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Sample records for arch transverse nasal

  1. 12. INTERIOR: ARCH (JUNCTION OF TRANSVERSE AND MAIN HALLS) Copy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. INTERIOR: ARCH (JUNCTION OF TRANSVERSE AND MAIN HALLS) Copy photograph of photogrammetric plate LC-HABS-GS07-T-935-511L. - Stanbery-Rising House, High Street, at corner of Wheeling Street, Lancaster, Fairfield County, OH

  2. Biomechanics of the transverse carpal arch under carpal bone loading.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Kai-Hua; Kim, Joo-Han; Li, Zong-Ming

    2010-10-01

    Carpal tunnel release and conservative interventions are widely used in clinical therapies of carpal tunnel syndrome. The efficacy of these treatment and interventions mainly lies in the exploitation of the mechanical properties of carpal tunnel. This study investigated the structural mechanics of the transverse carpal arch using cadaveric hands. Paired force was applied to the insertion sites of the transverse carpal ligament at both the distal (hamate-trapezium) and proximal (pisiform-scaphoid) levels of the carpal tunnel. The two pairs of forces were simultaneously applied in an inward or outward direction when the transverse carpal ligament was intact and transected. Transverse carpal arch and carpal tunnel compliance in response to the forces were analyzed. Three-way repeated measures ANOVA were used to examine the effect of the transverse carpal ligament status (intact/transected), the level of the carpal tunnel (distal/proximal) and the force application direction (inward/outward) on the biomechanics of the transverse carpal arch. Transverse carpal ligament plays a stabilizing role in resisting outward deformation of the carpal tunnel. The carpal tunnel at the proximal level is more flexible than the carpal tunnel at the distal level. The carpal tunnel is more compliant under the inward force application than under the outward force application. The understanding of carpal tunnel mechanics potentially helps to improve the existing strategies and to develop alternatives for the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Biomechanics of the Transverse Carpal Arch under Carpal Bone Loading

    PubMed Central

    Xiu, Kai-Hua; Kim, Joo-Han; Li, Zong-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel release and conservative interventions are widely used in clinical therapies of carpal tunnel syndrome. The efficacy of these treatment and interventions mainly lies in the exploitation of the mechanical properties of carpal tunnel. This study investigated the structural mechanics of the transverse carpal arch using cadaveric hands. Methods Paired force was applied to the insertion sites of the transverse carpal ligament at both the distal (hamate -trapezium) and proximal (pisiform - scaphoid) level of the carpal tunnel. The two pairs of forces were simultaneously applied in an inward or outward direction when the transverse carpal ligament was intact and transected. Transverse carpal arch and carpal tunnel compliance in response to the forces were analyzed. Three-way repeated measures ANOVA were used to examine the effect of the transverse carpal ligament status (intact/transected), the level of the carpal tunnel (distal/proximal) and the force application direction (inward/outward) on the biomechanics of the transverse carpal arch. Findings Transverse carpal ligament plays a stabilizing role in resisting outward deformation of the carpal tunnel. The carpal tunnel at the proximal level is more flexible than the carpal tunnel at the distal level. The carpal tunnel is more compliant under the inward force application than under the outward force application. Interpretation The understanding of carpal tunnel mechanics potentially helps to improve the existing strategies and to develop alternatives for the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:20579787

  4. Reverse Distal Transverse Palmar Arch in Distal Digital Replantation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ching-Yueh; Orozco, Oscar; Vinagre, Gustavo; Shafarenko, Mark

    2017-07-22

    Refinements in microsurgery have made distal finger replantation an established technique with high success rates and good functional and aesthetic outcomes. However, it still represents a technically demanding procedure due to the small vessel caliber and frequent lack of vessel length, requiring the use of interpositional venous grafts in some instances. We describe a new technique for anastomosis in fingertip replantation, whereby the need for venous grafts is eliminated. Applying the reverse distal transverse palmar arch technique, 11 cases of distal digital replantation were performed between January 2011 and July 2016. The described procedure was used for arterial anastomosis in 10 cases and arteriovenous shunting for venous drainage in 1 case. A retrospective case review was conducted. The technical description and clinical outcome evaluations are presented. Ten of the 11 replanted digits survived, corresponding to an overall success rate of 91%. One replant failed due to venous insufficiency. Blood transfusions were not required for any of the patients. Follow-up (range, 1.5-5 months) revealed near-normal range of motion and good aesthetic results. All of the replanted digits developed protective sensation. The average length of hospital admission was 5 days. All patients were satisfied with the results and were able to return to their previous work. The use of the reverse distal transverse palmar arch is a novel and reliable technique in distal digital replantation when an increase in vessel length is required, allowing for a tension-free arterial repair without the need for vein grafts.

  5. Dynamic postures of the transverse metacarpal arch during typing.

    PubMed

    Baker, Nancy A; Xiu, Kaihua; Moehling, Krissy; Li, Zong-Ming

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the transverse metacarpal arch (TMA) during a dynamic typing task. Static/relaxed and dynamic typing TMA were collected from 36 right-handed females with musculoskeletal discomfort using a motion capture system. While the angle of right TMA static/relaxed posture (10.1° ± 5.5°) was significantly larger than the left (8.5° ± 5.6°) (P < .05), the right dynamic posture (10.6° ± 4.3°) was not significantly different from the left (10.3° ± 5.5°) (P = .66). Within both these mean scores, there was considerable individual variation, with some subjects demonstrating very flat TMA, and some very curved. The results indicate that TMA angular postures both for static/relaxed and dynamic typing are highly variable both between individuals and between individual hands.

  6. Successful percutaneous stent implantation for isolated dismal transverse aortic arch kinking

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zhi-Liang; Tsauo, Jia-Yu; Chen, Mao; Feng, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Isolated dismal transverse aortic arch kinking in adults is rare, and there is no recommended therapy at present. Percutaneous stent implantation may be an effective method to correct it and could be considered. Patient concerns: We report a 46-year-old woman who suffered from recurrent migraine and refractory hypertension with a significant systolic blood pressure difference between upper limbs. Diagnoses: The woman was diagnosed with isolated dismal transverse aortic arch kinking with refractory hypertension. Interventions: Percutaneous stent implantation was performed. Due to the kinking nature of the diseased transverse aortic arch, the first covered stent moved forward to the proximal transverse aortic arch during deploying without the left common carotid artery occlusion. And then, a second stent was placed to cover the residual kinked part of the dismal transverse arch. Outcomes: Angiography and post-procedural computed tomography angiography revealed fully corrected of the diseased segment. At 6-month follow-up after procedure, the patient was free of any symptoms and had a normal blood pressure under antihypertensive treatment. Lessons: This case indicates that transverse aortic arch kinking in isolation can be well treated by percutaneous stent implantation in adult patients. Unlike pure aortic coarctation, elongation and bucking give the rise to the occurrence rate of stent sliding and migration and sometimes a second stent is needed. PMID:28272200

  7. Effective way to reconstruct arch bridges using concrete walls and transverse strands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klusáček, Ladislav; Pěkník, Robin; Nečas, Radim

    2017-09-01

    There are more than 500 masonry arch bridges in the Czech Road system and about 2500 in the Czech Railway system. Many of them are cracked in the longitudinal (span) direction. The barrel vaults are separated by the cracks into partial masonry arches without load bearing connection in transverse direction. These constructions are about 150 years old and they are also too narrow for the current road system. This paper presents a strengthening method for masonry arch bridges using transverse post-tensioning. This method is very useful not only for strengthening in the transverse direction, but widening of masonry arches can be taken as secondary effect especially in case of road bridges. Several bridges were successfully repaired with the use of this system which seems to be effective and reliable.

  8. 25. 'DetailsTransverse Sections For Three Hinged Arch Bridge Over Yuba ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. 'Details--Transverse Sections For Three Hinged Arch Bridge Over Yuba River At Parks Bar, Thomas System, Thomas And Post-- Consulting Engineers--Los Angeles.' Revised plans, but date of revision not legible. - Parks Bar Bridge, Spanning Yuba River at State Highway 20, Smartville, Yuba County, CA

  9. The transverse forefoot arch demonstrated by a novel X-ray projection.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, O; Vuust, M; Understrup, B; Højbjerre, M; Bøttcher, S; Voigt, M

    2009-01-01

    Metatarsalgia is often treated by metatarsal osteotomy. Exact knowledge of the normal anatomy of the forefoot is essential for pre-operative planning. The objective of this study was to investigate the forefoot arch during maximal loading in a randomly selected population sample. Two hundred subjects randomly selected from a municipality representative of Denmark were invited to interview and forefoot X-ray examination, including a novel horizontal X-ray projection by which the height of each metatarsal from the floor can be measured under maximal loading. One hundred and thirty-four subjects (79%) presented themselves for interview and X-ray examination. The study group was representative of the randomly selected population sample in terms of age, sex and incidence of metatarsalgia. The study verified that the interrelated geometry of the metatarsal heads in the AP plane corresponds to a parabola as suggested previously (Le Lièvre's parabola). Also in the horizontal plane, the metatarsal heads generally form an arch, the transverse forefoot arch (TFA). Mean height was 3.91mm (S.E.=0.10). The individual height of the TFA varied from -1 to 10mm and was dependent on the width of the forefoot. The relative height of the arch (arch height divided by forefoot width) was independent of age and sex. A non-significant tendency towards a lower arch among subjects with metatarsalgia was observed. This population study demonstrated that the metatarsal heads constitute arches in both planes (Le Lièvre's parabola in the AP plane and the transverse forefoot arch in the horizontal plane). This knowledge is essential for pre-operative planning in metatarsal osteotomy for metatarsalgia. Formulae for calculating the individual location of each metatarsal head were obtained.

  10. Mid-Term Outcomes of a Modification of Extended Aortic Arch Anastomosis with Pulmonary Artery Banding in Single Ventricle Neonates with Hypoplastic Transverse Arch

    PubMed Central

    Thang, Bui Quoc; Furugaki, Tatsuya; Osaka, Motoo; Watanabe, Yutaka; Kanemoto, Shinya; Suetsugu, Fuminaga

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There is less certainty regarding the best strategy for treating neonates with functional single ventricle (SV) and hypoplastic aortic arch. We have applied a modified extended aortic arch anastomosis (EAAA) and main pulmonary artery banding (PAB) as an initial palliation in neonates with transverse arch hypoplasia and assessed the mid-term outcomes. Methods: In total, 10 neonates with functional SV and extensive hypoplasia or interruption of the arch underwent a modified EAAA (extended arch anastomosis with a subclavian flap) concomitant with main PAB through a thoracotomy without cardiopulmonary bypass. Patient age and weight ranged from 4 to 14 days and 2.3 to 3.8 kg, respectively. Results: There were no hospital deaths although there were two late deaths. Gradients across the arch were 0 to 7 mmHg at postoperative day 1 and no arch reoperations were required. Two patients required balloon aortoplasty. Nine underwent bidirectional cavopulmonary shunt and two of them needed concomitant Damus–Kaye–Stansel (DKS) anastomosis. Six have completed Fontan. Conclusion: Our modification of EAAA with main PAB for SV neonates may benefit a certain population with transverse arch hypoplasia as an option to be considered. Patients with the potential for developing outflow obstruction may be best managed with an initial DKS-type palliation. PMID:27725352

  11. Effects of transverse relationships between maxillary arch, mouth, and face on smile esthetics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Huang, Lan; Yang, Lin; Xu, Li; Xue, Chaoran; Xiang, Zichao; Zhao, Mengyuan; Li, Song; Bai, Yuxing; Bai, Ding

    2016-01-01

    To identify the ideal ratios between the widths of the maxillary arch, mouth, and face, respectively, and to determine the range of acceptable esthetic variations based on these ideal ratios. A photograph of a young female with a harmonious smile was selected and digitally altered to produce two sets of images. The first image showed an altered intercanine width, while the second one showed an altered oral fissure breadth. These alterations were independently rated by judges, including 23 orthodontists and 30 undergraduates. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare the scores given by male and female judges and those given by professional and nonprofessional judges. The following ideal transverse ratios were determined: intercanine width/oral fissure breadth, 0.638; oral fissure breadth/interparopia width: the distance between left and right paropia, 0.617; and intercanine width/face width at the level of the labial commissures, 0.300. A range of -10% to +10% was proposed as the thresholds of esthetic smile evaluations. It was shown that gender of the raters had no effect on the rating of photographs, nor were there any statistically significant differences between the professional and nonprofessional judges' ratings. Balanced transverse relationships in the facial region are important for smile esthetics, and there is a wide range of esthetically acceptable variations in the transverse relationships between the maxillary arch, mouth, and face.

  12. Integrated cerebral perfusion for hypothermic circulatory arrest during transverse aortic arch repairs.

    PubMed

    Estrera, Anthony L; Miller, Charles C; Lee, Taek-Yeon; Shah, Pallav; Irani, Adel D; Ganim, Nidal; Abdullah, Saad; Safi, Hazim J

    2010-09-01

    Antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) during hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) for ascending/transverse arch repair is used for cerebral protection. This study evaluates ACP in combination with retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) during extended HCA and compares it to RCP-only. Between January 2005 and April 2007, we performed 64 consecutive arch repairs requiring extended HCA (>40 min). RCP-only was used with 34 patients and ACP with brief RCP ('integrated') was used with 30 patients. Mean HCA time was 51 + or - 13 min. Mean RCP-only time was 47 + or - 9.6 min; in the integrated group, mean ACP time was 42 + or - 14.4 min with an added RCP time of 10.8 + or - 7.6 min. For the entire cohort, 95% (61/64) underwent total arch repair, and 67% (43/64) had elephant trunk reconstruction. Variables predictive of mortality and neurological outcomes were analysed prospectively, but technique selection was non-randomised. Preoperative and operative variables did not differ between the RCP-only and the integrated groups except for aortic valve replacement, which was more frequently performed in the integrated group (33% (10/30) vs 12% (4/34), P=0.05), and preoperative renal dysfunction, which was more frequent in the RCP group (26% (9/34) vs 7% (2/30), P=0.04). No significant difference was observed in outcomes between the groups; however, the integrated group had higher mortality, stroke and temporary neurological deficit than RCP-only. The observed trends in actual outcomes were a cause for concern. ACP combined with a short period of RCP did not provide better outcomes than RCP-only. The use of RCP remains warranted in our experience. Copyright 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Is there a correlation between nasal septum deviation and maxillary transversal deficiency? A retrospective study on prepubertal subjects.

    PubMed

    Fabiana, Ballanti; Alberto, Baldini; Salvatore, Ranieri; Alessandro, Nota; Paola, Cozza

    2016-04-01

    Deviated nasal septum may cause a reduction of the nasal airflow, thus, during the craniofacial development, a reduced nasal airflow could originate a chronic mouth-breathing pattern, related with moderate to severe maxillary constriction. The aim of this retrospective study is to analyze the correlation between maxillary transverse deficiency and nasal septum deviation. Frontal cephalograms were performed on 66 posterior-anterior radiographs of subjects (34M, 32F; mean age 9.95±2.50 years) with maxillary transverse deficiency and on a control group of 31 posterior-anterior radiographs of subjects (13M, 18F; 9.29±2.08 years). Angular parameters of the nasal cavities were recorded and compared between the two groups using a Student's t-test. Generally all the parameters are very similar between the two groups except for the ASY angle that differs for about the 27%; anyway the Student's t-test showed no statistically significant differences between the two groups (mostly p>0.20). This study failed to show an association between transverse maxillary deficiencies and nasal septum deviations. Moreover, no significant differences were found between the mean nasal cavities dimensions in subjects with transverse maxillary deficiency and the control group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Replacement of the transverse aortic arch during emergency operations for type A acute aortic dissection. Report of 26 cases.

    PubMed

    Bachet, J; Teodori, G; Goudot, B; Diaz, F; el Kerdany, A; Dubois, C; Brodaty, D; de Lentdecker, P; Guilmet, D

    1988-12-01

    In type A aortic dissection, the intimal disruption is located on or extends to the transverse arch in about 20% of patients. Replacement of the arch may then be necessary to avoid leaving an unresected, acutely dissected aorta and to prevent bleeding, progression of aneurysm, rupture, and ultimately reoperation or death. From 1970 to September 1987, 119 patients were operated on for type A acute dissection. Starting in January 1977, gelatin-resorcin-formaldehyde biologic glue was used in 91 patients to reinforce the dissected tissues at the suture sites. Among these 119 patients, 26 (ages 32 to 76 years) underwent replacement of the transverse aortic arch in addition to replacement of the ascending aorta. In 20 patients cerebral protection was achieved by profound hypothermia (16 degrees to 20 degrees C) associated with circulatory arrest (15 to 40 minutes, mean 27 minutes) during the distal anastomosis. In six patients the carotid arteries were selectively perfused with cold blood (6 degrees C) during moderate core hypothermia (28 degrees C) while cardiopulmonary bypass was discontinued (19 to 34 minutes, mean 25 minutes) to allow the prosthesis to be sutured without the distal aorta being cross-clamped. Moderate hypothermia avoided the long rewarming time necessitated by profound hypothermia. The hospital mortality rate was 34% (9/26). Two of the 20 patients subjected to profound hypothermia and circulatory arrest died during the operation and seven patients died of postoperative complications. No deaths or major complication were observed in the other six patients. Follow-up of the 17 survivors ranges from 3 to 90 months (mean 39). One patient died 6 months after the operation of cerebral hemorrhage. One patient is disabled by neurologic sequelae. Fifteen patients are in good clinical condition (New York Heart Association class I or II). Postoperative aortograms in 12 patients, and computed tomographic scans in all, have shown a stable repair of the transverse

  15. Evaluation of the relationship between the static measurement of transverse arch flexibility of the forefoot and gait parameters in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Takashi; Muneta, Takeshi; Fukui, Tsutomu

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the relationship between the static measurement of the transverse arch of the forefoot, using a 3-dimensional (3D) foot scanner, and kinetics and kinematics of gait parameters in the sagittal plane. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy subjects participated in this study. The transverse arch of the forefoot was measured under three conditions as follows: condition 1, sitting; condition 2, standing; and condition 3, foot forward and lower leg tilting anteriorly to the maximum position with heel contact. Gait parameters were recorded using a 3D motion analysis system and force plate. Correlation coefficients between TAF for each comparison of conditions and gait parameters were calculated using the Spearman correlation analysis. [Results] Rates of the transverse arch of the forefoot width and height between condition 2 and condition 3 were significantly correlated with the anterior and posterior component of ground reaction forces, the hip joint extension angle, and the ankle plantar flexion moment. [Conclusion] Our study’s findings indicated that increased stiffness of the transverse arch of the forefoot was related to the increase in ankle plantar moment, and decreased stiffness of the transverse arch of the forefoot was related to the increase in hip joint extension angle during gait. PMID:28356622

  16. Transverse dental arch relationship at 9 and 12 years in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate treated with infant orthopedics: a randomized clinical trial (DUTCHCLEFT).

    PubMed

    Noverraz, R L M; Disse, M A; Ongkosuwito, E M; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M; Prahl, C

    2015-12-01

    A long-term evaluation to assess the transverse dental arch relationships at 9 and 12 years of age in unilateral cleft lip and palate treated with or without infant orthopedics (IO). The hypothesis is that IO has no effect on the transverse dental arch relationship. A prospective two-arm randomized controlled trial (DUTCHCLEFT) in three academic cleft palate centers (Amsterdam, Nijmegen and Rotterdam, the Netherlands). Fifty-four children with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate and no other malformations were enrolled in this evaluation. One group wore passive maxillary plates (IO+) during the first year of life, and the other group did not (IO-). Until the age of 1.5, all other interventions were the same. Hard palate was closed simultaneously with bone grafting according to protocol of all teams. Orthodontic treatment was performed when indicated. The transverse dental arch relationship was assessed on dental casts using the modified Huddart/Bodenham score to measure the maxillary arch constriction at 9 and 12 years of age. No significant differences were found between the IO+ and IO- groups. Differences between the centers increased from 9 to 12 years of age. Transverse dental arch relationships at 9 and 12 years of age do not differ between children with UCLP treated with or without IO. There is no orthodontic need to perform IO as applied in this study in children with UCLP.

  17. Transversal dental arch dimensions in 9-year-old children born in the 1960s and the 1980s.

    PubMed

    Lindsten, R; Ogaard, B; Larsson, E

    2001-12-01

    The transversal arch dimension has been studied in 2 different cohorts of 9-year-old children, a group of 119 (56 girls and 63 boys) from Norway and a group of 133 (72 girls and 61 boys) from Sweden. Half of the children in each group were born in the 1960s and half in the 1980s. The maxillary and mandibular transversal dimensions did not differ between the 1960s groups and the 1980s groups when the maxilla and the mandible were studied separately. When the intermaxillary relationship was assessed, a significant reduction in the intermaxillary difference was found in the boys born in the 1980s compared with the boys born in the 1960s. This was confirmed with different measurement points. In the girls, the mesial drift of the first permanent molars, because of a greater prevalence of caries in the 1960s groups, masked this effect. When the mesial drift of the first permanent molars in the girls born in the 1960s was considered, the transversal intermaxillary difference showed the same secular pattern as in the boys. When the mesial drift of the first permanent molars was considered, the intermaxillary difference in the 1960s groups resembled that found in an American sample of northwest European ancestry born in the 1940s to a greater extent compared with the children born in the 1980s.

  18. Dental arch dimensional changes after adenotonsillectomy in prepubertal children.

    PubMed

    Petraccone Caixeta, Anna Cristina; Andrade, Ildeu; Bahia Junqueira Pereira, Tatiana; Franco, Letícia Paiva; Becker, Helena Maria Gonçalves; Souki, Bernardo Quiroga

    2014-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the dental arch changes after adenotonsillectomies in prepubertal children and to compare the dental arch dimensions of mouth-breathing and nasal-breathing children. The sample included 49 prepubertal severely obstructed mouth-breathing children and 46 prepubertal nasal-breathing children. Twenty-four of the 49 mouth-breathing children had an adenotonsillectomy and composed the adenotonsillectomy subgroup. The 25 children in whom the mouth-breathing pattern was unchanged during the 1-year study period composed the control subgroup. The mouth-breathing children showed a deeper palatal vault, a larger mandibular width, and a larger mandibular arch length in comparison with the nasal-breathing children. After airway clearance, the adenotonsillectomy group showed a significant maxillary transverse width gain compared with the control subgroup. The control subgroup showed a significant deepening of the palatal height when compared with the adenotonsillectomy subgroup after 1 year. The adenotonsillectomy subgroup had a significantly different pattern of arch development compared with the untreated controls. After adenotonsillectomy, the mouth-breathing children showed greater maxillary transverse development than did the controls. The palatal vault deepened in the untreated children. The mouth-breathing children showed a deeper palatal vault, a larger mandibular width, and a larger mandibular arch length in comparison with the nasal-breathing children. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Skeletal effects of RME in the transverse and vertical dimensions of the nasal cavity in mouth-breathing growing children.

    PubMed

    Cappellette, Mario; Nagai, Lucia Hatsue Yamamoto; Gonçalves, Raquel Mori; Yuki, Aparecida Keiko; Pignatari, Shirley Shizue Nagata; Fujita, Reginaldo Raimundo

    2017-01-01

    Maxillary constriction is a dentoskeletal deformity characterized by discrepancy in maxilla/mandible relationship in the transverse plane, which may be associated with respiratory dysfunction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the skeletal effects of RME on maxillary and nasal transverse dimensions and compare the differences between males and females. Sixty-one mouth-breathers patients with skeletal maxillary constriction (35 males and 26 females, mean age 9.6 years) were included in the study. Posteroanterior (PA) radiographs were taken before expansion (T1) and 3 months after expansion (T2). Data obtained from the evaluation of T1 and T2 cephalograms were tested for normality with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov method. The Student's t-test was performed for each measurement to determine sex differences. RME produced a significant increase in all linear measurements of maxillary and nasal transverse dimensions. No significant differences were associated regarding sex. The RME produced significant width increases in the maxilla and nasal cavity, which are important for treatment stability, improving respiratory function and craniofacial development.

  20. Skeletal effects of RME in the transverse and vertical dimensions of the nasal cavity in mouth-breathing growing children

    PubMed Central

    Cappellette, Mario; Nagai, Lucia Hatsue Yamamoto; Gonçalves, Raquel Mori; Yuki, Aparecida Keiko; Pignatari, Shirley Shizue Nagata; Fujita, Reginaldo Raimundo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Maxillary constriction is a dentoskeletal deformity characterized by discrepancy in maxilla/mandible relationship in the transverse plane, which may be associated with respiratory dysfunction. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the skeletal effects of RME on maxillary and nasal transverse dimensions and compare the differences between males and females. Methods: Sixty-one mouth-breathers patients with skeletal maxillary constriction (35 males and 26 females, mean age 9.6 years) were included in the study. Posteroanterior (PA) radiographs were taken before expansion (T1) and 3 months after expansion (T2). Data obtained from the evaluation of T1 and T2 cephalograms were tested for normality with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov method. The Student’s t-test was performed for each measurement to determine sex differences. Results: RME produced a significant increase in all linear measurements of maxillary and nasal transverse dimensions. Conclusions: No significant differences were associated regarding sex. The RME produced significant width increases in the maxilla and nasal cavity, which are important for treatment stability, improving respiratory function and craniofacial development. PMID:28902251

  1. Effect of timing of palatal repair on the transverse development of maxillary alveolar arch in complete-cleft cases.

    PubMed

    Shamsudheen, M; Utreja, A; Tewari, A; Chari, P S

    1991-03-01

    Forty cleft cases in the age range of 5-12 years where the palatal repair had been performed at 16-24 months (17 cases), 24-36 months (15 cases) and 36-72 months (8 cases) were assessed retrospectively, for the status of maxillary arch and were segregated as acceptable and unacceptable. Plaster casts were prepared from alginate impressions and their graphical reproduction using Huddart's technique, were used to measure the alveolar arch. Anterior palatal measurement (C-C') and posterior palatal measurement (P-P') of the cleft subjects were compared with that in the non-cleft matched controls. The 16-24 month group showed 41.2% acceptable and 58.8% unacceptable arch cases. The 24-36 month group showed that 73.4% had acceptable arches and 26.6% had unacceptable arches. In the 36-72 months group the arch was acceptable in 62.5% cases and unacceptable in 37.5% cases. It was concluded that palatal repair performed before 24 months of age adversely affected the maxillary growth, whereas most favourable growth of maxillary arch occurred when the repair was done between 24-36 months.

  2. Transverse Slicing of the Sixth-Seventh Costal Cartilaginous Junction: A Novel Technique to Prevent Warping in Nasal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Teshima, Tara Lynn; Cheng, Homan; Pakdel, Amir; Kiss, Alex; Fialkov, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    Costal cartilage is an important reconstructive tissue for correcting nasal deformities. Warping of costal cartilage, a recognized complication, can lead to significant functional and aesthetic problems. The authors present a technique to prevent warping that involves transverse slicing of the sixth-seventh costal cartilaginous junction, that when sliced perpendicular to the long axis of the rib, provides multiple long, narrow, clinically useful grafts with balanced cross-sections. The aim was to measure differences in cartilage warp between this technique (TJS) and traditional carving techniques. Costal cartilage was obtained from human subjects and cut to clinically relevant dimensions using a custom cutting jig. The sixth-seventh costal cartilaginous junction was sliced transversely leaving the outer surface intact. The adjacent sixth rib cartilage was carved concentrically and eccentrically. The samples were incubated and standardized serial photography was performed over time up to 4 weeks. Warp was quantified by measuring nonlinearity of the grafts using least-squares regression and compared between carving techniques. TJS grafts (n = 10) resulted in significantly less warp than both eccentrically (n = 3) and concentrically carved grafts (n = 3) (P < 0.0001). Warp was significantly higher with eccentric carving compared with concentric carving (P < 0.0001). Warp increased significantly with time for both eccentric (P = 0002) and concentric (P = 0.0007) techniques while TJS warp did not (P = 0.56). The technique of transverse slicing costal cartilage from the sixth-seventh junction minimizes warp compared with traditional carving methods providing ample grafts of adequate length and versatility for reconstructive requirements.

  3. Transverse effect of Haas and Hyrax appliances on the upper dental arch in patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Façanha, Anna Júlia de Oliveira; Lara, Tulio Silva; Garib, Daniela Gamba; da Silva Filho, Omar Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to evaluate the transverse effect of rapid maxillary expansion in patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate while comparing the Haas and Hyrax appliances. Methods The sample consisted of 48 patients divided into two groups: Group I - 25 patients treated with modified Haas appliance (mean age: 10 years 8 months); and Group II - 23 patients treated with Hyrax appliance (mean age: 10 years 6 months). Casts were taken during pre-expansion and after removal of the appliance at the end of the retention period. The models were scanned with the aid of the 3 Shape R700 3D scanner. Initial and final transverse distances were measured at cusp tips and cervical-palatal points of maxillary teeth by using the Ortho AnalyzerTM 3D software. Results The mean expansion obtained between cusp tips and cervical-palatal points for inter-canine width was 4.80 mm and 4.35 mm with the Haas appliance and 5.91 mm and 5.91 mm with the Hyrax appliance. As for first premolars or first deciduous molars, the values obtained were 6.46 mm and 5.90 mm in the Haas group and 7.11 mm and 6.65 mm in the Hyrax group. With regard to first molars, values were 6.11 mm and 5.24 mm in the Haas group and 7.55 mm and 6.31 mm in the Hyrax group. Conclusion Rapid maxillary expansion significantly increased the transverse dimensions of the upper dental arch in patients with cleft palate, with no significant differences between the Hass and Hyrax expanders. PMID:24945513

  4. Toward a realistic optoelectronic-based kinematic model of the hand: representing the transverse metacarpal arch reduces accessory rotations of the metacarpophalangeal joints.

    PubMed

    Cocchiarella, David M; Kociolek, Aaron M; Tse, Calvin T F; Keir, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    A kinematic model representing the versatility of the human hand is needed to evaluate biomechanical function and predict injury risk in the workplace. We improved upon an existing optoelectronic-based kinematic hand model with grouped metacarpals by defining segmented metacarpals and adding the trapeziometacarpal joint of the thumb. Eight participants performed three static postures (neutral pose, cylinder grip, cap grip) to evaluate kinematic performance of three different models, with one, two, and four metacarpal segment(s). Mean distal transverse metacarpal arch angles in the four-segment metacarpal model were between 22.0° ± 3.3° (neutral pose) and 32.1° ± 3.7° (cap grip). Representation of the metacarpals greatly influenced metacarpophalangeal joint rotations. Both the two- and four-segment metacarpal models displayed significantly lower metacarpophalangeal joint 'supination' angles (than the one-segment model) for the fourth and fifth fingers. However, the largest reductions were for the four- versus one-segment models, with mean differences ranging from 9.3° (neutral pose) to 17.0° (cap grip) for the fourth finger and 16.3° (neutral pose) to 33.0° (cylinder grip) for the fifth finger. MCP joint abduction/adduction angles of the fourth and fifth fingers also decreased with segmentation of the metacarpals, although the lowest magnitudes generally occurred in the four-segment model. Overall, the four-segment metacarpal model produced the lowest accessory rotations in non-dominant axes, and best matched previous radiological studies that found MCP joint pronation/supination angles were typically less than 10°. The four-segment metacarpal model, with improved anatomic fidelity, will better serve future studies of detailed actions of the hand in clinical or work applications.

  5. Aortic Arch Interruption and Persistent Fifth Aortic Arch in Phace Syndrome: Prenatal Diagnosis and Postnatal Course.

    PubMed

    Chiappa, Enrico; Greco, Antonella; Fainardi, Valentina; Passantino, Silvia; Serranti, Daniele; Favilli, Silvia

    2015-09-01

    PHACE is a rare congenital neurocutaneous syndrome where posterior fossa malformations, hemangiomas, cerebrovascular anomalies, aortic arch anomalies, cardiac defects, and eye abnormalities are variably associated. We describe the prenatal detection and the postnatal course of a child with PHACE syndrome with a unique type of aortic arch anomaly consisting of proximal interruption of the aortic arch and persistence of the fifth aortic arch. The fifth aortic arch represented in this case a vital systemic-to-systemic connection between the ascending aorta and the transverse portion of the aortic arch allowing adequate forward flow through the aortic arch without surgical treatment.

  6. [Effect of dental arch length decrease during orthodontic treatment in the upper airway development. A review].

    PubMed

    Haddad, Stéphanie; Kerbrat, Jean-Baptiste; Schouman, Thomas; Goudot, Patrick

    2017-03-01

    A possible relation between an upper airway space decrease and the development of obstructive sleep apnea syndrom explains the importance to know the effect of the modification of dental arch length on the upper airway during orthodontic treatment. The aim of this article is to expose recent knowledge about upper airway development and dental arch length decrease factors, to determine the influence of this decrease on upper airway development. A review was done to determine the upper airway normal development, to define dental arch to specify if an ideal position of dental arch on apical base exists. All of the length dental arch decrease factors during orthodontic treatment (dental extraction, dental agenesis and dental malpositions) and their upper airway resounding were searched. Some authors found a diminution of upper airway space after premolars extractions while others didn't found this diminution after extractions premolars when incisor retraction is finished. A decrease of transversal maxillary diameter and nasal cavity may be due to absence of permanent teeth. The effect of dental arch length decrease during orthodontic treatment in the upper airway development was not scientifically proved. However we had to be vigilant and adapt our orthodontic treatment case by case to avoid an upper airway modification. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2017.

  7. Nasal Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure Statement CONDITIONS Adult ... Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly ...

  8. Saccular Aneurysms of the Transverse Aortic Arch Based on a Presentation at the 2013 VEITH Symposium, November 19–23, 2013 (New York, NY, USA)

    PubMed Central

    Preventza, Ourania; Coselli, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    Saccular aneurysms of the aortic arch, whether single or multiple, are uncommon. The choice of repair technique is influenced by patients' comorbidities and age. Repairing saccular aneurysms with traditional open techniques can be technically demanding; therefore, endovascular technology and a variety of hybrid approaches have been developed to facilitate such repairs and, potentially, to improve clinical outcomes, especially in high-risk patients. There have been no large, randomized studies to compare the outcomes of these different treatment options in patients with single or multiple saccular aneurysms of the arch. In this review, we outline the etiology and common locations of these aneurysms, the different open, completely endovascular, and hybrid techniques used to treat them, and the treatment selection process. PMID:26798759

  9. High arch

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition can make it difficult to fit into shoes. People who have high arches most often need ... Symptoms include: Shortened foot length Difficulty fitting shoes Foot pain with walking, standing, and running (not everyone has this symptom)

  10. Changes in the palatal dimensions of mouth breathing children caused by nasal obstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indiarti, I. S.; Setyanto, D. B.; Kusumaningrum, A.; Budiardjo, S. B.

    2017-08-01

    During children’s growth and development, the breathing process plays an important role in craniofacial growth, especially of the palate. Nose breathing can stimulate the lateral growth of the maxilla, thus making the palate flat. Disturbances in nose breathing caused by nasal obstruction such as allergic rhinitis, adenoid hypertrophy, rhinosinusitis, nasal polyps, and obstructive sleep apnea can lead to a mouth breathing habit in children. This habit can cause palatal dimension changes such as a narrow V-shaped maxillary arch and a high palatal vault. This study analyzed the relationship between the mouth breathing habit in children who have nasal obstruction and palatal dimension changes. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted with a consecutive sampling method on children 7-18 years old with a history of allergic rhinitis, adenoid hypertrophy, rhinosinusitis, nasal polyps, and obstructive sleep apnea in the Pediatric Respirology and Pediatric Immunology Allergy Outpatient Clinic Kiara Maternal and Child Health Center at Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital in Jakarta. The palatal dimensions were measured by the height and transversal width of the hard palate of castings of each child’s upper dental arch using vernier calipers. Palatal dimension changes were found in children with a mouth breathing habit due to nasal obstruction.

  11. Solar Arches

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    The magnetic field lines between a pair of active regions formed a beautiful set of swaying arches, seen in this footage captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory on April 24-26, 2017. The arches are traced out by charged particles spinning along the magnetic field lines. These arches, which form a connection between regions of opposite magnetic polarity, are visible in exquisite detail in this wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. Extreme ultraviolet light is typically invisible to our eyes, but is colorized here in gold. Read more: go.nasa.gov/2pGgYZt NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  12. ArchE - An Architecture Design Assistant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-30

    X, Module X 3 Author / Presenter, Date if Needed What is ArchE? ArchE is a software architecture design assistant, which: • Takes quality and...functional requirements as input • Elicits key quality attribute information to refine quality requirements • Elicits key architectural information...Derives candidate architectures • Evaluates whether quality requirements are satisfied • Identifies tradeoffs • Suggests alternative architectures ArchE is

  13. A Comparison of Mandibular Transverse Dimensions of a Class I Normal and Class II Patient Population using Anterior to Posterior Measurement Ratios

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-13

    a PA cephalogram to appreciate skeletal change. Growth and mandibular transverse development is modified through the interplay of resorption and...the mandible develops lateral to Meckel’s cartilage in utero, it should prove relatively stable during growth and development . With CBCT, this...Temporomandibular Joint. J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2009. 67:2254-65 17. Haas A. Rapid expansion of the maxillary dental arch and nasal cavity by opening the

  14. Nasal polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... get rid of nasal polyps. Nasal steroid sprays shrink polyps. They help clear blocked nasal passages and ... is stopped. Corticosteroid pills or liquid may also shrink polyps, and can reduce swelling and nasal congestion. ...

  15. Towering Arches

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-04-06

    This still image from an animation from NASA GSFC Solar Dynamics Observatory shows arches of magnetic field lines towered over the edge of the Sun as a pair of active regions began to rotate into view Apr. 5-6, 2016.

  16. Organized Arches

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-17

    Magnetic arcs of plasma that spiraled above two active regions held their shape fairly well over 18 hours (Jan. 11-12, 2017). The charged plasma is being controlled the magnetic field lines of the active regions. The field lines become clearly visible when viewed in this wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. Often the arches bend and twist more dynamically than the relatively stable ones seen here. Movies are available at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA12327

  17. Nasal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way to your throat as you breathe. Cancer of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is ... be like those of infections. Doctors diagnose nasal cancer with imaging tests, lighted tube-like instruments that ...

  18. Nasal mass removal in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Bercier, Marjorie; Wynne, Janna; Klause, Stephen; Stadler, Cynthia K; Gorow, April; Pye, Geoffrey W

    2012-12-01

    Nasal masses in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) are not uncommon and can be challenging to diagnose and treat. Differential diagnoses for nasal masses in the koala are cryptococcal granulomas, nasal polyps, nasal adenocarcinoma, and osteochondromatosis. This report describes successful surgical approaches for two adult koalas with nasal masses and includes photodocumentation and description of the anatomy of the koala nasal passages from the postmortem transverse sectioning of a normal koala head. Surgical removal of the nasal masses in these koalas resulted in a rapid resolution of clinical signs.

  19. Accuracy of impressions obtained with dual-arch trays.

    PubMed

    Wöstmann, Bernd; Rehmann, Peter; Balkenhol, Markus

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the accuracy resulting from dual-arch impressions when compared to conventional impressions in complex preparations (ie, inlay and partial crown). One hundred eighty impressions were made using two different dual-arch trays; conventional trays served as the control. The accuracy of the dies obtained (Fuji-Rock EP, GC Europe) was assessed indirectly from the change of 59 transversal dimensions. Statistical analysis (t test, analysis of variance) revealed that less rigid dual-arch trays performed better than rigid ones. Though the inlay preparation was more difficult to reproduce with dual-arch trays, it can be concluded that the accuracy obtainable with nonrigid dual-arch trays is comparable to impressions taken from full-arch trays.

  20. Evaluation of maxillary arch dimensions and palatal morphology in mouth-breathing children by using digital dental casts.

    PubMed

    Lione, Roberta; Buongiorno, Marco; Franchi, Lorenzo; Cozza, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the variations of maxillary arch size and of palatal morphology in subjects with prolonged mouth-breathing due to allergic rhinitis when compared with a control group with normal breathing pattern by using a three-dimensional analysis on digital casts. 26 Caucasian children (19 females and 7 males) with a mean age of 8.5 years (SD 1.6 years) were selected according to the following criteria: mouth-breathing pattern due to allergic rhinitis, early mixed dentition, skeletal Class I relationship and prepubertal stage of cervical vertebral maturation. The study group was compared with a control group of 17 nasal breathing subjects (9 females; 8 males, mean age 8.5 years SD 1.7 years). For each subject an initial dental cast was taken and the upper arch was scanned by using a tridimensional scanner. On each digital model linear measurements were performed to analyze maxillary arch dimensions and palatal morphology. Significant between-group differences were tested with the Student t-test (p<0.05). the transverse dimension of the upper arch was significantly smaller in subjects of the study group thus confirming the influence of oral breathing on skeletal development with a significant constriction of the whole palate. The study group showed a higher and sharper palatal vault at the level of second deciduous molars and of first permanent molars. Children with mouth-breathing pattern showed a significant constriction of the maxillary arch and an increased palatal height when compared with subjects with normal breathing pattern. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nasal polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Gerald A.

    1969-01-01

    A review of 313 cases of nasal polyposis indicates that there is a high incidence of recurrence in this disease. Other nasal pathology affects a significant number of these patients. Simple surgical removal of the polypi by a transnasal route is the common mode of treatment. PMID:4187956

  2. Respiratory mode, nasal patency and palatine dimensions.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Maria Elaine; Bellinaso, José Humberto; Pacheco, Andrielle de Bitencourt; Augé, Luciana Barros; Silva, Ana Maria Toniolo da; Corrêa, Eliane Castilhos Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the influence of breathing mode and nasal patency in the dimensions of the hard palate by comparing mouth breathing (MB) and nasal breathing (NB) adults. Seventy-seven individuals, distributed into the MB group (n=38) and the NB group (n=39), of both genders and aged between 18 and 30 years old, took part in the study. The respiratory mode diagnosis was based on anamnesis, physical characteristics, and otorhinolaryngological examination. The volunteers were evaluated in terms of nasal patency, with a peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF) meter, and obstruction symptoms, by a Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) scale, and had their transversal and vertical hard palate dimensions measured with a digital caliper in plaster models. Comparing both groups, the MB group presented significantly higher values in the NOSE scale, lower values in the PNIF, lower values in the transversal distance of the palate in the intercanine region, and significantly higher values in the vertical distance in the regions of the first and second premolars and molars. There was a negative correlation between PNIF and NOSE, and a positive correlation between PNIF and transversal distance of the palate in the region of the first premolars. MB adults presented reduced nasal patency and a higher degree of nasal obstruction symptoms. The hard palate was morphologically narrower and deeper in adults with the MB mode compared to the NB mode. Moreover, it was concluded that the smaller the nasal patency, the greater the obstruction symptoms and the narrower the hard palate.

  3. Arch development with trans-force lingual appliances.

    PubMed

    Clark, William J

    2005-01-01

    Trans-Force lingual appliances are designed to correct arch form in patients with contracted dental arches. Interceptive treatment with this new series of pre-activated lingual appliances offers new possibilities for arch development, in combination with fixed appliances. Palatal and lingual appliances insert in horizontal lingual sheaths in molar bands. No activation is required after the appliance is fitted, and this principle is extended to a series of appliances for sagittal and transverse arch development. Both sagittal and transverse appliances have additional components to achieve 3-way expansion where this is indicated. The invisible lingual appliances may be used in correction of all classes of malocclusion at any stage of development, from mixed dentition through permanent dentition, and this approach has wide indications in adult treatment.

  4. Aortic coarctation with persistent fifth left aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Giuseppe; Caianiello, Giuseppe; Palladino, Maria Teresa; Iacono, Carola; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Calabrò, Raffaele

    2009-08-14

    A neonate with severe aortic coarctation showed a double lumen transverse aorta (persistent fifth aortic arch) with both channels joining at the isthmus where the obstruction was confirmed by echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. Surgical repair was performed with a pantaloon-shaped patch. Persistent fifth aortic arch does not result in a vascular ring and, per se, is not hemodynamically significant unless associated with other cardiac malformations.

  5. Desmopressin Nasal

    MedlinePlus

    ... stop some types of bleeding in people with hemophilia (condition in which the blood does not clot ... When desmopressin nasal (Stimate®) is used to treat hemophilia and von Willebrand's disease, 1 to 2 spray(s) ...

  6. Hard palate dimensions in nasal and mouth breathers from different etiologies.

    PubMed

    Berwig, Luana Cristina; Silva, Ana Maria Toniolo da; Côrrea, Eliane Castilhos Rodrigues; Moraes, Anaelena Bragança de; Montenegro, Márlon Munhoz; Ritzel, Rodrigo Agne

    2011-12-01

    To compare the hard palate dimensions of nasal-breathing children, mouth breathers from obstructive etiology, and habitual mouth breathers. The sample comprised 76 children, 37 boys and 39 girls, with mean age of 9.32±1.16 years, distributed according to the diagnosis of breathing mode and to the etiology of mouth breathing. Plaster cast models of the subjects' superior dental arch were obtained in order to measure the hard palate with a digital caliper. Measurements of transverse, vertical and anteroposterior palatal length were taken. The hard palate measures were compared among the groups through statistical analysis. The comparison of hard palate dimensions observed in nasal and mouth breathers showed differences regarding the distance and depth of second premolars, and the distance of first molars. Differences were also found between the groups of mouth breathers regarding the hard palate depth at the level of canines. Mouth breathers showed narrower hard palate at the level of second premolars and first molars, and deeper palate in the level of second premolars, when compared to nasal breathers. It is evidenced that habitual mouth breathers presented deeper hard palate at the level of canines, when compared to mouth breathers from obstructive etiology.

  7. Dental arch asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zubair, Nabil Muhsen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to assess the dental arch asymmetry in a Yemeni sample aged (18-25) years. Materials and Methods: The investigation involved clinical examination of 1479 adults; only 253 (129 females, 124 males) out of the total sample were selected to fulfill the criteria for the study sample. Study models were constructed and evaluated to measure mandibular arch dimensions. Three linear distances were utilized on each side on the dental arch: Incisal-canine distance, canine-molar distance and incisal-molar distance, which represent the dental arch segmental measurements. Results: When applying “t-test” at P < 0.05, no significant differences were found between the right and left canine-molar, incisal-canine and incisal-molar distances in both dental arches for both sexes. The greater variation (0.30 mm) was observed between right and left canine-molar distance in the maxillary dental arch in male and the smaller (0.04 mm) in the mandibular dental arch between the right and left canine-molar distance in females. Conclusion: The findings of the present study revealed a symmetrical pattern of dental arches, since the right and left sides showed no statistically significant difference. In general, it can be observed that the measurements related to the central incisors and canines have the widest range of reading and give the impression that the location of central incisor and canines to each other and to other teeth is the strongest factor in determining the dental arch asymmetry. PMID:24966774

  8. Arching Solar Prominence

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA’s STEREO (Ahead) spacecraft watched as an eruptive prominence rose up and arched out in a horseshoe shape far above the Sun’s surface (Aug. 25, 2010). The image and movie show the action in a...

  9. Intraoral gothic arch tracing.

    PubMed

    Rubel, Barry; Hill, Edward E

    2011-01-01

    In order to create optimum esthetics, function and phonetics in complete denture fabrication, it is necessary to record accurate maxillo-mandibular determinants of occlusion. This requires clinical skill to establish an accurate, verifiable and reproducible vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO) and centric relation (CR). Correct vertical relation depends upon a consideration of several factors, including muscle tone, inter-dental arch space and parallelism of the ridges. Any errors made while taking maxillo-mandibular jaw relation records will result in dentures that are uncomfortable and, possibly, unwearable. The application of a tracing mechanism such as the Gothic arch tracer (a central bearing device) is a demonstrable method of determining centric relation. Intraoral Gothic arch tracers provide the advantage of capturing VDO and CR in an easy-to-use technique for practitioners. Intraoral tracing (Gothic arch tracing) is a preferred method of obtaining consistent positions of the mandible in motion (retrusive, protrusive and lateral) at a comfortable VDO.

  10. What Does the Transverse Carpal Ligament Contribute to Carpal Stability?

    PubMed Central

    Vanhees, Matthias; Verstreken, Frederik; van Riet, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Background The transverse carpal ligament is well known for its involvement in carpal tunnel syndrome, and sectioning of this ligament remains the definite treatment for this pathology. Some authors believe that the transverse carpal ligament is an important stabilizer of the carpal arch, whereas others do not consider it to be significant. Several studies have been performed, both in vivo and in in vitro. Sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament does not seem to have any effect on the width of the carpal arch in the unloaded condition. However, patients will load the arch during their activities of daily living. Materials and Methods A cadaveric study was done with distraction of the carpal bones before and after sectioning the transverse carpal ligament. Results With the transverse carpal ligament intact, the carpal arch is mobile, with distraction leading up to 50% widening of the arch. Sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament resulted in a significant widening of the carpal arch by a further 30%. Conclusions Loading of the carpal arch after sectioning of the transeverse carapal ligament leads to a significant increase in intracarpal mobility. This will inevitably influence carpal kinematics in the patient and might be responsible for some complications after simple carpal tunnel releases, such as pillar pain, palmar tenderness, and loss of grip strength. PMID:25709876

  11. What does the transverse carpal ligament contribute to carpal stability?

    PubMed

    Vanhees, Matthias; Verstreken, Frederik; van Riet, Roger

    2015-02-01

    Background The transverse carpal ligament is well known for its involvement in carpal tunnel syndrome, and sectioning of this ligament remains the definite treatment for this pathology. Some authors believe that the transverse carpal ligament is an important stabilizer of the carpal arch, whereas others do not consider it to be significant. Several studies have been performed, both in vivo and in in vitro. Sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament does not seem to have any effect on the width of the carpal arch in the unloaded condition. However, patients will load the arch during their activities of daily living. Materials and Methods A cadaveric study was done with distraction of the carpal bones before and after sectioning the transverse carpal ligament. Results With the transverse carpal ligament intact, the carpal arch is mobile, with distraction leading up to 50% widening of the arch. Sectioning of the transverse carpal ligament resulted in a significant widening of the carpal arch by a further 30%. Conclusions Loading of the carpal arch after sectioning of the transeverse carapal ligament leads to a significant increase in intracarpal mobility. This will inevitably influence carpal kinematics in the patient and might be responsible for some complications after simple carpal tunnel releases, such as pillar pain, palmar tenderness, and loss of grip strength.

  12. Dental arch analysis system.

    PubMed

    Mutinelli, Sabrina; Cozzani, Mauro; Manfredi, Mario; Siciliani, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of our research is to describe a computerized method, which enables orthodontists and researchers to analyze variation of dental arch form and dimension. The analysis system is composed of two independent parts: the database, where the images of scanned dental casts are stored, and the software. The operator uses the software to identify some landmarks on dental cast images. Corresponding distances are calculated (interincisive, intercanine and intermolar widths and the curve axis). Then the software algorithms calculate and draw the curves passing trough the selected landmarks (conics, catenary, cubic spline and polynomial curves). In the chosen curves the arch length is measured. The dental cast data, recorded at different times of the subject's life or in different steps of orthodontic treatment, are compared in order to evaluate the change in dimension (arch length and width) and form (shape). The statistical analysis of the data evaluates the variation in form and in dimension separately. The shape change is defined by Euclidean Distance Matrix Analysis (EDMA) and Bootstrap analysis. The computerized method allows orthodontists and researches to evaluate the variation in dimension and form of the dental arch in un-treated subjects and-or orthodontic patients over time. After the analysis of a large sample of patients or subjects, information concerning changes in dental arch dimension and form can be added to previous studies of other authors, distinguishing variation during and after orthodontic treatment, during growth or aging.

