to which it is different from the thermo-mechanically processed base material is strongly influenced by the thermal cycle of welding. The mechanical properties of composite weld structures in titanium alloys depend on structural characteristics of each region (weld, base material and heat affected area), influenced by the specific thermal cycle imposed during welding and the subsequent post-weld heat treatment. In order to improve the as-welded metal toughness and ductility, the welded metal was subjected to various post weld laser heat treatments, above and below beta transus temperature in a shielding atmosphere of pure argon. Standard micro-hardness measurements and tensile strength techniques showed higher mechanical properties of the heat treated samples in different conditions with respect to the base metal. Metallographic investigations attribute this to the formation of α'phases in heat treated material, especially in the weld metal.

  19. An Analysis of the Welding Occupation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pucci, Alex L; Reichel, George F.

    The general purpose of the occupational analysis is to provide workable, basic information dealing with the many and varied duties performed in the welding occupation, It includes the basic manipulative skills and technical information in the following four areas: oxy/acetylene, electric arc, tungsten inert-gas arc, and metallic inert-arc welding.…

  20. Autoclave test of inertia welded slugs

    SciTech Connect

    Peacock, H.B.

    1986-01-27

    Inertia welding (IW) is being evaluated as an alternative to gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welding, for welding Mark 31 slugs. To demonstrate IW, 40 production (GTA) slugs rejected for pinholes and poor bonds were used. After welding, the slugs were autoclave tested. No autoclave failures occurred. (DLC)

  1. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Alloy Circumferential Weld Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cantrell, Mark; Carter, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an innovative weld process that continues to grow in use, in the commercial, defense, and space sectors. It produces high quality and high strength welds in aluminum alloys. The process consists of a rotating weld pin tool that plasticizes material through friction. The plasticized material is welded by applying a high weld forge force through the weld pin tool against the material during pin tool rotation. The high weld forge force is reacted against an anvil and a stout tool structure. A variation of friction stir welding currently being evaluated is self-reacting friction stir welding. Self-reacting friction stir welding incorporates two opposing shoulders on the crown and root sides of the weld joint. In self-reacting friction stir welding, the weld forge force is reacted against the crown shoulder portion of the weld pin tool by the root shoulder. This eliminates the need for a stout tooling structure to react the high weld forge force required in the typical friction stir weld process. Therefore, the self-reacting feature reduces tooling requirements and, therefore, process implementation costs. This makes the process attractive for aluminum alloy circumferential weld applications. To evaluate the application of self-reacting friction stir welding for aluminum alloy circumferential welding, a feasibility study was performed. The study consisted of performing a fourteen-foot diameter aluminum alloy circumferential demonstration weld using typical fusion weld tooling. To accomplish the demonstration weld, weld and tack weld development were performed and fourteen-foot diameter rings were fabricated. Weld development consisted of weld pin tool selection and the generation of a process map and envelope. Tack weld development evaluated gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding for tack welding rings together for circumferential welding. As a result of the study, a successful circumferential demonstration weld was produced leading

  2. Initial Parameter Estimation for Inverse Thermal Analysis of Ti-6Al-4V Deep Penetration Welds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-16

    Science Materials Science and Technology Division a. SHabaev George Mason University Fairfax, Virginia i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form ApprovedOMB No...These analyses employ a methodology that is in terms of analytical basis functions for inverse thermal analysis of steady state energy deposition in...of Computation and Data Sciences , Fairfax, VA 22030 ONR Inverse-analysis methodology Inverse thermal analysis Deep penetration welds Weld

  3. Size Distribution and Estimated Respiratory Deposition of Total Chromium, Hexavalent Chromium, Manganese, and Nickel in Gas Metal Arc Welding Fume Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Cena, Lorenzo G; Chisholm, William P; Keane, Michael J; Cumpston, Amy; Chen, Bean T

    A laboratory study was conducted to determine the mass of total Cr, Cr(VI), Mn, and Ni in 15 size fractions for mild and stainless steel gas-metal arc welding (GMAW) fumes. Samples were collected using a nano multi orifice uniform deposition impactor (MOUDI) with polyvinyl chloride filters on each stage. The filters were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and ion chromatography. Limits of detection (LODs) and quantitation (LOQs) were experimentally calculated and percent recoveries were measured from spiked metals in solution and dry, certified welding-fume reference material. The fraction of Cr(VI) in total Cr was estimated by calculating the ratio of Cr(VI) to total Cr mass for each particle size range. Expected, regional deposition of each metal was estimated according to respiratory-deposition models. The weight percent (standard deviation) of Mn in mild steel fumes was 9.2% (6.8%). For stainless steel fumes, the weight percentages were 8.4% (5.4%) for total Cr, 12.2% (6.5%) for Mn, 2.1% (1.5%) for Ni and 0.5% (0.4%) for Cr(VI). All metals presented a fraction between 0.04 and 0.6 μm. Total Cr and Ni presented an additional fraction <0.03 μm. On average 6% of the Cr was found in the Cr(VI) valence state. There was no statistical difference between the smallest and largest mean Cr(VI) to total Cr mass ratio (p-value D 0.19), hence our analysis does not show that particle size affects the contribution of Cr(VI) to total Cr. The predicted total respiratory deposition for the metal particles was ∼25%. The sites of principal deposition were the head airways (7-10%) and the alveolar region (11-14%). Estimated Cr(VI) deposition was highest in the alveolar region (14%).

  4. Influence of Feedstock Materials and Spray Parameters on Thermal Conductivity of Wire-Arc-Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, H. H.; Zhou, Z.; Wang, G. H.; He, D. Y.; Bobzin, K.; Zhao, L.; Öte, M.; Königstein, T.