  13. 9. DETAIL OF EAST ARCH, FROM ROADWAY, SHOWING ARCH RIB, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL OF EAST ARCH, FROM ROADWAY, SHOWING ARCH RIB, ARTICULATED HANGER AND GUARDRAIL. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Rock Valley Bridge, Spanning North Timber Creek at Old U.S. Highway 30, Marshalltown, Marshall County, IA

  14. 10. DETAIL OF WEST ARCH, FROM ROADWAY, SHOWING ARCH RIB, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL OF WEST ARCH, FROM ROADWAY, SHOWING ARCH RIB, HANGERS AND GUARDRAIL. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Rock Valley Bridge, Spanning North Timber Creek at Old U.S. Highway 30, Marshalltown, Marshall County, IA

  15. BRIDGE ABUTMENTS WITH ARCH SEGMENTS ON RIVER BOTTOM. ARCHES COLLAPSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BRIDGE ABUTMENTS WITH ARCH SEGMENTS ON RIVER BOTTOM. ARCHES COLLAPSED AROUND EIGHT YEARS BEFORE THIS DATE. - Whittlesey Road Bridge, Spanning Black River at Whittlesey Road, Lyons Falls, Lewis County, NY

  16. A Golden Arch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-08-06

    This still image from an animation from NASA GSFC Solar Dynamics Observatory shows magnetically charged particles forming a nicely symmetrical arch at the edge of the Sun as they followed the magnetic field lines of an active region Aug.4-5, 2015. Before long the arch begins to fade, but a fainter and taller arch appears for a time in the same place. Note that several other bright active regions display similar kinds of loops above them. These images of ionized iron at about one million degrees were taken in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. The video covers about 30 hours of activity. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19874

  17. Magnetic Field Arches

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-28

    When an active region rotated into a profile view, SDO was able to capture the magnificent loops arching above an active region (Sept. 28-29, 2016). Active region are areas of strong magnetic fields. The magnetic field lines above these regions are illuminated by charged particles spiraling along them. The images were taken in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. The video covers 12 hours of activity. The Earth was inset to give a sense of the scale of these towering arches. Movies are available at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21101

  18. Pitfalls of stenting coarctation of an angulated right circumflex aortic arch in Goldenhar syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rad, Elaheh Malakan; Mortezaeian, Hojjat; Pouraliakbar, Hamid Reza; Hijazi, Ziyad M

    2017-01-01

    We report stenting of coarctation of an angulated right circumflex aortic arch (RCAA) using four Cheatham Platinum stents in a child with Goldenhar syndrome. Difficulties in measuring the accurate length of the curved and narrowed transverse aortic arch marked discrepancy between the luminal diameters of the long narrow transverse arch and wide descending thoracic aorta, increased displacement force caused by the 90° bend between the two parts resulted in repeated stent migrations. We discuss the tips to avoid distal stent migration in the setting of an angulated RCAA.

  19. Arch length considerations due to the curve of Spee: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Germane, N; Staggers, J A; Rubenstein, L; Revere, J T

    1992-09-01

    Arch length analysis should consider discrepancies not only within the sagittal plane but also within the vertical and transverse planes. The vertical deviation of the occlusal plane from a flat plane is known as the curve of Spee. The purpose of this study was to produce a mathematical model of the mandibular arch form in three planes of space and to determine the effect that the curve of Spee has on arch circumference. Two mandibular arch forms, the catenary and the Bonwill-Hawley, were examined. The curve of Spee was modeled as a cylinder perpendicular to the midsagittal plane centered on the arch anteroposteriorly. A mathematical distance formula was used to calculate arch circumferences from the central fossa of the first molars for 10 arches with curves of Spee ranging from 0 to 10 mm. This procedure was repeated for arch circumferences extending from the central fossa of the second molars. Plots for the difference in arch circumferences verses depth of the curve of Spee showed that the relationship between these two variables is not linear and is less than one to one. This model showed that clinical practice of allowing 1 mm of arch circumference for leveling each millimeter of curve of Spee overestimates the amount of arch circumference needed to flatten the curve of Spee.

  20. Effects of unilateral premolar extraction treatment on the dental arch forms of Class II subdivision malocclusions.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Ginu; Masoud, Ahmed I; Viana, Grace; Obrez, Ales; Kusnoto, Budi; Evans, Carla A

    2017-08-01

    A retrospective study evaluating posttreatment symmetry in dental arch form and midlines was carried out in Class II subdivision patients treated with unilateral and bilateral maxillary premolar extractions. Using Geomagic (version 14; Geomagic, Research Triangle Park, NC) and MATLAB (version 8.4; MathWorks, Natick, Mass) software, best-fit curves expressed as quartic polynomials were generated for 13 Class II subdivisions treated with unilateral extractions and 20 treated with bilateral maxillary premolar extractions. Transverse and sagittal measurements were recorded to assess symmetry. Dental models were superimposed on constructed reference planes to generate average posttreatment arches. Statistical comparisons were performed with the significance level set at P ≤0.05. The unilateral extraction group showed significant differences in transverse arch forms between the right and left sides in the anterior, anterior-middle, and middle segments of the arch, and all regions other than the posterior segment in the sagittal dimension. Significant differences were found between groups in the anterior and anterior-middle segments of the arch transversely, the middle and middle-posterior segments sagittally, and the midline deviation relative to the midsagittal plane. Superimposed average arches showed similar results. Unilateral maxillary extraction treatment generally results in a narrower and more posteriorly displaced arch form on the extraction side, with a deviated maxillary midline toward the extraction side of the arch. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nasal ventilation.

    PubMed Central

    Simonds, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation is likely to have an increasing role in the management of acute ventilatory failure, weaning, and chronic ventilatory problems. Further improvements in ventilator and mask design will be seen. Appropriate application is likely to reduce both mortality and admissions to intensive care, while domiciliary use can improve life expectancy and/or quality of life in chronic ventilatory disorders. As with any new technique, enthusiasm should not outweigh clear outcome information, and possible new indications should always be subject to careful assessment. Images Figure 2 PMID:9799887

  2. Dental Arch Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Straightening teeth is an arduous process requiring months, often years, of applying corrective pressure by means of arch wires-better known as brace-which may have to be changed several times in the course of treatment. A new method has been developed by Dr. George Andreasen, orthodontist and dental scientist at the University of Iowa. The key is a new type of arch wire material, called Nitinol, with exceptional elasticity which helps reduce the required number of brace changes. An alloy of nickel and titanium, Nitinol was originally developed for aerospace applications by the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, now the Naval Surface Weapons Laboratory, White Oaks, Maryland. NASA subsequently conducted additional research on the properties of Nitinol and on procedures for processing the metal.

  3. The ARCHES Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motch, C.; Arches Consortium

    2015-09-01

    The Astronomical Resource Cross-matching for High Energy Studies (ARCHES) project is a FP7-Space funded programme started in 2013 and involving the Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg including the CDS (France), the Leibniz- Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (Germany), the University of Leicester (UK), the Universidad de Cantabria (IFCA, Spain) and the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (Spain). ARCHES will provide the international astronomical community with well-characterised multi-wavelength data in the form of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for large samples of objects extracted from the 3XMM X-ray catalogue of serendipitous sources. The project develops new tools implementing fully probabilistic simultaneous cross-correlation of several catalogues and a multi-wavelength finder for clusters of galaxies. SEDs are based on an enhanced version of the 3XMM catalogue and on a careful selection of the most relevant multi-wavelength archival catalogues. In order to ensure the largest audience, SEDs will be distributed to the international community through CDS services and through the Virtual Observatory. These enhanced resources are tested in the framework of several science cases. More information may be found at http://www.arches-fp7.eu/

  4. Double arch mirror study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukobratovich, D.; Hillman, D.

    1983-01-01

    The development of a method of mounting light weight glass mirrors for astronomical telescopes compatible with the goals of the Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) was investigated. A 20 in. diameter double arch lightweight mirror previously fabricated was modified to use a new mount configuration. This mount concept was developed and fabricated. The mounting concept of the double mounting mirror is outlined. The modifications made to the mirror, fabrication of the mirror mount, and room temperature testing of the mirror and mount and the extension of the mirror and mount concept to a full size (40 in. diameter) primary mirror for SIRTF are discussed.

  5. Solar Golden Arches

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-01

    The magnetic field lines between a pair of active regions formed a beautiful set of swaying arches rising up above them Apr. 24-26, 2017, as seen by NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory. The connection between opposing poles of polarity is visible in exquisite detail in this wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. What we are really seeing are charged particles spinning along the magnetic field lines. Other field lines are traced as they reach out in other directions as well. Videos can be seen at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21604

  6. Nasalance, nasality, voice, and articulation after uvulopalatopharyngoplasty.

    PubMed

    Van Lierde, Kristiane M; Van Borsel, John; Moerman, Mieke; Van Cauwenberge, Paul

    2002-05-01

    The main purpose of the study was to determine the impact of uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) on nasalance and nasality. It was hypothesized that nasalance would change from the presurgical to the postsurgical condition because the surgical protocol involves removal of palatal tissue. An additional objective of the study was to provide objective and subjective data about changes in voice and articulation after UPPP. Because the surgical procedure of UPPP does not involve laryngeal tissue, it was hypothesized that the voice characteristics remain relatively stable. Because of removal of effective velar length, articulation problems of the uvular /R/ can occur in the Dutch language. Prospective study in which 26 men were studied before (1 week before UPPP) and after (3 weeks after UPPP) surgery. The Nasometer was used to obtain nasalance scores. The mirror-fogging test, a perceptual evaluation of each subject's readings, and the Gutzmann and the Bzoch hypernasality tests were used for the assessment of nasality. For the assessment of articulation, a phonetic analysis was performed. Voice assessment included a perceptual rating of the voice and a determination of fundamental frequency. No significant differences were found between the conditions before and after surgery regarding nasalance (except for the vowel /i/), nasality, and voice. Regarding articulation, only 1 patient showed a derhotacized /R/. The findings of the study indicate that UPPP does not have an impact on nasality, voice, and articulation. Regarding nasalance, no significant nasalance change occurred after UPPP, except for the high vowel /i/.

  7. 35. ALTERNATE DESIGN USING THROUGH ARCH SPANS, WITH ARCH REPEATED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. ALTERNATE DESIGN USING THROUGH ARCH SPANS, WITH ARCH REPEATED BETWEEN TOWER LEGS, AND ASHLAR MASONRY WALLS AND PYLONS Pen-and-ink drawing by project architect Alfred Eichler, 1934. - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  8. The ARCHES project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motch, C.; Arches Consortium

    2014-07-01

    ARCHES (Astronomical Resource Cross-matching for High Energy Studies) is a FP7-Space funded project started in 2013 and involving the Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg including the CDS (France), the Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam (Germany), the University of Leicester (UK), the Universidad de Cantabria (IFCA, Spain) and the Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (Madrid, Spain). ARCHES aims at providing the international astronomical community with well-characterised multi-wavelength data in the form of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for large sets of objects extracted from the 3XMM catalogue. The project develops new tools implementing fully probabilistic simultaneous cross-correlation of several catalogues. SEDs are based on an enhanced version of the 3XMM catalogue and on a careful selection of the most relevant multi-wavelength archival catalogues. In order to ensure the largest audience, SEDs will be distributed to the international community through CDS services and through the Virtual Observatory. These enhanced resources are currently tested in the framework of several science cases. An integrated cluster finder is developed at Potsdam, AGN science is studied at Leicester and IFCA while populations of Galactic X-ray sources are investigated at Strasbourg and Madrid.

  9. Complete fourth metatarsal and arches in the foot of Australopithecus afarensis.

    PubMed

    Ward, Carol V; Kimbel, William H; Johanson, Donald C

    2011-02-11

    The transition to full-time terrestrial bipedality is a hallmark of human evolution. A key correlate of human bipedalism is the development of longitudinal and transverse arches of the foot that provide a rigid propulsive lever and critical shock absorption during striding bipedal gait. Evidence for arches in the earliest well-known Australopithecus species, A. afarensis, has long been debated. A complete fourth metatarsal of A. afarensis was recently discovered at Hadar, Ethiopia. It exhibits torsion of the head relative to the base, a direct correlate of a transverse arch in humans. The orientation of the proximal and distal ends of the bone reflects a longitudinal arch. Further, the deep, flat base and tarsal facets imply that its midfoot had no ape-like midtarsal break. These features show that the A. afarensis foot was functionally like that of modern humans and support the hypothesis that this species was a committed terrestrial biped.

  10. Deprojecting the nasal profile.

    PubMed

    Papel, I D; Mabrie, D C

    1999-02-01

    The nose is the most prominent aesthetic feature of the facial profile. Nasal length, tip rotation, and tip projection are integral aspects in analysis of the nasal profile. In most rhinoplasties the surgeon has the difficult task of increasing or maintaining tip projection of an underprojected or normally projected nasal tip. Less commonly, the rhinoplastic surgeon is presented with an overprojected nasal tip, and efforts are focused on deprojecting the nasal profile. In this article, the authors present a discussion of the overprojected tip, elucidating strategies of analysis, etiologies, and management of the nasal profile and give clinical examples.

  11. Nasal Injuries in Sports.

    PubMed

    Marston, Alexander P; O'Brien, Erin K; Hamilton, Grant S

    2017-04-01

    Nasal trauma is a common consequence of athletic competition. The nasal bones are the most commonly fractured facial bone and are particularly at risk during sports participation. Acute management of trauma to the nose includes thorough evaluation of all injuries and may require immediate management for repair of facial lacerations, epistaxis control, or septal hematoma drainage. Nasal fractures can often be addressed with closed reduction techniques; however, in the setting of complex nasal trauma, an open approach may be indicated. Using appropriate treatment techniques, posttraumatic nasal sequelae can be minimized; most patients report satisfactory long-term nasal form and function.

  12. Aortic arch morphology and late systemic hypertension following correction of coarctation of aorta.

    PubMed

    Lashley, Daniel; Curtin, John; Malcolm, Paul; Clark, Allan; Freeman, Leisa

    2007-01-01

    To reproduce in an adult population a pediatric study that found an association between aortic arch geometry and late systemic hypertension following successful repair of aortic coarctation. Fifty-one patients with successful repair of coarctation of the aorta had blood pressure measurement at rest and during exercise. After cross-sectional imaging of the aortic arch, patients were assigned to 1 of 3 previously defined morphological categories: normal, gothic, or crenel. The degree of residual stenosis and the ratio of the height/transverse diameter of the arch (A/T ratio) were calculated. No relationship was found between arch geometry and either resting- or exercise-induced hypertension. We found the classification into 3 morphological types difficult and did not find an association between gothic arch or a high A/T ratio and hypertension.

  13. Transversity 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Vincenzo; Ratcliffe, Philip G.

    Introduction. Purpose and status of the Italian Transversity Project / F. Bradamante -- Opening lecture. Transversity / M. Anselmino -- Experimental lectures. Azimuthal single-spin asymmetries from polarized and unpolarized hydrogen targets at HERMES / G. Schnell (for the HERMES Collaboration). Collins and Sivers asymmetries on the deuteron from COMPASS data / I. Horn (for the COMPASS Collaboration). First measurement of interference fragmentation on a transversely polarized hydrogen target / P. B. van der Nat (for the HERMES Collaboration). Two-hadron asymmetries at the COMPASS experiment / A. Mielech (for the COMPASS Collaboration). Measurements of chiral-odd fragmentation functions at Belle / R. Seidl ... [et al.]. Lambda asymmetries / A. Ferrero (for the COMPASS Collaboration). Transverse spin at PHENIX: results and prospects / C. Aidala (for the PHENIX Collaboration). Transverse spin and RHIC / L. Bland. Studies of transverse spin effects at JLab / H. Avakian ... [et al.] (for the CLAS Collaboration). Neutron transversity at Jefferson Lab / J. P. Chen ... [et al.] (for the Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration). PAX: polarized antiproton experiments / M. Contalbrigo. Single and double spin N-N interactions at GSI / M. Maggiora (for the ASSIA Collaboration). Spin filtering in storage rings / N. N. Nikolaev & F. F. Pavlov -- Theory lectures. Single-spin asymmetries and transversity in QCD / S. J. Brodsky. The relativistic hydrogen atom: a theoretical laboratory for structure functions / X. Artru & K. Benhizia. GPD's and SSA's / M. Burkardt. Time reversal odd distribution functions in chiral models / A. Drago. Soffer bound and transverse spin densities from lattice QCD / M. Diehl ... [et al.]. Single-spin asymmetries and Qiu-Sterman effect(s) / A. Bacchetta. Sivers function: SIDIS data, fits and predictions / M. Anselmino ... [et al.]. Twist-3 effects in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering / M. Schlegel, K. Goeke & A. Metz. Quark and gluon Sivers functions / I

  14. Transversity 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuseppe, Ciullo; Paolo, Lenisa; Marco, Contalbrigo; Delia, Hasch

    2009-04-01

    Purpose and status of the Italian transversity project / F. Bradamante -- Transversity asymmetries / D. Boer -- The transverse angular momentum sum rule / E. Leader -- Measurement of Collins and Sivers asymmetries at HERMES / L. L. Pappalardo (for the HERMES collaboration) -- Review of SSA results on deuteron at COMPASS / A. Richter (for the COMPASS collaboration) -- Single spin asymmetries on a transversely polarized proton target at COMPASS / S. Levorato (for the COMPASS collaboration) -- New preliminary results on the transversity distribution and the Collins fragmentation functions / M. Anselmino ... [et al.] -- Sivers effect in SIDIS pion and kaon production / M. Anselmino ... [et al.] -- Spin-orbit correlations / M. Burkardt -- Correlation functions in hard and (semi)-inclusive processes / M. Schlegel, S. Mei[symbol]ner and A. Metz -- Transversity via exclusive [pie symbol]-electroproduction / G. R. Goldstein, S. Liuti and S. Ahmad -- Estimate of the Sivers asymmetry at intermediate energies with rescattering extracted from exclusive processes / A. Bianconi -- Exclusively produced p[symbol] asymmetries on the deuteron and future GPD measurements at COMPASS / C. Schill (for the COMPASS collaboration) -- Transversity and transverse-momentum-dependent distribution measurements from PHENIX and BRAHMS / C. Aidala (for the PHENIX and BRAHMS collaborations) -- Sivers and Collins effects in polarized pp scattering processes / M. Anselmino ... [et al.] -- Sivers function in constituent quark models / S. Scopetta ... [et al.] -- Sivers, Boer-Mulders and transversity in Drell-Yan processes / M. Anselmino ... [et al.] -- TMDs and Drell-Yan experiments at Fermilab and J-PARC / J.-C. Peng -- Double polarisation observables at PAX / M. Nekipelov (for the PAX collaboration) -- Future Drell-Yan measurement @ COMPASS / M. Colantoni (for the COMPASS collaboration) -- Measurements of unpolarized azimuthal asymmetries at COMPASS / W. Käfer (for the COMPASS collaboration

  15. Abnormal aortic arch morphology in Turner syndrome patients is a risk factor for hypertension.

    PubMed

    De Groote, Katya; Devos, Daniël; Van Herck, Koen; Demulier, Laurent; Buysse, Wesley; De Schepper, Jean; De Wolf, Daniël

    2015-09-01

    Hypertension in Turner syndrome (TS) is a multifactorial, highly prevalent and significant problem that warrants timely diagnosis and rigorous treatment. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between abnormal aortic arch morphology and hypertension in adult TS patients. This was a single centre retrospective study in 74 adult TS patients (age 29.41 ± 8.91 years) who underwent a routine cardiac MRI. Patients were assigned to the hypertensive group (N = 31) if blood pressure exceeded 140/90 mmHg and/or if they were treated with antihypertensive medication. Aortic arch morphology was evaluated on MRI images and initially assigned as normal (N = 54) or abnormal (N = 20), based on the curve of the transverse arch and the distance between the left common carotid-left subclavian artery. We additionally used a new more objective method to describe aortic arch abnormality in TS by determination of the relative position of the highest point of the transverse arch (AoHP). Logistic regression analysis showed that hypertension is significantly and independently associated with age, BMI and abnormal arch morphology, with a larger effect size for the new AoHP method than for the classical method. TS patients with hypertension and abnormal arch morphology more often had dilatation of the ascending aorta. There is a significant association between abnormal arch morphology and hypertension in TS patients, independent of age and BMI, and not related to other structural heart disease. We suggest that aortic arch morphology should be included in the risk stratification for hypertension in TS and propose a new quantitative method to express aortic arch morphology.

  16. Beclomethasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... the lining of the nose) after nasal polyp removal surgery. Beclomethasone nasal spray should not be used ... room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom).Unneeded medications should be ...

  17. Triamcinolone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... itchy nose and itchy, watery eyes caused by hay fever or other allergies. Triamcinolone nasal spray should not ... germs.Triamcinolone nasal spray controls the symptoms of hay fever and allergies but does not cure these conditions. ...

  18. Flow velocity and turbulence in the transverse aorta of a proximally directed aortic cannula: hydrodynamic study in a transparent model.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ikuo; Fujimori, Shingo; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Yanaoka, Hideki; Inamura, Takao

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study was to visualize and characterize the effect of cannula tip direction on flow within transverse aortic arch. A hydrodynamic analysis of the Dispersion arterial cannula (Edwards Lifescience LLC, Irvine, CA) was performed using particle image velocimetry in glass perfusion models of healthy and aneurysmal aortic arches. Flow velocity, streamline, distribution of magnitude of the strain rate tensor (function of shear stress), and degree of flow turbulence were comparatively analyzed for cannula tip directed toward the aortic arch (standard direction) and toward the aortic root (root direction). Standard direction cannulation in the model of the healthy aorta showed the flow velocity in the transverse aortic arch was rapid, the streamlines were nonlinear, and the magnitude of the strain rate tensor was high along aortic curvatures. Conversely, directing the cannula tip toward the aortic root generated slower and less turbulent flow in the transverse aortic arch despite high velocity and turbulence and nonlinear streamlines in the ascending aorta. In the aneurysmal aortic arch model, the flow velocity was more rapid in the area where aortic arch vessels originated, and a reversely directed vortex was observed between the aneurysm and the origination of the arch vessels. In the root direction model, the flow velocity distribution was slower than that in the standard direction. Directing the cannula tip of the Dispersion cannula toward the aortic root generated slower and less turbulent flow in the transverse arch of the glass models of both healthy and aneurysmal aortic arches.

  19. Role of the tranverse arch in stiffness of the human foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcelo A.; Singh, Dhiraj K.; Bandi, Mahesh M.; Venkadesan, Madhusudhan; Mandre, Shreyas

    2015-03-01

    Human ancestors evolved from walking, around 6 million years (Ma) ago, to regular endurance running, around 2 Ma ago. Simultaneously, the feet evolved from a relatively flat structure like that of current day Chimpanzees (or our hands), to the modern human foot with two arches, a longitudinal and a transversal arch. The feet play a crucial role in locomotion by providing sufficient stiffness for propulsion, and being soft and pliable to absorb impacts and store energy elastically. Here we show that the transverse arch could play a central role in stiffness modulation. We first treat the foot as an elastic shell that is with intrinsic curvature. Calculations, numerics and physical experiments all show that for a foot-like shell, the stiffness has a power-law dependence on transverse curvature beyond a critical value. On the other hand, for purely longitudinally curved feet, or transverse curvature below the critical value, lead to low stiffness like a flat plate. Discrete realizations of a continuum shell, more closely resembling the human foot, also exhibit curvature induced stiffening. These results shed light on the role of the quintessentially human feature of a doubly arched foot, and suggest mechanical consequences of disorders such as a collapsed arch. HFSP RGY0091/2013.

  20. Nasal Harmony in Aguaruna.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Gui-Sun

    A discussion of the nasal harmony of Aguaruna, a language of the Jivaroan family in South America, approaches the subject from the viewpoint of generative phonology. This theory of phonology proposes an underlying nasal consonant, later deleted, that accounts for vowel nasalization. Complex rules that suppose a complex system of vowel and…

  1. Nasal Harmony in Aguaruna.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Gui-Sun

    A discussion of the nasal harmony of Aguaruna, a language of the Jivaroan family in South America, approaches the subject from the viewpoint of generative phonology. This theory of phonology proposes an underlying nasal consonant, later deleted, that accounts for vowel nasalization. Complex rules that suppose a complex system of vowel and…

  2. Nasal septal hematoma.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, C M

    1998-04-01

    Nasal septal hematoma is a rare but potentially serious complication of nasal trauma. Proper management consists of early recognition, prompt surgical evacuation of the hematoma, and antimicrobial therapy if a secondary nasal septal abscess is suspected. Clindamycin is recommended as initial therapy until the results of cultures and susceptibility studies are available.

  3. Nasal computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Ned F

    2006-05-01

    Chronic nasal disease is often a challenge to diagnose. Computed tomography greatly enhances the ability to diagnose chronic nasal disease in dogs and cats. Nasal computed tomography provides detailed information regarding the extent of disease, accurate discrimination of neoplastic versus nonneoplastic diseases, and identification of areas of the nose to examine rhinoscopically and suspicious regions to target for biopsy.

  4. [Double aortic arch with dominant left arch: case report].

    PubMed

    Ece, Ibrahim; Paç, Feyza Ayşenur; Paç, Mustafa; Ballı, Sevket

    2012-09-01

    A vascular ring is defined as an anomaly of the great arteries (aortic arch and its branches) that compresses the trachea or esophagus. Double aortic arch is the most common vascular ring. Double aortic arch is very rare and typically becomes symptomatic in infancy or early childhood. We present a 7-year-old girl admitted to our clinic for evaluation of recurrent respiratory infection with dysphagia. Double aortic arch was suspected from echocardiography and diagnosed with cardiac computed tomography. Left aortic arcus was larger than the right at computed tomography and cardiac catheterisation. After surgery the symptoms improved strikingly. We conclude that vascular ring should be considered in the patients presenting with recurrent pulmonary infections and dysphagia. Early diagnosis and treatment may prevent chronic, irreversible complications.

  5. Assessment of the effect of deviated nasal septum on the structure of nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junguo; Dou, Xin; Liu, Dingding; Song, Panpan; Qian, Xiaoyun; Wang, Shoulin; Gao, Xia

    2016-06-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of DNS on the structure of nasal cavity. The paranasal sinus coronal view CT of 108 patients with DNS and 129 hospitalized patients without DNS was retrospectively analyzed. The transverse diameter of nasal cavity (a), transverse diameter of nasal cavity and paranasal sinus (b), angle between maxillary and palatal bone, interalveolar distance, and maxillary rotation distance were measured. The ratio of a/b in experimental group was 0.367 ± 0.006 which was significantly (P = 0.0023) less than that in control group (0.391 ± 0.005). For the angle between maxillary and palatal bone, there was no significant difference found between DNS and control group for both right and left sides. The interalveolar distance was 40.75 mm in experimental group, and 38.8 mm in control (P = 0.0002). For the maxillary rotation distance, findings were considered as significant (P < 0.0001) in experimental group (11.25 mm) compared with control (10.1 mm). The present study demonstrates that long-term DNS affects the development of nasal cavity and paranasal sinus, as well as increases the interalveolar distance and maxillary rotation distance. These influences may be caused by the alteration of airflow inside the nasal cavities.

  6. Transverse dimension and long-term stability.

    PubMed

    Vanarsdall, R L

    1999-09-01

    This article emphasizes the critical importance of the skeletal differential between the width of the maxilla and the width of the mandible. Undiagnosed transverse discrepancy leads to adverse periodontal response, unstable dental camouflage, and less than optimal dentofacial esthetics. Hundreds of adult retreatment patients corrected for significant maxillary transverse deficiency using surgically assisted maxillary expansion (similar to osseous distraction) has produced excellent stability. Eliciting tooth movement for children (orthopedics, lip bumper, Cetlin plate) in all three planes of space by muscles, eruption, and growth, develops the broader arch form (without the mechanical forces of fixed or removable appliances) and has also demonstrated impressive long term stability.

  7. Dental arch changes associated with rapid maxillary expansion: A retrospective model analysis study

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Ivor M; Kumar, H. C. Kiran; Shetty, K. Sadashiva

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Transverse deficiency of the maxilla is a common clinical problem in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics. Transverse maxillary deficiency, isolated or associated with other dentofacial deformities, results in esthetic and functional impairment giving rise to several clinical manifestations such as asymmetrical facial growth, positional and functional mandibular deviations, altered dentofacial esthetics, adverse periodontal responses, unstable dental tipping, and other functional problems. Orthopedic maxillary expansion is the preferred treatment approach to increase the maxillary transverse dimension in young patients by splitting of the mid palatal suture. This orthopedic procedure has lately been subject of renewed interest in orthodontic treatment mechanics because of its potential for increasing arch perimeter to alleviate crowding in the maxillary arch without adversely affecting facial profile. Hence, the present investigation was conducted to establish a correlation between transverse expansion and changes in the arch perimeter, arch width and arch length. Methods: For this purpose, 10 subjects (five males, five females) were selected who had been treated by rapid maxillary expansion (RME) using hyrax rapid palatal expander followed by fixed mechanotherapy (PEA). Pretreatment (T1), postexpansion (T2), and posttreatment (T3) dental models were compared for dental changes brought about by RME treatment and its stability at the end of fixed mechanotherapy. After model measurements were made, the changes between T1–T2, T2–T3 and T1–T3 were determined for each patient. The mean difference between T1–T2, T2–T3 and T1–T3 were compared to assess the effects of RME on dental arch measurements. Results are expressed as mean ± standard deviation and are compared by repeated measures analysis of variance followed by a post-hoc test. Arch perimeter changes are correlated with changes in arch widths at the canine, premolar and molar regions

  8. Modeling Outcomes: Modified Aortic Arch Advancement for Neonatal Hypoplastic Arch.

    PubMed

    Nellis, Joseph R; Chung, Timothy K; Agarwal, Nandita; Torres, Jose E; Holgren, Sarah E; Raghavan, Madhavan L; Turek, Joseph W

    Numerous surgical approaches regarding aortic arch advancement for neonatal arch hypoplasia have been described. These repairs can be classified into two categories: those that incorporate a patch and those that do not. The decision between repairs remains largely experiential, rather than empirical, because of the limited number of reported outcomes. We report early outcomes from neonates undergoing modified aortic arch advancement with an anterior patch and our experience using computational fluid dynamic modeling to better understand the hemodynamic consequences associated with this repair. A retrospective review of neonates undergoing aortic arch advancement with anterior patch in 2014 at a single institution was performed. Anatomical, perioperative, and follow-up data were collected. Three-dimensional cardiac magnetic resonance images were used to generate computational fluid dynamic models of the modified anterior patch and direct end-to-side repairs. Cardiac waveform inputs were simulated and hemodynamic analyzed. Ten neonates underwent modified aortic arch advancement. No hemodynamically significant gradients were observed at a median follow-up of 0.77 (0.30-1.2) years. Asymmetrical flow was observed in the end-to-side repair, whereas more concentric laminar flow was observed throughout the modified model. Spatial variations in velocities immediately distal to the anastomosis were greater in the end-to-side model (0.35 vs 0.17 m/s, P < 0.001). Time-averaged variations in wall shear stress during systole were greater in the end-to-side model at the same location (3.44 vs 1.98 dynes/cm, P < 0.001). Early outcomes after the use of an anterior patch for neonatal hypoplastic aortic arch repair show favorable hemodynamic outcomes.

  9. [Nasal fractures in adults].

    PubMed

    Sjöstedt, Sannia; Larsen, Christian Grønhøj; Bilde, Anders; von Buchwald, Christian

    2016-03-07

    The risk of complications warrants treatment of most dislocated nasal fractures. Other injuries including other facial fractures and septal haematoma must be treated if present at the initial presentation. The usual treatment for a simple nasal fracture is closed reduction in local anaesthesia after five to seven days. Complicated cases require open reduction in general anaesthesia. Later revision of the deviated nose may become necessary in patients suffering from complications such as persistent nasal stenosis and/or deformity.

  10. The supernumerary nasal tooth.

    PubMed

    Kirmeier, R; Truschnegg, A; Payer, M; Malyk, J; Daghighi, S; Jakse, N

    2009-11-01

    Teeth exceeding the normal dental complement that have erupted into the nasal cavity are a rare pathological entity. This case report describes a female patient with recurrent complaints and fetid discharge from the left nasal cavity. The suspected clinical diagnosis of a supernumerary nasal tooth was confirmed by computed tomography. After endoscopic removal, the tooth was examined using X-ray microtomography and thin-section preparations; these findings are presented for the first time. A literature search identified 25 supernumerary nasal teeth in 23 patients.

  11. Measuring Nasal Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Jarrod; Most, Sam P

    2016-08-01

    The nose and the nasal airway is highly complex with intricate 3-dimensional anatomy, with multiple functions in respiration and filtration of the respired air. Nasal airway obstruction (NAO) is a complex problem with no clearly defined "gold-standard" in measurement. There are 3 tools for the measurement of NAO: patient-derived measurements, physician-observed measurements, and objective measurements. We continue to work towards finding a link between subjective and objective nasal obstruction. The field of evaluation and surgical treatment for NAO has grown tremendously in the past 4-5 decades and will continue to grow as we learn more about the pathophysiology and treatment of nasal obstruction.

  12. Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan-Qiang; Yao, Feng; Shang, An-Dong; Pan, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch is uncommonly associated with cancer, and is extremely rare in pulmonary cancer. Here, we report an unusual and successfully treated case of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm in a male patient with lung squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: A 64-year-old male patient was admitted to the Emergency Department, presenting with massive hemoptysis (>500 mL blood during the 12 hours prior to treatment). The diagnosis of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm was confirmed after inspection of computed tomographic angiography and three-dimensional reconstruction. We processed the immediate endovascular stent-grafting for this patient. Results: This patient recovered with no filling or enlargement of the pseudoaneurysm, no episodes of hemoptysis, and no neurological complications during the 4-week follow-up period. Conclusion: Herein, we compare our case with other cancer-related pseudoaneurysms in the medical literature and summarize the clinical features and treatment of this unusual case. PMID:27495079

  13. Controlled localized buckling responses of orthodontic arch wires.

    PubMed

    Nikolai, R J; Chung, A Y

    1999-09-01

    The orthodontic arch wire is often activated locally, in transverse bending and/or longitudinal torsion, to engage an individual malaligned tooth. Arch wires with substantial flexibilities and elastic ranges in bending are available. Several clinical reports of distal displacements of molars with appliances activated by locally buckling the arch wire have appeared in the recent published literature. This article contains an explanation of buckling or "column" action and the postbuckling response of a wire, and a report of the results of a controlled, in-vitro study of a sample of 256 wire segments subjected to activation-deactivation, buckling-postbuckling-unbuckling cycles. Continuous force-displacement diagrams were obtained from mechanical tests run at oral temperature. Four orthodontics-relevant, mechanical characteristics were quantified from each diagram, and each specimen was subjected to posttest evaluation for inelastic behavior. Although the deformation of the buckled wire is, in fact, bending, the force-displacement diagrams obtained differed substantially from their familiar counterparts generated in transverse bending. Judging from the force magnitudes induced as the deactivation half-cycles commenced as well as the deactivation rates, not all of the 8 wires seem to be clinically suitable for activation initiated by buckling. Magnitudes of springback were substantial from activations as large as 6 mm, and only 2 of the 8 wires exhibited full deactivations less than 80% of their activating displacements. This relatively new mode of arch wire activation that enables delivery to the dentition of mesiodistal pushing forces has substantial potential for clinical application from several biomechanical standpoints.

  14. Toxicology of the nasal passages

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow, C.S.

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this work include: Comparative Anatomy and Function of the Nasal Passages; Light Microscopic Examination of the Rat Nasal Passages: Preparation and Morphologic Features; Histopathology of Acute and Subacute Nasal Toxicity; Pathology of Chronic Nasal Toxic Responses Including Cancer; Responses of the Nasal Mucociliary Apparatus to Airborne Irritants; Effects of Chemical Exposure on Olfaction in Humans, Possible Consequences of Cytochrome P-450-Dependent Monooxygenases in Nasal Tissues.

  15. Three-Dimensional Stiffness of the Carpal Arch

    PubMed Central

    Gabra, Joseph N.; Li, Zong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The carpal arch of the wrist is formed by irregularly shaped carpal bones interconnected by numerous ligaments, resulting in complex structural mechanics. The purpose of this study was to determine the three-dimensional stiffness characteristics of the carpal arch using displacement perturbations. It was hypothesized that the carpal arch would exhibit an anisotropic stiffness behavior with principal directions that are oblique to the conventional anatomical axes. Eight (n = 8) cadavers were used in this study. For each specimen, the hamate was fixed to a custom stationary apparatus. An instrumented robot arm applied three-dimensional displacement perturbations to the ridge of trapezium and corresponding reaction forces were collected. The displacement-force data were used to determine a three-dimensional stiffness matrix using least squares fitting. Eigendecomposition of the stiffness matrix was used to identify the magnitudes and directions of the principal stiffness components. The carpal arch structure exhibited anisotropic stiffness behaviors with a maximum principal stiffness of 16.4 ± 4.6 N/mm that was significantly larger than the other principal components of 3.1 ± 0.9 and 2.6 ± 0.5 N/mm (p < 0.001). The principal direction of the maximum stiffness was pronated within the cross section of the carpal tunnel which is accounted for by the stiff transverse ligaments that tightly bind distal carpal arch. The minimal principal stiffness is attributed to the less constraining articulation between the trapezium and scaphoid. This study provides advanced characterization of the wrist's three-dimensional structural stiffness for improved insight into wrist biomechanics, stability, and function. PMID:26617368

  16. Three-dimensional stiffness of the carpal arch.

    PubMed

    Gabra, Joseph N; Li, Zong-Ming

    2016-01-04

    The carpal arch of the wrist is formed by irregularly shaped carpal bones interconnected by numerous ligaments, resulting in complex structural mechanics. The purpose of this study was to determine the three-dimensional stiffness characteristics of the carpal arch using displacement perturbations. It was hypothesized that the carpal arch would exhibit an anisotropic stiffness behavior with principal directions that are oblique to the conventional anatomical axes. Eight (n=8) cadavers were used in this study. For each specimen, the hamate was fixed to a custom stationary apparatus. An instrumented robot arm applied three-dimensional displacement perturbations to the ridge of trapezium and corresponding reaction forces were collected. The displacement-force data were used to determine a three-dimensional stiffness matrix using least squares fitting. Eigendecomposition of the stiffness matrix was used to identify the magnitudes and directions of the principal stiffness components. The carpal arch structure exhibited anisotropic stiffness behaviors with a maximum principal stiffness of 16.4±4.6N/mm that was significantly larger than the other principal components of 3.1±0.9 and 2.6±0.5N/mm (p<0.001). The principal direction of the maximum stiffness was pronated within the cross section of the carpal tunnel which is accounted for by the stiff transverse ligaments that tightly bind distal carpal arch. The minimal principal stiffness is attributed to the less constraining articulation between the trapezium and scaphoid. This study provides advanced characterization of the wrist׳s three-dimensional structural stiffness for improved insight into wrist biomechanics, stability, and function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nasality in Taiwanese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Ho-hsien

    2004-01-01

    This study used perceptual and articulatory data to investigate a language specific phonemic inventory, and allophonic rules for homorganic initial voiced stops versus homorganic nasal stops, and oral versus nasal vowels in Taiwanese. Four experiments were conducted: concept formation, gating, and two airflow studies. Results of a first nasal…

  18. Nasality in Taiwanese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Ho-hsien

    2004-01-01

    This study used perceptual and articulatory data to investigate a language specific phonemic inventory, and allophonic rules for homorganic initial voiced stops versus homorganic nasal stops, and oral versus nasal vowels in Taiwanese. Four experiments were conducted: concept formation, gating, and two airflow studies. Results of a first nasal…

  19. Lining in nasal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Haack, Sebastian; Fischer, Helmut; Gubisch, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    Restoring nasal lining is one of the essential parts during reconstruction of full-thickness defects of the nose. Without a sufficient nasal lining the whole reconstruction will fail. Nasal lining has to sufficiently cover the shaping subsurface framework. But in addition, lining must not compromise or even block nasal ventilation. This article demonstrates different possibilities of lining reconstruction. The use of composite grafts for small rim defects is described. The limits and technical components for application of skin grafts are discussed. Then the advantages and limitations of endonasal, perinasal, and hingeover flaps are demonstrated. Strategies to restore lining with one or two forehead flaps are presented. Finally, the possibilities and technical aspects to reconstruct nasal lining with a forearm flap are demonstrated. Technical details are explained by intraoperative pictures. Clinical cases are shown to illustrate the different approaches and should help to understand the process of decision making. It is concluded that although the lining cannot be seen after reconstruction of the cover it remains one of the key components for nasal reconstruction. When dealing with full-thickness nasal defects, there is no way to avoid learning how to restore nasal lining.

  20. Nasal dermoid sinus cyst.

    PubMed

    Cauchois, R; Laccourreye, O; Bremond, D; Testud, R; Küffer, R; Monteil, J P

    1994-08-01

    Nasal dermoid sinus cyst is one of the diagnoses of midline nasal masses in children. This retrospective study analyzes the various theories regarding the origin of this congenital abnormality, the differential diagnosis, and the value of magnetic resonance imaging, as well as the various surgical options available.

  1. [Nasal allergenic provocation test].

    PubMed

    Becerril Angeles, M H; Pérez López, A; Azuara Pliego, E

    2000-01-01

    This is a method to evaluate both specific sensitivity to allergens in the nasal mucosa, IgE-mediated hypersensitivity, and antiinflammatory and antiallergic drugs efficacy, whose objectives are for research in diagnosis and treatment. The method is based in allergen extracts delivery in the nasal mucosa and the post-challenge measurement of rhinitis symptoms, vasoactive mediators release quantification and nasal obstruction degree evaluated by rhinomanometry. Nasal allergen challenge is a procedure of diagnostic and therapeutic evaluation usefulness, that must be performed in selected patients, in adequate facilities, by experts physicians, with standardised allergen dosages, in an specific nasal area, with objective measurements (rhinomanometry, mediators and secretions of the allergic response) and symptoms scoring that allow get reliable results in patients with allergic rhinitis under study.

  2. Nanoparticles for nasal vaccination.

    PubMed

    Csaba, Noemi; Garcia-Fuentes, Marcos; Alonso, Maria Jose

    2009-02-27

    The great interest in mucosal vaccine delivery arises from the fact that mucosal surfaces represent the major site of entry for many pathogens. Among other mucosal sites, nasal delivery is especially attractive for immunization, as the nasal epithelium is characterized by relatively high permeability, low enzymatic activity and by the presence of an important number of immunocompetent cells. In addition to these advantageous characteristics, the nasal route could offer simplified and more cost-effective protocols for vaccination with improved patient compliance. The use of nanocarriers provides a suitable way for the nasal delivery of antigenic molecules. Besides improved protection and facilitated transport of the antigen, nanoparticulate delivery systems could also provide more effective antigen recognition by immune cells. These represent key factors in the optimal processing and presentation of the antigen, and therefore in the subsequent development of a suitable immune response. In this sense, the design of optimized vaccine nanocarriers offers a promising way for nasal mucosal vaccination.

  3. Simple Way of Recording Dental Arch Forms

    PubMed Central

    Ratre, Ram Kishore; Jain, Sandhya; Chandki, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Like finger prints each individual has a unique dental arch form design. Recording patient’s dental arch form may be required in various fields in dentistry be it longitudinal studies for evaluating growth, forensic dentistry and most importantly in orthodontic practice for fabricating arch wires for individual patients. An easy and practical method to obtain individual arch form for each patient is explained. PMID:25954726

  4. The Algebra of the Arches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buerman, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    Finding real-world examples for middle school algebra classes can be difficult but not impossible. As we strive to accomplish teaching our students how to solve and graph equations, we neglect to teach the big ideas of algebra. One of those big ideas is functions. This article gives three examples of functions that are found in Arches National…

  5. Arch Reconstruction with Autologous Pulmonary Artery Patch in Interrupted Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won-Young

    2014-01-01

    Various surgical techniques have been developed for the repair of an interrupted aortic arch. However, tension and Gothic arch formation at the anastomotic site have remained major problems for these techniques: Excessive tension causes arch stenosis and left main bronchus compression, and Gothic arch configuration is related to cardiovascular complications. To resolve these problems, we adopted a modified surgical technique of distal aortic arch augmentation using an autologous main pulmonary artery patch. The descending aorta was then anastomosed to the augmented aortic arch in an end-to-side manner. Here, we report two cases of interrupted aortic arch that were repaired using this technique. PMID:24782962

  6. Arch reconstruction with autologous pulmonary artery patch in interrupted aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Young; Park, Jeong-Jun

    2014-04-01

    Various surgical techniques have been developed for the repair of an interrupted aortic arch. However, tension and Gothic arch formation at the anastomotic site have remained major problems for these techniques: Excessive tension causes arch stenosis and left main bronchus compression, and Gothic arch configuration is related to cardiovascular complications. To resolve these problems, we adopted a modified surgical technique of distal aortic arch augmentation using an autologous main pulmonary artery patch. The descending aorta was then anastomosed to the augmented aortic arch in an end-to-side manner. Here, we report two cases of interrupted aortic arch that were repaired using this technique.

  7. Similarity and Enhancement: Nasality from Moroccan Arabic Pharyngeals and Nasals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zellou, Georgia Eve

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies of the articulation, acoustics, and perception of nasal and pharyngeal consonants and adjacent vowels were conducted to investigate nasality in Moroccan Arabic (MA). The status of nasality in MA is described as coarticulatorily complex, where two phoneme types (pharyngeal segments and nasal segments) yield similar…

  8. Comparison of Nasal Acceleration and Nasalance across Vowels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorp, Elias B.; Virnik, Boris T.; Stepp, Cara E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the performance of normalized nasal acceleration (NNA) relative to nasalance as estimates of nasalized versus nonnasalized vowel and sentence productions. Method: Participants were 18 healthy speakers of American English. NNA was measured using a custom sensor, and nasalance was measured using…

  9. Similarity and Enhancement: Nasality from Moroccan Arabic Pharyngeals and Nasals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zellou, Georgia Eve

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies of the articulation, acoustics, and perception of nasal and pharyngeal consonants and adjacent vowels were conducted to investigate nasality in Moroccan Arabic (MA). The status of nasality in MA is described as coarticulatorily complex, where two phoneme types (pharyngeal segments and nasal segments) yield similar…

  10. Comparison of Nasal Acceleration and Nasalance across Vowels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorp, Elias B.; Virnik, Boris T.; Stepp, Cara E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the performance of normalized nasal acceleration (NNA) relative to nasalance as estimates of nasalized versus nonnasalized vowel and sentence productions. Method: Participants were 18 healthy speakers of American English. NNA was measured using a custom sensor, and nasalance was measured using…

  11. Miniscrew-assisted rapid palatal expansion for managing arch perimeter in an adult patient

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha, Amanda Carneiro; Lee, Hisun; Nojima, Lincoln Issamu; Nojima, Matilde da Cunha Gonçalves; Lee, Kee-Joon

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Etiology of dental crowding may be related to arch constriction in diverse dimensions, and an appropriate manipulation of arch perimeter by intervening in basal bone discrepancies cases, may be a key for crowding relief, especially when incisors movement is limited due to underlying pathology, periodontal issues or restrictions related to soft tissue profile. Objectives: This case report illustrates a 24-year old woman, with maxillary transverse deficiency, upper and lower arches crowding, Class II, division 1, subdivision right relationship, previous upper incisors traumatic episode and straight profile. A non-surgical and non-extraction treatment approach was feasible due to the miniscrew-assisted rapid palatal expansion technique (MARPE). Methods: The MARPE appliance consisted of a conventional Hyrax expander supported by four orthodontic miniscrews. A slow expansion protocol was adopted, with an overall of 40 days of activation and a 3-month retention period. Intrusive traction miniscrew-anchored mechanics were used for correcting the Class II subdivision relationship, managing lower arch perimeter and midline deviation before including the upper central incisors. Results: Post-treatment records show an intermolar width increase of 5 mm, bilateral Class I molar and canine relationships, upper and lower crowding resolution, coincident dental midlines and proper intercuspation. Conclusions: The MARPE is an effective treatment approach for managing arch-perimeter deficiencies related to maxillary transverse discrepancies in adult patients. PMID:28746493

  12. Nasal septal trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Olsen, K D; Carpenter, R J; Kern, E B

    1979-07-01

    If the septal component of a nasal injury is adequately managed, usually the entire nasal injury will be well managed. Major or minor nasal trauma can cause cartilage fracture, deviation, dislocation, hematoma, or abscess formation, and the various associated sequelae, some of them life-threatening. A negative x-ray report should never be used as a substitute for a complete intranasal examination in any child with nasal trauma. Any nasal abnormality should be referred for immediate evaluation and treatment.

  13. The ARCHES Integrated Cluster Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mints, A.; Schwope, A.

    2014-07-01

    We are developing a tool to search for galaxy clusters associated with X-ray sources from the 3XMM catalog within the ARCHES project (Astronomical Resource cross-matching for High-Energy Studies). We make use of the new cross-matching tool developed for ARCHES to select galaxies in different catalogs around X-ray positions and then try to find clusters by searching for overdensities in the multi-color space. Colors are related to redshifts using spectroscopic data for passively evolving galaxies from the BOSS and VIPERS catalogs. So far we are making use of SDSS, UKIDSS, WISE, and CFHTLS photometric catalogs, but the method can easily be expanded to other data as well (e.g. Pan-STARRS and DES). We present test results of our tool performed on reference samples from the XMM/SDSS cluster survey (Takey et al 2012) and the NORAS/REFLEX surveys.

  14. Nasal corticosteroid sprays

    MedlinePlus

    ... best for decreasing symptoms during that season. Several brands of nasal corticosteroid sprays are available. They all ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  15. Budesonide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... by an allergy to pollen, mold, dust, or pets). Budesonide nasal spray should not be used to ... disposed of in special ways to ensure that pets, children, and other people cannot consume them. However, ...

  16. Cyanocobalamin Nasal Gel

    MedlinePlus

    ... B12 can cause anemia (condition in which the red blood cells do not bring enough oxygen to the organs) ... be treated with vitamin B12 injections. After the red blood cells have returned to normal, cyanocobalamin nasal gel can ...

  17. Nasal fracture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A nasal fracture is a break in the bone over the ridge of the nose. It usually results from a blunt ... and is one of the most common facial fracture. Symptoms of a broken nose include pain, blood ...

  18. Chapter 6: Nasal polyps.

    PubMed

    Settipane, Russell A; Peters, Anju T; Chiu, Alexander G

    2013-01-01

    Nasal polyps occur in 1-4% of the population, usually occurring in the setting of an underlying local or systemic disease. The most common associated condition is chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). A high prevalence of nasal polyps is also seen in allergic fungal rhinosinusitis, aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, Churg-Strauss syndrome, and cystic fibrosis. In the setting of CRS, nasal polyps are not likely to be cured by either medical or surgical therapy; however, control is generally attainable. The best medical evidence supports the use of intranasal corticosteroids for maintenance therapy and short courses of oral corticosteroids for exacerbations. The evidence for short- and long-term antibiotics is much less robust. For patients with symptomatic nasal polyposis nonresponsive to medical therapies, functional endoscopic sinus surgery provides an adjunctive therapeutic option.

  19. Nasal packing and stenting

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Rainer K.

    2011-01-01

    Nasal packs are indispensable in ENT practice. This study reviews current indications, effectiveness and risks of nasal packs and stents. In endoscopic surgery, nasal packs should always have smooth surfaces to minimize mucosal damage, improve wound healing and increase patient comfort. Functional endoscopic endonasal sinus surgery allows the use of modern nasal packs, since pressure is no longer required. So called hemostatic/resorbable materials are a first step in this direction. However, they may lead to adhesions and foreign body reactions in mucosal membranes. Simple occlusion is an effective method for creating a moist milieu for improved wound healing and avoiding dryness. Stenting of the frontal sinus is recommended if surgery fails to produce a wide, physiologically shaped drainage path that is sufficiently covered by intact tissue. PMID:22073095

  20. Saline nasal washes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Be sure you only use distilled, boiled, or filtered water. While rare, some tap water may contain small ... pot or nasal bulb with distilled, boiled, or filtered water after every use and let it dry. Use ...

  1. Complete arch implant impression technique.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junping; Rubenstein, Jeffrey E

    2012-06-01

    When making a definitive impression for an arch containing multiple implants, there are many reported techniques for splinting impression copings. This article introduces a splint technique that uses the shim method, which has been demonstrated to reduce laboratory and patient chair time, the number of impression copings and laboratory analogs needed, and the ultimate cost. Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pathophysiology of nasal congestion

    PubMed Central

    Naclerio, Robert M; Bachert, Claus; Baraniuk, James N

    2010-01-01

    Nasal congestion is a common symptom in rhinitis (both allergic and nonallergic), rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis. Congestion can also be caused by physical obstruction of nasal passages and/or modulation of sensory perception. Mucosal inflammation underlies many of the specific and interrelated factors that contribute to nasal congestion, as well as other symptoms of both allergic rhinitis and rhinosinusitis. A wide range of biologically active agents (eg, histamine, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukins, cell adhesion molecules) and cell types contribute to inflammation, which can manifest as venous engorgement, increased nasal secretions and tissue swelling/edema, ultimately leading to impaired airflow and the sensation of nasal congestion. Inflammation-induced changes in the properties of sensory afferents (eg, expression of peptides and receptors) that innervate the nose can also contribute to altered sensory perception, which may result in a subjective feeling of congestion. Increased understanding of the mechanisms underlying inflammation can facilitate improved treatment selection and the development of new therapies for congestion. PMID:20463823

  3. Titanium Mesh Nasal Repair without Nasal Lining.

    PubMed

    Zenga, Joseph; Kao, Katherine; Chen, Collin; Gross, Jennifer; Hahn, Samuel; Chi, John J; Branham, Gregory H

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to describe outcomes for patients who underwent titanium mesh reconstruction of full-thickness nasal defects without internal lining repair. This is a retrospective cohort study. Patients with through-and-through nasal defects were identified at a single academic institution between 2008 and 2016. Nasal reconstruction was performed with either titanium mesh and external skin reconstruction without repair of the intranasal lining or traditional three-layer closure. Five patients underwent titanium mesh reconstruction and 11 underwent traditional three-layer repair. Median follow-up was 11 months (range, 2-66 months). The only significant difference between groups was older age in patients undergoing titanium reconstruction (mean, 81 vs. 63 years; difference of 18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4-32 years). Defect extent including overall size and structures removed was similar between groups (p > 0.05). Paramedian forehead flap was the most common external reconstruction in both groups (100% for titanium mesh and 73% for three-layer closure). Time under anesthesia was significantly shorter for titanium mesh reconstruction (median, 119 vs. 314 minutes; difference of 195; 95% CI, 45-237). Estimated blood loss and length of hospital stay were similar between groups (p > 0.05). Complication rates were substantial although not significantly different, 40 and 36% in titanium and three-layer reconstruction, respectively (p > 0.05). All patients with complications after titanium reconstruction had prior or postoperative radiotherapy. Titanium mesh reconstruction of through-and-through nasal defects can successfully be performed without reconstruction of the intranasal lining, significantly decreasing operative times. This reconstructive technique may not be suitable for patients who undergo radiotherapy.

  4. Correlation between dental arch width and sagittal dento-skeletal morphology in untreated adults.

    PubMed

    Shahroudi, Atefe Saffar; Etezadi, Tahura

    2013-11-01

    Dental arch form is one of the most important characteristics of dentition. However, this dimension usually receives less attention in diagnosis or treatment planning and orthodontic patients are traditionally classified with regard to their sagittal characteristics. The objectives of this study were to investigate if a relationship exists between the dental arch width (transverse dimension) and sagittal skeletal and dental parameters in orthodontic patients. Dental casts and lateral cephalograms of 108 consecutive untreated Iranian patients (47 males and 61 females) between 16 and 31 years of age were evaluated. Arch width (AW) parameters including upper and lower inter-molar width (UIMW and LIMW) and upper and lower inter-canine width (UICW and LICW) were measured by a digital caliper. Sagittal parameters included SNA and SNB angle and Wits' appraisal obtained from lateral cephalograms in addition to upper and lower arch length (UAL and LAL) obtained from dental casts. The correlation between the aforementioned parameters was evaluated applying Pearson correlation coefficients. Molar and canine relationship according to Angle's classification was also recorded and the means of all parameters were compared between three occlusal relationship classes and two gender groups by means of two-way ANOVA. According to statistical analysis a significant positive correlation between sagittal parameters and arch width measures exists between SNA and UICW and between LICW and LAL. Upper and lower ICW were significantly correlated, the relationship between upper and lower IMW and between UAL and LAL were significant. Among sagittal measures, both UAL and LAL were correlated with the ANB angle. The means of arch width parameters in three occlusal classes were not significantly different. The only significant correlation between arch width and sagittal parameters existed between UICW and SNA angle and between LICW and LAL. No significant difference of the arch width parameter

  5. Chondrosarcoma of the nasal septum

    PubMed Central

    Bahgat, Mohammed; Bahgat, Yassin; Bahgat, Ahmed; Elwany, Yasmine

    2012-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma of the nasal septum is a rare malignancy. When it occurs, early diagnosis is difficult because patients generally present with common, non-specific sinonasal complaints. This is the report of a 62-year-old woman who presented with a 1-month history of nasal obstruction, headache and anosmia. Nasal endoscopy showed a nasal mass obstructing both nasal cavities not separable from the septum. A wedge biopsy of the nasal mass was taken. Histopathology was suggestive of chondrosarcoma. The tumour was removed by an endoscopic approach. The clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of this case as well as a review of the literature are discussed. PMID:22669930

  6. The Biomechanics of Zygomatic Arch Shape.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amanda L; Grosse, Ian R

    2016-12-01

    Mammalian zygomatic arch shape is remarkably variable, ranging from nearly cylindrical to blade-like in cross section. Based on geometry, the arch can be hypothesized to be a sub-structural beam whose ability to resist deformation is related to cross sectional shape. We expect zygomatic arches with different cross sectional shapes to vary in the degree to which they resist local bending and torsion due to the contraction of the masseter muscle. A stiffer arch may lead to an increase in the relative proportion of applied muscle load being transmitted through the arch to other cranial regions, resulting in elevated cranial stress (and thus, strain). Here, we examine the mechanics of the zygomatic arch using a series of finite element modeling experiments in which the cross section of the arch of Pan troglodytes has been modified to conform to idealized shapes (cylindrical, elliptical, blade-like). We find that the shape of the zygomatic arch has local effects on stain that do not conform to beam theory. One exception is that possessing a blade-like arch leads to elevated strains at the postorbital zygomatic junction and just below the orbits. Furthermore, although modeling the arch as solid cortical bone did not have the effect of elevating strains in other parts of the face, as had been expected, it does have a small effect on stress associated with masseter contraction. These results are counterintuitive. Even though the arch has simple beam-like geometry, we fail to find a simple mechanical explanation for the diversity of arch shape. Anat Rec, 299:1734-1752, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Revisiting impressions using dual-arch trays.

    PubMed

    Small, Bruce W

    2012-01-01

    Making routine perfect impressions is the goal of any restorative dentist. Using dual-arch trays is an easy, repeatable way to accomplish that goal, as long as each step is done before the next and each step is performed perfectly. This column reviewed several articles that support the metal dual-arch concept and provided some clinical tips that might help restorative dentists. The dual-arch technique does have its limits and is meant for one or two teeth in a quadrant when there are other teeth to occlude with. Also, if the case involves anterior guidance, a full-arch impression maybe advisable.

  8. Sectional anatomic and computed tomography features of the nasal and oral cavities of the one-humped camel (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Blanco, D; Rivero, M A; Vázquez, J M; Arencibia, A

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to provide a description of normal cross-sectional anatomy of the camel nasal and oral cavities using computed tomography (CT) and macroscopic cross-sections. Transverse images of two isolated camel cadaver heads were obtained by an axial CT equipment. Computed tomography scans were processed with a detailed algorithm using nasal and soft tissue windows settings and compared with the corresponding frozen cross-sections of the heads, to assist in the accurate identification of nasal and oral structures. In our study, nasal window provided excellent anatomic details of nasal conchae, bones and teeth; however, other soft tissue components of the nasal and oral cavities are better differentiated using a soft tissue window. These CT images are intended to be a useful anatomic reference in the interpretation for clinical CT imaging studies of the nasal and oral cavities in dromedary camels. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Infarcted angiomatous nasal polyps.

    PubMed

    Sheahan, Patrick; Crotty, Paul L; Hamilton, Sam; Colreavy, Michael; McShane, Donald

    2005-03-01

    Angiomatous nasal polyps are a rarely reported subtype of inflammatory sinonasal polyps that are characterized by extensive vascular proliferation and ectasia. Compromise of their vascular supply may occasionally lead to infarction, resulting in clinical, radiological and pathological features that simulate a neoplastic process. In the present paper, the salient characteristics of this unusual entity are described. The clinical, radiological and pathological features of two patients with infarcted angiomatous nasal polyps are presented. Grossly, the polyps had an unusual inhomogenous appearance and texture and were associated with a foul odor. CT findings included bony expansion and destruction. MRI findings included markedly inhomogenous contrast enhancement on T1-weighted images. Histopathologically, both cases showed abundant vascular ectasia, with widespread intraluminal thrombosis and necrosis. Recanalization and reparative changes were also present. Angiomatous nasal polyps are poorly documented in the literature. Although entirely benign, they may simulate neoplastic processes, thus awareness of their existence is of considerable importance.

  10. Nasal spray flu vaccine (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The flu vaccine can also be administered as a nasal spray instead of the usual injection method. It can be ... the recombinant influenza vaccine (RIV). The nasal spray flu vaccine (live attenuated influenza vaccine or LAIV) should not ...

  11. Nasalance in Cochlear Implantees

    PubMed Central

    Sreedevi, N; Lepcha, Anjali; Mathew, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Speech intelligibility is severely affected in children with congenital profound hearing loss. Hypernasality is a problem commonly encountered in their speech. Auditory information received from cochlear implants is expected to be far superior to that from hearing aids. Our study aimed at comparing the percentages of nasality in the speech of the cochlear implantees with hearing aid users and also with children with normal hearing. Methods Three groups of subjects took part in the study. Groups I and II comprised 12 children each, in the age range of 4-10 years, with prelingual bilateral profound hearing loss, using multichannel cochlear implants and digital hearing aids respectively. Both groups had received at least one year of speech therapy intervention since cochlear implant surgery and hearing aid fitting respectively. The third group consisted of age-matched and sex-matched children with normal hearing. The subjects were asked to say a sentence which consisted of only oral sounds and no nasal sounds ("Buy baby a bib"). The nasalance score as a percentage was calculated. Results Statistical analysis revealed that the children using hearing aids showed a high percentage of nasalance in their speech. The cochlear implantees showed a lower percentage of nasalance compared to children using hearing aids, but did not match with their normal hearing peers. Conclusion The quality of speech of the cochlear implantees was superior to that of the hearing aid users, but did not match with the normal controls. The study suggests that acoustic variables still exist after cochlear implantation in children, with hearing impairments at deviant levels, which needs attention. Further research needs to be carried out to explore the effect of the age at implantation as a variable in reducing nasality in the speech and attaining normative values in cochlear implantees, and also between unilateral versus bilateral implantees. PMID:26330912

  12. Dental arch dimensional changes after adenoidectomy or tonsillectomy in children with airway obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanfei; Li, Jiaying; Tang, Yanmei; Wang, Xiaoling; Xue, Xiaochen; Sun, Huijun; Nie, Ping; Qu, Xinhua; Zhu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Children with severe airway obstruction tend to have a vertical direction of growth, class II malocclusion, and narrow arches. Adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy were recommended for the promotion of balanced dentition growth in these children. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy on the growth of dental morphology in children with airway obstruction. Methods: A comprehensive search of the Medline, Embase, Web of science, and OVID databases for studies published through to January 17, 2016 was conducted. Prospective, comparative, clinical studies assessing the efficacy of adenoidectomy, or tonsillectomy in children with airway obstruction were included. The weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used for continuous variables. Forest plots were drawn to demonstrate effects in the meta-analyses. Results: Eight papers were included in our study. We found that adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy led to a significant change in nasal-breathing in children with airway obstruction. Children with airway obstruction had a significantly narrower posterior maxillary dental arch than children without airway obstruction (WMD = −0.94, 95% CI [−1.13, −0.76]; P < 0.001). After surgery, these children still had a significantly narrower dental arch than the nasal-breathing children (WMD = −0.60, 95% CI [−0.79, −0.42]; P < 0.001). In terms of dental arch width, malocclusion, palatal height, overjet, overbite, dental arch perimeter, and arch length, a tendency toward normalization was evident following adenoidectomy or tonsillectomy, with no significant differences evident between the surgical group and the normal group. The small number of studies and lack of randomized controlled trials were the main limitations of this meta-analysis. Conclusions: Following adenoidectomy and tonsillectomy, the malocclusion and narrow arch width of children with airway obstruction could not

  13. Nasal reconstruction after epithelioma.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Camps, S

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we present our procedure for the treatment, histopathological diagnosis, and resection of skin cancer in the nasal pyramid and its subsequent reconstruction. Because we are dealing with the most important anatomical feature of the face our goal is an aesthetic reconstruction [2,4] according to the anatomical subunits criterion of Burget [3]. First, a histopathological diagnosis is made to determine the nature of the tumor. Then, we proceed with the resection according to the Mohs Micrographic Surgery [1,5,7]. Then we begin with the first step of the nasal reconstruction.

  14. Large rhinolith causing nasal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dincer Kose, Onur; Kose, Taha Emre; Erdem, Mehmet Ali; Cankaya, Abdulkadir Burak

    2015-01-01

    Rhinoliths are calcified masses located in the nasal cavity and may cause symptoms such as nasal obstruction, fetid odour and facial pain. They are usually diagnosed incidentally on radiographic examinations or depending on the symptoms. In this paper we report a 27-year-old Caucasian woman with a calcified mass in the right nasal cavity causing nasal obstruction, anosmia and facial pain. The calcified mass was removed by endonasal approach. PMID:25759270

  15. Nasalance Norms in Greek Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okalidou, Areti; Karathanasi, Asimina; Grigoraki, Eleni

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to derive nasalance norms for monolingual Greek speakers, to examine nasalance scores as a function of gender and to draw cross-linguistic comparisons based on normative data. Participants read aloud a corpus of linguistic material, consisting of (1) a nasal text, an oral text and a balanced text; (2) a set of nasal…

  16. Nasalance Norms in Greek Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okalidou, Areti; Karathanasi, Asimina; Grigoraki, Eleni

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to derive nasalance norms for monolingual Greek speakers, to examine nasalance scores as a function of gender and to draw cross-linguistic comparisons based on normative data. Participants read aloud a corpus of linguistic material, consisting of (1) a nasal text, an oral text and a balanced text; (2) a set of nasal…

  17. Lysosomal exoglycosidases in nasal polyps.

    PubMed

    Chojnowska, Sylwia; Minarowska, Alina; Knaś, Małgorzata; Niemcunowicz-Janica, Anna; Kołodziejczyk, Paweł; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Kępka, Alina; Minarowski, Łukasz; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    Nasal polyps are smooth outgrowths assuming a shape of grapes, formed from the nasal mucosa, limiting air flow by projecting into a lumen of a nasal cavity. Up to now the surgical resection is the best method of their treatment, but etiology and pathogenesis of the nasal polyps is not yet fully established. The aim of the study was the assessment of the selected lysosomal exoglycosidases activity in the nasal polyps. In this study the activity of β-galactosidase, α-mannosidase and α-fucosidase was determined in the tissue of the nasal polyps obtained from 40 patients (10F, 30M) and control tissues derived from mucosa of lower nasal conchas obtained during mucotomy from 20 patients (10F, 10M). We observed significant lower values of GAL, FUC and tendency to decrease of MAN and GLU concentration in nasal polyps (P) in comparison to control healthy nasal mucosa (C). In nasal polyp tissue (P) no differences of GAL, MAN and FUC specific activity in comparison to control mucosa (C) were found. Our research supports bioelectrical theory of the nasal polyps pathogenesis and directs attention at research on glycoconjugates and glycosidases of the nasal mucosa extracellular matrix. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  18. Cosmetic and Functional Nasal Deformities

    MedlinePlus

    ... nasal complaints. Nasal deformity can be categorized as “cosmetic” or “functional.” Cosmetic deformity of the nose results in a less ... taste , nose bleeds and/or recurrent sinusitis . A cosmetic or functional nasal deformity may occur secondary to ...

  19. Nasal obstruction and human communication.

    PubMed

    Malinoff, R; Moreno, C

    1989-04-01

    Nasal obstruction may cause a variety of communication disorders, particularly in children. The effects of nasal obstruction on hearing, speech, language, and voice are examined. Methods for assessing the effects of nasal obstruction are delineated, and recommendations for therapeutic interventions are described.

  20. Arch mineral pursues multiple dipping seams

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouls, M.W.

    1981-07-01

    Arch Mineral's three Hanna Basin mines in Carbon County, WY, recover about eight million tpy from more than a dozen coal seams. Arch's experience has proven stripping techniques for dipping seams, and has revealed better methods for recontouring and revegetating mined land.

  1. Techniques for aortic arch endovascular repair.

    PubMed

    Hongku, Kiattisak; Dias, Nuno; Sonesson, Bjorn; Resch, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews endovascular strategies for aortic arch repair. Open repair remains the gold standard particularly for good risk patients. Endovascular treatment potentially offers a less invasive repair. Principles, technical considerations, devices and outcomes of each technique are discussed and summarized. Hybrid repair combines less invasive revascularization options, instead of arch replacement while extending stent-graft into the arch. Outcomes vary with regard to extent of repair and aortic arch pathologies treated. Results of arch chimney and other parallel graft techniques perhaps make it a less preferable choice for elective cases. However, they are very appealing options for urgent or bailout situations. Fenestrated stent-grafting is subjected to many technical challenges in aortic arch due to difficulties in stent-graft orientation and fenestration positioning. In situ fenestration techniques emerge to avoid these problems, but durability of stent-grafts after fenestration and ischemic consequences of temporary carotid arteries coverage raises some concern total arch repair using this technique. Arch branched graft is a new technology. Early outcomes did not meet the expectation; however the results have been improving after its learning curve period. Refining stent-graft technologies and implantation techniques positively impact outcomes of endovascular approaches.

  2. Comparison of nasal acceleration and nasalance across vowels.

    PubMed

    Thorp, Elias B; Virnik, Boris T; Stepp, Cara E

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the performance of normalized nasal acceleration (NNA) relative to nasalance as estimates of nasalized versus nonnasalized vowel and sentence productions. Participants were 18 healthy speakers of American English. NNA was measured using a custom sensor, and nasalance was measured using the KayPentax Nasometer II. Speech stimuli consisted of CVC syllables with the vowels (//, /æ/, /i/, /u/) and sentences loaded with high front, high back, low front, and low back vowels in both nasal and nonnasal contexts. NNA showed a small but significant effect of the vowel produced during syllable stimuli but no significant effect of vowel loading during sentence stimuli. Nasalance was significantly affected by the vowel being produced during both syllables and sentences with large effect sizes. Both NNA and nasalance were highly sensitive and specific to nasalization. NNA was less affected by vowel than nasalance. Discrimination of nasal versus nonnasal stimuli using NNA and nasalance was comparable, suggesting potential for use of NNA for biofeedback applications. Future work to improve calibration of NNA is needed to lower intersubject variability.

  3. Maxillary and mandibular anterior crown width/height ratio and its relation to various arch perimeters, arch length, and arch width groups

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Fazal; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Khamis, Mohd Fadhli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the maxillary and mandibular anterior crown width/height ratio and its relation to various arch perimeters, arch length, and arch width (intercanine, interpremolar, and intermolar) groups. Materials and Methods: The calculated sample size was 128 subjects. The crown width/height, arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width of the maxilla and mandible were obtained via digital calliper (Mitutoyo, Japan). A total of 4325 variables were measured. The sex differences in the crown width and height were evaluated. Analysis of variance was applied to evaluate the differences between arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width groups. Results: Males had significantly larger mean values for crown width and height than females (P ≤ 0.05) for maxillary and mandibular arches, both. There were no significant differences observed for the crown width/height ratio in various arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width (intercanine, interpremolar, and intermolar) groups (P ≤ 0.05) in maxilla and mandible, both. Conclusions: Our results indicate sexual disparities in the crown width and height. Crown width and height has no significant relation to various arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width groups of maxilla and mandible. Thus, it may be helpful for orthodontic and prosthodontic case investigations and comprehensive management. PMID:26929686

  4. Transcontinental arch - a pattern formed by rejuvenation of local features across central North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, M.P.

    1999-01-01

    The transcontinental Arch has been described by many authors as a feature having significant tectonic influence during the Phanerozoic, although the location, magnitude, and even the timing defining the arch vary greatly among authors. The general trend usually suggested for the Transcontinental Arch is northeast-southwest across the western midcontinent of North America. A series of isopachous and paleogeologic maps was compiled for this study that defines a number of smaller tectonic features - commonly trending northwest-southeast. Six persistent highs and six persistent lows (or sags) are defined that are largely basement controlled and were rejuvenated at various times during the Phanerozoic. These smaller northwest-trending features, when taken collectively and enhanced by the relative downwarping of the adjacent Williston and Anadarko basins, create a platform-like feature - the Transcontinental Arch of the literature. The concept of a Transcontinental Arch is an important reference trend in the geologic history of North America. In both regional and local studies, however, the smaller-scale, transverse features may have had significant control on both tectonic patterns and depositional influence.

  5. Routine nasal packing follwoing nasal surgery-Is it necessary?

    PubMed

    Basha, S I; Gupta, D; Kaluskar, S K

    2005-01-01

    The practice of routine nasal packing after nasal surgery is usually customary and not evidence based. Post operative complications, while uncoumon, are sometimes pack related. A retrospective analysis of 110 patients who underwent a variety of nasal operations was performed to determine the incidence of complications when nasal packs were not routinely inserted 9 cases (8.2%) [6 out of these were revision surgeries] needed nasal packing for haemostasis at the end of surgery. 4 cases (3.6%) required to be packed in the immediate post operative period. One patient who required nasal packing developed a unilateral adhesion. No patient developed septal hematoma. The need for routine nasal packing is not supported. Packing should be indicated where there continuous bleeding at.

  6. Determinant factors of Yemeni maxillary arch dimensions.

    PubMed

    Al-Zubair, Nabil Muhsen

    2015-01-01

    Information about maxillary arch and palatal dimensions in human populations is important for clinical orthodontics. This study was conducted to assess the determinants of maxillary arch dimensions in a sample of Yemeni individuals aged 18-25 years. The study sample comprised 214/765 adults (101 women, 113 men) who underwent clinical examination and fulfilled the study criteria. Study models were constructed and evaluated to measure maxillary arch and palatal dimensions. The majority of mean maxillary arch dimensions were significantly greater in men than in women, with inter-second molar distance showing the greatest difference and palatal depth showing the least difference. Measurements of palatal depth and relationships of the canines to one another and to other teeth thus had the widest ranges, implying that these dimensions are the strongest determinants of maxillary arch size.

  7. Azelastine Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... and replace with the pump unit. Prime the delivery system (pump unit) with four sprays or until a fine mist appears. If 3 days or more have elapsed since your last use of the nasal spray, reprime the pump with two sprays or until a fine mist appears.

  8. Management of nasal hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Hochman, Marcelo; Mascareno, Alfredo

    2005-01-01

    Infantile hemangiomas commonly involve the nose. Because of the nose's prominence as an aesthetically and functionally sensitive area, management of these lesions has important implications. The available options including medical therapy, lasers, and surgery are reviewed with recommendations specific to nasal tip and lobule lesions based on the senior author's (M.H.) experience.

  9. Oxymetazoline Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rinse the tip of the dispenser with hot water or wipe it clean after you use it.Follow the directions for using the nasal spray that appear on the package label. If you are using a product that comes in a pump dispenser, press down on the rim several times ...

  10. Cromolyn Sodium Nasal Solution

    MedlinePlus

    Cromolyn comes as a solution to use with a special nasal applicator. It usually is inhaled three to six times a day to prevent allergy ... first time, read the instructions provided with the solution. Ask your doctor, pharmacist, or respiratory therapist to ...

  11. Fetal Aortic Arch Anomalies: Key Sonographic Views for Their Differential Diagnosis and Clinical Implications Using the Cardiovascular System Sonographic Evaluation Protocol.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Coral; Gámez, Francisco; Pérez, Ricardo; Álvarez, Teresa; De León-Luis, Juan

    2016-02-01

    Aortic arch anomalies are present in 1% to 2% of the general population and are commonly associated with congenital heart disease, chromosomal defects, and tracheaesophageal compression in postnatal life. The sonographically based detection of aortic arch anomalies lies in the 3-vessel and trachea view. Although highly sensitive, this view alone does not allow identification of the aortic arch branching pattern, which prevents an accurate diagnosis. The systematic addition of a subclavian artery view as part of a standardized procedure may be useful in the differential diagnosis of these conditions. We describe the sonographic assessment of fetal aortic arch anomalies by combining 2 fetal transverse views: the 3-vessel and trachea view and the subclavian artery view, which are included in the cardiovascular system sonographic evaluation protocol. We also review the sonographic findings and the clinical implications of fetal aortic arch anomalies. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  12. Nasalance norms in Greek adults.

    PubMed

    Okalidou, Areti; Karathanasi, Asimina; Grigoraki, Eleni

    2011-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to derive nasalance norms for monolingual Greek speakers, to examine nasalance scores as a function of gender and to draw cross-linguistic comparisons based on normative data. Participants read aloud a corpus of linguistic material, consisting of (1) a nasal text, an oral text and a balanced text; (2) a set of nasal sentences and four sets of oral sentences and (3) repetitions of each of 12 syllable types (8 oral and 4 nasal). The last two sets of material corpus were based on an adaptation of the Simplified Nasometric Assessment Procedures Test (SNAP test) test ( MacKay and Kummer, 1994 ) in Greek, called the G-SNAP test. Eighty monolingual healthy young adult speakers of Greek, 40 males (mean age = 21 years) and 40 females (mean age = 20.5 years), with normal hearing and speech characteristics and unremarkable history were included in the study. The Nasometer (model 6200-3) was used to derive nasalance scores. Mean normative nasalance for spoken Greek was 25.50%, based on the G-oronasal text (with 8.6% nasals). Nasalance scores did not differ significantly with respect to gender. Finally, spoken Greek consistently yielded lower nasalance scores than other languages examined in past work. The aforementioned normative data on nasalance of young adult speakers of Greek are valid across gender and have direct clinical utility as they provide valuable reference information for the diagnosis and management of Greek adults with resonance disorders caused by velar dysfunction.

  13. Does rhinoplasty improve nasal breathing?

    PubMed

    Xavier, Rui

    2010-08-01

    Rhinoplasty is a surgical procedure that aims to improve nasal aesthetics and nasal breathing. The aesthetic improvement of the nose is usually judged subjectively by the patient and the surgeon, but the degree of improvement of nasal obstruction is difficult to assess by clinical examination only. The measurement of peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF) is a reliable tool that has been shown to correlate with other objective methods of assessing nasal breathing and with patients' symptoms of nasal obstruction. Twenty-three consecutive patients undergoing rhinoplasty have been evaluated by measurement of PNIF before and after surgery. All but three patients had an increase in PNIF after surgery. The mean preoperative PNIF was 86.5 L/min and the mean postoperative PNIF was 123.0 L/min ( P < 0.001). Not surprisingly, the greatest improvement in PNIF was achieved when bilateral spreader grafts were used. This study suggests that rhinoplasty does improve nasal breathing. (c) Thieme Medical Publishers

  14. Transverse Myelitis Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Flaccid Myelitis) REGISTER TODAY! The Transverse Myelitis Association Registry The NIH/NCATS GRDR® Program Global Rare ... be followed via electronic surveys THE TRANSVERSE MYELITIS ASSOCIATION ADVOCATING FOR THOSE WITH ACUTE DISSEMINATED ENCEPHALOMYELITIS, NEUROMYELITIS ...

  15. Influence of the mode of nutritive and non-nutritive sucking on the dimensions of primary dental arches.

    PubMed

    Diouf, Joseph Samba; Ngom, Papa Ibrahima; Badiane, Alpha; Cisse, Binta; Ndoye, Cheikh; Diop-Ba, Khady; Diagne, Falou

    2010-12-01

    Sucking is innate in both infants and young children. It is termed nutritive when referring to suckling from the breast or bottle-feeding and non-nutritive when applied to sucking of a digit or pacifier. Few studies have attempted to assess the impact of the type of sucking on the size of the dental arches. The aim of this study was to quantify the influence of the mode of nutritive suckling and non-nutritive sucking habits (NNSH) on the measurements of the dental arches. This was a transverse descriptive study involving 226 Senegalese children. The mode of feeding and the presence or not of a NNSH (digit or pacifier) were gathered from parents of all children using a structured questionnaire. Quantitative variables regarding intra- and inter-arch relationships were recorded using plaster moulds taken from the children. Statistical analyses were used to compare the different variables according to gender, the mode of feeding and the presence or not of a NNSH. The subjects in the study (123 boys and 103 girls) were aged between 5 and 6years old. The children who had enjoyed mixed feeding (breast/bottle combination) had a great length of the anterior maxillary arch and a significantly greater depth of the palatal arch than children receiving breast-feeding alone. The children with antecedents or a current NNSH had a longer anterior maxillary arch than subjects with no NNSH (P=0.01). Regarding inter-arch relationships, the children with antecedents or a current digit-sucking habit had less overbite than their peers who had no NNSH (P=0.04). The results of this study show that bottle-feeding, even partial, as well as NNSH are associated with changes in certain dimensions of the maxillary dental arch and in inter-arch relationships. Longitudinal studies are required to investigate further the nature of this association. Copyright © 2010 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of dental and apical base arch forms in Class II Division 1 and Class I malocclusions.

    PubMed

    Ball, Randy L; Miner, R Matthew; Will, Leslie A; Arai, Kazuhito

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the mandibular dental arch form and the mandibular basal bone arch form of patients with Class I malocclusion with those of patients with Class II Division 1 malocclusion. Our aims were to determine differences in dental and basal transverse dimensions and arch forms between the 2 groups, and to determine the usefulness of WALA points as a reference for predicting a stable dental arch form in Class II Division 1 patients. Three-dimensional graphic representations of mandibular casts from 35 Class I malocclusion patients and 32 Class II Division 1 patients were created by using a laser scanning system. Anatomic reference points were subjectively identified and used to represent the dental arch form (FA points) and the arch form of the basal bone (WALA points). The FA point intercanine width was found to be significantly larger in the Class II Division 1 sample compared with the Class I sample, whereas the basal arch form, represented by the WALA ridge, was not significantly different. No significant difference was found in the FA points for intermolar width or in the arch form of the basal bone between the 2 groups. A highly significant correlation between basal and dental arch forms was found at the canine and molar areas in the Class II Division 1 sample, and the FA and WALA point arch forms were highly individual in the Class II Division 1 sample. The mandibular dental arch forms for both the Class I and Class II samples were essentially the same, except at the canines; this is likely due to the nature of the occlusion in Class II Division 1 patients. There was no difference in arch forms of the basal bone between the 2 groups. The use of WALA points or other anatomic landmarks of the basal bone to predict the ideal dental arch form for a patient seems possible and could ensure a more stable orthodontic treatment outcome. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fetal sonographic diagnosis of aortic arch anomalies.

    PubMed

    Yoo, S-J; Min, J-Y; Lee, Y-H; Roman, K; Jaeggi, E; Smallhorn, J

    2003-11-01

    Aortic arch anomalies refer to congenital abnormalities of the position or branching pattern, or both of the aortic arch. Although aortic arch anomalies are not uncommon, reports on their prenatal diagnosis are scarce. Insight into the hypothetical arch model is crucial to understanding anomalies of the aortic arch in the fetus. Recognition of the trachea, three major vessels, ductus arteriosus and descending aorta in the axial views of the upper mediastinum is necessary for a complete fetal cardiac assessment. Clues to aortic arch anomalies include abnormal position of the descending aorta, absence of the normal 'V'-shaped confluence of the ductal and aortic arches, a gap between the ascending aorta and main pulmonary artery in the three-vessel view, and an abnormal vessel behind the trachea with or without a vascular loop or ring around the trachea. Meticulous attention to anatomic landmarks will lead to successful prenatal diagnosis of important vascular rings making early postnatal management possible. Copyright 2003 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Smackover-Norphlet stratigraphy, South Wiggins Arch, Mississippi and Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Cagle, J.W.; Khan, M.A.

    1983-09-01

    Mesozoic rocks of the Gulf were deposited on a wide coastal plain which was punctuated transversely by major positive and negative warpings. Two of the positive elements (Sabine and Monroe uplifts) underlie giant hydrocarbon accumulations. The Wiggins arch is notable because, although the flanks are productive, the crestal area is barren. This condition has led to a paucity of well control, especially deep well control. Only three wells on the arch have penetrated the entire sedimentary sequence (20,000 ft, 6,100 m) and reached basement rock (2 granite, 1 metamorphic) dated at 300 +/- m.y. These three wells are reported to have a normal stratigraphic sequence except that the Jurassic Haynesville Formation lies on the basement, and the Buckner, Smackover, Norphlet, and Louann are missing. Careful analysis of these wells indicates the lower part of the reported Haynesville is time-correlative with the Smackover. Thus, the Smackover is not missing, but is represented by a Haynesville-like facies deposted on a block of granitic basement. This block must have been barely emergent and led to a complex set of cays during Smackover deposition. Careful analysis of seismic records indicates the proposed cays are surrounded by areas of very different reflective character. These reflections may indicate the presence of high-energy Smackover carbonate and Norphlet sand that is missing from the wells.

  19. [Differential proteins analysis among human nasal inverted papilloma and nasal polyposis and normal nasal mucosa].

    PubMed

    Meng, Qing-shu; Jin, Sheng; Zhang, Qiu-hang; Zhang, Man

    2010-04-01

    Proteomics-based approach was applied to analyze and compare the difference of proteins among human nasal inverted papilloma (NIP), nasal polyposis and normal nasal mucosa, in order to screen different proteins as marker. The total proteins of NIP, nasal polyposis and normal nasal mucosa were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Protein image obtained by using the gel of Calibrated GS-800 Densitometer system, and determined different protein spots. Six differential proteins between NIP and nasal polyp tissue were identified, which were galectin-1, Manganese-superoxide dismutase, galectin-7, trichostatin A, prohibitin and transferring. All of them were increased in NIP. Six differential proteins were possibly involved in NIP, which provided a new way for discriminating NIP from nasal polyposis. The data would be good for the establishment of NIP protein 2-DE map.

  20. [Isolated bacteria from nasal cultures. Are they important in patients with acute leukemia?].

    PubMed

    Barranco-Lampón, Gilberto; Mendoza-García, Carlos Alberto; Cabrera-Osuna, Silvia; Olarte-Carrillo, Irma; Ventura, Yanet; Gutiérrez-Romero, Mario; Martínez-Murillo, Carlos; Martínez-Tovar, Adolfos; Ramos-Peñafiel, Christian Omar

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: la colonización nasal por Staphylcoccus epidermidis y Staphylococcus aureus es frecuente y se ha relacionado con bacteremia en huéspedes inmunocomprometidos. En la investigación que se presenta, los objetivos fueron determinar la frecuencia de cepas que colonizan la mucosa nasal en pacientes en tratamiento de leucemia aguda y su relación con los cultivos de sangre periférica. MÉTODOS: estudio retrospectivo, observacional, transversal, retrolectivo de cultivos nasales obtenidos durante cuatro semanas. La relación con los hemocultivos se estableció mediante chi cuadrada; se calculó razón de momios.

  1. Brief research on arch hinge of the steel truss arch bridge by contact problem under local stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei; Zhu, Yinqiao; Chen, Renlong

    2017-06-01

    Because of its wide deck, elegant design and reasonable stress, the steel truss arch bridge is suitable for urban bridges. In the steel truss arch bridge, the main arch hinge is an important structure, the local structure and the stress is complex, and it is necessary to analyze the local stress state of the arch hinge. Arch hinge problem belongs to the contact problem, this paper based on Chengdu Tianfu District Shenyang Lu Xi Duan Jin Jiang in bearing steel truss arch bridge design, take the finite element software ANSYS on the main arch hinge is locally analyzed, the arch at the junction of reliable performance test. Studies have shown that half through steel truss arch bridge should be adopted by reasonable cylindrical arch hinge, and Hertz theory is in the analysis of the arch hinge contact does not apply.

  2. Safety evaluation of arch dam stability

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Defu

    1995-12-31

    The abutment sliding is the main form of failure in arch dams. Two approaches are used in defining and evaluating the stability safety factor which are the load safety factor Kp and strength safety factor Kf. So far, the Kp method is still the main method in stability model test of arch dams. This paper, to begin with the analysis of the stability formulas and the influence factors of stability in arch dams, will discuss in detail the merits and demerits of Kp and Kf methods and compare Kp with Kf for same structure. A new approach is proposed and the test steps existing problems and their solutions are all discussed.

  3. Arching in tapped deposits of hard disks.

    PubMed

    Pugnaloni, Luis A; Valluzzi, Marcos G; Valluzzi, Lucas G

    2006-05-01

    We simulate the tapping of a bed of hard disks in a rectangular box by using a pseudodynamic algorithm. In these simulations, arches are unambiguously defined and we can analyze their properties as a function of the tapping amplitude. We find that an order-disorder transition occurs within a narrow range of tapping amplitudes as has been seen by others. Arches are always present in the system although they exhibit regular shapes in the ordered regime. Interestingly, an increase in the number of arches does not always correspond to a reduction in the packing fraction. This is in contrast with what is found in three-dimensional systems.

  4. Comparative morphometry of the nasal cavity in rats and mice.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, E A; Swenberg, J A; Fields, S; Popp, J A

    1982-01-01

    The distribution of the various epithelial types lining the nasal cavity in normal 7 and 16 weeks old male Fischer-344 rats and male B6C3F1 mice has been mapped at the light microscopic level. Photographs of transverse sections of the nose were analysed using a Zeiss Videoplan computerized image analysis system programmed for measurement and evaluation of count, area, perimeter and length. In rats, the volumes of the nasal cavity at 7 and 16 weeks are 156 and 257 mm3 respectively; while in mice the nasal cavity volume is essentially the same (32 . 5 and 31 . 5 mm3) at the same two ages. Total surface areas of the nasal cavity in rats at 7 and 16 weeks are 799 and 1344 mm2 respectively; and in mice 278 and 289 mm2. The percentages of the nasal cavity surface lined by squamous, respiratory and olfactory epithelium are similar at both ages in both species. Applications and significance of these data are discussed. PMID:7130058

  5. Tensile properties of the transverse carpal ligament and carpal tunnel complex.

    PubMed

    Ugbolue, Ukadike C; Gislason, Magnus K; Carter, Mark; Fogg, Quentin A; Riches, Philip E; Rowe, Philip J

    2015-08-01

    A new sophisticated method that uses video analysis techniques together with a Maillon Rapide Delta to determine the tensile properties of the transverse carpal ligament-carpal tunnel complex has been developed. Six embalmed cadaveric specimens amputated at the mid-forearm and aged (mean (SD)): 82 (6.29) years were tested. The six hands were from three males (four hands) and one female (two hands). Using trigonometry and geometry the elongation and strain of the transverse carpal ligament and carpal arch were calculated. The cross-sectional area of the transverse carpal ligament was determined. Tensile properties of the transverse carpal ligament-carpal tunnel complex and Load-Displacement data were also obtained. Descriptive statistics, one-way ANOVA together with a post-hoc analysis (Tukey) and t-tests were incorporated. A transverse carpal ligament-carpal tunnel complex novel testing method has been developed. The results suggest that there were no significant differences between the original transverse carpal ligament width and transverse carpal ligament at peak elongation (P=0.108). There were significant differences between the original carpal arch width and carpal arch width at peak elongation (P=0.002). The transverse carpal ligament failed either at the mid-substance or at their bony attachments. At maximum deformation the peak load and maximum transverse carpal ligament displacements ranged from 285.74N to 1369.66N and 7.09mm to 18.55mm respectively. The transverse carpal ligament cross-sectional area mean (SD) was 27.21 (3.41)mm(2). Using this method the results provide useful biomechanical information and data about the tensile properties of the transverse carpal ligament-carpal tunnel complex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of airflow communication between nasal cavities on nasal ventilation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bing; Huang, Qian; Cui, Shunjiu; Liu, Yingxi; Han, Demin

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the impact of airflow communication between bilateral nostril sides on nasal ventilation. In addition, we try to validate the efficacy of the Draf III procedure from the aerodynamics perspective. One health model and two disease models were constructed. These included 2 patients with nasal septum perforation and 1 patient who received the Draf III procedure. With the computational fluid dynamics method, indices such as airflow velocity and wall shear stress in the nasal cavity were detected and compared among the 3 subjects. The main pathway for airflow in the nasal cavity is the common meatus. Little airflow exchange occurred in the patient who underwent the Draf III procedure, and the wall shear stress around the communication site was as low as in the adjacent areas. However, when airflow communication occurred in the lower part of the nasal cavity, the airflow velocity and wall shear stress were obviously altered, and the ventilation function of the nasal cavity was impaired. Airflow communication in the upper part of the nasal cavity has little impact on nasal ventilation. Nonetheless, airflow communication occurring in the lower part of the nasal cavity disturbs the overall airflow distribution and a repair procedure is necessary. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Some acoustic features of nasal and nasalized vowels: a target for vowel nasalization.

    PubMed

    Feng, G; Castelli, E

    1996-06-01

    In order to characterize acoustic properties of nasal and nasalized vowels, these sounds will be considered as a dynamic trend from an oral configuration toward an [n]-like configuration. The latter can be viewed as a target for vowel nasalization. This target corresponds to the pharyngonasal tract and it can be modeled, with some simplifications, by a single tract without any parallel paths. Thus the first two resonance frequencies (at about 300 and 1000 Hz) characterize this target well. A series of measurements has been carried out in order to describe the acoustic characteristics of the target. Measured transfer functions confirm the resonator nature of the low-frequency peak. The introduction of such a target allows the conception of the nasal vowels as a trend beginning with a simple configuration, which is terminated in the same manner, so allowing the complex nasal phenomena to be bounded. A complete study of pole-zero evolutions for the nasalization of the 11 French vowels is presented. It allows the proposition of a common strategy for the nasalization of all vowels, so a true nasal vowel can be placed in this nasalization frame. The measured transfer functions for several French nasal vowels are also given.

  8. Nasal airflow during respiratory cycle.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seung-Kyu; Son, Young Rak; Shin, Seok Jae; Kim, Sung-Kyun

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge on the airflow patterns in the nasal cavity is essential to understanding the function of the nasal cavity. This study has attempted to observe the breath cycle of nasal airflow during respiration at rest. We constructed a nasal cavity model by rapid prototyping using 1.25-mm-thick CT data and devised a piston pump driven by a cam, to simulate respiration at rest. The airflow was evaluated with particle image velocimetry and visualized in coronal reconstructed images. During the inspiration, a maximal velocity was observed at the valve area and the main stream occurred in the middle and superior airways. During the expiration, main stream was noted in the middle airway and was slow compared with the flow during inspiration. Vortexes were observed between inspiration and expiration. This result widens our knowledge of nasal airflow and this technique will allow a more physiological understanding of nasal operations.

  9. Glowing Solar Material Arches Up and Out

    NASA Image and Video Library

    An elongated, streaming arch of solar material rose up at the sun’s edge before breaking apart in this animation of imagery captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory on April 28, 2016. While so...

  10. L'Arche: Its Philosophy and Ideology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumarah, John

    1986-01-01

    The L'Arche movement in mental retardation based upon the work of J. Vanier stresses the value of the disabled person, the importance of mutual relationships, the importance of a sense of community, and the spiritual dimension. (CL)

  11. Combined open proximal and stent-graft distal repair for distal arch aneurysms: an alternative to total debranching.

    PubMed

    Zierer, Andreas; Sanchez, Luis A; Moon, Marc R

    2009-07-01

    We present herein a novel, combined, simultaneous open proximal and stent-graft distal repair for complex distal aortic arch aneurysms involving the descending aorta. In the first surgical step, the transverse arch is opened during selective antegrade cerebral perfusion, and a Dacron graft (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) is positioned down the descending aorta in an elephant trunk-like fashion with its proximal free margin sutured circumferentially to the aorta just distal to the left subclavian or left common carotid artery. With the graft serving as the new proximal landing zone, subsequent endovascular repair is performed antegrade during rewarming through the ascending aorta.

  12. Aortic arch shape is not associated with hypertensive response to exercise in patients with repaired congenital heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aortic arch geometry is linked to abnormal blood pressure (BP) response to maximum exercise. This study aims to quantitatively assess whether aortic arch geometry plays a role in blood pressure (BP) response to exercise. Methods 60 age- and BSA-matched subjects – 20 post-aortic coarctation (CoA) repair, 20 transposition of great arteries post arterial switch operation (ASO) and 20 healthy controls – had a three-dimensional (3D), whole heart magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) at 1.5 Tesla, 3D geometric reconstructions created from the MRA. All subjects underwent cardiopulmonary exercise test on the same day as MRA using an ergometer cycle with manual BP measurements. Geometric analysis and their correlation with BP at peak exercise were assessed. Results Arch curvature was similarly acute in both the post-CoA and ASO cases [0.05 ± 0.01 vs. 0.05 ± 0.01 (1/mm/m2); p = 1.0] and significantly different to that of normal healthy controls [0.05 ± 0.01 vs. 0.03 ± 0.01 (1/mm/m2), p < 0.001]. Indexed transverse arch cross sectional area were significantly abnormal in the post-CoA cases compared to the ASO cases (117.8 ± 47.7 vs. 221.3 ± 44.6; p < 0.001) and controls (117.8 ± 47.7 vs. 157.5 ± 27.2 mm2; p = 0.003). BP response to peak exercise did not correlate with arch curvature (r = 0.203, p = 0.120), but showed inverse correlation with indexed minimum cross sectional area of transverse arch and isthmus (r = -0.364, p = 0.004), and ratios of minimum arch area/ descending diameter (r = -0.491, p < 0.001). Conclusion Transverse arch and isthmus hypoplasia, rather than acute arch angulation plays a role in the pathophysiology of BP response to peak exercise following CoA repair. PMID:24219806

  13. Comparison of dental arch dimensions in models of preschool children with cleft lip/palate repaired by means of surgery alone versus controls.

    PubMed

    Burhan, Ahmad S; Nawaya, Fehmieh R

    2016-09-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) anomaly is one of the most prevalent congenital defects causing disturbances of dental arch dimensions. This study aimed at investigating differences in these dimensions between preschool children with cleft lip/palate and a matched control group representing healthy individuals with normal occlusion (NO). The sample of this cross-sectional analytical study consisted of 108 plaster models of children aged from 4 to 5.5 years. They were divided into five groups: the cleft lip group, the cleft palate (CP) group, the unilateral cleft lip and palate group, the bilateral cleft lip and palate group, and the NO group. The NO group was used as a control group. All cleft-affected children were treated only with surgery. Dental arch length and widths were measured. The dental arch dimensions of the cleft lip group were nearly similar to those in the controls. Moreover, the mandibular transverse widths of the CP group were close to those in the controls. However, the mandibular arch length and all maxillary dimensions of the CP group were smaller than those in the controls. In the unilateral cleft lip and palate group, the arch lengths in both jaws and the maxillary transverse widths were smaller than those in the controls, whereas the mandibular transverse widths were similar to those in the controls. In the bilateral cleft lip and palate group, the arch lengths in both jaws were close to those in the controls, but both arches were narrower than those in the controls. The various types of CLP were found to be associated with differences in most maxillary and some mandibular arch dimensions. These data can be used for cleft patient counseling and treatment planning.

  14. Magnetically driven flows in arched plasma structures.

    PubMed

    Stenson, E V; Bellan, P M

    2012-08-17

    Laboratory experiments demonstrate high-speed plasma flows from both footpoints of arched magnetic flux tubes, resulting in bulk plasma transport into the flux tube and persistent axial collimation even as the flux tube lengthens and kinks. The measured flows are in agreement with the predictions of hoop force and collimation models involving fundamental MHD forces. These forces are expected to drive plasma acceleration in other open flux configurations with arched geometries, such as those found on the solar surface.

  15. Integrated exploration locates Cincinnati arch dolomite breccias

    SciTech Connect

    Tedesco, S.A. )

    1994-11-28

    Dolomite breccias or chimneys are prolific reservoirs found along the Cincinnati arch and adjacent basins from Tennessee to Ontario. An integrated approach using seismic and surface geochemistry, augmented by subsurface geology and magnetics, has led to a dramatic increase in the number of these fields being discovered in the past 10 years. Historically the reservoirs have been found by random drilling. The paper describes the geology of the arch, breccia characteristics, and case histories of discoveries using this integrated approach.

  16. Arch dam of the Khudoni hydroelectric station

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhakeli, P.A.; Kobakhidze, V.D.; Koridze, G.I.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the Khudoni hydroelectric station. The selection of the type and site of the dam are described. A plan of the hydro development with the chosen concrete arch dam is shown. Engineering-geologic and seismotectonic conditions of the chosen site are examined. Two types of design were examined for the arch dam, and they are described. Structural elements of the dam are discussed as is reinforcement, stress-strain state, underground contour and outlet works.

  17. Dedicated head-neck coil in MR angiography of the supra-aortic arteries from the aortic arch to the circle of Willis.