    2017-02-01

    To manufacture a protective coating with high thermal conductivity on drying cylinders in paper production machines, a FeCrB-cored wire was developed, and the spraying parameters for wire-arc spraying were optimized in this study. The conventional engineering materials FeCrAl and FeCrMo coatings were produced as the reference coatings under the same experimental condition. It has been shown that the oxide content in coating influences the thermal conductivity of coating significantly. The FeCrB coating exhibits a relative higher thermal conductivity due to the lower oxide content in comparison with conventional FeCrAl and FeCrMo coatings. Moreover, the oxidation of in-flight particles can be reduced by decreasing the standoff distance contributing to the increase in the thermal conductivity of coating. Total energy consumption of a papermaking machine can be significantly reduced if the coatings applied to dryer section exhibit high thermal conductivity. Therefore, the FeCrB coating developed in this study is a highly promising coating system for drying cylinders regarding the improved thermal conductivity and low operation costs in paper production industry.

  5. Influence of Feedstock Materials and Spray Parameters on Thermal Conductivity of Wire-Arc-Sprayed Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, H. H.; Zhou, Z.; Wang, G. H.; He, D. Y.; Bobzin, K.; Zhao, L.; Öte, M.; Königstein, T.

    2017-03-01

    To manufacture a protective coating with high thermal conductivity on drying cylinders in paper production machines, a FeCrB-cored wire was developed, and the spraying parameters for wire-arc spraying were optimized in this study. The conventional engineering materials FeCrAl and FeCrMo coatings were produced as the reference coatings under the same experimental condition. It has been shown that the oxide content in coating influences the thermal conductivity of coating significantly. The FeCrB coating exhibits a relative higher thermal conductivity due to the lower oxide content in comparison with conventional FeCrAl and FeCrMo coatings. Moreover, the oxidation of in-flight particles can be reduced by decreasing the standoff distance contributing to the increase in the thermal conductivity of coating. Total energy consumption of a papermaking machine can be significantly reduced if the coatings applied to dryer section exhibit high thermal conductivity. Therefore, the FeCrB coating developed in this study is a highly promising coating system for drying cylinders regarding the improved thermal conductivity and low operation costs in paper production industry.

  6. 4D dose simulation in volumetric arc therapy: Accuracy and affecting parameters.

    PubMed

    Sothmann, Thilo; Gauer, Tobias; Werner, René

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy of lung and liver lesions has changed from normofractioned 3D-CRT to stereotactic treatment in a single or few fractions, often employing volumetric arc therapy (VMAT)-based techniques. Potential unintended interference of respiratory target motion and dynamically changing beam parameters during VMAT dose delivery motivates establishing 4D quality assurance (4D QA) procedures to assess appropriateness of generated VMAT treatment plans when taking into account patient-specific motion characteristics. Current approaches are motion phantom-based 4D QA and image-based 4D VMAT dose simulation. Whereas phantom-based 4D QA is usually restricted to a small number of measurements, the computational approaches allow simulating many motion scenarios. However, 4D VMAT dose simulation depends on various input parameters, influencing estimated doses along with mitigating simulation reliability. Thus, aiming at routine use of simulation-based 4D VMAT QA, the impact of such parameters as well as the overall accuracy of the 4D VMAT dose simulation has to be studied in detail-which is the topic of the present work. In detail, we introduce the principles of 4D VMAT dose simulation, identify influencing parameters and assess their impact on 4D dose simulation accuracy by comparison of simulated motion-affected dose distributions to corresponding dosimetric motion phantom measurements. Exploiting an ITV-based treatment planning approach, VMAT treatment plans were generated for a motion phantom and different motion scenarios (sinusoidal motion of different period/direction; regular/irregular motion). 4D VMAT dose simulation results and dose measurements were compared by local 3% / 3 mm γ-evaluation, with the measured dose distributions serving as ground truth. Overall γ-passing rates of simulations and dynamic measurements ranged from 97% to 100% (mean across all motion scenarios: 98% ± 1%); corresponding values for comparison of different day repeat measurements were

  7. 4D dose simulation in volumetric arc therapy: Accuracy and affecting parameters

    PubMed Central

    Werner, René

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy of lung and liver lesions has changed from normofractioned 3D-CRT to stereotactic treatment in a single or few fractions, often employing volumetric arc therapy (VMAT)-based techniques. Potential unintended interference of respiratory target motion and dynamically changing beam parameters during VMAT dose delivery motivates establishing 4D quality assurance (4D QA) procedures to assess appropriateness of generated VMAT treatment plans when taking into account patient-specific motion characteristics. Current approaches are motion phantom-based 4D QA and image-based 4D VMAT dose simulation. Whereas phantom-based 4D QA is usually restricted to a small number of measurements, the computational approaches allow simulating many motion scenarios. However, 4D VMAT dose simulation depends on various input parameters, influencing estimated doses along with mitigating simulation reliability. Thus, aiming at routine use of simulation-based 4D VMAT QA, the impact of such parameters as well as the overall accuracy of the 4D VMAT dose simulation has to be studied in detail–which is the topic of the present work. In detail, we introduce the principles of 4D VMAT dose simulation, identify influencing parameters and assess their impact on 4D dose simulation accuracy by comparison of simulated motion-affected dose distributions to corresponding dosimetric motion phantom measurements. Exploiting an ITV-based treatment planning approach, VMAT treatment plans were generated for a motion phantom and different motion scenarios (sinusoidal motion of different period/direction; regular/irregular motion). 4D VMAT dose simulation results and dose measurements were compared by local 3% / 3 mm γ-evaluation, with the measured dose distributions serving as ground truth. Overall γ-passing rates of simulations and dynamic measurements ranged from 97% to 100% (mean across all motion scenarios: 98% ± 1%); corresponding values for comparison of different day repeat measurements were

  8. Auto Body Welding 2 (Course Outline), Automotive Body Repair and Refinishing 1: 9033.04.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The 90-hour course is a foundation quinmester course in welding for the auto body repairman. The outline consists of seven blocks of instruction (orientation, 6 hours; auto body oxyacetylene welding, 10 hours; electric arc welding equipment, 6 hours; auto body electric arc welding, 8 hours; position welding, 40 hours; electric spot welders, 16…

  9. Assessing the Impact of Sequencing Practicums for Welding in Agricultural Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Malcolm; Pate, Michael L.; Lawver, Rebecca G.; Warnick, Brian K.; Dai, Xin

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the impact of sequencing practicums for welding on students' ability to perform a 1F (flat position-fillet lap joint) weld on low-carbon steel. Participants were randomly assigned a specific practice sequence of welding for using gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). A total of 71 participants…

  10. Online Visual Quality Inspection for Weld Seams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löhndorf, Maike; Ramoser, Herbert; Cambrini, Luigi

    2007-12-01

    Arc welding is a widely used technology in almost all sectors of industrial production. Many tasks are automatically performed by robots. This paper presents a flexible vision based quality management system to detect defects online during the weld process.

  11. Welding Penetration Control of Fixed Pipe in TIG Welding Using Fuzzy Inference System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskoro, Ario Sunar; Kabutomori, Masashi; Suga, Yasuo

    This paper presents a study on welding penetration control of fixed pipe in Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding using fuzzy inference system. The welding penetration control is essential to the production quality welds with a specified geometry. For pipe welding using constant arc current and welding speed, the bead width becomes wider as the circumferential welding of small diameter pipes progresses. Having welded pipe in fixed position, obviously, the excessive arc current yields burn through of metals; in contrary, insufficient arc current produces imperfect welding. In order to avoid these errors and to obtain the uniform weld bead over the entire circumference of the pipe, the welding conditions should be controlled as the welding proceeds. This research studies the intelligent welding process of aluminum alloy pipe 6063S-T5 in fixed position using the AC welding machine. The monitoring system used a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to monitor backside image of molten pool. The captured image was processed to recognize the edge of molten pool by image processing algorithm. Simulation of welding control using fuzzy inference system was constructed to simulate the welding control process. The simulation result shows that fuzzy controller was suitable for controlling the welding speed and appropriate to be implemented into the welding system. A series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the performance of the fuzzy controller. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the control system that is confirmed by sound welds.

  12. Welding Curtains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-01-01

    Concept of transparent welding curtains made of heavy duty vinyl originated with David F. Wilson, President of Wilson Sales Company. In 1968, Wilson's curtains reduced glare of welding arc and blocked ultraviolet radiation. When later research uncovered blue light hazards, Wilson sought improvement of his products. He contracted Dr. Charles G. Miller and James B. Stephens, both of Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and they agreed to undertake development of a curtain capable of filtering out harmful irradiance, including ultraviolet and blue light and provide protection over a broad range of welding operation. Working on their own time, the JPL pair spent 3 years developing a patented formula that includes light filtering dyes and small particles of zinc oxide. The result was the Wilson Spectra Curtain.

  13. Probing Reliability of Transport Phenomena Based Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow Analysis in Autogeneous Fusion Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bag, S.; de, A.

    2010-09-01

    The transport phenomena based heat transfer and fluid flow calculations in weld pool require a number of input parameters. Arc efficiency, effective thermal conductivity, and viscosity in weld pool are some of these parameters, values of which are rarely known and difficult to assign a priori based on the scientific principles alone. The present work reports a bi-directional three-dimensional (3-D) heat transfer and fluid flow model, which is integrated with a real number based genetic algorithm. The bi-directional feature of the integrated model allows the identification of the values of a required set of uncertain model input parameters and, next, the design of process parameters to achieve a target weld pool dimension. The computed values are validated with measured results in linear gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) weld samples. Furthermore, a novel methodology to estimate the overall reliability of the computed solutions is also presented.

  14. The effect of laser welding process parameters on the mechanical and microstructural properties of V-4Cr-4Ti structural materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C.; Natesan, K.; Xu, Z.; Smith, D.

    2000-06-15

    This paper reports on a systematic study which was conducted to examine the use of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser to weld sheet materials of V-Cr-Ti alloys and to characterize the microstructural and mechanical properties of the resulting joints. Deep penetration and defect-free welds were achieved under an optimal combination of laser parameters including focal length of lens, pulse energy, pulse repetition rate, beam travel speed, and shielding gas arrangement. The key for defect-free welds was found to be the stabilization of the keyhole and providing an escape path for the gas trapped in the weld. An innovative method was developed to obtain deep penetration and oxygen contamination free welds. Oxygen and nitrogen uptake were reduced to levels only a few ppm higher than the base metal by design and development of an environmental control box. Effort directed at developing an acceptable postwelding heat treatment showed that five passes of a diffuse laser beam over the welded region softened the weld material, especially in the root region of the weld.

  15. Application Of A Control Algorithm To Vertical-Up Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Kenneth R.; Cook, George E.; Andersen, Kristinn; Barnett, Robert J.; Zein-Sabattou, Saleh

    1993-01-01

    Report describes application of generalized control algorithm for automatic robotic arc welding in vertical-up configuration. Applicable to variety of welding processes, previously applied to welding in downhand configuration. Generalized algorithm and application to downhand welding described in "Method for Automatic Downhand Welding" (MFS-27209).

  16. General Mechanical Repair. Welding. Volume 2. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    Five units on welding are presented in this teacher's guide. The units are the following: introduction to oxyacetylene welding, oxyacetylene welding positions and applications, use of the cutting torch, introduction to shielded metal arc welding, and welding joints and positions. Each instructional unit generally contains eight components:…

  17. Predicting the dilution of plasma transferred arc hardfacing of stellite on carbon steel using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Balasubramanian, V.; Varahamoorthy, R.; Babu, S.