    PubMed

    Strotzer, M; Fellner, C; Fraunhofer, S; Gmeinwieser, J; Albrich, H; Seitz, J; Feuerbach, S

    1998-05-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of a dedicated head-neck coil in preoperative imaging of the supra-aortic arteries. Forty consecutive patients with suspected carotid artery stenosis underwent MR angiography (MRA). Using a dedicated head-neck coil, we made a complete evaluation of the supra-aortic arteries and graded the internal carotid artery (ICA) stenoses. MRA was performed at 1.5 T with: coronal 3D FISP from the aortic arch to the circle of Willis; transverse 2D FLASH and 3D TONE of the carotid bifurcation; transverse 3D TONE of the carotid siphon and the circle of Willis; and transverse 3D FISP of the aortic arch. I.a. digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was used as the reference. ICA stenoses of 70% and more at DSA (NASCET methodology) were regarded as severe. Severe ICA stenoses were detected with high sensitivity and specificity: 93% and 92% respectively for coronal 3D FISP; 90% and 85% respectively for transverse 2D FLASH; and 97% and 94% respectively for transverse 3D TONE. The carotid siphon and the intracranial ICA were best depicted by 3D TONE. None of the applied sequences gave a satisfactory visualization of the aortic arch or of the origins of the vertebral arteries. With the head-neck coil, the supra-aortic arteries (including the intracranial vessels) were visualized without the need to reposition the patient, but depiction of the aortic arch was not acceptable. The quantification of ICA stenoses was reliable.

  18. Objective monitoring of nasal patency and nasal physiology in rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Robert A; Eccles, Ron; Howarth, Peter H; Steinsvåg, Sverre K; Togias, Alkis

    2005-03-01

    Nasal obstruction can be monitored objectively by measurement of nasal airflow, as evaluated by nasal peak flow, or as airways resistance/conductance as evaluated by rhinomanometry. Peak flow can be measured during inspiration or expiration. Of these measurements, nasal inspiratory peak flow is the best validated technique for home monitoring in clinical trials. The equipment is portable, relatively inexpensive, and simple to use. One disadvantage, however, is that nasal inspiratory peak flow is influenced by lower airway as well as upper airway function. Rhinomanometry is a more sensitive technique that is specific for nasal measurements. The equipment, however, requires an operator, is more expensive, and is not portable. Thus, it is applicable only for clinic visit measures in clinical trials. Measurements require patient cooperation and coordination, and not all can achieve repeatable results. Thus, this objective measure is best suited to laboratory challenge studies involving smaller numbers of selected volunteers. A nonphysiological measure of nasal patency is acoustic rhinometry. This sonic echo technique measures internal nasal luminal volume and the minimum cross-sectional area. The derivation of these measures from the reflected sound waves requires complex mathematical transformation and makes several theoretical assumptions. Despite this, however, such measures correlate well with the nasal physiological measures, and the nasal volume measures have been shown to relate well to results obtained by imaging techniques such as computed tomography scanning or magnetic resonance imaging. Like rhinomanometry, acoustic rhinometry is not suitable for home monitoring and can be applied only to clinic visit measures or for laboratory nasal challenge monitoring. It has advantages in being easy to use, in requiring little patient cooperation, and in providing repeatable results. In addition to nasal obstruction, allergic rhinitis is recognized to be associated with

  19. 7. View showing reinforced concrete arch, east approach. The 591 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View showing reinforced concrete arch, east approach. The 591 foot three-hinge steel arch that spans the Cuyahoga River is flanked by twelve such approach arches. Each concrete arch consists of four arch ribs, which support the beam and slab streetcar deck on spandrel columns. As the photograph illustrates, the spandrel columns continue above the lower deck to support the roadway. - Detroit Superior High Level Bridge, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  20. Mandibular arch perimeter changes with lip bumper treatment.

    PubMed

    Osborn, W S; Nanda, R S; Currier, G F

    1991-06-01

    The effects of lip bumper treatment on the mandibular arch were observed in 32 patients with late transitional and early permanent dentitions. Dental cast measurements were made for arch perimeter, arch length, and arch width. Cephalometric radiographs were used to determine labial tipping of the incisors and distal movement of the molars. Arch circumference increased in all patients, ranging from 0.7 mm to 8.8 mm, with an average of 4.1 mm. The mean increase in arch length was 1.2 mm and was largely attributed to anterior tipping of the mandibular incisors. Change in arch length was the most predictive variable for the increase in arch circumference. Passive changes in arch width were recorded, with a mean increase of 2.0 mm in the intercanine distance and 2.5 mm in the first premolar distance. Arch width increments contributed to the increase in arch circumference, but the increases in arch width were not found to be predictive of the change in arch circumference. Changes in either arch circumference or arch length were not related to the duration of treatment, age and sex of the patient, or the eruption status of the permanent second molars.

  1. Comparison between Perceptual Assessments of Nasality and Nasalance Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunnegard, Karin; Lohmander, Anette; van Doorn, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Background: There are different reports of the usefulness of the Nasometer[TM] as a complement to listening, often as correlation calculations between listening and nasalance measurements. Differences between findings have been attributed to listener experience and types of speech stimuli. Aims: To compare nasalance scores from the Nasometer with…

  2. Nasal septum injury in preterm infants using nasal prongs 1

    PubMed Central

    Bonfim, Suely de Fátima Santos Freire; de Vasconcelos, Maria Gorete Lucena; de Sousa, Nayara Francisca Cabral; da Silva, Daiana Vieira Câmara; Leal, Luciana Pedrosa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to assess the incidence and risk factors associated with nasal septum injury in premature infants using reused and new nasal prongs. METHOD: the study was a cohort from an open therapeutic intervention. The sample included 70 infants with a gestational age inferior to 37 weeks, who used nasal prongs and were hospitalized at the neonatal service of a hospital in Recife-PE, in the Northeast of Brazil. The data were collected in patient files through the assessment of the application of the device and of the nasal septum. Multinomial Logistic Regression and Survival analyses were applied. RESULTS: the incidence of nasal injury corresponded to 62.9%. In the multiple analysis, only the length of the infant's treatment was a determinant factor for the occurrence and severity of the injuries. CONCLUSION: the type of nasal prong does not serve as a risk factor for the nasal injury. The high incidence of nasal injury indicates the need to adapt the nursing care with emphasis on prevention. PMID:25493679

  3. Comparison between Perceptual Assessments of Nasality and Nasalance Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunnegard, Karin; Lohmander, Anette; van Doorn, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Background: There are different reports of the usefulness of the Nasometer[TM] as a complement to listening, often as correlation calculations between listening and nasalance measurements. Differences between findings have been attributed to listener experience and types of speech stimuli. Aims: To compare nasalance scores from the Nasometer with…

  4. Objective Measure of Nasal Air Emission Using Nasal Accelerometry.

    PubMed

    Cler, Meredith J; Lien, Yu-An S; Braden, Maia N; Mittelman, Talia; Downing, Kerri; Stepp, Cara E

    2016-10-01

    This article describes the development and initial validation of an objective measure of nasal air emission (NAE) using nasal accelerometry. Nasal acceleration and nasal airflow signals were simultaneously recorded while an expert speech language pathologist modeled NAEs at a variety of severity levels. In addition, microphone and nasal accelerometer signals were collected during the production of /pɑpɑpɑpɑ/ speech utterances by 25 children with and without cleft palate. Fourteen inexperienced raters listened to the microphone signals from the pediatric speakers and rated the samples for the severity of NAE using direct magnitude estimation. Mean listener ratings were compared to a novel quantitative measurement of NAE derived from the nasal acceleration signals. Correlation between the nasal acceleration energy measure and the measured nasal airflow was high (r = .87). Correlation between the measure and auditory-perceptual ratings was moderate (r = .49). The measure presented here is quantitative and noninvasive, and the required hardware is inexpensive ($150). Future studies will include speakers with a wider range of NAE severity and etiology, including cleft palate, hearing impairment, or dysarthria. Further development will also involve validation of the measure against airflow measures across subjects.

  5. Objective Measure of Nasal Air Emission Using Nasal Accelerometry

    PubMed Central

    Cler, Meredith J.; Lien, Yu-An S.; Braden, Maia N.; Mittelman, Talia; Downing, Kerri

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This article describes the development and initial validation of an objective measure of nasal air emission (NAE) using nasal accelerometry. Method Nasal acceleration and nasal airflow signals were simultaneously recorded while an expert speech language pathologist modeled NAEs at a variety of severity levels. In addition, microphone and nasal accelerometer signals were collected during the production of /pɑpɑpɑpɑ/ speech utterances by 25 children with and without cleft palate. Fourteen inexperienced raters listened to the microphone signals from the pediatric speakers and rated the samples for the severity of NAE using direct magnitude estimation. Mean listener ratings were compared to a novel quantitative measurement of NAE derived from the nasal acceleration signals. Results Correlation between the nasal acceleration energy measure and the measured nasal airflow was high (r = .87). Correlation between the measure and auditory-perceptual ratings was moderate (r = .49). Conclusion The measure presented here is quantitative and noninvasive, and the required hardware is inexpensive ($150). Future studies will include speakers with a wider range of NAE severity and etiology, including cleft palate, hearing impairment, or dysarthria. Further development will also involve validation of the measure against airflow measures across subjects. PMID:27618145

  6. Carpal tunnel expansion by palmarly directed forces to the transverse carpal ligament

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zong-Ming; Tang, Jie; Chakan, Matthew; Kaz, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the expansion of the carpal tunnel resulting from the application of palmarly directed forces to the transverse carpal ligament (TCL) from inside the carpal tunnel. Ten fresh-frozen cadaveric hands were dissected to evacuate the carpal tunnel and thus to expose the TCL. A custom lever device was built to apply forces, ranging from 10 to 200 N, to the TCL. Without force application, the carpal tunnel area was 148.4 ± 36.8 mm2. The force application caused the TCL to form arches with an increase in cross-sectional areas of 33.3 ± 5.6 mm2 at 10 N and 48.7 ± 11.4 mm2 at 200 N, representing respective increases of 22.4% and 32.8% relative to the initial carpal tunnel area. The TCL length remained constant under the applied forces. It was found that the TCL arch formation was due to the narrowing of the arch width, which resulted from the migration of the bony insertion sites of the TCL. A geometrical model of the carpal tunnel was then developed to elucidate the relationships among the arch width, TCL length, arch height, and arch area. The model illustrated the effectiveness of carpal tunnel expansion by TCL elongation or arch width narrowing. PMID:19604023

  7. Transverse Expansion and Stability after Segmental Le Fort I Osteotomy versus Surgically Assisted Rapid Maxillary Expansion: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Starch-Jensen, Thomas; Blæhr, Tue Lindberg

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present systematic review was to test the hypothesis of no difference in transverse skeletal and dental arch expansion and relapse after segmental Le Fort I osteotomy versus surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion. A MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase and Cochrane library search in combination with a hand-search of relevant journals was conducted by including human studies published in English from January 1, 2000 to June 1, 2016. The search provided 130 titles and four studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All the included studies were characterized by high risk of bias and meta-analysis was not possible due to considerable variation. Both treatment modalities significantly increase the transverse maxillary skeletal and dental arch width. The transverse dental arch expansion and relapse seems to be substantial higher with tooth-borne surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion compared to segmental Le Fort I osteotomy. The ratio of dental to skeletal relapse was significantly higher in the posterior maxilla with tooth-borne surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion. Moreover, a parallel opening without segment tilting was observed after segmental Le Fort I osteotomy. Maxillary transverse deficiency in adults can be treated successfully with both treatment modalities, although surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion seems more effective when large transverse maxillary skeletal and dental arch expansion is required. However, considering the methodological limitations of the included studies, long-term randomized studies assessing transverse skeletal and dental expansion and relapse with the two treatment modalities are needed before definite conclusions can be provided.

  8. Visual exploration of nasal airflow.

    PubMed

    Zachow, Stefan; Muigg, Philipp; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Doleisch, Helmut; Hege, Hans-Christian

    2009-01-01

    Rhinologists are often faced with the challenge of assessing nasal breathing from a functional point of view to derive effective therapeutic interventions. While the complex nasal anatomy can be revealed by visual inspection and medical imaging, only vague information is available regarding the nasal airflow itself: Rhinomanometry delivers rather unspecific integral information on the pressure gradient as well as on total flow and nasal flow resistance. In this article we demonstrate how the understanding of physiological nasal breathing can be improved by simulating and visually analyzing nasal airflow, based on an anatomically correct model of the upper human respiratory tract. In particular we demonstrate how various Information Visualization (InfoVis) techniques, such as a highly scalable implementation of parallel coordinates, time series visualizations, as well as unstructured grid multi-volume rendering, all integrated within a multiple linked views framework, can be utilized to gain a deeper understanding of nasal breathing. Evaluation is accomplished by visual exploration of spatio-temporal airflow characteristics that include not only information on flow features but also on accompanying quantities such as temperature and humidity. To our knowledge, this is the first in-depth visual exploration of the physiological function of the nose over several simulated breathing cycles under consideration of a complete model of the nasal airways, realistic boundary conditions, and all physically relevant time-varying quantities.

  9. Dlx5 regulates regional development of the branchial arches and sensory capsules.

    PubMed

    Depew, M J; Liu, J K; Long, J E; Presley, R; Meneses, J J; Pedersen, R A; Rubenstein, J L

    1999-09-01

    We report the generation and analysis of mice homozygous for a targeted deletion of the Dlx5 homeobox gene. Dlx5 mutant mice have multiple defects in craniofacial structures, including their ears, noses, mandibles and calvaria, and die shortly after birth. A subset (28%) exhibit exencephaly. Ectodermal expression of Dlx5 is required for the development of olfactory and otic placode-derived epithelia and surrounding capsules. The nasal capsules are hypoplastic (e.g. lacking turbinates) and, in most cases, the right side is more severely affected than the left. Dorsal otic vesicle derivatives (e. g. semicircular canals and endolymphatic duct) and the surrounding capsule, are more severely affected than ventral (cochlear) structures. Dlx5 is also required in mandibular arch ectomesenchyme, as the proximal mandibular arch skeleton is dysmorphic. Dlx5 may control craniofacial development in part through the regulation of the goosecoid homeobox gene. goosecoid expression is greatly reduced in Dlx5 mutants, and both goosecoid and Dlx5 mutants share a number of similar craniofacial malformations. Dlx5 may perform a general role in skeletal differentiation, as exemplified by hypomineralization within the calvaria. The distinct focal defects within the branchial arches of the Dlx1, Dlx2 and Dlx5 mutants, along with the nested expression of their RNAs, support a model in which these genes have both redundant and unique functions in the regulation of regional patterning of the craniofacial ectomesenchyme.

  10. Arch-first technique via clamshell incision: successful surgical reoperation for aortic arch dissection.

    PubMed

    Ozkara, Ahmet; Cetin, Gurkan; Mert, Murat; Akinci, Okan; Erdem, Can Caglar; Suzer, Kaya

    2005-01-01

    We report a case of successful reoperation for aortic arch dissection with use of the "arch-first" technique in a patient who had Marfan syndrome. Extracorporeal circulation was initiated via right subclavian artery cannulation, and the chest was entered through a clamshell incision for the best exposure. When the patient was cooled to 18 degrees C, the perfusion was stopped. After the 1st aortic arch anastomosis to a 30-mm Dacron graft, cerebral perfusion was reestablished via the right subclavian artery. The aortic repair was then completed. The cerebral ischemic time was 18 minutes, the aortic cross-clamp time was 69 minutes, and the total extracorporeal circulation time was 334 minutes. The patient was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 10 with no neurologic impairment. The arch-first technique shortens the duration of brain ischemia. When combined with a clamshell incision, the technique is particularly helpful for reoperation of the aortic arch and thoracic aorta.

  11. Same Noses, Different Nasalance Scores: Data from Normal Subjects and Cleft Palate Speakers for Three Systems for Nasalance Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bressmann, Tim; Klaiman, Paula; Fischbach, Simone

    2006-01-01

    Nasalance scores from the Nasometer, the NasalView and the OroNasal System were compared. The data was collected from 50 normal participants and 19 hypernasal patients with cleft palate. The Nasometer had the lowest nasalance scores for the non-nasal Zoo Passage and that the OroNasal System had the lowest nasalance scores for the Nasal Sentences.…

  12. TRANSVERSITY SINGLE SPIN ASYMMETRIES.

    SciTech Connect

    BOER,D.

    2001-04-27

    The theoretical aspects of two leading twist transversity single spin asymmetries, one arising from the Collins effect and one from the interference fragmentation functions, are reviewed. Issues of factorization, evolution and Sudakov factors for the relevant observables are discussed. These theoretical considerations pinpoint the most realistic scenarios towards measurements of transversity.

  13. Vibration of axially loaded circular arches

    SciTech Connect

    Sabir, A.B.; Djoudi, M.S.

    1996-11-01

    The work in the present paper is devoted to the determination of the buckling loads and natural frequencies of axially loaded arch structures. The finite element method is employed using a strain based arch element. The element is based on the conventional Euler curved beam type of strain displacement relationship and satisfies the exact representation of rigid body modes. The sub-space iteration technique is used to determine the eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors of the governing transcendental equation. The buckling of a pinned arch subjected to a uniform lateral pressure is first considered. The work is then extended to produce a comprehensive set of results for the vibration of axially loaded arches which are either pinned or fixed at both ends. The first symmetric and anti symmetric modes of vibration are determined and the effect of the axial load on these frequencies is investigated. The practical problem of an arch with a backfill is then considered and the effect of the elastic packing due to this backfill on the natural frequencies is determined.

  14. Transverse gravity versus observations

    SciTech Connect

    Álvarez, Enrique; Faedo, Antón F.; López-Villarejo, J.J. E-mail: anton.fernandez@uam.es

    2009-07-01

    Theories of gravity invariant under those diffeomorphisms generated by transverse vectors, ∂{sub μ}ξ{sup μ} = 0 are considered. Such theories are dubbed transverse, and differ from General Relativity in that the determinant of the metric, g, is a transverse scalar. We comment on diverse ways in which these models can be constrained using a variety of observations. Generically, an additional scalar degree of freedom mediates the interaction, so the usual constraints on scalar-tensor theories have to be imposed. If the purely gravitational part is Einstein-Hilbert but the matter action is transverse, the models predict that the three a priori different concepts of mass (gravitational active and gravitational passive as well as inertial) are not equivalent anymore. These transverse deviations from General Relativity are therefore tightly constrained, actually correlated with existing bounds on violations of the equivalence principle, local violations of Newton's third law and/or violation of Local Position Invariance.

  15. Correlation between nasal airflow characteristics and clinical relevance of nasal septal deviation to nasal airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Kyun; Heo, Go Eun; Seo, Anna; Na, Yang; Chung, Seung-Kyu

    2014-02-01

    Since the imbalance of the nasal cavities due to nasal septal deviation (NSD) is a commonly observed anatomic variation in healthy adults, clinicians must often decide whether or not it is clinically relevant to the symptoms of nasal airway obstruction (NAO). Main reason for this is a lack of data correlating the symptoms of NAO with objective findings. The aim of our study is to find the correlation between fluid dynamic parameters and the anatomy of nasal cavity with NSD by numerical simulation. We generated 6 computational models of nasal cavities with NSD were created from computed tomographic images: 3 symptomatic patients with NAO and 3 asymptomatic patients. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to simulate steady inspiratory airflows in each nasal cavity model and compare the fluid dynamic properties of each. In the symptomatic cases, the pressure drop from the naris to the end of the septum was larger, and more uneven flow partitioning was observed. Local maximum velocity and wall shear stress were higher in the symptomatic group than in the asymptomatic group. The symptoms of NAO seem to be related more to the nasal resistance from the naris to the end of the septum than to the total nasal resistance from naris to nasopharynx. Factors correlated with NAO by CFD can be used as elements in patient-specific objective diagnostic tools for NAO in the presence of NSD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Reduced three-dimensional nasal airway volume in treacher collins syndrome and its association with craniofacial morphology.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoyang; Forte, Antonio Jorge; Berlin, Nicholas Lee; Alonso, Nivaldo; Persing, John A; Steinbacher, Dereck Matthew

    2015-05-01

    Airway insufficiency decreases quality of life and may be life threatening in patients with Treacher Collins syndrome. The authors calculated the three-dimensional nasal airway volume in patients with Treacher Collins syndrome to identify correlations between nasal airway volume and craniofacial morphology and provide guidance for surgical planning. Thirty nonoperated patients with Treacher Collins syndrome were compared with 35 unaffected age- and gender-matched controls. Anatomic variables of the cranial base, the maxilla complex, and internal diameters of nasal airway were compared between patients and control subjects using three-dimensional craniometric analyses. In the Treacher Collins group, the relation of craniofacial morphology to nasal airway volume was assessed separately. Statistical analyses were performed using independent sample t tests and Pearson correlation coefficient analyses. Nasal airway volume was decreased 38.6 percent in patients with Treacher Collins syndrome relative to controls (p = 0.001). A positive correlation of maxillary position and nasal airway volume was shown in Treacher Collins patients (r = +0.463, p = 0.013). Maxillary, nasal bone, and orbitale width were also positively correlated with nasal airway volume (r = +0.582, p = 0.001; r = +0.408, p = 0.035; and r = +0.677, p < 0.001, respectively). Shortened internal diameters of the nasal airway all positively correlated with nasal airway volume. Nasal airway volume is reduced in patients with Treacher Collins syndrome. Reduced projection of the maxilla and transverse maxillary deficiency are correlated with reduced nasal airway volume and are primarily responsible for obstruction of the nasal airway. Risk, II.

  17. The Ponta Grossa Arch: A proposal for ts configuration and evolution from the interpretation of remote sensing data. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Dealmeida, T. I. R.

    1983-01-01

    Visual analysis of MSS imagery was used to construct a map of dikes in a wide area of the Ponta Grossa Arch both in the Parana Basin and its basement. Analysis of the map by photographic methods defined the zone of highest density of the dikes, and some aspects of the longitudinal and transverse heterogeneities, as well as localized the apex of the Arch. Borders of the Arch were also suggested. Field investigations confirmed the position of the apex of the flexure on Palezoic sediments and pre-lava Mesozoic sediments. Controversial aspects of the relative absence of dikes in certain units or lithologies and the composition of intrusions surrounding the city of Castro were observed. The apparent synchronism between the activity of the Parana Basin and the Arch is discussed as well as the frequent inverse characteristics of vertical movements. The similarity of rocks in Brazil and Africa is also considered.

  18. South Arch volcanic field9d\

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Clague, D.A.; Moore, J.G.; Holcomb, R.T.

    1989-01-01

    Several young lava fields were imaged by GLORIA sidescan sonar along the Hawaiian Arch south of Hawaii. The largest, 35 by 50 km across, includes a central area characterized by high sonar backscatter and composed of several flow lobes radiating from a vent area. Reflection profiling and sea-floor photography indicate that the central lobes are flat sheet flows bounded by pillowed margins; thin surface sediment and thin palagonite rinds on lava surfaces suggest ages of 1-10 ka. Vents are localized along the arch crest near bases of Cretaceous seamounts. Two dredged flows are basanite and alkalic basalt, broadly similar to rejuvenated-stage and some pre-shield alkalic lavas on the Hawaiian Ridge. Arch volcanism represents peripheral leakage of melt from the Hawaiian hot spot over much larger areas than previously recognized. -Authors

  19. Jaw muscle pain and its effect on gothic arch tracings.

    PubMed

    Obrez, A; Stohler, C S

    1996-04-01

    Perceived changes in occlusion and decreased range of motion are often expressed by patients with masticatory muscle pain. The adverse loading of craniomandibular tissues that results from an inadequate maxillomandibular relationship in combination with the coexisting dysfunction is widely regarded as the cause of pain. This study was designed to test whether pain can cause significant changes in position of the mandible and therefore form the basis for any perceived changes in the maxillomandibular relationship. A second objective was to determine whether pain can cause changes in the mandibular range of motion. Five subjects who rated pain intensity on a visual analog scale were used in a single-blind, randomized, repeated-measures study design. Tonic muscle pain was induced by infusion of 5% hypertonic saline solution into the central portion of the superficial masseter muscle. Isotonic saline solution was used as a control, with subjects blinded to the type of substance given. The effect of pain on the position of the apex of the gothic arch tracing, the direction of the lateral mandibular border movements, and the mandibular range of motion was studied in a horizontal plane with minimal occlusal separation. Pain significantly affected the position of the apex of the gothic arch tracing in anterior (F = 11.46, p = 0.03) and transverse (F = 35.0, p = 0.004) directions. Similarly, pain affected the orientation of the mandibular lateral border movements (F = 12.44, p = 0.02) and their magnitude (F = 14.97, p = 0.01). All pain-induced effects proved to be reversible. The observed effect of pain can explain the perceived change of bite that is frequently noted by patients with orofacial pain. This study provided evidence of an alternative causal relationship between pain and changes in occlusal relationship and questions occlusal therapy as treatment, directed toward the elimination of the underlying cause in patients with masticatory muscle pain.

  20. Improved dynamical modelling of the Arches cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joowon; Kim, Sungsoo S.

    2014-05-01

    Recently, Clarkson et al. (2012) measured the intrinsic velocity dispersion of the Arches cluster, a young and massive star cluster in the Galactic center. Using the observed velocity dispersion profile and the surface brightness profile of Espinoza et al. (2009), they estimate the cluster's present-day mass to be ˜ 1.5×104 M⊙ by fitting an isothermal King model. In this study, we trace the best-fit initial mass for the Arches cluster using the same observed data set and also the anisotropic Fokker-Planck calculations for the dynamical evolution.

  1. A bovine aortic arch in humans.

    PubMed

    Arnáiz-García, María Elena; González-Santos, Jose María; López-Rodriguez, Javier; Dalmau-Sorli, María José; Bueno-Codoñer, María; Arévalo-Abascal, Adolfo; Fdez García-Hierro, Jose Ma; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Arnáiz, Javier

    2014-01-01

    We describe a curious congenital variation of human aortic arch (AA) branching pattern termed the "bovine aortic arch". Rather than arising directly from the AA as a separate branch as occurs in the most common AA branching pattern, the left common carotid artery moves to the right and merges from the brachiocephalic trunk. It is the normal AA branching pattern presented in a number of animals (canines, felines or Macaque monkeys) but it has nothing to do with anatomy of AA in ruminant animals, including cattle and buffalo. That is why it is one of the most widely misnomers used in medical literature whose origin is nowadays unknown.

  2. Pathogenesis of nasal polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Hulse, K. E.; Stevens, W. W.; Tan, B. K.; Schleimer, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is a complex inflammatory condition that affects a large proportion of the population world-wide and is associated with high cost of management and significant morbidity. Yet, there is a lack of population-based epidemiologic studies using current definitions of CRSwNP, and the mechanisms that drive pathogenesis in this disease remain unclear. In this review, we summarize the current evidence for the plethora of factors that likely contribute to CRSwNP pathogenesis. Defects in the innate function of the airway epithelial barrier, including diminished expression of antimicrobial products and loss of barrier integrity, combined with colonization by fungi and bacteria likely play a critical role in the development of chronic inflammation in CRSwNP. This chronic inflammation is characterized by elevated expression of many key inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-5, thymic stromal lymphopoietin and CCL11, that help to initiate and perpetuate this chronic inflammatory response. Together, these factors likely combine to drive the influx of a variety of immune cells, including eosinophils, mast cells, group 2 innate lymphoid cells and lymphocytes, which participate in the chronic inflammatory response within the nasal polyps. Importantly, however, future studies are needed to demonstrate the necessity and sufficiency of these potential drivers of disease in CRSwNP. In addition to the development of new tools and models to aid mechanistic studies, the field of CRSwNP research also needs the type of robust epidemiologic data that has served the asthma community so well. Given the high prevalence, costs and morbidity, there is a great need for continued research into CRS that could facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies to improve treatment for patients who suffer from this disease. PMID:25482020

  3. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A nasal... nasal airflow. The device decreases airway resistance and increases nasal airflow. The external...

  4. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A nasal... nasal airflow. The device decreases airway resistance and increases nasal airflow. The external...

  5. The Relationship between Nasalance and Nasality in Children with Cleft Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watterson, Thomas; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This study correlated measures of nasalance computed by the Nasometer with listener judgments of nasality of speech passages spoken by 25 children with craniofacial disorders. Results showed a significant correlation between nasalance and nasality only when nasal consonants were not included in the passage spoken. (Author/DB)

  6. Transverse instability of dunes.

    PubMed

    Parteli, Eric J R; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2011-10-28

    The simplest type of dune is the transverse one, which propagates with invariant profile orthogonally to a fixed wind direction. Here we show, by means of numerical simulations, that transverse dunes are unstable with respect to along-axis perturbations in their profile and decay on the bedrock into barchan dunes. Any forcing modulation amplifies exponentially with growth rate determined by the dune turnover time. We estimate the distance covered by a transverse dune before fully decaying into barchans and identify the patterns produced by different types of perturbation.

  7. Easy removal of nasal magnets.

    PubMed

    Starke, Lori

    2005-09-01

    This article uses a case report and discussion to demonstrate the removal of magnets which have become lodged in the nasal cavity as a result of using magnet-backed earrings to decorate the alae. If bi-alar decoration is used, removal of nasal magnets can present more of a challenge than other nasal foreign bodies. This is because of their attraction to each other through the septum and because of the edema that can form around the magnets. This case discusses that removal of magnets lodged in the nares can be easily achieved with minimal trauma, by the use of a household pocket magnet.

  8. 8. GENERAL ELEVATION OF BRIDGE AFTER CONCRETE FOR ARCHES HAS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. GENERAL ELEVATION OF BRIDGE AFTER CONCRETE FOR ARCHES HAS BEEN POURED BUT BEFORE FALSEWORK HAS BEEN REMOVED. TAKEN JAN 7, 1928. - Marsh Rainbow Arch Bridge, West Eighth Street North, Newton, Jasper County, IA

  9. 30. DETAIL OF HOISTWAY AT THE TOP OF THE ARCH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. DETAIL OF HOISTWAY AT THE TOP OF THE ARCH, TRAIN IS IN BACKROUND, NOTE TRAIN IS ON TOP OF TRACKS - Jefferson National Expansion Memorial Arch, Mississippi River between Washington & Poplar Streets, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  10. VIEW FROM DOWN STREAM OF ARCH IN ELEVATION. NOTE FINISHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM DOWN STREAM OF ARCH IN ELEVATION. NOTE FINISHED INTERIOR ARCH. SSW BY 205 DEGREES - Chasm Brook Bridge, Spanning Chasm Brook on West Sargent Mountain Carriage Road, Bar Harbor, Hancock County, ME

  11. Detail, north span, from east, showing concrete "rainbow" arch rigidly ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, north span, from east, showing concrete "rainbow" arch rigidly fixed at center pier and north abutment, and hangers linking arch rib and bridge deck - Horner Street Bridge, Horner Street over Stonycreek River, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  12. View of Highway 140 west of Arch Rock. Note stone ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Highway 140 west of Arch Rock. Note stone wall at right and formed concrete wall at center. Looking north-northwest - All Year Highway, Between Arch Rock & Yosemite Valley, El Portal, Mariposa County, CA

  13. 4. NORTH ELEVATION, SHOWING BROKEN PEDIMENTED GABLE, ARCHED WINDOW IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. NORTH ELEVATION, SHOWING BROKEN PEDIMENTED GABLE, ARCHED WINDOW IN GABLE, AND SEGMENTALLY ARCHED WINDOW HEADS ON SECOND FLOOR WINDOWS - Jacob R. Fisher House, High Street, Oldwick, Hunterdon County, NJ

  14. Arches and contact forces in a granular pile.

    PubMed

    Carlevaro, C M; Pugnaloni, L A

    2012-06-01

    Assemblies of granular particles mechanically stable under their own weight contain arches. These are structural units identified as sets of mutually stable grains. It is generally assumed that these arches shield the weight above them and should bear most of the stress in the system. We test such hypothesis by studying the stress born by in-arch and out-of-arch grains. We show that, indeed, particles in arches withstand larger stresses. In particular, the isotropic stress tends to be larger for in-arch grains whereas the anisotropic component is marginally distinguishable between the two types of particles. The contact force distributions demonstrate that an exponential tail (compatible with the maximization of entropy under no extra constraints) is followed only by the out-of-arch contacts. In-arch contacts seem to be compatible with a Gaussian distribution consistent with a recently introduced approach that takes into account constraints imposed by the local force balance on grains.

  15. [The influence of nasal flow aerodynamics on the nasal physiology].

    PubMed

    Betlejewski, Stanisław; Betlejewski, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    The ability of the human nose to warm and humidify the respiratory air is important to maintaining the internal environment of the lungs, since ambient air is conditioned to nearly alveolar conditions (body temperature and fully saturated with water vapour) upon reaching the nasopharynx. Because of very short time of the inspiratory phase duration, as well as expiratory phase, only the rich vascularization of the nasal mucosa and specific organization of the submucosal vessels are not able to assure such effective physiological activity. Therefore the type of airflow during the respiration is essential to understanding the functional possibilities of the nasal mucosa. Most studies have investigated the airflow only in steady-flow conditions, where the laminar flow was observed. Anatomically accurate physical models of real nasal cavities and particle image velocimetry allow evaluation of the entire flow field in the nasal cavity. In these investigations a partially turbulent flow was observed even at low air velocities in most part of the nasal cavity. From a physiological perspective, a turbulent flow would seem sensible, since it enhances contact between air and the mucosal layer. By doing so, the nasal physiological functions - humidification, cleaning and warming are optimized.

  16. 3. View locking east of 591 foot steel arch of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View locking east of 591 foot steel arch of bridge. Arch consists of Pratt trusses divided into twenty-four, 24 foot, 7 inch panels. It was fabricated by the King Iron Bridge Company of Cleveland whose circular plaque can be seen where the arch meets the roadway. The steel arch was erected by the Berro construction Co. of Chicago. - Detroit Superior High Level Bridge, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  17. Transversity measurements at HERMES

    SciTech Connect

    Diefenthaler, Markus

    2005-10-06

    Azimuthal single-spin asymmetries (SSA) in semi-inclusive electroproduction of charged pions in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) of positrons on a transversely polarised hydrogen target are presented. Azimuthal moments for both the Collins and the Sivers mechanism are extracted. In addition the subleading-twist contribution due to the transverse spin component from SSA on a longitudinally polarised hydrogen target is evaluated.

  18. The nose and nasal vault.

    PubMed

    Vogelzang, P J; Babbel, R W; Harnsberger, H R

    1991-12-01

    In this article we have reviewed the anatomy of the nose and nasal vault, with emphasis on specific features that are imaged with the SSCT. Important areas of the lateral wall anatomy include the OMU and SER, areas that are key to understanding the obstructive patterns of inflammatory sinonasal disease. Lesions that result in these specific obstructive patterns include anatomic variants and other focal pathological lesions, such as polyps. Other types of sinonasal inflammatory disease include sinonasal polyposis and granulomatous and fungal disease. Congenital lesions of the nose may be understood through a knowledge of the relevant developmental anatomy. These lesions include nasal dermoids and epidermoids, cephaloceles, gliomas, and choanal atresia. Important benign masses include antrochoanal polyps, inverting papillomas, angiomatous polyps, JNAs, and osteomas. Benign nasal masses have characteristic features that distinguish them from malignant lesions. Malignant nasal tumors, such as SSCa, esthesioneuroblastoma, and others, are characterized by their more aggressive and destructive behavior.

  19. "Open" approach to aortic arch aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Al Kindi, Adil H; Al Kimyani, Nasser; Alameddine, Tarek; Al Abri, Qasim; Balan, Baskaran; Al Sabti, Hilal

    2014-07-01

    Aortic arch aneurysm is a relatively rare entity in cardiac surgery. Repair of such aneurysms, either in isolation or combined with other cardiac procedures, remains a challenging task. The need to produce a relatively bloodless surgical field with circulatory arrest, while at the same time protecting the brain, is the hallmark of this challenge. However, a clear understanding of the topic allows a better and less morbid approach to such a complex surgery. Literature has shown the advantage of selective cerebral perfusion techniques in comparison with only circulatory arrest. Ability to perfuse the brain has allowed circulatory arrest temperatures at moderate hypothermia without the need for deep hypothermia. Even though cannulation site selection appears to be a minor issue, literature has shown that the subclavian/axillary route has the best outcomes and that femoral cannulation should only be reserved for no access patients. Although different techniques for arch anastomosis have been described, we routinely perform the distal first technique as we find it to be less cumbersome and easiest to reproduce. In this review our aim is to outline a systematic approach to aortic arch surgery. Starting with indications for intervention and proceeding with approaches on site of cannulation, approaches to brain protection with hypothermia and selective cerebral perfusion and finally surgical steps in performing the distal and arch vessels anastomosis.

  20. Late lower arch crowding: the aetiology reviewed.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Margaret E

    2002-06-01

    This article reviews the causes of the crowding that commonly occurs, particularly in the lower arch, after eruption of the second permanent molars. Factors discussed include mesially directed forces, in treated and untreated subjects, distally directed forces, occlusal changes, direction of eruption, tooth morphology, periodontal forces, and degenerative connective tissue changes.

  1. Complications of Nasal Bone Fractures.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Yeom, Seung Han; Hwang, Suk Hyun

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review of the treatment of nasal bone fractures. The search terms ("nasal bone fracture" AND complication) and ("nasal bone fracture" AND [anosmia OR olfaction OR olfactory nerve OR smell]) and (anosmia AND ["nasal preparation" OR "nasal antiseptics"]) were used to search PubMed and SCOPUS. Of the 500 titles, 40 full papers were reviewed. One paper was excluded, and 3 mined papers were added. Ultimately, 12 papers were analyzed. The overall deformity rate was 10.4% ± 4.8%. No significant differences were found between patients who underwent closed reduction (14.7% ± 7.3%) and those who underwent open reduction (9.4% ± 4.4%), between those who underwent local anesthesia (5.8% ± 4.5%), and those who underwent general anesthesia (8.8% ± 3.8%), or between those who received timely treatment (5.7%) and those whose treatment was delayed (9.0%). Septal deviation occurred in 10.0% of patients as a sequela of nasal bone fracture. The nasal obstruction rate was 10.5% ± 5.3%. Fewer patients of nasal obstruction occurred in the open reduction patients (6.9% ± 4.4%) than in the closed reduction patients (15.2%). One patient of epiphora and 1 patient of diplopia were reportedAmong the 77 patients with nasal bone fractures, 29 (37.7% ± 11.3%) complained of olfactory disturbances. No significant associations were found between the type of fracture and the presence of olfactory disturbances. It is recommended for providers to explain to patients that approximately one-tenth of nasal bone fractures exhibit deformity, septal deviation, or nasal obstruction after surgery. Surgeons should take considerable care to avoid the olfactory mucosa during reduction surgery.

  2. Complications of Nasal Bone Fractures.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Yeom, Seung Han; Hwang, Suk Hyun

    2017-01-27

    The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review of the treatment of nasal bone fractures. The search terms ("nasal bone fracture" AND complication) and ("nasal bone fracture" AND [anosmia OR olfaction OR olfactory nerve OR smell]) and (anosmia AND ["nasal preparation" OR "nasal antiseptics"]) were used to search PubMed and SCOPUS. Of the 500 titles, 40 full papers were reviewed. One paper was excluded, and 3 mined papers were added. Ultimately, 12 papers were analyzed. The overall deformity rate was 10.4% ± 4.8%. No significant differences were found between patients who underwent closed reduction (14.7% ± 7.3%) and those who underwent open reduction (9.4% ± 4.4%), between those who underwent local anesthesia (5.8% ± 4.5%), and those who underwent general anesthesia (8.8% ± 3.8%), or between those who received timely treatment (5.7%) and those whose treatment was delayed (9.0%). Septal deviation occurred in 10.0% of patients as a sequela of nasal bone fracture. The nasal obstruction rate was 10.5% ± 5.3%. Fewer patients of nasal obstruction occurred in the open reduction patients (6.9% ± 4.4%) than in the closed reduction patients (15.2%). One patient of epiphora and 1 patient of diplopia were reportedAmong the 77 patients with nasal bone fractures, 29 (37.7% ± 11.3%) complained of olfactory disturbances. No significant associations were found between the type of fracture and the presence of olfactory disturbances. It is recommended for providers to explain to patients that approximately one-tenth of nasal bone fractures exhibit deformity, septal deviation, or nasal obstruction after surgery. Surgeons should take considerable care to avoid the olfactory mucosa during reduction surgery.

  3. 11. DETAIL VIEW OF BUTTRESS 8 AND HALF OF ARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL VIEW OF BUTTRESS 8 AND HALF OF ARCH 7 SHOWING THE UPSTREAM INCLINATION OF THE ARCH. ALSO VISIBLE IS A FORMER WASTE-GATE IN THE ARCH THAT IS NOW FILLED WITH CONCRETE. - Hume Lake Dam, Sequioa National Forest, Hume, Fresno County, CA

  4. 29. DETAIL OF 1 OF 3 INTERIOR CORNERS OF ARCH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. DETAIL OF 1 OF 3 INTERIOR CORNERS OF ARCH, SHOWING SYSTEM OF STIFFENING BRACES OR BEAMS, APPROXIMATELY HALF WAY UP THE LEG OF THE ARCH - Jefferson National Expansion Memorial Arch, Mississippi River between Washington & Poplar Streets, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  5. Individualized catenary curves: their relationship to arch form and perimeter.

    PubMed

    Battagel, J M

    1996-02-01

    Study casts of the lower arches of 35 children in whom arch alignment was considered acceptable, were examined using a reflex microscope. Arch perimeter was calculated mathematically from a method which required measurement of the mesio-distal widths of the teeth only. This was described as the 'overlap' method. Arch perimeter was also calculated using individualized catenary curves for each subject. Two calculations were made, recording arch width either at the distal contact points of the first permanent molars or between their mesio-buccal cusps. Arch perimeter measured from the length of the catenary curves was consistently shorter than that calculated by the overlap method. The variation ranged from 0.02 to 4.58 mm. The catenary constructed using the distal molar contacts gave a better representation of the actual arch form: the mean discrepancy was 2.36 mm, compared with 2.86 mm with the second method where arch width was measured between mesio-buccal cusps. Both techniques for calculation of arch perimeter were highly reproducible. The catenary curve only approximated arch form well when the arch was relatively narrow across the inter canine region. For square arches this method was unsatisfactory. It is suggested that alternative techniques would be more reliable and the overlap method described here is considered satisfactory.

  6. Cleft Nasal Deformity and Rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Yoav; Buchanan, Edward P.; Wolfswinkel, Erik M.; Weathers, William M.; Stal, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    The cleft nasal deformity is a complex challenge in plastic surgery involving the skin, cartilage, mucosa, and skeletal platform. Ever since Blair and Brown first described the intricacies of the cleft pathology in 1931, the appropriate approach has been extensively debated in the literature with respect to timing, technique, and extent of surgical intervention. In this article, the authors review the literature and summarize the various modalities for achieving a successful rhinoplasty in the patient with a cleft nasal deformity. PMID:24179452

  7. Angioleiomyoma of the Nasal Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Milena Moreira; Monteiro, Daniela Yasbek; Fernandes, Atilio Maximino; Menegatti, Vanessa; Thomazzi, Emerson; Hubner, Ricardo Arthur; Lima, Luiz Guilherme Cernaglia Aureliano de

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vascular leiomyoma of the nasal cavity is an extremely rare tumor that represents less than 1% of all vascular leiomyomas. It is more prevalent in women between the fourth and sixth decades, reaching primarily the inferior nasal turbinates. Objectives Reporting and assisting the systematization of more accurate diagnostic methods in clinical and complementary investigation of vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity. Resumed Report We present the case of a 49-year-old woman diagnosed with vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity, which manifested mainly with nasal obstruction. During investigation, computer tomography was not diagnostic, the cytologic study was not conclusive, and according to the biopsy, it was a squamous papilloma. Conclusion We suggest that the technical difficulty in obtaining an adequate amount of material for preoperative biopsy, associated with the topography of the lesion in the vestibular nasal region, may have contributed to changing the postoperative diagnosis. Thus, pathologic study of the surgical fragment is the more accurate method for diagnosis. PMID:25992133

  8. Transverse spin and transverse momentum in scattering of plane waves.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sudipta; Singh, Ankit K; Ray, Subir K; Banerjee, Ayan; Gupta, Subhasish Dutta; Ghosh, Nirmalya

    2016-10-01

    We study the near field to the far field evolution of spin angular momentum (SAM) density and the Poynting vector of the scattered waves from spherical scatterers. The results show that at the near field, the SAM density and the Poynting vector are dominated by their transverse components. While the former (transverse SAM) is independent of the helicity of the incident circular polarization state, the latter (transverse Poynting vector) depends upon the polarization state. It is further demonstrated that the interference of the transverse electric and transverse magnetic scattering modes enhances both the magnitudes and the spatial extent of the transverse SAM and the transverse momentum components.

  9. Nasal Reconstruction and Repair of Secondary Nasal Deformities Following Treatment of Nasal Hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaona; Fan, Fei; Wang, Huan; You, Jianjun

    2017-03-01

    Secondary nasal deformities and retardation of development due to treatment of nasal hemangioma during infancy are a challenge when it comes to nasal reconstruction. In order to evaluate nasal repair and reconstruction in these patients, the authors compared the ease and outcomes of using expanded forehead, nasolabial sulcus, and medial upper arm tube flaps. According to the deformities and patients' wishes, flaps were selected; using autogeneic rib cartilage, auricle cartilage, or silica gel as a scaffold or without framework; the inner lining were made by the residual scar tissue or the distal end of transferred flap. The esthetical and functional scores were recorded by the Nasal Appearance and Function Evaluation Questionnaire score to evaluate the effectiveness of the methods. From January 2010 to December 2015, 34 patients were included. Postoperative follow-up went for 12 to 36 months. The expanded forehead flap was used in 28 patients, the nasolabial sulcus flap in 5 patients, and the medial upper arm tube flap in 1 patient. Regarding framework, 20 patients used rib cartilage, 8 patients used auricle cartilage, 1 patient used silicone, and 5 patients did not use any framework. All patients reported the increasing nasal appearance and function evaluation. Repair of secondary nasal defects following treatment of hemangiomas in infants and young children using an expanded frontal flap and autogenous cartilage framework is a reliable method with great long-term esthetic results. The nasolabial sulcus flap is a relatively simple method, especially for patients with a unilateral nasal alar defect. Supporting structure is needed and appropriate overcorrection is necessary.

  10. Clinical Evaluation of Efficacy of CIA and CNA Intrusion Arches.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Swati; Vora, Sambhav; Pandey, Vinisha

    2015-09-01

    Excessive overbite is one of the most common problems that confront the orthodontist. Deep bite can be due to infraocclusion of posterior teeth, supraocclusion of anterior teeth or a combination of the two. Correction of same can be carried out by extrusion of molars, intrusion of incisors or by a combination of both respectively. Various intrusion arches are recommended for correcting deep bite by true intrusion of anterior teeth, Utility arches, Segmental arch, Connecticut Intrusion Arch (CIA) and Connecticut New Arch (CNA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical efficacy of CIA and CNA intrusion arches. Tracings recorded from pre and post-treatment lateral cephalograms of 25 patients treated by CIA (Group I) and another 25 patients treated by CNA (Group II) intrusion arches in deep bite cases after four months of treatment were analysed and findings were recorded. Paired t-test was used to compare pre and post-treatment changes within Groups I and II and unpaired t-test was used to compare treatment changes between Group I and Group II. A P-value of < 0.05 was set for statistical significance. Findings of this study demonstrate that an average of 1mm of intrusion takes place with CIA intrusion arch and 1.3mm with CNA intrusion arch in a period of 4 months. Both intrusion arches do not affect the position of molar in vertical or anteroposterior plane. Both CIA and CNA intrusion arches are effective in bringing about intrusion of lower incisors.

  11. Heritability estimates of dental arch parameters in Lithuanian twins.

    PubMed

    Švalkauskienė, Vilma; Šmigelskas, Kastytis; Šalomskienė, Loreta; Andriuškevičiūtė, Irena; Šalomskienė, Aurelija; Vasiliauskas, Arūnas; Šidlauskas, Antanas

    2015-01-01

    The genetic influence on dental arch morphology may be country-specific, thus it is reasonable to check the estimates of genetics across different populations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the heredity of dental arch morphology in the sample of Lithuanian twins with accurate zygosity determination. The study sample consisted of digital dental models of 40 monozygotic (MZ) and 32 dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs. The estimates of heritability (h(2)) for dental arch breadth and length were calculated. All dental arch breadths and lengths were statistically significantly larger in men than in women. Arch length differences between genders were less expressed than largest breadth differences. In the upper jaw the largest genetic effect was found on the arch breadth between lateral incisors. The heritability of dental arch length demonstrated similar differences between upper and lower jaw with mandible dental arch length being more genetically determined. The largest genetic impact was found on the upper dental arch breadth between lateral incisors. Similar, but lower heritability is inherent for canines and first premolars of the upper jaw and first premolars of the lower jaw. It also can be noted, that arch breadths between posterior teeth show lower heritability estimates than between anterior teeth on both jaws. The dental arch in the upper jaw has more expressed genetic component than in the lower jaw.

  12. Bilateral cleft lip nasal deformity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arun Kumar; Nandini, R.

    2009-01-01

    Bilateral cleft lip nose deformity is a multi-factorial and complex deformity which tends to aggravate with growth of the child, if not attended surgically. The goals of primary bilateral cleft lip nose surgery are, closure of the nasal floor and sill, lengthening of the columella, repositioning of the alar base, achieving nasal tip projection, repositioning of the lower lateral cartilages, and reorienting the nares from horizontal to oblique position. The multiplicity of procedures in the literature for correction of this deformity alludes to the fact that no single procedure is entirely effective. The timing for surgical intervention and its extent varies considerably. Early surgery on cartilage may adversely affect growth and development; at the same time, allowing the cartilage to grow in an abnormal position and contributing to aggravation of deformity. Some surgeons advocate correction of deformity at an early age. However, others like the cartilages to grow and mature before going in for surgery. With peer pressure also becoming an important consideration during the teens, the current trend is towards early intervention. There is no unanimity in the extent of nasal dissection to be done at the time of primary lip repair. While many perform limited nasal dissection for the fear of growth retardation, others opt for full cartilage correction at the time of primary surgery itself. The value of naso-alveolar moulding (NAM) too is not universally accepted and has now more opponents than proponents. Also most centres in the developing world have neither the personnel nor the facilities for the same. The secondary cleft nasal deformity is variable and is affected by the extent of the original abnormality, any prior surgeries performed and alteration due to nasal growth. This article reviews the currently popular methods for correction of nasal deformity associated with bilateral cleft lip, it's management both at the time of cleft lip repair and also secondarily

  13. Evaluation of polyvinylidene fluoride nasal sensor to assess deviated nasal septum in comparision with peak nasal inspiratory flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Manjunatha, Roopa G; Rajanna, K; Mahapatra, D Roy; Prakash, Surya

    2014-01-01

    Deviated nasal septum (DNS) is one of the major causes of nasal obstruction. Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) nasal sensor is the new technique developed to assess the nasal obstruction caused by DNS. This study evaluates the PVDF nasal sensor measurements in comparison with PEAK nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF) measurements and visual analog scale (VAS) of nasal obstruction. Because of piezoelectric property, two PVDF nasal sensors provide output voltage signals corresponding to the right and left nostril when they are subjected to nasal airflow. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the voltage signal corresponding to nasal airflow was analyzed to assess the nasal obstruction. PVDF nasal sensor and PNIF were performed on 30 healthy subjects and 30 DNS patients. Receiver operating characteristic was used to analyze the DNS of these two methods. Measurements of PVDF nasal sensor strongly correlated with findings of PNIF (r = 0.67; p < 0.01) in DNS patients. A significant difference (p < 0.001) was observed between PVDF nasal sensor measurements and PNIF measurements of the DNS and the control group. A cutoff between normal and pathological of 0.51 Vp-p for PVDF nasal sensor and 120 L/min for PNIF was calculated. No significant difference in terms of sensitivity of PVDF nasal sensor and PNIF (89.7% versus 82.6%) and specificity (80.5% versus 78.8%) was calculated. The result shows that PVDF measurements closely agree with PNIF findings. Developed PVDF nasal sensor is an objective method that is simple, inexpensive, fast, and portable for determining DNS in clinical practice.