    2008-12-01

    Control of dilution is important in hardfacing, where low dilution is typically desirable. At present, most fabrication industries use shielded metal are welding, gas metal arc welding, gas tungsten arc welding and submerged are welding processes for hardfacing purposes. In these processes, the percentage of the dilution level is higher, ranging between 10% and 30%. In Plasma Transferred Arc (PTA) hardfacing, a solidified metallurgical bond between the deposit and the substrate is obtained with minimum dilution (less than 10%). This paper highlights the application of response surface methodology to predict and optimize the percentage of the dilution of a cobalt-based hardfaced surface produced by the PTA process. Experiments were conducted based on a fully replicable five-factor, five-level central composite rotatable design and a mathematical model was developed using response surface methodology. Furthermore, the response surface methodology was used to optimize the process parameters that yield the lowest percentage of dilution.

  18. Evolution of Residual Stresses with Fatigue Crack Growth in a Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welded Aluminum Alloy Compact Tension Specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljedahl, C. D. M.; Zanellato, O.; Edwards, L.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.

    2008-10-01

    The evolution of the residual stresses during fatigue crack growth in a welded compact tension C(T) specimen was measured using neutron diffraction. The measurements were performed by growing a fatigue crack in a sample in situ on a neutron diffractometer. The stresses were found to be unaffected by crack growth through the compressive part of the initial residual stress field. The residual stresses at the crack tip increased when the crack entered the tensile residual stress field to maintain residual stress equilibrium. Finite element (FE) modeling of the evolution of the residual stresses showed good correlation with the experimental results. The residual stress evolution was found to be governed by redistribution of the initial stress field and only slightly affected by fatigue-induced effects at the measured spatial resolution (2 mm × 2 mm × 7 mm).

  19. Real-Time Measurement of Width and Height of Weld Beads in GMAW Processes

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Lopera, Jesús Emilio; S. T. Motta, José Mauricio; Absi Alfaro, Sadek Crisostomo

    2016-01-01

    Associated to the weld quality, the weld bead geometry is one of the most important parameters in welding processes. It is a significant requirement in a welding project, especially in automatic welding systems where a specific width, height, or penetration of weld bead is needed. This paper presents a novel technique for real-time measuring of the width and height of weld beads in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) using a single high-speed camera and a long-pass optical filter in a passive vision system. The measuring method is based on digital image processing techniques and the image calibration process is based on projective transformations. The measurement process takes less than 3 milliseconds per image, which allows a transfer rate of more than 300 frames per second. The proposed methodology can be used in any metal transfer mode of a gas metal arc welding process and does not have occlusion problems. The responses of the measurement system, presented here, are in a good agreement with off-line data collected by a common laser-based 3D scanner. Each measurement is compare using a statistical Welch’s t-test of the null hypothesis, which, in any case, does not exceed the threshold of significance level α = 0.01, validating the results and the performance of the proposed vision system. PMID:27649198

  20. Real-Time Measurement of Width and Height of Weld Beads in GMAW Processes.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Lopera, Jesús Emilio; S T Motta, José Mauricio; Absi Alfaro, Sadek Crisostomo

    2016-09-15

    Associated to the weld quality, the weld bead geometry is one of the most important parameters in welding processes. It is a significant requirement in a welding project, especially in automatic welding systems where a specific width, height, or penetration of weld bead is needed. This paper presents a novel technique for real-time measuring of the width and height of weld beads in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) using a single high-speed camera and a long-pass optical filter in a passive vision system. The measuring method is based on digital image processing techniques and the image calibration process is based on projective transformations. The measurement process takes less than 3 milliseconds per image, which allows a transfer rate of more than 300 frames per second. The proposed methodology can be used in any metal transfer mode of a gas metal arc welding process and does not have occlusion problems. The responses of the measurement system, presented here, are in a good agreement with off-line data collected by a common laser-based 3D scanner. Each measurement is compare using a statistical Welch's t-test of the null hypothesis, which, in any case, does not exceed the threshold of significance level α = 0.01, validating the results and the performance of the proposed vision system.

  1. The effect of laser welding process parameters on the mechanical and microstructural properties of V-4CR-4TI structural materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C. B.; Natesan, K.; Xu, Z.; Smith, D. L.

    1999-11-12

    V-Cr-Ti alloys are among the leading candidate materials for the frost wall and other structural materials applications in fusion power reactors because of several important advantages including inherently low irradiation-induced activity, good mechanical properties, good compatibility with lithium, high thermal conductivity and good resistance to irradiation-induced swelling and damage [1]. However, weldability of these alloys in general must be demonstrated, and laser welding, specifically, must be developed. Laser welding is considered to be an attractive process for construction of a reactor due to its high penetrating power and potential flexibility. This paper reports on a systematic study which was conducted to examine the use of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser to weld sheet materials of V-Cr-Ti alloys and to characterize the microstructural and mechanical properties of the resulting joints. Deep penetration and defect-free welds were achieved under an optimal combination of laser parameters including focal length of lens, pulse energy, pulse repetition rate, beam travel speed, and shielding gas arrangement. The key for defect-free welds was found to be the stabilization of the keyhole and providing an escape path for the gas trapped in the weld. An innovative method was developed to obtain deep penetration and oxygen contamination free welds. Oxygen and nitrogen uptake were reduced to levels only a few ppm higher than the base metal by design and development of an environmental control box. The effort directed at developing an acceptable postwelding heat treatment showed that five passes of a diffuse laser beam over the welded region softened the weld material, especially in the root region of the weld.

  2. Physics of Fusion Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Applicabilities and limitations of three techniques analyzed. NASA technical memorandum discusses physics of electron-beam, gas/ tungsten-arc, and laser-beam welding. From comparison of capabilities and limitations of each technique with regard to various welding conditions and materials, possible to develop criteria for selecting best welding technique in specific application. All three techniques classified as fusion welding; small volume of workpiece melted by intense heat source. Heat source moved along seam, leaving in wake solid metal that joins seam edges together.

  3. The effect of process parameters on Twin Wire Arc spray pattern shape

    DOE PAGES

    Hall, Aaron Christopher; McCloskey, James Francis; Horner, Allison Lynne

    2015-04-20

    A design of experiments approach was used to describe process parameter—spray pattern relationships in the Twin Wire Arc process using zinc feed stock in a TAFA 8835 (Praxair, Concord, NH, USA) spray torch. Specifically, the effects of arc current, primary atomizing gas pressure, and secondary atomizing gas pressure on spray pattern size, spray pattern flatness, spray pattern eccentricity, and coating deposition rate were investigated. Process relationships were investigated with the intent of maximizing or minimizing each coating property. It was determined that spray pattern area was most affected by primary gas pressure and secondary gas pressure. Pattern eccentricity was mostmore » affected by secondary gas pressure. Pattern flatness was most affected by primary gas pressure. Lastly, coating deposition rate was most affected by arc current.« less

  4. The effect of process parameters on Twin Wire Arc spray pattern shape

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Aaron Christopher; McCloskey, James Francis; Horner, Allison Lynne

    2015-04-20

    A design of experiments approach was used to describe process parameter—spray pattern relationships in the Twin Wire Arc process using zinc feed stock in a TAFA 8835 (Praxair, Concord, NH, USA) spray torch. Specifically, the effects of arc current, primary atomizing gas pressure, and secondary atomizing gas pressure on spray pattern size, spray pattern flatness, spray pattern eccentricity, and coating deposition rate were investigated. Process relationships were investigated with the intent of maximizing or minimizing each coating property. It was determined that spray pattern area was most affected by primary gas pressure and secondary gas pressure. Pattern eccentricity was most affected by secondary gas pressure. Pattern flatness was most affected by primary gas pressure. Lastly, coating deposition rate was most affected by arc current.

  5. Effect of Welding Parameters on the Microstructure and Strength of Friction Stir Weld Joints in Twin Roll Cast EN AW Al-Mn1Cu Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birol, Yucel; Kasman, Sefika

    2013-10-01

    Twin roll cast EN AW Al-Mn1Cu plates were butt welded with the friction stir welding process which employed a non-consumable tool, tilted by 1.5° and 3° with respect to the plate normal, rotated in a clockwise direction at 400 and 800 rpm, while traversing at a fixed rate of 80 mm/min along the weld line. Microstructural observations and microhardness tests were performed on sections perpendicular to the tool traverse direction. Tensile tests were carried out at room temperature on samples cut perpendicular to the weld line. The ultimate tensile strength of the welded EN AW Al-Mn1Cu plates improved with increasing tool rotation speed and decreasing tool tilt angle. This marked improvement in ultimate tensile strength is attributed to the increase in the heat input owing to an increased frictional heat generation. There appears to be a perfect correlation between the ultimate tensile strength and the size of the weld zone. The fracture surfaces of the base plate and the welded plates are distinctly different. The former is dominated by dimples typical of ductile fractures. A vast majority of the intermetallic particles inside the weld zones are too small to generate dimples during a tensile test. The fracture surface of the welded plates is thus characterized by occasional dimples that are elongated in the same direction suggesting a tensile tearing mechanism.

  6. Fluid Flow Phenomena during Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    MOLTEN WELD POOLS are dynamic. Liquid in the weld pool in acted on by several strong forces, which can result in high-velocity fluid motion. Fluid flow velocities exceeding 1 m/s (3.3 ft/s) have been observed in gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds under ordinary welding conditions, and higher velocities have been measured in submerged arc welds. Fluid flow is important because it affects weld shape and is related to the formation of a variety of weld defects. Moving liquid transports heat and often dominates heat transport in the weld pool. Because heat transport by mass flow depends on the direction and speed of fluid motion, weld pool shape can differ dramatically from that predicted by conductive heat flow. Temperature gradients are also altered by fluid flow, which can affect weld microstructure. A number of defects in GTA welds have been attributed to fluid flow or changes in fluid flow, including lack of penetration, top bead roughness, humped beads, finger penetration, and undercutting. Instabilities in the liquid film around the keyhole in electron beam and laser welds are responsible for the uneven penetration (spiking) characteristic of these types of welds.

  7. Method and apparatus for assessing weld quality

    DOEpatents

    Smartt, Herschel B.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Johnson, John A.; Carlson, Nancy M.; Clark, Denis E.; Taylor, Paul L.; Reutzel, Edward W.

    2001-01-01

    Apparatus for determining a quality of a weld produced by a welding device according to the present invention includes a sensor operatively associated with the welding device. The sensor is responsive to at least one welding process parameter during a welding process and produces a welding process parameter signal that relates to the at least one welding process parameter. A computer connected to the sensor is responsive to the welding process parameter signal produced by the sensor. A user interface operatively associated with the computer allows a user to select a desired welding process. The computer processes the welding process parameter signal produced by the sensor in accordance with one of a constant voltage algorithm, a short duration weld algorithm or a pulsed current analysis module depending on the desired welding process selected by the user. The computer produces output data indicative of the quality of the weld.

  8. Size Distribution and Estimated Respiratory Deposition of Total Chromium, Hexavalent Chromium, Manganese, and Nickel in Gas Metal Arc Welding Fume Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Cena, Lorenzo G.; Chisholm, William P.; Keane, Michael J.; Cumpston, Amy; Chen, Bean T.