  14. The impact of kiddy dentures on maxillary arch growth.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wen-Yu; Wu, Fu-Ya

    2016-09-01

    T3 for IDW (p < 0.05). Kiddy dentures do interfere with the transverse growth of the dental arch over the abutment tooth area during a 1-year follow-up period. However the teeth adjacent to the confined abutments still show transverse growth. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  15. Nasal and cutaneous aspergillosis in a goat.

    PubMed

    do Carmo, P M S; Portela, R A; de Oliveira-Filho, J C; Dantas, A F M; Simões, S V D; Garino, F; Riet-Correa, F

    2014-01-01

    Nasal and cutaneous aspergillosis is reported in an adult goat. The clinical signs were severe respiratory distress due to partial nasal obstruction, bilateral mucopurulent nasal discharge, skin nodules on the ears and dorsal nasal region and focal depigmentation of the ventral commissure of the right nostril. At necropsy examination, sagittal sectioning of the head revealed a yellow irregular mass extending from the nasal vestibule to the frontal portion of the nasal cavity. Microscopically, there was pyogranulomatous rhinitis and dermatitis, with numerous intralesional periodic acid-Schiff-positive fungal hyphae morphologically suggestive of Aspergillus spp. Aspergillus niger was isolated by microbiological examination.

  16. Evaluation of the fit of preformed nickel titanium arch wires on normal occlusion dental arches

    PubMed Central

    Al-Barakati, Rakhn G.; Alqahtani, Nasser D.; AlMadi, Abdulaziz; Albarakati, Sahar F.; ALKofide, Eman A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine the fits of preformed nickel titanium (NiTi) archwires on dental arches with normal occlusion. Methods Forty sets of upper and lower plaster models were obtained from men and women with Class I occlusions. Preformed 0.016″ × 0.022″ NiTi archwires from Rocky Mountain Orthodontics (RMO), 3 M Unitek, Ormco, and Dentaurum were evaluated in terms of their fits on dental arches from male, female, and combined cases. Data were analyzed by using fourth- and sixth-order polynomial equations, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and the Duncan post hoc test. Results In the upper arches, the best fit and least error were obtained with RMO Ovoid and Ormco Orthos Large archwires for male cases, but with 3 M Orthoform LA archwires for female and combined cases. In the lower arches, the best fit and least error were obtained with Ormco Orthos Large for male cases, with 3 M Orthoform LA and RMO Normal for female cases, and with 3 M Orthoform LA, RMO Normal, Ormco Orthos Large, and Ormco Orthos Small for combined cases. When both dental arches were matched, Ormco Orthos Large was the best wire for male cases. 3 M Orthoform LA was the best wire for female and combined cases. Conclusions Using an archwire form with the best fit to the dental arch should produce minimal changes in the dental arch form when NiTi wires are used and require less customization when stainless-steel wires are used. PMID:26792965

  17. Evaluation of continuous arch and segmented arch leveling techniques in adult patients--a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Weiland, F J; Bantleon, H P; Droschl, H

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of overbite correction achieved by a conventional continuous arch wire technique and the segmented arch technique as recommended by Burstone. The sample comprised 50 adult patients (age 18 to 40 years) with deep bites. Twenty-five patients were treated with a continuous arch wire technique (CAW); in the second half of the sample, the segmented arch technique (Burstone) was used for correction of the vertical malocclusion. Lateral cephalograms and plaster cast models taken before and immediately after treatment were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed on the collected data. The results showed that both techniques produced a highly significant overbite reduction (CAW: -3.17 mm, p < 0.001; Burstone: -3.56 mm, p < 0.001). The CAW group showed an extrusion in the molar area with subsequent posterior rotation of the mandible (6occl-ML: +1.30 mm; 6occl-NSL: +1.63 mm; ML/NSL: +1.94 degrees, all p < 0.001). The Burstone group, however, showed overbite reduction by incisor intrusion without any substantial extrusion of posterior teeth (upper 1-NSL: -1.50 mm; lower 1-ML: -1.72 mm; both p < 0.001). As a consequence, no significant posterior rotation of the mandible took place (ML/NSL: +0.52 degrees, n.s.). It is concluded that in adult patients the segmented arch technique (Burstone) can be considered as being superior to a conventional continuous arch wire technique if arch leveling by incisor intrusion is indicated.

  18. [Evaluation of the timing of orthodontic arch expansion and graft in cleft lip and palate].

    PubMed

    Chang, Le; Wang, Yingnan; Liu, Hongyan

    2016-04-01

    Maxillary transverse growth is inhibited by congenital cleft, early surgical scar strain, and oppression of lipmuscles in patients with cleft lip and palate. Clinical manifestations have shown severely constricted maxilla, insufficientmaxillary width, mismatch of upper and lower dental arches, and crossbite. Alveolar bone graft and arch expansion can effectively correct the deficiency in maxillary width. This paper discusses the timing and success rate of alveolar bone graft, as wellas the relationship between alveolar bone graft and arch expansion. Secondary alveolar bone graft is optimally performed beforepermanent canine eruption, especially when the teeth have formed between half and three quarters of their roots. Rapid maxillaryexpansion prior to alveolar bone graft is beneficial because this process increases the gap of the cleft, expands bone graft, andreduces the difficulty. However, the stability of this process remains controversial. Small-scale studies have reported that rapidmaxillary expansion after alveolar bone graft can open the midpalatal suture without bone graft loss. Slow maxillary expansioncan provide continuous light forces to reconstruct the bone. However, these studies are coordinated with fixed orthodontictreatment. Further research is necessary to determine the effects of maxillary expansion on long-term stability of teeth.

  19. Association of breastfeeding and three-dimensional dental arch relationships in primary dentition.

    PubMed

    Sum, Fung Hou Kumoi Mineaki Howard; Zhang, Linkun; Ling, Hiu Tung Bonnie; Yeung, Cindy Po Wan; Li, Kar Yan; Wong, Hai Ming; Yang, Yanqi

    2015-03-10

    The benefits of breastfeeding on oral health are still inconclusive, especially the association on occlusion. This study aimed to investigate the association of breastfeeding and the development of primary dentition. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 851 Asian children aged 2-5 years old in Hong Kong. Questionnaires were completed by the parents to collect information on breastfeeding and the non-nutritive sucking habits. The children's dental arch relationships were examined in the sagittal, vertical, and transverse dimensions by an experienced examiner. Children who experienced pure breastfeeding for more than 6 months had a lower chance of developing a class II incisal relationship (P < 0.05) or an increased overjet (P < 0.05), and had wider intercanine (P < 0.05) and intermolar widths (P < 0.05). Vertically, no association on the extent of overbite or openbite was found (P > 0.05). Pure breastfeeding for more than 6 months is positively associated with primary dental arch development in the anterior sagittal dental segment and on the horizontal arch width in primary dentition. Therefore, pure breastfeeding for more than 6 months is recommended, as it is associated with lower chance of the development of abnormal dental relationships. The results will be valuable for education and promotion of maternal breastfeeding.

  20. Influence of nasal structure on the distribution of airflow in nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shen; Liu, Yingxi; Sun, Xiuzhen; Li, Shouju

    2008-06-01

    Numerical simulation of the nasal cavity is essential in order to understand the relationship between nasal structure and airflow characteristics. Since the structure of the nasal cavity varies significantly, the relationship between nasal structure and airflow characteristics will be investigated by numerical simulation of airflow in twenty-four nasal models in this paper. Twenty-four three-dimensional models of the nasal cavity structure have been reconstructed on the basis of Computed Tomography medical images collected from twenty-four healthy volunteers. Modification of the turbinate has been applied to one of these models in order to simulate an operation. The results from this variant model have been compared with the original model. The numerical simulation for the airflow in the nasal cavity was performed by the finite element method. Pressure drop and the airflow distribution in nasal models are presented quantitatively in flow field. Main airflow will pass through the common nasal meatus. The nasal airway resistance in the region of nasal valve and nasal vestibule (flow limiting structure) accounts for 52.6%-78.3% of total nasal airway resistance. The numerical results show that differences in patients' nasal cavity structure may lead to different airflow distributions. Changes of nasal structure lead to variation of airflow in both sides of the nasal cavity as well as airflow redistribution in each side of the nasal cavity.

  1. Investigation on the nasal airflow characteristics of anterior nasal cavity stenosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Chen, D; Wang, P H; Chen, J; Deng, J

    2016-08-01

    We used a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to study the inspiratory airflow profiles of patients with anterior nasal cavity stenosis who underwent curative surgery, by comparing pre- and postoperative airflow characteristics. Twenty patients with severe anterior nasal cavity stenosis, including one case of bilateral stenosis, underwent computed tomography (CT) scans for CFD modelling. The pre- and postoperative airflow characteristics of the nasal cavity were simulated and analyzed. The narrowest area of the nasal cavity in all 20 patients was located within the nasal valve area, and the mean cross-sectional area increased from 0.39 cm2 preoperative to 0.78 cm2 postoperative (P<0.01). Meanwhile, the mean airflow velocity in the nasal valve area decreased from 6.19 m/s to 2.88 m/s (P<0.01). Surgical restoration of the nasal symmetry in the bilateral nasal cavity reduced nasal resistance in the narrow sides from 0.24 Pa.s/mL to 0.11 Pa.s/mL (P<0.01). Numerical simulation of the nasal cavity in patients with anterior nasal cavity stenosis revealed structural changes and the resultant patterns of nasal airflow. Surgery achieved balanced bilateral nasal ventilation and decreased nasal resistance in the narrow region of the nasal cavity. The correction of nasal valve stenosis is not only indispensable for reducing nasal resistance, but also the key to obtain satisfactory curative effect.

  2. Investigation on the nasal airflow characteristics of anterior nasal cavity stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, T.; Chen, D.; Wang, P.H.; Chen, J.; Deng, J.

    2016-01-01

    We used a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to study the inspiratory airflow profiles of patients with anterior nasal cavity stenosis who underwent curative surgery, by comparing pre- and postoperative airflow characteristics. Twenty patients with severe anterior nasal cavity stenosis, including one case of bilateral stenosis, underwent computed tomography (CT) scans for CFD modelling. The pre- and postoperative airflow characteristics of the nasal cavity were simulated and analyzed. The narrowest area of the nasal cavity in all 20 patients was located within the nasal valve area, and the mean cross-sectional area increased from 0.39 cm2 preoperative to 0.78 cm2 postoperative (P<0.01). Meanwhile, the mean airflow velocity in the nasal valve area decreased from 6.19 m/s to 2.88 m/s (P<0.01). Surgical restoration of the nasal symmetry in the bilateral nasal cavity reduced nasal resistance in the narrow sides from 0.24 Pa.s/mL to 0.11 Pa.s/mL (P<0.01). Numerical simulation of the nasal cavity in patients with anterior nasal cavity stenosis revealed structural changes and the resultant patterns of nasal airflow. Surgery achieved balanced bilateral nasal ventilation and decreased nasal resistance in the narrow region of the nasal cavity. The correction of nasal valve stenosis is not only indispensable for reducing nasal resistance, but also the key to obtain satisfactory curative effect. PMID:27533764

  3. Influence of maxillary constriction on nasal resistance and sleep apnea severity in patients with Marfan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cistulli, P A; Richards, G N; Palmisano, R G; Unger, G; Berthon-Jones, M; Sullivan, C E

    1996-11-01

    Marfan's syndrome is associated with a high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). As this syndrome is associated with a characteristic constricted maxilla and high-arched palate, we reasoned that nasal airway constriction and resultant high nasal airway resistance (NAR) may contribute to the development of OSA. Therefore, the aim of this study was to measure NAR in patients with Marfan's syndrome. In addition, we aimed to examine the influence of maxillary morphology on both NAR and the severity of OSA. We measured NAR in 13 consecutive patients with Marfan's syndrome and 13 control subjects. NAR was measured by posterior rhinomanometry, and expressed as the inspiratory resistance at a flow of 0.5 L/s. Dental impressions were taken to evaluate maxillary arch morphology, allowing measurement of the following distances: intercuspid (ICD), interpremolar (IPD), intermolar (IMD), and maximum hard palate height (MPH). Ten of the patients and four of the control subjects had previously undergone nocturnal polysomnography. Mean NAR for the Marfan group was more than twice that in the control group (7.7 +/- 1.2 vs 2.9 +/- 0.4 cm H2O/L/s; p < 0.005). The patients also had marked constriction of the maxillary arch compared with control subjects. Two of the lateral maxillary measurements were significantly inversely correlated with NAR. There were significant correlations between various maxillary arch measurements (MPH/ICD, MPH/IPD, MPH/IMD) and the apnea/hypopnea index. These data suggest that high NAR is a common feature of Marfan's syndrome. Maxillary constriction with a relatively high hard palate appears to be a major reason for the high NAR. The significant correlations between indexes of maxillary constriction and sleep apnea severity suggest that maxillary morphology may play an important role in the pathophysiology of OSA in Marfan's syndrome.

  4. Nasal bone clip: a novel approach to nasal bone fixation.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Masaaki; Sai, Kenshin; Shiratake, Yasuhisa; Ohjimi, Hiroyuki

    2010-03-01

    Nasal bone fracture is a common injury, but its repair can be unexpectedly difficult. To date, intranasal gauze packing has been used to support the nasal bone in position and to maintain contact between the mucosa of the septum and the cartilage. This gauze packing, however, has a tendency to shift, resulting in an inflammatory response characterized by a foul odor until removal, which detracts from the comfort of the patient. We developed a novel device, the nasal bone clip (NBC), which provides a satisfactory nasal airway and improved comfort. A 1.2-mm Kirschner wire and a small piece of hydrocolloid wound dressing are used. The single wire is bent into a double-curved shape, after which each of the 2 tips is curled with pliers. The end of the wire in the nasal passage is covered with a piece of wound dressing to protect the mucosa. After reduction, the external portion of the wire is inserted on the surface of the splint. The NBC was applied in 14 cases: 12 instances of fresh fractures and 2 of old fractures; there were 8 men and 6 women; their mean age was 19.9 years. Complications were not observed; moreover, no patients exhibited problems during the treatment. The advantages of the NBC are that all materials are available in the operating room or outpatient department, it is low cost, it is readily installable and detachable, it affords superior support for gauze packing, it provides effective external splinting with intranasal support, it never disturbs the nasal airway, and it offers comfort.

  5. Powered Endoscopic Nasal Septal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Aderito de; Iniciarte, Livia; Levine, Howard

    2005-01-01

    While nasal endoscopy is typically used for diagnosis and sinus surgery, endoscopy can be combined with powered instrumentation to perform nasal septal surgery. Powered Endoscopic Nasal Septum Surgery (PENSS) is an easy, effective and quick alternative to traditional headlight approaches to septoplasty. PENSS limits the dissection to the area of the deviation and markedly reduces the extent of subperichondrial dissection. This is particularly valuable in patients who have undergone prior septal cartilage resection. PENSS was used in 2,730 patients over 8 years. Surgical indications and technique are discussed. These patients had either isolated nasal septal deformities associated with other rhinologic pathology (sinusitis, adenoid hypertrophy polyps and external nasal deformity). PENSS was utilized with video assistance to allow an enhanced view of the endoscopic operative field. These patients were operated upon in an outpatient surgical suite and were seen for a post-operative video endoscopic evaluation at 5, 10, 15 and 20 days after surgery. The patients who had associated functional endoscopic sinus surgery were evaluated as needed until 6 weeks after surgery. There were no delayed complications. Endoscopic resection of septal spurs, deformities and deviations can be performed safely alone or in combination with endoscopic sinus surgery with minimal additional morbidity.

  6. Total endograft replacement of aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Neequaye, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Total endovascular replacement of the aortic arch is a complex procedure that is often favoured when the pathology anatomy precludes a standard median sternotomy. Here we present the case of endograft repair in a 79 year old male with 6.5 cm arch aneurysm and 5.4 cm descending thoracoabdominal aneurysm. Following bilateral carotid-subclavian bypasses, a long 7 Fr sheath was advanced into the descending aorta through the common iliac artery purse string. A double curved long Lunderquist wire was guided to deep within the left ventricle, and the endograft carefully advanced over the wire. The graft was radiologically orientated, and deployed under asystolic conditions. Retrograde cannulation of the branches were accomplished, with carotid sheath placed into the branches followed by bridging stents. The graft delivery system was then removed. This approach obviates the need for a sternotomy, cumbersome extra-anatomic debranching, and hypothermic circulatory arrest. PMID:23977607

  7. Nasoalveolar Molding Therapy for the Treatment of Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Improves Nasal Symmetry and Maxillary Alveolar Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Ruíz-Escolano, María Gloria; Martínez-Plaza, Adoración; Fernández-Valadés, Ricardo; Cortés-Sánchez, Rosario; Muñoz-Miguelsanz, María Angeles; Velasco-Ortega, Eugenio; Perez-Ureña, María Bélen; Matar-Satuf, Kamel; España-López, Antonio José

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the esthetic and morphologic outcomes before surgery using nasoalveolar molding (NAM) therapy in children with unilateral cleft lip and palate. A prospective analysis was performed. The study was carried out in the Congenital Malformations Craniofacial and Cleft Lip and Palate Unit, Hospital Virgen de las Nieves, Andalusian Health Service, Granada (Spain). Twenty consecutively enrolled infants ranging in age from 7 to 30 days with nonsyndromic unilateral cleft lip and palate treated from 2008 to 2012. All patients were treated with NAM appliances to align the alveolar segments and reduce severity of the nasal deformity. The extraoral nasal measurements were performed on casts and nasal photographs. The measurements consisted of bialar width (BAW), columellar deviation (CD), cleft nostril height (CNH), cleft nostril width (CNW), non-CNH, non-CNW, and the deviation of the columella to the horizontal line represented by bilateral pupil line (BIA). The authors have made the measurements following Barilla method. Also 2 intraoral measurements were taken. Following NAM the extraoral records showed a statistically significant decrease in CD (P < 0.0001), CNW (P < 0.0001), and BAW (P < 0.001). Furthermore, statistically significant increases in CNH (P < 0.05) and BIA (P < 0.0001) were observed.Following Barilla measurements, the authors have found a high percentage of symmetry in all the nasal measurements after the NAM therapy.Intraoral results showed a statistically significant decrease in the gap between the greater and lesser alveolar segments and a statistically significant increase in maxillary arch width. Nasoalveolar molding improves nasal symmetry and achieves an improvement of all maxillary alveolar dimensions, increasing alveolar rim width, reducing the size of alveolar cleft gap, and improving shape of the maxillary dental arch. As a consequence of reducing the alveolar and nasal deformities before surgery

  8. Jurassic stratigraphy of the Wiggins Arch, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.A.; Maxwell, G.B. )

    1993-09-01

    Mobil and Shell jointly explored the Wiggins arch area in southern Mississippi from 1985 to 1991. The effort concentrated on the Jurassic Norphlet and Smackover formations. Two wells were drilled into Paleozoic crystalline rocks and one well into the Pine Hill formation. Two of these wells were located on the southern side of the Wiggins arch and provide significant data for interpreting Jurassic stratigraphy. The Mobil No. 1 U.S.A. well encountered a complete Jurassic section, but with some significantly different facies than those encountered by wells to the north. A granite wash section is the equivalent to the Frisco City formation previously only found 100 mi to the north-northeast. All 300 ft of Smackover is crystalline dolomite. The Norphlet section is entirely granite wash. The Pine Hill anhydrite is unusually thick and interpreted to be equivalent to the Louann Salt. Correlations to other wells on the Wiggins arch, particularly the Conoco No. 1 Higgins, indicate that the Jurassic can be divided into three transgressive events separated by the Norphlet/Pine Hill and Frisco City/Buckner regressive events.

  9. Aortic arch dissection: a controversy of classification.

    PubMed

    Lempel, Jason K; Frazier, Aletta Ann; Jeudy, Jean; Kligerman, Seth J; Schultz, Randall; Ninalowo, Hammed A; Gozansky, Elliott K; Griffith, Bartley; White, Charles S

    2014-06-01

    Aortic dissections originating in the ascending aorta and descending aorta have been classified as type A and type B dissections, respectively. However, dissections with intimal flap extension into the aortic arch between the innominate and left subclavian arteries are not accounted for adequately in the widely used Stanford classification. This gap has been the subject of controversy in the medical and surgical literature, and there is a tendency among many radiologists to categorize such arch dissections as type A lesions, thus making them an indication for surgery. However, the radiologic perspective is not supported by either standard dissection classification or current clinical management. In this special report, the origin of dissection classification and its evolution into current radiologic interpretation and surgical practice are reviewed. The cause for the widespread misconception about classification and treatment algorithms is identified. Institutional review board approval and waiver of informed consent were obtained as part of this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study to assess all aortic dissection studies performed at the University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore between 2010 and 2012 to determine the prevalence of arch dissections. Finally, a unified classification system that reconciles imaging interpretation and management implementation is proposed.

  10. Oblique slip in Laramide foreland arches

    SciTech Connect

    Erslev, E.A.; Selvig, B.; Molzer, P. . Dept. of Earth Resources)

    1993-03-01

    Don Wise was one of the first structural geologists to recognize the complex, four-dimensional (space and time) nature of basement-involved faulting in the Rocky Mountain foreland. His focus on both small scale kinematic indicators and regional tectonic hypotheses has provided a launching point for many Rocky Mountain geologists. The implications of the anastomosing patterns of Laramide foreland arches on models of regional stress and strain have provoked considerable debate. Hypotheses range from those invoking multiple stages of lateral compression from different directions to single-stage models necessitating a component of strike-slip motion in east-west and north-south arches. These hypotheses were tested using slickenline analysis of minor faulting in structures with different orientations. In Wyoming, structures paralleling the dominant northwest structural trend have slickenlines in the NE-SW vertical plane, consistent with shortening and compression in this direction. The east-west Owl Creek and Casper Mountain structures also have NE-SW trending slickenlines, indicating slip oblique to these arches. In Colorado, minor faults in the north-south margin of the northeastern Front Range also indicate oblique slip, with shortening in the NE-SW quadrant. The actual trend of the slickenlines is more easterly, however, suggesting a change of slip trajectory with latitude, not time, possibly in response to identation by the Colorado Plateau.

  11. Digital transversal filter architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberger, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    A fast and efficient architecture is described for the realization of a pipelined, fully parallel digital transversal filter in VLSI. The order of summation is changed such that no explicit multiplication is seen, gated accumulators are used, and the coefficients are circulated. Estimates for the number of transistors needed for a CMOS implementation are given.

  12. ô Electroproduction and Transversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuti, Simonetta

    2008-10-01

    Exclusive ô electroproduction from the proton is suggested for extracting the tensor charge and other quantities related to transversity from experimental data [1]. A connection between a description based on partonic degrees of freedom, given in terms of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), and Regge phenomenology is discussed. Pion electroproduction is described in terms of the chiral odd (spin flip) GPDs for both longitudinal and transverse virtual photon polarizations. A mechanism for the Q^2-dependence of the &*circ;ô vertex is proposed that, by treating separately natural and unnatural parity exchanges at this vertex, allows one to separate the transverse and longitudinal virtual photon contributions, the latter being dominated by unnatural exchanges. A study of the sensitivity of different observables in both unpolarized and polarized scattering to both the tensor charge and the transverse anomalous magnetic moment [2], is presented with the aim of providing a practical method for extracting the latter. Future investigations using a variety of targets (proton, deuteron and ^4He) and probes -- both electron and neutrino scattering as well as hadronic reactions will be discussed. [1] S. Ahmad, G. R. Goldstein and S. Liuti, arXiv:0805.3568 [hep-ph] [2] M. Burkardt, Phys. Lett. B 639, 462 (2006).

  13. Spontaneous transverse colon volvulus

    PubMed Central

    Sana, Landolsi; Ali, Gassara; Kallel, Helmi; Amine, Baklouti; Ahmed, Saadaoui; Mohamed Ali, Elouer; Wajdi, Chaeib; Saber, Mannaï

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous transverse colon volvulus in a young healthy woman. It constitutes an unusual case since it occurred in a young healthy woman with a subacute onset and no aetiological factor has been found. Its diagnosis is still challenging. Prompt recognition with emergency intervention constitutes the key to successful outcome. PMID:23785565

  14. Spontaneous transverse colon volvulus.

    PubMed

    Sana, Landolsi; Ali, Gassara; Kallel, Helmi; Amine, Baklouti; Ahmed, Saadaoui; Ali, Elouer Mohamed; Wajdi, Chaeib; Saber, Mannaï

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous transverse colon volvulus in a young healthy woman. It constitutes an unusual case since it occurred in a young healthy woman with a subacute onset and no aetiological factor has been found. Its diagnosis is still challenging. Prompt recognition with emergency intervention constitutes the key to successful outcome.

  15. Effects of Nasal Port Area on Perception of Nasality and Measures of Nasalance Based on Computational Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Bunton, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to extend previously published modeling work examining the relation between nasal port opening, measures of nasalance, and perceptual ratings of nasality by experienced listeners for three simulated English corner vowels, /i/, /u/, and /ɑ/. Design Samples were generated using a computational model that allowed for exact control of nasal port size and direct measures of nasalance. Perceptual ratings were obtained using a paired stimulus presentation. Participants Four experienced listeners. Main Outcome Measures Nasalance and perceptual ratings of nasality. Results Findings indicate that perceptual ratings of nasality and nasalance increased for samples generated with nasal port areas up to and including 0.16 cm2 but plateaued in samples generated with larger nasal port areas. No vowel differences were noted for perceptual ratings. Conclusions This work extends previously published work by including nasal port areas representative of those reported in the literature for clinical populations, however, continued work using samples with varied phonetic context, and varying suprasegmental and temporal characteristics are needed. PMID:24437587

  16. Tuberculous granuloma in haemangiomatous nasal polyp.

    PubMed

    S, Bal M; S, Kanwal; P, Ritu

    2003-03-01

    Tuberculosis of upper respiratory tract is quite infrequent especially the nasal involvement. Isolated cases have been reported by certain authors. A ease of nasal tubercolosis is being presented for its rare site and its association with haemangioma.

  17. [Nasal septum cyst of odontogenic origin].

    PubMed

    Calvo Boizas, E; Sancipriano Hernández, J A; Diego Pérez, C; Rodríguez Gutiérrez, A; Martínez-Alegría López, J; Gómez Toranzo, F

    1997-10-01

    Cysts in the nasal septum are unusual, and the presence of a dental cyst is even rarer. A cyst of dental origin was produced by dental root fracture in the nasal septum. The differential diagnosis and management are discussed.

  18. Matizaciones ortologicas: La nasalizacion (Orthoepic Variations: Nasalization)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prado, Eduardo

    1975-01-01

    This paper discusses the slight nasalization occurring in Spanish to the vowels preceding "n" or "m" when placed before a "b" or "p" between two nasal consonants, in word-initial position or in elision. (Text is in Spanish.) (CHK)

  19. Nasal trauma: Primary reconstruction with open rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinidis, I; Malliari, H; Metaxas, S

    2011-01-01

    Due to the prominent location of the nose, the most common facial traumas are nasal injuries. Although nasal traumas usually require staged intervention at a later period of time, in selected cases, primary reconstruction can be effective. A 20-year-old man who was referred from the emergency department with nasal trauma is presented. He reported a fall after feeling unsteady, which caused a direct nasal injury. Clinical examination revealed septal fracture with obstruction of the left nasal cavity and deformity of the nasal pyramid (inverted V deformity). The patient also had a complete dissection of the columella skin. Epistaxis was self-limited, and an open rhinoplasty procedure was decided because the trauma occurred 1 h before admission and there was no significant edema. Surgical intervention included septal reconstruction combined with restoration of the nasal pyramid and columella. One month later, the patient had patent nasal airways, and he was satisfied with the aesthetic result. PMID:22942663

  20. Nasal mucociliary clearance after radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Stringer, S P; Stiles, W; Slattery, W H; Krumerman, J; Parsons, J T; Mendenhall, W M; Cassisi, N J

    1995-04-01

    Irradiation has been demonstrated to cause decreased mucociliary clearance in animal models. We sought to verify this effect clinically by using the saccharin transport test to evaluate nasal mucociliary clearance in 9 patients previously treated with radiation therapy to the nasal cavity. The patients also completed a questionnaire examining the prevalence of nasal symptoms before and after radiation therapy. Patients who received radiation therapy had no clearance of saccharin from the nasal cavity at a minimum of 20 minutes. The controls had a median clearance time of 5 minutes. The patients noted a higher prevalence of nasal congestion, drainage, and facial pain after radiation therapy. This study demonstrates that radiation therapy to the nasal cavity causes a decrease in nasal mucociliary clearance. This alteration should be considered when selecting therapy for malignancies in the nasal area.

  1. The Foot's Arch and the Energetics of Human Locomotion.

    PubMed

    Stearne, Sarah M; McDonald, Kirsty A; Alderson, Jacqueline A; North, Ian; Oxnard, Charles E; Rubenson, Jonas

    2016-01-19

    The energy-sparing spring theory of the foot's arch has become central to interpretations of the foot's mechanical function and evolution. Using a novel insole technique that restricted compression of the foot's longitudinal arch, this study provides the first direct evidence that arch compression/recoil during locomotion contributes to lowering energy cost. Restricting arch compression near maximally (~80%) during moderate-speed (2.7 ms(-1)) level running increased metabolic cost by + 6.0% (p < 0.001, d = 0.67; unaffected by foot strike technique). A simple model shows that the metabolic energy saved by the arch is largely explained by the passive-elastic work it supplies that would otherwise be done by active muscle. Both experimental and model data confirm that it is the end-range of arch compression that dictates the energy-saving role of the arch. Restricting arch compression had no effect on the cost of walking or incline running (3°), commensurate with the smaller role of passive-elastic mechanics in these gaits. These findings substantiate the elastic energy-saving role of the longitudinal arch during running, and suggest that arch supports used in some footwear and orthotics may increase the cost of running.

  2. Aspiration of Nasopore nasal packing.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jonathan; Reddy, Ekambar

    2017-10-04

    We present a case of postoperative Nasopore aspiration in an otherwise fit and well 11-year-old. An endoscopic adenoidectomy had been performed without incident and Nasopore packing placed into each nasal cavity. Immediately after extubation, there was marked hypoxia, tachypnoea and high clinical suspicion of pack aspiration. The patient returned to theatre for emergency rigid bronchoscopy and retrieval of nasal packing. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Nasal pemphigoid: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Rourke, Thomas; Pankhania, Miran; Hettige, Roland; Draper, Mark R

    2012-06-29

    Cicatricial pemphigoid is a chronic, systemic, immunobullous disorder affecting mucous membranes. Nasal manifestations of cicatricial pemphigoid are less common than in the rest of the upper aero-digestive tract, and may prove difficult to diagnose and manage effectively. We report one such case presenting with isolated nasal symptoms, in which diagnosis, treatment and ongoing management of the underlying cause was particularly challenging. A literature review was performed to ascertain the incidence of cicatricial pemphigoid and to establish the best evidence-based investigation and treatment.

  4. Quilting sutures for nasal septum.

    PubMed

    Hari, C; Marnane, C; Wormald, P J

    2008-05-01

    Suturing of the nasal septum after septal surgery is a commonly performed procedure designed to prevent complications such as septal haematoma and bleeding. It is also useful for closing any inadvertent tears of the septal mucosa and providing additional support for the cartilage pieces retained in septoplasty. In addition, the suture can be placed through the middle turbinates, stabilising them during the healing process. Placing knots for interrupted sutures in the posterior and middle part of the nasal septum can be technically difficult. We describe a continuous suturing technique for approximating the mucosal flaps following septal surgery.

  5. Nasal septal cyst--a case report.

    PubMed

    Chiang, C H; Juan, K H; Kuo, W R; Tai, C F; Wu, J R

    1996-04-01

    The usual complications of submucous resection of the nasal septum (SMR) are septal hematoma, infection, hemorrhage, septal perforation, and nasal deformity. We present a case of nasal septal cyst which may be a rare complication of SMR. Entrapment of free nasal mucosal remnants or inward folding of incised septal mucosa is thought to be the cause. The patient underwent deroofment of the left cystic wall by lateral rhinotomy. There was no recurrence after one year.

  6. D-TGA Combined With Left Arch Atresia of a Double Aortic Arch.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Song, Laichun; Tao, Liang; Zhou, Hong

    2017-05-05

    A three-month-old female underwent an arterial switch operation for transposition of the great arteries (TGA) with concomitant ventricular septal defect (VSD). After the operation, the patient suffered from stubborn pulmonary infection with increased airway resistance, and could not be weaned from a ventilator. Multispiral computed tomography (CT) scanning suggested a double aortic arch with left arch atresia. The patient underwent a second procedure to resection the left aortic arch. The patient gradually recovered and was successfully weaned from the ventilator. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterizing human nasal airflow physiologic variables by nasal index.

    PubMed

    Patki, Aniruddha; Frank-Ito, Dennis O

    2016-10-01

    Although variations in nasal index (NI) have been reported to represent adaptation to climatic conditions, assessments of NI with airflow variables have not been rigorously investigated. This study uses computational fluid dynamics modeling to investigate the relationship between NI and airflow variables in 16 subjects with normal nasal anatomy. Airflow simulations were conducted under constant inspiratory pressure. Nasal resistance (NR) against NI showed weak association from nostrils to anterior inferior turbinate (R(2)=0.26) and nostril to choanae (R(2)=0.12). NI accounted for 38% and 41% of the respective variation in wall shear stress (WSS) and heat flux (HF) at the nasal vestibule, and 52% and 49% of variability in WSS and HF across the entire nose. HF and WSS had strong correlation with NI<80, and weakly correlated with NI>80; these differences in HF and WSS for NI<80 and NI>80 were not statistically significant. Results suggest strong relationship between NI and both WSS and HF but not NR, particularly in subjects with NI<80. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of mouth breathing versus nasal breathing on dentofacial and craniofacial development in orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Harari, Doron; Redlich, Meir; Miri, Shalish; Hamud, Tachsin; Gross, Menachem

    2010-10-01

    To determine the effect of mouth breathing during childhood on craniofacial and dentofacial development compared to nasal breathing in malocclusion patients treated in the orthodontic clinic. Retrospective study in a tertiary medical center. Clinical variables and cephalometric parameters of 116 pediatric patients who had undergone orthodontic treatment were reviewed. The study group included 55 pediatric patients who suffered from symptoms and signs of nasal obstruction, and the control group included 61 patients who were normal nasal breathers. Mouth breathers demonstrated considerable backward and downward rotation of the mandible, increased overjet, increase in the mandible plane angle, a higher palatal plane, and narrowing of both upper and lower arches at the level of canines and first molars compared to the nasal breathers group. The prevalence of a posterior cross bite was significantly more frequent in the mouth breathers group (49%) than nose breathers (26%), (P = .006). Abnormal lip-to-tongue anterior oral seal was significantly more frequent in the mouth breathers group (56%) than in the nose breathers group (30%) (P = .05). Naso-respiratory obstruction with mouth breathing during critical growth periods in children has a higher tendency for clockwise rotation of the growing mandible, with a disproportionate increase in anterior lower vertical face height and decreased posterior facial height.

  9. Extramedullary plasmacytoma of the nasal sinus cavities.

    PubMed

    Lomeo, Paul E; McDonald, John E; Finneman, Judith; Shoreline

    2007-01-01

    This is case report of extramedullary plasmacytoma occurring in the nasal cavity. These are unusual tumors especially in the nasal area. Patients present mainly with nasal symptoms on the same side of the tumors. The treatment consists of surgery resection, or, radiation, or both. There is a fifty percent survival rate in five years.

  10. Does post septoplasty nasal packing reduce complications?

    PubMed

    Naghibzadeh, Bijan; Peyvandi, Ali Asghar; Naghibzadeh, Ghazal

    2011-01-01

    The main issues in nasal surgery are to stabilize the nose in the good position after surgery and preserve the cartilages and bones in the favorable situation and reduce the risk of deviation recurrence. Also it is necessary to avoid the synechia formation, nasal valve narrowing, hematoma and bleeding. Due to the above mentioned problems and in order to solve and minimize them nasal packing, nasal splint and nasal mold have been advised. Patients for whom the nasal packing used may faced to some problems like naso-pulmonary reflex, intractable pain, sleep disorder, post operation infection and very dangerous complication like toxic shock syndrome. We have two groups of patients and three surgeons (one of the surgeons used post operative nasal packing in his patients and the two others surgeons did not).Complications and morbidities were compared in these two groups. Comparing the two groups showed that the rate of complication and morbidities between these two groups were same and the differences were not valuable, except the pain and discomfort post operatively and at the time of its removal. Nasal packing has several risks for the patients while its effects are not studied. Septoplasty can be safely performed without postoperative nasal packing. Nasal packing had no main findings that compensated its usage. Septal suture is one of the procedures that can be used as alternative method to nasal packing. Therefore the nasal packing after septoplasty should be reserved for the patients with increased risk of bleeding.

  11. Nasal intubation: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Varun; Acharya, Gaurav

    2016-01-01

    Nasal intubation technique was first described in 1902 by Kuhn. The others pioneering the nasal intubation techniques were Macewen, Rosenberg, Meltzer and Auer, and Elsberg. It is the most common method used for giving anesthesia in oral surgeries as it provides a good field for surgeons to operate. The anatomy behind nasal intubation is necessary to know as it gives an idea about the pathway of the endotracheal tube and complications encountered during nasotracheal intubation. Various techniques can be used to intubate the patient by nasal route and all of them have their own associated complications which are discussed in this article. Various complications may arise while doing nasotracheal intubation but a thorough knowledge of the anatomy and physics behind the procedure can help reduce such complications and manage appropriately. It is important for an anesthesiologist to be well versed with the basics of nasotracheal intubation and advances in the techniques. A thorough knowledge of the anatomy and the advent of newer devices have abolished the negative effect of blindness of the procedure. PMID:27994382

  12. Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyps

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Whitney W.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Kern, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is an important clinical entity diagnosed by the presence of both subjective and objective evidence of chronic sinonasal inflammation. Symptoms include anterior or posterior rhinorrhea, nasal congestion, hyposmia and/or facial pressure or pain that last for greater than 12 weeks duration. Nasal polyps are inflammatory lesions that project into the nasal airway, are typically bilateral, and originate from the ethmoid sinus. Males are more likely to be affected than females but no specific genetic or environmental factors have been strongly linked to the development of this disorder to date. CRSwNP is frequently associated with asthma and allergic rhinitis but the cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to the clinical symptoms are not fully understood. Defects in the sinonasal epithelial cell barrier, increased exposure to pathogenic and colonized bacteria, and dysregulation of the host immune system are all thought to play prominent roles in disease pathogenesis. Additional studies are needed to further explore the clinical and pathophysiological features of CRSwNP so that biomarkers can be identified and novel advances can be made to improve the treatment and management of this disease. PMID:27393770

  13. Partonic Transverse Momentum Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2010-08-04

    In recent years parton distributions have been generalized to account also for transverse degrees of freedom and new sets of more general distributions, Transverse Momentum Dependent (TMD) parton distributions and fragmentation functions were introduced. Different experiments worldwide (HERMES, COMPASS, CLAS, JLab-Hall A) have measurements of TMDs in semi-inclusive DIS processes as one of their main focuses of research. TMD studies are also an important part of the present and future Drell-Yan experiments at RICH and JPARC and GSI, respectively, Studies of TMDs are also one of the main driving forces of the Jefferson Lab (JLab) 12 GeV upgrade project. Progress in phenomenology and theory is flourishing as well. In this talk an overview of the latest developments in studies of TMDs will be given and newly released results, ongoing activities, as well as planned near term and future measurements will be discussed.

  14. Comparison of overjet among 3 arch types in normal occlusion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-In; Bayome, Mohamed; Kim, Yoonji; Baek, Seung-Hak; Han, Seong Ho; Kim, Seong-Hun; Kook, Yoon-Ah

    2011-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the amounts of overjet in the anterior and posterior segments of 3 arch forms by using facial axis points on 3-dimensional virtual models and to verify the minimum posterior extension required for classification of the arch form in normal occlusions. Facial axis points were digitized on 97 virtual models with normal occlusion, classified into 20 tapered, 25 ovoid, and 52 square arch forms. Intercanine and intermolar arch widths and depths were measured. The best-fitting curves were created, and overjet was measured at each facial axis point. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to assess the relationship between arch form and overjet in different areas. The minimum posterior extension to determine arch type was analyzed with the chi-square test. Subjects with a tapered arch form had larger overjet compared with those with ovoid and square forms, except at the central incisor. A significant difference in overjet among different areas was found in subjects with a square arch form (P <0.0001). No significant difference (P = 0.864) was found among the first and second premolar and the first molar groups for classifying arch-form types. A significant difference was found in anterior and posterior overjet according to arch types. The extension to the first premolar was sufficient to classify arch form type. It might be beneficial to consider more coordinated preformed superelastic archwires according to variations in overjet of different arch types. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Bilateral first and second arch anomalies: a rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amit Pal; Kumar, Virad; Narula, Vineet; Meher, Ravi; Raj, Anoop

    2012-04-01

    Branchial sinuses are one of the most common congenital anomalies present. They are usually unilateral; bilateral cases are present but are rare. The presentation of bilateral branchial sinus anomalies along with bilateral first arch anomalies is very rare. Here, we present a case of bilateral first arch anomalies co-existing with bilateral second arch anomalies in a patient with no related family history and no associated syndrome.

  16. The Optimized Arch Design Theory and Engineering Practices,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-12

    ellipses, three centered circles, parabolas, catenary , horseshoe arches etc. (Fig. 1). 5 (6) . • -=.’ (𔄁)r ?F -42 i0 R(2) M" 4 3 9 )4 fu ix- = -, ME...10)• (14) Fig. 1 Arch shapes commonly used in engineering. Key: (1) Semi-circle, isometric ellipse; (2) Three- centered circle; (3) Catenary ; (4...circle; (12) Minor arc cyclotomic; (13) Catenary ; (14) Parabola. Then what generalities and characteristics do these arch shapes have? What are the

  17. Biomechanical Role of the Transverse Carpal Ligament in Carpal Tunnel Compliance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zong-Ming; Marquardt, Tamara L.; Evans, Peter J.; Seitz, William H.

    2014-01-01

    The transverse carpal ligament (TCL) is a significant constituent of the wrist structure and forms the volar boundary of the carpal tunnel. It serves biomechanical and physiological functions, acting as a pulley for the flexor tendons, anchoring the thenar and hypothenar muscles, stabilizing the bony structure, and providing wrist proprioception. This article mainly describes and reviews our recent studies regarding the biomechanical role of the TCL in the compliant characteristics of the carpal tunnel. First, force applied to the TCL from within the carpal tunnel increased arch height and area due to arch width narrowing from the migration of the bony insertion sites of the TCL. The experimental findings were accounted for by a geometric model that elucidated the relationships among arch width, height, and area. Second, carpal arch deformation showed that the carpal tunnel was more flexible at the proximal level than at the distal level and was more compliant in the inward direction than in the outward direction. The hamate-capitate joint had larger angular rotations than the capitate-trapezoid and trapezoid-trapezium joints for their contributions to changes of the carpal arch width. Lastly, pressure application inside the intact and released carpal tunnels led to increased carpal tunnel cross-sectional areas, which were mainly attributable to the expansion of the carpal arch formed by the TCL. Transection of the TCL led to an increase of carpal arch compliance that was nine times greater than that of the intact carpal tunnel. The carpal tunnel, while regarded as a stabile structure, demonstrates compliant properties that help to accommodate biomechanical and physiological variants such as changes in carpal tunnel pressure. PMID:25364633

  18. [Ettore Majoran's transversal epistemology].

    PubMed

    Bontems, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    « Il valore delle leggi statistiche nella fisica e nelle scienze sociali » is Ettore Majorana's only work on science. It offers a critique of classical determinism, establishing an analogy between the laws of quantum mechanics and social science and arguing that both are intrinsically linked to probability. This article first studies this argument from the standpoing of metaphysics, physics, and sociology, and then assesses the significance of this transversal epistemology.

  19. Tunable Microwave Transversal Filters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-01

    GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER AFOSR-TR. 84-0977 S4. TI TLE (and Subtitle) 5. TYP ?FE&T&PEO OEE U!NABLE MICROWAVE TRANSVERSAL FILTERS...this goal through magnetostatic waves MSW propagating at microwave frequency in magnetically biased, liquid phase epitaxial films of yttrium iron...garnet (YIG) grown on gadolinium gallium garnet (GGG). This technology has a number of advantages; low loss (greater than 30db/usec at xband), tunable by

  20. Transverse Spin Physics: Recent Developments

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Feng

    2008-12-10

    Transverse-spin physics has been very active and rapidly developing in the last few years. In this talk, I will briefly summarize recent theoretical developments, focusing on the associated QCD dynamics in transverse spin physics.

  1. Pediatric nasal fractures: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Desrosiers, Arthur E; Thaller, Seth R

    2011-07-01

    Nasal fractures have been reported as 1 of the 3 most commonly encountered pediatric facial bone fractures. The most common causes of nasal fractures in this age group are auto accidents (40%), sports injuries (25%), intended injuries (15%), and home injuries (10%). Nasal fractures are usually treated with closed reduction (Higuera S, Lee EI, Stal S. Nasal trauma and the deviated nose. Plast Reconstr Surg 2007;120:64S-75S). This results in a significant incidence of posttraumatic deformities, often requiring secondary surgical treatment. For this reason, it is paramount to pay careful attention to the underlying structural nasal anatomy during the initial diagnosis and management.

  2. 66. CORBELS, BLIND ARCHES & SHIELDS, COMMONS EAST WALL, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. CORBELS, BLIND ARCHES & SHIELDS, COMMONS EAST WALL, LOOKING EAST - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. Arched gonadal arteries in the South African negro.

    PubMed Central

    Grine, F E; Kramer, B

    1981-01-01

    The frequency with which the gonadal arteries follow a recurrent course, upwards and arching over the renal veins before descending to the gonads, is recorded for the South African Negro. The gonadal arteries follow such a course on the left side in 17, 2% and on the right side in 22% of cases. This incidence for arched left sided arteries is comparable to that recorded in other studies, but the frequency for arched right sided arteries in the South African Negro appears to be higher. Recognition of arching gonadal arteries is of importance to the vascular surgeon and urologist. PMID:7298490

  4. 2. Elkmont, deck view of corrugated arched bridge. Great ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Elkmont, deck view of corrugated arched bridge. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Elkmont Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Little River at Elkmont Campground, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  5. 3. Elkmont, underside detail of corrugated arched bridge. Great ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Elkmont, underside detail of corrugated arched bridge. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Elkmont Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Little River at Elkmont Campground, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  6. Mathematical model of a moment-less arch

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for predicting the geometrical shapes of rigid, two-pin, moment-less arches of constant cross section. The advancement of this work lies in the inclusion of arch self-weight and the ability to produce moment-less arch forms for any span/rise ratio, and any ratio of uniformly distributed load per unit span, w, to uniformly distributed arch weight per unit arch length, q. The model is used to derive the shapes of two classical ‘moment-less’ arch forms: parabolic and catenary, prior to demonstrating a general case, not restricted by the unrealistic load assumptions (absence of q, in the case of a parabolic form, or no w, in the case of a catenary arch). Using the same value of span/rise ratio, and w/q>1, the behaviour of the moment-less and parabolic arches under permanent loading, (w+q), is analysed. Results show the former to be developing much lower stresses than its parabolic rival, even when there are relatively small differences in the two geometries; for a medium span/rise ratio of 4 and w/q=2, differences in the parabolic and moment-less arch geometries would, in practical terms, be viewed as insignificant, but the stresses in them are different. PMID:27436970

  7. ARCH TYPE MAGAZINE # 2131. INTERIOR LOOKING TOWARD ENTRY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ARCH TYPE MAGAZINE # 2131. INTERIOR LOOKING TOWARD ENTRY. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Magazine Type, Various roads in northern & eastern portions of installation, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. Mathematical model of a moment-less arch.

    PubMed

    Lewis, W J

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for predicting the geometrical shapes of rigid, two-pin, moment-less arches of constant cross section. The advancement of this work lies in the inclusion of arch self-weight and the ability to produce moment-less arch forms for any span/rise ratio, and any ratio of uniformly distributed load per unit span, w, to uniformly distributed arch weight per unit arch length, q. The model is used to derive the shapes of two classical 'moment-less' arch forms: parabolic and catenary, prior to demonstrating a general case, not restricted by the unrealistic load assumptions (absence of q, in the case of a parabolic form, or no w, in the case of a catenary arch). Using the same value of span/rise ratio, and w/q>1, the behaviour of the moment-less and parabolic arches under permanent loading, (w+q), is analysed. Results show the former to be developing much lower stresses than its parabolic rival, even when there are relatively small differences in the two geometries; for a medium span/rise ratio of 4 and w/q=2, differences in the parabolic and moment-less arch geometries would, in practical terms, be viewed as insignificant, but the stresses in them are different.

  9. Relationship between the degree and direction of nasal septum deviation and nasal bone morphology.

    PubMed

    Serifoglu, Ismail; Oz, İbrahim İlker; Damar, Murat; Buyukuysal, Mustafa Cagtay; Tosun, Alptekin; Tokgöz, Özlem

    2017-02-28

    Nasal septal deviation may affect nasal bone growth and facial morphology. Knowledge of nasal morphologic parameters may plays an important role in planning successful rhinoplasty and septoplasty operation. The aim of our study was to evaluate the relationship between the direction and degree of nasal septal deviation with nasal bone morphology, along with factors such as age and gender. Maxillofacial computed tomography (CT) of 250 patients with nasal septal deviation was analyzed retrospectively in this study. We excluded patients with factors that could affect their nasal bone morphology, and a total of 203 patients (111 males, 92 females; mean age, 36.23 years; age range, 18-79 years) were evaluated. The nasal deviation angle was measured on coronal CT images as the angle between the most deviated point of the septum, and the midline nasal morphology was determined by measuring nasal length, internasal angle and lateral and intermediate nasal thickness on both sides. The deviation of nasal septum has been detected as to the right in 107 patients (52.7%) and to the left in 96 patients (47.3%). Lateral and intermediate nasal bone thickness and nasal bone length were significantly greater on the ipsilateral deviation side (Table 3). No significant correlation was found between the variation of the nasal deviation angle and nasal bone morphology (Table 4). There were significant differences between the sexes for all investigated parameters except for the nasal deviation angle (p = 0.660). We found that the only internasal angle increases with aging (p = 0.002). The study shows that the direction of nasal septal deviation may be a factor that affects nasal bone morphology.