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to determine the mass of total Cr, Cr(VI), Mn, and Ni in 15 size fractions for mild and stainless steel gas-metal arc welding (GMAW) fumes. Samples were collected using a nano multi orifice uniform deposition impactor (MOUDI) with polyvinyl chloride filters on each stage. The filters were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and ion chromatography. Limits of detection (LODs) and quantitation (LOQs) were experimentally calculated and percent recoveries were measured from spiked metals in solution and dry, certified welding-fume reference material. The fraction of Cr(VI) in total Cr was estimated by calculating the ratio of Cr(VI) to total Cr mass for each particle size range. Expected, regional deposition of each metal was estimated according to respiratory-deposition models. The weight percent (standard deviation) of Mn in mild steel fumes was 9.2% (6.8%). For stainless steel fumes, the weight percentages were 8.4% (5.4%) for total Cr, 12.2% (6.5%) for Mn, 2.1% (1.5%) for Ni and 0.5% (0.4%) for Cr(VI). All metals presented a fraction between 0.04 and 0.6 μm. Total Cr and Ni presented an additional fraction <0.03 μm. On average 6% of the Cr was found in the Cr(VI) valence state. There was no statistical difference between the smallest and largest mean Cr(VI) to total Cr mass ratio (p-value D 0.19), hence our analysis does not show that particle size affects the contribution of Cr(VI) to total Cr. The predicted total respiratory deposition for the metal particles was ∼25%. The sites of principal deposition were the head airways (7–10%) and the alveolar region (11–14%). Estimated Cr(VI) deposition was highest in the alveolar region (14%). PMID:26848207

  9. The effect of potential and aging on the Pb-assisted stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of alloy 22 gas tungsten arc-welded weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csontos, Aladar A.; Pan, Yi-Ming; Dunn, Darrell S.; Yang, Leitai; Cragnolino, Gustavo A.

    2005-05-01

    The susceptibility of as-received, solutionized, and short-term thermally aged mill-annealed (MA) and gas tungsten arc-welded (GTAW) alloy 22 to Pb-assisted stress corrosion cracking (PbSCC) was evaluated in supersaturated, deaerated, acidic PbCl2 solutions at 95 °C. Anodic polarization tests in acidic PbCl2 solutions showed that 16,000 ppm of Pb produced a strong anodic peak and an order of magnitude greater passive current density for both MA and GTAW alloy 22 as compared to pure NaCl solutions. Current spikes were also observed in the anodic polarization plots for the PbCl2 solutions, suggesting periodic events of passivity breakdown and repassivation. Constant deformation SCC tests were conducted using double U-bend samples of as-received, solutionized, and thermally aged MA and double U-groove welded alloy 22 plates. The results indicate that as-received, solutionized, and thermally aged MA and GTAW alloy 22 were resistant to PbSCC in supersaturated PbCl2 solutions at 95 °C, pH 0.5, and applied potentials near the anodic peak ranging from -100 to 50 mVSCE. Enhanced dissolution of alloy 22 was also observed in the crevice region of the double U-bend samples tested in the 16,000 ppm PbCl2 solutions. This Pb concentration is seven orders of magnitude greater than that found in the anticipated repository environments, and chemical speciation modeling showed that Pb2+ is strongly immobilized in J-13 Yucca Mountain waters through the precipitation of PbCO3 solids. Therefore, although enhanced dissolution of the inner U-bend did occur in our tests, the overall results from this PbSCC investigation suggest that as-fabricated, solutionized, and aged MA and GTAW alloy 22 are resistant to SCC in extremely aggressive, acidic, and supersaturated PbCl2 solutions at 95 °C. Provided that these high Pb concentrations are not attainable in the anticipated repository environments, alloy 22 is unlikely to be susceptible to SCC, localized corrosion, and enhanced dissolution by

  10. Lung tumor production and tissue metal distribution after exposure to manual metal ARC-stainless steel welding fume in A/J and C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Battelli, Lori A; Salmen-Muniz, Rebecca; Li, Zheng; Erdely, Aaron; Kashon, Michael L; Simeonova, Petia P; Antonini, James M

    2011-01-01

    Stainless steel welding produces fumes that contain carcinogenic metals. Therefore, welders may be at risk for the development of lung cancer, but animal data are inadequate in this regard. Our main objective was to examine lung tumor production and histopathological alterations in lung-tumor-susceptible (A/J) and -resistant C57BL/6J (B6) mice exposed to manual metal arc-stainless steel (MMA-SS) welding fume. Male mice were exposed to vehicle or MMA-SS welding fume (20 mg/kg) by pharyngeal aspiration once per month for 4 mo. At 78 wk postexposure, gross tumor counts and histopathological changes were assessed and metal analysis was done on extrapulmonary tissue (aorta, heart, kidney, and liver). At 78 wk postexposure, gross lung tumor multiplicity and incidence were unremarkable in mice exposed to MMA-SS welding fume. Histopathology revealed that only the exposed A/J mice contained minimal amounts of MMA-SS welding fume in the lung and statistically increased lymphoid infiltrates and alveolar macrophages. A significant increase in tumor multiplicity in the A/J strain was observed at 78 wk. Metal analysis of extrapulmonary tissue showed that only the MMA-SS-exposed A/J mice had elevated levels of Cr, Cu, Mn, and Zn in kidney and Cr in liver. In conclusion, this study further supports that MMA-SS welding fume does not produce a significant tumorigenic response in an animal model, but may induce a chronic lung immune response. In addition, long-term extrapulmonary tissue alterations in metals in the susceptible A/J mouse suggest that the adverse effects of this fume might be cumulative.

  11. Effect of minor chemistry elements on GTA weld fusion zone characteristics of a commercial grade titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Marya, S.K.