  10. Cosmetic rhinoseptoplasty in acute nasal bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Heui; Lee, Jung Woo; Park, Chan Hum

    2013-08-01

    Traditionally, rhinoseptoplasty for nasal bone fracture is only considered after an unsatisfactory outcome from initial closed reduction. However, better surgical outcomes may be achieved if rhinoseptoplasty is performed at the same time as the nasal bone fracture reduction. This study investigated the surgical outcomes of patients who underwent rhinoseptoplasty concomitantly with nasal bone fracture reduction according to their computed tomography image-based nasal bone fracture classifications. Case series with chart review. Academic tertiary care medical center. Fifty-six patients who underwent rhinoseptoplasty concomitantly with nasal bone fracture reduction were enrolled in this study. Nasal bone fractures were classified into 6 types by computed tomography scans. Two independent facial plastic surgeons evaluated the outcomes 6 months postoperatively using a visual analog scale. The nasal tip projection and rotation were measured using the pre- and postoperative profile views. The satisfaction scores of type I, IIo, and IIIo fractures without septal fracture were significantly higher than those of type II, III, and IV fractures with septal fractures. Among the patients, 82.1% underwent lower vault surgery. The nasal tip projection and rotation were increased after surgery in patients without septal fractures, whereas the tip rotation was elevated but the projection was unchanged postoperatively in patients with septal fractures. Rhinoseptoplasty for acute nasal bone fractures can be performed at the same time as nasal bone fracture reduction. However, nasal bone fracture with septal fracture should be managed carefully.

  11. The Geologic Story of Arches National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lohman, Stanley William

    1975-01-01

    According to former Superintendent Bates Wilson (1956), Prof. Lawrence M. Gould, of the University of Michigan, was the first to recognize the geologic and scenic values of the Arches area in eastern Utah and to urge its creation as a national monument. Mrs. Faun McConkie Tanner told me that Professor Gould, who had done a thesis problem in the nearby La Sal Mountains, was first taken through the area by Marv Turnbow, third owner of Wolfe cabin. (See p. 12.) When Professor Gould went into ecstasy over the beautiful scenery, Turnbow replied, 'I didn't know there was anything unusual about it.'

  12. Bovine aortic arch with supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Idhrees, Mohammed; Cherian, Vijay Thomas; Menon, Sabarinath; Mathew, Thomas; Dharan, Baiju S; Jayakumar, K

    2016-09-01

    A 5-year-old boy was diagnosed to have supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). On evaluation of CT angiogram, there was associated bovine aortic arch (BAA). Association of BAA with SVAS has not been previously reported in literature, and to best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of SVAS with BAA. Recent studies show BAA as a marker for aortopathy. SVAS is also an arteriopathy. In light of this, SVAS can also possibly be a manifestation of aortopathy associated with BAA.

  13. A bovine aortic arch in humans

    PubMed Central

    Arnáiz-García, María Elena; González-Santos, Jose María; López-Rodriguez, Javier; Dalmau-Sorli, María José; Bueno-Codoñer, María; Arévalo-Abascal, Adolfo; Fdez García-Hierro, Jose Ma; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Arnáiz, Javier

    2014-01-01

    We describe a curious congenital variation of human aortic arch (AA) branching pattern termed the “bovine aortic arch”. Rather than arising directly from the AA as a separate branch as occurs in the most common AA branching pattern, the left common carotid artery moves to the right and merges from the brachiocephalic trunk. It is the normal AA branching pattern presented in a number of animals (canines, felines or Macaque monkeys) but it has nothing to do with anatomy of AA in ruminant animals, including cattle and buffalo. That is why it is one of the most widely misnomers used in medical literature whose origin is nowadays unknown. PMID:24973853

  14. A Binomial Integer-Valued ARCH Model.

    PubMed

    Ristić, Miroslav M; Weiß, Christian H; Janjić, Ana D

    2016-11-01

    We present an integer-valued ARCH model which can be used for modeling time series of counts with under-, equi-, or overdispersion. The introduced model has a conditional binomial distribution, and it is shown to be strictly stationary and ergodic. The unknown parameters are estimated by three methods: conditional maximum likelihood, conditional least squares and maximum likelihood type penalty function estimation. The asymptotic distributions of the estimators are derived. A real application of the novel model to epidemic surveillance is briefly discussed. Finally, a generalization of the introduced model is considered by introducing an integer-valued GARCH model.

  15. [Single coronary artery and right aortic arch].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Coronary anomalies are mostly asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally during coronary angiography or echocardiography. However, they must be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of angina, dyspnea, syncope, acute myocardial infarction or sudden death in young patients. The case is presented of two rare anomalies, single coronary artery originating from right sinus of Valsalva and right aortic arch, in a 65 year-old patient with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease treated percutaneously. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Ideas in Transverse Spin Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivers, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Three simple ideas about transverse spin observables are presented for the purpose of stimulating discussion. The manuscript is based on a presentation at the Transversity 2014 Workshop in Torre Chia, Sardinia, Italy on June 9-13, 2014 where approximately sixty experts on transverse spin physics had gathered to share recent results in an atmosphere of sun-drenched intensity.

  17. A simple nasal anemometer for clinical purposes.

    PubMed

    Hutters, B; Brøndsted, K

    1992-01-01

    There is a need for clinical methods which give more direct information about the behaviour of the velopharyngeal mechanism in natural speech than do the examination methods normally applied to patients suffering from velopharyngeal insufficiency. One possibility is the recording of nasal airflow in order to detect nasal emission of air. The purpose of the present study is to examine the qualities and the characteristics of a simple and cheap nasal anemometer. As this type of flowmeter is considered less reliable than most other flowmeters, its limitations must be clearly understood and accounted for in drawing conclusions. Therefore, nasal airflow in speech obtained with this flowmeter is discussed in relation to nasal airflow obtained by the more reliable pneumotachograph and in relation to nasal airflow data found in the literature. The tests made here suggest that, at least for the type of speech material and measurements used in the present study, reliable nasal airflow data can be obtained by the anemometer.

  18. Transverse Expansion and Stability after Segmental Le Fort I Osteotomy versus Surgically Assisted Rapid Maxillary Expansion: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Blæhr, Tue Lindberg

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The objective of the present systematic review was to test the hypothesis of no difference in transverse skeletal and dental arch expansion and relapse after segmental Le Fort I osteotomy versus surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion. Material and Methods A MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase and Cochrane library search in combination with a hand-search of relevant journals was conducted by including human studies published in English from January 1, 2000 to June 1, 2016. Results The search provided 130 titles and four studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All the included studies were characterized by high risk of bias and meta-analysis was not possible due to considerable variation. Both treatment modalities significantly increase the transverse maxillary skeletal and dental arch width. The transverse dental arch expansion and relapse seems to be substantial higher with tooth-borne surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion compared to segmental Le Fort I osteotomy. The ratio of dental to skeletal relapse was significantly higher in the posterior maxilla with tooth-borne surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion. Moreover, a parallel opening without segment tilting was observed after segmental Le Fort I osteotomy. Conclusions Maxillary transverse deficiency in adults can be treated successfully with both treatment modalities, although surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion seems more effective when large transverse maxillary skeletal and dental arch expansion is required. However, considering the methodological limitations of the included studies, long-term randomized studies assessing transverse skeletal and dental expansion and relapse with the two treatment modalities are needed before definite conclusions can be provided. PMID:28154745

  19. The effect of an adhesive external nasal dilator strip on the inspiratory nasal airflow.

    PubMed

    Seren, Erdal

    2010-01-01

    We studied the affect of an adhesive external nasal dilator strip (ENDS) on the inspiratory nasal airflow. A prospective study was performed. Twenty-two healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. All volunteers analyzed the inspiratory nasal sound samples before and while wearing a commercially available ENDS. This nasal sound analysis includes the spectral analysis and average sound intensities in low frequency (Lf), medium frequency (Mf), and high frequency (Hf). In the sound analyses, an increase was found in sound intensity at Hf when the nasal strips were not worn whereas a decrease was found in sound intensity at Hf when the nasal strips were on. Changes in the nasal geometry of the anterior part of the nose by wearing nasal strips affects the pattern of nasal airflow and transforms it into a laminar pattern.

  20. Clinical evaluation of a novel internal nasal dilation stent for the improvement of nasal breathing.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Michael G; Moore, Corey C; Doyle, Philip C

    2008-05-01

    This study assessed rhinometric improvement in nasal airflow, perceived comfort, and the utility of nasal dilation devices for individuals with nasal obstruction treated with an external nasal dilator (END) or a novel internal nasal dilation stent (INDS). Prospective, randomized, crossover trial. Individuals with symptoms of nasal obstruction. Twenty-three participants underwent rhinometry and a trial with a novel INDS and a validated END. Devices were used in a randomized, crossover fashion. Nasal airflow, maximum use, continuous use, comfort, and challenge with these devices were assessed. The END and INDS showed greater nasal airflow from baseline, with the INDS being significantly better than the END. The INDS was used significantly more than the END, and demonstrated significantly greater comfort and less associated challenge. The novel INDS showed 3.4 times improved nasal airflow from baseline, was used maximally and continuously longer than a validated END, and was judged to be significantly more tolerable.

  1. Repercussions of Surgically Assisted Maxillary Expansion on Nose Width and Position of Septum and Inferior Nasal Conchae

    PubMed Central

    Landim, Fabrício Souza; Freitas, George Borba; Malouf, Andreana Braga; Studart, Liana P. Carvalho; Rocha, Nelson Studart; de Souza Andrade, Emanuel Sávio; Caubi, Antônio Figueiredo; Filho, José Rodrigues Laureano; Oliveira e Silva, Emanuel Dias

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the clinical and radiographic repercussions of surgically assisted maxillary expansion on the septum, nasal cavity and nasal conchae. The sample was made up of 15 patients with skeletal maturity (9 females and 6 males between 16 and 45 years of age) and maxillary transverse deficiency. Assessments were performed through anterior rhinoscopy and frontal cephalometric radiographs on three occasions: (T0) preoperative period, (T1) locking of the expander and (T2) six months following the locking procedure. An increase was observed in the basal portion of the pyriform aperture and distances between the lateral wall of the basal portion of the pyriform aperture and the septum. The radiographic exam revealed that the nasal septum did not undergo any statistically significant change in its position. Moreover, no significant changes in the position of the nasal septum or nasal conchae were detected throughout the three evaluation times. The results suggest that surgically assisted maxillary expansion is capable of widening the basal portion of the pyriform aperture, with little repercussion on the anterior position of the nasal septum and inferior nasal conchae. PMID:22135612

  2. The Effect of Nasal Obstruction after Different Nasal Surgeries Using Acoustic Rhinometry and Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation Scale

    PubMed Central

    Kahraman, Erkan; Cil, Yakup; Incesulu, Armagan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The efficiency of nasal surgeries can be determined by objective or subjective methods. We have assessed the effect of nasal obstruction after different nasal surgeries using Acoustic Rhinometry (AR) and Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) Scale. METHODS Between May 2011 and May 2012, 40 young adult patients and 10 healthy volunteers as control group who referred to Otorhinolaryngology Clinic in Eskisehir Military Hospital due to nasal obstruction were enrolled. Depending on operation, patients were divided into four equal groups. Group 1: Septoplasty, Group 2: Septoplasty with sprader graft, Group 3: Septorinoplasty and Group 4: Septorhinoplasty with spreader graft. The patients completed NOSE scale, 1 week before and 1 month after the surgery and AR measurements. RESULTS There were a significant improvement in mean NOSE scores of patients and statistical difference was found between pre and post-operational values for each group. There was a statistically significant change of the mean minimal cross section areas (MCA) of the deviated side of nasal passages measured by AR between pre and postoperative period. CONCLUSION In patients with nasal obstruction, functional nasal surgeries which were performed after appropriate medical examination and with right operation methods had a positive impact on quality of life and patient satisfaction. We observed that nasal findings were correlated with NOSE scores and MCA values. So, we suggest that NOSE scale and AR to be used for evaluation of the efficiency of functional nasal surgeries. PMID:27853686

  3. Clinical Evaluation of Efficacy of CIA and CNA Intrusion Arches

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Sambhav; Pandey, Vinisha

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Excessive overbite is one of the most common problems that confront the orthodontist. Deep bite can be due to infraocclusion of posterior teeth, supraocclusion of anterior teeth or a combination of the two. Correction of same can be carried out by extrusion of molars, intrusion of incisors or by a combination of both respectively. Various intrusion arches are recommended for correcting deep bite by true intrusion of anterior teeth, Utility arches, Segmental arch, Connecticut Intrusion Arch (CIA) and Connecticut New Arch (CNA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical efficacy of CIA and CNA intrusion arches. Materials and Methods Tracings recorded from pre and post-treatment lateral cephalograms of 25 patients treated by CIA (Group I) and another 25 patients treated by CNA (Group II) intrusion arches in deep bite cases after four months of treatment were analysed and findings were recorded. Statistical Analysis Paired t-test was used to compare pre and post-treatment changes within Groups I and II and unpaired t-test was used to compare treatment changes between Group I and Group II. A P-value of < 0.05 was set for statistical significance. Results Findings of this study demonstrate that an average of 1mm of intrusion takes place with CIA intrusion arch and 1.3mm with CNA intrusion arch in a period of 4 months. Both intrusion arches do not affect the position of molar in vertical or anteroposterior plane. Interpretation & Conclusion Both CIA and CNA intrusion arches are effective in bringing about intrusion of lower incisors. PMID:26501008

  4. The clinical value of peak nasal inspiratory flow, peak oral inspiratory flow, and the nasal patency index.

    PubMed

    Tsounis, Michael; Swart, Karin M A; Georgalas, Christos; Markou, Konstantinos; Menger, Dirk J

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain the most reliable objective measurement for the assessment of nasal patency by investigating the relationship between peak nasal inspiratory flow, peak oral inspiratory flow, and the nasal patency index in relation to the patient's subjective perception regarding nasal obstruction. Prospective cohort study. This study included 131 volunteers of both genders, aged 18 years or older, with or without nasal symptoms, who were able to give informed consent, completed the study protocol, and could speak and write Dutch fluently. Peak nasal inspiratory flow and peak oral inspiratory flow were performed and nasal patency index was computed. The results were evaluated and compared with the subjective perception of nasal passage, using the validated Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation scale and visual analog scale for nasal passage. Our study showed that peak nasal inspiratory flow, nasal patency index and nasal patency visual analog scale correlate with the Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation scale in contrast to peak oral inspiratory flow. Peak nasal inspiratory flow and nasal patency index also showed significant association with the Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation scale after adjustment for confounders. Peak nasal inspiratory flow is the most reliable method for the assessment of nasal patency. It is quick, inexpensive, and easy to perform, and correlates significantly with the subjective feeling of nasal obstruction. There is no clinical need to measure peak oral inspiratory flow or to calculate the nasal patency index in the evaluation of nasal patency. 4 © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Neutron Transversity at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen; Xiaodong Jiang; Jen-chieh Peng; Lingyan Zhu

    2005-09-07

    Nucleon transversity and single transverse spin asymmetries have been the recent focus of large efforts by both theorists and experimentalists. On-going and planned experiments from HERMES, COMPASS and RHIC are mostly on the proton or the deuteron. Presented here is a planned measurement of the neutron transversity and single target spin asymmetries at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a transversely polarized {sup 3}He target. Also presented are the results and plans of other neutron transverse spin experiments at Jefferson Lab. Finally, the factorization for semi-inclusive DIS studies at Jefferson Lab is discussed.

  6. Blood flow characteristics in the aortic arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Mihaiescu, Mihai; Fuchs, Laszlo; Gutmark, Ephraim; Backeljauw, Philippe; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2012-11-01

    The purpose with this study is to investigate the flow characteristics of blood in the aortic arch. Cardiovascular diseases are associated with specific locations in the arterial tree. Considering atherogenesis, it is claimed that the Wall Shear Stress (WSS) along with its temporal and spatial gradients play an important role in the development of the disease. The WSS is determined by the local flow characteristics, that in turn depends on the geometry as well as the rheological properties of blood. In this numerical work, the time dependent fluid flow during the entire cardiac cycle is fully resolved. The Quemada model is applied to account for the non-Newtonian properties of blood, an empirical model valid for different Red Blood Cell loading. Data obtained through Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging have been used in order to reconstruct geometries of the the aortic arch. Here, three different geometries are studied out of which two display malformations that can be found in patients having the genetic disorder Turner's syndrome. The simulations show a highly complex flow with regions of secondary flow that is enhanced for the diseased aortas. The financial support from the Swedish Research Council (VR) and the Sweden-America Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Patient management in aortic arch surgery†.

    PubMed

    Peterss, Sven; Pichlmaier, Maximilian; Curtis, Alexander; Luehr, Maximilian; Born, Frank; Hagl, Christian

    2017-01-01

    SummaryAortic arch surgery requires complex patient management beyond the manual replacement of the diseased vessel. These procedures include (i) a thorough and pathologically adjusted preoperative evaluation, (ii) initiation and control of cardiopulmonary bypass, (iii) cerebral protection strategies and (iv) techniques to protect the abdominal end organs during prolonged operations. Due to the complexity of aortic arch procedures, multimodal real-time surveillance is required during all stages of the operation. Although having the patient survive the operation is the major goal, further observation is necessary because of the chronicity of the disease. This review summarizes specific aspects of patient management during and after operations requiring periods of circulatory arrest, without necessarily referring to all studies on this topic. The pros and cons of different strategies are weighed against each other, including the personal experience of the authors. A number of questions are raised without providing a 'right' or 'wrong' answer. We show that a number of different well-established strategies can result in comparable excellent long-lasting surgical results.

  8. Dental arch dimensions in the mixed dentition: a study of Italian children born in the 1950s and the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Defraia, Efisio; Baroni, Giulia; Marinelli, Andrea

    2006-05-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the dental arch dimensions in the mixed dentition in two modern samples living in the same geographic area and separated by almost 35 years. A group of 83 subjects (39 boys and 44 girls) born between 1953 and 1959 (mean age: eight years and three months +/-15 months for the boys and seven years and 11 months +/-12 months for the girls) were compared with a group of 84 subjects (38 boys and 46 girls) born between 1990 and 1998 (mean age: eight years and eight months +/-12 months for the boys and eight years and four months +/-11 months for the girls). Measurements were taken on dental casts for posterior and anterior arch segments, intermolar and intercanine width, and mesiodistal size of incisors. The available anterior space in both arches and the posterior and anterior transverse dimensions were calculated. Groups were compared using a nonparametric test (Mann-Whitney U-test) for independent samples (P < .05). Results show that both boys and girls of 1990s showed significantly smaller maxillary intermolar width when compared with 1950s. Posterior transverse interarch discrepancy was significantly minor in girls of 1990s. The present population has a greater probability of developing a malocclusion as a consequence of the secular trend toward the reduction of the width of the upper arch.

  9. Transverse Spin Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, William

    2014-05-01

    Transverse spin diffusion is a relatively new transport coefficient and a review of its history and physical basis will be presented. In NMR spin diffusion is often measured by spin echo techniques, which involve spin currents perpendicular to the direction of the magnetization, in contrast with the usual longitudinal case where the current is parallel to the magnetization. The first indication that this involved new physics was the Leggett-Rice effect (1970) in which spin waves, new spin-echo behavior, and an altered spin diffusion coefficient were predicted in liquid 3He. This effect gave the possibility of the first measurement of F1a, the parameter of the Landau Fermi-liquid theory mean-field responsible for the effect. In 1982 Lhuillier and Laloe found a transport equation very similar to the Leggett equation, but valid for highly-polarized dilute Boltzmann Bose and Fermi gases, and describing the ``identical spin rotation effect'' (ISRE), the analog of a Landau mean field. Coincidentally Bashkin and Meyerovich had also given equivalent descriptions of transport in polarized Boltzmann gases. That a mean-field effect could exists in dilute Boltzmann gases was theoretically surprising, but was confirmed experimentally. At low polarization the basic transverse diffusion constant D⊥ coincides with the longitudinal value D∥ however Meyerovich first pointed out that they could differ in highly polarized degenerate gases. Indeed detailed calculations (Jeon and Mullin) showed that, while D∥ is proportional to T-2, D⊥ approaches a constant (depending on polarization) at low T. Considerable controversy existed until experimental verification was achieved in 2004. The importance of ISRE again arose in 2008 as the basis of ``anomalous spin-state segregation'' in Duke and JILA experiments. More recently application of the ideas of transverse spin diffusion to strongly interacting Fermi gases has resulted in the observation of the diffusion constants at the quantum

  10. Entangled transverse optical vortex.

    PubMed

    Chui, S T; Lin, Zhifang

    2014-10-01

    We discuss a new kind of optical vortex with the angular momentum perpendicular to the flow direction and entangled in that it is a coherent combination of different orbital angular momentum states of the same sign. This entangled state exhibits many unexpected physical properties. The transverse optical vortex can be generated from the reflection of an electromagnetic wave off an array of ferrite rods. Its vorticity can be reversed by switching the direction of the magnetization of the rods, which usually takes only a nanosecond.

  11. [Transverse ectopic testis].

    PubMed

    Jouini, Riadh; Lefi, Mounir; Sami, Chelly; Manef, Gesmi; Mohsen, Belguith; Nouri, Abdellatif

    2002-09-01

    Transverse ectopic testis (TET) is a rare form of ectopic testis. The authors report the case of a 2-month-old infant presenting with right inguinoscrotal hernia and ectopic left testis with an impalpable testis. Opening of the hernia sac revealed two testes with two distally fused vasa deferentes. The contralateral testis was easily descended by translocation through the other inguinal canal. A favourable result was obtained with two testes situated in a normal position. In the light of this case, the authors emphasize the clinical and therapeutic features of this anomaly.

  12. Transverse field focused system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1986-01-01

    A transverse field focused (TFF) system for transport or acceleration of an intense sheet beam of negative ions in which a serial arrangement of a plurality of pairs of concentric cylindrical-arc electrodes is provided. Acceleration of the sheet beam can be achieved by progressively increasing the mean electrode voltage of successive electrode pairs. Because the beam is curved by the electrodes, the system can be designed to transport the beam through a maze passage which is baffled to prevent line of sight therethrough. Edge containment of the beam can be achieved by shaping the side edges of the electrodes to produce an electric force vector directed inwardly from the electrode edges.

  13. Transverse axis fluid turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Brenneman, B.

    1983-11-15

    A fluid turbine, the rotation axis of which is transverse to the direction of fluid flow, has at least two blade assemblies mounted for rotation about the rotation axis. Each blade assembly includes a streamlined elongated blade having a span parallel to the rotation axis. Each blade is pivotable about a pivot axis parallel to and spaced from the rotation axis. The pivot axis is located circumferentially ahead of the blade center of pressure with respect to the direction of turbine rotation. Each blade assembly is so constructed that its center of mass is located either at its pivot axis or circumferentially at its pivot axis and radially outboard of its pivot axis.

  14. Smart Polymers in Nasal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chonkar, Ankita; Nayak, Usha; Udupa, N.

    2015-01-01

    Nasal drug delivery has now been recognized as a promising route for drug delivery due to its capability of transporting a drug to systemic circulation and central nervous system. Though nasal mucosa offers improved bioavailability and quick onset of action of the drug, main disadvantage associated with nasal drug delivery is mucocilliary clearance due to which drug particles get cleared from the nose before complete absorption through nasal mucosa. Therefore, mucoadhesive polymeric approach can be successfully used to enhance the retention of the drug on nasal mucosal surface. Here, some of the aspects of the stimuli responsive polymers have been discussed which possess liquid state at the room temperature and in response to nasal temperature, pH and ions present in mucous, can undergo in situ gelation in nasal cavity. In this review, several temperature responsive, pH responsive and ion responsive polymers used in nasal delivery, their gelling mechanisms have been discussed. Smart polymers not only able to enhance the retention of the drug in nasal cavity but also provide controlled release, ease of administration, enhanced permeation of the drug and protection of the drug from mucosal enzymes. Thus smart polymeric approach can be effectively used for nasal delivery of peptide drugs, central nervous system dugs and hormones. PMID:26664051

  15. Hemoglobin Promotes Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Kelly; Hernandez, Margarita; Boles, Blaise R.

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization is an important risk factor for community and nosocomial infection. Despite the importance of S. aureus to human health, molecular mechanisms and host factors influencing nasal colonization are not well understood. To identify host factors contributing to nasal colonization, we collected human nasal secretions and analyzed their ability to promote S. aureus surface colonization. Some individuals produced secretions possessing the ability to significantly promote S. aureus surface colonization. Nasal secretions pretreated with protease no longer promoted S. aureus surface colonization, suggesting the involvement of protein factors. The major protein components of secretions were identified and subsequent analysis revealed that hemoglobin possessed the ability to promote S. aureus surface colonization. Immunoprecipitation of hemoglobin from nasal secretions resulted in reduced S. aureus surface colonization. Furthermore, exogenously added hemoglobin significantly decreased the inoculum necessary for nasal colonization in a rodent model. Finally, we found that hemoglobin prevented expression of the agr quorum sensing system and that aberrant constitutive expression of the agr effector molecule, RNAIII, resulted in reduced nasal colonization of S. aureus. Collectively our results suggest that the presence of hemoglobin in nasal secretions contributes to S. aureus nasal colonization. PMID:21750673

  16. Contrastive and contextual vowel nasalization in Ottawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klopfenstein, Marie

    2005-09-01

    Ottawa is a Central Algonquian language that possesses the recent innovation of contrastive vowel nasalization. Most phonetic studies done to date on contrastive vowel nasalization have investigated Indo-European languages; therefore, a study of Ottawa could prove to be a valuable addition to the literature. To this end, a percentage of nasalization (nasal airflow/oral + nasal airflow) was measured during target vowels produced by native Ottawa speakers using a Nasometer 6200-3. Nasalized vowels in the target word set were either contrastively or contextually nasalized: candidates for contextual nasalization were either regressive or perserverative in word-initial and word-final syllables. Subjects were asked to read words containing target vowels in a carrier sentence. Mean, minimum, and maximum nasalance were obtained for each target vowel across its full duration. Target vowels were compared across context (regressive or perseverative and word-initial or word-final). In addition, contexts were compared to determine whether a significant difference existed between contrastive and contextual nasalization. Results for Ottawa will be compared with results for vowels in similar contexts in other languages including Hindi, Breton, Bengali, and French.

  17. Shape change in the atlas with congenital midline non-union of its posterior arch: a morphometric geometric study.

    PubMed

    Ríos, Luis; Palancar, Carlos; Pastor, Francisco; Llidó, Susana; Sanchís-Gimeno, Juan Alberto; Bastir, Markus

    2017-10-01

    The congenital midline non-union of the posterior arch of the atlas is a developmental variant present at a frequency ranging from 0.7% to 3.9%. Most of the reported cases correspond to incidental findings during routine medical examination. In cases of posterior non-union, hypertrophy of the anterior arch and cortical bone thickening of the posterior arches have been observed and interpreted as adaptive responses of the atlas to increased mechanical stress. We sought to determine if the congenital non-union of the posterior arch results in a change in the shape of the atlas. This study is an analysis of the first cervical vertebrae from osteological collections through morphometric geometric techniques. A total of 21 vertebrae were scanned with a high-resolution three-dimensional scanner (Artec Space Spider, Artec Group, Luxembourg). To capture vertebral shape, 19 landmarks and 100 semilandmarks were placed on the vertebrae. Procrustes superimposition was applied to obtain size and shape data (MorphoJ 1.02; Klingenberg, 2011), which were analyzed through principal component analysis (PCA) and mean shape comparisons. The PCA resulted in two components explaining 22.32% and 18.8% of the total shape variance. The graphic plotting of both components indicates a clear shape difference between the control atlas and the atlas with posterior non-union. This observation was supported by statistically significant differences in mean shape comparisons between both types of vertebra (p<.0001). Changes in shape were observed in the superior and inferior articular facets, the transverse processes, and the neural canal between the control and non-union vertebrae. Non-union of the posterior arch of the atlas is associated with significant changes in the shape of the vertebra. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nasal septal haematoma in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chukuezi, A B

    1992-05-01

    A prospective study of 46 consecutive patients with nasal septal haematoma admitted at the General Hospital, Owerri, Nigeria over a five year period is presented. The disease was commoner in males than females. The majority of the cases (65.6 per cent) were of unknown cause and were therefore grouped as spontaneous haematoma while 30.4 per cent were due to trauma. Trauma was more common in patients below the age of 15 years while spontaneous haematoma was common in patients above that age. All the patients with septal haematoma represented 0.2 per cent of total attendances to the ENT clinic over the period. Most of the patients presented with severe and threatening symptoms necessitating intense aggressive management. All the patients were managed by surgical incision and drainage, four had marked nasal abnormalities. Three patients died from a brain abscess as a complication of infected haematoma.

  19. 1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM (NORTHERLY) OF THE CONCRETE ARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. CONTEXTUAL VIEW, LOOKING DOWNSTREAM (NORTHERLY) OF THE CONCRETE ARCH ('ONE-WAY BRIDGE') THAT PROVIDES PRIVATE (WWP) ACCESS TO THE MIDDLE CHANNEL OF THE POST FALLS POWER PLANT. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Concrete Arch Bridge, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  20. 3. PORTAL VIEW OF THE CONCRETE ARCH (ONEWAY BRIDGE) THAT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. PORTAL VIEW OF THE CONCRETE ARCH (ONE-WAY BRIDGE) THAT PROVIDES ACCESS TO THE MIDDLE CHANNEL DAM AND POWER PLANT, LOOKING WEST. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Concrete Arch Bridge, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  1. 4. PORTAL VIEW OF THE CONCRETE ARCH (ONEWAY BRIDGE) THAT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. PORTAL VIEW OF THE CONCRETE ARCH (ONE-WAY BRIDGE) THAT EXITS THE MIDDLE CHANNEL ISLAND AND POST FALLS POWER PLANT, LOOKING EAST. - Washington Water Power Company Post Falls Power Plant, Concrete Arch Bridge, West of intersection of Spokane & Fourth Streets, Post Falls, Kootenai County, ID

  2. Adult presentation with vascular ring due to double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Henryk; Uebing, Anselm; Mohiaddin, Raad

    2006-11-01

    This is a case report on the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose vascular ring due to double aortic arch in an adult presenting with an abnormal chest X-ray. The experience in this case and the literature review identify the benefits of using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to clarify complex aortic arch anatomy.

  3. Lateral testing of glued laminated timber tudor arch

    Treesearch

    Douglas R. Rammer; Philip Line

    2016-01-01

    Glued laminated timber Tudor arches have been in wide use in the United States since the 1930s, but detailed knowledge related to seismic design in modern U.S. building codes is lacking. FEMA P-695 (P-695) is a methodology to determine seismic performance factors for a seismic force resisting system. A limited P-695 study for glued laminated timber arch structures...

  4. 10. COPY OF OBLIQUE PHOTOGRAPH SHOWING ARCH HANGAR AT RIGHT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. COPY OF OBLIQUE PHOTOGRAPH SHOWING ARCH HANGAR AT RIGHT, BUILDING 8200 (OBSERVATION TOWER) AT LEFT, AND B-52 AIRCRAFT PARKED ALONG APRON IN BACKGROUND, DATED OCTOBER 1967, PHOTOGRAPH FROM BASE MASTER PLAN LOCATED AT AIR FORCE BASE CONVERSION AGENCY, LORING AIR FORCE BASE, MAINE. - Loring Air Force Base, Arch Hangar, East of Arizona Road near southern end of runway, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  5. 15. Arched, concrete bridge along elevated rightofway of Shaker Rapid ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Arched, concrete bridge along elevated right-of-way of Shaker Rapid Transit through the east side of city of Cleveland, labelled: 'View Toward West Along Northerly Side Arches at E. 90th St. and Westerly.' 1914. - Shaker Heights Rapid Transit Line, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  6. VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST. SPANDREL ARCHES OF THE KELLER BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST. SPANDREL ARCHES OF THE KELLER BRIDGE ARE SEEN ON THE LEFT; THE SUPERSTRUCTURE OF THE TENNESSEE RIVER RISES ABOVE THE KELLER AND OBSCURES ITS ARCHES. - Keller Memorial Bridge, Spanning Tennessee River at U.S. Highway 31, Decatur, Morgan County, AL

  7. 12. AN IMAGE OF THE ARCH ENTRADOS LOOKING SOUTH FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. AN IMAGE OF THE ARCH ENTRADOS LOOKING SOUTH FROM THE NORTH SIDE OF U.S. 40. THIS DETAIL CLEARLY SHOWS THE FOUR LONGITUDINAL ARCH CASTINGS AND THE GHOSTS OF THE BOARDS USED AS FORMS. - Vandalia Railroad Bridge, Spanning U.S. Route 40, Indianapolis, Marion County, IN

  8. 145. Camp Creek Bridge. This is a Roman spandrel arch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    145. Camp Creek Bridge. This is a Roman spandrel arch bridge built in 1939. View shows the stone arch stones and the stone facing on the headwall and wing wall. Looking north-northwest. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  9. Nasal gel and olfactory cleft.

    PubMed

    Herranz González-Botas, Jesús; Padín Seara, Anselmo

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate whether a nasal gel, administrated using a radial-hole inhaler, reaches the olfactory cleft and if a different administration method influences distribution. Sixteen healthy volunteers underwent a nasal endoscopy at 1 and 7minutes after the administration of a intranasal gel, with a different method in each fossa. No dye deposition was identified at the olfactory cleft, middle turbinate or middle meatus. In all cases the gel was identified at the nasal vestibule. On the right side, the second most frequent dye identification area was the inferior turbinate, with a rate of 87% at the first minute and 75% at 7 minutes. It was followed by the septum (75 and 62%) and the inferior meatus (6.2 and 12.5%). On the left side, the second most frequent stained area was the septum (18.7 and 13.5%), followed by the inferior meatus (6.5 and 65%). No inferior turbinate staining was found in the left side. There was a significant difference in the deposition rate at the septum (P<.01) and inferior turbinate (P<.001), when both administration methods were compared. No nasal gel, administrated using a radial-hole inhaler, was found at the olfactory cleft, middle turbinate or middle meatus. Gel distribution was located at the anterior and inferior portion of the nose, independent of the administration method used. Significantly different gel distribution rates were found at the septum and inferior turbinate when the 2 administration methods were compared. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, S T Samuel; Buckley, C Paul; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon.

  11. Nasal airway responses to nasal continuous positive airway pressure breathing: An in-vivo pilot study.

    PubMed

    White, David E; Bartley, Jim; Shakeel, Muhammad; Nates, Roy J; Hankin, Robin K S

    2016-06-14

    The nasal cycle, through variation in nasal airflow partitioning, allows the upper airway to accommodate the contrasting demands of air conditioning and removal of entrapped air contaminants. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) breathing has on both nasal airflow partitioning and nasal geometry. Using a custom-made nasal mask, twenty healthy participants had the airflow in each naris measured during normal nasal breathing followed by nCPAP breathing. Eight participants also underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the nasal region during spontaneous nasal breathing, and then nCPAP breathing over a range of air pressures. During nCPAP breathing, a simultaneous reduction in airflow through the patent airway together with a corresponding increase in airway flow within the congested nasal airway were observed in sixteen of the twenty participants. Nasal airflow resistance is inversely proportional to airway cross-sectional area. MRI data analysis during nCPAP breathing confirmed airway cross-sectional area reduced along the patent airway while the congested airway experienced an increase in this parameter. During awake breathing, nCPAP disturbs the normal inter-nasal airflow partitioning. This could partially explain the adverse nasal drying symptoms frequently reported by many users of this therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ambient resonance of Mesa Arch, Canyonlands National Park, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, Alison M.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Thorne, Michael S.

    2015-08-01

    We analyzed the resonance characteristics of a prominent natural arch in Canyonlands National Park, Mesa Arch, as measured from ambient seismic data. Evaluating spectral and polarization attributes, we distinguished the first four resonant frequencies of the arch, 2.9, 6.0, 6.9, and 8.5 Hz, as well as basic properties of the associated mode shapes. We then affirmed experimental data using 3-D numerical modal analysis, providing estimates of material properties and clarifying vibrational mode shapes. Monitoring resonant frequencies over time, we searched for shifts associated with changing environmental conditions and long-term progressive damage. We measured ~3% direct daily variation in resonant frequency associated with changing rock temperature, thermal stress, and stiffening of the rock matrix. Independent tilt data showed similar diurnal cycles associated with thermoelastic stresses and deformation of the arch. We observed no permanent resonant frequency shifts related to irreversible damage of Mesa Arch during our study period.

  13. Critical Transitions in Early Embryonic Aortic Arch Patterning and Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, William J.; Dur, Onur; Wang, Yajuan; Patrick, Michael J.; Tinney, Joseph P.; Keller, Bradley B.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2013-01-01

    Transformation from the bilaterally symmetric embryonic aortic arches to the mature great vessels is a complex morphogenetic process, requiring both vasculogenic and angiogenic mechanisms. Early aortic arch development occurs simultaneously with rapid changes in pulsatile blood flow, ventricular function, and downstream impedance in both invertebrate and vertebrate species. These dynamic biomechanical environmental landscapes provide critical epigenetic cues for vascular growth and remodeling. In our previous work, we examined hemodynamic loading and aortic arch growth in the chick embryo at Hamburger-Hamilton stages 18 and 24. We provided the first quantitative correlation between wall shear stress (WSS) and aortic arch diameter in the developing embryo, and observed that these two stages contained different aortic arch patterns with no inter-embryo variation. In the present study, we investigate these biomechanical events in the intermediate stage 21 to determine insights into this critical transition. We performed fluorescent dye microinjections to identify aortic arch patterns and measured diameters using both injection recordings and high-resolution optical coherence tomography. Flow and WSS were quantified with 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Dye injections revealed that the transition in aortic arch pattern is not a uniform process and multiple configurations were documented at stage 21. CFD analysis showed that WSS is substantially elevated compared to both the previous (stage 18) and subsequent (stage 24) developmental time-points. These results demonstrate that acute increases in WSS are followed by a period of vascular remodeling to restore normative hemodynamic loading. Fluctuations in blood flow are one possible mechanism that impacts the timing of events such as aortic arch regression and generation, leading to the variable configurations at stage 21. Aortic arch variations noted during normal rapid vascular remodeling at stage 21 identify a

  14. Determining shapes and dimensions of dental arches for the use of straight-wire arches in lingual technique

    PubMed Central

    Kairalla, Silvana Allegrini; Scuzzo, Giuseppe; Triviño, Tarcila; Velasco, Leandro; Lombardo, Luca; Paranhos, Luiz Renato

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: This study aims to determine the shape and dimension of dental arches from a lingual perspective, and determine shape and size of a straight archwire used for lingual Orthodontics. METHODS: The study sample comprised 70 Caucasian Brazilian individuals with normal occlusion and at least four of Andrew's six keys. Maxillary and mandibular dental casts were digitized (3D) and the images were analyzed by Delcam Power SHAPET 2010 software. Landmarks on the lingual surface of teeth were selected and 14 measurements were calculated to determine the shape and size of dental arches. RESULTS: Shapiro-Wilk test determined small arch shape by means of 25th percentile (P25%) - an average percentile for the medium arch; and a large one determined by means of 75th percentile (P75%). T-test revealed differences between males and females in the size of 12 dental arches. CONCLUSION: The straight-wire arch shape used in the lingual straight wire technique is a parabolic-shaped arch, slightly flattened on its anterior portion. Due to similarity among dental arch sizes shown by males and females, a more simplified diagram chart was designed. PMID:25715725

  15. Unilateral nasal resistance and asymmetrical body pressure.

    PubMed

    Haight, J S; Cole, P

    1986-08-01

    Lateral recumbency causes ipsilateral nasal congestion and contralateral decongestion. Nasal resistances were measured before, during and after the application of pressure either regionally or by lateral recumbency. In some experiments an attempt was made to block the response by local anesthetic injection, splinting the nasal vestibules, or topical decongestants. In others an electric blanket was employed as a stimulus instead of pressure. It was concluded that the nasal resistance changes during lateral recumbency are due to pressure receptors in the pelvic and pectoral girdles, and thorax. These adapt slowly. They are probably situated in the intercostal spaces, parietal pleura, or sterno-costal joints. Their centripetal fibers probably travel in the intercostal nerves, and their efferents in the cervical sympathetic outflow to the nasal erectile tissue. Lateral recumbency of 12 minutes' duration induces changes in nasal resistance which persist after the pressure asymmetry has been terminated. This may be due to temporal summation.

  16. Nasal reconstruction using porous polyethylene implants.

    PubMed

    Romo, T; Sclafani, A P; Jacono, A A

    2000-01-01

    Nasal reconstruction presents a significant challenge to the facial plastic surgeon. The dual goals of reconstruction are restoration of the desired aesthetic nasal contour and an improved nasal airway. Autologous cartilage and bone are considered optimal grafting material, but their supply is often limited and harvesting entails additional morbidity. Many synthetic materials have been introduced in nasal reconstruction, but high infection and extrusion rates limited their use. Porous high density polyethylene implants present an alternative to autologous material as they allow for fibrovascular ingrowth, leading to stability of the implant and decreased rates of infection. Herein we describe the use of porous high density polyethylene implants for reconstruction of the platyrrhine nose and in revision rhinoplasty. The use of preformed nasal-dorsal tip and alar batten implants are described, as well as the use of columellar strut and premaxillary plumper implants. We believe that porous high density polyethylene implants provide a safe, desirable alternative in functional and aesthetic nasal reconstruction.

  17. Post Septorhinoplasty Custom-Made Unilateral Nasal Stent for Nasal Cleft Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Manu; Bhoria, Mohaneesh; Boora, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    Context: Nasal cleft deformity is a complicated problem. Utilization of nasal stent in post septorhinoplastyaims at establishing and maintaining airway patency, tissue position, and reduces tissue contracture after surgery. Case Report: A 16-year-old female patient presented with history of surgical reconstruction of congenital cleft lip and cleft palate with secondary septorhinoplasty of nasal cleft deformity. Patient was referred for nasal stent 1 week after septorhinoplasty. This case report provides a novel technique for fabrication of esthetic nasal stent after postseptorhinoplasty for secondary cleft nose deformity correction. Conclusion: This case report presents a simple, convenient technique for nasal stent fabrication for prevention of restenosis for cleft nose deformity post secondary septorhinoplasty. Provision of nasal stent allows breathing, maintains esthetics, comfort, nasal patency, and contour with minimal discomfort. PMID:25789253

  18. Clinical evaluation of 368 patients with nasal rosacea: subtype classification and grading of nasal rosacea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo Jin; Jung, Joon Min; Won, Kwang Hee; Won, Chong Hyun; Chang, Sung Eun; Choi, Jee Ho; Moon, Kee Chan; Lee, Mi Woo

    2015-01-01

    The clinical features of nasal rosacea have not been described in detail. To describe the clinical features of nasal rosacea. 599 patients were classified into those with rosacea in both the nasal and extra-nasal areas (group A), localized nasal rosacea (group B) and rosacea without nasal involvement (group C). The mixed subtype was more common in group A (n = 337) than in group C (n = 231). The severity score was higher in group A than in group C. Erythematotelangiectatic rosacea was the most common subtype in group B (n = 31) and was more common in group B than in group A. Rosacea mainly affected the lower half of the nose in group B, but affected the entire nose in group A. Nasal involvement may be an index of severe rosacea. Localized nasal rosacea is a separate spectrum with different clinical features. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Role of fracture localization in arch formation, Arches National Park, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Cruikshank, K.M.; Aydin, A. )

    1994-07-01

    Spectacular rock fins on the flanks of Salt Valley anticline in southeast Utah are formed by erosion along zones of joints. Within a rock fin, arches form where intense fracturing is localized. Fracture localization is controlled by shear displacement along existing horizontal or vertical discontinuities. Horizontal discontinuities may be shale layers, shale lenses, or bedding planes, whereas vertical discontinuities are usually preexisting joint segments. The roof and overall shape of an arch is controlled by existing shale layers, interfaces between sandstones of different properties, or secondary fractures due to shear on vertical joints. Joints that bound rock fins are related to the formation of the diapir-cored Salt Valley anticline. Shear displacement along existing discontinuities, which localizes intense fracturing, is probably related to the growth of Salt Valley anticline and its subsequent collapse due to dissolution of the anticlines salt core. 31 refs., 11 figs.

  20. An unusually medial axillary arch muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Dharap, A

    1994-01-01

    In the left upper limb of an adult male cadaver a triangular muscular slip, 3.5 cm long and 2.5 cm wide, arose from the lower border of latissimus dorsi just proximal to its tendon of insertion. It was inserted by a slender 6 cm long tendon mainly into the coracoid process of the scapula. Three short fibrous strands radiated from this slender tendon to gain attachments to pectoralis minor and the common tendon of origin of the short head of biceps brachii and coracobrachialis. In addition 2 flat tendinous bands attached the margin of this muscular slip to teres major. The thoracodorsal nerve entered the main bulk of latissimus dorsi close to the muscular slip but did not supply a separate branch to the latter. This is an axillary arch muscle in an unusually medial location. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7928652

  1. Arching in three-dimensional clogging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Török, János; Lévay, Sára; Szabó, Balázs; Somfai, Ellák; Wegner, Sandra; Stannarius, Ralf; Börzsönyi, Tamás

    2017-06-01

    Arching in dry granular material is a long established concept, however it remains still an open question how three-dimensional orifices clog. We investigate by means of numerical simulations and experimental data how the outflow creates a blocked configuration of particles. We define the concave surface of the clogged dome by two independent methods (geometric and density based). The average shape of the cupola for spheres is almost a hemisphere but individual samples have large holes in the structure indicating a blocked state composed of two-dimensional force chains rather than three-dimensional objects. The force chain structure justifies this assumption. For long particles the clogged configurations display large variations, and in certain cases the empty region reaches a height of 5 hole diameters. These structures involve vertical walls consisting of horizontally placed stable stacking of particles.

  2. Air flow in the human nasal cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, V. M.; Vetlutsky, V. N.; Ganimedov, V. L.; Muchnaya, M. I.; Shepelenko, V. N.; Melnikov, M. N.; Savina, A. A.

    2010-03-01

    A mathematical model of the air flow in the human nasal cavity is developed under the assumption of a turbulent viscous air flow. The shape of the nasal cavity is modeled with the use of the Gambit graphical software system and tomography data. A numerical solution is obtained by using the Fluent commercial software system. Calculations are performed for various variants of construction of the human nasal cavity.

  3. Nasal sequelae of Treacher Collins syndrome.

    PubMed

    Plomp, Raul G; Mathijssen, Irene M J; Moolenburgh, Sanne E; van Montfort, Kees A G M; van der Meulen, Jacques J N M; Poublon, René M L

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to determine external and endonasal deformity, and satisfaction with nasal functioning and appearance, in Treacher Collins syndrome. A cross-sectional cohort study was conducted. Eleven adult patients with Treacher Collins syndrome were compared with 151 controls in terms of satisfaction with nasal functioning and appearance by means of the Nasal Appearance and Function Evaluation Questionnaire. In all patients with Treacher Collins syndrome, external nasal deformities were scored on standardized digital photographs of the nose as rated independently by three experienced physicians. Endonasal deformity was determined by standardized nasal endoscopy. The patients were relatively satisfied with the various esthetic nasal subunits. The most significant functional problems were snoring (P = 0.001) and quality of phonation (P = 0.003). The main external nasal deformities were the dorsal hump (73%), external deviation (≤55%), the bifid or bulbous nasal tip (55%), and columellar septal luxation (55%). In 82% of the patients, a septal deviation was found, often associated with spurs. Satisfaction with esthetics of the nose was fair, but these patients suffer from the functional problems of snoring and impaired quality of phonation. A structured nasal ENT physical examination with nasal endoscopy might determine aspects requiring more attention during treatment. Septorhinoplasty can be performed at an adult age if there is a considerable esthetic wish of the patient and/or nasal obstruction combined with septal deviation. Attention should be paid to dorsal hump reduction, correction of the deviated external osseous framework, septoplasty, and correction of the nasal tip shape. 2b. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Rehabilitation in transverse myelitis.

    PubMed

    Sadowsky, Cristina L; Becker, Daniel; Bosques, Glendaliz; Dean, Janet M; McDonald, John W; Recio, Albert; Frohman, Elliot M

    2011-08-01

    The consequences of neurologic injuries related to transverse myelitis (TM) are long-lasting and require rehabilitative interventions in about two-thirds of cases. Because numerous neural repair mechanisms are dependent on maintenance of an optimal amount of activity both above and below the injury level, rehabilitation and exercise are useful not only for compensatory functional purposes but also as tools in neural system restoration. The application of established neurophysiologic principles to post-TM rehabilitation has substantial impact on optimizing residual functional capabilities while facilitating the processes of central plasticity and reorganization of sensory and motor programming. The process of neurorehabilitation thereby serves both to treat the patient with TM and to help physicians interrogate and dissect the mechanisms involved in spinal cord injury, neuroprotection, and, ultimately, recovery. Post-TM rehabilitation is lifelong and should be integrated into daily living in a home setting as part of the global management of paralysis, a chronic condition with significant comorbidities.

  5. Nasal dorsal augmentation with silicone implants.

    PubMed

    Erlich, Mark A; Parhiscar, Afshin

    2003-11-01

    Silicone rubber has been used safely and effectively for facial augmentation for nearly 5 decades in eastern Asia. We have used silicone rubber nasal implants in primary ethnic rhinoplasty and have found consistent and long-lasting results with low complication rates. Silicone dorsal nasal augmentation in primary rhinoplasty avoids donor site morbidity and implant resorption as seen with autogenous implants. Silicone nasal implants have a low extrusion and infection rate. In the appropriate patient with proper placement, silicone nasal implant is nearly the ideal implant material.

  6. Reconstruction of Small Soft Tissue Nasal Defects

    PubMed Central

    Wolfswinkel, Erik M.; Weathers, William M.; Cheng, David; Thornton, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Nasal defect repair has been one of the more challenging areas of reconstructive surgery due to the lack of uniform nasal skin thickness and complex contours. Currently, algorithms for medium to large nasal soft tissue defects have been well defined by various authors. Small defects, arbitrarily defined as 1 cm or less, still present significant challenges. In this article, the authors examine the options available to repair small soft tissue nasal defects and the appropriate situations in which each method is best suited. PMID:24872751

  7. Nasal Myiasis in Hinduism and Contemporary Otorhinolaryngology.

    PubMed

    Bosmia, Anand N; Zimmermann, Terence M; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Shane Tubbs, R; Rosenthal, Eben L

    2017-08-01

    Various case reports on nasal myiasis written during the 1990s and 2000s state that nasal myiasis, which is known as peenash among South Asian natives, is a form of divine punishment in Hindu mythology, but do not provide citations from Hindu scriptures that would suggest this interpretation. This paper aims to discuss the phenomenon of peenash in a historical context by examining medical literature written during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, to identify Hindu texts contributing to the belief of some Hindus that nasal myiasis is a form of divine punishment, and to provide an overview of contemporary treatment for and management of nasal myiasis.