    1996-06-01

    Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) is the most common technique employed in the fabrication of rolled thin tubes. One of the major manufacturing problems concerns the stability of weld fusion zone on materials from different casts, notwithstanding stringent monitoring of the process parameters -- current, voltage and travel speed. These parameters determine the theoretical weld heat and are expected to control the instantaneous mass of melt. According to the data compiled by Sahoo et al., oxygen is known to reduce the surface tension of most of the metals. However, investigations on the role of minor changes in concentrations of elements like sulphur, oxygen, selenium, bismuth, aluminium, and titanium in steels have very often attributed the cast to cast variations to different temperature gradients of surface tension over the weldpool. To the author`s knowledge, no reported work so far has revealed changing weld profiles in autogeneous mechanized GTA welds on titanium due to minor composition changes.

  12. Novel Optimization Methodology for Welding Process/Consumable Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Quintana, Marie A; DebRoy, Tarasankar; Vitek, John; Babu, Suresh

    2006-01-15

    Advanced materials are being developed to improve the energy efficiency of many industries of future including steel, mining, and chemical, as well as, US infrastructures including bridges, pipelines and buildings. Effective deployment of these materials is highly dependent upon the development of arc welding technology. Traditional welding technology development is slow and often involves expensive and time-consuming trial and error experimentation. The reason for this is the lack of useful predictive tools that enable welding technology development to keep pace with the deployment of new materials in various industrial sectors. Literature reviews showed two kinds of modeling activities. Academic and national laboratory efforts focus on developing integrated weld process models by employing the detailed scientific methodologies. However, these models are cumbersome and not easy to use. Therefore, these scientific models have limited application in real-world industrial conditions. On the other hand, industrial users have relied on simple predictive models based on analytical and empirical equations to drive their product development. The scopes of these simple models are limited. In this research, attempts were made to bridge this gap and provide the industry with a computational tool that combines the advantages of both approaches. This research resulted in the development of predictive tools which facilitate the development of optimized welding processes and consumables. The work demonstrated that it is possible to develop hybrid integrated models for relating the weld metal composition and process parameters to the performance of welds. In addition, these tools can be deployed for industrial users through user friendly graphical interface. In principle, the welding industry users can use these modular tools to guide their welding process parameter and consumable composition selection. It is hypothesized that by expanding these tools throughout welding industry

  13. Weld line detection and process control for welding automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sang-Min; Cho, Man-Ho; Lee, Ho-Young; Cho, Taik-Dong

    2007-03-01

    Welding has been widely used as a process to join metallic parts. But because of hazardous working conditions, workers tend to avoid this task. Techniques to achieve the automation are the recognition of joint line and process control. A CCD (charge coupled device) camera with a laser stripe was applied to enhance the automatic weld seam tracking in GMAW (gas metal arc welding). The adaptive Hough transformation having an on-line processing ability was used to extract laser stripes and to obtain specific weld points. The three-dimensional information obtained from the vision system made it possible to generate the weld torch path and to obtain information such as the width and depth of the weld line. In this study, a neural network based on the generalized delta rule algorithm was adapted to control the process of GMAW, such as welding speed, arc voltage and wire feeding speed. The width and depth of the weld joint have been selected as neurons in the input layer of the neural-network algorithm. The input variables, the width and depth of the weld joint, are determined by image information. The voltage, weld speed and wire feed rate are represented as the neurons in the output layer. The results of the neural-network learning applied to the welding are as follows: learning ratio 0.5, momentum ratio 0.7, the number of hidden layers 2 and the number of hidden units 8. They have significant influence on the weld quality.

  14. Weld analysis and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Larry Z. (Inventor); Rodgers, Michael H. (Inventor); Powell, Bradley W. (Inventor); Burroughs, Ivan A. (Inventor); Goode, K. Wayne (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a Weld Analysis and Control System developed for active weld system control through real time weld data acquisition. Closed-loop control is based on analysis of weld system parameters and weld geometry. The system is adapted for use with automated welding apparatus having a weld controller which is capable of active electronic control of all aspects of a welding operation. Enhanced graphics and data displays are provided for post-weld analysis. The system provides parameter acquisition, including seam location which is acquired for active torch cross-seam positioning. Torch stand-off is also monitored for control. Weld bead and parent surface geometrical parameters are acquired as an indication of weld quality. These parameters include mismatch, peaking, undercut, underfill, crown height, weld width, puddle diameter, and other measurable information about the weld puddle regions, such as puddle symmetry, etc. These parameters provide a basis for active control as well as post-weld quality analysis and verification. Weld system parameters, such as voltage, current and wire feed rate, are also monitored and archived for correlation with quality parameters.

  15. Influence of Process Parameters on Laser Weld Characteristics in Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    1 1󈧚 , 4 4 2.1.2 Alloying Element Vaporization Alloying elements added to aluminum for improving the mechanical properties and corrosion...effects the properties of the base metal surrounding the weld zone called the heat affected zone (HAZ). In the non-heat treatable aluminum alloys in the...Hydrogen in Aluminum . Magnesium, Copper, and Their Alloys . Int. Metall. Reviews, Review 201, 20:166-184. 31. Hatch, J.E. 1984. Aluminum , Properties and

  16. Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Closure Welding Process Parameter Development and Qualification

    SciTech Connect

    CANNELL, G.R.

    2003-09-15

    One of the Department of Energy's (DOE) top priorities at the Hanford Site (southeastern Washington state), is the processing of more than 2,000 tons of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) into large stainless steel containers called Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCO). Packaging into MCO's will assist in the safe and economic disposition of SNF and greatly reduce risk to the environment. Packaged fuel will be removed from close proximity to the Columbia River to a more suitable area of the site where it will be stored on an interim basis. Eventually, the fuel will be transferred to the federal geologic repository for long-term storage. One of the key elements in the SNF process is final closure of the MCO by welding. Fuel is loaded into the MCO (approximately 2 ft. in diameter and 13 ft. long) and a heavy shield plug inserted into the top, creating a mechanical seal. The plug contains several process ports for various operations, including vacuum drying and inert-gas backfilling of the packaged fuel. When fully processed, the Canister Cover Assembly (CCA) is placed over the shield plug and final closure made by welding. The following describes the effort to develop and qualify the root-pass technique associated with the MCO final closure weld.