  8. Transverse Wobbling in 135Pr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matta, J. T.; Garg, U.; Li, W.; Frauendorf, S.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Patel, D.; Schlax, K. W.; Palit, R.; Saha, S.; Sethi, J.; Trivedi, T.; Ghugre, S. S.; Raut, R.; Sinha, A. K.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Zhu, S.; Carpenter, M. P.; Lauritsen, T.; Seweryniak, D.; Chiara, C. J.; Kondev, F. G.; Hartley, D. J.; Petrache, C. M.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Lakshmi, D. Vijaya; Raju, M. Kumar; Madhusudhana Rao, P. V.; Tandel, S. K.; Ray, S.; Dönau, F.

    2015-02-01

    A pair of transverse wobbling bands is observed in the nucleus 135Pr . The wobbling is characterized by Δ I =1 , E 2 transitions between the bands, and a decrease in the wobbling energy confirms its transverse nature. Additionally, a transition from transverse wobbling to a three-quasiparticle band comprised of strong magnetic dipole transitions is observed. These observations conform well to results from calculations with the tilted axis cranking model and the quasiparticle rotor model.

  9. Transverse Spin Effects at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Wollny, H.

    2009-08-04

    The measurement of transverse spin effects in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) is an important part of the COMPASS physics program. In the years 2002-2004 data was taken by scattering a 160 GeV/c muon beam off a transversely polarized deuteron target. In 2007, additional data was collected on a transversely polarized proton target. New preliminary results for the Collins and Sivers asymmetries from the analysis of the proton data are presented.

  10. A computational analysis of nasal vestibule morphologic variabilities on nasal function.

    PubMed

    Ramprasad, Vaibhav H; Frank-Ito, Dennis O

    2016-02-08

    Although advances in computational modeling have led to increased understanding of nasal airflow, not much is known about the effects of normal sinonasal anatomic variabilities on nasal function. In this study, three distinct variations in the human nasal vestibule airspace that have not been previously described were identified. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of nasal airflow profile in each identified variation of nasal vestibule phenotype was conducted to assess the role of these phenotypes on nasal physiology. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the nasal geometry in sixteen subjects with normal radiographic sinonasal images were created and each respective unilateral nasal cavity was classified as Notched, Standard, or Elongated phenotype based nasal vestibule morphology. Steady state, laminar and incompressible flow simulations were performed in the nasal geometries under physiological, pressure-driven conditions with constant inspiratory pressure. Results showed that at localized regions of the unilateral nasal cavity, average resistance was significantly different among nasal vestibule phenotypes. However, global comparison from nostril to choana showed that average resistance was not significantly different across phenotypes; suggesting that with normal anatomic variations, the nose has a natural compensatory mechanism that modulates localized airflow in order to achieve a desired amount of global airflow. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Perception of Better Nasal Patency Correlates with Increased Mucosal Cooling after Surgery for Nasal Obstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Guilherme; Sullivan, Corbin; Frank-Ito, Dennis; Kimbell, Julia; Rhee, John

    2014-11-01

    Nasal airway obstruction (NAO) is a common health problem with 340,000 patients undergoing surgery annually in the United States. Traditionally, otolaryngologists have focused on airspace cross-sectional areas and nasal resistance to airflow as objective measures of nasal patency, but neither of these variables correlated consistently with patients' symptoms. Given that the sensation of nasal airflow is also associated with mucosal cooling (i.e., heat loss) during inspiration, we investigated the correlation between the sensation of nasal obstruction and mucosal cooling in 10 patients before and after NAO surgery. Three-dimensional models of the nasal anatomy were created based on pre- and post-surgery computed tomography scans. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted to quantify nasal resistance and mucosal cooling. Patient-reported symptoms were measured by a visual analog scale and the Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE), a disease-specific quality of life questionnaire. Our results revealed that the subjective sensation of nasal obstruction correlated with both nasal resistance and heat loss, but the strongest correlation was between the NOSE score and the nasal surface area where heat flux exceeds 50 W /m2 . In conclusion, a significant post-operative increase in mucosal cooling correlates well with patients' perception of better nasal patency after NAO surgery.

  12. Control of retinoic acid synthesis and FGF expression in the nasal pit is required to pattern the craniofacial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Song, Y; Hui, J N; Fu, K K; Richman, J M

    2004-12-15

    Endogenous retinoids are important for patterning many aspects of the embryo including the branchial arches and frontonasal region of the embryonic face. The nasal placodes express retinaldehyde dehydrogenase-3 (RALDH3) and thus retinoids from the placode are a potential patterning influence on the developing face. We have carried out experiments that have used Citral, a RALDH antagonist, to address the function of retinoid signaling from the nasal pit in a whole embryo model. When Citral-soaked beads were implanted into the nasal pit of stage 20 chicken embryos, the result was a specific loss of derivatives from the lateral nasal prominences. Providing exogenous retinoic acid residue development of the beak demonstrating that most Citral-induced defects were produced by the specific blocking of RA synthesis. The mechanism of Citral effects was a specific increase in programmed cell death on the lateral (lateral nasal prominence) but not the medial side (frontonasal mass) of the nasal pit. Gene expression studies were focused on the Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) pathway, which has a well-established role in programmed cell death. Unexpectedly, blocking RA synthesis decreased rather than increased Msx1, Msx2, and Bmp4 expression. We also examined cell survival genes, the most relevant of which was Fgf8, which is expressed around the nasal pit and in the frontonasal mass. We found that Fgf8 was not initially expressed along the lateral side of the nasal pit at the start of our experiments, whereas it was expressed on the medial side. Citral prevented upregulation of Fgf8 along the lateral edge and this may have contributed to the specific increase in programmed cell death in the lateral nasal prominence. Consistent with this idea, exogenous FGF8 was able to prevent cell death, rescue most of the morphological defects and was able to prevent a decrease in retinoic acid receptorbeta (Rarbeta) expression caused by Citral. Together, our results demonstrate that

  13. Dental arch diameters and relationships to oral habits.

    PubMed

    Aznar, T; Galán, A F; Marín, I; Domínguez, A

    2006-05-01

    The objective was to analyze variations in dental arch width in relation to oral habits. Maxillary and mandibular intercanine and intermolar distance were determined in relation to certain oral habits in 1297 children (ages 3 to 6 years). After an oral examination, the parents of each child completed a questionnaire about oral habits, including the use of a dummy or a bottle (or both), finger sucking, mouth breathing, breast- or bottle-feeding, and duration of these habits. Data were subjected to statistical analysis by the chi-square test for qualitative variables and analysis of variance for quantitative variables with homogeneous variances. Statistical significance was P < .05. In general, the maxillary arch was larger than the mandibular arch with regard to both the intercanine and the intermolar distances and more significantly so in boys. In relation to age, a significant increase was found only for the mandibular intercanine distance (P = .001). When arch width was analyzed in relation to various oral habits, the maxillary intercanine distance was less in children who used a dummy, especially one of a round design (P = .003). The maxillary intercanine distance was also less in children who breathed through their mouth (P = .002). In most cases, dummy use and mouth breathing were associated with a reduction in the intercanine distance in the maxillary arch. A dummy habit leads to a reduction in maxillary arch width, and mouth breathing causes a reduction in the size of both arches.

  14. Volumetric changes of the nose and nasal airway 2 years after tooth-borne and bone-borne surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion.

    PubMed

    Nada, Rania M; van Loon, Bram; Schols, Jan G J H; Maal, Thomas J J; de Koning, Martien J; Mostafa, Yehya A; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne M

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of bone-borne and tooth-borne surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion on the volumes of the nose and nasal airway 2 yr after maxillary expansion. This prospective cohort study included 32 patients with transverse maxillary hypoplasia. Expansion was performed with a tooth-borne distractor (Hyrax) in 19 patients and with a bone-borne distractor [transpalatal distractor (TPD)] in the remaining 13. Cone beam computed tomography scans and three-dimensional (3D) photographs of the face were acquired before treatment and 22 ± 7 months later, and were used to evaluate the volumes of the nose and nasal airway. Nasal volume increased by 1.01 ± 1.6% in the Hyrax group and by 2.39 ± 2.4% in the TPD group. Nasal airway volume increased by 9.7 ± 5.6% in the Hyrax group and by 12.9 ± 12.7% in the TPD group. Changes in the nasal volume and in the nasal airway volume between the pre- and post-treatment measurements were statistically significant, whereas differences between the treatment groups were not; 22 months after surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion, the increases in the nasal volume and in the nasal airway volume were comparable between tooth-borne and bone-borne devices.

  15. Variation in Formation of Superficial Palmar Arches with Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Vatsalaswamy, P.; Bahetee, B.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of the variations in the arterial supply of hand has reached a point of practical importance with the advent of microvascular surgery for revascularization, replantation and composite tissue transfers. Arterial supply of hand is derived from two anastomotic arches, formed between two main arteries of forearm i.e. radial, ulnar and their branches, in the palm. Objective: The superficial palmar arch shows variation in formation at the radial side. In the present study we have recorded its data which would help in its clinical and surgical implications. Material and Methods: In the present study we have studied the formation of superficial palmar arches and their variations in 100 cadaveric hands at Dr. D . Y. Patil Medical College, Pune and B.J. Government Medical College, Pune, India. Result and Conclusion: According to Adachi’s classification the most predominant pattern obseved was of Ulnar type arch (66%). According to Coleman and Anson classification 82% showed complete (Group I) superficial palmar arches and a very low incidence (18%) of incomplete arches (Group II). This suggests that collateral circulation is present in majority of cases. This would result in least number of complications considering radial artery harvesting for coronary bypass. Sub-classification of arches according to Coleman and Anson 1961 indicates that the predominant type in the present study was of Group I (Type B) which is formed entirely by Ulnar Artery (56%). Median artery and ulnar artery forming an incomplete superficial arch under Group II (Type C) having an incidence of 4% was recorded. Thus in such cases radial artery harvesting for coronary artery bypass may prove to be less fatal. This study is an effort to provide data about the formation of superficial palmar arches which has been a centre of attraction for most of the surgical procedures and injuries of the hand. PMID:24959427

  16. [Clinical analysis of nasal resistance and pulmonary function testing in patients with chronic nasal-sinusitis and nasal polyps].

    PubMed

    Liao, Hua; Shen, Ying; Wang, Pengjun

    2015-05-01

    To study the pulmonary function and nasal resistance characteristics of patients with chronic nose-sinusitis and nasal polyps (CRSwNP), to explore the evaluation role of nasal resistance in nasal ventilation function and the effect of endoscopic sinus surgery on pulmonary function in patients with CRSwNP. Fifty CRSwNP patients that met the study criteria were selected . The patients were performed endoscopic surgeries according to Messerklinger surgical procedures under general anesthesia. Extent of surgery was based on preoperative CT showing the range of the lesion of disease and endoscopic findings. Perioperative treatments contained intranasal corticosteroids, cephalosporin or penicillin antibiotics, nasal irrigation and other treatments. Main outcome measures included visual analog scale (VAS), endoscopic Lind-Kennedy scores, nasal resistence, pulmonary function in patientsone week before and after surgery, three months and six months after surgery. Pulmonary function includes forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), forced vital capacity FEV1/FVC and peak expiratory flow (PEF). The study found that there were significantly positive correlations among VAS score, Lund-Kennedy score and nasal resistance (P < 0.05) in CRSwNP patients, but there is a significantly negative correlation between VAS score, Lund-Kennedy score, nasal resistance and pulmonary function indexes of FEV1, FVC and PEF (P < 0.05). The VAS score, Lund-Kennedy score and nasal resistance values of CRSwNP patients were decreased significantly after comprehensive treatments with nasal endoscopic operation as the major one, the difference was statistically different (P < 0.05). And the pulmonary function indexs (FEV1, FVC, PEF) were significantly increased after surgery in CRSwNP patients. The nasal resistance can objectively and reliably reflect the degree of nasal congestion and the recovery of nasal function in CRSwNP patients after endoscopic sinus surgery. The detection method of nasal

  17. Neurilemmoma of lateral nasal wall.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Jyotsna Naresh; Gautam, Parul; Arora, Prerna

    2015-01-01

    Neurilemmoma is a benign tumour of nerve sheath origin that can arise from myelinated nerve. The Head and neck is the most frequent site involved and other sites are scalp, face, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, trachea and ear. Neurilemmoma usually occur as solitary lesions and in association with NF type 2. Malignant transformation is very rare. We report a case of 18 year old male presented with complaint of nasal obstruction and swelling in right side of nose. We discuss the clinical presentation, histologic features, and therapeutic options for such a rare benign lesion.

  18. Numbered nasal discs for waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartonek, J.C.; Dane, C.W.

    1964-01-01

    Numbered nasal discs were successfully used in studies requiring large numbers of individually marked waterfowl. The procedure for constructing these discs is outlined. Blue-winged teal (Anas discors) with 5/8-inch discs, and canvasback (Aythya valisineria) and redhead (A. americana) with 3/4-inch discs can be individually identified up to 50 and 80 yards, respectively, with a gunstock-mounted, 20-power spotting scope. The particular value of these markers is their durability, the number of combinations possible, and the apparent absence of behavioral or mortality influence among such species as the blue-winged teal.

  19. Tumours of the nasal cavity*

    PubMed Central

    Stünzi, H.; Hauser, B.

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of the nasal cavity are rare in domestic animals, most cases occurring in the dog. Epithelial tumours are the most common type in carnivores (dogs and cats). In general, the same types of tumour occur in domestic animals as occur in man. There was no significant predisposition for breed in dogs, but in both dogs and cats far more males than females were affected. Metastases occurred only rarely. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:1086156

  20. General formulation of transverse hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Florkowski, Wojciech

    2008-06-15

    General formulation of hydrodynamics describing transversally thermalized matter created at the early stages of ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions is presented. Similarities and differences with the standard three-dimensionally thermalized relativistic hydrodynamics are discussed. The role of the conservation laws as well as the thermodynamic consistency of two-dimensional thermodynamic variables characterizing transversally thermalized matter is emphasized.

  1. Changes in nasal airflow and heat transfer correlate with symptom improvement after surgery for nasal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kimbell, J.S.; Frank, D.O.; Laud, Purushottam; Garcia, G.J.M.; Rhee, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    Surgeries to correct nasal airway obstruction (NAO) often have less than desirable outcomes, partly due to the absence of an objective tool to select the most appropriate surgical approach for each patient. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models can be used to investigate nasal airflow, but variables need to be identified that can detect surgical changes and correlate with patient symptoms. CFD models were constructed from pre- and post-surgery computed tomography scans for 10 NAO patients showing no evidence of nasal cycling. Steady-state inspiratory airflow, nasal resistance, wall shear stress, and heat flux were computed for the main nasal cavity from nostrils to posterior nasal septum both bilaterally and unilaterally. Paired t-tests indicated that all CFD variables were significantly changed by surgery when calculated on the most obstructed side, and that airflow, nasal resistance, and heat flux were significantly changed bilaterally as well. Moderate linear correlations with patient-reported symptoms were found for airflow, heat flux, unilateral allocation of airflow, and unilateral nasal resistance as a fraction of bilateral nasal resistance when calculated on the most obstructed nasal side, suggesting that these variables may be useful for evaluating the efficacy of nasal surgery objectively. Similarity in the strengths of these correlations suggests that patient-reported symptoms may represent a constellation of effects and that these variables should be tracked concurrently during future virtual surgery planning. PMID:24063885

  2. Video-rhino-hygrometer: a new method for evaluation of nasal breathing after nasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Casale, Manuele; Pappacena, Marco; Setola, Roberto; Soda, Paolo; Cusimano, Valerio; Vitali, Massimiliano; Mladina, Ranko; Salvinelli, Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    Nasal obstruction is one of the most frequent symptoms in the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) setting. It can be evaluated either subjectively or objectively. In a subjective way, a visual analog scale (VAS) and the Sino-Nasal Outcome Test 20 (SNOT 20) can rapidly quantify the degree of obstruction, whereas the most commonly used objective methods are nasal endoscopy and active anterior rhinomanometry (AAR). It is still a matter of controversy to what extent the sense of nasal obstruction is associated with objective measures for nasal space and airflow. The aim of the study was to evaluate nasal breathing before and after functional nasal surgery by video-rhino-hygrometer (VRH) comparing the results with widely accepted methods. Twenty patient candidates for septoplasty and inferior turbinate reduction were included in the study. SNOT-20, VAS, nasal endoscopy, and AAR were analyzed and compared with VRH values. Before surgery VRH showed variability of nasal respiratory flow between individuals and between nostrils. After surgery we had an increase (p < 0.05) of airflow in both nostrils. VRH data were found to be correlated with VAS and SNOT-20 values (p < 0.05) both pre- and postoperatively. Despite the statistically significant correlation of AAR with SNOT-20 and VAS, no statistically significant correlation between AAR and VRH was found. VRH provides an immediate, easy, and noninvasive assessment of nasal respiration. For these reasons it can be used, in association with rhinoscopic data and other instrumental tests, to evaluate nasal breathing in daily ENT practice.

  3. Changes in nasal airflow and heat transfer correlate with symptom improvement after surgery for nasal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kimbell, J S; Frank, D O; Laud, Purushottam; Garcia, G J M; Rhee, J S

    2013-10-18

    Surgeries to correct nasal airway obstruction (NAO) often have less than desirable outcomes, partly due to the absence of an objective tool to select the most appropriate surgical approach for each patient. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models can be used to investigate nasal airflow, but variables need to be identified that can detect surgical changes and correlate with patient symptoms. CFD models were constructed from pre- and post-surgery computed tomography scans for 10 NAO patients showing no evidence of nasal cycling. Steady-state inspiratory airflow, nasal resistance, wall shear stress, and heat flux were computed for the main nasal cavity from nostrils to posterior nasal septum both bilaterally and unilaterally. Paired t-tests indicated that all CFD variables were significantly changed by surgery when calculated on the most obstructed side, and that airflow, nasal resistance, and heat flux were significantly changed bilaterally as well. Moderate linear correlations with patient-reported symptoms were found for airflow, heat flux, unilateral allocation of airflow, and unilateral nasal resistance as a fraction of bilateral nasal resistance when calculated on the most obstructed nasal side, suggesting that these variables may be useful for evaluating the efficacy of nasal surgery objectively. Similarity in the strengths of these correlations suggests that patient-reported symptoms may represent a constellation of effects and that these variables should be tracked concurrently during future virtual surgery planning.

  4. Endovascular repair of a ruptured descending thoracic aortic aneurysm in a patient with an ascending aortic aneurysm: hybrid open arch reconstruction with simultaneous thoracic stent-graft deployment within elephant trunk.

    PubMed

    Abou-Zamzam, Ahmed M; Zhang, Wayne; Wang, Nan; Razzouk, Anees

    2008-03-01

    Endovascular repair of the thoracic aorta is now widely practiced. The extension of this technique to emergent settings is in evolution. Pathology of the ascending and transverse aortic arch may preclude thoracic aortic stent grafting due to the lack of a proximal seal zone. Several hybrid open/endovascular approaches have been described. We recently encountered the difficult case of a contained rupture of a 6.8 cm descending thoracic aortic aneurysm in a 60-year-old patient with aneurysmal degeneration of the ascending and transverse aortic arch. This patient was treated with a hybrid approach of open ascending and transverse arch reconstruction along with simultaneous stent-graft repair of the descending thoracic aorta. The open repair established an excellent proximal landing zone by use of the "elephant trunk" technique. This technique also allowed direct suture fixation of the stent graft to the arch graft to prevent stent-graft migration. This hybrid surgical approach was successful and avoided the cumulative morbidity that a left thoracoabdominal approach would have added to the sternotomy. Further creative uses of these hybrid techniques will undoubtedly serve a larger role in the treatment of thoracic aortic pathology.

  5. Classical Weyl transverse gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Ichiro

    2017-05-01

    We study various classical aspects of the Weyl transverse (WTDiff) gravity in a general space-time dimension. First of all, we clarify a classical equivalence among three kinds of gravitational theories, those are, the conformally invariant scalar tensor gravity, Einstein's general relativity and the WTDiff gravity via the gauge-fixing procedure. Secondly, we show that in the WTDiff gravity the cosmological constant is a mere integration constant as in unimodular gravity, but it does not receive any radiative corrections unlike the unimodular gravity. A key point in this proof is to construct a covariantly conserved energy-momentum tensor, which is achieved on the basis of this equivalence relation. Thirdly, we demonstrate that the Noether current for the Weyl transformation is identically vanishing, thereby implying that the Weyl symmetry existing in both the conformally invariant scalar tensor gravity and the WTDiff gravity is a "fake" symmetry. We find it possible to extend this proof to all matter fields, i.e. the Weyl-invariant scalar, vector and spinor fields. Fourthly, it is explicitly shown that in the WTDiff gravity the Schwarzschild black hole metric and a charged black hole one are classical solutions to the equations of motion only when they are expressed in the Cartesian coordinate system. Finally, we consider the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) cosmology and provide some exact solutions.

  6. Transverse electron resonance accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Csonka, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    Transverse (to the velocity, v, of the particles to be accelerated) electron oscillations are generated in high (e.g. solid) density plasmas by either an electromagnetic wave or by the field of charged particles traveling parallel to v. The generating field oscillates with frequency ..omega.. = ..omega../sub p/, where ..omega../sub p/ is the plasma frequency. The plasma is confined to a sequence of microstructures with typical dimensions of d approx. = 2..pi..c/..omega../sub p/, allowing the generating fields to penetrate. Since ..omega../sub p/ is now high, the time scales, T, are correspondingly reduced. The microstructures are allowed to explode after t = T, until then they are confined by ion inertia. As a result of resonance, the electric field, E, inside the microstructures can exceed the generating field E/sub L/. The generating force is proportional to E/sub L/ (as opposed to E/sub L//sup 2/). Phase matching of particles is possible by appropriate spacing of the microstructures or by a gas medium. The generating beam travels outside the plasma, filamentation is not a problem. The mechanism is relatively insensitive to the exact shape and position of the microstructures. This device contains features of various earlier proposed acceleration mechanisms and may be considered as the limiting case of several of those for small d, T and high E.

  7. Transnasal microsurgical ethmoidectomy in nasal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Bagatella, F; Mazzoni, A

    1980-03-01

    A technique of microsurgical ethmoidectomy by a nasal route was devised for and applied to the treatment of nasal polyposis. A description of the operative procedure and the results in 30 cases with a 3-5 years of follow-up are reported.

  8. Nasal allergen challenge and mediators release.

    PubMed

    Carlos, A G; Carlos, M L; Ferreira, M B; Santos, A S; Santos, M C; Pedro, E

    1997-11-01

    Nasal allergen challenges, despite not reproducing exactly natural allergen exposure, are a very useful method to understand the complex cellular kinetics and cellular interactions that occur in allergic rhinitis. Cell-specific soluble mediator measurements can give useful diagnostic information. In this paper we present data concerning eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and tryptase measurements after nasal allergen challenge.

  9. Nasal Airway Resistance: Its Measurement and Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Lyle H.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews studies of regulation of nasal airway resistance (Rn). Describes methods of calculating Rn by measuring pressure-flow relationship. Data are presented on improved methods for measuring Rn and effects for expiratory and inspiratory Rn after topical application of phenylephrine nasal decongestant spray. (Author/SA)

  10. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  11. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  12. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  13. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance for the advanced imaging of the normal nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Bercier, Marjorie; Alexander, Kate; Gorow, April; Pye, Geoffrey W

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study is to describe computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) for the cross-sectional imaging of the normal anatomy of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus), to provide reference figures for gross anatomy with corresponding CT and MR images and to compare the features of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses of the normal koala with that reported in other domestic species. Advanced imaging can be used to aid in diagnosis, to plan surgical intervention, and to monitor therapeutic responses to diseases of the nasal passages in koalas. One clinically normal koala was anesthetized twice for the separate acquisition of dorsal CT scan images and transverse, dorsal, and sagittal MR images of its nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Sagittal and transverse CT planes were reformatted. Three fresh koala skulls were also transected in one of each transverse, sagittal, and dorsal planes and photographed. The CT and MR images obtained were matched with corresponding gross anatomic images and the normal bone, tissues and airway passages were identified. All anatomic structures were readily identifiable on CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and gross images. CT and MRI are both valuable diagnostic tools for imaging the nasal cavities and paranasal sinuses of koalas. Images obtained from this project can be used as baseline references for future comparison with diseased koalas to help with diagnosis, surgical intervention, and response to therapy.

  14. Chronic Rhinosinusitis without Nasal Polyps

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seong H; Kim, Dae Woo; Gevaert, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis without nasal polyps (CRSsNP) is more prevalent than chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP). Certain diseases predispose to whereas others are associated with CRSsNP. Predisposing diseases include allergic and non-allergic upper and lower airway diseases, epithelial cell disorders, immunodeficiencies, autoimmune diseases, and some infectious diseases. Additionally, environmental and host factors, examples of which include smoking, a higher incidence of abnormal biofilms, and innate immune defects play a role in the pathogenesis of this disease. CRSsNP is characterized by histologic abnormalities, including basement membrane thickening (fibrosis) and goblet cell hyperplasia. Neutrophils and several chemokines, TGF-β and CXCL-8, play a role in CRSsNP remodeling. However, there are conflicting data about CRSsNP endotypes, e.g., whether it is characterized by neutrophilia or eosinophilia or both. In spite of advancements and the understanding of the pathogenesis of this disease, additional study is necessary to better comprehend its underlying mechanisms, endotypes, and evidence based treatment strategies. PMID:27393771

  15. Assessment of nasalance and nasality in patients with a repaired cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Sinko, Klaus; Gruber, Maike; Jagsch, Reinhold; Roesner, Imme; Baumann, Arnulf; Wutzl, Arno; Denk-Linnert, Doris-Maria

    2017-03-15

    In patients with a repaired cleft palate, nasality is typically diagnosed by speech language pathologists. In addition, there are various instruments to objectively diagnose nasalance. To explore the potential of nasalance measurements after cleft palate repair by NasalView(®), we correlated perceptual nasality and instrumentally measured nasalance of eight speech items and determined the relationship between sensitivity and specificity of the nasalance measures by receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) analyses and AUC (area under the curve) computation for each single test item and specific item groups. We recruited patients with a primarily repaired cleft palate receiving speech therapy during follow-up. During a single day visit, perceptive and instrumental assessments were obtained in 36 patients and analyzed. The individual perceptual nasality was assigned to one of four categories; the corresponding instrumental nasalance measures for the eight specific speech items were expressed on a metric scale (1-100). With reference to the perceptual diagnoses, we observed 3 nasal and one oral test item with high sensitivity. However, the specificity of the nasality indicating measures was rather low. The four best speech items with the highest sensitivity provided scores ranging from 96.43 to 100%, while the averaged sensitivity of all eight items was below 90%. We conclude that perceptive evaluation of nasality remains state of the art. For clinical follow-up, instrumental nasalance assessment can objectively document subtle changes by analysis of four speech items only. Further studies are warranted to determine the applicability of instrumental nasalance measures in the clinical routine, using discriminative items only.

  16. Fabrication of a provisional nasal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Evan B; Golden, Marjorie; Huryn, Joseph M

    2014-11-01

    A technique for making a provisional nasal prosthesis for interim use after the ablation of a midface tumor is described. The technique is especially useful for the re-creation of a nasal form in an expedient and cost-effective manner. A preoperative definitive cast, or moulage, of the patient that includes a nasal form is used to fabricate a vacuum form of the midface. The vacuum form is evaluated on the patient, the extension is adjusted, and an external adhesive knit liner is applied to give the appearance of a contoured nasal bandage. The provisional nasal prosthesis is attached with medical adhesive tape and removed daily by the patient. The prosthesis is easily replaced during the course of treatment and has been found to be functional and esthetically acceptable to those patients receiving care from the Dental Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

  17. Nasal foreign body removal in children.

    PubMed

    Kiger, James R; Brenkert, Timothy E; Losek, Joseph D

    2008-11-01

    Nasal foreign bodies in children are often managed in the pediatric emergency department. The child is usually between 2 and 4 years old, and the foreign body is most commonly a plastic toy or bead. Nasal foreign bodies are removed by a number of techniques. Positive-pressure expulsion is accomplished by orally applied pressure via a parent's mouth or an Ambu bag or by nasally applied pressure via a catheter or an oxygen source. The object can be washed out with nasally applied saline. Direct mechanical extraction is possible with a variety of tools, including forceps, hooks, or balloon-tipped catheters. Each method carries its own risks and benefits. Serious complications of nasal foreign bodies include posterior dislodgement and aspiration, trauma caused by the object itself or removal attempts, infection, and choanal stenosis. Magnets and button batteries require emergent removal as they carry the risk of septal perforation or necrosis, which may develop within a relatively short time.

  18. [Nasal foreign body in infants].

    PubMed

    Claudet, I; Salanne, S; Debuisson, C; Maréchal, C; Rekhroukh, H; Grouteau, E

    2009-09-01

    Provide a descriptive analysis of children admitted to a tertiary care pediatric emergency department (PED) for a nasal foreign body (NFB) and describe the current knowledge and management of such accidents. A retrospective study was conducted from January 2003 to May 2008, including all patients aged less than 15 years admitted for a NFB. The data collected were age, sex, geographic origin, time and day of admission, duration in PED, duration of NFB insertion, nostril location, symptoms and clinical signs, prehospital extraction attempts, facial x-ray, extraction mode, referral to an ENT specialist, progression, and complications. For statistical analysis, the data were entered in Microsoft Excel spreadsheets. The data were analyzed with StatView 5.1 (SAS Institute) and EpiInfo 6.04fr (VF, ENSP Epiconcept). In the descriptive analysis, the data are presented as mean values with standard deviation, median with extreme values or with 95% confidence intervals where appropriate, unless otherwise indicated. To compare qualitative variables, a chi(2) test (Mantel-Haenszel) was used and the two-tailed Fisher exact test if the expected value was 5 or less. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. A total of 388 patients were included (393 NFB). The annual mean number of cases was 68. The annual distribution showed a higher number in January, March, April, and October following Christmas, Easter and Halloween celebrations, totaling 40% of all NFB admissions. The sex-ratio was 0.95. Children aged less than 4 years accounted for 71% of the studied population. The mean age was 3.5+/-1.6 years (range, 1.4-13 years). The majority of accidents occurred at home (95%). The length of time spent in the PED was 78+/-57 min. The NFB duration of insertion was unknown in one-quarter of cases, present for less than 4 h in 65% of cases. No symptoms were described in most cases (88%). When symptoms were described, bleeding, pain or nasal discomfort, and foul nasal odor were the

  19. 14. BRIDGE ABUTMENT AND ARCH TRUSS MOUNTING PLATE SHOWING EYEBAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. BRIDGE ABUTMENT AND ARCH TRUSS MOUNTING PLATE SHOWING EYE-BAR CONNECTION AND EYE-BAR PIN LOCATION - Spruce Street Bridge, East Spruce Street, 500 Block, spanning Power Canal, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  20. 7. VIEW ACROSS DECK FACING SOUTHWEST; GREAT ARCH IN DISTANCE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW ACROSS DECK FACING SOUTHWEST; GREAT ARCH IN DISTANCE - Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, Virgin River Bridge, Spanning North Fork of Virgin River on Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, Springdale, Washington County, UT

  1. 19. VIEW ACROSS DECK FACING SOUTHWEST, GREAT ARCH IN DISTANCE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW ACROSS DECK FACING SOUTHWEST, GREAT ARCH IN DISTANCE - Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, Virgin River Bridge, Spanning North Fork of Virgin River on Zion-Mount Carmel Highway, Springdale, Washington County, UT

  2. 11. DETAIL OF WEST WEB, FROM STREAMBANK, SHOWING ARCH RIB, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL OF WEST WEB, FROM STREAMBANK, SHOWING ARCH RIB, HANGERS, FLOOR BEAMS AND GUARDRAIL. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rock Valley Bridge, Spanning North Timber Creek at Old U.S. Highway 30, Marshalltown, Marshall County, IA

  3. 12. DETAIL OF NORTH ABUTMENT, FROM BENEATH, SHOWING ARCH RIB ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL OF NORTH ABUTMENT, FROM BENEATH, SHOWING ARCH RIB AND FLOOR BEAM. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rock Valley Bridge, Spanning North Timber Creek at Old U.S. Highway 30, Marshalltown, Marshall County, IA

  4. 11. View looking from opposite direction (N) at arched opening ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. View looking from opposite direction (N) at arched opening depicted in previous view. - Hacienda Azucarera La Esperanza, Mill (Ruins), 2.65 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Manati River, Manati, Manati Municipio, PR

  5. 19. INTERIOR: ARCH AND CORBELED VAULT NEAR FRONT Copy photograph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. INTERIOR: ARCH AND CORBELED VAULT NEAR FRONT Copy photograph of photogrammetric plate LC-HABS-GS07-1116-113L. - Provident Life & Trust Company Bank, 407-409 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. Detail of arched corbel table at top of brick privy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of arched corbel table at top of brick privy - Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Combination Smokestack, Water Tank & Privies, Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  7. 24. Detail view north under bridge showing arched bascule girder, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Detail view north under bridge showing arched bascule girder, deck girders and cross beams, and bracing of east bascule leaf. - Yellow Mill Bridge, Spanning Yellow Mill Channel at Stratford Avenue, Bridgeport, Fairfield County, CT

  8. Detail, center pier, showing rigidlyfixed arch ribs, starpattern balustrade, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, center pier, showing rigidly-fixed arch ribs, star-pattern balustrade, and simple ornamentation including molded treatment of concrete, pyramidal pier cap, and stylized pilaster - Horner Street Bridge, Horner Street over Stonycreek River, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  9. DETAIL OF GABLE END WITH ARCHED WINDOW, SHOWING SOFFIT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF GABLE END WITH ARCHED WINDOW, SHOWING SOFFIT OF OVERHANG; CAMERA FACING NORTH - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Transportation Building & Gas Station, Third Street, south side between Walnut Avenue & Cedar Avenue, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  10. 13. Detail view of arched opening where fuel was fed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Detail view of arched opening where fuel was fed to fire Jamaican Train. - Hacienda Azucarera La Esperanza, Mill (Ruins), 2.65 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Manati River, Manati, Manati Municipio, PR

  11. DETAIL VIEW, LOOKING WEST, SHOWING ARCH RIB FROM PIER TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW, LOOKING WEST, SHOWING ARCH RIB FROM PIER TO PIER, WITH SOUTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD BRIDGE IN BACKGROUND - Ash Avenue Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Foot of Ash Avenue, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  12. 11. Detail of laminated arch beams, radiators, pews and portion ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail of laminated arch beams, radiators, pews and portion of the office to the left of the sanctuary, facing north - Mountain Home Air Force Base, Base Chapel, 350 Willow Street, Cantonment Area, Mountain Home, Elmore County, ID

  13. View of Crane 55 above its arched portal over roadway ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Crane 55 above its arched portal over roadway atop pier at Drydock No. 2 - Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Portal Gantry Crane No. 55, Central Industrial Area, Farragut Avenue, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  14. BLDG 2 INTERIOR SHOWING ARCHES IN HALL BY MAIN ENTRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLDG 2 INTERIOR SHOWING ARCHES IN HALL BY MAIN ENTRY - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Police Station, Kolekole Road & Constitution Street intersection, north side of main quad, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. SPRINGING OF THE ARCH, SOUTH END OF BRIDGE, STATEN ISLAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SPRINGING OF THE ARCH, SOUTH END OF BRIDGE, STATEN ISLAND SIDE (CONTACT PRINT MADE FROM 5 1/4" X 4 1/2" NEGATIVE) - Bayonne Bridge, Spanning Kill Van Kull between Bayonne & Staten Island, Bayonne, Hudson County, NJ

  16. 41. VIEW EAST OF ARCH AND PASSAGEWAY MARKED '1905' THROUGH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. VIEW EAST OF ARCH AND PASSAGEWAY MARKED '1905' THROUGH BUILDING 48; BUILDING 7 IS AT LEFT CENTER, BUILDING 6 IS AT EXTREME RIGHT OF PHOTOGRAPH - Scovill Brass Works, 59 Mill Street, Waterbury, New Haven County, CT

  17. NASA's SDO Watches Magnetic Arches Tower Over Sun's Surface

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Massive arches of solar material brighten and stream over an active region on the sun’s surface in this animation of imagery captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, on Sept. 29, 2016...

  18. NASA’s SDO Captures Cascading Magnetic Arches

    NASA Image and Video Library

    A dark solar filament above the sun's surface became unstable and erupted on Dec. 16-17, 2015, generating a cascade of magnetic arches. A small eruption to the upper right of the filament was likel...

  19. 18. Pennsylvania Railroad: Brick Arch Viaduct. Philadelphia, Philadelphia Co., PA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Pennsylvania Railroad: Brick Arch Viaduct. Philadelphia, Philadelphia Co., PA. Sec. 1101, MP 87.44. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between Delaware-Pennsylvania & Pennsylvania-New Jersey state lines, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  20. 19. Pennsylvania Railroad: Brick Arch Viaduct. Philadelphia, Philadelphia Co., PA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Pennsylvania Railroad: Brick Arch Viaduct. Philadelphia, Philadelphia Co., PA. Sec. 1101, MP 87.44. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between Delaware-Pennsylvania & Pennsylvania-New Jersey state lines, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  1. Oblique view of arches and ironwork on south breezeway ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of arches and ironwork on south breezeway - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Pacific Branch, Mental Health Buildings, 11301 Wilshire Boulevard, West Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. 5. LOOKING DUE WEST, THIS ELEVATION SHOWS THE ABUTMENTS, ARCH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. LOOKING DUE WEST, THIS ELEVATION SHOWS THE ABUTMENTS, ARCH, DECORATED SPANDRELS, THE BALLISTERS AND THE 25' RAISE IN GRADE WHICH WAS ACCOMPLISHED WITH BORROWED FILL. - Vandalia Railroad Bridge, Spanning U.S. Route 40, Indianapolis, Marion County, IN

  3. Detail of windows in arched opening on left of east ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of windows in arched opening on left of east elevation; camera facing west. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Rubber Shop, California Avenue, west side across from Dry Dock 1 near Ninth Street, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  4. 25. REPRESENTATIVE DETAIL VIEW OF THE TWO ARCHED PEDESTRIAN BRIDGES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. REPRESENTATIVE DETAIL VIEW OF THE TWO ARCHED PEDESTRIAN BRIDGES OVER THE CANALS, SHOWING PLANKS AND RAILS. THIS BRIDGE IS THE LINNIE CANAL COURT BRIDGE OVER EASTERN CANAL. - Venice Canals, Community of Venice, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. 4. Detail view of brick arch above doorway on W ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Detail view of brick arch above doorway on W wall of Blacksmith Shop. - Central of Georgia Railway, Savannah Repair Shops & Terminal Facilities, Blacksmith Shop, Bounded by West Broad, Jones, West Boundary & Hull Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  6. Cellar: Detail of paired relieving arch and remains of herringbone ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cellar: Detail of paired relieving arch and remains of herringbone brick pattern from earlier cooking fireplace at back, southeast wall looking southeast - Kingston-Upon-Hill, Kitts Hummock Road, Dover, Kent County, DE

  7. 41. DETAIL OF DOUBLE WINDOW ELEMENT WITH ARCHED BRICK PATTERN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. DETAIL OF DOUBLE WINDOW ELEMENT WITH ARCHED BRICK PATTERN ON EAST SIDE OF 1931 SECTION, TAKEN FROM THE EAST. - James Russell Lowell Elementary School, 4501 Crittenden Drive, Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  8. Halfcellar underneath original house showing fireplace relieving arch at northwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Half-cellar underneath original house showing fireplace relieving arch at northwest end; enclosed "cheese" room to right - Scheetz Farm, House, 7161 Camp Hill Road, Fort Washington, Montgomery County, PA

  9. 57. Metz Run Viaduct. Detail of the reinforced concrete arched ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    57. Metz Run Viaduct. Detail of the reinforced concrete arched piers. Looking south-southeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  10. 16. TAILRACE ARCH FROM 1814 MILL BROKEN THROUGH DURING EXCAVATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. TAILRACE ARCH FROM 1814 MILL BROKEN THROUGH DURING EXCAVATION FOR A SURFACE WATER RUNOFF POLLUTION TRAP, SUBSEQUENTLY FILLED. - Boston Manufacturing Company, 144-190 Moody Street, Waltham, Middlesex County, MA

  11. Arch construction at south end, looking east with Phoenix Iron ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Arch construction at south end, looking east with Phoenix Iron Company foundry in background. - Gay Street Bridge, Spanning French Creek at Gay Street (State Route 113), Phoenixville, Chester County, PA

  12. 8. VIEW NORTHWEST OF EAST ELEVATION SOUTH BARREL ARCH. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW NORTHWEST OF EAST ELEVATION SOUTH BARREL ARCH. NOTE STONE WORK, 1920 CONCRETE REPAIRS, AND STEEL BRACES ADDED BY THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE CIRCA 1962. - Chesapeake & Ohio Canal, Conococheague Creek Aqueduct, Milepost 99.80, Williamsport, Washington County, MD

  13. 5. DETAIL VIEW OF PORTION OF EAST ELEVATION SHOWING ARCHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL VIEW OF PORTION OF EAST ELEVATION SHOWING ARCHED WINDOW AND DOOR OPENINGS - Presidio Water Treatment Plant, Filtration Plant, East of Lobos Creek at Baker Beach, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  14. Close view of the Constitution Avenue elevation to show arched ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Close view of the Constitution Avenue elevation to show arched gateways and pedimented pavilion ("Commerce and Communication" sculpted pediment) - Interstate Commerce Commission, Constitution Avenue between Twelfth and Fourteenth streets, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  15. LOOKING WEST, BETWEEN READING DEPOT BRIDGE AND SKEW ARCH BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOOKING WEST, BETWEEN READING DEPOT BRIDGE AND SKEW ARCH BRIDGE (HAER No. PA-116). - Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, Reading Depot Bridge, North Sixth Street at Woodward Street, Reading, Berks County, PA

  16. 3. DETAIL OF STONEWORK ON ARCH, WATER TABLE AND DENTILS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DETAIL OF STONEWORK ON ARCH, WATER TABLE AND DENTILS ON EAST ELEVATION LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Original Airport Entrance Overpass, Spanning original Airport Entrance Road at National Airport, Arlington, Arlington County, VA

  17. 4. ELEVATION OF WESTERN ARCHES OVER STATE ROUTE 611 AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. ELEVATION OF WESTERN ARCHES OVER STATE ROUTE 611 AND RAILROAD TRACKS, FROM SOUTH. - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, Delaware River Viaduct, Spanning Delaware River, north of Portland-Columbia Bridge, Portland, Northampton County, PA

  18. 2. ELEVATION OF TYPICAL ARCH OF VIADUCT, FROM SOUTH. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. ELEVATION OF TYPICAL ARCH OF VIADUCT, FROM SOUTH. - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad, Delaware River Viaduct, Spanning Delaware River, north of Portland-Columbia Bridge, Portland, Northampton County, PA

  19. 18. INTERIOR: ARCH AND COLUMN NEAR FRONT Copy photograph of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. INTERIOR: ARCH AND COLUMN NEAR FRONT Copy photograph of photogrammetric plate LC-HABS-GS07-1116-112L. - Provident Life & Trust Company Bank, 407-409 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  20. View from inside Train Shed looking out through arched opening. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from inside Train Shed looking out through arched opening. - Central of Georgia Railway, Passenger Station & Train Shed, Corner of Louisville (Railroad) Road & West Broad Street, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  1. Detail of arch opening on N elevation of Train Shed. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of arch opening on N elevation of Train Shed. - Central of Georgia Railway, Passenger Station & Train Shed, Corner of Louisville (Railroad) Road & West Broad Street, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  2. Arch opening on N elevation as seen from inside Train ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Arch opening on N elevation as seen from inside Train Shed, - Central of Georgia Railway, Passenger Station & Train Shed, Corner of Louisville (Railroad) Road & West Broad Street, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  3. ABUTMENT. NOTE HOW ARCHES BUTT AGAINST A CONCRETE PAD ADDED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ABUTMENT. NOTE HOW ARCHES BUTT AGAINST A CONCRETE PAD ADDED IN 1968. NOTE ALSO IRON TIE ROD AT LOWER CHORD. - Dreibelbis Station Bridge, Spanning Maiden Creek, Balthaser Road (TR 745), Lenhartsville, Berks County, PA

  4. 22. Detail view of arched passageway as in preceeding photo. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Detail view of arched passageway as in preceeding photo. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  5. 23. Detail view of brickwork in same arched passageway. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Detail view of brickwork in same arched passageway. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  6. 80. LITTLE ROCK DAM: DIMENSIONS, SECTION THROUGH ARCH RING, AMENDED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    80. LITTLE ROCK DAM: DIMENSIONS, SECTION THROUGH ARCH RING, AMENDED SHEET 5; SEPTEMBER, 1922. Palmdale Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. PERSPECTIVE OF UNDERSIDE SHOWING ARCHED GIRDER AND SLAB CONSTRUCTION. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PERSPECTIVE OF UNDERSIDE SHOWING ARCHED GIRDER AND SLAB CONSTRUCTION. NOTE TWISTED BAR STOCK REINFORCING CAN BE SEEN. - Keggereis Ford Bridge, Spanning West Branch Conococheague Creek at State Route 4006, Willow Hill, Franklin County, PA

  8. 18. SECOND FLOOR, CITY COMMISSION CHAMBERS, DETAIL OF ARCH WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. SECOND FLOOR, CITY COMMISSION CHAMBERS, DETAIL OF ARCH WITH MURAL ON LEFT OF BENCH, SHOWING SEAMEN,SCIENTIST,SPORTSMEN AND STATE SEAL - City Hall, Atlantic & Tennessee Avenues, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  9. Detail view of keystone sculpted head in the arched passage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of keystone sculpted head in the arched passage to the lobby vestibule - United States Department of Commerce, Bounded by Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and E streets and Constitution Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. 28. 'Details Of Abutments For Three Hinged Arch Bridge Over ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. 'Details Of Abutments For Three Hinged Arch Bridge Over Yuba River, Thomas System, Thomas And Post, Engineers, Hibernian Bldg., Los Angeles,' dated March 31, 1913. - Parks Bar Bridge, Spanning Yuba River at State Highway 20, Smartville, Yuba County, CA

  11. 31. 'Details For Three Hinged Arch Bridge Over Yuba River, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. 'Details For Three Hinged Arch Bridge Over Yuba River, Thomas System, Thomas And Post--Consulting Engineers, Hibernian Bldg., Los Angeles, Revised Oct. 22, 1912.' - Parks Bar Bridge, Spanning Yuba River at State Highway 20, Smartville, Yuba County, CA

  12. 1. South elevation, (lr) arches CD and DE. View north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. South elevation, (l-r) arches C-D and D-E. View north - Ashton Viaduct, State Route 116 (Washington Highway) spanning Blackstone River, Blackstone Canal, & Providence & Worcester Railroad, Ashton, Providence County, RI

  13. 7. (lr) Arches DE, CD, BC. View southwest Ashton ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. (l-r) Arches D-E, C-D, B-C. View southwest - Ashton Viaduct, State Route 116 (Washington Highway) spanning Blackstone River, Blackstone Canal, & Providence & Worcester Railroad, Ashton, Providence County, RI

  14. 5. Railroad tracks, (lr) arches EF, DE, CD, BC. View ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Railroad tracks, (l-r) arches E-F, D-E, C-D, B-C. View southwest - Ashton Viaduct, State Route 116 (Washington Highway) spanning Blackstone River, Blackstone Canal, & Providence & Worcester Railroad, Ashton, Providence County, RI

  15. 6. (1r) Arches EF, DE. View southeast Ashton Viaduct, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. (1-r) Arches E-F, D-E. View southeast - Ashton Viaduct, State Route 116 (Washington Highway) spanning Blackstone River, Blackstone Canal, & Providence & Worcester Railroad, Ashton, Providence County, RI

  16. 5. BUILDING 0503, INTERIOR WOODEN ARCHES. Looking south from entrance. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. BUILDING 0503, INTERIOR WOODEN ARCHES. Looking south from entrance. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Earth Covered Bunker Types, North of Sled Track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. 1. VIEW SOUTHWARD FROM SOUTHWEST CORNER FRONT AND ARCH STREETS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW SOUTHWARD FROM SOUTHWEST CORNER FRONT AND ARCH STREETS (2. N. Front Street starts at left) - North Front Street Area Study, 2-66 North Front Street (Commercial Buildings), Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  18. Detail view highlighting the series of pointed arch windows along ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view highlighting the series of pointed arch windows along the North Carrollton facade - Reformed Episcopal Church of the Rock of Ages, 1210 West Lanvale Street, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  19. 65. Close up view of downstream face of arch, buttress ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. Close up view of downstream face of arch, buttress ties and roadway support work. Photographer Mark Durben. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  20. 23. Upstream view of buttress and arch form work and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Upstream view of buttress and arch form work and construction. Photographer unknown, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  1. 19. Upstream face of arches and buttresses at west end. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Upstream face of arches and buttresses at west end. Photographer unknown, January 29, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  2. 36. DETAIL, ALTERNATE DESIGN USING THROUGH ARCH SPANS Pencil drawing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. DETAIL, ALTERNATE DESIGN USING THROUGH ARCH SPANS Pencil drawing by project architect Alfred Eichler, ca. 1934. - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  3. 198. SPOUT RUN ARCH BRIDGE AND SPOUT RUN WESTBOUND BRIDGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    198. SPOUT RUN ARCH BRIDGE AND SPOUT RUN WESTBOUND BRIDGE FROM POTOMAC RIVER LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  4. Detail, southwest arch rib, hangers, and portion of portal braces, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, southwest arch rib, hangers, and portion of portal braces, from southeast, showing simple ornamentation, including molded treatment of concrete and recessed panels - Horner Street Bridge, Horner Street over Stonycreek River, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  5. Detail southeast arch rib, hangers, and portion of portal frame, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail southeast arch rib, hangers, and portion of portal frame, from southwest, showing simple ornamentation, including molded treatment of concrete and recessed panels - Horner Street Bridge, Horner Street over Stonycreek River, Johnstown, Cambria County, PA

  6. 5. DETAIL VIEW OF JUNCTURE BETWEEN ARCH, AND ABUTMENT, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL VIEW OF JUNCTURE BETWEEN ARCH, AND ABUTMENT, SHOWING CANTILEVERED WALKWAY AND DECK BEAMS ON UNDERSIDE OF BRIDGE - Benson Street Concrete Bowstring Bridge, Spanning Mill Creek at Benson Street, Lockland, Hamilton County, OH

  7. 4. SIDE VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING ARCHES, CANTILEVERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. SIDE VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING ARCHES, CANTILEVERED WALKWAY, DECK BEAMS AND STREAMBED - Benson Street Concrete Bowstring Bridge, Spanning Mill Creek at Benson Street, Lockland, Hamilton County, OH

  8. 90. VIEW OF THE HEAD ARCHES AND FAIRMOUNT POND, CA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    90. VIEW OF THE HEAD ARCHES AND FAIRMOUNT POND, CA. 1875 Collection of the Fairmount Park Commission - Fairmount Waterworks, East bank of Schuylkill River, Aquarium Drive, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  9. 19. SECOND FLOOR, CITY COMMISSION CHAMBERS, DETAIL OF ARCH WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. SECOND FLOOR, CITY COMMISSION CHAMBERS, DETAIL OF ARCH WITH MURAL ON RIGHT OF BENCH, SHOWING PIONEERS AND ATLANTIC CITY SEAL - City Hall, Atlantic & Tennessee Avenues, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  10. 19. COPY OF ENGRAVING OF 'WROUGHT IRON ARCH TRUSS BRIDGE,' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. COPY OF ENGRAVING OF 'WROUGHT IRON ARCH TRUSS BRIDGE,' PAT. DEC. 10, 1867 BY OHIO BRIDGE COMPANY, CLEVELAND, OHIO. (COURTESY OF OHIO HISTORICAL SOCIETY ARCHIVES, COLUMBUS, OHIO) - Tioronda Bridge, South Avenue spanning Fishkill Creek, Beacon, Dutchess County, NY

  11. 22. DETAIL, WEST ABUTMENT AND SHOE, WEST ARCH, UPSTREAM SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. DETAIL, WEST ABUTMENT AND SHOE, WEST ARCH, UPSTREAM SIDE File photo, Caltrans Office of Structures Maintenance, August, 1953. Photographer unknown. Photocopy of photograph. - San Roque Canyon Bridge, State Highway 192, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara County, CA

  12. 22. STEEL ARCH SEGMENT AND VENT IN OFFICE, ROOM 2351, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. STEEL ARCH SEGMENT AND VENT IN OFFICE, ROOM 2351, SECOND FLOOR, NORTH SIDE. - Hughes Aircraft Company, Processing & Electronics Building, 6775 Centinela Avenue, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. 9. DETAIL (WITH SCALE) OF CLOSED SPANDREL CONCRETE ARCH, ABUTMENT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL (WITH SCALE) OF CLOSED SPANDREL CONCRETE ARCH, ABUTMENT, RAILINGS AND ENDPOST; VIEW TO WEST. - Pleasants Valley Road Bridge, Spanning Pleasants Creek at Pleasants Valley Road, Vacaville, Solano County, CA

  14. View of south entrance to #157 through south breezeway arches ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of south entrance to #157 through south breezeway arches - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Pacific Branch, Mental Health Buildings, 11301 Wilshire Boulevard, West Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. 25. DETAIL OF THE MASONRY ARCH OF A RECTANGULAR COKE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. DETAIL OF THE MASONRY ARCH OF A RECTANGULAR COKE OVEN. - Tower Hill No. 2 Mine, Approximately 0.47 mile Southwest of intersection of Stone Church Road & Township Route 561, Hibbs, Fayette County, PA

  16. 7. VAL CONCRETE 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE SHOWING CAMERA TOWER ARCHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VAL CONCRETE 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE SHOWING CAMERA TOWER ARCHED OPENING FOR ROADWAY AND COUNTERWEIGHT SLOPE TAKEN FROM RESERVOIR LOOKING WEST. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  17. Age changes in dental arch dimensions of Australian Aboriginals.