  17. Inverse Thermal Analysis of Titanium GTA Welds Using Multiple Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrakos, S. G.; Shabaev, A.; Huang, L.

    2015-06-01

    Inverse thermal analysis of titanium gas-tungsten-arc welds using multiple constraint conditions is presented. This analysis employs a methodology that is in terms of numerical-analytical basis functions for inverse thermal analysis of steady-state energy deposition in plate structures. The results of this type of analysis provide parametric representations of weld temperature histories that can be adopted as input data to various types of computational procedures, such as those for prediction of solid-state phase transformations. In addition, these temperature histories can be used to construct parametric function representations for inverse thermal analysis of welds corresponding to other process parameters or welding processes whose process conditions are within similar regimes. The present study applies an inverse thermal analysis procedure that provides for the inclusion of constraint conditions associated with both solidification and phase transformation boundaries.

  18. Heat Treatment of Friction-Stir-Welded 7050 Aluminum Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petter, George E.; Figert, John D.; Rybicki, Daniel J.; Burns, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    A method of heat treatment has been developed to reverse some of the deleterious effects of friction stir welding of plates of aluminum alloy 7050. This alloy is considered unweldable by arc and high-energy-density beam fusion welding processes. The alloy can be friction stir welded, but as-welded workpieces exhibit low ductility, low tensile and yield strengths, and low resistance to stress corrosion cracking. Heat treatment according to the present method increases tensile and yield strengths, and minimizes or eliminates stress corrosion cracking. It also increases ductility. This method of heat treatment is a superior alternative to a specification-required heat treatment that caused the formation of large columnar grains, which are undesired. Workpieces subjected to the prior heat treatment exhibited elongations <2 percent, and standard three-point bend specimens shattered. The development of the present heat treatment method was guided partly by the principles that (1) by minimizing grain sizes and relieving deformation stresses, one can minimize or eliminate stress corrosion cracking and (2) the key to maximizing strength and eliminating residual stresses is to perform post-weld solution heating for as long a time as possible while incurring little or no development of large columnar grains in friction stir weld nuggets. It is necessary to perform some of the solution heat treatment (to soften the alloy and improve machine welding parameters) before welding. The following is an example of thickness- dependent pre- and post-weld heat treatments according to the present method: For plates 0.270 in. (approx.6.86 mm) thick milled from plates 4.5 in. (114.3 mm) thick, perform pre-weld solution heating at 890 F (477 C) for 1 hour, then cool in air. After friction stir welding, perform solution heating for 10 minutes, quench, hold at room temperature for 96 hours, then age at 250 F (121 C) for 5 hours followed by 325 F (163 C) for 27 hours.

  19. Fusion Welding of AerMet 100 Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    ENGLEHART, DAVID A.; MICHAEL, JOSEPH R.; NOVOTNY, PAUL M.; ROBINO, CHARLES V.

    1999-08-01

    A database of mechanical properties for weldment fusion and heat-affected zones was established for AerMet{reg_sign}100 alloy, and a study of the welding metallurgy of the alloy was conducted. The properties database was developed for a matrix of weld processes (electron beam and gas-tungsten arc) welding parameters (heat inputs) and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) conditions. In order to insure commercial utility and acceptance, the matrix was commensurate with commercial welding technology and practice. Second, the mechanical properties were correlated with fundamental understanding of microstructure and microstructural evolution in this alloy. Finally, assessments of optimal weld process/PWHT combinations for cotildent application of the alloy in probable service conditions were made. The database of weldment mechanical properties demonstrated that a wide range of properties can be obtained in welds in this alloy. In addition, it was demonstrated that acceptable welds, some with near base metal properties, could be produced from several different initial heat treatments. This capability provides a means for defining process parameters and PWHT's to achieve appropriate properties for different applications, and provides useful flexibility in design and manufacturing. The database also indicated that an important region in welds is the softened region which develops in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and analysis within the welding metallurgy studies indicated that the development of this region is governed by a complex interaction of precipitate overaging and austenite formation. Models and experimental data were therefore developed to describe overaging and austenite formation during thermal cycling. These models and experimental data can be applied to essentially any thermal cycle, and provide a basis for predicting the evolution of microstructure and properties during thermal processing.

  20. Welding for life

    SciTech Connect

    Stiebler, T.J.; Nugent, R.M.; Wilson, R.P.

    1994-12-31

    State of the Art Welding Techniques are being utilized to extend the life of major steam turbine components, as well as other traditional types of repairs. The development of a temper bead welding technique has allowed Houston Lighting and Power (HL and P) to perform innovative weld repairs. Nozzle vanes are weld repaired without removing the nozzle blocks from the case; repair life has also been doubled. A new two wire Gas Tungsten ARC Welding (GTAW) machine has produced high deposition rates while maintaining excellent mechanical properties. This results in faster turn-around time and with an improved weld repair. Development of a weld wire specification has also been instrumental in achieving additional component life by increasing the resistance to fatigue, especially in the heat affected zone. All these factors work together to enhance the weld repairs. Tensile strengths of 140,000 PSI with good ductility have been achieved. This paper will discuss their experiences with several repairs and recap the results of some studies and tests performed during the technique development stages. Major repairs include; weld repair of cases, nozzle blocks, nozzle boxes, stationary blade repair, forced draft fan shaft buildup, weld repair of turbine shrouds, blades, tennons and journals.