    PubMed

    Brown, T; Abbott, A H; Burgess, V B

    1983-11-01

    Breadths and depths of the dental arches were measured from standardized photographs of serial casts of Australian Aboriginals enrolled in a longitudinal growth study. The data were obtained from 1161 sets of casts representing 111 boys and 86 girls ranging in age from 6 to 19 years. Age changes in the arch dimensions conformed to previously described patterns in Caucasian children, namely, an increase in breadth and a decrease in depth. Corresponding dimensions and dimensional changes in the maxilla and mandible were strongly correlated, but breadth and depth changes were relatively independent. The disparity in size between arches increased with age, particularly in the breadth dimension of boys. Marked disparity in arch breadths characterizes an occlusal feature of this population that has been termed alternate intercuspation.

  18. 1. Elkmont vehicle bridge at Elkmont Campground, galvanized corrugated arch. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Elkmont vehicle bridge at Elkmont Campground, galvanized corrugated arch. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Elkmont Vehicle Bridge, Spanning Little River at Elkmont Campground, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  19. The azygous arch: normal and pathologic CT appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Smathers, R.L.; Buschi, A.J.; Pope, T.L. Jr.; Brenbridge, A.N.; Williamson, B.R.

    1982-09-01

    The arch of the azygous vein, a commonly identified anatomic landmark on contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scans of the chest, forms the lateral boundary of the pretracheal-retrocaval space and, with its pleural reflections, demarcates the mediastinum from the right lung. Normal variations, congenital anomalies, vascular lesions, adenopathy, neoplasm, and mediastinitis alter the position, size contour, and flow patterns of the azygous venous arch. Mass lesions may displace the arch laterally when they arise from the mediastinum or medially when they arise from the right lung. Malignancies, either primary or secondary, can invade, obstruct, or obliterate it. Abnormal flow patterns can be identified due to caval obstruction or pericardial disease. Awareness of the variability of the CT appearance of the azygous arch and its alteration by disease increases the utility of CT in the analysis of mediastinal and pulmonary pathology.

  20. Detail view of bracket, arched window and eagle from building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of bracket, arched window and eagle from building 18 section. Jet Lowe, Haer staff photographer, summer 1995 - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Machine Shops, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  1. Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Crossbracing Joint Detail - Dunlapsville Covered Bridge, Spanning East Fork Whitewater River, Dunlapsville, Union County, IN

  2. 84. AERIAL VIEW OF SPOUT RUN ARCH BRIDGE, SPOUT RUN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    84. AERIAL VIEW OF SPOUT RUN ARCH BRIDGE, SPOUT RUN BRIDGE WESTBOUND AND SPOUT RUN PARKWAY CULVERT LOOKING SOUTH. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  3. 87. AERIAL VIEW OF SPOUT RUN ARCH BRIDGE, SPOUT RUN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    87. AERIAL VIEW OF SPOUT RUN ARCH BRIDGE, SPOUT RUN BRIDGE WESTBOUND AND SPOUT RUN PARKWAY CULVERT LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  4. 86. AERIAL VIEW OF SPOUT RUN ARCH BRIDGE, SPOUT RUN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    86. AERIAL VIEW OF SPOUT RUN ARCH BRIDGE, SPOUT RUN BRIDGE WESTBOUND AND SPOUT RUN PARKWAY CULVERT LOOKING SOUTH. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  5. 11. DETAIL VIEW OF NORTH ELEVATION ARCH AND WING WALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL VIEW OF NORTH ELEVATION ARCH AND WING WALL AT JUNCTURE WITH PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - Lake Street Bridge, Spanning Ruddiman Creek at Lake Shore Drive, Muskegon, Muskegon County, MI

  6. Perspective of east arch section, showing five panels made up ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective of east arch section, showing five panels made up of diagonal suspension ribs and vertical ribs. The abutments, piers, wing walls, coping and deck are of concrete. - Weaverland Bridge, Quarry Road spanning Conestoga Creek, Terre Hill, Lancaster County, PA

  7. 8. Detail view of pierced arch concrete rails and recessed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Detail view of pierced arch concrete rails and recessed panel railing piers at the west pedestrian alcove, north side of the bridge. - Yellow Mill Bridge, Spanning Yellow Mill Channel at Stratford Avenue, Bridgeport, Fairfield County, CT

  8. Digital evaluation of nasal changes induced by rapid maxillary expansion with different anchorage and appliance design.

    PubMed

    Fastuca, Rosamaria; Lorusso, Paola; Lagravère, Manuel O; Michelotti, Ambra; Portelli, Marco; Zecca, Piero Antonio; D' Antò, Vincenzo; Militi, Angela; Nucera, Riccardo; Caprioglio, Alberto

    2017-07-14

    Scientific evidence showed that rapid maxillary expansion (RME) affects naso-maxillary complex, increasing nasal width and volume. This study aimed to evaluate nasal changes induced by rapid maxillary expansion with different anchorage and appliance design by using low dose and cone beam computed tomography. A total of 44 patients (20 males, mean age 8y 8 m ± 1y 2 m; 24 females mean age 8y 2 m ± 1y 4 m) were included in the investigation and divided into three groups according to the appliance: Hyrax-type expander anchored to permanent teeth, modified Hyrax-type expander anchored to deciduous teeth, modified Haas-type expander anchored to deciduous teeth. Maxillary expansion was performed until overcorrection and the expander was passively kept in situ for 7 months at least. All patients had three-dimensional imaging before expansion (T0) and after the retention period (T1). Nasal floor width, nasal wall width, maxillary inter-molar width were measured by means of Mimics software. The paired sample t-test was employed to assess the significance of the differences between the time points; the analysis of variance test (ANOVA) was used to compare differences between groups. The statistical analysis revealed significant differences between T0 and T1 for each recorded measurement in each group; no significant differences were found by comparing groups. Rapid maxillary expansion produces a significant skeletal transverse expansion of nasal region in growing patients. No significant differences in nasal effects are expected when the appliance is anchored onto deciduous teeth, with or without the palatal acrylic coverage.

  9. Growth and hemodynamics after early embryonic aortic arch occlusion*

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephanie E.; Menon, Prahlad G.; Kowalski, William J.; Shekhar, Akshay; Yalcin, Huseyin C.; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schaffer, Chris B.; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-01-01

    The majority of severe clinically significant forms of congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with great artery lesions, including hypoplastic, double, right or interrupted aortic arch morphologies. While fetal and neonatal interventions are advancing, their potential ability to restore cardiac function, optimal timing, location, and intensity required for intervention remain largely unknown. We here combine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with in vivo experiments to test how individual pharyngeal arch artery hemodynamics alters as a result of local interventions to obstruct individual arch artery flow. Simulated isolated occlusions within each pharyngeal arch artery were created with image derived three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of normal chick pharyngeal arch anatomy at Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) developmental stages HH18 and HH24. Acute flow redistributions were then computed using in vivo measured subject-specific aortic sinus inflow velocity profiles. A kinematic vascular growth-rendering algorithm was then developed and implemented to test the role of changing local wall shear stress patterns in downstream 3D morphogenesis of arch arteries. CFD simulations predicted that altered pressure gradients and flow redistributions were most sensitive to occlusion of the IVth arches. To evaluate these simulations experimentally, a novel in vivo experimental model of pharyngeal arch occlusion was developed and implemented using two-photon microscopy guided femtosecond laser based photodisruption surgery. The right IVth arch was occluded at HH18, and resulting diameter changes were followed for up to 24 hours. Pharyngeal arch diameter responses to acute hemodynamic changes were predicted qualitatively but poorly quantitatively. Chronic growth and adaptation to hemodynamic changes however were predicted in a subset of arches. Our findings suggest that this complex biodynamic process is governed through more complex forms of mechanobiological

  10. Growth and hemodynamics after early embryonic aortic arch occlusion.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Stephanie E; Menon, Prahlad G; Kowalski, William J; Shekhar, Akshay; Yalcin, Huseyin C; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schaffer, Chris B; Butcher, Jonathan T; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-08-01

    The majority of severe clinically significant forms of congenital heart disease (CHD) are associated with great artery lesions, including hypoplastic, double, right or interrupted aortic arch morphologies. While fetal and neonatal interventions are advancing, their potential ability to restore cardiac function, optimal timing, location, and intensity required for intervention remain largely unknown. Here, we combine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with in vivo experiments to test how individual pharyngeal arch artery hemodynamics alter as a result of local interventions obstructing individual arch artery flow. Simulated isolated occlusions within each pharyngeal arch artery were created with image-derived three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of normal chick pharyngeal arch anatomy at Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) developmental stages HH18 and HH24. Acute flow redistributions were then computed using in vivo measured subject-specific aortic sinus inflow velocity profiles. A kinematic vascular growth-rendering algorithm was then developed and implemented to test the role of changing local wall shear stress patterns in downstream 3D morphogenesis of arch arteries. CFD simulations predicted that altered pressure gradients and flow redistributions were most sensitive to occlusion of the IVth arches. To evaluate these simulations experimentally, a novel in vivo experimental model of pharyngeal arch occlusion was developed and implemented using two-photon microscopy-guided femtosecond laser-based photodisruption surgery. The right IVth arch was occluded at HH18, and resulting diameter changes were followed for up to 24 h. Pharyngeal arch diameter responses to acute hemodynamic changes were predicted qualitatively but poorly quantitatively. Chronic growth and adaptation to hemodynamic changes, however, were predicted in a subset of arches. Our findings suggest that this complex biodynamic process is governed through more complex forms of mechanobiological

  11. Functional nasal morphology of chimaerid fishes.

    PubMed

    Howard, Lauren E; Holmes, William M; Ferrando, Sara; Maclaine, James S; Kelsh, Robert N; Ramsey, Andrew; Abel, Richard L; Cox, Jonathan P L

    2013-09-01

    Holocephalans (chimaeras) are a group of marine fishes comprising three families: the Callorhinchidae (callorhinchid fishes), the Rhinochimaeridae (rhinochimaerid fishes) and the Chimaeridae (chimaerid fishes). We have used X-ray microcomputed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging to characterise in detail the nasal anatomy of three species of chimaerid fishes: Chimaera monstrosa, C. phantasma and Hydrolagus colliei. We have shown that the nasal chamber of these three species is linked to the external environment by an incurrent channel and to the oral cavity by an excurrent channel via an oral groove. A protrusion of variable morphology is present on the medial wall of the incurrent channel in all three species, but is absent in members of the two other holocephalan families that we inspected. A third nasal channel, the lateral channel, functionally connects the incurrent nostril to the oral cavity, by-passing the nasal chamber. From anatomical reconstructions, we have proposed a model for the circulation of water, and therefore the transport of odorant, in the chimaerid nasal region. In this model, water could flow through the nasal region via the nasal chamber or the lateral channel. In either case, the direction of flow could be reversed. Circulation through the entire nasal region is likely to be driven primarily by the respiratory pump. We have identified several anatomical features that may segregate, distribute, facilitate and regulate flow in the nasal region and have considered the consequences of flow reversal. The non-sensory cilia lining the olfactory sensory channels appear to be mucus-propelling, suggesting that these cilia have a common protective role in cartilaginous fishes (sharks, rays and chimaeras). The nasal region of chimaerid fishes shows at least two adaptations to a benthic lifestyle, and suggests good olfactory sensitivity, with secondary folding enhancing the hypothetical flat sensory surface area by up to 70%.

  12. Nasal Drug Delivery in Traditional Persian Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zarshenas, Mohammad Mehdi; Zargaran, Arman; Müller, Johannes; Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali

    2013-01-01

    Background Over one hundred different pharmaceutical dosage forms have been recorded in literatures of Traditional Persian Medicine among which nasal forms are considerable. Objectives This study designed to derive the most often applied nasal dosage forms together with those brief clinical administrations. Materials and Methods In the current study remaining pharmaceutical manuscripts of Persia during 9th to 18th century AD have been studied and different dosage forms related to nasal application of herbal medicines and their therapeutic effects were derived. Results By searching through pharmaceutical manuscripts of medieval Persia, different nasal dosage forms involving eleven types related to three main groups are found. These types could be derived from powder, solution or liquid and gaseous forms. Gaseous form were classified into fumigation (Bakhoor), vapor bath (Enkebab), inhalation (Lakhlakheh), aroma agents (Ghalieh) and olfaction or smell (Shomoom). Nasal solutions were as drops (Ghatoor), nasal snuffing drops (Saoot) and liquid snuff formulations (Noshoogh). Powders were as nasal insufflation or snorting agents (Nofookh) and errhine or sternutator medicine (Otoos). Nasal forms were not applied only for local purposes. Rather systemic disorders and specially CNS complications were said to be a target for these dosage forms. Discussion While this novel type of drug delivery is known as a suitable substitute for oral and parenteral administration, it was well accepted and extensively mentioned in Persian medical and pharmaceutical manuscripts and other traditional systems of medicine as well. Accordingly, medieval pharmaceutical standpoints on nasal dosage forms could still be an interesting subject of study. Therefore, the current work can briefly show the pharmaceutical knowledge on nasal formulations in medieval Persia and clarify a part of history of traditional Persian pharmacy. PMID:24624204

  13. Nasal deposition in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Guo, Mindy; Xi, Jinxiang; Irshad, Hammad; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    2014-04-01

    The variability of particle deposition in infant and child nasal airways is significant due to the airway geometry and breathing rate. Estimation of particle deposition in the nasal airway of this age group is necessary, especially for inhalation drug delivery application. Previous studies on nasal aerosol deposition were focused mostly on adult. A few empirical equations were also developed to calculate nasal deposition in different age groups of children. However, those studies have their limitations. The aim of this study is to find a simple way to calculate the nasal aerosol deposition in all age groups. An in vitro test of micrometer particle deposition in nasal airways for three different ages of infants and children is conducted. An adult nasal replica is also studied as a comparison. Monodisperse oleic acid aerosols ranging in size between 2 and 28 μm are delivered into the replica at the rest condition. This size range covers the deposition efficiency up to around 100%. This study also compares results from our previous deposition tests with a 5-year-old replica. Nasal deposition of micrometer aerosols in small children and infants is higher than that in adults under equivalent breathing conditions, e.g., sitting awake in this study. Combining the data set of infants, children, and adults, we found the deposition in the nasal airway strongly depends on the particle size and pressure drop. The particle deposition can be calculated based on a single empirical equation in all age groups. The intersubject variability within the same age group was not addressed in this study. An empirical equation for all age groups is developed. From this equation, particle deposition efficiency in the nasal airway can best be estimated with input data of particle size and pressure drop of the airway.

  14. The Relation Between Body Mass Index and Nasal Airflow.

    PubMed

    Demir, Mehmet Gökhan; Ylmaz, Hüseyin Baki

    2015-06-01

    Nasal obstruction and complaints are common attendance causes in otorhinolaryngology clinics. Obese patients are especially more vulnerable for these complaints. There is not enough data about nasal resistance and weight. One hundred ten patients who had no nasal complaint and nasal pathology were investigated by peak nasal inspiratory flow meter, nasal symptom evaluation scale (NOSE), and visual analog scale (VAS) calculation. According to the statistical analyses among the BMI groups, there is no significant difference detected. Peak nasal inspiratory flow values highly correlated with height. Height correlated with VAS and weight correlated with NOSE scores. VAS score highly correlated with NOSE score. Also, there is a negative statistically significant correlation between BMI and nasal congestion index. All these data show that there is no relation between BMI and nasal resistance, and although the nasal congestion cycle is preserved in all BMI groups, nasal congestion index is decreased when the weight is raised.

  15. [Intraparotid first branchial arch cyst: complex diagnostic and therapeutic process].

    PubMed

    Gilabert Rodríguez, R; Berenguer, B; González Meli, B; Marín Molina, C; de Tomás Palacios, E; Buitrago Weiland, G; Aguado del Hoyo, A

    2013-01-01

    First branchial arch cysts are uncommon. Therefore, together with its variable clinical and age presentation they are often misdiagnosed at first. The treatment is surgical, requiring a correct procedure to avoid future recurrences. In this paper we describe a typical case of first branchial arch cyst in which as described in other reports, we first made several misdiagnoses and therefore an inadequate treatment and lastly, with the correct diagnosis, we performed a meticulous complete excision under facial nerve monitoring.

  16. The mathematical model of the chevron-arch gearing transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubenchikov, Aleksey; Bubenchikov, Mikhail; Matvienko, Oleg; Shcherbakov, Nikolay

    2016-01-01

    The teeth of herringbone transmission wheels are obtained by docking two helical wheels with an opposite arrangement of teeth, which can solve the problem of the axial force. The mathematical model of coupling chevron teeth of the driving wheel in the area of their docking using the arch tooth fragment is developed. The conjugacy area surface of the driven wheel chevron teeth is obtained as the envelope of the surfaces family formed by the arched tooth during the process of the parts motion.

  17. Clarifying the anatomy of the fifth arch artery

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh Kumar; Gulati, Gurpreet Singh; Anderson, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    The artery allegedly forming in the fifth pharyngeal arch has increasingly been implicated as responsible for various vascular malformations in patients with congenitally malformed hearts. Observations from studies on developing embryos, however, have failed to provide support to substantiate several of these inferences such that the very existence of the fifth arch artery remains debatable. To the best of our knowledge, in only a solitary human embryo has a vascular channel been found that truly resembled the artery of the fifth arch. Despite the meager evidence to support its existence, the fifth arch artery has been invoked to explain the morphogenesis of double-barreled aorta, some unusual forms of aortopulmonary communications, and abnormalities of the brachiocephalic arteries. In most of these instances, the interpretations have proved fallible when examined in the light of existing knowledge of cardiac development. In our opinion, there are more plausible alternative explanations for the majority of these descriptions. Double-barreled aorta is more likely to result from retention of the recently identified dorsal collateral channels while abnormalities of brachiocephalic arteries are better explained on the basis of extensive remodeling of aortic arches during fetal development. Some examples of aortopulmonary communications, nonetheless, may well represent persistence of the developing artery of the fifth pharyngeal arch. We here present one such case — a patient with tetralogy of Fallot and pulmonary atresia, in whom the fifth arch artery provided a necessary communication between the ascending aorta and the pulmonary arteries. In this light, we discuss the features we consider to be essential before attaching the tag of “fifth arch artery” to a candidate vascular channel. PMID:27011696

  18. NASA ARCH- A FILE ARCHIVAL SYSTEM FOR THE DEC VAX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    The function of the NASA ARCH system is to provide a permanent storage area for files that are infrequently accessed. The NASA ARCH routines were designed to provide a simple mechanism by which users can easily store and retrieve files. The user treats NASA ARCH as the interface to a black box where files are stored. There are only five NASA ARCH user commands, even though NASA ARCH employs standard VMS directives and the VAX BACKUP utility. Special care is taken to provide the security needed to insure file integrity over a period of years. The archived files may exist in any of three storage areas: a temporary buffer, the main buffer, and a magnetic tape library. When the main buffer fills up, it is transferred to permanent magnetic tape storage and deleted from disk. Files may be restored from any of the three storage areas. A single file, multiple files, or entire directories can be stored and retrieved. archived entities hold the same name, extension, version number, and VMS file protection scheme as they had in the user's account prior to archival. NASA ARCH is capable of handling up to 7 directory levels. Wildcards are supported. User commands include TEMPCOPY, DISKCOPY, DELETE, RESTORE, and DIRECTORY. The DIRECTORY command searches a directory of savesets covering all three archival areas, listing matches according to area, date, filename, or other criteria supplied by the user. The system manager commands include 1) ARCHIVE- to transfer the main buffer to duplicate magnetic tapes, 2) REPORTto determine when the main buffer is full enough to archive, 3) INCREMENT- to back up the partially filled main buffer, and 4) FULLBACKUP- to back up the entire main buffer. On-line help files are provided for all NASA ARCH commands. NASA ARCH is written in DEC VAX DCL for interactive execution and has been implemented on a DEC VAX computer operating under VMS 4.X. This program was developed in 1985.

  19. Cost of skid roads for arch logging in West Virginia

    Treesearch

    George R., Jr. Trimble; Carl R. Barr

    1960-01-01

    In the mountain hardwood country of the northern Appalachians, tree-length skidding with tractor and arch has proved to be economical logging. One essential part of this type of logging is that tree-length logs are winched to the skid roads: tractor and arch do not run around through the woods. Winching distance is commonly 200 to 300 feet; and occasionally an extra...

  20. [Application of modified traction arch of skull in skull traction].

    PubMed

    Lei, Xing; Wang, Huan; Song, Yang; Qu, Yanlong

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of the modified traction arch of skull (crossbar traction arch) for skull traction in treating cervical spine injury by comparing with traditional traction arch of skull. Between June 2009 and June 2013, 90 patients with cervical vertebrae fractures or dislocation were treated with modified skull traction surgery (trial group, n=45) and traditional skull traction surgery (control group, n=45). There was no significant difference in gender, age, injury types, injury level, the interval between injury and admission, and Frankel grading of spinal injury between 2 groups (P > 0.05). The clinical efficacy was evaluated after operation by the indexes such as traction arch slippage times, operation time, the infection incidence of the pin hole, incidence of skull perforation, visual analogue scale (VAS), and reduction status of cervical dislocation. The traction arch slippage times, the infection incidence of the pin hole, operation time, blood loss, and postoperative VAS score in trial group were significantly lower than those in control group (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the incidence of skull perforation caused by clamp crooks of traction arch between 2 groups (P=1.000). At 2 weeks after operation, the patients had no headaches, infections, or other complications in 2 groups. In patients with cervical dislocation, 4 of the trial group and 6 of the control group failed to be reset, the reduction rate was 83.33% (20/24) and 68.42% (13/19) respectively, showing no significant difference (χ2=0.618, P=0.432). The operation with modified traction arch of skull has significant advantages to reduce postoperative complication compared with tradition traction arch of skull.

  1. Aortic arch origin of the left vertebral artery: An Anatomical and Radiological Study with Significance for Avoiding Complications with Anterior Approaches to the Cervical Spine.

    PubMed

    Tardieu, Gabrielle G; Edwards, Bryan; Alonso, Fernando; Watanabe, Koichi; Saga, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Moriyoshi; Motomura, Mayuko; Sampath, Raghuram; Iwanaga, Joe; Goren, Oded; Monteith, Stephen; Oskouian, Rod J; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-09-01

    Complications from anterior approaches to the cervical spine are uncommon with normal anatomy. However, variant anatomy might predispose one to an increased incidence of injury during such procedures. We hypothesized that left vertebral arteries that arise from the aortic arch instead of the subclavian artery might take a more medial path in their ascent making them more susceptible to iatrogenic injury. Fifty human adult cadavers were examined for left vertebral arteries having an aortic arch origin and these were dissected along their entire cervical course. Additionally, two radiological databases of CTA and arteriography procedures were retrospectively examined for cases of aberrant left vertebral artery origin from the aortic arch over a two-year period. Two cadaveric specimens (4%) were found to have a left vertebral artery arising from the aortic arch. The retrospective radiological database analysis identified 13 cases (0.87%) of left vertebral artery origin from the aortic arch. Of all cases, vertebral arteries that arose from the aortic arch were much more likely to not only have a more medial course (especially their preforaminal segment) over the cervical vertebral bodies but also to enter a transverse foramen that was more cranially located than the normal C6 entrance of the vertebral artery. Spine surgeons who approach the anterior cervical spine should be aware that an aortic origin of the left vertebral artery is likely to be closer to the midline and less protected above the C6 vertebral level. Clin. Anat. 30:811-816, 2017. © 2017Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Assessment of dental arches in patients with Class II division 1 and division 2 malocclusions using 3D digital models in a Syrian sample.

    PubMed

    Hajeer, M Y

    2014-06-01

    (1) to evaluate the applicability of using 3D digital models in the assessment of Class II Division 1 (Cl II-1) and Class II Division 2 (Cl II-2) malocclusion in a Syrian sample, (2) to detect any significant differences between the two groups in tooth and arch widths, anterior (ABR) and overall Bolton ratios, PAR Index, and (3) to detect any gender differences in these variables. observational, cross-sectional study for descriptive and analytical purposes at the Orthodontic Dept., University of Al-Baath Hamah Dental School, Hamah, Syria. A disproportionate multi-stratified random sampling was employed to select 36 Cl II-1 and 36 Cl II-2 patients (female-to-male ratio was 1:1 in each group). 3D digital models (O3DM) with a dedicated programme were used to measure dental arch variables. Significant differences were observed between the two groups in the mesiodistal widths of some teeth but not in the dental arch widths. The prevalence of 'discrepancy cases' in Anterior Bolton Ratios (ABRs) was 33.33% and 41.67% in Cl II1 and Cl II2 groups, respectively. The mean PAR Index score was 25.36 and 20.82 for Cl II1 and Cl II2 groups, respectively (p=0.009). (1) 3D digital models enabled fast, accurate and reliable measurements of dental arch characteristics in patients with Class II malocclusion. (2) Insignificant differences between Cl II1 and Cl II2 patients were observed regarding Bolton's ratios and transverse arch measurements. (3) Sexual dimorphism was observed in mesiodistal tooth widths and in dental arch widths, but not in Bolton's ratios and PAR Index scores.

  3. Kinesthetic Transverse Wave Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantidos, Panagiotis; Patapis, Stamatis

    2005-09-01

    This is a variation on the String and Sticky Tape demonstration "The Wave Game," suggested by Ron Edge. A group of students stand side by side, each one holding a card chest high with both hands. The teacher cues the first student to begin raising and lowering his card. When he starts lowering his card, the next student begins to raise his. As succeeding students move their cards up and down, a wave such as that shown in the figure is produced. To facilitate the process, students' motions were synchronized with the ticks of a metronome (without such synchronization it was nearly impossible to generate a satisfactory wave). Our waves typically had a frequency of about 1 Hz and a wavelength of around 3 m. We videotaped the activity so that the students could analyze the motions. The (17-year-old) students had not received any prior instruction regarding wave motion and did not know beforehand the nature of the exercise they were about to carry out. During the activity they were asked what a transverse wave is. Most of them quickly realized, without teacher input, that while the wave propagated horizontally, the only motion of the transmitting medium (them) was vertical. They located the equilibrium points of the oscillations, the crests and troughs of the waves, and identified the wavelength. The teacher defined for them the period of the oscillations of the motion of a card to be the total time for one cycle. The students measured this time and then several asserted that it was the same as the wave period. Knowing the length of the waves and the number of waves per second, the next step can easily be to find the wave speed.

  4. Time-dependent behavior of layered arches with viscoelastic interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Peng; Zhou, Ding; Liu, Weiqing; Fang, Hai

    2017-08-01

    This work studies the time-dependent behavior of a layered arch adhesively bonded by viscoelastic interlayers. The deformation of the viscoelastic interlayer is represented by the Maxwell-Wiechert model. The constitutive relation in an interlayer is simplified through the quasi-elastic approximation approach. The mechanical property of an arch layer is described by the exact two-dimensional (2-D) elasticity theory in polar coordinates. The stress and displacement components in an arch layer, which strictly satisfy the simply supported boundary conditions, have been analytically derived out. The stresses and displacements are efficiently obtained by means of the recursive matrix method for the arch with any number of layers. The comparison study shows that the 2-D finite element solution has good agreement with the present one, while the solution based on the one-dimensional (1-D) Euler-Bernoulli theory has considerable error, especially for thick arches. The influences of geometrical and material parameters on the time-dependent behavior of the layered arch are analyzed in detail.

  5. Modified protrusion arch for anterior crossbite correction - a case report.

    PubMed

    Roy, Abhishek Singha; Singh, Gulshan Kr; Tandon, Pradeep; Chaudhary, Ramsukh

    2013-01-01

    Borderline and mild skeletal Class III relationships in adult patients are usually treated by orthodontic camouflage. Reasonably rood results have been achieved with nonsurgical teatment of anterior crossbite. Class III malocclusion may be associated with mandibular prognathism, maxillary retrognathism, or both. Class III maxillary retrognathism generally involves anterior crossbite, which must be opened if upper labial brackets are to be bonded. If multiple teeth are in crossbite, after opening the bite usual step is to ligate forward or advancement arch made of 0.018" or 0.020" stainless steel or NiTi wire main arch that must be kept separated 2 mm from the slot ofupper incisor braces. Two stops or omegas are made 1 mm mesial to the tubes of the molar bands that will impede main arch from slipping,and in this manner the arch will push the anterior teeth forward Here we have fabricated a modified multiple loop protrusion arch to correct an anterior crossbite with severe crowding that was not amenable to correct by advancement arches.

  6. Comparison of arch forms between Turkish and North American

    PubMed Central

    Celebi, Ahmet A.; Keklik, Hakan; Tan, Enes; Ucar, Faruk I.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this study was to clarify the morphological differences in the mandibular arches of Turkish and North American white subjects. Methods: The sample included 132 Turkish (34 Class I, 58 Class II, and 40 Class III) and 160 North American (60 Class I, 50 Class II, and 50 Class III) subjects. The most facial portion of 13 proximal contact areas was digitized from photocopied images of patients' mandibular dental arches. Clinical bracket points were calculated for each tooth based on mandibular tooth thickness data. Four linear and two proportional measurements were taken. The subjects were grouped according to arch form types (tapered, ovoid and square) in order to have frequency distribution compared between ethnic groups in each Angle classification. Results: The Turkish group showed significantly lower molar depth and more significant molar width-depth (W/D) ratio in all three Angle classifications. On the other hand, the Turkish group also showed a significantly larger intercanine width in Class III malocclusion and intermolar width in Class II malocclusion. The most frequent arch forms seen were the ovoid arch form in the Turkish group and the tapered form in the white group. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that when treating Turkish patients, one should expect to use preformed ovoid arch form orthodontic wires in a significant percentage of patients. PMID:27275615

  7. Monitoring system of arch bridge for safety network management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Bong Chul; Yoo, Young Jun; Lee, Chin Hyung; Park, Ki Tae; Hwang, Yoon Koog

    2010-03-01

    Korea has constructed the safety management network monitoring test systems for the civil infrastructure since 2006 which includes airport structure, irrigation structure, railroad structure, road structure, and underground structure. Bridges among the road structure include the various superstructure types which are Steel box girder bridge, suspension bridge, PSC-box-girder bridge, and arch bridge. This paper shows the process of constructing the real-time monitoring system for the arch bridge and the measured result by the system. The arch type among various superstructure types has not only the structural efficiency but the visual beauty, because the arch type superstructure makes full use of the feature of curve. The main measuring points of arch bridges composited by curved members make a difference to compare with the system of girder bridges composited by straight members. This paper also shows the method to construct the monitoring system that considers the characteristic of the arch bridge. The system now includes strain gauges and thermometers, and it will include various sensor types such as CCTV, accelerometers and so on additionally. For the long term and accuracy monitoring, the latest optical sensors and equipments are applied to the system.

  8. [Exhaled and nasal nitric oxide in patients with Japanese cedar pollinosis and effects of nasal steroids].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Y

    1999-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is produced by the action of NO synthase (NOS) using L-arginine as a substrate in various cells and found in air exhaled by humans. Previous studies suggest that almost all exhaled NO is derived from the upper airways and increases in patients with untreated asthma and allergic rhinitis. Exhaled NO is inhibited by treatment with inhalation of steroids that may be caused by inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). The purpose of this study is to determine whether exhaled and nasal NO increases in patients with Japanese cedar pollinosis compared with nonallergic healthy subjects, and whether it is affected by treatment with nasal steroids. Furthermore, we investigated its relation to nasal function and allergic rhinitis. 10 patients with Japanese cedar pollinosis and 5 healthy normal subjects were tested. All subjects had no history of respiratory infection for at least 2 weeks and did not smoke. Exhaled NO was collected in a sampling bag from oral and nasal breathing, and nasal NO was sampled directly from the nasal cavity. Both were measured by a chemiluminescence NO analyzer, ML9841, at a detection limit of 1 part per billion (ppb). Subjects used nasal steroids for 2 weeks and were measured similarly afterwards. NO concentrations in nasal air and air exhaled from the nose in patients with Japanese cedar pollinosis (277.9 +/- 59.5 ppb, 34.4 +/- 3.9 ppb, n = 10) were higher than the normal subjects (153.3 +/- 30.6 ppb, 19.9 +/- 3.4 ppb, n = 5) (p < 0.05). NO exhaled from the mouth was not significantly different between patients (20.5 +/- 4.9 ppb) and normal subjects (23.7 +/- 2.6 ppb). In patients with Japanese cedar pollinosis, the concentration of nasal NO and nasal exhaled NO were significantly decreased after treatment with nasal steroids (144.0 +/- 21.0 ppb, 26.1 +/- 3.0 ppb) (p < 0.01, p < 0.05), but there was no change in oral exhaled NO (17.2 +/- 3.3 ppb). In normal subjects, oral (22.5 +/- 5.3 ppb), nasal exhaled NO (19

  9. Translocation of the Aortic Arch with Norwood Procedure for Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome Variant with Circumflex Retroesophageal Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chee-Hoon; Seo, Dong Ju; Bang, Ji Hyun; Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Jeong-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Retroesophageal aortic arch, in which the aortic arch crosses the midline behind the esophagus to the contralateral side, is a rare form of vascular anomaly. The complete form may cause symptoms by compressing the esophagus or the trachea and need a surgical intervention. We report a rare case of a hypoplastic left heart syndrome variant with the left retroesophageal circumflex aortic arch in which the left aortic arch, retroesophageal circumflex aorta, and the right descending aorta with the aberrant right subclavian artery encircle the esophagus completely, thus causing central bronchial compression. Bilateral pulmonary artery banding and subsequent modified Norwood procedure with extensive mobilization and creation of the neo-aorta were performed. As a result of the successful translocation of the aorta, the airway compression was relieved. The patient underwent the second-stage operation and is doing well currently. PMID:25207249

  10. Diagnostic methods for assessing maxillary skeletal and dental transverse deficiencies: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sawchuk, Dena; Currie, Kris; Vich, Manuel Lagravere; Palomo, Juan Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the accuracy and reliability of the diagnostic tools available for assessing maxillary transverse deficiencies. Methods An electronic search of three databases was performed from their date of establishment to April 2015, with manual searching of reference lists of relevant articles. Articles were considered for inclusion if they reported the accuracy or reliability of a diagnostic method or evaluation technique for maxillary transverse dimensions in mixed or permanent dentitions. Risk of bias was assessed in the included articles, using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies tool-2. Results Nine articles were selected. The studies were heterogeneous, with moderate to low methodological quality, and all had a high risk of bias. Four suggested that the use of arch width prediction indices with dental cast measurements is unreliable for use in diagnosis. Frontal cephalograms derived from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were reportedly more reliable for assessing intermaxillary transverse discrepancies than posteroanterior cephalograms. Two studies proposed new three-dimensional transverse analyses with CBCT images that were reportedly reliable, but have not been validated for clinical sensitivity or specificity. No studies reported sensitivity, specificity, positive or negative predictive values or likelihood ratios, or ROC curves of the methods for the diagnosis of transverse deficiencies. Conclusions Current evidence does not enable solid conclusions to be drawn, owing to a lack of reliable high quality diagnostic studies evaluating maxillary transverse deficiencies. CBCT images are reportedly more reliable for diagnosis, but further validation is required to confirm CBCT's accuracy and diagnostic superiority. PMID:27668196

  11. Ventriculoarterial coupling in palliated hypoplastic left heart syndrome: Noninvasive assessment of the effects of surgical arch reconstruction and shunt type.

    PubMed

    Biglino, Giovanni; Giardini, Alessandro; Ntsinjana, Hopewell N; Schievano, Silvia; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Taylor, Andrew M

    2014-10-01

    To assess the coupling efficiency in hypoplastic left heart syndrome, considering the effect of surgical arch reconstruction and the shunt type received during the Norwood procedure. Ventriculoarterial coupling was assessed before Fontan completion in 32 patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (19 modified Blalock-Taussig and 13 Sano shunts at stage 1). Cardiovascular magnetic resonance data were analyzed, deriving functional parameters and 3-dimensional volumes. Dimensional indexes were computed from 3-dimensional data sets as the area ratio of the isthmus to the descending aorta (Risthmus) and the isthmus to surgically enlarged transverse arch (Rarch). Wave intensity was calculated from cardiac magnetic resonance, using the peaks of the forward compression and expansion waves in early and late systole as surrogate indicators of ventriculoarterial coupling. Aortic distensibility (3.6±2.7×10(-3) 1/mm Hg) was not associated with the time elapsed from stage 1 palliation (P=.94), suggesting an early loss of elasticity that did not progress thereafter. Risthmus was 1.0±0.4, and Rarch was 0.3±0.1, indicating the dilated reconstructed arch was the main anatomic feature. The forward compression wave correlated significantly with Rarch (R2=0.23, P=.006) but not with Risthmus (R2<0.01, P=.63). Patients with a reduced ejection fraction exhibited a larger ventricular mass (R2=0.28, P=.003). The Sano shunt patients had a lower ejection fraction (51%±6% vs 57%±6%, P=.02); however, neither the forward compression nor expansion wave varied significantly between shunt type or the other functional parameters. Ventriculoarterial coupling in operated hypoplastic left heart syndrome was affected by aortic arch size mismatch but not by the type of shunt placed at the Norwood operation. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Dacryolithiasis: diagnosis using nasal endoscopy].

    PubMed

    Piaton, J-M; Keller, P; Sahel, J-A; Nguyen, R; Quesnot, S

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of two new clinical findings for the diagnosis of dacryolithiasis discovered with nasal endoscopy: anatomical abnormalities of the Hasner valve (HV) and mucopurulent discharge visible at this valve. The value of these findings is compared with other clinical and radiological signs of dacryolithiasis. A hypothesis is developed as to the responsibility of the HV in the formation of dacryolithiasis. This study was prospective and based on 797 operations performed for epiphora: 647 endonasal dacryocystorhinostomies and 150 meatotomies of the HV, with systematic preoperative nasal videoendoscopy. Ninety dacryocystographies (DCGs) and 129 lacrimal computed tomographies (LCT) were preoperatively performed. Dacryoliths were found in 55 of 797 patients (6.9%). The HV could be examined in 48 patients in the lithiasis group and in 687 patients in the control group. Mucopurulent discharge was observed in 22 patients with lithiasis (45.8%) and in 40 patients (5.8%) (p<10(-6)) of the control group. Anatomical abnormalities of the HV were found in 40 patients with dacryolithiasis (83.3%) as compared to 82 patients ing the control group (11.4%) (p<10(-6)). In 13 patients, the VH was very small (<2 mm), in 12 patients it was very long (>15 mm), and in 15 patients both abnormalities were observed. Other clinical signs were young age (mean, 48.2 years vs 59.1% in the control group) (p<0.05), a history of acute noninfectious dacryocystic retention (38.2% vs 9.5%) (p<10(-5)), partial obstruction of the lacrimal pathway (LP) (61.8% vs 30.5%) (p<10(-5)). The 28 LCTs that were performed in subjects who had lithiasis made it possible to diagnose 19 cases of dacryolithiasis and confirmed abnormalities of the HV causing narrowing of the LP in 20. Dacryolithiasis is frequent and often misdiagnosed. When dacryolithiasis is suspected, a nasal videoendoscopic exam must be done to seek HV abnormalities and mucopurulent discharge at this valve

  13. Perception of better nasal patency correlates with increased mucosal cooling after surgery for nasal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Corbin D; Garcia, Guilherme J M; Frank-Ito, Dennis O; Kimbell, Julia S; Rhee, John S

    2014-01-01

    To (1) quantify mucosal cooling (ie, heat loss) spatially in the nasal passages of nasal airway obstruction (NAO) patients before and after surgery using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and (2) correlate mucosal cooling with patient-reported symptoms, as measured by the Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) and a visual analog scale (VAS) for sensation of nasal airflow. Prospective. Academic tertiary medical center. Computed tomography (CT) scans and NOSE and VAS surveys were obtained from 10 patients before and after surgery to relieve NAO. Three-dimensional models of each patient's nasal anatomy were used to run steady-state CFD simulations of airflow and heat transfer during inspiration. Heat loss across the nasal vestibule and the entire nasal cavity, as well as the surface area of mucosa exposed to heat fluxes >50 W/m(2), were compared pre- and postoperatively. After surgery, heat loss increased significantly on the preoperative most obstructed side (P < .0002). A larger surface area of nasal mucosa was exposed to heat fluxes >50 W/m(2) after surgery. The best correlation between patient-reported and CFD measures of nasal patency was obtained for NOSE against surface area in which heat fluxes were >50 W/m(2) (Pearson r = -0.76). A significant postoperative increase in mucosal cooling correlates well with patients' perception of better nasal patency after NAO surgery. Computational fluid dynamics-derived heat fluxes may prove to be a valuable predictor of success in NAO surgery.

  14. Expression and distribution of epithelial sodium channel in nasal polyp and nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yiming; Xu, Ji; Chen, Yanqing; Shi, Jiali; Zhang, Chun; Li, Jiping

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the expression and location of epithelial sodium channels (ENaCs) in human nasal polyp and normal nasal mucosa, and to characterize the relevance of ENaCs to the development of NPs. Nasal polyp tissue from 17 patients and nasal mucosa from ten patients were obtained through endoscopic sinus surgery. The mRNA concentrations of ENaC-α, β, and γ were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The expression of ENaC-α was detected using western blot and immunofluorescence techniques. The distribution of ENaC-α in mucosal tissue was observed using a laser scanning confocal microscope. The transcriptional expression of three subunits of ENaC was in the following order: α > β > γ, in both groups. The transcriptional expression of α, β, and γ subunits of ENaC was elevated in nasal polyp compared to nasal mucosa (p < 0.01). ENaC-α expression was higher in nasal polyp than in nasal mucosa (p < 0.05). Immunofluorescent staining indicated that ENaC-α protein was distributed in the epithelial cell apical membrane. The expression of ENaC is upregulated in human nasal polyp, which might in turn facilitate the formation and development of nasal polyp.

  15. Transversity and SIDIS at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Avagyan, Harutyun; Rossi, Patrizia

    2009-01-01

    The single-spin asymmetries (SSA) in semi-inclusive DIS have emerged as a powerful tool to access transverse momentum distributions of partons and to give access to the spin-orbit correlations. SSA enable measurements of some essentially unexplored physical observables, including transversity, {\\it time-reversal odd} distribution and fragmentation functions. In this talk we present an overview of the latest studies of transverse spin effects and discuss newly released results, ongoing activities, as well as planned near term and future measurements of spin-orbit correlations at CLAS.

  16. Prenatal diagnosis of a rare aortic arch anomaly with left aortic arch and right ductus arteriosus: Cross ribbon sign

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaraghavan, S Boopathy; Senthil, Sathiya; Latha, K

    2017-01-01

    Here, we report a fetus with a rare aortic arch anomaly with left aortic arch and right ductus arteriosus, which has not been reported so far. In this condition, the aorta extends to the left of the trachea as in normal, while the ductus arteriosus extends to the right of the trachea and joins the descending aorta posterior to the trachea, with a cross-ribbon sign. PMID:28515590

  17. Adjuncts to Improve Nasal Reconstruction Results.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Shayna Lee; Hurst, Eva A

    2017-02-01

    The final cosmetic appearance of nasal reconstruction scars is of paramount importance to both the patient and surgeon. Ideal postreconstruction nasal scars are flat and indistinguishable from surrounding skin. Unfortunately, even with meticulous surgical execution, nasal scars can occasionally be suboptimal. Abnormal fibroblast response can lead to hypertrophic nasal scars, and excessive angiogenesis may lead to telangiectasias or an erythematous scar. Imperfect surgical closure or poor postoperative management can lead to surgical outcomes with step-offs, depressions, suture marks, or dyspigmentation. Aesthetically unacceptable nasal scars can cause pruritus, tenderness, pain, sleep disturbance, and anxiety and depression in postsurgical patients. Fortunately, there are several minimally invasive or noninvasive techniques that allow for enhancement and improvement of cosmetic results with minimal risk and associated downtime. This article provides an overview of adjuncts to improve nasal reconstruction with a focus on techniques to be used in the postoperative period. Armed with an understanding of relevant available therapies, skillful surgeons may drastically improve the final cosmesis and outcome of nasal reconstruction scars.

  18. The effect of vowels on nasalance scores.

    PubMed

    Lewis, K E; Watterson, T; Quint, T

    2000-11-01

    Nasalance scores were compared for nine different speech stimuli with vowel content controlled. The nine speech stimuli included four vowels spoken in isolation and five sentences. The four vowels were /i/, /u/, /ae/, and /a/. Four of the five sentences were loaded with High Front, High Back, Low Front, or Low Back vowels, and the fifth sentence contained a mixture of vowel types. Academic and clinical craniofacial center. The subjects were 19 children with velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD) and 19 children without history of communication disorder. The main outcome measures were the nasalance scores associated with the nine different speech stimuli for two groups of subjects. For the VPD group, analysis of variance procedures revealed that nasalance scores for high-vowel sentences and the mixed-vowel sentence were significantly higher than the nasalance scores for the two low-vowel sentences. This pattern was the same for the non-VPD group except for the High Back/Low Back contrast, which was not significant. In both groups, nasalance scores for sustained vowels were significantly higher for the High Front vowel /i/ than for any other vowel, and nasalance was significantly higher for the High Back vowel /u/ than for either of the Low vowels /ae/ or /a/. There was no significant difference between Low vowels. Nasalance scores may be affected by the vowel content of the speech stimulus. This should be taken into consideration on a clinical basis and for research purposes.

  19. Nonneoplastic nasal lesions in rats and mice.

    PubMed Central

    Monticello, T M; Morgan, K T; Uraih, L

    1990-01-01

    Rodents are commonly used for inhalation toxicology studies, but until recently the nasal passages have often been overlooked or only superficially examined. The rodent nose is a complex organ in which toxicant-induced lesions may vary, depending on the test compound. A working knowledge of rodent nasal anatomy and histology is essential for the proper evaluation of these responses. Lack of a systematic approach for examining rodent nasal tissue has led to a paucity of information regarding nonneoplastic lesions in the rodent nose. Therefore, slides from the National Toxicology Program (NTP) and the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology (CIIT) were examined, and the literature was reviewed to assemble the spectrum of nonneoplastic rodent nasal pathology. Presented are lesions associated with the various types of epithelia lining the rodent nasal cavity plus lesions involving accessory nasal structures. Even though there are anatomic and physiologic differences between the rodent and human nose, both rats and mice provide valuable animal models for the study of nasal epithelial toxicity, following administration of chemical compounds. Images PLATE 1. PLATE 2. PLATE 3. PLATE 4. PLATE 5. PLATE 6. PLATE 7. PLATE 8. PLATE 9. PLATE 10. PLATE 11. PLATE 12. PLATE 13. PLATE 14. PLATE 15. PLATE 16. PLATE 17. PLATE 18. PLATE 19. PLATE 20. PLATE 21. PLATE 22. PLATE 23. PLATE 24. PLATE 25. PLATE 26. PLATE 27. PLATE 28. PLATE 29. PLATE 30. PLATE 31. PLATE 32. PLATE 33. PLATE 34. PLATE 35. PLATE 36. PLATE 37. PLATE 38. PMID:2200665

  20. Polypoidal Lesions in the Nasal Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Kumari M.K., Kalpana; K.C., Mahadeva

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Nasal polyps are polypoidal masses arising from mucous membranes of nose and paranasal sinuses. They are overgrowths of the mucosa that frequently accompany allergic rhinitis. They are freely movable and nontender. Aims and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to study the histopathologic spectrum of polypoidal lesions of the nasal cavity. Materials and Methods: The study comprised of 100 consecutive cases of polypoidal lesions in the nasal cavity, received in the department of pathology. The age and sex of the patients were recorded. The tissues were routinely processed for histopathologic sections and stained with haematoxylin and eosin stains. Special stains like Periodic acid Schiff (PAS) was done wherever applicable. The cases were classified into neoplastic and nonneoplastic lesions. The neoplastic lesions were further classified according to WHO classification on histopathologic examination. Results: Analysis of 100 polypoidal lesions in the nose and paranasal sinuses with clinical diagnosis of nasal polyps, revealed 66 cases were nonneoplastic and 34 were neoplastic;17 (50%)were benign and 17(50%) were malignant. True nasal polyps both inflammatory and allergic together comprised 44 cases of the 100 polypoidal lesions in the nasal cavity. Angiofibroma and inverted papilloma were the most frequent benign tumour accounting for 12/17(0.7%). The most common malignant tumour was anaplastic carcinoma 7/17(0.4%). Nonneoplastic and benign tumours were common in younger age groups whereas malignant tumours were most common in older males. Conclusion: The majority of polypoidal lesions in the nasal cavity are nonneoplastic. PMID:23905098